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Sample records for intractable disease state

  1. Intractable colitis associated with chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed

    Arimura, Yoshiaki; Goto, Akira; Yamashita, Kentaro; Endo, Takao; Ikeda, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Kaori; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Shinomura, Yasuhisa; Imai, Kohzoh

    2006-11-01

    The case of a 20-year-old Japanese man, diagnosed as having autosomal recessive chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), who was being treated with corticosteroids for intractable unclassified colitis, is described. He died from multiple organ failure following disseminated intravascular coagulation secondary to disseminated varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection. He was diagnosed as an index case of CGD when 2 years old, was inoculated against VZV at the age of 5 years and had had an unremarkable course for 19 years. He was admitted to hospital because of a third episode of recurrent bloody diarrhoea. Clinical remission for each episode was achieved by intravenous corticosteroid therapy. Unclassified colitis associated with CGD was diagnosed based on a colonic biopsy demonstrating characteristic macrophages with lipofuscin deposits. From a treatment viewpoint, idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) should be differentiated from secondary IBD occurring in CGD, in which immunosuppressive drugs including corticosteroids, still the mainstay of IBD treatment, should be avoided. PMID:17030921

  2. Revision of measures to combat intractable diseases in Japan: Three pillars will play an even greater role in the future.

    PubMed

    Song, Peipei; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2013-02-01

    Over the past 40 years, measures to combat intractable diseases in Japan have progressed substantially since the implementation of the "Outline of Measures to Combat Intractable Diseases" in 1972. However, many challenges remain. In order to further promote measures to combat intractable diseases, a "Revision of Measures to Combat Intractable Diseases" was approved by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare (MHLW) on January 25, 2013. The revision rests on the three pillars of development of effective strategies to treat intractable diseases and improved care for those affected, creation of fair and consistent mechanisms to reimburse medical expenses, and implementing measures to enhance public understanding and encourage the social participation of those affected. These pillars will play an even greater role in future measures to combat intractable diseases. PMID:25343099

  3. Intractable ascites as a manifestation of Wolman's disease: report of two sibs.

    PubMed

    Kathuria, Rachana; Poddar, Ujjal; Ghosh, Jayanta; Yachha, Surender Kumar; Gnanapriya, V; Pandey, Rakesh; Kaur, Anupriya; Phadke, Subha; Srivastava, Anshu

    2012-12-01

    Wolman disease (WD) is a rare, inherited, rapidly fatal condition presenting in early infancy. The disease manifests in the first month of life with failure to thrive, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal distension, hepatosplenomegaly and bilateral adrenal calcification and is nearly always fatal before the age of 1 year. Barring a case report of isolated fetal ascites, there is no report of intractable ascites as the presentation of WD till date. We report two siblings with WD who both had intractable ascites and required therapeutic paracentesis, albumin infusion, and diuretics to control tense ascites. Although rare, WD should be considered in the differential diagnosis of infantile ascites. PMID:23007684

  4. Functional interleukin-17 receptor A are present in the thyroid gland in intractable Graves disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Rong; Hong, Fu-Yuan; Zeng, Jin-Yang; Huang, Guo-Liang

    2013-01-01

    Th17 lymphocytes and its main cytokine, IL-17, play an important role in autoimmune thyroid diseases, such as intractable Graves disease (GD). IL-17 signals are transmitted through its receptor, IL-17RA. The intrathyroid expression of IL-17RA in intractable GD is not understood. In this study, ELISA was used to measure serum IL-17 levels in patients with untreated GD, intractable GD or GD in remission and healthy controls. Real-time PCR, flow cytometry and immunofluorescence staining evaluated IL-17RA mRNA and protein expression in thyrocytes. IL-6, chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10) and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 expression was measured in IL-17-stimulated thyrocyte cultures to evaluate the functional status of IL-17RA. Our data indicates that serum IL-17 levels are significantly increased in intractable GD and affected thyrocytes show functional IL-17R expression. These changes facilitate the IL-17-mediated upregulation of IL-6, CXCL10, and ICAM-1. The IL-17/IL-17R interaction could be a potential target for therapeutic interventions in intractable GD. PMID:23501056

  5. Comparative Study of Endolymphatic Sac Decompression and Vestibular Neurectomy in Intractable Meniere's Disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiqing; Han, Jie; Zhou, Xuanchen; Luan, Deheng; Xie, Fengyang; Gao, Kun

    2015-03-01

    To comparative study the clinical effect of endolymphatic sac decompression (ELSD) and vestibular neurectomy (VN) in intractable Meniere's disease (MD). The study included 30 MD intractable patients, 21 of which underwent ELSD and nine of which were treated by VN via retrosigmoid approach. Follow-up period ranged from 3 to 6years. In 21 patients by ELSD, excellent vertigo control and good control were noted in 11 patients (52.4%) and 4 patients (19.0%), partial control in 4 and no control in 2 patients. All the 9 patients by VN, vertigo was excellent control. ELSD can improve hearing and tinnitus, but VN not. VN can achieve much better effect in improving vertigo in intractable MD patients. But relative to ELSD, it has much more disadvantages. PMID:25621233

  6. Renal Artery Embolization Controls Intractable Pain in a Patient with Polycystic Kidney Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Seong Tai; Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Jae Mun; Kim, Choon-Yul; Chang, Yoon Sik

    1999-09-15

    A 65-year-old man with adult polycystic kidney disease (APKD) and chronic renal failure suffered from intractable abdominal pain and distension for 2 weeks. Meperidine infusion did not alleviate his pain. However, pain and abdominal distension were successfully controlled by embolization of both renal arteries.

  7. Primary abdominal actinomycosis in a diabetic woman--an intractable disease.

    PubMed

    Raz, R; Lev, A

    1992-11-01

    Primary abdominal actinomycosis is very unusual. Only five previous cases have been reported in the English literature. We describe the case of a 57-year-old diabetic woman with primary abdominal actinomycosis, refractory to several antimicrobial regimens and surgical procedures. We conclude that primary abdominal actinomycosis in such a diabetic woman is an intractable disease. PMID:1474267

  8. Preliminary observation with dronabinol in patients with intractable pruritus secondary to cholestatic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Neff, Guy W; O'Brien, Christopher B; Reddy, K Rajender; Bergasa, Nora V; Regev, Arie; Molina, Enrique; Amaro, Rafael; Rodriguez, Miguel J; Chase, VeEtta; Jeffers, Lennox; Schiff, Eugene

    2002-08-01

    Pruritus due to cholestatic liver disease can be particularly difficult to manage and frequently is intractable to a variety of medical therapies. The aim of our study is to evaluate the efficacy of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC) for intractable cholestatic related pruritus (ICRP) that has failed conventional (and unconventional) remedies. Three patients were evaluated for plasmapheresis because of ICRP. All 3 patients had previously been extensively treated with standard therapies for ICRP including: diphenhydramine, chlorpheniramine, cholestyramine, rifampicin, phenobarbital, doxepin, naltrexone, UV therapy, and topical lotions. Even multiple courses of plasmapheresis were performed without any benefit for the intractable pruritus. All patients reported significant decreases in their quality of life, including lack of sleep, depression, inability to work, and suicidal ideations. All patients were started on 5 mg of delta-9-THC (Marinol) at bedtime. All 3 patients reported a decrease in pruritus, marked improvement in sleep, and eventually were able to return to work. Resolution of depression occurred in two of three. Side effects related to the drug include one patient experiencing a disturbance in coordination. Marinol dosage was decreased to 2.5 mg in this patient with resolution of symptoms. The duration of antipruritic effect is approximately 4-6 hrs in all three patients suggesting the need for more frequent dosing. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol may be an effective alternative in patients with intractable cholestatic pruritus. PMID:12190187

  9. [My way to "Keep Pioneering": integrated neuroscience and immunology research produces a paradigm shift for intractable neurological disease].

    PubMed

    Kira, Jun-ichi

    2014-01-01

    The motto of Prof. Yoshigoro Kuroiwa, who established the first independent neurology department in Japan at Kyushu University, is "Keep Pioneering". His students have followed this motto in all fields. I hereby present my efforts to keep pioneering in the following fields: (1) multiple sclerosis (MS); (2) central nervous system (CNS) involvement associated with peripheral atopic inflammation; and (3) care network for patients with intractable neurological disease. In MS, I propose that Th1/Th17 cell-mediated connexin astrocytopathy may play a critical role in producing huge demyelinating lesions in MS, neuromyelitis optica (NMO), and Baló's concentric sclerosis. I discovered a peculiar myelitis that occurred in patients with atopic disorders, and designated it atopic myelitis. In this condition, allodynia and neuropathic pain are cardinal features, regardless of the presence or absence of spinal cord MRI lesions. We found that peripheral atopic inflammation in mice produces allodynia as well as activation of microglia and astroglia in the spinal cord. It is important to involve a variety of medical specialists and care coordinators for collaborative work on medical and social care issues for people with intractable disease. The motto of "Keep Pioneering" in neurology covers not only advanced research for the creation of new therapies for intractable neurological disease, but also caring for actual people with intractable disease, which I believe is the corporate social responsibility of our neurological society. I think that "Keep Pioneering" is a challenging process that never ends throughout one's life. PMID:25672676

  10. Deep Anterior Lamellar Keratoplasty Using Irradiated Acellular Cornea with Amniotic Membrane Transplantation for Intractable Ocular Surface Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Sung Wook; Choi, Sang Uk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report the clinical outcomes of deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK) when sterile gamma-irradiated acellular corneal tissues (VisionGraft) are used in combination with amniotic membrane transplantation (AMT) for intractable ocular surface diseases. Methods The medical records of fifteen patients who had DALK with AMT were retrospectively reviewed. Indications for surgery included ocular burn, bacterial keratitis, herpes simplex virus keratitis, corneal opacity with Stevens-Johnson syndrome, Mooren's ulcer, idiopathic myxoid degeneration of corneal stroma, and recurrent band keratopathy. DALK was performed using partial-thickness acellular corneal tissue and a temporary amniotic membrane patch was added at the end of the operation. Results All cases that underwent DALK with AMT became epithelialized within 2 postoperative weeks. Twelve patients showed favorable outcomes without graft rejection, corneal opacification, or neovascularization. The other three grafts developed corneal opacification and neovascularization, and required additional penetrating keratoplasty (PK). Unlike the results of previous PKs, there were no graft rejections and the graft clarity was well-maintained in these three cases for at least 8 months after PK. Conclusions DALK using sterile acellular corneal tissues in combination with AMT may be a good therapeutic strategy for treating intractable ocular surface diseases because of lowered immune rejection, fibroblast activation, and facilitation of epithelialization. Furthermore, DALK can help stabilize the ocular surface, prolong graft survival, and may allow better outcomes when combined with subsequent PK. PMID:25829823

  11. An intractable case of suspected psoriatic arthritis combined with Dupuytren’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Wen Quan; Gu, Jian Hui

    2015-01-01

    Some cases of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) cannot be explicitly diagnosed, especially when the skin and nail lesions present years after the joint disease or are absent. Autoimmunity may also play a role in the development of Dupuytren's disease. However, the simultaneous presence of PsA and Dupuytren’s disease is very rare. We present a patient displaying arthritis in multiple small joints, with bone erosions and bony fusions in all four extremities, combined with Dupuytren’s disease. Because of the atypical clinical manifestation, the diagnosis perplexed doctors for decades. Without formal treatment, the disease followed a natural course over time. Reviewing the patient’s data, a potential diagnosis of PsA, combined with Dupuytren’s disease, was eventually made. After surgery, contractures of palmar and plantar fascia as well the thumb web were released, and the hallux valgus was corrected. PMID:25878651

  12. Intractable pain with breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, C. P.; Evans, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    This study examines retrospectively the cause, clinical features, natural history and results of treatment of intractable pain associated with breast cancer in 210 patients. The three chief types of pain were that due to skeletal metastases or brachial plexus neuropathy and pain of psychogenic origin. Onset at the time of cancer diagnosis characterized the psychogenic pain, whereas pain from metastases first occurred after a median latency of 3.7 years. Treatment was custom-tailored to the specific patient and pain problem, with several factors taken into account. The onset of intractable pain due to metastatic disease indicated a short survival (median, 9 months). PMID:6277445

  13. [Application of disease-specific iPS cells for intractable diseases-from pathomechanisms to drug discovery].

    PubMed

    Toguchida, Junya; Hino, Kyosuke; Ikeya, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    Genetic diseases affecting bone and cartilage, which are main components of the locomotive system, are extremely diverse. Even if the causative genes are known, detail pathomechanisms are not yet disclosed in most of them and no effective treatments are established. One of such condition is fibrodysplasia ossificance progressive, which is characterized by systemic ectopoic bone formation and caused by mutations of ACVR1/ALK2 gene encoding one of typeⅠBMP receptors. Using patient-derived iPS cells, we have succeeded to recapitulate the disease in vitro and found a unexpected molecular mechanism that Activin-A induced the BMP signal through mutant receptors. This novel finding provides us with a key to discover drugs for this condition. PMID:27013631

  14. Preclinical and Clinical Studies of Unrelieved Aural Fullness following Intratympanic Gentamicin Injection in Patients with Intractable Ménière’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Feng; Zhang, Ru; Zhang, Ting; Steyger, Peter S.; Dai, Chun-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Objective To clarify whether gentamicin affects vestibular dark cells in guinea pigs and relieves patients of aural fullness with intractable Ménière’s disease following intratympanic administration. Materials and Methods Purified gentamicin-Texas Red (GTTR) was injected intratympanically in guinea pigs that were sacrificed at 1, 3, 7, 14 and 28 days. GTTR uptake was examined in hair cells, and transitional cells and dark cells in vestibular end-organs were examined. Specific attention was paid to its distribution in dark cells under confocal microscopy, and the ultrastructure of dark cells using electron microscopy, following intratympanic injection. Results Dark cells in the semicircular canals showed weak GTTR uptake at 1, 3, 7, 14 and 28 days after intratympanic injection, with no significant differences at various time points after injection. However, the adjacent transitional cells demonstrated intense GTTR uptake that was retained for at least 28 days. Ultrastructural studies demonstrated negligible characteristics associated with apoptosis or necrosis in these dark cells. The tight junctions between dark cells showed no signs of disruption at 7 or 28 days after injection. Conclusion Intratympanic gentamicin has little direct impact on vestibular dark cells. Clinical Application A modified low-dose titration intratympanic approach was used in 29 patients with intractable vertigo and the clinical outcomes were followed. Aural fullness following intratympanic gentamicin injection was not relieved based on our subjective scales, demonstrated by no statistically significant difference between preinjection (4.16 ± 3.08) and postinjection (3.58 ± 2.93; p > 0.05) aural fullness scores. Vertigo control was achieved in 88% of patients, with hearing deterioration identified in 16% of patients. Intratympanic gentamicin administration might not lead to relief of aural fullness in patients with intractable vertigo, although it can achieve a high vertigo control rate with some cochleotoxicity. PMID:24008307

  15. [The Terminal Phase of an Intractable Neurological Disease from the Viewpoint of Nursing Care: The Importance of the Promotion of a Barrier-Free Mind for ALS Care].

    PubMed

    Muraoka, Koko

    2015-08-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a particularly serious intractable neurological disease. Patients with ALS have high mortality rates if they are not put on an artificial respirator. Even with an artificial respirator, individuals with ALS are forced to witness their own physical deterioration. Because 24 hour care is usually required, an intense relationship ofter develops between patients with ALS and family caregivers. This relationship forms an invisible barrier and can impede a smooth introduction of external services. As a result, there can be a degradation in the quality of care. The purpose of this paper is to describe the voluntary efforts of patients and family caregivers in order to break down this barrier and to discuss what types of care support are available to promote barrier-free minds. PMID:26241363

  16. Mindfulness: overcoming intractable conflict.

    PubMed

    Horton-Deutsch, Sara L; Horton, Janell M

    2003-08-01

    Intractable conflict involves reoccurring patterns of ineffective communication in which issues are not resolved and build over time. These situations can lead to bad feelings, damaged relationships, depression, aggression, anxiety and substance abuse. Grounded theory methods were used to study the processes involved in intractable conflicts and to identify ways of responding that promote growth and/or resolution. Results indicate that developing mindfulness over mindlessness is the basic social process that threads through three phases of working through intractable conflict. Phases include: growing awareness, self-realization, and regaining equilibrium. Mental health professionals can use this knowledge to support mindful practices as a means to protect against destructive conflict and mental health woes. PMID:14508774

  17. Management of intractable spontaneous epistaxis

    PubMed Central

    Rudmik, Luke

    2012-01-01

    Background: Epistaxis is a common otolaryngology emergency and is often controlled with first-line interventions such as cautery, hemostatic agents, or anterior nasal packing. A subset of patients will continue to bleed and require more aggressive therapy. Methods: Intractable spontaneous epistaxis was traditionally managed with posterior nasal packing and prolonged hospital admission. In an effort to reduce patient morbidity and shorten hospital stay, surgical and endovascular techniques have gained popularity. A literature review was conducted. Results: Transnasal endoscopic sphenopalatine artery ligation and arterial embolization provide excellent control rates but the decision to choose one over the other can be challenging. The role of transnasal endoscopic anterior ethmoid artery ligation is unclear but may be considered in certain cases when bleeding localizes to the ethmoid region. Conclusion: This article will focus on the management of intractable spontaneous epistaxis and discuss the role of endoscopic arterial ligation and embolization as it pertains to this challenging clinical scenario. PMID:22391084

  18. Amygdalar neuromelanosis intractable epilepsy without leptomeningeal involvement.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Douglas R; Wait, Scott D; Wheless, James W; Boop, Frederick A

    2013-07-01

    Neurocutaneous melanosis (NCM) is a rare, congenital neuroectodermal dysplasia generally resulting in early death from neurological decline due to leptomeningeal involvement. Nonmeningeal CNS epileptogenic lesions presenting in later childhood in the absence of leptomeningeal disease are rare. This report summarizes a rare presentation and curative epilepsy surgery. The authors discuss the case of a 14-year-old girl with NCM who originally presented with intractable partial-onset seizures. The MRI, PET, and SPECT studies subsequently revealed a focal epileptogenic source in the right temporal lobe. Results of video-electroencephalography monitoring concurred with the imaging findings, and a right temporal lobectomy was performed including the medial structures. Following surgery, histopathological features of the lesion included multiple scattered mononuclear cells with brown pigmentation in the amygdala specimen. The patient remains seizure free 2 years postresection, and no longer needs medication for seizure management. This patient presented with an atypical CNS manifestation of NCM that is curable by epilepsy surgery. Her intractable epilepsy developed secondary to amygdalar neuromelanosis, which had no associated leptomeningeal melanosis, an uncommon occurrence. As evidenced by the lack of seizure activity following resection, the patient's quality of life greatly improved after neurological surgery. PMID:23641959

  19. Oral bismuth for chronic intractable diarrheal conditions?

    PubMed Central

    Thazhath, Sony S; Haque, Mazhar; Florin, Timothy H

    2013-01-01

    Objective Bismuth has antidiarrheal, antibacterial, and anti-inflammatory properties. We report our single-center experience with oral colloidal bismuth subcitrate (CBS) treatment for patients with chronic intractable diarrhea. Method We interrogated our web-based Inflammatory Bowel Disease Clinical and Research database to ascertain clinical details on all patients in our tertiary hospital gastroenterology service treated with CBS between 2000 and 2010. Treatment responses were based on prospective scoring of daily number of liquid stools. Responses were recorded prior to commencement of CBS and at follow-up visits over 12 months. Results Thirty-one patients, mean age 47 years (range 17–79 years) and a mean duration of diarrhea of 22 weeks (range 6–104 weeks), were prescribed CBS at doses ranging from 120 mg to 480 mg/day for ≥1 month. Of these, 23 patients (74%) had an initial clinical response and 12 (39%) who continued with this treatment had a sustained clinical response at 1 year. Twelve patients with pouchitis and four patients with indeterminate colitis had initial responses of 92% and 75%, respectively, and sustained responses of 50% and 75%, respectively. Ulcerative colitis patients (n = 5) responded poorly with respect to both initial and sustained responses. Three patients with microscopic colitis showed encouraging initial response of 100% but did not have any sustained benefit. Three of four patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (dIBS) had an initial response and two (50%) had good sustained responses. There were no serious adverse events. One patient stopped therapy because of nausea. Conclusion This is the largest report of oral bismuth treatment in chronic intractable diarrhea. CBS is cheap and appears to have the potential to be effective for ameliorating diarrheal symptoms in indeterminate colitis, pouchitis, and dIBS. An appropriately powered, blinded, randomized, controlled study appears warranted to establish the position of oral bismuth in routine practice. PMID:23515887

  20. Kidney Disease Statistics for the United States

    MedlinePlus

    ... also order print versions from our online catalog. Kidney Disease Statistics for the United States Page Content ... for Vascular Access Acknowledgments The Growing Burden of Kidney Disease Kidney disease statistics for the United States ...

  1. Fundoplication in chronic intractable cough

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Airway reflux is a common cause of chronic cough and this is often refractory to medical therapy. Surgery in the form of Nissen fundoplication has been highly successful in the treatment of the classic reflux symptoms of heartburn and dyspepsia. There is a paucity of data regarding response to fundoplication in patients presenting with chronic cough. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the case notes of patients from the Hull Cough Clinic who had undergone Nissen fundoplication over the past 6 years. Demographic details, duration of symptoms, presence of other symptoms, results of oesophageal studies, outcome and complications were recorded. Patients were contacted by post and asked to complete a questionnaire detailing current symptoms. In a subgroup with continued troublesome cough 24 hour pharyngeal pH measurements were undertaken. Results Forty seven patients underwent fundoplication. The average duration of pre-operative cough was 8 years. Gastro intestinal symptoms were present in the majority. In 30 (64%) patients a positive response to treatment was recorded. Mild dysphagia or bloating was seen in 18 patients following surgery. Four patients needed repeat surgical intervention for modification of fundoplication. One patient developed aspiration pneumonia eight weeks following surgery and died of a myocardial infarction. Two thirds of patients with persisting cough had evidence of airway reflux on pharyngeal pH monitoring. Conclusion In these patients with intractable cough a long term response rate of 63% represents a useful therapeutic option. Treatment failure is more frequent than for classic peptic symptoms and may be related to persistent gaseous reflux. PMID:22812601

  2. Gabapentin for intractable hiccups in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Tegeler, Monica L; Baumrucker, Steven J

    2008-01-01

    Intractable hiccups are not common in the general population or in the palliative care population but can adversely impact quality of life and cause other complications such as weight loss and sleep disturbance. Many treatments have been proposed for intractable hiccups, but there is little consensus regarding treatment in the medical literature. This is partly because hiccups are relatively uncommon and many of the proposed treatments are unproven or have long-term side effects. Pharmacologic treatments rather than home remedies or surgical treatments are more appropriate for the palliative care patient. Gabapentin is a promising medication for the treatment of intractable hiccups for its safety, lack of serious side effects, and rapid onset of action. Further research is indicated to determine whether gabapentin is consistently effective. PMID:18292481

  3. Sequencing Intractable DNA to Close Microbial Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, Jr., Richard Ashley; Brown, Steven D; Podar, Mircea; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Elias, Dwayne A

    2012-01-01

    Advancement in high throughput DNA sequencing technologies has supported a rapid proliferation of microbial genome sequencing projects, providing the genetic blueprint for for in-depth studies. Oftentimes, difficult to sequence regions in microbial genomes are ruled intractable resulting in a growing number of genomes with sequence gaps deposited in databases. A procedure was developed to sequence such difficult regions in the non-contiguous finished Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 genome (6 intractable gaps) and the Desulfovibrio africanus genome (1 intractable gap). The polynucleotides surrounding each gap formed GC rich secondary structures making the regions refractory to amplification and sequencing. Strand-displacing DNA polymerases used in concert with a novel ramped PCR extension cycle supported amplification and closure of all gap regions in both genomes. These developed procedures support accurate gene annotation, and provide a step-wise method that reduces the effort required for genome finishing.

  4. Intractable diarrhoea of infancy and latent otomastoiditis.

    PubMed Central

    Salazar de Sousa, J; da Silva, A; da Costa Ribeiro, V

    1980-01-01

    In 16 infants with intractable diarrhoea, latent otomastoiditis was found in 9 (3 at necropsy and 6 at myringotomy-antrotomy). In 5 of the 6 operated group, surgery was followed by a striking cessation of the diarrhoea and with weight gain. It is concluded that (1) latent otomastoiditis may be a perpetuating factor in intractable diarrhoea; (2) myringotomy-antrotomy should be considered if other forms of treatment have failed, and especially if there is leucocytosis; (3) mastoiditis with diffuse osteitis seems to be associated with a poor prognosis. PMID:7458392

  5. Baclofen in the treatment of intractable hiccups.

    PubMed

    Patial, R K

    2002-10-01

    Availability of a large number of drugs/remedies for the management of hiccups suggests that all the available drugs are not effective in all the patients. Baclofen was successful in relieving the intractable hiccups where all other known drugs of hiccup were unable to provide relief. PMID:12568219

  6. Intractable hiccups due to herpetic esophagitis in an immunocompromised patient

    PubMed Central

    Harris, John; Smith, Tukisa; Preis, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Herpes virus family's association with visceral lesions is well established. Herpes simplex virus presentations vary based on immune status. Intractable hiccups due to herpes simplex esophagitis, to the best of our knowledge have been described twice in the literature. We present a 68 year-old immunocompromised male with intractable hiccups for 10 months. Case 68 year-old male with end-stage renal disease and multiple myeloma presented with coffee ground emesis and hiccups of ten months duration. A year earlier, he received cycles of bortezomib and dexamethasone, remaining on lenalidomide. During chemotherapy, he developed pneumococcal meningitis and subsequently intractable hiccups. Preceding admission, endoscopy showed duodenitis and esophagitis. Proton-pump inhibitor therapy was initiated; however, biopsy was not performed. During admission, hiccups often occurred every few seconds while off anti-emetics, persisting despite therapy. Exam showed cachexia/temporal wasting, aphthous stomatitis and abdominal tenderness. MRI of brain/spine, CT of neck, chest, abdomen and neurological evaluation were unremarkable. Endoscopy revealed gastritis and esophagitis with mucosal tears. Biopsy revealed intra-nuclear inclusions with multi-nucleated cells, consistent with herpes virus, later confirmed as herpes simplex by immunostaining. Hiccups and emesis resolved after of 2 days of intravenous acyclovir. 21 days of treatment were completed with oral valacyclovir. He remained free of hiccups during the remaining hospital stay and follow up. This case illustrates an exceptionally rare presentation of herpetic esophagitis in an immunocompromised host. As novel immunotherapeutic/suppressive agents continue to emerge, the evolving role of herpes virus prophylaxis and diagnosis of atypical presentations in new host populations is a topic of growing importance. PMID:27077025

  7. Noninvasive treatment alternative for intractable startle epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Klinkenberg, Sylvia; Ubbink, Sander; Vles, Johannes; de Louw, Anton; van Hall, Mariette Debeij; Scheijen, Dyon; Brokx, Jan

    2014-01-01

    We describe a treatment alternative for intractable, startle-provoked, epileptic seizures in four children aged between 8 and 14. Three of the four children had symptomatic localization-related epilepsy. They all suffered from intractable epilepsy precipitated by sudden sounds. The fact that seizures tended to occur with high frequency – more than one seizure a day – had a clear impact on daily life. Clinical seizure pattern demonstrated asymmetric tonic posturing in all four children. Three children experienced several seizure types including focal seizure onset. All children had focal neurological signs or learning disabilities or a combination of both. Our noninvasive treatment method using psychoeducational counseling and sound generators was applied in four children, resulting in a seizure frequency reduction of ≥ 50% in two of them. PMID:25667869

  8. Intractable Pruritus After Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Deborah A; Jaffee, Kenneth M; Kundu, Anjana

    2009-01-01

    Background: This report describes a young woman with incomplete traumatic cervical spinal cord injury and intractable pruritus involving her dorsal forearm. Method: Case report. Findings: Anatomic distribution of the pruritus corresponded to the dermatomal distribution of her level of spinal cord injury and vertebral fusion. Symptoms were attributed to the spinal cord injury and possible cervical root injury. Pruritus was refractory to all treatments, including topical lidocaine, gabapentin, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, intravenous Bier block, stellate ganglion block, and acupuncture. Conclusions: Further understanding of neuropathic pruritus is needed. Diagnostic workup of intractable pruritus should include advanced imaging to detect ongoing nerve root compression. If diagnostic studies suggest radiculopathy, epidural steroid injection should be considered. Because the autonomic nervous system may be involved in complex chronic pain or pruritic syndromes, sympatholysis via such techniques as stellate ganglion block might be effective. PMID:19777867

  9. Treatment of Intractable Hiccups With an Oral Agent Monotherapy of Baclofen -A Case Report-

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Hwan; Kim, Tai Yo; Lee, Hyun Wook; Choi, Yu Sun; Moon, Seo Young

    2010-01-01

    Hiccups are an involuntarily powerful spasm of the diaphragm, followed by a sudden inspiration with a closure of the glottis. Hiccups that are caused by gastric distention, spicy foods and neural dysfunction can resolve themselves without any treatment. Some hiccups are associated with certain diseases or they occur postsurgically, and life-restricting intractable hiccups should be treated. The cause of hiccups should be quickly determined so as to administer the proper treatment. Hiccups often remit spontaneously within a short period of time, but they may also occur without remission for a prolonged period in some cases. We report here on a 36-year-old man who suffered with intractable hiccups for 5 years. We administered a single oral dose of baclofen, and then the hiccups disappeared. We conclude that a single dose of baclofen is a good treatment for intractable hiccups. PMID:20552072

  10. Management of intractable pain in adiposis dolorosa with intravenous administration of lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Iwane, T; Maruyama, M; Matsuki, M; Ito, Y; Shimoji, K

    1976-01-01

    Intractable pain in a patient with adiposis dolorosa (Dercum's disease) was treated by IV administration of lidocaine (200 to 400 mg). Relief was maximum 20 minutes after the end of drug infusion and persisted for over 10 hours. Toxicity was minimal. Slow EEG waves which appeared during drug administration disappeared within 20 minutes. PMID:943987

  11. Corpus callosotomy with gamma knife radiosurgery for a case of intractable generalised epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Bodaghabadi, Mohammad; Bitaraf, Mohammad Ali; Aran, Shima; Alikhani, Mazdak; Ashrafian, Hossein; Zahiri, Alireza; Alahverdi, Mahmud

    2011-06-01

    Gamma knife radiosurgery is a minimally invasive procedure which can be used for patients with intractable epilepsies as an alternative for surgical corpus callosotomy. We report a 13-year-old boy with intractable epilepsy who underwent radiosurgical callosotomy. The patient demonstrated significant clinical improvement after gamma knife radiosurgery and was free of seizures 10 months after the procedure. However, He developed four short focal seizures with clonic movements during the 20 months post radiosurgery. Corpus callosotomy decreased epileptiform discharges in both hemispheres, indicating a role for the callosal neurons to facilitate an asymmetric epileptogenic susceptible state within the two hemispheres such that bisynchronous and bisymmetrical epileptiform discharges develop. Our result demonstrates that this novel therapeutic approach is a safe and effective option for the treatment of intractable generalised epilepsies. PMID:21628134

  12. [Lesion of intractable hiccups due to medullary infarction].

    PubMed

    Uemura, Junichi; Inoue, Takeshi; Aoki, Junya; Saji, Naoki; Shibazaki, Kensaku; Kimura, Kazumi

    2014-01-01

    The frequency and clinical characteristics of intractable hiccups due to the medullary infarction is unknown. The aim of this study was to identify the lesions of hiccups using by brain MRI. Ninety acute medullary patients admitted to our stroke center within 14 days of stroke onset between April 2004 and August 2012 were retrospectively studied. We evaluated clinical characteristics and the frequency of the patients causing intractable hiccups among acute medullary stroke patients. We divided the patients into two groups, intractable hiccups group, and not hiccups group. Of 90 patients, five (5.5%) had intractable hiccups. Hiccups group had more frequently involved right middle medullary lesion than not hiccups group (hiccups group vs. not hiccups group; (60% vs. 4%, p < 0.001). In 16 cases reported the lesion of intractable hiccups, the right middle medullary lesion was 11 cases. We suspected that the lesion of the intractable hiccups was associated with the right middle medullary. PMID:24943076

  13. Rethinking Intractable Conflict: The Perspective of Dynamical Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallacher, Robin R.; Coleman, Peter T.; Nowak, Andrzej; Bui-Wrzosinska, Lan

    2010-01-01

    Intractable conflicts are demoralizing. Beyond destabilizing the families, communities, or international regions in which they occur, they tend to perpetuate the very conditions of misery and hate that contributed to them in the first place. Although the common factors and processes associated with intractable conflicts have been identified…

  14. Pallidal stimulation for medically intractable blepharospasm.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kazumichi; Shinojima, Naoki; Hamasaki, Tadashi; Kuratsu, Jun-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the globus pallidus internus (GPi) is an established procedure to improve generalised, segmental craniofacial dystonia. However, no studies have addressed the applicability of DBS for blepharospasm as a focal craniofacial dystonia. A 52-year-old man developed medically intractable involuntary eye closure. Because the abnormal movement was observed exclusively in the eyelids, he was diagnosed not with Meige's syndrome but with blepharospasm as a focal craniofacial dystonia. He underwent stereotactic surgery under general anaesthesia for bilateral GPi-DBS. Continuous GPi stimulation almost completely abolished the blepharospasm. 15 months after the operation, his preoperative scores on the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale (=8 points) decreased to 1 (87.5% improvement). The present study demonstrates the applicability of GPi-DBS for treating blepharospasm presenting as focal dystonia. Further studies with accumulated case series are needed to confirm the effect of DBS on blepharospasm and other focal craniofacial dystonias. PMID:27033410

  15. Microcatheter Embolization of Intractable Idiopathic Epistaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Leppaenen, Martti; Seppaenen, Seppo; Laranne, Jussi; Kuoppala, Katriina

    1999-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy and safety of microcatheter embolization in the treatment of intractable idiopathic epistaxis. Methods: Thirty-seven patients underwent microcatheter embolization in 1991-1998. We evaluated retrospectively the technical and clinical outcome, the number of complications, the duration of embolization in each case, and the number of blood transfusions needed. All embolizations were done with biplane digital subtraction angiography (DSA) equipment. The procedure was carried out under local anesthesia using transfemoral catheterization, except in one case where the translumbar route was used. Tracker 18 or 10 microcatheters were advanced as far as possible to the distal branches of the sphenopalatine artery. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles were used for embolization in most cases, while platinum coils or a combination of these two materials were occasionally used. The primary outcome was always assessed immediately by angiography. Follow-up data were obtained from patient records, by interviewing patients on the telephone or by postal questionnaires when necessary. The mean follow-up time was 21 months. Results: The embolization was technically successful in all 37 cases. A curative outcome was achieved in 33 cases (89%). The mean duration of the procedure was 110 min. Four patients (8%) had mild transient complications, but no severe or persistent complications were encountered. Twenty-three patients needed a blood transfusion. Slight rebleeding occurred in three patients during the follow-up; all responded to conservative treatment. One patient suffered two episodes of rebleeding within 2 months after primary embolization. Re-embolizations successfully stopped the bleeding. Conclusion: Embolization is the primary invasive modality for treating intractable idiopathic epistaxis. It proved both safe and effective over a relatively long follow-up.

  16. Sustained improvement of intractable rheumatoid arthritis after total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Field, E.H.; Strober, S.; Hoppe, R.T.; Calin, A.; Engleman, E.G.; Kotzin, B.L.; Tanay, A.S.; Calin, H.J.; Terrell, C.P.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1983-08-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) was administered to 11 patients who had intractable rheumatoid arthritis that was unresponsive to conventional medical therapy, including aspirin, multiple nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, gold salts, and D-penicillamine. Total lymphoid irradiation was given as an alternative to cytotoxic drugs such as azathioprine and cyclophosphamide. After radiotherapy, 9 of the 11 patients showed a marked improvement in clinical disease activity as measured by morning stiffness, joint tenderness, joint swelling, and overall functional abilities. The mean improvement of disease activity in all patients ranged from 40-70 percent and has persisted throughout a 13-28 month followup period. This improvement permitted the mean daily steroid dose to be reduced by 54%. Complications included severe fatigue and other constitutional symptoms during radiotherapy, development of Felty's syndrome in 1 patient, and an exacerbation of rheumatoid lung disease in another. After therapy, all patients exhibited a profound T lymphocytopenia, and a reversal in their T suppressor/cytotoxic cell to helper cell ratio. The proliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin A, and allogeneic leukocytes (mixed leukocyte reaction) were markedly reduced, as was in vitro immunoglobulin synthesis after stimulation with pokeweed mitogen. Alterations in T cell numbers and function persisted during the entire followup period, except that the mixed leukocyte reaction showed a tendency to return to normal values.

  17. Neuropsychological and psychiatric correlates of intractable pseudoseizures.

    PubMed

    Drake, M E; Pakalnis, A; Phillips, B B

    1992-03-01

    Psychogenic seizures can mimic convulsive epilepsy and with repetitive attacks, iatrogenic complications from aggressive treatment of status epilepticus can occur. We studied neuropsychiatric features of 20 patients in whom psychogenic seizures were intractable and at times continuous. Nineteen of 20 patients seen were female, and all but one were under 40 years of age. All had convulsive attacks resistant to various medications, normal neurological examinations, and negative imaging studies and electroencephalograms (EEGs). Sixteen had previous evidence of epilepsy and the other four had epileptic relatives. Seizures were atypically prolonged, included back arching and pelvic thrusting, and persisted despite intravenous diazepam and therapeutic phenytoin and phenobarbital levels. Seizures terminated spontaneously in five, were stopped by suggestion in four, and persisted until respiratory arrest or elective intubation in 11. Ten patients had conversion disorder, six borderline or mixed personality disorder and four mental retardation. Fifteen had had some precipitating stressor and the remainder had histories of exhibiting attention-seeking behaviour. Nine of 10 patients with conversion disorder had 'conversion V' Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) profiles, while personality disorder patients had elevation of several psychopathological scales. Patients with conversion disorder gradually improved with anticonvulsant discontinuation, while retarded individuals were helped by behaviour modification, situational change or neuroleptics. Personality disorder patients continued to have attacks and eventually discontinued follow-up. Clinical evidence of non-epileptic seizures includes clinical atypicality and long duration, exacerbation by medications and frequent attacks despite normal examination and studies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1364248

  18. Intractable pain--the present position.

    PubMed Central

    Lipton, S.

    1981-01-01

    The broad changes that have occurred in the treatment of intractable pain are considered. There is a new understanding of the anatomy and physiology of pain pathways and pain appreciation. Thus gate control theory, the spinal laminae, and the descending inhibitory pain pathway through the raphe nuclei are discussed in relation to the recent discovery of the opioid (enkephalin) systems. Out of this arises the stimulation methods of pain relief--transcutaneous neural stimulation, periaqueductal stimulation, and acupuncture. These are valuable in patients with a normal expectation of life. For patients with a shortened expectation of life other methods, especially destructive ones, are valuable (though in all types of chronic pain drug therapy is still the most used method). Basic changes in techniques and the equipment used to bring this about are detailed broadly. In particular, the use of the image intensifier X-ray machine and the stimulation and destruction available from the modern lesion generator when used in combination provide accuracy and safety. Techniques and methods are constantly altering and examples of this are given. All this costs money in time, personnel, and equipment; the costings of the Liverpool Centre for Pain Relief are given. Finally, the Pain Relief Foundation is in being in Liverpool in the grounds of Walton Hospital. This has been made possible by a large 'seed' donation by the Wolfson Foundation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6894676

  19. Physical exercise in women with intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, H R; Ellertsen, B; Grønningsaeter, H; Nakken, K O; Løyning, Y; Ursin, H

    1994-01-01

    Fifteen women with pharmacologically intractable epilepsy were given physical exercise (aerobic dancing with strength training and stretching) for 60 min, twice weekly, for 15 weeks. Seizure frequency was recorded by the patients for 3-7 months before the intervention, during the intervention period, and for 3 months after the intervention. Medication and other known seizure-influencing factors were kept as constant as possible. Self-reported seizure frequency was significantly reduced during the intervention period. The exercise also led to reduced level of subjective health complaints, such as muscle pains, sleep problems, and fatigue. The exercise reduced plasma cholesterol ratio and increased maximum O2 uptake. Because most of the patients were unable to continue the exercise on their own after the intervention period, the exercise effects were not maintained during the follow-up period. The patients were not unwilling to continue the exercise, but it was not sufficient to offer them the possibility of continuing similar types of exercise. We believe that 15 weeks is too short a time to establish a life-style change and that continued physical exercise for these patients requires a well-organized and supportive program, requiring experienced and dedicated instructors. PMID:7988519

  20. The Effect of Stellate Ganglion Block on Intractable Lymphedema after Breast Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin; Cho, Soo Young; Baik, Hee Jung; Kim, Jong Hak

    2015-01-01

    Lymphedema of the upper limb after breast cancer surgery is a disease that carries a life-long risk and is difficult to cure once it occurs despite the various treatments which have been developed. Two patients were referred from general surgery department for intractable lymphedema. They were treated with stellate ganglion blocks (SGBs), and the circumferences of the mid-point of their each upper and lower arms were measured on every visit to the pain clinic. A decrease of the circumference in each patient was observed starting after the second injection. A series of blocks were established to maintain a prolonged effect. Both patients were satisfied with less swelling and pain. This case demonstrates the benefits of an SGB for intractable upper limb lymphedema. PMID:25589949

  1. The effect of stellate ganglion block on intractable lymphedema after breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin; Park, Hahck Soo; Cho, Soo Young; Baik, Hee Jung; Kim, Jong Hak

    2015-01-01

    Lymphedema of the upper limb after breast cancer surgery is a disease that carries a life-long risk and is difficult to cure once it occurs despite the various treatments which have been developed. Two patients were referred from general surgery department for intractable lymphedema. They were treated with stellate ganglion blocks (SGBs), and the circumferences of the mid-point of their each upper and lower arms were measured on every visit to the pain clinic. A decrease of the circumference in each patient was observed starting after the second injection. A series of blocks were established to maintain a prolonged effect. Both patients were satisfied with less swelling and pain. This case demonstrates the benefits of an SGB for intractable upper limb lymphedema. PMID:25589949

  2. Mechanisms of Cachexia in Chronic Disease States.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tadashi; Delafontaine, Patrice

    2015-10-01

    Sarcopenia and cachexia are muscle wasting syndromes associated with aging and with many chronic diseases, such as congestive heart failure (CHF), diabetes, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic kidney disease (CKD). While mechanisms are complex, these conditions are often accompanied by elevated angiotensin II (Ang II). Patients with advanced CHF or CKD often have increased Ang II levels and cachexia, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor treatment improves weight loss. It was found that Ang II infusion in rodents leads to skeletal muscle wasting. Ang II increases cytokines and circulating hormones, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, serum amyloid-A and glucocorticoids, which regulate muscle protein synthesis and degradation. Ang II-induced muscle wasting is caused by alterations in insulin-like growth factor-1 signaling, enhanced muscle protein breakdown via the ubiquitin-proteasome system and decreased appetite resulting from the downregulation of hypothalamic orexigenic neuropeptides, such as Npy and orexin. Ang II also inhibits 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activity and disrupts normal energy balance via the activation of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase phosphatase PP2Cα. Furthermore, Ang II inhibits skeletal muscle stem (satellite) cell proliferation, leading to lowered muscle regenerative capacity. Distinct satellite cell angiotensin receptor subtypes have different effects on different stages of differentiation and are critical for the regulation of muscle regeneration. These data suggest that the renin-angiotensin system plays a critical role in mechanisms underlying cachexia in chronic disease states, and it is a promising target for the treatment of muscle atrophy in patients with diseases such as CHF and CKD. PMID:26083652

  3. Intractable itch relieved by 4-phenylbutyrate therapy in patients with progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 1 (PFIC1), an inherited liver disease caused by mutations in ATP8B1, progresses to severe cholestasis with a sustained intractable itch. Currently, no effective therapy has been established for PFIC1. Decreased function of the bile salt export pump (BSEP) in hepatocytes is suggested to be responsible for the severe cholestasis observed in PFIC1. We found a previously unidentified pharmacological effect of 4-phenylbutyrate (4PB) that increases the expression and function of BSEP. Here, we tested 4PB therapy in three patients with PFIC1. Methods The therapeutic potency of 4PB in these patients was tested by oral administration of this drug with gradually increasing dosage (200, 350, and 500 mg/kg/day) for 6 months. Biochemical, histological, and clinical data were collected. Results 4PB therapy had no beneficial effect on the patients’ liver functions, as assessed by biochemical and histological analyses, despite an increase in hepatic BSEP expression. However, therapy with 4PB at a dosage of 350 or 500 mg/kg/day significantly relieved the intractable itch. Serum levels of potential pruritogens in cholestasis were much higher than the reference ranges during the 4PB therapy. Conclusions 4PB therapy may be a new medication for patients with intractable cholestatic pruritus and may improve quality of life for patients and their families. PMID:25022842

  4. Ultrasound-Guided Nerve Block with Botulinum Toxin Type A for Intractable Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Young Eun; Choi, Jung Hyun; Park, Hue Jung; Park, Ji Hye; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain includes postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN), and trigeminal neuralgia, and so on. Although various drugs have been tried to treat neuropathic pain, the effectiveness of the drugs sometimes may be limited for chronic intractable neuropathic pain, especially when they cannot be used at an adequate dose, due to undesirable severe side effects and the underlying disease itself. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) has been known for its analgesic effect in various pain conditions. Nevertheless, there are no data of nerve block in PHN and PDN. Here, we report two patients successfully treated with ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve block using BoNT-A for intractable PHN and PDN. One patient had PHN on the left upper extremity and the other patient had PDN on a lower extremity. Due to side effects of drugs, escalation of the drug dose could not be made. We injected 50 Botox units (BOTOX®, Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA, USA) into brachial plexus and lumbar plexus, respectively, under ultrasound. Their pain was significantly decreased for about 4–5 months. Ultrasound-guided nerve block with BoNT-A may be an effective analgesic modality in a chronic intractable neuropathic pain especially when conventional treatment failed to achieve adequate pain relief. PMID:26761032

  5. Ultrasound-Guided Nerve Block with Botulinum Toxin Type A for Intractable Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Moon, Young Eun; Choi, Jung Hyun; Park, Hue Jung; Park, Ji Hye; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain includes postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN), and trigeminal neuralgia, and so on. Although various drugs have been tried to treat neuropathic pain, the effectiveness of the drugs sometimes may be limited for chronic intractable neuropathic pain, especially when they cannot be used at an adequate dose, due to undesirable severe side effects and the underlying disease itself. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) has been known for its analgesic effect in various pain conditions. Nevertheless, there are no data of nerve block in PHN and PDN. Here, we report two patients successfully treated with ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve block using BoNT-A for intractable PHN and PDN. One patient had PHN on the left upper extremity and the other patient had PDN on a lower extremity. Due to side effects of drugs, escalation of the drug dose could not be made. We injected 50 Botox units (BOTOX(®), Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA, USA) into brachial plexus and lumbar plexus, respectively, under ultrasound. Their pain was significantly decreased for about 4-5 months. Ultrasound-guided nerve block with BoNT-A may be an effective analgesic modality in a chronic intractable neuropathic pain especially when conventional treatment failed to achieve adequate pain relief. PMID:26761032

  6. Intractability of the Initial Arrangement of Input Data on Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Y.; Tani, S.; Takahashi, Y.; Kunihiro, N.

    2005-08-01

    We study the intractability of finding an optimal initial arrangement of input data on qubits when the qubits are arranged on the vertices of a d-dimensional grid (d is constant) and we can perform quantum operations only between nearest-neighbor qubits. The problem is called the d-IAP (d-dimensional initial arrangement problem) in this paper. We prove that the intractability of the d-IAP is equivalent to that of the weighted d-dimensional arrangement. Thus, there is no deterministic polynomial-time algorithm for finding an optimal initial arrangement of 1-IAP if P≠NP.

  7. Extensive apoptosis in a case of intractable infantile status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Koshi A.; Weidenheim, Karen; Legatt, Alan D.; Shifteh, Keivan; Abbott, I. Richmond; Mosh, Solomon L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary A previously healthy 8-month-old girl underwent epilepsy surgery for intractable focal seizures with secondary generalization that progressed to status epilepticus. The major neuropathologic finding was extensive apoptosis. Investigations did not reveal any etiology for the apoptosis or the seizures. This is the first report of apoptosis, without necrosis, in association with intractable status epilepticus in the developing human brain. The findings suggest that new treatment strategies targeted to prevent apoptosis may be useful in children with prolonged status epilepticus. PMID:19464149

  8. Alum Irrigation for the Treatment of Intractable Haematuria

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Christopher Chee Kong; Md Zainuddin, Zulkifli

    2009-01-01

    Managing intractable haematuria is a daunting task. One cause of this condition is radiationinduced haemorrhagic cystitis. Several treatments for the condition have been proposed and one non-invasive option is alum irrigation. Here, we report on a 65-year-old woman with intractable haematuria secondary to radiation cystitis who was successfully treated with alum irrigation. Alum irrigation is safe, well tolerated and relatively cheap. A review of the literature and a comprehensive discussion on alum irrigation as treatment for haematuria is discussed here to create an awareness regarding this treatment option. PMID:22135514

  9. Donepezil-related intractable hiccups: a case report.

    PubMed

    McGrane, Ian R; Shuman, Michael D; McDonald, Robert W

    2015-03-01

    This case report describes a man with intractable hiccups probably caused by donepezil. The patient's symptoms were not responsive to commonly used medications for hiccups, but they were improved and completely relieved upon donepezil dose deescalation and discontinuation. We report two occasions in which the discontinuation of donepezil resulted in hiccup resolution and three occasions in which initiation of donepezil was associated with the onset of hiccups. This report contributes to the growing body of literature that describes an association between centrally acting medications and intractable hiccups. PMID:25756505

  10. Management of intractable hiccups: an illustrative case and review.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Camielle; Vitale, Caroline; Montagnini, Marcos

    2014-03-01

    Often thought of as a benign and self-limited condition, hiccups can become persistent or intractable, and thus be associated with substantial morbidity and distress. In such cases, an underlying etiology is often present, and may be overlooked. Debilitating hiccups can present a major challenge to optimal symptom management. Various causes of protracted hiccups have been identified including metabolic abnormalities, central nervous system pathology, malignancy, medications, and disorders attributed to cardiac, pulmonary and gastrointestinal etiologies. We present a case of intractable hiccups in a patient with an advanced hematological malignancy and review specific therapies for the management of persistent hiccups. PMID:23408373

  11. Hydrophilic treatment of porous PTFE for intractable glaucoma implant devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murahara, Masataka M.; Sato, Yuji; Fernandez, Viviana; Fantes, Francisco; Nose, Izuru; Lee, William E.; Milne, Peter J.; Parel, Jean-Marie A.

    2001-06-01

    Intractable glaucoma results from hindrances in the eyeball aqueous humor pathways that increase the intraocular pressure above normal physiological levels (over 20 mmHg). In this study porous PTFE membranes were made hydrophilic with a photochemical method that use ethyl alcohol and water for the chemical solution.

  12. Early Career Teacher Attrition: New Thoughts on an Intractable Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallant, Andrea; Riley, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Early career exit from teaching has reached epidemic proportions and appears intractable. Previous attempts to find solutions are yet to make much of an inroad. The aim of the research was to discover what nine beginning teachers required to remain in the classroom, by adopting a phenomenological approach. The authors identified participants'

  13. Early Career Teacher Attrition: New Thoughts on an Intractable Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallant, Andrea; Riley, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Early career exit from teaching has reached epidemic proportions and appears intractable. Previous attempts to find solutions are yet to make much of an inroad. The aim of the research was to discover what nine beginning teachers required to remain in the classroom, by adopting a phenomenological approach. The authors identified participants'…

  14. A diagnostic challenge in a young woman with intractable hiccups and vomiting: a case of neuromyelitis optica

    PubMed Central

    Mandaliya, Rohan; Boigon, Margot; Smith, David G.; Bhutani, Suchit; Ali, Naveed; Hilton, Cheryl; Kelly, John; Ternopolska, Nataliya

    2015-01-01

    Intractable nausea and vomiting along with hiccups is a commonly encountered problem on any general medicine or gastroenterology service. These symptoms are usually not appreciated as the possible initial manifestation of neuromyelitis optica (NMO). Missing diagnosis at this early stage will lead to a delay in the treatment, and hence, irreversible complications including blindness and paraplegia could occur. We report a case of a 22-year-old young female who presented with intractable hiccups and vomiting. After extensive evaluation, she was found to have NMO which involved the area postrema, the vomiting center of the brain. Early diagnosis from the clinical picture aided by aquaporin-4 serologic testing is extremely important to allow early initiation of immunosuppressive therapy. Immunosuppression gives an opportunity to modify the disease at an earlier stage rather than waiting for evolution of disease to fulfill the diagnostic criteria of NMO. PMID:26486116

  15. Role of biologics in intractable urticaria

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Andrew; Bulkhi, Adeeb; Casale, Thomas B

    2015-01-01

    Chronic urticaria (CU) is a common condition faced by many clinicians. CU has been estimated to affect approximately 0.5%–1% of the population, with nearly 20% of sufferers remaining symptomatic 20 years after onset. Antihistamines are the first-line therapy for CU. Unfortunately, nearly half of these patients will fail this first-line therapy and require other medication, including immune response modifiers or biologics. Recent advances in our understanding of urticarial disorders have led to more targeted therapeutic options for CU and other urticarial diseases. The specific biologic agents most investigated for antihistamine-refractory CU are omalizumab, rituximab, and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). Of these, the anti-IgE monoclonal antibody omalizumab is the best studied, and has recently been approved for the management of CU. Other agents, such as interleukin-1 inhibitors, have proved beneficial for Schnitzler syndrome and cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), diseases associated with urticaria. This review summarizes the relevant data regarding the efficacy of biologics in antihistamine-refractory CU. PMID:25926715

  16. Usefulness of magnetic motor evoked potentials in the surgical treatment of hemiplegic patients with intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kamida, Tohru; Baba, Hiroshi; Ono, Kenji; Yonekura, Masato; Fujiki, Minoru; Kobayashi, Hidenori

    2003-09-01

    Five hemiplegic patients with intractable epilepsy were studied with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) before and after various surgical treatments. These patients had unilateral widespread cerebral lesions acquired at various times, including congenital, infantile and childhood injury. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) of the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) muscles were simultaneously recorded on both sides following TMS of the motor cortex in the respective hemisphere using a figure-8 or circular coil. In all patients with congenital disease, the abolition of motor function in the affected hemisphere was estimated by magnetic MEPs, and the hemiplegia did not deteriorate after functional hemispherectomy (HS) was performed in two of them. In two patients with acquired disease, HS was not performed because it was shown by magnetic maps that the motor function in the affected hemisphere remained. Furthermore, it was shown by electric MEPs using subdural electrodes that a patient who had had encephalitis in early childhood had a reorganised motor area in the parietal cortex of the affected hemisphere. The present findings indicate that magnetic MEPs are a very useful non-invasive method of assessing whether the motor area in the affected hemisphere can be resected in hemiplegic patients with intractable epilepsy. PMID:12915083

  17. [Management of intractable cancer pain: from intrathecal morphine to cell allograft].

    PubMed

    Lazorthes, Y; Sallerin, B; Verdie, J C; Sol, J C; Duplan, H; Tkaczuk, J; Tafani, M; Bastide, R; Bes, J C

    2000-11-01

    The durable effectiveness of intrathecal morphine administration is well established for the management of intractable cancer pain, after failure of systemic opioids, secondary to the persistence of non-reversible undesirable side effects. Many patients are referred to late in the disease course. This conservative method to control pain of malignant origin must not be reserved for last resort treatment for terminal patients. Intra-cerebro-ventricular morphine administration is a very effective and generally safe method for controlling intractable cancer pain. Because of the chronic implantation of an intra-ventricular catheter this method is somewhat invasive. Its indications remain a simple and effective alternative when the topography of nociceptive pain is diffuse or cephalic. In clinical practice, intrathecal and/or intra-cerebro-ventricular administration of opioids is limited by cost, the need for specialized maintenance and mechanical malfunctions if implantable drug delivery systems, or by the risk of bacterial contamination and ambulatory constraints when repeated daily injections via an intrathecal access port are used. To answer these limitations, cell therapy using intrathecal chromaffin cell allograft is a promising approach for the management of cancer pain refractory to traditional drug therapy and pain lesion surgery. The basic rationale and preclinical studies on experimental pain models have enabled starting prospective clinical trials. Prior to transplantation, handling and preparation of the chromaffin tissue is critical for allograft viability. The initial results of clinical trials with human chromaffin cell grafts from intractable cancer pain have reported long-lasting pain relief, in correlation with met-enkephalin release into the CSF. Convincing evidence will require controlled studies. The limitations of this innovative cell therapy and especially the lack of human adrenal gland availability point to the need for new sources of cells. Perspectives include xenogenic or engineered cell lines. PMID:11084478

  18. Olanzapine and baclofen for the treatment of intractable hiccups.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Amy N; Ehret Leal, Julie; Brzezinski, Walter A

    2014-01-01

    Intractable hiccups are a relatively uncommon condition characterized by involuntary, spasmodic contractions of the diaphragm. This type of hiccups generally has a duration of more than 1 month. We describe a 59-year-old kidney transplant recipient with a complicated medical history (atrial fibrillation, chronic renal failure, type 2 diabetes mellitus, gastroesophageal reflux, gout, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and obstructive sleep apnea) who developed intractable hiccups that significantly affected his quality of life. Despite an extensive gastrointestinal and pulmonary evaluation, and treatment failures with several different drug regimens--metoclopramide, desipramine, amantadine, cyclobenzaprine, phenytoin, and lorazepam--his hiccups were eventually controlled with a combination of baclofen and low-dose olanzapine therapy. Baclofen is a c-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analog that contains a phenylethylamine moiety. It is hypothesized that having both GABA and phenylethylamine properties activates inhibitory neurotransmitters, most notably GABA, which may in turn block the hiccup stimulus. The exact mechanism through which olanzapine is effective in patients with hiccups is not fully understood. It is thought that the effect is, in part, due to serotonin augmenting phrenic motoneuronal activity on the reflex arcs involved in the generation of hiccups within the spinal cord. In addition, since olanazapine is a dopamine antagonist, particularly a dopamine D₂-receptor antagonist, this could also have played a role in its effectiveness in treating our patient. Strong evidence for a specific treatment regimen for intractable hiccups is lacking in the primary literature. Our case report adds to the available literature, as there are currently no published data on the use of combination therapy for the treatment of intractable hiccups, and the combination of baclofen and olanzapine significantly improved our patient's quality of life. PMID:24551889

  19. Role of surgical therapy in management of intractable ascites.

    PubMed

    Elcheroth, J; Vons, C; Franco, D

    1994-01-01

    Almost 10% of patients with cirrhosis and ascites develop intractable ascites. When large-volume paracentesis fails to relieve ascites, patients may be submitted to one of the three following surgical options: portosystemic shunting, peritoneovenous shunting, or liver transplantation. Portosystemic shunting is efficient in clearing ascites, but it is associated with a high rate of encephalopathy and liver failure. The indications for portosystemic shunting are therefore limited for treatment of intractable ascites and should be performed only in patients with good liver function in whom all other treatments failed. Peritoneovenous shunting has been associated with a high rate of early complications and valve obstruction. Improvements in perioperative care and in the material used have greatly reduced the operative risks and increased the patency rate. Mortality remains high in patients with severe liver failure or with a history of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis or variceal bleeding. Peritoneovenous shunting should not be done when these risk factors are present. In the absence of such risk factors, peritoneovenous shunting is a good procedure and may provide definitive relief of ascites and long-term survival in more than 50% of the operated patients. In patients with poor risk factors liver transplantation may be preferable, and the onset of intractable ascites in a patient with a severely compromised liver should trigger the indication of liver replacement. PMID:8042329

  20. Intractable hiccups (singultus) abolished by risperidone, but not by haloperidol.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Tadashi; Araki, Yoichiro; Hayashi, Teruo

    2015-01-01

    Hiccups or singulata are rhythmic involuntary movements of the diaphragm, caused by a variety of conditions that interfere with the functions of the nerve nuclei in the medulla and supra-spinal hiccup center. Although neurotransmitters and receptors involved in the pathophysiology of hiccups are not defined well, dopamine has been considered to play an important role. In some cases, chlorpromazine or other antipsychotics are used for the treatment of intractable hiccups but their efficacy is often limited. This report involves an 18-year-old patient who experienced two episodes of intractable hiccups triggered by stress, which lasted for weeks or even months. In both episodes, haloperidol was initially used, but there was no significant effect. In contrast, risperidone, the second-generation antipsychotic that possesses a dopamine-serotonin antagonist property, completely abolished the hiccups 6 hours after administration. This is one of few case reports in which two antipsychotics were challenged for a single patient with hiccups, and the effects of the drugs were obviously different. Our finding suggests that, in addition to dopaminergic system, the serotonergic systems may be involved in the pathophysiology of some hiccup cases and that the serotonin-acting antipsychotics such as risperidone should be considered as a choice in the drug treatment of intractable hiccups. PMID:25763097

  1. Grapevine Fanleaf Disease in Washington State Vineyards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wine grapes (Vitis vinifera L.) are susceptible to a wide range of viruses. Among them, grapevine degeneration caused by Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV) is considered as one of the most economically important virus diseases affecting grapevines worldwide. Infected grapevines show a range of foliar sy...

  2. Treatment of intractable skin ulcers caused by vascular insufficiency with allogeneic cultured dermal substitute: a report of eight cases.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Tomonori; Amoh, Yasuyuki; Tanabe, Kenichi; Katsuoka, Kensei; Kuroyanagi, Yoshimitsu

    2012-03-01

    Chronic leg ulcers have various causes and can be difficult to treat, although topical treatments, including basic fibroblast growth factor and PGE1, have been used. We applied an allogeneic cultured dermal substitute (CDS) to eight patients with intractable ulcers. The patients had various underlying diseases, including diabetes mellitus, systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid syndrome, necrobiosis lipoidica, stasis dermatitis, livedo vasculopathy, and rheumatoid arthritis. The CDS was prepared by seeding cultured human fibroblasts on a spongy matrix consisting of hyaluronic acid and atelocollagen. Good clinical results were achieved, as demonstrated by reepithelization, healthy granulation tissue formation, and a subsequent decrease in wound size. Daily dressing changes became unnecessary when the allogeneic CDS was used. Based on these results, we suggest that CDS may be useful for the treatment of intractable skin ulcers. PMID:21861088

  3. Clinical application of kampo medicine (rikkunshito) for common and/or intractable symptoms of the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Tominaga, Kazunari; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenterological reflux disease and functional dyspepsia are usually treatable using Western medical practices. Nonetheless, some cases present with intractable symptoms that are not amenable to these therapies. Treatment with kampo, a traditional Japanese medicine, recently has been proposed as an alternative therapy for use in combination with the Western practices. In general, traditional Japanese medicines have been used empirically for intractable symptoms correctively designated as “general malaises.” Accumulating lines of evidence, including basic and clinical researches, have demonstrate detailed mechanisms where traditional Japanese medicines exert pharmacological action to improve symptoms. Therefore, traditional Japanese medicines have been gaining use by various medical doctors as the specific modes of pharmacological action are recognized. This review covers both the pharmacological functions and the clinical efficacies of rikkunshito for use in treating disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25688209

  4. Respiratory disease in United States farmers

    PubMed Central

    Hoppin, Jane A; Umbach, David M; Long, Stuart; Rinsky, Jessica L; Henneberger, Paul K; Salo, Paivi M; Zeldin, Darryl C; London, Stephanie J; Alavanja, Michael C R; Blair, Aaron; Freeman, Laura E Beane; Sandler, Dale P

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Farmers may be at increased risk for adverse respiratory outcomes compared with the general population due to their regular exposures to dusts, animals and chemicals. However, early life farm exposures to microbial agents may result in reduced risk. Understanding respiratory disease risk among farmers and identifying differences between farmers and other populations may lead to better understanding of the contribution of environmental exposures to respiratory disease risk in the general population. Methods We compared the prevalence of self-reported respiratory outcomes in 43548 participants from the Agricultural Health Study (AHS), a prospective cohort of farmers and their spouses from Iowa and North Carolina, with data from adult participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) over the same period (2005–2010). Results AHS participants had lower prevalences of respiratory diseases (asthma, adult-onset asthma, chronic bronchitis and emphysema), but higher prevalences of current respiratory symptoms (wheeze, cough and phlegm) even after controlling for smoking, body mass index and population characteristics. The overall prevalence of asthma in the AHS (7.2%, 95% CI 6.9 to 7.4) was 52% of that in NHANES (13.8%, 95% CI 13.3 to 14.3), although the prevalence of adult-onset asthma among men did not differ (3.6% for AHS, 3.7% for NHANES). Conversely, many respiratory symptoms were more common in the AHS than NHANES, particularly among men. Conclusions These findings suggest that farmers and their spouses have lower risk for adult-onset respiratory diseases compared with the general population, and potentially higher respiratory irritation as evidenced by increased respiratory symptoms. PMID:24913223

  5. Lyme Disease Coinfections in the United States.

    PubMed

    Caulfield, Adam J; Pritt, Bobbi S

    2015-12-01

    Lyme disease in North America is caused by infection with the spirochetal bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and transmitted by Ixodes scapularis and Ixodes pacificus ticks. These ticks also have the potential to transmit a rapidly expanding list of other pathogenic bacteria, viruses, and parasites, including Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Babesia microti, deer tick (Powassan) virus, Borrelia miyamotoi, and the Ehrlichia muris-like organism. Coinfections with B burgdorferi and these other agents are often difficult to diagnose and may go untreated, and thus contribute significantly to patient morbidity and mortality from tick-borne infections. PMID:26593260

  6. Lymphoproliferative disease virus in wild turkeys in southeast United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously, retroviral neoplasms reported in wild upland game birds in the United States of America have typically been associated with reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) infection. The information presented herein described the first reports of lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) infection in ...

  7. OUTBREAKS OF WATERBORNE DISEASE IN THE UNITED STATES, 1978

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surveillance of outbreaks of waterborne disease is jointly conducted by the Center for Disease Control (CDC), Atlanta, Ga., and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Cincinnati, Ohio. Waterborne outbreaks are reported to the CDC and EPA by state and local health departments ...

  8. OBSERVATIONS ON THE STATE OF MARINE DISEASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    State of marine disease studies is described. erhaps the greatest area of success in the last 20 years has been in the identification and characterization of viruses, bacteria, fungi, protozoan and metazoan disease agents. pening of new areas of investigation such as that of inte...

  9. Alternative therapies for traditional disease states: osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Vincent; Naquin, Christopher; Weaver, Victor

    2003-01-15

    Americans spend more on natural remedies for osteoarthritis than for any other medical condition. In treating osteoarthritis, glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate, two of the molecular building blocks found in articular cartilage, are the most commonly used alternative supplements. In randomized trials of variable quality, these compounds show efficacy in reducing symptoms, but neither has been shown to arrest progression of the disease or regenerate damaged cartilage. Although few clinical trials on S-adenosylmethionine exist, preliminary evidence indicates that it relieves pain to a degree similar to that of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs but with fewer side effects. Clinical trials of dimethyl sulfoxide offer conflicting results. Neither ginger nor cetyl myristoleate has proven clinical usefulness. PMID:12562155

  10. State-space size considerations for disease-progression models.

    PubMed

    Regnier, Eva D; Shechter, Steven M

    2013-09-30

    Markov models of disease progression are widely used to model transitions in patients' health state over time. Usually, patients' health status may be classified according to a set of ordered health states. Modelers lump together similar health states into a finite and usually small, number of health states that form the basis of a Markov chain disease-progression model. This increases the number of observations used to estimate each parameter in the transition probability matrix. However, lumping together observably distinct health states also obscures distinctions among them and may reduce the predictive power of the model. Moreover, as we demonstrate, precision in estimating the model parameters does not necessarily improve as the number of states in the model declines. This paper explores the tradeoff between lumping error introduced by grouping distinct health states and sampling error that arises when there are insufficient patient data to precisely estimate the transition probability matrix. PMID:23609629

  11. Costs of Chronic Diseases at the State Level: The Chronic Disease Cost Calculator

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Louise B.; Khavjou, Olga A.; Li, Rui; Maylahn, Christopher M.; Tangka, Florence K.; Nurmagambetov, Tursynbek A.; Ekwueme, Donatus U.; Nwaise, Isaac; Chapman, Daniel P.; Orenstein, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Many studies have estimated national chronic disease costs, but state-level estimates are limited. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention developed the Chronic Disease Cost Calculator (CDCC), which estimates state-level costs for arthritis, asthma, cancer, congestive heart failure, coronary heart disease, hypertension, stroke, other heart diseases, depression, and diabetes. Methods Using publicly available and restricted secondary data from multiple national data sets from 2004 through 2008, disease-attributable annual per-person medical and absenteeism costs were estimated. Total state medical and absenteeism costs were derived by multiplying per person costs from regressions by the number of people in the state treated for each disease. Medical costs were estimated for all payers and separately for Medicaid, Medicare, and private insurers. Projected medical costs for all payers (2010 through 2020) were calculated using medical costs and projected state population counts. Results Median state-specific medical costs ranged from $410 million (asthma) to $1.8 billion (diabetes); median absenteeism costs ranged from $5 million (congestive heart failure) to $217 million (arthritis). Conclusion CDCC provides methodologically rigorous chronic disease cost estimates. These estimates highlight possible areas of cost savings achievable through targeted prevention efforts or research into new interventions and treatments. PMID:26334712

  12. Sex differences in episodic memory among children with intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mary Lou; Elliott, Irene; Naguiat, Abigail

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated whether children with epilepsy exhibit sex differences in episodic memory. Fifty-one children and adolescents (26 boys and 25 girls) with intractable epilepsy were administered two verbal-auditory tasks (learning and recall of a word list and story recall) and two visual tasks (design recall and face recognition). Girls exhibited an advantage on the delayed recall of stories and on the learning phase of the word list task. No significant differences were observed on the delayed recall of words or the visual tasks. These results identify a particular risk for cognitive impairment in boys that could have an important impact on their academic performance. PMID:18765300

  13. Intractable Hiccups Due to Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Chehab, Monzer; Noujaim, Samir; Qahwash, Omar; Mezwa, Duane; Roy, Anindya

    2015-01-01

    This is the third reported case of a posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) aneurysm presenting as intractable hiccups (IH). A previously healthy 29-year-old woman was admitted with a 2-week history of hiccups occurring >100 times per minute. Symptoms persisted despite numerous noninvasive therapies. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiogram of the brain showed a left PICA aneurysm that was confirmed by catheter angiography. Symptoms resolved following suboccipital craniotomy and resection. Although rare, PICA aneurysm is a potentially curable cause of IH. PMID:26251787

  14. Trypanosoma cruzi and Chagas' Disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Bern, Caryn; Kjos, Sonia; Yabsley, Michael J.; Montgomery, Susan P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Chagas' disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and causes potentially life-threatening disease of the heart and gastrointestinal tract. The southern half of the United States contains enzootic cycles of T. cruzi, involving 11 recognized triatomine vector species. The greatest vector diversity and density occur in the western United States, where woodrats are the most common reservoir; other rodents, raccoons, skunks, and coyotes are also infected with T. cruzi. In the eastern United States, the prevalence of T. cruzi is highest in raccoons, opossums, armadillos, and skunks. A total of 7 autochthonous vector-borne human infections have been reported in Texas, California, Tennessee, and Louisiana; many others are thought to go unrecognized. Nevertheless, most T. cruzi-infected individuals in the United States are immigrants from areas of endemicity in Latin America. Seven transfusion-associated and 6 organ donor-derived T. cruzi infections have been documented in the United States and Canada. As improved control of vector- and blood-borne T. cruzi transmission decreases the burden in countries where the disease is historically endemic and imported Chagas' disease is increasingly recognized outside Latin America, the United States can play an important role in addressing the altered epidemiology of Chagas' disease in the 21st century. PMID:21976603

  15. The Epidemiology of Meningococcal Disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Lee H.

    2009-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis and other serious infections worldwide. The epidemiology of N. meningitidis is highly changeable, with major changes in disease incidence and serogroup distribution. Six serogroups are responsible for most meningococcal disease worldwide, namely serogroups, A, B, C, W-135, X, and Y; the epidemiology of disease caused by each serogroup is unique. No vaccine is available for endemic disease caused by serogroup B strains. Two tetravalent (A/C/Y/W-135) meningococcal vaccines are licensed in the United States, a purified polysaccharide product and a polysaccharide–protein conjugate vaccine. The conjugate vaccine is recommended for all adolescents, although vaccine coverage remains low, and other high risk groups. A comprehensive program to prevent invasive meningococcal disease in the US will require immunization of infants; several conjugate vaccines for infants may become available in the near future. Broadly protective vaccines for endemic serogroup B disease are also needed. PMID:20144015

  16. Motive attribution asymmetry for love vs. hate drives intractable conflict

    PubMed Central

    Waytz, Adam; Young, Liane L.; Ginges, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Five studies across cultures involving 661 American Democrats and Republicans, 995 Israelis, and 1,266 Palestinians provide previously unidentified evidence of a fundamental bias, what we term the “motive attribution asymmetry,” driving seemingly intractable human conflict. These studies show that in political and ethnoreligious intergroup conflict, adversaries tend to attribute their own group’s aggression to ingroup love more than outgroup hate and to attribute their outgroup’s aggression to outgroup hate more than ingroup love. Study 1 demonstrates that American Democrats and Republicans attribute their own party’s involvement in conflict to ingroup love more than outgroup hate but attribute the opposing party’s involvement to outgroup hate more than ingroup love. Studies 2 and 3 demonstrate this biased attributional pattern for Israelis and Palestinians evaluating their own group and the opposing group’s involvement in the current regional conflict. Study 4 demonstrates in an Israeli population that this bias increases beliefs and intentions associated with conflict intractability toward Palestinians. Finally, study 5 demonstrates, in the context of American political conflict, that offering Democrats and Republicans financial incentives for accuracy in evaluating the opposing party can mitigate this bias and its consequences. Although people find it difficult to explain their adversaries’ actions in terms of love and affiliation, we suggest that recognizing this attributional bias and how to reduce it can contribute to reducing human conflict on a global scale. PMID:25331879

  17. Plerixafor may treat intractable post-herpetic neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fang; Li, Xueyang; Bao, Mengmeng; Guo, Ruijuan; Zhang, Chen; Wu, Anshi; Yue, Yun; Guan, Yun; Wang, Yun

    2015-10-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes varicella (chicken pox) and establishes latency in ganglia. A reactivation of latent VZV leads to herpes zoster (shingles). Herpes zoster often causes herpetic pain that can last for months or years after the rash has healed. Prolonged herpetic pain is defined as post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN). There is an unmet need to explore novel therapeutic approaches for intractable PHN. Postmortem studies have shown that VZV induces neuro-inflammation and damage to the ganglia and spinal cord. These pathological changes may be critical factors resulting in PHN. Accumulated evidence suggests that stem cells may alleviate neuropathic pain in animal models through immunomodulatory actions and neuronal repair. Unfortunately, exogenous stem cell transplantation has limited clinical use due to safety concerns, immune rejection, and complications. Pharmacological mobilization of endogenous bone marrow stem cells may overcome these obstacles. Plerixafor is a SDF-1/CXCR4 axis blocker which can stimulate the release of stem cells from the bone marrow into blood circulation. We propose a hypothesis that endogenous stem cells mobilized by plerixafor may relieve the symptoms of PHN. If so, it may represent a novel approach for the treatment of intractable PHN. PMID:26175195

  18. Motive attribution asymmetry for love vs. hate drives intractable conflict.

    PubMed

    Waytz, Adam; Young, Liane L; Ginges, Jeremy

    2014-11-01

    Five studies across cultures involving 661 American Democrats and Republicans, 995 Israelis, and 1,266 Palestinians provide previously unidentified evidence of a fundamental bias, what we term the "motive attribution asymmetry," driving seemingly intractable human conflict. These studies show that in political and ethnoreligious intergroup conflict, adversaries tend to attribute their own group's aggression to ingroup love more than outgroup hate and to attribute their outgroup's aggression to outgroup hate more than ingroup love. Study 1 demonstrates that American Democrats and Republicans attribute their own party's involvement in conflict to ingroup love more than outgroup hate but attribute the opposing party's involvement to outgroup hate more than ingroup love. Studies 2 and 3 demonstrate this biased attributional pattern for Israelis and Palestinians evaluating their own group and the opposing group's involvement in the current regional conflict. Study 4 demonstrates in an Israeli population that this bias increases beliefs and intentions associated with conflict intractability toward Palestinians. Finally, study 5 demonstrates, in the context of American political conflict, that offering Democrats and Republicans financial incentives for accuracy in evaluating the opposing party can mitigate this bias and its consequences. Although people find it difficult to explain their adversaries' actions in terms of love and affiliation, we suggest that recognizing this attributional bias and how to reduce it can contribute to reducing human conflict on a global scale. PMID:25331879

  19. [Repeated syncope episodes caused by intractable hiccups; a case report].

