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Sample records for intramural esophagic hematoma

  1. Laparoscopic drainage of an intramural duodenal hematoma.

    PubMed

    Maemura, T; Yamaguchi, Y; Yukioka, T; Matsuda, H; Shimazaki, S

    1999-02-01

    A 21-year-old man was admitted with vomiting and abdominal pain 3 days after sustaining blunt abdominal trauma by being tackled in a game of American football. A diagnosis of intramural hematoma of the duodenum was made using computed tomography and upper gastrointestinal tract contrast radiography. The hematoma caused obstructive jaundice by compressing the common bile duct. The contents of the hematoma were laparoscopically drained. A small perforation was then found in the duodenal wall. The patient underwent laparotomy and repair of the injury. Laparoscopic surgery can be used as definitive therapy in this type of abdominal trauma. PMID:10204621

  2. Spontaneous intramural hematoma of the colon.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Samuel; Gonçalves, Ana Rita; Araújo Correia, Luís

    2016-08-01

    A 73-year-old man was admitted to our clinic with sudden left quadrant abdominal pain and hematochezia. There was no history of trauma. He denied other symptoms or taking off-the-counter medication. His medical history was relevant for ischemic and aortic-mitral valve disease with prosthetic valves for which he was medicated with aspirin and warfarin. On physical examination the patient presented normal vital signs with tenderness on palpation of the left side of the abdomen. Laboratory tests revealed moderate anemia (10.8 g/dl) and thrombocytopenia (135.000x10^9 U/L) with therapeutic international normalized ratio (2.53). Colonoscopy revealed an extensive area of erythematous and bluish mucosa with an apparent torsion of the proximal descending colon around a volumous hematoma measuring 6.5x3 cm (Figure 1 A-C). Urgent abdominal CT confirmed the presence of a large intramural hematoma of the descending colon (Figure 2 A-B). A conservative approach was adopted with temporary suspension of anticoagulation. Given the high thrombotic risk, abdominal ultrasound was performed after 72 hours showing considerable reduction in the size of the hematoma. Anti-coagulation was then resumed without complications. One month later, colonoscopy was repeated showing complete healing of the mucosa. The increasing use of anti-aggregating and anti-coagulant therapy, especially in elderly patients, explains the increasing incidence of bleeding events seen in this population. However, gastrointestinal hematomas are estimated to occur in only 1 for every 250.000 anti-coagulated patients. Diagnosis is based on characteristic radiologic findings. While most parietal hematomas can be approached conservatively, surgery is indicated in the presence of complications or persistence of the hematoma. PMID:27554386

  3. Coronary Intramural Hematoma Presenting as Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Takenobu; Kadota, Kazushige; Kubo, Shunsuke; Habara, Seiji; Mitsudo, Kazuaki

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a case of intramural hematoma without ongoing myocardial ischemia that healed spontaneously with conservative treatment. A 37-year-old woman was admitted due to chest pain. Acute coronary syndrome was diagnosed by electrocardiography and echocardiography. Coronary angiography showed 90% stenosis in the distal portion of the left anterior descending coronary artery, where intravascular ultrasound showed a hematoma, but optical coherence tomography could not detect the entry point. Therefore, we identified the intramural hematoma as the etiology. Because the coronary flow was maintained and chest pain disappeared, we chose conservative treatment. Fifteen days after admission, coronary computed tomography showed an improvement in the intramural hematoma. PMID:27477409

  4. Emerging Concepts in Intramural Hematoma Imaging.

    PubMed

    Gutschow, Susan E; Walker, Christopher M; Martínez-Jiménez, Santiago; Rosado-de-Christenson, Melissa L; Stowell, Justin; Kunin, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    Intramural hematoma (IMH) is included in the spectrum of acute aortic syndrome and appears as an area of hyperattenuating crescentic thickening in the aortic wall that is best seen at nonenhanced computed tomography. IMH is historically believed to originate from ruptured vasa vasorum in the aortic media without an intimal tear, but there are reports of small intimomedial tears identified prospectively at imaging or found at surgery in some cases of IMH. These reports have blurred the distinction between aortic dissection and IMH and raise questions about what truly distinguishes the entities that compose acute aortic syndrome. The pathophysiology of these subgroups and the controversies surrounding their differentiation are discussed. The natural history of IMH is highly variable; it may resolve or progress to aneurysm, dissection, or rupture. The authors review various imaging prognostic factors that should be reported by the radiologist, including Stanford classification, maximum aortic diameter, maximum IMH thickness, focal contrast enhancement (including ulcerlike projection and intramural blood pool), and pleural or pericardial effusion. Medical (nonsurgical) versus surgical treatment strategies depend primarily on the Stanford classification, although more recent studies of Asian cohorts report success of initial medical treatment in patients with Stanford type A IMH, with timed (delayed) surgery for patients who develop complications. Understanding the imaging appearance and prognostic factors of IMH helps the radiologist and surgeon identify patients at greatest risk for complications to ensure appropriate treatment and improve patient outcomes. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27163587

  5. A Treatment Option for Esophageal Intramural Pseudodiverticulosis.

    PubMed

    Tyberg, Amy; Jodorkovsky, Daniela

    2014-04-01

    Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis (EIPD) is a rare condition often presenting with esophageal strictures. Treatment is often limited to endoscopic dilatation and treatment of the underlying esophageal pathology. We present a case of a patient with longstanding GERD on famotidine (she experienced anaphylaxis with proton pump inhibitors [PPIs]) who presented with dysphagia and weight loss. Work-up revealed a diagnosis of EIPD with a 5-mm mid-esophageal stricture. Therapy with dilatation was unsuccessful until the addition of sucralfate, after which dilatation was successful and symptoms resolved. In patients who are unable to take PPIs, the addition of sucralfate may enhance the success of dilatations of esophageal strictures and EIPD. PMID:26157852

  6. Conservative Management of Left Atrial Intramural Hematoma after Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Oraii, Saeed; Roshanali, Farideh; Ghorbanisharif, Alireza; Mikaeili, Javad; Tahraei, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Left atrial intramural hematoma is a very rare complication of radiofrequency ablation procedures. A patient with tachyarrhythmia underwent radiofrequency catheter ablation. Echocardiography performed the following morning showed a large mass in the left atrium, suggestive of intramural hematoma formation. The patient was in a stable condition; therefore, it was decided that follow-up should be conservative and her anticoagulation therapy was continued. The size of the hematoma decreased significantly over the following 50 days. This case highlights a rare complication of a complex catheter ablation procedure in the left atrium that was managed via a noninvasive approach, with which all interventionists should be familiar. PMID:27482270

  7. [Aortic intramural hematoma fissuration: atypical presentation in an aircraft pilot].

    PubMed

    Fozzato, Francesca; Prioli, Maria Antonia; Santini, Francesco; Menini, Fabio; Pavan, Michela; Guarise, Paola; Vassanelli, Corrado

    2010-02-01

    Aortic intramural hematoma is a life-threatening thoracic aortic pathology. In this report we describe a case of fissuration of an aortic intramural hematoma with atypical clinical presentation, which occurred in an aircraft pilot. The patient was admitted to our emergency room with transient chest pain developed during a flight landing, followed only by persistent abdominal pain. The ECG and cardiac enzymes were normal. A portable two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiogram showed aortic root dilation and pericardial effusion. Transesophageal echocardiography showed aortic intramural hematoma with fissuration into the pericardial space. The angio-computed tomography confirmed the diagnosis. Two hours after admission the patient, with signs of cardiac tamponade, underwent Bentall surgical intervention without complications. PMID:20408481

  8. Renal Infarction Caused by Isolated Spontaneous Renal Artery Intramural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sihyung; Lee, Ga Hee; Jin, Kyubok; Park, Kang Min; Kim, Yang Wook; Park, Bong Soo

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 46 Final Diagnosis: Renal infarction Symptoms: Flank pain Medication: — Clinical Procedure: CT Specialty: Nephrology Objective: Rare disease Background: Acute renal infarction is an uncommon condition resulting from an obstruction or a decrease in renal arterial blood flow. Isolated spontaneous renal artery intramural hematoma is a rare cause of renal infarction. Case Report: A 46-year-old healthy man presented to our emergency room because of sudden onset of severe right flank pain. An enhanced abdominal computed tomography scan showed a low-attenuated lesion in the lateral portion of the right kidney but no visible thromboembolisms in the main vessels. Computed tomography angiography revealed acute infarction resulting from intramural hematoma of the anterior segmental artery of the right kidney, with distal occlusion. Conclusions: The rarity and non-specific clinical presentation of renal infarction often lead to a delayed diagnosis that may result in impaired renal function. Clinical suspicion is important in the early diagnosis, and intramural hematoma of the renal artery should be considered the cause of renal infarction even in healthy patients without pre-disposing factors. PMID:26596500

  9. Intramural duodenal hematoma after endoscopic therapy for a bleeding duodenal ulcer in a patient with liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Sugai, Kyoko; Kajiwara, Eiji; Mochizuki, Yuichi; Noma, Eijiro; Nakashima, Jo; Uchimura, Koutaro; Sadoshima, Seizou

    2005-09-01

    We report a case of intestinal obstruction due to intramural hematoma of the duodenum following therapeutic endoscopy for a bleeding duodenal ulcer in a patient with liver cirrhosis. A 44-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with severe epigastralgia, nausea and tarry stool. Two years previously he had undergone endoscopic sclerotherapy for esophageal varices caused by alcoholic liver cirrhosis. Endoscopy revealed an open ulcer with a bleeding vessel in the duodenal bulb, and sclerotherapy was performed by clipping the vessel and injecting 20 ml of 0.2% epinephrine. His platelet count was 3.5x10(4)/mul. Twelve hours later, he again developed epigastralgia and hypotension. Emergency computed tomography and ultrasonography revealed an intramural hematoma, 15x18 cm in diameter, at the dorsal and lateral duodenum. Endoscopy and upper gastrointestinal series revealed severe stenosis of the duodenal lumen caused by intramural hematoma. He received parenteral feeding for 22 days and within 8 weeks the hematoma was gradually absorbed using conservative management. Intramural duodenal hematoma may be diagnosed as a complication of the endoscopic procedure in a patient with a bleeding tendency, such as liver cirrhosis. PMID:16258210

  10. Unusual Case of Overt Aortic Dissection Mimicking Aortic Intramural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Disha, Kushtrim; Kuntze, Thomas; Girdauskas, Evaldas

    2016-01-01

    We report an interesting case in which overt aortic dissection mimicked two episodes of aortic intramural hematoma (IMH) (Stanford A, DeBakey I). This took place over the course of four days and had a major influence on the surgical treatment strategy. The first episode of IMH regressed completely within 15 hours after it was clinically diagnosed and verified using imaging techniques. The recurrence of IMH was detected three days thereafter, resulting in an urgent surgical intervention. Overt aortic dissection with evidence of an intimal tear was diagnosed intraoperatively. PMID:27066437

  11. Computed tomography of intramural hematoma of the small intestime: a report of 3 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Plojoux, O.; Hauser, H.; Wettstein, P.

    1982-08-01

    CT findings in 3 cases of intramural hematoma of the small intestine are described. One patient needed surgery. CT characteristics were specific and included a region of increased density (50-80 H) representing the hematoma. The differential diagnosis includes tumor (lymphoma or melanoma) and inflammatory disease (Crohn disease or pancreatic cyst.)

  12. Outcomes and management of type A intramural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Harleen K.; Tanaka, Akiko; Charlton-Ouw, Kristofer M.; Afifi, Rana O.; Miller, Charles C.; Safi, Hazim J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Initial optimal management of acute type A aortic dissection (ATAAD) with intramural hematoma (ATAIMH) remains controversial, especially between centers in the Eastern vs. Western worlds. We examined the literature and our experience to report outcomes after repair of ATAIMH. Methods We reviewed the hospital, follow-up clinic records and online mortality databases for all patients who presented to our center for open repair of ATAAD between 1999 and 2014. Preoperative characteristics, early and long-term outcomes were compared between classic ATAAD vs. ATAIMH. Survival was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier and log-rank statistics. Results Of the 523 repaired ATAAD, 101 patients (19%) presented with IMH and 422 (81%) had classic dissection. ATAIMH were significantly older (64.8±12.9 vs. 56.8±14.6 years; P<0.001), more commonly females (39% vs. 26%; P=0.010), had poor baseline renal function (i.e., glomerular filtration rate) (P<0.017), more retrograde dissections (27% vs. 8.3%; P<0.001), and less distal malperfusion (5% vs. 15%; P<0.001). Age greater than 60 years, female sex, retrograde dissection, and Marfan syndrome were strongly correlated with ATAIMH. Time to repair for ATAIMH was longer (median, 55.3 vs. 9.8 hours; P<0.001) with one death in ATAIMH within three days of presentation (0.9% vs. 6%; P=0.040). In all, 30-day mortality in ATAIMH was not different from classic ATAAD (12% vs.16%; P=0.289). A significantly lower incidence of postoperative dialysis in ATAIMH was noted (10% vs. 19%; P=0.034). When adjusted for age and renal function, late survival was improved with IMH (P<0.039). Conclusions ATAIMH continues to be associated with significant morbidity and mortality, comparable to classic aortic dissection. A multidisciplinary management approach involving aggressive medical management and risk stratification for timely surgical intervention, along with genetic profiling, is recommended for optimal care. Long-term monitoring is mandatory to assess

  13. Concurrent Spontaneous Sublingual and Intramural Small Bowel Hematoma due to Warfarin Use

    PubMed Central

    Pamukçu Günaydın, Gül; Çiftçi Sivri, Hatice Duygu; Sivri, Serkan; Otal, Yavuz; Özhasenekler, Ayhan; Kurtoğlu Çelik, Gülhan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. We present a case of concurrent spontaneous sublingual and intramural small bowel hematoma due to warfarin anticoagulation. Case. A 71-year-old man presented to the emergency department complaining of a swollen, painful tongue. He was on warfarin therapy. Physical examination revealed sublingual hematoma. His international normalized ratio was 11.9. The computed tomography scan of the neck demonstrated sublingual hematoma. He was admitted to emergency department observation unit, monitored closely; anticoagulation was reversed with fresh frozen plasma and vitamin K. 26 hours after his arrival to the emergency department, his abdominal pain and melena started. His abdomen tomography demonstrated intestinal submucosal hemorrhage in the ileum. He was admitted to surgical floor, monitored closely, and discharged on day 4. Conclusion. Since the patient did not have airway compromise holding anticoagulant, reversing anticoagulation, close monitoring and observation were enough for management of both sublingual and spontaneous intramural small bowel hematoma. PMID:26649210

  14. Intramural hematoma or aortic dissection – a diagnostic and therapeutic problem. A case report

    PubMed Central

    Suder, Bogdan; Wasilewski, Grzegorz; Sadowski, Jerzy; Kapelak, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    The authors present a case report of a 60-year-old patient with an ascending aortic aneurysm along with the associated diagnostic and therapeutic problems. The choice of therapy in patients with aortic intramural hematoma is difficult and should be based on comprehensive evaluation of the patient's status as well as on the experience of the radiologist and surgeon. PMID:26702280

  15. CT Findings of Ruptured Intramural Hematoma of the Aorta Extending Along the Pulmonary Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Sueyoshi, Eijun Sakamoto, Ichiro; Uetani, Masataka; Matsuoka, Yojiro; Suenaga, Etsuro

    2007-04-15

    Mediastinal hematoma extending along the pulmonary artery is a rare complication of Stanford type A classic (double-barreled) aortic dissection. Rupture from the posterior aspect of the aortic root penetrates the shared adventitia of the aorta and pulmonary artery. From this location, hematoma can spread along the adventitial planes of the pulmonary arteries out into the lungs. We report a case of ruptured intramural hematoma of the aorta (IMH) extending along the pulmonary artery. To our knowledge, this finding in patients with IMH has not been reported in the literature.

  16. Spontaneous intramural esophageal dissection: an unusual onset of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Sanz, Gemma; Rodríguez Alonso, Lorena; Romero Martínez, Natalia M

    2016-03-01

    A 35-year-old man, with a history of rhinitis, eczema and a dubious achalasia was admitted due to chest pain and sialorrhea. Upper endoscopy showed a little hole and a narrowing of the distal esophagus. A CT-scan with oral contrast exposed a discontinuity of the lumen of the middle third of the esophagus and a dissection of submucosal space 16 cm long. The patient recovered after parenteral nutrition. After four months, an esophageal endoscopic showed transient whitish exudates, longitudinal furrows and esophageal lacerations. The biopsies illustrated significant eosinophilic inflammation, eosinophilic microabscesses and basal cell hyperplasia. PMID:26949147

  17. Gastric intramural hematoma accompanied by severe epigastric pain and hematemesis after endoscopic mucosal resection

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peng; Tan, Shi-Yun; Liao, Guo-Hai

    2012-01-01

    Gastric intramural hematoma is a rare injury of the stomach, and is most often seen in patients with underlying disease. Such injury following endoscopic therapy is even rarer, and there are no universally accepted guidelines for its treatment. In this case report, we describe a gastric intramural hematoma which occurred within 6 h of endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR). Past medical history of this patient was negative, and laboratory examinations revealed normal coagulation profiles and platelet count. Following EMR, the patient experienced severe epigastric pain and vomited 150 mL of gastric contents which were bright red in color. Subsequent emergency endoscopy showed a 4 cm × 5 cm diverticulum-like defect in the anterior gastric antrum wall and a 4 cm × 8 cm intramural hematoma adjacent to the endoscopic submucosal dissection lesion. Following unsatisfactory temporary conservative management, the patient was treated surgically and made a complete recovery. Retrospectively, one possible reason for the patient’s condition is that the arterioles in the submucosa or muscularis may have been damaged during deep and massive submucosal injection. Thus, endoscopists should be aware of this potential complication and improve the level of surgery, especially the skills required for submucosal injection. PMID:23323020

  18. Massive Hemothorax Occurring with Intramural Hematoma of the Descending Aorta in the Early Postpartum Period

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jeong Hee; Jeon, Yeong Jeong; Hong, Tae Hee; Byun, Joung Hun; Hwang, Sang Won; Park, Jae Hong

    2016-01-01

    Postpartum aortic intramural hematoma (IMH) is a rare but potentially lethal condition. We report a case of aortic IMH with massive hemothorax in a postpartum woman. The patient was a 31-year-old woman who had delivered twins by cesarean section. Two days after delivery, she complained of sudden-onset dyspnea. Chest computed tomography revealed a massive left hemothorax. Exploratory thoracotomy was performed, and we found a defect measuring approximately 6 mm in the adventitial layer of the thoracic aorta and an IMH. We repaired the defect primarily, and no more bleeding was observed. The patient was discharged on the 19th postoperative day without any complications. PMID:27066436

  19. Conservative management of intestinal obstruction by isolated intramural duodenal hematoma. A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    D'Arpa, Francesco; Orlando, Giuseppina; Tutino, Roberta; Salamone, Giuseppe; Battaglia, Emanuele Onofrio; Gulotta, Gaspare

    2015-01-01

    The duodenal injuries occur in the 3-5% of blunt abdominal traumas. The isolated intramural duodenal hematoma is a very rare lesion. An early diagnosis and an adequate therapy are crucial because a delay, beyond 24 hours, increases the mortality from the 11% to 40%. However, diagnosis is often hindered by a lack of specific symptoms. We report a case of a 21 years-old man with an intestinal obstruction from isolated intramural duodenal hematoma occurred after a blunt abdominal trauma in a sport competition. The patient was treated conservatively with total parenteral nutrition, gastric decompression and intravenous PPIs. The progressive spontaneous resolution of the hematoma was checked with periodical endoscopies. The discharge occurred after three weeks with no early complications. No late complications occurred at one-year follow-up. The endoscopy is a good and safe tool in the management of this intestinal obstructions with the possibility of conservative or interventional treatment. PMID:26675664

  20. Operative management of pulmonary abscess due to spontaneous perforation of diffuse intramural esophageal pseudodiverticulosis

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Diffuse intramural esophageal pseudodiverticulosis is a rare, benign esophageal condition of unclear cause, pathologically manifested by pseudodiverticula along a portion of the esophagus. It most commonly presents as dysphagia and is usually amenable to endoscopic dilation. It is most reliably diagnosed endoscopically or with a fluoroscopic swallow study. Surgical intervention is rarely indicated but can create a need for an extensive resection and reconstruction, as in the case presented here. PMID:21738294

  1. Operative management of pulmonary abscess due to spontaneous perforation of diffuse intramural esophageal pseudodiverticulosis.

    PubMed

    Liechty, Joseph; Wood, Richard

    2011-07-01

    Diffuse intramural esophageal pseudodiverticulosis is a rare, benign esophageal condition of unclear cause, pathologically manifested by pseudodiverticula along a portion of the esophagus. It most commonly presents as dysphagia and is usually amenable to endoscopic dilation. It is most reliably diagnosed endoscopically or with a fluoroscopic swallow study. Surgical intervention is rarely indicated but can create a need for an extensive resection and reconstruction, as in the case presented here. PMID:21738294

  2. Diagnosis and management of acute aortic syndromes: dissection, intramural hematoma, and penetrating aortic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Bonaca, Marc P; O'Gara, Patrick T

    2014-01-01

    Acute aortic syndromes constitute a spectrum of conditions characterized by disruptions in the integrity of the aortic wall that may lead to potentially catastrophic outcomes. They include classic aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, and penetrating aortic ulcer. Although imaging studies are sensitive and specific, timely diagnosis can be delayed because of variability in presenting symptoms and the relatively low frequency with which acute aortic syndromes are seen in the emergency setting. Traditional classification systems, such as the Stanford system, facilitate early treatment decision-making through recognition of the high risk of death and major complications associated with involvement of the ascending aorta (type A). These patients are treated surgically unless intractable and severe co-morbidities are present. Outcomes with dissections that do not involve the ascending aorta (type B) depend on the presence of acute complications (e.g., malperfusion, early aneurysm formation, leakage), the patency and size of the false lumen, and patient co-morbidities. Patients with uncomplicated type B dissections are initially treated medically. Endovascular techniques have emerged as an alternative to surgery for the management of complicated type B dissections when intervention is necessary. Patients with acute aortic syndromes require aggressive medical care, risk stratification for additional complications and targeted genetic assessment as well as careful long-term monitoring to assess for evolving complications. The optimal care of patients with acute aortic syndrome requires the cooperation of members of an experienced multidisciplinary team both in the acute and chronic setting. PMID:25156302

  3. Ultrasound follow-up in a patient with intestinal obstruction due to post-traumatic intramural duodenal hematoma.

    PubMed

    Homma, Yukako; Mori, Kazuhiro; Ohnishi, Yasuhiro; Fujioka, Keisuke; Terada, Tomomasa; Sasaki, Ayumi; Nagai, Takashi; Inoue, Miki

    2016-07-01

    We report the case of a 7-year-old girl with intestinal obstruction due to post-traumatic intramural duodenal hematoma. She had fallen from the monkey bars the day before presenting to our hospital, and was admitted with signs of abdominal pain, vomiting, and nausea. Abdominal ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a heterogeneous solid mass located within the duodenal wall, compressing the descending part of the duodenum. The inferior vena cava was also compressed by the mass lesion, although no associated symptoms were evident. Based on these findings, the mass lesion was considered to represent intramural hematoma causing intestinal obstruction. She was managed conservatively with total parenteral nutrition. Although CT and MRI are useful for differentiating hematoma from other intestinal tumors, ultrasonography is minimally invasive and easier to perform repeatedly. In case of duodenal hematoma, ultrasonography may be quite helpful for diagnosis and follow-up by monitoring tumor size and characteristics, and the degree of duodenal compression during conservative treatment. PMID:27194436

  4. Aortic Branch Artery Pseudoaneurysms Associated with Intramural Hematoma: When and How to Do Endovascular Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G. Seitun, Sara; Scarano, Flavio; Passerone, Giancarlo; Williams, David M.

    2013-04-15

    To describe when and how to perform endovascular embolization of aortic branch artery pseudoaneurysms associated with type A and type B intramural hematoma (IMH) involving the descending thoracic and abdominal aorta (DeBakey I and III) that increased significantly in size during follow-up. Sixty-one patients (39 men; mean {+-} standard deviation age 66.1 {+-} 11.2 years) with acute IMH undergoing at least two multidetector computed tomographic examinations during follow-up for 12 months or longer were enrolled. Overall, 48 patients (31 men, age 65.9 {+-} 11.5) had type A and type B IMH involving the descending thoracic and abdominal aorta (DeBakey I and III). Among the 48 patients, 26 (54 %; 17 men, aged 64.3 {+-} 11.4 years) had 71 aortic branch artery pseudoaneurysms. Overall, during a mean follow-up of 22.1 {+-} 9.5 months (range 12-42 months), 31 (44 %) pseudoaneurysms disappeared; 22 (31 %) decreased in size; two (3 %) remained stable; and 16 (22 %) increased in size. Among the 16 pseudoaneurysms with increasing size, five of these (three intercostal arteries, one combined intercostobronchial/intercostal arteries, one renal artery), present in five symptomatic patients, had a significant increase in size (thickness >10 mm; width and length >20 mm). These five patients underwent endovascular embolization with coils and/or Amplatzer Vascular Plug. In all patients, complete thrombosis and exclusion of aortic pseudoaneurysm and relief of back pain were achieved. Aortic branch artery pseudoaneurysms associated with type A and type B IMH involving the descending thoracic and abdominal aorta (DeBakey I and III) may be considered relatively benign lesions. However, a small number may grow in size or extend longitudinally with clinical symptoms during follow-up, and in these cases, endovascular embolization can be an effective and safe procedure.

  5. Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis, a rare cause of food impaction: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Siba, Yahuza; Gorantla, Saritha; Gupta, Anand; Lung, Edward; Culpepper-Morgan, Joan

    2015-05-01

    Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis (EIPD) is a rare, benign condition of uncertain etiology and pathogenesis, which usually presents with either progressive or intermittent dysphagia. Acute presentation with food impaction, requiring emergency esophago-gastroduodenoscopy (EGD), is rare. We report a case of EIPD presenting as food bolus impaction in an elderly black female. The patient had no previous history of dysphagia or odynophagia. Currently accepted risk factors, such as diabetes mellitus, chronic alcoholism, and reflux esophagitis, were not present in our patient. Emergency EGD established the diagnosis and also dislodged the food bolus. Histopathological evaluation of the mucosa diagnosed co-existent acute candidal infection. Medical treatment with proton pump inhibitor and azole antifungal led to resolution of her symptoms. Review of the literature revealed that stenosis, strictures, perforation, gastro-intestinal bleed, and fistula formation are potential complications of EIPD. Multiple motility abnormalities have been described but are not consistent. Treatment of the underlying inflammatory and or infectious condition is the mainstay of management of this unusual condition. PMID:24951515

  6. Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis, a rare cause of food impaction: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Siba, Yahuza; Gorantla, Saritha; Gupta, Anand; Lung, Edward; Culpepper-Morgan, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis (EIPD) is a rare, benign condition of uncertain etiology and pathogenesis, which usually presents with either progressive or intermittent dysphagia. Acute presentation with food impaction, requiring emergency esophago-gastroduodenoscopy (EGD), is rare. We report a case of EIPD presenting as food bolus impaction in an elderly black female. The patient had no previous history of dysphagia or odynophagia. Currently accepted risk factors, such as diabetes mellitus, chronic alcoholism, and reflux esophagitis, were not present in our patient. Emergency EGD established the diagnosis and also dislodged the food bolus. Histopathological evaluation of the mucosa diagnosed co-existent acute candidal infection. Medical treatment with proton pump inhibitor and azole antifungal led to resolution of her symptoms. Review of the literature revealed that stenosis, strictures, perforation, gastro-intestinal bleed, and fistula formation are potential complications of EIPD. Multiple motility abnormalities have been described but are not consistent. Treatment of the underlying inflammatory and or infectious condition is the mainstay of management of this unusual condition. PMID:24951515

  7. A Case of Ruptured Aneurysm of the Proper Esophageal Artery with Symptomatic Mediastinal Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiajia; Sato, Yusuke; Takahashi, Satoshi; Motoyama, Satoru; Yoshino, Kei; Sasaki, Tomohiko; Imai, Kazuhiro; Saito, Hajime; Minamiya, Yoshihiro

    2016-08-01

    Mediastinal aneurysms are rare but potentially life-threatening. Among these, bronchial artery aneurysms are most frequently reported, whereas up to now aneurysms of the proper esophageal artery had never been reported. A 69-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for treatment of a massive mediastinal hematoma. Enhanced computed tomography and selective proper esophageal arteriography revealed a 5-mm aneurysm in the proper esophageal artery that arises from the thoracic aorta at the Th8 level and has an anastomotic branch with the bronchial artery peripherally. Transcatheter arterial embolization was successfully performed using a mixture of N-butyl cyanoacrylate and lipiodol (1:3 ratio, 0.3 ml). Post-embolization angiography showed no filling into the aneurysm. The patient recovered with no complications and was discharged on the 25th post-procedure day. PMID:27094689

  8. Intramural Superstars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spindt, Gary B.

    1981-01-01

    A junior high intramural athletic program was developed to foster enthusiasm among the junior high school student body. Twenty different sports were offered. A Superstar Competition was comprised of eight events including the 100-yard dash, shot put, basketball shoot, and obstacle course. (JN)

  9. Intramural Gymnastics Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornelius, William L.

    1981-01-01

    An intramural gymnastic competition, if properly organized, can foster student and community interest in gymnastics. Aspects of organization and essential preplanning include: directing, judging, scoring, and managing. (JN)

  10. Commericial Involvement in Intramurals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maas, Gerry

    Sport in general has long had ties with commercial interests, the most popular and widespread involving publicity. Intramural sports programs, however, have not cultivated many commercial involvements in publicity. The approach in intramural sports advertising is simple. A commercial interest pays for space or time in a given communication media…

  11. Esophagitis

    MedlinePlus

    Esophagitis is often caused by stomach fluid that flows back into the esophagus. The fluid contains acid which irritates the tissue. This problem is called gastroesophageal reflux . An autoimmune disorder called ...

  12. Esophagitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... swelling of the esophagus. The esophagus is the tube that leads from the back of the mouth to the stomach. Causes Esophagitis is often caused by stomach fluid that flows back into the esophagus. The fluid contains acid ...

  13. Epidural hematoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... hematoma is bleeding between the inside of the skull and the outer covering of the brain (called ... An epidural hematoma is often caused by a skull fracture during childhood or adolescence. This type of ...

  14. Subdural hematoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... hematoma is usually the result of a serious head injury. When it occurs this way, it is called ... subdural hematomas are among the deadliest of all head injuries. The bleeding fills the brain area very rapidly, ...

  15. Modifying Intramural Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rokosz, Francis M.

    1981-01-01

    Standard sports rules can be altered to improve the game for intramural participants. These changes may improve players' attitudes, simplify rules for officials, and add safety features to a game. Specific rule modifications are given for volleyball, football, softball, floor hockey, basketball, and soccer. (JN)

  16. Organizing an Intramural Triathlon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Bruce

    1984-01-01

    Suggestions for developing an intramural triathlon consisting of a 1000-yard swim, 15-mile bike ride, and 5-mile run are presented in this article. Topics to consider when organizing this event include course selection, publicity, personnel, equipment, and awards. (DF)

  17. Ralleyball: A Tennis Intramural Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Stanley J.; Duncan, Lisa

    2004-01-01

    Physical education teachers often look for ways to bring any activity to life and give it meaning with all-out participation from students. To showcase the talents of each sports-enthusiast-students, schools facilitate an intramural activity. The authors of this article present an intramural program titled Ralleyball, which is an ideal way to…

  18. [Aortic intramural hematoma. An atypical pattern equivalent to aortic dissection].

    PubMed

    López-Mínguez, J R; Merchán, A; Arrobas, J; Fernández, G; González-Egüaras, M; García-Andoaín, J M; Alonso, M; Gamero, C; Poblador, M A; Alonso, F

    1995-09-01

    A case is presented of a hypertensive woman who had suffered a stabbing back pain for some three hours, with mild irradiation to precordium and accompanied by vegetative signs. A sinusal rhythm and negative T waves of little depth were seen on the ECG. A transthoracic bidimensional echocardiogram (TTE) showed a normal left ventricle with a somewhat dilated aortic root and the existence of a double echo running parallel to the anterior wall of the aorta but non-ondulating and without a visible intimal flap. Because of suspected aortic dissection an urgent contrasted CAT and a transesophageal echocardiogram were performed. These were informed as an aneurysm of the aortic root with mural thrombus from the ascending to descending aorta, but with no existing intimal flap suggesting dissection. A cardiac catheterization showed a mildly some dilated aortic root without dissection signs and normal left ventricle and coronary arteries. The patient was presented for surgical evaluation but, since no dissection was present, was not considered urgent surgery; she was admitted to the coronary unit and died 48 hours later in a situation of acute pericardial tamponade, documented by TTE, surely due to rupture of the aortic root to pericardial sack. This way of presenting threatened aorta rupture that has been only recently recognized is discussed, as well as some misconceptions which must be avoided. PMID:7569267

  19. Computer Coordination for Campus Intramurals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holley, Bruce

    1980-01-01

    A large intramural program can be effectively organized and scheduled with the help of computer programing. Benefits include overall increased efficiency, better service to the students' needs, a superior evaluation device, and more consistency throughout the program. (CJ)

  20. A New Twist to Intramurals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gildersleeve, Robert; Williams, Jill

    The intramural program at Arizona State University has recently undergone major reorganization. Three highlights of this year's program were the "Run to Tucson," the powerlifting meet, and the rodeo. The "Run to Tucson" involved a 126-mile football relay race from Arizona State University's campus in Tempe to the University of Arizona's campus in…

  1. Imaging and Clinicopathologic Features of Esophageal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Winant, Abbey J.; Gollub, Marc J.; Shia, Jinru; Antonescu, Christina; Bains, Manjit S.; Levine, Marc S.

    2016-01-01

    esophageal leiomyomas had overlapping imaging features, esophageal GISTs tended to be more distal, larger, more heterogeneous, and more enhancing on CT and were markedly FDG avid on PET. Given their malignant potential, esophageal GISTs should be included in the differential diagnosis of intramural esophageal neoplasms. PMID:25055264

  2. Chronic subdural hematoma

    MedlinePlus

    Subdural hemorrhage - chronic; Subdural hematoma - chronic; Subdural hygroma ... Ling GSF. Traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  3. Intramurals: New and Innovative Ideas for a School Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastore, Donna L.

    Intramurals have been a part of elementary and secondary schools since the early part of this century. Intramurals are considered to be an important part of the educational process. Often many schools offer traditional intramural activities, such as basketball, softball, tennis, and volleyball. The purpose of this session is to present new and…

  4. New Directions in Intramurals and Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabian, Louis A.

    This survey attempts to verify and delineate the trends in intramural physical education. Surveys were mailed to 395 colleges and universities in November of 1975. Two hundred and thirty three (56.6%) were returned for statistical analysis, but the number of responses to questions varied because not all questions were applicable to every…

  5. The Social Benefits of Intramural Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artinger, Lori; Clapham, Lisa; Hunt, Carla; Meigs, Matthew; Milord, Nadia; Sampson, Bryan; Forrester, Scott A.

    2006-01-01

    One of the distinguishing features of collegiate student recreational sports complexes is the sense of community that is intentionally introduced in the programs and services that occur within these facilities. Intramural sports programs provide a powerful medium for student interaction (Belch, Gebel, & Mass, 2001). This study was designed to…

  6. Subchorionic hematoma: a review.

    PubMed

    Pearlstone, M; Baxi, L

    1993-02-01

    A review of the English literature on subchorionic hematoma (SCH) is presented. Fourteen studies are reviewed. The incidence of SCH varied greatly among studies from 4 to 48 per cent. Small SCH tend to be more common in the first trimester and appear to pose no added risk to the ongoing pregnancy. Conversely, SCH in the second trimester often are larger and may be associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery. The etiology of these hematomas remains unclear. Pathological changes that might contribute to their formation are reviewed. Larger studies with controls, including data on the incidence of SCH in a population of normal obstetric patients are needed. PMID:8437776

  7. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... esophagus, and chest wall Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Barrett’s Esophagus Chest Wall Tumors Mediastinal Tumors ... Section Navigation Select Topic Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Barrett’s Esophagus Chest Wall Tumors Mediastinal Tumors ...

  8. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... from your throat to your stomach. Early esophageal cancer usually does not cause symptoms. Later, you may ... You're at greater risk for getting esophageal cancer if you smoke, drink heavily, or have acid ...

  9. Esophageal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - esophagus ... Esophageal cancer is not common in the United States. It occurs most often in men over 50 years old. There are two main types of esophageal cancer: squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. These two types ...

  10. Intramural Staff Handbook. Student Staff Personnel Manual from the Office of Intramural/Recreational Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudenhoeffer, Frances Tomlin; Fedak, Joseph F.

    This student staff personnel manual is designed to orient student employees of the New Mexico State University (Las Cruces) Office of Intramural/Recreational Sports to their duties and responsibilities and to provide personnel policies and standard operating procedures. Topics include: student employment procedures, pay rates for job…

  11. Microwave hematoma detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.; Matthews, Dennis L.

    2001-01-01

    The Microwave Hematoma Detector is a non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots near the outer surface of the body. While being geared towards finding sub-dural and epi-dural hematomas, the device can be used to detect blood pooling anywhere near the surface of the body. Modified versions of the device can also detect pneumothorax, organ hemorrhage, atherosclerotic plaque in the carotid arteries, evaluate perfusion (blood flow) at or near the body surface, body tissue damage at or near the surface (especially for burn assessment) and be used in a number of NDE applications. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with a specialized antenna, signal processing/recognition algorithms and a disposable cap worn by the patient which will facilitate accurate mapping of the brain and proper function of the instrument. The invention may be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of sub-dural or epi-dural hematoma in human or animal patients, detection of hemorrhage within approximately 5 cm of the outer surface anywhere on a patient's body.

  12. Pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm associated with coeliac artery occlusion from an aortic intramural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Sakatani, Akihiko; Doi, Yoshinori; Kitayama, Toshiaki; Matsuda, Takaaki; Sasai, Yasutaka; Nishida, Naohiro; Sakamoto, Megumi; Uenoyama, Naoto; Kinoshita, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysms are a rare type of visceral artery aneurysm, whose rupture is associated with high mortality. These aneurysms are of particular interest because local haemodynamic change caused by coeliac artery obstruction plays an important role in their development. However, the pathophysiological mechanism of coeliac artery obstruction is not completely understood. Pressure from the median arcuate ligament is most frequently reported cause. Although it is well-known that stenosis or occlusion of the visceral vessels may be caused by aortic syndrome, reports of pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm associated with coeliac artery occlusion due to aortic syndrome are extremely rare. Our case indicates a new aetiology for a pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm and demonstrates the rapid deterioration of the patient affected. PMID:27122676

  13. Carotid blowout and cerebral gas embolism related to bidirectional carotid-esophageal fistula: a serious complication of esophageal cancer under radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Kuei-Hong; Hsu, Hung-Lung; Pan, Yi-Ju; Huang, Chun-Yang

    2016-03-01

    Carotid-esophageal fistula (CEF) could be a serious complication of esophageal cancer in a patient receiving radiotherapy. We reported a 47-year-old male patient with advanced cervical esophageal cancer under radiotherapy who developed CEF with the presentations of unstable vital signs and disturbances of consciousness. Carotid-esophageal fistula-associated life-threatening conditions of carotid blowout syndrome and cerebral gas embolism were diagnosed after presentation. Subsequently, intramural dissection of esophageal and gastric walls, profound hemoperitoneum, and hypovolemic shock occurred. When a patient who had an underlying cervical esophageal cancer treated by radiotherapy develops unstable vital signs and neurological symptoms, CEF should be kept in mind in the differential diagnoses. Physicians must be alert of the associated complications of carotid blowout syndrome and cerebral gas embolism and perform timely management including decompression, fluid resuscitation, and aggressive endovascular procedure when indicated. PMID:26349780

  14. Eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Kedia, Saurabh; Baruah, Bhaskar Jyoti; Makharia, Govind; Ahuja, Vineet

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a clinico-pathological entity characterised by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and eosinophilia on esophageal mucosal biopsies in the absence of other causes of esophageal eosinophilia. It is a chronic inflammatory condition of esophagus often characterized by refractory reflux symptoms in children and dysphagia in adults. It occurs as a result of Th2 inflammatory response to environmental triggers (food antigens) in genetically predisposed individuals. The diagnostic criteria include symptoms of esophageal dysfunction, esophageal eosinophilia (> 15/hpf), and a PPI trial (persistent eosinophilia after 8 weeks of PPI). Mainstay of treatment at present is topical steroids and dietary therapy. Maintenance treatment should be considered to prevent long term complications. PMID:27522734

  15. Herpetic esophagitis

    SciTech Connect

    Shortsleeve, M.J.; Gauvin, G.P.; Gardner, R.C.; Greenberg, M.S.

    1981-12-01

    Four patients with herpetic esophagitis were examined. In three of them, the presenting symptom was odynophagia. Early in the course of herpetic esophagitis, shallow round and oval ulcers were seen on barium esophagograms. Later, the ulcers filled with fibrinous exudate, forming nodular plaques that projected into the esophageal lumen. Although these findings are diagnostic of esophagitis, they are not specific for a herpes virus infection. The definitive diagnosis must be established by histologic examination, which demonstrates the cytopathic effect of the herpes virus infection within the squamous epithelium.

  16. Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Alsop, Benjamin R; Sharma, Prateek

    2016-09-01

    Esophageal cancer carries a poor prognosis among gastrointestinal malignancies. Although esophageal squamous cell carcinoma predominates worldwide, Western nations have seen a marked rise in the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma that parallels the obesity epidemic. Efforts directed toward early detection have been difficult, given that dysplasia and early cancer are generally asymptomatic. However, significant advances have been made in the past 10 to 15 years that allow for endoscopic management and often cure in early stage esophageal malignancy. New diagnostic imaging technologies may provide a means by which cost-effective, early diagnosis of dysplasia allows for definitive therapy and ultimately improves the overall survival among patients. PMID:27546839

  17. Intramural myomas: to treat or not to treat

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Mayra J; Carr, Bruce R

    2016-01-01

    A debate among gynecologic and reproductive surgeons is whether or not there is a clinical need to treat all intramural myomas. Considerations include myoma size and number, ability to access them, whether or not they compromise the endometrium, and treatment effect on gynecologic, reproductive, and obstetric outcomes. We conducted a detailed study regarding intramural myomas, their prevalence in subject populations, the imaging methods used to detect them, their growth rate, their suspected adverse effects on gynecologic, fertility, and obstetric outcomes, and the effectiveness of various treatment methods. The growing body of evidence reported in the literature supports the need to manage intramural myomas and to treat them appropriately. PMID:27274313

  18. Esophageal Apoplexy.

    PubMed

    Crispin, Melanie Danielle; Chan, Kevin J; Winter, Nicole; Hii, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Oesophageal apoplexy or intramural haematoma of the oesophagus (IHE) is a rare condition with a pattern of presentation that can mimic sinister pathologies. Diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion, and the exclusion of an oesophageal perforation or oesophageal malignancy is important. Investigations include computer topography (CT) and contrast swallow studies as well as a gastroscopy. Management is mainly supportive with resolution of symptoms typically occurring rapidly. We present two cases of this rare condition, with accompanying images. PMID:27271541

  19. Surgical management of intracerebral hematomas

    SciTech Connect

    Tsementzis, S.A.

    1985-04-01

    Traditional and recent developments in the management of spontaneous intracranial hematomas are reviewed. A comprehensive account of the epidemiological characteristics worldwide with an etiological analysis including prevention and prophylaxis introduce the size and clinical significance of this neurological problem. The usefulness and limitations of the available diagnostic methods are described. Most of the emphasis, however, is placed on the management and medicosurgical treatment of intracranial hematomas in correlation with their clinical presentation and localization. 80 references.

  20. Esophageal culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... for infection-causing germs in a sample of tissue from the esophagus. ... Culture - esophageal ... A sample of tissue from your esophagus is needed. The sample is ... or viruses. Other tests may be done to determine what medicine ...

  1. Esophageal manometry

    MedlinePlus

    ... its ability to move food toward the stomach ( achalasia ) A weak LES, which causes heartburn (GERD) Abnormal contractions of the esophagus muscles that do not effectively move food to the stomach ( esophageal spasm )

  2. Esophageal perforation

    MedlinePlus

    ... object or caustic chemicals, such as household cleaners, disk batteries, and battery acid Trauma or injury to ... may have esophageal perforation. Prevention These injuries are hard to prevent. Alternative Names Perforation of the esophagus ...

  3. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... release mucus and other fluids. Smoking and heavy alcohol use increase the risk of esophageal squamous cell ...

  4. Esophagitis - infectious

    MedlinePlus

    ... system Organisms (germs) that cause esophagitis include fungi, yeast, and viruses. Common organisms include: Candida albicans Cytomegalovirus ( ... Difficulty swallowing and painful swallowing Fever and chills Yeast infection of the tongue and lining of the ...

  5. Whole Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Kyeong-Wook; Song, Jae Gyok; Ryu, Jae-Wook

    2014-01-01

    A 26-year-old male who had no underlying disease, including coagulopathy, underwent thoracotomy and bleeding control due to hemothorax. On the fifth postoperative day, paralysis of both lower limbs occurred. Urgent spine magnetic resonance imaging showed a massive anterior spinal epidural hematoma from C2 to L1 level with different signal intensities, which was suspected to be staged hemorrhage. Hematoma evacuation with decompressive laminectomy was performed. The patient's neurologic deterioration was recovered immediately, and he was discharged without neurological deficits. A drug history of naftazone, which could induce a drug-induced platelet dysfunction, was revealed retrospectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report of whole spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma in a young patient, with a history of hemorrhoid medication. PMID:24967052

  6. [Clinical criteria of acute epidural hematoma].

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, W P; Grössing, N

    1992-08-01

    In a retrospective study 368 epidural hematomas are presented, treated from 1970 until August 1991. The clinical course and manifestation of acute epidural hematomas is commented on by means of own cases. Assessing the success of treatment, it could be demonstrated that the prompter diagnosis reduced the lethal outcome of epidural hematoma to 6.6%. PMID:1413279

  7. Esophageal Microbiome in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Harris, J. Kirk; Fang, Rui; Wagner, Brandie D.; Choe, Ha Na; Kelly, Caleb J.; Schroeder, Shauna; Moore, Wendy; Stevens, Mark J.; Yeckes, Alyson; Amsden, Katie; Kagalwalla, Amir F.; Zalewski, Angelika; Hirano, Ikuo; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Henry, Lauren N.; Masterson, Joanne C.; Robertson, Charles E.; Leung, Donald Y.; Pace, Norman R.; Ackerman, Steven J.; Furuta, Glenn T.; Fillon, Sophie A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The microbiome has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of allergic and inflammatory diseases. The mucosa affected by eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is composed of a stratified squamous epithelia and contains intraepithelial eosinophils. To date, no studies have identified the esophageal microbiome in patients with EoE or the impact of treatment on these organisms. The aim of this study was to identify the esophageal microbiome in EoE and determine whether treatments change this profile. We hypothesized that clinically relevant alterations in bacterial populations are present in different forms of esophagitis. Design In this prospective study, secretions from the esophageal mucosa were collected from children and adults with EoE, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) and normal mucosa using the Esophageal String Test (EST). Bacterial load was determined using quantitative PCR. Bacterial communities, determined by 16S rRNA gene amplification and 454 pyrosequencing, were compared between health and disease. Results Samples from a total of 70 children and adult subjects were examined. Bacterial load was increased in both EoE and GERD relative to normal subjects. In subjects with EoE, load was increased regardless of treatment status or degree of mucosal eosinophilia compared with normal. Haemophilus was significantly increased in untreated EoE subjects as compared with normal subjects. Streptococcus was decreased in GERD subjects on proton pump inhibition as compared with normal subjects. Conclusions Diseases associated with mucosal eosinophilia are characterized by a different microbiome from that found in the normal mucosa. Microbiota may contribute to esophageal inflammation in EoE and GERD. PMID:26020633

  8. Eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, Anand R; Draganov, Peter V

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is increasingly recognized in adults. The diagnosis is based on the presence of both typical symptoms and pathologic findings on esophageal biopsy. Patients usually present with dysphagia, food impaction and/or reflux-like symptoms, and biopsy of the esophagus shows more than 15 eosinophils per high-power field. In addition, it is essential to exclude the presence of known causes of tissue eosinophilia such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, infections, malignancy, collagen vascular diseases, hypersensitivity, and inflammatory bowel disease. There are no standardized protocols for the therapy of eosinophilic esophagitis. A variety of therapeutic approaches including acid suppression, dietary modifications, topical corticosteroids and endoscopic dilation can be used alone or in combination. PMID:19115464

  9. Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Glenn T.; Katzka, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Once considered a rare condition, eosinophilic esophagitis is now one of the most common conditions diagnosed during the assessment of feeding problems in children and during the evaluation of dysphagia and food impaction in adults.1 The entity exists worldwide but has been most extensively studied in Western countries, where its prevalence has been estimated to be 0.4% among all children and adults.2 Whether eosinophilic esophagitis is truly a new disease or simply a recently recognized one is uncertain.3 In this review, we consider the diagnostic criteria, pathophysiological and clinical features, and treatment of this increasingly prevalent disease. PMID:26488694

  10. Intersecting Identities of Female College Student Intramural Sports Officials: A Grounded Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flint, April Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Intramural activities are conducted on virtually every college campus throughout the United States, but there is a debate as to the role of intramurals in the overall development of the student (Rothwell & Theodore, 2006). Specifically for females, not every sport is offered for participation at youth or higher levels, but intramural sports is…

  11. Esophageal perforation

    MedlinePlus

    ... esophagus into the space around the lungs Collapsed lung. X-rays taken after you drink a non-harmful dye can help pinpoint the location of the perforation. You may also have chest CT scan look for an abscess in the chest or esophageal cancer.

  12. [Eosinophilic esophagitis].

    PubMed

    Couto, Mariana; Rodrigues, Susana; Piedade, Susana; Gaspar, Ângela; Morais-Almeida, Mário; Macedo, Guilherme

    2011-12-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is an inflammatory disease of the esophagus characterized by significant and isolated infiltration of the esophageal mucosa by eosinophils, associated with clinical symptoms of esophageal dysfunction, affecting children and adults. It is an increasingly frequent cause of symptoms similar to gastroesophageal reflux disease but refractory to anti-acid therapeutic. It is commonly associated with food allergies or other atopic diseases. Since there are no symptoms, signs, serological biomarkers or endoscopic findings pathognomonic of EE, the diagnosis requires a high degree of suspicion; moreover, due to its chronic relapsing nature the potential to cause major esophageal structural changes, its early recognition and close cooperation between gastroenterologists and immunoallergologists is essential for the timely institution of appropriate therapy. The treatment is based on two main strategies: diet and / or pharmacotherapy, depending on the co-existence of sensitization to food allergens. It is our aim to review this issue, considering recent guidelines, as well as propose a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm. PMID:22863504

  13. Intramural ganglia in diverticular disease of the colon

    PubMed Central

    Macbeth, W. A. A. G.; Hawthorne, J. H. R.

    1965-01-01

    Intramural plexuses were studied in 30 colons, and a plethora of ganglionic tissue was observed in specimens with diverticula when compared with a control series. This alteration in the ganglionic pattern is considered real rather than apparent; the changes are confined to the region of the colon where muscular hypertrophy is present. Images PMID:14247702

  14. Intramural Foci During Long Duration Fibrillation in the Pig Ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Jin, Qi; Huang, Jian; Cheng, Kang-An; Ideker, Raymond E.

    2008-01-01

    For more than 50 years, it has been assumed that ventricular fibrillation (VF) is maintained solely by reentry in the working myocardium. This hypothesis has never been tested by recording VF with electrodes spaced sufficiently close to map activation sequences in 3D. We recorded the first 10 minutes of electrically induced VF from the anterior left ventricular (LV) free wall near the insertion of the anterior papillary muscle in 6 pigs. A 3D transmural unipolar electrode array consisting of a 9×9 array of needles with 2-mm spacing and 6 electrodes 2 mm apart on each needle was used for recordings. Automatic analyses were performed to recognize 3D reentry and foci. Our results showed that intramural reentry is present early but not late during VF in the mapped region. The incidence of reentry in working myocardium decreases almost to 0 after 3 minutes of VF. In contrast, intramural foci are present during early VF and, as VF continues, increase in incidence, so that by 10 minutes of VF, 27% of wavefronts arise from intramural foci. These results suggest that, particularly after the first 3 minutes of VF, mechanisms other than local reentry in the working myocardium maintain VF in the anterior LV free wall near the root of the anterior papillary muscle. Intramural foci may play an important role in later VF maintenance. It remains to be determined if these foci arise from Purkinje fibers attributable to abnormal automaticity, afterdepolarizations, or reentry. PMID:18420942

  15. Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma Report.

    PubMed

    Kukreja, Sunil; Nanda, Anil

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma in a 12-year-old female, who presented with significant upper and lower extremities weakness preceded by pain around the neck and shoulder girdle. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed epidural hematoma extending from C6-T2 with characteristic heterogeneously hyperintensity on T2 and homogenously isointensity on T1. Emergent spinal decompression was performed. However, the patient remained substantially weak in her lower extremities and was wheelchair bound at 3 months postoperatively. We have discussed clinical features, predisposing events, pathogenesis and treatment guidelines described in the literature. We also aim to reinforce the notion of keeping a high degree of clinical suspicion to identify and intervene at the earliest stage to prevent the physically and socially challenging consequences of SSEH. PMID:27598898

  16. Radiation esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Murro, Diana; Jakate, Shriram

    2015-06-01

    The esophagus is frequently exposed to radiation during treatment of advanced stages of common cancers such as lung, breast, and esophagus. However, symptomatic radiation esophagitis requiring endoscopic and histologic evaluation occurs quite rarely, affecting less than 1% of patients receiving radiation treatment. Symptoms occur acutely, generally within the first 2 months. Patients typically present with nonspecific symptoms such as dysphagia and odynophagia. Endoscopic changes such as erythema and ulceration are also nonspecific and nondiagnostic. Biopsies from affected areas show variable inflammatory changes and radiation-related atypia of endothelial and stromal cells. Such atypia mimics cytomegalovirus cytopathic changes, which are ruled out through absence of immunostaining. Radiation esophagitis is thus clinically unsuspected and endoscopically and histologically quite different from the more common and familiar radiation proctitis for which angioectasia is the predominant finding. PMID:26030254

  17. Eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Merves, Jamie; Muir, Amanda; Chandramouleeswaran, Prasanna Modayur; Cianferoni, Antonella; Wang, Mei-Lun; Spergel, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To review the understanding of the pathogenesis of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and the role of the immune system in the disease process. Data Sources Peer-reviewed articles on EoE from PubMed searching for “Eosinophilic Esophagitis and fibrosis” in the period of 1995 to 2013. Study Selection Studies on the clinical and immunologic features, pathogenesis, and management of EoE. Results Recent work has revealed that thymic stromal lymphopoietin and basophil have an increased role in the pathogenesis of disease. Additional understanding on the role of fibrosis in EoE is emerging. Conclusion The incidence of EoE is increasing like most atopic disease. Similar to other allergic diseases, EoE is treated with topical steroids and/or allergen avoidance. PMID:24566295

  18. Histotripsy Liquefaction of Large Hematomas.

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D; Monsky, Wayne L; Haider, Yasser A; Maxwell, Adam D; Wang, Yak-Nam; Matula, Thomas J

    2016-07-01

    Intra- and extra-muscular hematomas result from repetitive injury as well as sharp and blunt limb trauma. The clinical consequences can be serious, including debilitating pain and functional deficit. There are currently no short-term treatment options for large hematomas, only lengthy conservative treatment. The goal of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-based technique, termed histotripsy, for rapid (within a clinically relevant timeframe of 15-20 min) liquefaction of large volume (up to 20 mL) extra-vascular hematomas for subsequent fine-needle aspiration. Experiments were performed using in vitro extravascular hematoma phantoms-fresh bovine blood poured into 50 mL molds and allowed to clot. The resulting phantoms were treated by boiling histotripsy (BH), cavitation histotripsy (CH) or a combination in a degassed water tank under ultrasound guidance. Two different transducers operating at 1 MHz and 1.5 MHz with f-number = 1 were used. The liquefied lysate was aspirated and analyzed by histology and sized in a Coulter Counter. The peak instantaneous power to achieve BH was lower than (at 1.5 MHz) or equal to (at 1 MHz) that which was required to initiate CH. Under the same exposure duration, BH-induced cavities were one and a half to two times larger than the CH-induced cavities, but the CH-induced cavities were more regularly shaped, facilitating easier aspiration. The lysates contained a small amount of debris larger than 70 μm, and 99% of particulates were smaller than 10 μm. A combination treatment of BH (for initial debulking) and CH (for liquefaction of small residual fragments) yielded 20 mL of lysate within 17.5 minutes of treatment and was found to be most optimal for liquefaction of large extravascular hematomas. PMID:27126244

  19. Intra-uterine hematoma in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Glavind, K; Nøhr, S; Nielsen, P H; Ipsen, L

    1991-06-01

    In 60 patients with a live fetus and an intra-uterine hematoma (IUH) proven by ultrasonic scanning the outcome of pregnancy was spontaneous abortion in 12% and premature delivery in 10%. No correlation between the outcome of the pregnancy and the maximum size of the hematoma or the week of detection was found. A subplacentar localization of the hematoma was associated with a higher, but not statistically significant, incidence of spontaneous abortion than a subchorionic localization. Spontaneous abortion most often occurred in the first weeks after the formation of the hematoma. PMID:1855608

  20. Esophageal pH monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    pH monitoring - esophageal; Esophageal acidity test ... esophagitis You may need to have the following tests if your doctor suspects esophagitis : Barium swallow Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (also called upper GI endoscopy)

  1. Subchorionic hematomas and the presence of autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Baxi, L V; Pearlstone, M M

    1991-11-01

    Five cases of subchorionic hematoma detected by ultrasonography in patients with threatened abortion are presented. Three of these subjects had antinuclear antibodies, and the remaining two subjects had anticardiolipin antibodies. We recommend that patients with subchorionic hematomas be tested for autoantibodies regardless of their obstetric history. PMID:1957874

  2. Esophageal Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) ... radiofrequency ablation . This procedure uses radio waves to heat and destroy abnormal cells, which may become cancer. ...

