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Sample records for intractable disease state

  1. [Estimated numbers of patients with intractable respiratory diseases].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, S; Tatsumi, K; Osamu, O; Tanabe, N; Kimura, H; Kuriyama, T; Tamakoshi, A; Kawamura, T; Ohno, Y

    1998-12-01

    To estimate the number of patients with intractable respiratory diseases, we conducted a two-stage nationwide epidemiological survey in 1997. The first survey was performed at randomly sampled hospitals to identify the number of patients treated. The second survey sought detailed clinico-epidemiological data on the patients reported in the first survey. The response rates were 54% for the first survey and 62% for the second. Based on the survey findings, we derived the following nationwide estimates: 450 patients (95% confidence interval: 360-530) with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension; 230 (200-260) with primary pulmonary hypertension; 180 (150-210) with obesity-associated hypoventilation syndrome; 40 (30-50) with primary alveolar hypoventilation syndrome; 160 (140-180) with histiocytosis X; and 190 (150-230) with juvenile pulmonary emphysema. PMID:10064952

  2. Functional interleukin-17 receptor A are present in the thyroid gland in intractable Graves disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Rong; Hong, Fu-Yuan; Zeng, Jin-Yang; Huang, Guo-Liang

    2013-01-01

    Th17 lymphocytes and its main cytokine, IL-17, play an important role in autoimmune thyroid diseases, such as intractable Graves disease (GD). IL-17 signals are transmitted through its receptor, IL-17RA. The intrathyroid expression of IL-17RA in intractable GD is not understood. In this study, ELISA was used to measure serum IL-17 levels in patients with untreated GD, intractable GD or GD in remission and healthy controls. Real-time PCR, flow cytometry and immunofluorescence staining evaluated IL-17RA mRNA and protein expression in thyrocytes. IL-6, chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10) and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 expression was measured in IL-17-stimulated thyrocyte cultures to evaluate the functional status of IL-17RA. Our data indicates that serum IL-17 levels are significantly increased in intractable GD and affected thyrocytes show functional IL-17R expression. These changes facilitate the IL-17-mediated upregulation of IL-6, CXCL10, and ICAM-1. The IL-17/IL-17R interaction could be a potential target for therapeutic interventions in intractable GD. PMID:23501056

  3. Comparative Study of Endolymphatic Sac Decompression and Vestibular Neurectomy in Intractable Meniere's Disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiqing; Han, Jie; Zhou, Xuanchen; Luan, Deheng; Xie, Fengyang; Gao, Kun

    2015-03-01

    To comparative study the clinical effect of endolymphatic sac decompression (ELSD) and vestibular neurectomy (VN) in intractable Meniere's disease (MD). The study included 30 MD intractable patients, 21 of which underwent ELSD and nine of which were treated by VN via retrosigmoid approach. Follow-up period ranged from 3 to 6years. In 21 patients by ELSD, excellent vertigo control and good control were noted in 11 patients (52.4%) and 4 patients (19.0%), partial control in 4 and no control in 2 patients. All the 9 patients by VN, vertigo was excellent control. ELSD can improve hearing and tinnitus, but VN not. VN can achieve much better effect in improving vertigo in intractable MD patients. But relative to ELSD, it has much more disadvantages. PMID:25621233

  4. Renal Artery Embolization Controls Intractable Pain in a Patient with Polycystic Kidney Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Seong Tai; Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Jae Mun; Kim, Choon-Yul; Chang, Yoon Sik

    1999-09-15

    A 65-year-old man with adult polycystic kidney disease (APKD) and chronic renal failure suffered from intractable abdominal pain and distension for 2 weeks. Meperidine infusion did not alleviate his pain. However, pain and abdominal distension were successfully controlled by embolization of both renal arteries.

  5. Intractable diseases treated with intra-bone marrow-bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Guo, Kuquan; Ikehara, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is used to treat hematological disorders, autoimmune diseases (ADs) and lymphoid cancers. Intra bone marrow-BMT (IBM-BMT) has been proven to be a powerful strategy for allogeneic BMT due to the rapid hematopoietic recovery and the complete restoration of T cell functions. IBM-BMT not only replaces hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) but also mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). MSCs are multi-potent stem cells that can be isolated from bone marrow (BM), umbilical cord blood (UCB), and adipose tissue. MSCs play an important role in the support of hematopoiesis, and modify and influence the innate and adaptive immune systems. MSCs also differentiate into mesodermal, endodermal and ectodermal lineage cells to repair tissues. This review aims to summarize the functions of BM-derived-MSCs, and the treatment of intractable diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and malignant tumors with IBM-BMT. PMID:25364755

  6. Elevated Endomyocardial Biopsy Macrophage-Related Markers in Intractable Myocardial Diseases.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yuka; Hanawa, Haruo; Jiao, Shuang; Hasegawa, Go; Ohno, Yukako; Yoshida, Kaori; Suzuki, Tomoyasu; Kashimura, Takeshi; Obata, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Komei; Watanabe, Tohru; Minamino, Tohru

    2015-12-01

    Tissue macrophages can be activated by endogenous danger signals released from cells that are stressed or injured, leading to infiltration of inflammatory macrophages and neutrophils. We postulated that macrophage-related markers might be closely associated with the existence of endogenous danger signals, reflecting ongoing tissue injury in the absence of foreign substances. This study was designed to assess the ability of macrophage-related markers in endomyocardial biopsies to predict ongoing cardiac injury in non-inflammatory myocardial diseases. We examined levels of macrophage-related markers (CD68, CD163, CD45) in endomyocardial biopsies from patients (n?=?86) with various myocardial diseases by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (n?=?78) and immunohistochemistry (n?=?56). Thirty-three patients without inflammatory cardiac disease such as myocarditis and sarcoidosis were classified as "improved" or "non-improved" defined as a 10% increase in left ventricular ejection fraction by echocardiograph and a value greater than 30% at the time of follow-up. All macrophage-related (MacR) markers levels were not higher in non-improved dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) patients than improved patients. However, patients with cardiac amyloidosis, cardiac Fabry disease, mitochondrial cardiomyopathy, and biventricular arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), which were categorized as "non-improvement diseases," had elevated macrophage-related markers compared to improved patients. Macrophage-related markers levels were increased in endomyocardial biopsy samples of patients with intractable myocardial diseases such as amyloidosis, mitochondrial disease, Fabry disease, and biventricular ARVC. PMID:26205770

  7. [My way to "Keep Pioneering": integrated neuroscience and immunology research produces a paradigm shift for intractable neurological disease].

    PubMed

    Kira, Jun-ichi

    2014-01-01

    The motto of Prof. Yoshigoro Kuroiwa, who established the first independent neurology department in Japan at Kyushu University, is "Keep Pioneering". His students have followed this motto in all fields. I hereby present my efforts to keep pioneering in the following fields: (1) multiple sclerosis (MS); (2) central nervous system (CNS) involvement associated with peripheral atopic inflammation; and (3) care network for patients with intractable neurological disease. In MS, I propose that Th1/Th17 cell-mediated connexin astrocytopathy may play a critical role in producing huge demyelinating lesions in MS, neuromyelitis optica (NMO), and Bal's concentric sclerosis. I discovered a peculiar myelitis that occurred in patients with atopic disorders, and designated it atopic myelitis. In this condition, allodynia and neuropathic pain are cardinal features, regardless of the presence or absence of spinal cord MRI lesions. We found that peripheral atopic inflammation in mice produces allodynia as well as activation of microglia and astroglia in the spinal cord. It is important to involve a variety of medical specialists and care coordinators for collaborative work on medical and social care issues for people with intractable disease. The motto of "Keep Pioneering" in neurology covers not only advanced research for the creation of new therapies for intractable neurological disease, but also caring for actual people with intractable disease, which I believe is the corporate social responsibility of our neurological society. I think that "Keep Pioneering" is a challenging process that never ends throughout one's life. PMID:25672676

  8. New Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Method: Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Plus Thymus Transplantation for Intractable Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hosaka, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    Although allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) has become a valuable strategy for some intractable diseases, a number of problems remain to be resolved. We have developed a new HSCT method, HSCT + thymus transplantation (TT) from the same donor, which induces elevated T cell function with mild graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in comparison to conventional HSCT alone and HSCT + donor lymphocyte infusion (HSCT + DLI). This new method is effective in the treatment of several intractable diseases and conditions, such as autoimmune diseases in aging, advanced malignant tumors, exposure to supralethal irradiation, multiple organ transplantation from different donors, and type 2 diabetes mellitus, for which conventional methods are ineffective. Our findings suggest that allo-HSCT + TT is preferable to conventional allo-HSCT alone or allo-HSCT + DLI. This method may become a valuable next-generation HSCT technique. PMID:23762092

  9. Deep Anterior Lamellar Keratoplasty Using Irradiated Acellular Cornea with Amniotic Membrane Transplantation for Intractable Ocular Surface Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Sung Wook; Choi, Sang Uk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report the clinical outcomes of deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK) when sterile gamma-irradiated acellular corneal tissues (VisionGraft) are used in combination with amniotic membrane transplantation (AMT) for intractable ocular surface diseases. Methods The medical records of fifteen patients who had DALK with AMT were retrospectively reviewed. Indications for surgery included ocular burn, bacterial keratitis, herpes simplex virus keratitis, corneal opacity with Stevens-Johnson syndrome, Mooren's ulcer, idiopathic myxoid degeneration of corneal stroma, and recurrent band keratopathy. DALK was performed using partial-thickness acellular corneal tissue and a temporary amniotic membrane patch was added at the end of the operation. Results All cases that underwent DALK with AMT became epithelialized within 2 postoperative weeks. Twelve patients showed favorable outcomes without graft rejection, corneal opacification, or neovascularization. The other three grafts developed corneal opacification and neovascularization, and required additional penetrating keratoplasty (PK). Unlike the results of previous PKs, there were no graft rejections and the graft clarity was well-maintained in these three cases for at least 8 months after PK. Conclusions DALK using sterile acellular corneal tissues in combination with AMT may be a good therapeutic strategy for treating intractable ocular surface diseases because of lowered immune rejection, fibroblast activation, and facilitation of epithelialization. Furthermore, DALK can help stabilize the ocular surface, prolong graft survival, and may allow better outcomes when combined with subsequent PK. PMID:25829823

  10. [Application of disease-specific iPS cells for intractable diseases-from pathomechanisms to drug discovery].

    PubMed

    Toguchida, Junya; Hino, Kyosuke; Ikeya, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    Genetic diseases affecting bone and cartilage, which are main components of the locomotive system, are extremely diverse. Even if the causative genes are known, detail pathomechanisms are not yet disclosed in most of them and no effective treatments are established. One of such condition is fibrodysplasia ossificance progressive, which is characterized by systemic ectopoic bone formation and caused by mutations of ACVR1/ALK2 gene encoding one of typeⅠBMP receptors. Using patient-derived iPS cells, we have succeeded to recapitulate the disease in vitro and found a unexpected molecular mechanism that Activin-A induced the BMP signal through mutant receptors. This novel finding provides us with a key to discover drugs for this condition. PMID:27013631

  11. Preclinical and Clinical Studies of Unrelieved Aural Fullness following Intratympanic Gentamicin Injection in Patients with Intractable Ménière’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Feng; Zhang, Ru; Zhang, Ting; Steyger, Peter S.; Dai, Chun-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Objective To clarify whether gentamicin affects vestibular dark cells in guinea pigs and relieves patients of aural fullness with intractable Ménière’s disease following intratympanic administration. Materials and Methods Purified gentamicin-Texas Red (GTTR) was injected intratympanically in guinea pigs that were sacrificed at 1, 3, 7, 14 and 28 days. GTTR uptake was examined in hair cells, and transitional cells and dark cells in vestibular end-organs were examined. Specific attention was paid to its distribution in dark cells under confocal microscopy, and the ultrastructure of dark cells using electron microscopy, following intratympanic injection. Results Dark cells in the semicircular canals showed weak GTTR uptake at 1, 3, 7, 14 and 28 days after intratympanic injection, with no significant differences at various time points after injection. However, the adjacent transitional cells demonstrated intense GTTR uptake that was retained for at least 28 days. Ultrastructural studies demonstrated negligible characteristics associated with apoptosis or necrosis in these dark cells. The tight junctions between dark cells showed no signs of disruption at 7 or 28 days after injection. Conclusion Intratympanic gentamicin has little direct impact on vestibular dark cells. Clinical Application A modified low-dose titration intratympanic approach was used in 29 patients with intractable vertigo and the clinical outcomes were followed. Aural fullness following intratympanic gentamicin injection was not relieved based on our subjective scales, demonstrated by no statistically significant difference between preinjection (4.16 ± 3.08) and postinjection (3.58 ± 2.93; p > 0.05) aural fullness scores. Vertigo control was achieved in 88% of patients, with hearing deterioration identified in 16% of patients. Intratympanic gentamicin administration might not lead to relief of aural fullness in patients with intractable vertigo, although it can achieve a high vertigo control rate with some cochleotoxicity. PMID:24008307

  12. [The Terminal Phase of an Intractable Neurological Disease from the Viewpoint of Nursing Care: The Importance of the Promotion of a Barrier-Free Mind for ALS Care].

    PubMed

    Muraoka, Koko

    2015-08-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a particularly serious intractable neurological disease. Patients with ALS have high mortality rates if they are not put on an artificial respirator. Even with an artificial respirator, individuals with ALS are forced to witness their own physical deterioration. Because 24 hour care is usually required, an intense relationship ofter develops between patients with ALS and family caregivers. This relationship forms an invisible barrier and can impede a smooth introduction of external services. As a result, there can be a degradation in the quality of care. The purpose of this paper is to describe the voluntary efforts of patients and family caregivers in order to break down this barrier and to discuss what types of care support are available to promote barrier-free minds. PMID:26241363

  13. Oral or percutaneous administration of lipopolysaccharide of small molecular size may cure various intractable diseases: a new version of Coley's toxin.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, D; Soma, G

    1992-12-01

    Based on our new finding that an inflammation in which tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is primed or triggered (ontogenic inflammation) can regulate the homeostasis in ontogenesis, we have identified a new lipopolysaccharide from wheat flour (LPSw) that can induce ontogenic inflammation in adult mice. LPSw can prime adult mice to produce TNF when given orally or percutaneously, suggesting that it may maintain homeostasis in adults. LPSw can cure experimental animals of diabetes, hyperlipidemia, ulcer, and herpes. It can also stimulate bone resorption and egg-laying, and shows a strong analgesic effect that is blocked by naloxone. This effect even allows a release from drug addiction. Suppression of serum cholesterol level by oral uptake of LPSw in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbit was also observed. Infection of toxoplasma was prevented by oral uptake of LPSw. The realization that a single oral or percutaneous administration of LPSw may be a cure for multiple intractable diseases may lead to the presentation of a nontoxic type of Coley's toxin, which is known to be an efficient cancer treatment, but has high toxicity. PMID:1476670

  14. Eosinophilic Jejunitis Presenting as Intractable Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Mungan, Zeynel; Attila, Tan; Kapran, Yersu; Tokatli, Ilyas Pinar; Unal, Zeynep

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is an uncommon disease characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract. The clinical manifestations are related to the layer(s) and extent of the bowel involved. In this paper, we present a case of intractable abdominal pain caused by jejunal submucosal eosinophilic infiltration without mucosal involvement, diagnosed by deep endoscopic biopsies. The patient was successfully treated with steroids without need for surgery for diagnosis or therapy. PMID:25565932

  15. Predictors of intractable childhood epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Seker Yilmaz, Berna; Okuyaz, Cetin; Komur, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Our study sought to identify early predictive factors of medically intractable childhood epilepsy. A cohort of epileptic children from the city of Mersin was retrospectively investigated. All patients received care from the same Department of Pediatric Neurology. The epileptic cohort was divided into a drug-responsive epilepsy group and an intractable epilepsy group. Intractable epilepsy is defined as continued seizures in children despite adequate therapy with two or more antiepileptic drugs for more than 18 months. Strong univariate association was observed between intractability and several factors: age of onset, high initial seizure frequency, symptomatic etiology, mixed seizure types, previous history of status epilepticus, febrile and neonatal seizures, mental and motor developmental delay, multiple seizures in 1 day, electroencephalogram abnormalities, magnetic resonance imaging findings, and specific epileptic syndromes. Logistic regression analysis revealed that a previous history of epilepticus status, abnormal electroencephalogram results, and multiple seizures in 1 day comprise independent predictors of medically intractable childhood epilepsy. We suggest that medical intractability in childhood epilepsy can be predicted by monitoring these factors. Along with early prediction, alternative therapies may be designed to provide patients better seizure control and quality of life. PMID:23290021

  16. Oral bismuth for chronic intractable diarrheal conditions?

    PubMed Central

    Thazhath, Sony S; Haque, Mazhar; Florin, Timothy H

    2013-01-01

    Objective Bismuth has antidiarrheal, antibacterial, and anti-inflammatory properties. We report our single-center experience with oral colloidal bismuth subcitrate (CBS) treatment for patients with chronic intractable diarrhea. Method We interrogated our web-based Inflammatory Bowel Disease Clinical and Research database to ascertain clinical details on all patients in our tertiary hospital gastroenterology service treated with CBS between 2000 and 2010. Treatment responses were based on prospective scoring of daily number of liquid stools. Responses were recorded prior to commencement of CBS and at follow-up visits over 12 months. Results Thirty-one patients, mean age 47 years (range 17–79 years) and a mean duration of diarrhea of 22 weeks (range 6–104 weeks), were prescribed CBS at doses ranging from 120 mg to 480 mg/day for ≥1 month. Of these, 23 patients (74%) had an initial clinical response and 12 (39%) who continued with this treatment had a sustained clinical response at 1 year. Twelve patients with pouchitis and four patients with indeterminate colitis had initial responses of 92% and 75%, respectively, and sustained responses of 50% and 75%, respectively. Ulcerative colitis patients (n = 5) responded poorly with respect to both initial and sustained responses. Three patients with microscopic colitis showed encouraging initial response of 100% but did not have any sustained benefit. Three of four patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (dIBS) had an initial response and two (50%) had good sustained responses. There were no serious adverse events. One patient stopped therapy because of nausea. Conclusion This is the largest report of oral bismuth treatment in chronic intractable diarrhea. CBS is cheap and appears to have the potential to be effective for ameliorating diarrheal symptoms in indeterminate colitis, pouchitis, and dIBS. An appropriately powered, blinded, randomized, controlled study appears warranted to establish the position of oral bismuth in routine practice. PMID:23515887

  17. Kidney Disease Statistics for the United States

    MedlinePLUS

    ... also order print versions from our online catalog. Kidney Disease Statistics for the United States Page Content ... for Vascular Access Acknowledgments The Growing Burden of Kidney Disease Kidney disease statistics for the United States ...

  18. Gabapentin for intractable hiccups in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Tegeler, Monica L; Baumrucker, Steven J

    2008-01-01

    Intractable hiccups are not common in the general population or in the palliative care population but can adversely impact quality of life and cause other complications such as weight loss and sleep disturbance. Many treatments have been proposed for intractable hiccups, but there is little consensus regarding treatment in the medical literature. This is partly because hiccups are relatively uncommon and many of the proposed treatments are unproven or have long-term side effects. Pharmacologic treatments rather than home remedies or surgical treatments are more appropriate for the palliative care patient. Gabapentin is a promising medication for the treatment of intractable hiccups for its safety, lack of serious side effects, and rapid onset of action. Further research is indicated to determine whether gabapentin is consistently effective. PMID:18292481

  19. Sequencing Intractable DNA to Close Microbial Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, Jr., Richard Ashley; Brown, Steven D; Podar, Mircea; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Elias, Dwayne A

    2012-01-01

    Advancement in high throughput DNA sequencing technologies has supported a rapid proliferation of microbial genome sequencing projects, providing the genetic blueprint for for in-depth studies. Oftentimes, difficult to sequence regions in microbial genomes are ruled intractable resulting in a growing number of genomes with sequence gaps deposited in databases. A procedure was developed to sequence such difficult regions in the non-contiguous finished Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 genome (6 intractable gaps) and the Desulfovibrio africanus genome (1 intractable gap). The polynucleotides surrounding each gap formed GC rich secondary structures making the regions refractory to amplification and sequencing. Strand-displacing DNA polymerases used in concert with a novel ramped PCR extension cycle supported amplification and closure of all gap regions in both genomes. These developed procedures support accurate gene annotation, and provide a step-wise method that reduces the effort required for genome finishing.

  20. Intractable diarrhoea of infancy and latent otomastoiditis.

    PubMed Central

    Salazar de Sousa, J; da Silva, A; da Costa Ribeiro, V

    1980-01-01

    In 16 infants with intractable diarrhoea, latent otomastoiditis was found in 9 (3 at necropsy and 6 at myringotomy-antrotomy). In 5 of the 6 operated group, surgery was followed by a striking cessation of the diarrhoea and with weight gain. It is concluded that (1) latent otomastoiditis may be a perpetuating factor in intractable diarrhoea; (2) myringotomy-antrotomy should be considered if other forms of treatment have failed, and especially if there is leucocytosis; (3) mastoiditis with diffuse osteitis seems to be associated with a poor prognosis. PMID:7458392

  1. Baclofen in the treatment of intractable hiccups.

    PubMed

    Patial, R K

    2002-10-01

    Availability of a large number of drugs/remedies for the management of hiccups suggests that all the available drugs are not effective in all the patients. Baclofen was successful in relieving the intractable hiccups where all other known drugs of hiccup were unable to provide relief. PMID:12568219

  2. CPAP Therapy Improves Intractable Hemifacial Spasm

    PubMed Central

    Kasemsap, Narongrit; Netwijitpan, Sittichai; Limpawattana, Panita; Kongbunkiat, Kannikar; Tiamkao, Somsak; Chotmongkol, Verajit; Aekphachaisawat, Noppadol; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2015-01-01

    The correlation between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and hemifacial spasm has never been reported in the literature. Here, we report a case of OSA-induced hypertension with intractable hemifacial spasm in which both conditions improved after continuous positive airway pressure treatment. PMID:26550503

  3. Peripheral subcutaneous stimulation for intractable abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Barolat, Giancarlo

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral subcutaneous stimulation has been utilized for a variety of painful conditions affecting the abdominal wall, including sequelae of hernia repair, painful surgical scars, ilio-inguinal neuritis. It has also occasionally been shown to be effective in patients with intractable abdominal visceral pain. Since this is a very recent modality, no large series or prospective studies exist. The results, however, are promising and certainly warrant further investigation. PMID:21422777

  4. Treatment of intractable epilepsy in a female with SLC6A8 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, Saadet; Connolly, Mary B; Poskitt, Kenneth J; Horvath, Gabriella A; Lowry, Noel; Salomons, Gajja S; Casey, Brett; Sinclair, Graham; Davis, Cynthia; Jakobs, Cornelis; Stockler-Ipsiroglu, Sylvia

    2010-12-01

    A female heterozygous for a novel, disease causing, missense mutation in the X-linked cerebral creatine transporter (SLC6A8) gene (c.1067G>T, p.Gly356Val) presented with intractable epilepsy, mild intellectual disability and moderately reduced cerebral creatine levels. Treatment with creatine monohydrate, to enhance cerebral creatine transport, combined with L-arginine and L-glycine, to enhance cerebral creatine synthesis, resulted in complete resolution of seizures. Heterozygous SLC6A8 deficiency is a potentially treatable condition and should be considered in females with intractable epilepsy and developmental delay/intellectual disability. PMID:20846889

  5. Corpus callosotomy with gamma knife radiosurgery for a case of intractable generalised epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Bodaghabadi, Mohammad; Bitaraf, Mohammad Ali; Aran, Shima; Alikhani, Mazdak; Ashrafian, Hossein; Zahiri, Alireza; Alahverdi, Mahmud

    2011-06-01

    Gamma knife radiosurgery is a minimally invasive procedure which can be used for patients with intractable epilepsies as an alternative for surgical corpus callosotomy. We report a 13-year-old boy with intractable epilepsy who underwent radiosurgical callosotomy. The patient demonstrated significant clinical improvement after gamma knife radiosurgery and was free of seizures 10 months after the procedure. However, He developed four short focal seizures with clonic movements during the 20 months post radiosurgery. Corpus callosotomy decreased epileptiform discharges in both hemispheres, indicating a role for the callosal neurons to facilitate an asymmetric epileptogenic susceptible state within the two hemispheres such that bisynchronous and bisymmetrical epileptiform discharges develop. Our result demonstrates that this novel therapeutic approach is a safe and effective option for the treatment of intractable generalised epilepsies. PMID:21628134

  6. Oral azithromycin for treatment of intractable rosacea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hong; Oh, Yoon Seok; Choi, Eung Ho

    2011-05-01

    Rosacea is a common chronic cutaneous disorder that primarily occurs on the convex surfaces of the central face and is often characterized by exacerbations and remissions. A case of a 52-yr-old woman visited our clinic in February 2008 complaining typical features of rosacea including multiple pinhead to rice-sized erythematous papules. We applied various conventional treatments including topical benzoyl peroxide and metronidazole as well as oral metronidazole, isotretinoin, and doxycycline. The lesions were not controlled but were rather aggravated by complications from these treatments. Therefore, we prescribed oral azithromycin, which has anti-inflammatory effects and reduces reactive oxygen species. Ten weeks after the administration of oral azithromycin, 500 mg per day for 2 weeks, the lesions had mostly disappeared and no specific side effects related to the azithromycin were noted. Oral azithromycin dosing 500 mg/day for 2 weeks is effective for treatment of intractable rosacea. PMID:21532865

  7. Rethinking Intractable Conflict: The Perspective of Dynamical Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallacher, Robin R.; Coleman, Peter T.; Nowak, Andrzej; Bui-Wrzosinska, Lan

    2010-01-01

    Intractable conflicts are demoralizing. Beyond destabilizing the families, communities, or international regions in which they occur, they tend to perpetuate the very conditions of misery and hate that contributed to them in the first place. Although the common factors and processes associated with intractable conflicts have been identified…

  8. Microcatheter Embolization of Intractable Idiopathic Epistaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Leppaenen, Martti; Seppaenen, Seppo; Laranne, Jussi; Kuoppala, Katriina

    1999-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy and safety of microcatheter embolization in the treatment of intractable idiopathic epistaxis. Methods: Thirty-seven patients underwent microcatheter embolization in 1991-1998. We evaluated retrospectively the technical and clinical outcome, the number of complications, the duration of embolization in each case, and the number of blood transfusions needed. All embolizations were done with biplane digital subtraction angiography (DSA) equipment. The procedure was carried out under local anesthesia using transfemoral catheterization, except in one case where the translumbar route was used. Tracker 18 or 10 microcatheters were advanced as far as possible to the distal branches of the sphenopalatine artery. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles were used for embolization in most cases, while platinum coils or a combination of these two materials were occasionally used. The primary outcome was always assessed immediately by angiography. Follow-up data were obtained from patient records, by interviewing patients on the telephone or by postal questionnaires when necessary. The mean follow-up time was 21 months. Results: The embolization was technically successful in all 37 cases. A curative outcome was achieved in 33 cases (89%). The mean duration of the procedure was 110 min. Four patients (8%) had mild transient complications, but no severe or persistent complications were encountered. Twenty-three patients needed a blood transfusion. Slight rebleeding occurred in three patients during the follow-up; all responded to conservative treatment. One patient suffered two episodes of rebleeding within 2 months after primary embolization. Re-embolizations successfully stopped the bleeding. Conclusion: Embolization is the primary invasive modality for treating intractable idiopathic epistaxis. It proved both safe and effective over a relatively long follow-up.

  9. Sustained improvement of intractable rheumatoid arthritis after total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Field, E.H.; Strober, S.; Hoppe, R.T.; Calin, A.; Engleman, E.G.; Kotzin, B.L.; Tanay, A.S.; Calin, H.J.; Terrell, C.P.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1983-08-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) was administered to 11 patients who had intractable rheumatoid arthritis that was unresponsive to conventional medical therapy, including aspirin, multiple nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, gold salts, and D-penicillamine. Total lymphoid irradiation was given as an alternative to cytotoxic drugs such as azathioprine and cyclophosphamide. After radiotherapy, 9 of the 11 patients showed a marked improvement in clinical disease activity as measured by morning stiffness, joint tenderness, joint swelling, and overall functional abilities. The mean improvement of disease activity in all patients ranged from 40-70 percent and has persisted throughout a 13-28 month followup period. This improvement permitted the mean daily steroid dose to be reduced by 54%. Complications included severe fatigue and other constitutional symptoms during radiotherapy, development of Felty's syndrome in 1 patient, and an exacerbation of rheumatoid lung disease in another. After therapy, all patients exhibited a profound T lymphocytopenia, and a reversal in their T suppressor/cytotoxic cell to helper cell ratio. The proliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin A, and allogeneic leukocytes (mixed leukocyte reaction) were markedly reduced, as was in vitro immunoglobulin synthesis after stimulation with pokeweed mitogen. Alterations in T cell numbers and function persisted during the entire followup period, except that the mixed leukocyte reaction showed a tendency to return to normal values.

  10. Intractable pain--the present position.

    PubMed Central

    Lipton, S.

    1981-01-01

    The broad changes that have occurred in the treatment of intractable pain are considered. There is a new understanding of the anatomy and physiology of pain pathways and pain appreciation. Thus gate control theory, the spinal laminae, and the descending inhibitory pain pathway through the raphe nuclei are discussed in relation to the recent discovery of the opioid (enkephalin) systems. Out of this arises the stimulation methods of pain relief--transcutaneous neural stimulation, periaqueductal stimulation, and acupuncture. These are valuable in patients with a normal expectation of life. For patients with a shortened expectation of life other methods, especially destructive ones, are valuable (though in all types of chronic pain drug therapy is still the most used method). Basic changes in techniques and the equipment used to bring this about are detailed broadly. In particular, the use of the image intensifier X-ray machine and the stimulation and destruction available from the modern lesion generator when used in combination provide accuracy and safety. Techniques and methods are constantly altering and examples of this are given. All this costs money in time, personnel, and equipment; the costings of the Liverpool Centre for Pain Relief are given. Finally, the Pain Relief Foundation is in being in Liverpool in the grounds of Walton Hospital. This has been made possible by a large 'seed' donation by the Wolfson Foundation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6894676

  11. Intractable pediatric chronic sinusitis with antrochoanal polyp.

    PubMed

    Saito, H; Honda, N; Yamada, T; Mori, S; Fujieda, S; Saito, T

    2000-08-31

    It has been reported that pediatric chronic sinusitis with antrochoanal polyp is difficult to cure because it tends to recur easily even with surgery. Therefore, in order to improve its cure rate, aggressive treatment combining polypectomy, intra-maxillary intubation through the inferior meatus, macrolide administration, etc., was attempted. Thirty-seven sides of pediatric chronic sinusitis with antrochoanal polyp and 44 sides of chronic sinusitis without polyp were evaluated after the same treatments. The mean age of patients was 9.7 years, and the mean intubation period was 20 months. Since subjective improvements in children are questionable, the efficacy was evaluated strictly on the basis of X-ray alone focusing on the maxillary sinus. Twenty-four percent of the group with antrochoanal polyp showed 'excellent' effect, i.e. almost complete resolution of the sinus findings, while 45% of the group without polyp showed 'excellent' effect, with a mean follow-up period of 3 years and 6 months. This difference was significant (P<0. 01, chi(2)-test). These results further document the intractableness of chronic sinusitis with choanal polyp in children. PMID:10967380

  12. [New drug therapies for intractable chronic pain: preface and comments].

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, Kazuo

    2013-07-01

    Recently, new drugs for intractable chronic pain are available in Japan. The following articles describe topics of new drugs for intractable chronic pain including transdermal fentanyl, tramadol/acetaminophen combination tablets, buprenorphine transdermal patch, pregabalin, and duloxetine. Treatment of constipation in chronic pain patients and management of opioid induced nausea and vomiting are also described to prevent complication of pain-relief drug therapy. PMID:23905399

  13. The effect of stellate ganglion block on intractable lymphedema after breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin; Park, Hahck Soo; Cho, Soo Young; Baik, Hee Jung; Kim, Jong Hak

    2015-01-01

    Lymphedema of the upper limb after breast cancer surgery is a disease that carries a life-long risk and is difficult to cure once it occurs despite the various treatments which have been developed. Two patients were referred from general surgery department for intractable lymphedema. They were treated with stellate ganglion blocks (SGBs), and the circumferences of the mid-point of their each upper and lower arms were measured on every visit to the pain clinic. A decrease of the circumference in each patient was observed starting after the second injection. A series of blocks were established to maintain a prolonged effect. Both patients were satisfied with less swelling and pain. This case demonstrates the benefits of an SGB for intractable upper limb lymphedema. PMID:25589949

  14. The Effect of Stellate Ganglion Block on Intractable Lymphedema after Breast Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin; Cho, Soo Young; Baik, Hee Jung; Kim, Jong Hak

    2015-01-01

    Lymphedema of the upper limb after breast cancer surgery is a disease that carries a life-long risk and is difficult to cure once it occurs despite the various treatments which have been developed. Two patients were referred from general surgery department for intractable lymphedema. They were treated with stellate ganglion blocks (SGBs), and the circumferences of the mid-point of their each upper and lower arms were measured on every visit to the pain clinic. A decrease of the circumference in each patient was observed starting after the second injection. A series of blocks were established to maintain a prolonged effect. Both patients were satisfied with less swelling and pain. This case demonstrates the benefits of an SGB for intractable upper limb lymphedema. PMID:25589949

  15. Ultrasound-Guided Nerve Block with Botulinum Toxin Type A for Intractable Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Moon, Young Eun; Choi, Jung Hyun; Park, Hue Jung; Park, Ji Hye; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain includes postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN), and trigeminal neuralgia, and so on. Although various drugs have been tried to treat neuropathic pain, the effectiveness of the drugs sometimes may be limited for chronic intractable neuropathic pain, especially when they cannot be used at an adequate dose, due to undesirable severe side effects and the underlying disease itself. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) has been known for its analgesic effect in various pain conditions. Nevertheless, there are no data of nerve block in PHN and PDN. Here, we report two patients successfully treated with ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve block using BoNT-A for intractable PHN and PDN. One patient had PHN on the left upper extremity and the other patient had PDN on a lower extremity. Due to side effects of drugs, escalation of the drug dose could not be made. We injected 50 Botox units (BOTOX(®), Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA, USA) into brachial plexus and lumbar plexus, respectively, under ultrasound. Their pain was significantly decreased for about 4-5 months. Ultrasound-guided nerve block with BoNT-A may be an effective analgesic modality in a chronic intractable neuropathic pain especially when conventional treatment failed to achieve adequate pain relief. PMID:26761032

  16. Ultrasound-Guided Nerve Block with Botulinum Toxin Type A for Intractable Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Young Eun; Choi, Jung Hyun; Park, Hue Jung; Park, Ji Hye; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain includes postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN), and trigeminal neuralgia, and so on. Although various drugs have been tried to treat neuropathic pain, the effectiveness of the drugs sometimes may be limited for chronic intractable neuropathic pain, especially when they cannot be used at an adequate dose, due to undesirable severe side effects and the underlying disease itself. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) has been known for its analgesic effect in various pain conditions. Nevertheless, there are no data of nerve block in PHN and PDN. Here, we report two patients successfully treated with ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve block using BoNT-A for intractable PHN and PDN. One patient had PHN on the left upper extremity and the other patient had PDN on a lower extremity. Due to side effects of drugs, escalation of the drug dose could not be made. We injected 50 Botox units (BOTOX®, Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA, USA) into brachial plexus and lumbar plexus, respectively, under ultrasound. Their pain was significantly decreased for about 4–5 months. Ultrasound-guided nerve block with BoNT-A may be an effective analgesic modality in a chronic intractable neuropathic pain especially when conventional treatment failed to achieve adequate pain relief. PMID:26761032

  17. Norovirus disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Hall, Aron J; Lopman, Ben A; Payne, Daniel C; Patel, Manish M; Gastaaduy, Paul A; Vinj, Jan; Parashar, Umesh D

    2013-08-01

    Although recognized as the leading cause of epidemic acute gastroenteritis across all age groups, norovirus has remained poorly characterized with respect to its endemic disease incidence. Use of different methods, including attributable proportion extrapolation, population-based surveillance, and indirect modeling, in several recent studies has considerably improved norovirus disease incidence estimates for the United States. Norovirus causes an average of 570-800 deaths, 56,000-71,000 hospitalizations, 400,000 emergency department visits, 1.7-1.9 million outpatient visits, and 19-21 million total illnesses per year. Persons >65 years of age are at greatest risk for norovirus-associated death, and children <5 years of age have the highest rates of norovirus-associated medical care visits. Endemic norovirus disease occurs year round but exhibits a pronounced winter peak and increases by ? 50% during years in which pandemic strains emerge. These findings support continued development and targeting of appropriate interventions, including vaccines, for norovirus disease. PMID:23876403

  18. Mechanisms of Cachexia in Chronic Disease States.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tadashi; Delafontaine, Patrice

    2015-10-01

    Sarcopenia and cachexia are muscle wasting syndromes associated with aging and with many chronic diseases, such as congestive heart failure (CHF), diabetes, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic kidney disease (CKD). While mechanisms are complex, these conditions are often accompanied by elevated angiotensin II (Ang II). Patients with advanced CHF or CKD often have increased Ang II levels and cachexia, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor treatment improves weight loss. It was found that Ang II infusion in rodents leads to skeletal muscle wasting. Ang II increases cytokines and circulating hormones, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, serum amyloid-A and glucocorticoids, which regulate muscle protein synthesis and degradation. Ang II-induced muscle wasting is caused by alterations in insulin-like growth factor-1 signaling, enhanced muscle protein breakdown via the ubiquitin-proteasome system and decreased appetite resulting from the downregulation of hypothalamic orexigenic neuropeptides, such as Npy and orexin. Ang II also inhibits 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activity and disrupts normal energy balance via the activation of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase phosphatase PP2Cα. Furthermore, Ang II inhibits skeletal muscle stem (satellite) cell proliferation, leading to lowered muscle regenerative capacity. Distinct satellite cell angiotensin receptor subtypes have different effects on different stages of differentiation and are critical for the regulation of muscle regeneration. These data suggest that the renin-angiotensin system plays a critical role in mechanisms underlying cachexia in chronic disease states, and it is a promising target for the treatment of muscle atrophy in patients with diseases such as CHF and CKD. PMID:26083652

  19. Intractable bleeding from solitary mandibular metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shiang-Fu; Wu, Ren-Chin; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Liao, Chun-Ta; Chen, I-How; Yeh, Chun-Nan

    2007-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) metastasizes to the mandible is infrequently seen. Solitary bony metastasis to the mandible is rarer. The intractable bleeding caused by rupture of the metastatic HCC is challenging to clinicians. We present a case of a 74-year-old woman with HCC under control without progression for 3 years. Left facial swelling and episodes of bleeding developed recently and biopsy revealed a metastatic HCC. Computer tomography showed a large tumor in parapharyngeal space with evident mandibular ramus destruction. Bleeding occurred from the metastatic tumor but could not be controlled by electrocauterization, Surgicel, tissue glue, and bone wax and angiographic embolization. Palliative radiotherapy (2400 cGy in 6 fractions) was tried and the intractable bleeding was successfully stopped after the radiotherapy. Because of the hypervascular and osteolytic nature of the solitary mandibular metastatic lesion, the bleeding was troublesome. Radiotherapy provided successful control of intractable bleeding from the metastatic tumor. PMID:17724815

  20. Extensive apoptosis in a case of intractable infantile status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Koshi A.; Weidenheim, Karen; Legatt, Alan D.; Shifteh, Keivan; Abbott, I. Richmond; Mosh, Solomon L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary A previously healthy 8-month-old girl underwent epilepsy surgery for intractable focal seizures with secondary generalization that progressed to status epilepticus. The major neuropathologic finding was extensive apoptosis. Investigations did not reveal any etiology for the apoptosis or the seizures. This is the first report of apoptosis, without necrosis, in association with intractable status epilepticus in the developing human brain. The findings suggest that new treatment strategies targeted to prevent apoptosis may be useful in children with prolonged status epilepticus. PMID:19464149

  1. Intractable Electrical Storm After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Originating in Abnormal Purkinje Fibers.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Chiho; Tsukada, Toru; Sakamoto, Hiroaki; Naruse, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Kentaro; Sekiguchi, Yukio; Imai, Akito; Aonuma, Kazutaka; Hiramatsu, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Electrical storm is a rare but critical complication following revascularization in patients with ischemic heart disease. We report the case of a 67-year-old man who developed drug refractory intractable electrical storm after emergent coronary artery bypass grafting for ischemic cardiomyopathy. The electrical storm was successfully eliminated by percutaneous endocardial radiofrequency catheter ablation targeting the abnormal Purkinje-related triggering ventricular premature contractions in a low-voltage zone. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12670 (J Card Surg 2016;31:74-77). PMID:26598230

  2. Early Career Teacher Attrition: New Thoughts on an Intractable Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallant, Andrea; Riley, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Early career exit from teaching has reached epidemic proportions and appears intractable. Previous attempts to find solutions are yet to make much of an inroad. The aim of the research was to discover what nine beginning teachers required to remain in the classroom, by adopting a phenomenological approach. The authors identified participants'

  3. Early Career Teacher Attrition: New Thoughts on an Intractable Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallant, Andrea; Riley, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Early career exit from teaching has reached epidemic proportions and appears intractable. Previous attempts to find solutions are yet to make much of an inroad. The aim of the research was to discover what nine beginning teachers required to remain in the classroom, by adopting a phenomenological approach. The authors identified participants'…

  4. Intractability in Graph Drawing and Geometry: FPT Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitesides, Sue

    The fixed parameter tractability (FPT) approach pioneered by Downey and Fellows provides an algorithm design philosophy for solving special cases of intractable problems. Here we review several examples from geometry and graph drawing, in particular layered graph drawing, that illustrate fixed parameter tractability techniques.

  5. Role of biologics in intractable urticaria

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Andrew; Bulkhi, Adeeb; Casale, Thomas B

    2015-01-01

    Chronic urticaria (CU) is a common condition faced by many clinicians. CU has been estimated to affect approximately 0.5%–1% of the population, with nearly 20% of sufferers remaining symptomatic 20 years after onset. Antihistamines are the first-line therapy for CU. Unfortunately, nearly half of these patients will fail this first-line therapy and require other medication, including immune response modifiers or biologics. Recent advances in our understanding of urticarial disorders have led to more targeted therapeutic options for CU and other urticarial diseases. The specific biologic agents most investigated for antihistamine-refractory CU are omalizumab, rituximab, and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). Of these, the anti-IgE monoclonal antibody omalizumab is the best studied, and has recently been approved for the management of CU. Other agents, such as interleukin-1 inhibitors, have proved beneficial for Schnitzler syndrome and cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), diseases associated with urticaria. This review summarizes the relevant data regarding the efficacy of biologics in antihistamine-refractory CU. PMID:25926715

  6. A diagnostic challenge in a young woman with intractable hiccups and vomiting: a case of neuromyelitis optica

    PubMed Central

    Mandaliya, Rohan; Boigon, Margot; Smith, David G.; Bhutani, Suchit; Ali, Naveed; Hilton, Cheryl; Kelly, John; Ternopolska, Nataliya

    2015-01-01

    Intractable nausea and vomiting along with hiccups is a commonly encountered problem on any general medicine or gastroenterology service. These symptoms are usually not appreciated as the possible initial manifestation of neuromyelitis optica (NMO). Missing diagnosis at this early stage will lead to a delay in the treatment, and hence, irreversible complications including blindness and paraplegia could occur. We report a case of a 22-year-old young female who presented with intractable hiccups and vomiting. After extensive evaluation, she was found to have NMO which involved the area postrema, the vomiting center of the brain. Early diagnosis from the clinical picture aided by aquaporin-4 serologic testing is extremely important to allow early initiation of immunosuppressive therapy. Immunosuppression gives an opportunity to modify the disease at an earlier stage rather than waiting for evolution of disease to fulfill the diagnostic criteria of NMO. PMID:26486116

  7. [Management of intractable cancer pain: from intrathecal morphine to cell allograft].

    PubMed

    Lazorthes, Y; Sallerin, B; Verdie, J C; Sol, J C; Duplan, H; Tkaczuk, J; Tafani, M; Bastide, R; Bes, J C

    2000-11-01

    The durable effectiveness of intrathecal morphine administration is well established for the management of intractable cancer pain, after failure of systemic opioids, secondary to the persistence of non-reversible undesirable side effects. Many patients are referred to late in the disease course. This conservative method to control pain of malignant origin must not be reserved for last resort treatment for terminal patients. Intra-cerebro-ventricular morphine administration is a very effective and generally safe method for controlling intractable cancer pain. Because of the chronic implantation of an intra-ventricular catheter this method is somewhat invasive. Its indications remain a simple and effective alternative when the topography of nociceptive pain is diffuse or cephalic. In clinical practice, intrathecal and/or intra-cerebro-ventricular administration of opioids is limited by cost, the need for specialized maintenance and mechanical malfunctions if implantable drug delivery systems, or by the risk of bacterial contamination and ambulatory constraints when repeated daily injections via an intrathecal access port are used. To answer these limitations, cell therapy using intrathecal chromaffin cell allograft is a promising approach for the management of cancer pain refractory to traditional drug therapy and pain lesion surgery. The basic rationale and preclinical studies on experimental pain models have enabled starting prospective clinical trials. Prior to transplantation, handling and preparation of the chromaffin tissue is critical for allograft viability. The initial results of clinical trials with human chromaffin cell grafts from intractable cancer pain have reported long-lasting pain relief, in correlation with met-enkephalin release into the CSF. Convincing evidence will require controlled studies. The limitations of this innovative cell therapy and especially the lack of human adrenal gland availability point to the need for new sources of cells. Perspectives include xenogenic or engineered cell lines. PMID:11084478

  8. Surgical repair of intractable chylous ascites following laparoscopic anterior resection

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Gi Won; Lee, Min Ro

    2015-01-01

    Chylous ascites is the accumulation of a milk-like peritoneal fluid rich in triglycerides and it is an unusual complication following surgical treatment of colorectal cancer. Conservative management is usually sufficient in patients with chylous ascites after surgery. However, we describe a patient with intractable chylous ascites after laparoscopic anterior resection for sigmoid colon cancer who failed initial conservative treatment. This patient was successfully managed by surgery. PMID:26019476

  9. Chronic spinal cord stimulation in medically intractable orthostatic tremor

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, J K; Weigel, R; Blahak, C; Bzner, H; Capelle, H?H; Grips, E; Rittmann, M; Whrle, J C

    2006-01-01

    Background Orthostatic tremor with its sense of unsteadiness when standing may have a devastating effect on affected persons. Currently, there are no other treatment options in those who do not respond or who do not tolerate medical treatment. Objectives To report on a pilot study on spinal cord stimulation in medically intractable orthostatic tremor. Methods Chronic spinal cord stimulation (SCS) was performed in two patients with medically?intractable orthostatic tremor via quadripolar plate electrodes implanted at the lower thoracic spine. The electrodes were connected to implantable pulse generators. Results Subjective and objective improvement of unsteadiness was achieved within a frequency range of 50 to 150?Hz, and occurred in the presence of stimulation?induced paraesthesia. With optimized stimulation settings polygraphic electromyelogram (EMG) recordings continued to show the typical 1416?Hz EMG activity. The beneficial effect of SCS was maintained at long?term follow?up. Conclusions The results of this pilot study indicate that SCS may be an option in patients with otherwise intractable orthostatic tremor. PMID:16735398

  10. Role of surgical therapy in management of intractable ascites.

    PubMed

    Elcheroth, J; Vons, C; Franco, D

    1994-01-01

    Almost 10% of patients with cirrhosis and ascites develop intractable ascites. When large-volume paracentesis fails to relieve ascites, patients may be submitted to one of the three following surgical options: portosystemic shunting, peritoneovenous shunting, or liver transplantation. Portosystemic shunting is efficient in clearing ascites, but it is associated with a high rate of encephalopathy and liver failure. The indications for portosystemic shunting are therefore limited for treatment of intractable ascites and should be performed only in patients with good liver function in whom all other treatments failed. Peritoneovenous shunting has been associated with a high rate of early complications and valve obstruction. Improvements in perioperative care and in the material used have greatly reduced the operative risks and increased the patency rate. Mortality remains high in patients with severe liver failure or with a history of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis or variceal bleeding. Peritoneovenous shunting should not be done when these risk factors are present. In the absence of such risk factors, peritoneovenous shunting is a good procedure and may provide definitive relief of ascites and long-term survival in more than 50% of the operated patients. In patients with poor risk factors liver transplantation may be preferable, and the onset of intractable ascites in a patient with a severely compromised liver should trigger the indication of liver replacement. PMID:8042329

  11. Clinical application of kampo medicine (rikkunshito) for common and/or intractable symptoms of the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Tominaga, Kazunari; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenterological reflux disease and functional dyspepsia are usually treatable using Western medical practices. Nonetheless, some cases present with intractable symptoms that are not amenable to these therapies. Treatment with kampo, a traditional Japanese medicine, recently has been proposed as an alternative therapy for use in combination with the Western practices. In general, traditional Japanese medicines have been used empirically for intractable symptoms correctively designated as general malaises. Accumulating lines of evidence, including basic and clinical researches, have demonstrate detailed mechanisms where traditional Japanese medicines exert pharmacological action to improve symptoms. Therefore, traditional Japanese medicines have been gaining use by various medical doctors as the specific modes of pharmacological action are recognized. This review covers both the pharmacological functions and the clinical efficacies of rikkunshito for use in treating disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25688209

  12. Treatment of intractable skin ulcers caused by vascular insufficiency with allogeneic cultured dermal substitute: a report of eight cases.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Tomonori; Amoh, Yasuyuki; Tanabe, Kenichi; Katsuoka, Kensei; Kuroyanagi, Yoshimitsu

    2012-03-01

    Chronic leg ulcers have various causes and can be difficult to treat, although topical treatments, including basic fibroblast growth factor and PGE1, have been used. We applied an allogeneic cultured dermal substitute (CDS) to eight patients with intractable ulcers. The patients had various underlying diseases, including diabetes mellitus, systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid syndrome, necrobiosis lipoidica, stasis dermatitis, livedo vasculopathy, and rheumatoid arthritis. The CDS was prepared by seeding cultured human fibroblasts on a spongy matrix consisting of hyaluronic acid and atelocollagen. Good clinical results were achieved, as demonstrated by reepithelization, healthy granulation tissue formation, and a subsequent decrease in wound size. Daily dressing changes became unnecessary when the allogeneic CDS was used. Based on these results, we suggest that CDS may be useful for the treatment of intractable skin ulcers. PMID:21861088

  13. Occurrence of whirling disease of trout in western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolf, H.; Yasutake, W.T.

    1970-01-01

    Whirling disease of trout, caused byMyxosoma cerebralis, was diagnosed in 1966 for the first time in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) from California and Nevada hatcheries. In 1969 the first incidence of this disease in cutthroat trout (S.clarki) was reported in Nevada. To date these have been the only confirmed cases of whirling disease in western United States.

  14. Grapevine Fanleaf Disease in Washington State Vineyards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wine grapes (Vitis vinifera L.) are susceptible to a wide range of viruses. Among them, grapevine degeneration caused by Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV) is considered as one of the most economically important virus diseases affecting grapevines worldwide. Infected grapevines show a range of foliar sy...

  15. The amyloid state of proteins in human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, David; Jucker, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid fibers and oligomers are associated with a great variety of human diseases including Alzheimers disease and the prion conditions. Here we attempt to connect recent discoveries on the molecular properties of proteins in the amyloid state with observations about pathological tissues and disease states. We summarize studies of structure and nucleation of amyloid and relate these to observations on amyloid polymorphism, prion strains, co-aggregation of pathogenic proteins in tissues, and mechanisms of toxicity and transmissibility. Molecular studies have also led to numerous strategies for biological and chemical interventions against amyloid diseases. PMID:22424229

  16. Intractable pneumothorax managed by talc pleurodesis and bronchial occlusion with spigots.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Atsuko; Kida, Hirotaka; Muraoka, Hiromi; Nishine, Hiroki; Mineshita, Masamichi; Miyazawa, Teruomi

    2015-03-01

    Three cases of inoperable secondary spontaneous pneumothorax were diagnosed in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Two cases initially underwent bronchial occlusion with endobronchial Watanabe spigot (EWS), while one underwent talc poudrage with pleuroscopy. As air leaks were not stopped completely in all cases with the initial procedures, we performed additional interventional treatments: pleuroscopic talc poudrage in cases when bronchial occlusion was performed first; and bronchial occlusion with EWS for a case that initially underwent talc pleurodesis. The air leaks ceased in all cases without complication. We successfully removed chest tubes 2-10 days after secondary procedure, which was 10-23 days after the first procedure. The combination of talc pleurodesis and bronchial occlusion with EWS, when a single, initial interventional treatment fails, can be considered in cases of intractable, inoperable secondary pneumothorax. PMID:25802742

  17. Motive attribution asymmetry for love vs. hate drives intractable conflict.

    PubMed

    Waytz, Adam; Young, Liane L; Ginges, Jeremy

    2014-11-01

    Five studies across cultures involving 661 American Democrats and Republicans, 995 Israelis, and 1,266 Palestinians provide previously unidentified evidence of a fundamental bias, what we term the "motive attribution asymmetry," driving seemingly intractable human conflict. These studies show that in political and ethnoreligious intergroup conflict, adversaries tend to attribute their own group's aggression to ingroup love more than outgroup hate and to attribute their outgroup's aggression to outgroup hate more than ingroup love. Study 1 demonstrates that American Democrats and Republicans attribute their own party's involvement in conflict to ingroup love more than outgroup hate but attribute the opposing party's involvement to outgroup hate more than ingroup love. Studies 2 and 3 demonstrate this biased attributional pattern for Israelis and Palestinians evaluating their own group and the opposing group's involvement in the current regional conflict. Study 4 demonstrates in an Israeli population that this bias increases beliefs and intentions associated with conflict intractability toward Palestinians. Finally, study 5 demonstrates, in the context of American political conflict, that offering Democrats and Republicans financial incentives for accuracy in evaluating the opposing party can mitigate this bias and its consequences. Although people find it difficult to explain their adversaries' actions in terms of love and affiliation, we suggest that recognizing this attributional bias and how to reduce it can contribute to reducing human conflict on a global scale. PMID:25331879

  18. Motive attribution asymmetry for love vs. hate drives intractable conflict

    PubMed Central

    Waytz, Adam; Young, Liane L.; Ginges, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Five studies across cultures involving 661 American Democrats and Republicans, 995 Israelis, and 1,266 Palestinians provide previously unidentified evidence of a fundamental bias, what we term the motive attribution asymmetry, driving seemingly intractable human conflict. These studies show that in political and ethnoreligious intergroup conflict, adversaries tend to attribute their own groups aggression to ingroup love more than outgroup hate and to attribute their outgroups aggression to outgroup hate more than ingroup love. Study 1 demonstrates that American Democrats and Republicans attribute their own partys involvement in conflict to ingroup love more than outgroup hate but attribute the opposing partys involvement to outgroup hate more than ingroup love. Studies 2 and 3 demonstrate this biased attributional pattern for Israelis and Palestinians evaluating their own group and the opposing groups involvement in the current regional conflict. Study 4 demonstrates in an Israeli population that this bias increases beliefs and intentions associated with conflict intractability toward Palestinians. Finally, study 5 demonstrates, in the context of American political conflict, that offering Democrats and Republicans financial incentives for accuracy in evaluating the opposing party can mitigate this bias and its consequences. Although people find it difficult to explain their adversaries actions in terms of love and affiliation, we suggest that recognizing this attributional bias and how to reduce it can contribute to reducing human conflict on a global scale. PMID:25331879

  19. Plerixafor may treat intractable post-herpetic neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fang; Li, Xueyang; Bao, Mengmeng; Guo, Ruijuan; Zhang, Chen; Wu, Anshi; Yue, Yun; Guan, Yun; Wang, Yun

    2015-10-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes varicella (chicken pox) and establishes latency in ganglia. A reactivation of latent VZV leads to herpes zoster (shingles). Herpes zoster often causes herpetic pain that can last for months or years after the rash has healed. Prolonged herpetic pain is defined as post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN). There is an unmet need to explore novel therapeutic approaches for intractable PHN. Postmortem studies have shown that VZV induces neuro-inflammation and damage to the ganglia and spinal cord. These pathological changes may be critical factors resulting in PHN. Accumulated evidence suggests that stem cells may alleviate neuropathic pain in animal models through immunomodulatory actions and neuronal repair. Unfortunately, exogenous stem cell transplantation has limited clinical use due to safety concerns, immune rejection, and complications. Pharmacological mobilization of endogenous bone marrow stem cells may overcome these obstacles. Plerixafor is a SDF-1/CXCR4 axis blocker which can stimulate the release of stem cells from the bone marrow into blood circulation. We propose a hypothesis that endogenous stem cells mobilized by plerixafor may relieve the symptoms of PHN. If so, it may represent a novel approach for the treatment of intractable PHN. PMID:26175195

  20. Lyme Disease Coinfections in the United States.

    PubMed

    Caulfield, Adam J; Pritt, Bobbi S

    2015-12-01

    Lyme disease in North America is caused by infection with the spirochetal bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and transmitted by Ixodes scapularis and Ixodes pacificus ticks. These ticks also have the potential to transmit a rapidly expanding list of other pathogenic bacteria, viruses, and parasites, including Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Babesia microti, deer tick (Powassan) virus, Borrelia miyamotoi, and the Ehrlichia muris-like organism. Coinfections with B burgdorferi and these other agents are often difficult to diagnose and may go untreated, and thus contribute significantly to patient morbidity and mortality from tick-borne infections. PMID:26593260

  1. Lymphoproliferative disease virus in wild turkeys in southeast United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously, retroviral neoplasms reported in wild upland game birds in the United States of America have typically been associated with reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) infection. The information presented herein described the first reports of lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) infection in ...

  2. OUTBREAKS OF WATERBORNE DISEASE IN THE UNITED STATES, 1978

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surveillance of outbreaks of waterborne disease is jointly conducted by the Center for Disease Control (CDC), Atlanta, Ga., and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Cincinnati, Ohio. Waterborne outbreaks are reported to the CDC and EPA by state and local health departments ...

  3. OBSERVATIONS ON THE STATE OF MARINE DISEASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    State of marine disease studies is described. erhaps the greatest area of success in the last 20 years has been in the identification and characterization of viruses, bacteria, fungi, protozoan and metazoan disease agents. pening of new areas of investigation such as that of inte...

  4. MULTI-STATE BLUETONGUE DISEASE SURVEILLANCE PROJECT: VECTOR STUDY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The distribution of the biting midge, Culicoides sonorensis, the major vector (carrier) of bluetongue viruses, was determined across the multi-state region of Nebraska, South, and North Dakota. This study was part of a larger study of bluetongue disease in cattle. Bluetongue disease is important b...

  5. Occupational disease in New York State: A comprehensive examination

    SciTech Connect

    Markowitz, S.B.; Fischer, E.; Fahs, M.C.; Shapiro, J.; Landrigan, P.J. )

    1989-01-01

    In order to obtain information on the current magnitude of occupational disease in New York State, four data sources were reviewed: Workers' Compensation records, disease registries maintained by the state department of health, data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), and data from the California's physician reporting system. A proportionate attributable risk approach is used to develop estimates of mortality due to occupational diseases. The distribution of occupational hazards was assessed using data from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. Finally, econometric estimates of the direct and indirect costs of occupational illness were developed. Data indicate that 5,000 to 7,000 deaths are caused each year in New York State by work-related illnesses, and at least 35,000 new cases of occupational illness develop each year in the State. It is also estimated that between 150,000 and 750,000 workers in New York State are employed in the 50 most hazardous industries. OSHA standards regulating exposure to selected chemicals were found to have been violated frequently. The annual costs of occupational disease in New York State are approximately $600,000,000. Of the 52,000 physicians in New York State, only 73 are board-certified in occupational medicine. Most of these are involved in administrative, teaching, and research aspects of occupational medicine. Of the 300 industrial hygenists in New York State, two-thirds are employed by major corporations. Recommendations are described to improve the recognition of occupational disease in New York State and to reduce the burden of this disease. A statewide network of occupational health clinical services is proposed and has been funded by the New York State Legislature.

  6. State-space size considerations for disease-progression models.

    PubMed

    Regnier, Eva D; Shechter, Steven M

    2013-09-30

    Markov models of disease progression are widely used to model transitions in patients' health state over time. Usually, patients' health status may be classified according to a set of ordered health states. Modelers lump together similar health states into a finite and usually small, number of health states that form the basis of a Markov chain disease-progression model. This increases the number of observations used to estimate each parameter in the transition probability matrix. However, lumping together observably distinct health states also obscures distinctions among them and may reduce the predictive power of the model. Moreover, as we demonstrate, precision in estimating the model parameters does not necessarily improve as the number of states in the model declines. This paper explores the tradeoff between lumping error introduced by grouping distinct health states and sampling error that arises when there are insufficient patient data to precisely estimate the transition probability matrix. PMID:23609629

  7. Costs of Chronic Diseases at the State Level: The Chronic Disease Cost Calculator

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Louise B.; Khavjou, Olga A.; Li, Rui; Maylahn, Christopher M.; Tangka, Florence K.; Nurmagambetov, Tursynbek A.; Ekwueme, Donatus U.; Nwaise, Isaac; Chapman, Daniel P.; Orenstein, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Many studies have estimated national chronic disease costs, but state-level estimates are limited. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention developed the Chronic Disease Cost Calculator (CDCC), which estimates state-level costs for arthritis, asthma, cancer, congestive heart failure, coronary heart disease, hypertension, stroke, other heart diseases, depression, and diabetes. Methods Using publicly available and restricted secondary data from multiple national data sets from 2004 through 2008, disease-attributable annual per-person medical and absenteeism costs were estimated. Total state medical and absenteeism costs were derived by multiplying per person costs from regressions by the number of people in the state treated for each disease. Medical costs were estimated for all payers and separately for Medicaid, Medicare, and private insurers. Projected medical costs for all payers (2010 through 2020) were calculated using medical costs and projected state population counts. Results Median state-specific medical costs ranged from $410 million (asthma) to $1.8 billion (diabetes); median absenteeism costs ranged from $5 million (congestive heart failure) to $217 million (arthritis). Conclusion CDCC provides methodologically rigorous chronic disease cost estimates. These estimates highlight possible areas of cost savings achievable through targeted prevention efforts or research into new interventions and treatments. PMID:26334712

  8. The effect of somatostatin on small intestinal transport in intractable diarrhoea of infancy.

    PubMed

    Bisset, W M; Jenkins, H; Booth, I; Smith, V; Milla, P J

    1993-08-01

    It has been reported that somatostatin may be an effective antisecretory agent in a range of conditions causing severe secretory diarrhoea. In many children, intractable diarrhoeal illnesses result in significant morbidity and mortality. In a group of seven children with secretory diarrhoea, the effect of i.v. infusion of somatostatin (3.5 micrograms/kg stratum plus 3.5 micrograms/kg/h) on the net mucosal flux of salt and water was assessed using an in vivo steady-state perfusion technique. In one of the seven children who had evidence of deranged mucosal secretion and preserved villus function, somatostatin infusion resulted in a moderate reduction in secretion. In the remaining six, it had little or no beneficial effect. Somatostatin did not alter the rate of glucose absorption. PMID:7901358

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi and Chagas' Disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Bern, Caryn; Kjos, Sonia; Yabsley, Michael J.; Montgomery, Susan P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Chagas' disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and causes potentially life-threatening disease of the heart and gastrointestinal tract. The southern half of the United States contains enzootic cycles of T. cruzi, involving 11 recognized triatomine vector species. The greatest vector diversity and density occur in the western United States, where woodrats are the most common reservoir; other rodents, raccoons, skunks, and coyotes are also infected with T. cruzi. In the eastern United States, the prevalence of T. cruzi is highest in raccoons, opossums, armadillos, and skunks. A total of 7 autochthonous vector-borne human infections have been reported in Texas, California, Tennessee, and Louisiana; many others are thought to go unrecognized. Nevertheless, most T. cruzi-infected individuals in the United States are immigrants from areas of endemicity in Latin America. Seven transfusion-associated and 6 organ donor-derived T. cruzi infections have been documented in the United States and Canada. As improved control of vector- and blood-borne T. cruzi transmission decreases the burden in countries where the disease is historically endemic and imported Chagas' disease is increasingly recognized outside Latin America, the United States can play an important role in addressing the altered epidemiology of Chagas' disease in the 21st century. PMID:21976603

  10. Intractable epilepsy and the P-glycoprotein hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Xin; Wang, Da-Wei; Liu, Yong; Ma, Yan-Hui

    2016-05-01

    Epilepsy is a serious neurological disorder that affects more than 60 million people worldwide. Intractable epilepsy (IE) refers to approximately 20%-30% of epileptic patients who fail to achieve seizure control with antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment. Although the mechanisms underlying IE are not well understood, it has been hypothesized that multidrug transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) play a major role in drug efflux at the blood-brain barrier, and may be the underlying factor in the variable responses of patients to AEDs. The main goal of the present review is to show evidence from different areas that support the idea that the overexpression of P-gp is associated with IE. We discuss here evidence from animal studies, pharmacology, clinical cases and genetic studies. PMID:26000919

  11. Surgical outcomes for intractable epilepsy in children with epileptic spasms.

    PubMed

    Moseley, Brian D; Nickels, Katherine; Wirrell, Elaine C

    2012-06-01

    Epileptic spasms, or seizures marked by flexor, extensor, or flexor-extensor spasms, are not always responsive to medical management. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the outcome of epilepsy surgery in children with medically intractable epileptic spasms. We identified 11 children with epileptic spasms who underwent lesionectomy (36%), lobectomy (27%), multi-lobectomy (9%), hemispherectomy (18%), or corpus callosotomy (9%). At the time of surgery, 6 children had developed other concurrent seizure type(s), including simple partial (9%), complex partial (27%), partial undifferentiated (9%), primary generalized tonic clonic (9%), tonic (9%), atonic (27%), and myoclonic (9%) seizures. Six children (55%) were seizure free at last follow-up from initial surgery. Predictors of favorable outcome included lack of focal slowing and the presence of less than 2 interictal epileptiform abnormalities on postoperative electroencephalogram (P = .035 and .035, respectively). Favorable outcome was significantly associated with parent/caregiver report of improved postoperative developmental outcomes (P = .026). PMID:22123426

  12. Neuraxial (epidural and intrathecal) opioids for intractable pain

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Summary Points 1. Neuraxial opioids are considered for use in patients who have resistant intractable pain that fails to respond to other treatment options or pain that responds to analgesia but for which the doses required result in unacceptable side-effects. 2. Neuraxial opiods can be considered for both chronic non-malignant pain and chronic cancer-related pain. 3. Effectiveness in chronic non-malignant pain and cancer pain is exerted through the use of either single-agent drugs (opioids) or a combination of drugs: opioids, local anaesthetics and other drugs such as clonodine and ziconotide. 4. Complications of long-term continuous infusion therapy are related to the insertion process (haematoma), the mechanical device (both pump and catheter) and the long-term effects of the drugs. 5. Patients will require ongoing ambulatory monitoring and supportive care. PMID:26516463

  13. [Laryngotracheal separation and tracheoesophageal diversion for intractable aspiration in ALS--usefulness and indication].

    PubMed

    Mita, Shuji

    2007-10-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of laryngotracheal separation or tracheoesophageal diversion (LTS/TED), we investigated changes in medical management after LTS/TED. We performed LTS/TED for intractable aspiration in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and patients with other neurological diseases. Most of the subjects had already received a tracheostomy, and all the patients with ALS had tracheostomy positive pressure ventilation. However, they remained at risk of intractable aspiration, had experienced frequent suctioning of aspiration material, and could not eat. In all cases, LTS/TED was performed safely within 3 hours and without any complications. After LTS/TED, there was no aspiration of saliva in any of the patients. In most subjects, the frequency of suctioning by medical staff and caregivers was much reduced. The frequency of aspiration pneumonia was also extremely lowered. Follow-up study demonstrated that complete control over aspiration was achieved in all of the patients. Some of them were completely self-sufficient in their ability to eat. Some of the other patients were at least able to enjoy taste. Nutritional status was significantly improved. All the patients, family caregivers, and medical staff involved in this study were satisfied with the outcome. These results indicate that LTS/TED is a very useful procedure in several aspects: it benefits patients who have a fear of aspiration; it reduces the burden on patients and family caregivers; it promotes their quality of life; and it limits the aspiration-associated demands on medical staff. Based on the results, we have proposed an indication of LTS/TED for dysphasia in ALS. PMID:17969355

  14. Lamotrigine for intractable migraine-like headaches in Sturge-Weber syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Shohei; Shimakawa, Shuichi; Fukui, Miho; Tanabe, Takuya; Tamai, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    We herein report that naratriptan remarkably improved intractable migraine-like headaches in a patient with Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) despite his past history of cerebral infarction. In addition, lamotrigine had a prophylactic effect on his visual aura and headaches. An 18-year-old male patient with SWS had intractable migraine-like headaches every several months from the age of 3years. His migraine-like headaches were characterized by pulsating attacks preceded by left homonymous hemianopsia, which persisted after headache disappearance. In addition, after 14years of age, the pulsating headaches were preceded by photophobia without homonymous hemianopsia and occurred almost daily. Headache pains were not improved by acetaminophen or loxoprofen sodium hydrate. Furthermore, various prophylactic drugs were ineffective. After obtaining informed consent, naratriptan was administered. The pain severity was reduced and the duration of headache with homonymous hemianopsia was shortened from several days to several hours. Interestingly, naratriptan also shortened the duration of homonymous hemianopsia to several hours. We confirmed that his headache attacks were not epileptic seizures by ictal electroencephalography. However, 25mg/day of lamotrigine had a prophylactic effect on the frequency of headache. Moreover, lamotrigine led to complete remission of his headache without homonymous hemianopsia. Lamotrigine may have an advantage in terms of reducing the risk of cerebrovascular disease caused by migraine-like headaches and the use of triptans. The most effective management for migraine-like headaches in patients with SWS has not been established. Lamotrigine is a potentially effective option for patients with SWS with migraine-like headaches. PMID:23877022

  15. Peace Education in Societies Involved in Intractable Conflicts: Direct and Indirect Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bar-Tal, Daniel; Rosen, Yigal

    2009-01-01

    The present article deals with the crucial question: Can peace education facilitate change in the sociopsychological infrastructure that feeds continued intractable conflict and then how the change can be carried? Intractable conflicts still rage in various parts of the globe, and they not only cause local misery and suffering but also threaten

  16. The Epidemiology of Meningococcal Disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Lee H.

    2009-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis and other serious infections worldwide. The epidemiology of N. meningitidis is highly changeable, with major changes in disease incidence and serogroup distribution. Six serogroups are responsible for most meningococcal disease worldwide, namely serogroups, A, B, C, W-135, X, and Y; the epidemiology of disease caused by each serogroup is unique. No vaccine is available for endemic disease caused by serogroup B strains. Two tetravalent (A/C/Y/W-135) meningococcal vaccines are licensed in the United States, a purified polysaccharide product and a polysaccharideprotein conjugate vaccine. The conjugate vaccine is recommended for all adolescents, although vaccine coverage remains low, and other high risk groups. A comprehensive program to prevent invasive meningococcal disease in the US will require immunization of infants; several conjugate vaccines for infants may become available in the near future. Broadly protective vaccines for endemic serogroup B disease are also needed. PMID:20144015

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance of iron and copper disease states

    SciTech Connect

    Runge, V.M.; Clanton, J.A.; Smith, F.W.; Hutchison, J.; Mallard, J.; Partain, C.L.; James, A.E. Jr.

