Science.gov

Sample records for intractable visceral pain

  1. Peripheral subcutaneous stimulation for intractable abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Barolat, Giancarlo

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral subcutaneous stimulation has been utilized for a variety of painful conditions affecting the abdominal wall, including sequelae of hernia repair, painful surgical scars, ilio-inguinal neuritis. It has also occasionally been shown to be effective in patients with intractable abdominal visceral pain. Since this is a very recent modality, no large series or prospective studies exist. The results, however, are promising and certainly warrant further investigation. PMID:21422777

  2. [Neurobiology of visceral pain].

    PubMed

    Jnig, W

    2014-06-01

    Visceral pain is diffusely localized, referred into other tissues, frequently not correlated with visceral traumata, preferentially accompanied by autonomic and somatomotor reflexes, and associated with strong negative affective feelings. It belongs together with the somatic pain sensations and non-painful body sensations to the interoception of the body. (1) Visceral pain is correlated with the excitation of spinal (thoracolumbar, sacral) visceral afferents and (with a few exceptions) not with the excitation of vagal afferents. Spinal visceral afferents are polymodal and activated by adequate mechanical and chemical stimuli. All groups of spinal visceral afferents can be sensitized (e.g., by inflammation). Silent mechanoinsensitive spinal visceral afferents are recruited by inflammation. (2) Spinal visceral afferent neurons project into the laminae I, II (outer part IIo) and V of the spinal dorsal horn over several segments, medio-lateral over the whole width of the dorsal horn and contralateral. Their activity is synaptically transmitted in laminae I, IIo and deeper laminae to viscero-somatic convergent neurons that receive additionally afferent synaptic (mostly nociceptive) input from the skin and from deep somatic tissues of the corresponding dermatomes, myotomes and sclerotomes. (3) The second-order neurons consist of excitatory and inhibitory interneurons (about 90?% of all dorsal horn neurons) and tract neurons activated monosynaptically in lamina I by visceral afferent neurons and di- or polysynaptically in deeper laminae. (4) The sensitization of viscero-somatic convergent neurons (central sensitization) is dependent on the sensitization of spinal visceral afferent neurons, local spinal excitatory and inhibitory interneurons and supraspinal endogenous control systems. The mechanisms of this central sensitization have been little explored. (5) Viscero-somatic tract neurons project through the contralateral ventrolateral tract and presumably other tracts to the lower and upper brain stem, the hypothalamus and via the thalamus to various cortical areas. (6) Visceral pain is presumably (together with other visceral sensations and nociceptive as well as non-nociceptive somatic body sensations) primarily represented in the posterior dorsal insular cortex (primary interoceptive cortex). This cortex receives in primates its spinal synaptic inputs mainly from lamina I tract neurons via the ventromedial posterior nucleus of the thalamus. (7) The transmission of activity from visceral afferents to second-order neurons in spinal cord is modulated in an excitatory and inhibitory way by endogenous anti- and pronociceptive control systems in the lower and upper brain stem. These control systems are under cortical control. (8) Visceral pain is referred to deep somatic tissues, to the skin and to other visceral organs. This referred pain consists of spontaneous pain and mechanical hyperalgesia. The mechanisms underlying referred pain and the accompanying tissue changes have been little explored. PMID:24903037

  3. [Psychophysiology of visceral pain].

    PubMed

    Horing, B; Enck, P

    2014-06-01

    The psychophysiology of visceral pain is--different from cardiac psychophysiology--much less well investigated due to the invasiveness of its methods and problems associated with reliably and reproducibly stimulating as well as recording of the gastrointestinal tract. Despite these problems, the last 30 years have documented a number of psychophysiological phenomena such as the perception (interoception) of visceral stimuli, the effect of emotions and stress on visceral sensations, and the effect of visceral processes on cortical processing. This was mainly due to the application of neurophysiological techniques (cortical imaging and stimulation) in these investigations. PMID:24903038

  4. Visceral Pain and Gastrointestinal Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Chichlowski, Maciej; Rudolph, Colin

    2015-01-01

    A complex set of interactions between the microbiome, gut and brain modulate responses to visceral pain. These interactions occur at the level of the gastrointestinal mucosa, and via local neural, endocrine or immune activity; as well as by the production of factors transported through the circulatory system, like bacterial metabolites or hormones. Various psychological, infectious and other stressors can disrupt this harmonious relationship and alter both the microbiome and visceral pain responses. There are critical sensitive periods that can impact visceral pain responses in adulthood. In this review we provide a brief background of the intestinal microbiome and emerging concepts of the bidirectional interactions between the microbiome, gut and brain. We also discuss recent work in animal models, and human clinical trials using prebiotics and probiotics that alter the microbiome with resultant alterations in visceral pain responses. PMID:25829337

  5. Visceral Pain: The Neurophysiological Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Jyoti N.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of visceral pain is still less understood compared with that of somatic pain. This is primarily due to the diverse nature of visceral pain compounded by multiple factors such as sexual dimorphism, psychological stress, genetic trait, and the nature of predisposed disease. Due to multiple contributing factors there is an enormous challenge to develop animal models that ideally mimic the exact disease condition. In spite of that, it is well recognized that visceral hypersensitivity can occur due to (1) sensitization of primary sensory afferents innervating the viscera, (2) hyperexcitability of spinal ascending neurons (central sensitization) receiving synaptic input from the viscera, and (3) dysregulation of descending pathways that modulate spinal nociceptive transmission. Depending on the type of stimulus condition, different neural pathways are involved in chronic pain. In early-life psychological stress such as maternal separation, chronic pain occurs later in life due to dysregulation of the hypothalamicpituitaryadrenal axis and significant increase in corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF) secretion. In contrast, in early-life inflammatory conditions such as colitis and cystitis, there is dysregulation of the descending opioidergic system that results excessive pain perception (i.e., visceral hyperalgesia). Functional bowel disorders and chronic pelvic pain represent unexplained pain that is not associated with identifiable organic diseases. Often pain overlaps between two organs and approximately 35% of patients with chronic pelvic pain showed significant improvement when treated for functional bowel disorders. Animal studies have documented that two main components such as (1) dichotomy of primary afferent fibers innervating two pelvic organs and (2) common convergence of two afferent fibers onto a spinal dorsal horn are contributing factors for organ-to-organ pain overlap. With reports emerging about the varieties of peptide molecules involved in the pathological conditions of visceral pain, it is expected that better therapy will be achieved relatively soon to manage chronic visceral pain. PMID:19655104

  6. Eosinophilic Jejunitis Presenting as Intractable Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Mungan, Zeynel; Attila, Tan; Kapran, Yersu; Tokatli, Ilyas Pinar; Unal, Zeynep

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is an uncommon disease characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract. The clinical manifestations are related to the layer(s) and extent of the bowel involved. In this paper, we present a case of intractable abdominal pain caused by jejunal submucosal eosinophilic infiltration without mucosal involvement, diagnosed by deep endoscopic biopsies. The patient was successfully treated with steroids without need for surgery for diagnosis or therapy. PMID:25565932

  7. Intractable pain--the present position.

    PubMed Central

    Lipton, S.

    1981-01-01

    The broad changes that have occurred in the treatment of intractable pain are considered. There is a new understanding of the anatomy and physiology of pain pathways and pain appreciation. Thus gate control theory, the spinal laminae, and the descending inhibitory pain pathway through the raphe nuclei are discussed in relation to the recent discovery of the opioid (enkephalin) systems. Out of this arises the stimulation methods of pain relief--transcutaneous neural stimulation, periaqueductal stimulation, and acupuncture. These are valuable in patients with a normal expectation of life. For patients with a shortened expectation of life other methods, especially destructive ones, are valuable (though in all types of chronic pain drug therapy is still the most used method). Basic changes in techniques and the equipment used to bring this about are detailed broadly. In particular, the use of the image intensifier X-ray machine and the stimulation and destruction available from the modern lesion generator when used in combination provide accuracy and safety. Techniques and methods are constantly altering and examples of this are given. All this costs money in time, personnel, and equipment; the costings of the Liverpool Centre for Pain Relief are given. Finally, the Pain Relief Foundation is in being in Liverpool in the grounds of Walton Hospital. This has been made possible by a large 'seed' donation by the Wolfson Foundation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6894676

  8. [New drug therapies for intractable chronic pain: preface and comments].

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, Kazuo

    2013-07-01

    Recently, new drugs for intractable chronic pain are available in Japan. The following articles describe topics of new drugs for intractable chronic pain including transdermal fentanyl, tramadol/acetaminophen combination tablets, buprenorphine transdermal patch, pregabalin, and duloxetine. Treatment of constipation in chronic pain patients and management of opioid induced nausea and vomiting are also described to prevent complication of pain-relief drug therapy. PMID:23905399

  9. Attentional modulation of visceral and somatic pain.

    PubMed

    Dunckley, P; Aziz, Q; Wise, R G; Brooks, J; Tracey, I; Chang, L

    2007-07-01

    A better understanding of the cortical processes underlying attentional modulation of visceral and somatic pain in health are essential for interpretation of future imaging studies of hypervigilance towards bodily sensations which is considered to be an aetiologically important factor in the heightened pain reported by patients with irritable bowel syndrome and fibromyalgia. Twelve healthy subjects were recruited for this study. Simultaneous trains of electrical pulses (delivered to either the rectum or lower abdomen) and auditory tones lasting 6 s were delivered to the subjects during a whole-brain functional scan acquisition. Subjects were instructed to attend to the auditory tones (distracter task) or electrical pulses (pain task). Pain intensity ratings were significantly lower during the distraction task compared with the pain task (P < 0.01) in both sensory modalities. The left primary somatosensory cortex increased in activity with increasing pain report, during attention to visceral pain. Bilateral anterior insula (aIns) cortex activity increased with increasing somatic pain report independent of the direction of attention. Conversely, the primary and secondary auditory cortices significantly increased in activation with decreased pain report. These results suggest that pain intensity perception during attentional modulation is reflected in the primary somatosensory cortex (visceral pain) and aIns cortex activity (somatic pain). PMID:17593138

  10. Intrathecal opioids for intractable pain syndromes.

    PubMed

    Koulousakis, A; Kuchta, J; Bayarassou, A; Sturm, V

    2007-01-01

    For more than 20 years intrathecal opioid application with implantable pumps is an option for selected patients with malignant as well as non-malignant pain. In general, most types of pain should be treatable by opioid medication. However, the associated systemic side-effects such as nausea, vomiting, constipation or the risk of suppression of the central nervous system hinder the application of oral or intravenous opioid therapy as a sole, widely applicable treatment. Causes of non-malignant pain that may represent an indication for intrathecal drug-delivery systems include: failed back syndrome, neuropathic pain, axial spinal pain, complex regional pain syndrome, diffuse pain, brachial plexitis, central pain, failed spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy, arachnoiditis, poststroke pain, spinal cord injury pain and peripheral neuropathy. Due to the proximity to the receptor sites, the therapeutic effect of intrathecal drug application lasts longer and the rate of systemic side effects is reduced. Before definitive pump implantation, the therapeutic effect of intrathecal opioid therapy is tested with an external pump. If there is no clear and satisfactory effect in this trial application, pump implantation is not indicated. In our patients, with a follow-up exceeding 3 years, the reduction of non-malignant pain (assessed with the Visual Analogue Scale, VAS) was good or excellent (pain decrease >50%) in 71.3% of the patients, fair (VAS 5-6) in 19.8% and poor (VAS 7-10) in 8.9%. After 3 years of continuous treatment, we observed catheter-related technical problems (catheter dislocation, obstruction, kinking, disconnection or rupture) in 17 of 165 patients. Pump malfunctions were very rare (8 of 165 cases) and limited to older pump types. Reversible, specific drug-related side effects of long-term therapy with intrathecal pumps developed in 32 of the 165 patients. In our series, the mean serum/cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentration ratio for morphine was 1/3000, which explains the low rate of systemic side effects. Local diffusion difficulties in CSF cause an uneven distribution of morphine in CSF. Therefore the clinical effect is markedly influenced by the position of the catheter tip, a fact that should be kept in mind during catheter implantation. Intrathecal drug application is cost effective and can significantly improve the quality of life in selected patients. An intensive training in this method and awareness of its specific complications is necessary for everyone to participate in the consulting and implanting team. Pumps for chronic intrathecal opioid application should only be implanted in specialized centers. PMID:17691355

  11. [Physiology and pathophysiology of visceral pain].

    PubMed

    Jnig, W; Hbler, H J

    2002-12-01

    Visceral pain is diffusely localized, referred to deep somatic tissues, skin and viscera, frequently not correlated with an actual trauma, commonly correlated with strong negative affective reactions and accompanied by strong protective autonomic and motor reactions. It is correlated with the excitation of spinal (thoraco-lumbar, sacral) visceral afferents and (with a few exceptions) not with the excitation of vagal afferents. Spinal visceral afferents are polymodal and can be excited by physical and chemical stimuli. All groups of visceral afferents can be sensitized (e.g.by inflammation). Normally silent (mechanically insensitive) visceral afferents are recruited by inflammation. Individual visceral afferent neurons project in laminae I and V of the dorsal horn over several segments, medio-lateral over the entire width of the dorsal horn and to the contralateral side. Their activity is synaptically transmitted, in these and deeper laminae, to viscero-somatic convergent neurons which receive additional afferent synaptic input from skin and deep somatic tissues of the corresponding dermatomes,myotomes and sclerotomes. The mechanism of sensitization of viscerosomatic convergent neurons (central sensitization) during sensitization of spinal visceral afferents is unclear.Viscero-somatic tract neurons project to lower and upper brain stem,hypothalamus and via the thalamus to various cortex areas. Visceral nociception and pain is presumably (together with other visceral sensations and homeostatic regulations of autonomic body functions) primarily represented in the insula in the context of interoception. The insula obtains its main peripheral afferent input from lamina I neurons via the Nucleus ventromedialis posterior of the thalamus. The transmission of visceral impulses in the spinal cord is modulated by the endogenous control systems in the brain stem which are in turn under the control of cortex and limbic system. PMID:12474029

  12. Neuraxial (epidural and intrathecal) opioids for intractable pain

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Summary Points 1. Neuraxial opioids are considered for use in patients who have resistant intractable pain that fails to respond to other treatment options or pain that responds to analgesia but for which the doses required result in unacceptable side-effects. 2. Neuraxial opiods can be considered for both chronic non-malignant pain and chronic cancer-related pain. 3. Effectiveness in chronic non-malignant pain and cancer pain is exerted through the use of either single-agent drugs (opioids) or a combination of drugs: opioids, local anaesthetics and other drugs such as clonodine and ziconotide. 4. Complications of long-term continuous infusion therapy are related to the insertion process (haematoma), the mechanical device (both pump and catheter) and the long-term effects of the drugs. 5. Patients will require ongoing ambulatory monitoring and supportive care. PMID:26516463

  13. Imaging brain mechanisms in chronic visceral pain.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Emeran A; Gupta, Arpana; Kilpatrick, Lisa A; Hong, Jui-Yang

    2015-04-01

    Chronic visceral pain syndromes are important clinical problems with largely unmet medical needs. Based on the common overlap with other chronic disorders of visceral or somatic pain, mood and affect, and their responsiveness to centrally targeted treatments, an important role of central nervous system in their pathophysiology is likely. A growing number of brain imaging studies in irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia, and bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis has identified abnormalities in evoked brain responses, resting state activity, and connectivity, as well as in gray and white matter properties. Structural and functional alterations in brain regions of the salience, emotional arousal, and sensorimotor networks, as well as in prefrontal regions, are the most consistently reported findings. Some of these changes show moderate correlations with behavioral and clinical measures. Most recently, data-driven machine-learning approaches to larger data sets have been able to classify visceral pain syndromes from healthy control subjects. Future studies need to identify the mechanisms underlying the altered brain signatures of chronic visceral pain and identify targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:25789437

  14. Novel nervous system mechanisms in visceral pain.

    PubMed

    De Winter, B Y; Deiteren, A; De Man, J G

    2016-03-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity is an important factor underlying abdominal pain in functional gastrointestinal disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and can result from aberrant signaling from the gut to the brain or vice versa. Over the last two decades, research has identified several selective, intertwining pathways that underlie IBS-related visceral nociception, including specific receptors on afferent and efferent nerve fibers such as transient receptor potential channels (TRP) channels, opioid, and cannabinoid receptors. In this issue of Neurogastroenterology and Motility Gil et al. demonstrate that in an animal model with reduced descending inhibitory control, the sympathetic nervous system outflow is enhanced, contributing to visceral and somatic hypersensitivity. They also provide evidence that interfering with the activation of adrenergic receptors on sensory nerves can be an interesting new strategy to treat visceral pain in IBS. This mini-review places these findings in a broader perspective by providing an overview of promising novel mechanisms to alter the nervous control of visceral pain interfering with afferent or efferent neuronal signaling. PMID:26891060

  15. Drug Management of Visceral Pain: Concepts from Basic Research

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Mellar P.

    2012-01-01

    Visceral pain is experienced by 40% of the population, and 28% of cancer patients suffer from pain arising from intra- abdominal metastasis or from treatment. Neuroanatomy of visceral nociception and neurotransmitters, receptors, and ion channels that modulate visceral pain are qualitatively or quantitatively different from those that modulate somatic and neuropathic pain. Visceral pain should be recognized as distinct pain phenotype. TRPV1, Na 1.8, and ASIC3 ion channels and peripheral kappa opioid receptors are important mediators of visceral pain. Mu agonists, gabapentinoids, and GABAB agonists reduce pain by binding to central receptors and channels. Combinations of analgesics and adjuvants in animal models have supra-additive antinociception and should be considered in clinical trials. This paper will discuss the neuroanatomy, receptors, ion channels, and neurotransmitters important to visceral pain and provide a basic science rationale for analgesic trials and management. PMID:22619712

  16. Protease-Activated Receptors as Therapeutic Targets in Visceral Pain

    PubMed Central

    Cenac, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    The protease-activated receptors (PARs) play a pivotal role in inflammatory and nociceptive processes. PARs have raised considerable interest because of their capacity to regulate numerous aspects of viscera physiology and pathophysiology. The present article summarizes research on PARs and proteases as signalling molecules in visceral pain. In particular, experiments in animal models suggest that PAR2 is important for visceral hypersensitivity. Moreover, endogenous PAR2 agonists seem to be released by colonic tissue of patients suffering from irritable bowel syndrome, suggesting a role for this receptor in visceral pain perception. Thus, PARs, together with proteases that activate them, represent exciting targets for therapeutic intervention on visceral pain. PMID:24396336

  17. Renal Artery Embolization Controls Intractable Pain in a Patient with Polycystic Kidney Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Seong Tai; Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Jae Mun; Kim, Choon-Yul; Chang, Yoon Sik

    1999-09-15

    A 65-year-old man with adult polycystic kidney disease (APKD) and chronic renal failure suffered from intractable abdominal pain and distension for 2 weeks. Meperidine infusion did not alleviate his pain. However, pain and abdominal distension were successfully controlled by embolization of both renal arteries.

  18. Assessment of visceral pain associated with metritis in dairy cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metritis is a common disease in dairy cattle but to our knowledge no work has assessed pain associated with this disease. Tissue palpation is commonly used to assess pain in human and veterinary medicine. The objective of this study was to evaluate visceral pain responses during rectal and uterine p...

  19. Role of Principal Ionotropic and Metabotropic Receptors in Visceral Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kannampalli, Pradeep; Sengupta, Jyoti N

    2015-01-01

    Visceral pain is the most common form of pain caused by varied diseases and a major reason for patients to seek medical consultation. It also leads to a significant economic burden due to workdays lost and reduced productivity. Further, long-term use of non-specific medications is also associated with side effects affecting the quality of life. Despite years of extensive research and the availability of several therapeutic options, management of patients with chronic visceral pain is often inadequate, resulting in frustration for both patients and physicians. This is, most likely, because the mechanisms associated with chronic visceral pain are different from those of acute pain. Accumulating evidence from years of research implicates several receptors and ion channels in the induction and maintenance of central and peripheral sensitization during chronic pain states. Understanding the specific role of these receptors will facilitate to capitalize on their unique properties to augment the therapeutic efficacy while at the same time minimizing unwanted side effects. The aim of this review is to provide a concise review of the recent literature that reports on the role of principal ionotropic receptors and metabotropic receptors in the modulation visceral pain. We also include an overview of the possibility of these receptors as potential new targets for the treatment of chronic visceral pain conditions. PMID:25843070

  20. Acupuncture for Visceral Pain: Neural Substrates and Potential Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuping; Wang, Shubin; Rong, Peijing; Wang, Junying; Qiao, Lina; Feng, Xiumei; Liu, Junling

    2014-01-01

    Visceral pain is the most common form of pain caused by varied diseases and a major reason for patients to seek medical consultation. Despite much advances, the pathophysiological mechanism is still poorly understood comparing with its somatic counterpart and, as a result, the therapeutic efficacy is usually unsatisfactory. Acupuncture has long been used for the management of numerous disorders in particular pain and visceral pain, characterized by the high therapeutic benefits and low adverse effects. Previous findings suggest that acupuncture depresses pain via activation of a number of neurotransmitters or modulators including opioid peptides, serotonin, norepinephrine, and adenosine centrally and peripherally. It endows us, by advancing the understanding of the role of ion channels and gut microbiota in pain process, with novel perspectives to probe the mechanisms underlying acupuncture analgesia. In this review, after describing the visceral innervation and the relevant afferent pathways, in particular the ion channels in visceral nociception, we propose three principal mechanisms responsible for acupuncture induced benefits on visceral pain. Finally, potential topics are highlighted regarding the future studies in this field. PMID:25614752

  1. Experience with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for relief of intractable pain in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Avellanosa, A M; West, C R

    1982-01-01

    Sixty patients with intractable cancer pain were subjected to transcutaneous electrical stimulation for pain control. Evaluation, after two weeks of treatment, revealed: 17 (28.3%) excellent response, 22 (36.2%) fair and 21 (35.0%) no relief. Re-assessment after 3 months revealed 9 (15%) excellent responses, 11 (18.3%) fair and 40 (67%) failures. Extremity and trunk pains appeared to be most rewarding to patient pain, so far as pain relief is concerned. Perineal and pelvic pains were most difficult to control, only 5 of 12 (41%) cases obtained some short term relief. Pain location and sources correlated with treatment results. PMID:6983553

  2. Stress and visceral pain: from animal models to clinical therapies

    PubMed Central

    Larauche, Muriel; Mulak, Agata; Taché, Yvette

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have implicated stress (psychosocial and physical) as a trigger of first onset or exacerbation of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms of which visceral pain is an integrant landmark. A number of experimental acute or chronic exteroceptive or interoceptive stressors induce visceral hyperalgesia in rodents although recent evidence also points to stress-related visceral analgesia as established in the somatic pain field. Underlying mechanisms of stress-related visceral hypersensitivity may involve a combination of sensitization of primary afferents, central sensitization in response to input from the viscera and dysregulation of descending pathways that modulate spinal nociceptive transmission or analgesic response. Biochemical coding of stress involves the recruitment of corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) signaling pathways. Experimental studies established that activation of brain and peripheral CRF receptor subtype 1 plays a primary role in the development of stress-related delayed visceral hyperalgesia while subtype 2 activation induces analgesic response. In line with stress pathways playing a role in IBS, non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic treatment modalities aimed at reducing stress perception using a broad range of evidence-based mind-body interventions and centrally-targeted medications to reduce anxiety impact on brain patterns activated by visceral stimuli and dampen visceral pain. PMID:21575632

  3. Ultrasound-Guided Nerve Block with Botulinum Toxin Type A for Intractable Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Moon, Young Eun; Choi, Jung Hyun; Park, Hue Jung; Park, Ji Hye; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain includes postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN), and trigeminal neuralgia, and so on. Although various drugs have been tried to treat neuropathic pain, the effectiveness of the drugs sometimes may be limited for chronic intractable neuropathic pain, especially when they cannot be used at an adequate dose, due to undesirable severe side effects and the underlying disease itself. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) has been known for its analgesic effect in various pain conditions. Nevertheless, there are no data of nerve block in PHN and PDN. Here, we report two patients successfully treated with ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve block using BoNT-A for intractable PHN and PDN. One patient had PHN on the left upper extremity and the other patient had PDN on a lower extremity. Due to side effects of drugs, escalation of the drug dose could not be made. We injected 50 Botox units (BOTOX(®), Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA, USA) into brachial plexus and lumbar plexus, respectively, under ultrasound. Their pain was significantly decreased for about 4-5 months. Ultrasound-guided nerve block with BoNT-A may be an effective analgesic modality in a chronic intractable neuropathic pain especially when conventional treatment failed to achieve adequate pain relief. PMID:26761032

  4. Ultrasound-Guided Nerve Block with Botulinum Toxin Type A for Intractable Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Young Eun; Choi, Jung Hyun; Park, Hue Jung; Park, Ji Hye; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain includes postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN), and trigeminal neuralgia, and so on. Although various drugs have been tried to treat neuropathic pain, the effectiveness of the drugs sometimes may be limited for chronic intractable neuropathic pain, especially when they cannot be used at an adequate dose, due to undesirable severe side effects and the underlying disease itself. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) has been known for its analgesic effect in various pain conditions. Nevertheless, there are no data of nerve block in PHN and PDN. Here, we report two patients successfully treated with ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve block using BoNT-A for intractable PHN and PDN. One patient had PHN on the left upper extremity and the other patient had PDN on a lower extremity. Due to side effects of drugs, escalation of the drug dose could not be made. We injected 50 Botox units (BOTOX®, Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA, USA) into brachial plexus and lumbar plexus, respectively, under ultrasound. Their pain was significantly decreased for about 4–5 months. Ultrasound-guided nerve block with BoNT-A may be an effective analgesic modality in a chronic intractable neuropathic pain especially when conventional treatment failed to achieve adequate pain relief. PMID:26761032

  5. Visceral pain modulation in female primary afferent sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chaban, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The variations in symptoms and pain perception across the menstrual cycle in a large percentage of women diagnosed with functional syndromes such as Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), Painful Bladder Syndrome (PBS), and Chronic Pelvic Pain (CPP), suggests the involvement of modulation of sex steroid hormones. Our recent studies have shown that estrogen modulation of visceral inputs of primary afferent nociceptors, located in the afferent primary sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), accounts for the observed changes in nociception. Patients with CPP frequently experience pain from several organs. For patients with IBS, the most common co-morbid diagnoses include PBS and CPP. Pain is strongly associated with these diseases and the lack of awareness of their pathology is further illustrated by the fact that the average time between the onset of pain and the diagnosis is three to ten years. CPP patients may initially only have pain in the pelvis, but a multitude of mechanisms involving the peripheral and central nervous systems can lead to development of painful sensations in other adjacent organs; examples include lower colonic pain associated with IBS, and other viscera, such as the endometrium. In addition to the central regulation of pain, it is important to understand new pathways in which sex steroid hormones, such as estrogen, affect visceral nociception peripherally.

  6. Role of MicroRNA in Visceral Pain

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Banerjee, Banani

    2015-01-01

    The long-lasting nociceptive transmission under various visceral pain conditions involves transcriptional and/or translational alteration in neurotransmitter and receptor expression as well as modification of neuronal function, morphology and synaptic connections. Although it is largely unknown how such changes in posttranscriptional expression induce visceral pain, recent evidence strongly suggests an important role for microRNAs (miRNAs, small non-coding RNAs) in the cellular plasticity underlying chronic visceral pain. MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNA endogenously produced in our body and act as a major regulator of gene expression by either through cleavage or translational repression of the target gene. This regulation is essential for the normal physiological function but when disturbed can result in pathological conditions. Usually one miRNA has multiple targets and target mRNAs are regulated in a combinatorial fashion by multiple miRNAs. In recent years, many studies have been performed to delineate the posttranscriptional regulatory role of miRNAs in different tissues under various nociceptive stimuli. In this review, we intend to discuss the recent development in miRNA research with special emphases on miRNAs and their targets responsible for long term sensitization in chronic pain conditions. In addition, we review miRNAs expression and function data for different animal pain models and also the recent progress in research on miRNA-based therapeutic targets for the treatment of chronic pain. PMID:25843071

  7. [Management of intractable cancer pain: from intrathecal morphine to cell allograft].

    PubMed

    Lazorthes, Y; Sallerin, B; Verdie, J C; Sol, J C; Duplan, H; Tkaczuk, J; Tafani, M; Bastide, R; Bes, J C

    2000-11-01

    The durable effectiveness of intrathecal morphine administration is well established for the management of intractable cancer pain, after failure of systemic opioids, secondary to the persistence of non-reversible undesirable side effects. Many patients are referred to late in the disease course. This conservative method to control pain of malignant origin must not be reserved for last resort treatment for terminal patients. Intra-cerebro-ventricular morphine administration is a very effective and generally safe method for controlling intractable cancer pain. Because of the chronic implantation of an intra-ventricular catheter this method is somewhat invasive. Its indications remain a simple and effective alternative when the topography of nociceptive pain is diffuse or cephalic. In clinical practice, intrathecal and/or intra-cerebro-ventricular administration of opioids is limited by cost, the need for specialized maintenance and mechanical malfunctions if implantable drug delivery systems, or by the risk of bacterial contamination and ambulatory constraints when repeated daily injections via an intrathecal access port are used. To answer these limitations, cell therapy using intrathecal chromaffin cell allograft is a promising approach for the management of cancer pain refractory to traditional drug therapy and pain lesion surgery. The basic rationale and preclinical studies on experimental pain models have enabled starting prospective clinical trials. Prior to transplantation, handling and preparation of the chromaffin tissue is critical for allograft viability. The initial results of clinical trials with human chromaffin cell grafts from intractable cancer pain have reported long-lasting pain relief, in correlation with met-enkephalin release into the CSF. Convincing evidence will require controlled studies. The limitations of this innovative cell therapy and especially the lack of human adrenal gland availability point to the need for new sources of cells. Perspectives include xenogenic or engineered cell lines. PMID:11084478

  8. Personality differences affect brainstem autonomic responses to visceral pain.

    PubMed

    Paine, P; Worthen, S F; Gregory, L J; Thompson, D G; Aziz, Q

    2009-11-01

    Brainstem autonomic nuclei integrate interoceptive inputs including pain, with descending modulation, to produce homeostatic and defence outputs. Cardiac Vagal Control is especially implicated in psychophysiological processes for both health and disease and is indexed non-invasively by heart rate variability. The study aim was to determine the nature of psychophysiological response profiles for visceral pain. Nineteen healthy subjects had electrocardiographic recordings at rest and during 10 painful oesophageal balloon distensions. Cardiac Vagal Control originating from nucleus ambiguus (CVC(NA)) was determined by polynomial filter application to the electrocardiogram inter-beat interval series. Heart rate and 'Cardiac Sympathetic Index (CSI)' were also determined. Psychological state and trait, including neuroticism and extroversion, were assessed. Subjects who increased CVC(NA) to pain were more neurotic, anxious and sensory sensitive than those who decreased CVC(NA.) Cluster analysis identified two psychophysiological groups: Group 1 (n = 11) demonstrated lower baseline CVC(NA) (P = 0.0001), higher heart rate (P = 0.02) and CSI (P = 0.015), pain tolerance at lower balloon volumes (P = 0.04), but attenuated heart rate response to pain (P = 0.01). Group 2 (n = 8) had the converse profile. Neuroticism scores were higher (P = 0.0004) and extroversion lower (P = 0.01) for group 1 than group 2. Two distinct psychophysiological response profiles to visceral pain exist that are influenced by personality. These may reflect different psychobiological bases for active and passive defence repertoires. Prevalence and clinical relevance of these endophenotypes as vulnerability factors for pain and emotion disorders warrant further exploration. PMID:19538443

  9. Stress-Induced Visceral Pain: Toward Animal Models of Irritable-Bowel Syndrome and Associated Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Moloney, Rachel D.; O’Mahony, Siobhain M.; Dinan, Timothy G.; Cryan, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Visceral pain is a global term used to describe pain originating from the internal organs, which is distinct from somatic pain. It is a hallmark of functional gastrointestinal disorders such as irritable-bowel syndrome (IBS). Currently, the treatment strategies targeting visceral pain are unsatisfactory, with development of novel therapeutics hindered by a lack of detailed knowledge of the underlying mechanisms. Stress has long been implicated in the pathophysiology of visceral pain in both preclinical and clinical studies. Here, we discuss the complex etiology of visceral pain reviewing our current understanding in the context of the role of stress, gender, gut microbiota alterations, and immune functioning. Furthermore, we review the role of glutamate, GABA, and epigenetic mechanisms as possible therapeutic strategies for the treatment of visceral pain for which there is an unmet medical need. Moreover, we discuss the most widely described rodent models used to model visceral pain in the preclinical setting. The theory behind, and application of, animal models is key for both the understanding of underlying mechanisms and design of future therapeutic interventions. Taken together, it is apparent that stress-induced visceral pain and its psychiatric comorbidities, as typified by IBS, has a multifaceted etiology. Moreover, treatment strategies still lag far behind when compared to other pain modalities. The development of novel, effective, and specific therapeutics for the treatment of visceral pain has never been more pertinent. PMID:25762939

  10. [Indication and usage of opioids except morphine for chronic non-malignant intractable pain].

    PubMed

    Saeki, Shigeru

    2008-11-01

    Indication and usage of opioids except morphine for chronic non-malignant intractable pain were reviewed. In Japan, other than morphine, we can use only two opioids, codeine phosphate (codeine), and dihydrocodeine phosphate (dihydrocodeine) for non-malignant pain management according to medical insurance system. But in western countries sustained-release opioids such as MS contine, transdermal fentanyl, oxycontin were used for the management of non-malignant chronic pain. The WHO ladder for cancer management should also be used for the management of non-malignant pain. Initial dose of codeine is 60 mg x day(-1) and the dosage should be increased or decreased according to pain intensity, patients' general condition and age. In most cases pain is controlled at the dose of 80-310 mg x day(-1). If pain intensity does not decrease or change, codeine should be changed to morphine. In our clinic, starting dose of codeine was 40-480 mg x day(-1) (average dose: 107.8 mg x day(-1)), maximum dose was 60-1280 mg x day (average dose: 310 mg x day(-1)). Average period for administration of codeine was 294.4 days. Dihydrocodeine has twice analgesic efficacy compared to codeine. The initial dose is the same as codeine. We hope that sustained release opioids such as transdermal fentanyl, oxycontin, tramadol etc will be used in Japan for management of non-malignant chronic pain in the near future. PMID:19039961

  11. Bupivacaine administered intrathecally versus rectally in the management of intractable rectal cancer pain in palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Zaporowska-Stachowiak, Iwona; Kowalski, Grzegorz; Łuczak, Jacek; Kosicka, Katarzyna; Kotlinska-Lemieszek, Aleksandra; Sopata, Maciej; Główka, Franciszek

    2014-01-01

    Background Unacceptable adverse effects, contraindications to and/or ineffectiveness of World Health Organization step III “pain ladder” drugs causes needless suffering among a population of cancer patients. Successful management of severe cancer pain may require invasive treatment. However, a patient’s refusal of an invasive procedure necessitates that clinicians consider alternative options. Objective Intrathecal bupivacaine delivery as a viable treatment of intractable pain is well documented. There are no data on rectal bupivacaine use in cancer patients or in the treatment of cancer tenesmoid pain. This study aims to demonstrate that bupivacaine administered rectally could be a step in between the current treatment options for intractable cancer pain (conventional/conservative analgesia or invasive procedures), and to evaluate the effect of the mode of administration (intrathecal versus rectal) on the bupivacaine plasma concentration. Cases We present two Caucasian, elderly inpatients admitted to hospice due to intractable rectal/tenesmoid pain. The first case is a female with vulvar cancer, and malignant infiltration of the rectum/vagina. Bupivacaine was used intrathecally (0.25–0.5%, 1–2 mL every 6 hours). The second case is a female with ovarian cancer and malignant rectal infiltration. Bupivacaine was adminstered rectally (0.05–0.1%, 100 mL every 4.5–11 hours). Methods Total bupivacaine plasma concentrations were determined using the high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet method. Results Effective pain control was achieved with intrathecal bupivacaine (0.077–0.154 mg·kg−1) and bupivacaine in enema (1.820 mg·kg−1). Intrathecal bupivacaine (0.5%, 2 mL) caused a drop in blood pressure; other side effects were absent in both cases. Total plasma bupivacaine concentrations following intrathecal and rectal bupivacaine application did not exceed 317.2 ng·mL−1 and 235.7 ng·mL−1, respectively. Bupivacaine elimination was slower after rectal than after intrathecal administration (t½= 5.50 versus 2.02 hours, respectively). Limitations This study reports two cases only, and there could be inter-patient variation. Conclusion Bupivacaine in boluses administered intrathecally (0.25%, 2 mL) provided effective, safe analgesia in advanced cancer patients. Bupivacaine enema (100 mg·100 mL−1) was shown to be a valuable option for control of end-of-life tenesmoid cancer pain. PMID:25336967

  12. Injections of botulinum toxin type a produce pain alleviation in intractable trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Allam, Nasser; Brasil-Neto, Joaquim P; Brown, Gilberto; Tomaz, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    To report the effects of local injections of botulinum toxin type A regarding pain relief and long-term control in a patient with intractable trigeminal neuralgia. The patient was a 75-year-old man with trigeminal neuralgia in the left hemifacial region. His pain was unbearable and could not be controlled by carbamazepine, amitriptyline, or blocked by infiltration of a glycerol solution or phenol. The authors evaluated pain intensity, quality, and location using a Visual Analog Scale to establish the efficacy of botulinum toxin type A injections. Two units of botulinum toxin type A (Botox) were subcutaneously injected once in eight points distributed along the territory of V1 and V2. Visual Analog Scores were measured at baseline and at 7, 30, 60, and 90 days after treatment. The authors also examined the patient's general condition and daily life activities. The Visual Analog values were, respectively, 82, 54, 25, 25, and 45 mm at each follow-up examination. No side effects were observed on the site of injection and on the patient's clinical state. The authors have been able to reduce trigeminal neuralgia pain with botulinum toxin type A injections in the V1, V2 territory during all the period of study, as well as to withdraw all medication. Interestingly, there was concomitant reduction of pain also in V3, which was not injected. PMID:15722812

  13. Efficacy and Safety of Ropivacaine Addition to Intrathecal Morphine for Pain Management in Intractable Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying; Li, Xihan; Zhu, Tong; Lin, Jian; Tao, Gaojian

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Although intrathecal drug infusion has been commonly adopted for terminal cancer pain relief, its adverse effects have made many clinicians reluctant to employ it for intractable cancer pain. The objective of this study is to compare the efficacy and security of an intrathecal continuous infusion of morphine and ropivacaine versus intrathecal morphine alone for cancer pain. Methods. Thirty-six cancer patients received either a continuous morphine (n = 19) or morphine and ropivacaine (n = 17) infusion using an intrathecal catheter through a subcutaneous port. Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) scores and the Barthel Index were analyzed. Adverse effects and complications on postoperative days 1, 3, 7, and 15 were also analyzed. Results. All patients experienced pain relief. Compared to those who received morphine alone, patients receiving morphine and ropivacaine had significantly lower postoperative morphine requirements and higher Barthel Index scores on the 15th postsurgical day (P < 0.05). Patients receiving morphine and ropivacaine had lower NRS scores than patients receiving morphine alone on postoperative days 1, 3, 7, and 15 (P < 0.05). Negative postsurgical effects were similar in both groups. Conclusions. Morphine and ropivacaine administration through intrathecal access ports is efficacious and safe and significantly improves quality of life. PMID:26556955

  14. Palliative Sedation and What Constitutes Active Dying: A Case of Severe Progressive Dystonia and Intractable Pain.

    PubMed

    Strand, Jacob J; Feely, Molly A; Kramer, Neha M; Moeschler, Susan M; Swetz, Keith M

    2016-05-01

    We present the case of a 34-year-old woman with Klippel-Feil syndrome who developed progressive generalized dystonia of unclear etiology, resulting in intractable pain despite aggressive medical and surgical interventions. Ultimately, palliative sedation was required to relieve suffering. Herein, we describe ethical considerations including defining sedation, determining prognosis in the setting of an undefined neurodegenerative condition, and use of treatments that concurrently might prolong or alter end-of-life trajectory. We highlight pertinent literature and how it may be applied in challenging and unique clinical situations. Finally, we discuss the need for expert multidisciplinary involvement when implementing palliative sedation and illustrate that procedures and rules need to be interpreted to deliver optimal patient-centered plan of care. PMID:25487783

  15. Activating endogenous visceral pain modulation: a comparison of heterotopic stimulation methods in healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Wilder-Smith, Clive H; Song, Guanghui; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Ho, Khek Yu

    2009-09-01

    All sensory input underlies modulation by endogenous central nervous system pathways. Dysfunctional endogenous pain modulation has been demonstrated in central sensitization and in several pain syndromes, including Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Activation of endogenous visceral pain modulation by heterotopic stimulation was compared using different methods. Rectal electrical or distension pain alone or with simultaneous (i.e. heterotopic) noxious hand or foot cold stimulation were investigated in randomized sequence in 14 male and 1 female healthy subjects. Mean pain intensities on a visual analogue scale of 0-100 (95% CI) during tonic rectal electrical and distension stimulation alone were 64 (52-76) and 55 (39-71), respectively. Rectal distension pain decreased by 36% (18-55) with simultaneous hand and by 45% (24-66) with simultaneous foot cold pain. Rectal electrical pain decreased by 45% (29-61) during hand and by 46% (28-64) during foot cold pain. Facilitation, i.e. increased rectal pain during heterotopic stimulation was observed in only 1 of 60 stimulation runs. Potent and consistent activation of endogenous visceral pain inhibition was achieved with heterotopic cold pain limb stimulation. Somato-visceral convergence did not affect the effectiveness of induction of endogenous visceral pain inhibition in healthy subjects, as hand and foot heterotopic stimulation resulted in similar pain inhibition. Pain facilitation, as shown earlier in IBS patients, was not evident in healthy controls. PMID:19004650

  16. Assessment of visceral pain associated with metritis in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Stojkov, J; von Keyserlingk, M A G; Marchant-Forde, J N; Weary, D M

    2015-08-01

    Metritis is a common disease in dairy cattle, but to our knowledge, no work has assessed pain associated with this disease. Tissue palpation is commonly used to assess pain in human and veterinary medicine. The objective of this study was to evaluate visceral pain responses during rectal palpation, with and without uterine palpation, in healthy cows and in cows diagnosed with metritis. A total of 49 Holstein dairy cows (mean standard deviation parity of 2.81.8) were subjected to systematic health checks every 3 d after parturition for 21 d, scoring for vaginal discharge (0 to 4); 13 cows showed a discharge score ?2 during at least 1 health check and were classified as metritic, whereas 29 cows were classified as healthy and showed no sign of this or any other disease (including mastitis and lameness). Back arch and heart rate variability before examination and during palpation were recorded using video and heart rate monitors. Back arch (cm(2)) on the day of diagnosis was greater in metritic versus healthy cows (1,03472 vs. 61248cm(2)), and greater during rectal palpation with uterine palpation versus rectal palpation without uterine palpation (86945 vs. 77745cm(2)). Heart rate frequency domain analysis showed that the low-frequency portion was higher in cows with metritis versus healthy cows (16.51.2 vs. 12.91.0). Time domain analysis showed that the standard deviation between normal to normal interbeat intervals and the root mean square of successive differences both decreased during rectal palpation with uterine palpation versus rectal palpation without uterine palpation (1.90.1 vs. 2.50.1 and 1.30.1 vs. 1.70.1, respectively). Together, these results indicate that the inflammation associated with metritis is painful, and that the pain response can be detected during rectal palpation with and without uterine palpation. Rectal palpation with uterine palpation appears to be more aversive than rectal palpation without uterine palpation, suggesting that the former should be avoided when possible. PMID:26074240

  17. Lack of endogenous opioid release during sustained visceral pain: a [11C]carfentanil PET study.

    PubMed

    Ly, Huynh Giao; Dupont, Patrick; Geeraerts, Brecht; Bormans, Guy; Van Laere, Koen; Tack, Jan; Van Oudenhove, Lukas

    2013-10-01

    Opioidergic neurotransmission in the central nervous system is involved in somatic pain, but its role in visceral pain remains unknown. We aimed to quantify endogenous opioid release in the brain during sustained painful gastric distension. Therefore, 2 dynamic [11C]carfentanil positron emission tomography scans were performed in 20 healthy subjects during 2 conditions: sustained (20 minutes) painful proximal gastric balloon distension at predetermined individual discomfort threshold (PAIN) and no distension (NO PAIN), in counterbalanced order. Pain levels were assessed during scanning using visual analogue scales and after scanning using the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Emotional state was rated after scanning using the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule. Distribution volume ratios in 21 volumes of interest in the pain matrix were used to quantify endogenous opioid release. During the PAIN compared to the NO PAIN condition, volunteers reported a significantly higher increase in negative affect (5.501.29 versus 0.101.08, P=.0147) as well as higher pain ratings (sensory: 74.059.23 versus 1.500.95, P<.0001; affective: 91.428.13 versus 4.336.56, P<.0001). No difference in endogenous opioid release was demonstrated in any of the volumes of interest. Thus, contrary to its somatic counterpart, no opioid release is detected in the brain during sustained visceral pain, despite similar pain intensities. Endogenous opioids may play a less important role in visceral compared to somatic pain. PMID:23792286

  18. Microendoscopy-guided percutaneous cordotomy for intractable pain: case series of 24 patients.

    PubMed

    Fonoff, Erich Talamoni; Lopez, William Omar Contreras; de Oliveira, Ywzhe Sifuentes Almeida; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2016-02-01

    OBJECT The aim of this study was to show that microendoscopic guidance using a double-channel technique could be safely applied during percutaneous cordotomy and provides clear real-time visualization of the spinal cord and surrounding structures during the entire procedure. METHODS Twenty-four adult patients with intractable cancer pain were treated by microendoscopic-guided percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) cordotomy using the double-channel technique under local anesthesia. A percutaneous lateral puncture was performed initially under fluoroscopy guidance to localize the target. When the subarachnoid space was reached by the guiding cannula, the endoscope was inserted for visualization of the spinal cord and surrounding structures. After target visualization, a second needle was inserted to guide the RF electrode. Cordotomy was performed by a standard RF method. RESULTS The microendoscopic double-channel approach provided real-time visualization of the target in 91% of the cases. The other 9% of procedures were performed by the single-channel technique. Significant analgesia was achieved in over 90% of the cases. Two patients had transient ataxia that lasted for a few weeks until total recovery. CONCLUSIONS The use of percutaneous microendoscopic cordotomy with the double-channel technique is useful for specific manipulations of the spinal cord. It provides real-time visualization of the RF probe, thereby adding a degree of safety to the procedure. PMID:26230468

  19. From Pavlov to pain: How predictability affects the anticipation and processing of visceral pain in a fear conditioning paradigm.

    PubMed

    Labrenz, Franziska; Icenhour, Adriane; Schlamann, Marc; Forsting, Michael; Bingel, Ulrike; Elsenbruch, Sigrid

    2016-04-15

    Conditioned pain-related fear may contribute to hyperalgesia and central sensitization, but this has not been tested for interoceptive, visceral pain. The underlying ability to accurately predict pain is based on predictive cue properties and may alter the sensory processing and cognitive-emotional modulation of pain thus exacerbating the subjective pain experience. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging study using painful rectal distensions as unconditioned stimuli (US), we addressed changes in the neural processing of pain during the acquisition of pain-related fear and subsequently tested if conditioned stimuli (CS) contribute to hyperalgesia and increased neural responses in pain-encoding regions. N=49 healthy volunteers were assigned to one of two groups and underwent 3T fMRI during acquisition of either differential fear conditioning (predictable) or non-contingent presentation of CS and US (unpredictable). During a subsequent test phase, pain stimuli signaled randomly by the CSs were delivered. For the acquisition, results confirmed differential conditioning in the predictable but not the unpredictable group. With regard to activation in response to painful stimuli, the unpredictable compared to the predictable group revealed greater activation in pain-encoding (somatosensory cortex, insula) and pain-modulatory (prefrontal and cingulate cortices, periaqueductal grey, parahippocampus) regions. In the test phase, no evidence of hyperalgesia or central sensitization was found, but the predictable group demonstrated enhanced caudate nucleus activation in response to CS(-)-signaled pain. These findings support that during fear conditioning, the ability to predict pain affects neural processing of visceral pain and alters the associative learning processes underlying the acquisition of predictive properties of cues signaling pain, but conditioned pain-related fear does not result in visceral hyperalgesia or central sensitization. PMID:26854560

  20. Peripheral and Neuraxial Chemical Neurolysis for the Management of Intractable Lower Extremity Pain in a Patient with Terminal Cancer.

    PubMed

    De Pinto, Mario; Naidu, Ramana K

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 74-year-old man with Stage IV metastatic, multifocal, malignant fibrous histiocytoma (T2b, N1, M1, G4) invading the proximal area of the left lower extremity and resulting in intractable neuropathic pain along the distribution of the femoral nerve. He described the pain as being so severe to cause inability to ambulate without assistance or to sleep in a supine or prone position. After a spinal cord stimulation trial and a trial of intrathecal (IT) hydromorphone, both performed at an outside institution, had failed to achieve adequate pain relief, we decided to perform a femoral nerve chemical neurolysis with phenol under ultrasound (US) guidance. The intervention provided 6 months of almost complete pain relief. With the tumor spreading in girth distally and proximally to the scrotal and pelvic areas as well as to the lungs, and pain returning back to baseline, we proceeded with a second femoral nerve chemical neurolysis. Unfortunately we were not able to achieve adequate pain relief. Therefore we opted to proceed with a diagnostic injection of local anesthetic under fluoroscopic guidance at the left L2, L3, and L4 nerve roots level. This intervention provided 100% pain relief and was followed, a few days later, by chemical neurolysis with phenol 3%. The patient reported complete pain relief with the procedure and no sensory-motor related side effects or complications. He was able to enjoy the last 6 weeks of life with his wife and family, pain-free. With this report we add to the limited literature available regarding the management of intractable cancer pain with chemical neurolysis in and around the epidural space. PMID:26218956

  1. Mechanisms underlying the analgesic effect of moxibustion on visceral pain in irritable bowel syndrome: a review.

    PubMed

    Huang, Renjia; Zhao, Jimeng; Wu, Luyi; Dou, Chuanzi; Liu, Huirong; Weng, Zhijun; Lu, Yuan; Shi, Yin; Wang, Xiaomei; Zhou, Cili; Wu, Huangan

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder that causes recurrent abdominal (visceral) pain. Epidemiological data show that the incidence rate of IBS is as high as 25%. Most of the medications may lead to tolerance, addiction and toxic side effects. Moxibustion is an important component of traditional Chinese medicine and has been used to treat IBS-like abdominal pain for several thousand years in China. As a mild treatment, moxibustion has been widely applied in clinical treatment of visceral pain in IBS. In recent years, it has played an irreplaceable role in alternative medicine. Extensive clinical studies have demonstrated that moxibustion for treatment of visceral pain is simple, convenient, and inexpensive, and it is being accepted by an increasing number of patients. There have not been many studies investigating the analgesic mechanisms of moxibustion. Studies exploring the analgesic mechanisms have mainly focused on visceral hypersensitivity, brain-gut axis neuroendocrine system, and immune system. This paper reviews the latest developments in moxibustion use for treatment of visceral pain in IBS from these perspectives. It also evaluates potential problems in relevant studies on the mechanisms of moxibustion therapy to promote the application of moxibustion in the treatment of IBS. PMID:25093032

  2. Clinical Effects and Brain Metabolic Correlates in Noninvasive Cortical Neuromodulation for Visceral Pain

    PubMed Central

    Fregni, Felipe; Potvin, Kimberly; DaSilva, Deborah; Wang, Xiaoen; Lenkinski, Robert; Freedman, Steven D.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Chronic visceral pain is frequent, extremely debilitating, and generally resistant to pharmacological treatment. It has been shown that chronic visceral inflammation, through altered afferent visceral sensory input, leads to plastic changes in the central nervous system that ultimately sustain pain. Therefore approaches aiming at modulation of brain activity are attractive candidates to control visceral pain. Methods Here we report findings of a phase II, sham-controlled clinical trial assessing the clinical and neurophysiological effects of a 10-day course of daily sessions of slow frequency, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) targeting the right secondary somatosensory cortex (SII) in patients with chronic pancreatitis and severe visceral pain. Results Our results show a significant reduction in pain after real rTMS that lasted for at least 3 weeks following treatment. These clinical changes were correlated with increases in glutamate and N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) levels - neurometabolites associated with cortical activity and brain damage - as measured by in vivo single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). Adverse effects in the real rTMS group were mild and short-lasting. Conclusions Our results support preliminary findings showing that modulation of right SII with rTMS is associated with a significant analgesic effect and that this effect is correlated with an increase in excitatory neurotransmitter levels such as glutamate and NAA. PMID:20822942

  3. Stress and the Microbiota-Gut-Brain Axis in Visceral Pain: Relevance to Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moloney, Rachel D; Johnson, Anthony C; O'Mahony, Siobhain M; Dinan, Timothy G; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Cryan, John F

    2016-02-01

    Visceral pain is a global term used to describe pain originating from the internal organs of the body, which affects a significant proportion of the population and is a common feature of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). While IBS is multifactorial, with no single etiology to completely explain the disorder, many patients also experience comorbid behavioral disorders, such as anxiety or depression; thus, IBS is described as a disorder of the gut-brain axis. Stress is implicated in the development and exacerbation of visceral pain disorders. Chronic stress can modify central pain circuitry, as well as change motility and permeability throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. More recently, the role of the gut microbiota in the bidirectional communication along the gut-brain axis, and subsequent changes in behavior, has emerged. Thus, stress and the gut microbiota can interact through complementary or opposing factors to influence visceral nociceptive behaviors. This review will highlight the evidence by which stress and the gut microbiota interact in the regulation of visceral nociception. We will focus on the influence of stress on the microbiota and the mechanisms by which microbiota can affect the stress response and behavioral outcomes with an emphasis on visceral pain. PMID:26662472

  4. A rat knockout model implicates TRPC4 in visceral pain sensation

    PubMed Central

    Westlund, Karin N.; Zhang, Li Ping; Ma, Fei; Nesemeier, Ryan; Ruiz, Joseph C.; Ostertag, Eric M.; Crawford, Jack S.; Babinski, Kazimierz; Marcinkiewicz, Mieczyslaw Martin

    2014-01-01

    Acute and chronic pain resulting from injury, surgery, or disease afflicts >100 million Americans each year, having a severe impact on mood, mental health, and quality of life. The lack of structural and functional information for most ion channels, many of which play key roles in the detection and transmission of noxious stimuli, means that there remain unidentified therapeutic targets for pain management. This study focuses on the TRPC4 ion channel, which is involved in the tissue-specific and stimulus-dependent regulation of intracellular Ca2+ signaling. Rats with a transposon-mediated TRPC4-knockout mutation displayed tolerance to visceral pain induced by colonic mustard oil (MO) exposure, but not somatic or neuropathic pain stimuli. Moreover, wild type rats treated with a selective TRPC4 antagonist (ML-204) prior to MO exposure mimicked the behavioral responses observed in TRPC4-knockout rats. Significantly, ML-204 inhibited visceral pain-related behavior in a dose-dependent manner without noticeable adverse effects. These data provide evidence that TRPC4 is required for detection and/or transmission of colonic mustard oil visceral pain sensation. In the future, inhibitors of TRPC4 signaling may provide a highly promising path for the development of first-in-class therapeutics for this visceral pain, which may have fewer side effects and less addictive potential than opioid derivatives. PMID:24388923

  5. A rat knockout model implicates TRPC4 in visceral pain sensation.

    PubMed

    Westlund, K N; Zhang, L P; Ma, F; Nesemeier, R; Ruiz, J C; Ostertag, E M; Crawford, J S; Babinski, K; Marcinkiewicz, M M

    2014-03-14

    Acute and chronic pain resulting from injury, surgery, or disease afflicts >100 million Americans each year, having a severe impact on mood, mental health, and quality of life. The lack of structural and functional information for most ion channels, many of which play key roles in the detection and transmission of noxious stimuli, means that there remain unidentified therapeutic targets for pain management. This study focuses on the transient receptor potential canonical subfamily 4 (TRPC4) ion channel, which is involved in the tissue-specific and stimulus-dependent regulation of intracellular Ca? signaling. Rats with a transposon-mediated TRPC4-knockout mutation displayed tolerance to visceral pain induced by colonic mustard oil (MO) exposure, but not somatic or neuropathic pain stimuli. Moreover, wild-type rats treated with a selective TRPC4 antagonist (ML-204) prior to MO exposure mimicked the behavioral responses observed in TRPC4-knockout rats. Significantly, ML-204 inhibited visceral pain-related behavior in a dose-dependent manner without noticeable adverse effects. These data provide evidence that TRPC4 is required for detection and/or transmission of colonic MO visceral pain sensation. In the future, inhibitors of TRPC4 signaling may provide a highly promising path for the development of first-in-class therapeutics for this visceral pain, which may have fewer side effects and less addictive potential than opioid derivatives. PMID:24388923

  6. Spinal cord stimulation for intractable chronic upper abdominal pain: a case report of the first patient in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Al-Mahrouqi, Haitham; Munro, Zea; Acland, Richard H; MacFarlane, Martin R

    2012-12-14

    We present the first patient in New Zealand to undergo Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS) for intractable upper abdominal pain. The patient was a 53-year-old man with a 20-year history of debilitating upper abdominal pain associated with chronic pancreatitis secondary to pancreatic divisum. Prior to the SCS, he was prescribed 680 mg of morphine sulphate equi-analgesia a day. Despite the intense analgesia, he still suffered monthly attacks of upper abdominal pain requiring hospitalisation. Nine months after implanting a Spinal Cord Stimulator, the monthly attacks ceased, his background pain was effectively controlled and the need for opioids decreased to 510 mg of morphine sulphate equi-analgesia a day. PMID:23321890

  7. Sex differences in brain response to anticipated and experienced visceral pain in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Kano, Michiko; Farmer, Adam D; Aziz, Qasim; Giampietro, Vincent P; Brammer, Michael J; Williams, Steven C R; Fukudo, Shin; Coen, Steven J

    2013-04-15

    Women demonstrate higher pain sensitivity and prevalence of chronic visceral pain conditions such as functional gastrointestinal disorders than men. The role of sex differences in the brain processing of visceral pain is still unclear. In 16 male and 16 female healthy subjects we compared personality, anxiety levels, skin conductance response (SCR), and brain processing using functional MRI during anticipation and pain induced by esophageal distension at pain toleration level. There was no significant difference in personality scores, anxiety levels, SCR, and subjective ratings of pain between sexes. In group analysis, both men and women demonstrated a similar pattern of brain activation and deactivation during anticipation and pain consistent with previous reports. However, during anticipation women showed significantly greater activation in the cuneus, precuneus, and supplementary motor area (SMA) and stronger deactivation in the right amygdala and left parahippocampal gyrus, whereas men demonstrated greater activation in the cerebellum. During pain, women demonstrated greater activation in the midcingulate cortex, anterior insula, premotor cortex, and cerebellum and stronger deactivation in the caudate, whereas men showed increased activity in the SMA. The pattern of brain activity suggests that, during anticipation, women may demonstrate stronger limbic inhibition, which is considered to be a cognitive modulation strategy for impending painful stimulation. During pain, women significantly activate brain areas associated with the affective and motivation components of pain. These responses may underlie the sex differences that exist in pain conditions, whereby women may attribute more emotional importance to painful stimuli compared with men. PMID:23392235

  8. Management of advanced plexiform neurofibromatosis of the foot presenting with skeletal deformation and intractable pain: an indication for proximal amputation.

    PubMed

    DeFazio, Michael V; Ter Louw, Ryan P; Attinger, Christopher E; Barbour, John R

    2015-03-01

    Plexiform neurofibromas of the foot are rare and often present with significant pain, deformity, and functional impairment secondary to their locally invasive behavior. While treatment has traditionally focused on attempts at radical resection, a lack of consensus among surgeons has hindered the establishment of a well-defined algorithm to guide the management of these highly co-morbid peripheral nerve sheath tumors. We present the case of an advanced plexiform neurofibroma of the right foot in a 24-year-old male with neurofibromatosis type 1. The patient presented following accelerated tumor growth with extensive osseous erosion, intractable pain, and progressive ankle instability that limited his capacity to ambulate and wear shoes. A modified transtibial amputation with a vascularized fibular bone graft (Ertl procedure) was performed without complication. Following graduated rehabilitation, postoperatively, the patient regained functional independence and was able to ambulate without pain in a customized prosthesis after 3 months. Plexiform neurofibromas of the foot present a complex challenge for foot and ankle surgeons. On the basis of our experience and previously reported cases, we advocate for amputation over aggressive attempts at advanced limb salvage for patients with extensive skeletal destruction, joint instability, and/or intractable pain caused by tumor mass effect. PMID:25496857

  9. [Three successful cases of continuous dexmedetomidine infusion for the treatment of intractable delirium associated with cancer pain].

    PubMed

    Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Kimura, Yoshie; Hato, Akio; Ikegaki, Junichi

    2013-12-01

    We report three cases of successful treatment of intractable delirium associated with cancer pain with continuous dexmedetomidine (DEX) infusion. Case 1 : An 83-year-old man receiving oral oxycodone for lung cancer pain developed delirium. He was resistant to haloperidol infusion, oral quetiapine, and opioid rotation. DEX infusion was administered at 0.4 microg kg-1 hr-1, and his delirium resolved. Case 2: A 50-year-old woman with cervical cancer of the uterus suffered from sepsis but could not take oral oxycodone. After continuous morphine infusion, she developed delirium. She was resistant to haloperidol infusion or injections of oxycodone for opioid rotation, but DEX infusion at 0.4 microg kg-1hr-1 led to disappearance of delirium symptoms. Case 3: A 71-year-old woman with advanced renal cancer was treated with epidural analgesia to alleviate cancer pain. She subsequently developed delirium but was resistant to haloperidol or chlorpromazine infusion. DEX infusion at 0.3 microg kg-1 hr-1 led to disappearance of delirium symptoms and orientation recovery. DEX infusion may be effective for the treatment of intractable delirium associated with cancer pain. PMID:24498781

  10. Intradural approach to selective stimulation in the spinal cord for treatment of intractable pain: design principles and wireless protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, M. A.; Utz, M.; Brennan, T. J.; Dalm, B. D.; Viljoen, S.; Jeffery, N. D.; Gillies, G. T.

    2011-08-01

    We introduce an intradural approach to spinal cord stimulation for the relief of intractable pain, and describe the biophysical rationale that underlies its design and performance requirements. The proposed device relies on wireless, inductive coupling between a pial surface implant and its epidural controller, and we present the results of benchtop experiments that demonstrate the ability to transmit and receive a frequency-modulated 1.6 MHz carrier signal between micro-coil antennae scaled to the ? 1 cm dimensions of the implant, at power levels of about 5 mW. Plans for materials selection, microfabrication, and other aspects of future development are presented and discussed.

  11. A New Perspective of Neuromyopathy to Explain Intractable Pancreatic Cancer Pains; Dry Needling as an Effective Adjunct to Neurolytic Blocks

    PubMed Central

    Vas, Lakshmi; Phanse, Sushama; Pai, Renuka

    2016-01-01

    We present a new perspective of neuromyopathy in pancreatic cancer pain (PCP) referral to bodywall; proposal of new rationale to include ultrasound guided dry needling (USGDN) of body wall muscles as an effective adjunct to neurolytic coeliac plexus block (NCPB) or splanchnic nerve radiofrequency ablation (SRF) for comprehensive interventional management. Methods: PCP response to SRF in 2 patients and NCPB in 3 patients was documented on numerical rating scale (NRS) on post procedure days 3 and 15. If the residual pain was >5 NRS on day 15, USGDN of abdominal and back muscles was started on a thrice weekly basis. The response to USGDN documented on day 30 after approximately 6 sessions of DN, showed a significant pain reduction (0-2 NRS) with 50% reduction of pre-treatment opioid consumption. This was sustained at 6 months or till their demise. Convergence of visceral and somatic nerves at the dorsal horn (viscerosomatic neurons) causes referral of visceral pain to the back and abdominal muscles. This leads to formation of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in the muscles which sets up a parallel network of sensitized peripheral and central motor nociceptive processing (neuromyopathy). USGDN specifically addressed the MTrPs that develop as an epiphenomenon of self-perpetuating neuromyopathy while SRF/NCPB, analgesics and neuromodulators could address only visceral nociceptive afferents (pain mediated through celiac plexus) which forms a meagre 10% of the total spinal cord afferent input. Thus, we conclude that combination of neuromyopathy and viscerosomatic convergence in PCP indicate a specific role for DN as an adjunct to SRF/NCPB in our patients PMID:26962286

  12. UNEXPLAINED VISCERAL PAIN IN CHILDREN: PATHOPHYSIOLOGY, CLINICAL FEATURES AND MANAGEMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many children experience recurrent episodes of abdominal pain, but it is unclear why this occurs. This article reviews our present understanding of this common condition and how it sometimes can relate to diet, inherent pain sensing ability, and the influence of how the parents perceive pain....

  13. Modulation of visceral pain and inflammation by protease-activated receptors

    PubMed Central

    Vergnolle, Nathalie

    2004-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is exposed to a large array of proteases, under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. The discovery of G protein-coupled receptors activated by proteases, the protease-activated receptors (PARs), has highlighted new signaling functions for proteases in the GI tract, particularly in the domains of inflammation and pain mechanisms. Activation of PARs by selective peptidic agonists in the intestine or the pancreas leads to inflammatory events and changes in visceral nociception, suggesting that PARs could be involved in the modulation of visceral pain and inflammation. PARs are present in most of the cells that are potentially actors in the generation of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms. Activation of PARs interferes with several pathophysiological factors that are involved in the generation of IBS symptoms, such as altered motility patterns, inflammatory mediator release, altered epithelial functions (immune, permeability and secretory) and altered visceral nociceptive functions. Although definitive studies using genetically modified animals, and, when available, pharmacological tools, in different IBS and inflammatory models have not yet confirmed a role for PARs in those pathologies, PARs appear as promising targets for therapeutic intervention in visceral pain and inflammation processes. PMID:15051630

  14. A comparison of visceral and somatic pain processing in the human brainstem using functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Dunckley, Paul; Wise, Richard G; Fairhurst, Merle; Hobden, Peter; Aziz, Qasim; Chang, Lin; Tracey, Irene

    2005-08-10

    Evidence from both human and animal studies has demonstrated a key role for brainstem centers in the control of ascending nociceptive input. Nuclei such as the rostral ventromedial medulla and periaqueductal gray (PAG) are able to both inhibit and facilitate the nociceptive response. It has been proposed that altered descending modulation may underlie many of the chronic pain syndromes (both somatic and visceral). We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to image the neural correlates of visceral and somatic pain within the brainstem. Ten healthy subjects were scanned twice at 3 tesla, during which they received matched, moderately painful, electrical stimuli to either the midline lower abdomen or rectum. Significant activation was observed in regions consistent with the PAG, nucleus cuneiformis (NCF), ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra, parabrachial nuclei/nucleus ceruleus, and red nucleus bilaterally to both stimuli. Marked spatial similarities in activation were observed for visceral and somatic pain, although significantly greater activation of the NCF (left NCF, p = 0.02; right NCF, p = 0.01; Student's paired t test, two-tailed) was observed in the visceral pain group compared with the somatic group. Right PAG activity correlated with anxiety during visceral stimulation (r = 0.74; p < 0.05, Pearson's r, two-tailed) but not somatic stimulation. We propose that the differences in NCF and right PAG activation observed may represent a greater nocifensive response and greater emotive salience of visceral over somatic pain. PMID:16093383

  15. ZD 7288, an HCN channel blocker, attenuates chronic visceral pain in irritable bowel syndrome-like rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Lin, Chun; Tang, Ying; Chen, Ai-Qin; Liu, Cui-Ying; Lu, Da-Li

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of ZD 7288, a hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel blocker, on rats with chronic visceral pain. METHODS: Rats with visceral hypersensitivity were generated using neonatal colon irritation during postnatal days 8-15 as described previously. Visceral hypersensitivity was evaluated using electromyographic (EMG) responses of abdominal external oblique muscles to 20-80 mmHg colorectal distentions (CRD). Abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) scores and pain thresholds were also detected in adult rats. Different doses of ZD 7288 (25, 50, and 100 nmol/L) were intrathecally administered in rats to study the role of spinal HCN channel in chronic visceral hypersensitivity. RESULTS: EMG responses to 20-80 mmHg CRD and AWR scores under 20-60 mmHg CRD significantly increased in rats with visceral hypersensitivity compared to control rats (P < 0.05). The pain threshold in rats with visceral hypersensitivity significantly decreased compared to control rats (P < 0.05). Treatment with 50-100 nmol/L ZD 7288 significantly inhibited EMG responses (16%-62%, 80-20 mmHg CRD, P < 0.05) and AWR scores (24%-37%, 40-20 mmHg CRD, P < 0.05; 12%-61%, 80-20 mmHg CRD, P < 0.05, respectively), and significantly increased pain thresholds (32%-77%, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Spinal HCN channels may play an important role in chronic visceral hypersensitivity. PMID:24587682

  16. Intractable pain: a neglected area of medical education in the UK.

    PubMed Central

    Marcer, D; Deighton, S

    1988-01-01

    Unease over the previous management of 67 patients referred for treatment to 3 pain relief clinics led us to investigate the current state of education in pain and pain control in the UK. Twenty-seven medical schools provided data which revealed; (i) in 4 schools no teaching whatsoever is given in these subjects; (ii) in the remainder it is accorded an average of 3.5 hours during the 5 year course, with little evidence of multidisciplinary teaching; (iii) only 10 schools (37%) regularly set questions on pain control in formal examinations. A survey of 219 general practitioners revealed a wide-ranging lack of knowledge about the facilities and approach to treatment at their local pain relief clinic. These findings have wide reaching implications for medical education. At the undergraduate level they demonstrate a need for more multidisciplinary teaching and practical experience in specialist units. Thereafter specialists in pain control must enable practising doctors to keep abreast of new developments. This may require them to devote more time writing for a non-specialist audience and devising short, postgraduate courses. PMID:3221366

  17. Dyspeptic patients with visceral hypersensitivity: sensitisation of pain specific or multimodal pathways?

    PubMed Central

    Vandenberghe, J; Vos, R; Persoons, P; Demyttenaere, K; Janssens, J; Tack, J

    2005-01-01

    Background and aims: Patients with functional dyspepsia who have hypersensitivity to gastric distension have more prevalent pain, suggesting the presence of hyperalgesia. It is unclear whether this reflects activation of pain specific afferent pathways or multimodal afferent pathways that also mediate non-painful sensations. In the former case, hyperalgesia should occur when intensity of non-painful sensations is still low. The aim of the study was to analyse whether the symptom profile during gastric dissentions in functional dyspepsia patients with hyperalgesia reflects sensitisation of pain specific or multimodal pathways. Methods: Forty eight consecutive dyspeptic patients (35 female) underwent gastric sensitivity testing with a barostat balloon using a double random staircase protocol. At the end of every distending step, patients scored perception of upper abdominal sensations on a graphic 06 rating scale and completed visual analogue scales (VAS 0100 mm) for pain, nausea, satiety, and fullness. The end point was a rating scale of 5 or more. Results: Hypersensitivity was present in 20 patients (40%); gastric compliance did not differ between normo- and hypersensitive patients. At maximal distension (score 5 or more), hypersensitive patients had significantly lower distending pressures and intra-balloon volumes, but similar VAS scores for pain, nausea, satiety, and fullness compared with normosensitive patients. In both normosensitive and hypersensitive patients, elevation of pain VAS scores with increasing distending pressures paralleled the elevation in VAS scores for nausea, satiety, and fullness. Conclusions: Hypersensitive dyspeptic patients reach the same intensity of painful and non-painful sensations as normosensitive patients but at lower distending pressures. Hyperalgesia occurs in hypersensitive dyspeptic patients at distending pressures that also induce intense non-painful sensations. These findings argue against isolated upregulation of pain specific afferents in functional dyspepsia patients with visceral hypersensitivity. PMID:15951533

  18. Monitoring equine visceral pain with a composite pain scale score and correlation with survival after emergency gastrointestinal surgery.