  3. A Standardized Classification for Subdural Hematomas- I.

    PubMed

    Alves, José Luís; Santiago, João Gonçalo; Costa, Guerreiro; Mota Pinto, Anabela

    2016-09-01

    Subdural hematomas are a frequent and highly heterogeneous traumatic disorder, with significant clinical and socioeconomic consequences. In clinical and medicolegal practice, subdural hematomas are classified according to its apparent age, which significantly influences its intrinsic pathogenic behavior, forensic implications, clinical management, and outcome. Although practical, this empirical classification is somewhat arbitrary and scarcely informative, considering the remarkable heterogeneity of this entity. The current research project aims at implementing a comprehensive multifactorial classification of subdural hematomas, allowing a more standardized and coherent assessment and management of this condition. This new method of classification of subdural hematomas takes into account its intrinsic and extrinsic features, using imaging data and histopathological elements, to provide an easily apprehensible and intuitive nomenclature. The proposed classification unifies and organizes all relevant details concerning subdural hematomas, hopefully improving surgical care and forensic systematization. PMID:27428027

  4. A blackhole over brain: Interdural hematoma - A challenging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Babayev, Rasim; Ekşi, Murat Şakir

    2015-01-01

    Hematoma in between two dura leaves, named as 'interdural hematoma', is a very rare entity in adulthood. Interdural hematoma may emerge spontaneously or secondary to coagulopathies. A 61-year-old male patient, who had a medical history of alcoholic cirrhosis, presented with interdural hematoma. The case has been discussed with a literature review about diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in this pathology. PMID:26048608

  5. Hematoma expansion following acute intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Brouwers, H Bart; Greenberg, Steven M

    2013-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), the most devastating form of stroke, has no specific therapy proven to improve outcome by randomized controlled trial. Location and baseline hematoma volume are strong predictors of mortality, but are nonmodifiable by the time of diagnosis. Expansion of the initial hematoma is a further marker of poor prognosis that may be at least partly preventable. Several risk factors for hematoma expansion have been identified, including baseline ICH volume, early presentation after symptom onset, anticoagulation, and the CT angiography spot sign. Although the biological mechanisms of hematoma expansion remain unclear, accumulating evidence supports a model of ongoing secondary bleeding from ruptured adjacent vessels surrounding the initial bleeding site. Several large clinical trials testing therapies aimed at preventing hematoma expansion are in progress, including aggressive blood pressure reduction, treatment with recombinant factor VIIa guided by CT angiography findings, and surgical intervention for superficial hematomas without intraventricular extension. Hematoma expansion is so far the only marker of outcome that is amenable to treatment and thus a potentially important therapeutic target. PMID:23466430

  6. Age determination of soft tissue hematomas.

    PubMed

    Neumayer, Bernhard; Hassler, Eva; Petrovic, Andreas; Widek, Thomas; Ogris, Kathrin; Scheurer, Eva

    2014-11-01

    In clinical forensic medicine, the estimation of the age of injuries such as externally visible subcutaneous hematomas is important for the reconstruction of violent events, particularly to include or exclude potential suspects. Since the estimation of the time of origin based on external inspection is unreliable, the aim of this study was to use contrast in MRI to develop an easy-to-use model for hematoma age estimation. In a longitudinal study, artificially created subcutaneous hematomas were repetitively imaged using MRI over a period of two weeks. The hemorrhages were created by injecting autologous blood into the subcutaneous tissue of the thigh in 20 healthy volunteers. For MRI, standard commercially available sequences, namely proton-density-weighted, T2 -weighted and inversion recovery sequences, were used. The hematomas' MRI data were analyzed regarding their contrast behavior using the most suitable sequences to derive a model allowing an objective estimation of the age of soft tissue hematomas. The Michelson contrast between hematoma and muscle in the proton-density-weighted sequence showed an exponentially decreasing behavior with a dynamic range of 0.6 and a maximum standard deviation of 0.1. The contrast of the inversion recovery sequences showed increasing characteristics and was hypointense for TI = 200ms and hyperintense for TI =1000ms. These sequences were used to create a contrast model. The cross-validation of the model finally yielded limits of agreement for hematoma age determination (corresponding to ±1.96 SD) of ±38.7h during the first three days and ±54 h for the entire investigation period. The developed model provides lookup tables which allow for the estimation of a hematoma's age given a single contrast measurement applicable by a radiologist or a forensic physician. This is a first step towards an accurate and objective dating method for subcutaneous hematomas, which will be particularly useful in child abuse. PMID:25208978

  7. Epidural hematoma after routine epidural steroid injection

    PubMed Central

    Alkhudari, Azzam M.; Malk, Craig S.; Rahman, Abed; Penmetcha, Taruna; Torres, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are few reported cases of an epidural spinal hematoma following interventional pain procedures. Case Description: We report a case of a spinal epidural hematoma in a patient with no known risk factors (e.g. coagulopathy), who underwent an epidural steroid injection (ESI) in the same anatomic location as two previously successful ESI procedures. Conclusion: Early detection was the key to our case, and avoiding sedation allowed the patient to recognize the onset of a new neurological deficit, and lead to prompt diagnosis as well as surgical decompression of the resultant hematoma. PMID:27213109

  8. Current Treatment Options for Auricular Hematomas.

    PubMed

    MacPhail, Catriona

    2016-07-01

    Ear disease, such as otitis externa, resulting in aggressive head shaking or ear scratching, is the most common cause of the development of aural hematomas in dogs and cats. An underlying immunologic cause has also been proposed to explain cartilage and blood vessel fragility. Numerous options exist for management of aural hematomas, from medical management alone with corticosteroids, to simple hematoma centesis, to surgical intervention. Because this condition is usually secondary to another disease process, regardless of mode of treatment, likelihood of recurrence is low if the underlying condition is managed properly. PMID:27012935

  9. Subperiosteal Hematoma of the Ankle

    PubMed Central

    Hui, S H; Lui, T H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Periosteal reaction has a long list of differential diagnoses ranging from trauma, infection, metabolic disease to malignancy. The morphology of periosteal reaction shown in imaging studies helps to narrow down the list of differential diagnoses. Case report: A 25 year old gentleman had an inversion injury to his left ankle. He complained of lateral ankle and posterior heel pain and swelling after the injury. Radiograph of his left ankle revealed solid, smooth periosteal reaction at posterior aspect of left distal tibia. MRI showed periosteal reaction at the corresponding site, which was better demonstrated in CT scan. Follow up MRI and CT showed maturation of the new bone formation at the site of periosteal reaction. Findings were compatible with subperiosteal hematoma formation from injury, which ossified with time. Conclusion: Smooth, thick periosteal reaction favours benign process, while interrupted pattern is an alarming feature for more aggressive causes. PMID:27299131

  10. 76 FR 45585 - Establishment of the Advisory Committee to the Deputy Director for Intramural Research

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ... Office of Intramural Training and Education; (2) the Office of Animal Care and Use; (3) the Office of... Director for Intramural Research Pursuant to the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App), the Director, National Institutes of Health (NIH), announces the establishment of the...

  11. A Self Appraisal Checklist for Intramurals in Ohio's Elementary and Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Robert L., Ed.; Drummond, Herbert E., Ed.

    The purpose of this self-appraisal checklist is to assist school personnel in their endeavors to improve intramural programs. The checklist is organized into eight major categories that represent essential aspects of an intramural program: philosophy and principles; organization and administration; finances, facilities, and equipments; rules and…

  12. History of Chronic Subdural Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeong-Seok

    2015-10-01

    Trephination or trepanation is an intentional surgical procedure performed from the Stone Age. It looks like escaping a black evil from the head. This technique is still used for treatment of chronic subdural hematoma (SDH). Now, we know the origin, pathogenesis and natural history of this lesion. The author try to explore the history of trephination and modern discovery of chronic SDH. The author performed a detailed electronic search of PubMed. By the key word of chronic SDH, 2,593 articles were found without language restriction in May 2015. The author reviewed the fact and way, discovering the present knowledge on the chronic SDH. The first authentic report of chronic SDH was that of Wepfer in 1657. Chronic SDH was regarded as a stroke in 17th century. It was changed as an inflammatory disease in 19th century by Virchow, and became a traumatic lesion in 20th century. However, trauma is not necessary in many cases of chronic SDHs. The more important prerequisite is sufficient potential subdural space, degeneration of the brain. Modifying Virchow's description, chronic SDH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by severe degeneration of the brain. From Wepfer's first description, nearly 350 years passed to explore the origin, pathogenesis, and fate of chronic SDH. The nature of the black evil in the head of the Stone Age is uncovering by many authors riding the giant's shoulder. Chronic SDH should be categorized as a degenerative lesion instead of a traumatic lesion. PMID:27169062

  13. History of Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Trephination or trepanation is an intentional surgical procedure performed from the Stone Age. It looks like escaping a black evil from the head. This technique is still used for treatment of chronic subdural hematoma (SDH). Now, we know the origin, pathogenesis and natural history of this lesion. The author try to explore the history of trephination and modern discovery of chronic SDH. The author performed a detailed electronic search of PubMed. By the key word of chronic SDH, 2,593 articles were found without language restriction in May 2015. The author reviewed the fact and way, discovering the present knowledge on the chronic SDH. The first authentic report of chronic SDH was that of Wepfer in 1657. Chronic SDH was regarded as a stroke in 17th century. It was changed as an inflammatory disease in 19th century by Virchow, and became a traumatic lesion in 20th century. However, trauma is not necessary in many cases of chronic SDHs. The more important prerequisite is sufficient potential subdural space, degeneration of the brain. Modifying Virchow's description, chronic SDH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by severe degeneration of the brain. From Wepfer's first description, nearly 350 years passed to explore the origin, pathogenesis, and fate of chronic SDH. The nature of the black evil in the head of the Stone Age is uncovering by many authors riding the giant's shoulder. Chronic SDH should be categorized as a degenerative lesion instead of a traumatic lesion. PMID:27169062

  14. Pathology of ear hematomas in swine.

    PubMed

    Drolet, Richard; Hélie, Pierre; D'Allaire, Sylvie

    2016-05-01

    The objectives of our study were to describe the pathology of ear hematomas in swine and to add to the comprehension of the pathogenesis of this condition. The pathogenesis of aural hematomas has been studied mainly in dogs; however, disagreements exist about the precise anatomic location of the hemorrhage. Sixteen pigs with ear hematoma at various stages of development were included in this study. The pigs were submitted for routine autopsy for various and unrelated reasons over a period of several years. Based on gross examination, the 16 cases of aural hematomas were subjectively classified as acute (n = 6), subacute (n = 3), and chronic (n = 7). The age of the animals at the time of autopsy ranged from 2 weeks to adulthood, with all acute cases being <7 weeks of age. Morphologic examination of all acute cases revealed that the hematoma developed predominantly in a subperichondral location on both sides of the cartilaginous plate simultaneously. Within these same cases, there were also some areas in which blood-filled clefts had formed within the cartilage itself. Besides fibroplasia, neoformation of cartilage was found to represent a significant part of the repair process. All chronic cases were characterized on cross-section of the ear by the presence of at least 2 distinct, wavy, focally folded, and roughly parallel plates of cartilage separated from each other by fibrous tissue. PMID:27034341

  15. Synchronous intrauterine and tubal pregnancies with subchorionic hematoma.

    PubMed

    Gemer, O; Zohav, E; Calman, D; Sassoon, E; Segal, S

    1993-08-01

    A case of a heterotopic pregnancy is presented. Clinical manifestations included vaginal bleeding, and on ultrasonography a subchorionic hematoma was demonstrated. The subchorionic hematoma may be regarded as blood draining from the tubal pregnancy through the uterus. PMID:8394632

  16. Diet and esophageal disease

    PubMed Central

    Dawsey, Sanford M.; Fagundes, Renato B.; Jacobson, Brian C.; Kresty, Laura A.; Mallery, Susan R.; Paski, Shirley; van den Brandt, Piet A.

    2014-01-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on macronutrients, dietary patterns, and risk of adenocarcinoma in Barrett’s esophagus; micronutrients, trace elements, and risk of Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma; the role of mate consumption in the development of squamous cell carcinoma; the relationship between energy excess and development of esophageal adenocarcinoma; and the nutritional management of the esophageal cancer patient. PMID:25266021

  17. Esophageal lichen planus*

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Janine Pichler; Uribe, Natalia Caballero; Abulafia, Luna Azulay; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the skin, mucous membranes, nails and scalp. Esophageal lichen planus is a rarely reported manifestation of lichen planus, presenting itself commonly in middle-aged women, with symptoms such as dysphagia. We report a case of esophageal lichen planus in a 54-year-old woman associated with oral, cutaneous and ungual lichen planus. Although lichen planus is a disorder well known by dermatologists, reports of esophageal lichen planus are rare in dermatologic literature. The esophageal lichen planus is little known and underdiagnosed, with a significant delay between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis. PMID:26131872

  18. Spontaneous aortic dissecting hematoma in two dogs.

    PubMed

    Boulineau, Theresa Marie; Andrews-Jones, Lydia; Van Alstine, William

    2005-09-01

    This report describes 2 cases of spontaneous aortic dissecting hematoma in young Border Collie and Border Collie crossbred dogs. Histology was performed in one of the cases involving an unusual splitting of the elastin present within the wall of the aorta, consistent with elastin dysplasia as described in Marfan syndrome in humans. The first case involved a young purebred Border Collie that died suddenly and the second case involved a Border Collie crossbred dog that died after a 1-month history of seizures. Gross lesions included pericardial tamponade with dissection of the ascending aorta in the former case and thoracic cavity hemorrhage, mediastinal hematoma, and aortic dissection in the latter. Histologic lesions in the case of the Border Collie crossbred dog included a dissecting hematoma of the ascending aorta with elastin dysplasia and right axillary arterial intimal proliferation. PMID:16312247

  19. Rectus sheath hematoma: three case reports

    PubMed Central

    Kapan, Selin; Turhan, Ahmet N; Alis, Halil; Kalayci, Mustafa U; Hatipoglu, Sinan; Yigitbas, Hakan; Aygun, Ersan

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Rectus sheath hematoma is an uncommon cause of acute abdominal pain. It is an accumulation of blood in the sheath of the rectus abdominis, secondary to rupture of an epigastric vessel or muscle tear. It could occur spontaneously or after trauma. They are usually located infraumblically and often misdiagnosed as acute abdomen, inflammatory diseases or tumours of the abdomen. Case presentation We reported three cases of rectus sheath hematoma presenting with a mass in the abdomen and diagnosed by computerized tomography. The patients recovered uneventfully after bed rest, intravenous fluid replacement, blood transfusion and analgesic treatment. Conclusion Rectus sheath hematoma is a rarely seen pathology often misdiagnosed as acute abdomen that may lead to unnecessary laparotomies. Computerized tomography must be chosen for definitive diagnosis since ultrasonography is subject to error due to misinterpretation of the images. Main therapy is conservative management. PMID:18221529

  20. Chronic subdural hematoma: demonstration by magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Sipponen, J.T.; Sepponen, R.E.; Sivula, A.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of magnetic resonance (MR) to identify intracranial hematomas was tested in five patients with clinical and computed tomographic signs of chronic subdural hematoma. The extracerebral collections were displayed as a zone of bright intensity using the T1-weighted inversion recovery (IR 1500/400) sequence, reflecting the lesions' short T1 relaxation times. The collections also showed high intensity using the spin echo (SE) sequence, with a longer delay of 100ms and 160ms, reflecting the long T2 relaxation time. The spin echo sequence with a repetition time of 500ms and an echo delay of 160ms (SE 500/160) almost effaced other structures in the image, thus increasing the specificity of this pulse scheme for detection of chronic blood collections. Although in two of the five patients the subdural hematomas were in the isodense CT phase, all were easily visualized with MR.

  1. 75 FR 63489 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; NIH Office of Intramural Training & Education Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ..., scientific discipline interests, educational history, standardized examination scores, reference information, resume ] components, employment history, employment interests, dissertation research details, letters of... educational level individuals into the National Institutes of Health Intramural Research Program (NIH-IRP)...

  2. [Chronic subdural hematoma--recurrence and prevention].

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Fumihiro; Tsuzuki, Nobusuke; Uozumi, Yoichi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Shima, Katsuji

    2011-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma is one of the most common disorders observed in routine neurosurgical care. In the vast majority of cases, this disorder is treated by surgical evacuation, which usually yields a good prognosis. However, the recurrence rates after this initial procedure range from approximately 5% to 30%. In this study, we focused on the recurrence rate of chronic subdural hematoma and its prevention. We reviewed the risk factors for recurrence, surgical procedures used, perioperative management, timing of operation, and medical treatment. PMID:21228450

  3. Ligamentum flavum hematoma in the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Hida, Kazutoshi; Akino, Minoru; Seki, Toshitaka; Yano, Shunsuke; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu

    2005-05-01

    A 62-year-old male presented with a rare case of ligamentum flavum hematoma manifesting as low back pain and gait difficulty beginning 1 month before consulting our institute. He had no history of lumbar spine surgery or lumbar puncture. However, he might have suffered forgotten back injury while practicing martial arts. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a heterogeneous intensity mass lesion with a cystic component at the L3-4 levels. The lesion was totally removed through a hemilaminectomy. Intraoperative and histological findings confirmed the diagnosis of old hematoma with granulomatous change in the ligamentum flavum. Postoperatively, his low back pain and gait difficulty resolved within a few days. PMID:15914970

  4. Decrease and disappearance of intramural neurons in the rat bladder during post-natal development.

    PubMed

    Alian, M; Gabella, G

    1996-11-01

    While confirming previous results that the bladder of adult female rats is devoid of intramural neurons, we show that during postnatal development some intramural neurons are present. There is about 200 of them per bladder at birth, and their number progressively decreases during post-natal life. In this strain of rats some neurons are still present at 12 weeks of age, and in one animal (out of five) there were still 25 neurons at 20 weeks of age. PMID:8945738

  5. Massive dissecting intramural duodenal haematoma following endoscopic haemostasis of a bleeding duodenal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Lukman, Mohd Rashid; Jasmi, Ali Yaakub; Niza, S Shahrun

    2006-04-01

    Intramural duodenal haematoma is a rare injury of the duodenum. Most reported cases are secondary to blunt trauma to the abdomen. Such injury following endoscopic intervention is even rarer, and there are no definite guidelines for its management. We report a case where endoscopic haemostasis of a bleeding duodenal ulcer resulted in a massive dissecting intramural duodenal haematoma with gastric outlet obstruction and obstructive jaundice. PMID:16644511

  6. Contralateral acute subdural hematoma occurring after evacuation of subdural hematoma with coexistent contralateral subdural hygroma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hsiao-Lun; Chang, Chih-Ju; Hsieh, Cheng-Ta

    2014-07-01

    Burr-hole craniostomy with closed-system drainage is a safe and effective method for the management of chronic subdural hematoma. However, contralateral acute subdural hematoma has been reported to be a rare and devastating complication. Only 3 cases have been described in the literature. Herein, we reported an 80-year-old male with chronic subdural hematoma and contralateral subdural hygroma. The burr-hole craniostomy with closed-system drainage was initially performed to treat the chronic subdural hematoma. Three days after surgery, weakness of the extremities developed, and contralateral acute subdural bleeding within the previous subdural hygroma was diagnosed by CT scan of the brain. The pathophysiological mechanism of this rare complication was discussed, and the relevant literature was also reviewed. PMID:24983286

  7. Contralateral acute subdural hematoma occurring after evacuation of subdural hematoma with coexistent contralateral subdural hygroma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hsiao-Lun; Chang, Chih-Ju; Hsieh, Cheng-Ta

    2014-01-01

    Burr-hole craniostomy with closed-system drainage is a safe and effective method for the management of chronic subdural hematoma. However, contralateral acute subdural hematoma has been reported to be a rare and devastating complication. Only 3 cases have been described in the literature. Herein, we reported an 80-year-old male with chronic subdural hematoma and contralateral subdural hygroma. The burr-hole craniostomy with closed-system drainage was initially performed to treat the chronic subdural hematoma. Three days after surgery, weakness of the extremities developed, and contralateral acute subdural bleeding within the previous subdural hygroma was diagnosed by CT scan of the brain. The pathophysiological mechanism of this rare complication was discussed, and the relevant literature was also reviewed. PMID:24983286

  8. Functional esophageal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Clouse, R; Richter, J; Heading, R; Janssens, J; Wilson, J

    1999-01-01

    The functional esophageal disorders include globus, rumination syndrome, and symptoms that typify esophageal diseases (chest pain, heartburn, and dysphagia). Factors responsible for symptom production are poorly understood. The criteria for diagnosis rest not only on compatible symptoms but also on exclusion of structural and metabolic disorders that might mimic the functional disorders. Additionally, a functional diagnosis is precluded by the presence of a pathology-based motor disorder or pathological reflux, defined by evidence of reflux esophagitis or abnormal acid exposure time during ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring. Management is largely empirical, although efficacy of psychopharmacological agents and psychological or behavioral approaches has been established for serveral of the functional esophageal disorders. As gastroesophageal reflux disease overlaps in presentation with most of these disorders and because symptoms are at least partially provoked by acid reflux events in many patients, antireflux therapy also plays an important role both in diagnosis and management. Further understanding of the fundamental mechanisms responsible for symptoms is a priority for future research efforts, as is the consideration of treatment outcome in a broader sense than reduction in esophageal symptoms alone. Likewise, the value of inclusive rather than restrictive diagnostic criteria that encompass other gastrointestinal and non-gastrointestinal symptoms should be examined to improve the accuracy of symptom-based criteria and reduce the dependence on objective testing.


Keywords: globus; rumination; chest pain; esophageal motility disorders; esophageal spasm; gastroesophageal reflux disease; Rome II PMID:10457042

  9. Eosinophilic esophagitis: an autoimmune esophageal disorder.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Neha; Levine, Jeremiah

    2014-12-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) represents a chronic, immune/antigen-mediated esophageal inflammatory disease associated with esophageal dysfunction resulting from severe inflammation. The incidence and prevalence of EoE have been increasing in the past decade; however, the reason for this increase is unclear. There is a chronic inflammatory infiltrate that is present in EoE which promotes inflammation, symptoms, and dysfunction. In addition to eosinophils, interleukin (IL)-5 expressing T cells, B cells, eotaxin-3, IL-13, and IgE-bearing mast cells are present in EoE and are thought to contribute to the disease process. Eosinophils are pro-inflammatory and modulate multiple aspects of the immune response. Eosinophils produce a wide range of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factors, and tumor necrosis factors. Once activated, eosinophils release granule components, which are toxic to a variety of tissues. Transforming growth factor β1 is a pro-fibrotic molecule produced by epithelial and inflammatory cells, is overexpressed in EoE, and plays a role in esophageal remodeling. Fibrous remodeling in EoE could be associated with symptoms of dysphagia and may explain and predict future esophageal strictures and dysmotility. EoE is a complex disease involving multiple activation pathways, a large number of cells, and various inflammatory molecules. It, along with other atopic disease, is becoming increasingly prevalent and has an important genetic load and may represent as an immunological tolerance disorder of the GI tract. PMID:25499460

  10. Study of near infrared technology for intracranial hematoma detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Quan; Ma, Hong Y.; Nioka, Shoko; Chance, Britton

    2000-04-01

    Although intracranial hematoma detection only requires the continuous wave technique of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), previous studies have shown that there are still some problems in obtaining very accurate, reliable hematoma detection. Several of the most important limitations of NIR technology for hematoma detection such as the dynamic range of detection, hair absorption, optical contact, layered structure of the head, and depth of detection are reported in this article. A pulsed light source of variable intensity was designed and studied in order to overcome hair absorption and to increase the dynamic range and depth of detection. An adaptive elastic optical probe was made to improve the optical contact and decrease contact noise. A new microcontroller operated portable hematoma detector was developed. Due to the layered structure of the human head, simulation on a layered medium was analyzed experimentally. Model inhomogeneity tests and animal hematoma tests showed the effectiveness of the improved hematoma detector for intracranial hematoma detection.

  11. Subacute Subdural Hematoma in a Patient with Bilateral DBS Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Pahapill, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Subdural hematomas (SDH) in patients with implanted deep brain stimulating (DBS) electrodes are rare. Only a handful of cases have been reported in the literature. No clear management guidelines exist regarding the management of the hematoma and the existing electrodes. We describe a 68-year-old female with bilateral DBS electrodes, who presented with acute, severe hemiparesis due to a large subacute SDH with associated electrode displacement. Urgent hematoma evacuation reversed the hemiparesis; the electrodes were left undisturbed. Brain reexpansion occurred promptly. The patient was able to benefit from stable DBS therapies within 3 weeks of hematoma evacuation, maintained at 1.5-year follow-up. The case highlights that despite relative electrode migration due to a subdural hematoma, the electrodes may not require revision during initial hematoma evacuation or in a delayed fashion. Timely hematoma evacuation, coupled with brain reexpansion, may be adequate for the electrode to travel back to its original position and effect reasonable DBS therapies. PMID:26779357

  12. Radiation Therapy, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Esophageal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer

  13. Factors Associated With Neck Hematoma After Thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Sayaka; Yasunaga, Hideo; Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Saito, Yuki; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To identify risk factors for post-thyroidectomy hematoma requiring airway intervention or surgery (“wound hematoma”) and determine post-thyroidectomy time to intervention. Post-thyroidectomy hematoma is rare but potentially lethal. Information on wound hematoma in a nationwide clinical setting is scarce. Using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database, we extracted data from records of patients undergoing thyroidectomy from July 2010 to March 2014. Patients with clinical stage IV cancer or those with bilateral neck dissection were excluded because they could have undergone planned tracheotomy on the day of thyroidectomy. We assessed the association between background characteristics and wound hematoma ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy, using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Among 51,968 patients from 880 hospitals, wound hematoma occurred in 920 (1.8%) ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy and in 203 (0.4%) ≥3 days post-thyroidectomy (in-hospital mortality = 0.05%). Factors significantly associated with wound hematoma ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy were male sex (odds ratio [OR] 1.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.30–1.77); higher age (OR 1.01, 95% CI 1.00–1.02); overweight or obese (OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.04–1.44); type of surgery (partial thyroidectomy for benign tumor compared with: total thyroidectomy, benign tumor [OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.45–2.63]; partial thyroidectomy, malignant tumor [OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.00–1.46]; total thyroidectomy, malignant tumor [OR 2.49, 95% CI 1.82–3.49]; and thyroidectomy for Graves disease [OR 3.88, 95% CI 2.59–5.82]); neck dissection (OR, 1.53, 95% CI 1.05–2.23); antithrombotic agents (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.15–2.17); and blood transfusion (OR 5.33, 95% CI 2.39–11.91). Closer monitoring of airway and neck is recommended for patients with risk factors, and further cautious monitoring beyond 3 days post-thyroidectomy. PMID:26886632

  14. Age determination of subdural hematomas: survey among radiologists.

    PubMed

    Postema, F A M; Sieswerda-Hoogendoorn, Tessa; Majoie, C B L M; van Rijn, R R

    2014-08-01

    Abusive head trauma is a severe form of child abuse. One important diagnostic finding is the presence of a subdural hematoma. Age determination of subdural hematomas is important to relate radiological findings to the clinical history presented by the caregivers. In court this topic is relevant as dating subdural hematomas can lead to identification of a suspect. The aim of our study is to describe the current practice among radiologists in the Netherlands regarding the age determination of subdural hematomas in children. This is a cross-sectional study, describing the results of an online questionnaire regarding dating subdural hematomas among pediatric and neuro-radiologists in the Netherlands. The questionnaire consisted of sociodemographic questions, theoretical questions and eight pediatric cases in which the participants were asked to date subdural hematomas based on imaging findings. Fifty-one out of 172 radiologists (30 %) filled out the questionnaire. The percentage of participants that reported it was possible to date the subdural hematoma varied between 58 and 90 % for the eight different cases. In four of eight cases (50 %), the age of the subdural hematoma as known from clinical history fell within the range reported by the participants. None of the participants was "very certain" of their age determination. The results demonstrate that there is a considerable practice variation among Dutch radiologists regarding the age determination of subdural hematomas. This implicates that dating of subdural hematomas is not suitable to use in court, as no uniformity among experts exists. PMID:24553773

  15. Intracranial subdural hematomas with elevated rivaroxaban concentration and subsequently detected spinal subdural hematoma: A case report.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka; Koga, Masatoshi; Matsuki, Takayuki; Hino, Tenyu; Yokota, Chiaki; Toyoda, Kazunori

    2016-07-01

    A 79-year-old lean man with a height of 157cm and weight of 42kg (body mass index, 17.2kg/m(2)) receiving rivaroxaban developed an intracranial subdural hematoma and was treated conservatively. Because he had a reduced creatinine clearance of 44mL/min, his dosage of rivaroxaban was reduced from 15 to 10mg daily according to official Japanese prescribing information. However, he developed bilateral intracranial subdural hematomas 2weeks later. Plasma rivaroxaban concentration on anti-factor Xa chromogenic assay was elevated at 301ng/mL, suggesting excessive accumulation. He underwent burr hole drainage and resumed anticoagulation with warfarin. Subsequently, he developed a lumbosacral hematoma. He was treated conservatively and discharged without neurological sequelae. The main cause of the increased concentration of rivaroxaban was believed to be his older age and low body weight. The etiology of the spinal hematoma was suspected to be the migration of intracranial hematoma to the spinal subdural space. PMID:27240110

  16. Esophageal stricture - benign

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicines) can keep a peptic stricture from returning. Surgery is rarely needed. If you have eosinophilic esophagitis, you may need to take medicines or make changes to your diet to reduce the inflammation. In some cases, dilation is done.

  17. [Esophageal motor disturbances in sclerodermia].

    PubMed

    Stanciu, C; Cijevschi, C; Dobrescu, A; Petrescu, Z

    1981-01-01

    By the manometric method the esophageal motility in 14 patients with sclerodermia was studied. All patients presented an esophageal motor dysfunction characterized by the decrease in amplitude of the spohageal contractions, presence of aperistaltic contractions, decrease of basal pressure of the lower esophageal sphincter and its incomplete relaxation at deglutition. These esophageal motor disturbances may appear in association or separately in the same patient. The pathogenesis of the esophageal motor dysfunction in sclerodermia is not yet fully understood. Besides the theoretical interest, the knowledge of the esophageal motor dysfunction in sclerodermia has also a practical value in respect of the tretment which is to be set up. PMID:25528800

  18. [Diagnostic and treatment of hypertensive cerebellar hematomas].

    PubMed

    Krylov, V V; Dash'ian, V G; Murashko, A A; Burov, S A

    2009-01-01

    Authors analyzed the results of treatment of 56 patients with hypertensive cerebellar hemorrhages (volume 0,5-41 cm3). Brain stem symptoms were found in 45 (80%) of patients. The dislocation of brain stem was observed in 38 (68%) cases, occlusive hydrocephaly - in 22 (39%), intraventricular hemorrhage - in 26 (46%). Severity of state depended on character of disease course, presence of stem symptoms, awakening level, volume and localization of cerebellar hematoma, development of intraventricular hemorrhage, occlusive hydrocephaly and dislocation of brain stem. Thirty-six patients were operated. After the neurosurgical intervention, 22 (61%) patients were discharged without or with the minimal neurological deficit, 1 (3%) with marked disability and 13 (36%) patients died. In conclusion, the removal of hematoma is recommended in dislocation of brain stem and disturbance of consiousnes: the ventricular drainage - in occlusive hydrocephaly developed as a consequence of hemotamponade of IV ventricular. The surgical treatment is not recommended to patients with cerebellar hematomas with the volume less than 7 cm3. PMID:19491806

  19. Spontaneous intrathyroidal hematoma causing airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Best, Corliss A.E.; Dhaliwal, Sandeep; Tam, Samantha; Low, T. Hubert; Hughes, Brian; Fung, Kevin; MacNeil, S. Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Spontaneous thyroid hemorrhage is a rare occurrence that results in pain, discomfort, and occasionally compressive symptoms. Infrequently, extensive thyroid hemorrhage can result in a rapidly expanding hematoma resulting in airway compromise. This is a case of an otherwise healthy young woman, 3 months postpartum, with a slowly expanding spontaneous thyroid hemorrhage that measured at 7 × 5.5 × 5 cm by computed tomography. She ultimately required intubation to manage respiratory distress and subsequently a hemithyroidectomy for definitive treatment. The case presentation is followed by a literature review where known etiologies of thyroid hematoma including traumatic and nontraumatic causes, precipitating anticoagulation, and spontaneous rupture of branches of the external carotid artery are outlined. The potential links to pregnancy are explored. The roles of bedside thyroid ultrasound in the emergency department and lateral neck roentgenogram in diagnosis are explored. The importance of airway management and indications for conservative versus surgical treatments are discussed. Conclusions: This is a case of a spontaneous intrathyroidal hemorrhage, which progressed over days to ultimately cause airway compromise. It is imperative that physicians are educated on the appropriate detection and management of the potentially life-threatening spontaneous thyroid hematoma. PMID:27583841

  20. [Congenital Esophageal Atresia].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Makoto; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    In this report, we describe the esophageal atresia in terms of current surgical management on the basis of our experience and literatures. Traditionally, infants with esophageal atresia have presented shortly after birth because of an inability to pass an orogastric tube, respiratory distress, or an inability to tolerate feeding. And also, an isolated trachea-esophageal fistula (TEF) usually cases coughing, recurrent pneumonia, or choking during feedings. To ignore these symptoms is to risk a delayed diagnosis. The condition may be associated with other major congenital anomalies such as those seen in the vertebral, anal, cardiac, tracheo-esophageal, renal/radial (VACTER) association, or it may be an isolated defect. Therapeutic strategies for esophageal atresia are a prevention of pulmonary complication by TEF closing and an early establishment of enteral alimentation. We promptly repair healthy infants without performing a gastrostomy and delay repair in infants with high-risk factors such as associated severe cardiac anomaly and respiratory insufficiency. Esophageal atresia has been classically approached through a thoracotomy. The disadvantages of such a thoracotomy have been recognized for a long time, for example winged scapula, elevation of fixation of shoulder, asymmetry of the chest wall, rib fusion, scoliosis, and breast and pectoral muscle maldevelopment. To avoid such disadvantages, thoracoscopic repair was recently reported. PMID:26197921

  1. New observations in scintigraphy of subdural and extradural hematomas

    SciTech Connect

    Smoak, W.M.; Gilson, A.J.; Janowitz, W.; Zusmer, N.; Maturo, V.

    1980-11-01

    Static radionuclide images of subacute subdural hematomas demonstrate significant variations in findings over a 3-hr period in the same patient. The lesion can appear, disappear, and reconstitute in an entirely different pattern. This transformation has not appeared in extradural hematomas, and may provide a differential diagnostic sign. In patients with a clinical history or physical findings suspicious for these intracranial hematomas, immediate and sequential delayed static imaging is recommended.

  2. [Chronic subdural hematoma presenting visual disturbance: a case report].

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, S; Manabe, H; Shimizu, T; Itoh, C; Suzuki, S

    2001-03-01

    The authors reported a rare case of chronic subdural hematoma presenting bilateral visual impairment caused by papilledema. A 49-year-old man was admitted to our department due to left blurred vision. On admission, ophthalmological examination revealed visual acuity disturbance on the left eye, bilateral nasal visual field defect and papilledema. CT scan and MRI demonstrated bilateral subdural hematoma. No remarkable findings were detected on cerebral angiography. After evacuation of bilateral subdural hematomas, his visual symptoms recovered. In this report, we discuss the mechanism of visual impairment caused by chronic subdural hematoma. PMID:11296405

  3. Minimally Invasive Surgical Treatment of Acute Epidural Hematoma: Case Series

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective. Although minimally invasive surgical treatment of acute epidural hematoma attracts increasing attention, no generalized indications for the surgery have been adopted. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of minimally invasive surgery in acute epidural hematoma with various hematoma volumes. Methods. Minimally invasive puncture and aspiration surgery were performed in 59 cases of acute epidural hematoma with various hematoma volumes (13–145 mL); postoperative follow-up was 3 months. Clinical data, including surgical trauma, surgery time, complications, and outcome of hematoma drainage, recovery, and Barthel index scores, were assessed, as well as treatment outcome. Results. Surgical trauma was minimal and surgery time was short (10–20 minutes); no anesthesia accidents or surgical complications occurred. Two patients died. Drainage was completed within 7 days in the remaining 57 cases. Barthel index scores of ADL were ≤40 (n = 1), 41–60 (n = 1), and >60 (n = 55); scores of 100 were obtained in 48 cases, with no dysfunctions. Conclusion. Satisfactory results can be achieved with minimally invasive surgery in treating acute epidural hematoma with hematoma volumes ranging from 13 to 145 mL. For patients with hematoma volume >50 mL and even cerebral herniation, flexible application of minimally invasive surgery would help improve treatment efficacy. PMID:27144170

  4. Bilateral Rectus Sheath Hematoma in Kidney Transplant Patient: Case Study and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Feizzadeh Kerigh, Behzad; Maddah, Ghodratolah

    2013-01-01

    Rectus sheath hematoma usually occurs unilateral but rare cases of bilateral hematoma have been reported. Herein we report the first case of spontaneous bilateral Rectus Sheath Hematoma in the kidney transplanted patient. PMID:24350093

  5. Clinical Implications and Pathogenesis of Esophageal Remodeling in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Ikuo; Aceves, Seema S.

    2014-01-01

    In eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), remodeling changes are manifest histologically in both the epithelium as well as in the subepithelium where lamina propria (LP) fibrosis, expansion of the muscularis propria and increased vascularity occur. The major clinical symptoms and complications of EoE are largely consequences of esophageal remodeling. Important mediators of the process include IL-5, IL-13, TGFβ1, mast cells, fibroblasts and eosinophils. Methods to detect remodeling effects include upper endoscopy, histopathology, barium esophagram, endoscopic ultrasonography, esophageal manometry, and functional luminal imaging. These modalities provide evidence of organ dysfunction that include focal and diffuse esophageal strictures, expansion of the mucosa and subepithelium, esophageal motor abnormalities and reduced esophageal distensibility. Complications of food impaction and perforations of the esophageal wall have been associated with reduction in esophageal caliber and increased esophageal mural stiffness. The therapeutic benefits of topical corticosteroids and elimination diet therapy in resolving mucosal eosinophilic inflammation of the esophagus are evident. Available therapies, however, have demonstrated variable ability to reverse existing remodeling changes of the esophagus. Systemic therapies that include novel, targeted biologic agents have the potential of addressing subepithelial remodeling. Esophageal dilation remains a useful, adjunctive therapeutic maneuver in symptomatic adults with esophageal stricture. As novel treatments emerge, it is essential that therapeutic endpoints account for the fundamental contributions of esophageal remodeling to overall disease activity. PMID:24813517

  6. Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... esophagus, and chest wall Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Barrett’s Esophagus Chest Wall Tumors Mediastinal Tumors ... Section Navigation Select Topic Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Barrett’s Esophagus Chest Wall Tumors Mediastinal Tumors ...

  7. General Information about Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Esophageal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Esophageal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  8. Esophageal pH monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... into the stomach. It is a test for gastroesophageal reflux disease ( GERD ). In infants, this test is also ... to: Barrett's esophagus Difficulty swallowing (dysphagia) Esophageal scarring Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) Heartburn Reflux esophagitis You may need ...

  9. Esophageal Atresia and Tracheoesophageal Fistula

    MedlinePlus

    ... Return to Web version Esophageal Atresia and Tracheoesophageal Fistula Overview What is esophageal atresia? In babies who ... gets into the stomach. What is a tracheoesophageal fistula? A fistula (say “fist-you-lah”) is a ...

  10. Excitatory and inhibitory enteric innervation of horse lower esophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Chiocchetti, R; Giancola, F; Mazzoni, M; Sorteni, C; Romagnoli, N; Pietra, M

    2015-06-01

    The lower esophageal sphincter (LES) is a specialized, thickened muscle region with a high resting tone mediated by myogenic and neurogenic mechanisms. During swallowing or belching, the LES undergoes strong inhibitory innervation. In the horse, the LES seems to be organized as a "one-way" structure, enabling only the oral-anal progression of food. We characterized the esophageal and gastric pericardial inhibitory and excitatory intramural neurons immunoreactive (IR) for the enzymes neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and choline acetyltransferase. Large percentages of myenteric plexus (MP) and submucosal (SMP) plexus nNOS-IR neurons were observed in the esophagus (72 ± 9 and 69 ± 8 %, respectively) and stomach (57 ± 17 and 45 ± 3 %, respectively). In the esophagus, cholinergic MP and SMP neurons were 29 ± 14 and 65 ± 24 vs. 36 ± 8 and 38 ± 20 % in the stomach, respectively. The high percentage of nitrergic inhibitory motor neurons observed in the caudal esophagus reinforces the role of the enteric nervous system in the horse LES relaxation. These findings might allow an evaluation of whether selective groups of enteric neurons are involved in horse neurological disorders such as megaesophagus, equine dysautonomia, and white lethal foal syndrome. PMID:25578519

  11. Laparoscopic drainage of an intramural duodenal haematoma: a novel technique and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Intramural Duodenal Haematoma (IDH) is an uncommon complication of blunt abdominal trauma. IDH's are most often treated non-operatively. We describe laparoscopic treatment of an IDH after failed conservative management. To our knowledge, successful laparoscopic drainage of an IDH in an adult has not been described previously in the literature. PMID:22185364

  12. Methods for Upgrading an Intramural-Recreational Sports Program: An Agency Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Richard E.; Miller, Michael T.

    This study assessed the state of intramural-recreational (IR) programs at Peru State College (Nebraska) and offered suggestions for the improvement of existing IR programs. The existing IR sports program is directed by a part-time adjunct staff member with the aid of student assistants and receives limited support. Upgrading the directorship of…

  13. The Culture of High-Risk Alcohol Use among Club and Intramural Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andes, Stacy; Poet, Kathryn; McWilliams, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the drinking patterns of club and intramural college athletes and compare their alcohol consumption, perceived norms around the excessive use of alcohol, experience of negative consequences, and employment of protective strategies with those of campus varsity athletes. Participants: A total of…

  14. Subdural actinomycoma presenting as recurrent chronic subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, N. J.; Bot, G. M.; Sahabi, S.; Aliu, S.; Usman, B.; Shilong, D. J.; Obande, J. O.; Shehu, B. B.

    2015-01-01

    Actimomycosis is a rare chronic bacterial infection of the central nervous system, and subdural actinomycoma is extremely rare. This case report brings to bear an uncommon association between subdural actinomycosis with chronic subdural hematoma. Subdural actinomycoma may present as a diagnostic conundrum and could be mistaken radiologically for either a subdural hematoma or an empyaema. PMID:25972947

  15. Intracerebral hematoma extends via perivascular spaces and perineurium.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jia; Lü, Tian-Ming; Qiu, Guang; Huang, Rui-Yu; Fang, Min; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Xiao, Duan; Liu, Xiao-Jia

    2013-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating disorder associated with high morbidity and mortality. ICH results in the formation of hematoma that affects not only the primary site of injury but also the remote regions. In fact, hematoma can extend via perivascular spaces (also called Virchow-Robin spaces, VRS) and perineurium in an animal model of ICH. In the present study, we used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) to investigate the characteristics of the perivascular and perineural extensions of hematomas in patients with ICH. A total of 20 ICH patients without secondary subarachnoid and secondary intraventricular hemorrhages were recruited. Brain MRI scans, including SWI, T1, and T2-weighted images, were performed between 17 h to 7 days after the onset of ICH. MRI with SWI revealed that paramagnetic substances spread along the VRS or the perineurium. Such distribution could cause the formation of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs). However, the distribution of remote hemorrhagic lesions varied, depending on the size and location of the original hematoma. The unenhanced CT scans of the 20 patients did not show any hyperdensity around the blood vessels and nerve tracts outside the hematoma. These results indicate the perivascular and perineural extensions of hematomas in patients with ICH, which is formed by the leakage of the original hematoma via the VRS or perineurium. We also provide a new explanation for the series of pathological processes involved in ICH, including the remote effects of hematoma and the formation of CMBs in patients with ICH. PMID:23812162

  16. A Case of Gastric Cancer with Neuroendocrine Carcinoma, Signet Ring Cell Carcinoma Components, and Intramural Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Aoyagi, Keishiro; Kizaki, Junya; Isobe, Taro; Akagi, Yoshito

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 67 Final Diagnosis: Gastric cancer with neuroendocrine carcinoma Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Total gastrectomy • splenectomy with D2 lymph node dissection Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Many neuroendocrine carcinomas exhibit medullary infiltration and expanded proliferation. Differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma is frequently seen in the superficial region in many neuroendocrine carcinoma cases. However, the present case showed non-medullary infiltration and signet ring cell carcinoma in the superficial region, with intramural metastases distributed throughout the whole of the stomach. Case Report: A 67-year-old man was referred to our institution for treatment of gastric cancer. Type IIc-like advanced gastric cancer was detected in the greater curvature of the middle body of the stomach. The patient underwent total gastrectomy, splenectomy with D2 lymph node dissection, and Roux-en-Y reconstruction with curative resection. The tumor was diagnosed as a large-cell endocrine carcinoma of the stomach. A solid growth of signet ring cells was seen in the mucosa and submucosa. Intramural metastases were observed in many other depressed lesions. Large-cell carcinoma invaded the submucosa, mainly in the intramural metastatic site. Metastasis to one lesser curvature lymph node was also seen on histological examination. The final diagnosis was a gastric cancer of type 0–IIc (T4a) [M] (with intramural metastases) at T4aN1H0P0M0 Stage IIIA. This patient has remained alive without recurrence for 72 months after surgery. Conclusions: We recommend close preoperative examination of neuroendocrine carcinoma, taking intramural metastases into consideration. PMID:27102318

  17. Subperiosteal hematoma of the orbit associated with sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Woo, K I; Kim, Y D

    1997-12-01

    Subperiosteal hematoma of the orbit is a rare but well-recognized entity, usually caused by trauma. Two cases of subperiosteal hematoma associated with sinusitis are presented. A 44-year-old woman experienced the sudden onset of proptosis, and decreased visual acuity. Computed tomographic scanning and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a frontoethmoidal mucocele and a biconvex mass in the upper part of the left orbit. The mucocele was drained during nasal endoscopic surgery and the subperiosteal hematoma was evacuated during superior orbitotomy. A 42-year-old man had a headache and proptosis. Computed tomographic scan revealed sinusitis and subperiosteal orbital hematoma of the left orbit. Subperiosteal orbital hematoma associated with sinusitis is extremely rare but should be suspected in a patient with acute onset of proptosis in whom computed tomographic scanning reveals paranasal sinusitis. PMID:9510655

  18. Recurrent subdural hematoma secondary to headbanging: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Jito, Junya; Nozaki, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Background: “Headbanging” is the slang term used to denote violent shaking of one's head in time with the music. This abrupt flexion-extension movement of the head to rock music extremely rarely causes a subdural hematoma. Case Description: A 24-year-old female was admitted to our department because of right sided partial seizure and acute or subacute subdural hematoma over the left cerebral convexity. She had no history of recent head trauma but performed headbanging at a punk rock concert at 3 days before admission. Since, she had a previous acute subdural hematoma on the same side after an accidental fall from a baby buggy when she was 11 months old, the present was recurrent subdural hematoma probably due to headbanging. Conclusions: Headbanging has the hazardous potential to cause a subdural hematoma. PMID:26664766

  19. Subchorionic hematoma in threatened abortion: Sonographic evaluation and significance.

    PubMed

    Al Nuaim, L; Chowdhury, N; Adelusi, B

    1996-11-01

    In a study of 92 women with subchorionic hematoma evaluated with sonographic scan in King Khalid University Hospital, it was found that the mean ages and live births of patients who carried their pregnancies to viability were higher when compared with the patients who aborted. There was a statistically significant association between the gestational age at diagnosis of subchorionic hematoma and the size of the hematoma. There was, however, no statistically significant association found between the gestational age at diagnosis, size and site of the hematoma and the outcome of pregnancy. It was concluded that subchorionic hematoma which appear either in the second trimester, or are larger, or located in the lower uterine segment, may be associated with higher rates of abortion or preterm deliveries. Nevertheless, there is no statistically significant impact of these on the outcome of pregnancy. PMID:17429250

  20. Minimally invasive surgery for esophageal achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huan-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal achalasia is due to the esophagus of neuromuscular dysfunction caused by esophageal functional disease. Its main feature is the lack of esophageal peristalsis, the lower esophageal sphincter pressure and to reduce the swallow’s relaxation response. Lower esophageal muscular dissection is one of the main ways to treat esophageal achalasia. At present, the period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection is one of the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Combined with our experience in minimally invasive esophageal surgery, to improved incision and operation procedure, and adopts the model of the complete period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection in the treatment of esophageal achalasia. PMID:27499977

  1. Spontaneous subperiosteal hematoma precipitated by anxiety attack.

    PubMed

    Swanenberg, Irene M; Rizzuti, Allison E; Shinder, Roman

    2013-12-01

    A 60-year-old woman presented with diplopia and left periorbital edema and pressure, which developed during an anxiety attack the previous day. Examination revealed left inferotemporal globe dystopia, periorbital edema, ecchymosis, and limitation in supraduction. Orbital MRI confirmed the diagnosis of a superior subperiosteal orbital hematoma. The patient's signs and symptoms rapidly resolved with administration of oral corticosteroids. The patient remains asymptomatic with complete resolution of orbital signs at 3-month follow-up. Subperiosteal orbital hematoma (SOH) is a rare condition in which blood accumulates between the bony orbit and separated periosteum, and is often due to blunt head trauma. Non-traumatic SOH (NTSOH) is exceedingly rare and usually associated with known coagulopathies or tendency to bleed. However, few cases of spontaneous NTSOH have been reported without any such predisposition and are thought to be caused by sudden elevations in intrathoracic and intracranial venous pressure such as vomiting, coughing, SCUBA diving, weight lifting and labor. We herein describe the presentation, radiography and outcome of a unique case of spontaneous NTSOH following an anxiety attack. PMID:24063522

  2. A case of interhemispheric subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Koumtchev, Y; Petkov, S; Gozmanov, G

    1994-01-01

    The interhemispheric subdural hematoma is a rare condition. We present a case of interhemispheric subdural hematoma in a patient aged 65 years. A day prior to admission he was struck with a water-pipe on the head. He went to sleep the same evening complaining of a slight headache. At about two o'clock in the morning the headache increased in intensity. By the morning he lost consciousness. On examination by a neurosurgeon the patient was found to be comatose. The physical examination revealed blue eyelids of the left eye, paraplegia of the right leg, paresis of the left leg and arms. Bilateral Babinski's reflex was present, the abdominal reflexes were absent, the tendon and periosteal reflexes were hyperactive. The pupils were equal in size and slowly reactive to light. The patient exhibited symptoms of meningoradicular irritation. An emergency CT scan revealed high-density area in the interhemispheric sulcus extending frontally to parietally. The patients was operated on in an emergency. At operation, extensive rupture of the sagittal sinus was identified. Later the patient died. The presented case was interesting with the extensive rupture of the sagittal sinus and the relatively long lucid interval until clear manifestation of the clinical picture becomes evident. PMID:7867995

  3. Molecular Phenotyping in Predicting Response in Patients With Stage IB-III Esophageal Cancer Receiving Combination Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-18

    Stage IB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIC Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

  4. Esophagitis in Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Philip E

    2016-01-01

    Esophagitis is the end result of a variety of insults to epithelial homeostasis. Eosinophilic esophagitis is a manifestation of non-IgE-mediated food allergy that most commonly affects the esophagus of males who have other atopic phenomena. Reflux esophagitis reflects repeated exposure to acidic gastric contents because of failure of the normal protections afforded by the LES. Because certain histologic features can be present in either condition, endoscopic biopsy alone does not distinguish them. Their symptoms overlap, but the treatment options are very different, such that making a formal diagnosis by following consensus guidelines is essential. A treatment protocol designed to manage the inflammation by controlling the provocative factors (acid for GERD and food antigens for EoE) or suppressing the inflammation (ie, topical steroids for EoE) should result in normalization of the mucosa and resolution of symptoms. Eosinophilic esophagitis is a chronic condition that rarely remits spontaneously, so any therapeutic modality will need to be continued indefinitely. PMID:27363230

  5. Hematoma-Directed Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, LaNette F.; Henry-Tillman, Ronda; Harms, Steve; Hronas, Theodore; Mancino, Anne T.; Westbrook, Kent C.; Korourian, Sohelia; Jones, Mary P.; Klimberg, V. Suzanne

    2001-01-01

    Objective and Summary Background Data The standard technique for removal of nonpalpable breast lesions is needle localization breast biopsy. Because traumatic hematomas can often be seen with ultrasound, the authors hypothesized that iatrogenically induced hematomas could be used to guide the excision of nonpalpable lesions using ultrasound. Methods Twenty patients with nonpalpable breast lesions detected by magnetic resonance imaging only were enrolled in this single-institution trial, approved by the institutional review board. A hematoma consisting of 2 to 5 mL of the patient’s own blood was injected into the breast to target the nonpalpable lesion. Intraoperative ultrasound of the hematoma was used to direct the excisional biopsy. Results The average age of women was 53.8 ± 10 years. Ninety-five percent of lesions detected by magnetic resonance imaging were localized by hematoma injection. All the hematomas used to recognize targeted lesions were identified at surgery by ultrasound and removed without complication. Eight (40%) of the lesions were malignant, with an average tumor size of 12 ± 6 mm (range 4–25). The remaining 12 lesions (60%) comprised papillomas, sclerosing adenosis, radial scar, fibroadenoma, and areas of atypical ductal hyperplasia. Conclusion The results of this pilot study show the effectiveness of hematoma-directed ultrasound-guided breast biopsy for nonpalpable lesions seen by magnetic resonance imaging. This new procedure is potentially more comfortable for the patient because no wire or needle is left in the breast. It is technically faster and easier because ultrasound is used to visualize directly the location of the hematoma at surgery and to confirm lesion removal in the operating room by specimen ultrasound. The hematoma can be placed several days before biopsy, easing scheduling, and without fear of the migration that may occur with needle localization. This method may have ready application to mammographically detected

  6. Microsurgical excision of hematoma of the lumbar ligamentum flavum.

    PubMed

    Takeno, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Shigeru; Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi; Yayama, Takafumi; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2010-07-01

    Hematoma of the lumbar ligamentum flavum is a very rare cause of sciatica. A 72-year-old man presented with left-sided sciatica and paresthesia of the lateral aspect of his left foot. From CT and MRI findings, he was diagnosed as having a hematoma embedded in the ligamentum flavum, which compressed the dura mater at the L5/S1 disc level. After an adequate surgical field was obtained with a microscope and a Casper retractor, the hematoma of the ligamentum flavum could be excised via a unilateral approach and satisfactory decompression of the cauda equina and nerve roots were obtained. PMID:20537575

  7. Spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma in a patient treated with apixaban

    PubMed Central

    Aktas, Halil; Inci, Sinan; Dogan, Pinar; Izgu, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Summary Apixaban, a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants, is a Factor Xa inhibitor that is prescribed for the treatment of non valvular atrial fibrillation. Rectus sheath hematoma is a rare but significant complication of oral anticoagulant treatment. The important causes of rectus sheath hematoma include treatment with anticoagulants, hematologic diseases, trauma, intense physical activity, coughing, sneezing and pregnancy. In this report, we describe case of a 71-year-old woman undergoing apixaban treatment for non valvular atrial fibrillation who presented with spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma. PMID:26989650

  8. First report of hepatic hematoma after presumed Bothrops envenomation.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Fernanda Cristina; Heerdt, Maike; Torrez, Pasesa Pascuala Quispe; França, Francisco Oscar de Siqueira; Molin, Graziela Zibetti Dal; Battisti, Rúbia; Zannin, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    In Latin America, Bothrops envenomation is responsible for the majority of accidents caused by venomous snakes. Patients usually present local edema, bleeding and coagulopathy. Visceral hemorrhage is extremely rare and considered a challenge for diagnosis and management. We report the first case of hepatic hematoma owing to the bothropic envenomation in a 66-year-old man who was bitten in the left leg. He presented local edema, coagulopathy, and acute kidney injury. Radiological findings suggested hepatic hematoma, with a volume of almost 3 liters. The hepatic hematoma was gradually absorbed without the need for surgical intervention with complete resolution in 8 months. PMID:26516980

  9. Spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma in a patient treated with apixaban.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Halil; Inci, Sinan; Dogan, Pinar; Izgu, Ibrahim