    1983-11-01

    The tissue levels of paramagnetic ions are an important factor in the determination of T/sub 1/ values as observed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging. The increased levels of iron present in human disease states such as hemochromatosis lead to decreased T/sub 1/ values. The mean liver T/sub 1/ of three patients with iron storage disease was determined to be 130 msec, significantly different from the value of 154 msec, the mean for 14 normal controls. Whether NMR will be able to detect the increased copper levels in liver and brain in Wilson disease remains for further clinical trials to evaluate. NMR imaging, however, does serve as a noninvasive method for the diagnosis of states of iron overload and as a technique to follow progression of disease or response to medical therapy.

  18. Deaths attributable to Alzheimer's disease in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Ewbank, D C

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study provided 2 estimates of the number of deaths attributable to Alzheimer's disease in the United States. METHODS: One estimate was based on data from the East Boston, Mass, study. The second was based on a simulation using population-based estimates of prevalence and separate estimates of excess death by duration of disease. RESULTS: Despite different methods and very different estimates of prevalence, these 2 methods led to very similar estimates of 173,000 and 163,000 excess deaths. CONCLUSIONS: These estimates suggest that 7.1% of all deaths in the United States in 1995 are attributable to Alzheimer's disease, placing it on a par with cerebrovascular diseases as the third leading cause of death. PMID:9987474

  19. Newborn screening for Krabbe disease: the New York State model.

    PubMed

    Duffner, Patricia K; Caggana, Michele; Orsini, Joseph J; Wenger, David A; Patterson, Marc C; Crosley, Carl J; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Arnold, Georgianne L; Escolar, Maria L; Adams, Darius J; Andriola, Mary R; Aron, Alan M; Ciafaloni, Emma; Djukic, Alexandra; Erbe, Richard W; Galvin-Parton, Patricia; Helton, Laura E; Kolodny, Edwin H; Kosofsky, Barry E; Kronn, David F; Kwon, Jennifer M; Levy, Paul A; Miller-Horn, Jill; Naidich, Thomas P; Pellegrino, Joan E; Provenzale, James M; Rothman, Stanley J; Wasserstein, Melissa P

    2009-04-01

    Krabbe disease is a rare inherited neurologic disorder affecting the central and peripheral nervous systems. The disease has four phenotypes: early infantile, later onset, adolescent, and adult. The only known treatment is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, which is, in the early infantile form of the disease, most beneficial if performed before onset of clinical symptoms. In August 2006, New York State began screening all newborns for Krabbe disease. A rapid and accurate technique for assessing galactocerebrosidase activity and performing DNA mutation analysis had been developed. Interpreting these results was limited, however, because neither enzyme activity nor genetic mutation reliably predicts phenotype. A series of initiatives were therefore developed by a multidisciplinary group of neurologists, geneticists, metabolic pediatricians, neurodevelopmental pediatricians, and transplant physicians (the Krabbe Consortium of New York State) to enhance the effectiveness of the newborn screening program. A standardized clinical evaluation protocol was designed based on the available literature, criteria for transplantation for the early infantile phenotype were formulated, a clinical database and registry was developed, and a study of developmental and functional outcomes was instituted. This multidisciplinary standardized approach to evaluating infants who have positive results on newborn screening may serve as a model for other states as they begin the process of screening for Krabbe disease and other lysosomal storage disorders. PMID:19302934

  20. Vector Blood Meals and Chagas Disease Transmission Potential, United States

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Patricia L.; Hobson, Julia; de la Rua, Nicholas M.; Lucero, David E.; Klotz, John H.; Schmidt, Justin O.; Klotz, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    A high proportion of triatomine insects, vectors for Trypanosoma cruzi trypanosomes, collected in Arizona and California and examined using a novel assay had fed on humans. Other triatomine insects were positive for T. cruzi parasite infection, which indicates that the potential exists for vector transmission of Chagas disease in the United States. PMID:22469536

  1. Periodontal Disease and Oral Hygiene Among Children. United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Health Statistics (DHEW/PHS), Hyattsville, MD.

    Statistical data presented on periodontal disease and oral hygiene among noninstitutionalized children, aged 6-11, in the United States are based on a probability sample of approximately 7,400 children involved in a national health survey during 1963-65. The report contains estimates of the Periodontal Index (PI) and the Simplified Oral Hygiene…

  2. THREE-STATE STUDY OF WATERBORNE DISEASE SURVEILLANCE TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    For a two-year period, the states of Colorado, Vermont and Washington tested the effectiveness of seven surveillance methods for identifying waterborne disease outbreaks. Six of the methods were termed active and utilized procedures soliciting reports of illness. The seventh meth...

  3. End State Renal Disease among Native Americans, 1983-86.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Jeffrey M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Determines the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) among Native Americans and Whites in the United States from 1983-86. Findings indicate 1,075 Native American cases represented an annual incidence 2.8 times the rate for Whites. Fifty-six percent of Native American cases and 27 percent of White cases were attributed to diabetes. (JS)

  4. Stereotactic laser ablation of the splenium for intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ho, Allen L; Miller, Kai J; Cartmell, Sam; Inoyama, Katherine; Fisher, Robert S; Halpern, Casey H

    2016-01-01

    Partial or complete corpus callosotomies have been applied, traditionally via open surgical or radiosurgical approaches, for the treatment of epilepsy in patients with multifocal tonic, atonic, or myoclonic seizures. Minimally invasive methods, such as MRI-guided laser interstitial thermal ablation (MTLA), are being employed to functionally remove or ablate seizure foci in the treatment of epilepsy. This therapy can achieve effectiveness similar to that of traditional resection, but with reduced morbidity compared with open surgery. Here, we present a patient with a history of prior partial corpus callosotomy who continued to suffer from medically refractory epilepsy with bisynchronous onset. We report on the utilization of laser ablation of the splenium in this patient to achieve full corpus callosotomy. Adequate ablation of the splenial remnant was confirmed by postoperative MRI imaging, and at four-month follow-up, the patient's seizure frequency had dropped more than 50%. This is the first reported instance of laser ablation of the splenium to achieve full corpus callosotomy following a previous unsuccessful anterior callosotomy in a patient with intractable generalized epilepsy. PMID:26955518

  5. Epilepsy Surgery in Pediatric Intractable Epilepsy with Destructive Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Park, So Young; Kwon, Hye Eun; Kang, Hoon-Chul; Lee, Joon Soo; Kim, Dong Seok; Kim, Heung Dong

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The aim of the current study is to review the clinical features, surgery outcomes and parental satisfaction of children with destructive encephalopathy who underwent epilepsy surgery due to medically intractable seizures. Methods: 48 patients who underwent epilepsy surgery from October 2003 to August 2011 at Severance Children’s Hospital have been reviewed. The survey was conducted for functional outcomes and parental satisfaction at least 1 year after the surgery. Results: Epileptic encephalopathy including Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and infantile spasms was more prevalent than symptomatic focal epilepsy. Hypoxic ischemic injury accounted for most of the underlying etiology of the destructive encephalpathy, followed by central nervous system infection and head trauma. 27 patients (56.3%) underwent resective surgery and 21 patients (43.7%) underwent palliative surgery. 16 patients (33.3%) achieved seizure free and 27 parents (87.5%) reported satisfaction with the outcome of their children’s epilepsy surgery. In addition, 14 parents (77.8 %) whose children were not seizure free reported satisfaction with their children’s improvement in cognitive and behavior issues. Conclusions: Epilepsy surgery in destructive encephalopathy was effective for controlling seizures. Parents reported satisfaction not only with the surgical outcomes, but also with improvement of cognitive and behavior issues. PMID:24649473

  6. Treatment of intractable rheumatoid arthritis with total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kotzin, B.L.; Strober, S.; Engleman, E.G.; Calin, A.; Hoppe, R.T.; Kansas, G.S.; Terrell, C.P.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1981-10-22

    Eleven patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis were treated with total lymphoid irradiation (total dose, 2000 rad) in an uncontrolled feasibility study, as an alternative to long-term therapy with cytotoxic drugs such as cyclophosphamide and azathioprine. During a follow-up period of five to 18 months after total lymphoid irradiation, there was a profound and sustained suppression of the absolute lymphocyte count and in vitro lymphocyte function, as well as an increase in the ratio of Leu-2 (suppressor/cytotoxic) to Leu-3 (helper) T cells in the blood. Persistent circulating suppressor cells of the mixed leukocyte response and of pokeweek mitogen-induced immunoglobulin secretion developed in most patients. In nine of the 11 patients, these changes in immune status were associated with relief of joint tenderness and swelling and with improvement in function scores. Maximum improvement occurred approximately six months after irradiation and continued for the remainder of the observation period. Few severe or chronic side effects were associated with the radiotherapy.

  7. Treatment of intractable rheumatoid arthritis with total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kotzin, B.L.; Strober, S.; Engleman, E.G.; Calin, A.; Hoppe, R.T.; Kansas, G.S.; Terrell, C.P.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1981-10-01

    Eleven patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis were treated with total lymphoid irradiation (total dose, 2000 rad) in an uncontrolled feasibility study, as an alternative to long-term therapy with cytotoxic drugs such as cyclophosphamide and azathioprine. During a follow-up period of five to 18 months after total lymphoid irradiation, there was a profound and sustained suppression of the absolute lymphocyte count and in vitro lymphocyte function, as well as an increase in the ratio of Leu-2 (suppressor/cytotoxic) to Leu-3 (helper) T cells in the blood. Persistent circulating suppressor cells of the mixed leukocyte response and of pokeweed mitogen-induced immunoglobulin secretion developed in most patients. In nine of the 11 patients, these changes in immune status were associated with relief of joint tenderness and swelling and with improvement in function scores. Maximum improvement occurred approximately six months after irradiation and continued for the remainder of the observation period. Few severe or chronic side effects were associated with the radiotherapy.

  8. Medically intractable seizures originating from the primary somatosensory hand area.

    PubMed

    Koubeissi, Mohamad Z; Maciunas, Robert J; Tanner, Adriana; Lüders, Hans O

    2008-12-01

    A 33-year-old woman had begun having intractable somatosensory seizures affecting the left hand since the age of 13 years. Occasionally, her seizures progressed to left arm posturing followed by secondary generalization. Scalp EEG revealed interictal epileptiform discharges in the right posterior quadrant, but with no ictal EEG correlates. Brain MRI showed a right temporal encephalomalacia, sparing mesial temporal structures, suggestive of a perinatal vascular insult. Ictal electrocorticogram, electrical stimulation mapping, and somatosensory evoked potentials localized the ictal onset to the hand area of the postcentral gyrus. Resection of that area resulted in total resolution of seizures with no significant lasting deficits. Potential complications of resecting the primary somatosensory hand area can be severe, as proprioceptive sensory loss may be permanent, resulting in significant disability. Such deficits may be temporary however, and the literature continues to report conflicting results regarding postsurgical outcome. Cortical plasticity may explain recovery of sensory deficits after partial resection of the primary somatosensory hand area. Multiple subpial transections of that area are sometimes performed to minimize functional deficits, but seizure control may be less optimal than with cortical resection. PMID:19017578

  9. Motor and sensory impairments in children with intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Beckung, E; Uvebrant, P

    1993-01-01

    During a 3-year period (1988-1991), 72 children with severe intractable epilepsy were studied. A standardized protocol for assessment of motor and sensory function was designed for school age children. Function was quantified on a 4-point scale on 47 items, including gross motor function, balance, coordination, strength, range of motion (ROM), velocity, fine motor function, sensation, perception, and neurologic tests. Classification of handicaps according to World Health Organization (WHO) definitions was performed. Videotape documentation completed the assessment. Evaluation of treatment services showed that provision of rehabilitation services had been insufficient and provided only for children with additional major movement disorders, mainly cerebral palsy (CP) cases. To minimize the handicap in children with severe epilepsy, it is essential to clarify the total sensorimotor impairment pattern, including balance, coordination, and perceptual capacity. Impairments in these functions are, as shown in this study, frequent and exist independent of major disabilities such as mental retardation or cerebral palsy. When several neuroimpairments were identified, a multiplicative rather than an additive effect on the total handicap was evident. PMID:8404748

  10. Stereotactic laser ablation of the splenium for intractable epilepsy☆

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Allen L.; Miller, Kai J.; Cartmell, Sam; Inoyama, Katherine; Fisher, Robert S.; Halpern, Casey H.

    2016-01-01

    Partial or complete corpus callosotomies have been applied, traditionally via open surgical or radiosurgical approaches, for the treatment of epilepsy in patients with multifocal tonic, atonic, or myoclonic seizures. Minimally invasive methods, such as MRI-guided laser interstitial thermal ablation (MTLA), are being employed to functionally remove or ablate seizure foci in the treatment of epilepsy. This therapy can achieve effectiveness similar to that of traditional resection, but with reduced morbidity compared with open surgery. Here, we present a patient with a history of prior partial corpus callosotomy who continued to suffer from medically refractory epilepsy with bisynchronous onset. We report on the utilization of laser ablation of the splenium in this patient to achieve full corpus callosotomy. Adequate ablation of the splenial remnant was confirmed by postoperative MRI imaging, and at four-month follow-up, the patient's seizure frequency had dropped more than 50%. This is the first reported instance of laser ablation of the splenium to achieve full corpus callosotomy following a previous unsuccessful anterior callosotomy in a patient with intractable generalized epilepsy. PMID:26955518

  11. Resting state brain networks and their implications in neurodegenerative disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, William S.; Yoo, Kwangsun; Kim, Jinho; Jeong, Yong

    2012-10-01

    Neurons are the basic units of the brain, and form network by connecting via synapses. So far, there have been limited ways to measure the brain networks. Recently, various imaging modalities are widely used for this purpose. In this paper, brain network mapping using resting state fMRI will be introduced with several applications including neurodegenerative disease such as Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal lobar degeneration and Parkinson's disease. The resting functional connectivity using intrinsic functional connectivity in mouse is useful since we can take advantage of perturbation or stimulation of certain nodes of the network. The study of brain connectivity will open a new era in understanding of brain and diseases thus will be an essential foundation for future research.

  12. West nile virus and other arboviral diseases - United States, 2013.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Nicole P; Lehman, Jennifer A; Staples, J Erin; Fischer, Marc

    2014-06-20

    Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) are transmitted to humans primarily through the bites of infected mosquitoes and ticks. West Nile virus (WNV) is the leading cause of domestically acquired arboviral disease in the United States. However, several other arboviruses also cause sporadic cases and seasonal outbreaks of neuroinvasive disease (i.e., meningitis, encephalitis, and acute flaccid paralysis). This report summarizes surveillance data reported to CDC in 2013 for WNV and other nationally notifiable arboviruses, excluding dengue. Forty-seven states and the District of Columbia reported 2,469 cases of WNV disease. Of these, 1,267 (51%) were classified as WNV neuroinvasive disease, for a national incidence of 0.40 per 100,000 population. After WNV, the next most commonly reported cause of arboviral disease was La Crosse virus (LACV) (85 cases), followed by Jamestown Canyon virus (JCV), Powassan virus (POWV), and eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) (eight). WNV and other arboviruses continue to cause serious illness in substantial numbers of persons annually. Maintaining surveillance remains important to help direct and promote prevention activities. PMID:24941331

  13. Progress Toward Eliminating Hepatitis A Disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Trudy V; Denniston, Maxine M; Hill, Holly A; McDonald, Marian; Klevens, Monina R; Elam-Evans, Laurie D; Nelson, Noele P; Iskander, John; Ward, John D

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) disease disproportionately affects adolescents and young adults, American Indian/Alaska Native and Hispanic racial/ethnic groups, and disadvantaged populations. During 1996-2006, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) made incremental changes in hepatitis A (HepA) vaccination recommendations to increase coverage for children and persons at high risk for HAV infection. This report examines the temporal association of ACIP-recommended HepA vaccination and disparities (on the absolute scale) in cases of HAV disease and on seroprevalence of HAV-related protection (measured as antibody to HAV [anti-HAV]). ACIP-recommended childhood HepA vaccination in the United States has eliminated most absolute disparities in HAV disease by age, race/ethnicity, and geographic area with relatively modest ?1-dose and ?2-dose vaccine coverage. However, the increasing proportion of cases of HAV disease among adults with identified and unidentified sources of exposure underscores the importance of considering new strategies for preventing HAV infection among U.S. adults. For continued progress to be made toward elimination of HAV disease in the United States, additional strategies are needed to prevent HAV infection among an emerging population of susceptible adults. Notably, HAV infection remains endemic in much of the world, contributing to U.S. cases through international travel and the global food economy. PMID:26916458

  14. Environmental tobacco smoke and periodontal disease in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Arbes, S J; Agstsdttir, H; Slade, G D

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Cigarette smoking is a leading risk factor for periodontal disease. This cross-sectional study investigated the relation between environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and periodontal disease in the United States. METHODS: Data were obtained from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-1994). The outcome was periodontal disease, defined as 1 or more periodontal sites with attachment loss of 3 mm or greater and a pocket depth of 4 mm or greater at the same site. Exposure to ETS at home and work was self-reported. The study analyzed 6611 persons 18 years and older who had never smoked cigarettes or used other forms of tobacco. RESULTS: Exposure to ETS at home only, work only, and both was reported by 18.0%, 10.7%, and 3.8% of the study population, respectively. The adjusted odds of having periodontal disease were 1.6 (95% confidence interval = 1.1, 2.2) times greater for persons exposed to ETS than for persons not exposed. CONCLUSIONS: Among persons in the United States who had never used tobacco, those exposed to ETS were more likely to have periodontal disease than were those not exposed to ETS. PMID:11211634

  15. Identity and psychological ownership in chronic illness and disease state

    PubMed Central

    Karnilowicz, W

    2011-01-01

    Psychological ownership is rarely considered in health discourse related to chronic illness or disease state. Construction of identity is an important consideration within this framework. This autoethnographic study explores psychological ownership and identity related to prostate cancer and chronic illness. Conclusions about the nature of psychological ownership and identity were gathered from the relevant literature and personal experience. Themes include the patient–healthcare professional relationship and that psychological ownership is personal and grounded in an individual's sense of identity, control and perceived capacity to control illness or disease. Personal reflection through autoethnography guides discussion of psychological ownership and identity. PMID:20738388

  16. Use of an Oral Elemental Diet in Infants with Severe Intractable Diarrhea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Joseph O.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Evaluated was the use of an oral elemental diet consisting of crystalline amino acids, glucose, electrolytes, and vitamins to control severe intractable diarrhea in 27 infants (1-day to 9-months of age). (DB)

  17. Recovery of heavy metals from intractable wastes: A thermal approach

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, D.W.

    1996-12-31

    The generation of industrial solid wastes containing leachable species of environmental concern is a problem for developing and developed nations alike. These materials arise from direct processing of mineral ores, from production of metals and minerals, from manufacturing operations, and from air and water pollution treatment processes. The general characteristics that make these wastes intractable is that their content of hazardous species is not easily liberated from the waste yet is not bound so tightly that they are safe for landfill disposal or industrial use. The approach taken in this work is a thermal treatment that separates the inorganic contaminants from the wastes. The objective is to provide recovery and reuse of both the residual solids and liberated contaminants. The results from operating this technique using two very different types of waste are described. The reasons that the process will work for a wide variety of wastes are explored. By using the knowledge of the thermodynamic stability of the phases found from the characterization analyses, a thermal regime was found that allowed separation of the contaminants without capturing the matrix materials. Bench scale studies were carried out using a tube furnace. Samples of the wastes were heated in crucible boats from 750 to 1150{degrees}C in the presence of various chlorinating agents. The offgas contained 90{sup +}% of the targeted contaminants despite their complex matrix form. The residue was free of contamination. As a result of the efficient concentrating mechanism of the process, the contaminants in the offgas solids are attractive for reuse in metallurgical industries. As an additional benefit, the organic contaminants of the residues were eliminated. Dioxin traces in the solids before treatment were absent after treatment. 15 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Lymphoid irradiation in intractable rheumatoid arthritis. A double-blind, randomized study comparing 750-rad treatment with 2,000-rad treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hanly, J.G.; Hassan, J.; Moriarty, M.; Barry, C.; Molony, J.; Casey, E.; Whelan, A.; Feighery, C.; Bresnihan, B.

    1986-01-01

    Twenty patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis were treated with 750-rad or 2,000-rad lymphoid irradiation in a randomized double-blind comparative study. Over a 12-month followup period, there was a significant improvement in 4 of 7 and 6 of 7 standard parameters of disease activity following treatment with 750 rads and 2,000 rads, respectively. Transient, short-term toxicity was less frequent with the lower dose. In both groups, there was a sustained peripheral blood lymphopenia, a selective depletion of T helper (Leu-3a+) lymphocytes, and reduced in vitro mitogen responses. These changes did not occur, however, in synovial fluid. These results suggest that 750-rad lymphoid irradiation is as effective as, but less toxic than, that with 2,000 rads in the management of patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis.

  19. Melatonin and sleep-related problems in children with intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Elkhayat, Hamed A; Hassanein, Sahar M; Tomoum, Hoda Y; Abd-Elhamid, Iman A; Asaad, Tarek; Elwakkad, Amany S

    2010-04-01

    Children with epilepsy have high rates of sleep problems. Melatonin has been advocated in treatment of sleep disorders, and its beneficial effect has been confirmed in insomnia. The aim of this study was to assess melatonin levels in children with intractable epilepsy and its relation to pattern of sleep and characteristics of seizure disorder, as well as the effect of melatonin therapy on those parameters. The study was conducted on 23 children with intractable epilepsy and 14 children with controlled seizures. Patients were evaluated by psychometric sleep assessment and assay of diurnal and nocturnal melatonin levels. Children with intractable epilepsy received oral melatonin before bedtime. They were reassessed after 3 months. Children with intractable epilepsy had higher scores for each category of sleep walking, forcible teeth grinding, and sleep apnea. At the end of therapeutic trial, patients with intractable epilepsy exhibited significant improvement in bedtime resistance, sleep duration, sleep latency, frequent nocturnal arousals, sleep walking, excessive daytime sleepiness, nocturnal enuresis, forcible teeth grinding, sleep apnea, and Epworth sleepiness scores. There was also significant reduction in seizure severity. Thus, use of melatonin in patients with intractable seizures was associated with improvement of both many sleep-related phenomena and the severity of seizures. PMID:20304327

  20. Characteristics and safety assessment of intractable proteins in genetically modified crops.

    PubMed

    Bushey, Dean F; Bannon, Gary A; Delaney, Bryan F; Graser, Gerson; Hefford, Mary; Jiang, Xiaoxu; Lee, Thomas C; Madduri, Krishna M; Pariza, Michael; Privalle, Laura S; Ranjan, Rakesh; Saab-Rincon, Gloria; Schafer, Barry W; Thelen, Jay J; Zhang, John X Q; Harper, Marc S

    2014-07-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops may contain newly expressed proteins that are described as "intractable". Safety assessment of these proteins may require some adaptations to the current assessment procedures. Intractable proteins are defined here as those proteins with properties that make it extremely difficult or impossible with current methods to express in heterologous systems; isolate, purify, or concentrate; quantify (due to low levels); demonstrate biological activity; or prove equivalency with plant proteins. Five classes of intractable proteins are discussed here: (1) membrane proteins, (2) signaling proteins, (3) transcription factors, (4) N-glycosylated proteins, and (5) resistance proteins (R-proteins, plant pathogen recognition proteins that activate innate immune responses). While the basic tiered weight-of-evidence approach for assessing the safety of GM crops proposed by the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) in 2008 is applicable to intractable proteins, new or modified methods may be required. For example, the first two steps in Tier I (hazard identification) analysis, gathering of applicable history of safe use (HOSU) information and bioinformatics analysis, do not require protein isolation. The extremely low level of expression of most intractable proteins should be taken into account while assessing safety of the intractable protein in GM crops. If Tier II (hazard characterization) analyses requiring animal feeding are judged to be necessary, alternatives to feeding high doses of pure protein may be needed. These alternatives are discussed here. PMID:24662477

  1. Current State of Stem Cell Therapy for Ischemic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Povsic, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Improvements in the care of patients with ischemic cardiovascular disease have led to improved survival but also a burgeoning population of patients with advanced ischemic heart disease. Cell therapies offer a novel approach toward cardiac "rejuvenation" via stimulation of new blood vessel growth, enhancing tissue perfusion, and via preservation or even regeneration of myocardial tissue, leading to improvements in cardiac performance after myocardial infarction and in patients with advanced heart failure. Here, we summarize and offer some thoughts on the state of the field of cell therapy for ischemic heart disease, targeting three separate conditions that have been the subject of significant clinical research: enhancing left ventricular recovery after MI, improving outcomes and symptoms in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF), and treatment of patients with refractory angina, despite maximal medical therapy. PMID:26768743

  2. The LeVeen shunt in the elective treatment of intractable ascites in cirrhosis. A prospective study on 140 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Smadja, C; Franco, D

    1985-01-01

    One hundred and forty patients with an intractable ascites complicating a chronic liver disease received a peritoneovenous shunt (PVS) using the LeVeen valve. Operative mortality was ten per cent but was 25% in patients with severe liver failure. Intraoperative drainage of ascites sharply decreased postoperative complications and mortality. One-year actuarial survival rate was 81.4%, respectively 77.7%, 61.3%, and 24.7% in patients with good liver function and moderate or severe liver failure. Variceal hemorrhage occurred in 11 patients and late infection in another 11 patients. Thirty-eight patients (30.5%) had recurrence of ascites. This was mostly due to an obstruction on the venous side of the shunt. An elective portacaval shunt had to be done in 23 patients for recurrence of ascites or variceal bleeding. Among the 57 patients still alive at time of writing, 51 were free of ascites. These results suggest that PVS is an efficient operation. This procedure may be largely indicated in the selected and small group of cirrhotic patients with true intractable ascites and moderate or no liver insufficiency. Images FIG. 1. FIG. 2. PMID:3977450

  3. Deletions of recessive disease genes: CNV contribution to carrier states and disease-causing alleles

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Philip M.; Campbell, Ian M.; Baggett, Brett C.; Soens, Zachry T.; Rao, Mitchell M.; Hixson, Patricia M.; Patel, Ankita; Bi, Weimin; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lalani, Seema R.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Shaw, Chad A.; Lupski, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Over 1200 recessive disease genes have been described in humans. The prevalence, allelic architecture, and per-genome load of pathogenic alleles in these genes remain to be fully elucidated, as does the contribution of DNA copy-number variants (CNVs) to carrier status and recessive disease. We mined CNV data from 21,470 individuals obtained by array-comparative genomic hybridization in a clinical diagnostic setting to identify deletions encompassing or disrupting recessive disease genes. We identified 3212 heterozygous potential carrier deletions affecting 419 unique recessive disease genes. Deletion frequency of these genes ranged from one occurrence to 1.5%. When compared with recessive disease genes never deleted in our cohort, the 419 recessive disease genes affected by at least one carrier deletion were longer and located farther from known dominant disease genes, suggesting that the formation and/or prevalence of carrier CNVs may be affected by both local and adjacent genomic features and by selection. Some subjects had multiple carrier CNVs (307 subjects) and/or carrier deletions encompassing more than one recessive disease gene (206 deletions). Heterozygous deletions spanning multiple recessive disease genes may confer carrier status for multiple single-gene disorders, for complex syndromes resulting from the combination of two or more recessive conditions, or may potentially cause clinical phenotypes due to a multiply heterozygous state. In addition to carrier mutations, we identified homozygous and hemizygous deletions potentially causative for recessive disease. We provide further evidence that CNVs contribute to the allelic architecture of both carrier and recessive disease-causing mutations. Thus, a complete recessive carrier screening method or diagnostic test should detect CNV alleles. PMID:23685542

  4. STAMPing at the crossroads of normal physiology and disease states.

    PubMed

    Sikkeland, Jørgen; Sheng, Xia; Jin, Yang; Saatcioglu, Fahri

    2016-04-15

    The six transmembrane protein of prostate (STAMP) proteins, also known as six transmembrane epithelial antigen of prostate (STEAPs), comprises three members: STAMP1-3. Their expression is regulated by a variety of stimuli, including hormones and cytokines, in varied settings and tissues with important roles in secretion and cell differentiation. In addition, they are implicated in metabolic and inflammatory diseases and cancer. Here, we review the current knowledge on the role of STAMPs in both physiological and pathological states. PMID:26911931

  5. Efficacy of total lymphoid irradiation in intractable rheumatoid arthritis. A double-blind, randomized trial

    SciTech Connect

    Strober, S.; Tanay, A.; Field, E.; Hoppe, R.T.; Calin, A.; Engleman, E.G.; Kotzin, B.; Brown, B.W.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1985-04-01

    Twenty-six patients participated in a randomized, double-blind study of the efficacy of total lymphoid irradiation in the treatment of intractable rheumatoid arthritis. All 26 patients, for whom therapy with gold compounds and penicillamine had failed, would ordinarily have been considered candidates for cytotoxic or antimetabolite drug therapy. Thirteen patients randomly assigned to receive full-dose total lymphoid irradiation (2000 rad) and 11 patients assigned to receive control low-dose total lymphoid irradiation (200 rad) completed radiotherapy. Alleviation of joint disease activity was significantly greater in the high-dose group as judged by morning stiffness, joint tenderness, and functional assessment (global composite score) at 3 and 6 months after radiotherapy. The high-dose group had a marked reduction in both T-lymphocyte function and numbers, but this finding was not observed in the low-dose group. Complications seen in the high-dose but not low-dose group included transient neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, pericarditis, and pleurisy.

  6. Lymphoid irradiation in intractable rheumatoid arthritis: effects on the production of immunoglobulins and rheumatoid factors.

    PubMed Central

    Hanly, J G; Hassan, J; Moriarty, M; Whelan, A; Feighery, C; Bresnihan, B

    1985-01-01

    Changes in the production of immunoglobulins and rheumatoid factors (RF's) were studied in 20 patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis (RA) following total doses of 750 rad or 2,000 rad lymphoid irradiation. Over a 12 month follow up period there was no consistent change in absolute serum or synovial fluid levels, or in synovial membrane production of either total IgG, IgA or IgM, or the corresponding RF fractions. The invitro production of immunoglobulins and IgM RF by peripheral blood mononuclear cells was also unaltered, except for one patient who had a dramatic rise in IgM RF production. Over the same period there was a significant overall reduction in disease activity following both doses of radiotherapy. It is concluded that the clinical response which occurs following lymphoid irradiation is not due to a reduction in RF production. Furthermore, the production of RF's appears to be unaffected by the changes in T cell immunity which occur following lymphoid irradiation. PMID:4085151

  7. Radical Surgical Excision and Use of Lateral Thoracic Flap for Intractable Axillary Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Wan-Lin; Ong, Yee-Siang

    2012-01-01

    Current treatments for hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) include prolonged courses of antibiotics, retinoids, immunosuppressants, and biologics. Severe cases that are resistant to prolonged medical treatment pose a therapeutic challenge. We propose radical excision and lateral thoracic flap reconstruction as a treatment option for such cases. In our experience with two patients, good aesthetic and functional outcomes were achieved, with a high level of patient satisfaction. The availability of suitable flap coverage allows for wide resection of all of the hair-bearing skin, leading to a low incidence of residual disease and subsequent recurrence. Following excision of the affected tissue, the ideal reconstructive method in the axilla provides suitable coverage without unacceptable donor site morbidity and also avoids axillary contractures. A long lateral thoracic flap with delay has excellent coverage with minimal donor tissue sacrifice. With a suitable flap coverage option, the management paradigm of intractable HS should shift from prolonged medical treatment to allow decisive radical excision, which will improve the quality of life for patients. PMID:23233895

  8. Injections of botulinum toxin type a produce pain alleviation in intractable trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Allam, Nasser; Brasil-Neto, Joaquim P; Brown, Gilberto; Tomaz, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    To report the effects of local injections of botulinum toxin type A regarding pain relief and long-term control in a patient with intractable trigeminal neuralgia. The patient was a 75-year-old man with trigeminal neuralgia in the left hemifacial region. His pain was unbearable and could not be controlled by carbamazepine, amitriptyline, or blocked by infiltration of a glycerol solution or phenol. The authors evaluated pain intensity, quality, and location using a Visual Analog Scale to establish the efficacy of botulinum toxin type A injections. Two units of botulinum toxin type A (Botox) were subcutaneously injected once in eight points distributed along the territory of V1 and V2. Visual Analog Scores were measured at baseline and at 7, 30, 60, and 90 days after treatment. The authors also examined the patient's general condition and daily life activities. The Visual Analog values were, respectively, 82, 54, 25, 25, and 45 mm at each follow-up examination. No side effects were observed on the site of injection and on the patient's clinical state. The authors have been able to reduce trigeminal neuralgia pain with botulinum toxin type A injections in the V1, V2 territory during all the period of study, as well as to withdraw all medication. Interestingly, there was concomitant reduction of pain also in V3, which was not injected. PMID:15722812

  9. Impact of noncommunicable diseases in the State of Qatar

    PubMed Central

    Al-Kaabi, Salma Khalaf; Atherton, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    This study, commissioned by the Supreme Council of Health in the State of Qatar, focuses on the main noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) globally and regionally, in order to gauge their potential impact on Qatar. The research shows that the Gulf Cooperation Council is projected to be affected dramatically by NCDs in the coming years. The top five NCDs that will affect Qatar in terms of economic burden and disability-adjusted life years are cardiovascular diseases, mental health and behavioral disorders, cancer, respiratory diseases, and diabetes. Whilst these diseases have diverse effects on patients, their causes can be traced to “… common lifestyle-related, or behavioral, risk factors such as tobacco use, a diet heavy in fat, and physical inactivity”. The total direct and indirect costs to the Gulf Cooperation Council calculated for the above five NCDs were $36.2 billion in 2013, which equates to 150% of the officially recorded annual health care expenditure. If this trajectory is maintained, spending per head of population in Qatar will reach $2,778 by 2022. These figures demonstrate not only the potential financial impact of the main NCDs, but also give an idea of how the current health system is working to address them. PMID:26170702

  10. Subcellular compartmentation of ascorbate and its variation in disease states.

    PubMed

    Bnhegyi, Gbor; Benedetti, Angelo; Margittai, Eva; Marcolongo, Paola; Fulceri, Rosella; Nmeth, Csilla E; Szarka, Andrs

    2014-09-01

    Beyond its general role as antioxidant, specific functions of ascorbate are compartmentalized within the eukaryotic cell. The list of organelle-specific functions of ascorbate has been recently expanded with the epigenetic role exerted as a cofactor for DNA and histone demethylases in the nucleus. Compartmentation necessitates the transport through intracellular membranes; members of the GLUT family and sodium-vitamin C cotransporters mediate the permeation of dehydroascorbic acid and ascorbate, respectively. Recent observations show that increased consumption and/or hindered entrance of ascorbate in/to a compartment results in pathological alterations partially resembling to scurvy, thus diseases of ascorbate compartmentation can exist. The review focuses on the reactions and transporters that can modulate ascorbate concentration and redox state in three compartments: endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and nucleus. By introducing the relevant experimental and clinical findings we make an attempt to coin the term of ascorbate compartmentation disease. PMID:24907663

  11. Liver protein synthesis in physiology and in disease states.

    PubMed

    De Feo, Pierpaolo; Lucidi, Paola

    2002-01-01

    Liver protein synthesis is usually estimated in humans by measuring the synthesis rates of major exported liver proteins. Among these, the synthesis rates of albumin and fibrinogen have been more commonly studied. Recently, it was reported that several physiological stimuli such as physical exercise followed by recovery in the upright position, active and passive ascent to high altitude or life-style habits like vegetarian diet or smoking affect the synthesis rates of albumin and fibrinogen. Among disease states, the most recent literature addresses the effects of kidney diseases (hemodialysis, nephrotic syndrome), type 2 diabetes mellitus and growth hormone administration to critically ill patients and to patients undergoing laparoscopic colecystectomy. The results of these studies have clarified several aspects of the regulation of liver protein synthesis in humans and raise open questions that will stimulate the future research in the area. PMID:11790949

  12. Acupuncture modulates resting state hippocampal functional connectivity in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiqun; Liang, Peipeng; Zhao, Zhilian; Han, Ying; Song, Haiqing; Xu, Jianyang; Lu, Jie; Li, Kuncheng

    2014-01-01

    Our objective is to clarify the effects of acupuncture on hippocampal connectivity in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twenty-eight right-handed subjects (14 AD patients and 14 healthy elders) participated in this study. Clinical and neuropsychological examinations were performed on all subjects. MRI was performed using a SIEMENS verio 3-Tesla scanner. The fMRI study used a single block experimental design. We first acquired baseline resting state data during the initial 3 minutes and then performed acupuncture stimulation on the Tai chong and He gu acupoints for 3 minutes. Last, we acquired fMRI data for another 10 minutes after the needle was withdrawn. The preprocessing and data analysis were performed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM5) software. Two-sample t-tests were performed using data from the two groups in different states. We found that during the resting state, several frontal and temporal regions showed decreased hippocampal connectivity in AD patients relative to control subjects. During the resting state following acupuncture, AD patients showed increased connectivity in most of these hippocampus related regions compared to the first resting state. In conclusion, we investigated the effect of acupuncture on AD patients by combing fMRI and traditional acupuncture. Our fMRI study confirmed that acupuncture at Tai chong and He gu can enhance the hippocampal connectivity in AD patients. PMID:24603951

  13. Intractable prurigo nodularis successfully treated with combination therapy with a newly developed excimer laser and topical steroids.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Chisa; Tanizaki, Hideaki; Otsuka, Atsushi; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Kabashima, Kenji

    2014-06-01

    Prurigo nodularis (PN) is an eruption of lichenified or excoriated nodules related to intractable pruritus. A few reports have shown that a 308-nm excimer lamp/laser (EL) is effective for intractable PN. Herein, we report on two cases of intractable prurigo nodularis successfully treated with a new EL equipped with a filter to cut wavelengths shorter than 297 nm. Because this newly developed EL yields a therapeutic effect with low cumulative dosages of UV and a lower risk of DNA damage, it can be a new treatment option for intractable PN. PMID:24945654

  14. Risk of Importing Zoonotic Diseases through Wildlife Trade, United States

    PubMed Central

    Schloegel, Lisa M.; Daszak, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The United States is the world’s largest wildlife importer, and imported wild animals represent a potential source of zoonotic pathogens. Using data on mammals imported during 2000–2005, we assessed their potential to host 27 selected risk zoonoses and created a risk assessment that could inform policy making for wildlife importation and zoonotic disease surveillance. A total of 246,772 mammals in 190 genera (68 families) were imported. The most widespread agents of risk zoonoses were rabies virus (in 78 genera of mammals), Bacillus anthracis (57), Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (48), Echinococcus spp. (41), and Leptospira spp. (35). Genera capable of harboring the greatest number of risk zoonoses were Canis and Felis (14 each), Rattus (13), Equus (11), and Macaca and Lepus (10 each). These findings demonstrate the myriad opportunities for zoonotic pathogens to be imported and suggest that, to ensure public safety, immediate proactive changes are needed at multiple levels. PMID:19891857

  15. Automated mechanical ventilation: adapting decision making to different disease states.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Zahonero, S; Gottlieb, D; Haberthr, C; Guttmann, J; Mller, K

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of the present study is to introduce a novel methodology for adapting and upgrading decision-making strategies concerning mechanical ventilation with respect to different disease states into our fuzzy-based expert system, AUTOPILOT-BT. The special features are: (1) Extraction of clinical knowledge in analogy to the daily routine. (2) An automated process to obtain the required information and to create fuzzy sets. (3) The controller employs the derived fuzzy rules to achieve the desired ventilation status. For demonstration this study focuses exclusively on the control of arterial CO(2) partial pressure (p(a)CO(2)). Clinical knowledge from 61 anesthesiologists was acquired using a questionnaire from which different disease-specific fuzzy sets were generated to control p(a)CO(2). For both, patients with healthy lung and with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) the fuzzy sets show different shapes. The fuzzy set "normal", i.e., "target p(a)CO(2) area", ranges from 35 to 39mmHg for healthy lungs and from 39 to 43mmHg for ARDS lungs. With the new fuzzy sets our AUTOPILOT-BT reaches the target p(a)CO(2) within maximal three consecutive changes of ventilator settings. Thus, clinical knowledge can be extended, updated, and the resulting mechanical ventilation therapies can be individually adapted, analyzed, and evaluated. PMID:21069471

  16. A sterile-female technique proposed for control of Striga hermonthica and other intractable weeds: Advantages, shortcomings, and risk management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weeds have posed intractable challenges to farmers since the dawn of agriculture. This article describes in detail a proposed control strategy based on the introduction of genes conferring female-sterility into the genomes of intractable target weeds. Spread of these genes through target populations...

  17. Safety and role of ketogenic parenteral nutrition for intractable childhood epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Da Eun; Kang, Hoon-Chul; Lee, Joon Soo; Lee, Eun Joo; Kim, Heung Dong

    2012-09-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the safety and role of ketogenic parenteral nutrition in patients with intractable childhood epilepsy. The ketogenic parenteral nutrition was given to 10 patients who were unable to absorb nutrients through the intestinal tract because of various gastrointestinal disorders and required complete bowel rest. This nutrition consisted of conventional intravenous fat emulsion (20% Lipision) plus dextrose and amino acid (6% Trophamine) hyperalimentation in a 4:1 (or 3:1) lipid to non-lipid ratio, infused during the bowel rest. If the ketogenic parenteral nutrition allowed normal daily functioning or resolved the underlying problems, we soon changed it to the enteral ketogenic diet (KD). The mean (±SD) duration of the ketogenic parenteral nutrition was 4.1 (±1.5) days. Although a brief span of several days, all patients could maintain ketosis and the efficacy of the previous enteral KD during the ketogenic parenteral nutrition. Complications included elevated aspartate aminotransferase and/or alanine aminotransferase in one patient. Amylase and lipase increased in one patient. Serum triglyceride level increased to the level of 1885 mg/dl in one patient, but normalized in one week after discontinuation of the ketogenic parenteral nutrition and resuming of the enteral KD. Nine patients (90%) remained on the enteral KD after the ketogenic parenteral nutrition (the mean follow-up period was 9 months), including 2 patients who successfully completed the diet with seizure free state. Only one patient discontinued the ketogenic parenteral nutrition because of persistent increase of the amylase and lipase levels. The ketogenic parenteral nutrition proved to be a relatively safe short-term method of continuing KD to maintain ketosis for seizure control, while patients were unable to absorb nutrients through their intestinal tract. PMID:22192619

  18. Growth Failure in Children with Intractable Epilepsy Is Not Due to Increased Resting Energy Expenditure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergqvist, A. G. Christina; Trabulsi, Jillian; Schall, Joan I.; Stallings, Virginia A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the resting energy expenditure (REE) of children with intractable epilepsy (IE) compared with healthy children, and to determine factors that contribute to the pattern of REE. REE, growth status, and body composition were assessed in 25 prepubertal children with IE (15 males, 10 females; mean age 5y 5mo [SD 2y…

  19. Growth Failure in Children with Intractable Epilepsy Is Not Due to Increased Resting Energy Expenditure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergqvist, A. G. Christina; Trabulsi, Jillian; Schall, Joan I.; Stallings, Virginia A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the resting energy expenditure (REE) of children with intractable epilepsy (IE) compared with healthy children, and to determine factors that contribute to the pattern of REE. REE, growth status, and body composition were assessed in 25 prepubertal children with IE (15 males, 10 females; mean age 5y 5mo [SD 2y

  20. Intractable Postpartum Hemorrhage Resulting from Uterine Artery Pseudoaneurysm: Superselective Arteriographic Embolization via the Collateral Route

    SciTech Connect

    Doenmez, Halil Oztuerk, M. Halil; Guergen, Fatma; Soylu, Serra O.; Hekimoglu, Baki

    2007-04-15

    We present a patient with intractable postpartum hemorrhage resulting from uterine artery pseudoaneurysm despite bilateral hypogastric artery ligation who was successfully treated by an endovascular approach via the collateral route. Although there is a good argument for postponing surgery until transcatheter embolization has been attempted, this case shows that embolization can still be successful even if the iliac vessels have been ligated.

  1. Tremor frequency characteristics in Parkinson's disease under resting-state and stress-state conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong Ji; Lee, Woong Woo; Kim, Sang Kyong; Park, Hyeyoung; Jeon, Hyo Seon; Kim, Han Byul; Jeon, Beom S; Park, Kwang Suk

    2016-03-15

    Tremor characteristics-amplitude and frequency components-are primary quantitative clinical factors for diagnosis and monitoring of tremors. Few studies have investigated how different patient's conditions affect tremor frequency characteristics in Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we analyzed tremor characteristics under resting-state and stress-state conditions. Tremor was recorded using an accelerometer on the finger, under resting-state and stress-state (calculation task) conditions, during rest tremor and postural tremor. The changes of peak power, peak frequency, mean frequency, and distribution of power spectral density (PSD) of tremor were evaluated across conditions. Patients whose tremors were considered more than "mild" were selected, for both rest (n=67) and postural (n=25) tremor. Stress resulted in both greater peak powers and higher peak frequencies for rest tremor (p<0.001), but not for postural tremor. Notably, peak frequencies were concentrated around 5Hz under stress-state condition. The distributions of PSD of tremor were symmetrical, regardless of conditions. Tremor is more evident and typical tremor characteristics, namely a lower frequency as amplitude increases, are different in stressful condition. Patient's conditions directly affect neural oscillations related to tremor frequencies. Therefore, tremor characteristics in PD should be systematically standardized across patient's conditions such as attention and stress levels. PMID:26944162

  2. Surveillance for Waterborne Disease Outbreaks Associated with Drinking Water — United States 2011-2012

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advances in water management and sanitation have reduced waterborne disease in the United States, although outbreaks continue to occur. Public health agencies in the U.S. states and territories* report information on waterborne disease outbreaks to the CDC Waterborne Disease and ...

  3. Intractable and highly active relapsing multiple sclerosis role of alemtuzumab

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Divyanshu; Cano, Christopher A; Stuve, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Alemtuzumab is a humanized recombinant monoclonal antibody that was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for the management of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). It has been utilized for the management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, bone marrow and renal transplantation, or graft versus host disease. Because of its immunomodulatory properties, it was brought into clinical development in MS. One Phase II (CAMMS223) and two Phase III clinical trials (CARE-MSI and -II) have evaluated the safety and efficacy of alemtuzumab in patients with relapsingremitting MS. Even though its efficacy profile and long-lasting effect have attracted much interest among physicians and patients, it has significant potential adverse effects that may limit its use to patients with active disease. Here, we review the history of drug development of alemtuzumab. Furthermore, we outline the postulated mechanisms of action, clinical evidence, and safety of alemtuzumab for its use as a disease-modifying agent in active and highly active MS. PMID:26425095

  4. Modeling the Dynamics of Disease States in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Demic, Selver; Cheng, Sen

    2014-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common and costly disorder associated with considerable morbidity, disability, and risk for suicide. The disorder is clinically and etiologically heterogeneous. Despite intense research efforts, the response rates of antidepressant treatments are relatively low and the etiology and progression of MDD remain poorly understood. Here we use computational modeling to advance our understanding of MDD. First, we propose a systematic and comprehensive definition of disease states, which is based on a type of mathematical model called a finite-state machine. Second, we propose a dynamical systems model for the progression, or dynamics, of MDD. The model is abstract and combines several major factors (mechanisms) that influence the dynamics of MDD. We study under what conditions the model can account for the occurrence and recurrence of depressive episodes and how we can model the effects of antidepressant treatments and cognitive behavioral therapy within the same dynamical systems model through changing a small subset of parameters. Our computational modeling suggests several predictions about MDD. Patients who suffer from depression can be divided into two sub-populations: a high-risk sub-population that has a high risk of developing chronic depression and a low-risk sub-population, in which patients develop depression stochastically with low probability. The success of antidepressant treatment is stochastic, leading to widely different times-to-remission in otherwise identical patients. While the specific details of our model might be subjected to criticism and revisions, our approach shows the potential power of computationally modeling depression and the need for different type of quantitative data for understanding depression. PMID:25330102

  5. Testing practices and volume of non-Lyme tickborne diseases in the United States.

    PubMed

    Connally, Neeta P; Hinckley, Alison F; Feldman, Katherine A; Kemperman, Melissa; Neitzel, David; Wee, Siok-Bi; White, Jennifer L; Mead, Paul S; Meek, James I

    2016-02-01

    Large commercial laboratories in the United States were surveyed regarding the number of specimens tested for eight tickborne diseases in 2008. Seven large commercial laboratories reported testing a total of 2,927,881 specimens nationally (including Lyme disease). Of these, 495,585 specimens (17%) were tested for tickborne diseases other than Lyme disease. In addition to large commercial laboratories, another 1051 smaller commercial, hospital, and government laboratories in four states (CT, MD, MN, and NY) were surveyed regarding tickborne disease testing frequency, practices, and results. Ninety-two of these reported testing a total of 10,091 specimens for four tickborne diseases other than Lyme disease. We estimate the cost of laboratory diagnostic testing for non-Lyme disease tickborne diseases in 2008 to be $9.6 million. These data provide a baseline to evaluate trends in tickborne disease test utilization and insight into the burden of these diseases. PMID:26565931

  6. Surveillance for Waterborne Disease Outbreaks Associated with Drinking Water United States, 2007-2008

    EPA Science Inventory

    Problem/Condition: Since 1971, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists have maintained a collaborative Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System (WBDOS...

  7. Mortality from Alzheimer's Disease in the United States: Data for 2000 and 2010

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the National Technical Information Service NCHS Mortality From Alzheimer's Disease in the United States: Data for 2000 and ... dementia, National Vital Statistics System, death rate, aging Alzheimer's disease mortality increased compared with selected major causes of ...

  8. Precipitation and the occurrence of lyme disease in the Northeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, G.J.; Bunnell, J.E.

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence of Lyme disease is a growing concern in the United States, and various studies have been performed to understand the factors related to Lyme disease occurrence. In the United States, Lyme disease has occurred most frequently in the northeastern United States. Positive correlations between the number of cases of Lyme disease reported in the northeastern United States during the 1992-2002 period indicate that late spring/early summer precipitation was a significant climate factor affecting the occurrence of Lyme disease. When late spring/early summer precipitation was greater than average, the occurrence of Lyme disease was above average, possibly due to increased tick activity and survival rate during wet conditions. Temperature did not seem to explain the variability in Lyme disease reports for the northeastern United States. ?? Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  9. Nebulized lidocaine in the treatment of intractable cough.

    PubMed

    Truesdale, Kelly; Jurdi, Adham

    2013-09-01

    Cough is one of the most common symptoms prompting patients to be seen by health care providers in the United States. Persistent cough can disrupt daily activities such as conversation, eating, breathing, and sleeping, and it can become extremely debilitating both physically and mentally. Pharmacological treatments include dextramethorphan, opioid cough suppressants, benzonatate, inhaled ipratropium, and guaifenesin. Successful cough suppression has also been demonstrated in several studies with the use of nebulized lidocaine. Nebulized lidocaine also appears to be well tolerated by patients with minimal side effects including dysphonia, oropharyngeal numbness, and bitter taste. Studies conducted thus far have been small, so larger randomized control trials comparing nebulized lidocaine to placebo need to be conducted in the future. PMID:22964341

  10. Lyme Disease in Hispanics, United States, 2000–2013

    PubMed Central

    Starr, J. Andrew; Kugeler, Kiersten J.; Mead, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Hispanics comprise a growing portion of the US population and might have distinct risk factors for tickborne diseases. During 2000–2013, a total of 5,473 Lyme disease cases were reported among Hispanics through national surveillance. Hispanics were more likely than non-Hispanics to have signs of disseminated infection and onset during fall months. PMID:26889721

  11. Lyme Disease in Hispanics, United States, 2000-2013.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Christina A; Starr, J Andrew; Kugeler, Kiersten J; Mead, Paul S

    2016-03-01

    Hispanics comprise a growing portion of the US population and might have distinct risk factors for tickborne diseases. During 2000-2013, a total of 5,473 Lyme disease cases were reported among Hispanics through national surveillance. Hispanics were more likely than non-Hispanics to have signs of disseminated infection and onset during fall months. PMID:26889721

  12. Disease prioritization: what is the state of the art?

    PubMed

    Brookes, V J; Del Rio Vilas, V J; Ward, M P

    2015-10-01

    Disease prioritization is motivated by the need to ensure that limited resources are targeted at the most important problems to achieve the greatest benefit in improving and maintaining human and animal health. Studies have prioritized a range of disease types, for example, zoonotic and foodborne diseases, using a range of criteria that describe potential disease impacts. This review describes the progression of disease prioritization methodology from ad hoc techniques to decision science methods (including multi-criteria decision analysis, conjoint analysis and probabilistic inversion), and describes how these methods aid defensible resource allocation. We discuss decision science in the context of disease prioritization to then review the development of disease prioritization studies. Structuring the prioritization and assessing decision-makers' preferences through value trade-offs between criteria within the decision context are identified as key factors that ensure transparency and reproducibility. Future directions for disease prioritization include the development of validation techniques, guidelines for model selection and neuroeconomics to gain a deeper understanding of decision-making. PMID:25876939

  13. Projections of Alzheimer's disease in the United States and the public health impact of delaying disease onset.

    PubMed Central

    Brookmeyer, R; Gray, S; Kawas, C

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to project the future prevalence and incidence of Alzheimer's disease in the United States and the potential impact of interventions to delay disease onset. METHODS: The numbers of individuals in the United States with Alzheimer's disease and the numbers of newly diagnosed cases that can be expected over the next 50 years were estimated from a model that used age-specific incidence rates summarized from several epidemiological studies, US mortality rates, and US Bureau of the Census projections. RESULTS: in 1997, the prevalence of Alzheimer's disease in the United States was 2.32 million (range: 1.09 to 4.58 million); of these individuals, 68% were female. It is projected that the prevalence will nearly quadruple in the next 50 years, by which time approximately 1 in 45 Americans will be afflicted with the disease. Currently, the annual number of new incident cases in 360,000. If interventions could delay onset of the disease by 2 years, after 50 years there would be nearly 2 million fewer cases than projected; if onset could be delayed by 1 year, there would be nearly 800,000 fewer prevalent cases. CONCLUSIONS: As the US population ages, Alzheimer's disease will become an enormous public health problem. interventions that could delay disease onset even modestly would have a major public health impact. PMID:9736873

  14. Percutaneous Cyanoacrylate Glue Injection into the Renal Pseudoaneurysm to Control Intractable Hematuria After Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    SciTech Connect

    Lal, Anupam Kumar, Ajay; Prakash, Mahesh; Singhal, Manphool; Agarwal, Mayank Mohan; Sarkar, Debansu; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2009-07-15

    We report a case of a 43-year-old man who developed intractable hematuria after percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Angiography detected a pseudoaneurysm arising from the lower polar artery; however, embolization could not be performed because of unfavorable vascular anatomy. A percutaneous thrombin injection under ultrasound guidance initially controlled the bleeding, but hematuria subsequently recurred as a result of recanalization of the aneurysm. The case was successfully managed with ultrasound- and fluoroscopic-guided direct injection of cyanoacrylate glue into the pseudoaneurysm.

  15. [Case of intractable ventricula fibrillation by a multicomponent dietary supplement containing ephedra and caffeine overdose].

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Homma, Masato; Inoue, Junichi; Kato, Hiroshi; Murata, Kiyoshi; Ogasawara, Tomoko

    2007-07-01

    Multicomponent dietary supplement containing ephedra and caffeine (DSEC) was widely used for weight loss and energy enhancement. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) banned the sale of DSEC in 2004 because of side effects such as cardiotoxity. We report a rare case of intractable ventricular fibrillation, requiring frequent defibrillation, by DSEC overdose. The direct cardiotoxity of ephedra, synergistic effect of caffeine and ephedra, and hypokalemia may cause refractory ventricular arrhythmia. PMID:17784561

  16. Research Progress on the Role of ABC Transporters in the Drug Resistance Mechanism of Intractable Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jie; Mao, Ding-an; Liu, Li-qun

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of intractable epilepsy is not fully clear. In recent years, both animal and clinical trials have shown that the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters is increased in patients with intractable epilepsy; additionally, epileptic seizures can lead to an increase in the number of sites that express ABC transporters. These findings suggest that ABC transporters play an important role in the drug resistance mechanism of epilepsy. ABC transporters can perform the funcions of a drug efflux pump, which can reduce the effective drug concentration at epilepsy lesions by reducing the permeability of the blood brain barrier to antiepileptic drugs, thus causing resistance to antiepileptic drugs. Given the important role of ABC transporters in refractory epilepsy drug resistance, antiepileptic drugs that are not substrates of ABC transporters were used to obtain ABC transporter inhibitors with strong specificity, high safety, and few side effects, making them suitable for long-term use; therefore, these drugs can be used for future clinical treatment of intractable epilepsy. PMID:26491660

  17. Drosophila as a Model for Intractable Epilepsy: Gilgamesh Suppresses Seizures in parabss1 Heterozygote Flies

    PubMed Central

    Howlett, Iris C.; Rusan, Zeid M.; Parker, Louise; Tanouye, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Intractable epilepsies, that is, seizure disorders that do not respond to currently available therapies, are difficult, often tragic, neurological disorders. Na+ channelopathies have been implicated in some intractable epilepsies, including Dravet syndrome (Dravet 1978), but little progress has been forthcoming in therapeutics. Here we examine a Drosophila model for intractable epilepsy, the Na+ channel gain-of-function mutant parabss1 that resembles Dravet syndrome in some aspects (parker et al. 2011a). In particular, we identify second-site mutations that interact with parabss1, seizure enhancers, and seizure suppressors. We describe one seizure-enhancer mutation named charlatan (chn). The chn gene normally encodes an Neuron-Restrictive Silencer Factor/RE1-Silencing Transcription factor transcriptional repressor of neuronal-specific genes. We identify a second-site seizure-suppressor mutation, gilgamesh (gish), that reduces the severity of several seizure-like phenotypes of parabss1/+ heterozygotes. The gish gene normally encodes the Drosophila ortholog of casein kinase CK1g3, a member of the CK1 family of serine-threonine kinases. We suggest that CK1g3 is an unexpected but promising new target for seizure therapeutics. PMID:23797108

  18. Physical Feature Encoding and Word Recognition Abilities Are Altered in Children with Intractable Epilepsy: Preliminary Neuromagnetic Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Pardos, Maria; Korostenskaja, Milena; Xiang, Jing; Fujiwara, Hisako; Lee, Ki H.; Horn, Paul S.; Byars, Anna; Vannest, Jennifer; Wang, Yingying; Hemasilpin, Nat; Rose, Douglas F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective evaluation of language function is critical for children with intractable epilepsy under consideration for epilepsy surgery. The purpose of this preliminary study was to evaluate word recognition in children with intractable epilepsy by using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Ten children with intractable epilepsy (M/F 6/4, mean SD 13.4 2.2 years) were matched on age and sex to healthy controls. Common nouns were presented simultaneously from visual and auditory sensory inputs in match and mismatch conditions. Neuromagnetic responses M1, M2, M3, M4, and M5 with latencies of ~100?ms, ~150?ms, ~250?ms, ~350?ms, and ~450?ms, respectively, elicited during the match condition were identified. Compared to healthy children, epilepsy patients had both significantly delayed latency of the M1 and reduced amplitudes of M3 and M5 responses. These results provide neurophysiologic evidence of altered word recognition in children with intractable epilepsy. PMID:26146459

  19. Mechanisms of dopamine transporter regulation in normal and disease states

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Roxanne A.; Foster, James D.

    2013-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) controls the spatial and temporal dynamics of dopamine (DA) neurotransmission by driving reuptake of extracellular transmitter into presynaptic neurons. Many diseases such as depression, bipolar disorder, Parkinsons disease, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder are associated with abnormal DA levels, implicating DAT as a factor in their etiology. Medications used to treat these disorders and many addictive drugs target DAT and enhance dopaminergic signaling by suppressing transmitter reuptake. We now understand that transport and binding properties of DAT are regulated by complex and overlapping mechanisms that provide neurons the ability to modulate DA clearance in response to physiological demands. These processes are controlled by endogenous signaling pathways and affected by exogenous transporter ligands, demonstrating their importance for normal neurotransmission, drug abuse, and disease treatments. Increasing evidence supports the disruption of these mechanisms in DA disorders, implicating dysregulation of transport in disease etiologies and suggesting these processes as potential points for therapeutic manipulation of DA availability. PMID:23968642

  20. [Peyronie's disease: state of the art and future perspectives].

    PubMed

    Gulino, G; Sasso, F; Falabella, R; Racioppi, M; Sacco, E; D'Onofrio, A; Bassi, P F

    2007-01-01

    Peyronie's disease (PD) is characterized by the onset of a fibrous plaque within the tunica albuginea of the penile corpora cavernosa, resulting in pain and bending during the erection, which can make the intercourse difficult or impossible. Evidence from literature supports the autoimmune etiology of PD, and suggests genetic and familiar conditions, penile traumatisms and history of genital tract diseases as risk factors, even though no definitive conclusions arise about the pathogenesis of the disease. Few randomized trials demonstrated that medical therapies, such as Vitamin E, Colchicine, Potassium amminobenzoate, Tamoxifen and injection therapy with Verapamil are effective in stabilizing the acute phase of the disease. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) and ionophoresis cannot be considered as first line or gold standard therapies. Satisfactory results have been published about Nesbit operation in large number of cases with low-stage disease, whereas plication procedures have shown significant rates of relapse. High incidence of long-term penile retraction have been reported in high-stage disease treated with plaque incision and simple graft insertion. Malleable, soft or inflatable prostheses combined with graft implant have given the best results in terms of penile straightening and lengthening and patients' satisfaction. In conclusion, the PD etiopathogenesis hasn't been clearly understood-yet, no medical therapy is fully effective; surgery remains therefore the gold standard in case of severe deformity and/or erectile dysfunction. PMID:21086391

  1. State of the art: Reproduction and pregnancy in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    stensen, Monika; Andreoli, Laura; Brucato, Antonio; Cetin, Irene; Chambers, Christina; Clowse, Megan E B; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Cutolo, Maurizio; Dolhain, Radboud; Fenstad, M H; Frger, Frauke; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Koksvik, Hege; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Tincani, Angela; Villiger, Peter M; Wallenius, Marianne; von Wolff, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Throughout the last decade, increasing awareness has been raised on issues related to reproduction in rheumatic diseases including basic research to clarify the important role of estrogens in the etiology and pathophysiology of immune/inflammatory diseases. Sub- or infertility is a heterogeneous condition that can be related to immunological mechanisms, to pregnancy loss, to disease burden, to therapy, and to choices in regard to family size. Progress in reproductive medicine has made it possible for more patients with rheumatic disease to have children. Active disease in women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects their children's birth weight and may have long-term effects on their future health status. Pregnancy complications as preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction are still increased in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), however, biomarkers can monitor adverse events, and several new therapies may improve outcomes. Pregnancies in women with APS remain a challenge, and better therapies for the obstetric APS are needed. New prospective studies indicate improved outcomes for pregnancies in women with rare diseases like systemic sclerosis and vasculitis. TNF inhibitors hold promise for maintaining remission in rheumatological patients and may be continued at least in the first half of pregnancy. Pre-conceptional counseling and interdisciplinary management of pregnancies are essential for ensuring optimal pregnancy outcomes. PMID:25555818

  2. Can end of life care for the pediatric patient suffering with escalating and intractable symptoms be improved?

    PubMed

    Houlahan, Kathleen E; Branowicki, Patricia A; Mack, Jennifer W; Dinning, Constance; McCabe, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    Over twelve thousand children are diagnosed each year with cancer, and approximately 2200 children die each year from the disease. A percentage of these patients experiences escalating and intractable distress with symptoms that include pain, dyspnea, and agitation. These symptoms may continue for hours to days. Intractable symptoms of pain, agitation, and dyspnea can be very distressing to the patient, family, and staff and often a challenge for the physicians and nursing staff to treat. To meet this challenge, The Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Children's Hospital Cancer Care Program has made it a priority to create a process of care that includes identifying barriers to care and the development of an end-of-life (EOL) rapid response model that includes guidelines and physician-templated orders for rapid escalation of opioids. The goal of this quality-improvement initiative was to develop a model of care that would enable the caregivers to provide effective comfort care to any patient experiencing symptoms of rapid escalation of pain, dyspnea, and agitation. A model of care was created to overcome barriers to care. The model includes role clarification, "Guidelines for the Management of Escalating Pain/Dyspnea/Agitation at the End of Life," and "Rapid Titration-Templated Physician Orders." Staff feedback was solicited relative to the content, format, and usability of the guidelines and templated orders. The physician and nursing staff reported that they found the templated orders and guidelines very helpful and effective and suggested only a few edits. A retrospective chart review is currently under way. The purpose of this chart review is to systematically document and compare the record of management of rapidly escalating symptoms of pain and/or dyspnea and/or agitation prior to and after instituting the EOL Rapid Response Model of Care. Care of the EOL patient experiencing symptoms of pain, dyspnea, and agitation is challenging. The EOL Rapid Response Model of Care outlines a process of care and provides recommendations and templated physician orders for rapid titration of opioids. PMID:16689405

  3. Nonalcoholic Wernicke's Encephalopathy Associated with Unintentional Weight Loss, Cholecystectomy, and Intractable Vomiting: The Role of Dual Thiamine and Corticosteroid Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Donadee, Chenell; Gomez, Leslie; Zaretskaya, Marina

    2014-01-01

    A 23-year-old male with one month of intractable vomiting, subsequent cholecystitis status post cholecystectomy, and overall 40-pound weight loss over the last few months presented with altered mental status and seizures. MRI showed signal abnormalities involving the hypothalamus, periaqueductal gray matter, 4th ventricle, and bilateral thalami, indicative of Wernicke's encephalopathy. The patient was started on empiric IV thiamine and methylprednisolone; thiamine levels were subsequently found to be low. Infectious disease workup was negative. Within a few days of this therapy, the patient's neurological status steadily improved with increased responsiveness and communication. Repeat MRI 7 days after admission showed significant resolution of the signal abnormalities. Over the next several weeks the patient became fully conversational, cognitively intact, and increasingly ambulatory. Nonalcoholic Wernicke's encephalopathy is rare; there have been reports relating it separately to vomiting and invasive surgery. In this case report, we associate it with both recurrent vomiting and minimally invasive cholecystectomy. We also discuss combinatorial therapy of thiamine and corticosteroids, which is poorly defined in the literature. Though there is no consensus-based optimal treatment of Wernicke's encephalopathy, this adds to the discussion of using dual therapy and supports that the use of empiric corticosteroids does not harm the patient. PMID:24716018

  4. A State-Wide Research Network for Alzheimer's Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mintzer, Jacobo E.; Bachman, D. L.; Stuckey, M.; Ebeling, M.; Wagner, M. T.; Evans, W. J.; Hirth, V.; Walker, A.; Joglekar, R.; Faison, W.

    2014-03-13

    The Specific Aim of the proposal was to develop an administrative structure that will facilitate the development of AD research across the state of SC by providing key services such as (but not limited to) seeking funding research opportunities, financial tracking, regulatory management, central recruitment, training for investigators and coordinators, data collection, data storing, and data processing to researchers across the state.

