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Sample records for intradermally injected syngeneic

  1. Rejection of intradermally injected syngeneic tumor cells from mice by specific elimination of tumor-associated macrophages with liposome-encapsulated dichloromethylene diphosphonate, followed by induction of CD11b(+)/CCR3(-)/Gr-1(-) cells cytotoxic against the tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Takeshi; Ibata, Minenori; Yu, Zhiqian; Shikama, Yosuke; Endo, Yasuo; Miyauchi, Yasunori; Nakamura, Masanori; Tashiro-Yamaji, Junko; Miura-Takeda, Sayako; Shimizu, Tetsunosuke; Okada, Masashi; Ueda, Koichi; Kubota, Takahiro; Yoshida, Ryotaro

    2009-12-01

    Tumor cell expansion relies on nutrient supply, and oxygen limitation is central in controlling neovascularization and tumor spread. Monocytes infiltrate into tumors from the circulation along defined chemotactic gradients, differentiate into tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), and then accumulate in the hypoxic areas. Elevated TAM density in some regions or overall TAM numbers are correlated with increased tumor angiogenesis and a reduced host survival in the case of various types of tumors. To evaluate the role of TAMs in tumor growth, we here specifically eliminated TAMs by in vivo application of dichloromethylene diphosphonate (DMDP)-containing liposomes to mice bearing various types of tumors (e.g., B16 melanoma, KLN205 squamous cell carcinoma, and 3LL Lewis lung cancer), all of which grew in the dermis of syngeneic mouse skin. When DMDP-liposomes were injected into four spots to surround the tumor on day 0 or 5 after tumor injection and every third day thereafter, both the induction of TAMs and the tumor growth were suppressed in a dose-dependent and injection number-dependent manner; and unexpectedly, the tumor cells were rejected by 12 injections of three times-diluted DMDP-liposomes. The absence of TAMs in turn induced the invasion of inflammatory cells into or around the tumors; and the major population of effector cells cytotoxic against the target tumor cells were CD11b(+) monocytic macrophages, but not CCR3(+) eosinophils or Gr-1(+) neutrophils. These results indicate that both the absence of TAMs and invasion of CD11b(+) monocytic macrophages resulted in the tumor rejection. PMID:19365632

  2. Spontaneous rejection of intradermally transplanted non-engineered tumor cells by neutrophils and macrophages from syngeneic strains of mice.

    PubMed

    Ibata, Minenori; Takahashi, Takeshi; Shimizu, Tetsunosuke; Inoue, Yoshihiro; Maeda, Shogo; Tashiro-Yamaji, Junko; Okada, Masashi; Ueda, Koichi; Kubota, Takahiro; Yoshida, Ryotaro

    2011-10-01

    It is not surprising that tumors arising spontaneously are rarely rejected by T cells, because in general they lack molecules to elicit a primary T-cell response. In fact, cytokine-engineered tumors can induce granulocyte infiltration leading to tumor rejection. In the present study, we i.d. injected seven kinds of non-engineered tumor cells into syngeneic strains of mice. Three of them (i.e. B16, KLN205, and 3LL cells) continued to grow, whereas four of them (i.e. Meth A, I-10, CL-S1, and FM3A cells) were spontaneously rejected after transient growth or without growth. In contrast to the i.d. injection of B16 cells into C57BL/6 mice, which induces infiltration of TAMs into the tumors, the i.d. injection of Meth A cells into BALB/c mice induced the invasion of cytotoxic inflammatory cells, but not of TAMs, into or around the tumors leading to an IFN-γ-dependent rejection. On day 5, the cytotoxic activity against the tumor cells reached a peak; and the effector cells were found to be neutrophils and macrophages. The i.d. Meth A or I-10 cell-immunized, but not non-immunized, mice rejected i.p.- or i.m.-transplanted Meth A or I-10 cells without growth, respectively. The main effector cells were CTLs; and there was no cross-sensitization between these two kinds of tumor cells, suggesting specific rejection of tumor cells by CTLs from i.d. immunized mice. These results indicate that infiltration of cytotoxic myeloid cells (i.e. neutrophils and macrophages, but not TAMs) into or around tumors is essential for their IFN-γ-dependent spontaneous rejection. PMID:21806674

  3. Selective portal vein injection for the design of syngeneic models of liver malignancy.

    PubMed

    Limani, Perparim; Borgeaud, Nathalie; Linecker, Michael; Tschuor, Christoph; Kachaylo, Ekaterina; Schlegel, Andrea; Jang, Jae-Hwi; Ungethüm, Udo; Montani, Matteo; Graf, Rolf; Humar, Bostjan; Clavien, Pierre-Alain

    2016-05-01

    Liver metastases are the most frequent cause of death due to colorectal cancer (CRC). Syngeneic orthotopic animal models, based on the grafting of cancer cells or tissue in host liver, are efficient systems for studying liver tumors and their (patho)physiological environment. Here we describe selective portal vein injection as a novel tool to generate syngeneic orthotopic models of liver tumors that avoid most of the weaknesses of existing syngeneic models. By combining portal vein injection of cancer cells with the selective clamping of distal liver lobes, tumor growth is limited to specific lobes. When applied on MC-38 CRC cells and their mouse host C57BL6, selective portal vein injection leads with 100% penetrance to MRI-detectable tumors within 1 wk, followed by a steady growth until the time of death (survival ∼7 wk) in the absence of extrahepatic disease. Similar results were obtained using CT-26 cells and their syngeneic Balb/c hosts. As a proof of principle, lobe-restricted liver tumors were also generated using Hepa1-6 (C57BL6-syngeneic) and TIB-75 (Balb/c-syngeneic) hepatocellular cancer cells, demonstrating the general applicability of selective portal vein injection for the induction of malignant liver tumors. Selective portal vein injection is technically straightforward, enables liver invasion via anatomical routes, preserves liver function, and provides unaffected liver tissue. The tumor models are reproducible and highly penetrant, with survival mainly dependent on the growth of lobe-restricted liver malignancy. These models enable biological studies and preclinical testing within short periods of time. PMID:26893160

  4. Comparative trial of live attenuated measles vaccine in Hong Kong by intramuscular and intradermal injection

    PubMed Central

    1967-01-01

    Between April and July 1966 a comparative trial of two live attenuated measles vaccines (Schwarz and Beckenham 31), given intramuscularly or intradermally, was conducted in Hong Kong. Some 910 non-immune children completed the trial. The Beckenham 31 vaccine caused significantly more complications than Schwarz vaccine, but it also resulted in a much higher mean antibody titre by both intramuscular and intradermal injection than did Schwarz vaccine. The seroconversion rates were satisfactory for both vaccines given intramuscularly but not for either given intradermally (at one-fifth the recognized intramuscular dose). The authors suggest that either vaccine may usefully be given for measles prophylaxis. The choice between Beckenham 31, with a higher complication rate and higher antibody levels, and Schwarz, with fewer complications but lower antibody levels, would depend on the type of community, the adequacy of the medical services, the severity of measles and an assessment of how either vaccine, with its known complications, might affect other immunization programmes. PMID:5299670

  5. Effect of syngeneic marrow injection upon recovery in sub- and near-lethally irradiated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Boggs, S.S.; Boggs, D.R.; Patrene, K.D.

    1989-06-01

    Mice were given sub-lethal (200-600 cGy) or near-lethal (800 cGy) whole body irradiation and the effect of injecting syngeneic marrow on subsequent hematopoietic recovery was studied. Marrow cell injection enhanced erythropoietic recovery after sub-lethal irradiation as reflected in hematocrit values and rate of appearance of /sup 59/Fe-labeled red cells in blood. However, this enhanced erythropoiesis was only seen in the spleen, and /sup 59/Fe uptake in marrow was reduced. When the irradiation dose was kept constant and the marrow dose increased from 10(5) to 10(6) to 10(7) cells, there was a somewhat erratic increase in spleen /sup 59/Fe and a decrease in marrow /sup 59/Fe uptake. When marrow cell number was kept constant and the dose of irradiation was increased from 200 to 400 to 600 to 800 cGy, there was an exponential increase in spleen /sup 59/Fe uptake but the marrow /sup 59/Fe uptake changed from depressed after lower doses to increased after 800 cGy. Cell injection after sub-lethal irradiation did not increase or decrease granulocytopoiesis. Injection of irradiated marrow cells also reduced marrow erythropoiesis and this was evident after both sub- and near-lethal irradiation. However, injection of irradiated cells did not increase splenic erythropoiesis. Following splenectomy, the depressed marrow erythropoiesis attending injection of viable cells was virtually eliminated but no increase was seen. These data suggest that the injection of autologous or syngeneic marrow may not be effective as a means of accelerating hematopoietic recovery after irradiation unless near-lethal or lethal dose have been received.

  6. Hollow Microneedles for Intradermal Injection Fabricated by Sacrificial Micromolding and Selective Electrodeposition

    PubMed Central

    Norman, James J.; Choi, Seong-O; Tong, Nhien T.; Aiyar, Avishek R.; Patel, Samirkumar R.; Prausnitz, Mark R.; Allen, Mark G.

    2012-01-01

    Limitations with standard intradermal injections have created a clinical need for an alternative, low-cost injection device. In this study, we designed a hollow metal microneedle for reliable intradermal injection and developed a high-throughput micromolding process to produce metal microneedles with complex geometries. To fabricate the microneedles, we laser-ablated a 70 μm × 70 μm square cavity near the tip of poly(lactic acid-co-glyoclic acid) (PLGA) microneedles. The master structure was a template for multiple micromolded PLGA replicas. Each replica was sputtered with a gold seed layer with minimal gold deposited in the cavity due to masking effects. In this way, nickel was electrodeposited selectively outside of the cavity, after which the polymer replica was dissolved to produce a hollow metal microneedle. Force-displacement tests showed the microneedles, with 12 μm thick electrodeposition, could penetrate skin with an insertion force 9 times less than their axial failure force. We injected fluid with the microneedles into pig skin in vitro and hairless guinea pig skin in vivo. The injections targeted 90% of the material within the skin with minimal leakage onto the skin surface. We conclude that hollow microneedles made by this simple microfabrication method can achieve targeted intradermal injection. PMID:23053452

  7. Best infection control practices for intradermal, subcutaneous, and intramuscular needle injections.

    PubMed Central

    Hutin, Yvan; Hauri, Anja; Chiarello, Linda; Catlin, Mary; Stilwell, Barbara; Ghebrehiwet, Tesfamicael; Garner, Julia

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To draw up evidence-based guidelines to make injections safer. METHODS: A development group summarized evidence-based best practices for preventing injection-associated infections in resource-limited settings. The development process included a breakdown of the WHO reference definition of a safe injection into a list of potentially critical steps, a review of the literature for each of these steps, the formulation of best practices, and the submission of the draft document to peer review. FINDINGS: Eliminating unnecessary injections is the highest priority in preventing injection-associated infections. However, when intradermal, subcutaneous, or intramuscular injections are medically indicated, best infection control practices include the use of sterile injection equipment, the prevention of contamination of injection equipment and medication, the prevention of needle-stick injuries to the provider, and the prevention of access to used needles. CONCLUSION: The availability of best infection control practices for intradermal, subcutaneous, and intramuscular injections will provide a reference for global efforts to achieve the goal of safe and appropriate use of injections. WHO will revise the best practices five years after initial development, i.e. in 2005. PMID:12973641

  8. Controlled Human Malaria Infection of Tanzanians by Intradermal Injection of Aseptic, Purified, Cryopreserved Plasmodium falciparum Sporozoites

    PubMed Central

    Shekalaghe, Seif; Rutaihwa, Mastidia; Billingsley, Peter F.; Chemba, Mwajuma; Daubenberger, Claudia A.; James, Eric R.; Mpina, Maximillian; Ali Juma, Omar; Schindler, Tobias; Huber, Eric; Gunasekera, Anusha; Manoj, Anita; Simon, Beatus; Saverino, Elizabeth; Church, L. W. Preston; Hermsen, Cornelus C.; Sauerwein, Robert W.; Plowe, Christopher; Venkatesan, Meera; Sasi, Philip; Lweno, Omar; Mutani, Paul; Hamad, Ali; Mohammed, Ali; Urassa, Alwisa; Mzee, Tutu; Padilla, Debbie; Ruben, Adam; Lee Sim, B. Kim; Tanner, Marcel; Abdulla, Salim; Hoffman, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    Controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) by mosquito bite has been used to assess anti-malaria interventions in > 1,500 volunteers since development of methods for infecting mosquitoes by feeding on Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) gametocyte cultures. Such CHMIs have never been used in Africa. Aseptic, purified, cryopreserved Pf sporozoites, PfSPZ Challenge, were used to infect Dutch volunteers by intradermal injection. We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to assess safety and infectivity of PfSPZ Challenge in adult male Tanzanians. Volunteers were injected intradermally with 10,000 (N = 12) or 25,000 (N = 12) PfSPZ or normal saline (N = 6). PfSPZ Challenge was well tolerated and safe. Eleven of 12 and 10 of 11 subjects, who received 10,000 and 25,000 PfSPZ respectively, developed parasitemia. In 10,000 versus 25,000 PfSPZ groups geometric mean days from injection to Pf positivity by thick blood film was 15.4 versus 13.5 (P = 0.023). Alpha-thalassemia heterozygosity had no apparent effect on infectivity. PfSPZ Challenge was safe, well tolerated, and infectious. PMID:25070995

  9. Antihistamines do not inhibit the wheal induced by the intradermal injection of autologous serum in resistant chronic idiopathic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Magen, Eli; Mishal, Joseph; Zeldin, Yuri; Schlesinger, Menachem

    2012-01-01

    Some patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) are resistant to conventional doses of antihistamines (AHs). This study was designed to check whether the skin wheal and flare reaction produced by the intradermal injection of autologous serum (AS) and by histamine differs in AH-resistant and AH responder CIU patients. CIU patients with treatment failure under fexofenadine at 180 mg q.d. increased their daily dose of AH to 4 tablets daily. Those with significant improvement of urticaria activity score under fexofenadine at 180 mg were included in the CIU group. Subjects with treatment failure despite a full 8-week fourfold fexofenadine treatment were included in the resistant CIU (R-CIU group). The control group consisted of sex- and age-matched patents with allergic rhinitis. The AS skin test and intradermal histamine-induced wheal and flare reaction were performed at baseline (without AH), after 8 and 16 weeks (under AH treatment). Forty-six subjects were included in the CIU group, 21 were in the R-CIU group, and 44 were in the control group. Under AH therapy, the skin reaction to intradermal histamine injection was significantly diminished in all study groups. In the R-CIU group, fexofenadine at 180 mg did not suppress AS-induced wheal reaction (5.96 ± 2.25 mm; p = 0.85), and with a fourfold AH dose some reduction of AS-induced wheal (3.79 ± 1.74 mm; p = 0.008) was observed but remained larger than in the CIU (2.31 ± 1.12; p = 0.006) and control groups (2.52 ± 1.36; p = 0.037). AHs do not inhibit the wheal induced by the intradermal injection of AS in R-CIU. PMID:23394513

  10. Injection of Syngeneic Murine Melanoma Cells to Determine Their Metastatic Potential in the Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Timmons, Joshua J.; Cohessy, Sean; Wong, Eric T.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 90% of human cancer deaths are linked to metastasis. Despite the prevalence and relative harm of metastasis, therapeutics for treatment or prevention are lacking. We report a method for the establishment of pulmonary metastases in mice, useful for the study of this phenomenon. Tail vein injection of B57BL/6J mice with B16-BL6 is among the most used models for melanoma metastases. Some of the circulating tumor cells establish themselves in the lungs of the mouse, creating "experimental" metastatic foci. With this model it is possible to measure the relative effects of therapeutic agents on the development of cancer metastasis. The difference in enumerated lung foci between treated and untreated mice indicates the efficacy of metastases neutralization. However, prior to the investigation of a therapeutic agent, it is necessary to determine an optimal number of injected B16-BL6 cells for the quantitative analysis of metastatic foci. Injection of too many cells may result in an overabundance of metastatic foci, impairing proper quantification and overwhelming the effects of anti-cancer therapies, while injection of too few cells will hinder the comparison between treated and controls. PMID:27285567

  11. Systemic and local immune response in pigs intradermally and intramuscularly injected with inactivated Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae vaccines.

    PubMed

    Martelli, P; Saleri, R; Cavalli, V; De Angelis, E; Ferrari, L; Benetti, M; Ferrarini, G; Merialdi, G; Borghetti, P

    2014-01-31

    The systemic and respiratory local immune response induced by the intradermal administration of a commercial inactivated Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae whole-cell vaccine (Porcilis(®) MHYO ID ONCE - MSD AH) in comparison with two commercial vaccines administered via the intramuscular route and a negative control (adjuvant only) was investigated. Forty conventional M. hyopneumoniae-free pigs were randomly assigned to four groups (ten animals each): Group A=intradermal administration of the test vaccine by using the needle-less IDAL(®) vaccinator at a dose of 0.2 ml; Group B=intramuscular administration of a commercially available vaccine (vaccine B); Group C=intramuscular administration of the adjuvant only (2 ml of X-solve adjuvant); Group D=intramuscular administration of a commercially available vaccine (vaccine D). Pigs were vaccinated at 28 days of age. Blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid samples were collected at vaccination (blood only), 4 and 8 weeks post-vaccination. Serum and BAL fluid were tested for the presence of antibodies by ELISA test. Peripheral blood monomorphonuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated to quantify the number of IFN-γ secreting cells by ELISpot. Moreover, cytokine gene expression from the BAL fluid was performed. Total antibodies against M. hyopneumoniae and specific IgG were detected in serum of intradermally and intramuscularly (vaccine B only) vaccinated pigs at 4 and 8 weeks post-vaccination. M. hyopneumoniae specific IgA were detected in BAL fluid from vaccinated animals (Groups A and B) but not from controls and animals vaccinated with the bacterin D (p<0.05). Significantly higher gene expression of IL-10 was observed in the BAL fluid at week 8 post-vaccination in the intradermally vaccinated pigs (p<0.05). The results support that the intradermal administration of an adjuvanted bacterin induces both systemic and mucosal immune responses. Moreover, the intramuscularly administered commercial vaccines each had a different

  12. Intradermal injection of Botulinum toxin type A alleviates infraorbital nerve constriction-induced thermal hyperalgesia in an operant assay.

    PubMed

    Kumada, A; Matsuka, Y; Spigelman, I; Maruhama, K; Yamamoto, Y; Neubert, J K; Nolan, T A; Watanabe, K; Maekawa, K; Kamioka, H; Yamashiro, T; Kuboki, T; Oguma, K

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that infraorbital nerve constriction (IoNC)-induced mechanical allodynia has been attenuated by administration of highly purified 150-kDa Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A). Here, we extend these studies to determine whether BoNT/A could attenuate IoNC-induced symptoms of thermal hyperalgesia. Instead of testing head withdrawal thresholds, a thermal operant assay was used to evaluate cortical processing of sensory input following IoNC. In this assay, a fasted rat's desire to obtain a food reward (sweetened condensed milk) is coupled to its ability to tolerate facial contact with a warm (45 °C) thermode. Bilateral IoNC decreased the ratio of thermode contact duration/event, which is an indicative of thermal hyperalgesia. BoNT/A injection intradermally in the area of infraorbital nerve (IoN) innervation 7 days after IoNC resulted in decreased number of facial contacts and increased the ratio of contact duration/event (measured at 14 days after IoNC). The BoNT/A (2-200 pg) effects were dose dependent and statistically significant at 100 and 200 pg (P < 0·05). Complete reversal of thermal hyperalgesia symptoms was obtained with a 200-pg dose, without affecting sham rat behaviour. Off-site (neck) injection of BoNT/A did not relieve thermal hyperalgesia, while co-injection of BoNT/A with a neutralising antibody in the area of IoN innervation prevented relief of thermal hyperalgesia. Neither IoNC nor BoNT/A injection affected operant assay parameters with a 24 °C thermode, indicating selectivity of thermal hyperalgesia measurements. These results strongly suggest that intradermal injection of BoNT/A in the area of IoN innervation alleviates IoNC-induced thermal hyperalgesia in an operant assay. PMID:21793870

  13. [A case received pre-exposure immunization against rabies by intradermal injection of rabies vaccine because of allergic reaction to the component of the vaccine].

    PubMed

    Takayama, N; Okuma, K; Sakuma, H

    1999-06-01

    A female, 25 years of age, came to our clinic to receive pre-exposure immunization against rabies. In another hospital she was tested to find out whether she was allergic to the components of rabies vaccine (PCEC) manufactured by the Chemo-Sero-Theraptic Research Institute (Kaketsuken) by cutaneous reaction using a 2,000-fold diluted PCEC. She showed a positive reaction. In our clinic she was again examined by skin test using 0.1 ml of 10-fold diluted PCEC. She showed wheal and flare reaction. Further we tested using 0.05 ml and 0.1 ml of non-diluted PCEC. Her skin reaction did not increase by several mm in diameter. So we decided to immunized her against rabies with intradermal injections of PCEC instead of subcutaneous injections that is indicated by the manufacturer. The second intradermal injections were done to right and left forearms a week later. Then the third shot was given 4 weeks after the second. At 2 weeks after the third injection her blood sample was taken to measure anti-rabies antibody titer by ELISA method with Platelia rabies kit (Diagnostic Pasteur, France). She had 6.7 U/ml of anti-rabies ELISA antibody that was much higher than the protective level (0.5 IU/ml) officially recognized by WHO. Therefore, it is concluded that she had produced sufficiently high level of anti-rabies antibody with intradermal injection of PCEC. It is reasonably recommended to investigate further if the intradermal injection of PCEC will be an effective method as a pre-exposure immunization against rabies. PMID:10423951

  14. Intradermal needle-free powdered drug injection by a helium-powered device.

    PubMed

    Liu, John; Hogan, N Catherine; Hunter, Ian W

    2012-01-01

    We present a new method for needle-free powdered drug injection via a bench-top gas-powered device. This injector provides an alternative method of vaccine delivery to address the cold chain problem--the cost and risk of transporting temperature sensitive vaccines to developing countries. The device houses interchangeable nozzle inserts to vary orifice geometries and is capable of delivering polymer beads (1-5 µm diameter) into the dermal layer of porcine tissue. Results for injection shape and injection depth versus nozzle orifice diameter demonstrate the device's controllability. PMID:23366327

  15. Host responses in human skin after conventional intradermal injection or microneedle administration of virus-like-particle influenza vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Pearton, Marc; Pirri, Daniela; Kang, Sang-Moo; Compans, Richard W; Birchall, James C

    2014-01-01

    Miniaturized microneedle devices are being developed for painlessly targeting vaccines to the immune cell populations in skin. As skin immunization studies are generally restricted to animal models however, where skin architecture and immunity is greatly different to human, surprisingly little is known about the local human response to intradermal (ID) vaccines. Here we use surgically excised human skin to explore for the first time the complex molecular and cellular host responses to a candidate influenza vaccine comprising nanoparticulate virus-like-particles (VLPs), administered via conventional hypodermic injection or reduced scale microneedles. Responses at the molecular level are determined by microarray analysis (47,296 discrete transcripts) and validated by quantitative PCR (96 genes). Cellular response is probed through monitoring migration of dendritic cells in viable skin tissue. Gene expression mapping, ontological analysis and qPCR reveal up-regulation of a host of genes responsible for key immunomodulatory processes and host viral response, including cell recruitment, activation, migration and T cell interaction following both ID and microneedle injection of VLPs; the response from the microneedles being more subtle. Significant morphological and migratory changes to skin dendritic cells are also apparent following microneedle VLP delivery. This is the first study displaying the global, multifaceted immunological events that occur at the site of vaccine deposition in human skin and will subsequently influence the degree and nature of innate and adaptive immune responses. An increased understanding of the detailed similarities and differences in response against antigen administered via different delivery modalities will inform the development of improved vaccines and vaccine delivery systems. PMID:23564440

  16. The immunogenicity of the intradermal injection of seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine containing influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in COPD patients soon after a pandemic.

    PubMed

    Chuaychoo, Benjamas; Kositanont, Uraiwan; Rittayamai, Nuttapol; Niyomthong, Parichat; Songserm, Thaweesak; Maranetra, Khun Nanta; Rattanasaengloet, Kanokwan; Nana, Arth

    2016-07-01

    The antibody responses of a reduced-dose intradermal seasonal influenza vaccination have never been studied in COPD patients soon after a pandemic. A total of 149 COPD patients (60 y of age or older) were randomized to receive trivalent influenza vaccine (Sanofi-Pasteur, France) either 9 µg of hemagglutinin (HA) per strain split into 2-site intradermal (ID) injections via the Mantoux technique or one intramuscular (IM) injection of 15 µg of HA per strain. The geometric mean titers, seroconversion factors, seroconversion rates and seroprotection rates for influenza A(H3N2) and B administered through the ID injection (n = 75) were similar to those obtained with the IM injection (n = 74) 4 weeks post-vaccination. The antibody responses for influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 administered through the ID injection were lower than those obtained with the IM injection, but all of these responses met the 3 criteria proposed by the Committee for Proprietary Medicinal Products (CPMP) for annual re-licensure. The seroprotection rates 4 weeks post-vaccination for influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 were 64.0% (95%CI 52.7-74.0%) in the ID group vs. 78.4% (95% CI 67.6-86.3%) in the IM group (p = 0.053). Influenza-related acute respiratory illness (ARI), diagnosed as a 4-fold rise in HI titers with a convalescent titer > 1:40, and/or the RT-PCR between the ID group (5.3%) and the IM group (8.1%) were not significantly different. The reduced-dose intradermal influenza vaccine may expand vaccine coverage in cases of vaccine shortage. PMID:27153158

  17. The role of nitric oxide in the phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate-responsive element-binding protein in the spinal cord after intradermal injection of capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Fang, Li; Lin, Qing; Willis, William D

    2002-06-01

    We investigated the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in the phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) in the spinal cord of rats during central sensitization after intradermal capsaicin injection. CREB and phosphorylated CREB (p-CREB) were measured by immunoblotting. The level of p-CREB increased by 20 minutes, peaked between 20 and 60 minutes after capsaicin injection, and started to decrease after 150 minutes. CREB itself did not show an obvious change after capsaicin injection. The p-CREB expression on the ipsilateral side of the spinal dorsal horn, but not on the contralateral side, increased significantly after capsaicin injection. The increase in p-CREB induced by capsaicin injection was partially blocked by pretreatment with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an NO synthase inhibitor, administered through a microdialysis fiber placed across the spinal cord. D-NAME, an inactive form of L-NAME, had no effect. CREB phosphorylation, not the level of CREB, was induced within 20 minutes by microdialysis administration of SIN-1, an NO donor. These results indicate that CREB phosphorylation in the spinal cord results from both endogenous and exogenous NO release and that p-CREB may play a role in central sensitization or in longer-term changes in gene expression induced by strong peripheral noxious stimulation. PMID:14622772

  18. Positron Lymphography: Multimodal, High-Resolution, Dynamic Mapping and Resection of Lymph Nodes After Intradermal Injection of 18F-FDG

    PubMed Central

    Thorek, Daniel L.J.; Abou, Diane S.; Beattie, Bradley J.; Bartlett, Rachel M.; Huang, Ruimin; Zanzonico, Pat B.; Grimm, Jan

    2012-01-01

    The lymphatic system plays a critical role in the maintenance of healthy tissues. Its function is an important indicator of the presence and extent of disease. In oncology, metastatic spread to local lymph nodes (LNs) is a strong predictor of poor outcome. Clinical methods for the visualization of LNs involve regional injection and tracking of 99mTc-sulfur colloid (99mTc-SC) along with absorbent dyes. Intraoperatively, these techniques suffer from the requirement of administration of multiple contrast media (99mTc-SC and isosulfan blue), unwieldy γ-probes, and a short effective surgical window for dyes. Preclinically, imaging of transport through the lymphatics is further hindered by the resolution of lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT. We investigated multimodal imaging in animal models using intradermal administration of 18F-FDG for combined diagnostic and intraoperative use. PET visualizes LNs with high sensitivity and resolution and low background. Cerenkov radiation (CR) from 18F-FDG was evaluated to optically guide surgical resection of LNs. Methods Imaging of 18F-FDG uptake used PET and sensitive luminescent imaging equipment (for CR). Dynamic PET was performed in both sexes and multiple strains (NCr Nude, C57BL/6, and Nu/Nu) of mice. Biodistribution confirmed the uptake of 18F-FDG and was compared with that of 99mTc-SC. Verification of uptake and the ability to use 18F-FDG CR to guide nodal removal were confirmed histologically. Results Intradermal injection of 18F-FDG clearly revealed lymphatic vessels and LNs by PET. Dynamic imaging revealed rapid and sustained labeling of these structures. Biodistribution of the radiotracer confirmed the active transport of radioglucose in the lymphatics to the local LNs and over time into the general circulation. 18F-FDG also enabled visualization of LNs through CR, even before surgically revealing the site, and guided LN resection. Conclusion Intradermal 18F-FDG can enhance the preclinical investigation of the lymphatics

  19. SKIN LANGERIN+ DENDRITIC CELLS TRANSPORT INTRADERMALLY INJECTED ANTI-DEC-205 ANTIBODIES, BUT ARE NOT ESSENTIAL FOR SUBSEQUENT CYTOTOXIC CD8+ T CELL RESPONSES1

    PubMed Central

    Flacher, Vincent; Tripp, Christoph H.; Haid, Bernhard; Kissenpfennig, Adrien; Malissen, Bernard; Stoitzner, Patrizia; Idoyaga, Juliana; Romani, Nikolaus

    2012-01-01

    Incorporation of antigens by dendritic cells (DCs) increases when antigens are targeted to endocytic receptors by monoclonal antibodies (mAb). We have previously demonstrated in the mouse that mAb against C-type lectins administered intradermally are taken up by epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs), dermal Langerinneg DCs and dermal Langerin+ DCs in situ. However, the relative contribution of these skin DC subsets to the induction of immune responses after antigen targeting has not been addressed in vivo. We show here that murine epidermal LCs and dermal DCs transport intradermally injected mAb against the lectin receptor DEC-205/CD205 in vivo. Skin DCs targeted in situ with mAb migrated through lymphatic vessels in steady state and inflammation. In the skin-draining lymph nodes, targeting mAb were found in resident CD8α+ DCs and in migrating skin DCs. More than 70% of targeted DCs expressed Langerin, including dermal Langerin+ DCs and LCs. Numbers of targeted skin DCs in the nodes increased 2-3-fold when skin was topically inflamed by the TLR7 agonist imiquimod. Complete removal of the site where ovalbumin-coupled anti-DEC-205 had been injected decreased endogenous cytotoxic responses against ovalbumin peptide-loaded target cells by 40-50%. Surprisingly, selective ablation of all Langerin+ skin DCs in Langerin-Diphtheria-Toxin-Receptor knock-in mice did not affect such responses, independent of the adjuvant chosen. Thus, in cutaneous immunization strategies where antigen is targeted to DCs, Langerin+ skin DCs play a major role in transport of anti-DEC-205 mAb, although Langerinneg dermal DCs and CD8α+ DCs are sufficient to subsequent CD8+ T cell responses. PMID:22291181

  20. Intradermal injection of an anti-Langerin-HIVGag fusion vaccine targets epidermal Langerhans cells in nonhuman primates and can be tracked in vivo.

