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Sample records for intranuclear p27kip1 protein

  1. [Prognostic value of the inmunohïstochemical expression of protein p27KIP1 in laryngeal cancer].

    PubMed

    García Lozano, M C; Orradre Romero, J L; Caro García, M; Martínez Alvarez, A; Lasso Luis, O; Piris Pinilla, M A

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we carried out an immunohistochemical study of protein p27KIP1 expression in a series of 195 patients with laryngeal carcinoma that were diagnosticated, treated and followed at the Department of Otolaryngology at "Virgen de la Salud" Hospital (Toledo, Spain). In the cases with lymph node metastasis we also studied p27KIP1 expression at this level. Furthermore we have analysed the value of protein p27KIP1 expression as a prognostic factor (tumor recurrence, deads due to cancer and survival) and we evaluate the relationship between p27KIP1 expression and other clinic and pathologic parameters. PMID:16566195

  2. Cell cycle regulatory protein p27KIP1 is a substrate and interacts with the protein kinase CK2.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Julio C; Bolanos-Garcia, Victor M; Sayed, Muhammed; Allende, Catherine C; Allende, Jorge E

    2004-04-01

    The protein kinase CK2 is constituted by two catalytic (alpha and/or alpha') and two regulatory (beta) subunits. CK2 phosphorylates more than 300 proteins with important functions in the cell cycle. This study has looked at the relation between CK2 and p27(KIP1), which is a regulator of the cell cycle and a known inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdk). We demonstrated that in vitro recombinant Xenopus laevis CK2 can phosphorylate recombinant human p27(KIP1), but this phosphorylation occurs only in the presence of the regulatory beta subunit. The principal site of phosphorylation is serine-83. Analysis using pull down and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) techniques showed that p27(KIP1) interacts with the beta subunit through two domains present in the amino and carboxyl ends, while CD spectra showed that p27(KIP1) phosphorylation by CK2 affects its secondary structure. Altogether, these results suggest that p27(KIP1) phosphorylation by CK2 probably involves a docking event mediated by the CK2beta subunit. The phosphorylation of p27(KIP1) by CK2 may affect its biological activity. PMID:15034923

  3. The Relevance of Women's Diseases, Jun Activation-domain Binding Protein 1 (JAB1) and p27kip1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mijin; Lee, Hae-Hyeog

    2016-01-01

    The Jun activation-domain binding protein 1 (Jab1) recognize a potential coactivator of activator protein 1 (AP-1) such as c-fos, c-jun transcription factor and the fifth subunit of the COP9 signalosome complex. Also, Jab1 activate the c-jun gene resulted cell proliferation. Not only a powerful tumor suppressor but also regulator of apoptosis negative cdk inhibitor p27kip1 are involved in the cell cycle. This is Jab1 and p27kip1 interact with each other, Jab1 accelerate p27kip1 from nuclear to cytoplasm through ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. However, information about the relationship between Jab1 and p27kip1 is not known much. Taken together, the results of this study identify function and structure of Jab1 and p27kip1 were described in a recent article on the basis of relevant. Besides Jab1 and p27kip1 will organize the relationship between the disease and women. PMID:27152307

  4. Discovery of Small Molecules that Inhibit the Disordered Protein, p27Kip1

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Iconaru, Luigi I.; Ban, David; Bharatham, Kavitha; Ramanathan, Arvind; Zhang, Weixing; Shelat, Anang A.; Zuo, Jian; Kriwacki, Richard W.

    2015-10-28

    In disordered proteins we see that they are highly prevalent in biological systems. They control myriad signaling and regulatory processes, and their levels and/or cellular localization are often altered in human disease. In contrast to folded proteins, disordered proteins, due to conformational heterogeneity and dynamics, are not considered viable drug targets. We challenged this paradigm by identifying through NMR-based screening small molecules that bound specifically, albeit weakly, to the disordered cell cycle regulator, p27Kip1 (p27). Moreover, two groups of molecules bound to sites created by transient clusters of aromatic residues within p27. Conserved chemical features within these two groups ofmore » small molecules exhibited complementarity to their binding sites within p27, establishing structure-activity relationships for small molecule: disordered protein interactions. Finally, one compound counteracted the Cdk2/cyclin A inhibitory function of p27 in vitro, providing proof-of- principle that small molecules can inhibit the function of a disordered protein (p27) through sequestration in a conformation incapable of folding and binding to a natural regulatory target (Cdk2/cyclin A).« less

  5. Discovery of Small Molecules that Inhibit the Disordered Protein, p27Kip1

    PubMed Central

    Iconaru, Luigi I.; Ban, David; Bharatham, Kavitha; Ramanathan, Arvind; Zhang, Weixing; Shelat, Anang A.; Zuo, Jian; Kriwacki, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    Disordered proteins are highly prevalent in biological systems, they control myriad signaling and regulatory processes, and their levels and/or cellular localization are often altered in human disease. In contrast to folded proteins, disordered proteins, due to conformational heterogeneity and dynamics, are not considered viable drug targets. We challenged this paradigm by identifying through NMR-based screening small molecules that bound specifically, albeit weakly, to the disordered cell cycle regulator, p27Kip1 (p27). Two groups of molecules bound to sites created by transient clusters of aromatic residues within p27. Conserved chemical features within these two groups of small molecules exhibited complementarity to their binding sites within p27, establishing structure-activity relationships for small molecule:disordered protein interactions. Finally, one compound counteracted the Cdk2/cyclin A inhibitory function of p27 in vitro, providing proof-of-principle that small molecules can inhibit the function of a disordered protein (p27) through sequestration in a conformation incapable of folding and binding to a natural regulatory target (Cdk2/cyclin A). PMID:26507530

  6. Cryptic sequence features within the disordered protein p27Kip1 regulate cell cycle signaling

    PubMed Central

    Das, Rahul K.; Huang, Yongqi; Phillips, Aaron H.; Kriwacki, Richard W.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2016-01-01

    Peptide motifs embedded within intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) of proteins are often the sites of posttranslational modifications that control cell-signaling pathways. How do IDR sequences modulate the functionalities of motifs? We answer this question using the polyampholytic C-terminal IDR of the cell cycle inhibitory protein p27Kip1 (p27). Phosphorylation of Thr-187 (T187) within the p27 IDR controls entry into S phase of the cell division cycle. Additionally, the conformational properties of polyampholytic sequences are predicted to be influenced by the linear patterning of oppositely charged residues. Therefore, we designed sequence variants of the p27 IDR to alter charge patterning outside the primary substrate motif containing T187. Computer simulations and biophysical measurements confirm predictions regarding the impact of charge patterning on the global dimensions of IDRs. Through functional studies, we uncover cryptic sequence features within the p27 IDR that influence the efficiency of T187 phosphorylation. Specifically, we find a positive correlation between T187 phosphorylation efficiency and the weighted net charge per residue of an auxiliary motif. We also find that accumulation of positive charges within the auxiliary motif can diminish the efficiency of T187 phosphorylation because this increases the likelihood of long-range intra-IDR interactions that involve both the primary and auxiliary motifs and inhibit their contributions to function. Importantly, our findings suggest that the cryptic sequence features of the WT p27 IDR negatively regulate T187 phosphorylation signaling. Our approaches provide a generalizable strategy for uncovering the influence of sequence contexts on the functionalities of primary motifs in other IDRs. PMID:27140628

  7. Cryptic sequence features within the disordered protein p27Kip1 regulate cell cycle signaling.

    PubMed

    Das, Rahul K; Huang, Yongqi; Phillips, Aaron H; Kriwacki, Richard W; Pappu, Rohit V

    2016-05-17

    Peptide motifs embedded within intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) of proteins are often the sites of posttranslational modifications that control cell-signaling pathways. How do IDR sequences modulate the functionalities of motifs? We answer this question using the polyampholytic C-terminal IDR of the cell cycle inhibitory protein p27(Kip1) (p27). Phosphorylation of Thr-187 (T187) within the p27 IDR controls entry into S phase of the cell division cycle. Additionally, the conformational properties of polyampholytic sequences are predicted to be influenced by the linear patterning of oppositely charged residues. Therefore, we designed sequence variants of the p27 IDR to alter charge patterning outside the primary substrate motif containing T187. Computer simulations and biophysical measurements confirm predictions regarding the impact of charge patterning on the global dimensions of IDRs. Through functional studies, we uncover cryptic sequence features within the p27 IDR that influence the efficiency of T187 phosphorylation. Specifically, we find a positive correlation between T187 phosphorylation efficiency and the weighted net charge per residue of an auxiliary motif. We also find that accumulation of positive charges within the auxiliary motif can diminish the efficiency of T187 phosphorylation because this increases the likelihood of long-range intra-IDR interactions that involve both the primary and auxiliary motifs and inhibit their contributions to function. Importantly, our findings suggest that the cryptic sequence features of the WT p27 IDR negatively regulate T187 phosphorylation signaling. Our approaches provide a generalizable strategy for uncovering the influence of sequence contexts on the functionalities of primary motifs in other IDRs. PMID:27140628

  8. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 stabilizes p27(kip1) by its phosphorylation at serine 10 and contributes to cell motility.

    PubMed

    Pierantoni, Giovanna Maria; Esposito, Francesco; Tornincasa, Mara; Rinaldo, Cinzia; Viglietto, Giuseppe; Soddu, Silvia; Fusco, Alfredo

    2011-08-19

    HIPK2 is a serine/threonine kinase that acts as a coregulator of an increasing number of factors involved in cell survival and proliferation during development and in response to different types of stress. Here we report on a novel target of HIPK2, the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(kip1). HIPK2 phosphorylates p27(kip1) in vitro and in vivo at serine 10, an event that accounts for 80% of the total p27(kip1) phosphorylation and plays a crucial role in the stability of the protein. Indeed, HIPK2 depletion by transient or stable RNA interference in tumor cells of different origin was consistently associated with strong reduction of p27(kip1) phosphorylation at serine 10 and of p27(kip1) stability. An initial evaluation of the functional relevance of this HIPK2-mediated regulation of p27(kip1) revealed a contribution to cell motility, rather than to cell proliferation, but only in cells that do not express wild-type p53. PMID:21715331

  9. Rat Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase η Suppresses the Neoplastic Phenotype of Retrovirally Transformed Thyroid Cells through the Stabilization of p27Kip1

    PubMed Central

    Trapasso, Francesco; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Boccia, Angelo; Stella, Antonella; Visconti, Roberta; Bruni, Paola; Baldassarre, Gustavo; Santoro, Massimo; Viglietto, Giuseppe; Fusco, Alfredo

    2000-01-01

    The r-PTPη gene encodes a rat receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase whose expression is negatively regulated by neoplastic cell transformation. Here we first demonstrate a dramatic reduction in DEP-1/HPTPη (the human homolog of r-PTPη) expression in a panel of human thyroid carcinomas. Subsequently, we show that the reexpression of the r-PTPη gene in highly malignant rat thyroid cells transformed by retroviruses carrying the v-mos and v-ras-Ki oncogenes suppresses their malignant phenotype. Cell cycle analysis demonstrated that r-PTPη caused G1 growth arrest and increased the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 protein level by reducing the proteasome-dependent degradation rate. We propose that the r-PTPη tumor suppressor activity is mediated by p27Kip1 protein stabilization, because suppression of p27Kip1 protein synthesis using p27-specific antisense oligonucleotides blocked the growth-inhibitory effect induced by r-PTPη. Furthermore, we provide evidence that in v-mos- or v-ras-Ki-transformed thyroid cells, the p27Kip1 protein level was regulated by the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway and that r-PTPη regulated p27Kip1 stability by preventing v-mos- or v-ras-Ki-induced MAP kinase activation. PMID:11094075

  10. Prognostic implications of expression of the cell cycle inhibitor protein p27Kip1.

    PubMed

    Cariou, S; Catzavelos, C; Slingerland, J M

    1998-01-01

    Mitogenic and growth inhibitory signals influence the activity of a family of cyclin dependent kinases (cdks). p27 is an important cdk inhibitor, acting in G1 to inhibit cyclin-cdks. As negative growth regulators, the cdk inhibitors may function as tumor suppressors. While the p16 gene plays a tumor suppressor role in cancers, p27 gene mutations have been identified only rarely. While high levels of p27 protein are expressed in normal human mammary epithelium, loss of p27 is frequent and is of independent prognostic significance in breast cancers. Low p27 is also a poor prognostic factor in colon, gastric, esophageal, lung, and prostate carcinomas, and enhanced proteasomal degradation may underlie loss of p27 in tumor cells. Loss of p27 has not been significantly correlated with tumor proliferation in a number of studies and may reflect alterations in differentiation and adhesion-dependent growth regulation germane to oncogenesis and tumor progression. Efforts to confirm the prognostic value of p27 are under way in a number of large breast cancer studies. These studies may also indicate whether loss of p27 in association with other traditional or novel markers has greater prognostic potential than each factor alone. p27 immunostaining is inexpensive and reliable and may become part of the routine histopathologic processing of tumors in the near future. Widespread application of p27 in prognostic testing will require greater uniformity in scoring techniques and determination of the cut off levels which distinguish individuals at high and low risk of cancer recurrence and death. Finally, the greatest utility of p27 may lie in the information it sheds on the biology of aberrant growth regulation in breast cancer and the potential to use this in the generation of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:10066070

  11. Insect peptide CopA3-induced protein degradation of p27Kip1 stimulates proliferation and protects neuronal cells from apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Seung Taek; Kim, Dae Hong; Lee, Min Bum; Nam, Hyo Jung; Kang, Jin Ku; Park, Mi Jung; Lee, Ik Hwan; Seok, Heon; Lee, Dong Gun; Hwang, Jae Sam; Kim, Ho

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •CopA3 peptide isolated from the Korean dung beetle has antimicrobial activity. •Our study reported that CopA3 has anticancer and immunosuppressive effects. •We here demonstrated that CopA3 has neurotropic and neuroprotective effects. •CopA3 degrades p27Kip1 protein and this mediates effects of CopA3 on neuronal cells. -- Abstract: We recently demonstrated that the antibacterial peptide, CopA3 (a D-type disulfide dimer peptide, LLCIALRKK), inhibits LPS-induced macrophage activation and also has anticancer activity in leukemia cells. Here, we examined whether CopA3 could affect neuronal cell proliferation. We found that CopA3 time-dependently increased cell proliferation by up to 31 ± 2% in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, and up to 29 ± 2% in neural stem cells isolated from neonatal mouse brains. In both cell types, CopA3 also significantly inhibited the apoptosis and viability losses caused by 6-hydroxy dopamine (a Parkinson disease-mimicking agent) and okadaic acid (an Alzheimer’s disease-mimicking agent). Immunoblotting revealed that the p27Kip1 protein (a negative regulator of cell cycle progression) was markedly degraded in CopA3-treated SH-SY5Y cells. Conversely, an adenovirus expressing p27Kip1 significantly inhibited the antiapoptotic effects of CopA3 against 6-hydroxy dopamine- and okadaic acid-induced apoptosis, and decreased the neurotropic effects of CopA3. These results collectively suggest that CopA3-mediated protein degradation of p27Kip1 may be the main mechanism through which CopA3 exerts neuroprotective and neurotropic effects.

  12. The Down syndrome-related protein kinase DYRK1A phosphorylates p27Kip1 and Cyclin D1 and induces cell cycle exit and neuronal differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Soppa, Ulf; Schumacher, Julian; Florencio Ortiz, Victoria; Pasqualon, Tobias; Tejedor, Francisco J; Becker, Walter

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental question in neurobiology is how the balance between proliferation and differentiation of neuronal precursors is maintained to ensure that the proper number of brain neurons is generated. Substantial evidence implicates DYRK1A (dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A) as a candidate gene responsible for altered neuronal development and brain abnormalities in Down syndrome. Recent findings support the hypothesis that DYRK1A is involved in cell cycle control. Nonetheless, how DYRK1A contributes to neuronal cell cycle regulation and thereby affects neurogenesis remains poorly understood. In the present study we have investigated the mechanisms by which DYRK1A affects cell cycle regulation and neuronal differentiation in a human cell model, mouse neurons, and mouse brain. Dependent on its kinase activity and correlated with the dosage of overexpression, DYRK1A blocked proliferation of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells within 24 h and arrested the cells in G1 phase. Sustained overexpression of DYRK1A induced G0 cell cycle exit and neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, we provide evidence that DYRK1A modulated protein stability of cell cycle-regulatory proteins. DYRK1A reduced cellular Cyclin D1 levels by phosphorylation on Thr286, which is known to induce proteasomal degradation. In addition, DYRK1A phosphorylated p27Kip1 on Ser10, resulting in protein stabilization. Inhibition of DYRK1A kinase activity reduced p27Kip1 Ser10 phosphorylation in cultured hippocampal neurons and in embryonic mouse brain. In aggregate, these results suggest a novel mechanism by which overexpression of DYRK1A may promote premature neuronal differentiation and contribute to altered brain development in Down syndrome. PMID:24806449

  13. Cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 expression in normal and neoplastic cervical epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Troncone, G; Vetrani, A; de Rosa, G; Gerbasio, D; Palombini, L

    1999-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether there is loss of the p27Kip1 protein in developing cervical cancer and whether p27Kip1 immunoreactivity has any relation to the proliferative indicator Ki-67. METHODS: The expression of p27Kip1 and Ki-67 was assessed by immunohistochemistry in serial sections from normal epithelium (13), low grade (27) and high grade (19) squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL, HSIL), and invasive cervical cancer (23). In the SIL cases the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) genomic sequences was assessed by in situ hybridisation. The results were evaluated by image analysis, and reported as mean score of the percentage of p27Kip1 and of Ki-67 positive cells in each histological group. RESULTS: In general, p27Kip1 immunostaining was related to squamous differentation, and was intense in normal epithelium (47%), while it was reduced in SIL lesions as an effect of the decreased number of differentiating cells. However, decrease in the p27Kip1 expression was more evident in LSIL (36%) than in HSIL (39%); in the latter, p27Kip1 had a different intraepithelial distribution in that the staining extended to the basal cells. The average levels of p27Kip1 were similar in SIL lesions associated to low, intermediate, and high risk HPV types. Compared with normal epithelium and dysplasia, invasive cancer showed significantly lower p27Kip1 levels (23%). There was no relation between p27Kip1 and Ki-67 labelling indices in any of the histological groups examined. CONCLUSIONS: A reduction in p27Kip1 protein occurs in cervical cancer independently of the proliferative status. The changes in p27Kip1 expression may be related to the unregulated kinetics of developing cervical cancer. Images PMID:10711250

  14. Cdc6 Protein Activates p27KIP1-bound Cdk2 Protein Only after the Bound p27 Protein Undergoes C-terminal Phosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Uranbileg, Baasanjav; Yamamoto, Hanako; Park, Jung-ha; Mohanty, Atish R.; Arakawa-Takeuchi, Shiho; Jinno, Shigeki; Okayama, Hiroto

    2012-01-01

    In mammalian cells Cdk2 activity during the G1-S transition is mainly controlled by p27KIP1. Although the amount and subcellular localization of p27 influence Cdk2 activity, how Cdk2 activity is regulated during this phase transition still remains virtually unknown. Here we report an entirely new mechanism for this regulation. Cdc6 the AAA+ ATPase, known to assemble prereplicative complexes on chromosomal replication origins and activate p21CIP1-bound Cdk2, also activated p27-bound Cdk2 in its ATPase and cyclin binding motif-dependent manner but only after the p27 bound to the Cdk2 was phosphorylated at the C terminus. ROCK, which mediates a signal for cell anchorage to the extracellular matrix and activates the mTORC1 cascade as well as controls cytoskeleton assembly, was partly responsible for C-terminal phosphorylation of the p27. In vitro reconstitution demonstrated ROCK (Rho-associated kinase)-mediated phosphorylation of Cdk2-bound p27 at the C terminus and subsequent activation of the Cdk2 by Cdc6. PMID:22223646

  15. Brk/Protein tyrosine kinase 6 phosphorylates p27KIP1, regulating the activity of cyclin D-cyclin-dependent kinase 4.

    PubMed

    Patel, Priyank; Asbach, Benedikt; Shteyn, Elina; Gomez, Cindy; Coltoff, Alexander; Bhuyan, Sadia; Tyner, Angela L; Wagner, Ralf; Blain, Stacy W

    2015-05-01

    Cyclin D and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (cdk4) are overexpressed in a variety of tumors, but their levels are not accurate indicators of oncogenic activity because an accessory factor such as p27(Kip1) is required to assemble this unstable dimer. Additionally, tyrosine (Y) phosphorylation of p27 (pY88) is required to activate cdk4, acting as an "on/off switch." We identified two SH3 recruitment domains within p27 that modulate pY88, thereby modulating cdk4 activity. Via an SH3-PXXP interaction screen, we identified Brk (breast tumor-related kinase) as a high-affinity p27 kinase. Modulation of Brk in breast cancer cells modulates pY88 and increases resistance to the cdk4 inhibitor PD 0332991. An alternatively spliced form of Brk (Alt Brk) which contains its SH3 domain blocks pY88 and acts as an endogenous cdk4 inhibitor, identifying a potentially targetable regulatory region within p27. Brk is overexpressed in 60% of breast carcinomas, suggesting that this facilitates cell cycle progression by modulating cdk4 through p27 Y phosphorylation. p27 has been considered a tumor suppressor, but our data strengthen the idea that it should also be considered an oncoprotein, responsible for cyclin D-cdk4 activity. PMID:25733683

  16. Fad24, a Positive Regulator of Adipogenesis, Is Required for S Phase Re-entry of C2C12 Myoblasts Arrested in G0 Phase and Involved in p27(Kip1) Expression at the Protein Level.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Natsuki; Nishizuka, Makoto; Osada, Shigehiro; Imagawa, Masayoshi

    2016-05-01

    Factor for adipocyte differentiation 24 (fad24) is a positive regulator of adipogenesis. We previously found that human fad24 is abundantly expressed in skeletal muscle. However, the function of fad24 in skeletal muscle remains largely unknown. Because skeletal muscle is a highly regenerative tissue, we focused on the function of fad24 in skeletal muscle regeneration. In this paper, we investigated the role of fad24 in the cell cycle re-entry of quiescent C2C12 myoblasts-mimicked satellite cells. The expression levels of fad24 and histone acetyltransferase binding to ORC1 (hbo1), a FAD24-interacting factor, were elevated at the early phase of the regeneration process in response to cardiotoxin-induced muscle injury. The knockdown of fad24 inhibited the proliferation of quiescent myoblasts, whereas fad24 knockdown did not affect differentiation. S phase entry following serum activation is abrogated by fad24 knockdown in quiescent cells. Furthermore, fad24 knockdown cells show a marked accumulation of p27(Kip1) protein. These results suggest that fad24 may have an important role in the S phase re-entry of quiescent C2C12 cells through the regulation of p27(Kip1) at the protein level. PMID:26902224

  17. O-GlcNAc glycosylation of p27(kip1) promotes astrocyte migration and functional recovery after spinal cord contusion.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xingxing; Zhang, Dongmei; Tao, Tao; Liu, Xiaojuan; Sun, Xiaolei; Wang, Youhua; Shen, Aiguo

    2015-12-10

    Glial scar formation derived from astrocyte proliferation and migration influences the functional recovery after spinal cord injury. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(kip1), whose activity is closely related to its phosphorylation state, reportedly regulates astrocyte proliferation and migration. In this study, we reported that p27(Kip1) undergoes O-GlcNAc modification at Ser 2, Ser 110 and Thr 197. Inhibiting O-GlcNAcylation on Ser 2 by gene mutation (S2A) attenuated the phosphorylation of Ser 10, and vice versa. Interestingly, compared with wild type p27(Kip1), S2A p27(Kip1) displayed a decreased interaction with CRM1 and reduced nuclear export following serum starvation and release. In addition, the interaction between stathmin and S2A p27(Kip1) was also decreased. Cytoskeletal proteins microtubules appeared high density in astrocytes transfected with S2A p27(Kip1) especially at the leading edge of the scratch wound. Accordingly, scratch-wound assay revealed that the motility of astrocytes transfected with S2A p27(Kip1) was faster than that of control. Finally, we injected lentiviral vectors immediately after spinal cord contusion, and found the lesion volume of the rat injected with S2A p27(Kip1) was smaller than that of rat injected with wild type p27(Kip1). Besides, the BBB and CBS behavioral tests showed greater functional recovery in S2A p27(Kip1) treated rats. Taken together, our findings revealed a novel function of O-GlcNAc modification of p27(Kip1) in mediating astrocytes migration and functional recovery after spinal cord contusion. PMID:26562163

  18. Structural Basis of the Cks1-Dependent Recognition of P27Kip1 by the SCF skp2 Ubiquitin Ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Hao,B.; Zheng, N.; Schulman, B.; Wu, G.; Miller, J.; Pagano, M.; Pavletich, N.

    2005-01-01

    The ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis of the Cdk2 inhibitor p27(Kip1) plays a central role in cell cycle progression, and enhanced degradation of p27(Kip1) is associated with many common cancers. Proteolysis of p27(Kip1) is triggered by Thr187 phosphorylation, which leads to the binding of the SCF(Skp2) (Skp1-Cul1-Rbx1-Skp2) ubiquitin ligase complex. Unlike other known SCF substrates, p27(Kip1) ubiquitination also requires the accessory protein Cks1. The crystal structure of the Skp1-Skp2-Cks1 complex bound to a p27(Kip1) phosphopeptide shows that Cks1 binds to the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain and C-terminal tail of Skp2, whereas p27(Kip1) binds to both Cks1 and Skp2. The phosphorylated Thr187 side chain of p27(Kip1) is recognized by a Cks1 phosphate binding site, whereas the side chain of an invariant Glu185 inserts into the interface between Skp2 and Cks1, interacting with both. The structure and biochemical data support the proposed model that Cdk2-cyclin A contributes to the recruitment of p27(Kip1) to the SCF(Skp2)-Cks1 complex.

  19. Phosphorylation and subcellular localization of p27Kip1 regulated by hydrogen peroxide modulation in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ibañez, Irene L; Bracalente, Candelaria; Notcovich, Cintia; Tropper, Ivanna; Molinari, Beatriz L; Policastro, Lucía L; Durán, Hebe

    2012-01-01

    The Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (p27Kip1) is a key protein in the decision between proliferation and cell cycle exit. Quiescent cells show nuclear p27Kip1, but this protein is exported to the cytoplasm in response to proliferating signals. We recently reported that catalase treatment increases the levels of p27Kip1 in vitro and in vivo in a murine model. In order to characterize and broaden these findings, we evaluated the regulation of p27Kip1 by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in human melanoma cells and melanocytes. We observed a high percentage of p27Kip1 positive nuclei in melanoma cells overexpressing or treated with exogenous catalase, while non-treated controls showed a cytoplasmic localization of p27Kip1. Then we studied the levels of p27Kip1 phosphorylated (p27p) at serine 10 (S10) and at threonine 198 (T198) because phosphorylation at these sites enables nuclear exportation of this protein, leading to accumulation and stabilization of p27pT198 in the cytoplasm. We demonstrated by western blot a decrease in p27pS10 and p27pT198 levels in response to H(2)O(2) removal in melanoma cells, associated with nuclear p27Kip1. Melanocytes also exhibited nuclear p27Kip1 and lower levels of p27pS10 and p27pT198 than melanoma cells, which showed cytoplasmic p27Kip1. We also showed that the addition of H(2)O(2) (0.1 µM) to melanoma cells arrested in G1 by serum starvation induces proliferation and increases the levels of p27pS10 and p27pT198 leading to cytoplasmic localization of p27Kip1. Nuclear localization and post-translational modifications of p27Kip1 were also demonstrated by catalase treatment of colorectal carcinoma and neuroblastoma cells, extending our findings to these other human cancer types. In conclusion, we showed in the present work that H(2)O(2) scavenging prevents nuclear exportation of p27Kip1, allowing cell cycle arrest, suggesting that cancer cells take advantage of their intrinsic pro-oxidant state to favor cytoplasmic localization of p27

  20. Phosphorylation and Subcellular Localization of p27Kip1 Regulated by Hydrogen Peroxide Modulation in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ibañez, Irene L.; Bracalente, Candelaria; Notcovich, Cintia; Tropper, Ivanna; Molinari, Beatriz L.; Policastro, Lucía L.; Durán, Hebe

    2012-01-01

    The Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (p27Kip1) is a key protein in the decision between proliferation and cell cycle exit. Quiescent cells show nuclear p27Kip1, but this protein is exported to the cytoplasm in response to proliferating signals. We recently reported that catalase treatment increases the levels of p27Kip1 in vitro and in vivo in a murine model. In order to characterize and broaden these findings, we evaluated the regulation of p27Kip1 by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in human melanoma cells and melanocytes. We observed a high percentage of p27Kip1 positive nuclei in melanoma cells overexpressing or treated with exogenous catalase, while non-treated controls showed a cytoplasmic localization of p27Kip1. Then we studied the levels of p27Kip1 phosphorylated (p27p) at serine 10 (S10) and at threonine 198 (T198) because phosphorylation at these sites enables nuclear exportation of this protein, leading to accumulation and stabilization of p27pT198 in the cytoplasm. We demonstrated by western blot a decrease in p27pS10 and p27pT198 levels in response to H2O2 removal in melanoma cells, associated with nuclear p27Kip1. Melanocytes also exhibited nuclear p27Kip1 and lower levels of p27pS10 and p27pT198 than melanoma cells, which showed cytoplasmic p27Kip1. We also showed that the addition of H2O2 (0.1 µM) to melanoma cells arrested in G1 by serum starvation induces proliferation and increases the levels of p27pS10 and p27pT198 leading to cytoplasmic localization of p27Kip1. Nuclear localization and post-translational modifications of p27Kip1 were also demonstrated by catalase treatment of colorectal carcinoma and neuroblastoma cells, extending our findings to these other human cancer types. In conclusion, we showed in the present work that H2O2 scavenging prevents nuclear exportation of p27Kip1, allowing cell cycle arrest, suggesting that cancer cells take advantage of their intrinsic pro-oxidant state to favor cytoplasmic localization of p27Kip1. PMID

  1. CacyBP/SIP nuclear translocation regulates p27Kip1 stability in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Ying-Lin; Li, Ya-Jun; Wang, Jing-Bo; Lu, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Zhen-Xiong; Feng, Shan-Shan; Hu, Jian-Guo; Zhai, Hui-Hong

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the mechanism of calcyclin binding protein/Siah-1 interacting protein (CacyBP/SIP) nuclear translocation in promoting the proliferation of gastric cancer (GC) cells. METHODS: The effect of CacyBP/SIP nuclear translocation on cell cycle was investigated by cell cycle analysis. Western blot analysis was used to assess the change in expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins and proteasome-mediated degradation of p27Kip1. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) analysis was performed to examine the binding of CacyBP/SIP with Skp1. A CacyBP/SIP truncation mutant which lacked the Skp1 binding site was constructed and fused to a fluorescent protein. Subsequently, the effect on Skp1 binding with the fusion protein was examined by co-IP, while localization of fluorescent fusion protein observed by confocal laser microscopy, and change in p27Kip1 protein expression assessed by Western blot analysis. RESULTS: CacyBP/SIP nuclear translocation induced by gastrin promoted progression of GC cells from G1 phase. However, while CacyBP/SIP nuclear translocation was inhibited using siRNA to suppress CacyBP/SIP expression, cell cycle was clearly inhibited. CacyBP/SIP nuclear translocation significantly decreased the level of cell cycle inhibitor p27Kip1, increased Cyclin E protein expression whereas the levels of Skp1, Skp2, and CDK2 were not affected. Upon inhibition of CacyBP/SIP nuclear translocation, there were no changes in protein levels of p27Kip1 and Cyclin E, while p27Kip1 decrease could be prevented by the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Moreover, CacyBP/SIP was found to bind to Skp1 by immunoprecipitation, an event that was abolished by mutant CacyBP/SIP, which also failed to stimulate p27Kip1 degradation, even though the mutant could still translocate into the nucleus. CONCLUSION: CacyBP/SIP nuclear translocation contributes to the proliferation of GC cells, and CacyBP/SIP exerts this effect, at least in part, by stimulating ubiquitin-mediated degradation of p27

  2. Expression of p27Kip1, a cell cycle repressor protein, is inversely associated with potential carcinogenic risk in the genetic rodent models of obesity and long-lived Ames dwarf mice

    PubMed Central

    Eto, Isao

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The association of genetic rodent models of obesity and cancer still remains a controversial issue. Although this controversy has largely been resolved in recent years for homozygous leptin receptor-deficient obese Zucker rats and homozygous long-lived Ames dwarf mice, it is still unresolved for homozygous leptin-deficient obese ob/ob mice. Objective The objective of the present study described below was to investigate whether the expression of the cell cycle repressor protein p27(Kip1) is (a) down-regulated in the tumor-free homozygous leptin receptor-deficient obese Zucker rats as well as tumor-free homozygous leptin-deficient obese ob/ob mice and (b) up-regulated in the tumor-free homozygous long-lived Ames dwarf mice. Methods To achieve this objective, we first performed western immunoblot analysis of the hepatic expression of p27. We then performed western immunoblot analysis and proteomic analysis of the hepatic expression of the proteins involved in the upstream molecular signaling pathways for the expression of p27. Lastly, we analyzed the serum levels of glucose, insulin, and branched-chain amino acids, all of which have been shown to regulate, causally and inversely, the expression of p27. Results/Conclusions The results indicated that the hepatic expression of p27 was down-regulated in the homozygous leptin receptor-deficient obese Zucker rats and up-regulated in the homozygous long-lived Ames dwarf mice as expected. We also found that the hepatic expression of p27 was down-regulated in the homozygous leptin-deficient obese ob/ob mice. This last observation was not completely consistent with all of the results of the published studies where homozygous leptin-deficient obese ob/ob mice were used. PMID:23357529

  3. p27(Kip1) participates in the regulation of endoreplication in differentiating chick retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Ovejero-Benito, María C; Frade, José M

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear DNA duplication in the absence of cell division (i.e. endoreplication) leads to somatic polyploidy in eukaryotic cells. In contrast to some invertebrate neurons, whose nuclei may contain up to 200,000-fold the normal haploid DNA amount (C), polyploid neurons in higher vertebrates show only 4C DNA content. To explore the mechanism that prevents extra rounds of DNA synthesis in these latter cells we focused on the chick retina, where a population of tetraploid retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) has been described. We show that differentiating chick RGCs that express the neurotrophic receptors p75 and TrkB while lacking retinoblastoma protein, a feature of tetraploid RGCs, also express p27(Kip1). Two different short hairpin RNAs (shRNA) that significantly downregulate p27(Kip1) expression facilitated DNA synthesis and increased ploidy in isolated chick RGCs. Moreover, this forced DNA synthesis could not be prevented by Cdk4/6 inhibition, thus suggesting that it is triggered by a mechanism similar to endoreplication. In contrast, p27(Kip1) deficiency in mouse RGCs does not lead to increased ploidy despite previous observations have shown ectopic DNA synthesis in RGCs from p27(Kip1-/-) mice. This suggests that a differential mechanism is used for the regulation of neuronal endoreplication in mammalian versus avian RGCs. PMID:25946375