  5. Mechanisms of dopamine transporter regulation in normal and disease states.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Roxanne A; Foster, James D

    2013-09-01

    The dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) controls the spatial and temporal dynamics of DA neurotransmission by driving reuptake of extracellular transmitter into presynaptic neurons. Many diseases such as depression, bipolar disorder, Parkinson's disease (PD), and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are associated with abnormal DA levels, implicating DAT as a factor in their etiology. Medications used to treat these disorders and many addictive drugs target DAT and enhance dopaminergic signaling by suppressing transmitter reuptake. We now understand that the transport and binding properties of DAT are regulated by complex and overlapping mechanisms that provide neurons with the ability to modulate DA clearance in response to physiological demands. These processes are controlled by endogenous signaling pathways and affected by exogenous transporter ligands, demonstrating their importance for normal neurotransmission, drug abuse, and disease treatments. Increasing evidence supports the disruption of these mechanisms in DA disorders, implicating dysregulation of transport in disease etiologies and suggesting these processes as potential points for therapeutic manipulation of DA availability. PMID:23968642

  6. Intractable Posterior Epistaxis due to a Spontaneous Low-Flow Carotid-Cavernous Sinus Fistula: A Case Report and a Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Giotakis, A.; Kral, F.; Riechelmann, H.; Freund, M.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 90-year-old patient with intractable posterior epistaxis presenting as the only symptom of a nontraumatic low-flow carotid-cavernous sinus fistula. Purpose of this case report is to introduce low-flow carotid-cavernous sinus fistula in the differential diagnosis of intractable posterior epistaxis. We provide a literature review for the sequence of actions for the confrontation of posterior epistaxis. We also emphasize the significance of the radiological diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in the management of posterior epistaxis due to pathology of the cavernous sinus. The gold-standard diagnostic procedure of carotid-cavernous sinus fistula is digital subtraction angiography (DSA). DSA with coils is also the state-of-the-art therapy. By failure of DSA, neurosurgery or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) may be used as alternatives. SRS may also be used as enhancement procedure of the DSA. Considering the prognosis of a successfully closed carotid-cavernous sinus fistula, recanalization occurs only in a minority of patients. Close follow-up is advised. PMID:26839726

  7. Electrodiagnostic evidence of subclinical disease states in drug abusers.

    PubMed

    DiBenedetto, M

    1976-02-01

    One hundred drug abusers, free of clinical signs or symptoms of disease, were examined by electrodiagnostic techniques. Sensory conduction of median, ulnar and sural nerves was evaluated in terms of latency, velocity and amplitude of evoked potential. Motor nerve latencies and conduction velocities of median, ulnar and personeal nerves were determined. Definite changes in the evoked sensory potentials of median and sural nerves of subjects using heroin or LSD were demonstrated. The sensory amplitude changes were suggestive of axonal degreneration because of normal duration. Maximum motor conduction velocity was abnormal in one patient who admitted using a variety of drugs; five heroin and two barbiturate users showed dispersed motor responses suggesting small fiber involvement. No abnormality could be shown in marjuana smokers. Signifcance of these findings is explained, emphasizing important potential for recognition of subclinical abnormalities and the opportunity for disease prevention. PMID:1259544

  8. Transglutaminase 2 Inhibitors and their Therapeutic Role in Disease States

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Matthew; Khosla, Chaitan

    2007-01-01

    Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is a multi-domain, multi-functional enzyme that post-translationally modifies proteins by catalyzing the formation of intermolecular isopeptide bonds between glutamine and lysine side-chains. It plays a role in diverse biological functions, including extracellular matrix formation, integrin mediated signaling, and signal transduction involving 7-transmembrane receptors. While some of the roles of TG2 under normal physiological conditions remain obscure, the protein is believed to participate in the pathogenesis of several unrelated diseases including celiac sprue, neurodegenerative diseases, and certain types of cancer. A variety of small molecule and peptidomimetic inhibitors of the TG2 active site have been identified. Here we summarize the biochemistry, biology, pharmacology and medicinal chemistry of human TG2. PMID:17582505

  9. Current state of interventional cardiology in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Bentham, J R; Thomson, J D R

    2015-08-01

    Congenital interventional cardiology seeks to provide alternative percutaneous solutions to congenital cardiac problems in preference to more traditional surgical approaches. Simpler procedures have been refined and are now achievable in smaller children and infants. More complex procedures are increasingly recognised as superior to surgical alternatives, though most patients with complex disease inevitably undergo combinations of interventional, surgical and joint or hybrid procedures. This review seeks to highlight recent advances in these techniques of most interest to the readership of this journal. PMID:25678596

  10. Genetics of Parkinson's disease--state of the art, 2013.

    PubMed

    Bonifati, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    In the past 15 years there has been substantial progress in our understanding of the genetics of Parkinson's disease (PD). Highly-penetrant mutations in different genes (SNCA, LRRK2, VPS35, Parkin, PINK1, and DJ-1) are known to cause rare monogenic forms of the disease. Furthermore, different variants with incomplete penetrance in the LRRK2 and the GBA gene are strong risk factors for PD, and are especially prevalent in some populations. Last, common variants of small effect size, modulating the risk for PD, have been identified by genome-wide association studies in more than 20 chromosomal loci. Here, I first outline the evolution of the research strategies to find PD-related genes, and then focus on recent advances in the field of the monogenic forms, including VPS35 mutations in autosomal dominant PD, and DNAJC6 and SYNJ1 mutations in recessive forms of juvenile parkinsonism. Additional genetic determinants of PD likely remain to be identified, as the currently known mutations and variants only explain a minor fraction of the disease burden. There is great expectation that the new DNA sequencing technologies (exome and whole-genome sequencing) will bring us closer to the full resolution of the genetic landscape of PD. PMID:24262182

  11. The Ketogenic and Atkins Diets Effect on Intractable Epilepsy: A Comparison

    PubMed Central

    GHAZAVI, Ahad; TONEKABONI, Seyed Hassan; KARIMZADEH, Parvaneh; NIKIBAKHSH, Ahmad Ali; KHAJEH, Ali; FAYYAZI, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    Objective Intractable epilepsy is a major difficulty in child neurology, because the numbers of drugs that are available for treatment are limited and new treatments such as diets must be tried. Now there are some diets available for treating patients with intractable epilepsy. The oldest diet is the classic ketogenic diet and one of the newest diets is the modified Atkins diet. Patients have a harder time accepting the classic ketogenic diet than the Atkins diet, which is easier to accept because the food tastes better. This study compares the efficacy of the ketogenic diet and the Atkins diet for intractable epilepsy in children. Materials & Methods This study is a clinical trial survey with sample size of 40 children with refractory epilepsy who were patients at Mofid hospital in Tehran, Iran. Initially, from Jan 2005–Oct 2007, 20 children were treated with the Atkins diet, and then from Oct 2007–March 2010, the other group was treated with the classic ketogenic diet and the results were compared. Results In this study, response to treatment was greater than a 50% reduction in seizures and at the end of first, second, and third months for the ketogenic diet were 55%, 30%, and 70% and for the Atkins diet were 50%, 65%, and 70%, respectively. Conclusion The results of this study show that there is no significant difference between the classic Ketogenic diet and the Atkins diet at the end of first, second, and third months and both had similar responses to the treatments. PMID:25143768

  12. TIPS Versus Peritoneovenous Shunt in the Treatment of Medically Intractable Ascites

    PubMed Central

    Rosemurgy, Alexander S.; Zervos, Emmanuel E.; Clark, Whalen C.; Thometz, Donald P.; Black, Thomas J.; Zwiebel, Bruce R.; Kudryk, Bruce T.; Grundy, L Shane; Carey, Larry C.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: We undertook a prospective randomized clinical trial comparing TIPS to peritoneovenous (PV) shunts in the treatment of medically intractable ascites to establish relative efficacy and morbidity, and thereby superiority, between these shunts. Methods: Thirty-two patients were prospectively randomized to undergo TIPS or peritoneovenous (Denver) shunts. All patients had failed medical therapy. Results: After TIPS versus peritoneovenous shunts, median (mean ± SD) duration of shunt patency was similar: 4.4 months (6 ± 6.6 months) versus 4.0 months (5 ± 4.6 months). Assisted shunt patency was longer after TIPS: 31.1 months (41 ± 25.9 months) versus 13.1 months (19 ± 17.3 months) (P < 0.01, Wilcoxon test). Ultimately, after TIPS 19% of patients had irreversible shunt occlusion versus 38% of patients after peritoneovenous shunts. Survival after TIPS was 28.7 months (41 ± 28.7 months) versus 16.1 months (28 ± 29.7 months) after peritoneovenous shunts. Control of ascites was achieved sooner after peritoneovenous shunts than after TIPS (73% vs. 46% after 1 month), but longer-term efficacy favored TIPS (eg, 85% vs. 40% at 3 years). Conclusion: TIPS and peritoneovenous shunts treat medically intractable ascites. Absence of ascites after either is uncommon. PV shunts control ascites sooner, although TIPS provides better long-term efficacy. After either shunt, numerous interventions are required to assist patency. Assisted shunt patency is better after TIPS. Treating medically refractory ascites with TIPS risks early shunt-related mortality for prospects of longer survival with ascites control. This study promotes the application of TIPS for medically intractable ascites if patients undergoing TIPS have prospects beyond short-term survival. PMID:15166968

  13. Chemotactic and mitogenic stimuli of neuronal apoptosis in patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Fiala, Milan; Avagyan, Hripsime; Merino, Jose Joaquin; Bernas, Michael; Valdivia, Juan; Espinosa-Jeffrey, Araceli; Witte, Marlys; Weinand, Martin

    2012-01-01

    To identify the upstream signals of neuronal apoptosis in patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), we evaluated by immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy brain tissues of 13 TLE patients and 5 control patients regarding expression of chemokines and cell-cycle proteins. The chemokine RANTES (CCR5) and other CC-chemokines and apoptotic markers (caspase-3, -8, -9) were expressed in lateral temporal cortical and hippocampal neurons of TLE patients, but not in neurons of control cases. The chemokine RANTES is usually found in cytoplasmic and extracellular locations. However, in TLE neurons, RANTES was displayed in an unusual location, the neuronal nuclei. In addition, the cell-cycle regulatory transcription factor E2F1 was found in an abnormal location in neuronal cytoplasm. The pro-inflammatory enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 and cytokine interleukin-1? were expressed both in neurons of patients suffering from temporal lobe epilepsy and from cerebral trauma. The vessels showed fibrin leakage, perivascular macrophages and expression of IL-6 on endothelial cells. In conclusion, the cytoplasmic effects of E2F1 and nuclear effects of RANTES might have novel roles in neuronal apoptosis of TLE neurons and indicate a need to develop new medical and/or surgical neuroprotective strategies against apoptotic signaling by these molecules. Both RANTES and E2F1 signaling are upstream from caspase activation, thus the antagonists of RANTES and/or E2F1 blockade might be neuroprotective for patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. The results have implications for the development of new medical and surgical therapies based on inhibition of chemotactic and mitogenic stimuli of neuronal apoptosis in patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:22444245

  14. [A case of primary lung cancer complicated with post-operative intractable pulmonary fistula].

    PubMed

    Morio, A; Miyamoto, H; Yamazaki, A; Anami, Y; Oh, S; Izumi, H; Hosoda, Y; Fukuchi, Y

    2000-12-01

    The case was a 76-year-old male. After thoracoscopic left upper lobectomy against primary lung cancer with poor risks such as complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and pulmonary emphysema, oral steroid treatment, heavy smoker, decreased renal function, the patient was complicated with intractable pulmonary fistula and MRSA pyothorax. Intracavitary administration of albumin preparation and fibrin glue (Beriplast P) was effective against pulmonary fistula though it was not helpful in the pleurodesis which was conducted 7 times. Teicoplanin (Targosid) was effective against MRSA pyothorax and maintained the renal function. PMID:11127565

  15. Hot water irrigation as treatment for intractable posterior epistaxis in an out-patient setting.

    PubMed

    Novoa, E; Schlegel-Wagner, C

    2012-01-01

    The management of intractable posterior epistaxis is challenging for any physician. Nasal packing, often combined with use of an endonasal balloon system, is painful for the patient, and torturous to maintain for two to three days. If conservative treatment fails, the most commonly used treatment options are currently invasive procedures such as endoscopic coagulation of bleeding arteries, external ligation and, rarely, embolisation. This paper describes a simple, non-invasive technique of treating posterior epistaxis with hot water irrigation. Technical information is presented, and the benefits of the method are discussed. PMID:21888749

  16. Experience with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for relief of intractable pain in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Avellanosa, A M; West, C R

    1982-01-01

    Sixty patients with intractable cancer pain were subjected to transcutaneous electrical stimulation for pain control. Evaluation, after two weeks of treatment, revealed: 17 (28.3%) excellent response, 22 (36.2%) fair and 21 (35.0%) no relief. Re-assessment after 3 months revealed 9 (15%) excellent responses, 11 (18.3%) fair and 40 (67%) failures. Extremity and trunk pains appeared to be most rewarding to patient pain, so far as pain relief is concerned. Perineal and pelvic pains were most difficult to control, only 5 of 12 (41%) cases obtained some short term relief. Pain location and sources correlated with treatment results. PMID:6983553

  17. Nanoimaging in cardiovascular diseases: Current state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Suryyani; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Shetty, Shrimati Dharmapal

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been integrated into healthcare system in terms of diagnosis as well as therapy. The massive impact of imaging nanotechnology has a deeper intervention in cardiology i.e. as contrast agents, to target vulnerable plaques with site specificity and in a theranostic approach to treat these plaques, stem cell delivery in necrotic myocardium, etc. Thus cardiovascular nanoimaging is not limited to simple diagnosis but also can help real time tracking during therapy as well as surgery. The present review provides a comprehensive description of the molecular imaging techniques for cardiovascular diseases with the help of nanotechnology and the potential clinical implications of nanotechnology for future applications. PMID:25963489

  18. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and vascular disease: state-of-the-art.

    PubMed

    Fargion, Silvia; Porzio, Marianna; Fracanzani, Anna Ludovica

    2014-10-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the most common of chronic liver disease in Western Country, is closely related to insulin resistance and oxidative stress and includes a wide spectrum of liver diseases ranging from steatosis alone, usually a benign and non-progressive condition, to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which may progress to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. NAFLD is considered the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome with which shares several characteristics, however recent data suggest that NAFLD is linked to increased cardiovascular risk independently of the broad spectrum of risk factors of metabolic syndrome. Accumulating evidence suggests that the clinical burden of NAFLD is not restricted to liver-related morbidity and mortality, with the majority of deaths in NAFLD patients related to cardiovascular disease and cancer and not to the progression of liver disease. Retrospective and prospective studies provide evidence of a strong association between NAFLD and subclinical manifestation of atherosclerosis (increased intima-media thickness, endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffness, impaired left ventricular function and coronary calcification). A general agreement emerging from these studies indicates that patients with NASH are at higher risk of cardiovascular diseases than those with simple steatosis, emphasizing the role of chronic inflammation in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis of these patients. It is very likely that the different mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in patients with NAFLD have a different relevance in the patients according to individual genetic background. In conclusion, in the presence of NAFLD patients should undergo a complete cardiovascular evaluation to prevent future atherosclerotic complications. Specific life-style modification and aggressive pharmaceutical modification will not only reduce the progression of liver disease, but also reduce morbidity for cardiovascular disease improving overall prognosis and survival. PMID:25309067

  19. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and vascular disease: State-of-the-art

    PubMed Central

    Fargion, Silvia; Porzio, Marianna; Fracanzani, Anna Ludovica

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the most common of chronic liver disease in Western Country, is closely related to insulin resistance and oxidative stress and includes a wide spectrum of liver diseases ranging from steatosis alone, usually a benign and non-progressive condition, to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which may progress to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. NAFLD is considered the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome with which shares several characteristics, however recent data suggest that NAFLD is linked to increased cardiovascular risk independently of the broad spectrum of risk factors of metabolic syndrome. Accumulating evidence suggests that the clinical burden of NAFLD is not restricted to liver-related morbidity and mortality, with the majority of deaths in NAFLD patients related to cardiovascular disease and cancer and not to the progression of liver disease. Retrospective and prospective studies provide evidence of a strong association between NAFLD and subclinical manifestation of atherosclerosis (increased intima-media thickness, endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffness, impaired left ventricular function and coronary calcification). A general agreement emerging from these studies indicates that patients with NASH are at higher risk of cardiovascular diseases than those with simple steatosis, emphasizing the role of chronic inflammation in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis of these patients. It is very likely that the different mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in patients with NAFLD have a different relevance in the patients according to individual genetic background. In conclusion, in the presence of NAFLD patients should undergo a complete cardiovascular evaluation to prevent future atherosclerotic complications. Specific life-style modification and aggressive pharmaceutical modification will not only reduce the progression of liver disease, but also reduce morbidity for cardiovascular disease improving overall prognosis and survival. PMID:25309067

  20. SURVEILLANCE FOR WATERBORNE DISEASE AND OUTBREAK ASSOCIATED WITH RECREATIONAL WATER - UNITED STATES 2003-2004

    EPA Science Inventory

    Problem/Condition: Since 1971, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists have maintained a collaborative surveillance system for collecting and periodically reporting da...

  1. Novel roles for protein disulphide isomerase in disease states: a double edged sword?

    PubMed Central

    Parakh, Sonam; Atkin, Julie D.

    2015-01-01

    Protein disulphide isomerase (PDI) is a multifunctional redox chaperone of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Since it was first discovered 40 years ago the functions ascribed to PDI have evolved significantly and recent studies have recognized its distinct functions, with adverse as well as protective effects in disease. Furthermore, post translational modifications of PDI abrogate its normal functional roles in specific disease states. This review focusses on recent studies that have identified novel functions for PDI relevant to specific diseases. PMID:26052512

  2. Identifying Mutations of the Tetratricopeptide Repeat Domain 37 (TTC37) Gene in Infants With Intractable Diarrhea and a Comparison of Asian and Non-Asian Phenotype and Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen-I; Huang, Jing-Long; Chen, Chien-Chang; Lin, Ju-Li; Wu, Ren-Chin; Jaing, Tang-Her; Ou, Liang-Shiou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Syndromic diarrhea/tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome (SD/THE) is a rare, autosomal recessive and severe bowel disorder mainly caused by mutations in the tetratricopeptide repeat domain 37 (TTC37) gene which act as heterotetrameric cofactors to enhance aberrant mRNAs decay. The phenotype and immune profiles of SD/THE overlap those of primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs). Neonates with intractable diarrhea underwent immunologic assessments including immunoglobulin levels, lymphocyte subsets, lymphocyte proliferation, superoxide production, and IL-10 signaling function. Candidate genes for PIDs predisposing to inflammatory bowel disease were sequencing in this study. Two neonates, born to nonconsanguineous parents, suffered from intractable diarrhea, recurrent infections, and massive hematemesis from esopharyngeal varices due to liver cirrhosis or accompanying Trichorrhexis nodosa that developed with age and thus guided the diagnosis of SD/THE compatible to TTC37 mutations (homozygous DelK1155H, Fs∗2; heterozygous Y1169Ter and InsA1143, Fs∗3). Their immunologic evaluation showed normal mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation, superoxide production, and IL-10 signaling, but low IgG levels, undetectable antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen and decreased antigen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation. A PubMed search for bi-allelic TTC37 mutations and phenotypes were recorded in 14 Asian and 12 non-Asian cases. They had similar presentations of infantile onset refractory diarrhea, facial dysmorphism, hair anomalies, low IgG, low birth weight, and consanguinity. A higher incidence of heart anomalies (8/14 vs 2/12; P = 0.0344, Chi-square), nonsense mutations (19 in 28 alleles), and hot-spot mutations (W936Ter, 2779-2G>A, and Y1169Ter) were found in the Asian compared with the non-Asian patients. Despite immunoglobulin therapy in 20 of the patients, 4 died from liver cirrhosis and 1 died from sepsis. Patients of all ethnicities with SD/THE with the characteristic triad of T nodosa, hepatic cirrhosis, and intractable enteropathy have low IgG, poor vaccine response and/or decreased antigen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation. This is now better classified into the subgroup of “well-defined syndromes with immunodeficiency” (the update termed as “combined immunodeficiencies with associated or syndromic features”) than “predominantly antibody deficiencies” in the update PIDs classification, and requires optimal interventions. PMID:26945392

  3. Nutritional state and lung disease in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bakker, W

    1992-10-01

    The life expectancy of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is largely dependent on the severity and progress of the pulmonary involvement associated with the disease. Many data support the view that malnutrition and deterioration of lung function are closely interrelated and interdependent, with each affecting the other, leading to a spiral decline in both. The occurrence of malnutrition appears to be associated with poor lung function and poor survival, and conversely prevention of malnutrition appears to be associated with better lung function and improved survival. Nutritional intervention may lead to an improvement in body weight, lung function and exercise tolerance, provided that the intervention is combined with exercise training in order to increase both respiratory and other muscle mass. These improvements can be preserved when patients have the stamina to continue with a high-energy, high-fat diet and daily exercise training at home. PMID:1470283

  4. 75 FR 3243 - NIH State-of-the-Science Conference: Preventing Alzheimer's Disease and Cognitive Decline; Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ... the ``NIH State-of-the-Science Conference: Preventing Alzheimer's Disease and Cognitive Decline'' to... state of cognitive impairment or into various forms of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease. Such... impairment or Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's disease was first described in 1906, when German......

  5. Kissing Bugs in the United States: Risk for Vector-Borne Disease in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Klotz, Stephen A; Dorn, Patricia L; Mosbacher, Mark; Schmidt, Justin O

    2014-01-01

    Eleven species of kissing bugs are found in the United States. Their home ranges may be expanding northward, perhaps as a consequence of climate change. At least eight of the species, perhaps all, are reported to harbor Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite that causes Chagas disease. Because humans are encroaching on kissing bug habitat, there is concern for vector-transmitted Chagas disease in the United States. To date, documented autochthonous cases of Chagas in humans in the United States are rare. Kissing bugs are capable of adapting to new habitats such as human domiciles; however, they do not colonize homes in the United States as in Central and South America. We review the biology, behavior, and medical importance of kissing bugs and the risk they pose for transmission of Chagas disease in the United States. Where possible, descriptions of US species are compared to the epidemiologically important Latin American species. PMID:25574143

  6. Intractable Persistent Direction-Changing Geotropic Nystagmus Improved by Lateral Semicircular Canal Plugging

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Kazuya; Doi, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    Antigravitational deviation of the cupula of the lateral semicircular canal, which is also called light cupula, evokes persistent direction-changing geotropic nystagmus with a neutral point. No intractable cases of this condition have been reported. In our case, a 67-year-old man complained of positional vertigo 3 months after developing idiopathic sudden hearing loss in the right ear with vertigo. He showed a persistent direction-changing geotropic nystagmus with a leftward beating nystagmus in the supine position. The nystagmus resolved when his head was turned approximately 30 to the right. He was diagnosed with light cupula of the right lateral semicircular canal and was subsequently treated with an antivertiginous agent. However, his symptoms and positional nystagmus did not improve, so the right lateral semicircular canal was plugged by surgery. One month after surgery, his positional vertigo and nystagmus were completely resolved. We speculated that the cause of the patient's intractable light cupula was an enlarged cupula caused by his idiopathic sudden hearing loss. PMID:25685577

  7. Intractable persistent direction-changing geotropic nystagmus improved by lateral semicircular canal plugging.

    PubMed

    Seo, Toru; Saito, Kazuya; Doi, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    Antigravitational deviation of the cupula of the lateral semicircular canal, which is also called light cupula, evokes persistent direction-changing geotropic nystagmus with a neutral point. No intractable cases of this condition have been reported. In our case, a 67-year-old man complained of positional vertigo 3 months after developing idiopathic sudden hearing loss in the right ear with vertigo. He showed a persistent direction-changing geotropic nystagmus with a leftward beating nystagmus in the supine position. The nystagmus resolved when his head was turned approximately 30 to the right. He was diagnosed with light cupula of the right lateral semicircular canal and was subsequently treated with an antivertiginous agent. However, his symptoms and positional nystagmus did not improve, so the right lateral semicircular canal was plugged by surgery. One month after surgery, his positional vertigo and nystagmus were completely resolved. We speculated that the cause of the patient's intractable light cupula was an enlarged cupula caused by his idiopathic sudden hearing loss. PMID:25685577

  8. [Ketogenic diet for intractable childhood epilepsy; as an early option as well as a last resort].

    PubMed

    Ito, Susumu; Oguni, Hirokazu

    2011-04-01

    Since the 1920s, a ketogenic diet, of low-carbohydrate, adequate-protein and high-fat content, has been used for the treatment of intractable childhood epilepsy. A decade ago this diet was tried as a last resort in the treatment of intractable epilepsy. However, recent advances in ketogenic diet have enabled it to become more commonly used worldwide even early in the course of epilepsy. Two less-restrictive ketogenic diets, namely, the modified Atkins diet and low-glycemic-index treatment, have been developed. These diets allow the patients and their families to choose a more liberal menu. Furthermore, a randomized controlled trial found that the ketogenic diet has a significant benefit, which strengthens the supportive evidence. Recently, an international consensus statement guiding optimal clinical management has been published, allowing clinicians to provide standardized treatment. There has also been increased interest in investigating the mechanisms of action of ketogenic diet using various experimental models. The authors review the history, efficacy, side effects, and possible mechanisms underlying the ketogenic diet, as well as the experience with the ketogenic diet at Tokyo Women's Medical University. PMID:21441643

  9. Intracranial Chronic Subdural Hematoma Presenting with Intractable Headache after Cervical Epidural Steroid Injection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myungsoo

    2015-01-01

    Postdural punctural headache (PDPH) following spinal anesthesia is due to intracranial hypotension caused by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage, and it is occasionally accompanied by an intracranial hematoma. To the best of our knowledge, an intracranial chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) presenting with an intractable headache after a cervical epidural steroid injection (ESI) has not been reported. A 39-year-old woman without any history of trauma underwent a cervical ESI for a herniated nucleus pulposus at the C5-6 level. One month later, she presented with a severe headache that was not relieved by analgesic medication, which changed in character from being positional to non-positional during the preceding month. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed a CSDH along the left convexity. Emergency burr-hole drainage was performed and the headache abated. This report indicates that an intracranial CSDH should be considered a possible complication after ESI. In addition, the event of an intractable and changing PDPH after ESI suggests further evaluation for diagnosis of an intracranial hematoma. PMID:26361532

  10. Putting chronic disease on the map: building GIS capacity in state and local health departments.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Marie Lynn; Casper, Michele; Tootoo, Joshua; Schieb, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Techniques based on geographic information systems (GIS) have been widely adopted and applied in the fields of infectious disease and environmental epidemiology; their use in chronic disease programs is relatively new. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention is collaborating with the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors and the University of Michigan to provide health departments with capacity to integrate GIS into daily operations, which support priorities for surveillance and prevention of chronic diseases. So far, 19 state and 7 local health departments participated in this project. On the basis of these participants' experiences, we describe our training strategy and identify high-impact GIS skills that can be mastered and applied over a short time in support of chronic disease surveillance. We also describe the web-based resources in the Chronic Disease GIS Exchange that were produced on the basis of this training and are available to anyone interested in GIS and chronic disease (www.cdc.gov/DHDSP/maps/GISX). GIS offers diverse sets of tools that promise increased productivity for chronic disease staff of state and local health departments. PMID:23786907

  11. Climate change influences on the annual onset of Lyme disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Monaghan, Andrew J; Moore, Sean M; Sampson, Kevin M; Beard, Charles B; Eisen, Rebecca J

    2015-07-01

    Lyme disease is the most commonly reported vector-borne illness in the United States. Lyme disease occurrence is highly seasonal and the annual springtime onset of cases is modulated by meteorological conditions in preceding months. A meteorological-based empirical model for Lyme disease onset week in the United States is driven with downscaled simulations from five global climate models and four greenhouse gas emissions scenarios to project the impacts of 21st century climate change on the annual onset week of Lyme disease. Projections are made individually and collectively for the 12 eastern States where >90% of cases occur. The national average annual onset week of Lyme disease is projected to become 0.4-0.5 weeks earlier for 2025-2040 (p<0.05), and 0.7-1.9 weeks earlier for 2065-2080 (p<0.01), with the largest shifts for scenarios with the highest greenhouse gas emissions. The more southerly mid-Atlantic States exhibit larger shifts (1.0-3.5 weeks) compared to the Northeastern and upper Midwestern States (0.2-2.3 weeks) by 2065-2080. Winter and spring temperature increases primarily cause the earlier onset. Greater spring precipitation and changes in humidity partially counteract the temperature effects. The model does not account for the possibility that abrupt shifts in the life cycle of Ixodes scapularis, the primary vector of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi in the eastern United States, may alter the disease transmission cycle in unforeseen ways. The results suggest 21st century climate change will make environmental conditions suitable for earlier annual onset of Lyme disease cases in the United States with possible implications for the timing of public health interventions. PMID:26025268

  12. Occlusive IOLs for Intractable Diplopia Demonstrate a Novel Near-Infrared Window of Transmission for SLO/OCT Imaging and Clinical Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Yusuf, Imran H.; Peirson, Stuart N.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Occlusive intraocular lens (IOL) implantation is an effective therapeutic option in patients with intractable diplopia, visual confusion, and unsightly leukocoria. However, their use has been restricted by concerns that inability to visualize the retina may prevent the diagnosis of important posterior pole diseases. In this study, transmission spectra of occlusive IOLs were defined as a basis for acquiring scanning laser ophthalmoscopy/optical coherence tomography (SLO/OCT) images. Methods. Fifteen IOLs of three designs were examined: black small and large PMMA and black Lotus (Morcher GmbH, Stuttgart, Germany). Each IOL was placed between a broad-spectrum white light source and a spectroradiometer, to generate transmission spectra for each lens and determine the cutoff wavelength. Transmission in the near-infrared (NIR) range was confirmed with an 850-nm LED. A model eye was implanted with occlusive IOLs, and SLO/OCT scans were acquired with seven clinical SLO/OCT imaging systems. Results. Occlusive IOLs demonstrated high levels of transmission of NIR light. It was determined that most SLO/OCT scanners would achieve 99% to 100% transmission at their operational wavelengths of NIR light. Furthermore, all clinical SLO/OCT imaging systems were capable of imaging fine retinal features without attenuation through occlusive IOLs in a model eye. Conclusions. In this study, a novel NIR window of high-level transmission was identified across the occlusive IOLs with applications to SLO/OCT imaging and NIR-based clinical assessment. The ability to acquire high-quality SLO/OCT scans to detect posterior pole disease may fundamentally change the current view on occlusive IOLs and encourage their use in patients with intractable diplopia. PMID:21372014

  13. Subclinical hypercortisolism: a state, a syndrome, or a disease?

    PubMed

    Di Dalmazi, Guido; Pasquali, Renato; Beuschlein, Felix; Reincke, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Subclinical hypercortisolism (SH), defined as alterations of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis in the absence of clinical signs or symptoms related to cortisol secretion, is a common finding in patients with adrenal incidentalomas. The clinical correlates of this pathological condition have become clearer over the last few years. The aim of this review is to summarize the co-morbidities and the clinical outcomes of patients with SH. According to the analysis of the results of the studies published within the last 15 years, hypertension and type 2 diabetes are a common finding in patients with SH, occurring roughly in 2/3 and 1/3 of the patients respectively. Moreover, several additional cardiovascular and metabolic complications, like endothelial damage, increased visceral fat accumulation and impaired lipid metabolism have been shown to increase the cardiovascular risk of those patients. Accordingly, recent independent reports investigating the natural history of the disease in a long-term follow-up setting have shown that patients with SH have a higher incidence of cardiovascular events and related mortality. Moreover, longitudinal studies have also shown increased incidence of osteoporotic vertebral fractures. Future research is needed to improve the diagnostic performance of hormonal tests, by assessment of the complete steroid profile with more accurate assays, and to define the efficacy of surgical vs medical treatment in a randomized-controlled setting. PMID:26282599

  14. Diversification of importin-? isoforms in cellular trafficking and disease states.

    PubMed

    Pumroy, Ruth A; Cingolani, Gino

    2015-02-15

    The human genome encodes seven isoforms of importin ? which are grouped into three subfamilies known as ?1, ?2 and ?3. All isoforms share a fundamentally conserved architecture that consists of an N-terminal, autoinhibitory, importin-?-binding (IBB) domain and a C-terminal Arm (Armadillo)-core that associates with nuclear localization signal (NLS) cargoes. Despite striking similarity in amino acid sequence and 3D structure, importin-? isoforms display remarkable substrate specificity invivo. In the present review, we look at key differences among importin-? isoforms and provide a comprehensive inventory of known viral and cellular cargoes that have been shown to associate preferentially with specific isoforms. We illustrate how the diversification of the adaptor importin ? into seven isoforms expands the dynamic range and regulatory control of nucleocytoplasmic transport, offering unexpected opportunities for pharmacological intervention. The emerging view of importin ? is that of a key signalling molecule, with isoforms that confer preferential nuclear entry and spatiotemporal specificity on viral and cellular cargoes directly linked to human diseases. PMID:25656054

  15. Successful Fecal Bacteria Transplantation and Nurse Management for a Patient With Intractable Functional Constipation: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yingchun; Wang, Xinying; Li, Xuejiao; Peng, Nanhai

    2016-01-01

    Intractable functional constipation is a common gastrointestinal disorder that features persistent difficult defecation, reduced bowel movements, or a feeling of incomplete defecation. Despite many therapeutic approaches, there has not been an established standard treatment protocol. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), an innovative therapy that was introduced recently, has been preliminarily shown to have good effects and is expected to have good prospects. However, nursing is also of great importance during the process of FMT. An innovative nursing care protocol is combined with FMT, with a view to improving the clinical symptoms and quality of life of patients with intractable functional dyspepsia. This case-based study addresses the effects of nursing interventions used during the treatment of one patient with intractable functional constipation who received FMT. PMID:26871249

  16. Coral transcriptome and bacterial community profiles reveal distinct Yellow Band Disease states in Orbicella faveolata.

    PubMed

    Closek, Collin J; Sunagawa, Shinichi; DeSalvo, Michael K; Piceno, Yvette M; DeSantis, Todd Z; Brodie, Eoin L; Weber, Michele X; Voolstra, Christian R; Andersen, Gary L; Medina, Mónica

    2014-12-01

    Coral diseases impact reefs globally. Although we continue to describe diseases, little is known about the etiology or progression of even the most common cases. To examine a spectrum of coral health and determine factors of disease progression we examined Orbicella faveolata exhibiting signs of Yellow Band Disease (YBD), a widespread condition in the Caribbean. We used a novel combined approach to assess three members of the coral holobiont: the coral-host, associated Symbiodinium algae, and bacteria. We profiled three conditions: (1) healthy-appearing colonies (HH), (2) healthy-appearing tissue on diseased colonies (HD), and (3) diseased lesion (DD). Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed health state-specific diversity in Symbiodinium clade associations. 16S ribosomal RNA gene microarrays (PhyloChips) and O. faveolata complimentary DNA microarrays revealed the bacterial community structure and host transcriptional response, respectively. A distinct bacterial community structure marked each health state. Diseased samples were associated with two to three times more bacterial diversity. HD samples had the highest bacterial richness, which included components associated with HH and DD, as well as additional unique families. The host transcriptome under YBD revealed a reduced cellular expression of defense- and metabolism-related processes, while the neighboring HD condition exhibited an intermediate expression profile. Although HD tissue appeared visibly healthy, the microbial communities and gene expression profiles were distinct. HD should be regarded as an additional (intermediate) state of disease, which is important for understanding the progression of YBD. PMID:24950107

  17. The thalamostriatal system in normal and diseased states

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Yoland; Galvan, Adriana; Ellender, Tommas J.; Doig, Natalie; Villalba, Rosa M.; Huerta-Ocampo, Icnelia; Wichmann, Thomas; Bolam, J. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Because of our limited knowledge of the functional role of the thalamostriatal system, this massive network is often ignored in models of the pathophysiology of brain disorders of basal ganglia origin, such as Parkinsons disease (PD). However, over the past decade, significant advances have led to a deeper understanding of the anatomical, electrophysiological, behavioral and pathological aspects of the thalamostriatal system. The cloning of the vesicular glutamate transporters 1 and 2 (vGluT1 and vGluT2) has provided powerful tools to differentiate thalamostriatal from corticostriatal glutamatergic terminals, allowing us to carry out comparative studies of the synaptology and plasticity of these two systems in normal and pathological conditions. Findings from these studies have led to the recognition of two thalamostriatal systems, based on their differential origin from the caudal intralaminar nuclear group, the center median/parafascicular (CM/Pf) complex, or other thalamic nuclei. The recent use of optogenetic methods supports this model of the organization of the thalamostriatal systems, showing differences in functionality and glutamate receptor localization at thalamostriatal synapses from Pf and other thalamic nuclei. At the functional level, evidence largely gathered from thalamic recordings in awake monkeys strongly suggests that the thalamostriatal system from the CM/Pf is involved in regulating alertness and switching behaviors. Importantly, there is evidence that the caudal intralaminar nuclei and their axonal projections to the striatum partly degenerate in PD and that CM/Pf deep brain stimulation (DBS) may be therapeutically useful in several movement disorders. PMID:24523677

  18. Hansen disease among Micronesian and Marshallese persons living in the United States.

    PubMed

    Woodall, Patricia; Scollard, David; Rajan, Latha

    2011-07-01

    An increasing proportion of Hansen disease cases in the United States occurs among migrants from the Micronesian region, where leprosy prevalence is high. We abstracted surveillance and clinical records of the National Hansen's Disease Program to determine geographic, demographic, and clinical patterns. Since 2004, 13% of US cases have occurred in this migrant population. Although Hawaii reported the most cases, reports have increased in the central and southern states. Multibacillary disease in men predominates on the US mainland. Of 49 patients for whom clinical data were available, 37 (75%) had leprosy reaction, neuropathy, or other complications; 17 (37%) of 46 completed treatment. Comparison of data from the US mainland with Hawaii and country-of-origin suggests under-detection of cases in pediatric and female patients and with paucibacillary disease in the United States. Increased case finding and management, and avoidance of leprosy-labeled stigma, is needed for this population. PMID:21762573

  19. A Chronic Disease State Simulation in an Ambulatory Care Elective Course.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, Diana; Roberson, Cindy Leslie A; Prasad-Reddy, Lalita

    2015-11-25

    Objective. To implement a chronic disease state simulation in an ambulatory care elective course and to assess the simulation's impact on students' perceptions of their empathy toward patients and of their counseling skills. Design. The chronic disease state simulation occurred over 2 weeks. Students alternated playing the role of patient and pharmacist. As patients, students adhered to medication regimens, lifestyle modifications, and blood glucose or blood pressure monitoring. As pharmacists, students conducted patient interviews, and provided education and counseling. Empathy and counseling skills were assessed through course surveys, written reflections, and SOAP notes. Assessment. Results from a cohort of 130 students indicated the simulation enhanced students' perceptions of their abilities to empathize with and counsel patients with chronic diseases. Conclusion. The chronic disease state simulation provides a novel approach to develop skills needed for working with complex patient cases in ambulatory care settings. PMID:26839423

  20. A Chronic Disease State Simulation in an Ambulatory Care Elective Course

    PubMed Central

    Roberson, Cindy Leslie A.; Prasad-Reddy, Lalita

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To implement a chronic disease state simulation in an ambulatory care elective course and to assess the simulation’s impact on students’ perceptions of their empathy toward patients and of their counseling skills. Design. The chronic disease state simulation occurred over 2 weeks. Students alternated playing the role of patient and pharmacist. As patients, students adhered to medication regimens, lifestyle modifications, and blood glucose or blood pressure monitoring. As pharmacists, students conducted patient interviews, and provided education and counseling. Empathy and counseling skills were assessed through course surveys, written reflections, and SOAP notes. Assessment. Results from a cohort of 130 students indicated the simulation enhanced students’ perceptions of their abilities to empathize with and counsel patients with chronic diseases. Conclusion. The chronic disease state simulation provides a novel approach to develop skills needed for working with complex patient cases in ambulatory care settings. PMID:26839423

  1. Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders in State Mental Hospitals: Data from a Nationwide Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moak, Gary S.; Fisher, William H.

    1990-01-01

    Reports data from nationwide survey of state mental hospitals, providing exploratory look at patients with Alzheimer's disease and related disorders currently residing in state hospitals. Describes admissions trends, reasons for admission, and sources of referral. Discusses civil commitment of nursing home patients with dementing illnesses and

  2. DNA Modifications: Function and Applications in Normal and Disease States

    PubMed Central

    Liyanage, Vichithra R. B.; Jarmasz, Jessica S.; Murugeshan, Nanditha; Del Bigio, Marc R.; Rastegar, Mojgan; Davie, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetics refers to a variety of processes that have heritable effects on gene expression programs without changes in DNA sequence. Key players in epigenetic control are chemical modifications to DNA, histone, and non-histone chromosomal proteins, which establish a complex regulatory network that controls genome function. Methylation of DNA at the fifth position of cytosine in CpG dinucleotides (5-methylcytosine, 5mC), which is carried out by DNA methyltransferases, is commonly associated with gene silencing. However, high resolution mapping of DNA methylation has revealed that 5mC is enriched in exonic nucleosomes and at intron-exon junctions, suggesting a role of DNA methylation in the relationship between elongation and RNA splicing. Recent studies have increased our knowledge of another modification of DNA, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), which is a product of the ten-eleven translocation (TET) proteins converting 5mC to 5hmC. In this review, we will highlight current studies on the role of 5mC and 5hmC in regulating gene expression (using some aspects of brain development as examples). Further the roles of these modifications in detection of pathological states (type 2 diabetes, Rett syndrome, fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and teratogen exposure) will be discussed. PMID:25340699

  3. DNA modifications: function and applications in normal and disease States.

    PubMed

    Liyanage, Vichithra R B; Jarmasz, Jessica S; Murugeshan, Nanditha; Del Bigio, Marc R; Rastegar, Mojgan; Davie, James R

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetics refers to a variety of processes that have heritable effects on gene expression programs without changes in DNA sequence. Key players in epigenetic control are chemical modifications to DNA, histone, and non-histone chromosomal proteins, which establish a complex regulatory network that controls genome function. Methylation of DNA at the fifth position of cytosine in CpG dinucleotides (5-methylcytosine, 5mC), which is carried out by DNA methyltransferases, is commonly associated with gene silencing. However, high resolution mapping of DNA methylation has revealed that 5mC is enriched in exonic nucleosomes and at intron-exon junctions, suggesting a role of DNA methylation in the relationship between elongation and RNA splicing. Recent studies have increased our knowledge of another modification of DNA, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), which is a product of the ten-eleven translocation (TET) proteins converting 5mC to 5hmC. In this review, we will highlight current studies on the role of 5mC and 5hmC in regulating gene expression (using some aspects of brain development as examples). Further the roles of these modifications in detection of pathological states (type 2 diabetes, Rett syndrome, fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and teratogen exposure) will be discussed. PMID:25340699

  4. Pulsed radiofrequency to the great occipital nerve for the treatment of intractable postherpetic itch: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ding, De-Fang; Li, Rong-Chun; Xiong, Qiu-Ju; Zhou, Ling; Xiang, Hong-Bing

    2014-01-01

    A patient with intractable postherpetic itch lasting for 1 year was reported. The itch was mainly from the left vertex, frontal and ophthalmic regions and extended to the left neck area. The patient had negative response to the ophthalmic nerve block. Under the initial positive response to the great occipital nerve block, pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) was performed on the position of the great occipital nerve. After 4 months treatment, the itch was completely vanished. This case study demonstrates the effectiveness of PRF for intractable postherpetic itch originating in the head and neck. However, more samples needed to verify this management. PMID:25419389

  5. Rhabdomyolysis After Cooked Seafood Consumption (Haff Disease) in the United States vs China

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, James H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Haff disease is a syndrome of myalgia and rhabdomyolysis that occurs after eating cooked seafood. Methods For this descriptive analytical article, a literature search identified the scientific articles on Haff disease and/or rhabdomyolysis after eating cooked seafood in the United States and China. Analysis of those articles focused on identifying the seafood vectors of Haff disease, describing the most commonly recurring clinical and laboratory manifestations of Haff disease, and comparing the Haff disease toxidrome with other similar seafood-borne toxidromes. Statistically significant differences were determined using unpaired t tests and Fisher exact tests. Results Twenty-nine confirmed cases of Haff disease were identified in the United States, and 60 cases were identified in China during 1984-2014. Most of the US cases followed consumption of buffalo fish, and most of the Chinese cases followed consumption of freshwater pomfret. However, Haff disease also followed consumption of the same species of boiled crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) in the United States (n=9) and China (n=6). US patients with crayfish-transmitted Haff disease reported significantly more nausea with and without vomiting, chest pain, body and back pain, dyspnea, and diaphoresis than the Chinese patients and were more frequently misdiagnosed as having myocardial infarctions. Conclusion The bioaccumulation of a new, heat-stable freshwater and/or brackish/saltwater algal toxin, similar to palytoxin but primarily myotoxic and not neurotoxic, is suspected of causing Haff disease. At present, only the rapid identification of the seafood vectors of Haff disease will limit disease outbreaks and prevent further cases. PMID:26130980

  6. [The importance of detecting prepathologic states in preventing chronic nonspecific lung diseases].

    PubMed

    Mizin, V T

    1989-07-01

    A study is presented of 863 patients with chronic unspecific pulmonary diseases (CUPD) and 2785 healthy persons and a method was worked out of detection of predisease states in which stages may be singled out; initial health state with risk factors--threatening period--premorbid state--prenosological condition. From the viewpoint of these factors a prognostic model of CUPD in healthy persons is designed. PMID:2800501

  7. Abdominal Tuberculosis: An Immigrant's Disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Jehangir, Waqas; Khan, Rafay; Gil, Constante; Baruiz-Creel, Marilyn; Bandel, Geraldo; Middleton, John R.; Sen, Purnendu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Abdominal tuberculosis (TB) is an uncommon condition in the United States (US) except for patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). An increasing number of cases have been reported in western countries amongst immigrants. It is important to be aware of the data and clinical characteristics in the immigrant population. Aims: The purpose of this study is to determine the epidemiologic characteristics of abdominal TB among immigrants in the US and to review the clinical presentations of abdominal TB with a focus particularly on unusual features. Materials and Methods: In a community teaching hospital in New Jersey, patients diagnosed with abdominal TB were examined and included in this report. All nine patients were immigrants from countries with high prevalence of TB and a majority had resided in the US for at least 5 years. None had clinical evidence of HIV and those that were tested were not found to be positive for HIV. Initial examination, diagnostic workup, and response to therapy were all pertinent to the management and diagnosis of these patients. Results: Three patients had atypical clinical presentations with normal chest X-rays and either negative or unknown tuberculin tests leading to delayed diagnosis and inappropriate therapy in at least one patient. With antituberculous therapy, all except for one patient had satisfactory outcomes. Immigrant patients with a diagnosis of abdominal TB had no evidence of HIV infection or other associated conditions in contrast to native-born individuals. Conclusion: Atypical presentations may cause diagnostic difficulties. Failure to perform appropriate tests may lead to inappropriate therapy with adverse outcomes. Although there is a decline in the number of TB cases in the US and screening for latent pulmonary infection in foreigners has been implemented effectively, the diagnosis of abdominal TB continues to be under diagnosed. PMID:26199920

  8. Challenges in Designing a National Surveillance Program for Inflammatory Bowel Disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Long, Millie D.; Hutfless, Susan; Kappelman, Michael D.; Khalili, Hamed; Kaplan, Gil; Bernstein, Charles N.; Colombel, Jean Frederic; Herrinton, Lisa; Velayos, Fernando; Loftus, Edward V.; Nguyen, Geoffrey C.; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N.; Sonnenberg, Amnon; Chan, Andrew; Sandler, Robert S.; Atreja, Ashish; Shah, Samir A.; Rothman, Kenneth; Leleiko, Neal S.; Bright, Renee; Boffetta, Paolo; Myers, Kelly D.; Sands, Bruce E.

    2015-01-01

    This review describes the history of US government funding for surveillance programs in IBD, provides current estimates of the incidence and prevalence of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) in the United States (US), and enumerates a number of challenges faced by current and future IBD surveillance programs. A rationale for expanding the focus of IBD surveillance beyond counts of incidence and prevalence, in order to provide a greater understanding of the burden of IBD, disease etiology and pathogenesis, is provided. Lessons learned from other countries are summarized, as well as potential resources that may be used to optimize a new form of IBD surveillance in the US. A consensus recommendation on the goals and available resources for a new model for disease surveillance are provided. This new model should focus upon “surveillance of the burden of disease,” including 1) natural history of disease and 2) outcomes and complications of the disease and/or treatments. PMID:24280882

  9. No Geographic Correlation between Lyme Disease and Death Due to 4 Neurodegenerative Disorders, United States, 2001–2010

    PubMed Central

    Kugeler, Kiersten J.; Perea, Anna E.; Pastula, Daniel M.; Mead, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Associations between Lyme disease and certain neurodegenerative diseases have been proposed, but supportive evidence for an association is lacking. Similar geographic distributions would be expected if 2 conditions were etiologically linked. Thus, we compared the distribution of Lyme disease cases in the United States with the distributions of deaths due to Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis (MS), and Parkinson disease; no geographic correlations were identified. Lyme disease incidence per US state was not correlated with rates of death due to ALS, MS, or Parkinson disease; however, an inverse correlation was detected between Lyme disease and Alzheimer disease. The absence of a positive correlation between the geographic distribution of Lyme disease and the distribution of deaths due to Alzheimer disease, ALS, MS, and Parkinson disease provides further evidence that Lyme disease is not associated with the development of these neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:26488307

  10. No Geographic Correlation between Lyme Disease and Death Due to 4 Neurodegenerative Disorders, United States, 2001-2010.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Joseph D; Kugeler, Kiersten J; Perea, Anna E; Pastula, Daniel M; Mead, Paul S

    2015-11-01

    Associations between Lyme disease and certain neurodegenerative diseases have been proposed, but supportive evidence for an association is lacking. Similar geographic distributions would be expected if 2 conditions were etiologically linked. Thus, we compared the distribution of Lyme disease cases in the United States with the distributions of deaths due to Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis (MS), and Parkinson disease; no geographic correlations were identified. Lyme disease incidence per US state was not correlated with rates of death due to ALS, MS, or Parkinson disease; however, an inverse correlation was detected between Lyme disease and Alzheimer disease. The absence of a positive correlation between the geographic distribution of Lyme disease and the distribution of deaths due to Alzheimer disease, ALS, MS, and Parkinson disease provides further evidence that Lyme disease is not associated with the development of these neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:26488307

  11. Bupivacaine administered intrathecally versus rectally in the management of intractable rectal cancer pain in palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Zaporowska-Stachowiak, Iwona; Kowalski, Grzegorz; Łuczak, Jacek; Kosicka, Katarzyna; Kotlinska-Lemieszek, Aleksandra; Sopata, Maciej; Główka, Franciszek

    2014-01-01

    Background Unacceptable adverse effects, contraindications to and/or ineffectiveness of World Health Organization step III “pain ladder” drugs causes needless suffering among a population of cancer patients. Successful management of severe cancer pain may require invasive treatment. However, a patient’s refusal of an invasive procedure necessitates that clinicians consider alternative options. Objective Intrathecal bupivacaine delivery as a viable treatment of intractable pain is well documented. There are no data on rectal bupivacaine use in cancer patients or in the treatment of cancer tenesmoid pain. This study aims to demonstrate that bupivacaine administered rectally could be a step in between the current treatment options for intractable cancer pain (conventional/conservative analgesia or invasive procedures), and to evaluate the effect of the mode of administration (intrathecal versus rectal) on the bupivacaine plasma concentration. Cases We present two Caucasian, elderly inpatients admitted to hospice due to intractable rectal/tenesmoid pain. The first case is a female with vulvar cancer, and malignant infiltration of the rectum/vagina. Bupivacaine was used intrathecally (0.25–0.5%, 1–2 mL every 6 hours). The second case is a female with ovarian cancer and malignant rectal infiltration. Bupivacaine was adminstered rectally (0.05–0.1%, 100 mL every 4.5–11 hours). Methods Total bupivacaine plasma concentrations were determined using the high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet method. Results Effective pain control was achieved with intrathecal bupivacaine (0.077–0.154 mg·kg−1) and bupivacaine in enema (1.820 mg·kg−1). Intrathecal bupivacaine (0.5%, 2 mL) caused a drop in blood pressure; other side effects were absent in both cases. Total plasma bupivacaine concentrations following intrathecal and rectal bupivacaine application did not exceed 317.2 ng·mL−1 and 235.7 ng·mL−1, respectively. Bupivacaine elimination was slower after rectal than after intrathecal administration (t½= 5.50 versus 2.02 hours, respectively). Limitations This study reports two cases only, and there could be inter-patient variation. Conclusion Bupivacaine in boluses administered intrathecally (0.25%, 2 mL) provided effective, safe analgesia in advanced cancer patients. Bupivacaine enema (100 mg·100 mL−1) was shown to be a valuable option for control of end-of-life tenesmoid cancer pain. PMID:25336967

  12. Transitions between epithelial and mesenchymal states in development and disease.

    PubMed

    Baum, Buzz; Settleman, Jeffrey; Quinlan, Margaret P

    2008-06-01

    The ancestors of modern Metazoa were constructed in large part by the foldings and distortions of two-dimensional sheets of epithelial cells. This changed approximately 600 million years ago with the evolution of mesenchymal cells. These cells arise as the result of epithelial cell delamination through a reprogramming process called an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) [Shook D, Keller R. Mechanisms, mechanics and function of epithelial-mesenchymal transitions in early development. Mech Dev 2003;120:1351-83; Thiery JP, Sleeman JP. Complex networks orchestrate epithelial-mesenchymal transitions. Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 2006;7:131-42]. Because mesenchymal cells are free to migrate through the body cavity, the evolution of the mesenchyme opened up new avenues for morphological plasticity, as cells evolved the ability to take up new positions within the embryo and to participate in novel cell-cell interactions; forming new types of internal tissues and organs such as muscle and bone [Thiery JP, Sleeman, JP. Complex networks orchestrate epithelial-mesenchymal transitions. Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 2006;7:131-42; Hay ED, Zuk A. Transformations between epithelium and mesenchyme: normal, pathological, and experimentally induced. Am J Kidney Dis 1995;26:678-90]. After migrating to a suitable site, mesenchymal cells coalesce and re-polarize to form secondary epithelia, in a so-called mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET). Such switches between mesenchymal and epithelial states are a frequent feature of Metazoan gastrulation [Hay ED, Zuk A. Transformations between epithelium and mesenchyme: normal, pathological, and experimentally induced. Am J Kidney Dis 1995;26:678-90] and the neural crest lineage [Duband JL, Monier F, Delannet M, Newgreen D. Epitheliu-mmesenchyme transition during neural crest development. Acta Anat 1995;154:63-78]. Significantly, however, when hijacked during the development of cancer, the ability of cells to undergo EMT, to leave the primary tumor and to undergo MET at secondary sites can have devastating consequences on the organism, allowing tumor cells derived from epithelia to invade surrounding tissues and spread through the host [Thiery JP, Sleeman JP. Complex networks orchestrate epithelial-mesenchymal transitions. Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 2006;7:131-42; Hay ED, Zuk A. Transformations between epithelium and mesenchyme: normal, pathological, and experimentally induced. Am J Kidney Dis 1995;26:678-90]. Thus, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underpinning EMT are both an essential feature of Metazoan development and an important area of biomedical research. In this review, we discuss the common molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in EMT in both cases. PMID:18343170

  13. Three decades of meningococcal disease in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Puricelli, Rubens C B; Kupek, Emil; Westrupp, Maria Helena Bittencourt

    2004-06-01

    Consolidation of data on meningococcal disease surveillance for the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil, has provided new insight about the evolution of this disease during the period of 1971-2000. A descriptive epidemiological study, based on retrospective analysis of all cases of meningococcal disease notified in the state of Santa Catarina, linked the surveillance data from the Secretary of the State of Health, magnetic tape records and the data from the national surveillance of diseases of obligatory notification. Following World Health Organization guidelines, cumulative incidence exceeding five cases per 100,000 inhabitants was considered indicative of an epidemic. Official population data from the Fundao Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatstica were used for the incidence denominator. During the 1971-2000 period, 7,893 cases and 1,354 deaths caused by meningococcal disease were reported. This corresponds to a mean of 263 cases and 45 deaths per year, with a mean incidence of 6.4 cases per 100,000 inhabitants and a fatality rate of 17.2%. Three distinct epidemiological periods were identified, two of which can be considered epidemic. Two of three distinct epidemiological periods were characterized by an epidemic of meningococcal disease, covering 20 of the 30 years analyzed. Identification of the epidemics and preventive actions, such as vaccination and health education, contributed to the reduction of morbidity and mortality due to this disease. PMID:15476056

  14. Resting-state networks link invasive and noninvasive brain stimulation across diverse psychiatric and neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Michael D.; Buckner, Randy L.; Liu, Hesheng; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Lozano, Andres M.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Brain stimulation, a therapy increasingly used for neurological and psychiatric disease, traditionally is divided into invasive approaches, such as deep brain stimulation (DBS), and noninvasive approaches, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation. The relationship between these approaches is unknown, therapeutic mechanisms remain unclear, and the ideal stimulation site for a given technique is often ambiguous, limiting optimization of the stimulation and its application in further disorders. In this article, we identify diseases treated with both types of stimulation, list the stimulation sites thought to be most effective in each disease, and test the hypothesis that these sites are different nodes within the same brain network as defined by resting-state functional-connectivity MRI. Sites where DBS was effective were functionally connected to sites where noninvasive brain stimulation was effective across diseases including depression, Parkinson's disease, obsessive-compulsive disorder, essential tremor, addiction, pain, minimally conscious states, and Alzheimer’s disease. A lack of functional connectivity identified sites where stimulation was ineffective, and the sign of the correlation related to whether excitatory or inhibitory noninvasive stimulation was found clinically effective. These results suggest that resting-state functional connectivity may be useful for translating therapy between stimulation modalities, optimizing treatment, and identifying new stimulation targets. More broadly, this work supports a network perspective toward understanding and treating neuropsychiatric disease, highlighting the therapeutic potential of targeted brain network modulation. PMID:25267639

  15. Geographic Expansion of Lyme Disease in the Southeastern United States, 20002014

    PubMed Central

    Lantos, Paul M.; Nigrovic, Lise E.; Auwaerter, Paul G.; Fowler, Vance G.; Ruffin, Felicia; Brinkerhoff, R. Jory; Reber, Jodi; Williams, Carl; Broyhill, James; Pan, William K.; Gaines, David N.

    2015-01-01

    Background.?The majority of Lyme disease cases in the United States are acquired on the east coast between northern Virginia and New England. In recent years the geographic extent of Lyme disease has been expanding, raising the prospect of Lyme disease becoming endemic in the southeast. Methods.?We collected confirmed and probable cases of Lyme disease from 2000 through 2014 from the Virginia Department of Health and North Carolina Department of Public Health and entered them in a geographic information system. We performed spatial and spatiotemporal cluster analyses to characterize Lyme disease expansion. Results.?There was a marked increase in Lyme disease cases in Virginia, particularly from 2007 onwards. Northern Virginia experienced intensification and geographic expansion of Lyme disease cases. The most notable area of expansion was to the southwest along the Appalachian Mountains with development of a new disease cluster in the southern Virginia mountain region. Conclusions.?The geographic distribution of Lyme disease cases significantly expanded in Virginia between 2000 and 2014, particularly southward in the Virginia mountain ranges. If these trends continue, North Carolina can expect autochthonous Lyme disease transmission in its mountain region in the coming years. PMID:26550580

  16. Geographic Expansion of Lyme Disease in the Southeastern United States, 2000-2014.

    PubMed

    Lantos, Paul M; Nigrovic, Lise E; Auwaerter, Paul G; Fowler, Vance G; Ruffin, Felicia; Brinkerhoff, R Jory; Reber, Jodi; Williams, Carl; Broyhill, James; Pan, William K; Gaines, David N

    2015-12-01

    Background. ?The majority of Lyme disease cases in the United States are acquired on the east coast between northern Virginia and New England. In recent years the geographic extent of Lyme disease has been expanding, raising the prospect of Lyme disease becoming endemic in the southeast. Methods. ?We collected confirmed and probable cases of Lyme disease from 2000 through 2014 from the Virginia Department of Health and North Carolina Department of Public Health and entered them in a geographic information system. We performed spatial and spatiotemporal cluster analyses to characterize Lyme disease expansion. Results. ?There was a marked increase in Lyme disease cases in Virginia, particularly from 2007 onwards. Northern Virginia experienced intensification and geographic expansion of Lyme disease cases. The most notable area of expansion was to the southwest along the Appalachian Mountains with development of a new disease cluster in the southern Virginia mountain region. Conclusions. ?The geographic distribution of Lyme disease cases significantly expanded in Virginia between 2000 and 2014, particularly southward in the Virginia mountain ranges. If these trends continue, North Carolina can expect autochthonous Lyme disease transmission in its mountain region in the coming years. PMID:26550580

  17. Estimates of disease effects on soybean yields in the United States 2003 to 2005.

    PubMed

    Wrather, J Allen; Koenning, Steve R

    2006-06-01

    Research must focus on management of diseases that cause extensive losses, especially when funds for research are limited. Knowledge of the losses caused by various soybean diseases is essential when prioritizing research budgets. The objective of this project was to compile estimates of soybean yields suppressed due to diseases for each soybean-producing state in the US from 2003 to 2005. The goal was to provide this information to help funding agencies and scientists prioritize research objectives and budgets. Yield suppression due to individual diseases varied among regions in the US, and the total of soybean yields suppressed due to diseases in the US varied among years. Soybean cyst nematode suppressed US soybean yield more during 2003 to 2005 than any other disease. Phytophthora root and stem rot, sudden death syndrome, and seedling diseases ranked in the top four on the list of diseases that suppressed soybean yield during these years. This is the first report of soybean yield suppression due to Asian soybean rust in the United States. PMID:19259444

  18. Perceptions of a Changing World Induce Hope and Promote Peace in Intractable Conflicts

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Chen, Smadar; Crisp, Richard J.; Halperin, Eran

    2015-01-01

    The importance of hope in promoting conciliatory attitudes has been asserted in the field of conflict resolution. However, little is known about conditions inducing hope, especially in intractable conflicts, where reference to the outgroup may backfire. In the current research, five studies yielded convergent support for the hypothesis that hope for peace stems from a general perception of the world as changing. In Study 1, coders observed associations between belief in a changing world, hope regarding peace, and support for concessions. Study 2 revealed the hypothesized relations using self-reported measures. Studies 3 and 4 established causality by instilling a perception of the world as changing (vs. unchanging) using narrative and drawing manipulations. Study 5 compared the changing world message with a control condition during conflict escalation. Across studies, although the specific context was not referred to, the belief in a changing world increased support for concessions through hope for peace. PMID:25713171

  19. Acute encephalopathy and intractable seizures in a 10-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Caceres, M E; de los Reyes, E C; Khan, R; Caceres, M J

    1999-09-01

    We report a 10-year-old child with Robinow's syndrome who had a 2-week history of headaches and dizziness. On the day of admission, he developed a focal onset seizure with rapid secondary generalization. The seizures were intractable despite adequate doses of benzodiazepine, phenytoin, and phenobarbital, requiring a pentobarbital drip. Continuous electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring showed persistence of the epileptiform discharges for 13 days. Cerebrospinal fluid and brain biopsy studies were unrevealing. Mycoplasma pneumonia titers showed elevation of both immunoglobulins G and M that doubled during the tenth hospital day. High-dose methylprednisolone was begun, and within 12 hours of initiation the patient sat up and began to follow commands appropriately. The overall EEG background markedly improved. Central nervous system Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection should be suspected in patients with an encephalopathy of unclear etiology. PMID:10522345

  20. Effect of corpus callosotomy on attention deficit and behavioral problems in pediatric patients with intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Yonekawa, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Eiji; Takeshita, Eri; Inoue, Yuki; Inagaki, Masumi; Kaga, Makiko; Sugai, Kenji; Sasaki, Masayuki; Kaido, Takanobu; Takahashi, Akio; Otsuki, Taisuke

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of corpus callosotomy (CC) on attention deficit and behavioral problems in pediatric patients with intractable epilepsy, we retrospectively investigated sequential patients who had undergone CC to control seizures. Between August 2005 and April 2010, a total of 15 patients aged between 3.1 and 17.9 years underwent CC at our institute. All the patients experienced either drop attacks or head nodding, which were considered to be therapeutic targets of CC. A standardized instrument, the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), was used to assess behavioral and emotional problems before and after surgery. On postoperative EEGs, 8 (53%) showed improvement and 7 (47%) showed no change in epileptiform discharges. The Attention Problems scale and total score on the CBCL significantly improved in patients whose postoperative EEGs showed improvement. In addition to amelioration of target seizures, CC can improve attention impairments in association with improvement in the postoperative EEG. PMID:21978470

  1. [New international classification of epilepsy and new antiepileptic drugs for medically intractable epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Sadatoshi

    2009-11-01

    The task force of the international league against epilepsy (ILAE) proposed the "Diagnostic scheme for people with epileptic seizures and epilepsy" in 2001. The 2001 diagnostic scheme was updated in 2006. The ILAE Core Group recommended the new classification to replace the previous one (ILAE, 1981, 1989). However, the new classification is too complex to use for clinicians except expert epileptologists. About 10 new antiepileptic drugs are launched recently. Among them, gabapentine, topiramate, and lamotrigine have been approved in Japan as adjunctive therapy for medically intractable seizures. The advantage of the new antiepileptic drugs includes newer mechanism of action, broad spectrum of anti-seizure effects, fewer side effects, and lesser drug interactions. The rational polytherapy is necessary for refractory epilepsy. The majority of elderly patients with new onset epilepsy become seizure free on antiepileptic monotherapy, often with modest dose. We are now in the new era of epilepsy treatment. PMID:20030206

  2. Perceptions of a changing world induce hope and promote peace in intractable conflicts.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Chen, Smadar; Crisp, Richard J; Halperin, Eran

    2015-04-01

    The importance of hope in promoting conciliatory attitudes has been asserted in the field of conflict resolution. However, little is known about conditions inducing hope, especially in intractable conflicts, where reference to the outgroup may backfire. In the current research, five studies yielded convergent support for the hypothesis that hope for peace stems from a general perception of the world as changing. In Study 1, coders observed associations between belief in a changing world, hope regarding peace, and support for concessions. Study 2 revealed the hypothesized relations using self-reported measures. Studies 3 and 4 established causality by instilling a perception of the world as changing (vs. unchanging) using narrative and drawing manipulations. Study 5 compared the changing world message with a control condition during conflict escalation. Across studies, although the specific context was not referred to, the belief in a changing world increased support for concessions through hope for peace. PMID:25713171

  3. Melanosomal sequestration of cytotoxic drugs contributes to the intractability of malignant melanomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kevin G.; Valencia, Julio C.; Lai, Barry; Zhang, Guofeng; Paterson, Jill K.; Rouzaud, François; Berens, Werner; Wincovitch, Stephen M.; Garfield, Susan H.; Leapman, Richard D.; Hearing, Vincent J.; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2006-06-01

    Multidrug resistance mechanisms underlying the intractability of malignant melanomas remain largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that the development of multidrug resistance in melanomas involves subcellular sequestration of intracellular cytotoxic drugs such as cis-diaminedichloroplatinum II (cisplatin; CDDP). CDDP is initially sequestered in subcellular organelles such as melanosomes, which significantly reduces its nuclear localization when compared with nonmelanoma/KB-3-1 epidermoid carcinoma cells. The melanosomal accumulation of CDDP remarkably modulates melanogenesis through a pronounced increase in tyrosinase activity. The altered melanogenesis manifested an 8-fold increase in both intracellular pigmentation and extracellular transport of melanosomes containing CDDP. Thus, our experiments provide evidence that melanosomes contribute to the refractory properties of melanoma cells by sequestering cytotoxic drugs and increasing melanosome-mediated drug export. Preventing melanosomal sequestration of cytotoxic drugs by inhibiting the functions of melanosomes may have great potential as an approach to improving the chemosensitivity of melanoma cells. cancer | melanosomes | skin | tumor therapy | multidrug resistance

  4. Palliative Sedation and What Constitutes Active Dying: A Case of Severe Progressive Dystonia and Intractable Pain.

    PubMed

    Strand, Jacob J; Feely, Molly A; Kramer, Neha M; Moeschler, Susan M; Swetz, Keith M

    2016-05-01

    We present the case of a 34-year-old woman with Klippel-Feil syndrome who developed progressive generalized dystonia of unclear etiology, resulting in intractable pain despite aggressive medical and surgical interventions. Ultimately, palliative sedation was required to relieve suffering. Herein, we describe ethical considerations including defining sedation, determining prognosis in the setting of an undefined neurodegenerative condition, and use of treatments that concurrently might prolong or alter end-of-life trajectory. We highlight pertinent literature and how it may be applied in challenging and unique clinical situations. Finally, we discuss the need for expert multidisciplinary involvement when implementing palliative sedation and illustrate that procedures and rules need to be interpreted to deliver optimal patient-centered plan of care. PMID:25487783

  5. Effects of disease severity and medication state on postural control asymmetry during challenging postural tasks in individuals with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Fabio A; Polastri, Paula F; Baptista, André M; Lirani-Silva, Ellen; Simieli, Lucas; Orcioli-Silva, Diego; Beretta, Victor S; Gobbi, Lilian T B

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of disease severity and medication state on postural control asymmetry during challenging tasks in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). Nineteen people with PD and 11 neurologically healthy individuals performed three standing task conditions: bipedal standing, tandem and unipedal adapted standing; the individuals with PD performed the tasks in ON and OFF medication state. The participants with PD were distributed into 2 groups according to disease severity: unilateral group (n=8) and bilateral group (n=11). The two PD groups performed the evaluations both under and without the medication. Two force plates were used to analyze the posture. The symmetric index was calculated for various of center of pressure. ANOVA one-way (groups) and two-way (PD groups×medication), with repeated measures for medication, were calculated. For main effects of group, the bilateral group was more asymmetric than CG. For main effects of medication, only unipedal adapted standing presented effects of PD medication. There was PD groups×medication interaction. Under the effects of medication, the unilateral group presented lower asymmetry of RMS in anterior-posterior direction and area than the bilateral group in unipedal adapted standing. In addition, the unilateral group presented lower asymmetry of mean velocity, RMS in anterior-posterior direction and area in unipedal standing and area in tandem adapted standing after a medication dose. Postural control asymmetry during challenging postural tasks was dependent on disease severity and medication state in people with PD. The bilateral group presented higher postural control asymmetry than the control and unilateral groups in challenging postural tasks. Finally, the medication dose was able to reduce postural control asymmetry in the unilateral group during challenging postural tasks. PMID:26741255

  6. Scale dependence of disease impacts on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) mortality in the southwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Bell, David M; Bradford, John B; Lauenroth, William K

    2015-07-01

    Depending on how disease impacts tree exposure to risk, both the prevalence of disease and disease effects on survival may contribute to patterns of mortality risk across a species' range. Disease may accelerate tree species' declines in response to global change factors, such as drought, biotic interactions, such as competition, or functional traits, such as allometry. To assess the role of disease in mediating mortality risk in quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides), we developed hierarchical Bayesian models for both disease prevalence in live aspen stems and the resulting survival rates of healthy and diseased aspen near the species' southern range limit using 5088 individual trees on 281 United States Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis plots in the southwestern United States. We found that disease prevalence depended primarily on tree size, tree allometry, and spatial variation in precipitation, while mortality depended on tree size, allometry, competition, spatial variation in summer temperature, and both temporal and spatial variation in summer precipitation. Disease prevalence was highest in large trees with low slenderness found on dry sites. For healthy trees, mortality decreased with diameter, slenderness, and temporal variation in summer precipitation, but increased with competition and spatial variation in summer temperature. Mortality of diseased trees decreased with diameter and aspen relative basal area and increased with mean summer temperature and precipitation. Disease infection increased aspen mortality, especially in trees of intermediate size and trees on plots at climatic extremes (i.e., cool, wet and warm, dry climates). By examining variation in disease prevalence, mortality of healthy trees, and mortality of diseased trees, we showed that the role of disease in aspen tree mortality depended on the scale of inference. For variation among individuals in diameter, disease tended to expose intermediate-size trees experiencing moderate risk to greater risk. For spatial variation in summer temperature, disease exposed lower risk populations to greater mortality probabilities, but the magnitude of this exposure depended on summer precipitation. Furthermore, the importance of diameter and slenderness in mediating responses to climate supports the increasing emphasis on trait variation in studies of ecological responses to global change. PMID:26378306

  7. People efficiently explore the solution space of the computationally intractable traveling salesman problem to find near-optimal tours.

    PubMed

    Acua, Daniel E; Parada, Vctor

    2010-01-01

    Humans need to solve computationally intractable problems such as visual search, categorization, and simultaneous learning and acting, yet an increasing body of evidence suggests that their solutions to instantiations of these problems are near optimal. Computational complexity advances an explanation to this apparent paradox: (1) only a small portion of instances of such problems are actually hard, and (2) successful heuristics exploit structural properties of the typical instance to selectively improve parts that are likely to be sub-optimal. We hypothesize that these two ideas largely account for the good performance of humans on computationally hard problems. We tested part of this hypothesis by studying the solutions of 28 participants to 28 instances of the Euclidean Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP). Participants were provided feedback on the cost of their solutions and were allowed unlimited solution attempts (trials). We found a significant improvement between the first and last trials and that solutions are significantly different from random tours that follow the convex hull and do not have self-crossings. More importantly, we found that participants modified their current better solutions in such a way that edges belonging to the optimal solution ("good" edges) were significantly more likely to stay than other edges ("bad" edges), a hallmark of structural exploitation. We found, however, that more trials harmed the participants' ability to tell good from bad edges, suggesting that after too many trials the participants "ran out of ideas." In sum, we provide the first demonstration of significant performance improvement on the TSP under repetition and feedback and evidence that human problem-solving may exploit the structure of hard problems paralleling behavior of state-of-the-art heuristics. PMID:20686597

  8. People Efficiently Explore the Solution Space of the Computationally Intractable Traveling Salesman Problem to Find Near-Optimal Tours

    PubMed Central

    Acuña, Daniel E.; Parada, Víctor

    2010-01-01

    Humans need to solve computationally intractable problems such as visual search, categorization, and simultaneous learning and acting, yet an increasing body of evidence suggests that their solutions to instantiations of these problems are near optimal. Computational complexity advances an explanation to this apparent paradox: (1) only a small portion of instances of such problems are actually hard, and (2) successful heuristics exploit structural properties of the typical instance to selectively improve parts that are likely to be sub-optimal. We hypothesize that these two ideas largely account for the good performance of humans on computationally hard problems. We tested part of this hypothesis by studying the solutions of 28 participants to 28 instances of the Euclidean Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP). Participants were provided feedback on the cost of their solutions and were allowed unlimited solution attempts (trials). We found a significant improvement between the first and last trials and that solutions are significantly different from random tours that follow the convex hull and do not have self-crossings. More importantly, we found that participants modified their current better solutions in such a way that edges belonging to the optimal solution (“good” edges) were significantly more likely to stay than other edges (“bad” edges), a hallmark of structural exploitation. We found, however, that more trials harmed the participants' ability to tell good from bad edges, suggesting that after too many trials the participants “ran out of ideas.” In sum, we provide the first demonstration of significant performance improvement on the TSP under repetition and feedback and evidence that human problem-solving may exploit the structure of hard problems paralleling behavior of state-of-the-art heuristics. PMID:20686597

  9. The burden of infectious diseases in the Brazilian Southern state of Santa Catarina.

    PubMed

    Traebert, Jefferson; Nickel, Daniela A; Traebert, Eliane; Escalante, Juan J C; Schneider, Ione J C

    2016-01-01

    Infectious diseases are still significant causes of deaths in Brazil. The objective of this study was to estimate the burden of selected infectious diseases in the Brazilian Southern state of Santa Catarina in 2011. An ecological study was conducted. The infectious diseases included were HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, Chagas disease, diarrheal diseases and other infectious diseases. Data were collected from official health information systems. Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALY) were estimated by the sum of Years of Life Lost (YLL) and Years Lived with Disability (YLD). 45,237.33 DALYs were estimated, with a rate of 685.46 DALYs per 100,000 population. 92.9% was due to YLL and 7.1% to YLD. Men and the age range of 0-4 years presented higher burden. The highest burden was attributed to HIV/AIDS. There was a high concentration of burden rates in the coast regions of the state. It could be concluded that more than 90% of the burden was attributed to the early mortality component. The highest burden was observed among men, children under 5 years of age and at the coast regions of the state. The highest levels of burden were due to HIV/AIDS. PMID:26608780

  10. Endemic, Notifiable Bioterrorism-Related Diseases, United States, 1992–1999

    PubMed Central

    Glynn, M. Kathleen; Groseclose, Samuel L.