    PubMed

    van Loon, Johannes P A M; Jonckheer-Sheehy, Valerie S M; Back, Willem; van Weeren, P Ren; Hellebrekers, Ludo J

    2014-04-01

    Recognition and management of equine pain have been studied extensively in recent decades and this has led to significant advances. However, there is still room for improvement in the ability to identify and treat pain in horses that have undergone emergency gastrointestinal surgery. This study assessed the validity and clinical application of the composite pain scale (CPS) in horses after emergency gastrointestinal surgery. Composite pain scores were determined every 4h over 3 days following emergency gastrointestinal surgery in 48 horses. Inter-observer reliability was determined and another composite visceral pain score (numerical rating scale, NRS) was determined simultaneously with CPS scores. CPS scores had higher inter-observer reliability (r=0.87, K=0.84, P<0.001), compared to NRS scores (r=0.68, K=0.72, P<0.001). Horses that survived without complications had significantly lower CPS and NRS scores compared to horses that were euthanased or had to undergo re-laparotomy (P<0.001). Breed and the location in the intestinal tract (small or large intestine) did not influence pain scores. In conclusion, the use of the CPS improved objectivity of pain scoring in horses following emergency gastrointestinal surgery. High inter-observer reliability allows for comparisons between different observers. This will be of great benefit in larger veterinary hospitals where several attending clinicians are often involved in the care of each case. PMID:24491373

  19. Functional brain activation during retrieval of visceral pain-conditioned passive avoidance in the rat.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuo; Bradesi, Sylvie; Charles, Jonathan R; Pang, Raina D; Maarek, Jean-Michel I; Mayer, Emeran A; Holschneider, Daniel P

    2011-12-01

    This study assessed functional brain activation in rats during expectation of visceral pain. Male rats were trained in step-down passive avoidance (PA) for 2 days. Upon stepping down from a platform, conditioned animals received noxious colorectal distension delivered through a colorectal balloon, whereas the balloon in control rats remained uninflated. On day 3, PA behavior was assessed while [(14)C]-iodoantipyrine was infused intravenously, followed by immediate euthanasia. Regional cerebral blood flow-related tissue radioactivity (rCBF) was analyzed by statistical parametric mapping using 3-dimensional brains reconstructed from autoradiographic brain slice images. Associated with retrieved PA behavior, conditioned rats compared with control subjects showed increases in rCBF in sensory (anterior insula, somatosensory cortex), limbic/paralimbic regions (anterior cingulate, prelimbic cortex, amygdala), all regions previously reported to show activation during acute visceral pain. Increases in rCBF were also noted in the dorsal hippocampus, nucleus accumbens, and caudate putamen, regions associated with retrieval of PA. Organization of the underlying brain network was further delineated by functional connectivity analysis. This revealed in conditioned rats a strongly and positively connected corticostriatal cluster (cingulate, prelimbic cortex, caudate putamen). The amygdala and cerebellar hemispheres formed another positively connected cluster, which was negatively connected with the corticostriatal cluster, suggesting corticolimbic modulation. Prelimbic cortex, nucleus accumbens, and anterior insula emerged in conditioned animals as hubs. Our results show that during retrieval of PA, brain areas implicated in PA expression as well as those implicated in acute visceral pain processing were recruited, in line with findings from human brain imaging studies on pain expectation. PMID:21944154

  20. Analgesic effect of Minocycline in rat model of inflammation-induced visceral pain

    PubMed Central

    Kannampalli, Pradeep; Pochiraju, Soumya; Bruckert, Mitchell; Shaker, Reza; Banerjee, Banani; Sengupta, Jyoti N.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates the analgesic effect of minocycline, a semi-synthetic tetracycline antibiotic, in a rat model of inflammation-induced visceral pain. Inflammation was induced in male rats by intracolonic administration of tri-nitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS). Visceral hyperalgesia was assessed by comparing the viscero-motor response (VMR) to graded colorectal distension (CRD) prior and post 7 days after TNBS treatment. Electrophysiology recordings from CRD-sensitive pelvic nerve afferents (PNA) and lumbo-sacral (LS) spinal neurons were performed in naïve and inflamed rats. Colonic inflammation produced visceral hyperalgesia characterized by increase in the VMRs to CRD accompanied with simultaneous activation of microglia in the spinal cord and satellite glial cells (SGCs) in the dorsal root ganglions (DRGs). Selectively inhibiting the glial activation following inflammation by araC (Arabinofuranosyl Cytidine) prevented the development of visceral hyperalgesia. Intrathecal minocycline significantly attenuated the VMR to CRD in inflamed rats, whereas systemic minocycline produced a delayed effect. In electrophysiology experiments, minocycline significantly attenuated the mechanotransduction of CRD-sensitive PNAs and the responses of CRD-sensitive LS spinal neurons in TNBS-treated rats. While the spinal effect of minocycline was observed within 5 min of administration, systemic injection of the drug produced a delayed effect (60 min) in inflamed rats. Interestingly, minocycline did not exhibit analgesic effect in naïve, non-inflamed rats. The results demonstrate that intrathecal injection of minocycline can effectively attenuate inflammation-induced visceral hyperalgesia. Minocycline might as well act on neuronal targets in the spinal cord of inflamed rats, in addition to the widely reported glial inhibitory action to produce analgesia. PMID:24485889

  1. H2S and Pain: A Novel Aspect for Processing of Somatic, Visceral and Neuropathic Pain Signals.

    PubMed

    Terada, Yuka; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) formed by multiple enzymes including cystathionine-?-lyase (CSE) targets Cav3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels (T-channels) and transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1). Intraplantar and intracolonic administration of H2S donors promotes somatic and visceral pain, respectively, via activation of Cav3.2 and TRPA1 in rats and/or mice. Injection of H2S donors into the plantar tissues, pancreatic duct, colonic lumen, or bladder causes T-channel-dependent excitation of nociceptors, determined as phosphorylation of ERK or expression of Fos in the spinal dorsal horn. Electrophysiological studies demonstrate that exogenous and/or endogenous H2S facilitates membrane currents through T-channels in NG108-15 cells and isolated mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons that abundantly express Cav3.2 and also in Cav3.2-transfected HEK293 cells. In mice with cerulein-induced pancreatitis and cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis, visceral pain and/or referred hyperalgesia are inhibited by CSE inhibitors and by pharmacological blockade or genetic silencing of Cav3.2, and CSE protein is upregulated in the pancreas and bladder. In rats with neuropathy induced by L5 spinal nerve cutting or by repeated administration of paclitaxel, an anticancer drug, the neuropathic hyperalgesia is reversed by inhibitors of CSE or T-channels and by silencing of Cav3.2. Upregulation of Cav3.2 protein in DRG is detectable in the former, but not in the latter, neuropathic pain models. Thus, H2S appears to function as a nociceptive messenger by facilitating functions of Cav3.2 and TRPA1, and the enhanced function of the CSE/H2S/Cav3.2 pathway is considered to be involved in the pancreatitis- and cystitis-related pain and in neuropathic pain. PMID:26162837

  2. Heightened central affective response to visceral sensations of pain and discomfort in IBS.

    PubMed

    Hall, G B C; Kamath, M V; Collins, S; Ganguli, S; Spaziani, R; Miranda, K L; Bayati, A; Bienenstock, J

    2010-03-01

    BACKGROUND Typically, conventional functional imaging methods involve repeated exposures to sensory stimulation. In rectal distension (RD) studies that involve multiple distensions, however, it is difficult to disambiguate the central response to RD from pathological alterations in peripheral neural responses associated with relaxation and accommodation of the rectum. METHODS This study addressed potential confounders found in previous imaging studies by collecting functional magnetic resonance imaging studies (fMRI) data during a single slow ramp-tonic distension paradigm and analysing fMRI signal changes using independent component analysis. KEY RESULTS Compared with controls, IBS participants showed increased activation of the anterior cingulate cortices, insula and ventral medial prefrontal regions suggesting heightened affective responses to painful visceral stimuli. In addition, the failure by IBS patients to down-regulate activity within ventral medial prefrontal and the posterior cingulate/precuneus regions was suggestive of reduced sensitivity to somatic changes and delayed shifts away from rest in ;default network' activity patterns. Controls showed heightened activation of the thalamus, striatal regions and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex suggesting greater arousal and salience-driven sustained attention reactions and greater modulation of affective responses to discomfort and pain. CONCLUSION&INFERENCES This work points to alterations in the central response to visceral pain and discomfort in IBS, highlighting diminished modulation and heightened internalization of affective reactions. PMID:20003075

  3. Phosphorylated CaMKII post-synaptic binding to NR2B subunits in the anterior cingulate cortex mediates visceral pain in visceral hypersensitive rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Haiyan; Cao, Zhijun; Chen, Shengliang; Cao, Bing; Liu, Jin

    2012-05-01

    The NR2B subunit of NMDA receptor in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is up-regulated in viscerally hypersensitive (VH) rats induced by colonic anaphylaxis. It plays a critical role in modulation of ACC sensitization and visceral pain responses. Given the key role of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in synaptic plasticity and behavior learning and memory, we hypothesize that phosphorylation of CaMKII binding to NR2B mediates visceral pain in VH states. We performed in vivo electroporation of CaMKII siRNA produced inhibition of colorectal distension-induced visceromotor response in the VH rats. The NR2B, CaMKII and P-CaMKII-Thr²⁸⁶ protein levels were increased in 180%, 220% and 304% fold in the post-synaptic density (PSD) fraction in VH rats separately. Western blotting following co-immunoprecipitation showed that P-CaMKII-Thr²⁸⁶ bound to NR2B in the PSD, which was increased to 267% of control in VH rats. Administration of CaMKII antagonist Antennapedia-CaMKIINtide suppressed visceromotor response in VH rats in parallel with decrease of NR2B levels and reduction of the NR2B-P-CaMKII-Thr²⁸⁶ protein complex in PSD. In conclusion, CaMKII is a critical signaling molecule in the ACC glutamatergic synaptic transmission and phosphorylation of CaMKII at Thr286, which binds to NR2B subunit at post-synaptic site, modulates visceral pain in viscerally hypersensitive state. PMID:22380661

  4. Novel therapeutic approaches to the treatment of chronic abdominal visceral pain.

    PubMed

    Patrizi, Franca; Freedman, Steven D; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Fregni, Felipe

    2006-01-01

    Chronic abdominal visceral pain (CAVP) has a significant clinical impact and represents one of the most frequent and debilitating disorders in the general population. It also leads to a significant economic burden due to workdays lost, reduced productivity, and long-term use of medications with their associated side effects. Despite the availability of several therapeutic options, the management of patients with CAVP is often inadequate, resulting in frustration for both patients and physicians. This may in part be explained by the lack of understanding of the mechanisms underlying chronic pain; in contrast with acute pain in which the pathophysiology is relatively well known and has several satisfactory therapeutic options. Recently, the development of tools for brain investigation, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging, has provided new insights on the pathophysiology of chronic pain. These new data have shown that plastic changes in the central and peripheral nervous system might play an important role in the maintenance of chronic pain. Therefore, approaches aimed at the modulation of the nervous system, rather than the ones interfering with the inflammatory pathways, may be more effective for chronic pain treatment. We propose that noninvasive central nervous system stimulation, with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), might be a novel therapeutic option for CAVP. This paper will present an overview of the pathophysiology and the available therapies for CAVP, focusing on the recent advances in the treatment of this pathology. PMID:16633700

  5. Central amygdala mGluR5 in the modulation of visceral pain

    PubMed Central

    Crock, Lara W.; Kolber, Benedict J.; Morgan, Clinton D; Sadler, Katelyn E.; Vogt, Sherri K.; Bruchas, Michael R.; Gereau, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    Painful bladder syndrome is a debilitating condition that affects 3–6% of women in the United States. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that changes in central nervous system processing are key to the development of chronic bladder pain conditions, but little is known regarding the underlying cellular, molecular, and neuronal mechanisms. Using a mouse model of distension-induced bladder pain, we found that the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is a critical site of neuromodulation for processing of bladder nociception. Furthermore, we demonstrate that metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) activation in the CeA induces bladder pain sensitization by increasing CeA output. Thus, pharmacological activation of mGluR5 in the CeA is sufficient to increase the response to bladder distension. Additionally, pharmacological blockade or virally-mediated conditional deletion of mGluR5 in the CeA reduced responses to bladder distention suggesting that mGluR5 in the CeA is also necessary for these responses. Finally, we used optogenetic activation of the CeA and demonstrated that this caused a robust increase in the visceral pain response. The CeA localized effects on responses to bladder distention are associated with changes in extracellular signal regulated kinases 1/2 phosphorylation in the spinal cord. Overall, these data demonstrate that mGluR5 activation leads to increased CeA output that drives bladder pain sensitization. PMID:23055491

  6. Difficult Cases of Pain and Nonpain Symptoms in Intractable Spinal Infections: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Molly L.; Havyer, Rachel D. A.; Smith, Thomas J.; Swetz, Keith M.

    2014-01-01

    In the modern age of advanced surgical techniques and pharmacologic management, bacterial spinal infections (SIs) can be managed (either eradicated or suppressed) in many hosts. However, the optimal management of SIs may be limited by patient comorbidities, which do not allow for surgical management, or limited by antimicrobial options due to side effects, toxicities, or emerging drug resistance. In these settings, frank and honest discussion regarding risks and benefits of treatment should be pursued, including that the SI may be a terminal illness. In this case series, we present 3 patients who had bacterial SIs whose treatments were limited by the above-mentioned factors. Furthermore, each case presented challenges regarding optimal medical management of somatic and neuropathic pain associated with the SI. PMID:22144661

  7. Effect of commensals and probiotics on visceral sensitivity and pain in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Theodorou, Vassilia; Belgnaoui, Afifa Ait; Agostini, Simona; Eutamene, Helene

    2014-07-01

    The last ten years' wide progress in the gut microbiota phylogenetic and functional characterization has been made evidencing dysbiosis in several gastrointestinal diseases including inflammatory bowel diseases and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). IBS is a functional gut disease with high prevalence and negative impact on patient's quality of life characterized mainly by visceral pain and/or discomfort, representing a good paradigm of chronic gut hypersensitivity. The IBS features are strongly regulated by bidirectional gut-brain interactions and there is increasing evidence for the involvement of gut bacteria and/or their metabolites in these features, including visceral pain. Further, gut microbiota modulation by antibiotics or probiotics has been promising in IBS. Mechanistic data provided mainly by animal studies highlight that commensals or probiotics may exert a direct action through bacterial metabolites on sensitive nerve endings in the gut mucosa, or indirect pathways targeting the intestinal epithelial barrier, the mucosal and/or systemic immune activation, and subsequent neuronal sensitization and/or activation. PMID:25181491

  8. Effect of commensals and probiotics on visceral sensitivity and pain in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Theodorou, Vassilia; Ait Belgnaoui, Afifa; Agostini, Simona; Eutamene, Helene

    2014-01-01

    The last ten years' wide progress in the gut microbiota phylogenetic and functional characterization has been made evidencing dysbiosis in several gastrointestinal diseases including inflammatory bowel diseases and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). IBS is a functional gut disease with high prevalence and negative impact on patient's quality of life characterized mainly by visceral pain and/or discomfort, representing a good paradigm of chronic gut hypersensitivity. The IBS features are strongly regulated by bidirectional gut-brain interactions and there is increasing evidence for the involvement of gut bacteria and/or their metabolites in these features, including visceral pain. Further, gut microbiota modulation by antibiotics or probiotics has been promising in IBS. Mechanistic data provided mainly by animal studies highlight that commensals or probiotics may exert a direct action through bacterial metabolites on sensitive nerve endings in the gut mucosa, or indirect pathways targeting the intestinal epithelial barrier, the mucosal and/or systemic immune activation, and subsequent neuronal sensitization and/or activation. PMID:25184834

  9. Effect of commensals and probiotics on visceral sensitivity and pain in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Theodorou, Vassilia; Belgnaoui, Afifa Ait; Agostini, Simona; Eutamene, Helene

    2014-01-01

    The last ten years’ wide progress in the gut microbiota phylogenetic and functional characterization has been made evidencing dysbiosis in several gastrointestinal diseases including inflammatory bowel diseases and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). IBS is a functional gut disease with high prevalence and negative impact on patient’s quality of life characterized mainly by visceral pain and/or discomfort, representing a good paradigm of chronic gut hypersensitivity. The IBS features are strongly regulated by bidirectional gut-brain interactions and there is increasing evidence for the involvement of gut bacteria and/or their metabolites in these features, including visceral pain. Further, gut microbiota modulation by antibiotics or probiotics has been promising in IBS. Mechanistic data provided mainly by animal studies highlight that commensals or probiotics may exert a direct action through bacterial metabolites on sensitive nerve endings in the gut mucosa, or indirect pathways targeting the intestinal epithelial barrier, the mucosal and/or systemic immune activation, and subsequent neuronal sensitization and/or activation. PMID:25184834

  10. Centrally administered verapamil prevents the autonomic reaction to visceral pain in sheep.

    PubMed

    Kania, B F; Brytan, M; Tomaszewska, D

    2009-02-01

    The significant role of voltage gated calcium channels (VGCC) L-type antagonists used concomitantly with opioids in attenuation of clinical pain has been confirmed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of centrally administered verapamil on behavior and biochemical parameters in sheep that have undergone experimental duodenal distension (DD) and to determine whether verapamil exerts any anti-nociceptive effects under these conditions. The study was carried out using 24 mature crossbred ewes, each weighing 38-43 kg. Verapamil, a VGCC blocker, was administered through an intracerebroventricular cannula at the following doses: 0.25, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0mg in toto. Ten minutes later experimental DD was conducted by insertion and the distension of rubber balloon (containing 40 ml of warm water) inserted into sheep duodenum. After 5 min of mechanical DD the following reactions were then observed: the significant increase in behavioral pain responses, i.e. tachycardia, hyperventilation, inhibition of reticulo-ruminal contractions (70% approximately, during 15 min), an increase of plasma catecholamine concentration (over 7-fold increase of epinephrine during 2h following DD, 2-times norepinephrine and +/-80% increase of dopamine). Verapamil infusion administered 10 min prior to DD decreased intensity of visceral pain responses, such as: behavioral changes, tachycardia, hyperventilation, inhibition of the reticulo-rumen motility and efficiently prevented the appearance of catecholamine release. These data demonstrated that the development and persistence of duodenal hyperalgesia depends on the activation of Ca(2+) ion flux leading to neurotransmitters release and modulation of membrane excitability. The observed antinociceptive action of VGCCs type-L blockers suggests that these channels play a crucial role in the modulation of acute visceral hyperalgesia in sheep. PMID:18621406

  11. Central amygdala metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 in the modulation of visceral pain.

    PubMed

    Crock, Lara W; Kolber, Benedict J; Morgan, Clinton D; Sadler, Katelyn E; Vogt, Sherri K; Bruchas, Michael R; Gereau, Robert W

    2012-10-10

    Painful bladder syndrome is a debilitating condition that affects 3-6% of women in the United States. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that changes in CNS processing are key to the development of chronic bladder pain conditions but little is known regarding the underlying cellular, molecular, and neuronal mechanisms. Using a mouse model of distention-induced bladder pain, we found that the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is a critical site of neuromodulation for processing of bladder nociception. Furthermore, we demonstrate that metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) activation in the CeA induces bladder pain sensitization by increasing CeA output. Thus, pharmacological activation of mGluR5 in the CeA is sufficient to increase the response to bladder distention. Additionally, pharmacological blockade or virally mediated conditional deletion of mGluR5 in the CeA reduced responses to bladder distention suggesting that mGluR5 in the CeA is also necessary for these responses. Finally, we used optogenetic activation of the CeA and demonstrated that this caused a robust increase in the visceral pain response. The CeA-localized effects on responses to bladder distention are associated with changes in extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation in the spinal cord. Overall, these data demonstrate that mGluR5 activation leads to increased CeA output that drives bladder pain sensitization. PMID:23055491

  12. Raphe magnus neurons help protect reactions to visceral pain from interruption by cutaneous pain.

    PubMed

    Brink, Thaddeus S; Hellman, Kevin M; Lambert, Aaron M; Mason, Peggy

    2006-12-01

    Suppression of reactions to one noxious stimulus by a spatially distant noxious stimulus is termed heterotopic antinociception. In lightly anesthetized rats, a noxious visceral stimulus, colorectal distension (CRD), suppressed motor withdrawals but not blood pressure or heart rate changes evoked by noxious hindpaw heat. Microinjection of muscimol, a GABA(A) receptor agonist, into raphe magnus (RM) reduced CRD-evoked suppression of withdrawals, evidence that RM neurons contribute to this heterotopic antinociception. To understand how brain stem neurons contribute to heterotopic antinociception, RM neurons were recorded during CRD-elicited suppression of hindpaw withdrawals. Although subsets of RM neurons that were excited (on cells) or inhibited (off cells) by noxious cutaneous stimulation were either excited or inhibited by CRD, on cells were inhibited and off cells excited by an intracerebroventricularly administered opioid, evidence that the nociception-facilitating and -inhibiting functions of on and off cells, respectively, are predicted by the cellular response to noxious cutaneous stimulation alone and not by the response to CRD. When recorded during CRD-elicited antinociception, RM cell discharge resembled the pattern observed in response to CRD stimulation alone. However, when hindpaw withdrawal suppression was incomplete, RM cell discharge resembled the pattern observed in response to heat alone. We propose that on cells excited by CRD facilitate responses to CRD itself, which in turn augments excitation of off cells that then act to suppress cutaneous nociception. RM cells may thereby contribute to the dominance of quiet recuperative reactions evoked by potentially life-threatening visceral stimuli over transient somatomotor activity elicited by less-injurious noxious cutaneous stimuli. PMID:16928792

  13. The role of cannabinoids in regulation of nausea and vomiting, and visceral pain.

    PubMed

    Malik, Zubair; Baik, Daniel; Schey, Ron

    2015-02-01

    Marijuana derived from the plant Cannabis sativa has been used for the treatment of many gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, including anorexia, emesis, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and others. However, its psychotropic side effects have often limited its use. Several cannabinoid receptors, which include the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1), CB2, and possibly GPR55, have been identified throughout the GI tract. These receptors may play a role in the regulation of food intake, nausea and emesis, gastric secretion and gastroprotection, GI motility, ion transport, visceral sensation, intestinal inflammation, and cell proliferation in the gut. However, the regulation of nausea and vomiting by cannabinoids and the endocannabinoid system has shed new knowledge in this field. Thus far, despite evidence of visceral sensitivity inhibition in animal models, data in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients is scarce and not supportive. Furthermore, many compounds that either act directly at the receptor or increase (or reduce) ligand availability have the potential to affect other brain functions and cause side effects. Novel drug targets such as FAAH and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) inhibitors appear to be promising in animal models, but more studies are necessary to prove their efficiency. The promise of emerging drugs that are more selective and peripherally acting suggest that, in the near future, cannabinoids will play a major role in managing an array of GI diseases. PMID:25715910

  14. Sympathetic blocks for visceral cancer pain management: A systematic review and EAPC recommendations.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Klepstad, Pl; Kurita, Geana Paula; Sjgren, Per; Giarratano, Antonino

    2015-12-01

    The neurolytic blocks of sympathetic pathways, including celiac plexus block (CPB) and superior hypogastric plexus block (SHPB) , have been used for years. The aim of this review was to assess the evidence to support the performance of sympathetic blocks in cancer patients with abdominal visceral pain. Only comparison studies were included. All data from the eligible trials were analyzed using the GRADE system. Twenty-seven controlled studies were considered. CPB, regardless of the technique used, improved analgesia and/or decrease opioid consumption, and decreased opioid-induced adverse effects in comparison with a conventional analgesic treatment. In one study patients treated with superior hypogastric plexus block (SHPB) had a decrease in pain intensity and a less morphine consumption, while no statistical differences in adverse effects were found. The quality of these studies was generally poor due to several limitations, including sample size calculation, allocation concealment, no intention to treat analysis. However, at least two CPB studies were of good quality. Data regarding the comparison of techniques or other issues were sparse and of poor quality, and evidence could not be analysed. On the basis of existing evidence, CPB has a strong recommendation in patients with pancreatic cancer pain. There is a weak recommendation for SHPB, that should be based on individual conditions. Data regarding the choice of the technique are sparse and unfit to provide any recommendation. PMID:26297518

  15. Pain and Interoception Imaging Network (PAIN): A multimodal, multisite, brain-imaging repository for chronic somatic and visceral pain disorders.

    PubMed

    Labus, Jennifer S; Naliboff, Bruce; Kilpatrick, Lisa; Liu, Cathy; Ashe-McNalley, Cody; Dos Santos, Ivani R; Alaverdyan, Mher; Woodworth, Davis; Gupta, Arpana; Ellingson, Benjamin M; Tillisch, Kirsten; Mayer, Emeran A

    2016-01-01

    The Pain and Interoception Imaging Network (PAIN) repository (painrepository.org) is a newly created NIH (NIDA/NCCAM) funded neuroimaging data repository that aims to accelerate scientific discovery regarding brain mechanisms in pain and to provide more rapid benefits to pain patients through the harmonization of efforts and data sharing. The PAIN Repository consists of two components, an Archived Repository and a Standardized Repository. Similar to other 'open' imaging repositories, neuroimaging researchers can deposit any dataset of chronic pain patients and healthy controls into the Archived Repository. Scans in the Archived Repository can be very diverse in terms of scanning procedures and clinical metadata, complicating the merging of datasets for analyses. The Standardized Repository overcomes these limitations through the use of standardized scanning protocols along with a standardized set of clinical metadata, allowing an unprecedented ability to perform pooled analyses. The Archived Repository currently includes 741 scans and is rapidly growing. The Standardized Repository currently includes 433 scans. Pain conditions currently represented in the PAIN repository include: irritable bowel syndrome, vulvodynia, migraine, chronic back pain, and inflammatory bowel disease. Both the PAIN Archived and Standardized Repositories promise to be important resources in the field of chronic pain research. The enhanced ability of the Standardized Repository to combine imaging, clinical and other biological datasets from multiple sites in particular make it a unique resource for significant scientific discoveries. PMID:25902408

  16. Colon distention induces persistent visceral hypersensitivity by mechanotranscription of pain mediators in colonic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, You-Min; Fu, Yu; Wu, Chester C; Xu, Guang-Yin; Huang, Li-Yen; Shi, Xuan-Zheng

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal pain and distention are major complaints in irritable bowel syndrome. Abdominal distention is mainly attributed to intraluminal retention of gas or solid contents, which may cause mechanical stress to the gut wall. Visceral hypersensitivity (VHS) may account for abdominal pain. We sought to determine whether tonic colon distention causes persistent VHS and if so whether mechanical stress-induced expression (mechanotranscription) of pain mediators in colonic smooth muscle cells (SMCs) plays a role in VHS. Human colonic SMCs were isolated and stretched in vitro to investigate whether mechanical stress upregulates expression of the pain mediator cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Rat colon was distended with a 5-cm-long balloon, and gene expression of COX-2, visceromotor response (VMR), and sensory neuron excitability were determined. Static stretch of colonic SMCs induced marked expression of COX-2 mRNA and protein in a force- and time-dependent manner. Subnoxious tonic distention of the distal colon at ?30-40 mmHg for 20 or 40 min induced COX-2 expression and PGE2 production in colonic smooth muscle, but not in the mucosa layer. Lumen distention also increased VMR in a force- and time-dependent manner. The increase of VMR persisted for at least 3 days. Patch-clamp experiments showed that the excitability of colon projecting sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia was markedly augmented, 24 h after lumen distention. Administration of COX-2 inhibitor NS-398 partially but significantly attenuated distention-induced VHS. In conclusion, tonic lumen distention upregulates expression of COX-2 in colonic SMC, and COX-2 contributes to persistent VHS. PMID:25540231

  17. Hippocampal NR2B-containing NMDA receptors enhance long-term potentiation in rats with chronic visceral pain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Chen, Ai-qin; Luo, Xiao-qing; Guo, Li-xia; Tang, Ying; Bao, Cheng-jia; Lin, Ling; Lin, Chun

    2014-06-27

    Pain and learning memory have striking similarities in synaptic plasticity. Activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptors 2B subunits (NR2B-NMDAs) is responsible for the hippocampal LTP in memory formation. In our previous studies, we found the significant enhancement of CA1 hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) induced by high-frequency stimulation (HFS) in rats with chronic visceral pain. However, it is unclear whether the NR2B-NMDAs are required for the LTP in chronic visceral pain. In this study, a rat model with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) was established by colorectal distention (CRD). The sensitivity of visceral pain and HFS-induced LTP at SC-CA1 synapses were significantly enhanced in IBS-like rats (p<0.05). In addition, hippocampal NR2B protein levels significantly increased in IBS-like rats (p<0.05). To test whether NR2B-NMDAs are responsible for the LTP, effects of Ro 25-6981, a selective antagonist of NR2B-NMDAs, on field potential in CA1 region were investigated in vitro. Our results demonstrated that Ro 25-6981 dose-dependently inhibited the facilitation of CA1 LTP in IBS-like rats. The plausible activation mechanism of hippocampal NR2B-NMDAs in the LTP enhancement was further explored. Western blot data indicated that expression of tyrosine phosphorylated NR2B protein in hippocampus significantly enhanced in IBS-like rats. Accordingly, genistein, a specific inhibitor of tyrosine kinases, dose-dependently blocked the facilitation of hippocampal LTP in IBS-like rats. Furthermore, EMG data revealed that intra-hippocampal injection of Ro 25-6981 dose-dependently attenuated the visceral hypersensitivity. In conclusion, hippocampal NR2B-NMDAs are responsible for the facilitation of CA1 LTP via tyrosine phosphorylation, which leads to visceral hypersensitivity. PMID:24824341

  18. Early life stress elicits visceral hyperalgesia and functional reorganization of pain circuits in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Holschneider, D.P.; Guo, Y.; Mayer, E.A.; Wang, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Early life stress (ELS) is a risk factor for developing functional gastrointestinal disorders, and has been proposed to be related to a central amplification of sensory input and resultant visceral hyperalgesia. We sought to characterize ELS-related changes in functional brain responses during acute noxious visceral stimulation. Neonatal rats (males/females) were exposed to limited bedding (ELS) or standard bedding (controls) on postnatal days 2–9. Age 10–11 weeks, animals were implanted with venous cannulas and transmitters for abdominal electromyography (EMG). Cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was mapped during colorectal distension (CRD) using [14C]-iodoantipyrine autoradiography, and analyzed in three-dimensionally reconstructed brains by statistical parametric mapping and functional connectivity. EMG responses to CRD were increased after ELS, with no evidence of a sex difference. ELS rats compared to controls showed a greater significant positive correlation of EMG with amygdalar rCBF. Factorial analysis revealed a significant main effect of ‘ELS’ on functional activation of nodes within the pain pathway (somatosensory, insular, cingulate and prefrontal cortices, locus coeruleus/lateral parabrachial n. [LC/LPB], periaqueductal gray, sensory thalamus), as well as in the amygdala, hippocampus and hypothalamus. In addition, ELS resulted in an increase in the number of significant functional connections (i.e. degree centrality) between regions within the pain circuit, including the amygdala, LC/LPB, insula, anterior ventral cingulate, posterior cingulate (retrosplenium), and stria terminalis, with decreases noted in the sensory thalamus and the hippocampus. Sex differences in rCBF were less broadly expressed, with significant differences noted at the level of the cortex, amygdala, dorsal hippocampus, raphe, sensory thalamus, and caudate-putamen. ELS showed a sexually dimorphic effect (‘Sex x ELS’ interaction) at the LC/LPB complex, globus pallidus, hypothalamus, raphe, septum, caudate-putamen and cerebellum. Our results suggest that ELS alters functional activation of the thalamo-cortico-amydala pathway, as well as the emotional-arousal network (amygdala, locus coeruleus), with evidence that ELS may additionally show sexually dimorphic effects on brain function. PMID:26751119

  19. Supraspinal antinociceptive effect of apelin-13 in a mouse visceral pain model.

    PubMed

    Lv, Shuang-Yu; Qin, Yao-Jun; Wang, Ning-Bo; Yang, Yan-Jie; Chen, Qiang

    2012-09-01

    Apelin, as the endogenous ligand of the APJ receptor, is a novel identified neuropeptide whose biological functions are not fully understood. APJ receptor mRNA was found in several brain regions related to descending control system of pain, such as amygdala, hypothalamus and dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). The present study was designed to determine whether supraspinal apelin-13 may produce antinociceptive effect observed in the acetic acid-induced writhing test, a model of visceral pain. Apelin-13 not only significantly produced preemptive antinociception at the dose of 0.3, 0.5, 1 and 3 ?g/mouse when injected intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) before acetic acid, but also significantly induced antinociception at a dose of 0.5, 1 and 3 ?g/mouse when injected i.c.v. after acetic acid. And i.c.v. apelin-13 did not influence 30-min locomotor activity counts in mice. Intrathecal (i.t.) administration of apelin-13 (1 and 3 ?g/mouse) significantly decreased the number of writhes, however, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of apelin-13 (10-100 ?g/mouse) had no effect on the number of writhes in the writhing test. The specific APJ receptor antagonist apelin-13(F13A), no-specific opioid receptor antagonist naloxone and ?-opioid receptor antagonist ?-funaltrexamine hydrochloride (?-FNA) could significantly antagonize the antinociceptive effect of i.c.v. apelin-13, suggesting APJ receptor and ?-opioid receptor are involved in this process. Central low dose of apelin-13 (0.3 ?g/mouse, i.c.v.) could significantly potentiate the analgesic potencies of modest and even relatively ineffective doses of morphine administrated at supraspinal level. This enhanced antinociceptive effect was reversed by naloxone, suggesting that the potentiated analgesic response is mediated by opioid-responsive neurons. PMID:22732665

  20. Visceral pain perception in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and healthy volunteers is affected by the MRI scanner environment

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Reuben K; Van Oudenhove, Lukas; Li, Xinhua; Cao, Yang; Ho, Khek Yu

    2015-01-01

    Background The MRI scanner environment induces marked psychological effects, but specific effects on pain perception and processing are unknown and relevant to all brain imaging studies. Objectives and methods We performed visceral and somatic quantitative sensory and pain testing and studied endogenous pain modulation by heterotopic stimulation outside and inside the functional MRI scanner in 11 healthy controls and 13 patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Results Rectal pain intensity (VAS 0–100) during identical distension pressures increased from 39 (95% confidence interval: 35–42) outside the scanner to 53 (43–63) inside the scanner in irritable bowel syndrome, and from 42 (31–52) to 49 (39–58), respectively, in controls (ANOVA for scanner effect: p = 0.006, group effect: p = 0.92). The difference in rectal pain outside versus inside correlated significantly with stress (r = −0.76, p = 0.006), anxiety (r = −0.68, p = 0.02) and depression scores (r = −0.67, p = 0.02) in controls, but not in irritable bowel syndrome patients, who a priori had significantly higher stress and anxiety scores. ANOVA analysis showed trends for effect of the scanner environment and subject group on endogenous pain modulation (p = 0.09 and p = 0.1, respectively), but not on somatic pain (p > 0.3). Conclusion The scanner environment significantly increased visceral, but not somatic, pain perception in irritable bowel syndrome patients and healthy controls in a protocol specifically aimed at investigating visceral pain. Psychological factors, including anxiety and stress, are the likely underlying causes, whereas classic endogenous pain modulation pathways activated by heterotopic stimulation play a lesser role. These results are highly relevant to a wide range of imaging applications and need to be taken into account in future pain research. Further controlled studies are indicated to clarify these findings. PMID:26966533

  1. Neural mechanisms mediating positive and negative treatment expectations in visceral pain: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study on placebo and nocebo effects in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Julia; Theysohn, Nina; Gaß, Florian; Benson, Sven; Gramsch, Carolin; Forsting, Michael; Gizewski, Elke R; Elsenbruch, Sigrid

    2013-11-01

    To elucidate placebo and nocebo effects in visceral pain, we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study to analyze effects of positive and negative treatment expectations in a rectal pain model. In 36 healthy volunteers, painful rectal distensions were delivered after intravenous application of an inert substance combined with either positive instructions of pain relief (placebo group) or negative instructions of pain increase (nocebo group), each compared to neutral instructions. Neural activation during cued-pain anticipation and pain was analyzed along with expected and perceived pain intensity. Expected and perceived pain intensity were significantly increased in the nocebo group and significantly decreased in the placebo group. In the placebo group, positive expectations significantly reduced activation of the somatosensory cortex during anticipation and of the insula, somatosensory cortex, and amygdala during pain delivery when compared to neutral expectations. Within the nocebo group, negative expectations led to significantly increased insula activation during painful stimulation. Direct group contrasts during expectation modulation revealed significantly increased distension-induced activation within the somatosensory cortex in the nocebo group. In conclusion, the experience and neural processing of visceral pain can be increased or decreased by drug-specific expectations. This first brain imaging study on nocebo effects in visceral pain has implications for the pathophysiology and treatment of patients with chronic abdominal complaints such as irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:23867733

  2. An uncommon cause of visceral arterial embolism in patients presenting with acute abdominal pain: a report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Ulenaers, M; Buchel, O C; Van Olmen, A; Moons, V; D'Haens, G; Christiaens, P

    2010-01-01

    We report on 2 cases of visceral arterial embolism presenting with acute abdominal pain. In neither patient a cause could be established on initial clinical, laboratory, echographic or radiological investigation. Both patients were subsequently found to have a mural thrombus in the thoracic aorta, with visceral arterial embolism. Each underwent a successful operative thrombectomy. Both patients had a normal underlying aortic intima at inspection. The first patient was a young male with no known diseases. He regularly used cannabis and tested positive on admission, an association not yet reported with aortic mural thrombus. He was found to have a slightly reduced protein C. The second patient was a middle aged man with non-insulin dependent diabetes, hyperlipidaemia, arterial hypertension and hyperthyroidism. He was found to have an underlying adenocarcinoma of the lung and received chemotherapy. He died due to his cancer, 4 months after first presentation. PMID:20458852

  3. Monosynaptic convergence of somatic and visceral C-fiber afferents on projection and local circuit neurons in lamina I: a substrate for referred pain

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Liliana L.; Fernandes, Elisabete C.; Sivado, Miklos; Kokai, Eva; Szucs, Peter; Safronov, Boris V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Referred pain is a phenomenon of feeling pain at a site other than the site of the painful stimulus origin. It arises from a pathological mixing of nociceptive processing pathways for visceral and somatic inputs. Despite numerous studies based on unit recordings from spinal and supraspinal neurons, the exact mechanism and site of this mixing within the central nervous system are not known. Here, we selectively recorded from lamina I neurons, using a visually guided patch-clamp technique, in thoracic spinal cord preparation with preserved intercostal (somatic) and splanchnic (visceral) nerves. We show that somatic and visceral C fibers converge monosynaptically onto a group of lamina I neurons, which includes both projection and local circuit neurons. Other groups of lamina I neurons received inputs from either somatic or visceral afferents. We have also identified a population of lamina I local circuit neurons showing overall inhibitory responses upon stimulation of both nerves. Thus, the present data allow us to draw two major conclusions. First, lamina I of the spinal cord is the first site in the central nervous system where somatic and visceral pathways directly converge onto individual projection and local circuit neurons. Second, the mechanism of somatovisceral convergence is complex and based on functional integration of monosynaptic and polysynaptic excitatory as well as inhibitory inputs in specific groups of neurons. This complex pattern of convergence provides a substrate for alterations in the balance between visceral and somatic inputs causing referred pain. PMID:26098437

  4. Gabapentin Effects on PKC-ERK1/2 Signaling in the Spinal Cord of Rats with Formalin-Induced Visceral Inflammatory Pain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mei-yi; Fong, Peter; Zhang, Ji-guo; Zhang, Can-wen; Gong, Ke-rui; Yang, Ming-feng; Niu, Jing-zhong; Ji, Xun-ming; Lv, Guo-wei

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the clinical management of visceral pain remains unsatisfactory for many patients suffering from this disease. While preliminary animal studies have suggested the effectiveness of gabapentin in successfully treating visceral pain, the mechanism underlying its analgesic effect remains unclear. Evidence from other studies has demonstrated the involvement of protein kinase C (PKC) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) in the pathogenesis of visceral inflammatory pain. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that gabapentin produces analgesia for visceral inflammatory pain through its inhibitory effect on the PKC-ERK1/2 signaling pathway. Intracolonic injections of formalin were performed in rats to produce colitis pain. Our results showed that visceral pain behaviors in these rats decreased after intraperitoneal injection of gabapentin. These behaviors were also reduced by intrathecal injections of the PKC inhibitor, H-7, and the ERK1/2 inhibitor, PD98059. Neuronal firing of wide dynamic range neurons in L6–S1 of the rat spinal cord dorsal horn were significantly increased after intracolonic injection of formalin. This increased firing rate was inhibited by intraperitoneal injection of gabapentin and both the individual and combined intrathecal application of H-7 and PD98059. Western blot analysis also revealed that PKC membrane translocation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation increased significantly following formalin injection, confirming the recruitment of PKC and ERK1/2 during visceral inflammatory pain. These effects were also significantly reduced by intraperitoneal injection of gabapentin. Therefore, we concluded that the analgesic effect of gabapentin on visceral inflammatory pain is mediated through suppression of PKC and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. Furthermore, we found that the PKC inhibitor, H-7, significantly diminished ERK1/2 phosphorylation levels, implicating the involvement of PKC and ERK1/2 in the same signaling pathway. Thus, our results suggest a novel mechanism of gabapentin-mediated analgesia for visceral inflammatory pain through a PKC-ERK1/2 signaling pathway that may be a future therapeutic target for the treatment of visceral inflammatory pain. PMID:26512901

  5. Behavioral and molecular processing of visceral pain in the brain of mice: impact of colitis and psychological stress

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Piyush; Hassan, Ahmed M.; Koyani, Chintan N.; Mayerhofer, Raphaela; Reichmann, Florian; Farzi, Aitak; Schuligoi, Rufina; Malle, Ernst; Holzer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal disorders with abdominal pain are associated with central sensitization and psychopathologies that are often exacerbated by stress. Here we investigated the impact of colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) and repeated water avoidance stress (WAS) on spontaneous and nociception-related behavior and molecular signaling in the mouse brain. DSS increased the mechanical pain sensitivity of the abdominal skin while both WAS and DSS enhanced the mechanical and thermal pain sensitivity of the plantar skin. These manifestations of central sensitization were associated with augmented c-Fos expression in spinal cord, thalamus, hypothalamus, amygdala and prefrontal cortex. While WAS stimulated phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p42/44, DSS activated another signaling pathway, both of which converged on c-Fos. The DSS- and WAS-induced hyperalgesia in the abdominal and plantar skin and c-Fos expression in the brain disappeared when the mice were subjected to WAS+DSS treatment. Intrarectal allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) evoked aversive behavior (freezing, reduction of locomotion and exploration) in association with p42/44 MAPK and c-Fos activation in spinal cord and brain. These effects were inhibited by morphine, which attests to their relationship with nociception. DSS and WAS exerted opposite effects on AITC-evoked p42/44 MAPK and c-Fos activation, which indicates that these transduction pathways subserve different aspects of visceral pain processing in the brain. In summary, behavioral perturbations caused by colitis and psychological stress are associated with distinct alterations in cerebral signaling. These findings provide novel perspectives on central sensitization and the sensory and emotional processing of visceral pain stimuli in the brain. PMID:26217204

  6. Novel polymeric bioerodable microparticles for prolonged-release intrathecal delivery of analgesic agents for relief of intractable cancer-related pain.

    PubMed

    Han, Felicity Y; Thurecht, Kristofer J; Lam, Ai-Leen; Whittaker, Andrew K; Smith, Maree T

    2015-07-01

    Intractable cancer-related pain complicated by a neuropathic component due to nerve impingement is poorly alleviated even by escalating doses of a strong opioid analgesic. To address this unmet medical need, we developed sustained-release, bioerodable, hydromorphone (potent strong opioid)- and ketamine (analgesic adjuvant)-loaded microparticles for intrathecal (i.t.) coadministration. Drug-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles were prepared using a water-in-oil-in-water method with evaporation. Encapsulation efficiency of hydromorphone and ketamine in PLGA (50:50) microparticles was 26% and 56%, respectively. Microparticles had the desired size range (20-60 ?m) and in vitro release was prolonged at ?28 days. Microparticles were stable for ?6 months when stored refrigerated protected from light in a desiccator. Desirably, i.t. injected fluorescent dye-labeled PLGA microparticles in rats remained in the lumbar region for ?7 days. In a rat model of neuropathic pain, i.t. coinjection of hydromorphone- and ketamine-loaded microparticles (each 1 mg) produced analgesia for 8 h only. Possible explanations include inadequate release of ketamine and/or hydromorphone into the spinal fluid, and/or insufficient ketamine loading to prevent development of analgesic tolerance to the released hydromorphone. As sub-analgesic doses of i.t. ketamine at 24-48 h intervals restored analgesia on each occasion, insufficient ketamine loading appears problematic. We will investigate these issues in future work. PMID:25990226

  7. Can intractable discogenic back pain be managed by low-level laser therapy without recourse to operative intervention?

    PubMed Central

    Ip, David; Fu, Nga-Yue

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study reported here was to investigate the possible clinical role of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in discogenic back pain patients who failed to respond to a conventional physical therapy program to avoid recourse to operative intervention. Methods The paper reports on the long-term mean 5-year prospective follow-up of a patient cohort of 50 unselected patients visiting our tertiary referral pain center for discogenic back pain who had had a single-level lesion documented by magnetic resonance imaging followed by subsequent discography to confirm the affected disc being the pain generator. All of the patients who entered the study had failed response to a combination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and had had not less than 3 months of conventional physical therapy. LLLT, at a wavelength of 810 nm wavelength emitted from a GaAIAs semiconductor laser device with 5.4 J per point and a power density of 20 mW/cm2, was employed. The treatment regimen consisted of three sessions of treatment per week for 12 consecutive weeks. Results All but one patient had significant improvement in their Oswestry Disability Index score, from a mean of 50% score to a mean of 10% score, at the end of treatment at 12 weeks. In addition, surprisingly, the improvement was found maintained at follow-up assessments 1 year and 5 years later. The one patient among the 50 patients who failed to respond eventually required surgery, while the others did not require surgery. Conclusion We conclude that LLLT is a viable option in the conservative treatment of discogenic back pain, with a positive clinical result of more than 90% efficacy, not only in the short-term but also in the long-term, with lasting benefits. PMID:26064065

  8. Synergistic effect of 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 and neurokinin 1 receptor antagonism in rodent models of somatic and visceral pain.

    PubMed

    Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Mohammadi, Ehsan; Tyler, Karl; Pietra, Claudio; Bee, Lucy A; Dickenson, Anthony

    2014-10-01

    Synergistic activity has been observed between serotonergic 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 (5-HT3) and tachykinergic neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor-mediated responses. This study investigated the efficacy of a 5-HT3 antagonist, palonosetron, and a NK1 antagonist, netupitant, alone or in combination in rodent models of somatic and visceral colonic hypersensitivity. In a rat model of experimental neuropathic pain, somatic hypersensitivity was quantified by the number of ipsilateral paw withdrawals to a von Frey filament (6g). Electrophysiologic responses were recorded in the dorsal horn neurons after mechanical or thermal stimuli. Acute colonic hypersensitivity was induced experimentally in rats by infusing dilute acetic acid (0.6%) directly into the colon. Colonic sensitivity was assessed by a visceromotor behavioral response quantified as the number of abdominal contractions in response to graded isobaric pressures (0-60 mm Hg) of colorectal distension. Palonosetron or netupitant was administered alone or in combination via oral gavage. When dosed alone, both significantly reduced somatic sensitivity, decreased the evoked response of spinal dorsal horn neurons to mechanical or thermal stimulation, and caused significant (P < 0.05) inhibition of colonic hypersensitivity in a dose-dependent manner. The combined administration of palonosetron and netupitant at doses that were ineffective alone significantly reduced both somatic and visceral sensitivity and decreased the evoked response of spinal dorsal horn neurons to mechanical or thermal stimulation. In summary, the combination of palonosetron with a NK1 receptor antagonist showed synergistic analgesic activity in rodent models of somatic and visceral hypersensitivity, and may prove to be a useful therapeutic approach to treat pain associated with irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:25077526

  9. The development of tolerance to intrathecal morphine in rat models of visceral and cutaneous pain.

    PubMed

    Ness, T J; Follett, K A

    1998-05-22

    The development of tolerance to intrathecal morphine was studied in rats chronically implanted with intrathecal catheters connected to osmotic minipumps. Measures of cutaneous nociception were the hot plate (HP) and tail flick (TF) tests. Measures of visceral nociception were visceromotor (VM) responses to ramped colorectal distension (CRD) and cardiovascular (CV) responses to phasic colorectal distension. Tolerance to a continuous infusion of 6 or 20 nmol/h of morphine sulfate developed over 6 days. A significant reduction in the dose-dependent effects of intrathecal morphine in the TF and HP tests and VM and CV responses to CRD occurred in rats receiving continuous infusions of morphine. The development of tolerance to intrathecal morphine was similar in both cutaneous and visceral models. PMID:9665657

  10. Patients with chronic visceral pain show sex-related alterations in intrinsic oscillations of the resting brain.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jui-Yang; Kilpatrick, Lisa A; Labus, Jennifer; Gupta, Arpana; Jiang, Zhiguo; Ashe-McNalley, Cody; Stains, Jean; Heendeniya, Nuwanthi; Ebrat, Bahar; Smith, Suzanne; Tillisch, Kirsten; Naliboff, Bruce; Mayer, Emeran A

    2013-07-17

    Abnormal responses of the brain to delivered and expected aversive gut stimuli have been implicated in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a visceral pain syndrome occurring more commonly in women. Task-free resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can provide information about the dynamics of brain activity that may be involved in altered processing and/or modulation of visceral afferent signals. Fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation is a measure of the power spectrum intensity of spontaneous brain oscillations. This approach was used here to identify differences in the resting-state activity of the human brain in IBS subjects compared with healthy controls (HCs) and to identify the role of sex-related differences. We found that both the female HCs and female IBS subjects had a frequency power distribution skewed toward high frequency to a greater extent in the amygdala and hippocampus compared with male subjects. In addition, female IBS subjects had a frequency power distribution skewed toward high frequency in the insula and toward low frequency in the sensorimotor cortex to a greater extent than male IBS subjects. Correlations were observed between resting-state blood oxygen level-dependent signal dynamics and some clinical symptom measures (e.g., abdominal discomfort). These findings provide the first insight into sex-related differences in IBS subjects compared with HCs using resting-state fMRI. PMID:23864686

  11. Sex differences in brain activity during aversive visceral stimulation and its expectation in patients with chronic abdominal pain: a network analysis.

    PubMed

    Labus, J S; Naliboff, B N; Fallon, J; Berman, S M; Suyenobu, B; Bueller, J A; Mandelkern, M; Mayer, E A

    2008-07-01

    Differences in brain responses to aversive visceral stimuli may underlie previously reported sex differences in symptoms as well as perceptual and emotional responses to such stimuli in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The goal of the current study was to identify brain networks activated by expected and delivered aversive visceral stimuli in male and female patients with chronic abdominal pain, and to test for sex differences in the effective connectivity of the circuitry comprising these networks. Network analysis was applied to assess the brain response of 46 IBS patients (22 men and 24 women) recorded using [15O] water positron emission tomography during rest/baseline and expected and delivered aversive rectal distension. Functional connectivity results from partial least squares analyses provided support for the hypothesized involvement of 3 networks corresponding to: 1) visceral afferent information processing (thalamus, insula and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, orbital frontal cortex), 2) emotional-arousal (amygdala, rostral and subgenual cingulate regions, and locus coeruleus complex) and 3) cortical modulation (frontal and parietal cortices). Effective connectivity results obtained via structural equation modeling indicated that sex-related differences in brain response are largely due to alterations in the effective connectivity of emotional-arousal circuitry rather than visceral afferent processing circuits. Sex differences in the cortico-limbic circuitry involved in emotional-arousal, pain facilitation and autonomic responses may underlie the observed differences in symptoms, and in perceptual and emotional responses to aversive visceral stimuli. PMID:18450481

  12. Acupuncture at both ST25 and ST37 improves the pain threshold of chronic visceral hypersensitivity rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Mei; Zhou, En-Hua; Shi, Yin; Li, Na; Yuan, Ling-Song; Wu, Huan-Gan

    2009-11-01

    Previous studies demonstrated the efficacy of electro-acupuncture (EA) in relieving chronic visceral hypersensitivity (CVH) in IBS rats. However, ST25 which is a key acupoint for patients with IBS has not been reported in these experiments. Eight CVH rats were treated by EA at both ST25 and ST37 for 20 min, once daily for seven consecutive days, model rats (n = 8) and normal rats (n = 8) as controls. After the first EA treatment, the abdominal withdrawal reflex scores were investigated to evaluate the pain threshold. After seven EA treatments, the concentrations of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), 5-HT3 receptor (5-HT3R) and 5-HT4 receptor (5-HT4R) in colon tissue were assayed quantitatively by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed that EA improved the pain threshold of CVH rats, reduced the 5-HT concentration and increased the 5-HT4R concentration, but had no effect on the 5-HT3R concentration. Further studies are needed to optimize the choice of two-matching points for EA in the treatment of CVH rats. PMID:19387829

  13. Expression and pharmacological modulation of visceral pain-induced conditioned place aversion in mice.

    PubMed

    Bagdas, Deniz; Muldoon, Pretal P; AlSharari, Shakir; Carroll, F Ivy; Negus, S Stevens; Damaj, M Imad

    2016-03-01

    Pain encompasses both a sensory as well as an affective dimension and these are differentially processed in the brain and periphery. It is therefore important to develop animal models to reflect the non-reflexive assays in pain. In this study, we compared effects of the mu opioid receptor agonist morphine, the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ketoprofen and the kappa receptor opioid agonist U50,488H and antagonist JDTic on acetic acid-induced stretching and acetic acid-induced aversion in the condition place aversion (CPA) test in male ICR mice. Intraperitoneal administration of acetic acid (0.32-1%) was equipotent in stimulating stretching and CPA. Ketoprofen, morphine and U50,488H all inhibited the acid-induced stretching. Ketoprofen and morphine also blocked the acid-induced CPA but U50,488H failed to do so. The reversal ability of ketoprofen and morphine on acid-induced CPA is unique to pain-stimulated place aversion since these drugs failed to reduce non-noxious LiCl-induced CPA. Overall, this study characterized and validated a preclinical mouse model of pain-related aversive behavior that can be used to assess genetic and biological mechanisms of pain as well as improving the predictive validity of preclinical studies on candidate analgesics. PMID:26639043

  14. Paradoxic effects of propofol on visceral pain induced by various TRPV1 agonists.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wenjin; Cui, Can; Zhang, Zhiwei; Liang, Jiexian

    2013-04-01

    Intraperitoneal injection of propofol inhibits subsequent acetic acid-induced writhing response in mice. Propofol increases the sensitivity of dorsal root ganglion neurons to capsaicin through transient receptor potential ankyrin subtype-1 (TRPA1) and protein kinase C? (PKC?)-mediated phosphorylation of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype-1 (TRPV1). Intraperitoneal co-injection of propofol may increase visceral nociception induced by TRPV1 agonists via sensitization of TRPV1. Therefore, we investigated the effects of intraperitoneal co-injection of propofol on nociception induced by acetic acid and capsaicin. The number of writhing movements induced by acetic acid or nociception time by capsaicin with or without propofol were counted. Neonatal capsaicin-treated mice were also used to demonstrate the role of TRPV1 in the effects of propofol on nociception, induced by TRPV1 agonists. Co-injection of propofol resulted in a pronociceptive effect on the writhing response induced by acetic acid, while the same dose of propofol ameliorated the response to capsaicin. The writhing response to intraperitoneal acetic acid was sharply inhibited following neonatal treatment with capsaicin. Co-injection with propofol reduced the number of writhing movements induced by acetic acid in neonatal capsaicin-treated mice. These results suggest that propofol binds to TRPV1 at the capsaicin-binding pocket. PMID:23596498

  15. Role for protease activity in visceral pain in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cenac, Nicolas; Andrews, Christopher N.; Holzhausen, Marinella; Chapman, Kevin; Cottrell, Graeme; Andrade-Gordon, Patricia; Steinhoff, Martin; Barbara, Giovanni; Beck, Paul; Bunnett, Nigel W.; Sharkey, Keith A.; Ferraz, Jose Geraldo P.; Shaffer, Eldon; Vergnolle, Nathalie

    2007-01-01

    Mediators involved in the generation of symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are poorly understood. Here we show that colonic biopsy samples from IBS patients release increased levels of proteolytic activity (arginine cleavage) compared to asymptomatic controls. This was dependent on the activation of NF-κB. In addition, increased proteolytic activity was measured in vivo, in colonic washes from IBS compared with control patients. Trypsin and tryptase expression and release were increased in colonic biopsies from IBS patients compared with control subjects. Biopsies from IBS patients (but not controls) released mediators that sensitized murine sensory neurons in culture. Sensitization was prevented by a serine protease inhibitor and was absent in neurons lacking functional protease-activated receptor–2 (PAR2). Supernatants from colonic biopsies of IBS patients, but not controls, also caused somatic and visceral hyperalgesia and allodynia in mice, when administered into the colon. These pronociceptive effects were inhibited by serine protease inhibitors and a PAR2 antagonist and were absent in PAR2-deficient mice. Our study establishes that proteases are released in IBS and that they can directly stimulate sensory neurons and generate hypersensitivity symptoms through the activation of PAR2. PMID:17304351

  16. Postprandial lower limb pain: An unusual presentation of visceral arteries occlusion.

    PubMed

    Patelis, Nikolaos; Papoutsis, Konstantinos; Liakopoulos, Dimitrios; Koutsoumpelis, Andreas; Bakogiannis, Christos; Georgopoulos, Sotirios

    2015-06-01

    This case report describes an atypical and unique presentation of mesenteric arteries occlusive disease. The patient presented with typical symptoms of chronic mesenteric ischemia, as well as with an atypical new symptom; postprandial buttock and lower limbs pain. Pain followed the time curve of the postprandial abdominal discomfort, starting 30?min after meals and gradually resolving within 2?h. The patient had been tolerating the signs of chronic mesenteric ischemia quite well by adjusting the quantity of food per meal to relieve symptoms. Angiography showed that the celiac artery, the superior mesenteric artery, and distal aorta were occluded, leaving the inferior mesenteric artery as the only feeding vessel of all abdominal viscera and both the lower limbs. Since an English medical literature search returned only one marginally similar case, we consider this case of iliac arteries' "steal syndrome" from the inferior mesenteric artery unique. PMID:25057158

  17. The amygdala central nucleus is required for acute stress-induced bladder hyperalgesia in a rat visceral pain model.

    PubMed

    DeBerry, Jennifer J; Robbins, Meredith T; Ness, Timothy J

    2015-05-01

    Chronic stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic visceral pain conditions, such as interstitial cystitis (IC), and bouts of acute stress exacerbate clinical urological pain. Studies using animal models have shown that exposure to chronic footshock stress augments reflex responses to urinary bladder distension (UBD) in animal models, however acute effects in animal models are largely unknown, as are the central nervous system mechanisms of stress-related increases in nociception. The amygdala is a salient structure for integration of sensory and cognitive/emotional factors. The present study determined the role of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) in stress-related bladder hypersensitivity. We examined the effects of CeA manipulations (lesions and chemical stimulation) on visceromotor responses (abdominal muscle contractions) to UBD in adult, female Sprague-Dawley rats. We report that acute footshock stress produces bladder hyperalgesia that can be prevented by bilateral CeA lesions, despite no effect of lesions on baseline somatic sensation, as indicated by flinch/jump thresholds to electrical shock. Further, acute glucocorticoid stimulation of the CeA recapitulated stress-induced hyperalgesia. Of note is that CeA lesions, but not chemical stimulation, significantly affected HPA axis activation, as indicated by measurements of circulating corticosterone. Our findings conclusively show that the CeA is necessary for the generation of bladder hyperalgesia in response to acute stress. The CeA may play multiple stress-related roles in nociceptive modulation, i.e., via direct facilitation of the HPA axis during acute stress, or via modulation of other systems that augment acute stress responsiveness. PMID:25698616

  18. Disturbance of the gut microbiota in early-life selectively affects visceral pain in adulthood without impacting cognitive or anxiety-related behaviors in male rats.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, S M; Felice, V D; Nally, K; Savignac, H M; Claesson, M J; Scully, P; Woznicki, J; Hyland, N P; Shanahan, F; Quigley, E M; Marchesi, J R; O'Toole, P W; Dinan, T G; Cryan, J F

    2014-09-26

    Disruption of bacterial colonization during the early postnatal period is increasingly being linked to adverse health outcomes. Indeed, there is a growing appreciation that the gut microbiota plays a role in neurodevelopment. However, there is a paucity of information on the consequences of early-life manipulations of the gut microbiota on behavior. To this end we administered an antibiotic (vancomycin) from postnatal days 4-13 to male rat pups and assessed behavioral and physiological measures across all aspects of the brain-gut axis. In addition, we sought to confirm and expand the effects of early-life antibiotic treatment using a different antibiotic strategy (a cocktail of pimaricin, bacitracin, neomycin; orally) during the same time period in both female and male rat pups. Vancomycin significantly altered the microbiota, which was restored to control levels by 8 weeks of age. Notably, vancomycin-treated animals displayed visceral hypersensitivity in adulthood without any significant effect on anxiety responses as assessed in the elevated plus maze or open field tests. Moreover, cognitive performance in the Morris water maze was not affected by early-life dysbiosis. Immune and stress-related physiological responses were equally unaffected. The early-life antibiotic-induced visceral hypersensitivity was also observed in male rats given the antibiotic cocktail. Both treatments did not alter visceral pain perception in female rats. Changes in visceral pain perception in males were paralleled by distinct decreases in the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1, the ?-2A adrenergic receptor and cholecystokinin B receptor. In conclusion, a temporary disruption of the gut microbiota in early-life results in very specific and long-lasting changes in visceral sensitivity in male rats, a hallmark of stress-related functional disorders of the brain-gut axis such as irritable bowel disorder. PMID:25088912

  19. Effect of electroacupuncture on P2X3 receptor regulation in the peripheral and central nervous systems of rats with visceral pain caused by irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Weng, Z J; Wu, L Y; Zhou, C L; Dou, C Z; Shi, Y; Liu, H R; Wu, H G

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the role of the purinergic receptor P2X3 in the peripheral and central nervous systems during acupuncture treatment for the visceral pain of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A total of 24 8-day-old Sprague-Dawley (SD) neonatal male rats (SPF grade) were stimulated using colorectal distention (CRD) when the rats were awake. The modeling lasted for 2 weeks with one stimulation per day. After 6 weeks, the rats were randomly divided into three groups of eight each: (1) the normal group (NG, n = 8); (2) the model group (MG, n = 8); and (3) the model + electroacupuncture group (EA, n = 8) that received electroacupuncture at a needling depth of 5 mm at the Shangjuxu (ST37, bilateral) and Tianshu (ST25, bilateral) acupoints. The parameters of the Han's acupoint nerve stimulator (HANS) were as follows: sparse-dense wave with a frequency of 2/100 Hz, current of 2 mA, 20 min/stimulation, and one stimulation per day; the treatment was provided for seven consecutive days. At the sixth week after the treatment, the abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) score was determined; immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry were used to measure the expression of the P2X3 receptor in myenteric plexus neurons, prefrontal cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex; and, a real-time PCR assay was performed to measure the expression of P2X3 messenger RNA (mRNA) in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord. After stimulation with CRD, the expression levels of the P2X3 receptor in the inter-colonic myenteric plexus, DRG, spinal cord, prefrontal cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex were upregulated, and the sensitivity of the rats to IBS visceral pain was increased. Electroacupuncture (EA) could downregulate the expression of the P2X3 receptor and ease the sensitivity to visceral pain. The P2X3 receptor plays an important role in IBS visceral pain. The different levels of P2X3 in the peripheral enteric nervous system and central nervous system mediate the effects of the EA treatment of the visceral hyperalgesia of IBS. PMID:25809868

  20. Neuromodulation of the cervical spinal cord in the treatment of chronic intractable neck and upper extremity pain: a case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Ricardo; Kramer, Jeffery; Benyamin, Ramsin

    2007-03-01

    Electrical spinal neuromodulation in the form of spinal cord stimulation is currently used for treating chronic painful conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome, diabetic neuropathy, postherpetic neuralgia, peripheral ischemia, low back pain, and other conditions refractory to more conservative treatments. To date, there are very few published reports documenting the use of spinal cord stimulation in the treatment of head/neck and upper limb pain. This paper reports a case series of 5 consecutive patients outlining the use of spinal cord stimulation to treat upper extremity pain. All subjects had previously undergone cervical fusion surgery to treat chronic neck and upper limb pain. Patients were referred following failure of the surgery to manage their painful conditions. Spinal cord stimulators were placed in the cervical epidural space through a thoracic needle placement. Stimulation parameters were adjusted to capture as much of the painful area(s) as possible. In total, 4 out of 5 patients moved to implantation. In all cases, patients reported significant (70-90%) reductions in pain, including axial neck pain and upper extremity pain. Interestingly, 2 patients with associated headache and lower extremity pain obtained relief after paresthesia-steering reportedly covered those areas. Moreover, 2 patients reported that cervical spinal cord stimulation significantly improved axial low back pain. Patients continue to report excellent pain relief up to 9 months following implantation. This case series documents the successful treatment of neck and upper extremity pain following unsuccessful cervical spine fusion surgery. Given this initial success, prospective, controlled studies are warranted to more adequately assess the long term utility and cost effectiveness of electrical neuromodulation treatment of chronic neck and upper extremity pain. PMID:17387353

  1. Cortical effects of anticipation and endogenous modulation of visceral pain assessed by functional brain MRI in irritable bowel syndrome patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Song, Guang Hui; Venkatraman, Vinod; Ho, Khek Yu; Chee, Michael W L; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Wilder-Smith, Clive H

    2006-12-15

    Visceral pain processing is abnormal in a majority of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients. Aberrant endogenous nociceptive modulation and anticipation are possible underlying mechanisms investigated in the current study. Twelve IBS patients and 12 matched healthy controls underwent brain fMRI scanning during the following randomised stimuli: sham and painful rectal distensions by barostat without and with simultaneous activation of endogenous descending nociceptive inhibition using ice water immersion of the foot for heterotopic stimulation. Heterotopic stimulation decreased rectal pain scores from 3.7+/-0.2 to 3.1+/-0.3 (mean+/-SE, scale 0-5) in controls (p<0.01), but not significantly in IBS. Controls differed from IBS patients in showing significantly greater activation bilaterally in the anterior insula, SII and putamen during rectal stimulation alone compared to rectal plus heterotopic stimulation. Greater activation during rectal plus heterotopic versus rectal stimulation was seen bilaterally in SI and the right superior temporal gyrus in controls and in the right inferior lobule and bilaterally in the superior temporal gyrus in IBS. Rectal pain scores were similarly low during sham stimulation in both groups, but brain activation patterns differed. In conclusion, IBS patients showed dysfunctional endogenous inhibition of pain and concomitant aberrant activation of brain areas involved in pain processing and integration. Anticipation of rectal pain was associated with different brain activation patterns in IBS involving multiple interoceptive, homeostatic, associative and emotional areas, even though pain scores were similar during sham distension. The aberrant activation of endogenous pain inhibition appears to involve circuitry relating to anticipation as well as pain processing itself. PMID:16846694

  2. Special sunrise & sunset solar energy stored papers and their clinical applications for intractable pain, circulatory disturbances & cancer: comparison of beneficial effects between Special Solar Energy Stored Paper and Qigong Energy Stored Paper.