  4. Huntingtin with an expanded polyglutamine repeat affects the Jab1-p27(Kip1) pathway.

    PubMed

    Cong, S Y; Pepers, B A; Zhou, T T; Kerkdijk, H; Roos, R A; van Ommen, G J; Dorsman, J C

    2012-06-01

    Expansion of polyglutamine repeats is the cause of at least nine inherited human neurodegenerative disorders, including Huntington's disease (HD). It is widely accepted that deregulation of the transcriptional coactivator CBP by expanded huntingtin (htt) plays an important role in HD molecular pathogenesis. In this study, we report on a novel target of expanded polyglutamine stretches, the transcriptional coactivator Jun activation domain-binding protein 1 (Jab1), which shares DNA-sequence-specific transcription factor targets with CBP. Jab1 also plays a major role in the degradation of the cyclin-dependent-kinase inhibitor and putative transcription cofactor p27(Kip1). We found that Jab1 accumulates in aggregates when co-expressed with either expanded polyglutamine stretches or N-terminal fragments of mutant htt. In addition, the coactivator function of Jab1 was suppressed both by aggregated expanded polyglutamine solely and by mutant htt. Inhibition by mutant htt even preceded the appearance of microscopic aggregation. In an exon 1 HD cell model, we found that endogenous Jab1 could be recruited into aggregates and that this was accompanied by the accumulation of p27(Kip1). Accumulation of p27(Kip1) was also found in brains derived from HD patients. The repression of Jab1 by various mechanisms coupled with an increase of p27(Kip1) at late stages may have important transcriptional effects. In addition, the interference with the Jab1-p27(Kip1) pathway may contribute to the observed lower incidence of cancer in HD patients and may also be relevant for the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of polyglutamine disorders in general. PMID:22426400

  5. Epidermal growth factor upregulates Skp2/Cks1 and p27kip1 in human extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ja-yeon; Kim, Hong Joo; Park, Jung Ho; Park, Dong Il; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik; Kim, Dong Hoon; Chae, Seoung Wan; Sohn, Jin Hee

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the expression status of S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2)/cyclin-dependent kinases regulatory subunit 1 (Cks1) and p27kip1, and assess the prognostic significance of Skp2/Cks1 expression with p27kip1 in patients with extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. METHODS: Seventy-six patients who underwent curative resection for histologically confirmed extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma at our institution from December 1994 to March 2008 were enrolled. Immunohistochemical staining for Skp2, Cks1, p27kip1, and Ki67, along with other relevant molecular biologic experiments, were performed. RESULTS: By Cox regression analyses, advanced age (> 65 years), advanced AJCC tumor stage, poorly differentiated histology, and higher immunostaining intensity of Skp2 were identified as independent prognostic factors in patients with extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Exogenous epidermal growth factor (EGF, especially 0.1-10 ng/mL) significantly increased the proliferation indices by MTT assay and the mRNA levels of Skp2/Cks1 and p27kip1 in SNU-1196, SNU-1079, and SNU-245 cells. The protein levels of Skp2/Cks1 (from nuclear lysates) and p27kip1 (from cytosolic lysate) were also significantly increased in these cells. There were significant reductions in the protein levels of Skp2/Cks1 and p27kip1 (from nuclear lysate) after the treatment of LY294002. By chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we found that E2F1 transcription factor directly binds to the promoter site of Skp2. CONCLUSION: Higher immunostaining intensity of Skp2/Cks1 was an independent prognostic factor for patients with extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. EGF upregulates the mRNA and protein levels of Skp2/Cks1 and p27kip1 via the PI3K/Akt pathway and direct binding of E2F1 transcription factor with the Skp2 promoter. PMID:24574749

  6. CRM-1 knockdown inhibits extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma tumor growth by blocking the nuclear export of p27Kip1.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian; Chen, Yongjun; Li, Qiang; Wang, Bing; Zhou, Yanqiong; Lan, Hongzhen

    2016-08-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a deadly disease which responds poorly to surgery and conventional chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Early diagnosis is difficult due to the anatomical and biological characteristics of cholangiocarcinoma. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (p27Kip1) is a cyclin‑dependent kinase inhibitor and in the present study, we found that p27Kip1 expression was suppressed in the nucleus and increased in the cytoplasm in 53 samples of cholangiocarcinoma from patients with highly malignant tumors (poorly-differentiated and tumor-node-metastsis (TNM) stage III-IV) compared with that in samples from 10 patients with chronic cholangitis. The expression of phosphorylated (p-)p27Kip1 (Ser10), one of the phosphorylated forms of p27Kip1, was increased in the patient samples with increasing malignancy and clinical stage. Coincidentally, chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM-1; also referred to as exportin 1 or Xpo1), a critical protein responsible for protein translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, was also overexpressed in the tumor samples which were poorly differentiated and of a higher clinical stage. Through specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of CRM-1 in the cholangiocarcinoma cell line QBC939, we identified an elevation of cytoplasmic p27Kip1 and a decrease of nuclear p27Kip1. Furthermore, the viability and colony formation ability of QBC939 cells was largely reduced with G1 arrest. Consistent with the findings of the in vitro experiments, in a xenograft mouse model, the tumors formed in the CRM-1 knockdown group were markedly smaller and weighed less than those in the control group in vivo. Taken together, these findings demonstrated that the interplay between CRM-1 and p27Kip1 may provide potentially potent biomarkers and functional targets for the development of future cholangiocarcinoma treatments. PMID:27279267

  7. CRM-1 knockdown inhibits extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma tumor growth by blocking the nuclear export of p27Kip1

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jian; Chen, Yongjun; Li, Qiang; Wang, Bing; Zhou, Yanqiong; Lan, Hongzhen

    2016-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a deadly disease which responds poorly to surgery and conventional chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Early diagnosis is difficult due to the anatomical and biological characteristics of cholangiocarcinoma. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (p27Kip1) is a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor and in the present study, we found that p27Kip1 expression was suppressed in the nucleus and increased in the cytoplasm in 53 samples of cholangiocarcinoma from patients with highly malignant tumors (poorly-differentiated and tumor-node-metastsis (TNM) stage III–IV) compared with that in samples from 10 patients with chronic cholangitis. The expression of phosphorylated (p-)p27Kip1 (Ser10), one of the phosphorylated forms of p27Kip1, was increased in the patient samples with increasing malignancy and clinical stage. Coincidentally, chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM-1; also referred to as exportin 1 or Xpo1), a critical protein responsible for protein translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, was also overexpressed in the tumor samples which were poorly differentiated and of a higher clinical stage. Through specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of CRM-1 in the cholangiocarcinoma cell line QBC939, we identified an elevation of cytoplasmic p27Kip1 and a decrease of nuclear p27Kip1. Furthermore, the viability and colony formation ability of QBC939 cells was largely reduced with G1 arrest. Consistent with the findings of the in vitro experiments, in a xenograft mouse model, the tumors formed in the CRM-1 knockdown group were markedly smaller and weighed less than those in the control group in vivo. Taken together, these findings demonstrated that the interplay between CRM-1 and p27Kip1 may provide potentially potent biomarkers and functional targets for the development of future cholangiocarcinoma treatments. PMID:27279267

  8. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Increase p27Kip1 by Affecting Its Ubiquitin-Dependent Degradation through Skp2 Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Borriello, Adriana; Naviglio, Silvio; Bencivenga, Debora; Caldarelli, Ilaria; Tramontano, Annunziata; Speranza, Maria Carmela; Stampone, Emanuela; Sapio, Luigi; Negri, Aide; Oliva, Adriana; Sinisi, Antonio Agostino; Spina, Annamaria; Della Ragione, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) represent an intriguing class of pharmacologically active compounds. Currently, some HDACIs are FDA approved for cancer therapy and many others are in clinical trials, showing important clinical activities at well tolerated doses. HDACIs also interfere with the aging process and are involved in the control of inflammation and oxidative stress. In vitro, HDACIs induce different cellular responses including growth arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis. Here, we evaluated the effects of HDACIs on p27Kip1, a key cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CKI). We observed that HDACI-dependent antiproliferative activity is associated with p27Kip1 accumulation due to a reduced protein degradation. p27Kip1 removal requires a preliminary ubiquitination step due to the Skp2-SCF E3 ligase complex. We demonstrated that HDACIs increase p27Kip1 stability through downregulation of Skp2 protein levels. Skp2 decline is only partially due to a reduced Skp2 gene expression. Conversely, the protein decrease is more profound and enduring compared to the changes of Skp2 transcript. This argues for HDACIs effects on Skp2 protein posttranslational modifications and/or on its removal. In summary, we demonstrate that HDACIs increase p27Kip1 by hampering its nuclear ubiquitination/degradation. The findings might be of relevance in the phenotypic effects of these compounds, including their anticancer and aging-modulating activities. PMID:26682002

  9. MARCKS Signaling Differentially Regulates Vascular Smooth Muscle and Endothelial Cell Proliferation through a KIS-, p27kip1- Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dan; Makkar, George; Dong, Tuo; Strickland, Dudley K.; Sarkar, Rajabrata; Monahan, Thomas Stacey

    2015-01-01

    Background Overexpression of the myristolated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS) occurs in vascular proliferative diseases such as restenosis after bypass surgery. MARCKS knockdown results in arrest of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation with little effect on endothelial cell (EC) proliferation. We sought to identify the mechanism of differential regulation by MARCKS of VSMC and EC proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Results siRNA-mediated MARCKS knockdown in VSMCs inhibited proliferation and prevented progression from phase G0/G1 to S. Protein expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27kip1, but not p21cip1 was increased by MARCKS knockdown. MARCKS knockdown did not affect proliferation in VSMCs derived from p27kip1-/- mice indicating that the effect of MARCKS is p27kip1-dependent. MARCKS knockdown resulted in decreased phosphorylation of p27kip1 at threonine 187 and serine 10 as well as, kinase interacting with stathmin (KIS), cyclin D1, and Skp2 expression. Phosphorylation of p27kip1 at serine 10 by KIS is required for nuclear export and degradation of p27kip1. MARCKS knockdown caused nuclear trapping of p27kip1. Both p27kip1 nuclear trapping and cell cycle arrest were released by overexpression of KIS, but not catalytically inactive KIS. In ECs, MARCKS knockdown paradoxically increased KIS expression and cell proliferation. MARCKS knockdown in a murine aortic injury model resulted in decreased VSMC proliferation determined by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) integration assay, and inhibition of vascular wall thickening. MARCKS knockdown increased the rate of re-endothelialization. Conclusions MARCKS knockdown arrested VSMC cell cycle by decreasing KIS expression. Decreased KIS expression resulted in nuclear trapping of p27kip1 in VSMCs. MARCKS knockdown paradoxically increased KIS expression in ECs resulting in increased EC proliferation. MARCKS knockdown significantly attenuated the VSMC proliferative response to vascular

  10. Notch Signaling Activates Stem Cell Properties of Müller Glia through Transcriptional Regulation and Skp2-mediated Degradation of p27Kip1

    PubMed Central

    Parameswaran, Sowmya; Mathews, Saumi; Xia, Xiaohuan; Zheng, Li; Neville, Andrew J.; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2016-01-01

    Müller glia (MG), the sole glial cells generated by retinal progenitors, have emerged as a viable cellular target for therapeutic regeneration in degenerative blinding diseases, as they possess dormant stem cell properties. However, the mammalian MG does not display the neurogenic potential of their lower vertebrate counterparts, precluding their practical clinical use. The answer to this barrier may be found in two interlinked processes underlying the neurogenic potential, i.e., the activation of the dormant stem cell properties of MG and their differentiation along the neuronal lineage. Here, we have focused on the former and examined Notch signaling-mediated activation of MG. We demonstrate that one of the targets of Notch signaling is the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CKI), p27Kip1, which is highly expressed in quiescent MG. Notch signaling facilitates the activation of MG by inhibiting p27Kip1 expression. This is likely achieved through the Notch- p27Kip1 and Notch-Skp2-p27Kip1 axes, the former inhibiting the expression of p27Kip1 transcripts and the latter levels of p27Kip1 proteins by Skp2-mediated proteasomal degradation. Thus, Notch signaling may facilitate re-entry of MG into the cell cycle by inhibiting p27Kip1 expression both transcriptionally and post-translationally. PMID:27011052

  11. Notch Signaling Activates Stem Cell Properties of Müller Glia through Transcriptional Regulation and Skp2-mediated Degradation of p27Kip1.

    PubMed

    Del Debbio, Carolina Beltrame; Mir, Qulsum; Parameswaran, Sowmya; Mathews, Saumi; Xia, Xiaohuan; Zheng, Li; Neville, Andrew J; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2016-01-01

    Müller glia (MG), the sole glial cells generated by retinal progenitors, have emerged as a viable cellular target for therapeutic regeneration in degenerative blinding diseases, as they possess dormant stem cell properties. However, the mammalian MG does not display the neurogenic potential of their lower vertebrate counterparts, precluding their practical clinical use. The answer to this barrier may be found in two interlinked processes underlying the neurogenic potential, i.e., the activation of the dormant stem cell properties of MG and their differentiation along the neuronal lineage. Here, we have focused on the former and examined Notch signaling-mediated activation of MG. We demonstrate that one of the targets of Notch signaling is the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CKI), p27Kip1, which is highly expressed in quiescent MG. Notch signaling facilitates the activation of MG by inhibiting p27Kip1 expression. This is likely achieved through the Notch- p27Kip1 and Notch-Skp2-p27Kip1 axes, the former inhibiting the expression of p27Kip1 transcripts and the latter levels of p27Kip1 proteins by Skp2-mediated proteasomal degradation. Thus, Notch signaling may facilitate re-entry of MG into the cell cycle by inhibiting p27Kip1 expression both transcriptionally and post-translationally. PMID:27011052

  12. Reduced levels of the cell-cycle inhibitor p27Kip1 in epithelial dysplasia and carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, R. C.; Bradley, G.; Slingerland, J.

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitors play important roles in cell cycle progression in normal cells. Alterations in the cdk inhibitors also appear to be important in cancer development in a number of human tumors. p27Kip1 is a member of the CIP/KIP family of cdk inhibitors that negatively regulates cyclin-cdk complexes. Reduced levels of p27Kip1 protein have been identified in a number of human cancers, and in some cases reduced p27Kip1 is associated with an increase in proliferative fraction. In the present study, we examined p27Kip1 protein by immunohistochemistry in 10 normal and 36 dysplastic epithelia and in 8 squamous cell carcinomas from one anatomical site within the oral cavity, the floor of the mouth. Proliferative activity was assessed in serial sections by determining the expression of the cell cycle proteins Ki-67 and cyclin A. p27kip1 protein was significantly reduced in oral dysplasias and carcinomas compared with that in normal epithelial controls. In addition, there was a significant reduction in p27Kip1 protein between low- and high-grade dysplasias, suggesting that changes in p27Kip1 expression may be an early event in oral carcinogenesis. There was increasing expression of Ki-67 and cyclin A proteins with increasingly severe grades of dysplasia compared with normal controls. Although there was a strong correlation between Ki-67 and cyclin A scores (r2= 0.61) for all categories of disease, there was a weak negative correlation between Ki-67 and p27Kip1 levels (r2 = 0.29) and between cyclin A and p27Kip1 levels (r2 = 0.25). In conclusion, this study has found that a reduction in the proportion of cells expressing p27Kip1 protein is frequently associated with oral dysplasia and carcinoma from the floor of the mouth. Furthermore, reductions in p27Kip1 levels are associated with increased cell proliferation, although other changes likely contribute to altered cell kinetics during carcinogenesis at this site

  13. Depletion of p18/LAMTOR1 promotes cell survival via activation of p27(kip1) -dependent autophagy under starvation.

    PubMed

    Zada, Sahib; Noh, Hae Sook; Baek, Seon Mi; Ha, Ji Hye; Hahm, Jong Ryeal; Kim, Deok Ryong

    2015-11-01

    The MAPK and mTOR signal pathways in endosomes or lysosomes play a crucial role in cell survival and death. They are also closely associated with autophagy, a catabolic process highly regulated under various cellular stress or nutrient deprivation. Recently we have isolated a protein, named p18/LAMTOR1, that specifically regulates the ERK or mTOR pathway in lysosomes. p18/LAMTOR1 also interacts with p27(kip1) . Here we examined how p18/LAMTOR1 plays a role in autophagy under nutrient deprivation. The p18(+/+) MEF cells were more susceptible to cell death under starvation or in the presence of AICAR in comparison with p18(-/-) MEF cells. Cleavage of caspase-3 was increased in p18(+/+) MEF cells under starvation, and phosphorylation at the threonine 198 of p27(kip1) was highly elevated in starved p18(-/-) MEF cells. Furthermore, LC3-II formation and other autophagy-associated proteins were largely increased in p18-deficient cells, and suppression of p27(kip1) expression in p18(-/-) MEF cells mitigated starvation-induced cell death. These data suggest that ablation of p18/LAMTOR1 suppresses starvation-induced cell death by stimulating autophagy through modulation of p27(kip1) activity. PMID:26032166

  14. CPEB1 restrains proliferation of Glioblastoma cells through the regulation of p27(Kip1) mRNA translation.

    PubMed

    Galardi, Silvia; Petretich, Massimo; Pinna, Guillaume; D'Amico, Silvia; Loreni, Fabrizio; Michienzi, Alessandro; Groisman, Irina; Ciafrè, Silvia Anna

    2016-01-01

    The cytoplasmic element binding protein 1 (CPEB1) regulates many important biological processes ranging from cell cycle control to learning and memory formation, by controlling mRNA translation efficiency via 3' untranslated regions (3'UTR). In the present study, we show that CPEB1 is significantly downregulated in human Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) tissues and that the restoration of its expression impairs glioma cell lines growth. We demonstrate that CPEB1 promotes the expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p27(Kip1) by specifically targeting its 3'UTR, and competes with miR-221/222 binding at an overlapping site in the 3'UTR, thus impairing miR-221/222 inhibitory activity. Upon binding to p27(Kip1) 3'UTR, CPEB1 promotes elongation of poly-A tail and the subsequent translation of p27(Kip1) mRNA. This leads to higher levels of p27(Kip1) in the cell, in turn significantly inhibiting cell proliferation, and confers to CPEB1 a potential value as a tumor suppressor in Glioblastoma. PMID:27142352

  15. CPEB1 restrains proliferation of Glioblastoma cells through the regulation of p27Kip1 mRNA translation

    PubMed Central

    Galardi, Silvia; Petretich, Massimo; Pinna, Guillaume; D’Amico, Silvia; Loreni, Fabrizio; Michienzi, Alessandro; Groisman, Irina; Ciafrè, Silvia Anna

    2016-01-01

    The cytoplasmic element binding protein 1 (CPEB1) regulates many important biological processes ranging from cell cycle control to learning and memory formation, by controlling mRNA translation efficiency via 3′ untranslated regions (3′UTR). In the present study, we show that CPEB1 is significantly downregulated in human Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) tissues and that the restoration of its expression impairs glioma cell lines growth. We demonstrate that CPEB1 promotes the expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p27Kip1 by specifically targeting its 3′UTR, and competes with miR-221/222 binding at an overlapping site in the 3′UTR, thus impairing miR-221/222 inhibitory activity. Upon binding to p27Kip1 3′UTR, CPEB1 promotes elongation of poly-A tail and the subsequent translation of p27Kip1 mRNA. This leads to higher levels of p27Kip1 in the cell, in turn significantly inhibiting cell proliferation, and confers to CPEB1 a potential value as a tumor suppressor in Glioblastoma. PMID:27142352

  16. Embryonic Lethal Abnormal Vision-like HuR-dependent mRNA Stability Regulates Post-transcriptional Expression of Cyclin-dependent Kinase Inhibitor p27Kip1

    PubMed Central

    Ziegeler, Gudrun; Ming, Jie; Koseki, Jana C.; Sevinc, Sema; Chen, Ting; Ergun, Suleyman; Qin, Xuebin; Aktas, Bertal H.

    2010-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 plays a critical role in regulating entry into and exit from the cell cycle. Post-transcriptional regulation of p27Kip1 expression is of significant interest. The embryonic lethal abnormal vision (ELAV)-like RNA-binding protein HuR is thought be important for the translation of p27Kip1, however, different reports attributed diametrically opposite roles to HuR. We report here an alternative mechanism wherein HuR regulates stability of the p27Kip1 mRNA. Specifically, human and mouse p27Kip1 mRNAs interact with HuR protein through multiple U-rich elements in both 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions (UTR). These interactions, which occur in vitro and in vivo, stabilize p27Kip1 mRNA and play a critical role in its accumulation. Deleting HuR binding sites or knocking down HuR expression destabilizes p27Kip1 mRNA and reduces its accumulation. We also identified a CT repeat in the 5′ UTR of full-length p27Kip1 mRNA isoforms that interact with a ∼41-kDa protein and represses p27Kip1 expression. This CT-rich element and diffuse elements in the 3′ UTR regulate post-transcriptional expression of p27Kip1 at the level of translation. This is the first demonstration that HuR-dependent mRNA stability and HuR-independent mRNA translation plays a critical role in the regulation of post-transcriptional p27Kip1 expression. PMID:20332085

  17. Nanog induces suppression of senescence through downregulation of p27KIP1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Münst, Bernhard; Thier, Marc Christian; Winnemöller, Dirk; Helfen, Martina; Thummer, Rajkumar P.; Edenhofer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A comprehensive analysis of the molecular network of cellular factors establishing and maintaining pluripotency as well as self renewal of pluripotent stem cells is key for further progress in understanding basic stem cell biology. Nanog is necessary for the natural induction of pluripotency in early mammalian development but dispensable for both its maintenance and its artificial induction. To gain further insight into the molecular activity of Nanog, we analyzed the outcomes of Nanog gain-of-function in various cell models employing a recently developed biologically active recombinant cell-permeant protein, Nanog-TAT. We found that Nanog enhances the proliferation of both NIH 3T3 and primary fibroblast cells. Nanog transduction into primary fibroblasts results in suppression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. Investigation of cell cycle factors revealed that transient activation of Nanog correlates with consistent downregulation of the cell cycle inhibitor p27KIP1 (also known as CDKN1B). By performing chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, we confirmed bona fide Nanog-binding sites upstream of the p27KIP1 gene, establishing a direct link between physical occupancy and functional regulation. Our data demonstrates that Nanog enhances proliferation of fibroblasts through transcriptional regulation of cell cycle inhibitor p27 gene. PMID:26795560

  18. Knockdown of AMPKα2 Promotes Pulmonary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells Proliferation via mTOR/Skp2/p27Kip1 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Rui; Liu, Lu; Zhu, Yanting; Li, Shaojun; Xie, Xinming; Li, Fangwei; Song, Yang; Yang, Lan; Gao, Li; Li, Manxiang

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) suppresses proliferation of a variety of tumor cells as well as nonmalignant cells. In this study, we used post-transcriptional gene silencing with small interfering RNA (siRNA) to specifically examine the effect of AMPK on pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) proliferation and to further elucidate its underlying molecular mechanisms. Our results showed that knockdown of AMPKα2 promoted primary cultured PASMCs proliferation; this was accompanied with the elevation of phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2) protein level and reduction of p27Kip1. Importantly, prior silencing of mTOR with siRNA abolished AMPKα2 knockdown-induced Skp2 upregulation, p27Kip1 reduction as well as PASMCs proliferation. Furthermore, pre-depletion of Skp2 by siRNA also eliminated p27Kip1 downregulation and PASMCs proliferation caused by AMPKα2 knockdown. Taken together, our study indicates that AMPKα2 isoform plays an important role in regulation of PASMCs proliferation by modulating mTOR/Skp2/p27Kip1 axis, and suggests that activation of AMPKα2 might have potential value in the prevention and treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:27258250

  19. Regulation of the p27Kip1 tumor suppressor by miR-221 and miR-222 promotes cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    le Sage, Carlos; Nagel, Remco; Egan, David A; Schrier, Mariette; Mesman, Elly; Mangiola, Annunziato; Anile, Corrado; Maira, Giulio; Mercatelli, Neri; Ciafrè, Silvia Anna; Farace, Maria Giulia; Agami, Reuven

    2007-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are potent post-transcriptional regulators of protein coding genes. Patterns of misexpression of miRNAs in cancer suggest key functions of miRNAs in tumorigenesis. However, current bioinformatics tools do not entirely support the identification and characterization of the mode of action of such miRNAs. Here, we used a novel functional genetic approach and identified miR-221 and miR-222 (miR-221&222) as potent regulators of p27Kip1, a cell cycle inhibitor and tumor suppressor. Using miRNA inhibitors, we demonstrate that certain cancer cell lines require high activity of miR-221&222 to maintain low p27Kip1 levels and continuous proliferation. Interestingly, high levels of miR-221&222 appear in glioblastomas and correlate with low levels of p27Kip1 protein. Thus, deregulated expression of miR-221&222 promotes cancerous growth by inhibiting the expression of p27Kip1. PMID:17627278

  20. Involvement of p27KIP1 in G1 arrest mediated by an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Wu, X; Rubin, M; Fan, Z; DeBlasio, T; Soos, T; Koff, A; Mendelsohn, J

    1996-04-01

    Activation of the cyclin dependent kinases (CDK4/CDK6 and CDK2) is required for G1 phase progression and entry into S-phase. The activation of these kinases is regulated by checkpoints that monitor environmental and intracellular conditions. Progression into S-phase is controlled, in part, by the availability of growth factors, and we have investigated the relationship between growth factor availability and the activation of the CDK kinases. Blocking activation of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor tyrosine kinase with anti-EGF receptor monoclonal antibody (mAb) 225 induces G1 phase cell cycle arrest in DiFi human colon adenocarcinoma cells. When DiFi cells are treated with mAb 225 for 24 h, we observe marked decreases in the activities of CDK2 kinase and cyclin E-associated CDK kinase which are not accompanied by reduced levels of cyclin E and CDK2 proteins. However, the amount of cyclin/CDK kinase inhibitor p27KIP1 increases in the mAb-treated cells and p27KIP1 is bound to CDK2 in increasing amounts. Immunodepletion of p27KIP1 removes an inhibitory activity from lysates of mAb-treated cells: the immunodepleted and heated lysates lose the capacity to inhibit cyclin E/CDK2 activity in an in vitro assay. The results suggest that G1 arrest in the cell cycle induced by EGF receptor blockade involves p27KIP1. PMID:8622855

  1. MicroRNAs 221 and 222 target p27Kip1 in Marek's disease virus-transformed tumour cell line MSB-1.

    PubMed

    Lambeth, Luke S; Yao, Yongxiu; Smith, Lorraine P; Zhao, Yuguang; Nair, Venugopal

    2009-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of short RNAs that function as post-transcriptional suppressors of protein expression and are involved in a variety of biological processes, including oncogenesis. Several recent studies have implicated the involvement of miR-221 and miR-222 in tumorigenesis as these miRNAs are upregulated in a number of cancers and affect the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins such as the cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitor p27(Kip1). Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a highly oncogenic herpesvirus that affects poultry, causing acute neoplastic disease with lymphomatous lesions in several organs. MDV-encoded oncogenes such as Meq are directly implicated in the neoplastic transformation of T cells and have been well studied. More recently, however, the involvement of both host and virus-encoded miRNAs in the induction of MD lymphomas is being increasingly recognized. We analysed the miRNA expression profiles in the MDV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell line MSB-1 and found that endogenous miRNAs miR-221 and miR-222 were significantly upregulated. Demonstration of the conserved binding sites for these miRNAs in the chicken p27(Kip1) 3'-untranslated region sequence and the repression of luciferase activity of reporter constructs indicated that miR-221 and miR-222 target p27(Kip1) in these cells. We also found that overexpression of miR-221 and miR-222 decreased p27(Kip1) levels and that treatment with retrovirally expressed antagomiRs partially alleviated this suppression. These data show that an oncogenic herpesvirus, as in the case of many cancers, can exploit the miRNA machinery for suppressing cell cycle regulatory molecules such as p27(Kip1) in the induction and progression of T-cell lymphomas. PMID:19264608

  2. PRMT5 Is Upregulated in Malignant and Metastatic Melanoma and Regulates Expression of MITF and p27Kip1

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Courtney; Yang, Jennifer; Peters, Sara B.; Bill, Matthew A.; Baiocchi, Robert A.; Yan, Fengting; Sïf, Saïd; Tae, Sookil; Gaudio, Eugenio; Wu, Xin; Grever, Michael R.; Young, Gregory S.; Lesinski, Gregory B.

    2013-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferase-5 (PRMT5) is a Type II arginine methyltransferase that regulates various cellular functions. We hypothesized that PRMT5 plays a role in regulating the growth of human melanoma cells. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated significant upregulation of PRMT5 in human melanocytic nevi, malignant melanomas and metastatic melanomas as compared to normal epidermis. Furthermore, nuclear PRMT5 was significantly decreased in metastatic melanomas as compared to primary cutaneous melanomas. In human metastatic melanoma cell lines, PRMT5 was predominantly cytoplasmic, and associated with its enzymatic cofactor Mep50, but not STAT3 or cyclin D1. However, histologic examination of tumor xenografts from athymic mice revealed heterogeneous nuclear and cytoplasmic PRMT5 expression. Depletion of PRMT5 via siRNA inhibited proliferation in a subset of melanoma cell lines, while it accelerated growth of others. Loss of PRMT5 also led to reduced expression of MITF (microphthalmia-associated transcription factor), a melanocyte-lineage specific oncogene, and increased expression of the cell cycle regulator p27Kip1. These results are the first to report elevated PRMT5 expression in human melanoma specimens and indicate this protein may regulate MITF and p27Kip1 expression in human melanoma cells. PMID:24098663

  3. A prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia-dependent p27kip1 checkpoint induces senescence, inhibits cell proliferation and cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Pradip K.; Grisanzio, Chiara; O’Connell, Fionnuala; Barry, Marc; Brito, Joseph M.; Xu, Qing; Guney, Isil; Berger, Raanan; Herman, Paula; Bikoff, Rachel; Fedele, Giuseppe; Baek, Won-Ki; Wang, Shunyou; Ellwood-Yen, Katharine; Wu, Hong; Sawyers, Charles L.; Signoretti, Sabina; Hahn, William C.; Loda, Massimo; Sellers, William R.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Transgenic expression of activated AKT1 in the murine prostate induces Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia (PIN) that does not progress to invasive prostate cancer (CaP). In luminal epithelial cells of Akt-driven PIN we show the concomitant induction of p27kip1 and senescence. Genetic ablation of p27Kip1 led to down regulation of senescence markers and progression to cancer. In humans, p27Kip1 and senescence markers were elevated in PIN not associated with CaP, but were decreased and absent, respectively in cancer-associated PIN and in CaP. Importantly, p27Kip1 up-regulation in mouse and human in situ lesions did not depend upon mTOR or Akt activation but was instead specifically associated with alterations in cellular polarity, architecture and adhesion molecules. These data suggest that a p27Kip1-driven checkpoint limits progression of PIN to CaP. PMID:18691549

  4. Rheb promotes cancer cell survival through p27Kip1-dependent activation of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Campos, Tania; Ziehe, Javiera; Palma, Mario; Escobar, David; Tapia, Julio C; Pincheira, Roxana; Castro, Ariel F

    2016-02-01

    We previously found that the small GTPase Rheb regulates the cell-cycle inhibitor p27KIP1 (p27) in colon cancer cells by a mTORC1-independent mechanism. However, the biological function of the Rheb/p27 axis in cancer cells remains unknown. Here, we show that siRNA-mediated depletion of Rheb decreases survival of human colon cancer cells under serum deprivation. As autophagy can support cell survival, we analyzed the effect of Rheb on this process by detecting the modification of the autophagy marker protein LC3 by western blot and imunofluorescence. We found that Rheb promotes autophagy in several human cancer cell lines under serum deprivation. Accordingly, blocking autophagy inhibited the pro-survival effect of Rheb in colon cancer cells. We then analyzed whether p27 was involved in the biological effect of Rheb. Depletion of p27 inhibited colon cancer cell survival, and Rheb induction of autophagy. These results suggest that p27 has an essential role in the effect of Rheb in response to serum deprivation. In addition, we demonstrated that the role of p27 in autophagy stands on the N-terminal portion of the protein, where the CDK-inhibitory domain is located. Our results indicate that a Rheb/p27 axis accounts for the activation of autophagy that supports cancer cell survival. Our work therefore highlights a biological function of Rheb and prompts the need for future studies to address whether the mTORC1-independent Rheb/p27 axis could contribute to tumorigenesis and/or resistance to mTOR inhibitors. PMID:25594310

  5. p27Kip1 Is Required to Mediate a G1 Cell Cycle Arrest Downstream of ATM following Genotoxic Stress.