    PubMed

    Sueyoshi, Shintaro; Shin, Buichiro; Nakashima, Tadashi

    2013-10-01

    A 66-year-old man visited our hospital with a chief complaint of a sore throat. On examination, the pharyngeal and laryngeal mucosa was reddish and localized mucosal erosion was present on the left side. Based on an initial diagnosis of acute pharyngitis caused by bacteriological infection or mycotic infection, treatment with antibacterial and antimycotic agents was initiated. However, the patient's sore throat gradually worsened and he developed intractable hiccups. Intravenous steroids were given for the treatment of the severe sore throat, and this symptom was gradually alleviated. However, the intractable hiccups persisted. In addition, the patient began to have convulsive syncope episodes and was subsequently admitted to our hospital. Further examination revealed that the syncope episodes were linked to the hiccups. To treat the hiccups, baclofen and Chinese medicine were prescribed, and the convulsive syncope episodes disappeared immediately. The patient's hiccups also improved and disappeared six days thereafter. Based on this clinical evidence, we concluded that the hiccups were caused by pharyngitis, resulting in the stimulation of the glossopharyngeal nerve, while the convulsive syncope episodes were a type of situational syncope related to hiccups. PMID:24313063

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance of iron and copper disease states

    SciTech Connect

    Runge, V.M.; Clanton, J.A.; Smith, F.W.; Hutchison, J.; Mallard, J.; Partain, C.L.; James, A.E. Jr.

    1983-11-01

    The tissue levels of paramagnetic ions are an important factor in the determination of T/sub 1/ values as observed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging. The increased levels of iron present in human disease states such as hemochromatosis lead to decreased T/sub 1/ values. The mean liver T/sub 1/ of three patients with iron storage disease was determined to be 130 msec, significantly different from the value of 154 msec, the mean for 14 normal controls. Whether NMR will be able to detect the increased copper levels in liver and brain in Wilson disease remains for further clinical trials to evaluate. NMR imaging, however, does serve as a noninvasive method for the diagnosis of states of iron overload and as a technique to follow progression of disease or response to medical therapy.

  1. Deaths attributable to Alzheimer's disease in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Ewbank, D C

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study provided 2 estimates of the number of deaths attributable to Alzheimer's disease in the United States. METHODS: One estimate was based on data from the East Boston, Mass, study. The second was based on a simulation using population-based estimates of prevalence and separate estimates of excess death by duration of disease. RESULTS: Despite different methods and very different estimates of prevalence, these 2 methods led to very similar estimates of 173,000 and 163,000 excess deaths. CONCLUSIONS: These estimates suggest that 7.1% of all deaths in the United States in 1995 are attributable to Alzheimer's disease, placing it on a par with cerebrovascular diseases as the third leading cause of death. PMID:9987474

  2. The effect of somatostatin on small intestinal transport in intractable diarrhoea of infancy.

    PubMed

    Bisset, W M; Jenkins, H; Booth, I; Smith, V; Milla, P J

    1993-08-01

    It has been reported that somatostatin may be an effective antisecretory agent in a range of conditions causing severe secretory diarrhoea. In many children, intractable diarrhoeal illnesses result in significant morbidity and mortality. In a group of seven children with secretory diarrhoea, the effect of i.v. infusion of somatostatin (3.5 micrograms/kg stratum plus 3.5 micrograms/kg/h) on the net mucosal flux of salt and water was assessed using an in vivo steady-state perfusion technique. In one of the seven children who had evidence of deranged mucosal secretion and preserved villus function, somatostatin infusion resulted in a moderate reduction in secretion. In the remaining six, it had little or no beneficial effect. Somatostatin did not alter the rate of glucose absorption. PMID:7901358

  3. [Laryngotracheal separation and tracheoesophageal diversion for intractable aspiration in ALS--usefulness and indication].

    PubMed

    Mita, Shuji

    2007-10-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of laryngotracheal separation or tracheoesophageal diversion (LTS/TED), we investigated changes in medical management after LTS/TED. We performed LTS/TED for intractable aspiration in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and patients with other neurological diseases. Most of the subjects had already received a tracheostomy, and all the patients with ALS had tracheostomy positive pressure ventilation. However, they remained at risk of intractable aspiration, had experienced frequent suctioning of aspiration material, and could not eat. In all cases, LTS/TED was performed safely within 3 hours and without any complications. After LTS/TED, there was no aspiration of saliva in any of the patients. In most subjects, the frequency of suctioning by medical staff and caregivers was much reduced. The frequency of aspiration pneumonia was also extremely lowered. Follow-up study demonstrated that complete control over aspiration was achieved in all of the patients. Some of them were completely self-sufficient in their ability to eat. Some of the other patients were at least able to enjoy taste. Nutritional status was significantly improved. All the patients, family caregivers, and medical staff involved in this study were satisfied with the outcome. These results indicate that LTS/TED is a very useful procedure in several aspects: it benefits patients who have a fear of aspiration; it reduces the burden on patients and family caregivers; it promotes their quality of life; and it limits the aspiration-associated demands on medical staff. Based on the results, we have proposed an indication of LTS/TED for dysphasia in ALS. PMID:17969355

  4. Peace Education in Societies Involved in Intractable Conflicts: Direct and Indirect Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bar-Tal, Daniel; Rosen, Yigal

    2009-01-01

    The present article deals with the crucial question: Can peace education facilitate change in the sociopsychological infrastructure that feeds continued intractable conflict and then how the change can be carried? Intractable conflicts still rage in various parts of the globe, and they not only cause local misery and suffering but also threaten

  5. Emerging infectious diseases in the United States, 1993.

    PubMed

    Berkelman, R L

    1994-08-01

    Three outbreaks of disease in the United States in 1993 caused by Escherichia coli O157:H7, Cryptosporidium organisms, and a previously unrecognized hantavirus clearly illustrate the increasing challenges posed by emerging infectious diseases. The largest US outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 infection reported occurred as a result of contaminated hamburgers served at a fast-food restaurant chain. The largest recorded waterborne disease outbreak in US history was due to contamination of a municipal water supply with cryptosporidia. In the southwestern United States, hantavirus was first recognized as the cause of a pulmonary syndrome with a mortality rate exceeding 50%. The detection of and response to these outbreaks document the need for a strong partnership between the clinical and public health sectors to prevent and control diseases. Health care reform in the United States provides an opportunity to address critical needs, such as improved surveillance and diagnosis, to ensure timely detection of and rapid response to newly emerging infectious diseases. PMID:8035009

  6. Prognostic impact of Chagas disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Milei, José; Guerri-Guttenberg, Roberto Andrés; Grana, Daniel Rodolfo; Storino, Rubén

    2009-01-01

    A prior publication from our group reported the fact that Chagas disease is underdiagnosed. This review will summarize several aspects of Chagas disease in the United States including modes of transmission, which will demonstrate that clinicians should be more aware of the disease and its consequences. Trypanosoma cruzi is present in many animal species spread throughout most of the United States. Chagas disease also reaches the North American continent through immigration, making it more frequent than expected. Apart from immigration, non-endemic countries should be aware of transmissions through blood transfusions, organ transplantations, or mother-to-child infections. In conclusion, it is possible that many chagasic cardiomyopathies are being misdiagnosed as "primary dilated idiopathic cardiomyopathies." Recognizing that there is an evident threat of Chagas disease present in the United States will allow an increase of clinician's awareness and hence will permit to correctly diagnose and treat this cardiomyopathy. Health authorities should guarantee a generalized screening of T cruzi of blood donors, before organ donations, and of pregnant women who were born or have lived in endemic areas. PMID:19081392

  7. Newborn screening for Krabbe disease: the New York State model.

    PubMed

    Duffner, Patricia K; Caggana, Michele; Orsini, Joseph J; Wenger, David A; Patterson, Marc C; Crosley, Carl J; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Arnold, Georgianne L; Escolar, Maria L; Adams, Darius J; Andriola, Mary R; Aron, Alan M; Ciafaloni, Emma; Djukic, Alexandra; Erbe, Richard W; Galvin-Parton, Patricia; Helton, Laura E; Kolodny, Edwin H; Kosofsky, Barry E; Kronn, David F; Kwon, Jennifer M; Levy, Paul A; Miller-Horn, Jill; Naidich, Thomas P; Pellegrino, Joan E; Provenzale, James M; Rothman, Stanley J; Wasserstein, Melissa P

    2009-04-01

    Krabbe disease is a rare inherited neurologic disorder affecting the central and peripheral nervous systems. The disease has four phenotypes: early infantile, later onset, adolescent, and adult. The only known treatment is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, which is, in the early infantile form of the disease, most beneficial if performed before onset of clinical symptoms. In August 2006, New York State began screening all newborns for Krabbe disease. A rapid and accurate technique for assessing galactocerebrosidase activity and performing DNA mutation analysis had been developed. Interpreting these results was limited, however, because neither enzyme activity nor genetic mutation reliably predicts phenotype. A series of initiatives were therefore developed by a multidisciplinary group of neurologists, geneticists, metabolic pediatricians, neurodevelopmental pediatricians, and transplant physicians (the Krabbe Consortium of New York State) to enhance the effectiveness of the newborn screening program. A standardized clinical evaluation protocol was designed based on the available literature, criteria for transplantation for the early infantile phenotype were formulated, a clinical database and registry was developed, and a study of developmental and functional outcomes was instituted. This multidisciplinary standardized approach to evaluating infants who have positive results on newborn screening may serve as a model for other states as they begin the process of screening for Krabbe disease and other lysosomal storage disorders. PMID:19302934

  8. Intractable epilepsy and the P-glycoprotein hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Xin; Wang, Da-Wei; Liu, Yong; Ma, Yan-Hui

    2016-05-01

    Epilepsy is a serious neurological disorder that affects more than 60 million people worldwide. Intractable epilepsy (IE) refers to approximately 20%-30% of epileptic patients who fail to achieve seizure control with antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment. Although the mechanisms underlying IE are not well understood, it has been hypothesized that multidrug transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) play a major role in drug efflux at the blood-brain barrier, and may be the underlying factor in the variable responses of patients to AEDs. The main goal of the present review is to show evidence from different areas that support the idea that the overexpression of P-gp is associated with IE. We discuss here evidence from animal studies, pharmacology, clinical cases and genetic studies. PMID:26000919

  9. Magnesium Therapy for Intractable Ventricular Tachyarrhythmias in Normomagnesemic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Iseri, Lloyd T.; Chung, Peter; Tobis, Jonathan

    1983-01-01

    Intractable ventricular tachyarrhythmia associated with hypomagnesemia responds well to magnesium given intravenously. Two patients with recurrent ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation associated with normal serum magnesium levels and resistant to treatment with potassium chloride, lidocaine and bretylium tosylate responded dramatically to the administration of magnesium sulfate. A third patient in whom the serum magnesium level was unknown also showed dramatic response to magnesium therapy. Magnesium depletion probably interferes with sodium-potassium adenosine triphosphatase enzyme activity and causes ionic imbalance and electrical instability of purkinje's fibers. Without obvious magnesium depletion this element in high concentration may still prolong transient inward current, prolong the effective refractory period, increase the membrane potential and control ventricular tachyarrhythmia. When ventricular fibrillation or malignant ventricular tachycardia cannot be controlled with lidocaine and other conventional drugs, we recommend infusing magnesium sulfate, 2 to 3 grams in one minute, followed by 10 grams over five hours. Images PMID:6613108

  10. Surgical outcomes for intractable epilepsy in children with epileptic spasms.

    PubMed

    Moseley, Brian D; Nickels, Katherine; Wirrell, Elaine C

    2012-06-01

    Epileptic spasms, or seizures marked by flexor, extensor, or flexor-extensor spasms, are not always responsive to medical management. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the outcome of epilepsy surgery in children with medically intractable epileptic spasms. We identified 11 children with epileptic spasms who underwent lesionectomy (36%), lobectomy (27%), multi-lobectomy (9%), hemispherectomy (18%), or corpus callosotomy (9%). At the time of surgery, 6 children had developed other concurrent seizure type(s), including simple partial (9%), complex partial (27%), partial undifferentiated (9%), primary generalized tonic clonic (9%), tonic (9%), atonic (27%), and myoclonic (9%) seizures. Six children (55%) were seizure free at last follow-up from initial surgery. Predictors of favorable outcome included lack of focal slowing and the presence of less than 2 interictal epileptiform abnormalities on postoperative electroencephalogram (P = .035 and .035, respectively). Favorable outcome was significantly associated with parent/caregiver report of improved postoperative developmental outcomes (P = .026). PMID:22123426

  11. Atypical language representation in children with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Maulisova, Alice; Korman, Brandon; Rey, Gustavo; Bernal, Byron; Duchowny, Michael; Niederlova, Marketa; Krsek, Pavel; Novak, Vilem

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated language organization in children with intractable epilepsy caused by temporal lobe focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) alone or dual pathology (temporal lobe FCD and hippocampal sclerosis, HS). We analyzed clinical, neurological, fMRI, neuropsychological, and histopathologic data in 46 pediatric patients with temporal lobe lesions who underwent excisional epilepsy surgery. The frequency of atypical language representation was similar in both groups, but children with dual pathology were more likely to be left-handed. Atypical receptive language cortex correlated with lower intellectual capacity, verbal abstract conceptualization, receptive language abilities, verbal working memory, and a history of status epilepticus but did not correlate with higher seizure frequency or early seizure onset. Histopathologic substrate had only a minor influence on neuropsychological status. Greater verbal comprehension deficits were noted in children with atypical receptive language representation, a risk factor for cognitive morbidity. PMID:27064828

  12. THREE-STATE STUDY OF WATERBORNE DISEASE SURVEILLANCE TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    For a two-year period, the states of Colorado, Vermont and Washington tested the effectiveness of seven surveillance methods for identifying waterborne disease outbreaks. Six of the methods were termed active and utilized procedures soliciting reports of illness. The seventh meth...

  13. Periodontal Disease and Oral Hygiene Among Children. United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Health Statistics (DHEW/PHS), Hyattsville, MD.

    Statistical data presented on periodontal disease and oral hygiene among noninstitutionalized children, aged 6-11, in the United States are based on a probability sample of approximately 7,400 children involved in a national health survey during 1963-65. The report contains estimates of the Periodontal Index (PI) and the Simplified Oral Hygiene…

  14. Resting state brain networks and their implications in neurodegenerative disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, William S.; Yoo, Kwangsun; Kim, Jinho; Jeong, Yong

    2012-10-01

    Neurons are the basic units of the brain, and form network by connecting via synapses. So far, there have been limited ways to measure the brain networks. Recently, various imaging modalities are widely used for this purpose. In this paper, brain network mapping using resting state fMRI will be introduced with several applications including neurodegenerative disease such as Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal lobar degeneration and Parkinson's disease. The resting functional connectivity using intrinsic functional connectivity in mouse is useful since we can take advantage of perturbation or stimulation of certain nodes of the network. The study of brain connectivity will open a new era in understanding of brain and diseases thus will be an essential foundation for future research.

  15. Diagnostic reframing of intractable environmental problems: case of a contested multiparty public land-use conflict.

    PubMed

    Asah, Stanley T; Bengston, David N; Wendt, Keith; Nelson, Kristen C

    2012-10-15

    Intractable conflicts are omnipresent in environmental management. These conflicts do not necessarily resist resolution but need to be fundamentally transformed in order to reach agreement. Reframing, a process that allows disputants to create new alternative understandings of the problem, is one way of transforming these conflicts. Cognitive and interactional reframing are the two major approaches to conflict transformation. These approaches have some drawbacks. Cognitive reframing does not guarantee commensurate consideration of all disputants' views about the problem. Interactional reframing is prone to inter-disputant influences that interfere with presenting the problems as accurately as they exist in disputants' minds. Inadequate consideration of other disputants' views and inter-disputant influences often lead to inaccurate problem identification and definition. This in turn leads to solving the wrong problem, enabling intractability to persist. Proper problem identification and definition requires commensurate consideration of all sides of the conflict while minimizing inter-disputant influences. From a problem diagnosis perspective, we show how Q methodology is used to reframe environmental problems, rendering them more tractable to analysis while minimizing the influence of who disputants are talking with, and without ignoring the perspectives of other disputants. Using a case of contentious All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) use in a state-administered public land, conflicting parties reframed the problem by prioritizing issues, outlining areas and levels of consensus and disagreement, and revealing inherent unrecognized and/or unspoken agendas. The reframing process surprisingly revealed several areas of common ground in disputants' diagnosis of the problem, including lack of emphasis on environmental protection and uncoordinated management factions. Emergent frames were misaligned on some issues, such as the behaviors of ATV riders and the role of management, including political and economic influences on decision making. We discuss how the reframing process enhances tractability of multiparty environmental problems. We point to some limitations of Q methodology as a tool for the diagnostic reframing of such problems. PMID:22705762

  16. Progress Toward Eliminating Hepatitis A Disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Trudy V; Denniston, Maxine M; Hill, Holly A; McDonald, Marian; Klevens, Monina R; Elam-Evans, Laurie D; Nelson, Noele P; Iskander, John; Ward, John D

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) disease disproportionately affects adolescents and young adults, American Indian/Alaska Native and Hispanic racial/ethnic groups, and disadvantaged populations. During 1996-2006, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) made incremental changes in hepatitis A (HepA) vaccination recommendations to increase coverage for children and persons at high risk for HAV infection. This report examines the temporal association of ACIP-recommended HepA vaccination and disparities (on the absolute scale) in cases of HAV disease and on seroprevalence of HAV-related protection (measured as antibody to HAV [anti-HAV]). ACIP-recommended childhood HepA vaccination in the United States has eliminated most absolute disparities in HAV disease by age, race/ethnicity, and geographic area with relatively modest ?1-dose and ?2-dose vaccine coverage. However, the increasing proportion of cases of HAV disease among adults with identified and unidentified sources of exposure underscores the importance of considering new strategies for preventing HAV infection among U.S. adults. For continued progress to be made toward elimination of HAV disease in the United States, additional strategies are needed to prevent HAV infection among an emerging population of susceptible adults. Notably, HAV infection remains endemic in much of the world, contributing to U.S. cases through international travel and the global food economy. PMID:26916458

  17. Environmental tobacco smoke and periodontal disease in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Arbes, S J; Agústsdóttir, H; Slade, G D

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Cigarette smoking is a leading risk factor for periodontal disease. This cross-sectional study investigated the relation between environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and periodontal disease in the United States. METHODS: Data were obtained from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-1994). The outcome was periodontal disease, defined as 1 or more periodontal sites with attachment loss of 3 mm or greater and a pocket depth of 4 mm or greater at the same site. Exposure to ETS at home and work was self-reported. The study analyzed 6611 persons 18 years and older who had never smoked cigarettes or used other forms of tobacco. RESULTS: Exposure to ETS at home only, work only, and both was reported by 18.0%, 10.7%, and 3.8% of the study population, respectively. The adjusted odds of having periodontal disease were 1.6 (95% confidence interval = 1.1, 2.2) times greater for persons exposed to ETS than for persons not exposed. CONCLUSIONS: Among persons in the United States who had never used tobacco, those exposed to ETS were more likely to have periodontal disease than were those not exposed to ETS. PMID:11211634

  18. West nile virus and other arboviral diseases - United States, 2013.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Nicole P; Lehman, Jennifer A; Staples, J Erin; Fischer, Marc

    2014-06-20

    Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) are transmitted to humans primarily through the bites of infected mosquitoes and ticks. West Nile virus (WNV) is the leading cause of domestically acquired arboviral disease in the United States. However, several other arboviruses also cause sporadic cases and seasonal outbreaks of neuroinvasive disease (i.e., meningitis, encephalitis, and acute flaccid paralysis). This report summarizes surveillance data reported to CDC in 2013 for WNV and other nationally notifiable arboviruses, excluding dengue. Forty-seven states and the District of Columbia reported 2,469 cases of WNV disease. Of these, 1,267 (51%) were classified as WNV neuroinvasive disease, for a national incidence of 0.40 per 100,000 population. After WNV, the next most commonly reported cause of arboviral disease was La Crosse virus (LACV) (85 cases), followed by Jamestown Canyon virus (JCV), Powassan virus (POWV), and eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) (eight). WNV and other arboviruses continue to cause serious illness in substantial numbers of persons annually. Maintaining surveillance remains important to help direct and promote prevention activities. PMID:24941331

  19. Identity and psychological ownership in chronic illness and disease state

    PubMed Central

    Karnilowicz, W

    2011-01-01

    Psychological ownership is rarely considered in health discourse related to chronic illness or disease state. Construction of identity is an important consideration within this framework. This autoethnographic study explores psychological ownership and identity related to prostate cancer and chronic illness. Conclusions about the nature of psychological ownership and identity were gathered from the relevant literature and personal experience. Themes include the patient–healthcare professional relationship and that psychological ownership is personal and grounded in an individual's sense of identity, control and perceived capacity to control illness or disease. Personal reflection through autoethnography guides discussion of psychological ownership and identity. PMID:20738388

  20. Current State of Stem Cell Therapy for Ischemic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Povsic, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Improvements in the care of patients with ischemic cardiovascular disease have led to improved survival but also a burgeoning population of patients with advanced ischemic heart disease. Cell therapies offer a novel approach toward cardiac "rejuvenation" via stimulation of new blood vessel growth, enhancing tissue perfusion, and via preservation or even regeneration of myocardial tissue, leading to improvements in cardiac performance after myocardial infarction and in patients with advanced heart failure. Here, we summarize and offer some thoughts on the state of the field of cell therapy for ischemic heart disease, targeting three separate conditions that have been the subject of significant clinical research: enhancing left ventricular recovery after MI, improving outcomes and symptoms in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF), and treatment of patients with refractory angina, despite maximal medical therapy. PMID:26768743

  1. The intrinsic resting state voice network in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    New, Anneliese B; Robin, Donald A; Parkinson, Amy L; Eickhoff, Claudia R; Reetz, Kathrin; Hoffstaedter, Felix; Mathys, Christian; Sudmeyer, Martin; Grefkes, Christian; Larson, Charles R; Ramig, Loraine O; Fox, Peter T; Eickhoff, Simon B

    2015-05-01

    Over 90 percent of patients with Parkinson's disease experience speech-motor impairment, namely, hypokinetic dysarthria characterized by reduced pitch and loudness. Resting-state functional connectivity analysis of blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging is a useful measure of intrinsic neural functioning. We utilized resting-state functional connectivity modeling to analyze the intrinsic connectivity in patients with Parkinson's disease within a vocalization network defined by a previous meta-analysis of speech (Brown et al., 2009). Functional connectivity of this network was assessed in 56 patients with Parkinson's disease and 56 gender-, age-, and movement-matched healthy controls. We also had item 5 and 18 of the UPDRS, and the PDQ-39 Communication subscale available for correlation with the voice network connectivity strength in patients. The within-group analyses of connectivity patterns demonstrated a lack of subcortical-cortical connectivity in patients with Parkinson's disease. At the cortical level, we found robust (homotopic) interhemispheric connectivity but only inconsistent evidence for many intrahemispheric connections. When directly contrasted to the control group, we found a significant reduction of connections between the left thalamus and putamen, and cortical motor areas, as well as reduced right superior temporal gyrus connectivity. Furthermore, most symptom measures correlated with right putamen, left cerebellum, left superior temporal gyrus, right premotor, and left Rolandic operculum connectivity in the voice network. The results reflect the importance of (right) subcortical nodes and the superior temporal gyrus in Parkinson's disease, enhancing our understanding of the neurobiological underpinnings of vocalization impairment in Parkinson's disease. PMID:25627959

  2. STAMPing at the crossroads of normal physiology and disease states.

    PubMed

    Sikkeland, Jørgen; Sheng, Xia; Jin, Yang; Saatcioglu, Fahri

    2016-04-15

    The six transmembrane protein of prostate (STAMP) proteins, also known as six transmembrane epithelial antigen of prostate (STEAPs), comprises three members: STAMP1-3. Their expression is regulated by a variety of stimuli, including hormones and cytokines, in varied settings and tissues with important roles in secretion and cell differentiation. In addition, they are implicated in metabolic and inflammatory diseases and cancer. Here, we review the current knowledge on the role of STAMPs in both physiological and pathological states. PMID:26911931

  3. Deletions of recessive disease genes: CNV contribution to carrier states and disease-causing alleles

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Philip M.; Campbell, Ian M.; Baggett, Brett C.; Soens, Zachry T.; Rao, Mitchell M.; Hixson, Patricia M.; Patel, Ankita; Bi, Weimin; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lalani, Seema R.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Shaw, Chad A.; Lupski, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Over 1200 recessive disease genes have been described in humans. The prevalence, allelic architecture, and per-genome load of pathogenic alleles in these genes remain to be fully elucidated, as does the contribution of DNA copy-number variants (CNVs) to carrier status and recessive disease. We mined CNV data from 21,470 individuals obtained by array-comparative genomic hybridization in a clinical diagnostic setting to identify deletions encompassing or disrupting recessive disease genes. We identified 3212 heterozygous potential carrier deletions affecting 419 unique recessive disease genes. Deletion frequency of these genes ranged from one occurrence to 1.5%. When compared with recessive disease genes never deleted in our cohort, the 419 recessive disease genes affected by at least one carrier deletion were longer and located farther from known dominant disease genes, suggesting that the formation and/or prevalence of carrier CNVs may be affected by both local and adjacent genomic features and by selection. Some subjects had multiple carrier CNVs (307 subjects) and/or carrier deletions encompassing more than one recessive disease gene (206 deletions). Heterozygous deletions spanning multiple recessive disease genes may confer carrier status for multiple single-gene disorders, for complex syndromes resulting from the combination of two or more recessive conditions, or may potentially cause clinical phenotypes due to a multiply heterozygous state. In addition to carrier mutations, we identified homozygous and hemizygous deletions potentially causative for recessive disease. We provide further evidence that CNVs contribute to the allelic architecture of both carrier and recessive disease-causing mutations. Thus, a complete recessive carrier screening method or diagnostic test should detect CNV alleles. PMID:23685542

  4. Recurrent intractable hiccups treated by cervical phrenic nerve block under electromyography: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Sa, Young Jo; Song, Dae Heon; Kim, Jae Jun; Kim, Young Du; Kim, Chi Kyung; Moon, Seok Whan

    2015-11-01

    Intractable or persistent hiccups require intensive or invasive treatments. The use of a phrenic nerve block or destructive treatment for intractable hiccups has been reported to be a useful and discrete method that might be valuable to patients with this distressing problem and for whom diverse management efforts have failed. We herein report a successful treatment using a removable and adjustable ligature for the phrenic nerve in a patient with recurrent and intractable hiccups, which was employed under the guidance of electromyography. PMID:25391774

  5. Medically intractable seizures originating from the primary somatosensory hand area.

    PubMed

    Koubeissi, Mohamad Z; Maciunas, Robert J; Tanner, Adriana; Lüders, Hans O

    2008-12-01

    A 33-year-old woman had begun having intractable somatosensory seizures affecting the left hand since the age of 13 years. Occasionally, her seizures progressed to left arm posturing followed by secondary generalization. Scalp EEG revealed interictal epileptiform discharges in the right posterior quadrant, but with no ictal EEG correlates. Brain MRI showed a right temporal encephalomalacia, sparing mesial temporal structures, suggestive of a perinatal vascular insult. Ictal electrocorticogram, electrical stimulation mapping, and somatosensory evoked potentials localized the ictal onset to the hand area of the postcentral gyrus. Resection of that area resulted in total resolution of seizures with no significant lasting deficits. Potential complications of resecting the primary somatosensory hand area can be severe, as proprioceptive sensory loss may be permanent, resulting in significant disability. Such deficits may be temporary however, and the literature continues to report conflicting results regarding postsurgical outcome. Cortical plasticity may explain recovery of sensory deficits after partial resection of the primary somatosensory hand area. Multiple subpial transections of that area are sometimes performed to minimize functional deficits, but seizure control may be less optimal than with cortical resection. PMID:19017578

  6. Motor and sensory impairments in children with intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Beckung, E; Uvebrant, P

    1993-01-01

    During a 3-year period (1988-1991), 72 children with severe intractable epilepsy were studied. A standardized protocol for assessment of motor and sensory function was designed for school age children. Function was quantified on a 4-point scale on 47 items, including gross motor function, balance, coordination, strength, range of motion (ROM), velocity, fine motor function, sensation, perception, and neurologic tests. Classification of handicaps according to World Health Organization (WHO) definitions was performed. Videotape documentation completed the assessment. Evaluation of treatment services showed that provision of rehabilitation services had been insufficient and provided only for children with additional major movement disorders, mainly cerebral palsy (CP) cases. To minimize the handicap in children with severe epilepsy, it is essential to clarify the total sensorimotor impairment pattern, including balance, coordination, and perceptual capacity. Impairments in these functions are, as shown in this study, frequent and exist independent of major disabilities such as mental retardation or cerebral palsy. When several neuroimpairments were identified, a multiplicative rather than an additive effect on the total handicap was evident. PMID:8404748

  7. A case of hypereosinophilic syndrome presenting with intractable gastric ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tae Young; Choi, Chang Hwan; Yang, Suh Yoon; Oh, In Soo; Song, In-Do; Lee, Hyun Woong; Kim, Hyung Joon; Do, Jae Hyuk; Chang, Sae Kyung; Cho, Ah Ra; Cha, Young Joo

    2009-01-01

    We report a rare case of hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) presenting with intractable gastric ulcers. A 71-year-old man was admitted with epigastric pain. Initial endoscopic findings revealed multiple, active gastric ulcers in the gastric antrum. He underwent Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) eradication therapy followed by proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. However, follow-up endoscopy at 4, 6, 10 and 14 mo revealed persistent multiple gastric ulcers without significant improvement. The proportion of his eosinophil count increased to 43% (total count: 7903/mm3). Abdominal-pelvic and chest computed tomography scans showed multiple small nodules in the liver and both lungs. The endoscopic biopsy specimen taken from the gastric antrum revealed prominent eosinophilic infiltration, and the liver biopsy specimen also showed eosinophilic infiltration in the portal tract and sinusoid. A bone marrow biopsy disclosed eosinophilic hyperplasia as well as increased cellularity of 70%. The patient was finally diagnosed with HES involving the stomach, liver, lung, and bone marrow. When gastric ulcers do not improve despite H pylori eradication and prolonged PPI therapy, infiltrative gastric disorders such as HES should be considered. PMID:20027690

  8. Treatment of intractable rheumatoid arthritis with total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kotzin, B.L.; Strober, S.; Engleman, E.G.; Calin, A.; Hoppe, R.T.; Kansas, G.S.; Terrell, C.P.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1981-10-01

    Eleven patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis were treated with total lymphoid irradiation (total dose, 2000 rad) in an uncontrolled feasibility study, as an alternative to long-term therapy with cytotoxic drugs such as cyclophosphamide and azathioprine. During a follow-up period of five to 18 months after total lymphoid irradiation, there was a profound and sustained suppression of the absolute lymphocyte count and in vitro lymphocyte function, as well as an increase in the ratio of Leu-2 (suppressor/cytotoxic) to Leu-3 (helper) T cells in the blood. Persistent circulating suppressor cells of the mixed leukocyte response and of pokeweed mitogen-induced immunoglobulin secretion developed in most patients. In nine of the 11 patients, these changes in immune status were associated with relief of joint tenderness and swelling and with improvement in function scores. Maximum improvement occurred approximately six months after irradiation and continued for the remainder of the observation period. Few severe or chronic side effects were associated with the radiotherapy.

  9. Treatment of intractable rheumatoid arthritis with total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kotzin, B.L.; Strober, S.; Engleman, E.G.; Calin, A.; Hoppe, R.T.; Kansas, G.S.; Terrell, C.P.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1981-10-22

    Eleven patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis were treated with total lymphoid irradiation (total dose, 2000 rad) in an uncontrolled feasibility study, as an alternative to long-term therapy with cytotoxic drugs such as cyclophosphamide and azathioprine. During a follow-up period of five to 18 months after total lymphoid irradiation, there was a profound and sustained suppression of the absolute lymphocyte count and in vitro lymphocyte function, as well as an increase in the ratio of Leu-2 (suppressor/cytotoxic) to Leu-3 (helper) T cells in the blood. Persistent circulating suppressor cells of the mixed leukocyte response and of pokeweek mitogen-induced immunoglobulin secretion developed in most patients. In nine of the 11 patients, these changes in immune status were associated with relief of joint tenderness and swelling and with improvement in function scores. Maximum improvement occurred approximately six months after irradiation and continued for the remainder of the observation period. Few severe or chronic side effects were associated with the radiotherapy.

  10. Stereotactic laser ablation of the splenium for intractable epilepsy☆

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Allen L.; Miller, Kai J.; Cartmell, Sam; Inoyama, Katherine; Fisher, Robert S.; Halpern, Casey H.

    2016-01-01

    Partial or complete corpus callosotomies have been applied, traditionally via open surgical or radiosurgical approaches, for the treatment of epilepsy in patients with multifocal tonic, atonic, or myoclonic seizures. Minimally invasive methods, such as MRI-guided laser interstitial thermal ablation (MTLA), are being employed to functionally remove or ablate seizure foci in the treatment of epilepsy. This therapy can achieve effectiveness similar to that of traditional resection, but with reduced morbidity compared with open surgery. Here, we present a patient with a history of prior partial corpus callosotomy who continued to suffer from medically refractory epilepsy with bisynchronous onset. We report on the utilization of laser ablation of the splenium in this patient to achieve full corpus callosotomy. Adequate ablation of the splenial remnant was confirmed by postoperative MRI imaging, and at four-month follow-up, the patient's seizure frequency had dropped more than 50%. This is the first reported instance of laser ablation of the splenium to achieve full corpus callosotomy following a previous unsuccessful anterior callosotomy in a patient with intractable generalized epilepsy. PMID:26955518

  11. Stereotactic laser ablation of the splenium for intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ho, Allen L; Miller, Kai J; Cartmell, Sam; Inoyama, Katherine; Fisher, Robert S; Halpern, Casey H

    2016-01-01

    Partial or complete corpus callosotomies have been applied, traditionally via open surgical or radiosurgical approaches, for the treatment of epilepsy in patients with multifocal tonic, atonic, or myoclonic seizures. Minimally invasive methods, such as MRI-guided laser interstitial thermal ablation (MTLA), are being employed to functionally remove or ablate seizure foci in the treatment of epilepsy. This therapy can achieve effectiveness similar to that of traditional resection, but with reduced morbidity compared with open surgery. Here, we present a patient with a history of prior partial corpus callosotomy who continued to suffer from medically refractory epilepsy with bisynchronous onset. We report on the utilization of laser ablation of the splenium in this patient to achieve full corpus callosotomy. Adequate ablation of the splenial remnant was confirmed by postoperative MRI imaging, and at four-month follow-up, the patient's seizure frequency had dropped more than 50%. This is the first reported instance of laser ablation of the splenium to achieve full corpus callosotomy following a previous unsuccessful anterior callosotomy in a patient with intractable generalized epilepsy. PMID:26955518

  12. Epilepsy Surgery in Pediatric Intractable Epilepsy with Destructive Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Park, So Young; Kwon, Hye Eun; Kang, Hoon-Chul; Lee, Joon Soo; Kim, Dong Seok; Kim, Heung Dong

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The aim of the current study is to review the clinical features, surgery outcomes and parental satisfaction of children with destructive encephalopathy who underwent epilepsy surgery due to medically intractable seizures. Methods: 48 patients who underwent epilepsy surgery from October 2003 to August 2011 at Severance Children’s Hospital have been reviewed. The survey was conducted for functional outcomes and parental satisfaction at least 1 year after the surgery. Results: Epileptic encephalopathy including Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and infantile spasms was more prevalent than symptomatic focal epilepsy. Hypoxic ischemic injury accounted for most of the underlying etiology of the destructive encephalpathy, followed by central nervous system infection and head trauma. 27 patients (56.3%) underwent resective surgery and 21 patients (43.7%) underwent palliative surgery. 16 patients (33.3%) achieved seizure free and 27 parents (87.5%) reported satisfaction with the outcome of their children’s epilepsy surgery. In addition, 14 parents (77.8 %) whose children were not seizure free reported satisfaction with their children’s improvement in cognitive and behavior issues. Conclusions: Epilepsy surgery in destructive encephalopathy was effective for controlling seizures. Parents reported satisfaction not only with the surgical outcomes, but also with improvement of cognitive and behavior issues. PMID:24649473

  13. Some state vaccination laws contribute to greater exemption rates and disease outbreaks in the United States.

    PubMed

    Bradford, W David; Mandich, Anne

    2015-08-01

    Health officials attest that immunizations are among the most successful interventions in public health. However, there remains a substantial unvaccinated population in the United States. We analyzed how state-level vaccination exemption laws affect immunization rates and the incidence of preventable disease. We measured the association between each component of state kindergarten vaccination exemption laws and state vaccination exemption rates from 2002 to 2012, using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's annual school assessment reports. We found that policies such as requiring health department approval of nonmedical exemptions, requiring a physician to sign an exemption application, and having criminal or civil punishments for noncompliance with immunization requirements had a significant effect in reducing vaccine exemptions. Our exemption law effectiveness index identified eighteen states with the most effective laws and nine states with the least effective ones. The most effective states had lower incidences of pertussis, compared to other states. For policy makers interested in decreasing the number of vaccine exemptions in their state, our findings are of particular interest. PMID:26240253

  14. Two state model for a constant disease hazard in paratuberculosis (and other bovine diseases).

    PubMed

    Louzoun, Yoram; Mitchell, Rebecca; Behar, Hilla; Schukken, Ynte

    2015-01-01

    Many diseases are characterized by a long and varying sub-clinical period. Two main mechanisms can explain such periods: a slow progress toward disease or a sudden transition from a healthy state to a disease state induced by internal or external events. We here survey epidemiological features of the amount of bacteria shed during Mycobacterium Avium Paratuberculosis (MAP) infection to test which of these two models, slow progression or sudden transition (or a combination of the two), better explains the transition from intermittent and low shedding to high shedding. Often, but not always, high shedding is associated with the occurrence of clinical signs. In the case of MAP, the clinical signs include diarrhea, low milk production, poor fertility and eventually emaciation and death. We propose a generic model containing bacterial growth, immune control and fluctuations. This proposed generic model can represent the two hypothesized types of transitions in different parameter regimes. The results show that the sudden transition model provides a simpler explanation of the data, but also suffers from some limitations. We discuss the different immunological mechanism that can explain and support the sudden transition model and the interpretation of each term in the studied model. These conclusions are applicable to a wide variety of diseases, and MAP serves as a good test case based on the large scale measurements of single cow longitudinal profiles in this disease. PMID:26092587

  15. Use of an Oral Elemental Diet in Infants with Severe Intractable Diarrhea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Joseph O.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Evaluated was the use of an oral elemental diet consisting of crystalline amino acids, glucose, electrolytes, and vitamins to control severe intractable diarrhea in 27 infants (1-day to 9-months of age). (DB)

  16. Impact of noncommunicable diseases in the State of Qatar

    PubMed Central

    Al-Kaabi, Salma Khalaf; Atherton, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    This study, commissioned by the Supreme Council of Health in the State of Qatar, focuses on the main noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) globally and regionally, in order to gauge their potential impact on Qatar. The research shows that the Gulf Cooperation Council is projected to be affected dramatically by NCDs in the coming years. The top five NCDs that will affect Qatar in terms of economic burden and disability-adjusted life years are cardiovascular diseases, mental health and behavioral disorders, cancer, respiratory diseases, and diabetes. Whilst these diseases have diverse effects on patients, their causes can be traced to “… common lifestyle-related, or behavioral, risk factors such as tobacco use, a diet heavy in fat, and physical inactivity”. The total direct and indirect costs to the Gulf Cooperation Council calculated for the above five NCDs were $36.2 billion in 2013, which equates to 150% of the officially recorded annual health care expenditure. If this trajectory is maintained, spending per head of population in Qatar will reach $2,778 by 2022. These figures demonstrate not only the potential financial impact of the main NCDs, but also give an idea of how the current health system is working to address them. PMID:26170702

  17. Subcellular compartmentation of ascorbate and its variation in disease states.

    PubMed

    Bánhegyi, Gábor; Benedetti, Angelo; Margittai, Eva; Marcolongo, Paola; Fulceri, Rosella; Németh, Csilla E; Szarka, András

    2014-09-01

    Beyond its general role as antioxidant, specific functions of ascorbate are compartmentalized within the eukaryotic cell. The list of organelle-specific functions of ascorbate has been recently expanded with the epigenetic role exerted as a cofactor for DNA and histone demethylases in the nucleus. Compartmentation necessitates the transport through intracellular membranes; members of the GLUT family and sodium-vitamin C cotransporters mediate the permeation of dehydroascorbic acid and ascorbate, respectively. Recent observations show that increased consumption and/or hindered entrance of ascorbate in/to a compartment results in pathological alterations partially resembling to scurvy, thus diseases of ascorbate compartmentation can exist. The review focuses on the reactions and transporters that can modulate ascorbate concentration and redox state in three compartments: endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and nucleus. By introducing the relevant experimental and clinical findings we make an attempt to coin the term of ascorbate compartmentation disease. PMID:24907663

  18. [Stress imaging in coronary artery disease: state of the art].

    PubMed

    Baldini, U; Venturini, C; Genovesi-Ebert, A; Savoia, M T; Raugi, M; Pauletti, M; Carluccio, M; Digiorgio, A; Gasperetti, G; Galli, M

    2004-02-01

    To date, several diagnostic tools allow an accurate non-invasive evaluation of coronary artery disease; this is due to the great progress in echocardiographic and nuclear imaging techniques in the last 10 years. The large availability of different stress imaging techniques allows to choose the most appropriate technique for each patient according to the clinical characteristics. This paper presents the state of the art of echocardiographic and nuclear stress imaging for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease and for the prognostic stratification of infarcted patients. Advantages and limits of the different techniques are described rather than putting in competition echo and nuclear cardiology as has often been done in the past. Cardiologists should select among the various techniques on the basis of clinical characteristics of single patients, center's experience and an objective evaluation of economical aspects. PMID:14765034

  19. Lymphoid irradiation in intractable rheumatoid arthritis. A double-blind, randomized study comparing 750-rad treatment with 2,000-rad treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hanly, J.G.; Hassan, J.; Moriarty, M.; Barry, C.; Molony, J.; Casey, E.; Whelan, A.; Feighery, C.; Bresnihan, B.

    1986-01-01

    Twenty patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis were treated with 750-rad or 2,000-rad lymphoid irradiation in a randomized double-blind comparative study. Over a 12-month followup period, there was a significant improvement in 4 of 7 and 6 of 7 standard parameters of disease activity following treatment with 750 rads and 2,000 rads, respectively. Transient, short-term toxicity was less frequent with the lower dose. In both groups, there was a sustained peripheral blood lymphopenia, a selective depletion of T helper (Leu-3a+) lymphocytes, and reduced in vitro mitogen responses. These changes did not occur, however, in synovial fluid. These results suggest that 750-rad lymphoid irradiation is as effective as, but less toxic than, that with 2,000 rads in the management of patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis.

  20. The tilt-up osteotomy for correction of intractable plantar keratoses.

    PubMed

    Berkun, R N; DeVincentis, A; Goller, W L

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe and follow-up a new surgical technique used for the correction of intractable plantar keratoses. Twenty-five osteotomies were studied from 8 to 20 months postoperatively. The results showed a 60% success rate, but a patient satisfaction rate of 92%. The tilt-up osteotomy is a promising new procedure for the correction of intractable plantar keratoses. PMID:6699361

  1. Melatonin and sleep-related problems in children with intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Elkhayat, Hamed A; Hassanein, Sahar M; Tomoum, Hoda Y; Abd-Elhamid, Iman A; Asaad, Tarek; Elwakkad, Amany S

    2010-04-01

    Children with epilepsy have high rates of sleep problems. Melatonin has been advocated in treatment of sleep disorders, and its beneficial effect has been confirmed in insomnia. The aim of this study was to assess melatonin levels in children with intractable epilepsy and its relation to pattern of sleep and characteristics of seizure disorder, as well as the effect of melatonin therapy on those parameters. The study was conducted on 23 children with intractable epilepsy and 14 children with controlled seizures. Patients were evaluated by psychometric sleep assessment and assay of diurnal and nocturnal melatonin levels. Children with intractable epilepsy received oral melatonin before bedtime. They were reassessed after 3 months. Children with intractable epilepsy had higher scores for each category of sleep walking, forcible teeth grinding, and sleep apnea. At the end of therapeutic trial, patients with intractable epilepsy exhibited significant improvement in bedtime resistance, sleep duration, sleep latency, frequent nocturnal arousals, sleep walking, excessive daytime sleepiness, nocturnal enuresis, forcible teeth grinding, sleep apnea, and Epworth sleepiness scores. There was also significant reduction in seizure severity. Thus, use of melatonin in patients with intractable seizures was associated with improvement of both many sleep-related phenomena and the severity of seizures. PMID:20304327

  2. Sphenopalatine ganglion electrical nerve stimulation implant for intractable facial pain.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Foad; Reddy, Chandan G

    2015-01-01

    Persistent idiopathic facial pain can be extremely difficult and significantly challenging to manage for the patient and the clinician. Pharmacological treatment of these painful conditions is not always successful. It has been suggested that the autonomic reflex plays an important role in the pathophysiology of headaches and facial neuralgia. The key structure in the expression of cranial autonomic symptoms is the sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG), also known as the pterygopalatine ganglion. The role of the SPG in the pathophysiology of headaches and facial pain has become clearer in the past decade. In this case report, we describe a 30 year-old woman with insidious onset of right facial pain. She was suffering from daily pain for more than 9 years prior to her visit at the pain clinic. Her pain was constant with episodic aggravation without a predisposing trigger factor. The patient was evaluated by multiple different specialties and tried multimodal therapy, which included antiepileptic medications, with minimal pain relief. A SPG block using short-acting local anesthetic provided significant temporary pain relief. The second and third attempt of SPG block using different local anesthetic medications demonstrated the same responses. After a thorough psychological assessment and ruling out the presence of a correctable cause for the pain, we decided to proceed with SPG electrical neuromodulation. The patient reported significant pain relief during the electrical nerve stimulation trial. The patient underwent a permanent implant of the neurostimulation electrode in the SPG region. The patient was successfully taken off opioid medication and her pain was dramatically responsive during a 6 month follow-up visit. In this article we describe the SPG nerve stimulation and the technical aspect of pterygopalatine fossa electrode placement. The pterygoplatine fossa is an easily accessible location. This case report will be encouraging for physicians treating intractable facial pain by demonstrating a novel therapeutic option. This report shows a minimally invasive approach to the SPG. PMID:26000687

  3. Efficacy of total lymphoid irradiation in intractable rheumatoid arthritis. A double-blind, randomized trial

    SciTech Connect

    Strober, S.; Tanay, A.; Field, E.; Hoppe, R.T.; Calin, A.; Engleman, E.G.; Kotzin, B.; Brown, B.W.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1985-04-01

    Twenty-six patients participated in a randomized, double-blind study of the efficacy of total lymphoid irradiation in the treatment of intractable rheumatoid arthritis. All 26 patients, for whom therapy with gold compounds and penicillamine had failed, would ordinarily have been considered candidates for cytotoxic or antimetabolite drug therapy. Thirteen patients randomly assigned to receive full-dose total lymphoid irradiation (2000 rad) and 11 patients assigned to receive control low-dose total lymphoid irradiation (200 rad) completed radiotherapy. Alleviation of joint disease activity was significantly greater in the high-dose group as judged by morning stiffness, joint tenderness, and functional assessment (global composite score) at 3 and 6 months after radiotherapy. The high-dose group had a marked reduction in both T-lymphocyte function and numbers, but this finding was not observed in the low-dose group. Complications seen in the high-dose but not low-dose group included transient neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, pericarditis, and pleurisy.

  4. Radical Surgical Excision and Use of Lateral Thoracic Flap for Intractable Axillary Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Wan-Lin; Ong, Yee-Siang

    2012-01-01

    Current treatments for hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) include prolonged courses of antibiotics, retinoids, immunosuppressants, and biologics. Severe cases that are resistant to prolonged medical treatment pose a therapeutic challenge. We propose radical excision and lateral thoracic flap reconstruction as a treatment option for such cases. In our experience with two patients, good aesthetic and functional outcomes were achieved, with a high level of patient satisfaction. The availability of suitable flap coverage allows for wide resection of all of the hair-bearing skin, leading to a low incidence of residual disease and subsequent recurrence. Following excision of the affected tissue, the ideal reconstructive method in the axilla provides suitable coverage without unacceptable donor site morbidity and also avoids axillary contractures. A long lateral thoracic flap with delay has excellent coverage with minimal donor tissue sacrifice. With a suitable flap coverage option, the management paradigm of intractable HS should shift from prolonged medical treatment to allow decisive radical excision, which will improve the quality of life for patients. PMID:23233895

  5. Treatment of acute or chronic severe, intractable pain and other intractable medical problems associated with unrecognized viral or bacterial infection: Part I.

    PubMed

    Omura, Y

    1990-01-01

    In many cases of chronic intractable pain without any discernible causes, when both Western medical treatment and acupuncture treatment failed to eliminate the pain, this pain is often due to the unrecognized presence of viral or bacterial infection. Even effective anti-viral or bacterial agents often fail to eliminate or inhibit the infection, as these drugs may also fail to reach the most painful area where often unrecognizable circulatory disturbances co-exist. Using the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test Molecular Identification Method, we were able to localize substance P and thromboxane B2 (a good indicator of the presence and degree of circulatory disturbances) in the painful area along with virus or bacteria. Based on the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test localization method for specific substances or microbes, the author has successfully treated cases of chronic intractable pain by the combination of anti-viral or bacterial agents with either manual acupuncture, electro-acupuncture or transcutaneous electrical stimulation through a pair of surface electrodes. Among a variety of infections, the most common cause of severe intractable pain was herpes simplex virus, and the most common bacterial cause of intractable pain of moderate degree was campylobacter. In addition, chlamydia was a very common cause of mild intractable pain. When peripheral nerve fibers are hypersensitive from nerve injury due to viral infection, in addition to the drug therapy for infection, use of Vitamin B1 25 mg., 2 times a day for an average adult often accelerates recovery time. As an anti-viral agent for the herpes virus family, the author found that EPA (Omega 3 fish oil, Eicosa Pentaenoic Acid, C20:5 omega 3), at doses between 180 mg. and 350 mg (depending upon body weight) 4 times a day for 2 to 6 weeks, without prescribing the common anti-viral agent Acyclovir, often eliminated the symptoms due to viral infection including all well-known types of the herpes virus, such as herpes simplex virus, Epstein-Barr virus, and cytomegalovirus. Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus are usually not associated with intractable severe pain, but they are often associated with a recurrent burning or itching sensation and they can cause intractable frequent muscle twitching. Viruses belonging to the herpes family almost always exist between the midline of one side of the spinal cord and the midline of the front of the body where these nerves from the spinal cord end and the same virus is localized only on one side of the body at the same spinal level.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1973580

  6. Injections of botulinum toxin type a produce pain alleviation in intractable trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Allam, Nasser; Brasil-Neto, Joaquim P; Brown, Gilberto; Tomaz, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    To report the effects of local injections of botulinum toxin type A regarding pain relief and long-term control in a patient with intractable trigeminal neuralgia. The patient was a 75-year-old man with trigeminal neuralgia in the left hemifacial region. His pain was unbearable and could not be controlled by carbamazepine, amitriptyline, or blocked by infiltration of a glycerol solution or phenol. The authors evaluated pain intensity, quality, and location using a Visual Analog Scale to establish the efficacy of botulinum toxin type A injections. Two units of botulinum toxin type A (Botox) were subcutaneously injected once in eight points distributed along the territory of V1 and V2. Visual Analog Scores were measured at baseline and at 7, 30, 60, and 90 days after treatment. The authors also examined the patient's general condition and daily life activities. The Visual Analog values were, respectively, 82, 54, 25, 25, and 45 mm at each follow-up examination. No side effects were observed on the site of injection and on the patient's clinical state. The authors have been able to reduce trigeminal neuralgia pain with botulinum toxin type A injections in the V1, V2 territory during all the period of study, as well as to withdraw all medication. Interestingly, there was concomitant reduction of pain also in V3, which was not injected. PMID:15722812

  7. Evaluating an interprofessional disease state and medication management review model.

    PubMed

    Hoti, Kreshnik; Forman, Dawn; Hughes, Jeffery

    2014-03-01

    There is lack of literature data reporting an incorporation of medication management reviews in students' interprofessional education (IPE) and practice programs in aged care settings. This pilot study reports how an interprofessional disease state and medication management review program (DSMMR) was established in a residential aged care facility in Perth, Western Australia. Students from the professions of nursing, pharmacy and physiotherapy focused on a wellness check in the areas of cognition, falls and continence while integrating a medication management review. Students' attitudes were explored using a pre- and post-placement questionnaire. Students indicated positive experience with the IPE DSMMR program which also resulted in their positive attitudinal shift towards IPE and practice. These findings indicated that aged care can be a suitable setting for student interprofessional programs focusing on DSMMR. PMID:24246025

  8. Risk of Importing Zoonotic Diseases through Wildlife Trade, United States

    PubMed Central

    Schloegel, Lisa M.; Daszak, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The United States is the world’s largest wildlife importer, and imported wild animals represent a potential source of zoonotic pathogens. Using data on mammals imported during 2000–2005, we assessed their potential to host 27 selected risk zoonoses and created a risk assessment that could inform policy making for wildlife importation and zoonotic disease surveillance. A total of 246,772 mammals in 190 genera (68 families) were imported. The most widespread agents of risk zoonoses were rabies virus (in 78 genera of mammals), Bacillus anthracis (57), Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (48), Echinococcus spp. (41), and Leptospira spp. (35). Genera capable of harboring the greatest number of risk zoonoses were Canis and Felis (14 each), Rattus (13), Equus (11), and Macaca and Lepus (10 each). These findings demonstrate the myriad opportunities for zoonotic pathogens to be imported and suggest that, to ensure public safety, immediate proactive changes are needed at multiple levels. PMID:19891857

  9. Intractable end-of-life suffering and the ethics of palliative sedation.

    PubMed

    Cassell, Eric J; Rich, Ben A

    2010-03-01

    Palliative sedation (sedation to unconsciousness) as an option of last resort for intractable end-of-life distress has been the subject of ongoing discussion and debate as well as policy formulation. A particularly contentious issue has been whether some dying patients experience a form of intractable suffering not marked by physical symptoms that can reasonably be characterized as "existential" in nature and therefore not an acceptable indication for palliative sedation. Such is the position recently taken by the American Medical Association. In this essay we argue that such a stance reflects a fundamental misunderstanding of the nature of human suffering, particularly at the end of life, and may deprive some dying patients of an effective means of relieving their intractable terminal distress. PMID:20088855

  10. Closure of the larynx for intractable aspiration in neurologically impaired patients.

    PubMed

    Tatekawa, Yukihiro; Hosino, Noriko; Hori, Tetsuo; Kaneko, Michio

    2010-05-01

    We present three patients with intractable aspiration pneumonia in the setting of permanent neurologic impairment, who had received a tracheostomy and showed a juxtaposition of the innominate artery against the trachea. Neurologically impaired patients often show a juxtaposition or compression of the innominate artery against the trachea by chest deformity in the setting of severe scoliosis, which could result in a trachea-innominate artery fistula. For intractable aspiration, laryngotracheal separation is safely performed and effective in controlling aspiration, but is occasionally complicated by trachea-innominate artery fistula. As an alternative procedure, we performed a closure of the larynx in these three cases, using double flaps of the vocal folds and false vocal folds, as a treatment for intractable aspiration. After operation, the patients did well without complication or clinical evidence of recurrent aspiration. PMID:20383513

  11. Use of paced respiration to alleviate intractable hiccups (Singultus): a case report.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Duane F; Purdom, Catherine L; Hogan, Michael J

    2013-06-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback is an emerging treatment for many health conditions involving dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system including hypertension, gastric pain, anxiety, and depression. Hiccups are frequently considered an annoyance. However, when intractable (lasting over 1 month), they can become debilitating, with some patients resorting to invasive treatments that often involve the phrenic nerve. Theoretically, HRV biofeedback should also provide a means to stimulate the phrenic nerve and could be an alternative option. We report the successful treatment of a 5 year-long case of intractable hiccups with one session of HRV biofeedback training. These results suggest that biofeedback may be a useful, non-invasive means of relieving intractable hiccups. No clear causality can be inferred from a single case, and further study is needed to determine if this finding has wider applicability. PMID:23568280

  12. Tremor frequency characteristics in Parkinson's disease under resting-state and stress-state conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong Ji; Lee, Woong Woo; Kim, Sang Kyong; Park, Hyeyoung; Jeon, Hyo Seon; Kim, Han Byul; Jeon, Beom S; Park, Kwang Suk

    2016-03-15

    Tremor characteristics-amplitude and frequency components-are primary quantitative clinical factors for diagnosis and monitoring of tremors. Few studies have investigated how different patient's conditions affect tremor frequency characteristics in Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we analyzed tremor characteristics under resting-state and stress-state conditions. Tremor was recorded using an accelerometer on the finger, under resting-state and stress-state (calculation task) conditions, during rest tremor and postural tremor. The changes of peak power, peak frequency, mean frequency, and distribution of power spectral density (PSD) of tremor were evaluated across conditions. Patients whose tremors were considered more than "mild" were selected, for both rest (n=67) and postural (n=25) tremor. Stress resulted in both greater peak powers and higher peak frequencies for rest tremor (p<0.001), but not for postural tremor. Notably, peak frequencies were concentrated around 5Hz under stress-state condition. The distributions of PSD of tremor were symmetrical, regardless of conditions. Tremor is more evident and typical tremor characteristics, namely a lower frequency as amplitude increases, are different in stressful condition. Patient's conditions directly affect neural oscillations related to tremor frequencies. Therefore, tremor characteristics in PD should be systematically standardized across patient's conditions such as attention and stress levels. PMID:26944162

  13. Surveillance for Waterborne Disease Outbreaks Associated with Drinking Water — United States 2011-2012

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advances in water management and sanitation have reduced waterborne disease in the United States, although outbreaks continue to occur. Public health agencies in the U.S. states and territories* report information on waterborne disease outbreaks to the CDC Waterborne Disease and ...

  14. Diverticular disease at colonoscopy in Lagos State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Oluyemi, Aderemi; Odeghe, Emuobor

    2016-01-01

    Background: The upsurge in the reported cases of diverticular disease (DD) has led to a re-appraisal of the earlier held views that it was a rare entity in Nigeria. The advent of colonoscopy has contributed in no small way to this change. We sought to determine the clinical characteristics, indications for colonoscopy, and intra-procedural findings among these patients. Materials and Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study was carried out on the colonoscopy records from four private endoscopy units based in Lagos State, Nigeria. The records were drawn from a 5-year period (August 2010 to July 2015). The endoscopy logs and reports were reviewed, and the bio data, indications, and colonoscopy findings were gleaned. Results: A total of 265 colonoscopies were carried out in the stated period. Of these, 28 (10.6%) had DD. Of the patients with DD, 5 (17.9%) were females while 23 (82.1%) were males. Their ages ranged from 46 to 94 years (mean = 68.2 ± 11 years). Fifteen patients had been referred for the procedure on account of hematochezia alone (15 = 53.6%). Other reasons for referral included abdominal pain alone (2 = 7%), hematochezia plus abdominal pain (5 = 17.9%), and change in bowel habits (3 = 10.8%). Ten (35%) patients had pan-colonic involvement. Regional disease involved the right side alone in only one case (3.5%) while the other combinations of sites are as follows; 6 (21.4%) in the sigmoid colon alone, 2 (7%) in the descending colon alone, 5 (17.9%) in the sigmoid–descending colon, 4 (14.3%) in the sigmoid-descending-transverse colon, thus the sigmoid colon was involved in 25 (89.3%) cases. Five cases (17.9%) had endoscopic features suggestive of diverticulitis. Conclusions: DD should no longer be regarded as a rare problem in the Nigerian patient. The study findings support the notion of higher prevalence among the elderly, in males, and of sigmoid colon involvement. PMID:27226685

  15. Intractable hiccup accompanying pleural effusion: reversible clipping of an intrathoracic phrenic nerve.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Jun; Sa, Young Jo; Cho, Deog Gon; Kim, Young Du; Kim, Chi Kyung; Moon, Seok Whan

    2013-06-01

    Hiccup is usually a self-limiting condition, and can be treated with medications and physical maneuvers. However, hiccup episodes continuing for days or weeks can be incapacitating, and disturb work, sleep, and eating. Therefore, timely therapeutic intervention is needed to achieve early resolution of this treatable condition. We report on a successful phrenic nerve block for intractable hiccups, which consisted of thoracoscopic nerve clipping under general anesthesia and reversal under local anesthesia. This method has the advantage of assured diaphragmatic functional recovery while controlling intractable hiccups. PMID:23752012

  16. Reducing drug related mortality in Europe - a seemingly intractable public health issue.

    PubMed

    Giraudon, Isabelle; Vicente, Julian; Matias, João; Mounteney, Jane; Griffiths, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on an analysis of data from over 30 cohort studies, it can be estimated that between 10.000 and 20.000 opioid users die each year in Europe. Typically, annual mortality rates are between 10-20/1000, representing an excess mortality 10 to 20 times greater than expected. Most deaths occur among males in their mid-thirties. Four broad categories of cause of death can be identified: overdoses, diseases, suicide and trauma. While the long term trend in HIV related mortality among drug users is downwards, other causes of mortality have shown little sign of decreasing in recent years. Of particular concern are overdoses which account for 6300 to 8400 deaths reported annually. The fact that deaths have not decreased is surprising given the scaling up of treatment and other services. Opioid substitution treatment in particular is known to be protective and the numbers of those in substitution treatment in Europe has increased dramatically. A number of interrelated factors may help explain this intractable problem. These include: the possibility of an aging cohort becoming more vulnerable; the use of alcohol and other drugs; high levels of ill-health, risk behaviour, and co-morbidity; and social exclusion and marginalisation. Reducing overall morbidity among heroin users remains a key issue for Europe's public health services. More efforts are required to better understand and target both the direct and indirect factors associated with mortality among problem drugs users, if this major health cost associated with drug consumption is to be reduced. PMID:22508011

  17. Modeling the Dynamics of Disease States in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Demic, Selver; Cheng, Sen

    2014-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common and costly disorder associated with considerable morbidity, disability, and risk for suicide. The disorder is clinically and etiologically heterogeneous. Despite intense research efforts, the response rates of antidepressant treatments are relatively low and the etiology and progression of MDD remain poorly understood. Here we use computational modeling to advance our understanding of MDD. First, we propose a systematic and comprehensive definition of disease states, which is based on a type of mathematical model called a finite-state machine. Second, we propose a dynamical systems model for the progression, or dynamics, of MDD. The model is abstract and combines several major factors (mechanisms) that influence the dynamics of MDD. We study under what conditions the model can account for the occurrence and recurrence of depressive episodes and how we can model the effects of antidepressant treatments and cognitive behavioral therapy within the same dynamical systems model through changing a small subset of parameters. Our computational modeling suggests several predictions about MDD. Patients who suffer from depression can be divided into two sub-populations: a high-risk sub-population that has a high risk of developing chronic depression and a low-risk sub-population, in which patients develop depression stochastically with low probability. The success of antidepressant treatment is stochastic, leading to widely different times-to-remission in otherwise identical patients. While the specific details of our model might be subjected to criticism and revisions, our approach shows the potential power of computationally modeling depression and the need for different type of quantitative data for understanding depression. PMID:25330102

  18. Mortality from Alzheimer's Disease in the United States: Data for 2000 and 2010

    MedlinePlus

    ... the National Technical Information Service NCHS Mortality From Alzheimer's Disease in the United States: Data for 2000 ... dementia, National Vital Statistics System, death rate, aging Alzheimer's disease mortality increased compared with selected major causes ...

  19. Surveillance for Waterborne Disease Outbreaks Associated with Drinking Water United States, 2007-2008

    EPA Science Inventory

    Problem/Condition: Since 1971, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists have maintained a collaborative Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System (WBDOS...

  20. Precipitation and the occurrence of lyme disease in the Northeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, G.J.; Bunnell, J.E.

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence of Lyme disease is a growing concern in the United States, and various studies have been performed to understand the factors related to Lyme disease occurrence. In the United States, Lyme disease has occurred most frequently in the northeastern United States. Positive correlations between the number of cases of Lyme disease reported in the northeastern United States during the 1992-2002 period indicate that late spring/early summer precipitation was a significant climate factor affecting the occurrence of Lyme disease. When late spring/early summer precipitation was greater than average, the occurrence of Lyme disease was above average, possibly due to increased tick activity and survival rate during wet conditions. Temperature did not seem to explain the variability in Lyme disease reports for the northeastern United States. ?? Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  1. A sterile-female technique proposed for control of Striga hermonthica and other intractable weeds: Advantages, shortcomings, and risk management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weeds have posed intractable challenges to farmers since the dawn of agriculture. This article describes in detail a proposed control strategy based on the introduction of genes conferring female-sterility into the genomes of intractable target weeds. Spread of these genes through target populations...

  2. Safety and role of ketogenic parenteral nutrition for intractable childhood epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Da Eun; Kang, Hoon-Chul; Lee, Joon Soo; Lee, Eun Joo; Kim, Heung Dong

    2012-09-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the safety and role of ketogenic parenteral nutrition in patients with intractable childhood epilepsy. The ketogenic parenteral nutrition was given to 10 patients who were unable to absorb nutrients through the intestinal tract because of various gastrointestinal disorders and required complete bowel rest. This nutrition consisted of conventional intravenous fat emulsion (20% Lipision) plus dextrose and amino acid (6% Trophamine) hyperalimentation in a 4:1 (or 3:1) lipid to non-lipid ratio, infused during the bowel rest. If the ketogenic parenteral nutrition allowed normal daily functioning or resolved the underlying problems, we soon changed it to the enteral ketogenic diet (KD). The mean (±SD) duration of the ketogenic parenteral nutrition was 4.1 (±1.5) days. Although a brief span of several days, all patients could maintain ketosis and the efficacy of the previous enteral KD during the ketogenic parenteral nutrition. Complications included elevated aspartate aminotransferase and/or alanine aminotransferase in one patient. Amylase and lipase increased in one patient. Serum triglyceride level increased to the level of 1885 mg/dl in one patient, but normalized in one week after discontinuation of the ketogenic parenteral nutrition and resuming of the enteral KD. Nine patients (90%) remained on the enteral KD after the ketogenic parenteral nutrition (the mean follow-up period was 9 months), including 2 patients who successfully completed the diet with seizure free state. Only one patient discontinued the ketogenic parenteral nutrition because of persistent increase of the amylase and lipase levels. The ketogenic parenteral nutrition proved to be a relatively safe short-term method of continuing KD to maintain ketosis for seizure control, while patients were unable to absorb nutrients through their intestinal tract. PMID:22192619

  3. Growth Failure in Children with Intractable Epilepsy Is Not Due to Increased Resting Energy Expenditure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergqvist, A. G. Christina; Trabulsi, Jillian; Schall, Joan I.; Stallings, Virginia A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the resting energy expenditure (REE) of children with intractable epilepsy (IE) compared with healthy children, and to determine factors that contribute to the pattern of REE. REE, growth status, and body composition were assessed in 25 prepubertal children with IE (15 males, 10 females; mean age 5y 5mo [SD 2y

  4. A preterm infant with intractable metabolic acidosis: a devastating presentation of Chryseobacterium meningosepticum meningitis.