    2016-02-01

    Apixaban, a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants, is a Factor Xa inhibitor that is prescribed for the treatment of non valvular atrial fibrillation. Rectus sheath hematoma is a rare but significant complication of oral anticoagulant treatment. The important causes of rectus sheath hematoma include treatment with anticoagulants, hematologic diseases, trauma, intense physical activity, coughing, sneezing and pregnancy. In this report, we describe case of a 71-year-old woman undergoing apixaban treatment for non valvular atrial fibrillation who presented with spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma. PMID:26989650

  10. Supraspinatus Intramuscular Calcified Hematoma or Necrosis Associated with Tendon Tear

    PubMed Central

    Lädermann, Alexandre; Genevay, Muriel; Abrassart, Sophie; Schwitzguébel, Adrien Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Rotator cuff intramuscular calcification is a rare condition usually caused by heterotopic ossification and myositis ossificans. Case Presentation. We describe a patient with voluminous calcified mass entrapped in supraspinatus muscle associated with corresponding tendon tear. Histological examination corresponded to a calcified hematoma or necrosis. Patient was surgically managed with open excision of the calcified hematoma and rotator cuff arthroscopic repair. At 6 months, supraspinatus muscle was healed, and functional outcome was good. Discussion and Conclusion. We hypothesized that supraspinatus intramuscular calcified hematoma was responsible for mechanical stress on the tendon. This association has never been described. PMID:26380138

  11. Intra-Abdominal Hematoma Following Enoxaparin Injection

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kin Tong

    2016-01-01

    An elderly patient, who was being treated for therapeutic enoxaparin for a couple of days due to suspected deep vein thrombosis, was admitted to hospital following a collapse and severe abdominal pain. She was in hypovolemic shock and was fluid resuscitated. Ultrasound scan and computed tomography (CT) scan showed a large pelvic hematoma. Radiologists also suspected a possibility of bleeding from inferior epigastric artery following a CT angiogram. The patient was stabilized and transferred to intensive care unit (ICU) for further hemodynamic supports and close monitoring. The patient was then transferred back to the general ward when she was stable. She was managed conservatively as there were no more signs of active bleeding. Unfortunately, she died of recurrent bleeding three days after ICU discharge. PMID:27158226

  12. Intra-Abdominal Hematoma Following Enoxaparin Injection.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kin Tong

    2016-01-01

    An elderly patient, who was being treated for therapeutic enoxaparin for a couple of days due to suspected deep vein thrombosis, was admitted to hospital following a collapse and severe abdominal pain. She was in hypovolemic shock and was fluid resuscitated. Ultrasound scan and computed tomography (CT) scan showed a large pelvic hematoma. Radiologists also suspected a possibility of bleeding from inferior epigastric artery following a CT angiogram. The patient was stabilized and transferred to intensive care unit (ICU) for further hemodynamic supports and close monitoring. The patient was then transferred back to the general ward when she was stable. She was managed conservatively as there were no more signs of active bleeding. Unfortunately, she died of recurrent bleeding three days after ICU discharge. PMID:27158226

  13. Eosinophilic esophagitis in children with esophageal atresia.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, J; Tobias, V; Sugo, E; Varjavandi, V; Lemberg, D; Day, A; Bohane, T; Ledder, O; Jiwane, A; Adams, S; Henry, G; Dilley, A; Shi, E; Krishnan, U

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) has only rarely been reported in esophageal atresia (EA) patients. A retrospective case analysis of all EA patients born at our center between January 1999 and April 2012 was performed. A total of 113 of patients were identified; 10 patients were excluded as a result of inadequate data. Eighteen patients (17%) were diagnosed with EoE. The average number of eosinophilis was 30/high-power field (HPF) (19/HPF-80/HPF). The median age for diagnosis of EoE was 1 year and 6 months (8 months-8 years and 7 months). Children with EoE had a significantly greater incidence of reflux symptoms, dysphagia, tracheomalacia, and 'hypoxic spells' (P < 0.05). EoE patients also underwent significantly more surgery including fundoplication and aortopexy when compared with those without EoE (P < 0.0001). Although the incidence of gastrostomy was greater in the EoE group (33% vs. 13%), this was not statistically significant. Half of the EoE patients had a coexisting atopic condition at time of diagnosis. The commonest condition was asthma 7/18 (38%) followed by specific food allergy 6/18 (33%). EoE was treated in 11 patients with either swallowed fluticasone or budesonide slurry. All improved clinically. Histologically, five had complete resolution and six had partial improvement. Six children with EoE were treated with acid suppression alone. All improved clinically, and 5/6 had subsequent histological resolution. One child who received acid suppression and an exclusion diet also improved. Seven patients (38%) had an esophageal stricture at time of EoE diagnosis. Five were dilated at time of the initial endoscopy, prior to the diagnosis of EoE being available. Two patients had resolution of their strictures on medical treatment of their EoE alone and did not require further dilatation. EoE was seen in 17% of children with EA in this study. EoE should be considered in EA patients with persistent symptoms on standard reflux treatment, increasing

  14. Intramural gas in stomach along with acute calculus cholecystitis: an unusual association

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Zohaib Gulzar; Shahzad, Noman; Alvi, Abdul Rehman; Effendi, Shahrukh

    2013-01-01

    Intramural gas in stomach is a rare finding, but differential diagnosis of this condition into gastric emphysema and emphysematous gastritis is clinically important because of vastly different aetiologies and prognosis. Emphysematous gastritis is caused by gas producing micro-organisms inside the stomach wall and is a potentially fatal condition, while, on the other hand, gas enters stomach wall through mucosal breach in the case of gastric emphysema and prognosis is usually good with complete resolution. To date, no case has been reported in the literature showing gas in the stomach wall in a patient with acute calculus cholecystitis. We present a case of a young man with upper abdominal pain, and who, upon diagnostic work up was diagnosed with acute calculus cholecystitis with associated intramural gas in the stomach with no known aetiological factors to be positive. Conservative management with close observation resulted in complete symptomatic resolution. PMID:23645637

  15. The OPPIuM technique: office hysteroscopic technique for the preparation of partially intramural leiomyomas.

    PubMed

    Cicinelli, Ettore; Mitsopoulos, Vasileios; Fascilla, Fabiana D; Sioutis, Dimos; Bettocchi, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Uterine fibroids, also known as leiomyomas, represent the most common benign tumors of the female genital tract. Submucosal leiomyomas are classified into three grades: G0, GI, GII according to the degree of their intramural proportion. A recently developed technique enables the preparation of G1 and G2 leiomyomas for their subsequent successful resection in a second step. The OPPIuM (office preparation of partially intramural leiomyomas) technique aims to downgrade type I and II leiomyomas, in order to facilitate a subsequent easier and safer resectoscopy. Hysteroscopic resection of large GI or GII submucosal fibroids is a complex procedure. OPPIuM technique has been invented and seems to achieve the downgrading of these types of leiomyomas in approximately 93% of cases, without any significant surgical complications or the need of hormonal agents' administration. In this way, the safer and quicker subsequent complete myomectomy is facilitated. PMID:26928422

  16. Ectopic Pregnancy in Uncommon Implantation Sites: Intramural Pregnancy and Rudimentary Horn Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Yu, Fan; Zeng, Li-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic pregnancy is commonly located in the fallopian tube. Nevertheless, two unusual types of ectopic pregnancy, intramural pregnancy and rudimentary horn pregnancy, seriously threaten maternal life. The diagnosis and treatment of these unusual implantation sites present a clinical challenge. In this study, we illustrated the two unusual types of ectopic pregnancy and summarized the current data regarding diagnosis and optimal treatment from our experience. PMID:26819788

  17. Intramural Reentrant Ventricular Tachycardia in a Patient with Severe Hypertensive Left Ventricular Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chin-Yu; Chung, Fa-Po; Lin, Yenn-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a patient with severe hypertensive left ventricular hypertrophy and sustained hemodynamically unstable ventricular tachycardia (VT). Entrainment was demonstrated in the electrophysiological study. Activation mapping and pacemapping identified the location of the intramural reentrant VT with the exit site close to the epicardium. However, VT persisted after ablation at the epicardial exit site. Successful ablation was performed endocardially at the corresponding position. PMID:26617657

  18. Ectopic Pregnancy in Uncommon Implantation Sites: Intramural Pregnancy and Rudimentary Horn Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Yu, Fan; Zeng, Li-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic pregnancy is commonly located in the fallopian tube. Nevertheless, two unusual types of ectopic pregnancy, intramural pregnancy and rudimentary horn pregnancy, seriously threaten maternal life. The diagnosis and treatment of these unusual implantation sites present a clinical challenge. In this study, we illustrated the two unusual types of ectopic pregnancy and summarized the current data regarding diagnosis and optimal treatment from our experience. PMID:26819788

  19. Esophageal trichomoniasis in chickens.

    PubMed

    Willoughby, D H; Bickford, A A; Charlton, B R; Cooper, G L

    1995-01-01

    Esophageal trichomoniasis has been rarely reported in chickens. At the California Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory System-Turlock Branch, this disease was recently diagnosed in two cases submitted from backyard chicken flocks. The esophageal lesions observed were similar to those seen in several other important diseases of chickens. The causative trichomonad organisms were readily demonstrated on wet smears and by histologic studies. In both cases, the investigated flocks were afflicted with several concurrent diseases. California has experienced an increase in the number of small nontraditional chicken production operations. These facilities are sometimes in close proximity to commercial poultry operations and biosecurity barriers occasionally fail. The poor husbandry practices often used in these small flocks make them a potential reservoir for rare diseases such as trichomoniasis and also for disease organisms that are devastating to commercial poultry. PMID:8719231

  20. Hand-held instrument should relieve hematoma pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raggio, L. J.; Robertson, T. L.

    1967-01-01

    Portable instrument relieves hematomas beneath fingernails and toenails without surgery. This device simplifies the operative procedure with an instant variable heating tip, adjustable depth settings and interchangeable tip sizes for cauterizing small areas and relieving pressurized clots.

  1. Warfarin-associated fetal intracranial subdural hematoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Kana; Aoki, Shigeru; Kurasawa, Kentaro; Okuda, Mika; Takahashi, Tsuneo; Hirahara, Fumiki

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We present a case in which to of fetal subdural hematoma developing despite that the maternal the prothrombin time by international normalized ratio (PT/INR) during pregnancy was within the normal range. PMID:25356261

  2. Threatened miscarriage and intrauterine hematomas. Sonographic and biochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Stabile, I; Campbell, S; Grudzinskas, J G

    1989-06-01

    In a prospective study of 406 women with threatened miscarriage (TMC), 22 (5.4%) had an intrauterine hematoma (less than 16 mL) noted ultrasonically, decreasing in size as the patients experienced repeated episodes of bleeding. Twenty (91%) of the hematomas visualized were subchorionic and two (9%) were retroplacental. None of these women subsequently miscarried. Human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG), Schwangerschafts protein 1 (SP1), and pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) levels measured in these patients were not significantly different in women with or without hematomas. We conclude that the presence of small intrauterine hematomas in women with TMC does not increase the risk of miscarriage. PMID:2472492

  3. [Cervicodorsal subdural hematoma caused by coumarinic rodenticide poisoning].

    PubMed

    Nighoghossian, N; Ruel, J H; Ffrench, P; Froment, J C; Trouillas, P

    1990-01-01

    A 59-year old man developed subacute tetraparesis following severe sudden neck pain. MRI showed a subdural cervical hematoma. Prothrombin complex activity was low. An unusual coagulopathy after rodenticides exposure was found. Diphenacoum, an effective antagonist of vitamin K1, was present in the patients plasma. Specific medical management led to a complete recovery. Follow-up MRI seventy days later confirmed the complete disappearance of the hematoma. PMID:2330467

  4. Hypnotherapy for Esophageal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Riehl, Megan E; Keefer, Laurie

    2015-07-01

    Hypnotherapy is an evidence based intervention for the treatment of functional bowel disorders, particularly irritable bowel syndrome. While similar in pathophysiology, less is known about the utility of hypnotherapy in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal disorders, most of which are functional in nature, cause painful and uncomfortable symptoms that impact patient quality of life and are difficult to treat from a medical perspective. After a thorough medical workup and a failed trial of proton pump inhibitor therapy, options for treatment are significantly limited. While the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial, two critical factors are believed to drive esophageal symptoms--visceral hypersensitivity and symptom hypervigilance. The goal of esophageal directed hypnotherapy is to promote a deep state of relaxation with focused attention allowing the patient to learn to modulate physiological sensations and symptoms that are not easily addressed with conventional medical intervention. Currently, the use of hypnosis is suitable for dysphagia, globus, functional chest pain/non-cardiac chest pain, dyspepsia, and functional heartburn. In this article the authors will provide a rationale for the use of hypnosis in these disorders, presenting the science whenever available, describing their approach with these patients, and sharing a case study representing a successful outcome. PMID:26046715

  5. Spontaneous thoracic epidural hematoma: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Babayev, Rasim; Ekşi, Murat Şakir

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural hematoma is a rare neurosurgical emergency in respect of motor and sensory loss. Identifiable reasons for spontaneous hemorrhage are vascular malformations and hemophilias. We presented a case of spontaneous epidural hematoma in an 18-year-old female patient who had motor and sensory deficits that had been present for 1 day. On MRI, there was spinal epidural hematoma posterior to the T2-T3 spinal cord. The hematoma was evacuated with T2 hemilaminectomy and T3 laminectomy. Patient recovered immediately after the surgery. Literature review depicted 112 pediatric cases (including the presented one) of spinal epidural hematoma. The female/male ratio is 1.1:2. Average age at presentation is 7.09 years. Clinical presentations include loss of strength, sensory disturbance, bowel and bladder disturbances, neck pain, back pain, leg pain, abdominal pain, meningismus, respiratory difficulty, irritability, gait instability, and torticollis. Most common spinal level was cervicothoracic spine. Time interval from symptom onset to clinical diagnosis varied from immediate to 18 months. Spinal epidural hematoma happened spontaneously in 71.8 % of the cases, and hemophilia was the leading disorder (58 %) in the cases with a definable disorder. Partial or complete recovery is possible after surgical interventions and factor supplementations. PMID:26033378

  6. Primary Enlarged Craniotomy in Organized Chronic Subdural Hematomas

    PubMed Central

    CALLOVINI, Giorgio Maria; BOLOGNINI, Andrea; CALLOVINI, Gemma; GAMMONE, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of craniotomy and membranectomy as initial treatment of organized chronic subdural hematoma (OCSH). We retrospectively reviewed a series of 34 consecutive patients suffering from OCSH, diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or contrast computer tomography (CCT) in order to establish the degree of organization and determine the intrahematomal architecture. The indication to perform a primary enlarged craniotomy as initial treatment for non-liquefied chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) with multilayer loculations was based on the hematoma MRI appearance—mostly hyperintense in both T1- and T2-weighted images with a hypointense web- or net-like structure within the hematoma cavity. The reason why some hematomas evolve towards a complex and organized architecture remains unclear; the most common aspect to come to light was the “long standing” of the CSDHs which, in our series, had an average interval of 10 weeks between head injury and initial scan. Recurrence was found to have occurred in 2 patients (6% of cases) in the form of acute subdural hematoma. One patient died as the result of an intraventricular and subarachnoid haemorrhage, while 2 patients (6%) suffered an haemorrhagic stroke ipsilateral to the OCSH. Eighty-nine percent of cases had a good recovery, while 11% remained unchanged or worsened. In select cases, based on the MRI appearance, primary enlarged craniotomy seems to be the treatment of choice for achieving a complete recovery and a reduced recurrence rate in OCSH. PMID:24305027

  7. Delayed Onset of Subdural Hematoma following Epidural Catheter Breakage

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Yoshimoto; Imagama, Shiro; Ito, Zenya; Ando, Kei; Gotoh, Momokazu; Nishiwaki, Kimitoshi; Nagao, Yoshimasa; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objectives To describe a case of delayed-onset spinal hematoma following the breakage of a spinal epidural catheter. Methods The authors describe the clinical case review. Results A 64-year-old woman had undergone epidural anesthesia 18 years before she was referred to our hospital because of lower-back pain and lower neurologic deficit with leg pain. The clinical examination showed the presence of a fragment of an epidural catheter in the thoracolumbar canal, as assessed by computed tomography, and a spinal hematoma that compressed the spinal cord at the same spinal level, as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Surgical removal of the epidural catheter and decompression surgery were performed. The patient exhibited substantial clinical improvement 1 month after surgery; she achieved a steady gait without the need for a cane and had no leg pain. Conclusion This is the first report of delayed onset of spinal hematoma following the breakage of an epidural catheter. Generally, when the breakage of an epidural catheter occurs without symptoms, follow-up alone is recommended. However, because spinal hematoma might exhibit a late onset, the possibility of this complication should be considered when deciding whether to remove the catheter fragment. We believe that in our patient, there could be a relationship between the catheter fragment and subdural hematoma, and catheter breakage could have been a risk factor for the spinal hematoma. PMID:26835209

  8. Chronic subdural hematoma infected by propionibacterium acnes: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shusuke; Asahi, Takashi; Akioka, Naoki; Kashiwazaki, Daina; Kuwayama, Naoya; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    We present a very rare case of a patient with an infected subdural hematoma due to Propionibacterium acnes. A 63-year-old male complained of dizziness and was admitted to our hospital. He had a history of left chronic subdural hematoma due to a traffic accident, which had been conservatively treated. Physical, neurological and laboratory examinations revealed no definite abnormality. Plain CT scan demonstrated a hypodense crescentic fluid collection over the surface of the left cerebral hemisphere. The patient was diagnosed with chronic subdural hematoma and underwent burr hole surgery three times and selective embolization of the middle meningeal artery, but the lesion easily recurred. Repeated culture examinations of white sedimentation detected P. acnes. Therefore, he underwent craniotomy surgery followed by intravenous administration of antibiotics. The infected subdural hematoma was covered with a thick, yellowish outer membrane, and the large volume of pus and hematoma was removed. However, the lesion recurred again and a low-density area developed in the left frontal lobe. Craniotomy surgery was performed a second time, and two Penrose drainages were put in both the epidural and subdural spaces. Subsequently, the lesions completely resolved and he was discharged without any neurological deficits. Infected subdural hematoma may be refractory to burr hole surgery or craniotomy alone, in which case aggressive treatment with craniotomy and continuous drainage should be indicated before the brain parenchyma suffers irreversible damage. PMID:25759659

  9. [Eosinophilic esophagitis: an "emerging disease"].

    PubMed

    Collardeau-Frachon, Sophie; Hervieu, Valérie; Scoazec, Jean-Yves

    2007-12-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is a recently identified disease. The histological examination of esophageal biopsies is essential for its diagnosis, which is made with steadily increasing frequency. Eosinophilic esophagitis is an anatomoclinical entity, involving both children and adults, characterized by a dense and isolated infiltration of the esophageal mucosa by eosinophils, revealed by clinical symptoms of upper digestive tract origin and resistant to anti-acid treatment with IPP at high doses. Eosinophilic esophagitis is currently interpreted as an allergic disease, even though its pathogenesis remains unclear. The disease has a chronic course with persistent or relapsing symptoms, present with symptoms similar to those of gastro-esophageal reflux or with dysphagia. Endoscopic examination shows the presence of characteristic, but not pathognomonic, lesions (stenoses, strictures, circular rings, reduction of calibre, white specks, granularity of the mucosa). The histological diagnosis requires multiple biopsies taken all along the esophagus. The main sign is the presence of a dense eosinophilic infiltrate of the mucosa: a peak density of more than 15 eosinophils in at least one x400 field is the minimal criteria required for diagnosis. Associated lesions correspond to tissue damage and repair secondary to eosinophil activation (basal hyperplasia, microabscesses, fibrosis of the lamina propria). The treatment is based on dietary measures (allergen exclusion) and on the use of anti-inflammatory drugs, mainly corticoids. In conclusion, eosinophilic esophagitis is an emerging disease, important to identify, since it requires a specific treatment, different from that of reflux esophagitis. PMID:18554551

  10. Esophageal Manifestations of Multisystem Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mapp, Esmond

    1980-01-01

    The esophagus may be involved directly or indirectly by numerous disease conditions. On occasion, the esophageal process may be the key to the diagnosis. In some situations, the esophageal manifestation of a disease may be more immediately life-threatening than the primary process. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:7310903

  11. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: Biology to Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis, a recently recognized and growing clinical disorder over the past decade, is characterized by antigen-driven eosinophil accumulation in the esophagus. Symptoms frequently mimic those of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) but the two diseases are quite distinct in terms of their histopathology, genetic signature, response to therapy, hereditary risk and association with allergy. Disease pathogenesis involves the interplay of external and genetic factors, particularly food antigens and the eosinophil chemoattractant eotaxin-3, respectively. Transcript signatures and animal models have uncovered the importance of adaptive T cell immunity involving IL-5 and IL-13 elicited esophageal epithelial cell responses. Notably, symptoms, dysregulated esophageal gene expression and pathology are largely reversible following reduction of specific food antigen exposure, as well as anti-inflammatory therapy, but chronic treatment is necessary to prevent relapse. As such, eosinophilic esophagitis is a disease with the unique features of chronic esophagitis, atopy, immune sensitization to oral antigens, reversibility and familial association. PMID:19596009

  12. [Endoscopic Therapy for Esophageal Cancer].

    PubMed

    Sakai, Makoto; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    Endoscopic treatment for esophageal neoplasms includes endoscopic resection, argon plasma coagulation(APC), photodynamic therapy( PDT) and stent placement. Endoscopic resection is widely used as an effective, less invasive treatment for superficial esophageal carcinoma in Japan. APC is considered to be safe and effective treatment for superficial esophageal carcinoma which cannot be resected endoscopically because of severe comorbidities, as well as for local recurrence after endoscopic resection or chemoradiotherapy. PDT is thought to be an effective option as salvage treatment for local failure after chemoradiotherapy. Stent placement mainly using self-expanding metallic stents have been used as a minimally invasive and effective modality for the palliative treatment of malignant esophageal obstruction. Endoscopic treatment is expected to have more important role in the treatment of esophageal neoplasms in the future. PMID:27440040

  13. Spontaneous bacterial seeding of a biceps hematoma.

    PubMed

    Frye, Benjamin; Prud'homme, Joseph; Daney, Blake

    2010-11-01

    A 19-year-old male construction worker presented with an injury to his left upper arm after lifting a heavy pipe. He reported an acute onset of sharp pain followed by swelling, warmth, and weakness with elbow flexion. The diagnosis of a distal biceps tendon rupture was made and elective repair was scheduled. Seventy-two hours later, the patient presented with a spontaneous draining wound on his anterior distal humerus. The wound was draining thick purulent material. The patient underwent surgery for irrigation and debridement of his abscess. Nearly 500 cc of hematoma and purulent fluid were evacuated. A large tear of both the biceps and brachialis muscle bellies were found. Cultures were obtained that revealed the infecting organism to be Streptococcus intermedius. Human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis-C virus testing were negative, and no history, signs, or symptoms of any cause of underlying immunodeficiency were detected. No signs or history of drug use were present. He was discharged home on culture-specific oral antibiotics. At 4-month postoperative follow-up, the patient reported no pain or limitations. He has returned to full duty at his job. Elbow range of motion was measured from 7° to 150° of flexion. Strength of elbow flexion and extension was symmetric to the uninjured side. Pronation and supination of the forearm was symmetric on both sides. He has been released from scheduled follow-up and will be seen again on an as-needed basis. PMID:21053873

  14. Delayed Onset Intracranial Subdural Hematoma Following Spinal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Işik, Semra; Yilmaz, Baran; Ekşi, Murat Şakir; Özcan-Ekşi, Emel Ece; Akakin, Akin; Toktaş, Zafer Orkun; Demir, Mustafa Kemal; Konya, Deniz

    2016-06-01

    In this case-based review, the authors analyzed relevant literature with an illustrative patient of theirs about subdural hematoma secondary to dural tear at spinal surgery. Intracranial hypotension is a condition of decreased cerebrospinal fluid volume and pressure. Even though intracranial hypotension is temporary and can be managed conservatively, it may progress and result in subdural fluid collections, hematoma formations, "brain sagging or slumping" states, syringohydromyelia, encephalopathy, coma, and even death. The authors present an 81-year-old man admitted with subdural hematoma 50 days following previous spinal surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis. In his previous spinal surgery he had had dural tear, which had been closed primarily. To the literature, only 21 patients have been reported to develop subdural hematoma following spinal surgery. In patients with subdural hematoma following spinal surgery, the female:male ratio was 3:4 and the median age was 55 years. Surgical diagnoses for previous spinal surgeries were intervertebral disc herniation (5), spinal canal stenosis and spondylolisthesis (6), failed back syndrome (2), tethered cord syndrome and myelodysplastic spine (2), spinal cord tumor, spinal epidural hematoma, vertebral dislocation, vertebral fracture, vertebral tumor, and inflammatory spine. Patients presented with signs and symptoms of subdural hematoma within 6 hours to 50 days following the spinal surgery. Source of cerebrospinal fluid leak was most commonly from lumbar region (13 patients, 62%). Ten of 21 (48%) patients were treated conservatively. Late-onset neurological findings should not prevent the evaluation of cranial vault with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Spinal dural tear should be more aggressively treated instead of suture alone approach, when recognized in older patients during the spinal surgery. PMID:27192649

  15. Encapsulated Unresolved Subdural Hematoma Mimicking Acute Epidural Hematoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Soo; Kim, Hyo-Joon; Kwon, Chang-Young

    2014-01-01

    Encapsulated acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) has been uncommonly reported. To our knowledge, a few cases of lentiform ASDH have been reported. The mechanism of encapsulated ASDH has been studied but not completely clarified. Encapsulated lentiform ASDH on a computed tomography (CT) scan mimics acute epidural hematoma (AEDH). Misinterpretation of biconvex-shaped ASDH on CT scan as AEDH often occurs and is usually identified by neurosurgical intervention. We report a case of an 85-year-old man presenting with a 2-day history of mental deterioration and right-sided weakness. CT scan revealed a biconvex-shaped hyperdense mass mixed with various densities of blood along the left temporoparietal cerebral convexity, which was misinterpreted as AEDH preoperatively. Emergency craniectomy was performed, but no AEDH was found beneath the skull. In the subdural space, encapsulated ASDH was located. En block resection of encapsulated ASDH was done. Emergency craniectomy confirmed that the preoperatively diagnosed AEDH was an encapsulated ASDH postoperatively. Radiologic studies of AEDH-like SDH allow us to establish an easy differential diagnosis between AEDH and ASDH by distinct features. More histological studies will provide us information on the mechanism underlying encapsulated ASDH. PMID:27169052

  16. Atorvastatin May Attenuate Recurrence of Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua; Luo, Zhengxiang; Liu, Zhongkun; Yang, Jian; Kan, Shifeng

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common form of intracranial hemorrhage with a substantial recurrence rate. Atorvastatin may reduce CSDH via its anti-inflammatory and pro-angiogenesis effects, but its effectiveness for preventing recurrent CSDH has never been explored. We hypothesized that atorvastatin is effective in reducing recurrence of CSDH after surgery and identified determining factors predictive of hematoma recurrence. Methods: A prospective study was conducted in 168 surgical cases of CSDH.All patients were randomly assigned to the group treated with atorvastatin or control group. Clinically relevant data were compared between two groups, and subsequently between the recurrence and non-recurrence patients. Multiple logistic regression analysis of the relationship between atorvastatin treatment and the recurrence using brain atrophy, septated and bilateral hematoma was performed. Results: Atorvastatin group conferred an advantage by significantly decreasing the recurrence rate (P = 0.023), and patients managed with atorvastatin also had a longer time-to-recurrence (P = 0.038). Admission brain atrophy and bilateral hematoma differed significantly between the recurrence and non-recurrence patients (P = 0.047 and P = 0.045). The results of logistic regression analysis showed that atorvastatin significantly reduced the probability of recurrence; severe brain atrophy and bilateral hematoma were independent risk factors for recurrent CSDH. Conclusions: Atorvastatin administration may decrease the risks of recurrence.Patients with severe brain atrophy and bilateral CSDH are prone to the recurrence. PMID:27445673

  17. Influence of hematoma location on acute mortality after intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Yong; King, Caroline; Stradling, Dana; Warren, Michael; Nguyen, Dennis; Lee, Johnny; Riola, Mark A.; Montoya, Ricardo; Patel, Dipika; Le, Vu H.; Welbourne, Susan J.; Cramer, Steven C.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose The current study aimed to identify predictors of acute mortality after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), including voxel-wise analysis of hematoma location. Methods In 282 consecutive patients with acute ICH, clinical and radiological predictors of acute mortality were identified. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping examined spatial correlates of acute mortality, contrasting results in basal ganglia ICH and lobar ICH. Results Acute mortality was 47.9%. In bivariate analyses, one clinical (serum glucose) and two radiological (hematoma volume and intraventricular extension) measures significantly predicted mortality. The relationship was strongest for hematoma volume. Multivariable modeling identified four significant predictors of mortality (ICH volume, intraventricular extension, serum glucose, and serum hemoglobin), although this model only minimally improved the predictive value provided by ICH volume alone. Voxel-wise analysis found that for patients with lobar ICH, brain regions where acute hematoma was significantly associated with higher acute mortality included inferior parietal lobule and posterior insula; for patients with basal ganglia ICH, a large region extending from cortex to brainstem. Conclusions For patients with lobar ICH, acute mortality is related to both hematoma size and location, with findings potentially useful for therapeutic decision-making. The current findings also underscore differences between the syndromes of acute deep and lobar ICH. PMID:23279617

  18. [Case of renal subcapsular hematoma caused by flexible transurethral lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ryuta; Inada, Kouji; Azuma, Kouji; Yamashita, Yokihiko; Oka, Akihiro

    2013-09-01

    A 39-year-old man with macroscopic hematuria was admitted to our hospital. A stone, 5 mm in diameter was detected in the right ureteropelvic junction after abdominal computed tomography and plain abdominal radiography. We performed flexible transurethral lithotripsy (f-TUL) and crushed the stone and extracted almost all stone fragments without any complications. However, almost immediately after the operation, the patient began to complain about pain in the right back. In the results of abdominal plain computed tomography right renal subcapsular hematoma was detected. Because active bleeding was not observed in the results of enhanced computed tomography, only conservative treatment was performed. The patient was discharged from the hospital on day 11 of hospitalization. One month after the operation, plain computed tomography was performed and diminished subcapsular hematoma was detected. Renal subcapsular hematoma is assumed to be a unique complication of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. This is the first report of a case of renal subcapsular hematoma caused by f-TUL. The onset of renal subcapsular hematoma following f-TUL could have been caused either because the laser fiber thrust into the renal lithiasis unintentionally or because the internal pressure of the renal pelvis increased substantially during the operation. PMID:24113753

  19. A tale of two acute extradural hematomas

    PubMed Central

    Adeleye, Amos Olufemi; Jite, Ikechi E.; Smith, Omolara A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In much of the Western hemisphere, mortality from traumatic acute extradural hematomas (AEDH) has been drastically brought down toward 0%. This is still not the case however in most developing countries. Case Description: This report represents a tragi-comic tale of two cases of traumatic AEDH managed by an academic neurosurgeon in a neurosurgically ill-resourced private health facility during a nationwide industrial strike action preventing clinical-surgical care in the principal author's University Teaching Hospital. A young man presented with altered consciousness, Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) 14/15, following a road accident. The cranial computed tomography (CT) scan was obtained only 9 h after its request, long after the man had actually deteriorated to GCS 7/15 with pupillary changes. The neurosurgeon, summoned from the nearby University Teaching Hospital for the operative care of this man, arrived on-site and was about moving the patient into the operative room when he took the final breaths and died, all within 2 h of the belated neuroimaging. This scenario repeated itself in the same health facility just 24 h later with another young man who presented GCS 7/15 and another identical CT evidence of traumatic AEDH. With more financially able relations, the diagnostic/surgical care of this second patient was much more prompt. He made a very brisk recovery from neurosurgical operative intervention. He is alive and well, 5-month postoperative. Conclusions: In most low-resourced health systems of the developing countries, a significant proportion of potentially salvageable cases of AEDH still perish from this disease condition. PMID:27213108

  20. Esophageal impacted dentures.

    PubMed Central

    Nwaorgu, Onyekwere G.; Onakoya, Paul A.; Sogebi, Olusola A.; Kokong, Daniel D.; Dosumu, Oluwole O.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study aims to highlight the problems associated with impacted acrylic dentures and proffers advice to check them. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Retrospective review of all cases of impacted acrylic dentures over a 16-year period. RESULTS: Twenty-two adults had impacted esophageal acrylic dentures of which 16 (72.7%) and six (27.3%) were males and females, respectively (M:F ratio = 2.7:1) with age range 23-77 years. Fourteen patients (63.6%) had worn their dentures for more than 10 years without check-up, and 54.5% presented within 48 hours of impaction. The common symptoms in all the patients were difficulty with swallowing, throat pain and discomfort, followed by tenderness in the neck in 15 (68.2%). Dentures were extracted through esophagoscopy (17 cases) and cervical (three cases) esophagotomy, respectively. Observed complications included pulmonary edema in one and esophageal perforation in five patients. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic extraction of dentures carries a high risk of perforation. Extraction of an impacted denture via esophagoscopy can be undertaken under direct vision and in an ideal situation with judicious use of the Shears forceps. In the absence of these, the safest option is an esophagotomy. Proper treatment planning in the fabrication of dentures with incorporation of radiopaque materials in the dental resins and adequate postdenture delivery instructions are necessary as preventive measures. PMID:15540888

  1. Esophageal Lipoma: A Rare Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Jeremy; Tejerina, Manfred; Hallowell, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal lipomas are rare tumors, making up 0.4% of all digestive tract benign neoplasms. Most of these lesions are clinically silent as a result of their small size, however, the majority of lesions over 4 cm have been reported to cause dysphagia, regurgitation and/or epigastralgia. We report a case of a 53 year-old African American female who presented with dysphagia. Computed tomography of the chest and esophagram confirmed esophageal lipoma as the cause of the patient’s symptoms. Accurately diagnosing an esophageal lipoma is crucial in order to rule out potential malignant lesions, relieve patient symptoms and plan the appropriate treatment. PMID:23365708

  2. Treatment of advanced esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsen, D.

    1982-12-01

    When radiation therapy is used for palliation of obstruction in patients with advanced esophageal carcinoma, an improvement in dysphagia can be expected in approximately 50% of patients. Major objective responses have rarely been quantitied but, in one study, were seen in 33% patients. Recurrence of dysphagia is usually seen within 2-6 months of treatment. Radiation toxicities and complications, even when used with palliative intent, can be substantial and include esophagitis, tracheoesophageal or esophageal-aortic fistula, mediastinitis, hemorrhage, pneumonitis, and myelosuppression. (JMT)

  3. Nuclear medicine and esophageal surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Taillefer, R.; Beauchamp, G.; Duranceau, A.C.; Lafontaine, E.

    1986-06-01

    The principal radionuclide procedures involved in the evaluation of esophageal disorders that are amenable to surgery are illustrated and briefly described. The role of the radionuclide esophagogram (RE) in the diagnosis and management of achalasia, oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy and its complications, tracheoesophageal fistulae, pharyngeal and esophageal diverticulae, gastric transposition, and fundoplication is discussed. Detection of columnar-lined esophagus by Tc-99m pertechnetate imaging and of esophageal carcinoma by Ga-67 citrate and Tc-99m glucoheptonate studies also is presented. 37 references.

  4. Esophageal tissue engineering: a new approach for esophageal replacement.

    PubMed

    Totonelli, Giorgia; Maghsoudlou, Panagiotis; Fishman, Jonathan M; Orlando, Giuseppe; Ansari, Tahera; Sibbons, Paul; Birchall, Martin A; Pierro, Agostino; Eaton, Simon; De Coppi, Paolo

    2012-12-21

    A number of congenital and acquired disorders require esophageal tissue replacement. Various surgical techniques, such as gastric and colonic interposition, are standards of treatment, but frequently complicated by stenosis and other problems. Regenerative medicine approaches facilitate the use of biological constructs to replace or regenerate normal tissue function. We review the literature of esophageal tissue engineering, discuss its implications, compare the methodologies that have been employed and suggest possible directions for the future. Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, National Research Register and ClinicalTrials.gov databases were searched with the following search terms: stem cell and esophagus, esophageal replacement, esophageal tissue engineering, esophageal substitution. Reference lists of papers identified were also examined and experts in this field contacted for further information. All full-text articles in English of all potentially relevant abstracts were reviewed. Tissue engineering has involved acellular scaffolds that were either transplanted with the aim of being repopulated by host cells or seeded prior to transplantation. When acellular scaffolds were used to replace patch and short tubular defects they allowed epithelial and partial muscular migration whereas when employed for long tubular defects the results were poor leading to an increased rate of stenosis and mortality. Stenting has been shown as an effective means to reduce stenotic changes and promote cell migration, whilst omental wrapping to induce vascularization of the construct has an uncertain benefit. Decellularized matrices have been recently suggested as the optimal choice for scaffolds, but smart polymers that will incorporate signalling to promote cell-scaffold interaction may provide a more reproducible and available solution. Results in animal models that have used seeded scaffolds strongly suggest that seeding of both muscle and epithelial cells on scaffolds

  5. Ruptured pseudoaneurysm of the middle meningeal artery presenting with a temporal lobe hematoma and a contralateral subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Marvin, Eric; Laws, Lindsay Hilken; Coppens, Jeroen Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traumatic pseudoaneurysms of the middle meningeal artery (MMA) are rare, associated with skull fractures, and have a high mortality rate. When they rupture, MMA pseudoaneurysms frequently cause epidural hematomas and occasionally ipsilateral subdural or subarachnoid hemorrhage. Isolated intraparenchymal hemorrhage has also been reported. Case Description: A 54-year-old female who suffered a loss of consciousness resulting in a fall presented with a Glasgow Coma Scale of 7t. Imaging demonstrated a right subdural hematoma (SDH) with midline shift, left skull fracture overlying the left MMA, and left temporal lobe intraparenchymal hematoma extending to the surface. The patient underwent a right craniectomy with evacuation of the SDH, and the preoperative computed tomographic angiography revealed abnormal dilation of the left MMA consistent with a pseudoaneurysm. The pseudoaneurysm was treated with endovascular treatment, and the intraparenchymal hematoma was treated conservatively. Her recovery was uneventful, and she received a cranioplasty 3 months after the decompression. Conclusions: The presence of a fracture over the MMA and intraparenchymal hematoma should prompt suspicion for a traumatic pseudoaneurysm. Pseudoaneurysms of the MMA can cause catastrophic bleeding, and prompt treatment is necessary. Endovascular embolization is an effective method that decreases the hemorrhage risk of MMA pseudoaneurysms. PMID:26862457

  6. [Chronic subdural hematoma infected by Campylobacter fetus: case report].

    PubMed

    Dost, L; Denes, E; Hidri, N; Ploy, M-C; Barraud, O; Moreau, J-J; Caire, F

    2012-02-01

    We report here a rare case of chronic subdural hematoma infected by Campylobacter fetus in a 86-year-old woman. She was admitted for confusion and disorientation in a context of high fever and diarrhoea. After two surgeries, the evolution was finally good with a combination of antibiotics (amoxicillin and clindamycin). Chronic subdural hematoma is a potential site for bacterial infection. Our case suggests that C. fetus infection should be suspected in elderly patients presenting with fever and enteritis. The frequency of such cases may be underestimated, due to the difficult diagnosis of C. fetus. It is also suspected that C. fetus could play a role in the recurrence of hematoma, because of its vessel tropism. PMID:22154423

  7. High-Grade Sarcomas Mimicking Traumatic Intramuscular Hematomas

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Pablo; Morcuende, Jose

    2004-01-01

    We reported on three patients with high-grade soft-tissue sarcomas mimicking traumatic intramuscular hematomas. Patients had an episode of trauma to the extremity, and after initial clinical and imaging evaluations they were considered to have muscular hematomas. The lesions increased in size over time, leading to further evaluations that demonstrated the actual diagnosis. We conducted a retrospective review of the clinical findings, magnetic resonance images, and computed tomography scans to assess characteristics that will help in the differential diagnosis. We conclude that intramuscular hematomas following trauma should be approached with a high degree of clinical suspicion. MRI analysis can be used as an important diagnostic tool, but the results must be seen in the context of the clinical history. MRI is not sensitive or specific enough to rule out malignancy. The diagnosis of a high-grade sarcoma must be considered in these patients and any doubt should be resolved with a biopsy. PMID:15296215

  8. Mesenteric Hematoma: Is there a Role for Selective Management?

    PubMed

    Corzo, Camila; Murdock, Alan; Alarcon, Louis; Puyana, Juan C

    2016-04-01

    Mesenteric hematomas may present as a radiologic finding after blunt abdominal trauma that may be associated with surgically significant mesenteric and/or bowel injury. The question of whether to operate or not to operate on patients with mesenteric hematoma remains a topic of debate, especially with the improved imaging technology. This study sought to identify clinical and radiological characteristics for patient selection for operative management (OM) of mesenteric hematoma. A retrospective review of 33 adults with blunt abdominal trauma and mesenteric hematoma on CT scan (2009-2012) was performed. Patients with other intra-abdominal injuries, penetrating trauma, isolated gastric hematoma, contrast extravasation, extraluminal air, and Glasgow Coma Scale < 14 were excluded. Patients requiring surgical treatment within 24 hours of admission were compared with those who did not using chi-squared test, Fisher's exact test, and t test. Parameters included age, gender, race, Glasgow Coma Scale, vital signs, pain, tenderness, ecchymosis, Injury Severity Score, length of stay, and inhospital mortality. Logistic regression was used to determine positive associations with OM. Of the 33 patients, 19 underwent OM and 14 did not. Both groups were similar at baseline. Regression analysis revealed association for pain [odds ratio (OR) = 9.6, confidence interval (CI) = 1.8-49.9, P < 0.01], tenderness (OR = 32, CI = 4.6-222.2, P < 0.01), and free fluid (OR = 10.3, CI = 1.8-60, P < 0.01) with need for operative intervention. Nonoperative management patients had 100 per cent success rate. Of the OM patients, 100 per cent underwent therapeutic laparotomies. Findings of mesenteric hematoma on CT scan in examinable patients with no abdominal pain, tenderness, or free fluid predict successful nonoperative management. PMID:27097623

  9. Preventing graft loss caused by hematoma: experimental study.

    PubMed

    Benlier, Erol; Taş, Süleyman; Usta, Ufuk

    2014-01-01

    Hematoma is a common reason for graft loss. This study was intended to investigate the effects of microporous polysaccharide hemospheres (MPH; Arista® AH; Medafor, Inc.) on graft survival, the effect of MPH on graft loss caused by hematoma, and the correlation between neutrophil accumulation and graft survival. A total of 35 adult male Wistar rats were separated into five groups of seven as follows: control 1, saline, MPH, control 2 (hematoma group), and MPH + hematoma. All graft dressing was removed on the fifth postoperative day and graft survival percentage measured. Histopathological and semiquantitative analysis, including inflammatory cell infiltration and subcutaneous inflammation based on neutrophil count, was performed. Graft survival significantly improved in the MPH group (97.86 ± 1.676) compared with the control 1 (91.14 ± 3.671; P = .004) and saline groups (91.57 ± 4.791; P = .014). There was no significant increase in graft survival in the saline group compared with the control 1 group or in the MPH + hematoma group (19.57 ± 14.707) compared with the control 2 group (20.71 ± 16.869; P > .05). The neutrophil count was highest in the control 2 group (177.43 ± 22.464) and significantly decreased in the MPH group (33. 71 ± 8,674) compared with the control 1 group (66.14 ± 5.872; P = .001) and the saline group (65.57 ± 3.309; P= .001). There was no significant decrease in neutrophil count in the MPH + hematoma group (160.00 ± 27.952) compared with the control 2 group (P > .05). It seems that MPH can increase the graft survival, and there is an inverse relationship between graft survival and neutrophil accumulation. PMID:24823329

  10. A combination of intramural stomach and portal venous air: conservative treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Prabin; Akl, Elias George

    2016-01-01

    Emphysematous gastritis is a severe and rare form of gastritis with characteristic findings of intramural gas in the stomach. It is an acute life-threatening condition resulting from gas-producing microorganisms invading the stomach wall. Early diagnosis and initiation of treatment with bowel rest, hydration, and intravenous broad-spectrum antibiotics is imperative for an effective outcome. Surgical intervention is reserved for perforations, peritonitis, strictures, and uncontrolled disseminated sepsis. We present a case of an 82-year-old female with prior history of colon and uterine cancer on remission treated with surgeries who presented with bilious vomiting, abdominal discomfort, and nausea. She was tachycardic and had a diffusely tender abdomen with rebound on examination. Her laboratory results including blood count, serum chemistry, and coagulation studies were normal. She was diagnosed with emphysematous gastritis based on the characteristic radiographic findings of intramural stomach gas and also the presence of gas in the portal venous system. It is important to differentiate emphysematous gastritis from gastric emphysema because of the difference in management and prognosis, as emphysematous gastritis has a worse outcome and requires aggressive management. Despite an anticipated poor prognosis due to the known grave outcomes of emphysematous gastritis, our patient was successfully managed with conservative treatment. We concluded that she developed emphysematous gastritis probably secondary to immunosuppression and possible mucosal tears from multiple bouts of vomiting. She had a stable hospital course and resolution with medical management most likely due to early diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatment. PMID:26908389

  11. Long electrodes for radio frequency ablation: comparative study of surface versus intramural application.

    PubMed

    Berjano, Enrique J; Hornero, Fernando; Atienza, Felipe; Montero, Anastasio

    2003-12-01

    There is increasing use of radio frequency (RF) ablation with long electrodes in the intraoperative treatment of atrial fibrillation. Nevertheless, the disparity in the lesion geometry in both depth and width is the major pitfall in the use of RF currents. The objective of this study was to differentiate the shape and size of long lesions created by three surface application electrodes (SAE) and two intramural electrodes (IE). The SAE included a standard multi-polar catheter, and two standard electrosurgical pencils. The IE consisted of a needle and a wire both intramurally buried. The lesions were created on fresh fragments of porcine ventricular tissue. The IE created lesions with a curved prism-like shape around the electrode body, with homogeneous characteristics along the lesion trajectory. On the contrary, the lesions created with the SAE were in the shape of an hourglass. They showed a different geometry between the central zone and the edge zone (p<0.001 for depth and surface width). Electrical impedance evolution was recorded during the RF heating. We observed a slow decrease of the impedance in all the electrodes, except in the wire electrode. In conclusion, the results suggest that the IE might be a more suitable option than SAE when it is necessary to create long and homogeneous thermal lesions. PMID:14630474

  12. Drugs Approved for Esophageal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for esophageal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  13. Environmental Causes of Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kamangar, Farin; Chow, Wong-Ho; Abnet, Christian; Dawsey, Sanford

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis This articles reviews the environmental risk factors and predisposing conditions for the two main histological types of esophageal cancer, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA). Tobacco smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, drinking maté, low intake of fresh fruits and vegetables, achalasia, and low socioeconomic status increase the risk of ESCC. Results of investigations on several other potential risk factors, including opium consumption, intake of hot drinks, eating pickled vegetables, poor oral health, and exposure to human papillomavirus, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, N-nitroso compounds, acetaldehyde, and fumonisins are also discussed. Gastroesophageal reflux, obesity, tobacco smoking, hiatal hernia, achalasia, and probably absence of H. pylori in the stomach increase the risk of EA. Results of studies investigating other factors, including low intake of fresh fruits and vegetables, consumption of carbonated soft drink, use of H2 blockers, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and drugs that relax the lower esophageal sphincter are also discussed. PMID:19327566

  14. Caustic ingestion and esophageal function

    SciTech Connect

    Cadranel, S.; Di Lorenzo, C.; Rodesch, P.; Piepsz, A.; Ham, H.R. )

    1990-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate esophageal motor function by means of krypton-81m esophageal transit scintigraphy and to compare the results with the functional and morphological data obtained by means of triple lumen manometry and endoscopy. In acute and subacute stages of the disease, all clinical, anatomical, and functional parameters were in good agreement, revealing significant impairment. In chronic stages, the severity of the dysphagia was not correlated to the importance of the residual stenosis. Conversely, 81mKr esophageal transit and manometric's findings were in good agreement with the clinical symptoms, during the entire follow-up period ranging between 3 months to 7 years. The 81mKr test is undoubtedly the easiest and probably the most physiological technique currently available for long-term functional evaluation of caustic esophagitis.

  15. The development of the intramural research program at the National Institutes of Health after World War II.

    PubMed

    Park, Buhm Soon

    2003-01-01

    This paper explores the rise of the National Institutes of Health after World War II from the perspective of intramural scientists working at the NIH's main campus in Bethesda. Several postwar social circumstances-the local research tradition, the wartime experience of civilian scientists, the doctor draft, and anti-nepotism rules in academia-affected the recruitment of research-oriented scientists into the NIH. These historically contingent factors were no less important than the larger political, legislative context for the development of the NIH intramural program as a prominent research institution. PMID:12878809

  16. 21 CFR 882.1935 - Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. 882.1935 Section 882.1935 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. (a) Identification. A Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma...

  17. 21 CFR 882.1935 - Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. 882.1935 Section 882.1935 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. (a) Identification. A Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma...

  18. 21 CFR 882.1935 - Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. 882.1935 Section 882.1935 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. (a) Identification. A Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma...

  19. [Isolated cheiro-facial formication caused by a thalamic hematoma].

    PubMed

    Awada, A

    1989-01-01

    A 25 year-old Saudi female patient presented with numbness of the left half of the face and the tongue and the left hand. Neurological and neuropsychological examinations were normal. Brain CT showed a small hematoma (5 to 7 mm diameter) of the right thalamus probably destroying or compressing the ventropostero-median and ventropostero-lateral thalamic nuclei. Thalamic hematoma has been reported only twice as a cause of pure sensory stroke. The absence of clinical signs together with the presence of symptoms, and the particular topography of the symptoms are discussed. PMID:2616971

  20. Spontaneous Meckel's cave hematoma: A rare cause of trigeminal neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Alafaci, Concetta; Grasso, Giovanni; Granata, Francesca; Marino, Daniele; Salpietro, Francesco M.; Tomasello, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Background: The most common etiology of classic trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is vascular compression. However, other causes must be considered. Among these, spontaneous hematoma of the Meckel's cave (MC) causing symptomatic TN is very rare. Case Description: We present the case of a 60-year-old woman with a 2-month history of left TN and diplopia. Neuroradiological examinations revealed a well-defined hematoma in the left MC. The patient underwent surgical decompression with a progressive neurological improvement. Conclusion: Despite the number of lesions potentially affecting the MC, spontaneous hemorrhage is rare but should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis. PMID:26539319

  1. Enlarged cerebrospinal fluid spaces in infants with subdural hematomas

    SciTech Connect

    Kapila, A.; Trice, J.; Spies, W.G.; Siegel, B.A.; Gado, M.H.

    1982-03-01

    Computed tomography in 16 infants with subdural hematomas showed enlarged basal cisterns, a wide interhemispheric fissure, prominent cortical sulci, and varying degrees of ventricular enlargement. Radionuclide cisternography in eight of the 16 patients showed findings consistent with enlargement of the subarachnoid space rather than those of communicating hydrocephalus. Clinical findings and brief follow-up showed no convincing evidence for cerebral atrophy in 13 patients. These findings suggest that the enlarged subarachnoid space, which is encountered in some infants and may be a developmental variant, predisposes such infants to subdural hematomas.

  2. Spontaneous epidural hematoma due to cervico-thoracic angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    Eap, C; Bannwarth, M; Jazeron, J-F; Kleber, J-C; Theret, É; Duntze, J; Litre, C-F

    2015-12-01

    Epidural angiolipomas are uncommon benign tumors of the spine. Their clinical presentation is usually a progressive spinal cord compression. We report the case of a 22-year-old patient who presented with an acute paraparesis and a spontaneous epidural hematoma, which revealed a epidural angiolipoma which extended from C7 to T3. The patient underwent a C7-T3 laminectomy, in emergency, with evacuation of the hematoma and extradural complete resection of a fibrous epidural tumor bleeding. The postoperative course was favorable with regression of neurological symptoms. Epidural angiolipomas can be revealed by spontaneous intratumoral hemorrhage without traumatism. The standard treatment is total removal by surgery. PMID:26597606

  3. Antenatal MRI diagnosis of massive subchorionic hematoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rohini; Sharma, Raju; Jain, Tarun; Vashisht, Sushma

    2007-01-01

    Massive subchorionic hematoma is a large maternal blood clot, which separates the chorionic plate from the villous chorion [Kojima K, et al: Fetal Diagn Ther 2001;16:57-60]. It is an uncommon condition associated with poor perinatal prognosis and intrauterine growth retardation [Tan WH, et al: Fetal Diagn Ther 1997;76:381-383, Nishijima K, et al: Fetal Diagn Ther 2005;20:23-26]. Ultrasound may not be able to differentiate this condition from other placental abnormalities [Kojima K, et al: Fetal Diagn Ther 2001;16:57-60]. We report a case of massive subchorionic hematoma where the antenatal diagnosis was made on MRI. PMID:17652925

  4. Understanding the sensory irregularities of esophageal disease.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Adam D; Brock, Christina; Frøkjaer, Jens Brøndum; Gregersen, Hans; Khan, Sheeba; Lelic, Dina; Lottrup, Christian; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2016-08-01

    Symptoms relating to esophageal sensory abnormalities can be encountered in the clinical environment. Such sensory abnormalities may be present in demonstrable disease, such as erosive esophagitis, and in the ostensibly normal esophagus, such as non-erosive reflux disease or functional chest pain. In this review, the authors discuss esophageal sensation and the esophageal pain system. In addition, the authors provide a primer concerning the techniques that are available for investigating the autonomic nervous system, neuroimaging and neurophysiology of esophageal sensory function. Such technological advances, whilst not readily available in the clinic may facilitate the stratification and individualization of therapy in disorders of esophageal sensation in the future. PMID:26890720

  5. Uses of esophageal function testing: dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Yazaki, Etsuro; Woodland, Philip; Sifrim, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Esophageal function testing should be used for differential diagnosis of dysphagia. Dysphagia can be the consequence of hypermotility or hypomotility of the muscles of the esophagus. Decreased esophageal or esophagogastric junction distensibility can provoke dysphagia. The most well established esophageal dysmotility is achalasia. Other motility disorders can also cause dysphagia. High-resolution manometry (HRM) is the gold standard investigation for esophageal motility disorders. Simultaneous measurement of HRM and intraluminal impedance can be useful to assess motility and bolus transit. Impedance planimetry measures distensibility of the esophageal body and gastroesophageal junction in patients with achalasia and eosinophilic esophagitis. PMID:25216909

  6. Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Cianferoni, Antonella; Spergel, Jonathan M

    2015-09-01

    Eosinophilic gastrointestinal disease (EGID) can be classified as eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) when the eosinophilia is limited to the esophagus or as eosinophilic gastritis (EG) if it is limited to the gastric tract, eosinophilic colitis (EC) if it is limited to the colon, and eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) if the eosinophilia involves one or more parts of the gastrointestinal tract. EoE is by far the most common EGID. It is a well-defined chronic atopic disease due to a T helper type 2 (Th2) inflammation triggered often by food allergens. EoE diagnosis is done if an esophageal biopsy shows at least 15 eosinophils per high power field (eos/hpf). Globally accepted long-term therapies for EoE are the use of swallowed inhaled steroids or food antigen avoidance. The treatment of EoE is done not only to control symptoms but also to prevent complications such as esophageal stricture and food impaction. EGE cause non-specific gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and are diagnosed if esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD)/colonoscopy show eosinophilia in one or more parts of the GI tract. They are rare diseases with an unclear pathogenesis, and they are poorly defined in terms of diagnostic criteria and treatment. Before initiating treatment of any EGE, it is imperative to conduct a differential diagnosis to exclude other causes of hypereosinophilia with GI localization. EGE are often poorly responsive to therapy and there is no commonly accepted long-term treatment. EG has many characteristics similar to EoE, including the fact that it is often due to a food allergen-driven Th2 inflammation; transcriptome analysis however shows that it is more a systemic disease and has a different gene signature than EoE. EC is a benign form of delayed food allergy in infant and is instead a difficult-to-treat severe inflammatory condition in older children and adults. EC in the latter groups can be a manifestation of drug allergy or autoimmune disease. Overall EGE, EC, and EG are rare and

  7. Esophageal malignancy: A growing concern

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Jianyuan; Jamal, M Mazen

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is mainly found in Asia and east Africa and is one of the deadliest cancers in the world. However, it has not garnered much attention in the Western world due to its low incidence rate. An increasing amount of data indicate that esophageal cancer, particularly esophageal adenocarcinoma, has been rising by 6-fold annually and is now becoming the fastest growing cancer in the United States. This rise has been associated with the increase of the obese population, as abdominal fat puts extra pressure on the stomach and causes gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Long standing GERD can induce esophagitis and metaplasia and, ultimately, leads to adenocarcinoma. Acid suppression has been the main strategy to treat GERD; however, it has not been proven to control esophageal malignancy effectively. In fact, its side effects have triggered multiple warnings from regulatory agencies. The high mortality and fast growth of esophageal cancer demand more vigorous efforts to look into its deeper mechanisms and come up with better therapeutic options. PMID:23236223

  8. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  9. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  10. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  11. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  12. Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Adolescent Patients Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients Basics Overview Eosinophilic esophagitis also known as ( ... children may have vomiting and abdominal pain, and adolescents may complain of the feeling of food getting ...