    2003-01-01

    Little information is available in the United States regarding the incidence and distribution of diseases caused by critical microbiologic agents with the potential for use in acts of terrorism. We describe disease-specific, demographic, geographic, and seasonal distribution of selected bioterrorism-related conditions (anthrax, botulism, brucellosis, cholera, plague, tularemia, and viral encephalitides) reported to the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System in 1992–1999. Tularemia and brucellosis were the most frequently reported diseases. Anthrax, plague, western equine encephalitis, and eastern equine encephalitis were rare. Higher incidence rates for cholera and plague were noted in the western United States and for tularemia in the central United States. Overall, the incidence of conditions caused by these critical agents in the United States is low. Individual case reports should be considered sentinel events. For potential bioterrorism-related conditions that are endemic and have low incidence, the use of nontraditional surveillance methods and complementary data sources may enhance our ability to rapidly detect changes in disease incidence. PMID:12737739

  11. Access to care for Chagas disease in the United States: a health systems analysis.

    PubMed

    Manne-Goehler, Jennifer; Reich, Michael R; Wirtz, Veronika J

    2015-07-01

    There are 300,000 estimated cases of Chagas disease in the United States but limited data on access to care. This study analyzed trends in access to care for Chagas disease in the United States and assessed the national and state barriers to access. Data on cases in blood donors and drug releases were obtained from the AABB (formerly American Association of Blood Banks) and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), respectively. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 30 key informants at the national level and in five states where treatment had been released. Interview responses were analyzed according to the health systems dimensions of regulation, financing, payment, organization, and persuasion. Data indicate that 1,908 cases were identified in the blood donation system from 2007 to 2013 and that CDC released 422 courses of benznidazole or nifurtimox during this period. The barriers to access at the national level include limited diagnostic and institutionalized referral and care processes, lack of financing for patient-care activities, and limited awareness and training among providers. This study demonstrates that access to treatment of Chagas disease in the United States is limited. The lack of licensing is only one of several barriers to access, highlighting the need for a health systems perspective when scaling up access to these essential medicines. PMID:25986581

  12. Perceived Benefits and Challenges of Coordinated Approaches to Chronic Disease Prevention in State Health Departments

    PubMed Central

    Sequeira, Sonia; Best, Leslie; Jones, Ellen; Baker, Elizabeth A.; Brownson, Ross C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Chronic disease prevention efforts have historically been funded categorically according to disease or risk factor. Federal agencies are now progressively starting to fund combined programs to address common risk. The purpose of this study was to inform transitions to coordinated chronic disease prevention by learning views on perceived benefits and challenges of a coordinated approach to funding. Methods A national survey on evidence-based public health was conducted from March through May 2013 among state health department employees working in chronic disease prevention (N = 865). Participants were asked to rank the top 3 benefits and top 3 challenges in coordinating chronic disease approaches from provided lists and could provide additional responses. Descriptive analyses, ?2 tests, and analysis of variance were conducted. Results The most common perceived benefits of coordinated approaches to chronic disease prevention were improved health outcomes, common risk factors better addressed, and reduced duplication of program efforts. The most common perceived challenges were funding restrictions, such as disease-specific performance measures; competing priorities; lack of communication across programs; funding might be reduced; agency not structured for program coordination; and loss of disease-specific partner support. Rankings of benefits and challenges were similar across states and participant roles; the perceived challenges lack of communication across programs (P = .02) and funding might be reduced differed by program area (P < .001). Conclusion Findings can be used by funding agencies and state health departments for planning, training, and technical assistance. The information on perceived challenges demonstrates the need to improve communication across programs, enhance organizational support for coordinated approaches, and create benefits for organizational partners. PMID:24809362

  13. Wetland cover dynamics drive hemorrhagic disease patterns in white-tailed deer in the United States.

    PubMed

    Berry, Brett S; Magori, Krisztian; Perofsky, Amanda C; Stallknecht, David E; Park, Andrew W

    2013-07-01

    While vector-borne diseases are known to be particularly influenced by environmental factors, the impact of land-cover change on vector-borne wildlife disease patterns is poorly understood, largely due to the paucity of data on disease occurrence at extensive spatial and temporal scales. Widespread and rapid anthropogenic land-cover change, especially urbanization, has transformed the US landscape during the last century. Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus and blue tongue virus, vectored by Culicoides biting midges, are two RNA viruses in the Orbivirus genus that cause severe hemorrhagic disease (HD) in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). We examine the spatial dynamics of HD affecting white-tailed deer in the contiguous United States in two periods covering 1980 to 2007 in connection with land-cover change over the same time. Using spatial statistical modeling, wetland cover emerges as a critical driver of HD morbidity, whereas the drivers of mortality patterns are more complex. Increasing wetland cover is positively associated with HD morbidity, which is consistent with the ecologic requirements of the Culicoides vector. Wetland cover is inherently dynamic due to its importance to biodiversity and water quality as well as its utility for other purposes when drained. Accordingly this analysis helps in understanding the consequences of changing wetlands on vector-borne disease patterns, to identify disease hotspots in a large landscape, and to forecast the spatial spread of HD and related diseases. PMID:23778598

  14. Surveillance for Waterborne Disease Outbreaks and Other Health Events Associated with Recreational Water -United States, 2007-2008

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Since 1978, CDC, EPA, and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists have collaborated on the Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System (WBDOSS) to capture data on waterborne disease outbreaks associated with recreational water. WBDOSS is the prima...

  15. An abnormal resting-state functional brain network indicates progression towards Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jie; Guo, Hao; Cao, Rui; Liang, Hong; Chen, Junjie

    2013-10-25

    Brain structure and cognitive function change in the temporal lobe, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex of patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease, and brain network-connection strength, network efficiency, and nodal attributes are abnormal. However, existing research has only analyzed the differences between these patients and normal controls. In this study, we constructed brain networks using resting-state functional MRI data that was extracted from four populations (normal controls, patients with early mild cognitive impairment, patients with late mild cognitive impairment, and patients with Alzheimer's disease) using the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative data set. The aim was to analyze the characteristics of resting-state functional neural networks, and to observe mild cognitive impairment at different stages before the transformation to Alzheimer's disease. Results showed that as cognitive deficits increased across the four groups, the shortest path in the resting-state functional network gradually increased, while clustering coefficients gradually decreased. This evidence indicates that dementia is associated with a decline of brain network efficiency. In addition, the changes in functional networks revealed the progressive deterioration of network function across brain regions from healthy elderly adults to those with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. The alterations of node attributes in brain regions may reflect the cognitive functions in brain regions, and we speculate that early impairments in memory, hearing, and language function can eventually lead to diffuse brain injury and other cognitive impairments. PMID:25206600

  16. GEOGRAPHIC VARIATION IN THE ONSET OF DECLINE OF ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE MORTALITY IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report examines geographic variation in the onset of the decline of ischemic heart disease (IHD) mortality in white males aged 35-74 during the period 1968-78. Using a quadratic regression model, State Economic Areas (SEAs) were classified as experiencing onset of the decline...

  17. GENOMIC AND PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS OF SURROGATE TISSUES FOR ASSESSING TOXIC EXPOSURES AND DISEASE STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genomic and Proteomic Analysis of Surrogate Tissues for Assessing Toxic Exposures and Disease States
    David J. Dix and John C. Rockett
    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, USEPA, ...

  18. FACTS ON THE MAJOR KILLING AND CRIPPLING DISEASES IN THE UNITED STATES TODAY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Health Education Committee, Inc., New York, NY.

    MAJOR CAUSES OF DEATH AND DISABILITY, RESULTS OF MEDICAL RESEARCH, LIFE EXPECTANCY FIGURES, COST OF ILLNESS TO THE UNITED STATES, AND GOVERNMENT EXPENDITURES IN MEDICINE AND HEALTH ARE PRESENTED TABULARLY AND GRAPHICALLY IN QUESTION AND ANSWER FORM. FOR EACH OF 14 MAJOR DISEASES, PERTINENT FACTS ARE LISTED ABOUT INCIDENCE, COST, DEATH RATE,

  19. SURVEILLANCE FOR WATERBORNE-DISEASE OUTBREAKS - UNITED STATES, 1999-2000

    EPA Science Inventory

    PROBLEM/CONDITION: Since 1971, CDC, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) have maintained a collaborative surveillance system for the occurrences and causes of waterborne-disease outbreaks (WBDOs).This surv...

  20. GENOMIC ANALYSIS OF SURROGATE TISSUES FOR ASSESSING ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURES AND FUTURE DISEASE STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genomic Analysis of Surrogate Tissues for Assessing Environmental Exposures and Future Disease States

    John C. Rockett, Chad R. Blystone, Amber K. Goetz, Rachel N. Murrell, Hongzu Ren, Judith E. Schmid, Jessica Stapelfeldt, Lillian F. Strader, Kary E. Thompson, Douglas B. T...

  1. State of world allergy report 2008: allergy and chronic respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Pawankar, Ruby; Baena-Cagnani, Carlos E; Bousquet, Jean; Canonica, G Walter; Cruz, Alvaro A; Kaliner, Michael A; Lanier, Bobby Q

    2008-06-01

    It is widely recognized that the incidence of allergies and allergic diseases is on the rise globally. As an international umbrella organization for regional and national allergy and clinical immunology societies, the World Allergy Organization is at the forefront of a combined united effort across nations and organizations to address this global concern by promoting the science of allergy and clinical immunology, and advancing exchange of information.The World Allergy Organization's State of World Allergy Reports will provide a biennial review of allergic diseases worldwide, consider their medical and socioeconomic contexts, and propose effective approaches to addressing these problems.In this first State of World Allergy Report 2008, experts from different regions of the world have attempted to define the extent of the global allergy problem, examine recent trends, and provide a framework for the collaboration among world medicine, science, and government agencies that is needed to address the rapidly developing issues associated with allergy and allergic diseases. PMID:23282447

  2. State of World Allergy Report 2008: Allergy and Chronic Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    It is widely recognized that the incidence of allergies and allergic diseases is on the rise globally. As an international umbrella organization for regional and national allergy and clinical immunology societies, the World Allergy Organization is at the forefront of a combined united effort across nations and organizations to address this global concern by promoting the science of allergy and clinical immunology, and advancing exchange of information. The World Allergy Organization's State of World Allergy Reports will provide a biennial review of allergic diseases worldwide, consider their medical and socioeconomic contexts, and propose effective approaches to addressing these problems. In this first State of World Allergy Report 2008, experts from different regions of the world have attempted to define the extent of the global allergy problem, examine recent trends, and provide a framework for the collaboration among world medicine, science, and government agencies that is needed to address the rapidly developing issues associated with allergy and allergic diseases. PMID:23282447

  3. Meteorological Influences on the Seasonality of Lyme Disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sean M.; Eisen, Rebecca J.; Monaghan, Andrew; Mead, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi infection) is the most common vector-transmitted disease in the United States. The majority of human Lyme disease (LD) cases occur in the summer months, but the timing of the peak occurrence varies geographically and from year to year. We calculated the beginning, peak, end, and duration of the main LD season in 12 highly endemic states from 1992 to 2007 and then examined the association between the timing of these seasonal variables and several meteorological variables. An earlier beginning to the LD season was positively associated with higher cumulative growing degree days through Week 20, lower cumulative precipitation, a lower saturation deficit, and proximity to the Atlantic coast. The timing of the peak and duration of the LD season were also associated with cumulative growing degree days, saturation deficit, and cumulative precipitation, but no meteorological predictors adequately explained the timing of the end of the LD season. PMID:24470565

  4. Potential novel risk factors for autochthonous and sylvatic transmission of human Chagas disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease is an emerging vector-borne disease in the United States that causes progressive dilated cardiomyopathy in a third of infected humans. While transmission studies have been performed in Latin America, little is known about the source of infection in locally acquired cases in the United States. This letter describes the underlying factors possibly leading to an increased risk of disease transmission among high-risk groups in the United States. PMID:24996479

  5. Historical Perspectives on the Epidemiology of Human Chagas Disease in Texas and Recommendations for Enhanced Understanding of Clinical Chagas Disease in the Southern United States

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Melissa N.; Woc-Colburn, Laila; Aguilar, David; Hotez, Peter J.; Murray, Kristy O.

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi infection) has recently been identified as an important neglected tropical disease in the United States. Anecdotally referred to as a “silent killer,” it leads to the development of potentially fatal cardiac disease in approximately 30% of those infected. In an attempt to better understand the potential of Chagas disease as a significant underlying cause of morbidity in Texas, we performed a historical literature review to assess disease burden. Human reports of triatomine bites and disease exposure were found to be prevalent in Texas. Despite current beliefs that Chagas disease is a recently emerging disease, we report historical references dating as far back as 1935. Both imported cases and autochthonous transmission contribute to the historical disease burden in Texas. We end by discussing the current knowledge gaps, and recommend priorities for advancing further epidemiologic studies and their policy implications. PMID:26540273

  6. Emerging Capripoxvirus disease outbreaks in Himachal Pradesh, a northern state of India.

    PubMed

    Verma, S; Verma, L K; Gupta, V K; Katoch, V C; Dogra, V; Pal, B; Sharma, M

    2011-02-01

    Both sheep and goat pox are contagious viral diseases and affect small ruminants and are caused by sheep pox virus and goat pox virus respectively that belong to genus Capripoxvirus of Poxviridae family. Huge economic losses emanating from the disease outbreaks are the results of the wool and hide damage, subsequent production losses and also the morbidities and mortalities associated with the disease. This communication highlights clinico-epidemiological observations from the two sheep pox and one goat pox outbreaks. Grossly, multisystemic nodular lesions, mucopurulent nasal discharges and respiratory symptoms were observed in the affected animals. The morbidity, mortality and case fatality rates were 5.18%, 2.45% and 32.37%, respectively. Histopathological, haematological, molecular and serological techniques and also isolation of virus in embryonated chicken eggs were used for the diagnosis of the diseases. The spatial distribution of the disease signifies the role of common pasturelands used for grazing the animals while temporally all three outbreaks occurred in winters and were probably associated with cold stress and fodder scarcity. This is the first recorded report of Capripoxvirus infection in recent times and it highlights the disease as one of the emerging diseases in the northern state of Himachal Pradesh in India. PMID:21214867

  7. Noninfectious disease among the Bhutanese refugee population at a United States urban clinic.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gayathri S; Varma, Selina; Saenger, Michael S; Burleson, Molly; Kohrt, Brandon A; Cantey, Paul

    2014-10-01

    A large number of Bhutanese are currently being resettled to the United States. A high prevalence of noninfectious diseases has been noted in some refugee groups, but data on the Bhutanese refugee population are lacking. A retrospective, chart review study was conducted to determine proportion of noninfectious disease among ethnically Nepali Bhutanese refugees (n = 66) seen at the Grady Refugee Clinic (GRC). GRC disease proportions included the following: 52 % of the patients were overweight/obese (n = 34), 23 % were hypertensive (n = 15), 12 % had vitamin B(12) deficiency (n = 8), 15 % had depression (n = 10), and 14 % had diabetes (n = 9). Nine (90 %) patients with depression had chronic disease compared to 30 (54 %) of the patients without depression. The study found a substantial burden of chronic disease, micronutrient deficiency, and depression in the GRC. Further research is needed to accurately describe the disease burden in refugee populations and to evaluate pre-resettlement disease prevention strategies to provide a framework for future public health interventions. PMID:23456726

  8. [On the Differential Diagnosis of Intractable Psychogenic Chronic Cough: Neuropathic Larynx Irritable - Gabapentin's Antitussive Action].

    PubMed

    Bonnet, U; Ossowski, A; Schubert, M; Gall, H; Steinkamp, I; Richter, L E; Khalil-Boutros, Y; Nefedev, A; Kuhlmann, R

    2015-10-01

    We present the case of a 76 year old female inpatient who suffered from a chronic intractable cough which arose simultaneously to a severe major depression and was secondary to an exorbitant psychological distress. Chronic cough had never been experienced before and was initially considered to have a mere psychogenic origin since a comprehensive and guideline-based diagnostic screening did not reveal any underlying somatic cause. However, several factors cast doubt on the solitary psychic genesis of the chronic cough: i) occurrence immediately after a penetrant cold, ii) embedding in other complaints of laryngeal hyperreagibility (larynx irritable), such as persistent globus pharyngeus sensation, throat clearing and episodic dysphonia, iii) first occurrence on old life, iv) erupting from sleep as well, v) persistence despite remission of the major depression, and v) no sustaining benefit from specific psychotherapy and speech therapy. Therefore, diagnostics were extended to apparative tools for objective evaluation of swallowing by using fiberoptic videoendoscopic (FEES) and videofluoroscopic (VFS) techniques, which revealed signs of laryngeal neuropathy but without evidence of penetration or aspiration. A co-existing small goiter and an impaired glucose tolerance along with a putative intracellular vitamin B12 or folate deficiency (as indirectly derived from an apparent hyperhomocysteinemia) were assumed to be responsible for the neuropathy and underwent specific treatments. The impaired glucose tolerance and putative vitamin deficit were compatible with a distal symmetric sensorimotoric, even subclinical polyneuropathy of the lower extremities. The larynx irritable improved under gabapentin being confirmed by drug removals several times, and finally calmed down almost completely under gabapentin, which was in line with the scant literature of this topic. Re-examination of the larynx per FEES nine months later showed no deficits any more under the well-tolerated treatment (gabapentin, levothyroxine, vitamin B12 and folic acid substitution, weight reduction andphysical training). All in all, the larynx irritable as well as the chronic cough were most probably induced by a laryngeal neuropathy and were not solely of psychic origin. Due to good treatment options a larynx irritable should be regularly taken into consideration of the investigation of intractable chronic cough. Therefore, an apparative evaluation of deglutition is recommended in the diagnostic toolbox of chronic cough - even if embedded in a psychiatric disorder or distress - before diagnosing a sole psychic origin. An hypothetical scheme of the development of a larynx irritable caused by neuropathic and non-neuropathic ("nociceptive") conditions is proposed. PMID:26588720

  9. Resting state functional connectivity of the striatum in Parkinsons disease

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Carl D.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Criswell, Susan R.; Ances, Beau M.

    2012-01-01

    Classical accounts of the pathophysiology of Parkinsons disease have emphasized degeneration of dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons with consequent dysfunction of corticostriatalthalamic loops. In contrast, post-mortem studies indicate that pathological changes in Parkinsons disease (Lewy neurites and Lewy bodies) first appear primarily in the lower brainstem with subsequent progression to more rostral parts of the neuraxis. The nigrostriatal and histological perspectives are not incompatible, but they do emphasize different anatomical structures. To address the question of which brain structures are functionally most affected by Parkinsons disease, we performed a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study focused on striatal functional connectivity. We contrasted 13 patients with advanced Parkinsons disease versus 19 age-matched control subjects, using methodology incorporating scrupulous attention to minimizing the effects of head motion during scanning. The principal finding in the Parkinsons disease group was markedly lower striatal correlations with thalamus, midbrain, pons and cerebellum. This result reinforces the importance of the brainstem in the pathophysiology of Parkinsons disease. Focally altered functional connectivity also was observed in sensori-motor and visual areas of the cerebral cortex, as well the supramarginal gyrus. Striatal functional connectivity with the brainstem was graded (posterior putamen > anterior putamen > caudate), in both patients with Parkinsons disease and control subjects, in a manner that corresponds to well-documented gradient of striatal dopaminergic function loss in Parkinsons disease. We hypothesize that this gradient provides a clue to the pathogenesis of Parkinsons disease. PMID:23195207

  10. Epidemiology of Infant Meningococcal Disease in the United States, 2006–2012

    PubMed Central

    MacNeil, Jessica R.; Bennett, Nancy; Farley, Monica M.; Harrison, Lee H.; Lynfield, Ruth; Nichols, Megin; Petit, Sue; Reingold, Arthur; Schaffner, William; Thomas, Ann; Pondo, Tracy; Mayer, Leonard W.; Clark, Thomas A.; Cohn, Amanda C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The incidence of meningococcal disease is currently at historic lows in the United States; however, incidence remains highest among infants aged <1 year. With routine use of Haemophilus influenzae type b and pneumococcal vaccines in infants and children in the United States, Neisseria meningitidis remains an important cause of bacterial meningitis in young children. METHODS Data were collected from active, population- and laboratory-based surveillance for N meningitidis conducted through Active Bacterial Core surveillance during 2006 through 2012. Expanded data collection forms were completed for infant cases identified in the surveillance area during 2006 through 2010. RESULTS An estimated 113 cases of culture-confirmed meningococcal disease occurred annually among infants aged <1 year in the United States from 2006 through 2012, for an overall incidence of 2.74 per 100 000 infants. Among these cases, an estimated 6 deaths occurred. Serogroup B was responsible for 64%, serogroup C for 12%, and serogroup Y for 16% of infant cases. Based on the expanded data collection forms, a high proportion of infant cases (36/58, 62%) had a smoker in the household and the socioeconomic status of the census tracts where infant meningococcal cases resided was lower compared with the other Active Bacterial Core surveillance areas and the United States as a whole. CONCLUSIONS The burden of meningococcal disease remains highest in young infants and serogroup B predominates. Vaccines that provide long-term protection early in life have the potential to reduce the burden of meningococcal disease, especially if they provide protection against serogroup B meningococcal disease. PMID:25583921

  11. Epidemiology of HIV-Associated Lung Disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Meghan; Brooks, John T; Kaplan, Jonathan E

    2016-04-01

    The epidemiology of HIV infection and its pulmonary complications in the United States has evolved significantly over nearly 20 years since the advent of combination antiretroviral therapy. While infectious complications are less of a threat to patients whose immune systems have been restored, many HIV-infected persons in the United States remain at high risk for opportunistic infection because they are unaware of their HIV infection, have difficulty maintaining linkage to care, or maintain inadequate viral control. Bacterial pneumonia and Pneumocystis pneumonia remain significantly more prevalent among HIV-infected persons, and together with seasonal influenza are areas where public health efforts to increase antiretroviral therapy, appropriate prophylaxis, and vaccination may decrease burden of disease. Noninfectious pulmonary complications of chronic HIV infection are increasingly recognized in the United States and elsewhere. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, pulmonary hypertension, sleep-disordered breathing, and primary lung cancer may all be more common among persons with HIV; of concern, disease burden in U.S. HIV-infected persons may be underestimated due to lack of diagnostic testing for these conditions. Smoking is among the most prevalent preventable causes of morbidity and mortality affecting persons living with HIV infection, and has particular import to pulmonary disease. As of 2009, 42% of HIV-infected adults in medical care in the United States smoked tobacco (over twice the national rate in the general population). Successful efforts to promote smoking cessation among HIV-infected persons are of critical importance to decrease the burden of chronic pulmonary disease. PMID:26974297

  12. Haff disease associated with eating buffalo fish--United States, 1997.

    PubMed

    1998-12-25

    Haff disease is a syndrome of unexplained rhabdomyolysis following consumption of certain types of fish; it is caused by an unidentified toxin. Rhabdomyolysis is a clinical syndrome caused by injury to skeletal muscle that results in release of muscle cell contents into the circulation. In 1997, six cases of Haff disease were identified in the United States (four in California and two in Missouri) among persons who ate buffalo fish (Ictiobus cyprinellus), a bottom-feeding species found mostly in the Mississippi River or its tributaries. This report summarizes the investigation of these cases. PMID:9883771

  13. Efficacy and Safety of Ropivacaine Addition to Intrathecal Morphine for Pain Management in Intractable Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying; Li, Xihan; Zhu, Tong; Lin, Jian; Tao, Gaojian

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Although intrathecal drug infusion has been commonly adopted for terminal cancer pain relief, its adverse effects have made many clinicians reluctant to employ it for intractable cancer pain. The objective of this study is to compare the efficacy and security of an intrathecal continuous infusion of morphine and ropivacaine versus intrathecal morphine alone for cancer pain. Methods. Thirty-six cancer patients received either a continuous morphine (n = 19) or morphine and ropivacaine (n = 17) infusion using an intrathecal catheter through a subcutaneous port. Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) scores and the Barthel Index were analyzed. Adverse effects and complications on postoperative days 1, 3, 7, and 15 were also analyzed. Results. All patients experienced pain relief. Compared to those who received morphine alone, patients receiving morphine and ropivacaine had significantly lower postoperative morphine requirements and higher Barthel Index scores on the 15th postsurgical day (P < 0.05). Patients receiving morphine and ropivacaine had lower NRS scores than patients receiving morphine alone on postoperative days 1, 3, 7, and 15 (P < 0.05). Negative postsurgical effects were similar in both groups. Conclusions. Morphine and ropivacaine administration through intrathecal access ports is efficacious and safe and significantly improves quality of life. PMID:26556955

  14. Bilateral Thalamic Stimulation Induces Insomnia in Patients Treated for Intractable Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Bridoux, Agathe; Drouot, Xavier; Sangare, Aude; Al-ani, Tarik; Brignol, Arnaud; Charles-Nelson, Anais; Brugières, Pierre; Gouello, Gaëtane; Hosomi, Koichi; Lepetit, Hélène; Palfi, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To explore the influence of acute bilateral ventral intermediate thalamic nucleus (VIM) stimulation on sleep. Design: Three consecutive full-night polysomnography recordings were made in the laboratory. After the habituation night, a random order for night ON-stim and OFF-stim was applied for the second and third nights. Setting: Sleep disorders unit of a university hospital. Patients: Eleven patients with bilateral stimulation of the ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus (VIM) for drug-resistant tremor. Measurements: Sleep measures on polysomnography. Results: Total sleep time was reduced during night ON-stim compared to OFF- stim, as well as rapid eye movement sleep percentage while the percentage of N2 increased. Wakefulness after sleep onset time was increased. Conclusion: Our results show that bilateral stimulation of the VIM nuclei reduces sleep and could be associated with insomnia. Citation: Bridoux A, Drouot X, Sangare A, Al-ani T, Brignol A, Charles-Nelson A, Brugières P, Gouello G, Hosomi K, Lepetit H, Palfi S. Bilateral thalamic stimulation induces insomnia in patients treated for intractable tremor. SLEEP 2015;38(3):473–478. PMID:25515098

  15. Supernumerary tricentric derivative chromosome 15 in two boys with intractable epilepsy: another mechanism for partial hexasomy.

    PubMed

    Mann, S M; Wang, N J; Liu, D H; Wang, L; Schultz, R A; Dorrani, N; Sigman, M; Schanen, N C

    2004-07-01

    Rearrangements of chromosome 15q, including isodicentric 15 chromosomes and interstitial duplications and triplications, have been previously reported in association with autism spectrum disorders. We have identified two boys with exceptionally large der(15) chromosomes that are tricentric and contain four copies of the proximal long arm, including the Prader Willi/Angelman critical region, and leading to hexasomy of the involved segment. Biallelic inheritance of maternal alleles and methylation analysis indicate that the markers are maternally derived. Clinical assessment of the boys indicated severe cognitive impairment associated with marked delays in gross and fine motor skills. Social and language deficits were present in both, although the severity of the mental retardation precluded diagnosis of autism (both were considered to have pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified). Neurologic manifestations included infantile spasms evolving into intractable early-onset myoclonic seizures, psychomotor regression, and profound diffuse hypotonia. These patients represent the most severe end of the spectrum of phenotypes associated with segmental aneuploidy for chromosome 15q11-q13. PMID:15141347

  16. Combining stereo-electroencephalography and subdural electrodes in the diagnosis and treatment of medically intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Enatsu, Rei; Bulacio, Juan; Najm, Imad; Wyllie, Elaine; So, Norman K; Nair, Dileep R; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy; Bingaman, William; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge

    2014-08-01

    Stereo-electroencephalography (SEEG) has advantages for exploring deeper epileptic foci. Nevertheless, SEEG can only sample isolated cortical areas and its spatial limitation, with the inability to record contiguous cortical regions, may cause difficulties in interpretation. In light of these limitations, the authors describe the hybrid technique of SEEG and subdural strip electrode placement. The hybrid technique was used for a presurgical evaluation in four patients with intractable epilepsy. Initially, the depth electrodes were inserted with a robotic stereotactic system. Thereafter, a skin incision and a small craniectomy were performed at the entry point of the strip electrode trajectory. The dura was opened and, under live fluoroscopic guidance, strip electrodes were slid into the subdural space. In these patients, the additional subdural strip electrodes provided (1) information regarding the precise description of seizure spread in the cortical surface adjacent to the subdural space, (2) identification of epileptogenic zones located near the crown, (3) more precise definition of functional cortex and (4) a better delineation of the interface between epileptogenic zones and functional cortex. This hybrid technique provides additional data compared to either technique alone, offering superior understanding of the dynamics of the epileptic activity and its interaction with functional cortical areas. PMID:24650680

  17. Intractable glaucoma necessitating dexamethasone implant (Ozurdex) removal and glaucoma surgery in a child with uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Neha; Parchand, Swapnil; Kaushik, Sushmita; Singh, Ramandeep

    2013-01-01

    Although there are encouraging reports showing the use of dexamethasone implant (Ozurdex) in uveitis in adults, the literature is scanty regarding its benefits and side effects in children. A 12-year-old boy presented with intermediate uveitis with disc oedema. He had 20/20 visual acuity and intraocular pressure (IOP) of 18?mm?Hg in both eyes. He was treated with intravitreal Ozurdex in his left eye (LE) due to progressive worsening of uveitis and disc oedema. He developed increased IOP (31?mm?Hg) that could not be controlled on maximal antiglaucoma medications and required the removal of the Ozurdex implant at 2.5?months. His IOP remained persistently high leading to increased cup disc ratio necessitating glaucoma filtration surgery (GFS). At 9?months of post-GFS follow-up, IOP was 12?mm?Hg in LE without any medication. Though dexamethasone implant is being increasingly used in children with uveitis, its potential risk factors such as intractable glaucoma should be considered. PMID:24311419

  18. Brain somatic mutations in MTOR cause focal cortical dysplasia type II leading to intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jae Seok; Kim, Woo-il; Kang, Hoon-Chul; Kim, Se Hoon; Park, Ah Hyung; Park, Eun Kyung; Cho, Young-Wook; Kim, Sangwoo; Kim, Ho Min; Kim, Jeong A; Kim, Junho; Rhee, Hwanseok; Kang, Seok-Gu; Kim, Heung Dong; Kim, Daesoo; Kim, Dong-Seok; Lee, Jeong Ho

    2015-04-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia type II (FCDII) is a sporadic developmental malformation of the cerebral cortex characterized by dysmorphic neurons, dyslamination and medically refractory epilepsy. It has been hypothesized that FCD is caused by somatic mutations in affected regions. Here, we used deep whole-exome sequencing (read depth, 412-668) validated by site-specific amplicon sequencing (100-347,499) in paired brain-blood DNA from four subjects with FCDII and uncovered a de novo brain somatic mutation, mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR) c.7280T>C (p.Leu2427Pro) in two subjects. Deep sequencing of the MTOR gene in an additional 73 subjects with FCDII using hybrid capture and PCR amplicon sequencing identified eight different somatic missense mutations found in multiple brain tissue samples of ten subjects. The identified mutations accounted for 15.6% of all subjects with FCDII studied (12 of 77). The identified mutations induced the hyperactivation of mTOR kinase. Focal cortical expression of mutant MTOR by in utero electroporation in mice was sufficient to disrupt neuronal migration and cause spontaneous seizures and cytomegalic neurons. Inhibition of mTOR with rapamycin suppressed cytomegalic neurons and epileptic seizures. This study provides, to our knowledge, the first evidence that brain somatic activating mutations in MTOR cause FCD and identifies mTOR as a treatment target for intractable epilepsy in FCD. PMID:25799227

  19. Oblique metatarsal osteotomy for intractable plantar keratosis: 10-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Idusuyi, O B; Kitaoka, H B; Patzer, G L

    1998-06-01

    Twenty patients (14 women and 6 men) (23 feet) had a single oblique osteotomy operation of the 2nd, 3rd, or 4th metatarsal without fixation during an 8-year period. The mean age was 46 years (range, 21-64 years). Each patient had a painful intractable plantar keratosis preoperatively. The average follow-up was 10 years (range, 3-14 years). Postoperatively, reoperation was performed in four feet because of painful callosities. For 13 of the 19 feet that did not have reoperation, patients were limited in footwear or required a shoe insert. Overall results were good for 10 feet, fair for 7 feet, and poor for 6 feet. The only complication was a deep infection that occurred in one foot (good result). Nonunion occurred in one foot and delayed union in one. The average decrease in metatarsal length after osteotomy was 6+/-6 mm. The single oblique lesser metatarsal osteotomy may be successful, but one half of the patients continued to have some degree of pain and most patients had limitations in footwear. Overall results were disappointing, and patients who are offered this procedure should be advised of its limitations. PMID:9677076

  20. Gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgical thalamotomy for intractable tremor: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Allison M; Glover, Janis; Chiang, Veronica L S; Gerrard, Jason; Yu, James B

    2015-03-01

    Tremor markedly reduces quality of life and causes a significant psychological burden for patients who are severely affected by this movement disorder. Pharmacologic and surgical treatments for tremor exist, but for patients who have failed medical therapy and are not surgical candidates, stereotactic radiosurgery is the only available treatment option. Of available stereotactic radiosurgical techniques for intractable tremor, the authors chose to evaluate the safety and efficacy of gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgical thalamotomy. In order to qualitatively synthesize available data a systematic review was conducted by searching MEDLINE (OvidSP 1946-January Week 1 2014) and Embase (OvidSP 1974-2014 January). The search strategy was not limited by study design or language of publication. All searches were conducted on January 7, 2014. Treatment efficacy, adverse outcomes, and patient deaths were reviewed and tabulated. Complications appeared months to years post procedure and most commonly consisted of mild contralateral numbness and transient hemiparesis. Rarely, more severe complications were reported, including dysphagia and death. Though no data from randomized controlled trials are available, our analysis of the literature indicates that unilateral gamma knife thalamotomy using doses from 130 to 150Gy appears safe and well tolerated. PMID:25690750

  1. [Indication and usage of opioids except morphine for chronic non-malignant intractable pain].

    PubMed

    Saeki, Shigeru

    2008-11-01

    Indication and usage of opioids except morphine for chronic non-malignant intractable pain were reviewed. In Japan, other than morphine, we can use only two opioids, codeine phosphate (codeine), and dihydrocodeine phosphate (dihydrocodeine) for non-malignant pain management according to medical insurance system. But in western countries sustained-release opioids such as MS contine, transdermal fentanyl, oxycontin were used for the management of non-malignant chronic pain. The WHO ladder for cancer management should also be used for the management of non-malignant pain. Initial dose of codeine is 60 mg x day(-1) and the dosage should be increased or decreased according to pain intensity, patients' general condition and age. In most cases pain is controlled at the dose of 80-310 mg x day(-1). If pain intensity does not decrease or change, codeine should be changed to morphine. In our clinic, starting dose of codeine was 40-480 mg x day(-1) (average dose: 107.8 mg x day(-1)), maximum dose was 60-1280 mg x day (average dose: 310 mg x day(-1)). Average period for administration of codeine was 294.4 days. Dihydrocodeine has twice analgesic efficacy compared to codeine. The initial dose is the same as codeine. We hope that sustained release opioids such as transdermal fentanyl, oxycontin, tramadol etc will be used in Japan for management of non-malignant chronic pain in the near future. PMID:19039961

  2. Occipital nerve stimulation for the treatment of intractable chronic migraine headache: ONSTIM feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Saper, Joel R; Dodick, David W; Silberstein, Stephen D; McCarville, Sally; Sun, Mark; Goadsby, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Medically intractable chronic migraine (CM) is a disabling illness characterized by headache ?15 days per month. Methods: A multicenter, randomized, blinded, controlled feasibility study was conducted to obtain preliminary safety and efficacy data on occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) in CM. Eligible subjects received an occipital nerve block, and responders were randomized to adjustable stimulation (AS), preset stimulation (PS) or medical management (MM) groups. Results: Seventy-five of 110 subjects were assigned to a treatment group; complete diary data were available for 66. A responder was defined as a subject who achieved a 50% or greater reduction in number of headache days per month or a three-point or greater reduction in average overall pain intensity compared with baseline. Three-month responder rates were 39% for AS, 6% for PS and 0% for MM. No unanticipated adverse device events occurred. Lead migration occurred in 12 of 51 (24%) subjects. Conclusion: The results of this feasibility study offer promise and should prompt further controlled studies of ONS in CM. PMID:20861241

  3. Tactile Electrosurgical Ablation: A Technique for the Treatment of Intractable Heavy and Prolonged Menstrual Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    El Saman, Ali M.; AbdelHafez, Faten F.; Zahran, Kamal M.; Saad, Hazem; Khalaf, Mohamed; Hussein, Mostafa; Hassanin, Ibrahim M. A.; Shugaa Al Deen, Saba M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To study the efficacy and safety of tactile electrosurgical ablation (TEA) in stopping a persistent attack of abnormal uterine bleeding not responding to medical and hormonal therapy. Methods. This is a case series of 19 cases with intractable abnormal uterine bleeding, who underwent TEA at the Women's Health Center of Assiut University. The outcomes measured were; patient's acceptability, operative time, complications, menstrual outcomes, and reintervention. Results. None of the 19 counseled cases refused the TEA procedure which took 610 minutes without intraoperative complications. The procedure was successful in the immediate cessation of bleeding in 18 out of 19 cases. During the 24-month follow-up period, 9 cases developed amenorrhea, 5 had scanty menstrual bleeding, 3 were regularly menstruating, 1 case underwent repeat TEA ablation, and one underwent a hysterectomy. Conclusions. TEA represents a safe, inexpensive, and successful method for management of uterine bleeding emergencies with additional long-term beneficial effects. However, more studies with more cases and longer follow-up periods are warranted. PMID:26294969

  4. Amoeba-inspired nanoarchitectonic computing: solving intractable computational problems using nanoscale photoexcitation transfer dynamics.

    PubMed

    Aono, Masashi; Naruse, Makoto; Kim, Song-Ju; Wakabayashi, Masamitsu; Hori, Hirokazu; Ohtsu, Motoichi; Hara, Masahiko

    2013-06-18

    Biologically inspired computing devices and architectures are expected to overcome the limitations of conventional technologies in terms of solving computationally demanding problems, adapting to complex environments, reducing energy consumption, and so on. We previously demonstrated that a primitive single-celled amoeba (a plasmodial slime mold), which exhibits complex spatiotemporal oscillatory dynamics and sophisticated computing capabilities, can be used to search for a solution to a very hard combinatorial optimization problem. We successfully extracted the essential spatiotemporal dynamics by which the amoeba solves the problem. This amoeba-inspired computing paradigm can be implemented by various physical systems that exhibit suitable spatiotemporal dynamics resembling the amoeba's problem-solving process. In this Article, we demonstrate that photoexcitation transfer phenomena in certain quantum nanostructures mediated by optical near-field interactions generate the amoebalike spatiotemporal dynamics and can be used to solve the satisfiability problem (SAT), which is the problem of judging whether a given logical proposition (a Boolean formula) is self-consistent. SAT is related to diverse application problems in artificial intelligence, information security, and bioinformatics and is a crucially important nondeterministic polynomial time (NP)-complete problem, which is believed to become intractable for conventional digital computers when the problem size increases. We show that our amoeba-inspired computing paradigm dramatically outperforms a conventional stochastic search method. These results indicate the potential for developing highly versatile nanoarchitectonic computers that realize powerful solution searching with low energy consumption. PMID:23565603

  5. Microendoscopy-guided percutaneous cordotomy for intractable pain: case series of 24 patients.

    PubMed

    Fonoff, Erich Talamoni; Lopez, William Omar Contreras; de Oliveira, Ywzhe Sifuentes Almeida; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2016-02-01

    OBJECT The aim of this study was to show that microendoscopic guidance using a double-channel technique could be safely applied during percutaneous cordotomy and provides clear real-time visualization of the spinal cord and surrounding structures during the entire procedure. METHODS Twenty-four adult patients with intractable cancer pain were treated by microendoscopic-guided percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) cordotomy using the double-channel technique under local anesthesia. A percutaneous lateral puncture was performed initially under fluoroscopy guidance to localize the target. When the subarachnoid space was reached by the guiding cannula, the endoscope was inserted for visualization of the spinal cord and surrounding structures. After target visualization, a second needle was inserted to guide the RF electrode. Cordotomy was performed by a standard RF method. RESULTS The microendoscopic double-channel approach provided real-time visualization of the target in 91% of the cases. The other 9% of procedures were performed by the single-channel technique. Significant analgesia was achieved in over 90% of the cases. Two patients had transient ataxia that lasted for a few weeks until total recovery. CONCLUSIONS The use of percutaneous microendoscopic cordotomy with the double-channel technique is useful for specific manipulations of the spinal cord. It provides real-time visualization of the RF probe, thereby adding a degree of safety to the procedure. PMID:26230468

  6. The Disease Burden Attributable to Smoking in the State Of Rio De Janeiro, Brazil in 2000

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Andreia Ferreira; Valente, Joaquim Gonalves; Leite, Iuri Costa

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Smoking is one of the main risk factors for morbidity and mortality. An estimated 59 million (4.4%) disability-adjusted life years were lost due to smoking throughout the world in 2000. OBJECTIVE To estimate the disease burden attributable to smoking in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, for the year 2000. METHODS Based on estimates of smoking prevalence and relative death risks, the smoking-attributable fraction was calculated for each selected cause, by age and gender. The disease burden attributable to smoking was estimated by multiplying the fractions by the corresponding disability-adjusted life years. RESULTS In the State of Rio de Janeiro, 7% of all disability-adjusted life years were due to smoking. For individuals 30 or more years old, the fraction increased to 10.6% (13.6% in males and 7.5% in females). Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and tracheal, bronchial, and lung cancer accounted for 32.2%, 15.7%, 13.2%, and 11.1% of the estimated total DALYs, respectively, amounting to 72.2% of the smoking-attributable disease burden. DISCUSSION Limitations related to parameter estimates were not unique to this study, and therefore should not compromise the comparability of our results. Outcomes were similar to those obtained in other countries, despite methodological differences. CONCLUSION Smoking is an important risk factor and places a significant disease burden on Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, showing a pattern similar to that observed in high income countries. PMID:18438576

  7. Assessment of Climate-sensitive Infectious Diseases in the Federated States of Micronesia

    PubMed Central

    McIver, Lachlan; Hashizume, Masahiro; Kim, Ho; Honda, Yasushi; Pretrick, Moses; Iddings, Steven; Pavlin, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Background: The health impacts of climate change are an issue of growing concern in the Pacific region. Prior to 2010, no formal, structured, evidence-based approach had been used to identify the most significant health risks posed by climate change in Pacific island countries. During 2010 and 2011, the World Health Organization supported the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) in performing a climate change and health vulnerability and adaptation assessment. This paper summarizes the priority climate-sensitive health risks in FSM, with a focus on diarrheal disease, its link with climatic variables and the implications of climate change. Methods: The vulnerability and adaptation assessment process included a review of the literature, extensive stakeholder consultations, ranking of climate-sensitive health risks, and analysis of the available long-term data on climate and climate-sensitive infectious diseases in FSM, which involved examination of health information data from the four state hospitals in FSM between 2000 and 2010; along with each state’s rainfall, temperature and El Niño-Southern Oscillation data. Generalized linear Poisson regression models were used to demonstrate associations between monthly climate variables and cases of climate-sensitive diseases at differing temporal lags. Results: Infectious diseases were among the highest priority climate-sensitive health risks identified in FSM, particularly diarrheal diseases, vector-borne diseases and leptospirosis. Correlation with climate data demonstrated significant associations between monthly maximum temperature and monthly outpatient cases of diarrheal disease in Pohnpei and Kosrae at a lag of one month and 0 to 3 months, respectively; no such associations were observed in Chuuk or Yap. Significant correlations between disease incidence and El Niño-Southern Oscillation cycles were demonstrated in Kosrae state. Conclusions: Analysis of the available data demonstrated significant associations between climate variables and climate-sensitive infectious diseases. This information should prove useful in implementing health system and community adaptation strategies to avoid the most serious impacts of climate change on health in FSM. PMID:25859151

  8. The burden of disease and injury in the United States 1996

    PubMed Central

    Michaud, Catherine M; McKenna, Matthew T; Begg, Stephen; Tomijima, Niels; Majmudar, Meghna; Bulzacchelli, Maria T; Ebrahim, Shahul; Ezzati, Majid; Salomon, Joshua A; Gaber Kreiser, Jessica; Hogan, Mollie; Murray, Christopher JL

    2006-01-01

    Background Burden of disease studies have been implemented in many countries using the Disability-Adjusted Life Year (DALY) to assess major health problems. Important objectives of the study were to quantify intra-country differentials in health outcomes and to place the United States situation in the international context. Methods We applied methods developed for the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) to data specific to the United States to compute Disability-Adjusted Life Years. Estimates are provided by age and gender for the general population of the United States and for each of the four official race groups: White; Black; American Indian or Alaskan Native; and Asian or Pacific Islander. Several adjustments of GBD methods were made: the inclusion of race; a revised list of causes; and a revised algorithm to allocate cardiovascular disease garbage codes to ischaemic heart disease. We compared the results of this analysis to international estimates published by the World Health Organization for developed and developing regions of the world. Results In the mid-1990s the leading sources of premature death and disability in the United States, as measured by DALYs, were: cardiovascular conditions, breast and lung cancers, depression, osteoarthritis, diabetes mellitus, and alcohol use and abuse. In addition, motor vehicle-related injuries and the HIV epidemic exacted a substantial toll on the health status of the US population, particularly among racial minorities. The major sources of death and disability in these latter populations were more similar to patterns of burden in developing rather than developed countries. Conclusion Estimating DALYs specifically for the United States provides a comprehensive assessment of health problems for this country compared to what is available using mortality data alone. PMID:17049081

  9. The management and treatment of children with Fabry disease: A United States-based perspective.

    PubMed

    Hopkin, Robert J; Jefferies, John L; Laney, Dawn A; Lawson, Victoria H; Mauer, Michael; Taylor, Matthew R; Wilcox, William R

    2016-02-01

    Fabry disease is an inherited X-linked disorder that presents during childhood in male and female patients. Young patients may initially experience pain, hypohidrosis, and gastrointestinal symptoms. Other manifestations of Fabry disease, such as renal and cardiac disease, manifest later in adolescence or adulthood. In the pediatric population, renal damage is typically subclinical and identifiable only through biopsy. Specialists from the United States with expertise in Fabry disease convened during 2013-2014 in order to develop these consensus guidelines about the management and treatment of children with Fabry disease. The presence of symptoms in boys and girls of any age is an indication to begin therapy. Early treatment before the onset of potentially irreversible vital organ pathology is ideal. Asymptomatic children with Fabry mutations should be followed closely for the development of renal, cardiac, neurological, or gastrointestinal signs, symptoms, or laboratory changes, which would warrant treatment initiation. A comprehensive care plan should be implemented by the treating physicians to guide the management of children with Fabry disease. PMID:26546059

  10. Renal Embolization and Urothelial Sclerotherapy for Recurrent Obstructive Urosepsis and Intractable Haematuria from Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Brown, Nicholas; Olayos, Elizabeth; Elmer, Sandra; Wong, Lih-Ming; Brooks, Duncan M; Jhamb, Ashu

    2016-03-01

    Management of intractable haematuria and obstructive urosepsis from upper tract urothelial carcinoma can be problematic in patients not suitable for surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Interventional radiology techniques provide alternative approaches in this setting, such as complete kidney embolization to cease urine output, percutaneous nephrostomy, antegrade injection of sclerotherapy agents and sterilisation of the upper collecting system. Related approaches have been successfully employed to sclerose renal cysts, lymphoceles, chyluria and intractable lower tract haemorrhage. No reports of percutaneous, antegrade sclerotherapy in the upper urinary tract have previously been published. We present a case of recurrent haematuria and obstructive urosepsis caused by invasive upper tract urothelial carcinoma in a non-operative patient, which was treated with renal embolisation and percutaneous upper tract urothelial sclerotherapy. PMID:26206598

  11. The use of ketogenic diet in special situations: expanding use in intractable epilepsy and other neurologic disorders

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The ketogenic diet has been widely used and proved to be effective for intractable epilepsy. Although the mechanisms underlying its anti-epileptic effects remain to be proven, there are increasing experimental evidences for its neuroprotective effects along with many researches about expanding use of the diet in other neurologic disorders. The first success was reported in glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome, in which the diet served as an alternative metabolic source. Many neurologic disorders share some of the common pathologic mechanisms such as mitochondrial dysfunction, altered neurotransmitter function and synaptic transmission, or abnormal regulation of reactive oxygen species, and the role of the ketogenic diet has been postulated in these mechanisms. In this article, we introduce an overview about the expanding use and emerging trials of the ketogenic diet in various neurologic disorders excluding intractable epilepsy and provide explanations of the mechanisms in that usage. PMID:23049588

  12. Health states for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder within the Global Burden of Disease 2010 Study.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Alize J; Saha, Sukanta; McGrath, John J; Norman, Rosana; Baxter, Amanda J; Vos, Theo; Whiteford, Harvey A

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive revision of the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study is expected to be completed in 2012. This study utilizes a broad range of improved methods for assessing burden, including closer attention to empirically derived estimates of disability. The aim of this paper is to describe how GBD health states were derived for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. These will be used in deriving health state-specific disability estimates. A literature review was first conducted to settle on a parsimonious set of health states for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. A second review was conducted to investigate the proportion of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder cases experiencing these health states. These were pooled using a quality-effects model to estimate the overall proportion of cases in each state. The two schizophrenia health states were acute (predominantly positive symptoms) and residual (predominantly negative symptoms). The three bipolar disorder health states were depressive, manic, and residual. Based on estimates from six studies, 63% (38%-82%) of schizophrenia cases were in an acute state and 37% (18%-62%) were in a residual state. Another six studies were identified from which 23% (10%-39%) of bipolar disorder cases were in a manic state, 27% (11%-47%) were in a depressive state, and 50% (30%-70%) were in a residual state. This literature review revealed salient gaps in the literature that need to be addressed in future research. The pooled estimates are indicative only and more data are required to generate more definitive estimates. That said, rather than deriving burden estimates that fail to capture the changes in disability within schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, the derived proportions and their wide uncertainty intervals will be used in deriving disability estimates. PMID:22913393

  13. Invasive Haemophilus influenzae Disease in Adults ?65 Years, United States, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Blain, Amy; MacNeil, Jessica; Wang, Xin; Bennett, Nancy; Farley, Monica M.; Harrison, Lee H.; Lexau, Catherine; Miller, Lisa; Nichols, Megin; Petit, Susan; Reingold, Arthur; Schaffner, William; Thomas, Ann; Clark, Thomas; Cohn, Amanda; Briere, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Background ?Since the introduction of the Haemophilus influenzae serotype b vaccine, H influenzae epidemiology has shifted. In the United States, the largest burden of disease is now in adults aged ?65 years. However, few data exist on risk factors for disease severity and outcome in this age group. Methods ?A retrospective case-series review of invasive H influenzae infections in patients aged ?65 years was conducted for hospitalized cases reported to Active Bacterial Core surveillance in 2011. Results ?There were 299 hospitalized cases included in the analysis. The majority of cases were caused by nontypeable H influenzae, and the overall case fatality ratio (CFR) was 19.5%. Three or more underlying conditions were present in 63% of cases; 94% of cases had at least 1. Patients with chronic heart conditions (congestive heart failure, coronary artery disease, and/or atrial fibrillation) (odds ratio [OR], 3.27; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.656.46), patients from private residences (OR, 8.75; 95% CI, 2.1335.95), and patients who were not resuscitate status (OR, 2.72; 95% CI, 1.315.66) were more likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Intensive care unit admission (OR, 3.75; 95% CI, 1.718.22) and do not resuscitate status (OR, 12.94; 95% CI, 4.8434.55) were significantly associated with death. Conclusions ?Within this age group, burden of disease and CFR both increased significantly as age increased. Using ICU admission as a proxy for disease severity, our findings suggest several conditions increased risk of disease severity and patients with severe disease were more likely to die. Further research is needed to determine the most effective approach to prevent H influenzae disease and mortality in older adults. PMID:25734116

  14. 78 FR 66938 - Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention--State, Tribal, Local and Territorial (STLT) Subcommittee In... management activities, for both the Centers for Disease Control and ] Prevention and the Agency for...

  15. Human Risk of Infection with Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme Disease Agent, in Eastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Diuk-Wasser, Maria A.; Hoen, Anne Gatewood; Cislo, Paul; Brinkerhoff, Robert; Hamer, Sarah A.; Rowland, Michelle; Cortinas, Roberto; Vourc'h, Gwenal; Melton, Forrest; Hickling, Graham J.; Tsao, Jean I.; Bunikis, Jonas; Barbour, Alan G.; Kitron, Uriel; Piesman, Joseph; Fish, Durland

    2012-01-01

    The geographic pattern of human risk for infection with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, the tick-borne pathogen that causes Lyme disease, was mapped for the eastern United States. The map is based on standardized field sampling in 304 sites of the density of Ixodes scapularis host-seeking nymphs infected with B. burgdorferi, which is closely associated with human infection risk. Risk factors for the presence and density of infected nymphs were used to model a continuous 8 km8 km resolution predictive surface of human risk, including confidence intervals for each pixel. Discontinuous Lyme disease risk foci were identified in the Northeast and upper Midwest, with a transitional zone including sites with uninfected I. scapularis populations. Given frequent under- and over-diagnoses of Lyme disease, this map could act as a tool to guide surveillance, control, and prevention efforts and act as a baseline for studies tracking the spread of infection. PMID:22302869

  16. A Case Study Examination of Structure and Function in a State Health Department Chronic Disease Unit

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. I explored the structural and operational practices of the chronic disease prevention and control unit of a state health department and proposed a conceptual model of structure, function, and effectiveness for future study. Methods. My exploratory case study examined 7 elements of organizational structure and practice. My interviews with staff and external stakeholders of a single chronic disease unit yielded quantitative and qualitative data that I coded by perspective, process, relationship, and activity. I analyzed these for patterns and emerging themes. Results. Chi-square analysis revealed significant correlations among collaboration with goal ambiguity, political support, and responsiveness, and evidence-based decisions with goal ambiguity and responsiveness. Conclusions. Although my study design did not permit conclusions about causality, my findings suggested that some elements of the model might facilitate effectiveness for chronic disease units and should be studied further. My findings might have important implications for identifying levers around which capacity can be built that may strengthen effectiveness. PMID:25689211

  17. Assessment of Mood States in Neurodegenerative Disease: Methodological Issues and Diagnostic Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Stern

    1996-10-01

    Mood disorders are common in patients with neurodegenerative disease. Accurate diagnosis and assessment of mood changes are a crucial requirement for establishing reliable correlations with functional neuroanatomical changes, investigating their causes, and establishing effective treatment strategies. However, differential diagnosis of mood disorders is difficult in elderly patients with aphasia, impaired emotional expression, and other cognitive and neurobehavioral impairments. Although specific assessment of internal mood state would improve diagnostic accuracy, most standardized measures of mood are not appropriate for this population. The Visual Analog Mood Scales (VAMS) are valid, standardized measures, developed specifically for neurologically impaired patients, which assess eight moods: sad, happy, tense, afraid, tired, energetic, confused, and angry. The utility of these very brief scales is presented, as are specific recommendations and guidelines for the diagnosis of depression and other mood disorders in patients with neurodegenerative disease, such as dementia, Parkinson's disease, and stroke. PMID:10320434

  18. PulseNet: the molecular subtyping network for foodborne bacterial disease surveillance, United States.

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, B.; Barrett, T. J.; Hunter, S. B.; Tauxe, R. V.

    2001-01-01

    PulseNet, the national molecular subtyping network for foodborne disease surveillance, was established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and several state health department laboratories to facilitate subtyping bacterial foodborne pathogens for epidemiologic purposes. PulseNet, which began in 1996 with 10 laboratories typing a single pathogen (Escherichia coli O157:H7), now includes 46 state and 2 local public health laboratories and the food safety laboratories of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Four foodborne pathogens (E. coli O157:H7; nontyphoidal Salmonella serotypes, Listeria monocytogenes and Shigella) are being subtyped, and other bacterial, viral, and parasitic organisms will be added soon. PMID:11384513

  19. Infectious diseases of Khmer immigrants in the United States: review of published reports.

    PubMed

    Pilsczek, Florian H

    2011-01-01

    Infectious diseases are influenced by where patients have lived or travelled in the past, e.g., infection with Schistosoma mekongi can be acquired during freshwater contact in Cambodia, but not in the United States. Here the infectious diseases of Khmer immigrants in the United States were studied by reviewing published reports. Thirteen case series and 9 case reports of 5,222 patients were identified. Most reports were of infections with gastrointestinal parasites (8, 36%), Plasmnodium species (3, 14%), Mycobacterium tuberculosis (3, 14%), and Mycobacterium leprae (2, 9%). Other reports included infections with Burkholderia pseudomallei, Trichinella spiralis, and Schistosoma japonicum. In conclusion, Khmer patients in the US can be infected with different gastrointestinal. parasites, different extrapulmonary forms of tuberculosis have been reported, and 2 reports of M. leprae were identified. A country-specific database for origin and current residence for Khmer and other immigrant groups providing access to specialised information may be useful for clinicians taking care of immigrants. PMID:23272458

  20. Familial partial trisomy 15q11-13 presenting as intractable epilepsy in the child and schizophrenia in the mother.

    PubMed

    Michelson, Marina; Eden, Avi; Vinkler, Chana; Leshinsky-Silver, Esther; Kremer, Uri; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Lev, Dorit

    2011-05-01

    Various rearrangements involve the proximal long arm of chromosome 15, including deletions, duplications, translocations, inversions and supernumerary marker chromosome of an inverted duplication. The large marker 15, that contains the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS)/Angelman syndrome (AS) chromosome region, is usually associated with an abnormal phenotype of moderate to severe mental retardation, seizures, poor motor coordination, early-onset central hypotonia, autism and autistic-like behavior, schizophrenia and mild dysmorphic features. We report a ten year-old girl with normal intelligence prior to the onset of seizures, who developed severe intractable epilepsy at the age of seven years. Family history was significant for a mother with recurrent episodes of acute psychosis. The patient's and mother's karyotype revealed 47,XX+m. Array comparative genomic hybridization (A-CGH) identified a gain of 13 BAC clones from 15q11.2 through 15q13.1, which was then confirmed by FISH to be part of the marker chromosome. This duplicated region contains the SNRPN/UBE3A locus. This case demonstrates that a duplication of 15q11-13 can present differently in the same family either as intractable epilepsy or as a psychiatric illness and that intelligence can be preserved. We suggest that CGH microarray should be performed in cases with intractable epilepsy or schizophrenia, with or without mental retardation. PMID:21145272

  1. Efficacy of and Patient Compliance with a Ketogenic Diet in Adults with Intractable Epilepsy: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Fang; Li, Xiao-Jia; Jiang, Wan-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Despite the successful use of a ketogenic diet in pediatric epilepsy, its application in adults has been limited. The aim of this meta-analysis was to summarize the findings of relevant published studies in order to identify the efficacy of and compliance with a ketogenic diet and its main subtypes (i.e., classic ketogenic diet and modified Atkins diet) in adults with intractable epilepsy, and to provide useful information for clinical practice. Methods Electronic searches of PubMed, EMBASE, Google Scholar, and the ISI Web of Science were conducted to identify studies of the efficacy of and patient compliance with a ketogenic diet in adults with intractable epilepsy; the included studies were reviewed. Meta-analyses were performed using STATA to determine combined efficacy rates and combined rates of compliance with the ketogenic diet and its main subtypes. Results In total, 12 studies qualified for inclusion, and data from 270 patients were evaluated.The results of the meta-analysis revealed combined efficacy rates of all types of ketogenic diet, a classical ketogenic diet, and a modified Atkins diet were 42%, 52%, and 34%, respectively; the corresponding combined compliance rates were 45%, 38%, and 56%. Conclusions The results indicate that a ketogenic diet is a promising complementary therapy in adult intractable epilepsy, and that while a classical ketogenic diet may be more effective, adult patients are likely to be less compliant with it than with a modified Atkins diet. PMID:25628734

  2. The Intrinsic Resting State Voice Network in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    New, Anneliese B.; Robin, Donald A.; Parkinson, Amy L.; Eickhoff, Claudia R.; Reetz, Kathrin; Hoffstaedter, Felix; Mathys, Christian; Sudmeyer, Martin; Grefkes, Christian; Larson, Charles R.; Ramig, Loraine O.; Fox, Peter T.; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2016-01-01

    Over 90 percent of patients with Parkinson’s disease experience speech-motor impairment, namely, hypokinetic dysarthria characterized by reduced pitch and loudness. Resting-state functional connectivity analysis of blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging is a useful measure of intrinsic neural functioning. We utilized resting-state functional connectivity modeling to analyze the intrinsic connectivity in patients with Parkinson’s disease within a vocalization network defined by a previous meta-analysis of speech (Brown et al., 2009). Functional connectivity of this network was assessed in 56 patients with Parkinson’s disease and 56 gender-, age-, and movement-matched healthy controls. We also had item 5 and 18 of the UPDRS, and the PDQ-39 Communication subscale available for correlation with the voice network connectivity strength in patients. The within-group analyses of connectivity patterns demonstrated a lack of subcortical–cortical connectivity in patients with Parkinson’s disease. At the cortical level, we found robust (homotopic) interhemispheric connectivity but only inconsistent evidence for many intrahemispheric connections. When directly contrasted to the control group, we found a significant reduction of connections between the left thalamus and putamen, and cortical motor areas, as well as reduced right superior temporal gyrus connectivity. Furthermore, most symptom measures correlated with right putamen, left cerebellum, left superior temporal gyrus, right premotor, and left Rolandic operculum connectivity in the voice network. The results reflect the importance of (right) subcortical nodes and the superior temporal gyrus in Parkinson’s disease, enhancing our understanding of the neurobiological underpinnings of vocalization impairment in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:25627959

  3. West Nile Virus and Other Nationally Notifiable Arboviral Diseases - United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Nicole P; Lehman, Jennifer A; Staples, J Erin; Fischer, Marc

    2015-09-01

    Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) are transmitted to humans primarily through the bites of infected mosquitoes and ticks. West Nile virus (WNV) is the leading cause of domestically acquired arboviral disease in the United States (1). However, several other arboviruses also cause sporadic cases and seasonal outbreaks. This report summarizes surveillance data reported to CDC in 2014 for WNV and other nationally notifiable arboviruses, excluding dengue. Forty-two states and the District of Columbia (DC) reported 2,205 cases of WNV disease. Of these, 1,347 (61%) were classified as WNV neuroinvasive disease (e.g., meningitis, encephalitis, or acute flaccid paralysis), for a national incidence of 0.42 cases per 100,000 population. After WNV, the next most commonly reported cause of arboviral disease was La Crosse virus (80 cases), followed by Jamestown Canyon virus (11), St. Louis encephalitis virus (10), Powassan virus (8), and Eastern equine encephalitis virus (8). WNV and other arboviruses cause serious illness in substantial numbers of persons each year. Maintaining surveillance programs is important to help direct prevention activities. PMID:26334477

  4. Progression of the load of waterborne and intestinal parasitic diseases in the State of Amazonas.

    PubMed

    Martins, Marilaine; Lacerda, Marcus Vincius Guimares; Monteiro, Wuelton Marcelo; Moura, Marco Antonio Saboia; Santos, Eyde Cristianne Saraiva; Saraceni, Valria; Saraiva, Maria Graas Gomes

    2015-01-01

    In the State of Amazonas, Brazil, urban expansion together with precarious basic sanitation conditions and human settlement on river banks has contributed to the persistence of waterborne and intestinal parasitic diseases. Time series of the recorded cases of cholera, typhoid fever, hepatitis A and leptospirosis are described, using data from different levels of the surveillance systems. The sources for intestinal parasitosis prevalence data (non-compulsory reporting in Brazil) were Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE), Literatura Latino-Americana (LILACS) and the annals of major scientific meetings. Relevant papers and abstracts in all languages were accessed by two independent reviewers. The references cited by each relevant paper were scrutinized to locate additional papers. Despite its initial dissemination across the entire State of Amazonas, cholera was controlled in 1998. The magnitude of typhoid fever has decreased; however, a pattern characterized by eventual outbreaks still remains. Leptospirosis is an increasing cause of concern in association with the annual floods. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites is high regardless of the municipality and the characteristics of areas and populations. The incidence of hepatitis A has decreased over the past decade. A comparison of older and recent surveys shows that the prevalence of intestinal parasitic diseases has remained constant. The load of waterborne and intestinal parasitic diseases ranks high among the health problems present in the State of Amazonas. Interventions aiming at basic sanitation and vaccination for hepatitis A were formulated and implemented, but assessment of their effectiveness in the targeted populations is still needed. PMID:26061370

  5. Interictal MEG/MSI in Intractable Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Spike Yield and Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Kaiboriboon, Kitti; Nagarajan, Srikantan; Mantle, Mary; Kirsch, Heidi E.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate the ability of MEG to detect medial temporal spikes in patients with known medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) and to use magnetic source imaging (MSI) with equivalent current dipoles to examine localization and orientation of spikes and their relation to surgical outcome. METHODS We prospectively obtained MSI on a total of 25 patients previously diagnosed with intractable MTLE. MEG was recorded with a 275 channel whole-head system with simultaneous 21-channel scalp EEG during inpatient admission one day prior to surgical resection. The patients surgical outcomes were classified based on one-year follow-up after surgery. RESULTS Nineteen of the 22 patients (86.4%) had interictal spikes during the EEG and MEG recordings. Thirteen of 19 patients (68.4%) demonstrated unilateral temporal dipoles ipsilateral to the site of surgery. Among these patients, five (38.5%) patients had horizontal dipoles, one (7.7%) patient had vertical dipoles, and seven (53.8%) patients had both horizontal and vertical dipoles. Sixty percent of patients with nonlocalizing ictal scalp EEG had well-localized spikes on MSI ipsilateral to the side of surgery and 66.7% of patients with nonlocalizing MRI had well-localized spikes on MSI ipsilateral to the side of surgery. Concordance between MSI localization and the side of lobectomy was not associated with a likelihood of an excellent postsurgical outcome. CONCLUSIONS MSI can detect medial temporal spikes. It may provide important localizing information in patients with MTLE, especially when MRI and/or ictal scalp EEG are not localizing. SIGNIFICANCE This study demonstrates that MSI has a good ability to detect interictal spikes from mesial temporal structures. PMID:20064741

  6. Vagus nerve stimulation for intractable epilepsy: outcome in two series combining 90 patients.

    PubMed

    Sakas, D E; Korfias, S; Nicholson, C L; Panourias, I G; Georgakoulias, N; Gatzonis, S; Jenkins, A

    2007-01-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is the most widely used non-pharmacological treatment for medically intractable epilepsy and has been in clinical use for over a decade. It is indicated in patients who are refractory to medical treatment or who experience intolerable side effects, and who are not candidates for resective surgery. VNS used in the acute setting can both abort seizures and have an acute prophylactic effect. This effect increases over time in chronic treatment to a maximum at around 18 months. The evidence base supporting the efficacy of VNS is strong, but its exact mechanism of action remains unknown. A vagus nerve stimulator consists of two electrodes embedded in a silastic helix that is wrapped around the cervical vagus nerve. The stimulator is always implanted on the left vagus nerve in order to reduce the likelihood of adverse cardiac effects. The electrodes are connected to an implantable pulse generator (IPG) which is positioned subcutaneously either below the clavicle or in the axilla. The IPG is programmed by computer via a wand placed on the skin over it. In addition, extra pulses of stimulation triggered by a hand-held magnet may help to prevent or abort seizures. VNS is essentially a palliative treatment and the number of patients who become seizure free is very small. A significant reduction in the frequency and severity of seizures can be expected in about one third of patients and efficacy tends to improve with time. Vagus nerve stimulation is well tolerated and has few significant side effects. We describe our experience on the use of VNS on drug-resistant epilepsy in 90 patients treated in two departments (in Athens, Greece and Newcastle, England). PMID:17691315

  7. Molecular Surveillance for Lymphoproliferative Disease Virus in Wild Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) from the Eastern United States.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jesse M; Allison, Andrew B; Holmes, Edward C; Phillips, Jamie E; Bunting, Elizabeth M; Yabsley, Michael J; Brown, Justin D

    2015-01-01

    Lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) is a poorly understood, oncogenic avian retrovirus of domestic turkeys that has historically been restricted to Europe and Israel. However, a recent study reported LPDV in multiple wild turkey diagnostic cases from throughout the eastern United States of America (USA). To better understand the distribution of LPDV in the eastern USA, we surveyed 1,164 reportedly asymptomatic hunter-harvested wild turkeys from 17 states for the presence of LPDV proviral DNA by PCR. In total, 564/1,164 (47%) turkeys were positive for LPDV. Wild turkeys from each state had a relatively high prevalence of LPDV, although statewide prevalence varied from 26 to 83%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two major clades of LPDV in the USA, although one was at a low frequency suggesting restricted transmission, as well as significant clustering by state of isolation. To determine the best tissue to target for diagnostic purposes, liver, spleen, and bone marrow were tested from a subset of 15 hunter-harvested wild turkeys and 20 wild turkey diagnostic cases. Overall, bone marrow provided the highest level of detection for both hunter-harvested turkeys and diagnostic cases. The sensitivity of LPDV detection between tissues was not significantly different for diagnostic cases, but was for hunter-harvested birds. These results indicate that LPDV infection is common and widespread in wild turkey populations throughout the eastern USA, even without overt signs of disease. PMID:25897755

  8. Molecular Surveillance for Lymphoproliferative Disease Virus in Wild Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) from the Eastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jesse M.; Allison, Andrew B.; Holmes, Edward C.; Phillips, Jamie E.; Bunting, Elizabeth M.; Yabsley, Michael J.; Brown, Justin D.