    PubMed

    Eroğlu-Ertuğrul, Nesibe; Sürmeli-Onay, Özge; Yurdakök, Murat

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis-related mortality and morbidity are the leading issues that neonatal intensive care units struggle with worldwide. We report a preterm infant with septic shock and intractable metabolic acidosis whose postmortem microbiologic examination revealed Chryseobacterium meningosepticum meningitis. We would like to alert clinicians about this uncommon sepsis agent, and to call into question the treatment modalities for metabolic acidosis. PMID:26022592

  5. Intractable Postpartum Hemorrhage Resulting from Uterine Artery Pseudoaneurysm: Superselective Arteriographic Embolization via the Collateral Route

    SciTech Connect

    Doenmez, Halil Oztuerk, M. Halil; Guergen, Fatma; Soylu, Serra O.; Hekimoglu, Baki

    2007-04-15

    We present a patient with intractable postpartum hemorrhage resulting from uterine artery pseudoaneurysm despite bilateral hypogastric artery ligation who was successfully treated by an endovascular approach via the collateral route. Although there is a good argument for postponing surgery until transcatheter embolization has been attempted, this case shows that embolization can still be successful even if the iliac vessels have been ligated.

  6. Developing Agency through Peacebuilding in the Midst of Intractable Conflict: The Case of Israel and Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plonski, Sharri

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the presence of "peacebuilding islands" within civil society as potential agents of transformation in the midst of intractable conflict. Focusing on the particular case of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the argument stems from a deconstruction of the legacy of national myopia perpetuated through social and political…

  7. Growth Failure in Children with Intractable Epilepsy Is Not Due to Increased Resting Energy Expenditure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergqvist, A. G. Christina; Trabulsi, Jillian; Schall, Joan I.; Stallings, Virginia A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the resting energy expenditure (REE) of children with intractable epilepsy (IE) compared with healthy children, and to determine factors that contribute to the pattern of REE. REE, growth status, and body composition were assessed in 25 prepubertal children with IE (15 males, 10 females; mean age 5y 5mo [SD 2y…

  8. Lyme Disease in Hispanics, United States, 2000-2013.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Christina A; Starr, J Andrew; Kugeler, Kiersten J; Mead, Paul S

    2016-03-01

    Hispanics comprise a growing portion of the US population and might have distinct risk factors for tickborne diseases. During 2000-2013, a total of 5,473 Lyme disease cases were reported among Hispanics through national surveillance. Hispanics were more likely than non-Hispanics to have signs of disseminated infection and onset during fall months. PMID:26889721

  9. Lyme Disease in Hispanics, United States, 2000–2013

    PubMed Central

    Starr, J. Andrew; Kugeler, Kiersten J.; Mead, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Hispanics comprise a growing portion of the US population and might have distinct risk factors for tickborne diseases. During 2000–2013, a total of 5,473 Lyme disease cases were reported among Hispanics through national surveillance. Hispanics were more likely than non-Hispanics to have signs of disseminated infection and onset during fall months. PMID:26889721

  10. Disease prioritization: what is the state of the art?

    PubMed

    Brookes, V J; Del Rio Vilas, V J; Ward, M P

    2015-10-01

    Disease prioritization is motivated by the need to ensure that limited resources are targeted at the most important problems to achieve the greatest benefit in improving and maintaining human and animal health. Studies have prioritized a range of disease types, for example, zoonotic and foodborne diseases, using a range of criteria that describe potential disease impacts. This review describes the progression of disease prioritization methodology from ad hoc techniques to decision science methods (including multi-criteria decision analysis, conjoint analysis and probabilistic inversion), and describes how these methods aid defensible resource allocation. We discuss decision science in the context of disease prioritization to then review the development of disease prioritization studies. Structuring the prioritization and assessing decision-makers' preferences through value trade-offs between criteria within the decision context are identified as key factors that ensure transparency and reproducibility. Future directions for disease prioritization include the development of validation techniques, guidelines for model selection and neuroeconomics to gain a deeper understanding of decision-making. PMID:25876939

  11. Intractable and highly active relapsing multiple sclerosis - role of alemtuzumab.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Divyanshu; Cano, Christopher A; Stuve, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Alemtuzumab is a humanized recombinant monoclonal antibody that was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for the management of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). It has been utilized for the management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, bone marrow and renal transplantation, or graft versus host disease. Because of its immunomodulatory properties, it was brought into clinical development in MS. One Phase II (CAMMS223) and two Phase III clinical trials (CARE-MSI and -II) have evaluated the safety and efficacy of alemtuzumab in patients with relapsing-remitting MS. Even though its efficacy profile and long-lasting effect have attracted much interest among physicians and patients, it has significant potential adverse effects that may limit its use to patients with active disease. Here, we review the history of drug development of alemtuzumab. Furthermore, we outline the postulated mechanisms of action, clinical evidence, and safety of alemtuzumab for its use as a disease-modifying agent in active and highly active MS. PMID:26425095

  12. Projections of Alzheimer's disease in the United States and the public health impact of delaying disease onset.

    PubMed Central

    Brookmeyer, R; Gray, S; Kawas, C

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to project the future prevalence and incidence of Alzheimer's disease in the United States and the potential impact of interventions to delay disease onset. METHODS: The numbers of individuals in the United States with Alzheimer's disease and the numbers of newly diagnosed cases that can be expected over the next 50 years were estimated from a model that used age-specific incidence rates summarized from several epidemiological studies, US mortality rates, and US Bureau of the Census projections. RESULTS: in 1997, the prevalence of Alzheimer's disease in the United States was 2.32 million (range: 1.09 to 4.58 million); of these individuals, 68% were female. It is projected that the prevalence will nearly quadruple in the next 50 years, by which time approximately 1 in 45 Americans will be afflicted with the disease. Currently, the annual number of new incident cases in 360,000. If interventions could delay onset of the disease by 2 years, after 50 years there would be nearly 2 million fewer cases than projected; if onset could be delayed by 1 year, there would be nearly 800,000 fewer prevalent cases. CONCLUSIONS: As the US population ages, Alzheimer's disease will become an enormous public health problem. interventions that could delay disease onset even modestly would have a major public health impact. PMID:9736873

  13. Intractable desquamative interstitial pneumonia in a tattooed man.

    PubMed

    Arai, Toru; Inoue, Yoshikazu; Hayashi, Seiji; Akira, Masanori; Yamamoto, Satoru; Travis, William D; Sakatani, Mitsunori

    2006-01-01

    A 20-year-old man with a 15 pack-year history of cigarette smoking had a tattoo outlined on his back with blue pigment. He noticed a dry cough and shortness of breath on exertion when the pigment of other colors was added at the age of 27. He visited our hospital two years later because of severe dyspnea. He was diagnosed with desquamative interstitial pneumonia by surgical lung biopsy. Steroid therapy with cessation of smoking was partially effective, however his disease worsened again and he died three and a half years after the diagnosis because of respiratory failure. PMID:17043377

  14. Children and End-State Renal Disease (ERSD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the U.S. I'm a caregiver Children & End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) How to tell if your ... important links Privacy policy Nondiscrimination Accessibility FOIA No Fear Act USA.gov Inspector General Plain language Archive ...

  15. [Fabry-Anderson disease: current state of knowledge].

    PubMed

    Vega-Vega, Olynka; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Angélica; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Fabry-Anderson disease is a lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of the enzyme alpha-galactosidase. This enzymatic defect results in the accumulation of glycosphingolipid into different lines cells. Usually the deficiency is complete, resulting in a multisystem disorder, with injury in different organs, predominantly heart, kidney and nervous system. However, in some patients the enzymatic deficit is partial and causes diverse clinical variants of the disease (renal or cardiac variety), this cause a difficult diagnostic and the absence of real epidemiology data. This review is about the epidemiology, the metabolic defect of this disease, it's molecular and genetics bases, the different forms of clinical presentation and the enzyme replacement therapy. PMID:21888295

  16. [Alcoholic liver disease: current state of the problem].

    PubMed

    Maev, I V; Abdurakhmanov, D T; Andreev, D N; Dicheva, D T

    2014-01-01

    The literature review gives the present views of the diagnosis and treatment of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and data on the genetic markers associated with the development of ALD and alcohol addiction. It discusses in detail the mechanisms of liver damage within the disease in question and substantiates indications for the use of prednisolone and pentoxifylline in alcoholic hepatitis. Therapeutic approaches to treating different forms of ALD are considered. PMID:24864478

  17. [Peyronie's disease: state of the art and future perspectives].

    PubMed

    Gulino, G; Sasso, F; Falabella, R; Racioppi, M; Sacco, E; D'Onofrio, A; Bassi, P F

    2007-01-01

    Peyronie's disease (PD) is characterized by the onset of a fibrous plaque within the tunica albuginea of the penile corpora cavernosa, resulting in pain and bending during the erection, which can make the intercourse difficult or impossible. Evidence from literature supports the autoimmune etiology of PD, and suggests genetic and familiar conditions, penile traumatisms and history of genital tract diseases as risk factors, even though no definitive conclusions arise about the pathogenesis of the disease. Few randomized trials demonstrated that medical therapies, such as Vitamin E, Colchicine, Potassium amminobenzoate, Tamoxifen and injection therapy with Verapamil are effective in stabilizing the acute phase of the disease. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) and ionophoresis cannot be considered as first line or gold standard therapies. Satisfactory results have been published about Nesbit operation in large number of cases with low-stage disease, whereas plication procedures have shown significant rates of relapse. High incidence of long-term penile retraction have been reported in high-stage disease treated with plaque incision and simple graft insertion. Malleable, soft or inflatable prostheses combined with graft implant have given the best results in terms of penile straightening and lengthening and patients' satisfaction. In conclusion, the PD etiopathogenesis hasn't been clearly understood-yet, no medical therapy is fully effective; surgery remains therefore the gold standard in case of severe deformity and/or erectile dysfunction. PMID:21086391

  18. State of the art: Reproduction and pregnancy in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Østensen, Monika; Andreoli, Laura; Brucato, Antonio; Cetin, Irene; Chambers, Christina; Clowse, Megan E B; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Cutolo, Maurizio; Dolhain, Radboud; Fenstad, M H; Förger, Frauke; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Koksvik, Hege; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Tincani, Angela; Villiger, Peter M; Wallenius, Marianne; von Wolff, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Throughout the last decade, increasing awareness has been raised on issues related to reproduction in rheumatic diseases including basic research to clarify the important role of estrogens in the etiology and pathophysiology of immune/inflammatory diseases. Sub- or infertility is a heterogeneous condition that can be related to immunological mechanisms, to pregnancy loss, to disease burden, to therapy, and to choices in regard to family size. Progress in reproductive medicine has made it possible for more patients with rheumatic disease to have children. Active disease in women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects their children's birth weight and may have long-term effects on their future health status. Pregnancy complications as preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction are still increased in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), however, biomarkers can monitor adverse events, and several new therapies may improve outcomes. Pregnancies in women with APS remain a challenge, and better therapies for the obstetric APS are needed. New prospective studies indicate improved outcomes for pregnancies in women with rare diseases like systemic sclerosis and vasculitis. TNF inhibitors hold promise for maintaining remission in rheumatological patients and may be continued at least in the first half of pregnancy. Pre-conceptional counseling and interdisciplinary management of pregnancies are essential for ensuring optimal pregnancy outcomes. PMID:25555818

  19. Intractable livedoid vasculopathy successfully treated with hyperbaric oxygen.

    PubMed

    Yang, C-H; Ho, H-C; Chan, Y-S; Liou, L-B; Hong, H-S; Yang, L-C

    2003-09-01

    We describe a new method for treating livedoid vasculopathy. The typical presentation of livedoid vasculopathy includes chronic, recurrent painful ulcers, satellite scar-like atrophy and telangiectasia involving the lower extremities. Histologically, these lesions show areas of ulceration and dermal vessel occlusion without frank inflammatory cell infiltration. There is currently no satisfactory therapy available for this disease. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) has recently established itself as one of the most effective methods of treating ischaemic wounds, including diabetic ulcers. We used this therapy in two patients whose lesions were resistant to multiple therapeutic modalities. Not only did their ulcers respond rapidly to the HBO therapy, but the disturbing wound pain also resolved at the same time. To our knowledge, this is the first successful trial of HBO therapy in livedoid vasculopathy. We believe this to be a very promising new therapy for livedoid vasculopathy and to be worth further investigation. PMID:14511004

  20. What do we need to know about disease ecology to prevent Lyme disease in the northeastern United States?

    PubMed

    Eisen, Rebecca J; Piesman, Joseph; Zielinski-Gutierrez, Emily; Eisen, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Lyme disease is the most commonly reported vector-borne disease in the United States, with the majority of cases occurring in the Northeast. It has now been three decades since the etiological agent of the disease in North America, the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, and its primary North American vectors, the ticks Ixodes scapularis Say and I. pacificus Cooley & Kohls, were identified. Great strides have been made in our understanding of the ecology of the vectors and disease agent, and this knowledge has been used to design a wide range of prevention and control strategies. However, despite these advances, the number of Lyme disease cases have steadily increased. In this article, we assess potential reasons for the continued lack of success in prevention and control of Lyme disease in the northeastern United States, and identify conceptual areas where additional knowledge could be used to improve Lyme disease prevention and control strategies. Some of these areas include: 1) identifying critical host infestation rates required to maintain enzootic transmission of B. burgdorferi, 2) understanding how habitat diversity and forest fragmentation impacts acarological risk of exposure to B. burgdorferi and the ability of interventions to reduce risk, 3) quantifying the epidemiological outcomes of interventions focusing on ticks or vertebrate reservoirs, and 4) refining knowledge of how human behavior influences Lyme disease risk and identifying barriers to the adoption of personal protective measures and environmental tick management. PMID:22308766

  1. A State-Wide Research Network for Alzheimer's Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mintzer, Jacobo E.; Bachman, D. L.; Stuckey, M.; Ebeling, M.; Wagner, M. T.; Evans, W. J.; Hirth, V.; Walker, A.; Joglekar, R.; Faison, W.

    2014-03-13

    The Specific Aim of the proposal was to develop an administrative structure that will facilitate the development of AD research across the state of SC by providing key services such as (but not limited to) seeking funding research opportunities, financial tracking, regulatory management, central recruitment, training for investigators and coordinators, data collection, data storing, and data processing to researchers across the state.

  2. Higher expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 and its receptor in brain tissue of intractable epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunyan; Yang, Lihua; Zhang, Jiadong; Lin, Zhiguo; Qi, Jiping; Duan, Shurong

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to explore the pathogenesis of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP1) and CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) in brain tissue of patients with intractable epilepsy (IE). Hippocampi or temporal lobe tissues were obtained from 40 patients with IE and five patients without IE who had undergone surgical decompression and debridement. The levels of MCP1 and CCR2 were evaluated using immunohistochemistry. Pearson correlation analysis was employed to evaluate the correlation between levels of MCP1 and CCR2 in IE with or without hippocampal sclerosis (HS) and the disease duration, along with age. Higher levels of MCP1 (11.68±4.68% versus 1.72±1.54%) and CCR2 (11.54±4.65% versus 1.52±1.29%; P<0.05) were observed in IE patients compared to controls. Expression levels of MCP1 (R=0.867) and CCR2 (R=0.835) in IE patients with HS were correlated with the disease duration. However, no correlation was found in IE patients without HS. There was also no correlation between levels of MCP1 and CCR2 in IE patients with age, either with HS or without HS. These results suggest that MCP1 and its receptor may play a role in the pathogenesis and progression of IE. PMID:26810469

  3. State of the art: deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bhidayasiri, R; Srikijvilaikul, T; Locharernkul, C; Phanthumchinda, K; Kaoroptham, S

    2006-03-01

    Surgical therapy for Parkinson's disease has a long history beginning in the 1930s with empirical exploration of different brain targets, such as resection of the primary motor cortex or extirpation of the caudate. Recently, there has been a renaissance of functional neurosurgery for the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease, particularly deep brain stimulation (DBS). To date, DBS of the globus pallidus interna and subthalamic nucleus has been reported to relieve motor symptoms and levodopa-induced dyskinesia in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease. DBS also has different advantages over pallidotomy and subthalamotomy, including reversibility, decreased risk of reoperation and decreased morbidity. In addition to well-experienced neurologists and neurosurgeons, a multidisciplinary team approach is fundamental and critical to ensure success in the DBS procedure in individual patients. With the advances in neuroimaging, neurophysiology and localization techniques, it is increasingly likely that there will be more surgical targets in the future that can also improve cardinal features of Parkinson's disease, or even nonmotor manifestations of this condition. PMID:16696426

  4. Ultrasound-guided Pulsed Radiofrequency Lesioning of the Phrenic Nerve in a Patient with Intractable Hiccup

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Keum Nae; Park, In Kyung; Suh, Jeong Hun; Leem, Jeong Gill

    2010-01-01

    Persistent and intractable hiccups (with respective durations of more than 48 hours and 1 month) can result in depression, fatigue, impaired sleep, dehydration, weight loss, malnutrition, and aspiration syndromes. The conventional treatments for hiccups are either non-pharmacological, pharmacological or a nerve block treatment. Pulsed radiofrequency lesioning (PRFL) has been proposed for the modulation of the excited nervous system pathway of pain as a safe and nondestructive treatment method. As placement of the electrode in close proximity to the targeted nerve is very important for the success of PRFL, ultrasound appears to be well suited for this technique. A 74-year-old man suffering from intractable hiccups that had developed after a coronary artery bypass graft and had continued for 7 years was referred to our pain clinic. He had not been treated with conventional methods or medications. We performed PRFL of the phrenic nerve guided by ultrasound and the hiccups disappeared. PMID:20830266

  5. NADPH diaphorase reactive neurons in temporal lobe cortex of patients with intractable epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis.

    PubMed

    D'Alessio, Luciana; López-Costa, Juan José; Konopka, Héctor; Consalvo, Damián; Seoane, Eduardo; López, María Esther; Guelman, María Laura; Kochen, Silvia; Zieher, Luis María

    2007-05-01

    Several studies have demonstrated a controversial involvement of NO in epileptogenesis. The aim of this study is to compare the NADPH diaphorase (NADPH-d) reactivity in the temporal cortex between surgical specimens of patients with intractable epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis and autopsy controls. Brain samples of patients and postmortem controls were stained with the NADPH-d technique. Sprouting and larger areas of NADPH-d reactive neurons were found in the temporal cortex of epileptic patients. PMID:17412562

  6. Intractable Nausea and Vomiting from Autoantibodies Against a Brain Water Channel

    PubMed Central

    Iorio, Raffaele; Lucchinetti, Claudia F.; Lennon, Vanda A.; Farrugia, Gianrico; Pasricha, Pankaj J.; Weinshenker, Brian G.; Pittock, Sean J.

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Antibodies against the water channel protein aquaporin (AQP)-4 cause a spectrum of inflammatory, demyelinating, central nervous system disorders called neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSDs); these primarily affect the optic nerves and spinal cord, but also the brain. Symptoms of intractable nausea, vomiting and hiccups reflect involvement of AQP4 in the brainstem area postrema and account for gastroenterologic presentations. We investigated the frequency of intractable nausea, vomiting, or hiccups in patients with NMOSD who tested positive for immunoglobulin-G against AQP4 (AQP4-IgG). We also analyzed sera from patients with idiopathic nausea or vomiting for the presence of AQP4-IgG. Methods We reviewed the Mayo Clinic AQP4-IgG positive NMOSD database (n=70) to identify patients who presented with vomiting, focusing on results from gastroenterologic evaluations. We also tested serum samples (from the Gastroparesis Clinical Research Consortium repository) from patients who presented with idiopathic nausea or vomiting for AQP4-IgG (controls n=318 with gastroparesis and 117 without gastroparesis). Results Ten AQP4-IgG-positive patients diagnosed with NMOSD (14% of patients in the database) initially presented with intractable vomiting. Extensive gastroenterological evaluation was non-informative. AQP4-IgG was not detected in any of the controls. Conclusions Though NMOSDs are rare, tests for AQP4-IgG should be considered for patients that present with unexplained, intractable vomiting. Detection of the antibody before the development of optic neuritis or transverse myelitis allows patients to receive immunosuppressive therapy before the development of neurologic disabilities. PMID:23211959

  7. [Case of intractable ventricula fibrillation by a multicomponent dietary supplement containing ephedra and caffeine overdose].

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Homma, Masato; Inoue, Junichi; Kato, Hiroshi; Murata, Kiyoshi; Ogasawara, Tomoko

    2007-07-01

    Multicomponent dietary supplement containing ephedra and caffeine (DSEC) was widely used for weight loss and energy enhancement. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) banned the sale of DSEC in 2004 because of side effects such as cardiotoxity. We report a rare case of intractable ventricular fibrillation, requiring frequent defibrillation, by DSEC overdose. The direct cardiotoxity of ephedra, synergistic effect of caffeine and ephedra, and hypokalemia may cause refractory ventricular arrhythmia. PMID:17784561

  8. Drosophila as a Model for Intractable Epilepsy: Gilgamesh Suppresses Seizures in parabss1 Heterozygote Flies

    PubMed Central

    Howlett, Iris C.; Rusan, Zeid M.; Parker, Louise; Tanouye, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Intractable epilepsies, that is, seizure disorders that do not respond to currently available therapies, are difficult, often tragic, neurological disorders. Na+ channelopathies have been implicated in some intractable epilepsies, including Dravet syndrome (Dravet 1978), but little progress has been forthcoming in therapeutics. Here we examine a Drosophila model for intractable epilepsy, the Na+ channel gain-of-function mutant parabss1 that resembles Dravet syndrome in some aspects (parker et al. 2011a). In particular, we identify second-site mutations that interact with parabss1, seizure enhancers, and seizure suppressors. We describe one seizure-enhancer mutation named charlatan (chn). The chn gene normally encodes an Neuron-Restrictive Silencer Factor/RE1-Silencing Transcription factor transcriptional repressor of neuronal-specific genes. We identify a second-site seizure-suppressor mutation, gilgamesh (gish), that reduces the severity of several seizure-like phenotypes of parabss1/+ heterozygotes. The gish gene normally encodes the Drosophila ortholog of casein kinase CK1g3, a member of the CK1 family of serine-threonine kinases. We suggest that CK1g3 is an unexpected but promising new target for seizure therapeutics. PMID:23797108

  9. Research Progress on the Role of ABC Transporters in the Drug Resistance Mechanism of Intractable Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jie; Mao, Ding-an; Liu, Li-qun

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of intractable epilepsy is not fully clear. In recent years, both animal and clinical trials have shown that the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters is increased in patients with intractable epilepsy; additionally, epileptic seizures can lead to an increase in the number of sites that express ABC transporters. These findings suggest that ABC transporters play an important role in the drug resistance mechanism of epilepsy. ABC transporters can perform the funcions of a drug efflux pump, which can reduce the effective drug concentration at epilepsy lesions by reducing the permeability of the blood brain barrier to antiepileptic drugs, thus causing resistance to antiepileptic drugs. Given the important role of ABC transporters in refractory epilepsy drug resistance, antiepileptic drugs that are not substrates of ABC transporters were used to obtain ABC transporter inhibitors with strong specificity, high safety, and few side effects, making them suitable for long-term use; therefore, these drugs can be used for future clinical treatment of intractable epilepsy. PMID:26491660

  10. Intractable hiccup as the presenting symptom of cavernous hemangioma in the medulla oblongata: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Moon, Kyung-Sub; Jung, Min-Young; Jung, Shin

    2014-06-01

    A case of intractable hiccup developed by cavernous hemangioma in the medulla oblongata is reported. There have been only five previously reported cases of medullary cavernoma that triggered intractable hiccup. The patient was a 28-year-old man who was presented with intractable hiccup for 15 days. It developed suddenly, then aggravated progressively and did not respond to any types of medication. On magnetic resonance images, a well-demarcated and non-enhancing mass with hemorrhagic changes was noted in the left medulla oblongata. Intraoperative findings showed that the lesion was fully embedded within the brain stem and pathology confirmed the diagnosis of cavernous hemangioma. The hiccup resolved completely after the operation. Based on the presumption that the medullary cavernoma may trigger intractable hiccup by displacing or compression the hiccup arc of the dorsolateral medulla, surgical excision can eliminate the symptoms, even in the case totally buried in brainstem. PMID:25237438

  11. Intractable Hiccup as the Presenting Symptom of Cavernous Hemangioma in the Medulla Oblongata: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Jung, Min-Young; Jung, Shin

    2014-01-01

    A case of intractable hiccup developed by cavernous hemangioma in the medulla oblongata is reported. There have been only five previously reported cases of medullary cavernoma that triggered intractable hiccup. The patient was a 28-year-old man who was presented with intractable hiccup for 15 days. It developed suddenly, then aggravated progressively and did not respond to any types of medication. On magnetic resonance images, a well-demarcated and non-enhancing mass with hemorrhagic changes was noted in the left medulla oblongata. Intraoperative findings showed that the lesion was fully embedded within the brain stem and pathology confirmed the diagnosis of cavernous hemangioma. The hiccup resolved completely after the operation. Based on the presumption that the medullary cavernoma may trigger intractable hiccup by displacing or compression the hiccup arc of the dorsolateral medulla, surgical excision can eliminate the symptoms, even in the case totally buried in brainstem. PMID:25237438

  12. Nanoimaging in cardiovascular diseases: Current state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Suryyani; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Shetty, Shrimati Dharmapal

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been integrated into healthcare system in terms of diagnosis as well as therapy. The massive impact of imaging nanotechnology has a deeper intervention in cardiology i.e. as contrast agents, to target vulnerable plaques with site specificity and in a theranostic approach to treat these plaques, stem cell delivery in necrotic myocardium, etc. Thus cardiovascular nanoimaging is not limited to simple diagnosis but also can help real time tracking during therapy as well as surgery. The present review provides a comprehensive description of the molecular imaging techniques for cardiovascular diseases with the help of nanotechnology and the potential clinical implications of nanotechnology for future applications. PMID:25963489

  13. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and vascular disease: state-of-the-art.

    PubMed

    Fargion, Silvia; Porzio, Marianna; Fracanzani, Anna Ludovica

    2014-10-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the most common of chronic liver disease in Western Country, is closely related to insulin resistance and oxidative stress and includes a wide spectrum of liver diseases ranging from steatosis alone, usually a benign and non-progressive condition, to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which may progress to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. NAFLD is considered the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome with which shares several characteristics, however recent data suggest that NAFLD is linked to increased cardiovascular risk independently of the broad spectrum of risk factors of metabolic syndrome. Accumulating evidence suggests that the clinical burden of NAFLD is not restricted to liver-related morbidity and mortality, with the majority of deaths in NAFLD patients related to cardiovascular disease and cancer and not to the progression of liver disease. Retrospective and prospective studies provide evidence of a strong association between NAFLD and subclinical manifestation of atherosclerosis (increased intima-media thickness, endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffness, impaired left ventricular function and coronary calcification). A general agreement emerging from these studies indicates that patients with NASH are at higher risk of cardiovascular diseases than those with simple steatosis, emphasizing the role of chronic inflammation in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis of these patients. It is very likely that the different mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in patients with NAFLD have a different relevance in the patients according to individual genetic background. In conclusion, in the presence of NAFLD patients should undergo a complete cardiovascular evaluation to prevent future atherosclerotic complications. Specific life-style modification and aggressive pharmaceutical modification will not only reduce the progression of liver disease, but also reduce morbidity for cardiovascular disease improving overall prognosis and survival. PMID:25309067

  14. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and vascular disease: State-of-the-art

    PubMed Central

    Fargion, Silvia; Porzio, Marianna; Fracanzani, Anna Ludovica

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the most common of chronic liver disease in Western Country, is closely related to insulin resistance and oxidative stress and includes a wide spectrum of liver diseases ranging from steatosis alone, usually a benign and non-progressive condition, to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which may progress to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. NAFLD is considered the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome with which shares several characteristics, however recent data suggest that NAFLD is linked to increased cardiovascular risk independently of the broad spectrum of risk factors of metabolic syndrome. Accumulating evidence suggests that the clinical burden of NAFLD is not restricted to liver-related morbidity and mortality, with the majority of deaths in NAFLD patients related to cardiovascular disease and cancer and not to the progression of liver disease. Retrospective and prospective studies provide evidence of a strong association between NAFLD and subclinical manifestation of atherosclerosis (increased intima-media thickness, endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffness, impaired left ventricular function and coronary calcification). A general agreement emerging from these studies indicates that patients with NASH are at higher risk of cardiovascular diseases than those with simple steatosis, emphasizing the role of chronic inflammation in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis of these patients. It is very likely that the different mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in patients with NAFLD have a different relevance in the patients according to individual genetic background. In conclusion, in the presence of NAFLD patients should undergo a complete cardiovascular evaluation to prevent future atherosclerotic complications. Specific life-style modification and aggressive pharmaceutical modification will not only reduce the progression of liver disease, but also reduce morbidity for cardiovascular disease improving overall prognosis and survival. PMID:25309067

  15. Can end of life care for the pediatric patient suffering with escalating and intractable symptoms be improved?

    PubMed

    Houlahan, Kathleen E; Branowicki, Patricia A; Mack, Jennifer W; Dinning, Constance; McCabe, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    Over twelve thousand children are diagnosed each year with cancer, and approximately 2200 children die each year from the disease. A percentage of these patients experiences escalating and intractable distress with symptoms that include pain, dyspnea, and agitation. These symptoms may continue for hours to days. Intractable symptoms of pain, agitation, and dyspnea can be very distressing to the patient, family, and staff and often a challenge for the physicians and nursing staff to treat. To meet this challenge, The Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Children's Hospital Cancer Care Program has made it a priority to create a process of care that includes identifying barriers to care and the development of an end-of-life (EOL) rapid response model that includes guidelines and physician-templated orders for rapid escalation of opioids. The goal of this quality-improvement initiative was to develop a model of care that would enable the caregivers to provide effective comfort care to any patient experiencing symptoms of rapid escalation of pain, dyspnea, and agitation. A model of care was created to overcome barriers to care. The model includes role clarification, "Guidelines for the Management of Escalating Pain/Dyspnea/Agitation at the End of Life," and "Rapid Titration-Templated Physician Orders." Staff feedback was solicited relative to the content, format, and usability of the guidelines and templated orders. The physician and nursing staff reported that they found the templated orders and guidelines very helpful and effective and suggested only a few edits. A retrospective chart review is currently under way. The purpose of this chart review is to systematically document and compare the record of management of rapidly escalating symptoms of pain and/or dyspnea and/or agitation prior to and after instituting the EOL Rapid Response Model of Care. Care of the EOL patient experiencing symptoms of pain, dyspnea, and agitation is challenging. The EOL Rapid Response Model of Care outlines a process of care and provides recommendations and templated physician orders for rapid titration of opioids. PMID:16689405

  16. SURVEILLANCE FOR WATERBORNE DISEASE AND OUTBREAK ASSOCIATED WITH RECREATIONAL WATER - UNITED STATES 2003-2004

    EPA Science Inventory

    Problem/Condition: Since 1971, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists have maintained a collaborative surveillance system for collecting and periodically reporting da...

  17. Novel roles for protein disulphide isomerase in disease states: a double edged sword?

    PubMed Central

    Parakh, Sonam; Atkin, Julie D.

    2015-01-01

    Protein disulphide isomerase (PDI) is a multifunctional redox chaperone of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Since it was first discovered 40 years ago the functions ascribed to PDI have evolved significantly and recent studies have recognized its distinct functions, with adverse as well as protective effects in disease. Furthermore, post translational modifications of PDI abrogate its normal functional roles in specific disease states. This review focusses on recent studies that have identified novel functions for PDI relevant to specific diseases. PMID:26052512

  18. Nonalcoholic Wernicke's Encephalopathy Associated with Unintentional Weight Loss, Cholecystectomy, and Intractable Vomiting: The Role of Dual Thiamine and Corticosteroid Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Donadee, Chenell; Gomez, Leslie; Zaretskaya, Marina

    2014-01-01

    A 23-year-old male with one month of intractable vomiting, subsequent cholecystitis status post cholecystectomy, and overall 40-pound weight loss over the last few months presented with altered mental status and seizures. MRI showed signal abnormalities involving the hypothalamus, periaqueductal gray matter, 4th ventricle, and bilateral thalami, indicative of Wernicke's encephalopathy. The patient was started on empiric IV thiamine and methylprednisolone; thiamine levels were subsequently found to be low. Infectious disease workup was negative. Within a few days of this therapy, the patient's neurological status steadily improved with increased responsiveness and communication. Repeat MRI 7 days after admission showed significant resolution of the signal abnormalities. Over the next several weeks the patient became fully conversational, cognitively intact, and increasingly ambulatory. Nonalcoholic Wernicke's encephalopathy is rare; there have been reports relating it separately to vomiting and invasive surgery. In this case report, we associate it with both recurrent vomiting and minimally invasive cholecystectomy. We also discuss combinatorial therapy of thiamine and corticosteroids, which is poorly defined in the literature. Though there is no consensus-based optimal treatment of Wernicke's encephalopathy, this adds to the discussion of using dual therapy and supports that the use of empiric corticosteroids does not harm the patient. PMID:24716018

  19. Altered Resting State Brain Networks in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Göttlich, Martin; Münte, Thomas F.; Heldmann, Marcus; Kasten, Meike; Hagenah, Johann; Krämer, Ulrike M.

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra leading to dysfunctional cortico-striato-thalamic-cortical loops. In addition to the characteristic motor symptoms, PD patients often show cognitive impairments, affective changes and other non-motor symptoms, suggesting system-wide effects on brain function. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging and graph-theory based analysis methods to investigate altered whole-brain intrinsic functional connectivity in PD patients (n = 37) compared to healthy controls (n = 20). Global network properties indicated less efficient processing in PD. Analysis of brain network modules pointed to increased connectivity within the sensorimotor network, but decreased interaction of the visual network with other brain modules. We found lower connectivity mainly between the cuneus and the ventral caudate, medial orbitofrontal cortex and the temporal lobe. To identify regions of altered connectivity, we mapped the degree of intrinsic functional connectivity both on ROI- and on voxel-level across the brain. Compared to healthy controls, PD patients showed lower connectedness in the medial and middle orbitofrontal cortex. The degree of connectivity was also decreased in the occipital lobe (cuneus and calcarine), but increased in the superior parietal cortex, posterior cingulate gyrus, supramarginal gyrus and supplementary motor area. Our results on global network and module properties indicated that PD manifests as a disconnection syndrome. This was most apparent in the visual network module. The higher connectedness within the sensorimotor module in PD patients may be related to compensation mechanism in order to overcome the functional deficit of the striato-cortical motor loops or to loss of mutual inhibition between brain networks. Abnormal connectivity in the visual network may be related to adaptation and compensation processes as a consequence of altered motor function. Our analysis approach proved sensitive for detecting disease-related localized effects as well as changes in network functions on intermediate and global scale. PMID:24204812

  20. Kissing Bugs in the United States: Risk for Vector-Borne Disease in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Klotz, Stephen A; Dorn, Patricia L; Mosbacher, Mark; Schmidt, Justin O

    2014-01-01

    Eleven species of kissing bugs are found in the United States. Their home ranges may be expanding northward, perhaps as a consequence of climate change. At least eight of the species, perhaps all, are reported to harbor Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite that causes Chagas disease. Because humans are encroaching on kissing bug habitat, there is concern for vector-transmitted Chagas disease in the United States. To date, documented autochthonous cases of Chagas in humans in the United States are rare. Kissing bugs are capable of adapting to new habitats such as human domiciles; however, they do not colonize homes in the United States as in Central and South America. We review the biology, behavior, and medical importance of kissing bugs and the risk they pose for transmission of Chagas disease in the United States. Where possible, descriptions of US species are compared to the epidemiologically important Latin American species. PMID:25574143

  1. Climate change influences on the annual onset of Lyme disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Monaghan, Andrew J; Moore, Sean M; Sampson, Kevin M; Beard, Charles B; Eisen, Rebecca J

    2015-07-01

    Lyme disease is the most commonly reported vector-borne illness in the United States. Lyme disease occurrence is highly seasonal and the annual springtime onset of cases is modulated by meteorological conditions in preceding months. A meteorological-based empirical model for Lyme disease onset week in the United States is driven with downscaled simulations from five global climate models and four greenhouse gas emissions scenarios to project the impacts of 21st century climate change on the annual onset week of Lyme disease. Projections are made individually and collectively for the 12 eastern States where >90% of cases occur. The national average annual onset week of Lyme disease is projected to become 0.4-0.5 weeks earlier for 2025-2040 (p<0.05), and 0.7-1.9 weeks earlier for 2065-2080 (p<0.01), with the largest shifts for scenarios with the highest greenhouse gas emissions. The more southerly mid-Atlantic States exhibit larger shifts (1.0-3.5 weeks) compared to the Northeastern and upper Midwestern States (0.2-2.3 weeks) by 2065-2080. Winter and spring temperature increases primarily cause the earlier onset. Greater spring precipitation and changes in humidity partially counteract the temperature effects. The model does not account for the possibility that abrupt shifts in the life cycle of Ixodes scapularis, the primary vector of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi in the eastern United States, may alter the disease transmission cycle in unforeseen ways. The results suggest 21st century climate change will make environmental conditions suitable for earlier annual onset of Lyme disease cases in the United States with possible implications for the timing of public health interventions. PMID:26025268

  2. [State of the art in invasive diseases by filamentous fungi].

    PubMed

    Pemán, Javier; Quindós, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections have become a major cause of morbimortality in intensive care patients, persons suffering from cancer or immune deficiencies, and other diseases with impaired immunity. Candida albicans remains the most frequent fungal pathogen, but advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of invasive candidiasis are leading to important etiological changes. Among the emerging invasive mycoses, are those caused by filamentous fungi, such as Aspergillus, Lomentospora/Scedosporium, Fusarium or the Mucorales. Invasive aspergillosis is difficult to diagnose, and although there are diagnostic tools available, their use is not widespread, and their effectiveness vary depending on the group of patients. Clinical suspicion in high-risk patients, radiological diagnosis and the use of biomarkers, such as 1,3-β-D-glucan and galactomannan, can be of great help. However, diagnostic resources are limited in other mycoses, but radiology, pathological studies and the microbiological diagnosis can be useful. The high mortality of these mycoses requires early empirical antifungal treatment in many cases. Voriconazole is the first choice for treatment of the majority of aspergillosis, scedosporiasis, fusariosis and other hyalohyphomycoses. The treatment of mucormycoses, Lomentospora prolificans infections or mycoses by dematiaceous fungi are more complicated. Amphotericin B is active against many mucoralean fungi, but the combination of two or more antifungal agents could be a therapeutic alternative in many amphotericin B-refractory mycoses. Current clinical challenges include improving the diagnosis and the treatment of these mycoses, along with improving the adequate prevention in patients at high risk of suffering from them. PMID:25449676

  3. Subclinical hypercortisolism: a state, a syndrome, or a disease?

    PubMed

    Di Dalmazi, Guido; Pasquali, Renato; Beuschlein, Felix; Reincke, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Subclinical hypercortisolism (SH), defined as alterations of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis in the absence of clinical signs or symptoms related to cortisol secretion, is a common finding in patients with adrenal incidentalomas. The clinical correlates of this pathological condition have become clearer over the last few years. The aim of this review is to summarize the co-morbidities and the clinical outcomes of patients with SH. According to the analysis of the results of the studies published within the last 15 years, hypertension and type 2 diabetes are a common finding in patients with SH, occurring roughly in 2/3 and 1/3 of the patients respectively. Moreover, several additional cardiovascular and metabolic complications, like endothelial damage, increased visceral fat accumulation and impaired lipid metabolism have been shown to increase the cardiovascular risk of those patients. Accordingly, recent independent reports investigating the natural history of the disease in a long-term follow-up setting have shown that patients with SH have a higher incidence of cardiovascular events and related mortality. Moreover, longitudinal studies have also shown increased incidence of osteoporotic vertebral fractures. Future research is needed to improve the diagnostic performance of hormonal tests, by assessment of the complete steroid profile with more accurate assays, and to define the efficacy of surgical vs medical treatment in a randomized-controlled setting. PMID:26282599

  4. Intractable Posterior Epistaxis due to a Spontaneous Low-Flow Carotid-Cavernous Sinus Fistula: A Case Report and a Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Giotakis, A.; Kral, F.; Riechelmann, H.; Freund, M.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 90-year-old patient with intractable posterior epistaxis presenting as the only symptom of a nontraumatic low-flow carotid-cavernous sinus fistula. Purpose of this case report is to introduce low-flow carotid-cavernous sinus fistula in the differential diagnosis of intractable posterior epistaxis. We provide a literature review for the sequence of actions for the confrontation of posterior epistaxis. We also emphasize the significance of the radiological diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in the management of posterior epistaxis due to pathology of the cavernous sinus. The gold-standard diagnostic procedure of carotid-cavernous sinus fistula is digital subtraction angiography (DSA). DSA with coils is also the state-of-the-art therapy. By failure of DSA, neurosurgery or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) may be used as alternatives. SRS may also be used as enhancement procedure of the DSA. Considering the prognosis of a successfully closed carotid-cavernous sinus fistula, recanalization occurs only in a minority of patients. Close follow-up is advised. PMID:26839726

  5. Coral transcriptome and bacterial community profiles reveal distinct Yellow Band Disease states in Orbicella faveolata.

    PubMed

    Closek, Collin J; Sunagawa, Shinichi; DeSalvo, Michael K; Piceno, Yvette M; DeSantis, Todd Z; Brodie, Eoin L; Weber, Michele X; Voolstra, Christian R; Andersen, Gary L; Medina, Mónica

    2014-12-01

    Coral diseases impact reefs globally. Although we continue to describe diseases, little is known about the etiology or progression of even the most common cases. To examine a spectrum of coral health and determine factors of disease progression we examined Orbicella faveolata exhibiting signs of Yellow Band Disease (YBD), a widespread condition in the Caribbean. We used a novel combined approach to assess three members of the coral holobiont: the coral-host, associated Symbiodinium algae, and bacteria. We profiled three conditions: (1) healthy-appearing colonies (HH), (2) healthy-appearing tissue on diseased colonies (HD), and (3) diseased lesion (DD). Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed health state-specific diversity in Symbiodinium clade associations. 16S ribosomal RNA gene microarrays (PhyloChips) and O. faveolata complimentary DNA microarrays revealed the bacterial community structure and host transcriptional response, respectively. A distinct bacterial community structure marked each health state. Diseased samples were associated with two to three times more bacterial diversity. HD samples had the highest bacterial richness, which included components associated with HH and DD, as well as additional unique families. The host transcriptome under YBD revealed a reduced cellular expression of defense- and metabolism-related processes, while the neighboring HD condition exhibited an intermediate expression profile. Although HD tissue appeared visibly healthy, the microbial communities and gene expression profiles were distinct. HD should be regarded as an additional (intermediate) state of disease, which is important for understanding the progression of YBD. PMID:24950107

  6. Coral transcriptome and bacterial community profiles reveal distinct Yellow Band Disease states in Orbicella faveolata

    PubMed Central

    Closek, Collin J; Sunagawa, Shinichi; DeSalvo, Michael K; Piceno, Yvette M; DeSantis, Todd Z; Brodie, Eoin L; Weber, Michele X; Voolstra, Christian R; Andersen, Gary L; Medina, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    Coral diseases impact reefs globally. Although we continue to describe diseases, little is known about the etiology or progression of even the most common cases. To examine a spectrum of coral health and determine factors of disease progression we examined Orbicella faveolata exhibiting signs of Yellow Band Disease (YBD), a widespread condition in the Caribbean. We used a novel combined approach to assess three members of the coral holobiont: the coral-host, associated Symbiodinium algae, and bacteria. We profiled three conditions: (1) healthy-appearing colonies (HH), (2) healthy-appearing tissue on diseased colonies (HD), and (3) diseased lesion (DD). Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed health state-specific diversity in Symbiodinium clade associations. 16S ribosomal RNA gene microarrays (PhyloChips) and O. faveolata complimentary DNA microarrays revealed the bacterial community structure and host transcriptional response, respectively. A distinct bacterial community structure marked each health state. Diseased samples were associated with two to three times more bacterial diversity. HD samples had the highest bacterial richness, which included components associated with HH and DD, as well as additional unique families. The host transcriptome under YBD revealed a reduced cellular expression of defense- and metabolism-related processes, while the neighboring HD condition exhibited an intermediate expression profile. Although HD tissue appeared visibly healthy, the microbial communities and gene expression profiles were distinct. HD should be regarded as an additional (intermediate) state of disease, which is important for understanding the progression of YBD. PMID:24950107

  7. Chagas disease: a proposal for testing policy for solid-organ transplant in the United States.

    PubMed

    Wallace, James A; Miller, Linda; Beavis, Andrew; Baptista, Carlos A C

    2013-09-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The disease is difficult to detect because of the asymptomatic pathogenesis after infection. Chagas disease is endemic throughout much of Mexico, Central America, and South America, but human migration patterns are bringing the pathogen to the United States. The disease currently affects 16 to 18 million people with approximately 50 000 deaths annually in these countries. In the United States, national screening of the blood supply was instituted in early 2007, and more than 1000 donors with T cruzi infection have been identified within the past 3 years of testing. It was observed that out of the 58 organ procurement organizations in the United States, only 4 required mandatory testing of every donor for Chagas disease. It was estimated that as of 2009, approximately 409 000 residents are living with Chagas disease, and in a 22-year span, approximately 300 patients may have contracted Chagas disease through transplant. Proposed solutions to the current testing method include automatic testing based on the medical social history questionnaire, testing of all recipients for Chagas disease, testing all persons of Latin descent, or testing of all organ donors. PMID:23996948

  8. A Chronic Disease State Simulation in an Ambulatory Care Elective Course

    PubMed Central

    Roberson, Cindy Leslie A.; Prasad-Reddy, Lalita

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To implement a chronic disease state simulation in an ambulatory care elective course and to assess the simulation’s impact on students’ perceptions of their empathy toward patients and of their counseling skills. Design. The chronic disease state simulation occurred over 2 weeks. Students alternated playing the role of patient and pharmacist. As patients, students adhered to medication regimens, lifestyle modifications, and blood glucose or blood pressure monitoring. As pharmacists, students conducted patient interviews, and provided education and counseling. Empathy and counseling skills were assessed through course surveys, written reflections, and SOAP notes. Assessment. Results from a cohort of 130 students indicated the simulation enhanced students’ perceptions of their abilities to empathize with and counsel patients with chronic diseases. Conclusion. The chronic disease state simulation provides a novel approach to develop skills needed for working with complex patient cases in ambulatory care settings. PMID:26839423

  9. TIPS Versus Peritoneovenous Shunt in the Treatment of Medically Intractable Ascites

    PubMed Central

    Rosemurgy, Alexander S.; Zervos, Emmanuel E.; Clark, Whalen C.; Thometz, Donald P.; Black, Thomas J.; Zwiebel, Bruce R.; Kudryk, Bruce T.; Grundy, L Shane; Carey, Larry C.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: We undertook a prospective randomized clinical trial comparing TIPS to peritoneovenous (PV) shunts in the treatment of medically intractable ascites to establish relative efficacy and morbidity, and thereby superiority, between these shunts. Methods: Thirty-two patients were prospectively randomized to undergo TIPS or peritoneovenous (Denver) shunts. All patients had failed medical therapy. Results: After TIPS versus peritoneovenous shunts, median (mean ± SD) duration of shunt patency was similar: 4.4 months (6 ± 6.6 months) versus 4.0 months (5 ± 4.6 months). Assisted shunt patency was longer after TIPS: 31.1 months (41 ± 25.9 months) versus 13.1 months (19 ± 17.3 months) (P < 0.01, Wilcoxon test). Ultimately, after TIPS 19% of patients had irreversible shunt occlusion versus 38% of patients after peritoneovenous shunts. Survival after TIPS was 28.7 months (41 ± 28.7 months) versus 16.1 months (28 ± 29.7 months) after peritoneovenous shunts. Control of ascites was achieved sooner after peritoneovenous shunts than after TIPS (73% vs. 46% after 1 month), but longer-term efficacy favored TIPS (eg, 85% vs. 40% at 3 years). Conclusion: TIPS and peritoneovenous shunts treat medically intractable ascites. Absence of ascites after either is uncommon. PV shunts control ascites sooner, although TIPS provides better long-term efficacy. After either shunt, numerous interventions are required to assist patency. Assisted shunt patency is better after TIPS. Treating medically refractory ascites with TIPS risks early shunt-related mortality for prospects of longer survival with ascites control. This study promotes the application of TIPS for medically intractable ascites if patients undergoing TIPS have prospects beyond short-term survival. PMID:15166968

  10. Chemotactic and mitogenic stimuli of neuronal apoptosis in patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Fiala, Milan; Avagyan, Hripsime; Merino, Jose Joaquin; Bernas, Michael; Valdivia, Juan; Espinosa-Jeffrey, Araceli; Witte, Marlys; Weinand, Martin

    2012-01-01

    To identify the upstream signals of neuronal apoptosis in patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), we evaluated by immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy brain tissues of 13 TLE patients and 5 control patients regarding expression of chemokines and cell-cycle proteins. The chemokine RANTES (CCR5) and other CC-chemokines and apoptotic markers (caspase-3, -8, -9) were expressed in lateral temporal cortical and hippocampal neurons of TLE patients, but not in neurons of control cases. The chemokine RANTES is usually found in cytoplasmic and extracellular locations. However, in TLE neurons, RANTES was displayed in an unusual location, the neuronal nuclei. In addition, the cell-cycle regulatory transcription factor E2F1 was found in an abnormal location in neuronal cytoplasm. The pro-inflammatory enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 and cytokine interleukin-1β were expressed both in neurons of patients suffering from temporal lobe epilepsy and from cerebral trauma. The vessels showed fibrin leakage, perivascular macrophages and expression of IL-6 on endothelial cells. In conclusion, the cytoplasmic effects of E2F1 and nuclear effects of RANTES might have novel roles in neuronal apoptosis of TLE neurons and indicate a need to develop new medical and/or surgical neuroprotective strategies against apoptotic signaling by these molecules. Both RANTES and E2F1 signaling are upstream from caspase activation, thus the antagonists of RANTES and/or E2F1 blockade might be neuroprotective for patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. The results have implications for the development of new medical and surgical therapies based on inhibition of chemotactic and mitogenic stimuli of neuronal apoptosis in patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:22444245

  11. The Ketogenic and Atkins Diets Effect on Intractable Epilepsy: A Comparison

    PubMed Central

    GHAZAVI, Ahad; TONEKABONI, Seyed Hassan; KARIMZADEH, Parvaneh; NIKIBAKHSH, Ahmad Ali; KHAJEH, Ali; FAYYAZI, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    Objective Intractable epilepsy is a major difficulty in child neurology, because the numbers of drugs that are available for treatment are limited and new treatments such as diets must be tried. Now there are some diets available for treating patients with intractable epilepsy. The oldest diet is the classic ketogenic diet and one of the newest diets is the modified Atkins diet. Patients have a harder time accepting the classic ketogenic diet than the Atkins diet, which is easier to accept because the food tastes better. This study compares the efficacy of the ketogenic diet and the Atkins diet for intractable epilepsy in children. Materials & Methods This study is a clinical trial survey with sample size of 40 children with refractory epilepsy who were patients at Mofid hospital in Tehran, Iran. Initially, from Jan 2005–Oct 2007, 20 children were treated with the Atkins diet, and then from Oct 2007–March 2010, the other group was treated with the classic ketogenic diet and the results were compared. Results In this study, response to treatment was greater than a 50% reduction in seizures and at the end of first, second, and third months for the ketogenic diet were 55%, 30%, and 70% and for the Atkins diet were 50%, 65%, and 70%, respectively. Conclusion The results of this study show that there is no significant difference between the classic Ketogenic diet and the Atkins diet at the end of first, second, and third months and both had similar responses to the treatments. PMID:25143768

  12. DNA modifications: function and applications in normal and disease States.

    PubMed

    Liyanage, Vichithra R B; Jarmasz, Jessica S; Murugeshan, Nanditha; Del Bigio, Marc R; Rastegar, Mojgan; Davie, James R

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetics refers to a variety of processes that have heritable effects on gene expression programs without changes in DNA sequence. Key players in epigenetic control are chemical modifications to DNA, histone, and non-histone chromosomal proteins, which establish a complex regulatory network that controls genome function. Methylation of DNA at the fifth position of cytosine in CpG dinucleotides (5-methylcytosine, 5mC), which is carried out by DNA methyltransferases, is commonly associated with gene silencing. However, high resolution mapping of DNA methylation has revealed that 5mC is enriched in exonic nucleosomes and at intron-exon junctions, suggesting a role of DNA methylation in the relationship between elongation and RNA splicing. Recent studies have increased our knowledge of another modification of DNA, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), which is a product of the ten-eleven translocation (TET) proteins converting 5mC to 5hmC. In this review, we will highlight current studies on the role of 5mC and 5hmC in regulating gene expression (using some aspects of brain development as examples). Further the roles of these modifications in detection of pathological states (type 2 diabetes, Rett syndrome, fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and teratogen exposure) will be discussed. PMID:25340699

  13. DNA Modifications: Function and Applications in Normal and Disease States

    PubMed Central

    Liyanage, Vichithra R. B.; Jarmasz, Jessica S.; Murugeshan, Nanditha; Del Bigio, Marc R.; Rastegar, Mojgan; Davie, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetics refers to a variety of processes that have heritable effects on gene expression programs without changes in DNA sequence. Key players in epigenetic control are chemical modifications to DNA, histone, and non-histone chromosomal proteins, which establish a complex regulatory network that controls genome function. Methylation of DNA at the fifth position of cytosine in CpG dinucleotides (5-methylcytosine, 5mC), which is carried out by DNA methyltransferases, is commonly associated with gene silencing. However, high resolution mapping of DNA methylation has revealed that 5mC is enriched in exonic nucleosomes and at intron-exon junctions, suggesting a role of DNA methylation in the relationship between elongation and RNA splicing. Recent studies have increased our knowledge of another modification of DNA, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), which is a product of the ten-eleven translocation (TET) proteins converting 5mC to 5hmC. In this review, we will highlight current studies on the role of 5mC and 5hmC in regulating gene expression (using some aspects of brain development as examples). Further the roles of these modifications in detection of pathological states (type 2 diabetes, Rett syndrome, fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and teratogen exposure) will be discussed. PMID:25340699

  14. Distal, intermediate, and proximal mediators of racial disparities in renal disease mortality in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Assari, Shervin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Kidney failure and associated mortality is one of the major components of racial disparities in the United States. Objectives: The current study aimed to investigate the role of distal (socioeconomic status, SES), intermediate (chronic medical diseases), and proximal (health behaviors) factors that may explain Black-White disparities in mortality due to renal diseases. Patients and Methods: This is a nationally representative prospective cohort with 25 years of follow up. Data came from the Americans’ Changing Lives (ACL) study, 1986 to 2011. The study included 3361 Black (n = 1156) or White (n = 2205) adults who were followed for up to 25 years. Race was the main predictor and death due to renal disease was the outcome. SES, chronic medical disease (diabetes, hypertension, obesity), and health behaviors (smoking, drinking, and exercise) at baseline were potential mediators. We used Cox proportional hazards models for data analysis. Results: In age and gender adjusted models, Blacks had higher risk of death due to renal disease over the follow up period. Separate models suggested that SES, health behaviors and chronic medical disease fully explained the effect of race on renal disease mortality. Conclusions: Black-White disparities in rate of death due to renal diseases in the United States are not genuine but secondary to racial differences in income, health behaviors, hypertension, and diabetes. As distal, intermediate, and proximal factors contribute to racial disparities in renal disease mortality, elimination of such disparities requires a wide range of policies and programs that target income, medical conditions, and health behaviors. PMID:27047811

  15. Rhabdomyolysis After Cooked Seafood Consumption (Haff Disease) in the United States vs China

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, James H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Haff disease is a syndrome of myalgia and rhabdomyolysis that occurs after eating cooked seafood. Methods For this descriptive analytical article, a literature search identified the scientific articles on Haff disease and/or rhabdomyolysis after eating cooked seafood in the United States and China. Analysis of those articles focused on identifying the seafood vectors of Haff disease, describing the most commonly recurring clinical and laboratory manifestations of Haff disease, and comparing the Haff disease toxidrome with other similar seafood-borne toxidromes. Statistically significant differences were determined using unpaired t tests and Fisher exact tests. Results Twenty-nine confirmed cases of Haff disease were identified in the United States, and 60 cases were identified in China during 1984-2014. Most of the US cases followed consumption of buffalo fish, and most of the Chinese cases followed consumption of freshwater pomfret. However, Haff disease also followed consumption of the same species of boiled crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) in the United States (n=9) and China (n=6). US patients with crayfish-transmitted Haff disease reported significantly more nausea with and without vomiting, chest pain, body and back pain, dyspnea, and diaphoresis than the Chinese patients and were more frequently misdiagnosed as having myocardial infarctions. Conclusion The bioaccumulation of a new, heat-stable freshwater and/or brackish/saltwater algal toxin, similar to palytoxin but primarily myotoxic and not neurotoxic, is suspected of causing Haff disease. At present, only the rapid identification of the seafood vectors of Haff disease will limit disease outbreaks and prevent further cases. PMID:26130980

  16. Role of hyperbaric medicine for intractable leg ulcers: a case report.

    PubMed

    Skeik, N; Kia, F; Klosterman, D

    2014-10-01

    We present a case report of intractable multifactorial leg ulcer that was treated successfully with multiple approaches including hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT) to prepare for skin grafting. A 66-year-old female with a history of rheumatoid arthritis and Felty's syndrome presented with a non-healing ulcer on her left leg that was caused by a trauma. She failed multiple treatment options including debridement, different wound dressings, antibiotics, anti-inflammatories and vein closure procedure. She finally healed with skin graft following HBOT that prepared the wound bed before the procedure. PMID:25289650

  17. Hot water irrigation as treatment for intractable posterior epistaxis in an out-patient setting.

    PubMed

    Novoa, E; Schlegel-Wagner, C

    2012-01-01

    The management of intractable posterior epistaxis is challenging for any physician. Nasal packing, often combined with use of an endonasal balloon system, is painful for the patient, and torturous to maintain for two to three days. If conservative treatment fails, the most commonly used treatment options are currently invasive procedures such as endoscopic coagulation of bleeding arteries, external ligation and, rarely, embolisation. This paper describes a simple, non-invasive technique of treating posterior epistaxis with hot water irrigation. Technical information is presented, and the benefits of the method are discussed. PMID:21888749

  18. [A case of primary lung cancer complicated with post-operative intractable pulmonary fistula].

    PubMed

    Morio, A; Miyamoto, H; Yamazaki, A; Anami, Y; Oh, S; Izumi, H; Hosoda, Y; Fukuchi, Y

    2000-12-01

    The case was a 76-year-old male. After thoracoscopic left upper lobectomy against primary lung cancer with poor risks such as complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and pulmonary emphysema, oral steroid treatment, heavy smoker, decreased renal function, the patient was complicated with intractable pulmonary fistula and MRSA pyothorax. Intracavitary administration of albumin preparation and fibrin glue (Beriplast P) was effective against pulmonary fistula though it was not helpful in the pleurodesis which was conducted 7 times. Teicoplanin (Targosid) was effective against MRSA pyothorax and maintained the renal function. PMID:11127565

  19. A Qualitative Study of State-level Zoonotic disease surveillance in New England

    PubMed Central

    Scotch, Matthew; Mattocks, Kristin; Rabinowitz, Peter; Brandt, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Summary Zoonotic diseases are infectious diseases transmittable between animals and humans and outbreaks of these diseases in animals can signify that humans are also infected (or vice-versa). Thus, communication between animal and human health agencies is critical for surveillance. Understanding how these agencies conduct surveillance and share information is important for development of successful automated zoonotic monitoring systems. Individual interviews were conducted with 13 professionals who perform animal or human zoonotic disease surveillance in one of the New England states. Questions centered on existing surveillance methods, collaborations between animal and human health agencies, and technological and data needs. The results showed that agencies routinely communicate over suspected zoonotic disease cases yet there are barriers preventing automated electronic linking of health data of animals and humans. These include technological barriers and barriers due sensitivity and confidentiality of information. Addressing these will facilitate development of electronic systems for integrating animal and human zoonotic disease surveillance data. PMID:20163575

  20. Challenges in Designing a National Surveillance Program for Inflammatory Bowel Disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Long, Millie D.; Hutfless, Susan; Kappelman, Michael D.; Khalili, Hamed; Kaplan, Gil; Bernstein, Charles N.; Colombel, Jean Frederic; Herrinton, Lisa; Velayos, Fernando; Loftus, Edward V.; Nguyen, Geoffrey C.; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N.; Sonnenberg, Amnon; Chan, Andrew; Sandler, Robert S.; Atreja, Ashish; Shah, Samir A.; Rothman, Kenneth; Leleiko, Neal S.; Bright, Renee; Boffetta, Paolo; Myers, Kelly D.; Sands, Bruce E.

    2015-01-01

    This review describes the history of US government funding for surveillance programs in IBD, provides current estimates of the incidence and prevalence of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) in the United States (US), and enumerates a number of challenges faced by current and future IBD surveillance programs. A rationale for expanding the focus of IBD surveillance beyond counts of incidence and prevalence, in order to provide a greater understanding of the burden of IBD, disease etiology and pathogenesis, is provided. Lessons learned from other countries are summarized, as well as potential resources that may be used to optimize a new form of IBD surveillance in the US. A consensus recommendation on the goals and available resources for a new model for disease surveillance are provided. This new model should focus upon “surveillance of the burden of disease,” including 1) natural history of disease and 2) outcomes and complications of the disease and/or treatments. PMID:24280882

  1. No Geographic Correlation between Lyme Disease and Death Due to 4 Neurodegenerative Disorders, United States, 2001–2010

    PubMed Central

    Kugeler, Kiersten J.; Perea, Anna E.; Pastula, Daniel M.; Mead, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Associations between Lyme disease and certain neurodegenerative diseases have been proposed, but supportive evidence for an association is lacking. Similar geographic distributions would be expected if 2 conditions were etiologically linked. Thus, we compared the distribution of Lyme disease cases in the United States with the distributions of deaths due to Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis (MS), and Parkinson disease; no geographic correlations were identified. Lyme disease incidence per US state was not correlated with rates of death due to ALS, MS, or Parkinson disease; however, an inverse correlation was detected between Lyme disease and Alzheimer disease. The absence of a positive correlation between the geographic distribution of Lyme disease and the distribution of deaths due to Alzheimer disease, ALS, MS, and Parkinson disease provides further evidence that Lyme disease is not associated with the development of these neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:26488307

  2. Secular trends in ischemic heart disease mortality in California versus the United States, 1980 to 1991.

    PubMed

    Karter, A J; Casper, M L; Cohen, R D; Gazzaniga, J M; Blanton, C J; Kaplan, G A

    1997-03-01

    We compare the recent trends in ischemic heart disease mortality in California and the United States. Because California was among the first states to have declines in ischemic heart disease mortality, an examination of these recent trends may provide important clues for upcoming national trends. Age-adjusted and -specific ischemic heart disease mortality rates were calculated by sex for persons aged 35 and older during the years 1980 to 1991. Log-linear regression modeling was used to estimate the average annual percentage change in mortality. Between 1980 and 1991, the annual age-adjusted ischemic heart disease mortality declined less in California than in the United States for both women (1.9% versus 3.1%) and men (3.1% versus 3.5%). In California, it increased slightly between 1986 and 1990 for the oldest women and men. The slower rates of decline in mortality of this disease in California compared with the United States and the rising rates among the most elderly Californians suggest that careful attention should be paid to these trends in death rates of and risk factors for this disease in California. PMID:9143193

  3. Resting-state networks link invasive and noninvasive brain stimulation across diverse psychiatric and neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Michael D.; Buckner, Randy L.; Liu, Hesheng; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Lozano, Andres M.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Brain stimulation, a therapy increasingly used for neurological and psychiatric disease, traditionally is divided into invasive approaches, such as deep brain stimulation (DBS), and noninvasive approaches, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation. The relationship between these approaches is unknown, therapeutic mechanisms remain unclear, and the ideal stimulation site for a given technique is often ambiguous, limiting optimization of the stimulation and its application in further disorders. In this article, we identify diseases treated with both types of stimulation, list the stimulation sites thought to be most effective in each disease, and test the hypothesis that these sites are different nodes within the same brain network as defined by resting-state functional-connectivity MRI. Sites where DBS was effective were functionally connected to sites where noninvasive brain stimulation was effective across diseases including depression, Parkinson's disease, obsessive-compulsive disorder, essential tremor, addiction, pain, minimally conscious states, and Alzheimer’s disease. A lack of functional connectivity identified sites where stimulation was ineffective, and the sign of the correlation related to whether excitatory or inhibitory noninvasive stimulation was found clinically effective. These results suggest that resting-state functional connectivity may be useful for translating therapy between stimulation modalities, optimizing treatment, and identifying new stimulation targets. More broadly, this work supports a network perspective toward understanding and treating neuropsychiatric disease, highlighting the therapeutic potential of targeted brain network modulation. PMID:25267639

  4. Identifying Mutations of the Tetratricopeptide Repeat Domain 37 (TTC37) Gene in Infants With Intractable Diarrhea and a Comparison of Asian and Non-Asian Phenotype and Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen-I; Huang, Jing-Long; Chen, Chien-Chang; Lin, Ju-Li; Wu, Ren-Chin; Jaing, Tang-Her; Ou, Liang-Shiou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Syndromic diarrhea/tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome (SD/THE) is a rare, autosomal recessive and severe bowel disorder mainly caused by mutations in the tetratricopeptide repeat domain 37 (TTC37) gene which act as heterotetrameric cofactors to enhance aberrant mRNAs decay. The phenotype and immune profiles of SD/THE overlap those of primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs). Neonates with intractable diarrhea underwent immunologic assessments including immunoglobulin levels, lymphocyte subsets, lymphocyte proliferation, superoxide production, and IL-10 signaling function. Candidate genes for PIDs predisposing to inflammatory bowel disease were sequencing in this study. Two neonates, born to nonconsanguineous parents, suffered from intractable diarrhea, recurrent infections, and massive hematemesis from esopharyngeal varices due to liver cirrhosis or accompanying Trichorrhexis nodosa that developed with age and thus guided the diagnosis of SD/THE compatible to TTC37 mutations (homozygous DelK1155H, Fs∗2; heterozygous Y1169Ter and InsA1143, Fs∗3). Their immunologic evaluation showed normal mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation, superoxide production, and IL-10 signaling, but low IgG levels, undetectable antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen and decreased antigen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation. A PubMed search for bi-allelic TTC37 mutations and phenotypes were recorded in 14 Asian and 12 non-Asian cases. They had similar presentations of infantile onset refractory diarrhea, facial dysmorphism, hair anomalies, low IgG, low birth weight, and consanguinity. A higher incidence of heart anomalies (8/14 vs 2/12; P = 0.0344, Chi-square), nonsense mutations (19 in 28 alleles), and hot-spot mutations (W936Ter, 2779-2G>A, and Y1169Ter) were found in the Asian compared with the non-Asian patients. Despite immunoglobulin therapy in 20 of the patients, 4 died from liver cirrhosis and 1 died from sepsis. Patients of all ethnicities with SD/THE with the characteristic triad of T nodosa, hepatic cirrhosis, and intractable enteropathy have low IgG, poor vaccine response and/or decreased antigen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation. This is now better classified into the subgroup of “well-defined syndromes with immunodeficiency” (the update termed as “combined immunodeficiencies with associated or syndromic features”) than “predominantly antibody deficiencies” in the update PIDs classification, and requires optimal interventions. PMID:26945392

  5. Geographic Expansion of Lyme Disease in the Southeastern United States, 2000–2014

    PubMed Central

    Lantos, Paul M.; Nigrovic, Lise E.; Auwaerter, Paul G.; Fowler, Vance G.; Ruffin, Felicia; Brinkerhoff, R. Jory; Reber, Jodi; Williams, Carl; Broyhill, James; Pan, William K.; Gaines, David N.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The majority of Lyme disease cases in the United States are acquired on the east coast between northern Virginia and New England. In recent years the geographic extent of Lyme disease has been expanding, raising the prospect of Lyme disease becoming endemic in the southeast. Methods. We collected confirmed and probable cases of Lyme disease from 2000 through 2014 from the Virginia Department of Health and North Carolina Department of Public Health and entered them in a geographic information system. We performed spatial and spatiotemporal cluster analyses to characterize Lyme disease expansion. Results. There was a marked increase in Lyme disease cases in Virginia, particularly from 2007 onwards. Northern Virginia experienced intensification and geographic expansion of Lyme disease cases. The most notable area of expansion was to the southwest along the Appalachian Mountains with development of a new disease cluster in the southern Virginia mountain region. Conclusions. The geographic distribution of Lyme disease cases significantly expanded in Virginia between 2000 and 2014, particularly southward in the Virginia mountain ranges. If these trends continue, North Carolina can expect autochthonous Lyme disease transmission in its mountain region in the coming years. PMID:26550580

  6. Jamestown Canyon Virus Disease in the United States-2000-2013.

    PubMed

    Pastula, Daniel M; Hoang Johnson, Diep K; White, Jennifer L; Dupuis, Alan P; Fischer, Marc; Staples, J Erin

    2015-08-01

    Jamestown Canyon virus (JCV) is a mosquito-borne orthobunyavirus in the California serogroup that can cause an acute febrile illness, meningitis, or meningoencephalitis. We describe epidemiologic and clinical features for JCV disease cases occurring in the United States during 2000-2013. A case of JCV disease was defined as an acute illness in a person with laboratory evidence of a recent JCV infection. During 2000-2013, we identified 31 cases of JCV disease in residents of 13 states. The median age was 48 years (range, 10-69) and 21 (68%) were male. Eleven (35%) case patients had meningoencephalitis, 6 (19%) meningitis, 7 (23%) fever without neurologic involvement, and 7 (23%) had an unknown clinical syndrome. Fifteen (48%) were hospitalized and there were no deaths. Health-care providers and public health officials should consider JCV disease in the differential diagnoses of viral meningitis and encephalitis, obtain appropriate specimens for testing, and report cases to public health authorities. PMID:26033022

  7. Intracranial Chronic Subdural Hematoma Presenting with Intractable Headache after Cervical Epidural Steroid Injection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myungsoo

    2015-01-01

    Postdural punctural headache (PDPH) following spinal anesthesia is due to intracranial hypotension caused by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage, and it is occasionally accompanied by an intracranial hematoma. To the best of our knowledge, an intracranial chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) presenting with an intractable headache after a cervical epidural steroid injection (ESI) has not been reported. A 39-year-old woman without any history of trauma underwent a cervical ESI for a herniated nucleus pulposus at the C5-6 level. One month later, she presented with a severe headache that was not relieved by analgesic medication, which changed in character from being positional to non-positional during the preceding month. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed a CSDH along the left convexity. Emergency burr-hole drainage was performed and the headache abated. This report indicates that an intracranial CSDH should be considered a possible complication after ESI. In addition, the event of an intractable and changing PDPH after ESI suggests further evaluation for diagnosis of an intracranial hematoma. PMID:26361532

  8. Tackling learning intractability through topological organization and regulation of cortical networks.

    PubMed

    Thangavelautham, Jekanthan; D'Eleuterio, Gabriele M T

    2012-04-01

    A key challenge in evolving control systems for robots using neural networks is training tractability. Evolving monolithic fixed topology neural networks is shown to be intractable with limited supervision in high dimensional search spaces. Common strategies to overcome this limitation are to provide more supervision by encouraging particular solution strategies, manually decomposing the task and segmenting the search space and network. These strategies require a supervisor with domain knowledge and may not be feasible for difficult tasks where novel concepts are required. The alternate strategy is to use self-organized task decomposition to solve difficult tasks with limited supervision. The artificial neural tissue (ANT) approach presented here uses self-organized task decomposition to solve tasks. ANT inspired by neurobiology combines standard neural networks with a novel wireless signaling scheme modeling chemical diffusion of neurotransmitters. These chemicals are used to dynamically activate and inhibit wired network of neurons using a coarse-coding framework. Using only a global fitness function that does not encourage a predefined solution, modular networks of neurons are shown to self-organize and perform task decomposition. This approach solves the sign-following task found to be intractable with conventional fixed and variable topology networks. In this paper, key attributes of the ANT architecture that perform self-organized task decomposition are shown. The architecture is robust and scalable to number of neurons, synaptic connections, and initialization parameters. PMID:24805039

  9. [Ketogenic diet for intractable childhood epilepsy; as an early option as well as a last resort].