  13. [Treatment of subungual hematoma in office and outdoor conditions].

    PubMed

    Horn, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Treptising with an glowing spike or paperclip can be performed everywhere without local anesthesia and even by non-professionals. Evacuation of hematoma with a Insulin-Syringe/Needle in small nails (children, toe 2 - 5) is an interesting alternative. PMID:25533259

  14. [Subdural hematoma after dural puncture: fateful complication of epidural anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Schott, M; Gehrke, A; Gaab, M; Jantzen, J-P

    2013-05-01

    Subdural hematoma may occur as rare, although intervention- specific complications of accidental dural puncture by neuroaxial block. Bleeding may be caused by rapid cerebrospinal fluid loss related to traction on fragile intracranial bridging veins. This article reports a case of postdural puncture headache in a 43-year-old woman after accidental dural puncture during attempted placement of an epidural catheter for induction of abortion. Bed rest, analgesics, theophylline and hydration were to no avail and only a blood patch improved the headaches. The patient presented 7 weeks later with headache and left-sided hemiplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a right frontoparietal subdural intracranial hematoma which had to be surgically evacuated. The patient recovered completely. Intracranial hematoma is a rare but serious complication of central neuroaxial block. According to current German jurisdiction this risk must be addressed when informed consent is obtained. Intracranial hematoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of atypical headache and neurological signs (e.g. focal motor and sensory deficits and seizures) following neuroaxial block and adequate image diagnostics should be carried out without delay. PMID:23558719

  15. Esophageal perforation during or after conformal radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hai-yan; Ma, Xiu-mei; Ye, Ming; Hou, Yan-li; Xie, Hua-Ying; Bai, Yong-rui

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the risk factors and prognosis for patients with esophageal perforation occurring during or after radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma. We retrospectively analyzed 322 patients with esophageal carcinoma. These patients received radiotherapy for unresectable esophageal tumors, residual tumors after operation, or local recurrence. Of these, 12 had radiotherapy to the esophagus before being admitted, 68 patients had concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT), and 18 patients had esophageal perforation after RT (5.8%). Covered self-expandable metallic stents were placed in 11 patients. Two patients continued RT after stenting and control of infection; one of these suffered a new perforation, and the other had a massive hemorrhage. The median overall survival was 2 months (0–3 months) compared with 17 months in the non-perforation group. In univariate analysis, the Karnofsky performance status (KPS) being ≤70, age younger than 60, T4 stage, a second course of radiotherapy to the esophagus, extracapsular lymph nodes (LN) involving the esophagus, a total dose >100 Gy (biologically effective dose−10), and CRT were risk factors for perforation. In multivariate analysis, age younger than 60, extracapsular LN involving the esophagus, T4 stage, and a second course of radiotherapy to the esophagus were risk factors. In conclusion, patients with T4 stage, extracapsular LN involving the esophagus, and those receiving a second course of RT should be given particular care to avoid perforation. The prognosis after perforation was poor. PMID:24914102

  16. Prevention and Treatment of Esophageal Stenosis after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Early Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jing; Lu, Zhongsheng; Liu, Qingsen

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for the treatment of esophageal mucosal lesions is associated with a risk of esophageal stenosis, especially for near-circumferential or circumferential esophageal mucosal defects. Here, we review historic and modern studies on the prevention and treatment of esophageal stenosis after ESD. These methods include prevention via pharmacological treatment, endoscopic autologous cell transplantation, endoscopic esophageal dilatation, and stent placement. This short review will focus on direct prevention and treatment, which may help guide the way forward. PMID:25386186

  17. The Resource Allocation Program at the University of California, San Francisco: Getting More from Intramural Funding Bucks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volpe, Emanuela; Kiser, Gretchen; Henry, Roland; Giacomini, Kathy; Volberding, Paul; Waldman, Frederic; Lowenstein, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Intramural funding programs within both large and small research institutions are an essential mechanism to foster collaborative, novel, or preliminary research activity, and to further institutional research strategic goals. At most research institutions in the United States, these funding opportunities are managed by each funding agency or…

  18. An intramural left main coronary artery with a left sinus of valsalva aneurysm: a unique combination of congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Altarabsheh, Salah Eldien; Deo, Salil V; Spitell, Peter; Araoz, Philip; Park, Soon J

    2013-02-01

    The congenital anomaly of an intramural left main coronary artery arising in the anatomically correct aortic sinus is very infrequent. Aneurysms involving the sinus of Valsalva rarely arise from the left aortic sinus. We present the clinical features and surgical correction of this rare anomaly along with a short discussion of these congenital malformations. PMID:23439356

  19. Optoacoustic detection of intra- and extracranial hematomas in rats after blast injury

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Andrey; Wynne, Karon E.; Parsley, Margaret A.; Petrov, Irene Y.; Petrov, Yuriy; Ruppert, Katherine A.; Prough, Donald S.; DeWitt, Douglas S.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2014-01-01

    Surgical drainage of intracranial hematomas is often required within the first four hours after traumatic brain injury (TBI) to avoid death or severe disability. Although CT and MRI permit hematoma diagnosis, they can be used only at a major health-care facility. This delays hematoma diagnosis and therapy. We proposed to use an optoacoustic technique for rapid, noninvasive diagnosis of hematomas. In this study we developed a near-infrared OPO-based optoacoustic system for hematoma diagnosis and cerebral venous blood oxygenation monitoring in rats. A specially-designed blast device was used to inflict TBI in anesthetized rats. Optoacoustic signals were recorded from the superior sagittal sinus and hematomas that allowed for measurements of their oxygenations. These results indicate that the optoacoustic technique may be used for early diagnosis of hematomas and may provide important information for improving outcomes in patients with TBI. PMID:25302157

  20. Optoacoustic detection of intra- and extracranial hematomas in rats after blast injury.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Andrey; Wynne, Karon E; Parsley, Margaret A; Petrov, Irene Y; Petrov, Yuriy; Ruppert, Katherine A; Prough, Donald S; DeWitt, Douglas S; Esenaliev, Rinat O

    2014-06-01

    Surgical drainage of intracranial hematomas is often required within the first four hours after traumatic brain injury (TBI) to avoid death or severe disability. Although CT and MRI permit hematoma diagnosis, they can be used only at a major health-care facility. This delays hematoma diagnosis and therapy. We proposed to use an optoacoustic technique for rapid, noninvasive diagnosis of hematomas. In this study we developed a near-infrared OPO-based optoacoustic system for hematoma diagnosis and cerebral venous blood oxygenation monitoring in rats. A specially-designed blast device was used to inflict TBI in anesthetized rats. Optoacoustic signals were recorded from the superior sagittal sinus and hematomas that allowed for measurements of their oxygenations. These results indicate that the optoacoustic technique may be used for early diagnosis of hematomas and may provide important information for improving outcomes in patients with TBI. PMID:25302157

  1. Acute subdural hematoma: morbidity, mortality, and operative timing.

    PubMed

    Wilberger, J E; Harris, M; Diamond, D L

    1991-02-01

    Traumatic acute subdural hematoma remains one of the most lethal of all head injuries. Since 1981, it has been strongly held that the critical factor in overall outcome from acute subdural hematoma is timing of operative intervention for clot removal; those operated on within 4 hours of injury may have mortality rates as low as 30% with functional survival rates as high as 65%. Data were reviewed for 1150 severely head-injured patients (Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores 3 to 7) treated at a Level 1 trauma center between 1982 and 1987; 101 of these patients had acute subdural hematoma. Standard treatment protocol included aggressive prehospital resuscitation measures, rapid operative intervention, and aggressive postoperative control of intracranial pressure (ICP). The overall mortality rate was 66%, and 19% had functional recovery. The following variables statistically correlated (p less than 0.05) with outcome; motorcycle accident as a mechanism of injury, age over 65 years, admission GCS score of 3 or 4, and postoperative ICP greater than 45 mm Hg. The time from injury to operative evacuation of the acute subdural hematoma in regard to outcome morbidity and mortality was not statistically significant even when examined at hourly intervals although there were trends indicating that earlier surgery improved outcome. The findings of this study support the pathophysiological evidence that, in acute subdural hematoma, the extent of primary underlying brain injury is more important than the subdural clot itself in dictating outcome; therefore, the ability to control ICP is more critical to outcome than the absolute timing of subdural blood removal. PMID:1988590

  2. Gallium-67 imaging in candidal esophagitis

    SciTech Connect

    Rundback, J.H.; Goldfarb, C.R.; Ongseng, F. )

    1990-01-01

    Ga-67 scanning has been used to evaluate esophageal carcinoma. It has demonstrated candidal infection in other body sites and, in one previous case, in the esophagus. The authors present a case of diffuse esophageal uptake of Ga-67 in esophageal candidiasis.

  3. Outcomes of esophageal surgery, especially of the lower esophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Bonavina, Luigi; Siboni, Stefano; Saino, Greta I; Cavadas, Demetrio; Braghetto, Italo; Csendes, Attila; Korn, Owen; Figueredo, Edgar J; Swanstrom, Lee L; Wassenaar, Eelco

    2013-10-01

    This paper includes commentaries on outcomes of esophageal surgery, including the mechanisms by which fundoduplication improves lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure; the efficacy of the Linx™ management system in improving LES function; the utility of radiologic characterization of antireflux valves following surgery; the correlation between endoscopic findings and reported symptoms following antireflux surgery; the links between laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and decreased LES pressure, endoscopic esophagitis, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD); the less favorable outcomes following fundoduplication among obese patients; the application of bioprosthetic meshes to reinforce hiatal repair and decrease the incidence of paraesophageal hernia; the efficacy of endoluminal antireflux procedures, and the limited efficacy of revisional antireflux operations, underscoring the importance of good primary surgery and diligent work-up to prevent the necessity of revisional procedures. PMID:24117632

  4. Esophageal fistula associated with intracavitary irradiation for esophageal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hishikawa, Y.; Tanaka, S.; Miura, T.

    1986-05-01

    Fifty-three patients with esophageal carcinoma were treated with high-dose-rate intracavitary irradiation following external irradiation. Ten patients developed esophageal fistula. Perforations were found in the bronchus (four), major vessels (four), pericardium (one), and mediastinum (one). The frequency of fistula occurrence in these patients was not remarkably different from that in 30 other patients treated only with greater than or equal to 50 Gy external irradiation. From the time of the development of esophageal fistula, intracavitary irradiation did not seem to accelerate the development of fistula. The fistulas in our ten patients proved to be associated with tumor, deep ulcer (created before intracavitary irradiation), chemotherapy, infection, and trauma rather than the direct effect of intracavitary irradiation.

  5. The pathophysiology of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Raheem, Mayumi; Leach, Steven T; Day, Andrew S; Lemberg, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an emerging disease characterized by esophageal eosinophilia (>15eos/hpf), lack of responsiveness to acid-suppressive medication and is managed by allergen elimination and anti-allergy therapy. Although the pathophysiology of EoE is currently unsubstantiated, evidence implicates food and aeroallergen hypersensitivity in genetically predisposed individuals as contributory factors. Genome-wide expression analyses have isolated a remarkably conserved gene-expression profile irrespective of age and gender, suggesting a genetic contribution. EoE has characteristics of mainly TH2 type immune responses but also some TH1 cytokines, which appear to strongly contribute to tissue fibrosis, with esophageal epithelial cells providing a hospitable environment for this inflammatory process. Eosinophil-degranulation products appear to play a central role in tissue remodeling in EoE. This remodeling and dysregulation predisposes to fibrosis. Mast-cell-derived molecules such as histamine may have an effect on enteric nerves and may also act in concert with transforming growth factor-β to interfere with esophageal musculature. Additionally, the esophageal epithelium may facilitate the inflammatory process under pathogenic contexts such as in EoE. This article aims to discuss the contributory factors in the pathophysiology of EoE. PMID:24910846

  6. The Pathophysiology of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Raheem, Mayumi; Leach, Steven T.; Day, Andrew S.; Lemberg, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an emerging disease characterized by esophageal eosinophilia (>15eos/hpf), lack of responsiveness to acid-suppressive medication and is managed by allergen elimination and anti-allergy therapy. Although the pathophysiology of EoE is currently unsubstantiated, evidence implicates food and aeroallergen hypersensitivity in genetically predisposed individuals as contributory factors. Genome-wide expression analyses have isolated a remarkably conserved gene-expression profile irrespective of age and gender, suggesting a genetic contribution. EoE has characteristics of mainly TH2 type immune responses but also some TH1 cytokines, which appear to strongly contribute to tissue fibrosis, with esophageal epithelial cells providing a hospitable environment for this inflammatory process. Eosinophil-degranulation products appear to play a central role in tissue remodeling in EoE. This remodeling and dysregulation predisposes to fibrosis. Mast-cell-derived molecules such as histamine may have an effect on enteric nerves and may also act in concert with transforming growth factor-β to interfere with esophageal musculature. Additionally, the esophageal epithelium may facilitate the inflammatory process under pathogenic contexts such as in EoE. This article aims to discuss the contributory factors in the pathophysiology of EoE. PMID:24910846

  7. Anatomy of the intramural venous sinuses of the right atrium and their tributaries.

    PubMed

    Ortale, J R; Marquez, C Q

    1998-01-01

    A precise knowledge of the mode of opening of the vv. on the anterior wall of the right ventricle, i.e., directly or by means of intramural venous sinuses in the right atrium, is of fundamental importance for cardiologic methods of examination and treatment. We dissected 32 hearts obtained from cadavers belonging to adult individuals of unknown age and sex, fixed and stored in formalin. A total of 151 veins were detected for the 32 cases. The following distribution was observed: 33 right marginal vv. (m) in 29/32, 59 anterior vv. of the right ventricle (a) in 29/32, 29 vv. of the arterial cone (c) in 26/32, 17 posterior vv. of the cone (p) in 17/32, and 13 Zuckerkandl vv. (z) in 13/32. Of these veins, a) 4 m emptied into the right atrium, with one of them forming a bifurcation and emptying twice; b) 4 m continued into a small cardiac v.; c) 6 collector vv. present in 4/32 cases emptied into the right atrium and received 2 m, 5 a, 2 c, 3 p and 2 z; d) 35 intramural venous sinuses were present in 30/32 or 94% of cases emptied into the right atrium and received 15 m, 26 a, 5 c, 4 p, 3 z and 32 collector vv., into which 8 m, 28 a, 22 c, 10 p and 8 z drained. In conclusion, these venous sinuses are normal and are very important for venous drainage. PMID:9574485

  8. Intramural haematoma of the thoracic aorta: who's to be alerted the cardiologist or the cardiac surgeon?

    PubMed Central

    Baikoussis, Nikolaos G; Apostolakis, Efstratios E; Siminelakis, Stavros N; Papadopoulos, Georgios S; Goudevenos, John

    2009-01-01

    This review article is written so as to present the pathophysiology, the symptomatology and the ways of diagnosis and treatment of a rather rare aortic disease called Intra-Mural Haematoma (IMH). Intramural haematoma is a quite uncommon but potentially lethal aortic disease that can strike as a primary occurrence in hypertensive and atherosclerotic patients to whom there is spontaneous bleeding from vasa vasorum into the aortic wall (media) or less frequently, as the evolution of a penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer (PAU). IMH displays a typical of dissection progress, and could be considered as a precursor of classic aortic dissection. IMH enfeebles the aortic wall and may progress to either outward rupture of the aorta or inward disruption of the intima layer, which ultimately results in aortic dissection. Chest and back acute penetrating pain is the most commonly noticed symptom at patients with IMH. Apart from a transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), a tomographic imaging such as a chest computed tomography (CT), a magnetic resonance (MRI) and most lately a multy detector computed tomography (MDCT) can ensure a quick and accurate diagnosis of IMH. Similar to type A and B aortic dissection, surgery is indicated at patients with type-A IMH, as well as at patients with a persistent and/or recurrent pain. For any other patient (with type-B IMH without an incessant pain and/or without complications), medical treatment is suggested, as applied in the case of aortic dissection. The outcome of IMH in ascending aorta (type A) appears favourable after immediate (emergent or urgent) surgical intervention, but according to international bibliography patients with IMH of the descending aorta (type B) show similar mortality rates to those being subjected to conservative medical or surgical treatment. Endovascular surgery and stent-graft placement is currently indicated in type B IMH. PMID:19793400

  9. Surgical treatments for esophageal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Allum, William H.; Bonavina, Luigi; Cassivi, Stephen D.; Cuesta, Miguel A.; Dong, Zhao Ming; Felix, Valter Nilton; Figueredo, Edgar; Gatenby, Piers A.C.; Haverkamp, Leonie; Ibraev, Maksat A.; Krasna, Mark J.; Lambert, René; Langer, Rupert; Lewis, Michael P.N.; Nason, Katie S.; Parry, Kevin; Preston, Shaun R.; Ruurda, Jelle P.; Schaheen, Lara W.; Tatum, Roger P.; Turkin, Igor N.; van der Horst, Sylvia; van der Peet, Donald L.; van der Sluis, Peter C.; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Wormald, Justin C.R.; Wu, Peter C.; Zonderhuis, Barbara M.

    2015-01-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on the role of the nurse in preparation of esophageal resection (ER); the management of patients who develop high-grade dysplasia after having undergone Nissen fundoplication; the trajectory of care for the patient with esophageal cancer; the influence of the site of tumor in the choice of treatment; the best location for esophagogastrostomy; management of chylous leak after esophagectomy; the optimal approach to manage thoracic esophageal leak after esophagectomy; the choice for operational approach in surgery of cardioesophageal crossing; the advantages of robot esophagectomy; the place of open esophagectomy; the advantages of esophagectomy compared to definitive chemoradiotherapy; the pathologist report in the resected specimen; the best way to manage patients with unsuspected positive microscopic margin after ER; enhanced recovery after surgery for ER: expedited care protocols; and long-term quality of life in patients following esophagectomy. PMID:25266029

  10. Neoadjuvant treatment of esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Nicholas P; Villaflor, Victoria M

    2010-01-01

    The management of esophageal cancer has been evolving over the past 30 years. In the United States, multimodality treatment combining chemotherapy and radiotherapy (RT) prior to surgical resection has come to be accepted by many as the standard of care, although debate about its overall effect on survival still exists, and rightfully so. Despite recent improvements in detection and treatment, the overall survival of patients with esophageal cancer remains lower than most solid tumors, which highlights why further advances are so desperately needed. The aim of this article is to provide a complete review of the history of esophageal cancer treatment with the addition of chemotherapy, RT, and more recently, targeted agents to the surgical management of resectable disease. PMID:20698042

  11. Prevalence of Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Lymphocytic Esophagitis in Adults with Esophageal Food Bolus Impaction

    PubMed Central

    Truskaite, Kotryna

    2016-01-01

    Background. The relation of esophageal food bolus impaction (FBI) to eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and lymphocytic esophagitis (LyE) is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of EoE and LyE among adults with FBI. Methods. In this retrospective study we analyzed data from all patients referred for gastroscopy during the past 5 years, because of a present or recent episode of FBI. Results. We found 238 patients with FBI (median age 51 (17–96), 71% males). Endoscopic therapy was required in 143 patients. Esophageal biopsies were obtained in 185 (78%) patients. All biopsies were assessed for numbers of eosinophils and lymphocytes. EoE was found in 18% of patients who underwent biopsy. We found 41 patients (22%) who fulfilled the criteria for both EoE and LyE (EoE/LyE). LyE was found in the 9% of patients with FBI. EoE together with EoE/LyE was the leading cause of FBI in patients ≤50 years (64%). GERD was the leading cause of FBI among patients older than 50 years (42%). Conclusions. Our study showed that EoE was the leading cause of FBI in particular among young adults. Our study highlights the need for esophageal biopsies in any patient with FBI. PMID:27547221

  12. Prevalence of Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Lymphocytic Esophagitis in Adults with Esophageal Food Bolus Impaction.

    PubMed

    Truskaite, Kotryna; Dlugosz, Aldona

    2016-01-01

    Background. The relation of esophageal food bolus impaction (FBI) to eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and lymphocytic esophagitis (LyE) is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of EoE and LyE among adults with FBI. Methods. In this retrospective study we analyzed data from all patients referred for gastroscopy during the past 5 years, because of a present or recent episode of FBI. Results. We found 238 patients with FBI (median age 51 (17-96), 71% males). Endoscopic therapy was required in 143 patients. Esophageal biopsies were obtained in 185 (78%) patients. All biopsies were assessed for numbers of eosinophils and lymphocytes. EoE was found in 18% of patients who underwent biopsy. We found 41 patients (22%) who fulfilled the criteria for both EoE and LyE (EoE/LyE). LyE was found in the 9% of patients with FBI. EoE together with EoE/LyE was the leading cause of FBI in patients ≤50 years (64%). GERD was the leading cause of FBI among patients older than 50 years (42%). Conclusions. Our study showed that EoE was the leading cause of FBI in particular among young adults. Our study highlights the need for esophageal biopsies in any patient with FBI. PMID:27547221

  13. Eosinophilic esophagitis: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Jay A; Chehade, Mirna

    2012-02-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is a clinicopathologic disease that can present with a constellation of upper gastrointestinal symptoms and endoscopic findings in conjunction with significant infiltration of the esophageal tissue with eosinophils. Clinical and histologic resolution of the disease can be seen with dietary restriction therapies and systemic and topical corticosteroids. Because most patients have an atopic background and the disease seems to have an underlying T-helper type 2 pathogenesis, allergists and gastroenterologists need to be familiar with the diagnosis and management of this disease. In this review, clinical characteristics, endoscopic and histologic findings, and available therapy options are discussed. PMID:22244233

  14. Reslizumab for pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Garry M

    2010-07-01

    Pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis is an inflammatory condition associated with marked eosinophil accumulation in the mucosal tissues of the esophagus. Eosinophils are major proinflammatory cells thought to make a major contribution to allergic diseases that affect the upper and lower airways, skin and GI tract. IL-5 is central to eosinophil maturation and release from the bone marrow, and their subsequent accumulation, activation and persistence in the tissues. Reslizumab (Cinquil, Ception Therapeutics Inc., PA, USA) is a humanized monoclonal antibody with potent IL-5 neutralizing effects that represents a potential treatment for eosinophilic diseases. This article considers the current status of the clinical development of reslizumab for pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis. PMID:20636000

  15. Characterization of intraventricular and intracerebral hematomas in non-contrast CT.

    PubMed

    Nowinski, Wieslaw L; Gomolka, Ryszard S; Qian, Guoyu; Gupta, Varsha; Ullman, Natalie L; Hanley, Daniel F

    2014-06-01

    Characterization of hematomas is essential in scan reading, manual delineation, and designing automatic segmentation algorithms. Our purpose is to characterize the distribution of intraventricular (IVH) and intracerebral hematomas (ICH) in NCCT scans, study their relationship to gray matter (GM), and to introduce a new tool for quantitative hematoma delineation. We used 289 serial retrospective scans of 51 patients. Hematomas were manually delineated in a two-stage process. Hematoma contours generated in the first stage were quantified and enhanced in the second stage. Delineation was based on new quantitative rules and hematoma profiling, and assisted by a dedicated tool superimposing quantitative information on scans with 3D hematoma display. The tool provides: density maps (40-85HU), contrast maps (8/15HU), mean horizontal/vertical contrasts for hematoma contours, and hematoma contours below a specified mean contrast (8HU). White matter (WM) and GM were segmented automatically. IVH/ICH on serial NCCT is characterized by 59.0HU mean, 60.0HU median, 11.6HU standard deviation, 23.9HU mean contrast, -0.99HU/day slope, and -0.24 skewness (changing over time from negative to positive). Its 0.1(st)-99.9(th) percentile range corresponds to 25-88HU range. WM and GM are highly correlated (R (2)=0.88; p<10(-10)) whereas the GM-GS correlation is weak (R (2)=0.14; p<10(-10)). The intersection point of mean GM-hematoma density distributions is at 55.6±5.8HU with the corresponding GM/hematoma percentiles of 88(th)/40(th). Objective characterization of IVH/ICH and stating the rules quantitatively will aid raters to delineate hematomas more robustly and facilitate designing algorithms for automatic hematoma segmentation. Our two-stage process is general and potentially applicable to delineate other pathologies on various modalities more robustly and quantitatively. PMID:24976197

  16. Language recovery after acute intracerebral hematoma in temporoparietal region.

    PubMed

    Kolundžić, Zdravko; Klarić, Andrea Šimić; Krip, Marija; Gotovac, Nikola; Banožić, Ljerka; Vodanović, Dinah

    2015-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations are the most common cause of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhages in older children. Intracerebral hematoma can cause serious lasting neurologic, cognitive, and language deficits, or even possible death. We present the case of a 16-year-old boy who had language impairments after suffering a large hemorrhagic stroke in the left temporoparietal region. All language components, verbal and nonverbal communication, reading, and writing, were found to be affected. These impairments were expected as they are characteristic of the location of the hematoma. After a year of speech language rehabilitation, there was an almost complete recovery of language skills. Quick diagnosis and adequate therapeutic interventions are important to diminish the influence of intracerebral hemorrhage on cognitive and language functions in children. PMID:24532808

  17. Complete nonsurgical resolution of a spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Silber, S H

    1996-07-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematomas (SSEH) are heralded by spinal pain and progressive cord compression syndromes which may lead to permanent neurological disability or death if emergent neurosurgical intervention is delayed. It therefore must be considered early in the differential diagnosis of acute spinal cord compression syndrome. A case of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma presenting as an acute myelopathy in a clarinet player who chronically used a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication is presented. The case was remarkable for the rare complete spontaneous resolution of neurological function. Approximately 250 cases of SSEH have been reported in the medical literature, although only a handful of these patients have recovered spontaneously. This is the sixth report of such an event. The etiologies, contributing factors, disease progression, and treatment recommendations are discussed. PMID:8768163

  18. Chronic Subdural Hematomas Associated with Arachnoid Cysts: Significance in Young Patients with Chronic Subdural Hematomas

    PubMed Central

    TAKIZAWA, Ken; SORIMACHI, Takatoshi; HONDA, Yumie; ISHIZAKA, Hideo; BABA, Tanefumi; OSADA, Takahiro; NISHIYAMA, Jun; INOUE, Go; MATSUMAE, Mitsunori

    2015-01-01

    Although arachnoid cysts (ACs) are associated with chronic subdural hematomas (CSDHs), especially in young patients, the detailed features of CSDHs associated with ACs remain poorly understood. The objective of this study was to clarify the relationship between the location of CSDHs and ACs and the significance of ACs in young patients with CSDHs. We retrospectively assessed 605 consecutive patients 7 years of age and older who were diagnosed with a CSDH between 2002 and 2014. Twelve patients (2%) had ACs, and 10 of the 12 patients were 7–40 years of age. Patients with ACs as a complication of CSDHs were significantly younger than those without ACs (p < 0.05). Three different relationships between the location of CSDHs and ACs were found: a CSDH contacting an AC, an ipsilateral CSDH apart from an AC, and a CSDH contralateral to an AC. In 21 patients with CSDHs who were 7–40 years of age, 10 (47.6%) had ACs (AC group) and 7 (33.3%) had no associated illnesses (non-AC group). All 10 young patients with ACs showed ipsilateral CSDHs including a CSDH apart from an AC. All 17 patients in both the AC and non-AC groups showed headache but no paresis at admission. The pathogenesis of CSDHs associated with ACs may be different among the three types of locations. The clinical characteristics of patients with a combination of a CSDH and an AC including headache as a major symptom may be attributed to young age in the majority of patients with ACs. PMID:26345665

  19. Subdural Hematoma as a Consequence of Epidural Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Tracy M.; Elsayed, Kareem S.; Kane, Kathleen E.

    2015-01-01

    Regional spinal and epidural anesthesia are used commonly in operative procedures. While the most frequent complication, postdural puncture headache (PDPH), is a clinically diagnosed positional headache that is usually self-limited, subdural hemorrhage (SDH) is a potentially fatal complication that cannot be missed. We report a case of an otherwise healthy female who presented with persistent positional headache and was ultimately found to have a large subdural hematoma with midline shift requiring surgical evacuation. PMID:26697237

  20. Congenital afibrinogenemia: a case report of a spontaneous hepatic hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Malaquin, Stephanie; Rebibo, Lionel; Chivot, Cyril; Badoux, Louise; Mahjoub, Yazine; Dupont, Herve

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Afibrinogenemia is a rare coagulation disorder. Clinical features of spontaneous bleeding, bleeding after minor trauma, or after surgery have been described as well as thrombo-embolic complications. In this article, we presented the case of a 19-year old female with congenital afibrinogenemia who was admitted with a spontaneous intrahepatic hematoma. Conclusions: Supportive treatment including transfusion and fibrinogen administration, associated with repeated packing surgeries and selective embolization, were successfully performed. PMID:27428204

  1. Efficacy of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Early Stage of Esophageal Carcinoma;

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-09

    Esophageal Neoplasm; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Primary Tumor (T) T2; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Primary Tumor (T) T3; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Regional Lymph Nodes (N) N0; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Distal Metastasis (M) M0

  2. [Influence of anticoagulants on the appearance of chronic subdural hematoma].

    PubMed

    Krupa, Mariusz; Moskała, Marek; Składzień, Tomasz; Grzywna, Ewelina

    2009-01-01

    In recent years in the Department of Neurotraumatology in Cracow it has been noticed the frequent connection between appearance of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) and treatment by anticoagulant medications. The aim of this study is to draw attention to the problem of insufficient control of anticoagulants consumption, especially by patients treated for cardiovascular system diseases that increases the risk of bleeding and CSDH development. The paper is based on data from questionnaires that was sent to patients with CSDH, cured in the Department of Neurotraumatology form 2004 to 2005. Analyzed was the group of 51 patients with chronic subdural hematoma; 37 individuals (72.5%) confirmed taking acetylsalicylic acid in the period of 3 months before admission to the Department, 9 (17.6%) patients answered that they were taking low-molecular weight heparin. One patient (1.9%) was taking chronically derivative of cumarin. The authors would inform that anticoagulant treatment might favour increase of chronic subdural hematoma incidence. It's especially important, because the average life expectancy has been prolonged in Poland and there are more people taking acetylsalicylic acid. This can be an epidemiological problem in future. PMID:20043584

  3. Chronic expanding hematoma with bronchopleural fistula and empyema space.

    PubMed

    Tsubochi, Hiroyoshi; Sato, Nobuyuki; Imai, Tadashi

    2009-06-01

    Chronic expanding hematoma of the thorax is not typically accompanied by a bronchopleural fistula or purulent lesion. We report an extremely rare case of chronic expanding hematoma with a bronchopleural fistula and empyema space in a 66-year-old man with a history of tuberculous pleurisy admitted because of fever and bloody sputa. Computed tomography and a magnetic resonance imaging revealed a huge mass and an air space in the right thorax. A fiber-optic bronchoscope examination showed hemorrhagic effusion from the apical bronchus of the right lower lobe. First, open-window thoracostomy was undertaken to control the septic state and to prevent aspiration of infected pleural fluid. At operation, air leakage was found at the most superior portion in the rear of the thoracic empyema space; this was thought to be from the bronchopleural fistula. Enterococcus casseliflavus was detected in cultures for bacteria of the effusion from the empyema space. After an improvement of his general condition, a radical operation, including the complete extirpation of the hematoma and intrathoracic muscle transposition using the latissimus dorsi muscle, was successfully performed. PMID:19597392

  4. Infrequent Hemorrhagic Complications Following Surgical Drainage of Chronic Subdural Hematomas

    PubMed Central

    Sangiorgi, Simone; Bifone, Lidia; Balbi, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematomas mainly occur amongst elderly people and usually develop after minor head injuries. In younger patients, subdural collections may be related to hypertension, coagulopathies, vascular abnormalities, and substance abuse. Different techniques can be used for the surgical treatment of symptomatic chronic subdural hematomas : single or double burr-hole evacuation, with or without subdural drainage, twist-drill craniostomies and classical craniotomies. Failure of the brain to re-expand, pneumocephalus, incomplete evacuation, and recurrence of the fluid collection are common complications following these procedures. Acute subdural hematomas may also occur. Rarely reported hemorrhagic complications include subarachnoid, intracerebral, intraventricular, and remote cerebellar hemorrhages. The causes of such uncommon complications are difficult to explain and remain poorly understood. Overdrainage and intracranial hypotension, rapid brain decompression and shift of the intracranial contents, cerebrospinal fluid loss, vascular dysregulation and impairment of venous outflow are the main mechanisms discussed in the literature. In this article we report three cases of different post-operative intracranial bleeding and review the related literature. PMID:26113968

  5. Infrequent Hemorrhagic Complications Following Surgical Drainage of Chronic Subdural Hematomas.

    PubMed

    Rusconi, Angelo; Sangiorgi, Simone; Bifone, Lidia; Balbi, Sergio

    2015-05-01

    Chronic subdural hematomas mainly occur amongst elderly people and usually develop after minor head injuries. In younger patients, subdural collections may be related to hypertension, coagulopathies, vascular abnormalities, and substance abuse. Different techniques can be used for the surgical treatment of symptomatic chronic subdural hematomas : single or double burr-hole evacuation, with or without subdural drainage, twist-drill craniostomies and classical craniotomies. Failure of the brain to re-expand, pneumocephalus, incomplete evacuation, and recurrence of the fluid collection are common complications following these procedures. Acute subdural hematomas may also occur. Rarely reported hemorrhagic complications include subarachnoid, intracerebral, intraventricular, and remote cerebellar hemorrhages. The causes of such uncommon complications are difficult to explain and remain poorly understood. Overdrainage and intracranial hypotension, rapid brain decompression and shift of the intracranial contents, cerebrospinal fluid loss, vascular dysregulation and impairment of venous outflow are the main mechanisms discussed in the literature. In this article we report three cases of different post-operative intracranial bleeding and review the related literature. PMID:26113968

  6. Chronic Subdural Hematoma in the Aged, Trauma or Degeneration?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematomas (CSHs) are generally regarded to be a traumatic lesion. It was regarded as a stroke in 17th century, an inflammatory disease in 19th century. From 20th century, it became a traumatic lesion. CSH frequently occur after a trauma, however, it cannot occur when there is no enough subdural space even after a severe head injury. CSH may occur without trauma, when there is sufficient subdural space. The author tried to investigate trends in the causation of CSH. By a review of literature, the author suggested a different view on the causation of CSH. CSH usually originated from either a subdural hygroma or an acute subdural hematoma. Development of CSH starts from the separation of the dural border cell (DBC) layer, which induces proliferation of DBCs with production of neomembrane. Capillaries will follow along the neomembrane. Hemorrhage would occur into the subdural fluid either by tearing of bridge veins or repeated microhemorrhage from the neomembrane. That is the mechanism of hematoma enlargement. Trauma or bleeding tendency may precipitate development of CSH, however, it cannot lead CSH, if there is no sufficient subdural space. The key determinant for development of CSH is a sufficient subdural space, in other words, brain atrophy. The most common and universal cause of brain atrophy is the aging. Modifying Virchow's description, CSH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by degeneration of the brain. Now, it is reasonable that degeneration of brain might play pivotal role in development of CSH in the aged persons. PMID:26885279

  7. Perirenal hematoma in a patient treated with bevacizumab for metastatic colon cancer: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LEE, MIN SUNG; SHIN, IL SANG; KWUN, DO HYUNG; KIM, SE HYUNG; KIM, HYUN JUNG; KIM, CHAN KYU; PARK, SEONG KYU; HONG, DAE SIK; YUN, JINA

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports the case of a patient that developed spontaneous perirenal hematoma during treatment with bevacizumab-containing chemotherapy. A 44-year-old woman with metastatic sigmoid colon cancer, who was being treated with bevacizumab (5 mg/kg, intravenous, 90 min biweekly), was admitted to hospital following 3 cycles of chemotherapy, with a sudden onset of dyspnea and oliguria. An emergency hemodialysis was performed and a large right perirenal hematoma was diagnosed using computed tomography. The patient was immediately instructed to discontinue chemotherapy, including bevacizumab. However, the right perirenal hematoma increased in size and a left perirenal hematoma developed 3 weeks later. The two perirenal hematomas stabilized 7 weeks subsequent to the termination of bevacizumab treatment. Spontaneous perirenal hematoma due to bevacizumab treatment is an extremely rare occurrence. However, physicians should be aware of this potential complication associated with bevacizumab treatment. PMID:27123092

  8. Delayed chronic intracranial subdural hematoma complicating resection of a tanycytic thoracic ependymoma

    PubMed Central

    Maugeri, Rosario; Giugno, Antonella; Graziano, Francesca; Visocchi, Massimiliano; Giller, Cole; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Background: To demonstrate that the diagnosis of an intracranial subdural hematoma should be considered for patients presenting with acute or delayed symptoms of intracranial pathology following resection of a spinal tumor. Case Description: We present a case of a 57-year-old woman found to have a chronic subdural hematoma 1 month following resection of a thoracic extramedullary ependymoma. Evacuation of the hematoma through a burr hole relieved the presenting symptoms and signs. Resolution of the hematoma was confirmed with a computed tomography (CT) scan. Conclusion: Headache and other symptoms not referable to spinal pathology should be regarded as a warning sign of an intracranial subdural hematoma, and a CT scan of the head should be obtained. The mechanism of the development of the hematoma may be related to the leakage of cerebrospinal fluid with subsequent intracranial hypotension leading to an expanding subdural space and hemorrhage. PMID:26862454

  9. Association of canine splenic hemangiosarcomas and hematomas with nodular lymphoid hyperplasia or siderotic nodules.

    PubMed

    Cole, Patricia Ann

    2012-07-01

    Hemorrhagic splenic masses diagnosed as hemangioma or hemangiosarcoma were reviewed. Lymphoid hyperplasia was present in none of the hemangiosarcoma cases and in 27% of the hematoma cases. Siderotic nodules in the capsule or trabeculae were present in 25% of hemangiosarcoma cases and in 36% of hematoma cases. Hemoabdomen was noted in the clinical history of 54% of hemangiosarcoma cases and in 22% of hematoma cases. The average age (10.3 and 9.6 years, respectively), sex ratios (slightly more males), and most common breeds (Labrador Retriever, Golden Retriever, and German Shepherd Dog) were similar for the hemangiosarcoma and hematoma cases. Since lymphoid hyperplasia is much more common in cases of hematoma, the presence of this feature lends support to a diagnosis of hematoma rather than hemangiosarcoma. Signalment, history of hemoabdomen, and presence of siderotic nodules do not point to one diagnosis over the other. PMID:22621950

  10. A new technique using fibrin glue in the management of auricular hematoma.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, Shwan H; Barnes, Martyn; Jones, Stephen; Mahendran, Suresh

    2014-11-01

    : This study aims to describe a new technique for the management of auricular hematoma using fibrin glue. Five difficult cases of auricular hematoma were managed using this technique, including 2 recurrent and 3 delayed presentations. After skin preparation and local anesthetic, an incision was made, the hematoma was evacuated, and the cavity was washed out with saline. Fibrin glue was applied liberally; a dental roll pressure dressing was applied and secured with a prolene bead suture. The patients were given a course of oral antibiotic and reviewed after 5 days for removal of the external dressing. They were later assessed to exclude re-accumulation of the hematoma. All patients had complete resolution of the hematoma without re-accumulation; they were satisfied with the cosmetic results and experienced no complications. This case series provides evidence that fibrin glue is effective in the management of auricular hematoma. Larger studies may provide further evidence of the effectiveness of this new technique. PMID:24699189

  11. Bilateral recurrent external obturator muscle hematoma: An unusual cause of pelvic pain in hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    ARPACI, TANER; SASMAZ, ILGEN; AKBAS, TUGANA; EKEN, ALPER; OZGUR, ANIL; ANTMEN, BULENT

    2016-01-01

    Following joint hemorrhages, intramuscular hemorrhages are the second most prevalent bleeding pattern in hemophiliac patients. Hematomas of the iliopsoas muscle are a well-known complication of hemophilia; however, obturator muscle hematomas are rare. We herein report a case of spontaneous bleeding of the bilateral external obturator muscles, which occured three times within a period of 9 months in a hemophilia patient with factor VIII inhibitors. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first published case of an obturator externus muscle hematoma in hemophilia. In addition to hip hemarthrosis, iliopsoas hematomas and acute appendicitis, obturator muscle hematoma should be considered as one of the diagnostic alternatives for pelvic pain in hemophiliaψ patients. Magnetic resonance imaging enables rapid diagnosis of obturator muscle hematoma. PMID:27073678

  12. Esophageal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing esophageal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  13. Treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis by dilation.

    PubMed

    Schoepfer, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Treatment options for eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) include drugs, diets and esophageal dilation. Esophageal dilation can be performed using either through-the-scope balloons or wire-guided bougies. Dilation can lead to long-lasting symptom improvement in EoE patients presenting with esophageal strictures. Esophageal strictures are most often diagnosed when the 8- to 9-mm outer diameter adult gastroscope cannot be passed any further or only against resistance. A defined esophageal diameter to be targeted by dilation is missing, but the majority of patients have considerable symptomatic improvement when a diameter of 16-18 mm has been reached. A high complication rate, especially regarding esophageal perforations, has been reported in small case series until 2006. Several large series were published in 2007 and later that demonstrated that the complication risk (especially esophageal perforation) was much lower than what was reported in earlier series. The procedure can therefore be regarded as safe when some simple precautions are followed. It is noteworthy that esophageal dilation does not influence the underlying eosinophil-predominant inflammation. Patients should be informed before the procedure that postprocedural retrosternal pain may occur for some days, but that it usually responds well to over-the-counter analgesics such as paracetamol. Dilation-related superficial lacerations of the mucosa should not be regarded and reported as complications, but instead represent a desired effect of the therapy. Patient tolerance and acceptance for esophageal dilation have been reported to be good. PMID:24603396

  14. Clinical Study of Time Optimizing of Endoscopic Photodynamic Therapy on Esophageal and/or Gastric Cardiac Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-10

    Stage I Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage II Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage I Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  15. Intrapelvic chronic expanding hematoma: magnetic resonance imaging findings with pathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Jun; Akaki, Shiro; Yonezawa, Masaru; Horiguchi, Ikuyo; Nakamura, Satoko; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    Chronic expanding hematoma is rare and occasionally misdiagnosed as malignant neoplasm. We describe a case in the female pelvis and correlate findings from pathology and magnetic resonance imaging. On diffusion-weighted images (DWI), our patient's hematoma showed 2 different signal intensities, which corresponded to pathological features of fresh and altered blood components. DWI can distinguish between such pathological features of a chronic expanding hematoma. PMID:20585198

  16. Restoring esophageal continuity following a failed colonic interposition for long-gap esophageal atresia

    PubMed Central

    Dionigi, Beatrice; Bairdain, Sigrid; Smithers, Charles Jason; Jennings, Russell W.; Hamilton, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    The Foker process is a method of esophageal lengthening through axial tension-induced growth, allowing for subsequent primary reconstruction of the esophagus in esophageal atresia (EA). In this unique case, the Foker process was used to grow the remaining esophageal segment long enough to attain esophageal continuity following failed colonic interpositions for long-gap esophageal atresia (LGEA). Initially developed for the treatment of LGEA in neonates, this case demonstrates that (i) an active esophageal lengthening response may still be present beyond the neonate time-period; and, (ii) the Foker process can be used to restore esophageal continuity following a failed colonic interposition if the lower esophageal segment is still present. PMID:25907539

  17. Intramural Dissection of the Renal Collecting System During Percutaneous Nephrostomy: Computed Tomography Findings of a Rare Complication

    SciTech Connect

    Michaelides, Michael Dimarelos, Vasileios Stratilati, Sofia Tsitouridis, Ioannis

    2011-02-15

    Intramural dissection of the renal collecting system during percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) is a rare complication that can be challenging to diagnose. In this report, we describe the computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopic findings of urothelial dissection during CT-guided PCN in a 65-year old patient with an obstructed congenital solitary left kidney due to an urinary bladder carcinoma. To our knowledge, CT findings of urothelial dissection have not yet been described.

  18. Chronic Expanding Organized Hematoma of the Lower Leg: A Rare Cause for Nonhealing Leg Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Heinig, Birgit; Langner, Dana

    2015-09-01

    Chronic expanding hematoma is a rare entity on the leg. A 55-year-old women presented with 2 small nonhealing leg ulcers. On examination we observed a painless bulky tumor-like mass that developed slowly after deep soft tissue infection almost 2 years ago. Vascular computed tomography suggested an organized hematoma. Important differential diagnoses include sarcoma and lymphoma. Treatment of choice is surgery. Histology confirmed the diagnosis of an organized hematoma. Chronic expanding hematoma is a rare cause of nonhealing leg ulcers. PMID:25691320

  19. Quantitative estimation of hemorrhage in chronic subdural hematoma using the /sup 51/Cr erythrocyte labeling method

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, H.; Yamamoto, S.; Saito, K.; Ikeda, K.; Hisada, K.

    1987-06-01

    Red cell survival studies using an infusion of chromium-51-labeled erythrocytes were performed to quantitatively estimate hemorrhage in the chronic subdural hematoma cavity of 50 patients. The amount of hemorrhage was determined during craniotomy. Between 6 and 24 hours after infusion of the labeled red cells, hemorrhage accounted for a mean of 6.7% of the hematoma content, indicating continuous or intermittent hemorrhage into the cavity. The clinical state of the patients and the density of the chronic subdural hematoma on computerized tomography scans were related to the amount of hemorrhage. Chronic subdural hematomas with a greater amount of hemorrhage frequently consisted of clots rather than fluid.

  20. Subchorionic hematomas in early pregnancy: clinical outcome and blood flow patterns.

    PubMed

    Kurjak, A; Schulman, H; Zudenigo, D; Kupesic, S; Kos, M; Goldenberg, M

    1996-01-01

    A case control study of 59 women with subchorionic hematomas compared to 135 normally pregnant. Transvaginal ultrasound was used to image the pregnancy, and identify the site and size of the hematomas. Color flow Doppler was used to calculate velocity indices of the spiral arteries. More spontaneous abortions occurred in women with subchorionic hematomas (SCH). There was general correlation between gestational age, velocity indices, and hematoma size. There were 10 spontaneous abortions in the study group (17%) versus 9 (6.5%) in the controls (P = 0.02). Hematoma size did not affect outcome, but site did. Most hematomas associated with abortion were found in the corpus or fundus of the uterus, not in the supracervical area (P = 0.03). The presence of a hematoma did not affect the frequency of preterm delivery. In conclusion, subchorionic hematomas in early pregnancy are associated with an increased risk of spontaneous abortion. Flow disturbances are seen in the spiral arteries, but these are probably secondary effects. The critical factor is site of hematoma, not volume. PMID:8796766

  1. ESOPHAGEAL DYSMOTILITY IN CHILDREN WITH EOSINOPHILIC ESOPHAGITIS. A STUDY USING PROLONGED ESOPHAGEAL MANOMETRY

    PubMed Central

    Nurko, Samuel; Rosen, Rachel; Furuta, Glenn T.

    2010-01-01

    Background The pathophysiology of dysphagia in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is unknown, but may be related to abnormal esophageal motor function. Symptoms rarely occur during stationary esophageal manometry so it has been difficult to establish an association between symptoms and motor events. Aim To evaluate esophageal motor function in children with EoE with the use of stationary manometry and ambulatory prolonged esophageal manometry and pH-metry (PEMP) Methods PEMP was performed in children with EoE, compared with controls and children with GERD. Effective peristalsis was considered when the esophageal contractions had a normal amplitude and propagation. Results expressed as mean ± S.E. Results Seventeen patients with EoE, 13 with GERD and 11 controls were studied. Values are expressed as mean ± se. Stationary manometry identified abnormal peristalsis in 41% of children with EoE. During PEMP, children with EoE had an increased number of isolated (16.7 ± 3.8 vs 9.5 ± 1.6 vs 6.5 ± 1.1 ; p< 0.03) and high amplitude contractions (4.1 ± 1.2 vs 1.8 ±0.8 vs 0.1 ± 0.1; p< 0.03), and more % ineffective peristalsis both during fasting (70.5% ± 2.5 vs 57.8% ± 3.0 vs 53.8% ± 1.9; p <0.05) and during meals (68.4 ± 3.4 vs 55.3 ± 2.8 vs 48.1 ± 2.8; p < 0.05) when compared with children with GERD and controls. Thirteen patients with EoE experienced 21 episodes of dysphagia and all correlated with simultaneous abnormal motor function. Conclusions PEMP allowed the detection of ineffective peristalsis in children with EoE. Symptoms observed in children with EoE may be related to esophageal motor dysfunction. PMID:19755968

  2. Spontaneous Expulsion of Intramural Fibroid Six Weeks after Emergency Caesarean Section.

    PubMed

    Sagoo, Balvinder; Ng, Ka Ying Bonnie; Ghaleb, G; Brown, Heather

    2015-01-01

    We present a thirty-six-year-old woman with a high risk pregnancy, complicated by multiple congenital anomalies, severe hyperemesis, a pulmonary embolus, and a large intramural fibroid. This fibroid grew in size during the pregnancy. At 34 + 5 weeks, there were reduced fetal movements and a pathological CTG. A live infant was delivered by an emergency cesarean section. Five weeks postpartum, she presented with abdominal pain, offensive vaginal discharge, and fevers. She was given antibiotics and ferrous sulphate. An abdominal ultrasound showed an 11 × 12 × 9 cm fibroid with a coarse degenerative appearance. Clinically, she showed signs of sepsis; a CT scan and laparotomy performed under general anesthetic did not find any collections as a source of sepsis. When stable, she was discharged. She re-presented two days later with a large mass (necrotic fibroid) in her vagina. This is the first case of spontaneous expulsion of fibroid six weeks after caesarean section. Presentation of pain and fever after the delivery may be due to red degeneration of the fibroid, caused by diminished blood supply, ischaemia, and necrosis. This case highlights the importance of considering fibroids as a cause for abdominal pain during and after pregnancy, even up to 6 weeks after delivery. PMID:26380133

  3. Endovascular treatment of an intramural aortic haematoma following cardiopulmonary resuscitation for myocardial ischemia with ventricular fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Kopp, R; Axt, R; Klein, A; Weidenhagen, R; Schmucker, R; Czerner, S; Hartl, W H; Jauch, K W; Sigg, M

    2008-06-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation by manual cardiac compression can restore cardiocirculatory function but can also injure patients. Commonly reported are skeletal fractures of the rips and sternum, while injuries to the large thoracic vessels will frequently be lethal. We report the case of a 57-year-old male patient with sudden cardiac arrest because of myocardial ischemia with ventricular fibrillation, successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation, associated with an intramural haematoma (IMH) of the descending thoracic aorta treated by endovascular aortic repair. Secondary coronary angiography revealed a severe three vessel coronary disease with an occlusion of the proximal anterior descending branch and a subtotal stenosis of the first segmental branch of the left coronary artery (LCA) and a high-grade stenosis of the posterolateral segmental branch of the circumflex left coronary artery. Stenotic segments of coronary arteries were treated successfully by implantation of three drug-eluting stents followed by dual antiplatelet therapy. The patients recovered almost completely and was discharged for further rehabilitation after 3 weeks. PMID:18241973

  4. Intramural oesophageal dissection as an unusual presentation of chest pain: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Mizumoto, Ryo; Van Rooyen, Henk

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Intramural oesophageal dissection (IOD) is a rare clinical condition and there is a paucity of information regarding the appropriate diagnosis and management. It is described as bleeding in the submucosal plane of the oesophagus, and has various documented causes. Presentation of case We report a case of a 73 year old female who developed IOD. She presented with severe chest pain. Subsequent imaging revealed IOD and haematoma formation. This was confirmed on oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD). She was on a bisphosphonate for her osteoporosis, as well as having age-related dysmotility of her oesophagus on manometric studies. She was also taking fish oil. Treatment was conservative and the patient was discharged with proton pump inhibitors and follow up. Discussion Spontaneous haematoma formation and IOD resulted likely from a combination of the anticoagulant effect of fish oil and oesophageal dysmotility. Bisphosphonates also have some well documented gastrointestinal side effects involving mucosal damage. The possibility that the concurrent use of bisphosphonate led to a pre-existing ulcer which could have contributed to the development of IOD in this patient should be considered. Conclusion spontaneous IOD can occur in elderly patients who are anticoagulated. Fish oil has not been previously reported as having an association with IOD. This is the first known reported case of spontaneous IOD occurring in association with concurrent use of a bisphosphonate and fish oil. IOD is a rare disorder, and any anticoagulated patients presenting with severe chest pain may need careful investigation prior to definitive management. PMID:26904189

  5. Spontaneous Expulsion of Intramural Fibroid Six Weeks after Emergency Caesarean Section

    PubMed Central

    Sagoo, Balvinder; Ng, Ka Ying Bonnie; Ghaleb, G.; Brown, Heather

    2015-01-01

    We present a thirty-six-year-old woman with a high risk pregnancy, complicated by multiple congenital anomalies, severe hyperemesis, a pulmonary embolus, and a large intramural fibroid. This fibroid grew in size during the pregnancy. At 34 + 5 weeks, there were reduced fetal movements and a pathological CTG. A live infant was delivered by an emergency cesarean section. Five weeks postpartum, she presented with abdominal pain, offensive vaginal discharge, and fevers. She was given antibiotics and ferrous sulphate. An abdominal ultrasound showed an 11 × 12 × 9 cm fibroid with a coarse degenerative appearance. Clinically, she showed signs of sepsis; a CT scan and laparotomy performed under general anesthetic did not find any collections as a source of sepsis. When stable, she was discharged. She re-presented two days later with a large mass (necrotic fibroid) in her vagina. This is the first case of spontaneous expulsion of fibroid six weeks after caesarean section. Presentation of pain and fever after the delivery may be due to red degeneration of the fibroid, caused by diminished blood supply, ischaemia, and necrosis. This case highlights the importance of considering fibroids as a cause for abdominal pain during and after pregnancy, even up to 6 weeks after delivery. PMID:26380133

  6. Adenosine-induced activation of esophageal nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Ru, F; Surdenikova, L; Brozmanova, M; Kollarik, M

    2011-03-01

    Clinical studies implicate adenosine acting on esophageal nociceptive pathways in the pathogenesis of noncardiac chest pain originating from the esophagus. However, the effect of adenosine on esophageal afferent nerve subtypes is incompletely understood. We addressed the hypothesis that adenosine selectively activates esophageal nociceptors. Whole cell perforated patch-clamp recordings and single-cell RT-PCR analysis were performed on the primary afferent neurons retrogradely labeled from the esophagus in the guinea pig. Extracellular recordings were made from the isolated innervated esophagus. In patch-clamp studies, adenosine evoked activation (inward current) in a majority of putative nociceptive (capsaicin-sensitive) vagal nodose, vagal jugular, and spinal dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons innervating the esophagus. Single-cell RT-PCR analysis indicated that the majority of the putative nociceptive (transient receptor potential V1-positive) neurons innervating the esophagus express the adenosine receptors. The neural crest-derived (spinal DRG and vagal jugular) esophageal nociceptors expressed predominantly the adenosine A(1) receptor while the placodes-derived vagal nodose nociceptors expressed the adenosine A(1) and/or A(2A) receptors. Consistent with the studies in the cell bodies, adenosine evoked activation (overt action potential discharge) in esophageal nociceptive nerve terminals. Furthermore, the neural crest-derived jugular nociceptors were activated by the selective A(1) receptor agonist CCPA, and the placodes-derived nodose nociceptors were activated by CCPA and/or the selective adenosine A(2A) receptor CGS-21680. In contrast to esophageal nociceptors, adenosine failed to stimulate the vagal esophageal low-threshold (tension) mechanosensors. We conclude that adenosine selectively activates esophageal nociceptors. Our data indicate that the esophageal neural crest-derived nociceptors can be activated via the adenosine A(1) receptor while the placodes

  7. [Esophageal mucocele: report of 2 pediatric cases].

    PubMed

    Achour-Arifa, N; Tlili-Graiess, K; El Ouni, F; Mrad-Dali, K; Derbel, F; Yacoubi, M T; Gharbi-Jemni, H; Haj Hmida, R B; Jeddi, M

    2002-01-01

    Two cases of esophageal mucocele in pediatric patients are reported: two children of 5 and 9 years respectively underwent surgical isolation of the esophagus and esophagocoloplasty for caustic stenosis related to accidental ingestion of caustic soda. Clinical pattern of mediastinal compression was proved with cervical fistulous tract in one case. In both cases, thoracic computed tomography was a sensitive imaging method to demonstrate the mucocele and its extension. Esophageal mucocele is rarely described in children, especially following esophageal corrosive stricture. PMID:11965151

  8. Eosinophilic esophagitis: an immune-mediated esophageal disease.

    PubMed

    Weinbrand-Goichberg, Jenny; Segal, Idit; Ovadia, Adi; Levine, Arie; Dalal, Ilan

    2013-07-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an emerging disease defined by esophageal dysfunction, by typical endoscopic findings and by abnormal eosinophilic inflammation within the esophagus. Eosinophilic accumulation in the esophagus occurs as a result of esophageal overexpression of pro-inflammatory mediators, including T cells and mast cells, cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-13, IL-5 and IL-15, as well as chemoattractants (eotaxin and transforming growth factor-β1, fibroblast growth factor and the newly characterized gene--thymic stromal lymphopoietin, which is a key regulator of allergic sensitization initiation). The role of allergy, particularly food allergy in EoE is indisputable, as elimination diet is a proven commonly used treatment for the disease. However, unlike classical immediate IgE-mediated reaction to allergen, EoE is associated with an altered immune response, characterized by a combination of IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated mechanisms. In this review, we aim to discuss the many typical aspects of EoE as opposed to other entities involving the esophagus, with focusing on the aberrant immune-mediated key players contributing to the pathogenesis of this unique disease. PMID:23579771

  9. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Giacchino, Maria; Bodini, Giorgia; Marabotto, Elisa; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2014-05-01

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted. PMID:24868489

  10. Pediatric esophageal scintigraphy. Results of 200 studies

    SciTech Connect

    Guillet, J.; Wynchank, S.; Basse-Cathalinat, B.; Christophe, E.; Ducassou, D.; Blanquet, P.