    PubMed

    Omura, Yoshiaki

    2004-01-01

    Various phases of solar energy were evaluated for possible medical application, using the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test. A 2-4 minute interval of highly beneficial phase during sunrise and sunset which is comparable or is stronger than (+) Qigong Energy was detected. This energy was stored on 3 x 5 inch index cards. The sun energy stored on the exposed surface had a Bi-Digital O-Ring Test extremely strong positive (+) response, and the opposite side of the index card which was not exposed to the sun showed an equally strong negative (-) response. When the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test strong positive side (+) was applied to the patient's skin above various intractable painful areas with circulatory disturbances, including gangrenous pain, muscle pain, joint pain, & migraine headache, most of the pain disappeared or was significantly reduced within between 10 seconds and 5 minutes, with accelerated wound healing compared with Qigong energy stored paper of the same exposure, which caused pain to disappear within between 1.5 minutes and 15 minutes. When this Special Solar Energy Stored Paper was applied either directly to the skin above cancer positive areas or the midline of the upper chest above the thymus gland representation area, or the occipital area above the medulla oblongata, various cancer related parameters returned to close to normal values, with immediate clinical improvement. The beneficial effects of 10-60 seconds of application of the Special Solar Energy Stored Paper lasted for between 7 and 40 days, depending on the individual and their environmental electromagnetic field, how the special solar energy was stored, and how it was applied to the patient. PMID:15382787

  3. Pronociceptive effect of 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist on visceral pain involves spinal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor.

    PubMed

    Mickle, A; Kannampalli, P; Bruckert, M; Miranda, A; Banerjee, B; Sengupta, J N

    2012-09-01

    The functional role of serotonergic 5-HT(1A) receptors in the modulation of visceral pain is controversial. The objective of this study was to systematically examine the mechanism and site of action of a selective 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)-tetralin (DPAT) on visceral pain. In the behavioral model of visceral pain, systemic injection (5-250 μg/kg) of DPAT produced a significant increase in the viscero-motor response (VMR) to colorectal distension (CRD) and this effect was blocked by the selective 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist WAY-100135 (5 mg/kg, s.c.). Similarly, intrathecal (i.t.) injection (5 μmol) of DPAT into the lumbo-sacral (L6-S1) spinal cord produced a significant increase in VMR. The administration of N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist AP5 (50 μg/kg) prior to DPAT injection completely blocked the pronociceptive effect of DPAT. Similarly, DPAT failed to increase VMR in rats chronically treated with NR1 subunit-targeted antisense oligonucleotide (ON), whereas the drug increased VMR in rats treated with mismatched-ON. Chronic i.t. injection of allylglycine (AG), a γ-amino decarboxylase (GAD) enzyme inhibitor, produced significant increase in VMRs, suggesting that the inhibition of GABA synthesis produces pronociception. In AG-treated rats, i.t. injection of DPAT failed to further increase in VMR, suggesting that the DPAT action is linked to GABA release. Similarly, WAY-100135 failed to attenuate VMR in AG-treated rats, suggesting that unlike DPAT, AG action is not via the activation of 5-HT(1A) receptors. In electrophysiology experiments, DPAT (50 μg/kg) significantly increased the responses of spinal neurons to CRD, but did not influence the mechanotransduction property of CRD-sensitive pelvic nerve afferent fibers. The effect of DPAT on spinal neurons remained unaffected when tested in spinal-transected (C1-C2) rats. These results indicate that the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist DPAT produces pronociceptive effects, primarily via the activation of presynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptors in GABAergic neuron to restrict GABA release and thereby disinhibits the excitatory glutamatergic neurons in the spinal cord. PMID:22626644

  4. Changes in saccharin preference behavior as a primary outcome to evaluate pain and analgesia in acetic acid-induced visceral pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    de la Puente, Beatriz; Romero-Alejo, Elizabeth; Vela, Jos Miguel; Merlos, Manuel; Zamanillo, Daniel; Portillo-Salido, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Reflex-based procedures are important measures in preclinical pain studies that evaluate stimulated behaviors. These procedures, however, are insufficient to capture the complexity of the pain experience, which is often associated with the depression of several innate behaviors. While recent studies have made efforts to evidence the suppression of some positively motivated behaviors in certain pain models, they are still far from being routinely used as readouts for analgesic screening. Here, we characterized and compared the effect of the analgesic ibuprofen (Ibu) and the stimulant, caffeine, in assays of acute pain-stimulated and pain-depressed behavior. Intraperitoneal injection of acetic acid (AA) served as a noxious stimulus to stimulate a writhing response or depress saccharin preference and locomotor activity (LMA) in mice. AA injection caused the maximum number of writhes between 5 and 20 minutes after administration, and writhing almost disappeared 1 hour later. AA-treated mice showed signs of depression-like behaviors after writhing resolution, as evidenced by reduced locomotion and saccharin preference for at least 4 and 6 hours, respectively. Depression-like behaviors resolved within 24 hours after AA administration. A dose of Ibu (40 mg/kg) inactive to reduce AA-induced abdominal writhing administered before or after AA injection significantly reverted pain-induced saccharin preference deficit. The same dose of Ibu also significantly reverted the AA-depressed LMA, but only when it was administered after AA injection. Caffeine restored locomotion but not saccharin preference in AA-treated mice, thus suggesting that the reduction in saccharin preference but not in locomotion was specifically sensitive to analgesics. In conclusion, AA-induced acute pain attenuated saccharin preference and LMA beyond the resolution of writhing behavior, and the changes in the expression of hedonic behavior, such as sweet taste preference, can be used as a more sensitive and translational model to evaluate analgesics. PMID:26504405

  5. Predictors of intractable childhood epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Seker Yilmaz, Berna; Okuyaz, Cetin; Komur, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Our study sought to identify early predictive factors of medically intractable childhood epilepsy. A cohort of epileptic children from the city of Mersin was retrospectively investigated. All patients received care from the same Department of Pediatric Neurology. The epileptic cohort was divided into a drug-responsive epilepsy group and an intractable epilepsy group. Intractable epilepsy is defined as continued seizures in children despite adequate therapy with two or more antiepileptic drugs for more than 18 months. Strong univariate association was observed between intractability and several factors: age of onset, high initial seizure frequency, symptomatic etiology, mixed seizure types, previous history of status epilepticus, febrile and neonatal seizures, mental and motor developmental delay, multiple seizures in 1 day, electroencephalogram abnormalities, magnetic resonance imaging findings, and specific epileptic syndromes. Logistic regression analysis revealed that a previous history of epilepticus status, abnormal electroencephalogram results, and multiple seizures in 1 day comprise independent predictors of medically intractable childhood epilepsy. We suggest that medical intractability in childhood epilepsy can be predicted by monitoring these factors. Along with early prediction, alternative therapies may be designed to provide patients better seizure control and quality of life. PMID:23290021

  6. Pregabalin modulation of spinal and brainstem visceral nociceptive processing.

    PubMed

    Sikandar, Shafaq; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2011-10-01

    Brainstem and spinal mechanisms mediating visceral nociception are investigated here using electrophysiology and immunohistochemistry techniques in a model of acute visceral pain. Colorectal distension (CRD) produced graded visceromotor responses (VMR) in normal rats, and these were facilitated by intracolonic mustard oil (MO) that generated acute visceral hyperalgesia. The neuropathic pain drug pregabalin (PGB) is thought to have state-dependent effects in attenuating neuropathic, but not acute somatic pain, likely by impairing calcium-channel trafficking. We found that systemic PGB produced antinociceptive effects on CRD-evoked VMRs in naïve rats lacking pathophysiology and in MO-pretreated rats. Systemic PGB also significantly reduced Fos labelling in lumbosacral spinal cords of rats given noxious repetitive CRD; however, PGB did not alter this measure of neural activity in the brainstem. Differential brainstem processing of noxious somatic and visceral stimuli may underlie the unique lack of state-dependent actions of PGB in this visceral pain model. Single-unit recordings in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) verify that brainstem processing of somatic and visceral stimuli differs. The effects of CRD on RVM cells classed as ON, OFF, or NEUTRAL were independent of their somatic responses, with surprising changes in RVM cell activity to innocuous visceral stimulation. PGB also markedly reduced the visceral responses of RVM ON-cells to noxious CRD. These results illustrate clear differences in the central processing of visceral and somatic stimuli, yet a common role for descending modulation by brainstem activity in mediating evoked pain measures. PMID:21778018

  7. Pregabalin modulation of spinal and brainstem visceral nociceptive processing

    PubMed Central

    Sikandar, Shafaq; Dickenson, Anthony H.

    2011-01-01

    Brainstem and spinal mechanisms mediating visceral nociception are investigated here using electrophysiology and immunohistochemistry techniques in a model of acute visceral pain. Colorectal distension (CRD) produced graded visceromotor responses (VMR) in normal rats, and these were facilitated by intracolonic mustard oil (MO) that generated acute visceral hyperalgesia. The neuropathic pain drug pregabalin (PGB) is thought to have state-dependent effects in attenuating neuropathic, but not acute somatic pain, likely by impairing calcium-channel trafficking. We found that systemic PGB produced antinociceptive effects on CRD-evoked VMRs in nave rats lacking pathophysiology and in MO-pretreated rats. Systemic PGB also significantly reduced Fos labelling in lumbosacral spinal cords of rats given noxious repetitive CRD; however, PGB did not alter this measure of neural activity in the brainstem. Differential brainstem processing of noxious somatic and visceral stimuli may underlie the unique lack of state-dependent actions of PGB in this visceral pain model. Single-unit recordings in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) verify that brainstem processing of somatic and visceral stimuli differs. The effects of CRD on RVM cells classed as ON, OFF, or NEUTRAL were independent of their somatic responses, with surprising changes in RVM cell activity to innocuous visceral stimulation. PGB also markedly reduced the visceral responses of RVM ON-cells to noxious CRD. These results illustrate clear differences in the central processing of visceral and somatic stimuli, yet a common role for descending modulation by brainstem activity in mediating evoked pain measures. PMID:21778018

  8. Estrogen modulation of visceral nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Chaban, Victor

    2014-01-01

    A large body of literature supports the idea that estrogen modulates nociceptive responses in pelvic pain syndromes; however, whether this hormone is pro- or anti-nociceptive remains unresolved. The dorsal root ganglion (DRG) is an important site of visceral afferent convergence and cross-sensitization. Within the context of our hypothesis visceral nociception and nociceptor sensitization appear to be regulated by purinergic P2X3 and vanilloid TRPV1 receptors and 17?-estradiol modulates DRG neuron response to ATP (P2X agonist) and capsaicin (TRPV1 agonist) suggesting that visceral afferent nociceptors are modulated by estrogen in the DRG. 17-? estradiol (E2), the most common form of estrogen, acts on functional properties of P2X3 and TRPV1 receptors in DRG neurons in vitro. The localization of estrogen receptors (ER) in DRG neurons and the attenuation of ATP/capsaicin-induced intracellular calcium concentration [Ca2+]i strongly suggest that E2 modulates visceral pain processing peripherally. Moreover, E2 appears to have different actions on nociceptive signaling depending on the input. Based on our data we propose that E2 can gate primary afferent response to increase or decrease nociception. PMID:26752851

  9. Monitoring acute equine visceral pain with the Equine Utrecht University Scale for Composite Pain Assessment (EQUUS-COMPASS) and the Equine Utrecht University Scale for Facial Assessment of Pain (EQUUS-FAP): A scale-construction study.

    PubMed

    van Loon, Johannes P A M; Van Dierendonck, Machteld C

    2015-12-01

    Although recognition of equine pain has been studied extensively over the past decades there is still need for improvement in objective identification of pain in horses with acute colic. This study describes scale construction and clinical applicability of the Equine Utrecht University Scale for Composite Pain Assessment (EQUUS-COMPASS) and the Equine Utrecht University Scale for Facial Assessment of Pain (EQUUS-FAP) in horses with acute colic. A cohort follow-up study was performed using 50 adult horses (n?=?25 with acute colic, n?=?25 controls). Composite pain scores were assessed by direct observations, Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores were assessed from video clips. Colic patients were assessed at arrival, and on the first and second mornings after arrival. Both the EQUUS-COMPASS and EQUUS-FAP scores showed high inter-observer reliability (ICC?=?0.98 for EQUUS-COMPASS, ICC?=?0.93 for EQUUS-FAP, P?<0.001), while a moderate inter-observer reliability for the VAS scores was found (ICC?=?0.63, P?<0.001). The cut-off value for differentiation between healthy and colic horses for the EQUUS-COMPASS was 5, and for differentiation between conservatively treated and surgically treated or euthanased patients it was 11. For the EQUUS-FAP, cut-off values were 4 and 6, respectively. Internal sensitivity and specificity were good for both EQUUS-COMPASS (sensitivity 95.8%, specificity 84.0%) and EQUUS-FAP (sensitivity 87.5%, specificity 88.0%). The use of the EQUUS-COMPASS and EQUUS-FAP enabled repeated and objective scoring of pain in horses with acute colic. A follow-up study with new patients and control animals will be performed to further validate the constructed scales that are described in this study. PMID:26526526

  10. Levorphanol, Methadone, and the Management of Intractable Chronic Pain: An Interview with Kerry Schmidt, BA,MBA; Jack P. McNulty, MD,FACP; and George B. Muller, RPh.

    PubMed

    Vail, Jane

    2006-01-01

    For former National Football League player Kerry Schmidt, BA,MBA, chronic pain is a part of everyday life. To repair sports-related trauma sustained during his 6-year career as a defensive back, Schmidt has undergone 24 major orthopedic surgeries over the past three decades and will undergo two or three additional procedures to repair his lower back. Now a sports reporter, a syndicated sports columnist, and a business owner, Schmidt says his pain at times has rated a 10-plus on a 10-point pain scale. Schmidt recently took control of his constant discomfort. After he consulted with Jack P. McNulty, MD,FACP, a specialist in the management of chronic pain, who collaborated with George B. Muller, RPh, a compounding pharmacist, Schmidt found relief with no adverse effects from the seldom-prescribed drug levorphanol. PMID:23974121

  11. Plerixafor may treat intractable post-herpetic neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fang; Li, Xueyang; Bao, Mengmeng; Guo, Ruijuan; Zhang, Chen; Wu, Anshi; Yue, Yun; Guan, Yun; Wang, Yun

    2015-10-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes varicella (chicken pox) and establishes latency in ganglia. A reactivation of latent VZV leads to herpes zoster (shingles). Herpes zoster often causes herpetic pain that can last for months or years after the rash has healed. Prolonged herpetic pain is defined as post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN). There is an unmet need to explore novel therapeutic approaches for intractable PHN. Postmortem studies have shown that VZV induces neuro-inflammation and damage to the ganglia and spinal cord. These pathological changes may be critical factors resulting in PHN. Accumulated evidence suggests that stem cells may alleviate neuropathic pain in animal models through immunomodulatory actions and neuronal repair. Unfortunately, exogenous stem cell transplantation has limited clinical use due to safety concerns, immune rejection, and complications. Pharmacological mobilization of endogenous bone marrow stem cells may overcome these obstacles. Plerixafor is a SDF-1/CXCR4 axis blocker which can stimulate the release of stem cells from the bone marrow into blood circulation. We propose a hypothesis that endogenous stem cells mobilized by plerixafor may relieve the symptoms of PHN. If so, it may represent a novel approach for the treatment of intractable PHN. PMID:26175195

  12. Attenuation of capsaicin-induced acute and visceral nociceptive pain by alpha- and beta-amyrin, a triterpene mixture isolated from Protium heptaphyllum resin in mice.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Francisco A; Costa, Charllynton L S; Chaves, Mariana H; Almeida, Fernanda R C; Cavalcante, Italo J M; Lima, Alana F; Lima, Roberto C P; Silva, Regilane M; Campos, Adriana Rolim; Santos, Flavia A; Rao, Vietla S N

    2005-10-21

    The triterpene mixture, alpha- and beta-amyrin, isolated from Protium heptaphyllum resin was evaluated on capsaicin-evoked nociception in mice. Orally administered alpha- and beta-amyrin (3 to 100 mg/kg) significantly suppressed the nociceptive behaviors--evoked by either subplantar (1.6 microg) or intracolonic (149 microg) application of capsaicin. The antinociception produced by alpha- and beta-amyrin against subplantar capsaicin-induced paw-licking behavior was neither potentiated nor attenuated by ruthenium red (1.5 mg/kg, s.c.), a non-specific antagonist of vanilloid receptor (TRPV1), but was greatly abolished in animals pretreated with naloxone (2 mg/kg, s.c.), suggesting an opioid mechanism. However, participation of alpha2-adrenoceptor involvement was unlikely since yohimbine (2 mg/kg, i.p.) pretreatment failed to block the antinociceptive effect of alpha- and beta-amyrin in the experimental model of visceral nociception evoked by intracolonic capsaicin. The triterpene mixture (3 to 30 mg/kg, p.o.) neither altered significantly the pentobarbital sleeping time, nor impaired the ambulation or motor coordination in open-field and rota-rod tests, respectively, indicating the absence of sedative or motor abnormality that could account for its antinociception. Nevertheless, alpha- and beta-amyrin could significantly block the capsaicin (10 mg/kg, s.c.)-induced hyperthermic response but not the initial hypothermia. These results suggest that the triterpene mixture, alpha- and beta-amyrin has an analgesia inducing effect, possibly involving vanilloid receptor (TRPV1) and an opioid mechanism. PMID:15964027

  13. Berberine Improves Intestinal Motility and Visceral Pain in the Mouse Models Mimicking Diarrhea-Predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS-D) Symptoms in an Opioid-Receptor Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Qiuhui; Fichna, Jakub; Zheng, Lijun; Wang, Kesheng; Yu, Zhen; Li, Yongyu; Li, Kun; Song, Aihong; Liu, Zhongchen; Song, Zhenshun; Kreis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Berberine and its derivatives display potent analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activity. Here we aimed at characterizing the mechanism of action of berberine in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and cortical neurons using animal models and in vitro tests. Methods The effect of berberine was characterized in murine models mimicking diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) symptoms. Then the opioidantagonists were used to identify the receptors involved. Furthermore, the effect of berberineon opioid receptors expression was established in the mouse intestine and rat fetal cortical neurons. Results In mouse models, berberine prolonged GI transit and time to diarrhea in a dose-dependent manner, and significantly reduced visceral pain. In physiological conditions the effects of berberine were mediated by mu- (MOR) and delta- (DOR) opioidreceptors; hypermotility, excessive secretion and nociception were reversed by berberine through MOR and DOR-dependent action. We also found that berberine increased the expression of MOR and DOR in the mouse bowel and rat fetal cortical neurons. Conclusion Berberine significantly improved IBS-D symptoms in animal models, possibly through mu- and delta- opioid receptors. Berberine may become a new drug candidate for the successful treatment of IBS-D in clinical conditions. PMID:26700862

  14. Pain.

    PubMed

    Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Invasive stimulation of the motor (precentral) cortex using surgically implanted epidural electrodes is indicated for the treatment of neuropathic pain that is refractory to medical treatment. Controlled trials have demonstrated the efficacy of epidural motor cortex stimulation (MCS), but MCS outcome remains variable and validated criteria for selecting good candidates for implantation are lacking. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive approach that could be used as a preoperative tool to predict MCS outcome and also could serve as a therapeutic procedure in itself to treat pain disorders. This requires repeated rTMS sessions and a maintenance protocol. Other studies have also demonstrated the efficacy of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in relieving chronic pain syndromes. The most studied target is the precentral cortex, but other targets, such as the prefrontal and parietal cortices, could be of interest. The analgesic effects of cortical stimulation relate to the activation of various circuits modulating neural activities in remote structures, such as the thalamus, limbic cortex, insula, or descending inhibitory controls. In addition to the treatment of refractory neuropathic pain by epidural MCS, new developments of this type of strategy are ongoing, for other types of pain syndrome and stimulation techniques. PMID:24112914

  15. [Pathophysiology of abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Curatolo, Michele

    2011-08-01

    Abdominal pain can be induced by stimulation of visceral nociceptors. Activation of nociceptors usually requires previous sensitization by pathological events, such as inflammation, ischemia or acidosis. Although abdominal pain can obviously be caused by pathology of a visceral structure, clinicians frequently observe that such a pathology explains only part of the pain complaints. Occasionally, there is lack of objective signs of visceral lesions. There is clear evidence that pain states are associated with profound changes of the central processing of the sensory input. The main consequences of such alterations for patients are twofold: 1) a central sensitization, i.e. an increased excitability of the central nervous system; 2) an alteration of the endogenous pain modulation, which under normal conditions inhibits the processing of nociceptive signals in the central nervous system. Both phenomena lead to a spread of pain to other body regions and an amplification of the pain perception. The interactions between visceral pathology and alterations of the central pain processes represent an at least partial explanation for the discrepancy between objective signs of peripheral lesions and severity of the symptoms. Today, both central hypersensitivity and alteration in endogenous pain modulation can be measured in clinical practice. This information can be used to provide the patients with an explanatory model for their pain. Furthermore, first data suggest that alterations in central pain processing may represent negative prognostic factors. A better understanding of the individual pathophysiology may allow in the future the development of individual therapeutic strategies. PMID:21796591

  16. Gabapentin for intractable hiccups in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Tegeler, Monica L; Baumrucker, Steven J

    2008-01-01

    Intractable hiccups are not common in the general population or in the palliative care population but can adversely impact quality of life and cause other complications such as weight loss and sleep disturbance. Many treatments have been proposed for intractable hiccups, but there is little consensus regarding treatment in the medical literature. This is partly because hiccups are relatively uncommon and many of the proposed treatments are unproven or have long-term side effects. Pharmacologic treatments rather than home remedies or surgical treatments are more appropriate for the palliative care patient. Gabapentin is a promising medication for the treatment of intractable hiccups for its safety, lack of serious side effects, and rapid onset of action. Further research is indicated to determine whether gabapentin is consistently effective. PMID:18292481

  17. Sequencing Intractable DNA to Close Microbial Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, Jr., Richard Ashley; Brown, Steven D; Podar, Mircea; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Elias, Dwayne A

    2012-01-01

    Advancement in high throughput DNA sequencing technologies has supported a rapid proliferation of microbial genome sequencing projects, providing the genetic blueprint for for in-depth studies. Oftentimes, difficult to sequence regions in microbial genomes are ruled intractable resulting in a growing number of genomes with sequence gaps deposited in databases. A procedure was developed to sequence such difficult regions in the non-contiguous finished Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 genome (6 intractable gaps) and the Desulfovibrio africanus genome (1 intractable gap). The polynucleotides surrounding each gap formed GC rich secondary structures making the regions refractory to amplification and sequencing. Strand-displacing DNA polymerases used in concert with a novel ramped PCR extension cycle supported amplification and closure of all gap regions in both genomes. These developed procedures support accurate gene annotation, and provide a step-wise method that reduces the effort required for genome finishing.

  18. Intractable diarrhoea of infancy and latent otomastoiditis.

    PubMed Central

    Salazar de Sousa, J; da Silva, A; da Costa Ribeiro, V

    1980-01-01

    In 16 infants with intractable diarrhoea, latent otomastoiditis was found in 9 (3 at necropsy and 6 at myringotomy-antrotomy). In 5 of the 6 operated group, surgery was followed by a striking cessation of the diarrhoea and with weight gain. It is concluded that (1) latent otomastoiditis may be a perpetuating factor in intractable diarrhoea; (2) myringotomy-antrotomy should be considered if other forms of treatment have failed, and especially if there is leucocytosis; (3) mastoiditis with diffuse osteitis seems to be associated with a poor prognosis. PMID:7458392

  19. Ruptured visceral artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Chiaradia, M; Novelli, L; Deux, J-F; Tacher, V; Mayer, J; You, K; Djabbari, M; Luciani, A; Rahmouni, A; Kobeiter, H

    2015-01-01

    Visceral artery aneurysms are rare but their estimated mortality due to rupture ranges between 25 and 70%. Treatment of visceral artery aneurysm rupture is usually managed by interventional radiology. Specific embolization techniques depend on the location, affected organ, locoregional arterial anatomy, and interventional radiologist skill. The success rate following treatment by interventional radiology is greater than 90%. The main complication is recanalization of the aneurysm, showing the importance of post-therapeutic monitoring, which should preferably be performed using MR imaging. PMID:26054246

  20. Baclofen in the treatment of intractable hiccups.

    PubMed

    Patial, R K

    2002-10-01

    Availability of a large number of drugs/remedies for the management of hiccups suggests that all the available drugs are not effective in all the patients. Baclofen was successful in relieving the intractable hiccups where all other known drugs of hiccup were unable to provide relief. PMID:12568219

  1. CPAP Therapy Improves Intractable Hemifacial Spasm

    PubMed Central

    Kasemsap, Narongrit; Netwijitpan, Sittichai; Limpawattana, Panita; Kongbunkiat, Kannikar; Tiamkao, Somsak; Chotmongkol, Verajit; Aekphachaisawat, Noppadol; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2015-01-01

    The correlation between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and hemifacial spasm has never been reported in the literature. Here, we report a case of OSA-induced hypertension with intractable hemifacial spasm in which both conditions improved after continuous positive airway pressure treatment. PMID:26550503

  2. Advanced Innovations for Pain.

    PubMed

    Lamer, Tim J; Deer, Timothy R; Hayek, Salim M

    2016-02-01

    Chronic pain represents one of the most important public health problems in terms of both the number of patients afflicted and health care costs. Most patients with chronic pain are treated with medications as the mainstay of therapy, and yet most medically treated patients continue to report ongoing pain. Additionally, adverse effects from pain medications represent a major challenge for clinicians and patients. Spinal cord stimulation and intrathecal drug delivery systems are well-established techniques that have been utilized for over 25 years. Intrathecal drug delivery systems have proven efficacy for a wide variety of intractable pain conditions and fewer adverse effects than systemic medical therapy in patients with refractory cancer-related pain. Spinal cord stimulation is cost-effective and provides improved pain control compared with medical therapy in patients with a variety of refractory pain conditions including complex regional pain syndrome, painful diabetic neuropathy, and chronic radiculopathy. Patients who have intractable pain that has not responded to reasonable attempts at conservative pain care measures should be referred to a qualified interventional pain specialist to determine candidacy for the procedures discussed in this article. PMID:26848005

  3. The effect of stellate ganglion block on intractable lymphedema after breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin; Park, Hahck Soo; Cho, Soo Young; Baik, Hee Jung; Kim, Jong Hak

    2015-01-01

    Lymphedema of the upper limb after breast cancer surgery is a disease that carries a life-long risk and is difficult to cure once it occurs despite the various treatments which have been developed. Two patients were referred from general surgery department for intractable lymphedema. They were treated with stellate ganglion blocks (SGBs), and the circumferences of the mid-point of their each upper and lower arms were measured on every visit to the pain clinic. A decrease of the circumference in each patient was observed starting after the second injection. A series of blocks were established to maintain a prolonged effect. Both patients were satisfied with less swelling and pain. This case demonstrates the benefits of an SGB for intractable upper limb lymphedema. PMID:25589949

  4. The Effect of Stellate Ganglion Block on Intractable Lymphedema after Breast Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin; Cho, Soo Young; Baik, Hee Jung; Kim, Jong Hak

    2015-01-01

    Lymphedema of the upper limb after breast cancer surgery is a disease that carries a life-long risk and is difficult to cure once it occurs despite the various treatments which have been developed. Two patients were referred from general surgery department for intractable lymphedema. They were treated with stellate ganglion blocks (SGBs), and the circumferences of the mid-point of their each upper and lower arms were measured on every visit to the pain clinic. A decrease of the circumference in each patient was observed starting after the second injection. A series of blocks were established to maintain a prolonged effect. Both patients were satisfied with less swelling and pain. This case demonstrates the benefits of an SGB for intractable upper limb lymphedema. PMID:25589949

  5. Roles of prefrontal cortex and paraventricular thalamus in affective and mechanical components of visceral nociception.

    PubMed

    Jurik, Angela; Auffenberg, Eva; Klein, Sabine; Deussing, Jan M; Schmid, Roland M; Wotjak, Carsten T; Thoeringer, Christoph K

    2015-12-01

    Visceral pain represents a major clinical challenge in the management of many gastrointestinal disorders, eg, pancreatitis. However, cerebral neurobiological mechanisms underlying visceral nociception are poorly understood. As a representative model of visceral nociception, we applied cerulein hyperstimulation in C57BL6 mice to induce acute pancreatitis and performed a behavioral test battery and c-Fos staining of brains. We observed a specific pain phenotype and a significant increase in c-Fos immunoreactivity in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (PVT), the periaqueductal gray, and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Using neuronal tracing, we observed projections of the PVT to cortical layers of the mPFC with contacts to inhibitory GABAergic neurons. These inhibitory neurons showed more activation after cerulein treatment suggesting thalamocortical "feedforward inhibition" in visceral nociception. The activity of neurons in pancreatitis-related pain centers was pharmacogenetically modulated by designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs, selectively and cell type specifically expressed in target neurons using adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer. Pharmacogenetic inhibition of PVT but not periaqueductal gray neurons attenuated visceral pain and induced an activation of the descending inhibitory pain pathway. Activation of glutamatergic principle neurons in the mPFC, but not inhibitory neurons, also reversed visceral nociception. These data reveal novel insights into central pain processing that underlies visceral nociception and may trigger the development of novel, potent centrally acting analgesic drugs. PMID:26262826

  6. Testing of visceral sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Mulak, A

    2003-12-01

    Under normal circumstances most of the visceral input to the central nervous system is not perceived consciously. Visceral hypersensitivity associated with altered reflex activity seems to be a common pathophysiological mechanism in functional gastrointestinal disorders. Investigation of visceral sensitivity in humans is based on distension tests using barostat, or tensostat more recently. Tensostat may allow better standardization of distending stimuli, regardless of the capacity or compliance of the organ being tested. Other techniques include transmucosal electrical nerve stimulation, and chemical or thermal stimulation. Measurement of the responses to gut stimuli is based on the evaluation of conscious perception or objective responses, such as reflex activity or central processes. Recently, the assessment of the central responses has become available due to a variety of new brain imaging techniques. Several factors are thought to influence the results of visceral sensitivity studies: age, gender, physiological factors (postprandial testing) as well as psychological factors (stress, hypnosis, hypervigilance phenomenon). Technical conditions for performing tests like distension protocols may considerably affect the perception of sensory thresholds. Various mediators and pharmacological agents, in particular those acting on serotonin receptors, affect the sensory function of the gastrointestinal tract, and some of them have therapeutic potential in the treatment of visceral hypersensitivity. PMID:15075449

  7. Pain pharmacology: focus on opioids

    PubMed Central

    Fornasari, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Summary The incidence of chronic pain is estimated to be 2025% worldwide. Although major improvements in pain control have been obtained, more than 50% of the patients reports inadequate relief. It is accepted that chronic pain, if not adequately and rapidly treated, can become a disease in itself, often intractable and maybe irreversible. This is mainly due to neuroplasticity of pain pathways. In the present review I will discuss about pain depicting the rational for the principal pharmacological interventions and finally focusing on opioids, that represent a primary class of drug to treat pain. PMID:25568646

  8. Activation of ERK signaling in rostral ventromedial medulla is dependent on afferent input from dorsal column pathway and contributes to acetic acid-induced visceral nociception.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yi; Zhao, Yujie; Guo, Ruijuan; Zhang, Meijuan; Wang, Yue; Mu, Yonggao; Wu, Anshi; Yue, Yun; Wu, Jing; Wang, Yun

    2013-11-01

    Several lines of evidence from both animal and clinical studies have demonstrated that dorsal column (DC) pathway plays a critical role in visceral pain transmission from the spinal cord to supraspinal center. The descending pain modulation pathway from the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) area has been implicated in visceral nociceptive neurotransmission. Previous studies have demonstrated that the multiple protein kinase signaling transduction cascades in the RVM area contribute to the descending facilitation of inflammatory pain and neuropathic pain. However, whether these signaling transduction pathways in the RVM area are triggered by the afferent visceral input from the DC pathway during acute visceral pain remains elusive. Here, we have tested the hypothesis that the afferent visceral stimuli from the DC pathway might induce the activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) signaling in the RVM area and contribute to the descending facilitation of neurotransmission in a rat model of visceral pain. Our results showed that acetic acid-induced visceral nociception produced a persistent activation of ERK in the RVM area and a microinjection of a mitogen-activated ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor, U0126, into the RVM area significantly inhibited the visceral noxious stimulation-induced behaviors in rats. A microinjection of lidocaine into the nucleus gracilis (NG) also inhibited the activation of ERK in the RVM area. The current study indicates that activated ERK signaling pathway in the RVM area is dependent on afferent input from dorsal column pathway and may contribute to acetic acid-induced visceral nociception. PMID:23876632

  9. Pain perception in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tillisch, Kirsten; Mayer, Emeran A

    2005-11-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by chronic abdominal discomfort or pain in the absence of detectable organic disease. IBS is common and is associated with a significant impairment in health-related quality of life. Enhanced perception of visceral stimuli ("visceral hypersensitivity") appears to be an important pathophysiological mechanism. Early IBS studies using functional brain imaging techniques suggest an alteration in central pain modulation circuits, rather than an increased sensitivity of peripheral visceral pain pathways. The frequent comorbidity with psychiatric disorders suggests the possibility of shared pathophysiological mechanisms and etiologic factors. PMID:16273016

  10. Spinal Cord Stimulation Modulates Visceral Nociception and Hyperalgesia via the Spinothalamic Tracts and the Postsynaptic Dorsal Column Pathways: A Literature Review and Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Krames, Elliot S; Foreman, Robert

    2007-07-01

    Introduction.  Early animal and human evidence existed for a postsynaptic dorsal column (PSDC) pathway for visceral nociception that, when lesioned, decreased pain of terminal illness. There have been recent anecdotal reports in the literature that spinal cord stimulation (SCS) reduces pain of visceral nociception. We present here a review of the literature supporting a hypothesis that SCS might work by modulating information through the spinothalamic tracts (STT) and PSDC. Methods.  A review of the relevant literature regarding nociception, nociceptive transmission, visceral sensitization, and the "brain-gut" axis; and SCS was performed as a foundation for this hypothesis. Key words used for this review of databases and nonindexed relevant journals included visceral pain, visceral nociception, visceral hyperalgesia, visceral neuropathic pain, visceral sensitization, "brain-gut" axis, SCS, PSDC pathway, and STTs. Results.  An abundance of both clinical and scientific literature suggests the neuropathic and sensitized nature of chronic visceral nociception. There is also evidence that there may be an interaction between the PSDC pathway and lateral spinothalamic tracts (LSTT) that might be operant in the preclinical and anecdotal clinical evidence that SCS ameliorates the pain of visceral nociception. Conclusions.  Chronic visceral nociception may be secondary to visceral sensitization and hyperalgesia and can be affected by the spinal cord and brain, the "brain-gut" axis. There is preclinical evidence and clinical anecdotes that this nociceptive information is transmitted in the central nervous system through the PSDC pathway and LSTT and that SCS decreases pain of visceral nociception. It may be that SCS works by modulation of the above pathways. PMID:22150836

  11. Visceral and somatic hypersensitivity in a subset of rats following TNBS-induced colitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, QiQi; Price, Donald D.; Caudle, Robert M.; Verne, G. Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic abdominal pain is one of the most common gastrointestinal symptoms experienced by patients. Visceral hypersensitivity has been shown to be a biological marker in many patients with chronic visceral pain. We have previously shown that IBS patients with visceral hypersensitivity also have evidence of thermal hyperalgesia of the hand/foot. Objective The objective of the current study was to develop an animal model of chronic visceral and somatic hypersensitivity in rats treated with intracolonic trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid. Design Male SpragueDawley rats (200250 g) were treated with either 20 mg/rat trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS, Sigma Chemical Co.) in 50% ethanol (n = 75), an equivalent volume of 50% ethanol (n = 20) or an equivalent volume of saline (n = 20). The agents were delivered with a 24-gauge catheter inserted into the lumen of the colon. Mechanical and thermal behavioral tests were performed using an automated von Frey and Hargreaves device to evaluate somatic hyperalgesia. Colonic distension was performed using an automated distension device to evaluate visceral pain thresholds. All animals were tested 16 weeks after TNBS treatment following complete resolution of the colitis. Results At 16 weeks, 24% of the treated rats (18/75 rats) still exhibited evidence of visceral as well as somatic hypersensitivity compared to saline- and ethanol-treated rats. Conclusion Transient colonic inflammation leads to chronic visceral and somatic hypersensitivity in a subset of rats. These findings are similar to the subset of patients who develop chronic gastrointestinal symptoms following enteric infection. PMID:17481818

  12. Oral azithromycin for treatment of intractable rosacea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hong; Oh, Yoon Seok; Choi, Eung Ho

    2011-05-01

    Rosacea is a common chronic cutaneous disorder that primarily occurs on the convex surfaces of the central face and is often characterized by exacerbations and remissions. A case of a 52-yr-old woman visited our clinic in February 2008 complaining typical features of rosacea including multiple pinhead to rice-sized erythematous papules. We applied various conventional treatments including topical benzoyl peroxide and metronidazole as well as oral metronidazole, isotretinoin, and doxycycline. The lesions were not controlled but were rather aggravated by complications from these treatments. Therefore, we prescribed oral azithromycin, which has anti-inflammatory effects and reduces reactive oxygen species. Ten weeks after the administration of oral azithromycin, 500 mg per day for 2 weeks, the lesions had mostly disappeared and no specific side effects related to the azithromycin were noted. Oral azithromycin dosing 500 mg/day for 2 weeks is effective for treatment of intractable rosacea. PMID:21532865

  13. Rethinking Intractable Conflict: The Perspective of Dynamical Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallacher, Robin R.; Coleman, Peter T.; Nowak, Andrzej; Bui-Wrzosinska, Lan

    2010-01-01

    Intractable conflicts are demoralizing. Beyond destabilizing the families, communities, or international regions in which they occur, they tend to perpetuate the very conditions of misery and hate that contributed to them in the first place. Although the common factors and processes associated with intractable conflicts have been identified…

  14. Microcatheter Embolization of Intractable Idiopathic Epistaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Leppaenen, Martti; Seppaenen, Seppo; Laranne, Jussi; Kuoppala, Katriina

    1999-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy and safety of microcatheter embolization in the treatment of intractable idiopathic epistaxis. Methods: Thirty-seven patients underwent microcatheter embolization in 1991-1998. We evaluated retrospectively the technical and clinical outcome, the number of complications, the duration of embolization in each case, and the number of blood transfusions needed. All embolizations were done with biplane digital subtraction angiography (DSA) equipment. The procedure was carried out under local anesthesia using transfemoral catheterization, except in one case where the translumbar route was used. Tracker 18 or 10 microcatheters were advanced as far as possible to the distal branches of the sphenopalatine artery. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles were used for embolization in most cases, while platinum coils or a combination of these two materials were occasionally used. The primary outcome was always assessed immediately by angiography. Follow-up data were obtained from patient records, by interviewing patients on the telephone or by postal questionnaires when necessary. The mean follow-up time was 21 months. Results: The embolization was technically successful in all 37 cases. A curative outcome was achieved in 33 cases (89%). The mean duration of the procedure was 110 min. Four patients (8%) had mild transient complications, but no severe or persistent complications were encountered. Twenty-three patients needed a blood transfusion. Slight rebleeding occurred in three patients during the follow-up; all responded to conservative treatment. One patient suffered two episodes of rebleeding within 2 months after primary embolization. Re-embolizations successfully stopped the bleeding. Conclusion: Embolization is the primary invasive modality for treating intractable idiopathic epistaxis. It proved both safe and effective over a relatively long follow-up.

  15. Oral bismuth for chronic intractable diarrheal conditions?

    PubMed Central

    Thazhath, Sony S; Haque, Mazhar; Florin, Timothy H

    2013-01-01

    Objective Bismuth has antidiarrheal, antibacterial, and anti-inflammatory properties. We report our single-center experience with oral colloidal bismuth subcitrate (CBS) treatment for patients with chronic intractable diarrhea. Method We interrogated our web-based Inflammatory Bowel Disease Clinical and Research database to ascertain clinical details on all patients in our tertiary hospital gastroenterology service treated with CBS between 2000 and 2010. Treatment responses were based on prospective scoring of daily number of liquid stools. Responses were recorded prior to commencement of CBS and at follow-up visits over 12 months. Results Thirty-one patients, mean age 47 years (range 17–79 years) and a mean duration of diarrhea of 22 weeks (range 6–104 weeks), were prescribed CBS at doses ranging from 120 mg to 480 mg/day for ≥1 month. Of these, 23 patients (74%) had an initial clinical response and 12 (39%) who continued with this treatment had a sustained clinical response at 1 year. Twelve patients with pouchitis and four patients with indeterminate colitis had initial responses of 92% and 75%, respectively, and sustained responses of 50% and 75%, respectively. Ulcerative colitis patients (n = 5) responded poorly with respect to both initial and sustained responses. Three patients with microscopic colitis showed encouraging initial response of 100% but did not have any sustained benefit. Three of four patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (dIBS) had an initial response and two (50%) had good sustained responses. There were no serious adverse events. One patient stopped therapy because of nausea. Conclusion This is the largest report of oral bismuth treatment in chronic intractable diarrhea. CBS is cheap and appears to have the potential to be effective for ameliorating diarrheal symptoms in indeterminate colitis, pouchitis, and dIBS. An appropriately powered, blinded, randomized, controlled study appears warranted to establish the position of oral bismuth in routine practice. PMID:23515887

  16. Hepatic visceral larva migrans

    PubMed Central

    Rohilla, Seema; Jain, Nitin; Yadav, Rohtas; Dhaulakhandi, Dhara Ballabh

    2013-01-01

    Visceral larva migrans (VLM) is a systemic manifestation of migration of second stage larvae of nematodes through the tissue of human viscera. It is not uncommon but is underdiagnosed in developing countries. The liver is the most common organ to be involved due to its portal venous blood supply. The imaging findings are subtle and differentiation from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), metastases, cystic mesenchymal hamartoma and granulomatous diseases is difficult. This case report highlights the imaging features of hepatic lesions of VLM along with clinical and laboratory data which help in clinching the diagnosis. PMID:23853189

  17. Hot water irrigation as treatment for intractable posterior epistaxis in an out-patient setting.

    PubMed

    Novoa, E; Schlegel-Wagner, C

    2012-01-01

    The management of intractable posterior epistaxis is challenging for any physician. Nasal packing, often combined with use of an endonasal balloon system, is painful for the patient, and torturous to maintain for two to three days. If conservative treatment fails, the most commonly used treatment options are currently invasive procedures such as endoscopic coagulation of bleeding arteries, external ligation and, rarely, embolisation. This paper describes a simple, non-invasive technique of treating posterior epistaxis with hot water irrigation. Technical information is presented, and the benefits of the method are discussed. PMID:21888749

  18. Visceral larva migrans mimicking lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bachmeyer, Claude; Lamarque, Grard; Morariu, Rodica; Molina, Thierry; Boure, Patrice; Delmer, Alain

    2003-04-01

    We report a case of visceral larva migrans in an adult with fever, night sweats, weight loss, hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy, bilateral pleural effusion, and eosinophilia-mimicking lymphoma. Visceral larva migrans was diagnosed subsequently because of negative findings for malignancy and positive serologic test result for Toxocara canis. Progressive improvement was observed with albendazole therapy. PMID:12684326

  19. Negative allosteric modulation of the mGlu7 receptor reduces visceral hypersensitivity in a stress-sensitive rat strain.

    PubMed

    Moloney, Rachel D; Golubeva, Anna V; O'Connor, Richard M; Kalinichev, Mikhail; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate, the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, exerts its effect through ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. Of these, group III mGlu receptors (mGlu 4, 6, 7, 8) are among the least studied due to a lack of pharmacological tools. mGlu7 receptors, the most highly conserved isoform, are abundantly distributed in the brain, especially in regions, such as the amygdala, known to be crucial for the emotional processing of painful stimuli. Visceral hypersensitivity is a poorly understood phenomenon manifesting as an increased sensitivity to visceral stimuli. Glutamate has long been associated with somatic pain processing leading us to postulate that crossover may exist between these two modalities. Moreover, stress has been shown to exacerbate visceral pain. ADX71743 is a novel, centrally penetrant, negative allosteric modulator of mGlu7 receptors. Thus, we used this tool to explore the possible involvement of this receptor in the mediation of visceral pain in a stress-sensitive model of visceral hypersensitivity, namely the Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat. ADX71743 reduced visceral hypersensitivity in the WKY rat as exhibited by increased visceral sensitivity threshold with concomitant reductions in total number of pain behaviours. Moreover, AD71743 increased total distance and distance travelled in the inner zone of the open field. These findings show, for what is to our knowledge, the first time, that mGlu7 receptor signalling plays a role in visceral pain processing. Thus, negative modulation of the mGlu7 receptor may be a plausible target for the amelioration of stress-induced visceral pain where there is a large unmet medical need. PMID:26844237

  20. Negative allosteric modulation of the mGlu7 receptor reduces visceral hypersensitivity in a stress-sensitive rat strain

    PubMed Central

    Moloney, Rachel D.; Golubeva, Anna V.; O'Connor, Richard M.; Kalinichev, Mikhail; Dinan, Timothy G.; Cryan, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate, the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, exerts its effect through ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. Of these, group III mGlu receptors (mGlu 4, 6, 7, 8) are among the least studied due to a lack of pharmacological tools. mGlu7 receptors, the most highly conserved isoform, are abundantly distributed in the brain, especially in regions, such as the amygdala, known to be crucial for the emotional processing of painful stimuli. Visceral hypersensitivity is a poorly understood phenomenon manifesting as an increased sensitivity to visceral stimuli. Glutamate has long been associated with somatic pain processing leading us to postulate that crossover may exist between these two modalities. Moreover, stress has been shown to exacerbate visceral pain. ADX71743 is a novel, centrally penetrant, negative allosteric modulator of mGlu7 receptors. Thus, we used this tool to explore the possible involvement of this receptor in the mediation of visceral pain in a stress-sensitive model of visceral hypersensitivity, namely the Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat. ADX71743 reduced visceral hypersensitivity in the WKY rat as exhibited by increased visceral sensitivity threshold with concomitant reductions in total number of pain behaviours. Moreover, AD71743 increased total distance and distance travelled in the inner zone of the open field. These findings show, for what is to our knowledge, the first time, that mGlu7 receptor signalling plays a role in visceral pain processing. Thus, negative modulation of the mGlu7 receptor may be a plausible target for the amelioration of stress-induced visceral pain where there is a large unmet medical need. PMID:26844237

  1. Acute visceral obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mabbutt, Sarah Elizabeth; Burdall, Oliver Charles; Kariyawasam, Sanjeeva

    2013-01-01

    Gastric volvulus is a rare cause for acute visceral obstruction, with a high mortality rate that rises with delay in definitive treatment. A 33-year-old woman with a rare chromosomal mutation (46,XX,del(6)(q25.1q25.3)) presented with evidence of acute visceral obstruction. Diagnostic difficulties delayed treatment and she clinically deteriorated. Urgent CT imaging revealed acute mesentero-axial gastric volvulus. At laparotomy, global failure of colonic and splenic fixation was found. The viscera were de-rotated, the stomach salvaged and gastropexy and colopexy were performed. This is the first report of gastric volvulus secondary to congenital absence of colonic and splenic ligamentous attachments occurring in a patient over 30?years of age. This case is interesting not only due to unique pathology, but also highlights that general surgeons must be aware of the possibility of unusual causes for intestinal obstruction in patients with recognised genetic abnormalities, even in adult cases, to avoid harmful diagnostic delay. PMID:23853188

  2. Acute visceral obstruction.

    PubMed

    Mabbutt, Sarah Elizabeth; Burdall, Oliver Charles; Kariyawasam, Sanjeeva

    2013-01-01

    Gastric volvulus is a rare cause for acute visceral obstruction, with a high mortality rate that rises with delay in definitive treatment. A 33-year-old woman with a rare chromosomal mutation (46,XX,del(6)(q25.1q25.3)) presented with evidence of acute visceral obstruction. Diagnostic difficulties delayed treatment and she clinically deteriorated. Urgent CT imaging revealed acute mesentero-axial gastric volvulus. At laparotomy, global failure of colonic and splenic fixation was found. The viscera were de-rotated, the stomach salvaged and gastropexy and colopexy were performed. This is the first report of gastric volvulus secondary to congenital absence of colonic and splenic ligamentous attachments occurring in a patient over 30 years of age. This case is interesting not only due to unique pathology, but also highlights that general surgeons must be aware of the possibility of unusual causes for intestinal obstruction in patients with recognised genetic abnormalities, even in adult cases, to avoid harmful diagnostic delay. PMID:23853188

  3. Diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Pankaj; Dayama, Anand; Mehrotra, Sanjana; Sundar, Shyam

    2010-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease with up to 350 million people at risk of infection worldwide. Among its different clinical manifestations, visceral is the most severe form. Since clinical features of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) mimic several other common diseases, accurate diagnosis of VL is crucial as the treatment is associated with significant toxicity. Invasive and risky techniques involving demonstration of the parasites in stained preparations from splenic and bone marrow aspirate is still the gold standard for VL diagnosis. Serological tests using rk39 in ELISA or rapid immunochromatographic format, Direct Agglutination Test (DAT), immunoblotting have issues related to a significant proportion of asymptomatic individuals being positive with these tests and their inability to diagnose relapses as these remain positive for several months to years after cure. PCR is the most common molecular technique successfully used for diagnosis and differentiation of species. Through this review we focus extensively on the comparative utilities of the various diagnostic tools currently available for VL, describing in depth their advantages and disadvantages, addressing the recent advances attained in the field. A simple, rapid, non invasive, accurate and cost effective marker of active VL, which can be used in field conditions, is necessary to improve diagnosis of VL. PMID:21074233

  4. The Pain of Labour

    PubMed Central

    Labor, Simona

    2008-01-01

    Labour is an emotional experience and involves both physiological and psychological mechanisms. The pain of labour is severe but despite this its memory diminishes with time. Labour pain has two components: visceral pain which occurs during the early first stage and the second stage of childbirth, and somatic pain which occurs during the late first stage and the second stage. The pain of labour in the first stage is mediated by T10 to L1 spinal segments, whereas that in the second stage is carried by T12 to L1, and S2 to S4 spinal segments. Pain relief in labour is complex and often challenging without regional analgesia. Effective management of labour pain plays a relatively minor role in a woman's satisfaction with childbirth. PMID:26526404

  5. Thalamic modulation of visceral nociceptive processing in adult rats with neonatal colon irritation.

    PubMed

    Saab, Carl Y; Park, Young C; Al-Chaer, Elie D

    2004-05-22

    Visceral pain originates from visceral organs in response to a noxious stimulus which, if prolonged, may lead to chronic changes in the neural network mediating visceral nociception. For instance, colon inflammation enhances the responses of neurons in the thalamus to colorectal distension (CRD), whereas lesion in the dorsal column (DC) reverses this neuronal sensitization, suggesting that the thalamus and the DC play major roles in chronic visceral pain. In this study, we used adult rats sensitized with neonatal painful colon irritation to reveal the contribution of the thalamus and the DC to neuronal hyperexcitability in a model of chronic visceral pain. We recorded the responses of lumbosacral neurons to CRD in control rats and in rats with colon irritation following stimulation or inactivation of the thalamus, and after DC lesion. Our results show that, first, neuronal responses to CRD decreased following thalamic stimulation in control rats, whereas, in rats with colon irritation, responses either decreased or increased; second, DC lesion attenuated or enhanced these effects in the positively or in the negatively modulated group of neurons, respectively; third, lidocaine injection in the thalamus reduced the responses to CRD in some of the neurons recorded in rats with colon irritation, but had no effect on those in control rats. Therefore, it is reasonable to speculate that plasticity in rats with colon irritation that may underlie chronic pain is sustained by feedback loops ascending in the DC and engaging the thalamus. PMID:15145755

  6. Intractable pediatric chronic sinusitis with antrochoanal polyp.

    PubMed

    Saito, H; Honda, N; Yamada, T; Mori, S; Fujieda, S; Saito, T

    2000-08-31

    It has been reported that pediatric chronic sinusitis with antrochoanal polyp is difficult to cure because it tends to recur easily even with surgery. Therefore, in order to improve its cure rate, aggressive treatment combining polypectomy, intra-maxillary intubation through the inferior meatus, macrolide administration, etc., was attempted. Thirty-seven sides of pediatric chronic sinusitis with antrochoanal polyp and 44 sides of chronic sinusitis without polyp were evaluated after the same treatments. The mean age of patients was 9.7 years, and the mean intubation period was 20 months. Since subjective improvements in children are questionable, the efficacy was evaluated strictly on the basis of X-ray alone focusing on the maxillary sinus. Twenty-four percent of the group with antrochoanal polyp showed 'excellent' effect, i.e. almost complete resolution of the sinus findings, while 45% of the group without polyp showed 'excellent' effect, with a mean follow-up period of 3 years and 6 months. This difference was significant (P<0. 01, chi(2)-test). These results further document the intractableness of chronic sinusitis with choanal polyp in children. PMID:10967380

  7. Glutamate Transporter GLT-1 Upregulation Attenuates Visceral Nociception and Hyperalgesia via Spinal Mechanisms Not Related to Anti-Inflammatory or Probiotic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Y.; Roman, K.; Foust, K. D.; Kaspar, B. K.; Bailey, M. T.; Stephens, R. L.

    2011-01-01

    Visceral pain is the most common reason for physician visits in US. Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter and mediates visceral nociceptive neuro-transmission and hypersensitivity. Removal of extracellular glutamate is predominantly mediated by glial glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1). The pharmacological approach to up-regulate GLT-1 by 1 week administration of ceftriaxone (CTX) has been successful to mitigate visceral nociception. The present study shows that intrathecal delivery of selective GLT-1 antagonist dihydrokainate reversed CTX-blunted visceral nociceptive response, suggesting a spinal site of action. The role of GLT-1 up-regulation in animal models of colitis was studied. CTX treatment reversed TNBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity. In addition, CTX treatment initiated one week after the onset of DSS-induced visceral inflammation also attenuated visceral hypersensitivity, revealing a potential therapeutic effect. Cephalothin, a cephalosporin antibiotic lacking GLT-1 induction activity, failed to attenuate visceral nociception. CTX-induced changes in fecal microbiota do not support a role of probiotic effects in mitigating visceral nociception/hypersensitivity. Finally, adeno-associated virus serotype 9-mediated GLT-1 over-expression was effective to mitigate visceromotor response to 60?mmHg colo-rectal distension. These studies indicate that GLT-1 over-expression is a novel and effective method to attenuate visceral nociception, and is deserving of further study as a translationally relevant approach to treat visceral pain. PMID:22220274

  8. The effect of ketamine as an additive in epidural block on the intractable herpetic neuralgia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Young; Kim, Kyung Mi; Oh, Min Seok; Lee, Ji Eun

    2014-01-01

    Ketamine has been shown to have analgesic effect by blocking N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, thus preventing and reducing central sensitization caused by peripheral nociceptive stimulation. However, due to lack of knowledge about its safety and toxicity in the central nervous system, either epidural or intrathecal injection of ketamine still remains controversial. Here, we describe a case report of satisfactory pain relief after the addition of ketamine in epidural injection in a patient with severe herpes zoster pain that was refractory to conventional medication, intravenous opioids and continuous epidural block. This case indicates the viability of epidural ketamine injection in patients with intractable herpetic neuralgia. PMID:24567816

  9. [My way to "Keep Pioneering": integrated neuroscience and immunology research produces a paradigm shift for intractable neurological disease].

    PubMed

    Kira, Jun-ichi

    2014-01-01

    The motto of Prof. Yoshigoro Kuroiwa, who established the first independent neurology department in Japan at Kyushu University, is "Keep Pioneering". His students have followed this motto in all fields. I hereby present my efforts to keep pioneering in the following fields: (1) multiple sclerosis (MS); (2) central nervous system (CNS) involvement associated with peripheral atopic inflammation; and (3) care network for patients with intractable neurological disease. In MS, I propose that Th1/Th17 cell-mediated connexin astrocytopathy may play a critical role in producing huge demyelinating lesions in MS, neuromyelitis optica (NMO), and Bal's concentric sclerosis. I discovered a peculiar myelitis that occurred in patients with atopic disorders, and designated it atopic myelitis. In this condition, allodynia and neuropathic pain are cardinal features, regardless of the presence or absence of spinal cord MRI lesions. We found that peripheral atopic inflammation in mice produces allodynia as well as activation of microglia and astroglia in the spinal cord. It is important to involve a variety of medical specialists and care coordinators for collaborative work on medical and social care issues for people with intractable disease. The motto of "Keep Pioneering" in neurology covers not only advanced research for the creation of new therapies for intractable neurological disease, but also caring for actual people with intractable disease, which I believe is the corporate social responsibility of our neurological society. I think that "Keep Pioneering" is a challenging process that never ends throughout one's life. PMID:25672676

  10. Visceral obesity: A new risk factor for stone disease

    PubMed Central

    Akarken, Ilker; Tarhan, Hüseyin; Ekin, Rahmi Gökhan; Çakmak, Özgür; Koç, Gökan; İlbey, Yusuf Özlem; Zorlu, Ferruh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We examined the relationship between stone disease and the amount of visceral adipose tissue measured with unenhanced computed tomography (CT). Methods: We included 149 patients with complaints of flank pain and kidney stones detected by CT, from August 2012 to April 2013. In addition, as the control group we included 139 healthy individuals, with flank pain within the same time period, with no previous history of urological disease and no current kidney stones identified by CT. Patients were analyzed for age, gender, body mass index, amount of visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue, and serum level of low-density lipoprotein and triglyceride. Results: There were no differences between groups in terms of gender and age (p = 0.27 and 0.06, respectively). Respective measurements for the stone and control groups for body mass index were 29.1 and 27.6 kg/m2; for visceral fat measurement 186.0 and 120.2 cm2; and for subcutaneous fat measurements 275.9 and 261.9 cm2 (p = 0.01; 0.01 and 0.36, respectively). Using multivariate analysis, the following factors were identified as increasing the risk of kidney stone formation: hyperlipidemia (p = 0.003), hypertension (p = 0.001), and ratio of visceral fat tissue to subcutaneous fat tissue (p = 0.01). Our study has its limitations, including its retrospective nature, its small sample size, possible selection bias, and missing data. The lack of stone composition data is another major limitation of our study. Conclusion: The ratio of visceral to subcutaneous adipose tissue, in addition to obesity, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension, was identified as an emerging factor in the formation of kidney stones. PMID:26600887

  11. Facilitation of Synaptic Transmission in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex in Viscerally Hypersensitive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xu; Cao, Bing; Liu, Jin; Li, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Electrophysiological studies have shown the enhanced response of anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) to colorectal distension in viscerally hypersensitive (VH) rats, which can be observed up to 7 weeks following colonic anaphylaxis, independent of colon inflammation, suggesting a mechanism for learning and triggering of pain memories in the ACC neuronal circuitry. Activity-dependent plasticity in synaptic strength may serve as a key mechanism that reflects cortical plasticity. However, only a few reports have indicated the synaptic plasticity of ACC in vivo. In the present study, electrophysiological recording showed long-lasting potentiation of local field potential in the medial thalamus (MT)-ACC synapses in VH rats. Theta burst stimulation in the MT reliably induced long-term potentiation in the MT-ACC pathway in normal rats, but was occluded in the VH state. Further, repeated tetanization of MT increased ACC neuronal activity and visceral pain responses of normal rats, mimicking VH rats. In conclusion, we demonstrated for the first time that visceral hypersensitivity is associated with alterations of synaptic plasticity in the ACC. The ACC synaptic strengthening in chronic visceral pain may engage signal transduction pathways that are in common with those activated by electrical stimulation, and serves as an attractive cellular model of functional visceral pain. PMID:24108805

  12. Descending influence from the nucleus locus coeruleus/subcoeruleus on visceral nociceptive transmission in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Tsuruoka, M; Wang, D; Tamaki, J; Inoue, T

    2010-02-17

    Visceral nociceptive signals are the subject of descending modulation from the locus coeruleus/subcoeruleus (LC/SC). We have recently found dorsal horn neurons whose visceral nociceptive responses are not inhibited by the descending LC/SC system (LC/SC-unaffected neurons) in the rat. The aim of the present study was to estimate a possible role of LC/SC-unaffected neurons for pain processing and pain-related responses. We focused on the fact that nociceptive signals from a visceral organ produce not only visceral pain but also visceromotor reflexes (muscular defense). Different effects of LC/SC stimulation can be expected between visceral pain and visceromotor reflexes. To accomplish our objective, the descending colon was electrically stimulated, and both the evoked discharge (ED) in the ventral posterolateral (VPL) nucleus of the thalamus and the electromyogram (EMG) of the abdominal muscle were simultaneously recorded under halothane anesthesia. The ED recorded from the VPL was completely inhibited with the increase of LC/SC stimulus intensity, while the EMG of the abdominal muscle still remained even after the ED disappeared. This result suggests that the minimum visceromotor reflex responses are maintained by the presence of LC/SC-unaffected neurons, which play the important role of protecting the visceral organs. Considering a role of muscular defense, the presence of the LC/SC-unaffected neurons may be advantageous for the individual under an abnormal pain state, such as inflammation. PMID:19958815

  13. [Visceral leishmaniasis: an update].

    PubMed

    Faucher, B; Piarroux, R

    2011-09-01

    During the last decade, visceral leishmaniasis has been reconsidered in its epidemiology and strategies for diagnosis, treatment and prevention. This vectorial disease, responsible for more than 50,000 deaths each year across India, East Africa, South America, the Mediterranean area, Central Asia and China, is currently spreading over new territories. This formerly rural disease has even reached cities in South America. This spreading is caused by environmental changes due to global warming or human activity, and by the movement of workers and refugees. As a consequence, the burden of HIV/Leishmania coinfection is increasing in many developing countries even though effective antiretroviral therapy has led to a marked decrease in its incidence in Europe. The disease is now handled differently than it was 10 years ago: PCR has become the most accurate tool for diagnosis and follow-up in developed countries, and field diagnostic tools have been developed (antigenuria, rK39 dipstick). While resistance to antimoniate has appeared in India and Europe, new therapies have been evaluated such as miltefosine, the first oral therapy, or short treatment with liposomal amphotericin B. In France, liposomal amphotericin B has supplanted antimoniate meglumine because of better tolerance and shorter hospitalization duration. Protecting dogs through immunization or collars impregnated with deltamethrin proved effective to prevent zoonotic leishmaniasis due to Leishmania infantum. PMID:20850210

  14. Management of sickle pain.

    PubMed

    Ballas, S K

    1997-03-01

    Sickle cell disease is characterized by recurrent episodes of acute pain. Some patients also suffer from chronic pain syndromes including avascular necrosis, leg ulcers, and intractable pain. Approaches to rational therapy of sickle pain include pharmacologic, nonpharmacologic, and preventive therapeutic interventions. Pharmacologic treatment of sickle pain entails the use of nonopioid analgesics, opioid analgesics, and adjuvants singly or in combination depending on the severity of pain. Meticulous evaluation and assessment of painful episodes should precede and accompany all approaches to management. The choice of the opioid analgesic, its route of administration, dose, and frequency of administration should be individualized on a case-by-case basis. Meperidine should be avoided whenever possible. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, meperidine, and morphine are contraindicated in the presence of renal failure. Administration of opioids on a fixed schedule or by patient-controlled analgesia is ideal for effective therapy. Nonpharmacologic approaches to manage sickle pain are underutilized and more studies are needed to determine their role in sickle pain. Preventive therapy of sickle pain is best achieved with hydroxyurea, which was found to decrease the frequency of crises significantly, decrease the incidence of acute chest syndrome, and decrease the need for blood transfusion. PMID:9107526

  15. Botulinum toxin and intractable trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Trk, Ulk; Ilhan, Selen; Alp, Recep; Sur, Haydar

    2005-01-01

    The effects of botulinum toxin have been demonstrated in pain syndromes such as migraine, tension headache, and postherpetic neuralgia. With this background data in hand, the authors planned a randomized, open-ended study to investigate the efficacy of botulinum injections in cases of refractory trigeminal neuralgia. In 8 patients with trigeminal neuralgia, 100 U botulinum toxin was injected into the region of the zygomatic arch. The results of their statistical analyses demonstrated that the medication can be effective in treating trigeminal neuralgia. The patients did not develop any significant adverse effects. Botulinum toxin can be used in the treatment of refractory trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:16062093

  16. Epidemiology of visceral leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Ready, Paul D

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania species are the causative agents of leishmaniasis, a neglected tropical disease. These parasitic protozoans are usually transmitted between vertebrate hosts by the bite of blood sucking female phlebotomine sand flies. This review focuses on the two parasites causing most human visceral leishmaniasis (VL), which leads to substantial health problems or death for up to 400,000 people per year. Except for travel cases, Leishmania donovani infections are restricted to the (sub-)tropics of Asia and Africa, where transmission is mostly anthroponotic, while Leishmania infantum occurs in the drier parts of Latin America as well as in the Mediterranean climate regions of the Old World, with the domestic dog serving as the main reservoir host. The prevalence of VL caused by L. infantum has been declining where living standards have improved. In contrast, infections of L. donovani continue to cause VL epidemics in rural areas on the Indian subcontinent and in East Africa. The current review compares and contrasts these continental differences and suggests priorities for basic and applied research that might improve VL control. Transmission cycles, pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis, prevention (including vector control), surveillance, transmission modeling, and international control efforts are all reviewed. Most case detection is passive, and so routine surveillance does not usually permit accurate assessments of any changes in the incidence of VL. Also, it is not usually possible to estimate the human inoculation rate of parasites by the sand fly vectors because of the limitations of survey methods. Consequently, transmission modeling rarely passes beyond the proof of principle stage, and yet it is required to help develop risk factor analysis for control programs. Anthroponotic VL should be susceptible to elimination by rapid case detection and treatment combined with local vector control, and one of the most important interventions may well be socioeconomic development. PMID:24833919

  17. Visceral obesity: a "civilization syndrome".

    PubMed

    Björntorp, P

    1993-05-01

    The controversial question of the relationship between obesity and disease has been considerably clearer after the demonstration in several prospective, epidemiological studies that the subgroup of central, visceral obesity is particularly prone to develop cardiovascular disease, stroke, and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. Visceral obesity is associated with multiple central endocrine aberrations. The hypothalamo-adrenal axis is apparently sensitive to stimuli, sex steroid hormone secretion blunted, and hyperandrogenicity is found in women. In addition, there seem to be signs of central dysfunctions in the regulation of hemodynamic factors after stress, and growth hormone secretion appears to be particularly blunted. Several of these endocrine abnormalities are associated with insulin resistance, particularly glycogen synthesis in muscle. Fiber composition with low type I/type II ratio might be secondary to the prevailing hyperinsulinemia, but low capillary density in muscle may well be of importance. In combination with elevated turn-over of free fatty acids (FFA) this will probably provide powerful mechanisms whereby insulin resistance is created. Portal FFA, from the highly lipolytic visceral depots may, in addition, affect hepatic metabolism to induce increased gluconeogenesis, production of very low density lipoproteins as well as to perhaps inhibit clearance of insulin. By these mechanisms a Metabolic Syndrome Visceral adipocytes seem to have a high density of several steroid hormone receptors, directing steroid hormone effects particularly to these depots. The net effect of cortisol is apparently a stimulation of lipid storage, with opposing effects of sex steroid hormones which also facilitate lipid mobilization, regulations most often found at the gene transcription level. Growth hormone inhibits cortisol effects on lipid accumulation, and amplifies the lipid mobilizing effects of steroid hormones. The combined perturbations of hormonal secretions will therefore probably direct triglycerides toward visceral depots. Circulatory and nervous regulatory mechanisms require, however, more attention. The multiple central endocrine and nervous aberrations of visceral obesity suggest neuroendocrine dysregulations, and have features characteristic of the hypothalamic arousal seen after certain types of stress, alcohol intake, and smoking. Such factors can be traced to subjects with visceral fat accumulation. Standardized stress, eliciting a "defeat reaction" in primates is followed by an apparently identical syndrome. This integrated picture of the multiple symptoms of visceral obesity is based on epidemiological, clinical, experimental, cellular, and molecular evidence. The ingredients of positive energy balance, including physical inactivity, stress, smoking, and alcohol consumption are frequent features of modern, urbanized society. Visceral obesity may therefore be an expression of a "Civilization Syndrome." PMID:16350574

  18. Main ion channels and receptors associated with visceral hypersensitivity in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho Rocha, Heraldo Arcela; Dantas, Bruna Priscilla Vasconcelos; Rolim, Thaísa Leite; Costa, Bagnólia Araújo; de Medeiros, Arnaldo Correia

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a very frequent functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort and alteration of bowel habits. The IBS physiopathology is extremely complex. Visceral hypersensitivity plays an important role in the pathogenesis of abdominal pain in both in vitro and in vivo models of this functional disorder. In order to obtain a general view of the participation of the main ion channels and receptors regarding the visceral hypersensitivity in the IBS and to describe their chemical structure, a literature review was carried out. A bibliographical research in the following electronic databases: Pubmed and Virtual Library in Health (BVS) was fulfilled by using the search terms “ion channels” “or” “receptors” “and” “visceral hypersensitivity” “or” “visceral nociception” “and” “irritable bowel syndrome”. Original and review articles were considered for data acquisition. The activation of the ATP ion-gated channels, voltage-gated sodium (Nav) and calcium (Cav) channels, as well as the activation of protease-activated receptors (PAR2), transient receptor potential vanilloide-1, serotonin, cannabinoids and cholecystokinin are involved in the genesis of visceral hypersensitivity in IBS. The involvement of ion channels and receptors concerning visceral hypersensitivity is noteworthy in IBS models. PMID:24976114

  19. Intractable bleeding from solitary mandibular metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shiang-Fu; Wu, Ren-Chin; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Liao, Chun-Ta; Chen, I-How; Yeh, Chun-Nan

    2007-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) metastasizes to the mandible is infrequently seen. Solitary bony metastasis to the mandible is rarer. The intractable bleeding caused by rupture of the metastatic HCC is challenging to clinicians. We present a case of a 74-year-old woman with HCC under control without progression for 3 years. Left facial swelling and episodes of bleeding developed recently and biopsy revealed a metastatic HCC. Computer tomography showed a large tumor in parapharyngeal space with evident mandibular ramus destruction. Bleeding occurred from the metastatic tumor but could not be controlled by electrocauterization, Surgicel, tissue glue, and bone wax and angiographic embolization. Palliative radiotherapy (2400 cGy in 6 fractions) was tried and the intractable bleeding was successfully stopped after the radiotherapy. Because of the hypervascular and osteolytic nature of the solitary mandibular metastatic lesion, the bleeding was troublesome. Radiotherapy provided successful control of intractable bleeding from the metastatic tumor. PMID:17724815

  20. Drug-induced visceral angioedema

    PubMed Central

    Thalanayar, Prashanth M.; Ghobrial, Ibrahim; Lubin, Fritz; Karnik, Reena; Bhasin, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Angioedema associated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) is due to the accumulation of bradykinin and its metabolites. Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) produce anti-hypertensive effects by blocking the angiotensin II AT1 receptor action; hence bradykinin-related side effects are not expected. However, we notice the occurrence of ARB-induced angioedema as not a very rare side effect. Visceral drug-induced angioedema has been reported with ACEIs, not with ARBs. This underlying review will help educate readers on the pathophysiology and recent guidelines pertaining to ACEI- and ARB-induced visceral angioedema. PMID:25317271

  1. Extensive apoptosis in a case of intractable infantile status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Koshi A.; Weidenheim, Karen; Legatt, Alan D.; Shifteh, Keivan; Abbott, I. Richmond; Mosh, Solomon L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary A previously healthy 8-month-old girl underwent epilepsy surgery for intractable focal seizures with secondary generalization that progressed to status epilepticus. The major neuropathologic finding was extensive apoptosis. Investigations did not reveal any etiology for the apoptosis or the seizures. This is the first report of apoptosis, without necrosis, in association with intractable status epilepticus in the developing human brain. The findings suggest that new treatment strategies targeted to prevent apoptosis may be useful in children with prolonged status epilepticus. PMID:19464149

  2. Neurobiological Mechanisms of Pelvic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Leone Roberti Maggiore, Umberto; Candiani, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic pain is a common condition which significantly deteriorates health-related quality of life. The most commonly identified causes of pain in the pelvic region are gynaecologic, urologic, gastrointestinal, neurological, and musculoskeletal. However, in up to 33% of patients the source of this symptom is not identified, frustrating both patients and health-care professionals. Pelvic pain may involve both the somatic and visceral systems, making the differential diagnosing challenging. This paper aimed to review the mechanisms involved in pelvic pain perception by analyzing the neural plasticity and molecules which are involved in these complex circuits. PMID:25110704

  3. Mechanisms of cardiac pain.

    PubMed

    Foreman, Robert D; Garrett, Kennon M; Blair, Robert W

    2015-04-01

    Angina pectoris is cardiac pain that typically is manifested as referred pain to the chest and upper left arm. Atypical pain to describe localization of the perception, generally experienced more by women, is referred to the back, neck, and/or jaw. This article summarizes the neurophysiological and pharmacological mechanisms for referred cardiac pain. Spinal cardiac afferent fibers mediate typical anginal pain via pathways from the spinal cord to the thalamus and ultimately cerebral cortex. Spinal neurotransmission involves substance P, glutamate, and transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptors; release of neurokinins such as nuclear factor kappa b (NF-kb) in the spinal cord can modulate neurotransmission. Vagal cardiac afferent fibers likely mediate atypical anginal pain and contribute to cardiac ischemia without accompanying pain via relays through the nucleus of the solitary tract and the C1-C2 spinal segments. The psychological state of an individual can modulate cardiac nociception via pathways involving the amygdala. Descending pathways originating from nucleus raphe magnus and the pons also can modulate cardiac nociception. Sensory input from other visceral organs can mimic cardiac pain due to convergence of this input with cardiac input onto spinothalamic tract neurons. Reduction of converging nociceptive input from the gallbladder and gastrointestinal tract can diminish cardiac pain. Much work remains to be performed to discern the interactions among complex neural pathways that ultimately produce or do not produce the sensations associated with cardiac pain. PMID:25880519

  4. Early Career Teacher Attrition: New Thoughts on an Intractable Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallant, Andrea; Riley, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Early career exit from teaching has reached epidemic proportions and appears intractable. Previous attempts to find solutions are yet to make much of an inroad. The aim of the research was to discover what nine beginning teachers required to remain in the classroom, by adopting a phenomenological approach. The authors identified participants'

  5. Early Career Teacher Attrition: New Thoughts on an Intractable Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallant, Andrea; Riley, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Early career exit from teaching has reached epidemic proportions and appears intractable. Previous attempts to find solutions are yet to make much of an inroad. The aim of the research was to discover what nine beginning teachers required to remain in the classroom, by adopting a phenomenological approach. The authors identified participants'…

  6. Intractability in Graph Drawing and Geometry: FPT Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitesides, Sue

    The fixed parameter tractability (FPT) approach pioneered by Downey and Fellows provides an algorithm design philosophy for solving special cases of intractable problems. Here we review several examples from geometry and graph drawing, in particular layered graph drawing, that illustrate fixed parameter tractability techniques.