    2015-01-01

    Lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) is a poorly understood, oncogenic avian retrovirus of domestic turkeys that has historically been restricted to Europe and Israel. However, a recent study reported LPDV in multiple wild turkey diagnostic cases from throughout the eastern United States of America (USA). To better understand the distribution of LPDV in the eastern USA, we surveyed 1,164 reportedly asymptomatic hunter-harvested wild turkeys from 17 states for the presence of LPDV proviral DNA by PCR. In total, 564/1,164 (47%) turkeys were positive for LPDV. Wild turkeys from each state had a relatively high prevalence of LPDV, although statewide prevalence varied from 26 to 83%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two major clades of LPDV in the USA, although one was at a low frequency suggesting restricted transmission, as well as significant clustering by state of isolation. To determine the best tissue to target for diagnostic purposes, liver, spleen, and bone marrow were tested from a subset of 15 hunter-harvested wild turkeys and 20 wild turkey diagnostic cases. Overall, bone marrow provided the highest level of detection for both hunter-harvested turkeys and diagnostic cases. The sensitivity of LPDV detection between tissues was not significantly different for diagnostic cases, but was for hunter-harvested birds. These results indicate that LPDV infection is common and widespread in wild turkey populations throughout the eastern USA, even without overt signs of disease. PMID:25897755

  9. Meningococcal disease among men who have sex with men - United States, January 2012-June 2015.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Hajime; MacNeil, Jessica; Blain, Amy; Patel, Manisha; Martin, Stacey; Weiss, Don; Ngai, Stephanie; Ezeoke, Ifeoma; Mascola, Laurene; Civen, Rachel; Ngo, Van; Black, Stephanie; Kemble, Sarah; Chugh, Rashmi; Murphy, Elizabeth; Petit, Colette; Harriman, Kathleen; Winter, Kathleen; Beron, Andrew; Clegg, Whitney; Conover, Craig; Misegades, Lara

    2015-11-13

    Since 2012, three clusters of serogroup C meningococcal disease among men who have sex with men (MSM) have been reported in the United States. During 2012, 13 cases of meningococcal disease among MSM were reported by the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (1); over a 5-month period during 20122013, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health reported four cases among MSM; and during MayJune 2015, the Chicago Department of Public Health reported seven cases of meningococcal disease among MSM in the greater Chicago area. MSM have not previously been considered at increased risk for meningococcal disease. Determining outbreak thresholds* for special populations of unknown size (such as MSM) can be difficult. The New York City health department declared an outbreak based on an estimated increased risk for meningococcal infection in 2012 among MSM and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)infected MSM compared with city residents who were not MSM or for whom MSM status was unknown (1). The Chicago Department of Public Health also declared an outbreak based on an increase in case counts and thresholds calculated using population estimates of MSM and HIV-infected MSM. Local public health response included increasing awareness among MSM, conducting contact tracing and providing chemoprophylaxis to close contacts, and offering vaccination to the population at risk (13). To better understand the epidemiology and burden of meningococcal disease in MSM populations in the United States and to inform recommendations, CDC analyzed data from a retrospective review of reported cases from January 2012 through June 2015. PMID:26562570

  10. Characterization of the Hypercoagulable State in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nirmish; Thornburg, Courtney; Telen, Marilyn J.; Ortel, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Background The pathophysiology of sickle cell disease (SCD) is complex, with increasing evidence of a pronounced prothrombotic state. Objective We investigated thrombin generation in SCD utilizing calibrated automated thrombography (CAT) and Ddimer, with subsequent correlation to clinical disease. Patient/Methods The study included 51 patients homozygous for hemoglobin S, either admitted for vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) (n=34) or while in steady state and being seen in outpatient clinic (n=37). Twenty patients had blood drawn during both VOC and steady state. Mean values for CAT and D-dimer were compared between groups. Mean values for patients with and without clinical complications such as avascular necrosis and stroke were also compared. Linear regression was used to evaluate correlation to number of hospitalizations and for all pediatric patients, transcranial doppler (TCD) velocities. Results The mean D-dimer during VOC (2743 3118 ng/ml) was significantly higher than during steady state (1151 802, p<0.0001). Comparison of crisis and steady state by CAT also revealed a significant difference in all phases of thrombin generation, including mean endogenous thrombin potential (1381 295 nM vs 923 316, p<0.0001) and peak thrombin generated (284 9 vs 223 18, p=0.0002). There were no significant differences in mean values for the clinical outcomes examined in adults. In pediatric patients, however, increased TCD velocities correlated with steady state Ddimer (r2=0.32, p=0.02) and thrombin-antithrombin complex (r2=0.28, p=0.04. Conclusion Hypercoagulable markers distinguish between patients with SCD during and between VOC, but do not correlate with specific clinical phenotypes. PMID:22959127

  11. Electroencephalographic prodromal markers of dementia across conscious states in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Latreille, Véronique; Carrier, Julie; Gaudet-Fex, Benjamin; Rodrigues-Brazète, Jessica; Panisset, Michel; Chouinard, Sylvain; Postuma, Ronald B; Gagnon, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    In Parkinson's disease, electroencephalographic abnormalities during wakefulness and non-rapid eye movement sleep (spindles) were found to be predictive biomarkers of dementia. Because rapid eye movement sleep is regulated by the cholinergic system, which shows early degeneration in Parkinson's disease with cognitive impairment, anomalies during this sleep stage might mirror dementia development. In this prospective study, we examined baseline electroencephalographic absolute spectral power across three states of consciousness (non-rapid eye movement sleep, rapid eye movement sleep, and wakefulness) in 68 non-demented patients with Parkinson's disease and 44 healthy controls. All participants underwent baseline polysomnographic recordings and a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment. Power spectral analyses were performed on standard frequency bands. Dominant occipital frequency during wakefulness and ratios of slow-to-fast frequencies during rapid eye movement sleep and wakefulness were also computed. At follow-up (an average 4.5 years after baseline), 18 patients with Parkinson's disease had developed dementia and 50 patients remained dementia-free. In rapid eye movement sleep, patients with Parkinson's disease who later developed dementia showed, at baseline, higher absolute power in delta and theta bands and a higher slowing ratio, especially in temporal, parietal, and occipital regions, compared to patients who remained dementia-free and controls. In non-rapid eye movement sleep, lower baseline sigma power in parietal cortical regions also predicted development of dementia. During wakefulness, patients with Parkinson's disease who later developed dementia showed lower dominant occipital frequency as well as higher delta and slowing ratio compared to patients who remained dementia-free and controls. At baseline, higher slowing ratios in temporo-occipital regions during rapid eye movement sleep were associated with poor performance on visuospatial tests in patients with Parkinson's disease. Using receiver operating characteristic curves, we found that best predictors of dementia in Parkinson's disease were rapid eye movement sleep slowing ratios in posterior regions, wakefulness slowing ratios in temporal areas, and lower dominant occipital frequency. These results suggest that electroencephalographic slowing during sleep is a new promising predictive biomarker for Parkinson's disease dementia, perhaps as a marker of cholinergic denervation. PMID:26912643

  12. Screening for Common Occupational Health Diseases Among Long Distance Professional Drivers in Sagamu, Ogun State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Amoran, Olorunfemi Emmanuel; Salako, Albert Adekunle; Jeminusi, Olubunmi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Long term exposure to hazards at the work place is injurious to health and usually leads to diseased conditions. The objective of this study was to determine the occupational health problems associated with driving among the professional drivers in Sagamu, Ogun state, Nigeria. Methods: This study is a cross-sectional study. Total sample of all the consenting professional drivers in the five interstate motor parks, including the cement factory [WAPCO] in the local government area, were recruited into the study. An interviewer administered structured questionnaire was administered by trained health workers and respondents were screen for common occupational health problems. Results: A total of 400 professional drivers were interviewed, all [100%] of them were males with age range from 21 to 59 yrs and nearly half [42%] were non indigenes. Only half, 208 [52%] of them were married with majority, 232 [58.0%] working for about 12 hrs daily and 46% of them had been working for 5 yrs or more. Most, 382 [95.5%] had been educated on HIV/AIDS before and 313 [78.3%] of them had multiple sexual partners. Only 241 [60.3%] used condom at the last sexual act and 55 [13.5%] had ever been tested for HIV/AIDS. Common occupational health diseases were renal tubular acidosis (RTA) 52 [13%] in the last one year and most of them currently have myalgia 352 [88.0%], upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) 20 [5.0%], sexually transmitted diseases (STD) 15 [3.8%], short sightedness 41 [10.3%], and Hypertension 90 [22.5%]. Conclusions: The study shows that common occupational diseases among long distance professional drivers in Western Nigeria were myalgia, upper respiratory tract infection, hypertension, short sightedness, sexually transmitted diseases, and RTA. Prevention and control of these common diseases among the drivers will lead to reduction of road traffic accidents in Western Nigeria and other low income countries. PMID:24829742

  13. Effects of noise on a computational model for disease states of mood disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias Huber, Martin; Krieg, Jürgen-Christian; Braun, Hans Albert; Moss, Frank

    2000-03-01

    Nonlinear dynamics are currently proposed to explain the progressive course of recurrent mood disorders starting with isolated episodes and ending with accelerated irregular (``chaotic") mood fluctuations. Such a low-dimensional disease model is attractive because of its principal accordance with biological disease models, i.e. the kindling and biological rhythms model. However, most natural systems are nonlinear and noisy and several studies in the neuro- and physical sciences have demonstrated interesting cooperative behaviors arising from interacting random and deterministic dynamics. Here, we consider the effects of noise on a recent neurodynamical model for the timecourse of affective disorders (Huber et al.: Biological Psychiatry 1999;46:256-262). We describe noise effects on temporal patterns and mean episode frequencies of various in computo disease states. Our simulations demonstrate that noise can cause unstructured randomness or can maximize periodic order. The frequency of episode occurence can increase with noise but it can also remain unaffected or even can decrease. We show further that noise can make visible bifurcations before they would normally occur under deterministic conditions and we quantify this behavior with a recently developed statistical method. All these effects depend critically on both, the dynamic state and the noise intensity. Implications for neurobiology and course of mood disorders are discussed.

  14. Surveillance for Waterborne Disease Outbreaks Associated with Drinking Water - United States, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Beer, Karlyn D; Gargano, Julia W; Roberts, Virginia A; Hill, Vincent R; Garrison, Laurel E; Kutty, Preeta K; Hilborn, Elizabeth D; Wade, Timothy J; Fullerton, Kathleen E; Yoder, Jonathan S

    2015-08-14

    Advances in water management and sanitation have substantially reduced waterborne disease in the United States, although outbreaks continue to occur. Public health agencies in the U.S. states and territories* report information on waterborne disease outbreaks to the CDC Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System (http://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/surveillance/index.html). For 2011-2012, 32 drinking water-associated outbreaks were reported, accounting for at least 431 cases of illness, 102 hospitalizations, and 14 deaths. Legionella was responsible for 66% of outbreaks and 26% of illnesses, and viruses and non-Legionella bacteria together accounted for 16% of outbreaks and 53% of illnesses. The two most commonly identified deficiencies† leading to drinking water-associated outbreaks were Legionella in building plumbing§ systems (66%) and untreated groundwater (13%). Continued vigilance by public health, regulatory, and industry professionals to identify and correct deficiencies associated with building plumbing systems and groundwater systems could prevent most reported outbreaks and illnesses associated with drinking water systems. PMID:26270059

  15. Experimental and Imaging Techniques for Examining Fibrin Clot Structures in Normal and Diseased States

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Natalie K.; Keegan, Philip M.; Platt, Manu O.; Averett, Rodney D.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrin is an extracellular matrix protein that is responsible for maintaining the structural integrity of blood clots. Much research has been done on fibrin in the past years to include the investigation of synthesis, structure-function, and lysis of clots. However, there is still much unknown about the morphological and structural features of clots that ensue from patients with disease. In this research study, experimental techniques are presented that allow for the examination of morphological differences of abnormal clot structures due to diseased states such as diabetes and sickle cell anemia. Our study focuses on the preparation and evaluation of fibrin clots in order to assess morphological differences using various experimental assays and confocal microscopy. In addition, a method is also described that allows for continuous, real-time calculation of lysis rates in fibrin clots. The techniques described herein are important for researchers and clinicians seeking to elucidate comorbid thrombotic pathologies such as myocardial infarctions, ischemic heart disease, and strokes in patients with diabetes or sickle cell disease. PMID:25867016

  16. Diseases Attributable to Asbestos Exposure: Years of Potential Life Lost, United States, 19992010

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Ki Moon; Mazurek, Jacek M.; Wood, John M.; Hendricks, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although asbestos use has been restricted in recent decades, asbestos-associated deaths continue to occur in the United States. Objectives We evaluated premature mortality and loss of potentially productive years of life attributable to asbestos-associated diseases. Methods Using 19992010 National Center for Health Statistics mortality data, we identified decedents aged ?25 years whose death certificate listed asbestosis and malignant mesothelioma as the underlying cause of death. We computed years of potential life lost to life expectancy (YPLL) and to age 65 (YPLL65). Results During 19992010, a total of 427,005 YPLL and 55,184 YPLL65 were attributed to asbestosis (56,907 YPLL and 2,167 YPLL65), malignant mesothelioma (370,098 YPPL and 53,017 YPLL65). Overall and disease-specific asbestos-attributable total YPLL and YPLL65 and median YPLL and YPLL65 per decedent did not change significantly from 1999 to 2010. Conclusions The continuing occurrence of asbestos-associated diseases and their substantial premature mortality burden underscore the need for maintaining prevention efforts and for ongoing surveillance to monitor temporal trends in these diseases. PMID:24108494

  17. Recreational water-associated disease outbreaks--United States, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Hlavsa, Michele C; Roberts, Virginia A; Kahler, Amy M; Hilborn, Elizabeth D; Wade, Timothy J; Backer, Lorraine C; Yoder, Jonathan S

    2014-01-10

    Recreational water-associated disease outbreaks result from exposure to infectious pathogens or chemical agents in treated recreational water venues (e.g., pools and hot tubs or spas) or untreated recreational water venues (e.g., lakes and oceans). For 2009-2010, the most recent years for which finalized data are available, public health officials from 28 states and Puerto Rico electronically reported 81 recreational water-associated disease outbreaks to CDC's Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System (WBDOSS) via the National Outbreak Reporting System (NORS). This report summarizes the characteristics of those outbreaks. Among the 57 outbreaks associated with treated recreational water, 24 (42%) were caused by Cryptosporidium. Among the 24 outbreaks associated with untreated recreational water, 11 (46%) were confirmed or suspected to have been caused by cyanobacterial toxins. In total, the 81 outbreaks resulted in at least 1,326 cases of illness and 62 hospitalizations; no deaths were reported. Laboratory and environmental data, in addition to epidemiologic data, can be used to direct and optimize the prevention and control of recreational water-associated disease outbreaks. PMID:24402466

  18. State-of-the-Art Imaging of the Lung for Connective Tissue Disease (CTD).

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Seki, Shinichiro

    2015-12-01

    Involvement of the respiratory system is common in connective tissue diseases (CTDs), and the resultant lung injury can affect every part of the lung: the pleura, alveoli, interstitium, vasculature, lymphatic tissue, and large and/or small airways. Most of the parenchymal manifestations of CTD are similar to those found in interstitial lung diseases (ILDs), especially idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, and can be classified using the same system. Although there is some overlap, each CTD is associated with a characteristic pattern of pulmonary involvement. For this reason, thin-section CT as well as pulmonary function tests and serum markers are utilized for diagnosis, disease severity assessment, and therapeutic efficacy evaluation of ILD associated with CTD. In addition, newly developed pulmonary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedures have been recommended as useful alternative imaging options for patients with CTD. This review article will (1) address radiological findings for chest radiography and conventional or thin-section CT currently used for six major types of CTD, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma (progressive systemic sclerosis), polymyositis/dermatomyositis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjgren syndrome and mixed connective tissue disease; (2) briefly deal with radiation dose reduction for thin-section CT examination; and (3) discuss clinically applicable or state-of-the-art MR imaging for CTD patients. PMID:26483318

  19. PREVALENCE OF CHAGAS DISEASE AMONG BLOOD DONOR CANDIDATES IN TRIANGULO MINEIRO, MINAS GERAIS STATE, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    LOPES, Patrcia da Silva; RAMOS, Eliezer Lucas Pires; GMEZ-HERNNDEZ, Csar; FERREIRA, Gabriela Lcia Santos; REZENDE-OLIVEIRA, Karine

    2015-01-01

    Despite public health campaigns and epidemiological surveillance activities, Chagas disease remains a major health problem in Latin America. According to data from the World Health Organization, there are approximately 7-8 million people infected with Trypanosoma cruzi worldwide, a large percentage of which in Latin America. This study aims to examine the serological profile of blood donors in blood banks of Hemominas hematology center, in the town of Ituiutaba, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The study sample consisted of 53,941 blood donors, which were grouped according to gender and age. Sample collections were performed from January 1991 to December 2011, and 277 donors (0.5%) were considered serologically ineligible due to Chagas disease. Analysis of data showed no significant difference between genders. As for age, the highest proportion of ineligible donors was from 40 to 49 years (30%), and there was a positive correlation between increasing age and the percentage of patients seropositive for Chagas disease. Therefore, adopting strategies that allow the safe identification of donors with positive serology for Chagas disease is essential to reduce or eliminate indeterminate serological results.

  20. The burden of disease due to tuberculosis in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil*, **

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Glênio César Nunes; da Silva, Rosemeri Maurici; Ferrer, Kelian Tenfen; Traebert, Jefferson

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the burden of disease due to tuberculosis in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil, in 2009. METHODS: This was an epidemiological study with an ecological design. Data on tuberculosis incidence and mortality were collected from specific Brazilian National Ministry of Health databases. The burden of disease due to tuberculosis was based on the calculation of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). The DALYs were estimated by adding the years of life lost (YLLs) and years lived with disability (YLDs). Absolute values were transformed into rates per 100,000 population. The rates were calculated by gender, age group, and health care macroregion. RESULTS: The burden of disease due to tuberculosis was 5,644.27 DALYs (92.25 DALYs/100,000 population), YLLs and YLDs respectively accounting for 78.77% and 21.23% of that total. The highest rates were found in males in the 30-44 and 45-59 year age brackets, although that was not true in every health care macroregion. Overall, the highest estimated burden was in the Planalto Norte macroregion (179.56 DALYs/100,000 population), followed by the Nordeste macroregion (167.07 DALYs/100,000 population). CONCLUSIONS: In the majority of the health care macroregions of Santa Catarina, the burden of disease due to tuberculosis was concentrated in adult males, the level of that concentration varying among the various macroregions. PMID:24626271

  1. Feral swine brucellosis in the United States and prospective genomic techniques for disease epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Leiser, Owen P; Corn, Joseph L; Schmit, Brandon S; Keim, Paul S; Foster, Jeffrey T

    2013-09-27

    Brucellosis is a common infection of feral swine throughout the United States. With the recent expansion of feral swine populations across the country, this disease poses an increasing threat to agriculture and hunters. The standard approach to Brucella surveillance in feral swine has been serological testing, which gives an indication of past exposure and is a rapid method of determining populations where Brucella is present. More in-depth analyses require bacterial isolation to determine the Brucella species and biovar involved. Ultimately, for a comprehensive understanding of Brucella epizootiology in feral swine, incorporation of genotyping assays has become essential. Fortunately, the past decade has given rise to an array of genetic tools for assessing Brucella transmission and dispersal. This review aims to synthesize what is known about brucellosis in feral swine and will cover prospective genomic techniques that may be utilized to develop more complete understanding of the disease and its transmission history. PMID:23548760

  2. FIRST REPORT OF ACUTE CHAGAS DISEASE BY VECTOR TRANSMISSION IN RIO DE JANEIRO STATE, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    SANGENIS, Luiz Henrique Conde; DE SOUSA, Andra Silvestre; SPERANDIO DA SILVA, Gilberto Marcelo; XAVIER, Srgio Salles; MACHADO, Carolina Romero Cardoso; BRASIL, Patrcia; DE CASTRO, Liane; DA SILVA, Sidnei; GEORG, Ingebourg; SARAIVA, Roberto Magalhes; do BRASIL, Pedro Emmanuel Alvarenga Americano; HASSLOCHER-MORENO, Alejandro Marcel

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chagas disease (CD) is an endemic anthropozoonosis from Latin America of which the main means of transmission is the contact of skin lesions or mucosa with the feces of triatomine bugs infected by Trypanosoma cruzi. In this article, we describe the first acute CD case acquired by vector transmission in the Rio de Janeiro State and confirmed by parasitological, serological and PCR tests. The patient presented acute cardiomyopathy and pericardial effusion without cardiac tamponade. Together with fever and malaise, a 3 cm wide erythematous, non-pruritic, papule compatible with a "chagoma" was found on his left wrist. This case report draws attention to the possible transmission of CD by non-domiciled native vectors in non-endemic areas. Therefore, acute CD should be included in the diagnostic workout of febrile diseases and acute myopericarditis in Rio de Janeiro. PMID:26422165

  3. Kikuchi-Fujimoto Disease in the Unites States: Three Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Deaver, Darcie; Naghashpour, Mojdeh; Sokol, Lubomir

    2014-01-01

    Kikuchi-Fujimoto Disease (KFD), also known as histiocytic lymphadenitis, is a benign, self-limiting disease that manifests primarily as cervical lymphadenopathy but may include low-grade fever, headache, and fatigue. There is a higher incidence of KFD in women aged 2035 years and in Asian populations. A PubMed search revealed 590 articles that described KFD. Of these, 22 cases have been fully described in the United States. Ten of the 22 (45%) patients were male and 12 (55%) were female, with 20% Caucasian, 20% Asian American, and the remaining 60% of other ethnic backgrounds. In this study, we describe an additional 3 cases of KFD and discuss the diagnosis, pathology, and management of KFD. PMID:24455110

  4. A spatio-temporal absorbing state model for disease and syndromic surveillance.

    PubMed

    Heaton, Matthew J; Banks, David L; Zou, Jian; Karr, Alan F; Datta, Gauri; Lynch, James; Vera, Francisco

    2012-08-30

    Reliable surveillance models are an important tool in public health because they aid in mitigating disease outbreaks, identify where and when disease outbreaks occur, and predict future occurrences. Although many statistical models have been devised for surveillance purposes, none are able to simultaneously achieve the important practical goals of good sensitivity and specificity, proper use of covariate information, inclusion of spatio-temporal dynamics, and transparent support to decision-makers. In an effort to achieve these goals, this paper proposes a spatio-temporal conditional autoregressive hidden Markov model with an absorbing state. The model performs well in both a large simulation study and in an application to influenza/pneumonia fatality data. PMID:22388709

  5. Lessons from falling coronary heart disease mortality in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, F. H.

    1984-01-01

    The marked decline in coronary heart disease mortality in the United States since the late 1960s is most likely due in large part to successful efforts at primary prevention, attributable in turn to improved eating habits, better control of blood pressure and a reduction in smoking. Another part of the decline can probably be explained by an improvement in prognosis. It remains to be established if there has been a reduction in morbidity as well as mortality. There are other countries which have experienced declines, though of a lesser degree, while several countries have recorded increases in coronary heart disease mortality. These downward and upward turns, in general, are likewise compatible with the theory that they are caused by corresponding favourable or unfavourable changes in life styles. PMID:6694940

  6. Quality of Health Care in the United States: Implications for Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Brendan M.; Palmer, Lena; Kappelman, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    The Institute of Medicines publications To Error is Human and Crossing the Quality Chasm publicized the widespread deficits in U.S. health care quality. Emerging studies continue to reveal deficits in the quality of adult and pediatric care, including subspecialty care. In recent years, key stakeholders in the health care system including providers, purchasers, and the public have been applying various quality improvement methods to address these concerns. Lessons learned from these efforts in other pediatric conditions, including asthma, cystic fibrosis, neonatal intensive care, and liver transplantation may be applicable to the care of children with inflammatory bowel disease. This review is intended to be a primer on the quality of care movement in the United States, with a focus on pediatric inflammatory bowel disease. In this article, we review the history, rationale, and methods of quality measurement and improvement, and we discuss the unique challenges in adapting these general strategies to pediatric IBD care. PMID:19633570

  7. Notes from the field: Heartland virus disease - United States, 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Pastula, Daniel M; Turabelidze, George; Yates, Karen F; Jones, Timonthy F; Lambert, Amy J; Panella, Amanda J; Kosoy, Olga I; Velez, Jason O; Fisher, Marc; Staples, Erin

    2014-03-28

    Heartland virus is a newly identified phlebovirus that was first isolated from two northwestern Missouri farmers hospitalized with fever, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia in 2009. Based on the patients' clinical findings and their reported exposures, the virus was suspected to be transmitted by ticks. After this discovery, CDC worked with state and local partners to define the ecology and modes of transmission of Heartland virus, develop diagnostic assays, and identify additional cases to describe the epidemiology and clinical disease. From this work, it was learned that Heartland virus is found in the Lone Star tick (Amblyomma americanum). Six additional cases of Heartland virus disease were identified during 2012-2013; four of those patients were hospitalized, including one with comorbidities who died. PMID:24670929

  8. Regulation of hepatic ABCC transporters by xenobiotics and in disease states

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xinsheng; Manautou, Jose E.

    2015-01-01

    The subfamily of ABCC transporters consists of 13 members in mammals, including the multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs), sulfonylurea receptors (SURs), and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). These proteins play roles in chemical detoxification, disposition, and normal cell physiology. ABCC transporters are expressed differentially in the liver and are regulated at the transcription and translation level. Their expression and function are also controlled by post-translational modification and membrane-trafficking events. These processes are tightly regulated. Information about alterations in the expression of hepatobiliary ABCC transporters could provide important insights into the pathogenesis of diseases and disposition of xenobiotics. In this review, we describe the regulation of hepatic ABCC transporters in humans and rodents by a variety of xenobiotics, under disease states and in genetically modified animal models deficient in transcription factors, transporters, and cell-signaling molecules. PMID:20233023

  9. Management and prevention of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations: a state of the art review

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, John R; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A

    2009-01-01

    Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are important events in the natural history of this prevalent and devastating condition. This review provides a concise, state of the art summary on prevention and management of exacerbations. Considerable new data underpins evidence in support of many preventative interventions, pharmacological and non-pharmacological, that are now available. Challenges remain in developing new approaches, and delivering those that already exist to the right patient at the right time. Management of an exacerbation remains stepwise according to clinical severity, but there is now additional focus on addressing comorbidities and taking the opportunity at acute events to optimise preventative strategies for the future. Ultimately, exacerbations are heterogeneous events in a heterogeneous disease, and an individualised approach is paramount. PMID:19664218

  10. Pathogens and diseases of freshwater mussels in the United States: studies on bacterial transmission and depuration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Starliper, Clifford E.

    2011-01-01

    Unionid mussels are recognized as important contributors to healthy aquatic ecosystems, as well as bioindicators of environmental perturbations. Because they are sedentary, filter feeding animals and require hosts (i.e., fishes) to transform embryonic glochidia, mussels are susceptible to direct adverse environmental parameters, and indirect parameters that restrict the timely presence of the host(s). Their numbers have declined in recent decades to a point that this fauna is regarded as one of the most imperiled in North America. The most significant threat to populations of native unionids in recent years has been the introduction and spread of zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha. Many federal and state agencies, and private interests are now engaged in mussel conservation efforts, including collecting selected imperiled species from impacted rivers and lakes and propagating them at refuges for future population augmentations. One essential consideration with mussel propagation and their intensive culture at refugia is the prevention of pathogen introductions and control of diseases. Currently, there are few reports of etiological agents causing diseases among freshwater mussels; however, because of increased observations of mussel die-offs in conjunction with transfers of live animals between natural waters and refugia, disease problems can be anticipated to emerge. This review summarizes research to develop bacterial isolation techniques, study pathogen transmission between fish and mussels, identify causes of seasonal mussel die-offs, and develop non-destructive methods for pathogen detection. These efforts were done to develop disease preventative techniques for use by resource managers to avoid potential large-scale disease problems in restoration and population augmentation efforts among imperiled populations.

  11. Can male vaccination reduce the burden of human papillomavirus-related disease in the United States?

    PubMed

    Low, Garren M I; Attiga, Yasser S; Garg, Gaurav; Schlegal, Richard; Gallicano, G Ian

    2012-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) can cause cervical cancer, as well as a number of other diseases in both men and women. Both sexes play a role in transmission of the disease, but the cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination differs between them. It is necessary to determine the best allocation of limited resources between these two populations to produce the most effective strategy for reducing the burden from HPV-related disease. This literature review intends to elucidate the economic and social considerations that will lead to maximum utilization of vaccination programs, which in turn will reduce the burden of HPV-related disease. Current outreach in the United States is based on vaccination against HPV as a means for combating cervical cancer in women. If we are to include males, however, new marketing strategies must focus on educating patients about the full range of the vaccine's benefits. Men who have sex with men (MSM) are also unprotected against HPV in the current system. Social considerations alone may not be enough, however, as economic prediction models suggest that the associated costs outweigh the benefits in most circumstances. Taking this into account, our review also considers alternate methods of maximizing prevention of HPV-associated disease. The most prudent programs will include physician involvement in patient education and the implementation of structured vaccination and screening programs. Unfortunately, many countries do not have the necessary resources to undertake national vaccination programs. HPV testing and cytology screening for women and MSM may be the most financially reasonable option for many countries. PMID:22691099

  12. Alveolar hydatid disease in Minnesota. First human case acquired in the contiguous United States.

    PubMed

    Gamble, W G; Segal, M; Schantz, P M; Rausch, R L

    1979-03-01

    A 56-year-old woman from southwestern Minnesota underwent an extended left hepatic lobectomy to remove a large multinodular mass with a necrotic central cavity. The clinical, serological, and pathological findings led to the diagnosis of alveolar hydatid disease, and specific identification of Echinococcus multilocularis was achieved by growing mature larvas in voles inoculated intraperitoneally with tissue from the hepatic lesions. The patient probably acquired her infection some years previously from pet cats or dogs that had become infected by ingesting infected rodents. In North America E multilocularis is enzootic in the northern tundra zone of Alaska and Canada. Since 1964 the cestode has been recognized with increasing frequency in several north-central states, including Minnesota. The parasite may extend its range farther south, since suitable animal hosts occur throughout the United States. PMID:762867

  13. Adapting logic models over time: the Washington State Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Program experience.

    PubMed

    Sitaker, Marilyn; Jernigan, Jan; Ladd, Susan; Patanian, Miriam

    2008-04-01

    Logic models are graphic representations of the relationship between program activities and their intended effects and are used for both program planning and evaluation. Logic models can provide an important foundation for program evaluation by identifying evaluation questions that most appropriately assess program processes and outcomes and by guiding measurement decisions. We demonstrate how logic models can be used to plan program evaluation by describing the adoption of logic modeling by the Washington State Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Program (WaHDSPP) and by specifying the changes in process and use of logic models since the program's initial funding. Our paper describes how a logic model was used in generating the program evaluation plan for the WaHDSPP, including the identification of evaluation questions and development of indicators to track progress effectively. We describe the use of evaluation results, as well as steps state programs can take to use logic models in program evaluation. PMID:18341795

  14. [RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE PREVALENCE OF CHRONIC NONINFECTIOUS DISEASES AND ELECTROPHYSICAL STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT].

    PubMed

    Rakhmanin, Yu A; Stekhin, A A; Yakovleva, G V; Karasev, A K; Marasanov, A V; Iksanova, T I; Ryabikov, V V

    2015-01-01

    In the paper there is evaluated the relationship of features of electronic state of the environment with a level of chronic, noninfectious diseases (CNID) in the regions of Russia, obtained on the basis of the monitoring measurements of the intensity of natural background electronic Bose condensate (BEBC) of natural ecosystems in a number of Russian regions and seas of the Arctic Ocean. The assessment of BEBC was implemented on results of measurements of redox state of distilled water being in the contact with natural water. The equilibrium redox state of distilled water, determined by the influx of electrons (quantum reduction) outside, is proportional to the intensity of BEBC. The obtained data attest to an increase in the intensity of the background of EBC in Siberia regions and, especially, within the limits ofwaters of Lake Baikal (the redox potential of the surface water in the lake ~ -70mV). Also there is observed a strong dependence of the background EBC in the latitudinal direction. Low levels of background EBC were noted in the Arkhangelsk region and the north-eastern Chukotka. Functioning of international systems of plasma sounding of ionosphere (such systems as HAARP) were established to have a detrimental effect on the background EBC in these regions. According to the results of measurements of the relative values of intensities of natural background of Bose condensate of electrons there was constructed the dependence reflecting the relationship of the prevalence of noninfectious diseases in the regions of Russia with the redox state of distilled water which can be characterized as a significant (regression coefficient R2 = 0.78). The relationship between noninfectious diseases (NID, %) with the intensity of the background of EBC (Ib rel. units) is estimated by the equation: NID [%] = 0.24Eh [mV]-25, where Eh ~ I/Ib. Numerical evaluations show that an increase in the biosphere redox potential of water by 90mV leads to an increase of the primary incidence by 20% (relatively to the average values for Russia). Analysis of results attests to the relationship of CNID with the electrophysical state of the environment that allows from different positions to arrive to true causes of their emergence, associated with changes in the electrophysical conditions of habitation and human activities that lead to the nascency of cellular metabolic disturbances. PMID:26856159

  15. Intradural approach to selective stimulation in the spinal cord for treatment of intractable pain: design principles and wireless protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, M. A.; Utz, M.; Brennan, T. J.; Dalm, B. D.; Viljoen, S.; Jeffery, N. D.; Gillies, G. T.

    2011-08-01

    We introduce an intradural approach to spinal cord stimulation for the relief of intractable pain, and describe the biophysical rationale that underlies its design and performance requirements. The proposed device relies on wireless, inductive coupling between a pial surface implant and its epidural controller, and we present the results of benchtop experiments that demonstrate the ability to transmit and receive a frequency-modulated 1.6 MHz carrier signal between micro-coil antennae scaled to the ? 1 cm dimensions of the implant, at power levels of about 5 mW. Plans for materials selection, microfabrication, and other aspects of future development are presented and discussed.

  16. The effect of ketamine as an additive in epidural block on the intractable herpetic neuralgia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Young; Kim, Kyung Mi; Oh, Min Seok; Lee, Ji Eun

    2014-01-01

    Ketamine has been shown to have analgesic effect by blocking N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, thus preventing and reducing central sensitization caused by peripheral nociceptive stimulation. However, due to lack of knowledge about its safety and toxicity in the central nervous system, either epidural or intrathecal injection of ketamine still remains controversial. Here, we describe a case report of satisfactory pain relief after the addition of ketamine in epidural injection in a patient with severe herpes zoster pain that was refractory to conventional medication, intravenous opioids and continuous epidural block. This case indicates the viability of epidural ketamine injection in patients with intractable herpetic neuralgia. PMID:24567816

  17. Development of an in vitro renal epithelial disease state model for xenobiotic toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Crean, Daniel; Bellwon, Patricia; Aschauer, Lydia; Limonciel, Alice; Moenks, Konrad; Hewitt, Philip; Schmidt, Tobias; Herrgen, Karin; Dekant, Wolfgang; Lukas, Arno; Bois, Frederic; Wilmes, Anja; Jennings, Paul; Leonard, Martin O

    2015-12-25

    There is a growing impetus to develop more accurate, predictive and relevant in vitro models of renal xenobiotic exposure. As part of the EU-FP7, Predict-IV project, a major aim was to develop models that recapitulate not only normal tissue physiology but also aspects of disease conditions that exist as predisposing risk factors for xenobiotic toxicity. Hypoxia, as a common micro-environmental alteration associated with pathophysiology in renal disease, was investigated for its effect on the toxicity profile of a panel of 14 nephrotoxins, using the human proximal tubular epithelial RPTECT/TERT1 cell line. Changes in ATP, glutathione and resazurin reduction, after 14days of daily repeat exposure, revealed a number of compounds, including adefovir dipivoxil with enhanced toxicity in hypoxia. We observed intracellular accumulation of adefovir in hypoxia and suggest decreases in the efflux transport proteins MRP4, MRP5, NHERF1 and NHERF3 as a possible explanation. MRP5 and NHERF3 were also down-regulated upon treatment with the HIF-1 activator, dimethyloxalylglycine. Interestingly, adefovir dependent gene expression shifted from alterations in cell cycle gene expression to an inflammatory response in hypoxia. The ability to investigate aspects of disease states and their influence on renal toxin handling is a key advantage of in vitro systems developed here. They also allow for detailed investigations into mechanisms of compound toxicity of potential importance for compromised tissue exposure. PMID:25536518

  18. Trends in Meningococcal Disease in the United States Military, 19712010

    PubMed Central

    Faix, Dennis J.; Hansen, Christian J.; Blair, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    Meningococci have historically caused extensive illness among members of the United States military. Three successive meningococcal vaccine types were used from 1971 through 2010; overall disease incidence dropped by >90% during this period. During 20062010, disease incidence of 0.38 (cases per 100,000 person-years) among members of the US military was not significantly different from the incidence of 0.26 among the age-matched US general population. Of the 26 cases in the US military, 5 were fatal, 15 were vaccine failures (e.g., illness in a person who had been vaccinated), and 9 were caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup Y. Incidences among 17- to 19-year-old basic trainees and among US Marines were significantly higher than among comparison military populations (p<0.05). No apparent change in epidemiology of meningococcal disease was observed after replacement of quadrivalent polysaccharide vaccine with conjugate vaccine in 2007. The data demonstrate that vaccination with meningococcal vaccine is effective. PMID:22932005

  19. Optimal set of EEG features for emotional state classification and trajectory visualization in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yuvaraj, R; Murugappan, M; Ibrahim, Norlinah Mohamed; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Omar, Mohd Iqbal; Mohamad, Khairiyah; Palaniappan, R

    2014-12-01

    In addition to classic motor signs and symptoms, individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) are characterized by emotional deficits. Ongoing brain activity can be recorded by electroencephalograph (EEG) to discover the links between emotional states and brain activity. This study utilized machine-learning algorithms to categorize emotional states in PD patients compared with healthy controls (HC) using EEG. Twenty non-demented PD patients and 20 healthy age-, gender-, and education level-matched controls viewed happiness, sadness, fear, anger, surprise, and disgust emotional stimuli while fourteen-channel EEG was being recorded. Multimodal stimulus (combination of audio and visual) was used to evoke the emotions. To classify the EEG-based emotional states and visualize the changes of emotional states over time, this paper compares four kinds of EEG features for emotional state classification and proposes an approach to track the trajectory of emotion changes with manifold learning. From the experimental results using our EEG data set, we found that (a) bispectrum feature is superior to other three kinds of features, namely power spectrum, wavelet packet and nonlinear dynamical analysis; (b) higher frequency bands (alpha, beta and gamma) play a more important role in emotion activities than lower frequency bands (delta and theta) in both groups and; (c) the trajectory of emotion changes can be visualized by reducing subject-independent features with manifold learning. This provides a promising way of implementing visualization of patient's emotional state in real time and leads to a practical system for noninvasive assessment of the emotional impairments associated with neurological disorders. PMID:25109433

  20. Epigenetic Modulators of Monocytic Function: Implication for Steady State and Disease in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Papavasiliou, F. Nina; Chung, Young Cheul; Gagnidze, Khatuna; Hajdarovic, Kaitlyn H.; Cole, Dan C.; Bulloch, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic alterations are necessary for the establishment of functional and phenotypic diversity in the populations of immune cells of the monocytic lineage. The epigenetic status of individual genes at different time points defines their transcriptional responses throughout development and in response to environmental stimuli. Epigenetic states are defined at the level of DNA modifications, chromatin modifications, as well as at the level of RNA base changes through RNA editing. Drawing from lessons regarding the epigenome and epitranscriptome of cells of the monocytic lineage in the periphery, and from recently published RNAseq data deriving from brain-resident monocytes, we discuss the impact of modulation of these epigenetic states and how they affect processes important for the development of a healthy brain, as well as mechanisms of neurodegenerative disease and aging. An understanding of the varied brain responses and pathologies in light of these novel gene regulatory systems in monocytes will lead to important new insights in the understanding of the aging process and the treatment and diagnosis of neurodegenerative disease. PMID:26834738

  1. Review of the 2012 Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease Outbreak in Domestic Ruminants in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, G.; McCluskey, B.; King, A.; O’Hearn, E.; Mayr, G.

    2015-01-01

    An unusually large number of cases of Epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) were observed in United States cattle and white-tailed deer in the summer and fall of 2012. USDA APHIS Veterinary Services area offices were asked to report on foreign animal disease investigations and state diagnostic laboratory submissions which resulted in a diagnosis of EHD based on positive PCR results. EHD was reported in the following species: cattle (129 herds), captive white-tailed deer (65 herds), bison (8 herds), yak (6 herds), elk (1 herd), and sheep (1 flock). A majority of the cases in cattle and bison were found in Nebraska, South Dakota, and Iowa. The majority of cases in captive white-tailed deer were found in Ohio, Iowa, Michigan, and Missouri. The most common clinical sign observed in the cattle and bison herds was oral lesions. The major observation in captive white-tailed deer herds was death. Average within-herd morbidity was 7% in cattle and bison herds, and 46% in captive white-tailed deer herds. The average within-herd mortality in captive white-tailed deer herds was 42%. PMID:26244773

  2. Review of the 2012 Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease Outbreak in Domestic Ruminants in the United States.

    PubMed

    Stevens, G; McCluskey, B; King, A; O'Hearn, E; Mayr, G

    2015-01-01

    An unusually large number of cases of Epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) were observed in United States cattle and white-tailed deer in the summer and fall of 2012. USDA APHIS Veterinary Services area offices were asked to report on foreign animal disease investigations and state diagnostic laboratory submissions which resulted in a diagnosis of EHD based on positive PCR results. EHD was reported in the following species: cattle (129 herds), captive white-tailed deer (65 herds), bison (8 herds), yak (6 herds), elk (1 herd), and sheep (1 flock). A majority of the cases in cattle and bison were found in Nebraska, South Dakota, and Iowa. The majority of cases in captive white-tailed deer were found in Ohio, Iowa, Michigan, and Missouri. The most common clinical sign observed in the cattle and bison herds was oral lesions. The major observation in captive white-tailed deer herds was death. Average within-herd morbidity was 7% in cattle and bison herds, and 46% in captive white-tailed deer herds. The average within-herd mortality in captive white-tailed deer herds was 42%. PMID:26244773

  3. Phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes (PEA)-15: A potential therapeutic target in multiple disease states

    PubMed Central

    Greig, Fiona H.; Nixon, Graeme F.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes-15 (PEA-15) is a cytoplasmic protein that sits at an important junction in intracellular signalling and can regulate diverse cellular processes, such as proliferation and apoptosis, dependent upon stimulation. Regulation of these processes occurs by virtue of the unique interaction of PEA-15 with other signalling proteins. PEA-15 acts as a cytoplasmic tether for the mitogen-activated protein kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) preventing nuclear localisation. In order to release ERK1/2, PEA-15 requires to be phosphorylated via several potential pathways. PEA-15 (and its phosphorylation state) therefore regulates many ERK1/2-dependent processes, including proliferation, via regulating ERK1/2 nuclear translocation. In addition, PEA-15 contains a death effector domain (DED) which allows interaction with other DED-containing proteins. PEA-15 can bind the DED-containing apoptotic adaptor molecule, Fas-associated death domain protein (FADD) which is also dependent on the phosphorylation status of PEA-15. PEA-15 binding of FADD can inhibit apoptosis as bound FADD cannot participate in the assembly of apoptotic signalling complexes. Through these proteinprotein interactions, PEA-15-regulated cellular effects have now been investigated in a number of disease-related studies. Changes in PEA-15 expression and regulation have been observed in diabetes mellitus, cancer, neurological disorders and the cardiovascular system. These changes have been suggested to contribute to the pathology related to each of these disease states. As such, new therapeutic targets based around PEA-15 and its associated interactions are now being uncovered and could provide novel avenues for treatment strategies in multiple diseases. PMID:24657708

  4. Non-Erosive Reflux Disease Manifested Exclusively by Protracted Hiccups

    PubMed Central

    Esparza, Edgar A; Cervantes-Sodi, Mara

    2010-01-01

    Hiccups are a benign physiological feature affecting almost everyone at one time or another. They tend to be short-lived and do not affect quality of life; however, there are various pathologies that may present with long-lasting hiccups. These are grouped into 3 categories according to their duration: acute, persistent and intractable or protracted hiccups. Intractable hiccups last longer than 2 months and are usually associated with more severe conditions. The association between intractable hiccups and reflux disease has not been previously documented by objective methods. This report describes the case of a 23-year-old female who presented with protracted hiccups; all other organic pathologies were ruled out, and endoscopy and conventional pH-metry confirmed a diagnosis of non-erosive reflux disease as the unique cause. PMID:21103425

  5. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of the efficacy of treatment with zinc in children with intractable epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Khaled; El-Houfey, Amira A.; Abd El-Hamed, Mohamed A.; El-Asheer, Osama M.; Al-Atram, Abdulrahman A.; Tawfeek, Mostafa S. K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary This study was conducted to assess the efficacy of oral zinc supplementation in children with intractable epilepsy. Forty-five children aged between three and 12 years and diagnosed with idiopathic intractable epilepsy at Assiut University Hospital, Assiut, Egypt were recruited. The patients were randomly allocated to two groups: the intervention group received oral zinc supplementation (1 mg/kg/day) while the placebo group received placebo, each for six months. The parents of each child filled in a detailed questionnaire that covered demographic characteristics, type of seizures, frequency, duration of seizures, previous hospital admissions, postictal phenomena and the occurrence of status epilepticus. The primary outcome (frequency of seizures) was compared between the two groups. Zinc supplementation resulted in a significant reduction of seizure frequency in 31% of the treated children. Zinc is an important trace element. Our results suggest that it has mildly beneficial effects in children with intractable epilepsy. We recommend further investigation of oral zinc supplementation as an adjunctive therapy for managing intractable epilepsy in children. Zinc therapy may be an option in treatment protocols for intractable epilepsy in the near future.

  6. Quantifying the burden of disease and perceived health state in patients with hereditary angioedema in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Nordenfelt, Patrik; Dawson, Simon; Wahlgren, Carl-Fredrik; Lindfors, Anders; Mallbris, Lotus; Björkander, Janne

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) due to C1 inhibitor deficiency is a rare disease characterized by attacks of edema, known to impact quality of life (QoL). This study investigates the burden of HAE in Swedish patients, both children and adults. We used a retrospective registry study of Swedish patients with HAE, captured by the Sweha-Reg census. Data were collected using a paper-based survey. Patients completed EuroQoL 5 Dimensions 5 Levels (EQ5D-5L) questionnaires for both the attack-free state (EQ5D today), and the last HAE attack (EQ5D attack). Questions related to patient's age and sex and other variables, such as attack location and severity, were included to better understand the burden of HAE. EQ5D-5L values were estimated for the two HAE disease states. Patient-reported sick leave was also analyzed. A total of 103 responses were analyzed from 139 surveys (74% response rate). One hundred one reported an EQ5D today score (mean, 0.825) and 78 reported an EQ5D attack score (mean, 0.512) with significant differences between the two states (p < 0.0001). This difference was observed for both mild (p < 0.05), moderate (p < 0.0001), and severe attacks (p < 0.0001). Attack frequency had a negative effect on EQ5D today. Patients with >30 attacks a year had a significantly lower EQ5D today score than those with less frequent attacks. Of 74 participants, 33 (44.6%) had been absent from work or school during the latest attack and, of those with a severe attack, 81% had been absent. HAE has a significant impact on QoL both during and between attacks and on absenteeism during attacks. PMID:24411585

  7. Resting state functional connectivity differences between behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Hafkemeijer, Anne; Möller, Christiane; Dopper, Elise G. P.; Jiskoot, Lize C.; Schouten, Tijn M.; van Swieten, John C.; van der Flier, Wiesje M.; Vrenken, Hugo; Pijnenburg, Yolande A. L.; Barkhof, Frederik; Scheltens, Philip; van der Grond, Jeroen; Rombouts, Serge A. R. B.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Alzheimer's disease (AD) and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) are the most common types of early-onset dementia. Early differentiation between both types of dementia may be challenging due to heterogeneity and overlap of symptoms. Here, we apply resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study functional brain connectivity differences between AD and bvFTD. Methods: We used resting state fMRI data of 31 AD patients, 25 bvFTD patients, and 29 controls from two centers specialized in dementia. We studied functional connectivity throughout the entire brain, applying two different analysis techniques, studying network-to-region and region-to-region connectivity. A general linear model approach was used to study group differences, while controlling for physiological noise, age, gender, study center, and regional gray matter volume. Results: Given gray matter differences, we observed decreased network-to-region connectivity in bvFTD between (a) lateral visual cortical network and lateral occipital and cuneal cortex, and (b) auditory system network and angular gyrus. In AD, we found decreased network-to-region connectivity between the dorsal visual stream network and lateral occipital and parietal opercular cortex. Region-to-region connectivity was decreased in bvFTD between superior temporal gyrus and cuneal, supracalcarine, intracalcarine cortex, and lingual gyrus. Conclusion: We showed that the pathophysiology of functional brain connectivity is different between AD and bvFTD. Our findings support the hypothesis that resting state fMRI shows disease-specific functional connectivity differences and is useful to elucidate the pathophysiology of AD and bvFTD. However, the group differences in functional connectivity are less abundant than has been shown in previous studies. PMID:26441584

  8. Resting state cortical EEG rhythms in Alzheimer's disease: toward EEG markers for clinical applications: a review.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Fabrizio; Babiloni, Claudio; Lizio, Roberta; Fallani, Fabrizio De Vico; Blinowska, Katarzyna; Verrienti, Giulio; Frisoni, Giovanni; Rossini, Paolo M

    2013-01-01

    The human brain contains an intricate network of about 100 billion neurons. Aging of the brain is characterized by a combination of synaptic pruning, loss of cortico-cortical connections, and neuronal apoptosis that provoke an age-dependent decline of cognitive functions. Neural/synaptic redundancy and plastic remodeling of brain networking, also secondary to mental and physical training, promote maintenance of brain activity and cognitive status in healthy elderly subjects for everyday life. However, age is the main risk factor for neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) that impact on cognition. Growing evidence supports the idea that AD targets specific and functionally connected neuronal networks and that oscillatory electromagnetic brain activity might be a hallmark of the disease. In this line, digital electroencephalography (EEG) allows noninvasive analysis of cortical neuronal synchronization, as revealed by resting state brain rhythms. This review provides an overview of the studies on resting state eyes-closed EEG rhythms recorded in amnesic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and AD subjects. Several studies support the idea that spectral markers of these EEG rhythms, such as power density, spectral coherence, and other quantitative features, differ among normal elderly, MCI, and AD subjects, at least at group level. Regarding the classification of these subjects at individual level, the most previous studies showed a moderate accuracy (70-80%) in the classification of EEG markers relative to normal and AD subjects. In conclusion, resting state EEG makers are promising for large-scale, low-cost, fully noninvasive screening of elderly subjects at risk of AD. PMID:24053043

  9. Management of advanced plexiform neurofibromatosis of the foot presenting with skeletal deformation and intractable pain: an indication for proximal amputation.

    PubMed

    DeFazio, Michael V; Ter Louw, Ryan P; Attinger, Christopher E; Barbour, John R

    2015-03-01

    Plexiform neurofibromas of the foot are rare and often present with significant pain, deformity, and functional impairment secondary to their locally invasive behavior. While treatment has traditionally focused on attempts at radical resection, a lack of consensus among surgeons has hindered the establishment of a well-defined algorithm to guide the management of these highly co-morbid peripheral nerve sheath tumors. We present the case of an advanced plexiform neurofibroma of the right foot in a 24-year-old male with neurofibromatosis type 1. The patient presented following accelerated tumor growth with extensive osseous erosion, intractable pain, and progressive ankle instability that limited his capacity to ambulate and wear shoes. A modified transtibial amputation with a vascularized fibular bone graft (Ertl procedure) was performed without complication. Following graduated rehabilitation, postoperatively, the patient regained functional independence and was able to ambulate without pain in a customized prosthesis after 3 months. Plexiform neurofibromas of the foot present a complex challenge for foot and ankle surgeons. On the basis of our experience and previously reported cases, we advocate for amputation over aggressive attempts at advanced limb salvage for patients with extensive skeletal destruction, joint instability, and/or intractable pain caused by tumor mass effect. PMID:25496857

  10. [Three successful cases of continuous dexmedetomidine infusion for the treatment of intractable delirium associated with cancer pain].

    PubMed

    Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Kimura, Yoshie; Hato, Akio; Ikegaki, Junichi

    2013-12-01

    We report three cases of successful treatment of intractable delirium associated with cancer pain with continuous dexmedetomidine (DEX) infusion. Case 1 : An 83-year-old man receiving oral oxycodone for lung cancer pain developed delirium. He was resistant to haloperidol infusion, oral quetiapine, and opioid rotation. DEX infusion was administered at 0.4 microg kg-1 hr-1, and his delirium resolved. Case 2: A 50-year-old woman with cervical cancer of the uterus suffered from sepsis but could not take oral oxycodone. After continuous morphine infusion, she developed delirium. She was resistant to haloperidol infusion or injections of oxycodone for opioid rotation, but DEX infusion at 0.4 microg kg-1hr-1 led to disappearance of delirium symptoms. Case 3: A 71-year-old woman with advanced renal cancer was treated with epidural analgesia to alleviate cancer pain. She subsequently developed delirium but was resistant to haloperidol or chlorpromazine infusion. DEX infusion at 0.3 microg kg-1 hr-1 led to disappearance of delirium symptoms and orientation recovery. DEX infusion may be effective for the treatment of intractable delirium associated with cancer pain. PMID:24498781

  11. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria–associated Lung Disease in Hospitalized Persons, United States, 1998–2005

    PubMed Central

    Billinger, Megan E.; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Viboud, Cecile; Montes de Oca, Ruben; Steiner, Claudia; Holland, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence and trends of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM)–associated hospitalizations in the United States were estimated using national hospital discharge data. Records were extracted for all persons with a pulmonary NTM International Classification of Diseases code (031.0) hospitalized in the 11 states with continuous data available from 1998 through 2005. Prevalence was calculated using US census data. Pulmonary NTM hospitalizations (031.0) increased significantly with age among both sexes: relative prevalence for persons 70–79 years of age compared with those 40–49 years of age was 15/100,000 for women (9.4 vs. 0.6) and 9/100,000 for men (7.6 vs. 0.83). Annual prevalence increased significantly among men and women in Florida (3.2%/year and 6.5%/year, respectively) and among women in New York (4.6%/year) with no significant changes in California. The prevalence of pulmonary NTM–associated hospitalizations is increasing in selected geographic areas of the United States. PMID:19861046

  12. Oxidative stress markers in hypertensive states of pregnancy: preterm and term disease

    PubMed Central

    Kurlak, Lesia O.; Green, Amanda; Loughna, Pamela; Broughton Pipkin, Fiona

    2014-01-01

    Discussion continues as to whether de novo hypertension in pregnancy with significant proteinuria (pre-eclampsia; PE) and non-proteinuric new hypertension (gestational hypertension; GH) are parts of the same disease spectrum or represent different conditions. Non-pregnant hypertension, pregnancy and PE are all associated with oxidative stress. We have established a 6 weeks postpartum clinic for women who experienced a hypertensive pregnancy. We hypothesized that PE and GH could be distinguished by markers of oxidative stress; thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and antioxidants (ferric ion reducing ability of plasma; FRAP). Since the severity of PE and GH is greater pre-term, we also compared pre-term and term disease. Fifty-eight women had term PE, 23 pre-term PE, 60 had term GH and 6 pre-term GH, 11 pre-existing (essential) hypertension (EH) without PE. Limited data were available from normotensive pregnancies (n = 7) and non-pregnant controls (n = 14). There were no differences in postpartum TBARS or FRAP between hypertensive states; TBARS (P = 0.001) and FRAP (P = 0.009) were lower in plasma of non-pregnant controls compared to recently-pregnant women. Interestingly FRAP was higher in preterm than term GH (P = 0.013). In PE and GH, TBARS correlated with low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol (P = 0.036); this association strengthened with inclusion of EH (P = 0.011). The 10 year Framingham index for cardiovascular risk was positively associated with TBARS (P = 0.003). Oxidative stress profiles do not differ between hypertensive states but appear to distinguish between recently-pregnant and non-pregnant states. This suggests that pregnancy may alter vascular integrity with changes remaining 6 weeks postpartum. LDL-cholesterol is a known determinant of oxidative stress in cardiovascular disease and we have shown this association to be present in hypertensive pregnancy further emphasizing that such a pregnancy may be revealing a pre-existing cardiovascular risk. PMID:25202276

  13. Surveillance of Chagas disease vectors in municipalities of the state of Cear, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Gonalves, Teresa Cristina Monte; Freitas, Assilon Lindoval Carneiro; Freitas, Simone Patrcia Carneiro

    2009-12-01

    The present study aimed to analyse the dwelling infestation rates and the distribution and natural Trypanosoma cruzi infection rates, among triatomines captured in the 13 municipalities of the state of Cear. The records relating to the capture of intradomicile and peridomicile triatomines during the Chagas disease control program of 1998-2008 were available. Among the triatomines captured and in all of the municipalities studied, Triatoma brasiliensis presented the highest incidence in intradomicile and Triatoma pseudomaculata in peridomicile and some were positive for infection by T. cruzi. We emphasise that it is important to have sustainable epidemiological surveillance in the region, since when the control measures decreased, the incidence of T. pseudomaculata in intradomicile grew. PMID:20140377

  14. Quality of health care in the United States: implications for pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Brendan M; Palmer, Lena; Kappelman, Michael D

    2009-09-01

    The Institute of Medicine's publications To Error is Human and Crossing the Quality Chasm publicized the widespread deficits in US health care quality. Emerging studies continue to reveal deficits in the quality of adult and pediatric care, including subspecialty care. In recent years, key stakeholders in the health care system including providers, purchasers, and the public have been applying various quality improvement methods to address these concerns. Lessons learned from these efforts in other pediatric conditions, including asthma, cystic fibrosis, neonatal intensive care, and liver transplantation may be applicable to the care of children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).This review is intended to be a primer on the quality of care movement in the United States, with a focus on pediatric IBD. In this article, we review the history, rationale, and methods of quality measurement and improvement, and we discuss the unique challenges in adapting these general strategies to pediatric IBD care. PMID:19633570

  15. Dropping out of school and chronic disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Salas-Wright, Christopher P.; Maynard, Brandy R.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Despite links between education and health, it is unclear to what extent dropping out of school is associated with major chronic health conditions. Subjects and Methods Data from the 2006–2010 United States National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) was employed and examined associations between dropping out of school and major chronic health conditions among individuals 18 years or older (N=189,896). Results Analyses show that dropout status is associated with increased odds of reporting a major chronic health condition; however, the effect is stronger for Whites and African-Americans than Hispanics. Conclusions Study findings suggest that one important strategy to prevent and reduce health disparities is increased education in general including high school completion. Policies and practices that reduce dropout may in turn impact the prevalence of chronic disease. PMID:25232516

  16. State of the Art: Medical treatment of aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD).

    PubMed

    Ta, Von; Simon, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is characterized as adult onset asthma, nasal polyps, chronic rhinosinusitis, and hypersensitivity to a cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) inhibitor, viz aspirin or nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The method for diagnosing AERD is with aspirin challenge, and treatment includes aspirin desensitization followed by continued daily aspirin. Although oral challenge has been the mainstay in the United States, lysyl-aspirin has been validated as a diagnostic tool for aspirin-sensitive asthma and will be discussed further in this article. The challenges with aspirin therapy surrounding endoscopy and perioperative aspirin therapy will be discussed. Additionally, daily aspirin therapy is not for everyone. Aspirin is relatively contraindicated in those with a history of gastrointestinal bleed and an absolute contraindication in pregnancy. Aspirin desensitization and subsequent treatment has been shown to be highly effective for AERD. PMID:25590318

  17. Ebola virus disease: What clinicians in the United States need to know.

    PubMed

    Fischer, William A; Uyeki, Timothy M; Tauxe, Robert V

    2015-08-01

    In March 2014 the World Health Organization was notified of an outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in the forest region of Guinea. As of May 2015, the outbreak had become the most devastating EVD epidemic in history with more than 27,000 cases and more than 11,000 deaths. The introduction of EVD into noncontiguous countries, including the United States, from infected travelers highlights the importance of preparedness of all health care providers. Early identification and rapid isolation of patients suspected with EVD is critical to limiting the spread of Ebola virus. Additionally, enhanced understanding of EVD case definitions, clinical presentation, treatment procedures, and infection control strategies will improve the ability of health care workers to provide safe care for patients with EVD. PMID:26116335

  18. State of the Art Review: Depression, Stress, Anxiety, and Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Beth E; Edmondson, Donald; Kronish, Ian M

    2015-11-01

    The notion that psychological states can influence physical health is hardly new, and perhaps nowhere has the mind-body connection been better studied than in cardiovascular disease (CVD). Recently, large prospective epidemiologic studies and smaller basic science studies have firmly established a connection between CVD and several psychological conditions, including depression, chronic psychological stress, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and anxiety. In addition, numerous clinical trials have been conducted to attempt to prevent or lessen the impact of these conditions on cardiovascular health. In this article, we review studies connecting depression, stress/PTSD, and anxiety to CVD, focusing on findings from the last 5 years. For each mental health condition, we first examine the epidemiologic evidence establishing a link with CVD. We then describe studies of potential underlying mechanisms and finally discuss treatment trials and directions for future research. PMID:25911639

  19. Resting-State Network Disruption and APOE Genotype in Alzheimer's Disease: A lagged Functional Connectivity Study

    PubMed Central

    Canuet, Leonides; Tellado, Ivan; Couceiro, Veronica; Fraile, Carmen; Fernandez-Novoa, Lucia; Ishii, Ryouhei; Takeda, Masatoshi; Cacabelos, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    Background The apolipoprotein E epsilon 4 (APOE-4) is associated with a genetic vulnerability to Alzheimer's disease (AD) and with AD-related abnormalities in cortical rhythms. However, it is unclear whether APOE-4 is linked to a specific pattern of intrinsic functional disintegration of the brain after the development of the disease or during its different stages. This study aimed at identifying spatial patterns and effects of APOE genotype on resting-state oscillations and functional connectivity in patients with AD, using a physiological connectivity index called “lagged phase synchronization”. Methodology/Principal Findings Resting EEG was recorded during awake, eyes-closed state in 125 patients with AD and 60 elderly controls. Source current density and functional connectivity were determined using eLORETA. Patients with AD exhibited reduced parieto-occipital alpha oscillations compared with controls, and those carrying the APOE-4 allele had reduced alpha activity in the left inferior parietal and temporo-occipital cortex relative to noncarriers. There was a decreased alpha2 connectivity pattern in AD, involving the left temporal and bilateral parietal cortex. Several brain regions exhibited increased lagged phase synchronization in low frequencies, specifically in the theta band, across and within hemispheres, where temporal lobe connections were particularly compromised. Areas with abnormal theta connectivity correlated with cognitive scores. In patients with early AD, we found an APOE-4-related decrease in interhemispheric alpha connectivity in frontal and parieto-temporal regions. Conclusions/Significance In addition to regional cortical dysfunction, as indicated by abnormal alpha oscillations, there are patterns of functional network disruption affecting theta and alpha bands in AD that associate with the level of cognitive disturbance or with the APOE genotype. These functional patterns of nonlinear connectivity may potentially represent neurophysiological or phenotypic markers of AD, and aid in early detection of the disorder. PMID:23050006

  20. Epidemiology of Foodborne Disease Outbreaks Caused by Clostridium perfringens, United States, 1998–2010

    PubMed Central

    Grass, Julian E.; Gould, L. Hannah; Mahon, Barbara E.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is estimated to be the second most common bacterial cause of foodborne illness in the United States, causing one million illnesses each year. Local, state, and territorial health departments voluntarily report C. perfringens outbreaks to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention through the Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System. Our analysis included outbreaks confirmed by laboratory evidence during 1998–2010. A food item was implicated if C. perfringens was isolated from food or based on epidemiologic evidence. Implicated foods were classified into one of 17 standard food commodities when possible. From 1998 to 2010, 289 confirmed outbreaks of C. perfringens illness were reported with 15,208 illnesses, 83 hospitalizations, and eight deaths. The number of outbreaks reported each year ranged from 16 to 31 with no apparent trend over time. The annual number of outbreak-associated illnesses ranged from 359 to 2,173, and the median outbreak size was 24 illnesses. Outbreaks occurred year round, with the largest number in November and December. Restaurants (43%) were the most common setting of food preparation. Other settings included catering facility (19%), private home (16%), prison or jail (11%), and other (10%). Among the 144 (50%) outbreaks attributed to a single food commodity, beef was the most common commodity (66 outbreaks, 46%), followed by poultry (43 outbreaks, 30%), and pork (23 outbreaks, 16%). Meat and poultry outbreaks accounted for 92% of outbreaks with an identified single food commodity. Outbreaks caused by C. perfringens occur regularly, are often large, and can cause substantial morbidity yet are preventable if contamination of raw meat and poultry products is prevented at the farm or slaughterhouse or, after contamination, if these products are properly handled and prepared, particularly in restaurants and catering facilities. PMID:23379281

  1. Mortality impact of thoracic aortic disease in So Paulo state from 1998 to 2007

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Ricardo Ribeiro; Mejia, Omar Asdrubal Vilca; Fernandes, Fbio; Ramires, Flix Jos Alvarez; Mady, Charles; Stolf, Noedir Antonio Groppo; Jatene, Fabio Biscegli

    2013-01-01

    Background The epidemiological characteristics of thoracic aortic diseases (TAD) in the State of So Paulo and in Brazil, as well as their impact on the survival of these patients have yet to be analyzed. Objectives To evaluate the mortality impact of TAD and characterize it epidemiologically. Methods Retrospective analysis of data from the public health system for the TAD registry codes of hospitalizations, procedures and deaths, from the International Code of Diseases (ICD-10), registered at the Ministry of Health of So Paulo State from January 1998 to December 2007. Results They were 9.465 TAD deaths, 5.500 men (58.1%) and 3.965 women (41.9%); 6.721 dissections (71%) and 2.744. aneurysms. In 86.3% of cases the diagnosis was attained during autopsy. There were 6.109 hospitalizations, of which 67.9% were males; 21.2% of them died (69% men), with similar proportions of dissection and aneurysm between sexes, respectively 54% and 46%, but with different mortality. Men with TAD die more often than women (OR = 1.5). The age distribution for deaths and hospitalizations was similar with predominance in the 6th decade. They were 3.572 surgeries (58% of hospitalizations) with 20.3% mortality (patients kept in clinical treatment showed 22.6% mortality; p = 0.047). The number of hospitalizations, surgeries, deaths of in-patients and general deaths by TAD were progressively greater than the increase in population over time. Conclusions Specific actions for the early identification of these patients, as well as the viability of their care should be implemented to reduce the apparent progressive mortality from TAD seen among our population. PMID:24100695

  2. [Association between air pollution and respiratory and cardiovascular diseases in Itabira, Minas Gerais State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Braga, Alfésio Luís Ferreira; Pereira, Luiz Alberto Amador; Procópio, Marly; André, Paulo Afonso de; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário do Nascimento

    2007-01-01

    The city of Itabira, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, is located in the Espinhaço Mountain Range, an area that features large-scale mechanized iron ore pit mines. The current study evaluates the acute effects of inhalable particulate matter (PM10) in terms of emergency room visits due to respiratory and cardiovascular diseases in Itabira. Generalized additive Poisson regression models were adopted, controlling for temperature, humidity, and both short and long-term seasonality. Increases of 10mg/m(3) in PM10 were associated with increases in respiratory emergency room visits of 4% (95%CI: 2.2-5.8), at lags 0 and 1 for children and adolescents younger than 13 years of age, and of 12% (95%CI: 8.5-15.5) on the three subsequent days for adolescents (13 to 19 years of age). For cardiovascular diseases, the effect was acute (4%; 95%CI: 0.8-8.5) and mainly for the 45 to 64 age group. These results show that PM10 generated by open pit mining can lead to health problems in the exposed population. PMID:18038038

  3. Utility of arthroscopic guided synovial biopsy in understanding synovial tissue pathology in health and disease states

    PubMed Central

    Wechalekar, Mihir D; Smith, Malcolm D

    2014-01-01

    The synovium is the soft tissue lining diarthrodial joints, tendon sheaths and bursae and is composed of intimal and subintimal layers. The intimal layer is composed of type A cells (macrophages) and type B cells (fibroblasts); in health, the subintima has few inflammatory cells. The synovium performs several homeostatic functions and is the primary target in several inflammatory arthritides. Inflammatory states are characterised by thickening of the synovial lining, macrophage recruitment and fibroblast proliferation, and an influx of inflammatory cells including lymphocytes, monocytes and plasma cells. Of the various methods employed to perform synovial biopsies arthroscopic techniques are considered the “gold standard”, and have an established safety record. Synovial biopsy has been of critical importance in understanding disease pathogenesis and has provided insight into mechanisms of action of targeted therapies by way of direct evidence about events in the synovial tissue in various arthritides. It has been very useful as a research tool for proof of concept studies to assess efficacy and mechanisms of new therapies, provide tissue for in vitro studies, proteomics and microarrays and allow evaluation for biomarkers that may help predict response to therapy and identify new targets for drug development. It also has diagnostic value in the evaluation of neoplastic or granulomatous disease or infection when synovial fluid analysis is non-contributory. PMID:25405084

  4. Bacterial Infection in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in 2000: a State-of-the-Art Review

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Sanjay; Murphy, Timothy F.