    PubMed

    Ito, Susumu; Oguni, Hirokazu

    2011-04-01

    Since the 1920s, a ketogenic diet, of low-carbohydrate, adequate-protein and high-fat content, has been used for the treatment of intractable childhood epilepsy. A decade ago this diet was tried as a last resort in the treatment of intractable epilepsy. However, recent advances in ketogenic diet have enabled it to become more commonly used worldwide even early in the course of epilepsy. Two less-restrictive ketogenic diets, namely, the modified Atkins diet and low-glycemic-index treatment, have been developed. These diets allow the patients and their families to choose a more liberal menu. Furthermore, a randomized controlled trial found that the ketogenic diet has a significant benefit, which strengthens the supportive evidence. Recently, an international consensus statement guiding optimal clinical management has been published, allowing clinicians to provide standardized treatment. There has also been increased interest in investigating the mechanisms of action of ketogenic diet using various experimental models. The authors review the history, efficacy, side effects, and possible mechanisms underlying the ketogenic diet, as well as the experience with the ketogenic diet at Tokyo Women's Medical University. PMID:21441643

  10. Intractable Persistent Direction-Changing Geotropic Nystagmus Improved by Lateral Semicircular Canal Plugging

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Kazuya; Doi, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    Antigravitational deviation of the cupula of the lateral semicircular canal, which is also called light cupula, evokes persistent direction-changing geotropic nystagmus with a neutral point. No intractable cases of this condition have been reported. In our case, a 67-year-old man complained of positional vertigo 3 months after developing idiopathic sudden hearing loss in the right ear with vertigo. He showed a persistent direction-changing geotropic nystagmus with a leftward beating nystagmus in the supine position. The nystagmus resolved when his head was turned approximately 30 to the right. He was diagnosed with light cupula of the right lateral semicircular canal and was subsequently treated with an antivertiginous agent. However, his symptoms and positional nystagmus did not improve, so the right lateral semicircular canal was plugged by surgery. One month after surgery, his positional vertigo and nystagmus were completely resolved. We speculated that the cause of the patient's intractable light cupula was an enlarged cupula caused by his idiopathic sudden hearing loss. PMID:25685577

  11. Intractable persistent direction-changing geotropic nystagmus improved by lateral semicircular canal plugging.

    PubMed

    Seo, Toru; Saito, Kazuya; Doi, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    Antigravitational deviation of the cupula of the lateral semicircular canal, which is also called light cupula, evokes persistent direction-changing geotropic nystagmus with a neutral point. No intractable cases of this condition have been reported. In our case, a 67-year-old man complained of positional vertigo 3 months after developing idiopathic sudden hearing loss in the right ear with vertigo. He showed a persistent direction-changing geotropic nystagmus with a leftward beating nystagmus in the supine position. The nystagmus resolved when his head was turned approximately 30 to the right. He was diagnosed with light cupula of the right lateral semicircular canal and was subsequently treated with an antivertiginous agent. However, his symptoms and positional nystagmus did not improve, so the right lateral semicircular canal was plugged by surgery. One month after surgery, his positional vertigo and nystagmus were completely resolved. We speculated that the cause of the patient's intractable light cupula was an enlarged cupula caused by his idiopathic sudden hearing loss. PMID:25685577

  12. Chronic bilateral thalamic stimulation: a new therapeutic approach in intractable Tourette syndrome. Report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Temel, Yasin; Boon, Peter; Vreeling, Fred; Colle, Henry; Hoogland, Govert; Groenewegen, Henk J; van der Linden, Chris

    2003-12-01

    Based on the results of thalamotomies described by Hassler in 1970, the authors performed bilateral thalamic high-frequency stimulation (HFS) in three patients with intractable Tourette syndrome (TS). In this report they describe the long-term effects. Three male patients (42, 28, and 45 years of age) had manifested motor and vocal tics since early childhood. The diagnosis of TS was made according to the criteria of the Tourette Syndrome Classification Study Group. Any drug or alternative treatment had been either ineffective or only temporarily effective in all three patients. There was no serious comorbidity. The target for stimulation was chosen at the level of the centromedian nucleus, substantia periventricularis, and nucleus ventrooralis internus. After 2 weeks of test stimulation, the pulse generators were implanted. After a follow-up period of 5 years in the patient in Case 1, 1 year in the patient in Case 2, and 8 months in the patient in Case 3, all major motor and vocal tics had disappeared and no serious complications had occurred. When stimulation was applied at the voltage necessary to achieve an optimal result on the tics, a slight sedative effect was noted in all three patients. In the patients in Cases 1 and 3 there were stimulation-induced changes in sexual behavior. Chronic thalamic HFS may be an effective and safe treatment for medically intractable TS in adult patients. Unwanted stimulation-induced side effects may occur. PMID:14705742

  13. Effects of disease severity and medication state on postural control asymmetry during challenging postural tasks in individuals with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Fabio A; Polastri, Paula F; Baptista, André M; Lirani-Silva, Ellen; Simieli, Lucas; Orcioli-Silva, Diego; Beretta, Victor S; Gobbi, Lilian T B

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of disease severity and medication state on postural control asymmetry during challenging tasks in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). Nineteen people with PD and 11 neurologically healthy individuals performed three standing task conditions: bipedal standing, tandem and unipedal adapted standing; the individuals with PD performed the tasks in ON and OFF medication state. The participants with PD were distributed into 2 groups according to disease severity: unilateral group (n=8) and bilateral group (n=11). The two PD groups performed the evaluations both under and without the medication. Two force plates were used to analyze the posture. The symmetric index was calculated for various of center of pressure. ANOVA one-way (groups) and two-way (PD groups×medication), with repeated measures for medication, were calculated. For main effects of group, the bilateral group was more asymmetric than CG. For main effects of medication, only unipedal adapted standing presented effects of PD medication. There was PD groups×medication interaction. Under the effects of medication, the unilateral group presented lower asymmetry of RMS in anterior-posterior direction and area than the bilateral group in unipedal adapted standing. In addition, the unilateral group presented lower asymmetry of mean velocity, RMS in anterior-posterior direction and area in unipedal standing and area in tandem adapted standing after a medication dose. Postural control asymmetry during challenging postural tasks was dependent on disease severity and medication state in people with PD. The bilateral group presented higher postural control asymmetry than the control and unilateral groups in challenging postural tasks. Finally, the medication dose was able to reduce postural control asymmetry in the unilateral group during challenging postural tasks. PMID:26741255

  14. Incidence of notifiable diseases among American Indians/Alaska Natives - United States, 2007-2011.

    PubMed

    Adekoya, Nelson; Truman, Benedict; Landen, Michael

    2015-01-16

    American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations experience substantial disparities in the incidence of multiple diseases compared with other racial/ethnic groups in the United States. A major goal of Healthy People 2020 is to eliminate health disparities, monitor disease trends, and identify population groups and diseases for targeted interventions. High rates of certain infectious diseases continue to be a major problem facing AI/AN populations. During 1990-2011, incidence rates for some infectious diseases declined among AI/AN populations, but disparities remain and AI/AN populations are still disproportionately affected. To describe disparities in selected notifiable diseases among AI/ANs, CDC analyzed data from the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS) for 2007-2011, the most recent 5 years for which data are available. The results of this analysis of 26 infectious diseases indicate that incidence rates of 14 diseases were higher for AI/ANs than for whites. Interventions are needed to address and reduce disparities in chlamydia, gonorrhea, West Nile virus, spotted fever rickettsiosis, and other infections among AI/ANs. PMID:25590681

  15. The burden of infectious diseases in the Brazilian Southern state of Santa Catarina.

    PubMed

    Traebert, Jefferson; Nickel, Daniela A; Traebert, Eliane; Escalante, Juan J C; Schneider, Ione J C

    2016-01-01

    Infectious diseases are still significant causes of deaths in Brazil. The objective of this study was to estimate the burden of selected infectious diseases in the Brazilian Southern state of Santa Catarina in 2011. An ecological study was conducted. The infectious diseases included were HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, Chagas disease, diarrheal diseases and other infectious diseases. Data were collected from official health information systems. Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALY) were estimated by the sum of Years of Life Lost (YLL) and Years Lived with Disability (YLD). 45,237.33 DALYs were estimated, with a rate of 685.46 DALYs per 100,000 population. 92.9% was due to YLL and 7.1% to YLD. Men and the age range of 0-4 years presented higher burden. The highest burden was attributed to HIV/AIDS. There was a high concentration of burden rates in the coast regions of the state. It could be concluded that more than 90% of the burden was attributed to the early mortality component. The highest burden was observed among men, children under 5 years of age and at the coast regions of the state. The highest levels of burden were due to HIV/AIDS. PMID:26608780

  16. Survey of Obstetrician-Gynecologists in the United States About Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Verani, Jennifer R.; Montgomery, Susan P.; Schulkin, Jay; Anderson, Britta; Jones, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    Chagas disease affects an estimated 300,000 people in the United States, and as many as 300 congenital infections are estimated to occur annually. The level of knowledge about Chagas disease among obstetricians-gynecologists in the United States has not been assessed. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists surveyed a representative sample of 1,000 members about Chagas disease. Among 421 respondents, 68.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 63.5–72.6) described their knowledge level about Chagas disease as “very limited.” Only 8.8% (95% CI = 6.2–12.0) knew the risk of congenital infection, and 7.4% (95% CI = 5.1–10.4) were aware that both acute and chronic maternal infections can lead to congenital transmission. The majority of respondents (77.9%; 95% CI = 73.5–81.9) reported “never” considering a diagnosis of Chagas disease among their patients from endemic countries. Most of those who did consider the diagnosis did so “rarely.” Knowledge of Chagas disease among obstetricians-gynecologists in the United States is limited. Greater awareness may help to detect treatable congenital Chagas cases. PMID:20889886

  17. Endemic, Notifiable Bioterrorism-Related Diseases, United States, 1992–1999

    PubMed Central

    Glynn, M. Kathleen; Groseclose, Samuel L.

    2003-01-01

    Little information is available in the United States regarding the incidence and distribution of diseases caused by critical microbiologic agents with the potential for use in acts of terrorism. We describe disease-specific, demographic, geographic, and seasonal distribution of selected bioterrorism-related conditions (anthrax, botulism, brucellosis, cholera, plague, tularemia, and viral encephalitides) reported to the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System in 1992–1999. Tularemia and brucellosis were the most frequently reported diseases. Anthrax, plague, western equine encephalitis, and eastern equine encephalitis were rare. Higher incidence rates for cholera and plague were noted in the western United States and for tularemia in the central United States. Overall, the incidence of conditions caused by these critical agents in the United States is low. Individual case reports should be considered sentinel events. For potential bioterrorism-related conditions that are endemic and have low incidence, the use of nontraditional surveillance methods and complementary data sources may enhance our ability to rapidly detect changes in disease incidence. PMID:12737739

  18. [Ultrasound-guided Sciatic Nerve Block (Pulsed Radiofrequency) for Intractable Cancer Pain Caused by Sacral Bone Metastasis].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Shunsuke; Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Hyoda, Akira; Kuwamura, Ayumu; Kido, Haruki; Minami, Toshiaki

    2015-06-01

    We report a case of successful pulsed radiofrequency stimulation of the sciatic nerve for intractable cancer pain caused by sacral bone metastasis of non-small cell lung cancer. A 57-year-old man who suffered from intractable left femoral pain was diagnosed with cancer metastasis to the sacral bone and lumbar spine. Oral oxycodone relieved the pain at rest but he could not walk or remain sitting due to the pain during exercise. Oxycodone rescue or increase did not relieve the pain, but induced drowsiness. Given that sciatic nerve block with mepivacaine was effective, we performed pulsed radiofrequency with ultrasound guidance twice. Pulsed radiofrequency relieved the left femoral pain and he could sit for hours and walk uneventfully. Our finding suggest that ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency of the sciatic nerve effectively relieves intractable left femoral pain caused by sacral bone metastasis. PMID:26437562

  19. Successful Fecal Bacteria Transplantation and Nurse Management for a Patient With Intractable Functional Constipation: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yingchun; Wang, Xinying; Li, Xuejiao; Peng, Nanhai

    2016-01-01

    Intractable functional constipation is a common gastrointestinal disorder that features persistent difficult defecation, reduced bowel movements, or a feeling of incomplete defecation. Despite many therapeutic approaches, there has not been an established standard treatment protocol. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), an innovative therapy that was introduced recently, has been preliminarily shown to have good effects and is expected to have good prospects. However, nursing is also of great importance during the process of FMT. An innovative nursing care protocol is combined with FMT, with a view to improving the clinical symptoms and quality of life of patients with intractable functional dyspepsia. This case-based study addresses the effects of nursing interventions used during the treatment of one patient with intractable functional constipation who received FMT. PMID:26871249

  20. Identification of Immune Parameters To Differentiate Disease States among Sheep Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Gillan, Sonia; O'Brien, Rory; Hughes, Alan D.; Griffin, J. Frank T.

    2010-01-01

    Johne's disease, a chronic enteritis of ruminants, is caused by infection with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Three distinct forms have been observed in sheep: paucibacillary disease (PB), multibacillary disease (MB), and asymptomatic infection (AS). In this study, immune parameters for animals naturally infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and identified postmortem as having PB, MB, or AS were compared to provide a further understanding of the immunological reactivity contributing to or resulting from these different disease states in sheep. PB was associated with strong ex vivo M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigen-stimulated gamma interferon responses, pronounced increases in CD25+ T-cell frequencies in circulation, antibody production, and a B-cell population that expanded significantly upon ex vivo antigenic stimulation. The MB group featured the highest antibody levels and a lack of cellular immune responsiveness to the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigen. The AS group expressed an immunological phenotype intermediate between that for noninfected control animals and that for the PB group. The relationship between immune responses and disease severity within the PB group was investigated more closely; significant positive correlations were observed between disease severity and both the CD8+ population in the circulating blood and the expression of interleukin-4 mRNA in antigen-stimulated blood samples ex vivo. Together, these data point toward distinct immune profiles in sheep that correspond to different Johne's disease states, which can be determined from circulating blood and/or from localized intestinal tract tissue samples. PMID:19923568

  1. Ebola virus disease cluster in the United States--Dallas County, Texas, 2014.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Michelle S; Chung, Wendy; Smith, Jessica; Weil, Lauren M; Hughes, Sonya M; Joyner, Sibeso N; Hall, Emily; Srinath, Divya; Ritch, Julia; Thathiah, Prea; Threadgill, Heidi; Cervantes, Diana; Lakey, David L

    2014-11-21

    Since March 10, 2014, Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone have experienced the largest known Ebola virus disease (Ebola) epidemic with approximately 13,000 persons infected as of October 28, 2014. Before September 25, 2014, only four patients with Ebola had been treated in the United States; all of these patients had been diagnosed in West Africa and medically evacuated to the United States for care. PMID:25412069

  2. Wetland cover dynamics drive hemorrhagic disease patterns in white-tailed deer in the United States.

    PubMed

    Berry, Brett S; Magori, Krisztian; Perofsky, Amanda C; Stallknecht, David E; Park, Andrew W

    2013-07-01

    While vector-borne diseases are known to be particularly influenced by environmental factors, the impact of land-cover change on vector-borne wildlife disease patterns is poorly understood, largely due to the paucity of data on disease occurrence at extensive spatial and temporal scales. Widespread and rapid anthropogenic land-cover change, especially urbanization, has transformed the US landscape during the last century. Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus and blue tongue virus, vectored by Culicoides biting midges, are two RNA viruses in the Orbivirus genus that cause severe hemorrhagic disease (HD) in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). We examine the spatial dynamics of HD affecting white-tailed deer in the contiguous United States in two periods covering 1980 to 2007 in connection with land-cover change over the same time. Using spatial statistical modeling, wetland cover emerges as a critical driver of HD morbidity, whereas the drivers of mortality patterns are more complex. Increasing wetland cover is positively associated with HD morbidity, which is consistent with the ecologic requirements of the Culicoides vector. Wetland cover is inherently dynamic due to its importance to biodiversity and water quality as well as its utility for other purposes when drained. Accordingly this analysis helps in understanding the consequences of changing wetlands on vector-borne disease patterns, to identify disease hotspots in a large landscape, and to forecast the spatial spread of HD and related diseases. PMID:23778598

  3. Surveillance for Waterborne Disease Outbreaks and Other Health Events Associated with Recreational Water -United States, 2007-2008

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Since 1978, CDC, EPA, and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists have collaborated on the Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System (WBDOSS) to capture data on waterborne disease outbreaks associated with recreational water. WBDOSS is the prima...

  4. Bupivacaine administered intrathecally versus rectally in the management of intractable rectal cancer pain in palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Zaporowska-Stachowiak, Iwona; Kowalski, Grzegorz; Łuczak, Jacek; Kosicka, Katarzyna; Kotlinska-Lemieszek, Aleksandra; Sopata, Maciej; Główka, Franciszek

    2014-01-01

    Background Unacceptable adverse effects, contraindications to and/or ineffectiveness of World Health Organization step III “pain ladder” drugs causes needless suffering among a population of cancer patients. Successful management of severe cancer pain may require invasive treatment. However, a patient’s refusal of an invasive procedure necessitates that clinicians consider alternative options. Objective Intrathecal bupivacaine delivery as a viable treatment of intractable pain is well documented. There are no data on rectal bupivacaine use in cancer patients or in the treatment of cancer tenesmoid pain. This study aims to demonstrate that bupivacaine administered rectally could be a step in between the current treatment options for intractable cancer pain (conventional/conservative analgesia or invasive procedures), and to evaluate the effect of the mode of administration (intrathecal versus rectal) on the bupivacaine plasma concentration. Cases We present two Caucasian, elderly inpatients admitted to hospice due to intractable rectal/tenesmoid pain. The first case is a female with vulvar cancer, and malignant infiltration of the rectum/vagina. Bupivacaine was used intrathecally (0.25–0.5%, 1–2 mL every 6 hours). The second case is a female with ovarian cancer and malignant rectal infiltration. Bupivacaine was adminstered rectally (0.05–0.1%, 100 mL every 4.5–11 hours). Methods Total bupivacaine plasma concentrations were determined using the high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet method. Results Effective pain control was achieved with intrathecal bupivacaine (0.077–0.154 mg·kg−1) and bupivacaine in enema (1.820 mg·kg−1). Intrathecal bupivacaine (0.5%, 2 mL) caused a drop in blood pressure; other side effects were absent in both cases. Total plasma bupivacaine concentrations following intrathecal and rectal bupivacaine application did not exceed 317.2 ng·mL−1 and 235.7 ng·mL−1, respectively. Bupivacaine elimination was slower after rectal than after intrathecal administration (t½= 5.50 versus 2.02 hours, respectively). Limitations This study reports two cases only, and there could be inter-patient variation. Conclusion Bupivacaine in boluses administered intrathecally (0.25%, 2 mL) provided effective, safe analgesia in advanced cancer patients. Bupivacaine enema (100 mg·100 mL−1) was shown to be a valuable option for control of end-of-life tenesmoid cancer pain. PMID:25336967

  5. Subacute and chronic electrical stimulation of the hippocampus on intractable temporal lobe seizures: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Velasco, A L; Velasco, M; Velasco, F; Menes, D; Gordon, F; Rocha, L; Briones, M; Márquez, I

    2000-01-01

    Recent animal experiments show that the application of an electrical stimulus to the amygdala or hippocampus following the kindling stimulus produced a significant and long-lasting suppressive effect on this experimental model of epilepsy. This is a preliminary report on the development of a surgical neuromodulatory procedure by chronic electrical stimulation of the hippocampus (CHCS) for control of intractable temporal lobe seizures in patients in whom anterior temporal lobectomy is not advisable, i.e., patients with bilateral temporal foci or a unilateral focus spreading to surrounding cerebral regions of the dominant hemisphere. This work was divided in two main consecutive stages. In the first stage, we demonstrated that subacute hippocampal stimulation (SAHCS) blocks intractable temporal lobe epileptogenesis with no additional damage to the stimulated tissue, and in a second stage, we attempt to demonstrate that CHCS may produce a sustained, long-lasting antiepileptic condition without additional undesirable effects on language and memory. In addition, taking advantage of this unique and ethically permissible situation, we attempt to determine whether or not the antiepileptic effects of SAHCS and CHCS are due to inhibition of the stimulation of hippocampal tissue by means of a number of electrophysiological, single photon computed tomography (SPECT) perfusion, and autoradiographic techniques.SAHCS during 3-4 weeks prior to anterior temporal lobectomy applied to a critical area located either at the anterior Pes hippocampus close to the amygdala or at the parahippocampal gyrus close to the entorhinal cortex abolished clinical seizures and significantly decreased the number of interictal spikes at focus after 5-6 days. Microscopy analysis of the stimulated tissue showed no evident histopathological differences between stimulated vs. non-stimulated hippocampal tissues. Additionally, CHCS persistently blocked temporal lobe epileptogenesis for 3-4 months with no apparent additional undesirable effects on short memory. Also, inhibition of the stimulated hippocampus seems to be one of the possible mechanisms underlying the beneficial antiepileptic effects of SAHCS and CHCS. This was revealed by increased threshold and decreased duration of the afterdischarges induced by hippocampal stimulation, flattening of the hippocampal-evoked response recovery cycles, SPECT hypoperfusion of the hippocampal region, and increased hippocampal benzodiazepine receptor binding. Future studies increasing the number and time of follow-up of patients under hippocampal stimulation are necessary before considering CHCS a reliable procedure for controlling intractable temporal lobe seizures. PMID:11036183

  6. An abnormal resting-state functional brain network indicates progression towards Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jie; Guo, Hao; Cao, Rui; Liang, Hong; Chen, Junjie

    2013-10-25

    Brain structure and cognitive function change in the temporal lobe, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex of patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease, and brain network-connection strength, network efficiency, and nodal attributes are abnormal. However, existing research has only analyzed the differences between these patients and normal controls. In this study, we constructed brain networks using resting-state functional MRI data that was extracted from four populations (normal controls, patients with early mild cognitive impairment, patients with late mild cognitive impairment, and patients with Alzheimer's disease) using the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative data set. The aim was to analyze the characteristics of resting-state functional neural networks, and to observe mild cognitive impairment at different stages before the transformation to Alzheimer's disease. Results showed that as cognitive deficits increased across the four groups, the shortest path in the resting-state functional network gradually increased, while clustering coefficients gradually decreased. This evidence indicates that dementia is associated with a decline of brain network efficiency. In addition, the changes in functional networks revealed the progressive deterioration of network function across brain regions from healthy elderly adults to those with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. The alterations of node attributes in brain regions may reflect the cognitive functions in brain regions, and we speculate that early impairments in memory, hearing, and language function can eventually lead to diffuse brain injury and other cognitive impairments. PMID:25206600

  7. PopMod: a longitudinal population model with two interacting disease states

    PubMed Central

    Lauer, Jeremy A; Röhrich, Klaus; Wirth, Harald; Charette, Claude; Gribble, Steve; Murray, Christopher JL

    2003-01-01

    This article provides a description of the population model PopMod, which is designed to simulate the health and mortality experience of an arbitrary population subjected to two interacting disease conditions as well as all other "background" causes of death and disability. Among population models with a longitudinal dimension, PopMod is unique in modelling two interacting disease conditions; among the life-table family of population models, PopMod is unique in not assuming statistical independence of the diseases of interest, as well as in modelling age and time independently. Like other multi-state models, however, PopMod takes account of "competing risk" among diseases and causes of death. PopMod represents a new level of complexity among both generic population models and the family of multi-state life tables. While one of its intended uses is to describe the time evolution of population health for standard demographic purposes (e.g. estimates of healthy life expectancy), another prominent aim is to provide a standard measure of effectiveness for intervention and cost-effectiveness analysis. PopMod, and a set of related standard approaches to disease modelling and cost-effectiveness analysis, will facilitate disease modelling and cost-effectiveness analysis in diverse settings and help make results more comparable. PMID:12773215

  8. GENOMIC AND PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS OF SURROGATE TISSUES FOR ASSESSING TOXIC EXPOSURES AND DISEASE STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genomic and Proteomic Analysis of Surrogate Tissues for Assessing Toxic Exposures and Disease States
    David J. Dix and John C. Rockett
    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, USEPA, ...

  9. FACTS ON THE MAJOR KILLING AND CRIPPLING DISEASES IN THE UNITED STATES TODAY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Health Education Committee, Inc., New York, NY.

    MAJOR CAUSES OF DEATH AND DISABILITY, RESULTS OF MEDICAL RESEARCH, LIFE EXPECTANCY FIGURES, COST OF ILLNESS TO THE UNITED STATES, AND GOVERNMENT EXPENDITURES IN MEDICINE AND HEALTH ARE PRESENTED TABULARLY AND GRAPHICALLY IN QUESTION AND ANSWER FORM. FOR EACH OF 14 MAJOR DISEASES, PERTINENT FACTS ARE LISTED ABOUT INCIDENCE, COST, DEATH RATE,…

  10. SURVEILLANCE FOR WATERBORNE-DISEASE OUTBREAKS - UNITED STATES, 1999-2000

    EPA Science Inventory

    PROBLEM/CONDITION: Since 1971, CDC, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) have maintained a collaborative surveillance system for the occurrences and causes of waterborne-disease outbreaks (WBDOs).This surv...

  11. GENOMIC ANALYSIS OF SURROGATE TISSUES FOR ASSESSING ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURES AND FUTURE DISEASE STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genomic Analysis of Surrogate Tissues for Assessing Environmental Exposures and Future Disease States

    John C. Rockett, Chad R. Blystone, Amber K. Goetz, Rachel N. Murrell, Hongzu Ren, Judith E. Schmid, Jessica Stapelfeldt, Lillian F. Strader, Kary E. Thompson, Douglas B. T...

  12. GEOGRAPHIC VARIATION IN THE ONSET OF DECLINE OF ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE MORTALITY IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report examines geographic variation in the onset of the decline of ischemic heart disease (IHD) mortality in white males aged 35-74 during the period 1968-78. Using a quadratic regression model, State Economic Areas (SEAs) were classified as experiencing onset of the decline...

  13. Meteorological Influences on the Seasonality of Lyme Disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sean M.; Eisen, Rebecca J.; Monaghan, Andrew; Mead, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi infection) is the most common vector-transmitted disease in the United States. The majority of human Lyme disease (LD) cases occur in the summer months, but the timing of the peak occurrence varies geographically and from year to year. We calculated the beginning, peak, end, and duration of the main LD season in 12 highly endemic states from 1992 to 2007 and then examined the association between the timing of these seasonal variables and several meteorological variables. An earlier beginning to the LD season was positively associated with higher cumulative growing degree days through Week 20, lower cumulative precipitation, a lower saturation deficit, and proximity to the Atlantic coast. The timing of the peak and duration of the LD season were also associated with cumulative growing degree days, saturation deficit, and cumulative precipitation, but no meteorological predictors adequately explained the timing of the end of the LD season. PMID:24470565

  14. State of World Allergy Report 2008: Allergy and Chronic Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    It is widely recognized that the incidence of allergies and allergic diseases is on the rise globally. As an international umbrella organization for regional and national allergy and clinical immunology societies, the World Allergy Organization is at the forefront of a combined united effort across nations and organizations to address this global concern by promoting the science of allergy and clinical immunology, and advancing exchange of information. The World Allergy Organization's State of World Allergy Reports will provide a biennial review of allergic diseases worldwide, consider their medical and socioeconomic contexts, and propose effective approaches to addressing these problems. In this first State of World Allergy Report 2008, experts from different regions of the world have attempted to define the extent of the global allergy problem, examine recent trends, and provide a framework for the collaboration among world medicine, science, and government agencies that is needed to address the rapidly developing issues associated with allergy and allergic diseases. PMID:23282447

  15. Complex Type 2 Reactions in Three Patients with Hansen's Disease from a Southern United States Clinic.

    PubMed

    Leon, Kristoffer E; Salinas, Jorge L; McDonald, Robert W; Sheth, Anandi N; Fairley, Jessica K

    2015-11-01

    In non-endemic countries, leprosy, or Hansen's disease (HD), remains rare and is often underrecognized. Consequently, the literature is currently lacking in clinical descriptions of leprosy complications in the United States. Immune-mediated inflammatory states known as reactions are common complications of HD. Type 1 reactions are typical of borderline cases and occur in 30% of patients and present as swelling and inflammation of existing skin lesions, neuritis, and nerve dysfunction. Type 2 reactions are systemic events that occur at the lepromatous end of the disease spectrum, and typical symptoms include fever, arthralgias, neuritis, and classic painful erythematous skin nodules known as erythema nodosum leprosum. We report three patients with lepromatous leprosy seen at a U.S. HD clinic with complicated type 2 reactions. The differences in presentations and clinical courses highlight the complexity of the disease and the need for increased awareness of unique manifestations of lepromatous leprosy in non-endemic areas. PMID:26304919

  16. State of world allergy report 2008: allergy and chronic respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Pawankar, Ruby; Baena-Cagnani, Carlos E; Bousquet, Jean; Canonica, G Walter; Cruz, Alvaro A; Kaliner, Michael A; Lanier, Bobby Q

    2008-06-01

    It is widely recognized that the incidence of allergies and allergic diseases is on the rise globally. As an international umbrella organization for regional and national allergy and clinical immunology societies, the World Allergy Organization is at the forefront of a combined united effort across nations and organizations to address this global concern by promoting the science of allergy and clinical immunology, and advancing exchange of information.The World Allergy Organization's State of World Allergy Reports will provide a biennial review of allergic diseases worldwide, consider their medical and socioeconomic contexts, and propose effective approaches to addressing these problems.In this first State of World Allergy Report 2008, experts from different regions of the world have attempted to define the extent of the global allergy problem, examine recent trends, and provide a framework for the collaboration among world medicine, science, and government agencies that is needed to address the rapidly developing issues associated with allergy and allergic diseases. PMID:23282447

  17. Potential novel risk factors for autochthonous and sylvatic transmission of human Chagas disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease is an emerging vector-borne disease in the United States that causes progressive dilated cardiomyopathy in a third of infected humans. While transmission studies have been performed in Latin America, little is known about the source of infection in locally acquired cases in the United States. This letter describes the underlying factors possibly leading to an increased risk of disease transmission among high-risk groups in the United States. PMID:24996479

  18. Resurgence of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases in the United States: Anesthetic and Critical Care Implications.

    PubMed

    Porteous, Grete H; Hanson, Neil A; Sueda, Lila Ann A; Hoaglan, Carli D; Dahl, Aaron B; Ohlson, Brooks B; Schmidt, Brian E; Wang, Chia C; Fagley, R Eliot

    2016-05-01

    Vaccine-preventable diseases (VPDs) such as measles and pertussis are becoming more common in the United States. This disturbing trend is driven by several factors, including the antivaccination movement, waning efficacy of certain vaccines, pathogen adaptation, and travel of individuals to and from areas where disease is endemic. The anesthesia-related manifestations of many VPDs involve airway complications, cardiovascular and respiratory compromise, and unusual neurologic and neuromuscular symptoms. In this article, we will review the presentation and management of 9 VPDs most relevant to anesthesiologists, intensivists, and other hospital-based clinicians: measles, mumps, rubella, pertussis, diphtheria, influenza, meningococcal disease, varicella, and poliomyelitis. Because many of the pathogens causing these diseases are spread by respiratory droplets and aerosols, appropriate transmission precautions, personal protective equipment, and immunizations necessary to protect clinicians and prevent nosocomial outbreaks are described. PMID:27088999

  19. Palliative Sedation and What Constitutes Active Dying: A Case of Severe Progressive Dystonia and Intractable Pain.

    PubMed

    Strand, Jacob J; Feely, Molly A; Kramer, Neha M; Moeschler, Susan M; Swetz, Keith M

    2016-05-01

    We present the case of a 34-year-old woman with Klippel-Feil syndrome who developed progressive generalized dystonia of unclear etiology, resulting in intractable pain despite aggressive medical and surgical interventions. Ultimately, palliative sedation was required to relieve suffering. Herein, we describe ethical considerations including defining sedation, determining prognosis in the setting of an undefined neurodegenerative condition, and use of treatments that concurrently might prolong or alter end-of-life trajectory. We highlight pertinent literature and how it may be applied in challenging and unique clinical situations. Finally, we discuss the need for expert multidisciplinary involvement when implementing palliative sedation and illustrate that procedures and rules need to be interpreted to deliver optimal patient-centered plan of care. PMID:25487783

  20. Effectiveness of cerebral hemispherotomy for improving behavioral disorders associated with intractable post-traumatic seizures.

    PubMed

    Morino, Michiharu; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Sakamoto, Shinichi; Tsuyuguchi, Naohiro; Ohata, Kenji; Hara, Mitsuhiro

    2006-04-01

    A 25-year-old man presented with intractable post-traumatic seizures after suffering cerebral contusion in a traffic accident at age 5 years. Cerebral hemispherotomy was performed to transect the neuronal fibers to interrupt connections between seizure foci in wide areas of the brain, and to minimize the resected brain parenchyma. His seizures resolved and behavioral disorders improved, which had been impaired since age 8 years. Increased glucose metabolism in the normal frontal lobe detected by interictal fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography was correlated with the improvements in behavioral disorders. These findings suggest that the effects of seizures may be reversible in brain areas connected with, but remote from, the epileptogenic cortex. PMID:16636508

  1. Fluoroscopy and Sonographic Guided Injection of Obliquus Capitis Inferior Muscle in an Intractable Occipital Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ok Sun; Jeong, Seung Min; Ro, Ji Young; Kim, Duck Kyoung; Koh, Young Cho; Ko, Young Sin; Lim, So Dug; Kim, Hae Kyoung

    2010-01-01

    Occipital neuralgia is a form of headache that involves the posterior occiput in the greater or lesser occipital nerve distribution. Pain can be severe and persistent with conservative treatment. We present a case of intractable occipital neuralgia that conventional therapeutic modalities failed to ameliorate. We speculate that, in this case, the cause of headache could be the greater occipital nerve entrapment by the obliquus capitis inferior muscle. After steroid and local anesthetic injection into obliquus capitis inferior muscles under fluoroscopic and sonographic guidance, the visual analogue scale was decreased from 9-10/10 to 1-2/10 for 2-3 weeks. The patient eventually got both greater occipital neurectomy and partial resection of obliquus capitis inferior muscles due to the short term effect of the injection. The successful steroid and local anesthetic injection for this occipital neuralgia shows that the refractory headache was caused by entrapment of greater occipital nerves by obliquus capitis inferior muscles. PMID:20552081

  2. Effect of corpus callosotomy on attention deficit and behavioral problems in pediatric patients with intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Yonekawa, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Eiji; Takeshita, Eri; Inoue, Yuki; Inagaki, Masumi; Kaga, Makiko; Sugai, Kenji; Sasaki, Masayuki; Kaido, Takanobu; Takahashi, Akio; Otsuki, Taisuke

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of corpus callosotomy (CC) on attention deficit and behavioral problems in pediatric patients with intractable epilepsy, we retrospectively investigated sequential patients who had undergone CC to control seizures. Between August 2005 and April 2010, a total of 15 patients aged between 3.1 and 17.9 years underwent CC at our institute. All the patients experienced either drop attacks or head nodding, which were considered to be therapeutic targets of CC. A standardized instrument, the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), was used to assess behavioral and emotional problems before and after surgery. On postoperative EEGs, 8 (53%) showed improvement and 7 (47%) showed no change in epileptiform discharges. The Attention Problems scale and total score on the CBCL significantly improved in patients whose postoperative EEGs showed improvement. In addition to amelioration of target seizures, CC can improve attention impairments in association with improvement in the postoperative EEG. PMID:21978470

  3. Perceptions of a changing world induce hope and promote peace in intractable conflicts.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Chen, Smadar; Crisp, Richard J; Halperin, Eran

    2015-04-01

    The importance of hope in promoting conciliatory attitudes has been asserted in the field of conflict resolution. However, little is known about conditions inducing hope, especially in intractable conflicts, where reference to the outgroup may backfire. In the current research, five studies yielded convergent support for the hypothesis that hope for peace stems from a general perception of the world as changing. In Study 1, coders observed associations between belief in a changing world, hope regarding peace, and support for concessions. Study 2 revealed the hypothesized relations using self-reported measures. Studies 3 and 4 established causality by instilling a perception of the world as changing (vs. unchanging) using narrative and drawing manipulations. Study 5 compared the changing world message with a control condition during conflict escalation. Across studies, although the specific context was not referred to, the belief in a changing world increased support for concessions through hope for peace. PMID:25713171

  4. Melanosomal sequestration of cytotoxic drugs contributes to the intractability of malignant melanomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kevin G.; Valencia, Julio C.; Lai, Barry; Zhang, Guofeng; Paterson, Jill K.; Rouzaud, François; Berens, Werner; Wincovitch, Stephen M.; Garfield, Susan H.; Leapman, Richard D.; Hearing, Vincent J.; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2006-06-01

    Multidrug resistance mechanisms underlying the intractability of malignant melanomas remain largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that the development of multidrug resistance in melanomas involves subcellular sequestration of intracellular cytotoxic drugs such as cis-diaminedichloroplatinum II (cisplatin; CDDP). CDDP is initially sequestered in subcellular organelles such as melanosomes, which significantly reduces its nuclear localization when compared with nonmelanoma/KB-3-1 epidermoid carcinoma cells. The melanosomal accumulation of CDDP remarkably modulates melanogenesis through a pronounced increase in tyrosinase activity. The altered melanogenesis manifested an 8-fold increase in both intracellular pigmentation and extracellular transport of melanosomes containing CDDP. Thus, our experiments provide evidence that melanosomes contribute to the refractory properties of melanoma cells by sequestering cytotoxic drugs and increasing melanosome-mediated drug export. Preventing melanosomal sequestration of cytotoxic drugs by inhibiting the functions of melanosomes may have great potential as an approach to improving the chemosensitivity of melanoma cells. cancer | melanosomes | skin | tumor therapy | multidrug resistance

  5. Perceptions of a Changing World Induce Hope and Promote Peace in Intractable Conflicts

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Chen, Smadar; Crisp, Richard J.; Halperin, Eran

    2015-01-01

    The importance of hope in promoting conciliatory attitudes has been asserted in the field of conflict resolution. However, little is known about conditions inducing hope, especially in intractable conflicts, where reference to the outgroup may backfire. In the current research, five studies yielded convergent support for the hypothesis that hope for peace stems from a general perception of the world as changing. In Study 1, coders observed associations between belief in a changing world, hope regarding peace, and support for concessions. Study 2 revealed the hypothesized relations using self-reported measures. Studies 3 and 4 established causality by instilling a perception of the world as changing (vs. unchanging) using narrative and drawing manipulations. Study 5 compared the changing world message with a control condition during conflict escalation. Across studies, although the specific context was not referred to, the belief in a changing world increased support for concessions through hope for peace. PMID:25713171

  6. [New international classification of epilepsy and new antiepileptic drugs for medically intractable epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Sadatoshi

    2009-11-01

    The task force of the international league against epilepsy (ILAE) proposed the "Diagnostic scheme for people with epileptic seizures and epilepsy" in 2001. The 2001 diagnostic scheme was updated in 2006. The ILAE Core Group recommended the new classification to replace the previous one (ILAE, 1981, 1989). However, the new classification is too complex to use for clinicians except expert epileptologists. About 10 new antiepileptic drugs are launched recently. Among them, gabapentine, topiramate, and lamotrigine have been approved in Japan as adjunctive therapy for medically intractable seizures. The advantage of the new antiepileptic drugs includes newer mechanism of action, broad spectrum of anti-seizure effects, fewer side effects, and lesser drug interactions. The rational polytherapy is necessary for refractory epilepsy. The majority of elderly patients with new onset epilepsy become seizure free on antiepileptic monotherapy, often with modest dose. We are now in the new era of epilepsy treatment. PMID:20030206

  7. Successful use of tetrabenazine in a patient with intractable hiccups after stroke.

    PubMed

    Naro, Antonino; Bramanti, Placido; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore

    2014-12-01

    A hiccup is a myoclonic jerk of the diaphragm, and cases of hiccups may last for more than 48 hours (persistent hiccups) or even more than 2 months (intractable hiccups). Current pharmacologic treatment of persistent or intractable hiccups mainly includes antidopaminergic drugs. We describe the case of a 60-year-old man with a recent diagnosis of right insular ischemic stroke who presented with frequent, intense, and disabling hiccups for more than 1 month. As diagnosis of poststroke hiccups was assumed, the patient was treated over the next 6 months with adequate doses of various antipsychotic drugs commonly used for the treatment of hiccups; however, all were discontinued because of adverse effects. Indeed, dyskinesia after chlorpromazine (up to 75 mg/day for 4 wks), as well as somnolence and dyskinesia after haloperidol (up to 6 mg/day for 6 wks), somnolence after gabapentin (up to 1800 mg/day for 8 wks), and severe somnolence and hypotension after baclofen (up to 50 mg/day for 6 wks) were reported. The patient was then prescribed tetrabenazine at a starting dose of 12.5 mg twice/day (25 mg/day), with a nearly complete remission of the hiccup symptomatology after ~6 weeks, when a daily dose of 150 mg was reached. We therefore hypothesize that a supratentorial lesion may disrupt the modulation of dopaminergic pathways involved in the regulation of medullar centers responsible for the hiccup reflex. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of poststroke hiccups responding to tetrabenazine. The dramatic response of our patient to tetrabenazine monotherapy suggests that this drug may be a valuable pharmacologic alternative for patients with hiccups after stroke who are intolerant or unresponsive to classic antipsychotic agents. PMID:25471210

  8. People Efficiently Explore the Solution Space of the Computationally Intractable Traveling Salesman Problem to Find Near-Optimal Tours

    PubMed Central

    Acuña, Daniel E.; Parada, Víctor

    2010-01-01

    Humans need to solve computationally intractable problems such as visual search, categorization, and simultaneous learning and acting, yet an increasing body of evidence suggests that their solutions to instantiations of these problems are near optimal. Computational complexity advances an explanation to this apparent paradox: (1) only a small portion of instances of such problems are actually hard, and (2) successful heuristics exploit structural properties of the typical instance to selectively improve parts that are likely to be sub-optimal. We hypothesize that these two ideas largely account for the good performance of humans on computationally hard problems. We tested part of this hypothesis by studying the solutions of 28 participants to 28 instances of the Euclidean Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP). Participants were provided feedback on the cost of their solutions and were allowed unlimited solution attempts (trials). We found a significant improvement between the first and last trials and that solutions are significantly different from random tours that follow the convex hull and do not have self-crossings. More importantly, we found that participants modified their current better solutions in such a way that edges belonging to the optimal solution (“good” edges) were significantly more likely to stay than other edges (“bad” edges), a hallmark of structural exploitation. We found, however, that more trials harmed the participants' ability to tell good from bad edges, suggesting that after too many trials the participants “ran out of ideas.” In sum, we provide the first demonstration of significant performance improvement on the TSP under repetition and feedback and evidence that human problem-solving may exploit the structure of hard problems paralleling behavior of state-of-the-art heuristics. PMID:20686597

  9. People efficiently explore the solution space of the computationally intractable traveling salesman problem to find near-optimal tours.

    PubMed

    Acuña, Daniel E; Parada, Víctor

    2010-01-01

    Humans need to solve computationally intractable problems such as visual search, categorization, and simultaneous learning and acting, yet an increasing body of evidence suggests that their solutions to instantiations of these problems are near optimal. Computational complexity advances an explanation to this apparent paradox: (1) only a small portion of instances of such problems are actually hard, and (2) successful heuristics exploit structural properties of the typical instance to selectively improve parts that are likely to be sub-optimal. We hypothesize that these two ideas largely account for the good performance of humans on computationally hard problems. We tested part of this hypothesis by studying the solutions of 28 participants to 28 instances of the Euclidean Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP). Participants were provided feedback on the cost of their solutions and were allowed unlimited solution attempts (trials). We found a significant improvement between the first and last trials and that solutions are significantly different from random tours that follow the convex hull and do not have self-crossings. More importantly, we found that participants modified their current better solutions in such a way that edges belonging to the optimal solution ("good" edges) were significantly more likely to stay than other edges ("bad" edges), a hallmark of structural exploitation. We found, however, that more trials harmed the participants' ability to tell good from bad edges, suggesting that after too many trials the participants "ran out of ideas." In sum, we provide the first demonstration of significant performance improvement on the TSP under repetition and feedback and evidence that human problem-solving may exploit the structure of hard problems paralleling behavior of state-of-the-art heuristics. PMID:20686597

  10. Historical Perspectives on the Epidemiology of Human Chagas Disease in Texas and Recommendations for Enhanced Understanding of Clinical Chagas Disease in the Southern United States.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Melissa N; Woc-Colburn, Laila; Aguilar, David; Hotez, Peter J; Murray, Kristy O

    2015-11-01

    Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi infection) has recently been identified as an important neglected tropical disease in the United States. Anecdotally referred to as a "silent killer," it leads to the development of potentially fatal cardiac disease in approximately 30% of those infected. In an attempt to better understand the potential of Chagas disease as a significant underlying cause of morbidity in Texas, we performed a historical literature review to assess disease burden. Human reports of triatomine bites and disease exposure were found to be prevalent in Texas. Despite current beliefs that Chagas disease is a recently emerging disease, we report historical references dating as far back as 1935. Both imported cases and autochthonous transmission contribute to the historical disease burden in Texas. We end by discussing the current knowledge gaps, and recommend priorities for advancing further epidemiologic studies and their policy implications. PMID:26540273

  11. Historical Perspectives on the Epidemiology of Human Chagas Disease in Texas and Recommendations for Enhanced Understanding of Clinical Chagas Disease in the Southern United States

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Melissa N.; Woc-Colburn, Laila; Aguilar, David; Hotez, Peter J.; Murray, Kristy O.

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi infection) has recently been identified as an important neglected tropical disease in the United States. Anecdotally referred to as a “silent killer,” it leads to the development of potentially fatal cardiac disease in approximately 30% of those infected. In an attempt to better understand the potential of Chagas disease as a significant underlying cause of morbidity in Texas, we performed a historical literature review to assess disease burden. Human reports of triatomine bites and disease exposure were found to be prevalent in Texas. Despite current beliefs that Chagas disease is a recently emerging disease, we report historical references dating as far back as 1935. Both imported cases and autochthonous transmission contribute to the historical disease burden in Texas. We end by discussing the current knowledge gaps, and recommend priorities for advancing further epidemiologic studies and their policy implications. PMID:26540273

  12. Physical Feature Encoding and Word Recognition Abilities Are Altered in Children with Intractable Epilepsy: Preliminary Neuromagnetic Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Pardos, Maria; Korostenskaja, Milena; Xiang, Jing; Fujiwara, Hisako; Lee, Ki H.; Horn, Paul S.; Byars, Anna; Vannest, Jennifer; Wang, Yingying; Hemasilpin, Nat; Rose, Douglas F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective evaluation of language function is critical for children with intractable epilepsy under consideration for epilepsy surgery. The purpose of this preliminary study was to evaluate word recognition in children with intractable epilepsy by using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Ten children with intractable epilepsy (M/F 6/4, mean ± SD 13.4 ± 2.2 years) were matched on age and sex to healthy controls. Common nouns were presented simultaneously from visual and auditory sensory inputs in “match” and “mismatch” conditions. Neuromagnetic responses M1, M2, M3, M4, and M5 with latencies of ~100 ms, ~150 ms, ~250 ms, ~350 ms, and ~450 ms, respectively, elicited during the “match” condition were identified. Compared to healthy children, epilepsy patients had both significantly delayed latency of the M1 and reduced amplitudes of M3 and M5 responses. These results provide neurophysiologic evidence of altered word recognition in children with intractable epilepsy. PMID:26146459

  13. Spatial Clusters of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Kenneth N.; Seitz, Amy E.; Falkinham, Joseph O.; Holland, Steven M.; Prevots, D. Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Prevalence of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (PNTM) disease varies by geographic region, yet the factors driving these differences remain largely unknown. Objectives: To identify spatial clusters of PNTM disease at the county level and to describe environmental and sociodemographic factors predictive of disease. Methods: PNTM cases identified from a nationally representative sample of Medicare Part B beneficiaries from 1997 to 2007 were geocoded by county and state of residence. County-level PNTM case counts and Medicare population data were then uploaded into SaTScan to identify significant spatial clusters and low-risk areas of disease. High-risk and low-risk counties were then compared to identify significant sociodemographic and environmental differences. Measurements and Main Results: We identified seven significant (P < 0.05) clusters of PNTM cases. These high-risk areas encompassed 55 counties in 8 states, including parts of California, Florida, Hawaii, Louisiana, New York, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. Five low-risk areas were also identified, which encompassed 746 counties in 23 states, mostly in the Midwest. Counties in high-risk areas were significantly larger, had greater population densities, and higher education and income levels than low-risk counties. High-risk counties also had higher mean daily potential evapotranspiration levels and percentages covered by surface water, and were more likely to have greater copper and sodium levels in the soil, although lower manganese levels. Conclusions: Specific environmental factors related to soil and water exposure appear to increase the risk of PNTM infection. Still, given that environmental sources of NTM are ubiquitous and PNTM disease is rare, both host susceptibility and environmental factors must be considered in explaining disease development. PMID:22773732

  14. Epidemiology of HIV-Associated Lung Disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Meghan; Brooks, John T; Kaplan, Jonathan E

    2016-04-01

    The epidemiology of HIV infection and its pulmonary complications in the United States has evolved significantly over nearly 20 years since the advent of combination antiretroviral therapy. While infectious complications are less of a threat to patients whose immune systems have been restored, many HIV-infected persons in the United States remain at high risk for opportunistic infection because they are unaware of their HIV infection, have difficulty maintaining linkage to care, or maintain inadequate viral control. Bacterial pneumonia and Pneumocystis pneumonia remain significantly more prevalent among HIV-infected persons, and together with seasonal influenza are areas where public health efforts to increase antiretroviral therapy, appropriate prophylaxis, and vaccination may decrease burden of disease. Noninfectious pulmonary complications of chronic HIV infection are increasingly recognized in the United States and elsewhere. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, pulmonary hypertension, sleep-disordered breathing, and primary lung cancer may all be more common among persons with HIV; of concern, disease burden in U.S. HIV-infected persons may be underestimated due to lack of diagnostic testing for these conditions. Smoking is among the most prevalent preventable causes of morbidity and mortality affecting persons living with HIV infection, and has particular import to pulmonary disease. As of 2009, 42% of HIV-infected adults in medical care in the United States smoked tobacco (over twice the national rate in the general population). Successful efforts to promote smoking cessation among HIV-infected persons are of critical importance to decrease the burden of chronic pulmonary disease. PMID:26974297

  15. Epidemiology of Infant Meningococcal Disease in the United States, 2006–2012

    PubMed Central

    MacNeil, Jessica R.; Bennett, Nancy; Farley, Monica M.; Harrison, Lee H.; Lynfield, Ruth; Nichols, Megin; Petit, Sue; Reingold, Arthur; Schaffner, William; Thomas, Ann; Pondo, Tracy; Mayer, Leonard W.; Clark, Thomas A.; Cohn, Amanda C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The incidence of meningococcal disease is currently at historic lows in the United States; however, incidence remains highest among infants aged <1 year. With routine use of Haemophilus influenzae type b and pneumococcal vaccines in infants and children in the United States, Neisseria meningitidis remains an important cause of bacterial meningitis in young children. METHODS Data were collected from active, population- and laboratory-based surveillance for N meningitidis conducted through Active Bacterial Core surveillance during 2006 through 2012. Expanded data collection forms were completed for infant cases identified in the surveillance area during 2006 through 2010. RESULTS An estimated 113 cases of culture-confirmed meningococcal disease occurred annually among infants aged <1 year in the United States from 2006 through 2012, for an overall incidence of 2.74 per 100 000 infants. Among these cases, an estimated 6 deaths occurred. Serogroup B was responsible for 64%, serogroup C for 12%, and serogroup Y for 16% of infant cases. Based on the expanded data collection forms, a high proportion of infant cases (36/58, 62%) had a smoker in the household and the socioeconomic status of the census tracts where infant meningococcal cases resided was lower compared with the other Active Bacterial Core surveillance areas and the United States as a whole. CONCLUSIONS The burden of meningococcal disease remains highest in young infants and serogroup B predominates. Vaccines that provide long-term protection early in life have the potential to reduce the burden of meningococcal disease, especially if they provide protection against serogroup B meningococcal disease. PMID:25583921

  16. Changing trends in carrier screening for genetic disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Nazareth, Shivani B; Lazarin, Gabriel A; Goldberg, James D

    2015-10-01

    Genetic disease is the leading cause of infant death in the United States, accounting for approximately 20% of annual infant mortality. Advances in genomic medicine and technological platforms have made possible low cost, pan-ethnic expanded genetic screening that enables obstetric care providers to offer screening for over 100 recessive genetic diseases. However, the rapid integration of genomic medicine into routine obstetric practice has raised some concerns about the practical implementation of such testing. These changing trends in carrier screening, along with concerns and potential solutions, will be addressed. PMID:26138560

  17. Assessment of Climate-sensitive Infectious Diseases in the Federated States of Micronesia

    PubMed Central

    McIver, Lachlan; Hashizume, Masahiro; Kim, Ho; Honda, Yasushi; Pretrick, Moses; Iddings, Steven; Pavlin, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Background: The health impacts of climate change are an issue of growing concern in the Pacific region. Prior to 2010, no formal, structured, evidence-based approach had been used to identify the most significant health risks posed by climate change in Pacific island countries. During 2010 and 2011, the World Health Organization supported the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) in performing a climate change and health vulnerability and adaptation assessment. This paper summarizes the priority climate-sensitive health risks in FSM, with a focus on diarrheal disease, its link with climatic variables and the implications of climate change. Methods: The vulnerability and adaptation assessment process included a review of the literature, extensive stakeholder consultations, ranking of climate-sensitive health risks, and analysis of the available long-term data on climate and climate-sensitive infectious diseases in FSM, which involved examination of health information data from the four state hospitals in FSM between 2000 and 2010; along with each state’s rainfall, temperature and El Niño-Southern Oscillation data. Generalized linear Poisson regression models were used to demonstrate associations between monthly climate variables and cases of climate-sensitive diseases at differing temporal lags. Results: Infectious diseases were among the highest priority climate-sensitive health risks identified in FSM, particularly diarrheal diseases, vector-borne diseases and leptospirosis. Correlation with climate data demonstrated significant associations between monthly maximum temperature and monthly outpatient cases of diarrheal disease in Pohnpei and Kosrae at a lag of one month and 0 to 3 months, respectively; no such associations were observed in Chuuk or Yap. Significant correlations between disease incidence and El Niño-Southern Oscillation cycles were demonstrated in Kosrae state. Conclusions: Analysis of the available data demonstrated significant associations between climate variables and climate-sensitive infectious diseases. This information should prove useful in implementing health system and community adaptation strategies to avoid the most serious impacts of climate change on health in FSM. PMID:25859151

  18. The burden of disease and injury in the United States 1996

    PubMed Central

    Michaud, Catherine M; McKenna, Matthew T; Begg, Stephen; Tomijima, Niels; Majmudar, Meghna; Bulzacchelli, Maria T; Ebrahim, Shahul; Ezzati, Majid; Salomon, Joshua A; Gaber Kreiser, Jessica; Hogan, Mollie; Murray, Christopher JL

    2006-01-01

    Background Burden of disease studies have been implemented in many countries using the Disability-Adjusted Life Year (DALY) to assess major health problems. Important objectives of the study were to quantify intra-country differentials in health outcomes and to place the United States situation in the international context. Methods We applied methods developed for the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) to data specific to the United States to compute Disability-Adjusted Life Years. Estimates are provided by age and gender for the general population of the United States and for each of the four official race groups: White; Black; American Indian or Alaskan Native; and Asian or Pacific Islander. Several adjustments of GBD methods were made: the inclusion of race; a revised list of causes; and a revised algorithm to allocate cardiovascular disease garbage codes to ischaemic heart disease. We compared the results of this analysis to international estimates published by the World Health Organization for developed and developing regions of the world. Results In the mid-1990s the leading sources of premature death and disability in the United States, as measured by DALYs, were: cardiovascular conditions, breast and lung cancers, depression, osteoarthritis, diabetes mellitus, and alcohol use and abuse. In addition, motor vehicle-related injuries and the HIV epidemic exacted a substantial toll on the health status of the US population, particularly among racial minorities. The major sources of death and disability in these latter populations were more similar to patterns of burden in developing rather than developed countries. Conclusion Estimating DALYs specifically for the United States provides a comprehensive assessment of health problems for this country compared to what is available using mortality data alone. PMID:17049081

  19. The management and treatment of children with Fabry disease: A United States-based perspective.

    PubMed

    Hopkin, Robert J; Jefferies, John L; Laney, Dawn A; Lawson, Victoria H; Mauer, Michael; Taylor, Matthew R; Wilcox, William R

    2016-02-01

    Fabry disease is an inherited X-linked disorder that presents during childhood in male and female patients. Young patients may initially experience pain, hypohidrosis, and gastrointestinal symptoms. Other manifestations of Fabry disease, such as renal and cardiac disease, manifest later in adolescence or adulthood. In the pediatric population, renal damage is typically subclinical and identifiable only through biopsy. Specialists from the United States with expertise in Fabry disease convened during 2013-2014 in order to develop these consensus guidelines about the management and treatment of children with Fabry disease. The presence of symptoms in boys and girls of any age is an indication to begin therapy. Early treatment before the onset of potentially irreversible vital organ pathology is ideal. Asymptomatic children with Fabry mutations should be followed closely for the development of renal, cardiac, neurological, or gastrointestinal signs, symptoms, or laboratory changes, which would warrant treatment initiation. A comprehensive care plan should be implemented by the treating physicians to guide the management of children with Fabry disease. PMID:26546059

  20. Health states for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder within the Global Burden of Disease 2010 Study.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Alize J; Saha, Sukanta; McGrath, John J; Norman, Rosana; Baxter, Amanda J; Vos, Theo; Whiteford, Harvey A

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive revision of the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study is expected to be completed in 2012. This study utilizes a broad range of improved methods for assessing burden, including closer attention to empirically derived estimates of disability. The aim of this paper is to describe how GBD health states were derived for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. These will be used in deriving health state-specific disability estimates. A literature review was first conducted to settle on a parsimonious set of health states for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. A second review was conducted to investigate the proportion of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder cases experiencing these health states. These were pooled using a quality-effects model to estimate the overall proportion of cases in each state. The two schizophrenia health states were acute (predominantly positive symptoms) and residual (predominantly negative symptoms). The three bipolar disorder health states were depressive, manic, and residual. Based on estimates from six studies, 63% (38%-82%) of schizophrenia cases were in an acute state and 37% (18%-62%) were in a residual state. Another six studies were identified from which 23% (10%-39%) of bipolar disorder cases were in a manic state, 27% (11%-47%) were in a depressive state, and 50% (30%-70%) were in a residual state. This literature review revealed salient gaps in the literature that need to be addressed in future research. The pooled estimates are indicative only and more data are required to generate more definitive estimates. That said, rather than deriving burden estimates that fail to capture the changes in disability within schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, the derived proportions and their wide uncertainty intervals will be used in deriving disability estimates. PMID:22913393

  1. Sexuality education policies and sexually transmitted disease rates in the United States of America.

    PubMed

    Hogben, M; Chesson, H; Aral, S O

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the study was to test for relationships between state-level sex educational policies and sexually transmitted disease (STD) rates. We analysed US case reports of gonorrhoea and chlamydial infection for 2001-2005 against state policies for abstinence coverage in sexuality education, using the proportion of the population per state who identified as black (aged 15-24 years) as a covariate. We also tested for effects on 15-19 year olds versus 35-39 year olds and tuberculosis rates (the latter to ensure findings applied only to STD). States with no mandates for abstinence had the lowest mean rates of infection among the overall population and among adolescents. States with mandates emphasizing abstinence had the highest rates; states with mandates to cover (but not emphasize) abstinence fell in between. Rates in some states covering abstinence changed faster than in others, as reflected in sharper declines (gonorrhoea) or slower increases (chlamydial infection). These effects were not shown for tuberculosis or 35-39 year olds. Having no abstinence education policy has no apparent effect on STD rates for adolescents. For states with elevated rates, policies mandating coverage may be useful, although policies emphasizing abstinence show no benefit. PMID:20378905

  2. A Case Study Examination of Structure and Function in a State Health Department Chronic Disease Unit

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. I explored the structural and operational practices of the chronic disease prevention and control unit of a state health department and proposed a conceptual model of structure, function, and effectiveness for future study. Methods. My exploratory case study examined 7 elements of organizational structure and practice. My interviews with staff and external stakeholders of a single chronic disease unit yielded quantitative and qualitative data that I coded by perspective, process, relationship, and activity. I analyzed these for patterns and emerging themes. Results. Chi-square analysis revealed significant correlations among collaboration with goal ambiguity, political support, and responsiveness, and evidence-based decisions with goal ambiguity and responsiveness. Conclusions. Although my study design did not permit conclusions about causality, my findings suggested that some elements of the model might facilitate effectiveness for chronic disease units and should be studied further. My findings might have important implications for identifying levers around which capacity can be built that may strengthen effectiveness. PMID:25689211

  3. Assessment of Mood States in Neurodegenerative Disease: Methodological Issues and Diagnostic Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Stern

    1996-10-01

    Mood disorders are common in patients with neurodegenerative disease. Accurate diagnosis and assessment of mood changes are a crucial requirement for establishing reliable correlations with functional neuroanatomical changes, investigating their causes, and establishing effective treatment strategies. However, differential diagnosis of mood disorders is difficult in elderly patients with aphasia, impaired emotional expression, and other cognitive and neurobehavioral impairments. Although specific assessment of internal mood state would improve diagnostic accuracy, most standardized measures of mood are not appropriate for this population. The Visual Analog Mood Scales (VAMS) are valid, standardized measures, developed specifically for neurologically impaired patients, which assess eight moods: sad, happy, tense, afraid, tired, energetic, confused, and angry. The utility of these very brief scales is presented, as are specific recommendations and guidelines for the diagnosis of depression and other mood disorders in patients with neurodegenerative disease, such as dementia, Parkinson's disease, and stroke. PMID:10320434

  4. PulseNet: the molecular subtyping network for foodborne bacterial disease surveillance, United States.

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, B.; Barrett, T. J.; Hunter, S. B.; Tauxe, R. V.

    2001-01-01

    PulseNet, the national molecular subtyping network for foodborne disease surveillance, was established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and several state health department laboratories to facilitate subtyping bacterial foodborne pathogens for epidemiologic purposes. PulseNet, which began in 1996 with 10 laboratories typing a single pathogen (Escherichia coli O157:H7), now includes 46 state and 2 local public health laboratories and the food safety laboratories of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Four foodborne pathogens (E. coli O157:H7; nontyphoidal Salmonella serotypes, Listeria monocytogenes and Shigella) are being subtyped, and other bacterial, viral, and parasitic organisms will be added soon. PMID:11384513

  5. Burden of Disease Associated with Alcohol Use Disorders in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Rehm, Jürgen; Dawson, Deborah; Frick, Ulrich; Gmel, Gerrit; Roerecke, Michael; Shield, Kevin D.; Grant, Bridget

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol use disorders (AUD) have long been considered to be some of the most disabling mental disorders; however, empirical data on the burden of disease associated with AUD have been sparse. The objective of this article is to quantify the burden of disease (in disability-adjusted life years [DALYs] lost), deaths, years of life lost due to premature mortality (YLL), and years of life lost due to disability (YLD) associated with AUD for the United States in 2005. Methods Statistical modeling was based on epidemiological indicators derived from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Formal consistency analyses were applied. Risk relations were taken from recent meta-analyses and the disability weights from the burden of disease study of the National Institutes of Health. Monte Carlo simulations were used to derive confidence intervals. All analyses were performed by sex and age. Sensitivity analyses were undertaken on key indicators. Results In the United States in 2005, 65,000 deaths, 1,152,000 YLL, 2,443,000 YLD, and 3,595,000 DALYs were associated with AUD. For individuals 18 years of age and older, AUD were associated with 3% of all deaths (5% for men and 1 % for women), and 5% of all YLL (7% for men and 2% for women). The majority of the burden of disease associated with AUD stemmed from YLD, which accounted for 68% of DALYs associated with AUD (66% for men and 74% for women). The youngest age group had the largest proportion of DALYs associated with AUD stemming from YLD. Conclusions Using data from a large representative survey (checked for consistency) and by combining these data with the best available evidence, we found that AUD were associated with a larger burden of disease than previously estimated. To reduce this disease burden, implementation of prevention interventions and expansion of treatment are necessary. PMID:24428196

  6. The Intrinsic Resting State Voice Network in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    New, Anneliese B.; Robin, Donald A.; Parkinson, Amy L.; Eickhoff, Claudia R.; Reetz, Kathrin; Hoffstaedter, Felix; Mathys, Christian; Sudmeyer, Martin; Grefkes, Christian; Larson, Charles R.; Ramig, Loraine O.; Fox, Peter T.; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2016-01-01

    Over 90 percent of patients with Parkinson’s disease experience speech-motor impairment, namely, hypokinetic dysarthria characterized by reduced pitch and loudness. Resting-state functional connectivity analysis of blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging is a useful measure of intrinsic neural functioning. We utilized resting-state functional connectivity modeling to analyze the intrinsic connectivity in patients with Parkinson’s disease within a vocalization network defined by a previous meta-analysis of speech (Brown et al., 2009). Functional connectivity of this network was assessed in 56 patients with Parkinson’s disease and 56 gender-, age-, and movement-matched healthy controls. We also had item 5 and 18 of the UPDRS, and the PDQ-39 Communication subscale available for correlation with the voice network connectivity strength in patients. The within-group analyses of connectivity patterns demonstrated a lack of subcortical–cortical connectivity in patients with Parkinson’s disease. At the cortical level, we found robust (homotopic) interhemispheric connectivity but only inconsistent evidence for many intrahemispheric connections. When directly contrasted to the control group, we found a significant reduction of connections between the left thalamus and putamen, and cortical motor areas, as well as reduced right superior temporal gyrus connectivity. Furthermore, most symptom measures correlated with right putamen, left cerebellum, left superior temporal gyrus, right premotor, and left Rolandic operculum connectivity in the voice network. The results reflect the importance of (right) subcortical nodes and the superior temporal gyrus in Parkinson’s disease, enhancing our understanding of the neurobiological underpinnings of vocalization impairment in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:25627959

  7. Implementation of a drug-use and disease-state management program.

    PubMed

    Skledar, S J; Hess, M M

    2000-12-15

    A drug-use and disease-state management (DUDSM) program was instituted in 1996 at a teaching hospital associated with a large nonprofit health care system. The program's goals are to optimize pharmacotherapeutic regimens, evaluate health outcomes of identified disease states, and evaluate the economic impact of pharmacotherapeutic options for given disease states by developing practice guidelines. Through a re-engineering process, resources within the pharmacy department were identified that could be devoted to the DUDSM program, including the use of clinical pharmacy specialists, promotion of staff pharmacists into the DUDSM program, a pharmacy technician, and information systems support. A strength of the program is its systematic approach for developing and implementing new initiatives, as well as monitoring compliance with all initiatives on an ongoing basis. The initiative-design process incorporates continuous quality improvement principles, outcome design and evaluation, competency assessment for all pharmacists, multidisciplinary collaboration, and sophisticated information systems. Seventy-five initiatives have been implemented, ranging from simple dose-optimization strategies for specific drugs to complicated practice guidelines for managing specific disease states. Improved patient outcomes have been documented, including reduced length of stay, postsurgical wound infection, adverse drug reactions, and medication errors. Documented cost savings exceeded $4 million annually for fiscal years 1996-97 through 1999-2000. Overall compliance with DUDSM initiatives exceeds 80%, and physician service profiling has been initiated to monitor variant prescribing. The DUDSM program has successfully integrated practice guidelines into therapeutic decision-making, resulting in improved patient-care outcomes and cost savings. PMID:11148941

  8. [Clinical pathway management of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease based on state machine].

    PubMed

    Tan, Jian; Hao, Liwei; Cheng, Yuanxiong; Xu, Tongliang; Song, Yingnuo

    2014-04-01

    We propose a clinical pathway of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) based on state machine. Clinical event-driven response was utilized to control workflow execution of the AECOPD clinical pathway. By comparison with the traditional clinical pathway management, clinical numerical results showed that the proposed method was better in hospitalization days, average hospitalization expense and aberration rate, and better handled the variability in the AECOPD clinical pathway execution. PMID:24752111

  9. West Nile Virus and Other Nationally Notifiable Arboviral Diseases - United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Nicole P; Lehman, Jennifer A; Staples, J Erin; Fischer, Marc

    2015-09-01

    Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) are transmitted to humans primarily through the bites of infected mosquitoes and ticks. West Nile virus (WNV) is the leading cause of domestically acquired arboviral disease in the United States (1). However, several other arboviruses also cause sporadic cases and seasonal outbreaks. This report summarizes surveillance data reported to CDC in 2014 for WNV and other nationally notifiable arboviruses, excluding dengue. Forty-two states and the District of Columbia (DC) reported 2,205 cases of WNV disease. Of these, 1,347 (61%) were classified as WNV neuroinvasive disease (e.g., meningitis, encephalitis, or acute flaccid paralysis), for a national incidence of 0.42 cases per 100,000 population. After WNV, the next most commonly reported cause of arboviral disease was La Crosse virus (80 cases), followed by Jamestown Canyon virus (11), St. Louis encephalitis virus (10), Powassan virus (8), and Eastern equine encephalitis virus (8). WNV and other arboviruses cause serious illness in substantial numbers of persons each year. Maintaining surveillance programs is important to help direct prevention activities. PMID:26334477

  10. Progression of the load of waterborne and intestinal parasitic diseases in the State of Amazonas.

    PubMed

    Martins, Marilaine; Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius Guimarães; Monteiro, Wuelton Marcelo; Moura, Marco Antonio Saboia; Santos, Eyde Cristianne Saraiva; Saraceni, Valéria; Saraiva, Maria Graças Gomes

    2015-01-01

    In the State of Amazonas, Brazil, urban expansion together with precarious basic sanitation conditions and human settlement on river banks has contributed to the persistence of waterborne and intestinal parasitic diseases. Time series of the recorded cases of cholera, typhoid fever, hepatitis A and leptospirosis are described, using data from different levels of the surveillance systems. The sources for intestinal parasitosis prevalence data (non-compulsory reporting in Brazil) were Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE), Literatura Latino-Americana (LILACS) and the annals of major scientific meetings. Relevant papers and abstracts in all languages were accessed by two independent reviewers. The references cited by each relevant paper were scrutinized to locate additional papers. Despite its initial dissemination across the entire State of Amazonas, cholera was controlled in 1998. The magnitude of typhoid fever has decreased; however, a pattern characterized by eventual outbreaks still remains. Leptospirosis is an increasing cause of concern in association with the annual floods. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites is high regardless of the municipality and the characteristics of areas and populations. The incidence of hepatitis A has decreased over the past decade. A comparison of older and recent surveys shows that the prevalence of intestinal parasitic diseases has remained constant. The load of waterborne and intestinal parasitic diseases ranks high among the health problems present in the State of Amazonas. Interventions aiming at basic sanitation and vaccination for hepatitis A were formulated and implemented, but assessment of their effectiveness in the targeted populations is still needed. PMID:26061370

  11. Disease properties, geography, and mitigation strategies in a simulation spread of rinderpest across the United States.