  7. Lamotrigine for intractable migraine-like headaches in Sturge-Weber syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Shohei; Shimakawa, Shuichi; Fukui, Miho; Tanabe, Takuya; Tamai, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    We herein report that naratriptan remarkably improved intractable migraine-like headaches in a patient with Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) despite his past history of cerebral infarction. In addition, lamotrigine had a prophylactic effect on his visual aura and headaches. An 18-year-old male patient with SWS had intractable migraine-like headaches every several months from the age of 3years. His migraine-like headaches were characterized by pulsating attacks preceded by left homonymous hemianopsia, which persisted after headache disappearance. In addition, after 14years of age, the pulsating headaches were preceded by photophobia without homonymous hemianopsia and occurred almost daily. Headache pains were not improved by acetaminophen or loxoprofen sodium hydrate. Furthermore, various prophylactic drugs were ineffective. After obtaining informed consent, naratriptan was administered. The pain severity was reduced and the duration of headache with homonymous hemianopsia was shortened from several days to several hours. Interestingly, naratriptan also shortened the duration of homonymous hemianopsia to several hours. We confirmed that his headache attacks were not epileptic seizures by ictal electroencephalography. However, 25mg/day of lamotrigine had a prophylactic effect on the frequency of headache. Moreover, lamotrigine led to complete remission of his headache without homonymous hemianopsia. Lamotrigine may have an advantage in terms of reducing the risk of cerebrovascular disease caused by migraine-like headaches and the use of triptans. The most effective management for migraine-like headaches in patients with SWS has not been established. Lamotrigine is a potentially effective option for patients with SWS with migraine-like headaches. PMID:23877022

  8. Noncardiac Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Schey, Ron; Villarreal, Autumn

    2007-01-01

    Noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) is very common, affecting up to 25% of the adult population in the United States. Treatment for NCCP has markedly evolved in the past decade and is presently focused on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and visceral hypersensitivity. Aggressive treatment with proton pump inhibitors has become the standard of care for GERD-related NCCP. Pain modulators such as tricyclics, trazodone, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are considered the mainstay of therapy for non-GERD-related NCCP Other therapeutic modalities such as botulinum toxin injections and hypnotherapy have demonstrated promise in small clinical trials. PMID:21960837

  9. Neuronal correlates in the modulation of placebo analgesia in experimentally-induced esophageal pain: a 3T-fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hsueh-Chieh; Hsieh, Jen-Chuen; Lu, Ching-Liang; Niddam, David M; Wu, Yu-Te; Yeh, Tzu-Chen; Cheng, Chou-Ming; Chang, Full-Young; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2010-01-01

    Visceral pain/discomfort is the cardinal complaints and treatment targets for functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID). However, effective treatment for such pain is limited and often associated with high placebo effects. The mechanisms of placebo effects in visceral pain are unclear. We used functional neuroimaging to study the central representations of the placebo effect and its anticipation during esophageal pain in healthy adults. Fourteen subjects were enrolled. Pain extent, psychophysical inventories [Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PAS), visual analogue scale (VAS) and short-form McGill questionnaire], and brain activity upon placebo intervention and upon anticipation were assessed in response to esophageal balloon distension. Large reductions of pain extent, VAS rating, short-form McGill questionnaire scores, and brain activity in the visceral pain matrix [thalamus, somatosensory cortices, insula, prefrontal cortex (PFC), anterior cingulate cortex] were observed upon placebo treatment. The aforementioned brain areas and the bilateral amygdala were significantly correlated with decreased pain extent and VAS in response to placebo. The ventral lateral PFC (VLPFC) was associated with increased activity during anticipation of visceral pain. PAS cannot predict the placebo effect in visceral pain. In conclusion, pronounced placebo analgesia was coupled with prominent changes of brain activity in visceral pain matrix, which are thus likely involved in high placebo efficacy during the treatment of visceral pain in FGID. VLPFC activation during the anticipation of placebo analgesia suggests top-down control in the modulation of pain experience. PMID:19962240

  10. Oblique metatarsal osteotomy for intractable plantar keratosis: 10-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Idusuyi, O B; Kitaoka, H B; Patzer, G L

    1998-06-01

    Twenty patients (14 women and 6 men) (23 feet) had a single oblique osteotomy operation of the 2nd, 3rd, or 4th metatarsal without fixation during an 8-year period. The mean age was 46 years (range, 21-64 years). Each patient had a painful intractable plantar keratosis preoperatively. The average follow-up was 10 years (range, 3-14 years). Postoperatively, reoperation was performed in four feet because of painful callosities. For 13 of the 19 feet that did not have reoperation, patients were limited in footwear or required a shoe insert. Overall results were good for 10 feet, fair for 7 feet, and poor for 6 feet. The only complication was a deep infection that occurred in one foot (good result). Nonunion occurred in one foot and delayed union in one. The average decrease in metatarsal length after osteotomy was 6+/-6 mm. The single oblique lesser metatarsal osteotomy may be successful, but one half of the patients continued to have some degree of pain and most patients had limitations in footwear. Overall results were disappointing, and patients who are offered this procedure should be advised of its limitations. PMID:9677076

  11. Pain management after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Cogan, Jennifer

    2010-09-01

    Pain levels after cardiac surgery are often severe and undertreated. The effects of undertreatment may be both severe and prolonged. The incidence of chronic pain after cardiac surgery varies between 21% and 55%. Pain syndromes that occur following cardiac surgery may be multiple and may be of visceral, musculoskeletal, or neurogenic origin. Risk factors for acute pain vary depending on the study but generally include younger age, longer duration of surgery, and the location of the surgery. Risk factors for chronic pain include depression and psychological vulnerability, both preoperative and postoperative. Other independent risk factors for chronic pain are more extensive surgery, surgery lasting longer than 3 hours, and ASA grade greater than III. Pain control is achieved with regular and systematic evaluation and the use of multimodal regimens. Treatment strategies that are commonly used include opioids, paracetamol, NSAIDS, and more recently anticonvulsants. PMID:20705642

  12. Role of histaminergic neurons in hypnotic modulation of brain processing of visceral perception.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, S; Hattori, T; Kanazawa, M; Kano, M; Fukudo, S

    2007-10-01

    Modulating visceral sensation of the body is important to the understanding of emotion formation. Molecules that act during hypnosis and modify visceral pain perception are not known. We tested our hypothesis that hypnotic suggestion changes electrophysiological processing of visceroafferent signals in the human brain and that these conditions are in part dependent on histaminergic neurons. Twelve healthy male subjects were studied on two separate days: a day of treatment with histamine H1 receptor antagonist (d-chlorpheniramine 100 microg kg(-1), intravenously) and another day of that with placebo (saline, the same amount) in a randomized order. We recorded cortical evoked potentials to 100 rectal electrical stimuli after neutral, hyperalgesic or analgesic hypnotic suggestions as given to modulate the visceral perception. Analgesic suggestion reduced the amplitude of the deepest positive peak of viscerosensory evoked potential. Administration of histamine H1 antagonist diminished the attenuation of viscerosensory evoked potential by analgesic suggestion. Our results suggest that central pain modulatory system in the brain is activated by hypnotic suggestion and that brain histamine is a mediator in the hypnotic modulation of visceral sensory pathway as well as in the control of consciousness level. These findings lead us to possible new treatment for control of visceral perception. PMID:17883434

  13. Visceral adiposopathy: a vascular perspective

    PubMed Central

    Farb, Melissa G.; Gokce, Noyan

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has emerged as one of the most critical health care problems globally that is associated with the development of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus, metabolic dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. Central adiposity with intra-abdominal deposition of visceral fat, in particular, has been closely linked to cardiometabolic consequences of obesity. Increasing epidemiological, clinical and experimental data suggest that both adipose tissue quantity and perturbations in its quality termed adiposopathy contribute to mechanisms of cardiometabolic disease. The current review discusses regional differences in adipose tissue characteristics and highlights profound abnormalities in vascular endothelial function and angiogenesis that are manifest within the visceral adipose tissue milieu of obese individuals. Clinical data demonstrate up-regulation of pro-inflammatory and pro-atherosclerotic mediators in dysfunctional adipose tissue that may support pathological vascular changes not only locally in fat but also in multiple organ systems, including coronary and peripheral circulations, potentially contributing to mechanisms of obesity-related cardiovascular disease. PMID:25781557

  14. Immunosuppression in Kenyan visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, M; Koech, D K; Iha, D W; Bryceson, A D

    1983-01-01

    Cell-mediated immune responses were evaluated in 15 patients with active visceral leishmaniasis from Masinga location in eastern Kenya where the disease is endemic. Age and sex matched controls were selected from a village school in the same area. In vivo studies were carried out by skin testing with leishmanin, tuberculin, streptococcal and candida antigens. Lymphocyte blastogenic transformation to the mitogens phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A) and the antigens purified protein derivative (PPD), streptokinase-streptodornase (SKSD) and leishmanial antigen (LA) was studied in vitro. The results showed that immunosuppression in visceral leishmaniasis in Kenya was both specific and non-specific. In the majority of patients there was complete anergy to all antigens in vivo and in vitro. The suppression of responses to mitogens was less marked. Recovery of non-specific responses preceded the development of specific immunity. In a small number of patients (23%) immune unresponsiveness to leishmanial antigens persisted 1 year after parasitological cure. PMID:6839538

  15. Diagnosis of human visceral pentastomiasis.

    PubMed

    Tappe, Dennis; Bttner, Dietrich W

    2009-01-01

    Visceral pentastomiasis in humans is caused by the larval stages (nymphs) of the arthropod-related tongue worms Linguatula serrata, Armillifer armillatus, A. moniliformis, A. grandis, and Porocephalus crotali. The majority of cases has been reported from Africa, Malaysia, and the Middle East, where visceral pentastomiasis may be an incidental finding in autopsies, and less often from China and Latin America. In Europe and North America, the disease is only rarely encountered in immigrants and long-term travelers, and the parasitic lesions may be confused with malignancies, leading to a delay in the correct diagnosis. Since clinical symptoms are variable and serological tests are not readily available, the diagnosis often relies on histopathological examinations. This laboratory symposium focuses on the diagnosis of this unusual parasitic disease and presents its risk factors and epidemiology. PMID:19238218

  16. Diagnosis of Human Visceral Pentastomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Tappe, Dennis; Bttner, Dietrich W.

    2009-01-01

    Visceral pentastomiasis in humans is caused by the larval stages (nymphs) of the arthropod-related tongue worms Linguatula serrata, Armillifer armillatus, A. moniliformis, A. grandis, and Porocephalus crotali. The majority of cases has been reported from Africa, Malaysia, and the Middle East, where visceral pentastomiasis may be an incidental finding in autopsies, and less often from China and Latin America. In Europe and North America, the disease is only rarely encountered in immigrants and long-term travelers, and the parasitic lesions may be confused with malignancies, leading to a delay in the correct diagnosis. Since clinical symptoms are variable and serological tests are not readily available, the diagnosis often relies on histopathological examinations. This laboratory symposium focuses on the diagnosis of this unusual parasitic disease and presents its risk factors and epidemiology. PMID:19238218

  17. Pain Assessment

    MedlinePLUS

    Introduction Types of Pain Pain Assessment Pain Treatments Integrative Pain Therapy Pain Management Recommendations References March 30, 2016 Pain Assessment Effective pain management begins with a comprehensive assessment. This ...

  18. P2X₇ receptor of rat dorsal root ganglia is involved in the effect of moxibustion on visceral hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuangmei; Shi, Qingming; Zhu, Qicheng; Zou, Ting; Li, Guilin; Huang, An; Wu, Bing; Peng, Lichao; Song, Miaomiao; Wu, Qin; Xie, Qiuyu; Lin, Weijian; Xie, Wei; Wen, Shiyao; Zhang, Zhedong; Lv, Qiulan; Zou, Lifang; Zhang, Xi; Ying, Mofeng; Li, Guodong; Liang, Shangdong

    2015-06-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease often display visceral hypersensitivity. Visceral nociceptors after inflammatory stimulation generate afferent nerve impulses through dorsal root ganglia (DRG) transmitting to the central nervous system. ATP and its activated-purinergic 2X7 (P2X7) receptor play an important role in the transmission of nociceptive signal. Purinergic signaling is involved in the sensory transmission of visceral pain. Moxibustion is a therapy applying ignited mugwort directly or indirectly at acupuncture points or other specific parts of the body to treat diseases. Heat-sensitive acupoints are the corresponding points extremely sensitive to moxa heat in disease conditions. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between the analgesic effect of moxibustion on a heat-sensitive acupoint "Dachangshu" and the expression levels of P2X7 receptor in rat DRG after chronic inflammatory stimulation of colorectal distension. Heat-sensitive moxibustion at Dachangshu acupoint inhibited the nociceptive signal transmission by decreasing the upregulated expression levels of P2X7 mRNA and protein in DRG induced by visceral pain, and reversed the abnormal expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, a marker of satellite glial cells) in DRG. Consequently, abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) score in a visceral pain model was reduced, and the pain threshold was elevated. Therefore, heat-sensitive moxibustion at Dachangshu acupoint can produce a therapeutic effect on IBS via inhibiting the nociceptive transmission mediated by upregulated P2X7 receptor. PMID:25527178

  19. Surgical repair of intractable chylous ascites following laparoscopic anterior resection

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Gi Won; Lee, Min Ro

    2015-01-01

    Chylous ascites is the accumulation of a milk-like peritoneal fluid rich in triglycerides and it is an unusual complication following surgical treatment of colorectal cancer. Conservative management is usually sufficient in patients with chylous ascites after surgery. However, we describe a patient with intractable chylous ascites after laparoscopic anterior resection for sigmoid colon cancer who failed initial conservative treatment. This patient was successfully managed by surgery. PMID:26019476

  20. Visceral hypersensitivity and electromechanical dysfunction as therapeutic targets in pediatric functional dyspepsia

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, John M; Cocjin, Jose T; Schurman, Jennifer V; Colombo, Jennifer M; Friesen, Craig A

    2014-01-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) are common clinical syndromes diagnosed in the absence of biochemical, structural, or metabolic abnormalities. They account for significant morbidity and health care expenditures and are identifiable across variable age, geography, and culture. Etiology of abdominal pain associated FGIDs, including functional dyspepsia (FD), remains incompletely understood, but growing evidence implicates the importance of visceral hypersensitivity and electromechanical dysfunction. This manuscript explores data supporting the role of visceral hypersensitivity and electromechanical dysfunction in FD, with focus on pediatric data when available, and provides a summary of potential therapeutic targets. PMID:25133041

  1. A late visceral hernia after diaphragmatic flap coverage of the bronchial stump.

    PubMed

    Ayalp, Kemal; Kaba, Erkan; Demirhan, zkan; zyurtkan, Mehmet O?uzhan; Toker, Alper

    2015-07-01

    A 54-year-old man presented with sudden and severe abdominal pain, and vomiting. He had underwent a right pneumonectomy with bronchial stump reinforcement using diaphragmatic muscle flap 9 years ago, due to non-small cell lung cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. A right partial visceral herniation had been detected 5 years ago during the follow-up which was not present at previous visits. He had refused any surgical intervention since he had been asymptomatic. The chest computed tomography demonstrated visceral herniation. The patient underwent an urgent operation via thoracoabdominal incision to repair the herniation. This type of late catastrophic complication of diaphragmatic muscle flap reinforcement is extremely rare. PMID:26380752

  2. A late visceral hernia after diaphragmatic flap coverage of the bronchial stump

    PubMed Central

    Kaba, Erkan; Demirhan, zkan; zyurtkan, Mehmet O?uzhan; Toker, Alper

    2015-01-01

    A 54-year-old man presented with sudden and severe abdominal pain, and vomiting. He had underwent a right pneumonectomy with bronchial stump reinforcement using diaphragmatic muscle flap 9 years ago, due to non-small cell lung cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. A right partial visceral herniation had been detected 5 years ago during the follow-up which was not present at previous visits. He had refused any surgical intervention since he had been asymptomatic. The chest computed tomography demonstrated visceral herniation. The patient underwent an urgent operation via thoracoabdominal incision to repair the herniation. This type of late catastrophic complication of diaphragmatic muscle flap reinforcement is extremely rare. PMID:26380752

  3. Chronic spinal cord stimulation in medically intractable orthostatic tremor

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, J K; Weigel, R; Blahak, C; Bzner, H; Capelle, H?H; Grips, E; Rittmann, M; Whrle, J C

    2006-01-01

    Background Orthostatic tremor with its sense of unsteadiness when standing may have a devastating effect on affected persons. Currently, there are no other treatment options in those who do not respond or who do not tolerate medical treatment. Objectives To report on a pilot study on spinal cord stimulation in medically intractable orthostatic tremor. Methods Chronic spinal cord stimulation (SCS) was performed in two patients with medically?intractable orthostatic tremor via quadripolar plate electrodes implanted at the lower thoracic spine. The electrodes were connected to implantable pulse generators. Results Subjective and objective improvement of unsteadiness was achieved within a frequency range of 50 to 150?Hz, and occurred in the presence of stimulation?induced paraesthesia. With optimized stimulation settings polygraphic electromyelogram (EMG) recordings continued to show the typical 1416?Hz EMG activity. The beneficial effect of SCS was maintained at long?term follow?up. Conclusions The results of this pilot study indicate that SCS may be an option in patients with otherwise intractable orthostatic tremor. PMID:16735398

  4. Role of surgical therapy in management of intractable ascites.

    PubMed

    Elcheroth, J; Vons, C; Franco, D

    1994-01-01

    Almost 10% of patients with cirrhosis and ascites develop intractable ascites. When large-volume paracentesis fails to relieve ascites, patients may be submitted to one of the three following surgical options: portosystemic shunting, peritoneovenous shunting, or liver transplantation. Portosystemic shunting is efficient in clearing ascites, but it is associated with a high rate of encephalopathy and liver failure. The indications for portosystemic shunting are therefore limited for treatment of intractable ascites and should be performed only in patients with good liver function in whom all other treatments failed. Peritoneovenous shunting has been associated with a high rate of early complications and valve obstruction. Improvements in perioperative care and in the material used have greatly reduced the operative risks and increased the patency rate. Mortality remains high in patients with severe liver failure or with a history of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis or variceal bleeding. Peritoneovenous shunting should not be done when these risk factors are present. In the absence of such risk factors, peritoneovenous shunting is a good procedure and may provide definitive relief of ascites and long-term survival in more than 50% of the operated patients. In patients with poor risk factors liver transplantation may be preferable, and the onset of intractable ascites in a patient with a severely compromised liver should trigger the indication of liver replacement. PMID:8042329

  5. The pathophysiology of acute pain.

    PubMed

    Fink, Walter Allen

    2005-05-01

    The method by which the body detects, interprets, and responds to painful stimulation is tantamount to an orchestral concert, with each individual instrument contributing a subtle yet important element composing the finished product. The polymodal peripheral receptors initiate unpleasant sensations that can be modulated in the dorsal horn and the anterior columns of the spinal cord before reaching the cerebral cortex. Despite similar neurological "wiring," pain sensations from the skin are not the same in character as those from visceral organs. A reaction of pain is based upon interpretation in specific cerebral centers and the resultant motor function. With the advent of functional MRI and PET scanners, the understanding of the cerebral interpretation of pain is expanding. Remember as well that emotional and psychological factors are crucial in pain perception, and are the starting points for any individual's perception of a painful circumstance. PMID:15829382

  6. Transient receptor potential cation channels in visceral sensory pathways

    PubMed Central

    Blackshaw, L Ashley

    2014-01-01

    The extensive literature on this subject is in direct contrast to the limited range of clinical uses for ligands of the transient receptor potential cation channels (TRPs) in diseases of the viscera. TRPV1 is the most spectacular example of this imbalance, as it is in other systems, but it is nonetheless the only TRP target that is currently targeted clinically in bladder sensory dysfunction. It is not clear why this discrepancy exists, but a likely answer is in the promiscuity of TRPs as sensors and transducers for environmental mechanical and chemical stimuli. This review first describes the different sensory pathways from the viscera, and on which nociceptive and non-nociceptive neurones within these pathways TRPs are expressed. They not only fulfil roles as both mechano-and chemo-sensors on visceral afferents, but also form an effector mechanism for cell activation after activation of GPCR and cytokine receptors. Their role may be markedly changed in diseased states, including chronic pain and inflammation. Pain presents the most obvious potential for further development of therapeutic interventions targeted at TRPs, but forms of inflammation are emerging as likely to benefit also. However, despite much basic research, we are still at the beginning of exploring such potential in visceral sensory pathways. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on the pharmacology of TRP channels. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-10 PMID:24641218

  7. Hippocampal microglial activation and glucocorticoid receptor down-regulation precipitate visceral hypersensitivity induced by colorectal distension in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gongliang; Zhao, Bing-Xue; Hua, Rong; Kang, Jie; Shao, Bo-Ming; Carbonaro, Theresa M; Zhang, Yong-Mei

    2016-03-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity is a common characteristic in patients suffering from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and other disorders with visceral pain. Although the pathogenesis of visceral hypersensitivity remains speculative due to the absence of pathological changes, the long-lasting sensitization in neuronal circuitry induced by early life stress may play a critical role beyond the digestive system even after complete resolution of the initiating event. The hippocampus integrates multiple sources of afferent inputs and sculpts integrated autonomic outputs for pain and analgesia regulation. Here, we examined the hippocampal mechanism in the pathogenesis of visceral hypersensitivity with a rat model induced by neonatal and adult colorectal distensions (CRDs). Neither neonatal nor adult CRD evoked behavioral abnormalities in adulthood; however, adult re-exposure to CRD induced persistent visceral hypersensitivity, depression-like behaviors, and spatial learning impairment in rats that experienced neonatal CRD. Rats that experienced neonatal and adult CRDs presented a decrease in hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor (GR) immunofluorescence staining and protein expression, and increases in hippocampal microglial activation and cytokine (IL-1β and TNF-α) accumulation. The decrease in hippocampal GR expression and increase in hippocampal IL-1β and TNF-α accumulation could be prevented by hippocampal local infusion of minocycline, a microglial inhibitor. These results suggest that neonatal CRD can increase the vulnerability of hippocampal microglia, and adult CRD challenge facilitates the hippocampal cytokine release from the sensitized microglia, which down-regulates hippocampal GR protein expression and, subsequently, precipitates visceral hypersensitivity. PMID:26656865

  8. Early-life stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity and anxiety behavior is reversed by histone deacetylase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Moloney, R D; Stilling, R M; Dinan, T G; Cryan, J F

    2015-12-01

    Stressful life events, especially in childhood, can have detrimental effects on health and are associated with a host of psychiatric and gastrointestinal disorders including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Early-life stress can be recapitulated in animals using the maternal separation (MS) model, exhibiting many key phenotypic outcomes including visceral hypersensitivity and anxiety-like behaviors. The molecular mechanisms of MS are unclear, but recent studies point to a role for epigenetics. Histone acetylation is a key epigenetic mark that is altered in numerous stress-related disease states. Here, we investigated the role of histone acetylation in early-life stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity. Interestingly, increased number of pain behaviors and reduced threshold of visceral sensation were associated with alterations in histone acetylation in the lumbosacral spinal cord, a key region in visceral pain processing. Moreover, we also investigated whether the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), could reverse early-life stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity and stress-induced fecal pellet output in the MS model. Significantly, SAHA reversed both of these parameters. Taken together, these data describe, for the first time, a key role of histone acetylation in the pathophysiology of early-life stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity in a well-established model of IBS. These findings will inform new research aimed at the development of novel pharmaceutical approaches targeting the epigenetic machinery for novel anti-IBS drugs. PMID:26403543

  9. Visceral hyperalgesia induced by forebrain-specific suppression of native Kv7/KCNQ/M-current in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dysfunction of brain-gut interaction is thought to underlie visceral hypersensitivity which causes unexplained abdominal pain syndromes. However, the mechanism by which alteration of brain function in the brain-gut axis influences the perception of visceral pain remains largely elusive. In this study we investigated whether altered brain activity can generate visceral hyperalgesia. Results Using a forebrain specific ?CaMKII promoter, we established a line of transgenic (Tg) mice expressing a dominant-negative pore mutant of the Kv7.2/KCNQ2 channel which suppresses native KCNQ/M-current and enhances forebrain neuronal excitability. Brain slice recording of hippocampal pyramidal neurons from these Tg mice confirmed the presence of hyperexcitable properties with increased firing. Behavioral evaluation of Tg mice exhibited increased sensitivity to visceral pain induced by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of either acetic acid or magnesium sulfate, and intracolon capsaicin stimulation, but not cutaneous sensation for thermal or inflammatory pain. Immunohistological staining showed increased c-Fos expression in the somatosensory SII cortex and insular cortex of Tg mice that were injected intraperitoneally with acetic acid. To mimic the effect of cortical hyperexcitability on visceral hyperalgesia, we injected KCNQ/M channel blocker XE991 into the lateral ventricle of wild type (WT) mice. Intracerebroventricular injection of XE991 resulted in increased writhes of WT mice induced by acetic acid, and this effect was reversed by co-injection of the channel opener retigabine. Conclusions Our findings provide evidence that forebrain hyperexcitability confers visceral hyperalgesia, and suppression of central hyperexcitability by activation of KCNQ/M-channel function may provide a therapeutic potential for treatment of abdominal pain syndromes. PMID:22029713

  10. Progress in the treatment of a neglected infectious disease: visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Murray, Henry W

    2004-04-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (kala-azar) is a disseminated intracellular protozoal infection. Most cases (90%) occur in the rural regions of five countries: India, Sudan, Nepal, Bangladesh and Brazil. As with other infectious diseases embedded in high-level poverty, developing and/or delivering new treatments for visceral leishmaniasis had been painfully slow or nonexistent. However, despite persistent unresolved obstacles (e.g., drug affordability), renewed interest in visceral leishmaniasis and numerous successful treatment trials have combined to turn a therapeutic corner in the past 5 years, yielding new alternatives to conventional pentavalent antimony. Advances include the use of low-cost generic pentavalent antimony, rediscovery of amphotericin B, short-course regimens via lipid formulations of amphotericin B, retesting injectible paromyomycin and, of clear-cut importance, identifying miltefosine (Impavido, Zentaris) as the first effective oral therapy for this neglected disease. PMID:15482193

  11. Evidence-based Clinical Practice Guidelines for Interventional Pain Management in Cancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Sushma; Gupta, Maynak

    2015-01-01

    Intractable cancer pain not amenable to standard oral or parenteral analgesics is a horrifying truth in 10–15% of patients. Interventional pain management techniques are an indispensable arsenal in pain physician's armamentarium for severe, intractable pain and can be broadly classified into neuroablative and neuromodulation techniques. An array of neurolytic techniques (chemical, thermal, or surgical) can be employed for ablation of individual nerve fibers, plexuses, or intrathecalneurolysis in patients with resistant pain and short life-expectancy. Neuraxial administration of drugs and spinal cord stimulation to modulate or alter the pain perception constitutes the most frequently employed neuromodulation techniques. Lately, there is a rising call for early introduction of interventional techniques in carefully selected patients simultaneously or even before starting strong opioids. After decades of empirical use, it is the need of the hour to head towards professionalism and standardization in order to secure credibility of specialization and those practicing it. Even though the interventional management has found a definite place in cancer pain, there is a dearth of evidence-based practice guidelines for interventional therapies in cancer pain. This may be because of paucity of good quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating their safety and efficacy in cancer pain. Laying standardized guidelines based on existing and emerging evidence will act as a foundation step towards strengthening, credentialing, and dissemination of the specialty of interventional cancer pain management. This will also ensure an improved decision-making and quality of life (QoL) of the suffering patients. PMID:26009665

  12. Fos expression in spinothalamic and postsynaptic dorsal column neurons following noxious visceral and cutaneous stimuli.

    PubMed

    Palecek, J; Paleckova, V; Willis, W D

    2003-07-01

    The spinothalamic tract (STT) has been classically viewed as the major ascending pathway for pain transmission while the dorsal column (DC) was thought to be involved primarily in signaling innocuous stimuli. Recent clinical studies have shown that limited midline myelotomy, which transects fibers in the DC, offers good pain relief in patients with visceral cancer pain. Experimental studies provided evidence that a DC lesion decreases the activation of thalamic neurons by visceral stimuli and suggested that this effect is due to transection of the axons of postsynaptic dorsal column (PSDC) neurons. In our study, Fos protein expression in retrogradely labeled STT and PSDC neurons in the lumbosacral enlargement in rats was used as an anatomical marker of enhanced activation to compare the role of these neurons in cutaneous and visceral pain. The noxious stimuli used were intradermal injection of capsaicin and distention of the ureter. Retrogradely labeled PSDC neurons were found in laminae III-IV and in the vicinity of the central canal. STT neurons were located in laminae I, III-VII and X. Ureter distention evoked Fos expression in PSDC and STT neurons located in all laminae in which retrogradely labeled cells were found, with the maximum in the L(2) spinal segment. The Fos-positive PSDC neurons represented a significantly higher percentage of the retrogradely labeled PSDC neurons (19.3+/-2.3% SEM) than of the STT Fos-positive neurons (13.2+/-1.5% SEM). Intradermal capsaicin injection also evoked Fos expression in both PSDC and STT neurons, but with no significant difference between these two, when expressed as a percentage of the retrogradely labeled cells (11.6+/-2.9% SEM, 10.8+/-1.1% SEM). These results show that both PSDC and STT neurons are activated by cutaneous and visceral noxious stimuli. Their particular role in transmission and modulation of painful stimuli needs to be investigated further. PMID:12855335

  13. Brain networks underlying perceptual habituation to repeated aversive visceral stimuli in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Labus, Jennifer S; Naliboff, Bruce D; Berman, Steve M; Suyenobu, Brandall; Vianna, Eduardo P; Tillisch, Kirsten; Mayer, Emeran A

    2009-09-01

    Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) show decreased discomfort and pain thresholds to visceral stimuli, as well hypervigilance to gastrointestinal sensations, symptoms, and the context in which these visceral sensations and symptoms occur. Previous research demonstrated normalization of visceral hypersensitivity following repeated exposure to experimental rectal stimuli over a 12-month period that was associated with reduction in cortical regions functionally associated with attention and arousal. Building upon these functional analyses, multivariate functional and effective connectivity analyses were applied to [(15)O] water positron emission tomography (PET) data from 12 IBS patients (male=4) participating in a PET study before and after 4 visceral sensory testing sessions involving rectal balloon distensions over a 1-year period. First, behavioral partial least squares was applied to test for networks related to reduced subjective ratings observed following repeated application of an aversive rectal stimulus. Next, path analysis within a structural equation modeling framework tested the hypothesis that perceptual habituation to the repeated visceral stimuli resulted in part from the reduced connectivity within a selective attention to threat network over time. Two independent, perception-related networks comprised of interoceptive, attentional and arousal regions were engaged differentially during expectation and distension. In addition, changes in the effective connectivity of an attentional network as well as modulatory amygdala influence suggested that perceptual habituation associated with repeated stimulus delivery results both in an increase in top-down modulation of attentional circuits, as well as in a reduction of amygdala-related interference with attentional mechanisms. PMID:19501173

  14. Strain-dependent variations in visceral sensitivity: relationship to stress, anxiety and spinal glutamate transporter expression.

    PubMed

    Moloney, R D; Dinan, T G; Cryan, J F

    2015-04-01

    Responses to painful stimuli differ between populations, ethnic groups, sexes and even among individuals of a family. However, data regarding visceral pain are still lacking. Thus, we investigated differences in visceral nociception across inbred and outbred mouse strains using colorectal distension. Anxiety and depression-like behaviour were assessed using the open field and forced swim test as well as the corticosterone stress response. Possible mechanistic targets [excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT-1), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and 5HT1A receptor] were also assessed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Adult, male, inbred and outbred mouse strains were used in all assays (inbred strains; CBA/J Hsd, C3H/HeNHsd, BALB/c OlaHsd, C57 BL/6JOlaHsd, DBA/2J RccHsd, CAST/EiJ, SM/J, A/J OlaHsd, 129P2/OlaHsd, FVB/NHan Hsd and outbred strains: Swiss Webster, CD-1). mRNA expression levels of EAAT-1, BDNF and 5HT1A receptor (HTR1A) were quantified in the lumbosacral spinal cord, amygdala and hippocampus. A significant effect of strain was found in visceral sensitivity, anxiety and depressive-like behaviours. Strain differences were also seen in both baseline and stress-induced corticosterone levels. CBA/J mice consistently exhibited heightened visceral sensitivity, anxiety behaviour and depression-like behaviour which were associated with decreased spinal EAAT-1 and hippocampal BDNF and HTR1A. Our results show the CBA/J mouse strain as a novel mouse model to unravel the complex mechanisms of brain-gut axis disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome, in particular the underlying mechanisms of visceral hypersensitivity, for which there is great need. Furthermore, this study highlights the importance of genotype and the consequences for future development of transgenic strains in pain research. PMID:25851919

  15. Brainstem facilitations and descending serotonergic controls contribute to visceral nociception but not pregabalin analgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Sikandar, Shafaq; Bannister, Kirsty; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2012-06-21

    Pro-nociceptive ON-cells in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) facilitate nociceptive processing and contribute to descending serotonergic controls. We use RVM injections of neurotoxic dermorphin-saporin (Derm-SAP) in rats to evaluate the role of putative ON-cells, or μ-opioid receptor-expressing (MOR) neurones, in visceral pain processing. Our immunohistochemistry shows that intra-RVM Derm-SAP locally ablates a substantial proportion of MOR and serotonergic cells. Given the co-localization of these neuronal markers, some RVM ON-cells are serotonergic. We measure visceromotor responses in the colorectal distension (CRD) model in control and Derm-SAP rats, and using the 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist ondansetron, we demonstrate pro-nociceptive serotonergic modulation of visceral nociception and a facilitatory drive from RVM MOR cells. The α(2)δ calcium channel ligand pregabalin produces state-dependent analgesia in neuropathy and osteoarthritis models relating to injury-specific interactions with serotonergic facilitations from RVM MOR cells. Although RVM MOR cells mediate noxious mechanical visceral input, we show that their presence is not a permissive factor for pregabalin analgesia in acute visceral pain. PMID:22579856

  16. Motive attribution asymmetry for love vs. hate drives intractable conflict.

    PubMed

    Waytz, Adam; Young, Liane L; Ginges, Jeremy

    2014-11-01

    Five studies across cultures involving 661 American Democrats and Republicans, 995 Israelis, and 1,266 Palestinians provide previously unidentified evidence of a fundamental bias, what we term the "motive attribution asymmetry," driving seemingly intractable human conflict. These studies show that in political and ethnoreligious intergroup conflict, adversaries tend to attribute their own group's aggression to ingroup love more than outgroup hate and to attribute their outgroup's aggression to outgroup hate more than ingroup love. Study 1 demonstrates that American Democrats and Republicans attribute their own party's involvement in conflict to ingroup love more than outgroup hate but attribute the opposing party's involvement to outgroup hate more than ingroup love. Studies 2 and 3 demonstrate this biased attributional pattern for Israelis and Palestinians evaluating their own group and the opposing group's involvement in the current regional conflict. Study 4 demonstrates in an Israeli population that this bias increases beliefs and intentions associated with conflict intractability toward Palestinians. Finally, study 5 demonstrates, in the context of American political conflict, that offering Democrats and Republicans financial incentives for accuracy in evaluating the opposing party can mitigate this bias and its consequences. Although people find it difficult to explain their adversaries' actions in terms of love and affiliation, we suggest that recognizing this attributional bias and how to reduce it can contribute to reducing human conflict on a global scale. PMID:25331879

  17. Motive attribution asymmetry for love vs. hate drives intractable conflict

    PubMed Central

    Waytz, Adam; Young, Liane L.; Ginges, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Five studies across cultures involving 661 American Democrats and Republicans, 995 Israelis, and 1,266 Palestinians provide previously unidentified evidence of a fundamental bias, what we term the motive attribution asymmetry, driving seemingly intractable human conflict. These studies show that in political and ethnoreligious intergroup conflict, adversaries tend to attribute their own groups aggression to ingroup love more than outgroup hate and to attribute their outgroups aggression to outgroup hate more than ingroup love. Study 1 demonstrates that American Democrats and Republicans attribute their own partys involvement in conflict to ingroup love more than outgroup hate but attribute the opposing partys involvement to outgroup hate more than ingroup love. Studies 2 and 3 demonstrate this biased attributional pattern for Israelis and Palestinians evaluating their own group and the opposing groups involvement in the current regional conflict. Study 4 demonstrates in an Israeli population that this bias increases beliefs and intentions associated with conflict intractability toward Palestinians. Finally, study 5 demonstrates, in the context of American political conflict, that offering Democrats and Republicans financial incentives for accuracy in evaluating the opposing party can mitigate this bias and its consequences. Although people find it difficult to explain their adversaries actions in terms of love and affiliation, we suggest that recognizing this attributional bias and how to reduce it can contribute to reducing human conflict on a global scale. PMID:25331879

  18. Can end of life care for the pediatric patient suffering with escalating and intractable symptoms be improved?

    PubMed

    Houlahan, Kathleen E; Branowicki, Patricia A; Mack, Jennifer W; Dinning, Constance; McCabe, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    Over twelve thousand children are diagnosed each year with cancer, and approximately 2200 children die each year from the disease. A percentage of these patients experiences escalating and intractable distress with symptoms that include pain, dyspnea, and agitation. These symptoms may continue for hours to days. Intractable symptoms of pain, agitation, and dyspnea can be very distressing to the patient, family, and staff and often a challenge for the physicians and nursing staff to treat. To meet this challenge, The Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Children's Hospital Cancer Care Program has made it a priority to create a process of care that includes identifying barriers to care and the development of an end-of-life (EOL) rapid response model that includes guidelines and physician-templated orders for rapid escalation of opioids. The goal of this quality-improvement initiative was to develop a model of care that would enable the caregivers to provide effective comfort care to any patient experiencing symptoms of rapid escalation of pain, dyspnea, and agitation. A model of care was created to overcome barriers to care. The model includes role clarification, "Guidelines for the Management of Escalating Pain/Dyspnea/Agitation at the End of Life," and "Rapid Titration-Templated Physician Orders." Staff feedback was solicited relative to the content, format, and usability of the guidelines and templated orders. The physician and nursing staff reported that they found the templated orders and guidelines very helpful and effective and suggested only a few edits. A retrospective chart review is currently under way. The purpose of this chart review is to systematically document and compare the record of management of rapidly escalating symptoms of pain and/or dyspnea and/or agitation prior to and after instituting the EOL Rapid Response Model of Care. Care of the EOL patient experiencing symptoms of pain, dyspnea, and agitation is challenging. The EOL Rapid Response Model of Care outlines a process of care and provides recommendations and templated physician orders for rapid titration of opioids. PMID:16689405

  19. Groin pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain - groin; Lower abdominal pain; Genital pain; Perineal pain ... Common causes of groin pain include: Pulled muscle, tendon, or ligaments in the leg. This problem often occurs in people who play sports such as ...

  20. [Visceral leishmaniasis: a possible diagnosis in Belgium].

    PubMed

    Desmyttere, S; Hachimi-Idrissi, S; Otten, J

    1993-10-01

    A 22-months old girl contracted visceral leishmaniasis during a vacation in Portugal, 12 months prior the manifestation of disease. She presented with fever, hepatosplenomegaly and pancytopenia. A serological test proved the diagnosis. Therapy with a pentavalent antimony drug brought about immediate improvement. Visceral leishmaniasis has to be suspected in individuals with fever, hepatosplenomegaly and pancytopenia who have resided in endemic areas (Mediterranean countries, India, East Africa, South America) during the previous years. If untreated, visceral leishmaniasis runs a fatal course. Therefore, early diagnosis by morphological and serological means and specific therapy with pentavalent antimony drugs are mandatory. PMID:8266313

  1. Inguinoscrotal pain resistant to conventional treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anuj; Agarwal, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Inguinoscrotal pain (ISP) is a common complaint that affects almost all age groups. The etiology may be vascular, neurogenic, visceral, muscular or psychological. Most causes of ISP are benign, but Pott's spine as a cause of ISP, when missed, may lead to serious outcomes. PMID:25624580

  2. Modulation of human visceral sensitivity by noninvasive magnetoelectrical neural stimulation in health and irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Algladi, Tarig; Harris, Mary; Whorwell, Peter J; Paine, Peter; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2015-07-01

    Visceral pain is a particularly difficult symptom to manage in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Our aim was to examine whether noninvasive neurostimulation applied to the motor cortex or lumbosacral region can modulate human visceral sensation. Sixteen healthy adult volunteers and 10 patients with IBS were evaluated. Single-pulse lumbosacral magnetic stimulation (LSMS) or transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to assess spinal root and cortical excitability as well as the effect of neurostimulation on anorectal sensation and pain, which were provoked by a local electrical stimulus. Initially, healthy volunteers received 6 stimulation paradigms in a randomised order (3 repetitive LSMS [1 Hz, 10 Hz, and sham]) and 3 repetitive TMS (1 Hz, 10 Hz, and sham) to investigate the effects on neural function and visceral sensation over 1 hour. The most effective cortical and spinal interventions were then applied in patients with IBS. Only 1-Hz rLSMS altered healthy anal motor excitability, increasing spinal (58 12.3 vs 38.5 5.7 ?V, P = 0.04) but not cortical responses. Both 1-Hz rLSMS and 10-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation increased healthy rectal pain thresholds for up to an hour after intervention (P < 0.05). When applied to patients with IBS, rectal pain thresholds were increased across all time points after both 1-Hz rLSMS and 10-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (P < 0.05) compared with sham. The application of magnetoelectric stimuli to the cortical and lumbosacral areas modulates visceral sensation in healthy subjects and patients with IBS. This proof-of-concept study provides supportive evidence for neurostimulation in managing functional gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:25867123

  3. Sex Differences in Functional Brain Activation during Noxious Visceral Stimulation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bradesi, Sylvie; Labus, Jennifer S.; Maarek, Jean-Michel I.; Lee, Kevin; Winchester, Wendy J.; Mayer, Emeran A.; Holschneider, Daniel P.

    2009-01-01

    Studies in healthy human subjects and patients with irritable bowel syndrome suggest sex differences in cerebral nociceptive processing. Here we examine sex differences in functional brain activation in the rat during colorectal distention (CRD), a preclinical model of acute visceral pain. [14C]-iodoantipyrine was injected intravenously in awake, nonrestrained female rats during 60-mmHg or 0-mmHg CRD while electromyographic abdominal activity (EMG) and pain behavior were recorded. Regional cerebral blood flow related tissue radioactivity was analyzed by statistical parametric mapping from autoradiographic images of 3-dimensionally reconstructed brains. Sex differences were addressed by comparing current data with our previously published data collected from male rats. While sex differences in EMG and pain scores were modest, significant differences were noted in functional brain activation. Females showed widespread changes in limbic (amygdala, hypothalamus) and paralimbic structures (ventral striatum, nucleus accumbens, raphe), while males demonstrated broad cortical changes. Sex differences were apparent in the homeostatic afferent network (parabrachial nucleus, thalamus, insular and dorsal anterior cingulate cortices), in an emotional-arousal network (amygdala, locus coeruleus complex), and in cortical areas modulating these networks (prefrontal cortex). Greater activation of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and broader limbic/paralimbic changes in females suggest greater engagement of affective mechanisms during visceral pain. Greater cortical activation in males is consistent with the concept of greater cortical inhibitory effects on limbic structures in males, which may relate to differences in attentional and cognitive attribution to visceral stimuli. These findings show remarkable similarities to reported sex differences in brain responses to visceral stimuli in humans. PMID:19560270

  4. Corticotrophin-releasing factor 1 activation in the central amygdale and visceral hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    TACHÉ, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-CRF1 receptor in the brain plays a key role in stress-related alterations of behavior including anxiety/depression, and autonomic and visceral functions. In particular, CRF1 signaling mediates hypersensitivity to colorectal distension (CRD) in various models (early life adverse events, repeated psychological stress, chronic high anxiety, postcolonic inflammation, or repeated nociceptive CRD). So far, knowledge of brain sites involved is limited. A recent article demonstrates in rats that CRF microinjected into the central amygdala (CeA) induces a hyperalgesic response to CRD and enhances the noradrenaline and dopamine levels at this site. The visceral and noradrenaline, unlike dopamine, responses were blocked by a CRF1 antagonist injected into the CeA. Here, we review the emerging role that CRF-CRF1 signaling plays in the CeA to induce visceral hypersensitivity. In the somatic pain field, CRF in the CeA was shown to induce pain sensitization. This is mediated by the activation of postsynaptic CRF1 receptors and protein kinase A signaling that increases N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor neurotransmission. In addition, the activation of tetraethylamonium-sensitive ion channels such as Kv3 accelerates repolarization and firing rate. Whether facilitation of pain transmission underlies CRF action in the CeA-induced visceral hypersensitivity will need to be delineated. CRF1 signaling in the CeA is also an important component of the neuronal circuitry inducing anxiety-like behavior and positioned at the interphase of the reciprocal relationship between pain and affective state. The hyperactivity of this system may represent the neuroanatomical and biochemical substrate contributing to the coexpression of hypersensitivity to CRD and mood disorders in subsets of irritable bowel syndrome patients. PMID:25557223

  5. Occipital nerve stimulation for the treatment of intractable chronic migraine headache: ONSTIM feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Saper, Joel R; Dodick, David W; Silberstein, Stephen D; McCarville, Sally; Sun, Mark; Goadsby, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Medically intractable chronic migraine (CM) is a disabling illness characterized by headache ?15 days per month. Methods: A multicenter, randomized, blinded, controlled feasibility study was conducted to obtain preliminary safety and efficacy data on occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) in CM. Eligible subjects received an occipital nerve block, and responders were randomized to adjustable stimulation (AS), preset stimulation (PS) or medical management (MM) groups. Results: Seventy-five of 110 subjects were assigned to a treatment group; complete diary data were available for 66. A responder was defined as a subject who achieved a 50% or greater reduction in number of headache days per month or a three-point or greater reduction in average overall pain intensity compared with baseline. Three-month responder rates were 39% for AS, 6% for PS and 0% for MM. No unanticipated adverse device events occurred. Lead migration occurred in 12 of 51 (24%) subjects. Conclusion: The results of this feasibility study offer promise and should prompt further controlled studies of ONS in CM. PMID:20861241

  6. Biomarkers for visceral hypersensitivity identified by classification of electroencephalographic frequency alterations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graversen, Carina; Brock, Christina; Mohr Drewes, Asbjrn; Farina, Dario

    2011-10-01

    Abdominal pain is frequently related to visceral hypersensitivity. This is associated with increased neuronal excitability in the central nervous system (CNS), which can be manifested as discrete electroencephalographic (EEG) alterations. In the current placebo-controlled study, visceral hypersensitivity was evoked by chemical irritation of the esophagus with acid and capsaicin perfusion. The resulting hyperexcitability of the CNS was evaluated by evoked brain potentials following painful electrical stimulations of a remote organthe rectosigmoid colon. Alterations in individual EEG power distributions between baseline and after perfusion were quantified by extracting features from the evoked brain potentials using an optimized discrete wavelet transform. Visceral hypersensitivity was identified as increased EEG power in the delta, theta and alpha frequency bands. By applying a support vector machine in regression mode, the individual baseline corrected alterations after sensitization were discriminated from alterations caused by placebo perfusions. An accuracy of 91.7% was obtained (P < 0.01). The regression value representing the overall alteration of the EEG correlated with the degree of hyperalgesia (P = 0.03). In conclusion, this study showed that classification of EEG can be used to detect biomarkers reflecting central neuronal changes. In the future, this may be used in studies of pain physiology and pharmacological interventions.

  7. Systematic mechanism-orientated approach to chronic pancreatitis pain.

    PubMed

    Bouwense, Stefan A W; de Vries, Marjan; Schreuder, Luuk T W; Olesen, Søren S; Frøkjær, Jens B; Drewes, Asbjørn M; van Goor, Harry; Wilder-Smith, Oliver H G

    2015-01-01

    Pain in chronic pancreatitis (CP) shows similarities with other visceral pain syndromes (i.e., inflammatory bowel disease and esophagitis), which should thus be managed in a similar fashion. Typical causes of CP pain include increased intrapancreatic pressure, pancreatic inflammation and pancreatic/extrapancreatic complications. Unfortunately, CP pain continues to be a major clinical challenge. It is recognized that ongoing pain may induce altered central pain processing, e.g., central sensitization or pro-nociceptive pain modulation. When this is present conventional pain treatment targeting the nociceptive focus, e.g., opioid analgesia or surgical/endoscopic intervention, often fails even if technically successful. If central nervous system pain processing is altered, specific treatment targeting these changes should be instituted (e.g., gabapentinoids, ketamine or tricyclic antidepressants). Suitable tools are now available to make altered central processing visible, including quantitative sensory testing, electroencephalograpy and (functional) magnetic resonance imaging. These techniques are potentially clinically useful diagnostic tools to analyze central pain processing and thus define optimum management approaches for pain in CP and other visceral pain syndromes. The present review proposes a systematic mechanism-orientated approach to pain management in CP based on a holistic view of the mechanisms involved. Future research should address the circumstances under which central nervous system pain processing changes in CP, and how this is influenced by ongoing nociceptive input and therapies. Thus we hope to predict which patients are at risk for developing chronic pain or not responding to therapy, leading to improved treatment of chronic pain in CP and other visceral pain disorders. PMID:25574079

  8. Systematic mechanism-orientated approach to chronic pancreatitis pain

    PubMed Central

    Bouwense, Stefan AW; de Vries, Marjan; Schreuder, Luuk TW; Olesen, Sren S; Frkjr, Jens B; Drewes, Asbjrn M; van Goor, Harry; Wilder-Smith, Oliver HG

    2015-01-01

    Pain in chronic pancreatitis (CP) shows similarities with other visceral pain syndromes (i.e., inflammatory bowel disease and esophagitis), which should thus be managed in a similar fashion. Typical causes of CP pain include increased intrapancreatic pressure, pancreatic inflammation and pancreatic/extrapancreatic complications. Unfortunately, CP pain continues to be a major clinical challenge. It is recognized that ongoing pain may induce altered central pain processing, e.g., central sensitization or pro-nociceptive pain modulation. When this is present conventional pain treatment targeting the nociceptive focus, e.g., opioid analgesia or surgical/endoscopic intervention, often fails even if technically successful. If central nervous system pain processing is altered, specific treatment targeting these changes should be instituted (e.g., gabapentinoids, ketamine or tricyclic antidepressants). Suitable tools are now available to make altered central processing visible, including quantitative sensory testing, electroencephalograpy and (functional) magnetic resonance imaging. These techniques are potentially clinically useful diagnostic tools to analyze central pain processing and thus define optimum management approaches for pain in CP and other visceral pain syndromes. The present review proposes a systematic mechanism-orientated approach to pain management in CP based on a holistic view of the mechanisms involved. Future research should address the circumstances under which central nervous system pain processing changes in CP, and how this is influenced by ongoing nociceptive input and therapies. Thus we hope to predict which patients are at risk for developing chronic pain or not responding to therapy, leading to improved treatment of chronic pain in CP and other visceral pain disorders. PMID:25574079

  9. Visceral larva migrans caused by Trichuris vulpis.

    PubMed Central

    Sakano, T; Hamamoto, K; Kobayashi, Y; Sakata, Y; Tsuji, M; Usui, T

    1980-01-01

    Two brothers with visceral larva migrans caused by Trichuris vulpis were diagnosed after they had been investigated for an eosinophilia. Both patients were almost asymptomatic. The diagnosis of visceral larva migrans was based on the results of immunoelectrophoretic studies and no liver biopsy was performed. After administration of thiabendazole, the number of eosinophils and serum total IgE levels gradually decreased, and the patients have remained well. PMID:7436519

  10. Intractable epilepsy and the P-glycoprotein hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Xin; Wang, Da-Wei; Liu, Yong; Ma, Yan-Hui

    2016-05-01

    Epilepsy is a serious neurological disorder that affects more than 60 million people worldwide. Intractable epilepsy (IE) refers to approximately 20%-30% of epileptic patients who fail to achieve seizure control with antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment. Although the mechanisms underlying IE are not well understood, it has been hypothesized that multidrug transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) play a major role in drug efflux at the blood-brain barrier, and may be the underlying factor in the variable responses of patients to AEDs. The main goal of the present review is to show evidence from different areas that support the idea that the overexpression of P-gp is associated with IE. We discuss here evidence from animal studies, pharmacology, clinical cases and genetic studies. PMID:26000919

  11. Surgical outcomes for intractable epilepsy in children with epileptic spasms.

    PubMed

    Moseley, Brian D; Nickels, Katherine; Wirrell, Elaine C

    2012-06-01

    Epileptic spasms, or seizures marked by flexor, extensor, or flexor-extensor spasms, are not always responsive to medical management. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the outcome of epilepsy surgery in children with medically intractable epileptic spasms. We identified 11 children with epileptic spasms who underwent lesionectomy (36%), lobectomy (27%), multi-lobectomy (9%), hemispherectomy (18%), or corpus callosotomy (9%). At the time of surgery, 6 children had developed other concurrent seizure type(s), including simple partial (9%), complex partial (27%), partial undifferentiated (9%), primary generalized tonic clonic (9%), tonic (9%), atonic (27%), and myoclonic (9%) seizures. Six children (55%) were seizure free at last follow-up from initial surgery. Predictors of favorable outcome included lack of focal slowing and the presence of less than 2 interictal epileptiform abnormalities on postoperative electroencephalogram (P = .035 and .035, respectively). Favorable outcome was significantly associated with parent/caregiver report of improved postoperative developmental outcomes (P = .026). PMID:22123426

  12. [Estimated numbers of patients with intractable respiratory diseases].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, S; Tatsumi, K; Osamu, O; Tanabe, N; Kimura, H; Kuriyama, T; Tamakoshi, A; Kawamura, T; Ohno, Y

    1998-12-01

    To estimate the number of patients with intractable respiratory diseases, we conducted a two-stage nationwide epidemiological survey in 1997. The first survey was performed at randomly sampled hospitals to identify the number of patients treated. The second survey sought detailed clinico-epidemiological data on the patients reported in the first survey. The response rates were 54% for the first survey and 62% for the second. Based on the survey findings, we derived the following nationwide estimates: 450 patients (95% confidence interval: 360-530) with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension; 230 (200-260) with primary pulmonary hypertension; 180 (150-210) with obesity-associated hypoventilation syndrome; 40 (30-50) with primary alveolar hypoventilation syndrome; 160 (140-180) with histiocytosis X; and 190 (150-230) with juvenile pulmonary emphysema. PMID:10064952

  13. Peace Education in Societies Involved in Intractable Conflicts: Direct and Indirect Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bar-Tal, Daniel; Rosen, Yigal

    2009-01-01

    The present article deals with the crucial question: Can peace education facilitate change in the sociopsychological infrastructure that feeds continued intractable conflict and then how the change can be carried? Intractable conflicts still rage in various parts of the globe, and they not only cause local misery and suffering but also threaten

  14. Emergency Thoracic Endovascular Aneurysm Repair in Acute Type B Dissection with Visceral Malperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Petrilli, Giuseppe; Puppini, Giovanni; Calzaferri, Daniele; Torre, Salvo; Bugana, Antonella; Faggian, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    A 46-year-old female patient was admitted to the emergency room with the sudden onset of abdominal pain, back pain, and paresthesia in the right leg. An emergent chest computed tomography (CT) showed an acute Type B aortic dissection. An emergency thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) procedure was subsequently performed, for an evolving visceral malperfusion syndrome. We performed the procedure using an axillary approach because the small diameter of the true lumen precluded transfemoral endovascular access. This case illustrates that TEVAR permits the treatment of complicated acute Type B aortic dissection; specifically, technical variations can expand the applicability of endovascular procedures.

  15. Enhanced responses of the anterior cingulate cortex neurones to colonic distension in viscerally hypersensitive rats

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun; Wu, Xiaoyin; Owyang, Chung; Li, Ying

    2006-01-01

    The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is critically involved in processing the affective component of pain sensation. Visceral hypersensitivity is a characteristic of irritable bowel syndrome. Electrophysiological activity of the ACC with regard to visceral sensitization has not been characterized. Single ACC neuronal activities in response to colorectal distension (CRD) were recorded in control, sham-treated rats and viscerally hypersensitive (EA) rats (induced by chicken egg albumin injection, i.p). The ACC neurones of controls failed to respond to 10 or 30 mmHg CRD; only 22% were activated by 50 mmHg CRD. Among the latter, 16.4% exhibited an excitatory response to CRD and were labelled CRD-excited neurones. In contrast, CRD (10, 30 and 50 mmHg) markedly increased ACC neuronal responses of EA rats (10%, 28% and 47%, respectively). CRD produced greater pressure-dependent increases in ACC spike firing rates in EA rats compared with controls. Splanchnicectomy combined with pelvic nerve section abolished ACC responses to CRD in EA rats. Spontaneous activity in CRD-excited ACC neurones was significantly higher in EA rats than in controls. CRD-excited ACC neurones in control and EA rats (7 of 16 (42%) and 8 of 20 (40%), respectively) were activated by transcutaneous electrical and thermal stimuli. However, ACC neuronal activity evoked by noxious cutaneous stimuli did not change significantly in EA rats. This study identifies CRD-responsive neurones in the ACC and establishes for the first time that persistence of a heightened visceral afferent nociceptive input to the ACC induces ACC sensitization, characterized by increased spontaneous activity of CRD-excited neurones, decreased CRD pressure threshold, and increased response magnitude. Enhanced ACC nociceptive transmission in viscerally hypersensitive rats is restricted to visceral afferent input. PMID:16239277

  16. Investigational Drugs for Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Sundar, Shyam; Chakravarty, Jaya

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The armamentarium of antileishmanials is small. It is further being threatened by development of resistance and decreasing sensitivity to the available drugs. Development of newer drugs are sorely needed. Areas covered Literature search on investigational drugs for visceral leishmaniasis (VL) was done on PubMed. Those candidates with at least in vitro and in vivo activity against leishmania species causing VL were reviewed. Among the investigational drugs the nitroimidazole compound fexinidazole is the one of the few drugs which has reached phase II trials. Although the (S)-PA-824 is in phase II trials for the treatment of tuberculosis its R enantiomer has shown good antileishmanial activity. Development of sitamaquin, which has completed phase II studies has been stopped for VL due to its low efficacy. Many novel delivery system and oral formulations of Amphotericin B which are cheap and less toxic are in investigational stages, and will go a long way in improving the treatment of VL. Expert opinion Very few new drugs have reached the clinical stage in the treatment of this neglected tropical disease. Thus, there is an urgent need for support from public private partnerships to ensure that drug candidates are promptly taken forward into development. PMID:25409760

  17. Does anterior trunk pain predict a different course of recovery in chronic low back pain?

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, John; Hancock, Mark J; Kongsted, Alice; Hush, Julia; Kent, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Patient characteristics associated with the course and severity of low back pain (LBP) and disability have been the focus of extensive research, however, known characteristics do not explain much of the variance in outcomes. The relationship between anterior trunk pain (ATP) and LBP has not been explored, though mechanisms for visceral referred pain have been described. Study objectives were: (1) determine prevalence of ATP in chronic LBP patients, (2) determine whether ATP is associated with increased pain and disability in these patients, and (3) evaluate whether ATP predicts the course of pain and disability in these patients. In this study, spinal outpatient department patients mapped the distribution of their pain and patients describing pain in their chest, abdomen or groin were classified with ATP. Generalized estimating equations were performed to investigate the relationship between ATP and LBP outcomes. A total of 2974 patients were included and 19.6% of patients reported ATP. At all time points, there were significant differences in absolute pain intensity and disability in those with ATP compared with those without. The presence of ATP did not affect the clinical course of LBP outcomes. The results of this study suggest that patients who present with LBP and ATP have higher pain and disability levels than patients with localised LBP. Visceral referred pain mechanisms may help to explain some of this difference. PMID:24502844

  18. Specific alteration of rhythm in temperature-stressed rats possess features of abdominal pain in IBS patients.

    PubMed

    Itomi, Yasuo; Kawamura, Toru; Tsukimi, Yasuhiro

    2015-09-01

    It is known that specific alteration of rhythm in temperature (SART) stress produces somatic pain. However, it remains to be investigated whether SART stress induces visceral pain. In this study, we investigated the visceral hypersensitivity in the SART stress model by pharmacological tools and heterotopical nociception. Four-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to repeated cold stress. Visceral pain was measured by visceromotor response to colorectal distension, and the effects of alosetron and duloxetine on visceral pain were investigated in SART rats. Heterotopical nociception was given by capsaicin injection into the left forepaw to induce diffuse noxious inhibitory controls (DNIC). SART stress induced visceral hypersensitivity that was sustained at minimum for one week. In pharmacological analysis, alosetron and duloxetine improved SART stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity. Heterotopical nociception induced DNIC in normal conditions, but was disrupted in SART rats. On the other hand, RMCP-II mRNA in distal colon was not affected by SART stress. In conclusion, SART rats exhibit several features of visceral pain in IBS, and may be a useful model for investigating the central modification of pain control in IBS. PMID:26344878

  19. Intractable Headache - The Pain in Your Head that Just Won't Quit

    MedlinePLUS

    ... don’t have definite answers yet. Like a car engine, you have to understand how it works before you can understand what is wrong with it, and you have to understand what is wrong with it before you can fix it. So that is where we are in terms of the big picture . In the meantime, what do we do about ...

  20. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Stomach pain; Pain - abdomen; Belly ache; Abdominal cramps; Bellyache; Stomachache ... Almost everyone has pain in the abdomen at some point. Most of the time, it is not serious. How bad your pain is ...

  1. Flank pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain - side; Side pain ... Flank pain can be a sign of a kidney problem. But, since many organs are in this area, other causes are possible. If you have flank pain and fever , chills, blood in the urine, or ...

  2. Pain (PDQ)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... moderate pain. 7 to 10 means severe pain. Acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may be used to relieve mild pain. Acetaminophen and NSAIDs help relieve mild pain. They may ...

  3. [Treatment of visceral leishmaniasis in children].