    1983-09-01

    Esophageal transit of a small volume of watery liquid has been observed scintigraphically in 200 studies performed on patients aged between 6 days and 16 years. Qualitative information concerning esophageal morphology and function in the various phases of deglutition, and scintigraphic features of achalasia, stenosis, and other pathologies are described. Measured esophageal transit time and its normal variation, its relevance to the diagnosis of esophagitis, and the monitoring of treatment are discussed. This technique observing distinct deglutitions has proven a useful diagnostic tool. Its advantages and limitations are discussed in comparison with other methods.

  11. New techniques in measuring nonacidic esophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Vaezi, M F; Shay, S S

    2001-07-01

    New techniques in esophageal monitoring are allowing for better differentiation in the role of different gastric refluxates in esophageal mucosal damage and patient symptoms. The Bilitec 2001 (Synectics, Stockholm, Sweden) is a portable spectrophotometer that measures bilirubin as a surrogate marker for bile reflux and multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII) (Sandhill Scientific Inc, Highlands Ranch, CO) is a new technique allowing measurement of esophageal volume refluxate. Both techniques assess the role of nonacidic esophageal reflux. Despite their novel approach in assessing nonacid reflux, both methods have limitations. Future studies in this area, however, will prove beneficial in identifying their role in diagnosis and management of patients with suspected nonacid reflux disease. PMID:11568871

  12. Corrosive Esophagitis Caused by Ingestion of Picosulfate

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jae Yong; Kang, Ho Suk; Kim, Seong Eun; Park, Ji Won; Moon, Sung Hoon; Kim, Jong Hyeok; Park, Choong Kee

    2015-01-01

    Corrosive esophagitis is characterized by caustic injury due to the ingestion of chemical agents, mainly alkaline substances such as detergents. Esophageal bleeding, perforation, or stricture can be worsened by high-degree corrosive esophagitis. Picosulfate is a commonly used laxative frequently administered for bowel preparation before colonoscopy or colon surgery. Picosulfate powder should be completely dissolved in water before ingestion because the powder itself may cause chemical burning of the esophagus and stomach. Here, we report a case of corrosive esophagitis due to the ingestion of picosulfate powder that was not completely dissolved in water. PMID:25674529

  13. [Eosinophilic esophagitis: a rare cause of dysphagia].

    PubMed

    Billot, D; Pernin, M; Pillot, C; Bredin, C; Hoeffler, P; Graffin, B; Rey, P

    2010-12-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is an unrecognized and emerging entity. Its incidence increases with allergic disorders. A 29-year-old man presented with a 4-year history of intermittent and paroxysmal dysphagia. The triad including allergy, young age, and impaction of foreign bodies, combined with a chronic dysphagia is almost pathognomonic of eosinophilic esophagitis. Endoscopic esophageal features can be diverse, so systematic esophageal biopsies are required. Diagnosis is established with the demonstration of an eosinophilic infiltrate with a cell count exceeding 15 eosinophils per high power field (×400). First line therapy includes swallowed topical corticosteroids and removal of an allergic cause, when it could be identified. PMID:20605659

  14. Optoacoustic detection and monitoring of blast-induced intracranial hematomas in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Andrey; Wynne, Karon E.; Prough, Donald S.; Dewitt, Douglas S.; Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Irene Y.; Parsley, Margaret A.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2014-03-01

    Patients with acute intracranial hematomas often require surgical drainage within the first four hours after traumatic brain injury (TBI) to avoid death or severe neurologic disability. CT and MRI permit rapid, noninvasive diagnosis of hematomas, but can be used only at a major health-care facility. At present, there is no device for noninvasive detection and characterization of hematomas in pre-hospital settings. We proposed to use an optoacoustic technique for rapid, noninvasive diagnosis and monitoring of hematomas, including intracranial hematomas. Unlike bulky CT and MR equipment, an optoacoustic system can be small and easily transported in an emergency vehicle. In this study we used a specially-designed blast device to inflict TBI in rats. A near-infrared OPO-based optoacoustic system developed for hematoma diagnosis and for blood oxygenation monitoring in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) in small animals was used in the study. Optoacoustic signals recorded simultaneously from the SSS and hematomas allowed for measurements of their oxygenations. The presence of hematomas was confirmed after the experiment in gross pictures of the exposed brains. After blast the hematoma signal and oxygenation increased, while SSS oxygenation decreased due to the blastinduced TBI. The increase of the oxygenation in fresh hematomas may be explained by the leakage of blood from arteries which have higher blood pressure compared to that of veins. These results indicate that the optoacoustic technique can be used for early diagnosis of hematomas and may provide important information for improving outcomes in patients with TBI or stroke (both hemorrhagic and ischemic).

  15. Esophageal Stenosis Associated With Tumor Regression in Radiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer: Frequency and Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Atsumi, Kazushige; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Arimura, Hidetaka; Terashima, Kotaro; Matsuki, Takaomi; Ohga, Saiji; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Nonoshita, Takeshi; Tsurumaru, Daisuke; Ohnishi, Kayoko; Asai, Kaori; Matsumoto, Keiji; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine clinical factors for predicting the frequency and severity of esophageal stenosis associated with tumor regression in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study group consisted of 109 patients with esophageal cancer of T1-4 and Stage I-III who were treated with definitive radiotherapy and achieved a complete response of their primary lesion at Kyushu University Hospital between January 1998 and December 2007. Esophageal stenosis was evaluated using esophagographic images within 3 months after completion of radiotherapy. We investigated the correlation between esophageal stenosis after radiotherapy and each of the clinical factors with regard to tumors and therapy. For validation of the correlative factors for esophageal stenosis, an artificial neural network was used to predict the esophageal stenotic ratio. Results: Esophageal stenosis tended to be more severe and more frequent in T3-4 cases than in T1-2 cases. Esophageal stenosis in cases with full circumference involvement tended to be more severe and more frequent than that in cases without full circumference involvement. Increases in wall thickness tended to be associated with increases in esophageal stenosis severity and frequency. In the multivariate analysis, T stage, extent of involved circumference, and wall thickness of the tumor region were significantly correlated to esophageal stenosis (p = 0.031, p < 0.0001, and p = 0.0011, respectively). The esophageal stenotic ratio predicted by the artificial neural network, which learned these three factors, was significantly correlated to the actual observed stenotic ratio, with a correlation coefficient of 0.864 (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Our study suggested that T stage, extent of involved circumference, and esophageal wall thickness of the tumor region were useful to predict the frequency and severity of esophageal stenosis associated with tumor regression in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer.

  16. Neoadjuvant therapy for esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rachit D; Cassano, Anthony D; Neifeld, James P

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is increasing in incidence more than any other visceral malignancy in North America. Adenocarcinoma has become the most common cell type. Surgery remains the primary treatment modality for locoregional disease. Overall survival with surgery alone has been dismal, with metastatic disease the primary mode of treatment failure after an R0 surgical resection. Cure rates with chemotherapy or radiation therapy alone have been disappointing as well. For these reasons, over the last decade multi-modality treatment has gained increasing acceptance as the standard of care. This review examines the present data and role of neoadjuvant treatment using chemotherapy and radiation therapy followed by surgery for the treatment of esophageal cancer. PMID:25320656

  17. [Surgical treatment of esophageal diverticula].

    PubMed

    Constantinoiu, S; Constantin, A; Predescu, D; Mates, I N; Mocanu, A; Gheorghe, M; Hoară, P; Achim, F; Cociu, L

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the methods and therapeutic principles of esophageal diverticula pathology. We analyze the main pathological mechanisms which establish the therapeutic attitude linked with a complex pretherapeutic evaluation. In our study we enrolled 12 patients operated between 2001-2009 for esophageal diverticula with different topography. In this period of time there were much more patients diagnosed with this pathology, but the need for surgery was establish very tight regarding the actual practical guide which impose the identification and interception of physiological mechanisms by the surgical procedure. We highlight the particular technical details, as well as the important differences of postoperatory complications according to the topography of the diverticula pouch. PMID:21523958

  18. Allergic Mechanisms in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Wechsler, Joshua B; Bryce, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Paralleling the overall trend in allergic diseases, Eosinophilic Esophagitis is rapidly increasing in incidence. It is associated with food antigen-triggered, eosinophil-predominant inflammation and the pathogenic mechanisms have many similarities to other chronic atopic diseases, such as eczema and allergic asthma. Studies in animal models and from patients over the last 15 years have suggested that allergic sensitization leads to food-specific IgE and T-helper lymphocyte type 2 cells, both of which appear to contribute to the pathogenesis along with basophils, mast cells, and antigen-presenting cells. This review will outline our current understandings of the allergic mechanisms that drive eosinophilic esophagitis, drawing from clinical and translational studies in humans as well as experimental animal models. PMID:24813516

  19. Successful Use of Esophageal Stent Placement to Treat a Postoperative Esophageal Stricture in a Toddler.

    PubMed

    Gebrail, Rami; Absah, Imad

    2014-10-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is the most common type of gastrointestinal atresia. The most common variant (type C) consists of a blind esophageal pouch with a fistula between the trachea and the distal esophagus. Surgical repair can be complicated by the development of benign stricture. Most strictures are amenable to dilation, but refractory strictures may require surgical intervention. A 24-month-old boy born with tracheoesophageal fistula and EA underwent surgical repair on day 1 of life. He developed esophageal stricture that responded to esophageal stent placement. Endoscopic biliary accessories can be safely used to dilate refractory esophageal strictures in children, and should be considered prior to seeking other complex alternatives. PMID:26157909

  20. The Evolution and Current Utility of Esophageal Stent Placement for the Treatment of Acute Esophageal Perforation.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Argenis; Freeman, Richard K

    2016-08-01

    Esophageal stent placement was used primarily for the treatment of malignant strictures until the development of a new generation of biomaterials allowed the production of easily removable, occlusive stents in 2001. Since then, thoracic surgeons have gained experience using esophageal stents for the treatment of acute esophageal perforation. As part of a hybrid treatment strategy, including surgical drainage of infected spaces, enteral nutrition, and aggressive supportive care, esophageal stent placement has produced results that can exceed those of traditional surgical repair. This review summarizes the evolution of esophageal stent use for acute perforation and provides evidence-based recommendations for the technique. PMID:27427525

  1. Acute Esophageal Necrosis: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Inayat, Faisal; Hurairah, Abu; Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Acute esophageal necrosis (AEN) or “black esophagus” is a rare clinical entity with an unclear etiology. It is diagnosed at upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with the presence of strikingly black necrotic esophagus. The treatment is primarily medical, but the prognosis is generally poor due to advanced age and comorbid illnesses in patients who develop AEN. Herein, we discussed the implications of poor glycemic control in regards with AEN and undertook a literature review of this rare diagnosis. PMID:27583242

  2. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Cianferoni, Antonella; Spergel, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an emerging chronic atopic clinical-pathologic disease with an estimated prevalence of 1/1000 similar to the one of Crohn's diseases. Usually, EoE is firstly suspected due to symptoms that are caused by esophageal dysfunction and/or fibrosis. EoE diagnosis is confirmed if the esophageal biopsy shows at least 15 eosinophils per high power field (eos/hpf) as a peak value in one or more of at least four specimens obtained randomly from the esophagus. Most of the patients affected by EoE have other atopic diseases such as allergic rhinitis, asthma, IgE-mediated food allergies, and/or atopic dermatitis. The local inflammation is a T helper type 2 (Th2) flogosis, which most likely is driven by a mixed IgE and non-IgE-mediated reaction to food and/or environmental allergens. Recently published genetic studies showed also that EoE is associated with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) on genes which are important in atopic inflammation such as thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) located close to the Th2 cytokine cluster (IL-4, IL-5, IL-13) on chromosome 5q22. When the EoE diagnosis is made, it is imperative to control the local eosinophilic inflammation not only to give symptomatic relief to the patient but also to prevent complications such as esophageal stricture and food impaction. EoE is treated like many other atopic diseases with a combination of topical steroids and/or food antigen avoidance. PMID:26194940

  3. Esophageal tuberculosis presenting with hematemesis

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Samit S; Somani, Piyush O; Mahey, Rajeshkumar C; Shah, Dharmesh K; Contractor, Qais Q; Rathi, Pravin M

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal tuberculosis is rare, constituting about 0.3% of gastrointestinal tuberculosis. It presents commonly with dysphagia, cough, chest pain in addition to fever and weight loss. Complications may include hemorrhage from the lesion, development of arterioesophageal fistula, esophagocutaneous fistula or tracheoesophageal fistula. There are very few reports of esophageal tuberculosis presenting with hematemesis due to ulceration. We report a patient with hematemesis that was due to the erosion of tuberculous subcarinal lymph nodes into the esophagus. A 15-year-old boy presented with hemetemesis as his only complaint. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed an eccentric ulcerative lesion involving 50% of circumference of the esophagus. Biopsy showed caseating epitheloid granulomas with lymphocytic infiltrates suggestive of tuberculosis. Computerised tomography of the thorax revealed thickening of the mid-esophagus with enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes in the subcarinal region compressing the esophagus along with moderate right sided pleural effusion. Patient was treated with anti-tuberculosis therapy (Rifampicin, Isoniazid, Pyrazinamide, Ethambutol) for 6 mo. Repeat EGD showed scarring and mucosal tags with complete resolution of the esophageal ulcer. PMID:24255751

  4. Pharmacologic influence on esophageal varices

    SciTech Connect

    Lunderquist, A.; Owman, T.; Alwmark, A.; Gullstrand, P.; Hall-Angeras, M.; Joelsson, B.; Tranberg, K.G.; Pettersson, K.I.

    1983-06-01

    Selective catherization of the left gastric vein was performed after percutaneous transhepatic portography (PTP) in patients with portal hypertension and esophageal varices. Following the hypothesis that drugs increasing the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure may obstruct the variceal blood flow throught the lower esophagus, the effect of different drugs (i.e., intravenous injection of vasopressin, pentagastrin, domperidone and somatostatin and subcutaneous injection of metacholine) on the variceal blood flow was examined. Vasopressin did not change the variceal blood flow; pentagastrine, with its known effect of increasing the LES pressure produced a total interruption of the flow in four of eight patients; domperiodone, also known to increase the LES pressure obstructed the variceal blood flow in the only patient examined with this drug; somatostatin has no reported action on the LES but blocked the flow in one of two patients; and metacholine, reported to increase the LES pressure did not produce any change in the flow in the three patients examined. LES pressure was recorded before and during vasopressin infusion in seven patients with portal hypertension and esophageal varices. No reaction on the pressure was found. The patient number in the study is small and the results are nonuniform but still they suggest that drugs increasing the LES tonus might be useful to control variceal blood flow.

  5. Development of contralateral extradural hematomas after evacuation of primary one

    PubMed Central

    Senapati, Satya Bhusan; Panigrahi, Souvagya; Mishra, Sudhansu Sekhar

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of bilateral extradural hematomas (EDH) is an uncommon consequence of closed head injuries. Incidence of bilateral EDH has been reported in various studies ranging from 2 to 25%. Bilateral EDH may develop simultaneously or second EDH develops few hours after first one. Development of second EDH after evacuation of primary one is rarely seen. We are reporting one such case. Awareness of this entity is required to detect such cases as timely intervention gives an excellent result like an acute EDH. PMID:27366279

  6. Primary Renal Lymphoma Mimicking a Subcapsular Hematoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dedekam, Erik; Graham, Jess; Strenge, Karen; Mosier, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Primary renal lymphoma (PRL) is a rare entity with a history of controversy regarding its existence. Lymphomatous involvement of the kidney is more commonly seen secondarily to spread from an adjacent lymphomatous mass, rather than arising primarily from the kidney. PRL can mimic other renal lesions such as renal cell carcinoma, renal abscess, and metastasis; therefore, an early diagnosis is crucial to guide treatment and properly assess prognosis. We present a rare case of a 77 year-old male who presented with hematuria and PRL mimicking a subcapsular hematoma. PMID:24421949

  7. Primary renal lymphoma mimicking a subcapsular hematoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Dedekam, Erik; Graham, Jess; Strenge, Karen; Mosier, Andrew D

    2013-08-01

    Primary renal lymphoma (PRL) is a rare entity with a history of controversy regarding its existence. Lymphomatous involvement of the kidney is more commonly seen secondarily to spread from an adjacent lymphomatous mass, rather than arising primarily from the kidney. PRL can mimic other renal lesions such as renal cell carcinoma, renal abscess, and metastasis; therefore, an early diagnosis is crucial to guide treatment and properly assess prognosis. We present a rare case of a 77 year-old male who presented with hematuria and PRL mimicking a subcapsular hematoma. PMID:24421949

  8. Remote Postoperative Epidural Hematoma after Brain Tumor Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ho-Jung; Park, Jae-Sung; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2015-01-01

    A postoperative epidural hematoma (EDH) is a serious and embarrassing complication, which usually occurs at the site of operation after intracranial surgery. However, remote EDH is relatively rare. We report three cases of remote EDH after brain tumor surgery. All three cases seemed to have different causes of remote postoperative EDH; however, all patients were managed promptly and showed excellent outcomes. Although the exact mechanism of remote postoperative EDH is unknown, surgeons should be cautious of the speed of lowering intracranial pressure and implement basic procedures to prevent this hazardous complication of brain tumor surgery. PMID:26605271

  9. Extensive spinal epidural hematoma: a rare complication of aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Zizka, J; Eliás, P; Michl, A; Harrer, J; Cesák, T; Herman, A

    2001-01-01

    Development of collateral circulation belongs among the typical signs of aortic coarctation. Cerebral or spinal artery aneurysm formation with increased risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage represent the most common neurovascular complication of this disease. We report a case of a 20-year-old sportsman who developed acute non-traumatic paraplegia as a result of extensive spinal epidural hemorrhage from collateral vessels accompanying aortic coarctation which was unrecognized up to that time. To the best of our knowledge, acute spinal epidural hematoma as a complication of aortic coarctation has not been previously reported. PMID:11471620

  10. Novel device to sample the esophageal microbiome--the esophageal string test.

    PubMed

    Fillon, Sophie A; Harris, J Kirk; Wagner, Brandie D; Kelly, Caleb J; Stevens, Mark J; Moore, Wendy; Fang, Rui; Schroeder, Shauna; Masterson, Joanne C; Robertson, Charles E; Pace, Norman R; Ackerman, Steven J; Furuta, Glenn T

    2012-01-01

    A growing number of studies implicate the microbiome in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation. Previous work has shown that adults with esophagitis related to gastroesophageal reflux disease have altered esophageal microbiota compared to those who do not have esophagitis. In these studies, sampling of the esophageal microbiome was accomplished by isolating DNA from esophageal biopsies obtained at the time of upper endoscopy. The aim of the current study was to identify the esophageal microbiome in pediatric individuals with normal esophageal mucosa using a minimally invasive, capsule-based string technology, the Enterotest™. We used the proximal segment of the Enterotest string to sample the esophagus, and term this the "Esophageal String Test" (EST). We hypothesized that the less invasive EST would capture mucosal adherent bacteria present in the esophagus in a similar fashion as mucosal biopsy. EST samples and mucosal biopsies were collected from children with no esophageal inflammation (n = 15) and their microbiome composition determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Microbiota from esophageal biopsies and ESTs produced nearly identical profiles of bacterial genera and were different from the bacterial contents of samples collected from the nasal and oral cavity. We conclude that the minimally invasive EST can serve as a useful device for study of the esophageal microbiome. PMID:22957025

  11. Noninvasive, optoacoustic detection and characterization of intra- and extracranial hematomas and cerebral hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Andrey; Prough, Donald S.; Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Irene Y.; Robertson, Claudia S.; Asokan, Vasantha; Agbor, Adaeze; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2015-03-01

    Early diagnosis of intracranial hematomas is necessary to improve outcome in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). CT and MRI can diagnose intracranial hematomas, but cannot be used until the patient arrives at a major healthcare facility, resulting in delayed diagnosis. Near infrared spectroscopy may suggest the presence of unilateral intracranial hematomas, but provides minimal information on hematoma type and location due to limitations associated with strong light scattering. We have used optoacoustics (which combines high endogenous optical contrast with the resolution of ultrasound) to diagnose hematomas and monitor cerebral oxygenation. We performed animal and clinical studies on detection and characterization of hematomas and on monitoring cerebral hypoxia by probing the superior sagittal sinus (SSS). Recently, we built a medical grade, multi-wavelength, OPO-based optoacoustic system tunable in the near infrared spectral range. We developed new patient interfaces for noninvasive, transcranial measurements in the transmission mode in the presence of dense hair and used it in patients with TBI. The optoacoustic system was capable of detecting and characterizing intra- and extracranial hematomas. SSS blood oxygenation was measured as well with the new interface. The obtained results indicate that the optoacoustic system in the transmission mode provides detection and characterization of hematomas in TBI patients, as well as cerebral venous blood oxygenation monitoring. The transmission mode approach can be used for optoacoustic brain imaging, tomography, and mapping in humans.

  12. Clinical Application of Esophageal High-resolution Manometry in the Diagnosis of Esophageal Motility Disorders

    PubMed Central

    van Hoeij, Froukje B; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) is replacing conventional manometry in the clinical evaluation of patients with esophageal symptoms, especially dysphagia. The introduction of HRM gave rise to new objective metrics and recognizable patterns of esophageal motor function, requiring a new classification scheme: the Chicago classification. HRM measurements are more detailed and more easily performed compared to conventional manometry. The visual presentation of acquired data improved the analysis and interpretation of esophageal motor function. This led to a more sensitive, accurate, and objective analysis of esophageal motility. In this review we discuss how HRM changed the way we define and categorize esophageal motility disorders. Moreover, we discuss the clinical applications of HRM for each esophageal motility disorder separately. PMID:26631942

  13. Clinical Application of Esophageal High-resolution Manometry in the Diagnosis of Esophageal Motility Disorders.

    PubMed

    van Hoeij, Froukje B; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2016-01-31

    Esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) is replacing conventional manometry in the clinical evaluation of patients with esophageal symptoms, especially dysphagia. The introduction of HRM gave rise to new objective metrics and recognizable patterns of esophageal motor function, requiring a new classification scheme: the Chicago classification. HRM measurements are more detailed and more easily performed compared to conventional manometry. The visual presentation of acquired data improved the analysis and interpretation of esophageal motor function. This led to a more sensitive, accurate, and objective analysis of esophageal motility. In this review we discuss how HRM changed the way we define and categorize esophageal motility disorders. Moreover, we discuss the clinical applications of HRM for each esophageal motility disorder separately. PMID:26631942

  14. Pralatrexate and Oxaliplatin in Treating Patients With Unresectable or Metastatic Esophageal, Stomach, or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-11

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Esophageal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Gastric Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Gastric Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIC Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IV Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Undifferentiated Gastric Carcinoma

  15. A Knowledge Discovery Approach to Diagnosing Intracranial Hematomas on Brain CT: Recognition, Measurement and Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chun-Chih; Xiao, Furen; Wong, Jau-Min; Chiang, I.-Jen

    Computed tomography (CT) of the brain is preferred study on neurological emergencies. Physicians use CT to diagnose various types of intracranial hematomas, including epidural, subdural and intracerebral hematomas according to their locations and shapes. We propose a novel method that can automatically diagnose intracranial hematomas by combining machine vision and knowledge discovery techniques. The skull on the CT slice is located and the depth of each intracranial pixel is labeled. After normalization of the pixel intensities by their depth, the hyperdense area of intracranial hematoma is segmented with multi-resolution thresholding and region-growing. We then apply C4.5 algorithm to construct a decision tree using the features of the segmented hematoma and the diagnoses made by physicians. The algorithm was evaluated on 48 pathological images treated in a single institute. The two discovered rules closely resemble those used by human experts, and are able to make correct diagnoses in all cases.

  16. Nasalseptal hematoma/abscess: management and outcome in a tertiary hospital of a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Nwosu, Jones N; Nnadede, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    Background Nasal hematoma/abscess is an uncommon entity, but capable of leading to serious consequences if not handled meticulously, and with urgency. Objective To present the management, and outcome of nasal septal hematoma/abscess in a Nigerian tertiary institution. Method Consecutive patients diagnosed with nasal septal hematoma/abscess over a 10-year period, treated at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria, were prospectively studied. The processes leading to diagnosis, treatment, and outcome were sequentially evaluated. Results Fifty-three patients (37 males and 16 females), age 5–65 years (with mean age of 23.10 years), were included. Surgical drainage of the hematoma/abscess, intranasal packing with insertion of drain was performed with total resolution of problem in all the cases. Conclusion Incision and drainage, and intranasal packing with insertion of drain was effective in treating nasal septal hematoma/abscess. PMID:26251577

  17. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1910 Esophageal stethoscope....

  18. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1910 Esophageal stethoscope....

  19. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1910 Esophageal stethoscope....

  20. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1910 Esophageal stethoscope....

  1. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1910 Esophageal stethoscope....

  2. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Esophageal dilator. 876.5365 Section 876.5365 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5365 Esophageal dilator....

  3. Esophageal Impedance Monitoring: Clinical Pearls and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Karthik; Katzka, David A

    2016-09-01

    The development of intraluminal esophageal impedance monitoring has improved our ability to detect and measure gastroesophageal reflux without dependence on acid content. This ability to detect previously unrecognized weak or nonacid reflux episodes has had important clinical implications in the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In addition, with the ability to assess bolus transit within the esophageal lumen, impedance monitoring has enhanced the recognition and characterization of esophageal motility disorders in patients with nonobstructive dysphagia. The assessment of the intraluminal movement of gas and liquid has also been proven to be of diagnostic value in conditions such as rumination syndrome and excessive belching. Further, alternative applications of impedance monitoring, such as the measurement of mucosal impedance, have provided novel insights into assessing esophageal mucosal integrity changes as a consequence of inflammatory change. Future applications for esophageal impedance monitoring also hold promise in esophageal conditions other than GERD. However, despite all of the clinical benefits afforded by esophageal impedance monitoring, important clinical and technical shortcomings limit its diagnostic value and must be considered when interpreting study results. Overinterpretation of studies or application of impedance monitoring in patients can have deleterious clinical implications. This review will highlight the clinical benefits and limitations of esophageal impedance monitoring and provide clinical pearls and pitfalls associated with this technology. PMID:27325223

  4. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal...

  5. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal...

  6. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal...

  7. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal...

  8. Evaluation of Risk Factors for Rectus Sheath Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Heena S; Kumar, Rohit; DiNella, Jeannine; Janov, Cheryl; Kaldas, Hoda; Smith, Roy E

    2016-04-01

    Rectus sheath hematoma (RSH) develops due to rupture of epigastric arteries or the rectus muscle. Although RSH incidence rate is low, it poses a significant diagnostic dilemma. We evaluated the risk factors for RSH, its presentation, management, and outcomes for 115 patients hospitalized with confirmed RSH by computed tomography scan between January 2005 and June 2009. More than three-fourth (77.4%) of the patients were on anticoagulation therapy, 58.3% patients had chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage ≥3, 51.3% had abdominal injections, 41.7% were on steroids/immunosuppressant therapy, 37.4% had abdominal surgery/trauma, 33.9% had cough, femoral puncture was performed in 31.3% of patients, and 29.5% were on antiplatelet therapy. Rectus sheath hematoma was not an attributable cause in any of the 17 deaths. Mortality was significantly higher in patients with CKD stage ≥3 (P = .03) or who required transfusion (P = .007). Better understanding of RSH risk factors will facilitate early diagnoses and improve management. PMID:25294636

  9. Idiopathic Hypertrophic Cranial Pachymeningitis Misdiagnosed as Acute Subtentorial Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ik-Seong; Kim, Hoon; Chung, Eun Yong

    2010-01-01

    A case of idiopathic hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis (IHCP) misdiagnosed as an acute subdural hematoma is reported. A 37-year-old male patient presented with headache following head trauma 2 weeks earlier. Computerized tomography showed a diffuse high-density lesion along the left tentorium and falx cerebri. Initial chest X-rays revealed a small mass in the right upper lobe with right lower pleural thickening, which suggested lung cancer, such as an adenoma or mediastinal metastasis. During conservative treatment under the diagnosis of a subdural hematoma, left cranial nerve palsies were developed (3rd and 6th), followed by scleritis and uveitis involving both eyes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an unusual tentorium-falx enhancement on gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images. Non-specific chronic inflammation of the pachymeninges was noticed on histopathologic examination following an open biopsy. Systemic steroid treatment was initiated, resulting in dramatic improvement of symptoms. A follow-up brain MRI showed total resolution of the lesion 2 months after steroid treatment. IHCP should be included in the differential diagnosis of subtentorial-enhancing lesions. PMID:20856672

  10. Prediction of Chronic Subdural Hematoma in Minor Head Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang-Beom; Song, Shi-Hun; Youm, Jin-Young; Koh, Hyeon-Song; Kim, Seon-Hwan; Kwon, Hyon-Jo

    2014-01-01

    Objective Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is relatively common in neurosurgical field. However not all patients develop CSDH after minor head trauma. In this study, we evaluate the risk factors of post-traumatic CSDH. Methods Two-hundred and seventy-seven patients were enrolled and analyzed in this study from January 2012 to December 2013. Of those, 20 participants had minor head trauma developed CSDH afterward. We also included 257 patients with minor head trauma who did not develop CSDH during the same follow-up period as the control group. We investigated the risk factors related to the development of CSDH after minor head trauma. Results Old age (p=0.014), preexisting diabetes mellitus (p=0.010), hypertension (p=0.026), history of cerebral infarction (p=0.035), antiplatelet agents (p=0.000), acute subdural hematoma in the convexity (p=0.000), encephalomalacia (p=0.029), and long distance between skull and brain parenchyma (p=0.000) were significantly correlated with the development of CSDH after trauma. Multivariate analysis revealed that only the maximum distance between the skull and the cerebral parenchyma was the independent risk factor for the occurrence of CSDH (hazard ratio 2.55, p=0.000). Conclusion We should consider the possibility of developing CSDH in the post-traumatic patients with the identified risk factors. PMID:27169043

  11. The annular hematoma of the shrew yolk-sac placenta.

    PubMed

    King, B F; Enders, A C; Wimsatt, W A

    1978-05-01

    The annular hematoma of the shrew, Blarina brevicauda, is a specialized portion of the yolk-sac wall. In this study, we have examined the fine structure of the different cellular components of the anular hematoma. Small pieces of the gestation sacs from seven pregnant shrews were fixed in glutaraldehyde and osmium tetroxide and processed for transmission electron microscopy. In the area of the trophoblastic curtain, the maternal capillary endothelial cells were hypertrophied and syncytial trophoblast surrounded the capillaries. Cellular trophoblast covered part of the luminal surface of the curtain region, whereas masses of apparently degenerating syncytium were present on other areas of the surface. Maternal erythrocytes, released into the uterine lumen from the curtain region, were phagocytized and degraded by the columnar cells of the trophoblastic annulus. No evidence of iron or pigment accumulation was evident in the parietal endodermal cells underlying the annular trophoblast. Parietal endodermal cells were characterized by cuboidal shape, widely dilated intercellular spaces, and cytoplasm containing granular endoplasmic reticulum. Endodermal cells of the visceral yolk-sac accumulated large numbers of electron-dense granules as well as glycogen in their cytoplasm. Hemopoietic areas and vitelline capillaries were found subjacent to the visceral endoderm. The various portions of the yolk-sac wall of Blarina appear to perform complementary functions which are probably important in maternal-fetal iron transfer. PMID:677046

  12. Esophageal stents: when and how.

    PubMed

    Kachaamy, Toufic; Pannala, Rahul

    2016-06-01

    Esophageal stents are devices used to alleviate dysphagia and treat leaks and perforations. Successful esophageal stenting requires definition of the abnormal anatomy such as stricture length or location of the leak, proper stent selection and deployment. This requires detailed knowledge of characteristics of the currently available stents. Self-expanding metal stents whether fully or partially covered have become the mainstay of treatment of esophageal cancer-related dysphagia as they provide quick relief of symptoms and have a favorable safety and efficacy profile, compared to other modalities such as radiation, laser, and argon plasma coagulation. They are also the initial treatment of choice for both malignant and benign fistulae. Stents are also used in benign refractory strictures but long-term stricture resolution rates are low in this setting. Fully covered metal stents are relatively easier to remove compared to partially covered stents; optimal time interval for removal depends on the indication for stenting and the clinical status of the patient. Stent related adverse events include chest pain, reflux, migration, and recurrent obstruction. Serious adverse events occur in less than 5% with procedure-related mortality of less than 2%. Techniques such as placement of hemostatic clips, Over The Scope clips, and endoscopic suturing are being used to decrease the migration risk but the optimal approach has not been defined. Antireflux measures are needed when a stent is placed across the gastroesophageal junction. Stents with antireflux designs do not appear to offer additional benefit compared to the conventional stent designs. Newer stent designs including biodegradable, drug eluting and radioactive stents are currently being investigated. PMID:26824424

  13. Endoscopic management of esophageal varices

    PubMed Central

    Poza Cordon, Joaquin; Froilan Torres, Consuelo; Burgos García, Aurora; Gea Rodriguez, Francisco; Suárez de Parga, Jose Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The rupture of gastric varices results in variceal hemorrhage, which is one the most lethal complications of cirrhosis. Endoscopic therapies for varices aim to reduce variceal wall tension by obliteration of the varix. The two principal methods available for esophageal varices are endoscopic sclerotherapy (EST) and band ligation (EBL). The advantages of EST are that it is cheap and easy to use, and the injection catheter fits through the working channel of a diagnostic gastroscope. Endoscopic variceal ligation obliterates varices by causing mechanical strangulation with rubber bands. The following review aims to describe the utility of EBL and EST in different situations, such as acute bleeding, primary and secondary prophylaxis PMID:22816012

  14. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension manifesting as a unilateral subdural hematoma with a marked midline shift.

    PubMed

    Inamasu, Joji; Moriya, Shigeta; Shibata, Junpei; Kumai, Tadashi; Hirose, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is a syndrome in which hypovolemia of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) results in various symptoms. Although its prognosis is usually benign, cases with a rapid neurologic deterioration resulting in an altered mental status have been reported. One of the characteristic radiographic findings in such cases is the presence of bilateral accumulation of subdural fluid (hematoma/hygroma). When SIH-related subdural hematoma is present only unilaterally with a concomitant midline shift, making an accurate diagnosis may be challenging, and inadvertent hematoma evacuation may result in further neurologic deterioration. We report a 58-year-old woman with an altered mental status who had visited a local hospital and in whom a brain CT showed a unilateral subdural hematoma with a marked midline shift. She was referred to our department because of her neurologic deterioration after hematoma evacuation. A CT myelography revealed a massive CSF leakage in the entire thoracic epidural space. She made a full neurologic recovery following blood patch therapy. Our case is unique and educational because the suspicion for SIH as an underlying cause of subdural hematoma is warranted in nongeriatric patients not only with bilateral but also unilateral lesions. An immediate search for CSF leakage may be important in cases with failed hematoma evacuation surgery. PMID:25969682

  15. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension Manifesting as a Unilateral Subdural Hematoma with a Marked Midline Shift

    PubMed Central

    Inamasu, Joji; Moriya, Shigeta; Shibata, Junpei; Kumai, Tadashi; Hirose, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is a syndrome in which hypovolemia of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) results in various symptoms. Although its prognosis is usually benign, cases with a rapid neurologic deterioration resulting in an altered mental status have been reported. One of the characteristic radiographic findings in such cases is the presence of bilateral accumulation of subdural fluid (hematoma/hygroma). When SIH-related subdural hematoma is present only unilaterally with a concomitant midline shift, making an accurate diagnosis may be challenging, and inadvertent hematoma evacuation may result in further neurologic deterioration. We report a 58-year-old woman with an altered mental status who had visited a local hospital and in whom a brain CT showed a unilateral subdural hematoma with a marked midline shift. She was referred to our department because of her neurologic deterioration after hematoma evacuation. A CT myelography revealed a massive CSF leakage in the entire thoracic epidural space. She made a full neurologic recovery following blood patch therapy. Our case is unique and educational because the suspicion for SIH as an underlying cause of subdural hematoma is warranted in nongeriatric patients not only with bilateral but also unilateral lesions. An immediate search for CSF leakage may be important in cases with failed hematoma evacuation surgery. PMID:25969682

  16. Neuroendoscopic Removal of Acute Subdural Hematoma with Contusion: Advantages for Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Ryota; Kuroshima, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Background. Large craniotomy for acute subdural hematoma is sometimes too invasive. We report good outcomes for two cases of neuroendoscopic evacuation of hematoma and contusion by 1 burr hole surgery. Case Presentation. Both patients arrived by ambulance at our hospital with disturbed consciousness after falling. Case 1 was an 81-year-old man who took antiplatelet drugs for brain infarction. Case 2 was a 73-year-old alcoholic woman. CT scanning showed acute subdural hematoma and frontal contusion in both cases. In the acute stage, glycerol was administered to reduce edema; CTs after 48 and 72 hours showed an increase of subdural hematoma and massive contusion of the frontal lobe. Disturbed consciousness steadily deteriorated. The subdural hematoma and contusion were removed as soon as possible by neuroendoscopy under local anesthesia, because neither patient was a good candidate for large craniotomy considering age and past history. 40%~70% of the hematoma was removed, and the consciousness level improved. Conclusion. Neuroendoscopic removal of acute subdural hematoma and contusion has advantages and disadvantages. For patients with underlying medical issues or other risk factors, it is likely to be effective. PMID:26981295

  17. Spinal subdural hematoma revealing hemophilia A in a child: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar, Behzad; Ghodsi, Mohammad; Ketabchi, Ebrahim; Bakhtiari, Abbas; Mostajabi, Pardis

    2003-01-01

    Background Intraspinal bleeding especially in the form of subdural hematoma is rare in hemophiliacs. In the present case, we report a neglected hemophilic A child with such a problem and discuss its management options. Case Presentation A 9-year old hemophilic A boy presented with quadriparesis, confusion and meningismus after a fall 4 days previously. There was no sign of direct trauma to his back. His CT Scan and MRI showed spinal extramedullary hematoma extended from C5 to L2. We corrected the factor VIII level, but two days later, the patient's lower limbs weakened to 1/5 proximally as well as distally. We performed a laminectomy from T11 to L2, according to the level of the maximal neurological deficit and recent deterioration course. The subdural hematoma was evacuated. The hematoma in other spinal levels was managed conservatively. In the week following the operation, the patient's neurological status approached normal. Conclusion This case calls attention to the clinical manifestation, radiological features and management options of the rarely reported intraspinal hematoma in hemophilic children. Although this case has been managed operatively for its hematoma in the thoracolumbar region, at the same time it can be considered a successful case of conservative management of intraspinal hematoma in the cervicothoracic region. Both conservative and surgical management could be an option in managing these patients considering their neurological course. PMID:12904268

  18. Spinal subdural hematoma revealing hemophilia A in a child: A case report.

    PubMed

    Eftekhar, Behzad; Ghodsi, Mohammad; Ketabchi, Ebrahim; Bakhtiari, Abbas; Mostajabi, Pardis

    2003-08-01

    BACKGROUND: Intraspinal bleeding especially in the form of subdural hematoma is rare in hemophiliacs. In the present case, we report a neglected hemophilic A child with such a problem and discuss its management options. CASE PRESENTATION: A 9-year old hemophilic A boy presented with quadriparesis, confusion and meningismus after a fall 4 days previously. There was no sign of direct trauma to his back. His CT Scan and MRI showed spinal extramedullary hematoma extended from C5 to L2. We corrected the factor VIII level, but two days later, the patient's lower limbs weakened to 1/5 proximally as well as distally. We performed a laminectomy from T11 to L2, according to the level of the maximal neurological deficit and recent deterioration course. The subdural hematoma was evacuated. The hematoma in other spinal levels was managed conservatively. In the week following the operation, the patient's neurological status approached normal. CONCLUSION: This case calls attention to the clinical manifestation, radiological features and management options of the rarely reported intraspinal hematoma in hemophilic children. Although this case has been managed operatively for its hematoma in the thoracolumbar region, at the same time it can be considered a successful case of conservative management of intraspinal hematoma in the cervicothoracic region. Both conservative and surgical management could be an option in managing these patients considering their neurological course. PMID:12904268

  19. The National Institutes of Health/National Institutes of Nursing Research Intramural Research Program and the Development of the NIH Symptom Science Model

    PubMed Central

    Cashion, Ann K.; Grady, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    The National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) Intramural Research Program conducts basic and biobehavioral symptom science research, and provides training opportunities to the next generation of scientists. Recently, NINR developed the Symptom Science Model to guide research. The model begins by identifying a complex symptom, which is then characterized into a phenotype with biological and clinical data, followed by the application of genomic and other discovery methodologies to illuminate targets for therapeutic and clinical interventions. Using the Symptom Science Model, the intramural program organizes and implements biobehavioral, symptom management, and tissue injury research. The model is also used as a framework for training and career development opportunities including oncampus trainings, and research fellowship. The scientific goal of the intramural program is to enhance patient outcomes including health-related quality of life. Achieving this goal requires a long-term vision, continued resource investments, and a commitment to mentoring our next generation of scientists. PMID:26187087

  20. Current Gene Expression Studies in Esophageal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Jiang, Yao-Guang

    2009-01-01

    Esophageal carcinoma is one of the deadliest cancers with highly aggressive potency, ranking as the sixth most common cancer among males and ninth most common cancer among females globally. Due to metastasis and invasion of surrounding tissues in early stage, the 5-year overall survival rate (14%) of esophageal cancer remains poor, even in comparison with the dismal survival rates (4%) from the 1970s. Numerous genes and proteins with abnormal expression and function involve in the pathogenesis of esophageal cancer, but the concrete process remains unclear. Microarray technique has been applied to investigating esophageal cancer. Many gene expression studies have been undertaken to look at the specific patterns of gene transcript levels in esophageal cancer. Human tissues and cell lines were used in these geneprofiling studies and a very valuable and interesting set of data has resulted from various microarray experiments. These expression studies have provided increased understanding of the complex pathological mechanisms involved in esophageal cancer. The eventual goal of microarray is to discover new markers for therapy and to customize therapy based on an individual tumor genetic composition. This review summarized the current state of gene expression profile studies in esophageal cancer. PMID:20514215

  1. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Giacchino, Maria; Bodini, Giorgia; Marabotto, Elisa; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett’s esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted. PMID:24868489

  2. Role of advanced diagnostics for eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Ikuo

    2014-01-01

    In eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), diagnostic tests aid in the identification of pathophysiologic consequences and accurate detection of the disease. The EoE Endoscopic Reference Score (EREFS) classifies and grades the severity of the five major endoscopically identified esophageal features of EoE (edema, rings, exudates, furrows and strictures). The EREFS may be useful in the evaluation of disease severity and as an objective outcome of response to therapy. pH monitoring identifies the presence of abnormal degrees of acid exposure in the esophagus that characterizes gastroesophageal reflux disease. The presence of acid reflux, however, does not indicate that the reflux is responsible for esophageal eosinophilia. Esophageal manometry has not demonstrated a characteristic abnormality with sufficient sensitivity to make the test of diagnostic value in clinical practice. On the other hand, manometric characteristics of esophageal pressurization and longitudinal muscle dysfunction may help identify important pathophysiologic consequences of EoE. Esophageal impedance testing has demonstrated increased baseline mucosal impedance that correlates with increased epithelial permeability in EoE. Reduced mucosal integrity may provide intraluminal allergens access to antigen-presenting cells, serving as an early event in the pathogenesis of EoE. The functional luminal impedance probe (FLIP) provides quantitative assessment of esophageal mural compliance, a physiologic correlate of remodeling in EoE. Studies using FLIP have associated reductions in esophageal distensibility in EoE with the important outcome of food impaction risk. Finally, confocal endomicroscopy, multiphoton fluorescence microscopy and novel eosinophil-enhancing contrast agents are emerging methods that may allow for in vivo visualization of esophageal eosinophilic inflammation, thereby improving the detection and understanding of this emerging disease. PMID:24603385

  3. Esophageal Distensibility as a Measure of Disease Severity in Patients with Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Nicodème, Frédéric; Hirano, Ikuo; Chen, Joan; Robinson, Kenika; Lin, Zhiyue; Xiao, Yinglian; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Kwasny, Mary J; Kahrilas, Peter J; Pandolfino, John E

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims The aim of this study was to assess whether measurements of esophageal distensibility, made by high-resolution impedance planimetry, correlated with important clinical outcomes in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis. Methods Seventy patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (50 male, ages 18–68) underwent endoscopy with esophageal biopsy collection and high-resolution impedance planimetry using the functional lumen-imaging probe. The patients were followed prospectively for an average of 9.2 months (range 3–14 months), and the risk of food impaction, requirement for dilation; symptom severity during the follow-up period was determined from medical records. Esophageal distensibility metrics and the severity of mucosal eosinophilia at baseline were compared between patients presenting with and without food impaction and those requiring or not requiring esophageal dilation. Logistic regression and stratification assessments were used to assess the predictive value of esophageal distensibility metrics in assessing risk of food impaction, the need for dilation, and continued symptoms. Results Patients with prior food impactions had significantly lower distensibility plateau (DP) values than those with solid food dysphagia alone. Additionally, patients sustaining food impaction and requiring esophageal dilation during the follow-up period had significantly lower DP values than those who did not. The severity of mucosal eosinophilia did not correlate with risk for food impaction, the requirement for dilation during follow up, or DP values. Conclusions Reduced esophageal distensibility predicts risk for food impaction and the requirement for esophageal dilation in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis. The severity of mucosal eosinophilia was not predictive of these outcomes and had a poor correlation with esophageal distensibility. PMID:23591279

  4. Acute Scrotum Following Traumatic Spermatic Cord Hematoma: A Case Report and Review

    PubMed Central

    Pepe, Pietro; Bonaccorsi, Astrid; Candiano, Giuseppe; Pietropaolo, Francesco; Panella, Paolo; Pennisi, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Acute scrotum constitutes the most common urological emergency secondary to spermatic cord torsion, testicular trauma, orchiepididymitis and hernias. We report a very rare case of unique traumatic spermatic cord hematoma following scrotum injury occurred during a football match. Clinical exam showed an increased volume of the left spermatic cord; the color Doppler ultrasound (CDU) demonstrated left testicular ischemia secondary to a large spermatic cord hematoma that needs surgical exploration. Spermatic cord hematoma rarely induces acute scrotum, however it could be treated conservatively surgery is mandatory when pain is persistent or testicular ischemia is confirmed by CDU. PMID:26793493

  5. Treatment of thoracic hemorrhage due to rupture of traumatic mediastinal hematoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui-Jie; Zhang, Ling-Fang; Cao, Wei-Zhong

    2016-02-01

    Patients in traffic accidents are usually presented with pain and bleeding due to fractures or soft tissue injury. On some occasions, more severe complications may be triggered by the trauma. A review of the published English language literature reveals no survival case once the traumatic mediastinal hematoma is ruptured. In our case, a 54-year-old man suffering motorcycle accident was admitted to emergency department. Computed tomography scan revealed subdural hematoma combined with posterior mediastinal hematoma. The patient was saved and discharged with a satisfactory outcome. Here we hope to share our treatment experience in dealing with the patient with severe multiple trauma. PMID:27033275

  6. Heading injury precipitating subdural hematoma associated with arachnoid cysts--two case reports.

    PubMed

    Kawanishi, A; Nakayama, M; Kadota, K

    1999-03-01

    A 14-year-old boy and a 11-year-old boy presented with subdural hematomas as complications of preexisting arachnoid cysts in the middle cranial fossa, manifesting as symptoms of raised intracranial pressure. Both had a history of heading the ball in a soccer game about 7 weeks and 2 days before the symptom occurred. There was no other head trauma, so these cases could be described as "heading injury." Arachnoid cysts in the middle cranial fossa are often associated with subdural hematomas. We emphasize that mild trauma such as heading of the ball in a soccer game may cause subdural hematomas in patients with arachnoid cysts. PMID:10344112

  7. [A heat gelatinized subdural hematoma in a burned cadaver as an indication of a vital accident].

    PubMed

    Ritter, C

    1990-01-01

    The autopsy of a carbonized male cadaver revealed a subdural hematoma which permitted by absence of soot aspiration and carbon monoxid intoxication to think of a crime with following fire setting. This was confirmed later by detective investigations. The most impressive finding of this case was a heat-gelatinized subdural hematoma highly resembling to a postmortem epidural burn hematoma, which could easily lead to an error conclusion. The problems in the diagnosis of the causes of death in carbonized bodies are discussed and the taking into account of crimes is accentuated. PMID:2309533

  8. Massive subchorionic hematoma: peculiar prenatal images and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Koji; Shukunami, Ken-Ichi; Tsuyoshi, Hideaki; Orisaka, Makoto; Tajima, Kimihisa; Kurokawa, Tetsuji; Yoshida, Yoshio; Kotsuji, Fumikazu

    2005-01-01

    Massive subchorionic hematoma is a localized collection of blood or hematoma in the placenta, and can result in serious obstetrical complications. The condition can be diagnosed antenatally by ultrasound. However, no reports have previously described the same condition featuring an intraplacental fluid-fluid level on imaging studies. We report a case of massive subchorionic hematoma diagnosed prenatally, and propose an additional peculiar finding detectable on both the ultrasound and magnetic resonance images: the intraplacental fluid-fluid level. We also review previously reported cases that were detected by ultrasonography. PMID:15608455

  9. Elevated maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein levels in patients with subchorionic hematoma.

    PubMed

    Kumbak, Banu; Sahin, Levent

    2010-07-01

    Subchorionic hematoma might be associated with poor pregnancy outcome. Two intra cytoplasmic sperm injection pregnancies complicated with subchorionic hematoma were found to have elevated mid-trimester maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein levels. One of them had miscarriage at 16 weeks' gestation and the other delivered a healthy baby by cesarean section. The valid interpretation of triple test result might be complicated by subchorionic hematoma. Therefore, it is better not to order triple test in such cases to avoid unnecessarily provoking the anxiety of the couple. PMID:19883262

  10. Obturator Compartment Syndrome Secondary to Pelvic Hematoma After Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jun H.; Abbott, Daniel; Gewirtz, Eric; Hauck, Ellen; Eun, Daniel D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Obturator nerve injury is a known injury after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) and patients often present with motor and sensory deficits in the immediate postoperative period. We describe a 65-year-old male who presented with motor deficits, indicative of obturator neurapraxia after RALP upon waking from anesthesia. Work-up revealed an expansile hematoma possibly compressing the obturator nerve. After evacuation of the hematoma, the patient had immediate improvement of his neurologic deficits. Our patient's clinical vignette illustrates the importance of considering postsurgical hematoma in the differential diagnosis when patients present with signs and symptoms of obturator neurapraxia after RALP. PMID:27579444

  11. Obturator Compartment Syndrome Secondary to Pelvic Hematoma After Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Song, Jun H; Kaplan, Joshua R; Abbott, Daniel; Gewirtz, Eric; Hauck, Ellen; Eun, Daniel D

    2016-01-01

    Obturator nerve injury is a known injury after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) and patients often present with motor and sensory deficits in the immediate postoperative period. We describe a 65-year-old male who presented with motor deficits, indicative of obturator neurapraxia after RALP upon waking from anesthesia. Work-up revealed an expansile hematoma possibly compressing the obturator nerve. After evacuation of the hematoma, the patient had immediate improvement of his neurologic deficits. Our patient's clinical vignette illustrates the importance of considering postsurgical hematoma in the differential diagnosis when patients present with signs and symptoms of obturator neurapraxia after RALP. PMID:27579444

  12. Shunt site chronic calcified extradural hematoma: An avoidable complication

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sudhansu Sekhar; Satapathy, Mani Charan; Senapati, Satya Bhusan

    2014-01-01

    Extradural hematoma (EDH) after ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt procedure is a rare, dangerous but easily avoidable and manageable complication. It is more common in children and young adults presumably due to relatively lax adhesion of dura to calvarium. We report a case of an 18-year-old male with acqueductal stenosis who underwent VP shunt procedure. Three months later, a computed tomography (CT) scan was done for the complaints of intractable headache and altered sensorium which showed chronic calcified EDH near shunt site. The ventricular catheter was in position and the ventricles were decompressed. After surgical decompression of EDH his symptoms improved. We discuss the factors leading to formation of EDH, with stress on proper technique to prevent or minimize such an avoidable complication. PMID:25250078

  13. Traumatic acute subdural hygroma mimicking acute subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Kamezaki, Takao; Yanaka, Kiyoyuki; Fujita, Keishi; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Nagatomo, Yasushi; Nose, Tadao

    2004-04-01

    Subdural hygroma is a frequent delayed complication of head trauma. Most hygromas are clinically 'silent' and a few cases have shown slow deterioration in the chronic stage. We report a case of subdural hygroma showing unique radiological findings and rapid deterioration. A 74-years-old female presented with a mild headache and consciousness disturbance after head injury. Computed tomography showed a midline shift as a result of two components piling up in the subdural space; the outer components showed low density, the inner components high density. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated that these two subdural components were subdural hygroma and subarachnoid hematoma. Simple burr hole irrigation, rather than large craniotomy, was thought to be more appropriate treatment to reduce the mass effect. Simple burr hole irrigation was performed to remove the subdural hygroma and the patient showed an excellent recovery. Careful examination of the radiological findings prevented an unnecessary procedure in this case. A possible mechanism of this phenomenon is discussed. PMID:14975427

  14. Subchorionic hematoma associated with thrombophilia: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Heller, Debra S; Rush, Demaretta; Baergen, Rebecca N

    2003-01-01

    Subchorionic hematomas (SCHs) are associated with poor reproductive outcome including spontaneous abortions and stillbirth. Although many associations with maternal and prenatal factors have been reported, an underlying etiology has not been elucidated. We report three cases of SCHs associated with thrombophilias in the mother. One patient suffered a fetal demise at 30 wk gestational age, and two patients had second trimester losses. The mother of the 30-wk fetus was homozygous for mutations on the methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase gene C677T. The other two patients had Protein S deficiency. SCHs may be associated with abnormal coagulative states suggesting that the underlying etiology of SCH may be related to hypercoagulability in the maternal circulation. The presence of a SCH may be the first indicator of an underlying thrombophilia and, thus, it is suggested that women who have placentas showing SCH should undergo a thrombophilia workup. PMID:12658542

  15. Massive subchorionic hematoma (Breus' mole) complicated by intrauterine growth retardation.

    PubMed

    Nishida, N; Suzuki, S; Hamamura, Y; Igarashi, K; Hayashi, Z; Sawa, R; Yoneyama, Y; Asakura, H; Kawabata, K; Shima, Y; Shin, S; Araki, T

    2001-02-01

    We present here a case of massive subchorionic hematoma complicated by intrauterine growth retardation and oligohydramnios diagnosed at 22 weeks' gestation. The patient was managed with the following medications: (1) tocolysis with ritodrine infusion, (2) 10%maltose infusion therapy (1500mL/day), (3) antibiotic infusion (cefotaxim sodium, 2 g/dayx7) and (4) kampo therapy with Sairei-to until delivery. At 33 weeks and 0 days' gestation, a female baby weighing 1,342 g was delivered without complication by caesarean section. During surgery, an escape of about 500~600 g of dark brown blood with no clots was noted from the subchorionic space of the placenta. Examination of the placenta showed a large fibrosis with well-defined margins on the fetal surface. PMID:11180702

  16. Esophageal melanocytosis in oral opium consumption.

    PubMed

    Geramizadeh, Bita; Asadian, Fatemeh; Taghavi, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal melanocytosis is a rare and benign condition, characterized by melanocytic proliferation of the esophageal squamous epithelium with heavy melanin deposition. The etiology and pathogenesis has not been exactly known but it seems to be a chronic stimulus such as gastroesophageal reflux. This condition is very rare and about 35 cases have been reported so far, most of which have been from India and Japan. Herein, we present a case of esophageal melanocytosis in a patient with long history of oral opium consumption. To the best of our knowledge, such a history has not been reported. PMID:24719715

  17. [Oral blastomycosis, laryngeal papillomatosis and esophageal tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Montoya, Manuel; Chumbiraico, Robert; Ricalde, Melvin; Cazorla, Ernesto; Hernández-Córdova, Gustavo

    2012-06-01

    Esophageal involvement is an extremely rare complication of tuberculosis even in countries with high prevalence of infection. We report the case of a 57 year-old hiv-seronegative patient with simultaneous diagnoses of oral blastomycosis and laryngeal papillomatosis. Both were confirmed by anatomopathological analysis. The esophageal biopsy revealed granulomatous esophagitis with necrosis and ziehl-neelsen stain showed acid-fast alcohol resistant bacilli suggestive of tuberculosis. The patient's history included pulmonary tuberculosis twice and previous abandonment of therapy. Thus, it was necessary to use oral itraconazole combined with second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs administered through a gastrostomy tube. The clinical development was favorable. PMID:22858774

  18. Eosinophilic esophagitis: emerging therapies and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Straumann, Alex

    2014-06-01

    Twenty years have passed since eosinophilic esophagitis was first recognized as a new and distinct entity. Current treatment modalities for eosinophilic esophagitis include the "3 Ds": drugs, allergen avoidance with diet, and esophageal dilation. Drugs entail the limitation that only corticosteroids have a proven efficacy; most other compounds evoke only a minimal effect. Diets must be maintained continuously and they interfere markedly with the quality of life, possibly even involving some risk of malnutrition. A greater understanding of the immunopathogenesis, natural history, and disease spectrum will inevitably lead to improved therapeutic outcomes for this emerging entity. PMID:24813523

  19. Esophageal stent placement as a therapeutic option for iatrogenic esophageal perforation in children

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Alsafadi; Wong Kee Song, Louis M.; Absah, Imad

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic esophageal perforation (IEP) is a potentially serious adverse event of interventional endoscopy. The approach to IEP varies from surgical repair for large perforations to conservative treatment for small contained perforations. We report a case of an 18-month-old girl with congenital esophageal stenosis suffering a large esophageal perforation after a trial of stricture dilatation, which was successfully managed by the placement of fully covered stent. Hence, in selected cases, esophageal stent placement is a feasible alternative to invasive surgery in managing IEP. PMID:27144142

  20. CD163 promotes hematoma absorption and improves neurological functions in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wen-jing; Yu, Hong-quan; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Qun; Meng, Hong-mei

    2016-01-01

    Clinical outcomes are positively associated with hematoma absorption. The monocyte-macrophage scavenger receptor, CD163, plays an important role in the metabolism of hemoglobin, and a soluble form of CD163 is present in plasma and other tissue fluids; therefore, we speculated that serum CD163 affects hematoma absorption after intracerebral hemorrhage. Patients with intracerebral hemorrhage were divided into high- and low-level groups according to the average CD163 level (1,977.79 ± 832.91 ng/mL). Compared with the high-level group, the low-level group had a significantly slower hematoma absorption rate, and significantly increased National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores and modified Rankin Scale scores. These results suggest that CD163 promotes hematoma absorption and the recovery of neurological function in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage.