    PubMed

    Cassimere, Erica K; Mauvais, Claire; Denicourt, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a coordinated signaling network that ensures the maintenance of genome stability under DNA damaging stress. In response to DNA lesions, activation of the DDR leads to the establishment of cell cycle checkpoints that delay cell-cycle progression and allow repair of the defects. The tumor suppressor p27Kip1 is a cyclin-CDK inhibitor that plays an important role in regulating quiescence in a variety of tissues. Several studies have suggested that p27Kip1 also plays a role in the maintenance of genomic integrity. Here we demonstrate that p27Kip1 is essential for the establishment of a G1 checkpoint arrest after DNA damage. We also uncovered that ATM phosphorylates p27Kip1 on a previously uncharacterized residue (Ser-140), which leads to its stabilization after induction of DNA double-strand breaks. Inhibition of this stabilization by replacing endogenous p27Kip1 with a Ser-140 phospho-mutant (S140A) significantly sensitized cells to IR treatments. Our findings reveal a novel role for p27Kip1 in the DNA damage response pathway and suggest that part of its tumor suppressing functions relies in its ability to mediate a G1 arrest after the induction of DNA double strand breaks. PMID:27611996

  6. Differential modulation of paclitaxel-mediated apoptosis by p21Waf1 and p27Kip1.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M; Lu, Y; Liu, B; Fang, M; Mendelsohn, J; Fan, Z

    2000-05-11

    The impact of the cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p21Waf1 and p27Kip1 on paclitaxel-mediated cytotoxicity was investigated in RKO human colon adenocarcinoma cells with the ecdysone-inducible expression of p21Waf1 or p27Kip1. Ectopic expression of p27Kip1 arrested cells at G1 phase, whereas p21Waf1 expression arrested cells at G1 and G2. Expression of p21Waf1 after paclitaxel treatment produced much greater resistance to paclitaxel than did expression of p27Kip1. We attributed this difference to the additional block at G2 induced by p21Waf1, which prevented cells from entering M phase and becoming paclitaxel susceptible. Expression of p21Waf1 inhibited p34cdc2 activity and markedly reduced paclitaxel-mediated mitotic arrest, from 87.5 to 23%. In contrast, p27Kip1 expression also inhibited p34cdc2 but reduced mitotic arrest only slightly, from 87. 4 to 74.5%. We concluded that the G2 block produced by p21Waf1, but not by p27Kip1, contributed to their unequal modulation of sensitivity to paclitaxel-mediated apoptosis in RKO cells, and there is no causal relationship between paclitaxel-mediated cytotoxicity and elevation of p34cdc2 activity. PMID:10828884

  7. p27Kip1 expression as a prognostic marker for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    DE ALMEIDA, MIGUEL REIS; PÉREZ-SAYÁNS, MARIO; SUÁREZ-PEÑARANDA, JOSÉ MANUEL; SOMOZA-MARTÍN, JOSÉ MANUEL; GARCÍA-GARCÍA, ABEL

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of the cell cycle is essential for carcinogenesis. The cell cycle is controlled by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), which are upregulated by cyclins and downregulated by CDK inhibitors (CDKIs). Decreased p27Kip1 expression has been associated with survival rate, tumor size, histological differentiation and the presence of lymph node metastasis in patients with various types of cancer. The aim of the current study is to provide a literature review on the association between p27Kip1 expression and the clinical and pathological aspects of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), and the expression of other CDKIs of the Cip/Kip family and cyclins. Throughout the literature, different methodologies were used to determine the immunohistochemical expression of p27Kip1; thus, results concerning p27Kip1 expression in HNSCC vary widely. However, it has now been confirmed that p27Kip1 is underexpressed in SCC cells. p27 may be a promising marker for determining the prognosis of HNSCC, despite the marked variability of the results obtained. An association between p27 expression and survival rate, time to recurrence and tumor stage has been observed. Based on the information currently available, it is premature to recommend the analysis of p27Kip1 expression in guiding HNSCC treatment planning. However, although relatively unstudied, the correlation between p27Kip1 expression and other tumor suppressor genes may turn out to be important in determining the prognosis of HNSCC. Further prospective studies utilizing standardized laboratory methodologies and statistics that facilitate meta-analyses are required to confirm this proposal. PMID:26722226

  8. The inhibition of activated hepatic stellate cells proliferation by arctigenin through G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest: persistent p27(Kip1) induction by interfering with PI3K/Akt/FOXO3a signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Ao; Wang, Jun; Wu, Mingjun; Zhang, Xiaoxun; Zhang, Hongzhi

    2015-01-15

    Proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is vital for the development of fibrosis during liver injury. In this study, we describe that arctigenin (ATG), a major bioactive component of Fructus Arctii, exhibited selective cytotoxic activity via inhibiting platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB)-activated HSCs proliferation and arrested cell cycle at G0/G1 phase, which could not be observed in normal human hepatocytes in vitro. The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 activities could be strongly inhibited by ATG through down-regulation of cyclin D1 and CDK4/6 expression in early G1 phase arrest. In the ATG-treated HSCs, the expression level of p27(Kip1) and the formation of CDK2-p27(Kip1) complex were also increased. p27(Kip1) silencing significantly attenuated the effect of ATG, including cell cycle arrest and suppression of proliferation in activated HSCs. We also found that ATG suppressed PDGF-BB-induced phosphorylation of Akt and its downstream transcription factor Forkhead box O 3a (FOXO3a), decreased binding of FOXO3a to 14-3-3 protein, and stimulated nuclear translocation of FOXO3a in activated HSCs. Furthermore, knockdown of FOXO3a expression by FOXO3a siRNA attenuated ATG-induced up-regulation of p27(Kip1) in activated HSCs. All the above findings suggested that ATG could increase the levels of p27(Kip1) protein through inhibition of Akt and improvement of FOXO3a activity, in turn inhibited the CDK2 kinase activity, and eventually caused an overall inhibition of HSCs proliferation. PMID:25498792

  9. NSun2 delays replicative senescence by repressing p27 (KIP1) translation and elevating CDK1 translation

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Junyue; Liu, Zhenyun; Jiang, Bin; Dou, Yali; Gorospe, Myriam; Wang, Wengong

    2015-01-01

    A rise in the levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p27KIP1 is important for the growth arrest of senescent cells, but the mechanisms responsible for this increase are poorly understood. Here, we show that the tRNA methyltransferase NSun2 represses the expression of p27 in replicative senescence. NSun2 methylated the 5′-untranslated region (UTR) of p27 mRNA at cytosine C64 in vitro and in cells, thereby repressing the translation of p27. During replicative senescence, increased p27 protein levels were accompanied by decreased NSun2 protein levels. Knockdown of NSun2 in human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) elevated p27 levels and reduced the expression of CDK1 (encoded by CDK1 mRNA, a previously reported target of NSun2), which in turn further repressed cell proliferation and accelerated replicative senescence, while overexpression of NSun2 exerted the opposite effect. Ectopic overexpression of the p27 5′UTR fragment rescued the effect of NSun2 overexpression in lowering p27, increasing CDK1, promoting cell proliferation, and delaying replicative senescence. Our findings indicate that NSun2-mediated mRNA methylation regulates p27 and CDK1 levels during replicative senescence. PMID:26687548

  10. A new tumour suppression mechanism by p27Kip1: EGFR down-regulation mediated by JNK/c-Jun pathway inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yong; Wang, Yihong; Wang, Yulei; Meng, Yan; Zhu, Junlan; Jin, Honglei; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Dongyun; Yu, Yonghui; Wu, Xue-Ru; Huang, Chuanshu

    2014-01-01

    p27Kip1 is a potent inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases that drive G1-to-S cell-cycle transition. Reduced p27Kip1 expression is prevalent in a wide range of human tumours; however, the exact mechanism(s) of p27Kip1-mediated tumour suppression remains obscure. In the present study, we identified a close inverse relationship between p27Kip1 and EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) expression: the parental T24 human bladder cancer cells had high p27Kip1 expression but low EGFR expression and, in striking contrast, the metastatic derivative of T24 (T24T) had low p27Kip1 expression but high EGFR expression. This relationship was also found in various human cancer tissues, and was not only just correlative but also causal; depletion of p27Kip1 in MEF (mouse embryonic fibroblast) cells resulted in markedly elevated EGFR expression, a result reproducible with an Egfr promoter-luciferase reporter in both T24 and MEF cells, suggesting transcriptional repression of EGFR by p27Kip1. Indeed, p27Kip1 was found to regulate EGFR expression via the JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase)/c-Jun transcription factor: p27Kip1 deficiency activated JNK/c-Jun, whereas inhibition of JNK/c-Jun by dominant-negative mutants dramatically repressed Egfr transcription. Furthermore, the proximal promoter of the Egfr gene was crucial for its transcription, where the recruiting activity of c-Jun was much greater in p27Kip1−/− cells than in p27Kip1+/+ cells. Introduction of GFP–p27Kip1 into T24T cells suppressed JNK/c-Jun activation, EGFR expression and anchorage-independent growth. The results of the present study demonstrate that p27Kip1 suppresses JNK/c-Jun activation and EGFR expression in MEFs and human bladder cancer cells, and the results obtained are consistent with those from human cancer specimens. The present study provides new insights into p27Kip1 suppression of cancer cell growth, migration and metastasis. PMID:25121353

  11. MYC antagonizes the differentiation induced by imatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia cells through downregulation of p27(KIP1.).

    PubMed

    Gómez-Casares, M T; García-Alegria, E; López-Jorge, C E; Ferrándiz, N; Blanco, R; Alvarez, S; Vaqué, J P; Bretones, G; Caraballo, J M; Sánchez-Bailón, P; Delgado, M D; Martín-Perez, J; Cigudosa, J C; León, J

    2013-04-25

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) progresses from a chronic to a blastic phase where the leukemic cells are proliferative and undifferentiated. The CML is nowadays successfully treated with BCR-ABL kinase inhibitors as imatinib and dasatinib. In the CML-derived K562 cell line, low concentrations of imatinib induce proliferative arrest and erythroid differentiation. We found that imatinib upregulated the cell cycle inhibitor p27(KIP1) (p27) in a time- and -concentration dependent manner, and that the extent of imatinib-mediated differentiation was severely decreased in cells with depleted p27. MYC (c-Myc) is a transcription factor frequently deregulated in human cancer. MYC is overexpressed in untreated CML and is associated to poor response to imatinib. Using K562 sublines with conditional MYC expression (induced by Zn(2+) or activated by 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen) we show that MYC prevented the erythroid differentiation induced by imatinib and dasatinib. The differentiation inhibition is not due to increased proliferation of MYC-expressing clones or enhanced apoptosis of differentiated cells. As p27 overexpression is reported to induce erythroid differentiation in K562, we explored the effect of MYC on imatinib-dependent induction of p27. We show that MYC abrogated the imatinib-induced upregulation of p27 concomitantly with the differentiation inhibition, suggesting that MYC inhibits differentiation by antagonizing the imatinib-mediated upregulation of p27. This effect occurs mainly by p27 protein destabilization. This was in part due to MYC-dependent induction of SKP2, a component of the ubiquitin ligase complex that targets p27 for degradation. The results suggest that, although MYC deregulation does not directly confer resistance to imatinib, it might be a factor that contributes to progression of CML through the inhibition of differentiation. PMID:22710719

  12. eIF3a improve cisplatin sensitivity in ovarian cancer by regulating XPC and p27Kip1 translation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Yu, Jing-Jing; Tian, Yan; Li, Zheng-Zheng; Zhang, Cai-Yi; Zhang, Shu-Fen; Cao, Lan-Qin; Zhang, Yi; Qian, Chen-Yue; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Yin, Ji-Ye; Liu, Zhao-Qian

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3a (eIF3a) is one of the core subunits of the translation initiation complex eIF3, responsible for ribosomal subunit joining and mRNA recruitment to the ribosome. Our previous study identified that it was correlated with platinum response in lung cancer. The current study aims to test the hypothesis that eIF3a may affect the drug response and prognosis of ovarian cancer patients receiving platinum-based chemotherapy by regulating xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC) and p27Kip1. Immunohistochemistry and western blot was used to determine the expression of eIF3a in 126 human ovarian cancer tissues followed by association analysis of eIF3a expression with patient's response and survival. Ectopic over-expression and RNA interference knockdown of eIF3a were carried out in A2780/cisplatin (DDP) and its parental A2780 cells, respectively, to determine the effect of altered eIF3a expression on cellular response to cisplatin by employing MTT assay. Western Blot analyses were also carried out to determine the regulation of eIF3a on XPC and p27Kip1. eIF3a expression was associated with response of ovarian cancer patients to DDP-based chemotherapy and their survival. Overexpression and knockdown of eIF3a increased and decreased the cellular response to cisplatin in A2780/DDP and A2780 cells, respectively. In addition, XPC and p27Kip1 were down regulated by eIF3a. eIF3a improves ovarian cancer patients' response to DDP-based chemotherapy via down regulating XPC and p27Kip1. PMID:26213845

  13. A single-nucleotide polymorphism in the human p27kip1 gene (-838C>A) affects basal promoter activity and the risk of myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    González, Pelayo; Díez-Juan, Antonio; Coto, Eliecer; Álvarez, Victoria; Reguero, Julian R; Batalla, Alberto; Andrés, Vicente

    2004-01-01

    Background Excessive proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells and leukocytes within the artery wall is a major event in the development of atherosclerosis. The growth suppressor p27kip1 associates with several cyclin-dependent kinase/cyclin complexes, thereby abrogating their capacity to induce progression through the cell cycle. Recent studies have implicated p27kip1 in the control of neointimal hyperplasia. For instance, p27kip1 ablation in apolipoprotein-E-null mice enhanced arterial cell proliferation and accelerated atherogenesis induced by dietary cholesterol. Therefore, p27kip1 is a candidate gene to modify the risk of developing atherosclerosis and associated ischaemic events (i.e., myocardial infarction and stroke). Results In this study we found three common single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the human p27kip1 gene (+326T>G [V109G], -79C>T, and -838C>A). The frequency of -838A carriers was significantly increased in myocardial infarction patients compared to healthy controls (odds ratio [OR] = 1.73, 95% confidence interval [95%CI] = 1.12–2.70). In addition, luciferase reporter constructs driven by the human p27kip1 gene promoter containing A at position -838 had decreased basal transcriptional activity when transiently transfected in Jurkat cells, compared with constructs bearing C in -838 (P = 0.04). Conclusions These data suggest that -838A is associated with reduced p27kip1 promoter activity and increased risk of myocardial infarction. PMID:15061869

  14. Differential roles of p21(Waf1) and p27(Kip1) in modulating chemosensitivity and their possible application in drug discovery studies.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M; Lu, Y; Parant, J M; Lozano, G; Bacher, G; Beckers, T; Fan, Z

    2001-11-01

    In this study, the differential role of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p21(Waf1) and p27(Kip1) in cell cycle regulation was proposed for use in screening natural or synthetic compounds for cell cycle-dependent (particularly M phase-dependent) antineoplastic activity. p21(Waf1) or p27(Kip1) was ectopically expressed with an ecdysone-inducible mammalian expression system in a human colon adenocarcinoma cell line. Induction of p21(Waf1) or p27(Kip1) expression inhibited the activities of CDK2 and completely arrested cells at G(1) phase of the cell cycle by p27(Kip1) and at G(1) and G(2) phases by p21(Waf1). We examined the sensitivity of these cells to several antineoplastic agents known to be cell cycle-dependent or -independent. Substantially increased resistance to cell cycle-dependent antineoplastic agents was found in the cells when the expression of p21(Waf1) or p27(Kip1) was induced. In contrast, only a desensitization to cell cycle-independent antineoplastic agents was found in the cells arrested by p21(Waf1) or p27(Kip1). Because p21(Waf1) induces an additional block at G(2) phase that inhibits cell entry into M phase, we further examined the difference between p21(Waf1)- and p27(Kip1)-induced cells in their sensitivity to D-24851, a novel M phase-dependent compound. We found that induction of p21(Waf1) after exposure of the cells to D-24851 conferred stronger resistance than did induction of p27(Kip1). Taken together, our results suggest that the differential effect of p21(Waf1) and p27(Kip1) on cell cycle regulation may be advantageous for screening chemical libraries for novel antineoplastic candidates that are cell cycle-dependent, and M phase-dependent in particular. PMID:11641417

  15. Knockdown of CRM1 inhibits the nuclear export of p27(Kip1) phosphorylated at serine 10 and plays a role in the pathogenesis of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, You; Wang, Yingying; Xiang, Jingying; Ji, Fang; Deng, Yan; Tang, Chunhui; Yang, Shuyun; Xi, Qinghua; Liu, Rong; Di, Wen

    2014-02-01

    In a previous study, the nuclear export protein chromosomal region maintenance (CRM1) was correlated with p27(Kip1) in glioma. The aims of the present study were to investigate the expression of CRM1 and pSer10p27 and their functional roles in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) tissues. Using immunohistochemical analysis, CRM1 and pSer10p27 expression levels were shown to be associated with histologic stage and grade (P<0.05). High CRM1 and pSer10p27 expression levels were prognostic indicators of overall survival (P<0.05). Knockdown of CRM1 and pSer10p27 expression arrested cell cycle progression and inhibited the proliferation of SKOV3 cells both in vitro and in vivo. These data support the idea that pSer10p27 and CRM1 play cooperative roles in EOC. PMID:24018641

  16. Ras activity late in G1 phase required for p27kip1 downregulation, passage through the restriction point, and entry into S phase in growth factor-stimulated NIH 3T3 fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Takuwa, N; Takuwa, Y

    1997-01-01

    It is well documented that Ras functions as a molecular switch for reentry into the cell cycle at the border between G0 and G1 by transducing extracellular growth stimuli into early G1 mitogenic signals. In the present study, we investigated the role of Ras during the late stage of the G1 phase by using NIH 3T3 (M17) fibroblasts in which the expression of a dominant negative Ras mutant, p21(Ha-Ras[Asn17]), is induced in response to dexamethasone treatment. We found that delaying the expression of Ras(Asn17) until late in the G1 phase by introducing dexamethasone 3 h after the addition of epidermal growth factor (EGF) abolished the downregulation of the p27kip1 cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor which normally occurred during this period, with resultant suppression of cyclin Ds/CDK4 and cyclin E/CDK2 and G1 arrest. The immunodepletion of p27kip1 completely eliminated the CDK inhibitor activity from EGF-stimulated, dexamethasone-treated cell lysate. The failure of p27kip1 downregulation and G1 arrest was also observed in cells in which Ras(Asn17) was induced after growth stimulation with a phorbol ester or alpha-thrombin and was mimicked by the addition late in the G1 phase of inhibitors for phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase. Ras-mediated downregulation of p27kip1 involved both the suppression of synthesis and the stimulation of the degradation of the protein. Unlike the earlier expression of Ras(Asn17) at the border between G0 and G1, its delayed expression did not compromise the EGF-stimulated transient activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases or inhibit the stimulated expression of a principal D-type cyclin, cyclin D1, until close to the border between G1 and S. We conclude that Ras plays temporally distinct, phase-specific roles throughout the G1 phase and that Ras function late in G1 is required for p27kip1 downregulation and passage through the restriction point, a prerequisite for entry into the S phase. PMID:9271412

  17. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester induced cell cycle arrest and growth inhibition in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells via regulation of Skp2, p53, p21Cip1 and p27Kip1

    PubMed Central

    Su, Liang-Cheng; Jiang, Shih Sheng; Chan, Tzu-Min; Chang, Chung-Ho; Chen, Li-Tzong; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Wang, Horng-Dar; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) patients receiving the androgen ablation therapy ultimately develop recurrent castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) within 1–3 years. Treatment with caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) suppressed cell survival and proliferation via induction of G1 or G2/M cell cycle arrest in LNCaP 104-R1, DU-145, 22Rv1, and C4–2 CRPC cells. CAPE treatment also inhibited soft agar colony formation and retarded nude mice xenograft growth of LNCaP 104-R1 cells. We identified that CAPE treatment significantly reduced protein abundance of Skp2, Cdk2, Cdk4, Cdk7, Rb, phospho-Rb S807/811, cyclin A, cyclin D1, cyclin H, E2F1, c-Myc, SGK, phospho-p70S6kinase T421/S424, phospho-mTOR Ser2481, phospho-GSK3α Ser21, but induced p21Cip1, p27Kip1, ATF4, cyclin E, p53, TRIB3, phospho-p53 (Ser6, Ser33, Ser46, Ser392), phospho-p38 MAPK Thr180/Tyr182, Chk1, Chk2, phospho-ATM S1981, phospho-ATR S428, and phospho-p90RSK Ser380. CAPE treatment decreased Skp2 and Akt1 protein expression in LNCaP 104-R1 tumors as compared to control group. Overexpression of Skp2, or siRNA knockdown of p21Cip1, p27Kip1, or p53 blocked suppressive effect of CAPE treatment. Co-treatment of CAPE with PI3K inhibitor LY294002 or Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT737 showed synergistic suppressive effects. Our finding suggested that CAPE treatment induced cell cycle arrest and growth inhibition in CRPC cells via regulation of Skp2, p53, p21Cip1, and p27Kip1. PMID:25788262

  18. Cell cycle arrest in Metformin treated breast cancer cells involves activation of AMPK, downregulation of cyclin D1, and requires p27Kip1 or p21Cip1

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Yongxian; Miskimins, W Keith

    2008-01-01

    Background The antihyperglycemic drug metformin may have beneficial effects on the prevention and treatment of cancer. Metformin is known to activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). It has also been shown to inhibit cyclin D1 expression and proliferation of some cultured cancer cells. However, the mechanisms of action by which metformin mediates cell cycle arrest are not completely understood. Results In this study, metformin was found to inhibit proliferation of most cultured breast cancer cell lines. This was independent of estrogen receptor, HER2, or p53 status. Inhibition of cell proliferation was associated with arrest within G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. As in previous studies, metformin treatment led to activation of (AMPK) and downregulation of cyclin D1. However, these events were not sufficient for cell cycle arrest because they were also observed in the MDA-MB-231 cell line, which is not sensitive to growth arrest by metformin. In sensitive breast cancer lines, the reduction in cyclin D1 led to release of sequestered CDK inhibitors, p27Kip1 and p21Cip1, and association of these inhibitors with cyclin E/CDK2 complexes. The metformin-resistant cell line MDA-MB-231 expresses significantly lower levels of p27Kip1 and p21Cip1 than the metformin-sensitive cell line, MCF7. When p27Kip1 or p21Cip1 were overexpressed in MDA-MB-231, the cells became sensitive to cell cycle arrest in response to metformin. Conclusion Cell cycle arrest in response to metformin requires CDK inhibitors in addition to AMPK activation and cyclin D1 downregulation. This is of interest because many cancers are associated with loss or downregulation of CDK inhibitors and the results may be relevant to the development of anti-tumor reagents that target the AMPK pathway. PMID:19046439

  19. FGFR1 signaling stimulates proliferation of human mesenchymal stem cells by inhibiting the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21(Waf1) and p27(Kip1).

    PubMed

    Dombrowski, Christian; Helledie, Torben; Ling, Ling; Grünert, Martin; Canning, Claire A; Jones, C Michael; Hui, James H; Nurcombe, Victor; van Wijnen, Andre J; Cool, Simon M

    2013-12-01

    Signaling through fibroblast growth factor receptor one (FGFR1) is a known inducer of proliferation in both embryonic and human adult mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and positively regulates maintenance of stem cell viability. Leveraging the mitogenic potential of FGF2/FGFR1 signaling in stem cells for therapeutic applications necessitates a mechanistic understanding of how this receptor stimulates cell cycle progression. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA) depletion, antibody-inhibition, and small molecule inhibition, we establish that FGFR1 activity is rate limiting for self-renewal of hMSCs. We show that FGFR1 promotes stem cell proliferation through multiple mechanisms that unite to antagonize cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors. FGFR1 not only stimulates c-Myc to suppress transcription of the CDK inhibitors p21(Waf1) and p27(Kip1), thus promoting cell cycle progression but also increases the activity of protein kinase B (AKT) and the level of S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2), resulting in the nuclear exclusion and reduction of p21(Waf1). The in vivo importance of FGFR1 signaling for the control of proliferation in mesenchymal progenitor populations is underscored by defects in ventral mesoderm formation during development upon inhibition of its signaling. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that FGFR1 signaling mediates the continuation of MSC growth and establishes a receptor target for enhancing the expansion of mesenchymal progenitors while maintaining their multilineage potential. PMID:23939995

  20. Butein inhibits cell proliferation and induces cell cycle arrest in acute lymphoblastic leukemia via FOXO3a/p27kip1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-Na; Tian, Yun; Shi, Dingbo; Wang, Jingshu; Qin, Ge; Li, Anchuan; Liang, Yan-Ni; Zhou, Huan-Juan; Ke, Zhi-Yong; Huang, Wenlin; Deng, Wuguo; Luo, Xue-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a common hematological malignancy characterized by the uncontrolled proliferation of leukemia cells in children. Discovering and developing effective chemotherapeutic drugs are needed for ALL. In this study, we investigated the anti-leukemic activity of butein and its action mechanisms in ALL. Butein was found to significantly suppress the cellular proliferation of ALL cell lines and primary ALL blasts in a dose-dependent manner. It also induced cell cycle arrest by decreasing the expression of cyclin E and CDK2. We also found that butein promoted nuclear Forkhead Class box O3a (FOXO3a) localization, enhanced the binding of FOXO3a on the p27kip1 gene promoter and then increased the expression of p27kip1. Moreover, we showed that FOXO3a knockdown significantly decreased the proliferation inhibition by butein, whereas overexpression of FOXO3a enhanced the butein-mediated proliferation inhibition. However, overexpression of FOXO3a mutation (C-terminally truncated FOXO3a DNA-binding domain) decreased the proliferation inhibition by butein through decreasing the expression of p27kip1. Our results therefore demonstrate the therapeutic potential of butein for ALL via FOXO3a/p27kip1 pathway. PMID:26919107

  1. HBx-upregulated lncRNA UCA1 promotes cell growth and tumorigenesis by recruiting EZH2 and repressing p27Kip1/CDK2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiao-Jiao; Song, Wei; Zhang, Shao-Dan; Shen, Xiao-Hui; Qiu, Xue-Mei; Wu, Hua-Zhang; Gong, Pi-Hai; Lu, Sen; Zhao, Zhu-Jiang; He, Ming-Liang; Fan, Hong

    2016-01-01

    It is well accepted that HBx plays the major role in hepatocarcinogenesis associated with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections. However, little was known about its role in regulating long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), a large group of transcripts regulating a variety of biological processes including carcinogenesis in mammalian cells. Here we report that HBx upregulates UCA1 genes and downregulates p27 genes in hepatic LO2 cells. Further studies show that the upregulated UCA1 promotes cell growth by facilitating G1/S transition through CDK2 in both hepatic and hepatoma cells. Knock down of UCA1 in HBx-expressing hepatic and hepatoma cells resulted in markedly increased apoptotic cells by elevating the cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-8. More importantly, UCA1 is found to be physically associated with enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), which suppresses p27Kip1 through histone methylation (H3K27me3) on p27Kip1 promoter. We also show that knockdown of UCA1 in hepatoma cells inhibits tumorigenesis in nude mice. In a clinic study, UCA1 is found to be frequently up-regulated in HBx positive group tissues in comparison with the HBx negative group, and exhibits an inverse correlation between UCA1 and p27Kip1 levels. Our findings demonstrate an important mechanism of hepatocarcinogenesis through the signaling of HBx-UCA1/EZH2-p27Kip1 axis, and a potential target of HCC. PMID:27009634

  2. HBx-upregulated lncRNA UCA1 promotes cell growth and tumorigenesis by recruiting EZH2 and repressing p27Kip1/CDK2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiao-Jiao; Song, Wei; Zhang, Shao-Dan; Shen, Xiao-Hui; Qiu, Xue-Mei; Wu, Hua-Zhang; Gong, Pi-Hai; Lu, Sen; Zhao, Zhu-Jiang; He, Ming-Liang; Fan, Hong

    2016-01-01

    It is well accepted that HBx plays the major role in hepatocarcinogenesis associated with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections. However, little was known about its role in regulating long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), a large group of transcripts regulating a variety of biological processes including carcinogenesis in mammalian cells. Here we report that HBx upregulates UCA1 genes and downregulates p27 genes in hepatic LO2 cells. Further studies show that the upregulated UCA1 promotes cell growth by facilitating G1/S transition through CDK2 in both hepatic and hepatoma cells. Knock down of UCA1 in HBx-expressing hepatic and hepatoma cells resulted in markedly increased apoptotic cells by elevating the cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-8. More importantly, UCA1 is found to be physically associated with enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), which suppresses p27Kip1 through histone methylation (H3K27me3) on p27Kip1 promoter. We also show that knockdown of UCA1 in hepatoma cells inhibits tumorigenesis in nude mice. In a clinic study, UCA1 is found to be frequently up-regulated in HBx positive group tissues in comparison with the HBx negative group, and exhibits an inverse correlation between UCA1 and p27Kip1 levels. Our findings demonstrate an important mechanism of hepatocarcinogenesis through the signaling of HBx-UCA1/EZH2-p27Kip1 axis, and a potential target of HCC. PMID:27009634

  3. Upregulation of p27Kip1 by demethylation sensitizes cisplatin-resistant human ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Li, Qiaoyan; Wu, Xiaoying; Chen, Puxiang

    2016-08-01

    Ovarian cancer has a poor prognosis due to its chemoresistance, and p27Kip1 (p27) has been implicated in tumor prognosis and drug-resistance. However, the regulatory mechanisms of p27 in drug‑resistance in ovarian cancer remain unknown. The current study successfully established chemoresistant cell lines using paclitaxel (TAX), cisplatin (DDP) and carboplatin (CBP) in SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells. The results indicated that the expression levels of p27 were dramatically downregulated in chemoresistant cells. However, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza) treatment restored p27 expression in DDP-resistant cells, and increased their sensitivity to DDP. In addition, it was observed that the methylation of DDP‑resistant cells, which was downregulated by 5‑aza treatment, was significantly higher compared with SKOV3 cells. Additionally, the overexpression of p27 arrested the cell cycle in S phase and promoted an apoptotic response to DDP. In conclusion, p27 was involved in chemoresistance of SKOV3 cells. Upregulated p27 expression induced by demethylation may enhance sensitivity to DDP through the regulation of the cell cycle. PMID:27314502

  4. The MLL fusion gene, MLL-AF4, regulates cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor CDKN1B (p27kip1) expression

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zhen-Biao; Popovic, Relja; Chen, Jing; Theisler, Catherine; Stuart, Tara; Santillan, Donna A.; Erfurth, Frank; Diaz, Manuel O.; Zeleznik-Le, Nancy J.

    2005-01-01

    MLL, involved in many chromosomal translocations associated with acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemia, has >50 known partner genes with which it is able to form in-frame fusions. Characterizing important downstream target genes of MLL and of MLL fusion proteins may provide rational therapeutic strategies for the treatment of MLL-associated leukemia. We explored downstream target genes of the most prevalent MLL fusion protein, MLL-AF4. To this end, we developed inducible MLL-AF4 fusion cell lines in different backgrounds. Overexpression of MLL-AF4 does not lead to increased proliferation in either cell line, but rather, cell growth was slowed compared with similar cell lines inducibly expressing truncated MLL. We found that in the MLL-AF4-induced cell lines, the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor gene CDKN1B was dramatically changed at both the RNA and protein (p27kip1) levels. In contrast, the expression levels of CDKN1A (p21) and CDKN2A (p16) were unchanged. To explore whether CDKN1B might be a direct target of MLL and of MLL-AF4, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays and luciferase reporter gene assays. MLL-AF4 binds to the CDKN1B promoter in vivo and regulates CDKN1B promoter activity. Further, we confirmed CDKN1B promoter binding by ChIP in MLL-AF4 as well as in MLL-AF9 leukemia cell lines. Our results suggest that CDKN1B is a downstream target of MLL and of MLL-AF4, and that, depending on the background cell type, MLL-AF4 inhibits or activates CDKN1B expression. This finding may have implications in terms of leukemia stem cell resistance to chemotherapy in MLL-AF4 leukemias. PMID:16169901

  5. SKP2 Oncogene Is a Direct MYC Target Gene and MYC Down-regulates p27KIP1 through SKP2 in Human Leukemia Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Bretones, Gabriel; Acosta, Juan C.; Caraballo, Juan M.; Ferrándiz, Nuria; Gómez-Casares, M. Teresa; Albajar, Marta; Blanco, Rosa; Ruiz, Paula; Hung, Wen-Chun; Albero, M. Pilar; Perez-Roger, Ignacio; León, Javier

    2011-01-01

    SKP2 is the ubiquitin ligase subunit that targets p27KIP1 (p27) for degradation. SKP2 is induced in the G1-S transit of the cell cycle, is frequently overexpressed in human cancer, and displays transformation activity in experimental models. Here we show that MYC induces SKP2 expression at the mRNA and protein levels in human myeloid leukemia K562 cells with conditional MYC expression. Importantly, in these systems, induction of MYC did not activate cell proliferation, ruling out SKP2 up-regulation as a consequence of cell cycle entry. MYC-dependent SKP2 expression was also detected in other cell types such as lymphoid, fibroblastic, and epithelial cell lines. MYC induced SKP2 mRNA expression in the absence of protein synthesis and activated the SKP2 promoter in luciferase reporter assays. With chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, MYC was detected bound to a region of human SKP2 gene promoter that includes E-boxes. The K562 cell line derives from human chronic myeloid leukemia. In a cohort of chronic myeloid leukemia bone marrow samples, we found a correlation between MYC and SKP2 mRNA levels. Analysis of cancer expression databases also indicated a correlation between MYC and SKP2 expression in lymphoma. Finally, MYC-induced SKP2 expression resulted in a decrease in p27 protein in K562 cells. Moreover, silencing of SKP2 abrogated the MYC-mediated down-regulation of p27. Our data show that SKP2 is a direct MYC target gene and that MYC-mediated SKP2 induction leads to reduced p27 levels. The results suggest the induction of SKP2 oncogene as a new mechanism for MYC-dependent transformation. PMID:21245140

  6. SKP2 oncogene is a direct MYC target gene and MYC down-regulates p27(KIP1) through SKP2 in human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Bretones, Gabriel; Acosta, Juan C; Caraballo, Juan M; Ferrándiz, Nuria; Gómez-Casares, M Teresa; Albajar, Marta; Blanco, Rosa; Ruiz, Paula; Hung, Wen-Chun; Albero, M Pilar; Perez-Roger, Ignacio; León, Javier

    2011-03-18

    SKP2 is the ubiquitin ligase subunit that targets p27(KIP1) (p27) for degradation. SKP2 is induced in the G(1)-S transit of the cell cycle, is frequently overexpressed in human cancer, and displays transformation activity in experimental models. Here we show that MYC induces SKP2 expression at the mRNA and protein levels in human myeloid leukemia K562 cells with conditional MYC expression. Importantly, in these systems, induction of MYC did not activate cell proliferation, ruling out SKP2 up-regulation as a consequence of cell cycle entry. MYC-dependent SKP2 expression was also detected in other cell types such as lymphoid, fibroblastic, and epithelial cell lines. MYC induced SKP2 mRNA expression in the absence of protein synthesis and activated the SKP2 promoter in luciferase reporter assays. With chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, MYC was detected bound to a region of human SKP2 gene promoter that includes E-boxes. The K562 cell line derives from human chronic myeloid leukemia. In a cohort of chronic myeloid leukemia bone marrow samples, we found a correlation between MYC and SKP2 mRNA levels. Analysis of cancer expression databases also indicated a correlation between MYC and SKP2 expression in lymphoma. Finally, MYC-induced SKP2 expression resulted in a decrease in p27 protein in K562 cells. Moreover, silencing of SKP2 abrogated the MYC-mediated down-regulation of p27. Our data show that SKP2 is a direct MYC target gene and that MYC-mediated SKP2 induction leads to reduced p27 levels. The results suggest the induction of SKP2 oncogene as a new mechanism for MYC-dependent transformation. PMID:21245140

  7. Down-regulation of both p21/Cip1 and p27/Kip1 produces a more aggressive prostate cancer phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Srirupa; Singh, Rana P.; Agarwal, Chapla; Siriwardana, Sunitha; Sclafani, Robert; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2009-01-01

    Roles of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors, p21/Cip1 (p21) and p27/Kip1 (p27) in prostate cancer (PCa) progression is still not clear. Lower p27 protein expression in PCa tissues is often associated with poor prognosis, but prognostic significance of p21 is still controversial. Herein, we investigated the role of these molecules in determining PCa growth characteristics. We generated human PCa DU145 cell variants with knocked down levels of p21 (DU-p21) or p27 (DU-p27), or both (DU-p21+p27) via retroviral transduction of respective shRNAs and compared their various characteristics with empty vector-transduced DU145 (DU-EV) cells in vitro as well as in vivo. Knocking down either p21 or p27 did not show any significant change in doubling time, clonogenicity and cell cycle progression in DU145 cells, but simultaneous knock-down of both p21 and p27 significantly enhanced these parameters. In athymic mice, DU-p21+p27 tumors showed higher growth rate than the comparable growth of DU-EV, DU-p21 and DU-p27 tumors. Concurrently, DU-p21+p27 tumors had significantly higher proliferation rate, showing 54% and 48% increase in proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Ki-67-positive cells, respectively, compared to DU-EV tumors. DU-p21+p27 tumors also showed higher microvessel density and increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Proliferation and angiogenic status of DU-p21 and DU-p27 tumors was comparable to DU-EV tumors. Both in vitro and in vivo results implicate that p21 and p27 have compensatory roles in advanced prostate cancer cells, and ablation or down-modulation of both these molecules essentially enhances the aggressive prostate carcinoma phenotype. PMID:18583941

  8. TGF-β activates APC through Cdh1 binding for Cks1 and Skp2 proteasomal destruction stabilizing p27kip1 for normal endometrial growth.