    PubMed

    Salabert, Nina; Todorova, Biliana; Martinon, Frédéric; Boisgard, Raphaël; Zurawski, Gerard; Zurawski, Sandra; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Cosma, Antonio; Kortulewski, Thierry; Banchereau, Jacques; Levy, Yves; Le Grand, Roger; Chapon, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    The development of new immunization strategies requires a better understanding of early molecular and cellular events occurring at the site of injection. The skin is particularly rich in immune cells and represents an attractive site for vaccine administration. Here, we specifically targeted vaccine antigens to epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs) using a fusion protein composed of HIV antigens and a monoclonal antibody targeting Langerin. We developed a fluorescence imaging approach to visualize, in vivo, the vaccine-targeted cells. Studies were performed in nonhuman primates (NHPs) because of their relevance as a model to assess human vaccines. We directly demonstrated that in NHPs, intradermally injected anti-Langerin-HIVGag specifically targets epidermal LCs and induces rapid changes in the LC network, including LC activation and migration out of the epidermis. Vaccine targeting of LCs significantly improved anti-HIV immune response without requirement of an adjuvant. Although the co-injection of the TLR-7/8 synthetic ligand, R-848 (resiquimod), with the vaccine, did not enhance significantly the antibody response, it stimulated recruitment of HLA-DR+ inflammatory cells to the site of immunization. This study allowed us to characterize the dynamics of early local events following the injection of a vaccine-targeted epidermal LCs and R-848. PMID:26678013

  1. Laser Doppler imager (LDI) scanner and intradermal injection for in vivo pharmacology in human skin microcirculation: responses to acetylcholine, endothelin-1 and their repeatability

    PubMed Central

    Saez, Anabelle M Opazo; Mosel, Frank; Nürnberger, Jens; Rushentsova, U; Gössl, Mario; Mitchell, Anna; Schäfers, Rafael F; Philipp, Thomas; Wenzel, René R

    2005-01-01

    Aims The purpose of this study was to evaluate the repeatability of forearm skin blood flow responses to intradermal injections of acetylcholine (ACh) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) using a double injection technique (DIT) and a laser Doppler imager (LDI) scanner in the human skin microcirculation. Methods We used a laser Doppler imager (Moor LDI V3.01) to continuously monitor the change in skin blood flow during intradermal administration of physiological saline (0.9% NaCl), acetylcholine (ACh 10−7, 10−8, 10−9 M) and endothelin-1 (ET-1 10−14, 10−16, 10−18 M) in 10 healthy male subjects. Subjects were examined on 3 different days for assessment of interday and interobserver repeatability. Injections of either drug were randomly placed on different sites of the forearm. Laser Doppler images were collected before and after injection at 2.5 min intervals for 30 min. Data were analysed after the completion of each experiment using Moor Software V.3.01. Results are expressed as changes from baseline in arbitrary perfusion units (PU). Results ACh caused a significant vasodilation (P< 0.0001 anova, mean ± SE: 766 ± 152 PU, ACh 10−9 M; 1868 ± 360 PU, ACh 10−8 M; 4188 ± 848 PU, ACh 10−7 M; mean of days 1 and 2, n = 10), and ET-1 induced a significant vasoconstrictive response (P< 0.0001 anova, −421 ± 83 PU, ET-1 10−18 M; −553 ± 66 PU, ET-1 10−16 M; −936 ± 90 PU, ET-1 10−14 M; mean of days 1 and 2, n = 10). There was no difference on the response to either drug on repeated days. Bland-Altman analyses showed a close agreement of responses between days with repeatability coefficients of 1625.4 PU for ACh, and 386.0 PU for ET-1 (95% CI: ACh, −1438 to 1747 PU, ET-1, −399 to 358 PU) and between observers with repeatability coefficients of 1057.2 PU for ACh and 255.8 PU for ET-1 (95% CI: ACh, −1024 to 1048 PU, ET-1, −252 to 249 PU). The variability between these responses was independent of average flux values for both ACh and ET-1. There was

  2. Response of immune response genes to adjuvants poly [di(sodium carboxylatoethylphenoxy)phosphazene] (PCEP), CpG oligodeoxynucleotide and emulsigen at intradermal injection site in pigs.

    PubMed

    Magiri, R B; Lai, K; Chaffey, A M; Wilson, H L; Berry, W E; Szafron, M L; Mutwiri, G K

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the mechanisms by which adjuvants mediate their effects provide critical information on how innate immunity influences the development of adaptive immunity. Despite being a critical vaccine component, the mechanisms by which adjuvants mediate their effects are not fully understood and this is especially true when they are used in large animals. This lack of understanding limits our ability to design effective vaccines. In the present study, we administered polyphosphazene (PCEP), CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG), emulsigen or saline via an intradermal injection into pigs and assessed the impact on the expression of reported 'adjuvant response genes' over time. CpG induced a strong upregulation of the chemokine CXL10 several 'Interferon Response Genes', as well as TNFα, and IL-10, and a down-regulation of IL-17 genes. Emulsigen upregulated expression of chemokines CCL2 and CCL5, proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNFα, as well as TLR9, and several IFN response genes. PCEP induced the expression of chemokine CCL2 and proinflammatory cytokine IL-6. These results suggest that emulsigen and CpG may promote recruitment of innate immune cells and Th1 type cytokine production but that PCEP may promote a Th-2 type immune response through the induction of IL-6, an inducer of B cell activity and differentiation. PMID:27269793

  3. A new biolistic intradermal injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouillette, M.; Doré, M.; Hébert, C.; Spooner, M.-F.; Marchand, S.; Côté, J.; Gobeil, F.; Rivest, M.; Lafrance, M.; Talbot, B. G.; Moutquin, J.-M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel intradermal needle-free drug delivery device which exploits the unsteady high-speed flow produced by a miniature shock tube to entrain drug or vaccine particles onto a skin target. A first clinical study of pain and physiological response of human subjects study is presented, comparing the new injector to intramuscular needle injection. This clinical study, performed according to established pain assessment protocols, demonstrated that every single subject felt noticeably less pain with the needle-free injector than with the needle injection. Regarding local tolerance and skin reaction, bleeding was observed on all volunteers after needle injection, but on none of the subjects following powder injection. An assessment of the pharmacodynamics, via blood pressure, of pure captopril powder using the new device on spontaneously hypertensive rats was also performed. It was found that every animal tested with the needle-free injector exhibited the expected pharmacodynamic response following captopril injection. Finally, the new injector was used to study the delivery of an inactivated influenza vaccine in mice. The needle-free device induced serum antibody response to the influenza vaccine that was comparable to that of subcutaneous needle injection, but without requiring the use of an adjuvant. Although no effort was made to optimize the formulation or the injection parameters in the present study, the novel injector demonstrates great promise for the rapid, safe and painless intradermal delivery of systemic drugs and vaccines.

  4. Amorphous silica nanoparticles size-dependently aggravate atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions following an intradermal injection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Due to the rising use of nanomaterials (NMs), there is concern that NMs induce undesirable biological effects because of their unique physicochemical properties. Recently, we reported that amorphous silica nanoparticles (nSPs), which are one of the most widely used NMs, can penetrate the skin barrier and induce various biological effects, including an immune-modulating effect. Thus, it should be clarified whether nSPs can be a risk factor for the aggravation of skin immune diseases. Thus, in this study, we investigated the relationship between the size of SPs and adjuvant activity using a model for atopic dermatitis. Results We investigated the effects of nSPs on the AD induced by intradermaly injected-mite antigen Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dp) in NC/Nga mice. Ear thickness measurements and histopathological analysis revealed that a combined injection of amorphous silica particles (SPs) and Dp induced aggravation of AD in an SP size-dependent manner compared to that of Dp alone. In particular, aggravation was observed remarkably in nSP-injected groups. Furthermore, these effects were correlated with the excessive induction of total IgE and a stronger systemic Th2 response. We demonstrated that these results are associated with the induction of IL-18 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) in the skin lesions. Conclusions A particle size reduction in silica particles enhanced IL-18 and TSLP production, which leads to systemic Th2 response and aggravation of AD-like skin lesions as induced by Dp antigen treatment. We believe that appropriate regulation of nanoparticle physicochemical properties, including sizes, is a critical determinant for the design of safer forms of NMs. PMID:22296706

  5. Intradermal Hepatitis B Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ruddock, David G.S.; Dickson, Annie

    1992-01-01

    Intramuscular administration of hepatitis B (HB) vaccine is safe and efficacious, but its cost has limited its availability. In this pilot study, 49 of 56 participants who received 2 μg of intradermal (ID) HB vaccine (one tenth the intramuscular dose) at the beginning of administration, at 1 month, and at 6 months developed protective levels of antibody to HB surface antigen. Although questions remain, the cost savings of this technique make it worth considering. PMID:21229118

  6. Delivery systems for intradermal vaccination.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y C; Jarrahian, C; Zehrung, D; Mitragotri, S; Prausnitz, M R

    2012-01-01

    Intradermal (ID) vaccination can offer improved immunity and simpler logistics of delivery, but its use in medicine is limited by the need for simple, reliable methods of ID delivery. ID injection by the Mantoux technique requires special training and may not reliably target skin, but is nonetheless used currently for BCG and rabies vaccination. Scarification using a bifurcated needle was extensively used for smallpox eradication, but provides variable and inefficient delivery into the skin. Recently, ID vaccination has been simplified by introduction of a simple-to-use hollow microneedle that has been approved for ID injection of influenza vaccine in Europe. Various designs of hollow microneedles have been studied preclinically and in humans. Vaccines can also be injected into skin using needle-free devices, such as jet injection, which is receiving renewed clinical attention for ID vaccination. Projectile delivery using powder and gold particles (i.e., gene gun) have also been used clinically for ID vaccination. Building off the scarification approach, a number of preclinical studies have examined solid microneedle patches for use with vaccine coated onto metal microneedles, encapsulated within dissolving microneedles or added topically to skin after microneedle pretreatment, as well as adapting tattoo guns for ID vaccination. Finally, technologies designed to increase skin permeability in combination with a vaccine patch have been studied through the use of skin abrasion, ultrasound, electroporation, chemical enhancers, and thermal ablation. The prospects for bringing ID vaccination into more widespread clinical practice are encouraging, given the large number of technologies for ID delivery under development. PMID:21472533

  7. Immunological recovery in 48 patients following syngeneic marrow transplantation for hematological malignancy. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Whiterspoon R.P.; Kopecky, K.; Storb, R.F.

    1982-02-01

    Immunological function of 48 syngeneic transplant patients prepared with 120 mg of cyclophosphamide per kg and 9.2 to 12.0 Gy (920 to 1000 rad) total body irradiation was compared with that of 153 allogeneic recipients. Lymphocyte counts and T cell numbers in syngeneic recipients were low during the first post-transplant month but higher than those of allogeneic recipients. Serum immunoglobulin levels in syngeneic recipients were normal by completion of the first post-transplantation month and were higher than allogeneic recipients at that time. Total hemolytic complement (CH/sub 50/) and third (C3) and fourth (C4) components were normal throughout the post-transplantation course in both groups of patients. Antibody production to primary injection of bacteriophage THETAX174 (Phage) was low in both syngeneic and allogeneic recipients during the first post-transplantation month and rose gradually thereafter. Some syngeneic recipients failed to produce normal amounts of IgG in their secondary response to phage. Antibody production after primary and secondary injection of keyhole limpet hemocyanin or pneumococcal polysaccharide was lower than normal early after grafting and rose later, comparable to that seen in allogeneic recipients. We conclude that immunological recovery in syngeneic recipients is very similar to recovery in allogeneic recipients except in the first month postgrafting where twins are slightly better than allogeneic recipients for lymphocyte and immunoglobulin levels. Other mechanisms than those listed here must play an important role in protecting the syngeneic marrow graft recipient from opportunistic infection. (JMT)

  8. Efficacy of intradermal vaccination.

    PubMed

    Hunsaker, B D; Perino, L J

    2001-05-10

    Intradermal (ID) inoculation has been investigated as a means of vaccinating laboratory animals, domestic farm animals, and humans. Various forms of viral, bacterial, parasitic, and fungal antigens have been administered ID, with varying results. This review emphasizes results from studies reporting clinically relevant outcomes such as clinical protection and body weight change following experimental challenge. Antibody titers, cytokines, cellular responses are included as supportive data. Based on the reports reviewed, ID vaccination is a promising alternative to more traditional routes of vaccination. ID vaccination has particular appeal to the beef cattle industry based on recently emphasized quality assurance issues. It is evident that the ultimate test of vaccine efficacy is the ability to protect against clinical disease under natural challenge conditions. We propose that the immune response of ID vaccinated cattle, using clinically relevant outcomes such as morbidity, mortality, average daily gain and feed efficiency, needs to be further investigated to define the value of this potentially effective and practical means of antigen delivery, particularly for domesticated farm animals. PMID:11356246

  9. Administration of HPV DNA vaccine via electroporation elicits the strongest CD8+ T cell immune responses compared to intramuscular injection and intradermal gene gun delivery.

    PubMed

    Best, Simon R; Peng, Shiwen; Juang, Chi-Mou; Hung, Chien-Fu; Hannaman, Drew; Saunders, John R; Wu, T-C; Pai, Sara I

    2009-09-01

    DNA vaccines are an attractive approach to eliciting antigen-specific immunity. Intracellular targeting of tumor antigens through its linkage to immunostimulatory molecules such as calreticulin (CRT) can improve antigen processing and presentation through the MHC class I pathway and increase cytotoxic CD8+ T cell production. However, even with these enhancements, the efficacy of such immunotherapeutic strategies is dependent on the identification of an effective route and method of DNA administration. Electroporation and gene gun-mediated particle delivery are leading methods of DNA vaccine delivery that can generate protective and therapeutic levels of immune responses in experimental models. In this study, we perform a head-to-head comparison of three methods of vaccination--conventional intramuscular injection, electroporation-mediated intramuscular delivery, and epidermal gene gun-mediated particle delivery--in the ability to generate antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses as well as anti-tumor immune responses against an HPV-16 E7 expressing tumor cell line using the pNGVL4a-CRT/E7(detox) DNA vaccine. Vaccination via electroporation generated the highest number of E7-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cells, which correlated to improved outcomes in the treatment of growing tumors. In addition, we demonstrate that electroporation results in significantly higher levels of circulating protein compared to gene gun or intramuscular vaccination, which likely enhances calreticulin's role as a local tumor anti-angiogenesis agent. We conclude that electroporation is a promising method for delivery of HPV DNA vaccines and should be considered for DNA vaccine delivery in human clinical trials. PMID:19622402

  10. Intradermal vaccination using the novel microneedle device MicronJet600: Past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Yotam; Kochba, Efrat; Hung, Ivan; Kenney, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Intradermal immunization has become a forefront of vaccine improvement, both scientifically and commercially. Newer technologies are being developed to address the need to reduce the dose required for vaccination and to improve the reliability and ease of injection, which have been major hurdles in expanding the number of approved vaccines using this route of administration. In this review, 7 y of clinical experience with a novel intradermal delivery device, the MicronJet600, which is a registered hollow microneedle that simplifies the delivery of liquid vaccines, are summarized. This device has demonstrated both significant dose-sparing and superior immunogenicity in various vaccine categories, as well as in diverse subject populations and age groups. These studies have shown that intradermal delivery using this device is safe, effective, and preferred by the subjects. Comparison with other intradermal devices and potential new applications for intradermal delivery that could be pursued in the future are also discussed. PMID:25745830

  11. Evaluation of intravenous fluorescein in intradermal allergy testing in psittacines.

    PubMed

    Nett, Claudia S; Hosgood, Giselle; Heatley, J Jill; Foil, Carol S; Tully, Thomas N

    2003-12-01

    This study was designed to improve the clinical feasibility of intradermal skin testing of psittacine birds using intravenous fluorescein stain. Twenty-five healthy, anaesthetized Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis) were injected intravenously with 10 mg kg-1 fluorescein-sodium 1% followed by intradermal injections of 0.02 mL phosphate-buffered saline, histamine phosphate (1:100,000 w/v) and codeine phosphate (1:100,000 w/v) at the sternal apteria. Wheal diameters of reaction sites were measured grossly and under illumination with a Wood's lamp after 5 and 10 min. Fluorescence-enhanced injection sites were scored between 0 and 2, with 0 equivalent to normal skin and 2 equivalent to a plucked feather follicle. The presence of a fluorescent halo around intradermal injections was also recorded. Under Wood's light illumination at 10 min, histamine and saline were evaluated as positive and negative controls, respectively, based on a positive test having a halo and a score of 2. Sensitivity and specificity were each 76% for halo, 84 and 42% for score and 64 and 77% for combination of score and halo, respectively. Further, mean histamine reactions were significantly larger than codeine phosphate and saline (8.8 +/- 0.4 mm; 7.2 +/- 0.3 mm; 5.9 +/- 0.6 mm); however, this finding was not consistent in individual birds. Wheal size, halo presence and score were affected by site location independent from the injected compound. Intravenous fluorescein improved the readability of avian skin tests; however, the compounds tested raised inconsistent reactions in wheal size, score or halo presence. The compound-independent site effect raises concern on the validity of avian skin testing and warrants investigation of other techniques such as in vitro allergy testing. Based on our findings, intradermal allergy testing in psittacines with or without fluorescein is unreliable and cannot be recommended for practical clinical use. PMID:14678444

  12. Clinical usefulness of intradermal fluorescein and patent blue violet dyes for sentinel lymph node identification in dogs.

    PubMed

    Wells, S; Bennett, A; Walsh, P; Owens, S; Peauroi, J

    2006-06-01

    The first lymph node receiving drainage from a specific anatomic region is referred to as the sentinel lymph node (SLN). This study sought to evaluate the intradermal use of two dyes, patent blue violet (PBV) and fluorescein (FL), for SLN mapping in the dog. Multiple intradermal injections were performed in five healthy dogs using two dyes, PBV in 0.9% NaCl and FL in solutions of 0.9% NaCl and 6% hetastarch. Skin flaps were raised and followed to the first area of discrete stain uptake. Areas of uptake were identified as lymph nodes grossly and by cytology. Identification of a SLN for each area of intradermal injection was accomplished for 98% of the injection sites. Intradermal injections of both PBV and FL dyes produce readily visible staining of lymphatic vessels and SLNs in healthy dogs and are sufficient to allow ready identification of these structures during postmortem dissection. PMID:19754821

  13. In vivo toxicological evaluation of polymeric nanocapsules after intradermal administration.

    PubMed

    Bulcão, Rachel P; de Freitas, Fernando A; Dallegrave, Eliane; Venturini, Cristina G; Baierle, Marília; Durgante, Juliano; Sauer, Elisa; Cassini, Carina; Cerski, Carlos T; Zielinsky, Paulo; Salvador, Mirian; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Guterres, Sílvia S; Garcia, Solange C

    2014-02-01

    Polymeric nanocarriers have shown great promise as delivery systems. An alternative strategy has been to explore new delivery routes, such as intradermal (i.d.), that can be used for vaccines and patch-based drug delivery. Despite their many advantages, there are few toxicity studies, especially in vivo. We report a safety assessment of biodegradable poly(ɛ-caprolactone) lipid-core nanocapsules (LNC) with a mean size of 245±10nm following single and repeated intradermal injections to Wistar rats. Suspensions were prepared by interfacial deposition of polymer. The animals (n=6/group) received a single-dose of saline solution (1.2ml/kg) or LNC (7.2×10(12)LNC/kg), or repeated-doses of two controls, saline solution or Tween 80 (0.9ml/kg), or three different concentrations of LNC (1.8, 3.6, and 5.4×10(12)LNC/kg) for 28 consecutive days. Clinical and physiological signs and mortality were observed. Samples of urine, blood, and tissue were used to perform toxicological evaluation. There were no clinical signs of toxicity or mortality, but there was a slight decrease in the relative body weights in the Tween 80-treated group (p<0.01) after repeated administration. No histopathological alterations were observed in tissues or significant changes in blood and urinary biomarkers for tissue damage. Mild alterations in white blood cells count with increases in granulocytes in the Tween-80 group (p<0.05) were found. Genotoxicity was evaluated through the comet assay, and no statistical difference was observed among the groups. Therefore, we conclude that, under the conditions of these experiments, biodegradable LNC did not present appreciable toxicity after 28 consecutive days of intradermal administration and is promising for its future application in vaccines and patch-based devices for enhancing the delivery of drugs. PMID:23643792

  14. Therapy of a murine sarcoma using syngeneic monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Kennel, S.J.; Lankford, T.; Flynn, K.M.

    1983-01-01

    Syngeneic monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) to Moloney sarcoma cells were produced by fusion of spleen cells from MSC regressor mice to myeloma SP2/0. MoAb 244-19A, an immunoglobulin G2b, bound to MSC cells and did not bind to two other sarcomas (K-BALB and Ha2), a carcinoma (Line 1), a fibroblast (A31) or a fibroblast infected with C-type virus (A31) or a fibroblast infected with C-type virus (A31-Moloney leukemia virus). In contrast, MoAb 271-1A bound to the MSC and Ha2 sarcoma and line 1 carcinoma as well as to the normal and infected fibroblast cultures. Antibodies were tested for therapeutic effect using three schedules of antibody injection. Injection i.p. of ascites fluid containing 244-19A MoAb given on Days -1, 0, and +1 relative to tumor cell injection increased life span significantly over that of control animals given injections (P3, immunoglobulin G, or MoAb 271-1A) and produced some seven of 19, one of five, and one of five long-term survivors in three separate experiments. Antibody given to animals with established tumors (4 days after implantation) also prolonged life span significantly and produced three of nine long-term survivors. Antibody given to animals with very large tumor burdens (10 days after implantation) did not prolong life span significantly. Optimal dose, schedule, and mechanism studies concerning this therapy are in progress.

  15. A New Biolistic Intradermal Injector Based on a Miniature Shock Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouillette, M.

    Intradermal powder injection is an emerging technology for the needlefree delivery of a potentially wide array of drugs and vaccines. Although needle injection of liquids is widespread principally because of its low cost, this delivery method is painful, generates dangerous medical waste and can cause contamination. Various technologies have been developed to address these shortcomings, amongst them creams, patches, inhalers and liquid jet injectors, each with their own severe limitations.

  16. 9 CFR 113.406 - Tuberculin, Intradermic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Tuberculin, Intradermic. 113.406 Section 113.406 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Diagnostics and Reagents § 113.406...

  17. 9 CFR 113.406 - Tuberculin, Intradermic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Tuberculin, Intradermic. 113.406 Section 113.406 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Diagnostics and Reagents § 113.406...

  18. 9 CFR 113.406 - Tuberculin, Intradermic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tuberculin, Intradermic. 113.406 Section 113.406 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Diagnostics and Reagents § 113.406...

  19. Influence of glucocorticoids on a time-of-day-dependent variation in intradermal reactivity to histamine in dogs.

    PubMed

    Goto, Shun; Shimizu, Sunao; Watanabe, Miwa; Osada, Hironari; Sasaki, Kazuaki; Shimoda, Minoru; Nagai, Makoto; Shirai, Junsuke; Itoh, Hiroshi; Ohmori, Keitaro

    2016-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine daily variation in intradermal reactivity to histamine in dogs and to evaluate a potential influence of glucocorticoids on reactivity. Wheal sizes formed after intradermal injections of histamine were measured every 6 h during a single 24 h period in six healthy dogs. To determine whether glucocorticoids were implicated in daily variation, intradermal reactivity to histamine was evaluated at 9:00 h and at 21:00 h during a single day in dogs that received oral prednisolone (a synthetic glucocorticoid) or oral trilostane (an inhibitor of endogenous glucocorticoid synthesis). Finally, the time required for the histamine reaction to diminish after an intravenous injection of hydrocortisone was also assessed. A significant time-of-day-dependent variation in intradermal reactivity to histamine was detected in dogs, with a larger wheal size observed at 9:00 h than at 21:00 h. Administration of prednisolone or trilostane disrupted this variation. Intradermal reactivity to histamine was significantly reduced 6 h after an intravenous injection of hydrocortisone. These results suggest that glucocorticoid secretion from the adrenal glands could be involved in the regulation of daily variation in histamine-mediated reactions in dogs. PMID:27387732

  20. Bone marrow transfusions in previously irradiated, hematologically normal syngeneic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Brecher, G.; Lawce, H.; Tjio, J.H.

    1981-03-01

    Transfusion of syngeneic marrow into normal, nonirradiated recipients results only in minimal proliferation of donor cells. However, irradiated recipients, restored to hematologic normalcy by an initial marrow transfusion, subsequently sustain proliferation which replaces approximately 10% of endogenous marrow after a single transfusion of 4 x 10/sup 7/ marrow cells of the same strain as the host. Cells from histoincompatible donors proliferate only rarely or minimally in the marrows of these irradiated, but hematologically normal recipients without reirradiation. Syngeneic male donor cells proliferate in irradiated and restored female mice, while female donor cells fail to proliferate in the marrow of syngeneic male recipients. A possible explanation is that transfused female cells respond immunologically to the abundant H-Y antigen in the male environment and are eliminated as a result.

  1. 9 CFR 113.409 - Tuberculin-PPD Bovis, Intradermic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tuberculin-PPD Bovis, Intradermic. 113.409 Section 113.409 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT..., Intradermic is a purified protein derivative produced from cultures of Mycobacterium bovis Strain...

  2. 9 CFR 113.409 - Tuberculin-PPD Bovis, Intradermic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Tuberculin-PPD Bovis, Intradermic. 113.409 Section 113.409 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT..., Intradermic is a purified protein derivative produced from cultures of Mycobacterium bovis Strain...

  3. 9 CFR 113.409 - Tuberculin-PPD Bovis, Intradermic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Tuberculin-PPD Bovis, Intradermic. 113.409 Section 113.409 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT..., Intradermic is a purified protein derivative produced from cultures of Mycobacterium bovis Strain...

  4. 9 CFR 113.409 - Tuberculin-PPD Bovis, Intradermic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Tuberculin-PPD Bovis, Intradermic. 113.409 Section 113.409 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT..., Intradermic is a purified protein derivative produced from cultures of Mycobacterium bovis Strain...

  5. 9 CFR 113.409 - Tuberculin-PPD Bovis, Intradermic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Tuberculin-PPD Bovis, Intradermic. 113.409 Section 113.409 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT..., Intradermic is a purified protein derivative produced from cultures of Mycobacterium bovis Strain...

  6. In vivo natural antitumor resistance against murine EL-4 lymphoma cells in lethally irradiated syngeneic C57Bl/6 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Iorio, A.M.; Neri, M.; Bonmassar, E.; Titti, F.; Rossi, G.B.

    1987-08-01

    Natural resistance has been detected in lethally irradiated C57Bl/6 (B6) mice inoculated intravenously with the ascites form of a syngeneic B6 leukemia. EL-4 cells were injected into lethally irradiated (800 R) B6 mice and tumor cell proliferation was evaluated by /sup 125/IUdR uptake in different organs 4 days after the challenge. Differential growth of lymphoma cells was observed when young mice were injected as compared with older mice and when mice were treated with agents known to interfere with natural resistance (e.g., poly(I:C), FLV-P, carrageenan, cyclophosphamide, high doses of irradiated cells). Similar results were obtained by measuring rapid clearance of /sup 125/IUdR-labeled EL-4 cells from lungs of intact B6 mice. In vivo cold competition studies, employing EL-4 and several other tumor lines of the same or different haplotype, showed that only EL-4 and RBL-5 cells were capable of inhibiting syngeneic resistance against EL-4 tumor. On the contrary, YAC-1 lymphoma cells, the most susceptible target to natural killer-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro, did not compete. These results suggest that EL-4 cells express membrane determinants not detectable on normal H-2b parental bone marrow cells and are susceptible to natural resistance against hemopoietic tumor cells in lethally irradiated syngeneic B6 mice.

  7. PREVALENCE OF PARACOCCIDIOIDOMYCOSIS INFECTION BY INTRADERMAL REACTION IN RURAL AREAS IN ALFENAS, MINAS GERAIS, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Evandro Monteiro de Sá; Ribeiro, Carla de Fátima; Dâmaso, Carla Silva; Coelho, Luiz Felipe Leomil; Silva, Roberta Ribeiro; Ferreira, Eric Batista; Rodrigues, Maria Rita; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires; Velloso, Tânia Regina Grão; Malaquias, Luiz Cosme Cotta

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of paracoccidioidal infection by intradermal reaction (Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity, DTH) to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in rural areas in Alfenas, Southern Minas Gerais (MG) State, Brazil, and to assess risk factors (gender, occupation, age, alcohol intake and smoking) associated with infection. We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study using intradermal tests with gp 43 paracoccidioidin in 542 participants, who were previously contacted by local health agents and so spontaneously attended the test. Participants underwent an interview by filling out a registration form with epidemiological data and were tested with an intradermal administration of 0.1 mL of paracoccidioidin in the left forearm. The test was read 48 hours after injection and was considered positive if induration was greater than or equal to 5 mm. Out of 542 participants, 46.67% were positive to the skin test. Prevalence increased in accordance with an increase of age. There was statistical significance only for males. Occupation, alcohol intake and smoking habits were not significantly associated with the risk of paracoccidioidomycosis infection. There is relevance of paracoccidioidomycosis infection in such rural areas, which suggests that further epidemiological and clinical studies on this mycosis should be done in the southern part of Minas Gerais State. PMID:25076426

  8. Vaccination of pigs against Aujeszky's disease by the intradermal route using live attenuated and inactivated virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Vannier, P; Cariolet, R

    1989-09-01

    A study was undertaken of the protection induced by inactivated and live Aujeszky's disease virus vaccines. The vaccines were administered using a special device which, without the use of a needle, delivered the preparation intradermally. The trials were performed on 88 pigs which were vaccinated at the beginning of the fattening period both in experimental conditions and in pig herds. All the pigs were challenged at the end of the fattening period in isolation units. The results obtained were compared with those obtained using the same vaccines injected intramuscularly. It was shown that vaccination via the intradermal route induced good protection in the vaccinated animals and was similar to that conferred by live virus vaccine injected intramuscularly. The results, with the inactivated virus vaccine, were not so good when it was injected via the intradermal route. Studies with intradermal vaccination showed no local lesion or very small nodules strictly localized to the dermis. The results also confirmed that the effects of challenge exposure depended on the health status of animals prior to infection and show the necessity to use a synthetic value (delta G) to interpret the data and mainly to compare the results objectively. In fattening pigs this vaccination procedure is attractive because (i) less animal constraint is needed than would be for intramuscular injections, (ii) injection can be checked by the presence of a visible papula at the site of inoculation and, (iii) pigs can be vaccinated in the ham while they are feeding. Injection without a needle also contributes to avoiding bacterial contamination under practical farm conditions of vaccination. PMID:2554623

  9. Specific biodetection of B16 mouse melanoma in vivo by syngeneic monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Yamasaki, T.; Wakabayashi, S.; Inoue, O.; Ando, K.; Kusakabe, K.; Kawasaki, Y.; Okamoto, S.; Taniguchi, M.

    1987-09-01

    The specific detection of tumors in vivo using a radiolabeled syngeneic monoclonal antibody made by fusion of P3U1 (BALB/c myeloma cells) and C57BL/6 spleen cells primed with syngeneic B16 melanoma cells was investigated by color imaging, autoradiography, and biodistribution. The radiolabeled antimelanoma antibody specifically accumulated only in the tumor lesions, whereas no radioactivity was observed in normal tissues or organs. The distribution patterns of the radioactive antibody in the tumor lesions depended on the sizes of the tumor. Almost the entire region of the small metastatic tumor in lymph nodes was labeled, whereas the radioactive antibody was irregularly localized mainly in the center of the medium-sized tumor. However, only the peripheral region of the large primary tumor was labeled. The highest uptake of radioactivity (tumor:blood ratio) was observed in the small lymph node metastatic tumor lesions rather than in the large primary tumor. Furthermore, high resolution color imaging of B16 melanoma was also obtained by using /sup 125/I-labeled monoclonal antibody. Tumor location was specifically visible without subtraction or enhancement methods 3-5 days after injection of the radiolabeled antibody.