  1. Spontaneous ventral spinal epidural hematoma in a child: A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Ratre, Shailendra; Yadav, Yadram; Choudhary, Sushma; Parihar, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma is very uncommon cause of spinal cord compression. It is extremely rare in children and is mostly located in dorsal epidural space. Ventral spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) is even rarer, with only four previous reports in childrens. We are reporting fifth such case in a 14 year old male child. He presented with history of sudden onset weakness and sensory loss in both lower limbs with bladder bowel involvment since 15 days. There was no history of trauma or bleeding diasthesis. On clinical examination he had spastic paraplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of dorsal spine was suggestive of ventral spinal epidural hematoma extending from first to sixth dorsal vertebrae. Laminectomy of fourth and fifth dorsal vertebrae and complete evacuation of hematoma was done on the same day of admission. Postoperatively the neurological status was same. PMID:27114667

  2. Bilateral Traumatic Basal Ganglia Hemorrhage Associated With Epidural Hematoma: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Calderon-Miranda, Willem Guillermo; Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; M. Rubiano, Andres; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic basal ganglia hematoma is a rare condition defined as presence of hemorrhagic lesions in basal ganglia or adjacent structures suchas internal capsule, putamen and thalamus. Bilateral basal ganglia hematoma are among the devastating and rare condition. We herein report a 28-year old man, a victim of car-car accident who was brought to our surgical emergency room by immediate loss of consciousness and was diagnosed to have hyperdense lesion in the basal ganglia bilaterally, with the presence of right parietal epidural hematoma. Craniotomy and epidural hematoma drainage were considered, associated to conservative management of gangliobasal traumatic contusions. On day 7 the patient had sudden neurologic deterioration, cardiac arrest unresponsive to resuscitation. Management of these lesions is similar to any other injury in moderate to severe traumatic injury. The use of intracranial pressure monitoring must be guaranteed. PMID:27162882

  3. Bilateral Traumatic Basal Ganglia Hemorrhage Associated With Epidural Hematoma: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Calderon-Miranda, Willem Guillermo; Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; M Rubiano, Andres; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael

    2014-07-01

    Traumatic basal ganglia hematoma is a rare condition defined as presence of hemorrhagic lesions in basal ganglia or adjacent structures suchas internal capsule, putamen and thalamus. Bilateral basal ganglia hematoma are among the devastating and rare condition. We herein report a 28-year old man, a victim of car-car accident who was brought to our surgical emergency room by immediate loss of consciousness and was diagnosed to have hyperdense lesion in the basal ganglia bilaterally, with the presence of right parietal epidural hematoma. Craniotomy and epidural hematoma drainage were considered, associated to conservative management of gangliobasal traumatic contusions. On day 7 the patient had sudden neurologic deterioration, cardiac arrest unresponsive to resuscitation. Management of these lesions is similar to any other injury in moderate to severe traumatic injury. The use of intracranial pressure monitoring must be guaranteed. PMID:27162882

  4. Scintigraphic demonstration of intracranial communication between arachnoid cyst and associated subdural hematoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, K.; Tonami, N.; Kimura, M.; Kinoshita, A.; Aburano, T.; Hisada, K.

    1989-05-01

    An arachnoid cyst found to have a communication to an associated subdural hematoma was demonstrated with the Tc-99m DTPA brain scintigraphy. Although arachnoid cysts are known to be silent, when a patient with an arachnoid cyst develops signs of increased intracranial pressure or neurological deficits, the presence of a complication, including subdural hematoma, intracystic hemorrhage or subdural hygroma, is highly suspected. In the present case, the patient with an arachnoid cyst had a subdural hematoma following minor head injury. Tc-99m DTPA brain scintigraphy showed abnormal accumulation of the tracer not only in the hematoma but in the arachnoid cyst. This observation suggested communication of the two lesions, which was confirmed at surgery.

  5. Long-term prognosis of pregnancies in women with intrauterine hematomas.

    PubMed

    Børlum, K G; Thomsen, A; Clausen, I; Eriksen, G

    1989-08-01

    To evaluate the long-term significance of intrauterine hematomas in patients with threatened abortion, 380 women with a living fetus of more than 8 weeks were studied. On ultrasound, intrauterine hematomas, defined as an echo-poor subchorionic collection, were found in 86 women. Two hundred ninety-four patients without hematomas served as controls. The rate of miscarriage was significantly increased in the study group (22.1 versus 8.2%; P less than .05). Patients discharged from the initial hospitalization without aborting still had a higher abortion risk than controls (16.3 versus 5.6%; P less than .05). Second-trimester debut of symptoms was followed more often by preterm delivery. Thus, patients with intrauterine hematomas continue to be a high-risk group for the remainder of their pregnancies. PMID:2664611

  6. Alcohol, Obesity Could Raise Esophageal Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160133.html Alcohol, Obesity Could Raise Esophageal Cancer Risk A third of ... at the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR). "Obesity is now linked to 11 types of cancer ...

  7. Multidisciplinary management for esophageal and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boniface, Megan M; Wani, Sachin B; Schefter, Tracey E; Koo, Phillip J; Meguid, Cheryl; Leong, Stephen; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Wingrove, Lisa J; McCarter, Martin D

    2016-01-01

    The management of esophageal and gastric cancer is complex and involves multiple specialists in an effort to optimize patient outcomes. Utilizing a multidisciplinary team approach starting from the initial staging evaluation ensures that all members are in agreement with the plan of care. Treatment selection for esophageal and gastric cancer often involves a combination of chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, and palliative interventions (endoscopic and surgical), and direct communication between specialists in these fields is needed to ensure appropriate clinical decision making. At the University of Colorado, the Esophageal and Gastric Multidisciplinary Clinic was created to bring together all experts involved in treating these diseases at a weekly conference in order to provide patients with coordinated, individualized, and patient-centered care. This review details the essential elements and benefits of building a multidisciplinary program focused on treating esophageal and gastric cancer patients. PMID:27217796

  8. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal prosthesis... of a plastic, metal, or polymeric material that is intended to be implanted to restore the...

  9. Esophageal papilloma: Flexible endoscopic ablation by radiofrequency

    PubMed Central

    del Genio, Gianmattia; del Genio, Federica; Schettino, Pietro; Limongelli, Paolo; Tolone, Salvatore; Brusciano, Luigi; Avellino, Manuela; Vitiello, Chiara; Docimo, Giovanni; Pezzullo, Angelo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    Squamous papilloma of the esophagus is a rare benign lesion of the esophagus. Radiofrequency ablation is an established endoscopic technique for the eradication of Barrett esophagus. No cases of endoscopic ablation of esophageal papilloma by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have been reported. We report a case of esophageal papilloma successfully treated with a single session of radiofrequency ablation. Endoscopic ablation of the lesion was achieved by radiofrequency using a new catheter inserted through the working channel of endoscope. The esophageal ablated tissue was removed by a specifically designed cup. Complete ablation was confirmed at 3 mo by endoscopy with biopsies. This case supports feasibility and safety of as a new potential indication for BarrxTM RFA in patients with esophageal papilloma. PMID:25789102

  10. Tissue engineering: an option for esophageal replacement?

    PubMed

    Zani, Augusto; Pierro, Agostino; Elvassore, Nicola; De Coppi, Paolo

    2009-02-01

    Esophageal replacement is required in several pediatric surgical conditions, like long-gap esophageal atresia. Although several techniques have been described to bridge the gap, all of them could be followed by postoperative complications. Esophageal tissue engineering could represent a valid alternative thanks to the recent advances in biomaterial science and cellular biology. Numerous attempts to shape a new esophagus in vitro have been described in the last decade. Herein, we review the main studies on the experimental use of nonabsorbable and absorbable materials as well as the development of cellularized patches. Furthermore, we describe the future perspectives of esophageal tissue engineering characterized by the use of stem cells seeded on new biopolymers. This opens to the construction of a functional allograft that could allow an anatomical replacement that grows with the children and does not severely impair their anatomy. PMID:19103424

  11. Management of delayed intrathoracic esophageal perforation with modified intraluminal esophageal stent.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J-H; Gong, T-Q; Jiang, Y-G; Wang, R-W; Zhao, Y-P; Tan, Q-Y; Ma, Z; Lin, Y-D; Deng, B

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we reviewed our experience of treatment of the delayed intrathoracic nonmalignant esophageal perforation employing modified intraluminal esophageal stent. Between February 1990 and August 2006, eight patients were included in this study. Five patients experienced sepsis. The interval time between perforation and stent placement ranged from 36 h to 27 days (average, 8.6 days). Esophageal stenting and throracotomy for foreign body removal were performed in four patients. The remaining four patients underwent stent placement and thoracostomy. Nutrition was initiated through gastrostomy after 7 to 10 days after the stenting. The stent was removed after the patients resumed oral intake of food and the esophagogram showed that perforation was closed. There was no death in this group. Signs of sepsis remitted 1 week after stent placement. Complications included stress ulcer, stimulative cough, and pneumonia each. Stent removal ranged 32 to 120 days (average 66.7) after its placement. The stent was kept in place for 4 months to prevent formation of esophageal stricture in one patient with caustic esophageal burns. The follow-up was completed in all the patients. The mean follow-up period was 59 months (range 12-180). One patient with caustic esophageal burn underwent cicatricial esophagectomy and gastric transposition 3 years later due to the esophageal stricture. Barium swallow demonstrated that there was a diverticulum-like outpouching in one patient and slight esophageal stricture at T2 and T3 level in another. One patient developed reflux esophagitis 5 years after stent removal. All the patients finally had a normal intake of food. Modified esophageal stenting is an effective method to manage the delayed intrathoracic esophageal perforation. Prevention of stent migration and its convenient adjustment might be the major advantages of this method. PMID:19191858

  12. Clinical application of endoscopic ultrasonography for esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Minami, Hitomi; Inoue, Haruhiro; Isomoto, Hajime; Urabe, Shigetoshi; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2015-04-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has been widely used for evaluating the nature of diseases of various organs. The possibility of applying EUS for esophageal motility diseases has not been well discussed despite its versatility. At present, peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) for esophageal achalasia and related diseases has brought new attention to esophageal diseases because POEM provides a more direct approach to the inner structures of the esophageal wall. In the present study, we discuss the clinical utility of EUS in evaluating and treating esophageal motility diseases such as esophageal achalasia and related diseases. PMID:25573637

  13. Scintigraphic demonstration of tracheo-esophageal fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, E.K.; Man, A.C.; Lin, K.J.; Kaufman, H.D.; Solomon, N.A.

    1983-12-01

    A tracheo-esophageal fistula, developed following radiotherapy for an esophageal carcinoma, was vividly demonstrated by radionuclide imaging. The abnormality was later confirmed by a barium esophagram and endoscopic examinations. The scintigraphic procedure, making use of a Tc-99m sulfur colloid swallow, appears to be a simple alternative method use of a Tc-99m sulfur colloid swallow, appears to be a simple alternative method that may be clinically useful for the diagnosis of such a condition.

  14. Mechanisms of Disease of Eosinophilic Esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Davis, Benjamin P; Rothenberg, Marc E

    2016-05-23

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a recently recognized inflammatory disease of the esophagus with clinical symptoms derived from esophageal dysfunction. The etiology of EoE is now being elucidated, and food hypersensitivity is emerging as the central cornerstone of disease pathogenesis. Herein, we present a thorough picture of the current clinical, pathologic, and molecular understanding of the disease with a focus on disease mechanisms. PMID:26925500

  15. Expanding Hematoma's Life-Threatening Neck and Face Emergency Management of Ballistic Injuries.

    PubMed

    Shuker, Sabri T

    2016-07-01

    This article aims to bring attention to the morbidity and fatality of hemorrhage, how expanding hematoma and air compromise neck/face N/F injuries and present challenges. Large neck vessel ballistic injuries may lead to hemorrhage and expanding hematoma, resulting in airway compromise, due to injuries to the internal and/or external carotid arteries, internal jugular veins "internal carotid artery, external carotid artery, internal jugular vein," and the external carotid artery deep branches. This also leads to injuries to the cervical fascial layers (barriers of deep spaces) that facilitate pooling blood and hematoma into compartmental and large potential space which effects the pharynx, larynx, esophagus, and trachea.The expanding hematomas distort neck anatomical landmarks so "no neck zones" classifications are applicable. As the spectrum of injuries continues to evolve, the clinical characterization needs a new categorization based on compartmental hematoma and potential space anatomical location like retropharyngeal, parapharyngeal, sublingual, submandibular spaces, retrobulbar, and cheek compartment space hematomas.Presence of symptoms and location of the hematoma generally dictate what type of procedure is needed and how urgently it needs to be appropriately performed.Two unusual patients of pseudoaneurysms facial artery injuries with extravasation of blood producing a pulsating hematoma are referred to. Another patient considers large internal carotid artery injuries pseudoaneurysms revealed in angiography.The immediate management of life-saving patients requires aggressive airway maintenance at the scene, conscious victim will often obtain a posture that clears his airway and the semiconscious or unconscious put him in prone position. Air compromise may need emergency intubation, large bore cannula cricothyroidotomy, cricothyrotomy and at medical facilities tracheostomy. PMID:27315316

  16. Use of brain electrical activity for the identification of hematomas in mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Daniel F; Chabot, Robert; Mould, W Andrew; Morgan, Timothy; Naunheim, Rosanne; Sheth, Kevin N; Chiang, William; Prichep, Leslie S

    2013-12-15

    This study investigates the potential clinical utility in the emergency department (ED) of an index of brain electrical activity to identify intracranial hematomas. The relationship between this index and depth, size, and type of hematoma was explored. Ten minutes of brain electrical activity was recorded from a limited montage in 38 adult patients with traumatic hematomas (CT scan positive) and 38 mild head injured controls (CT scan negative) in the ED. The volume of blood and distance from recording electrodes were measured by blinded independent experts. Brain electrical activity data were submitted to a classification algorithm independently developed traumatic brain injury (TBI) index to identify the probability of a CT+traumatic event. There was no significant relationship between the TBI-Index and type of hematoma, or distance of the bleed from recording sites. A significant correlation was found between TBI-Index and blood volume. The sensitivity to hematomas was 100%, positive predictive value was 74.5%, and positive likelihood ratio was 2.92. The TBI-Index, derived from brain electrical activity, demonstrates high accuracy for identification of traumatic hematomas. Further, this was not influenced by distance of the bleed from the recording electrodes, blood volume, or type of hematoma. Distance and volume limitations noted with other methods, (such as that based on near-infrared spectroscopy) were not found, thus suggesting the TBI-Index to be a potentially important adjunct to acute assessment of head injury. Because of the life-threatening risk of undetected hematomas (false negatives), specificity was permitted to be lower, 66%, in exchange for extremely high sensitivity. PMID:24040943

  17. Adrenal Hematoma and Right Hemothorax after Echis Carinatus Bite: An Unusual Manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Lakhotia, Manoj; Pahadiya, Hans Raj; Singh, Jagdish; Gandhi, Ronak; Bhansali, Shashank

    2014-01-01

    Common bleeding manifestations after viperine bite include bleeding from site of bite, bleeding gums, epistaxis, hemoptysis, hematuria, hematemesis, and intracranial bleed. Bleeding in the adrenal gland is a rare manifestation. We report here a patient of viperine bite who developed right adrenal hematoma and right hemothorax after 3 days of bite. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case report of adrenal hematoma and right hemothorax after Echis carinatus bite. PMID:25948976

  18. Late Intrahepatic Hematoma Complicating Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt for Budd-Chiari Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Terreni, Natalia; Vangeli, Marcello; Raimondo, Maria Luisa; Tibballs, Jonathan M.; Patch, David; Burroughs, Andrew K.

    2007-09-15

    Late intrahepatic hematoma is a rare complication of the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedure. We describe a patient with Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS), who presented with a large inrahepatic hematoma 13 days after TIPS. Review of the literature reveals only two previous cases, both occurring in patients with BCS and presenting after a similar time interval. This potentially serious complication appears to be specific for TIPS in BCS.

  19. Do large hiatal hernias affect esophageal peristalsis?

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Sabine; Kahrilas, Peter J; Kia, Leila; Luger, Daniel; Soper, Nathaniel; Pandolfino, John E

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aim Large hiatal hernias can be associated with a shortened or tortuous esophagus. We hypothesized that these anatomic changes may alter esophageal pressure topography (EPT) measurements made during high-resolution manometry (HRM). Our aim was to compare EPT measures of esophageal motility in patients with large hiatal hernias to those of patients without hernia. Methods Among 2000 consecutive clinical EPT, we identified 90 patients with large (>5 cm) hiatal hernias on endoscopy and at least 7 evaluable swallows on EPT. Within the same database a control group without hernia was selected. EPT was analyzed for lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, Distal Contractile Integral (DCI), contraction amplitude, Contractile Front Velocity (CFV) and Distal Latency time (DL). Esophageal length was measured on EPT from the distal border of upper esophageal sphincter to the proximal border of the LES. EPT diagnosis was based on the Chicago Classification. Results The manometry catheter was coiled in the hernia and did not traverse the crural diaphragm in 44 patients (49%) with large hernia. Patients with large hernias had lower average LES pressures, lower DCI, slower CFV and shorter DL than patients without hernia. They also exhibited a shorter mean esophageal length. However, the distribution of peristaltic abnormalities was not different in patients with and without large hernia. Conclusions Patients with large hernias had an alteration of EPT measurements as a consequence of the associated shortened esophagus. However, the distribution of peristaltic disorders was unaffected by the presence of hernia. PMID:22508779

  20. Laryngopharyngeal reflux in patients with reflux esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yung-Chih; Wang, Pa-Chun; Lin, Jun-Chen

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To assess the prevalence of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) in patients with reflux esophagitis and disclose factors contributing to the development of LPR. METHODS: A total of 167 patients who proved to have reflux esophagitis by endoscopy were enrolled. They received laryngoscopy to grade the reflux findings for the diagnosis of LPR. We used validated questionnaires to identify the presence of laryngopharyngeal symptoms, and stringent criteria of inclusion to increase the specificity of laryngoscopic findings. The data of patients were analyzed statistically to find out factors related to LPR. RESULTS: The prevalence rate of LPR in studied subjects with reflux esophagitis was 23.9%. Age, hoarseness and hiatus hernia were factors significantly associated with LPR. In 23 patients with a hiatus hernia, the group with LPR was found to have a lower trend of esophagitis grading. CONCLUSION: Laryngopharyngeal reflux is present in patients with reflux esophagitis, and three predicting factors were identified. However, the development of LPR might be different from that of reflux esophagitis. The importance of hiatus hernia deserves further study. PMID:18680233

  1. Effect of total laryngectomy on esophageal motility

    SciTech Connect

    Hanks, J.B.; Fisher, S.R.; Meyers, W.C.; Christian, K.C.; Postlethwait, R.W.; Jones, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    Total laryngectomy for cancer can result in dysphagia and altered esophageal motility. Manometric changes in the upper esophageal sphincter (UES), and in proximal and distal esophageal function have been reported. However, most studies have failed to take into account radiation therapy and appropriate controls. We selected ten male patients (54.3 +/- 1.9 yr) for longitudinal manometric evaluation prior to laryngectomy then at two weeks and again six months later. No patient received preoperative radiation therapy, had a previous history of esophageal surgery, or developed a postoperative wound infection or fistula. Seven of ten patients had positive nodes and received 6,000-6,600 rads postoperative radiation therapy. Preoperatively 4 of 10 patients complained of dysphagia which did not significantly change following surgery and radiation. Two of three patients who did not complain of dysphagia preoperatively and received radiation postoperatively developed dysphagia. No patient without dysphagia preoperatively who received no radiation therapy developed symptoms. Our studies show that laryngectomy causes alterations in the UES resting and peak pressures but not in the proximal or distal esophagus, or the lower esophageal sphincter. These data also imply radiation therapy may be associated with progressive alterations in motility and symptomatology. Further study regarding the effects of radiation on esophageal motility and function are urged.

  2. Diagnosis and management of esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Stavropoulos, Stavros N; Friedel, David; Modayil, Rani; Parkman, Henry P

    2016-01-01

    Achalasia is a rare esophageal motility disorder that is usually idiopathic in origin. It is characterized by dysphagia, and patients often have chest pain, regurgitation, weight loss, and an abnormal barium radiograph showing esophageal dilation with narrowing at the gastroesophageal junction. Abnormal or absent esophageal peristalsis and impaired relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) are typically seen on esophageal manometry. The advent of high resolution manometry (HRM) has allowed more precise diagnosis of achalasia, subtype designation, and differentiation from other esophageal motor disorders with an initial seminal publication in 2008 followed by further refinements of what has been termed the Chicago classification. Potential treatments include drugs, endoscopic botulinum toxin injection, balloon dilation, traditional surgery (usually laparoscopic Heller myotomy; LHM), and a novel, less invasive, natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) approach to Heller myotomy termed peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). The first human POEM was performed in 2008, with the first publication appearing in 2010 and evidence now rapidly accumulating showing POEM to be comparable to traditional surgery in terms of clinical success and radiologic and manometric post-therapy outcomes. This review discusses the diagnosis and management of achalasia with particular emphasis on the recent developments of HRM and POEM, which arguably represent the most important advances in the field since the advent of laparoscopic Heller myotomy in the 1990s. PMID:27625387

  3. Non-traumatic Bilateral Orbital Subperiosteal Hematoma in a Person Who Attempted Suicide by Hanging.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Keiji; Morita, Seiji; Otsuka, Hiroyuki; Sugita, Mariko; Taira, Takayuki; Nakagawa, Yoshihide; Inokuchi, Sadaki

    2014-09-01

    Orbital subperiosteal hematomas are rare and most often result from facial trauma; however, occurrence of these hematomas due to non-traumatic causes is extremely rare. Herein, we present the case of a 38-year-old man who was transferred to our emergency department because he became comatose after attempting suicide by hanging. He underwent computed tomography (CT) of the head and neck. CT findings revealed a bilateral orbital subperiosteal hematoma. We then performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head for definite diagnosis of hematoma. There is no consensus regarding if this condition should be treated conservatively or surgically. Conservative management was selected for this patient because he was in deep coma. Some non-traumatic causes of orbital subperiosteal hematoma include weight lifting, coughing, vomiting, Valsalva maneuver, labor, and scuba diving. Sudden elevations in cranial pressure may be the mechanism underlying this condition. Although suicide attempt by hanging could have caused a sudden elevation in cranial pressure, this is the first report of the occurrence of this condition. Patients with orbital subperiosteal hematomas generally complain of blurred vision, eye pain, or exophthalmos. However, identifying this sign may be difficult in patients with disturbed consciousness. PMID:25248423

  4. [Endoscopic Surgery for Esophageal Cancer].

    PubMed

    Noshiro, Hirokazu

    2016-07-01

    Conventional thoracotomic esophagectomy has been performed for treating invasive thoracic esophageal carcinoma. In spite of the improved survival rate, the procedure is associated with significant operative morbidity and mortality rates due to the extreme invasiveness of an extensive dissection for the lymph nodes. Minimally invasive esophagectomy was developed to reduce surgical invasiveness. Recently, the use of thoracoscopic esophagectomy performed in the prone position has stimulated new interest in minimally invasive approaches. However, the advantages and disadvantages of this technique are not well known. In this paper, we present our minimally invasive esophagectomy in the prone position, and the literature to date, including series and comparative studies of minimally invasive esophagectomy performed in the prone position, is summarized. PMID:27440041

  5. Management of refractory Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Mukkada, Vincent A.; Furuta, Glenn T.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Whereas most children and adults respond to traditional EoE treatments, such as exclusion of dietary allergens or the use of topical steroids, a small fraction may not. Methods Based on clinical experiences and review of the literature, the aim of this work is to provide practical advice to care for ‘refractory’ patients with EoE. Results The approach to this type of patient continues to evolve and decision-making should consider a number of issues including the patient's age, lack of complete understanding of the natural history of this disease, risks of monitoring and side effects of treatments. Next, one needs to define the term refractory, in that this can refer either to persistent symptoms, or to continued inflammation in the face of presumably effective drug or diet therapy. Before considering alternative treatments, it is important to rule out any other cause of persistent symptoms. For instance, could they be related to an occult esophageal narrowing not identified at the time of endoscopy? Esophagrams may be necessary to identify localized or longitudinal narrowing that could be amenable to dilation. If symptoms and inflammation are persistent and no narrowing is appreciated, an elemental diet can be considered but the long term use of this in older children and adults may be difficult. Prednisone or systemic steroids may be indicated to induce remission but side effects and complications associated with chronic use are limiting. Finally, the use of immunosuppression or biological agents has been reported in case reports and studies; use of these may be limited by side effects or the need to utilize compassionate use protocols. Conclusions As the scope of esophageal eosinophilia continues to evolve, the clinical and molecular characterization of new clinical phenotypes will be important so that new therapeutic targets can be identified. PMID:24603397

  6. Epigenetic biomarkers in esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaz, Andrew M; Grady, William M

    2014-01-28

    The aberrant DNA methylation of tumor suppressor genes is well documented in esophageal cancer, including adenocarcinoma (EAC) and squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) as well as in Barrett's esophagus (BE), a pre-malignant condition that is associated with chronic acid reflux. BE is a well-recognized risk factor for the development of EAC, and consequently the standard of care is for individuals with BE to be placed in endoscopic surveillance programs aimed at detecting early histologic changes that associate with an increased risk of developing EAC. Yet because the absolute risk of EAC in individuals with BE is minimal, a clinical need in the management of BE is the identification of additional risk markers that will indicate individuals who are at a significant absolute risk of EAC so that they may be subjected to more intensive surveillance. The best currently available risk marker is the degree of dysplasia in endoscopic biopsies from the esophagus; however, this marker is suboptimal for a variety of reasons. To date, there are no molecular biomarkers that have been translated to widespread clinical practice. The search for biomarkers, including hypermethylated genes, for either the diagnosis of BE, EAC, or ESCC or for risk stratification for the development of EAC in those with BE is currently an area of active research. In this review, we summarize the status of identified candidate epigenetic biomarkers for BE, EAC, and ESCC. Most of these aberrantly methylated genes have been described in the context of early detection or diagnostic markers; others might prove useful for estimating prognosis or predicting response to treatment. Finally, special attention will be paid to some of the challenges that must be overcome in order to develop clinically useful esophageal cancer biomarkers. PMID:22406828

  7. Ambulatory esophageal manometry/pH-metry discriminates between patients with different esophageal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Paterson, W G; Beck, I T; Wang, H

    1996-02-01

    Ambulatory esophageal manometry/pH-metry has been used primarily in patients with chest pain of presumed esophageal origin, and it is unclear whether the discriminating power of this test applies to other esophageal symptoms. In the present study, prolonged ambulatory manometry/pH recordings were compared in 17 healthy controls, 12 patients with atypical chest pain, and 11 patients with chest pain and nonstructural dysphagia using the Synectics microdigitrapper system. Chest pain patients tended to have higher values for all the pH variables, but their esophageal motility parameters were no different than controls. On the other hand, the chest pain plus dysphagia group was characterized by a significantly lower proportion of propagated contractions between 10 and 5 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter. This group also tended to have a higher frequency of high-amplitude or prolonged-duration contractions. In comparison to the results of standard stationary esophageal manometry, the prolonged ambulatory recordings were more sensitive in detecting esophageal motor dysfunction in the two patient groups. This study suggests that quantitative analysis of ambulatory pH/motility recordings is a sensitive method of evaluating patients with suspected esophageal dysfunction. PMID:8601383

  8. Student Reactions to Health Services Rendered by the Sports Medicine Program to Intramural Participants at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Violette, Ronald W.

    This paper describes the activities of the Division of Sports Medicine at the University of North Carolina. The program works in the areas of (a) prevention, (b) treatment, (c) first aid, and (d) rehabilitation of athletic injuries sustained during intramural activities. The sports medicine staff consists of three full-time physicians, four…

  9. Chronic xerostomia increases esophageal acid exposure and is associated with esophageal injury

    SciTech Connect

    Korsten, M.A.; Rosman, A.S.; Fishbein, S.; Shlein, R.D.; Goldberg, H.E.; Biener, A. )

    1991-06-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of chronic xerostomia on parameters of gastroesophageal reflux and esophagitis. DESIGN: Observational study of a cohort of male patients with xerostomia and age-matched control subjects. SETTING: Tertiary-care Veterans Affairs Medical Center. SUBJECTS: Sixteen male patients with chronic xerostomia secondary to radiation for head and neck cancers or medications. Nineteen age-matched male control subjects with comparable alcohol and smoking histories. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Esophageal motility was similar in patients with xerostomia and controls. Clearance of acid from the esophagus and 24-hour intraesophageal pH were markedly abnormal in patients with xerostomia. Symptoms and signs of esophagitis were significantly more frequent in subjects with xerostomia. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic xerostomia may predispose to esophageal injury, at least in part, by decreasing the clearance of acid from the esophagus and altering 24-hour intraesophageal pH. Esophageal injury is a previously unreported complication of long-term salivary deficiency.

  10. Clinical and dosimetric factors of radiation-induced esophageal injury: Radiation-induced esophageal toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Wen-Bo; Zhao, Yan-Hui; Zhao, Yan-Bin; Wang, Rui-Zhi

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the clinical and dosimetric predictive factors for radiation-induced esophageal injury in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 208 consecutive patients (146 men and 62 women) with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT. The median age of the patients was 64 years (range 35-87 years). The clinical and treatment parameters including gender, age, performance status, sequential chemotherapy, concurrent chemotherapy, presence of carinal or subcarinal lymph nodes, pretreatment weight loss, mean dose to the entire esophagus, maximal point dose to the esophagus, and percentage of volume of esophagus receiving >55 Gy were studied. Clinical and dosimetric factors for radiation-induced acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury were analyzed according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria. RESULTS: Twenty-five (12%) of the two hundred and eight patients developed acute or late grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Among them, nine patients had both acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury, two died of late esophageal perforation. Concurrent chemotherapy and maximal point dose to the esophagus ≥60 Gy were significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Fifty-four (26%) of the two hundred and eight patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Among them, 25 (46%) developed grade 3-5 esophageal injury (P = 0.0001<0.01). However, no grade 3-5 esophageal injury occurred in patients who received a maximal point dose to the esophagus <60 Gy (P = 0.0001<0.01). CONCLUSION: Concurrent chemotherapy and the maximal esophageal point dose ≥60 Gy are significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury in patients with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT. PMID:15849822

  11. [Histotopographic and morphometric studies of the intramural coronary arteries in the trabecula septomarginalis of swine and pigmy goats].

    PubMed

    Lorenz, G; Guski, H

    1990-01-01

    Up to six arteries traverse from the interventricular septum to the M. papillaris magnus in the trabecula septomarginalis (moderator band) of swine and pygmy goat. Musculo-elastic intimal thickenings, many of them quite extensive, are recordable from along the entire length of all these intramural coronary arteries which are between 50 microns and 300 microns in diameter. The conclusion may be drawn from the results of morphometric analysis that coronary arteries undergo enlargement in response to increased intimal thickening and that such enlargement does not lead to narrowing of the lumen. Peculiarities in wall structure of the arteries in the trabecula septomarginalis are interpreted as adaptive processes of the vascular wall to the extraordinary stress on those vessels. PMID:2327188

  12. [FEATURES OF TREATMENT OF EOSINOPHILIC ESOPHAGITIS IN SCHOOLCHILDREN].

    PubMed

    Horodylovska, M I

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of probiotic L. reuteri into the complex therapy of eosinophilic esophagitis significantly affect the outcomes of children--there was significant decrease in the number of eosinophils in the esophageal mucosa of children. PMID:26118052

  13. Evaluation of Esophageal Motor Function With High-resolution Manometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    For several decades esophageal manometry has been the test of choice to evaluate disorders of esophageal motor function. The recent introduction of high-resolution manometry for the study of esophageal motor function simplified performance of esophageal manometry, and revealed previously unidentified patterns of normal and abnormal esophageal motor function. Presentation of pressure data as color contour plots or esophageal pressure topography led to the development of new tools for analyzing and classifying esophageal motor patterns. The current standard and still developing approach to do this is the Chicago classification. While this methodical approach is improving our diagnosis of esophageal motor disorders, it currently does not address all motor abnormalities. We will explore the Chicago classification and disorders that it does not address. PMID:23875094

  14. Chemoprevention of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Stoner, Gary D. Wang Lishu; Chen Tong

    2007-11-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is responsible for approximately one-sixth of all cancer-related mortality worldwide. This malignancy has a multifactorial etiology involving several environmental, dietary and genetic factors. Since esophageal cancer has often metastasized at the time of diagnosis, current treatment modalities offer poor survival and cure rates. Chemoprevention offers a viable alternative that could well be effective against the disease. Clinical investigations have shown that primary chemoprevention of this disease is feasible if potent inhibitory agents are identified. The Fischer 344 (F-344) rat model of esophageal SCC has been used extensively to investigate the biology of the disease, and to identify chemopreventive agents that could be useful in human trials. Multiple compounds that inhibit tumor initiation by esophageal carcinogens have been identified using this model. These include several isothiocyanates, diallyl sulfide and polyphenolic compounds. These compounds influence the metabolic activation of esophageal carcinogens resulting in reduced genetic (DNA) damage. Recently, a few agents have been shown to inhibit the progression of preneoplastic lesions in the rat esophagus into tumors. These agents include inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and c-Jun [a component of activator protein-1 (AP-1)]. Using a food-based approach to cancer prevention, we have shown that freeze-dried berry preparations inhibit both the initiation and promotion/progression stages of esophageal SCC in F-344 rats. These observations have led to a clinical trial in China to evaluate the ability of freeze-dried strawberries to influence the progression of esophageal dysplasia to SCC.

  15. Evaluation of urgent esophagectomy in esophageal perforation

    PubMed Central

    de AQUINO, José Luis Braga; de CAMARGO, José Gonzaga Teixeira; CECCHINO, Gustavo Nardini; PEREIRA, Douglas Alexandre Rizzanti; BENTO, Caroline Agnelli; LEANDRO-MERHI, Vânia Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    Background Esophageal trauma is considered one of the most severe lesions of the digestive tract. There is still much controversy in choosing the best treatment for cases of esophageal perforation since that decision involves many variables. The readiness of medical care, the patient's clinical status, the local conditions of the perforated segment, and the severity of the associated injuries must be considered for the most adequate therapeutic choice. Aim To demonstrate and to analyze the results of urgent esophagectomy in a series of patients with esophageal perforation. Methods A retrospective study of 31 patients with confirmed esophageal perforation. Most injuries were due to endoscopic dilatation of benign esophageal disorders, which had evolved with stenosis. The diagnosis of perforation was based on clinical parameters, laboratory tests, and endoscopic images. ‪The main surgical technique used was transmediastinal esophagectomy followed by reconstruction of the digestive tract in a second surgical procedure. Patients were evaluated for the development of systemic and local complications, especially for the dehiscence or stricture of the anastomosis of the cervical esophagus with either the stomach or the transposed colon. Results Early postoperative evaluation showed a survival rate of 77.1% in relation to the proposed surgery, and 45% of these patients presented no further complications. The other patients had one or more complications, being pulmonary infection and anastomotic fistula the most frequent. The seven patients (22.9%) who underwent esophageal resection 48 hours after the diagnosis died of sepsis. At medium and long-term assessments, most patients reported a good quality of life and full satisfaction regarding the surgery outcomes. Conclusions Despite the morbidity, emergency esophagectomy has its validity, especially in well indicated cases of esophageal perforation subsequent to endoscopic dilation for benign strictures. PMID:25626932

  16. Broken Esophageal Stent Successfully Treated by Interventional Radiology Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenak, Kamil; Mistuna, Dusan; Lucan, Jaroslav; Polacek, Hubert

    2010-06-15

    Esophageal stent fractures occur quite rarely. A 61-year-old male patient was previously treated for rupture of benign stenosis, occurring after dilatation, by implanting an esophageal stent. However, a year after implantation, the patient suffered from dysphagia caused by the broken esophageal stent. He was treated with the interventional radiology technique, whereby a second implantation of the esophageal stent was carried out quite successfully.

  17. Microwave Hematoma Detector for the Rapid Assessment of Head Injuries

    SciTech Connect

    Hadded, W.; Chang, J.; Rosenbury, T.; Dallum, G.; Welsch, P.; Scott, D.; Duarte, D.; Acevedo-Bolton, V.

    2000-02-11

    A non-invasive microwave device for the detection of epi/subdural hemorrhaging (hematoma) is under current development. The final device will be highly portable and allow real time assessment of head injuries, thereby satisfying early detection needs of the field technician as well as providing a tool for repetitious monitoring of high-risk individuals. The device will adopt the advanced technology of micropower impulse radar (MIR) which is a state of the art low cost ultra wide band (UWB) microwave radar developed here at LLNL. It will consist of a MIR transmitting and receiving module, a computer based signal processing module, and a device-to-patient signal coupling module--the UWB antenna. The prototype design is being guided by the needs of the patient and the practitioner along with the prerequisites of the technology including issues such as the specificity of the device, efficacy of diagnosis, accuracy, robustness, and patient comfort. The prototype development follows a concurrent approach which .includes experiments designed to evaluate requirements of the radar and antenna design, phantom development to facilitate laboratory investigations, and investigation into the limits of adapting pre-existing non-medical MIR devices to medical applications. This report will present the accomplishments and project highlights to date in the fiscal year 1999. Future project projections will also be discussed.

  18. Acute subdural hematoma in a high school football player.

    PubMed

    Litt, D W

    1995-03-01

    A 16-year-old football player developed a headache following a collision during a game. When his headache persisted for 1 week, he underwent a computerized tomographic (CT) scan to determine the cause. Findings were normal and a concussion was diagnosed. Seventeen days after the injury, the athlete reported disappearance of his symptoms. Provocative testing failed to recreate symptoms. The athlete continued to deny any symptoms and was cleared for unlimited participation 30 days after the initial injury. In the next game, the athlete collided with an opposing player, ran to the sidelines, and deteriorated on the sidelines after complaining of dizziness. Local Emergency Medical Squad personnel intubated him and transported him to a local hospital emergency room. Attending neurosurgeons diagnosed a right subdural hematoma by CT scan. A burr hole craniotomy evacuated the lesion. The operative report noted a second area of chronic membrane formation consistent with past head trauma. This lesion had escaped detection on two CT scans. In an interview 4 months postoperatively, the athlete admitted having experienced constant symptoms between the first and second injuries. PMID:16558315

  19. Recovery of normal esophageal function in a kitten with diffuse megaesophagus and an occult lower esophageal stricture.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jaycie; Ames, Marisa; DiCicco, Michael; Savage, Mason; Atkins, Clarke; Wood, Michael; Gookin, Jody L

    2015-06-01

    An 8-week-old male domestic shorthair was presented to the Internal Medicine Service at North Carolina State University for regurgitation. Radiographic diagnosis of generalized esophageal dilation and failure of esophageal peristalsis were compatible with diagnosis of congenital megaesophagus. Endoscopic examination of the esophagus revealed a fibrous stricture just orad to the lower esophageal sphincter. Conservative management to increase the body condition and size of the kitten consisted of feeding through a gastrostomy tube, during which time the esophagus regained normal peristaltic function, the stricture orifice widened in size and successful balloon dilatation of the stricture was performed. Esophageal endoscopy should be considered to rule out a stricture near the lower esophageal sphincter in kittens with radiographic findings suggestive of congenital megaesophagus. Management of such kittens by means of gastrostomy tube feeding may be associated with a return of normal esophageal motility and widening of the esophageal stricture, and facilitate subsequent success of interventional dilation of the esophageal stricture. PMID:25030954

  20. Non-contact hematoma damage and healing assessment using reflectance photoplethysmographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelard, Robert; Pfisterer, Kaylen J.; Clausi, David A.; Wong, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Impact trauma may cause a hematoma, which is the leakage of venous blood into surrounding tissues. Large hematomas can be dangerous as they may inhibit local blood ow. Hematomas are often diagnosed visually, which may be problematic if the hematoma leaks deeper than the visible penetration depth. Furthermore, vascular wound healing is often monitored at home without the aid of a clinician. We therefore investigated the use of near infrared (NIR) re ectance photoplethysmographic imaging (PPGI) to assess vascular damage resulting from a hematoma, and monitor the healing process. In this case study, the participant experienced internal vascular damage in the form of a hematoma. Using a PPGI system with dual-mode temporally coded illumination for ambient-agnostic data acquisition and mounted optical elements, the tissue was illuminated with a spatially uniform irradiance pattern of 850 nm wavelength light for increased tissue penetration and high oxy-to-deoxyhemoglobin absorption ratio. Initial and follow-up PPGI data collection was performed to assess vascular damage and healing. The tissue PPGI sequences were spectrally analyzed, producing spectral maps of the tissue area. Experimental results show that spatial differences in spectral information can be observed around the damaged area. In particular, the damaged site exhibited lower pulsatility than the surrounding healthy tissue. This pulsatility was largely restored in the follow-up data, suggesting that the tissue had undergone vascular healing. These results indicate that hematomas can be assessed and monitored in a non-contact visual manner, and suggests that PPGI can be used for tissue health assessment, with potential extensions to peripheral vascular disease.

  1. Conservative surgical treatment of reflux esophagitis and esophageal stricture.

    PubMed Central

    Herrington, J L; Wright, R S; Edwards, W H; Sawyers, J L

    1975-01-01

    During a recent 3-year period, 17 consecutive patients were seen with advanced fibrotic esophageal strictures secondary to alkaline-acid-pepsin reflux. From detailed preoperative evaluations alone it was impossible to determine whether therapy should consist of excisional surgery, esophagogastroplasty or intra-operative dilatation with correction of reflux. Only at operation could the length, extent, degree and severity of the stricture be fully determined. Each of the 17 patients was treated by controlled dilatation, coupled with an antireflux procedure. This simplified approach proved successful on strictures thought preoperatively to be undilatable. It appears that this conservative approach is applicable to many advanced strictures and excisional and plastic procedures should be reserved for those cases that prove unyielding to intraoperative dilatation. The true appraisal of a reflux stricture and the choice of surgical procedure is best determined at the operating table. Images Fig. 5A. Fig. 5B. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. Fig. 11. Fig. 12. Fig. 13. Fig. 14. Fig. 15. Fig. 16. Fig. 17. Fig. 18. Fig. 19. Fig. 20. Fig. 21. PMID:1130874

  2. Odynophagia in a woman with known coronary artery disease and ischemia on electrocardiogram.

    PubMed Central

    Weinrauch, L A; Tam, S K; Tanzer, J L; Loewenstein, M S; Shortsleeve, M J

    1999-01-01

    Esophageal intramural hematoma can mimic other causes of chest pain. When the patient is known to have coronary artery disease, the diagnosis may be difficult. Moreover, the course may be complicated and may harm the patient if antiplatelet drugs, thrombolytics, and anticoagulants are used. The presence of odynophagia should alert the clinician to the possibility of an esophageal origin, even in a patient with known coronary artery disease. We present a case in which early recognition of the clinical presentation prevented potential iatrogenic complications. Images PMID:10653268

  3. Targeting chemokine pathways in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Makardhwaj S; Hussain, Zulfiqar; Giricz, Orsolya; Shenoy, Niraj; Polineni, Rahul; Maitra, Anirban; Verma, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is one of the fastest growing malignancies in the US and needs newer therapeutic and diagnostic strategies. Chronic inflammation plays a role in the pathogenesis of EAC and contributes to the dysplastic conversion of normal esophageal epithelium to Barrett's esophagus and frank adenocarcinoma. Chemokines play important roles in mediating inflammation and recent evidence implicates these ligands and their receptors in the development and spread of various tumors. We demonstrated that the chemokines IL8, CXCL1 and CXCL3 are significantly overexpressed during esophageal carcinogenesis and accompanied by amplification and demethylation of the chr4q21 gene locus. We also demonstrated that IL8 levels can be detected in serum of patients with EAC and can serve as potential biomarkers. We now demonstrate that inhibition of IL8 receptor, CXCR2, leads to decreased invasiveness of esophageal adenocarcinoma derived cells without affecting cellular proliferation. Taken together, these studies reveal the important roles that chemokines play in development of esophageal cancer and demonstrate that these pathways can serve as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:25485576

  4. Esophageal surgery in minimally invasive era.

    PubMed

    Bencini, Lapo; Moraldi, Luca; Bartolini, Ilenia; Coratti, Andrea

    2016-01-27

    The widespread popularity of new surgical technologies such as laparoscopy, thoracoscopy and robotics has led many surgeons to treat esophageal diseases with these methods. The expected benefits of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) mainly include reductions of postoperative complications, length of hospital stay, and pain and better cosmetic results. All of these benefits could potentially be of great interest when dealing with the esophagus due to the potentially severe complications that can occur after conventional surgery. Moreover, robotic platforms are expected to reduce many of the difficulties encountered during advanced laparoscopic and thoracoscopic procedures such as anastomotic reconstructions, accurate lymphadenectomies, and vascular sutures. Almost all esophageal diseases are approachable in a minimally invasive way, including diverticula, gastro-esophageal reflux disease, achalasia, perforations and cancer. Nevertheless, while the limits of MIS for benign esophageal diseases are mainly technical issues and costs, oncologic outcomes remain the cornerstone of any procedure to cure malignancies, for which the long-term results are critical. Furthermore, many of the minimally invasive esophageal operations should be compared to pharmacologic interventions and advanced pure endoscopic procedures; such a comparison requires a difficult literature analysis and leads to some confounding results of clinical trials. This review aims to examine the evidence for the use of MIS in both malignancies and more common benign disease of the esophagus, with a particular emphasis on future developments and ongoing areas of research. PMID:26843913

  5. Genetic polymorphisms and esophageal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Hiyama, Toru; Yoshihara, Masaharu; Tanaka, Shinji; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2007-10-15

    The aim of this paper is to review and evaluate, in a comprehensive manner, the published data regarding the contribution of genetic polymorphisms to risk of esophageal cancer, including squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma, in humans. All relevant studies available in MEDLINE and published before February 2007 were identified. Studies carried out in humans and that compared esophageal cancer patients with at least 1 standard control group were considered for analysis. One-hundred studies and 3 meta-analyses were identified. Eighty (80%) studies were conducted in Asian countries, particularly China including Taiwan (60 (60%) studies). The most intensively examined genes were those encoding carcinogen metabolic enzymes. The most widely studied gene was GSTM1 (15 studies), followed by ALDH2 (11 studies). ALDH2, MTHFR C677T, CYP1A1 Ile/Val, CYP1A1MspI, CYP2E1, GSTP1, GSTM1 and GSTT1 were examined by meta-analyses and significant relations were found between ALDH2*1*2 and the CYP1A1 Val allele and increased risk of esophageal cancer. In addition, increased risk of esophageal SCC was consistently associated with the ADH2*1*2 and the p53 codon 72 Pro/Pro genotypes. Cohort studies that simultaneously consider multiple genetic and environmental factors possibly involved in esophageal carcinogenesis are needed to ascertain not only the relative contribution of these factors to tumor development but also the contributions of their putative interactions. PMID:17674367

  6. Esophageal tissue engineering: Current status and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, T; Catry, J; Luong-Nguyen, M; Bruneval, P; Domet, T; Arakelian, L; Sfeir, R; Michaud, L; Vanneaux, V; Gottrand, F; Larghero, J; Cattan, P

    2016-02-01

    Tissue engineering, which consists of the combination and in vivo implantation of elements required for tissue remodeling toward a specific organ phenotype, could be an alternative for classical techniques of esophageal replacement. The current hybrid approach entails creation of an esophageal substitute composed of an acellular matrix and autologous epithelial and muscle cells provides the most successful results. Current research is based on the use of mesenchymal stem cells, whose potential for differentiation and proangioogenic, immune-modulator and anti-inflammatory properties are important assets. In the near future, esophageal substitutes could be constructed from acellular "intelligent matrices" that contain the molecules necessary for tissue regeneration; this should allow circumvention of the implantation step and still obtain standardized in vivo biological responses. At present, tissue engineering applications to esophageal replacement are limited to enlargement plasties with absorbable, non-cellular matrices. Nevertheless, the application of existing clinical techniques for replacement of other organs by tissue engineering in combination with a multiplication of translational research protocols for esophageal replacement in large animals should soon pave the way for health agencies to authorize clinical trials. PMID:26711880

  7. Esophageal surgery in minimally invasive era

    PubMed Central

    Bencini, Lapo; Moraldi, Luca; Bartolini, Ilenia; Coratti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The widespread popularity of new surgical technologies such as laparoscopy, thoracoscopy and robotics has led many surgeons to treat esophageal diseases with these methods. The expected benefits of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) mainly include reductions of postoperative complications, length of hospital stay, and pain and better cosmetic results. All of these benefits could potentially be of great interest when dealing with the esophagus due to the potentially severe complications that can occur after conventional surgery. Moreover, robotic platforms are expected to reduce many of the difficulties encountered during advanced laparoscopic and thoracoscopic procedures such as anastomotic reconstructions, accurate lymphadenectomies, and vascular sutures. Almost all esophageal diseases are approachable in a minimally invasive way, including diverticula, gastro-esophageal reflux disease, achalasia, perforations and cancer. Nevertheless, while the limits of MIS for benign esophageal diseases are mainly technical issues and costs, oncologic outcomes remain the cornerstone of any procedure to cure malignancies, for which the long-term results are critical. Furthermore, many of the minimally invasive esophageal operations should be compared to pharmacologic interventions and advanced pure endoscopic procedures; such a comparison requires a difficult literature analysis and leads to some confounding results of clinical trials. This review aims to examine the evidence for the use of MIS in both malignancies and more common benign disease of the esophagus, with a particular emphasis on future developments and ongoing areas of research. PMID:26843913

  8. Esophageal Cancer: Insights From Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Tétreault, Marie-Pier

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is the eighth leading cause of cancer and the sixth most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Despite recent advances in the development of surgical techniques in combination with the use of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the prognosis for esophageal cancer remains poor. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that drive the pathogenesis of esophageal cancer are still poorly understood. Hence, understanding these mechanisms is crucial to improving outcomes for patients with esophageal cancer. Mouse models constitute valuable tools for modeling human cancers and for the preclinical testing of therapeutic strategies in a manner not possible in human subjects. Mice are excellent models for studying human cancers because they are similar to humans at the physiological and molecular levels and because they have a shorter gestation time and life cycle. Moreover, a wide range of well-developed technologies for introducing genetic modifications into mice are currently available. In this review, we describe how different mouse models are used to study esophageal cancer. PMID:26380556

  9. Pharmacological Management of Esophageal Food Bolus Impaction

    PubMed Central

    Khayyat, Yasir Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Background. Soft esophageal bolus impaction is an emergency that requires skilled endoscopic removal if persistent obstructive symptoms do not resolve spontaneously after careful observation. Expedited care of these patients is crucial to avoid respiratory and mechanical complications. Other possible options for management include medical agents used to manage it prior to performing endoscopy if access to endoscopy was not available or declined by the patient. Aim. To review the available pharmacological and other nonmedicinal options and their mechanism of relief for soft esophageal impaction. Method. Pubmed, Medline and Ovid were used for search of MESH terms pertinent including “foreign body, esophageal, esophageal bolus and medical” for pharmacological and non medicinial agents used for management of esophageal soft bolus impaction as well as manual review of the cross-references. Results. Several agents were identified including Buscopan, Glucagon, nitrates, calcium channel blockers, and papaveretum. Non medicinal agents are water, effervescent agents, and papain. No evidence was found to suggest preference or effectiveness of use of a certain pharmacological agent compared to others. Buscopan, Glucagon, benzodiazepines, and nitrates were studied extensively and may be used in selected patients with caution. Use of papain is obsolete in management of soft bolus impaction. PMID:23738071

  10. Candida Esophagitis in an Immunocompetent Pregnant Woman

    PubMed Central

    Kivnick, Seth

    1993-01-01

    Background: Nausea and vomiting are common during the first half of pregnancy and usually require only supportive measures. When symptoms are progressive and weight loss occurs, treatable causes should be sought by means of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. We report a case of an immunocompetent gravida with invasive Candida albicans esophagitis. Case: The immunocompetent primigravida developed progressive nausea, vomiting, epigastric pain, and a 4.1 kg weight loss during the second trimester of pregnancy. Treatment with metoclopramide and cimetidine for presumed gastroesophageal reflux was not effective. The patient had normal T-cell CD4 and CD8 subsets and was human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody negative. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed C. albicans esophagitis which was treated with oral nystatin. The esophagitis had resolved completely when reassessed postpartum. The use of histamine2 blockers is associated with an increased risk for fungal esophagitis and may have been a contributing cause in this case. Conclusion: Pregnant patients with persistent nausea, vomiting, and weight loss should be evaluated by endoscopy for fungal esophagitis. PMID:18475336

  11. FOLFOX-6 Induction Chemotherapy Followed by Esophagectomy and Post-operative Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-16

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastric Cardia; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer

  12. Endoscopic treatment of esophageal achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Dario; Maione, Francesco; D’Alessandro, Alessandra; Sarnelli, Giovanni; De Palma, Giovanni D

    2016-01-01

    Achalasia is a motility disorder of the esophagus characterized by dysphagia, regurgitation of undigested food, chest pain, weight loss and respiratory symptoms. The most common form of achalasia is the idiopathic one. Diagnosis largely relies upon endoscopy, barium swallow study, and high resolution esophageal manometry (HRM). Barium swallow and manometry after treatment are also good predictors of success of treatment as it is the residue symptomatology. Short term improvement in the symptomatology of achalasia can be achieved with medical therapy with calcium channel blockers or endoscopic botulin toxin injection. Even though few patients can be cured with only one treatment and repeat procedure might be needed, long term relief from dysphagia can be obtained in about 90% of cases with either surgical interventions such as laparoscopic Heller myotomy or with endoscopic techniques such pneumatic dilatation or, more recently, with per-oral endoscopic myotomy. Age, sex, and manometric type by HRM are also predictors of responsiveness to treatment. Older patients, females and type II achalasia are better after treatment compared to younger patients, males and type III achalasia. Self-expandable metallic stents are an alternative in patients non responding to conventional therapies. PMID:26839644

  13. Endoscopic treatment of esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Dario; Maione, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Alessandra; Sarnelli, Giovanni; De Palma, Giovanni D

    2016-01-25

    Achalasia is a motility disorder of the esophagus characterized by dysphagia, regurgitation of undigested food, chest pain, weight loss and respiratory symptoms. The most common form of achalasia is the idiopathic one. Diagnosis largely relies upon endoscopy, barium swallow study, and high resolution esophageal manometry (HRM). Barium swallow and manometry after treatment are also good predictors of success of treatment as it is the residue symptomatology. Short term improvement in the symptomatology of achalasia can be achieved with medical therapy with calcium channel blockers or endoscopic botulin toxin injection. Even though few patients can be cured with only one treatment and repeat procedure might be needed, long term relief from dysphagia can be obtained in about 90% of cases with either surgical interventions such as laparoscopic Heller myotomy or with endoscopic techniques such pneumatic dilatation or, more recently, with per-oral endoscopic myotomy. Age, sex, and manometric type by HRM are also predictors of responsiveness to treatment. Older patients, females and type II achalasia are better after treatment compared to younger patients, males and type III achalasia. Self-expandable metallic stents are an alternative in patients non responding to conventional therapies. PMID:26839644

  14. [Surgical Outcome of Acute and Subacute Subdural Hematoma with Endoscopic Surgery].