    PubMed

    Minodier, P; Nol, G; Blanc, P; Uters, M; Retornaz, K; Garnier, J M

    2007-02-01

    Visceral Leishmania infantum leishmaniasis is endemic in the south of France. For many years the mainstay for treatment of infected children was pentavalent antimony: meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime) or sodium stibogluconate (Pentostam). However these drugs are poorly tolerated and resistance similar to that observed in the treatment of Indian visceral Leishmania donovani leishmaniasis has been reported. Currently liposomal amphotericin B is being used instead of antimony for treatment of visceral leishmaniasis in children in France. In addition to being well tolerated, liposomal amphotericin B is almost 100% effective. It can be administered in six intravenous injections of 3-4 mg/kg each (days 1 to 5 then day 10). A two-day protocol (10 mg/kg/d) that would reduce overall cost by shortening the duration of hospitalization is now being studied. Another oral drug, i.e., miltefosine, has been successfully used for treatment of visceral leishmaniasis in India. However it has not been evaluated for treatment of Mediterranean visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:17506279

  4. Vaccines for visceral leishmaniasis: A review.

    PubMed

    Jain, Keerti; Jain, N K

    2015-07-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis, which is also known as Kala-Azar, is one of the most severely neglected tropical diseases recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO). The threat of this debilitating disease continues due to unavailability of promising drug therapy or human vaccine. An extensive research is undergoing to develop a promising vaccine to prevent this devastating disease. In this review we compiled the findings of recent research with a view to facilitate knowledge on experimental vaccinology for visceral leishmaniasis. Various killed or attenuated parasite based first generation vaccines, second generation vaccines based on antigenic protein or recombinant protein, and third generation vaccines derived from antigen-encoding DNA plasmids including heterologous prime-boost Leishmania vaccine have been examined for control and prevention of visceral leishmaniasis. Vaccines based on recombinant protein and antigen-encoding DNA plasmids have given promising results and few vaccines including Leishmune®, Leishtec, and CaniLeish® have been licensed for canine visceral leishmaniasis. A systematic investigation of these vaccine candidates can lead to development of promising vaccine for human visceral leishmaniasis, most probably in the near future. PMID:25858230

  5. Stereotactic laser ablation of the splenium for intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ho, Allen L; Miller, Kai J; Cartmell, Sam; Inoyama, Katherine; Fisher, Robert S; Halpern, Casey H

    2016-01-01

    Partial or complete corpus callosotomies have been applied, traditionally via open surgical or radiosurgical approaches, for the treatment of epilepsy in patients with multifocal tonic, atonic, or myoclonic seizures. Minimally invasive methods, such as MRI-guided laser interstitial thermal ablation (MTLA), are being employed to functionally remove or ablate seizure foci in the treatment of epilepsy. This therapy can achieve effectiveness similar to that of traditional resection, but with reduced morbidity compared with open surgery. Here, we present a patient with a history of prior partial corpus callosotomy who continued to suffer from medically refractory epilepsy with bisynchronous onset. We report on the utilization of laser ablation of the splenium in this patient to achieve full corpus callosotomy. Adequate ablation of the splenial remnant was confirmed by postoperative MRI imaging, and at four-month follow-up, the patient's seizure frequency had dropped more than 50%. This is the first reported instance of laser ablation of the splenium to achieve full corpus callosotomy following a previous unsuccessful anterior callosotomy in a patient with intractable generalized epilepsy. PMID:26955518

  6. Epilepsy Surgery in Pediatric Intractable Epilepsy with Destructive Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Park, So Young; Kwon, Hye Eun; Kang, Hoon-Chul; Lee, Joon Soo; Kim, Dong Seok; Kim, Heung Dong

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The aim of the current study is to review the clinical features, surgery outcomes and parental satisfaction of children with destructive encephalopathy who underwent epilepsy surgery due to medically intractable seizures. Methods: 48 patients who underwent epilepsy surgery from October 2003 to August 2011 at Severance Children’s Hospital have been reviewed. The survey was conducted for functional outcomes and parental satisfaction at least 1 year after the surgery. Results: Epileptic encephalopathy including Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and infantile spasms was more prevalent than symptomatic focal epilepsy. Hypoxic ischemic injury accounted for most of the underlying etiology of the destructive encephalpathy, followed by central nervous system infection and head trauma. 27 patients (56.3%) underwent resective surgery and 21 patients (43.7%) underwent palliative surgery. 16 patients (33.3%) achieved seizure free and 27 parents (87.5%) reported satisfaction with the outcome of their children’s epilepsy surgery. In addition, 14 parents (77.8 %) whose children were not seizure free reported satisfaction with their children’s improvement in cognitive and behavior issues. Conclusions: Epilepsy surgery in destructive encephalopathy was effective for controlling seizures. Parents reported satisfaction not only with the surgical outcomes, but also with improvement of cognitive and behavior issues. PMID:24649473

  7. Treatment of intractable rheumatoid arthritis with total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kotzin, B.L.; Strober, S.; Engleman, E.G.; Calin, A.; Hoppe, R.T.; Kansas, G.S.; Terrell, C.P.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1981-10-22

    Eleven patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis were treated with total lymphoid irradiation (total dose, 2000 rad) in an uncontrolled feasibility study, as an alternative to long-term therapy with cytotoxic drugs such as cyclophosphamide and azathioprine. During a follow-up period of five to 18 months after total lymphoid irradiation, there was a profound and sustained suppression of the absolute lymphocyte count and in vitro lymphocyte function, as well as an increase in the ratio of Leu-2 (suppressor/cytotoxic) to Leu-3 (helper) T cells in the blood. Persistent circulating suppressor cells of the mixed leukocyte response and of pokeweek mitogen-induced immunoglobulin secretion developed in most patients. In nine of the 11 patients, these changes in immune status were associated with relief of joint tenderness and swelling and with improvement in function scores. Maximum improvement occurred approximately six months after irradiation and continued for the remainder of the observation period. Few severe or chronic side effects were associated with the radiotherapy.

  8. Treatment of intractable rheumatoid arthritis with total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kotzin, B.L.; Strober, S.; Engleman, E.G.; Calin, A.; Hoppe, R.T.; Kansas, G.S.; Terrell, C.P.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1981-10-01

    Eleven patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis were treated with total lymphoid irradiation (total dose, 2000 rad) in an uncontrolled feasibility study, as an alternative to long-term therapy with cytotoxic drugs such as cyclophosphamide and azathioprine. During a follow-up period of five to 18 months after total lymphoid irradiation, there was a profound and sustained suppression of the absolute lymphocyte count and in vitro lymphocyte function, as well as an increase in the ratio of Leu-2 (suppressor/cytotoxic) to Leu-3 (helper) T cells in the blood. Persistent circulating suppressor cells of the mixed leukocyte response and of pokeweed mitogen-induced immunoglobulin secretion developed in most patients. In nine of the 11 patients, these changes in immune status were associated with relief of joint tenderness and swelling and with improvement in function scores. Maximum improvement occurred approximately six months after irradiation and continued for the remainder of the observation period. Few severe or chronic side effects were associated with the radiotherapy.

  9. Sustained improvement of intractable rheumatoid arthritis after total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Field, E.H.; Strober, S.; Hoppe, R.T.; Calin, A.; Engleman, E.G.; Kotzin, B.L.; Tanay, A.S.; Calin, H.J.; Terrell, C.P.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1983-08-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) was administered to 11 patients who had intractable rheumatoid arthritis that was unresponsive to conventional medical therapy, including aspirin, multiple nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, gold salts, and D-penicillamine. Total lymphoid irradiation was given as an alternative to cytotoxic drugs such as azathioprine and cyclophosphamide. After radiotherapy, 9 of the 11 patients showed a marked improvement in clinical disease activity as measured by morning stiffness, joint tenderness, joint swelling, and overall functional abilities. The mean improvement of disease activity in all patients ranged from 40-70 percent and has persisted throughout a 13-28 month followup period. This improvement permitted the mean daily steroid dose to be reduced by 54%. Complications included severe fatigue and other constitutional symptoms during radiotherapy, development of Felty's syndrome in 1 patient, and an exacerbation of rheumatoid lung disease in another. After therapy, all patients exhibited a profound T lymphocytopenia, and a reversal in their T suppressor/cytotoxic cell to helper cell ratio. The proliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin A, and allogeneic leukocytes (mixed leukocyte reaction) were markedly reduced, as was in vitro immunoglobulin synthesis after stimulation with pokeweed mitogen. Alterations in T cell numbers and function persisted during the entire followup period, except that the mixed leukocyte reaction showed a tendency to return to normal values.

  10. Medically intractable seizures originating from the primary somatosensory hand area.

    PubMed

    Koubeissi, Mohamad Z; Maciunas, Robert J; Tanner, Adriana; Lüders, Hans O

    2008-12-01

    A 33-year-old woman had begun having intractable somatosensory seizures affecting the left hand since the age of 13 years. Occasionally, her seizures progressed to left arm posturing followed by secondary generalization. Scalp EEG revealed interictal epileptiform discharges in the right posterior quadrant, but with no ictal EEG correlates. Brain MRI showed a right temporal encephalomalacia, sparing mesial temporal structures, suggestive of a perinatal vascular insult. Ictal electrocorticogram, electrical stimulation mapping, and somatosensory evoked potentials localized the ictal onset to the hand area of the postcentral gyrus. Resection of that area resulted in total resolution of seizures with no significant lasting deficits. Potential complications of resecting the primary somatosensory hand area can be severe, as proprioceptive sensory loss may be permanent, resulting in significant disability. Such deficits may be temporary however, and the literature continues to report conflicting results regarding postsurgical outcome. Cortical plasticity may explain recovery of sensory deficits after partial resection of the primary somatosensory hand area. Multiple subpial transections of that area are sometimes performed to minimize functional deficits, but seizure control may be less optimal than with cortical resection. PMID:19017578

  11. Motor and sensory impairments in children with intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Beckung, E; Uvebrant, P

    1993-01-01

    During a 3-year period (1988-1991), 72 children with severe intractable epilepsy were studied. A standardized protocol for assessment of motor and sensory function was designed for school age children. Function was quantified on a 4-point scale on 47 items, including gross motor function, balance, coordination, strength, range of motion (ROM), velocity, fine motor function, sensation, perception, and neurologic tests. Classification of handicaps according to World Health Organization (WHO) definitions was performed. Videotape documentation completed the assessment. Evaluation of treatment services showed that provision of rehabilitation services had been insufficient and provided only for children with additional major movement disorders, mainly cerebral palsy (CP) cases. To minimize the handicap in children with severe epilepsy, it is essential to clarify the total sensorimotor impairment pattern, including balance, coordination, and perceptual capacity. Impairments in these functions are, as shown in this study, frequent and exist independent of major disabilities such as mental retardation or cerebral palsy. When several neuroimpairments were identified, a multiplicative rather than an additive effect on the total handicap was evident. PMID:8404748

  12. Stereotactic laser ablation of the splenium for intractable epilepsy☆

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Allen L.; Miller, Kai J.; Cartmell, Sam; Inoyama, Katherine; Fisher, Robert S.; Halpern, Casey H.

    2016-01-01

    Partial or complete corpus callosotomies have been applied, traditionally via open surgical or radiosurgical approaches, for the treatment of epilepsy in patients with multifocal tonic, atonic, or myoclonic seizures. Minimally invasive methods, such as MRI-guided laser interstitial thermal ablation (MTLA), are being employed to functionally remove or ablate seizure foci in the treatment of epilepsy. This therapy can achieve effectiveness similar to that of traditional resection, but with reduced morbidity compared with open surgery. Here, we present a patient with a history of prior partial corpus callosotomy who continued to suffer from medically refractory epilepsy with bisynchronous onset. We report on the utilization of laser ablation of the splenium in this patient to achieve full corpus callosotomy. Adequate ablation of the splenial remnant was confirmed by postoperative MRI imaging, and at four-month follow-up, the patient's seizure frequency had dropped more than 50%. This is the first reported instance of laser ablation of the splenium to achieve full corpus callosotomy following a previous unsuccessful anterior callosotomy in a patient with intractable generalized epilepsy. PMID:26955518

  13. Cancer pain management in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Stuart A; Dunbar, Erin M; Nesbit, Suzanne A

    2006-10-01

    Cancer causes pain as it invades bone, compresses nerves, produces obstructive symptoms in the pulmonary, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary systems, and distends involved visceral organs. This manuscript reviews progress in cancer pain management during the past 2 decades. Since the 1980s, we have seen (1) genuine advances in research on the biology of pain, (2) new approaches to the treatment of cancer pain, and (3) important changes in the health-care system to ensure that pain is appropriately assessed and managed. Currently, clinicians have the appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic tools to ensure that the vast majority of patients with cancer pain can be comfortable during their illness. Nevertheless, too many patients with terminal malignancies continue to die in pain in nations around the globe. An effective strategy to make alleviating pain a major health-care priority remains the primary challenge to effectively palliating patients with cancer pain. PMID:17111998

  14. Use of an Oral Elemental Diet in Infants with Severe Intractable Diarrhea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Joseph O.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Evaluated was the use of an oral elemental diet consisting of crystalline amino acids, glucose, electrolytes, and vitamins to control severe intractable diarrhea in 27 infants (1-day to 9-months of age). (DB)

  15. Recovery of heavy metals from intractable wastes: A thermal approach

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, D.W.

    1996-12-31

    The generation of industrial solid wastes containing leachable species of environmental concern is a problem for developing and developed nations alike. These materials arise from direct processing of mineral ores, from production of metals and minerals, from manufacturing operations, and from air and water pollution treatment processes. The general characteristics that make these wastes intractable is that their content of hazardous species is not easily liberated from the waste yet is not bound so tightly that they are safe for landfill disposal or industrial use. The approach taken in this work is a thermal treatment that separates the inorganic contaminants from the wastes. The objective is to provide recovery and reuse of both the residual solids and liberated contaminants. The results from operating this technique using two very different types of waste are described. The reasons that the process will work for a wide variety of wastes are explored. By using the knowledge of the thermodynamic stability of the phases found from the characterization analyses, a thermal regime was found that allowed separation of the contaminants without capturing the matrix materials. Bench scale studies were carried out using a tube furnace. Samples of the wastes were heated in crucible boats from 750 to 1150{degrees}C in the presence of various chlorinating agents. The offgas contained 90{sup +}% of the targeted contaminants despite their complex matrix form. The residue was free of contamination. As a result of the efficient concentrating mechanism of the process, the contaminants in the offgas solids are attractive for reuse in metallurgical industries. As an additional benefit, the organic contaminants of the residues were eliminated. Dioxin traces in the solids before treatment were absent after treatment. 15 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Back Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Back Pain Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Back Pain March 2015 Handout on Health: Back Pain This publication is for people who have back ... to discuss them with your doctor. What Is Back Pain? Back pain is an all-too-familiar problem ...

  17. Melatonin and sleep-related problems in children with intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Elkhayat, Hamed A; Hassanein, Sahar M; Tomoum, Hoda Y; Abd-Elhamid, Iman A; Asaad, Tarek; Elwakkad, Amany S

    2010-04-01

    Children with epilepsy have high rates of sleep problems. Melatonin has been advocated in treatment of sleep disorders, and its beneficial effect has been confirmed in insomnia. The aim of this study was to assess melatonin levels in children with intractable epilepsy and its relation to pattern of sleep and characteristics of seizure disorder, as well as the effect of melatonin therapy on those parameters. The study was conducted on 23 children with intractable epilepsy and 14 children with controlled seizures. Patients were evaluated by psychometric sleep assessment and assay of diurnal and nocturnal melatonin levels. Children with intractable epilepsy received oral melatonin before bedtime. They were reassessed after 3 months. Children with intractable epilepsy had higher scores for each category of sleep walking, forcible teeth grinding, and sleep apnea. At the end of therapeutic trial, patients with intractable epilepsy exhibited significant improvement in bedtime resistance, sleep duration, sleep latency, frequent nocturnal arousals, sleep walking, excessive daytime sleepiness, nocturnal enuresis, forcible teeth grinding, sleep apnea, and Epworth sleepiness scores. There was also significant reduction in seizure severity. Thus, use of melatonin in patients with intractable seizures was associated with improvement of both many sleep-related phenomena and the severity of seizures. PMID:20304327

  18. Characteristics and safety assessment of intractable proteins in genetically modified crops.

    PubMed

    Bushey, Dean F; Bannon, Gary A; Delaney, Bryan F; Graser, Gerson; Hefford, Mary; Jiang, Xiaoxu; Lee, Thomas C; Madduri, Krishna M; Pariza, Michael; Privalle, Laura S; Ranjan, Rakesh; Saab-Rincon, Gloria; Schafer, Barry W; Thelen, Jay J; Zhang, John X Q; Harper, Marc S

    2014-07-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops may contain newly expressed proteins that are described as "intractable". Safety assessment of these proteins may require some adaptations to the current assessment procedures. Intractable proteins are defined here as those proteins with properties that make it extremely difficult or impossible with current methods to express in heterologous systems; isolate, purify, or concentrate; quantify (due to low levels); demonstrate biological activity; or prove equivalency with plant proteins. Five classes of intractable proteins are discussed here: (1) membrane proteins, (2) signaling proteins, (3) transcription factors, (4) N-glycosylated proteins, and (5) resistance proteins (R-proteins, plant pathogen recognition proteins that activate innate immune responses). While the basic tiered weight-of-evidence approach for assessing the safety of GM crops proposed by the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) in 2008 is applicable to intractable proteins, new or modified methods may be required. For example, the first two steps in Tier I (hazard identification) analysis, gathering of applicable history of safe use (HOSU) information and bioinformatics analysis, do not require protein isolation. The extremely low level of expression of most intractable proteins should be taken into account while assessing safety of the intractable protein in GM crops. If Tier II (hazard characterization) analyses requiring animal feeding are judged to be necessary, alternatives to feeding high doses of pure protein may be needed. These alternatives are discussed here. PMID:24662477

  19. Measuring pain in patients undergoing hemodialysis: a review of pain assessment tools

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Chandani; Cameron, Karen; Murphy, Laura; Battistella, Marisa

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients undergoing hemodialysis frequently report pain with multifactorial causes, not limited to that experienced directly from hemodialysis treatment. Their pain may be nociceptive, neuropathic, somatic or visceral in nature. Despite this, pain in this population remains under-recognized and under-treated. Although several tools have been used to measure pain in patients undergoing hemodialysis as reported in the literature, none of them have been validated specifically in this population. The objective for this review was to compare and contrast these pain assessment tools and discuss their clinical utility in this patient population. Methods To identify pain assessment tools studied in patients undergoing hemodialysis, a literature search was performed in PubMed and Medline. An expert panel of dialysis and pain clinicians reviewed each tool. Each pain assessment tool was assessed on how it is administered and scored, its psychometric properties such as reliability, validity and responsiveness to change, and its clinical utility in a hemodialysis population. Brief Pain Inventory, McGill Pain Questionnaire, Pain Management Index, Edmonton Symptom Assessment System, Visual Analogue Scale and Faces Pain Scale were evaluated and compared. Results This assessment will help clinicians practicing in nephrology to determine which of these pain assessment tools is best suited for use in their individual clinical practice. PMID:25852910

  20. Spinal Cord Stimulation for Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology policy assessment was to determine the effectiveness of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) to manage chronic intractable neuropathic pain and to evaluate the adverse events and Ontario-specific economic profile of this technology. Clinical Need SCS is a reversible pain therapy that uses low-voltage electrical pulses to manage chronic, intractable neuropathic pain of the trunk or limbs. Neuropathic pain begins or is caused by damage or dysfunction to the nervous system and can be difficult to manage. The prevalence of neuropathic pain has been estimated at about 1.5% of the population in the United States and 1% of the population in the United Kingdom. These prevalence rates are generalizable to Canada. Neuropathic pain is extremely difficult to manage. People with symptoms that persist for at least 6 months or who have symptoms that last longer than expected for tissue healing or resolution of an underlying disease are considered to have chronic pain. Chronic pain is an emotional, social, and economic burden for those living with it. Depression, reduced quality of life (QOL), absenteeism from work, and a lower household income are positively correlated with chronic pain. Although the actual number is unknown, a proportion of people with chronic neuropathic pain fail to obtain pain relief from pharmacological therapies despite adequate and reasonable efforts to use them. These people are said to have intractable neuropathic pain, and they are the target population for SCS. The most common indication for SCS in North America is chronic intractable neuropathic pain due to failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS), a term that describes persistent leg or back and leg pain in patients who have had back or spine surgery. Neuropathic pain due to complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), which can develop in the distal aspect of a limb a minor injury, is another common indication. To a lesser extent, chronic intractable pain of postherpetic neuralgia, which is a persistent burning pain and hyperesthesia along the distribution of a cutaneous nerve after an attack of herpes zoster, is also managed with SCS. For each condition, SCS is considered as a pain management therapy only after conventional pain therapies, including pharmacological, nonpharmacological, and surgical treatments, if applicable, have been attempted and have failed. The Technology The SCS technology consists of 3 implantable components: a pulse generator, an extension cable, and a lead (a small wire). The pulse generator is the power source for the spinal cord stimulator. It generates low-voltage electrical pulses. The extension cable connects the pulse generator to the lead. The lead is a small, insulated wire that has a set of electrodes at one end. The lead is placed into the epidural space on the posterior aspect of the spinal cord, and the electrodes are positioned at the level of the nerve roots innervating the painful area. An electrical current from the electrodes induces a paresthesia, or a tingling sensation that masks the pain. Before SCS is initiated, candidates must have psychological testing to rule out major psychological illness, drug habituation, and issues of secondary gain that can negatively influence the success of the therapy. Successful candidates will have a SCS test stimulation period (trial period) to assess their responsiveness to SCS. The test stimulation takes about 1 week to complete, and candidates who obtain at least 50% pain relief during this period are deemed suitable to receive a permanent implantation of a spinal cord stimulator Review Strategy The Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) reviewed all published health technology assessments of spinal cord stimulation. Following this, a literature search was conducted from 2000 to January, 2005 and a systematic review of the literature was completed. The primary outcome for the systematic review was pain relief. Secondary outcomes included functional status and quality of life. After applying the predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria, 2 randomized controlled trials (MAS level 2 evidence), and 2 prospective non-randomized controlled trials with a before-and-after-treatment study design (MAS level 3a evidence) were retrieved and reviewed. Summary of Findings The authors of 6 health technology assessments concluded that evidence exists to support the effectiveness of SCS to decrease pain in various neuropathic pain syndromes. However, the quality of this evidence varied among reports from weak to moderate. The systematic review completed by MAS found high quality level 2 evidence that SCS decreases pain and level 3a evidence that it improves functional status and quality of life in some people with neuropathic pain conditions. The rate of technical failures was approximately 11%, which included electrode lead migration and/or malposition. Procedural complications included infection and dural puncture; each occurred at a rate of 1.2%. Conclusions SCS may be considered for patients with chronic, neuropathic pain for whom standard pain treatments have failed and when there is no indication for surgical intervention to treat the underlying condition. PMID:23074473

  1. Foetal pain?

    PubMed

    Derbyshire, Stuart W G

    2010-10-01

    The majority of commentary on foetal pain has looked at the maturation of neural pathways to decide a lower age limit for foetal pain. This approach is sensible because there must be a minimal necessary neural development that makes pain possible. Very broadly, it is generally agreed that the minimal necessary neural pathways for pain are in place by 24 weeks gestation. Arguments remain, however, as to the possibility of foetal pain before or after 24 weeks. Some argue that the foetus can feel pain earlier than 24 weeks because pain can be supported by subcortical structures. Others argue that the foetus cannot feel pain at any stage because it is maintained in a state of sedation in the womb and lacks further neural and conceptual development necessary for pain. Much of this argument rests on the definition of terms such as 'wakefulness' and 'pain'. If a behavioural and neural reaction to a noxious stimulus is considered sufficient for pain, then pain is possible from 24 weeks and probably much earlier. If a conceptual subjectivity is considered necessary for pain, however, then pain is not possible at any gestational age. Regardless of how pain is defined, it is clear that pain for conceptual beings is qualitatively different than pain for non-conceptual beings. It is therefore a mistake to draw an equivalence between foetal pain and pain in the older infant or adult. PMID:20356798

  2. Pain Relievers

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain relievers are medicines that reduce or relieve headaches, sore muscles, arthritis, or other aches and pains. There ... also have a slightly different response to a pain reliever. Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines are good for ...

  3. Elbow pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain - elbow ... Elbow pain can be caused by many problems. A common cause in adults is tendinitis . This is inflammation and ... a partial dislocation ). Other common causes of elbow pain are: Bursitis -- inflammation of a fluid-filled cushion ...

  4. Heel pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain - heel ... Heel pain is most often the result of overuse. Rarely, it may be caused by an injury. Your heel ... on the heel Conditions that may cause heel pain include: When the tendon that connects the back ...

  5. Neck pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... causes of neck pain: Take over-the-counter pain relievers such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB) or acetaminophen ( ... prescribe a muscle relaxant or a more powerful pain reliever. Over-the-counter medications often work as well ...

  6. Knee pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain - knee ... Knee pain can have different causes. Being overweight puts you at greater risk for knee problems. Overusing your knee can trigger knee problems that cause pain. If you have a history of arthritis, it ...

  7. Chronic Pain: Where the Body Meets the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Crofford, Leslie J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain is one of the most intractable clinical problems faced by clinicians and can be devastating for patients. Central pain amplification is perceived pain that cannot be fully explained on the basis of somatic or neuropathic processes and is due to physiologic alterations in pain transmission or descending pain modulatory pathways. In any individual, central pain amplification may complicate nociceptive or neuropathic pain. Furthermore, patients with somatic symptom disorders may have alterations in their psychological or behavioral responses to pain that contribute significantly to the clinical presentation. Genetic, physiologic, and psychological factors associated with central pain amplification are beginning to be understood. One important contributor to chronic pain is perceived stress and stress response systems. We and others have shown a complex relationship between the physiologic stress response and chronic pain symptoms. Unfortunately, treatments for chronic pain are woefully inadequate and often worsen clinical outcomes. Developing new treatment strategies for patients with chronic pain is of utmost urgency. This essay provides a framework for thinking about chronic pain and developing new treatment approaches. PMID:26330672

  8. Depression, Pain, and Pain Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Francis J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined the degree to which depression predicted pain and pain behavior. The Beck Depression Inventory was administered to 207 low back pain patients. Depression and physical findings were the most important predictors of pain and pain behavior. Depression proved significant even after controlling for important demographic and medical status

  9. Depression, Pain, and Pain Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Francis J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined the degree to which depression predicted pain and pain behavior. The Beck Depression Inventory was administered to 207 low back pain patients. Depression and physical findings were the most important predictors of pain and pain behavior. Depression proved significant even after controlling for important demographic and medical status…

  10. Bilateral Thoracoscopic Splanchnotomy to Alleviate Pain in Chronic Pancreatic Disease.

    PubMed

    Bosanquet, David C; Wilcox, Christopher R M; Rasheed, Ashraf

    2016-03-01

    Chronic intractable pain is a common problem in severe pancreatic disease. Bilateral thoracoscopic splanchnotomy, a thoracoscopic neurotomy of the splanchnic nerves, is rarely performed but may provide significant pain relief in these patients. We present a safe strategy that uses prone positioning and two thoracoscopic ports for either hemithorax, permitting easy exposure and simple dissection of the greater and lesser splanchnic nerves. In our experience, this technique provides excellent pain relief with a minimal postoperative stay and few postoperative adverse events. This intervention has the potential to reduce dependency on opioid agents and improve quality of life in carefully selected patients. PMID:26897240

  11. Irritable bowel syndrome and visceral hypersensitivity : risk factors and pathophysiological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Deiteren, A; de Wit, A; van der Linden, L; De Man, J G; Pelckmans, P A; De Winter, B Y

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional gastro-intestinal disorder, characterized by abdominal pain and altered intestinal motility. Visceral hypersensitivity is an important hallmark feature of IBS and is believed to underlie abdominal pain in patients with IBS. The two main risk factors associated with the development of IBS are gastrointestinal inflammation and psychological distress. On a peripheral level, visceral sensitivity seems to be modulated by several mechanisms. Immune cells in the mucosal wall, such as mast cells, and enterochromaffin cells may sensitize afferent nerves by release of their mediators. Furthermore, increased mucosal permeability, altered intestinal microflora and dietary habits may contribute to this feature. On a central level, an increased prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities is demonstrated in IBS patients, alongside alterations in the hormonal brain-gut axis, increased vigilance towards intestinal stimuli and functional and structural changes in the brain. The pathogenesis of IBS is complicated and multifactorial and the treatment remains clinically challenging. Dietary measures and symptomatic control are the cornerstones for IBS treatment and may be sufficient for patients experiencing mild symptoms, alongside education, reassurance and an effective therapeutic physician-patient relationship. New pharmacological therapies are aimed at interfering with mediator release and/or blockade of the relevant receptors within the gut wall, while modulation of the intestinal flora and diet may also be of therapeutic benefit. Tricyclic anti-depressants and serotonin reuptake inhibitors act both on a central and peripheral level by modulating pain signalling pathways. PMID:26852761

  12. Shoulder pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain - shoulder ... changes around the rotator cuff can cause shoulder pain. You may have pain when lifting the arm above your head or ... The most common cause of shoulder pain occurs when rotator cuff tendons ... The tendons become inflamed or damaged. This condition ...

  13. Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Pelvic pain occurs mostly in the lower abdomen area. The pain might be steady, or it might come and go. If the pain is severe, it might get in the way ... re a woman, you might feel a dull pain during your period. It could also happen during ...

  14. Back Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Back Pain Information Page Condensed from Low Back Pain Fact ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Back Pain? Acute or short-term low back pain generally ...

  15. Development of Vaccines against Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Krystal J.; Kedzierski, Lukasz

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a neglected disease resulting in a global morbidity of 2,090 thousand Disability-Adjusted Life Years and a mortality rate of approximately 60,000 per year. Among the three clinical forms of leishmaniasis (cutaneous, mucosal, and visceral), visceral leishmaniasis (VL) accounts for the majority of mortality, as if left untreated VL is almost always fatal. Caused by infection with Leishmania donovani or L. infantum, VL represents a serious public health problem in endemic regions and is rapidly emerging as an opportunistic infection in HIV patients. To date, no vaccine exists for VL or any other form of leishmaniasis. In endemic areas, the majority of those infected do not develop clinical symptoms and past infection leads to robust immunity against reinfection. Thus the development of vaccine for Leishmania is a realistic public health goal, and this paper summarizes advances in vaccination strategies against VL. PMID:21912561

  16. American Visceral Leishmaniasis in Chiapas, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Pastor-Santiago, Jorge A.; Chvez-Lpez, Susana; Guzmn-Bracho, Carmen; Flisser, Ana; Olivo-Daz, Anglica

    2012-01-01

    We report the results of a study conducted during 19902006 with 89 cases of American visceral leishmaniasis in Chiapas State in southeastern Mexico and a seroprevalence study performed with 726 persons and 224 dogs that lived near cases of American visceral leishmaniasis. Clinical aspects, epidemiologic profiles, and risk factors are described. Most cases were in children ? 5 years of age, the prevalence of seropositive persons was 77%. The main risk factors associated with this disease were having 13 rooms in a house compared with ? 4 rooms, having a roof that was not made of cement, and having domestic animals. In contrast, only 19% of dogs were seropositive, suggesting that this species is not important in the transmission cycle of Leishmania. These data indicate that active transmission is taking place in the central valley of Chiapas State, Mexico, in communities located < 1,000 meters above sea level near the Grijalva River. PMID:22232459

  17. Visceral larva migrans (toxocariasis) in Toronto.

    PubMed Central

    Fanning, M; Hill, A; Langer, H M; Keystone, J S

    1981-01-01

    A 7-year-old child was admitted to Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children in 1976 with symptoms and laboratory findings compatible with visceral larva migrans, a disease usually caused by Toxocara canis. This prompted a search for other cases seen at the hospital during the period 1952 through 1978. Only 18 cases were discovered that met at least three of six criteria and thus were considered possible or probably cases of the disease. Three possible cases of ocular toxocariasis during the same period were also uncovered. Fever was the commonest presenting symptom. Eosinophilia, leukocytosis and hyperglobulinemia were the most frequent laboratory findings. In view of the small number of cases found in 27 years at this large pediatric hospital with a broad referral base, it is concluded that visceral larva migrans poses little risk to the health of children in the Toronto area. PMID:7459767

  18. Immunity to visceral leishmaniasis: implications for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Khadem, Forough; Uzonna, Jude E

    2014-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis, caused by Leishmania donovani, L. infantum (syn. Leishmania chagasi), is a globally widespread disease with a burden of about 400,000 new infections reported annually. It is the most dangerous form of human leishmaniasis in terms of mortality and morbidity and is spreading to several nonendemic areas because of migration, global traveling and military conflicts. The emergence of Leishmania-HIV co-infection and increased prevalence of drug-resistant strains have worsened the impact of the disease. The traditional low-cost drugs are often toxic with several adverse effects, highlighting the need for development of new therapeutic and prophylactic strategies. Therefore, a detailed understanding of mechanisms of protective immunity is extremely important in order to develop new therapeutics in the form of vaccines or immunotherapies. This review gives an overview of visceral leishmaniasis, with particular emphasis on the innate and adaptive immune responses, vaccine and vaccination strategies and their potentials for immunotherapy against the disease. PMID:25156379

  19. Functional interleukin-17 receptor A are present in the thyroid gland in intractable Graves disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Rong; Hong, Fu-Yuan; Zeng, Jin-Yang; Huang, Guo-Liang

    2013-01-01

    Th17 lymphocytes and its main cytokine, IL-17, play an important role in autoimmune thyroid diseases, such as intractable Graves disease (GD). IL-17 signals are transmitted through its receptor, IL-17RA. The intrathyroid expression of IL-17RA in intractable GD is not understood. In this study, ELISA was used to measure serum IL-17 levels in patients with untreated GD, intractable GD or GD in remission and healthy controls. Real-time PCR, flow cytometry and immunofluorescence staining evaluated IL-17RA mRNA and protein expression in thyrocytes. IL-6, chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10) and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 expression was measured in IL-17-stimulated thyrocyte cultures to evaluate the functional status of IL-17RA. Our data indicates that serum IL-17 levels are significantly increased in intractable GD and affected thyrocytes show functional IL-17R expression. These changes facilitate the IL-17-mediated upregulation of IL-6, CXCL10, and ICAM-1. The IL-17/IL-17R interaction could be a potential target for therapeutic interventions in intractable GD. PMID:23501056

  20. Stress-Related Alterations of Visceral Sensation: Animal Models for Irritable Bowel Syndrome Study

    PubMed Central

    Mulak, Agata; Taché, Yvette

    2011-01-01

    Stressors of different psychological, physical or immune origin play a critical role in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome participating in symptoms onset, clinical presentation as well as treatment outcome. Experimental stress models applying a variety of acute and chronic exteroceptive or interoceptive stressors have been developed to target different periods throughout the lifespan of animals to assess the vulnerability, the trigger and perpetuating factors determining stress influence on visceral sensitivity and interactions within the brain-gut axis. Recent evidence points towards adequate construct and face validity of experimental models developed with respect to animals' age, sex, strain differences and specific methodological aspects such as non-invasive monitoring of visceromotor response to colorectal distension as being essential in successful identification and evaluation of novel therapeutic targets aimed at reducing stress-related alterations in visceral sensitivity. Underlying mechanisms of stress-induced modulation of visceral pain involve a combination of peripheral, spinal and supraspinal sensitization based on the nature of the stressors and dysregulation of descending pathways that modulate nociceptive transmission or stress-related analgesic response. PMID:21860814

  1. Attenuation of visceral nociception by α-bisabolol in mice: investigation of mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously described the visceral antinociceptive property of α-bisabolol (BISA) in mouse models of visceral nociception induced by cyclophosphamide and mustard oil (MO). This study examined the effect of BISA in mouse models of visceral nociception induced by acetic acid, capsaicin, formalin, and the contribution of the nitric oxide system, α2, KATP, 5-HT3 and TRPV1 receptors to the effect of BISA on MO-evoked nociceptive behaviors. Mice were pretreated orally with BISA (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg) or vehicle, and the pain-related behavioral responses to intraperitoneal administration of acetic acid or intracolonic injection of MO were analyzed. Results BISA significantly suppressed the nociceptive behaviors in a dose-unrelated manner. The antinociceptive effect of BISA (50 mg/kg) was show to be glibenclamide resistant, but it was not blocked by pretreatment with the other antagonists tested. In the open-field test that detects sedative or motor abnormality, mice received 50 mg/kg BISA did not show any per se influence in ambulation frequency. Conclusions However, their precise antinociceptive mechanisms of action have not been determined. PMID:22613014

  2. A rare differential diagnosis to occupational neck pain: bilateral stylohyoid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, Gertrud; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Buhmann, Sonja; Kanz, Karl-Georg; Lenz, Miriam; Vogel, Tobias; Kichhoff, Rainer Maria

    2006-01-01

    Chronic neck pain is widely prevalent and a common source of disability in the working-age population. Etiology of chronic neck pain includes neck sprain, mechanical or muscular neck pain, myofascial pain syndrome, postural neck pain as well as pain due to degenerative changes. We report the case of a 42 year old secretary, complaining about a longer history of neck pain and limited movement of the cervical spine. Surprisingly, the adequate radiologic examination revealed a bilateral ossification of the stylohyoid ligament complex. Her symptoms remained intractable from conservative treatment consisting of anti-inflammatory medication as well as physical therapy. Hence the patient was admitted to surgical resection of the ossified stylohyoid ligament complex. Afterwards she was free of any complaints and went back to work. Therefore, ossification of the stylohyoid ligament complex causing severe neck pain and movement disorder should be regarded as a rare differential diagnosis of occupational related neck pain. PMID:16800878

  3. [Hematologic abnormalities in infantile visceral leishmaniasis].

    PubMed

    Chouchene, S; Braham, N; Bouatay, A; Hizem, S; Berriri, S; Eljemai, A; Boughamoura, L; Kortas, M

    2015-11-01

    The clinical and biological manifestations of visceral leishmaniasis are often confusing, most particularly because it can mimic and lead to a variety of hematological disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the hematologic abnormalities observed in infantile visceral leishmaniasis from January 2000 and December 2013. The study included 35 children with a mean age of 3.5 years. Clinical manifestations were dominated by splenomegaly, fever, and paleness, defining the classic triad in 16% of our patients. Anemia was present in all patients. Leukopenia was found in 51% of the cases. Thrombocytopenia was observed in 48% of our patients and 36% had pancytopenia. All cases were confirmed by the presence of Leishman bodies (amastigotes) in the bone marrow smears. Quantitative and qualitative megakaryocyte abnormalities were found. Similarly, dysgranulopoiesis was observed in 31% of the cases, eosinophilia was present in 6%, erythroid hypoplasia in 3%, and erythroid hyperplasia in 34%. Different features of dyserythropoiesis were revealed in 71% of the patients with images of hemophagocytosis in 6% and multiple dysplasias in 9%. The knowledge of these hematological abnormalities associated with infantile visceral leishmaniasis can assist us in searching for Leishman bodies in the bone marrow smears to provide a diagnosis more quickly without necessarily resorting to more sophisticated tests. PMID:26433577

  4. Regulation of immunity during visceral Leishmania infection.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Vasco; Cordeiro-da-Silva, Anabela; Laforge, Mireille; Silvestre, Ricardo; Estaquier, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Unicellular eukaryotes of the genus Leishmania are collectively responsible for a heterogeneous group of diseases known as leishmaniasis. The visceral form of leishmaniasis, caused by L. donovani or L. infantum, is a devastating condition, claiming 20,000 to 40,000 lives annually, with particular incidence in some of the poorest regions of the world. Immunity to Leishmania depends on the development of protective type I immune responses capable of activating infected phagocytes to kill intracellular amastigotes. However, despite the induction of protective responses, disease progresses due to a multitude of factors that impede an optimal response. These include the action of suppressive cytokines, exhaustion of specific T cells, loss of lymphoid tissue architecture and a defective humoral response. We will review how these responses are orchestrated during the course of infection, including both early and chronic stages, focusing on the spleen and the liver, which are the main target organs of visceral Leishmania in the host. A comprehensive understanding of the immune events that occur during visceral Leishmania infection is crucial for the implementation of immunotherapeutic approaches that complement the current anti-Leishmania chemotherapy and the development of effective vaccines to prevent disease. PMID:26932389

  5. Intractable prurigo nodularis successfully treated with combination therapy with a newly developed excimer laser and topical steroids.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Chisa; Tanizaki, Hideaki; Otsuka, Atsushi; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Kabashima, Kenji

    2014-06-01

    Prurigo nodularis (PN) is an eruption of lichenified or excoriated nodules related to intractable pruritus. A few reports have shown that a 308-nm excimer lamp/laser (EL) is effective for intractable PN. Herein, we report on two cases of intractable prurigo nodularis successfully treated with a new EL equipped with a filter to cut wavelengths shorter than 297 nm. Because this newly developed EL yields a therapeutic effect with low cumulative dosages of UV and a lower risk of DNA damage, it can be a new treatment option for intractable PN. PMID:24945654

  6. Corpus callosotomy with gamma knife radiosurgery for a case of intractable generalised epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Bodaghabadi, Mohammad; Bitaraf, Mohammad Ali; Aran, Shima; Alikhani, Mazdak; Ashrafian, Hossein; Zahiri, Alireza; Alahverdi, Mahmud

    2011-06-01

    Gamma knife radiosurgery is a minimally invasive procedure which can be used for patients with intractable epilepsies as an alternative for surgical corpus callosotomy. We report a 13-year-old boy with intractable epilepsy who underwent radiosurgical callosotomy. The patient demonstrated significant clinical improvement after gamma knife radiosurgery and was free of seizures 10 months after the procedure. However, He developed four short focal seizures with clonic movements during the 20 months post radiosurgery. Corpus callosotomy decreased epileptiform discharges in both hemispheres, indicating a role for the callosal neurons to facilitate an asymmetric epileptogenic susceptible state within the two hemispheres such that bisynchronous and bisymmetrical epileptiform discharges develop. Our result demonstrates that this novel therapeutic approach is a safe and effective option for the treatment of intractable generalised epilepsies. PMID:21628134

  7. Comparative Study of Endolymphatic Sac Decompression and Vestibular Neurectomy in Intractable Meniere's Disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiqing; Han, Jie; Zhou, Xuanchen; Luan, Deheng; Xie, Fengyang; Gao, Kun

    2015-03-01

    To comparative study the clinical effect of endolymphatic sac decompression (ELSD) and vestibular neurectomy (VN) in intractable Meniere's disease (MD). The study included 30 MD intractable patients, 21 of which underwent ELSD and nine of which were treated by VN via retrosigmoid approach. Follow-up period ranged from 3 to 6years. In 21 patients by ELSD, excellent vertigo control and good control were noted in 11 patients (52.4%) and 4 patients (19.0%), partial control in 4 and no control in 2 patients. All the 9 patients by VN, vertigo was excellent control. ELSD can improve hearing and tinnitus, but VN not. VN can achieve much better effect in improving vertigo in intractable MD patients. But relative to ELSD, it has much more disadvantages. PMID:25621233

  8. Interactions between visceral afferent signaling and stimulus processing

    PubMed Central

    Critchley, Hugo D.; Garfinkel, Sarah N.

    2015-01-01

    Visceral afferent signals to the brain influence thoughts, feelings and behavior. Here we highlight the findings of a set of empirical investigations in humans concerning body-mind interaction that focus on how feedback from states of autonomic arousal shapes cognition and emotion. There is a longstanding debate regarding the contribution of the body to mental processes. Recent theoretical models broadly acknowledge the role of (autonomically-mediated) physiological arousal to emotional, social and motivational behaviors, yet the underlying mechanisms are only partially characterized. Neuroimaging is overcoming this shortfall; first, by demonstrating correlations between autonomic change and discrete patterns of evoked, and task-independent, neural activity; second, by mapping the central consequences of clinical perturbations in autonomic response and; third, by probing how dynamic fluctuations in peripheral autonomic state are integrated with perceptual, cognitive and emotional processes. Building on the notion that an important source of the brain's representation of physiological arousal is derived from afferent information from arterial baroreceptors, we have exploited the phasic nature of these signals to show their differential contribution to the processing of emotionally-salient stimuli. This recent work highlights the facilitation at neural and behavioral levels of fear and threat processing that contrasts with the more established observations of the inhibition of central pain processing during baroreceptors activation. The implications of this body-brain-mind axis are discussed. PMID:26379481

  9. Treatment of intractable epilepsy in a female with SLC6A8 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, Saadet; Connolly, Mary B; Poskitt, Kenneth J; Horvath, Gabriella A; Lowry, Noel; Salomons, Gajja S; Casey, Brett; Sinclair, Graham; Davis, Cynthia; Jakobs, Cornelis; Stockler-Ipsiroglu, Sylvia

    2010-12-01

    A female heterozygous for a novel, disease causing, missense mutation in the X-linked cerebral creatine transporter (SLC6A8) gene (c.1067G>T, p.Gly356Val) presented with intractable epilepsy, mild intellectual disability and moderately reduced cerebral creatine levels. Treatment with creatine monohydrate, to enhance cerebral creatine transport, combined with L-arginine and L-glycine, to enhance cerebral creatine synthesis, resulted in complete resolution of seizures. Heterozygous SLC6A8 deficiency is a potentially treatable condition and should be considered in females with intractable epilepsy and developmental delay/intellectual disability. PMID:20846889

  10. Intolerance to visceral distension in functional dyspepsia or irritable bowel syndrome: an organ specific defect or a pan intestinal dysregulation?

    PubMed

    Bouin, M; Lupien, F; Riberdy, M; Boivin, M; Plourde, V; Poitras, P

    2004-06-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) are characterized by visceral hypersensitivity that could be specific to a region of the gut or reflect a diffuse pan-intestinal disorder. Sensory thresholds to distension at two visceral sites in patients with different FGIDs were determined. According to Rome II criteria, 30 patients from three groups were studied: patients with (i) functional dyspepsia (FD) or (ii) irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and (iii) patients with concomitant symptoms of FD and IBS. Pain thresholds to balloon distension were determined in stomach and rectum. In FD patients, gastric intolerance to balloon distension was found in 91% patients; rectal hypersensitivity was documented in 18% patients. In IBS patients, rectal hypersensitivity was seen in 75% patients; while gastric hypersensitivity was never found. In patients with concomitant symptoms of FD + IBS, gastric and rectal intolerance to distension were present respectively in 82 and 91% patients. In the whole group, visceral intolerance to distension was documented at one site in 90% patients and at both sites, i.e. stomach and rectum, in 33% patients. Visceral intolerance to distension can be pan-intestinal in patients with multiple sites of symptoms, but appears organ-specific in patients exhibiting a specific site of symptoms. PMID:15198653

  11. Minocycline markedly reduces acute visceral nociception via inhibiting neuronal ERK phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Minocycline prevents the development of neuropathic and inflammatory pain by inhibiting microglial activation and postsynaptic currents. But, how minocycline obviates acute visceral pain is unclear. The present study investigated whether minocycline had an any antinociceptive effect on acetic acid-induced acute abdominal pain after intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of saline or minocycline 1 hour before acetic acid injection (1.0%, 250 ?l, i.p.). Results Minocycline (4, 10, or 40 mg/kg) significantly decreased acetic acid-induced nociception (0-60 minutes post-injection) and the enhancement in the number of c-Fos positive cells in the T5-L2 spinal cord induced by acetic acid injection. Also, the expression of spinal phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) induced by acetic acid was reduced by minocycline pre-administration. Interestingly, intrathecal introduction of PD98059, an ERK upstream kinase inhibitor, markedly blocked the acetic acid-stimulated pain responses. Conclusions These results demonstrate that minocycline effectively inhibits acetic acid-induced acute abdominal nociception via the inhibition of neuronal p-ERK expression in the spinal cord, and that minocycline may have therapeutic potential in suppressing acute abdominal pain. PMID:22364340

  12. PKC? receptor mediates visceral nociception and hyperalgesia following exposure to PTSD-like stress in the spinal cord of rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical studies indicate that patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) frequently share comorbidity with numerous chronic pain conditions. However, the sustained effects of PTSD-like stress over time on visceral nociception and hyperalgesia have been rarely studied, and the underlying mechanisms of stress-induced modulation of visceral hyperalgesia remain elusive. The purpose of this study was to investigate the characterization of visceral nociception and hyperalgesia over time in rats exposed to PTSD-like stress, and to explore the potential role of protein kinase C gamma (PKC?) in mediating visceral hyperalgesia following exposure to PTSD-like stress. Results On day 1, the rats exposed to single-prolonged stress (SPS, an established animal model for PTSD) exhibited an analgesic response and its visceromotor response (VMR) to graded colorectal distention (CRD) at 40 and 60mmHg was reduced compared with the control group (all P?visceral sensitivity to CRD, and contributes to the maintenance of visceral hyperalgesia, which is associated with enhanced PKC? expression in the spinal cord. Functional blockade of the PKC? receptors attenuates SPS-induced visceral hyperalgesia. Thus, the present study identifies a specific molecular mechanism for visceral hyperalgesia which may pave the way for novel therapeutic strategies for PTSD-like conditions. PMID:23837410

  13. Metabotropic glutamate receptors as novel therapeutic targets on visceral sensory pathways.

    PubMed

    Blackshaw, L Ashley; Page, Amanda J; Young, Richard L

    2011-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) have a diverse range of structures and molecular coupling mechanisms. There are eight mGluR subtypes divided into three major groups. Group I (mGluR1 and 5) is excitatory; groups II (mGluR2 and 3) and III (mGluR 4, 6, and 7) are inhibitory. All mGluR are found in the mammalian nervous system but some are absent from sensory neurons. The focus here is on mGluR in sensory pathways from the viscera, where they have been explored as therapeutic targets. Group I mGluR are activated by endogenous glutamate or constitutively active without agonist. Constitutive activity can be exploited by inverse agonists to reduce neuronal excitability without synaptic input. This is promising for reducing activation of nociceptive afferents and pain using mGluR5 negative allosteric modulators. Many inhibitory mGluR are also expressed in visceral afferents, many of which markedly reduce excitability. Their role in visceral pain remains to be determined, but they have shown promise in inhibition of the triggering of gastro-esophageal reflux, via an action on mechanosensory gastric afferents. The extent of reflux inhibition is limited, however, and may not reach a clinically useful level. On the other hand, negative modulation of mGluR5 has very potent actions on reflux inhibition, which has produced the most likely candidates so far as therapeutic drugs. These act probably outside the central nervous system, and may therefore provide a generous therapeutic window. There are many unanswered questions about mGluR along visceral afferent pathways, the answers to which may reveal many more therapeutic candidates. PMID:21472028

  14. Low back pain - acute

    MedlinePLUS

    Backache; Low back pain; Lumbar pain; Pain - back; Acute back pain; Back pain - new; Back pain - short-term; Back strain - new ... back supports most of your body's weight. Low back pain is the number two reason that Americans see ...

  15. Botulinum neurotoxin for pain management: insights from animal models.

    PubMed

    Pavone, Flaminia; Luvisetto, Siro

    2010-12-01

    The action of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) at the neuromuscular junction has been extensively investigated and knowledge gained in this field laid the foundation for the use of BoNTs in human pathologies characterized by excessive muscle contractions. Although much more is known about the action of BoNTs on the peripheral system, growing evidence has demonstrated several effects also at the central level. Pain conditions, with special regard to neuropathic and intractable pain, are some of the pathological states that have been recently treated with BoNTs with beneficial effects. The knowledge of the action and potentiality of BoNTs utilization against pain, with emphasis for its possible use in modulation and alleviation of chronic pain, still represents an outstanding challenge for experimental research. This review highlights recent findings on the effects of BoNTs in animal pain models. PMID:22069581

  16. Botulinum Neurotoxin for Pain Management: Insights from Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Pavone, Flaminia; Luvisetto, Siro

    2010-01-01

    The action of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) at the neuromuscular junction has been extensively investigated and knowledge gained in this field laid the foundation for the use of BoNTs in human pathologies characterized by excessive muscle contractions. Although much more is known about the action of BoNTs on the peripheral system, growing evidence has demonstrated several effects also at the central level. Pain conditions, with special regard to neuropathic and intractable pain, are some of the pathological states that have been recently treated with BoNTs with beneficial effects. The knowledge of the action and potentiality of BoNTs utilization against pain, with emphasis for its possible use in modulation and alleviation of chronic pain, still represents an outstanding challenge for experimental research. This review highlights recent findings on the effects of BoNTs in animal pain models. PMID:22069581

  17. Neck Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... over-the counter medicine, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen, to relieve pain, and apply heat to the ... an injury. Use anti-inflammatory medicines, such as ibuprofen and aspirin, to relieve pain and discomfort, and ...

  18. Finger pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain - finger ... Nearly everyone has had finger pain at some time. You may have: Tenderness Burning Stiffness Numbness Tingling Coldness Swelling Change in skin color Redness Many conditions, such ...

  19. Orofacial Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Neck, shoulder or back pain Dizziness ?xml:namespace> Sleep disorders ; If you have gone through treatment and still experience orofacial pain, you may have a sleep disorder, such as bruxism, or a sleep-related breathing ...

  20. Chest pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your jaw, left arm, or between your shoulder blades. You have nausea, dizziness, sweating, a racing heart, ... such as: Is the pain between the shoulder blades? Under the breast bone? Does the pain change ...

  1. Ribcage pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... not cause the pain in someone who has pleurisy (swelling of the lining of the lungs) or ... Inflammation of cartilage near the breastbone ( costochondritis ) Osteoporosis Pleurisy (the pain is worse when breathing deeply)

  2. Breast pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain - breast; Mastalgia; Mastodynia; Breast tenderness ... There are many possible causes for breast pain. For example, hormone level changes from menstruation or pregnancy often cause breast tenderness. Some swelling and tenderness just before your period ...

  3. Belly Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Medical Words En Espaol What Other Kids Are Reading Movie: Digestive System Winter Sports: Sledding, Skiing, Snowboarding, ... cause pain in your belly or abdomen. Keep reading to find out what belly pain is, what ...

  4. Back Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Oh, my aching back!", you are not alone. Back pain is one of the most common medical problems, ... 10 people at some point during their lives. Back pain can range from a dull, constant ache to ...

  5. Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... practice bulletin no. 51. Chronic pelvic pain. Obstetrics & Gynecology, 103 ,589–605. [top] UCSF Medical Center. (2012). ... women with chronic pelvic pain. Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology, 33 ,130–136 [top] What are common symptoms? » ...

  6. Penis pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... pain. If penis pain is caused by a sexually transmitted disease, it is important for your sexual partner to ... Are you at risk for exposure to any sexually transmitted diseases? What other symptoms do you have? The physical ...

  7. [Visceral form of human anthrax imported from Africa].

    PubMed

    Paulet, R; Caussin, C; Coudray, J M; Selcer, D; de Rohan Chabot, P

    1994-03-12

    Widespread vaccination has largely eliminated anthrax in Europe (the last case was reported in France in 1972) but the disease remains endemic in many developing countries. The usual cutaneous presentation (malignant pustules) is much more familiar than the various visceral manifestations including digestive tract, pulmonary or meningeal signs. We report a case of a 33-year-old immigrant living in France who was hospitalized for asthenia, dyspnoea, mucopurulant expectoration and moderate diarrhoea 3 days after a 3-month stay in Senegal and Gambia. The temperature was 39 degrees C at admission and blood pressure 110/70 mmHg. Crepitants were heard at the base of the right lung and the rest of the physical examination was normal. Blood was drawn for culture. Laboratory tests and the chest X-ray led to the diagnosis of pneumopathy and a treatment of amoxicillin and clavulanic acid was given with oxygenotherapy. The patient's temperature returned to normal but over the next 48 hours the dyspnoea worsened together with the black diarrhoea. The abdomen was painful. There were no skin lesions. The chest X-ray revealed an extension of the bilateral pulmonary images and bilateral pleural effusion. Laboratory tests revealed thrombopenia (platelet count 38,000/mm3) hyperleukocytosis (WBC 48,000/mm3) and haemolysis (Hb 4 milligrams). The diagnosis was made on the basis of the initial blood cultures which were positive for Bacillus anthracis. All other samples were negative, including HIV serology. Despite adapted antibiotic therapy (penicillin G, 8MU/day, was initiated on day 2), multiple organ failure occurred with septic shock and pulmonary oedema. The patient died in the intensive care unit on day 7. Fatal outcome due to anthrax is described in 25% of the visceral forms but reaches 100% in cases of septicaemia. The haemolysis observed in this case is not mentioned in the classical descriptions of anthrax. When treating septic syndromes in patients who have returned from endemic zones, clinicians should entertain the diagnosis of anthrax since the risk of fatal outcome is increased greatly in case of delayed diagnosis. PMID:8022724

  8. A sterile-female technique proposed for control of Striga hermonthica and other intractable weeds: Advantages, shortcomings, and risk management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weeds have posed intractable challenges to farmers since the dawn of agriculture. This article describes in detail a proposed control strategy based on the introduction of genes conferring female-sterility into the genomes of intractable target weeds. Spread of these genes through target populations...

  9. Role of satellite glial cells in gastrointestinal pain

    PubMed Central

    Hanani, Menachem

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) pain is a common clinical problem, for which effective therapy is quite limited. Sensations from the GI tract, including pain, are mediated largely by neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and to a smaller extent by vagal afferents emerging from neurons in the nodose/jugular ganglia. Neurons in rodent DRG become hyperexcitable in models of GI pain (e.g., gastric or colonic inflammation), and can serve as a source for chronic pain. Glial cells are another element in the pain signaling pathways, and there is evidence that spinal glial cells (microglia and astrocytes) undergo activation (gliosis) in various pain models and contribute to pain. Recently it was found that satellite glial cells (SGCs), the main type of glial cells in sensory ganglia, might also contribute to chronic pain in rodent models. Most of that work focused on somatic pain, but in several studies GI pain was also investigated, and these are discussed in the present review. We have shown that colonic inflammation induced by dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS) in mice leads to the activation of SGCs in DRG and increases gap junction-mediated coupling among these cells. This coupling appears to contribute to the hyperexcitability of DRG neurons that innervate the colon. Blocking gap junctions (GJ) in vitro reduced neuronal hyperexcitability induced by inflammation, suggesting that glial GJ participate in SGC-neuron interactions. Moreover, blocking GJ by carbenoxolone and other agents reduces pain behavior. Similar changes in SGCs were also found in the mouse nodose ganglia (NG), which provide sensory innervation to most of the GI tract. Following systemic inflammation, SGCs in these ganglia were activated, and displayed augmented coupling and greater sensitivity to the pain mediator ATP. The contribution of these changes to visceral pain remains to be determined. These results indicate that although visceral pain is unique, it shares basic mechanisms with somatic pain, suggesting that therapeutic approaches to both pain types may be similar. Future research in this field should include additional types of GI injury and also other types of visceral pain. PMID:26528140

  10. Visceral Obesity If Associated with Gallbladder Polyps

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Kyu; Hahn, Suk Jae; Kang, Hyoun Woo; Jung, Jae Gu; Choi, Han Seok; Lee, Jin Ho; Han, In Woong; Jung, Jin-Hee; Kwon, Jae Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Gallbladder polyps (GBP) are a common clinical finding and may possess malignant potential. We conducted this study to determine whether visceral obesity is a risk factor for GBP. Methods We retrospectively reviewed records of subjects who received both ultrasonography and computed tomography with measurements of the areas of visceral adipose tissue and total adipose tissue (TAT) on the same day as health checkups. Results Ninety-three of 1,615 subjects (5.8%) had GBP and were compared with 186 age- and sex-matched controls. VAT (odds ratio [OR], 2.941; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.325 to 6.529; p=0.008 for the highest quartile vs the lowest quartile) and TAT (OR, 3.568; 95% CI, 1.625 to 7.833; p=0.002 for the highest quartile vs the lowest quartile) were independent risk factors together with hypertension (OR, 2.512; 95% CI, 1.381 to 4.569; p=0.003), diabetes mellitus (OR, 2.942; 95% CI, 1.061 to 8.158; p=0.038), hepatitis B virus positivity (OR, 3.548; 95% CI, 1.295 to 9.716; p=0.014), and a higher level of total cholesterol (OR, 2.232; 95% CI, 1.043 to 4.778; p=0.039 for <200 mg/dL vs ≥240 mg/dL). Body mass index and waist circumference were not meaningful variables. Conclusions Visceral obesity measured by VAT and TAT was associated with GBP irrespective of body mass index or waist circumference. PMID:26260756

  11. Patellofemoral Pain.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Rebecca A; Khadavi, Michael J; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Patellofemoral pain is characterized by insidious onset anterior knee pain that is exaggerated under conditions of increased patellofemoral joint stress. A variety of risk factors may contribute to the development of patellofemoral pain. It is critical that the history and physical examination elucidate those risk factors specific to an individual in order to prescribe an appropriate and customized treatment plan. This article aims to review the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, and management of patellofemoral pain. PMID:26616176

  12. Lymphoid irradiation in intractable rheumatoid arthritis. Long-term followup of patients treated with 750 rads or 2,000 rads

    SciTech Connect

    Soden, M.; Hassan, J.; Scott, D.L.; Hanly, J.G.; Moriarty, M.; Whelan, A.; Feighery, C.; Bresnihan, B.

    1989-05-01

    Twenty patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis were randomized to receive 750 or 2,000 rads of lymphoid irradiation (LI) in a double-blind comparative study, and were followed for a maximum of 48 months (mean 40 months) after treatment. During followup, sustained immunomodulation (including lymphopenia, particularly of the T helper cell subset; reduced ratio of helper cells to suppressor cells; and impaired in vitro lymphocyte proliferation in response to phytohemagglutinin and pokeweed mitogen) was observed. Significant improvements in early morning stiffness, Ritchie articular index, pain score, grip strength, and 15-meter walk time were observed in both treatment groups, but these were not sustained through the followup period. Progressive joint damage was observed radiologically in both groups during followup. Thus, LI induced sustained immunosuppression, but resulted in only short-lived clinical improvement and was associated with progressive joint erosion in these patients.

  13. Visceral Sensory Inputs to the Endocrine Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Rinaman, Linda

    2007-01-01

    Interoceptive feedback signals from the body are transmitted to hypothalamic neurons that control pituitary hormone release. This review article describes the organization of central neural pathways that convey ascending visceral sensory signals to endocrine neurons in the paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic nuclei (SON) of the hypothalamus in rats. A special emphasis is placed on viscerosensory inputs to corticotropin releasing factor (CRF)-containing PVN neurons that drive the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and on inputs to magnocellular PVN and SON neurons that release vasopressin (AVP) or oxytocin (OT) from the posterior pituitary. The postnatal development of these ascending pathways also is considered. PMID:17391741

  14. Immune Regulation during Chronic Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Faleiro, Rebecca J.; Kumar, Rajiv; Hafner, Louise M.; Engwerda, Christian R.

    2014-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is a chronic parasitic disease associated with severe immune dysfunction. Treatment options are limited to relatively toxic drugs, and there is no vaccine for humans available. Hence, there is an urgent need to better understand immune responses following infection with Leishmania species by studying animal models of disease and clinical samples from patients. Here, we review recent discoveries in these areas and highlight shortcomings in our knowledge that need to be addressed if better treatment options are to be developed and effective vaccines designed. PMID:25010815

  15. Immune regulation during chronic visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Faleiro, Rebecca J; Kumar, Rajiv; Hafner, Louise M; Engwerda, Christian R

    2014-07-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is a chronic parasitic disease associated with severe immune dysfunction. Treatment options are limited to relatively toxic drugs, and there is no vaccine for humans available. Hence, there is an urgent need to better understand immune responses following infection with Leishmania species by studying animal models of disease and clinical samples from patients. Here, we review recent discoveries in these areas and highlight shortcomings in our knowledge that need to be addressed if better treatment options are to be developed and effective vaccines designed. PMID:25010815

  16. Spinal cord stimulation: Current applications for treatment of chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Vannemreddy, Prasad; Slavin, Konstantin V

    2011-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is thought to relieve chronic intractable pain by stimulating nerve fibers in the spinal cord. The resulting impulses in the fibers may inhibit the conduction of pain signals to the brain, according to the pain gate theory proposed by Melzack and Wall in 1965 and the sensation of pain is thus blocked. Although SCS may reduce pain, it will not eliminate it. After a period of concern about safety and efficacy, SCS is now regaining popularity among pain specialists for the treatment of chronic pain. The sympatholytic effect of SCS is one of its most interesting therapeutic properties. This effect is considered responsible for the effectiveness of SCS in peripheral ischemia, and at least some cases of complex regional pain syndrome. The sympatholytic effect has also been considered part of the management of other chronic pain states such as failed back surgery syndrome, phantom pain, diabetic neuropathy, and postherpetic neuralgia. In general, SCS is part of an overall treatment strategy and is used only after the more conservative treatments have failed. The concept of SCS has evolved rapidly following the technological advances that have produced leads with multiple contact electrodes and battery systems. The current prevalence of patients with chronic pain requiring treatment other than conventional medical management has significantly increased and so has been the need for SCS. With the cost benefit analysis showing significant support for SCS, it may be appropriate to offer this as an effective alternative treatment for these patients. PMID:25885295

  17. Growth Failure in Children with Intractable Epilepsy Is Not Due to Increased Resting Energy Expenditure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergqvist, A. G. Christina; Trabulsi, Jillian; Schall, Joan I.; Stallings, Virginia A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the resting energy expenditure (REE) of children with intractable epilepsy (IE) compared with healthy children, and to determine factors that contribute to the pattern of REE. REE, growth status, and body composition were assessed in 25 prepubertal children with IE (15 males, 10 females; mean age 5y 5mo [SD 2y…

  18. Growth Failure in Children with Intractable Epilepsy Is Not Due to Increased Resting Energy Expenditure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergqvist, A. G. Christina; Trabulsi, Jillian; Schall, Joan I.; Stallings, Virginia A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the resting energy expenditure (REE) of children with intractable epilepsy (IE) compared with healthy children, and to determine factors that contribute to the pattern of REE. REE, growth status, and body composition were assessed in 25 prepubertal children with IE (15 males, 10 females; mean age 5y 5mo [SD 2y

  19. Intractable Postpartum Hemorrhage Resulting from Uterine Artery Pseudoaneurysm: Superselective Arteriographic Embolization via the Collateral Route

    SciTech Connect

    Doenmez, Halil Oztuerk, M. Halil; Guergen, Fatma; Soylu, Serra O.; Hekimoglu, Baki

    2007-04-15

    We present a patient with intractable postpartum hemorrhage resulting from uterine artery pseudoaneurysm despite bilateral hypogastric artery ligation who was successfully treated by an endovascular approach via the collateral route. Although there is a good argument for postponing surgery until transcatheter embolization has been attempted, this case shows that embolization can still be successful even if the iliac vessels have been ligated.

  20. Management of chronic severe pain: spinal neuromodulatory and neuroablative approaches.

    PubMed

    Raslan, A M; McCartney, S; Burchiel, K J

    2007-01-01

    The spinal cord is the target of many neurosurgical procedures used to treat pain. Compactness and well-defined tract separation in addition to well understood dermatomal cord organization make the spinal cord an ideal target for pain procedures. Moreover, the presence of opioid and other receptors involved in pain modulation at the level of the dorsal horn increases the suitability of the spinal cord. Neuromodulative approaches of the spinal cord are either electrical or pharmacological. Electrical spinal cord modulation is used on a large scale for various pain syndromes including; failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS), complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), neuropathic pain, angina, and ischemic limb pain. Intraspinal delivery of medications e.g. opioids is used to treat nociceptive and neuropathic pains due to malignant and cancer pain etiologies. Neuroablation of the spinal cord pain pathway is mainly used to treat cancer pain. Targets involved include; the spinothalamic tract, the midline dorsal column visceral pain pathway and the trigeminal tract in the upper spinal cord. Spinal neuroablation can also involve cellular elements such as with trigeminal nucleotomy and the dorsal root entry zone (DREZ) operation. The DREZ operation is indicated for phantom type pain and root avulsion injuries. Due to its reversible nature spinal neuromodulation prevails, and spinal neuroablation is performed in a few select cases. PMID:17691354

  1. Challenges in pain management at the end of life.

    PubMed

    Miller, K E; Miller, M M; Jolley, M R

    2001-10-01

    Effective pain management in the terminally ill patient requires an understanding of pain control strategies. Ongoing assessment of pain is crucial and can be accomplished using various forms and scales. It is also important to determine if the pain is nociceptive (somatic or visceral pain) or neuropathic (continuous dysesthesias or chronic lancinating or paroxysmal pain). Nociceptive pain can usually be controlled with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs or corticosteroids, whereas neuropathic pain responds to tricyclic antidepressants or anticonvulsants. Relief of breakthrough pain requires the administration of an immediate-release analgesic medication. If a significant amount of medication for breakthrough pain is already being given, the baseline dose of sustained-release analgesic medication should be increased. If pain does not respond to one analgesic medication, physicians should use an equianalgesic dose chart when changing the medication or route of administration. Opioid rotation can be used if pain can no longer be controlled on a specific regimen. The impact of unresolved psychosocial or spiritual issues on pain management may need to be addressed. PMID:11601805

  2. Visceral Leishmaniasis in Ethiopia: An Evolving Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leta, Samson; Dao, Thi Ha Thanh; Mesele, Frehiwot; Alemayehu, Gezahegn

    2014-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (also known as kala-azar) is classified as one of the most neglected tropical diseases. It is becoming a growing health problem in Ethiopia, with endemic areas that are continually spreading. The annual burden of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in Ethiopia is estimated to be between 4,500 and 5,000 cases, and the population at risk is more than 3.2 million. There has been a change in the epidemiology of VL in Ethiopia. Over the last decades, almost all cases and outbreaks of VL were reported from arid and semi-arid parts of the country; however, recent reports indicated the introduction of this disease into the highlands. Migration of labourers to and from endemic areas, climatic and environmental changes, and impaired immunity due to HIV/AIDS and malnutrition resulted in the change of VL epidemiology. HIV spurs the spread of VL by increasing the risk of progression from asymptomatic infection towards full VL. Conversely, VL accelerates the onset of AIDS. In Ethiopia, VL epidemiology remains complex because of the diversity of risk factors involved, and its control is becoming an increasing challenge. This paper reviews the changes in epidemiology of VL in Ethiopia and discusses some of the possible explanations for these changes. The prospects for novel approaches to VL control are discussed, as are the current and future challenges facing Ethiopia's public health development program. PMID:25188253

  3. Visceral leishmaniasis in Ethiopia: an evolving disease.

    PubMed

    Leta, Samson; Dao, Thi Ha Thanh; Mesele, Frehiwot; Alemayehu, Gezahegn

    2014-09-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (also known as kala-azar) is classified as one of the most neglected tropical diseases. It is becoming a growing health problem in Ethiopia, with endemic areas that are continually spreading. The annual burden of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in Ethiopia is estimated to be between 4,500 and 5,000 cases, and the population at risk is more than 3.2 million. There has been a change in the epidemiology of VL in Ethiopia. Over the last decades, almost all cases and outbreaks of VL were reported from arid and semi-arid parts of the country; however, recent reports indicated the introduction of this disease into the highlands. Migration of labourers to and from endemic areas, climatic and environmental changes, and impaired immunity due to HIV/AIDS and malnutrition resulted in the change of VL epidemiology. HIV spurs the spread of VL by increasing the risk of progression from asymptomatic infection towards full VL. Conversely, VL accelerates the onset of AIDS. In Ethiopia, VL epidemiology remains complex because of the diversity of risk factors involved, and its control is becoming an increasing challenge. This paper reviews the changes in epidemiology of VL in Ethiopia and discusses some of the possible explanations for these changes. The prospects for novel approaches to VL control are discussed, as are the current and future challenges facing Ethiopia's public health development program. PMID:25188253

  4. Genetically Modified Organisms and Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Chhajer, Rudra; Ali, Nahid

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination is the most effective method of preventing infectious diseases. Since the eradication of small pox in 1976, many other potentially life compromising if not threatening diseases have been dealt with subsequently. This event was a major leap not only in the scientific world already burdened with many diseases but also in the mindset of the common man who became more receptive to novel treatment options. Among the many protozoan diseases, the leishmaniases have emerged as one of the largest parasite killers of the world, second only to malaria. There are three types of leishmaniasis namely cutaneous (CL), mucocutaneous (ML), and visceral (VL), caused by a group of more than 20 species of Leishmania parasites. Visceral leishmaniasis, also known as kala-azar is the most severe form and almost fatal if untreated. Since the first attempts at leishmanization, we have killed parasite vaccines, subunit protein, or DNA vaccines, and now we have live recombinant carrier vaccines and live attenuated parasite vaccines under various stages of development. Although some research has shown promising results, many more potential genes need to be evaluated as live attenuated vaccine candidates. This mini-review attempts to summarize the success and failures of genetically modified organisms used in vaccination against some of major parasitic diseases for their application in leishmaniasis. PMID:24860575

  5. [NLRP3 inflammasome and visceral adipose tissue].