    PubMed

    Pavlides, Savvas C; Lecanda, Jon; Daubriac, Julien; Pandya, Unnati M; Gama, Patricia; Blank, Stephanie; Mittal, Khushbakhat; Shukla, Pratibha; Gold, Leslie I

    2016-04-01

    We previously reported that aberrant TGF-β/Smad2/3 signaling in endometrial cancer (ECA) leads to continuous ubiquitylation of p27(kip1)(p27) by the E3 ligase SCF-Skp2/Cks1 causing its degradation, as a putative mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of this cancer. In contrast, normal intact TGF-β signaling prevents degradation of nuclear p27 by SCF-Skp2/Cks1 thereby accumulating p27 to block Cdk2 for growth arrest. Here we show that in ECA cell lines and normal primary endometrial epithelial cells, TGF-β increases Cdh1 and its binding to APC/C to form the E3 ligase complex that ubiquitylates Cks1 and Skp2 prompting their proteasomal degradation and thus, leaving p27 intact. Knocking-down Cdh1 in ECA cell lines increased Skp2/Cks1 E3 ligase activity, completely diminished nuclear and cytoplasmic p27, and obviated TGF-β-mediated inhibition of proliferation. Protein synthesis was not required for TGF-β-induced increase in nuclear p27 and decrease in Cks1 and Skp2. Moreover, half-lives of Cks1 and Skp2 were extended in the Cdh1-depleted cells. These results suggest that the levels of p27, Skp2 and Cks1 are strongly or solely regulated by proteasomal degradation. Finally, an inverse relationship of low p27 and high Cks1 in the nucleus was shown in patients in normal proliferative endometrium and grade I-III ECAs whereas differentiated secretory endometrium showed the reverse. These studies implicate Cdh1 as the master regulator of TGF-β-induced preservation of p27 tumor suppressor activity. Thus, Cdh1 is a potential therapeutic target for ECA and other human cancers showing an inverse relationship between Cks1/Skp2 and p27 and/or dysregulated TGF-β signaling. PMID:26963853

  9. Cooperation of p27Kip1 and p18INK4c in Progestin-Mediated Cell Cycle Arrest in T-47D Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Swarbrick, Alexander; Lee, Christine S. L.; Sutherland, Robert L.; Musgrove, Elizabeth A.

    2000-01-01

    The steroid hormone progesterone regulates proliferation and differentiation in the mammary gland and uterus by cell cycle phase-specific actions. The long-term effect of progestins on T-47D breast cancer cells is inhibition of cellular proliferation. This is accompanied by decreased G1 cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) activities, redistribution of the CDK inhibitor p27Kip1 among these CDK complexes, and alterations in the elution profile of cyclin E-Cdk2 upon gel filtration chromatography, such that high-molecular-weight complexes predominate. This study aimed to determine the relative contribution of CDK inhibitors to these events. Following progestin treatment, the majority of cyclin E- and D-CDK complexes were bound to p27Kip1 and few were bound to p21Cip1. In vitro, recombinant His6-p27 could quantitatively reproduce the effects on cyclin E-Cdk2 kinase activity and the shift in molecular weight observed following progestin treatment. In contrast, cyclin D-Cdk4 was not inhibited by His6-p27 in vitro or p27Kip1 in vivo. However, an increase in the expression of the Cdk4/6 inhibitor p18INK4c and its extensive association with Cdk4 and Cdk6 were apparent following progestin treatment. Recombinant p18INK4c led to the reassortment of cyclin-CDK-CDK inhibitor complexes in vitro, with consequent decrease in cyclin E-Cdk2 activity. These results suggest a concerted model of progestin action whereby p27Kip1 and p18INK4c cooperate to inhibit cyclin E-Cdk2 and Cdk4. Since similar models have been developed for growth inhibition by transforming growth factor β and during adipogenesis, interaction between the Cip/Kip and INK4 families of inhibitors may be a common theme in physiological growth arrest and differentiation. PMID:10713180

  10. miR-222 confers the resistance of breast cancer cells to Adriamycin through suppression of p27(kip1) expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan-Dan; Li, Jian; Sha, Huan-Huan; Chen, Xiu; Yang, Su-Jin; Shen, Hong-Yu; Zhong, Shan-Liang; Zhao, Jian-Hua; Tang, Jin-Hai

    2016-09-15

    Adriamycin (Adr) is a potent chemotherapeutic agent for chemotherapy of breast cancer patients. Despite impressive initial clinical responses, some developed drug resistance to Adr-based therapy and the mechanisms underlying breast cancer cells resistance to Adr are not well known. In our previous study, in vitro, we verified that miR-222 was upregulated in Adr-resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/Adr) compared with the sensitive parental cells (MCF-7/S). Here, miR-222 inhibitors or mimics were transfected into MCF-7 cell lines. RT-qPCR and western blot were used to detect the expression of p27(kip1). Immunofluorescence showed that miR-222 altered the subcellular location of p27(kip1) in nucleus. MTT was employed to verify the sensitivity of breast cancer cell lines to Adr. Flow cytometry showed the apoptosis and cell cycles of the cells after adding Adr. The results showed that downregulation of miR-222 in MCF-7/Adr increased sensitivity to Adr and Adr-induced apoptosis, and arrested the cells in G1 phase, accompanied by more expressions of p27(kip1), especially in nucleus. Furthermore, overexpressed miR-222 in MCF-7/S had the inverse results. Taken together, the results found that miR-222 induced Adr-resistance at least in part via suppressing p27(kip1) expression and altering its subcellular localization, and miR-222 inhibitors could reverse Adr-resistance of breast cancer cells. These results disclosed that the future holds much promise for the targeted therapeutic in the treatment of Adr-resistant breast cancer. PMID:27282281

  11. A novel miRNA-mediated STOP sign in lung cancer: miR-340 inhibits the proliferation of lung cancer cells through p27KIP1

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Serena; Risolino, Maurizio; Verde, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Oncosuppressor miRNAs inhibit cancer cell proliferation by targeting key components of the cell cycle machinery. In our recent report we showed that miR-340 is a novel tumor suppressor in non-small cell lung cancer. miR-340 inhibits neoplastic cell proliferation and induces p27KIP1 by targeting multiple translational and post-translational regulators of this cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor. PMID:27308439

  12. Cell-permeable Carboxyl-terminal p27Kip1 Peptide Exhibits Anti-tumor Activity by Inhibiting Pim-1 Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Morishita, Daisuke; Takami, Miho; Yoshikawa, Seiko; Katayama, Ryohei; Sato, Shigeo; Kukimoto-Niino, Mutsuko; Umehara, Takashi; Shirouzu, Mikako; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Fujita, Naoya

    2011-01-01

    The incidence and death rate of prostate cancer is increasing rapidly. In addition, the low sensitivity of prostate cancer to chemotherapy makes it difficult to treat this condition. The serine/threonine kinase Pim-1 plays an important role in cell cycle progression and apoptosis inhibition, resulting in prostate tumorigenesis. Therefore, Pim-1 inhibition has been expected to be an attractive target for developing new anti-cancer drugs. However, no small compounds targeting Pim-1 have progressed to clinical use because of their lack of specificity. Here, we have reported a new cell-permeable Pim-1 inhibitory p27Kip1 peptide that could interfere with the binding of Pim-1 to its substrates and act as an anti-cancer drug. The peptide could bind to Pim-1 and inhibit phosphorylation of endogenous p27Kip1 and Bad by Pim-1. Treatment of prostate cancer with the peptide induces G1 arrest and subsequently apoptosis in vitro. However, the peptide showed almost no growth inhibitory or apoptosis-inducing effects in normal cells. The peptide could inhibit tumor growth in in vivo prostate cancer xenograft models. Moreover, the peptide treatment could overcome resistance to taxol, one of the first line chemotherapeutic agents for prostate cancer, and a combination of the peptide with taxol synergistically inhibited prostate cancer growth in vivo. These results indicate that a Pim-1 inhibitory p27Kip1 peptide could be developed as an anti-cancer drug against prostate cancer. PMID:21062737

  13. Augmentation of antitumor activity of 5-fluorouracil by interferon alpha is associated with up-regulation of p27Kip1 in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, H; Nagano, H; Yamamoto, H; Miyamoto, A; Kondo, M; Dono, K; Nakamori, S; Umeshita, K; Sakon, M; Monden, M

    2000-07-01

    Several clinical trials have demonstrated the effectiveness of combination therapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and IFN-alpha in colon cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and other malignancies. In our preliminary clinical studies, we have observed outstanding effects with this combination therapy in patients with advanced HCC. However, the underlying mechanism by which IFN-alpha modulates the effects of 5-FU is unknown. We, therefore, conducted a mechanistic study using two HCC cell lines, PLC/PRF/5 and HuH7. IFN-alpha significantly enhanced the growth inhibitory effect of 5-FU in PLC/PRF/5 cells but not in HuH7 cells, and the isobolographic analysis indicated that this effect was synergistic. Flow cytometric analysis showed a delay in the progression of G0-G1 to S phase in PLC/PRF/5, and a sustained, induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27-Kip1 and down-regulation of cyclin D1 was observed. Moreover, increased expression of p27Kip1 was associated with reduced CDK-2-associated kinase activity. Another difference in the two cell types was that PLC/PRF/5 expressed abundant IFN receptors, but HuH7 did not. Apoptosis assays were not helpful in explaining the mechanism. Our results suggest that the synergistic effects of 5-FU and IFN-alpha may in part be attributable to alterations in cell cycle progression via up-regulation of p27Kip1. PMID:10914738

  14. p27kip1 Maintains a Subset of Leukemia Stem Cells in the Quiescent State in Murine MLL-Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Seet, Christopher; Sun, Clare; Li, Jing; You, Dewen; Volk, Andrew; Breslin, Peter; Li, Xingyu; Wei, Wei; Qian, Zhijian; Zeleznik-Le, Nancy J.; Zhang, Zhou; Zhang, Jiwang

    2013-01-01

    MLL (mixed-lineage leukemia)-fusion genes induce the development of leukemia through deregulation of normal MLL target genes, such as HOXA9 and MEIS1. Both HOXA9 and MEIS1 are required for MLL-fusion gene-induced leukemogenesis. Co-expression of HOXA9 and MEIS1 induces acute myeloid leukemia (AML) similar to that seen in mice in which MLL-fusion genes are over-expressed. p27kip1 (p27 hereafter), a negative regulator of the cell cycle, has also been defined as an MLL target, the expression of which is up-regulated in MLL leukemic cells (LCs). To investigate whether p27 plays a role in the pathogenesis of MLL-leukemia, we examined the effects of p27 deletion (p27-/-) on MLL-AF9 (MA9)-induced murine AML development. HOXA9/MEIS1 (H/M)-induced, p27 wild-type (p27+/+) and p27-/- AML were studied in parallel as controls. We found that LCs from both MA9-AML and H/M-AML can be separated into three fractions, a CD117-CD11bhi differentiated fraction as well as CD117+CD11bhi and CD117+CD11blo, two less differentiated fractions. The CD117+CD11blo fraction, comprising only 1-3% of total LCs, expresses higher levels of early hematopoietic progenitor markers but lower levels of mature myeloid cell markers compared to other populations of LCs. p27 is expressed and is required for maintaining the quiescent and drug-resistant states of the CD117+CD11blo fraction of MA9-LCs but not of H/M-LCs. p27 deletion significantly compromises the leukemogenic capacity of CD117+CD11blo MA9-LCs by reducing the frequency of leukemic stem cells (LSCs) but does not do so in H/M-LCs. In addition, we found that p27 is highly expressed and required for cell cycle arrest in the CD117-CD11bhi fraction in both types of LCs. Furthermore, we found that c-Myc expression is required for maintaining LCs in an undifferentiated state independently of proliferation. We concluded that p27 represses the proliferation of LCs, which is specifically required for maintaining the quiescent and drug-resistant states of a

  15. A vitamin D3 analog induces a G1-phase arrest in CaCo-2 cells by inhibiting cdk2 and cdk6: roles of cyclin E, p21Waf1, and p27Kip1.

    PubMed

    Scaglione-Sewell, B A; Bissonnette, M; Skarosi, S; Abraham, C; Brasitus, T A

    2000-11-01

    Previous studies by our laboratory have shown that a noncalcemic fluorinated analog of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, 1alpha,25-dihydroxy-16-ene-23-yne-26,27-hexafluorocholcal ciferol (F6-D3), significantly reduced the frequency of colonic adenomas and completely abolished the development of colonic adenocarcinomas in rats treated with azoxymethane. The mechanisms involved in this analog's chemopreventive actions, however, remain unclear. In the present study, we now show that although both 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and F6-D3 inhibited the proliferation of CaCo-2 cells, a human colonic adenocarcinoma cell line, by increasing their doubling times, only F6-D3 caused an arrest of these cells in the G1 phase of their cell cycle. This arrest was accompanied by an increase in the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitor proteins, p2Waf1 and p27Kip1, which served to decrease the activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and cyclin-dependent kinase 6, whereas the expression and phosphorylation of pRB were unchanged. In contrast to the increased expression of these cdk inhibitors, the expression of cyclin E was decreased, which further inhibited the activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 2. Collectively, the inhibition of these cyclin-dependent kinases served to arrest the CaCo-2 cells, independent of changes in pRB. Furthermore, antibody neutralization studies suggest that transforming growth factor-beta may mediate the coassociations between cdk2 and p27Kip1 and cyclin E induced by F6-D3. These data indicate that cell cycle arrest may, at least in part, underlie the chemopreventive actions of F6-D3 observed in the azoxymethane model of colon cancer. Furthermore, if the antiproliferative action observed in CaCo-2 cells also occurs in human colonic epithelium, F6-D3 may have chemopreventive potential against human colon cancer, as well. PMID:11089522

  16. Thrombin Induces Tumor Cell Cycle Activation and Spontaneous Growth by Down-regulation of p27Kip1, in Association with the Up-regulation of Skp2 and MiR-222

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Liang; Ibrahim, Sherif; Liu, Cynthia; Skaar, Jeffrey; Pagano, Michele; Karpatkin, Simon

    2009-01-01

    The effect of thrombin on tumor cell cycle activation and spontaneous growth was examined in synchronized serum-starved tumor cell lines and a model of spontaneous prostate cancer development in TRAMP mice. BrdUrd incorporation and propidium iodide staining of prostate LNCaP cells arrested in G0 and treated with thrombin or serum revealed a 48- and 29-fold increase in S phase cells, respectively, at 8 hours. Similar results were obtained with TRAMP cells and a glioblastoma cell line, T98G. Cell cycle kinases and inhibitors in synchronized tumor cells revealed high levels of p27Kip1 and low levels of Skp2 and cyclins D1 and A. Addition of thrombin, TFLLRN, or serum down-regulated p27Kip1 with concomitant induction of Skp2, Cyclin D1, and Cyclin A with similar kinetics. LNCaP p27Kip1-transfected cells or Skp2 knockdown cells were refractory to thrombin-induced cell cycle activation. MicroRNA 222, an inhibitor of p27Kip1, was robustly up-regulated by thrombin. The in vitro observations were tested in vivo with transgenic TRAMP mice. Repetitive thrombin injection enhanced prostate tumor volume 6- to 8-fold (P < 0.04). Repetitive hirudin, a specific potent antithrombin, decreased tumor volume 13- to 24-fold (P < 0.04). Thus, thrombin stimulates tumor cell growth in vivo by down-regulation of p27Kip1. PMID:19351827

  17. Ganglioside GM3 modulates tumor suppressor PTEN-mediated cell cycle progression--transcriptional induction of p21(WAF1) and p27(kip1) by inhibition of PI-3K/AKT pathway.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hee-Jung; Chung, Tae-Wook; Kang, Sung-Koo; Lee, Young-Choon; Ko, Jeong-Heon; Kim, Jong-Guk; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2006-07-01

    The simple ganglioside GM3 has been shown to have anti-proliferative effects in several in vitro and in vivo cancer models. Although the exogenous ganglioside GM3 has an inhibitory effect on cancer cell proliferation, the exact mechanism by which it prevents cell proliferation remains unclear. Previous studies showed that MDM2 is an oncoprotein that controls tumorigenesis through both p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms, and tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), a dual-specificity phosphatase that antagonizes phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI-3K)/AKT signaling, is capable of blocking MDM2 nuclear translocation and destabilizing the MDM2 protein. Results from our current study show that GM3 treatment dramatically increases cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor (CKI) p21(WAF1) expression through the accumulation of p53 protein by the PTEN-mediated inhibition of the PI-3K/AKT/MDM2 survival signaling in HCT116 colon cancer cells. Moreover, the data herein clearly show that ganglioside GM3 induces p53-dependent transcriptional activity of p21(WAF1), as evidenced by the p21(WAF1) promoter-driven luciferase reporter plasmid (full-length p21(WAF1) promoter and a construct lacking the p53-binding sites). Additionally, ganglioside GM3 enhances expression of CKI p27(kip1) through the PTEN-mediated inhibition of the PI-3K/AKT signaling. Furthermore, the down-regulation of the cyclin E and CDK2 was clearly observed in GM3-treated HCT116 cells, but the down-regulation of cyclin D1 and CDK4 was not. On the contrary, suppression of PTEN levels by RNA interference restores the enhanced expression of p53-dependent p21(WAF1) and p53-independent p27(kip1) through inactivating the effect of PTEN on PI-3K/AKT signaling modulated by ganglioside GM3. These results suggest that ganglioside GM3-stimulated PTEN expression modulates cell cycle regulatory proteins, thus inhibiting cell growth. We conclude that ganglioside GM3 represents a

  18. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of a cell-permeable superoxide dismutase targeted to lung adenocarcinoma cells. Inhibition cell proliferation through the Akt/p27kip1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Lu, Min; Gong, Xingguo; Lu, Yuwen; Guo, Jianjun; Wang, Chenhui; Pan, Yuanjiang

    2006-05-12

    In clinical oncology, many trials with superoxide dismutase (SOD) have failed to demonstrate antitumor ability and in many cases even caused deleterious effects because of low tumor-targeting ability. In the current research, the Nostoc commune Fe-SOD coding sequence was amplified from genomic DNA. In addition, the single chain variable fragment (ScFv) was constructed from the cDNA of an LC-1 hybridoma cell line secreting anti-lung adenocarcinoma monoclonal antibody. After modification, the SOD and ScFv were fused and co-expressed, and the resulting fusion protein produced SOD and LC-1 antibody activity. Tracing SOD-ScFv by fluorescein isothiocyanate and superoxide anions (O2*-) in SPC-A-1 cells showed that the fusion protein could recognize and enter SPC-A-1 cells to eliminate O2*-. The lower oxidative stress resulting from the decrease in cellular O2*- delayed the cell cycle at G1 and significantly slowed SPC-A-1 cell growth in association with the dephosphorylation of the serine-threonine protein kinase Akt and expression of p27kip1. The tumor-targeting fusion protein resulting from this research overcomes two disadvantages of SODs previously used in the clinical setting, the inability to target tumor cells or permeate the cell membrane. These findings lay the groundwork for development of an efficient antitumor drug targeted by the ScFv. PMID:16551617

  19. KDM4B and KDM4A promote endometrial cancer progression by regulating androgen receptor, c-myc, and p27kip1

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Suet-Ying; Chen, Limo; Chen, Jin-Hong; Ying, Zuo-Lin; Zhou, Ye; Gu, Wei; Wang, Li-Hua; Cheng, Wei-Wei; Zeng, Jianfang; Wan, Xiao-Ping; Mok, Samuel C.; Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Bao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that elevated androgen levels and genetic variation related to the androgen receptor (AR) increase the risk of endometrial cancer (EC). However, the role of AR in EC is poorly understood. We report that two members of the histone demethylase KDM4 family act as major regulators of AR transcriptional activityin EC. In the MFE-296 cell line, KDM4B and AR upregulate c-myc expression, while in AN3CA cells KDM4A and AR downregulate p27kip1. Additionally, KDM4B expression is positively correlated with AR expression in EC cell lines with high baseline AR expression, while KDM4A and AR expression are positively correlated in low-AR cell lines. In clinical specimens, both KDM4B and KDM4A expression are significantly higher in EC tissues than that in normal endometrium. Finally, patients with alterations in AR, KDM4B, KDM4A, and c-myc have poor overall and disease-free survival rates. Together, these findings demonstrate that KDM4B and KDM4A promote EC progression by regulating AR activity. PMID:26397136

  20. KDM4B and KDM4A promote endometrial cancer progression by regulating androgen receptor, c-myc, and p27kip1.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Mei-Ting; Fan, Qiong; Zhu, Zhu; Kwan, Suet-Ying; Chen, Limo; Chen, Jin-Hong; Ying, Zuo-Lin; Zhou, Ye; Gu, Wei; Wang, Li-Hua; Cheng, Wei-Wei; Zeng, Jianfang; Wan, Xiao-Ping; Mok, Samuel C; Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Bao, Wei

    2015-10-13

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that elevated androgen levels and genetic variation related to the androgen receptor (AR) increase the risk of endometrial cancer (EC). However, the role of AR in EC is poorly understood. We report that two members of the histone demethylase KDM4 family act as major regulators of AR transcriptional activityin EC. In the MFE-296 cell line, KDM4B and AR upregulate c-myc expression, while in AN3CA cells KDM4A and AR downregulate p27kip1. Additionally, KDM4B expression is positively correlated with AR expression in EC cell lines with high baseline AR expression, while KDM4A and AR expression are positively correlated in low-AR cell lines. In clinical specimens, both KDM4B and KDM4A expression are significantly higher in EC tissues than that in normal endometrium. Finally, patients with alterations in AR, KDM4B, KDM4A, and c-myc have poor overall and disease-free survival rates. Together, these findings demonstrate that KDM4B and KDM4A promote EC progression by regulating AR activity. PMID:26397136

  1. Targeting the cyclin-binding groove site to inhibit the catalytic activity of CDK2/cyclin A complex using p27(KIP1)-derived peptidomimetic inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Karthiga, Arumugasamy; Tripathi, Sunil Kumar; Shanmugam, Ramasamy; Suryanarayanan, Venkatesan; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Functionally activated cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2)/cyclin A complex has been validated as an interesting therapeutic target to develop the efficient antineoplastic drug based on the cell cycle arrest. Cyclin A binds to CDK2 and activates the kinases as well as recruits the substrate and inhibitors using a hydrophobic cyclin-binding groove (CBG). Blocking the cyclin substrate recruitment on CBG is an alternative approach to override the specificity hurdle of the currently available ATP site targeting CDK2 inhibitors. Greater understanding of the interaction of CDK2/cyclin A complex with p27 (negative regulator) reveals that the Leu-Phe-Gly (LFG) motif region of p27 binds with the CBG site of cyclin A to arrest the malignant cell proliferation that induces apoptosis. In the present study, Replacement with Partial Ligand Alternatives through Computational Enrichment (REPLACE) drug design strategies have been applied to acquire LFG peptide-derived peptidomimetics library. The peptidomimetics function is equivalent with respect to substrate p27 protein fashion but does not act as an ATP antagonist. The combined approach of molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD), and molecular electrostatic potential and ADME/T prediction were carried out to evaluate the peptidomimetics. Resultant interaction and electrostatic potential maps suggested that smaller substituent is desirable at the position of phenyl ring to interact with Trp217, Arg250, and Gln254 residues in the active site. The best docked poses were refined by the MD simulations which resulted in conformational changes. After equilibration, the structure of the peptidomimetic and receptor complex was stable. The results revealed that the various substrate protein-derived peptidomimetics could serve as perfect leads against CDK2 protein. PMID:25584078

  2. Structural basis of the Cks1-dependent recognition of p27(Kip1) by the SCF(Skp2) ubiquitin ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, B.; Zheng, N.; Schulman, B.A.; Wu, G.; Miller, J.J.; Pagano, M.; Pavletich, N.P.

    2010-07-19

    The ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis of the Cdk2 inhibitor p27{sup Kip1} plays a central role in cell cycle progression, and enhanced degradation of p27{sup Kip1} is associated with many common cancers. Proteolysis of p27{sup Kip1} is triggered by Thr187 phosphorylation, which leads to the binding of the SCF{sup Skp2} (Skp1-Cul1-Rbx1-Skp2) ubiquitin ligase complex. Unlike other known SCF substrates, p27{sup Kip1} ubiquitination also requires the accessory protein Cks1. The crystal structure of the Skp1-Skp2-Cks1 complex bound to a p27{sup Kip1} phosphopeptide shows that Cks1 binds to the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain and C-terminal tail of Skp2, whereas p27{sup Kip1} binds to both Cks1 and Skp2. The phosphorylated Thr187 side chain of p27{sup Kip1} is recognized by a Cks1 phosphate binding site, whereas the side chain of an invariant Glu185 inserts into the interface between Skp2 and Cks1, interacting with both. The structure and biochemical data support the proposed model that Cdk2-cyclin A contributes to the recruitment of p27{sup Kip1} to the SCF{sup Skp2}-Cks1 complex.

  3. CRM1/Ran-mediated nuclear export of p27(Kip1) involves a nuclear export signal and links p27 export and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Connor, Michael K; Kotchetkov, Rouslan; Cariou, Sandrine; Resch, Ansgar; Lupetti, Rafaella; Beniston, Richard G; Melchior, Frauke; Hengst, Ludger; Slingerland, Joyce M

    2003-01-01

    We show that p27 localization is cell cycle regulated and we suggest that active CRM1/RanGTP-mediated nuclear export of p27 may be linked to cytoplasmic p27 proteolysis in early G1. p27 is nuclear in G0 and early G1 and appears transiently in the cytoplasm at the G1/S transition. Association of p27 with the exportin CRM1 was minimal in G0 and increased markedly during G1-to-S phase progression. Proteasome inhibition in mid-G1 did not impair nuclear import of p27, but led to accumulation of p27 in the cytoplasm, suggesting that export precedes degradation for at least part of the cellular p27 pool. p27-CRM1 binding and nuclear export were inhibited by S10A mutation but not by T187A mutation. A putative nuclear export sequence in p27 is identified whose mutation reduced p27-CRM1 interaction, nuclear export, and p27 degradation. Leptomycin B (LMB) did not inhibit p27-CRM1 binding, nor did it prevent p27 export in vitro or in heterokaryon assays. Prebinding of CRM1 to the HIV-1 Rev nuclear export sequence did not inhibit p27-CRM1 interaction, suggesting that p27 binds CRM1 at a non-LMB-sensitive motif. LMB increased total cellular p27 and may do so indirectly, through effects on other p27 regulatory proteins. These data suggest a model in which p27 undergoes active, CRM1-dependent nuclear export and cytoplasmic degradation in early G1. This would permit the incremental activation of cyclin E-Cdk2 leading to cyclin E-Cdk2-mediated T187 phosphorylation and p27 proteolysis in late G1 and S phase. PMID:12529437

  4. KLRG1 impairs CD4+ T cell responses via p16ink4a and p27kip1 pathways: role in hepatitis B vaccine failure in individuals with hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Wang, Jia M; Ren, Jun P; Cheng, Yong Q; Ying, Ruo S; Wu, Xiao Y; Lin, Shu M; Griffin, Jeddidiah W D; Li, Guang Y; Moorman, Jonathan P; Yao, Zhi Q

    2014-01-15

    Coinfection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is quite common, leading to an increase in morbidity and mortality. As such, HBV vaccination is recommended in HCV-infected individuals. However, HBV vaccine responses in HCV-infected individuals are often blunted compared with uninfected populations. The mechanism for this failure of vaccine response in HCV-infected subjects remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the expression and function of an inhibitory receptor, killer cell lectin-like receptor subfamily G member 1 (KLRG1), in the regulation of CD4(+) T cells and HBV vaccine responses during HCV infection. We demonstrated that KLRG1 was overexpressed on CD4(+) T cells from HCV-infected, HBV vaccine nonresponders compared with HBV vaccine responders. The capacity of CD4(+) T cells to proliferate and secrete IL-2 cytokine was inversely associated with the level of KLRG1 expression. Importantly, blocking KLRG1 signaling resulted in a significant improvement in CD4(+) T cell proliferation and IL-2 production in HCV-infected, HBV vaccine nonresponders in response to TCR stimulation. Moreover, blockade of KLRG1 increased the phosphorylation of Akt (Ser(473)) and decreased the expression of cell cycle inhibitors p16(ink4a) and p27(kip1), which subsequently enhanced the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and cyclin E. These results suggest that the KLRG1 pathway impairs CD4(+) T cell responses to neoantigen and induces a state of immune senescence in individuals with HCV infection, raising the possibility that blocking this negative-signaling pathway might improve HBV vaccine responses in the setting of chronic viral infection. PMID:24337749

  5. KLRG1 impairs CD4+ T cell responses via p16ink4a and p27kip1 pathways - Role in hepatitis B vaccine failure in individuals with hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Wang, Jia M.; Ren, Jun P.; Cheng, Yong Q.; Ying, Ruo S.; Wu, Xiao Y.; Lin, Shu M.; Griffin, Jeddidiah WD; Li, Guang Y.; Moorman, Jonathan P.; Yao, Zhi Q.

    2014-01-01

    Co-infection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is quite common, leading to an increase in morbidity and mortality. As such, HBV vaccination is recommended in HCV-infected individuals. HBV vaccine responses in HCV-infected individuals, however, are often blunted when compared to uninfected populations. The mechanism for this failure of vaccine response in HCV-infected subjects remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the expression and function of an inhibitory receptor, killer cell lectin-like receptor subfamily G member 1 (KLRG1), in regulation of CD4+ T cells and HBV vaccine responses during HCV infection. We demonstrated that KLRG1 was over-expressed on CD4+ T cells from HCV-infected, HBV vaccine non-responders (HBV-NR) compared to those responders (HBV-R). The capacity of CD4+ T cell to proliferate and secrete IL-2 cytokine was inversely associated with the level of KLRG1 expression. Importantly, blocking KLRG1 signaling resulted in a significant improvement of CD4+ T cell proliferation and IL-2 production in HCV-infected, HBV-NR in response to T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation. Moreover, blockade of KLRG1 increased the phosphorylation of Akt (Ser473) and decreased the expression of cell cycle inhibitors p16ink4a and p27kip1, which subsequently enhanced CDK 2 and cyclin E expressions. These results suggest that the KLRG1 pathway impairs CD4+ T cell responses to neo-antigen and induces a state of immune senescence in individuals with HCV infection, raising the possibility that blocking this negative signaling pathway might improve HBV vaccine responses in the setting of chronic viral infection. PMID:24337749

  6. Intranuclear localization and UV response of ERCC5/XPG protein

    SciTech Connect

    Park, M.S.; Marrone, B.L.; MacInnes, M.A.

    1995-11-01

    The human ERCC5/XPG protein is defective in the hereditary genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum, group-G. The XPG gene encodes a single-strand DNA endonuclease which is essential for the incision step of nucleotide excision repair for a wide variety of DNA damages. We have shown previously by indirect immunofluorescence and biochemical fractionation that the XPG protein is localized in the nucleus, in discrete foci, and probably associated with the nuclear matrix. However, the intranuclear localization of XPG is markedly altered for a short time after UV irradiation. Here, we report the identification of XPG protein regions involved in the UV response, and its putative nuclear localization signals (NLS) using a B-galactosidase (B-gal) reporter gene system. Control and fusion reporter genes were expressed in Hela S3 cells after CaPO{sub 4} transfection. B-gal protein was detected by indirect immuno-fluorescence using an anti B-gal monoclonal antibody and FITC-labeled goat anti-mouse antiserum. Two NLS peptides of the XPG carboxy-terminal region (AA 1029-1069 and 1146-1186 term) were shown to independently localize B-gal fusion proteins to the nucleus (>90%). The C-terminus peptide was observed to further localize B-gal into nuclear foci and the perinucleolar regions. When B-gal was fused with two copies of the C-terminal NLS, in tandem, B-gal was extensively sublocalized to the perinucleolar regions. Shortly after cell UV irradiation (5 J/m{sup 2}) this B-gal fusion protein became dissociated from the perinucleolar regions whereupon it was distributed throughout the nucleus. Within 6 hours post-irradiation, the fusion protein reassociated again with the perinucleolar regions. These observations confirm and extend a similar UV response of endogenous XPG protein in UV-irradiation human cells. The involvement of XPG protein and its UV responses will be discussed in context of models nuclear matrix and preferential DNA repair in actively transcribed genes.