    PubMed

    Manore, Carrie; McMahon, Benjamin; Fair, Jeanne; Hyman, James M; Brown, Mac; Labute, Montiago

    2011-01-01

    For the past decade, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations has been working toward eradicating rinderpest through vaccination and intense surveillance by 2012. Because of the potential severity of a rinderpest epidemic, it is prudent to prepare for an unexpected outbreak in animal populations. There is no immunity to the disease among the livestock or wildlife in the United States (US). If rinderpest were to emerge in the US, the loss in livestock could be devastating. We predict the potential spread of rinderpest using a two-stage model for the spread of a multi-host infectious disease among agricultural animals in the US. The model incorporates large-scale interactions among US counties and the small-scale dynamics of disease spread within a county. The model epidemic was seeded in 16 locations and there was a strong dependence of the overall epidemic size on the starting location. The epidemics were classified according to overall size into small epidemics of 100 to 300 animals (failed epidemics), epidemics infecting 3,000 to 30,000 animals (medium epidemics), and the large epidemics infecting around one million beef cattle. The size of the rinderpest epidemics were directly related to the origin of the disease and whether or not the disease moved into certain key counties in high-livestock-density areas of the US. The epidemic size also depended upon response time and effectiveness of movement controls. PMID:21435236

  12. Disease properties, geography, and mitigation strategies in a simulation spread of rinderpest across the United States

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    For the past decade, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations has been working toward eradicating rinderpest through vaccination and intense surveillance by 2012. Because of the potential severity of a rinderpest epidemic, it is prudent to prepare for an unexpected outbreak in animal populations. There is no immunity to the disease among the livestock or wildlife in the United States (US). If rinderpest were to emerge in the US, the loss in livestock could be devastating. We predict the potential spread of rinderpest using a two-stage model for the spread of a multi-host infectious disease among agricultural animals in the US. The model incorporates large-scale interactions among US counties and the small-scale dynamics of disease spread within a county. The model epidemic was seeded in 16 locations and there was a strong dependence of the overall epidemic size on the starting location. The epidemics were classified according to overall size into small epidemics of 100 to 300 animals (failed epidemics), epidemics infecting 3 000 to 30 000 animals (medium epidemics), and the large epidemics infecting around one million beef cattle. The size of the rinderpest epidemics were directly related to the origin of the disease and whether or not the disease moved into certain key counties in high-livestock-density areas of the US. The epidemic size also depended upon response time and effectiveness of movement controls. PMID:21435236

  13. [On the Differential Diagnosis of Intractable Psychogenic Chronic Cough: Neuropathic Larynx Irritable - Gabapentin's Antitussive Action].

    PubMed

    Bonnet, U; Ossowski, A; Schubert, M; Gall, H; Steinkamp, I; Richter, L E; Khalil-Boutros, Y; Nefedev, A; Kuhlmann, R

    2015-10-01

    We present the case of a 76 year old female inpatient who suffered from a chronic intractable cough which arose simultaneously to a severe major depression and was secondary to an exorbitant psychological distress. Chronic cough had never been experienced before and was initially considered to have a mere psychogenic origin since a comprehensive and guideline-based diagnostic screening did not reveal any underlying somatic cause. However, several factors cast doubt on the solitary psychic genesis of the chronic cough: i) occurrence immediately after a penetrant cold, ii) embedding in other complaints of laryngeal hyperreagibility (larynx irritable), such as persistent globus pharyngeus sensation, throat clearing and episodic dysphonia, iii) first occurrence on old life, iv) erupting from sleep as well, v) persistence despite remission of the major depression, and v) no sustaining benefit from specific psychotherapy and speech therapy. Therefore, diagnostics were extended to apparative tools for objective evaluation of swallowing by using fiberoptic videoendoscopic (FEES) and videofluoroscopic (VFS) techniques, which revealed signs of laryngeal neuropathy but without evidence of penetration or aspiration. A co-existing small goiter and an impaired glucose tolerance along with a putative intracellular vitamin B12 or folate deficiency (as indirectly derived from an apparent hyperhomocysteinemia) were assumed to be responsible for the neuropathy and underwent specific treatments. The impaired glucose tolerance and putative vitamin deficit were compatible with a distal symmetric sensorimotoric, even subclinical polyneuropathy of the lower extremities. The larynx irritable improved under gabapentin being confirmed by drug removals several times, and finally calmed down almost completely under gabapentin, which was in line with the scant literature of this topic. Re-examination of the larynx per FEES nine months later showed no deficits any more under the well-tolerated treatment (gabapentin, levothyroxine, vitamin B12 and folic acid substitution, weight reduction and physical training). All in all, the larynx irritable as well as the chronic cough were most probably induced by a laryngeal neuropathy and were not solely of psychic origin. Due to good treatment options a larynx irritable should be regularly taken into consideration of the investigation of intractable chronic cough. Therefore, an apparative evaluation of deglutition is recommended in the diagnostic toolbox of chronic cough - even if embedded in a psychiatric disorder or distress - before diagnosing a sole psychic origin. An hypothetical scheme of the development of a larynx irritable caused by neuropathic and non-neuropathic ("nociceptive") conditions is proposed. PMID:26588720

  14. Molecular Surveillance for Lymphoproliferative Disease Virus in Wild Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) from the Eastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jesse M.; Allison, Andrew B.; Holmes, Edward C.; Phillips, Jamie E.; Bunting, Elizabeth M.; Yabsley, Michael J.; Brown, Justin D.

    2015-01-01

    Lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) is a poorly understood, oncogenic avian retrovirus of domestic turkeys that has historically been restricted to Europe and Israel. However, a recent study reported LPDV in multiple wild turkey diagnostic cases from throughout the eastern United States of America (USA). To better understand the distribution of LPDV in the eastern USA, we surveyed 1,164 reportedly asymptomatic hunter-harvested wild turkeys from 17 states for the presence of LPDV proviral DNA by PCR. In total, 564/1,164 (47%) turkeys were positive for LPDV. Wild turkeys from each state had a relatively high prevalence of LPDV, although statewide prevalence varied from 26 to 83%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two major clades of LPDV in the USA, although one was at a low frequency suggesting restricted transmission, as well as significant clustering by state of isolation. To determine the best tissue to target for diagnostic purposes, liver, spleen, and bone marrow were tested from a subset of 15 hunter-harvested wild turkeys and 20 wild turkey diagnostic cases. Overall, bone marrow provided the highest level of detection for both hunter-harvested turkeys and diagnostic cases. The sensitivity of LPDV detection between tissues was not significantly different for diagnostic cases, but was for hunter-harvested birds. These results indicate that LPDV infection is common and widespread in wild turkey populations throughout the eastern USA, even without overt signs of disease. PMID:25897755

  15. Meningococcal disease among men who have sex with men - United States, January 2012-June 2015.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Hajime; MacNeil, Jessica; Blain, Amy; Patel, Manisha; Martin, Stacey; Weiss, Don; Ngai, Stephanie; Ezeoke, Ifeoma; Mascola, Laurene; Civen, Rachel; Ngo, Van; Black, Stephanie; Kemble, Sarah; Chugh, Rashmi; Murphy, Elizabeth; Petit, Colette; Harriman, Kathleen; Winter, Kathleen; Beron, Andrew; Clegg, Whitney; Conover, Craig; Misegades, Lara

    2015-11-13

    Since 2012, three clusters of serogroup C meningococcal disease among men who have sex with men (MSM) have been reported in the United States. During 2012, 13 cases of meningococcal disease among MSM were reported by the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (1); over a 5-month period during 2012–2013, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health reported four cases among MSM; and during May–June 2015, the Chicago Department of Public Health reported seven cases of meningococcal disease among MSM in the greater Chicago area. MSM have not previously been considered at increased risk for meningococcal disease. Determining outbreak thresholds* for special populations of unknown size (such as MSM) can be difficult. The New York City health department declared an outbreak based on an estimated increased risk for meningococcal infection in 2012 among MSM and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected MSM compared with city residents who were not MSM or for whom MSM status was unknown (1). The Chicago Department of Public Health also declared an outbreak based on an increase in case counts and thresholds calculated using population estimates of MSM and HIV-infected MSM. Local public health response included increasing awareness among MSM, conducting contact tracing and providing chemoprophylaxis to close contacts, and offering vaccination to the population at risk (1–3). To better understand the epidemiology and burden of meningococcal disease in MSM populations in the United States and to inform recommendations, CDC analyzed data from a retrospective review of reported cases from January 2012 through June 2015. PMID:26562570

  16. Rapid assessment of vectorborne diseases during the Midwest flood--United States, 1993.

    PubMed

    1994-07-01

    Heavy spring and summer rainfall during 1993 caused the most extensive flash and riverine flooding ever recorded in the upper midwestern United States. In portions of the flood region,* standing water provided large expanses of habitat capable of producing large populations of the mosquitoes Culex pipiens and Cx. tarsalis. These species can rapidly amplify transmission of the arboviruses that cause St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) and western equine encephalitis (WEE). Although information from state health departments in the disaster area indicated minimal SLE or WEE activity in the region before the flooding, large vector populations in certain areas following the flooding increased the potential for exposure of residents and emergency workers to arboviral infection. To determine the risk for arboviral disease in the disaster area, CDC, in collaboration with state and local health departments, conducted surveillance during August-September 1993. This report summarizes the results of the surveillance activity. PMID:7911970

  17. [Indication and usage of opioids except morphine for chronic non-malignant intractable pain].

    PubMed

    Saeki, Shigeru

    2008-11-01

    Indication and usage of opioids except morphine for chronic non-malignant intractable pain were reviewed. In Japan, other than morphine, we can use only two opioids, codeine phosphate (codeine), and dihydrocodeine phosphate (dihydrocodeine) for non-malignant pain management according to medical insurance system. But in western countries sustained-release opioids such as MS contine, transdermal fentanyl, oxycontin were used for the management of non-malignant chronic pain. The WHO ladder for cancer management should also be used for the management of non-malignant pain. Initial dose of codeine is 60 mg x day(-1) and the dosage should be increased or decreased according to pain intensity, patients' general condition and age. In most cases pain is controlled at the dose of 80-310 mg x day(-1). If pain intensity does not decrease or change, codeine should be changed to morphine. In our clinic, starting dose of codeine was 40-480 mg x day(-1) (average dose: 107.8 mg x day(-1)), maximum dose was 60-1280 mg x day (average dose: 310 mg x day(-1)). Average period for administration of codeine was 294.4 days. Dihydrocodeine has twice analgesic efficacy compared to codeine. The initial dose is the same as codeine. We hope that sustained release opioids such as transdermal fentanyl, oxycontin, tramadol etc will be used in Japan for management of non-malignant chronic pain in the near future. PMID:19039961

  18. Pulsed radiofrequency on radial nerve under ultrasound guidance for treatment of intractable lateral epicondylitis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dae Seok; Kang, Tae Hyung; Kim, Hyae Jin

    2016-06-01

    Lateral epicondylitis is a painful and functionally limiting disorder. Although lateral elbow pain is generally self-limiting, in a minority of people symptoms persist for a long time. When various conservative treatments fail, surgical approach is recommended. Surgical denervation of several nerves that innervate the lateral humeral epicondyle could be considered in patients with refractory pain because it denervates the region of pain. Pulsed radiofrequency is a minimally invasive procedure that improves chronic pain when applied to various neural tissues without causing any significant destruction and painful complication. This procedure is safe, minimally invasive, and has less risk of complications relatively compared to the surgical approach. The radial nerve can be identified as a target for pulsed radiofrequency lesioning in lateral epicondylitis. This innovative method of pulsed radiofrequency applied to the radial nerve has not been reported before. We reported on two patients with intractable lateral epicondylitis suffering from elbow pain who did not respond to nonoperative treatments, but in whom the ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency neuromodulation of the radial nerve induced symptom improvement. After a successful diagnostic nerve block, radiofrequency probe adjustment around the radial nerve was performed on the lateral aspect of the distal upper arm under ultrasound guidance and multiple pulsed treatments were applied. A significant reduction in pain was reported over the follow-up period of 12 weeks. PMID:26896944

  19. Intractable Facial Pain and Numb Chin due to Metastatic Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Elahi, Foad; Luke, Whitney; Elahi, Fazel

    2014-01-01

    The etiologies of facial pain are innumerable, thus facial pain misdiagnosis and resultant mismanagement is common. Numb chin syndrome presents with hypoesthesia and/or anesthesia in the dermatomal distribution of the inferior alveolar or the mental nerve. In this case report, we will discuss a case of intractable facial pain in a 57-year-old male with a history of esophageal adenocarcinoma who was initially misdiagnosed and treated as trigeminal neuralgia. During clinical examination, the loss of sensation in the inferior alveolar nerve distribution was identified and led to the diagnosis of mandibular metastasis. The details of the clinical presentation will be discussed in the context of accurate identification and diagnosis. Focal radiation to the metastatic location along with sphenopalatine ganglion radiofrequency ablation and medication management provided significant pain relief. This case report provides additional information to the current medical knowledge and it enhances the clinical vigilance of the clinicians when they encounter similar cases. We concluded that patients with a history of neoplasms who present with atypical symptoms of facial pain should undergo further investigation with advanced imaging. Targeted treatment based on an accurate diagnosis is the foundation of pain management. PMID:25606033

  20. Combining stereo-electroencephalography and subdural electrodes in the diagnosis and treatment of medically intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Enatsu, Rei; Bulacio, Juan; Najm, Imad; Wyllie, Elaine; So, Norman K; Nair, Dileep R; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy; Bingaman, William; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge

    2014-08-01

    Stereo-electroencephalography (SEEG) has advantages for exploring deeper epileptic foci. Nevertheless, SEEG can only sample isolated cortical areas and its spatial limitation, with the inability to record contiguous cortical regions, may cause difficulties in interpretation. In light of these limitations, the authors describe the hybrid technique of SEEG and subdural strip electrode placement. The hybrid technique was used for a presurgical evaluation in four patients with intractable epilepsy. Initially, the depth electrodes were inserted with a robotic stereotactic system. Thereafter, a skin incision and a small craniectomy were performed at the entry point of the strip electrode trajectory. The dura was opened and, under live fluoroscopic guidance, strip electrodes were slid into the subdural space. In these patients, the additional subdural strip electrodes provided (1) information regarding the precise description of seizure spread in the cortical surface adjacent to the subdural space, (2) identification of epileptogenic zones located near the crown, (3) more precise definition of functional cortex and (4) a better delineation of the interface between epileptogenic zones and functional cortex. This hybrid technique provides additional data compared to either technique alone, offering superior understanding of the dynamics of the epileptic activity and its interaction with functional cortical areas. PMID:24650680

  1. Amoeba-inspired nanoarchitectonic computing: solving intractable computational problems using nanoscale photoexcitation transfer dynamics.

    PubMed

    Aono, Masashi; Naruse, Makoto; Kim, Song-Ju; Wakabayashi, Masamitsu; Hori, Hirokazu; Ohtsu, Motoichi; Hara, Masahiko

    2013-06-18

    Biologically inspired computing devices and architectures are expected to overcome the limitations of conventional technologies in terms of solving computationally demanding problems, adapting to complex environments, reducing energy consumption, and so on. We previously demonstrated that a primitive single-celled amoeba (a plasmodial slime mold), which exhibits complex spatiotemporal oscillatory dynamics and sophisticated computing capabilities, can be used to search for a solution to a very hard combinatorial optimization problem. We successfully extracted the essential spatiotemporal dynamics by which the amoeba solves the problem. This amoeba-inspired computing paradigm can be implemented by various physical systems that exhibit suitable spatiotemporal dynamics resembling the amoeba's problem-solving process. In this Article, we demonstrate that photoexcitation transfer phenomena in certain quantum nanostructures mediated by optical near-field interactions generate the amoebalike spatiotemporal dynamics and can be used to solve the satisfiability problem (SAT), which is the problem of judging whether a given logical proposition (a Boolean formula) is self-consistent. SAT is related to diverse application problems in artificial intelligence, information security, and bioinformatics and is a crucially important nondeterministic polynomial time (NP)-complete problem, which is believed to become intractable for conventional digital computers when the problem size increases. We show that our amoeba-inspired computing paradigm dramatically outperforms a conventional stochastic search method. These results indicate the potential for developing highly versatile nanoarchitectonic computers that realize powerful solution searching with low energy consumption. PMID:23565603

  2. Bilateral Thalamic Stimulation Induces Insomnia in Patients Treated for Intractable Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Bridoux, Agathe; Drouot, Xavier; Sangare, Aude; Al-ani, Tarik; Brignol, Arnaud; Charles-Nelson, Anais; Brugières, Pierre; Gouello, Gaëtane; Hosomi, Koichi; Lepetit, Hélène; Palfi, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To explore the influence of acute bilateral ventral intermediate thalamic nucleus (VIM) stimulation on sleep. Design: Three consecutive full-night polysomnography recordings were made in the laboratory. After the habituation night, a random order for night ON-stim and OFF-stim was applied for the second and third nights. Setting: Sleep disorders unit of a university hospital. Patients: Eleven patients with bilateral stimulation of the ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus (VIM) for drug-resistant tremor. Measurements: Sleep measures on polysomnography. Results: Total sleep time was reduced during night ON-stim compared to OFF- stim, as well as rapid eye movement sleep percentage while the percentage of N2 increased. Wakefulness after sleep onset time was increased. Conclusion: Our results show that bilateral stimulation of the VIM nuclei reduces sleep and could be associated with insomnia. Citation: Bridoux A, Drouot X, Sangare A, Al-ani T, Brignol A, Charles-Nelson A, Brugières P, Gouello G, Hosomi K, Lepetit H, Palfi S. Bilateral thalamic stimulation induces insomnia in patients treated for intractable tremor. SLEEP 2015;38(3):473–478. PMID:25515098

  3. Microendoscopy-guided percutaneous cordotomy for intractable pain: case series of 24 patients.

    PubMed

    Fonoff, Erich Talamoni; Lopez, William Omar Contreras; de Oliveira, Ywzhe Sifuentes Almeida; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2016-02-01

    OBJECT The aim of this study was to show that microendoscopic guidance using a double-channel technique could be safely applied during percutaneous cordotomy and provides clear real-time visualization of the spinal cord and surrounding structures during the entire procedure. METHODS Twenty-four adult patients with intractable cancer pain were treated by microendoscopic-guided percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) cordotomy using the double-channel technique under local anesthesia. A percutaneous lateral puncture was performed initially under fluoroscopy guidance to localize the target. When the subarachnoid space was reached by the guiding cannula, the endoscope was inserted for visualization of the spinal cord and surrounding structures. After target visualization, a second needle was inserted to guide the RF electrode. Cordotomy was performed by a standard RF method. RESULTS The microendoscopic double-channel approach provided real-time visualization of the target in 91% of the cases. The other 9% of procedures were performed by the single-channel technique. Significant analgesia was achieved in over 90% of the cases. Two patients had transient ataxia that lasted for a few weeks until total recovery. CONCLUSIONS The use of percutaneous microendoscopic cordotomy with the double-channel technique is useful for specific manipulations of the spinal cord. It provides real-time visualization of the RF probe, thereby adding a degree of safety to the procedure. PMID:26230468

  4. Occipital nerve stimulation for the treatment of intractable chronic migraine headache: ONSTIM feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Saper, Joel R; Dodick, David W; Silberstein, Stephen D; McCarville, Sally; Sun, Mark; Goadsby, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Medically intractable chronic migraine (CM) is a disabling illness characterized by headache ?15 days per month. Methods: A multicenter, randomized, blinded, controlled feasibility study was conducted to obtain preliminary safety and efficacy data on occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) in CM. Eligible subjects received an occipital nerve block, and responders were randomized to adjustable stimulation (AS), preset stimulation (PS) or medical management (MM) groups. Results: Seventy-five of 110 subjects were assigned to a treatment group; complete diary data were available for 66. A responder was defined as a subject who achieved a 50% or greater reduction in number of headache days per month or a three-point or greater reduction in average overall pain intensity compared with baseline. Three-month responder rates were 39% for AS, 6% for PS and 0% for MM. No unanticipated adverse device events occurred. Lead migration occurred in 12 of 51 (24%) subjects. Conclusion: The results of this feasibility study offer promise and should prompt further controlled studies of ONS in CM. PMID:20861241

  5. Electroencephalographic prodromal markers of dementia across conscious states in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Latreille, Véronique; Carrier, Julie; Gaudet-Fex, Benjamin; Rodrigues-Brazète, Jessica; Panisset, Michel; Chouinard, Sylvain; Postuma, Ronald B; Gagnon, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    In Parkinson's disease, electroencephalographic abnormalities during wakefulness and non-rapid eye movement sleep (spindles) were found to be predictive biomarkers of dementia. Because rapid eye movement sleep is regulated by the cholinergic system, which shows early degeneration in Parkinson's disease with cognitive impairment, anomalies during this sleep stage might mirror dementia development. In this prospective study, we examined baseline electroencephalographic absolute spectral power across three states of consciousness (non-rapid eye movement sleep, rapid eye movement sleep, and wakefulness) in 68 non-demented patients with Parkinson's disease and 44 healthy controls. All participants underwent baseline polysomnographic recordings and a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment. Power spectral analyses were performed on standard frequency bands. Dominant occipital frequency during wakefulness and ratios of slow-to-fast frequencies during rapid eye movement sleep and wakefulness were also computed. At follow-up (an average 4.5 years after baseline), 18 patients with Parkinson's disease had developed dementia and 50 patients remained dementia-free. In rapid eye movement sleep, patients with Parkinson's disease who later developed dementia showed, at baseline, higher absolute power in delta and theta bands and a higher slowing ratio, especially in temporal, parietal, and occipital regions, compared to patients who remained dementia-free and controls. In non-rapid eye movement sleep, lower baseline sigma power in parietal cortical regions also predicted development of dementia. During wakefulness, patients with Parkinson's disease who later developed dementia showed lower dominant occipital frequency as well as higher delta and slowing ratio compared to patients who remained dementia-free and controls. At baseline, higher slowing ratios in temporo-occipital regions during rapid eye movement sleep were associated with poor performance on visuospatial tests in patients with Parkinson's disease. Using receiver operating characteristic curves, we found that best predictors of dementia in Parkinson's disease were rapid eye movement sleep slowing ratios in posterior regions, wakefulness slowing ratios in temporal areas, and lower dominant occipital frequency. These results suggest that electroencephalographic slowing during sleep is a new promising predictive biomarker for Parkinson's disease dementia, perhaps as a marker of cholinergic denervation. PMID:26912643

  6. Effects of noise on a computational model for disease states of mood disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias Huber, Martin; Krieg, Jürgen-Christian; Braun, Hans Albert; Moss, Frank

    2000-03-01

    Nonlinear dynamics are currently proposed to explain the progressive course of recurrent mood disorders starting with isolated episodes and ending with accelerated irregular (``chaotic") mood fluctuations. Such a low-dimensional disease model is attractive because of its principal accordance with biological disease models, i.e. the kindling and biological rhythms model. However, most natural systems are nonlinear and noisy and several studies in the neuro- and physical sciences have demonstrated interesting cooperative behaviors arising from interacting random and deterministic dynamics. Here, we consider the effects of noise on a recent neurodynamical model for the timecourse of affective disorders (Huber et al.: Biological Psychiatry 1999;46:256-262). We describe noise effects on temporal patterns and mean episode frequencies of various in computo disease states. Our simulations demonstrate that noise can cause unstructured randomness or can maximize periodic order. The frequency of episode occurence can increase with noise but it can also remain unaffected or even can decrease. We show further that noise can make visible bifurcations before they would normally occur under deterministic conditions and we quantify this behavior with a recently developed statistical method. All these effects depend critically on both, the dynamic state and the noise intensity. Implications for neurobiology and course of mood disorders are discussed.

  7. Surveillance for Waterborne Disease Outbreaks Associated with Drinking Water - United States, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Beer, Karlyn D; Gargano, Julia W; Roberts, Virginia A; Hill, Vincent R; Garrison, Laurel E; Kutty, Preeta K; Hilborn, Elizabeth D; Wade, Timothy J; Fullerton, Kathleen E; Yoder, Jonathan S

    2015-08-14

    Advances in water management and sanitation have substantially reduced waterborne disease in the United States, although outbreaks continue to occur. Public health agencies in the U.S. states and territories* report information on waterborne disease outbreaks to the CDC Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System (http://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/surveillance/index.html). For 2011-2012, 32 drinking water-associated outbreaks were reported, accounting for at least 431 cases of illness, 102 hospitalizations, and 14 deaths. Legionella was responsible for 66% of outbreaks and 26% of illnesses, and viruses and non-Legionella bacteria together accounted for 16% of outbreaks and 53% of illnesses. The two most commonly identified deficiencies† leading to drinking water-associated outbreaks were Legionella in building plumbing§ systems (66%) and untreated groundwater (13%). Continued vigilance by public health, regulatory, and industry professionals to identify and correct deficiencies associated with building plumbing systems and groundwater systems could prevent most reported outbreaks and illnesses associated with drinking water systems. PMID:26270059

  8. Ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency ablation of the genital branch of the genitofemoral nerve for treatment of intractable orchalgia

    PubMed Central

    Terkawi, Abdullah Sulieman; Romdhane, Kamel

    2014-01-01

    Chronic orchalgia is a frustrating clinical problem for both the patient and the physician. We present a 17-year-old boy with a bilateral idiopathic chronic intractable orchalgia with failed conservative treatment. For 2 years, he suffered from severe attacks of scrotal pain that affected his daily activities and caused frequent absence from school. Ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency ablation (PRF) of the genital branches of the genitofemoral nerve performed after local anesthetic nerve block confirmed the diagnosis and yielded 6 weeks of symptom relief. Seven-month follow-up revealed complete satisfactory analgesia. The use of PRF is an effective and non-invasive approach to treat intractable chronic orchalgia. PMID:24843352

  9. Renal Embolization and Urothelial Sclerotherapy for Recurrent Obstructive Urosepsis and Intractable Haematuria from Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Brown, Nicholas; Olayos, Elizabeth; Elmer, Sandra; Wong, Lih-Ming; Brooks, Duncan M; Jhamb, Ashu

    2016-03-01

    Management of intractable haematuria and obstructive urosepsis from upper tract urothelial carcinoma can be problematic in patients not suitable for surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Interventional radiology techniques provide alternative approaches in this setting, such as complete kidney embolization to cease urine output, percutaneous nephrostomy, antegrade injection of sclerotherapy agents and sterilisation of the upper collecting system. Related approaches have been successfully employed to sclerose renal cysts, lymphoceles, chyluria and intractable lower tract haemorrhage. No reports of percutaneous, antegrade sclerotherapy in the upper urinary tract have previously been published. We present a case of recurrent haematuria and obstructive urosepsis caused by invasive upper tract urothelial carcinoma in a non-operative patient, which was treated with renal embolisation and percutaneous upper tract urothelial sclerotherapy. PMID:26206598

  10. Diseases Attributable to Asbestos Exposure: Years of Potential Life Lost, United States, 1999–2010

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Ki Moon; Mazurek, Jacek M.; Wood, John M.; Hendricks, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although asbestos use has been restricted in recent decades, asbestos-associated deaths continue to occur in the United States. Objectives We evaluated premature mortality and loss of potentially productive years of life attributable to asbestos-associated diseases. Methods Using 1999–2010 National Center for Health Statistics mortality data, we identified decedents aged ≥25 years whose death certificate listed asbestosis and malignant mesothelioma as the underlying cause of death. We computed years of potential life lost to life expectancy (YPLL) and to age 65 (YPLL65). Results During 1999–2010, a total of 427,005 YPLL and 55,184 YPLL65 were attributed to asbestosis (56,907 YPLL and 2,167 YPLL65), malignant mesothelioma (370,098 YPPL and 53,017 YPLL65). Overall and disease-specific asbestos-attributable total YPLL and YPLL65 and median YPLL and YPLL65 per decedent did not change significantly from 1999 to 2010. Conclusions The continuing occurrence of asbestos-associated diseases and their substantial premature mortality burden underscore the need for maintaining prevention efforts and for ongoing surveillance to monitor temporal trends in these diseases. PMID:24108494

  11. PREVALENCE OF CHAGAS DISEASE AMONG BLOOD DONOR CANDIDATES IN TRIANGULO MINEIRO, MINAS GERAIS STATE, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    LOPES, Patrícia da Silva; RAMOS, Eliezer Lucas Pires; GÓMEZ-HERNÁNDEZ, César; FERREIRA, Gabriela Lícia Santos; REZENDE-OLIVEIRA, Karine

    2015-01-01

    Despite public health campaigns and epidemiological surveillance activities, Chagas disease remains a major health problem in Latin America. According to data from the World Health Organization, there are approximately 7-8 million people infected with Trypanosoma cruzi worldwide, a large percentage of which in Latin America. This study aims to examine the serological profile of blood donors in blood banks of Hemominas hematology center, in the town of Ituiutaba, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The study sample consisted of 53,941 blood donors, which were grouped according to gender and age. Sample collections were performed from January 1991 to December 2011, and 277 donors (0.5%) were considered serologically ineligible due to Chagas disease. Analysis of data showed no significant difference between genders. As for age, the highest proportion of ineligible donors was from 40 to 49 years (30%), and there was a positive correlation between increasing age and the percentage of patients seropositive for Chagas disease. Therefore, adopting strategies that allow the safe identification of donors with positive serology for Chagas disease is essential to reduce or eliminate indeterminate serological results. PMID:27049698

  12. Recreational water-associated disease outbreaks--United States, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Hlavsa, Michele C; Roberts, Virginia A; Kahler, Amy M; Hilborn, Elizabeth D; Wade, Timothy J; Backer, Lorraine C; Yoder, Jonathan S

    2014-01-10

    Recreational water-associated disease outbreaks result from exposure to infectious pathogens or chemical agents in treated recreational water venues (e.g., pools and hot tubs or spas) or untreated recreational water venues (e.g., lakes and oceans). For 2009-2010, the most recent years for which finalized data are available, public health officials from 28 states and Puerto Rico electronically reported 81 recreational water-associated disease outbreaks to CDC's Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System (WBDOSS) via the National Outbreak Reporting System (NORS). This report summarizes the characteristics of those outbreaks. Among the 57 outbreaks associated with treated recreational water, 24 (42%) were caused by Cryptosporidium. Among the 24 outbreaks associated with untreated recreational water, 11 (46%) were confirmed or suspected to have been caused by cyanobacterial toxins. In total, the 81 outbreaks resulted in at least 1,326 cases of illness and 62 hospitalizations; no deaths were reported. Laboratory and environmental data, in addition to epidemiologic data, can be used to direct and optimize the prevention and control of recreational water-associated disease outbreaks. PMID:24402466

  13. Experimental and Imaging Techniques for Examining Fibrin Clot Structures in Normal and Diseased States

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Natalie K.; Keegan, Philip M.; Platt, Manu O.; Averett, Rodney D.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrin is an extracellular matrix protein that is responsible for maintaining the structural integrity of blood clots. Much research has been done on fibrin in the past years to include the investigation of synthesis, structure-function, and lysis of clots. However, there is still much unknown about the morphological and structural features of clots that ensue from patients with disease. In this research study, experimental techniques are presented that allow for the examination of morphological differences of abnormal clot structures due to diseased states such as diabetes and sickle cell anemia. Our study focuses on the preparation and evaluation of fibrin clots in order to assess morphological differences using various experimental assays and confocal microscopy. In addition, a method is also described that allows for continuous, real-time calculation of lysis rates in fibrin clots. The techniques described herein are important for researchers and clinicians seeking to elucidate comorbid thrombotic pathologies such as myocardial infarctions, ischemic heart disease, and strokes in patients with diabetes or sickle cell disease. PMID:25867016

  14. The burden of disease due to tuberculosis in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil*, **

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Glênio César Nunes; da Silva, Rosemeri Maurici; Ferrer, Kelian Tenfen; Traebert, Jefferson

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the burden of disease due to tuberculosis in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil, in 2009. METHODS: This was an epidemiological study with an ecological design. Data on tuberculosis incidence and mortality were collected from specific Brazilian National Ministry of Health databases. The burden of disease due to tuberculosis was based on the calculation of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). The DALYs were estimated by adding the years of life lost (YLLs) and years lived with disability (YLDs). Absolute values were transformed into rates per 100,000 population. The rates were calculated by gender, age group, and health care macroregion. RESULTS: The burden of disease due to tuberculosis was 5,644.27 DALYs (92.25 DALYs/100,000 population), YLLs and YLDs respectively accounting for 78.77% and 21.23% of that total. The highest rates were found in males in the 30-44 and 45-59 year age brackets, although that was not true in every health care macroregion. Overall, the highest estimated burden was in the Planalto Norte macroregion (179.56 DALYs/100,000 population), followed by the Nordeste macroregion (167.07 DALYs/100,000 population). CONCLUSIONS: In the majority of the health care macroregions of Santa Catarina, the burden of disease due to tuberculosis was concentrated in adult males, the level of that concentration varying among the various macroregions. PMID:24626271

  15. [Serological response and the viral carrier state in chickens infected with the pathogenic Newcastle disease virus].

    PubMed

    Gerganov, G

    1979-01-01

    Three groups of susceptible chickens were treated with Newcastle Disease vaccine, as follows: group I--orally, strain La Sota; group II--aerosole treatment, strain La Sota and group III--intramusculary, Komarov's vaccine. Varying HI antibody levels were observed following vaccine application. The average antibody titer of group I and II experimental chickens (40 in number for each group) was 25 days post vaccination respectively log2 = 3.47 and log2 = 6.2 while of group III (50 chickens) it was 14 days post vaccination log2 = 8.4. Aerosole challenge with velogenic viscerothropic strain of Newcastle Disease virus caused a sharp change in serum antibody titer. The low antibody titer in group I rose quickly post challenge while in groups II and III, on the contrary, it fell sharply. This characteristic dynamics is proposed for use as an indicator showing the presence of pathogenic virus in vaccinated birds. It was proven that pathogenic Newcastle Disease virus persisted in birds from group I for 40 days and 10% of them were in a state of latent infection (clinically healthy). The virus was isolated after method of organ cultures of tracheal explantates. It was established that the HI antibody level in the blood serum of virus carriers was higher as compared with that of the remaining birds in the group. The use of this fact as an indicator for beginning virusological investigations aiming to reveal latent Newcastle Disease infection is proposed. PMID:317545

  16. West Nile virus in the United States: an update on an emerging infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Huhn, Gregory D; Sejvar, James J; Montgomery, Susan P; Dworkin, Mark S

    2003-08-15

    West Nile virus is a mosquito-borne flavivirus and human neuropathogen. Since the virus was recognized in New York City in 1999, it has spread rapidly across the United States, with human disease documented in 39 states and the District of Columbia. West Nile virus can cause a broad range of clinical syndromes, including fever, meningitis, encephalitis, and a flaccid paralysis characteristic of a poliomyelitis-like syndrome. Approximately one in 150 infections results in severe neurologic illness. Advanced age is the greatest risk factor for severe neurologic disease, long-term sequelae, and death. Physicians should consider West Nile virus infection when evaluating febrile patients who have unexplained neurologic symptoms, muscle weakness, or erythematous rash during late spring through early fall, or throughout the year in warm climates. West Nile virus infection has no characteristic findings on routine laboratory tests, although anemia, leukocytosis, or lymphopenia may be present. Testing for IgM antibody to West Nile virus in serum or cerebrospinal fluid (samples from the acute and convalescent phases, submitted at least two weeks apart) is the most common diagnostic method. Local or state health departments usually can perform the test within 24 to 36 hours of submission. Treatment is supportive. Prevention relies on comprehensive mosquito-control programs and measures to avoid mosquito bites, including the use of mosquito repellents containing N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide. PMID:12952382

  17. A spatio-temporal absorbing state model for disease and syndromic surveillance.

    PubMed

    Heaton, Matthew J; Banks, David L; Zou, Jian; Karr, Alan F; Datta, Gauri; Lynch, James; Vera, Francisco

    2012-08-30

    Reliable surveillance models are an important tool in public health because they aid in mitigating disease outbreaks, identify where and when disease outbreaks occur, and predict future occurrences. Although many statistical models have been devised for surveillance purposes, none are able to simultaneously achieve the important practical goals of good sensitivity and specificity, proper use of covariate information, inclusion of spatio-temporal dynamics, and transparent support to decision-makers. In an effort to achieve these goals, this paper proposes a spatio-temporal conditional autoregressive hidden Markov model with an absorbing state. The model performs well in both a large simulation study and in an application to influenza/pneumonia fatality data. PMID:22388709

  18. Lessons from falling coronary heart disease mortality in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, F. H.

    1984-01-01

    The marked decline in coronary heart disease mortality in the United States since the late 1960s is most likely due in large part to successful efforts at primary prevention, attributable in turn to improved eating habits, better control of blood pressure and a reduction in smoking. Another part of the decline can probably be explained by an improvement in prognosis. It remains to be established if there has been a reduction in morbidity as well as mortality. There are other countries which have experienced declines, though of a lesser degree, while several countries have recorded increases in coronary heart disease mortality. These downward and upward turns, in general, are likewise compatible with the theory that they are caused by corresponding favourable or unfavourable changes in life styles. PMID:6694940

  19. Pectinase production by Aspergillus niger using wastewater in solid state fermentation for eliciting plant disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Bai, Z H; Zhang, H X; Qi, H Y; Peng, X W; Li, B J

    2004-10-01

    An elicitor of plant disease resistance, pectinase, was produced by solid state fermentation with Aspergillus niger. Sugar beet pulp was used as carbon source and the wastewater from monosodium glutamate production was used as nitrogen and water source. The composition of the fermentation medium was: 11 ml concentrated wastewater (containing NH3-N 38.2 mg/ml), sugar beet pulp 10 g, Na2HPO4.12H2O 0.2 g, KH2PO4 0.04 g in a 500 ml Erlenmeyer flask. The fermentation temperature was 30 degrees C and the relative humidity of the air was 75-90%. The maximum production of pectinase was reached after 96 h cultivation. The crude pectinase extracted from the fermented materials could elicit disease resistance in cucumber and tomato seedlings. PMID:15207294

  20. FIRST REPORT OF ACUTE CHAGAS DISEASE BY VECTOR TRANSMISSION IN RIO DE JANEIRO STATE, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    SANGENIS, Luiz Henrique Conde; DE SOUSA, Andréa Silvestre; SPERANDIO DA SILVA, Gilberto Marcelo; XAVIER, Sérgio Salles; MACHADO, Carolina Romero Cardoso; BRASIL, Patrícia; DE CASTRO, Liane; DA SILVA, Sidnei; GEORG, Ingebourg; SARAIVA, Roberto Magalhães; do BRASIL, Pedro Emmanuel Alvarenga Americano; HASSLOCHER-MORENO, Alejandro Marcel

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chagas disease (CD) is an endemic anthropozoonosis from Latin America of which the main means of transmission is the contact of skin lesions or mucosa with the feces of triatomine bugs infected by Trypanosoma cruzi. In this article, we describe the first acute CD case acquired by vector transmission in the Rio de Janeiro State and confirmed by parasitological, serological and PCR tests. The patient presented acute cardiomyopathy and pericardial effusion without cardiac tamponade. Together with fever and malaise, a 3 cm wide erythematous, non-pruritic, papule compatible with a "chagoma" was found on his left wrist. This case report draws attention to the possible transmission of CD by non-domiciled native vectors in non-endemic areas. Therefore, acute CD should be included in the diagnostic workout of febrile diseases and acute myopericarditis in Rio de Janeiro. PMID:26422165

  1. Regulation of hepatic ABCC transporters by xenobiotics and in disease states

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xinsheng; Manautou, Jose E.

    2015-01-01

    The subfamily of ABCC transporters consists of 13 members in mammals, including the multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs), sulfonylurea receptors (SURs), and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). These proteins play roles in chemical detoxification, disposition, and normal cell physiology. ABCC transporters are expressed differentially in the liver and are regulated at the transcription and translation level. Their expression and function are also controlled by post-translational modification and membrane-trafficking events. These processes are tightly regulated. Information about alterations in the expression of hepatobiliary ABCC transporters could provide important insights into the pathogenesis of diseases and disposition of xenobiotics. In this review, we describe the regulation of hepatic ABCC transporters in humans and rodents by a variety of xenobiotics, under disease states and in genetically modified animal models deficient in transcription factors, transporters, and cell-signaling molecules. PMID:20233023

  2. Drosophila as a model for intractable epilepsy: gilgamesh suppresses seizures in para(bss1) heterozygote flies.

    PubMed

    Howlett, Iris C; Rusan, Zeid M; Parker, Louise; Tanouye, Mark A

    2013-08-01

    Intractable epilepsies, that is, seizure disorders that do not respond to currently available therapies, are difficult, often tragic, neurological disorders. Na(+) channelopathies have been implicated in some intractable epilepsies, including Dravet syndrome (Dravet 1978), but little progress has been forthcoming in therapeutics. Here we examine a Drosophila model for intractable epilepsy, the Na(+) channel gain-of-function mutant para(bss1) that resembles Dravet syndrome in some aspects (parker et al. 2011a). In particular, we identify second-site mutations that interact with para(bss1), seizure enhancers, and seizure suppressors. We describe one seizure-enhancer mutation named charlatan (chn). The chn gene normally encodes an Neuron-Restrictive Silencer Factor/RE1-Silencing Transcription factor transcriptional repressor of neuronal-specific genes. We identify a second-site seizure-suppressor mutation, gilgamesh (gish), that reduces the severity of several seizure-like phenotypes of para(bss1)/+ heterozygotes. The gish gene normally encodes the Drosophila ortholog of casein kinase CK1g3, a member of the CK1 family of serine-threonine kinases. We suggest that CK1g3 is an unexpected but promising new target for seizure therapeutics. PMID:23797108

  3. Clinical care of two patients with Ebola virus disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Lyon, G Marshall; Mehta, Aneesh K; Varkey, Jay B; Brantly, Kent; Plyler, Lance; McElroy, Anita K; Kraft, Colleen S; Towner, Jonathan S; Spiropoulou, Christina; Ströher, Ute; Uyeki, Timothy M; Ribner, Bruce S

    2014-12-18

    West Africa is currently experiencing the largest outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in history. Two patients with EVD were transferred from Liberia to our hospital in the United States for ongoing care. Malaria had also been diagnosed in one patient, who was treated for it early in the course of EVD. The two patients had substantial intravascular volume depletion and marked electrolyte abnormalities. We undertook aggressive supportive measures of hydration (typically, 3 to 5 liters of intravenous fluids per day early in the course of care) and electrolyte correction. As the patients' condition improved clinically, there was a concomitant decline in the amount of virus detected in plasma. PMID:25390460

  4. Predicting Falls in Parkinson Disease: What Is the Value of Instrumented Testing in OFF Medication State?

    PubMed Central

    Hoskovcová, Martina; Dušek, Petr; Sieger, Tomáš; Brožová, Hana; Zárubová, Kateřina; Bezdíček, Ondřej; Šprdlík, Otakar; Jech, Robert; Štochl, Jan; Roth, Jan; Růžička, Evžen

    2015-01-01

    Background Falls are a common complication of advancing Parkinson's disease (PD). Although numerous risk factors are known, reliable predictors of future falls are still lacking. The objective of this prospective study was to investigate clinical and instrumented tests of balance and gait in both OFF and ON medication states and to verify their utility in the prediction of future falls in PD patients. Methods Forty-five patients with idiopathic PD were examined in defined OFF and ON medication states within one examination day including PD-specific clinical tests, instrumented Timed Up and Go test (iTUG) and computerized dynamic posturography. The same gait and balance tests were performed in 22 control subjects of comparable age and sex. Participants were then followed-up for 6 months using monthly fall diaries and phone calls. Results During the follow-up period, 27/45 PD patients and 4/22 control subjects fell one or more times. Previous falls, fear of falling, more severe motor impairment in the OFF state, higher PD stage, more pronounced depressive symptoms, higher daily levodopa dose and stride time variability in the OFF state were significant risk factors for future falls in PD patients. Increased stride time variability in the OFF state in combination with faster walking cadence appears to be the most significant predictor of future falls, superior to clinical predictors. Conclusion Incorporating instrumented gait measures into the baseline assessment battery as well as accounting for both OFF and ON medication states might improve future fall prediction in PD patients. However, instrumented testing in the OFF state is not routinely performed in clinical practice and has not been used in the development of fall prevention programs in PD. New assessment methods for daylong monitoring of gait, balance and falls are thus required to more effectively address the risk of falling in PD patients. PMID:26443998

  5. Can male vaccination reduce the burden of human papillomavirus-related disease in the United States?

    PubMed

    Low, Garren M I; Attiga, Yasser S; Garg, Gaurav; Schlegal, Richard; Gallicano, G Ian

    2012-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) can cause cervical cancer, as well as a number of other diseases in both men and women. Both sexes play a role in transmission of the disease, but the cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination differs between them. It is necessary to determine the best allocation of limited resources between these two populations to produce the most effective strategy for reducing the burden from HPV-related disease. This literature review intends to elucidate the economic and social considerations that will lead to maximum utilization of vaccination programs, which in turn will reduce the burden of HPV-related disease. Current outreach in the United States is based on vaccination against HPV as a means for combating cervical cancer in women. If we are to include males, however, new marketing strategies must focus on educating patients about the full range of the vaccine's benefits. Men who have sex with men (MSM) are also unprotected against HPV in the current system. Social considerations alone may not be enough, however, as economic prediction models suggest that the associated costs outweigh the benefits in most circumstances. Taking this into account, our review also considers alternate methods of maximizing prevention of HPV-associated disease. The most prudent programs will include physician involvement in patient education and the implementation of structured vaccination and screening programs. Unfortunately, many countries do not have the necessary resources to undertake national vaccination programs. HPV testing and cytology screening for women and MSM may be the most financially reasonable option for many countries. PMID:22691099

  6. Systems for rapidly detecting and treating persons with ebola virus disease--United States.

    PubMed

    Koonin, Lisa M; Jamieson, Denise J; Jernigan, John A; Van Beneden, Chris A; Kosmos, Christine; Harvey, Melissa Cole; Pietz, Harald; Bertolli, Jeanne; Perz, Joseph F; Whitney, Cynthia G; Halpin, Alison Sheehan-Laufer; Daley, W Randolph; Pesik, Nicki; Margolis, Gregg S; Tumpey, Abbigail; Tappero, Jordan; Damon, Inger

    2015-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), CDC, other U.S. government agencies, the World Health Organization (WHO), and international partners are taking multiple steps to respond to the current Ebola virus disease (Ebola) outbreak in West Africa to reduce its toll there and to reduce the chances of international spread. At the same time, CDC and HHS are working to ensure that persons who have a risk factor for exposure to Ebola and who develop symptoms while in the United States are rapidly identified and isolated, and safely receive treatment. HHS and CDC have actively worked with state and local public health authorities and other partners to accelerate health care preparedness to care for persons under investigation (PUI) for Ebola or with confirmed Ebola. This report describes some of these efforts and their impact. PMID:25742383

  7. [RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE PREVALENCE OF CHRONIC NONINFECTIOUS DISEASES AND ELECTROPHYSICAL STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT].

    PubMed

    Rakhmanin, Yu A; Stekhin, A A; Yakovleva, G V; Karasev, A K; Marasanov, A V; Iksanova, T I; Ryabikov, V V

    2015-01-01

    In the paper there is evaluated the relationship of features of electronic state of the environment with a level of chronic, noninfectious diseases (CNID) in the regions of Russia, obtained on the basis of the monitoring measurements of the intensity of natural background electronic Bose condensate (BEBC) of natural ecosystems in a number of Russian regions and seas of the Arctic Ocean. The assessment of BEBC was implemented on results of measurements of redox state of distilled water being in the contact with natural water. The equilibrium redox state of distilled water, determined by the influx of electrons (quantum reduction) outside, is proportional to the intensity of BEBC. The obtained data attest to an increase in the intensity of the background of EBC in Siberia regions and, especially, within the limits ofwaters of Lake Baikal (the redox potential of the surface water in the lake ~ -70mV). Also there is observed a strong dependence of the background EBC in the latitudinal direction. Low levels of background EBC were noted in the Arkhangelsk region and the north-eastern Chukotka. Functioning of international systems of plasma sounding of ionosphere (such systems as HAARP) were established to have a detrimental effect on the background EBC in these regions. According to the results of measurements of the relative values of intensities of natural background of Bose condensate of electrons there was constructed the dependence reflecting the relationship of the prevalence of noninfectious diseases in the regions of Russia with the redox state of distilled water which can be characterized as a significant (regression coefficient R2 = 0.78). The relationship between noninfectious diseases (NID, %) with the intensity of the background of EBC (Ib rel. units) is estimated by the equation: NID [%] = 0.24Eh [mV]-25, where Eh ~ I/Ib. Numerical evaluations show that an increase in the biosphere redox potential of water by 90mV leads to an increase of the primary incidence by 20% (relatively to the average values for Russia). Analysis of results attests to the relationship of CNID with the electrophysical state of the environment that allows from different positions to arrive to true causes of their emergence, associated with changes in the electrophysical conditions of habitation and human activities that lead to the nascency of cellular metabolic disturbances. PMID:26856159

  8. Pathologic features of dysplasia and accompanying alterations observed in surgical specimens from patients with intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kakita, Akiyoshi; Kameyama, Shigeki; Hayashi, Shintaro; Masuda, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi

    2005-04-01

    Malformations caused by abnormalities of cortical development, or cortical dysplasias, were examined in surgical specimens from 108 patients with medically intractable epilepsy to determine the scope of histopathologic changes. The relevance of the clinical findings was also evaluated. Various types and degrees of dysplastic features were observed in various combinations, including architectural abnormalities, an increased number of neurons in the molecular layer and/or cortical layer II, neuronal clustering, an increased number of satellite oligodendrocytes, abnormal gyration, single and/or aggregates of heterotopic neurons in the white matter, and the appearance of cytologically abnormal cells, such as giant or dysmorphic neurons and balloon cells. In the temporal lobe specimens, microdysgenesis (corresponding to mild malformations caused by abnormalities of cortical development and type IA/B focal cortical dysplasias) was more frequently observed than Taylor-type focal cortical dysplasia (type IIA/B), whereas in the frontal lobe specimens, the frequency of occurrence of both types was even. The ages at seizure onset and surgery of patients with the latter type were significantly lower than those of patients with the former. On the other hand, prominent astrocytosis in the cortex and white matter was evident in all cases, and many corpora amylacea and neurofibrillary tangle-like inclusions were observed in a subset of cases. An ultrastructural investigation revealed dilatation of the postsynaptic dendritic spines and shafts in the cortex and features indicating the occurrence in the white matter of demyelination followed by remyelination. Thus, with regard to the epileptogenic lesions, although dysplastic changes constitute the pathogenetic basis, the overlapping subsequent degenerative processes involving synapses, dendrites, and axons might contribute to the development of epileptogenic processes. Astrocytes might also actively participate in the development of the pathogenesis of epilepsy. PMID:15921237

  9. Inherent intractability of the ascertainment problem for pedigree data: a general likelihood framework.

    PubMed Central

    Vieland, V J; Hodge, S E

    1995-01-01

    The problem of ascertainment in segregation analysis arises when families are selected for study through ascertainment of affected individuals. In this case, ascertainment must be corrected for in data analysis. However, methods for ascertainment correction are not available for many common sampling schemes, e.g., sequential sampling of extended pedigrees (except in the case of "single" selection). Concerns about whether ascertainment correction is even required for large pedigrees, about whether and how multiple probands in the same pedigree can be taken into account properly, and about how to apply sequential sampling strategies have occupied many investigators in recent years. We address these concerns by reconsidering a central issue, namely, how to handle pedigree structure (including size). We introduce a new distinction, between sampling in such a way that observed pedigree structure does not depend on which pedigree members are probands (proband-independent [PI] sampling) and sampling in such a way that observed pedigree structure does depend on who are the probands (proband-dependent [PD] sampling). This distinction corresponds roughly (but not exactly) to the distinction between fixed-structure and sequential sampling. We show that conditioning on observed pedigree structure in ascertained data sets obtained under PD sampling is not in general correct (with the exception of "single" selection), while PI sampling of pedigree structures larger than simple sibships is generally not possible. Yet, in practice one has little choice but to condition on observed pedigree structure. We conclude that the problem of genetic modeling in ascertained data sets is, in most situations, literally intractable. We recommend that future efforts focus on the development of robust approximate approaches to the problem. PMID:7825595

  10. Distributed Source Modeling of Language with Magnetoencephalography: Application to Patients with Intractable Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Carrie R.; Thesen, Thomas; Hagler, Donald J.; Carlson, Chad; Devinksy, Orrin; Kuzniecky, Rubin; Barr, William; Gharapetian, Lusineh; Trongnetrpunya, Amy; Dale, Anders M.; Halgren, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To examine distributed patterns of language processing in healthy controls and patients with epilepsy using magnetoencephalography (MEG), and to evaluate the concordance between laterality of distributed MEG sources and language laterality as determined by the intracarotid amobarbitol procedure (IAP). Methods MEG was performed in ten healthy controls using an anatomically-constrained, noise-normalized distributed source solution (dSPM). Distributed source modeling of language was then applied to eight patients with intractable epilepsy. Average source strengths within temporoparietal and frontal lobe regions of interest (ROIs) were calculated and the laterality of activity within ROIs during discrete time windows was compared to results from the IAP. Results In healthy controls, dSPM revealed activity in visual cortex bilaterally from ~80-120ms in response to novel words and sensory control stimuli (i.e., false fonts). Activity then spread to fusiform cortex ~160-200ms, and was dominated by left hemisphere activity in response to novel words. From ~240-450ms, novel words produced activity that was left-lateralized in frontal and temporal lobe regions, including anterior and inferior temporal, temporal pole, and pars opercularis, as well as bilaterally in posterior superior temporal cortex. Analysis of patient data with dSPM demonstrated that from 350-450ms, laterality of temporoparietal sources agreed with the IAP 75% of the time, whereas laterality of frontal MEG sources agreed with the IAP in all eight patients. Discussion Our results reveal that dSPM can unveil the timing and spatial extent of language processes in patients with epilepsy and may enhance knowledge of language lateralization and localization for use in preoperative planning. PMID:19552656

  11. Vagus nerve stimulation for intractable epilepsy: outcome in two series combining 90 patients.

    PubMed

    Sakas, D E; Korfias, S; Nicholson, C L; Panourias, I G; Georgakoulias, N; Gatzonis, S; Jenkins, A

    2007-01-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is the most widely used non-pharmacological treatment for medically intractable epilepsy and has been in clinical use for over a decade. It is indicated in patients who are refractory to medical treatment or who experience intolerable side effects, and who are not candidates for resective surgery. VNS used in the acute setting can both abort seizures and have an acute prophylactic effect. This effect increases over time in chronic treatment to a maximum at around 18 months. The evidence base supporting the efficacy of VNS is strong, but its exact mechanism of action remains unknown. A vagus nerve stimulator consists of two electrodes embedded in a silastic helix that is wrapped around the cervical vagus nerve. The stimulator is always implanted on the left vagus nerve in order to reduce the likelihood of adverse cardiac effects. The electrodes are connected to an implantable pulse generator (IPG) which is positioned subcutaneously either below the clavicle or in the axilla. The IPG is programmed by computer via a wand placed on the skin over it. In addition, extra pulses of stimulation triggered by a hand-held magnet may help to prevent or abort seizures. VNS is essentially a palliative treatment and the number of patients who become seizure free is very small. A significant reduction in the frequency and severity of seizures can be expected in about one third of patients and efficacy tends to improve with time. Vagus nerve stimulation is well tolerated and has few significant side effects. We describe our experience on the use of VNS on drug-resistant epilepsy in 90 patients treated in two departments (in Athens, Greece and Newcastle, England). PMID:17691315

  12. Optimal set of EEG features for emotional state classification and trajectory visualization in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yuvaraj, R; Murugappan, M; Ibrahim, Norlinah Mohamed; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Omar, Mohd Iqbal; Mohamad, Khairiyah; Palaniappan, R

    2014-12-01

    In addition to classic motor signs and symptoms, individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) are characterized by emotional deficits. Ongoing brain activity can be recorded by electroencephalograph (EEG) to discover the links between emotional states and brain activity. This study utilized machine-learning algorithms to categorize emotional states in PD patients compared with healthy controls (HC) using EEG. Twenty non-demented PD patients and 20 healthy age-, gender-, and education level-matched controls viewed happiness, sadness, fear, anger, surprise, and disgust emotional stimuli while fourteen-channel EEG was being recorded. Multimodal stimulus (combination of audio and visual) was used to evoke the emotions. To classify the EEG-based emotional states and visualize the changes of emotional states over time, this paper compares four kinds of EEG features for emotional state classification and proposes an approach to track the trajectory of emotion changes with manifold learning. From the experimental results using our EEG data set, we found that (a) bispectrum feature is superior to other three kinds of features, namely power spectrum, wavelet packet and nonlinear dynamical analysis; (b) higher frequency bands (alpha, beta and gamma) play a more important role in emotion activities than lower frequency bands (delta and theta) in both groups and; (c) the trajectory of emotion changes can be visualized by reducing subject-independent features with manifold learning. This provides a promising way of implementing visualization of patient's emotional state in real time and leads to a practical system for noninvasive assessment of the emotional impairments associated with neurological disorders. PMID:25109433

  13. [The functional state of the upper respiratory tract and ears in the patients presenting with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Gilifanov, E A; Nevzorova, V A

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study the functional state of the ENT organ system in 50 patients during exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The most pronounced clinical manifestations of the disease included chronic catarrhal rhinitis, chronic catarrhal pharyngitis, and hyperplastic laryngitis. No clinically significant pathological changes were documented in the organs of hearing. PMID:24429847

  14. [Spatial distribution of endemic diseases in Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo State].

    PubMed

    Hino, Paula; Villa, Tereza Cristina Scatena; da Cunha, Tarcísio Neves; dos Santos, Claudia Benedita

    2011-01-01

    The perception that some diseases happen in certain places is old. The concern in studying the relation between the human being and the environment resulted in several studies of medical geography, directed to the analysis of diseases spatial distribution. This sectional study was carried out in Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo State, and aimed to illustrate, through health problems (dengue, leprosy and tuberculosis), how a Geographic Information System tool allows the identification of heterogeneous areas, providing support for the choice of strategies and specific interventions according to the need of residents, as well as, priority of resources to more vulnerable groups. The population comprised cases of dengue, leprosy and tuberculosis notified in Ribeirão Preto in 2000. Data were collected in the Health Secretary Epidemiological Surveillance of the city. In order to obtain the thematic maps, data were geo-codified with the software MapInfo 7.8 e Spring 4.3. The thematic maps showed the density distribution of dengue, leprosy and tuberculosis cases in the city as a way to complement the analysis of health information, pointing priority areas for the control of these diseases. PMID:21503478

  15. Chagas disease in the State of Amazonas: history, epidemiological evolution, risks of endemicity and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Maria das Graças Vale; Ferreira, João Marcos Bemfica Barbosa; Arcanjo, Ana Ruth Lima; Santana, Rosa Amélia Gonçalves; Magalhães, Laylah Kelre Costa; Magalhães, Laise Kelma Costa; Mota, Daniel Testa; Fé, Nelson Ferreira; Monteiro, Wuelton Marcelo; Silveira, Henrique; Guerra, Jorge Augusto de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD) is a parasitic infection that originated in the Americas and is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. In the last few years, the disease has spread to countries in North America, Asia and Europe due to the migration of Latin Americans. In the Brazilian Amazon, CD has an endemic transmission, especially in the Rio Negro region, where an occupational hazard was described for piaçaveiros (piassaba gatherers). In the State of Amazonas, the first chagasic infection was reported in 1977, and the first acute CD case was recorded in 1980. After initiatives to integrate acute CD diagnostics with the malaria laboratories network, reports of acute CD cases have increased. Most of these cases are associated with oral transmission by the consumption of contaminated food. Chronic cases have also been diagnosed, mostly in the indeterminate form. These cases were detected by serological surveys in cardiologic outpatient clinics and during blood donor screening. Considering that the control mechanisms adopted in Brazil's classic transmission areas are not fully applicable in the Amazon, it is important to understand the disease behavior in this region, both in the acute and chronic cases. Therefore, the pursuit of control measures for the Amazon region should be a priority given that CD represents a challenge to preserving the way of life of the Amazon's inhabitants. PMID:26061368

  16. Development of an in vitro renal epithelial disease state model for xenobiotic toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Crean, Daniel; Bellwon, Patricia; Aschauer, Lydia; Limonciel, Alice; Moenks, Konrad; Hewitt, Philip; Schmidt, Tobias; Herrgen, Karin; Dekant, Wolfgang; Lukas, Arno; Bois, Frederic; Wilmes, Anja; Jennings, Paul; Leonard, Martin O

    2015-12-25

    There is a growing impetus to develop more accurate, predictive and relevant in vitro models of renal xenobiotic exposure. As part of the EU-FP7, Predict-IV project, a major aim was to develop models that recapitulate not only normal tissue physiology but also aspects of disease conditions that exist as predisposing risk factors for xenobiotic toxicity. Hypoxia, as a common micro-environmental alteration associated with pathophysiology in renal disease, was investigated for its effect on the toxicity profile of a panel of 14 nephrotoxins, using the human proximal tubular epithelial RPTECT/TERT1 cell line. Changes in ATP, glutathione and resazurin reduction, after 14days of daily repeat exposure, revealed a number of compounds, including adefovir dipivoxil with enhanced toxicity in hypoxia. We observed intracellular accumulation of adefovir in hypoxia and suggest decreases in the efflux transport proteins MRP4, MRP5, NHERF1 and NHERF3 as a possible explanation. MRP5 and NHERF3 were also down-regulated upon treatment with the HIF-1 activator, dimethyloxalylglycine. Interestingly, adefovir dependent gene expression shifted from alterations in cell cycle gene expression to an inflammatory response in hypoxia. The ability to investigate aspects of disease states and their influence on renal toxin handling is a key advantage of in vitro systems developed here. They also allow for detailed investigations into mechanisms of compound toxicity of potential importance for compromised tissue exposure. PMID:25536518

  17. Epigenetic Modulators of Monocytic Function: Implication for Steady State and Disease in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Papavasiliou, F. Nina; Chung, Young Cheul; Gagnidze, Khatuna; Hajdarovic, Kaitlyn H.; Cole, Dan C.; Bulloch, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic alterations are necessary for the establishment of functional and phenotypic diversity in the populations of immune cells of the monocytic lineage. The epigenetic status of individual genes at different time points defines their transcriptional responses throughout development and in response to environmental stimuli. Epigenetic states are defined at the level of DNA modifications, chromatin modifications, as well as at the level of RNA base changes through RNA editing. Drawing from lessons regarding the epigenome and epitranscriptome of cells of the monocytic lineage in the periphery, and from recently published RNAseq data deriving from brain-resident monocytes, we discuss the impact of modulation of these epigenetic states and how they affect processes important for the development of a healthy brain, as well as mechanisms of neurodegenerative disease and aging. An understanding of the varied brain responses and pathologies in light of these novel gene regulatory systems in monocytes will lead to important new insights in the understanding of the aging process and the treatment and diagnosis of neurodegenerative disease. PMID:26834738

  18. Review of the 2012 Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease Outbreak in Domestic Ruminants in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, G.; McCluskey, B.; King, A.; O’Hearn, E.; Mayr, G.

    2015-01-01

    An unusually large number of cases of Epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) were observed in United States cattle and white-tailed deer in the summer and fall of 2012. USDA APHIS Veterinary Services area offices were asked to report on foreign animal disease investigations and state diagnostic laboratory submissions which resulted in a diagnosis of EHD based on positive PCR results. EHD was reported in the following species: cattle (129 herds), captive white-tailed deer (65 herds), bison (8 herds), yak (6 herds), elk (1 herd), and sheep (1 flock). A majority of the cases in cattle and bison were found in Nebraska, South Dakota, and Iowa. The majority of cases in captive white-tailed deer were found in Ohio, Iowa, Michigan, and Missouri. The most common clinical sign observed in the cattle and bison herds was oral lesions. The major observation in captive white-tailed deer herds was death. Average within-herd morbidity was 7% in cattle and bison herds, and 46% in captive white-tailed deer herds. The average within-herd mortality in captive white-tailed deer herds was 42%. PMID:26244773

  19. Review of the 2012 Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease Outbreak in Domestic Ruminants in the United States.

    PubMed

    Stevens, G; McCluskey, B; King, A; O'Hearn, E; Mayr, G

    2015-01-01

    An unusually large number of cases of Epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) were observed in United States cattle and white-tailed deer in the summer and fall of 2012. USDA APHIS Veterinary Services area offices were asked to report on foreign animal disease investigations and state diagnostic laboratory submissions which resulted in a diagnosis of EHD based on positive PCR results. EHD was reported in the following species: cattle (129 herds), captive white-tailed deer (65 herds), bison (8 herds), yak (6 herds), elk (1 herd), and sheep (1 flock). A majority of the cases in cattle and bison were found in Nebraska, South Dakota, and Iowa. The majority of cases in captive white-tailed deer were found in Ohio, Iowa, Michigan, and Missouri. The most common clinical sign observed in the cattle and bison herds was oral lesions. The major observation in captive white-tailed deer herds was death. Average within-herd morbidity was 7% in cattle and bison herds, and 46% in captive white-tailed deer herds. The average within-herd mortality in captive white-tailed deer herds was 42%. PMID:26244773

  20. Phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes (PEA)-15: A potential therapeutic target in multiple disease states

    PubMed Central

    Greig, Fiona H.; Nixon, Graeme F.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes-15 (PEA-15) is a cytoplasmic protein that sits at an important junction in intracellular signalling and can regulate diverse cellular processes, such as proliferation and apoptosis, dependent upon stimulation. Regulation of these processes occurs by virtue of the unique interaction of PEA-15 with other signalling proteins. PEA-15 acts as a cytoplasmic tether for the mitogen-activated protein kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) preventing nuclear localisation. In order to release ERK1/2, PEA-15 requires to be phosphorylated via several potential pathways. PEA-15 (and its phosphorylation state) therefore regulates many ERK1/2-dependent processes, including proliferation, via regulating ERK1/2 nuclear translocation. In addition, PEA-15 contains a death effector domain (DED) which allows interaction with other DED-containing proteins. PEA-15 can bind the DED-containing apoptotic adaptor molecule, Fas-associated death domain protein (FADD) which is also dependent on the phosphorylation status of PEA-15. PEA-15 binding of FADD can inhibit apoptosis as bound FADD cannot participate in the assembly of apoptotic signalling complexes. Through these proteinprotein interactions, PEA-15-regulated cellular effects have now been investigated in a number of disease-related studies. Changes in PEA-15 expression and regulation have been observed in diabetes mellitus, cancer, neurological disorders and the cardiovascular system. These changes have been suggested to contribute to the pathology related to each of these disease states. As such, new therapeutic targets based around PEA-15 and its associated interactions are now being uncovered and could provide novel avenues for treatment strategies in multiple diseases. PMID:24657708

  1. A novel HSD17B10 mutation impairing the activities of the mitochondrial RNase P complex causes X-linked intractable epilepsy and neurodevelopmental regression.

    PubMed

    Falk, Marni J; Gai, Xiaowu; Shigematsu, Megumi; Vilardo, Elisa; Takase, Ryuichi; McCormick, Elizabeth; Christian, Thomas; Place, Emily; Pierce, Eric A; Consugar, Mark; Gamper, Howard B; Rossmanith, Walter; Hou, Ya-Ming

    2016-05-01

    We report a Caucasian boy with intractable epilepsy and global developmental delay. Whole-exome sequencing identified the likely genetic etiology as a novel p.K212E mutation in the X-linked gene HSD17B10 for mitochondrial short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase SDR5C1. Mutations in HSD17B10 cause the HSD10 disease, traditionally classified as a metabolic disorder due to the role of SDR5C1 in fatty and amino acid metabolism. However, SDR5C1 is also an essential subunit of human mitochondrial RNase P, the enzyme responsible for 5'-processing and methylation of purine-9 of mitochondrial tRNAs. Here we show that the p.K212E mutation impairs the SDR5C1-dependent mitochondrial RNase P activities, and suggest that the pathogenicity of p.K212E is due to a general mitochondrial dysfunction caused by reduction in SDR5C1-dependent maturation of mitochondrial tRNAs. PMID:26950678

  2. Report of a patient with chronic intractable autoimmune hemorrhaphilia due to anti-factor XIII/13 antibodies who died of hemorrhage after sustained clinical remission for 3 years.