    PubMed

    Esser, N; Legrand-Poels, S; Piette, J; Paquot, N; Scheen, A J

    2014-01-01

    It is recognized that abdominal obesity is accompanied by a chronic low-grade inflammation that is involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes are associated with an abnormal production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, an increased level of acute-phase proteins and an activation of inflammatory signalling pathways. These pro-inflammatory cytokines, mainly produced by adipose tissue macrophages, are involved in development of obesity-associated insulin resistance and in the progression from obesity to type 2 diabetes. Particularly, the interleukin-1 beta may play a key role through the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Adipose tissue topography, more than the total amount of fat, may play an important pathogenic role. Indeed, the presence of metabolic abnormalities in obesity is associated with a deleterious immunological and inflammatory profile of visceral adipose tissue and with an increased activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in macrophages infiltrating visceral adipose tissue. Targeting inflammation, especially NLRP3 inflammasome, may offer potential novel therapeutic perspectives in the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:25796800

  6. Endemic transmission of visceral leishmaniasis in Bhutan.

    PubMed

    Yangzom, Thinley; Cruz, Israel; Bern, Caryn; Argaw, Daniel; den Boer, Margriet; Vlez, Ivn Dario; Bhattacharya, Sujit K; Molina, Ricardo; Alvar, Jorge

    2012-12-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis was first reported in Bhutan in 2006. We conducted studies of the parasite, possible vectors and reservoirs, and leishmanin skin test and risk factor surveys in three villages. Nineteen cases were reported from seven districts. Parasite typing yielded two novel microsatellite sequences, both related to Indian L. donovani. In one case village, 40 (18.5%) of 216 participants had positive leishmanin skin test results, compared with 3 (4.2%) of 72 in the other case village and 0 of 108 in the control village. Positive results were strongly associated with the village and increasing age. None of the tested dogs were infected. Eighteen sand flies were collected, 13 Phlebotomus species and 5 Sergentomyia species; polymerase chain reaction for leishmanial DNA was negative. This assessment suggests that endemic visceral leishmaniasis transmission has occurred in diverse locations in Bhutan. Surveillance, case investigations, and further parasite, vector, and reservoir studies are needed. The potential protective impact of bed nets should be evaluated. PMID:23091191

  7. Genetically modified organisms and visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Chhajer, Rudra; Ali, Nahid

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination is the most effective method of preventing infectious diseases. Since the eradication of small pox in 1976, many other potentially life compromising if not threatening diseases have been dealt with subsequently. This event was a major leap not only in the scientific world already burdened with many diseases but also in the mindset of the common man who became more receptive to novel treatment options. Among the many protozoan diseases, the leishmaniases have emerged as one of the largest parasite killers of the world, second only to malaria. There are three types of leishmaniasis namely cutaneous (CL), mucocutaneous (ML), and visceral (VL), caused by a group of more than 20 species of Leishmania parasites. Visceral leishmaniasis, also known as kala-azar is the most severe form and almost fatal if untreated. Since the first attempts at leishmanization, we have killed parasite vaccines, subunit protein, or DNA vaccines, and now we have live recombinant carrier vaccines and live attenuated parasite vaccines under various stages of development. Although some research has shown promising results, many more potential genes need to be evaluated as live attenuated vaccine candidates. This mini-review attempts to summarize the success and failures of genetically modified organisms used in vaccination against some of major parasitic diseases for their application in leishmaniasis. PMID:24860575

  8. Mechanisms of Acupuncture-Electroacupuncture on Persistent Pain

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruixin; Lao, Lixing; Ren, Ke; Berman, Brian M.

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, preclinical investigations of electroacupuncture mechanisms on persistent tissue-injury (inflammatory), nerve-injury (neuropathic), cancer, and visceral pain have increased. These studies show that electroacupuncture activates the nervous system differently in health than in pain conditions, alleviates both sensory and affective inflammatory pain, and inhibits inflammatory and neuropathic pain more effectively at 210 Hz than at 100 Hz. Electroacupuncture blocks pain by activating a variety of bioactive chemicals through peripheral, spinal, and supraspinal mechanisms. These include opioids, which desensitize peripheral nociceptors and reduce pro-inflammatory cytokines peripherally and in the spinal cord, and serotonin and norepinephrine, which decrease spinal n-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit GluN1 phosphorylation. Additional studies suggest that electroacupuncture, when combined with low dosages of conventional analgesics, provides effective pain management that can forestall the side effects of often-debilitating pharmaceuticals. PMID:24322588

  9. Resiniferatoxin for Pain Treatment: An Interventional Approach to Personalized Pain Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Iadarola, Michael J.; Gonnella, Gian Luigi

    2015-01-01

    This review examines existing preclinical and clinical studies related to resiniferatoxin (RTX) and its potential uses in pain treatment. Like capsaicin, RTX is a vanilloid receptor (TRPV1) agonist, only more potent. This increased potency confers both quantitative and qualitative advantages in terms of drug action on the TRPV1 containing nerve terminal, which result in an increased efficacy and a long duration of action. RTX can be delivered by a central route of administration through injection into the subarachnoid space around the lumbosacral spinal cord. It can also be administered peripherally into a region of skin or deep tissue where primary afferents nerves terminate, or directly into a nerve trunk or a dorsal root ganglion. The central route is currently being evaluated as a treatment for intractable pain in patients with advanced cancer. Peripheral administration offers the possibility to treat a wide diversity of pain problems because of the ability to bring the treatment to the site of the pain (the peripheral generator). While not all pain disorders are appropriate for RTX, tailoring treatment to an individual patient's needs via a selective and local intervention that chemically targets a specific population of nerve terminals provides a new capability for pain therapy and a simplified and effective approach to personalized pain medicine. PMID:26779292

  10. Effect of intraperitoneal local anesthetic on pain characteristics after laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Geun Joo; Kang, Hyun; Baek, Chong Wha; Jung, Yong Hun; Kim, Dong Rim

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To systematically evaluate the effect of intraperitoneal local anesthetic on pain characteristics after laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library. Randomized controlled trials in English that compared the effect of intraperitoneal administration of local anesthetics on pain with that of placebo or nothing after elective LC under general anesthesia were included. The primary outcome variables analyzed were the combined scores of abdominal, visceral, parietal, and shoulder pain after LC at multiple time points. We also extracted pain scores at resting and dynamic states. RESULTS: We included 39 studies of 3045 patients in total. The administration of intraperitoneal local anesthetic reduced pain intensity in a resting state after laparoscopic cholecystectomy: abdominal [standardized mean difference (SMD) = -0.741; 95%CI: -1.001 to -0.48, P < 0.001]; visceral (SMD = -0.249; 95%CI: -0.493 to -0.006, P = 0.774); and shoulder (SMD = -0.273; 95%CI: -0.464 to -0.082, P = 0.097). Application of intraperitoneal local anesthetic significantly reduced the incidence of shoulder pain (RR = 0.437; 95%CI: 0.299 to 0.639, P < 0.001). There was no favorable effect on resting parietal or dynamic abdominal pain. CONCLUSION: Intraperitoneal local anesthetic as an analgesic adjuvant in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy exhibited beneficial effects on postoperative abdominal, visceral, and shoulder pain in a resting state. PMID:26715824

  11. Low back pain - chronic

    MedlinePLUS

    Nonspecific back pain; Backache - chronic; Lumbar pain - chronic; Pain - back - chronic; Chronic back pain - low ... Low back pain is common. Almost everyone has back pain at some time in their life. Often, the exact cause ...

  12. Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Costigan, Michael; Scholz, Joachim; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2009-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is triggered by lesions to the somatosensory nervous system that alter its structure and function so that pain occurs spontaneously and responses to noxious and innocuous stimuli are pathologically amplified. The pain is an expression of maladaptive plasticity within the nociceptive system, a series of changes that constitute a neural disease state. Multiple alterations distributed widely across the nervous system contribute to complex pain phenotypes. These alterations include ectopic generation of action potentials, facilitation and disinhibition of synaptic transmission, loss of synaptic connectivity and formation of new synaptic circuits, and neuroimmune interactions. Although neural lesions are necessary, they are not sufficient to generate neuropathic pain; genetic polymorphisms, gender, and age all influence the risk of developing persistent pain. Treatment needs to move from merely suppressing symptoms to a disease-modifying strategy aimed at both preventing maladaptive plasticity and reducing intrinsic risk. PMID:19400724

  13. Involvement of cannabinoid receptors in gut motility and visceral perception

    PubMed Central

    Hornby, Pamela J; Prouty, Stephen M

    2004-01-01

    From a historical perspective to the present day, all the evidence suggests that activation of cannabinoid receptors (CBRs) is beneficial for gut discomfort and pain, which are symptoms related to dysmotility and visceral perception. CBRs comprise G-protein coupled receptors that are predominantly in enteric and central neurones (CB1R) and immune cells (CB2R). In the last decade, evidence obtained from the use of selective agonists and inverse agonists/antagonists indicates that manipulation of CB1R can alter (1) sensory processing from the gut, (2) brain integration of brain-gut axis, (3) extrinsic control of the gut and (4) intrinsic control by the enteric nervous system. The extent to which activation of CB1R is most critical at these different levels is related to the region of the GI tract. The upper GI tract is strongly influenced by CB1R activation on central vagal pathways, whereas intestinal peristalsis can be modified by CB1R activation in the absence of extrinsic input. Actions at multiple levels make the CB1R a target for the treatment of functional bowel disorders, such as IBS. Since low-grade inflammation may act as a trigger for occurrence of IBS, CB2R modulation could be beneficial, but there is little supporting evidence for this yet. The challenge is to accomplish CBR activation while minimizing adverse effects and abuse liabilities. Potential therapeutic strategies involve increasing signaling by endocannabinoids (EC). The pathways involved in the biosynthesis, uptake and degradation of EC provide opportunities for modulation of CB1R and some recent evidence with inhibitors of EC uptake and metabolism suggest that these could be exploited for therapeutic gain. PMID:15100166

  14. Involvement of cannabinoid receptors in gut motility and visceral perception.

    PubMed

    Hornby, Pamela J; Prouty, Stephen M

    2004-04-01

    From a historical perspective to the present day, all the evidence suggests that activation of cannabinoid receptors (CBRs) is beneficial for gut discomfort and pain, which are symptoms related to dysmotility and visceral perception. CBRs comprise G-protein coupled receptors that are predominantly in enteric and central neurones (CB1R) and immune cells (CB2R). In the last decade, evidence obtained from the use of selective agonists and inverse agonists/antagonists indicates that manipulation of CB1R can alter (1) sensory processing from the gut, (2) brain integration of brain-gut axis, (3) extrinsic control of the gut and (4) intrinsic control by the enteric nervous system. The extent to which activation of CB1R is most critical at these different levels is related to the region of the GI tract. The upper GI tract is strongly influenced by CB1R activation on central vagal pathways, whereas intestinal peristalsis can be modified by CB1R activation in the absence of extrinsic input. Actions at multiple levels make the CB1R a target for the treatment of functional bowel disorders, such as IBS. Since low-grade inflammation may act as a trigger for occurrence of IBS, CB2R modulation could be beneficial, but there is little supporting evidence for this yet. The challenge is to accomplish CBR activation while minimizing adverse effects and abuse liabilities. Potential therapeutic strategies involve increasing signaling by endocannabinoids (EC). The pathways involved in the biosynthesis, uptake and degradation of EC provide opportunities for modulation of CB1R and some recent evidence with inhibitors of EC uptake and metabolism suggest that these could be exploited for therapeutic gain. PMID:15100166

  15. Clinico-hematological profile of visceral leishmaniasis among immunocompetent patients.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Sudipta; Sarkar, Supriya; Goswami, Bidyut Krishna; Sarkar, Niladri; Das, Shikha

    2013-03-01

    We studied cases of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) over a 2-year period among immunocompetent patients who presented to a rural medical college in West Bengal, India to determine a clinical and hematological profile among these patients. We studied a total of 36 cases of VL; the male to female ratio of the cases was 1.6:1 and the mean age was 20.1+/-11.1 years. A detailed history, physical examination, hemogram, bone marrow or splenic aspiration and chest x-ray were conducted on all cases. A CT-scan of the thorax and fiberoptic bronchoscopy were performed in selected cases. Fever and splenomegaly were present in all cases. Weakness, abdominal pain, bleeding, and hepatomegaly were seen in 63.9, 27.8, 8.3 and 58.3% of cases, respectively. Pancytopenia, bicytopenia, leukopenia and thrombocytopenia were seen in 58.3, 41.7, 61.1 and 83.3% of cases, respectively. Five patients (13.9%) had cough, 2 (5.6%) had hemoptysis, 6 (16.7%) had an abnormal chest x-ray and 3 (8.3%) had localized reticulo-nodular opacities on a CT-scan of the thorax. Bronchoalveolar lavage showed gram-positive cocci in 2 cases (5.6%). One patient died of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Cytopenia was common among the series of VL patients. Pulmonary complications, usually secondary infection, were less frequent (found in 13.9% cases) but was fatal in one patient. PMID:23691621

  16. Disseminated visceral coccidiosis in sandhill cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, J.W.; Novilla, M.N.; Fayer, R.; Iverson, G.C.

    1984-01-01

    Disseminated visceral coccidiosis (DVC) caused by Eimeria spp was first recognized as a disease entity in captive sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) and whooping cranes (G americana) at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center. Because cranes produced at the Center are reintroduced to the wild to augment wild populations, studies involving both experimentally induced and natural infections were initiated to determine the potential or actual occurrence of DVC in wild Gruidae. Nine sandhill cranes dosed orally with eimerian oocysts of wild origin developed lesions characteristic of DVC. Extraintestinal granulomas associated with developing schizonts were found in 6 birds. Similar lesions were observed in wild sandhill cranes throughout parts of midwestern United States, Alaska, and Saskatchewan. These studies revealed the wide geographic distribution and the high frequency of occurrence of DVC in wild cranes.

  17. Aneurysms of the visceral and renal arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Panayiotopoulos, Y. P.; Assadourian, R.; Taylor, P. R.

    1996-01-01

    Visceral aneurysms represent a rare clinical entity; however, 10-20% will rupture and this is accompanied by a significant mortality rate of 20-70%, depending on the location of the aneurysm. The incidence, pathogenesis and clinical aspects of splanchnic and renal artery aneurysms are reviewed from the available literature and the problems of diagnosis and treatment are discussed. Their incidence is increasing and controversy still exists regarding their treatment. The decision for intervention has to take into account the size and the natural history of the lesion, the risk of rupture, which is high during pregnancy, and the relative risk of surgical or radiological intervention. For most asymptomatic aneurysms, expectant treatment is acceptable. For large, symptomatic or aneurysms with a high risk of rupture, surgery is advisable. An alternative treatment is the use of endovascular techniques, ie embolisation, or graft stent insertion. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:8881722

  18. Multiple Hemolymphangioma of the Visceral Organs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Deng-Yong; Lu, Zheng; Ma, Xiang; Wang, Qiu-Yue; Sun, Wang-Liang; Wu, Wei; Cui, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Hemolymphangioma is a rare disease with malformation of both lymphatic and vascular vessels. Few cases of hemolymphangioma occurring in the rectum, small intestine, pancreas, esophagus, and other organs have been reported. Nevertheless, multiple hemolymphangioma of the visceral organs are extremely rare. We report a 25-year-old female with a significantly enlarged spleen full of multiple-rounded lesions. Curiously, the splenic flexure and even retroperitoneum had many lesions. The patient recovered well after splenectomy and the pathologic diagnosis of spleen was hemolymphangioma with abnormal lymphatic and blood vessels with polycystic spaces. Usually, it is hard to cure this disease. We should take much more consideration into the diagnosis, treatment, and even pathogenesis, even though it is a benign lesion. PMID:26166115

  19. Visceral leishmaniasis in zoo and wildlife.

    PubMed

    Souza, Tayse Domingues; Turchetti, Andréia Pereira; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; Paixão, Tatiane Alves; Santos, Renato Lima

    2014-03-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is an emerging zoonosis caused by Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum. Although the domestic dog is the main vertebrate host, many zoo and wild mammal species have been diagnosed with L. infantum infection, especially in endemic areas. There are many available diagnostic approaches, including serological, parasitological and molecular tests. Among wild animals, carnivores and primates are more often clinically affected, with some species, such as the bush dog (Speothos venaticus) being especially susceptible to development of clinical signs. There are also reports and research articles of VL in felids, rodents, and marsupials. This work aims to review the occurrence of VL in zoo and wildlife and raise awareness of its importance in the field of conservational veterinary medicine. PMID:24439771

  20. Effects of Combined Opioids on Pain and Mood in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Rech, Richard H.; Mokler, David J.; Briggs, Shannon L.

    2012-01-01

    The authors review the opioid literature for evidence of increased analgesia and reduced adverse side effects by combining mu-opioid-receptor (MOR) agonists, kappa-opioid-receptor (KOR) agonists, and nonselective low-dose-opioid antagonists (LD-Ant). We tested fentanyl (MOR agonist) and spiradoline (KOR agonist), singly and combined, against somatic and visceral pain models. Combined agonists induced additive analgesia in somatic pain and synergistic analgesia in visceral pain. Other investigators report similar effects and reduced tolerance and dependence with combined MOR agonist and KOR agonist. LD-Ant added to either a MOR agonist or KOR agonist markedly enhanced analgesia of either agonist. In accordance with other place-conditioning (PC) studies, our PC investigations showed fentanyl-induced place preference (CPP) and spiradoline-induced place aversion (CPA). We reduced fentanyl CPP with a low dose of spiradoline and reduced spiradoline CPA with a low dose of fentanyl. We propose combined MOR agonist, KOR agonist, and LD-Ant to produce superior analgesia with reduced adverse side effects, particularly for visceral pain. PMID:22550575

  1. Ancient origin of somatic and visceral neurons

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A key to understanding the evolution of the nervous system on a large phylogenetic scale is the identification of homologous neuronal types. Here, we focus this search on the sensory and motor neurons of bilaterians, exploiting their well-defined molecular signatures in vertebrates. Sensorimotor circuits in vertebrates are of two types: somatic (that sense the environment and respond by shaping bodily motions) and visceral (that sense the interior milieu and respond by regulating vital functions). These circuits differ by a small set of largely dedicated transcriptional determinants: Brn3 is expressed in many somatic sensory neurons, first and second order (among which mechanoreceptors are uniquely marked by the Brn3+/Islet1+/Drgx+ signature), somatic motoneurons uniquely co-express Lhx3/4 and Mnx1, while the vast majority of neurons, sensory and motor, involved in respiration, blood circulation or digestion are molecularly defined by their expression and dependence on the pan-visceral determinant Phox2b. Results We explore the status of the sensorimotor transcriptional code of vertebrates in mollusks, a lophotrochozoa clade that provides a rich repertoire of physiologically identified neurons. In the gastropods Lymnaea stagnalis and Aplysia californica, we show that homologues of Brn3, Drgx, Islet1, Mnx1, Lhx3/4 and Phox2b differentially mark neurons with mechanoreceptive, locomotory and cardiorespiratory functions. Moreover, in the cephalopod Sepia officinalis, we show that Phox2 marks the stellate ganglion (in line with the respiratory — that is, visceral— ancestral role of the mantle, its target organ), while the anterior pedal ganglion, which controls the prehensile and locomotory arms, expresses Mnx. Conclusions Despite considerable divergence in overall neural architecture, a molecular underpinning for the functional allocation of neurons to interactions with the environment or to homeostasis was inherited from the urbilaterian ancestor by contemporary protostomes and deuterostomes. PMID:23631531

  2. Vulnerability in Clinical Research with Patients in Pain

    PubMed Central

    Tait, Raymond C.

    2011-01-01

    Some have characterized patients living with intractable pain as a vulnerable population in both clinical and research settings. Labeling the population as vulnerable, however, does not provide clarity regarding the potential risks that they face when they participate in research. Instead, research vulnerability for patients in pain is a function of an interaction between their pain conditions and elements of the research enterprise. Therefore, the identification of potential risks requires consideration not only of characteristics of patients with chronic pain, but also consideration of features of researchers, the quality of institutional oversight, and the medical/social environment within which the research is conducted. This paper provides an analysis of those risks and provides some suggestions as to how the risks might be better managed. PMID:19245603

  3. Abdominal pain in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: a review of putative psychological, neural and neuro-immune mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Elsenbruch, Sigrid

    2011-03-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is a common symptom of great clinical significance in several areas of medicine. In many cases no organic cause can be established resulting in the classification as functional gastrointestinal disorder. Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is the most common of these conditions and is considered an important public health problem because it can be disabling and constitutes a major social and economic burden given the lack of effective treatments. IBS aetiology is most likely multi-factorial involving biological, psychological and social factors. Visceral hyperalgesia (or hypersensitivity) and visceral hypervigilance, which could be mediated by peripheral, spinal, and/or central pathways, constitute key concepts in current research on pathophysiological mechanisms of visceral hyperalgesia. The role of central nervous system mechanisms along the "brain-gut axis" is increasingly appreciated, owing to accumulating evidence from brain imaging studies that neural processing of visceral stimuli is altered in IBS together with long-standing knowledge regarding the contribution of stress and negative emotions to symptom frequency and severity. At the same time, there is also growing evidence suggesting that peripheral immune mechanisms and disturbed neuro-immune communication could play a role in the pathophysiology of visceral hyperalgesia. This review presents recent advances in research on the pathophysiology of visceral hyperalgesia in IBS, with a focus on the role of stress and anxiety in central and peripheral response to visceral pain stimuli. Together, these findings support that in addition to lower pain thresholds displayed by a significant proportion of patients, the evaluation of pain appears to be altered in IBS. This may be attributable to affective disturbances, negative emotions in anticipation of or during visceral stimulation, and altered pain-related expectations and learning processes. Disturbed "top-down" emotional and cognitive pain modulation in IBS is reflected by functional and possibly structural brain changes involving prefrontal as well as cingulate regions. At the same time, there is growing evidence linking peripheral and mucosal immune changes and abdominal pain in IBS, supporting disturbed peripheral pain signalling. Findings in post-infectious IBS emphasize the interaction between centrally-mediated psychosocial risk factors and local inflammation in predicting long-term IBS symptoms. Investigating afferent immune-to-brain communication in visceral hyperalgesia as a component of the sickness response constitutes a promising future research goal. PMID:21094682

  4. Neuroimaging and pain: a window on the autonomic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Leone, M; Proietti Cecchini, A; Mea, E; Tullo, V; Curone, M; Bussone, G

    2006-05-01

    Pain is one of the most common experiences of humans. Neuroimaging techniques can visualize the main brain areas involved in pain modulation, the pain matrix. It is noteworthy that many of the brain areas forming the pain matrix are also involved in modulating autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity that in turn plays a major role in determining the best adaptive response to the pain experience. The tight connection between the pain system and ANS is also evident from neuroanatomical studies indicating that the lamina 1 neurons receive both painful and visceral stimuli from all visceral organs giving rise to the spinothalamocortical pathway concerned with conveying interoceptive information to central structures. The resulting interoceptive stream projects to the viscerosensory cortex in the mid-insula and onto the right anterior insula and orbitofrontal cortices. Right anterior insula activation is involved in the sympathetic arousal associated with mental tasks. This brain region receives numerous other inputs including pain and painful stimuli are conveyed somatotopically to both insulae. A similar somatotopic organization of painful stimuli has also been shown in the basal ganglia involved in cognitive, affective, motor and autonomic states. This highly specialized organization of nociceptive information in these brain areas may subserve a number of functions, particularly of coupling pain with the most appropriate autonomic states and affective/emotional states. The anterior cingulated cortex, another brain area playing a crucial role in nociception, is also directly involved in the control of autonomic functions such as arousal during volitional behaviour, including effortful cognitive processing. It is evident that the nociceptive system and ANS closely interact in many processes involved in maintaining internal homeostatis and in order to give the most appropriate biological substrate for cognitive, affective and emotional states. PMID:16688617

  5. Percutaneous Cyanoacrylate Glue Injection into the Renal Pseudoaneurysm to Control Intractable Hematuria After Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    SciTech Connect

    Lal, Anupam Kumar, Ajay; Prakash, Mahesh; Singhal, Manphool; Agarwal, Mayank Mohan; Sarkar, Debansu; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2009-07-15

    We report a case of a 43-year-old man who developed intractable hematuria after percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Angiography detected a pseudoaneurysm arising from the lower polar artery; however, embolization could not be performed because of unfavorable vascular anatomy. A percutaneous thrombin injection under ultrasound guidance initially controlled the bleeding, but hematuria subsequently recurred as a result of recanalization of the aneurysm. The case was successfully managed with ultrasound- and fluoroscopic-guided direct injection of cyanoacrylate glue into the pseudoaneurysm.

  6. [Case of intractable ventricula fibrillation by a multicomponent dietary supplement containing ephedra and caffeine overdose].

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Homma, Masato; Inoue, Junichi; Kato, Hiroshi; Murata, Kiyoshi; Ogasawara, Tomoko

    2007-07-01

    Multicomponent dietary supplement containing ephedra and caffeine (DSEC) was widely used for weight loss and energy enhancement. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) banned the sale of DSEC in 2004 because of side effects such as cardiotoxity. We report a rare case of intractable ventricular fibrillation, requiring frequent defibrillation, by DSEC overdose. The direct cardiotoxity of ephedra, synergistic effect of caffeine and ephedra, and hypokalemia may cause refractory ventricular arrhythmia. PMID:17784561

  7. Impact of Bioelectronic Medicine on the Neural Regulation of Pelvic Visceral Function

    PubMed Central

    de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2015-01-01

    Neuromodulation elicited by electrical stimulation of peripheral or spinal nerves is a U.S. Food and Drug Administered (FDA)-approved therapy for treating disorders of the pelvic viscera, including urinary urgency, urgency-frequency, nonobstructive urinary retention and fecal incontinence. The technique is also being tested experimentally for its efficacy in treating interstitial cystitis, chronic constipation and pelvic pain. The goal of neuromodulation is to suppress abnormal visceral sensations and involuntary reflexes and restore voluntary control. Although detailed mechanisms underlying the effects of neuromodulation are still to be elucidated, it is generally believed that effects are due to stimulation of action potentials in somatic afferent nerves. Afferent nerves project to the lumbosacral spinal cord, where they release excitatory neurotransmitters that activate ascending pathways to the brain or spinal circuits that modulate visceral sensory and involuntary motor mechanisms. Studies in animals revealed that different types of neuromodulation (for example, stimulation of a sacral spinal root, pudendal nerve or posterior tibial nerve) act by releasing different inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. In addition, certain types of neuromodulation inhibit visceral smooth muscle by initiating reflex firing in peripheral autonomic nerves or excite striated sphincter muscles by initiating reflex firing in somatic efferent nerves. This report will provide a brief summary of (a) neural control of the lower urinary tract and distal bowel, (b) clinical use of neuromodulation in the treatment of bladder and bowel dysfunctions, (c) putative mechanisms of action of neuromodulation on the basis of animal experiments and (d) new approaches using combination therapies to improve the efficacy of neuromodulation. PMID:26491706

  8. VEGF induces sensory and motor peripheral plasticity, alters bladder function, and promotes visceral sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This work tests the hypothesis that bladder instillation with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) modulates sensory and motor nerve plasticity, and, consequently, bladder function and visceral sensitivity. In addition to C57BL/6J, ChAT-cre mice were used for visualization of bladder cholinergic nerves. The direct effect of VEGF on the density of sensory nerves expressing the transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily 1 (TRPV1) and cholinergic nerves (ChAT) was studied one week after one or two intravesical instillations of the growth factor. To study the effects of VEGF on bladder function, mice were intravesically instilled with VEGF and urodynamic evaluation was assessed. VEGF-induced alteration in bladder dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons was performed on retrogradly labeled urinary bladder afferents by patch-clamp recording of voltage gated Na+ currents. Determination of VEGF-induced changes in sensitivity to abdominal mechanostimulation was performed by application of von Frey filaments. Results In addition to an overwhelming increase in TRPV1 immunoreactivity, VEGF instillation resulted in an increase in ChAT-directed expression of a fluorescent protein in several layers of the urinary bladder. Intravesical VEGF caused a profound change in the function of the urinary bladder: acute VEGF (1 week post VEGF treatment) reduced micturition pressure and longer treatment (2 weeks post-VEGF instillation) caused a substantial reduction in inter-micturition interval. In addition, intravesical VEGF resulted in an up-regulation of voltage gated Na+ channels (VGSC) in bladder DRG neurons and enhanced abdominal sensitivity to mechanical stimulation. Conclusions For the first time, evidence is presented indicating that VEGF instillation into the mouse bladder promotes a significant increase in peripheral nerve density together with alterations in bladder function and visceral sensitivity. The VEGF pathway is being proposed as a key modulator of neural plasticity in the pelvis and enhanced VEGF content may be associated with visceral hyperalgesia, abdominal discomfort, and/or pelvic pain. PMID:23249422

  9. Research Progress on the Role of ABC Transporters in the Drug Resistance Mechanism of Intractable Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jie; Mao, Ding-an; Liu, Li-qun

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of intractable epilepsy is not fully clear. In recent years, both animal and clinical trials have shown that the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters is increased in patients with intractable epilepsy; additionally, epileptic seizures can lead to an increase in the number of sites that express ABC transporters. These findings suggest that ABC transporters play an important role in the drug resistance mechanism of epilepsy. ABC transporters can perform the funcions of a drug efflux pump, which can reduce the effective drug concentration at epilepsy lesions by reducing the permeability of the blood brain barrier to antiepileptic drugs, thus causing resistance to antiepileptic drugs. Given the important role of ABC transporters in refractory epilepsy drug resistance, antiepileptic drugs that are not substrates of ABC transporters were used to obtain ABC transporter inhibitors with strong specificity, high safety, and few side effects, making them suitable for long-term use; therefore, these drugs can be used for future clinical treatment of intractable epilepsy. PMID:26491660

  10. Drosophila as a Model for Intractable Epilepsy: Gilgamesh Suppresses Seizures in parabss1 Heterozygote Flies

    PubMed Central

    Howlett, Iris C.; Rusan, Zeid M.; Parker, Louise; Tanouye, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Intractable epilepsies, that is, seizure disorders that do not respond to currently available therapies, are difficult, often tragic, neurological disorders. Na+ channelopathies have been implicated in some intractable epilepsies, including Dravet syndrome (Dravet 1978), but little progress has been forthcoming in therapeutics. Here we examine a Drosophila model for intractable epilepsy, the Na+ channel gain-of-function mutant parabss1 that resembles Dravet syndrome in some aspects (parker et al. 2011a). In particular, we identify second-site mutations that interact with parabss1, seizure enhancers, and seizure suppressors. We describe one seizure-enhancer mutation named charlatan (chn). The chn gene normally encodes an Neuron-Restrictive Silencer Factor/RE1-Silencing Transcription factor transcriptional repressor of neuronal-specific genes. We identify a second-site seizure-suppressor mutation, gilgamesh (gish), that reduces the severity of several seizure-like phenotypes of parabss1/+ heterozygotes. The gish gene normally encodes the Drosophila ortholog of casein kinase CK1g3, a member of the CK1 family of serine-threonine kinases. We suggest that CK1g3 is an unexpected but promising new target for seizure therapeutics. PMID:23797108

  11. Chronic Pain, Psychopathology, and DSM-5 Somatic Symptom Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Joel; Rosenbloom, Brittany N; Fashler, Samantha

    2015-01-01

    Unlike acute pain that warns us of injury or disease, chronic or persistent pain serves no adaptive purpose. Though there is no agreed on definition of chronic pain, it is commonly referred to as pain that is without biological value, lasting longer than the typical healing time, not responsive to treatments based on specific remedies, and of a duration greater than 6 months. Chronic pain that is severe and intractable has detrimental consequences, including psychological distress, job loss, social isolation, and, not surprisingly, it is highly comorbid with depression and anxiety. Historically, pain without an apparent anatomical or neurophysiological origin was labelled as psychopathological. This approach is damaging to the patient and provider alike. It pollutes the therapeutic relationship by introducing an element of mutual distrust as well as implicit, if not explicit, blame. It is demoralizing to the patient who feels at fault, disbelieved, and alone. Moreover, many medically unexplained pains are now understood to involve an interplay between peripheral and central neurophysiological mechanisms that have gone awry. The new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, somatic symptom disorder overpsychologizes people with chronic pain; it has low sensitivity and specificity, and it contributes to misdiagnosis, as well as unnecessary stigma. Adjustment disorder remains the most appropriate, accurate, and acceptable diagnosis for people who are overly concerned about their pain. PMID:26174215

  12. Chronic Pain, Psychopathology, and DSM-5 Somatic Symptom Disorder.

    PubMed

    Katz, Joel; Rosenbloom, Brittany N; Fashler, Samantha

    2015-04-01

    Unlike acute pain that warns us of injury or disease, chronic or persistent pain serves no adaptive purpose. Though there is no agreed on definition of chronic pain, it is commonly referred to as pain that is without biological value, lasting longer than the typical healing time, not responsive to treatments based on specific remedies, and of a duration greater than 6 months. Chronic pain that is severe and intractable has detrimental consequences, including psychological distress, job loss, social isolation, and, not surprisingly, it is highly comorbid with depression and anxiety. Historically, pain without an apparent anatomical or neurophysiological origin was labelled as psychopathological. This approach is damaging to the patient and provider alike. It pollutes the therapeutic relationship by introducing an element of mutual distrust as well as implicit, if not explicit, blame. It is demoralizing to the patient who feels at fault, disbelieved, and alone. Moreover, many medically unexplained pains are now understood to involve an interplay between peripheral and central neurophysiological mechanisms that have gone awry. The new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, somatic symptom disorder overpsychologizes people with chronic pain; it has low sensitivity and specificity, and it contributes to misdiagnosis, as well as unnecessary stigma. Adjustment disorder remains the most appropriate, accurate, and acceptable diagnosis for people who are overly concerned about their pain. PMID:26174215

  13. Pain frequency moderates the relationship between pain catastrophizing and pain

    PubMed Central

    Kjgx, Heidi; Zachariae, Robert; Pfeiffer-Jensen, Mogens; Kasch, Helge; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Troels S.; Vase, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pain frequency has been shown to influence sensitization, psychological distress, and pain modulation. The present study examined if pain frequency moderates the relationship between pain catastrophizing and pain. Method: A non-clinical (247 students) and a clinical (223 pain patients) sample completed the Danish versions of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), Beck Depression Inventory, and the State Trait Anxiety Inventory and rated pain intensity, unpleasantness and frequency. Results: In both samples, high pain frequency was found to moderate the association between pain catastrophizing and pain intensity, whereas low pain frequency did not. The psychometric properties and the factor structure of the Danish version of the PCS were confirmed. Conclusions: This is the first study to validate the Danish version of the PCS and to show that pain frequency moderates the relationship between pain catastrophizing and reported pain in both non-clinical and clinical populations. PMID:25646089

  14. Physical Feature Encoding and Word Recognition Abilities Are Altered in Children with Intractable Epilepsy: Preliminary Neuromagnetic Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Pardos, Maria; Korostenskaja, Milena; Xiang, Jing; Fujiwara, Hisako; Lee, Ki H.; Horn, Paul S.; Byars, Anna; Vannest, Jennifer; Wang, Yingying; Hemasilpin, Nat; Rose, Douglas F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective evaluation of language function is critical for children with intractable epilepsy under consideration for epilepsy surgery. The purpose of this preliminary study was to evaluate word recognition in children with intractable epilepsy by using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Ten children with intractable epilepsy (M/F 6/4, mean SD 13.4 2.2 years) were matched on age and sex to healthy controls. Common nouns were presented simultaneously from visual and auditory sensory inputs in match and mismatch conditions. Neuromagnetic responses M1, M2, M3, M4, and M5 with latencies of ~100?ms, ~150?ms, ~250?ms, ~350?ms, and ~450?ms, respectively, elicited during the match condition were identified. Compared to healthy children, epilepsy patients had both significantly delayed latency of the M1 and reduced amplitudes of M3 and M5 responses. These results provide neurophysiologic evidence of altered word recognition in children with intractable epilepsy. PMID:26146459

  15. [Emergency management of acute pain in oncology].

    PubMed

    Pichard, Evelyne

    2003-12-15

    Acute pains requiring emergency management in oncology can be considered as physiopathological, somatic or visceral nociceptive pains. They are linked: to the tumour, indicating a modification of the tumoural evolution (necrosis, haemorrhage, fracture, acute obstruction of hollow organs or canals, occlusion, hydronephrosis); to the treatment: (inflammation of mucosal membranes, anusitis, post PL syndromes); and to invasive investigations. They are equally neuropathic, revealing an underlying threatened or confirmed medullary compression, or induced by neurotoxic chemotherapy. They are also analysed according to their mode of apparition: mechanical, arising as acute on chronic pain (the pre-fracture pain of metastases); insufficiency of the duration of therapeutic efficacity; an acute episode of neuropathic pain that is often lancing, unpredictable and inevitable. In all cases, it needs to be quantitatively and qualitatively analysed: evaluation, flavour of the symptoms; in order to choose one or a combination of adapted molecules, true antalgics or co-antalgics, antidepressants and anticonvulsants. To counteract this pain, medications with a short onset of action and a short half-life should be used to avoid side effects. These are administered in an intercurrent manner, initially starting at a low dose, modified daily according to the utilisation of supplementary doses. It is necessary to anticipate pain provoked by physical examinations or nursing care as much in the timing as the pharmacology, in using antalgics and/or anxiolytics with a short duration of action. Acutely emerging pains, whatever be their type, arising in the context of cancer and long-term pain are sensitising elements to all further pains, as they imprint in the memory, and are very negatively conditioned by the anguishing context of the illness. PMID:15008470

  16. New data on epidemiology of visceral leishmaniasis in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Zenaishvili, O; Gugushvili, G; Chubabria, G; Manjgaladze, M; Kokaia, N

    2009-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is spread as sporadic cases in eastern regions of Georgia. In Georgia as throughout the world steady increase of the disease incidence is observed. It is related to socio-economic crisis of population, increase in the number of invaded dogs and global warming processes. In west Georgia visceral leishmaniasis cases were never observed in the past. From 2004 to 2008 authors registered 10 local cases of visceral leishmaniasis in kutaisi (8 children and 2 adult patients). It should be noted that from these 10 patients eight resided in sapichkia area and two were from other areas of kutaisi. Authors consider that the detailed epidemiologic evaluation of the above mentioned cases should be carried out urgently to avoid the emergence of new endemic of visceral leishmaniasis in west Georgia. PMID:19644197

  17. [Visceral leishmaniasis without splenomegaly. A pediatric case report].

    PubMed

    Leblanc, C; Nouar, D; Izri, A; Brun, S; Marty, P; Gaudelus, J; De Pontual, L

    2016-04-01

    Pediatric visceral leishmaniasis is caused by Leishmania infantum, a dog parasite transmitted to humans by the bite of the female phlebotomine sand fly. The well-known clinical triad is fever, pallor, and splenomegaly. A secondary macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) can complicate this infection, which is lethal when not treated. When MAS is observed without any explanation, a visceral leishmaniasis is highly recommended. We report a case of visceral leishmaniasis in a 21-month-old child complicated by a macrophage activation syndrome without splenomegaly. No immunodeficiency was diagnosed that could explain this unusual clinical condition. To our knowledge, this is the first case of visceral leishmaniasis without splenomegaly reported to date. PMID:26776600

  18. A case of extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma originating from the visceral pleura

    PubMed Central

    Karatziou, C; Pitta, X; Stergiouda, T; Karadimou, V; Termentzis, G

    2011-01-01

    Extra skeletal Ewing Sarcoma (EES) is a rare entity which predominantly occurs in adolescents and young adults. It usually arises from the soft tissues of the trunk or the extremities. We present a case of EES arising from the left visceral pleura in a 21 year old female patient who presented to the emergency room of our institution with fever, productive cough and sternal pain radiating to the back for the last 3 days. Chest radiograph was firstly performed, followed by chest CT examination. Finally open lung biopsy revealed a small round cell malignancy. The mass was resected and the histological examination revealed Extra skeletal Ewing Sarcoma (EES) of the visceral pleura without involvement of the adjacent lung. Secondary multiple nodules at the lateral wall of the pleura were also noticed and so postoperative multiagent chemotherapy was performed. EES should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any patient, especially adolescents or young adults, with a soft tissue mass of the trunk or the extremities. PMID:24391423

  19. Spinal pain.

    PubMed

    Izzo, R; Popolizio, T; D'Aprile, P; Muto, M

    2015-05-01

    The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic pain, much more difficult to treat. The clinical assessment of pain source can be a challenge because of the complex anatomy and function of the spine; the advanced imaging methods are often not sufficient for a definitive diagnosis because similar findings could be present in either asymptomatic and symptomatic subjects: a clinical correlation is always mandatory and the therapy cannot rely uniquely upon any imaging abnormalities. Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. Special attention will be done to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. PMID:25824642

  20. Visceral gout in a rough legged hawk (Buteo lagopus).

    PubMed

    Murnane, R D; Garner, M M

    1987-07-01

    Visceral gout is reported for the first time in a rough legged hawk (Buteo lagopus). Urate crystals were present on the pericardium, thoracic and abdominal air sacs, and the ventral surface of the liver. The liver and spleen also had urate crystals throughout the parenchyma. There was no indication of articular or renal involvement. The immediate cause of death in this hawk was not identified, but appeared to result from multiple factors, including the visceral gout. PMID:3625918

  1. Targeting Epigenetic Mechanisms for Chronic Pain: A Valid Approach for the Development of Novel Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ligon, Casey O; Moloney, Rachel D; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley

    2016-04-01

    Chronic pain is a multifaceted and complex condition. Broadly classified into somatic, visceral, or neuropathic pain, it is poorly managed despite its prevalence. Current drugs used for the treatment of chronic pain are limited by tolerance with long-term use, abuse potential, and multiple adverse side effects. The persistent nature of pain suggests that epigenetic machinery may be a critical factor driving chronic pain. In this review, we discuss the latest insights into epigenetic processes, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, and microRNAs, and we describe their involvement in the pathophysiology of chronic pain and whether epigenetic modifications could be applied as future therapeutic targets for chronic pain. We provide evidence from experimental models and translational research in human tissue that have enhanced our understanding of epigenetic processes mediating nociception, and we then speculate on the potential future use of more specific and selective agents that target epigenetic mechanisms to attenuate pain. PMID:26787772

  2. Visceral urate deposition in a little bittern (Ixobrychus minutus).

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Morad; Minoosh, Zahra; Haghighi, Siavosh

    2015-01-01

    Visceral urate deposition (visceral gout) is a common finding during post-mortem examination of poultry. Rare cases of visceral gout may occur in wild birds. A rare case of visceral urate deposition in a little bittern (Ixobrychus minutus) is reported here. In May 2013, carcass of a little bittern was submitted for necropsy to the Clinic of Poultry Diseases (Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Razi University) by local authorities of Iran Department of Environment. At necropsy, white chalky deposits were observed on the heart and thoracic air sacs of the bird. To confirm the presence of urates, chalky deposits were collected from pericardium and tested by muerxide test. Heart and kidneys were sampled, preserved in 10% neutral-buffered formalin solution and submitted to laboratory for histopathology. Murexide test was positive for presence of uric acid in chalky deposits collected from pericardium. Light microscopy of affected organs confirmed the condition as visceral urate deposition. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the occurrence of visceral urate deposition in a little bittern. PMID:26261716

  3. Central sympathetic innervations to visceral and subcutaneous white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ngoc Ly T; Randall, Jessica; Banfield, Bruce W; Bartness, Timothy J

    2014-03-15

    There is a link between visceral white adipose tissue (WAT) and the metabolic syndrome in humans, with health improvements produced with small visceral WAT reduction. By contrast, subcutaneous WAT provides a site for lipid storage that is rather innocuous relative to ectopic lipid storage in muscle or liver. The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is the principal initiator for lipolysis in WAT by mammals. Nothing is known, however, about the central origins of the SNS circuitry innervating the only true visceral WAT in rodents, mesenteric WAT (MWAT), which drains into the hepatic portal vein. We tested whether the central sympathetic circuits to subcutaneous [inguinal WAT (IWAT)] and visceral WAT (MWAT) are separate or shared and whether they possess differential sympathetic drives with food deprivation in Siberian hamsters. Using two isogenic strains of pseudorabies virus, a retrograde transneuronal viral tract tracer within the same hamsters, we found some overlap (?20-55% doubly infected neurons) between the two circuitries across the neural axis with lesser overlap proximal to the depots (spinal cord and sympathetic chain) and with more neurons involved in the innervation of IWAT than MWAT in some brain regions. Food deprivation triggered a greater sympathetic drive to subcutaneous (IWAT) than visceral (MWAT) depots. Collectively, we demonstrated both shared and separate populations of brain, spinal cord, and sympathetic chain neurons ultimately project to a subcutaneous WAT depot (IWAT) and the only visceral WAT depot in rodents (MWAT). In addition, the lipolytic stimulus of food deprivation only increased SNS drive to subcutaneous fat (IWAT). PMID:24452544

  4. Visceral urate deposition in a little bittern (Ixobrychus minutus)

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Morad; Minoosh, Zahra; Haghighi, Siavosh

    2015-01-01

    Visceral urate deposition (visceral gout) is a common finding during post-mortem examination of poultry. Rare cases of visceral gout may occur in wild birds. A rare case of visceral urate deposition in a little bittern (Ixobrychus minutus) is reported here. In May 2013, carcass of a little bittern was submitted for necropsy to the Clinic of Poultry Diseases (Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Razi University) by local authorities of Iran Department of Environment. At necropsy, white chalky deposits were observed on the heart and thoracic air sacs of the bird. To confirm the presence of urates, chalky deposits were collected from pericardium and tested by muerxide test. Heart and kidneys were sampled, preserved in 10% neutral-buffered formalin solution and submitted to laboratory for histopathology. Murexide test was positive for presence of uric acid in chalky deposits collected from pericardium. Light microscopy of affected organs confirmed the condition as visceral urate deposition. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the occurrence of visceral urate deposition in a little bittern. PMID:26261716

  5. Fetal pain?

    PubMed

    Vanhatalo, S; van Nieuwenhuizen, O

    2000-05-01

    During the last few years a vivid debate, both scientifically and emotionally, has risen in the medical literature as to whether a fetus is able to feel pain during abortion or intrauterine surgery. This debate has mainly been inspired by the demonstration of various hormonal or motor reactions to noxious stimuli at very early stages of fetal development. The aims of this paper are to review the literature on development of the pain system in the fetus, and to speculate about the relationship between "sensing" as opposed to "feeling" pain and the number of reactions associated with painful stimuli. While a cortical processing of pain theoretically becomes possible after development of the thalamo-cortical connections in the 26th week of gestation, noxious stimuli may trigger complex reflex reactions much earlier. However, more important than possible painfulness is the fact that the noxious stimuli, by triggering stress responses, most likely affect the development of an individual at very early stages. Hence, it is not reasonable to speculate on the possible emotional experiences of pain in fetuses or premature babies. A clinically relevant aim is rather to avoid and/or treat any possibly noxious stimuli, and thereby prevent their potential adverse effects on the subsequent development. PMID:10814894

  6. [Musculoskeletal pain].

    PubMed

    Casser, H-R; Schaible, H-G

    2015-10-01

    Among the clinically relevant pain conditions, pain in the musculoskeletal system is most frequent. This article reports extensive epidemiological data on musculoskeletal system pain in Germany and worldwide. Since back pain is most frequent, the diagnostics and therapeutic algorithms of acute, recurring, and chronic lower back pain in Germany will be particularly addressed. The importance of the physiologic-organic, the cognitive-emotional, the behavioral, and the social level to diagnostics and treatment will be discussed. We will also focus on osteoarthritic pain and address its epidemiology, clinical importance, and significance for the health care system. This article will list some reasons why the musculoskeletal system in particular is frequently the site of chronic pain. The authors believe that these reasons are to be sought in the complex structures of the musculoskeletal system; in the particular sensitivity of the deep somatic nociceptive system for long-term sensitization processes, as well as the ensuing nervous system reactions; and in the interactions between the nervous and immune systems. The article will give some insights into the research carried out on this topic in Germany. PMID:26351130

  7. Neuron-glial communication mediated by TNF-? and glial activation in dorsal root ganglia in visceral inflammatory hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Song, Dan-dan; Li, Yong; Tang, Dong; Huang, Li-ya; Yuan, Yao-zong

    2014-05-01

    Communication between neurons and glia in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and the central nervous system is critical for nociception. Both glial activation and proinflammatory cytokine induction underlie this communication. We investigated whether satellite glial cell (SGC) and tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) activation in DRG participates in a 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced rat model of visceral hyperalgesia. In TNBS-treated rats, TNF-? expression increased in DRG and was colocalized to SGCs enveloping a given neuron. These SGCs were activated as visualized under electron microscopy: they had more elongated processes projecting into the connective tissue space and more gap junctions. When nerves attached to DRG (L6-S1) were stimulated with a series of electrical stimulations, TNF-? were released from DRG in TNBS-treated animals compared with controls. Using a current clamp, we noted that exogenous TNF-? (2.5 ng/ml) increased DRG neuron activity, and visceral pain behavioral responses were reversed by intrathecal administration of anti-TNF-? (10 ?gkg(-1)day(-1)). Based on our findings, TNF-? and SGC activation in neuron-glial communication are critical in inflammatory visceral hyperalgesia. PMID:24627565

  8. Post-laparoscopic cholecystectomy pain: effects of intraperitoneal local anesthetics on pain control--a randomized prospective double-blinded placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Bestoun H; Ahmed, Aryan; Tan, Dongfeng; Awad, Ziad T; Al-Aali, Ali Yousef; Kilkenny, John; Orlando, Frank A; Al-Chalabi, Abbas; Crass, Richard; Alrawi, Sadir J

    2008-03-01

    Postoperative pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) is generally less than open cholecystectomy; however, the postoperative shoulder and abdominal pain experienced by patients still causes preventable distress. Intraperitoneal irrigation of the diaphragmatic surface and gallbladder fossa using normal saline, bupivacaine, or lignocaine may effectively control visceral abdominal pain after an LC. Two hundred patients with similar demographics undergoing elective LC were randomized to one of four groups of 50 patients each, including Group A placebo control, Group B with isotonic saline irrigation, Group C with bupivacaine irrigation, and Group D with lignocaine irrigation. All patients received preperitoneal abdominal wall infiltration with 0.25 per cent bupivacaine to control parietal (somatic) abdominal pain. The visual analogue and verbal rating pain scores at 0, 4, 8, 12 and 24 hours for both shoulder and abdominal pain were recorded in a prospective double-blind fashion at four points during the first 24 postoperative hours. Analgesia requirements, vital signs, blood glucose, and incidence of nausea and vomiting were also recorded. Patients in each group demonstrated a significant difference in visual analogue and verbal rating pain scores and analgesic consumption when compared with controls. Lignocaine controlled pain significantly better than saline or bupivacaine. Bowel function recovery was similar in all patients, and there were no significant complications. We conclude that intraperitoneal irrigation with either saline, bupivacaine, or lignocaine can significantly reduce visceral abdominal pain after LC. Lignocaine was the most efficacious local anesthetic in this trial and has a high safety profile when used at recommended doses. PMID:18376682

  9. What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains KidsHealth > For Kids > What a Pain! Kids and ... something doctors call growing pains . What Are Growing Pains? Growing pains aren't a disease. You probably ...

  10. Chronic pain - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain - resources; Resources - chronic pain ... The following organizations are good resources for information on chronic pain: American Chronic Pain Association -- www.theacpa.org National Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Association -- www.fmcpaware.org ...

  11. Human visceral leishmaniasis: a picture from Italy.

    PubMed

    Abdalmaula, Giuma Harun; Barbadoro, Pamela; Marigliano, Anna; Illuminati, Diego; Di Stanislao, Francesco; D'Errico, Marcello Mario; Prospero, Emilia

    2013-12-01

    The aim of our study was to describe the distribution of Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) in Italy, focusing on HIV-infected patients, to estimate the burden of the disease and the public health actions that should be undertaken. A review of official notifications and hospitalization data has been performed. From 2006 to 2008, a total of 289 cases of VL were notified; the overall notification rate was 1.63/1,000,000 (95% CI 1.45-1.83). In total, 1192 VL-associated hospitalizations were detected, with a hospitalization rate of 6.71/1,000,000 (95% CI 6.34-7.10). For the age group "≤ 24 years", a statistically significant increase was detected (p<0.05). A total of 68.9% (n = 821) of hospitalizations were detected in HIV-positive patients. The geographic distribution of rates revealed a significant increase in the north-eastern area of the country. Our study confirms that the epidemiological pattern of VL is changing and that, in Italy, control measures and preventive strategies should be based on not only the official notification system but also hospital data. This would lead to the identification of areas of parasite spread and to the creation of awareness campaigns geared toward general practitioners in the affected areas. Easy case detection would allow for timely public health actions and strategies for the implementation of more effective interventions for reservoir control. PMID:23999330

  12. Visceral analgesic effect of 5-HT(4) receptor agonist in rats involves the rostroventral medulla (RVM).

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Jyoti N; Mickle, Aaron; Kannampalli, Pradeep; Spruell, Russell; McRorie, John; Shaker, Reza; Miranda, Adrian

    2014-04-01

    The 5-HT(4) receptor agonist tegaserod (TEG) has been reported to modulate visceral pain. However, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. The objective of the present study was to examine the analgesic mechanism and site of action of TEG. In male rats, visceral pain was assessed by measuring visceromotor response (VMR) to colorectal distension (CRD). Inflammation was induced by intracolonic injection of tri-nitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). The effect of TEG on the VMR was tested by injecting intraperitoneal (i.p.), intrathecal (i.t.), intracerebroventricular (i.c.v) or in the rostroventral medulla (RVM). The effect of the drug was also tested on responses of CRD-sensitive pelvic nerve afferents (PNA) and lumbo-sacral (LS) spinal neurons. Systemic injection of TEG attenuated VMR in naive and TNBS-treated rats. Similarly, supraspinal, but not spinal, injection of TEG attenuated the VMR. While GR113808, (selective 5-HT(4) antagonist) blocked the effect, naloxone (NLX) an opioid receptor antagonist reversed the effect of TEG. Although i.t. NLX did not block the inhibitory effect of TEG in VMR study, i.t. injection of α2-adrenergic receptor antagonist yohimbine blocked the effect of TEG when given systemically. While TEG had no effect on the responses of CRD-sensitive PNA, it inhibited the responses of CRD-sensitive LS neurons in spinal intact condition. This inhibition was blocked by GR113808, NLX and β-funaltrexamine (β-FNA) when injected into the RVM. Results indicate that TEG produces analgesia via activation of supraspinal 5-HT(4) receptors which triggers the release of opioids at supraspinal site, which activates descending noradrenergic pathways to the spinal cord to produce analgesia. PMID:24334068

  13. Descending modulation of visceral nociceptive transmission from the locus coeruleus/subcoeruleus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Limin; Tsuruoka, Masayoshi; Maeda, Masako; Hayashi, Bunsho; Wang, Xiaomin; Inoue, Tomio

    2008-08-15

    The purpose of the present investigation was to examine whether electrical stimulation in the locus coeruleus/subcoeruleus (LC/SC) could modulate visceral pain evoked by noxious colorectal distention (CRD). Experiments were performed on 40 pentobarbital anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats. Extracellular potentials of single L(6)-S(2) spinal neuron were recorded with a carbon filament electrode. CRD (80 mmHg) was produced by inflating a balloon inside the descending colon and rectum. Electrical stimulation of the LC/SC (30, 50 and 70 microA, 100 Hz, 0.1 ms pulses) was delivered either ipsilaterally or contralaterally. Results showed that for 42/62 (68%) short-latency abrupt (SL-A) neurons, all of the short-latency sustained (SL-S) and long-latency (LL) neurons, LC/SC stimulation produced intensity-dependent attenuation of the CRD-evoked discharge. For 10/62 (16%) SL-A neurons, 6/8 (75%) inhibited (INHIB) neurons LC/SC stimulation increased the evoked discharge, for 10/62 (16%) SL-A neurons and 2/8 (25%) INHIB neurons, the evoked discharges were unaffected by the LC/SC stimulation. LC/SC stimulation also had different effects on the spontaneous activities of these neurons. The effects of LC/SC stimulation were the same both ipsilaterally and contralaterally either for the evoked discharges or for spontaneous activities. Following LC/SC lesions, LC/SC stimulation did not inhibit nociceptive responses, whereas inhibitory effects were observed by stimulation of the intact LC/SC contralateral to the recording site. These data suggest that the transmission of visceral pain was under the control of the centrifugal pathways from the LC/SC. PMID:18598853

  14. Leg pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... usually seen in boys and overweight children between ages 11 and 15 ... as much as possible. Elevate your leg. Apply ice for up to 15 minutes. ... Other homecare will depend on the cause of your leg pain.

  15. Face pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the body. Abscessed tooth (ongoing throbbing pain on one side of the lower face that gets worse with eating or touching) Cluster headache Herpes zoster (shingles) or herpes simplex (cold sores) infection Injury to the face Migraine ...

  16. Joint pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... both rest and exercise are important. Warm baths, massage, and stretching exercises should be used as often ... Does keeping the joint elevated help? Do medicines, massage, or applying heat reduce the pain? What other ...

  17. Neuropathic Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... know that it can erode quality of life. Communication Tools View All Everyday Tools During Your Visit ... pain. Online Tool Printable Tool (PDF) Show More Communication Tools Where Does It Hurt? / Nerve Man With ...

  18. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... can I find more information and related topics? Functional Abdominal Pain (English, French or Spanish)—from The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN). Gastro Kids , a site for kids with ...

  19. Wrist pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... wrist; Pain - carpal tunnel; Injury - wrist; Arthritis - wrist; Gout - wrist; Pseudogout - wrist ... 37.7°C), and recent illness. Other Causes Gout : This occurs when your body produces too much ...

  20. Urination Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... small masses of minerals) in the urinary tract. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common cause of painful ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Urinary Tract Infections A to Z: Dysuria Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections ...

  1. Cannabinoids in the management of difficult to treat pain.

    PubMed

    Russo, Ethan B

    2008-02-01

    This article reviews recent research on cannabinoid analgesia via the endocannabinoid system and non-receptor mechanisms, as well as randomized clinical trials employing cannabinoids in pain treatment. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, Marinol((R))) and nabilone (Cesamet((R))) are currently approved in the United States and other countries, but not for pain indications. Other synthetic cannabinoids, such as ajulemic acid, are in development. Crude herbal cannabis remains illegal in most jurisdictions but is also under investigation. Sativex((R)), a cannabis derived oromucosal spray containing equal proportions of THC (partial CB(1) receptor agonist ) and cannabidiol (CBD, a non-euphoriant, anti-inflammatory analgesic with CB(1) receptor antagonist and endocannabinoid modulating effects) was approved in Canada in 2005 for treatment of central neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis, and in 2007 for intractable cancer pain. Numerous randomized clinical trials have demonstrated safety and efficacy for Sativex in central and peripheral neuropathic pain, rheumatoid arthritis and cancer pain. An Investigational New Drug application to conduct advanced clinical trials for cancer pain was approved by the US FDA in January 2006. Cannabinoid analgesics have generally been well tolerated in clinical trials with acceptable adverse event profiles. Their adjunctive addition to the pharmacological armamentarium for treatment of pain shows great promise. PMID:18728714

  2. [Pain therapy].

    PubMed

    Donnadieu, S; Djian, M C

    1998-12-12

    NEW OPIOID ANALGESICS: Progress in pain reliet has recently been achieved with the introduction of new opioid analgesics such as tramadol and the pediatric preparation of codeine phosphate as well as powerful long-release opioids which can be administered per os, or percutaneously for transdermal fentanyl. CO-ANALGESICS: Other drugs, mainly antidepressants and anti-convulsants, can be usefully combined with analgesics. New serotonin uptake inhibitors and anticonvulsants (gabapentin and lamotrigin) have the advantage of better tolerance. None of these drugs has marketing approval in France for their pain relieving effects. The same is true for clonidine and neostigmine which, after spinal infusion, potentialize opioids and for ketamine which can relieve neuropathy pain by dissociative anesthesia. NEW ANTI-MIGRAINE DRUGS: New drugs have been developed for specific types of pain such as migraine. The new "triptans" are tolerated better than sumatriptan and is reimbursed by the national social security. REFRACTORY NEUROPATHY PAIN: Indications for electrical stimulation techniques conducted in a neurosurgery unit have been identified. Stimulators may be implanted in spinal or supra-spinal localizations. REGULATORY ASPECTS: New legislation has reorganized health care for pain relief in France. The new texts take into consideration personnel training, the health care network and progress in therapeutics. PMID:9893699

  3. Neonatal pain

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback. PMID:24330444

  4. Correlations between social-emotional feelings and anterior insula activity are independent from visceral states but influenced by culture

    PubMed Central

    Immordino-Yang, Mary Helen; Yang, Xiao-Fei; Damasio, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    The anterior insula (AI) maps visceral states and is active during emotional experiences, a functional confluence that is central to neurobiological accounts of feelings. Yet, it is unclear how AI activity correlates with feelings during social emotions, and whether this correlation may be influenced by culture, as studies correlating real-time AI activity with visceral states and feelings have focused on Western subjects feeling physical pain or basic disgust. Given psychological evidence that social-emotional feelings are cognitively constructed within cultural frames, we asked Chinese and American participants to report their feeling strength to admiration and compassion-inducing narratives during fMRI with simultaneous electrocardiogram recording. Trial-by-trial, cardiac arousal and feeling strength correlated with ventral and dorsal AI activity bilaterally but predicted different variance, suggesting that interoception and social-emotional feeling construction are concurrent but dissociable AI functions. Further, although the variance that correlated with cardiac arousal did not show cultural effects, the variance that correlated with feelings did. Feeling strength was especially associated with ventral AI activity (the autonomic modulatory sector) in the Chinese group but with dorsal AI activity (the visceral-somatosensory/cognitive sector) in an American group not of Asian descent. This cultural group difference held after controlling for posterior insula (PI) activity and was replicated. A bi-cultural East-Asian American group showed intermediate results. The findings help elucidate how the AI supports feelings and suggest that previous reports that dorsal AI activation reflects feeling strength are culture related. More broadly, the results suggest that the brain's ability to construct conscious experiences of social emotion is less closely tied to visceral processes than neurobiological models predict and at least partly open to cultural influence and learning. PMID:25278862

  5. The Ketogenic and Atkins Diets Effect on Intractable Epilepsy: A Comparison

    PubMed Central

    GHAZAVI, Ahad; TONEKABONI, Seyed Hassan; KARIMZADEH, Parvaneh; NIKIBAKHSH, Ahmad Ali; KHAJEH, Ali; FAYYAZI, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    Objective Intractable epilepsy is a major difficulty in child neurology, because the numbers of drugs that are available for treatment are limited and new treatments such as diets must be tried. Now there are some diets available for treating patients with intractable epilepsy. The oldest diet is the classic ketogenic diet and one of the newest diets is the modified Atkins diet. Patients have a harder time accepting the classic ketogenic diet than the Atkins diet, which is easier to accept because the food tastes better. This study compares the efficacy of the ketogenic diet and the Atkins diet for intractable epilepsy in children. Materials & Methods This study is a clinical trial survey with sample size of 40 children with refractory epilepsy who were patients at Mofid hospital in Tehran, Iran. Initially, from Jan 2005–Oct 2007, 20 children were treated with the Atkins diet, and then from Oct 2007–March 2010, the other group was treated with the classic ketogenic diet and the results were compared. Results In this study, response to treatment was greater than a 50% reduction in seizures and at the end of first, second, and third months for the ketogenic diet were 55%, 30%, and 70% and for the Atkins diet were 50%, 65%, and 70%, respectively. Conclusion The results of this study show that there is no significant difference between the classic Ketogenic diet and the Atkins diet at the end of first, second, and third months and both had similar responses to the treatments. PMID:25143768

  6. TIPS Versus Peritoneovenous Shunt in the Treatment of Medically Intractable Ascites

    PubMed Central

    Rosemurgy, Alexander S.; Zervos, Emmanuel E.; Clark, Whalen C.; Thometz, Donald P.; Black, Thomas J.; Zwiebel, Bruce R.; Kudryk, Bruce T.; Grundy, L Shane; Carey, Larry C.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: We undertook a prospective randomized clinical trial comparing TIPS to peritoneovenous (PV) shunts in the treatment of medically intractable ascites to establish relative efficacy and morbidity, and thereby superiority, between these shunts. Methods: Thirty-two patients were prospectively randomized to undergo TIPS or peritoneovenous (Denver) shunts. All patients had failed medical therapy. Results: After TIPS versus peritoneovenous shunts, median (mean ± SD) duration of shunt patency was similar: 4.4 months (6 ± 6.6 months) versus 4.0 months (5 ± 4.6 months). Assisted shunt patency was longer after TIPS: 31.1 months (41 ± 25.9 months) versus 13.1 months (19 ± 17.3 months) (P < 0.01, Wilcoxon test). Ultimately, after TIPS 19% of patients had irreversible shunt occlusion versus 38% of patients after peritoneovenous shunts. Survival after TIPS was 28.7 months (41 ± 28.7 months) versus 16.1 months (28 ± 29.7 months) after peritoneovenous shunts. Control of ascites was achieved sooner after peritoneovenous shunts than after TIPS (73% vs. 46% after 1 month), but longer-term efficacy favored TIPS (eg, 85% vs. 40% at 3 years). Conclusion: TIPS and peritoneovenous shunts treat medically intractable ascites. Absence of ascites after either is uncommon. PV shunts control ascites sooner, although TIPS provides better long-term efficacy. After either shunt, numerous interventions are required to assist patency. Assisted shunt patency is better after TIPS. Treating medically refractory ascites with TIPS risks early shunt-related mortality for prospects of longer survival with ascites control. This study promotes the application of TIPS for medically intractable ascites if patients undergoing TIPS have prospects beyond short-term survival. PMID:15166968

  7. Chemotactic and mitogenic stimuli of neuronal apoptosis in patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Fiala, Milan; Avagyan, Hripsime; Merino, Jose Joaquin; Bernas, Michael; Valdivia, Juan; Espinosa-Jeffrey, Araceli; Witte, Marlys; Weinand, Martin

    2012-01-01

    To identify the upstream signals of neuronal apoptosis in patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), we evaluated by immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy brain tissues of 13 TLE patients and 5 control patients regarding expression of chemokines and cell-cycle proteins. The chemokine RANTES (CCR5) and other CC-chemokines and apoptotic markers (caspase-3, -8, -9) were expressed in lateral temporal cortical and hippocampal neurons of TLE patients, but not in neurons of control cases. The chemokine RANTES is usually found in cytoplasmic and extracellular locations. However, in TLE neurons, RANTES was displayed in an unusual location, the neuronal nuclei. In addition, the cell-cycle regulatory transcription factor E2F1 was found in an abnormal location in neuronal cytoplasm. The pro-inflammatory enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 and cytokine interleukin-1? were expressed both in neurons of patients suffering from temporal lobe epilepsy and from cerebral trauma. The vessels showed fibrin leakage, perivascular macrophages and expression of IL-6 on endothelial cells. In conclusion, the cytoplasmic effects of E2F1 and nuclear effects of RANTES might have novel roles in neuronal apoptosis of TLE neurons and indicate a need to develop new medical and/or surgical neuroprotective strategies against apoptotic signaling by these molecules. Both RANTES and E2F1 signaling are upstream from caspase activation, thus the antagonists of RANTES and/or E2F1 blockade might be neuroprotective for patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. The results have implications for the development of new medical and surgical therapies based on inhibition of chemotactic and mitogenic stimuli of neuronal apoptosis in patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:22444245

  8. Intractable Electrical Storm After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Originating in Abnormal Purkinje Fibers.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Chiho; Tsukada, Toru; Sakamoto, Hiroaki; Naruse, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Kentaro; Sekiguchi, Yukio; Imai, Akito; Aonuma, Kazutaka; Hiramatsu, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Electrical storm is a rare but critical complication following revascularization in patients with ischemic heart disease. We report the case of a 67-year-old man who developed drug refractory intractable electrical storm after emergent coronary artery bypass grafting for ischemic cardiomyopathy. The electrical storm was successfully eliminated by percutaneous endocardial radiofrequency catheter ablation targeting the abnormal Purkinje-related triggering ventricular premature contractions in a low-voltage zone. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12670 (J Card Surg 2016;31:74-77). PMID:26598230

  9. [A case of primary lung cancer complicated with post-operative intractable pulmonary fistula].