  7. Compartmentalization and Functionality of Nuclear Disorder: Intrinsic Disorder and Protein-Protein Interactions in Intra-Nuclear Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanchi; Na, Insung; Kurgan, Lukasz; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2015-01-01

    The cell nucleus contains a number of membrane-less organelles or intra-nuclear compartments. These compartments are dynamic structures representing liquid-droplet phases which are only slightly denser than the bulk intra-nuclear fluid. They possess different functions, have diverse morphologies, and are typically composed of RNA (or, in some cases, DNA) and proteins. We analyzed 3005 mouse proteins localized in specific intra-nuclear organelles, such as nucleolus, chromatin, Cajal bodies, nuclear speckles, promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies, nuclear lamina, nuclear pores, and perinuclear compartment and compared them with ~29,863 non-nuclear proteins from mouse proteome. Our analysis revealed that intrinsic disorder is enriched in the majority of intra-nuclear compartments, except for the nuclear pore and lamina. These compartments are depleted in proteins that lack disordered domains and enriched in proteins that have multiple disordered domains. Moonlighting proteins found in multiple intra-nuclear compartments are more likely to have multiple disordered domains. Protein-protein interaction networks in the intra-nuclear compartments are denser and include more hubs compared to the non-nuclear proteins. Hubs in the intra-nuclear compartments (except for the nuclear pore) are enriched in disorder compared with non-nuclear hubs and non-nuclear proteins. Therefore, our work provides support to the idea of the functional importance of intrinsic disorder in the cell nucleus and shows that many proteins associated with sub-nuclear organelles in nuclei of mouse cells are enriched in disorder. This high level of disorder in the mouse nuclear proteins defines their ability to serve as very promiscuous binders, possessing both large quantities of potential disorder-based interaction sites and the ability of a single such site to be involved in a large number of interactions. PMID:26712748

  8. The intranuclear mobility of messenger RNA binding proteins is ATP dependent and temperature sensitive

    PubMed Central

    Calapez, Alexandre; Pereira, Henrique M.; Calado, Angelo; Braga, José; Rino, José; Carvalho, Célia; Tavanez, João Paulo; Wahle, Elmar; Rosa, Agostinho C.; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria

    2002-01-01

    fAter being released from transcription sites, messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) must reach the nuclear pore complexes in order to be translocated to the cytoplasm. Whether the intranuclear movement of mRNPs results largely from Brownian motion or involves molecular motors remains unknown. Here we have used quantitative photobleaching techniques to monitor the intranuclear mobility of protein components of mRNPs tagged with GFP. The results show that the diffusion coefficients of the poly(A)-binding protein II (PABP2) and the export factor TAP are significantly reduced when these proteins are bound to mRNP complexes, as compared with nonbound proteins. The data further show that the mobility of wild-type PABP2 and TAP, but not of a point mutant variant of PABP2 that fails to bind to RNA, is significantly reduced when cells are ATP depleted or incubated at 22°C. Energy depletion has only minor effects on the intranuclear mobility of a 2,000-kD dextran (which corresponds approximately in size to 40S mRNP particles), suggesting that the reduced mobility of PABP2 and TAP is not caused by a general alteration of the nuclear environment. Taken together, the data suggest that the mobility of mRNPs in the living cell nucleus involves a combination of passive diffusion and ATP-dependent processes. PMID:12473688

  9. Protein complex formation and intranuclear dynamics of NAC1 in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Naomi; Kato, Hiroaki; Sakashita, Gyosuke; Nariai, Yuko; Nakayama, Kentaro; Kyo, Satoru; Urano, Takeshi

    2016-09-15

    Nucleus accumbens-associated protein 1 (NAC1) is a cancer-related transcription regulator protein that is also involved in the pluripotency and differentiation of embryonic stem cells. NAC1 is overexpressed in various carcinomas including ovarian, cervical, breast, and pancreatic carcinomas. NAC1 knock-down was previously shown to result in the apoptosis of ovarian cancer cell lines and to rescue their sensitivity to chemotherapy, suggesting that NAC1 may be a potential therapeutic target, but protein complex formation and the dynamics of intranuclear NAC1 in cancer cells remain poorly understood. In this study, analysis of HeLa cell lysates by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) on a sizing column showed that the NAC1 peak corresponded to an apparent molecular mass of 300-500 kDa, which is larger than the estimated molecular mass (58 kDa) of the protein. Furthermore, live cell photobleaching analyses with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fused NAC1 proteins revealed the intranuclear dynamics of NAC1. Collectively our results demonstrate that NAC1 forms a protein complex to function as a transcriptional regulator in cancer cells. PMID:27424155

  10. Autophagy-related intrinsically disordered proteins in intra-nuclear compartments.

    PubMed

    Na, Insung; Meng, Fanchi; Kurgan, Lukasz; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-08-16

    Recent analyses indicated that autophagy can be regulated via some nuclear transcriptional networks and many important players in the autophagy and other forms of programmed cell death are known to be intrinsically disordered. To this end, we analyzed similarities and differences in the intrinsic disorder distribution of nuclear and non-nuclear proteins related to autophagy. We also looked at the peculiarities of the distribution of the intrinsically disordered autophagy-related proteins in various intra-nuclear organelles, such as the nucleolus, chromatin, Cajal bodies, nuclear speckles, promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies, nuclear lamina, nuclear pores, and perinucleolar compartment. This analysis revealed that the autophagy-related proteins constitute about 2.5% of the non-nuclear proteins and 3.3% of the nuclear proteins, which corresponds to a substantial enrichment by about 32% in the nucleus. Curiously, although, in general, the autophagy-related proteins share similar characteristics of disorder with a generic set of all non-nuclear proteins, chromatin and nuclear speckles are enriched in the intrinsically disordered autophagy proteins (29 and 37% of these proteins are disordered, respectively) and have high disorder content at 0.24 and 0.27, respectively. Therefore, our data suggest that some of the nuclear disordered proteins may play important roles in autophagy. PMID:27377881

  11. Valosin-containing protein immunoreactivity in tauopathies, synucleinopathies, polyglutamine diseases and intranuclear inclusion body disease.

    PubMed

    Mori, Fumiaki; Tanji, Kunikazu; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Sasaki, Hidenao; Yoshida, Mari; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Wakabayashi, Koichi

    2013-12-01

    Valosin-containing protein (VCP) is associated with multiple cellular functions, including ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation. Mutations in VCP are known to cause inclusion body myopathy with Paget's disease and frontotemporal dementia and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS; ALS14), both of which are characterized by trans-activation response DNA protein 43 (TDP-43)-positive neuronal cytoplasmic and nuclear inclusions. Recently, immunoreactivity for fALS-associated proteins (TDP-43, fused in sarcoma (FUS), optineurin and ubiquilin-2) were reported to be present in cytoplasmic and nuclear inclusions in various neurodegenerative diseases. However, the extent and frequency of VCP-immunoreactive structures in these neurodegenerative diseases are uncertain. We immunohistochemically examined the brains of 72 cases with neurodegenerative diseases and five control cases. VCP immunoreactivity was present in Lewy bodies in Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies, and neuronal nuclear inclusions in five polyglutamine diseases and intranuclear inclusion body disease, as well as in Marinesco bodies in aged control subjects. However, other neuronal and glial cytoplasmic inclusions in tauopathies and TDP-43 proteinopathies were unstained. These findings suggest that VCP may have common mechanisms in the formation or degradation of cytoplasmic and nuclear inclusions of neurons, but not of glial cells, in several neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:23782134

  12. Nuclear translocation and regulation of intranuclear distribution of cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein are distinct processes mediated by two Epstein Barr virus proteins.

    PubMed

    Park, Richard; El-Guindy, Ayman; Heston, Lee; Lin, Su-Fang; Yu, Kuan-Ping; Nagy, Mate; Borah, Sumit; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Steitz, Joan; Miller, George

    2014-01-01

    Many viruses target cytoplasmic polyA binding protein (PABPC) to effect widespread inhibition of host gene expression, a process termed viral host-shutoff (vhs). During lytic replication of Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) we observed that PABPC was efficiently translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Translocated PABPC was diffusely distributed but was excluded from viral replication compartments. Vhs during EBV infection is regulated by the viral alkaline nuclease, BGLF5. Transfection of BGLF5 alone into BGLF5-KO cells or uninfected 293 cells promoted translocation of PAPBC that was distributed in clumps in the nucleus. ZEBRA, a viral bZIP protein, performs essential functions in the lytic program of EBV, including activation or repression of downstream viral genes. ZEBRA is also an essential replication protein that binds to viral oriLyt and interacts with other viral replication proteins. We report that ZEBRA also functions as a regulator of vhs. ZEBRA translocated PABPC to the nucleus, controlled the intranuclear distribution of PABPC, and caused global shutoff of host gene expression. Transfection of ZEBRA alone into 293 cells caused nuclear translocation of PABPC in the majority of cells in which ZEBRA was expressed. Co-transfection of ZEBRA with BGLF5 into BGLF5-KO cells or uninfected 293 cells rescued the diffuse intranuclear pattern of PABPC seen during lytic replication. ZEBRA mutants defective for DNA-binding were capable of regulating the intranuclear distribution of PABPC, and caused PABPC to co-localize with ZEBRA. One ZEBRA mutant, Z(S186E), was deficient in translocation yet was capable of altering the intranuclear distribution of PABPC. Therefore ZEBRA-mediated nuclear translocation of PABPC and regulation of intranuclear PABPC distribution are distinct events. Using a click chemistry-based assay for new protein synthesis, we show that ZEBRA and BGLF5 each function as viral host shutoff factors. PMID:24705134

  13. Orchid Fleck Virus Structural Proteins N and P Form Intranuclear Viroplasm-Like Structures in the Absence of Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Sotaro; Andika, Ida Bagus; Maruyama, Kazuyuki; Tamada, Tetsuo; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Orchid fleck virus (OFV) has a unique two-segmented negative-sense RNA genome that resembles that of plant nucleorhabdoviruses. In infected plant cells, OFV and nucleorhabdoviruses induce an intranuclear electron-lucent viroplasm that is believed to be the site for virus replication. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism by which OFV viroplasms are produced in vivo. Among OFV-encoded proteins, the nucleocapsid protein (N) and the putative phosphoprotein (P) were present in nuclear fractions of OFV-infected Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Transient coexpression of N and P, in the absence of virus infection, was shown to be sufficient for formation of an intranuclear viroplasm-like structure in plant cells. When expressed independently as a fluorescent protein fusion product in uninfected plant cells, N protein accumulated throughout the cell, while P protein accumulated in the nucleus. However, the N protein, when coexpressed with P, was recruited to a subnuclear region to induce a large viroplasm-like focus. Deletion and substitution mutagenesis demonstrated that the P protein contains a nuclear localization signal (NLS). Artificial nuclear targeting of the N-protein mutant was insufficient for formation of viroplasm-like structures in the absence of P. A bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay confirmed interactions between the N and P proteins within subnuclear viroplasm-like foci and interactions of two of the N. benthamiana importin-α homologues with the P protein but not with the N protein. Taken together, our results suggest that viroplasm formation by OFV requires nuclear accumulation of both the N and P proteins, which is mediated by P-NLS, unlike nucleorhabdovirus viroplasm utilizing the NLS on protein N. PMID:23616651

  14. Intranuclear Actin Regulates Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Buer; Xie, Zhihui; Uzer, Gunes; Thompson, William R.; Styner, Maya; Wu, Xin; Rubin, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton induces nuclear trafficking of regulatory proteins and global effects on gene transcription. We here show that in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), cytochalasin D treatment causes rapid cofilin-/importin-9-dependent transfer of G-actin into the nucleus. The continued presence of intranuclear actin, which forms rod-like structures that stain with phalloidin, is associated with induction of robust expression of the osteogenic genes osterix and osteocalcin in a Runx2-dependent manner, and leads to acquisition of osteogenic phenotype. Adipogenic differentiation also occurs, but to a lesser degree. Intranuclear actin leads to nuclear export of Yes-associated protein (YAP); maintenance of nuclear YAP inhibits Runx2 initiation of osteogenesis. Injection of cytochalasin into the tibial marrow space of live mice results in abundant bone formation within the space of 1 week. In sum, increased intranuclear actin forces MSC into osteogenic lineage through controlling Runx2 activity; this process may be useful for clinical objectives of forming bone. PMID:26140478

  15. Intranuclear Delivery of a Novel Antibody-Derived Radiosensitizer Targeting the DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Catalytic Subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong Hairong; Lee, Robert J.; Haura, Eric B.; Edwards, John G.; Dynan, William S.; Li Shuyi

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To inhibit DNA double-strand break repair in tumor cells by delivery of a single-chain antibody variable region fragment (ScFv 18-2) to the cell nucleus. ScFv 18-2 binds to a regulatory region of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), an essential enzyme in the nonhomologous end-joining pathway, and inhibits DNA end-joining in a cell-free system and when microinjected into single cells. Development as a radiosensitizer has been limited by the lack of a method for intranuclear delivery to target cells. We investigated a delivery method based on folate receptor-mediated endocytosis. Methods and Materials: A recombinant ScFv 18-2 derivative was conjugated to folate via a scissile disulfide linker. Folate-ScFv 18-2 was characterized for its ability to be internalized by tumor cells and to influence the behavior of ionizing radiation-induced repair foci. Radiosensitization was measured in a clonogenic survival assay. Survival curves were fitted to a linear-quadratic model, and between-group differences were evaluated by an F test. Sensitization ratios were determined based on mean inhibitory dose. Results: Human KB and NCI-H292 lung cancer cells treated with folate-conjugated ScFv 18-2 showed significant radiosensitization (p < 0.001). Sensitization enhancement ratios were 1.92 {+-} 0.42 for KB cells and 1.63 {+-} 0.13 for NCI-H292 cells. Studies suggest that treatment inhibits repair of radiation-induced DSBs, as evidenced by the persistence of {gamma}-H2AX-stained foci and by inhibition of staining with anti-DNA-PKcs phosphoserine 2056. Conclusions: Folate-mediated endocytosis is an effective method for intranuclear delivery of an antibody-derived DNA repair inhibitor.

  16. Studies of a nuclear matrix protein restricted to normal brain cells and lead-induced intranuclear inclusion bodies of kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, K.; Egle, P.; Redford, K.; Bigbee, J.

    1986-05-01

    A nuclear matrix protein, p32/6.3, with an unusual tissue distribution, has been identified. Protein from 21 tissues was surveyed by immunoprobing Western blots. In normal adult rats p32/6.3 is found only in grey matter from the cerebrum and the cerebellum, occurring in both neurons and astrocytes. Other brain cell types have not been examined. The protein appears to be developmentally regulated. It is detectable in the brain within a few days after birth and reaches adult levels within one to two weeks. Brain p32/6.3 has been found in all animals tested including rat, mouse, dog, cow, pig, chicken and human. This conservation indicates a fundamental role for p32/6.3 in the nucleus of brain cells. Possible functions for p32/6.3 may be indicated by a second novel occurrence. Chronic lead poisoning characteristically induces intranuclear inclusion bodies in the cells lining kidney proximal tubules. p32/6.3 is a major constituent of these inclusion bodies. They are also rich in lead and other metals including calcium, iron, zinc, copper and cadmium. These diverse observations suggest that p32/6.3 may have a role in metal homeostasis in the brain of normal animals.

  17. Intranuclear location of the adenovirus type 5 E1B 55-kilodalton protein.

    PubMed Central

    Smiley, J K; Young, M A; Flint, S J

    1990-01-01

    The intracellular location of the adenovirus type 5 E1B 55-kilodalton (kDa) protein, particularly the question of whether it is associated with nuclear pore complexes, was examined. Fractionation of adenovirus type 5-infected HeLa cell nuclei by an established procedure (N. Dwyer and G. Blobel, J. Cell. Biol. 70:581-591, 1976) yielded one population of E1B 55-kDa protein molecules released by digestion of nuclei with RNase A and a second population recovered in the pore complex-lamina fraction. Free and E1B 55-kDa protein-bound forms of the E4 34-kDa protein (P. Sarnow, C. A. Sullivan, and A. J. Levine, Virology 120:387-394, 1982) were largely recovered in the pore complex-lamina fraction. Nevertheless, the association of E1B 55-kDa protein molecules with this nuclear envelope fraction did not depend on interaction of the E1B 55-kDa protein with the E4 34-kDa protein. Comparison of the immunofluorescence patterns observed with antibodies recognizing the E1B 55-kDa protein or cellular pore complex proteins and of the behavior of these viral and cellular proteins during in situ fractionation suggests that the E1B 55-kDa protein does not become intimately or stably associated with pore complexes in adenovirus-infected cells. Images PMID:2143545

  18. Modulation of VEGF-induced endothelial cell cycle protein expression through cyclic AMP hydrolysis by PDE2 and PDE4.

    PubMed

    Favot, Laure; Keravis, Thérèse; Lugnier, Claire

    2004-09-01

    Endothelial cell proliferation in response to VEGF plays an important role in physiological and pathological angiogenesis. The role of PDE2 and PDE4 in VEGF-induced proliferation in HUVEC was investigated: 1) VEGF increased cAMP-hydrolytic activity by up-regulating the expression of PDE2 and PDE4 isozymes; 2) VEGF increased progression in cell cycle with an increase in p42/p44 MAP kinase, cyclin A and cyclin D1 expressions and with a decrease in p21 waf1/cip1 and p27 kip1 expressions; 3) EHNA (20 micro M), a selective PDE2 inhibitor, RP73401 (10 micro M), a selective PDE4 inhibitor blocked the VEGF-induced increase in p42/p44 MAP kinase expression; 4) RP73401, but not EHNA, blocked the VEGF-induced increase in cyclin A and decrease in p27 kip1 expressions; 5) EHNA, contrary to RP73401, enhanced the VEGF-induced increase of cyclin A and decrease of p27 kip1. 6) EHNA and RP73401 together blocked the VEGF-induced increase in cyclin D1 and decrease in p21 waf1/cip1 expressions; 7) Inhibition of VEGF-upregulated PDE2 and PDE4 reversed the VEGF-induced alterations in cell cycle protein expression, bringing back endothelial cells to a non-proliferating status. Consequently, PDE2 and PDE4 inhibitions were able to inhibit VEGF-induced endothelial cell proliferation by restoring cell cycle key protein expression, and might thus be useful in excessive angiogenesis. Furthermore, the differences between PDE2 and PDE4 effects may suggest compartmentalized effects. PMID:15351862

  19. Serum insensitive, intranuclear protein delivery by the multipurpose cationic lipid SAINT-2.

    PubMed

    van der Gun, Bernardina T F; Monami, Amélie; Laarmann, Sven; Raskó, Tamás; Slaska-Kiss, Krystyna; Weinhold, Elmar; Wasserkort, Reinhold; de Leij, Lou F M H; Ruiters, Marcel H J; Kiss, Antal; McLaughlin, Pamela M J

    2007-11-20

    Cationic liposomal compounds are widely used to introduce DNA and siRNA into viable cells, but none of these compounds are also capable of introducing proteins. Here we describe the use of a cationic amphiphilic lipid SAINT-2:DOPE for the efficient delivery of proteins into cells (profection). Labeling studies demonstrated equal delivery efficiency for protein as for DNA and siRNA. Moreover, proteins complexed with Saint-2:DOPE were successfully delivered, irrespective of the presence of serum, and the profection efficiency was not influenced by the size or the charge of the protein:cationic liposomal complex. Using beta-galactosidase as a reporter protein, enzymatic activity was detected in up to 98% of the adherent cells, up to 83% of the suspension cells and up to 70% of the primary cells after profection. A delivered antibody was detected in the cytoplasm for up to 7 days after profection. Delivery of the methyltransferase M.SssI resulted in DNA methylation, leading to a decrease in E-cadherin expression. The lipid-mediated multipurpose transport system reported here can introduce proteins into the cell with an equal delivery efficiency as for nucleotides. Delivery is irrespective of the presence of serum, and the protein can exert its function both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Furthermore, DNA methylation by M.SssI delivery as a novel tool for gene silencing has potential applications in basic research and therapy. PMID:17884225

  20. NF-κB hyper-activation by HTLV-1 tax induces cellular senescence, but can be alleviated by the viral anti-sense protein HBZ.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Huijun; Yang, Liangpeng; Kuo, Yu-Liang; Ho, Yik-Khuan; Shih, Hsiu-Ming; Giam, Chou-Zen

    2011-04-01

    Activation of I-κB kinases (IKKs) and NF-κB by the human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) trans-activator/oncoprotein, Tax, is thought to promote cell proliferation and transformation. Paradoxically, expression of Tax in most cells leads to drastic up-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p21(CIP1/WAF1) and p27(KIP1), which cause p53-/pRb-independent cellular senescence. Here we demonstrate that p21(CIP1/WAF1)-/p27(KIP1)-mediated senescence constitutes a checkpoint against IKK/NF-κB hyper-activation. Senescence induced by Tax in HeLa cells is attenuated by mutations in Tax that reduce IKK/NF-κB activation and prevented by blocking NF-κB using a degradation-resistant mutant of I-κBα despite constitutive IKK activation. Small hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown indicates that RelA induces this senescence program by acting upstream of the anaphase promoting complex and RelB to stabilize p27(KIP1) protein and p21(CIP1/WAF1) mRNA respectively. Finally, we show that down-regulation of NF-κB by the HTLV-1 anti-sense protein, HBZ, delay or prevent the onset of Tax-induced senescence. We propose that the balance between Tax and HBZ expression determines the outcome of HTLV-1 infection. Robust HTLV-1 replication and elevated Tax expression drive IKK/NF-κB hyper-activation and trigger senescence. HBZ, however, modulates Tax-mediated viral replication and NF-κB activation, thus allowing HTLV-1-infected cells to proliferate, persist, and evolve. Finally, inactivation of the senescence checkpoint can facilitate persistent NF-κB activation and leukemogenesis. PMID:21552325

  1. Organ differences in the impact of p27(kip1) deficiency on carcinogenesis induced by N-methyl-N-nitrosourea.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kumiko; Murasaki, Toshiya; Sugiura, Satoshi; Nakanishi, Makoto; Shirai, Tomoyuki

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the impact of p27 on carcinogenesis in various organs, N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU), a direct-acting alkylating agent, was given to p27 knock-out mice. Groups of 20-40 male and female mice with null, hetero- or wild-type p27 alleles were given drinking water containing 240 ppm MNU or distilled water every other week for five cycles. The incidence and multiplicity of the induced proliferative lesions were then histologically evaluated at weeks 14 and 20. MNU treatment induced various lesions including squamous hyperplasia and squamous cell carcinoma in the forestomach, atypical hyperplasia and adenocarcinomas in the fundic and pyloric glands, adenomas and adenocarcinomas in the duodenum, malignant lymphomas in the thymus, liver, kidney and spleen and alveolar hyperplasia, adenomas, adenocarcinomas and malignant lymphomas in the lung. Although the incidences of the lesions in the forestomach, fundic and pyloric glands did not differ among the p27 genotypes, those of alveolar hyperplasia of the lung and malignant lymphoma of the thymus were significantly increased in p27-null males as compared with both wild- and hetero-type animals. Moreover, in both p27(+/+) and p27(+/-) cases, the rates for p27-positive cells were obviously increased in proliferative lesions of the pyloric gland and the lung. However, an increased rate of p27-positive cells was not observed in malignant lymphoma of the thymus. These findings suggest that p27 does not control the cell cycle equally in all organs affected by MNU-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:22183835

  2. A pathway in quiescent cells that controls p27Kip1 stability, subcellular localization, and tumor suppression

    PubMed Central

    Besson, Arnaud; Gurian-West, Mark; Chen, Xueyan; Kelly-Spratt, Karen S.; Kemp, Christopher J.; Roberts, James M.

    2006-01-01

    We have created two knock-in mouse models to study the mechanisms that regulate p27 in normal cells and cause misregulation of p27 in tumors: p27S10A, in which Ser10 is mutated to Ala; and p27CK–, in which point mutations abrogate the ability of p27 to bind cyclins and CDKs. These two mutant alleles identify steps in a pathway that controls the proteasomal degradation of p27 uniquely in quiescent cells: Dephosphorylation of p27 on Ser10 inhibits p27 nuclear export and promotes its assembly into cyclin–CDK complexes, which is, in turn, necessary for p27 turnover. We further show that Ras-dependent lung tumorigenesis is associated with increased phosphorylation on Ser10 and cytoplasmic mislocalization of p27. Indeed, we find that p27S10A is refractory to Ras-induced cytoplasmic translocation and that p27S10A mice are tumor resistant. Thus, phosphorylation of p27 on Ser10 is an important event in the regulation of the tumor suppressor function of p27. PMID:16391232

  3. Herpes simplex virus type 1 tegument proteins VP1/2 and UL37 are associated with intranuclear capsids

    SciTech Connect

    Bucks, Michelle A.; O'Regan, Kevin J.; Murphy, Michael A.; Wills, John W.; Courtney, Richard J. . E-mail: rcourtney@psu.edu

    2007-05-10

    The assembly of the tegument of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a complex process that involves a number of events at various sites within virus-infected cells. Our studies focused on determining whether tegument proteins, VP1/2 and UL37, are added to capsids located within the nucleus. Capsids were isolated from the nuclear fraction of HSV-1-infected cells and purified by rate-zonal centrifugation to separate B capsids (containing the scaffold proteins and no viral DNA) and C capsids (containing DNA and no scaffold proteins). Western blot analyses of these capsids indicated that VP1/2 associated primarily with C capsids and UL37 associated with B and C capsids. The results demonstrate that at least two of the tegument proteins of HSV-1 are associated with capsids isolated from the nuclear fraction, and these capsid-tegument protein interactions may represent initial events of the tegumentation process.

  4. Enhancement of gene targeting in human cells by intranuclear permeation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad52 protein

    PubMed Central

    Kalvala, Arjun; Rainaldi, Giuseppe; Di Primio, Cristina; Liverani, Vania; Falaschi, Arturo; Galli, Alvaro

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of exogenous DNA in human somatic cells results in a frequency of random integration at least 100-fold higher than gene targeting (GT), posing a seemingly insurmountable limitation for gene therapy applications. We previously reported that, in human cells, the stable over-expression of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad52 gene (yRAD52), which plays the major role in yeast homologous recombination (HR), caused an up to 37-fold increase in the frequency of GT, indicating that yRAD52 interacts with the double-strand break repair pathway(s) of human cells favoring homologous integration. In the present study, we tested the effect of the yRad52 protein by delivering it directly to the human cells. To this purpose, we fused the yRAD52 cDNA to the arginine-rich domain of the TAT protein of HIV (tat11) that is known to permeate the cell membranes. We observed that a recombinant yRad52tat11 fusion protein produced in Escherichia coli, which maintains its ability to bind single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), enters the cells and the nuclei, where it is able to increase both intrachromosomal recombination and GT up to 63- and 50-fold, respectively. Moreover, the non-homologous plasmid DNA integration decreased by 4-fold. yRAD52tat11 proteins carrying point mutations in the ssDNA binding domain caused a lower or nil increase in recombination proficiency. Thus, the yRad52tat11 could be instrumental to increase GT in human cells and a ‘protein delivery approach’ offers a new tool for developing novel strategies for genome modification and gene therapy applications. PMID:20519199

  5. Effects of Deletion and Overexpression of the Autographa californica Nuclear Polyhedrosis Virus FP25K Gene on Synthesis of Two Occlusion-Derived Virus Envelope Proteins and Their Transport into Virus-Induced Intranuclear Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Rosas-Acosta, Germán; Braunagel, Sharon C.; Summers, Max D.

    2001-01-01

    Partial deletions within Autographa californica open reading frame 61 (FP25K) alter the expression and accumulation profile of several viral proteins and the transport of occlusion-derived virus (ODV)-E66 to intranuclear membranes during infection (S. C. Braunagel et al., J. Virol. 73:8559–8570, 1999). Here we show the effects of a full deletion and overexpression of FP25K on the transport and expression of two ODV envelope proteins, ODV-E66 (E66) and ODV-E25 (E25). Deletion and overexpression of FP25K substantially altered the levels of expression of E66 during infection. Compared with cells infected with wild-type (wt) virus, the levels of E66 were reduced fivefold in cells infected with a viral mutant lacking FP25K (ΔFP25K) and were slightly increased in cells infected with a viral mutant overexpressing FP25K (FP25Kpolh). In contrast, no significant changes were observed in the levels of E25 among wt-, ΔFP25K-, and FP25Kpolh-infected cells. The changes observed in the levels of E66 among the different viral mutants were not accompanied by changes in either the time of synthesis, membrane association, protein turnover, or steady-state transcript abundance. Deletion of FP25K also substantially altered the transport and localization of E66 during infection. In cells infected with the ΔFP25K mutant virus, E66 accumulated in localized regions at the nuclear periphery and the outer nuclear membrane and did not traffic to intranuclear membranes. In contrast, in cells infected with the FP25Kpolh mutant virus E66 trafficked to intranuclear membranes. For comparison, E25 was normally transported to intranuclear membranes in both ΔFP25K- and FP25Kpolh-infected cells. Altogether these studies suggest that FP25K affects the synthesis of E66 at a posttranscriptional level, probably by altering the translation of E66; additionally, the block in transport of E66 at the nuclear envelope in ΔFP25K-infected cells suggests that the pathway of E66 trafficking to the inner

  6. The interplay between TEAD4 and KLF5 promotes breast cancer partially through inhibiting the transcription of p27Kip1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhongmei; Zhang, Hailin; Liu, Rong; Wu, Jing; Qin, Junying; Ma, Yun; Chen, Liang; Li, Shumo; Chen, Wenlin; Li, Fubing; Shi, Peiguo; Wu, Yingying; Shen, Jian; Chen, Ceshi

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that YAP/TAZ are mediators of the Hippo pathway and promote breast cancer. However, the roles of YAP/TAZ transcription factor partners TEADs in breast cancer remain unclear. Here we found that TEAD4 was expressed in breast cancer cell lines, especially in triple negative breast cancers (TNBC) cell lines. TEAD4 binds to KLF5. Knockdown of either TEAD4 or KLF5 in HCC1937 and HCC1806 cells induced the expression of CDK inhibitor p27. Depletion of either TEAD4 or KLF5 activated the p27 gene promoter and increased the p27 mRNA levels. Depletion of p27 partially prevents growth inhibition caused by TEAD4 and KLF5 knockdown. TEAD4 overexpression stimulated proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in mice, while stable knockdown of TEAD4 inhibited proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in mice. Thus TEAD4 and KLF5, in collaboration, promoted TNBC cell proliferation and tumor growth in part by inhibiting p27 gene transcription. TEAD4 is a potential target and biomarker for the development of novel therapeutics for breast cancer. PMID:25970772

  7. The STAR protein QKI-7 recruits PAPD4 to regulate post-transcriptional polyadenylation of target mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Ryota; Tsusaka, Takeshi; Mitsunaga, Hiroko; Maehata, Takaharu; Hoshino, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence has demonstrated that regulating the length of the poly(A) tail on an mRNA is an efficient means of controlling gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In early development, transcription is silenced and gene expression is primarily regulated by cytoplasmic polyadenylation. In somatic cells, considerable progress has been made toward understanding the mechanisms of negative regulation by deadenylation. However, positive regulation through elongation of the poly(A) tail has not been widely studied due to the difficulty in distinguishing whether any observed increase in length is due to the synthesis of new mRNA, reduced deadenylation or cytoplasmic polyadenylation. Here, we overcame this barrier by developing a method for transcriptional pulse-chase analysis under conditions where deadenylases are suppressed. This strategy was used to show that a member of the Star family of RNA binding proteins, QKI, promotes polyadenylation when tethered to a reporter mRNA. Although multiple RNA binding proteins have been implicated in cytoplasmic polyadenylation during early development, previously only CPEB was known to function in this capacity in somatic cells. Importantly, we show that only the cytoplasmic isoform QKI-7 promotes poly(A) tail extension, and that it does so by recruiting the non-canonical poly(A) polymerase PAPD4 through its unique carboxyl-terminal region. We further show that QKI-7 specifically promotes polyadenylation and translation of three natural target mRNAs (hnRNPA1, p27kip1 and β-catenin) in a manner that is dependent on the QKI response element. An anti-mitogenic signal that induces cell cycle arrest at G1 phase elicits polyadenylation and translation of p27kip1 mRNA via QKI and PAPD4. Taken together, our findings provide significant new insight into a general mechanism for positive regulation of gene expression by post-transcriptional polyadenylation in somatic cells. PMID:26926106

  8. Hyperinvasive Meningococci Induce Intra-nuclear Cleavage of the NF-κB Protein p65/RelA by Meningococcal IgA Protease

    PubMed Central

    Besbes, Anissa; Le Goff, Salomé; Antunes, Ana; Terrade, Aude; Hong, Eva; Giorgini, Dario; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Deghmane, Ala-Eddine

    2015-01-01

    Differential modulation of NF-κB during meningococcal infection is critical in innate immune response to meningococcal disease. Non-invasive isolates of Neisseria meningitidis provoke a sustained NF-κB activation in epithelial cells. However, the hyperinvasive isolates of the ST-11 clonal complex (ST-11) only induce an early NF-κB activation followed by a sustained activation of JNK and apoptosis. We show that this temporal activation of NF-κB was caused by specific cleavage at the C-terminal region of NF-κB p65/RelA component within the nucleus of infected cells. This cleavage was mediated by the secreted 150 kDa meningococcal ST-11 IgA protease carrying nuclear localisation signals (NLS) in its α-peptide moiety that allowed efficient intra-nuclear transport. In a collection of non-ST-11 healthy carriage isolates lacking NLS in the α-peptide, secreted IgA protease was devoid of intra-nuclear transport. This part of iga polymorphism allows non-invasive isolates lacking NLS, unlike hyperinvasive ST-11 isolates of N. meningitides habouring NLS in their α-peptide, to be carried asymptomatically in the human nasopharynx through selective eradication of their ability to induce apoptosis in infected epithelial cells. PMID:26241037

  9. Neuronal intranuclear inclusion disease in identical twins.

    PubMed

    Haltia, M; Somer, H; Palo, J; Johnson, W G

    1984-04-01

    A pair of female identical twins exhibited slurred speech, nystagmus, and oculogyral spasms starting at age 11. The patients then had episodic rage, extrapyramidal and lower motor neuron abnormalities, and grand mal seizures, but retained largely normal intelligence, until death at age 21. Severe loss of nigral and craniospinal motor neurons was noted postmortem. Round, eosinophilic, autofluorescent inclusion bodies, 3 to 10 microns in diameter, were observed in the nuclei of most nerve cell types of the central and peripheral nervous systems and retina. Ultrastructurally the inclusions appeared as masses of filaments without a limiting membrane, the constituent filaments having a diameter of 8.5 to 9.5 nm. Histochemical results suggested the presence of proteins with a high content of tryptophan. Four similar cases have been reported previously under various designations. We propose the name neuronal intranuclear inclusion disease for the disorder. PMID:6331275

  10. A novel partner for D-type cyclins: protein kinase A-anchoring protein AKAP95.

    PubMed Central

    Arsenijevic, Tatjana; Degraef, Chantal; Dumont, Jacques E; Roger, Pierre P; Pirson, Isabelle

    2004-01-01

    Using a yeast interaction screen to search for proteins that interact with cyclin D3 in thyroid gland, we identified the cAMP-dependent AKAP95 (protein kinase A-anchoring protein 95). AKAP95 is a scaffolding protein that primarily co-fractionates with the nuclear matrix, whereas a minor fraction associates with chromatin in interphase cells. In co-transfected Chinese-hamster ovary cells, AKAP95 strongly interacted with the three D-type cyclins, but not with CDK4 (cyclin-dependent kinase 4) or with p27kip1. CDK4 displaced the interaction between cyclin D3 and AKAP95, suggesting that AKAP95 could not be the elusive bridging adaptor between D-type cyclins and CDK4 or play a role in the regulation of cyclin D3-CDK4 activity. Interaction between endogenous AKAP95 and cyclin D3 or cyclin D1 was detected in canine thyrocytes, human fibroblasts and NIH-3T3 cells. As both AKAP95 and cyclins D were recently reported to associate with minichromosome maintenance proteins [Eide, Tasken, Carlson, Williams, Jahnsen, Tasken and Collas (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 26750-26756; Gladden and Diehl (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 9754-9760], we hypothesize that the interaction between AKAP95 and D-type cyclins might serve to facilitate the emerging regulatory role of cyclin D-CDK4 in the formation of the prereplication complex at the DNA replication origins. PMID:14641107

  11. DNA polymerase alpha associated protein P1, a murine homolog of yeast MCM3, changes its intranuclear distribution during the DNA synthetic period.