  10. Intra-dermal administration of rabies vaccines in developing countries: at an affordable cost.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ramesh; Khanna, Pardeep; Prinja, Shankar; Rajput, Meena

    2011-07-01

    Rabies is a virtually 100% fatal acute viral encephalitis. Rabies occurs in more than 150 countries and territories. Globally there are 17.4 million animal bite cases and more than 55,000 deaths annually. India's 20,000 deaths accounts for 36% of global and 65% of the Asian (31,000) deaths. The Intradermal Rabies Vaccine (IDRV) was first started in Thailand in 1984. In 1992, World Health Organization approved it for use in developing countries which face a shortage of rabies vaccine due to paucity of funds. Vaccines like Purified Vero cell vaccine (PVRV), Purified chick embryo cell vaccine (PCECV) and Human diploid cell vaccine (HDCV) that can be injected by the intradermal route for Post Exposure Prophylaxis as approved by WHO. The regimen approved by the WHO/DCGI India is the Updated Thai Red Cross Regimen, which involves injection of 0.1 mL of reconstituted vaccine per ID site and on two such ID site per visit on Days 0, 3, 7 and 28 (2-2-2-0-2). All reconstituted vaccine unused at the end of 6-8 h must be discarded. The ID route is ideal in terms of economic benefits, safety and efficacy. This reduces the cost of vaccination by about 68%, which is clearly an attractive option for resource-starved countries like India. PMID:21734465

  11. Characterization of scratching behavior induced by intradermal administration of morphine and fentanyl in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Atsuki; Kuyama, Shoji; Kamei, Chiaki; Sugimoto, Yukio

    2010-02-10

    Itching is known as a commonly side effect of opioid administration. However, the relationship of opioid receptors to itching is unclear. In this study, we examined the effect of intradermal injection of morphine and fentanyl on the itching sensation. When injected intradermally into the rostral back of mice, morphine and fentanyl elicited scratching behavior. In addition, an opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone, and a peripherally restricted opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone methiodide, significantly suppressed morphine- and fentanyl-induced scratching behavior. Moreover, the morphine-induced scratching behavior was suppressed by histamine H(1) receptor antagonists, such as diphenhydramine, chlorpheniramine, epinastine and cetirizine. On the other hand, fentanyl-induced scratching behavior was not suppressed by histamine H(1) receptor antagonists. Additionally, scratching behavior induced by morphine and fentanyl were not suppressed by glucocorticoids (predonisolone and dexamethasone). In conclusion, opioid-induced itching may involve in peripheral opioid receptors. Moreover, histamine and arachidonic acid metabolites played no main role in opioid-induced scratching behavior. PMID:19900440

  12. Rapid Intradermal Delivery of Liquid Formulations Using a Hollow Microstructured Array

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Scott A.; Ng, Chin-Yee; Simmers, Ryan; Moeckly, Craig; Brandwein, David; Gilbert, Tom; Johnson, Nathan; Brown, Ken; Alston, Tesha; Prochnow, Gayatri; Siebenaler, Kris

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose The purpose of this work is to demonstrate rapid intradermal delivery of up to 1.5 mL of formulation using a hollow microneedle delivery device designed for self-application. Methods 3M’s hollow Microstructured Transdermal System (hMTS) was applied to domestic swine to demonstrate delivery of a variety of formulations including small molecule salts and proteins. Blood samples were collected after delivery and analyzed via HPLC or ELISA to provide a PK profile for the delivered drug. Site evaluations were conducted post delivery to determine skin tolerability. Results Up to 1.5 mL of formulation was infused into swine at a max rate of approximately 0.25 mL/min. A red blotch, the size of the hMTS array, was observed immediately after patch removal, but had faded so as to be almost indistinguishable 10 min post-patch removal. One-mL deliveries of commercial formulations of naloxone hydrochloride and human growth hormone and a formulation of equine anti-tetanus toxin were completed in swine. With few notable differences, the resulting PK profiles were similar to those achieved following subcutaneous injection of these formulations. Conclusions 3M’s hMTS can provide rapid, intradermal delivery of 300–1,500 µL of liquid formulations of small molecules salts and proteins, compounds not typically compatible with passive transdermal delivery. PMID:20582455

  13. Enhanced growth and experimental metastasis of chemically induced tumor in ultraviolet irradiated syngeneic mice.

    PubMed

    Gensler, H L; Chen, H

    1991-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that ultraviolet (UV) irradiation induces a systemic effect which enhances subsequent tumor induction by benzo[a]pyrene in a manner which is dependent on the dose of benzo[a]pyrene. The present study was designed to test whether UV-B irradiation renders mice susceptible to subcutaneous or intravenous injection of a regressor tumor induced by benzo[a]pyrene. The sources of UV-B irradiation were banks of 6 Westinghouse FS-40 sunlamps, situated 20 cm above the mouse cages. Female BALB/cAnNHsd received five 30-min dorsal UV-B radiation treatments per week for 12 weeks, resulting in a total dose of approx. 6.4 x 10(5) J m-2. Two to seven days after termination of UV treatments, syngeneic regressor tumor cells (BP2) induced by benzo[a]pyrene were injected subcutaneously or intravenously into irradiated mice and unirradiated controls. By 38 days post subcutaneous implantation, 24/30 and 3/30 BP2 implants were detectable in the irradiated and unirradiated mice, respectively. Ultraviolet irradiated mice were also unable to reject lung colonies resulting from intravenous administration of BP2 cells, although they were rejected by unirradiated mice. The mean number of lung colonies per mouse was 16- to 35-fold greater in UV irradiated mice than in unirradiated controls, at 14 to 17 days post injection. Thus, UV irradiation rendered mice, with no known exposure to benzo[a]pyrene, susceptible to a subcutaneous or intravenous injection of a regressor tumor induced by benzo[a]pyrene. PMID:1881963

  14. Comparison of intradermal and intramuscular delivery followed by in vivo electroporation of SIV Env DNA in macaques

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Viraj; Rosati, Margherita; Bear, Jenifer; Pilkington, Guy R; Jalah, Rashmi; Bergamaschi, Cristina; Singh, Ashish K; Alicea, Candido; Chowdhury, Bhabadeb; Zhang, Gen-Mu; Kim, Eun-Young; Wolinsky, Steven M; Huang, Wensheng; Guan, Yongjun; LaBranche, Celia; Montefiori, David C; Broderick, Kate E; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Valentin, Antonio; Felber, Barbara K; Pavlakis, George N

    2013-01-01

    A panel of SIVmac251 transmitted Env sequences were tested for expression, function and immunogenicity in mice and macaques. The immunogenicity of a DNA vaccine cocktail expressing SIVmac239 and three transmitted SIVmac251 Env sequences was evaluated upon intradermal or intramuscular injection followed by in vivo electroporation in macaques using sequential vaccination of gp160, gp120 and gp140 expressing DNAs. Both intradermal and intramuscular vaccination regimens using the gp160 expression plasmids induced robust humoral immune responses, which further improved using the gp120 expressing DNAs. The responses showed durability of binding and neutralizing antibody titers and high avidity for > 1 y. The intradermal DNA delivery regimen induced higher cross-reactive responses able to neutralize the heterologous tier 1B-like SIVsmE660_CG7V. Analysis of cellular immune responses showed induction of Env-specific memory responses and cytotoxic granzyme B+ T cells in both vaccine groups, although the magnitude of the responses were ~10x higher in the intramuscular/electroporation group. The cellular responses induced by both regimens were long lasting and could be detected ~1 y after the last vaccination. These data show that both DNA delivery methods are able to induce robust and durable immune responses in macaques. PMID:23811579

  15. Comparison of intradermal and intramuscular delivery followed by in vivo electroporation of SIV Env DNA in macaques.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Viraj; Rosati, Margherita; Bear, Jenifer; Pilkington, Guy R; Jalah, Rashmi; Bergamaschi, Cristina; Singh, Ashish K; Alicea, Candido; Chowdhury, Bhabadeb; Zhang, Gen-Mu; Kim, Eun-Young; Wolinsky, Steven M; Huang, Wensheng; Guan, Yongjun; LaBranche, Celia; Montefiori, David C; Broderick, Kate E; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Valentin, Antonio; Felber, Barbara K; Pavlakis, George N

    2013-10-01

    A panel of SIVmac251 transmitted Env sequences were tested for expression, function and immunogenicity in mice and macaques. The immunogenicity of a DNA vaccine cocktail expressing SIVmac239 and three transmitted SIVmac251 Env sequences was evaluated upon intradermal or intramuscular injection followed by in vivo electroporation in macaques using sequential vaccination of gp160, gp120 and gp140 expressing DNAs. Both intradermal and intramuscular vaccination regimens using the gp160 expression plasmids induced robust humoral immune responses, which further improved using the gp120 expressing DNAs. The responses showed durability of binding and neutralizing antibody titers and high avidity for>1 y. The intradermal DNA delivery regimen induced higher cross-reactive responses able to neutralize the heterologous tier 1B-like SIVsmE660_CG7V. Analysis of cellular immune responses showed induction of Env-specific memory responses and cytotoxic granzyme B(+) T cells in both vaccine groups, although the magnitude of the responses were ~10x higher in the intramuscular/electroporation group. The cellular responses induced by both regimens were long lasting and could be detected ~1 y after the last vaccination. These data show that both DNA delivery methods are able to induce robust and durable immune responses in macaques. PMID:23811579

  16. Protocol for a double-blind randomised controlled trial of low dose intradermal grass pollen immunotherapy versus a histamine control on symptoms and medication use in adults with seasonal allergic rhinitis (PollenLITE)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Subcutaneous immunotherapy with high dose grass pollen (typically microgram quantities) was first described over 100 years ago. This treatment suppresses allergen-induced cutaneous late responses, with lesser effects on early responses. We previously reported that repeated 2-weekly intradermal injections of grass pollen - containing approximately 7 ng of major allergen Phl p 5 – led to a progressive suppression of the allergen-induced cutaneous response, and that by the sixth injection, this was inhibited by over 90%. The purpose of this trial is to investigate the clinical efficacy of intradermal desensitisation with low doses (i.e. nanogram quantities) of grass pollen allergen for seasonal allergic rhinitis. Methods/design The Pollen Low dose Intradermal therapy Evaluation (PollenLITE) is a single centre double-blind randomised parallel group controlled trial of the efficacy and safety of intradermal grass pollen injections plus standard treatment, versus histamine injections plus standard treatment, in adults with moderate-severe grass pollen-induced allergic rhinitis (‘summer hay fever’). A minimum of ninety adults with a history of moderate-severe persistent allergic rhinitis during the UK grass pollen season will be randomised into two equal groups to receive 7 or 8 intradermal injections of grass pollen extract (containing approximately 7 ng of major allergen Phl p 5) or histamine, before the grass pollen season. In the summer, participants will score their symptoms, medication requirements, visual analogue scores, and complete EuroQOL (EQ-5D-5 L) and mini Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaires. Global assessments will also be recorded at the end of the pollen season. Blood samples will be collected from all participants for mechanistic immune assays. Skin punch biopsies will also be collected in 40 participants selected at random from intradermal injection sites after the grass pollen season for mechanistic assays. Finally

  17. Immunocompetent syngeneic cotton rat tumor models for the assessment of replication-competent oncolytic adenovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Steel, Jason C.; Morrison, Brian J.; Mannan, Poonam; Abu-Asab, Mones S.; Wildner, Oliver; Miles, Brian K.; Yim, Kevin C.; Ramanan, Vijay; Prince, Gregory A.; Morris, John C.

    2007-12-05

    Oncolytic adenoviruses as a treatment for cancer have demonstrated limited clinical activity. Contributing to this may be the relevance of preclinical animal models used to study these agents. Syngeneic mouse tumor models are generally non-permissive for adenoviral replication, whereas human tumor xenograft models exhibit attenuated immune responses to the vector. The cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) is susceptible to human adenovirus infection, permissive for viral replication and exhibits similar inflammatory pathology to humans with adenovirus replicating in the lungs, respiratory passages and cornea. We evaluated three transplantable tumorigenic cotton rat cell lines, CCRT, LCRT and VCRT as models for the study of oncolytic adenoviruses. All three cells lines were readily infected with adenovirus type-5-based vectors and exhibited high levels of transgene expression. The cell lines supported viral replication demonstrated by the induction of cytopathogenic effect (CPE) in tissue culture, increase in virus particle numbers and assembly of virions seen on transmission electron microscopy. In vivo, LCRT and VCRT tumors demonstrated delayed growth after injection with replicating adenovirus. No in vivo antitumor activity was seen in CCRT tumors despite in vitro oncolysis. Adenovirus was also rapidly cleared from the CCRT tumors compared to LCRT and VCRT tumors. The effect observed with the different cotton rat tumor cell lines mimics the variable results of human clinical trials highlighting the potential relevance of this model for assessing the activity and toxicity of oncolytic adenoviruses.

  18. Intradermal Gene Immunization: The Possible Role of DNA Uptake in the Induction of Cellular Immunity to Viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raz, Eyal; Carson, Dennis A.; Parker, Suezanne E.; Parr, Tyler B.; Abai, Anna M.; Aichinger, Gerald; Gromkowski, Stanislaw H.; Singh, Malini; Lew, Denise; Yankauckas, Michelle A.; Baird, Stephen M.; Rhodes, Gary H.

    1994-09-01

    The skin and mucous membranes are the anatomical sites where most viruses are first encountered by the immune system. Previous experiments have suggested that striated muscle cells are unique among mammalian cell types in their capacity to take up and express free DNA in the absence of a viral vector or physical carrier. However, we have found that mice injected into the superficial skin with free (naked) plasmid DNA encoding the influenza nucleoprotein gene had discrete foci of epidermal and dermal cells, including cells with dendritic morphology, that contained immunoreactive nucleoprotein antigen. A single intradermal administration of 0.3-15 μ g of free plasmid DNA induced anti-nucleoprotein-specific antibody and cytotoxic T lymphocytes that persisted for at least 68-70 weeks after vaccination. Intradermal gene administration induced higher antibody titers than did direct gene injection into skeletal muscle and did not cause local inflammation or necrosis. Compared with control animals, the gene-injected mice were resistant to challenge with a heterologous strain of influenza virus. These results indicate that the cells of the skin can take up and express free foreign DNA and induce cellular and humoral immune responses against the encoded protein. We suggest that DNA uptake by the skin-associated lymphoid tissues may play a role in the induction of cytotoxic T cells against viruses and other intracellular pathogens.

  19. An Intradermal Inoculation Model of Scrub Typhus in Swiss CD-1 Mice Demonstrates More Rapid Dissemination of Virulent Strains of Orientia tsutsugamushi

    PubMed Central

    Sunyakumthorn, Piyanate; Paris, Daniel H.; Chan, Teik-Chye; Jones, Margaret; Luce-Fedrow, Alison; Chattopadhyay, Suchismita; Jiang, Ju; Anantatat, Tippawan; Turner, Gareth D. H.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Richards, Allen L.

    2013-01-01

    Scrub typhus is an important endemic disease of the Asia-Pacific region caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi. To develop an effective vaccine to prevent scrub typhus infection, a better understanding of the initial host-pathogen interaction is needed. The objective of this study was to investigate early bacterial dissemination in a CD-1 Swiss outbred mouse model after intradermal injection of O. tsutsugamushi. Three human pathogenic strains of O. tsutsugamushi (Karp, Gilliam, and Woods) were chosen to investigate the early infection characteristics associated with bacterial virulence. Tissue biopsies of the intradermal injection site and draining lymph nodes were examined using histology and immunohistochemistry to characterize bacterial dissemination, and correlated with quantitative real-time PCR for O. tsutsugamushi in blood and tissue from major organs. Soluble adhesion molecules were measured to examine cellular activation in response to infection. No eschar formation was seen at the inoculation site and no clinical disease developed within the 7 day period of observation. However, O. tsutsugamushi was localized at the injection site and in the draining lymph nodes by day 7 post inoculation. Evidence of leukocyte and endothelial activation was present by day 7 with significantly raised levels of sL-selectin, sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1. Infection with the Karp strain was associated with earlier and higher bacterial loads and more extensive dissemination in various tissues than the less pathogenic Gilliam and Woods strains. The bacterial loads of O. tsutsugamushi were highest in the lungs and spleens of mice inoculated with Karp and Gilliam, but not Woods strains. Strains of higher virulence resulted in more rapid systemic infection and dissemination in this model. The CD-1 mouse intradermal inoculation model demonstrates features relevant to early scrub typhus infection in humans, including the development of regional lymphadenopathy, leukocyte activation and distant

  20. SynGenics Optimization System (SynOptSys)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ventresca, Carol; McMilan, Michelle L.; Globus, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    The SynGenics Optimization System (SynOptSys) software application optimizes a product with respect to multiple, competing criteria using statistical Design of Experiments, Response-Surface Methodology, and the Desirability Optimization Methodology. The user is not required to be skilled in the underlying math; thus, SynOptSys can help designers and product developers overcome the barriers that prevent them from using powerful techniques to develop better pro ducts in a less costly manner. SynOpt-Sys is applicable to the design of any product or process with multiple criteria to meet, and at least two factors that influence achievement of those criteria. The user begins with a selected solution principle or system concept and a set of criteria that needs to be satisfied. The criteria may be expressed in terms of documented desirements or defined responses that the future system needs to achieve. Documented desirements can be imported into SynOptSys or created and documented directly within SynOptSys. Subsequent steps include identifying factors, specifying model order for each response, designing the experiment, running the experiment and gathering the data, analyzing the results, and determining the specifications for the optimized system. The user may also enter textual information as the project progresses. Data is easily edited within SynOptSys, and the software design enables full traceability within any step in the process, and facilitates reporting as needed. SynOptSys is unique in the way responses are defined and the nuances of the goodness associated with changes in response values for each of the responses of interest. The Desirability Optimization Methodology provides the basis of this novel feature. Moreover, this is a complete, guided design and optimization process tool with embedded math that can remain invisible to the user. It is not a standalone statistical program; it is a design and optimization system.

  1. Intradermal Therapy (Mesotherapy) for the Treatment of Acute Pain in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Conforti, Giorgio; Capone, Loredana

    2014-01-01

    Background The carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common cause of severe hand pain. In this study we treated acute pain in CTS patients by means of local intradermal injections of anti-inflammatory drugs (mesotherapy). Methods In twenty-five patients (forty-five hands), CTS diagnosis was confirmed by clinical and neurophysiological examination prior to mesotherapy. A mixture containing lidocaine 10 mg, ketoprophen lysine-acetylsalycilate 80 mg, xantinol nicotinate 100 mg, cyanocobalamine 1,000 mcg plus injectable water was used. Sites of injection were three parallel lines above the transverse carpal ligament and two v-shaped lines, one at the base of the thenar eminence, and the other at the base of the hypothenar eminence. Results The day after the treatment, all but four patients reported a significant reduction in pain and paresthesias. After 12 months, 17 patients had a complete pain relief, eight patients reported recurrence of pain and sensory symptoms and four out of them underwent surgical treatment. Conclusions With the obvious limits of a small-size open-label study, our results suggest that mesotherapy can temporary relieve pain and paresthesias in most CTS patients and in some cases its effect seems to be long-lasting. Further controlled studies are needed to confirm our preliminary findings and to compare mesotherapy to conventional approaches for the treatment of CTS. PMID:24478901

  2. Tolerability of intramuscular and intradermal delivery by CELLECTRA® adaptive constant current electroporation device in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Diehl, Malissa C; Lee, Jessica C; Daniels, Stephen E; Tebas, Pablo; Khan, Amir S; Giffear, Mary; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Bagarazzi, Mark L

    2013-01-01

    DNA vaccines are being developed as a potentially safe and effective immunization platform. However, translation of DNA vaccines into a clinical setting has produced results that have fallen short of those generated in a preclinical setting. Various strategies are being developed to address this lack of potency, including improvements in delivery methods. Electroporation (EP) creates transient increases in cell membrane permeability, thus enhancing DNA uptake and leading to a more robust immune response. Here, we report on the safety and tolerability of delivering sterile saline via intramuscular (IM) or intradermal (ID) injection followed by in vivo electroporation using the CELLECTRA® adaptive constant current device in healthy adults from two open-label studies. Pain, as assessed by VAS, was highest immediately after EP but diminishes by about 50% within 5 min. Mean VAS scores appear to correlate with the amount of energy delivered and depth of needle insertion, especially for intramuscular EP. Mean scores did not exceed 7 out of 10 or 3 out of 10 for IM and ID EP, respectively. The majority of adverse events included mild to moderate injection site reactions that resolved within one day. No deaths or serious adverse events were reported during the course of either study. Overall, injection followed by EP with the CELLECTRA® device was well-tolerated and no significant safety concerns were identified. These studies support the further development of electroporation as a vaccine delivery method to enhance immunogenicity, particularly for diseases in which traditional vaccination approaches are ineffective. PMID:24051434

  3. Optimization of Electroporation-Enhanced Intradermal Delivery of DNA Vaccine Using a Minimally Invasive Surface Device

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Feng; Shen, Xuefei; Kichaev, Gleb; Mendoza, Janess M.; Yang, Maria; Armendi, Philip; Yan, Jian; Kobinger, Gary P.; Bello, Alexander; Khan, Amir S.; Broderick, Kate E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In vivo electroporation (EP) is an efficient nonviral method for enhancing DNA vaccine delivery and immunogenicity in animals and humans. Intradermal delivery of DNA vaccines is an attractive strategy because of the immunocompetence of skin tissue. We have previously reported a minimally invasive surface intradermal EP (SEP) device for delivery of prophylactic DNA vaccines. Robust antibody responses were induced after vaccine delivery via surface EP in several tested animal models. Here we further investigated the optimal EP parameters for efficient delivery of DNA vaccines, with a specific emphasis on eliciting cellular immunity in addition to robust humoral responses. In a mouse model, using applied voltages of 10–100 V, transgene expression of green fluorescent protein and luciferase reporter genes increased significantly when voltages as low as 10 V were used as compared with DNA injection only. Tissue damage to skin was undetectable when voltages of 20 V and less were applied. However, inflammation and bruising became apparent at voltages above 40 V. Delivery of DNA vaccines encoding influenza virus H5 hemagglutinin (H5HA) and nucleoprotein (NP) of influenza H1N1 at applied voltages of 10–100 V elicited robust and sustained antibody responses. In addition, low-voltage (less than 20 V) EP elicited higher and more sustained cellular immune responses when compared with the higher voltage (above 20 V) EP groups after two immunizations. The data confirm that low-voltage EP, using the SEP device, is capable of efficient delivery of DNA vaccines into the skin, and establishes that these parameters are sufficient to elicit both robust and sustainable humoral as well as cellular immune responses without tissue damage. The SEP device, functioning within these parameters, may have important clinical applications for delivery of prophylactic DNA vaccines against diseases such as HIV infection, malaria, and tuberculosis that require both cellular

  4. Optimization of electroporation-enhanced intradermal delivery of DNA vaccine using a minimally invasive surface device.

    PubMed

    Lin, Feng; Shen, Xuefei; Kichaev, Gleb; Mendoza, Janess M; Yang, Maria; Armendi, Philip; Yan, Jian; Kobinger, Gary P; Bello, Alexander; Khan, Amir S; Broderick, Kate E; Sardesai, Niranjan Y

    2012-06-01

    In vivo electroporation (EP) is an efficient nonviral method for enhancing DNA vaccine delivery and immunogenicity in animals and humans. Intradermal delivery of DNA vaccines is an attractive strategy because of the immunocompetence of skin tissue. We have previously reported a minimally invasive surface intradermal EP (SEP) device for delivery of prophylactic DNA vaccines. Robust antibody responses were induced after vaccine delivery via surface EP in several tested animal models. Here we further investigated the optimal EP parameters for efficient delivery of DNA vaccines, with a specific emphasis on eliciting cellular immunity in addition to robust humoral responses. In a mouse model, using applied voltages of 10-100 V, transgene expression of green fluorescent protein and luciferase reporter genes increased significantly when voltages as low as 10 V were used as compared with DNA injection only. Tissue damage to skin was undetectable when voltages of 20 V and less were applied. However, inflammation and bruising became apparent at voltages above 40 V. Delivery of DNA vaccines encoding influenza virus H5 hemagglutinin (H5HA) and nucleoprotein (NP) of influenza H1N1 at applied voltages of 10-100 V elicited robust and sustained antibody responses. In addition, low-voltage (less than 20 V) EP elicited higher and more sustained cellular immune responses when compared with the higher voltage (above 20 V) EP groups after two immunizations. The data confirm that low-voltage EP, using the SEP device, is capable of efficient delivery of DNA vaccines into the skin, and establishes that these parameters are sufficient to elicit both robust and sustainable humoral as well as cellular immune responses without tissue damage. The SEP device, functioning within these parameters, may have important clinical applications for delivery of prophylactic DNA vaccines against diseases such as HIV infection, malaria, and tuberculosis that require both cellular and humoral immune

  5. Potency and Stability of Intradermal Capsaicin: Implications for Use as a Human Model of Pain in Multicenter Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Balabathula, Pavan; Bhattacharjee, Himanshu; Thoma, Laura A; Nolly, Robert J; Horton, Frank P; Stornes, Gwendolyn D; Wan, Jim Y; Brooks, Ian M; Bachmann, Gloria A; Foster, David C; Brown, Candace S

    2014-01-01

    Intradermally injected capsaicin has been used extensively both as a human pain model and to assess analgesic efficacy. Factors such as dose, formulation, route, and site are known to affect its sensitivity. We determined whether potency and stability of capsaicin solutions were further sources of variability when following strict manufacturing guidelines. Capsaicin solution (1.0 mg/mL) was prepared according to Current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) guidelines and aseptically filled into sterile amber borosilicate vials and stored at 5°C, 25°C, and 30°C. All samples were analyzed at one, three, six, and twelve months. Chemical stability was determined using HPLC and physical stability was evaluated by visual inspection of color changes, clarity, particulate matter, and product/ container closure abnormalities during each sampling time. Capsaicin intradermal injection was found to be sterile and retained 95% of the initial concentration for at least one year, regardless of studied storage temperatures (P<0.0001). Visual inspection indicated no changes in color, clarity, particulate matter, and product/ container closure abnormalities in all samples. These data show that capsaicin solutions (1.0 mg/mL) maintain their potency and stability over one year when manufactured according to cGMP guidelines. These results suggest that in clinical trials manufacturing of capsaicin solutions is recommended over extemporaneous compounding. PMID:25105064

  6. [Novel approaches for the prevention of influenza: the intradermal vaccination].

    PubMed

    Durando, Paolo; Sticchi, Laura; Alberti, Marisa; Alicino, Cristiano; Iudici, Rocco; Martini, Mariano; Icardi, Giancarlo

    2010-01-01

    Conventional non-adjuvanted influenza vaccines have shown suboptimal immunogenicity in subjects at high risk for complications, such as the elderly. Between the several strategies proposed to develop more immunogenic vaccines than the conventional ones, a promising option is represented by the administration of non-adjuvanted vaccine through the intradermal (ID) route. This paper summarizes and discusses the main results recently obtained in clinical trials investigating the safety, tolerability and immunogenicity of new ID influenza vaccines, containing standard or reduced antigen dosages, in different age-groups. PMID:20859311

  7. Immunization against strontium-90 induction of bone tumors with inactivated FBJ virus and irradiated syngeneic strontium-90-induced tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reif, A.E.; Triest, W.E.

    1981-01-01

    Three hundred six C57BL/6J female mice were subdivided into a control group left untreated and an experimental group treated intraperitoneally with 1.0 ..mu..Ci strontium-90/g of body weight at an age of 66 days. Treatments for the groups were as follows: none, 6 injections of formalin-inactivated FBJ viral preparation, 6 injections of active FBJ viral preparation, and 2 injections of 10,000 rad irradiated transplantable osteosarcoma previously induced in C57BL/6J mice by strontium-90. In addition to the above groups, two other groups were treated with respectively 0.032 and 0.10 ..mu..Ci strontium-90/g body weight in order to obtain information on the dose-response relationship between the injection of strontium-90 and the yield of bone tumors. In the groups not treated with strontium-90, only 1 bone tumor developed; this occurred in the group injected with FBJ virus. The incidence of bone tumors in the groups treated with 1.0 ..mu..Ci strontium-90 was significantly lower (18.5% or 18.2%) in the two groups that had received injections of inactivated FBJ virus or irradiated isogenic osteosarcoma when compared to the group left uninjected, which developed 43.5% tumors. In contrast, the strontium-90-treated group that also received injections of active FBJ virus developed 63.0% tumors. Only a single bone tumor developed in the groups treated solely with intermediate doses of strontium-90. The results indicate that immunization with inactivated FBJ virus or with irradiated syngeneic strontium-90-induced tumor cells can significantly decrease the development of strontium-90-induced tumors.

  8. Optimizing Intradermal Administration of Cryopreserved Plasmodium falciparum Sporozoites in Controlled Human Malaria Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lyke, Kirsten E.; Laurens, Matthew B.; Strauss, Kathy; Adams, Matthew; Billingsley, Peter F.; James, Eric; Manoj, Anita; Chakravarty, Sumana; Plowe, Christopher V.; Li, Ming Lin; Ruben, Adam; Edelman, Robert; Green, Michael; Dube, Tina J.; Kim Lee Sim, B.; Hoffman, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) is a powerful tool to evaluate malaria vaccine and prophylactic drug efficacy. Until recently CHMI was only carried out by the bite of infected mosquitoes. A parenteral method of CHMI would standardize Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite (PfSPZ) administration, eliminate the need for expensive challenge facility infrastructure, and allow for use of many P. falciparum strains. Recently, intradermal (ID) injection of aseptic, purified, cryopreserved PfSPZ was shown to induce P. falciparum malaria; however, 100% infection rates were not achieved by ID injection. To optimize ID PfSPZ dosing so as to achieve 100% infection, 30 adults aged 18–45 years were randomized to one of six groups composed of five volunteers each. The parameters of dose (1 × 104 versus 5 × 104 PfSPZ total dose per volunteer), number of injections (two versus eight), and aliquot volume per ID injection (10 μL versus 50 μL) were studied. Three groups attained 100% infection: 1 × 104 PfSPZ in 50 μL/2 doses, 1 × 104 PfSPZ in 10 μL/2 doses, and 5 × 104 PfSPZ in 10 μL/8 doses. The group that received 5 × 104 PfSPZ total dose in eight 10 μL injections had a 100% infection rate and the shortest prepatent period (mean of 12.7 days), approaching the prepatent period for the current CHMI standard of five infected mosquitoes. PMID:26416102

  9. Successful radioimmunotherapy of established syngeneic rat colon carcinoma with 211At-mAb

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most carcinomas are prone to metastasize despite successful treatment of the primary tumor. One way to address this clinical challenge may be targeted therapy with α-emitting radionuclides such as astatine-211 (211At). Radioimmunotherapy utilizing α-particle emitting radionuclides is considered especially suitable for the treatment of small cell clusters and single cells, although lesions of different sizes may also be present in the patient. The aim of this study was primarily to evaluate the toxicity and secondarily in vivo efficacy of a 211At-labeled monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed against colon carcinoma with tumor diameters of approximately 10 mm. Methods Eighteen rats with subperitoneal syngeneic colon carcinoma were allocated to three groups of six animals together with three healthy rats in each group. The groups were injected intravenously with either 150 μg of unlabeled mAbs (controls) or 2.5 or 5 MBq 211At-mAbs directed towards the Lewis Y antigen expressed on the cell membrane of several carcinomas. Tumor volume, body weight, and blood cell counts were monitored for 100 days after treatment. Results Local tumors were non-palpable in five out of six rats after treatment with both activities of 211At-mAbs, compared to one out of six in the control group. At the study end, half of the animals in each group given 211At-BR96 and one animal in the control group were free from disease. Radioimmunotherapy resulted in dose-dependent, transient weight loss and myelotoxicity. Survival was significantly better in the groups receiving targeted alpha therapy than in those receiving unlabeled mAbs. Conclusions This study demonstrates the possibility of treating small, solid colon carcinoma tumors with α-emitting radionuclides such as 211At bound to mAbs, with tolerable toxicity. PMID:23557183

  10. Utility of intradermal smear in the diagnosis of malaria.

    PubMed

    Singh, H; Sen, R; Singh, S; Siwach, S B; Jagdish; Singh, R M

    2003-04-01

    The objective of this preliminary study was to evaluate the usefulness of the intradermal smear test in the diagnosis of malaria. One hundred cases of suspected malaria (having received no prior antimalarials) were investigated. Both peripheral blood film (PBF) and intradermal smears (IDS) were simultaneously prepared and patients placed on antimalarial therapy. The slides were repeated for the next 2 days. At admission, 70 cases were positive on PBF--59 were Plasmodium falciparum (PF) and 11 were Plasmodium vivax (PV) whereas surprisingly 62 cases were positive on IDS at admission--61 were PF, one was PV. IDS identified two more cases of PF [P value (not significant)] but failed to identify any new cases of PV (P value NS). On subsequent days IDS positivity for PF was higher than for PBF (P < 0.05 for day 1 and P < 0.001 for day 2). However, the PV yield was poor for any further statistical evaluation on subsequent days. We conclude that IDS is simple, easy to perform, requires no special infrastructure compared to PBF, and is a helpful diagnostic tool in cases where malaria is strongly suspected but peripheral blood slides are repeatedly negative due to prior use of antimalarial therapy. IDS may be added to routine PBF in malaria (especially PF). PMID:12680550

  11. Perpendicular Strut Injection of Hyaluronic Acid Filler for Deep Wrinkles

    PubMed Central

    Mashiko, Takanobu; Kinoshita, Kahori; Kanayama, Koji; Feng, Jingwei

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Although various injection techniques of hyaluronic acid (HA) filler for facial rejuvenation have been developed, correction of deep wrinkles/grooves, such as the nasolabial fold (NLF), with intradermal or subdermal injections remains difficult. We tested the intradermal HA injection method to place multiple HA struts by (1) inserting a small needle perpendicularly to the wrinkle and (2) injecting HA as intradermal struts with the skin fully stretched by the practitioner’s fingers. The results of both NLFs in 10 patients suggest that this technique improves NLFs and maintain the effects more consistently than conventional techniques, although the effects of both methods were almost lost after 6 months. Selective and/or combined application of this technique may enhance the current approach to facial rejuvenation with dermal fillers. PMID:26893992

  12. Perpendicular Strut Injection of Hyaluronic Acid Filler for Deep Wrinkles.

    PubMed

    Mashiko, Takanobu; Kinoshita, Kahori; Kanayama, Koji; Feng, Jingwei; Yoshimura, Kotaro

    2015-11-01

    Although various injection techniques of hyaluronic acid (HA) filler for facial rejuvenation have been developed, correction of deep wrinkles/grooves, such as the nasolabial fold (NLF), with intradermal or subdermal injections remains difficult. We tested the intradermal HA injection method to place multiple HA struts by (1) inserting a small needle perpendicularly to the wrinkle and (2) injecting HA as intradermal struts with the skin fully stretched by the practitioner's fingers. The results of both NLFs in 10 patients suggest that this technique improves NLFs and maintain the effects more consistently than conventional techniques, although the effects of both methods were almost lost after 6 months. Selective and/or combined application of this technique may enhance the current approach to facial rejuvenation with dermal fillers. PMID:26893992

  13. Evaluation of intradermal vaccination at the anti rabies vaccination OPD.

    PubMed

    Mankeshwar, R; Silvanus, V; Akarte, S

    2014-09-01

    Rabies is a virtually 100% fatal acute viral encephalitis caused by an RNA virus belonging to family Rhabdoviridae and genus Lyssavirus. The virus can infect all warm blooded animals. The disease is transmitted to humans by the bite, lick or scratch of an infected animal. More than 99% of all human rabies deaths occur in the developing world. It is preventable with timely and proper usage of modern immunobiologicals (vaccines and immunoglobulins). Once exposure occurs, modern prophylaxis entails immediate wound care, local infiltration of rabies immune globulin and parenteral administration of modern cell culture vaccines in multiple doses. The annual medicinal (vaccines and other drugs) cost for animal bite treatment is Rs. 2 billion approximately (2004). The objective of the present study is to evaluate the performance of the Intradermal (i.d.) route visa vis the Intramuscular (i.m.) route in our clinical setting the Antirabies Vaccination (ARV) OPD, Sir J.J. Hospital, Mumbai. A total of 1460 patients were administered the Antirabies vaccine by the Intradermal route over the 1 year period as compared to 1075 patients who were administered the Antirabies vaccine by the Intramuscular route in the previous year. 1230 (84.2) of the patients who were administered the vaccine by the i.d. route completed the schedule and 230 (15.8%) partially completed the schedule. Four hundred thirty two (40%) of the patients who were administered the vaccine by the Intramuscular route completed the schedule and 643 (59.8%) partially completed the schedule. The vaccine cost for i.d. was Rs. 2,80,600. The vaccine cost for the intramuscular (i.m.) assuming 84% compliance was estimated as Rs. 15, 64, 000. Assuming 40% compliance the cost was estimated as Rs. 7, 82, 230. Thus a saving of Rs. 5, 01, 630 to Rs. 12, 83, 400 was effected. In our setting, the Intradermal regime was cost effective and increased patient adherence and enrolment. It has now been routinely adopted at the clinic

  14. Pharmacokinetic Model of the Transport of Fast-Acting Insulin From the Subcutaneous and Intradermal Spaces to Blood

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Dayu; Kulkarni, Sandip D.; Chan, Alice; Keith, Stephen; Pettis, Ron; Kovatchev, Boris P.; Farhi, Leon S.; Breton, Marc D.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) models describing the transport of insulin from the injection site to blood assist clinical decision making and are part of in silico platforms for developing and testing of insulin delivery strategies for treatment of patients with diabetes. The ability of these models to accurately describe all facets of the in vivo insulin transport is therefore critical for their application. Here, we propose a new model of fast-acting insulin analogs transport from the subcutaneous and intradermal spaces to blood that can accommodate clinically observed biphasic appearance and delayed clearance of injected insulin, 2 phenomena that are not captured by existing PK models. To develop the model we compare 9 insulin transport PK models which describe hypothetical insulin delivery pathways potentially capable of approximating biphasic appearance of exogenous insulin. The models are tested with respect to their ability to describe clinical data from 10 healthy volunteers which received 1 subcutaneous and 2 intradermal insulin injections on 3 different occasions. The optimal model, selected based on information and posterior identifiability criteria, assumes that insulin is delivered at the administrative site and is then transported to the bloodstream via 2 independent routes (1) diffusion-like process to the blood and (2) combination of diffusion-like processes followed by an additional compartment before entering the blood. This optimal model accounts for biphasic appearance and delayed clearance of exogenous insulin. It agrees better with the clinical data as compared to commonly used models and is expected to improve the in silico development and testing of insulin treatment strategies, including artificial pancreas systems. PMID:25759184

  15. Pharmacokinetic Model of the Transport of Fast-Acting Insulin From the Subcutaneous and Intradermal Spaces to Blood.

    PubMed

    Lv, Dayu; Kulkarni, Sandip D; Chan, Alice; Keith, Stephen; Pettis, Ron; Kovatchev, Boris P; Farhi, Leon S; Breton, Marc D

    2015-07-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) models describing the transport of insulin from the injection site to blood assist clinical decision making and are part of in silico platforms for developing and testing of insulin delivery strategies for treatment of patients with diabetes. The ability of these models to accurately describe all facets of the in vivo insulin transport is therefore critical for their application. Here, we propose a new model of fast-acting insulin analogs transport from the subcutaneous and intradermal spaces to blood that can accommodate clinically observed biphasic appearance and delayed clearance of injected insulin, 2 phenomena that are not captured by existing PK models. To develop the model we compare 9 insulin transport PK models which describe hypothetical insulin delivery pathways potentially capable of approximating biphasic appearance of exogenous insulin. The models are tested with respect to their ability to describe clinical data from 10 healthy volunteers which received 1 subcutaneous and 2 intradermal insulin injections on 3 different occasions. The optimal model, selected based on information and posterior identifiability criteria, assumes that insulin is delivered at the administrative site and is then transported to the bloodstream via 2 independent routes (1) diffusion-like process to the blood and (2) combination of diffusion-like processes followed by an additional compartment before entering the blood. This optimal model accounts for biphasic appearance and delayed clearance of exogenous insulin. It agrees better with the clinical data as compared to commonly used models and is expected to improve the in silico development and testing of insulin treatment strategies, including artificial pancreas systems. PMID:25759184

  16. Antibody response of patients after postexposure rabies vaccination with small intradermal doses of purified chick embryo cell vaccine or purified Vero cell rabies vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, D. J.; Banzhoff, A.; Nicolay, U.; Sirikwin, S.; Dumavibhat, B.; Tongswas, S.; Wasi, C.