    PubMed

    Morio, A; Miyamoto, H; Yamazaki, A; Anami, Y; Oh, S; Izumi, H; Hosoda, Y; Fukuchi, Y

    2000-12-01

    The case was a 76-year-old male. After thoracoscopic left upper lobectomy against primary lung cancer with poor risks such as complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and pulmonary emphysema, oral steroid treatment, heavy smoker, decreased renal function, the patient was complicated with intractable pulmonary fistula and MRSA pyothorax. Intracavitary administration of albumin preparation and fibrin glue (Beriplast P) was effective against pulmonary fistula though it was not helpful in the pleurodesis which was conducted 7 times. Teicoplanin (Targosid) was effective against MRSA pyothorax and maintained the renal function. PMID:11127565

  10. Treatment of chronic regional pain syndrome type 1 with palmitoylethanolamide and topical ketamine cream: modulation of nonneuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Keppel Hesselink, Jan M; Kopsky, David J

    2013-01-01

    Chronic regional pain syndrome (CRPS) can be intractable to treat and patients sometimes suffer for many years. Therefore, new treatment strategies are needed to alleviate symptoms in CRPS patients. This case report describes a patient suffering from intractable CRPS type 1 for 13 years. Due to her swollen painful feet and left knee she is wheelchair-bound. The combination of palmitoylethanolamide and ketamine 10% cream reduced her pain by more than 50% after 1 month of treatment, and a marked reduction in swelling and skin discoloration was noticed. Furthermore, she could walk independently again and she experienced no side effects. Thus, palmitoylethanolamide and topical ketamine could be a combination therapy option for treating CRPS patients. PMID:23658493

  11. Giant prosthetic reinforcement of the visceral sac.

    PubMed

    Wantz, G E

    1989-11-01

    One hundred and seventy-nine patients with 237 hernias of the groin who were at high risk for recurrence after classic hernioplasty were operated upon; the procedure of giant prosthetic reinforcement of the visceral sac (GPRVS) was used. The patients in this series had predominantly recurrent and re-recurrent hernias. However, a few were obese with bilateral primary direct hernias and some had associated connective tissue disorders, such as Marfan and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes. GPRVS eliminates hernias of the groin by rendering the peritoneum inextensible by placing, in the preperitoneal space, a large prosthesis that extends far beyond the borders of the myopectineal orifice. The myopectineal orifice is the weak spot at which all hernias of the groin begin and is bounded by the rectus, oblique abdominal and iliopsoas muscles and the pectin of the pubis. In bilateral GPRVS, the peritoneum of both groins is reinforced with a single prosthesis inserted in the preperitoneal space through the midline. In unilateral GPRVS, the mesh envelops the peritoneum of a single groin. This simplifies the operation and makes it suitable for surgical centers that perform outpatient operations. The prosthesis with the best physical characteristics for GPRVS is Mersilene (polyester fiber). Unsutured prostheses of polypropylene and Teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene) may not adhere at the far edges, leading to a failure and recurrence. The over-all recurrence rate in this series of problem hernias was 3.7 per cent, which is extremely good. However, the rate becomes outstanding if recurrences resulting from meshes unsuitable for GPRVS are excluded. PMID:2814751

  12. Visceral adipose tissue quantification using Lunar Prodigy.

    PubMed

    Ergun, David L; Rothney, Megan P; Oates, Mary K; Xia, Yi; Wacker, Wynn K; Binkley, Neil C

    2013-01-01

    A dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) application to measure visceral adipose tissue (VAT) in the android region of a total body DXA scan has recently been developed. This new application, CoreScan, has been validated on the Lunar iDXA (GE Healthcare, Madison, WI) densitometer against volumetric computed tomography. The geometric assumptions underlying the CoreScan model are the same on the Prodigy (GE Healthcare, Madison, WI) densitometer. However, differences between the peak X-ray voltage and detector array configurations may lead to differences in VAT quantification. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the agreement of Prodigy and iDXA CoreScan values and to characterize differences in VAT precision between the instruments. Data from volunteers with paired Prodigy and iDXA measurements were used to define empirical adjustments to the VAT algorithm parameters (n=59) and validate performance on Prodigy (n=62). Prodigy VAT measurements were highly correlated to iDXA (r=0.984). The mean of the Prodigy-iDXA VAT volume differences was -13.8cm with a 95% confidence interval of -45 to +17cm. The Bland-Altman 95% limits of agreement for the 2 methods were -252 to +224cm. Measurement of short-term precision showed that measurement error variance on iDXA was smaller (p<0.01) than Prodigy (coefficient of variance: 7.3% vs 9.8%). Precision results are in agreement with previous reports on the differences between Prodigy and iDXA for body composition measures. Prodigy and iDXA measures of VAT are similar, but the lower precision of the Prodigy may require investigators to target larger changes in VAT. PMID:23148876

  13. Novel Arylimidamides for Treatment of Visceral Leishmaniasis?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Michael Zhuo; Zhu, Xiaohua; Srivastava, Anuradha; Liu, Qiang; Sweat, J. Mark; Pandharkar, Trupti; Stephens, Chad E.; Riccio, Ed; Parman, Toufan; Munde, Manoj; Mandal, Swati; Madhubala, Rentala; Tidwell, Richard R.; Wilson, W. David; Boykin, David W.; Hall, James Edwin; Kyle, Dennis E.; Werbovetz, Karl A.

    2010-01-01

    Arylimidamides (AIAs) represent a new class of molecules that exhibit potent antileishmanial activity (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], <1 ?M) against both Leishmania donovani axenic amastigotes and intracellular Leishmania, the causative agent for human visceral leishmaniasis (VL). A systematic lead discovery program was employed to characterize in vitro and in vivo antileishmanial activities, pharmacokinetics, mutagenicities, and toxicities of two novel AIAs, DB745 and DB766. They were exceptionally active (IC50 ? 0.12 ?M) against intracellular L. donovani, Leishmania amazonensis, and Leishmania major and did not exhibit mutagenicity in an Ames screen. DB745 and DB766, given orally, produced a dose-dependent inhibition of liver parasitemia in two efficacy models, L. donovani-infected mice and hamsters. Most notably, DB766 (100 mg/kg of body weight/day for 5 days) reduced liver parasitemia in mice and hamsters by 71% and 89%, respectively. Marked reduction of parasitemia in the spleen (79%) and bone marrow (92%) of hamsters was also observed. Furthermore, these compounds distributed to target tissues (liver and spleen) and had a moderate oral bioavailability (up to 25%), a large volume of distribution, and an elimination half-life ranging from 1 to 2 days in mice. In a repeat-dose toxicity study of mice, there was no indication of liver or kidney toxicity for DB766 from serum chemistries, although mild hepatic cell eosinophilia, hypertrophy, and fatty changes were noted. These results demonstrated that arylimidamides are a promising class of molecules that possess good antileishmanial activity and desirable pharmacokinetics and should be considered for further preclinical development as an oral treatment for VL. PMID:20368397

  14. P2X3 Receptors Mediate Visceral Hypersensitivity during Acute Chemically-Induced Colitis and in the Post-Inflammatory Phase via Different Mechanisms of Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Deiteren, Annemie; van der Linden, Laura; de Wit, Anouk; Ceuleers, Hannah; Buckinx, Roeland; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Moreels, Tom G.; Pelckmans, Paul A.; De Man, Joris G.; De Winter, Benedicte Y.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Experiments using P2X3 knock-out mice or more general P2X receptor antagonists suggest that P2X3 receptors contribute to visceral hypersensitivity. We aimed to investigate the effect of the selective P2X3 antagonist A-317491 on visceral sensitivity under physiological conditions, during acute colitis and in the post-inflammatory phase of colitis. Methods Trinitrobenzene sulphonic-acid colitis was monitored by colonoscopy: on day 3 to confirm the presence of colitis and then every 4 days, starting from day 10, to monitor convalescence and determine the exact timepoint of endoscopic healing in each rat. Visceral sensitivity was assessed by quantifying visceromotor responses to colorectal distension in controls, rats with acute colitis and post-colitis rats. A-317491 was administered 30 min prior to visceral sensitivity testing. Expression of P2X3 receptors (RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry) and the intracellular signalling molecules cdk5, csk and CASK (RT-PCR) were quantified in colonic tissue and dorsal root ganglia. ATP release in response to colorectal distension was measured by luminiscence. Results Rats with acute TNBS-colitis displayed significant visceral hypersensitivity that was dose-dependently, but not fully, reversed by A-317491. Hypersenstivity was accompanied by an increased colonic release of ATP. Post-colitis rats also displayed visceral hypersensitivity that was dose-dependently reduced and fully normalized by A-317491 without increased release of ATP. A-317491 did not modify visceral sensitivity in controls. P2X3 mRNA and protein expression in the colon and dorsal root ganglia were similar in control, acute colitis and post-colitis groups, while colonic mRNA expression of cdk5, csk and CASK was increased in the post-colitis group only. Conclusions These findings indicate that P2X3 receptors are not involved in sensory signaling under physiological conditions whereas they modulate visceral hypersensitivity during acute TNBS-colitis and even more so in the post-inflammatory phase, albeit via different mechanisms of sensitization, validating P2X3 receptors as potential new targets in the treatment of abdominal pain syndromes. PMID:25885345

  15. The roles of neurotensin and its analogues in pain.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yu-Peng; Wang, Jian; Dong, Yu-Lin; Wang, Ya-Yun; Li, Yun-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Neurotensin (NT) is an endogenous 13 amino acid neuropeptide with profound opioid-independent analgesic effects. This role of NT is thought to be mediated by both neurotensin receptor subtype 1 (NTS1) and neurotensin receptor subtype 2 (NTS2). NT and its receptors are widely distributed in the pain circuits in central nervous system. Thus NT might modulate pain in many structures of pain pathway, such as spinal cord, rostroventral medulla (RVM) and periaqueductal gray (PAG). Actually either intrathecal application of NT or direct injection of NT into RVM or PAG or intracerebroventricular injection of NT showed analgesic effects. NT exerted its antinociceptive effects in both acute pain and chronic pain models. The analgesic effects of NT were originally found in acute pain experiments. In the case of pathological pain, for example, formalin injection induced inflammatory pain and sciatic nerve constriction induced neuropathic pain, NT also shows antinociceptive effects. The effects exist in somatic pain as well as visceral pain induced by noxious colorectal distension (CRD) or writhing test. It should be noted that NT plays an important role in stress-induced antinociception (SIAN), especially in higher intensity stress experiments. However as a neuropeptide, NT is susceptible to degradation by peptidases and cannot cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Great efforts have been made to find NT analogues that are more biologically stable and could inhibit pain by systematic administration. The present review focuses on the analgesic role and the underlying mechanisms of NT and its analogues in pain, especially in chronic pain models. PMID:25345606

  16. Visceral leishmaniasis and malaria prevalence in West Pokot District, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Mutero, C M; Mutinga, M J; Ngindu, A M; Kenya, P R; Amimo, F A

    1992-01-01

    The prevalence of visceral leishmaniasis and malaria in the human population of West Pokot district of Kenya was studied in 1986. A total of 2139 people was proportionately screened for the two diseases according to four age categories (0-4, 5-14, 15-44 and greater than 45 years). Diagnostic methods included the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Leishmanin skin test for visceral leishmaniasis, and parasitological examination for malaria. The epidemiological value of the spleen rate was evaluated in relation to visceral leishmaniasis and malaria endemicity. A general decline of infection rates with altitude was observed for both diseases. Visceral leishmaniasis was less prevalent than malaria, with less than 2% active cases in any age group and had the same distribution in both sexes. Malaria infection rate was highest in the younger age groups, declining from 21.5% in the 0-4 year old age group to 5.5% in people more than 45 years old. Malaria affected significantly more males than females. The spleen rate was inappropriate for epidemiological survey of either malaria or visceral leishmaniasis due to an overlap in the distribution of the two diseases. PMID:1628545

  17. Pain management.

    PubMed

    Wild, L

    1990-12-01

    Postoperative pain management in the critically ill patient is a challenge for nurses. Knowing the basis of pain transmission and mechanisms of action of interventions can assist the critical care nurse in making clinical decisions regarding pain control for individual patients. There are a number of modalities available to treat postoperative pain including both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions. Techniques such as PCA not only can provide good analgesia, but allow the critically ill patient at least one aspect of control in the otherwise highly controlled environment of the critical care unit. Epidural or intrathecal analgesia, using either opioids or LAAs alone or in combination, provides excellent analgesic effect (with minimal side effects) and may improve patient outcomes. Nonpharmacologic techniques, unfortunately, are commonly overlooked as adjuncts to traditional analgesia routines because of the nature of the illness in the critically ill patient. Nonpharmacologic techniques of pain management have a place in the care of the critically ill when applied based on the assessment of an individual patient's needs and abilities to participate in his or her care. Ensuring optimal patient comfort can benefit critically ill patients and improve clinical outcomes. PMID:2096859

  18. Pain management.

    PubMed

    Ripamonti, C I

    2012-09-01

    Despite published guidelines and educational programs on the assessment and treatment of cancer-related pain, in any stage of oncological disease, unrelieved pain continues to be a substantial worldwide public health concern either in patients with solid and haematological malignancies. The proper and regular self-reporting assessment of pain is the first step for an effective and individualized treatment. Opioids are the mainstay of analgesic therapy and can be associated with non-opioids drugs such as paracetamol or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and to adjuvant drugs (for neuropathic pain and symptom control). The role and the utility of weak opioids (i.e. codeine, dihydrocodeine, tramadol) are a controversy point. Morphine has been placed by World Health Organization on its Essential Drug List. In the comparative study with other strong opioids (hydromorphone, oxycodone), there is no evidence to show superiority or inferiority with morphine as the first choice opioid. Oral methadone is a useful and safe alternative to morphine. Methadone presents the potential to control pain difficult to manage with other opioids. although the oral route of opioid administration is considered the one of choice, intravenous, subcutaneous, rectal, transdermal, sublingual, intranasal, and spinal routes must be used in particular situation. Transdermal opioids such as fentanyl and buprenorphine are best reserved for patients whose opioid requirements are stable. Switching from one opioid to another can improve analgesia and tolerability. PMID:22987980

  19. Does the pain-protective GTP cyclohydrolase haplotype significantly alter the pattern or severity of pain in humans with chronic pancreatitis?

    PubMed Central

    Lazarev, Mark; Lamb, Janette; Barmada, M Michael; Dai, Feng; Anderson, Michelle A; Max, Mitchell B; Whitcomb, David C

    2008-01-01

    Background Pain is often a dominant clinical feature of chronic pancreatitis but the frequency and severity is highly variable between subjects. We hypothesized that genetic polymorphisms contribute to variations in clinical pain patterns. Since genetic variations in the GTP cyclohydrolase (GCH1) gene have been reported to protect some patients from pain, we investigated the effect of the "pain protective haplotype" in well characterized patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) or recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) from the North American Pancreatitis Study 2 (NAPS2). Results Subjects in the NAPS2 study were asked to rank their pain in one of 5 categories reflecting different levels of pain frequency and severity. All subjects were genotyped at rs8007267 and rs3783641 to determine the frequency of the GCH1 pain-protective haplotype. In Caucasian subjects the frequency of the pain-protective GCH1 haplotype was no different in the control group (n = 236), CP patients (n = 265), RAP patients (N = 131), or in CP patients subclassified by pain category compared to previously reported haplotype frequencies in the general Caucasian population. Conclusion The GCH1 pain-protective haplotype does not have a significant effect on pain patterns or severity in RAP or CP. These results are important for helping to define the regulators of visceral pain, and to distinguish different mechanisms of pain. PMID:19014702

  20. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists modulate neuropathic pain: a link to chemokines?

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Caroline M.; Miller, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain presents a widespread and intractable medical problem. While numerous pharmaceuticals are used to treat chronic pain, drugs that are safe for extended use and highly effective at treating the most severe pain do not yet exist. Chronic pain resulting from nervous system injury (neuropathic pain) is common in conditions ranging from multiple sclerosis to HIV-1 infection to type II diabetes. Inflammation caused by neuropathy is believed to contribute to the generation and maintenance of neuropathic pain. Chemokines are key inflammatory mediators, several of which (MCP-1, RANTES, MIP-1α, fractalkine, SDF-1 among others) have been linked to chronic, neuropathic pain in both human conditions and animal models. The important roles chemokines play in inflammation and pain make them an attractive therapeutic target. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are a family of nuclear receptors known for their roles in metabolism. Recent research has revealed that PPARs also play a role in inflammatory gene repression. PPAR agonists have wide-ranging effects including inhibition of chemokine expression and pain behavior reduction in animal models. Experimental evidence suggests a connection between the pain ameliorating effects of PPAR agonists and suppression of inflammatory gene expression, including chemokines. In early clinical research, one PPARα agonist, palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), shows promise in relieving chronic pain. If this link can be better established, PPAR agonists may represent a new drug therapy for neuropathic pain. PMID:25191225

  1. Disodium Cromoglycate Reverses Colonic Visceral Hypersensitivity and Influences Colonic Ion Transport in a Stress-Sensitive Rat Strain

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Siobhan Yvonne; OMahony, Siobhain Mary; Grenham, Susan; Cryan, John Francis; Hyland, Niall Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The interface between psychiatry and stress-related gastrointestinal disorders (GI), such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), is well established, with anxiety and depression the most frequently occurring comorbid conditions. Moreover, stress-sensitive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats, which display anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors, exhibit GI disturbances akin to those observed in stress-related GI disorders. Additionally, there is mounting preclinical and clinical evidence implicating mast cells as significant contributors to the development of abdominal visceral pain in IBS. In this study we examined the effects of the rat connective tissue mast cell (CTMC) stabiliser, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) on visceral hypersensitivity and colonic ion transport, and examined both colonic and peritoneal mast cells from stress-sensitive WKY rats. DSCG significantly decreased abdominal pain behaviors induced by colorectal distension in WKY animals independent of a reduction in colonic rat mast cell mediator release. We further demonstrated that mast cell-stimulated colonic ion transport was sensitive to inhibition by the mast cell stabiliser DSCG, an effect only observed in stress-sensitive rats. Moreover, CTMC-like mast cells were significantly increased in the colonic submucosa of WKY animals, and we observed a significant increase in the proportion of intermediate, or immature, peritoneal mast cells relative to control animals. Collectively our data further support a role for mast cells in the pathogenesis of stress-related GI disorders. PMID:24367692

  2. Painful menstrual periods

    MedlinePLUS

    Menstruation - painful; Dysmenorrhea; Periods - painful; Cramps - menstrual; Menstrual cramps ... a few days during each menstrual cycle. Painful menstruation is the leading cause of lost time from ...

  3. Intractable Persistent Direction-Changing Geotropic Nystagmus Improved by Lateral Semicircular Canal Plugging

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Kazuya; Doi, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    Antigravitational deviation of the cupula of the lateral semicircular canal, which is also called light cupula, evokes persistent direction-changing geotropic nystagmus with a neutral point. No intractable cases of this condition have been reported. In our case, a 67-year-old man complained of positional vertigo 3 months after developing idiopathic sudden hearing loss in the right ear with vertigo. He showed a persistent direction-changing geotropic nystagmus with a leftward beating nystagmus in the supine position. The nystagmus resolved when his head was turned approximately 30 to the right. He was diagnosed with light cupula of the right lateral semicircular canal and was subsequently treated with an antivertiginous agent. However, his symptoms and positional nystagmus did not improve, so the right lateral semicircular canal was plugged by surgery. One month after surgery, his positional vertigo and nystagmus were completely resolved. We speculated that the cause of the patient's intractable light cupula was an enlarged cupula caused by his idiopathic sudden hearing loss. PMID:25685577

  4. Intractable persistent direction-changing geotropic nystagmus improved by lateral semicircular canal plugging.

    PubMed

    Seo, Toru; Saito, Kazuya; Doi, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    Antigravitational deviation of the cupula of the lateral semicircular canal, which is also called light cupula, evokes persistent direction-changing geotropic nystagmus with a neutral point. No intractable cases of this condition have been reported. In our case, a 67-year-old man complained of positional vertigo 3 months after developing idiopathic sudden hearing loss in the right ear with vertigo. He showed a persistent direction-changing geotropic nystagmus with a leftward beating nystagmus in the supine position. The nystagmus resolved when his head was turned approximately 30 to the right. He was diagnosed with light cupula of the right lateral semicircular canal and was subsequently treated with an antivertiginous agent. However, his symptoms and positional nystagmus did not improve, so the right lateral semicircular canal was plugged by surgery. One month after surgery, his positional vertigo and nystagmus were completely resolved. We speculated that the cause of the patient's intractable light cupula was an enlarged cupula caused by his idiopathic sudden hearing loss. PMID:25685577

  5. [Ketogenic diet for intractable childhood epilepsy; as an early option as well as a last resort].

    PubMed

    Ito, Susumu; Oguni, Hirokazu

    2011-04-01

    Since the 1920s, a ketogenic diet, of low-carbohydrate, adequate-protein and high-fat content, has been used for the treatment of intractable childhood epilepsy. A decade ago this diet was tried as a last resort in the treatment of intractable epilepsy. However, recent advances in ketogenic diet have enabled it to become more commonly used worldwide even early in the course of epilepsy. Two less-restrictive ketogenic diets, namely, the modified Atkins diet and low-glycemic-index treatment, have been developed. These diets allow the patients and their families to choose a more liberal menu. Furthermore, a randomized controlled trial found that the ketogenic diet has a significant benefit, which strengthens the supportive evidence. Recently, an international consensus statement guiding optimal clinical management has been published, allowing clinicians to provide standardized treatment. There has also been increased interest in investigating the mechanisms of action of ketogenic diet using various experimental models. The authors review the history, efficacy, side effects, and possible mechanisms underlying the ketogenic diet, as well as the experience with the ketogenic diet at Tokyo Women's Medical University. PMID:21441643

  6. Intracranial Chronic Subdural Hematoma Presenting with Intractable Headache after Cervical Epidural Steroid Injection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myungsoo

    2015-01-01

    Postdural punctural headache (PDPH) following spinal anesthesia is due to intracranial hypotension caused by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage, and it is occasionally accompanied by an intracranial hematoma. To the best of our knowledge, an intracranial chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) presenting with an intractable headache after a cervical epidural steroid injection (ESI) has not been reported. A 39-year-old woman without any history of trauma underwent a cervical ESI for a herniated nucleus pulposus at the C5-6 level. One month later, she presented with a severe headache that was not relieved by analgesic medication, which changed in character from being positional to non-positional during the preceding month. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed a CSDH along the left convexity. Emergency burr-hole drainage was performed and the headache abated. This report indicates that an intracranial CSDH should be considered a possible complication after ESI. In addition, the event of an intractable and changing PDPH after ESI suggests further evaluation for diagnosis of an intracranial hematoma. PMID:26361532

  7. Tuberous sclerosis with visceral leishmaniasis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Visceral leishmaniasis, a tropical infectious disease, is a major public health problem in India. Tuberous sclerosis, a congenital neuro-ectodermosis, is an uncommon disease which requires life long treatment. Case presentation A 15-year-old Indian patient, presented to the outpatient department of our institute with a high-grade fever for two months, splenomegaly and a history of generalized tonic-clonic convulsions since childhood. The clinical and laboratory findings suggested visceral leishmaniasis with tuberous sclerosis. The patient was treated with miltefosine and antiepileptics. Conclusion The patient responded well and in a follow up six months after presentation, she was found free of visceral leishmaniasis and seizures. Diagnosis and treatment of this rare combination of diseases is difficult.

  8. Drug resistance in Indian visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Sundar, S

    2001-11-01

    Throughout the world, pentavalent antimonial compounds (Sb(v)) have been the mainstay of antileishmanial therapy for more than 50 years. Sb(v) has been highly effective in the treatment of Indian visceral leishmaniasis (VL: kala-azar) at a low dose (10 mg/kg) for short durations (6-10 days). But in the early 1980s reports of its ineffectiveness emerged, and the dose of Sb(v) was eventually raised to 20 mg/kg for 30-40 days. This regimen cures most patients with VL except in India, where the proportion of patients unresponsive to Sb(v) has steadily increased. In hyperendemic districts of north Bihar, 50-65% patients fail treatment with Sb(v). Important reasons are rampant use of subtherapeutic doses, incomplete duration of treatment and substandard drugs. In vitro experiments have established emergence of Sb(v) resistant strains of Leishmania donovani, as isolates from unresponsive patients require 3-5 times more Sb(v) to reach similarly effectiveness against the parasite as in Sb(v) responders. Anthroponotic transmission in India has been an important factor in rapid increase in the Sb(v) refractoriness. Pentamidine was the first drug to be used and cured 99% of these refractory patients, but over time even with double the amount of initial doses, it cures only 69-78% patients now and its use has largely been abandoned in India. Despite several disadvantages, amphotericin B is the only drug available for use in these areas and should be used as first-line drug instead of Sb(v). The new oral antileishmanial drug miltefosine is likely to be the first-line drug in future. Unfortunately, development of newer antileishmanial drugs is rare; two promising drugs, aminosidine and sitamaquine, may be developed for use in the treatment of VL. Lipid associated amphotericin B has an excellent safety and efficacy profile, but remains out of reach for most patients because of its high cost. PMID:11703838

  9. Epidemiology of Visceral Leishmaniasis in Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Babuadze, Giorgi; Alvar, Jorge; Argaw, Daniel; de Koning, Harry P.; Iosava, Merab; Kekelidze, Merab; Tsertsvadze, Nikoloz; Tsereteli, David; Chakhunashvili, Giorgi; Mamatsashvili, Tamar; Beria, Nino; Kalandadze, Irine; Ejov, Mikhail; Imnadze, Paata

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the transmission and prevalence of Leishmania parasite infection of humans in two foci of Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) in Georgia, the well known focus in Tbilisi in the East, and in Kutaisi, a new focus in the West of the country. The seroprevalence of canine leishmaniasis was investigated in order to understand the zoonotic transmission. Blood samples of 1575 dogs (stray and pet) and 77 wild canids were tested for VL by Kalazar Detect rK39 rapid diagnostic tests. Three districts were investigated in Tbilisi and one in Kutaisi. The highest proportions of seropositive pet dogs were present in District #2 (28.1%, 82/292) and District #1 (26.9%, 24/89) in Tbilisi, compared to 17.3% (26/150) of pet dogs in Kutaisi. The percentage of seropositive stray dogs was also twice as high in Tbilisi (16.1%, n?=?670) than in Kutaisi (8%, n?=?50); only 2/58 wild animals screened were seropositive (2. 6%). A total of 873 Phlebotomine sand flies were collected, with 5 different species identified in Tbilisi and 3 species in Kutaisi; 2.3% of the females were positive for Leishmania parasites. The Leishmanin Skin Test (LST) was performed on 981 human subjects in VL foci in urban areas in Tbilisi and Kutaisi. A particularly high prevalence of LST positives was observed in Tbilisi District #1 (22.2%, 37.5% and 19.5% for ages 59, 1524 and 2559, respectively); lower prevalence was observed in Kutaisi (0%, 3.2% and 5.2%, respectively; P<0.05). This study shows that Tbilisi is an active focus for leishmaniasis and that the infection prevalence is very high in dogs and in humans. Although exposure is as yet not as high in Kutaisi, this is a new VL focus. The overall situation in the country is alarming and new control measures are urgently needed. PMID:24603768

  10. Successful Fecal Bacteria Transplantation and Nurse Management for a Patient With Intractable Functional Constipation: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yingchun; Wang, Xinying; Li, Xuejiao; Peng, Nanhai

    2016-01-01

    Intractable functional constipation is a common gastrointestinal disorder that features persistent difficult defecation, reduced bowel movements, or a feeling of incomplete defecation. Despite many therapeutic approaches, there has not been an established standard treatment protocol. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), an innovative therapy that was introduced recently, has been preliminarily shown to have good effects and is expected to have good prospects. However, nursing is also of great importance during the process of FMT. An innovative nursing care protocol is combined with FMT, with a view to improving the clinical symptoms and quality of life of patients with intractable functional dyspepsia. This case-based study addresses the effects of nursing interventions used during the treatment of one patient with intractable functional constipation who received FMT. PMID:26871249

  11. Facts and Figures on Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... adults. Common chronic pain complaints include headache, low back pain, cancer pain, arthritis pain, neurogenic pain (pain resulting ... Institute of Health Statistics survey indicated that low back pain was the most common (27%), followed by severe ...

  12. Central sensitization: Implications for the diagnosis and treatment of pain

    PubMed Central

    Woolf, Clifford J

    2010-01-01

    Nociceptor inputs can trigger a prolonged but reversible increase in the excitability and synaptic efficacy of neurons in central nociceptive pathways, the phenomenon of central sensitization. Central sensitization manifests as pain hypersensitivity, particularly dynamic tactile allodynia, secondary punctate or pressure hyperalgesia, aftersensations, and enhanced temporal summation. It can be readily and rapidly elicited in human volunteers by diverse experimental noxious conditioning stimuli to skin, muscles or viscera, and in addition to producing pain hypersensitivity, results in secondary changes in brain activity that can be detected by electrophysiological or imaging techniques. Studies in clinical cohorts reveal changes in pain sensitivity that have been interpreted as revealing an important contribution of central sensitization to the pain phenotype in patients with fibromyalgia, osteoarthritis, musculoskeletal disorders with generalized pain hypersensitivity, headache, temporomandibular joint disorders, dental pain, neuropathic pain, visceral pain hypersensitivity disorders and postsurgical pain. The comorbidity of those pain hypersensitivity syndromes that present in the absence of inflammation or a neural lesion, their similar pattern of clinical presentation and response to centrally acting analgesics, may reflect a commonality of central sensitization to their pathophysiology. An important question that still needs to be determined is whether there are individuals with a higher inherited propensity for developing central sensitization than others, and if so, whether this conveys an increased risk both of developing conditions with pain hypersensitivity, and their chronification. Diagnostic criteria to establish the presence of central sensitization in patients will greatly assist the phenotyping of patients for choosing treatments that produce analgesia by normalizing hyperexcitable central neural activity. We have certainly come a long way since the first discovery of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity in the spinal cord and the revelation that it occurs and produces pain hypersensitivity in patients. Nevertheless, discovering the genetic and environmental contributors to and objective biomarkers of central sensitization will be highly beneficial, as will additional treatment options to prevent or reduce this prevalent and promiscuous form of pain plasticity. PMID:20961685

  13. Presentation of AIDS with Disseminated Cutaneous and Visceral Leishmaniasis in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Davarpanah, Mohammadali; Rassaei, Masumeh; Sari aslani, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is an infectious disease in form of visceral (VL), cutaneous (CL), and mucocutaneous (MCL) leishmaniasis. Immunocompromised patients have increased risk of Leishmania infection, especially in endemic areas for visceral leishmaniasis, where in the world HIV/VL coinfection has become endemic. The case here suffers from both AIDS and visceral-cutaneous leishmaniasis. We report an Iranian woman with disseminated cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis who became positive for HIV test. PMID:26075117

  14. Achilles Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Five ailments which can cause pain in the achilles tendon area are: (1) muscular strain, involving the stretching or tearing of muscle or tendon fibers; (2) a contusion, inflammation or infection called tenosynovitis; (3) tendonitis, the inflammation of the tendon; (4) calcaneal bursitis, the inflammation of the bursa between the achilles tendon…

  15. Shoulder Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in my shoulder? A common cause of shoulder pain is soreness of the tendon (a cord that attaches a muscle to a bone) of the rotator cuff (the part of the shoulder that helps circular motion). Another common cause is soreness of the subacromial bursa (a sac of fluid under the highest ...

  16. Achilles Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Five ailments which can cause pain in the achilles tendon area are: (1) muscular strain, involving the stretching or tearing of muscle or tendon fibers; (2) a contusion, inflammation or infection called tenosynovitis; (3) tendonitis, the inflammation of the tendon; (4) calcaneal bursitis, the inflammation of the bursa between the achilles tendon

  17. Transdermal buprenorphine controls central neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Michelle; Sarantopoulos, Constantine; Gordon, Eva

    2012-01-01

    A 53-year-old male with peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy suffered an intracerebral hemorrhage resulting in right hemiparesis and hemisensory loss. Three months later, he developed constant and burning pain within the entire right side of his body. He was diagnosed with central pain syndrome and treated with antiepileptics and tricyclic antidepressants. Minimal analgesia was achieved, which was limited by intractable sedation and drowsiness. Patient was then treated with oral opioids (morphine and hydrocodone with acetaminophen) in escalating doses that produced cognitive impairment. After an opioid rotation was attempted, by switching morphine to transdermal fentanyl, there was no pain reduction or improved quality of life. A trial of buprenorphine was initiated, by administering transdermal patches in escalating doses in weekly intervals. Patient's pain was eventually successfully controlled with buprenorphine patch 60 ?g/h every 7 days. His self-reported Visual Analogue Scale pain scores decreased from an average of 8/10 to 2/10 or less. Patient's overall function and participation in home activities increased. Buprenorphine is a partial ?-receptor and a ?-? receptor antagonist known to block NMDA receptors and reduce hyperalgesia secondary to central sensitization.(1) Buprenorphine is also a partial agonist at the opioid receptor-like (ORL-1) receptor, which is found to be analgesic and antinociceptive at the level of the spinal cord.(1,2) The difference in analgesic responses between buprenorphine and other opioids may be due to different receptor G protein interactions and/or selective activation of neuronal K(ATP) channels by buprenorphine.(3) Deficient opening of K(ATP) channels has been shown to mediate neuropathic pain(4); therefore, activation of these channels by buprenorphine may contribute to its analgesic effect in neuropathic pain states wherein other opioids fail. More recently, there have been two case reports in which patients with neuropathic pain of different central etiology were successfully treated with buprenorphine.(5) Despite advances in understanding the pathology related to central pain, effective treatment options are limited. Buprenorphine may be an analgesic option for central pain management when opioids fail to reduce hypersensitivity or when patients exhibit intolerable side effects to other medications. PMID:23264319

  18. Modulation of enteric neurons by interleukin-6 and corticotropin-releasing factor contributes to visceral hypersensitivity and altered colonic motility in a rat model of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Maria M; O'Halloran, Ken D; Rae, Mark G; Dinan, Timothy G; O'Malley, Dervla

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The search for effective therapeutic strategies for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is hampered by an incomplete understanding of its underlying pathophysiology. Stress and altered plasma cytokine profiles indicative of immune activation are characteristic of the disorder. The neuromodulatory effects of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and corticotropin-releasing factor receptor (CRFR) 1 in visceral pain and stress-induced defecation in the Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat model of IBS were investigated. Sprague Dawley and WKY rats were administered anti-IL-6 receptor antibodies (xIL-6R, 0.5 mg kg−1 i.p) with or without the CRFR1 antagonist antalarmin (10 mg kg−1 i.p). Post-intervention, the pain threshold to colorectal distension and stress-induced faecal output were compared and changes in colonic mucosal protein expression were investigated. The neuro-stimulatory effects of IBS plasma on the myenteric plexus is mediated by IL-6, IL-8 and CRF. The stimulatory effects of these soluble factors on myenteric neuron excitability and colonic contractility were additive. Moreover, inhibition of IL-6 and CRF1 receptors in vivo in the WKY IBS rat model normalized stress-induced defecation (P < 0.01) and visceral pain sensitivity (P < 0.001) with associated changes in protein expression of the tight junction proteins occludin and claudin 2, the visceral pain-associated T-type calcium channel CaV3.2 and intracellular signalling molecules STAT3, SOCS3 and ERK1/2. These studies demonstrate the additive effects of immune and stress factors on myenteric neuronal excitability. Moreover, combined targeting of peripheral IL-6 and CRF1 receptors is effective in alleviating IBS-like symptoms in the WKY rat. Thus, crosstalk between stress and immune factors during IBS flares may underlie symptom exacerbation. PMID:25260633

  19. What Is Chronic Pain?

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Management Tools Videos What Is Chronic Pain? What Is Chronic Pain? View Transcript Download Transcript If you ... with chronic pain, you know that chronic pain is different. Ed Covington, MD, director of the Cleveland ...

  20. Somatoform pain disorder

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain disorder ... thought to be related to emotional stress. The pain was often said to be "all in their head." However, patients with somatoform pain disorder seem to experience painful sensations in a ...

  1. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition. It causes intense pain, usually in the arms, hands, legs, or feet. ... in skin temperature, color, or texture Intense burning pain Extreme skin sensitivity Swelling and stiffness in affected ...

  2. Fighting Chronic Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... earache, toothache, sore throat, sinus pain, facial numbness Muscles and Bones: Arthritis, back pain, bone pain from spread of cancer, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome Neurologic: "Phantom limb" pain after amputation, nerve ...

  3. American Chronic Pain Association

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ACPA Contact Us Shop FAQs The Art of Pain Management Resources Going to the ER Glossary Surveys What We Have Learned Communication Tools Videos Pain Management Programs Resource Guide to Chronic Pain Treatments Pain ...

  4. Back Pain During Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Back Pain During Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs Back ... Pain During Pregnancy FAQ115, January 2016 PDF Format Back Pain During Pregnancy Pregnancy What causes back pain during ...

  5. Prevent Back Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Back Pain Print This Topic En español Prevent Back Pain Browse Sections The Basics Overview Types of Back ... 1 of 7 sections The Basics: Types of Back Pain There are different kinds of back pain. Back ...

  6. When Sex Is Painful

    MedlinePLUS

    ... AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS FAQ020 When Sex Is Painful • How common is painful sex? • What causes pain during sex? • Where is pain during sex felt? • When should ...

  7. Pulsed radiofrequency to the great occipital nerve for the treatment of intractable postherpetic itch: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ding, De-Fang; Li, Rong-Chun; Xiong, Qiu-Ju; Zhou, Ling; Xiang, Hong-Bing

    2014-01-01

    A patient with intractable postherpetic itch lasting for 1 year was reported. The itch was mainly from the left vertex, frontal and ophthalmic regions and extended to the left neck area. The patient had negative response to the ophthalmic nerve block. Under the initial positive response to the great occipital nerve block, pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) was performed on the position of the great occipital nerve. After 4 months treatment, the itch was completely vanished. This case study demonstrates the effectiveness of PRF for intractable postherpetic itch originating in the head and neck. However, more samples needed to verify this management. PMID:25419389

  8. Inflammation-induced pain sensitization in men and women: does sex matter in experimental endotoxemia?

    PubMed Central

    Wegner, Alexander; Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Rebernik, Laura; Roderigo, Till; Engelbrecht, Elisa; Jäger, Marcus; Engler, Harald; Schedlowski, Manfred; Benson, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A role of the innate immune system is increasingly recognized as a mechanism contributing to pain sensitization. Experimental administration of the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) constitutes a model to study inflammation-induced pain sensitization, but all existing human evidence comes from male participants. We assessed visceral and musculoskeletal pain sensitivity after low-dose LPS administration in healthy men and women to test the hypothesis that women show greater LPS-induced hyperalgesia compared with men. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, healthy men (n = 20) and healthy women using oral contraceptives (n = 20) received an intravenous injection of 0.4 ng/kg body weight LPS or placebo. Pain sensitivity was assessed with established visceral and musculoskeletal pain models (ie, rectal pain thresholds; pressure pain thresholds for different muscle groups), together with a heartbeat perception (interoceptive accuracy) task. Plasma cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6) were measured along with state anxiety at baseline and up to 6-hour postinjection. Lipopolysaccharide application led to significant increases in plasma cytokines and state anxiety and decreased interoceptive awareness in men and women (P < 0.001, condition effects), with more pronounced LPS-induced cytokine increases in women (P < 0.05, interaction effects). Although both rectal and pressure pain thresholds were significantly decreased in the LPS condition (all P < 0.05, condition effect), no sex differences in endotoxin-induced sensitization were observed. In summary, LPS-induced systemic immune activation leads to visceral and musculoskeletal hyperalgesia, irrespective of biological sex. These findings support the broad applicability of experimental endotoxin administration as a translational preclinical model of inflammation-induced pain sensitization in both sexes. PMID:26058036

  9. Inflammation-induced pain sensitization in men and women: does sex matter in experimental endotoxemia?

    PubMed

    Wegner, Alexander; Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Rebernik, Laura; Roderigo, Till; Engelbrecht, Elisa; Jger, Marcus; Engler, Harald; Schedlowski, Manfred; Benson, Sven

    2015-10-01

    A role of the innate immune system is increasingly recognized as a mechanism contributing to pain sensitization. Experimental administration of the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) constitutes a model to study inflammation-induced pain sensitization, but all existing human evidence comes from male participants. We assessed visceral and musculoskeletal pain sensitivity after low-dose LPS administration in healthy men and women to test the hypothesis that women show greater LPS-induced hyperalgesia compared with men. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, healthy men (n = 20) and healthy women using oral contraceptives (n = 20) received an intravenous injection of 0.4 ng/kg body weight LPS or placebo. Pain sensitivity was assessed with established visceral and musculoskeletal pain models (ie, rectal pain thresholds; pressure pain thresholds for different muscle groups), together with a heartbeat perception (interoceptive accuracy) task. Plasma cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-? and interleukin-6) were measured along with state anxiety at baseline and up to 6-hour postinjection. Lipopolysaccharide application led to significant increases in plasma cytokines and state anxiety and decreased interoceptive awareness in men and women (P < 0.001, condition effects), with more pronounced LPS-induced cytokine increases in women (P < 0.05, interaction effects). Although both rectal and pressure pain thresholds were significantly decreased in the LPS condition (all P < 0.05, condition effect), no sex differences in endotoxin-induced sensitization were observed. In summary, LPS-induced systemic immune activation leads to visceral and musculoskeletal hyperalgesia, irrespective of biological sex. These findings support the broad applicability of experimental endotoxin administration as a translational preclinical model of inflammation-induced pain sensitization in both sexes. PMID:26058036

  10. Multiple roles for NaV1.9 in the activation of visceral afferents by noxious inflammatory, mechanical, and human diseasederived stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Hockley, James R.F.; Boundouki, George; Cibert-Goton, Vincent; McGuire, Cian; Yip, Ping K.; Chan, Christopher; Tranter, Michael; Wood, John N.; Nassar, Mohammed A.; Blackshaw, L. Ashley; Aziz, Qasim; Michael, Gregory J.; Baker, Mark D.; Winchester, Wendy J.; Knowles, Charles H.; Bulmer, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic visceral pain affects millions of individuals worldwide and remains poorly understood, with current therapeutic options constrained by gastrointestinal adverse effects. Visceral pain is strongly associated with inflammation and distension of the gut. Here we report that the voltage-gated sodium channel subtype NaV1.9 is expressed in half of gut-projecting rodent dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons. We show that NaV1.9 is required for normal mechanosensation, for direct excitation and for sensitization of mouse colonic afferents by mediators from inflammatory bowel disease tissues, and by noxious inflammatory mediators individually. Excitatory responses to ATP or PGE2 were substantially reduced in NaV1.9?/? mice. Deletion of NaV1.9 substantially attenuates excitation and subsequent mechanical hypersensitivity after application of inflammatory soup (IS) (bradykinin, ATP, histamine, PGE2, and 5HT) to visceral nociceptors located in the serosa and mesentery. Responses to mechanical stimulation of mesenteric afferents were also reduced by loss of NaV1.9, and there was a rightward shift in stimulusresponse function to ramp colonic distension. By contrast, responses to rapid, high-intensity phasic distension of the colon are initially unaffected; however, run-down of responses to repeat phasic distension were exacerbated in NaV1.9?/? afferents. Finally colonic afferent activation by supernatants derived from inflamed human tissue was greatly reduced in NaV1.9?/? mice. These results demonstrate that NaV1.9 is required for persistence of responses to intense mechanical stimulation, contributes to inflammatory mechanical hypersensitivity, and is essential for activation by noxious inflammatory mediators, including those from diseased human bowel. These observations indicate that NaV1.9 represents a high-value target for development of visceral analgesics. PMID:24972070

  11. [Microinjection of L-NAME into dorsal raphe nucleus inhibits nociceptive response in sigmoid pain model of rats].

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Zhang, Li-Cai; Zeng, Yin-Ming

    2003-10-25

    By means of Fos immunocytochemistry, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase (NADPH-d) histochemistry and microinjection methods, the role of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) of dorsal raphe (DR) neurons in the modulation of rats sigmoid pain was studied. The results showed: (1) Rats exhibited aversive behavioral responses related to visceral pain after injecting formalin into the sigmoid wall. NOS neurons in DR were up-regulated, in addition, about 8% of NOS-labeled neurons were Fos positive. By contrast, there were no Fos/NOS double-labeled neurons in the control group. (2) Formalin-induced sigmoid pain scores and the expression of Fos in the spinal cord at S1 segment were decreased after microinjecting L-NAME into the DR. These findings suggest that NOS neurons are involved in the modulation of formalin-induced sigmoid pain and that NO may play an important role in the transmission of visceral nociceptive message in the midbrain. PMID:14566407

  12. Oesophageal sensation assessed by electrical stimuli and brain evoked potentials--a new model for visceral nociception.

    PubMed Central

    Frbert, O; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Bak, P; Funch-Jensen, P; Bagger, J P

    1995-01-01

    Sensory thresholds and brain evoked potentials were determined in 12 healthy volunteers using electrical stimulation of the oesophagus 28 and 38 cm from the nares. The peaks of the evoked potentials were designated N for negative deflections and P for positive. Continuous electrical stimulation (40 Hz) at the 38 cm position resembled heartburn (five of 12 subjects) while non-specific ('electrical') sensations were provoked at 28 cm (10 of 12). Thresholds of sensation and of pain were lower at the initial than the second determination, but did not differ with respect to stimulation site. The pain summation threshold to repeated stimuli (2 Hz, 5 stimuli) was determined for the first time in a viscus. This threshold was lower than the pain threshold to single stimuli at 38 cm (p < 0.02). Evoked potential latencies did not change significantly over a six month period while the N1/P2 amplitude was higher at the first measurement (p < 0.05). P1 and N1 latencies were significantly shorter 38 cm (medians 100 and 141 ms) than 28 cm from the nares (102 and 148 ms) (p = 0.04 and p = 0.008). Electrical stimulation of the oesophagus may serve as a human experimental model for visceral pain. Longer evoked potential latencies from the proximal compared with distal stimulations provide new information about the sensory pathways of the oesophagus. PMID:8549932

  13. Antimony to Cure Visceral Leishmaniasis Unresponsive to Liposomal Amphotericin B.

    PubMed

    Morizot, Gloria; Jouffroy, Romain; Faye, Albert; Chabert, Paul; Belhouari, Katia; Calin, Ruxandra; Charlier, Caroline; Miailhes, Patrick; Siriez, Jean-Yves; Mouri, Oussama; Yera, Hlne; Gilquin, Jacques; Tubiana, Roland; Lanternier, Fanny; Mamzer, Marie-France; Legendre, Christophe; Peyramond, Dominique; Caumes, Eric; Lortholary, Olivier; Buffet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    We report on 4 patients (1 immunocompetent, 3 immunosuppressed) in whom visceral leishmaniasis had become unresponsive to (or had relapsed after) treatment with appropriate doses of liposomal amphotericin B. Under close follow-up, full courses of pentavalent antimony were administered without life-threatening adverse events and resulted in rapid and sustained clinical and parasitological cure. PMID:26735920

  14. VISCERAL TISSUE GROWTH AND PROLIFERATION DURING THE BOVINE LACTATION CYCLE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty one multiparous, nonpregnant, lactating dairy cows were used to assess the impact of stage of lactation on visceral tissue mass and small intestinal cell proliferation. Cows were housed in tie stalls with 12 h of light/dark and were milked twice daily at 0700 and 1800 h. Cows had ad libitum...

  15. Obesity reduces methionine sulfoxide reductase activity in visceral adipose tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Visceral obesity is linked to the development of comorbidities including insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. Elevated levels of oxidative stress are observed in obese individuals and in animal models of obesity, pointing to a mechanistic role of oxidative stress. A recent genetic study in...

  16. The pathology associated with visceral toxicosis of catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Visceral toxicosis of catfish (VTC) syndrome was recognized in the late 1990s and recently has been associated with exposure to Clostridium botulinum type E neurotoxin. Tentative diagnosis is based on clinical presentation and ross findings, and is confirmed by bioassay. In April 2009, channel cat...

  17. Sonographic evaluation of visceral and subcutaneous fat in obese children*

    PubMed Central

    Sakuno, Telma; Tomita, Letcia Mary; Tomita, Carolina Mywa; Giuliano, Isabela de Carlos Back; Ibagy, Amanda; Perin, Nilza Maria Medeiros; Poeta, Lisiane Schilling

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate sonographic measurements of visceral and subcutaneous fat in children, and to investigate the usefulness of preperitoneal fat (PF) and the abdominal wall fat index (AFI) as parameters to determine visceral fat and presence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in obese children. Materials and Methods A case-control study of a sample including 44 children (22 cases and 22 controls) matched by sex and age. The Student t test and the Fisher exact test were utilized in the descriptive and bivariate analysis. Results The sonographic parameters evaluated - subcutaneous cell tissue, PF and intraperitoneal fat, and NAFLD - presented high statistical association with body mass index. NAFLD was observed in eight obese patients (36.36%), and PF and AFI were the variables with highest statistical significance, with p < 0.0001. Conclusion Ultrasonography is useful tool in the differentiation and quantification of visceral and subcutaneous fat in children. The measures of PF and AFI are useful in the assessment of visceral fat and NAFLD in obese children. PMID:25741071

  18. Antimony to Cure Visceral Leishmaniasis Unresponsive to Liposomal Amphotericin B

    PubMed Central

    Morizot, Gloria; Jouffroy, Romain; Faye, Albert; Chabert, Paul; Belhouari, Katia; Calin, Ruxandra; Charlier, Caroline; Miailhes, Patrick; Siriez, Jean-Yves; Mouri, Oussama; Yera, Hélène; Gilquin, Jacques; Tubiana, Roland; Lanternier, Fanny; Mamzer, Marie-France; Legendre, Christophe; Peyramond, Dominique; Caumes, Eric; Lortholary, Olivier; Buffet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    We report on 4 patients (1 immunocompetent, 3 immunosuppressed) in whom visceral leishmaniasis had become unresponsive to (or had relapsed after) treatment with appropriate doses of liposomal amphotericin B. Under close follow-up, full courses of pentavalent antimony were administered without life-threatening adverse events and resulted in rapid and sustained clinical and parasitological cure. PMID:26735920

  19. Stress-induced visceral analgesia assessed non-invasively in rats is enhanced by prebiotic diet

    PubMed Central

    Larauche, Muriel; Mulak, Agata; Yuan, Pu-Qing; Kanauchi, Osamu; Taché, Yvette

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the influence of repeated water avoidance stress (rWAS) on the visceromotor response (VMR) to colorectal distension (CRD) and the modulation of the response by a prebiotic diet in rats using a novel surgery-free method of solid-state manometry. METHODS: Male Wistar rats fed a standard diet with or without 4% enzyme-treated rice fiber (ERF) for 5 wk were subjected to rWAS (1 h daily x 10 d) or no stress. The VMR to graded phasic CRD was assessed by intraluminal colonic pressure recording on days 0 (baseline), 1 and 10 (45 min) and 11 (24 h) after rWAS and expressed as percentage change from baseline. Cecal content of short chain fatty acids and distal colonic histology were assessed on day 11. RESULTS: WAS on day 1 reduced the VMR to CRD at 40 and 60 mmHg similarly by 28.9% ± 6.6% in both diet groups. On day 10, rWAS-induced reduction of VMR occurred only at 40 mmHg in the standard diet group (36.2% ± 17.8%) while in the ERF group VMR was lowered at 20, 40 and 60 mmHg by 64.9% ± 20.9%, 49.3% ± 11.6% and 38.9% ± 7.3% respectively. The visceral analgesia was still observed on day 11 in ERF- but not in standard diet-fed rats. By contrast the non-stressed groups (standard or ERF diet) exhibited no changes in VMR to CRD. In standard diet-fed rats, rWAS induced mild colonic histological changes that were absent in ERF-fed rats exposed to stress compared to non-stressed rats. The reduction of cecal content of isobutyrate and total butyrate, but not butyrate alone, was correlated with lower visceral pain response. Additionally, ERF diet increased rWAS-induced defecation by 26% and 75% during the first 0-15 min and last 15-60 min, respectively, compared to standard diet, and reduced rats’ body weight gain by 1.3 fold independently of their stress status. CONCLUSION: These data provide the first evidence of psychological stress-related visceral analgesia in rats that was enhanced by chronic intake of ERF prebiotic. PMID:22294825

  20. Perceptions of a Changing World Induce Hope and Promote Peace in Intractable Conflicts

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Chen, Smadar; Crisp, Richard J.; Halperin, Eran

    2015-01-01

    The importance of hope in promoting conciliatory attitudes has been asserted in the field of conflict resolution. However, little is known about conditions inducing hope, especially in intractable conflicts, where reference to the outgroup may backfire. In the current research, five studies yielded convergent support for the hypothesis that hope for peace stems from a general perception of the world as changing. In Study 1, coders observed associations between belief in a changing world, hope regarding peace, and support for concessions. Study 2 revealed the hypothesized relations using self-reported measures. Studies 3 and 4 established causality by instilling a perception of the world as changing (vs. unchanging) using narrative and drawing manipulations. Study 5 compared the changing world message with a control condition during conflict escalation. Across studies, although the specific context was not referred to, the belief in a changing world increased support for concessions through hope for peace. PMID:25713171

  1. Acute encephalopathy and intractable seizures in a 10-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Caceres, M E; de los Reyes, E C; Khan, R; Caceres, M J

    1999-09-01

    We report a 10-year-old child with Robinow's syndrome who had a 2-week history of headaches and dizziness. On the day of admission, he developed a focal onset seizure with rapid secondary generalization. The seizures were intractable despite adequate doses of benzodiazepine, phenytoin, and phenobarbital, requiring a pentobarbital drip. Continuous electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring showed persistence of the epileptiform discharges for 13 days. Cerebrospinal fluid and brain biopsy studies were unrevealing. Mycoplasma pneumonia titers showed elevation of both immunoglobulins G and M that doubled during the tenth hospital day. High-dose methylprednisolone was begun, and within 12 hours of initiation the patient sat up and began to follow commands appropriately. The overall EEG background markedly improved. Central nervous system Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection should be suspected in patients with an encephalopathy of unclear etiology. PMID:10522345

  2. Effect of corpus callosotomy on attention deficit and behavioral problems in pediatric patients with intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Yonekawa, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Eiji; Takeshita, Eri; Inoue, Yuki; Inagaki, Masumi; Kaga, Makiko; Sugai, Kenji; Sasaki, Masayuki; Kaido, Takanobu; Takahashi, Akio; Otsuki, Taisuke

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of corpus callosotomy (CC) on attention deficit and behavioral problems in pediatric patients with intractable epilepsy, we retrospectively investigated sequential patients who had undergone CC to control seizures. Between August 2005 and April 2010, a total of 15 patients aged between 3.1 and 17.9 years underwent CC at our institute. All the patients experienced either drop attacks or head nodding, which were considered to be therapeutic targets of CC. A standardized instrument, the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), was used to assess behavioral and emotional problems before and after surgery. On postoperative EEGs, 8 (53%) showed improvement and 7 (47%) showed no change in epileptiform discharges. The Attention Problems scale and total score on the CBCL significantly improved in patients whose postoperative EEGs showed improvement. In addition to amelioration of target seizures, CC can improve attention impairments in association with improvement in the postoperative EEG. PMID:21978470

  3. [New international classification of epilepsy and new antiepileptic drugs for medically intractable epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Sadatoshi

    2009-11-01

    The task force of the international league against epilepsy (ILAE) proposed the "Diagnostic scheme for people with epileptic seizures and epilepsy" in 2001. The 2001 diagnostic scheme was updated in 2006. The ILAE Core Group recommended the new classification to replace the previous one (ILAE, 1981, 1989). However, the new classification is too complex to use for clinicians except expert epileptologists. About 10 new antiepileptic drugs are launched recently. Among them, gabapentine, topiramate, and lamotrigine have been approved in Japan as adjunctive therapy for medically intractable seizures. The advantage of the new antiepileptic drugs includes newer mechanism of action, broad spectrum of anti-seizure effects, fewer side effects, and lesser drug interactions. The rational polytherapy is necessary for refractory epilepsy. The majority of elderly patients with new onset epilepsy become seizure free on antiepileptic monotherapy, often with modest dose. We are now in the new era of epilepsy treatment. PMID:20030206

  4. The effect of somatostatin on small intestinal transport in intractable diarrhoea of infancy.

    PubMed

    Bisset, W M; Jenkins, H; Booth, I; Smith, V; Milla, P J

    1993-08-01

    It has been reported that somatostatin may be an effective antisecretory agent in a range of conditions causing severe secretory diarrhoea. In many children, intractable diarrhoeal illnesses result in significant morbidity and mortality. In a group of seven children with secretory diarrhoea, the effect of i.v. infusion of somatostatin (3.5 micrograms/kg stratum plus 3.5 micrograms/kg/h) on the net mucosal flux of salt and water was assessed using an in vivo steady-state perfusion technique. In one of the seven children who had evidence of deranged mucosal secretion and preserved villus function, somatostatin infusion resulted in a moderate reduction in secretion. In the remaining six, it had little or no beneficial effect. Somatostatin did not alter the rate of glucose absorption. PMID:7901358

  5. Perceptions of a changing world induce hope and promote peace in intractable conflicts.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Chen, Smadar; Crisp, Richard J; Halperin, Eran

    2015-04-01

    The importance of hope in promoting conciliatory attitudes has been asserted in the field of conflict resolution. However, little is known about conditions inducing hope, especially in intractable conflicts, where reference to the outgroup may backfire. In the current research, five studies yielded convergent support for the hypothesis that hope for peace stems from a general perception of the world as changing. In Study 1, coders observed associations between belief in a changing world, hope regarding peace, and support for concessions. Study 2 revealed the hypothesized relations using self-reported measures. Studies 3 and 4 established causality by instilling a perception of the world as changing (vs. unchanging) using narrative and drawing manipulations. Study 5 compared the changing world message with a control condition during conflict escalation. Across studies, although the specific context was not referred to, the belief in a changing world increased support for concessions through hope for peace. PMID:25713171

  6. Intractable pneumothorax managed by talc pleurodesis and bronchial occlusion with spigots.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Atsuko; Kida, Hirotaka; Muraoka, Hiromi; Nishine, Hiroki; Mineshita, Masamichi; Miyazawa, Teruomi

    2015-03-01

    Three cases of inoperable secondary spontaneous pneumothorax were diagnosed in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Two cases initially underwent bronchial occlusion with endobronchial Watanabe spigot (EWS), while one underwent talc poudrage with pleuroscopy. As air leaks were not stopped completely in all cases with the initial procedures, we performed additional interventional treatments: pleuroscopic talc poudrage in cases when bronchial occlusion was performed first; and bronchial occlusion with EWS for a case that initially underwent talc pleurodesis. The air leaks ceased in all cases without complication. We successfully removed chest tubes 2-10 days after secondary procedure, which was 10-23 days after the first procedure. The combination of talc pleurodesis and bronchial occlusion with EWS, when a single, initial interventional treatment fails, can be considered in cases of intractable, inoperable secondary pneumothorax. PMID:25802742

  7. Melanosomal sequestration of cytotoxic drugs contributes to the intractability of malignant melanomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kevin G.; Valencia, Julio C.; Lai, Barry; Zhang, Guofeng; Paterson, Jill K.; Rouzaud, François; Berens, Werner; Wincovitch, Stephen M.; Garfield, Susan H.; Leapman, Richard D.; Hearing, Vincent J.; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2006-06-01

    Multidrug resistance mechanisms underlying the intractability of malignant melanomas remain largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that the development of multidrug resistance in melanomas involves subcellular sequestration of intracellular cytotoxic drugs such as cis-diaminedichloroplatinum II (cisplatin; CDDP). CDDP is initially sequestered in subcellular organelles such as melanosomes, which significantly reduces its nuclear localization when compared with nonmelanoma/KB-3-1 epidermoid carcinoma cells. The melanosomal accumulation of CDDP remarkably modulates melanogenesis through a pronounced increase in tyrosinase activity. The altered melanogenesis manifested an 8-fold increase in both intracellular pigmentation and extracellular transport of melanosomes containing CDDP. Thus, our experiments provide evidence that melanosomes contribute to the refractory properties of melanoma cells by sequestering cytotoxic drugs and increasing melanosome-mediated drug export. Preventing melanosomal sequestration of cytotoxic drugs by inhibiting the functions of melanosomes may have great potential as an approach to improving the chemosensitivity of melanoma cells. cancer | melanosomes | skin | tumor therapy | multidrug resistance

  8. Intractable diseases treated with intra-bone marrow-bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Guo, Kuquan; Ikehara, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is used to treat hematological disorders, autoimmune diseases (ADs) and lymphoid cancers. Intra bone marrow-BMT (IBM-BMT) has been proven to be a powerful strategy for allogeneic BMT due to the rapid hematopoietic recovery and the complete restoration of T cell functions. IBM-BMT not only replaces hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) but also mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). MSCs are multi-potent stem cells that can be isolated from bone marrow (BM), umbilical cord blood (UCB), and adipose tissue. MSCs play an important role in the support of hematopoiesis, and modify and influence the innate and adaptive immune systems. MSCs also differentiate into mesodermal, endodermal and ectodermal lineage cells to repair tissues. This review aims to summarize the functions of BM-derived-MSCs, and the treatment of intractable diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and malignant tumors with IBM-BMT. PMID:25364755

  9. Metabolic obesity: the paradox between visceral and subcutaneous fat.

    PubMed

    Hamdy, Osama; Porramatikul, Sriurai; Al-Ozairi, Ebaa

    2006-11-01

    In contrast to the accumulation of fat in the gluteo-femoral region, the accumulation of fat around abdominal viscera and inside intraabdominal solid organs is strongly associated with obesity-related complications like Type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease. The association between visceral adiposity and accelerated atherosclerosis was shown to be independent of age, overall obesity or the amount of subcutaneous fat. Recent evidence revealed several biological and genetic differences between intraabdominal visceral-fat and peripheral subcutaneous-fat. Such differences are also reflected in their contrasting roles in the pathogenesis of obesity-related cardiometabolic problems, in either lean or obese individuals. The functional differences between visceral and the subcutaneous adipocytes may be related to their anatomical location. Visceral adipose tissue and its adipose-tissue resident macrophages produce more proinflamatory cytokines like tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and less adiponectin. These cytokines changes induce insulin resistance and play a major role in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction and subsequent atherosclerosis. The rate of visceral fat accumulation is also different according to the individual's gender and ethnic background; being more prominent in white men, African American women and Asian Indian and Japanese men and women. Such differences may explain the variation in the cardiometabolic risk at different waist measurements between different populations. However, it is unclear how much visceral fat reduction is needed to induce favorable metabolic changes. On the other hand, peripheral fat mass is negatively correlated with atherogenic metabolic risk factors and its selective reduction by liposuction does improve cardiovascular risk profile. The increasing knowledge about body fat distribution and its modifiers may lead to the development of more effective treatment strategies for people with/or at high risk for Type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease. These accumulating observations also urge our need for a new definition of obesity based on the anatomical location of fat rather than on its volume, especially when cardiometabolic risk is considered. The term "Metabolic Obesity", in reference to visceral fat accumulation in either lean or obese individuals may identify those at risk for cardiovascular disease better than the currently used definitions of obesity. PMID:18220642

  10. Neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Non-specific neck pain has a postural or mechanical basis and affects about two thirds of people at some stage, especially in middle age. Acute neck pain resolves within days or weeks, but may become chronic in about 10% of people. Whiplash injuries follow sudden acceleration–deceleration of the neck, such as in road traffic or sporting accidents. Up to 40% of people continue to report symptoms 15 years after the accident, although this varies between countries. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for people with non-specific neck pain without severe neurological deficit? What are the effects of treatments for acute whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for chronic whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for neck pain with radiculopathy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 91 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of the evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, biofeedback, drug treatments (analgesics, antidepressants, epidural steroid injections, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]), early mobilisation, early return to normal activity, exercise, heat or cold, manipulation (alone or plus exercise), mobilisation, multimodal treatment, patient education, percutaneous radiofrequency neurotomy, physical treatments, postural techniques (yoga, pilates, Alexander technique), pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatment, soft collars and special pillows, spray and stretch, surgery, traction, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). PMID:19445809

  11. Genitofemoral neuralgia: adding to the burden of chronic vulvar pain

    PubMed Central

    Verstraelen, Hans; De Zutter, Eline; De Muynck, Martine

    2015-01-01

    The vulva is a particularly common locus of chronic pain with neuropathic characteristics that occurs in women of any age, though most women with neuropathic type chronic vulvar pain will remain undiagnosed even following multiple physician visits. Here, we report on an exemplary case of a middle-aged woman who was referred to the Vulvovaginal Disease Clinic with debilitating vulvar burning and itching over the right labium majus that had been persisting for 2 years and was considered intractable. Careful history taking and clinical examination, followed by electrophysiological assessment through somatosensory evoked potentials was consistent with genitofemoral neuralgia, for which no obvious cause could be identified. Adequate pain relief was obtained with a serotonin–noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor and topical gabapentin cream. We briefly discuss the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of genitofemoral neuralgia and provide a series of clues to guide clinicians in obtaining a presumptive diagnosis of specific neuropathic pain syndromes that may underlie chronic vulvar pain. We further aim to draw attention to the tremendous burden of chronic, unrecognized vulvar pain. PMID:26664155

  12. [Laryngotracheal separation and tracheoesophageal diversion for intractable aspiration in ALS--usefulness and indication].