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, H; Nozaki, N; Sugimoto, K

    1994-01-01

    We isolated a murine gene for the DNA polymerase alpha associated protein P1, which shares high homology with the budding yeast MCM3 protein, which is a member of a protein family involved in the early event of DNA replication having a putative DNA-dependent ATPase motif. Using a polyclonal anti-P1 antibody raised against a beta-galactosidase-P1 fusion protein, we identified at least two forms of P1 protein in the nucleus of a mouse cell line, an underphosphorylated form that was associated with a particular nuclear structure and a hyperphosphorylated form loosely bound to the nucleus. During progression through S phase, P1 disappeared, first from the euchromatic region, then from the heterochromatic region, apparently in parallel with temporally ordered DNA replication. Thus, it is likely that the underphosphorylated P1 is dissociated from the nuclear structure after DNA replication by cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation. This is the first direct observation of a protein whose behavior is consistent with that of a hypothetical factor which restricts the chromatin to replicate once per cell cycle in higher eukaryotes. Images PMID:7925275

  12. Spatial Localization of Genes Determined by Intranuclear DNA Fragmentation with the Fusion Proteins Lamin KRED and Histone KRED und Visible Light

    PubMed Central

    Waldeck, Waldemar; Mueller, Gabriele; Glatting, Karl-Heinz; Hotz-Wagenblatt, Agnes; Diessl, Nicolle; Chotewutmonti, Sasithorn; Langowski, Jörg; Semmler, Wolfhard; Wiessler, Manfred; Braun, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The highly organized DNA architecture inside of the nuclei of cells is accepted in the scientific world. In the human genome about 3 billion nucleotides are organized as chromatin in the cell nucleus. In general, they are involved in gene regulation and transcription by histone modification. Small chromosomes are localized in a central nuclear position whereas the large chromosomes are peripherally positioned. In our experiments we inserted fusion proteins consisting of a component of the nuclear lamina (lamin B1) and also histone H2A, both combined with the light inducible fluorescence protein KillerRed (KRED). After activation, KRED generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing toxic effects and may cause cell death. We analyzed the spatial damage distribution in the chromatin after illumination of the cells with visible light. The extent of DNA damage was strongly dependent on its localization inside of nuclei. The ROS activity allowed to gain information about the location of genes and their functions via sequencing and data base analysis of the double strand breaks of the isolated DNA. A connection between the damaged gene sequences and some diseases was found. PMID:23869190

  13. Ultrastructural Studies of H-1 Parvovirus Replication VI. Simultaneous Autoradiographic and Immunochemical Intranuclear Localization of Viral DNA Synthesis and Protein Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Irwin I.; Rhode, Solon L.

    1978-01-01

    The localization of H-1 viral replicative-form double-stranded DNA and progeny single-stranded DNA replication in parasynchronously infected, simian virus 40-transformed newborn human kidney cells was studied with high-resolution electron microscope autoradiography (80-nm silver grains). We analyzed wild-type H-1 and ts1 H-1 (a conditional mutant defective in progeny single-stranded DNA synthesis). The proportion of the total DNA synthesis that was viral was estimated to be >90% by comparing the amount of [3H]thymidine uptake in cultures infected with wild-type H-1 versus ts14 (an H-1 mutant defective in DNA replication). Simultaneous staining with cytochrome c-conjugated anti-H-1 immunoglobulin G was performed to ensure that cells incorporating [3H]thymidine (2- to 60-min pulses) were H-1 infected. The sites of H-1 replicative-form (in ts1-infected cells) and progeny (in wild-type-infected cells) DNA synthesis were identical. Immunospecifically labeled nuclei at the earliest stages of infection exhibited dense clusters of silver grains over material extruded from nucleolar fibrillar centers. These foci became larger with increasing cellular damage, forming a limited number of H-1 DNA synthetic centers in the euchromatin. Each island-like focus was surrounded by tufts of heterochromatin containing high concentrations of unassembled H-1 capsid proteins. In late phases of infection, the heterochromatin became completely marginated, and the nucleoplasm contained only euchromatin that exhibited randomly distributed sites of H-1 DNA replication. This indicates that H-1 DNA synthesis begins at localized euchromatic or nucleolar sites and then spreads outward. Immunostained heterochromatin and nucleolar chromatin never incorporated [3H]thymidine. Our results suggest that H-1 proteins and cellular cofactors associated with the fibrillar component of the nucleolus and the euchromatin may play a role in the regulation of H-1 DNA synthesis. Images PMID:340710

  14. An unusual degenerative disorder of neurons associated with a novel intranuclear hyaline inclusion (neuronal intranuclear hyaline inclusion disease). A clinicopathological study of a case.

    PubMed

    Sung, J H; Ramirez-Lassepas, M; Mastri, A R; Larkin, S M

    1980-03-01

    A 21-year-old woman with an unusual, progressive, degenerative neurological disorder is described. The disorder is characterized clinically by behavioral abnormality, peculiar involuntary movements, and ataxia starting in early childhood and subsequent development of dementia, choreoathetosis, rectal and bladder incontinence, bulbar and spinal muscular weakness, pes cavus, kyphoscoliosis, and generalized seizures. The clinical manifestations are correlated, with widespread pathological changes affecting almost all neuronal systems. The pathological changes are discussed in relation to the wide spectrum of "multisystem atrophies." Particular attention is directed to the ubiquitous occurrence of a novel intranuclear, eosinophilic, hyaline inclusion in almost all types of central, peripheral, and autonomic neurons. The ubiquitous neuronal involvement seems to explain the diffuse multiple system degeneration. The pathogenesis of the neuronal inclusions is unknown, but it is speculated that the disorder may represent a metabolic abnormality affecting the nuclear protein of neurons, rather than a viral infection. The pathological features, consisting of the neuronal intranuclear hyaline inclusions associated with multiple system atrophy, have not hitherto been described, and "neuronal intranuclear hyaline inclusion disease" is proposed as a name for the disorder. Rectal biopsy demonstrating the intranuclear hyaline inclusions in ganglion cells of the hyenteric plexuses may serve as a diagnostic procedure for the disorder. PMID:6154779

  15. Neuronal intranuclear inclusion disease and juvenile parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, J D; Hanagasi, H A; Daniel, S E; Tidswell, P; Davies, S W; Lees, A J

    2000-09-01

    Juvenile parkinsonism (onset age <20 yrs) is uncommon and few cases with neuropathologic confirmation have been reported. We present the case of a 17-year-old boy who presented with asymmetric arm tremor and bulbar symptoms. His paternal great aunt had parkinsonism with onset at age 22 years. Examination revealed parkinsonism in the absence of additional neurologic signs except for delayed pupillary responses to light. He responded well to levodopa but developed motor fluctuations and disabling dyskinesias after 3 years of treatment. Following attempted withdrawal of levodopa at age 24 years, he developed severe aspiration pneumonia complicated by cardiorepiratory arrests and he died 6 months later. At autopsy, the dominant histologic feature was wide-spread neuronal hyaline intranuclear inclusions. Neuronal depletion was observed in the substantia nigra, locus ceruleus, and, to a lesser extent, in the frontal cortex, and inclusions were particularly prominent in these areas. Inclusions were immunoreactive for ubiquitin and were typical of those seen in neuronal intranuclear inclusion disease (NIID), a rare, multisytem neurodegenerative disease. NIID should be considered in the differential diagnosis of juvenile parkinsonism. A link between NIID and hereditary neurodegenerative disorders characterized by expanded polyglutamine tracts is supported by the similar appearance of intranuclear inclusions in both conditions and by a family history in some cases of NIID. PMID:11009211

  16. Heat Shock Protein B1-Deficient Mice Display Impaired Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    McNamee, Kay; Przybycien, Paulina M.; Lu, Xin; Williams, Richard O.; Bou-Gharios, George; Saklatvala, Jeremy; Dean, Jonathan L. E.

    2013-01-01

    There is large literature describing in vitro experiments on heat shock protein (hsp)B1 but understanding of its function in vivo is limited to studies in mice overexpressing human hspB1 protein. Experiments in cells have shown that hspB1 has chaperone activity, a cytoprotective role, regulates inflammatory gene expression, and drives cell proliferation. To investigate the function of the protein in vivo we generated hspB1-deficient mice. HspB1-deficient fibroblasts display increased expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-6, compared to wild-type cells, but reduced proliferation. HspB1-deficient fibroblasts exhibit reduced entry into S phase and increased expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p27kip1 and p21waf1. The expression of hspB1 protein and mRNA is also controlled by the cell cycle. To investigate the physiological function of hspB1 in regulating inflammation and cell proliferation we used an excisional cutaneous wound healing model. There was a significant impairment in the rate of healing of wounds in hspB1-deficient mice, characterised by reduced re-epithelialisation and collagen deposition but also increased inflammation. HspB1 deficiency augments neutrophil infiltration in wounds, driven by increased chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 expression. This appears to be a general mechanism as similar results were obtained in the air-pouch and peritonitis models of acute inflammation. PMID:24143227

  17. Protein Kinase C alpha (PKCα) dependent signaling mediates endometrial cancer cell growth and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Haughian, James M.; Reno, Elaine M.; Thorne, Alicia M.; Bradford, Andrew P.

    2009-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common invasive gynecologic malignancy, yet molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways underlying its etiology and pathophysiology remain poorly characterized. We sought to define a functional role for the protein kinase C (PKC) isoform, PKCα, in an established cell model of endometrial adenocarcinoma. Ishikawa cells depleted of PKCα protein grew slower, formed fewer colonies in anchorage-independent growth assays and exhibited impaired xenograft tumor formation in nude mice. Consistent with impaired growth, PKCα knockdown increased levels of the cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p21Cip1/WAF1 (p21) and p27Kip1 (p27). Despite the absence of functional phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) protein in Ishikawa cells, PKCα knockdown reduced Akt phosphorylation at serine 473 and concomitantly inhibited phosphorylation of the Akt target, glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β). PKCα knockdown also resulted in decreased basal ERK phosphorylation and attenuated ERK activation following EGF stimulation. p21 and p27 expression was not increased by treatment of Ishikawa cells with ERK and Akt inhibitors, suggesting PKCα regulates CDK expression independently of Akt and ERK. Immunohistochemical analysis of grade 1 endometrioid adenocarcinoma revealed aberrant PKCα expression, with foci of elevated PKCα staining, not observed in normal endometrium. These studies demonstrate a critical role for PKCα signaling in endometrial tumorigenesis by regulating expression of CDK inhibitors p21 and p27 and activation of Akt and ERK dependent proliferative pathways. Thus, targeting PKCα may provide novel therapeutic options in endometrial tumors. PMID:19672862

  18. Protein Kinase C Signaling Mediates a Program of Cell Cycle Withdrawal in the Intestinal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Mark R.; Clark, Jennifer A.; Leontieva, Olga; Uronis, Joshua M.; Black, Adrian R.; Black, Jennifer D.

    2000-01-01

    Members of the protein kinase C (PKC) family of signal transduction molecules have been widely implicated in regulation of cell growth and differentiation, although the underlying molecular mechanisms involved remain poorly defined. Using combined in vitro and in vivo intestinal epithelial model systems, we demonstrate that PKC signaling can trigger a coordinated program of molecular events leading to cell cycle withdrawal into G0. PKC activation in the IEC-18 intestinal crypt cell line resulted in rapid downregulation of D-type cyclins and differential induction of p21waf1/cip1 and p27kip1, thus targeting all of the major G1/S cyclin-dependent kinase complexes. These events were associated with coordinated alterations in expression and phosphorylation of the pocket proteins p107, pRb, and p130 that drive cells to exit the cell cycle into G0 as indicated by concomitant downregulation of the DNA licensing factor cdc6. Manipulation of PKC isozyme levels in IEC-18 cells demonstrated that PKCα alone can trigger hallmark events of cell cycle withdrawal in intestinal epithelial cells. Notably, analysis of the developmental control of cell cycle regulatory molecules along the crypt–villus axis revealed that PKCα activation is appropriately positioned within intestinal crypts to trigger this program of cell cycle exit–specific events in situ. Together, these data point to PKCα as a key regulator of cell cycle withdrawal in the intestinal epithelium. PMID:11076962

  19. Ultrastructural cytochemical analysis of intranuclear arsenic inclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, E.M.B.

    1987-01-01

    To establish the chemical composition of the arsenic inclusion, freshly isolated preparations of inclusions and epon-embedded thin sections of inclusions were subjected to ultrastructural cytochemical analysis. Intranuclear inclusions are composed of amorphous, arsenic-containing subunits aligned linearly to form a coiled complex. Lipase, ribonuclease, deoxyribonuclease, trypsin, pepsin, protease, amylase, or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) was used to digest or chelate these inclusions. Following enzymatic digestion or chelation, the electron opacity of inclusions was compared with that of control sections exposed for equal times to equivalent solutions lacking the enzymes. Exposure to amylase caused a consistent reduction in the electron opacity of thin sections of inclusions and almost complete digestion of the freshly isolated preparations of inclusions. This was indicative of the presence of a carbohydrate moiety within arsenic inclusions. Incubation of inclusions with EDTA resulted in solubilization of freshly isolated and thin-sectioned embedded material. These data indicated that the intranuclear arsenic inclusion is composed of both metallic and carbohydrate moieties, confirming earlier studies which identified arsenic within inclusions using instrumental neutron activation analysis and x-ray microprobe analysis.

  20. The p53 tumor suppressor protein protects against chemotherapeutic stress and apoptosis in human medulloblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Parasido, Erika; Tricoli, Lucas; Sivakumar, Angiela; Mikhaiel, John P.; Yenugonda, Venkata; Rodriguez, Olga C.; Karam, Sana D.; Rood, Brian R.; Avantaggiati, Maria Laura; Albanese, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB), a primitive neuroectodermal tumor, is the most common malignant childhood brain tumor and remains incurable in about a third of patients. Currently, survivors carry a significant burden of late treatment effects. The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a crucial role in influencing cell survival in response to cellular stress and while the p53 pathway is considered a key determinant of anti-tumor responses in many tumors, its role in cell survival in MB is much less well defined. Herein, we report that the experimental drug VMY-1-103 acts through induction of a partial DNA damage-like response as well induction of non-survival autophagy. Surprisingly, the genetic or chemical silencing of p53 significantly enhanced the cytotoxic effects of both VMY and the DNA damaging drug, doxorubicin. The inhibition of p53 in the presence of VMY revealed increased late stage apoptosis, increased DNA fragmentation and increased expression of genes involved in apoptosis, including CAPN12 and TRPM8, p63, p73, BIK, EndoG, CIDEB, P27Kip1 and P21cip1. These data provide the groundwork for additional studies on VMY as a therapeutic drug and support further investigations into the intriguing possibility that targeting p53 function may be an effective means of enhancing clinical outcomes in MB. PMID:26540407

  1. RNF135, RING finger protein, promotes the proliferation of human glioblastoma cells in vivo and in vitro via the ERK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yongjian; Wang, Feng; Liu, Yongsheng; Yao, Yiqun; Lv, Xiupeng; Dong, Bin; Li, Jun; Ren, Siyang; Yao, Yiwen; Xu, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    Ring finger protein 135 (RNF135), located on chromosome 17q11.2, is a RING finger domain-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase that was identified as a bio-marker and therapy target of glioblastoma. In our study, we confirmed that RNF135 was up-regulated in glioblastoma tissues compared with normal brain (NB) tissues, and that RNF135 knockdown inhibited proliferation and migration and led to cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase in vivo. By lowering RNF135 expression, phosphorylated Erk and cell cycle protein CDK4 were down-regulated, while p27Kip1 and p21Waf1/Cip1 were up-regulated in U87 and U251 cells in vitro. In addition, using the immunofluorescence double labelling method, we found that RNF135 and P-Erk were co-localized in the cytoplasm and were highly expressed in glioblastoma samples compared with NB tissues. Moreover, the growth of U87 cell-transplanted tumours in nude mice was inhibited while transduced with Lv-shRNF135. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the biological effects of RNF135 in glioblastoma cell proliferation, migration and cell cycle, and its role in the progression of glioblastoma may be associated with the ERK signal transduction pathway. PMID:26856755

  2. The soybean-derived peptide lunasin inhibits non-small cell lung cancer cell proliferation by suppressing phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Elizabeth J.; Devapatla, Bharat; Yaddanapudi, Kavitha; Davis, Keith R.

    2015-01-01

    Lunasin, a soybean bioactive peptide, has both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities. The aim of this study was to determine the chemotherapeutic potential of lunasin against human lung cancer. Treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells with highly purified soybean-derived lunasin caused limited, cell-line specific anti-proliferative effects on anchorage-dependent growth whereas two normal bronchial epithelial cell lines were unaffected. Lunasin's antiproliferative effects were potentiated upon utilization of anchorage-independent conditions. Furthermore, NSCLC cell lines that were unaffected by lunasin in anchorage-dependent assays exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition in colony formation or colony size. Mouse xenograft studies revealed that 30 mg lunasin/kg body weight per day decreased NSCLC H1299 tumor volume by 63.0% at day 32. Mechanistic studies using cultured NSCLC H661 cells showed that lunasin inhibited cell cycle progression at the G1/S phase interface without inducing apoptosis. Immunoblot analyses of key cell-cycle proteins demonstrated that lunasin altered the expression of the G1 specific cyclin-dependent kinase complex components, increased levels of p27Kip1, reduced levels of phosphorylated Akt, and ultimately inhibited the sequential phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein (RB). These results establish for the first time that lunasin can inhibit NSCLC proliferation by suppressing cell-cycle dependent phosphorylation of RB. PMID:25609198

  3. The cyclopentenone 15-deoxy-delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J2 inhibits G1/S transition and retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation in immortalized lymphocytes from Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Ursula; de Las Cuevas, Natividad; Bartolomé, Fernando; Hermida, Ofelia G; Bermejo, Félix; Martín-Requero, Angeles

    2005-10-01

    Epidemiologic studies indicated that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) might prevent or delay the clinical features of Alzheimer disease (AD). The pharmacological activity of NSAIDs is generally attributed to inhibition of cyclooxygenase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) activation. Based on the antineoplastic and apoptotic effects of PPARgamma activation in a number of cell types, we hypothesized that NSAIDs could protect neurons by controlling the regulation of cell cycle. Recent work suggests that uncoordinated expression of cell cycle molecules and perturbation of cell cycle checkpoints may be one of the mechanisms by which post-mitotic neurons die. Since cell cycle dysfunction is not restricted to neurons in AD, we found it interesting to study the role of PPARgamma activation on cell proliferation in immortalized lymphocytes from AD patients. We report here that 15-deoxy-delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2), but not NSAIDs or thiazolidinediones inhibited the serum-mediated enhancement of cell proliferation in AD by blocking the events critical for G1/S transition. The cyclopentenone induced a partial inhibition of retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation and increased levels of the CDK inhibitor p27kip1. PMID:16061222

  4. Nuclear export of proteins and drug resistance in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Joel G.; Dawson, Jana; Sullivan, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular location of a protein is crucial to its normal functioning in a cell. Cancer cells utilize the normal processes of nuclear-cytoplasmic transport through the nuclear pore complex of a cell to effectively evade anti-neoplastic mechanisms. CRM1-mediated export is increased in various cancers. Proteins that are exported in cancer include tumor-suppressive proteins such as retinoblastoma, APC, p53, BRAC1, FOXO proteins, INI1/hSNF5, galectin-3, Bok, nucleophosmin, RASSF2, Merlin, p21CIP, p27KIP1, N-WASP/FAK, estradiol receptor and Tob, drug targets topoisomerase I and IIα and BCR-ABL, and the molecular chaperone protein Hsp90. Here, we review in detail the current processes and known structures involved in the export of a protein through the nuclear pore complex. We also discuss the export receptor molecule CRM1 and its binding to the leucine-rich nuclear export signal of the cargo protein and the formation of a nuclear export trimer with RanGTP. The therapeutic potential of various CRM1 inhibitors will be addressed, including leptomycin B, ratjadone, KOS-2464, and specific small molecule inhibitors of CRM1, N-azolylacrylate analogs, FOXO export inhibitors, valtrate, acetoxychavicol acetate, CBS9106, and SINE inhibitors. We will also discuss examples of how drug resistance may be reversed by targeting the exported proteins topoisomerase IIα, BCR-ABL, and galectin-3. As effective and less toxic CRM1 export inhibitors become available, they may be used as both single agents and in combination with current chemotherapeutic drugs. We believe that the future development of low-toxicity, small-molecule CRM1 inhibitors may provide a new approach to treating cancer. PMID:22209898

  5. INTRANUCLEAR MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASES PROMOTE DNA DAMAGE AND APOPTOSIS INDUCED BY OXYGEN–GLUCOSE DEPRIVATION IN NEURONS

    PubMed Central

    HILL, J. W.; PODDAR, R.; THOMPSON, J. F.; ROSENBERG, G. A.; YANG, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Degradation of the extracellular matrix by elevated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity following ischemia/reperfusion is implicated in blood–brain barrier disruption and neuronal death. In contrast to their characterized extracellular roles, we previously reported that elevated intranuclear MMP-2 and -9 (gelatinase) activity degrades nuclear DNA repair proteins and promotes accumulation of oxidative DNA damage in neurons in rat brain at 3-h reperfusion after ischemic stroke. Here, we report that treatment with a broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor significantly reduced neuronal apoptosis in rat ischemic hemispheres at 48-h reperfusion after a 90-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Since extracellular gelatinases in brain tissue are known to be neurotoxic during acute stroke, the contribution of intranuclear MMP-2 and -9 activities in neurons to neuronal apoptosis has been unclear. To confirm and extend our in vivo observations, oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD), an in vitro model of ischemia/reperfusion, was employed. Primary cortical neurons were subjected to 2-h OGD with reoxygenation. Increased intranuclear gelatinase activity was detected immediately after reoxygenation onset and was maximal at 24 h, while extracellular gelatinase levels remained unchanged. We detected elevated levels of both MMP-2 and -9 in neuronal nuclear extracts and gelatinase activity in neurons co-localized primarily with MMP-2. We found a marked decrease in PARP1, XRCC1, and OGG1, and decreased PARP1 activity. Pretreatment of neurons with selective MMP-2/9 inhibitor II significantly decreased gelatinase activity and downregulation of DNA repair enzymes, decreased accumulation of oxidative DNA damage, and promoted neuronal survival after OGD. Our results confirm the nuclear localization of gelatinases and their nuclear substrates observed in an animal stroke model, further supporting a novel role for intranuclear gelatinase activity in an intrinsic apoptotic pathway in neurons

  6. Intranuclear bacteria: inside the cellular control center of eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Frederik; Horn, Matthias

    2015-06-01

    Intracellular bacteria including major pathogens live in the cytoplasm or in cytoplasmic vacuoles within their host cell. However, some can invade more unusual intracellular niches such as the eukaryotic nucleus. Phylogenetically diverse intranuclear bacteria have been discovered in various protist, arthropod, marine invertebrate, and mammalian hosts. Although targeting the same cellular compartment, they have apparently developed fundamentally-different infection strategies. The nucleus provides a rich pool of nutrients and protection against host cytoplasmic defense mechanisms; intranuclear bacteria can directly manipulate the host by interfering with nuclear processes. The impact on their host cells ranges from stable associations with a neutral or beneficial effect on host fitness to rapid host lysis. The analysis of the intranuclear lifestyle will extend our current framework for understanding host-pathogen interactions. PMID:25680230

  7. Constitutive photomorphogenesis protein 1 (COP1) and COP9 signalosome, evolutionarily conserved photomorphogenic proteins as possible targets of melatonin.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Barcelo, Emilio J; Mediavilla, Maria D; Vriend, Jerry; Reiter, Russel J

    2016-08-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system has been proposed as a possible mechanism involved in the multiple actions of melatonin. COP1 (constitutive photomorphogenesis protein 1), a RING finger-type ubiquitin E3 ligase formerly identified in Arabidopsis, is a central switch for the transition from plant growth underground in darkness (etiolation) to growth under light exposure (photomorphogenesis). In darkness, COP1 binds to photomorphogenic transcription factors driving its degradation via the 26S proteasome; blue light, detected by cryptochromes, and red and far-red light detected by phytochromes, negatively regulate COP1. Homologues of plant COP1 containing all the structural features present in Arabidopsis as well as E3 ubiquitin ligase activity have been identified in mice and humans. Substrates for mammalian (m) COP1 include p53, AP-1 and c-Jun, p27(Kip1) , ETV1, MVP, 14-3-3σ, C/EBPα, MTA1, PEA3, ACC, TORC2 and FOXO1. This mCOP1 target suggests functions related to tumorigenesis, gluconeogenesis, and lipid metabolism. The role of mCOP1 in tumorigenesis (either as a tumor promoter or tumor suppressor), as well as in glucose metabolism (inhibition of gluconeogenesis) and lipid metabolism (inhibition of fatty acid synthesis), has been previously demonstrated. COP1, along with numerous other ubiquitin ligases, is regulated by the COP9 signalosome; this protein complex is associated with the oxidative stress sensor Keap1 and the deubiquitinase USP15. The objective of this review was to provide new information on the possible role of COP1 and COP9 as melatonin targets. The hypothesis is based on common functional aspects of melatonin and COP1 and COP9, including their dependence on light, regulation of the metabolism, and their control of tumor growth. PMID:27121162

  8. Nucleon removal from unstable nuclei investigated via intranuclear cascade

    SciTech Connect

    Louchart, C.; Obertelli, A.; Boudard, A.; Flavigny, F.

    2011-01-15

    An intranuclear cascade model for one-nucleon removal cross sections at intermediate energies beyond the sudden and inert-core assumptions is presented. Indirect processes are taken into account in the reaction mechanism via a Monte Carlo-based approach. The formalism is applied to a set of weakly bound nuclei for which data are available. Results are in correct agreement with experiment including the case of deeply bound nucleon removal. A comparison to eikonal predictions is performed.

  9. MIF4G domain containing protein regulates cell cycle and hepatic carcinogenesis by antagonizing CDK2-dependent p27 stability.

    PubMed

    Wan, C; Hou, S; Ni, R; Lv, L; Ding, Z; Huang, X; Hang, Q; He, S; Wang, Y; Cheng, C; Gu, X X; Xu, G; Shen, A

    2015-01-01

    The CDK inhibitor p27(kip1) plays crucial roles in cell cycle regulation and cancer progression. Through yeast two-hybrid screening, we identified MIF4G domain containing protein (MIF4GD) as a novel binding partner for p27. The association of MIF4GD and p27 was verified using immunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down assays. Interaction with MIF4GD led to the stabilization of p27 both in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells as a result of suppressed phosphorylation of p27 by CDK2 at threonine187. Serum stimulation decreased the levels of MIF4GD and p27 simultaneously. In addition, MIF4GD overexpression resulted in increased p27 levels and reduced cell proliferation, while knockdown of MIF4GD promoted cell cycle progression with decreased p27 levels in cells. Furthermore, overexpression of MIF4GD reduced colony formation and inhibited xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. Finally, we found that both MIF4GD and p27 were expressed at low levels in HCC tissues compared to non-cancerous tissues, and that low expression levels of MIF4GD and p27 were associated with significantly worse prognosis in HCC patients. Our results suggest that MIF4GD is a potential regulator of p27-dependent cell proliferation in HCC. These findings provide a rational framework for the development of potential HCC therapy by targeting the MIF4GD-p27 interaction. PMID:24336329

  10. A model for mammalian cochlear hair cell differentiation in vitro: effects of retinoic acid on cytoskeletal proteins and potassium conductances.

    PubMed

    Helyer, R; Cacciabue-Rivolta, D; Davies, D; Rivolta, M N; Kros, C J; Holley, M C

    2007-02-01

    We have established a model for the in-vitro differentiation of mouse cochlear hair cells and have used it to explore the influence of retinoic acid on proliferation, cytoskeletal proteins and voltage-gated potassium conductances. The model is based on the conditionally immortal cell line University of Sheffield/ventral otocyst-epithelial cell line clone 36 (US/VOT-E36), derived from ventral otic epithelial cells of the mouse at embryonic day 10.5 and transfected with a reporter for myosin VIIa. Retinoic acid did not increase cell proliferation but led to up-regulation of myosin VIIa and formation of prominent actin rings that gave rise to numerous large, linear actin bundles. Cells expressing myosin VIIa had larger potassium conductances and did not express the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(kip1). US/VOT-E36 endogenously expressed the voltage-gated potassium channel alpha-subunits Kv1.3 and Kv2.1, which we subsequently identified in embryonic and neonatal hair cells in both auditory and vestibular sensory epithelia in vivo. These subunits could underlie the embryonic and neonatal delayed-rectifiers recorded in nascent hair cells in vivo. Kv2.1 was particularly prominent on the basolateral membrane of cochlear inner hair cells. Kv1.3 was distributed throughout all hair cells but tended to be localized to the cuticular plates. US/VOT-E36 recapitulates a coherent pattern of cell differentiation under the influence of retinoic acid and will provide a convenient model for screening the effects of other extrinsic factors on the differentiation of cochlear epithelial cell types in vitro. PMID:17331193

  11. The expression of the ubiquitin ligase subunit Cks1 in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Slotky, Merav; Shapira, Ma'anit; Ben-Izhak, Ofer; Linn, Shai; Futerman, Boris; Tsalic, Medy; Hershko, Dan D

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Loss of the cell-cycle inhibitory protein p27Kip1 is associated with a poor prognosis in breast cancer. The decrease in the levels of this protein is the result of increased proteasome-dependent degradation, mediated and rate-limited by its specific ubiquitin ligase subunits S-phase kinase protein 2 (Skp2) and cyclin-dependent kinase subunit 1 (Cks1). Skp2 was recently found to be overexpressed in breast cancers, but the role of Cks1 in these cancers is unknown. The present study was undertaken to examine the role of Cks1 expression in breast cancer and its relation to p27Kip1 and Skp2 expression and to tumor aggressiveness. Methods The expressions of Cks1, Skp2, and p27Kip1 were examined immunohistochemically on formalin-fixed, paraffin-wax-embedded tissue sections from 50 patients with breast cancer and by immunoblot analysis on breast cancer cell lines. The relation between Cks1 levels and patients' clinical and histological parameters were examined by Cox regression and the Kaplan–Meier method. Results The expression of Cks1 was strongly associated with Skp2 expression (r = 0.477; P = 0.001) and inversely with p27Kip1 (r = -0.726; P < 0.0001). Overexpression of Cks1 was associated with loss of tumor differentiation, young age, lack of expression of estrogen receptors and of progesterone receptors, and decreased disease-free (P = 0.0007) and overall (P = 0.041) survival. In addition, Cks1 and Skp2 expression were increased by estradiol in estrogen-dependent cell lines but were down-regulated by tamoxifen. Conclusion These results suggest that Cks1 is involved in p27Kip1 down-regulation and may have an important role in the development of aggressive tumor behavior in breast cancer. PMID:16168119

  12. Intranuclear dynamics of the Nup107-160 complex

    PubMed Central

    Morchoisne-Bolhy, Stéphanie; Geoffroy, Marie-Claude; Bouhlel, Imène B.; Alves, Annabelle; Audugé, Nicolas; Baudin, Xavier; Van Bortle, Kevin; Powers, Maureen A.; Doye, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Nup98 is a glycine-leucine-phenylalanine-glycine (GLFG) repeat–containing nucleoporin that, in addition to nuclear transport, contributes to multiple aspects of gene regulation. Previous studies revealed its dynamic localization within intranuclear structures known as GLFG bodies. Here we show that the mammalian Nup107-160 complex (Y-complex), a major scaffold module of the nuclear pore, together with its partner Elys, colocalizes with Nup98 in GLFG bodies. The frequency and size of GLFG bodies vary among HeLa sublines, and we find that an increased level of Nup98 is associated with the presence of bodies. Recruitment of the Y-complex and Elys into GLFG bodies requires the C-terminal domain of Nup98. During cell division, Y-Nup–containing GLFG bodies are disassembled in mitotic prophase, significantly ahead of nuclear pore disassembly. FRAP studies revealed that, unlike at nuclear pores, the Y-complex shuttles into and out of GLFG bodies. Finally, we show that within the nucleoplasm, a fraction of Nup107, a key component of the Y-complex, displays reduced mobility, suggesting interaction with other nuclear components. Together our data uncover a previously neglected intranuclear pool of the Y-complex that may underscore a yet-uncharacterized function of these nucleoporins inside the nucleus, even in cells that contain no detectable GLFG bodies. PMID:25904327

  13. 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induces expression of p27(kip¹) and FoxO3a in female rat cerebral cortex and PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guangfei; Liu, Jiao; Yoshimoto, Katsuhiko; Chen, Gang; Iwata, Takeo; Mizusawa, Noriko; Duan, Zhiqing; Wan, Chunhua; Jiang, Junkang

    2014-05-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a potent toxin that alters normal brain development, producing cognitive disability and motor dysfunction. Previous studies in rats have proved that female rats are more sensitive to TCDD lethality than male ones. Recent studies have shown that TCDD induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, but the regulatory proteins involved in these processes have yet to be elucidated. In this study, we constructed an acute TCDD injury female rat model, and investigated the effects of TCDD on apoptosis and expression of cell cycle regulators, forkhead box class O 3a (FoxO3a) and p27(kip1), in the central nervous system (CNS). Increased levels of active caspase-3 were observed in the cerebral cortex of female rats treated with TCDD, suggesting that TCDD-induced apoptosis occurs in the CNS. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotinylated-dUTP nick-end labeling assay showed that apoptosis primarily occurred in neurons. Furthermore, Western blot analysis, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry showed a significant up-regulation of FoxO3a and p27(kip1) in the cerebral cortex. Immunofluorescent labeling indicated that FoxO3a and p27(kip1) were predominantly localized in apoptotic neurons, but not in astrocytes. In vitro experiments using PC12, a rat neuron-like pheochromocytoma cell line, also revealed that TCDD induced apoptosis and an increase in FoxO3a and p27(kip1) expression. Furthermore, knockdown of FoxO3a expression inhibited p27(kip1) transcription and TCDD-induced apoptosis. Based on our data, induction of FoxO3a may play an important role in TCDD-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:24594276

  14. Distribution and frequency of intranuclear inclusions in female CGG KI mice modeling the fragile X premutation☆

    PubMed Central

    Schluter, Erik W.; Hunsaker, Michael R.; Greco, Claudia M.; Willemsen, Rob; Berman, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    The fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is an adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder caused by CGG trinucleotide repeat expansions in the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. The neuropathological hallmark of FXTAS is the presence of ubiquitin-positive intranuclear inclusions in neurons and in astroglia. Intranuclear inclusions have also been reported in the neurons of male CGG KI mice carrying an expanded CGG trinucleotide repeat and used to model FXTAS, but no study has been carried out quantifying inclusions in female CGG KI mice heterozygous for the fragile X premutation. We used histologic and immunocytochemical methods to determine the pathological features of intranuclear inclusions in astroglia and neurons. In female CGG KI mice, ubiquitin-positive intranuclear inclusions were found in neurons and astroglia throughout the brain in cortical and subcortical regions. These inclusions increased in number and became larger with advanced age and increasing CGG repeat length, supporting hypotheses that these pathologic features are progressive across the lifespan. The number of inclusions in neurons was reduced by ~25% in female CGG KI mice compared to male CGG KI mice, but not so low as the 50% predicted. These data emphasize the need to evaluate the neurocognitive and pathological features in female carriers of the fragile X premutation with and without FXTAS symptomatology is warranted, as this population shows similar neuropathological features present in male FXTAS patients. PMID:22796595