    PubMed

    Miki, Koichi; Yoshioka, Tsutomu; Hirata, Yoko; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Takagi, Tomohiro; Tsugu, Hitoshi; Inoue, Tooru

    2016-06-01

    Acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) and subacute subdural hematoma(SASDH)evacuations are commonly performed through a large craniotomy or with external decompression surgery to avoid secondary brain injury. In the field of head trauma, minimally invasive surgeries performed with neuroendoscopy were recently reported. We report 12 patients with ASDH( n=9) and SASDH (n=3)w ho underwent endoscopic hematoma evacuation via a small craniotomy between November 2013 and May 2015. All patients were over 65 years of age(mean age, 78.8 years[range, 65-91 years]) and had subdural hematomas without extensive contusion. The mean preoperative Glasgow Coma Scale(GCS)score was 8.75 (range, 4-13). In three patients, we observed the bleeding point and substantially coagulated it. Decompression in all patients was adequate after surgery. Patients with a preoperative GCS score of 4-6 showed poor outcomes, whereas those with a score >9 showed relatively good outcomes. We performed the operations safely in patients who were on antithrombotic therapy or had a systemic bleeding tendency pre-injury. Endoscopic hematoma evacuation via a small craniotomy is a safe and minimally invasive procedure in patients older than 65 years with comorbidities. PMID:27270143

  15. Auricular hematoma and cauliflower deformation of the ear: from art to medicine.

    PubMed

    Mudry, Albert; Pirsig, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Auricular hematoma and cauliflower deformation of the ear are unique in several respects. Knowledge about it began, in antiquity, through artists, particularly Greek and Roman, and then Japanese in the 18th century with their representation of cauliflower deformation of the ear on sculptures and paintings of pugilists and wrestlers. It is only in the 19th century that physicians began to make substantive progress in understanding this abnormality. It was first thought to be associated with mental disease, but by the beginning of the 20th century, its etiology was recognized as being caused by trauma and was then named auricular hematoma. The second step in the understanding of this affliction was the observation that auricular hematoma progresses toward cauliflower deformation of the ear, which was named cauliflower ear. Recognition of this evolution led to the development of therapies. During the second half of the 20th century, different treatments were developed. They included various hematoma drainage techniques with special bandages to prevent hematoma recurrence and ensuing progression to cauliflower ear. In summary, cauliflower deformation of the ear is an old artistic affliction that has only recently received medical attention. PMID:18800018

  16. Total Hip Arthroplasty Complicated by a Gluteal Hematoma Resulting in Acute Foot Drop.

    PubMed

    Khattar, Nicolas K; Parry, Phillip V; Agarwal, Nitin; George, Hope K; Kretz, Eric S; Larkin, Timothy M; Gruen, Gary S; Abla, Adnan A

    2016-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is a prevalent orthopedic intervention in the United States. Massive postoperative hematomas are a rare albeit serious complication of the procedure. Sequelae of these hematomas can include lower extremity paralysis from compression of the sciatic nerve. A 66-year-old woman taking aspirin and clopidogrel for coronary stents presented with a complete foot drop, paresthesias, and lower extremity pain 10 days after a total hip arthroplasty. The patient was initially seen by a neurology service at another hospital and thought to have lateral recess stenosis. At the authors' center, magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine failed to show lateral recess stenosis. Urgent pelvic computed tomography showed a large hematoma and raised suspicion of sciatic nerve compression. Hip magnetic resonance imaging showed a right gluteal hematoma compressing the sciatic nerve. The patient was then taken to the operating room for the clot to be evacuated and was later referred for rehabilitation. Massive hematomas after total hip arthroplasty are an important consideration in the differential diagnosis of nontraumatic acute foot drop. Prompt diagnosis may correlate with improved neurological outcome and help reduce overall morbidity. PMID:26966944

  17. The effects of subchorionic hematoma on pregnancy outcome in patients with threatened abortion

    PubMed Central

    Şükür, Yavuz Emre; Göç, Göksu; Köse, Osman; Açmaz, Gökhan; Özmen, Batuhan; Atabekoğlu, Cem Somer; Koç, Acar; Söylemez, Feride

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of ultrasonographically detected subchorionic hematomas on pregnancy outcomes in patients with vaginal bleeding within the first half of pregnancy. Material and Methods Patients diagnosed with threatened abortion due to painless vaginal bleeding and who were followed up in an in-patient service during the first vaginal bleeding between January 2009 and December 2010 were included in this retrospective cohort study. Patients were divided into two groups according to the presence of subchorionic hematoma. Miscarriage rates and pregnancy outcomes of ongoing pregnancies were compared between the groups. Results There were no statistically significant differences between the groups regarding demographic parameters, including age, parity, previous miscarriage history, and gestational age at first vaginal bleeding. While 13 of 44 pregnancies (29.5%) with subchorionic hematoma resulted in miscarriage, 25 of 198 pregnancies (12.6%) without subchorionic hematoma resulted in miscarriage (p=.010). The gestational age at miscarriage and the duration between first vaginal bleeding and miscarriage were similar between the groups. The outcome measures of ongoing pregnancies, such as gestational week at delivery, birth weight, and delivery route, were also similar between the groups. Conclusion Ultrasonographically detected subchorionic hematoma increases the risk of miscarriage in patients with vaginal bleeding and threatened abortion during the first 20 weeks of gestation. However, it does not affect the pregnancy outcome measures of ongoing pregnancies. PMID:25584033

  18. Amniotic fluid 'sludge' detected in patients with subchorionic hematoma: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Tskitishvili, E; Tomimatsu, T; Kanagawa, T; Sawada, K; Kinugasa, Y; Mimura, K; Kimura, T

    2009-04-01

    Amniotic fluid 'sludge' is defined as the presence of dense aggregates of particulate matter in close proximity to the internal cervical os. It is of clinical significance in asymptomatic patients at high risk for spontaneous delivery, and in patients with preterm labor and intact membranes. Subchorionic hematoma is another ultrasound finding that is associated with a higher incidence of threatened miscarriage and preterm delivery. We report two cases of occurrence of amniotic fluid sludge in patients with previously detected large subchorionic hematoma. In the first case subchorionic hematoma and amniotic fluid sludge were detected by ultrasonography at 13 + 1 and 18 + 6 weeks' gestation, respectively, followed by preterm premature rupture of membranes, placental abruption and emergency Cesarean section. In the second case subchorionic hematoma and amniotic fluid sludge were detected by ultrasound at 11 + 3 and 15 + 5 weeks' gestation, respectively, followed by miscarriage with histological chorioamnionitis. The coincidence of subchorionic hematoma and amniotic fluid sludge in these cases points to a possible connection between these two significant ultrasound findings. PMID:19308930

  19. An Overview of the Diagnosis and Management of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Manish B; Moawad, Fouad J

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory condition characterized by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and eosinophilic infiltration of the esophageal mucosa. The diagnosis requires esophageal biopsies demonstrating at least 15 eosinophils per high-powered field following a course of high-dose proton pump inhibitors. Management of EoE consists of the three Ds: drugs, dietary therapy, and esophageal dilation. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of EoE to include the role of emerging therapies. PMID:26986655

  20. Endoscopic options for early stage esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Pari M.

    2015-01-01

    Surgery has traditionally been the preferred treatment for early stage esophageal cancer. Recent advances in endoscopic treatments have been shown to be effective and safe. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) allow endoscopists to remove small, superficial lesions, providing tumor specimen that can be examined for accurate pathologic tumor staging and assessment of adequacy of resection. Endoscopic ablation procedures, including photodynamic therapy (PDT) and radio frequency ablation (RFA), have also been shown to safely and effectively treat esophageal dysplasia and early stage neoplasia, with excellent long-term disease control. Both approaches are becoming more widely available around the world, and provide an alternative, safe, low risk strategy for treating early stage disease, making combined endoscopic therapy the recommended treatment of choice for early stage esophageal cancers. PMID:25642334

  1. Congenital esophageal stenosis owing to tracheobronchial remnants

    PubMed Central

    Rebelo, Priscila Guyt; Ormonde, João Victor C.; Ormonde, João Baptista C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To emphasize the need of an accurate diagnosis of congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, since its treatment differs from other types of congenital narrowing. CASE DESCRIPTION Four cases of lower congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, whose definitive diagnosis was made by histopathology. Except for the last case, in which a concomitant anti-reflux surgery was not performed, all had a favorable outcome after resection and anastomosis of the esophagus. COMMENTS The congenital esophageal stenosis is an intrinsic narrowing of the organâ€(tm)s wall associated with its structural malformation. The condition can be caused by tracheobronchial remnants, fibromuscular stenosis or membranous diaphragm and the first symptom is dysphagia after the introduction of solid food in the diet. The first-choice treatment to tracheobronchial remnants cases is the surgical resection and end-to-end anastomosis of the esophagus. PMID:24142326

  2. Interventional gastroenterology: esophageal and pancreatic cancers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeffrey H

    2005-12-01

    The development and refinement of endoscopic procedures have greatly improved the diagnosis and management of esophageal and pancreatic cancers. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a highly accurate technique for TNM staging in esophageal cancer, and allows a tissue diagnosis of lymph nodes via fine-needle aspiration with low risk of complications. Endoscopic mucosal resection is a treatment option in patients with early esophageal cancer who are poor surgical candidates. Similarly, EUS fine-needle aspiration is helpful in establishing a diagnosis in cystic lesions, exocrine tumors, neuroendocrine tumors, and other lesions in the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography provides diagnostic and therapeutic modalities for various pancreaticobiliary problems. A number of promising EUS-guided therapies for pancreatic cancers are under investigation. PMID:16360009

  3. Esophagectomy in esophageal perforations: an analysis.

    PubMed

    Abu-Daff, S; Shamji, F; Ivanovic, J; Villeneuve, P J; Gilbert, S; Maziak, D E; Sundaresan, R S; Seely, A J E

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to study the factors that are associated with urgent esophagectomy for the treatment of esophageal perforations and the impact of this therapy. A retrospective review of all esophageal perforations treated at a tertiary care hospital from January 1984 to January 2012 was performed. Compiling demographics, cause and site of perforations, time to presentation, comorbidities, radiological tests, the length of perforation, the hemodynamic status of the patient, type of treatment required, and outcomes were performed. Univariate, multivariate, and Cox regression analyses were conducted. Of 127 cases of esophageal perforation, it was spontaneous in 44 (35%), iatrogenic in 53 (44%), foreign body ingestion in 22 (17%), and traumatic perforation in 7 (6%) cases. Overall, 85 of the 127 (67%) patients were managed operatively, 35 (27.6%) patients were treated conservatively, and 7 (6.3%) patients were treated by endoscopic stent placement. Of the 85 patients who were managed operatively, 21 (16.5%) required esophagectomies, 13 (15.3%) had esophagectomy with immediate reconstruction, 5 (5.9%) patients had esophagectomy followed by delayed reconstruction, and 3 (3.5%) patients failed primary repair and required an esophagectomy as a secondary definitive procedure. Multivariate analysis revealed that esophagectomy in esophageal perforations was associated with the presence of benign or malignant esophageal stricture (P = 0.001) and a perforation >5 cm (P = 0.001). Mortality was mainly associated with the presence of a benign or malignant esophageal stricture (P = 0.04). The presence of pre-existing benign or malignant stricture or large perforation (>5 cm) is associated with the need for an urgent esophagectomy with or without immediate reconstruction. Performing esophagectomy was not found to be a significant prognosticator for mortality. PMID:25327568

  4. Eosinophilic esophagitis in adults: An update

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Monjur

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is a worldwide chronic allergic disease of the esophagus. In the last decade, there is an epidemic of this entity in the western world. Mostly seen in children and young adults, patients present with dysphagia or food impaction in the emergency room. Characteristic endoscopic findings, esophageal eosinophilia and non-responsiveness to proton pump inhibitors help make the diagnosis. Avoidance of food allergens, administration of steroidal anti-inflammatory medications and dilation of the esophagus are the mainstays of treatment. Investigations are ongoing for mucosal healing and optimum maintenance treatment. PMID:27158535

  5. Esophageal recurrence of medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Muñoz de Nova, Jose Luis; Dworzynska, Agnieszka; Lorente-Poch, Leyre; Sancho, Juan Jose; Sitges-Serra, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) metastasizes to the regional lymph nodes and to the lungs, liver and bones. Only one case of recurrence of MTC involving the upper gastrointestinal tract has been reported so far. We describe the case of a 38-year-old woman with MTC, who developed an upper esophageal submucosal recurrence after two previous local recurrences treated surgically and one ethanol injection. After resection of the right lateral esophageal wall, calcitonin dropped by 60% and showed a doubling time >1 year. We cannot rule out the role of deep ethanol injection in the involvement of the cervical esophagus wall. PMID:26645011

  6. Eosinophilic esophagitis in adults: An update.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Monjur

    2016-05-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is a worldwide chronic allergic disease of the esophagus. In the last decade, there is an epidemic of this entity in the western world. Mostly seen in children and young adults, patients present with dysphagia or food impaction in the emergency room. Characteristic endoscopic findings, esophageal eosinophilia and non-responsiveness to proton pump inhibitors help make the diagnosis. Avoidance of food allergens, administration of steroidal anti-inflammatory medications and dilation of the esophagus are the mainstays of treatment. Investigations are ongoing for mucosal healing and optimum maintenance treatment. PMID:27158535

  7. Herpetic esophagitis following bendamustine-containing regimen

    PubMed Central

    Yamane, Hiromichi; Monobe, Yasumasa; Tanikawa, Tomohiro; Ochi, Nobuaki; Honda, Yoshihiro; Kawamoto, Hirofumi; Takigawa, Nagio

    2016-01-01

    A 76-year-old Japanese woman presented to our hospital with anorexia. Two years before, she was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and had received ten cycles of systemic chemotherapy. After salvage chemotherapy with bendamustine and rituximab (B–R), bone marrow suppression had lasted >3 months. Esophagogastroscopy revealed polynesic white protrusions in the mid-esophagus. These lesions were diagnosed as herpetic esophagitis. To the best of our knowledge, there is no other report in which herpetic esophagitis has been documented as an adverse event of B–R regimen. Because the complication could cause symptomatic gastrointestinal discomfort, physicians should be aware of this disease. PMID:27330298

  8. Esophageal recurrence of medullary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dworzynska, Agnieszka; Lorente-Poch, Leyre; Sancho, Juan Jose; Sitges-Serra, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) metastasizes to the regional lymph nodes and to the lungs, liver and bones. Only one case of recurrence of MTC involving the upper gastrointestinal tract has been reported so far. We describe the case of a 38-year-old woman with MTC, who developed an upper esophageal submucosal recurrence after two previous local recurrences treated surgically and one ethanol injection. After resection of the right lateral esophageal wall, calcitonin dropped by 60% and showed a doubling time >1 year. We cannot rule out the role of deep ethanol injection in the involvement of the cervical esophagus wall. PMID:26645011

  9. Acute Herpes Simplex Viral Esophagitis Occurring in 5 Immunocompetent Individuals With Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Criblez, Dominique H.; Dellon, Evan S.; Bussmann, Christian; Pfeifer, David; Froh, Matthias; Straumann, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex esophagitis (HSE) is an acute, severe viral infection of the esophagus, rarely occurring in immunocompetent individuals. Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a rare immune-mediated esophageal disorder. We recently observed 5 severe HSE cases in diagnosed EoE patients. Four of the 5 patients had active, untreated EoE at the time of infection, so HSE is not likely a side effect of swallowed topical corticosteroids, the first-line medical treatment of EoE. However, this coincidence of these 2 rare conditions raises the question of a causal relationship between these 2 forms of esophagitis, and whether active EoE might predispose to HSE infection. PMID:27144193

  10. Acute Herpes Simplex Viral Esophagitis Occurring in 5 Immunocompetent Individuals With Eosinophilic Esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Dorothee; Criblez, Dominique H; Dellon, Evan S; Bussmann, Christian; Pfeifer, David; Froh, Matthias; Straumann, Alex

    2016-04-01

    Herpes simplex esophagitis (HSE) is an acute, severe viral infection of the esophagus, rarely occurring in immunocompetent individuals. Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a rare immune-mediated esophageal disorder. We recently observed 5 severe HSE cases in diagnosed EoE patients. Four of the 5 patients had active, untreated EoE at the time of infection, so HSE is not likely a side effect of swallowed topical corticosteroids, the first-line medical treatment of EoE. However, this coincidence of these 2 rare conditions raises the question of a causal relationship between these 2 forms of esophagitis, and whether active EoE might predispose to HSE infection. PMID:27144193

  11. Solid Right Ventricular Compression by Intraventricular Septum-Hematoma Induced after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    El-Battrawy, Ibrahim; Akin, Ibrahim; Münz, Benedikt; Leistner, David Manuel; Behnes, Michael; Henzler, Thomas; Haubenreisser, Holger; Papavassiliu, Theano; Borggrefe, Martin; Lehmann, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Intraventricular septum-hematoma is a rare complication following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). This complication may represent a challenge for accurate diagnosis and treatment. This case report is about a 60-year-old male patient being admitted with an acute coronary syndrome. Despite successful PCI with drug eluting stent implantation into the right coronary artery (RCA) the patient complained about recurrent angina pectoris according to Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) class IV. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and transthoracic echocardiography revealed a massive 4.9 × 9.2 cm sized end-diastolic septum-hematoma, which compromised right ventricular cavity. Emergent recoronary angiography ruled out further contrast extravasation from the RCA. Conservative treatment was intended after discussion in the “heart-team.” The patient completely recovered with nearly complete resolution of the hematoma after 6 months. PMID:27119029

  12. HbSC Disease and Spontaneous Epidural Hematoma with Kernohan's Notch Phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Yogarajah, Meera; Agu, Chidozie Charles; Sivasambu, Bhradeev; Mittler, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous (nontraumatic) acute epidural hematoma is a rare and poorly understood complication of sickle cell disease. A 19-year-old African American male with hemoglobin SC disease (HbSC) presented with generalized body aches and was managed for acute painful crisis. During his hospital stay he developed rapid deterioration of his mental status and computed topography revealed a spontaneous massive epidural hematoma with mass effect and midline shift with Kernohan's notch phenomena for which urgent craniotomy and evacuation was done. We report the first case of HbSC disease associated with catastrophic epidural hematoma progressing to transtentorial herniation and Kernohan's notch phenomena within few hours with rapid clinical deterioration. The etiopathogenesis and the rare presentation are discussed in detail in this case report. PMID:26576305

  13. Spontaneous chronic subdural hematoma associated with arachnoid cyst in children and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Rajendra; You, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts are clear, colorless fluid-filled cysts that arise during brain and skull development from the splitting of the arachnoid membrane. Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is an encapsulated collection of old blood, mostly or totally liquefied and located between the dura mater and the arachnoid mater. Trauma is an important factor in the development of CSDH. Here, we report four patients, previously asymptomatic, revealing CSDH with AC on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. All patients underwent craniotomy with evacuation of hematoma and resection of the cystic membrane that was then connected to the basal cistern under the operating microscope. Postoperatively, all patients were symptom-free. Presentation of an AC with chronic subdural hematoma in the absence of preceding head trauma is considered to be rare in children and young adults. PMID:25685210

  14. Vertex epidural hematoma: A rare cause of post-traumatic headache and a diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Juliano Nery; Alves, Raphael Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vertex epidural hematomas (VEH) account for only 8% of all epidural hematomas. However, these traumatic injuries may be underestimated or overlooked altogether when only computed tomography (CT) scans are used for diagnosis. The vertex may be a potential anatomic “blind spot” on this radiological method. In such cases, magnetic resonance (MRI) offers a great diagnostic aid. Case Description: This manuscript reports a patient of a head trauma who developed progressive and intractable headache. MRI made the diagnosis of progressive VEH and highlighted the detachment of the superior sagittal sinus by the hematoma. Surgical treatment, because of the refractory clinical findings, was performed with good postoperative recovery. Conclusion: Multiple trauma patients with progressive and refractory headache should have their head CT thoroughly reviewed and, if necessary, be investigated with MRI.

  15. Acute subdural hematoma secondary to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Hanish; Chaudhary, Ashwani; Mahajan, Anuj; Paul, Birinder

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare type of stroke primarily affecting young women. Diagnosis is generally delayed or overlooked due to a wide spectrum of clinical symptoms. Subdural hematoma secondary to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is very rare. We report a case of 40-year-old female with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis who presented to us with an acute subdural hematoma and subarachnoid hemorrhage besides venous infarct. Management of such patients is complicated due to the rarity of the condition and contraindication for the use of anticoagulation. We conducted a thorough literature search through PubMed and could find only nine cases of spontaneous subdural hematoma secondary to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. PMID:27057237

  16. Pure tentorial subdural hematoma from rupture of aneurysm along the transmastoid branches of the occipital artery

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Doan, Ninh; Shabani, Saman; Gelsomino, Michael; Zaidat, Osama

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pure subdural hematoma (without subarachnoid, intraventricular, or intraparenchymal hemorrhage) due to a ruptured intracranial aneurysm is rare. Most reported cases involve an aneurysm along the internal carotid artery, posterior communicating artery, or middle cerebral artery. No reports have described an aneurysm along the transmastoid branches of the occipital artery. Case Description: A 70-year-old female presented with sudden-onset, excruciating headaches, associated with dizziness, nausea, and emesis. There was no history of trauma. Computed tomography (CT) head demonstrated a pure tentorial subdural hematoma. Vascular imaging revealed bilateral aneurysms along the transmastoid branches of the intracranial portion of both the occipital arteries. Consequently, these branches were embolized, with no residual filling of the aneurysms. After the procedure, the patient remained neurologically well. The patient was monitored appropriately for vasospasm, and was discharged home 10 days after presentation. Conclusion: Rupture of aneurysms along intracranial branches of the occipital artery can lead to pure subdural hematoma along the tentorium. PMID:27583173

  17. 'Subarachnoid cyst' after evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma: Case report of an unusual postoperative morbidity.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Low Y Y; Wai Hoe, N G

    2016-01-01

    Burr-hole drainage of chronic subdural hematomas are routine operative procedures done by neurosurgical residents. Common postoperative complications include acute epidural and/or subdural bleeding, tension pneumocephalus, intracranial hematomas and ischemic cerebral infarction. We report an interesting post-operative complication of a 'subarachnoid cyst' after burr-hole evacuation of a chronic subdural hematoma. The authors hypothesize that the 'cyst' is likely secondary to the splitting of the adjacent neomembrane within its arachnoid-brain interface by iatrogenic irrigation of the subdural space. Over time, this 'cyst' develops into an area of gliosis which eventually causes long-term scar epilepsy in the patient. As far as we are aware, this is the first complication of such a 'subarachnoid cyst' post burr-hole drainage reported in the literature. PMID:27366276

  18. Simultaneous Spinal and Intracranial Chronic Subdural Hematoma Cured by Craniotomy and Laminectomy: A Video Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Hideki; Kanamaru, Kenji; Araki, Tomohiro; Hamada, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous spinal and intracranial chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a rare entity. A 67-year-old man visited our hospital due to headache after diving into a river 2 weeks before. Non-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed bilateral intracranial CSDH. The bilateral CSDH was evacuated and his symptoms improved. Three days after craniotomy, he complained of sensory disturbance on his buttocks. Lumbar MRI showed a space-occupying lesion behind the thecal sac at L5. CT with myelography showed a subdural mass lesion; there was no communication with the subarachnoid space. Fourteen days after craniotomy, L5 laminectomy was performed and the dura mater was incised carefully. The video shows that a liquid hematoma similar to the intracranial CSDH flowed out, followed by cerebrospinal fluid. His symptoms improved after the operation and the hematoma did not recur. This is a rare condition of spinal CSDH demonstrated by neuroimaging and intraoperative video. PMID:27194987

  19. Simultaneous Spinal and Intracranial Chronic Subdural Hematoma Cured by Craniotomy and Laminectomy: A Video Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kanamaru, Hideki; Kanamaru, Kenji; Araki, Tomohiro; Hamada, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous spinal and intracranial chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a rare entity. A 67-year-old man visited our hospital due to headache after diving into a river 2 weeks before. Non-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed bilateral intracranial CSDH. The bilateral CSDH was evacuated and his symptoms improved. Three days after craniotomy, he complained of sensory disturbance on his buttocks. Lumbar MRI showed a space-occupying lesion behind the thecal sac at L5. CT with myelography showed a subdural mass lesion; there was no communication with the subarachnoid space. Fourteen days after craniotomy, L5 laminectomy was performed and the dura mater was incised carefully. The video shows that a liquid hematoma similar to the intracranial CSDH flowed out, followed by cerebrospinal fluid. His symptoms improved after the operation and the hematoma did not recur. This is a rare condition of spinal CSDH demonstrated by neuroimaging and intraoperative video. PMID:27194987

  20. Does the volume and localization of intracerebral hematoma affect short-term prognosis of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage?

    PubMed

    Salihović, Denisa; Smajlović, Dževdet; Ibrahimagić, Omer Ć

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether volume and localization of intracerebral hematoma affects the six-month prognosis of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Patients and Methods. The study included 75 patients with ICH of both sex and all age groups. ICH, based on CT scan findings, was divided in the following groups: lobar, subcortical, infratentorial, intraventricular haemorrhage and multiple hematomas. Volume of intracerebral hematoma was calculated according to formula V = 0.5 × a × b × c. Intracerebral hematomas, according to the volume, are divided in three groups (0-29 mL, 30-60 mL, and >60 mL). Results. The highest mortality rate was recorded in the group with multiple hematomas (41%), while the lowest in infratentorial (12.8%). The best six-month survival was in patients with a volume up to 29 mL, 30 of them (64%) survived. The highest mortality rate was recorded in patients with the hematoma volume >60 mL (85%). Kaplan-Meier's analysis showed that there was statistical significance between the size of the hematoma and the six-month survival (P < 0.0001). More than half of patients (61.1%) who survived 6 months after ICH were functionally independent (Rankin scale ≤2). Conclusion The volume of hematoma significantly affects six-month prognosis in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage, while localization does not. PMID:24967309

  1. Does the Volume and Localization of Intracerebral Hematoma Affect Short-Term Prognosis of Patients with Intracerebral Hemorrhage?

    PubMed Central

    Salihović, Denisa; Smajlović, Dževdet; Ibrahimagić, Omer Ć.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether volume and localization of intracerebral hematoma affects the six-month prognosis of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Patients and Methods. The study included 75 patients with ICH of both sex and all age groups. ICH, based on CT scan findings, was divided in the following groups: lobar, subcortical, infratentorial, intraventricular haemorrhage and multiple hematomas. Volume of intracerebral hematoma was calculated according to formula V = 0.5 × a × b × c. Intracerebral hematomas, according to the volume, are divided in three groups (0–29 mL, 30–60 mL, and >60 mL). Results. The highest mortality rate was recorded in the group with multiple hematomas (41%), while the lowest in infratentorial (12.8%). The best six-month survival was in patients with a volume up to 29 mL, 30 of them (64%) survived. The highest mortality rate was recorded in patients with the hematoma volume >60 mL (85%). Kaplan-Meier's analysis showed that there was statistical significance between the size of the hematoma and the six-month survival (P < 0.0001). More than half of patients (61.1%) who survived 6 months after ICH were functionally independent (Rankin scale ≤2). Conclusion The volume of hematoma significantly affects six-month prognosis in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage, while localization does not. PMID:24967309

  2. Scrotal hematoma resulting from extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for a renal calculus: a sign of retroperitoneal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Darren J.; Dodds, Lachlan J.

    2011-01-01

    We report a rare case of a patient presenting with scrotal hematoma associated with retroperitoneal hemorrhage after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). We propose a mechanism for the formation of scrotal hematoma and its importance as a sign of retroperitoneal hemorrhage. PMID:24578909

  3. [Esophageal perforation following a biopsy in a patient with eosinophilic esophagitis].

    PubMed

    Benítez Cantero, José Manuel; Angel Rey, José Manuel; Rodríguez Perálvarez, Manuel; Ayllón Terán, María Dolores; Jurado García, Juan; Soto Escribano, Pilar; Hervás Molina, Antonio José; Poyato González, Antonio; González Galilea, Angel

    2011-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is an underdiagnosed disease that should be suspected in all patients with dysphagia and food impaction. Although these are the leading symptoms, the clinical and endoscopic spectrum is highly varied. Clinicians should be aware of the risk of endoscopy-related complications in this disorder. Precautions should be maximized in endoscopic examinations to avoid iatrogenic damage. We describe the case of a young patient with esophageal stricture and dysphagia who suffered a perforation following a biopsy. PMID:21703721

  4. IgG4-Related Esophageal Disease Presenting as Esophagitis Dissecans Superficialis With Chronic Strictures.

    PubMed

    Dumas-Campagna, Myriam; Bouchard, Simon; Soucy, Genevieve; Bouin, Mickael

    2014-08-01

    IgG4-related disease is a recently recognized autoimmune systemic disorder that has been described in various organs. The disease is characterized histologically by a dense lymphoplasmocytic infiltrate of IgG4-positive cells, storiform fibrosis and can be associated with tumefactive lesions. IgG4-related disease involving the upper gastrointestinal tract is rare and only two previous case reports have reported IgG4-related esophageal disease. We report the case of a 63-year-old female patient with a long-standing history of severe dysphagia and odynophagia with an initial diagnosis of reflux esophagitis. Symptoms persisted despite anti-acid therapy and control esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed endoscopic images consistent with esophagitis dissecans superficialis (sloughing esophagitis). An underlying autoimmune process was suspected and immunosuppressant agents were tried to control her disease. The patient eventually developed disabling dysphagia secondary to multiple chronic esophageal strictures. A diagnosis of IgG4-related disease was eventually made after reviewing esophageal biopsies and performing an immunohistochemical study with an anti-IgG4 antibody. Treatment attempts with corticosteroids and rituximab was not associated with a significant improvement of the symptoms of dysphagia and odynophagia, possibly because of the chronic nature of the disease associated with a high fibrotic component. Our case report describes this unique case of IgG4-related esophageal disease presenting as chronic esophagitis dissecans with strictures. We also briefly review the main histopathological features and treatment options in IgG4-related disease. PMID:24883156

  5. Identification of Hematomas in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Using an Index of Quantitative Brain Electrical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Naunheim, Rosanne; Bazarian, Jeffrey; Mould, W. Andrew; Hanley, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Rapid identification of traumatic intracranial hematomas following closed head injury represents a significant health care need because of the potentially life-threatening risk they present. This study demonstrates the clinical utility of an index of brain electrical activity used to identify intracranial hematomas in traumatic brain injury (TBI) presenting to the emergency department (ED). Brain electrical activity was recorded from a limited montage located on the forehead of 394 closed head injured patients who were referred for CT scans as part of their standard ED assessment. A total of 116 of these patients were found to be CT positive (CT+), of which 46 patients with traumatic intracranial hematomas (CT+) were identified for study. A total of 278 patients were found to be CT negative (CT−) and were used as controls. CT scans were subjected to quanitative measurements of volume of blood and distance of bleed from recording electrodes by blinded independent experts, implementing a validated method for hematoma measurement. Using an algorithm based on brain electrical activity developed on a large independent cohort of TBI patients and controls (TBI-Index), patients were classified as either positive or negative for structural brain injury. Sensitivity to hematomas was found to be 95.7% (95% CI=85.2, 99.5), specificity was 43.9% (95% CI=38.0, 49.9). There was no significant relationship between the TBI-Index and distance of the bleed from recording sites (F=0.044, p=0.833), or volume of blood measured F=0.179, p=0.674). Results of this study are a validation and extension of previously published retrospective findings in an independent population, and provide evidence that a TBI-Index for structural brain injury is a highly sensitive measure for the detection of potentially life-threatening traumatic intracranial hematomas, and could contribute to the rapid, quantitative evaluation and treatment of such patients. PMID:25054838

  6. [Complications of superficial venous surgery of the legs: thigh hematomas and abscess].

    PubMed

    Millien, J P; Coget, J M

    1993-01-01

    A series of 1,000 patients has been studied. I. HEMATOMAE: They are nearly continuous during internal saphena stripping but depend on various parameters. 1) Anatomical: a) Varicose veins topography. Perforating veins. Perforating veins of the thigh cause haemorrhage but reactions of venous construction are quite important and precocious not to observe subcutaneous bleedings. More or less "soft" stripping creates a reaction of reflex vasoconstriction. Fore saphenous vein of the thigh Hematomae are more and more numerous and important because the fore saphenous vein is a vein whose wall is thinner, more fragile and almost more superficial. b) Type of patient. In an obese patient, hematoma seems to be more spectacular. In the thin patient, it appears faster, if hematic expression is too late. 2) Stripping techniques: It is possible to propose different techniques of stripping, but none of them can lower specifically post-surgical hematomae. 3) Anaesthesiae: a) General anaesthesia. A bilateral surgery under general anaesthesia was helpful to observe in some cases a less important hematoma at the level of the second operated leg. b) Rachi-anaesthesia. Physiological vasoconstriction requires a latent period for this kind of anaethesia which causes a vasomotor paralysis due to a blockade of the sympathetic nerve. c) Local anaesthesia. It is obtained by crural block in association with injection of Xylocaine Adrenalina at the level of perforating veins of the thigh. This technique causes less hematomae. II. ABSCESSES: Only 4 cases out of 1,000 operated legs have been reported. No related pathology have been observed particularly about lymphatic disorders (erysipelas or lymphoedema), no previous infection known which could not have explained such complications. Therapy was simple: incision at mid-thigh and draining by lamina. The patient recovered within two weeks. PMID:8115469

  7. Blunt traumatic superior gluteal artery pseudoaneurysm presenting as gluteal hematoma without bony injury: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Babu, Annu; Gupta, Amit; Sharma, Pawan; Ranjan, Piyush; Kumar, Atin

    2016-08-01

    Blunt traumatic injuries to the superior gluteal artery are rare in clinic. A majority of injuries present as aneurysms following penetrating trauma, fracture pelvis or posterior dislocation of the hip joint. We reported a rare case of superior gluteal artery pseudoaneurysm following blunt trauma presenting as large expanding right gluteal hematoma without any bony injury. The gluteal hematoma was suspected clinically, confirmed by ultrasound and the arterial injury was diagnosed by CT angiography that revealed a large right gluteal hematoma with a focal contrast leakage forming a pseudoaneurysm within the hematoma. Pseudoaneurysm arose from the superior gluteal branch of right internal iliac artery, which was successfully angioembolized. The patient was discharged on day 4 of hospitalization with resolving gluteal hematoma. This report highlighted the importance of considering an arterial injury following blunt trauma to the buttocks with subsequent painful swelling. Acknowledgment of this rare injury pattern was necessary to facilitate rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment. PMID:27578385

  8. Family history of esophageal cancer increases the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tiantian; Cheng, Hongwei; Chen, Xingdong; Yuan, Ziyu; Yang, Xiaorong; Zhuang, Maoqiang; Lu, Ming; Jin, Li; Ye, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    A population-based case-control was performed to explore familial aggregation of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Family history of cancer was assessed by a structured questionnaire, and from which 2 cohorts of relatives of cases and controls were reconstructed. Unconditional logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards regression were applied for case-control design and reconstructed cohort design, respectively. We observed a close to doubled risk of ESCC associated with a positive family history of esophageal cancer among first degree relatives (odds ratio [OR] = 1.85, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.42-2.41), after adjusting age, sex, family size and other confounders. The excess risks of ESCC increased with the increasing of first-degree relatives affected by esophageal cancer (p < 0.001). In particular, those individuals whose both parents with esophageal cancer had an 8-fold excess risk of ESCC (95% CI: 1.74-36.32). The reconstructed cohort analysis showed that the cumulative risk of esophageal cancer to age 75 was 12.2% in the first-degree relatives of cases and 7.0% in those of controls (hazard ratio = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.54-2.37). Our results suggest family history of esophageal cancer significantly increases the risk for ESCC. Future studies are needed to understand how the shared genetic susceptibility and/or environmental exposures contribute to the observed excess risk. PMID:26526791

  9. PPI-responsive esophageal eosinophilia and eosinophilic esophagitis: More similarities than differences

    PubMed Central

    Eluri, Swathi; Dellon, Evan S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To discuss the clinical, endoscopic, and histologic features, pathogenesis, and disease mechanisms of proton pump inhibitor–responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE), and to highlight similarities and differences with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Recent findings PPI-REE is a condition in which patients have clinical and histologic findings similar to EoE, but achieve complete remission with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment. More than one-third of patients who have esophageal symptoms associated with esophageal eosinophilia respond to PPI treatment. Emerging data elucidating the pathogenesis of PPI-REE have shown that Th2-related inflammatory factors such as IL-13, IL-5, eotaxin-3, and major basic protein (MBP) are elevated in PPI-REE, similar to EoE. PPI-REE also shares a genetic expression signature with EoE that reverses with PPI treatment. Mechanisms proposed to explain the PPI response include an acid-independent, anti-inflammatory action of PPIs and PPI-induced restoration of esophageal barrier function. Summary Multiple features of PPI-REE overlap extensively with EoE. This raises the question of whether PPI-REE is merely a subtype of EoE rather than an independent condition. This similarity may have future implications for algorithms informing evaluation and treatment of esophageal eosinophilia. PMID:26039722

  10. Spontaneous hematoma in the setting of dual anti-platelet therapy with ticagrelor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    FENG, CHUNGUANG; WANG, LINGUANG; WANG, LULU

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old male patient was admitted to hospital because a lump was discovered, accompanied with pain lasting 5 h under his right scapula. Two months earlier, he had undergone a double-stent insertion operation due to lesions on the end of the left main coronary artery, the opening of left circumflex artery, and the opening of the anterior descending branch. After the operation, he was administered with dual anti-platelet therapy (DAPT) with aspirin and ticagrelor and was diagnosed with hematoma under his right scapula through ultrasonic inspection. It was established that no other factor, except DAPT, was responsible for his spontaneous hematoma. PMID:27347115

  11. Abdominal Wall Hematoma as a Rare Complication following Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Moon, In Tae; Sohn, Young Seok; Lee, Ji Young; Park, Hwan Cheol; Choi, Sung Il; Kim, Soon Gil; Oh, Ji Young

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal wall hematoma is a rare but potentially serious vascular complication that may develop after coronary angiographic procedures. In particular, an oblique muscle hematoma caused by an injury of the circumflex iliac artery is very rare, yet can be managed by conservative treatment including hydration and transfusion. However, when active bleeding continues, angiographic embolization or surgery might be needed. In this study, we report an uncommon case of injury to the circumflex iliac artery by an inappropriate introduction of the hydrophilic guidewire during the performance of a percutaneous coronary intervention.

  12. Subcapsular Renal-Infected Hematoma After Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery: A Rare but Serious Complication

    PubMed Central

    Consigliere, Lucas; Gallegos, Hector; Rojas, Francisco; Astroza, Gastón

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report a case of a 53-year-old woman affected by a left kidney stone and persistent positive urinary culture treated by retrograde intrarenal surgery. During postoperative day 1, she developed a sudden back pain associated with a decrease in hemoglobin. CT scan showed a subcapsular hematoma giving the impression of partial compression of kidney and upper urinary tract. For that reason, in the first instance, a Double-J ureteral stent was installed. Unfortunately, an open surgical drainage was necessary because a secondary infection of the hematoma was evident during the following days. PMID:27579416

  13. Traumatic spinal epidural hematoma in a 1-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Tarbé de Saint Hardouin, A-L; Grévent, D; Sainte-Rose, C; Angoulvant, F; Chéron, G

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic spinal epidural hematoma is uncommon in children, making rapid diagnosis difficult. In this report, we present a case of traumatic cervical epidural hematoma in a 1-year-old boy, diagnosed with computed tomography scanning and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Management was conservative and the lesion regressed spontaneously. The presentation in childhood is often nonspecific. MRI is the imaging modality of choice for diagnosing these lesions. Conservative treatment has to be considered in cases with a benign clinical course and provided that the patient is followed up neurologically with repeated MRI. PMID:27266638

  14. Subcapsular Renal-Infected Hematoma After Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery: A Rare but Serious Complication.

    PubMed

    Salvadó, José A; Consigliere, Lucas; Gallegos, Hector; Rojas, Francisco; Astroza, Gastón

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 53-year-old woman affected by a left kidney stone and persistent positive urinary culture treated by retrograde intrarenal surgery. During postoperative day 1, she developed a sudden back pain associated with a decrease in hemoglobin. CT scan showed a subcapsular hematoma giving the impression of partial compression of kidney and upper urinary tract. For that reason, in the first instance, a Double-J ureteral stent was installed. Unfortunately, an open surgical drainage was necessary because a secondary infection of the hematoma was evident during the following days. PMID:27579416

  15. Indium-111-labeled leukocyte localization in hematomas: a pitfall in abscess detection

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, V.W.; vanSonnenberg, E.; Kipper, S.; Bieberstein, M.P.

    1984-07-01

    Indium-111-labeled white-blood-cell scanning is a useful modality in abscess detection and has replaced gallium scanning in many institutions. Sensitivities of 72% to 90% and specificities of 90% to 100% have been reported. In searching for abscesses seven cases of indium-111-labeled leukocyte uptake were encountered in collections subsequently proved to be noninfected hematomas. Abundant red blood cells with few or no white blood cells, no bacteria, and a benign clinical course identified these noninfected hematomas. Five of the patients were being treated with hemodialysis and three were recent allograft recipients. The results indicate some limitation and nonspecificity in indium-111 scanning, despite its many benefits.

  16. Esophageal testing: What we have so far.

    PubMed

    de Bortoli, Nicola; Martinucci, Irene; Bertani, Lorenzo; Russo, Salvatore; Franchi, Riccardo; Furnari, Manuele; Tolone, Salvatore; Bodini, Giorgia; Bolognesi, Valeria; Bellini, Massimo; Savarino, Vincenzo; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Edoardo Vincenzo

    2016-02-15

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. In the last few decades, new technologies have evolved and have been applied to the functional study of the esophagus, allowing for the improvement of our knowledge of the pathophysiology of GERD. High-resolution manometry (HRM) permits greater understanding of the function of the esophagogastric junction and the risks associated with hiatal hernia. Moreover, HRM has been found to be more reproducible and sensitive than conventional water-perfused manometry to detect the presence of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. Esophageal 24-h pH-metry with or without combined impedance is usually performed in patients with negative endoscopy and reflux symptoms who have a poor response to anti-reflux medical therapy to assess esophageal acid exposure and symptom-reflux correlations. In particular, esophageal 24-h impedance and pH monitoring can detect acid and non-acid reflux events. EndoFLIP is a recent technique poorly applied in clinical practice, although it provides a large amount of information about the esophagogastric junction. In the coming years, laryngopharyngeal symptoms could be evaluated with up and coming non-invasive or minimally invasive techniques, such as pepsin detection in saliva or pharyngeal pH-metry. Future studies are required of these techniques to evaluate their diagnostic accuracy and usefulness, although the available data are promising. PMID:26909230

  17. Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing.

    PubMed

    Gravesen, Flemming H; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2009-01-14

    The esophagus serves to transport food and fluid from the pharynx to the stomach. Manometry has been the "golden standard" for the diagnosis of esophageal motility diseases for many decades. Hence, esophageal function is normally evaluated by means of manometry even though it reflects the squeeze force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure of esophageal transport function. The technique used to record axial force has developed from external force transducers over in-vivo strain gauges of various sizes to electrical impedance based measurements. The amplitude and duration of the axial force has been shown to be as reliable as manometry. Normal, as well as abnormal, manometric recordings occur with normal bolus transit, which have been documented using imaging modalities such as radiography and scintigraphy. This inconsistency using manometry has also been documented by axial force recordings. This underlines the lack of information when diagnostics are based on manometry alone. Increasing the volume of a bag mounted on a probe with combined axial force and manometry recordings showed that axial force amplitude increased by 130% in contrast to an increase of 30% using manometry. Using axial force in combination with manometry provides a more complete picture of esophageal motility, and the current paper outlines the advantages of using this method. PMID:19132762

  18. Perception of Syllable Stress in Esophageal Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Christopher Niles; Morris, Hughlett L.

    1988-01-01

    Ten esophageal speakers and ten normal speakers produced repetitions of the disyllable /mama/ using five different conditions of syllable stress. Nine normal listeners judged both relative and absolute syllable stress. Reliable judgments were made of the syllable stress, and speakers were able to effect systematic changes in listener perceptions…

  19. Esophageal testing: What we have so far

    PubMed Central

    de Bortoli, Nicola; Martinucci, Irene; Bertani, Lorenzo; Russo, Salvatore; Franchi, Riccardo; Furnari, Manuele; Tolone, Salvatore; Bodini, Giorgia; Bolognesi, Valeria; Bellini, Massimo; Savarino, Vincenzo; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Edoardo Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. In the last few decades, new technologies have evolved and have been applied to the functional study of the esophagus, allowing for the improvement of our knowledge of the pathophysiology of GERD. High-resolution manometry (HRM) permits greater understanding of the function of the esophagogastric junction and the risks associated with hiatal hernia. Moreover, HRM has been found to be more reproducible and sensitive than conventional water-perfused manometry to detect the presence of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. Esophageal 24-h pH-metry with or without combined impedance is usually performed in patients with negative endoscopy and reflux symptoms who have a poor response to anti-reflux medical therapy to assess esophageal acid exposure and symptom-reflux correlations. In particular, esophageal 24-h impedance and pH monitoring can detect acid and non-acid reflux events. EndoFLIP is a recent technique poorly applied in clinical practice, although it provides a large amount of information about the esophagogastric junction. In the coming years, laryngopharyngeal symptoms could be evaluated with up and coming non-invasive or minimally invasive techniques, such as pepsin detection in saliva or pharyngeal pH-metry. Future studies are required of these techniques to evaluate their diagnostic accuracy and usefulness, although the available data are promising. PMID:26909230

  20. Histomorphological and Immunophenotypic Features of Pill-Induced Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Hwan; Kim, Won; Lee, Kook Lae; Byeon, Sun-ju; Choi, Euno; Chang, Mee Soo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate histomorphological and immunophenotypic features in pill-induced esophagitis. We comparatively evaluated the histomorphological, immunophenotypic features of pill-induced esophagitis vs. reflux esophagitis, as well as clinical information and endoscopic findings. Fifty-two tissue pieces from 22 cases of pill-induced esophagitis, 46 pieces from 20 reflux esophagitis, and 16 pieces from 14 control samples were subjected to immunohistochemistry for inflammatory infiltrates (CD3 for T lymphocyte, CD20 for B lymphocyte, CD56 for NK cell, CD68 for macrophage, CD117 for mast cell) and eosinophil chemotaxis-associated proteins (Erk, leptin, leptin receptor, pSTAT3, phospho-mTOR). As a result, Histomorphology showed that a diffuse pattern of dilated intercellular spaces was more frequently observed in pill-induced esophagitis, while reactive atypia and subepithelial papillary elongation were more often found in reflux esophagitis (P < 0.05, respectively). Interestingly, intraepithelial eosinophilic microabscess, intraepithelial pustule and diffuse pattern of dilated intercellular spaces were observed in 14% (3 cases), 9% (2 cases) and 32% (7 cases) of pill-induced esophagitis, respectively, but in no cases of reflux esophagitis. Regarding intraepithelial inflammatory infiltrates in pill-induced esophagitis, T lymphocytes were the most common cells, followed by eosinophil; 11 and 7 in one x400 power field, respectively. Intraepithelial pSTAT3-positive pattern was more frequently observed in pill-induced esophagitis than in reflux esophagitis, at 45% (10 cases) versus 10% (2 cases), respectively (P < 0.05). Considering the distal esophageal lesion only, intraepithelial pustule, diffuse dilated intercellular spaces and stromal macrophages were more frequently found in distal pill-induced esophagitis, whereas reactive atypia and intraepithelial mast cells in reflux esophagitis (P < 0.05, respectively). In conclusion, diffuse dilated

  1. Distal intramural spread of rectal cancer after preoperative radiotherapy: The results of a multicenter randomized clinical study

    SciTech Connect

    Chmielik, Ewa; Bujko, Krzysztof . E-mail: bujko@coi.waw.pl; Nasierowska-Guttmejer, Anna; Nowacki, Marek P.; Kepka, Lucyna; Sopylo, Rafal; Wojnar, Andrzej; Majewski, Przemyslaw; Sygut, Jacek; Karmolinski, Andrzej; Huzarski, Tomasz; Wandzel, Piotr

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the extent of distal intramural spread (DIS) after preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 316 patients with T{sub 3-4} primary resectable rectal cancer were randomized to receive either preoperative 5x5 Gy radiation with immediate surgery or chemoradiation (50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy per fraction plus boluses of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin) with delayed surgery. The slides of the 106 patients who received short-course radiation and of the 86 who received chemoradiation were available for central microscopic evaluation of DIS. Results: The length of DIS did not differ significantly (p = 0.64) between the short-course group and the chemoradiation group and was 0 in 47% vs. 49%; 1 to 5 mm in 41% vs. 42%; 6 to 10 mm in 8% vs. 9%, and greater than 10 mm in 4% vs. 0, respectively. Among the 11 clinically complete responders, DIS was found 1 to 5 mm from the microscopically detected ulceration of the mucosa in 5 patients. The discontinuous DIS was more frequent in the chemoradiation group as compared with the short-course group (i.e., 57% vs. 16% of cases, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Approximately 1 out of 10 advanced rectal cancers after preoperative radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy was characterized by DIS of over 5 mm. No significant difference was seen in the length of DIS between the 2 groups.

  2. Does surgery correct esophageal motor dysfunction in gastroesophageal reflux

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, C.O.; Pope, C.E.; Gannan, R.M.; Allen, F.D.; Velasco, N.; Hill, L.D.

    1981-09-01

    The high incidence of dysphagia in patients with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux (GER) but no evidence of peptic stricture suggests esophageal motor dysfunction. Conventional methods for detecting dysfunction (radiologic and manometric examinations) often fail to detect abnormality in these patients. Radionuclide transit (RT), a new method for detecting esophageal motor dysfunction, was used to prospectively assess function in 29 patients with symptomatic GER uncomplicated by stricture before and three months after antireflux surgery (HILL). The preoperative incidence of dysphagia and esophageal dysfunction was 73% and 52%, respectively. During operation (Hill repair), intraoperative measurement of the lower esophageal sphincter pressure was performed and the LESP raised to levels between 45 and 55 mmHg. The preoperative lower esophageal sphincter pressure was raised from a mean of 8.6 mmHg, to mean of 18.5 mmHg after operation. No patient has free reflux after operation. Postoperative studies on 20 patients demonstrated persistence of all preoperative esophageal dysfunction despite loss of dysphagia. RT has demonstrated a disorder of esophageal motor function in 52% of patients with symptomatic GER that may be responsible for impaired esophageal clearance. This abnormality is not contraindication to surgery. The results indicate that construction of an effective barrier to reflex corrects symptoms of reflux, even in the presence of impaired esophageal transit. Radionuclide transit is a safe noninvasive test for assessment of esophageal function.

  3. Clinicopathologic Features and Clinical Outcomes of Esophageal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Fan; Tian, Yangzi; Liu, Zhen; Xu, Guanghui; Liu, Shushang; Guo, Man; Lian, Xiao; Fan, Daiming; Zhang, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Clinicopathologic features and clinical outcomes of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) in esophagus are limited, because of the relatively rare incidence of esophageal GISTs. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate the clinicopathologic features and clinical outcomes of esophageal GISTs, and to investigate the potential factors that may predict prognosis. Esophageal GIST cases were obtained from our center and from case reports and clinical studies extracted from MEDLINE. Clinicopathologic features and survivals were analyzed and compared with gastric GISTs from our center. The most common location was lower esophagus (86.84%), followed by middle and upper esophagus (11.40% and 1.76%). The majority of esophageal GISTs were classified as high-risk category (70.83%). Mitotic index was correlated with histologic type, mutational status, and tumor size. The 5-year disease-free survival and disease-specific survival were 65.1% and 65.9%, respectively. Tumor size, mitotic index, and National Institutes of Health risk classification were associated with prognosis of esophageal GISTs. Only tumor size, however, was the independent risk factor for the prognosis of esophageal GISTs. In comparison to gastric GISTs, the distribution of tumor size, histologic type, and National Institutes of Health risk classification were significantly different between esophageal GISTs and gastric GISTs. The disease-free survival and disease-specific survival of esophageal GISTs were significantly lower than that of gastric GISTs. The most common location for esophageal GISTs was lower esophagus, and most of the esophageal GISTs are high-risk category. Tumor size was the independent risk factor for the prognosis of esophageal GISTs. Esophageal GISTs differ significantly from gastric GISTs in respect to clinicopathologic features. The prognosis of esophageal GISTs was worse than that of gastric GISTs. PMID:26765432

  4. Functional luminal imaging probe topography: an improved method for characterizing esophageal distensibility in eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Kahrilas, Peter J.; Xiao, Yinglian; Nicodème, Frédéric; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Hirano, Ikuo; Pandolfino, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aims of this study were to develop a new method for analysis and presentation of esophageal distensibility data using high-resolution impedance planimetry recordings during a volume-controlled distention. Methods: Two control subjects and six patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) with stricture, narrow caliber or normal endoscopy according to EndoFLIP studies were included for analysis. Median filtering and pulse detection techniques were applied to the pressure signal and a wavelet decomposition technique was applied to the 16 channels of raw esophageal diameter data to reduce vascular artifact, respiratory effect and remove esophageal contraction interference. These data were used to generate a functional luminal imaging probe (FLIP) topography plot that describes regional variation of cross-sectional area (CSA). A previously developed computer program was used to calculate and model the CSA-pressure data to derive the slope of line fitting and distension plateau for each individual subject. The results were compared among the four endoscopic phenotypes. Results: Patients with EoE and normal endoscopy had similar esophageal distensibility parameters to those of normal controls whereas patients with EoE and stricture or narrow caliber had much lower distensibility than patients with EoE and normal endoscopy. The FLIP topography plots provided a global assessment of the esophageal distensibility along the axial plane of measurement that differentiated patients with varying degrees of endoscopic abnormality. Conclusions: New techniques can be leveraged to improve data analysis and presentation using EndoFLIP assessment of the esophageal body in EoE. These techniques may be helpful in defining clinically relevant phenotypes and guiding treatment strategies and should be helpful in structuring future outcome trials. PMID:23503784

  5. A case of acute subdural hematoma due to ruptured aneurysm detected by postmortem angiography.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, Go; Makino, Yohsuke; Yajima, Daisuke; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Torimitsu, Suguru; Hoshioka, Yumi; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2016-03-01

    Acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) is mostly caused by head trauma, but intrinsic causes also exist such as aneurysm rupture. We describe here a case involving a man in his 70s who was found lying on the bedroom floor by his family. CT performed at the hospital showed ASDH and a forensic autopsy was requested. Postmortem cerebral angiography showed dilatation of the bifurcation of the middle cerebral artery, which coincided with the dilated part of the Sylvian fissure. Extravasation of contrast medium into the subdural hematoma from this site was suggestive of a ruptured aneurysm. Autopsy revealed a fleshy hematoma (total weight 110 g) in the right subdural space and findings of brain herniation. As indicated on angiography, a ruptured saccular aneurysm was confirmed at the bifurcation of the middle cerebral artery. Obvious injuries to the head or face could not be detected on either external or internal examination, and intrinsic ASDH due to a ruptured middle cerebral artery aneurysm was determined as the cause of death. One of the key points of forensic diagnosis is the strict differentiation between intrinsic and extrinsic onset for conditions leading to death. Although most subdural hematomas (SDH) are caused by extrinsic factors, forensic pathologists should consider the possibility of intrinsic SDH. In addition, postmortem angiography can be useful for identifying vascular lesions in such cases. PMID:26362305

  6. Subdural hematoma caused by rupture of a posterior cerebral artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhou; Tan, Qiang; Li, Lin; Chen, Zhi

    2016-04-01

    Subdural hematoma (SDH) caused by rupture of a cerebral aneurysm is rare and is usually associated with delayed diagnosis and treatment. We present a patient of a posterior cerebral artery aneurysm presenting as subacute SDH. The incidence, mechanisms and treatment of this condition are discussed. PMID:27094528

  7. Multiple Episodes of Hemorrhage Identified in MRI of Chronic Subdural Hematomas

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Dong-Ho; Shim, Jae-Joon; Yoon, Seok-Mann

    2014-01-01

    Objective Septa within the hematoma cavity are common, especially in the mixed density chronic subdural hematomas (CSHs). Although CT remains the diagnosis of choice, MRI is superior to detect the membranes in CSHs. We could obtain MRIs in 64 patients with CSH. We examined the value of MRI to understand the history of CSH. Methods We retrospectively examined the medical records and MRIs of 64 consecutive patients. MRI was selected to find any organic causes of neurologic symptoms. We classified the CSHs into septated or non-septated group, since classification of the septa was frequently obscure. Results Septa were identified by MRI in 43 patients (67%). They were more common in the over 70-years-old group. Unknown causes were more common in the septated group, which implies they might suffer from multiple traumas. The signal intensity of the CSH was variable. The methods of treatment were different between two groups. Surgery was more common in the septated group (p=0.021). Surgery was performed in 57 patients (89%). Burr-hole drainage was successful in 55 patients, even in the septated group. Conclusion Septa within the hematoma cavity may be related to the multiple episodes of head trauma. Repeated trauma may cause acute bleedings over the CSHs, which is one of the pathogenic mechanisms of hematoma enlargement. MRI could show the history of CSH. PMID:27169028

  8. Spinal Epidural Hematoma Following Cupping Glass Treatment in an Infant With Hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Fruchtman, Yariv; Dardik, Rima; Barg, Assaf Arie; Livnat, Tami; Feldman, Zeev; Rubinstein, Marina; Grinberg, Gahl; Rosenberg, Nurit; Kenet, Gili

    2016-06-01

    A 6 months old infant, diagnosed with a rare mutation causing severe hemophilia A, presented with spinal epidural hematoma. Parents later admitted the infant had glass cupping therapy performed within 2 weeks of the onset of symptoms. The rare mutation, rare bleeding complication, and the eventual course of therapy applied in this case will be discussed in our case report. PMID:26844816

  9. Bilateral Chronic Subdural Hematoma is Associated with Rapid Progression and Poor Clinical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    AGAWA, Yuji; MINEHARU, Yohei; TANI, Shoichi; ADACHI, Hidemitsu; IMAMURA, Hirotoshi; SAKAI, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) has been recognized as a benign disease, but its clinical outcome is not well documented. This study aims to expand the knowledge base regarding the outcome of CSDH. We retrospectively reviewed clinical characteristics of CSDH operated in the Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital between June 2005 and June 2012. Variants included age at onset, sex, laterality, presence of headache, consciousness level, and risk factors for hemorrhage such as malignancy or intake of anticoagulants. A total of 368 cases were analyzed. Six patients (1.4%) had a poor outcome, defined as any morbidity or mortality at 7 days postoperatively. Bilateral hematoma was significantly associated with a poor outcome (p = 0.041). Warfarin use and malignancy, albeit statistically not significant, were more frequently observed in patients with a poor outcome. Bilateral CSDH was observed in 53 patients (14.4%). Age at onset, sex, history of malignancy, anticoagulant use, and antiplatelet use did not differ between bilateral and unilateral CSDH. Recurrence rate was not different between bilateral and unilateral CSDH (14.2% vs. 11.3%), but poor outcome as a result of brain herniation was significantly higher in bilateral than in unilateral hematomas (5.7% vs. 0.3%, p = 0.01). Bilateral CSDH was associated with rapid progression and showed worse outcome as a result of brain herniation in comparison with unilateral CSDH. Urgent trephination surgery for decompression of hematoma pressure may be recommended for bilateral CSDH. PMID:26923835

  10. 77 FR 16925 - Medical Devices; Neurological Devices; Classification of the Near Infrared Brain Hematoma Detector

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 882 Medical Devices; Neurological Devices; Classification of the Near Infrared Brain Hematoma Detector AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the Near Infrared (NIR)...