    PubMed

    Kotake, Takeshi; Souri, Masayoshi; Takada, Koji; Kosugi, Satoru; Nakata, Soichi; Ichinose, Akitada

    2015-06-01

    Although the incidence of autoimmune hemorrhaphilia due to anti-Factor XIII (FXIII, not FVIII or FXII to avoid confusion) antibodies (AH13) or hemorrhagic "acquired FXIII deficiency due to anti-FXIII autoantibodies" was previously considered rare, it has been on the increase in the twenty-first century, at least in Japan. An 83-year-old woman with an unexplained hemorrhage was admitted to our hospital for intramuscular hematoma and severe anemia. Her FXIII activity was reduced to 10 % of normal; since FXIII inhibitors and anti-FXIII-A subunit autoantibodies were detected, she was definitively diagnosed with AH13. Despite developing cardiac tamponade due to pericardial hemorrhage, she clinically recovered from AH13 after hemostatic therapy with FXIII-concentrates and immunosuppressive treatment with rituximab and cyclophosphamide. However, her FXIII activity remained low and she died of hemorrhage 3.5 years after admission. AH13 patients should be monitored for a prolonged period, as this disease is very likely a chronic intractable hemorrhagic disorder. PMID:25663511

  3. Exome sequencing identifies a de novo SCN2A mutation in a patient with intractable seizures, severe intellectual disability, optic atrophy, muscular hypotonia, and brain abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Baasch, Anna-Lena; Hüning, Irina; Gilissen, Christian; Klepper, Joerg; Veltman, Joris A; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Hoischen, Alexander; Lohmann, Katja

    2014-04-01

    Epilepsy is a phenotypically and genetically highly heterogeneous disorder with >200 genes linked to inherited forms of the disease. To identify the underlying genetic cause in a patient with intractable seizures, optic atrophy, severe intellectual disability (ID), brain abnormalities, and muscular hypotonia, we performed exome sequencing in a 5-year-old girl and her unaffected parents. In the patient, we detected a novel, de novo missense mutation in the SCN2A (c.5645G>T; p.R1882L) gene encoding the αII -subunit of the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav 1.2. A literature review revealed 33 different SCN2A mutations in 14 families with benign forms of epilepsy and in 21 cases with severe phenotypes. Although almost all benign mutations were inherited, the majority of severe mutations occurred de novo. Of interest, de novo SCN2A mutations have also been reported in five patients without seizures but with ID (n = 3) and/or autism (n = 3). In the present study, we successfully used exome sequencing to detect a de novo mutation in a genetically heterogeneous disorder with epilepsy and ID. Using this approach, we expand the phenotypic spectrum of SCN2A mutations. Our own and literature data indicate that SCN2A-linked severe phenotypes are more likely to be caused by de novo mutations. A PowerPoint slide summarizing this article is available for download in the Supporting Information section here. PMID:24579881

  4. Sickle cell disease incidence among newborns in New York State by maternal race/ethnicity and nativity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Kennedy, Joseph; Caggana, Michele; Zimmerman, Regina; Thomas, Sanil; Berninger, John; Harris, Katharine; Green, Nancy S.; Oyeku, Suzette; Hulihan, Mary; Grant, Althea M.; Grosse, Scott D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Sickle cell disease is estimated to occur in 1:300–400 African-American births, with higher rates among immigrants from Africa and the Caribbean, and is less common among Hispanic births. This study determined sickle cell disease incidence among New York State newborns stratified by maternal race/ethnicity and nativity. Methods Newborns with confirmed sickle cell disease born to New York State residents were identified by the New York State newborn screening program for the years 2000–2008 and matched to birth records to obtain birth and maternal information. Annual incidence rates were computed and bivariate analyses were conducted to examine associations with maternal race/ethnicity and nativity. Results From 2000 to 2008, 1,911 New York State newborns were diagnosed with sickle cell disease and matched to the birth certificate files. One in every 1,146 live births was diagnosed with sickle cell disease. Newborns of non-Hispanic black mothers accounted for 86% of sickle cell disease cases whereas newborns of Hispanic mothers accounted for 12% of cases. The estimated incidence was 1:230 live births for non-Hispanic black mothers, 1:2,320 births for Hispanic mothers, and 1:41,647 births for non-Hispanic white mothers. Newborns of foreign-born non-Hispanic black mothers had a twofold higher incidence of sickle cell disease than those born to US-born non-Hispanic black mothers (P < 0.001). Conclusion This study provides the first US estimates of sickle cell disease incidence by maternal nativity. Women born outside the United States account for the majority of children with sickle cell disease born in New York State. Such findings identify at-risk populations and inform outreach activities that promote ongoing, high-quality medical management to affected children. PMID:23018751

  5. Quantifying the burden of disease and perceived health state in patients with hereditary angioedema in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Nordenfelt, Patrik; Dawson, Simon; Wahlgren, Carl-Fredrik; Lindfors, Anders; Mallbris, Lotus; Björkander, Janne

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) due to C1 inhibitor deficiency is a rare disease characterized by attacks of edema, known to impact quality of life (QoL). This study investigates the burden of HAE in Swedish patients, both children and adults. We used a retrospective registry study of Swedish patients with HAE, captured by the Sweha-Reg census. Data were collected using a paper-based survey. Patients completed EuroQoL 5 Dimensions 5 Levels (EQ5D-5L) questionnaires for both the attack-free state (EQ5D today), and the last HAE attack (EQ5D attack). Questions related to patient's age and sex and other variables, such as attack location and severity, were included to better understand the burden of HAE. EQ5D-5L values were estimated for the two HAE disease states. Patient-reported sick leave was also analyzed. A total of 103 responses were analyzed from 139 surveys (74% response rate). One hundred one reported an EQ5D today score (mean, 0.825) and 78 reported an EQ5D attack score (mean, 0.512) with significant differences between the two states (p < 0.0001). This difference was observed for both mild (p < 0.05), moderate (p < 0.0001), and severe attacks (p < 0.0001). Attack frequency had a negative effect on EQ5D today. Patients with >30 attacks a year had a significantly lower EQ5D today score than those with less frequent attacks. Of 74 participants, 33 (44.6%) had been absent from work or school during the latest attack and, of those with a severe attack, 81% had been absent. HAE has a significant impact on QoL both during and between attacks and on absenteeism during attacks. PMID:24411585

  6. Resting state functional connectivity differences between behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Hafkemeijer, Anne; Möller, Christiane; Dopper, Elise G. P.; Jiskoot, Lize C.; Schouten, Tijn M.; van Swieten, John C.; van der Flier, Wiesje M.; Vrenken, Hugo; Pijnenburg, Yolande A. L.; Barkhof, Frederik; Scheltens, Philip; van der Grond, Jeroen; Rombouts, Serge A. R. B.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Alzheimer's disease (AD) and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) are the most common types of early-onset dementia. Early differentiation between both types of dementia may be challenging due to heterogeneity and overlap of symptoms. Here, we apply resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study functional brain connectivity differences between AD and bvFTD. Methods: We used resting state fMRI data of 31 AD patients, 25 bvFTD patients, and 29 controls from two centers specialized in dementia. We studied functional connectivity throughout the entire brain, applying two different analysis techniques, studying network-to-region and region-to-region connectivity. A general linear model approach was used to study group differences, while controlling for physiological noise, age, gender, study center, and regional gray matter volume. Results: Given gray matter differences, we observed decreased network-to-region connectivity in bvFTD between (a) lateral visual cortical network and lateral occipital and cuneal cortex, and (b) auditory system network and angular gyrus. In AD, we found decreased network-to-region connectivity between the dorsal visual stream network and lateral occipital and parietal opercular cortex. Region-to-region connectivity was decreased in bvFTD between superior temporal gyrus and cuneal, supracalcarine, intracalcarine cortex, and lingual gyrus. Conclusion: We showed that the pathophysiology of functional brain connectivity is different between AD and bvFTD. Our findings support the hypothesis that resting state fMRI shows disease-specific functional connectivity differences and is useful to elucidate the pathophysiology of AD and bvFTD. However, the group differences in functional connectivity are less abundant than has been shown in previous studies. PMID:26441584

  7. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria–associated Lung Disease in Hospitalized Persons, United States, 1998–2005

    PubMed Central

    Billinger, Megan E.; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Viboud, Cecile; Montes de Oca, Ruben; Steiner, Claudia; Holland, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence and trends of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM)–associated hospitalizations in the United States were estimated using national hospital discharge data. Records were extracted for all persons with a pulmonary NTM International Classification of Diseases code (031.0) hospitalized in the 11 states with continuous data available from 1998 through 2005. Prevalence was calculated using US census data. Pulmonary NTM hospitalizations (031.0) increased significantly with age among both sexes: relative prevalence for persons 70–79 years of age compared with those 40–49 years of age was 15/100,000 for women (9.4 vs. 0.6) and 9/100,000 for men (7.6 vs. 0.83). Annual prevalence increased significantly among men and women in Florida (3.2%/year and 6.5%/year, respectively) and among women in New York (4.6%/year) with no significant changes in California. The prevalence of pulmonary NTM–associated hospitalizations is increasing in selected geographic areas of the United States. PMID:19861046

  8. Non-Erosive Reflux Disease Manifested Exclusively by Protracted Hiccups

    PubMed Central

    Esparza, Edgar A; Cervantes-Sodi, Mara

    2010-01-01

    Hiccups are a benign physiological feature affecting almost everyone at one time or another. They tend to be short-lived and do not affect quality of life; however, there are various pathologies that may present with long-lasting hiccups. These are grouped into 3 categories according to their duration: acute, persistent and intractable or protracted hiccups. Intractable hiccups last longer than 2 months and are usually associated with more severe conditions. The association between intractable hiccups and reflux disease has not been previously documented by objective methods. This report describes the case of a 23-year-old female who presented with protracted hiccups; all other organic pathologies were ruled out, and endoscopy and conventional pH-metry confirmed a diagnosis of non-erosive reflux disease as the unique cause. PMID:21103425

  9. Evolving patterns of spinal cord stimulation in patients implanted for intractable low back and leg pain.

    PubMed

    Sharan, Ashwini; Cameron, Tracy; Barolat, Giancarlo

    2002-07-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the programming strategies used in patients with intractable low-back pain treated with epidural spinal cord stimulation (SCS) utilizing paddle electrodes and a radio frequency (RF) stimulator. Programming strategies were examined in a group of patients implanted with a 16-contact paddle electrode and a dual channel RF receiver to treat chronic low-back pain. Baseline data included previous surgical history information, leg and low back pain severity and characteristics, and routine demographic information. Outcome measurements included the visual analog scale (VAS) (1), patient pain relief rating scale, and programming parameters. Patients rated their pain relief on a 5-point scale where 4 = excellent, 3 = good, 2 = fair, 1 = poor and 0 = none. Success was determined to be a pain relief score of "fair" or above. Data were collected during patient visits or by mail, at approximately 6, 12, and 24 months, postoperatively. Immediate postop data were available in 16 patients, 6-month data in 21 patients, 1-year data in 20 patients, and 2-year data in 10 patients, and analyzed for the purposes of examining programming strategies. The most common location for the tip of the electrode (lead) was found to be in the middle of the 8th thoracic vertebrae (N = 26). At the immediate postop assessment, the majority of cathodes were activated in the upper half of T9. By the 6-month follow-up, the majority of cathodes had shifted to the bottom of T9 and top of T10. Overall 88% of cathode locations were changed at one or more study visits. At 2 years, 86% of the programs used four or more active contacts. At 6 months, 83% of the patients reported that the therapy was a success, at 1 year, success was 94%, and by 2 years, success was 75%. Both SCS and chronic pain are dynamic processes. Complex pain patterns, such as the ones of patients who have pain in the low back and in one or both lower extremities, require a high degree of flexibility in the implanted SCS system. The system must provide the capability to redirect the current electronically over at least two segments of the spinal canal, to electronically steer the current in a medio-lateral direction, and to activate multiple electrical contacts simultaneously. The willingness and ability to provide extensive reprogramming in the long term follow-up is also of the utmost importance. Pain and its treatment with SCS is a dynamic process. PMID:22150814

  10. Ebola virus disease: What clinicians in the United States need to know.

    PubMed

    Fischer, William A; Uyeki, Timothy M; Tauxe, Robert V

    2015-08-01

    In March 2014 the World Health Organization was notified of an outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in the forest region of Guinea. As of May 2015, the outbreak had become the most devastating EVD epidemic in history with more than 27,000 cases and more than 11,000 deaths. The introduction of EVD into noncontiguous countries, including the United States, from infected travelers highlights the importance of preparedness of all health care providers. Early identification and rapid isolation of patients suspected with EVD is critical to limiting the spread of Ebola virus. Additionally, enhanced understanding of EVD case definitions, clinical presentation, treatment procedures, and infection control strategies will improve the ability of health care workers to provide safe care for patients with EVD. PMID:26116335

  11. Prediction of Outcome after Traumatic Brain Injury: Comparison of Disease State Index and IMPACT Calculator.

    PubMed

    Liedes, Hilkka; Mattila, Jussi; Lingsma, Hester; Lötjönen, Jyrki; Menon, David; Tenovuo, Olli; van Gils, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability, especially in young adults. A reliable prediction of outcome after TBI is of great importance in clinical practice and research. We aimed to compare performance of the well-established IMPACT calculator and an alternative method, Disease State Index (DSI), in the prediction of six-month outcome after TBI. Performance of the models was evaluated using 2036 patients with moderate or severe TBI from the International Mission for Prognosis and Analysis of Clinical Trials in TBI (IMPACT) database. Prediction performance of both models was similar. The models with more variables provided better performance than the simpler models. This study showed that the DSI is a valid tool with efficient visualizations that can help clinicians with their decision making process in clinical practice. PMID:27225575

  12. Relationships between obesity and cardiovascular diseases in four southern states and Colorado.

    PubMed

    Akil, Luma; Ahmad, H Anwar

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is among the leading causes of elevated cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality and morbidity. In the present study, the associations between the increase in body mass index (BMI) and the increase rates of CVD and high blood pressure (HBP) in the states of Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana, Tennessee, and Colorado are examined using regression analysis and by means of neural network models for obesity and HBP. Data from Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were obtained and analyzed for obesity rates, percent of myocardial infarction, stroke, and HBP from 2005-2009. Results of this study showed a low association between obesity and myocardial infarction rates (R2=0.067); a moderate association with stroke rates ((R2=0.462); and a strong association with HBP rates ((R2=0.811). The highest rates of obesity, CVD, and HBP were found in Mississippi, while Colorado had the lowest rates. Maintaining healthy weight helps reduce the risks of developing CVD. PMID:22102306

  13. Dropping out of school and chronic disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Salas-Wright, Christopher P.; Maynard, Brandy R.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Despite links between education and health, it is unclear to what extent dropping out of school is associated with major chronic health conditions. Subjects and Methods Data from the 2006–2010 United States National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) was employed and examined associations between dropping out of school and major chronic health conditions among individuals 18 years or older (N=189,896). Results Analyses show that dropout status is associated with increased odds of reporting a major chronic health condition; however, the effect is stronger for Whites and African-Americans than Hispanics. Conclusions Study findings suggest that one important strategy to prevent and reduce health disparities is increased education in general including high school completion. Policies and practices that reduce dropout may in turn impact the prevalence of chronic disease. PMID:25232516

  14. Advanced Practice Internship: Experiential Learning in a Drug Use and Disease State Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Skledar, Susan J.; McKaveney, Teresa P.; Ward, Charles O.; Culley, Colleen M.; Ervin, Kelly C.; Weber, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective Establish a 3-year hospital internship within a drug use and disease state management program that would provide doctor of pharmacy students with experiential learning while still completing their classroom studies. Design As paid interns, students engaged in group and individual activities that assessed clinical practice guidelines. Patient monitoring and clinical intervention techniques were learned through prospective evaluation of drug therapy. Students designed evidence-based treatment guidelines and participated in all phases of development, including multidisciplinary approval, implementation, and evaluation stages. Assessment Student competency was continually monitored through direct observation by a preceptor and written examinations. Patient case studies, group discussions, and poster presentations allowed assessment of student growth in knowledge and communication skills. Conclusion The comprehensive structure of this internship provides a broad perspective for understanding the role of the hospital pharmacist in providing pharmaceutical care. Close supervision maximizes student learning potential and fosters a mentoring relationship for both personal and professional growth. PMID:17136188

  15. Quality of health care in the United States: implications for pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Brendan M; Palmer, Lena; Kappelman, Michael D

    2009-09-01

    The Institute of Medicine's publications To Error is Human and Crossing the Quality Chasm publicized the widespread deficits in US health care quality. Emerging studies continue to reveal deficits in the quality of adult and pediatric care, including subspecialty care. In recent years, key stakeholders in the health care system including providers, purchasers, and the public have been applying various quality improvement methods to address these concerns. Lessons learned from these efforts in other pediatric conditions, including asthma, cystic fibrosis, neonatal intensive care, and liver transplantation may be applicable to the care of children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).This review is intended to be a primer on the quality of care movement in the United States, with a focus on pediatric IBD. In this article, we review the history, rationale, and methods of quality measurement and improvement, and we discuss the unique challenges in adapting these general strategies to pediatric IBD care. PMID:19633570

  16. State of the Art Review: Depression, Stress, Anxiety, and Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Beth E; Edmondson, Donald; Kronish, Ian M

    2015-11-01

    The notion that psychological states can influence physical health is hardly new, and perhaps nowhere has the mind-body connection been better studied than in cardiovascular disease (CVD). Recently, large prospective epidemiologic studies and smaller basic science studies have firmly established a connection between CVD and several psychological conditions, including depression, chronic psychological stress, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and anxiety. In addition, numerous clinical trials have been conducted to attempt to prevent or lessen the impact of these conditions on cardiovascular health. In this article, we review studies connecting depression, stress/PTSD, and anxiety to CVD, focusing on findings from the last 5 years. For each mental health condition, we first examine the epidemiologic evidence establishing a link with CVD. We then describe studies of potential underlying mechanisms and finally discuss treatment trials and directions for future research. PMID:25911639

  17. State of the Art: Medical treatment of aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD).

    PubMed

    Ta, Von; Simon, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is characterized as adult onset asthma, nasal polyps, chronic rhinosinusitis, and hypersensitivity to a cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) inhibitor, viz aspirin or nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The method for diagnosing AERD is with aspirin challenge, and treatment includes aspirin desensitization followed by continued daily aspirin. Although oral challenge has been the mainstay in the United States, lysyl-aspirin has been validated as a diagnostic tool for aspirin-sensitive asthma and will be discussed further in this article. The challenges with aspirin therapy surrounding endoscopy and perioperative aspirin therapy will be discussed. Additionally, daily aspirin therapy is not for everyone. Aspirin is relatively contraindicated in those with a history of gastrointestinal bleed and an absolute contraindication in pregnancy. Aspirin desensitization and subsequent treatment has been shown to be highly effective for AERD. PMID:25590318

  18. Epidemiology of Foodborne Disease Outbreaks Caused by Clostridium perfringens, United States, 1998–2010

    PubMed Central

    Grass, Julian E.; Gould, L. Hannah; Mahon, Barbara E.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is estimated to be the second most common bacterial cause of foodborne illness in the United States, causing one million illnesses each year. Local, state, and territorial health departments voluntarily report C. perfringens outbreaks to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention through the Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System. Our analysis included outbreaks confirmed by laboratory evidence during 1998–2010. A food item was implicated if C. perfringens was isolated from food or based on epidemiologic evidence. Implicated foods were classified into one of 17 standard food commodities when possible. From 1998 to 2010, 289 confirmed outbreaks of C. perfringens illness were reported with 15,208 illnesses, 83 hospitalizations, and eight deaths. The number of outbreaks reported each year ranged from 16 to 31 with no apparent trend over time. The annual number of outbreak-associated illnesses ranged from 359 to 2,173, and the median outbreak size was 24 illnesses. Outbreaks occurred year round, with the largest number in November and December. Restaurants (43%) were the most common setting of food preparation. Other settings included catering facility (19%), private home (16%), prison or jail (11%), and other (10%). Among the 144 (50%) outbreaks attributed to a single food commodity, beef was the most common commodity (66 outbreaks, 46%), followed by poultry (43 outbreaks, 30%), and pork (23 outbreaks, 16%). Meat and poultry outbreaks accounted for 92% of outbreaks with an identified single food commodity. Outbreaks caused by C. perfringens occur regularly, are often large, and can cause substantial morbidity yet are preventable if contamination of raw meat and poultry products is prevented at the farm or slaughterhouse or, after contamination, if these products are properly handled and prepared, particularly in restaurants and catering facilities. PMID:23379281

  19. Resting-State Network Disruption and APOE Genotype in Alzheimer's Disease: A lagged Functional Connectivity Study

    PubMed Central

    Canuet, Leonides; Tellado, Ivan; Couceiro, Veronica; Fraile, Carmen; Fernandez-Novoa, Lucia; Ishii, Ryouhei; Takeda, Masatoshi; Cacabelos, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    Background The apolipoprotein E epsilon 4 (APOE-4) is associated with a genetic vulnerability to Alzheimer's disease (AD) and with AD-related abnormalities in cortical rhythms. However, it is unclear whether APOE-4 is linked to a specific pattern of intrinsic functional disintegration of the brain after the development of the disease or during its different stages. This study aimed at identifying spatial patterns and effects of APOE genotype on resting-state oscillations and functional connectivity in patients with AD, using a physiological connectivity index called “lagged phase synchronization”. Methodology/Principal Findings Resting EEG was recorded during awake, eyes-closed state in 125 patients with AD and 60 elderly controls. Source current density and functional connectivity were determined using eLORETA. Patients with AD exhibited reduced parieto-occipital alpha oscillations compared with controls, and those carrying the APOE-4 allele had reduced alpha activity in the left inferior parietal and temporo-occipital cortex relative to noncarriers. There was a decreased alpha2 connectivity pattern in AD, involving the left temporal and bilateral parietal cortex. Several brain regions exhibited increased lagged phase synchronization in low frequencies, specifically in the theta band, across and within hemispheres, where temporal lobe connections were particularly compromised. Areas with abnormal theta connectivity correlated with cognitive scores. In patients with early AD, we found an APOE-4-related decrease in interhemispheric alpha connectivity in frontal and parieto-temporal regions. Conclusions/Significance In addition to regional cortical dysfunction, as indicated by abnormal alpha oscillations, there are patterns of functional network disruption affecting theta and alpha bands in AD that associate with the level of cognitive disturbance or with the APOE genotype. These functional patterns of nonlinear connectivity may potentially represent neurophysiological or phenotypic markers of AD, and aid in early detection of the disorder. PMID:23050006

  20. Toward implementation of quorum sensing autoinducers as biomarkers for infectious disease states.

    PubMed

    Struss, Anjali K; Nunes, Ashlee; Waalen, Jill; Lowery, Colin A; Pullanikat, Prasanna; Denery, Judith R; Conrad, Douglas J; Kaufmann, Gunnar F; Janda, Kim D

    2013-03-19

    The opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Importantly, virulence factor expression and biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa is coordinated by quorum sensing (QS) and one of the key QS signaling molecules is 3-oxo-C12-HSL. Remarkably, a tetramic acid, (C12-TA), with antibacterial properties is formed spontaneously from 3-oxo-C12-HSL under physiological conditions. Seeking to better understand this relationship, we sought to investigate whether 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C12-TA may be contributing factors to the overall pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa in CF individuals and if their detection and quantitation in sputum samples might be used as an indicator to assess disease states and monitor therapy success in CF patients. To this end, 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C12-TA concentrations were initially analyzed in P. aeruginosa flow cell biofilms using liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS). A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based method was then developed and validated for their detection and quantification in the sputa of CF patients. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to show the presence of both the quorum sensing molecule (3-oxo-C12-HSL) and its rearranged product (C12-TA) in human clinical samples such as sputum. A total of 47 sputum samples from 20 CF and 2 non-CF individuals were analyzed. 3-Oxo-C12-HSL was detected and quantified in 45 samples with concentrations ranging from 20 to >1000 nM; C12-TA was found in 14 samples (13-900 nM). On the basis of our findings, quorum sensing autoinducers merit further investigation as biomarkers for infectious disease states. PMID:23391272

  1. Mortality impact of thoracic aortic disease in So Paulo state from 1998 to 2007

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Ricardo Ribeiro; Mejia, Omar Asdrubal Vilca; Fernandes, Fbio; Ramires, Flix Jos Alvarez; Mady, Charles; Stolf, Noedir Antonio Groppo; Jatene, Fabio Biscegli

    2013-01-01

    Background The epidemiological characteristics of thoracic aortic diseases (TAD) in the State of So Paulo and in Brazil, as well as their impact on the survival of these patients have yet to be analyzed. Objectives To evaluate the mortality impact of TAD and characterize it epidemiologically. Methods Retrospective analysis of data from the public health system for the TAD registry codes of hospitalizations, procedures and deaths, from the International Code of Diseases (ICD-10), registered at the Ministry of Health of So Paulo State from January 1998 to December 2007. Results They were 9.465 TAD deaths, 5.500 men (58.1%) and 3.965 women (41.9%); 6.721 dissections (71%) and 2.744. aneurysms. In 86.3% of cases the diagnosis was attained during autopsy. There were 6.109 hospitalizations, of which 67.9% were males; 21.2% of them died (69% men), with similar proportions of dissection and aneurysm between sexes, respectively 54% and 46%, but with different mortality. Men with TAD die more often than women (OR = 1.5). The age distribution for deaths and hospitalizations was similar with predominance in the 6th decade. They were 3.572 surgeries (58% of hospitalizations) with 20.3% mortality (patients kept in clinical treatment showed 22.6% mortality; p = 0.047). The number of hospitalizations, surgeries, deaths of in-patients and general deaths by TAD were progressively greater than the increase in population over time. Conclusions Specific actions for the early identification of these patients, as well as the viability of their care should be implemented to reduce the apparent progressive mortality from TAD seen among our population. PMID:24100695

  2. Interaction between psychiatric and autoimmune disorders in celiac disease patients in the Northeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    GARUD, S.; LEFFLER, D.; DENNIS, M.; EDWARDS-GEORGE, J.; SARYAN, D.; SHETH, S.; SCHUPPAN, D.; JAMMA, S.; KELLY, C. P.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background Previous studies yielded conflicting results regarding the presence of an association between celiac disease (CD) and psychiatric disorders including depression. This association has not been studied in the United States. Aim To determine the prevalence of psychiatric and autoimmune disorders in patients with CD in the US compared to control groups. Methods In a case control study, the prevalence of psychiatric and autoimmune disorders was compared in 600 CD patients, 200 irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients and 200 healthy controls. Results The prevalence of depression in CD was 17.2% and was similar to that in IBS (18.5%, P = 0.74) and controls (16.0%, P = 0.79). Among CD patients, type I DM was identified as a significant risk factor for depression (P < 0.01) with 37% of patients with both CD and type I DM having clinical depression. Conclusion The prevalence of depression in CD is similar to that in other chronic gastrointestinal diseases and healthy controls. However, there is a markedly elevated risk of depression in patients with both type I DM and CD. Differing rates of type 1 DM among celiac populations may account for disparity in published rates of depression in patients with CD. PMID:19183153

  3. Current status of Marek's disease in the United States and worldwide based on a questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Dunn, John R; Gimeno, Isabel M

    2013-06-01

    A questionnaire was widely distributed in 2011 to estimate the global prevalence of Marek's disease (MD) and gain a better understanding of current control strategies and future concerns. A total of 112 questionnaires were returned representing 116 countries from sources including national branch secretaries of the World Veterinary Poultry Association, vaccine, breeder, and production companies, as well as MD researchers from various backgrounds. Each country listed on a questionnaire was recorded as an individual entry, and on average there were 2.0 entries per country (median 1; range 1-13). All flock types were listed as having increased MD incidence during the last 10 yr in close to 50% of countries by at least one respondent, with the majority of these countries located within French-speaking Africa, Eastern Europe, East Asia, and South America. Only 18 countries (16%) indicated increasing MD incidence was likely due to higher virulent strains, while the presence of other immunosuppressive diseases was a more common explanation. Increased use of CVI988/Rispens was cited as the most likely reason for decreasing MD incidence in 49 countries (42%). In the United States, MD incidence has continued to decrease during the last 10 yr, reaching a record low in 2007 (0.0008%) as measured by leukosis condemnation rates in broilers at slaughter. However, a recent increase of leukosis condemnations in North Carolina and Pennsylvania needs to be closely monitored. PMID:23901765

  4. Bacterial Infection in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in 2000: a State-of-the-Art Review

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Sanjay; Murphy, Timothy F.

    2001-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. The precise role of bacterial infection in the course and pathogenesis of COPD has been a source of controversy for decades. Chronic bacterial colonization of the lower airways contributes to airway inflammation; more research is needed to test the hypothesis that this bacterial colonization accelerates the progressive decline in lung function seen in COPD (the vicious circle hypothesis). The course of COPD is characterized by intermittent exacerbations of the disease. Studies of samples obtained by bronchoscopy with the protected specimen brush, analysis of the human immune response with appropriate immunoassays, and antibiotic trials reveal that approximately half of exacerbations are caused by bacteria. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae are the most common causes of exacerbations, while Chlamydia pneumoniae causes a small proportion. The role of Haemophilus parainfluenzae and gram-negative bacilli remains to be established. Recent progress in studies of the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis of infection in the human respiratory tract and in vaccine development guided by such studies promises to lead to novel ways to treat and prevent bacterial infections in COPD. PMID:11292642

  5. Utility of arthroscopic guided synovial biopsy in understanding synovial tissue pathology in health and disease states

    PubMed Central

    Wechalekar, Mihir D; Smith, Malcolm D

    2014-01-01

    The synovium is the soft tissue lining diarthrodial joints, tendon sheaths and bursae and is composed of intimal and subintimal layers. The intimal layer is composed of type A cells (macrophages) and type B cells (fibroblasts); in health, the subintima has few inflammatory cells. The synovium performs several homeostatic functions and is the primary target in several inflammatory arthritides. Inflammatory states are characterised by thickening of the synovial lining, macrophage recruitment and fibroblast proliferation, and an influx of inflammatory cells including lymphocytes, monocytes and plasma cells. Of the various methods employed to perform synovial biopsies arthroscopic techniques are considered the “gold standard”, and have an established safety record. Synovial biopsy has been of critical importance in understanding disease pathogenesis and has provided insight into mechanisms of action of targeted therapies by way of direct evidence about events in the synovial tissue in various arthritides. It has been very useful as a research tool for proof of concept studies to assess efficacy and mechanisms of new therapies, provide tissue for in vitro studies, proteomics and microarrays and allow evaluation for biomarkers that may help predict response to therapy and identify new targets for drug development. It also has diagnostic value in the evaluation of neoplastic or granulomatous disease or infection when synovial fluid analysis is non-contributory. PMID:25405084

  6. Bluetongue disease and seroprevalence in South American camelids from the northwestern region of the United States.

    PubMed

    Allen, Andrew J; Stanton, James B; Evermann, James F; Fry, Lindsay M; Ackerman, Melissa G; Barrington, George M

    2015-03-01

    In late summer/early fall of 2013, 2 South American camelids from central Washington were diagnosed with fatal bluetongue viral disease, an event which is rarely reported. A 9-year-old intact male llama (Lama glama), with a 1-day history of anorexia, recumbency, and dyspnea before death. Abundant foam discharged from the mouth and nostrils, and the lungs were severely edematous on postmortem examination. Histologically, there was abundant intra-alveolar edema with fibrin. Hemorrhage and edema disrupted several other organs. Bluetongue viral RNA was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and serotype 11 was identified by sequencing a segment of the VP2 outer capsid gene. Approximately 1 month later, at a site 150 miles north of the index case, a 2-year-old female alpaca with similar, acutely progressive clinical signs was reported. A postmortem examination was performed, and histologic lesions from the alpaca were similar to those of the llama, and again serotype 11 was detected by PCR. The occurrence of bluetongue viral infection and disease is described in the context of seasonal Bluetongue virus activity within the northwestern United States and southwestern Canada. PMID:25680921

  7. [Association between air pollution and respiratory and cardiovascular diseases in Itabira, Minas Gerais State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Braga, Alfésio Luís Ferreira; Pereira, Luiz Alberto Amador; Procópio, Marly; André, Paulo Afonso de; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário do Nascimento

    2007-01-01

    The city of Itabira, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, is located in the Espinhaço Mountain Range, an area that features large-scale mechanized iron ore pit mines. The current study evaluates the acute effects of inhalable particulate matter (PM10) in terms of emergency room visits due to respiratory and cardiovascular diseases in Itabira. Generalized additive Poisson regression models were adopted, controlling for temperature, humidity, and both short and long-term seasonality. Increases of 10mg/m(3) in PM10 were associated with increases in respiratory emergency room visits of 4% (95%CI: 2.2-5.8), at lags 0 and 1 for children and adolescents younger than 13 years of age, and of 12% (95%CI: 8.5-15.5) on the three subsequent days for adolescents (13 to 19 years of age). For cardiovascular diseases, the effect was acute (4%; 95%CI: 0.8-8.5) and mainly for the 45 to 64 age group. These results show that PM10 generated by open pit mining can lead to health problems in the exposed population. PMID:18038038

  8. Mediators of the Association Between Low Socioeconomic Status and Chronic Kidney Disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Vart, Priya; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Crews, Deidra C.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; Bültmann, Ute

    2015-01-01

    Using data collected from 9,823 participants in the 2007–2008 and 2009–2010 cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, we formally investigated potentially modifiable factors linking low socioeconomic status (SES) to chronic kidney disease (CKD) for their presence and magnitude of mediation. SES was defined using the poverty income ratio. The main outcome was CKD, defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/minute/1.73 m2 (using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation) and/or urinary albumin:creatinine ratio ≥30 mg/g. In mediation analyses, we tested the contributions of health-related behaviors (smoking, alcohol intake, diet, physical activity, and sedentary time), comorbid conditions (diabetes, hypertension, obesity, abdominal obesity, and hypercholesterolemia), and access to health care (health insurance and routine health-care visits) to this association. Except for sedentary time and diet, all examined health-related behaviors, comorbid conditions, and factors related to health-care access mediated the low SES–CKD association and contributed 20%, 32%, and 11%, respectively, to this association. In race/ethnicity-specific analyses, identified mediators tended to explain more of the association between low SES and CKD in non-Hispanic blacks than in other racial/ethnic groups. In conclusion, potentially modifiable factors like health-related behaviors, comorbid conditions, and health-care access contribute substantially to the association between low SES and CKD in the United States, especially among non-Hispanic blacks. PMID:25731886

  9. Intradural approach to selective stimulation in the spinal cord for treatment of intractable pain: design principles and wireless protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, M. A.; Utz, M.; Brennan, T. J.; Dalm, B. D.; Viljoen, S.; Jeffery, N. D.; Gillies, G. T.

    2011-08-01

    We introduce an intradural approach to spinal cord stimulation for the relief of intractable pain, and describe the biophysical rationale that underlies its design and performance requirements. The proposed device relies on wireless, inductive coupling between a pial surface implant and its epidural controller, and we present the results of benchtop experiments that demonstrate the ability to transmit and receive a frequency-modulated 1.6 MHz carrier signal between micro-coil antennae scaled to the ≈ 1 cm dimensions of the implant, at power levels of about 5 mW. Plans for materials selection, microfabrication, and other aspects of future development are presented and discussed.

  10. A group-theoretical notation for disease states: an example using the psychiatric rating scale

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background While many branches of natural science have embraced group theory reaping enormous advantages for their respective fields, clinical medicine lacks to date such applications. Here we intend to explain a prototypal model based on the postulates of groups that could have potential in categorizing clinical states. Method As an example, we begin by modifying the original ‘Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale’ (BPRS), the most frequently used standards for evaluating the psychopathology of patients with schizophrenia. We consider a presumptively idealized (virtually standardized) BPRS (denoted BPRS-I) with assessments ranging from ‘0’ to ‘6’ to simplify our discussion. Next, we introduce the modulo group Z7 containing elements {0,1,2,…,6} defined by composition rule, ‘modulo 7 addition’, denoted by *. Each element corresponds to a score resulting from grading a symptom under the BPRS-I assessment. By grading all symptoms associated with the illness, a Cartesian product, denoted Aj, constitutes a summary of a patient assessment. By considering operations denoted A(j→k) that change state Aj into state Ak, a group M (that itself contains Aj and Ak as elements) is also considered. Furthermore, composition of these operations obey modulo 7 arithmetic (i.e., addition, multiplication, and division). We demonstrate the application with a simple example in the form of a series of states (A4 = A1*A(1→2)*A(2→3)*A(3→4)) to illustrate this result. Results The psychiatric disease states are defined as 18-fold Cartesian products of Z7, i.e., Z7×18 = Z7×…×Z7 (18 times). We can construct set G ≡ {a(m)i| m = 1,2,3,…(the patient’s history of the i-th symptom)} and M ≡ {Am | Am ∈ Z7×18 (the set of all possible assessments of a patient)} simplistically, at least, in terms of modulo 7 addition that satisfies the group postulates. Conclusions Despite the large limitations of our methodology, there are grounds not only within psychiatry but also within other medical fields to consider more generalized notions based on groups (if not rings and fields). These might enable through some graduated expression a systematization of medical states and of medical procedures in a manner more aligned with other branches of natural science. PMID:22776348

  11. Meteorological conditions associated with increased incidence of West Nile virus disease in the United States, 2004-2012.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Micah B; Monaghan, Andrew J; Hayden, Mary H; Eisen, Rebecca J; Delorey, Mark J; Lindsey, Nicole P; Nasci, Roger S; Fischer, Marc

    2015-05-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a leading cause of mosquito-borne disease in the United States. Annual seasonal outbreaks vary in size and location. Predicting where and when higher than normal WNV transmission will occur can help direct limited public health resources. We developed models for the contiguous United States to identify meteorological anomalies associated with above average incidence of WNV neuroinvasive disease from 2004 to 2012. We used county-level WNV data reported to ArboNET and meteorological data from the North American Land Data Assimilation System. As a result of geographic differences in WNV transmission, we divided the United States into East and West, and 10 climate regions. Above average annual temperature was associated with increased likelihood of higher than normal WNV disease incidence, nationally and in most regions. Lower than average annual total precipitation was associated with higher disease incidence in the eastern United States, but the opposite was true in most western regions. Although multiple factors influence WNV transmission, these findings show that anomalies in temperature and precipitation are associated with above average WNV disease incidence. Readily accessible meteorological data may be used to develop predictive models to forecast geographic areas with elevated WNV disease risk before the coming season. PMID:25802435

  12. Infectious disease surveillance in the United States and the United Kingdom: from public goods to the challenges of new technologies.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Tony; Sorenson, Corinna

    2011-02-01

    Infectious diseases are a long-standing and continuing threat to health and welfare, with their containment dependent on national disease surveillance and response capacities. This article discusses infectious disease surveillance in the United States and the United Kingdom, examining historical national traditions for identifying and controlling infectious disease risks and how globalization and technical advances have influenced the evolution of their respective approaches. The two systems developed in different but parallel ways. In the United States, surveillance remained quite localized at the state level until the early twentieth century and still retains many of those features. The U.K. approach became centralized from the latter part of the nineteenth century and has principally remained so. In both cases, disease surveillance was traditionally conceived as a public good, where national or local authorities held sovereign rights and power to protect public health. With the increasing globalized nature of infectious disease, such notions shifted toward surveillance as a global public good, with countries responding in turn by creating new global health governance arrangements and regulations. However, the limitations of current surveillance systems and the strong hold of national interests place into question the provision of surveillance as a global public good. These issues are further highlighted with the introduction of new surveillance technologies, which offer opportunities for improved disease detection and identification but also create potential tensions between individual rights, corporate profit, equitable access to technology, and national and global public goods. PMID:21498799

  13. SIR model on a dynamical network and the endemic state of an infectious disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dottori, M.; Fabricius, G.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we performed a numerical study of an epidemic model that mimics the endemic state of whooping cough in the pre-vaccine era. We considered a stochastic SIR model on dynamical networks that involve local and global contacts among individuals and analysed the influence of the network properties on the characterization of the quasi-stationary state. We computed probability density functions (PDF) for infected fraction of individuals and found that they are well fitted by gamma functions, excepted the tails of the distributions that are q-exponentials. We also computed the fluctuation power spectra of infective time series for different networks. We found that network effects can be partially absorbed by rescaling the rate of infective contacts of the model. An explicit relation between the effective transmission rate of the disease and the correlation of susceptible individuals with their infective nearest neighbours was obtained. This relation quantifies the known screening of infective individuals observed in these networks. We finally discuss the goodness and limitations of the SIR model with homogeneous mixing and parameters taken from epidemiological data to describe the dynamic behaviour observed in the networks studied.

  14. Brain functional connectivity patterns for emotional state classification in Parkinson's disease patients without dementia.

    PubMed

    Yuvaraj, R; Murugappan, M; Acharya, U Rajendra; Adeli, Hojjat; Ibrahim, Norlinah Mohamed; Mesquita, Edgar

    2016-02-01

    Successful emotional communication is crucial for social interactions and social relationships. Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients have shown deficits in emotional recognition abilities although the research findings are inconclusive. This paper presents an investigation of six emotions (happiness, sadness, fear, anger, surprise, and disgust) of twenty non-demented (Mini-Mental State Examination score >24) PD patients and twenty Healthy Controls (HCs) using Electroencephalogram (EEG)-based Brain Functional Connectivity (BFC) patterns. The functional connectivity index feature in EEG signals is computed using three different methods: Correlation (COR), Coherence (COH), and Phase Synchronization Index (PSI). Further, a new functional connectivity index feature is proposed using bispectral analysis. The experimental results indicate that the BFC change is significantly different among emotional states of PD patients compared with HC. Also, the emotional connectivity pattern classified using Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier yielded the highest accuracy for the new bispectral functional connectivity index. The PD patients showed emotional impairments as demonstrated by a poor classification performance. This finding suggests that decrease in the functional connectivity indices during emotional stimulation in PD, indicating functional disconnections between cortical areas. PMID:26515932

  15. A Novel Ilarvirus Is Associated with Privet Necrotic Ringspot Disease in the Southern United States.

    PubMed

    Aboughanem-Sabanadzovic, Nina; Tzanetakis, Ioannis E; Lawrence, Amanda; Stephenson, Ronald C; Sabanadzovic, Sead

    2016-01-01

    Necrotic ringspot disease (NRSD) is a graft-transmissible disorder of privet (synonym ligustrum), originally reported from Florida and Louisiana more than 50 years ago. In this communication we report an isometric virus isolated from Japanese privet (Ligustrum japonicum) collected in the southern United States displaying symptoms resembling those of NRSD. In mechanical transmission tests, the virus induced systemic infections in several herbaceous hosts. Double-stranded RNA analysis showed a pattern resembling replicative forms of members of the family Bromoviridae. The genome organization along with phylogenetic analyses and serological tests revealed that the virus belongs to subgroup 1 of the genus Ilarvirus. Pairwise comparisons with recognized ilarviruses indicated that the virus is a distinct, and as yet, undescribed member in the taxon, for which we propose the name Privet ringspot virus (PrRSV). Furthermore, the near-perfect association of PrRSV infections with symptoms, and apparent absence of any other virus(es) in studied samples, strongly suggest an important role of this virus in the etiology of NRSD of privet in the southeastern United States. PMID:26390186

  16. Adults Eligible for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Counseling and Participation in Aerobic Physical Activity - United States, 2013.

    PubMed

    Omura, John D; Carlson, Susan A; Paul, Prabasaj; Watson, Kathleen B; Loustalot, Fleetwood; Foltz, Jennifer L; Fulton, Janet E

    2015-09-25

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States, and physical inactivity is a major risk factor (1). Health care professionals have a role in counseling patients about physical activity for CVD prevention. In August 2014, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended that adults who are overweight or obese and have additional CVD risk factors be offered or referred to intensive behavioral counseling interventions to promote a healthful diet and physical activity for CVD prevention. Although the USPSTF recommendation does not specify an amount of physical activity, the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans state that for substantial health benefits adults should achieve ≥150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity or ≥75 minutes per week of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity, or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity. To assess the proportion of adults eligible for intensive behavioral counseling and not meeting the aerobic physical activity guideline, CDC analyzed data from the 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). This analysis indicated that 36.8% of adults were eligible for intensive behavioral counseling for CVD prevention. Among U.S. states and the District of Columbia (DC), the prevalence of eligible adults ranged from 29.0% to 44.6%. Nationwide, 19.9% of all adults were eligible and did not meet the aerobic physical activity guideline. These data can inform the planning and implementation of health care interventions for CVD prevention that are based on physical activity. PMID:26401758

  17. Reliability analysis of the resting state can sensitively and specifically identify the presence of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Skidmore, F M; Yang, M; Baxter, L; von Deneen, K M; Collingwood, J; He, G; White, K; Korenkevych, D; Savenkov, A; Heilman, K M; Gold, M; Liu, Y

    2013-07-15

    Parkinson disease (PD) is characterized by a number of motor and behavioral abnormalities that could be considered deficits of a "no task" or "resting" state, including resting motor findings and defects in emerging from a resting state (e.g., resting tremor, elevated resting tone, abulia, akinesia, apathy). PET imaging, and recently, the MRI technique of continuous arterial spin labeling (CASL) have shown evidence of changes in metabolic patterns in individuals with PD. The purpose of this study was to learn if the presence of PD could be "predicted" based on resting fluctuations of the BOLD signal. Participants were 15 healthy controls, 14 subjects with PD, and 1 subject who presented as a control but later developed PD. The amplitude of the low frequency fluctuation (ALFF) was used as an index of brain activity level in the resting state. Participants with PD using this index showed a reliable decrease in activity in a number of regions, including the supplementary motor cortex, the mesial prefrontal cortex, the right middle frontal gyrus, and the left cerebellum (lobule VII/VIII) as well as increased activity in the right cerebellum (lobule IV/V). Using a cross validation approach we term "Reliability Mapping of Regional Differences" (RMRD) to analyze our sample, we were able to reliably distinguish participants with PD from controls with 92% sensitivity and 87% specificity. Our "pre-diagnostic" subject segregated in our analysis with the PD group. These results suggest that resting fMRI should be considered for development as a biomarker and analytical tool for evaluation of PD. PMID:21924367

  18. The adjuvant use of lansoprazole, clonazepam and dimenhydrinate for treating intractable hiccups in a patient with gastritis and reflux esophagitis complicated with myocardial infarction: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hiccup (Singultus) is a sudden and involuntary contraction of the diaphragm followed by a sharp closure of the epiglottis which results in the production of a specific “hic” sound. Normally, hiccups are treated without intervention. Intractable hiccups occur rarely but are a disturbing symptom underlying other health related disorders. Case presentation We report the clinical case of a 67-year-old male patient with myocardial infarction accompanied by intractable hiccups during the course of 8 months, and who was non-responsive to chlorpromazine or metoclopramide, and baclofen; drugs routinely used to treat this condition. This sustained hiccup had severely restricted the patient's ability to intake food and sleep. To explore alternative treatments, we investigated the adjuvant administration of lansoprazole, dimenhydrinate and clonazepam in this patient. We discovered that this drug combination was capable of successfully terminating his intractable hiccups, with no further evidence of recurrence. No similar treatment is previously reported for intractable hiccups. We further suggest a hypothesis concerning a potential mechanism on the anti-hiccup effect of dimenhydrinate. Conclusion We identified that the adjuvant use of lansoprazole, clonazepam and dimenhydrinate was capable of attenuating the symptoms of our patient with intractable hiccups. PMID:23954069

  19. Virus diseases of salmonidae in the western United States. II. Aspects of pathogenesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yasutake, W.T.; Parisot, T.J.; Klontz, G.W.

    1965-01-01

    This study was undertaken to initiate a series concerning pathogeneses of infectious diseases of salmonids. The two viral diseases covered in this paper are the Oregon sockeye disease (OSD) and Sacramento River chinook disease (SRCD). Some preliminary data on pathology of the corresponding material from the hatchery epizootics will also be described and discussed.

  20. 9 CFR 53.2 - Determination of existence of disease; agreements with States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Determination of existence of disease... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, PLEUROPNEUMONIA, RINDERPEST, AND CERTAIN OTHER COMMUNICABLE DISEASES...

  1. 9 CFR 53.2 - Determination of existence of disease; agreements with States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Determination of existence of disease... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, PLEUROPNEUMONIA, RINDERPEST, AND CERTAIN OTHER COMMUNICABLE DISEASES...

  2. 9 CFR 53.2 - Determination of existence of disease; agreements with States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Determination of existence of disease... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, PLEUROPNEUMONIA, RINDERPEST, AND CERTAIN OTHER COMMUNICABLE DISEASES...

  3. 9 CFR 53.2 - Determination of existence of disease; agreements with States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Determination of existence of disease... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, PLEUROPNEUMONIA, RINDERPEST, AND CERTAIN OTHER COMMUNICABLE DISEASES...

  4. 9 CFR 53.2 - Determination of existence of disease; agreements with States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Determination of existence of disease... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, PLEUROPNEUMONIA, RINDERPEST, AND CERTAIN OTHER COMMUNICABLE DISEASES...

  5. 76 FR 15211 - Changes in Disease Status of the Brazilian State of Santa Catarina With Regard to Certain...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-21

    ...In a final rule that was published in the Federal Register on November 16, 2010, and effective on December 1, 2010, we added the Brazilian State of Santa Catarina to the list of regions we recognize as free of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), rinderpest, swine vesicular disease (SVD), classical swine fever (CSF), and African swine fever. We also added Santa Catarina to the list of regions that......

  6. Intractable epilepsy and craniocerebral trauma: analysis of 163 patients with blunt and penetrating head injuries sustained in war.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Hadi; Hashemi-Fesharaki, Sohrab; Razaghi, Soodeh; Najafi, Masomeh; Kolivand, Peir Hossein; Kovac, Stjepana; Gorji, Ali

    2012-12-01

    Post-traumatic epileptic seizure is a common complication of brain trauma including military injuries. We present clinical characteristics and correlates of post-traumatic epilepsy in 163 head-injured veterans suffering from intractable epilepsy due to blunt or penetrating head injuries sustained during the Iraq-Iran war. The medical records of 163 war veterans who were admitted by the Epilepsy Department of the Shefa Neuroscience Center between 2005 and 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. The mean follow-up period after developing epilepsy was 17.2 years. The time interval between the trauma and the first seizure was shorter and the seizure frequency was higher in epileptic patients suffering from penetrating head trauma. There was no difference in seizure type between epileptic patients traumatised by blunt or penetrating injury. Patients with seizure frequency of more than 30 per month mostly had simple partial seizure. Frontal and parietal semiologies were observed more frequently in patients with penetrating trauma, whereas patients with blunt trauma showed a higher temporal semiology. The most common brain lesion observed by CT scan was encephalomalacia followed by porencephaly and focal atrophy. There was no association between intracerebral retained fragments and different characteristic features of epilepsy. Patients with military brain injury carry a high risk of intractable post-traumatic epilepsy decades after their injury, and thus require a long-term medical follow-up. PMID:22763317

  7. Spinal Cauda Equina Stimulation for Alternative Location of Spinal Cord Stimulation in Intractable Phantom Limb Pain Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pil Moo; So, Yun; Park, Jung Min; Park, Chul Min; Kim, Hae Kyoung; Kim, Jae Hun

    2016-04-01

    Phantom limb pain is a phenomenon in which patients experience pain in a part of the body that no longer exists. In several treatment modalities, spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been introduced for the management of intractable post-amputation pain. A 46-year-old male patient complained of severe ankle and foot pain, following above-the-knee amputation surgery on the right side amputation surgery three years earlier. Despite undergoing treatment with multiple modalities for pain management involving numerous oral and intravenous medications, nerve blocks, and pulsed radiofrequency (RF) treatment, the effect duration was temporary and the decreases in the patient's pain score were not acceptable. Even the use of SCS did not provide completely satisfactory pain management. However, the trial lead positioning in the cauda equina was able to stimulate the site of the severe pain, and the patient's pain score was dramatically decreased. We report a case of successful pain management with spinal cauda equina stimulation following the failure of SCS in the treatment of intractable phantom limb pain. PMID:27103968

  8. Closed-lip schizencephaly around the central sulcus with intractable epilepsy treated by peri-lesional focus resection.

    PubMed

    Nishibayashi, Hiroki; Miki, Junichiro; Uematsu, Yuji; Itakura, Toru

    2007-11-01

    A 24-year-old man presented with closed-lip schizencephaly around the right central sulcus manifesting as an 11-year history of intractable epilepsy. Mild motor paresis in the left extremities and mental retardation were observed. Tonic posture with bilateral facial tonic contraction was asymmetrical, predominantly in the left extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated closed-lip schizencephaly around the right central sulcus. The epileptogenic zone was determined in the supplementary motor area, and premotor and primary sensorimotor cortices using invasive recordings. As the thickened cortex was considered functional, corticectomy of the supplementary motor area and premotor area was performed, preserving the primary sensorimotor area. Histological examination revealed marked cortico-subcortical gliosis, particularly in the medial part of the resection. Asymmetrical tonic postural seizure disappeared completely after surgery. Medically intractable epilepsy with schizencephaly represents a considerable challenge in epilepsy surgery. Partial corticectomy adjacent to the thickened cortex was effective for seizure control in a patient with closed-lip schizencephaly around the central sulcus. PMID:18037809

  9. Spinal Cauda Equina Stimulation for Alternative Location of Spinal Cord Stimulation in Intractable Phantom Limb Pain Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Pil Moo; So, Yun; Park, Jung Min; Park, Chul Min; Kim, Hae Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    Phantom limb pain is a phenomenon in which patients experience pain in a part of the body that no longer exists. In several treatment modalities, spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been introduced for the management of intractable post-amputation pain. A 46-year-old male patient complained of severe ankle and foot pain, following above-the-knee amputation surgery on the right side amputation surgery three years earlier. Despite undergoing treatment with multiple modalities for pain management involving numerous oral and intravenous medications, nerve blocks, and pulsed radiofrequency (RF) treatment, the effect duration was temporary and the decreases in the patient's pain score were not acceptable. Even the use of SCS did not provide completely satisfactory pain management. However, the trial lead positioning in the cauda equina was able to stimulate the site of the severe pain, and the patient's pain score was dramatically decreased. We report a case of successful pain management with spinal cauda equina stimulation following the failure of SCS in the treatment of intractable phantom limb pain. PMID:27103968

  10. An observational study of the temporal and spatial patterns of Marek's-disease-associated leukosis condemnation of young chickens in the United States of America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek's disease, a disease primarily affecting immature chickens, is a worldwide problem that has on at least three occasions threatened the poultry industry in the United States. A rich dataset to study the epidemiology of this disease is available because the United States Department of Agricultu...

  11. The Prevalence of Peyronie's Disease in the United States: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Stuntz, Mark; Perlaky, Anna; des Vignes, Franka; Kyriakides, Tassos; Glass, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Peyronie’s disease (PD) is a connective tissue disorder which can result in penile deformity. The prevalence of diagnosed PD in the United States (US) has been estimated to be 0.5% in adult males, but there is limited additional information comparing definitive and probable PD cases. We conducted a population-based survey to assess PD prevalence using a convenience-sample of adult men participating in the ResearchNow general population panel. Respondents were categorized according to PD status (definitive, probable, no PD) and segmented by US geographic region, education, and income levels. Of the 7,711 respondents, 57 (0.7%) had definitive PD while 850 (11.0%) had probable PD. Using univariate logistic regression modeling, older age (18–24 vs 24+) (OR = 0.721; 95% CI = 0.570,0.913), Midwest/Northeast/West geographic region (South vs Midwest/Northeast/West) (OR = 0.747; 95% CI = 0.646,0.864), and higher income level (<25K vs 25K+) (OR = 0.820; 95% CI = 0.673,0.997) were each significantly associated with reduced odds of having a definitive/probable PD diagnosis compared with no PD diagnosis. When all three variables were entered in a stepwise multivariable logistic regression, only age (OR = 0.642; 95% CI = 0.497, 0.828) and region (OR = 0.752; 95% CI = 0.647, 0.872) remained significant. This study is the first to report PD prevalence by geographic region and income, and it advocates that the prevalence of PD in the US may be higher than previously cited. Further, given the large discrepancy between definitive PD cases diagnosed by a physician and probable cases not diagnosed by a physician, much more needs to be done to raise awareness of this disease. PMID:26907743

  12. The Prevalence of Peyronie's Disease in the United States: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Stuntz, Mark; Perlaky, Anna; des Vignes, Franka; Kyriakides, Tassos; Glass, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Peyronie's disease (PD) is a connective tissue disorder which can result in penile deformity. The prevalence of diagnosed PD in the United States (US) has been estimated to be 0.5% in adult males, but there is limited additional information comparing definitive and probable PD cases. We conducted a population-based survey to assess PD prevalence using a convenience-sample of adult men participating in the ResearchNow general population panel. Respondents were categorized according to PD status (definitive, probable, no PD) and segmented by US geographic region, education, and income levels. Of the 7,711 respondents, 57 (0.7%) had definitive PD while 850 (11.0%) had probable PD. Using univariate logistic regression modeling, older age (18-24 vs 24+) (OR = 0.721; 95% CI = 0.570,0.913), Midwest/Northeast/West geographic region (South vs Midwest/Northeast/West) (OR = 0.747; 95% CI = 0.646,0.864), and higher income level (<25K vs 25K+) (OR = 0.820; 95% CI = 0.673,0.997) were each significantly associated with reduced odds of having a definitive/probable PD diagnosis compared with no PD diagnosis. When all three variables were entered in a stepwise multivariable logistic regression, only age (OR = 0.642; 95% CI = 0.497, 0.828) and region (OR = 0.752; 95% CI = 0.647, 0.872) remained significant. This study is the first to report PD prevalence by geographic region and income, and it advocates that the prevalence of PD in the US may be higher than previously cited. Further, given the large discrepancy between definitive PD cases diagnosed by a physician and probable cases not diagnosed by a physician, much more needs to be done to raise awareness of this disease. PMID:26907743

  13. Low-frequency fluctuation amplitude analysis of resting-state fMRI in sickle cell disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coloigner, Julie; Kim, Yeun; Bush, Adam; Borzage, Matt; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Lepore, Natasha; Wood, John

    2015-12-01

    Sickle cell disease may result in neurological damage and strokes, leading to morbidity and mortality. Currently, there are no dependable biomarkers to predict impending strokes. In this study, we analyzed neuronal processes at resting state and more particularly how this disease affects the default mode network. The amplitude of low frequency fluctuations was used to reflect areas of spontaneous BOLD signal across brain regions. We compared the activations of sickle cell disease patients to a control group using variance analysis and t-test. Significant regional differences among the two groups were observed, especially in the default mode network areas and cortical regions near large cerebral arteries. These findings suggest that sickle cell disease causes activation modifications near vessels, and these changes could be used as a biomarker of the disease.

  14. Making a case for the CDE's role in outsourcing diabetes services to a freestanding outpatient diabetes disease state management center.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, L E; Hendricks, R T

    1999-01-01

    Outsourcing of diabetes disease state management services by MCOs is a good thing for enrollees with diabetes. It is a good mechanism for MCOs that are striving to cut the costs of diabetes care, and it is a trend that the authors expect to see continue in an accelerated way, given the new diagnostic guidelines released by the American Diabetes Association and the epidemic of diabetes among older persons. Through a partnership with a quality, freestanding, outpatient diabetes disease state management center staffed by CDEs, MCOs with a vision can expect to profit now and pay less later for devastating, expensive diabetes complications that lead to increased hospitalizations. PMID:10646473

  15. Sex-specific relationships between adverse childhood experiences and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in five states

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Timothy J; Ford, Earl S; Croft, Janet B; Merrick, Melissa T; Rolle, Italia V; Giles, Wayne H

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) before age 18 have been repeatedly associated with several chronic diseases in adulthood such as depression, heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and stroke. We examined sex-specific relationships between individual ACEs and the number of ACEs with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the general population. Materials and methods Data from 26,546 women and 19,015 men aged ≥18 years in five states of the 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were analyzed. We used log-linear regression to estimate prevalence ratios (PRs) and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the relationship of eight ACEs with COPD after adjustment for age group, race/ethnicity, marital status, educational attainment, employment, asthma history, health insurance coverage, and smoking status. Results Some 63.8% of women and 62.2% of men reported ≥1 ACE. COPD was reported by 4.9% of women and 4.0% of men. In women, but not in men, there was a higher likelihood of COPD associated with verbal abuse (PR =1.30, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.61), sexual abuse (PR =1.69, 95% CI: 1.36, 2.10), living with a substance abusing household member (PR =1.49, 95% CI: 1.23, 1.81), witnessing domestic violence (PR =1.40, 95% CI: 1.14, 1.72), and parental separation/divorce (PR =1.47, 95% CI: 1.21, 1.80) during childhood compared to those with no individual ACEs. Reporting ≥5 ACEs (PR =2.08, 95% CI: 1.55, 2.80) compared to none was associated with a higher likelihood of COPD among women only. Conclusion ACEs are related to COPD, especially among women. These findings underscore the need for further research that examines sex-specific differences and the possible mechanisms linking ACEs and COPD. This work adds to a growing body of research suggesting that ACEs may contribute to health problems later in life and suggesting a need for program and policy solutions. PMID:25298732

  16. Climate variability and change in the United States: potential impacts on vector- and rodent-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Gubler, D J; Reiter, P; Ebi, K L; Yap, W; Nasci, R; Patz, J A

    2001-05-01

    Diseases such as plague, typhus, malaria, yellow fever, and dengue fever, transmitted between humans by blood-feeding arthropods, were once common in the United States. Many of these diseases are no longer present, mainly because of changes in land use, agricultural methods, residential patterns, human behavior, and vector control. However, diseases that may be transmitted to humans from wild birds or mammals (zoonoses) continue to circulate in nature in many parts of the country. Most vector-borne diseases exhibit a distinct seasonal pattern, which clearly suggests that they are weather sensitive. Rainfall, temperature, and other weather variables affect in many ways both the vectors and the pathogens they transmit. For example, high temperatures can increase or reduce survival rate, depending on the vector, its behavior, ecology, and many other factors. Thus, the probability of transmission may or may not be increased by higher temperatures. The tremendous growth in international travel increases the risk of importation of vector-borne diseases, some of which can be transmitted locally under suitable circumstances at the right time of the year. But demographic and sociologic factors also play a critical role in determining disease incidence, and it is unlikely that these diseases will cause major epidemics in the United States if the public health infrastructure is maintained and improved. PMID:11359689

  17. Climate variability and change in the United States: potential impacts on vector- and rodent-borne diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Gubler, D J; Reiter, P; Ebi, K L; Yap, W; Nasci, R; Patz, J A

    2001-01-01

    Diseases such as plague, typhus, malaria, yellow fever, and dengue fever, transmitted between humans by blood-feeding arthropods, were once common in the United States. Many of these diseases are no longer present, mainly because of changes in land use, agricultural methods, residential patterns, human behavior, and vector control. However, diseases that may be transmitted to humans from wild birds or mammals (zoonoses) continue to circulate in nature in many parts of the country. Most vector-borne diseases exhibit a distinct seasonal pattern, which clearly suggests that they are weather sensitive. Rainfall, temperature, and other weather variables affect in many ways both the vectors and the pathogens they transmit. For example, high temperatures can increase or reduce survival rate, depending on the vector, its behavior, ecology, and many other factors. Thus, the probability of transmission may or may not be increased by higher temperatures. The tremendous growth in international travel increases the risk of importation of vector-borne diseases, some of which can be transmitted locally under suitable circumstances at the right time of the year. But demographic and sociologic factors also play a critical role in determining disease incidence, and it is unlikely that these diseases will cause major epidemics in the United States if the public health infrastructure is maintained and improved. PMID:11359689

  18. Information processing in micro and meso-scale neural circuits during normal and disease states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luongo, Francisco

    Neural computation can occur at multiple spatial and temporal timescales. The sum total of all of these processes is to guide optimal behaviors within the context of the constraints imposed by the physical world. How the circuits of the brain achieves this goal represents a central question in systems neuroscience. Here I explore the many ways in which the circuits of the brain can process information at both the micro and meso scale. Understanding the way information is represented and processed in the brain could shed light on the neuropathology underlying complex neuropsychiatric diseases such as autism and schizophrenia. Chapter 2 establishes an experimental paradigm for assaying patterns of microcircuit activity and examines the role of dopaminergic modulation on prefrontal microcircuits. We find that dopamine type 2 (D2) receptor activation results in an increase in spontaneous activity while dopamine type 1 (D1) activation does not. Chapter 3 of this dissertation presents a study that illustrates how cholingergic activation normally produces what has been suggested as a neural substrate of attention; pairwise decorrelation in microcircuit activity. This study also shows that in two etiologicall distinct mouse models of autism, FMR1 knockout mice and Valproic Acid exposed mice, this ability to decorrelate in the presence of cholinergic activation is lost. This represents a putative microcircuit level biomarker of autism. Chapter 4 examines the structure/function relationship within the prefrontal microcircuit. Spontaneous activity in prefrontal microcircuits is shown to be organized according to a small world architecture. Interestingly, this architecture is important for one concrete function of neuronal microcircuits; the ability to produce temporally stereotyped patterns of activation. In the final chapter, we identify subnetworks in chronic intracranial electrocorticographic (ECoG) recordings using pairwise electrode coherence and dimensionality reduction techniques. We show that we can further reduce the dimensionality of these networks by identifying 'key-interactions' that are informative of the overall subnetwork state at any given point in time. This study highlights that redundancy in ECoG data can be exploited to identify low-dimensional representation of brain-wide subnetworks. Taken together, these studies represent the development of multiple technological and analytical techniques aimed at understanding how information is processed and modulated at emergent circuit and network levels as well as understanding their dysfunction in a neuropsychiatric disease state.

  19. Classification of Single Normal and Alzheimer's Disease Individuals from Cortical Sources of Resting State EEG Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Babiloni, Claudio; Triggiani, Antonio I.; Lizio, Roberta; Cordone, Susanna; Tattoli, Giacomo; Bevilacqua, Vitoantonio; Soricelli, Andrea; Ferri, Raffaele; Nobili, Flavio; Gesualdo, Loreto; Millán-Calenti, José C.; Buján, Ana; Tortelli, Rosanna; Cardinali, Valentina; Barulli, Maria Rosaria; Giannini, Antonio; Spagnolo, Pantaleo; Armenise, Silvia; Buenza, Grazia; Scianatico, Gaetano; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Frisoni, Giovanni B.; del Percio, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown abnormal power and functional connectivity of resting state electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms in groups of Alzheimer's disease (AD) compared to healthy elderly (Nold) subjects. Here we tested the best classification rate of 120 AD patients and 100 matched Nold subjects using EEG markers based on cortical sources of power and functional connectivity of these rhythms. EEG data were recorded during resting state eyes-closed condition. Exact low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (eLORETA) estimated the power and functional connectivity of cortical sources in frontal, central, parietal, occipital, temporal, and limbic regions. Delta (2–4 Hz), theta (4–8 Hz), alpha 1 (8–10.5 Hz), alpha 2 (10.5–13 Hz), beta 1 (13–20 Hz), beta 2 (20–30 Hz), and gamma (30–40 Hz) were the frequency bands of interest. The classification rates of interest were those with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) higher than 0.7 as a threshold for a moderate classification rate (i.e., 70%). Results showed that the following EEG markers overcame this threshold: (i) central, parietal, occipital, temporal, and limbic delta/alpha 1 current density; (ii) central, parietal, occipital temporal, and limbic delta/alpha 2 current density; (iii) frontal theta/alpha 1 current density; (iv) occipital delta/alpha 1 inter-hemispherical connectivity; (v) occipital-temporal theta/alpha 1 right and left intra-hemispherical connectivity; and (vi) parietal-limbic alpha 1 right intra-hemispherical connectivity. Occipital delta/alpha 1 current density showed the best classification rate (sensitivity of 73.3%, specificity of 78%, accuracy of 75.5%, and AUROC of 82%). These results suggest that EEG source markers can classify Nold and AD individuals with a moderate classification rate higher than 80%. PMID:26941594

  20. Dopaminergic modulation of resting-state functional connectivity in de novo patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Baik, KyoungWon; Cha, Jungho; Ham, Jee Hyun; Baek, Gwang-Min; Sunwoo, Mun Kyung; Hong, Jin Yong; Shin, Na-Young; Kim, Jae Seung; Lee, Jong-Min; Lee, Seung-Koo; Sohn, Young Ho; Lee, Phil Hyu

    2014-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by degenerative changes of nigral dopamine neurons, resulting in the dopaminergic denervation of the striatum. Resting state networks studies have demonstrated that dopamine modulates distinct network connectivity patterns in both a linear and a nonlinear fashion, but quantitative analyses of dopamine-dependent functional connectivity secondary to PD pathology were less informative. In the present study, we performed a correlation analysis between striatal dopamine levels assessed quantitatively by FP-CIT positron emission tomography imaging and resting-state functional connectivity in 23 drug naïve de novo patients with PD to elucidate dopamine-dependent functional networks. The major finding is that the patterns of dopamine-dependent positive functional connectivity varied depending on the location of striatal seeds. Dopamine-dependent functional connectivity with the caudate predominantly overlay pericentral cortical areas, whereas dopamine-dependent structures functionally connected with the posterior putamen predominantly involved cerebellar areas. The dorsolateral frontal area overlapped as a dopamine-dependent cortical region that was positively connected with the anterior and posterior putamen. On the other hand, cortical areas where functional connectivity from the posterior cingulate was negatively correlated with dopaminergic status in the posterior putamen were localized in the left anterior prefrontal area and the parietal area. Additionally, functional connectivity between the anterior putamen and mesiofrontal areas was negatively coupled with striatal dopamine levels. The present study demonstrated that dopamine-dependent functional network connectivity secondary to PD pathology mainly exhibits a consistent pattern, albeit with some variation. These patterns may reflect the diverse effects of dopaminergic medication on parkinsonian-related motor and cognitive performance. PMID:24938993

  1. Classification of Single Normal and Alzheimer's Disease Individuals from Cortical Sources of Resting State EEG Rhythms.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Triggiani, Antonio I; Lizio, Roberta; Cordone, Susanna; Tattoli, Giacomo; Bevilacqua, Vitoantonio; Soricelli, Andrea; Ferri, Raffaele; Nobili, Flavio; Gesualdo, Loreto; Millán-Calenti, José C; Buján, Ana; Tortelli, Rosanna; Cardinali, Valentina; Barulli, Maria Rosaria; Giannini, Antonio; Spagnolo, Pantaleo; Armenise, Silvia; Buenza, Grazia; Scianatico, Gaetano; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Del Percio, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown abnormal power and functional connectivity of resting state electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms in groups of Alzheimer's disease (AD) compared to healthy elderly (Nold) subjects. Here we tested the best classification rate of 120 AD patients and 100 matched Nold subjects using EEG markers based on cortical sources of power and functional connectivity of these rhythms. EEG data were recorded during resting state eyes-closed condition. Exact low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (eLORETA) estimated the power and functional connectivity of cortical sources in frontal, central, parietal, occipital, temporal, and limbic regions. Delta (2-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha 1 (8-10.5 Hz), alpha 2 (10.5-13 Hz), beta 1 (13-20 Hz), beta 2 (20-30 Hz), and gamma (30-40 Hz) were the frequency bands of interest. The classification rates of interest were those with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) higher than 0.7 as a threshold for a moderate classification rate (i.e., 70%). Results showed that the following EEG markers overcame this threshold: (i) central, parietal, occipital, temporal, and limbic delta/alpha 1 current density; (ii) central, parietal, occipital temporal, and limbic delta/alpha 2 current density; (iii) frontal theta/alpha 1 current density; (iv) occipital delta/alpha 1 inter-hemispherical connectivity; (v) occipital-temporal theta/alpha 1 right and left intra-hemispherical connectivity; and (vi) parietal-limbic alpha 1 right intra-hemispherical connectivity. Occipital delta/alpha 1 current density showed the best classification rate (sensitivity of 73.3%, specificity of 78%, accuracy of 75.5%, and AUROC of 82%). These results suggest that EEG source markers can classify Nold and AD individuals with a moderate classification rate higher than 80%. PMID:26941594

  2. Governors' priorities for public health and chronic disease prevention: a qualitative analysis of State of the State addresses.

    PubMed

    Eyler, Amy A; Zwald, Marissa L

    2015-09-01

    Governors use State of the State speeches to publicly outline state status, progress, and policy priorities. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively analyze the public health content of State of the State addresses from 2009 to 2013. Speech transcripts were collected and uploaded into NVivo10. Speeches were coded using a priori, general thematic codes followed by detailed sub-coding of public health text. Data was organized by emergent thematic patterns. From 2009 to 2013, 48 governors presented 72 speeches with public health messages. Framing current public health problems and outlining strategies were two of the three main themes that emerged. Problems were often framed using data or emphasizing economic costs. Governors outlined prevention strategies on tobacco, nutrition, or physical activity through increased funding, policies, or partnerships. Speech content provides information on priorities and trends and can be used to inform advocacy efforts. Future research should link these priorities to outcomes of legislation. PMID:26327940

  3. Identification of lymphoproliferative disease virus in wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Viral-associated lymphoproliferative neoplasia in domestic poultry is caused by infection with a herpesvirus (Marek’s disease virus) or three species of retroviruses [Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), Avian leukosis/sarcoma virus, lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV)]. Previously, retroviral n...