  15. Nucleosome-like structural subunits of intranuclear parental adenovirus type 2 DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Sergeant, A; Tigges, M A; Raskas, H J

    1979-01-01

    The intranuclear structure of parental adenovirus 2 DNA was studied using digestion with micrococcal nuclease as a probe. When cultures were infected with 32P-labeled virions, at a multiplicity of 3,000 particles per cell, 14 to 21% of parental DNA penetrated the cell and reached the nucleus. Of this parental DNA, 60% could be solubilized by extensive digestion with micrococcal nuclease. The nuclease-resistant fraction contained viral deoxyribonucleoprotein monomers and oligomers. These nucleosome-like structures contained DNA fragments which are integral multiples of a unit-length DNA of approximately 185 base pairs. The monomeric DNA is similar in length to the unit-length DNA contained in cellular nucleosomes. However, the viral oligomers are slightly smaller than their cellular counterparts. DNA-DNA hybridization demonstrated that all segments of the viral genome, including those expressed as mRNA only at late times, are represented in the nucleosomal viral DNA. The amount of early intranuclear viral chromatin was proportional to multiplicity of infection up to multiplicities of 4,000 particles per cell. However, viral transcriptional activity did not increase in direct proportion to the amount of viral chromatin. Maximum accumulation of intranuclear viral chromatin was achieved by 3 h after infection. The intranuclear parental viral chromatin remained resistant to nuclease digestion even at late times in infection, after viral DNA replication had begun. Images PMID:448800

  16. PKCeta enhances cell cycle progression, the expression of G1 cyclins and p21 in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Fima, E; Shtutman, M; Libros, P; Missel, A; Shahaf, G; Kahana, G; Livneh, E

    2001-10-11

    Protein kinase C encodes a family of enzymes implicated in cellular differentiation, growth control and tumor promotion. However, not much is known with respect to the molecular mechanisms that link protein kinase C to cell cycle control. Here we report that the expression of PKCeta in MCF-7 cells, under the control of a tetracycline-responsive inducible promoter, enhanced cell growth and affected the cell cycle at several points. The induced expression of another PKC isoform, PKCdelta, in MCF-7 cells had opposite effects and inhibited their growth. PKCeta expression activated cellular pathways in these cells that resulted in the increased expression of the G1 phase cyclins, cyclin D and cyclin E. Expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(WAF1) was also specifically elevated in PKCeta expressing cells, but its overall effects were not inhibitory. Although, the protein levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(KIP1) were not altered by the induced expression of PKCeta, the cyclin E associated Cdk2 kinase activity was in correlation with the p27(KIP1) bound to the cyclin E complex and not by p21(WAF1) binding. PKCeta expression enhanced the removal of p27(KIP1) from this complex, and its re-association with the cyclin D/Cdk4 complex. Reduced binding of p27(KIP1) to the cyclin D/Cdk4 complex at early time points of the cell cycle also enhanced the activity of this complex, while at later time points the decrease in bound p21(WAF1) correlated with its increased activity in PKCeta-expressing cells. Thus, PKCeta induces altered expression of several cell cycle functions, which may contribute to its ability to affect cell growth. PMID:11709714

  17. Disruption of NAD+ binding site in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase affects its intranuclear interactions

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Manali; Krynetskaia, Natalia; Mishra, Anurag; Barrero, Carlos; Merali, Salim; Gothe, Scott A; Krynetskiy, Evgeny

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To characterize phosphorylation of human glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and mobility of GAPDH in cancer cells treated with chemotherapeutic agents. METHODS: We used proteomics analysis to detect and characterize phosphorylation sites within human GAPDH. Site-specific mutagenesis and alanine scanning was then performed to evaluate functional significance of phosphorylation sites in the GAPDH polypeptide chain. Enzymatic properties of mutated GAPDH variants were assessed using kinetic studies. Intranuclear dynamics parameters (diffusion coefficient and the immobile fraction) were estimated using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments and confocal microscopy. Molecular modeling experiments were performed to estimate the effects of mutations on NAD+ cofactor binding. RESULTS: Using MALDI-TOF analysis, we identified novel phosphorylation sites within the NAD+ binding center of GAPDH at Y94, S98, and T99. Using polyclonal antibody specific to phospho-T99-containing peptide within GAPDH, we demonstrated accumulation of phospho-T99-GAPDH in the nuclear fractions of A549, HCT116, and SW48 cancer cells after cytotoxic stress. We performed site-mutagenesis, and estimated enzymatic properties, intranuclear distribution, and intranuclear mobility of GAPDH mutated variants. Site-mutagenesis at positions S98 and T99 in the NAD+ binding center reduced enzymatic activity of GAPDH due to decreased affinity to NAD+ (Km = 741 ± 257 μmol/L in T99I vs 57 ± 11.1 µmol/L in wild type GAPDH. Molecular modeling experiments revealed the effect of mutations on NAD+ binding with GAPDH. FRAP (fluorescence recovery after photo bleaching) analysis showed that mutations in NAD+ binding center of GAPDH abrogated its intranuclear interactions. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest an important functional role of phosphorylated amino acids in the NAD+ binding center in GAPDH interactions with its intranuclear partners. PMID:26629320

  18. Insulin-like growth factor-I extends in vitro replicative life span of skeletal muscle satellite cells by enhancing G1/S cell cycle progression via the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase/Akt signaling pathway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakravarthy, M. V.; Abraha, T. W.; Schwartz, R. J.; Fiorotto, M. L.; Booth, F. W.

    2000-01-01

    Interest is growing in methods to extend replicative life span of non-immortalized stem cells. Using the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) transgenic mouse in which the IGF-I transgene is expressed during skeletal muscle development and maturation prior to isolation and during culture of satellite cells (the myogenic stem cells of mature skeletal muscle fibers) as a model system, we elucidated the underlying molecular mechanisms of IGF-I-mediated enhancement of proliferative potential of these cells. Satellite cells from IGF-I transgenic muscles achieved at least five additional population doublings above the maximum that was attained by wild type satellite cells. This IGF-I-induced increase in proliferative potential was mediated via activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase/Akt pathway, independent of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity, facilitating G(1)/S cell cycle progression via a down-regulation of p27(Kip1). Adenovirally mediated ectopic overexpression of p27(Kip1) in exponentially growing IGF-I transgenic satellite cells reversed the increase in cyclin E-cdk2 kinase activity, pRb phosphorylation, and cyclin A protein abundance, thereby implicating an important role for p27(Kip1) in promoting satellite cell senescence. These observations provide a more complete dissection of molecular events by which increased local expression of a growth factor in mature skeletal muscle fibers extends replicative life span of primary stem cells than previously known.

  19. 14-3-3ζ coordinates adipogenesis of visceral fat

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Gareth E.; Albrecht, Tobias; Piske, Micah; Sarai, Karnjit; Lee, Jason T. C; Ramshaw, Hayley S.; Sinha, Sunita; Guthridge, Mark A.; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Lopez, Angel F.; Clee, Susanne M.; Nislow, Corey; Johnson, James D.

    2015-01-01

    The proteins that coordinate complex adipogenic transcriptional networks are poorly understood. 14-3-3ζ is a molecular adaptor protein that regulates insulin signalling and transcription factor networks. Here we report that 14-3-3ζ-knockout mice are strikingly lean from birth with specific reductions in visceral fat depots. Conversely, transgenic 14-3-3ζ overexpression potentiates obesity, without exacerbating metabolic complications. Only the 14-3-3ζ isoform is essential for adipogenesis based on isoform-specific RNAi. Mechanistic studies show that 14-3-3ζ depletion promotes autophagy-dependent degradation of C/EBP-δ, preventing induction of the master adipogenic factors, Pparγ and C/EBP-α. Transcriptomic data indicate that 14-3-3ζ acts upstream of hedgehog signalling-dependent upregulation of Cdkn1b/p27Kip1. Indeed, concomitant knockdown of p27Kip1 or Gli3 rescues the early block in adipogenesis induced by 14-3-3ζ knockdown in vitro. Adipocyte precursors in 14-3-3ζKO embryos also appear to have greater Gli3 and p27Kip1 abundance. Together, our in vivo and in vitro findings demonstrate that 14-3-3ζ is a critical upstream driver of adipogenesis. PMID:26220403

  20. Nucleospora cyclopteri n. sp., an intranuclear microsporidian infecting wild lumpfish, Cyclopterus lumpus L., in Icelandic waters

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Commercial fisheries of lumpfish Cyclopterus lumpus have been carried out in Iceland for centuries. Traditionally the most valuable part is the eggs which are harvested for use as a caviar substitute. Previously reported parasitic infections from lumpfish include an undescribed intranuclear microsporidian associated with abnormal kidneys and mortalities in captive lumpfish in Canada. During Icelandic lumpfish fisheries in spring 2011, extensive enlargements to the kidneys were observed in some fish during processing. The aim of this study was to identify the pathogen responsible for these abnormalities. Methods Lumpfish from the Icelandic coast were examined for the causative agent of kidney enlargement. Fish were dissected and used in histological and molecular studies. Results Lumpfish, with various grades of clinical signs, were observed at 12 of the 43 sites sampled around Iceland. From a total of 77 fish examined, 18 had clear clinical signs, the most prominent of which was an extensive enlargement and pallor of the kidneys. The histopathology of the most severely affected fish consisted of extensive degeneration and necrosis of kidney tubules and vacuolar degeneration of the haematopoietic tissue. Intranuclear microsporidians were detected in all organs examined in fish with prominent clinical signs and most organs of apparently healthy fish using the new PCR and histological examination. One or multiple uniformly oval shaped spores measuring 3.12 ± 0.15 × 1.30 ± 0.12 μm were observed in the nucleus of affected lymphocytes and lymphocyte precursor cells. DNA sequencing provided a ribosomal DNA sequence that was strongly supported in phylogenetic analyses in a clade containing other microsporidian parasites from the Enterocytozoonidae, showing highest similarity to the intranuclear microsporidian Nucleospora salmonis. Conclusions Intranuclear microsporidian infections are common in wild caught lumpfish from around the Icelandic

  1. Neurotropic and neuroprotective activities of the earthworm peptide Lumbricusin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Hong; Lee, Ik Hwan; Nam, Seung Taek; Hong, Ji; Zhang, Peng; Hwang, Jae Sam; Seok, Heon; Choi, Hyemin; Lee, Dong Gun; Kim, Jae Il; Kim, Ho

    2014-06-01

    We recently isolated a polypeptide from the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris that is structurally similar to defensin, a well-known antibacterial peptide. An 11-mer antibacterial peptide (NH2-RNRRWCIDQQA), designated Lumbricusin, was synthesized based on the amino acid sequence of the isolated polypeptide. Since we previously reported that CopA3, a dung beetle peptide, enhanced neuronal cell proliferation, we here examined whether Lumbricusin exerted neurotropic and/or neuroprotective effects. Lumbricusin treatment induced a time-dependent increase (∼51%) in the proliferation of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Lumbricusin also significantly inhibited the apoptosis and decreased viability induced by treatment with 6-hydroxy dopamine, a Parkinson's disease-mimicking agent. Immunoblot analyses revealed that Lumbricusin treatment increased ubiquitination of p27(Kip1) protein, a negative regulator of cell-cycle progression, in SH-SY5Y cells, and markedly promoted its degradation. Notably, adenoviral-mediated over-expression of p27(Kip1) significantly blocked the antiapoptotic effect of Lumbricusin in 6-hydroxy dopamine-treated SH-SY5Y cells. These results suggest that promotion of p27(Kip1) degradation may be the main mechanism underlying the neuroprotective and neurotropic effects of Lumbricusin. PMID:24796676

  2. Induction of intranuclear membranes by overproduction of Opi1p and Scs2p, regulators for yeast phospholipid biosynthesis, suggests a mechanism for Opi1p nuclear translocation.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Miki; Oshima, Ayaka; Noguchi, Tetsuko; Kagiwada, Satoshi

    2016-03-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the expression of phospholipid biosynthetic genes is suppressed by the Opi1p negative regulator. Opi1p enters into the nucleoplasm from the nuclear membrane to suppress the gene expression under repressing conditions. The binding of Opi1p to the nuclear membrane requires an integral membrane protein, Scs2p and phosphatidic acid (PA). Although it is demonstrated that the association of Opi1p with membranes is affected by PA levels, how Opi1p dissociates from Scs2p is unknown. Here, we found that fluorescently labelled Opi1p accumulated on a perinuclear region in an Scs2p-dependent manner. Electron microscopic analyses indicated that the perinuclear region consists of intranuclear membranes, which may be formed by the invagination of the nuclear membrane due to the accumulation of Opi1p and Scs2p in a restricted area. As expected, localization of Opi1p and Scs2p in the intranuclear membranes was detected by immunoelectron microscopy. Biochemical analysis showed that Opi1p recovered in the membrane fraction was detergent insoluble while Scs2p was soluble, implying that Opi1p behaves differently from Scs2p in the fraction. We hypothesize that Opi1p dissociates from Scs2p after targeting to the nuclear membrane, making it possible to be released from the membrane quickly when PA levels decrease. PMID:26590299

  3. Widespread occurrence of an intranuclear bacterial parasite in vent and seep bathymodiolin mussels.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Frank U; Pernthaler, Annelie; Duperron, Sébastien; Raggi, Luciana; Giere, Olav; Borowski, Christian; Dubilier, Nicole

    2009-05-01

    Many parasitic bacteria live in the cytoplasm of multicellular animals, but only a few are known to regularly invade their nuclei. In this study, we describe the novel bacterial parasite "Candidatus Endonucleobacter bathymodioli" that invades the nuclei of deep-sea bathymodiolin mussels from hydrothermal vents and cold seeps. Bathymodiolin mussels are well known for their symbiotic associations with sulfur- and methane-oxidizing bacteria. In contrast, the parasitic bacteria of vent and seep animals have received little attention despite their potential importance for deep-sea ecosystems. We first discovered the intranuclear parasite "Ca. E. bathymodioli" in Bathymodiolus puteoserpentis from the Logatchev hydrothermal vent field on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Using primers and probes specific to "Ca. E. bathymodioli" we found this intranuclear parasite in at least six other bathymodiolin species from vents and seeps around the world. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and transmission electron microscopy analyses of the developmental cycle of "Ca. E. bathymodioli" showed that the infection of a nucleus begins with a single rod-shaped bacterium which grows to an unseptated filament of up to 20 microm length and then divides repeatedly until the nucleus is filled with up to 80,000 bacteria. The greatly swollen nucleus destroys its host cell and the bacteria are released after the nuclear membrane bursts. Intriguingly, the only nuclei that were never infected by "Ca. E. bathymodioli" were those of the gill bacteriocytes. These cells contain the symbiotic sulfur- and methane-oxidizing bacteria, suggesting that the mussel symbionts can protect their host nuclei against the parasite. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the "Ca. E. bathymodioli" belongs to a monophyletic clade of Gammaproteobacteria associated with marine metazoans as diverse as sponges, corals, bivalves, gastropods, echinoderms, ascidians and fish. We hypothesize that many of the sequences from this clade

  4. Acid-fast intranuclear inclusion bodies in the kidneys of mallards fed lead shot

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Locke, L.N.; Bagley, G.E.; Irby, H.D.

    1966-01-01

    Acid-fast intranuclear inclusion bodies were found in the cells of the proximal convoluted tubules of the kidneys of mallards fed one, two, three or eight number 6 lead shot and maintained on cracked or whole corn and on grain-duck pellet diets. No acid-fast inclusion bodies were found in mallards fed one or three lead shot but maintained on a duck pellet ration. Dietary factors may be responsible for the failure of mallards fed a duck pellet ration to develop lead Inclusion bodies when treated with one or three lead shot. The authors suggest these inclusion bodies can be used as presumptive evidence for lead intoxication in mallards.

  5. Neuronal intranuclear inclusions are ultrastructurally and immunologically distinct from cytoplasmic inclusions of neuronal intermediate filament inclusion disease.

    PubMed

    Mosaheb, Sabrina; Thorpe, Julian R; Hashemzadeh-Bonehi, Lida; Bigio, Eileen H; Gearing, Marla; Cairns, Nigel J

    2005-10-01

    Abnormal neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCIs) containing aggregates of alpha-internexin and the neurofilament (NF) subunits, NF-H, NF-M, and NF-L, are the signature lesions of neuronal intermediate filament (IF) inclusion disease (NIFID). The disease has a clinically heterogeneous phenotype, including frontotemporal dementia, pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs presenting at a young age. NCIs are variably ubiquitinated and about half of cases also have neuronal intranuclear inclusions (NIIs), which are also ubiquitinated. NIIs have been described in polyglutamine-repeat expansion diseases, where they are strongly ubiquitin immunoreactive. The fine structure of NIIs of NIFID has not previously been described. Therefore, to determine the ultrastructure of NIIs, immunoelectron microscopy was undertaken on NIFID cases and normal aged control brains. Our results indicate that the NIIs of NIFID are strongly ubiquitin immunoreactive. However, unlike NCIs which contain ubiquitin, alpha-internexin and NF epitopes, NIIs contain neither epitopes of alpha-internexin nor NF subunits. Neither NIIs nor NCIs were recognised by antibodies to expanded polyglutamine repeats. The NII of NIFID lacks a limiting membrane and contains straight filaments of 20 nm mean width (range 11-35 nm), while NCIs contain filaments with a mean width of 10 nm (range 5-18 nm; t-test, P<0.001). Biochemistry revealed no differences in neuronal IF protein mobilities between NIFID and normal brain tissue. Therefore, NIIs of NIFID contain filaments morphologically and immunologically distinct from those of NCIs, and both types of inclusion lack expanded polyglutamine tracts of the triplet-repeat expansion diseases. These observations indicate that abnormal protein aggregation follows separate pathways in different neuronal compartments of NIFID. PMID:16025283

  6. Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in a case of intranuclear rod myopathy without any prenatal sentinel event.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Koya; Nishino, Ichizo; Sugimoto, Mari; Kouwaki, Masanori; Koyama, Norihisa; Yokochi, Kenji

    2015-02-01

    Intranuclear rod myopathy (IRM), a variant of nemaline myopathy, is characterized by the presence of nemaline bodies in myonuclei. We report a case of IRM presenting with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). There were no prenatal complications caused by fetal brain injury. Although no nemaline bodies were observed in the cytoplasm, intranuclear rods were observed in some fibers under light and electron microscopy. Molecular analysis identified a heterozygous variant, c.449C>T (p.Thr150Ile), in ACTA1. On magnetic resonance imaging at 9days of age, injuries to the basal ganglia, thalamus, and brainstem consistent with perinatal HIE were seen. Respiratory insufficiency at birth was strongly suspected to be the cause of HIE. Our case highlights that a patient with a congenital neuromuscular disorder who presents with severe respiratory dysfunction requiring substantial resuscitative efforts at birth can be complicated by HIE without any prenatal sentinel event. Prenatal detection of neuromuscular disorders, careful management of delivery, and neonatal resuscitation and adequate respiratory management are important in preventing irreversible brain injury in these patients. PMID:24787270

  7. Intranuclear Pseudo-inclusions and Grooves in Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology of Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari, Maral; Kumar, Perikala Vijayananda

    2016-02-01

    Cytologic findings of pulmonary carcinoid have been well described. We report new cytological findings in a case of carcinoid tumor. The patient is a 36-year-old man presenting with hemoptysis of about six months in duration. Chest CT scans showed a well-defined round polypoid lesion measuring 1 × 1 cm within the right upper lobe of the bronchus with hyperinflation of the right upper lobe. Trans-bronchial fine needle aspiration and biopsy were done. Cytologic smears showed isolated and loose clusters of uniform round to spindle shape cells with round centrally located nuclei, fine granular (salt and pepper) chromatin and pale cytoplasm. Intranuclear pseudo-inclusions and grooves were seen in some tumor cells. No mitotic figures or necrosis were evident. A cytological diagnosis of carcinoid tumor was made and histopathologic examination and subsequent immunohistochemical study confirmed the diagnosis. Carcinoid tumor may be reliably diagnosed on fine needle aspiration cytology smears. Intranuclear pseudo-inclusions and grooves may be evident in tumor cells. PMID:26838088

  8. Accessing the tonotopic organization of the ventral cochlear nucleus by intranuclear microstimulation.

    PubMed

    McCreery, D B; Shannon, R V; Moore, J K; Chatterjee, M

    1998-12-01

    This study is part of a program to develop an auditory prosthesis for the profoundly deaf, based on multichannel microstimulation in the cochlear nucleus. The functionality of such a device is dependent on its ability to access the tonotopic axis of the human ventral cochlear nucleus in an orderly fashion. In these studies, we utilized the homologies between the human and feline ventral cochlear nuclei and the known tonotopic organization of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (IC). In anesthetized cats, stimuli were delivered to three or four locations along the dorsal-to-ventral axis of the posteroventral cochlear nucleus (PVCN), and for each stimulus location, we recorded the multiunit neuronal activity and the field potentials at 20 or more locations along the dorsolateral-ventromedial (tonotopic) axis of the IC. The current source-sink density (CSD), which delimits regions of neuronal activity, was computed from the sequence of field potentials recorded along this axis. The multiunit activity and the CSD analysis both showed that the tonotopic organization of the PVCN can be accessed in an orderly manner by intranuclear microstimulation in several regions of the PVCN, using the range of stimulus pulse amplitudes that have been shown in previous studies to be noninjurious during prolonged intranuclear microstimulation via chronically implanted microelectrodes. We discuss the applicability of these findings to the design of clinical auditory prostheses for implantation into the human cochlear nucleus. PMID:9865886

  9. Extended Intranuclear Cascade model for pickup reactions induced by 50-MeV-range protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uozumi, Yusuke; Mori, Taiki; Sonoda, Akifumi; Nakano, Masahiro

    2016-06-01

    The intranuclear cascade model was investigated to explain (p, dx) and (p, ax) reactions at incident energies of around 50 MeV. Since these reactions are governed mainly by the direct pickup process, the model was expanded to include exclusive pickup processes leading to hole-state-excitations. The energy of the outgoing clusters is determined with single-particle energies of transferred nucleons, the reaction Q-value, and the recoil of the residual nucleus. The rescattering of the produced cluster inside the nucleus is treated within the intranuclear cascade model. The emission angle is given by the sum of momentum vectors of transferred nucleons in addition to the deflection at the nuclear surface, which was introduced to explain angular distributions of elastic scattering. Double differential cross sections of reactions were calculated and compared with experimental data. The proposed model showed a high predictive power over the wide range of emission energies and angles. The treatment ofthe cluster transport inside the nucleus was also verified.

  10. Intranuclear bundles of microfilaments and microtubules in chromaffin cells of the auricle of the heart of a lungfish, Protopterus aethiopicus.

    PubMed

    Scheuermann, D W; Adriaensen, D; De Groodt-Lasseel, M H

    1988-01-01

    Intranuclear microtubular-microfilamentous rod-like inclusions were investigated in chromaffin cells of the auricle of the heart of lungfishes. In conventional electron microscopy, these inclusions reveal a wide variety in appearance, depending on their orientation to the plane of sectioning. Whereas originally they were merely interpreted as a bundle of microfilaments, application of a goniometer stage showed the rod- or spindle-shaped intranuclear inclusions to have a basic substructure of parallel arranged microtubules among microfilaments, which are clearly connected to chromatin granules, occasionally penetrating dense areas of chromatin. The chemical nature and biological significance of these structures, which so far remain enigmatic, are discussed. PMID:3227775

  11. Memory Loss and Frontal Cognitive Dysfunction in a Patient with Adult-onset Neuronal Intranuclear Inclusion Disease.

    PubMed

    Araki, Kunihiko; Sone, Jun; Fujioka, Yusuke; Masuda, Michihito; Ohdake, Reiko; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Sobue, Gen

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal intranuclear inclusion disease (NIID) is an uncommon progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Adult-onset NIID can result in prominent dementia. We herein describe the case of a 74-year-old man who presented with dementia, cerebellar ataxia, neuropathy, and autonomic dysfunction. Diffusion-weighted imaging showed hyperintensity of the corticomedullary junction. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images showed frontal-dominant white matter hyperintensity. NIID was diagnosed from the presence of intranuclear inclusions in a skin biopsy sample. Neuropsychological testing revealed memory loss and frontal cognitive dysfunction, especially in relation to language and executive functions. We were therefore able to confirm the association of NIID with cognitive dysfunction. PMID:27523009

  12. Protein kinase C delta inhibits Caco-2 cell proliferation by selective changes in cell cycle and cell death regulators.

    PubMed

    Cerda, S R; Mustafi, R; Little, H; Cohen, G; Khare, S; Moore, C; Majumder, P; Bissonnette, M

    2006-05-25

    PKC-delta is a serine/threonine kinase that mediates diverse signal transduction pathways. We previously demonstrated that overexpression of PKC-delta slowed the G1 progression of Caco-2 colon cancer cells, accelerated apoptosis, and induced cellular differentiation. In this study, we further characterized the PKC-delta dependent signaling pathways involved in these tumor suppressor actions in Caco-2 cells overexpressing PKC-delta using a Zn2+ inducible expression vector. Consistent with a G1 arrest, increased expression of PKC-delta caused rapid and significant downregulation of cyclin D1 and cyclin E proteins (50% decreases, P<0.05), while mRNA levels remained unchanged. The PKC agonist, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA, 100 nM, 4 h), induced two-fold higher protein and mRNA levels of p21(Waf1), a cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitor in PKC-delta transfectants compared with empty vector (EV) transfected cells, whereas the PKC-delta specific inhibitor rottlerin (3 microM) or knockdown of this isoenzyme with specific siRNA oligonucleotides blocked p21(Waf1) expression. Concomitantly, compared to EV control cells, PKC-delta upregulation decreased cyclin D1 and cyclin E proteins co-immunoprecipitating with cdk6 and cdk2, respectively. In addition, overexpression of PKC-delta increased binding of cdk inhibitor p27(Kip1) to cdk4. These alterations in cyclin-cdks and their inhibitors are predicted to decrease G1 cyclin kinase activity. As an independent confirmation of the direct role PKC-delta plays in cell growth and cell cycle regulation, we knocked down PKC-delta using specific siRNA oligonucleotides. PKC-delta specific siRNA oligonucleotides, but not irrelevant control oligonucleotides, inhibited PKC-delta protein by more than 80% in Caco-2 cells. Moreover, PKC-delta knockdown enhanced cell proliferation ( approximately 1.4-2-fold, P<0.05) and concomitantly increased cyclin D1 and cyclin E expression ( approximately 1.7-fold, P<0.05). This was a specific

  13. Intranuclear interactomic inhibition of NF-κB suppresses LPS-induced severe sepsis

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung-Dong; Cheon, So Yeong; Park, Tae-Yoon; Shin, Bo-Young; Oh, Hyunju; Ghosh, Sankar; Koo, Bon-Nyeo; Lee, Sang-Kyou

    2015-08-28

    Suppression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, which is best known as a major regulator of innate and adaptive immune responses, is a potent strategy for the treatment of endotoxic sepsis. To inhibit NF-κB functions, we designed the intra-nuclear transducible form of transcription modulation domain (TMD) of RelA (p65), called nt-p65-TMD, which can be delivered effectively into the nucleus without influencing the cell viability, and work as interactomic inhibitors via disruption of the endogenous p65-mediated transcription complex. nt-p65-TMD effectively inhibited the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-1β, or IL-6 from BV2 microglia cells stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). nt-p65-TMD did not inhibit tyrosine phosphorylation of signaling mediators such as ZAP-70, p38, JNK, or ERK involved in T cell activation, but was capable of suppressing the transcriptional activity of NF-κB without the functional effect on that of NFAT upon T-cell receptor (TCR) stimulation. The transduced nt-p65-TMD in T cell did not affect the expression of CD69, however significantly inhibited the secretion of T cell-specific cytokines such as IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-17A, or IL-10. Systemic administration of nt-p65-TMD showed a significant therapeutic effect on LPS-induced sepsis model by inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion. Therefore, nt-p65-TMD can be a novel therapeutics for the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including sepsis, where a transcription factor has a key role in pathogenesis, and further allows us to discover new functions of p65 under normal physiological condition without genetic alteration. - Highlights: • The nt-p65-TMD is intra-nuclear interactomic inhibitor of endogenous p65. • The nt-p65-TMD effectively inhibited the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. • The excellent therapeutic potential of nt-p65-TMD was confirmed in sepsis model.

  14. Processes involving few degrees of freedom in the frame of Intranuclear Cascade approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cugnon, J.; Boudard, A.; David, J.-C.; Leray, S.; Mancusi, D.

    2016-05-01

    This article focuses on spallation reactions, i.e. interactions of energetic nucleons, basically with a kinetic energy in the 100MeV to a few GeV range, with a target nucleus. These processes are described rather successfully by the so-called Intranuclear Cascade (INC) plus evaporation models. They can be viewed as a first stage of nucleon-nucleon collisions, ejecting fast particles, followed by evaporation of slow particles from the target remnant. These cascade + evaporation models have, now, globally reached a high level of predictive power, owing in particular to successive research programs. The present work, which is an outcome of one of these programs, the recent European Union ANDES research program, deals with a set of reactions (or observable quantities), which can be due to a single collision, such as the one-nucleon removal reactions or the quasi-elastic elastic process. A survey of the experimental data is presented, which allows to clearly point out that, often, the INC models are unsatisfactory for the description of these peculiar events, whereas they are rather successful for the rest of the experimental data. This paradoxical situation is tentatively related to quasi-particle effects which are neglected in INC models.

  15. Intranuclear cascade with emission of light fragment code implemented in the transport code system PHITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Y.; Uozumi, Y.; Nogamine, S.; Yamada, T.; Iwamoto, Y.; Sato, T.; Niita, K.

    2012-11-01

    The Intranuclear Cascade with Emission of Light Fragment (INC-ELF) code has been developed and implemented in the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS). The INC-ELF code explicitly includes nucleon correlations within the framework of the INC model to describe light fragment emissions from nuclear spallation reactions by using the model in Phys. Rev. C 84, (2011) 064617. In addition to the degrees of freedom of nucleons, the developed code also accounts for pions, Δs, and N∗s, and can cover energy ranges up to 3 GeV. The predictive capabilities of the ELF/PHITS system have been verified through comparison with a diverse set of experimental observations. In particular, the verification was conducted with abundant double-differential cross-section data covering a wide range of reactions (e.g., (p, p'x), (p, nx), (p, dx), (p, 3Hex), (p, αx) and (p, πx) reactions) over a wide energy range (between 400 MeV and 1.5 GeV). As a result, our ELF/PHITS code has demonstrated strong predictive capability for all of these data, although areas requiring future study remain due to the lack of experimental data on high-energy cluster production.