    2000-01-01

    Although the introduction of tissue culture vaccines for rabies has dramatically improved the immunogenicity and safety of rabies vaccines, they are often prohibitively expensive for developing countries. To examine whether smaller doses of these vaccines could be used, we tested the safety and immunogenicity of purified chick embryo cell vaccine (PCECV) on 211 patients in Thailand with World Health Organization (WHO) category II and III exposures to rabies. The patients presented at two Thai hospitals and were randomized into three groups. Patients in Group 1 received 0.1 ml PCECV intradermally at two sites on days 0, 3, 7, and at one site on days 30 and 90. Group 2 was treated similarly, except that purified Vero cell rabies vaccine (PVRV) was used instead of PCECV. Group 3 received 1.0 ml PCECV intramuscularly on days 0, 3, 7, 14, 30 and 90. After 0, 3, 7, 14, 30 and 90 days serum was collected from the subjects and the geometric mean titres (GMTs) of rabies virus neutralizing antibody determined. After 14 days the GMT of 59 patients vaccinated intradermally with PCECV was equivalent to that of patients who received PVRV. Adverse reactions were more frequent in patients who received vaccines intradermally, indicating the reactions were associated with the route of injection, rather than the vaccine per se. We conclude that PCECV is a safe and highly immunogenic vaccine for postexposure rabies vaccination when administered intradermally in 0.1-ml doses using the two-site method ("2,2,2,0,1,1") recommended by WHO. PMID:10859864

  17. Spinal neurons that contain gastrin-releasing peptide seldom express Fos or phosphorylate extracellular signal-regulated kinases in response to intradermal chloroquine

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Mecinas, Maria; Polgár, Erika; Todd, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is thought to play a role in the itch evoked by intradermal injection of chloroquine. Although some early studies suggested that GRP was expressed in pruriceptive primary afferents, it is now thought that GRP in the spinal cord is derived mainly from a population of excitatory interneurons in lamina II, and it has been suggested that these are involved in the itch pathway. To test this hypothesis, we used the transcription factor Fos and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) to look for evidence that interneurons expressing GRP were activated following intradermal injection of chloroquine into the calf, in mice that express enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in these cells. Results Injection of chloroquine resulted in numerous Fos- or phospho-ERK (pERK) positive cells in the somatotopically appropriate part of the superficial dorsal horn. The proportion of all neurons in this region that showed Fos or pERK was 18% and 21%, respectively. However, among the GRP–EGFP, only 7% were Fos-positive and 3% were pERK-positive. As such, GRP–EGFP cells were significantly less likely than other neurons to express Fos or to phosphorylate ERK. Conclusions Both expression of Fos and phosphorylation of ERK can be used to identify dorsal horn neurons activated by chloroquine injection. However, these results do not support the hypothesis that interneurons expressing GRP are critical components in the itch pathway. PMID:27270268

  18. Targeting Skin Dendritic Cells to Improve Intradermal Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Romani, N.; Flacher, V.; Tripp, C. H.; Sparber, F.; Ebner, S.; Stoitzner, P.

    2014-01-01

    Vaccinations in medicine are typically administered into the muscle beneath the skin or into the subcutaneous fat. As a consequence, the vaccine is immunologically processed by antigen-presenting cells of the skin or the muscle. Recent evidence suggests that the clinically seldom used intradermal route is effective and possibly even superior to the conventional subcutaneous or intramuscular route. Several types of professional antigen-presenting cells inhabit the healthy skin. Epidermal Langerhans cells (CD207/langerin+), dermal langerinneg, and dermal langerin+ dendritic cells (DC) have been described, the latter subset so far only in mouse skin. In human skin langerinneg dermal DC can be further classified based on their reciprocal expression of CD1a and CD14. The relative contributions of these subsets to the generation of immunity or tolerance are still unclear. Yet, specializations of these different populations have become apparent. Langerhans cells in human skin appear to be specialized for induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes; human CD14+ dermal DC can promote antibody production by B cells. It is currently attempted to rationally devise and improve vaccines by harnessing such specific properties of skin DC. This could be achieved by specifically targeting functionally diverse skin DC subsets. We discuss here advances in our knowledge on the immunological properties of skin DC and strategies to significantly improve the outcome of vaccinations by applying this knowledge. PMID:21253784

  19. Tolerability of intramuscular and intradermal delivery by CELLECTRA(®) adaptive constant current electroporation device in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Malissa C; Lee, Jessica C; Daniels, Stephen E; Tebas, Pablo; Khan, Amir S; Giffear, Mary; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Bagarazzi, Mark L

    2013-10-01

    DNA vaccines are being developed as a potentially safe and effective immunization platform. However, translation of DNA vaccines into a clinical setting has produced results that have fallen short of those generated in a preclinical setting. Various strategies are being developed to address this lack of potency, including improvements in delivery methods. Electroporation (EP) creates transient increases in cell membrane permeability, thus enhancing DNA uptake and leading to a more robust immune response. Here, we report on the safety and tolerability of delivering sterile saline via intramuscular (IM) or intradermal (ID) injection followed by in vivo electroporation using the CELLECTRA(®) adaptive constant current device in healthy adults from two open-label studies. Pain, as assessed by VAS, was highest immediately after EP but diminishes by about 50% within 5 min. Mean VAS scores appear to correlate with the amount of energy delivered and depth of needle insertion, especially for intramuscular EP. Mean scores did not exceed 7 out of 10 or 3 out of 10 for IM and ID EP, respectively. The majority of adverse events included mild to moderate injection site reactions that resolved within one day. No deaths or serious adverse events were reported during the course of either study. Overall, injection followed by EP with the CELLECTRA(®) device was well-tolerated and no significant safety concerns were identified. These studies support the further development of electroporation as a vaccine delivery method to enhance immunogenicity, particularly for diseases in which traditional vaccination approaches are ineffective. PMID:24051434

  20. Rapid Pharmacokinetics of Intradermal Insulin Administered Using Microneedles in Type 1 Diabetes Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Jyoti

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background This study compared the pharmacokinetics, postprandial glycemic response, and pain associated with intradermal lispro insulin delivery using a microneedle with that of a conventional catheter. Subjects and Methods Five subjects with type 1 diabetes were administered a bolus infusion of lispro insulin using a 9-mm-long subcutaneous catheter (control treatment) and a 0.9-mm-long microneedle (study treatment), followed by consumption of a standardized meal. Blood samples were periodically assayed for plasma glucose and free insulin levels. Results Intradermal insulin infusion using microneedles reached peak insulin concentrations in approximately half the time and led to greater reduction in plasma glucose levels than subcutaneous catheters. Microneedles were also significantly less painful than the catheters. Conclusion The rapid pharmacokinetics and minimally invasive nature of intradermal insulin infusion using microneedles provide significant potential for improved diabetes management. PMID:21355717

  1. Myofibroblasts in Murine Cutaneous Fibrosis Originate From Adiponectin-Positive Intradermal Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Marangoni, Roberta Goncalves; Korman, Benjamin D.; Wei, Jun; Wood, Tammara A.; Graham, Lauren V.; Whitfield, Michael L.; Scherer, Philipp E.; Tourtellotte, Warren G.; Varga, John

    2015-01-01

    Objective Accumulation of myofibroblasts in fibrotic skin is a hallmark of systemic sclerosis (SSc; scleroderma), but the origins of these cells remain unknown. Because loss of intradermal adipose tissue is a consistent feature of cutaneous fibrosis, we sought to examine the hypothesis that myofibroblasts populating fibrotic dermis derive from adipocytic progenitors. Methods We performed genetic fate mapping studies to investigate the loss of intradermal adipose tissue and its potential role in fibrosis in mice with bleomycin-induced scleroderma. Modulation of adipocytic phenotypes ex vivo was investigated in adipose tissue–derived cells in culture. Results A striking loss of intradermal adipose tissue and its replacement with fibrous tissue were consistently observed in mice with bleomycin-induced fibrosis. Loss of adipose tissue and a decline in the expression of canonical adipogenic markers in lesional skin preceded the onset of dermal fibrosis and expression of fibrogenic markers. Ex vivo, subcutaneous adipocytes were driven by transforming growth factor β to preferentially undergo fibrogenic differentiation. Cell fate mapping studies in mice with the adiponectin promoter–driven Cre recombinase transgenic construct indicated that adiponectin-positive progenitors that are normally confined to the intradermal adipose tissue compartment were distributed throughout the lesional dermis over time, lost their adipocytic markers, and expressed myofibroblast markers in bleomycin-treated mice. Conclusion These observations establish a novel link between intradermal adipose tissue loss and dermal fibrosis and demonstrate that adiponectin-positive intradermal progenitors give rise to dermal myofibroblasts. Adipose tissue loss and adipocyte–myofibroblast transition might be primary events in the pathogenesis of cutaneous fibrosis that represent novel potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25504959

  2. Novel myeloma-associated antigens revealed in the context of syngeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Biernacki, Melinda A.; Tai, Yu-tzu; Zhang, Guang Lan; Alonso, Anselmo; Zhang, Wandi; Prabhala, Rao; Zhang, Li; Munshi, Nikhil; Neuberg, Donna; Soiffer, Robert J.; Ritz, Jerome; Alyea, Edwin P.; Brusic, Vladimir; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2012-01-01

    Targets of curative donor-derived graft-versus-myeloma (GVM) responses after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) remain poorly defined, partly because immunity against minor histocompatibility Ags (mHAgs) complicates the elucidation of multiple myeloma (MM)–specific targets. We hypothesized that syngeneic HSCT would facilitate the identification of GVM-associated Ags because donor immune responses in this setting should exclusively target unique tumor Ags in the absence of donor-host genetic disparities. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the development of tumor immunity in an HLA-A0201+ MM patient who achieved durable remission after myeloablative syngeneic HSCT. Using high-density protein microarrays to screen post-HSCT plasma, we identified 6 Ags that elicited high-titer (1:5000-1:10 000) Abs that correlated with clinical tumor regression. Two Ags (DAPK2 and PIM1) had enriched expression in primary MM tissues. Both elicited Ab responses in other MM patients after chemotherapy or HSCT (11 and 6 of 32 patients for DAPK2 and PIM1, respectively). The index patient also developed specific CD8+ T-cell responses to HLA-A2–restricted peptides derived from DAPK2 and PIM1. Peptide-specific T cells recognized HLA-A2+ MM-derived cell lines and primary MM tumor cells. Coordinated T- and B-cell immunity develops against MM-associated Ags after syngeneic HSCT. DAPK1 and PIM1 are promising target Ags for MM-directed immunotherapy. PMID:22267603

  3. Myeloid Cell Isolation from Mouse Skin and Draining Lymph Node Following Intradermal Immunization with Live Attenuated Plasmodium Sporozoites.

    PubMed

    Mac-Daniel, Laura; Buckwalter, Matthew R; Gueirard, Pascale; Ménard, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Malaria infection begins when the sporozoite stage of Plasmodium is inoculated into the skin of a mammalian host through a mosquito bite. The highly motile parasite not only reaches the liver to invade hepatocytes and transform into erythrocyte-infective form. It also migrates into the skin and to the proximal lymph node draining the injection site, where it can be recognized and degraded by resident and/or recruited myeloid cells. Intravital imaging reported the early recruitment of brightly fluorescent Lys-GFP positive leukocytes in the skin and the interactions between sporozoites and CD11c(+) cells in the draining lymph node. We present here an efficient procedure to recover, identify and enumerate the myeloid cell subsets that are recruited to the mouse skin and draining lymph node following intradermal injection of immunizing doses of sporozoites in a murine model. Phenotypic characterization using multi-parametric flow cytometry provides a reliable assay to assess early dynamic cellular changes during inflammatory response to Plasmodium infection. PMID:27286053

  4. Activation of autoreactive T-lymphocytes by cultured syngeneic glomerular mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Radeke, H H; Emmendörffer, A; Uciechowski, P; von der Ohe, J; Schwinzer, B; Resch, K

    1994-03-01

    The capacity of intrinsic, glomerular mesangial cells (MC) to cause an autoreactive response of syngeneic lymphocytes in vitro are presented. Initial experiments demonstrated the MHC class II dependent capacity of MC to present exogenous antigen to sensitized lymph node lymphocytes (LN) and to activate naive, allogeneic LN in the absence of a nominal antigen. However, the most striking finding of the present investigation was that mouse MC (C57BL/6 or DBA/2) augmented a significant activation of naive, syngeneic lymphocytes. The extent of the proliferative lymphocyte response was comparable to that observed after stimulation with allogeneic MC. Moreover, during syngeneic coculture substantial amounts of interferon bioactivity were generated. Equipotent concentrations of rm IFN-gamma were sufficient to induce class II MHC expression of mouse MC. In control experiments the macrophage cell line, IC-21 (C57BL/6), or freshly prepared DBA/2 mouse peritoneal macrophages did not elicit a syngeneic LN response. Using MC, which had not been pretreated, the MC-specific LN stimulation occurred after prolonged periods of coculture. The stimulation index (S.I.) was 9.77 after 144 hours compared with LN controls (S.I. = 1). However, a 48 hour pretreatment of MC with either rm IFN-gamma alone or in combination with rh TNF-alpha and/or the continuous presence of rm IL-1 alpha during coculture periods from 72 to 144 hours substantially enhanced the proliferative LN response. Analysis of non-adherent LN by flow cytometry (FACS) after 96 or 120 hours coculture with MC revealed an increased ratio of Thy1.2+ to B220+ cells with a predominant rise of L3T4+ T-helper cells compared to Lyt2+ cytotoxic T-cells. Furthermore, immune fluorescence microscopy showed that a fraction of Thy1.2+ lymphoblasts adhered to MC. FACS analysis of these adherent LN after detachment demonstrated that in comparison to cocultures with untreated MC, cocultures of LN with IFN-gamma/TNF-alpha pre-treated MC

  5. Interleukin-2 and syngeneic bone marrow transplantation in a murine fibrosarcoma model.

    PubMed

    Ho, S P; Stebler, B; Ershler, W B

    1991-04-01

    Mice received interleukin-2 (IL-2) either before and after, or just after intravenous inoculation of syngeneic fibrosarcoma cells. Fewer pulmonary tumor colonies were observed in those animals treated with IL-2, and the best results were observed when IL-2 was administered prior to tumor inoculation. When mice were lethally irradiated and reconstituted with tumor-contaminated bone marrow, IL-2 treatment was also associated with fewer tumor lung colonies. IL-2 may prove to be a useful adjuvant therapy, particularly in the setting of autologous bone marrow transplantation when the infused marrow is contaminated with tumor cells. PMID:1873353

  6. Activation of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor by TCDD Inhibits Mammary Tumor Metastasis in a Syngeneic Mouse Model of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Wyrick, Katie L.; Meadows, Gary G.; Wills, Tamara B.; Vorderstrasse, Beth A.

    2011-01-01

    Treatment with aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists can slow or reverse the growth of primary mammary tumors in rodents, which has fostered interest in developing selective AhR modulators for treatment of breast cancer. However, the major goal of breast cancer therapy is to inhibit metastasis, the primary cause of mortality in women with this disease. Studies conducted using breast cancer cell lines have demonstrated that AhR agonists suppress proliferation, invasiveness, and colony formation in vitro; however, further exploration using in vivo models of metastasis is warranted. To test the effect of AhR activation on metastasis, 4T1.2 mammary tumor cells were injected into the mammary gland fat pad of syngeneic Balb/c mice treated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Primary tumor growth was monitored for 4 weeks, at which time metastasis was determined. TCDD treatment suppressed metastasis by approximately 50%, as measured both in the lung and in mammary glands at sites distant from the primary tumor. Primary tumor growth was not suppressed by TCDD exposure nor was proliferation of 4T1.2 cells affected by TCDD treatment in vitro. Taken together, these results suggest that the protective effect of AhR activation was selective for the metastatic process and not simply the result of a direct decrease in tumor cell proliferation or survival at the primary site. These observations in immunologically intact animals warrant further investigation into the mechanism of the protective effects of AhR activation and support the promise for use of AhR modulators to treat breast cancer. PMID:21948867

  7. Vesicular stomatitis virus expressing interferon-β is oncolytic and promotes antitumor immune responses in a syngeneic murine model of non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Manish R.; Jacobson, Blake A.; Ji, Yan; Drees, Jeremy; Tang, Shaogeng; Xiong, Kerry; Wang, Hengbing; Prigge, Jennifer E.; Dash, Alexander S.; Kratzke, Andrea K.; Mesev, Emily; Etchison, Ryan; Federspiel, Mark J.; Russell, Stephen J.; Kratzke, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a potent oncolytic virus for many tumors. VSV that produces interferon-β (VSV-IFNβ) is now in early clinical testing for solid tumors. Here, the preclinical activity of VSV and VSV-IFNβ against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is reported. NSCLC cell lines were treated in vitro with VSV expressing green fluorescence protein (VSV-GFP) and VSV-IFNβ. VSV-GFP and VSV-IFNβ were active against NSCLC cells. JAK/STAT inhibition with ruxolitinib re-sensitized resistant H838 cells to VSV-IFNβ mediated oncolysis. Intratumoral injections of VSV-GFP and VSV-IFNβ reduced tumor growth and weight in H2009 nude mouse xenografts (p < 0.01). A similar trend was observed in A549 xenografts. Syngeneic LM2 lung tumors grown in flanks of A/J mice were injected with VSV-IFNβ intratumorally. Treatment of LM2 tumors with VSV-IFNβ resulted in tumor regression, prolonged survival (p < 0.0001), and cure of 30% of mice. Intratumoral injection of VSV-IFNβ resulted in decreased tumor-infiltrating regulatory T cells (Treg) and increased CD8+ T cells. Tumor cell expression of PDL-1 was increased after VSV-IFNβ treatment. VSV-IFNβ has potent antitumor effects and promotes systemic antitumor immunity. These data support further clinical investigation of VSV-IFNβ for NSCLC. PMID:26431376

  8. The Evolutionary Relationships between Endosymbiotic Green Algae of Paramecium bursaria Syngens Originating from Different Geographical Locations.

    PubMed

    Zagata, Patrycja; Greczek-Stachura, Magdalena; Tarcz, Sebastian; Rautian, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Paramecium bursaria (Ehrenberg 1831), a freshwater ciliate, typically harbors hundreds of green algal symbionts inside the cell. The aim of present study was the molecular identification of newly analyzed P. bursaria symbionts. The second aspect of the present survey was testing a hypothesis whether endosymbionts prefer the specified syngen of the host, and the specified geographical distribution. Ten strains of endosymbionts isolated from strains of P. bursaria originating from different geographical locations were studied. We analyzed for the first time, both the fragment of plastid genome containing 3'rpl36-5' infA genes and a fragment of a nuclear gene encoding large subunit ribosomal RNA (LSU rDNA). The analysis of the LSU rDNA sequences showed the existence of 3 haplotypes and the haplotype diversity of 0.733, and 8 haplotypes for the 3'rpl36-5' infA gene fragment and haplotype diversity of 0.956. The endosymbionts isolated from P. bursaria strains were identified as Chlorella vulgaris, Ch. variabilis and Micractinium conductrix. There was no correlation between the syngen of P. bursaria and the species of endosymbiont. PMID:27172712

  9. Murine cellular cytotoxicity to syngeneic and xenogeneic herpes simplex virus-infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kohl, S; Drath, D B; Loo, L S

    1982-01-01

    Cellular cytotoxicity of C57BL/6 adult mice peritoneal cells to xenogeneic (Chang liver) and syngeneic (BL/6-WT3) herpes simplex virus (HSV)-infected cells was analyzed in a 6-h 51Cr release assay. There was no difference in antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity to either target. There was no natural killer cytotoxicity to targets with cells from uninfected mice except at very high effector cell ratios. HSV-infected (2 X 10(4) PFU intraperitoneally 1 day previously) mice mediated significantly higher antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and required less antibody (10(-5) versus 10(-2) dilution), fewer cells, and less time to kill than cells from uninfected mice. HSV-infected mice mediated natural killer cytotoxicity but preferentially killed syngeneic HSV-infected cells. Stimulation of cytotoxicity was not virus specific since influenza-infected mice mediated similar levels of cytotoxicity to HSV-infected targets. There was no difference in morphology (95% macrophage) or in the percentage of FcR-positive cells, but infected mice had more peritoneal cells and generated higher levels of superoxide in response to opsonized zymosan or phorbolmyristate acetate. These data demonstrate nonspecific virus-stimulated metabolic and effector cell function which may enhance clearance of virus in an infected host. PMID:6295943

  10. Murine cellular cytotoxicity to syngeneic and xenogeneic herpes simplex virus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Kohl, S; Drath, D B; Loo, L S

    1982-12-01

    Cellular cytotoxicity of C57BL/6 adult mice peritoneal cells to xenogeneic (Chang liver) and syngeneic (BL/6-WT3) herpes simplex virus (HSV)-infected cells was analyzed in a 6-h 51Cr release assay. There was no difference in antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity to either target. There was no natural killer cytotoxicity to targets with cells from uninfected mice except at very high effector cell ratios. HSV-infected (2 X 10(4) PFU intraperitoneally 1 day previously) mice mediated significantly higher antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and required less antibody (10(-5) versus 10(-2) dilution), fewer cells, and less time to kill than cells from uninfected mice. HSV-infected mice mediated natural killer cytotoxicity but preferentially killed syngeneic HSV-infected cells. Stimulation of cytotoxicity was not virus specific since influenza-infected mice mediated similar levels of cytotoxicity to HSV-infected targets. There was no difference in morphology (95% macrophage) or in the percentage of FcR-positive cells, but infected mice had more peritoneal cells and generated higher levels of superoxide in response to opsonized zymosan or phorbolmyristate acetate. These data demonstrate nonspecific virus-stimulated metabolic and effector cell function which may enhance clearance of virus in an infected host. PMID:6295943

  11. Induction of tolerance to cardiac allografts in lethally irradiated rats reconstituted with syngeneic bone marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Hartnett, L.C.

    1983-01-01

    Generally, organ grafts from one individual animal to another are rejected in one-two weeks. However, if the recipients are given Total Body Irradiation (TBI) just prior to grafting, followed by reconstitution of hemopoietic function with syngeneic (recipient-type) bone marrow cells, then vascularized organ grafts are permanently accepted. Initially after irradiation, it is possible to induce tolerance to many strain combinations in rats. This thesis examines the system of TBI as applied to the induction of tolerance in LEW recipients of WF cardiac allografts. These two rat strains are mismatched across the entire major histocompatibility complex. When the LEW recipient are given 860 rads, a WF cardiac allograft and LEW bone marrow on the same day, 60% of the grafts are accepted. Methods employed to improve the rate of graft acceptance include: treating either donor or recipient with small amounts of methotrexate, or waiting until two days after irradiation to repopulate with bone marrow. It seems from these investigations of some of the early events in the induction of tolerance to allografts following TBI and syngeneic marrow reconstitution that an immature cell population in the bone marrow interacts with a radioresistant cell population in the spleen to produce tolerance to completely MHC-mismatched allografts.

  12. Risk factors for syngeneic graft-versus-host disease after adult hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Adams, Kristina M; Holmberg, Leona A; Leisenring, Wendy; Fefer, Alexander; Guthrie, Katherine A; Tylee, Tracy S; McDonald, George B; Bensinger, William I; Nelson, J Lee

    2004-09-15

    Syngeneic graft-versus-host disease (sGVHD) has been described after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) but remains poorly defined. We retrospectively reviewed adult syngeneic HCTs at our center (1980-2002) for sGVHD to investigate incidence, morbidity, and risk factors with a primary focus on parity. Among 119 transplantations, there were 21 cases of biopsy-proven sGVHD. The cumulative incidence was 18%, with multiorgan involvement in 6 cases and 1 death. sGVHD was more frequent when the donor was parous (32%) than nulliparous (9%) or male (13%; P =.03) and when the recipient was parous (31%) than nulliparous (7%) or male (13%; P =.02). Other univariable risk factors included older age (P <.01), busulfan/melphalan/thiotepa conditioning (P <.01), interleukin-2 (P =.02), HLA-A26 (P =.03), and more recent transplantation year (P <.01). Overall, risk factors were similar to those described in GVHD. Although an independent effect of parity could not be completely separated from other factors, donor and recipient pregnancy history merits further investigation. PMID:15117763

  13. Safety of the intradermal Copenhagen 1331 BCG vaccine in neonates in Durban, South Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Jeena, P. M.; Chhagan, M. K.; Topley, J.; Coovadia, H. M.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the safety of the intradermal Copenhagen BCG vaccine in neonates at different levels of delivery and neonatal units of the Durban Functional Region and surrounding regions. METHODS: A prospective study was carried out over a two-year period between July 1997 and June 1999. All neonates who had been vaccinated with the intradermal vaccine were evaluated at immunization clinics six weeks after immunization, or earlier if adverse effects occurred. FINDINGS: In total, 9763 neonates were examined: in 95.4% the vaccination scar had healed and 1.5% had no visible scar. Adverse events occurred in 3.1%. The proportion of neonates with no visible vaccination scars decreased over the study period, as did the number with adverse events. The lowest rate of adverse events and the highest rates of healed vaccination scars were seen in the tertiary hospital and regional and district hospitals that were in close proximity to the academic centre involved in this study. CONCLUSIONS: In the study sites, the transition from the percutaneous to intradermal route of administration of BCG vaccine was successful and took place without incurring unacceptably high rates of adverse events. To minimize adverse events, however, it is essential to continue training health personnel involved in implementing intradermal BCG vaccination programmes. PMID:11357213

  14. Syndecan-1 Is Required to Maintain Intradermal Fat and Prevent Cold Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wollny, Damian; Clark, Rod J.; Roopra, Avtar; Colman, Ricki J.; MacDougald, Ormond A.; Shedd, Timothy A.; Nelson, David W.; Yen, Mei-I; Yen, Chi-Liang Eric; Alexander, Caroline M.

    2014-01-01

    Homeostatic temperature regulation is fundamental to mammalian physiology and is controlled by acute and chronic responses of local, endocrine and nervous regulators. Here, we report that loss of the heparan sulfate proteoglycan, syndecan-1, causes a profoundly depleted intradermal fat layer, which provides crucial thermogenic insulation for mammals. Mice without syndecan-1 enter torpor upon fasting and show multiple indicators of cold stress, including activation of the stress checkpoint p38α in brown adipose tissue, liver and lung. The metabolic phenotype in mutant mice, including reduced liver glycogen, is rescued by housing at thermoneutrality, suggesting that reduced insulation in cool temperatures underlies the observed phenotypes. We find that syndecan-1, which functions as a facultative lipoprotein uptake receptor, is required for adipocyte differentiation in vitro. Intradermal fat shows highly dynamic differentiation, continuously expanding and involuting in response to hair cycle and ambient temperature. This physiology probably confers a unique role for Sdc1 in this adipocyte sub-type. The PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone rescues Sdc1−/− intradermal adipose tissue, placing PPARγ downstream of Sdc1 in triggering adipocyte differentiation. Our study indicates that disruption of intradermal adipose tissue development results in cold stress and complex metabolic pathology. PMID:25101993

  15. Phase I Randomized Clinical Trial of VRC DNA and rAd5 HIV-1 Vaccine Delivery by Intramuscular (IM), Subcutaneous (SC) and Intradermal (ID) Administration (VRC 011)

    PubMed Central

    Enama, Mary E.; Ledgerwood, Julie E.; Novik, Laura; Nason, Martha C.; Gordon, Ingelise J.; Holman, LaSonji; Bailer, Robert T.; Roederer, Mario; Koup, Richard A.; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.; Graham, Barney S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Phase 1 evaluation of the VRC HIV DNA and rAd5 vaccines delivered intramuscularly (IM) supported proceeding to a Phase 2 b efficacy study. Here we report comparison of the IM, subcutaneous (SC) and intradermal (ID) routes of administration. Methods Sixty subjects were randomized to 6 schedules to evaluate the IM, SC or ID route for prime injections. Three schedules included DNA primes (Wks 0,4,8) and 3 schedules included rAd5 prime (Wk0); all included rAd5 IM boost (Wk24). DNA vaccine dosage was 4 mg IM or SC, but 0.4 mg ID, while all rAd5 vaccinations were 1010 PU. All injections were administered by needle and syringe. Results Overall, 27/30 subjects completed 3 DNA primes; 30/30 subjects completed rAd5 primes. Mild local pruritus (itchiness), superficial skin lesions and injection site nodules were associated with ID and SC, but not IM injections. All routes induced T-cell and antibody immune responses after rAd5 boosting. Overall, >95% had Env antibody and >80% had Env T-cell responses. Conclusions The pattern of local reactogenicity following ID and SC injections differed from IM injections but all routes were well-tolerated. There was no evidence of an immunogenicity advantage following SC or ID delivery, supporting IM delivery as the preferred route of administration. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00321061 PMID:24621858

  16. Molecular Identification of Paramecium bursaria Syngens and Studies on Geographic Distribution using Mitochondrial Cytochrome C Oxidase Subunit I (COI).