    PubMed

    Mita, Shuji

    2007-10-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of laryngotracheal separation or tracheoesophageal diversion (LTS/TED), we investigated changes in medical management after LTS/TED. We performed LTS/TED for intractable aspiration in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and patients with other neurological diseases. Most of the subjects had already received a tracheostomy, and all the patients with ALS had tracheostomy positive pressure ventilation. However, they remained at risk of intractable aspiration, had experienced frequent suctioning of aspiration material, and could not eat. In all cases, LTS/TED was performed safely within 3 hours and without any complications. After LTS/TED, there was no aspiration of saliva in any of the patients. In most subjects, the frequency of suctioning by medical staff and caregivers was much reduced. The frequency of aspiration pneumonia was also extremely lowered. Follow-up study demonstrated that complete control over aspiration was achieved in all of the patients. Some of them were completely self-sufficient in their ability to eat. Some of the other patients were at least able to enjoy taste. Nutritional status was significantly improved. All the patients, family caregivers, and medical staff involved in this study were satisfied with the outcome. These results indicate that LTS/TED is a very useful procedure in several aspects: it benefits patients who have a fear of aspiration; it reduces the burden on patients and family caregivers; it promotes their quality of life; and it limits the aspiration-associated demands on medical staff. Based on the results, we have proposed an indication of LTS/TED for dysphasia in ALS. PMID:17969355

  13. Rapid tests for the diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis in patients with suspected disease

    PubMed Central

    Boelaert, Marleen; Verdonck, Kristien; Menten, Joris; Sunyoto, Temmy; van Griensven, Johan; Chappuis, Francois; Rijal, Suman

    2014-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in patients with fever and a large spleen relies on showing Leishmania parasites in tissue samples and on serological tests. Parasitological techniques are invasive, require sophisticated laboratories, consume time, or lack accuracy. Recently, rapid diagnostic tests that are easy to perform have become available. Objectives To determine the diagnostic accuracy of rapid tests for diagnosing VL in patients with suspected disease presenting at health services in endemic areas. Search methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, CIDG SR, CENTRAL, SCI-expanded, Medion, Arif, CCT, and the WHO trials register on 3 December 2013, without applying language or date limits. Selection criteria This review includes original, phase III, diagnostic accuracy studies of rapid tests in patients clinically suspected to have VL. As reference standards, we accepted: (1) direct smear or culture of spleen aspirate; (2) composite reference standard based on one or more of the following: parasitology, serology, or response to treatment; and (3) latent class analysis. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed quality of included studies using the QUADAS-2 tool. Discrepancies were resolved by a third author. We carried out a meta-analysis to estimate sensitivity and specificity of rapid tests, using a bivariate normal model with a complementary log-log link function. We analysed each index test separately. As possible sources of heterogeneity, we explored: geographical area, commercial brand of index test, type of reference standard, disease prevalence, study size, and risk of bias (QUADAS-2). We also undertook a sensitivity analysis to assess the influence of imperfect reference standards. Main results Twenty-four studies containing information about five index tests (rK39 immunochromatographic test (ICT), KAtex latex agglutination test in urine, FAST agglutination test, rK26 ICT, and rKE16 ICT) recruiting 4271 participants (2605 with VL) were included. We carried out a meta-analysis for the rK39 ICT (including 18 studies; 3622 participants) and the latex agglutination test (six studies; 1374 participants). The results showed considerable heterogeneity. For the rK39 ICT, the overall sensitivity was 91.9% (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 84.8 to 96.5) and the specificity 92.4% (95% CI 85.6 to 96.8). The sensitivity was lower in East Africa (85.3%; 95% CI 74.5 to 93.2) than in the Indian subcontinent (97.0%; 95% CI 90.0 to 99.5). For the latex agglutination test, overall sensitivity was 63.6% (95% CI 40.9 to 85.6) and specificity 92.9% (95% CI 76.7 to 99.2). Authors' conclusions The rK39 ICT shows high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis in patients with febrile splenomegaly and no previous history of the disease, but the sensitivity is notably lower in east Africa than in the Indian subcontinent. Other rapid tests lack accuracy, validation, or both. PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY Rapid diagnostic tests for visceral leishmaniasis Visceral leishmaniasis (or kala-azar) is caused by a parasite, results in fever, a large spleen and other health problems, occuring in India, Bangladesh and Nepal, east Africa, the Mediterranean region and Brazil. Without treatment people die, and proper treatment can result in cure, so diagnosis is important. Many of the tests that are used to determine if a person has visceral leishmaniasis are complicated, costly, painful and sometimes dangerous for the patients. Now rapid diagnostic tests that are safe and easy to perform are available. This Cochrane review describes how accurate these rapid diagnostic tests are for diagnosing visceral leishmaniasis. We summarize those studies that evaluated the rapid tests in people who, according to their physicians, could have the disease. We only included studies in which the researchers had used established methods to distinguish the people with visceral leishmaniasis from those who did not have the disease. We found 24 studies, which contained information about five different rapid tests. A total of 4271 people participated in these studies. One of the rapid tests (called the rK39 immunochromatographic test) gave correct, positive results in 92% of the people with visceral leishmaniasis and it gave correct, negative results in 92% of the people who did not have the disease. This test worked better in India and Nepal than in east Africa. In India and Nepal, it gave correct, positive results in 97% of the people with the disease. In east Africa, it gave correct, positive results in only 85% of the people with the disease. A second rapid test (called latex agglutination test) gave correct, positive results in 64% of the people with the disease and it gave correct, negative results in 93% of the people without the disease. For the other rapid tests evaluated, there are too few studies to know how accurate they are. PMID:24947503

  14. Gastrointestinal (GI) permeability is associated with trait anxiety in children with functional abdominal pain (FAP) and Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    FAP and IBS affect 10-15% of school age children and bear many physiological similarities to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in adults (e.g., functional pain, visceral hyperalgesia). Animal models of IBS have suggested a relationship between neonatal stress and increased GI permeability later in life...

  15. Computed tomography-guided radiofrequency ablation for palliation of a painful supraclavicular soft-tissue metastasis invading the brachial plexus

    PubMed Central

    KECHAGIAS, ARISTOTELIS; DELIS, SPIROS; DERVENIS, CHRISTOS; MANIATIS, PETROS; PAPAILIOU, JOHN

    2013-01-01

    The present study describes a case of a painful supraclavicular soft-tissue metastasis of a skin melanoma invading the brachial plexus in a 38-year-old male. The patient was treated twice with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) under computed tomography (CT) guidance, which caused tumoral necrosis. The patient was originally referred with a 7-cm metastasis in the right supraclavicular fossa, which caused intractable pain and a degree of numbness. These symptoms were unresponsive to chemotherapy and radiotherapy and the pain was not controlled using narcotic analgesics. The lesion was treated with CT-guided RFA causing necrosis, relieving the pain and sparing the patient from using analgesics. The pain recurred 19 months thereafter and a CT scan revealed an 8-cm mass in the right supraclavicular space. The patient underwent repeat CT-guided RFA, which reduced the pain to a level that was controlled with minor oral analgesics. In conclusion, in this case of a painful supraclavicular soft-tissue metastasis invading the brachial plexus, which was intractable to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, RFA was feasible and offered substantial palliation of the symptoms, freedom from the use of narcotic analgesics and improvements to the quality of life. PMID:24179552

  16. Pain Management: Post-Amputation Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain Management Post-Amputation Pain Volume 8 · Issue 2 · March/April 1998 Text size Larger text Smaller text Java Required Print page Save and share ... by G. Edward Jeffries, MD, FACS Post-Amputation Pain Post-amputation pain is one of the most ...

  17. Pain and Hand Function.

    PubMed

    Howland, Nicholas; Lopez, Mariela; Zhang, Andrew Y

    2016-02-01

    Pain is a unique somatosensory perception that can dramatically affect our ability to function. It is also a necessary perception, without which we would do irreparable damage to ourselves. In this article, the authors assess the impact of pain on function of the hand. Pain can be categorized into acute pain, chronic pain, and neuropathic pain. Hand function and objective measurements of hand function are analyzed as well as the impact of different types of pain on each of these areas. PMID:26611383

  18. Pain in Parkinson's Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study of Its Prevalence, Types, and Relationship to Depression and Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Valkovic, Peter; Minar, Michal; Singliarova, Helena; Harsany, Jan; Hanakova, Marta; Martinkova, Jana; Benetin, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Pain is an important and distressing symptom in Parkinson's disease (PD). Our aim was to determine the prevalence of pain, its various types and characteristics, as well as its impact on depression and quality of life (QoL) in patients with PD. How pain differs in early- and advanced-stage PD and male and female PD patients was of special interest. One hundred PD patients on dopaminergic medications had a neurological examination and participated in a structured interview on pain characteristics and completed standardized questionnaires. A total of 76% of the patients had pain. The following types of pain were present: musculoskeletal pain accounted for 41% of the total pain, dystonic pain for 17%, central neuropathic pain for 22%, radicular pain for 27%, and other pains (non-radicular low back pain, arthritic, and visceral pain) made up 24%. One type of pain affected 29% of all the subjects, two types 35%, three types 10%, and four types of pain were reported by 2%. All types of pain were more prevalent in advanced-stage PD subjects than in early-stage PD subjects, except for arthritic pain (subclassified under"other pain"). The frequency and intensity of actual, average, and worst experienced pain were significantly more severe in advanced-stage subjects. PD subjects with general pain and in advanced stages were more depressed and had poorer QoL. Depression correlated with worst pain in the last 24 hours and with pain periodicity (the worst depression score in patients with constant pain). QoL correlated with average pain in the last 7 days. Pain is a frequent problem in PD patients, and it worsens during the course of the disease. PMID:26309254

  19. Ultrasound-Guided Infraorbital Nerve Pulsed Radiofrequency Treatment for Intractable Postherpetic Neuralgia - A Case Report -

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seung Mo; Park, Hae Lang; Moon, Hyong Yong; Kang, Kyung Ho; Kang, Hyun; Baek, Chong Hwa; Jung, Yong Hun; Kim, Jin Yun; Koo, Gill Hoi

    2013-01-01

    A 60-year-old man presented with pain on the left cheek and lateral nose. The patient had been diagnosed with facial herpes zoster in the left V2 area 6 months previously. Medical treatment was prescribed for 6 months but it had little effect. We blocked the left infraorbital nerve under ultrasound guidance, but pain relief was short term. Therefore, we performed pulsed radiofrequency treatment on the left infraorbital nerve under ultrasound guidance. Six months after the procedure, the reduction of pain was still maintained, and there was no need for further management. PMID:23342215

  20. Attenuation of visceral nociception by alpha- and beta-amyrin, a triterpenoid mixture isolated from the resin of Protium heptaphyllum, in mice.

    PubMed

    Lima-Jnior, Roberto C P; Oliveira, Francisco A; Gurgel, Luilma A; Cavalcante, Italo J; Santos, Kelcyana A; Campos, Deive A; Vale, Cinthia A; Silva, Regilane M; Chaves, Mariana H; Rao, Vietla S N; Santos, Flvia A

    2006-01-01

    In the search for novel natural compounds effective against visceral nociception, the triterpenoid mixture alpha- and beta-amyrin, isolated from Protium heptaphyllum resin, was assessed in two established mouse models of visceral nociception. Mice were pretreated orally with alpha- and beta-amyrin (3, 10, 30, and 100 mg/kg) or vehicle, and the pain-related behavioral responses to intraperitoneal cyclophosphamide or to intracolonic mustard oil were analyzed. The triterpenoid mixture showed a dose-related significant antinociception against the cyclophosphamide-induced bladder pain, and at 100 mg/kg, the nociceptive behavioral expression was almost completely suppressed. Intracolonic mustard oil-induced nociceptive behaviors were maximally inhibited by 10 mg/kg alpha- and beta-amyrin mixture in a naloxone-reversible manner. While pretreatment with ruthenium red (3 mg/kg, s. c.), a non-specific transient receptor potential cation channel V1 (TRPV1) antagonist, also caused significant inhibition, the alpha (2)-adrenoceptor antagonist, yohimbine (2 mg/kg, s. c.), showed no significant effect. The triterpene mixture (10 mg/kg, p. o.) neither altered significantly the pentobarbital sleeping time, nor impaired the ambulation or motor coordination in open-field and rotarod tests, respectively, indicating the absence of sedative or motor abnormalities that could account for its antinociception. These results indicate that the antinociceptive potential of alpha- and beta-amyrin possibly involves the opioid and vanilloid (TRPV1) receptor mechanisms and further suggests that it could be useful to treat visceral pain of intestinal and pelvic origins. PMID:16450293

  1. Central Neuropathic Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Watson, James C; Sandroni, Paola

    2016-03-01

    Chronic pain is common in patients with neurologic complications of a central nervous system insult such as stroke. The pain is most commonly musculoskeletal or related to obligatory overuse of neurologically unaffected limbs. However, neuropathic pain can result directly from the central nervous system injury. Impaired sensory discrimination can make it challenging to differentiate central neuropathic pain from other pain types or spasticity. Central neuropathic pain may also begin months to years after the injury, further obscuring recognition of its association with a past neurologic injury. This review focuses on unique clinical features that help distinguish central neuropathic pain. The most common clinical central pain syndromes-central poststroke pain, multiple sclerosis-related pain, and spinal cord injury-related pain-are reviewed in detail. Recent progress in understanding of the pathogenesis of central neuropathic pain is reviewed, and pharmacological, surgical, and neuromodulatory treatments of this notoriously difficult to treat pain syndrome are discussed. PMID:26944242

  2. Amputation as an Unusual Treatment for Therapy-Resistant Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Kashy, Babak K.; Abd-Elsayed, Alaa A.; Farag, Ehab; Yared, Maria; Vakili, Roya; Esa, Wael Ali Sakr

    2015-01-01

    Background Complex regional pain syndrome, type 1 (CRPS-1) causes severe pain that can be resistant to multiple treatment modalities. Amputation as a form of long-term treatment for therapy-resistant CRPS-1 is controversial. Case Report We report the case of a 38-year-old man who failed all treatment modalities for CRPS-1, including medication, steroid injections, and spinal cord stimulator implantation. Below-the-knee amputation to relieve intractable foot and ankle pain resulted in a favorable outcome for this patient. Conclusion Select patients with severe CRPS-1 who are unresponsive to all forms of treatment for pain may benefit from amputation as a last option for relief of suffering. Larger studies are needed to prove the efficacy of amputation.

  3. Solitary Painful Osseous Metastases: Correlation of Imaging Features with Pain Palliation after Radiofrequency AblationA Multicenter American College of Radiology Imaging Network Study

    PubMed Central

    Guenette, Jeffrey P.; Lopez, Michael J.; Kim, Eunhee

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To identify the correlation of pre- and postablation imaging features with pain relief, pain intensity, and patient mood after radiofrequency (RF) ablation of solitary painful osseous metastases. Materials and Methods: This prospective, multicenter group trial was approved by each institutional review board. Participants were enrolled between November 1, 2001, and April 6, 2006. Written informed consent was obtained from all subjects, and patient confidentiality protocols were followed in compliance with HIPAA. Computed tomography (CT)-guided RF ablation and contrast materialenhanced 1-month follow-up CT and/or magnetic resonance imaging were performed in 49 subjects (24 men, 25 women; age range, 3483 years) with a confirmed malignant solitary bone lesion of maximum dimension of 8 cm or smaller that was causing intractable pain. Pain intensity and patient mood were measured before and after RF ablation. Tumor imaging features were recorded. Unadjusted and adjusted linear mixed-effects models, with a random intercept for each subject, were used to model patient mood, pain relief, and pain intensity scores at three times after ablation as a function of each tumor characteristic. Results: Decreased postablation tumor pain correlated with preablation tumor volume (P = .02) and pathologic fracture (P = .01), while pain relief correlated with pathologic fracture (P = .03) and percentage of bone-tumor interface (BTI) ablated (P = .02). Conversely, presence of an irregular rim after ablation (P = .02) and rim thickness (P = .01) correlated with increased pain. There was no evidence in this study that RF ablation of larger tumor percentage or larger volume leads to better pain relief or decreased pain (P > .05). Conclusion: Existing pathologic fracture and smaller tumor size appear to be predictive parameters of success when selecting patients for palliative RF ablation of painful solitary osseous metastases. Successful palliation also appears to be related to the percentage of BTI ablated. RSNA, 2013 PMID:23657892

  4. Low Back Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Low Back Pain Overview What is low back pain? Low back pain is a common problem for many people. It can be caused by many ... lift and exercise correctly. Symptoms When is low back pain serious? Call your family doctor if: Pain goes ...

  5. Adrenergic stimulation sensitizes TRPV1 through upregulation of cystathionine β-synthetase in a rat model of visceral hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liyan; Zhao, Liting; Qu, Ruobing; Zhu, Hong-Yan; Wang, Yongmeng; Jiang, Xinghong; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of pain in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is poorly understood and treatment remains difficult. The present study was designed to investigate roles of adrenergic signaling and the endogenous hydrogen sulfide producing enzyme cystathionine β-synthetase (CBS) in a previously validated rat model of IBS induced by neonatal colonic inflammation (NCI). Here we showed that NCI-induced visceral hypersensitivity (VH) was significantly attenuated by β2 subunit inhibitor but not by β1 or β3 or α subunit inhibitor. NCI markedly elevated plasma norepinephrine (NE) concentration without alteration in expression of β2 subunit receptors in dorsal root ganglion (DRGs) innervating the colon. In addition, NCI markedly enhanced TRPV1 and CBS expression in the colon DRGs. CBS inhibitor AOAA reversed the upregulation of TRPV1 in NCI rats. In vitro experiments showed that incubation of DRG cells with NE markedly enhanced expression of TRPV1, which was reversed by application of AOAA. Incubation of DRG cells with the H2S donor NaHS greatly enhanced TRPV1 expression. Collectively, these data suggest that activation of adrenergic signaling by NCI sensitizes TRPV1 channel activity, which is likely mediated by upregulation of CBS expression in peripheral sensory neurons, thus contributing to chronic visceral hypersensitivity. PMID:26527188

  6. Pain in Parkinson´s Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study of Its Prevalence, Types, and Relationship to Depression and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Singliarova, Helena; Harsany, Jan; Hanakova, Marta; Martinkova, Jana; Benetin, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Pain is an important and distressing symptom in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Our aim was to determine the prevalence of pain, its various types and characteristics, as well as its impact on depression and quality of life (QoL) in patients with PD. How pain differs in early- and advanced-stage PD and male and female PD patients was of special interest. One hundred PD patients on dopaminergic medications had a neurological examination and participated in a structured interview on pain characteristics and completed standardized questionnaires. A total of 76% of the patients had pain. The following types of pain were present: musculoskeletal pain accounted for 41% of the total pain, dystonic pain for 17%, central neuropathic pain for 22%, radicular pain for 27%, and other pains (non-radicular low back pain, arthritic, and visceral pain) made up 24%. One type of pain affected 29% of all the subjects, two types 35%, three types 10%, and four types of pain were reported by 2%. All types of pain were more prevalent in advanced-stage PD subjects than in early-stage PD subjects, except for arthritic pain (subclassified under”other pain”). The frequency and intensity of actual, average, and worst experienced pain were significantly more severe in advanced-stage subjects. PD subjects with general pain and in advanced stages were more depressed and had poorer QoL. Depression correlated with worst pain in the last 24 hours and with pain periodicity (the worst depression score in patients with constant pain). QoL correlated with average pain in the last 7 days. Pain is a frequent problem in PD patients, and it worsens during the course of the disease. PMID:26309254

  7. Opioids in chronic noncancer pain: More faces from the crowd

    PubMed Central

    Watson, C Peter N

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of opioids for chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) remains very controversial. There are several randomized controlled trials, mostly in neuropathic pain, reporting efficacy and safety in the short term, but more long-term data are needed. Randomized controlled trials may be limited in providing data about the patients who benefit from often high-dose opioids over the long term. The present article provides details of these patients and adds to a previous case series. METHODS: The present article contains 17 case reports of 11 CNCP conditions (followed to 2011) selected to illustrate specific issues from a survey of 84 patients with intractable CNCP treated with opioids and followed every three months for a median of 11 years. The previous published survey of this group reported outcomes of pain severity, adverse effects, pain relief, satisfaction, mood, problematic opioid use, tolerance, physical dependency, functional status, health-related quality of life (HRQL), immune status and sexual function. The outcome measures for that study included a numerical rating scale for pain, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Brief Pain Inventory Interference Scale, the Pain Disability Index and, for HRQL, the Short-Form Health Survey 12 version 2. Most patients in the total sample reported 50% or greater relief and a moderate improvement in disability. Scores for functional status and HRQL were not severely affected. Problematic use, tolerance and serious adverse effects, including constipation, were not major issues. These selected patient reports were chosen, not to illustrate optimal results, but rather important aspects of the diagnoses, opioids and doses, the paucity of intolerable adverse effects, particular issues (concurrent addiction history, bipolar disorder and combination therapy), disease-specific and other outcomes and duration of follow-up with complex pain problems. RESULTS: Opioids were found to be safe and useful in the long term for these particular patients, as well as in the larger group from which they originated. INTERPRETATION: These 17 reports of patients with intractable CNCP treated with opioids with some success over many years puts a face on more of the participants in the larger survey of 84 subjects, suggesting that this approach is effective and safe for some patients over many years. PMID:22891192

  8. Host resistance to visceral leishmaniasis: prevalence and prevention.

    PubMed

    Maran, Naiara; Gomes, Pollyanna Stephanie; Freire-de-Lima, Leonardo; Freitas, Elisangela Oliveira; Freire-de-Lima, Célio Geraldo; Morrot, Alexandre

    2016-04-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a chronic parasitic disease caused by the vector-borne Leishmania donovani and Leishmania (L.) infantum chagasi parasites. The disease affects about 12 million humans in more than 90 countries worldwide. If not treated, the visceral form of Leishmania infection is potentially fatal, yielding about 50000 deaths per year. In the vertebrate host, the Leishmania species causing VL spread systematically to propagate in macrophage reservoirs distributed in the tissues of internal organs, primarily the liver, spleen, bone marrow and the lymph nodes. The infection is associated with evolved mechanisms from the parasite to subvert the host immune system in order to establish a persistent infection. Currently, efforts are being deployed to develop new anti-leishmanial therapies in VL combining immunomodulatory treatment regimens that burst the host immune responses together with leishmanicidal drugs that target the parasite growth. Discoveries in this field are discussed in this article. PMID:26934623

  9. Visceral leishmaniasis in captive wild canids in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Luppi, Marcela M; Malta, Marcelo C C; Silva, Teane M A; Silva, Fabiana L; Motta, Rafael O C; Miranda, Ildik; Ecco, Roselene; Santos, Renato L

    2008-08-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is endemic in Belo Horizonte (State of Minas Gerais, Brazil). Leishmania sp. can naturally infect several species of mammals, and the domestic dog is the most important reservoir of the disease in South America. This report describes five cases of visceral leishmaniasis in Brazilian canids. Among 15 animals kept in captivity in a zoo in Belo Horizonte (State of Minas Gerais, Brazil), two animals, a bush dog (Spheotos venaticos) and a hoary zorro (Lycalopex vetulus) were serologically positive and developed clinical signs of VL, whereas three other canids, including a crab-eating fox (Cerdocyon thous), a maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus), and a hoary zorro (Lycalopex vetulus) had positive serological results without clinical signs. PMID:18556130

  10. Visceral leishmaniasis: Revisiting current treatments and approaches for future discoveries.

    PubMed

    No, Joo Hwan

    2016-03-01

    The current treatments for visceral leishmaniasis are old and toxic with limited routes of administration. The emergence of drug-resistant Leishmania threatens the efficacy of the existing reservoir of antileishmanials, leading to an urgent need to develop new treatments. It is particularly important to review and understand how the current treatments act against Leishmania in order to identify valid drug targets or essential pathways for next-generation antileishmanials. It is equally important to adapt newly emerging biotechnologies to facilitate the current research on the development of novel antileishmanials in an efficient fashion. This review covers the basic background of the current visceral leishmaniasis treatments with an emphasis on the modes of action. It briefly discusses the role of the immune system in aiding the chemotherapy of leishmaniasis, describes potential new antileishmanial drug targets and pathways, and introduces recent progress on the utilization of high-throughput phenotypic screening assays to identify novel antileishmanial compounds. PMID:26748356

  11. [On the Differential Diagnosis of Intractable Psychogenic Chronic Cough: Neuropathic Larynx Irritable - Gabapentin's Antitussive Action].

    PubMed

    Bonnet, U; Ossowski, A; Schubert, M; Gall, H; Steinkamp, I; Richter, L E; Khalil-Boutros, Y; Nefedev, A; Kuhlmann, R

    2015-10-01

    We present the case of a 76 year old female inpatient who suffered from a chronic intractable cough which arose simultaneously to a severe major depression and was secondary to an exorbitant psychological distress. Chronic cough had never been experienced before and was initially considered to have a mere psychogenic origin since a comprehensive and guideline-based diagnostic screening did not reveal any underlying somatic cause. However, several factors cast doubt on the solitary psychic genesis of the chronic cough: i) occurrence immediately after a penetrant cold, ii) embedding in other complaints of laryngeal hyperreagibility (larynx irritable), such as persistent globus pharyngeus sensation, throat clearing and episodic dysphonia, iii) first occurrence on old life, iv) erupting from sleep as well, v) persistence despite remission of the major depression, and v) no sustaining benefit from specific psychotherapy and speech therapy. Therefore, diagnostics were extended to apparative tools for objective evaluation of swallowing by using fiberoptic videoendoscopic (FEES) and videofluoroscopic (VFS) techniques, which revealed signs of laryngeal neuropathy but without evidence of penetration or aspiration. A co-existing small goiter and an impaired glucose tolerance along with a putative intracellular vitamin B12 or folate deficiency (as indirectly derived from an apparent hyperhomocysteinemia) were assumed to be responsible for the neuropathy and underwent specific treatments. The impaired glucose tolerance and putative vitamin deficit were compatible with a distal symmetric sensorimotoric, even subclinical polyneuropathy of the lower extremities. The larynx irritable improved under gabapentin being confirmed by drug removals several times, and finally calmed down almost completely under gabapentin, which was in line with the scant literature of this topic. Re-examination of the larynx per FEES nine months later showed no deficits any more under the well-tolerated treatment (gabapentin, levothyroxine, vitamin B12 and folic acid substitution, weight reduction andphysical training). All in all, the larynx irritable as well as the chronic cough were most probably induced by a laryngeal neuropathy and were not solely of psychic origin. Due to good treatment options a larynx irritable should be regularly taken into consideration of the investigation of intractable chronic cough. Therefore, an apparative evaluation of deglutition is recommended in the diagnostic toolbox of chronic cough - even if embedded in a psychiatric disorder or distress - before diagnosing a sole psychic origin. An hypothetical scheme of the development of a larynx irritable caused by neuropathic and non-neuropathic ("nociceptive") conditions is proposed. PMID:26588720

  12. Loin to groin pain: The importance of a differential diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alexander E.P.; Bhatti, Ibrahim N.; Hester, Thomas; Ritchie, James F.S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ureteric colic frequently presents as loin to groin pain and accounts for a significant proportion of emergency urological admissions. However, a number of differential diagnoses should be considered in a systematic approach when assessing patients. Presentation of case We report a case of a 30 year old man admitted with severe unilateral loin to groin pain following lumbar specific weightlifting exercises. After a significant delay due to initial mis-diagnosis he was diagnosed with acute paravertebral lumbar compartment syndrome (PVCS) and managed conservatively. Discussion Exertional PVCS is a rare and potentially life threatening condition arising following lumbar specific exercise that has only been recorded a handful of times previously. Patients typically present with intractable lumbar pain and rhabdomyolysis 612h following exercise. Due to initial diagnostic delay our case was managed conservatively with fluid resuscitation and monitoring of renal function. Conclusion Assessment of patients with loin pain requires a systematic approach. PVCS is a rare cause of lumbar back and loin pain but one that should be considered, particularly in active young males. Early diagnosis is key to prevent the potential sequalae of untreated rhabdomyolysis. There is currently no consensus on management option for PVCS with only a few cases being reported in the literature. We describe successful management with supportive non operative treatment. PMID:26453939

  13. Visceral leishmaniasis with pericarditis in an HIV-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Mofredj, Ali; Guerin, Jean Michel; Leibinger, Frank; Masmoudi, Rafik

    2002-01-01

    The clinical presentation of visceral leishmaniasis, or kala-azar, is variable but usually includes fever, severe cachexia, lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. In immunocompromised patients the clinical course of the disease is even less specific and the diagnosis is often made by means of incidental detection of the parasites at atypical sites such as the gastrointestinal tract, peripheral blood, lungs and cerebrospinal fluid. We describe a case of pericardial leishmaniasis in an HIV-infected patient. PMID:11928856

  14. [Simultaneous reconstruction of visceral aortic branches and renal arteries].

    PubMed

    Troitski?, A V; Elagin, O S; Khabazov, R I; Lysenko, E R; Orekhov, P Iu; Parshin, P Iu; Griaznov, O G; Ust'iantseva, N V

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents a case report of simultaneous reconstruction of visceral aortic branches and renal arteries. The case is interesting because of special operative particularities, that occurred in 54-year-old patient who received previously radiotherapy for abdominal lymphogranulomatosis. Follow-up investigation 4 years after vascular intervention has shown that the patient remained in a satisfactory condition. The paper includes brief literature review concerning the strategy of reconstructive volume choice for this disease. PMID:17053775

  15. Involvement of amygdaloid corticosterone in altered visceral and somatic sensation.

    PubMed

    Myers, Brent; Dittmeyer, Kale; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley

    2007-07-19

    Behavioral responses to thermal and mechanical stimuli were used to examine somatic sensitivity in rats with stereotaxic corticosterone (CORT) implants on the amygdala. These animals have previously been shown to display anxiety-like behavior coupled with colonic hypersensitivity; in this study, CORT induced not only visceral hypersensitivity but also somatic hypersensitivity. These findings suggest that modulation of the amygdala with CORT results in a generalized decrease in sensory thresholds via descending neuronal pathways. PMID:17481745

  16. First case of visceral leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania martiniquensis.

    PubMed

    Liautaud, Bernard; Vignier, Nicolas; Miossec, Charline; Plumelle, Yves; Kone, Moumini; Delta, Delphine; Ravel, Christophe; Cabi, Andr; Desbois, Nicole

    2015-02-01

    We report the first case of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by Leishmania martiniquensis in the Caribbean, which until now, was known only to cause cutaneous leishmaniasis. The disease presented with fatigue, anemia, and hepatosplenomegaly in a 61-year-old man with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection who was receiving antiretroviral therapy. Diagnosis was made by bone marrow biopsy. VL is life-threatening, and its emergence in the Caribbean is of concern. PMID:25404076

  17. [Visceral leishmaniasis and pregnancy in renal transplanted patient: case report].

    PubMed

    Silva, Jaqueline de Almeida; Arajo, Ivan de Melo; Pavanetti, Luiz Carlos; Okamoto, Liene Shigaki; Dias, Mnica

    2015-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a severe and potentially fatal disease caused by different Leishmania species, Leishmania chagasi prevailing in Brazil. Main symptoms include fever, malaise, anorexia, weight loss and abdominal enlargement with typically occurring hepatosplenomegaly Currently, VL is considered an opportunistic infection in immunocompromised hosts, including solid organ transplanted patients. The present study reports a case of VL associated to pregnancy after renal transplantation. PMID:26154649

  18. Behavioral, Medical Imaging and Histopathological Features of a New Rat Model of Bone Cancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Dor-Savard, Louis; Otis, Valrie; Belleville, Karine; Lemire, Myriam; Archambault, Mlanie; Tremblay, Luc; Beaudoin, Jean-Franois; Beaudet, Nicolas; Lecomte, Roger; Lepage, Martin; Gendron, Louis; Sarret, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Pre-clinical bone cancer pain models mimicking the human condition are required to respond to clinical realities. Breast or prostate cancer patients coping with bone metastases experience intractable pain, which affects their quality of life. Advanced monitoring is thus required to clarify bone cancer pain mechanisms and refine treatments. In our model of rat femoral mammary carcinoma MRMT-1 cell implantation, pain onset and tumor growth were monitored for 21 days. The surgical procedure performed without arthrotomy allowed recording of incidental pain in free-moving rats. Along with the gradual development of mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia, behavioral signs of ambulatory pain were detected at day 14 by using a dynamic weight-bearing apparatus. Osteopenia was revealed from day 14 concomitantly with disorganization of the trabecular architecture (CT). Bone metastases were visualized as early as day 8 by MRI (T1-Gd-DTPA) before pain detection. PET (Na18F) co-registration revealed intra-osseous activity, as determined by anatomical superimposition over MRI in accordance with osteoclastic hyperactivity (TRAP staining). Pain and bone destruction were aggravated with time. Bone remodeling was accompanied by c-Fos (spinal) and ATF3 (DRG) neuronal activation, sustained by astrocyte (GFAP) and microglia (Iba1) reactivity in lumbar spinal cord. Our animal model demonstrates the importance of simultaneously recording pain and tumor progression and will allow us to better characterize therapeutic strategies in the future. PMID:21048940

  19. Disability Evaluation of the Pain : The Present and Prospect in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jai-Joon; Yoon, Seok-Mann; Doh, Jae-Won; Yun, Il-Gyu; Bae, Hack-Gun

    2009-01-01

    Objective Pain has long been regarded as a subjective symptom. Recently, however, some regard a type of intractable chronic pain as a disease. Furthermore, chronic persistent pain becomes a cause of permanent impairment (PI). In 6th edition, the American Medical Association (AMA) Guides has rated the pain as a PI. In Korea, pain has been already been rated as a PI. Here, we examined the present status and the prospect of disability evaluation for the pain in Korea. Methods Pain can be rated as a PI by the Workmen's Compensation Insurance Act (WCIA) and Patriots and Veterans Welfare Corporation Act (PVWCA) in Korea. We examined the definition, diagnostic criteria and grades of the pain related disability (PRD) in these two acts. We also examined legal judgments, which were made in 2005 for patients with severe pain. We also compared the acts and the judgments to the criteria of the 6th AMA Guides. Results The PRD can be rated as one of the 4 grades according to the WCIA. The provisions of the law do not limit the pain only for the complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). The PRD can be rated as one of the 3 grades by the PVWCA. If there were objective signs such as osteoporosis, joint contracture and muscle atrophy corresponding to the CRPS, the grade is rated as 6. When the pain always interferes with one's job except easy work, the grade is rated as high as 5. In Korea, judicial precedents dealt the pain as a permanent disability in 2005. Conclusion Although there were no objective criteria for evaluation of the PRD, pain has been already rated as a PI by the laws or judicial precedents, in Korea. Thus, we should regulate the Korean criteria of PRD like the AMA 6th edition. We also should develop the objective tools for evaluation of the PRD near in future. PMID:19516947

  20. Pain and pain management in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Beiteke, Ulrike; Bigge, Stefan; Reichenberger, Christina; Gralow, Ingrid

    2015-10-01

    It is estimated that 23 million Germans suffer from chronic pain. A recent survey has revealed that 30 % of chronic pain patients are dissatisfied with their pain management. Furthermore, five million Germans suffer from neuropathic pain, 20 % of whom are inadequately treated. Pain is also a symptom of many dermatologic diseases, which is mostly somatic and may be classified as mild in the majority of cases. Nevertheless, research on the quality of life (QoL) has increasingly shown a marked impairment of QoL by moderate pain such as in psoriatic arthritis. -Severe pain is associated with herpes zoster (shingles), leg ulcers, and pyoderma gangrenosum. This article addresses the basics of pain classification and, in a short excerpt, pain transduction/transmission and modulation. The use of standardized diagnostic -scales is recommended for the purpose of recording and monitoring pain intensity, which allows for the optimization of therapy and consistent interdisciplinary -communication. Any dermatology residency program includes the acquisition of knowledge and skills in pain management. This review therefore aims to present fundamental therapeutic concepts based on the expanded WHO analgesic ladder, and describes a step-wise therapeutic approach and combination therapies. The article focuses on the pain management of the above-mentioned severely painful, conservatively treated dermatoses. Besides well-established therapeutic agents and current -therapeutic standards, it discusses specific options based on guidelines (where available). Current knowledge on peri- and postoperative pain management is briefly outlined. This article addresses: ? The fundamentals of the classification and neurophysiology of pain; ? Standards for pain documentation in children and adults; ? General standards for pharmaceutical pain management; ? Current specific treatment options for postherpetic neuralgia, leg ulcers, and -pyoderma gangrenosum in conjunction with the expanded WHO analgesic -ladder. PMID:26408457

  1. [Macrophage activation syndrome and autoimmunity due to visceral leishmaniasis].

    PubMed

    Higel, L; Froehlich, C; Pages, M-P; Dupont, D; Collardeau-Frachon, S; Dijoud, F; Cochat, P; Belot, A

    2015-04-01

    Hemophagocytic syndromes are a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by an excessive immune response, mediated by activated cytotoxic T cells and macrophages. Among hemophagocytic syndromes, genetic and secondary forms can be distinguished. We report on the case of a male newborn who presented with macrophage activation syndrome associated with lymphoproliferation with favorable outcome under prednisone and cyclosporin. Hemopathy, infection, or genetic lymphohistiocytosis were initially ruled out. Severe autoimmunity was suspected because of positive antinuclear antibodies and Farr test associated with anemia and a positive Coombs test as well as cytolytic hepatitis with anti-liver, kidney microsome (LKM) antibodies. Treatment was therefore intensified by adding mycophenolate mofetil. This led to an unexpected deterioration of general health and lab exam results with recurrence of fever and inflammation. The initial investigations were revisited and completed by a liver biopsy, which revealed the presence of numerous leishmania parasites at the amastigote stage, enabling the diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis. The patient's condition dramatically improved under liposomal amphotericin B treatment. Our observation shows that visceral leishmaniasis can present as lupus-like syndrome with lymphoproliferation. Moreover, the lack of leishmania on marrow aspiration cannot rule out the diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis. Detection of leishmania by serological or molecular tests is mandatory in case of hepatosplenomegaly with hemophagocytic syndrome together with autoantibodies, in order to avoid useless and life-threatening exposure to immunosuppressive treatments. PMID:25617995

  2. Evaluating Eve: visceral states influence the evaluation of impulsive behavior.

    PubMed

    Nordgren, Loran F; van der Pligt, Joop; van Harreveld, Frenk

    2007-07-01

    Impulsive behavior is a common source of stigma. The authors argue that people often stigmatize impulsive behavior because they fail to appreciate the influence visceral impulses have on behavior. Because people tend to underestimate the motivational force of cravings for sex, drugs, food, and so forth, they are prone to stigmatize those who act on these impulses. In line with this reasoning, in 4 studies, the authors found that participants who were in a cold state (e.g., not hungry) made less favorable evaluations of a related impulsive behavior (impulsive eating) than did participants who were in a hot state (e.g., hungry). This empathy gap effect was tested with 3 different visceral states--fatigue, hunger, and sexual arousal--and was found both when participants evaluated others' impulsive behavior (Studies 1 & 2) and when participants evaluated their own impulsive behavior (Study 3). Study 3 also demonstrated that the empathy gap effect is due to different perceptions of the strength of the visceral state itself. Finally, Study 4 revealed that this effect is state specific: Hungry people, for example, evaluated only hunger-driven impulses, and not other forms of impulse, more favorably. PMID:17605590

  3. Blood-brain barrier disruption during spontaneous canine visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Melo, G D; Grano, F G; Silva, J E S; Kremer, B E; Lima, V M F; Machado, G F

    2015-12-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is a complex disease caused by Leishmania infantum, and in dogs, besides the classical symptoms, there are descriptions of inflammatory alterations in the brain. Brain inflammation is a strictly controlled process, and as the brain counts on the efficiency of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), we aimed to assess BBB integrity in dogs with spontaneous visceral leishmaniasis. Therefore, we evaluated markers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and in brain tissue related to BBB disruption and brain inflammation. Elevated albumin quota revealed BBB breakdown, corroborated by increased concentrations of anti-Leishmania antibodies in the CSF. In the brain, albumin and IgG staining formed halos around blood vessels, a classical indicator of BBB leakage. Soluble IgG was also detected in the choroid plexus and ependyma, and in these structures, IgG stained random resident cells. IgG(+) cells and Fc?-RI(+) cells were identified in the choroid plexus, ependyma and perivascular in the brain parenchyma. The data support the occurrence of BBB disruption in dogs with spontaneous visceral leishmaniasis, and IgG as a key molecule that is capable of initiating and/or maintaining the inflammatory stimuli in the nervous milieu and the CSF as an important disseminator of inflammatory stimuli within the CNS. PMID:26434684

  4. Pain and your emotions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... separated. The way your mind controls thoughts and attitudes affects the way your body controls pain. Pain ... Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 100. Turk DC. Psychosocial aspects of chronic pain. In: Benzon HT. Practical Management ...

  5. Central Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Central Pain Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Central Pain Syndrome? Central pain syndrome is a neurological condition ...

  6. Palliative care - managing pain

    MedlinePLUS

    End of life - pain management; Hospice - pain management ... Bookbinder M, McHugh ME. Symptom management in palliative care and end of life care. Nurs Clin North Am . 2010;45:271-327. Mercadente S. Challenging pain problems. In: ...

  7. Overview of Neck Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Back) > Overview of Neck Pain Overview of Neck Pain Page Content Developing a Program That's Right for ... activity? What Kinds of Problems Might Cause Neck Pain? Treatment for any neck condition is recommended as ...

  8. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome, ... Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Complex Regional Pain Syndrome? Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a ...

  9. Eldercare at Home: Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nerve pain which work by changing how the brain and nerves perceive pain signals from the body. These can be taken in addition to usual pain blockers, but may have side effects of confusion, sleepiness or low blood pressure. As ...

  10. Pain: Hope through Research

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cells or body chemistry, thus producing pain relief. Marijuana or, by its Latin name, cannabis , continues to remain highly controversial as a pain ... eyes of many individuals campaigning on its behalf, marijuana rightfully belongs with other pain remedies. Scientific studies ...

  11. Low Back Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Low Back Pain Fact Sheet See a list of all NINDS ... the body to the brain. What causes lower back pain? The vast majority of low back pain is ...

  12. Pain Information Brochure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Top Back Pain Back Pain Information Page National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Low Back Pain Fact Sheet National Institute of Neurological Disorders and ...

  13. What Is Back Pain?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Back Pain Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Back Pain PDF Version Size: 127 KB Audio Version Time: ... Size: 12.5 MB November 2014 What Is Back Pain? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of ...

  14. Assessment of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Jeans, Mary-Ellen; Stratford, Joseph G.; Melzack, Ronald; Monks, Richard C.

    1979-01-01

    The assessment of pain presents a major problem in both research and clinical practice. Until recently our methods for evaluating pain were based on a sensory conceptual model of pain and an acute care approach to illness. These traditional views are often inadequate, particularly in relation to chronic pain syndromes. Clinical assessment of chronic pain must include extensive physical and psychological examination. New approaches to pain measurement and clinical assessment of the patient are discussed.

  15. Assessing cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Shalini; Bruera, Eduardo

    2012-08-01

    Regular assessment for the presence of pain and response to pain management strategies should be high priority in cancer patients. Pain is a multidimensional experience in cancer patients. Pain management will be most effective when treatments are individualized after exploring the various physical and non-physical components of pain, and the patient and family are educated and involved in decision making. This article discusses the various issues that are pertinent to the assessment of pain in cancer patients. PMID:22585314

  16. What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains

    MedlinePLUS

    ... More Quizzes Games Kids' Medical Dictionary En Espaol What Other Kids Are Reading Girls and Puberty Boys ... Digestive System How the Body Works Main Page What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains KidsHealth > Kids > ...

  17. Role of voltage gated Ca2+ channels in rat visceral hypersensitivity change induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Visceral pain is common symptom involved in many gastrointestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. The underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. We investigated the molecular mechanisms and the role for voltage gated calcium channel (VGCC) in the pathogenesis in a rat model of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) induced visceral inflammatory hypersensitivity. Results Using Agilent cDNA arrays, we found 172 genes changed significantly in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of TNBS treated rats. Among these changed genes, Cav1.2 and Cav2.3 were significantly up-regulated. Then the RT-PCR and Western blot further confirmed the up-regulation of Cav1.2 and Cav2.3. The whole cell patch clamp recording of acutely dissociated colonic specific DRG neurons showed that the peak IBa density was significantly increased in colonic neurons of TNBS treated rats compared with control rats (?127.82??20.82 pA/pF Vs ?91.67??19.02 pA/pF, n?=?9, *P?visceral pain in TNBS induced inflammatory visceral hypersensitivity. Conclusion Cav1.2 and Cav2.3 in colonic primary sensory neurons play an important role in visceral inflammatory hyperalgesia, which maybe the potential therapeutic targets. PMID:23537331

  18. Elevated Endomyocardial Biopsy Macrophage-Related Markers in Intractable Myocardial Diseases.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yuka; Hanawa, Haruo; Jiao, Shuang; Hasegawa, Go; Ohno, Yukako; Yoshida, Kaori; Suzuki, Tomoyasu; Kashimura, Takeshi; Obata, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Komei; Watanabe, Tohru; Minamino, Tohru

    2015-12-01

    Tissue macrophages can be activated by endogenous danger signals released from cells that are stressed or injured, leading to infiltration of inflammatory macrophages and neutrophils. We postulated that macrophage-related markers might be closely associated with the existence of endogenous danger signals, reflecting ongoing tissue injury in the absence of foreign substances. This study was designed to assess the ability of macrophage-related markers in endomyocardial biopsies to predict ongoing cardiac injury in non-inflammatory myocardial diseases. We examined levels of macrophage-related markers (CD68, CD163, CD45) in endomyocardial biopsies from patients (n?=?86) with various myocardial diseases by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (n?=?78) and immunohistochemistry (n?=?56). Thirty-three patients without inflammatory cardiac disease such as myocarditis and sarcoidosis were classified as "improved" or "non-improved" defined as a 10% increase in left ventricular ejection fraction by echocardiograph and a value greater than 30% at the time of follow-up. All macrophage-related (MacR) markers levels were not higher in non-improved dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) patients than improved patients. However, patients with cardiac amyloidosis, cardiac Fabry disease, mitochondrial cardiomyopathy, and biventricular arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), which were categorized as "non-improvement diseases," had elevated macrophage-related markers compared to improved patients. Macrophage-related markers levels were increased in endomyocardial biopsy samples of patients with intractable myocardial diseases such as amyloidosis, mitochondrial disease, Fabry disease, and biventricular ARVC. PMID:26205770

  19. Bilateral Thalamic Stimulation Induces Insomnia in Patients Treated for Intractable Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Bridoux, Agathe; Drouot, Xavier; Sangare, Aude; Al-ani, Tarik; Brignol, Arnaud; Charles-Nelson, Anais; Brugières, Pierre; Gouello, Gaëtane; Hosomi, Koichi; Lepetit, Hélène; Palfi, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To explore the influence of acute bilateral ventral intermediate thalamic nucleus (VIM) stimulation on sleep. Design: Three consecutive full-night polysomnography recordings were made in the laboratory. After the habituation night, a random order for night ON-stim and OFF-stim was applied for the second and third nights. Setting: Sleep disorders unit of a university hospital. Patients: Eleven patients with bilateral stimulation of the ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus (VIM) for drug-resistant tremor. Measurements: Sleep measures on polysomnography. Results: Total sleep time was reduced during night ON-stim compared to OFF- stim, as well as rapid eye movement sleep percentage while the percentage of N2 increased. Wakefulness after sleep onset time was increased. Conclusion: Our results show that bilateral stimulation of the VIM nuclei reduces sleep and could be associated with insomnia. Citation: Bridoux A, Drouot X, Sangare A, Al-ani T, Brignol A, Charles-Nelson A, Brugières P, Gouello G, Hosomi K, Lepetit H, Palfi S. Bilateral thalamic stimulation induces insomnia in patients treated for intractable tremor. SLEEP 2015;38(3):473–478. PMID:25515098

  20. Supernumerary tricentric derivative chromosome 15 in two boys with intractable epilepsy: another mechanism for partial hexasomy.

    PubMed

    Mann, S M; Wang, N J; Liu, D H; Wang, L; Schultz, R A; Dorrani, N; Sigman, M; Schanen, N C

    2004-07-01

    Rearrangements of chromosome 15q, including isodicentric 15 chromosomes and interstitial duplications and triplications, have been previously reported in association with autism spectrum disorders. We have identified two boys with exceptionally large der(15) chromosomes that are tricentric and contain four copies of the proximal long arm, including the Prader Willi/Angelman critical region, and leading to hexasomy of the involved segment. Biallelic inheritance of maternal alleles and methylation analysis indicate that the markers are maternally derived. Clinical assessment of the boys indicated severe cognitive impairment associated with marked delays in gross and fine motor skills. Social and language deficits were present in both, although the severity of the mental retardation precluded diagnosis of autism (both were considered to have pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified). Neurologic manifestations included infantile spasms evolving into intractable early-onset myoclonic seizures, psychomotor regression, and profound diffuse hypotonia. These patients represent the most severe end of the spectrum of phenotypes associated with segmental aneuploidy for chromosome 15q11-q13. PMID:15141347

  1. Combining stereo-electroencephalography and subdural electrodes in the diagnosis and treatment of medically intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Enatsu, Rei; Bulacio, Juan; Najm, Imad; Wyllie, Elaine; So, Norman K; Nair, Dileep R; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy; Bingaman, William; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge

    2014-08-01

    Stereo-electroencephalography (SEEG) has advantages for exploring deeper epileptic foci. Nevertheless, SEEG can only sample isolated cortical areas and its spatial limitation, with the inability to record contiguous cortical regions, may cause difficulties in interpretation. In light of these limitations, the authors describe the hybrid technique of SEEG and subdural strip electrode placement. The hybrid technique was used for a presurgical evaluation in four patients with intractable epilepsy. Initially, the depth electrodes were inserted with a robotic stereotactic system. Thereafter, a skin incision and a small craniectomy were performed at the entry point of the strip electrode trajectory. The dura was opened and, under live fluoroscopic guidance, strip electrodes were slid into the subdural space. In these patients, the additional subdural strip electrodes provided (1) information regarding the precise description of seizure spread in the cortical surface adjacent to the subdural space, (2) identification of epileptogenic zones located near the crown, (3) more precise definition of functional cortex and (4) a better delineation of the interface between epileptogenic zones and functional cortex. This hybrid technique provides additional data compared to either technique alone, offering superior understanding of the dynamics of the epileptic activity and its interaction with functional cortical areas. PMID:24650680

  2. Intractable glaucoma necessitating dexamethasone implant (Ozurdex) removal and glaucoma surgery in a child with uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Neha; Parchand, Swapnil; Kaushik, Sushmita; Singh, Ramandeep

    2013-01-01

    Although there are encouraging reports showing the use of dexamethasone implant (Ozurdex) in uveitis in adults, the literature is scanty regarding its benefits and side effects in children. A 12-year-old boy presented with intermediate uveitis with disc oedema. He had 20/20 visual acuity and intraocular pressure (IOP) of 18?mm?Hg in both eyes. He was treated with intravitreal Ozurdex in his left eye (LE) due to progressive worsening of uveitis and disc oedema. He developed increased IOP (31?mm?Hg) that could not be controlled on maximal antiglaucoma medications and required the removal of the Ozurdex implant at 2.5?months. His IOP remained persistently high leading to increased cup disc ratio necessitating glaucoma filtration surgery (GFS). At 9?months of post-GFS follow-up, IOP was 12?mm?Hg in LE without any medication. Though dexamethasone implant is being increasingly used in children with uveitis, its potential risk factors such as intractable glaucoma should be considered. PMID:24311419

  3. Brain somatic mutations in MTOR cause focal cortical dysplasia type II leading to intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jae Seok; Kim, Woo-il; Kang, Hoon-Chul; Kim, Se Hoon; Park, Ah Hyung; Park, Eun Kyung; Cho, Young-Wook; Kim, Sangwoo; Kim, Ho Min; Kim, Jeong A; Kim, Junho; Rhee, Hwanseok; Kang, Seok-Gu; Kim, Heung Dong; Kim, Daesoo; Kim, Dong-Seok; Lee, Jeong Ho

    2015-04-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia type II (FCDII) is a sporadic developmental malformation of the cerebral cortex characterized by dysmorphic neurons, dyslamination and medically refractory epilepsy. It has been hypothesized that FCD is caused by somatic mutations in affected regions. Here, we used deep whole-exome sequencing (read depth, 412-668) validated by site-specific amplicon sequencing (100-347,499) in paired brain-blood DNA from four subjects with FCDII and uncovered a de novo brain somatic mutation, mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR) c.7280T>C (p.Leu2427Pro) in two subjects. Deep sequencing of the MTOR gene in an additional 73 subjects with FCDII using hybrid capture and PCR amplicon sequencing identified eight different somatic missense mutations found in multiple brain tissue samples of ten subjects. The identified mutations accounted for 15.6% of all subjects with FCDII studied (12 of 77). The identified mutations induced the hyperactivation of mTOR kinase. Focal cortical expression of mutant MTOR by in utero electroporation in mice was sufficient to disrupt neuronal migration and cause spontaneous seizures and cytomegalic neurons. Inhibition of mTOR with rapamycin suppressed cytomegalic neurons and epileptic seizures. This study provides, to our knowledge, the first evidence that brain somatic activating mutations in MTOR cause FCD and identifies mTOR as a treatment target for intractable epilepsy in FCD. PMID:25799227

  4. Gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgical thalamotomy for intractable tremor: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Allison M; Glover, Janis; Chiang, Veronica L S; Gerrard, Jason; Yu, James B

    2015-03-01

    Tremor markedly reduces quality of life and causes a significant psychological burden for patients who are severely affected by this movement disorder. Pharmacologic and surgical treatments for tremor exist, but for patients who have failed medical therapy and are not surgical candidates, stereotactic radiosurgery is the only available treatment option. Of available stereotactic radiosurgical techniques for intractable tremor, the authors chose to evaluate the safety and efficacy of gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgical thalamotomy. In order to qualitatively synthesize available data a systematic review was conducted by searching MEDLINE (OvidSP 1946-January Week 1 2014) and Embase (OvidSP 1974-2014 January). The search strategy was not limited by study design or language of publication. All searches were conducted on January 7, 2014. Treatment efficacy, adverse outcomes, and patient deaths were reviewed and tabulated. Complications appeared months to years post procedure and most commonly consisted of mild contralateral numbness and transient hemiparesis. Rarely, more severe complications were reported, including dysphagia and death. Though no data from randomized controlled trials are available, our analysis of the literature indicates that unilateral gamma knife thalamotomy using doses from 130 to 150Gy appears safe and well tolerated. PMID:25690750

  5. Efficacy of total lymphoid irradiation in intractable rheumatoid arthritis. A double-blind, randomized trial

    SciTech Connect

    Strober, S.; Tanay, A.; Field, E.; Hoppe, R.T.; Calin, A.; Engleman, E.G.; Kotzin, B.; Brown, B.W.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1985-04-01

    Twenty-six patients participated in a randomized, double-blind study of the efficacy of total lymphoid irradiation in the treatment of intractable rheumatoid arthritis. All 26 patients, for whom therapy with gold compounds and penicillamine had failed, would ordinarily have been considered candidates for cytotoxic or antimetabolite drug therapy. Thirteen patients randomly assigned to receive full-dose total lymphoid irradiation (2000 rad) and 11 patients assigned to receive control low-dose total lymphoid irradiation (200 rad) completed radiotherapy. Alleviation of joint disease activity was significantly greater in the high-dose group as judged by morning stiffness, joint tenderness, and functional assessment (global composite score) at 3 and 6 months after radiotherapy. The high-dose group had a marked reduction in both T-lymphocyte function and numbers, but this finding was not observed in the low-dose group. Complications seen in the high-dose but not low-dose group included transient neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, pericarditis, and pleurisy.

  6. Tactile Electrosurgical Ablation: A Technique for the Treatment of Intractable Heavy and Prolonged Menstrual Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    El Saman, Ali M.; AbdelHafez, Faten F.; Zahran, Kamal M.; Saad, Hazem; Khalaf, Mohamed; Hussein, Mostafa; Hassanin, Ibrahim M. A.; Shugaa Al Deen, Saba M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To study the efficacy and safety of tactile electrosurgical ablation (TEA) in stopping a persistent attack of abnormal uterine bleeding not responding to medical and hormonal therapy. Methods. This is a case series of 19 cases with intractable abnormal uterine bleeding, who underwent TEA at the Women's Health Center of Assiut University. The outcomes measured were; patient's acceptability, operative time, complications, menstrual outcomes, and reintervention. Results. None of the 19 counseled cases refused the TEA procedure which took 610 minutes without intraoperative complications. The procedure was successful in the immediate cessation of bleeding in 18 out of 19 cases. During the 24-month follow-up period, 9 cases developed amenorrhea, 5 had scanty menstrual bleeding, 3 were regularly menstruating, 1 case underwent repeat TEA ablation, and one underwent a hysterectomy. Conclusions. TEA represents a safe, inexpensive, and successful method for management of uterine bleeding emergencies with additional long-term beneficial effects. However, more studies with more cases and longer follow-up periods are warranted. PMID:26294969

  7. Lymphoid irradiation in intractable rheumatoid arthritis: effects on the production of immunoglobulins and rheumatoid factors.

    PubMed Central

    Hanly, J G; Hassan, J; Moriarty, M; Whelan, A; Feighery, C; Bresnihan, B

    1985-01-01

    Changes in the production of immunoglobulins and rheumatoid factors (RF's) were studied in 20 patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis (RA) following total doses of 750 rad or 2,000 rad lymphoid irradiation. Over a 12 month follow up period there was no consistent change in absolute serum or synovial fluid levels, or in synovial membrane production of either total IgG, IgA or IgM, or the corresponding RF fractions. The invitro production of immunoglobulins and IgM RF by peripheral blood mononuclear cells was also unaltered, except for one patient who had a dramatic rise in IgM RF production. Over the same period there was a significant overall reduction in disease activity following both doses of radiotherapy. It is concluded that the clinical response which occurs following lymphoid irradiation is not due to a reduction in RF production. Furthermore, the production of RF's appears to be unaffected by the changes in T cell immunity which occur following lymphoid irradiation. PMID:4085151

  8. Amoeba-inspired nanoarchitectonic computing: solving intractable computational problems using nanoscale photoexcitation transfer dynamics.

    PubMed

    Aono, Masashi; Naruse, Makoto; Kim, Song-Ju; Wakabayashi, Masamitsu; Hori, Hirokazu; Ohtsu, Motoichi; Hara, Masahiko

    2013-06-18

    Biologically inspired computing devices and architectures are expected to overcome the limitations of conventional technologies in terms of solving computationally demanding problems, adapting to complex environments, reducing energy consumption, and so on. We previously demonstrated that a primitive single-celled amoeba (a plasmodial slime mold), which exhibits complex spatiotemporal oscillatory dynamics and sophisticated computing capabilities, can be used to search for a solution to a very hard combinatorial optimization problem. We successfully extracted the essential spatiotemporal dynamics by which the amoeba solves the problem. This amoeba-inspired computing paradigm can be implemented by various physical systems that exhibit suitable spatiotemporal dynamics resembling the amoeba's problem-solving process. In this Article, we demonstrate that photoexcitation transfer phenomena in certain quantum nanostructures mediated by optical near-field interactions generate the amoebalike spatiotemporal dynamics and can be used to solve the satisfiability problem (SAT), which is the problem of judging whether a given logical proposition (a Boolean formula) is self-consistent. SAT is related to diverse application problems in artificial intelligence, information security, and bioinformatics and is a crucially important nondeterministic polynomial time (NP)-complete problem, which is believed to become intractable for conventional digital computers when the problem size increases. We show that our amoeba-inspired computing paradigm dramatically outperforms a conventional stochastic search method. These results indicate the potential for developing highly versatile nanoarchitectonic computers that realize powerful solution searching with low energy consumption. PMID:23565603

  9. Radical Surgical Excision and Use of Lateral Thoracic Flap for Intractable Axillary Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Wan-Lin; Ong, Yee-Siang

    2012-01-01

    Current treatments for hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) include prolonged courses of antibiotics, retinoids, immunosuppressants, and biologics. Severe cases that are resistant to prolonged medical treatment pose a therapeutic challenge. We propose radical excision and lateral thoracic flap reconstruction as a treatment option for such cases. In our experience with two patients, good aesthetic and functional outcomes were achieved, with a high level of patient satisfaction. The availability of suitable flap coverage allows for wide resection of all of the hair-bearing skin, leading to a low incidence of residual disease and subsequent recurrence. Following excision of the affected tissue, the ideal reconstructive method in the axilla provides suitable coverage without unacceptable donor site morbidity and also avoids axillary contractures. A long lateral thoracic flap with delay has excellent coverage with minimal donor tissue sacrifice. With a suitable flap coverage option, the management paradigm of intractable HS should shift from prolonged medical treatment to allow decisive radical excision, which will improve the quality of life for patients. PMID:23233895

  10. Using cannabinoids in pain and palliative care.

    PubMed

    Peat, Sue

    2010-10-01

    Interest in the use of cannabinoids in a clinical setting is gradually increasing, particularly in patients where more conventional treatments have failed. They have been reported as offering perceived benefits in a wide range of conditions, but the major interest at present is centred on their place in pain management and in the palliation of symptoms secondary to terminal cancer and neurological disease. The potential benefits include symptomatic relief for patients suffering from intractable neuropathic pain, anorexia, anxiety and muscle spasm. There is clear consensus that cannibinoids should not be used as a first-line monotherapy, but should be considered as valuable adjuvants to more commonly indicated therapeutic options in the management of palliative care patients. Scientific evidence documenting the benefits of the canibinoids nabilone and sativex is accumulating, but needs to be evaluated carefully in the light of the paucity of available data. Both drugs are usually used under the guidance of specialist units. Nabilone and Sativex are now controlled drugs, and are frequently used outside of their licensed indication (control of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting) and hence particular care needs to be taken in evaluating the rational for their use. Sativex has been recently licenced for use in the management of patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:20972379

  11. Psychophysiology of pain.

    PubMed

    Sternbach, R A

    1975-01-01

    The recent literature on pain states shows: pain thresholds are relatively constant for an individual, but pain tolerance is influenced by psychological state; the expression of pain is a function partly of ethnic membership and degree of extroversion; pain complaints are determined as well by cultural and extroversive factors, and also degree of neuroticism. Studies of pain patients reveals that those with acute pain tend to show normal personality profiles, but the degree of pain experienced is related to the degree of anxiety present. Most chronic pain patients, like those with psychogenic pain, show somatic preoccupations and reactive depression. The treatment and/or rehabilitation of pain patients has developed in three areas. In cases of peripheral neuropathy and some spinal cord lesions, electrical stimulation with "neural pacemakers" can often "close the gate" to pain signals and provide significant reduction or abolition of pain. Psychotropic medications, particularly the tricyclic antidepressants, sometimes in combination with phenothiazines and antihistamines, are effective in many instances of central pain, and help increase the pain tolerance and decrease the need for narcotics in other pain states. Operant conditioning, including the use of biofeedback, extinguishes pain behavior and increases pain-incompatible behaviors, with good long-term results. PMID:5384

  12. Interest in paromomycin for the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis (kala-azar)

    PubMed Central

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is an important vector-borne disease, and it is classified as one of the most important tropical fly-borne infections. This disease can cause two types of clinical manifestations: cutaneous forms and visceral forms. Visceral leishmaniasis, which is also called kala-azar, is a very serious infection that can be fatal. The management of visceral leishmaniasis requires informed diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Continuous research and development regarding the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis had led to many improvements. Paromomycin is a relatively new antibiotic drug that has been used for the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis for several years. This article reviews and discusses the use of paromomycin for visceral leishmaniasis therapy. PMID:22802694

  13. Visceral adiposity index as a predictor of clinical severity and therapeutic outcome of PCOS.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Sai-Hua; Li, Xue-Lian

    2016-03-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine-metabolic disease which often accompany with abnormal fat distribution. Visceral adiposity has association with abnormal lipid metabolic, pro-inflammatory activity, insulin resistance (IR) and hyperandrogenism. Increased visceral adiposity raises the risk of metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular (CV) events, and aggravates ovulatory dysfunction and hyperandrogenism in PCOS women. Visceral adiposity index (VAI), a simple surrogate maker of visceral adipose dysfunction and visceral adiposity, is a predictor of IR, and link hyperinsulinemia, hyperandrogenism and anovulation. This review aims to discuss the visceral adiposity situation in PCOS women, and suggests that VAI may be a useful predictor of clinical severity and therapeutic outcome of PCOS. PMID:26502288

  14. Visceral Adipose Tissue Mesothelial Cells: Living on the Edge or Just Taking Up Space?

    PubMed

    Gupta, Olga T; Gupta, Rana K

    2015-10-01

    Visceral adiposity and pathological adipose tissue remodeling, a result of overnutrition, are strong predictors of metabolic health in obesity. Factors intrinsic to visceral adipose depots are likely to play a causal role in eliciting the detrimental effects of this tissue on systemic nutrient homeostasis. The visceral adipose-associated mesothelium, a monolayer of epithelial cells of mesodermal origin that line the visceral serosa, has recently attracted attention for its role in metabolic dysfunction. Here we highlight and consolidate literature from various fields of study that points to the visceral adipose-associated mesothelium as a potential contributor to adipose development and remodeling. We propose a hypothesis in which adipose mesothelial cells represent a visceral depot-specific determinant of adipose tissue health in obesity. PMID:26412153

  15. Pain and musculoskeletal pain syndromes in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Aura Ligia; Moraes, Ana Julia Pantoja; Leone, Claudio; Doria-Filho, Ulysses; Silva, Clovis Artur Almeida

    2006-06-01

    The presence of musculoskeletal pain was evaluated in adolescents. Pain was reported by 40% of respondents, benign joint hypermobility syndrome by 10%, myofascial syndrome by 5%, tendonitis by 2%, and fibromialgia by 1%. Logistical regression analysis indicated that sex and age were predictive of pain. PMID:16730613

  16. Delta and kappa opioid receptors as suitable drug targets for pain.

    PubMed

    Vanderah, Todd W

    2010-01-01

    Similar to mu opioid receptors, kappa and delta opioid receptors reside in the periphery, the dorsal root ganglion, the spinal cord, and in supraspinal regions associated with pain modulation. Both delta and kappa opioid agonists have been shown to activate pain inhibitory pathways in the central nervous system. Yet, currently there are only a few pharmacologic agents that target kappa receptors, and none that target delta receptors. Spurred by the need for an efficacious analgesic without the unwanted side effects associated with the typical clinical profile of mu opioid agonists, new research has provided insight into why the development of effective kappa and delta opioid receptor agonists has remained elusive thus far, and importantly, how these obstacles may be overcome. For example, for delta opioid agonists to be effective, a state of inflammation may be required as this induces delta opioid receptors to migrate to the surface of neuronal cells and thereby become accessible to delta opioid agonists. Studies have shown that delta opioid agonists can provide relief of inflammatory pain and malignant bone pain. Meanwhile, peripherally restricted kappa opioid agonists have been developed to target kappa opioid receptors located on visceral and somatic afferent nerves for relief of inflammatory, visceral, and neuropathic chronic pain. The recently shown efficacy of these analgesics combined with a possible lower abuse potential and side effect burden than mu opioid receptor agonists makes delta and peripherally restricted kappa opioid receptor agonists promising targets for treating pain. PMID:20026960

  17. Antinociceptive effects of novel melatonin receptor agonists in mouse models of abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chunqiu; Fichna, Jakub; Laudon, Moshe; Storr, Martin

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the antinociceptive action of the novel melatonin receptor (MT) agonists, Neu-P11 and Neu-P12 in animal models of visceral pain. METHODS: Visceral pain was induced by intracolonic (ic) application of mustard oil or capsaicin solution or by intraperitoneal (ip) administration of acetic acid. Neu-P11, Neu-P12, or melatonin were given ip or orally and their effects on pain-induced behavioral responses were evaluated. To identify the receptors involved, the non-selective MT1/MT2 receptor antagonist luzindole, the MT2 receptor antagonist 4-P-PDOT, or the ?-opioid receptor antagonist naloxone were injected ip or intracerebroventricularly (icv) prior to the induction of pain. RESULTS: Orally and ip administered melatonin, Neu-P11, and Neu-P12 reduced pain responses in a dose-dependent manner. Neu-P12 was more effective and displayed longer duration of action compared to melatonin. The antinociceptive effects of Neu-P11 or Neu-P12 were antagonized by ip or icv. administered naloxone. Intracerebroventricularly, but not ip administration of luzindole or 4-P-PDOT blocked the antinociceptive actions of Neu-P11 or Neu-P12. CONCLUSION: Neu-P12 produced the most potent and long-lasting antinociceptive effect. Further development of Neu-P12 for future treatment of abdominal pain seems promising. PMID:24574803

  18. A diagnostic challenge in a young woman with intractable hiccups and vomiting: a case of neuromyelitis optica

    PubMed Central

    Mandaliya, Rohan; Boigon, Margot; Smith, David G.; Bhutani, Suchit; Ali, Naveed; Hilton, Cheryl; Kelly, John; Ternopolska, Nataliya

    2015-01-01

    Intractable nausea and vomiting along with hiccups is a commonly encountered problem on any general medicine or gastroenterology service. These symptoms are usually not appreciated as the possible initial manifestation of neuromyelitis optica (NMO). Missing diagnosis at this early stage will lead to a delay in the treatment, and hence, irreversible complications including blindness and paraplegia could occur. We report a case of a 22-year-old young female who presented with intractable hiccups and vomiting. After extensive evaluation, she was found to have NMO which involved the area postrema, the vomiting center of the brain. Early diagnosis from the clinical picture aided by aquaporin-4 serologic testing is extremely important to allow early initiation of immunosuppressive therapy. Immunosuppression gives an opportunity to modify the disease at an earlier stage rather than waiting for evolution of disease to fulfill the diagnostic criteria of NMO. PMID:26486116

  19. Renal Embolization and Urothelial Sclerotherapy for Recurrent Obstructive Urosepsis and Intractable Haematuria from Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Brown, Nicholas; Olayos, Elizabeth; Elmer, Sandra; Wong, Lih-Ming; Brooks, Duncan M; Jhamb, Ashu

    2016-03-01

    Management of intractable haematuria and obstructive urosepsis from upper tract urothelial carcinoma can be problematic in patients not suitable for surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Interventional radiology techniques provide alternative approaches in this setting, such as complete kidney embolization to cease urine output, percutaneous nephrostomy, antegrade injection of sclerotherapy agents and sterilisation of the upper collecting system. Related approaches have been successfully employed to sclerose renal cysts, lymphoceles, chyluria and intractable lower tract haemorrhage. No reports of percutaneous, antegrade sclerotherapy in the upper urinary tract have previously been published. We present a case of recurrent haematuria and obstructive urosepsis caused by invasive upper tract urothelial carcinoma in a non-operative patient, which was treated with renal embolisation and percutaneous upper tract urothelial sclerotherapy. PMID:26206598

  20. Clinical application of kampo medicine (rikkunshito) for common and/or intractable symptoms of the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Tominaga, Kazunari; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenterological reflux disease and functional dyspepsia are usually treatable using Western medical practices. Nonetheless, some cases present with intractable symptoms that are not amenable to these therapies. Treatment with kampo, a traditional Japanese medicine, recently has been proposed as an alternative therapy for use in combination with the Western practices. In general, traditional Japanese medicines have been used empirically for intractable symptoms correctively designated as general malaises. Accumulating lines of evidence, including basic and clinical researches, have demonstrate detailed mechanisms where traditional Japanese medicines exert pharmacological action to improve symptoms. Therefore, traditional Japanese medicines have been gaining use by various medical doctors as the specific modes of pharmacological action are recognized. This review covers both the pharmacological functions and the clinical efficacies of rikkunshito for use in treating disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25688209