  4. Oral immunotherapy for allergic diseases using transgenic rice seeds: current state and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Mayumi; Nishimura, Tomoe; Kaminuma, Osamu; Mori, Akio; Hiroi, Takachika

    2013-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (IT) has been shown to provide clinical benefit for patients with allergic diseases. At present, subcutaneous and sublingual ITs are mainly authorized for clinical treatment. Oral administration of allergens seems to be the easiest way to achieve IT, though it has yet to be translated to the clinical setting, mainly due to the requirement of a large amount of allergens. Plants, especially rice seeds, have recently been recognized as superior allergen carriers for oral administration, because of their high productivity, stability and safety. Therefore, in order to establish clinically applicable oral IT, we have been developing transgenic rice seeds (Tg rice), in which major epitopes of cedar pollen allergens or house-dust mites (HDM) are expressed. The efficacy of this orally administered Tg rice was confirmed in murine models of allergic rhinitis and bronchial asthma. In the safety study of the Tg rice, no adverse effects on cynomolgus macaques were observed. In this review, we summarized the current state and future prospects of allergen-specific IT, focusing particularly on oral IT with allergen-expressing Tg rice. PMID:23711869

  5. Parameterizing state-space models for infectious disease dynamics by generalized profiling: measles in Ontario.

    PubMed

    Hooker, Giles; Ellner, Stephen P; Roditi, Laura De Vargas; Earn, David J D

    2011-07-01

    Parameter estimation for infectious disease models is important for basic understanding (e.g. to identify major transmission pathways), for forecasting emerging epidemics, and for designing control measures. Differential equation models are often used, but statistical inference for differential equations suffers from numerical challenges and poor agreement between observational data and deterministic models. Accounting for these departures via stochastic model terms requires full specification of the probabilistic dynamics, and computationally demanding estimation methods. Here, we demonstrate the utility of an alternative approach, generalized profiling, which provides robustness to violations of a deterministic model without needing to specify a complete probabilistic model. We introduce novel means for estimating the robustness parameters and for statistical inference in this framework. The methods are applied to a model for pre-vaccination measles incidence in Ontario, and we demonstrate the statistical validity of our inference through extensive simulation. The results confirm that school term versus summer drives seasonality of transmission, but we find no effects of short school breaks and the estimated basic reproductive ratio (0) greatly exceeds previous estimates. The approach applies naturally to any system for which candidate differential equations are available, and avoids many challenges that have limited Monte Carlo inference for state-space models. PMID:21084339

  6. Lifestyle, serum lipids and coronary artery disease: comparison of Japan with the United States.

    PubMed

    Egusa, Genshi; Yamane, Kiminori

    2004-01-01

    Westernization of the Japanese lifestyle has been steadily progressing, and the percent energy intake as fat has increased 3.8 fold over the past 50 years. Although the serum cholesterol (C) level has also increased, the death rate due to coronary artery disease (CAD) is not increasing. Consumption of dietary fat in the United States (US) is decreasing and serum C levels are also decreasing. Although the death rate due to CAD is markedly decreasing in men and women in the US, it is still 4 times higher than that of Japanese. The percent energy intake as fat in Japanese migrants to the US (Japanese-American: JA) lies between that of native Japanese and US populations, and their C values are higher than those of native Japanese. Compared with native Japanese, JA showed a significant increase in carotid intima-media wall thickness, and deaths from CAD are also higher than those of Japanese in Japan. Although the death rate due to CAD has not yet increased in Japan, Japanese have the potential for further progression of atherosclerosis and increasing CAD. PMID:15644583

  7. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging of resting-state cerebral blood flow in preclinical Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Robert C; Grön, Georg; Sambataro, Fabio; Vasic, Nenad; Wolf, Nadine D; Thomann, Philipp A; Saft, Carsten; Landwehrmeyer, G Bernhard; Orth, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain could be a powerful tool for discovering early biomarkers in clinically presymptomatic carriers of the Huntington's disease gene mutation (preHD). The aim of this study was to investigate the sensitivity of resting-state perfusion MRI in preHD and to identify neural changes, which could serve as biomarkers for future clinical trials. Differences in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in 18 preHD and 18 controls were assessed with a novel MRI method based on perfusion images obtained with continuous arterial spin labeling. High-resolution structural data were collected to test for changes of brain volume. Compared with controls, preHD individuals showed decreased rCBF in medial and lateral prefrontal regions and increased rCBF in the precuneus. PreHD near to symptom onset additionally showed decreased rCBF in the putamen and increased rCBF in the hippocampus. Network analyses revealed an abnormal lateral prefrontal pattern in preHD far and near to motor onset. These data suggest early changes of frontostriatal baseline perfusion in preHD independent of substantial reductions of gray matter volume. This study also shows the feasibility of detecting neural changes in preHD with a robust MRI technique that would be suitable for longitudinal multisite application. PMID:21559028

  8. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging of resting-state cerebral blood flow in preclinical Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Robert C; Grön, Georg; Sambataro, Fabio; Vasic, Nenad; Wolf, Nadine D; Thomann, Philipp A; Saft, Carsten; Landwehrmeyer, G Bernhard; Orth, Michael

    2011-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain could be a powerful tool for discovering early biomarkers in clinically presymptomatic carriers of the Huntington's disease gene mutation (preHD). The aim of this study was to investigate the sensitivity of resting-state perfusion MRI in preHD and to identify neural changes, which could serve as biomarkers for future clinical trials. Differences in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in 18 preHD and 18 controls were assessed with a novel MRI method based on perfusion images obtained with continuous arterial spin labeling. High-resolution structural data were collected to test for changes of brain volume. Compared with controls, preHD individuals showed decreased rCBF in medial and lateral prefrontal regions and increased rCBF in the precuneus. PreHD near to symptom onset additionally showed decreased rCBF in the putamen and increased rCBF in the hippocampus. Network analyses revealed an abnormal lateral prefrontal pattern in preHD far and near to motor onset. These data suggest early changes of frontostriatal baseline perfusion in preHD independent of substantial reductions of gray matter volume. This study also shows the feasibility of detecting neural changes in preHD with a robust MRI technique that would be suitable for longitudinal multisite application. PMID:21559028

  9. National surveillance of dialysis associated diseases in the United States, 1995.

    PubMed

    Tokars, J I; Miller, E R; Alter, M J; Arduino, M J

    1998-01-01

    Chronic hemodialysis centers in the United States were surveyed in 1995 regarding a number of hemodialysis associated diseases and practices. A total of 2,647 centers, representing 224,954 patients and 54,194 staff members, responded. Seventy-seven percent of centers reported that they reused disposable dialyzers. At the end of 1995, 65% of patients were treated with an arteriovenous graft, 22% an arteriovenous fistula, and 13% a temporary or permanent central catheter. By the end of 1995, at least three doses of hepatitis B vaccine had been administered to 35% of patients and to 82% of staff members. Acute infection with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) occurred in 0.06% of patients, and was more likely to be reported by centers with lower proportions of patients vaccinated against HBV. The prevalence of antibody to hepatitis C virus (HCV) was 10.4% among patients and 2.0% among staff. At least one patient with vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) was reported by 11.5% of centers, more commonly by hospital (vs freestanding centers not located in hospitals) and government centers, and centers located in certain geographic areas. Vancomycin was received by 7.2% of patients in December 1995. The percentage of centers reporting patients with other pathogens was 7.9% for active tuberculosis, 39% for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and 40% for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). PMID:9466509

  10. Complexity analysis of resting-state MEG activity in early-stage Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Carlos; Olde Dubbelink, Kim T E; Stam, Cornelis J; Abásolo, Daniel; Berendse, Henk W; Hornero, Roberto

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze resting-state brain activity in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), a degenerative disorder of the nervous system. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals were recorded with a 151-channel whole-head radial gradiometer MEG system in 18 early-stage untreated PD patients and 20 age-matched control subjects. Artifact-free epochs of 4 s (1250 samples) were analyzed with Lempel-Ziv complexity (LZC), applying two- and three-symbol sequence conversion methods. The results showed that MEG signals from PD patients are less complex than control subjects' recordings. We found significant group differences (p-values <0.01) for the 10 major cortical areas analyzed (e.g., bilateral frontal, central, temporal, parietal, and occipital regions). In addition, using receiver-operating characteristic curves with a leave-one-out cross-validation procedure, a classification accuracy of 81.58% was obtained. In order to investigate the best combination of LZC results for classification purposes, a forward stepwise linear discriminant analysis with leave-one out cross-validation was employed. LZC results (three-symbol sequence conversion) from right parietal and temporal brain regions were automatically selected by the model. With this procedure, an accuracy of 84.21% (77.78% sensitivity, 90.0% specificity) was achieved. Our findings demonstrate the usefulness of LZC to detect an abnormal type of dynamics associated with PD. PMID:21969108

  11. Multiscale entropy analysis of resting-state magnetoencephalogram with tensor factorisations in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Javier; Acar, Evrim; Fernández, Alberto; Bro, Rasmus

    2015-10-01

    Tensor factorisations have proven useful to model amplitude and spectral information of brain recordings. Here, we assess the usefulness of tensor factorisations in the multiway analysis of other brain signal features in the context of complexity measures recently proposed to inspect multiscale dynamics. We consider the "refined composite multiscale entropy" (rcMSE), which computes entropy "profiles" showing levels of physiological complexity over temporal scales for individual signals. We compute the rcMSE of resting-state magnetoencephalogram (MEG) recordings from 36 patients with Alzheimer's disease and 26 control subjects. Instead of traditional simple visual examinations, we organise the entropy profiles as a three-way tensor to inspect relationships across temporal and spatial scales and subjects with multiway data analysis techniques based on PARAFAC and PARAFAC2 factorisations. A PARAFAC2 model with two factors was appropriate to account for the interactions in the entropy tensor between temporal scales and MEG channels for all subjects. Moreover, the PARAFAC2 factors had information related to the subjects' diagnosis, achieving a cross-validated area under the ROC curve of 0.77. This confirms the suitability of tensor factorisations to represent electrophysiological brain data efficiently despite the unsupervised nature of these techniques. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Neural data analysis'. PMID:25982737

  12. Prevalence and Morbidity of Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases, United States 2001–2007

    PubMed Central

    Kobrynski, Lisa; Powell, Rachel Waltenburg; Bowen, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Few studies have estimated population prevalence and morbidity of primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD). We used administrative healthcare databases to estimate the prevalence of PIDD diagnoses in the United States from 2001 to 2007. Methods MarketScan databases compile claims from commercial health insurance plans and Medicaid, recording individual diagnoses for outpatient encounters and hospital stays. We used a cross sectional survey to estimate prevalence of PIDD using related ICD-9 codes (279.0, 279.1, 279.2, 279.8, 279.9, 288.1 and 288.2). Persons with secondary immunodeficiency diagnoses were excluded from analysis. Results Between 2001 and 2007, prevalence of any PIDD diagnosis increased from 38.9 to 50.5 per 100,000 among privately insured and from 29.1 to 41.1 per 100,000 among publicly insured persons. B cell defects predominated. Prevalence was more than twice as high among Whites as among Blacks or Hispanics. Conclusion In this large database, we found a higher prevalence of diagnosed PIDD than has been reported previously from registries. Increased awareness may have contributed to the increasing prevalence. PMID:25257253

  13. Intractable Postoperative Wounds Caused by Self-Inflicted Trauma in a Patient with Cutaneous Munchausen Syndrome Presenting as a Pyoderma Gangrenosum-Like Lesion.

    PubMed

    Inui, Keiko; Hanafusa, Takaaki; Namiki, Takeshi; Ueno, Makiko; Igawa, Ken; Yokozeki, Hiroo

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old Japanese woman consulted the emergency department of our hospital for bleeding due to an intractable postoperative wound on the lower abdomen; the postoperative wound was owing to a laparoscopic cholecystectomy performed 1 year previously for acute cholecystitis. She presented with a painful ulcer on her right lower abdomen. She also presented with multiple scars, skin grafts on the extremities, and a missing left lower leg, the causes for all of which were unexplained. The results of her blood test were normal, except for the hemoglobin level. Histology of the skin biopsy specimen from the ulcer did not show any specific findings. The previous surgeon who had performed the laparoscopic cholecystectomy revealed that surgical wound dehiscence had occurred during her admission. After a body restraint had been applied, the ulcer improved. Medical records indicated that she had been admitted to the department of plastic surgery at our hospital for skin grafting of a leg ulcer. During that admission, she refused to consult with the department of psychiatry, al-though the staff suspected mental disorders. Therefore, we diagnosed her with cutaneous Munchausen syndrome. After vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy had been performed to prevent her from traumatizing the ulcer again, it rapidly became granulated and reepithelialized. Munchausen syndrome is characterized by feigning physical symptoms to seek attention. Patients self-inflict numerous lesions, keep getting admitted to different hospitals, and feign acute illness, usually spectacular diseases. VAC therapy may be effective for preventing patients with cutaneous Munchausen syndrome from traumatizing their wounds. PMID:27194978

  14. Intractable Postoperative Wounds Caused by Self-Inflicted Trauma in a Patient with Cutaneous Munchausen Syndrome Presenting as a Pyoderma Gangrenosum-Like Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Inui, Keiko; Hanafusa, Takaaki; Namiki, Takeshi; Ueno, Makiko; Igawa, Ken; Yokozeki, Hiroo

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old Japanese woman consulted the emergency department of our hospital for bleeding due to an intractable postoperative wound on the lower abdomen; the postoperative wound was owing to a laparoscopic cholecystectomy performed 1 year previously for acute cholecystitis. She presented with a painful ulcer on her right lower abdomen. She also presented with multiple scars, skin grafts on the extremities, and a missing left lower leg, the causes for all of which were unexplained. The results of her blood test were normal, except for the hemoglobin level. Histology of the skin biopsy specimen from the ulcer did not show any specific findings. The previous surgeon who had performed the laparoscopic cholecystectomy revealed that surgical wound dehiscence had occurred during her admission. After a body restraint had been applied, the ulcer improved. Medical records indicated that she had been admitted to the department of plastic surgery at our hospital for skin grafting of a leg ulcer. During that admission, she refused to consult with the department of psychiatry, al-though the staff suspected mental disorders. Therefore, we diagnosed her with cutaneous Munchausen syndrome. After vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy had been performed to prevent her from traumatizing the ulcer again, it rapidly became granulated and reepithelialized. Munchausen syndrome is characterized by feigning physical symptoms to seek attention. Patients self-inflict numerous lesions, keep getting admitted to different hospitals, and feign acute illness, usually spectacular diseases. VAC therapy may be effective for preventing patients with cutaneous Munchausen syndrome from traumatizing their wounds. PMID:27194978

  15. Racial/ethnic disparities in chronic diseases of youths and access to health care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Price, James H; Khubchandani, Jagdish; McKinney, Molly; Braun, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Racial/ethnic minorities are 1.5 to 2.0 times more likely than whites to have most of the major chronic diseases. Chronic diseases are also more common in the poor than the nonpoor and this association is frequently mediated by race/ethnicity. Specifically, children are disproportionately affected by racial/ethnic health disparities. Between 1960 and 2005 the percentage of children with a chronic disease in the United States almost quadrupled with racial/ethnic minority youth having higher likelihood for these diseases. The most common major chronic diseases of youth in the United States are asthma, diabetes mellitus, obesity, hypertension, dental disease, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, mental illness, cancers, sickle-cell anemia, cystic fibrosis, and a variety of genetic and other birth defects. This review will focus on the psychosocial rather than biological factors that play important roles in the etiology and subsequent solutions to these health disparities because they should be avoidable and they are inherently unjust. Finally, this review examines access to health services by focusing on health insurance and dental insurance coverage and access to school health services. PMID:24175301

  16. Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Chronic Diseases of Youths and Access to Health Care in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Price, James H.; Braun, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Racial/ethnic minorities are 1.5 to 2.0 times more likely than whites to have most of the major chronic diseases. Chronic diseases are also more common in the poor than the nonpoor and this association is frequently mediated by race/ethnicity. Specifically, children are disproportionately affected by racial/ethnic health disparities. Between 1960 and 2005 the percentage of children with a chronic disease in the United States almost quadrupled with racial/ethnic minority youth having higher likelihood for these diseases. The most common major chronic diseases of youth in the United States are asthma, diabetes mellitus, obesity, hypertension, dental disease, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, mental illness, cancers, sickle-cell anemia, cystic fibrosis, and a variety of genetic and other birth defects. This review will focus on the psychosocial rather than biological factors that play important roles in the etiology and subsequent solutions to these health disparities because they should be avoidable and they are inherently unjust. Finally, this review examines access to health services by focusing on health insurance and dental insurance coverage and access to school health services. PMID:24175301

  17. First report of zebra chip disease and Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum on potatoes in Oregon and Washington State

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In August of 2011, potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers grown in the lower Columbia Basin of southern Washington State and northern Oregon were observed with internal discolorations suggestive of the zebra chip disease (ZC). Symptoms included brown spots, streaks, and stripes in and near the vascular ...

  18. Surveillance for Waterborne Disease Outbreaks and Other Health Events Associated with Recreational Water -United States, 2007-2008*

    EPA Science Inventory

    Problem/Condition: Since 1978, CDC, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists have collaborated on the Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System (WBDOSS) for collecting and reporting data on occurrences and causes...

  19. Virulent Newcastle disease viruses isolated from cormorant and gull species in the states of the Atlantic Flyway in 2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Newcastle disease viruses (NDV) have been the causative agent for die-offs of juvenile double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) in the northern border-states focused around the Great Lakes of the U.S. in years past. However, the most recent die-off has included not only great cormorants (P...

  20. A novel cognitive-neurophysiological state biomarker in premanifest Huntington's disease validated on longitudinal data

    PubMed Central

    Beste, Christian; Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Ness, Vanessa; Hoffmann, Rainer; Lukas, Carsten; Saft, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    In several neurodegenerative diseases, like Huntington's disease (HD), treatments are still lacking. To determine whether a treatment is effective, sensitive disease progression biomarkers are especially needed for the premanifest phase, since this allows the evaluation of neuroprotective treatments preventing, or delaying disease manifestation. On the basis of a longitudinal study we present a biomarker that was derived by integrating behavioural and neurophysiological data reflecting cognitive processes of action control. The measure identified is sensitive enough to track disease progression over a period of only 6 month. Changes tracked were predictive for a number of clinically relevant parameters and the sensitivity of the measure was higher than that of currently used parameters to track prodromal disease progression. The study provides a biomarker, which could change practice of progression diagnostics in a major basal ganglia disease and which may help to evaluate potential neuroprotective treatments in future clinical trials. PMID:23652721

  1. Alzheimer's disease: insights from Drosophila melanogaster models

    PubMed Central

    Moloney, Aileen; Sattelle, David B.; Lomas, David A.; Crowther, Damian C.

    2010-01-01

    The power of fruit fly genetics is being deployed against some of the most intractable and economically significant problems in modern medicine, the neurodegenerative diseases. Fly models of Alzheimer's disease can be exposed to the rich diversity of biological techniques that are available to the community and are providing new insights into disease mechanisms, and assisting in the identification of novel targets for therapy. Similar approaches might also help us to interpret the results of genome-wide association studies of human neurodegenerative diseases by allowing us to triage gene hits according to whether a candidate risk factor gene has a modifying effect on the disease phenotypes in fly model systems. PMID:20036556

  2. Impairments and Hansen's disease control in Rondônia state, Amazon region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    De Oliveira, Carmelita Ribeira; De Alencar, Maria De Jesus Freitas; De Sena Neto, Sebastiao Alves; Lehman, Linda F; Schreuder, Pieter A M

    2003-12-01

    This retrospective study of impairments in a decentralized and integrated, routine Hansen's disease (HD) programme was done on a cohort of all new patients detected in Rondônia state from 1996 to 1999. It shows that the dynamics of impairments during treatment in Rondônia are similar to what has been published in other recent studies from Africa and Asia. Data about impairments at detection and at release from treatment (cure), the prescription of steroids, and epidemiological information are provided. Of the original 5350 new patients, 4230 patients (80%) completed multidrug therapy (MDT) and had complete data about their impairment status. At the start of treatment, 9% of the paucibacillary (PB) and 26% of the multibacillary (MB) patients had WHO grade 1 impairment. Three percent of the PB and 11% of the MB patients had visible deformities (WHO grade 2 impairment). Of the patients without impairments (grade 0) at the start of treatment, 5% of the PB and 20% of the MB patients developed impairments during treatment. Of the PB patients with a WHO impairment grade 1 at start of treatment, 34% improved and 6% got worse. Of the MB patients 34% improved and 12% became worse. In a separate study of patients from the 1997 intake, 17% of the PB and 58% of the MB patients were treated at least once with a course of steroids or thalidomide during MDT treatment. It is noted in the literature that the percentage of persons with recent nerve function impairment (NFI), nerve pain or tenderness and/or reaction reactions differs between projects. This may reflect real differences or may be caused by differences in routine monitoring and/or criteria and methods of treatment. The use of the WHO maximum score, particularly for the patients with grade 2, is not as sensitive to change as utilizing the summary of Eye, Hand and Foot (EHF) scores. If overall impairment figures are given, the proportions of MB patients may define the differences between projects, therefore it is important to analysis and present the results of PB and MB patients separately. The most simple (outcome) indicator to estimate the effectiveness of patient management would be the proportions of patients with impairment grade 0 at start of treatment who develop either grade 1 or 2 impairments during treatment. An additional (outcome) indicator could be the proportion of patients with impairment grade 1 at start of treatment who develop grade 2 impairments during treatment. Currently, no operational targets or acceptable level of performance for patient management have been set. This would be important to enable programme managers to determine if adequate patient education, treatment and follow up have been provided after the disease detection to prevent and/or minimize problems associated with the disease. The available evidence strongly suggests that reactions and impairments related to HD will continue to occur in large numbers, requiring the development of adequate infrastructures and sustainable services to detect and to manage problems associated with HD during and after MDT treatment. PMID:14750579

  3. Recommendations for the use of eliglustat in the treatment of adults with Gaucher disease type 1 in the United States.

    PubMed

    Balwani, Manisha; Burrow, Thomas Andrew; Charrow, Joel; Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Kaplan, Paige; Kishnani, Priya S; Mistry, Pramod; Ruskin, Jeremy; Weinreb, Neal

    2016-02-01

    In Gaucher disease, deficient activity of acid β-glucosidase results in accumulation of its substrates, glucosylceramide and glucosylsphingosine, within the lysosomes of cells primarily in the spleen, liver, bone marrow, and occasionally the lung. The multisystem disease is predominantly characterized by hepatosplenomegaly, anemia, thrombocytopenia, and skeletal disease. Enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human acid β-glucosidase has been the first-line therapy for Gaucher disease type 1 for more than two decades. Eliglustat, a novel oral substrate reduction therapy, was recently approved in the United States and the European Union as a first-line treatment for adults with Gaucher disease type 1. Eliglustat inhibits glucosylceramide synthase, thereby decreasing production of the substrate glucosylceramide and reducing its accumulation. Although existing recommendations for the care of patients with Gaucher disease remain in effect, unique characteristics of eliglustat require additional investigation and monitoring. A panel of physicians with expertise in Gaucher disease and experience with eliglustat in the clinical trials provide guidance regarding the use of eliglustat, including considerations before starting therapy and monitoring of patients on eliglustat therapy. PMID:26387627

  4. The Impact of Movements and Animal Density on Continental Scale Cattle Disease Outbreaks in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Buhnerkempe, Michael G.; Tildesley, Michael J.; Lindström, Tom; Grear, Daniel A.; Portacci, Katie; Miller, Ryan S.; Lombard, Jason E.; Werkman, Marleen; Keeling, Matt J.; Wennergren, Uno; Webb, Colleen T.

    2014-01-01

    Globalization has increased the potential for the introduction and spread of novel pathogens over large spatial scales necessitating continental-scale disease models to guide emergency preparedness. Livestock disease spread models, such as those for the 2001 foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) epidemic in the United Kingdom, represent some of the best case studies of large-scale disease spread. However, generalization of these models to explore disease outcomes in other systems, such as the United States’s cattle industry, has been hampered by differences in system size and complexity and the absence of suitable livestock movement data. Here, a unique database of US cattle shipments allows estimation of synthetic movement networks that inform a near-continental scale disease model of a potential FMD-like (i.e., rapidly spreading) epidemic in US cattle. The largest epidemics may affect over one-third of the US and 120,000 cattle premises, but cattle movement restrictions from infected counties, as opposed to national movement moratoriums, are found to effectively contain outbreaks. Slow detection or weak compliance may necessitate more severe state-level bans for similar control. Such results highlight the role of large-scale disease models in emergency preparedness, particularly for systems lacking comprehensive movement and outbreak data, and the need to rapidly implement multi-scale contingency plans during a potential US outbreak. PMID:24670977

  5. Status of Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke in Hispanics/Latinos in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Carlos J.; Allison, Matthew; Daviglus, Martha L.; Isasi, Carmen R.; Keller, Colleen; Leira, Enrique C.; Palaniappan, Latha; Piña, Ileana L.; Ramirez, Sarah M.; Rodriguez, Beatriz; Sims, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose This American Heart Association (AHA) scientific statement provides a comprehensive overview of current evidence on the burden cardiovascular disease (CVD) among Hispanics in the United States. Hispanics are the largest minority ethnic group in the United States, and their health is vital to the public health of the nation and to achieving the AHA’s 2020 goals. This statement describes the CVD epidemiology and related personal beliefs and the social and health issues of US Hispanics, and it identifies potential prevention and treatment opportunities. The intended audience for this statement includes healthcare professionals, researchers, and policy makers. Methods Writing group members were nominated by the AHA’s Manuscript Oversight Committee and represent a broad range of expertise in relation to Hispanic individuals and CVD. The writers used a general framework outlined by the committee chair to produce a comprehensive literature review that summarizes existing evidence, indicate gaps in current knowledge, and formulate recommendations. Only English-language studies were reviewed, with PubMed/MEDLINE as our primary resource, as well as the Cochrane Library Reviews, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the US Census data as secondary resources. Inductive methods and descriptive studies that focused on CVD outcomes incidence, prevalence, treatment response, and risks were included. Because of the wide scope of these topics, members of the writing committee were responsible for drafting individual sections selected by the chair of the writing committee, and the group chair assembled the complete statement. The conclusions of this statement are the views of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official view of the AHA. All members of the writing group had the opportunity to comment on the initial drafts and approved the final version of this document. The manuscript underwent extensive AHA internal peer review before consideration and approval by the AHA Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee. Results This statement documents the status of knowledge regarding CVD among Hispanics and the sociocultural issues that impact all subgroups of Hispanics with regard to cardiovascular health. In this review, whenever possible, we identify the specific Hispanic subgroups examined to avoid generalizations. We identify specific areas for which current evidence was less robust, as well as inconsistencies and evidence gaps that inform the need for further rigorous and interdisciplinary approaches to increase our understanding of the US Hispanic population and its potential impact on the public health and cardiovascular health of the total US population. We provide recommendations specific to the 9 domains outlined by the chair to support the development of these culturally tailored and targeted approaches. Conclusions Healthcare professionals and researchers need to consider the impact of culture and ethnicity on health behavior and ultimately health outcomes. There is a need to tailor and develop culturally relevant strategies to engage Hispanics in cardiovascular health promotion and cultivate a larger workforce of healthcare providers, researchers, and allies with the focused goal of improving cardiovascular health and reducing CVD among the US Hispanic population. PMID:25098323

  6. An Assessment of Non-Communicable Diseases, Diabetes, and Related Risk Factors in the Federated States of Micronesia, State of Kosrae: A Systems Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Tolenoa, Nena; Taulung, Livinson; Mongkeya, Maria; Lippwe, Kipier; Aitaoto, Nia

    2013-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) have been identified as a health emergency in the US-affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI).1 This assessment, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was conducted in the Federated States of Micronesia, State of Kosrae and describes the burdens due to NCDs, including diabetes, and assesses the system of service capacity and current activities for service delivery, data collection and reporting as well as identifying the issues that need to be addressed. There has been a 13.9% decline in the population between 2000 and 2010. Findings reveal that the risk factors of poor diet, lack of physical activity, and lifestyle behaviors lead to overweight and obesity and subsequent NCD that are a significant factor in the morbidity and mortality of the population. Leading causes of death were due to nutrition and metabolic diseases followed by diseases of the circulatory system. Data from selected community programs show that the prevalence of overweight and obese participants ranged between 82% and 95% and the rate of reported diabetes ranged from 13% to 14%. Other findings show significant gaps in the system of administrative, clinical, data, and support services to address these NCD. There is no functional data system that is able to identify, register, or track patients with diabetes. Priority administrative and clinical issues were identified that need to be addressed to begin to mitigate the burdens of NCDs among the residents of Kosrae State. PMID:23900387

  7. Detection and molecular characterization of Newcastle disease virus in peafowl (Pavo cristatus) in Haryana State, India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Aman; Maan, Sushila; Mahajan, Nand Kishore; Rana, Virender Pratap; Jindal, Naresh; Batra, Kanisht; Ghosh, Arnab; Mishra, Shiv Kumar; Kapoor, Sanjay; Maan, Narender Singh

    2013-12-01

    Present study was undertaken to investigate the cause of deaths of peafowls in Haryana State. In total, 145 birds were sick and 28 birds were reported dead during July to September 2012. Some of the sick birds were showing signs of shaking of heads, torticollis and paresis. Blood and cloacal swab samples from sick birds along with brain and intestinal tissues from dead birds were collected for further investigation. Although post-mortem examination showed no typical lesions of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) yet raised HI tires against NDV in some serum samples and clinical signs indicated the presence of NDV. One of the brain tissues (NDV/IND2012/01) from the field case was processed and adapted to Vero cell line for virus isolation. The fusion (F) gene based nested RT-PCR (RT-nPCR) confirmed the presence of NDV in all field samples and cell culture isolate. Sequencing of the partial F gene amplicons (216 bp) using the PCR primers as sequencing primers confirmed the PCR results. The deduced amino acid sequences of partial F gene were found to have the amino acid motif (111)GRRQKR/F(117) in the fusion protein cleavage site (FPCS). This amino acid motif is indicative of the velogenic nature of these NDVs. Phylogenetic studies have shown that the virus belonged to class II genotype VII very closely related to virus isolates originated from outbreaks in Western Europe, Israel, Indonesia, Taiwan and India. Phylogenetic grouping of the virus and sequence of FPCS is indicative of pathogenic potential of virus strain circulating in peacocks in Haryana. PMID:24426301

  8. Regional Disparities in Mortality after Ischemic Heart Disease in a Brazilian State from 2006 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Luciano; Zanini, Vanessa; Batilana, Adelia Portero; de Carvalho, Elias Cesar Araujo; Pietrobon, Ricardo; Nihei, Oscar Kenji; de Barros Carvalho, Maria Dalva

    2013-01-01

    Background High technology in the field of interventional cardiology applied in tertiary hospitals has brought enormous benefits in the treatment of ischemic heart disease (IHD). However, IHD mortality rates remain high. We analyzed the relationship between IHD mortality rate and the socioeconomic, demographic, and geographic conditions in 399 cities in Parana state, Brazil, from 2006 to 2010. Methods and Results Data were obtained from the Mortality Information System and the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics and evaluated through Exploratory Spatial Data Analysis. GeoDa™ was used to analyze 29.351 deaths across 399 cities. We found a positive spatial autocorrelation regarding IHD mortality (I = 0.5913, p = 0.001). There was a significant positive association between each of three socioeconomic and demographic indicators and IHD mortality rate: Population Elderly Index (I = 0.3436), Illiteracy Rate (I = 0.1873) and City Development Index (I = 0.0900). In addition, two indicators presented significant negative association with IHD mortality rate: Adjusted Population Size (I = −0.1216) and Gross Domestic Product (I = −0.0864). We also found a positive association between IHD mortality rates and the geographic distances between patients’ city of residence and their corresponding regional referral centers in interventional cardiology (I = 0.3368). Cities located within Regional Health Units with Reference Interventional Cardiology Center presented a significantly lower average specific mortality rate by IHD. The high mortality rate by IHD within the Regional Health Units was not restricted to socioeconomic and demographic variables, but dependent on the distance between each city and their reference interventional cardiology center. Conclusions We conclude that geographic factors play a significant role in IHD mortality within cities. These findings have important policy implications regarding the geographic distribution of cardiac health care networks in Latin America and in other emerging countries. PMID:23527174

  9. Effects of Kamishoyosan, a Traditional Japanese Kampo Medicine, on Pain Conditions in Patients with Intractable Persistent Dentoalveolar Pain Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Young-Chang P.; Makino, Izumi; Aono, Shuichi; Yasui, Hiromichi; Isai, Hideya; Nishihara, Makoto; Hatakeyama, Noboru; Kawai, Takashi; Ikemoto, Tatsunori; Inoue, Shinsuke; Ushida, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    There are patients who suffer from persistent dentoalveolar pain disorder (PDAP) which is a pain of the teeth, either dentoalveolar pain or nonodontogenic toothache, and its cause has not yet been identified. An effective intervention for PDAP has not yet been established. Interventions for patients with PDAP are generally pharmacological treatments such as antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and pregabalin. However, these medicines are not always effective for patients. The pain disorder in the orofacial region including temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and PDAP was effectively treated with our original exercise therapy. However, we did observe some intractable cases of PDAP even when our original exercise therapy was used. This paper presents our findings in which Kamishoyosan improved the pain intensity in 14 out of 15 PDAP patients refractory to our original exercise therapy. PMID:26495024

  10. A case of successful management with splenectomy of intractable ascites due to congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II-induced cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Vassiliadis, Themistoklis; Garipidou, Vassilia; Perifanis, Vassilios; Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Giouleme, Olga; Patsiaoura, Kalliopi; Avramidis, Michalis; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos; Vakalopoulou, Sofia; Tsitouridis, Ioannis; Antoniadis, Antonios; Semertzidis, Panagiotis; Kioumi, Anna; Premetis, Evangelos; Eugenidis, Nikolaos

    2006-01-01

    The congenital dyserythropoietic anemias comprise a group of rare hereditary disorders of erythropoiesis, characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis as the predominant mechanism of anemia and by characteristic morphological aberrations of the majority of erythroblasts in the bone marrow. Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II is the most frequent type. All types of congenital dyserythropoietic anemias distinctly share a high incidence of iron loading. Iron accumulation occurs even in untransfused patients and can result in heart failure and liver cirrhosis. We have reported about a patient who presented with liver cirrhosis and intractable ascites caused by congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II. Her clinical course was further complicated by the development of autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Splenectomy was eventually performed which achieved complete resolution of ascites, increase of hemoglobin concentration and abrogation of transfusion requirements. PMID:16521204

  11. Long-term impact of the ketogenic diet on growth and resting energy expenditure in children with intractable epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    GROLEAU, VERONIQUE; SCHALL, JOAN I; STALLINGS, VIRGINIA A; BERGQVIST, CHRISTINA A

    2014-01-01

    AIM The long-term effects of the ketogenic diet, a high fat diet for treating intractable epilepsy, on resting energy expenditure (REE) are unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of 15 months of ketogenic diet treatment on growth and REE in children with intractable epilepsy. METHOD Growth, body composition and REE were assessed at baseline, 3 and 15 months in 24 children (14 males, 10 females; mean age 5y 6mo (SD 26mo), range 7mo–6y 5mo), 10 with cerebral palsy [CP]). Fifteen were identified as ketogenic diet responders at 3 months and continued on the ketogenic diet until 15 months. These were compared to 75 healthy children (43 males, 32 females; mean age 6y 3mo [SD 21mo] age range 2–9y). REE was expressed as percentage predicted, growth as height (HAz) and weight (WAz) z-scores, and body composition as fat and fat free mass (FFM). RESULTS HAz declined −0.2 and −0.6 from baseline to 3 and 15 months, respectively (p=0.001), while WAz was unchanged. In ketogenic diet responders, FFM, age and CP diagnosis predicted REE (overall R2=0.76, p<0.001) and REE did not change. REE adjusted for FFM was lower (p<0.01) in children with CP at baseline (mean [standard error], −143[51] kcals/d) and 15 months (−198[53] kcals/d) compared to the healthy children. INTERPRETATION After 15 months of the ketogenic diet, linear growth status declined while weight status and REE were unchanged. REE remained reduced in children with CP. PMID:24749520

  12. Argon Plasma Coagulation Therapy Versus Topical Formalin for Intractable Rectal Bleeding and Anorectal Dysfunction After Radiation Therapy for Prostate Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yeoh, Eric; Tam, William; Schoeman, Mark; Moore, James; Thomas, Michelle; Botten, Rochelle; Di Matteo, Addolorata

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the effect of argon plasma coagulation (APC) and topical formalin for intractable rectal bleeding and anorectal dysfunction associated with chronic radiation proctitis. Methods and Materials: Thirty men (median age, 72 years; range, 49-87 years) with intractable rectal bleeding (defined as ≥1× per week and/or requiring blood transfusions) after radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma were randomized to treatment with APC (n=17) or topical formalin (n=13). Each patient underwent evaluations of (1) anorectal symptoms (validated questionnaires, including modified Late Effects in Normal Tissues–Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic and visual analogue scales for rectal bleeding); (2) anorectal motor and sensory function (manometry and graded rectal balloon distension); and (3) anal sphincteric morphology (endoanal ultrasound) before and after the treatment endpoint (defined as reduction in rectal bleeding to 1× per month or better, reduction in visual analogue scales to ≤25 mm, and no longer needing blood transfusions). Results: The treatment endpoint was achieved in 94% of the APC group and 100% of the topical formalin group after a median (range) of 2 (1-5) sessions of either treatment. After a follow-up duration of 111 (29-170) months, only 1 patient in each group needed further treatment. Reductions in rectal compliance and volumes of sensory perception occurred after APC, but no effect on anorectal symptoms other than rectal bleeding was observed. There were no differences between APC and topical formalin for anorectal symptoms and function, nor for anal sphincteric morphology. Conclusions: Argon plasma coagulation and topical formalin had comparable efficacy in the durable control of rectal bleeding associated with chronic radiation proctitis but had no beneficial effect on anorectal dysfunction.

  13. Peripheral and Neuraxial Chemical Neurolysis for the Management of Intractable Lower Extremity Pain in a Patient with Terminal Cancer.

    PubMed

    De Pinto, Mario; Naidu, Ramana K

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 74-year-old man with Stage IV metastatic, multifocal, malignant fibrous histiocytoma (T2b, N1, M1, G4) invading the proximal area of the left lower extremity and resulting in intractable neuropathic pain along the distribution of the femoral nerve. He described the pain as being so severe to cause inability to ambulate without assistance or to sleep in a supine or prone position. After a spinal cord stimulation trial and a trial of intrathecal (IT) hydromorphone, both performed at an outside institution, had failed to achieve adequate pain relief, we decided to perform a femoral nerve chemical neurolysis with phenol under ultrasound (US) guidance. The intervention provided 6 months of almost complete pain relief. With the tumor spreading in girth distally and proximally to the scrotal and pelvic areas as well as to the lungs, and pain returning back to baseline, we proceeded with a second femoral nerve chemical neurolysis. Unfortunately we were not able to achieve adequate pain relief. Therefore we opted to proceed with a diagnostic injection of local anesthetic under fluoroscopic guidance at the left L2, L3, and L4 nerve roots level. This intervention provided 100% pain relief and was followed, a few days later, by chemical neurolysis with phenol 3%. The patient reported complete pain relief with the procedure and no sensory-motor related side effects or complications. He was able to enjoy the last 6 weeks of life with his wife and family, pain-free. With this report we add to the limited literature available regarding the management of intractable cancer pain with chemical neurolysis in and around the epidural space. PMID:26218956

  14. Intractable gelastic seizures during infancy: ictal positron emission tomography (PET) demonstrating epileptiform activity within the hypothalamic hamartoma.

    PubMed

    Shahar, Eli; Goldsher, Dorit; Genizi, Jacob; Ravid, Sarit; Keidar, Zohar

    2008-02-01

    Gelastic seizures comprise a very rare form of epilepsy. They present with recurrent bursts of laughter voices without mirth and are most commonly associated with the evolution of a hypothalamic hamartoma. The purpose of this article is to describe the second reported ictal fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography study in a unique case of an infant with intractable gelastic seizures since the neonatal period associated with a hypothalamic hamartoma. The patient presented at 4 months old with recurrent, almost persistent, gelastic seizures consisting of laughter bouts without mirth. The seizures were noticeable at the first week of life and increased in frequency to last up to 12 hours, namely status gelasticus. These gelastic fits were accompanied with focal motor seizures, including unilateral right-eye blinking and mouth twitching. Developmental mile-stones were intact for age. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cortex demonstrated a large hypothalamic hamartoma within the third ventricle, hampering cerebrovascular fluid drainage of the lateral ventricles. An electroencephalography was nondiagnostic. Ictal fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography demonstrated a large circumscribed hypermetabolic region within the location of the hypothalamic hamartoma, representing localized intense epileptiform activity. The infant became instantly free of all seizure types given minute doses of oral benzodiazepine (clonazepam) and remains completely controlled after 12 months. Her overall development remains intact. This ictal fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography is the second reported study verifying that the main source of the epileptic activity inducing gelastic seizures originates from the hypothalamic hamartoma itself; therefore, a complementary fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography study should be considered in any patient presenting with intractable gelastic seizures, especially in those associated with hypothalamic hamartoma, in order to localize the region of epileptiform activity amenable to surgical resection if intensive drug therapy fails. PMID:18160558

  15. Upregulated P2X3 Receptor Expression in Patients with Intractable Temporal Lobe Epilepsy and in a Rat Model of Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Ma, Li-Min; Xiong, Yan; Huang, Hao; Yuan, Jin-Xian; Li, Ruo-Han; Li, Jia-Ni; Chen, Yang-Mei

    2016-06-01

    Purinergic P2X3 receptors (P2X3Rs) play extensive roles in nerve cells in the central nervous system, particularly in hyperexcitability and calcium (Ca(2+)) influx. However, the role of P2X3Rs in epilepsy has not been previously investigated. To determine the relationship between P2X3Rs and epilepsy, the expression and cellular location of P2X3Rs in patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and in a lithium chloride-pilocarpine-induced chronic rat model of epilepsy were assessed. Furthermore, the function of P2X3Rs was assessed in vitro. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and Western blot analysis were used to evaluate the expression levels of P2X3Rs in brain tissues from TLE patients and an epileptic rat model, whereas immunofluorescence labeling was applied to determine the distribution of target proteins. Whole-cell recording was subsequently performed to identify the influence of P2X3Rs on seizure-like discharges. P2X3Rs were located at the cell bodies and dendrites of neurons with significantly increased expression in the TLE patients and epileptic rat model. In vitro, P2X3R activation accelerated sustained repetitive firing, whereas P2X3R inhibition led to relatively low-frequency discharges. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study provide evidence that upregulated P2X3R expression exists in both epileptic humans and rats and may aggravate the epileptic state in vitro. Thus, P2X3Rs may represent a novel therapeutic target for antiepileptic drugs. PMID:26738991

  16. Recent Advancements in Stem Cell and Gene Therapies For Neurological Disorders and Intractable Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Naegele, Janice R.; Maisano, Xu; Yang, Jia; Royston, Sara; Ribeiro, Efrain

    2010-01-01

    The potential applications of stem cell therapies for treating neurological disorders are enormous. Many laboratories are focusing on stem cell treatments for CNS diseases, including spinal cord injury, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis, stroke, traumatic brain injury, and epilepsy. Among the many stem cell types under testing for neurological treatments, the most common are fetal and adult brain stem cells, embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cells. An expanding toolbox of molecular probes is now available to allow analyses of neural stem cell fates prior to and after transplantation. Concomitantly, protocols are being developed to direct the fates of stem cell derived neural progenitors, and also to screen stem cells for tumorigenicity and aneuploidy. The rapid progress in the field suggests that novel stem cell and gene therapies for neurological disorders are in the pipeline. PMID:20146928

  17. Delayed Diagnosis, Leprosy Reactions, and Nerve Injury Among Individuals With Hansen's Disease Seen at a United States Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Kristoffer E.; Jacob, Jesse T.; Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Kozarsky, Phyllis E.; Wu, Henry M.; Fairley, Jessica K.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hansen's disease (HD), or leprosy, is uncommon in the United States. We sought to describe the characteristics of patients with HD in a US clinic, including an assessment of delays in diagnosis and HD reactions, which have both been associated with nerve damage. Methods. A retrospective chart review was conducted on patients seen at an HD clinic in the southern United States between January 1, 2002 and January 31, 2014. Demographic and clinical characteristics were summarized, including delays in diagnosis, frequency of reactions, and other complications including peripheral neuropathy. Results. Thirty patients were seen during the study time period. The majority of patients were male (73%) and had multibacillary disease (70%). Brazil, Mexico, and the United States were the most frequent of the 14 countries of origin. Hansen's disease “reactions”, severe inflammatory complications, were identified among 75% of patients, and nerve damage was present at diagnosis in 36% of patients. The median length of time between symptom onset and diagnosis was long at 12 months (range, 1–96), but no single factor was associated with a delay in diagnosis. Conclusions. The diagnosis of HD was frequently delayed among patients referred to our US clinic. The high frequency of reactions and neuropathy at diagnosis suggests that further efforts at timely diagnosis and management of this often unrecognized disease is needed to prevent the long-term sequelae associated with irreversible nerve damage. PMID:27186586

  18. Measuring Burden of Diseases in a Rapidly Developing Economy: State of Qatar

    PubMed Central

    Bener, Abdulbari; Zirie, Mahmoud A.; Kim, Eun-Jung; Buz, Rama Al; Zaza, Mouayyad; Al-Nufal, Mohammed; Basha, Basma; Hillhouse, Edward W; Riboli, Elio

    2013-01-01

    Background: The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study has provided a conceptual and methodological framework to quantify and compare the health of populations. Aim: The objective of the study was to assess the national burden of disease in the population of Qatar using the disability-adjusted life year (DALYs) as a measure of disability. Methods: We adapted the methodology described by the World Health Organization for conducting burden of disease to calculate years of life lost due to premature mortality (YLL), years lived with disability (YLD) and disability adjusted life years (DALYs). The study was conducted during the period from November 2011 to October 2012. Results:: The study findings revealed that ischemic heart disease (11.8%) and road traffic accidents (10.3%) were the two leading causes of burden of diseases in Qatar in 2010. The burden of diseases among men (222.04) was found three times more than of women's (71.85). Of the total DALYs, 72.7% was due to non fatal health outcomes and 27.3% was due to premature death. For men, chronic diseases like ischemic heart disease (15.7%) and road traffic accidents (13.7%) accounted great burden and an important source of lost years of healthy life. For women, birth asphyxia and birth trauma (12.6%) and abortion (4.6%) were the two leading causes of disease burden. Conclusion:: The results of the study have shown that the national health priority areas should cover cardiovascular diseases, road traffic accidents and mental health. The burden of diseases among men was three times of women's. PMID:23445701

  19. Gene suppression strategies for dominantly inherited neurodegenerative diseases: lessons from Huntington's disease and spinocerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Keiser, Megan S; Kordasiewicz, Holly B; McBride, Jodi L

    2016-04-15

    RNA-targeting approaches are emerging as viable therapeutics that offer an alternative method to modulate traditionally 'undrugable' targets. In the case of dominantly inherited neurodegenerative diseases, gene suppression strategies can target the underlying cause of these intractable disorders. Polyglutamine diseases are caused by CAG expansions in discrete genes, making them ideal candidates for gene suppression therapies. Here, we discuss the current state of gene suppression approaches for Huntington's disease and the spinocerebellar ataxias, including the use of antisense oligonucleotides, short-interfering RNAs, as well as viral vector-mediated delivery of short hairpin RNAs and artificial microRNAs. We focus on lessons learned from preclinical studies investigating gene suppression therapies for these disorders, particularly in rodent models of disease and in non-human primates. In animal models, recent advances in gene suppression technologies have not only prevented disease progression in a number of cases, but have also reversed existing disease, providing evidence that reducing the expression of disease-causing genes may be of benefit in symptomatic patients. Both allele- and non-allele-specific approaches to gene suppression have made great strides over the past decade, showing efficacy and safety in both small and large animal models. Advances in delivery techniques allow for broad and durable suppression of target genes, have been validated in non-human primates and in some cases, are currently being evaluated in human patients. Finally, we discuss the challenges of developing and delivering gene suppression constructs into the CNS and recent advances of potential therapeutics into the clinic. PMID:26503961

  20. A simplified approach for evaluating multiple test outcomes and multiple disease states in relation to the exercise thallium-201 stress test in suspected coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, S.G.; Watson, D.D.; Gibson, R.S.; Beller, G.A.; Kaul, S. )

    1989-09-01

    This study describes a simplified approach for the interpretation of electrocardiographic and thallium-201 imaging data derived from the same patient during exercise. The 383 patients in this study had also undergone selective coronary arteriography within 3 months of the exercise test. This matrix approach allows for multiple test outcomes (both tests positive, both negative, 1 test positive and 1 negative) and multiple disease states (no coronary artery disease vs 1-vessel vs multivessel coronary artery disease). Because this approach analyzes the results of 2 test outcomes simultaneously rather than serially, it also negates the lack of test independence, if such an effect is present. It is also demonstrated that ST-segment depression on the electrocardiogram and defects on initial thallium-201 images provide conditionally independent information regarding the presence of coronary artery disease in patients without prior myocardial infarction. In contrast, ST-segment depression on the electrocardiogram and redistribution on the delayed thallium-201 images may not provide totally independent information regarding the presence of exercise-induced ischemia in patients with or without myocardial infarction.

  1. Identification of lymphoproliferative disease virus in wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) in the southeastern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The eight cases described herein represent the first reports of lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) infection in wild turkeys and the first identification of LPDV in North America. Systemic lymphoproliferative disease was presumably the cause of morbidity and mortality in five of the eight turk...

  2. Software for generating liability distributions for pedigrees conditional on their observed disease states and covariates.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Desmond D; Sham, Pak C; Knight, Jo; Wickham, Harvey; Landau, Sabine

    2010-02-01

    For many multifactorial diseases, aetiology is poorly understood. A major research aim is the identification of disease predictors (environmental, biological, and genetic markers). In order to achieve this, a two-stage approach is proposed. The initial or synthesis stage combines observed pedigree data with previous genetic epidemiological research findings, to produce estimates of pedigree members' disease risk and predictions of their disease liability. A further analysis stage uses the latter as inputs to look for associations with potential disease markers. The incorporation of previous research findings into an analysis should lead to power gains. It also allows separate predictions for environmental and genetic liabilities to be generated. This should increase power for detecting disease predictors that are environmental or genetic in nature. Finally, the approach brings pragmatic benefits in terms of data reduction and synthesis, improving comprehensibility, and facilitating the use of existing statistical genetics tools. In this article we present a statistical model and Gibbs sampling approach to generate liability predictions for multifactorial disease for the synthesis stage. We have implemented the approach in a software program. We apply this program to a specimen disease pedigree, and discuss the results produced, comparing its results with those generated under a more naïve model. We also detail simulation studies that validate the software's operation. PMID:19771574

  3. Cat scratch disease in the United States: an analysis of three national databases.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, L A; Perkins, B A; Wenger, J D

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Current knowledge of the epidemiology of cat scratch disease is based primarily on information from case series. We used three national databases to obtain more representative data to determine the incidence and demographics of cat scratch disease. METHODS. Records coded with the diagnosis of cat scratch disease from two hospital discharge databases and an ambulatory care database were analyzed. Costs of diagnostic tests and hospitalization were obtained from a sample of providers and published data. RESULTS. The incidence of patients discharged from hospitals with a diagnosis of cat scratch disease was between 0.77 and 0.86 per 100,000 population per year. Fifty-five percent of the case patients were 18 years of age or younger. Males accounted for 60% of cases. Incidence varied by season; approximately 60% of case patients were discharged in the months September through January. The estimated incidence of disease in ambulatory patients was 9.3 per 100,000 population per year. On the basis of these rates, we estimated the annual health care cost of the disease to be more than $12 million. CONCLUSIONS. The rates and seasonality of cat scratch disease found in this study were consistent with previous reports. Adults represented a higher percentage of the total than reported in previous case series, suggesting that the disease may affect more adults than previously recognized. PMID:8259799

  4. Quantitative Network Measures as Biomarkers for Classifying Prostate Cancer Disease States: A Systems Approach to Diagnostic Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Dehmer, Matthias; Mueller, Laurin A. J.; Emmert-Streib, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Identifying diagnostic biomarkers based on genomic features for an accurate disease classification is a problem of great importance for both, basic medical research and clinical practice. In this paper, we introduce quantitative network measures as structural biomarkers and investigate their ability for classifying disease states inferred from gene expression data from prostate cancer. We demonstrate the utility of our approach by using eigenvalue and entropy-based graph invariants and compare the results with a conventional biomarker analysis of the underlying gene expression data. PMID:24236006

  5. The Role of Resting State Networks in Focal Neocortical Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Bandt, S. Kathleen; Bundy, David T.; Hawasli, Ammar H.; Ayoub, Kareem W.; Sharma, Mohit; Hacker, Carl D.; Pahwa, Mrinal; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The role of resting state functional networks in epilepsy is incompletely understood. While some pathologic diagnoses have been shown to have maintained but altered resting state connectivity, others have implicated resting state connectivity in disease progression. However little is known about how these resting state networks influence the behavior of a focal neocortical seizure. Methods Using data taken from invasively monitored patients with intractable focal neocortical epilepsy, we evaluated network connectivity (as determined by oscillatory covariance of the slow cortical potential (<0.5 Hz)) as it relates to neocortical seizure foci both in the interictal and ictal states. Results Similar to what has been shown in the past for sleep and anesthesia, electophysiologic resting state networks that are defined by this slow cortical potential covariance maintain their topographic correlation structure throughout an ictal event. Moreover, in the context of focal epilepsy in which the seizure has a specific site of onset, seizure propagation is not chaotic or random. Rather, the seizure (reflected by an elevation of high frequency power) preferentially propagates along the network that contains the seizure onset zone. Significance Taken together, these findings further undergird the fundamental role of resting state networks, provide novel insights into the network-influenced behavior of seizures, and potentially identify additional targets for surgical disconnection including informing the location for the completion of multiple subpial transections (MSPTs). PMID:25247680

  6. Monitoring the Spread of Swine Enteric Coronavirus Diseases in the United States in the Absence of a Regulatory Framework

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Andres M.; Alba, Anna; Goede, Dane; McCluskey, Brian; Morrison, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The reporting and monitoring of swine enteric coronavirus diseases (SECD), including porcine epidemic diarrhea virus and porcine delta coronavirus, in the United States have been challenging because of the initial absence of a regulatory framework and the emerging nature of these diseases. The National Animal Health Laboratory Network, the Emergency Management and Response System, and the Swine Health Monitoring Project were used to monitor the disease situation between May 2013 and March 2015. Important differences existed between and among them in terms of nature and extent of reporting. Here, we assess the implementation of these systems from different perspectives, including a description and comparison of collected data, disease metrics, usefulness, simplicity, flexibility, acceptability, representativeness, timeliness, and stability. This assessment demonstrates the limitations that the absence of premises identification imposes on certain animal health surveillance and response databases, and the importance of federally regulated frameworks in collecting accurate information in a timely manner. This study also demonstrates the value that the voluntary and producer-organized systems may have in monitoring emerging diseases. The results from all three data sources help to establish the baseline information on SECD epidemiological dynamics after almost 3 years of disease occurrence in the country. PMID:27014703

  7. Monitoring the Spread of Swine Enteric Coronavirus Diseases in the United States in the Absence of a Regulatory Framework.

    PubMed

    Perez, Andres M; Alba, Anna; Goede, Dane; McCluskey, Brian; Morrison, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The reporting and monitoring of swine enteric coronavirus diseases (SECD), including porcine epidemic diarrhea virus and porcine delta coronavirus, in the United States have been challenging because of the initial absence of a regulatory framework and the emerging nature of these diseases. The National Animal Health Laboratory Network, the Emergency Management and Response System, and the Swine Health Monitoring Project were used to monitor the disease situation between May 2013 and March 2015. Important differences existed between and among them in terms of nature and extent of reporting. Here, we assess the implementation of these systems from different perspectives, including a description and comparison of collected data, disease metrics, usefulness, simplicity, flexibility, acceptability, representativeness, timeliness, and stability. This assessment demonstrates the limitations that the absence of premises identification imposes on certain animal health surveillance and response databases, and the importance of federally regulated frameworks in collecting accurate information in a timely manner. This study also demonstrates the value that the voluntary and producer-organized systems may have in monitoring emerging diseases. The results from all three data sources help to establish the baseline information on SECD epidemiological dynamics after almost 3 years of disease occurrence in the country. PMID:27014703

  8. Multidrug-resistant nontyphoidal Salmonella in New York state's foodborne diseases active surveillance network counties.

    PubMed

    Solghan, Suzanne M; Dumas, Nellie B; Root, Timothy P; Quinlan, Tammy M; Armstrong, Leeanna R; Spina, Nancy L; Zansky, Shelley M

    2010-02-01

    With the emergence of multidrug-resistant nontyphoidal (NT) Salmonella, knowledge of resistance patterns is critical for appropriate presumptive treatment. This report describes the prevalence and trends of NT Salmonella antimicrobial susceptibility within the New York State (NYS) Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet). The NYS Department of Health, Wadsworth Center Public Health Laboratory tested all Salmonella isolates from the NYS FoodNet catchment area between May 2003 and December 2007 for antimicrobial susceptibility to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfisoxazole, tetracycline, nalidixic acid, and ciprofloxacin. Isolate susceptibility results were linked to their corresponding demographic and clinical data and analyzed. Multidrug-resistant isolates were defined as resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfisoxazole, and tetracycline (R-type ACSSuT). Antimicrobial susceptibility for 2189 FoodNet cases (98.5% of total cases) showed 79.6% pansusceptible, 6.9% R-type ACSSuT, and 13.5% resistant to at least one antimicrobial agent but not R-type ACSSuT. Four (0.2%) isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin. From 2004 to 2007, cases with R-type ACSSuT significantly decreased from 8.7% (37/424) to 4.8% (24/499) (p < 0.01). Serotypes with the highest proportion of R-type ACSSuT included Salmonella Typhimurium 17.9% (79/444), and Salmonella Newport 29.1% (51/175). Among Salmonella Typhimurium isolates, over 40% of the African-American cases (19/46) had R-type ACSSuT isolates, compared with 15.7% of the Caucasian cases (58/369) (p < 0.01). R-type ACSSuT Salmonella Typhimurium cases were hospitalized (41.8%) more frequently than pansusceptible Salmonella Typhimurium cases (24.9%), after controlling for age (p < 0.05). Length of hospitalization was not significantly different. Although R-type ACSSuT NT Salmonella has decreased since 2003 within the NYS FoodNet catchment area, monitoring resistance patterns remains important in identifying emerging resistant strains, vulnerable populations, and determining appropriate presumptive treatment regimens. The higher rate of R-type ACSSuT among the African-American cases requires further study. PMID:19821741

  9. State of the art; microbiology in health and disease. Intestinal bacterial flora in autism.

    PubMed

    Finegold, Sydney M

    2011-12-01

    Autism of the regressive variety is selected as an example of the importance of intestinal bacterial microflora in disease other than classical infection. Our studies have indicated that intestinal bacteria play a role in this disease since it responds to oral vancomycin, a drug that is not absorbed from the GI tract. Pyrosequencing studies document an abnormal gut microflora in regressive autism subjects as compared to controls. Finally, we present preliminary evidence suggesting that Desulfovibrio may play a key role in this disease. PMID:21524713

  10. Intractable myoclonic seizures in an allogeneic stem cell transplant recipient: A rare case of myoclonic epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Robuccio, Anna; Ssentongo, Paddy; Sather, Michael D.; Claxton, David F.; Gilliam, Frank G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Myoclonus may be a rare complication of stem cell transplant but has limited discussion in the scientific literature. Case We present a case of an acute myeloid leukemia survivor who developed refractory myoclonic epilepsy four years after graft versus host disease (GVHD) developed six days following matched unrelated allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Discussion Graft versus host disease occurs in 30–50% of allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients and may cause pharmacoresistant myoclonic epilepsy; however, the mechanisms by which GVHD leads to recurrent myoclonic seizures are not well understood (Lee, 2005) [1]. The paucity of clinical reports of such manifestation makes it difficult to diagnose and effectively manage these patients. PMID:26288756

  11. Intractable and highly active relapsing multiple sclerosis – role of alemtuzumab

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Divyanshu; Cano, Christopher A; Stuve, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Alemtuzumab is a humanized recombinant monoclonal antibody that was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for the management of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). It has been utilized for the management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, bone marrow and renal transplantation, or graft versus host disease. Because of its immunomodulatory properties, it was brought into clinical development in MS. One Phase II (CAMMS223) and two Phase III clinical trials (CARE-MSI and -II) have evaluated the safety and efficacy of alemtuzumab in patients with relapsing–remitting MS. Even though its efficacy profile and long-lasting effect have attracted much interest among physicians and patients, it has significant potential adverse effects that may limit its use to patients with active disease. Here, we review the history of drug development of alemtuzumab. Furthermore, we outline the postulated mechanisms of action, clinical evidence, and safety of alemtuzumab for its use as a disease-modifying agent in active and highly active MS. PMID:26425095

  12. Impact of metabolic syndrome on the risk of cardiovascular disease mortality in the United States and in Japan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Longjian; Miura, Katsuyuki; Fujiyoshi, Akira; Kadota, Aya; Miyagawa, Naoko; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Okayama, Akira; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu

    2014-01-01

    The United States has a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality than Japan, but it is unknown how much of the difference in MS accounts for the mortality difference. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of MS on the excess CVD mortality in the United States compared with that in Japan. Data from the United States Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III; n = 12,561) and the Japanese National Integrated Project for Prospective Observation of Noncommunicable Disease and Its Trends in Aged (NIPPON DATA; n = 7,453) were analyzed. MS was defined as ≥3 of 5 risk factors (obesity, high blood pressure, decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated glycosylated hemoglobin, and elevated triglycerides). The results show that after a median of 13.8 years of follow-up in the United States, 1,683 patients died from CVD (11.75 per 1,000 person-years), and after a median of 15 years of follow-up in Japan, 369 patients died from CVD (3.56 per 1,000 person-years). The age-adjusted prevalence of MS was 26.7% in the United States and 19.3% in Japan. Of 5 MS factors, obesity, high blood pressure, elevated triglycerides, and glycosylated hemoglobin in the United States, and high blood pressure and elevated glycosylated hemoglobin in Japan were significant risk factors for CVD mortality. Estimates of 13.3% and 44% of the excess CVD mortality for the United States could be explained by the higher prevalence of MS and MS plus baseline CVD history than in Japan. In conclusion, the present study is the first to quantitatively demonstrate that MS and MS plus baseline CVD history may significantly contribute to the explanation of excess CVD mortality in the United States compared with Japan. PMID:24169008

  13. State of diagnostic quandary solved by modern technology: a rare case of Madelung's disease.

    PubMed

    Kyaw, Htoo; Grillo, Michael; Lin, Aung Naing; Kapp, David A

    2016-01-01

    Madelung's disease is a neglected metabolic disease characterised by generalised multiple fatty tissue deposits. A 64-year-old Caucasian woman presented with generalised weakness and symptomatic hypoglycaemia with altered mental status. Physical examination showed very distinct physical characteristics with multiple lumps distributed over the upper body. Her neurological symptoms were solved by giving intravenous glucose and optimisation of medical treatment. Even though she had unique characteristics of Madelung's disease, many physicians, on several occasions, failed to recognise her 'hidden diagnosis'. This diagnostic uncertainty was able to be solved by searching the Internet for similar clinical features and images. This case demonstrates characteristics and unique features of a rare disease that can be seen in a female patient even though it is mostly found in males. PMID:26851254

  14. Surveillance for pneumonic plague in the United States during an international emergency: a model for control of imported emerging diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, C. L.; Dennis, D. T.; Tipple, M. A.; Campbell, G. L.; McCance, C. R.; Gubler, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    In September 1994, in response to a reported epidemic of plague in India, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) enhanced surveillance in the United States for imported pneumonic plague. Plague information materials were rapidly developed and distributed to U.S. public health officials by electronic mail, facsimile, and expedited publication. Information was also provided to medical practitioners and the public by recorded telephone messages and facsimile transmission. Existing quarantine protocols were modified to effect active surveillance for imported plague cases at U.S. airports. Private physicians and state and local health departments were relied on in a passive surveillance system to identify travelers with suspected plague not detected at airports. From September 27 to October 27, the surveillance system identified 13 persons with suspected plague; no case was confirmed. This coordinated response to an international health emergency may serve as a model for detecting other emerging diseases and preventing their importation. PMID:8964057

  15. Host and Potential Vector Susceptibility to an Emerging Orbivirus in the United States: Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease Virus Serotype 6.

    PubMed

    Ruder, M G; Stallknecht, D E; Allison, A B; Mead, D G; Carter, D L; Howerth, E W

    2016-05-01

    Epizootic hemorrhagic disease viruses (EHDVs) are orbiviruses transmitted byCulicoidesbiting midges to domestic and wild ruminants. EHDV-1 and EHDV-2 are endemic in the United States, where epizootic hemorrhagic disease is the most significant viral disease of white-tailed deer (WTD;Odocoileus virginianus) and reports of epizootic hemorrhagic disease in cattle are increasing. In 2006, a reassortant EHDV-6 was isolated from dead WTD in Indiana and has been detected each subsequent year over a wide geographic region. Since EHDV-6 is not a historically endemic serotype in the United States, it is important to understand infection outcome in potential hosts. Specifically, we aimed to evaluate the pathogenicity of the virus in 2 primary US ruminant hosts (WTD and cattle) and the susceptibility of a confirmed US vector (Culicoides sonorensis). Five WTD and 4 cattle were inoculated with >10(6)TCID50EHDV-6 by intradermal and subcutaneous injection. All 5 WTD exhibited moderate to severe disease, and 3 died. Viremia was first detected 3 to 5 days postinfection (dpi) with surviving animals seroconverting by 10 dpi. Two of 4 inoculated cattle had detectable viremia, 5 to 10 dpi and 7 to 24 dpi, respectively. No clinical, hematologic, or pathologic abnormalities were observed. Antibodies were detected by 10 dpi in 3 of 4 cows.C. sonorensiswere fed on WTD blood spiked with EHDV-6 and held for 4 to 14 days postfeeding at 25°C. From 4 to 14 days postfeeding, 19 of 171 midges were virus isolation positive and 6 of 171 had ≥10(2.7)TCID50EHDV-6. Although outcomes varied, these studies demonstrate the susceptibility of ruminant and vector hosts in the United States for this recently emerged EHDV serotype. PMID:26459518

  16. Thoracic lymphadenopathy in benign diseases: A state of the art review.

    PubMed

    Nin, Carlos Schüler; de Souza, Vinícius Valério Silveira; do Amaral, Ricardo Holderbaum; Neto, Roberto Schuhmacher; Tronco Alves, Giordano Rafael; Marchiori, Edson; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Balbinot, Fernanda; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Santana, Pablo; Portugal Gomes, Antônio Carlos; Hochhegger, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    Lymphadenopathy is a common radiological finding in many thoracic diseases and may be caused by a variety of infectious, inflammatory, and neoplastic conditions. This review aims to describe the patterns of mediastinal and hilar lymphadenopathy found in benign diseases in immunocompetent patients. Computed tomography is the method of choice for the evaluation of lymphadenopathy, as it is able to demonstrate increased size of individual nodes, abnormalities of the interface between the mediastinum and lung, invasion of surrounding fat, coalescence of adjacent nodes, obliteration of the mediastinal fat, and hypo- and hyperdensity in lymph nodes. Intravenous contrast enhancement may be needed to help distinguish nodes from vessels. The most frequent infections resulting in this finding are tuberculosis and fungal disease (particularly histoplasmosis and coccidioidomycosis). Sarcoidosis is a relatively frequent cause of lymphadenopathy in young adults, and can be distinguished from other diseases - especially when enlarged lymph nodes are found to be multiple and symmetrical. Other conditions discussed in this review are silicosis, drug reactions, amyloidosis, heart failure, Castleman's disease, viral infections, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:26860219

  17. The unfolded state of the murine prion protein and properties of single-point mutants related to human prion diseases.