    PubMed

    Zagata, Patrycja; Greczek-Stachura, Magdalena; Tarcz, Sebastian; Rautian, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Paramecium bursaria is composed of five syngens that are morphologically indistinguishable but sexually isolated. The aim of the present study was to confirm by molecular methods (analyses of mitochondrial COI) the identification of P. bursaria syngens originating from different geographical locations. Phylograms constructed using both the neighbor-joining and maximum-likelihood methods based on a comparison of 34 sequences of P. bursaria strains and P. multimicronucleatum, P. caudatum and P.calkinsi strains used as outgroups revealed five clusters which correspond to results obtained previously by mating reaction. Our analysis shows the existence of 24 haplotypes for the COI gene sequence in the studied strains. The interspecies haplotype diversity was Hd = 0.967. We confirmed genetic differentiation between strains of P. bursaria and the occurrence of a correlation between geographical distribution and the correspondent syngen. PMID:26103689

  17. Intramuscular vs intradermal route for hepatitis B booster vaccine in celiac children

    PubMed Central

    Leonardi, Salvatore; Praticò, Andrea Domenico; Lionetti, Elena; Spina, Massimo; Vitaliti, Giovanna; Rosa, Mario La

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To compare intradermal (ID) and intramuscular (IM) booster doses, which have been used in healthy and high risk subjects, such as healthcare workers, haemodialysis patients, human immunodeficiency virus patients, and renal transplant recipients unresponsive to initial hepatitis B vaccination, in celiac individuals. METHODS: We conducted our study on 58 celiac patients, vaccinated in the first year of life, whose blood analysis had showed the absence of protective hepatitis B virus (HBV) antibodies. All patients had received the last vaccine injection at least one year before study enrolment and they had been on a gluten free diet for at least 1 year. In all patients we randomly performed an HBV vaccine booster dose by ID or IM route. Thirty celiac patients were revaccinated with recombinant hepatitis B vaccine (Engerix B) 2 μg by the ID route, while 28 celiac patients were revaccinated with Engerix B 10 μg by the IM route. Four weeks after every booster dose, the anti-hepatitis B surface (HBs) antibody titer was measured by an enzyme-linked immune-adsorbent assay. We performed a maximum of three booster doses in patients with no anti-HBs antibodies after the first or the second vaccine dose. The cut off value for a negative anti-HBs antibody titer was 10 IU/L. Patients with values between 10 and 100 IU/L were considered "low responders" while patients with an antibody titer higher than 1000 IU/L were considered "high responders". RESULTS: No significant difference in age, gender, duration of illness, and years of gluten intake was found between the two groups. We found a high percentage of "responders" after the first booster dose (ID = 76.7%, IM = 78.6%) and a greater increase after the third dose (ID = 90%, IM = 96.4%) of vaccine in both groups. Moreover we found a significantly higher number of high responders (with an anti-HBs antibody titer > 1000 IU/L) in the ID (40%) than in the IM (7.1%) group, and this difference was evident after the first booster

  18. Intravitreal injection

    MedlinePlus

    Retinal vein occlusion-intravitreal injection; Triamcinolone-intravitreal injection; Dexamethasone-intravitreal injection; Lucentis-intravitreal injection; Avastin-intravitreal injection; Bevacizumab-intravitreal injection; Ranibizumab- ...

  19. High Local Concentrations of Intradermal MSCs Restore Skin Integrity and Facilitate Wound Healing in Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Kühl, Tobias; Mezger, Markus; Hausser, Ingrid; Handgretinger, Rupert; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Nyström, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) is an incurable skin fragility disorder caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene, coding for the anchoring fibril protein collagen VII (C7). Life-long mechanosensitivity of skin and mucosal surfaces is associated with large body surface erosions, chronic wounds, and secondary fibrosis that severely impede functionality. Here, we present the first systematic long-term evaluation of the therapeutic potential of a mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC)-based therapy for DEB. Intradermal administration of MSCs in a DEB mouse model resulted in production and deposition of C7 at the dermal-epidermal junction, the physiological site of function. The effect was dose-dependent with MSCs being up to 10-fold more potent than dermal fibroblasts. MSCs promoted regeneration of DEB wounds via normalization of dermal and epidermal healing and improved skin integrity through de novo formation of functional immature anchoring fibrils. Additional benefits were gained by MSCs' anti-inflammatory effects, which led to decreased immune cell infiltration into injured DEB skin. In our setting, the clinical benefit of MSC injections lasted for more than 3 months. We conclude that MSCs are viable options for localized DEB therapy. Importantly, however, the cell number needed to achieve therapeutic efficacy excludes the use of systemic administration. PMID:25858020

  20. High Local Concentrations of Intradermal MSCs Restore Skin Integrity and Facilitate Wound Healing in Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    PubMed

    Kühl, Tobias; Mezger, Markus; Hausser, Ingrid; Handgretinger, Rupert; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Nyström, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) is an incurable skin fragility disorder caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene, coding for the anchoring fibril protein collagen VII (C7). Life-long mechanosensitivity of skin and mucosal surfaces is associated with large body surface erosions, chronic wounds, and secondary fibrosis that severely impede functionality. Here, we present the first systematic long-term evaluation of the therapeutic potential of a mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC)-based therapy for DEB. Intradermal administration of MSCs in a DEB mouse model resulted in production and deposition of C7 at the dermal-epidermal junction, the physiological site of function. The effect was dose-dependent with MSCs being up to 10-fold more potent than dermal fibroblasts. MSCs promoted regeneration of DEB wounds via normalization of dermal and epidermal healing and improved skin integrity through de novo formation of functional immature anchoring fibrils. Additional benefits were gained by MSCs' anti-inflammatory effects, which led to decreased immune cell infiltration into injured DEB skin. In our setting, the clinical benefit of MSC injections lasted for more than 3 months. We conclude that MSCs are viable options for localized DEB therapy. Importantly, however, the cell number needed to achieve therapeutic efficacy excludes the use of systemic administration. PMID:25858020

  1. Mutational Analysis of Mating Type Inheritance in Syngen 4 of PARAMECIUM AURELIA.

    PubMed

    Byrne, B C

    1973-05-01

    Six genic mutations restricting clones to mating type VII (O) were isolated in syngen 4, Paramecium aurelia. The only three extensively tested were neither allelic nor closely linked. A second type of mutation, allelic to one of the O restricted mutants, was also found. Clones homozygous for this mutant gene were selfers, producing both O and E (VIII) mating types, but only when they were progeny of mating type E parental clones. While all seven mutant genes behaved as recessives in monohybrid crosses, clones heterozygous at two different loci often demonstrated an unanticipated phenotype: selfing. The significance of the findings is discussed in relation to mating type determination and the evolution of mating type systems. PMID:17248611

  2. Mutational Analysis of Mating Type Inheritance in Syngen 4 of PARAMECIUM AURELIA

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Bruce C.

    1973-01-01

    Six genic mutations restricting clones to mating type VII (O) were isolated in syngen 4, Paramecium aurelia. The only three extensively tested were neither allelic nor closely linked. A second type of mutation, allelic to one of the O restricted mutants, was also found. Clones homozygous for this mutant gene were selfers, producing both O and E (VIII) mating types, but only when they were progeny of mating type E parental clones. While all seven mutant genes behaved as recessives in monohybrid crosses, clones heterozygous at two different loci often demonstrated an unanticipated phenotype: selfing. The significance of the findings is discussed in relation to mating type determination and the evolution of mating type systems. PMID:17248611

  3. Generation of a syngeneic orthotopic transplant model of prostate cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Leigh; Lehet, Kristin; Ku, ShengYu; Azabdaftari, Gissou; Pili, Roberto

    2014-10-15

    Progression to metastatic disease is the primary cause of mortality in men with prostate cancer (PCa). Mouse models which progress with spontaneous metastasis are limited. Such models would allow for extensive studies of molecular mechanisms of metastasis, and more definite pre- clinical therapy trials. Orthotopic murine models have been described; however a limiting biology of these models is their lack of an intact immune system. Within, we describe the development of an androgen sensitive and castrate resistant tractable orthotopic murine syngeneic (immune competent) model of prostate cancer. Both models develop primary tumors which spontaneously progress to metastatic disease in lymph tissue. These models will allow for more complete mechanistic and therapeutic studies in a short time period. PMID:25485289

  4. Generation of a syngeneic orthotopic transplant model of prostate cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Leigh; Lehet, Kristin; Ku, ShengYu; Azabdaftari, Gissou; Pili, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Progression to metastatic disease is the primary cause of mortality in men with prostate cancer (PCa). Mouse models which progress with spontaneous metastasis are limited. Such models would allow for extensive studies of molecular mechanisms of metastasis, and more definite pre- clinical therapy trials. Orthotopic murine models have been described; however a limiting biology of these models is their lack of an intact immune system. Within, we describe the development of an androgen sensitive and castrate resistant tractable orthotopic murine syngeneic (immune competent) model of prostate cancer. Both models develop primary tumors which spontaneously progress to metastatic disease in lymph tissue. These models will allow for more complete mechanistic and therapeutic studies in a short time period. PMID:25485289

  5. Effects of Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibition with MK-0431 on Syngeneic Mouse Islet Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Juang, Jyuhn-Huarng; Kuo, Chien-Hung; Liu, Ying-Hsiu; Chang, Han-Ying; Chen, Chiung-Tong

    2014-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors increase circulating levels of glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide which may promote β-cell proliferation and survival. This study tested if DPP-4 inhibition with MK-0431 is beneficial for diabetic mice syngeneically transplanted with a marginal number of islets. We syngeneically transplanted 150 C57BL/6 mouse islets under the kidney capsule of each streptozotocin-diabetic mouse and then treated recipients with (n = 21) or without (n = 17) MK-0431 (30 mg/kg/day, po) for 6 weeks. After islet transplantation, blood glucose levels decreased in both MK-0431-treated and control groups. However, the blood glucose and area under the curve of the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test at 2, 4, and 6 weeks were not significantly different between MK-0431-treated mice and controls. During 6 weeks, both groups exhibited increased body weights over time. However, the weight between two groups did not differ throughout the study period. At 6 weeks after transplantation, the graft beta-cell mass (0.024 ± 0.005 versus 0.023 ± 0.007 mg, P = 0.8793) and insulin content (140 ± 48 versus 231 ± 63 ng, P = 0.2939) were comparable in the MK-0431-treated group and controls. Our results indicate posttransplant DPP-4 inhibition with MK-0431 in the diabetic recipient with a marginal number of islets is not beneficial to transplantation outcome or islet grafts. PMID:25165473

  6. Priming with a Simplified Intradermal HIV-1 DNA Vaccine Regimen followed by Boosting with Recombinant HIV-1 MVA Vaccine Is Safe and Immunogenic: A Phase IIa Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Charlotta; Joachim, Agricola; Geldmacher, Christof; Mann, Philipp; Moshiro, Candida; Aboud, Said; Lyamuya, Eligius; Maboko, Leonard; Missanga, Marco; Kaluwa, Bahati; Mfinanga, Sayoki; Podola, Lilly; Bauer, Asli; Godoy-Ramirez, Karina; Marovich, Mary; Moss, Bernard; Hoelscher, Michael; Gotch, Frances; Stöhr, Wolfgang; Stout, Richard; McCormack, Sheena; Wahren, Britta; Mhalu, Fred; Robb, Merlin L.; Biberfeld, Gunnel; Sandström, Eric; Bakari, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Background Intradermal priming with HIV-1 DNA plasmids followed by HIV-1MVA boosting induces strong and broad cellular and humoral immune responses. In our previous HIVIS-03 trial, we used 5 injections with 2 pools of HIV-DNA at separate sites for each priming immunization. The present study explores whether HIV-DNA priming can be simplified by reducing the number of DNA injections and administration of combined versus separated plasmid pools. Methods In this phase IIa, randomized trial, priming was performed using 5 injections of HIV-DNA, 1000 μg total dose, (3 Env and 2 Gag encoding plasmids) compared to two “simplified” regimens of 2 injections of HIV-DNA, 600 μg total dose, of Env- and Gag-encoding plasmid pools with each pool either administered separately or combined. HIV-DNA immunizations were given intradermally at weeks 0, 4, and 12. Boosting was performed intramuscularly with 108 pfu HIV-MVA at weeks 30 and 46. Results 129 healthy Tanzanian participants were enrolled. There were no differences in adverse events between the groups. The proportion of IFN-γ ELISpot responders to Gag and/or Env peptides after the second HIV-MVA boost did not differ significantly between the groups primed with 2 injections of combined HIV-DNA pools, 2 injections with separated pools, and 5 injections with separated pools (90%, 97% and 97%). There were no significant differences in the magnitude of Gag and/or Env IFN-γ ELISpot responses, in CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses measured as IFN-γ/IL-2 production by intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) or in response rates and median titers for binding antibodies to Env gp160 between study groups. Conclusions A simplified intradermal vaccination regimen with 2 injections of a total of 600 μg with combined HIV-DNA plasmids primed cellular responses as efficiently as the standard regimen of 5 injections of a total of 1000 μg with separated plasmid pools after boosting twice with HIV-MVA. Trial Registration World Health

  7. Sequential treatment with intradermal incision (intracision) and 2,940-nm Er:YAG laser for chicken pox scars.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Ju; Kim, Young Koo; Choi, Sun Young; Park, Kui Young; Seo, Seong Jun

    2014-01-01

    Boxcar scars, such as chicken pox scars, are round to oval depressions with sharply defined vertical edges. Subcision is a simple and safe procedure for treatment of atrophic and depressed scars, but boxcar scars are generally not eliminated by subcision. Intradermal incision technique (intracision) can treat chicken pox scars by untethering fibrotic strands, raising collagen synthesis, and having additional intradermal blood pocket formation. We have found that chicken pox scars further improve when intracision is followed by laser skin resurfacing. PMID:24502307

  8. Cellular immune response following pre-exposure and postexposure rabies vaccination by intradermal and intramuscular routes

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, Sampada Sudarshan; Taj, Shaheen; Belludi, Ashwin Yajaman; Mani, Reeta Subramaniam; Hazra, Nandita

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Immunization against rabies in humans induces protective neutralizing antibodies; however, the induction of type 1 or type 2 cytokine mediated cellular immune responses following rabies vaccination is not understood. Hence, the present study investigated cellular cytokine responses in vaccinated individuals. Materials and Methods The study groups included healthy rabies antigen naive controls (n=10), individuals who received intradermal primary (n=10) or booster pre-exposure vaccination (n=20) and subjects who received postexposure rabies vaccination either by intradermal (n=18) or intramuscular (n=20) routes. The antigen specific cellular responses were analyzed by stimulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells with a rabies vaccine antigen in the interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISpot) assay. These responses were compared to the rabies virus neutralizing antibody (RVNA) titers that were measured by rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test. Results We observed that cellular and humoral immune responses to primary intradermal rabies vaccination could be greatly enhanced by a booster vaccine; and both type 1 and type 2 cytokine responses were significantly elevated. The magnitude of type 1 and type 2 cytokine responses did not differ significantly among the intramuscular and intradermal routes of postexposure vaccination. The number of cells producing IFN-γ and IL-4 correlated significantly with the levels of RVNA. Conclusion Both type 1 and type 2 cellular cytokine responses are strongly induced after rabies vaccination and directly correlate with levels of RVNA titers. The neutralizing antibody as well as the type 1 and type 2 cytokine responses may be important for vaccine induced protective responses against rabies. PMID:25649188

  9. Oral Tolerance to Environmental Mycobacteria Interferes with Intradermal, but Not Pulmonary, Immunization against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Price, Dominique N.; Kusewitt, Donna F.; Lino, Christopher A.; McBride, Amber A.; Muttil, Pavan

    2016-01-01

    Bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG) is currently the only approved vaccine against tuberculosis (TB) and is administered in over 150 countries worldwide. Despite its widespread use, the vaccine has a variable protective efficacy of 0–80%, with the lowest efficacy rates in tropical regions where TB is most prevalent. This variability is partially due to ubiquitous environmental mycobacteria (EM) found in soil and water sources, with high EM prevalence coinciding with areas of poor vaccine efficacy. In an effort to elucidate the mechanisms underlying EM interference with BCG vaccine efficacy, we exposed mice chronically to Mycobacterium avium (M. avium), a specific EM, by two different routes, the oral and intradermal route, to mimic human exposure. After intradermal BCG immunization in mice exposed to oral M. avium, we saw a significant decrease in the pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-γ, and an increase in T regulatory cells and the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 compared to naïve BCG-vaccinated animals. To circumvent the immunosuppressive effect of oral M. avium exposure, we vaccinated mice by the pulmonary route with BCG. Inhaled BCG immunization rescued IFN-γ levels and increased CD4 and CD8 T cell recruitment into airways in M. avium-presensitized mice. In contrast, intradermal BCG vaccination was ineffective at T cell recruitment into the airway. Pulmonary BCG vaccination proved protective against Mtb infection regardless of previous oral M. avium exposure, compared to intradermal BCG immunization. In conclusion, our data indicate that vaccination against TB by the pulmonary route increases BCG vaccine efficacy by avoiding the immunosuppressive interference generated by chronic oral exposure to EM. This has implications in TB-burdened countries where drug resistance is on the rise and health care options are limited due to economic considerations. A successful vaccine against TB is necessary in these areas as it is both effective and economical. PMID:27153120

  10. Kinetics of Leptospira interrogans Infection in Hamsters after Intradermal and Subcutaneous Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Mariana L.; Matsunaga, James; Wang, Long-Chieh; de la Peña Moctezuma, Alejandro; Lewis, Michael S.; Babbitt, Jane T.; Aleixo, Jose Antonio G.; Haake, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is a zoonosis caused by highly motile, helically shaped bacteria that penetrate the skin and mucous membranes through lesions or abrasions, and rapidly disseminate throughout the body. Although the intraperitoneal route of infection is widely used to experimentally inoculate hamsters, this challenge route does not represent a natural route of infection. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe the kinetics of disease and infection in hamster model of leptospirosis after subcutaneous and intradermal inoculation of Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni, strain Fiocruz L1-130. Histopathologic changes in and around the kidney, including glomerular and tubular damage and interstitial inflammatory changes, began on day 5, and preceded deterioration in renal function as measured by serum creatinine. Weight loss, hemoconcentration, increased absolute neutrophil counts (ANC) in the blood and hepatic dysfunction were first noted on day 6. Vascular endothelial growth factor, a serum marker of sepsis severity, became elevated during the later stages of infection. The burden of infection, as measured by quantitative PCR, was highest in the kidney and peaked on day 5 after intradermal challenge and on day 6 after subcutaneous challenge. Compared to subcutaneous challenge, intradermal challenge resulted in a lower burden of infection in both the kidney and liver on day 6, lower ANC and less weight loss on day 7. Conclusions/Significance The intradermal and subcutaneous challenge routes result in significant differences in the kinetics of dissemination and disease after challenge with L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni strain Fiocruz L1-130 at an experimental dose of 2×106 leptospires. These results provide new information regarding infection kinetics in the hamster model of leptospirosis. PMID:25411782

  11. Oral Tolerance to Environmental Mycobacteria Interferes with Intradermal, but Not Pulmonary, Immunization against Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Price, Dominique N; Kusewitt, Donna F; Lino, Christopher A; McBride, Amber A; Muttil, Pavan

    2016-05-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is currently the only approved vaccine against tuberculosis (TB) and is administered in over 150 countries worldwide. Despite its widespread use, the vaccine has a variable protective efficacy of 0-80%, with the lowest efficacy rates in tropical regions where TB is most prevalent. This variability is partially due to ubiquitous environmental mycobacteria (EM) found in soil and water sources, with high EM prevalence coinciding with areas of poor vaccine efficacy. In an effort to elucidate the mechanisms underlying EM interference with BCG vaccine efficacy, we exposed mice chronically to Mycobacterium avium (M. avium), a specific EM, by two different routes, the oral and intradermal route, to mimic human exposure. After intradermal BCG immunization in mice exposed to oral M. avium, we saw a significant decrease in the pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-γ, and an increase in T regulatory cells and the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 compared to naïve BCG-vaccinated animals. To circumvent the immunosuppressive effect of oral M. avium exposure, we vaccinated mice by the pulmonary route with BCG. Inhaled BCG immunization rescued IFN-γ levels and increased CD4 and CD8 T cell recruitment into airways in M. avium-presensitized mice. In contrast, intradermal BCG vaccination was ineffective at T cell recruitment into the airway. Pulmonary BCG vaccination proved protective against Mtb infection regardless of previous oral M. avium exposure, compared to intradermal BCG immunization. In conclusion, our data indicate that vaccination against TB by the pulmonary route increases BCG vaccine efficacy by avoiding the immunosuppressive interference generated by chronic oral exposure to EM. This has implications in TB-burdened countries where drug resistance is on the rise and health care options are limited due to economic considerations. A successful vaccine against TB is necessary in these areas as it is both effective and economical. PMID:27153120

  12. Interstitial Fluid Pressure and Vascularity of Intradermal and Intramuscular Human Tumor Xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Gulliksrud, Kristine; Galappathi, Kanthi; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: High interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) in tumors has been shown to be associated with poor prognosis. Mechanisms underlying the intertumor heterogeneity in IFP were investigated in this study. Methods and Materials: A-07 melanoma xenografts were transplanted intradermally or intramuscularly in BALB/c nu/nu mice. IFP was measured in the center of the tumors with a Millar catheter. Tumor blood perfusion and extracellular volume fraction were assessed by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). The necrotic fraction, vascular density, and vessel diameters of the tumors were determined by image analysis of histological preparations. Results: Significant intertumor heterogeneity in IFP, blood perfusion, and microvascular morphology was observed whether the tumors were transplanted intradermally or intramuscularly. High IFP was mainly a consequence of high resistance to blood flow caused by low vessel diameters in either transplantation site. IFP decreased with increasing blood perfusion in intradermal tumors and increased with increasing blood perfusion in intramuscular tumors, mainly because the morphology of the tumor microvasculature differed systematically between the two tumor models. Conclusion: The potential of DCE-MRI as a noninvasive method for assessing the IFP of tumors may be limited because any relationship between IFP and blood perfusion may differ with the tumor growth site.

  13. Hyporesponsiveness to intradermal administration of hepatitis B vaccine in insulin dependent diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Volti, S; Caruso-Nicoletti, M; Biazzo, F; Sciacca, A; Mandara, G; Mancuso, M; Mollica, F

    1998-01-01

    The immune response to intradermal or intramuscular hepatitis B vaccine in 18 children with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) compared with 24 healthy children was studied. Patients were divided into responders, hyporesponders, and non-responders according to their antihepatitis B serum concentrations after hepatitis B vaccination. We also studied HLA class II antigen distribution and did delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) tests on children with IDDM and controls.
 No difference in the immune response (antihepatitis B surface antigen antibody titres) was found with intramuscular administration, whereas with intradermal administration a statistically lower immune response (p < 0.001) was observed in children with IDDM v controls. This hyporesponsiveness cannot be attributed to HLA class II antigen distribution because their frequency was the same in both groups of children with IDDM.
 It is suggested that the poor immune response to intradermal hepatitis B vaccine may be due to impaired macrophage activity resulting in failure of antigen presentation, which may be of importance in the immune dysfunction in children with IDDM. This hypothesis is suggested by a significantly lower score on a DTH test to a battery of antigens in the IDDM group when compared with controls. It is therefore suggested that when the hepatitis B vaccination is offered to children with IDDM it may be preferable to give it intramuscularly.

 PMID:9534677

  14. Hyporesponsiveness to intradermal administration of hepatitis B vaccine in insulin dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Li Volti, S; Caruso-Nicoletti, M; Biazzo, F; Sciacca, A; Mandarà, G; Mancuso, M; Mollica, F

    1998-01-01

    The immune response to intradermal or intramuscular hepatitis B vaccine in 18 children with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) compared with 24 healthy children was studied. Patients were divided into responders, hyporesponders, and non-responders according to their antihepatitis B serum concentrations after hepatitis B vaccination. We also studied HLA class II antigen distribution and did delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) tests on children with IDDM and controls. No difference in the immune response (antihepatitis B surface antigen antibody titres) was found with intramuscular administration, whereas with intradermal administration a statistically lower immune response (p < 0.001) was observed in children with IDDM v controls. This hyporesponsiveness cannot be attributed to HLA class II antigen distribution because their frequency was the same in both groups of children with IDDM. It is suggested that the poor immune response to intradermal hepatitis B vaccine may be due to impaired macrophage activity resulting in failure of antigen presentation, which may be of importance in the immune dysfunction in children with IDDM. This hypothesis is suggested by a significantly lower score on a DTH test to a battery of antigens in the IDDM group when compared with controls. It is therefore suggested that when the hepatitis B vaccination is offered to children with IDDM it may be preferable to give it intramuscularly. PMID:9534677

  15. Injectable agents affecting subcutaneous fats.

    PubMed

    Chen, David Lk; Cohen, Joel L; Green, Jeremy B

    2015-09-01

    Mesotherapy is an intradermal or subcutaneous injection of therapeutic agents to induce local effects, and was pioneered in Europe during the 1950s. For the past 2 decades, there has been significant interest in the use of mesotherapy for minimally invasive local fat contouring. Based on the theorized lipolytic effects of the agent phosphatidylcholine, initial attempts involved its injection into subcutaneous tissue. With further studies, however, it became apparent that the activity attributed to phosphatidylcholine mesotherapy was due to the adipolytic effects of deoxycholate, a detergent used to solubilize phosphatidylcholine. Since then, clinical trials have surfaced that demonstrate the efficacy of a proprietary formulation of deoxycholate for local fat contouring. Current trials on mesotherapy with salmeterol, a b-adrenergic agonist and lipolysis stimulator, are underway-with promising preliminary results as well. PMID:26566569

  16. Skin allografts in lethally irradiated animals repopulated with syngeneic hemopoietic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schwadron, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    Total body irradiation and repopulation with syngeneic hemopoietic cells can be used to induce tolerance to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) mismatched heart and kidney grafts in rats and mice. However, this protocol does not work for MHC mismatched skin grafts in rats or mice. Furthermore, LEW rats that accept WF cardiac allografts after irradiation and repopulation reject subsequent WF skin grafts. Treatment of skin allograft donors with methotrexate prior to grafting onto irradiated and reconstituted mice resulted in doubling of the mean survival time. Analysis of which antigens provoked skin graft rejection by irradiation and reconstituted animals revealed the importance of I region antigens. Cardiac allograft acceptance by irradiated and reconstituted animals is mediated by suppressor cells found in the spleen. Adoptively tolerant LEW rats accepted WF skin grafts in 50% of grafted animals. Analysis of this phenomenon revealed that the adoptive transfer procedure itself was important in achieving skin allograft acceptance by these animals. In general, it seems that the lack of ability of irradiated and reconstituted animals to accept fully MHC disparate skin grafts results from the inability of these animals to suppress lymph node effector cells against I region antigen seen on highly immunogenic allogeneic Langerhans cells in the skin.

  17. Extrahepatic islet transplantation with microporous polymer scaffolds in syngeneic mouse and allogeneic porcine models

    PubMed Central

    Gibly, Romie F.; Zhang, Xiaomin; Graham, Melanie L.; Hering, Bernhard J.; Kaufman, Dixon B.; Lowe, William L.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2011-01-01

    Intraportal transplantation of islets has successfully treated select patients with type 1 diabetes. However, intravascular infusion and the intrahepatic site contribute to significant early and late islet loss, yet a clinical alternative has remained elusive. We investigated non-encapsulating, porous, biodegradable polymer scaffolds as a vehicle for islet transplantation into extrahepatic sites, using syngeneic mouse and allogeneic porcine models. Scaffold architecture was modified to enhance cell infiltration leading to re-vascularization of the islets with minimal inflammatory response. In the diabetic mouse model, 125 islets seeded on scaffolds implanted into the epididymal fat pad restored normoglycemia within an average of 1.95 days and transplantation of only 75 islets required 12.1 days. Increasing the pore size to increase islet-islet interactions did not significantly impact islet function. The porcine model was used to investigate early islet engraftment. Increasing the islet seeding density led to a greater mass of engrafted islets, though the efficiency of islet survival decreased. Transplantation into the porcine omentum provided greater islet engraftment than the gastric submucosa. These results demonstrate scaffolds support murine islet transplantation with high efficiency, and feasibility studies in large animals support continued pre-clinical studies with scaffolds as a platform to control the transplant microenvironment. PMID:21959005

  18. Effect of Modified Alkaline Supplementation on Syngenic Melanoma Growth in CB57/BL Mice

    PubMed Central

    Spugnini, Enrico Pierluigi; Canese, Rossella; Gugliotta, Alessio; Fidanza, Stefano; Fais, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Tumor extracellular acidity is a hallmark of malignant cancers. Thus, in this study we evaluated the effects of the oral administration of a commercially available water alkalizer (Basenpulver®) (BP) on tumor growth in a syngenic melanoma mouse model. The alkalizer was administered daily by oral gavage starting one week after tumor implantation in CB57/BL mice. Tumors were calipered and their acidity measured by in vivo MRI guided 31P MRS. Furthermore, urine pH was monitored for potential metabolic alkalosis. BP administration significantly reduced melanoma growth in mice; the optimal dose in terms of tolerability and efficacy was 8 g/l (p< 0.05). The in vivo results were supported by in vitro experiments, wherein BP-treated human and murine melanoma cell cultures exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition of tumor cell growth. This investigation provides the first proof of concept that systemic buffering can improve tumor control by itself and that this approach may represent a new strategy in prevention and/or treatment of cancers. PMID:27447181

  19. Vector optimization and needle-free intradermal application of a broadly protective polyvalent influenza A DNA vaccine for pigs and humans

    PubMed Central

    Borggren, Marie; Nielsen, Jens; Bragstad, Karoline; Karlsson, Ingrid; Krog, Jesper S; Williams, James A; Fomsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The threat posed by the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus emphasized the need for new influenza A virus vaccines inducing a broad cross-protective immune response for use in both humans and pigs. An effective and broad influenza vaccine for pigs would greatly benefit the pork industry and contribute to public health by diminishing the risk of emerging highly pathogenic reassortants. Current inactivated protein vaccines against swine influenza produce only short-lived immunity and have no efficacy against heterologous strains. DNA vaccines are a potential alternative with advantages such as the induction of cellular and humoral immunity, inherent safety and rapid production time. We have previously developed a DNA vaccine encoding selected influenza proteins of pandemic origin and demonstrated broad protective immune responses in ferrets and pigs. In this study, we evaluated our DNA vaccine expressed by next-generation vectors. These new vectors can improve gene expression, but they are also efficiently produced on large scales and comply with regulatory guidelines by avoiding antibiotic resistance genes. In addition, a new needle-free delivery of the vaccine, convenient for mass vaccinations, was compared with intradermal needle injection followed by electroporation. We report that when our DNA vaccine is expressed by the new vectors and delivered to the skin with the needle-free device in the rabbit model, it can elicit an antibody response with the same titers as a conventional vector with intradermal electroporation. The needle-free delivery is already in use for traditional protein vaccines in pigs but should be considered as a practical alternative for the mass administration of broadly protective influenza DNA vaccines. PMID:25746201

  20. Antibody response after a four-site intradermal booster vaccination with cell-culture rabies vaccine.

    PubMed

    Tantawichien, T; Benjavongkulchai, M; Limsuwan, K; Khawplod, P; Kaewchompoo, W; Chomchey, P; Sitprija, V

    1999-05-01

    The current World Health Organization recommendation for booster vaccination of previously immunized individuals with potential exposure to rabies is two doses of vaccine intramuscularly or intradermally on days 0 and 3. We report responses to two types of postexposure treatment of healthy individuals who had received preexposure rabies vaccination 1 year previously. Group A individuals received four intradermal doses (one-fifth of the diluent volume of vaccine per dose) on day 0, and group B individuals received two intramuscular doses on days 0 and 3. Immunogenicity of the two booster regimens was assessed by titrating the amount of neutralizing antibody (Nab). We found that the booster doses of vaccine produced remarkable responses in all subjects. Nab titers of > or = 0.5 IU/mL (acceptable antibody level for protection against rabies) were detected in all subjects on day 14, and they were shown to be consistently high 1 year after the booster vaccination. We also found that the Nab titers for group A were significantly higher (two- to eightfold) than those for group B on days 5, 14, 150, and 360 after the initial booster vaccination (P < .05). Our study shows that the four-site intradermal booster regimen with use of one-fifth of the diluent volume of cell-culture rabies vaccine on day 0 is associated with a significantly higher antibody response than is the conventional booster regimen for subsequent postexposure rabies treatment of individuals who have received preexposure rabies vaccination with cell-culture rabies vaccine 1 year previously. PMID:10452642

  1. Strategic use of serology for the diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis after intradermal skin testing.