  11. Detection of esophageal ulcerations with technetium-99m albumin sucralfate

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, J.S.; Adcock, K.A.; Schmelter, R.

    1986-07-01

    Technetium-99m albumin-sucralfate ((/sup 99m/Tc)Su) can be used to demonstrate peptic ulcer disease in man and animals. We evaluated the usefulness of (/sup 99m/Tc)Su for detecting various grades of esophagitis. (/sup 99m/Tc)Su adhered to the distal esophagus for up to 3 hr in five of six patients with esophageal ulcers but adhered to only two of nine with lesser degrees of esophagitis. No adherence was seen in five patients without esophagitis. Thus, (/sup 99m/Tc)Su may not be useful for detecting any but the most severe grade of esophagitis. Based on these results, we speculate that the previously documented beneficial effects of sucralfate on mild to moderate esophagitis may be due to other mechanisms besides adherence to the ulcerated mucosa.

  12. [Esophageal Injury Treated with a Covered Expandable Metallic Stent].

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Go; Aoki, Masaya; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Suenaga, Toyokuni; Sato, Masami

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of iatrogenic esophageal injury treated with a covered expandable metallic stent after thoracoscopic chest drainage. A 70-year-old man who had stricture of the esophagus after endoscopic submucosal dissection underwent balloon dilation. Chest computed tomography revealed esophageal rupture. Initially, continuous intra-esophageal drainage was carried out, however, due to the development of mediastinitis with enlarged abscess around the descending aorta and the left pneumothorax, thoracoscopic chest drainage was performed. Since direct closure was thought to be in appropriate, an intra-esophageal approach was chosen and a covered expandable metallic stent was mounted under fluorography on the next day. After the treatment, the patient was able to eat, and was able to discharge 42 days later. Intra-esophageal covered expandable metallic stent can be an alternative treatment for esophageal rupture. PMID:27365065

  13. Genes Regulating Epithelial Polarity Are Critical Suppressors of Esophageal Oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiu-Min; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Li-Li; Zhao, Run-Zhen; Ji, Hong-Long

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is an aggressive disease featured by early lymphatic and hematogenous dissemination, and is the sixth leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. The proper formation of apicobasal polarity is essential for normal epithelium physiology and tissue homeostasis, while loss of polarity is a hallmark of cancer development including esophageal oncogenesis. In this review, we summarized the stages of esophageal cancer development associated with the loss or deregulation of epithelial cell apicobasal polarity. Loss of epithelial apicobasal polarity exerts an indispensable role in the initiation of esophageal oncogenesis, tumor progression, and the advancement of tumors from benign to malignant. In particular, we reviewed the involvement of several critical genes, including Lkb1, claudin-4, claudin-7, Par3, Lgl1, E-cadherin, and the Scnn1 gene family. Understanding the role of apicobasal regulators may lead to new paradigms for treatment of esophageal tumors, including improvement of prognostication, early diagnosis, and individually tailored therapeutic interventions in esophageal oncology. PMID:26185530

  14. Epidemiologic differences in esophageal cancer between Asian and Western populations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han-Ze; Jin, Guang-Fu; Shen, Hong-Bing

    2012-06-01

    Esophageal cancer is a common cancer worldwide and has a poor prognosis. The incidence of esophageal squamous cell cancer has been decreasing, whereas the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma has been increasing rapidly, particularly in Western men. Squamous cell cancer continues to be the major type of esophageal cancer in Asia, and the main risk factors include tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, hot beverage drinking, and poor nutrition. In contrast, esophageal adenocarcinoma predominately affects the whites, and the risk factors include smoking, obesity, and gastroesophageal reflux disease. In addition, Asians and Caucasians may have different susceptibilities to esophageal cancer due to different heritage backgrounds. However, comparison studies between these two populations are limited and need to be addressed in the near future. Ethnic differences should be taken into account in preventive and clinical practices. PMID:22507220

  15. Fungal Esophagitis in a Child with Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Anjum; Assiri, Asaad; Zaidi, Zafar; Alsheikh, Abdulmalik

    2016-08-01

    Esophagitis in children is not uncommon, mostly due to gastro-esophageal reflux. Other conditions like eosinophilic and infective esophagitis need to be elucidated in differential diagnoses. Fungal orCandida esophagitisusually occurs in high risk children who are immune-compromised, malnourished, on steroid therapy or have uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. An eleven-year girl presented with uncontrolled type I diabetes mellitus and recurrent epigastric pain with vomiting. Her oral intake was satisfactory. There was no dysphagia and odynophagia. Physical examination was normal with good oral hygiene. Failure in responding to conventional medications led to endoscopic evaluation, which revealed white patches and esophageal inflammation and diagnosed as fungal esophagitis on histopathology. Although infective esophagitis is encountered sporadically in pediatric age group, but it should always be considered in high risk individuals and when conventional medication fails to resolve the symptoms. PMID:27539771

  16. Esophageal involvement by extranodal natural killer T cell lymphoma, nasal type, mimicking Ebstein Barr viral esophagitis in a tonsillar lymphoma patient undergoing chemoradiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Se Ryeon; Park, Eun Kyung; Won, Nam Hee; Kim, Byung Soo

    2010-09-01

    Esophageal involvement by extranodal natural killer (NK)/T cell lymphoma, nasal type, is rare. As a result, esophageal symptoms in these patients might at first be thought to originate from a benign condition, such as viral esophagitis. It is important to note, however, that benign conditions may mask esophageal involvement by lymphoma. Until now, there has been no report documenting esophageal involvement by lymphoma mimicking viral esophagitis in an extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma patient undergoing active treatment. Here, we report a case of esophageal involvement by extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type, initially misdiagnosed as Ebstein Barr virus esophagitis. Lymphoma invasion of the esophagus should be considered if esophageal symptoms do not respond to usual medical esophagitis therapy in an extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type, patient undergoing chemoradiation. PMID:20887494

  17. Eosinophilic esophagitis and food impaction: an instructive case.

    PubMed

    Tilakaratne, Samantha; Day, Andrew; Lemberg, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    Although the key features of eosinophilic esophagitis have been increasingly described over recent years, this entity is still often not considered and consequently diagnosis is often either not made or delayed. Typical endoscopic findings may be present. The diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis, however, relies on the histological assessment of mucosal biopsies. This case report highlights a common pattern of presentation of eosinophilic esophagitis and demonstrates the importance of considering this diagnosis. PMID:22798122

  18. Zollinger-Ellison syndrome with esophagitis and Barrett mucosa.

    PubMed

    Karl, T R; Pindyck, F; Sicular, A

    1983-10-01

    Although esophageal disease in Zollinger-Ellison syndrome is being recognized with increasing frequency, Barrett esophagus is seen only rarely. Basal lower esophageal sphincter pressure is probably not different in Zollinger-Ellison syndrome and non-Zollinger-Ellison syndrome patients. Circulating gastrin, therefore, cannot be the major determinant of lower esophageal sphincter pressure in vivo. Total gastrectomy and resection of all metaplastic esophagus, when feasible, is the treatment of choice for patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome and Barrett mucosa. PMID:6624733

  19. Endoscopic palliation of advanced esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mocanu, A; Bârla, R; Hoara, P; Constantinoiu, S

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer represents one of the most aggressive digestive tumors, with a survival rate at 5 years of only 10%. Globally, during the last three decades, there has been an increasing incidence of the esophageal cancer, approx. 400,000 new esophageal cancers being currently diagnosed annually. This represents the eighth leading cause of cancer incidence and the sixth leading cause of cancer death overall. Taking into account the population’s global aging and thus, the increase in the number of patients who will not bear surgery, PCT and radiation, or the fact that they do not want it especially because of deficiencies and associated pathology, the endoscopic ablative techniques with palliation purposes represent the alternative. If we refer to the Western Europe countries and North America, we notice an increase of esophageal adenocarcinoma rate versus squamous cancer. As for the Asian region, referring in particular to China and Japan, 9 out of 10 esophageal cancers are squamous cell carcinomas. For at least half of the patients with EC (esophageal cancer) there is no hope of healing because of the advanced regional malignant invasion (T3-4, N+, M+) with no chemo and radiotherapy response, poor preoperative patients’ conditions or systemic metastasis. The low life expectancy does not justify the risky medical procedures, the goal of the therapy consisting in the improvement of the quality of life by eliminating dysphagia (reestablishing oral feeding) which represents the most common complication of EC, the respiratory tract complication caused by eso-tracheal fistulas or by eliminating chest pain. To treat dysphagia, which is the main target of palliation, combined methods like endoscopic, chemo and radio-therapy, can be used, each one with indications, benefits and risks. Abbreviations: SEPS = self expanding plastic stent, SREMS = self expanding metal stent, EBRT = Endoscopic brachy radiotherapy, EUS = Ultra sound endoscopy, CT = Computer tomograph, UGE

  20. Surgical treatment analysis of idiopathic esophageal achalasia

    PubMed Central

    de AQUINO, José Luis Braga; SAID, Marcelo Manzano; PEREIRA, Douglas Rizzanti; do AMARAL, Paula Casals; LIMA, Juliana Carolina Alves; LEANDRO-MERHI, Vânia Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    Background Idiopathic esophageal achalasia is an inflammatory disease of unknown origin, characterized by aperistalsis of the esophageal body and failure of the lower esophageal sphincter in response to swallowing, with consequent dysphagia. Aim To demonstrate the results of surgical therapy in these patients, evaluating the occurred local and systemic complications. Methods Were studied retrospectively 32 patients, 22 of whom presented non-advanced stage of the disease (Stage I/II) and 10 with advanced disease (Stage III/IV). All of them had the clinical conditions to be submitted to surgery. The diagnoses were done by clinical, endoscopic, cardiological, radiological and esophageal manometry analysis. Pre-surgical evaluation was done with a questionnaire based on the most predisposing factors in the development of the disease and the surgical indication was based on the stage of the disease. Results The patients with non-advanced stages were submitted to cardiomyotomy with fundoplication, wherein in the post-surgical early assessment, only one (4,4%) presented pulmonary infection, but had a good outcome. In patients with advanced disease, seven were submitted to esophageal mucosectomy preserving the muscular layer, wherein one patient (14,2%) presented dehiscence of gastric cervical esophagus anastomosis as well as pulmonary infection; all of these complications were resolved with proper specific treatment; the other three patients with advanced stage were submitted to transmediastinal esophagectomy; two of them presented hydropneumothorax with good evolution, and one of them also presented fistula of the cervical esophagogastric anastomosis, but with spontaneous healing after conservative treatment and nutritional support. The two patients with fistula of the cervical anastomosis progressed to stenosis, with good results after endoscopic dilations. In the medium and long term assessment done in 23 patients, all of them reported improvement in life quality, with

  1. A Life-Threatening Mediastinal Hematoma After Central Venous Port System Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Sarach, Janine; Zschokke, Irin; Melcher, Gian A.

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 68 Final Diagnosis: Mediastinal hematoma Symptoms: Agitation • severe hemodynamic instability • severe respiratory distress Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation • reintubation • thoracic drain Specialty: Surgery Objective: Diagnostic/therapeutic accidents Background: We report a case of surgical central venous port system implantation using Seldinger’s technique with a life-threatening mediastinal hematoma due to the perforation of the superior vena cava. Case Report: A 68-year-old woman was admitted to our institution for port implantation. Open access to the cephalic vein and 2 punctures of the right subclavian vein were unsuccessful. Finally, the port catheter could be placed into the superior vena cava using Seldinger’s technique. As blood aspiration via the port catheter was not possible, fluoroscopy was performed, revealing mediastinal contrast extravasation without contrasting the venous system. A new port system could be placed in the correct position without difficulties. After extubation, the patient presented with severe respiratory distress and required consecutive cardiopulmonary resuscitation and reintubation. The CT scan showed a significant hematoma in the lower neck and posterior mediastinum with tracheal compression. We assumed a perforation of the superior vena cava with the tip of the guidewire using Seldinger’s technique. Long-term intensive treatment with prolonged ventilation and tracheotomy was necessary. The port system had to be subsequently explanted due to infection. Conclusions: Mediastinal hematoma is a rare but life-threatening complication associated with central venous catheterization using Seldinger’s technique. Perforation occurs most often during central venous catheterization in critical care. Mediastinal hematoma is an example of a mechanical complication occurring after central venous catheterization, which has been described only a few times in the literature to

  2. Diffusion-weighted imaging of traumatic subdural hematoma in the subacute stage.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Seikou; Fukuoka, Masaaki; Koan, Yoko; Miyake, Hirohisa; Ono, Yuko; Moriki, Akihito; Mori, Koreaki; Mokudai, Toshihiko; Uchida, Yasufumi; Kumano, Osamu

    2005-09-01

    Five cases of traumatic subdural hematomas in the subacute stage (from 7 to 20 days after head injury) were treated in one male and four females, aged from 63 to 82 years, with evacuation via craniotomy in three and aspiration via burr hole surgery in two. All hematomas were evaluated by T1-, T2-, and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, and measurement of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). Diffusion-weighted imaging showed the hematoma as a crescent high intensity area with a low intensity rim close to the brain surface (two-layered structure) in four cases and as high intensity with low intensity components in one case. The high intensity areas under the dura mater on diffusion-weighted imaging appeared as homogeneous high intensity on T1- and T2-weighted imaging in four cases, and inhomogeneous high intensity on T1- and isointensity on T2-weighted imaging in one case. The mean ADC value of the high intensity areas was 0.58 +/- 0.23 (mean +/- standard deviation) x 10(-3) mm2/sec. The operative findings revealed the high intensity areas as solid clots. The low intensity areas on diffusion-weighted imaging appeared as homogeneous high intensity in four cases and inhomogeneous isointensity with high intensity components in one case on T1- and T2-weighted imaging. The mean ADC value of the low intensity areas was 2.03 +/- 0.27 x 10(-3) mm2/sec. The operative findings revealed the low intensity areas as mixtures of resolved clot and cerebrospinal fluid. Diffusion-weighted imaging showed the characteristic two-layered structure in traumatic subdural hematomas in the subacute stage, and analysis of the ADC values was useful for differentiating solid from liquid hematoma and for selection of the surgical procedure. PMID:16195646

  3. Novel Clinical Scale for Evaluating Pre-Operative Risk of Cerebral Herniation from Traumatic Epidural Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong; Wang, Wen-Hao; Hu, Lian-Shui; Li, Jun; Luo, Fei; Lin, Jun-Ming; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Ming-Sheng; Zhang, Yuan; Hu, Kang; Zheng, Jian-Xian

    2016-06-01

    Secondary massive cerebral infarction (MCI) is the predominant prognostic factor for cerebral herniation from epidural hematoma (EDH) and determines the need for decompressive craniectomy. In this study, we tested the clinical feasibility and reliability of a novel pre-operative risk scoring system, the EDH-MCI scale, to guide surgical decision making. It is comprised of six risk factors, including hematoma location and volume, duration and extent of cerebral herniation, Glasgow Coma Scale score, and presence of preoperative shock, with a total score ranging from 0 to 18 points. Application of the EDH-MCI scale to guide surgical modalities for initial hematoma evacuation surgery for 65 patients (prospective cohort, 2012.02-2014.01) showed a significant improvement in the accuracy of the selected modality (95.38% vs. 77.95%; p = 0.002) relative to the results for an independent set of 126 patients (retrospective cohort, 2007.01-2012.01) for whom surgical modalities were decided empirically. Results suggested that simple hematoma evacuation craniotomy was sufficient for patients with low risk scores (≤9 points), whereas decompressive craniectomy in combination with duraplasty were necessary only for those with high risk scores (≥13 points). In patients with borderline risk scores (10-12 points), those having unstable vital signs, coexistence of severe secondary brainstem injury, and unresponsive dilated pupils after emergent burr hole hematoma drainage had a significantly increased incidence of post-traumatic MCI and necessity of radical surgical treatments. In conclusion, the novel pre-operative risk EDH-MCI evaluation scale has a satisfactory predictive and discriminative performance for patients who are at risk for the development of secondary MCI and therefore require decompressive craniectomy. PMID:25393339

  4. Aortic Pseudoaneurysm Secondary to Mediastinitis due to Esophageal Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Zuluaga, Claudia Patricia; Aluja Jaramillo, Felipe; Velásquez Castaño, Sergio Andrés; Rivera Bernal, Aura Lucía; Granada, Julio Cesar; Carrillo Bayona, Jorge Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal perforation is a condition associated with high morbidity and mortality rates; it requires early diagnosis and treatment. The most common complication of esophageal rupture is mediastinitis. There are several case reports in the literature of mediastinitis secondary to esophageal perforation and development of aortic pseudoaneurysm as a complication. We report the case of a patient with an 8-day history of esophageal perforation due to foreign body (fishbone) with mediastinitis and aortic pseudoaneurysm. The diagnosis was made using Computed Tomography (CT) with intravenous and oral water-soluble contrast material. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy did not detect the perforation. PMID:26977330

  5. Eosinophilic esophagitis as paraneoplastic syndrome in a patient with ganglioneuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Prader, S; Spalinger, J; Caduff, J; Hürlimann, S; Rischewski, J

    2015-05-01

    A 16-month-old boy presented with failure to thrive despite sufficient caloric intake, hypersalivation, abdominal pain, chronic diarrhea and blepharitis. An eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) was diagnosed by esophageal biopsy. Dietary restrictions and topical steroid treatment lead to no improvement. Further diagnostic work-up revealed an intrathoracal, paraspinal ganglioneuroblastoma. After operative extirpation of the tumour, all initial symptoms resolved. An esophageal control biopsy 4 weeks after tumour resection was normal. This is the first report of eosinophilic esophagitis as part of a paraneoplastic syndrome in a patient with a malignant disease other than a carcinoma. PMID:25985452

  6. Quantitative Analysis of Vasodilatory Action of Quercetin on Intramural Coronary Resistance Arteries of the Rat In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Monori-Kiss, Anna; Monos, Emil; Nádasy, György L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Dietary quercetin improves cardiovascular health, relaxes some vascular smooth muscle and has been demonstrated to serve as a substrate for the cyclooxygenase enzyme. Aims 1. To test quantitatively a potential direct vasodilatory effect on intramural coronary resistance artery segments, in different concentrations. 2. To scale vasorelaxation at different intraluminal pressure loads on such vessels of different size. 3. To test the potential role of prostanoids in vasodilatation induced by quercetin. Methods Coronary arterioles (70–240 µm) were prepared from 24 rats and pressurized in PSS, using a pressure microangiometer. Results The spontaneous tone that developed at 50 mmHg was relaxed by quercetin in the 10−9 moles/lit concentration (p<0.05), while 10−5 moles/lit caused full relaxation. Significant relaxation was observed at all pressure levels (10–100 mmHg) at 10−7 moles/lit concentration of quercetin. The cyclooxygenase blocker indomethacin (10−5moles/lit) induced no relaxation but contraction when physiological concentrations of quercetin were present in the tissue bath (p<0.02 with Anova), this contraction being more prominent in smaller vessels and in the higher pressure range (p<0.05, Pearson correlation). A further 2–8% contraction could be elicited by the NO blocker L-NAME (10−4 moles/lit). Conclusion These results demonstrate that circulating levels of quercetin (10−7 moles/lit) exhibit a substantial coronary vasodilatory effect. The extent of it is commeasurable with that of several other physiological mechanisms of coronary blood flow control. At least part of this relaxation is the result of an altered balance toward the production of endogenous vasodilatory prostanoids in the coronary arteriole wall. PMID:25144688

  7. Spontaneous enterogastric reflux gastritis and esophagitis.

    PubMed Central

    Gowen, G F

    1985-01-01

    Enterogastric reflux gastritis and esophagitis is best known after gastric resections and pyloroplasty but it also occurs spontaneously in the nonoperated patient. Forty-two patients are presented who meet the criteria for the diagnosis: constant burning epigastric pain, worse after meals, unrelieved by antacids and diet; endoscopic demonstration of a gastric bile pool; endoscopic biopsy proof of gastritis and esophagitis; and hypochlorhydria. Patients with mild and moderate stages of the disease can benefit from metoclopramide therapy which improves the gastric emptying mechanism. Of the surgical patients with intractable symptoms, 90% were women, 90% had marked hypochlorhydria, 83% had biliary disease, current or remote, and 50% had anemia. With vagotomy, antrectomy, and Roux-Y anastomosis 45-60 cm downstream, the clinical response has been most encouraging. PMID:3970596

  8. GWAS identifies four novel eosinophilic esophagitis loci

    PubMed Central

    Sleiman, Patrick MA; Wang, Mei-Lun; Cianferoni, Antonella; Aceves, Seema; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Nadeau, Kari; Bredenoord, Albert J.; Furuta, Glenn T.; Spergel, Jonathan M.; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an allergic disorder characterized by infiltration of the esophagus with eosinophils. We had previously reported association of the TSLP/WDR36 locus with EoE. Here we report genome-wide significant associations at four additional loci; c11orf30 and STAT6, which have been previously associated with both atopic and autoimmune disease, and two EoE-specific loci, ANKRD27 that regulates the trafficking of melanogenic enzymes to epidermal melanocytes and CAPN14, that encodes a calpain whose expression is highly enriched in the esophagus. The identification of five EoE loci, not only expands our etiological understanding of the disease but may also represent new therapeutic targets to treat the most debilitating aspect of EoE, esophageal inflammation and remodeling. PMID:25407941

  9. Neoadjuvant treatment for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Yoshifumi; Watanabe, Masayuki; Yoshida, Naoya; Baba, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma are types of esophageal cancer, one of the most aggressive malignant diseases. Since both histological types present entirely different diseases with different epidemiology, pathogenesis and tumor biology, separate therapeutic strategies should be developed against each type. While surgical resection remains the dominant therapeutic intervention for patients with operable esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), alternative strategies are actively sought to reduce the frequency of post-operative local or distant disease recurrence. Such strategies are particularly sought in the preoperative setting. Currently, the optimal management of resectable ESCC differs widely between Western and Asian countries (such as Japan). While Western countries focus on neoadjuvant or definitive chemoradiotherapy, neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery is the standard treatment in Japan. Importantly, each country and region has established its own therapeutic strategy from the results of local randomized control trials. This review discusses the current knowledge, available data and information regarding neoadjuvant treatment for operable ESCC. PMID:24834142

  10. Early esophageal cancer screening in China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qin-Yan; Fang, Jing-Yuan

    2015-12-01

    In China, the incidence of esophageal cancer (EC) and its related mortality are high. Screening strategies aiming at early diagnosis can improve the prognosis. Researches on detection of early EC, especially in China are reviewed. Compared to esophageal balloon cytology or routine endoscopy, chromoendoscopy with Lugol's staining and biopsy appears to be the gold standard for early EC diagnosis in China today. Narrow-band imaging endoscopy, Confocal Laser endomicroscopy and other novel diagnostic approaches are more and more widely used in developed urban areas, but cost and lack of essential training to the endoscopists have made their use limited in rural areas. No specific biomarkers or serum markers were strongly commended to be used in screening strategies currently, which need to be evaluated in future. Trials on organized screening have been proposed in some regions of china with high disease prevalence. Screening in these areas has been shown to be cost effective. PMID:26651250

  11. Esophageal perforation in a sword swallower.

    PubMed

    Scheinin, S A; Wells, P R

    2001-01-01

    We present the case of a 59-year-old man who sustained an esophageal perforation as a result of sword swallowing. An esophagogram established the diagnosis, and surgical repair was attempted. However, 19 days later, a persistent leak and deterioration of the patient's condition necessitated a transhiatal esophagectomy with a left cervical esophagogastrostomy. The patient recovered and has resumed his daily activities at the circus, with the exception of sword swallowing. This case report presents an unusual mechanism for a potentially lethal injury. Our search of the English-language medical literature revealed no other report of esophageal perforation resulting from sword swallowing. Management of such an injury is often difficult, and a favorable outcome is dependent on prompt diagnosis and treatment. PMID:11330747

  12. Current strategies in chemoradiation for esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Shane

    2014-01-01

    Chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has an important role in the treatment of esophageal cancer in both the inoperable and the pre-operative settings. Pre-operative chemoradiation therapy is generally given to 41.4-50.4 Gy with platinum or paclitaxel based chemotherapy. The most common definitive dose in the U.S. is 50-50.4 Gy. New advances in CRT for esophageal cancer have come from looking for ways to minimize toxicity and maximize efficacy. Recent investigations for minimizing toxicity have focused advanced radiation techniques such as IMRT and proton therapy, have sought to further define normal tissue tolerances, and have examined the use of tighter fields with less elective clinical target volume coverage. Efforts to maximize efficacy have included the use of early positron emission tomography (PET) response directed therapy, molecularly targeted therapies, and the use of tumor markers that predict response. PMID:24982764

  13. Reversal of lower esophageal sphincter hypotension and esophageal aperistalsis after treatment for hypothyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Eastwood, G.L.; Braverman, L.E.; White, E.M.; Vander Salm, T.J.

    1982-08-01

    A 65-year-old woman suffered from both chronic gastroesophageal reflux, which was complicated by columnar metaplasia (Barrett's epithelium), and profound hypothyroidism. An esophageal motility tracing showed absence of peristalsis in the lower esophagus and the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) could not be identified. Thyroid replacement therapy, in conjunction with antacid and cimetidine treatment, was associated not only with improvement in the gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, but also with a return of esophageal peristalsis and LES pressure to normal. To support our clinical observations, we rendered four cats hypothyroid with /sup 131/I and documented a fall in LES pressure. We propose that abnormal smooth-muscle function of the esophagus may be another manifestation of the gastrointestinal motility disturbances which are associated with hypothyroidism.

  14. Advances in Clinical Management of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Dellon, Evan S.; Liacouras, Chris A.

    2014-01-01

    EoE is a chronic immune/antigen-mediated clinicopathologic condition that has become an increasingly important cause of upper gastrointestinal morbidity in adults and children over the past 2 decades. It is diagnosed based on symptoms of esophageal dysfunction, the presence of at least 15 eosinophils/high-power field in esophageal biopsies, and exclusion of competing causes of esophageal eosinophilia, including proton pump inhibitor-responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE). We review what we have recently learned about the clinical aspects of EoE, discussing the clinical, endoscopic, and histologic features of EoE in adults and children. We explain the current diagnostic criteria and challenges to diagnosis, including the role of gastroesophageal reflux disease and PPI-REE. It is also important to consider the epidemiology of EoE (current incidence of 1/10,000 new cases per year and prevalence of 0.5-1/1,000 cases per year) and disease progression. We review the main treatment approaches and new treatment options; EoE can be treated with topical corticosteroids such as fluticasone and budesonide, or dietary strategies, such as amino acid-based formulas, allergy test-directed elimination diets, and non-directed empiric elimination diets. Endoscopic dilation has also become an important tool for treatment of fibrostenostic complications of EoE. There are number of unresolved issues in EoE, including phenotypes, optimal treatment endpoints, the role of maintenance therapy, and treatment of refractory EoE. The care of patients with EoE and the study of the disease span many disciplines—EoE is ideally managed by a multidisciplinary team of gastroenterologists, allergists, pathologists, and dieticians. PMID:25109885

  15. Esophageal tuberculosis: mimicry of gastrointestinal malignancy.

    PubMed

    Damtew, B; Frengley, D; Wolinsky, E; Spagnuolo, P J

    1987-01-01

    A case of tuberculous involvement of the esophagus was studied in an adult with mediastinal lymphadenopathy unrecognized by roentgenography of the chest. The roentgenographic and endoscopic features in this case were more consistent with malignancy than with tuberculosis. Nineteen additional cases from the English-language literature were reviewed. Although esophageal tuberculosis is a rare disease, it should be strongly suspected in a patient with dysphagia who has a positive tuberculin skin test, active pulmonary disease, or mediastinal adenopathy. PMID:3823717

  16. Esophageal pulse oximetry utilizing reflectance photoplethysmography.

    PubMed

    Kyriacou, Panayiotis A; Powell, Sarah; Langford, Richard M; Jones, Deric P

    2002-11-01

    Peripheral perfusion is often poor and barely pulsatile in patients undergoing prolonged major surgery. Hence, the arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) readings from commercial finger pulse oximeters can become unreliable or cease when they are most needed. To overcome this limitation, the esophagus has been investigated as an alternative measurement site, as perfusion may be preferentially preserved centrally. A reflectance esophageal pulse oximeter probe, and a processing system implemented in LabVIEW were developed. The system was evaluated in clinical measurements on 49 cardiothoracic surgery patients. The SpO2 values from the esophagus were in good agreement with arterial blood oxygen saturation (SaO2) values obtained from blood gas analysis and CO-oximetry. The means (+/-SD) of the differences between the esophageal SpO2 and SaO2 results from blood gas analysis and CO-oximetry were 0.02 +/- 0.88% and -0.73 +/- 0.72%, respectively. In five (10.2%) of the patients, the finger pulse oximeter failed for at least 10 min while the esophageal SpO2 readings remained reliable. The results confirm that the esophagus may be used as an alternative monitoring site for pulse oximetry even in patients with compromised peripheral perfusion. PMID:12450366

  17. Eosinophilic esophagitis: From pathophysiology to treatment

    PubMed Central

    D’Alessandro, Alessandra; Esposito, Dario; Pesce, Marcella; Cuomo, Rosario; De Palma, Giovanni Domenico; Sarnelli, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune disease, characterized by a dense eosinophilic infiltrate in the esophagus, leading to bolus impaction and reflux-like symptoms. Traditionally considered a pediatric disease, the number of adult patients with EoE is continuously increasing, with a relatively higher incidence in western countries. Dysphagia and food impaction represent the main symptoms complained by patients, but gastroesophageal reflux-like symptoms may also be present. Esophageal biopsies are mandatory for the diagnosis of EoE, though clinical manifestations and proton pump inhibitors responsiveness must be taken into consideration. The higher prevalence of EoE in patients suffering from atopic diseases suggests a common background with allergy, however both the etiology and pathophysiology are not completely understood. Elimination diets are considered the first-line therapy in children, but this approach appears less effective in adults patients, who often require steroids; despite medical treatments, EoE is complicated in some cases by esophageal stricture and stenosis, that require additional endoscopic treatments. This review summarizes the evidence on EoE pathophysiology and illustrates the safety and efficacy of the most recent medical and endoscopic treatments. PMID:26600973

  18. Endoscopic resection of gastric and esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Balmadrid, Bryan; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) and endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) techniques have reduced the need for surgery in early esophageal and gastric cancers and thus has lessened morbidity and mortality in these diseases. ESD is a relatively new technique in western countries and requires rigorous training to reproduce the proficiency of Asian countries, such as Korea and Japan, which have very high complete (en bloc) resection rates and low complication rates. EMR plays a valuable role in early esophageal cancers. ESD has shown better en bloc resection rates but it is easier to master and maintain proficiency in EMR; it also requires less procedural time. For early esophageal adenocarcinoma arising from Barrett’s, ESD and EMR techniques are usually combined with other ablative modalities, the most common being radiofrequency ablation because it has the largest dataset to prove its success. The EMR techniques have been used with some success in early gastric cancers but ESD is currently preferred for most of these lesions. ESD has the added advantage of resecting into the submucosa and thus allowing for endoscopic resection of more aggressive (deeper) early gastric cancer. PMID:26510452

  19. A Review of Esophageal Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Coss-Adame, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Noncardiac chest pain is a term that encompasses all causes of chest pain after a cardiac source has been excluded. This article focuses on esophageal sources for chest pain. Esophageal chest pain (ECP) is common, affects quality of life, and carries a substantial health care burden. The lack of a systematic approach toward the diagnosis and treatment of ECP has led to significant disability and increased health care costs for this condition. Identifying the underlying cause(s) or mechanism(s) for chest pain is key for its successful management. Common etiologies include gastroesophageal reflux disease, esophageal hypersensitivity, dysmotility, and psychological conditions, including panic disorder and anxiety. However, the pathophysiology of this condition is not yet fully understood. Randomized controlled trials have shown that proton pump inhibitor therapy (either omeprazole, lansoprazole, or rabeprazole) can be effective. Evidence for the use of antidepressants and the adenosine receptor antagonist theophylline is fair. Psychological treatments, notably cognitive behavioral therapy, may be useful in select patients. Surgery is not recommended. There remains a large unmet need for identifying the phenotype and prevalence of pathophysiologic mechanisms of ECP as well as for well-designed multicenter clinical trials of current and novel therapies. PMID:27134590

  20. Esophageal Stricture Prevention after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection.

    PubMed

    Jain, Deepanshu; Singhal, Shashideep

    2016-05-01

    Advances in diagnostic modalities and improvement in surveillance programs for Barrett esophagus has resulted in an increase in the incidence of superficial esophageal cancers (SECs). SEC, due to their limited metastatic potential, are amenable to non-invasive treatment modalities. Endoscopic ultrasound, endoscopic mucosal resection, and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) are some of the new modalities that gastroenterologists have used over the last decade to diagnose and treat SEC. However, esophageal stricture (ES) is a very common complication and a major cause of morbidity post-ESD. In the past few years, there has been a tremendous effort to reduce the incidence of ES among patients undergoing ESD. Steroids have shown the most consistent results over time with minimal complications although the preferred mode of delivery is debatable, with both systemic and local therapy having pros and cons for specific subgroups of patients. Newer modalities such as esophageal stents, autologous cell sheet transplantation, polyglycolic acid, and tranilast have shown promising results but the depth of experience with these methods is still limited. We have summarized case reports, prospective single center studies, and randomized controlled trials describing the various methods intended to reduce the incidence of ES after ESD. Indications, techniques, outcomes, limitations, and reported complications are discussed. PMID:26949124

  1. A Review of Esophageal Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Coss-Adame, Enrique; Rao, Satish S C

    2015-11-01

    Noncardiac chest pain is a term that encompasses all causes of chest pain after a cardiac source has been excluded. This article focuses on esophageal sources for chest pain. Esophageal chest pain (ECP) is common, affects quality of life, and carries a substantial health care burden. The lack of a systematic approach toward the diagnosis and treatment of ECP has led to significant disability and increased health care costs for this condition. Identifying the underlying cause(s) or mechanism(s) for chest pain is key for its successful management. Common etiologies include gastroesophageal reflux disease, esophageal hypersensitivity, dysmotility, and psychological conditions, including panic disorder and anxiety. However, the pathophysiology of this condition is not yet fully understood. Randomized controlled trials have shown that proton pump inhibitor therapy (either omeprazole, lansoprazole, or rabeprazole) can be effective. Evidence for the use of antidepressants and the adenosine receptor antagonist theophylline is fair. Psychological treatments, notably cognitive behavioral therapy, may be useful in select patients. Surgery is not recommended. There remains a large unmet need for identifying the phenotype and prevalence of pathophysiologic mechanisms of ECP as well as for well-designed multicenter clinical trials of current and novel therapies. PMID:27134590

  2. [Minimally Invasive Treatment of Esophageal Benign Diseases].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Haruhiro

    2016-07-01

    As a minimally invasive treatment of esophageal achalasia per-oral endoscopic myotomy( POEM) was developed in 2008. More than 1,100 cases of achalasia-related diseases received POEM. Success rate of the procedure was more than 95%(Eckerdt score improvement 3 points and more). No serious( Clavian-Dindo classification III b and more) complication was experienced. These results suggest that POEM becomes a standard minimally invasive treatment for achalasia-related diseases. As an off-shoot of POEM submucosal tumor removal through submucosal tunnel (per-oral endoscopic tumor resection:POET) was developed and safely performed. Best indication of POET is less than 5 cm esophageal leiomyoma. A novel endoscopic treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) was developed. Anti-reflux mucosectomy( ARMS) is nearly circumferential mucosal reduction of gastric cardia mucosa. ARMS is performed in 56 consecutive cases of refractory GERD. No major complications were encountered and excellent clinical results. Best indication of ARMS is a refractory GERD without long sliding hernia. Longest follow-up case is more than 10 years. Minimally invasive treatments for esophageal benign diseases are currently performed by therapeutic endoscopy. PMID:27440038

  3. Eosinophilic esophagitis: asthma of the esophagus?

    PubMed

    Arora, Amindra S; Yamazaki, Kiyoshi

    2004-07-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is rapidly emerging as a distinct disease entity in both pediatric and adult gastroenterology. The typical clinical presentation includes solid food dysphagia in young men who have an atopic predisposition. Food impaction necessitating endoscopic intervention is common. EE should be suspected, in particular, in patients with unexplained dysphagia or those with no response to antacid or anti-acid secretory therapy. Careful endoscopic and radiographic examinations reveal furrows, corrugations, rings, whitish plaques, fragile crêpe paper-like appearance, and a small-caliber esophagus. Mucosal erosion in the distal esophagus, characteristic to reflux esophagitis, is absent in EE. Marked eosinophil infiltration in the esophageal epithelia (>20 eosinophils per high-power field) is the diagnostic hallmark. Food antigens and aeroallergens may play a role in the pathogenesis of EE. The mechanisms may be dependent or independent of immunoglobulin E. Elimination diets, systemic and topical corticosteroids, leukotriene receptor antagonists, and, most recently, an anti-interleukin-5 monoclonal antibody have been used to treat EE. EE likely represents another example of eosinophil-associated inflammation of epithelia at the interface between external and internal milieu, similar to bronchial asthma and atopic dermatitis. This review summarizes recent progress in the diagnosis and management of EE and discusses future research directions. PMID:15224275

  4. Esophageal Stricture Prevention after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepanshu; Singhal, Shashideep

    2016-01-01

    Advances in diagnostic modalities and improvement in surveillance programs for Barrett esophagus has resulted in an increase in the incidence of superficial esophageal cancers (SECs). SEC, due to their limited metastatic potential, are amenable to non-invasive treatment modalities. Endoscopic ultrasound, endoscopic mucosal resection, and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) are some of the new modalities that gastroenterologists have used over the last decade to diagnose and treat SEC. However, esophageal stricture (ES) is a very common complication and a major cause of morbidity post-ESD. In the past few years, there has been a tremendous effort to reduce the incidence of ES among patients undergoing ESD. Steroids have shown the most consistent results over time with minimal complications although the preferred mode of delivery is debatable, with both systemic and local therapy having pros and cons for specific subgroups of patients. Newer modalities such as esophageal stents, autologous cell sheet transplantation, polyglycolic acid, and tranilast have shown promising results but the depth of experience with these methods is still limited. We have summarized case reports, prospective single center studies, and randomized controlled trials describing the various methods intended to reduce the incidence of ES after ESD. Indications, techniques, outcomes, limitations, and reported complications are discussed. PMID:26949124

  5. Diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Asifa K; Mussarat, Ahad; Mishra, Anil

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a recently recognized allergic disorder, characterized by eosophageal dysfunction, accumulation of ≥15 eosinophils/high-powered field, eosinophil microabssess, basal cell hyperplasia, extracellular eosinophilic granules in the esophageal epithelial mucosal biopsy and a lack of response to a 8-week proton pump inhibitor treatment. Despite the increased incidences and considerable progress made in understanding EoE pathogenesis, there are limited diagnostic and therapeutic options available for EoE. Currently, the only criterion for diagnosing EoE is repetitive esophageal endoscopic biopsies and histopathological evaluation. Antigen elimination or corticosteroid therapies are effective therapies for EoE but are expensive and have limitations, if continued in the long term. Hence, there is a great necessity for novel noninvasive diagnostic biomarkers that can easily diagnose EoE and assess effectiveness of therapy. Herein, we have provided an update on key molecules involved in the disease initiation, and progression and proposed novel noninvasive diagnostic molecules and strategies for EoE therapy. PMID:25400904

  6. Esophageal Perforation: A Rare Complication of Transesophageal Echocardiography in a Patient with Asymptomatic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Kabir; Lal, Yasir; Condron, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is a commonly used procedure in patients with suspected endocarditis. A rare but dreadful complication of this procedure is perforation of the esophagus. We report the case of an elderly female with multiple comorbidities, who presented with polyarticular septic arthritis. TEE was performed to rule out endocarditis. Though the standard procedure protocol was followed, she developed esophageal perforation. It was managed with esophageal stenting but she developed multiorgan failure and did not survive. This case highlights the potential of severe morbidity and mortality associated with TEE. Appropriate screening must be done and high-risk individuals must be identified before such procedures are attempted. PMID:23341798

  7. Distal Radius Fracture Hematoma Block with Combined Lidocaine and Bupivacaine can induce Seizures while within Therapeutic Window: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dezfuli, Bobby; Edwards, Christopher J.; DeSilva, Gregory L

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Hematoma blocks are effective pain management modalities for closed reduction of distal radius fractures. Complications of hematoma blocks are associated with systemic reaction to anesthetic used. Case Report: We present a case report of an elderly patient who received a hematoma block of lidocaine and bupivacaine for a distal radius fracture and subsequently developed a generalized tonic clonic seizure. The dose of both lidocaine and bupivacaine were well within the suggested dose limit. The episode was self limiting and patient had the cast applied. Conclusions: We conclude that hematoma blocks with a combination of anesthetics may decrease the threshold to neurologic complications, especially in elderly patients. Precautions and ready treatment measures should be made available while performing closed reduction

  8. Etizolam, an anti-anxiety agent, attenuates recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma--evaluation by computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Hirashima, Yutaka; Kuwayama, Naoya; Hamada, Hideo; Hayashi, Nakamasa; Endo, Shunro

    2002-02-01

    Etizolam, an anti-anxiety agent which is an antagonist of platelet-activating factor receptors, was administered to patients with chronic subdural hematoma (CSH) after hematoma removal to assess the effectiveness for preventing recurrence compared with control patients not given the drug after surgery. The remaining volumes of subdural hematomas on brain computed tomography were measured approximately 1 month after removal. Volume in the etizolam group (15 patients) was significantly smaller than in the control group (24 patients). Hematoma recurrence was not detected in the etizolam group 3 months after surgery, but occurred in the control group. The difference was significant. Etizolam administration may be useful for the prevention of recurrence of CSH. PMID:11944589

  9. Epidural hematomas. An unusual complication of minor blunt force injury due to seizures in a patient with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Wong, S W; Gardner, V; Sanger, J S

    1993-12-01

    Multiple subacute epidural hematomas in a patient with sickle cell disease (HbSS) are reported. The patient was a 22-year-old Black man with a history of strokes and seizures, who was unexpectedly found dead at his foster home. Scene investigation disclosed no foul play or any indication of violent activities. Autopsy findings included subgaleal contusions and bilateral epidural hematomas, but no calvarial fractures. The epidural hematomas were subacute and closely patterned to the headboard knots of the bed in which the decedent had slept. The etiology of the hematomas is minor blunt force injury secondary to the head striking against the headboard during seizures. The immediate cause of death was determined to be pneumonia and sepsis secondary to HbSS. PMID:8116593

  10. Outcome and prognostic factors for dogs with a histological diagnosis of splenic hematoma following splenectomy: 35 cases (2001-2013).

    PubMed

    Patten, Steve G; Boston, Sarah E; Monteith, Gabrielle J

    2016-08-01

    Canine splenic hematoma can be indistinguishable from hemangiosarcoma on clinical presentation and grossly at the time of surgery. However, hemangiosarcoma represents an aggressive malignancy and a misdiagnosis of hematoma would forgo indications for chemotherapy. This study describes a long-term follow-up of cases with a histologic diagnosis of splenic hematoma following splenectomy to determine if the clinical course of the disease corroborated the diagnosis. Thirty-five dogs were evaluated to determine survival and prognostic associations with signalment and clinical data. Overall median survival time was 647 days (range: 0 to 3287 days). Statistically significant variables included a palpable abdominal mass during physical examination, sub-clinical coagulopathy, and metastasis. Four cases (11%) had reported evidence of metastasis at the time of euthanasia; 1 case was histologically confirmed. Overall prognosis for splenic hematoma appears excellent, as expected, but a small proportion of cases may have an undiagnosed malignant component. PMID:27493283

  11. Risk Factors for Esophageal Fistula Associated With Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Unresectable Esophageal Cancer: A Supplementary Analysis of JCOG0303.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, Takahiro; Mizusawa, Junki; Sudo, Kazuki; Honma, Yoshitaka; Kato, Ken; Igaki, Hiroyasu; Tsubosa, Yasuhiro; Shinoda, Masayuki; Nakamura, Kenichi; Fukuda, Haruhiko; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2016-05-01

    Esophageal fistula is a critical adverse event in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced esophageal cancer. However, risk factors associated with esophageal fistula formation in patients receiving CRT have not yet been elucidated.We retrospectively analyzed data obtained from 140 patients who were enrolled in a phase II/III trial comparing low-dose cisplatin with standard-dose cisplatin administered in combination with 5-flurouracil and concomitant radiotherapy. Inclusion criteria were performance status (PS) 0 to 2 and histologically proven thoracic esophageal cancer clinically diagnosed as T4 and/or unresectable lymph node metastasis for which definitive CRT was applicable. Risk factors for esophageal fistula were examined with univariate analysis using Fisher exact test and multivariate analysis using logistic regression models.Esophageal fistula was observed in 31 patients (22%). Of these, 6 patients developed fistula during CRT. Median time interval between the date of CRT initiation and that of fistula diagnosis was 100 days (inter quartile range, 45-171). Esophageal stenosis was the only significant risk factor for esophageal fistula formation both in univariate (P = 0.026) and in multivariate analyses (odds ratio, 2.59; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-5.92, P = 0.025). Other clinicopathological factors, namely treatment arm, age, sex, PS, primary tumor location, T stage, lymph node invasion to adjacent organs, blood cell count, albumin level, and body mass index, were not risk factors fistula formation.Esophageal stenosis was a significant risk factor for esophageal fistula formation in patients treated with CRT for unresectable locally advanced thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27196482

  12. Use of anti-inflammatory drugs and lower esophageal sphincter relaxing drugs and risk of esophageal and gastric cancers

    PubMed Central

    Fortuny, Joan; Johnson, Christine; Bohlke, Kari; Chow, Wong-Ho; Hart, Gene; Kucera, Gena; Mujumdar, Urvi; Ownby, Dennis; Wells, Karen; Yood, Marianne Ulcickas; Engel, Lawrence S.

    2007-01-01

    Background and aims The incidence of esophageal and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma has increased in western countries in recent decades for largely unknown reasons. We investigated whether use of lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxing drugs was related to an increased risk of esophageal and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma, and whether use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was related to a reduced risk of esophageal and gastric cancers. Methods We examined these associations using administrative databases in a case-control study in two integrated health care delivery systems. Cases were incident esophageal adenocarcinomas (n= 163) and squamous cell carcinomas (n= 114), and gastric cardia (n= 176) and non-cardia adenocarcinomas (n= 320), diagnosed between 1980 and 2002 in one health system and between 1993 and 2002 in the other. Matched controls (n= 3996) were selected. Complete prescription information was available for the study period. Results Prescription of corticosteroids was associated with a decreased risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (OR= 0.6, 95% CI= 0.4-0.9), esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OR= 0.4, 95% CI= 0.2-0.6) and gastric non-cardia carcinoma (OR= 0.4, 95% CI=0.3-0.6). Ever use of pharmacy-purchased aspirin was associated with 30-60% decreased risks of the studied cancers. As a group, LES-relaxing drugs showed little evidence of association with increased risk of any esophageal or gastric cancer. Conclusions Corticosteroid and aspirin use were associated with significantly decreased risks of esophageal and gastric cancer. Lower esophageal sphincter relaxing drugs as a group did not affect these risks, although we had limited power to assess individual drugs. The possibility that corticosteroids and aspirin may reduce esophageal cancer risk warrants further consideration. PMID:17644046

  13. Prenatal diagnosis of a placental infarction hematoma associated with fetal growth restriction, preeclampsia and fetal death: clinicopathological correlation

    PubMed Central

    Aurioles-Garibay, Alma; Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Romero, Roberto; Qureshi, Faisal; Ahn, Hyunyoung; Jacques, Suzanne M.; Garcia, Maynor; Yeo, Lami; Hassan, Sonia S.

    2014-01-01

    The lesion termed “placental infarction hematoma” is associated with fetal death and adverse perinatal outcome. Such lesion has been associated with a high risk of fetal death and abruption placentae. The fetal and placental hemodynamic changes associated with placental infarction hematoma have not been reported. This communication describes a case of early and severe growth restriction with preeclampsia, and progressive deterioration of the fetal and placental Doppler parameters in the presence of a placental infarction hematoma. PMID:24852332

  14. [Morphological changes in esophageal mucosa in children with overweight].

    PubMed

    Dubrovskaia, M I; Tertychnyĭ, A S; Mukhina, Iu G; Volodina, I I; Mamchenko, S I

    2010-01-01

    In present work we studied the morphological features of the esophageal mucosa in 63 children with endoscopic diagnosis of the distal esophagitis having overweight and normal weight of a body. The biopsies were taken at level of 3 cm above a Z-line and at level of 1 cm above a Z-line. Dystrophic and dysregenerative changes were revealed at the majority of children and half of children had inflammatory changes of the esophageal mucosa regardless of weight of a body. These changes are more pronounced at level of 1 cm above a Z-line, their occurrence decreases with a distance from low esophageal sphincter. We used the pathology score system for assess the esophageal biopsies. According our scale we obtained following results: at level of 1 cm above Z-lines at 95% of children had the normal, minimum or mild features of esophagitis regardless of weight of a body. Morphological evidence of a reflux esophagitis was diagnosed statistically more often at level of 1 cm above Z lines in comparison with level of 3 cm above Z-lines (p < 0.01) as among children with overweight of the body (78 and 43% accordingly), and among children with normal weight of the body (78 and 35% accordingly). The obtained data will be allowed to avoid hyperdiagnostics of esophageal lesions in children. PMID:20405708

  15. Diagnosis and Treatment of Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Adults.

    PubMed

    Kavitt, Robert T; Hirano, Ikuo; Vaezi, Michael F

    2016-09-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is a relatively recently discovered disease of increasing incidence and prevalence and is a common cause of dysphagia and food bolus impaction. The definition of eosinophilic esophagitis continues to evolve, most recently with the characterization of proton pump inhibitor-responsive esophageal eosinophilia. The number of high-quality prospective, controlled trials guiding therapeutic decisions in eosinophilic esophagitis has increased steadily over the past several years. Treatment options at present focus on dietary therapy, particularly implementation of a 6-food elimination diet, and medical therapy, primarily the use of swallowed, topical corticosteroids. Proton pump inhibitors play an important role in current management. Conservative esophageal dilation is effective at ameliorating dysphagia in symptomatic patients with esophageal strictures. We conducted an evidence-based review of the diagnosis and treatment options in adults with eosinophilic esophagitis. The understanding of eosinophilic esophagitis continues to be refined. Continued validation of appropriate endpoints, however, is essential to establish the efficacy of existing and novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:27155108

  16. Photodynamic Therapy for Barrett's Esophagus and Esophageal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Qumseya, Bashar J.; David, Waseem

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the use of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in patients with Barrett's esophagus and esophageal carcinoma. We describe the history of PDT, mechanics, photosensitizers for PDT in patients with esophageal disease. Finally, we discuss its utility and limitations in this setting. PMID:23423151

  17. Esophageal Cancer: Role of Imaging in Primary Staging and Response Assessment Post Neoadjuvant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Yvette

    2016-08-01

    Advances in the early detection and treatment of esophageal cancer have meant improved survival rates for patients with esophageal cancer. Accurate pretreatment and post-neoadjuvant treatment staging of esophageal cancer is essential for assessing operability and determining the optimum treatment plan. This article reviews the multimodality imaging approach in the diagnosis, staging, and assessment of treatment response in esophageal cancer. PMID:27342898

  18. High prevalence of esophageal dysmotility in asymptomatic obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Côté-Daigneault, Justin; Leclerc, Pierre; Joubert, Josette; Bouin, Mickael

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obesity is an important health problem affecting >500 million people worldwide. Esophageal dysmotility is a gastrointestinal pathology associated with obesity; however, its prevalence and characteristics remain unclear. Esophageal dysmotilities have a high prevalence among obese patients regardless of gastrointestinal symptoms. OBJECTIVE: To identify the prevalence of esophageal dysmotility among obese patients. The secondary goals were to characterize these pathologies in obese patients and identify risk factors. METHOD: A prospective study from January 2009 to March 2010 at the University of Montreal Hospital Centre (Montreal, Quebec) was performed. Every patient scheduled for bariatric surgery underwent preoperatory esophageal manometry and was included in the study. Manometry was performed according to a standardized protocol with the following measures: superior esophageal sphincter – coordination and release during deglutition; esophageal body – presence, propagation, length, amplitude and type of esophageal waves of contraction; lower esophageal sphincter – localization, tone, release, intragastic pressure and intraesophageal pressure. All reference values were those used in the digestive motility laboratory. A gastrointestinal symptoms questionnaire was completed on the day manometry was performed. Chart reviews were performed to identify comorbidities and treatments that could influence the results. RESULTS: A total of 53 patients were included (mean [± SD] age 43±10 years; mean body mass index 46±7 kg/m2; 70% female). Esophageal manometry revealed dysmotility in 51% (n=27) of the patients. This dysmotility involved the esophageal body in 74% (n=20) of the patients and the inferior sphincter in 11% (n=3). Mixed dysmotility (body and inferior sphincter) was found in 15% (n=4) of cases. The esophageal body dysmotilities were hypomotility in 85% (n=23) of the patients, either from insignificant waves (74% [n=20]), nonpropagated waves (11

  19. [A Case of Organizing Chronic Subdural Hematoma Treated with Endoscopic Burr-Hole Surgery Using a Curettage and Suction Technique].

    PubMed

    Miki, Koichi; Oshiro, Shinya; Koga, Takaomi; Inoue, Tooru

    2016-09-01

    A 70-year-old man presented to our hospital because of difficulty with discrete movement of the right upper limb and dysarthria. Computed tomography(CT)of the head revealed a chronic subdural hematoma(CSDH)on the left side. The patient underwent single burr-hole irrigation and drainage on the same day. In addition to the burr hole, a cross-shaped dural incision was made which revealed a thick outer membrane and solidified hematoma. We removed as much of the clotted hematoma as possible using a curved suction tube under neuroendoscopy. The postoperative CT revealed that the hematoma was partially removed and the mass effect was reduced. As a result, the patient's neurological deficits improved. We reached a diagnosis of organizing CSDH following histologic examination of the removed hematoma that showed inflammatory cell infiltration and multiplication of fibroblasts. Neuroendoscopic hematoma evacuation via a burr hole is minimally invasive and may be a useful procedure in the treatment of some cases of organizing CSDH. PMID:27605476

  20. Two Fatal Complications after Parallel Tracheal-Esophageal Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Binkert, Christoph A.; Petersen, Bryan D.

    2002-03-15

    Two patients with malignant obstructions of both the trachea and esophagus underwent parallel stent placement with Gianturco-Roesch Z (GRZ) stents for palliation of symptoms. Fatal hemorrhage occurred in both patients 2 and 3 weeks after stent placement respectively. An autopsy performed on one of these patients demonstrated esophageal tissue necrosis and erosion with perforation of both the tracheal and esophageal walls at sites where the stent struts were in direct opposition, leading to bleeding from the esophageal venous plexus. GRZ stents have been successful in the treatment of both solitary tracheal and esophageal stenoses. However, parallel tracheal-esophageal stenting with GRZ stents places patients at high risk for complications due to the high radial force exerted by this particular stent and the minimal amount of intervening tissue between the two structures.