    2001-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. The precise role of bacterial infection in the course and pathogenesis of COPD has been a source of controversy for decades. Chronic bacterial colonization of the lower airways contributes to airway inflammation; more research is needed to test the hypothesis that this bacterial colonization accelerates the progressive decline in lung function seen in COPD (the vicious circle hypothesis). The course of COPD is characterized by intermittent exacerbations of the disease. Studies of samples obtained by bronchoscopy with the protected specimen brush, analysis of the human immune response with appropriate immunoassays, and antibiotic trials reveal that approximately half of exacerbations are caused by bacteria. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae are the most common causes of exacerbations, while Chlamydia pneumoniae causes a small proportion. The role of Haemophilus parainfluenzae and gram-negative bacilli remains to be established. Recent progress in studies of the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis of infection in the human respiratory tract and in vaccine development guided by such studies promises to lead to novel ways to treat and prevent bacterial infections in COPD. PMID:11292642

  5. Current status of Marek's disease in the United States and worldwide based on a questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Dunn, John R; Gimeno, Isabel M

    2013-06-01

    A questionnaire was widely distributed in 2011 to estimate the global prevalence of Marek's disease (MD) and gain a better understanding of current control strategies and future concerns. A total of 112 questionnaires were returned representing 116 countries from sources including national branch secretaries of the World Veterinary Poultry Association, vaccine, breeder, and production companies, as well as MD researchers from various backgrounds. Each country listed on a questionnaire was recorded as an individual entry, and on average there were 2.0 entries per country (median 1; range 1-13). All flock types were listed as having increased MD incidence during the last 10 yr in close to 50% of countries by at least one respondent, with the majority of these countries located within French-speaking Africa, Eastern Europe, East Asia, and South America. Only 18 countries (16%) indicated increasing MD incidence was likely due to higher virulent strains, while the presence of other immunosuppressive diseases was a more common explanation. Increased use of CVI988/Rispens was cited as the most likely reason for decreasing MD incidence in 49 countries (42%). In the United States, MD incidence has continued to decrease during the last 10 yr, reaching a record low in 2007 (0.0008%) as measured by leukosis condemnation rates in broilers at slaughter. However, a recent increase of leukosis condemnations in North Carolina and Pennsylvania needs to be closely monitored. PMID:23901765

  6. A group-theoretical notation for disease states: an example using the psychiatric rating scale

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background While many branches of natural science have embraced group theory reaping enormous advantages for their respective fields, clinical medicine lacks to date such applications. Here we intend to explain a prototypal model based on the postulates of groups that could have potential in categorizing clinical states. Method As an example, we begin by modifying the original ‘Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale’ (BPRS), the most frequently used standards for evaluating the psychopathology of patients with schizophrenia. We consider a presumptively idealized (virtually standardized) BPRS (denoted BPRS-I) with assessments ranging from ‘0’ to ‘6’ to simplify our discussion. Next, we introduce the modulo group Z7 containing elements {0,1,2,…,6} defined by composition rule, ‘modulo 7 addition’, denoted by *. Each element corresponds to a score resulting from grading a symptom under the BPRS-I assessment. By grading all symptoms associated with the illness, a Cartesian product, denoted Aj, constitutes a summary of a patient assessment. By considering operations denoted A(j→k) that change state Aj into state Ak, a group M (that itself contains Aj and Ak as elements) is also considered. Furthermore, composition of these operations obey modulo 7 arithmetic (i.e., addition, multiplication, and division). We demonstrate the application with a simple example in the form of a series of states (A4 = A1*A(1→2)*A(2→3)*A(3→4)) to illustrate this result. Results The psychiatric disease states are defined as 18-fold Cartesian products of Z7, i.e., Z7×18 = Z7×…×Z7 (18 times). We can construct set G ≡ {a(m)i| m = 1,2,3,…(the patient’s history of the i-th symptom)} and M ≡ {Am | Am ∈ Z7×18 (the set of all possible assessments of a patient)} simplistically, at least, in terms of modulo 7 addition that satisfies the group postulates. Conclusions Despite the large limitations of our methodology, there are grounds not only within psychiatry but also within other medical fields to consider more generalized notions based on groups (if not rings and fields). These might enable through some graduated expression a systematization of medical states and of medical procedures in a manner more aligned with other branches of natural science. PMID:22776348

  7. Meteorological conditions associated with increased incidence of West Nile virus disease in the United States, 2004-2012.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Micah B; Monaghan, Andrew J; Hayden, Mary H; Eisen, Rebecca J; Delorey, Mark J; Lindsey, Nicole P; Nasci, Roger S; Fischer, Marc

    2015-05-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a leading cause of mosquito-borne disease in the United States. Annual seasonal outbreaks vary in size and location. Predicting where and when higher than normal WNV transmission will occur can help direct limited public health resources. We developed models for the contiguous United States to identify meteorological anomalies associated with above average incidence of WNV neuroinvasive disease from 2004 to 2012. We used county-level WNV data reported to ArboNET and meteorological data from the North American Land Data Assimilation System. As a result of geographic differences in WNV transmission, we divided the United States into East and West, and 10 climate regions. Above average annual temperature was associated with increased likelihood of higher than normal WNV disease incidence, nationally and in most regions. Lower than average annual total precipitation was associated with higher disease incidence in the eastern United States, but the opposite was true in most western regions. Although multiple factors influence WNV transmission, these findings show that anomalies in temperature and precipitation are associated with above average WNV disease incidence. Readily accessible meteorological data may be used to develop predictive models to forecast geographic areas with elevated WNV disease risk before the coming season. PMID:25802435

  8. Infectious disease surveillance in the United States and the United Kingdom: from public goods to the challenges of new technologies.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Tony; Sorenson, Corinna

    2011-02-01

    Infectious diseases are a long-standing and continuing threat to health and welfare, with their containment dependent on national disease surveillance and response capacities. This article discusses infectious disease surveillance in the United States and the United Kingdom, examining historical national traditions for identifying and controlling infectious disease risks and how globalization and technical advances have influenced the evolution of their respective approaches. The two systems developed in different but parallel ways. In the United States, surveillance remained quite localized at the state level until the early twentieth century and still retains many of those features. The U.K. approach became centralized from the latter part of the nineteenth century and has principally remained so. In both cases, disease surveillance was traditionally conceived as a public good, where national or local authorities held sovereign rights and power to protect public health. With the increasing globalized nature of infectious disease, such notions shifted toward surveillance as a global public good, with countries responding in turn by creating new global health governance arrangements and regulations. However, the limitations of current surveillance systems and the strong hold of national interests place into question the provision of surveillance as a global public good. These issues are further highlighted with the introduction of new surveillance technologies, which offer opportunities for improved disease detection and identification but also create potential tensions between individual rights, corporate profit, equitable access to technology, and national and global public goods. PMID:21498799

  9. The role of seafood in foodborne diseases in the United States of America.

    PubMed

    Lipp, E K; Rose, J B

    1997-08-01

    In the United States of America, seafood ranked third on the list of products which caused foodborne disease between 1983 and 1992. Outbreaks connected with fish vectors were caused by scombroid, ciguatoxin, bacteria and unknown agents; in shellfish, unknown agents, paralytic shellfish poisoning, Vibrio spp. and other bacteria, followed by hepatitis A virus, were responsible for the outbreaks. At least ten genera of bacterial pathogens have been implicated in seafood-borne diseases. Over the past twenty-five years, bacterial pathogens associated with faecal contamination have represented only 4% of the shellfish-associated outbreaks, while naturally-occurring bacteria accounted for 20% of shellfish-related illnesses and 99% of the deaths. Most of these indigenous bacteria fall into the family Vibrionaceae which includes the genera Vibrio, Aeromonas and Plesiomonas. In general, Vibrio spp. are not associated with faecal contamination and therefore faecal indicators do not correlate with the presence of Vibrio. Viruses are the most significant cause of shellfish-associated disease: in New York State, for example, 33% and 62% of 196 outbreaks between 1981 and 1992 were caused by Norwalk virus and gastrointestinal viruses (small round structured viruses), respectively. In addition, several illnesses are a result of toxic algal blooms, the growth of naturally occurring bacteria and diatoms causing neurotoxic shellfish poisoning, paralytic shellfish poisoning, diarrhoetic shellfish poisoning, amnesic shellfish poisoning and ciguatera. Current estimates place the annual number of ciguatera cases at 20,000 world-wide. Scombroid poisoning is the most significant cause of illness associated with seafood. Scombrotoxin is of bacterial origin and halophilic Vibrio spp. causing high histamine levels are implicated as the source. Scombroid poisoning is geographically diverse and many species have been implicated, namely: tuna, mahi-mahi, bluefish, sardines, mackerel, amberjack and abalone. Temperature abuse has been cited as a major cause of scombroid poisoning. For routine work, the use of faecal indicators to predict the relative level of faecal contamination should not be disposed of. However, the main source of seafood illness is due to species which are not predicted by these organisms. In order to protect public health, routine surveillance using new pathogen-specific techniques such as polymerase chain reaction should be used. This, in combination with risk assessment methods and hazard analysis and critical control points, will begin to address the need for improvement in the safety of seafood. PMID:9501377

  10. Brain functional connectivity patterns for emotional state classification in Parkinson's disease patients without dementia.

    PubMed

    Yuvaraj, R; Murugappan, M; Acharya, U Rajendra; Adeli, Hojjat; Ibrahim, Norlinah Mohamed; Mesquita, Edgar

    2016-02-01

    Successful emotional communication is crucial for social interactions and social relationships. Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients have shown deficits in emotional recognition abilities although the research findings are inconclusive. This paper presents an investigation of six emotions (happiness, sadness, fear, anger, surprise, and disgust) of twenty non-demented (Mini-Mental State Examination score >24) PD patients and twenty Healthy Controls (HCs) using Electroencephalogram (EEG)-based Brain Functional Connectivity (BFC) patterns. The functional connectivity index feature in EEG signals is computed using three different methods: Correlation (COR), Coherence (COH), and Phase Synchronization Index (PSI). Further, a new functional connectivity index feature is proposed using bispectral analysis. The experimental results indicate that the BFC change is significantly different among emotional states of PD patients compared with HC. Also, the emotional connectivity pattern classified using Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier yielded the highest accuracy for the new bispectral functional connectivity index. The PD patients showed emotional impairments as demonstrated by a poor classification performance. This finding suggests that decrease in the functional connectivity indices during emotional stimulation in PD, indicating functional disconnections between cortical areas. PMID:26515932

  11. SIR model on a dynamical network and the endemic state of an infectious disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dottori, M.; Fabricius, G.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we performed a numerical study of an epidemic model that mimics the endemic state of whooping cough in the pre-vaccine era. We considered a stochastic SIR model on dynamical networks that involve local and global contacts among individuals and analysed the influence of the network properties on the characterization of the quasi-stationary state. We computed probability density functions (PDF) for infected fraction of individuals and found that they are well fitted by gamma functions, excepted the tails of the distributions that are q-exponentials. We also computed the fluctuation power spectra of infective time series for different networks. We found that network effects can be partially absorbed by rescaling the rate of infective contacts of the model. An explicit relation between the effective transmission rate of the disease and the correlation of susceptible individuals with their infective nearest neighbours was obtained. This relation quantifies the known screening of infective individuals observed in these networks. We finally discuss the goodness and limitations of the SIR model with homogeneous mixing and parameters taken from epidemiological data to describe the dynamic behaviour observed in the networks studied.

  12. A Novel Ilarvirus Is Associated with Privet Necrotic Ringspot Disease in the Southern United States.

    PubMed

    Aboughanem-Sabanadzovic, Nina; Tzanetakis, Ioannis E; Lawrence, Amanda; Stephenson, Ronald C; Sabanadzovic, Sead

    2016-01-01

    Necrotic ringspot disease (NRSD) is a graft-transmissible disorder of privet (synonym ligustrum), originally reported from Florida and Louisiana more than 50 years ago. In this communication we report an isometric virus isolated from Japanese privet (Ligustrum japonicum) collected in the southern United States displaying symptoms resembling those of NRSD. In mechanical transmission tests, the virus induced systemic infections in several herbaceous hosts. Double-stranded RNA analysis showed a pattern resembling replicative forms of members of the family Bromoviridae. The genome organization along with phylogenetic analyses and serological tests revealed that the virus belongs to subgroup 1 of the genus Ilarvirus. Pairwise comparisons with recognized ilarviruses indicated that the virus is a distinct, and as yet, undescribed member in the taxon, for which we propose the name Privet ringspot virus (PrRSV). Furthermore, the near-perfect association of PrRSV infections with symptoms, and apparent absence of any other virus(es) in studied samples, strongly suggest an important role of this virus in the etiology of NRSD of privet in the southeastern United States. PMID:26390186

  13. Combined vitrectomy and intravitreal injection versus combined laser and injection for treatment of intractable diffuse diabetic macular edema

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Ahmed M

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of combined vitrectomy, intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide (IVTA), and bevacizumab injection with that of IVTA and bevacizumab injection and subsequent macular grid laser photocoagulation for the treatment of intractable diffuse diabetic macular edema. Methods This randomized controlled clinical trial was performed at Benha University Hospital, Benha, Egypt, and included 34 eyes from 34 diabetic patients diagnosed with intractable diffuse diabetic macular edema without vitreomacular traction. The patients were divided into two groups. In group 1, pars plana vitrectomy with removal of the posterior hyaloid was performed, and at the end of the procedure, IVTA 0.1 mL (40 mg/mL) and bevacizumab 1.25 mg were injected. In group 2, macular grid laser photocoagulation was performed 2 weeks after the same intravitreal injection combination as used in group 1. The main outcome measures were best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and central foveal thickness, which were measured using optical coherence tomography at 3, 6, and 12 months. Results Changes in BCVA and central foveal thickness at 3, 6, and 12 months from baseline were highly statistically significant (P < 0.01). Mean BCVA was better in group 1 at 3 months, nearly equal at 6 months, and less at 12 months. Mean central foveal thickness was more improved in group 1 than in group 2 at 3 months, and was better in group 2 at subsequent measurement points. The major adverse events were development of cataract (more common in group 1) and elevation of intraocular pressure (more common in group 2). Conclusion The combined therapy described here could represent a solution for the treatment of intractable diabetic macular edema, and could have a favorable long-term outcome. Combined treatment of IVTA and bevacizumab plus grid laser resulted in a more favorable reduction in central foveal thickness and improvement in BCVA at 12 months than vitrectomy combined with the same injections. This small study favors the safer, cheaper, and more available line of treatment. PMID:23440389

  14. Virus diseases of salmonidae in the western United States. II. Aspects of pathogenesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yasutake, W.T.; Parisot, T.J.; Klontz, G.W.

    1965-01-01

    This study was undertaken to initiate a series concerning pathogeneses of infectious diseases of salmonids. The two viral diseases covered in this paper are the Oregon sockeye disease (OSD) and Sacramento River chinook disease (SRCD). Some preliminary data on pathology of the corresponding material from the hatchery epizootics will also be described and discussed.

  15. 9 CFR 53.2 - Determination of existence of disease; agreements with States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Determination of existence of disease... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, PLEUROPNEUMONIA, RINDERPEST, AND CERTAIN OTHER COMMUNICABLE DISEASES...

  16. 9 CFR 53.2 - Determination of existence of disease; agreements with States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Determination of existence of disease... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, PLEUROPNEUMONIA, RINDERPEST, AND CERTAIN OTHER COMMUNICABLE DISEASES...

  17. 9 CFR 53.2 - Determination of existence of disease; agreements with States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Determination of existence of disease... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, PLEUROPNEUMONIA, RINDERPEST, AND CERTAIN OTHER COMMUNICABLE DISEASES...

  18. 9 CFR 53.2 - Determination of existence of disease; agreements with States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Determination of existence of disease... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, PLEUROPNEUMONIA, RINDERPEST, AND CERTAIN OTHER COMMUNICABLE DISEASES...

  19. 9 CFR 53.2 - Determination of existence of disease; agreements with States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Determination of existence of disease... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, PLEUROPNEUMONIA, RINDERPEST, AND CERTAIN OTHER COMMUNICABLE DISEASES...

  20. Autoimmune disease and hair loss.

    PubMed

    Moghadam-Kia, Siamak; Franks, Andrew G

    2013-01-01

    Once systemic disease is in remission, it is prudent to recognize the importance of alopecia in the patient's overall sense of well-being and quality-of-life clinical outcome. Scarring alopecia (scalp discoid lupus erythematosus) can be the presenting manifestation of lupus in more than half of affected individuals. Diffuse nonscarring alopecia in lupus is usually responsive to treatment of the systemic disease. Severe, often intractable burning pruritus of the scalp is a frequent complaint in dermatomyositis. Lichen planopilaris may mimic other autoimmune forms of scarring alopecia. Alopecia can also be caused by medications used to treat systemic autoimmune disease and fibromyalgia. PMID:23159178

  1. Landscape, demographic, entomological, and climatic associations with human disease incidence of West Nile virus in the state of Iowa, USA

    PubMed Central

    DeGroote, John P; Sugumaran, Ramanathan; Brend, Sarah M; Tucker, Brad J; Bartholomay, Lyric C

    2008-01-01

    Background West Nile virus (WNV) emerged as a threat to public and veterinary health in the Midwest United States in 2001 and continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality annually. To investigate biotic and abiotic factors associated with disease incidence, cases of reported human disease caused by West Nile virus (WNV) in the state of Iowa were aggregated by census block groups in Iowa for the years 20022006. Spatially explicit data on landscape, demographic, and climatic conditions were collated and analyzed by census block groups. Statistical tests of differences between means and distributions of landscape, demographic, and climatic variables for census block groups with and without WNV disease incidence were carried out. Entomological data from Iowa were considered at the state level to add context to the potential ecological events taking place. Results Numerous statistically significant differences were shown in the means and distributions of various landscape and demographic variables for census block groups with and without WNV disease incidence. Census block groups with WNV disease incidence had significantly lower population densities than those without. Landscape variables showing differences included stream density, road density, land cover compositions, presence of irrigation, and presence of animal feeding operations. Statistically significant differences in the annual means of precipitations, dew point, and minimum temperature for both the year of WNV disease incidence and the prior year, were detected in at least one year of the analysis for each parameter. However, the differences were not consistent between years. Conclusion The analysis of human WNV disease incidence by census block groups in Iowa demonstrated unique landscape, demographic, and climatic associations. Our results indicate that multiple ecological WNV transmission dynamics are most likely taking place in Iowa. In 2003 and 2006, drier conditions were associated with WNV disease incidence. In a significant novel finding, rural agricultural settings were shown to be strongly associated with human WNV disease incidence in Iowa. PMID:18452604

  2. [A Case of Intractable Bile Leakage after Surgery for Gallbladder Cancer Successfully Treated by Transcatheter Arterial Embolization].

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Atsuyo; Noda, Takehiro; Hatano, Hisanori; Takata, Akihiro; Hirota, Masashi; Oshima, Kazuteru; Tanida, Tsukasa; Komori, Takamichi; Imamura, Hiroshi; Morita, Shunji; Iwazawa, Takashi; Akagi, Kenzo; Yakushiji, Hideaki; Yasumoto, Taku; Dono, Keizo

    2015-11-01

    An 83-year-old man underwent extended cholecystectomy for gallbladder cancer. On postoperative day 13, he developed fever and computed tomography(CT)revealed fluid collection at the cut surface of the liver. Ultrasound-guided fluid drainage was conducted, and he was diagnosed with biliary leakage. Radiological examination using a contrast agent revealed that the anterior branch of the bile duct(B5)was completely interrupted. Simple drainage and ethanol injections into the bile duct proved ineffective. Thus, we performed transcatheter arterial embolization(TAE)in the anterior segmental artery(A5)to stop the production of bile in the injured part of anterior segment. The treatment was effective, and he was discharged 15 days after TAE. TAE might be a useful method for treating intractable interrupted-type bile leakage. PMID:26805155

  3. Spinal cord stimulation for intractable chronic upper abdominal pain: a case report of the first patient in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Al-Mahrouqi, Haitham; Munro, Zea; Acland, Richard H; MacFarlane, Martin R

    2012-12-14

    We present the first patient in New Zealand to undergo Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS) for intractable upper abdominal pain. The patient was a 53-year-old man with a 20-year history of debilitating upper abdominal pain associated with chronic pancreatitis secondary to pancreatic divisum. Prior to the SCS, he was prescribed 680 mg of morphine sulphate equi-analgesia a day. Despite the intense analgesia, he still suffered monthly attacks of upper abdominal pain requiring hospitalisation. Nine months after implanting a Spinal Cord Stimulator, the monthly attacks ceased, his background pain was effectively controlled and the need for opioids decreased to 510 mg of morphine sulphate equi-analgesia a day. PMID:23321890

  4. An observational study of the temporal and spatial patterns of Marek's-disease-associated leukosis condemnation of young chickens in the United States of America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek's disease, a disease primarily affecting immature chickens, is a worldwide problem that has on at least three occasions threatened the poultry industry in the United States. A rich dataset to study the epidemiology of this disease is available because the United States Department of Agricultu...

  5. The Prevalence of Peyronie's Disease in the United States: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Stuntz, Mark; Perlaky, Anna; des Vignes, Franka; Kyriakides, Tassos; Glass, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Peyronie’s disease (PD) is a connective tissue disorder which can result in penile deformity. The prevalence of diagnosed PD in the United States (US) has been estimated to be 0.5% in adult males, but there is limited additional information comparing definitive and probable PD cases. We conducted a population-based survey to assess PD prevalence using a convenience-sample of adult men participating in the ResearchNow general population panel. Respondents were categorized according to PD status (definitive, probable, no PD) and segmented by US geographic region, education, and income levels. Of the 7,711 respondents, 57 (0.7%) had definitive PD while 850 (11.0%) had probable PD. Using univariate logistic regression modeling, older age (18–24 vs 24+) (OR = 0.721; 95% CI = 0.570,0.913), Midwest/Northeast/West geographic region (South vs Midwest/Northeast/West) (OR = 0.747; 95% CI = 0.646,0.864), and higher income level (<25K vs 25K+) (OR = 0.820; 95% CI = 0.673,0.997) were each significantly associated with reduced odds of having a definitive/probable PD diagnosis compared with no PD diagnosis. When all three variables were entered in a stepwise multivariable logistic regression, only age (OR = 0.642; 95% CI = 0.497, 0.828) and region (OR = 0.752; 95% CI = 0.647, 0.872) remained significant. This study is the first to report PD prevalence by geographic region and income, and it advocates that the prevalence of PD in the US may be higher than previously cited. Further, given the large discrepancy between definitive PD cases diagnosed by a physician and probable cases not diagnosed by a physician, much more needs to be done to raise awareness of this disease. PMID:26907743

  6. Low-frequency fluctuation amplitude analysis of resting-state fMRI in sickle cell disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coloigner, Julie; Kim, Yeun; Bush, Adam; Borzage, Matt; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Lepore, Natasha; Wood, John

    2015-12-01

    Sickle cell disease may result in neurological damage and strokes, leading to morbidity and mortality. Currently, there are no dependable biomarkers to predict impending strokes. In this study, we analyzed neuronal processes at resting state and more particularly how this disease affects the default mode network. The amplitude of low frequency fluctuations was used to reflect areas of spontaneous BOLD signal across brain regions. We compared the activations of sickle cell disease patients to a control group using variance analysis and t-test. Significant regional differences among the two groups were observed, especially in the default mode network areas and cortical regions near large cerebral arteries. These findings suggest that sickle cell disease causes activation modifications near vessels, and these changes could be used as a biomarker of the disease.

  7. Recent Advancements in Stem Cell and Gene Therapies For Neurological Disorders and Intractable Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Naegele, Janice R.; Maisano, Xu; Yang, Jia; Royston, Sara; Ribeiro, Efrain

    2010-01-01

    The potential applications of stem cell therapies for treating neurological disorders are enormous. Many laboratories are focusing on stem cell treatments for CNS diseases, including spinal cord injury, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis, stroke, traumatic brain injury, and epilepsy. Among the many stem cell types under testing for neurological treatments, the most common are fetal and adult brain stem cells, embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cells. An expanding toolbox of molecular probes is now available to allow analyses of neural stem cell fates prior to and after transplantation. Concomitantly, protocols are being developed to direct the fates of stem cell derived neural progenitors, and also to screen stem cells for tumorigenicity and aneuploidy. The rapid progress in the field suggests that novel stem cell and gene therapies for neurological disorders are in the pipeline. PMID:20146928

  8. Argon Plasma Coagulation Therapy Versus Topical Formalin for Intractable Rectal Bleeding and Anorectal Dysfunction After Radiation Therapy for Prostate Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yeoh, Eric; Tam, William; Schoeman, Mark; Moore, James; Thomas, Michelle; Botten, Rochelle; Di Matteo, Addolorata

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the effect of argon plasma coagulation (APC) and topical formalin for intractable rectal bleeding and anorectal dysfunction associated with chronic radiation proctitis. Methods and Materials: Thirty men (median age, 72 years; range, 49-87 years) with intractable rectal bleeding (defined as ≥1× per week and/or requiring blood transfusions) after radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma were randomized to treatment with APC (n=17) or topical formalin (n=13). Each patient underwent evaluations of (1) anorectal symptoms (validated questionnaires, including modified Late Effects in Normal Tissues–Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic and visual analogue scales for rectal bleeding); (2) anorectal motor and sensory function (manometry and graded rectal balloon distension); and (3) anal sphincteric morphology (endoanal ultrasound) before and after the treatment endpoint (defined as reduction in rectal bleeding to 1× per month or better, reduction in visual analogue scales to ≤25 mm, and no longer needing blood transfusions). Results: The treatment endpoint was achieved in 94% of the APC group and 100% of the topical formalin group after a median (range) of 2 (1-5) sessions of either treatment. After a follow-up duration of 111 (29-170) months, only 1 patient in each group needed further treatment. Reductions in rectal compliance and volumes of sensory perception occurred after APC, but no effect on anorectal symptoms other than rectal bleeding was observed. There were no differences between APC and topical formalin for anorectal symptoms and function, nor for anal sphincteric morphology. Conclusions: Argon plasma coagulation and topical formalin had comparable efficacy in the durable control of rectal bleeding associated with chronic radiation proctitis but had no beneficial effect on anorectal dysfunction.

  9. Peripheral and Neuraxial Chemical Neurolysis for the Management of Intractable Lower Extremity Pain in a Patient with Terminal Cancer.

    PubMed

    De Pinto, Mario; Naidu, Ramana K

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 74-year-old man with Stage IV metastatic, multifocal, malignant fibrous histiocytoma (T2b, N1, M1, G4) invading the proximal area of the left lower extremity and resulting in intractable neuropathic pain along the distribution of the femoral nerve. He described the pain as being so severe to cause inability to ambulate without assistance or to sleep in a supine or prone position. After a spinal cord stimulation trial and a trial of intrathecal (IT) hydromorphone, both performed at an outside institution, had failed to achieve adequate pain relief, we decided to perform a femoral nerve chemical neurolysis with phenol under ultrasound (US) guidance. The intervention provided 6 months of almost complete pain relief. With the tumor spreading in girth distally and proximally to the scrotal and pelvic areas as well as to the lungs, and pain returning back to baseline, we proceeded with a second femoral nerve chemical neurolysis. Unfortunately we were not able to achieve adequate pain relief. Therefore we opted to proceed with a diagnostic injection of local anesthetic under fluoroscopic guidance at the left L2, L3, and L4 nerve roots level. This intervention provided 100% pain relief and was followed, a few days later, by chemical neurolysis with phenol 3%. The patient reported complete pain relief with the procedure and no sensory-motor related side effects or complications. He was able to enjoy the last 6 weeks of life with his wife and family, pain-free. With this report we add to the limited literature available regarding the management of intractable cancer pain with chemical neurolysis in and around the epidural space. PMID:26218956

  10. Long-term impact of the ketogenic diet on growth and resting energy expenditure in children with intractable epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    GROLEAU, VERONIQUE; SCHALL, JOAN I; STALLINGS, VIRGINIA A; BERGQVIST, CHRISTINA A

    2014-01-01

    AIM The long-term effects of the ketogenic diet, a high fat diet for treating intractable epilepsy, on resting energy expenditure (REE) are unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of 15 months of ketogenic diet treatment on growth and REE in children with intractable epilepsy. METHOD Growth, body composition and REE were assessed at baseline, 3 and 15 months in 24 children (14 males, 10 females; mean age 5y 6mo (SD 26mo), range 7mo–6y 5mo), 10 with cerebral palsy [CP]). Fifteen were identified as ketogenic diet responders at 3 months and continued on the ketogenic diet until 15 months. These were compared to 75 healthy children (43 males, 32 females; mean age 6y 3mo [SD 21mo] age range 2–9y). REE was expressed as percentage predicted, growth as height (HAz) and weight (WAz) z-scores, and body composition as fat and fat free mass (FFM). RESULTS HAz declined −0.2 and −0.6 from baseline to 3 and 15 months, respectively (p=0.001), while WAz was unchanged. In ketogenic diet responders, FFM, age and CP diagnosis predicted REE (overall R2=0.76, p<0.001) and REE did not change. REE adjusted for FFM was lower (p<0.01) in children with CP at baseline (mean [standard error], −143[51] kcals/d) and 15 months (−198[53] kcals/d) compared to the healthy children. INTERPRETATION After 15 months of the ketogenic diet, linear growth status declined while weight status and REE were unchanged. REE remained reduced in children with CP. PMID:24749520

  11. Climate variability and change in the United States: potential impacts on vector- and rodent-borne diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Gubler, D J; Reiter, P; Ebi, K L; Yap, W; Nasci, R; Patz, J A

    2001-01-01

    Diseases such as plague, typhus, malaria, yellow fever, and dengue fever, transmitted between humans by blood-feeding arthropods, were once common in the United States. Many of these diseases are no longer present, mainly because of changes in land use, agricultural methods, residential patterns, human behavior, and vector control. However, diseases that may be transmitted to humans from wild birds or mammals (zoonoses) continue to circulate in nature in many parts of the country. Most vector-borne diseases exhibit a distinct seasonal pattern, which clearly suggests that they are weather sensitive. Rainfall, temperature, and other weather variables affect in many ways both the vectors and the pathogens they transmit. For example, high temperatures can increase or reduce survival rate, depending on the vector, its behavior, ecology, and many other factors. Thus, the probability of transmission may or may not be increased by higher temperatures. The tremendous growth in international travel increases the risk of importation of vector-borne diseases, some of which can be transmitted locally under suitable circumstances at the right time of the year. But demographic and sociologic factors also play a critical role in determining disease incidence, and it is unlikely that these diseases will cause major epidemics in the United States if the public health infrastructure is maintained and improved. PMID:11359689

  12. Sex-specific relationships between adverse childhood experiences and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in five states

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Timothy J; Ford, Earl S; Croft, Janet B; Merrick, Melissa T; Rolle, Italia V; Giles, Wayne H

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) before age 18 have been repeatedly associated with several chronic diseases in adulthood such as depression, heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and stroke. We examined sex-specific relationships between individual ACEs and the number of ACEs with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the general population. Materials and methods Data from 26,546 women and 19,015 men aged ≥18 years in five states of the 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were analyzed. We used log-linear regression to estimate prevalence ratios (PRs) and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the relationship of eight ACEs with COPD after adjustment for age group, race/ethnicity, marital status, educational attainment, employment, asthma history, health insurance coverage, and smoking status. Results Some 63.8% of women and 62.2% of men reported ≥1 ACE. COPD was reported by 4.9% of women and 4.0% of men. In women, but not in men, there was a higher likelihood of COPD associated with verbal abuse (PR =1.30, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.61), sexual abuse (PR =1.69, 95% CI: 1.36, 2.10), living with a substance abusing household member (PR =1.49, 95% CI: 1.23, 1.81), witnessing domestic violence (PR =1.40, 95% CI: 1.14, 1.72), and parental separation/divorce (PR =1.47, 95% CI: 1.21, 1.80) during childhood compared to those with no individual ACEs. Reporting ≥5 ACEs (PR =2.08, 95% CI: 1.55, 2.80) compared to none was associated with a higher likelihood of COPD among women only. Conclusion ACEs are related to COPD, especially among women. These findings underscore the need for further research that examines sex-specific differences and the possible mechanisms linking ACEs and COPD. This work adds to a growing body of research suggesting that ACEs may contribute to health problems later in life and suggesting a need for program and policy solutions. PMID:25298732

  13. Classification of Single Normal and Alzheimer's Disease Individuals from Cortical Sources of Resting State EEG Rhythms.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Triggiani, Antonio I; Lizio, Roberta; Cordone, Susanna; Tattoli, Giacomo; Bevilacqua, Vitoantonio; Soricelli, Andrea; Ferri, Raffaele; Nobili, Flavio; Gesualdo, Loreto; Millán-Calenti, José C; Buján, Ana; Tortelli, Rosanna; Cardinali, Valentina; Barulli, Maria Rosaria; Giannini, Antonio; Spagnolo, Pantaleo; Armenise, Silvia; Buenza, Grazia; Scianatico, Gaetano; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Del Percio, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown abnormal power and functional connectivity of resting state electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms in groups of Alzheimer's disease (AD) compared to healthy elderly (Nold) subjects. Here we tested the best classification rate of 120 AD patients and 100 matched Nold subjects using EEG markers based on cortical sources of power and functional connectivity of these rhythms. EEG data were recorded during resting state eyes-closed condition. Exact low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (eLORETA) estimated the power and functional connectivity of cortical sources in frontal, central, parietal, occipital, temporal, and limbic regions. Delta (2-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha 1 (8-10.5 Hz), alpha 2 (10.5-13 Hz), beta 1 (13-20 Hz), beta 2 (20-30 Hz), and gamma (30-40 Hz) were the frequency bands of interest. The classification rates of interest were those with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) higher than 0.7 as a threshold for a moderate classification rate (i.e., 70%). Results showed that the following EEG markers overcame this threshold: (i) central, parietal, occipital, temporal, and limbic delta/alpha 1 current density; (ii) central, parietal, occipital temporal, and limbic delta/alpha 2 current density; (iii) frontal theta/alpha 1 current density; (iv) occipital delta/alpha 1 inter-hemispherical connectivity; (v) occipital-temporal theta/alpha 1 right and left intra-hemispherical connectivity; and (vi) parietal-limbic alpha 1 right intra-hemispherical connectivity. Occipital delta/alpha 1 current density showed the best classification rate (sensitivity of 73.3%, specificity of 78%, accuracy of 75.5%, and AUROC of 82%). These results suggest that EEG source markers can classify Nold and AD individuals with a moderate classification rate higher than 80%. PMID:26941594

  14. Classification of Single Normal and Alzheimer's Disease Individuals from Cortical Sources of Resting State EEG Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Babiloni, Claudio; Triggiani, Antonio I.; Lizio, Roberta; Cordone, Susanna; Tattoli, Giacomo; Bevilacqua, Vitoantonio; Soricelli, Andrea; Ferri, Raffaele; Nobili, Flavio; Gesualdo, Loreto; Millán-Calenti, José C.; Buján, Ana; Tortelli, Rosanna; Cardinali, Valentina; Barulli, Maria Rosaria; Giannini, Antonio; Spagnolo, Pantaleo; Armenise, Silvia; Buenza, Grazia; Scianatico, Gaetano; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Frisoni, Giovanni B.; del Percio, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown abnormal power and functional connectivity of resting state electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms in groups of Alzheimer's disease (AD) compared to healthy elderly (Nold) subjects. Here we tested the best classification rate of 120 AD patients and 100 matched Nold subjects using EEG markers based on cortical sources of power and functional connectivity of these rhythms. EEG data were recorded during resting state eyes-closed condition. Exact low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (eLORETA) estimated the power and functional connectivity of cortical sources in frontal, central, parietal, occipital, temporal, and limbic regions. Delta (2–4 Hz), theta (4–8 Hz), alpha 1 (8–10.5 Hz), alpha 2 (10.5–13 Hz), beta 1 (13–20 Hz), beta 2 (20–30 Hz), and gamma (30–40 Hz) were the frequency bands of interest. The classification rates of interest were those with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) higher than 0.7 as a threshold for a moderate classification rate (i.e., 70%). Results showed that the following EEG markers overcame this threshold: (i) central, parietal, occipital, temporal, and limbic delta/alpha 1 current density; (ii) central, parietal, occipital temporal, and limbic delta/alpha 2 current density; (iii) frontal theta/alpha 1 current density; (iv) occipital delta/alpha 1 inter-hemispherical connectivity; (v) occipital-temporal theta/alpha 1 right and left intra-hemispherical connectivity; and (vi) parietal-limbic alpha 1 right intra-hemispherical connectivity. Occipital delta/alpha 1 current density showed the best classification rate (sensitivity of 73.3%, specificity of 78%, accuracy of 75.5%, and AUROC of 82%). These results suggest that EEG source markers can classify Nold and AD individuals with a moderate classification rate higher than 80%. PMID:26941594

  15. Resting-state frontostriatal functional connectivity in Parkinson's disease-related apathy.

    PubMed

    Baggio, Hugo Cesar; Segura, Brbara; Garrido-Millan, Jose Luis; Marti, Maria-Jos; Compta, Yaroslau; Valldeoriola, Francesc; Tolosa, Eduardo; Junque, Carme

    2015-04-15

    One of the most common neuropsychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) is apathy, affecting between 23% and 70% of patients and thought to be related to frontostriatal dopamine deficits. In the current study, we assessed functional resting-state frontostriatal connectivity and structural changes associated with the presence of apathy in a large sample of PD subjects and healthy controls, while controlling for the presence of comorbid depression and cognitive decline. Thirty-one healthy controls (HC) and 62 age-, sex-, and education-matched PD patients underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Apathy symptoms were evaluated with the Apathy Scale (AS). The 11 Beck Depression Inventory-II items that measure dysphoric mood symptoms as well as relevant neuropsychological scores were used as nuisance factors in connectivity analyses. Voxel-wise analyses of functional connectivity between frontal lobes (limbic, executive, rostral motor, and caudal motor regions), striata (limbic, executive, sensorimotor regions), and thalami were performed. Subcortical volumetry/shape analysis and fronto-subcortical voxel-based morphometry were performed to assess associated structural changes. Twenty-five PD patients were classified as apathetic (AS?>?13). Apathetic PD patients showed functional connectivity reductions compared with HC and with non-apathetic patients, mainly in left-sided circuits, and predominantly involving limbic striatal and frontal territories. Similarly, severity of apathy negatively correlated with connectivity in these circuits. No significant effects were found in structural analyses. Our results indicate that the presence of apathy in PD is associated with functional connectivity reductions in frontostriatal circuits, predominating in the left hemisphere and mainly involving its limbic components. PMID:25600482

  16. Identification of lymphoproliferative disease virus in wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Viral-associated lymphoproliferative neoplasia in domestic poultry is caused by infection with a herpesvirus (Mareks disease virus) or three species of retroviruses [Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), Avian leukosis/sarcoma virus, lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV)]. Previously, retroviral n...

  17. Seven Strains of Enterovirus D68 Detected in the United States during the 2014 Severe Respiratory Disease Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Brown, B. A.; Nix, W. A.; Sheth, M.; Frace, M.

    2014-01-01

    Clusters of severe respiratory disease in the United States were reported to the CDC beginning in August 2014. Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) was identified from 83% (30/36) of initial severe cases. Investigations in August and September found severe EV-D68 cases to be widespread across the United States. We report seven EV-D68 genomes from the outbreak. PMID:25414503

  18. Multiscale entropy analysis of resting-state magnetoencephalogram with tensor factorisations in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Javier; Acar, Evrim; Fernndez, Alberto; Bro, Rasmus

    2015-10-01

    Tensor factorisations have proven useful to model amplitude and spectral information of brain recordings. Here, we assess the usefulness of tensor factorisations in the multiway analysis of other brain signal features in the context of complexity measures recently proposed to inspect multiscale dynamics. We consider the "refined composite multiscale entropy" (rcMSE), which computes entropy "profiles" showing levels of physiological complexity over temporal scales for individual signals. We compute the rcMSE of resting-state magnetoencephalogram (MEG) recordings from 36 patients with Alzheimer's disease and 26 control subjects. Instead of traditional simple visual examinations, we organise the entropy profiles as a three-way tensor to inspect relationships across temporal and spatial scales and subjects with multiway data analysis techniques based on PARAFAC and PARAFAC2 factorisations. A PARAFAC2 model with two factors was appropriate to account for the interactions in the entropy tensor between temporal scales and MEG channels for all subjects. Moreover, the PARAFAC2 factors had information related to the subjects' diagnosis, achieving a cross-validated area under the ROC curve of 0.77. This confirms the suitability of tensor factorisations to represent electrophysiological brain data efficiently despite the unsupervised nature of these techniques. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Neural data analysis'. PMID:25982737

  19. Emotional state affects gait initiation in individuals with Parkinsons disease

    PubMed Central

    Hass, Chris J.; Bowers, Dawn; Janelle, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the impact of manipulating emotional state on gait initiation in persons with Parkinsons disease (PD) and healthy older adults. Following the presentation of pictures that are known to elicit specific emotional responses, participants initiated gait and continued to walk for several steps at their normal pace. Reaction time, the displacement and velocity of the center of pressure (COP) trajectory during the preparatory postural adjustments, and length and velocity of the first two steps were measured. Analysis of the gait initiation measures revealed that exposure to (1) threatening pictures, relative to all other pictures, speeded the initiation of gait for PD patients and healthy older adults; (2) approach-oriented emotional pictures (erotic and happy people), relative to withdrawal-oriented pictures, facilitated the anticipatory postural adjustments of gait initiation for PD patients and healthy older adults, as evidenced by greater displacement and velocity of the COP movement; and (3) emotional pictures modulated gait initiation parameters in PD patients to the same degree as in healthy older adults. Collectively, these findings hold significant implications for understanding the circuitry underlying the manner by which emotions modulate movement and for the development of emotion-based interventions designed to maximize improvements in gait initiation for individuals with PD. PMID:22194236

  20. Does the Cerebrospinal Fluid Reflect Altered Redox State But Not Neurotrophic Support Loss in Parkinson's Disease?

    PubMed

    Martn de Pablos, Angel; Garca-Moreno, Jos-Manuel; Fernndez, Emilio

    2015-10-10

    Alteration in neurotrophic factors support and antioxidant defenses in the central nervous system (CNS) along with deficit of ferritin have been associated with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). The objectives were to analyze in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with PD and controls the following: (i) the levels of the neuroprotectant factors glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, persephin, neurturin, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor, (ii) the levels of transforming growth factor-?1 (TGF?1) and transforming growth factor-?2 (TGF?2), proinflammatory factors, (iii) the activity of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), catalase, superoxide dismutases (SODs), and peroxiredoxins (PRDxs), and (iv) ferritin levels. The study revealed that, among neurotrophic factors, only TGF?1 levels were found to be enhanced in patients with PD (early, p?state in the CNS, as evaluated through the CSF, characterized by reduced hydrogen peroxide scavenging and iron storage. PMID:26263410

  1. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging of resting-state cerebral blood flow in preclinical Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Robert C; Grön, Georg; Sambataro, Fabio; Vasic, Nenad; Wolf, Nadine D; Thomann, Philipp A; Saft, Carsten; Landwehrmeyer, G Bernhard; Orth, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain could be a powerful tool for discovering early biomarkers in clinically presymptomatic carriers of the Huntington's disease gene mutation (preHD). The aim of this study was to investigate the sensitivity of resting-state perfusion MRI in preHD and to identify neural changes, which could serve as biomarkers for future clinical trials. Differences in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in 18 preHD and 18 controls were assessed with a novel MRI method based on perfusion images obtained with continuous arterial spin labeling. High-resolution structural data were collected to test for changes of brain volume. Compared with controls, preHD individuals showed decreased rCBF in medial and lateral prefrontal regions and increased rCBF in the precuneus. PreHD near to symptom onset additionally showed decreased rCBF in the putamen and increased rCBF in the hippocampus. Network analyses revealed an abnormal lateral prefrontal pattern in preHD far and near to motor onset. These data suggest early changes of frontostriatal baseline perfusion in preHD independent of substantial reductions of gray matter volume. This study also shows the feasibility of detecting neural changes in preHD with a robust MRI technique that would be suitable for longitudinal multisite application. PMID:21559028

  2. Parameterizing statespace models for infectious disease dynamics by generalized profiling: measles in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Hooker, Giles; Ellner, Stephen P.; Roditi, Laura De Vargas; Earn, David J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Parameter estimation for infectious disease models is important for basic understanding (e.g. to identify major transmission pathways), for forecasting emerging epidemics, and for designing control measures. Differential equation models are often used, but statistical inference for differential equations suffers from numerical challenges and poor agreement between observational data and deterministic models. Accounting for these departures via stochastic model terms requires full specification of the probabilistic dynamics, and computationally demanding estimation methods. Here, we demonstrate the utility of an alternative approach, generalized profiling, which provides robustness to violations of a deterministic model without needing to specify a complete probabilistic model. We introduce novel means for estimating the robustness parameters and for statistical inference in this framework. The methods are applied to a model for pre-vaccination measles incidence in Ontario, and we demonstrate the statistical validity of our inference through extensive simulation. The results confirm that school term versus summer drives seasonality of transmission, but we find no effects of short school breaks and the estimated basic reproductive ratio ?0 greatly exceeds previous estimates. The approach applies naturally to any system for which candidate differential equations are available, and avoids many challenges that have limited Monte Carlo inference for statespace models. PMID:21084339

  3. Parameterizing state-space models for infectious disease dynamics by generalized profiling: measles in Ontario.

    PubMed

    Hooker, Giles; Ellner, Stephen P; Roditi, Laura De Vargas; Earn, David J D

    2011-07-01

    Parameter estimation for infectious disease models is important for basic understanding (e.g. to identify major transmission pathways), for forecasting emerging epidemics, and for designing control measures. Differential equation models are often used, but statistical inference for differential equations suffers from numerical challenges and poor agreement between observational data and deterministic models. Accounting for these departures via stochastic model terms requires full specification of the probabilistic dynamics, and computationally demanding estimation methods. Here, we demonstrate the utility of an alternative approach, generalized profiling, which provides robustness to violations of a deterministic model without needing to specify a complete probabilistic model. We introduce novel means for estimating the robustness parameters and for statistical inference in this framework. The methods are applied to a model for pre-vaccination measles incidence in Ontario, and we demonstrate the statistical validity of our inference through extensive simulation. The results confirm that school term versus summer drives seasonality of transmission, but we find no effects of short school breaks and the estimated basic reproductive ratio (0) greatly exceeds previous estimates. The approach applies naturally to any system for which candidate differential equations are available, and avoids many challenges that have limited Monte Carlo inference for state-space models. PMID:21084339

  4. Alzheimer's disease: insights from Drosophila melanogaster models

    PubMed Central

    Moloney, Aileen; Sattelle, David B.; Lomas, David A.; Crowther, Damian C.

    2010-01-01

    The power of fruit fly genetics is being deployed against some of the most intractable and economically significant problems in modern medicine, the neurodegenerative diseases. Fly models of Alzheimer's disease can be exposed to the rich diversity of biological techniques that are available to the community and are providing new insights into disease mechanisms, and assisting in the identification of novel targets for therapy. Similar approaches might also help us to interpret the results of genome-wide association studies of human neurodegenerative diseases by allowing us to triage gene hits according to whether a candidate risk factor gene has a modifying effect on the disease phenotypes in fly model systems. PMID:20036556

  5. Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Chronic Diseases of Youths and Access to Health Care in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Price, James H.; Braun, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Racial/ethnic minorities are 1.5 to 2.0 times more likely than whites to have most of the major chronic diseases. Chronic diseases are also more common in the poor than the nonpoor and this association is frequently mediated by race/ethnicity. Specifically, children are disproportionately affected by racial/ethnic health disparities. Between 1960 and 2005 the percentage of children with a chronic disease in the United States almost quadrupled with racial/ethnic minority youth having higher likelihood for these diseases. The most common major chronic diseases of youth in the United States are asthma, diabetes mellitus, obesity, hypertension, dental disease, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, mental illness, cancers, sickle-cell anemia, cystic fibrosis, and a variety of genetic and other birth defects. This review will focus on the psychosocial rather than biological factors that play important roles in the etiology and subsequent solutions to these health disparities because they should be avoidable and they are inherently unjust. Finally, this review examines access to health services by focusing on health insurance and dental insurance coverage and access to school health services. PMID:24175301

  6. Virulent Newcastle disease viruses isolated from cormorant and gull species in the states of the Atlantic Flyway in 2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Newcastle disease viruses (NDV) have been the causative agent for die-offs of juvenile double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) in the northern border-states focused around the Great Lakes of the U.S. in years past. However, the most recent die-off has included not only great cormorants (P...

  7. 76 FR 15211 - Changes in Disease Status of the Brazilian State of Santa Catarina With Regard to Certain...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-21

    ... Federal Register on November 16, 2010 (75 FR 69851-69857, Docket No. APHIS-2009-0034), with an effective... / Monday, March 21, 2011 / Rules and Regulations#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 94 RIN 0579-AD12 Changes in Disease Status of the Brazilian State of...

  8. Surveillance for Waterborne Disease Outbreaks and Other Health Events Associated with Recreational Water -United States, 2007-2008*

    EPA Science Inventory

    Problem/Condition: Since 1978, CDC, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists have collaborated on the Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System (WBDOSS) for collecting and reporting data on occurrences and causes...

  9. First report of zebra chip disease and Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum on potatoes in Oregon and Washington State

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In August of 2011, potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers grown in the lower Columbia Basin of southern Washington State and northern Oregon were observed with internal discolorations suggestive of the zebra chip disease (ZC). Symptoms included brown spots, streaks, and stripes in and near the vascular ...

  10. A novel cognitive-neurophysiological state biomarker in premanifest Huntington's disease validated on longitudinal data

    PubMed Central

    Beste, Christian; Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Ness, Vanessa; Hoffmann, Rainer; Lukas, Carsten; Saft, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    In several neurodegenerative diseases, like Huntington's disease (HD), treatments are still lacking. To determine whether a treatment is effective, sensitive disease progression biomarkers are especially needed for the premanifest phase, since this allows the evaluation of neuroprotective treatments preventing, or delaying disease manifestation. On the basis of a longitudinal study we present a biomarker that was derived by integrating behavioural and neurophysiological data reflecting cognitive processes of action control. The measure identified is sensitive enough to track disease progression over a period of only 6 month. Changes tracked were predictive for a number of clinically relevant parameters and the sensitivity of the measure was higher than that of currently used parameters to track prodromal disease progression. The study provides a biomarker, which could change practice of progression diagnostics in a major basal ganglia disease and which may help to evaluate potential neuroprotective treatments in future clinical trials. PMID:23652721

  11. Gene suppression strategies for dominantly inherited neurodegenerative diseases: lessons from Huntington's disease and spinocerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Keiser, Megan S; Kordasiewicz, Holly B; McBride, Jodi L

    2016-04-15

    RNA-targeting approaches are emerging as viable therapeutics that offer an alternative method to modulate traditionally 'undrugable' targets. In the case of dominantly inherited neurodegenerative diseases, gene suppression strategies can target the underlying cause of these intractable disorders. Polyglutamine diseases are caused by CAG expansions in discrete genes, making them ideal candidates for gene suppression therapies. Here, we discuss the current state of gene suppression approaches for Huntington's disease and the spinocerebellar ataxias, including the use of antisense oligonucleotides, short-interfering RNAs, as well as viral vector-mediated delivery of short hairpin RNAs and artificial microRNAs. We focus on lessons learned from preclinical studies investigating gene suppression therapies for these disorders, particularly in rodent models of disease and in non-human primates. In animal models, recent advances in gene suppression technologies have not only prevented disease progression in a number of cases, but have also reversed existing disease, providing evidence that reducing the expression of disease-causing genes may be of benefit in symptomatic patients. Both allele- and non-allele-specific approaches to gene suppression have made great strides over the past decade, showing efficacy and safety in both small and large animal models. Advances in delivery techniques allow for broad and durable suppression of target genes, have been validated in non-human primates and in some cases, are currently being evaluated in human patients. Finally, we discuss the challenges of developing and delivering gene suppression constructs into the CNS and recent advances of potential therapeutics into the clinic. PMID:26503961

  12. Invasive Pneumococcal Disease Among Children With and Without Sickle Cell Disease in the United States, 1998 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Amanda B.; Link-Gelles, Ruth; Azonobi, Ijeoma; Hooper, W. Craig; Beall, Bernard W.; Jorgensen, James H.; Juni, Billie; Moore, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Background Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) are at increased risk of illness and death from invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). The introduction in 2000 of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) and penicillin prophylaxis for children with SCD has greatly reduced the incidence of IPD in this population. However, a recent report suggested an increase in cases of IPD in children with SCD. Methods Using data from Active Bacterial Core surveillance (ABCs), we analyzed trends in hospitalizations, mortality, and serotype among children with SCD compared with other children. We used neonatal screening data to estimate SCD population denominators for each ABCs site. Results From 19982009, 3,069 cases of IPD occurred among African-American children less than 18 years of age in the ABCs catchment area. Of these, 127 (4.1%) had SCD identified by medical chart review and 185 (6.0%) had one or more IPD risk factors, excluding SCD. Rates of IPD among children with SCD declined by 53% (1,118 versus 530 per 100,000) while the overall rates among African-American children declined by 74% (54 to 14 per 100,000). For all time periods, children with SCD and IPD were more likely to be hospitalized (84%92% versus 31%56%) and more likely to die (6%17% versus 1%2%) than children with no risk factors. Conclusions While the rate of IPD in children with SCD has dropped dramatically since PCV7 introduction, the rate of IPD in children with SCD remains higher than that of the general population of African-American children, pointing to the need for more effective prevention efforts to prevent IPD in children with SCD. PMID:23811745

  13. An assessment of non-communicable diseases, diabetes, and related risk factors in the Federated States of Micronesia, State of Chuuk: a systems perspective.

    PubMed

    Ichiho, Henry M; Shomour, Moria; Marar, Julio; Lippwe, Kipier; Aitaoto, Nia

    2013-05-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) have been identified as a health emergency in the US-affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI).1 This assessment, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was conducted in the Federated States of Micronesia, State of Chuuk and describes the burdens due to selected NCDs (diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, stroke, chronic kidney disease); and assesses the system of service capacity and current activities for service delivery, data collection and reporting as well as identifying the issues that need to be addressed. There has been a 9.2% decline in the total population between 2000 and 2010. Findings of medical and health data reveal that diabetes, myocardial infarction, and septicemia are the leading causes of death and lower limb surgical procedures and amputations was a major problem that was addressed with a foot care education program to prevent amputations. No data were available on the prevalence of diabetes among the population of Chuuk. Other findings show significant gaps in the system of administrative, clinical, data, and support services to address these NCDs. There is a lack of policy and procedure manuals, coordination among providers, and common standards of care. There is no functional data system to identify and track patients with diabetes and other chronic diseases. Priority issues and problems were identified for the clinical, administrative, and data systems. PMID:23901365

  14. An Assessment of Non-Communicable Diseases, Diabetes, and Related Risk Factors in the Federated States of Micronesia, State of Chuuk: A Systems Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Shomour, Moria; Marar, Julio; Lippwe, Kipier; Aitaoto, Nia

    2013-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) have been identified as a health emergency in the US-affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI).1 This assessment, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was conducted in the Federated States of Micronesia, State of Chuuk and describes the burdens due to selected NCDs (diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, stroke, chronic kidney disease); and assesses the system of service capacity and current activities for service delivery, data collection and reporting as well as identifying the issues that need to be addressed. There has been a 9.2% decline in the total population between 2000 and 2010. Findings of medical and health data reveal that diabetes, myocardial infarction, and septicemia are the leading causes of death and lower limb surgical procedures and amputations was a major problem that was addressed with a foot care education program to prevent amputations. No data were available on the prevalence of diabetes among the population of Chuuk. Other findings show significant gaps in the system of administrative, clinical, data, and support services to address these NCDs. There is a lack of policy and procedure manuals, coordination among providers, and common standards of care. There is no functional data system to identify and track patients with diabetes and other chronic diseases. Priority issues and problems were identified for the clinical, administrative, and data systems. PMID:23901365

  15. The Impact of Movements and Animal Density on Continental Scale Cattle Disease Outbreaks in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Buhnerkempe, Michael G.; Tildesley, Michael J.; Lindström, Tom; Grear, Daniel A.; Portacci, Katie; Miller, Ryan S.; Lombard, Jason E.; Werkman, Marleen; Keeling, Matt J.; Wennergren, Uno; Webb, Colleen T.

    2014-01-01

    Globalization has increased the potential for the introduction and spread of novel pathogens over large spatial scales necessitating continental-scale disease models to guide emergency preparedness. Livestock disease spread models, such as those for the 2001 foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) epidemic in the United Kingdom, represent some of the best case studies of large-scale disease spread. However, generalization of these models to explore disease outcomes in other systems, such as the United States’s cattle industry, has been hampered by differences in system size and complexity and the absence of suitable livestock movement data. Here, a unique database of US cattle shipments allows estimation of synthetic movement networks that inform a near-continental scale disease model of a potential FMD-like (i.e., rapidly spreading) epidemic in US cattle. The largest epidemics may affect over one-third of the US and 120,000 cattle premises, but cattle movement restrictions from infected counties, as opposed to national movement moratoriums, are found to effectively contain outbreaks. Slow detection or weak compliance may necessitate more severe state-level bans for similar control. Such results highlight the role of large-scale disease models in emergency preparedness, particularly for systems lacking comprehensive movement and outbreak data, and the need to rapidly implement multi-scale contingency plans during a potential US outbreak. PMID:24670977

  16. Recommendations for the use of eliglustat in the treatment of adults with Gaucher disease type 1 in the United States.

    PubMed

    Balwani, Manisha; Burrow, Thomas Andrew; Charrow, Joel; Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Kaplan, Paige; Kishnani, Priya S; Mistry, Pramod; Ruskin, Jeremy; Weinreb, Neal

    2016-02-01

    In Gaucher disease, deficient activity of acid β-glucosidase results in accumulation of its substrates, glucosylceramide and glucosylsphingosine, within the lysosomes of cells primarily in the spleen, liver, bone marrow, and occasionally the lung. The multisystem disease is predominantly characterized by hepatosplenomegaly, anemia, thrombocytopenia, and skeletal disease. Enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human acid β-glucosidase has been the first-line therapy for Gaucher disease type 1 for more than two decades. Eliglustat, a novel oral substrate reduction therapy, was recently approved in the United States and the European Union as a first-line treatment for adults with Gaucher disease type 1. Eliglustat inhibits glucosylceramide synthase, thereby decreasing production of the substrate glucosylceramide and reducing its accumulation. Although existing recommendations for the care of patients with Gaucher disease remain in effect, unique characteristics of eliglustat require additional investigation and monitoring. A panel of physicians with expertise in Gaucher disease and experience with eliglustat in the clinical trials provide guidance regarding the use of eliglustat, including considerations before starting therapy and monitoring of patients on eliglustat therapy. PMID:26387627

  17. Impairments and Hansen's disease control in Rondônia state, Amazon region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    De Oliveira, Carmelita Ribeira; De Alencar, Maria De Jesus Freitas; De Sena Neto, Sebastiao Alves; Lehman, Linda F; Schreuder, Pieter A M

    2003-12-01

    This retrospective study of impairments in a decentralized and integrated, routine Hansen's disease (HD) programme was done on a cohort of all new patients detected in Rondônia state from 1996 to 1999. It shows that the dynamics of impairments during treatment in Rondônia are similar to what has been published in other recent studies from Africa and Asia. Data about impairments at detection and at release from treatment (cure), the prescription of steroids, and epidemiological information are provided. Of the original 5350 new patients, 4230 patients (80%) completed multidrug therapy (MDT) and had complete data about their impairment status. At the start of treatment, 9% of the paucibacillary (PB) and 26% of the multibacillary (MB) patients had WHO grade 1 impairment. Three percent of the PB and 11% of the MB patients had visible deformities (WHO grade 2 impairment). Of the patients without impairments (grade 0) at the start of treatment, 5% of the PB and 20% of the MB patients developed impairments during treatment. Of the PB patients with a WHO impairment grade 1 at start of treatment, 34% improved and 6% got worse. Of the MB patients 34% improved and 12% became worse. In a separate study of patients from the 1997 intake, 17% of the PB and 58% of the MB patients were treated at least once with a course of steroids or thalidomide during MDT treatment. It is noted in the literature that the percentage of persons with recent nerve function impairment (NFI), nerve pain or tenderness and/or reaction reactions differs between projects. This may reflect real differences or may be caused by differences in routine monitoring and/or criteria and methods of treatment. The use of the WHO maximum score, particularly for the patients with grade 2, is not as sensitive to change as utilizing the summary of Eye, Hand and Foot (EHF) scores. If overall impairment figures are given, the proportions of MB patients may define the differences between projects, therefore it is important to analysis and present the results of PB and MB patients separately. The most simple (outcome) indicator to estimate the effectiveness of patient management would be the proportions of patients with impairment grade 0 at start of treatment who develop either grade 1 or 2 impairments during treatment. An additional (outcome) indicator could be the proportion of patients with impairment grade 1 at start of treatment who develop grade 2 impairments during treatment. Currently, no operational targets or acceptable level of performance for patient management have been set. This would be important to enable programme managers to determine if adequate patient education, treatment and follow up have been provided after the disease detection to prevent and/or minimize problems associated with the disease. The available evidence strongly suggests that reactions and impairments related to HD will continue to occur in large numbers, requiring the development of adequate infrastructures and sustainable services to detect and to manage problems associated with HD during and after MDT treatment. PMID:14750579

  18. Status of Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke in Hispanics/Latinos in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Carlos J.; Allison, Matthew; Daviglus, Martha L.; Isasi, Carmen R.; Keller, Colleen; Leira, Enrique C.; Palaniappan, Latha; Piña, Ileana L.; Ramirez, Sarah M.; Rodriguez, Beatriz; Sims, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose This American Heart Association (AHA) scientific statement provides a comprehensive overview of current evidence on the burden cardiovascular disease (CVD) among Hispanics in the United States. Hispanics are the largest minority ethnic group in the United States, and their health is vital to the public health of the nation and to achieving the AHA’s 2020 goals. This statement describes the CVD epidemiology and related personal beliefs and the social and health issues of US Hispanics, and it identifies potential prevention and treatment opportunities. The intended audience for this statement includes healthcare professionals, researchers, and policy makers. Methods Writing group members were nominated by the AHA’s Manuscript Oversight Committee and represent a broad range of expertise in relation to Hispanic individuals and CVD. The writers used a general framework outlined by the committee chair to produce a comprehensive literature review that summarizes existing evidence, indicate gaps in current knowledge, and formulate recommendations. Only English-language studies were reviewed, with PubMed/MEDLINE as our primary resource, as well as the Cochrane Library Reviews, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the US Census data as secondary resources. Inductive methods and descriptive studies that focused on CVD outcomes incidence, prevalence, treatment response, and risks were included. Because of the wide scope of these topics, members of the writing committee were responsible for drafting individual sections selected by the chair of the writing committee, and the group chair assembled the complete statement. The conclusions of this statement are the views of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official view of the AHA. All members of the writing group had the opportunity to comment on the initial drafts and approved the final version of this document. The manuscript underwent extensive AHA internal peer review before consideration and approval by the AHA Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee. Results This statement documents the status of knowledge regarding CVD among Hispanics and the sociocultural issues that impact all subgroups of Hispanics with regard to cardiovascular health. In this review, whenever possible, we identify the specific Hispanic subgroups examined to avoid generalizations. We identify specific areas for which current evidence was less robust, as well as inconsistencies and evidence gaps that inform the need for further rigorous and interdisciplinary approaches to increase our understanding of the US Hispanic population and its potential impact on the public health and cardiovascular health of the total US population. We provide recommendations specific to the 9 domains outlined by the chair to support the development of these culturally tailored and targeted approaches. Conclusions Healthcare professionals and researchers need to consider the impact of culture and ethnicity on health behavior and ultimately health outcomes. There is a need to tailor and develop culturally relevant strategies to engage Hispanics in cardiovascular health promotion and cultivate a larger workforce of healthcare providers, researchers, and allies with the focused goal of improving cardiovascular health and reducing CVD among the US Hispanic population. PMID:25098323

  19. Epidemiology of foot and mouth disease in Karnataka state, India: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Raveendra; Gomes, Amitha R; Giridhar, P; Kowalli, Srikanth; Shivashankar, B P; Sudharshana, K J; Nagaraj, K; Sesharao, R; Mallinath, K C; Shankar, B P; Nagaraj, D; Seema, C M; Khan, Tanveer Ahmed; Nagaraj, G V; Srikala, K; Dharanesh, N K; Venkatesha, M D; Renukaprasad, C

    2014-12-01

    A retrospective study on the epidemiology of foot and- mouth disease (FMD) in Karnataka, India between the years 1977 and 2012-13 based on the data collected through passive and active surveillance was undertaken. A total of 11,159 outbreaks with 0.271 million cases of FMD were recorded from 30 different revenue districts of Karnataka. There was a significant difference between the years for the annual incidence of FMD (P=<0.001, F=19.10) and also between the months (P=<0.001, F=4.22). Cattle and buffaloes were the predominant species affected being involved in all of the outbreaks reported. A significant correlation was observed between livestock density and the number of outbreaks reported (r=0.70, p<0.02), and number of cases (r=0.76, p<0.01) for all the agro-climatic zones. The Central dry zone (n=2257, 19.89%) reported the highest number of outbreaks followed by the Northern dry zone (n=1881, 16.58%) and the Southern transition zone (n=1761, 15.52%), and attack rates were concentrated in the North/Northeastern/Central dry and transition zones. A large majority of the outbreaks were caused by serotype O (64.04%), followed by Asia 1 (19.87%) and A (12.27%). Serotype C was not reported since 1993 in the state. In recent years, serotype O has dominated (82.59%), with the rest of the outbreaks being almost equally caused by A (9.01%) and Asia 1 (8.40%). The study highlights the significance of the O serotype and cattle as the main indicator species in the epidemiology of FMD in Karnataka, India. The findings from this study can be used as baseline epidemiological data for further research to identify endemic and epidemic areas for the development of a sustainable programme for the progressive control of FMD in the state of Karnataka as well as other endemic settings. PMID:25674631

  20. Detection and molecular characterization of Newcastle disease virus in peafowl (Pavo cristatus) in Haryana State, India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Aman; Maan, Sushila; Mahajan, Nand Kishore; Rana, Virender Pratap; Jindal, Naresh; Batra, Kanisht; Ghosh, Arnab; Mishra, Shiv Kumar; Kapoor, Sanjay; Maan, Narender Singh

    2013-12-01

    Present study was undertaken to investigate the cause of deaths of peafowls in Haryana State. In total, 145 birds were sick and 28 birds were reported dead during July to September 2012. Some of the sick birds were showing signs of shaking of heads, torticollis and paresis. Blood and cloacal swab samples from sick birds along with brain and intestinal tissues from dead birds were collected for further investigation. Although post-mortem examination showed no typical lesions of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) yet raised HI tires against NDV in some serum samples and clinical signs indicated the presence of NDV. One of the brain tissues (NDV/IND2012/01) from the field case was processed and adapted to Vero cell line for virus isolation. The fusion (F) gene based nested RT-PCR (RT-nPCR) confirmed the presence of NDV in all field samples and cell culture isolate. Sequencing of the partial F gene amplicons (216bp) using the PCR primers as sequencing primers confirmed the PCR results. The deduced amino acid sequences of partial F gene were found to have the amino acid motif (111)GRRQKR/F(117) in the fusion protein cleavage site (FPCS). This amino acid motif is indicative of the velogenic nature of these NDVs. Phylogenetic studies have shown that the virus belonged to class II genotype VII very closely related to virus isolates originated from outbreaks in Western Europe, Israel, Indonesia, Taiwan and India. Phylogenetic grouping of the virus and sequence of FPCS is indicative of pathogenic potential of virus strain circulating in peacocks in Haryana. PMID:24426301

  1. Altered Resting-State Brain Activity and Connectivity in Depressed Parkinsons Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Erfeng; Liu, Jiajia; Yuan, Yonggui; Liu, Weiguo; Liu, Yijun

    2015-01-01

    Depressive symptoms are common in Parkinsons disease (PD), but the neurophysiological mechanisms of depression in PD are poorly understood. The current study attempted to examine disrupted spontaneous local brain activities and functional connectivities that underlie the depression in PD. We recruited a total of 20 depressed PD patients (DPD), 40 non-depressed PD patients (NDPD) and 43 matched healthy controls (HC). All the subjects underwent neuropsychological tests and resting-state fMRI scanning. The between-group differences in the amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF) of BOLD signals were examined using post-hoc tests after the analysis of covariance. Compared with the NDPD and HC, the DPD group showed significantly increased ALFF in the left median cingulated cortex (MCC). The functional connectivity (FC) between left MCC and all the other voxels in the brain were then calculated. Compared with the HC and NDPD group, the DPD patients showed stronger FC between the left MCC and some of the major nodes of the default mode network (DMN), including the post cingulated cortex/precuneus, medial prefrontal cortex, inferior frontal gyrus, and cerebellum. Correlation analysis revealed that both the ALFF values in the left MCC and the FC between the left MCC and the nodes of DMN were significantly correlated with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score. Moreover, higher local activities in the left MCC were associated with increased functional connections between the MCC and the nodes of DMN in PD. These abnormal activities and connectivities of the limbic-cortical circuit may indicate impaired high-order cortical control or uncontrol of negative mood in DPD, which suggested a possible neural mechanism of the depression in PD. PMID:26147571

  2. Cognitive impairment and resting-state network connectivity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Baggio, Hugo-Cesar; Segura, Brbara; Sala-Llonch, Roser; Marti, Maria-Jos; Valldeoriola, Francesc; Compta, Yaroslau; Tolosa, Eduardo; Junqu, Carme

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate changes in the connectivity patterns of a set of cognitively relevant, dynamically interrelated brain networks in association with cognitive deficits in Parkinson's disease (PD) using resting-state functional MRI. Sixty-five nondemented PD patients and 36 matched healthy controls were included. Thirty-four percent of PD patients were classified as having mild cognitive impairment (MCI) based on performance in attention/executive, visuospatial/visuoperceptual (VS/VP) and memory functions. A data-driven approach using independent component analysis (ICA) was used to identify the default-mode network (DMN), the dorsal attention network (DAN) and the bilateral frontoparietal networks (FPN), which were compared between groups using a dual-regression approach controlling for gray matter atrophy. Additional seed-based analyses using a priori defined regions of interest were used to characterize local changes in intranetwork and internetwork connectivity. Structural group comparisons through voxel-based morphometry and cortical thickness were additionally performed to assess associated gray matter atrophy. ICA results revealed reduced connectivity between the DAN and right frontoinsular regions in MCI patients, associated with worse performance in attention/executive functions. The DMN displayed increased connectivity with medial and lateral occipito-parietal regions in MCI patients, associated with worse VS/VP performance, and with occipital reductions in cortical thickness. In line with data-driven results, seed-based analyses mainly revealed reduced within-DAN, within-DMN and DAN-FPN connectivity, as well as loss of normal DAN-DMN anticorrelation in MCI patients. Our findings demonstrate differential connectivity changes affecting the networks evaluated, which we hypothesize to be related to the pathophysiological bases of different types of cognitive impairment in PD. PMID:25164875

  3. Severe Clostridium difficile-associated disease in populations previously at low risk--four states, 2005.

    PubMed

    2005-12-01

    Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming, gram-positive bacillus that produces exotoxins that are pathogenic to humans. C. difficile-associated disease (CDAD) ranges in severity from mild diarrhea to fulminant colitis and death. Antimicrobial use is the primary risk factor for development of CDAD because it disrupts normal bowel flora and promotes C. difficile overgrowth. C. difficile typically has affected older or severely ill patients who are hospital inpatients or residents of long-term-care facilities. Recently, however, both the frequency and severity of health-care-associated CDAD has increased; from 2000 to 2001, the rate of U.S. hospital discharge diagnoses of CDAD increased by 26%. One possible explanation for these increases is the emergence of a previously uncommon strain of C. difficile responsible for severe hospital outbreaks. Although individual cases of CDAD are not nationally reportable, in 2005, the Pennsylvania Department of Health (PADOH) and CDC received several case reports of serious CDAD in otherwise healthy patients with minimal or no exposure to a health-care setting. An investigation was initiated by the Philadelphia Department of Public Health (PDPH), PADOH, and CDC to determine the scope of the problem and explore a possible change in CDAD epidemiology. This report summarizes the results of the investigation in Pennsylvania and three other states, which indicated the presence of severe CDAD in healthy persons living in the community and peripartum women, two populations previously thought to be at low risk. The findings underscore the importance of judicious antimicrobial use, the need for community clinicians to maintain a higher index of suspicion for CDAD, and the need for surveillance to better understand the changing epidemiology of CDAD. PMID:16319813

  4. Regional Disparities in Mortality after Ischemic Heart Disease in a Brazilian State from 2006 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Luciano; Zanini, Vanessa; Batilana, Adelia Portero; de Carvalho, Elias Cesar Araujo; Pietrobon, Ricardo; Nihei, Oscar Kenji; de Barros Carvalho, Maria Dalva

    2013-01-01

    Background High technology in the field of interventional cardiology applied in tertiary hospitals has brought enormous benefits in the treatment of ischemic heart disease (IHD). However, IHD mortality rates remain high. We analyzed the relationship between IHD mortality rate and the socioeconomic, demographic, and geographic conditions in 399 cities in Parana state, Brazil, from 2006 to 2010. Methods and Results Data were obtained from the Mortality Information System and the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics and evaluated through Exploratory Spatial Data Analysis. GeoDa was used to analyze 29.351 deaths across 399 cities. We found a positive spatial autocorrelation regarding IHD mortality (I?=?0.5913, p?=?0.001). There was a significant positive association between each of three socioeconomic and demographic indicators and IHD mortality rate: Population Elderly Index (I?=?0.3436), Illiteracy Rate (I?=?0.1873) and City Development Index (I?=?0.0900). In addition, two indicators presented significant negative association with IHD mortality rate: Adjusted Population Size (I?=??0.1216) and Gross Domestic Product (I?=??0.0864). We also found a positive association between IHD mortality rates and the geographic distances between patients city of residence and their corresponding regional referral centers in interventional cardiology (I?=?0.3368). Cities located within Regional Health Units with Reference Interventional Cardiology Center presented a significantly lower average specific mortality rate by IHD. The high mortality rate by IHD within the Regional Health Units was not restricted to socioeconomic and demographic variables, but dependent on the distance between each city and their reference interventional cardiology center. Conclusions We conclude that geographic factors play a significant role in IHD mortality within cities. These findings have important policy implications regarding the geographic distribution of cardiac health care networks in Latin America and in other emerging countries. PMID:23527174

  5. A simplified approach for evaluating multiple test outcomes and multiple disease states in relation to the exercise thallium-201 stress test in suspected coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, S.G.; Watson, D.D.; Gibson, R.S.; Beller, G.A.; Kaul, S. )

    1989-09-01

    This study describes a simplified approach for the interpretation of electrocardiographic and thallium-201 imaging data derived from the same patient during exercise. The 383 patients in this study had also undergone selective coronary arteriography within 3 months of the exercise test. This matrix approach allows for multiple test outcomes (both tests positive, both negative, 1 test positive and 1 negative) and multiple disease states (no coronary artery disease vs 1-vessel vs multivessel coronary artery disease). Because this approach analyzes the results of 2 test outcomes simultaneously rather than serially, it also negates the lack of test independence, if such an effect is present. It is also demonstrated that ST-segment depression on the electrocardiogram and defects on initial thallium-201 images provide conditionally independent information regarding the presence of coronary artery disease in patients without prior myocardial infarction. In contrast, ST-segment depression on the electrocardiogram and redistribution on the delayed thallium-201 images may not provide totally independent information regarding the presence of exercise-induced ischemia in patients with or without myocardial infarction.