    PubMed

    Casal, Carmen; Díez-Guerrier, Alberto; Álvarez, Julio; Rodriguez-Campos, Sabrina; Mateos, Ana; Linscott, Richard; Martel, Edmond; Lawrence, John C; Whelan, Clare; Clarke, John; O'Brien, Amanda; Domínguez, Lucas; Aranaz, Alicia

    2014-06-01

    Diagnostic tests based on cell-mediated immunity are used in programmes for eradication of bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis). Serological assays could be applied as ancillary methods to detect infected animals. Our objective was to evaluate two serological techniques: M. bovis Ab Test (IDEXX, USA) and Enferplex™ TB assay (Enfer, Ireland) in animals tested simultaneously with the single and comparative intradermal tests and the interferon-gamma assay. This work was performed at two stages. First, a preliminary panel of samples collected prior to intradermal tests from tuberculosis-free (n=60) and M. bovis-infected herds (n=78) was assayed, obtaining high specificity: 100% (M. bovis Ab Test) and 98.3% (Enferplex TB assay) but low sensitivity (detection of M. bovis infected animals): 23.9% (M. bovis Ab Test) and 32.6% (Enferplex TB assay). Subsequently, the use of serological techniques was further studied in two herds with M. bovis infection (n=77) using samples collected prior to, and 72 h and 15 days after PPD inoculation. The highest level of detection of infected animals for serology was achieved at 15 days post-intradermal tests taking advantage of the anamnestic effect: 70.4% and 85.2% in herd A, and 66.7% and 83.3% in herd B, using M. bovis Ab Test and Enferplex TB assay, respectively. Quantitative results (average values obtained with M. bovis Ab Test ELISA and degree of positivity obtained with Enferplex TB assay) were higher in animals showing lesions compatible with tuberculosis. No significant differences were observed in the number of confirmed infected animals detected with either serological technique. PMID:24679958

  2. Should the General Practitioner Consider Mesotherapy (Intradermal Therapy) to Manage Localized Pain?

    PubMed

    Mammucari, Massimo; Maggiori, Enrica; Lazzari, Marzia; Natoli, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    Wide variations in the types of pain and response to analgesic pharmacotherapy mean that a variety of treatment strategies are needed. One approach is mesotherapy (intradermal therapy). This consists of microinjections into the skin and is ideally suited to the management of localized pain. Advantages include increasing the duration of drug activity, reduced risk of adverse events and interactions, and possible synergy with other therapies. Mesotherapy provides general practitioners with another tool for the treatment of local pain. However, it is important to provide patients with full details of the pros and cons of this approach and obtain informed patient consent. PMID:27229350

  3. A Case of Intradermal Melanocytic Nevus with Ossification (Nevus of Nanta)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Bok; Lee, Kyung Ho

    2008-01-01

    A 49-year-old woman presented with a 30-year history of asymptomatic plaque on her right temple. The histological examination revealed nests of nevus cells throughout the entire dermis. Bony spicules were seen just beneath the nevus cell nests in the lower dermis. Cutaneous ossification is an unusual event. Herein, we present a case of intradermal melanocytic nevus with unusual ossification (nevus of Nanta). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such case report in the Korean literature. PMID:27303191

  4. Evaluation of the impact of viscosity, injection volume, and injection flow rate on subcutaneous injection tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Berteau, Cecile; Filipe-Santos, Orchidée; Wang, Tao; Rojas, Humberto E; Granger, Corinne; Schwarzenbach, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Aim The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of fluid injection viscosity in combination with different injection volumes and flow rates on subcutaneous (SC) injection pain tolerance. Methods The study was a single-center, comparative, randomized, crossover, Phase I study in 24 healthy adults. Each participant received six injections in the abdomen area of either a 2 or 3 mL placebo solution, with three different fluid viscosities (1, 8–10, and 15–20 cP) combined with two different injection flow rates (0.02 and 0.3 mL/s). All injections were performed with 50 mL syringes and 27G, 6 mm needles. Perceived injection pain was assessed using a 100 mm visual analog scale (VAS) (0 mm/no pain, 100 mm/extreme pain). The location and depth of the injected fluid was assessed through 2D ultrasound echography images. Results Viscosity levels had significant impact on perceived injection pain (P=0.0003). Specifically, less pain was associated with high viscosity (VAS =12.6 mm) than medium (VAS =16.6 mm) or low (VAS =22.1 mm) viscosities, with a significant difference between high and low viscosities (P=0.0002). Target injection volume of 2 or 3 mL was demonstrated to have no significant impact on perceived injection pain (P=0.89). Slow (0.02 mL/s) or fast (0.30 mL/s) injection rates also showed no significant impact on perceived pain during SC injection (P=0.79). In 92% of injections, the injected fluid was located exclusively in SC tissue whereas the remaining injected fluids were found located in SC and/or intradermal layers. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that solutions of up to 3 mL and up to 15–20 cP injected into the abdomen within 10 seconds are well tolerated without pain. High viscosity injections were shown to be the most tolerated, whereas injection volume and flow rates did not impact perceived pain. PMID:26635489

  5. Modulation of human allogeneic and syngeneic pluripotent stem cells and immunological implications for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sackett, S D; Brown, M E; Tremmel, D M; Ellis, T; Burlingham, W J; Odorico, J S

    2016-04-01

    Tissues derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a promising source of cells for building various regenerative medicine therapies; from simply transplanting cells to reseeding decellularized organs to reconstructing multicellular tissues. Although reprogramming strategies for producing iPSCs have improved, the clinical use of iPSCs is limited by the presence of unique human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes, the main immunologic barrier to transplantation. In order to overcome the immunological hurdles associated with allogeneic tissues and organs, the generation of patient-histocompatible iPSCs (autologous or HLA-matched cells) provides an attractive platform for personalized medicine. However, concerns have been raised as to the fitness, safety and immunogenicity of iPSC derivatives because of variable differentiation potential of different lines and the identification of genetic and epigenetic aberrations that can occur during the reprogramming process. In addition, significant cost and regulatory barriers may deter commercialization of patient specific therapies in the short-term. Nonetheless, recent studies provide some evidence of immunological benefit for using autologous iPSCs. Yet, more studies are needed to evaluate the immunogenicity of various autologous and allogeneic human iPSC-derived cell types as well as test various methods to abrogate rejection. Here, we present perspectives of using allogeneic vs. autologous iPSCs for transplantation therapies and the advantages and disadvantages of each related to differentiation potential, immunogenicity, genetic stability and tumorigenicity. We also review the current literature on the immunogenicity of syngeneic iPSCs and discuss evidence that questions the feasibility of HLA-matched iPSC banks. Finally, we will discuss emerging methods of abrogating or reducing host immune responses to PSC derivatives. PMID:26970668

  6. Assessing the relationship between antigenicity and immunogenicity of human rabies vaccines when administered by intradermal route

    PubMed Central

    Bilagumba, Gangaboraiah; Ravish, Haradanahalli Shankarappa; Narayana, Hanumanthappa Ashwath Doddabele

    2010-01-01

    The metadata of 10 published studies and 3 vaccine trial reports comprising of 19 vaccine cohorts from four countries conducted over a period of 23 years (1986–2009) was used for metaanalysis. The vaccines studied were purified chick embryo cell vaccine (Rabipur, India and Germany), purified vero cell rabies vaccine (Verorab, France; Indirab, India) and human diploid cell vaccine (MIRV, France). The potency of these vaccines varied from 0.55 IU to 2.32 IU per intradermal dose of 0.1 ml per site. The vaccines were administered to 1,011 subjects comprising of 19 cohorts and using five different ID regimens. The immunogenicity was measured by assays of rabies virus neutralizing antibody (RVNA) titres using rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT) [15 cohorts] and mouse neutralization test (MNT) [4 cohorts]. The statistical analysis of the data was done by Karl Pearson's correlation coefficient to measure the relationship between antigenicity and immunogenicity. It was revealed that, there was no significant linear relationship between antigenicity and immunogenicity of rabies vaccines when administered by intradermal route (p > 0.230 and p > 0.568). PMID:20523131

  7. Hepatitis B vaccine by intradermal route in non responder patients: an update.

    PubMed

    Filippelli, Martina; Lionetti, Elena; Gennaro, Alessia; Lanzafame, Angela; Arrigo, Teresa; Salpietro, Carmelo; La Rosa, Mario; Leonardi, Salvatore

    2014-08-14

    Vaccination is the main prophylactic measure to reduce the mortality caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in healthy subjects since the immune response to hepatitis B recombinant vaccination occurs in over 90% of general population. Individuals who develop an anti-HBs titer less than 10 mIU/mL after primary vaccination cycle are defined "no responders". Many factors could cause a non response to the HBV vaccination, such as administration of the vaccine in buttocks, impaired vaccine storage conditions, drug abuse, smoking, infections and obesity. Moreover there are some diseases, like chronic kidney disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection, chronic liver disease, celiac disease, thalassaemia, type I diabetes mellitus, down's syndrome and other forms of mental retardation that are characterized by a poorer response to HBV vaccination than healthy subjects. To date it is still unclear how to treat this group of patients at high risk of hepatitis B infection. Recent studies seem to indicate that the administration of HBV recombinant vaccine by the intradermal route is very effective and could represent a more useful strategy than intramuscular route. This review focuses on the use of anti hepatitis B vaccine by intradermal route as alternative to conventional intramuscular vaccine in all non responder patients. A comprehensive review of the literature using PubMed database, with appropriate terms, was undertaken for articles in English published since 1983. The literature search was undertaken in September 2013. PMID:25132754

  8. A Study about the Cause and Clinicopathologic Findings of Injection-Induced Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Young-Jun; Sim, Woo-Young

    2015-01-01

    Background Cases of dermatitis induced by the injection of certain drugs have been reported. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the cause and clinicopathologic findings of injection-induced dermatitis, and to reveal whether the reaction has any relation to the patient's age, injection site, drug concentration, and time interval from the injection to the occurrence of the skin lesion. Methods In this study, we enrolled 10 patients who developed erythematous skin lesions after the injection of causative drugs. The lesions were compared to each other according to the injection site, time interval from the injection to the occurrence of the skin lesion, and clinical characteristics. We performed intradermal and patch tests in each patient with different concentrations of causative drugs. Results The most common causative drugs were diclofenac and vitamin K1. The eczematous type was the most frequent clinical type. The intradermal test showed more positive results than the patch test. The patch tests with diclofenac (as is, 2.5%, 5%, and 10%) and vitamin K1 (10%) were all negative in 10 patients. Furthermore, intradermal tests with diclofenac (as is) and vitamin K1 (0.1%, 1%, and 10%) were performed in 8 patients. Six patients had a positive reaction, consisting of erythema, induration, and vesiculation, after 1 and 2 days. Conclusion Our results showed that the most common causative agents were diclofenac and vitamin K1. Moreover, it seems that that intradermal test is more useful than the patch test in the diagnosis of injection-induced dermatitis. PMID:26719642

  9. A Phase 1 clinical trial of a DNA vaccine for Venezuelan equine encephalitis delivered by intramuscular or intradermal electroporation.

    PubMed

    Hannaman, Drew; Dupuy, Lesley C; Ellefsen, Barry; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2016-06-30

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), a mosquito-borne alphavirus, causes periodic epizootics in equines and is a recognized biological defense threat for humans. There are currently no FDA-licensed vaccines against VEEV. We developed a candidate DNA vaccine expressing the E3-E2-6K-E1 genes of VEEV (pWRG/VEE) and performed a Phase 1 clinical study to assess the vaccine's safety, reactogenicity, tolerability, and immunogenicity when administered by intramuscular (IM) or intradermal (ID) electroporation (EP) using the Ichor Medical Systems TriGrid™ Delivery System. Subjects in IM-EP groups received 0.5mg (N=8) or 2.0mg (N=9) of pWRG/VEE or a saline placebo (N=4) in a 1.0ml injection. Subjects in ID-EP groups received 0.08mg (N=8) or 0.3mg (N=8) of DNA or a saline placebo (N=4) in a 0.15ml injection. Subjects were monitored for a total period of 360 days. No vaccine- or device-related serious adverse events were reported. Based on the results of a subject questionnaire, the IM- and ID-EP procedures were both considered to be generally acceptable for prophylactic vaccine administration, with the acute tolerability of ID EP delivery judged to be greater than that of IM-EP delivery. All subjects (100%) in the high and low dose IM-EP groups developed detectable VEEV-neutralizing antibodies after two or three administrations of pWRG/VEE, respectively. VEEV-neutralizing antibody responses were detected in seven of eight subjects (87.5%) in the high dose and five of eight subjects (62.5%) in the low dose ID-EP groups after three vaccine administrations. There was a correlation between the DNA dose and the magnitude of the resulting VEEV-neutralizing antibody responses for both IM and ID EP delivery. These results indicate that pWRG/VEE delivered by either IM- or ID-EP is safe, tolerable, and immunogenic in humans at the evaluated dose levels. Clinicaltrials.gov registry number NCT01984983. PMID:27206386

  10. Syngeneic syrian hamster tumors feature tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes allowing adoptive cell therapy enhanced by oncolytic adenovirus in a replication permissive setting.

    PubMed

    Siurala, Mikko; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Havunen, Riikka; Tähtinen, Siri; Bramante, Simona; Parviainen, Suvi; Mathis, J Michael; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2016-05-01

    Adoptive transfer of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) has shown promising yet sometimes suboptimal results in clinical trials for advanced cancer, underscoring the need for approaches improving efficacy and safety. Six implantable syngeneic tumor cell lines of the Syrian hamster were used to initiate TIL cultures. TIL generated from tumor fragments cultured in human interleukin-2 (IL-2) for 10 d were adoptively transferred into tumor-bearing hamsters with concomitant intratumoral injections of oncolytic adenovirus (Ad5-D24) for the assessment of antitumor efficacy. Pancreatic cancer (HapT1) and melanoma (RPMI 1846) TIL exhibited potent and tumor-specific cytotoxicity in effector-to-target (E/T) assays. MHC Class I blocking abrogated the cell killing of RPMI 1846 TIL, indicating cytotoxic CD8(+) T-cell activity. When TIL were combined with Ad5-D24 in vitro, HapT1 tumor cell killing was significantly enhanced over single agents. In vivo, the intratumoral administration of HapT1 TIL and Ad5-D24 resulted in improved tumor growth control compared with either treatment alone. Additionally, splenocytes derived from animals treated with the combination of Ad5-D24 and TIL killed autologous tumor cells more efficiently than monotherapy-derived splenocytes, suggesting that systemic antitumor immunity was induced. For the first time, TIL of the Syrian hamster have been cultured, characterized and used therapeutically together with oncolytic adenovirus for enhancing the efficacy of TIL therapy. Our results support human translation of oncolytic adenovirus as an enabling technology for adoptive T-cell therapy of solid tumors. PMID:27467954

  11. Evaluation of locomotor function and microscopic structure of the spinal cord in a mouse model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis following treatment with syngeneic mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Nilesh Kumar; Bindal, Umesh; Eng Hwa, Wong; Chua, Caroline L L; Tan, Chek Ying

    2015-01-01

    Out of the minor myelin proteins, most significant one is myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have proven immunoregulatory capacity. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of syngeneic MSCs on mouse model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) through observation of locomotion by footprint analysis, histological analysis of spinal cord and estimation IL-17. C57BL/6 mice (10 weeks, n = 16) were immunized with 300 µg of MOG35-55 and 200 µL of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) to produce EAE model. Sham-treated control (n = 8) were injected with CFA. Half of immunized mice were given 100 µL of PBS (n = 8) and next half (n = 8) received 1 × 10(5) MSCs on day 11 through the tail veins. Clinical scoring showed development of EAE (loss of tonicity of tail and weakness of hind limb) on day 10. Following MSC treatment, clinical scores and hindlimb stride length showed significant improvement on day 15 onwards, compared to day 10 (P < 0.05). Under LFB staining, while PBS-treated group of EAE mice showed pale and degenerated axons in anterolateral white column of lumbar spinal cord, MSC-treated group showed numerous normal-looking axons. H&E staining showed normal axons in anterolateral white column and reduction of macrophages in MSC-treated EAE mice group. A lower level of IL-17 was observed in MSC treated EAE mice, compared to PBS-treated EAE mice. Our results suggest that Intravenous MSC has the potential to improve the locomotion and regeneration of axons in spinal cord in MOG-induced EAE model. PMID:26722389

  12. Anti-CD45 Radioimmunotherapy with 90Y but Not 177Lu Is Effective Treatment in a Syngeneic Murine Leukemia Model

    PubMed Central

    Orozco, Johnnie J.; Balkin, Ethan R.; Gooley, Ted A.; Kenoyer, Aimee; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Fisher, Darrell R.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Shadman, Mazyar; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Press, Oliver W.; Pagel, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) for treatment of hematologic malignancies has primarily employed monoclonal antibodies (Ab) labeled with 131I or 90Y which have limitations, and alternative radionuclides are needed to facilitate wider adoption of RIT. We therefore compared the relative therapeutic efficacy and toxicity of anti-CD45 RIT employing 90Y and 177Lu in a syngeneic, disseminated murine myeloid leukemia (B6SJLF1/J) model. Biodistribution studies showed that both 90Y- and 177Lu-anti-murine CD45 Ab conjugates (DOTA-30F11) targeted hematologic tissues, as at 24 hours 48.8±21.2 and 156±14.6% injected dose per gram of tissue (% ID/g) of 90Y-DOTA-30F11 and 54.2±9.5 and 199±11.7% ID/g of 177Lu-DOTA-30F11 accumulated in bone marrow (BM) and spleen, respectively. However, 90Y-DOTA-30F11 RIT demonstrated a dose-dependent survival benefit: 60% of mice treated with 300 µCi 90Y-DOTA-30F11 lived over 180 days after therapy, and mice treated with 100 µCi 90Y-DOTA-30F11 had a median survival 66 days. 90Y-anti-CD45 RIT was associated with transient, mild myelotoxicity without hepatic or renal toxicity. Conversely, 177Lu- anti-CD45 RIT yielded no long-term survivors. Thus, 90Y was more effective than 177Lu for anti-CD45 RIT of AML in this murine leukemia model. PMID:25460570

  13. Evaluation of locomotor function and microscopic structure of the spinal cord in a mouse model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis following treatment with syngeneic mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Nilesh Kumar; Bindal, Umesh; Eng Hwa, Wong; Chua, Caroline LL; Tan, Chek Ying

    2015-01-01

    Out of the minor myelin proteins, most significant one is myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have proven immunoregulatory capacity. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of syngeneic MSCs on mouse model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) through observation of locomotion by footprint analysis, histological analysis of spinal cord and estimation IL-17. C57BL/6 mice (10 weeks, n = 16) were immunized with 300 µg of MOG35-55 and 200 µL of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) to produce EAE model. Sham-treated control (n = 8) were injected with CFA. Half of immunized mice were given 100 µL of PBS (n = 8) and next half (n = 8) received 1 × 105 MSCs on day 11 through the tail veins. Clinical scoring showed development of EAE (loss of tonicity of tail and weakness of hind limb) on day 10. Following MSC treatment, clinical scores and hindlimb stride length showed significant improvement on day 15 onwards, compared to day 10 (P < 0.05). Under LFB staining, while PBS-treated group of EAE mice showed pale and degenerated axons in anterolateral white column of lumbar spinal cord, MSC-treated group showed numerous normal-looking axons. H&E staining showed normal axons in anterolateral white column and reduction of macrophages in MSC-treated EAE mice group. A lower level of IL-17 was observed in MSC treated EAE mice, compared to PBS-treated EAE mice. Our results suggest that Intravenous MSC has the potential to improve the locomotion and regeneration of axons in spinal cord in MOG-induced EAE model. PMID:26722389

  14. Experimental sensitization of guinea pigs by drugs. Comparison of the maximization test with the wholly intradermal test.

    PubMed

    Rantuccio, F; Coviello, C; Sinisi, D; Scardigno, A; Conte, A

    1983-11-01

    The capacity of tegobetain, pyrrolnitrin, tolcyclate and chlorquinaldol to induce delayed-type contact sensitization was studied in guinea pigs in 2 series of tests using the method of Magnusson & Kligman and the authors' modification of the wholly intradermal Draize technique. Histological examination of skin biopsies obtained from the test area demonstrated that tegobetain, pyrrolnitrin and tolcyclate are potential sensitizers. PMID:6653105

  15. MHC Class I Expression by Donor Hematopoietic Stem Cells Is Required to Prevent NK Cell Attack in Allogeneic, but Not Syngeneic Recipient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Yuichi; Li, Hao-Wei; Takahashi, Kazuko; Ishii, Hiroshi; Sykes, Megan; Fujisaki, Joji

    2015-01-01

    NK cells resist engraftment of syngeneic and allogeneic bone marrow (BM) cells lacking major histocompatibility (MHC) class I molecules, suggesting a critical role for donor MHC class I molecules in preventing NK cell attack against donor hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), and their derivatives. However, using high-resolution in vivo imaging, we demonstrated here that syngeneic MHC class I knockout (KO) donor HSPCs persist with the same survival frequencies as wild-type donor HSPCs. In contrast, syngeneic MHC class I KO differentiated hematopoietic cells and allogeneic MHC class I KO HSPCs were rejected in a manner that was significantly inhibited by NK cell depletion. In vivo time-lapse imaging demonstrated that mice receiving allogeneic MHC class I KO HSPCs showed a significant increase in NK cell motility and proliferation as well as frequencies of NK cell contact with and killing of HSPCs as compared to mice receiving wild-type HSPCs. The data indicate that donor MHC class I molecules are required to prevent NK cell-mediated rejection of syngeneic differentiated cells and allogeneic HSPCs, but not of syngeneic HSPCs. PMID:26544200

  16. Injectable Filler Techniques for Facial Rejuvenation, Volumization, and Augmentation.

    PubMed

    Bass, Lawrence S

    2015-11-01

    Multiple fillers are available: various hyaluronic acid products, calcium hydroxylapatite, and a few others that are biocompatible with good duration and a variety of mechanical properties allowing intradermal, subdermal, and supraperiosteal injection. Facial features can be reshaped with great control using these fillers. Aging changes, including facial volume loss, can be well-corrected. These treatments have become a mainstay of rejuvenation in the early facial aging patient. Injection technique is critical to obtaining excellent results. Threading, fanning, cross-hatching, bleb, and pillar techniques must be mastered. Technical execution can only measure up to, but not exceed, the quality of the aesthetic analysis. PMID:26505544

  17. Protective effect of intradermal BCG against leprosy; a case-control study in central Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, M L; Silva, S A; Neto, J C; de Andrade, A L; Martelli, C M; Zicker, F

    1992-09-01

    A case-control study was undertaken to evaluate the protective efficacy of intradermal BCG against leprosy in a high-endemic area of leprosy in central Brazil. Sixty-two cases and 186 controls were included in the study. Cases were all newly diagnosed leprosy patients under 16 years of age attending an outpatient health service, and all of them were schoolchildren. Three controls under 16 years old, frequency matched by sex and age group, were selected from schools geographically located in the area from which the cases came. The presence of BCG was negatively associated with leprosy, indicating a 5.3 risk of leprosy for those nonvaccinated and protective efficacy of 81%. Paucibacillary patients were more likely to have a BCG scar than multibacillary patients. PMID:1474274

  18. Thermal hyperalgesia and light touch allodynia after intradermal Mycobacterium butyricum administration in rat.

    PubMed

    Arévalo, Maria Isabel; Escribano, Elvira; Calpena, Ana; Domenech, Josep; Queralt, Josep

    2003-10-01

    We examined the time course (7 weeks) of thermal hyperalgesia and light touch allodynia in rats after intradermal administration of Mycobacterium butyricum. Nociceptive thresholds to heat and light touch were assessed. Paw edema and temperature, motor function, body weight, and propioception were also tested. Some rats developed arthritis (named AA rats) but others did not (named non-AA rats). Both groups were compared with healthy animals. Persistent hyperalgesia was found in both groups; in AA rats it appeared before clinical evidence of arthritis. Transient allodynia ocurred only after edema development and fell when edema decreased. Motor function was impaired only in AA rats. The results of this study demonstrate that hyperalgesia, but not allodynia, appeared after Mycobacterium butyricum in both groups, suggesting that changes in sensitivity were not merely the result of local hypersensitivity of the inflamed tissue, but may also be due to alterations in nociception in the central nervous system. PMID:14635786

  19. Interference of intradermal tuberculin tests on the serodiagnosis of paratuberculosis in cattle.

    PubMed

    Varges, Renato; Marassi, Carla Dray; Oelemann, Walter; Lilenbaum, Walter

    2009-06-01

    In this experiment 63 animals from a paratuberculosis (PTB) and tuberculosis-free herd were tested by Intradermal Tuberculin Tests (ITT) and blood samples were collected before PPD inoculation and on days 3, 15, 30, 60 and 90 post-inoculation (p.i.). Sera were tested for PTB-specific antibodies by ELISA-PPA and confirmed by a commercial ELISA. Three (4.76%) animals were positive by ELISA-PPA and five (7.93%) in the commercial ELISA, between days 30 and 90 p.i. These results suggest that ITT can interfere in the reliability of ELISAs and that serological testing for PTB should be avoided for 90d after PPD inoculation. PMID:18930508

  20. Pharmacokinetics and Postprandial Glycemic Excursions following Insulin Lispro Delivered by Intradermal Microneedle or Subcutaneous Infusion

    PubMed Central

    McVey, Elaine; Hirsch, Laurence; Sutter, Diane E.; Kapitza, Christoph; Dellweg, Sibylle; Clair, Janina; Rebrin, Kerstin; Judge, Kevin; Pettis, Ronald J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Intradermal (ID) delivery has been shown to accelerate insulin pharmacokinetics (PK). We compared the PK and pharmacodynamic (PD) effects of insulin lispro administered before two daily standardized solid mixed meals (breakfast and lunch), using microneedle-based ID or traditional subcutaneous (SC) delivery. Method The study included 22 subjects with type 1 diabetes in an eight-arm full crossover block design. One arm established each subject’s optimal meal dose. In six additional arms, the optimal, higher, and lower doses (+30%, -30%) were each given ID and SC delivery, in random order. The final arm assessed earlier timing for the ID optimal dose (-12 versus -2 min). The PK/PD data were collected for 6 h following meals. Intravenous basal regular insulin was given throughout, and premeal blood glucose (BG) adjusted to 115 mg/dl. Results The primary end point, postprandial time in range (70–180 mg/dl), showed no route-based differences with a high level of overall BG control for both SC and ID delivery. Secondary insulin PK end points showed more rapid ID availability versus SC across doses and meals (∆Tmax -16 min, ∆T50rising -7 min, ∆T50falling -30 min, all p < .05). Both intrasubject and intersubject variability for ID Tmax were significantly lower. Intradermal delivery showed modest, statistically significant secondary PD differences across doses and meals, generally within 90–120 min postprandially (∆12 mg/dl BG at 90 min, ∆7 mg/dl BGmax, ∆7 mg/dl mean BG 0–2 h, all p < .05). Conclusions This study indicates that ID insulin delivery is superior to SC delivery in speed of systemic availability and PK consistency and may improve postprandial glucose control. PMID:22920798

  1. IgG-loaded hyaluronan-based dissolving microneedles for intradermal protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Mönkäre, Juha; Reza Nejadnik, M; Baccouche, Khalil; Romeijn, Stefan; Jiskoot, Wim; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2015-11-28

    Dissolving microneedles are an attractive approach for non-invasive delivery of drugs via the skin, particularly when the doses are in the microgram or low-milligram range. The aim of the study was to develop hyaluronan-based, monoclonal IgG-loaded microneedles for intradermal delivery enabling efficient penetration and rapid dissolution in the skin while preserving protein stability. Microscopic analysis showed successful preparation of sharp microneedles with the tip length of ~280 μm and with up to 10% (w/w) of IgG content. The water content of the microneedles was ~12% and was not affected by the protein content. The protein distribution was uniform within microneedle tips and individual arrays but some array-to-array variation of IgG level within a single preparation batch was detected. After dissolution of microneedle arrays in PBS, N80% of protein was recovered and no conformational changes were detected by fluorescence spectroscopy. At submicron level, only weak and reversible interaction between HA and IgG was found by asymmetric flow field flow fractionation analysis after the dissolution of prepared microneedles. Although, the formation of insoluble micron-size particles was detected by flow imaging microscopy the IgG amount incorporated into these particles was negligible (b5%). Finally, microneedles were able to penetrate into the epidermis of ex vivo human skin followed by the rapid dissolution of the microneedle tips in the skin. After 10 min of application, the majority of the original tip length was dissolved and IgG and hyaluronan were co-deposited until a depth of 150-200 μm in the skin. In conclusion, developed hyaluronan-based dissolving microneedles allow rapid noninvasive intradermal protein delivery. PMID:26437262

  2. Golimumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... it.Golimumab injection comes in prefilled syringes and auto-injection devices for subcutaneous injection. Use each syringe ... method.Do not remove the cap from the auto-injection device or the cover from the prefilled ...

  3. Recurrent adult choroid plexus carcinoma treated with high-dose chemotherapy and syngeneic stem cell (bone marrow) transplant.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Thomas A; Parikh, Jigarkumar; Sharma, Suash; Giller, Cole A; Sterling, Kristen; Kapoor, Suraj; Pirkle, Christen; Jillella, Anand

    2013-12-01

    Choroid plexus carcinomas (CPCs) are rare epithelial central nervous system tumors. CPC occurs mainly in infants and young children, comprising ≈ 1 to 4% of all pediatric brain neoplasms. There is very limited information available regarding tumor biology and CPC treatment due to its rarity. There have been various case reports and meta-analyses of reported cases with CPC. Surgical resection is often challenging but remains a well-established treatment option. Chemotherapy is often reserved for recurrent or refractory cases, but the goal of treatment is usually palliative. We present a case of recurrent, adult CPC with disseminated leptomeningeal involvement treated with salvage chemotherapy including high-dose ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide; once a remission was achieved, this response was consolidated with a syngeneic stem cell (bone marrow) transplant after a preparative regimen of high-dose chemotherapy with carboplatin, etoposide, and thiotepa. Although the patient tolerated the transplant well and remained disease-free for 12 months, she subsequently succumbed to relapsed disease 18 months posttransplant. We believe that this is the first report of using syngeneic stem cell transplant in CPC to consolidate a remission achieved by salvage chemotherapy. PMID:23427033

  4. Faulty Injection Technique: A Preventable But Often Overlooked Factor in Insulin Allergy.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Partha Pratim; Biswas, Sugata Narayan; Patra, Shinjan

    2016-03-01

    Insulin hypersensitivity-a rare occurrence with currently available insulin preparations-may have varied manifestations, ranging from a local injection site allergy to severe generalized anaphylactic reactions. While various additives included in commercial insulin preparations and insulin peptides themselves remain the primary allergens responsible, faulty injection technique may at times potentiate the development of insulin allergy. Management of insulin allergy is complex, potentially dangerous at times, and can be challenging for the treating physician. We report a case of insulin allergy due to intradermal insulin injections which was cured by adopting a proper injection technique. PMID:26843018

  5. Intradermal vaccination with un-adjuvanted sub-unit vaccines triggers skin innate immunity and confers protective respiratory immunity in domestic swine.

    PubMed

    Le Luduec, Jean-Benoît; Debeer, Sabine; Piras, Fabienne; Andréoni, Christine; Boudet, Florence; Laurent, Philippe; Kaiserlian, Dominique; Dubois, Bertrand

    2016-02-10

    Intradermal (ID) vaccination constitutes a promising approach to induce anti-infectious immunity. This route of immunization has mostly been studied with influenza split-virion vaccines. However, the efficacy of ID vaccination for sub-unit vaccines in relation to underlying skin innate immunity remains to be explored for wider application in humans. Relevant animal models that more closely mimic human skin immunity than the widely used mouse models are therefore necessary. Here, we show in domestic swine, which shares striking anatomic and functional properties with human skin, that a single ID delivery of pseudorabies virus (PRV) glycoproteins without added adjuvant is sufficient to trigger adaptive cellular and humoral immune responses, and to confer protection from a lethal respiratory infection with PRV. Analysis of early events at the skin injection site revealed up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine genes, recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes and accumulation of inflammatory DC. We further show that the sustained induction of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes results from the combined effects of skin puncture, liquid injection in the dermis and viral antigens. These data highlight that immune protection against respiratory infection can be induced by ID vaccination with a subunit vaccine and reveal that adjuvant requirements are circumvented by the mechanical and antigenic stress caused by ID injection, which triggers innate immunity and mobilization of inflammatory DC at the immunization site. ID vaccination with sub-unit vaccines may thus represent a safe and efficient solution for protection against respiratory infections in swine and possibly also in humans, given the similarity of skin structure and function in both species. PMID:26768129

  6. Usefulness of confocal microscopy in distinguishing between basal cell carcinoma and intradermal melanocytic nevus on the face.