    PubMed

    Gerum, Christian; Schlepckow, Kai; Schwalbe, Harald

    2010-08-01

    The prion protein can exist both in a normal cellular isoform and in a pathogenic conformational isoform. The latter is responsible for the development of different neurodegenerative diseases, for example Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease or fatal familial insomnia. To convert the native benign state of the protein into a highly ordered fibrillar aggregate, large-scale rearrangements of the tertiary structure are necessary during the conversion process and intermediates that are at least partially unfolded are present during fibril formation. In addition to the sporadic conversion into the pathogenic isoform, more than 20 familial diseases are known that are caused by single point mutations increasing the probability of aggregation and neurodegeneration. Here, we demonstrate that the chemically denatured states of the mouse and human prion proteins have very similar structural and dynamic characteristics. Initial studies on the single point mutants E196K, F198S, V203I and R208H of the oxidized mouse construct, which are related to human prion diseases, reveal significant differences in the rate of aggregation. Aggregation for mutants V203I and R208H is slower than it is for the wild type, and the constructs E196K and F198S show accelerated aggregation. These differences in aggregation behaviour are not correlated with the thermal stability of the mutants, indicating different mechanisms promoting the conformational conversion process. PMID:20541558

  18. Surveillance for waterborne disease outbreaks associated with drinking water and other nonrecreational water - United States, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    2013-09-01

    Despite advances in water management and sanitation, waterborne disease outbreaks continue to occur in the United States. CDC collects data on waterborne disease outbreaks submitted from all states and territories through the Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System. During 2009-2010, the most recent years for which finalized data are available, 33 drinking water-associated outbreaks were reported, comprising 1,040 cases of illness, 85 hospitalizations, and nine deaths. Legionella accounted for 58% of outbreaks and 7% of illnesses, and Campylobacter accounted for 12% of outbreaks and 78% of illnesses. The most commonly identified outbreak deficiencies in drinking water-associated outbreaks were Legionella in plumbing systems (57.6%), untreated ground water (24.2%), and distribution system deficiencies (12.1%), suggesting that efforts to identify and correct these deficiencies could prevent many outbreaks and illnesses associated with drinking water. In addition to the drinking water outbreaks, 12 outbreaks associated with other nonrecreational water were reported, comprising 234 cases of illness, 51 hospitalizations, and six deaths. Legionella accounted for 58% of these outbreaks, 42% of illnesses, 96% of hospitalizations, and all deaths. Public health, regulatory, and industry professionals can use this information to target prevention efforts against pathogens, infrastructure problems, and water sources associated with waterborne disease outbreaks. PMID:24005226

  19. An Assessment of Non-Communicable Diseases, Diabetes, and Related Risk Factors in the Federated States of Micronesia, State of Pohnpei: A Systems Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Anson, Robina; Keller, Elizabeth; Lippwe, Kipier; Aitaoto, Nia

    2013-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) have been identified as a health emergency in the US-affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI).1 This assessment, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was conducted in the Federated States of Micronesia, State of Pohnpei and describes the burden due to selected NCD (diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, stroke, chronic kidney disease); and assesses the system of service capacity and current activities for service delivery, data collection and reporting as well as identifies the issues that need to be addressed. Findings reveal that the risk factors of poor diet, lack of physical activity, and lifestyle behaviors lead to overweight and obesity and subsequent NCD that are significant factors in the morbidity and mortality of the population. Leading causes of death were due to heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and hypertension. Population survey data show that 32.1% of the adult population had diabetes with a higher rate among women (37.1%) when compared to men (26.4%). The data also showed that 73.1% of the adult population was overweight or obese. Other findings show significant gaps in the system of administrative, clinical, data, and support services to address these NCD. There is no overall planning document for the prevention and control of NCDs or diabetes. There is evidence of little communication among the medical and health care providers which leads to fragmentation of care and loss of continuity of care. Based on some of the findings, priority issues and problems that need to be addressed for the administrative and clinical systems are identified. PMID:23900565

  20. Emergency care physicians' knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to surveillance for foodborne disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    James, Lyn; Roberts, Rebecca; Jones, Roderick C; Watson, John T; Hota, Bala N; Kampe, Linda M; Weinstein, Robert A; Gerber, Susan I

    2008-04-15

    During the past decade, the incidence of certain bacterial pathogens that are commonly transmitted through food in the United States has decreased. Concurrently, the emergency department has become an increasingly common setting for health care. Because public health surveillance for bacterial foodborne diseases fundamentally depends on stool cultures, we conducted a survey of physicians who attended an emergency medicine conference to describe knowledge, attitudes, and practices among this provider population. A convenience sample of 162 physicians, representing 34 states, provided responses. Thirty-eight percent reported having ordered a stool culture for the most recent patient with acute diarrheal illness examined in the emergency department, but only 26% of the physicians subsequently received the stool culture results. For only 2 pathogens (Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella species) did at least one-half of the respondents provide the correct response regarding whether selected diarrheal disease pathogens were reportable in their state. Responses indicated familiarity with the Infectious Diseases Society of America's practice guidelines regarding stool cultures for patients with severe symptoms and a history of travel, but less so with characteristics of public health importance (i.e., attendance at day care and employment as a restaurant cook). We recommend that educational opportunities be made available to emergency care physicians that highlight the public health significance of acute diarrheal illness and that reinforce guidelines regarding culturing stool specimens, making recommendations to prevent further transmission, and reporting to local health authorities. PMID:18444866

  1. Improved prediction of complex diseases by common genetic markers: state of the art and further perspectives.

    PubMed

    Müller, Bent; Wilcke, Arndt; Boulesteix, Anne-Laure; Brauer, Jens; Passarge, Eberhard; Boltze, Johannes; Kirsten, Holger

    2016-03-01

    Reliable risk assessment of frequent, but treatable diseases and disorders has considerable clinical and socio-economic relevance. However, as these conditions usually originate from a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors, precise prediction remains a considerable challenge. The current progress in genotyping technology has resulted in a substantial increase of knowledge regarding the genetic basis of such diseases and disorders. Consequently, common genetic risk variants are increasingly being included in epidemiological models to improve risk prediction. This work reviews recent high-quality publications targeting the prediction of common complex diseases. To be included in this review, articles had to report both, numerical measures of prediction performance based on traditional (non-genetic) risk factors, as well as measures of prediction performance when adding common genetic variants to the model. Systematic PubMed-based search finally identified 55 eligible studies. These studies were compared with respect to the chosen approach and methodology as well as results and clinical impact. Phenotypes analysed included tumours, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular diseases. All studies applied one or more statistical measures reporting on calibration, discrimination, or reclassification to quantify the benefit of including SNPs, but differed substantially regarding the methodological details that were reported. Several examples for improved risk assessments by considering disease-related SNPs were identified. Although the add-on benefit of including SNP genotyping data was mostly moderate, the strategy can be of clinical relevance and may, when being paralleled by an even deeper understanding of disease-related genetics, further explain the development of enhanced predictive and diagnostic strategies for complex diseases. PMID:26839113

  2. Phytochemical Compounds and Protection from Cardiovascular Diseases: A State of the Art.

    PubMed

    Pagliaro, Beniamino; Santolamazza, Caterina; Simonelli, Francesca; Rubattu, Speranza

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases represent a worldwide relevant socioeconomical problem. Cardiovascular disease prevention relies also on lifestyle changes, including dietary habits. The cardioprotective effects of several foods and dietary supplements in both animal models and in humans have been explored. It was found that beneficial effects are mainly dependent on antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, also involving modulation of mitochondrial function. Resveratrol is one of the most studied phytochemical compounds and it is provided with several benefits in cardiovascular diseases as well as in other pathological conditions (such as cancer). Other relevant compounds are Brassica oleracea, curcumin, and berberine, and they all exert beneficial effects in several diseases. In the attempt to provide a comprehensive reference tool for both researchers and clinicians, we summarized in the present paper the existing literature on both preclinical and clinical cardioprotective effects of each mentioned phytochemical. We structured the discussion of each compound by analyzing, first, its cellular molecular targets of action, subsequently focusing on results from applications in both ex vivo and in vivo models, finally discussing the relevance of the compound in the context of human diseases. PMID:26504846

  3. Differential diagnosis in inflammatory bowel disease colitis: State of the art and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Vecchi, Maurizio; Pastorelli, Luca; Neurath, Markus F; Neumann, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Distinction between Crohn’s disease of the colon-rectum and ulcerative colitis or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) type unclassified can be of pivotal importance for a tailored clinical management, as each entity often involves specific therapeutic strategies and prognosis. Nonetheless, no gold standard is available and the uncertainty of diagnosis may frequently lead to misclassification or repeated examinations. Hence, we have performed a literature search to address the problem of differential diagnosis in IBD colitis, revised current and emerging diagnostic tools and refined disease classification strategies. Nowadays, the differential diagnosis is an untangled issue, and the proper diagnosis cannot be reached in up to 10% of patients presenting with IBD colitis. This topic is receiving emerging attention, as medical therapies, surgical approaches and leading prognostic outcomes require more and more disease-specific strategies in IBD patients. The optimization of standard diagnostic approaches based on clinical features, biomarkers, radiology, endoscopy and histopathology appears to provide only marginal benefits. Conversely, emerging diagnostic techniques in the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy, molecular pathology, genetics, epigenetics, metabolomics and proteomics have already shown promising results. Novel advanced endoscopic imaging techniques and biomarkers can shed new light for the differential diagnosis of IBD, better reflecting diverse disease behaviors based on specific pathogenic pathways. PMID:25574078

  4. Phytochemical Compounds and Protection from Cardiovascular Diseases: A State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Pagliaro, Beniamino; Santolamazza, Caterina; Simonelli, Francesca; Rubattu, Speranza

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases represent a worldwide relevant socioeconomical problem. Cardiovascular disease prevention relies also on lifestyle changes, including dietary habits. The cardioprotective effects of several foods and dietary supplements in both animal models and in humans have been explored. It was found that beneficial effects are mainly dependent on antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, also involving modulation of mitochondrial function. Resveratrol is one of the most studied phytochemical compounds and it is provided with several benefits in cardiovascular diseases as well as in other pathological conditions (such as cancer). Other relevant compounds are Brassica oleracea, curcumin, and berberine, and they all exert beneficial effects in several diseases. In the attempt to provide a comprehensive reference tool for both researchers and clinicians, we summarized in the present paper the existing literature on both preclinical and clinical cardioprotective effects of each mentioned phytochemical. We structured the discussion of each compound by analyzing, first, its cellular molecular targets of action, subsequently focusing on results from applications in both ex vivo and in vivo models, finally discussing the relevance of the compound in the context of human diseases. PMID:26504846

  5. Assessment of 6-sulfatoxymelatonin rhythms and melatonin response to light in disease states: lessons from cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Montagnese, Sara; Middleton, Benita; Corrias, Michela; Mani, Ali Reza; Skene, Debra J; Morgan, Marsha Y

    2015-03-01

    Circadian rhythmicity and non-visual sensitivity to light can be assessed, in healthy subjects, by measuring the rhythm of the urinary melatonin metabolite 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) and by determining the response of plasma melatonin to nocturnal retinal light exposure, respectively. However, the validity of these techniques has not been assessed in disease states in which disruption of the circadian rhythm is known or suspected to occur. Thus, the aims of this study were as follows: (i) to assess the reliability of circadian aMT6s profile estimates derived from 36 h versus 56 h urine collections and (ii) to test different models for calculating melatonin suppression in response to light in healthy volunteers and patients with cirrhosis. Twenty patients with biopsy-proven cirrhosis and 10 matched healthy volunteers undertook: (i) separate 36 - and 56-h urine collections, under controlled conditions, for cosinor analysis of the urinary aMT6s profile; (ii) a melatonin suppression test, comprising of a baseline night, during which subjects were woken and asked to sit in front of a switched off light sphere, and an experimental night, identically executed, except that the light sphere was switched on and the subjects were exposed to white light (4.1 × 10(14) photons/cm(2)/s) for 30 min. Alternative approaches to the calculation of melatonin suppression were taken, with/without inclusion of the baseline night. Eighteen patients and eight healthy volunteers had matched analysable 36 - and 56-h urinary samples. Cosinor analysis showed a significant fit in 88% of the remaining 56 h collections, and 48% of the remaining 36-h collections. Thus, eight patients and five healthy volunteers had matched analysable samples for cosinor analysis. In the healthy volunteers, aMT6s profile indices obtained using the 36 - and the 56-h collections did not differ significantly. In contrast, considerably more variability was observed in patients [i.e. the difference in the aMT6s peak time was 0.5 ± 1.7 h (limits of agreement: -3.9; +2.9 h)]. No difficulties were encountered in obtaining suppression estimates by use of the experimental night only. In contrast, suppression estimates obtained by use of both nights were considered inaccurate in one (11%) healthy volunteer and in 5 (28%) patients, primarily because: (i) melatonin concentrations at the beginning of light administration were significantly different on baseline and experimental night; (ii) the rise in melatonin was inconsistent on baseline night; and (iii) the shape of the rising phase of melatonin was different on baseline and experimental night. In conclusion, shorter urine collections lead to a higher number of profiles with no significant cosinor fit, and differences in cosinor indices obtained from the 36 - and 56-h collections were considerable, especially in patients. Thus, 56-h collections are probably advisable. Use of both baseline and experimental nights to calculate melatonin suppression often resulted in increased variation and confounding, due to point oscillations in melatonin concentration and lack of repeatability of the melatonin profiles on the two nights. Thus, use of the experimental night only is probably advisable. PMID:25264562

  6. Emergency care necessity for sickle cell disease patients at Rio de Janeiro State Coordinating Blood Bank

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Mario Sant'Anna; de Matos, Haroldo José; Fidlarczyk, Delaine

    2011-01-01

    Hemoglobinopathies, in particular sickle cell disease, is the most prevalent group of genetically transmitted diseases in the Brazilian population and should thus be treated as a public health problem. Many of these patients frequently present with complications and require emergency care at the blood bank Coordinator in Rio de Janeiro. This study was developed with the aim of characterizing the emergency assistance required by sickle cell disease patients registered in the blood bank from January 2007 to December 2008. A retrospective study of medical records was made of 78, mostly children, patients from the date of their registration until December 2009. Most attendances (63.7%) were not considered emergency care. The use of specialized services for cases that do not require this level of complexity may saturate the capacity of these centers. However, delay of intervention for complications due to the transportation of patients to specialist centers may lead to deterioration in the clinical condition. PMID:23284258

  7. Early renal failure as a cardiovascular disease: Focus on lipoprotein(a) and prothrombotic state

    PubMed Central

    Catena, Cristiana; Colussi, GianLuca; Nait, Francesca; Pezzutto, Francesca; Martinis, Flavia; Sechi, Leonardo A

    2015-01-01

    Patients with renal failure are at increased risk of cardiovascular events even at the earliest stages of disease. In addition to many classic cardiovascular risk factors, many conditions that are commonly identified as emerging risk factors might contribute to occurrence of cardiovascular disease. Changes in circulating levels of many of these emerging risk factors have been demonstrated in patients with early stages of renal failure caused by different types of renal disease and have been associated with detection of cardiovascular complications. However, for most of these factors evidence of benefits of correction on cardiovascular outcome is missing. In this article, we comment on the role of lipoprotein(a) and prothrombotic factors as potential contributors to cardiovascular events in patients with early renal failure. PMID:26167461

  8. Intelligent biomedical clothing for personal health and disease management: state of the art and future vision.

    PubMed

    Lymberis, Andreas; Olsson, Silas

    2003-01-01

    Telemedicine has been introduced to overcome distance in order to get prompt access to medical knowledge and appropriate health care. More recently, work in telemedicine has aimed at developing solutions to support the management of chronic diseases such as diabetes, and lung and heart diseases, as well as to provide support for home care services. Telemedicine is also entering the fields of health promotion/prevention disease, life style management, and well-being. The evolution and broadening of telemedicine gives birth to a nomenclature that includes "e-health," "telehealth," and "telecare." The latest developments in microsystems and nanotechnologies as well as in information processing and communication technologies allow miniaturization and non-invasive smart monitoring of physiological and physical data. Ongoing cutting-edge multidisciplinary research in textile fibers, biomedical sensors, and wireless and mobile telecommunications integrated with telemedicine, aims at developing intelligent biomedical clothing (IBC) that could pave the way to support personalized management of health and diseases at the point of need and at any time. In this study, we aim to describe the current status of multidisciplinary research and development of IBC, based on bibliographic research and reports from seminars, workshops, conferences, and working groups. A further aim is to inform the developers, the decision makers, and users in the health and healthcare sector regarding future solutions to support personalized health care and disease management. Both the textile sector and healthcare sector are looking with great interest at the innovative products and applications that could result from the integration of microsystems, nanotechnologies, biomedical sensors, textiles, and mobile telecommunications. For health monitoring, disease prevention and management, rehabilitation, and sport medicine, IBC may offer, in the mid-term future, a unique, wearable non-obtrusive telemedicine platform for individualized services that is readily accessible and of good quality. PMID:14980096

  9. An Asian Origin of Virulent Aeromonas hydrophila Responsible for Disease Epidemics in United States-Farmed Catfish

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mohammad J.; Sun, Dawei; McGarey, Donald J.; Wrenn, Shannon; Alexander, Laura M.; Martino, Maria Elena; Xing, Ye; Terhune, Jeffery S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Since 2009, catfish farming in the southeastern United States has been severely impacted by a highly virulent and clonal population of Aeromonas hydrophila causing motile Aeromonas septicemia (MAS) in catfish. The possible origin of this newly emerged highly virulent A. hydrophila strain is unknown. In this study, we show using whole-genome sequencing and comparative genomics that A. hydrophila isolates from diseased grass carp in China and catfish in the United States have highly similar genomes. Our phylogenomic analyses suggest that U.S. catfish isolates emerged from A. hydrophila populations of Asian origin. Furthermore, we identified an A. hydrophila strain isolated in 2004 from a diseased catfish in Mississippi, prior to the onset of the major epidemic outbreaks in Alabama starting in 2009, with genomic characteristics that are intermediate between those of the Asian and Alabama fish isolates. Investigation of A. hydrophila strain virulence demonstrated that the isolate from the U.S. catfish epidemic is significantly more virulent to both channel catfish and grass carp than is the Chinese carp isolate. This study implicates the importation of fish or fishery products into the United States as the source of highly virulent A. hydrophila that has caused severe epidemic outbreaks in United States-farmed catfish and further demonstrates the potential for invasive animal species to disseminate bacterial pathogens worldwide. PMID:24895303

  10. Simulants, stimulants and diseases: the evolution of the United States biological warfare programme, 1945-60.

    PubMed

    Hay, A

    1999-01-01

    Details about the US biological programme have largely been based on information in the open literature. More revealing aspects of the programme are now available through documents released under the Freedom of Information Act. Annual reports of the activities of the US Army Chemical Corps from 1945 to 1959 have revealed significant increases in activity in biological warfare research. The Corps research activity progressed from work on anthrax in 1941, through anti-crop agents in the mid-1940s, to a wider range of animal, plant and human diseases by 1960. A number of disease organisms were investigated sufficiently to permit some standardisation and manufacture of munitions. PMID:10472189

  11. Gallstone Disease is Associated with Increased Mortality in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Ruhl, Constance E.; Everhart, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Gallstones are common and contribute to morbidity and health-care costs, but their effects on mortality are unclear. We examined whether gallstone disease was associated with overall and cause-specific mortalities in a prospective national population-based sample. Methods We analyzed data from 14,228 participants in the third U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (20–74 years old) who underwent gallbladder ultrasonography from 1988 to 1994. Gallstone disease was defined as ultrasound-documented gallstones or evidence of cholecystectomy. The underlying cause of death was identified from death certificates collected through 2006 (mean follow up=14.3 years). Mortality hazard ratios (HR) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis, to adjust for multiple demographic and cardiovascular-disease risk factors. Results The prevalence of gallstones was 7.1% and of cholecystectomy was 5.3%. During a follow-up period of 18 years or more, the cumulative mortality was 16.5% from all causes (2,389 deaths), 6.7% from cardiovascular disease (886 deaths), and 4.9% from cancer (651 deaths). Participants with gallstone disease had higher all-cause mortality in age-adjusted (HR, 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2–1.5) and multivariate-adjusted analysis (HR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1–1.5). A similar increase was observed for cardiovascular disease mortality (multivariate-adjusted HR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.2–1.7) and cancer mortality (multivariate-adjusted HR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.98–1.8). Individuals with gallstones had a similar increase in risk of death as those with cholecystectomy (multivariate-adjusted HR, 1.1; 95% CI, 0.92–1.4). Conclusions In the U.S. population, persons with gallstone disease have increased mortality, overall, and mortalities from cardiovascular disease and cancer. This relationship was found for both ultrasound-diagnosed gallstones and cholecystectomy. PMID:21075109

  12. Crowdfunding drug development: the state of play in oncology and rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Dragojlovic, Nick; Lynd, Larry D

    2014-11-01

    In this article, we present descriptive data on 125 crowdfunding campaigns aimed at financing research in oncology (including basic research, drug discovery, and clinical trials). We also describe five campaigns that have succeeded in raising substantial funds to support the development of treatments for ultrarare diseases. The data suggest that crowdfunding is a viable approach to supporting early proof-of-concept research that could allow researchers in oncology and rare diseases to succeed in traditional grant competitions or to attract private investment. The data also suggest that such an approach could become a valuable additional source of funding for early-stage innovators in the drug development arena. PMID:24973645

  13. PREVALENCE OF CHAGAS DISEASE IN A RURAL AREA IN THE STATE OF CEARA, BRAZIL.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Erlane Chaves; Oliveira, Maria de Fátima; Andrade, Mônica Coelho; Vasconcelos, Arduina Sofia Ortet de Barros; Silva Filho, José Damião da; Cândido, Darlan da Silva; Pereira, Laíse dos Santos; Correia, João Paulo Ramalho; Cruz, José Napoleão Monte da; Cavalcanti, Luciano Pamplona de Góes

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi and affects about two to three million people in Brazil, still figuring as an important public health problem. A study was conducted in a rural area of the municipality of Limoeiro do Norte - CE, northeastern Brazil, aiming to determine the prevalence of T. cruzi infection. Of the inhabitants, 52% were examined, among whom 2.6% (4/154) were seropositive in at least two serological tests. All seropositive individuals were older than 50 years, farmers, with a low education and a family income of less than three minimum wages. Active surveillance may be an alternative for early detection of this disease. PMID:26603232

  14. Emergence of salsa and guacamole as frequent vehicles of foodborne disease outbreaks in the United States, 1973-2008.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Magdalena E; Mody, Rajal K; Mahon, Barbara E; Doyle, Michael P; Herman, Karen M; Tauxe, Robert V

    2013-04-01

    Fresh salsa and guacamole often contain diced raw produce, are often made in large batches, and are often poorly refrigerated, which may make them prone to contamination that can cause foodborne illness. The safety of salsa and guacamole is increasingly important as these foods gain popularity. Since 1973, local, state, and territorial health departments have voluntarily reported foodborne disease outbreaks to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System (FDOSS) using a standard reporting form. FDOSS used paper-based reporting for 1973-1997 and switched to electronic reporting for 1998-2008. We reviewed all reports of outbreaks during 1973-2008 in which salsa or guacamole was reported as a vehicle. We found 136 outbreaks in which salsa or guacamole was reported as a possible vehicle, which resulted in 5,658 illnesses. Of these 136 salsa- or guacamole-associated (SGA) outbreaks additional possible food vehicles were reported for 33 (24%) outbreaks. There were no SGA outbreaks reported before 1984. Among reported outbreaks, most were caused by norovirus (24%), nontyphoidal Salmonella (19%), and Shigella (7%). Eighty-four percent of outbreaks were caused by foods prepared in restaurants or delis; of these, 19% reported ill foodworkers, and 29% reported improper storage as possible contributing factors. Among all foodborne disease outbreaks with a reported food vehicle during 1984-1997, 26 (0.9%) of 2,966 outbreaks were SGA, and during 1998-2008, 110 (1.4%) of 7,738 outbreaks were SGA. The number of reported foodborne disease outbreaks attributable to salsa or guacamole increased in the United States from 1984 to 2008, especially in later years, and especially in restaurants. Fresh salsa and guacamole require careful preparation and storage. Focused prevention strategies should reduce the risk of illness and ensure that these foods are enjoyed safely. PMID:23461608

  15. [Intractable renal and enteral loss of potassium in a case of Turner's syndrome (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kopsa, H; Schmidt, P; Zazgornik, J; Henning, K; Altrichter, H; Trk, H; Ferenci, P

    1978-12-01

    A case of Turner's syndrome is presented; many congenital defects were detected. Predominant clinical findings were cheilognatoschisis, respiratory distress, caused by congenital bronchiektasis and chronic hypokalemia with paroxysmal attacks of paralysis and tetania. Hypokalemia was mainly due to gastrointestinal losses as a consequence of permanent vomiting in the presence of stomach atonia and hiatus insufficiency or because of "third space losses", while a subileus persisted chronically. Furthermore also a renal loss of serum potassium was evident in the patient's predialytic time. Basic renal diseases were pyelonephritis, renal damage from phenacetine abuse, or probably even a nephropathy due to potassium depletion. Uraemia was controlled by dialysis treatment and by a dialysate consisting of 7 and 6 mmol/l potassium respectively. The result of this intense therapy was physical rehabilitation and the patient finally could resume her professional work again. PMID:723752

  16. Intravenous lidocaine for the treatment of intractable pain of adiposis dolorosa.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, R L

    1982-01-01

    Adiposis dolorosa (Dercum's disease) is a syndrome of painful adipose tissue which occurs most often in post-menopausal women and is associated with obesity, asthenia, and emotional disturbances. The etiology is uncertain, but is probably multifactorial. Numerous treatments to relieve the pain have generally been unsuccessful. A patient with adiposis dolorosa was treated with intravenous infusions of lidocaine over a two-year period. Relief from pain lasted from two to 12 months after each infusion. A single-blind placebo infusion did not relieve the pain. Lidocaine infusions did not relieve the pain of diabetic neuropathy or of angina in this patient. The mechanism of relief of pain of adiposis dolorosa by lidocaine is uncertain, but previously reported central effects of lidocaine suggest that alterations in the central nervous system may be responsible. PMID:7129748

  17. Current state of biology and diagnosis of clonal mast cell diseases in adults.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Twose, I; Morgado, J M; Sánchez-Muñoz, L; García-Montero, A; Mollejo, M; Orfao, A; Escribano, L

    2012-10-01

    Mastocytosis comprises a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by the presence of clonal mast cells (MC) in organs such as skin, bone marrow (BM), and gastrointestinal tract, among other tissues. The clonal nature of the disease can be established in most adult patients by the demonstration of activating KIT mutations in their BM MC. When highly sensitive techniques capable of identifying cells present at very low frequencies in a sample are applied, BM MC from virtually all systemic mastocytosis patients display unique immunophenotypical features, particularly the aberrant expression of CD25. By contrast, large, multifocal BM MC aggregates (the only World Health Organization major criterion for systemic mastocytosis) are absent in a significant proportion of patients fulfilling at least three minor criteria for systemic mastocytosis, particularly in subjects studied at early stages of the disease with very low MC burden. Moreover, recent molecular and immunophenotypical investigations of BM MC from patients with indolent systemic mastocytosis have revealed a close association of some biological features (e.g., multilineage involvement of hematopoiesis by the KIT mutation and an immature mast cell immunophenotype) with an increased risk for disease progression. These observations support the fact that, although the current consensus diagnostic criteria for systemic mastocytosis have been a major advance for the diagnosis and classification of the disease, rationale usage of the most sensitive diagnostic techniques available nowadays is needed to improve the diagnosis, refine the classification, and reach objective prognostic stratification of adult mastocytosis. PMID:22551157

  18. Breeding Pearl Millet for Disease and Pest Resistance in the Southeastern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The primary diseases and pests in the southeastern U.S. generally differ from those found throughout much of Asia and Africa. Targets for resistance breeding include rust (Puccinia substriata var. penicillariae), pyricularia leaf spot (Pyricularia grisea), stalk rot, grain mold, root-knot nematodes...

  19. SURVEILLANCE FOR WATERBORNE-DISEASE OUTBREAKS-UNITED STATES, 1997-1998

    EPA Science Inventory

    PROBLEM/CONDITION: Since 1971, CDC and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have maintained a collaborative surveillance system for collecting and periodically reporting data relating to occurrences and causes of waterborne-disease outbreaks (WBDOs). REPORTING PERIOD CO...

  20. Chronic Cardiovascular Disease Mortality in Mountaintop Mining Areas of Central Appalachian States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esch, Laura; Hendryx, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if chronic cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality rates are higher among residents of mountaintop mining (MTM) areas compared to mining and nonmining areas, and to examine the association between greater levels of MTM surface mining and CVD mortality. Methods: Age-adjusted chronic CVD mortality rates from 1999 to 2006 for

  1. Chronic Cardiovascular Disease Mortality in Mountaintop Mining Areas of Central Appalachian States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esch, Laura; Hendryx, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if chronic cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality rates are higher among residents of mountaintop mining (MTM) areas compared to mining and nonmining areas, and to examine the association between greater levels of MTM surface mining and CVD mortality. Methods: Age-adjusted chronic CVD mortality rates from 1999 to 2006 for…

  2. [Epidemiology of chronic kidney disease in Italy: current state and contribution of the CARHES study].

    PubMed

    De Nicola, Luca; Donfrancesco, Chiara; Minutolo, Roberto; Lo Noce, Cinzia; De Curtis, Amalia; Palmieri, Luigi; Iacoviello, Licia; Conte, Giuseppe; Chiodini, Paolo; Sorrentino, Francesco; Coppo, Rosanna; Vanuzzo, Diego; Scherillo, Marillo; Giampaoli, Simona

    2011-01-01

    The epidemic dimensions of non-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) and the associated elevated cardiovascular risk as well as the high costs of renal replacement therapy have made the identification of CKD patients and the quantification of CKD-related comorbidities a key priority in the strategies of public health agencies worldwide. Information on the CKD prevalence at a national level is still lacking in Italy, although these data are critical for planning preventive strategies and increasing the awareness of CKD as a major chronic disease. In 2008 the CARHES (CArdiovascular risk in Renal Patients of the Italian Health Examination Survey) study was started. The study - a joint venture between the Italian Society of Nephrology, the Italian Society of Cardiologists, and the National Health Institute-Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Project - will integrate the previously collected information on the cardiovascular risk profile of the adult Italian population provided by the Health Examination Survey (HES) with epidemiological data on CKD. The initial results on approximately half of the prospective sample of 9020 subjects aged 35-79 years suggest a lower CKD prevalence than that reported in other countries. The final results will allow to estimate the level of CKD in Italy and hopefully increase the awareness of this high-risk chronic disease among Italian physicians and health authorities. PMID:21809309

  3. TRENDS IN THE GEOGRAPHIC INEQUALITY OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE MORTALITY IN THE UNITED STATES, 1962-1982

    EPA Science Inventory

    Substantial geographic variation of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality within the U.S. has been recognized for decades. nalyses reported here address the question of whether relative geographic inequality has increased or decreased during the period of rapidly declining CVD m...

  4. Lyme Disease Risk Influences Human Settlement in the Wildland–Urban Interface: Evidence from a Longitudinal Analysis of Counties in the Northeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Ashley E.; MacDonald, Andrew J.; Plantinga, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The expansion of human settlement into wildland areas, including forests in the eastern United States, has resulted in fragmented forest habitat that has been shown to drive higher entomological risk for Lyme disease. We investigated an alternative pathway between fragmentation and Lyme disease, namely whether increased risk of Lyme disease results in a reduced propensity to settle in high-risk areas at the interface of developed and undeveloped lands. We used longitudinal data analyses at the county level to determine whether Lyme disease incidence (LDI) influences the proportion of the population residing in the wildland–urban interface in 12 high LDI states in the eastern United States. We found robust evidence that a higher LDI reduces the proportion of a county's population residing in the wildland–urban interface in high-LDI states. This study provides some of the first evidence of human behavioral responses to Lyme disease risk via settlement decisions. PMID:25048372

  5. Lyme disease risk influences human settlement in the wildland-urban interface: evidence from a longitudinal analysis of counties in the northeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Ashley E; MacDonald, Andrew J; Plantinga, Andrew J

    2014-10-01

    The expansion of human settlement into wildland areas, including forests in the eastern United States, has resulted in fragmented forest habitat that has been shown to drive higher entomological risk for Lyme disease. We investigated an alternative pathway between fragmentation and Lyme disease, namely whether increased risk of Lyme disease results in a reduced propensity to settle in high-risk areas at the interface of developed and undeveloped lands. We used longitudinal data analyses at the county level to determine whether Lyme disease incidence (LDI) influences the proportion of the population residing in the wildland-urban interface in 12 high LDI states in the eastern United States. We found robust evidence that a higher LDI reduces the proportion of a county's population residing in the wildland-urban interface in high-LDI states. This study provides some of the first evidence of human behavioral responses to Lyme disease risk via settlement decisions. PMID:25048372

  6. Population-based approaches to understanding disparities in cardiovascular disease risk in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Garth

    2014-01-01

    This is a comprehensive narrative review of the literature on the current science and evidence of population-level differences in risk factors for heart disease among different racial and ethnic population in the US. It begins by discussing the importance of population-level risk assessment of heart disease in light of the growth rate of specific minority populations in the US. It describes the population-level dynamics for racial and ethnic minorities: a higher overall prevalence of risk factors for coronary artery disease that are unrecognized and therefore not treated, which increases their likelihood of experiencing adverse outcomes and, therefore, potentially higher morbidity and mortality. It discusses the rate of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in minority communities. Minority patients with ACS are at greater risk of myocardial infarction, rehospitalization, and death from ACS. They also are less likely than nonminority patients to receive potentially beneficial treatments such as angiography or percutaneous coronary intervention. This paper looks at the data surrounding the increased rate of congestive heart failure in racial and ethnic minorities, where the risk is related to the prevalence of comorbidities with hypertension or diabetes mellitus, which, in combination with environmental factors, may largely explain congestive heart failure disparity. The conclusion is it is essential that health care providers understand these various communities, including nuances in disease presentation, risk factors, and treatment among different racial and ethnic groups. Awareness of these communities’ attributes as well as differences in incidence, risk factor burdens, prognosis, and treatment are necessary to mitigate racial and ethnic disparities in heart disease. PMID:25143752

  7. Resurgence of West Nile neurologic disease in the United States in 2012: what happened? What needs to be done?

    PubMed

    Beasley, David W C; Barrett, Alan D T; Tesh, Robert B

    2013-07-01

    The resurgence in cases of neurologic disease caused by West Nile virus (WNV) in the United States in 2012 came as a surprise to the general public and to many non-arbovirus researchers. Following the introduction of WNV into the US in 1999, the number of human infections rose dramatically, peaking in 2002-03. However, cases declined from 2008-11, and it was unclear if the virus would continue to have a low-level endemic transmission pattern with occasional outbreaks, like the related flavivirus, Saint Louis encephalitis virus, or a more active pattern with annual outbreaks, including occasional years with large epidemics, like Japanese encephalitis virus. The large epidemic in 2012 suggests that the United States can expect periodic outbreaks of West Nile fever and neurologic disease in the coming years. In this paper, we consider the causes of the upsurge in WNV infections during the past year and their implications for future research and disease control measures. PMID:23624155

  8. [Clinical and histological characteristics of ictal onset zone in cases of intractable epilepsy associated with dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Nobuya; Morioka, Takato; Hashiguchi, Kimiaki; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Shigeto, Hiroshi; Sakata, Ayumi; Sasaki, Tomio

    2015-04-01

    Although the epileptogenic location of dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (DNTs) is controversial, it has recently been thought to be located within cortical dysplasia (CD) due to its frequent association with CD. Among the 84 resection surgeries for intractable epilepsy performed in our institution between January 2003 and April 2010, three patients had epileptogenic DNTs. In two cases, chronic subdural electrocorticography (ECoG) was performed, and the ictal onset zone was revealed to be in the cortex around the DNT. The ictal onset zone was resected along with the DNT, and good seizure outcome was achieved. Although histological examination of the ictal onset zone revealed mild gliosis, coexistence of CD was not noted. In the third case, the DNT was located in the left lateral temporal lobe and the intraoperative ECoG revealed frequent paroxysmal activity in the medial temporal lobe. Resection of the lateral temporal lobe involving the tumor did not result in good seizure control. The optimal surgical treatment of DNT is controversial. Some authors consider lesionectomy to be sufficient for good seizure control, whereas others advocate that additional resection of the epileptogenic zone beside the tumor improves outcome. Because the epileptogenic location of DNT varies among cases, it is important to identify its location by preoperative multimodal examinations, including chronic subdural ECoG recordings. PMID:25846601

  9. Psychiatric consequences of temporal lobectomy for intractable seizures: a 20-30-year follow-up of 14 cases.

    PubMed

    Stevens, J R

    1990-08-01

    Between 1958 and 1968, 14 patients from the epilepsy clinic at the University of Oregon Hospitals and Clinics with a diagnosis of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) had a temporal lobectomy for medically intractable seizures. Nine of the 14 patients operated on remained seizure-free over the 20-30-year period of follow-up. Between 6 months and one year following temporal lobectomy, two women, previously healthy from a psychiatric standpoint, developed psychoses, and the previous psychiatric problems of four other patients worsened. Two patients, one with incapacitating paranoid personality disorder and the other with explosive rage attacks preoperatively, had marked improvement in their psychiatric status following temporal lobectomy. The remaining six patients, all psychiatrically healthy prior to surgery, have had no change in psychiatric status following surgery. Development of psychosis or deterioration in psychiatric status after surgery was more common in patients with later age of onset, unreality or déjà vu rather than epigastric aura, pre-operative evidence of bilateral brain damage, and persistence of EEG or clinical seizure activity. Development of a chronic psychosis in psychiatrically healthy individuals many months after temporal lobectomy, even when seizures are arrested or ameliorated, suggests that anomalous synaptic regeneration may follow the surgery in these cases. Careful analysis of histories and outcomes may contribute to better understanding of the pathophysiology and anatomical substrates of psychoses. PMID:2236362

  10. Repeated pancreatitis-induced splenic vein thrombosis leads to intractable gastric variceal bleeding: A case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shan-Hong; Zeng, Wei-Zheng; He, Qian-Wen; Qin, Jian-Ping; Wu, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Tao; Wang, Zhao; He, Xuan; Zhou, Xiao-Lei; Fan, Quan-Shui; Jiang, Ming-De

    2015-01-01

    Gastric varices (GV) are one of the most common complications for patients with portal hypertension. Currently, histoacryl injection is recommended as the initial treatment for bleeding of GV, and this injection has been confirmed to be highly effective for most patients in many studies. However, this treatment might be ineffective for some types of GV, such as splenic vein thrombosis-related localized portal hypertension (also called left-sided, sinistral, or regional portal hypertension). Herein, we report a case of repeated pancreatitis-induced complete splenic vein thrombosis that led to intractable gastric variceal bleeding, which was treated by splenectomy. We present detailed radiological and pathological data and blood rheology analysis (the splenic artery - after a short gastric vein or stomach vein - gastric coronary vein - portal vein). The pathophysiology can be explained by the abnormal direction of blood flow in this patient. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case for which detailed pathology and blood rheology data are available. PMID:26488031

  11. Echinoderm microtubule-associated protein -like protein 5 in anterior temporal neocortex of patients with intractable epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ji-jun; Huang, Min; Xiao, Fei; Xi, Zhi-qin

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): EMAP-like Protein 5 (EML5) is a new echinoderm microtubule-associated protein that is expressed in the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression profile of EML5 in the anterior temporal neocortex of patients presenting with intractable epilepsy (IE). Materials and Methods: Western blot assays were performed to determine EML5 expression in 36 surgically resected anterior temporal neocortices of patients with IE and eight control tissues. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence were employed to explore protein expression in IE. Results: EML5 was highly expressed in both neurons and glial cells of the anterior temporal neocortex of IE patients, whereas only low levels of EML5 were detected in control brain tissues. Western blotting showed an enhanced expression of EML5 protein in the anterior temporal neocortex of IE (optical density (OD) = 1.8030 ± 0.1335/1.1852 ± 0.2253, P<0.05) compared with normal control tissues. Conclusion: The results demonstrate that highly expressed EML5 in the neurons and glial cells of the cortex of patients with epilepsy is associated with microtubular dysfunction after frequent and recurrent seizures. PMID:26730336

  12. [Prion disease].

    PubMed

    Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2010-11-01

    Human prion diseases are classified into 3 categories according to etiologies: idiopathic of unknown cause, acquired of infectious origin, and genetic by PRNP mutation. The surveillance committee have analyzed 2,494 cases and identified 1,402 as prion diseases. Most of them are idiopathic, namely sporadic CJD (77%) with less genetic and acquired prion diseases (17% and 5%, respectively). The number of patients identified by the surveillance committee in these years is about 120 which are less than the number of annual death of prion disease. The difference might be due to partly the fact our surveillance need the consent from patients' family and is not complete. The mean age at onset of prion disease is late 60s while the range is fairly wide. Brain MRIs and increase of CSF 14-3-3 and tau protein levels are very characteristic. Classical sporadic CJD could show completely normal T1WI with patchy high signals in the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia on DWI. In Japan, classical sporadic CJD (MM1) is most popular but there are some rare atypical subtypes. Among them, MM2-thalamic CJD is hardest to diagnose because it shows no high intensity signals on DWI, in addition to frequent absence of CSF and EEG characteristics. In this case, CBF decrease in the thalamus on SPECT is very helpful. Genetic prion diseases in Japan are quite distinct from those in Europe. V180I and M232R mutations are unique to Japan and show sporadic CJD phenotype. Dura graft-associated CJD (dCJD) are composed of 67% of classical sporadic CJD phenotype and 33% of atypical phenotype showing slower progression with amyloid plaques. Trace-back experiments suggested the PrP(sc) of the atypical dCJD was likely to be modified from infection of abnormal VV2 protein. Although there are some atypical forms of prion diseases as mentioned above, almost all prion cases could be diagnosed with EEG, MRI, genetic test, CSF test and SPECT. We also have some incidents in which brain surgery was done before the diagnosis of prion disease and many other patients were operated using the same operating instruments before their sterilization against prion disease had been done. The explanation of possibility of prion disease infection to the patients and their follow-up was started by the incident committee. It is very important for all the nations to cooperate with each other in order to overcome this intractable disease. PMID:21921445

  13. Chronic or intractable medical problems associated with prolonged exposure to unsuspected harmful environmental electric, magnetic or electro-magnetic fields radiating in the bedroom or workplace and their exacerbation by intake of harmful light and heavy metals from common sources.

    PubMed

    Omura, Y; Losco, M; Omura, A K; Yamamoto, S; Ishikawa, H; Takeshige, C; Shimotsuura, Y; Muteki, T

    1991-01-01

    Unsuspected prolonged exposure to abnormal environmental (very high frequency) electro-magnetic fields (EMF), electric fields (EF) or magnetic fields (MF) at 60 Hz or 16K Hz in the bedroom or workplace may contribute to the development of various intractable medical problems. Most of the clinical symptoms appear when the individuals are exposed to EMF for many hours a day for at least several months to 1-year for relatively benign diseases or symptoms (such as intractable pain or medical problems), or several to over 10 years for more serious diseases (such as cancers of the digestive system or other organs), all of which seem to appear with the additional co-existence of micro-circulatory disturbances with Thromboxane B2 (TXB2), bacterial or viral infections and decrease or absence of acetylcholine, and lead, mercury, or aluminum deposits, with or without asbestos. These abnormal environmental EMF's or EF's can be detected by the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test, which has good correlation with standard laboratory measurement, especially with EF measurement, and the distribution of EMF often includes a linear band-like appearance on the abnormal part of the patient's body, as well as on the patient's corresponding area of the bed, or at the workplace. These EMF's can be eliminated either by a metal sheet, acting as a reflector, which redirects the harmful EMF or eliminates it completely by grounding the metal sheet at high frequency range, while extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields at the near field are more difficult to eliminate. Several examples of medical problems that appear to be associated with repeated and prolonged exposure to abnormal environmental EMF, EF or MF are summarized in this article. EF or MF-induced abnormalities were artificially and reversibly created in humans by exposing the extremities or head to a 10Volt/Meter (V/M) EF at 60 Hz about 33 (evening) to 50 cm (daytime or after midnight) from a pair of rubber insulated wires connected to an AC source, but where no current is passed, so that no extra MF exists. After exposing normal parts of the extremities and head to a 10 V/M EF for 5 minutes, abnormal increase of TXB2 and disappearance or significant reduction of acetylcholine was observed for 5 minutes, and slightly longer abnormal time duration was observed in those who have aluminum, lead, or mercury deposits. This indicates that the upper limit of relatively safe EF should be around 10V/M at 60 Hz rather than 25V/M at ELF by Swedish Government recommendation, which is now widely accepted.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1685623

  14. Thalamocortical connectivity is enhanced following functional hemispherotomy for intractable lateralized epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, George M; Morgan, Benjamin R; Smith, Mary Lou; Kerr, Elizabeth; Donner, Elizabeth; Go, Cristina Y; Doesburg, Sam; Taylor, Margot; Widjaja, Elysa; Rutka, James T; Snead, O Carter

    2015-10-01

    Although developmental outcomes may improve following functional hemispherotomy for lateralized, catastrophic childhood epilepsy, the neuronal processes mediating these improvements are unknown. We report the case of a 14-year-old child with neurocognitive impairment who underwent functional hemispherotomy with longitudinal resting-state fMRI. Compared with preoperative fMRI, we report significantly more robust thalamo-default mode network connectivity on postoperative neuroimaging. Furthermore, we show decreased connectivity to nodes within the disconnected hemisphere, providing direct evidence that functional interactions are dependent upon structural connectivity. Since the vascular supply to these nodes remains intact, although they are disconnected from the remainder of the brain, these findings also confirm that blood-oxygen level dependent oscillations are driven primarily by neuronal activity. The current study highlights the importance of thalamocortical interactions in the understanding of neural oscillations and cognitive function, and their impairment in childhood epilepsy. PMID:26318790

  15. Medical management for intractable pain arising from primary sjögren syndrome involving both brain and spinal cord: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung Moo; Han, Kyu Yong; Kwon, Oh Pum

    2014-08-01

    Primary Sjögren syndrome, which involves lesions in both the brain and spinal cord, is rarely reported. Related symptoms, such as intractable pain due to central nervous system involvement, are very rare. A 73-year-old woman diagnosed with primary Sjögren syndrome manifested with subacute encephalopathy and extensive transverse myelitis. She complained of severe whole body neuropathic pain. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a non-enhancing ill-defined high intensity signal involving the posterior limb of the both internal capsule and right thalamus on a T2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery image. Additionally, multifocal intramedullary ill-defined contrast-enhancing lesion with cord swelling from the C-spine to L-spine was also visible on the T2-weighted image. Her intractable pain remarkably improved after administration of concomitant oral doses of gabapentin, venlafaxine, and carbamazepine. PMID:25229038

  16. Economic Impacts of Potential Foot and Mouth Disease Agro-terrorism in the United States: A Computable General Equilibrium Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Oladosu, Gbadebo A; Rose, Adam; Bumsoo, Lee

    2013-01-01

    The foot and mouth disease (FMD) virus has high agro-terrorism potential because it is contagious, can be easily transmitted via inanimate objects and can be spread by wind. An outbreak of FMD in developed countries results in massive slaughtering of animals (for disease control) and disruptions in meat supply chains and trade, with potentially large economic losses. Although the United States has been FMD-free since 1929, the potential of FMD as a deliberate terrorist weapon calls for estimates of the physical and economic damage that could result from an outbreak. This paper estimates the economic impacts of three alternative scenarios of potential FMD attacks using a computable general equilibrium (CGE) model of the US economy. The three scenarios range from a small outbreak successfully contained within a state to a large multi-state attack resulting in slaughtering of 30 percent of the national livestock. Overall, the value of total output losses in our simulations range between $37 billion (0.15% of 2006 baseline economic output) and $228 billion (0.92%). Major impacts stem from the supply constraint on livestock due to massive animal slaughtering. As expected, the economic losses are heavily concentrated in agriculture and food manufacturing sectors, with losses ranging from $23 billion to $61 billion in the two industries.

  17. Discovering and mapping chromatin states using a tree hidden Markov model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    New biological techniques and technological advances in high-throughput sequencing are paving the way for systematic, comprehensive annotation of many genomes, allowing differences between cell types or between disease/normal tissues to be determined with unprecedented breadth. Epigenetic modifications have been shown to exhibit rich diversity between cell types, correlate tightly with cell-type specific gene expression, and changes in epigenetic modifications have been implicated in several diseases. Previous attempts to understand chromatin state have focused on identifying combinations of epigenetic modification, but in cases of multiple cell types, have not considered the lineage of the cells in question. We present a Bayesian network that uses epigenetic modifications to simultaneously model 1) chromatin mark combinations that give rise to different chromatin states and 2) propensities for transitions between chromatin states through differentiation or disease progression. We apply our model to a recent dataset of histone modifications, covering nine human cell types with nine epigenetic modifications measured for each. Since exact inference in this model is intractable for all the scale of the datasets, we develop several variational approximations and explore their accuracy. Our method exhibits several desirable features including improved accuracy of inferring chromatin states, improved handling of missing data, and linear scaling with dataset size. The source code for our model is available at http:// http://github.com/uci-cbcl/tree-hmm PMID:23734743

  18. Regulation of Translocator Protein 18 kDa (TSPO) Expression in Health and Disease States

    PubMed Central

    Batarseh, Amani; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2010-01-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO) is an 18-kDa high affinity cholesterol- and drug-binding protein found primarily in the outer mitochondrial membrane. Although TSPO is found in many tissue types, it is expressed at the highest levels under normal conditions in tissues that synthesize steroids. TSPO has been associated with cholesterol import into mitochondria, a key function in steroidogenesis, and directly or indirectly with multiple other cellular functions including apoptosis, cell proliferation, differentiation, anion transport, porphyrin transport, heme synthesis, and regulation of mitochondrial function. Aberrant expression of TSPO has been linked to multiple diseases, including cancer, brain injury, neurodegeneration, and ischemia reperfusion injury. There has been an effort during the last decade to understand the mechanisms regulating tissue- and disease-specific TSPO expression and to identify pharmacological means to control its expression. This review focuses on the current knowledge regarding the chemicals, hormones, and molecular mechanisms regulating Tspo gene expression under physiological conditions in a tissue- and disease-specific manner. The results described here provide evidence that the PKC?-ERK1/2-AP1/Stat3 signal transduction pathway is the primary regulator of Tspo gene expression in normal and pathological tissues expressing high levels of TSPO. PMID:20600583

  19. Phylogeography of Borrelia burgdorferi in the eastern United States reflects multiple independent Lyme disease emergence events

    PubMed Central

    Hoen, Anne Gatewood; Margos, Gabriele; Bent, Stephen J.; Diuk-Wasser, Maria A.; Barbour, Alan; Kurtenbach, Klaus; Fish, Durland

    2009-01-01

    Since its first description in coastal Connecticut in 1976, both the incidence of Lyme disease and the geographic extent of endemic areas in the US have increased dramatically. The rapid expansion of Lyme disease into its current distribution in the eastern half of the US has been due to the range expansion of the tick vector, Ixodes scapularis, upon which the causative agent, Borrelia burgdorferi is dependent for transmission to humans. In this study, we examined the phylogeographic population structure of B. burgdorferi throughout the range of I. scapularis-borne Lyme disease using multilocus sequence typing based on bacterial housekeeping genes. We show that B. burgdorferi populations from the Northeast and Midwest are genetically distinct, but phylogenetically related. Our findings provide strong evidence of prehistoric population size expansion and east-to-west radiation of descendent clones from founding sequence types in the Northeast. Estimates of the time scale of divergence of northeastern and midwestern populations suggest that B. burgdorferi was present in these regions of North America many thousands of years before European settlements. We conclude that B. burgdorferi populations have recently reemerged independently out of separate relict foci, where they have persisted since precolonial times. PMID:19706476

  20. Epidemiology of Group B Streptococcal Disease in the United States: Shifting Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Schuchat, Anne

    1998-01-01

    Since its emergence 25 years ago, group B streptococcus has become recognized as a cause of serious illness in newborns, pregnant women, and adults with chronic medical conditions. Heavy colonization of the genital tract with group B streptococcus also increases the risk that a woman will deliver a preterm low-birthweight infant. Early-onset infections (occurring at <7 days of age) are associated with much lower fatality than when they were first described, and their incidence is finally decreasing as the use of preventive antibiotics during childbirth increases among women at risk. New serotypes of group B streptococcus have emerged as important pathogens in adults and newborns. Clinical and laboratory practices—in obstetrics, pediatrics, and clinical microbiology—have an impact on disease and/or its prevention, and protocols established at the institutional level appear to be critical tools for the reduction of perinatal disease due to group B streptococcus. Since intrapartum antibiotics will prevent at best only a portion of the full burden of group B streptococcal disease, critical developments in vaccine evaluation, including study of polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines, offer the potential for enhanced prevention in the relatively near future. PMID:9665980

  1. Biomarkers of therapeutic responses in chronic Chagas disease: state of the art and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pinazo, Maria-Jesus; Thomas, Maria-Carmen; Bustamante, Juan; Almeida, Igor Correia de; Lopez, Manuel-Carlos; Gascon, Joaquim

    2015-05-01

    The definition of a biomarker provided by the World Health Organization is any substance, structure, or process that can be measured in the body, or its products and influence, or predict the incidence or outcome of disease. Currently, the lack of prognosis and progression markers for chronic Chagas disease has posed limitations for testing new drugs to treat this neglected disease. Several molecules and techniques to detect biomarkers in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected patients have been proposed to assess whether specific treatment with benznidazole or nifurtimox is effective. Isolated proteins or protein groups from different T. cruzi stages and parasite-derived glycoproteins and synthetic neoglycoconjugates have been demonstrated to be useful for this purpose, as have nucleic acid amplification techniques. The amplification of T. cruzi DNA using the real-time polymerase chain reaction method is the leading test for assessing responses to treatment in a short period of time. Biochemical biomarkers have been tested early after specific treatment. Cytokines and surface markers represent promising molecules for the characterisation of host cellular responses, but need to be further assessed. PMID:25946151

  2. The Relationship between Depressive Symptoms, Disease State, and Cognition in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Jelsone-Swain, Laura; Persad, Carol; Votruba, Kristen L.; Weisenbach, Sara L.; Johnson, Timothy; Gruis, Kirsten L.; Welsh, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive impairment (CI) in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) may present a serious barrier to a patient’s wellbeing and significantly decrease quality of life. Although reports of CI in ALS without frank dementia are becoming quite common, questions remain regarding the specific cognitive domains affected, as well as how other psychological and medical factors may impact cognitive functioning in these patients. Additionally, the influence of depressive symptoms on disease processes is not known. We aimed to address these questions by completing extensive neuropsychological tests with 22 patients with ALS and 17 healthy volunteers. A subgroup of these patients also completed questionnaires to measure depressive and vegetative symptoms. We tested for overall cognitive differences between groups, the influence of physical (e.g., bulbar and limb), vegetative (e.g., fatigue), and depressive symptoms on cognitive performance, and the relationship between depressive symptoms and disease severity in ALS. Overall, patients performed more poorly than healthy controls (HCs), most notably on tests of executive functioning and learning and memory. Results suggest that true cognitive performance differences exist between patients with ALS and HCs, as these differences were not changed by the presence of vegetative or depressive symptoms. There was no effect of limb or bulbar symptoms on cognitive functioning. Also, patients were not any more depressed than HCs, however increased depressive scores correlated with faster disease progression and decreased limb function. Collectively, it is suggested that translational advances in psychological intervention for those with CI and depression become emphasized in future research. PMID:23411492

  3. Fasting therapy for treating and preventing disease - current state of evidence.

    PubMed

    Michalsen, Andreas; Li, Chenying

    2013-01-01

    Periods of deliberate fasting with restriction of solid food intake are practiced worldwide, mostly based on traditional, cultural or religious reasons. There is large empirical and observational evidence that medically supervised modified fasting (fasting cure, 200-500 kcal nutritional intake per day) with periods of 7-21 days is efficacious in the treatment of rheumatic diseases, chronic pain syndromes, hypertension, and metabolic syndrome. The beneficial effects of fasting followed by vegetarian diet in rheumatoid arthritis are confirmed by randomized controlled trials. Further beneficial effects of fasting are supported by observational data and abundant evidence from experimental research which found caloric restriction and intermittent fasting being associated with deceleration or prevention of most chronic degenerative and chronic inflammatory diseases. Intermittent fasting may also be useful as an accompanying treatment during chemotherapy of cancer. A further beneficial effect of fasting relates to improvements in sustainable lifestyle modification and adoption of a healthy diet, possibly mediated by fasting-induced mood enhancement. Various identified mechanisms of fasting point to its potential health-promoting effects, e.g., fasting-induced neuroendocrine activation and hormetic stress response, increased production of neurotrophic factors, reduced mitochondrial oxidative stress, general decrease of signals associated with aging, and promotion of autophagy. Fasting therapy might contribute to the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases and should be further evaluated in controlled clinical trials and observational studies. PMID:24434759

  4. Biomarkers of therapeutic responses in chronic Chagas disease: state of the art and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Pinazo, Maria-Jesus; Thomas, Maria-Carmen; Bustamante, Juan; de Almeida, Igor Correia; Lopez, Manuel-Carlos; Gascon, Joaquim

    2015-01-01

    The definition of a biomarker provided by the World Health Organization is any substance, structure, or process that can be measured in the body, or its products and influence, or predict the incidence or outcome of disease. Currently, the lack of prognosis and progression markers for chronic Chagas disease has posed limitations for testing new drugs to treat this neglected disease. Several molecules and techniques to detect biomarkers in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected patients have been proposed to assess whether specific treatment with benznidazole or nifurtimox is effective. Isolated proteins or protein groups from different T. cruzi stages and parasite-derived glycoproteins and synthetic neoglycoconjugates have been demonstrated to be useful for this purpose, as have nucleic acid amplification techniques. The amplification of T. cruzi DNA using the real-time polymerase chain reaction method is the leading test for assessing responses to treatment in a short period of time. Biochemical biomarkers have been tested early after specific treatment. Cytokines and surface markers represent promising molecules for the characterisation of host cellular responses, but need to be further assessed. PMID:25946151

  5. Rapid deployment of an electronic disease surveillance system in the state of Utah for the 2002 Olympic Winter Games.

    PubMed

    Gesteland, Per H; Wagner, Michael M; Chapman, Wendy W; Espino, Jeremy U; Tsui, Fu-Chiang; Gardner, Reed M; Rolfs, Robert T; Dato, Virginia; James, Brent C; Haug, Peter J

    2002-01-01

    The key to minimizing the effects of an intentionally caused disease outbreak is early detection of the attack and rapid identification of the affected individuals. The Bush administration's leadership in advocating for biosurveillance systems capable of monitoring for bioterrorism attacks suggests that we should move quickly to establish a nationwide early warning biosurveillance system as a defense against this threat. The spirit of collaboration and unity inspired by the events of 9-11 and the 2002 Olympic Winter Games in Salt Lake City provided the opportunity to demonstrate how a prototypic biosurveillance system could be rapidly deployed. In seven weeks we were able to implement an automated, real-time disease outbreak detection system in the State of Utah and monitored 80,684 acute care visits occurring during a 28-day period spanning the Olympics. No trends of immediate public health concern were identified. PMID:12463832

  6. Resting state cortical electroencephalographic rhythms are related to gray matter volume in subjects with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Carducci, Filippo; Lizio, Roberta; Vecchio, Fabrizio; Baglieri, Annalisa; Bernardini, Silvia; Cavedo, Enrica; Bozzao, Alessandro; Buttinelli, Carla; Esposito, Fabrizio; Giubilei, Franco; Guizzaro, Antonio; Marino, Silvia; Montella, Patrizia; Quattrocchi, Carlo C; Redolfi, Alberto; Soricelli, Andrea; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Ferri, Raffaele; Rossi-Fedele, Giancarlo; Ursini, Francesca; Scrascia, Federica; Vernieri, Fabrizio; Pedersen, Torleif Jan; Hardemark, Hans-Goran; Rossini, Paolo M; Frisoni, Giovanni B

    2013-06-01

    Cortical gray matter volume and resting state cortical electroencephalographic rhythms are typically abnormal in subjects with amnesic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we tested the hypothesis that in amnesic MCI and AD subjects, abnormalities of EEG rhythms are a functional reflection of cortical atrophy across the disease. Eyes-closed resting state EEG data were recorded in 57 healthy elderly (Nold), 102 amnesic MCI, and 108 AD patients. Cortical gray matter volume was indexed by magnetic resonance imaging recorded in the MCI and AD subjects according to Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging initiative project (http://www.adni-info.org/). EEG rhythms of interest were delta (2-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha1 (8-10.5 Hz), alpha2 (10.5-13 Hz), beta1 (13-20 Hz), beta2 (20-30 Hz), and gamma (30-40 Hz). These rhythms were indexed by LORETA. Compared with the Nold, the MCI showed a decrease in amplitude of alpha 1 sources. With respect to the Nold and MCI, the AD showed an amplitude increase of delta sources, along with a strong amplitude reduction of alpha 1 sources. In the MCI and AD subjects as a whole group, the lower the cortical gray matter volume, the higher the delta sources, the lower the alpha 1 sources. The better the score to cognitive tests the higher the gray matter volume, the lower the pathological delta sources, and the higher the alpha sources. These results suggest that in amnesic MCI and AD subjects, abnormalities of resting state cortical EEG rhythms are not epiphenomena but are strictly related to neurodegeneration (atrophy of cortical gray matter) and cognition. PMID:22331654

  7. Population Structure of Geosmithia morbida, the Causal Agent of Thousand Cankers Disease of Walnut Trees in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Andrew D.; Hartel, Colleen; Pscheidt, Jay W.; Tonos, Jadelys; Broders, Kirk; Cranshaw, Whitney; Seybold, Steven J.; Tisserat, Ned

    2014-01-01

    The ascomycete Geosmithia morbida and the walnut twig beetle Pityophthorus juglandis are associated with thousand cankers disease of Juglans (walnut) and Pterocarya (wingnut). The disease was first reported in the western United States (USA) on several Juglans species, but has been found more recently in the eastern USA in the native range of the highly susceptible Juglans nigra. We performed a comprehensive population genetic study of 209 G. morbida isolates collected from Juglans and Pterocarya from 17 geographic regions distributed across 12 U.S. states. The study was based on sequence typing of 27 single nucleotide polymorphisms from three genomic regions and genotyping with ten microsatellite primer pairs. Using multilocus sequence-typing data, 197 G. morbida isolates were placed into one of 57 haplotypes. In some instances, multiple haplotypes were recovered from isolates collected on the same tree. Twenty-four of the haplotypes (42%) were recovered from more than one isolate; the two most frequently occurring haplotypes (H02 and H03) represented 36% of all isolates. These two haplotypes were abundant in California, but were not recovered from Arizona or New Mexico. G. morbida population structure was best explained by four genetically distinct groups that clustered into three geographic regions. Most of the haplotypes isolated from the native range of J. major (Arizona and New Mexico) were found in those states only or present in distinct genetic clusters. There was no evidence of sexual reproduction or genetic recombination in any population. The scattered distribution of the genetic clusters indicated that G. morbida was likely disseminated to different regions at several times and from several sources. The large number of haplotypes observed and the genetic complexity of G. morbida indicate that it evolved in association with at least one Juglans spp. and the walnut twig beetle long before the first reports of the disease. PMID:25393300

  8. Population structure of Geosmithia morbida, the causal agent of thousand cankers disease of walnut trees in the United States.

    PubMed

    Zerillo, Marcelo M; Ibarra Caballero, Jorge; Woeste, Keith; Graves, Andrew D; Hartel, Colleen; Pscheidt, Jay W; Tonos, Jadelys; Broders, Kirk; Cranshaw, Whitney; Seybold, Steven J; Tisserat, Ned

    2014-01-01

    The ascomycete Geosmithia morbida and the walnut twig beetle Pityophthorus juglandis are associated with thousand cankers disease of Juglans (walnut) and Pterocarya (wingnut). The disease was first reported in the western United States (USA) on several Juglans species, but has been found more recently in the eastern USA in the native range of the highly susceptible Juglans nigra. We performed a comprehensive population genetic study of 209 G. morbida isolates collected from Juglans and Pterocarya from 17 geographic regions distributed across 12 U.S. states. The study was based on sequence typing of 27 single nucleotide polymorphisms from three genomic regions and genotyping with ten microsatellite primer pairs. Using multilocus sequence-typing data, 197 G. morbida isolates were placed into one of 57 haplotypes. In some instances, multiple haplotypes were recovered from isolates collected on the same tree. Twenty-four of the haplotypes (42%) were recovered from more than one isolate; the two most frequently occurring haplotypes (H02 and H03) represented 36% of all isolates. These two haplotypes were abundant in California, but were not recovered from Arizona or New Mexico. G. morbida population structure was best explained by four genetically distinct groups that clustered into three geographic regions. Most of the haplotypes isolated from the native range of J. major (Arizona and New Mexico) were found in those states only or present in distinct genetic clusters. There was no evidence of sexual reproduction or genetic recombination in any population. The scattered distribution of the genetic clusters indicated that G. morbida was likely disseminated to different regions at several times and from several sources. The large number of haplotypes observed and the genetic complexity of G. morbida indicate that it evolved in association with at least one Juglans spp. and the walnut twig beetle long before the first reports of the disease. PMID:25393300

  9. Estimated Human and Economic Burden of Four Major Adult Vaccine-Preventable Diseases in the United States, 2013.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, John M; McGinnis, Justin J; Tan, Litjen; Mercatante, Annette; Fortuna, Joseph

    2015-08-01

    Low uptake of routinely recommended adult immunizations is a public health concern. Using data from the peer-reviewed literature, government disease-surveillance programs, and the US Census, we developed a customizable model to estimate human and economic burden caused by four major adult vaccine-preventable diseases (VPD) in 2013 in the United States, and for each US state individually. To estimate the number of cases for each adult VPD for a given population, we multiplied age-specific incidence rates obtained from the literature by age-specific 2013 Census population data. We then multiplied the estimated number of cases for a given population by age-specific, estimated medical and indirect (non-medical) costs per case. Adult VPDs examined were: (1) influenza, (2) pneumococcal disease (both invasive disease and pneumonia), (3) herpes zoster (shingles), and (4) pertussis (whooping cough). Sensitivity analyses simulated the impact of various epidemiological scenarios on the total estimated economic burden. Estimated US annual cost for the four adult VPDs was $26.5 billion (B) among adults aged 50 years and older, $15.3B (58 %) of which was attributable to those 65 and older. Among adults 50 and older, influenza, pneumococcal disease, herpes zoster, and pertussis made up $16.0B (60 %), $5.1B (19 %), $5.0B (19 %), and $0.4B (2 %) of the cost, respectively. Among those 65 and older, they made up $8.3B (54 %), $3.8B (25 %), $3.0B (20 %), and 0.2B (1 %) of the cost, respectively. Most (80-85 %) pneumococcal costs stemmed from nonbacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia (NPP). Cost attributable to adult VPD in the United States is substantial. Broadening adult immunization efforts beyond influenza only may help reduce the economic burden of adult VPD, and a pneumococcal vaccination effort, primarily focused on reducing NPP, may constitute a logical starting place. Sensitivity analyses revealed that a pandemic influenza season or change in size of the US elderly population could increase these costs dramatically. PMID:26032932

  10. Impaired development of intrinsic connectivity networks in children with medically intractable localization-related epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, George M; Morgan, Benjamin R; Lee, Wayne; Smith, Mary Lou; Donner, Elizabeth J; Wang, Frank; Beers, Craig A; Federico, Paolo; Taylor, Margot J; Doesburg, Sam M; Rutka, James T; Snead, O Carter

    2014-11-01

    Typical childhood development is characterized by the emergence of intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) by way of internetwork segregation and intranetwork integration. The impact of childhood epilepsy on the maturation of ICNs is, however, poorly understood. The developmental trajectory of ICNs in 26 children (8-17 years) with localization-related epilepsy and 28 propensity-score matched controls was evaluated using graph theoretical analysis of whole brain connectomes from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. Children with epilepsy demonstrated impaired development of regional hubs in nodes of the salience and default mode networks (DMN). Seed-based connectivity and hierarchical clustering analysis revealed significantly decreased intranetwork connections, and greater internetwork connectivity in children with epilepsy compared to controls. Significant interactions were identified between epilepsy duration and the expected developmental trajectory of ICNs, indicating that prolonged epilepsy may cause progressive alternations in large-scale networks throughout childhood. DMN integration was also associated with better working memory, whereas internetwork segregation was associated with higher full-scale intelligence quotient scores. Furthermore, subgroup analyses revealed the thalamus, hippocampus, and caudate were weaker hubs in children with secondarily generalized seizures, relative to other patient subgroups. Our findings underscore that epilepsy interferes with the developmental trajectory of brain networks underlying cognition, providing evidence supporting the early treatment of affected children. PMID:24976288

  11. Intractable pain: a neglected area of medical education in the UK.

    PubMed Central

    Marcer, D; Deighton, S

    1988-01-01

    Unease over the previous management of 67 patients referred for treatment to 3 pain relief clinics led us to investigate the current state of education in pain and pain control in the UK. Twenty-seven medical schools provided data which revealed; (i) in 4 schools no teaching whatsoever is given in these subjects; (ii) in the remainder it is accorded an average of 3.5 hours during the 5 year course, with little evidence of multidisciplinary teaching; (iii) only 10 schools (37%) regularly set questions on pain control in formal examinations. A survey of 219 general practitioners revealed a wide-ranging lack of knowledge about the facilities and approach to treatment at their local pain relief clinic. These findings have wide reaching implications for medical education. At the undergraduate level they demonstrate a need for more multidisciplinary teaching and practical experience in specialist units. Thereafter specialists in pain control must enable practising doctors to keep abreast of new developments. This may require them to devote more time writing for a non-specialist audience and devising short, postgraduate courses. PMID:3221366

  12. [State of intestinal microbiota in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease].

    PubMed

    Lytvynenko, K O; Bodnar, P M; Lysiana, T O; Ponomar'ova, I H; Koval'chuk, O A

    2014-01-01

    High prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) contributes to the intensification of scientific research the aim of which is to improve existing treatment. It is given the data about the state of intestinal microbiota in 64 patients with type 2 DM and NAFLD, 26 patients with type 2 DM and 28--with NAFLD. The research revealed significant changes in microbiota composition in patients with type 2 DM combined with NAFLD. Decompensated dysbiosis was registered in 71.9% of patients in this group which manifested in increased quantitative indicators of transient microflora crop with pathogenic characteristics and lack of microflora with protective characteristics. PMID:25906652

  13. Ageing, menopause, and ischaemic heart disease mortality in England, Wales, and the United States: modelling study of national mortality data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To use changes in heart disease mortality rates with age to investigate the plausibility of attributing women’s lower heart disease mortality than men to the protective effects of premenopausal sex hormones. Design Modelling study of longitudinal mortality data with models assuming (i) a linear association between mortality rates and age (absolute mortality) or (ii) a logarithmic association (proportional mortality). We fitted models to age and sex specific mortality rates in the census years 1950 to 2000 for three birth cohorts (1916-25, 1926-35, and 1936-45). Data sources UK Office for National Statistics and the US National Center for Health Statistics. Main outcome measure(s) Fit of models to data for England and Wales and for the US. Results For England-Wales data, proportional increases in ischaemic heart disease mortality fitted the data better than absolute increases (improvement in deviance statistics: women, 58 logarithmic units; men, 37). We identified a deceleration in male mortality after age 45 years (decreasing from 30.3% to 5.2% per age-year, P=0.042), although the corresponding difference in women was non-significant (P=0.43, overall trend 7.9% per age-year, P<0.001). By contrast, female breast cancer mortality decelerated significantly after age 45 years (decreasing from 19.3% to 2.6% per age-year, P<0.001). We found similar results in US data. Conclusions Proportional age related changes in ischaemic heart disease mortality, suggesting a loss of reparative reserve, fit longitudinal mortality data from England, Wales, and the United States better than absolute age related changes in mortality. Acceleration in male heart disease mortality at younger ages could explain sex differences rather than any menopausal changes in women. PMID:21896608

  14. Evolution of Cardiovascular Diseases Mortality in the Counties of the State of Rio de Janeiro from 1979 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Gabriel Porto; Klein, Carlos Henrique; Silva, Nelson Albuquerque de Souza e; de Oliveira, Glaucia Maria Moraes

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD) are the leading cause of death in Brazil. Objective To estimate total CVD, cerebrovascular disease (CBVD), and ischemic heart disease (IHD) mortality rates in adults in the counties of the state of Rio de Janeiro (SRJ), from 1979 to 2010. Methods The counties of the SRJ were analysed according to their denominations stablished by the geopolitical structure of 1950, Each new county that have since been created, splitting from their original county, was grouped according to their former origin. Population Data were obtained from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE), and data on deaths were obtained from DataSus/MS. Mean CVD, CBVD, and IHD mortality rates were estimated, compensated for deaths from ill-defined causes, and adjusted for age and sex using the direct method for three periods: 1979–1989, 1990–1999, and 2000–2010, Such results were spatially represented in maps. Tables were also constructed showing the mortality rates for each disease and year period. Results There was a significant reduction in mortality rates across the three disease groups over the the three defined periods in all the county clusters analysed, Despite an initial mortality rate variation among the counties, it was observed a homogenization of such rates at the final period (2000–2010). The drop in CBVD mortality was greater than that in IHD mortality. Conclusion Mortality due to CVD has steadily decreased in the SRJ in the last three decades. This reduction cannot be explained by greater access to high technology procedures or better control of cardiovascular risk factors as these facts have not occurred or happened in low proportion of cases with the exception of smoking which has decreased significantly. Therefore, it is necessary to seek explanations for this decrease, which may be related to improvements in the socioeconomic conditions of the population. PMID:25789882

  15. Thermodynamic perspectives on genetic instructions, the laws of biology, diseased states and human population control

    PubMed Central

    Saier, M. H.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines in a broad perspective entropy and some examples of its relationship to evolution, genetic instructions and how we view diseases. Many knowledge gaps abound, hence our understanding is still fragmented and incomplete. Living organisms are programmed by functional genetic instructions (FGI), through cellular communication pathways, to grow and reproduce by maintaining a variety of hemistable, ordered structures (low entropy). Living organisms are far from equilibrium with their surrounding environmental systems, which tends towards increasing disorder (increasing entropy). Organisms must free themselves from high entropy (high disorder) to maintain their cellular structures for a period of time sufficient enough to allow reproduction and the resultant offspring to reach reproductive ages. This time interval varies for different species. Bacteria, for example need no sexual parents; dividing cells are nearly identical to the previous generation of cells, and can begin a new cell cycle without delay under appropriate conditions. By contrast, human infants require years of care before they can reproduce. Living organisms maintain order in spite of their changing surrounding environment, that decreases order according to the second law of thermodynamics. These events actually work together since living organisms create ordered biological structures by increasing local entropy. From a disease perspective, viruses and other disease agents interrupt the normal functioning of cells. The pressure for survival may result in mechanisms that allow organisms to resist attacks by viruses, other pathogens, destructive chemicals and physical agents such as radiation. However, when the attack is successful, the organism can be damaged until the cell, tissue, organ or entire organism is no longer functional and entropy increases. PMID:21262480

  16. Differential Epidemiology: IQ, Neuroticism, and Chronic Disease by the 50 U.S. States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pesta, Bryan J.; Bertsch, Sharon; McDaniel, Michael A.; Mahoney, Christine B.; Poznanski, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Current research shows that geo-political units (e.g., the 50 U.S. states) vary meaningfully on psychological dimensions like intelligence (IQ) and neuroticism (N). A new scientific discipline has also emerged, differential epidemiology, focused on how psychological variables affect health. We integrate these areas by reporting large correlations

  17. Differential Epidemiology: IQ, Neuroticism, and Chronic Disease by the 50 U.S. States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pesta, Bryan J.; Bertsch, Sharon; McDaniel, Michael A.; Mahoney, Christine B.; Poznanski, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Current research shows that geo-political units (e.g., the 50 U.S. states) vary meaningfully on psychological dimensions like intelligence (IQ) and neuroticism (N). A new scientific discipline has also emerged, differential epidemiology, focused on how psychological variables affect health. We integrate these areas by reporting large correlations…

  18. Current patterns of acute respiratory disease in the United States Navy and Marine Corps.

    PubMed Central

    Hoeffler, D. F.

    1975-01-01

    During 1974 there was an apparent decrease in the reported amount of acute respiratory illness in the Navy and Marine Corps. Streptococcal infections continued to be controlled by the selective use of prophylactic benzathine penicillin in recruit training centers. Influenza immunization limited the impact of that illness, and serogroup C polysaccharide vaccine reduced the amount of meningococcal disease among recruits. Although some of the data are contradictory there are indications that fully potent live adenovirus vaccines lessen the frequency and severity of respiratory illness in recruit populations. Continued epidemiologic study will be required to fill the gaps in our knowledge. PMID:808911

  19. A dynamic transmission model for predicting trends in Helicobacter pylori and associated diseases in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Rupnow, M. F.; Shachter, R. D.; Owens, D. K.; Parsonnet, J.

    2000-01-01

    To assess the benefits of intervention programs against Helicobacter pylori infection, we estimated the baseline curves of its incidence and prevalence. We developed a mathematical (compartmental) model of the intrinsic dynamics of H. pylori, which represents the natural history of infection and disease progression. Our model divided the population according to age, infection status, and clinical state. Case-patients were followed from birth to death. A proportion of the population acquired H. pylori infection and became ill with gastritis, duodenal ulcer, chronic atrophic gastritis, or gastric cancer. We simulated the change in transmissibility consistent with the incidence of gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer over time, as well as current H. pylori prevalence. In the United States, transmissibility of H. pylori has decreased to values so low that, should this trend continue, the organism will disappear from the population without targeted intervention; this process, however, will take more than a century. PMID:10827112

  20. [Fragment of Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products Improves Memory State in a Model of Alzheimer's Disease].

    PubMed

    Volpina, O M; Koroev, D O; Volkova, T D; Kamynina, A V; Filatova, M P; Zaporozhskayva, Y V; Samokhin, A N; Aleksandrova, I J; Bobkova, N V

    2015-01-01

    A number of synthetic peptides corresponding to potentially important regions in the sequence of the four membrane proteins known as beta-amyloid cell receptors have been investigated on their ability to improve memory state in experimental model of Alzheimer's disease. Nine fragments repeating all the exposed nonstructural regions of the RAGE protein according to X-ray data, have been synthesized. The activity of these peptides and synthesized earlier immunoprotective fragments of other three proteins (acetylcholine receptor alpha7-type, prion protein and neurotrophin receptor p75) has been investigated under intranasal administration, without immune response to the peptide. Only one fragment RAGE (60-76) was shown to have a therapeutic activity improving the memory state of bulbectomized mice and leads to decreasing in the level of brain beta-amyloid. PMID:27125025