  6. The Role of Resting State Networks in Focal Neocortical Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Bandt, S. Kathleen; Bundy, David T.; Hawasli, Ammar H.; Ayoub, Kareem W.; Sharma, Mohit; Hacker, Carl D.; Pahwa, Mrinal; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The role of resting state functional networks in epilepsy is incompletely understood. While some pathologic diagnoses have been shown to have maintained but altered resting state connectivity, others have implicated resting state connectivity in disease progression. However little is known about how these resting state networks influence the behavior of a focal neocortical seizure. Methods Using data taken from invasively monitored patients with intractable focal neocortical epilepsy, we evaluated network connectivity (as determined by oscillatory covariance of the slow cortical potential (<0.5 Hz)) as it relates to neocortical seizure foci both in the interictal and ictal states. Results Similar to what has been shown in the past for sleep and anesthesia, electophysiologic resting state networks that are defined by this slow cortical potential covariance maintain their topographic correlation structure throughout an ictal event. Moreover, in the context of focal epilepsy in which the seizure has a specific site of onset, seizure propagation is not chaotic or random. Rather, the seizure (reflected by an elevation of high frequency power) preferentially propagates along the network that contains the seizure onset zone. Significance Taken together, these findings further undergird the fundamental role of resting state networks, provide novel insights into the network-influenced behavior of seizures, and potentially identify additional targets for surgical disconnection including informing the location for the completion of multiple subpial transections (MSPTs). PMID:25247680

  7. [Intractable renal and enteral loss of potassium in a case of Turner's syndrome (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kopsa, H; Schmidt, P; Zazgornik, J; Henning, K; Altrichter, H; Trk, H; Ferenci, P

    1978-12-01

    A case of Turner's syndrome is presented; many congenital defects were detected. Predominant clinical findings were cheilognatoschisis, respiratory distress, caused by congenital bronchiektasis and chronic hypokalemia with paroxysmal attacks of paralysis and tetania. Hypokalemia was mainly due to gastrointestinal losses as a consequence of permanent vomiting in the presence of stomach atonia and hiatus insufficiency or because of "third space losses", while a subileus persisted chronically. Furthermore also a renal loss of serum potassium was evident in the patient's predialytic time. Basic renal diseases were pyelonephritis, renal damage from phenacetine abuse, or probably even a nephropathy due to potassium depletion. Uraemia was controlled by dialysis treatment and by a dialysate consisting of 7 and 6 mmol/l potassium respectively. The result of this intense therapy was physical rehabilitation and the patient finally could resume her professional work again. PMID:723752

  8. Disease classification: measuring the effect of the Tenth Revision of the International Classification of Diseases on cause-of-death data in the United States.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Robert N; Rosenberg, Harry M

    2003-05-15

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the statistical impact of the Tenth Revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) on cause-of-death data for the United States. ICD-10 was implemented in the U.S. effective with deaths occurring in 1999. The paper is based on cause-of-death information from a large sample of 1996 death certificates filed in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Cause-of-death information in the sample includes underlying cause of death classified by both ICD-9 and ICD-10. Preliminary comparability ratios by cause of death presented in this paper indicate the extent of discontinuities in cause-of-death trends from 1998 to 1999 resulting from implementing ICD-10. For some leading causes (for example, septicaemia, influenza and pneumonia, Alzheimer's disease, and nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and nephrosis) the discontinuity in trend is substantial. Results of this study, although preliminary, are essential to analysing trends in mortality statistics between ICD-9 and ICD-10. In particular, the results provide a means for interpreting changes between 1998, which is the last year in which ICD-9 was used, and 1999, the year in which ICD-10 was implemented for mortality in the United States. Published in 2003 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:12704615

  9. Software for generating liability distributions for pedigrees conditional on their observed disease states and covariates.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Desmond D; Sham, Pak C; Knight, Jo; Wickham, Harvey; Landau, Sabine

    2010-02-01

    For many multifactorial diseases, aetiology is poorly understood. A major research aim is the identification of disease predictors (environmental, biological, and genetic markers). In order to achieve this, a two-stage approach is proposed. The initial or synthesis stage combines observed pedigree data with previous genetic epidemiological research findings, to produce estimates of pedigree members' disease risk and predictions of their disease liability. A further analysis stage uses the latter as inputs to look for associations with potential disease markers. The incorporation of previous research findings into an analysis should lead to power gains. It also allows separate predictions for environmental and genetic liabilities to be generated. This should increase power for detecting disease predictors that are environmental or genetic in nature. Finally, the approach brings pragmatic benefits in terms of data reduction and synthesis, improving comprehensibility, and facilitating the use of existing statistical genetics tools. In this article we present a statistical model and Gibbs sampling approach to generate liability predictions for multifactorial disease for the synthesis stage. We have implemented the approach in a software program. We apply this program to a specimen disease pedigree, and discuss the results produced, comparing its results with those generated under a more naïve model. We also detail simulation studies that validate the software's operation. PMID:19771574

  10. Monitoring the Spread of Swine Enteric Coronavirus Diseases in the United States in the Absence of a Regulatory Framework

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Andres M.; Alba, Anna; Goede, Dane; McCluskey, Brian; Morrison, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The reporting and monitoring of swine enteric coronavirus diseases (SECD), including porcine epidemic diarrhea virus and porcine delta coronavirus, in the United States have been challenging because of the initial absence of a regulatory framework and the emerging nature of these diseases. The National Animal Health Laboratory Network, the Emergency Management and Response System, and the Swine Health Monitoring Project were used to monitor the disease situation between May 2013 and March 2015. Important differences existed between and among them in terms of nature and extent of reporting. Here, we assess the implementation of these systems from different perspectives, including a description and comparison of collected data, disease metrics, usefulness, simplicity, flexibility, acceptability, representativeness, timeliness, and stability. This assessment demonstrates the limitations that the absence of premises identification imposes on certain animal health surveillance and response databases, and the importance of federally regulated frameworks in collecting accurate information in a timely manner. This study also demonstrates the value that the voluntary and producer-organized systems may have in monitoring emerging diseases. The results from all three data sources help to establish the baseline information on SECD epidemiological dynamics after almost 3 years of disease occurrence in the country. PMID:27014703

  11. Addressing emerging infectious disease threats: a prevention strategy for the United States. Executive summary.

    PubMed

    1994-04-15

    The spectrum of infectious disease is changing rapidly in conjunction with dramatic societal and environmental changes. Worldwide, explosive population growth with expanding poverty and urban migration is occurring; international travel and commerce are increasing; and technology is rapidly changing-all of which affect the risk of exposure to infectious agents. Recent examples of important emerging infectious diseases include prolonged diarrheal illness due to waterborne cryptosporidium, hemorrhagic colitis and renal failure from foodborne Escherichia coli O157:H7, pneumonia and middle-ear infections caused by drug-resistant pneumococci, and rodentborne hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. These diseases as well as resurgent diseases (e.g., tuberculosis and cholera) illustrate human vulnerability to microorganisms in the environment. Three recent reports by the Institute of Medicine document the need to address emerging infectious disease threats. In partnership with representatives from health departments, other federal agencies, medical and public health professional associations, and international organizations, CDC has developed a strategic plan to address emerging infectious disease threats. The plain contains four goals that emphasize surveillance, applied research, prevention and control, and public health infrastructure. To ensure sustainability, plan implementation will be approached in stages, as a long-term endeavor with emphasis on extramural programs. As health-care reform proceeds, priority should be given to strengthening partnerships between health-care providers, microbiologists, and public health professionals to detect and control emerging infectious diseases. PMID:8164632

  12. Multidrug-resistant nontyphoidal Salmonella in New York state's foodborne diseases active surveillance network counties.

    PubMed

    Solghan, Suzanne M; Dumas, Nellie B; Root, Timothy P; Quinlan, Tammy M; Armstrong, Leeanna R; Spina, Nancy L; Zansky, Shelley M

    2010-02-01

    With the emergence of multidrug-resistant nontyphoidal (NT) Salmonella, knowledge of resistance patterns is critical for appropriate presumptive treatment. This report describes the prevalence and trends of NT Salmonella antimicrobial susceptibility within the New York State (NYS) Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet). The NYS Department of Health, Wadsworth Center Public Health Laboratory tested all Salmonella isolates from the NYS FoodNet catchment area between May 2003 and December 2007 for antimicrobial susceptibility to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfisoxazole, tetracycline, nalidixic acid, and ciprofloxacin. Isolate susceptibility results were linked to their corresponding demographic and clinical data and analyzed. Multidrug-resistant isolates were defined as resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfisoxazole, and tetracycline (R-type ACSSuT). Antimicrobial susceptibility for 2189 FoodNet cases (98.5% of total cases) showed 79.6% pansusceptible, 6.9% R-type ACSSuT, and 13.5% resistant to at least one antimicrobial agent but not R-type ACSSuT. Four (0.2%) isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin. From 2004 to 2007, cases with R-type ACSSuT significantly decreased from 8.7% (37/424) to 4.8% (24/499) (p < 0.01). Serotypes with the highest proportion of R-type ACSSuT included Salmonella Typhimurium 17.9% (79/444), and Salmonella Newport 29.1% (51/175). Among Salmonella Typhimurium isolates, over 40% of the African-American cases (19/46) had R-type ACSSuT isolates, compared with 15.7% of the Caucasian cases (58/369) (p < 0.01). R-type ACSSuT Salmonella Typhimurium cases were hospitalized (41.8%) more frequently than pansusceptible Salmonella Typhimurium cases (24.9%), after controlling for age (p < 0.05). Length of hospitalization was not significantly different. Although R-type ACSSuT NT Salmonella has decreased since 2003 within the NYS FoodNet catchment area, monitoring resistance patterns remains important in identifying emerging resistant strains, vulnerable populations, and determining appropriate presumptive treatment regimens. The higher rate of R-type ACSSuT among the African-American cases requires further study. PMID:19821741

  13. Upregulation of D site of albumin promoter binding protein in the brain of patients with intractable epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    YUAN, JINXIAN; GUO, JING; ZHANG, MELIN; WANG, QIAN; HUANG, HAO; CHEN, YANGMEI

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms that underlie the pathogenesis of intractable epilepsy (IE) remain to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the expression of D site of albumin promoter binding protein (DBP) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in the temporal lobes of patients with IE, in order to examine the possible roles of DBP in the pathogenesis of IE. The expression of DBP and MAPK was detected by immunohistochemistry and double-label immunofluorescence staining against DBP/MAPK in 35 patients with IE, and the data were compared with those of the 15 controls. The results demonstrated that DBP expression in IE group (0.310.03) was significantly higher compared with that in the controls (0.180.02; P<0.05) and MAPK expression in the IE group (0.190.03) was also higher compared with that in the controls (0.120.02; P<0.05). DBP and MAPK were mainly expressed in the cytoplasm of neurons and the double-label immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that DBP and MAPK expression occurred in the same neurons. Therefore, the expression of DBP and MAPK in epilepsy patients was upregulated, suggesting a possible pathogenetic role in IE. PMID:25503293

  14. Repeated pancreatitis-induced splenic vein thrombosis leads to intractable gastric variceal bleeding: A case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shan-Hong; Zeng, Wei-Zheng; He, Qian-Wen; Qin, Jian-Ping; Wu, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Tao; Wang, Zhao; He, Xuan; Zhou, Xiao-Lei; Fan, Quan-Shui; Jiang, Ming-De

    2015-01-01

    Gastric varices (GV) are one of the most common complications for patients with portal hypertension. Currently, histoacryl injection is recommended as the initial treatment for bleeding of GV, and this injection has been confirmed to be highly effective for most patients in many studies. However, this treatment might be ineffective for some types of GV, such as splenic vein thrombosis-related localized portal hypertension (also called left-sided, sinistral, or regional portal hypertension). Herein, we report a case of repeated pancreatitis-induced complete splenic vein thrombosis that led to intractable gastric variceal bleeding, which was treated by splenectomy. We present detailed radiological and pathological data and blood rheology analysis (the splenic artery - after a short gastric vein or stomach vein - gastric coronary vein - portal vein). The pathophysiology can be explained by the abnormal direction of blood flow in this patient. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case for which detailed pathology and blood rheology data are available. PMID:26488031

  15. Standard dose Valproic acid does not cause additional cognitive impact in a rodent model of intractable epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Jellett, Adam P.; Jenks, Kyle; Lucas, Marcella; Scott, Rod C.

    2015-01-01

    Children with epilepsy face significant cognitive and behavioral impairments. These impairments are due to a poorly characterized interaction between the underlying etiology, the effect of seizures and the effect of medication. The large variation in these factors make understanding the main drivers of cognitive impairment in humans extremely difficult. Therefore we investigated the cognitive effect of seizures and the antiepileptic drug valproic acid in a rodent model of cortical dysplasia. Rats were divided into seizure-receiving and non-receiving groups. Rats experienced frequent early life seizures using the flurothyl inhalation method: 50 seizures between postnatal day 5 and 15 and then one seizure a day following that. Rats were further divided into drug-treated and vehicle treated groups. Valproic acid treated animals were treated from 5 days preceding behavioral testing in the Morris water maze at a clinically relevant concentration. We show here that the main driver of cognitive impairments are the brain malformations, and that persistent seizures in animals with brain malformations and valproic acid caused no additional impact. These findings suggest that neither an appropriate dose of a standard antiepileptic drug or intractable seizures worsen cognition associated with a malformation of cortical development and that alternative treatment strategies to improve cognition are required. PMID:25616460

  16. Echinoderm microtubule-associated protein -like protein 5 in anterior temporal neocortex of patients with intractable epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ji-jun; Huang, Min; Xiao, Fei; Xi, Zhi-qin

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): EMAP-like Protein 5 (EML5) is a new echinoderm microtubule-associated protein that is expressed in the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression profile of EML5 in the anterior temporal neocortex of patients presenting with intractable epilepsy (IE). Materials and Methods: Western blot assays were performed to determine EML5 expression in 36 surgically resected anterior temporal neocortices of patients with IE and eight control tissues. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence were employed to explore protein expression in IE. Results: EML5 was highly expressed in both neurons and glial cells of the anterior temporal neocortex of IE patients, whereas only low levels of EML5 were detected in control brain tissues. Western blotting showed an enhanced expression of EML5 protein in the anterior temporal neocortex of IE (optical density (OD) = 1.8030 ± 0.1335/1.1852 ± 0.2253, P<0.05) compared with normal control tissues. Conclusion: The results demonstrate that highly expressed EML5 in the neurons and glial cells of the cortex of patients with epilepsy is associated with microtubular dysfunction after frequent and recurrent seizures. PMID:26730336

  17. Secondary breast reconstruction with deepithelialized free flaps from the lower abdomen for intractable capsular contracture and maintenance of breast volume.

    PubMed

    Gurunluoglu, Raffi; Shafighi, Maziar; Schwabegger, Anton; Ninkovic, Milomir

    2005-01-01

    Although surgical techniques and the quality of mammary prostheses have been improved significantly in recent years, capsular contracture attendant on prosthetic mammary reconstruction remains a major flaw. Although rarely, some patients are confronted with recurrent and intractable capsular contractures with resultant breast deformity, even after multiple attempts at capsulectomies and implant exchange. Patients with recurrent capsular contracture often do not want replacement with a new prosthesis, but desire the maintenance of their breast volume with a safe alternative. In an attempt to maintain breast volume and to improve the aesthetic appearance, secondary breast reconstruction using bilateral deepithelialized free flaps from the lower abdomen was performed in a series of seven patients. Three bilateral muscle-sparing TRAM flaps, two bilateral DIEP flaps, one bilateral SIEA flap, one unilateral SIEA flap, and one unilateral DIEP flap (a total number of 14 flaps) were used following implant removal, total capsulectomy, and prophylactic subcutaneous mastectomy. The early postoperative course was uneventful, and all flaps survived completely with no complications. There were no donor-site problems, except in one patient (case 5), who had partial skin necrosis of the abdominal flap. The long-term results (mean follow-up: 4.8 years) demonstrated an aesthetically satisfactory appearance of the breasts, with no major donor-site problems. Several advantages, as well as drawbacks, are highlighted with this technique. PMID:15672318

  18. State of diagnostic quandary solved by modern technology: a rare case of Madelung's disease.

    PubMed

    Kyaw, Htoo; Grillo, Michael; Lin, Aung Naing; Kapp, David A

    2016-01-01

    Madelung's disease is a neglected metabolic disease characterised by generalised multiple fatty tissue deposits. A 64-year-old Caucasian woman presented with generalised weakness and symptomatic hypoglycaemia with altered mental status. Physical examination showed very distinct physical characteristics with multiple lumps distributed over the upper body. Her neurological symptoms were solved by giving intravenous glucose and optimisation of medical treatment. Even though she had unique characteristics of Madelung's disease, many physicians, on several occasions, failed to recognise her 'hidden diagnosis'. This diagnostic uncertainty was able to be solved by searching the Internet for similar clinical features and images. This case demonstrates characteristics and unique features of a rare disease that can be seen in a female patient even though it is mostly found in males. PMID:26851254

  19. Impact of metabolic syndrome on the risk of cardiovascular disease mortality in the United States and in Japan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Longjian; Miura, Katsuyuki; Fujiyoshi, Akira; Kadota, Aya; Miyagawa, Naoko; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Okayama, Akira; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu

    2014-01-01

    The United States has a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality than Japan, but it is unknown how much of the difference in MS accounts for the mortality difference. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of MS on the excess CVD mortality in the United States compared with that in Japan. Data from the United States Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III; n = 12,561) and the Japanese National Integrated Project for Prospective Observation of Noncommunicable Disease and Its Trends in Aged (NIPPON DATA; n = 7,453) were analyzed. MS was defined as ?3 of 5 risk factors (obesity, high blood pressure, decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated glycosylated hemoglobin, and elevated triglycerides). The results show that after a median of 13.8 years of follow-up in the United States, 1,683 patients died from CVD (11.75 per 1,000 person-years), and after a median of 15 years of follow-up in Japan, 369 patients died from CVD (3.56 per 1,000 person-years). The age-adjusted prevalence of MS was 26.7% in the United States and 19.3% in Japan. Of 5 MS factors, obesity, high blood pressure, elevated triglycerides, and glycosylated hemoglobin in the United States, and high blood pressure and elevated glycosylated hemoglobin in Japan were significant risk factors for CVD mortality. Estimates of 13.3% and 44% of the excess CVD mortality for the United States could be explained by the higher prevalence of MS and MS plus baseline CVD history than in Japan. In conclusion, the present study is the first to quantitatively demonstrate that MS and MS plus baseline CVD history may significantly contribute to the explanation of excess CVD mortality in the United States compared with Japan. PMID:24169008

  20. Thoracic lymphadenopathy in benign diseases: A state of the art review.

    PubMed

    Nin, Carlos Schüler; de Souza, Vinícius Valério Silveira; do Amaral, Ricardo Holderbaum; Neto, Roberto Schuhmacher; Tronco Alves, Giordano Rafael; Marchiori, Edson; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Balbinot, Fernanda; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Santana, Pablo; Portugal Gomes, Antônio Carlos; Hochhegger, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    Lymphadenopathy is a common radiological finding in many thoracic diseases and may be caused by a variety of infectious, inflammatory, and neoplastic conditions. This review aims to describe the patterns of mediastinal and hilar lymphadenopathy found in benign diseases in immunocompetent patients. Computed tomography is the method of choice for the evaluation of lymphadenopathy, as it is able to demonstrate increased size of individual nodes, abnormalities of the interface between the mediastinum and lung, invasion of surrounding fat, coalescence of adjacent nodes, obliteration of the mediastinal fat, and hypo- and hyperdensity in lymph nodes. Intravenous contrast enhancement may be needed to help distinguish nodes from vessels. The most frequent infections resulting in this finding are tuberculosis and fungal disease (particularly histoplasmosis and coccidioidomycosis). Sarcoidosis is a relatively frequent cause of lymphadenopathy in young adults, and can be distinguished from other diseases - especially when enlarged lymph nodes are found to be multiple and symmetrical. Other conditions discussed in this review are silicosis, drug reactions, amyloidosis, heart failure, Castleman's disease, viral infections, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:26860219

  1. The unfolded state of the murine prion protein and properties of single-point mutants related to human prion diseases.

    PubMed

    Gerum, Christian; Schlepckow, Kai; Schwalbe, Harald

    2010-08-01

    The prion protein can exist both in a normal cellular isoform and in a pathogenic conformational isoform. The latter is responsible for the development of different neurodegenerative diseases, for example Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease or fatal familial insomnia. To convert the native benign state of the protein into a highly ordered fibrillar aggregate, large-scale rearrangements of the tertiary structure are necessary during the conversion process and intermediates that are at least partially unfolded are present during fibril formation. In addition to the sporadic conversion into the pathogenic isoform, more than 20 familial diseases are known that are caused by single point mutations increasing the probability of aggregation and neurodegeneration. Here, we demonstrate that the chemically denatured states of the mouse and human prion proteins have very similar structural and dynamic characteristics. Initial studies on the single point mutants E196K, F198S, V203I and R208H of the oxidized mouse construct, which are related to human prion diseases, reveal significant differences in the rate of aggregation. Aggregation for mutants V203I and R208H is slower than it is for the wild type, and the constructs E196K and F198S show accelerated aggregation. These differences in aggregation behaviour are not correlated with the thermal stability of the mutants, indicating different mechanisms promoting the conformational conversion process. PMID:20541558

  2. Intractable pain: a neglected area of medical education in the UK.

    PubMed Central

    Marcer, D; Deighton, S

    1988-01-01

    Unease over the previous management of 67 patients referred for treatment to 3 pain relief clinics led us to investigate the current state of education in pain and pain control in the UK. Twenty-seven medical schools provided data which revealed; (i) in 4 schools no teaching whatsoever is given in these subjects; (ii) in the remainder it is accorded an average of 3.5 hours during the 5 year course, with little evidence of multidisciplinary teaching; (iii) only 10 schools (37%) regularly set questions on pain control in formal examinations. A survey of 219 general practitioners revealed a wide-ranging lack of knowledge about the facilities and approach to treatment at their local pain relief clinic. These findings have wide reaching implications for medical education. At the undergraduate level they demonstrate a need for more multidisciplinary teaching and practical experience in specialist units. Thereafter specialists in pain control must enable practising doctors to keep abreast of new developments. This may require them to devote more time writing for a non-specialist audience and devising short, postgraduate courses. PMID:3221366

  3. Impaired development of intrinsic connectivity networks in children with medically intractable localization-related epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, George M; Morgan, Benjamin R; Lee, Wayne; Smith, Mary Lou; Donner, Elizabeth J; Wang, Frank; Beers, Craig A; Federico, Paolo; Taylor, Margot J; Doesburg, Sam M; Rutka, James T; Snead, O Carter

    2014-11-01

    Typical childhood development is characterized by the emergence of intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) by way of internetwork segregation and intranetwork integration. The impact of childhood epilepsy on the maturation of ICNs is, however, poorly understood. The developmental trajectory of ICNs in 26 children (8-17 years) with localization-related epilepsy and 28 propensity-score matched controls was evaluated using graph theoretical analysis of whole brain connectomes from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. Children with epilepsy demonstrated impaired development of regional hubs in nodes of the salience and default mode networks (DMN). Seed-based connectivity and hierarchical clustering analysis revealed significantly decreased intranetwork connections, and greater internetwork connectivity in children with epilepsy compared to controls. Significant interactions were identified between epilepsy duration and the expected developmental trajectory of ICNs, indicating that prolonged epilepsy may cause progressive alternations in large-scale networks throughout childhood. DMN integration was also associated with better working memory, whereas internetwork segregation was associated with higher full-scale intelligence quotient scores. Furthermore, subgroup analyses revealed the thalamus, hippocampus, and caudate were weaker hubs in children with secondarily generalized seizures, relative to other patient subgroups. Our findings underscore that epilepsy interferes with the developmental trajectory of brain networks underlying cognition, providing evidence supporting the early treatment of affected children. PMID:24976288

  4. An assessment of non-communicable diseases, diabetes, and related risk factors in the Federated States of Micronesia, State of Yap: a systems perspective.

    PubMed

    Ichiho, Henry M; Yurow, Julie; Lippwe, Kipier; Aitaoto, Nia

    2013-05-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) have been identified as a health emergency in the US-affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI).1 This assessment, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was conducted in the Federated States of Micronesia, State of Yap, and describes the burdens due to diabetes and other NCDs (heart disease, hypertension, stroke, chronic renal disease), and assesses the system of service capacity and current activities for service delivery, data collection and reporting as well as identifying the issues that need to be addressed. There has been a 1.2% increase in the population between 2000 and 2010; however, there was a significant increase in the 45-64 year old age group. Findings reveal that the risk factors of poor diet, lack of physical activity, and lifestyle behaviors lead to overweight and obesity and subsequent NCD that are a significant factor in the morbidity and mortality of the population. The leading causes of death include cancer, heart disease, and diabetes. Local household surveys show that 63% to 80% of the adults and 20.5% to 33.8% of the children were overweight or obese. The surveys also showed that 23% of the adult population had diabetes and 35% were hypertensive. Other findings show significant gaps in the system of administrative, clinical, data, and support services to address these NCD. There is a policy and procedure manual that guides the NCD staff. There is no functional data system that is able to identify, register, or track patients with diabetes and other NCDs. Priority administrative and clinical issues were identified. PMID:23900490

  5. An Assessment of Non-Communicable Diseases, Diabetes, and Related Risk Factors in the Federated States of Micronesia, State of Pohnpei: A Systems Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Anson, Robina; Keller, Elizabeth; Lippwe, Kipier; Aitaoto, Nia

    2013-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) have been identified as a health emergency in the US-affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI).1 This assessment, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was conducted in the Federated States of Micronesia, State of Pohnpei and describes the burden due to selected NCD (diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, stroke, chronic kidney disease); and assesses the system of service capacity and current activities for service delivery, data collection and reporting as well as identifies the issues that need to be addressed. Findings reveal that the risk factors of poor diet, lack of physical activity, and lifestyle behaviors lead to overweight and obesity and subsequent NCD that are significant factors in the morbidity and mortality of the population. Leading causes of death were due to heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and hypertension. Population survey data show that 32.1% of the adult population had diabetes with a higher rate among women (37.1%) when compared to men (26.4%). The data also showed that 73.1% of the adult population was overweight or obese. Other findings show significant gaps in the system of administrative, clinical, data, and support services to address these NCD. There is no overall planning document for the prevention and control of NCDs or diabetes. There is evidence of little communication among the medical and health care providers which leads to fragmentation of care and loss of continuity of care. Based on some of the findings, priority issues and problems that need to be addressed for the administrative and clinical systems are identified. PMID:23900565

  6. Improved prediction of complex diseases by common genetic markers: state of the art and further perspectives.

    PubMed

    Müller, Bent; Wilcke, Arndt; Boulesteix, Anne-Laure; Brauer, Jens; Passarge, Eberhard; Boltze, Johannes; Kirsten, Holger

    2016-03-01

    Reliable risk assessment of frequent, but treatable diseases and disorders has considerable clinical and socio-economic relevance. However, as these conditions usually originate from a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors, precise prediction remains a considerable challenge. The current progress in genotyping technology has resulted in a substantial increase of knowledge regarding the genetic basis of such diseases and disorders. Consequently, common genetic risk variants are increasingly being included in epidemiological models to improve risk prediction. This work reviews recent high-quality publications targeting the prediction of common complex diseases. To be included in this review, articles had to report both, numerical measures of prediction performance based on traditional (non-genetic) risk factors, as well as measures of prediction performance when adding common genetic variants to the model. Systematic PubMed-based search finally identified 55 eligible studies. These studies were compared with respect to the chosen approach and methodology as well as results and clinical impact. Phenotypes analysed included tumours, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular diseases. All studies applied one or more statistical measures reporting on calibration, discrimination, or reclassification to quantify the benefit of including SNPs, but differed substantially regarding the methodological details that were reported. Several examples for improved risk assessments by considering disease-related SNPs were identified. Although the add-on benefit of including SNP genotyping data was mostly moderate, the strategy can be of clinical relevance and may, when being paralleled by an even deeper understanding of disease-related genetics, further explain the development of enhanced predictive and diagnostic strategies for complex diseases. PMID:26839113

  7. Spatial and temporal analysis of stem bleeding disease in coconut palm in the state of Sergipe, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Rejane R da Costa e; Souza, Paulo E de; Warwick, Dulce R N; Pozza, Edson A; Filho, Jos L S de Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    Stem bleeding disease (resinosis) of coconut palm is caused by Thielaviopsis paradoxa and is very important in the state of Sergipe, Brazil. Understanding the epidemiological behavior of the disease is essential for establishing more efficient control strategies. Thus, we characterized the temporal progression and spatial distribution of stem bleeding in a commercial orchard under conditions of natural infection in the area of Neopolis, Sergipe. Three plots with 729 plants each were selected and evaluated every two months for stem bleeding incidence. In the temporal analysis, the monomolecular model gave the best fit to data on disease incidence, as it accurately showed the temporal dynamics of the disease during the experiment period. The spatial pattern of stem bleeding varied over time, with initial infections presenting random pattern and then evolving to aggregate pattern during evaluations. This indicates that the disease may have originated from the pathogen survival structures, followed by auto infections caused by dissemination from plant to plant, either by humans, by contact between roots, or by the vector Rhynchophorus palmarum. PMID:24270840

  8. Phytochemical Compounds and Protection from Cardiovascular Diseases: A State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Pagliaro, Beniamino; Santolamazza, Caterina; Simonelli, Francesca; Rubattu, Speranza

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases represent a worldwide relevant socioeconomical problem. Cardiovascular disease prevention relies also on lifestyle changes, including dietary habits. The cardioprotective effects of several foods and dietary supplements in both animal models and in humans have been explored. It was found that beneficial effects are mainly dependent on antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, also involving modulation of mitochondrial function. Resveratrol is one of the most studied phytochemical compounds and it is provided with several benefits in cardiovascular diseases as well as in other pathological conditions (such as cancer). Other relevant compounds are Brassica oleracea, curcumin, and berberine, and they all exert beneficial effects in several diseases. In the attempt to provide a comprehensive reference tool for both researchers and clinicians, we summarized in the present paper the existing literature on both preclinical and clinical cardioprotective effects of each mentioned phytochemical. We structured the discussion of each compound by analyzing, first, its cellular molecular targets of action, subsequently focusing on results from applications in both ex vivo and in vivo models, finally discussing the relevance of the compound in the context of human diseases. PMID:26504846

  9. Differential diagnosis in inflammatory bowel disease colitis: State of the art and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Vecchi, Maurizio; Pastorelli, Luca; Neurath, Markus F; Neumann, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Distinction between Crohn’s disease of the colon-rectum and ulcerative colitis or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) type unclassified can be of pivotal importance for a tailored clinical management, as each entity often involves specific therapeutic strategies and prognosis. Nonetheless, no gold standard is available and the uncertainty of diagnosis may frequently lead to misclassification or repeated examinations. Hence, we have performed a literature search to address the problem of differential diagnosis in IBD colitis, revised current and emerging diagnostic tools and refined disease classification strategies. Nowadays, the differential diagnosis is an untangled issue, and the proper diagnosis cannot be reached in up to 10% of patients presenting with IBD colitis. This topic is receiving emerging attention, as medical therapies, surgical approaches and leading prognostic outcomes require more and more disease-specific strategies in IBD patients. The optimization of standard diagnostic approaches based on clinical features, biomarkers, radiology, endoscopy and histopathology appears to provide only marginal benefits. Conversely, emerging diagnostic techniques in the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy, molecular pathology, genetics, epigenetics, metabolomics and proteomics have already shown promising results. Novel advanced endoscopic imaging techniques and biomarkers can shed new light for the differential diagnosis of IBD, better reflecting diverse disease behaviors based on specific pathogenic pathways. PMID:25574078

  10. Phytochemical Compounds and Protection from Cardiovascular Diseases: A State of the Art.

    PubMed

    Pagliaro, Beniamino; Santolamazza, Caterina; Simonelli, Francesca; Rubattu, Speranza

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases represent a worldwide relevant socioeconomical problem. Cardiovascular disease prevention relies also on lifestyle changes, including dietary habits. The cardioprotective effects of several foods and dietary supplements in both animal models and in humans have been explored. It was found that beneficial effects are mainly dependent on antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, also involving modulation of mitochondrial function. Resveratrol is one of the most studied phytochemical compounds and it is provided with several benefits in cardiovascular diseases as well as in other pathological conditions (such as cancer). Other relevant compounds are Brassica oleracea, curcumin, and berberine, and they all exert beneficial effects in several diseases. In the attempt to provide a comprehensive reference tool for both researchers and clinicians, we summarized in the present paper the existing literature on both preclinical and clinical cardioprotective effects of each mentioned phytochemical. We structured the discussion of each compound by analyzing, first, its cellular molecular targets of action, subsequently focusing on results from applications in both ex vivo and in vivo models, finally discussing the relevance of the compound in the context of human diseases. PMID:26504846

  11. Severe gas bubble disease in a warmwater fishery in the midwestern united states

    SciTech Connect

    Crunkilton, R.L.; Czarnezki, J.M.; Trial, L.

    1980-11-01

    Supersaturation of the water of the Osage River below the Harry S. Truman Dam resulted in an epidemic of gas bubble disease that caused the largest fish kill in the history of Missouri. This is the first recorded evidence of serious supersaturation in the midwestern U.S. Total gas saturation levels up to 139% killed nearly 500,000 fish in the Osage River and the Lake of the Ozarks during April-May 1978. Nitrogen was the primary gas responsible for gas bubble disease mortalities. Instream cage bioassays defined the zone of lethal supersaturation. Significant mortality occurred in pelagic and near-shore species, deepwater species, and bottom-dwelling species. Susceptibility to disease was related to fish size.

  12. Severe gas bubble disease in a warmwater fishery in the midwestern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Crunkilton, R.L.; Czarnezki, J.M.; Trial, L.

    1980-11-01

    Gas bubble disease below Harry S. Truman Dam, sited on the upper Osage River and spilling into Lake of the Ozarks, caused the largest fish kill on record in Missouri. This is the first recorded evidence of serious supersaturation in the Midwest. Total gas saturation levels up to 139% killed nearly a half million fish in the upper 85 km of the Osage Arm, Lake of the Ozarks, during April to June, 1978 and 1979. Gas supersaturation occurred throughout the 150 km of this main-stem reservoir. Nitrogen was the primary gas responsible for gas bubble disease mortalities. Pelagic and near-shore species suffered the earliest and heaviest mortalities, but fish characteristic of deeper waters were increasingly killed as supersaturation persisted. Instream cage bioassays defined the zone of lethal supersaturation. Significant mortality occurred in bottom-dwelling fish of several species, due to long-term intermittent exposure. Susceptibility to gas bubble disease was related to fish size.

  13. Early renal failure as a cardiovascular disease: Focus on lipoprotein(a) and prothrombotic state

    PubMed Central

    Catena, Cristiana; Colussi, GianLuca; Nait, Francesca; Pezzutto, Francesca; Martinis, Flavia; Sechi, Leonardo A

    2015-01-01

    Patients with renal failure are at increased risk of cardiovascular events even at the earliest stages of disease. In addition to many classic cardiovascular risk factors, many conditions that are commonly identified as emerging risk factors might contribute to occurrence of cardiovascular disease. Changes in circulating levels of many of these emerging risk factors have been demonstrated in patients with early stages of renal failure caused by different types of renal disease and have been associated with detection of cardiovascular complications. However, for most of these factors evidence of benefits of correction on cardiovascular outcome is missing. In this article, we comment on the role of lipoprotein(a) and prothrombotic factors as potential contributors to cardiovascular events in patients with early renal failure. PMID:26167461

  14. Intelligent biomedical clothing for personal health and disease management: state of the art and future vision.

    PubMed

    Lymberis, Andreas; Olsson, Silas

    2003-01-01

    Telemedicine has been introduced to overcome distance in order to get prompt access to medical knowledge and appropriate health care. More recently, work in telemedicine has aimed at developing solutions to support the management of chronic diseases such as diabetes, and lung and heart diseases, as well as to provide support for home care services. Telemedicine is also entering the fields of health promotion/prevention disease, life style management, and well-being. The evolution and broadening of telemedicine gives birth to a nomenclature that includes "e-health," "telehealth," and "telecare." The latest developments in microsystems and nanotechnologies as well as in information processing and communication technologies allow miniaturization and non-invasive smart monitoring of physiological and physical data. Ongoing cutting-edge multidisciplinary research in textile fibers, biomedical sensors, and wireless and mobile telecommunications integrated with telemedicine, aims at developing intelligent biomedical clothing (IBC) that could pave the way to support personalized management of health and diseases at the point of need and at any time. In this study, we aim to describe the current status of multidisciplinary research and development of IBC, based on bibliographic research and reports from seminars, workshops, conferences, and working groups. A further aim is to inform the developers, the decision makers, and users in the health and healthcare sector regarding future solutions to support personalized health care and disease management. Both the textile sector and healthcare sector are looking with great interest at the innovative products and applications that could result from the integration of microsystems, nanotechnologies, biomedical sensors, textiles, and mobile telecommunications. For health monitoring, disease prevention and management, rehabilitation, and sport medicine, IBC may offer, in the mid-term future, a unique, wearable non-obtrusive telemedicine platform for individualized services that is readily accessible and of good quality. PMID:14980096

  15. An Asian Origin of Virulent Aeromonas hydrophila Responsible for Disease Epidemics in United States-Farmed Catfish

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mohammad J.; Sun, Dawei; McGarey, Donald J.; Wrenn, Shannon; Alexander, Laura M.; Martino, Maria Elena; Xing, Ye; Terhune, Jeffery S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Since 2009, catfish farming in the southeastern United States has been severely impacted by a highly virulent and clonal population of Aeromonas hydrophila causing motile Aeromonas septicemia (MAS) in catfish. The possible origin of this newly emerged highly virulent A. hydrophila strain is unknown. In this study, we show using whole-genome sequencing and comparative genomics that A. hydrophila isolates from diseased grass carp in China and catfish in the United States have highly similar genomes. Our phylogenomic analyses suggest that U.S. catfish isolates emerged from A. hydrophila populations of Asian origin. Furthermore, we identified an A. hydrophila strain isolated in 2004 from a diseased catfish in Mississippi, prior to the onset of the major epidemic outbreaks in Alabama starting in 2009, with genomic characteristics that are intermediate between those of the Asian and Alabama fish isolates. Investigation of A. hydrophila strain virulence demonstrated that the isolate from the U.S. catfish epidemic is significantly more virulent to both channel catfish and grass carp than is the Chinese carp isolate. This study implicates the importation of fish or fishery products into the United States as the source of highly virulent A. hydrophila that has caused severe epidemic outbreaks in United States-farmed catfish and further demonstrates the potential for invasive animal species to disseminate bacterial pathogens worldwide. PMID:24895303

  16. PREVALENCE OF CHAGAS DISEASE IN A RURAL AREA IN THE STATE OF CEARA, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    FREITAS, Erlane Chaves; OLIVEIRA, Maria de Ftima; ANDRADE, Mnica Coelho; VASCONCELOS, Arduina Sofia Ortet de Barros; da SILVA, Jos Damio; CNDIDO, Darlan da Silva; PEREIRA, Lase dos Santos; CORREIA, Joo Paulo Ramalho; da CRUZ, Jos Napoleo Monte; CAVALCANTI, Luciano Pamplona de Ges

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi and affects about two to three million people in Brazil, still figuring as an important public health problem. A study was conducted in a rural area of the municipality of Limoeiro do Norte - CE, northeastern Brazil, aiming to determine the prevalence of T. cruzi infection. Of the inhabitants, 52% were examined, among whom 2.6% (4/154) were seropositive in at least two serological tests. All seropositive individuals were older than 50 years, farmers, with a low education and a family income of less than three minimum wages. Active surveillance may be an alternative for early detection of this disease. PMID:26603232

  17. Crowdfunding drug development: the state of play in oncology and rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Dragojlovic, Nick; Lynd, Larry D

    2014-11-01

    In this article, we present descriptive data on 125 crowdfunding campaigns aimed at financing research in oncology (including basic research, drug discovery, and clinical trials). We also describe five campaigns that have succeeded in raising substantial funds to support the development of treatments for ultrarare diseases. The data suggest that crowdfunding is a viable approach to supporting early proof-of-concept research that could allow researchers in oncology and rare diseases to succeed in traditional grant competitions or to attract private investment. The data also suggest that such an approach could become a valuable additional source of funding for early-stage innovators in the drug development arena. PMID:24973645

  18. [Prion disease].

    PubMed

    Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2010-11-01

    Human prion diseases are classified into 3 categories according to etiologies: idiopathic of unknown cause, acquired of infectious origin, and genetic by PRNP mutation. The surveillance committee have analyzed 2,494 cases and identified 1,402 as prion diseases. Most of them are idiopathic, namely sporadic CJD (77%) with less genetic and acquired prion diseases (17% and 5%, respectively). The number of patients identified by the surveillance committee in these years is about 120 which are less than the number of annual death of prion disease. The difference might be due to partly the fact our surveillance need the consent from patients' family and is not complete. The mean age at onset of prion disease is late 60s while the range is fairly wide. Brain MRIs and increase of CSF 14-3-3 and tau protein levels are very characteristic. Classical sporadic CJD could show completely normal T1WI with patchy high signals in the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia on DWI. In Japan, classical sporadic CJD (MM1) is most popular but there are some rare atypical subtypes. Among them, MM2-thalamic CJD is hardest to diagnose because it shows no high intensity signals on DWI, in addition to frequent absence of CSF and EEG characteristics. In this case, CBF decrease in the thalamus on SPECT is very helpful. Genetic prion diseases in Japan are quite distinct from those in Europe. V180I and M232R mutations are unique to Japan and show sporadic CJD phenotype. Dura graft-associated CJD (dCJD) are composed of 67% of classical sporadic CJD phenotype and 33% of atypical phenotype showing slower progression with amyloid plaques. Trace-back experiments suggested the PrP(sc) of the atypical dCJD was likely to be modified from infection of abnormal VV2 protein. Although there are some atypical forms of prion diseases as mentioned above, almost all prion cases could be diagnosed with EEG, MRI, genetic test, CSF test and SPECT. We also have some incidents in which brain surgery was done before the diagnosis of prion disease and many other patients were operated using the same operating instruments before their sterilization against prion disease had been done. The explanation of possibility of prion disease infection to the patients and their follow-up was started by the incident committee. It is very important for all the nations to cooperate with each other in order to overcome this intractable disease. PMID:21921445

  19. Current state of biology and diagnosis of clonal mast cell diseases in adults.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Twose, I; Morgado, J M; Sánchez-Muñoz, L; García-Montero, A; Mollejo, M; Orfao, A; Escribano, L

    2012-10-01

    Mastocytosis comprises a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by the presence of clonal mast cells (MC) in organs such as skin, bone marrow (BM), and gastrointestinal tract, among other tissues. The clonal nature of the disease can be established in most adult patients by the demonstration of activating KIT mutations in their BM MC. When highly sensitive techniques capable of identifying cells present at very low frequencies in a sample are applied, BM MC from virtually all systemic mastocytosis patients display unique immunophenotypical features, particularly the aberrant expression of CD25. By contrast, large, multifocal BM MC aggregates (the only World Health Organization major criterion for systemic mastocytosis) are absent in a significant proportion of patients fulfilling at least three minor criteria for systemic mastocytosis, particularly in subjects studied at early stages of the disease with very low MC burden. Moreover, recent molecular and immunophenotypical investigations of BM MC from patients with indolent systemic mastocytosis have revealed a close association of some biological features (e.g., multilineage involvement of hematopoiesis by the KIT mutation and an immature mast cell immunophenotype) with an increased risk for disease progression. These observations support the fact that, although the current consensus diagnostic criteria for systemic mastocytosis have been a major advance for the diagnosis and classification of the disease, rationale usage of the most sensitive diagnostic techniques available nowadays is needed to improve the diagnosis, refine the classification, and reach objective prognostic stratification of adult mastocytosis. PMID:22551157

  20. Chronic Cardiovascular Disease Mortality in Mountaintop Mining Areas of Central Appalachian States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esch, Laura; Hendryx, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if chronic cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality rates are higher among residents of mountaintop mining (MTM) areas compared to mining and nonmining areas, and to examine the association between greater levels of MTM surface mining and CVD mortality. Methods: Age-adjusted chronic CVD mortality rates from 1999 to 2006 for…

  1. Breeding Pearl Millet for Disease and Pest Resistance in the Southeastern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The primary diseases and pests in the southeastern U.S. generally differ from those found throughout much of Asia and Africa. Targets for resistance breeding include rust (Puccinia substriata var. penicillariae), pyricularia leaf spot (Pyricularia grisea), stalk rot, grain mold, root-knot nematodes...

  2. TRENDS IN THE GEOGRAPHIC INEQUALITY OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE MORTALITY IN THE UNITED STATES, 1962-1982

    EPA Science Inventory

    Substantial geographic variation of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality within the U.S. has been recognized for decades. nalyses reported here address the question of whether relative geographic inequality has increased or decreased during the period of rapidly declining CVD m...

  3. GEOGRAPHIC VARIATION IN DECLINING ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE MORTALITY IN THE UNITED STATES, 1968-1978

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite the well-known geographic pattern for ischemic heart disease (IHD) mortality, studies of the decline in IHD have not provided a comprehensive examination of its spatial component. In the study, the authors computed and mapped mean rates and percent change in IHD mortality...

  4. [Epidemiology of chronic kidney disease in Italy: current state and contribution of the CARHES study].

    PubMed

    De Nicola, Luca; Donfrancesco, Chiara; Minutolo, Roberto; Lo Noce, Cinzia; De Curtis, Amalia; Palmieri, Luigi; Iacoviello, Licia; Conte, Giuseppe; Chiodini, Paolo; Sorrentino, Francesco; Coppo, Rosanna; Vanuzzo, Diego; Scherillo, Marillo; Giampaoli, Simona

    2011-01-01

    The epidemic dimensions of non-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) and the associated elevated cardiovascular risk as well as the high costs of renal replacement therapy have made the identification of CKD patients and the quantification of CKD-related comorbidities a key priority in the strategies of public health agencies worldwide. Information on the CKD prevalence at a national level is still lacking in Italy, although these data are critical for planning preventive strategies and increasing the awareness of CKD as a major chronic disease. In 2008 the CARHES (CArdiovascular risk in Renal Patients of the Italian Health Examination Survey) study was started. The study - a joint venture between the Italian Society of Nephrology, the Italian Society of Cardiologists, and the National Health Institute-Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Project - will integrate the previously collected information on the cardiovascular risk profile of the adult Italian population provided by the Health Examination Survey (HES) with epidemiological data on CKD. The initial results on approximately half of the prospective sample of 9020 subjects aged 35-79 years suggest a lower CKD prevalence than that reported in other countries. The final results will allow to estimate the level of CKD in Italy and hopefully increase the awareness of this high-risk chronic disease among Italian physicians and health authorities. PMID:21809309

  5. Chronic Cardiovascular Disease Mortality in Mountaintop Mining Areas of Central Appalachian States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esch, Laura; Hendryx, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if chronic cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality rates are higher among residents of mountaintop mining (MTM) areas compared to mining and nonmining areas, and to examine the association between greater levels of MTM surface mining and CVD mortality. Methods: Age-adjusted chronic CVD mortality rates from 1999 to 2006 for

  6. SURVEILLANCE FOR WATERBORNE-DISEASE OUTBREAKS-UNITED STATES, 1997-1998

    EPA Science Inventory

    PROBLEM/CONDITION: Since 1971, CDC and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have maintained a collaborative surveillance system for collecting and periodically reporting data relating to occurrences and causes of waterborne-disease outbreaks (WBDOs). REPORTING PERIOD CO...

  7. Legal Authority for Infectious Disease Reporting in the United States: Case Study of the 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic.

    PubMed

    Danila, Richard N; Laine, Ellen S; Livingston, Franci; Como-Sabetti, Kathryn; Lamers, Lauren; Johnson, Kelli; Barry, Anne M

    2015-01-01

    Tracking of infectious diseases is a public health core function essential to disease prevention and control. Each state mandates reporting of certain infectious diseases to public health authorities. These laws vary by state, and the variation could affect the ability to collect critical information. The 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic served as a case study to examine the legal authority in the 50 states; Washington, DC; and New York City for mandatory infectious disease reporting, particularly for influenza and new or emerging infectious diseases. Our study showed reporting laws to be generally present and functioning well; nevertheless, jurisdictions should be mindful of their mandated parameters and review the robustness of their laws before they face a new or emerging disease outbreak. PMID:25393187

  8. Development of a Cold-Adapted Pseudoalteromonas Expression System for the Pseudoalteromonas Proteins Intractable for the Escherichia coli System.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zi-Chao; Tang, Bai-Lu; Zhao, Dian-Li; Pang, Xiuhua; Qin, Qi-Long; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Although the Escherichia coli expression system is the most commonly used expression system, some proteins are still difficult to be expressed by this system, such as proteins with high thermolability and enzymes that cannot mature by autoprocessing. Therefore, it is necessary to develop alternative expression systems. In this study, a cold-adapted Pseudoalteromonas expression system was developed. A shuttle vector was constructed, and a conjugational transfer system between E. coli and psychrophilic strain Pseudoalteromonas sp. SM20429 was established. Based on the shuttle vector, three reporter vectors were constructed to compare the strength of the cloned promoters at low temperature. The promoter of xylanase gene from Pseudoalteromonas sp. BSi20429 was chosen due to its high activity at 10-15°C. An expression vector pEV containing the chosen promoter, multiple cloning sites and a His tag was constructed for protein expression and purification. With pEV as expression vector and SM20429 as the host, a cold-adapted protease, pseudoalterin, which cannot be maturely expressed in E. coli, was successfully expressed as an active extracellular enzyme when induced by 2% oat spelt xylan at 15°C for 48 h. Recombinant pseudoalterin purified from the culture by Ni affinity chromatography had identical N-terminal sequence, similar molecular mass and substrate specificity as the native pseudoalterin. In addition, another two cold-adapted enzymes were also successfully expressed by this system. Our results indicate that this cold-adapted Pseudoalteromonas expression system will provide an alternative choice for protein expression, especially for the Pseudoalteromonas proteins intractable for the E. coli system. PMID:26333173

  9. Development of a Cold-Adapted Pseudoalteromonas Expression System for the Pseudoalteromonas Proteins Intractable for the Escherichia coli System

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dian-Li; Pang, Xiuhua; Qin, Qi-Long; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Although the Escherichia coli expression system is the most commonly used expression system, some proteins are still difficult to be expressed by this system, such as proteins with high thermolability and enzymes that cannot mature by autoprocessing. Therefore, it is necessary to develop alternative expression systems. In this study, a cold-adapted Pseudoalteromonas expression system was developed. A shuttle vector was constructed, and a conjugational transfer system between E. coli and psychrophilic strain Pseudoalteromonas sp. SM20429 was established. Based on the shuttle vector, three reporter vectors were constructed to compare the strength of the cloned promoters at low temperature. The promoter of xylanase gene from Pseudoalteromonas sp. BSi20429 was chosen due to its high activity at 10–15°C. An expression vector pEV containing the chosen promoter, multiple cloning sites and a His tag was constructed for protein expression and purification. With pEV as expression vector and SM20429 as the host, a cold-adapted protease, pseudoalterin, which cannot be maturely expressed in E. coli, was successfully expressed as an active extracellular enzyme when induced by 2% oat spelt xylan at 15°C for 48 h. Recombinant pseudoalterin purified from the culture by Ni affinity chromatography had identical N-terminal sequence, similar molecular mass and substrate specificity as the native pseudoalterin. In addition, another two cold-adapted enzymes were also successfully expressed by this system. Our results indicate that this cold-adapted Pseudoalteromonas expression system will provide an alternative choice for protein expression, especially for the Pseudoalteromonas proteins intractable for the E. coli system. PMID:26333173

  10. Presurgical language lateralization assessment by fMRI and dichotic listening of pediatric patients with intractable epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Norrelgen, Fritjof; Lilja, Anders; Ingvar, Martin; Åmark, Per; Fransson, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical use of a method to assess hemispheric language dominance in pediatric candidates for epilepsy surgery. The method is designed for patients but has previously been evaluated with healthy children. Methods Nineteen patients, 8–18 years old, with intractable epilepsy and candidates for epilepsy surgery were assessed. The assessment consisted of two functional MRI protocols (fMRI) intended to target frontal and posterior language networks respectively, and a behavioral dichotic listening task (DL). Regional left/right indices for each fMRI task from the frontal, temporal and parietal lobe were calculated, and left/right indices of the DL task were calculated from responses of consonants and vowels, separately. A quantitative analysis of each patient's data set was done in two steps based on clearly specified criteria. First, fMRI data and DL data were analyzed separately to determine whether the result from each of these assessments were conclusive or not. Thereafter, the results from the individual assessments were combined to reach a final conclusion regarding hemispheric language dominance. Results For 14 of the 19 subjects (74%) a conclusion was reached about their hemispheric language dominance. Nine subjects had a left-sided and five subjects had a right-sided hemispheric dominance. In three cases (16%) DL provided critical data to reach a conclusive result. Conclusions The success rate of conclusive language lateralization assessments in this study is comparable to reported rates on similar challenged pediatric populations. The results are promising but data from more patients than in the present study will be required to conclude on the clinical applicability of the method. PMID:25610785

  11. Localization of specific language pathways using diffusion-weighted imaging tractography for presurgical planning of children with intractable epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jeong-Won; Asano, Eishi; Juhász, Csaba; Chugani, Harry T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective To examine whether diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) tractography can detect multiple white matter pathways connected to language cortices, we employed a maximum a posteriori probability (MAP) classification method, which has been recently validated for the corticospinal tract. Methods DWI was performed in 12 normally developing children and 17 children with intractable focal epilepsy who underwent subsequent two-stage epilepsy surgery with intracranial functional mapping. First, whole-brain DWI tractography was performed to identify unique pathways originating from Broca’s area, premotor area, and Wernicke’s area on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of normal children and intracranial electrical stimulation mapping (ESM) of children with epilepsy. Group averaging of these pathways based on fMRI was performed to construct the probability maps of language areas in standard MRI space. These maps were finally used to design a DWI-MAP classifier, which can automatically sort individual fibers originating from fMRI language areas as well as ESM language areas. Results In normally developing children, the DWI-MAP classifier predicted language-activation areas on fMRI with up to 77% accuracy. In children with focal epilepsy, the DWI-MAP classifier also showed high accuracy (up to 82%) for the fibers terminating in proximity to essential language areas determined by ESM. Decreased volumes in DWI-MAP–defined pathways after epilepsy surgery were associated with postoperative language deficits. Significance This study encourages further investigations to determine if DWI-MAP analysis can serve as a noninvasive diagnostic tool during pediatric presurgical planning by estimating not only the location of essential language cortices, but also the underlying fibers connecting these cortical areas. PMID:25489639

  12. Lyme Disease Risk Influences Human Settlement in the Wildland–Urban Interface: Evidence from a Longitudinal Analysis of Counties in the Northeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Ashley E.; MacDonald, Andrew J.; Plantinga, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The expansion of human settlement into wildland areas, including forests in the eastern United States, has resulted in fragmented forest habitat that has been shown to drive higher entomological risk for Lyme disease. We investigated an alternative pathway between fragmentation and Lyme disease, namely whether increased risk of Lyme disease results in a reduced propensity to settle in high-risk areas at the interface of developed and undeveloped lands. We used longitudinal data analyses at the county level to determine whether Lyme disease incidence (LDI) influences the proportion of the population residing in the wildland–urban interface in 12 high LDI states in the eastern United States. We found robust evidence that a higher LDI reduces the proportion of a county's population residing in the wildland–urban interface in high-LDI states. This study provides some of the first evidence of human behavioral responses to Lyme disease risk via settlement decisions. PMID:25048372

  13. Population-based approaches to understanding disparities in cardiovascular disease risk in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Garth

    2014-01-01

    This is a comprehensive narrative review of the literature on the current science and evidence of population-level differences in risk factors for heart disease among different racial and ethnic population in the US. It begins by discussing the importance of population-level risk assessment of heart disease in light of the growth rate of specific minority populations in the US. It describes the population-level dynamics for racial and ethnic minorities: a higher overall prevalence of risk factors for coronary artery disease that are unrecognized and therefore not treated, which increases their likelihood of experiencing adverse outcomes and, therefore, potentially higher morbidity and mortality. It discusses the rate of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in minority communities. Minority patients with ACS are at greater risk of myocardial infarction, rehospitalization, and death from ACS. They also are less likely than nonminority patients to receive potentially beneficial treatments such as angiography or percutaneous coronary intervention. This paper looks at the data surrounding the increased rate of congestive heart failure in racial and ethnic minorities, where the risk is related to the prevalence of comorbidities with hypertension or diabetes mellitus, which, in combination with environmental factors, may largely explain congestive heart failure disparity. The conclusion is it is essential that health care providers understand these various communities, including nuances in disease presentation, risk factors, and treatment among different racial and ethnic groups. Awareness of these communities’ attributes as well as differences in incidence, risk factor burdens, prognosis, and treatment are necessary to mitigate racial and ethnic disparities in heart disease. PMID:25143752

  14. Resurgence of West Nile neurologic disease in the United States in 2012: what happened? What needs to be done?

    PubMed

    Beasley, David W C; Barrett, Alan D T; Tesh, Robert B

    2013-07-01

    The resurgence in cases of neurologic disease caused by West Nile virus (WNV) in the United States in 2012 came as a surprise to the general public and to many non-arbovirus researchers. Following the introduction of WNV into the US in 1999, the number of human infections rose dramatically, peaking in 2002-03. However, cases declined from 2008-11, and it was unclear if the virus would continue to have a low-level endemic transmission pattern with occasional outbreaks, like the related flavivirus, Saint Louis encephalitis virus, or a more active pattern with annual outbreaks, including occasional years with large epidemics, like Japanese encephalitis virus. The large epidemic in 2012 suggests that the United States can expect periodic outbreaks of West Nile fever and neurologic disease in the coming years. In this paper, we consider the causes of the upsurge in WNV infections during the past year and their implications for future research and disease control measures. PMID:23624155

  15. Discovering and mapping chromatin states using a tree hidden Markov model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    New biological techniques and technological advances in high-throughput sequencing are paving the way for systematic, comprehensive annotation of many genomes, allowing differences between cell types or between disease/normal tissues to be determined with unprecedented breadth. Epigenetic modifications have been shown to exhibit rich diversity between cell types, correlate tightly with cell-type specific gene expression, and changes in epigenetic modifications have been implicated in several diseases. Previous attempts to understand chromatin state have focused on identifying combinations of epigenetic modification, but in cases of multiple cell types, have not considered the lineage of the cells in question. We present a Bayesian network that uses epigenetic modifications to simultaneously model 1) chromatin mark combinations that give rise to different chromatin states and 2) propensities for transitions between chromatin states through differentiation or disease progression. We apply our model to a recent dataset of histone modifications, covering nine human cell types with nine epigenetic modifications measured for each. Since exact inference in this model is intractable for all the scale of the datasets, we develop several variational approximations and explore their accuracy. Our method exhibits several desirable features including improved accuracy of inferring chromatin states, improved handling of missing data, and linear scaling with dataset size. The source code for our model is available at http:// http://github.com/uci-cbcl/tree-hmm PMID:23734743

  16. [Medical control on the state of pilots' health suffering from urologic diseases].

    PubMed

    Shelepov, A M; Petrov, S B; Peshkov, V V; Shpilenia, E S; Shestaev, A Iu; Vo?tenko, A M; Iakovlev, A E

    2006-10-01

    The complexity of flying work and human factor significance increase the responsibility of aviation physician for health and high working capacity of the flying staff. The early diagnosis of potentially dangerous urological pathology is of particular importance because the renal and urinary tract diseases are revealed unexpectedly among the flying staff. The incidence of surgical pathology including the urologic one takes the third place in the RF Armed Forces. That's why the main directions to improve the urologic care in the Armed Forces medical service are the optimization of urologists' numerical staff, the development of new organizing-and-staff structure and the number of specialized urologic departments (centers, rooms, and wards) on the basis of central, district and garrison hospitals, the increase in urologists' professional training quality, the improvement of treatment-and-prophylactic work. It is necessary to conduct the quarterly, half-yearly and yearly analysis of urological diseases, connected with flying incidents. PMID:17236673

  17. Economic Impacts of Potential Foot and Mouth Disease Agro-terrorism in the United States: A Computable General Equilibrium Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Oladosu, Gbadebo A; Rose, Adam; Bumsoo, Lee

    2013-01-01

    The foot and mouth disease (FMD) virus has high agro-terrorism potential because it is contagious, can be easily transmitted via inanimate objects and can be spread by wind. An outbreak of FMD in developed countries results in massive slaughtering of animals (for disease control) and disruptions in meat supply chains and trade, with potentially large economic losses. Although the United States has been FMD-free since 1929, the potential of FMD as a deliberate terrorist weapon calls for estimates of the physical and economic damage that could result from an outbreak. This paper estimates the economic impacts of three alternative scenarios of potential FMD attacks using a computable general equilibrium (CGE) model of the US economy. The three scenarios range from a small outbreak successfully contained within a state to a large multi-state attack resulting in slaughtering of 30 percent of the national livestock. Overall, the value of total output losses in our simulations range between $37 billion (0.15% of 2006 baseline economic output) and $228 billion (0.92%). Major impacts stem from the supply constraint on livestock due to massive animal slaughtering. As expected, the economic losses are heavily concentrated in agriculture and food manufacturing sectors, with losses ranging from $23 billion to $61 billion in the two industries.

  18. Biomarkers of therapeutic responses in chronic Chagas disease: state of the art and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Pinazo, Maria-Jesus; Thomas, Maria-Carmen; Bustamante, Juan; de Almeida, Igor Correia; Lopez, Manuel-Carlos; Gascon, Joaquim

    2015-01-01

    The definition of a biomarker provided by the World Health Organization is any substance, structure, or process that can be measured in the body, or its products and influence, or predict the incidence or outcome of disease. Currently, the lack of prognosis and progression markers for chronic Chagas disease has posed limitations for testing new drugs to treat this neglected disease. Several molecules and techniques to detect biomarkers in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected patients have been proposed to assess whether specific treatment with benznidazole or nifurtimox is effective. Isolated proteins or protein groups from different T. cruzi stages and parasite-derived glycoproteins and synthetic neoglycoconjugates have been demonstrated to be useful for this purpose, as have nucleic acid amplification techniques. The amplification of T. cruzi DNA using the real-time polymerase chain reaction method is the leading test for assessing responses to treatment in a short period of time. Biochemical biomarkers have been tested early after specific treatment. Cytokines and surface markers represent promising molecules for the characterisation of host cellular responses, but need to be further assessed. PMID:25946151

  19. Phylogeography of Borrelia burgdorferi in the eastern United States reflects multiple independent Lyme disease emergence events.