    PubMed

    Gamo, R; Floristan, U; Pampín, A; Caro, D; Pinedo, F; López-Estebaranz, J L

    2015-10-01

    The clinical distinction between basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and intradermal melanocytic nevus lesions on the face can be difficult, particularly in young patients or patients with multiple nevi. Dermoscopy is a useful tool for analyzing characteristic dermoscopic features of BCC, such as cartwheel structures, maple leaf-like areas, blue-gray nests and dots, and ulceration. It also reveals arborizing telangiectatic vessels and prominent curved vessels, which are typical of BCC, and comma vessels, which are typical of intradermal melanocytic nevi. It is, however, not always easy to distinguish between these 2 conditions, even when dermoscopy is used. We describe 2 facial lesions that posed a clinical and dermoscopic challenge in two 38-year-old patients; confocal microscopy showed separation between tumor nests and stroma and polarized nuclei, which are confocal microscopy features of basal cell carcinoma. PMID:26093995

  7. Rapid systemic and local treatments with the antibacterial peptide dimer A3-APO and its monomeric metabolite eliminate bacteria and reduce inflammation in intradermal lesions infected with Propionibacterium acnes and meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Ostorhazi, Eszter; Voros, Elvira; Nemes-Nikodem, Eva; Pinter, Dora; Sillo, Palma; Mayer, Balazs; Wade, John D; Otvos, Laszlo

    2013-12-01

    When administered intramuscularly, the designer antibacterial peptide dimer A3-APO is highly efficacious in mouse models of Acinetobacter baumannii and Staphylococcus aureus burn infections. Here we compared the efficacy of A3-APO and its monomeric metabolite in mouse models of S. aureus and Propionibacterium acnes intradermal infections following administration as intramuscular (i.m.) or topical treatments. In the animal models, either (i) the ears of CD-1 mice were infected with P. acnes or (ii) S. aureus was injected into burn wounds inflicted to the back. A3-APO or the monomer were injected intramuscularly at 5 mg/kg one to three times or were applied three times as 1% local treatment in phosphate-buffered saline or Vaseline(®). Despite being inactive against the strains in vitro, in vivo the skin conditions of the mice were dramatically improved upon peptide treatment regardless of dosing frequency, administration mode or drug valency. In the P. acnes study, A3-APO statistically significantly reduced ear thickness and ear bacterial counts. The amount of ear connective tissue and epithelial macrophages correlated with therapeutic success. Bacterial load in the lesions was more representative of physical improvement than ear dimensions. In the S. aureus model, both peptides eliminated wound bacteria from >10(7) CFU/mg to almost background levels, with monomer treatment being somewhat more successful. In conclusion, A3-APO and its monomeric metabolite very efficiently ameliorate resistant aerobic and anaerobic intradermal infections, but the protection is apparently not due to direct bacterial killing. Immunostimulatory and anti-inflammatory actions are likely involved. Nevertheless, topical and i.m. administrations are equally effective. PMID:24074727

  8. Intradermal spitz nevi: a rare subtype of spitz nevi analyzed in a clinicopathologic study of 74 cases.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Jose A; De Stefano, Danielle; Suster, Saul; Prieto, Victor G; Kacerovska, Denisa; Michal, Michal; Sangueza, Martin; Kazakov, Dmitry V

    2014-04-01

    Spitz nevi are acquired melanocytic lesions with a wide histomorphological spectrum; reliable distinction from spitzoid melanoma is often difficult. Misdiagnoses of benign spitzoid tumors as spitzoid melanomas and vice versa are attributable to a frequently disturbing morphology and inconsistent or poorly defined histological criteria for diagnosis. Many recognized histological variants of Spitz nevi have been described, including the intradermal Spitz. Histopathologic descriptions of intradermal Spitz nevi have been done in the past; however, large studies addressing their histological spectrum have been lacking. We have retrospectively assessed the morphological features in 74 cases of intradermal Spitz nevi, excluding tumors clearly defined as atypical Spitz nevi and Spitzoid melanomas, to further delineate their histological spectrum. The patients' ages ranged from 5 to 81 years (median: 27). Anatomic location included: the upper extremities (27 cases), followed by head and neck (22 cases), lower extremities (9 cases), back (8 cases), buttock (5 cases), chest (1 case), and vulva (1 case). In 1 case, the anatomic location of the lesion was not available. Different histological variants were observed including hyalinized, polypoid, desmoplastic, angiomatoid, and halo Spitz. Morphological features evaluated included symmetry (100%), cell type (epithelioid 42%, spindle 16%, mixed 42%), maturation (85%), pigmentation (26%), chronic inflammation (24%), and mitotic activity (38%). Mild atypia was seen in 36 cases (49%), moderate atypia was seen in 28 cases (38%), and severe atypia was seen in 10 cases (14%). Intradermal Spitz nevus is a distinctive type of Spitz nevus that sometimes can be difficult to define given the unusual features that these lesions can show; thus, strict application of well-defined histological criteria and awareness of their morphological spectrum will facilitate definitive diagnosis. PMID:24736667

  9. Pathogenic role of macrophages in intradermal infection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in thermally injured mice.

    PubMed

    Asai, Akira; Tsuda, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Makiko; Hanafusa, Toshiaki; Herndon, David N; Suzuki, Fujio

    2010-10-01

    Intradermal infection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in burned mice was pathogenically analyzed. An abscess was formed in normal mice intradermally infected with 10(8) CFU/mouse of MRSA, and all of these mice survived after the infection; however, abscess formation was not demonstrated to occur in burned mice similarly exposed to the pathogen, and all of these mice died within 5 days of infection. In burned mice, MRSA infected at the burn site intradermal tissues spread quickly throughout the whole body, while in normal mice, the pathogen remained localized at the infection site. Macrophages (Mφ) isolated from the infection site tissues of normal mice produced interleukin-12 (IL-12) but not IL-10 and were characterized as M1Mφ. These M1Mφ were not isolated from the infection site tissues of burned mice. When normal-mouse infection site tissue Mφ were adoptively transferred to burned mice at the MRSA infection site, an abscess formed, and the infection did not develop into sepsis. In contrast, an abscess did not form and sepsis developed in normal mice that were inoculated with burned-mouse infection site tissue Mφ. These Mφ produced IL-10 but not IL-12 and were characterized as M2Mφ. These results indicate that abscess formation is a major mechanism of host resistance against intradermal MRSA infection. M1Mφ in the tissues surrounding the infection site play a pivotal role in abscess formation; however, the abscess is not formed in burned mice where M2Mφ predominate. M2Mφ have been described as inhibitor cells for Mφ conversion from resident Mφ to M1Mφ. PMID:20679444

  10. Golimumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... at golimumab injection before injecting it. Check the expiration date printed on the auto-injection device or carton and do not use the medication if the expiration date has passed. Do not use a prefilled syringe ...

  11. Safety and Immunogenicity of purified chick embryo cell rabies vaccine (VaxiRab N) administered intradermally as post exposure prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Ravish, Hardanahalli S; Vijayashankar, Veena; Madhusudana, Shampur N; Sudarshan, Mysore K; Narayana, Doddabele HA; Andanaiah, Gangaboraiah; Ashwin, Belludi Y; Rachana, Annadani R; Shamanna, Manjula

    2014-01-01

    The affordability to rabies vaccine for intramuscular administration in post exposure prophylaxis is a major constraint. Therefore, in countries, where there are financial constraints, World Health Organization recommends intradermal rabies vaccination that reduces the quantity and cost of vaccination. This study was done to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of indigenously developed rabies vaccine (VaxiRab N) in comparison to a WHO recommended rabies vaccine (Rabipur) with demonstrated efficacy when administered by intradermal route using updated Thai Red Cross regimen. Eighty-six dog bite cases were randomly given either VaxiRab N (n = 43) or Rabipur (n = 43) as post exposure prophylaxis. The rabies virus neutralizing antibody concentrations on days 14, 28, 90, and 180 were tested by modified rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test. The geometric mean RVNA concentration of both the groups were compared using t- test and was found that, P value > 0.05 on all days, thus showing no significant difference between the 2 groups. The adverse drug events were also compared using Z-test and was found to be not statistically significant (Z = 1.476, P = 0.139). In conclusion, VaxiRab N was found to be safe and effective in post exposure prophylaxis by intradermal route and was similar to the WHO recommended rabies vaccine (Rabipur) of demonstrated efficacy. PMID:25424951

  12. Hollow agarose microneedle with silver coating for intradermal surface-enhanced Raman measurements: a skin-mimicking phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, Clement; Liu, Quan

    2015-06-01

    Human intradermal components contain important clinical information beneficial to the field of immunology and disease diagnosis. Although microneedles have shown great potential to act as probes to break the human skin barrier for the minimally invasive measurement of intradermal components, metal microneedles that include stainless steel could cause the following problems: (1) sharp waste production, and (2) contamination due to reuse of microneedles especially in developing regions. In this study, we fabricate agarose microneedles coated with a layer of silver (Ag) and demonstrate their use as a probe for the realization of intradermal surface-enhanced Raman scattering measurements in a set of skin-mimicking phantoms. The Ag-coated agarose microneedle quantifies a range of glucose concentrations from 5 to 150 mM inside the skin phantoms with a root-mean-square error of 5.1 mM within 10 s. The needle is found enlarged by 53.9% after another 6 min inside the phantom. The shape-changing capability of this agarose microneedle ensures that the reuse of these microneedles is impossible, thus avoiding sharp waste production and preventing needle contamination, which shows the great potential for safe and effective needle-based measurements.

  13. CCR4 is critically involved in effective antitumor immunity in mice bearing intradermal B16 melanoma.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Kazuhiko; Itoh, Tatsuki; Koyama, Atsushi; Imamura, Reira; Kawai, Shiori; Nishiwaki, Keiji; Oiso, Naoki; Kawada, Akira; Yoshie, Osamu; Nakayama, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    CCR4 is a major chemokine receptor expressed by Treg cells and Th17 cells. While Treg cells are known to suppress antitumor immunity, Th17 cells have recently been shown to enhance the induction of antitumor cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Here, CCR4-deficient mice displayed enhanced tumor growth upon intradermal inoculation of B16-F10 melanoma cells. In CCR4-deficient mice, while IFN-γ+CD8+ effector T cells were decreased in tumor sites, IFN-γ+CD8+ T cells and Th17 cells were decreased in regional lymph nodes. In wild-type mice, CD4+IL-17A+ cells, which were identified as CCR4+CD44+ memory Th17, were found to be clustered around dendritic cells expressing MDC/CCL22, a ligand for CCR4, in regional lymph nodes. Compound 22, a CCR4 antagonist, also enhanced tumor growth and decreased Th17 cells in regional lymph nodes in tumor-bearing mice treated with Dacarbazine. In contrast, CCR6 deficiency did not affect the tumor growth and the numbers of Th17 cells in regional lymph nodes. These findings indicate that CCR4 is critically involved in regional lymph node DC-Th17 cell interactions that are necessary for Th17 cell-mediated induction of antitumor CD8+ effector T cells in mice bearing B16 melanoma. PMID:27132989

  14. Rabies intradermal post-exposure vaccination of humans using reconstituted and stored vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kamoltham, Thavachai; Khawplod, Pakamatz; Wilde, Henry

    2002-09-10

    Thailand's northern Petchabun province is endemic for canine rabies. There were 27 reported human rabies deaths between 1989 and 1998. A rabies control plan was formulated in 1997 between medical and veterinary public health officials. It started an intense education program and an ongoing dog vaccination campaign. Economic constraints and the high cost of biological were the main reasons for inadequate human post-exposure management (PET). It was therefore decided to use the economical Thai Red Cross Intradermal Vaccine Regimen (TRC-ID) throughout the province. The original TRC-ID method is only suitable for clinics that see more than one PET patient daily. TRC-ID was therefore modified by storing the reconstituted vaccine in a refrigerator for the same patient's next two visits. Data on a total of 8157 PET patients were collected. An additional modification of TRC-ID also eliminated the 90 day booster. There were no treatment failures and no human rabies deaths in 1999, 2000 and 2001. The modified TRC-ID method induces adequate levels of neutralizing antibodies, protects humans bitten by rabid dogs and results in significant savings in vaccine and travel costs. PMID:12213396

  15. Increased incidence of murine graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation by previous infusion of syngeneic bone marrow cells

    SciTech Connect

    Waer, M.; Ang, K.K.; van der Schueren, E.; Vandeputte, M.

    1984-10-01

    Different groups of BALB/c mice received supralethal total-body irradiation (TBI; 8.5 Gy, day 0). When 30 x 10(6) allogeneic (C57B1) bone marrow (BM) cells were infused with or without 10 x 10(6) syngeneic (BALB/c) bM cells on day 1, many animals (60%) died from graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Typing of peripheral blood leukocytes for donor antigens showed that, respectively, 22/22 and 17/21 of the mice in both groups became chimeric. When syngeneic bone marrow was given on day 1 and allogeneic bone marrow on day 2 after TBI, a similar number of animals (21/23) became chimeric, but GVHD occurred more frequently in this group (25/26 mice, P less than 0.01). When the syngeneic bone marrow cells were replaced by spleen cells, or when the transplantation of allogeneic bone marrow was delayed till days 3 or 6 after TBI, almost all mice rejected the allogeneic BM graft and became long-term survivors. BALB/c mice receiving 30 x 10(6) C57B1 BM cells after 17 daily fractions of 0.2 Gy of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI), showed a high incidence of chimerism (15/17) and in none of the latter animals was GVHD observed. Despite the high incidence of GVHD in the mice receiving allogeneic BM after TBI and syngeneic BM transplantation, as compared with mice prepared with TLI which do not develop GVHD, suppressor cells were as easily induced after TBI and syngeneic BM transplantation as after TLI.

  16. Folate Receptor-Targeted Multimodality Imaging of Ovarian Cancer in a Novel Syngeneic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A new transplantable ovarian tumor model is presented using a novel folate receptor (FR) positive, murine ovarian cancer cell line that emulates the human disease and induces widespread intraperitoneal (i.p.) tumors in immunocompetent mice within 4–8 weeks of implantation. Tumor development was monitored using a new positron emission tomography (PET) FR-targeting reporter with PET/computerized tomography (PET/CT) and fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) using a commercial FR-targeting reporter. Conventional structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was also performed. Adult female C57BL/6 mice were injected i.p. with 6 × 106 MKP-L FR+ cells. Imaging was performed weekly beginning 2 weeks after tumor induction. The albumin-binding, FR-targeting ligand cm09 was radiolabeled with the positron emitter 68Ga and used to image the tumors with a small animal PET/CT. The FR-reporter FolateRSense 680 (PerkinElmer) was used for FMT and flow cytometry. Preclinical MRI (7 T) without FR-targeting was compared with the PET and FMT molecular imaging. Tumors were visible by all three imaging modalities. PET/CT had the highest imaging sensitivity at 3–3.5 h postadministration (mean %IA/g mean > 6) and visualized tumors earlier than the other two modalities with lower kidney uptake (mean %IA/g mean < 17) than previously reported FR-targeting agents in late stage disease. FMT showed relatively low FR-targeted agent in the bladder and kidneys, but yielded the lowest anatomical image resolution. MRI produced the highest resolution images, but it was difficult to distinguish tumors from abdominal organs during early progression since a FR-targeting MRI reporter was not used. Nevertheless, there was good correlation of imaging biomarkers between the three modalities. Tumors in the mouse ovarian cancer model could be detected using FR-targeted imaging as early as 2 weeks post i.p. injection of tumor cells. An imaging protocol should combine one or more of the modalities, e

  17. Intradermal Tests for Diagnosis of Drug Allergy are not Affected by a Topical Anesthetic Patch.

    PubMed

    Couto, Mariana; Silva, Diana; Ferreira, Ana; Cernadas, Josefina R

    2014-09-01

    The use of topical anesthesia to perform intradermal tests (IDTs) for drug allergy diagnosis was never investigated. We aimed to determine the effects of a topical anesthetic patch containing prilocaine-lidocaine on wheal size of IDT with drugs. Patients who had positive IDT as part of their investigation process of suspected drug hypersensitivity were selected. IDT were performed according to guidelines. Anesthetic patch (AP) was placed and the same prior positive IDT, as well as positive histamine skin prick test (SPT) and negative (saline IDT) controls, were performed in the anesthetized area. Patients with negative IDT were also included to check for false positives with AP. Increase in wheals after 20 minutes both with and without AP was recorded and compared. 45 IDT were performed (36 patients), of which 37 have been previously positive (14 antibiotics, 10 general anesthetics, 6 non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, 3 iodinated contrasts, 3 anti-Hi-histamines and 1 ranitidine). Mean histamine SPT size without the AP was 4.7 mm [95%CI (4.4-5.1]), and 4.6 mm [95%CI(4.2-5.0)] with anesthesia. Mean wheal increase in IDT for drugs without the anesthesia was 4.5 mm [95%CI(3.3-5.7)] and with anesthesia was 4.3 mm [95%CI(2.8-5.8)]. No statistical significant differences were observed between skin tests with or without AP for histamine SPT (P=0.089), IDT with saline (P=0.750), and IDT with drugs (P=0.995). None of the patients with negative IDT showed positivity with the AP, or vice-versa. The use of an AP containing prilocaine-lidocaine does not interfere with IDT to diagnose drug allergy, and no false positive tests were found. PMID:25229004

  18. Evaluation of Intradermal and Subcutaneous Infusion Set Performance Under 24-Hour Basal and Bolus Conditions

    PubMed Central

    McVey, Elaine; Keith, Steven; Herr, Joshua K.; Sutter, Diane; Pettis, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study sought to assess the function and delivery reliability of intradermal (ID) infusion sets used with commercial insulin pumps. Method: Healthy subjects (n = 43) were randomized to either ID or subcutaneous (SC) arms, and received basal/bolus placebo delivery for 24 hours. Subjects received 4 of 8 infusion set combinations (ID: microneedle design A or B, with 2 pump brands [Animas or MiniMed]; SC: Teflon Quickset or steel Rapid-D, Animas pump only, with or without overtaping) and were evaluated for pump occlusion alarms, fluid leakage, pain, and tissue tolerability. A novel algorithm was developed to determine flow consistency based on fluid pressure, and the duration and occurrence rate for periods of unalarmed but interrupted flow (“silent occlusions’”) were compared. Results: ID delivery was successfully maintained over the 24-hour infusion period. The number of silent occlusions was lower for ID microneedle cannula design B than A (P < .01) and lower for Rapid-D SC device compared to Quick-set (P = .03). There was no significant difference in the number of occlusion alarms between the ID and SC devices with the Animas pump. However, the pumps tested with ID devices had significantly different alarm rates (MiniMed 29.5%, Animas 0%, P < .001). Leakage and tissue tolerability were comparable across devices. Conclusion: The ID infusion set reliably delivered diluent for an extended 24-hour period in healthy subjects and was well tolerated. Silent occlusion flow interruptions could be detected in both ID and SC infusion sets using a proprietary algorithm. This algorithm is a promising method for quantitatively evaluating infusion set flow performance. PMID:26319228

  19. An Intradermal Inoculation Mouse Model for Immunological Investigations of Acute Scrub Typhus and Persistent Infection.

    PubMed

    Soong, Lynn; Mendell, Nicole L; Olano, Juan P; Rockx-Brouwer, Dedeke; Xu, Guang; Goez-Rivillas, Yenny; Drom, Claire; Shelite, Thomas R; Valbuena, Gustavo; Walker, David H; Bouyer, Donald H

    2016-08-01

    Scrub typhus is a neglected tropical disease, caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi, a Gram-negative bacterium that is transmitted to mammalian hosts during feeding by Leptotrombidium mites and replicates predominantly within endothelial cells. Most studies of scrub typhus in animal models have utilized either intraperitoneal or intravenous inoculation; however, there is limited information on infection by the natural route in murine model skin or its related early host responses. Here, we developed an intradermal (i.d.) inoculation model of scrub typhus and focused on the kinetics of the host responses in the blood and major infected organs. Following ear inoculation with 6 x 104 O. tsutsugamushi, mice developed fever at 11-12 days post-infection (dpi), followed by marked hypothermia and body weight loss at 14-19 dpi. Bacteria in blood and tissues and histopathological changes were detected around 9 dpi and peaked around 14 dpi. Serum cytokine analyses revealed a mixed Th1/Th2 response, with marked elevations of MCP-1/CCL2, MIP-1α/CCL3 and IL-10 at 9 dpi, followed by increased concentrations of pro-inflammatory markers (IL-6, IL-12, IFN-γ, G-CSF, RANTES/CCL5, KC/CCL11, IL-1α/β, IL-2, TNF-α, GM-CSF), as well as modulatory cytokines (IL-9, IL-13). Cytokine levels in lungs had similar elevation patterns, except for a marked reduction of IL-9. The Orientia 47-kDa gene and infectious bacteria were detected in several organs for up to 84 dpi, indicating persistent infection. This is the first comprehensive report of acute scrub typhus and persistent infection in i.d.-inoculated C57BL/6 mice. This is a significant improvement over current murine models for Orientia infection and will permit detailed studies of host immune responses and infection control interventions. PMID:27479584

  20. An Intradermal Inoculation Mouse Model for Immunological Investigations of Acute Scrub Typhus and Persistent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rockx-Brouwer, Dedeke; Xu, Guang; Goez-Rivillas, Yenny; Drom, Claire; Shelite, Thomas R.; Valbuena, Gustavo; Walker, David H.; Bouyer, Donald H.

    2016-01-01

    Scrub typhus is a neglected tropical disease, caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi, a Gram-negative bacterium that is transmitted to mammalian hosts during feeding by Leptotrombidium mites and replicates predominantly within endothelial cells. Most studies of scrub typhus in animal models have utilized either intraperitoneal or intravenous inoculation; however, there is limited information on infection by the natural route in murine model skin or its related early host responses. Here, we developed an intradermal (i.d.) inoculation model of scrub typhus and focused on the kinetics of the host responses in the blood and major infected organs. Following ear inoculation with 6 x 104 O. tsutsugamushi, mice developed fever at 11–12 days post-infection (dpi), followed by marked hypothermia and body weight loss at 14–19 dpi. Bacteria in blood and tissues and histopathological changes were detected around 9 dpi and peaked around 14 dpi. Serum cytokine analyses revealed a mixed Th1/Th2 response, with marked elevations of MCP-1/CCL2, MIP-1α/CCL3 and IL-10 at 9 dpi, followed by increased concentrations of pro-inflammatory markers (IL-6, IL-12, IFN-γ, G-CSF, RANTES/CCL5, KC/CCL11, IL-1α/β, IL-2, TNF-α, GM-CSF), as well as modulatory cytokines (IL-9, IL-13). Cytokine levels in lungs had similar elevation patterns, except for a marked reduction of IL-9. The Orientia 47-kDa gene and infectious bacteria were detected in several organs for up to 84 dpi, indicating persistent infection. This is the first comprehensive report of acute scrub typhus and persistent infection in i.d.-inoculated C57BL/6 mice. This is a significant improvement over current murine models for Orientia infection and will permit detailed studies of host immune responses and infection control interventions. PMID:27479584

  1. An improved syngeneic orthotopic murine model of human breast cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Omar M; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Ramachandran, Suburamaniam; Dumur, Catherine; Schaum, Julia; Yamada, Akimitsu; Terracina, Krista P; Milstien, Sheldon; Spiegel, Sarah; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2014-10-01

    Breast cancer drug development costs nearly $610 million and 37 months in preclinical mouse model trials with minimal success rates. Despite these inefficiencies, there are still no consensus breast cancer preclinical models. Murine mammary adenocarcinoma 4T1-luc2 cells were implanted subcutaneous (SQ) or orthotopically percutaneous (OP) injection in the area of the nipple, or surgically into the chest 2nd mammary fat pad under direct vision (ODV) in Balb/c immunocompetent mice. Tumor progression was followed by in vivo bioluminescence and direct measurements, pathology and survival determined, and tumor gene expression analyzed by genome-wide microarrays. ODV produced less variable-sized tumors and was a reliable method of implantation. ODV implantation into the chest 2nd mammary pad rather than into the abdominal 4th mammary pad, the most common implantation site, better mimicked human breast cancer progression pattern, which correlated with bioluminescent tumor burden and survival. Compared to SQ, ODV produced tumors that differentially expressed genes whose interaction networks are of importance in cancer research. qPCR validation of 10 specific target genes of interest in ongoing clinical trials demonstrated significant differences in expression. ODV implantation into the chest 2nd mammary pad provides the most reliable model that mimics human breast cancer compared from subcutaneous implantation that produces tumors with different genome expression profiles of clinical significance. Increased understanding of the limitations of the different preclinical models in use will help guide new investigations and may improve the efficiency of breast cancer drug development . PMID:25200444

  2. Nine μg intradermal influenza vaccine and 15 μg intramuscular influenza vaccine induce similar cellular and humoral immune responses in adults

    PubMed Central

    Nougarede, Nolwenn; Bisceglia, Hélène; Rozières, Aurore; Goujon, Catherine; Boudet, Florence; Laurent, Philippe; Vanbervliet, Beatrice; Rodet, Karen; Hennino, Ana; Nicolas, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Intanza® 9 μg (Sanofi Pasteur), a trivalent split-virion vaccine administered by intradermal (ID) injection, was approved in Europe in 2009 for the prevention of seasonal influenza in adults 18 to 59 years. Here, we examined the immune responses induced in adults by the ID 9 μg vaccine and the standard trivalent intramuscular (IM) vaccine (Vaxigrip® 15 μg, Sanofi Pasteur). This trial was a randomized, controlled, single-center, open-label study in healthy adults 18 to 40 years of age during the 2007/8 influenza season. Subjects received a single vaccination with the ID 9 μg (n = 38) or IM 15 μg (n = 42) vaccine. Serum, saliva, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected up to 180 days post-vaccination. Geometric mean hemagglutination inhibition titers, seroprotection rates, seroconversion rates, and pre-vaccination-to-post-vaccination ratios of geometric mean hemagglutination inhibition titers did not differ between the two vaccines. Compared with pre-vaccination, the vaccines induced similar increases in vaccine-specific circulating B cells at day 7 but did not induce significant increases in vaccine-specific memory B cells at day 180. Cell-mediated immunity to all three vaccine strains, measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, was high at baseline and not increased by either vaccine. Neither vaccine induced a mucosal immune response. These results show that the humoral and cellular immune responses to the ID 9 μg vaccine are similar to those to the standard IM 15 μg vaccine. PMID:25483667

  3. Pharmacokinetic studies of mouse monoclonal antibodies to a rat colon carcinoma: I. Comparison of biodistribution in normal rats, syngeneic tumor-bearing rats, or tumor-bearing nude mice

    SciTech Connect

    Laborda, J.; Douillard, J.Y.; Burg, C.; Lizzio, E.F.; Ridge, J.; Levenbook, I.; Hoffman, T. )

    1990-06-01

    The pharmacokinetics of two iodine-131-({sup 131}I) labeled murine anti-rat colon carcinoma monoclonal antibodies (D3 and E4) were compared in normal Sprague Dawley rats, syngeneic BDIX rats, or nude mice bearing that tumor. Results of antibody uptake after i.v. administration were analyzed in terms of accumulation and localization indices for normal tissues and tumor. Statistically significant differences between rat and mouse tissue biodistribution were found. D3, which reacts in vitro with the tumor and several normal rat tissues, cleared quickly from the blood of rats and was specifically targeted to several normal tissues, notably the lung. Virtually no targeting to the tumor was observed. Nude mice, however, showed a slower blood clearance and specific antibody targeting only in the tumor. Similar results were seen after injection of another antibody, E4, which is tumor-specific in vitro. Data suggest that studies on the xenogeneic nude mouse model may not necessarily be relevant to the choice of monoclonal antibodies for clinical diagnostic imaging or therapy.

  4. Tumourigenicity and Immunogenicity of Induced Neural Stem Cell Grafts Versus Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Grafts in Syngeneic Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mou; Yao, Hui; Dong, Qin; Zhang, Hongtian; Yang, Zhijun; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Jianwei; Xu, Minhui; Xu, Ruxiang

    2016-01-01

    Along with the development of stem cell-based therapies for central nervous system (CNS) disease, the safety of stem cell grafts in the CNS, such as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and induced neural stem cells (iNSCs), should be of primary concern. To provide scientific basis for evaluating the safety of these stem cells, we determined their tumourigenicity and immunogenicity in syngeneic mouse brain. Both iPSCs and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were able to form tumours in the mouse brain, leading to tissue destruction along with immune cell infiltration. In contrast, no evidence of tumour formation, brain injury or immune rejection was observed with iNSCs, neural stem cells (NSCs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). With the help of gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis, we detected significantly elevated levels of chemokines in the brain tissue and serum of mice that developed tumours after ESC or iPSC transplantation. Moreover, we also investigated the interactions between chemokines and NF-κB signalling and found that NF-κB activation was positively correlated with the constantly rising levels of chemokines, and vice versa. In short, iNSC grafts, which lacked any resulting tumourigenicity or immunogenicity, are safer than iPSC grafts. PMID:27417157

  5. Endoplasmic reticulum resident heat shock protein-gp96 as morphogenetic and immunoregulatory factor in syngeneic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Jakovac, Hrvoje; Grebić, Damir; Grubić-Kezele, Tanja; Mrakovčić-Šutić, Ines; Rukavina, Daniel; Radosević-Stašić, Biserka

    2013-10-01

    The severe remodeling of endometrial stroma during blastocyst adhesion and trophoblast invasion initiates at maternal-fetal interface the reaction of evolutionary old heat shock response, in which heat shock proteins, as molecular chaperons, monitor the configurations of newly synthesized proteins and prevent the formation of functionless aggregates of misfolded proteins, targeting them to degradation by a the ubiquitin-proteasome system. In addition, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident HSPs, such as gp96/GRP94 may, after binding to CD91 and TLRs, elicit antigen-specific and antigen-unspecific immune responses, owing to its peptide-chaperoning capacity and ability to activate APCs. Considering these properties, we examined tissue expression of gp96 at the maternal-fetal interface and in the maternal liver and spleen on the 16th day of undisturbed syngeneic pregnancy and after the treatment with peptidoglycan monomer linked with zinc (PGM-Zn). The data showed that in undisturbed pregnancy the gp96, CD91 and TLR2 were markedly expressed on extravillous and villous trophoblast. PGM-Zn enhanced these findings, as well as the number of uterine natural killer cells and local NFκB immunoreactivity. Gp96 expression arose also in the maternal spleen and liver, where an accumulation of NKT cells or γδT lymphocytes was seen. The data point to roles of gp96 in maintenance of proteostasis and local and systemic immune balance in pregnancy complicated by infection. PMID:23553495

  6. Tumourigenicity and Immunogenicity of Induced Neural Stem Cell Grafts Versus Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Grafts in Syngeneic Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Mou; Yao, Hui; Dong, Qin; Zhang, Hongtian; Yang, Zhijun; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Jianwei; Xu, Minhui; Xu, Ruxiang

    2016-01-01

    Along with the development of stem cell-based therapies for central nervous system (CNS) disease, the safety of stem cell grafts in the CNS, such as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and induced neural stem cells (iNSCs), should be of primary concern. To provide scientific basis for evaluating the safety of these stem cells, we determined their tumourigenicity and immunogenicity in syngeneic mouse brain. Both iPSCs and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were able to form tumours in the mouse brain, leading to tissue destruction along with immune cell infiltration. In contrast, no evidence of tumour formation, brain injury or immune rejection was observed with iNSCs, neural stem cells (NSCs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). With the help of gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis, we detected significantly elevated levels of chemokines in the brain tissue and serum of mice that developed tumours after ESC or iPSC transplantation. Moreover, we also investigated the interactions between chemokines and NF-κB signalling and found that NF-κB activation was positively correlated with the constantly rising levels of chemokines, and vice versa. In short, iNSC grafts, which lacked any resulting tumourigenicity or immunogenicity, are safer than iPSC grafts. PMID:27417157

  7. Diabetes Is Reversed in a Murine Model by Marginal Mass Syngeneic Islet Transplantation Using a Subcutaneous Cell Pouch Device

    PubMed Central

    Pepper, Andrew R.; Pawlick, Rena; Gala-Lopez, Boris; MacGillivary, Amanda; Mazzuca, Delfina M.; White, David J. G.; Toleikis, Philip M.; Shapiro, A. M. James

    2015-01-01

    Background Islet transplantation is a successful β-cell replacement therapy for selected patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Although high rates of early insulin independence are achieved routinely, long-term function wanes over time. Intraportal transplantation is associated with procedural risks, requires multiple donors, and does not afford routine biopsy. Stem cell technologies may require potential for retrievability, and graft removal by hepatectomy is impractical. There is a clear clinical need for an alternative, optimized transplantation site. The subcutaneous space is a potential substitute, but transplantation of islets into this site has routinely failed to reverse diabetes. However, an implanted device, which becomes prevascularized before transplantation, may alter this equation. Methods Syngeneic mouse islets were transplanted subcutaneously within Sernova Corp's Cell Pouch (CP). All recipients were preimplanted with CPs 4 weeks before diabetes induction and transplantation. After transplantation, recipients were monitored for glycemic control and glucose tolerance. Results Mouse islets transplanted into the CP routinely restored glycemic control with modest delay and responded well to glucose challenge, comparable to renal subcapsular islet grafts, despite a marginal islet dose, and normoglycemia was maintained until graft explantation. In contrast, islets transplanted subcutaneously alone failed to engraft. Islets within CPs stained positively for insulin, glucagon, and microvessels. Conclusions The CP is biocompatible, forms an environment suitable for islet engraftment, and offers a potential alternative to the intraportal site for islet and future stem cell therapies. PMID:26308506

  8. Biogenicity and Syngeneity of Organic Matter in Ancient Sedimentary Rocks: Recent Advances in the Search for Evidence of Past Life

    SciTech Connect

    Oehler, Dorothy Z.; Cady, Sherry L.

    2014-12-01

    he past decade has seen an explosion of new technologies for assessment of biogenicity and syngeneity of carbonaceous material within sedimentary rocks. Advances have been made in techniques for analysis of in situ organic matter as well as for extracted bulk samples of soluble and insoluble (kerogen) organic fractions. The in situ techniques allow analysis of micrometer-to-sub-micrometer-scale organic residues within their host rocks and include Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy/imagery, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and forms of secondary ion/laser-based mass spectrometry, analytical transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray absorption microscopy/spectroscopy. Analyses can be made for chemical, molecular, and isotopic composition coupled with assessment of spatial relationships to surrounding minerals, veins, and fractures. The bulk analyses include improved methods for minimizing contamination and recognizing syngenetic constituents of soluble organic fractions as well as enhanced spectroscopic and pyrolytic techniques for unlocking syngenetic molecular signatures in kerogen. Together, these technologies provide vital tools for the study of some of the oldest and problematic carbonaceous residues and for advancing our understanding of the earliest stages of biological evolution on Earth and the search for evidence of life beyond Earth. We discuss each of these new technologies, emphasizing their advantages and disadvantages, applications, and likely future directions.

  9. Enhancement of the pro-apoptotic properties of Newcastle disease virus promotes tumor remission in syngeneic murine cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Cuadrado-Castano, Sara; Ayllon, Juan; Mansour, Mena; de la Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Jordan, Stefan; Tripathi, Shashank; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Villar, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is considered a promising agent for cancer therapy due to its oncolytic properties. These include preferential replication in transformed cells, induction of innate and adaptive immune responses within tumors and cytopathic effects in infected tumor cells due to the activation of apoptosis. In order to enhance the latter and thus possibly enhance the overall oncolytic activity of NDV, we generated a recombinant NDV encoding the human TNF receptor Fas (rNDV-B1/Fas). rNDV-B1/Fas replicates to similar titers as its wild type (rNDV-B1) counterpart, however overexpression of Fas in infected cells leads to higher levels of cytotoxicity correlated with faster and increased apoptosis responses in which both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways are activated earlier. Furthermore, in vivo studies in syngeneic murine melanoma model show an enhancement of the oncolytic properties of rNDV-B1/Fas, with major improvements in survival and tumor remission. Altogether, our data suggest that up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic function of NDV is a viable approach to enhance its anti-tumor properties, and adds to the currently known, rationally-based strategies to design optimized therapeutic viral vectors for the treatment of cancer. PMID:25761895

  10. Medroxyprogesterone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medroxyprogesterone subcutaneous injection is also used to treat endometriosis (a condition in which the type of tissue ... parts of the body in women who have endometriosis. Medroxyprogesterone injection is a very effective method of ...

  11. Chloramphenicol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Chloramphenicol injection is used to treat certain types of serious infections caused by bacteria when other antibiotics cannot be used. Chloramphenicol injection is in a class of medications called ...

  12. Levoleucovorin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to prevent harmful effects of methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall) when methotrexate is used to to treat certain types of ... people who have accidentally received an overdose of methotrexate or similar medications. Levoleucovorin injection is in a ...

  13. Estrogen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... forms of estrogen injection are used to treat hot flushes (hot flashes; sudden strong feelings of heat and sweating) ... If you are using estrogen injection to treat hot flushes, your symptoms should improve within 1 to ...

  14. Palonosetron Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Palonosetron injection is used to prevent nausea and vomiting that may occur within 24 hours after receiving ... occur several days after receiving certain chemotherapy medications. Palonosetron injection is in a class of medications called ...

  15. Leuprolide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... normal number of red blood cells) caused by uterine fibroids (noncancerous growths in the uterus). Leuprolide injection is ... Your doctor will tell you how long your treatment with leuprolide injection will last. When used in ...

  16. Naltrexone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Naltrexone injection is used along with counseling and social support to help people who have stopped drinking large ... injection is also used along with counseling and social support to help people who have stopped abusing opiate ...

  17. Posaconazole Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Posaconazole injection is used to prevent fungal infections in people with a weakened ability to fight infection. Posaconazole injection is in a class of medications called azole antifungals. It works ...

  18. Paclitaxel Injection

    MedlinePlus

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  19. Mipomersen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... become pregnant during your treatment, stop using mipomersen injection and call your doctor immediately. ... Mipomersen injection may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these ... and tiredness that are most likely to occur during the first 2 days ...

  20. Levofloxacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections. Levofloxacin injection is also used to prevent anthrax (a serious infection that may be spread on ... in people who may have been exposed to anthrax germs in the air. Levofloxacin injection is in ...

  1. Ciprofloxacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is also used to prevent or treat anthrax (a serious infection that may be spread on ... in people who may have been exposed to anthrax germs in the air. Ciprofloxacin injection is in ...

  2. Romidepsin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... with at least one other medication given by mouth or by injection. Romidepsin injection is in a ... antifungals such as itraconazole (Sporanox), ketoconazole (Nizoral), and voriconazole (Vfend); cisapride (Propulsid) (not available in the U.S.); ...

  3. Degarelix Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Degarelix injection is used to treat advanced prostate cancer (cancer that begins in the prostate [a male reproductive gland]). Degarelix injection is in a class of medications called gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) ...

  4. Paclitaxel Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... other medications. Paclitaxel injection manufactured with polyoxyethylated castor oil is used to treat ovarian cancer (cancer that ... and lung cancer. Paclitaxel injection with polyoxyethylated castor oil is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma (a ...

  5. Glatiramer Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS; a disease in which ... to inject glatiramer, inject it around the same time every day. Follow the directions on your prescription ...

  6. Daratumumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... any laboratory test, tell your doctor and the laboratory personnel that you are receiving or received daratumumab injection. ... a blood transfusion, tell your doctor and the laboratory personnel that you are receiving or received daratumumab injection. ...

  7. Pralatrexate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... will need to take folic acid and vitamin B12 during your treatment with pralatrexate injection to help ... that you will need to receive a vitamin B12 injection no more than 10 weeks before your ...

  8. Cefoxitin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to treat infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract (lung) ... medications called cephamycin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as cefoxitin injection will not work ...

  9. Chloramphenicol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain types of serious infections caused by bacteria when other antibiotics cannot be used. Chloramphenicol injection ... antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria..Antibiotics such as chloramphenicol injection will not work ...

  10. Oxacillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat infections caused by certain bacteria. Oxacillin injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as oxacillin injection will not work ...

  11. Nafcillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat infections caused by certain types of bacteria. Nafcillin injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as nafcillin injection will not work ...

  12. Doripenem Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... tract, kidney, and abdomen that are caused by bacteria. Doripenem injection is not approved by the Food ... medications called carbapenem antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as doripenem injection will not work ...

  13. Medroxyprogesterone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medroxyprogesterone injection is a very effective method of birth control but does not prevent the spread of human ... you have been using a different method of birth control and are switching to medroxyprogesterone injection, your doctor ...

  14. Doxycycline Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Doxycycline injection is used to treat or prevent bacterial infections, including pneumonia and other respiratory tract infections. ... certain skin, genital, intestine, and urinary system infections. Doxycycline injection may be used to treat or prevent ...

  15. Ferumoxytol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Ferumoxytol injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood ... and may cause the kidneys to stop working). Ferumoxytol injection is in a class of medications called ...

  16. Fondaparinux Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... using fondaparinux injection while you are in the hospital at least 6 to 8 hours after your ... you will continue to use fondaparinux after your hospital stay, you can inject fondaparinux yourself or have ...

  17. Epinephrine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Adrenalin® Chloride Solution ... a pre-filled automatic injection device containing a solution (liquid) to inject under the skin or into ... device when this date passes. Look at the solution in the device from time to time. If ...

  18. Trastuzumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Trastuzumab injection is used along with other medications or after other medications have been used to treat ... has spread to other parts of the body. Trastuzumab injection is also used during and after treatment ...

  19. Aripiprazole Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... aripiprazole injection and aripiprazole extended-release injection developed gambling problems or other intense urges or behaviors that ... even if you do not realize that your gambling or any other intense urges or unusual behaviors ...

  20. Potency requirements of rabies vaccines administered intradermally using the Thai Red Cross regimen: investigation of the immunogenicity of serially diluted purified chick embryo cell rabies vaccine.

    PubMed

    Beran, Jiri; Honegr, Karel; Banzhoff, Angelika; Malerczyk, Claudius

    2005-06-10

    To determine the minimum vaccine potency per intradermal dose required to elicit an adequate immune response using the Thai Red Cross (TRC) regimen (2-2-2-0-1-1), healthy volunteers received 0.1 mL volumes of PCECV containing decreasing amounts of antigen. Subjects also received HRIG to evaluate potential interference with antibody production. Results indicated that when each 0.1 mL intradermal dose of PCECV contained antigen corresponding to 0.32 IU per intramuscular dose, every subject had titers above 0.5 IU/mL by day 14. These results confirm that the current World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations for vaccine potency (2.5 IU per intramuscular dose) are sufficient for use in the Thai Red Cross intradermal regimen. PMID:15917111

  1. Assessing the relationship between antigenicity and immunogenicity of human rabies vaccines when administered by intradermal route: results of a metaanalysis.

    PubMed

    Sudarshan, Mysore K; Gangaboraiah, Bilagumba; Ravish, Haradanahalli S; Narayana, Doddabele H Ashwath

    2010-07-01

    The metadata of 10 published studies and 3 vaccine trial reports comprising of 19 vaccine cohorts from four countries conducted over a period of 23 years (1986 - 2009) was used for metaanalysis. The vaccines studied were purified chick embryo cell vaccine (Rabipur, India & Germany), purified vero cell rabies vaccine (Verorab, France; Indirab, India) & human diploid cell vaccine (MIRV, France).The potency of these vaccines varied from 0.55 IU to 2.32 IU per intradermal dose of 0.1 ml per site. The vaccines were administered to 1,011 subjects comprising of 19 cohorts and using five different ID regimens. The immunogenicity was measured by assays of rabies virus neutralizing antibody (RVNA) titres using rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT) [15 cohorts] and mouse neutralization test (MNT) [4 cohorts]. The statistical analysis of the data was done by Karl Pearson's correlation coefficient to measure the relationship between antigenicity and immunogenicity. It was revealed that, there was no significant linear relationship between antigenicity and immunogenicity of rabies vaccines when administered by intradermal route. (p> 0.230 and p>0.568). PMID:20523131

  2. Co-transplantation of syngeneic mesenchymal stem cells improves survival of allogeneic glial-restricted precursors in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Amit K; Bulte, Camille A; Shats, Irina; Walczak, Piotr; Bulte, Jeff W M

    2016-01-01

    Loss of functional cells from immunorejection during the early post-transplantation period is an important factor that reduces the efficacy of stem cell-based therapies. Recent studies have shown that transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can exert therapeutic effects by secreting anti-inflammatory and pro-survival trophic factors. We investigated whether co-transplantation of MSCs could improve the survival of other transplanted therapeutic cells. Allogeneic glial-restricted precursors (GRPs) were isolated from the brain of a firefly luciferase transgenic FVB mouse (at E13.5 stage) and intracerebrally transplanted, either alone, or together with syngeneic MSCs in immunocompetent BALB/c mice (n=20) or immunodeficient Rag2(-/-) mice as survival control (n=8). No immunosuppressive drug was given to any animal. Using bioluminescence imaging (BLI) as a non-invasive readout of cell survival, we found that co-transplantation of MSCs significantly improved (p<0.05) engrafted GRP survival. No significant change in signal intensities was observed in immunodeficient Rag2(-/-) mice, with transplanted cells surviving in both the GRP only and the GRP+MSC group. In contrast, on day 21 post-transplantation, we observed a 94.2% decrease in BLI signal intensity in immunocompetent mice transplanted with GRPs alone versus 68.1% in immunocompetent mice co-transplanted with MSCs and GRPs (p<0.05). Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated a lower number of infiltrating CD45, CD11b(+) and CD8(+) cells, reduced astrogliosis, and a higher number of FoxP3(+) cells at the site of transplantation for the immunocompetent mice receiving MSCs. The present study demonstrates that co-transplantation of MSCs can be used to create a microenvironment that is more conducive to the survival of allogeneic GRPs. PMID:26515691

  3. Cellular Intrinsic Mechanism Affecting the Outcome of AML Treated with Ara-C in a Syngeneic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Dongming; Su, Guangsong; Zheng, Yanwen; He, Chao; Mao, Zhengwei J.; Singleton, Timothy P.; Yin, Bin

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treatment failure are not clear. Here, we established a mouse model of AML by syngeneic transplantation of BXH-2 derived myeloid leukemic cells and developed an efficacious Ara-C-based regimen for treatment of these mice. We proved that leukemic cell load was correlated with survival. We also demonstrated that the susceptibility of leukemia cells to Ara-C could significantly affect the survival. To examine the molecular alterations in cells with different sensitivity, genome-wide expression of the leukemic cells was profiled, revealing that overall 366 and 212 genes became upregulated or downregulated, respectively, in the resistant cells. Many of these genes are involved in the regulation of cell cycle, cellular proliferation, and apoptosis. Some of them were further validated by quantitative PCR. Interestingly, the Ara-C resistant cells retained the sensitivity to ABT-737, an inhibitor of anti-apoptosis proteins, and treatment with ABT-737 prolonged the life span of mice engrafted with resistant cells. These results suggest that leukemic load and intrinsic cellular resistance can affect the outcome of AML treated with Ara-C. Incorporation of apoptosis inhibitors, such as ABT-737, into traditional cytotoxic regimens merits consideration for the treatment of AML in a subset of patients with resistance to Ara-C. This work provided direct in vivo evidence that leukemic load and intrinsic cellular resistance can affect the outcome of AML treated with Ara-C, suggesting that incorporation of apoptosis inhibitors into traditional cytotoxic regimens merits consideration for the treatment of AML in a subset of patients with resistance to Ara-C. PMID:25314317

  4. Lacosamide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. ... Before using lacosamide injection,tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to lacosamide, any other medications, or any of the ingredients in lacosamide injection. Ask your pharmacist for a ...

  5. Dexamethasone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... lines under the skin skin depressions at the injection site increased body fat or movement to different areas of your body inappropriate happiness difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep extreme ... increased appetite injection site pain or redness Some side effects can ...

  6. Etanercept Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... and colorless. The liquid may contain small white particles, but should not contain large or colored particles. Do not use a syringe or dosing pen ... liquid is cloudy or contains large or colored particles.The best place to inject etanercept injection is ...

  7. Pralatrexate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... you that you will need to receive a vitamin B12 injection no more than 10 weeks before your first ... tests to check your body's response to pralatrexate injection.Ask your ... such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring ...

  8. Leucovorin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... lack of vitamin B12 or inability to absorb vitamin B12. Your doctor will not prescribe leucovorin injection to treat this type of anemia.tell your ... tests to check your body's response to leucovorin injection.It is ... such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring ...

  9. Estimation of intradermal disposition kinetics of drugs: II. Factors determining penetration of drugs from viable skin to muscular layer.

    PubMed

    Higaki, Kazutaka; Asai, Masahide; Suyama, Takayuki; Nakayama, Kazuki; Ogawara, Ken-ichi; Kimura, Toshikiro

    2002-06-01

    To develop a more efficient transdermal delivery system, it is very important to regulate the intradermal disposition of drugs after topical application. We tried to elucidate the factors determining the intradermal disposition kinetics, especially drug penetration from the viable skin to the muscular layer, mainly based on the six-compartment model, including the contralateral skin and muscle for ten model drugs with different physicochemical characteristics. In vivo transdermal absorption study was performed for six model drugs using the stripped-skin rats. The fitting analyses by the six-compartment model gave the theoretical curves describing the observed data very well and the reasonable pharmacokinetic parameters, showing the pharmacokinetic model should be useful for the estimation of the intradermal disposition kinetics of drugs applied topically again. The simulation study using the pharmacokinetic parameters obtained above could show the relative contribution of the direct penetration and the distribution from the systemic circulation to the muscular distribution of drugs. The largest contribution of direct penetration was observed for antipyrine (90.8%) and the smallest was for felbinac (43.3%). Among the pharmacokinetic parameters obtained above, the clearance from the viable skin to the muscle (CL(vs-m)) was found to be significantly correlated with the unbound fraction of drugs in the viable skin (fu(vs)). Although the clearance from the viable skin to the plasma (CL(vs-p)) also tended to increase as fu(vs) increased, the ratio of CL(vs-m) to CL(vs-p) was significantly correlated with fu(vs), meaning that the larger amount of unbound drug in the viable skin significantly contributes to the direct penetration into the muscle more than to the systemic absorption. On the other hand, k(direct) values obtained in in vitro penetration study-the penetration rate constant of drugs from the viable skin to the muscular layer-were found to be correlated with CL

  10. Musculoskeletal Injection

    PubMed Central

    Wittich, Christopher M.; Ficalora, Robert D.; Mason, Thomas G.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Patients commonly present to primary care physicians with musculoskeletal symptoms. Clinicians certified in internal medicine must be knowledgeable about the diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal diseases, yet they often receive inadequate postgraduate training on this topic. The musculoskeletal problems most frequently encountered in our busy injection practice involve, in decreasing order, the knees, trochanteric bursae, and glenohumeral joints. This article reviews the clinical presentations of these problems. It also discusses musculoskeletal injections for these problems in terms of medications, indications, injection technique, and supporting evidence from the literature. Experience with joint injection and the pharmacological principles described in this article should allow primary care physicians to become comfortable and proficient with musculoskeletal injections. PMID:19720781

  11. Pseudoscleroderma secondary to phytomenadione (vitamin K1) injections: Texier's disease.

    PubMed

    Pang, B K; Munro, V; Kossard, S

    1996-02-01

    Cutaneous reactions to vitamin K1 (phytomenadione) are uncommon. They can present as acute eczematous reactions or late reactions that resemble localized scleroderma after vitamin K1 injections. A case is reported here of a patient who developed bilateral sclerodermoid plaques in a cowboy's holster pattern, which persisted for more than 10 years after subcutaneous vitamin K1 injections. Positive intradermal test with vitamin K1 that persisted as an erythematous indurated plaque at the test site for more than 5 months confirmed marked cutaneous hypersensitivity to vitamin K1 in this patient. Serial biopsies of the erythematous plaque at the test site showed transition from spongiotic eczematous features initially to inflammatory morphoea-like histology over a 5 month period. Possible pathogenic mechanisms for phytomenadione-induced pseudoscleroderma are discussed. PMID:8936071

  12. Esterase isozyme polymorphism, specific and nonspecific esterase, syngenic lines development and natural occurrence of a thermostable esterase in the tropical silkworm Bombyx mori L.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, G K; Sengupta, A K; Verma, A K; Sen, S K; Saratchandra, B

    2001-11-01

    Esterase isozyme polymorphism was documented for digestive juice and haemolymph of the tropical multivoltine silkworm, Bombyx mori L., breed CB5 (GP) and its syngenic lines (CB5Lm(e)-1, CB5Lm-2 and CB5Lm-5) using alpha- and beta-naphthylacetate separately as nonspecific substrates (Ogita, Z., Kasai, T., 1965. Genetico-biochemical analysis of specific esterases in Musca domestica. Jpn. J. Genet. 40, 173-184). Polymorphism existed in the isozyme pattern of alpha-esterase with two or three bands in digestive juice and three to five bands in haemolymph. No polymorphism was observed in beta-esterase isozyme pattern having four bands in digestive juice and two bands in haemolymph. During the course of esterase isozyme studies, the presence of some specific alpha-esterase bands (Est-1, 4 and 5) in haemolymph and beta-esterase bands (Est-1, 2 and 3) in digestive juice were observed. But both alpha- and beta-esterase bands Est-3 and 4 in digestive juice and Est-2 and 3 in haemolymph were found to be nonspecific. Nonspecific beta-esterase band (Est-3) in haemolymph of CB5 (GP) and its syngenic lines withstood a temperature up to 80+/-1 degrees C for 10 min. No thermostable band was observed in the isozyme zymogram of alpha-esterase in digestive juice and haemolymph or beta-esterase in digestive juice. Overall, this study discusses the presence of esterase heterogeneity in the CB5 (GP) genepool, syngenic lines development, occurrence of specific alpha- and beta-esterase bands in digestive juice and haemolymph and thermostable beta-esterase band Est-3 in haemolymph in tropical silkworm Bombyx mori L. PMID:11583932

  13. Cerebriform intradermal nevus presenting as cutis verticis gyrata with multiple cellular blue nevus over the body: A rare occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Somenath; Roychoudhury, Soumyajit; Shrimal, Arpit; Das, Kapildeb

    2014-01-01

    Cutis verticis gyrata is a rare skin condition characterized by swelling of scalp resembling the surface of the brain. Various conditions, like cerebriform intradermal nevus (CIN), may give rise to this clinical entity. Moreover, its association with cellular blue nevus is extremely rare and has not been reported so far. Here, we report a 28-year-old male with a huge cerebriform swelling covering the occipital lobe along with multiple nodules all over the body. Histology of the scalp swelling showed solitary or clusters of nevus cells in the dermis and from the body lesions showed features of cellular blue nevus. The diagnosis of CIN with cellular blue nevus was confirmed PMID:24616852

  14. Interpretation Criteria for Comparative Intradermal Tuberculin Test for Diagnosis of Bovine Tuberculosis in Cattle in Maroua Area of Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Temwa, J.; Mouiche, M. M.; Iyawa, D.; Zoli, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Intradermal tuberculin test (TST) is the choice method for diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis (Tb) in live animals. This work was done to assess the performance of single intradermal comparative cervical tuberculin (SICCT) test in randomly selected cattle in Maroua, Cameroon, against detection of Tb lesions and detection of Tb lesions plus acid fast bacilli in lesions. While 22.28% of slaughtered cattle presented Tb lesions at meat inspection, detection rates of anti-bovine-Tb antibody, Tb lesions, and Tb lesions plus acid fast bacilli were 68.57%, 32.95%, and 22.35%, respectively. SICCT-bovine-Tb positive cattle were 35.29%, 29.41%, 25.88%, 24.7%, and 21.18% at ≥2 mm, ≥2.5 mm, ≥3 mm, ≥3.5 mm, and ≥4 mm cut-offs, respectively. Higher sensitivity and predictive values were obtained at severe interpretations. The best performance was at ≥3 mm and ≥3.5 mm cut-offs. Against detection of Tb lesions, ≥3 mm and ≥3.5 mm showed sensitivity of 67.8% and specificity of 94.7% and 96.5%, respectively. For detection of Tb lesions accompanied with acid fast bacilli in lesions, ≥3 mm and ≥3.5 mm showed sensitivity of 89.4% and specificity of 92.4% and 93.9%, respectively. These findings revealed that interpretations of SICCT-bovine-Tb should be at ≥3 mm and/or ≥3.5 mm cut-offs. Severe interpretation of TST is essential for optimal diagnosis of bovine Tb in cattle in Maroua, Cameroon. PMID:27563481

  15. Interpretation Criteria for Comparative Intradermal Tuberculin Test for Diagnosis of Bovine Tuberculosis in Cattle in Maroua Area of Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Awah-Ndukum, J; Temwa, J; Ngwa, V Ngu; Mouiche, M M; Iyawa, D; Zoli, P A

    2016-01-01

    Intradermal tuberculin test (TST) is the choice method for diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis (Tb) in live animals. This work was done to assess the performance of single intradermal comparative cervical tuberculin (SICCT) test in randomly selected cattle in Maroua, Cameroon, against detection of Tb lesions and detection of Tb lesions plus acid fast bacilli in lesions. While 22.28% of slaughtered cattle presented Tb lesions at meat inspection, detection rates of anti-bovine-Tb antibody, Tb lesions, and Tb lesions plus acid fast bacilli were 68.57%, 32.95%, and 22.35%, respectively. SICCT-bovine-Tb positive cattle were 35.29%, 29.41%, 25.88%, 24.7%, and 21.18% at ≥2 mm, ≥2.5 mm, ≥3 mm, ≥3.5 mm, and ≥4 mm cut-offs, respectively. Higher sensitivity and predictive values were obtained at severe interpretations. The best performance was at ≥3 mm and ≥3.5 mm cut-offs. Against detection of Tb lesions, ≥3 mm and ≥3.5 mm showed sensitivity of 67.8% and specificity of 94.7% and 96.5%, respectively. For detection of Tb lesions accompanied with acid fast bacilli in lesions, ≥3 mm and ≥3.5 mm showed sensitivity of 89.4% and specificity of 92.4% and 93.9%, respectively. These findings revealed that interpretations of SICCT-bovine-Tb should be at ≥3 mm and/or ≥3.5 mm cut-offs. Severe interpretation of TST is essential for optimal diagnosis of bovine Tb in cattle in Maroua, Cameroon. PMID:27563481

  16. Fuel injection

    SciTech Connect

    Iiyoshi, A.; Vogoshi, S.

    1983-12-01

    The Plasma Physics Laboratory and the Dept. of Electrical Engineering report on three types of pellet injectors which have different applications: injection of a pellet into a magnetic bottle for magnetic confinement; injection of a pellet into a vacuum chamber for an inertial confinement experiment; and injection of a pellet into a magnetic bottle where the pellet is ionized by high-power laser irradiation for target plasma production. The requirements of pellet injectors are summarized in a table. Theoretical studies on pellet ablation in hot plasma and ablated particle diffusion are underway.

  17. Live imaging of transforming growth factor-β activated kinase 1 activation in Lewis lung carcinoma 3LL cells implanted into syngeneic mice and treated with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid.

    PubMed

    Takaoka, Saori; Kamioka, Yuji; Takakura, Kanako; Baba, Ai; Shime, Hiroaki; Seya, Tsukasa; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2016-05-01

    Transforming growth factor-β activated kinase 1 (TAK1) has been shown to play a crucial role in cell death, differentiation, and inflammation. Here, we live-imaged robust TAK1 activation in Lewis lung carcinoma 3LL cells implanted into the s.c. tissue of syngeneic C57BL/6 mice and treated with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (PolyI:C). First, we developed and characterized a Förster resonance energy transfer-based biosensor for TAK1 activity. The TAK1 biosensor, named Eevee-TAK1, responded to stress-inducing reagents such as anisomycin, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin1-β. The anisomycin-induced increase in Förster resonance energy transfer was abolished by the TAK1 inhibitor (5z)-7-oxozeaenol. Activity of TAK1 in 3LL cells was markedly increased by PolyI:C in the presence of macrophages. 3LL cells expressing Eevee-TAK1 were implanted into mice and observed through imaging window by two-photon excitation microscopy. During the growth of tumor, the 3LL cells at the periphery of the tumor showed higher TAK1 activity than the 3LL cells located at the center of the tumor, suggesting that cells at the periphery of the tumor mass were under stronger stress. Injection of PolyI:C, which is known to induce regression of the implanted tumors, induced marked and homogenous TAK1 activation within the tumor tissues. The effect of PolyI:C faded within 4 days. These observations suggest that Eevee-TAK1 is a versatile tool to monitor cellular stress in cancer tissues. PMID:26931406

  18. Ganciclovir Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is for intravenous (into a vein) use only. Giving ganciclovir through intramuscular (into a muscle) or ... the storage of ganciclovir solution. Store your medication only as directed. Make sure you understand what you ...

  19. Methylnaltrexone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to treat constipation caused by opioid (narcotic) pain medications in patients with advanced illnesses ... a class of medications called peripherally acting mu-opioid receptor antagonists. It works by protecting the bowel ...

  20. Dexamethasone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe allergic reactions. It is used in the management of certain types of edema (fluid retention and ... needed for normal body functioning) and in the management of certain types of shock. Dexamethasone injection is ...

  1. Pembrolizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat a certain type of non-small-cell lung cancer that has spread to nearby tissues or to ... successfully with other medications for non-small-cell lung cancer. Pembrolizumab injection is in a class of medications ...

  2. Ibandronate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ibandronate is in a class of medications called bisphosphonates. It works by preventing bone breakdown and increasing ... while receiving this medication.Being treated with a bisphosphonate medication such as ibandronate injection for osteoporosis may ...

  3. Omalizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... asthma attacks (sudden episodes of wheezing, shortness of breath, and trouble breathing) in people with allergic asthma ( ... receiving a dose of omalizumab injection shortness of breath coughing up blood skin sores severe pain, numbness ...

  4. Necitumumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest pain; shortness of breath; dizziness; loss of consciousness; or fast, irregular, or pounding heartbeat.Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory.Talk to your doctor about the risks of receiving necitumumab injection.

  5. Dolasetron Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... receiving cancer chemotherapy medications. Dolasetron is in a class of medications called serotonin 5-HT3 receptor antagonists. ... stiff or twitching muscles seizures coma (loss of consciousness) Dolasetron injection may cause other side effects. Call ...

  6. Topotecan Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... also used together with other medications to treat cervical cancer (cancer that begins in the opening of the ... days. When topotecan injection is used to treat cervical cancer, it is usually given once a day for ...

  7. Ertapenem Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Ertapenem injection is used to treat certain serious infections, including pneumonia and urinary tract, skin, diabetic foot, ... for the prevention of infections following colorectal surgery. Ertapenem is in a class of medications called carbapenem ...

  8. Octreotide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... immediate-release injection is also used to control diarrhea and flushing caused by carcinoid tumors (slow-growing ... symptoms are severe or do not go away: diarrhea constipation pale, bulky, foul-smelling stools constantly feeling ...

  9. Infliximab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection may cause serious allergic reactions during an infusion and for 2 hours afterward. A doctor or ... the following symptoms during or shortly after your infusion: hives; rash; itching; swelling of the face, eyes, ...

  10. Vedolizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection may cause serious allergic reactions during an infusion and for several hours afterward. A doctor or ... of the following symptoms during or after your infusion: rash; itching; swelling of the face, eyes, mouth, ...

  11. Panitumumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a solution (liquid) to be given by infusion (injected into a vein). It is usually given ... doctor or nurse in a doctor's office or infusion center. Panitumumab is usually given once every 2 ...

  12. Tositumomab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is in a class of medications called monoclonal antibodies with radioisotopes. It works by attaching to cancer ... you receive tositumomab injection, your body may develop antibodies (substances in the blood that help the immune ...

  13. Ibritumomab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is in a class of medications called monoclonal antibodies with radioisotopes. It works by attaching to cancer ... you receive ibritumomab injection, your body may develop antibodies (substances in the blood that help the immune ...

  14. Temozolomide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Temozolomide is used to treat certain types of brain tumors. Temozolomide is in a class of medications called ... injected once a day. For some types of brain tumors, temozolomide is given daily for 42 to 49 ...

  15. Teduglutide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome in people who need additional nutrition or fluids from intravenous (IV) therapy. Teduglutide injection is in ... analogs. It works by improving the absorption of fluids and nutrients in the intestines.

  16. Olanzapine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Olanzapine extended-release injection is used to treat schizophrenia (a mental illness that causes disturbed or unusual ... treat episodes of agitation in people who have schizophrenia or in people who have bipolar I disorder ( ...

  17. Risperidone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... release (long-acting) injection is used to treat schizophrenia (a mental illness that causes disturbed or unusual ... do not already have diabetes. If you have schizophrenia, you are more likely to develop diabetes than ...

  18. Aripiprazole Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injections (Abilify Maintena, Aristada) are used to treat schizophrenia (a mental illness that causes disturbed or unusual ... treat episodes of agitation in people who have schizophrenia or in people who have bipolar I disorder ( ...

  19. Certolizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... has not improved when treated with other medications, rheumatoid arthritis (a condition in which the body attacks its ... continues. When certolizumab injection is used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, it is usually given every other week and ...

  20. Ramucirumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... dose of ramucirumab injection. Tell your doctor or nurse if you experience any of the following while you receive ramucirumab: uncontrollable shaking of a part of the body; back pain or spasms; chest pain and tightness; chills; flushing; ...

  1. Topotecan Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... organs where eggs are formed) and small cell lung cancer (a type of cancer that begins in the ... topotecan injection is used to treat ovarian or lung cancer, it is usually given once a day for ...

  2. Colistimethate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibiotic, to help treat your infection. The drug will be either injected directly into a vein through ... catheter or added to an intravenous fluid that will drip through a needle or catheter into a ...

  3. Mitoxantrone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... medications to relieve pain in people with advanced prostate cancer who did not respond to other medications. Mitoxantrone ... doses). When mitoxantrone injection is used to treat prostate cancer, it is usually given once every 21 days. ...

  4. Palivizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... this medicine each month during RSV season. Your health care provider will let you know when the monthly injections are no longer needed.Your child's health care provider (doctor, nurse, or pharmacist) may measure ...

  5. Terbutaline Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Terbutaline injection is used to treat wheezing, shortness of breath, coughing, and chest tightness caused by asthma, chronic bronchitis, and emphysema. Terbutaline is in a class of medications called beta ...

  6. Leuprolide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the body and causes pain, heavy or irregular menstruation [periods], and other symptoms). Leuprolide injection (Lupron ... mention any of the following: certain medications for irregular heartbeat such as amiodarone (Cordarone), disopyramide (Norpace), procainamide ( ...

  7. Sumatriptan Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... accompanied by nausea and sensitivity to sound and light). Sumatriptan injection is also used to treat the ... children. Store it at room temperature, away from light, excess heat, and moisture (not in the bathroom). ...

  8. Insulin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... contraceptives (birth control pills, patches, rings, injections, or implants); niacin (Niacor, Niaspan, Slo-Niacin); octreotide (Sandostatin);oral ... cramps abnormal heartbeat large weight gain in a short period of time swelling of the arms, hands, ...

  9. Fondaparinux Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... had a serious allergic reaction (difficulty breathing or swallowing or swelling of the face, throat, tongue, lips, ... the face, throat, tongue, lips, or eyes difficulty swallowing or breathing Fondaparinux injection may cause other side ...

  10. Daclizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS; a disease in which ... injections. Before you use daclizumab yourself the first time, read the written instructions that come with it. ...