    PubMed

    Hoen, Anne Gatewood; Margos, Gabriele; Bent, Stephen J; Diuk-Wasser, Maria A; Barbour, Alan; Kurtenbach, Klaus; Fish, Durland

    2009-09-01

    Since its first description in coastal Connecticut in 1976, both the incidence of Lyme disease and the geographic extent of endemic areas in the US have increased dramatically. The rapid expansion of Lyme disease into its current distribution in the eastern half of the US has been due to the range expansion of the tick vector, Ixodes scapularis, upon which the causative agent, Borrelia burgdorferi is dependent for transmission to humans. In this study, we examined the phylogeographic population structure of B. burgdorferi throughout the range of I. scapularis-borne Lyme disease using multilocus sequence typing based on bacterial housekeeping genes. We show that B. burgdorferi populations from the Northeast and Midwest are genetically distinct, but phylogenetically related. Our findings provide strong evidence of prehistoric population size expansion and east-to-west radiation of descendent clones from founding sequence types in the Northeast. Estimates of the time scale of divergence of northeastern and midwestern populations suggest that B. burgdorferi was present in these regions of North America many thousands of years before European settlements. We conclude that B. burgdorferi populations have recently reemerged independently out of separate relict foci, where they have persisted since precolonial times. PMID:19706476

  20. Periodontal disease and risk of psoriasis among nurses in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Nakib, Sarah; Han, Jiali; Li, Tricia; Joshipura, Kaumudi; Qureshi, Abrar A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Periodontal disease has been associated with systemic inflammation and may be a risk factor for autoimmune diseases. We evaluated the association between periodontal disease and the risk of incident psoriasis in a large prospective cohort study. Material and methods Self-reported history of periodontal bone loss, from 1998 to 2008, was evaluated as a risk factor for incident psoriasis among 60,457 women in the Nurses' Health Study. Secondary analyses examined associations between history of tooth loss and number of natural teeth and psoriasis risk. Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess multivariate estimates, adjusting for age, cigarette smoking, body mass index, alcohol intake and physical activity. Results We observed an increased multivariate risk of psoriasis for those with mild periodontal bone loss (RR 1.35, 95% CI: 1.03-1.75) and moderate to severe periodontal bone loss (RR 1.49, 95% CI: 1.08-2.05), as compared to those without periodontal bone loss, after adjusting for age, cigarette smoking, body mass index, alcohol intake, physical activity, and tooth loss. Number of natural teeth and tooth loss were not associated with risk of psoriasis in our study. Conclusion A history of periodontal bone loss may increase risk of subsequent psoriasis. PMID:23374087

  1. Epidemiology of Group B Streptococcal Disease in the United States: Shifting Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Schuchat, Anne

    1998-01-01

    Since its emergence 25 years ago, group B streptococcus has become recognized as a cause of serious illness in newborns, pregnant women, and adults with chronic medical conditions. Heavy colonization of the genital tract with group B streptococcus also increases the risk that a woman will deliver a preterm low-birthweight infant. Early-onset infections (occurring at <7 days of age) are associated with much lower fatality than when they were first described, and their incidence is finally decreasing as the use of preventive antibiotics during childbirth increases among women at risk. New serotypes of group B streptococcus have emerged as important pathogens in adults and newborns. Clinical and laboratory practices—in obstetrics, pediatrics, and clinical microbiology—have an impact on disease and/or its prevention, and protocols established at the institutional level appear to be critical tools for the reduction of perinatal disease due to group B streptococcus. Since intrapartum antibiotics will prevent at best only a portion of the full burden of group B streptococcal disease, critical developments in vaccine evaluation, including study of polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines, offer the potential for enhanced prevention in the relatively near future. PMID:9665980

  2. Phylogeography of Borrelia burgdorferi in the eastern United States reflects multiple independent Lyme disease emergence events

    PubMed Central

    Hoen, Anne Gatewood; Margos, Gabriele; Bent, Stephen J.; Diuk-Wasser, Maria A.; Barbour, Alan; Kurtenbach, Klaus; Fish, Durland

    2009-01-01

    Since its first description in coastal Connecticut in 1976, both the incidence of Lyme disease and the geographic extent of endemic areas in the US have increased dramatically. The rapid expansion of Lyme disease into its current distribution in the eastern half of the US has been due to the range expansion of the tick vector, Ixodes scapularis, upon which the causative agent, Borrelia burgdorferi is dependent for transmission to humans. In this study, we examined the phylogeographic population structure of B. burgdorferi throughout the range of I. scapularis-borne Lyme disease using multilocus sequence typing based on bacterial housekeeping genes. We show that B. burgdorferi populations from the Northeast and Midwest are genetically distinct, but phylogenetically related. Our findings provide strong evidence of prehistoric population size expansion and east-to-west radiation of descendent clones from founding sequence types in the Northeast. Estimates of the time scale of divergence of northeastern and midwestern populations suggest that B. burgdorferi was present in these regions of North America many thousands of years before European settlements. We conclude that B. burgdorferi populations have recently reemerged independently out of separate relict foci, where they have persisted since precolonial times. PMID:19706476

  3. Protein sets define disease states and predict in vivo effects of drug treatment.

    PubMed

    Meierhofer, David; Weidner, Christopher; Hartmann, Ludger; Mayr, Johannes A; Han, Chung-Ting; Schroeder, Frank C; Sauer, Sascha

    2013-07-01

    Gaining understanding of common complex diseases and their treatments are the main drivers for life sciences. As we show here, comprehensive protein set analyses offer new opportunities to decipher functional molecular networks of diseases and assess the efficacy and side-effects of treatments in vivo. Using mass spectrometry, we quantitatively detected several thousands of proteins and observed significant changes in protein pathways that were (dys-) regulated in diet-induced obesity mice. Analysis of the expression and post-translational modifications of proteins in various peripheral metabolic target tissues including adipose, heart, and liver tissue generated functional insights in the regulation of cell and tissue homeostasis during high-fat diet feeding and medication with two antidiabetic compounds. Protein set analyses singled out pathways for functional characterization, and indicated, for example, early-on potential cardiovascular complication of the diabetes drug rosiglitazone. In vivo protein set detection can provide new avenues for monitoring complex disease processes, and for evaluating preclinical drug candidates. PMID:23579186

  4. Biomarkers of therapeutic responses in chronic Chagas disease: state of the art and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pinazo, Maria-Jesus; Thomas, Maria-Carmen; Bustamante, Juan; Almeida, Igor Correia de; Lopez, Manuel-Carlos; Gascon, Joaquim

    2015-05-01

    The definition of a biomarker provided by the World Health Organization is any substance, structure, or process that can be measured in the body, or its products and influence, or predict the incidence or outcome of disease. Currently, the lack of prognosis and progression markers for chronic Chagas disease has posed limitations for testing new drugs to treat this neglected disease. Several molecules and techniques to detect biomarkers in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected patients have been proposed to assess whether specific treatment with benznidazole or nifurtimox is effective. Isolated proteins or protein groups from different T. cruzi stages and parasite-derived glycoproteins and synthetic neoglycoconjugates have been demonstrated to be useful for this purpose, as have nucleic acid amplification techniques. The amplification of T. cruzi DNA using the real-time polymerase chain reaction method is the leading test for assessing responses to treatment in a short period of time. Biochemical biomarkers have been tested early after specific treatment. Cytokines and surface markers represent promising molecules for the characterisation of host cellular responses, but need to be further assessed. PMID:25946151

  5. Regulation of Translocator Protein 18 kDa (TSPO) Expression in Health and Disease States

    PubMed Central

    Batarseh, Amani; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2010-01-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO) is an 18-kDa high affinity cholesterol- and drug-binding protein found primarily in the outer mitochondrial membrane. Although TSPO is found in many tissue types, it is expressed at the highest levels under normal conditions in tissues that synthesize steroids. TSPO has been associated with cholesterol import into mitochondria, a key function in steroidogenesis, and directly or indirectly with multiple other cellular functions including apoptosis, cell proliferation, differentiation, anion transport, porphyrin transport, heme synthesis, and regulation of mitochondrial function. Aberrant expression of TSPO has been linked to multiple diseases, including cancer, brain injury, neurodegeneration, and ischemia reperfusion injury. There has been an effort during the last decade to understand the mechanisms regulating tissue- and disease-specific TSPO expression and to identify pharmacological means to control its expression. This review focuses on the current knowledge regarding the chemicals, hormones, and molecular mechanisms regulating Tspo gene expression under physiological conditions in a tissue- and disease-specific manner. The results described here provide evidence that the PKC?-ERK1/2-AP1/Stat3 signal transduction pathway is the primary regulator of Tspo gene expression in normal and pathological tissues expressing high levels of TSPO. PMID:20600583

  6. The Model State Emergency Health Powers Act: planning for and response to bioterrorism and naturally occurring infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Gostin, Lawrence O; Sapsin, Jason W; Teret, Stephen P; Burris, Scott; Mair, Julie Samia; Hodge, James G; Vernick, Jon S

    2002-08-01

    The Center for Law and the Public's Health at Georgetown and Johns Hopkins Universities drafted the Model State Emergency Health Powers Act (MSEHPA or Model Act) at the request of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Model Act provides state actors with the powers they need to detect and contain bioterrorism or a naturally occurring disease outbreak. Legislative bills based on the MSEHPA have been introduced in 34 states. Problems of obsolescence, inconsistency, and inadequacy may render current state laws ineffective or even counterproductive. State laws often date back to the early 20th century and have been built up in layers over the years. They frequently predate the vast changes in the public health sciences and constitutional law. The Model Act is structured to reflect 5 basic public health functions to be facilitated by law: (1) preparedness, comprehensive planning for a public health emergency; (2) surveillance, measures to detect and track public health emergencies; (3) management of property, ensuring adequate availability of vaccines, pharmaceuticals, and hospitals, as well as providing power to abate hazards to the public's health; (4) protection of persons, powers to compel vaccination, testing, treatment, isolation, and quarantine when clearly necessary; and (5) communication, providing clear and authoritative information to the public. The Model Act also contains a modernized, extensive set of principles and requirements to safeguard personal rights. Law can be a tool to improve public health preparedness. A constitutional democracy must balance the common good with respect for personal dignity, toleration of groups, and adherence to principles of justice. PMID:12150674

  7. Towards understanding microvillus inclusion disease.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Georg F; Hess, Michael W; Pfaller, Kristian; Huber, Lukas A; Janecke, Andreas R; Müller, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Microvillus inclusion disease (MVID) is characterised by onset of intractable life-threatening watery diarrhoea during infancy. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrates shortening or absence of apical microvilli, pathognomonic microvillus inclusions in mature enterocytes and subapical accumulation of periodic acid-Schiff-positive granules or vesicles confirming diagnosis. Mutations in MYO5B have been found to cause MVID. In two patients with MVID, whole-exome sequencing of DNA revealed homozygous truncating mutations in STX3. Mutations in these genes disrupt trafficking between apical cargo vesicles and the apical plasma membrane. Thus, disturbed delivery of certain brush border membrane proteins is a common defect in MVID. PMID:26830108

  8. Resting state cortical electroencephalographic rhythms are related to gray matter volume in subjects with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Carducci, Filippo; Lizio, Roberta; Vecchio, Fabrizio; Baglieri, Annalisa; Bernardini, Silvia; Cavedo, Enrica; Bozzao, Alessandro; Buttinelli, Carla; Esposito, Fabrizio; Giubilei, Franco; Guizzaro, Antonio; Marino, Silvia; Montella, Patrizia; Quattrocchi, Carlo C; Redolfi, Alberto; Soricelli, Andrea; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Ferri, Raffaele; Rossi-Fedele, Giancarlo; Ursini, Francesca; Scrascia, Federica; Vernieri, Fabrizio; Pedersen, Torleif Jan; Hardemark, Hans-Goran; Rossini, Paolo M; Frisoni, Giovanni B

    2013-06-01

    Cortical gray matter volume and resting state cortical electroencephalographic rhythms are typically abnormal in subjects with amnesic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we tested the hypothesis that in amnesic MCI and AD subjects, abnormalities of EEG rhythms are a functional reflection of cortical atrophy across the disease. Eyes-closed resting state EEG data were recorded in 57 healthy elderly (Nold), 102 amnesic MCI, and 108 AD patients. Cortical gray matter volume was indexed by magnetic resonance imaging recorded in the MCI and AD subjects according to Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging initiative project (http://www.adni-info.org/). EEG rhythms of interest were delta (2-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha1 (8-10.5 Hz), alpha2 (10.5-13 Hz), beta1 (13-20 Hz), beta2 (20-30 Hz), and gamma (30-40 Hz). These rhythms were indexed by LORETA. Compared with the Nold, the MCI showed a decrease in amplitude of alpha 1 sources. With respect to the Nold and MCI, the AD showed an amplitude increase of delta sources, along with a strong amplitude reduction of alpha 1 sources. In the MCI and AD subjects as a whole group, the lower the cortical gray matter volume, the higher the delta sources, the lower the alpha 1 sources. The better the score to cognitive tests the higher the gray matter volume, the lower the pathological delta sources, and the higher the alpha sources. These results suggest that in amnesic MCI and AD subjects, abnormalities of resting state cortical EEG rhythms are not epiphenomena but are strictly related to neurodegeneration (atrophy of cortical gray matter) and cognition. PMID:22331654

  9. Population Structure of Geosmithia morbida, the Causal Agent of Thousand Cankers Disease of Walnut Trees in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Andrew D.; Hartel, Colleen; Pscheidt, Jay W.; Tonos, Jadelys; Broders, Kirk; Cranshaw, Whitney; Seybold, Steven J.; Tisserat, Ned

    2014-01-01

    The ascomycete Geosmithia morbida and the walnut twig beetle Pityophthorus juglandis are associated with thousand cankers disease of Juglans (walnut) and Pterocarya (wingnut). The disease was first reported in the western United States (USA) on several Juglans species, but has been found more recently in the eastern USA in the native range of the highly susceptible Juglans nigra. We performed a comprehensive population genetic study of 209 G. morbida isolates collected from Juglans and Pterocarya from 17 geographic regions distributed across 12 U.S. states. The study was based on sequence typing of 27 single nucleotide polymorphisms from three genomic regions and genotyping with ten microsatellite primer pairs. Using multilocus sequence-typing data, 197 G. morbida isolates were placed into one of 57 haplotypes. In some instances, multiple haplotypes were recovered from isolates collected on the same tree. Twenty-four of the haplotypes (42%) were recovered from more than one isolate; the two most frequently occurring haplotypes (H02 and H03) represented 36% of all isolates. These two haplotypes were abundant in California, but were not recovered from Arizona or New Mexico. G. morbida population structure was best explained by four genetically distinct groups that clustered into three geographic regions. Most of the haplotypes isolated from the native range of J. major (Arizona and New Mexico) were found in those states only or present in distinct genetic clusters. There was no evidence of sexual reproduction or genetic recombination in any population. The scattered distribution of the genetic clusters indicated that G. morbida was likely disseminated to different regions at several times and from several sources. The large number of haplotypes observed and the genetic complexity of G. morbida indicate that it evolved in association with at least one Juglans spp. and the walnut twig beetle long before the first reports of the disease. PMID:25393300

  10. Estimated Human and Economic Burden of Four Major Adult Vaccine-Preventable Diseases in the United States, 2013.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, John M; McGinnis, Justin J; Tan, Litjen; Mercatante, Annette; Fortuna, Joseph

    2015-08-01

    Low uptake of routinely recommended adult immunizations is a public health concern. Using data from the peer-reviewed literature, government disease-surveillance programs, and the US Census, we developed a customizable model to estimate human and economic burden caused by four major adult vaccine-preventable diseases (VPD) in 2013 in the United States, and for each US state individually. To estimate the number of cases for each adult VPD for a given population, we multiplied age-specific incidence rates obtained from the literature by age-specific 2013 Census population data. We then multiplied the estimated number of cases for a given population by age-specific, estimated medical and indirect (non-medical) costs per case. Adult VPDs examined were: (1) influenza, (2) pneumococcal disease (both invasive disease and pneumonia), (3) herpes zoster (shingles), and (4) pertussis (whooping cough). Sensitivity analyses simulated the impact of various epidemiological scenarios on the total estimated economic burden. Estimated US annual cost for the four adult VPDs was $26.5 billion (B) among adults aged 50 years and older, $15.3B (58 %) of which was attributable to those 65 and older. Among adults 50 and older, influenza, pneumococcal disease, herpes zoster, and pertussis made up $16.0B (60 %), $5.1B (19 %), $5.0B (19 %), and $0.4B (2 %) of the cost, respectively. Among those 65 and older, they made up $8.3B (54 %), $3.8B (25 %), $3.0B (20 %), and 0.2B (1 %) of the cost, respectively. Most (80-85 %) pneumococcal costs stemmed from nonbacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia (NPP). Cost attributable to adult VPD in the United States is substantial. Broadening adult immunization efforts beyond influenza only may help reduce the economic burden of adult VPD, and a pneumococcal vaccination effort, primarily focused on reducing NPP, may constitute a logical starting place. Sensitivity analyses revealed that a pandemic influenza season or change in size of the US elderly population could increase these costs dramatically. PMID:26032932

  11. Management of intractable hiccup.

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, B W; MacIntyre, I M

    1977-01-01

    A patient who developed hiccups after laparotomy was treated with numerous drugs with limited success. A left phrenic nerve crush was eventually successful. A review of published work showed that the drugs most likely to succeed were chlorpromazine and metoclopramide, and that phrenic nerve injection and crush should be considered if these failed. PMID:890370

  12. "Grutter" Accommodates the Intractable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazer, Nathan

    2003-01-01

    Sandra Day O'Connor seems to have given us the next 25 years to reach a resolution to the racial gap in education--a problem on which we've made little headway in the last 25. Nathan Glazer is not sanguine that we'll fnd that answer, but he's prepared to live with the messy but, to him, satisfactory scheme of affirmative action that Justice

  13. Carvedilol suppresses intractable hiccups.

    PubMed

    Stueber, Danielle; Swartz, Conrad M

    2006-01-01

    Carvedilol (6.25 mg, 4 times daily) relieved 2 years of constant hiccupping, marked tardive dyskinesia, compulsive self-induced vomiting, and feelings of hopelessness and low mood in a 59-year-old African-American man. He previously failed trials of ranitidine, chlorpromazine, promethazine, tegaserod, ondansetron, metoclopramide, pantoprazole, pyloric injections of botulinum toxin A, and a vagal nerve stimulator. At a 5-month follow-up, improvement was maintained; there had been several instances of rapid relapse on carvedilol discontinuation. PMID:16809659

  14. [State of intestinal microbiota in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease].

    PubMed

    Lytvynenko, K O; Bodnar, P M; Lysiana, T O; Ponomar'ova, I H; Koval'chuk, O A

    2014-01-01

    High prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) contributes to the intensification of scientific research the aim of which is to improve existing treatment. It is given the data about the state of intestinal microbiota in 64 patients with type 2 DM and NAFLD, 26 patients with type 2 DM and 28--with NAFLD. The research revealed significant changes in microbiota composition in patients with type 2 DM combined with NAFLD. Decompensated dysbiosis was registered in 71.9% of patients in this group which manifested in increased quantitative indicators of transient microflora crop with pathogenic characteristics and lack of microflora with protective characteristics. PMID:25906652

  15. Evolution of Cardiovascular Diseases Mortality in the Counties of the State of Rio de Janeiro from 1979 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Gabriel Porto; Klein, Carlos Henrique; Silva, Nelson Albuquerque de Souza e; de Oliveira, Glaucia Maria Moraes

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD) are the leading cause of death in Brazil. Objective To estimate total CVD, cerebrovascular disease (CBVD), and ischemic heart disease (IHD) mortality rates in adults in the counties of the state of Rio de Janeiro (SRJ), from 1979 to 2010. Methods The counties of the SRJ were analysed according to their denominations stablished by the geopolitical structure of 1950, Each new county that have since been created, splitting from their original county, was grouped according to their former origin. Population Data were obtained from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE), and data on deaths were obtained from DataSus/MS. Mean CVD, CBVD, and IHD mortality rates were estimated, compensated for deaths from ill-defined causes, and adjusted for age and sex using the direct method for three periods: 1979–1989, 1990–1999, and 2000–2010, Such results were spatially represented in maps. Tables were also constructed showing the mortality rates for each disease and year period. Results There was a significant reduction in mortality rates across the three disease groups over the the three defined periods in all the county clusters analysed, Despite an initial mortality rate variation among the counties, it was observed a homogenization of such rates at the final period (2000–2010). The drop in CBVD mortality was greater than that in IHD mortality. Conclusion Mortality due to CVD has steadily decreased in the SRJ in the last three decades. This reduction cannot be explained by greater access to high technology procedures or better control of cardiovascular risk factors as these facts have not occurred or happened in low proportion of cases with the exception of smoking which has decreased significantly. Therefore, it is necessary to seek explanations for this decrease, which may be related to improvements in the socioeconomic conditions of the population. PMID:25789882

  16. Medication adherence among recipients with chronic diseases enrolled in a state Medicaid program.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Rahul; Pace, Patrick F; Mahabaleshwarkar, Rohan; Basak, Ram Sankar; Datar, Manasi; Banahan, Benjamin F

    2012-10-01

    Limited information is currently available about medication adherence for common chronic conditions among the Medicaid population. The primary objective of this study was to assess medication adherence among Medicaid recipients with depression, diabetes, epilepsy, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertension. Factors influencing adherence were determined. The authors also assessed whether adherence influences the utilization of acute care services. The target population included nonelderly adult recipients (ages 21-64 years) who were continuously enrolled in the Mississippi (MS) Medicaid fee-for-service program from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2007. Recipients were identified who had a medical services claim with a diagnosis of depression, diabetes, epilepsy, hypercholesterolemia, or hypertension in calendar year 2006. Within each chronic disease sample, medication adherence was determined using calendar year 2007 data for recipients who met inclusion and exclusion criteria. Recipients with adherence ?80% were classified as adherent. Logistic regression analyses were used to determine the factors that predict medication adherence and the effect of adherence on concurrent all-cause acute care service (ie, hospitalization, emergency room visit) utilization. Approximately 24% of recipients with depression, 35.9% with diabetes, 53.6% with epilepsy, 32% with hypercholesterolemia, and 42.2% with hypertension were adherent. Within each chronic disease sample, males and whites had higher adherence than females and blacks. After controlling for demographic and disease-related covariates, recipients who were adherent had lower concurrent acute care service utilization than nonadherent recipients. Given the inverse relationship between adherence and acute care service utilization, policy makers should consider implementing educational interventions aimed at improving adherence in this underprivileged population. PMID:22401152

  17. Laboratory diagnostics of chronic kidney disease in Croatia: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Honovi?, Lorena; Matica, Jasminka; Kneevi?, Branka; Vojak, Sanela imi?

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Early identification and management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is highly cost-effective and can reduce the risk of kidney failure progression and cardiovascular disease. In 2014, the Joint Croatian Working Group (JCWG) for laboratory diagnostic of CKD on the behalf of Croatian society of medical biochemistry and laboratory medicine (CSMBLM) and Croatian chamber of medical biochemists (CCMB) conducted a survey across Croatian medical-biochemistry laboratories to assess the current practice in this area of laboratory medicine. The aim of this study was to present the data collected through the survey and to give insight about laboratory diagnostics of chronic kidney disease in Croatia. Materials and methods An invitation to participate in the survey was sent to all Croatian medical-biochemistry laboratories (N = 196). The questionnaire was designed in a form of questions and statements, with possible multiple answers, comprising 24 questions. Results The response rate was 80/196 (40.8%). 39 answers were from primary medical-biochemistry laboratories. 31/78 (0.40) laboratories measure creatinine with non-standardized method (uncompensated Jaffe method). 58/78 (0.74) of laboratories that measure creatinine do not report eGFR values. Similar number of laboratories (58/80, 0.73) do not measure urine albumin or protein. Conclusions There is a large heterogeneity among Croatian laboratories regarding measuring methods, reporting units and reference intervals (cut-off values), both for creatinine and urine albumin or protein. The two key prerequisites for CKD screening, automatic reporting of eGFR and albuminuria or proteinuria assessment, are not implemented nationwide. There is a need for harmonization in laboratory diagnostics of CKD in Croatia. PMID:25672470

  18. Reprint of: Connections between single-cell biomechanics and human disease states: gastrointestinal cancer and malaria.

    PubMed

    Suresh, S; Spatz, J; Mills, J P; Micoulet, A; Dao, M; Lim, C T; Beil, M; Seufferlein, T

    2015-09-01

    We investigate connections between single-cell mechanical properties and subcellular structural reorganization from biochemical factors in the context of two distinctly different human diseases: gastrointestinal tumor and malaria. Although the cell lineages and the biochemical links to pathogenesis are vastly different in these two cases, we compare and contrast chemomechanical pathways whereby intracellular structural rearrangements lead to global changes in mechanical deformability of the cell. This single-cell biomechanical response, in turn, seems to mediate cell mobility and thereby facilitates disease progression in situations where the elastic modulus increases or decreases due to membrane or cytoskeleton reorganization. We first present new experiments on elastic response and energy dissipation under repeated tensile loading of epithelial pancreatic cancer cells in force- or displacement-control. Energy dissipation from repeated stretching significantly increases and the cell's elastic modulus decreases after treatment of Panc-1 pancreatic cancer cells with sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC), a bioactive lipid that influences cancer metastasis. When the cell is treated instead with lysophosphatidic acid, which facilitates actin stress fiber formation, neither energy dissipation nor modulus is noticeably affected. Integrating recent studies with our new observations, we ascribe these trends to possible SPC-induced reorganization primarily of keratin network to perinuclear region of cell; the intermediate filament fraction of the cytoskeleton thus appears to dominate deformability of the epithelial cell. Possible consequences of these results to cell mobility and cancer metastasis are postulated. We then turn attention to progressive changes in mechanical properties of the human red blood cell (RBC) infected with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. We present, for the first time, continuous force-displacement curves obtained from in-vitro deformation of RBC with optical tweezers for different intracellular developmental stages of parasite. The shear modulus of RBC is found to increase up to 10-fold during parasite development, which is a noticeably greater effect than that from prior estimates. By integrating our new experimental results with published literature on deformability of Plasmodium-harbouring RBC, we examine the biochemical conditions mediating increases or decreases in modulus, and their implications for disease progression. Some general perspectives on connections among structure, single-cell mechanical properties and biological responses associated with pathogenic processes are also provided in the context of the two diseases considered in this work. PMID:26235344

  19. Differential Epidemiology: IQ, Neuroticism, and Chronic Disease by the 50 U.S. States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pesta, Bryan J.; Bertsch, Sharon; McDaniel, Michael A.; Mahoney, Christine B.; Poznanski, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Current research shows that geo-political units (e.g., the 50 U.S. states) vary meaningfully on psychological dimensions like intelligence (IQ) and neuroticism (N). A new scientific discipline has also emerged, differential epidemiology, focused on how psychological variables affect health. We integrate these areas by reporting large correlations…

  20. Differential Epidemiology: IQ, Neuroticism, and Chronic Disease by the 50 U.S. States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pesta, Bryan J.; Bertsch, Sharon; McDaniel, Michael A.; Mahoney, Christine B.; Poznanski, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Current research shows that geo-political units (e.g., the 50 U.S. states) vary meaningfully on psychological dimensions like intelligence (IQ) and neuroticism (N). A new scientific discipline has also emerged, differential epidemiology, focused on how psychological variables affect health. We integrate these areas by reporting large correlations

  1. Socioenvironmental characteristics associated with the onset of decline of ischemic heart disease mortality in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Wing, S; Casper, M; Riggan, W; Hayes, C; Tyroler, H A

    1988-01-01

    The relation of community socioenvironmental characteristics to timing of the onset of decline of ischemic heart disease (IHD) mortality was investigated among the 507 State Economic Areas of the continental United States. Onset of decline was measured using data for White men aged 35-74 and classified as early (1968 or before) vs late (after 1968). Ten socioenvironmental characteristics derived from US Census Bureau data were strongly related to onset of decline. Areas with the poorest socioenvironmental conditions were two to 10 times more likely to experience late onset than those areas with the highest levels. We found that income-related characteristics could account for most of the difference in onset of decline of IHD between metropolitan and non-metropolitan places. We conclude that community socioenvironmental characteristics provide the context for changes in risk factors and medical care. PMID:3389429

  2. Drug Delivery for Treatment of Inner Ear Disease: Current State of Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Andrew A.; Leary Swan, Erin E.; Borenstein, Jeffrey T.; Sewell, William F.; Kujawa, Sharon G.; McKenna, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Delivery of medications to the inner ear has been an area of considerable growth in both the research and clinical realms over the past several decades. Systemic delivery of medication destined for treatment of the inner ear is the foundation upon which newer delivery techniques have been developed. Due to systemic side effects, investigators and clinicians have begun developing and utilizing techniques to deliver therapeutic agents locally. Alongside the now commonplace use of intratympanic gentamicin for Meniere's disease and the emerging use of intratympanic steroids for sudden sensorineural hearing loss, novel technologies, such as hydrogels and nanoparticles, are being explored. At the horizon of inner ear drug delivery techniques, intracochlear devices that leverage recent advances in microsystems technology are being developed to apply medications directly into the inner ear. Potential uses for such devices include neurotrophic factor and steroid delivery with cochlear implantation, RNA interference technologies, and stem cell therapy. The historical, current, and future delivery techniques and uses of drug delivery for treatment of inner ear disease serve as the basis for this review. PMID:19952751

  3. Cardiovascular Biomarkers in Chronic Kidney Disease: State of Current Research and Clinical Applicability

    PubMed Central

    D'Marco, Luis; Bellasi, Antonio; Raggi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The high incidence of cardiovascular events in chronic kidney disease (CKD) warrants an accurate evaluation of risk aimed at reducing the burden of disease and its consequences. The use of biomarkers to identify patients at high risk has been in use in the general population for several decades and has received mixed reactions in the medical community. Some practitioners have become staunch supporters and users while others doubt the utility of biomarkers and rarely measure them. In CKD patients numerous markers similar to those used in the general population and others more specific to the uremic population have emerged; however their utility for routine clinical application remains to be fully elucidated. The reproducibility and standardization of the serum assays are serious limitations to the broad implementation of these tests. The lack of focused research and validation in randomized trials rather than ad hoc measurement of multiple serum markers in observational studies is also cause for concern related to the clinical applicability of these markers. We review the current literature on biomarkers that may have a relevant role in field of nephrology. PMID:25944976

  4. State of the science: use of biomarkers and imaging in diagnosis and management of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Fraller, Deirdre Brett

    2013-04-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a significant health problem with increasing costs to patients, families, and society. Historically, AD has been diagnosed clinically in living patients using patient history and cognitive testing, approaches with limited sensitivity and specificity. Definitive diagnosis becomes possible only after the patient's death, when physical evidence of the disease process is found upon autopsy. By the time signs and symptoms are sufficient for clinical diagnosis, brain pathology is often quite advanced, limiting benefits of treatment. New techniques have been developed in recent years allowing clinicians to see evidence of the AD pathophysiological process in vivo, allowing more definitive diagnosis while the patient is still alive. In vivo methods able to identify AD in its earliest stages, before the development of the cognitive impairment that allows clinical diagnosis, could enable treatment to begin before pathology is advanced. In 2011, the U.S. NIH National Institute on Aging and the Alzheimer's Association issued new diagnostic guidelines for AD allowing use of biomarker and imaging techniques in addition to clinical criteria. This article describes these new techniques and discusses how they might be used in the diagnosis and management of AD. PMID:23353653

  5. Incidence of Clinician-Diagnosed Lyme Disease, United States, 2005–2010

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Shubhayu; Kugeler, Kiersten J.; Delorey, Mark J.; Shankar, Manjunath B.; Hinckley, Alison F.; Mead, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    National surveillance provides important information about Lyme disease (LD) but is subject to underreporting and variations in practice. Information is limited about the national epidemiology of LD from other sources. Retrospective analysis of a nationwide health insurance claims database identified patients from 2005–2010 with clinician-diagnosed LD using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, codes and antimicrobial drug prescriptions. Of 103,647,966 person-years, 985 inpatient admissions and 44,445 outpatient LD diagnoses were identified. Epidemiologic patterns were similar to US surveillance data overall. Outpatient incidence was highest among boys 5–9 years of age and persons of both sexes 60–64 years of age. On the basis of extrapolation to the US population and application of correction factors for coding, we estimate that annual incidence is 106.6 cases/100,000 persons and that ≈329,000 (95% credible interval 296,000–376,000) LD cases occur annually. LD is a major US public health problem that causes substantial use of health care resources. PMID:26291194

  6. Chromatin stretch enhancer states drive cell-specific gene regulation and harbor human disease risk variants.

    PubMed

    Parker, Stephen C J; Stitzel, Michael L; Taylor, D Leland; Orozco, Jose Miguel; Erdos, Michael R; Akiyama, Jennifer A; van Bueren, Kelly Lammerts; Chines, Peter S; Narisu, Narisu; Black, Brian L; Visel, Axel; Pennacchio, Len A; Collins, Francis S

    2013-10-29

    Chromatin-based functional genomic analyses and genomewide association studies (GWASs) together implicate enhancers as critical elements influencing gene expression and risk for common diseases. Here, we performed systematic chromatin and transcriptome profiling in human pancreatic islets. Integrated analysis of islet data with those from nine cell types identified specific and significant enrichment of type 2 diabetes and related quantitative trait GWAS variants in islet enhancers. Our integrated chromatin maps reveal that most enhancers are short (median = 0.8 kb). Each cell type also contains a substantial number of more extended (? 3 kb) enhancers. Interestingly, these stretch enhancers are often tissue-specific and overlap locus control regions, suggesting that they are important chromatin regulatory beacons. Indeed, we show that (i) tissue specificity of enhancers and nearby gene expression increase with enhancer length; (ii) neighborhoods containing stretch enhancers are enriched for important cell type-specific genes; and (iii) GWAS variants associated with traits relevant to a particular cell type are more enriched in stretch enhancers compared with short enhancers. Reporter constructs containing stretch enhancer sequences exhibited tissue-specific activity in cell culture experiments and in transgenic mice. These results suggest that stretch enhancers are critical chromatin elements for coordinating cell type-specific regulatory programs and that sequence variation in stretch enhancers affects risk of major common human diseases. PMID:24127591

  7. Serum bile acid profiling reflects enterohepatic detoxification state and intestinal barrier function in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Gnewuch, Carsten; Liebisch, Gerhard; Langmann, Thomas; Dieplinger, Benjamin; Mueller, Thomas; Haltmayer, Meinhard; Dieplinger, Hans; Zahn, Alexandra; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Rogler, Gerhard; Schmitz, Gerd

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine free and conjugated serum bile acid (BA) levels in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) subgroups with defined clinical manifestations. METHODS: Comprehensive serum BA profiling was performed in 358 IBD patients and 310 healthy controls by liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Serum levels of hyodeoxycholic acid, the CYP3A4-mediated detoxification product of the secondary BA lithocholic acid (LCA), was increased significantly in Crohns disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), while most other serum BA species were decreased significantly. Total BA, total BA conjugate, and total BA glycoconjugate levels were decreased only in CD, whereas total unconjugated BA levels were decreased only in UC. In UC patients with hepatobiliary manifestations, the conjugated primary BAs glycocholic acid, taurocholic acid, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid were as significantly increased as the secondary BAs LCA, ursodeoxycholic acid, and tauroursodeoxycholic acid compared to UC patients without hepatobiliary manifestations. Finally, we found that in ileocecal resected CD patients, the unconjugated primary BAs, cholic acid and chenodeoxycholic acid, were increased significantly compared to controls and patients without surgical interventions. CONCLUSION: Serum BA profiling in IBD patients that indicates impaired intestinal barrier function and increased detoxification is suitable for advanced diagnostic characterization and differentiation of IBD subgroups with defined clinical manifestations. PMID:19575493

  8. The role of adaptation to disability and disease in health state valuation: a preliminary normative analysis.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Paul; Dolan, Paul; Richardson, Jeff; Olsen, Jan Abel

    2002-12-01

    Chronically ill and disabled patients generally rate the value of their lives in a given health state more highly than do hypothetical patients imagining themselves to be in such states. Much of this difference may be due to actual patients' adaptation to their health states, a phenomenon that would not typically affect the ratings of persons who only hypothetically imagine themselves to be patients. This article pursues a non-empirical, normative question: does such adaptation render actual patients' ratings of quality of life morally questionable for purposes of resource allocation? Distinguishing the different basic elements in patient adaptation reveals why, and in what respects, people are pulled strongly in opposite directions in responding to this question. Several more explicit moral arguments against using adapted patients' ratings have been articulated by economists and philosophers, and others are developed by the authors. While most of these arguments do not survive careful analysis, several do. Given the subsequent complexity of the matter, it is argued that: (1) Neither solely actual nor solely hypothetical patient perspectives should be used for rating quality of life. (2) Even if representatives of the general public acting as hypothetical patients provide ultimately the best perspective from which to discern societal values about health states, patients' values that are often influenced by adaptation must still be conveyed to and clearly understood by public representatives as a critically important fact about health-related quality of life. The article also points to the need for much additional work on adaptation, both empirical research and normative analysis. PMID:12409128

  9. Mathematical modeling of bone marrow - peripheral blood dynamics in the disease state based on current emerging paradigms, part I.

    PubMed

    Afenya, Evans K; Ouifki, Rachid; Camara, Baba I; Mundle, Suneel D

    2016-04-01

    Stemming from current emerging paradigms related to the cancer stem cell hypothesis, an existing mathematical model is expanded and used to study cell interaction dynamics in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. The proposed mathematical model is described by a system of nonlinear differential equations with delay, to quantify the dynamics in abnormal hematopoiesis. The steady states of the model are analytically and numerically obtained. Some conditions for the local asymptotic stability of such states are investigated. Model analyses suggest that malignancy may be irreversible once it evolves from a nonmalignant state into a malignant one and no intervention takes place. This leads to the proposition that a great deal of emphasis be placed on cancer prevention. Nevertheless, should malignancy arise, treatment programs for its containment or curtailment may have to include a maximum and extensive level of effort to protect normal cells from eventual destruction. Further model analyses and simulations predict that in the untreated disease state, there is an evolution towards a situation in which malignant cells dominate the entire bone marrow - peripheral blood system. Arguments are then advanced regarding requirements for quantitatively understanding cancer stem cell behavior. Among the suggested requirements are, mathematical frameworks for describing the dynamics of cancer initiation and progression, the response to treatment, the evolution of resistance, and malignancy prevention dynamics within the bone marrow - peripheral blood architecture. PMID:26877072

  10. Current and Future Disease Progression of the Chronic HCV Population in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Zalesak, Martin; Francis, Kevin; Gedeon, Alex; Gillis, John; Hvidsten, Kyle; Kidder, Phyllis; Li, Hong; Martyn, Derek; Orne, Leslie; Smith, Amanda; Kwong, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can lead to advanced liver disease (AdvLD), including cirrhosis, decompensated cirrhosis, and liver cancer. The aim of this study was to determine recent historical rates of HCV patient progression to AdvLD and to project AdvLD prevalence through 2015. We first determined total 2008 US chronic HCV prevalence from the National Health and Nutrition Evaluation Surveys. Next, we examined disease progression and associated non-pharmacological costs of diagnosed chronic HCV-infected patients between 20072009 in the IMS LifeLink and CMS Medicare claims databases. A projection model was developed to estimate AdvLD population growth through 2015 in patients diagnosed and undiagnosed as of 2008, using the 20072009 progression rates to generate a worst case projection of the HCV-related AdvLD population (i.e., scenario where HCV treatment is the same in the forecasted period as it was before 2009). We found that the total diagnosed chronic HCV population grew from 983,000 to 1.19 million in 20072009, with patients born from 19451964 accounting for 75.0% of all patients, 83.7% of AdvLD patients, and 79.2% of costs in 2009, indicating that HCV is primarily a disease of the baby boomer population. Non-pharmacological costs grew from $7.22 billion to $8.63 billion, with the majority of growth derived from the 60,000 new patients that developed AdvLD in 20072009, 91.5% of whom were born between 1945 and 1964. The projection model estimated the total AdvLD population would grow from 195,000 in 2008 to 601,000 in 2015, with 73.5% of new AdvLD cases from patients undiagnosed as of 2008. AdvLD prevalence in patients diagnosed as of 2008 was projected to grow 6.5% annually to 303,000 patients in 2015. These findings suggest that strategies to diagnose and treat HCV-infected patients are urgently needed to increase the likelihood that progression is interrupted, particularly for patients born from 19451964. PMID:23704962

  11. Current and future disease progression of the chronic HCV population in the United States.

    PubMed

    Zalesak, Martin; Francis, Kevin; Gedeon, Alex; Gillis, John; Hvidsten, Kyle; Kidder, Phyllis; Li, Hong; Martyn, Derek; Orne, Leslie; Smith, Amanda; Kwong, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can lead to advanced liver disease (AdvLD), including cirrhosis, decompensated cirrhosis, and liver cancer. The aim of this study was to determine recent historical rates of HCV patient progression to AdvLD and to project AdvLD prevalence through 2015. We first determined total 2008 US chronic HCV prevalence from the National Health and Nutrition Evaluation Surveys. Next, we examined disease progression and associated non-pharmacological costs of diagnosed chronic HCV-infected patients between 2007-2009 in the IMS LifeLink and CMS Medicare claims databases. A projection model was developed to estimate AdvLD population growth through 2015 in patients diagnosed and undiagnosed as of 2008, using the 2007-2009 progression rates to generate a "worst case" projection of the HCV-related AdvLD population (i.e., scenario where HCV treatment is the same in the forecasted period as it was before 2009). We found that the total diagnosed chronic HCV population grew from 983,000 to 1.19 million in 2007-2009, with patients born from 1945-1964 accounting for 75.0% of all patients, 83.7% of AdvLD patients, and 79.2% of costs in 2009, indicating that HCV is primarily a disease of the "baby boomer" population. Non-pharmacological costs grew from $7.22 billion to $8.63 billion, with the majority of growth derived from the 60,000 new patients that developed AdvLD in 2007-2009, 91.5% of whom were born between 1945 and 1964. The projection model estimated the total AdvLD population would grow from 195,000 in 2008 to 601,000 in 2015, with 73.5% of new AdvLD cases from patients undiagnosed as of 2008. AdvLD prevalence in patients diagnosed as of 2008 was projected to grow 6.5% annually to 303,000 patients in 2015. These findings suggest that strategies to diagnose and treat HCV-infected patients are urgently needed to increase the likelihood that progression is interrupted, particularly for patients born from 1945-1964. PMID:23704962

  12. The Effects of a Disease Management Program on Self-Reported Health Behaviors and Health Outcomes: Evidence from the "Florida--A Healthy State (FAHS)" Medicaid Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morisky, Donald E.; Kominski, Gerald F.; Afifi, Abdelmonem A.; Kotlerman, Jenny B.

    2009-01-01

    Premature morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases account for a major proportion of expenditures for health care cost in the United States. The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of a disease management program on physiological and behavioral health indicators for Medicaid patients in Florida. A two-year prospective study of…

  13. The Effects of a Disease Management Program on Self-Reported Health Behaviors and Health Outcomes: Evidence from the "Florida--A Healthy State (FAHS)" Medicaid Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morisky, Donald E.; Kominski, Gerald F.; Afifi, Abdelmonem A.; Kotlerman, Jenny B.

    2009-01-01

    Premature morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases account for a major proportion of expenditures for health care cost in the United States. The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of a disease management program on physiological and behavioral health indicators for Medicaid patients in Florida. A two-year prospective study of

  14. Combining anatomical, diffusion, and resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging for individual classification of mild and moderate Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Schouten, Tijn M.; Koini, Marisa; de Vos, Frank; Seiler, Stephan; van der Grond, Jeroen; Lechner, Anita; Hafkemeijer, Anne; Mller, Christiane; Schmidt, Reinhold; de Rooij, Mark; Rombouts, Serge A.R.B.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is sensitive to structural and functional changes in the brain caused by Alzheimer's disease (AD), and can therefore be used to help in diagnosing the disease. Improving classification of AD patients based on MRI scans might help to identify AD earlier in the disease's progress, which may be key in developing treatments for AD. In this study we used an elastic net classifier based on several measures derived from the MRI scans of mild to moderate AD patients (N=77) from the prospective registry on dementia study and controls (N=173) from the Austrian Stroke Prevention Family Study. We based our classification on measures from anatomical MRI, diffusion weighted MRI and resting state functional MRI. Our unimodal classification performance ranged from an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.760 (full correlations between functional networks) to 0.909 (grey matter density). When combining measures from multiple modalities in a stepwise manner, the classification performance improved to an AUC of 0.952. This optimal combination consisted of grey matter density, white matter density, fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and sparse partial correlations between functional networks. Classification performance for mild AD as well as moderate AD also improved when using this multimodal combination. We conclude that different MRI modalities provide complementary information for classifying AD. Moreover, combining multiple modalities can substantially improve classification performance over unimodal classification. PMID:26909327

  15. Travel-Associated Zika Virus Disease Cases Among U.S. Residents - United States, January 2015-February 2016.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Paige; Hennessey, Morgan; Adams, Monica; Cherry, Cara; Chiu, Sophia; Harrist, Alexia; Kwit, Natalie; Lewis, Lillianne; McGuire, Dana Olzenak; Oduyebo, Titilope; Russell, Kate; Talley, Pamela; Tanner, Mary; Williams, Charnetta; Basile, Jane; Brandvold, Jacob; Calvert, Amanda; Cohn, Amanda; Fischer, Marc; Goldman-Israelow, Benjamin; Goodenough, Dana; Goodman, Christin; Hills, Susan; Kosoy, Olga; Lambert, Amy; Lanciotti, Robert; Laven, Janeen; Ledermann, Jeremy; Lehman, Jennifer; Lindsey, Nicole; Mead, Paul; Mossel, Eric; Nelson, Christina; Nichols, Megin; O'Leary, Daniel; Panella, Amanda; Powers, Ann; Rabe, Ingrid; Reagan-Steiner, Sarah; Staples, J Erin; Velez, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus. Recent outbreaks of Zika virus disease in the Pacific Islands and the Region of the Americas have identified new modes of transmission and clinical manifestations, including adverse pregnancy outcomes. However, data on the epidemiology and clinical findings of laboratory-confirmed Zika virus disease remain limited. During January 1, 2015-February 26, 2016, a total of 116 residents of 33 U.S. states and the District of Columbia had laboratory evidence of recent Zika virus infection based on testing performed at CDC. Cases include one congenital infection and 115 persons who reported recent travel to areas with active Zika virus transmission (n = 110) or sexual contact with such a traveler (n = 5). All 115 patients had clinical illness, with the most common signs and symptoms being rash (98%; n = 113), fever (82%; 94), and arthralgia (66%; 76). Health care providers should educate patients, particularly pregnant women, about the risks for, and measures to prevent, infection with Zika virus and other mosquito-borne viruses. Zika virus disease should be considered in patients with acute onset of fever, rash, arthralgia, or conjunctivitis, who traveled to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission (http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/index.html) or who had unprotected sex with a person who traveled to one of those areas and developed compatible symptoms within 2 weeks of returning. PMID:27023833

  16. Estimating the United States demand for influenza antivirals and the effect on severe influenza disease during a potential pandemic.

    PubMed

    O'Hagan, Justin J; Wong, Karen K; Campbell, Angela P; Patel, Anita; Swerdlow, David L; Fry, Alicia M; Koonin, Lisa M; Meltzer, Martin I

    2015-05-01

    Following the detection of a novel influenza strain A(H7N9), we modeled the use of antiviral treatment in the United States to mitigate severe disease across a range of hypothetical pandemic scenarios. Our outcomes were total demand for antiviral (neuraminidase inhibitor) treatment and the number of hospitalizations and deaths averted. The model included estimates of attack rate, healthcare-seeking behavior, prescription rates, adherence, disease severity, and the potential effect of antivirals on the risks of hospitalization and death. Based on these inputs, the total antiviral regimens estimated to be available in the United States (as of April 2013) were sufficient to meet treatment needs for the scenarios considered. However, distribution logistics were not examined and should be addressed in future work. Treatment was estimated to avert many severe outcomes (5200-248,000 deaths; 4800-504,000 hospitalizations); however, large numbers remained (25,000-425,000 deaths; 580,000-3,700,000 hospitalizations), suggesting that the impact of combinations of interventions should be examined. PMID:25878299

  17. Completeness of Reporting of Race and Ethnicity Data in the Nationally Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System, United States, 2006–2010

    PubMed Central

    Adekoya, Nelson; Truman, Benedict I.; Ajani, Umed A.

    2015-01-01

    Context During 1994–1997, approximately 70% and 60% of the cases of conditions reported to the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System included persons of known race and ethnicity, respectively. A major goal of the Healthy People 2020 initiative is to eliminate health disparities. Objective To describe trends in the completeness of race and ethnicity in case reports of the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System during 2006–2010. Methods The National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System is a public health surveillance system that aggregates case reports of infectious diseases and conditions that are designated nationally notifiable and are collected by US states and territories. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Atlanta, Georgia) maintains this surveillance system in collaboration with the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists. We used Cochran-Armitage Trend Test (SAS, version 9.2) to test the hypothesis that the percentage of case reports with the completeness of race and ethnicity data increased or decreased linearly during 2006–2010. Main Outcome Measure Completeness of race and ethnicity variables. Results The 32 conditions reviewed included 1 030 804 case records. Seventy percent of records included a known value for race, and 49% of records included ethnicity during 2006–2010. During 2006–2010, race was known in 70% or more of records in 24 of 32 conditions and in 23 of 51 jurisdictions. During 2006–2010, the systemwide reporting of race remained at the same level of completeness (70%) but the reporting of ethnicity increased slightly from 48% in 2006 to 53% in 2010. In comparison with race, the proportions of records coded to ethnicity were less among all conditions. Conclusions Significant change has occurred in the completeness of reporting of ethnicity but not race during 2006–2010. However, the reporting of ethnicity still lags substantially behind the reporting of race. Jurisdictions that identify conditions with lower rates of completeness of race and ethnicity can assess the net benefits of efforts to improve the completeness of race and ethnicity data. PMID:24777058

  18. [Reactive states in patients with traumatic disease of the brain at remote periods].

    PubMed

    Kornilov, A A

    1984-01-01

    Long-term reactive conditions in 100 patients with traumatic cerebral lesions were studied. On the basis of the disease course, the patients were divided into two groups. In 55 cases, psychogenic disorders developed into neuroses, the latter transforming over years into neurosis-like symptomatology, with the growing frequency of vegetative and liquorodynamic impairments and also with increased asthenia. In the case of psychoses development, there was a tendency toward the alleviation of the acuity of every subsequent reactive condition. Such disorders as acute reactive psychoses, reactive depression, delirium-like fantasies showed a progressive tendency to decline, while there was an increase in the incidence of pseudodementia, reactive paranoid and verbal hallucinosis. Conditions contributing to the development of individual types of psychoses are reviewed. PMID:6730824

  19. State of the art in the diagnosis and management of interstitial lung disease

    PubMed Central

    BUZAN, MARIA T. A.; POP, CARMEN MONICA

    2015-01-01

    The interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) are a diverse group of disorders characterized by a varying combination of inflammation and fibrosis of the pulmonary parenchyma. Treatment and prognosis of ILD typically depend on the underlying ILD subtype, highlighting the importance of accurate classification and diagnosis. Besides a thorough history and clinical examination, the protocol should include a 6-minute walk test, chest radiography, high-resolution computed tomography, biochemical analysis, pulmonary function tests, blood gas analysis, bronchoalveolar lavage, and, when necessary, a lung biopsy. The final diagnosis of ILD entities requires dynamic interaction between clinicians, radiologists and pathologists to reach a clinico-radiologic-pathologic diagnosis, the gold standard no longer being the histology but rather a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26528058

  20. [Effect of diet therapy on the state of the intestinal barrier in digestive organ diseases].

    PubMed

    Chanturiia, Zh A; Ekisenina, N I

    1980-01-01

    The effect of diets with varying amount of protein (135 and 160 g) on the intestinal barrier was studied in patients with the inadequate absorption syndrome of different etiology (chronic enterocolitis, the postgastroresection syndrome, chronic colitis). The data obtained indicate that in spite of the progress attained in the care of such patients at the present time, they show disturbed permeability of the intestinal barrier, determined by the passive hemagglutination test (PHAT) with diverse fractions of milk protein. With the postgastroresection syndrome, the abnormalities in the intestinal barrier arise less frequently, are less pronounced and more amenable by therapy as compared to patients with chronic enterocolitis. However, the condition of the small intestine should be taken into consideration in making dietetic recommendations for the patients suffering from the above diseases. The clinical findings and PHAT dynamics indicate that inclusion into the diet of over 135 g protein is not desirable. PMID:7368669

  1. Two-year seizure reduction in adults with medically intractable partial onset epilepsy treated with responsive neurostimulation: Final results of the RNS System Pivotal trial

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Christianne N; King-Stephens, David; Massey, Andrew D; Nair, Dileep R; Jobst, Barbara C; Barkley, Gregory L; Salanova, Vicenta; Cole, Andrew J; Smith, Michael C; Gwinn, Ryder P; Skidmore, Christopher; Van Ness, Paul C; Bergey, Gregory K; Park, Yong D; Miller, Ian; Geller, Eric; Rutecki, Paul A; Zimmerman, Richard; Spencer, David C; Goldman, Alica; Edwards, Jonathan C; Leiphart, James W; Wharen, Robert E; Fessler, James; Fountain, Nathan B; Worrell, Gregory A; Gross, Robert E; Eisenschenk, Stephan; Duckrow, Robert B; Hirsch, Lawrence J; Bazil, Carl; O'Donovan, Cormac A; Sun, Felice T; Courtney, Tracy A; Seale, Cairn G; Morrell, Martha J

    2014-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of responsive stimulation at the seizure focus as an adjunctive therapy to reduce the frequency of seizures in adults with medically intractable partial onset seizures arising from one or two seizure foci. Methods Randomized multicenter double-blinded controlled trial of responsive focal cortical stimulation (RNS System). Subjects with medically intractable partial onset seizures from one or two foci were implanted, and 1 month postimplant were randomized 1:1 to active or sham stimulation. After the fifth postimplant month, all subjects received responsive stimulation in an open label period (OLP) to complete 2 years of postimplant follow-up. Results All 191 subjects were randomized. The percent change in seizures at the end of the blinded period was −37.9% in the active and −17.3% in the sham stimulation group (p = 0.012, Generalized Estimating Equations). The median percent reduction in seizures in the OLP was 44% at 1 year and 53% at 2 years, which represents a progressive and significant improvement with time (p < 0.0001). The serious adverse event rate was not different between subjects receiving active and sham stimulation. Adverse events were consistent with the known risks of an implanted medical device, seizures, and of other epilepsy treatments. There were no adverse effects on neuropsychological function or mood. Significance Responsive stimulation to the seizure focus reduced the frequency of partial-onset seizures acutely, showed improving seizure reduction over time, was well tolerated, and was acceptably safe. The RNS System provides an additional treatment option for patients with medically intractable partial-onset seizures. PMID:24621228

  2. Fingolimod for the treatment of neurological diseasesstate of play and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Brunkhorst, Robert; Vutukuri, Rajkumar; Pfeilschifter, Waltraud

    2014-01-01

    Sphingolipids are a fascinating class of signaling molecules derived from the membrane lipid sphingomyelin. They show abundant expression in the brain. Complex sphingolipids such as glycosphingolipids (gangliosides and cerebrosides) regulate vesicular transport and lysosomal degradation and their dysregulation can lead to storage diseases with a neurological phenotype. More recently, simple sphingolipids such ceramide, sphingosine and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) were discovered to signal in response to many extracellular stimuli. Forming an intricate signaling network, the balance of these readily interchangeable mediators is decisive for cell fate under stressful conditions. The immunomodulator fingolimod is the prodrug of an S1P receptor agonist. Following receptor activation, the drug leads to downregulation of the S1P1 receptor inducing functional antagonism. As the first drug to modulate the sphingolipid signaling pathway, it was marketed in 2010 for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). At that time, immunomodulation was widely accepted as the key mechanism of fingolimods efficacy in MS. But given the excellent passage of this lipophilic compound into the brain and its massive brain accumulation as well as the abundant expression of S1P receptors on brain cells, it is conceivable that fingolimod also affects brain cells directly. Indeed, a seminal study showed that the protective effect of fingolimod in experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE), a murine MS model, is lost in mice lacking the S1P1 receptor on astrocytes, arguing for a specific role of astrocytic S1P signaling in MS. In this review, we discuss the role of sphingolipid mediators and their metabolizing enzymes in neurologic diseases and putative therapeutic strategies arising thereof. PMID:25309325

  3. Emerging roles for retinoids in regeneration and differentiation in normal and disease states.

    PubMed

    Gudas, Lorraine J

    2012-01-01

    The vitamin A (retinol) metabolite, all-trans retinoic acid (RA), is a signaling molecule that plays key roles in the development of the body plan and induces the differentiation of many types of cells. In this review the physiological and pathophysiological roles of retinoids (retinol and related metabolites) in mature animals are discussed. Both in the developing embryo and in the adult, RA signaling via combinatorial Hox gene expression is important for cell positional memory. The genes that require RA for the maturation/differentiation of T cells are only beginning to be cataloged, but it is clear that retinoids play a major role in expression of key genes in the immune system. An exciting, recent publication in regeneration research shows that ALDH1a2 (RALDH2), which is the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of RA from retinaldehyde, is highly induced shortly after amputation in the regenerating heart, adult fin, and larval fin in zebrafish. Thus, local generation of RA presumably plays a key role in fin formation during both embryogenesis and in fin regeneration. HIV transgenic mice and human patients with HIV-associated kidney disease exhibit a profound reduction in the level of RAR? protein in the glomeruli, and HIV transgenic mice show reduced retinol dehydrogenase levels, concomitant with a greater than 3-fold reduction in endogenous RA levels in the glomeruli. Levels of endogenous retinoids (those synthesized from retinol within cells) are altered in many different diseases in the lung, kidney, and central nervous system, contributing to pathophysiology. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Retinoid and Lipid Metabolism. PMID:21855651

  4. THE COST OF IMPLEMENTING RAPID HIV TESTING IN SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES CLINICS IN THE UNITED STATES

    PubMed Central

    Eggman, Ashley A.; Feaster, Daniel J.; Leff, Jared A.; Golden, Matthew R.; Castellon, Pedro C.; Gooden, Lauren; Matheson, Tim; Colfax, Grant N.; Metsch, Lisa R.; Schackman, Bruce R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rapid HIV testing in high-risk populations can increase the number of persons who learn their HIV status and avoid spending clinic resources to locate persons identified as HIV-infected. Methods We determined the cost to sexually transmitted disease clinics of point-of-care rapid HIV testing using data from 7 public clinics that participated in a randomized trial of rapid testing with and without brief patient-centered risk-reduction counseling in 2010. Costs included counselor and trainer time, supplies, and clinic overhead. We applied national labor rates and test costs. We calculated median clinic start-up costs and mean cost per patient tested, and projected incremental annual costs of implementing universal rapid HIV testing compared to current testing practices. Results Criteria for offering rapid HIV testing and methods for delivering non-rapid test results varied among clinics prior to the trial. Rapid HIV testing cost an average of $22/patient without brief risk-reduction counseling and $46/patient with counseling in these 7 clinics. Median start-up costs per clinic were $1,100 and $16,100 without and with counseling, respectively. Estimated incremental annual costs per clinic of implementing universal rapid HIV testing varied by whether or not brief counseling is conducted and by current clinic testing practices, ranging from a savings of $19,500 to a cost of $40,700 without counseling and a cost of $98,000 to $153,900 with counseling. Conclusions Universal rapid HIV testing in sexually transmitted disease clinics with same day results can be implemented at relatively low cost to STD clinics, if brief risk-reduction counseling is not offered. PMID:25118967

  5. Resting-State Connectivity of the Sustained Attention Network Correlates with Disease Duration in Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Maneshi, Mona; Moeller, Friederike; Fahoum, Firas; Gotman, Jean; Grova, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Introduction In idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE), a normal electroencephalogram between generalized spike and wave (GSW) discharges is believed to reflect normal brain function. However, some studies indicate that even excluding GSW-related errors, IGE patients perform poorly on sustained attention task, the deficit being worse as a function of disease duration. We hypothesized that at least in a subset of structures which are normally involved in sustained attention, resting-state functional connectivity (FC) is different in IGE patients compared to controls and that some of the changes are related to disease duration. Method Seeds were selected based on a sustained attention study in controls. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data was obtained from 14 IGE patients and 14 matched controls. After physiological noise removal, the mean time-series of each seed was used as a regressor in a general linear model to detect regions that showed correlation with the seed. In patients, duration factor was defined based on epilepsy duration. Between-group differences weighted by the duration factor were evaluated with mixed-effects model. Correlation was then evaluated in IGE patients between the FC, averaged over each significant cluster, and the duration factor. Results Eight of 18 seeds showed significant difference in FC across groups. However, only for seeds in the medial superior frontal and precentral gyri and in the medial prefrontal area, average FC taken over significant clusters showed high correlation with the duration factor. These 3 seeds showed changes in FC respectively with the premotor and superior frontal gyrus, the dorsal premotor, and the supplementary motor area plus precentral gyrus. Conclusion Alterations of FC in IGE patients are not limited to the frontal areas. However, as indicated by specificity analysis, patients with long history of disease show changes in FC mainly within the frontal areas. PMID:23227168

  6. Resting-state functional connectivity of the striatum in early-stage Parkinson's disease: Cognitive decline and motor symptomatology.

    PubMed

    Manza, Peter; Zhang, Sheng; Li, Chiang-Shan R; Leung, Hoi-Chung

    2016-02-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by changes to dopaminergic function in the striatum and a range of cognitive and motor deficits. Neuroimaging studies have repeatedly shown differences in activation and functional connectivity patterns of the striatum between symptomatic individuals with Parkinson's disease and healthy controls. However, the presence and severity of cognitive and motor symptoms seem to differ dramatically among individuals with Parkinson's disease at the early-stages. To investigate the neural basis of such heterogeneity, we examined the resting state functional connectivity patterns of caudate and putamen subdivisions in relation to cognitive and motor impairments among 62 early-stage individuals with Parkinson's disease (21 females, 23 drug naive, ages 39-77 years, average UPDRS motor scores off medication?=?18.56, average H&Y stage?=?1.66). We also explored how changes in striatal connectivity relate to changes in symptomatology over a year. There are two main findings. First, higher motor deficit rating was associated with weaker coupling between anterior putamen and midbrain including substantia nigra. Intriguingly, steeper declines in functional connectivity between these regions were associated with greater declines in motor function over the course of 1 year. Second, decline in cognitive function, particularly in the memory and visuospatial domains, was associated with stronger coupling between the dorsal caudate and the rostral anterior cingulate cortex. These findings remained significant after controlling for age, medication, gender, and education. In sum, our findings suggest that cognitive decline and motor deficit are each associated with a differentiable pattern of functional connectivity of striatal subregions. Hum Brain Mapp 37:648-662, 2016. 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26566885

  7. Computed tomographic assessment of coronary artery disease: state-of-the-art imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Flohr, Thomas G; De Cecco, Carlo Nicola; Schmidt, Bernhard; Wang, Rui; Schoepf, U Joseph; Meinel, Felix G

    2015-03-01

    While coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography and more refined imaging of the coronary anatomy have driven technical innovation in cardiac CT for the last 10 years, there is now an increasing focus on functional applications of cardiac CT, such as evaluation of the myocardial blood supply or assessment of dynamic myocardial perfusion. Novel techniques show promising results. This article focuses on state-of-the-art CT imaging techniques to visualize the coronary anatomy, describes aspects of radiation dose reduction, and briefly touches on recent approaches to obtain functional information from a CT scan of the heart, in particular dual-energy CT. PMID:25726993

  8. Treatment patterns of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in employed adults in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Diette, Gregory B; Dalal, Anand A; DSouza, Anna O; Lunacsek, Orsolya E; Nagar, Saurabh P

    2015-01-01

    Background This study evaluated patterns of pharmacotherapy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as they relate to recommended guidelines in a prevalent COPD patient population with employer-sponsored health insurance in the US. Methods Health care claims data from 2007 and 2008 were retrospectively analyzed for the study population defined as patients aged 40 years and older, continuously enrolled during the study period, and having at least one inpatient or one emergency department (ED) visit, or at least two outpatient claims coded with COPD (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification code 491.xx, 492.xx, 496.xx). Rates of any pharmacotherapy (both maintenance and reliever), long-acting maintenance pharmacotherapy in patients with an exacerbation history, and short-term treatment of acute exacerbations of COPD were evaluated in the overall population, newly diagnosed, and previously diagnosed patients (including maintenance-nave and maintenance-experienced). Stratified analyses were also conducted by age group (4064 years, ?65 years) and physician specialty. Results A total of 55,361 patients met study criteria of whom 39% were newly diagnosed. The mean age was 66 years, and 46% were male. Three-fourths (74%) of all COPD patients had some pharmacotherapy (maintenance or reliever) with less than half (45%) being treated with maintenance medications. The combination of an inhaled corticosteroid and a long-acting beta-agonist was the most prevalent drug class for maintenance treatment followed by tiotropium. Only 64% of patients with an exacerbation history had a prescription for a long-acting maintenance medication, and short-term treatment with oral corticosteroids or antibiotics was higher for hospitalization exacerbations compared to ED visit exacerbations (68% vs 44%). In general, the rates of pharmacotherapy were highest in patients who were maintenance-experienced followed by newly diagnosed and maintenance-nave. Conclusion The majority of COPD patients received maintenance or reliever COPD medications, but less than half received guideline-recommended care, especially those with an exacerbation history or receiving short-term treatment for acute exacerbations. PMID:25759574

  9. Malaria in the State of Amazonas: a typical Brazilian tropical disease influenced by waves of economic development.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Vanderson Souza; Siqueira, Andr Machado; Alecrim, Maria das Graas Costa; Mouro, Maria Paula Gomes; Marchesini, Paola Barbosa; Albuquerque, Bernardino Cludio; Nascimento, Joabi; Figueira, lder Augusto Guimares; Alecrim, Wilson Duarte; Monteiro, Wuelton Marcelo; Lacerda, Marcus Vincius Guimares

    2015-01-01

    In Brazil, more than 99% of malaria cases are reported in the Amazon, and the State of Amazonas accounts for 40% of this total. However, the accumulated experience and challenges in controlling malaria in this region in recent decades have not been reported. Throughout the first economic cycle during the rubber boom (1879 to 1912), malaria was recorded in the entire state, with the highest incidence in the villages near the Madeira River in the Southern part of the State of Amazonas. In the 1970s, during the second economic development cycle, the economy turned to the industrial sector and demanded a large labor force, resulting in a large migratory influx to the capital Manaus. Over time, a gradual increase in malaria transmission was observed in peri-urban areas. In the 1990s, the stimulation of agroforestry, particularly fish farming, led to the formation of permanent Anopheline breeding sites and increased malaria in settlements. The estimation of environmental impacts and the planning of measures to mitigate them, as seen in the construction of the Coari-Manaus gas pipeline, proved effective. Considering the changes occurred since the Amsterdam Conference in 1992, disease control has been based on early diagnosis and treatment, but the development of parasites that are resistant to major antimalarial drugs in Brazilian Amazon has posed a new challenge. Despite the decreased lethality and the gradual decrease in the number of malaria cases, disease elimination, which should be associated with government programs for economic development in the region, continues to be a challenge. PMID:26061365

  10. Mapping cancer disease using geographical information system (GIS) in Gezira State-Sudan.

    PubMed

    Elebead, F M; Hamid, Amna; Hilmi, H S M; Galal, H

    2012-08-01

    In Sudan, the prevalence of cancer cases increased and cancer ranked as the major cause of death. Therefore, forming a cancer control program and putting strategic action plans into practice became an important matter for the health industry. The correlation of variations in different societies and environmental factors should be examined spatially with reliable data. The aim of this study is to produce base maps for implementation of cancer control program and cancer density maps through the utilization of GIS in health work. In this study, a database was built with the use of GIS to examine the distribution of cancer cases and maps relating to cancer events in allocation units were created. Cancer cases data registered from 1999 to 2008, by the Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Biology and Treatment of Tumors--University of Gezira in El Gezira State, was used as case in this study. Using ArcGIS, the distribution of cancer cases were presented on cancer maps including allocation units and incidence values, which were calculated for each villages and locality region. According to the world standards, cancer rates were determined and examined by the spatial analysis power of GIS. The research concluded that cancer cases were increased, in some localities over the past 10 years (1999-2008). This can be related to many reasons including the existence of the Gezira Scheme were farmers used fertilizers and pesticides, as well as increasing health awareness among the citizens through the establishment of use in the state. PMID:22227773

  11. Lipoprotein abnormalities in South Asians and its association with cardiovascular disease: Current state and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Bilen, Ozlem; Kamal, Ayeesha; Virani, Salim S

    2016-01-01

    South Asians have a high prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) and suffer from early-onset CHD compared to other ethnic groups. Conventional risk factors may not fully explain this increased CHD risk in this population. Indeed, South Asians have a unique lipid profile which may predispose them to premature CHD. Dyslipidemia in this patient population seems to be an important contributor to the high incidence of coronary atherosclerosis. The dyslipidemia in South Asians is characterized by elevated levels of triglycerides, low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, elevated lipoprotein(a) levels, and a higher atherogenic particle burden despite comparable low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels compared with other ethnic subgroups. HDL particles also appear to be smaller, dysfunctional, and proatherogenic in South Asians. Despite the rapid expansion of the current literature with better understanding of the specific lipid abnormalities in this patient population, studies with adequate sample sizes are needed to assess the significance and contribution of a given lipid parameter on overall cardiovascular risk in this population. Specific management goals and treatment thresholds do not exist for South Asians because of paucity of data. Current treatment recommendations are mostly extrapolated from Western guidelines. Lastly, large, prospective studies with outcomes data are needed to assess cardiovascular benefit associated with various lipid-lowering therapies (including combination therapy) in this patient population.

  12. Molecular chaperones: guardians of the proteome in normal and disease states

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Wilson; Lee, Sukyeong; Sung, Nuri; Lee, Jungsoon; Tsai, Francis T.F.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins must adopt a defined three-dimensional structure in order to gain functional activity, or must they? An ever-increasing number of intrinsically disordered proteins and amyloid-forming polypeptides challenge this dogma. While molecular chaperones and proteases are traditionally associated with protein quality control inside the cell, it is now apparent that molecular chaperones not only promote protein folding in the “forward” direction by facilitating folding and preventing misfolding and aggregation, but also facilitate protein unfolding and even disaggregation resulting in the recovery of functional protein from aggregates. Here, we review our current understanding of ATP-dependent molecular chaperones that harness the energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis to fuel their chaperone functions. An emerging theme is that most of these chaperones do not work alone, but instead function together with other chaperone systems to maintain the proteome. Hence, molecular chaperones are the major component of the proteostasis network that guards and protects the proteome from damage. Furthermore, while a decline of this network is detrimental to cell and organismal health, a controlled perturbation of the proteostasis network may offer new therapeutic avenues against human diseases. PMID:26918154

  13. Sequential movement skill in Parkinson's disease: a state-of-the-art.

    PubMed

    Ruitenberg, Marit F L; Duthoo, Wout; Santens, Patrick; Notebaert, Wim; Abrahamse, Elger L

    2015-04-01

    The present work reviews research on the learning and skilled performance of movement sequences in Parkinson's disease (PD). We focus specifically on the serial reaction time (SRT) task, and start by outlining behavioral studies on PD patients and healthy control participants. The literature is not unequivocal: Whereas the majority of studies indicate impaired sequencing skill in PD, still a considerable set of studies opposes this conclusion. We identify and discuss various determinants of sequence skill in PD that may contribute to the inconclusiveness of the literature. One major determinant is the role of dopaminergic medication. It has been hypothesized that while such medication restores dopamine levels in depleted parts of the brain, it may also overdose brain regions in which dopamine depletion is less pronounced. As sequence learning involves the contribution of both affected and unaffected brain areas, dopaminergic medication may enhance particular (motor-related) processes involved in sequence learning, but hinder other (cognition-related) processes that are still intact in PD. We discuss studies supporting this notion and finish with some recommendations for future research: systematically consider the impact of medication, build on models of sequence learning that include both cognitive and motor components, and include more elaborated motor skill to be able to better dissociate cognitive and motor-based problems and explore their interactions. PMID:25681652

  14. Hodgkin's disease incidence in the United States by age, sex, geographic region and rye histologic subtype

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, S.L.

    1984-11-01

    Hodgkin's disease (HD) incidence in whites is described by age, sex, Rye histologic subtype and time period for ten US locations, using recently available data with Rye histologic diagnoses for most cases. Some distinctive features of incidence in young persons - stable childhood rates, and high and increasing rates in young adults, particularly women - resulted from the elevated rates of the Nodular Sclerosis (NS) subtype. NS was the only histologic form with a rising incidence. Unexpectedly, among middle-aged and older persons rates of all subtypes declined during the 1970s. HD incidence varied little across study regions and became more geographically homogeneous with time, notably among women. HD rates were positively correlated with regional socio-economic levels. In areas with the highest young adult incidence, higher risk also affected a broader age range, including older children. Rates for young adults were positively associated with community socioeconomic status but did not covary with older adult rates. Rates for the NS and Lymphocyte Predominance subtypes were inversely correlated across areas. NS incidence increased with community economic levels. These features suggest the incidence of HD in a well-developed country is not static but evolves, characterized by higher rates of NS in an increasingly broad age range of young, particularly female, adults, rising with small increments in socioeconomic status, and occurring over the relatively short study interval. 27 figures, 50 tables.

  15. Diversification of importin-α isoforms in cellular trafficking and disease states

    PubMed Central

    Pumroy, Ruth A.; Cingolani, Gino

    2015-01-01

    The human genome encodes seven isoforms of importin α which are grouped into three subfamilies known as α1, α2 and α3. All isoforms share a fundamentally conserved architecture that consists of an N-terminal, autoinhibitory, importin-β-binding (IBB) domain and a C-terminal Arm (Armadillo)-core that associates with nuclear localization signal (NLS) cargoes. Despite striking similarity in amino acid sequence and 3D structure, importin-α isoforms display remarkable substrate specificity in vivo. In the present review, we look at key differences among importin-α isoforms and provide a comprehensive inventory of known viral and cellular cargoes that have been shown to associate preferentially with specific isoforms. We illustrate how the diversification of the adaptor importin α into seven isoforms expands the dynamic range and regulatory control of nucleocytoplasmic transport, offering unexpected opportunities for pharmacological intervention. The emerging view of importin α is that of a key signalling molecule, with isoforms that confer preferential nuclear entry and spatiotemporal specificity on viral and cellular cargoes directly linked to human diseases. PMID:25656054

  16. Chlamydia pneumoniae and oxidative stress in cardiovascular disease: state of the art and prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, Marisa; Filardo, Simone; De Santis, Fiorenzo; Mastromarino, Paola; Sessa, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae, a pathogenic bacteria responsible for respiratory tract infections, is known as the most implicated infectious agent in atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Accumulating evidence suggests that C. pneumoniae-induced oxidative stress may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of CVDs. Indeed, the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within macrophages, endothelial cells, platelets and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) after C. pneumoniae exposure, has been shown to cause low density lipoprotein oxidation, foam cell formation, endothelial dysfunction, platelet adhesion and aggregation, and VSMC proliferation and migration, all responsible for the typical pathological changes of atherosclerotic plaque. The aim of this review is to improve our insight into C. pneumoniae-induced oxidative stress in order to suggest potential strategies for CVD prevention. Several antioxidants, acting on multi-enzymatic targets related to ROS production induced by C. pneumoniae, have been discussed. A future strategy for the prevention of C. pneumoniae-associated CVDs will be to target chlamydial HSP60, involved in oxidative stress. PMID:25561227

  17. Lung cancer in 2013: state of the art therapy for metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Frances A; Bunn, Paul A; Paz-Ares, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading worldwide cause of cancer death and the majority of patients present with metastatic stage IV disease. At diagnosis, clinical, histologic, and molecular features must be considered in therapeutic decision-making for systemic therapy. Molecular testing for at least epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and ALK should be performed in all patients before therapy. Platinum doublet chemotherapy may be considered for "fit" patients who do not have a molecular driver genetic abnormality. Bevacizumab can be considered for addition to the doublet in patients with nonsquamous cancers who have no contraindications. A pemetrexed combination is considered only in nonsquamous histology. Patients with EGFR mutations or ALK fusions should be treated with erlotinib or crizotinib, respectively, even in patients with tumor-related poor performance. The tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKIs) may be continued until multisite, symptomatic progression. For patients initially treated with a platinum doublet, maintenance chemotherapy with pemetrexed, erlotinib, gemcitabine, or possibly docetaxel is an option with selection based on clinical features, histology, type of initial therapy, and response to first-line therapy. PMID:23714542

  18. Resting state cortical rhythms in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease: electroencephalographic evidence.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Vecchio, Fabrizio; Lizio, Roberta; Ferri, Raffaele; Rodriguez, Guido; Marzano, Nicola; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Rossini, Paolo M

    2011-01-01

    Physiological brain aging is characterized by a combination of synaptic pruning, loss of cortico-cortical connections and neuronal apoptosis that provoke age-dependent decline of cognitive functions. Neural/synaptic redundancy and plastic remodeling of brain networking, also secondary to mental and physical training, promotes maintenance of brain activity in healthy elderly for everyday life and fully productive affective and intellectual capabilities. Unfortunately, in pathological situations, aging triggers neurodegenerative processes that impact on cognition, like Alzheimer's disease (AD). Oscillatory electromagnetic brain activity is a hallmark of neuronal network function in various brain regions. Modern neurophysiological techniques including digital electroencephalography (EEG) allow non-invasive analysis of cortico-cortical connectivity and neuronal synchronization of firing, and coherence of brain rhythmic oscillations at various frequencies. The present review of field EEG literature suggests that discrimination between physiological and pathological brain aging clearly emerges at the group level, with some promising result on the informative value of EEG markers at the individual level. Integrated approaches utilizing neurophysiological techniques together with biological markers and structural and functional imaging are promising for large-scale, low-cost, widely available on the territory and non-invasive screening of at-risk populations. PMID:21971461

  19. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for sickle cell disease: state of the science.

    PubMed

    Talano, Julie-An; Cairo, Mitchell S

    2015-05-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited disorder secondary to a point mutation at the sixth position of the beta chain of human hemoglobin resulting in the replacement of valine for glutamic acid. This recessive genetic abnormality precipitates the polymerization of the deoxygenated form of hemoglobin S inducing a major distortion of red blood cells (S-RBC), which decreases S-RBC deformability leading to chronic hemolysis and vaso-occlusion. These processes can result in severe complications including chronic pain, end-organ dysfunction, stroke, and early mortality. The only proven curative therapy for patients with SCD is myeloablative conditioning and allogeneic stem cell transplantation from HLA-matched sibling donors. In this review, we discuss the most recent advances in allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with SCD including more novel approaches such as reduced toxicity conditioning and the use of alternative allogeneic donors, including matched unrelated donors (MUDs), unrelated cord blood donors (UCBT), and familial haploidentical (FHI) donors. The results to date are very encouraging regarding allogeneic stem cell transplantation for patients with SCD including high survival rates and enabling a greater number of patients suffering from this chronic and debilitating condition to receive curative allogeneic stem cell therapies. However, we still have several areas to investigate and barriers to overcome to successfully cure the majority of patients with severe SCD through allogeneic stem cell therapies. PMID:25200500

  20. Electrical stimulation for gastroesophageal reflux disease: current state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sharon E; Soffer, Edy

    2016-01-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) who are not satisfied with acid suppression therapy can benefit primarily from fundoplication, a surgical intervention. Fundoplication has been the standard surgical procedure for GERD. It is effective but is associated with adverse effects, resulting in a declining number of interventions, creating a need for alternative interventions that are effective, yet have a better adverse effect profile. One such alternative involves the application of electrical stimulation to the lower esophageal sphincter. A number of animal studies showed that such stimulation can increase resting lower esophageal sphincter pressure. An acute human study confirmed this effect, and was followed by two open-label studies, with a follow-up of up to 3 years. Results thus far show that the therapy is associated with a significant improvement in symptoms, a significant reduction in esophageal acid exposure, and a very good safety profile. This review will describe the evolution of electrical stimulation therapy for GERD, as well as the safety and efficacy of this intervention. PMID:26834494