  16. Balbiani Ring mRNPs Diffuse through and Bind to Clusters of Large Intranuclear Molecular Structures

    PubMed Central

    Veith, Roman; Sorkalla, Thomas; Baumgart, Eugen; Anzt, Johannes; Häberlein, Hanns; Tyagi, Sanjay; Siebrasse, Jan Peter; Kubitscheck, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    A detailed conception of intranuclear messenger ribonucleoprotein particle (mRNP) dynamics is required for the understanding of mRNP processing and gene expression outcome. We used complementary state-of-the-art fluorescence techniques to quantify native mRNP mobility at the single particle level in living salivary gland cell nuclei. Molecular beacons and fluorescent oligonucleotides were used to specifically label BR2.1 mRNPs by an in vivo fluorescence in situ hybridization approach. We characterized two major mobility components of the BR2.1 mRNPs. These components with diffusion coefficients of 0.3 ± 0.02 μm2/s and 0.73 ± 0.03 μm2/s were observed independently of the staining method and measurement technique used. The mobility analysis of inert tracer molecules revealed that the gland cell nuclei contain large molecular nonchromatin structures, which hinder the mobility of large molecules and particles. The mRNPs are not only hindered by these mobility barriers, but in addition also interact presumably with these structures, what further reduces their mobility and effectively leads to the occurrence of the two diffusion coefficients. In addition, we provide evidence that the remarkably high mobility of the large, 50 nm-sized BR2.1 mRNPs was due to the absence of retarding chromatin. PMID:20959109

  17. A novel intranuclear RNA vector system for long-term stem cell modification.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Y; Makino, A; Matchett, W E; Holditch, S J; Lu, B; Dietz, A B; Tomonaga, K

    2016-03-01

    Genetically modified stem and progenitor cells have emerged as a promising regenerative platform in the treatment of genetic and degenerative disorders, highlighted by their successful therapeutic use in inherent immunodeficiencies. However, biosafety concerns over insertional mutagenesis resulting from integrating recombinant viral vectors have overshadowed the widespread clinical applications of genetically modified stem cells. Here, we report an RNA-based episomal vector system, amenable for long-term transgene expression in stem cells. Specifically, we used a unique intranuclear RNA virus, borna disease virus (BDV), as the gene transfer vehicle, capable of persistent infections in various cell types. BDV-based vectors allowed for long-term transgene expression in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) without affecting cellular morphology, cell surface CD105 expression or the adipogenicity of MSCs. Similarly, replication-defective BDV vectors achieved long-term transduction of human induced pluripotent stem cells, while maintaining the ability to differentiate into three embryonic germ layers. Thus, the BDV-based vectors offer a genomic modification-free, episomal RNA delivery system for sustained stem cell transduction. PMID:26632671

  18. A novel intranuclear RNA vector system for long-term stem cell modification

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Makino, Akiko; Matchett, William E.; Holditch, Sara J.; Lu, Brian; Dietz, Allan B.; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2015-01-01

    Genetically modified stem and progenitor cells have emerged as a promising regenerative platform in the treatment of genetic and degenerative disorders, highlighted by their successful therapeutic use in inherent immunodeficiencies. However, biosafety concerns over insertional mutagenesis resulting from integrating recombinant viral vectors have overshadowed the widespread clinical applications of genetically modified stem cells. Here, we report an RNA-based episomal vector system, amenable for long-term transgene expression in stem cells. Specifically, we used a unique intranuclear RNA virus, Borna disease virus (BDV), as the gene transfer vehicle, capable of persistent infections in various cell types. BDV-based vectors allowed for long-term transgene expression in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) without affecting cellular morphology, cell surface CD105 expression, or the adipogenicity of MSCs. Similarly, replication-defective BDV vectors achieved long-term transduction of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), while maintaining the ability to differentiate into three embryonic germ layers. Thus, the BDV-based vectors offer a genomic modification-free, episomal RNA delivery system for sustained stem cell transduction. PMID:26632671

  19. Topochemistry of Internuclear and Intranuclear Interneurons of the Vasomotor Area in the Medulla Oblongata of Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Chertok, V M; Kotsyuba, A E; Startseva, M S

    2016-01-01

    Immunohistochemical examination with the antiserum against neuronal NO synthase and cystathionine β-synthase was used to study the following two pools of interneurons in Wistar rats at various periods after the development of renovascular hypertension: intranuclear interneurons (lying in the projection of the solitary nucleus, reticular gigantocellular nucleus, and parvocellular nucleus) and 2 groups of internuclear interneurons (small interneurons, area 50-300 μ(2); and large interneurons, area above 350 μ(2)). Intranuclear and internuclear interneurons probably play a role in the central mechanisms of hemodynamics regulation. These interneurons differ by not only in topochemical parameters, but also functional properties (different resistances to BP changes). Intranuclear interneurons are characterized by high sensitivity of the gas transmitter systems to a continuous increase in BP, which results in remodeling and dysfunction of the bulbar part of the cardiovascular center. Large internuclear interneurons demonstrate a strong reaction to BP rise, which confirms their involvement into hemodynamics regulation. By contrast, small internuclear interneurons retain their characteristics in arterial hypertension and probably perform an integrative function. PMID:26746841

  20. Nitro-linoleic acid inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation via the Keap1/Nrf2 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Villacorta, Luis; Zhang, Jifeng; Garcia-Barrio, Minerva T.; Chen, Xi-lin; Freeman, Bruce A.; Chen, Yuqing E.; Cui, Taixing

    2007-01-01

    Nitroalkenes, the nitration products of unsaturated fatty acids formed via NO-dependent oxidative reactions, have been demonstrated to exert strong biological actions in endothelial cells and monocytes/macrophages; however, little is known about their effects on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The present study examined the role of nitro-linoleic acid (LNO2) in the regulation of VSMC proliferation. We observed that LNO2 inhibited VSMC proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, LNO2 induced growth arrest of VSMCs in the G1/S phase of the cell cycle with an upregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27kip1. Furthermore, LNO2 triggered nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) nuclear translocation and activation of the antioxidant-responsive element-driven transcriptional activity via impairing Kelch-like ECH-associating protein 1 (Keap1)-mediated negative control of Nrf2 activity in VSMCs. LNO2 upregulated the expression of Nrf2 protein levels, but not mRNA levels, in VSMCs. A forced activation of Nrf2 led to an upregulation of p27kip1 and growth inhibition of VSMCs. In contrast, knock down of Nrf2 using an Nrf2 siRNA approach reversed the LNO2-induced upregulation of p27kip1 and inhibition of cellular proliferation in VSMCs. These studies provide the first evidence that nitroalkene LNO2 inhibits VSMC proliferation through activation of the Keap1/Nrf2 signaling pathway, suggesting an important role of nitroalkenes in vascular biology. PMID:17468336

  1. Intranuclear verrucomicrobial symbionts and evidence of lateral gene transfer to the host protist in the termite gut.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tomoyuki; Kuwahara, Hirokazu; Fujita, Kazuma; Noda, Satoko; Kihara, Kumiko; Yamada, Akinori; Ohkuma, Moriya; Hongoh, Yuichi

    2014-05-01

    In 1944, Harold Kirby described microorganisms living within nuclei of the protists Trichonympha in guts of termites; however, their taxonomic assignment remains to be accomplished. Here, we identified intranuclear symbionts of Trichonympha agilis in the gut of the termite Reticulitermes speratus. We isolated single nuclei of T. agilis, performed whole-genome amplification, and obtained bacterial 16S rRNA genes by PCR. Unexpectedly, however, all of the analyzed clones were from pseudogenes of 16S rRNA with large deletions and numerous sequence variations even within a single-nucleus sample. Authentic 16S rRNA gene sequences were finally recovered by digesting the nuclear DNA; these pseudogenes were present on the host Trichonympha genome. The authentic sequences represented two distinct bacterial species belonging to the phylum Verrucomicrobia, and the pseudogenes have originated from each of the two species. Fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed that both species are specifically localized, and occasionally co-localized, within nuclei of T. agilis. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that they are distorted cocci with characteristic electron-dense and lucent regions, which resemble the intranuclear symbionts illustrated by Kirby. For these symbionts, we propose a novel genus and species, 'Candidatus Nucleococcus trichonymphae' and 'Candidatus Nucleococcus kirbyi'. These formed a termite-specific cluster with database sequences, other members of which were also detected within nuclei of various gut protists, including both parabasalids and oxymonads. We suggest that this group is widely distributed as intranuclear symbionts of diverse protists in termite guts and that they might have affected the evolution of the host genome through lateral gene transfer. PMID:24335826

  2. Intranuclear verrucomicrobial symbionts and evidence of lateral gene transfer to the host protist in the termite gut

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Tomoyuki; Kuwahara, Hirokazu; Fujita, Kazuma; Noda, Satoko; Kihara, Kumiko; Yamada, Akinori; Ohkuma, Moriya; Hongoh, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    In 1944, Harold Kirby described microorganisms living within nuclei of the protists Trichonympha in guts of termites; however, their taxonomic assignment remains to be accomplished. Here, we identified intranuclear symbionts of Trichonympha agilis in the gut of the termite Reticulitermes speratus. We isolated single nuclei of T. agilis, performed whole-genome amplification, and obtained bacterial 16S rRNA genes by PCR. Unexpectedly, however, all of the analyzed clones were from pseudogenes of 16S rRNA with large deletions and numerous sequence variations even within a single-nucleus sample. Authentic 16S rRNA gene sequences were finally recovered by digesting the nuclear DNA; these pseudogenes were present on the host Trichonympha genome. The authentic sequences represented two distinct bacterial species belonging to the phylum Verrucomicrobia, and the pseudogenes have originated from each of the two species. Fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed that both species are specifically localized, and occasionally co-localized, within nuclei of T. agilis. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that they are distorted cocci with characteristic electron-dense and lucent regions, which resemble the intranuclear symbionts illustrated by Kirby. For these symbionts, we propose a novel genus and species, ‘Candidatus Nucleococcus trichonymphae' and ‘Candidatus Nucleococcus kirbyi'. These formed a termite-specific cluster with database sequences, other members of which were also detected within nuclei of various gut protists, including both parabasalids and oxymonads. We suggest that this group is widely distributed as intranuclear symbionts of diverse protists in termite guts and that they might have affected the evolution of the host genome through lateral gene transfer. PMID:24335826

  3. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 infection leads to arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meihong; Yang, Liangpeng; Zhang, Ling; Liu, Baoying; Merling, Randall; Xia, Zheng; Giam, Chou-Zen

    2008-09-01

    Infection by the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is thought to cause dysregulated T-cell proliferation, which in turn leads to adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. Early cellular changes after HTLV-1 infection have been difficult to study due to the poorly infectious nature of HTLV-1 and the need for cell-to-cell contact for HTLV-1 transmission. Using a series of reporter systems, we show that HeLa cells cease proliferation within one or two division cycles after infection by HTLV-1 or transduction of the HTLV-1 tax gene. HTLV-1-infected HeLa cells, like their tax-transduced counterparts, expressed high levels of p21(CIP1/WAF1) and p27(KIP1), developed mitotic abnormalities, and became arrested in G(1) in senescence. In contrast, cells of a human osteosarcoma lineage (HOS) continued to divide after HTLV-1 infection or Tax expression, albeit at a reduced growth rate and with mitotic aberrations. Unique to HOS cells is the dramatic reduction of p21(CIP1/WAF1) and p27(KIP1) expression, which is in part associated with the constitutive activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)-protein kinase B (Akt) pathway. The loss of p21(CIP1/WAF1) and p27(KIP1) in HOS cells apparently allows HTLV-1- and Tax-induced G(1) arrest to be bypassed. Finally, HTLV-1 infection and Tax expression also cause human SupT1 T cells to arrest in the G(1) phase of the cell cycle. These results suggest that productive HTLV-1 infection ordinarily leads to Tax-mediated G(1) arrest. However, T cells containing somatic mutations that inactivate p21(CIP1/WAF1) and p27(KIP1) may continue to proliferate after HTLV-1 infection and Tax expression. These infected cells can expand clonally, accumulate additional chromosomal abnormalities, and progress to cancer. PMID:18596104

  4. A Honey Bee Hexamerin, HEX 70a, Is Likely to Play an Intranuclear Role in Developing and Mature Ovarioles and Testioles

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Juliana R.; Anhezini, Lucas; Dallacqua, Rodrigo P.; Simões, Zilá L. P.; Bitondi, Márcia M. G.

    2011-01-01

    Insect hexamerins have long been known as storage proteins that are massively synthesized by the larval fat body and secreted into hemolymph. Following the larval-to-pupal molt, hexamerins are sequestered by the fat body via receptor-mediated endocytosis, broken up, and used as amino acid resources for metamorphosis. In the honey bee, the transcript and protein subunit of a hexamerin, HEX 70a, were also detected in ovaries and testes. Aiming to identify the subcellular localization of HEX 70a in the female and male gonads, we used a specific antibody in whole mount preparations of ovaries and testes for analysis by confocal laser-scanning microscopy. Intranuclear HEX 70a foci were evidenced in germ and somatic cells of ovarioles and testioles of pharate-adult workers and drones, suggesting a regulatory or structural role. Following injection of the thymidine analog EdU we observed co-labeling with HEX 70a in ovariole cell nuclei, inferring possible HEX 70a involvement in cell proliferation. Further support to this hypothesis came from an injection of anti-HEX 70a into newly ecdysed queen pupae where it had a negative effect on ovariole thickening. HEX 70a foci were also detected in ovarioles of egg laying queens, particularly in the nuclei of the highly polyploid nurse cells and in proliferating follicle cells. Additional roles for this storage protein are indicated by the detection of nuclear HEX 70a foci in post-meiotic spermatids and spermatozoa. Taken together, these results imply undescribed roles for HEX 70a in the developing gonads of the honey bee and raise the possibility that other hexamerins may also have tissue specific functions. PMID:22205988

  5. A honey bee hexamerin, HEX 70a, is likely to play an intranuclear role in developing and mature ovarioles and testioles.

    PubMed

    Martins, Juliana R; Anhezini, Lucas; Dallacqua, Rodrigo P; Simões, Zilá L P; Bitondi, Márcia M G

    2011-01-01

    Insect hexamerins have long been known as storage proteins that are massively synthesized by the larval fat body and secreted into hemolymph. Following the larval-to-pupal molt, hexamerins are sequestered by the fat body via receptor-mediated endocytosis, broken up, and used as amino acid resources for metamorphosis. In the honey bee, the transcript and protein subunit of a hexamerin, HEX 70a, were also detected in ovaries and testes. Aiming to identify the subcellular localization of HEX 70a in the female and male gonads, we used a specific antibody in whole mount preparations of ovaries and testes for analysis by confocal laser-scanning microscopy. Intranuclear HEX 70a foci were evidenced in germ and somatic cells of ovarioles and testioles of pharate-adult workers and drones, suggesting a regulatory or structural role. Following injection of the thymidine analog EdU we observed co-labeling with HEX 70a in ovariole cell nuclei, inferring possible HEX 70a involvement in cell proliferation. Further support to this hypothesis came from an injection of anti-HEX 70a into newly ecdysed queen pupae where it had a negative effect on ovariole thickening. HEX 70a foci were also detected in ovarioles of egg laying queens, particularly in the nuclei of the highly polyploid nurse cells and in proliferating follicle cells. Additional roles for this storage protein are indicated by the detection of nuclear HEX 70a foci in post-meiotic spermatids and spermatozoa. Taken together, these results imply undescribed roles for HEX 70a in the developing gonads of the honey bee and raise the possibility that other hexamerins may also have tissue specific functions. PMID:22205988

  6. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Novel Amoeba-Resistant Intranuclear Bacteria, “Candidatus Berkiella cookevillensis” and “Candidatus Berkiella aquae”

    PubMed Central

    Mehari, Yohannes T.; Arivett, Brock A.; Farone, Anthony L.; Gunderson, John H.

    2016-01-01

    “Candidatus Berkiella cookevillensis” and “Candidatus Berkiella aquae” are obligate intranuclear endosymbionts of freshwater amoebae. Here, we present the draft genome sequences of these two bacteria, with total sizes of 2,990,361 bp and 3,626,027 bp, respectively. PMID:26893424

  7. Cross sections of proton- and neutron-induced reactions by the Liège intranuclear cascade model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Dong, Tiekuang; Ren, Zhongzhou

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the paper is mainly to test the validity of the Liège intranuclear cascade (INCL) model in calculating the cross sections of proton-induced reactions for cosmogenic nuclei using the newly compiled database of proton cross sections. The model calculations of 3He display the rising tendency of cross sections with the increase of energy, in accordance with the experimental data. Meanwhile, the differences between the theoretical results and experimental data of production cross sections (10Be and 26Al) are generally within a factor of 3, meaning that the INCL model works quite well for the proton-induced reactions. Based on the good agreement, we predict the production cross sections of 26Al from reactions n + 27Al, n + 28Si, and n + 40Ca and those of 10Be from reactions n + 16O and n + 28Si. The results also show a good agreement with a posteriori excitation functions.

  8. CDK2 and mTOR are direct molecular targets of isoangustone A in the suppression of human prostate cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunjung; Son, Joe Eun; Byun, Sanguine; Lee, Seung Joon; Kim, Yeong A; Liu, Kangdong; Kim, Jiyoung; Lim, Soon Sung; Park, Jung Han Yoon; Dong, Zigang; Lee, Ki Won; Lee, Hyong Joo

    2013-10-01

    Licorice extract which is used as a natural sweetener has been shown to possess inhibitory effects against prostate cancer, but the mechanisms responsible are poorly understood. Here, we report a compound, isoangustone A (IAA) in licorice that potently suppresses the growth of aggressive prostate cancer and sought to clarify its mechanism of action. We analyzed its inhibitory effects on the growth of PTEN-deleted human prostate cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo. Administration of IAA significantly attenuated the growth of prostate cancer cell cultures and xenograft tumors. These effects were found to be attributable to inhibition of the G1/S phase cell cycle transition and the accumulation of p27(kip1). The elevated p27(kip1) expression levels were concurrent with the decrease of its phosphorylation at threonine 187 through suppression of CDK2 kinase activity and the reduced phosphorylation of Akt at Serine 473 by diminishing the kinase activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Further analysis using recombinant proteins and immunoprecipitated cell lysates determined that IAA exerts suppressive effects against CDK2 and mTOR kinase activity by direct binding with both proteins. These findings suggested that the licorice compound IAA is a potent molecular inhibitor of CDK2 and mTOR, with strong implications for the treatment of prostate cancer. Thus, licorice-derived extracts with high IAA content warrant further clinical investigation for nutritional sources for prostate cancer patients. PMID:23707764

  9. Antimicrobial Peptide, Lumbricusin, Ameliorates Motor Dysfunction and Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration in a Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Hong; Lee, Ik Hwan; Nam, Seung Taek; Hong, Ji; Zhang, Peng; Lu, Li Fang; Hwang, Jae Sam; Park, Ki Cheol; Kim, Ho

    2015-10-01

    We recently reported that the antimicrobial peptide Lumbricusin (NH2-RNRRWCIDQQA), isolated from the earthworm, increases cell proliferation in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Here, we investigated whether Lumbricusin has neurotropic activity in mouse neural stem cells (MNSCs) and a protective effect in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease (PD). In MNSCs isolated from mouse brains, Lumbricusin treatment significantly increased cell proliferation (up to 12%) and reduced the protein expression of p27(Kip1) through proteasomal protein degradation but not transcriptional regulation. Lumbricusin inhibited the 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis of MNSCs, and also showed neuroprotective effects in a mouse PD model, ameliorating the motor impairments seen in the pole, elevated body swing, and rotation tests. These results suggest that the Lumbricusin-induced promotion of neural cell proliferation via p27(Kip1) degradation has a protective effect in an experimental PD model. Thus, the antimicrobial peptide Lumbricusin could possibly be developed as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of PD. PMID:26215270

  10. Cell-cycle arrest induced by the bacterial adenylate cyclase toxins from Bacillus anthracis and Bordetella pertussis

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Mary C.; Hewlett, Erik L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bacillus anthracis Edema Toxin (ET) and Bordetella pertussis Adenylate Cyclase Toxin (ACT) enter host cells and produce cAMP. To understand the cellular consequences, we exposed J774 cells to these toxins at ng/ml (pM) concentrations, then followed cell number and changes in cell signaling pathways. Under these conditions, both toxins produce a concentration-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation without cytotoxicity. ET and ACT increase the proportion of cells in G1/G0 and reduce S-phase, such that a single addition of ET or ACT inhibits cell division for 3 to 6 days. Treatment with ET or ACT produces striking changes in proteins controlling cell cycle, including virtual elimination of phosphorylated ERK 1/2 and Cyclin D1 and increases in phospho-CREB and p27Kip1. Importantly, PD98059, a MEK inhibitor, elicits a comparable reduction in Cyclin D1 to that produced by the toxins and blocks proliferation. These data show that non-lethal concentrations of ET and ACT impose a prolonged block on the proliferation of J774 cells by impairment of the progression from G1/G0 to S-phase in a process involving cAMP-mediated increases in phospho-CREB and p27Kip1 and reductions in phospho-ERK 1/2 and Cyclin D1. This phenomenon represents a new mechanism by which these toxins affect host cells. PMID:20946259

  11. ARTD1 regulates cyclin E expression and consequently cell-cycle re-entry and G1/S progression in T24 bladder carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Léger, Karolin; Hopp, Ann-Katrin; Fey, Monika; Hottiger, Michael O

    2016-08-01

    ADP-ribosylation is involved in a variety of biological processes, many of which are chromatin-dependent and linked to important functions during the cell cycle. However, any study on ADP-ribosylation and the cell cycle faces the problem that synchronization with chemical agents or by serum starvation and subsequent growth factor addition already activates ADP-ribosylation by itself. Here, we investigated the functional contribution of ARTD1 in cell cycle re-entry and G1/S cell cycle progression using T24 urinary bladder carcinoma cells, which synchronously re-enter the cell cycle after splitting without any additional stimuli. In synchronized cells, ARTD1 knockdown, but not inhibition of its enzymatic activity, caused specific down-regulation of cyclin E during cell cycle re-entry and G1/S progression through alterations of the chromatin composition and histone acetylation, but not of other E2F-1 target genes. Although Cdk2 formed a functional complex with the residual cyclin E, p27(Kip 1) protein levels increased in G1 upon ARTD1 knockdown most likely due to inappropriate cyclin E-Cdk2-induced phosphorylation-dependent degradation, leading to decelerated G1/S progression. These results provide evidence that ARTD1 regulates cell cycle re-entry and G1/S progression via cyclin E expression and p27(Kip 1) stability independently of its enzymatic activity, uncovering a novel cell cycle regulatory mechanism. PMID:27295004

  12. Combination treatment with proteasome inhibitors and antiestrogens has a synergistic effect mediated by p21WAF1 in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Maynadier, Marie; Basile, Ilaria; Gallud, Audrey; Gary-Bobo, Magali; Garcia, Marcel

    2016-08-01

    Although antiestrogens significantly improve the survival of patients with ER-positive breast cancer, therapeutic resistance remains a major limitation. The combinatorial use of antiestrogen with other therapies was proposed to increase their efficiency and more importantly, to prevent or delay the resistance phenomenon. In the present study, we addressed their combined effects with proteasome inhibitors (PIs). The effects of antiestrogens (hydroxyl-tamoxifen, raloxifen and fulvestrant) currently used in endocrine therapy were tested in combination with PIs, bortezomib or MG132, on the growth of three ER-positive breast cancer cell lines and in two cellular models of acquired antiestrogen resistance. When compared to single treatments, these combined treatments were significantly more effective in preventing the growth of the cell lines. The regulation of key cell cycle proteins, the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p21WAF1 and p27KIP1, were also studied. Bortezomib and MG132 drastically increased p21WAF1 expression through elevation of its mRNA concentration. Notably, p27KIP1 regulation was quite different from that of p21WAF1. Furthermore, the effect of bortezomib in combination with antiestrogen was evaluated on antiestrogen-resistant cell lines. The growth of two antiestrogen-resistant cell lines appeared responsive to proteasome inhibition and was strongly decreased by a combined therapy with an antiestrogen. Collectively, these findings provide new perspectives for the use of PIs in combination with endocrine therapies for breast cancer and possibly to overcome acquired hormonal resistance. PMID:27373750

  13. Pfaffosidic Fraction from Hebanthe paniculata Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Caspase-3-Induced Apoptosis in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Tereza Cristina; Cogliati, Bruno; Latorre, Andréia Oliveira; Akisue, Gokithi; Nagamine, Márcia Kazumi; Haraguchi, Mitsue; Hansen, Daiane; Sanches, Daniel Soares; Dagli, Maria Lúcia Zaidan

    2015-01-01

    Hebanthe paniculata roots (formerly Pfaffia paniculata and popularly known as Brazilian ginseng) show antineoplastic, chemopreventive, and antiproliferative properties. Functional properties of these roots and their extracts are usually attributed to the pfaffosidic fraction, which is composed mainly by pfaffosides A–F. However, the therapeutic potential of this fraction in cancer cells is not yet entirely understood. This study aimed to analyze the antitumoral effects of the purified pfaffosidic fraction or saponinic fraction on the human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cell line. Cellular viability, proliferation, and apoptosis were evaluated, respectively, by MTT assay, BrdU incorporation, activated caspase-3 immunocytochemistry, and DNA fragmentation assay. Cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry and the cell cycle-related proteins were analyzed by quantitative PCR and Western blot. The cells exposed to pfaffosidic fraction had reduced viability and cellular growth, induced G2/M at 48 h or S at 72 h arrest, and increased sub-G1 cell population via cyclin E downregulation, p27KIP1 overexpression, and caspase-3-induced apoptosis, without affecting the DNA integrity. Antitumoral effects of pfaffosidic fraction from H. paniculata in HepG2 cells originated by multimechanisms of action might be associated with cell cycle arrest in the S phase, by CDK2 and cyclin E downregulation and p27KIP1 overexpression, besides induction of apoptosis through caspase-3 activation. PMID:26075002

  14. In vivo optical detection of intranuclear cancer biomarkers using gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sonia; Sokolov, Konstantin; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2006-02-01

    Specific genotypes of human papillomavirus (HPV) are well correlated with cervical oncogenesis. The major transforming and immortalizing protein in high risk HPVs, namely HPV16, is E7 protein. E7 protein functions by deregulating the cell cycle and promoting S-phase reentry in differentiated keratinocytes. Currently, clinical diagnosis of cervical cancer is based on phenotypic changes observed in a screening Papanicolaou smear. Although screening has been effective in reducing the occurrence of cervical cancer, the low specificity of the Pap smear results in resources wasted on the evaluation of low-grade lesions not likely to progress to cervical cancer. Molecular characterization of active HPV infections using molecular specific contrast agents are combined with in-vivo optical imaging is proposed to be a cost-effective, non-invasive technique for the detection of cervical pre-cancers. Contrast is achieved by exploiting the peak absorbance and scattering shift in aggregated gold nanoparticles over isolated ones and molecular specificity is achieved via recognition moieties with high affinities for E7. Conjugates of gold nanoparticles and HPV16 anti-E7 antibodies are delivered into the nucleus of living cells and imaged with reflectance confocal microscopy. These contrast agents have been used to successfully enhance contrast in HPV16+ cervical cancer cells over HPV- cells by a factor of 2.5. Further characterization and development of these contrast agents will provide a robust, low cost screening tool for the detection of cervical pre-cancers.

  15. Inclusion of correlations in the empherical selection of intranuclear cascade nucleons from high energy hadron-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsmiller, F. S.; Alsmiller, R. G.

    1989-06-01

    The very high energy (5 GeV to 20 Tev) hadron-nucleus differential particle production model found in the Monte Carlo transport code FLUKA87 has been adapted for inclusion in the transport code HETC88. The empirical selection of intranuclear cascade nucleons has been modified to provide simple correlations with the randomly selected number of hadron-nucleon collisions. A standard method of calculating the extension energy of the compound nucleus preceding an added evaporation step by assuming the particles are produced in a one-dimensional nuclear well is applied. This method, coupled with the above correlations, lead to improved correlations of the excitation energy with the A and Z of the compound nucleus, and then to greatly improved distributions of the residual nuclei following evaporation. The frequency distribution of low enegy ( β < 0.7) charged particles show good agreement with experiment for 200 GeV protons incident on emulsions. Average multiplicities of showe and grey particles after evaporation for protons and pions incident on several elements are also compared with experiment.

  16. Atypical sporadic CJD-MM phenotype with white matter kuru plaques associated with intranuclear inclusion body and argyrophilic grain disease.

    PubMed

    Berghoff, Anna S; Trummert, Anita; Unterberger, Ursula; Ströbel, Thomas; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Kovacs, Gabor G

    2015-08-01

    We describe an atypical neuropathological phenotype of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in a 76-year-old man. The clinical symptoms were characterized by progressive dementia, gait ataxia, rigidity and urinary incontinence. The disease duration was 6 weeks. MRI did not show prominent atrophy or hyperintensities in cortical areas, striatum or thalamus. Biomarker examination of the cerebrospinal fluid deviated from that seen in pure Alzheimer's disease. Triphasic waves in the EEG were detected only later in the disease course, while 14-3-3 assay was positive. PRNP genotyping revealed methionine homozygosity (MM) at codon 129. Neuropathology showed classical CJD changes corresponding to the MM type 1 cases. However, a striking feature was the presence of abundant kuru-type plaques in the white matter. This rare morphology was associated with neuropathological signs of intranuclear inclusion body disease and advanced stage of argyrophilic grain disease. These alterations did not show correlation with each other, thus seemed to develop independently. This case further highlights the complexity of neuropathological alterations in the ageing brain. PMID:25783686

  17. A quantitative investigation of neuronal cytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusions in the pontine and inferior olivary nuclei in multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Nishie, M; Mori, F; Yoshimoto, M; Takahashi, H; Wakabayashi, K

    2004-10-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a sporadic neurodegenerative disease characterized by the presence of neuronal and oligodendroglial alpha-synuclein aggregates. To investigate the relationship between the occurrence of neuronal cytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusions (NCIs and NNIs, respectively) and the progression of neuronal degeneration, we performed a quantitative analysis of the pontine and inferior olivary nuclei based on 14 cases of MSA. alpha-Synuclein immunohistochemistry revealed that NCIs and NNIs were present in both brain nuclei in all the cases. The average incidence of NCIs in the pontine and inferior olivary nuclei was 9.1% and 25.8%, respectively, and that of NNIs was 9.2% and 9.0%, respectively. The number of NNIs was strongly correlated with that of neurones in the pontine and inferior olivary nuclei. Although the number of NCIs was not correlated with the neuronal population in both nuclei, the NCI count in patients with moderate MSA was higher than in patients with mild MSA. The NNI count was much higher than the NCI count in the pontine nucleus in four patients, and was the same in the olivary nucleus in three of the four patients. Moreover, the neuronal population in the NNI-predominant cases was significantly higher than in the NCI-predominant cases. These findings suggest that NCI formation is accelerated by the progression of the disease process, and that in MSA, NNI formation is an earlier phenomenon than NCI formation. PMID:15488031

  18. Neuronal ubiquitinated intranuclear inclusions in familial and non-familial frontotemporal dementia of the motor neuron disease type associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bigio, Eileen H; Johnson, Nancy A; Rademaker, Alfred W; Fung, Bing B; Mesulam, M-Marsel; Siddique, Nailah; Dellefave, Lisa; Caliendo, Janice; Freeman, Stefanie; Siddique, Teepu

    2004-08-01

    Ubiquitinated cytoplasmic inclusions (Ub-CIs) in superficial frontal cortex and dentate gyrus neurons are the hallmark of frontotemporal degeneration of the motor neuron disease-type (FTD-MND-type). To date, 2 reports have described intranuclear ubiquitinated inclusions (Ub-INIs) in 9 cases of familial FTD-MND-type (without clinical or pathologic motor neuron disease, MND). In the current study we found an additional 11 cases with Ub-INIs. We have identified for the first time among these cases 2 with a negative family history and 3 that have concomitant amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The results of the present study i) confirm a previous report of significantly lower average brain weight and longer duration in cases with Ub-INIs, ii) reveal significantly greater striatal neuronal loss and gliosis in cases with intranuclear inclusions, and iii) demonstrate that intranuclear inclusions correlate with cytoplasmic inclusions and dystrophic neurites in frontal cortex and striatum but not in dentate gyrus. In addition, the current study confirms that Ub-INIs are found in familial FTD-MND-type, but also extends the presence of Ub-INIs to familial FTD-MND (with concomitant ALS), and probably also to non-familial FTD-MND-type. PMID:15330335

  19. Efficient intranuclear gene delivery by CdSe aqueous quantum dots electrostatically-coated with polyethyleneimine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, Giang H. T.; Y Shih, Wan; Shih, Wei-Heng

    2015-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are semiconducting nanoparticles with photoluminescence properties that do not photobleach. Due to these advantages, using QDs for non-viral gene delivery has the additional benefit of being able to track the delivery of the genes in real time as it happens. We investigate the efficacy of mercaptopropionic acid (MPA)-capped CdSe aqueous quantum dots (AQDs) electrostatically complexed with branched polyethyleneimine (PEI) both as a non-viral gene delivery vector and as a fluorescent probe for tracking the delivery of genes into nuclei. The MPA-capped CdSe AQDs that were completely synthesized in water were the model AQDs. A nominal MPA:Cd:Se = 4:3:1 was chosen for optimal photoluminescence and zeta potential. The gene delivery study was carried out in vitro using a human colon cancer cell line, HT29 (ATCC). The model gene was a plasmid DNA (pDNA) that can express red fluorescent protein (RFP). Positively charged branched PEI was employed to provide a proton buffer to the AQDs to allow for endosomal escape. It is shown that by using a PEI-AQD complex with a PEI/AQD molar ratio of 300 and a nominal pDNA/PEI-AQD ratio of 6, we can achieve 75 ± 2.6% RFP expression efficiency with cell vitality remaining at 78 ± 4% of the control.

  20. Design of a microfluidic device to quantify dynamic intra-nuclear deformation during cell migration through confining environments

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Patricia M.; Sliz, Josiah; Isermann, Philipp; Denais, Celine; Lammerding, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The ability of cells to migrate through tissues and interstitial space is an essential factor during development and tissue homeostasis, immune cell mobility, and in various human diseases. Deformation of the nucleus and its associated lamina during 3-D migration is gathering increasing interest in the context of cancer metastasis, with the underlying hypothesis that a softer nucleus, resulting from reduced levels of lamin A/C, may aid tumour spreading. However, current methods to study the migration of cells in confining three dimensional (3-D) environments are limited by their imprecise control over the confinement, physiological relevance, and/or compatibility with high resolution imaging techniques. We describe the design of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic device composed of channels with precisely-defined constrictions mimicking physiological environments that enable high resolution imaging of live and fixed cells. The device promotes easy cell loading and rapid, yet long-lasting (>24 hours) chemotactic gradient formation without the need for continuous perfusion. Using this device, we obtained detailed, quantitative measurements of dynamic nuclear deformation as cells migrate through tight spaces, revealing distinct phases of nuclear translocation through the constriction, buckling of the nuclear lamina, and severe intranuclear strain. Furthermore, we found that lamin A/C-deficient cells exhibited increased and more plastic nuclear deformations compared to wild-type cells but only minimal changes in nuclear volume, implying that low lamin A/C levels facilitate migration through constrictions by increasing nuclear deformability rather than compressibility. The integration of our migration devices with high resolution time-lapse imaging provides a powerful new approach to study intracellular mechanics and dynamics in a variety of physiologically-relevant applications, ranging from cancer cell invasion to immune cell recruitment. PMID:26549481

  1. Evidence that FOXO3a is involved in oocyte apoptosis in the neonatal rat ovary.

    PubMed

    Sui, Xu-Xia; Luo, Li-Li; Xu, Jin-Jie; Fu, Yu-Cai

    2010-08-01

    Previous studies have proposed that the forkhead transcription factor FOXO3a is involved in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and that it may also repress follicular development by inducing cell cycle arrest in ovaries. We have recently demonstrated that FOXO3a induces oocyte apoptosis of neonatal rat ovaries under in vitro conditions. In the present study, we evaluated the role of FOXO3a in oocyte apoptosis under in vivo conditions. Ovaries from rats were obtained from newborns on postnatal day (PD) 1, 2, 3, and 4. TUNEL assay results showed that oocyte apoptosis occurred mainly on PD 1 and 2. Immunohistochemical staining of FOXO3a, Bim, Fas ligand (FasL), p27KIP1, caspase-8, and caspase-3 showed that they were all expressed mainly in naked oocytes on PD 1 and 2. The percentage of positive FOXO3a staining of oocytes reached peak levels in the ovaries of 2-day-old rats, which was consistent with the rate of the apoptotic profiles determined by TUNEL. The percentage between TUNEL-positive and FOXO3a-positive oocytes in the nucleus showed no statistical differences within the 4-day-old rat ovaries. Furthermore, the positive oocyte percentage of the target factors of FOXO3a (Bim, p27KIP1, and FasL) and pro-apoptotic proteins (caspase-3 and caspase-8) also reached peak levels in the ovaries of 2-day-old rats, which was similar to the rate of FOXO3a-positive oocytes. These results suggest that FOXO3a in the oocyte nucleus is involved in oocyte apoptosis; that is, FOXO3a-positive oocytes may be the apoptotic cells. To verify this, rat oocytes were subjected to TUNEL and immunofluorescent double-labeling assays. We found that TUNEL-positive cells were also FOXO3a-, Bim-, or FasL-positive. To identify the downstream target of FOXO3a, double immunofluorescent staining with antibodies to Bim and FasL was performed. We found that FOXO3a-positive cells were also Bim- and FasL-positive. We conclude that the overexpression of FOXO3a in the oocyte nucleus of neonatal rat ovaries

  2. Bax alpha perturbs T cell development and affects cell cycle entry of T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brady, H J; Gil-Gómez, G; Kirberg, J; Berns, A J

    1996-01-01

    Bax alpha can heterodimerize with Bcl-2 and Bcl-X(L), countering their effects, as well as promoting apoptosis on overexpression. We show that bax alpha transgenic mice have greatly reduced numbers of mature T cells, which results from an impaired positive selection in the thymus. This perturbation in positive selection is accompanied by an increase in the number of cycling thymocytes. Further to this, mature T cells overexpressing Bax alpha have lower levels of p27Kip1 and enter S phase more rapidly in response to interleukin-2 stimulation than do control T cells, while the converse is true of bcl-2 transgenic T cells. These data indicate that apoptotic regulatory proteins can modulate the level of cell cycle-controlling proteins and thereby directly impact on the cell cycle. Images PMID:9003775

  3. p62 positive, TDP-43 negative, neuronal cytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusions in the cerebellum and hippocampus define the pathology of C9orf72-linked FTLD and MND/ALS.

    PubMed

    Al-Sarraj, Safa; King, Andrew; Troakes, Claire; Smith, Bradley; Maekawa, Satomi; Bodi, Istvan; Rogelj, Boris; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Shaw, Christopher E

    2011-12-01

    Neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCIs) containing phosphorylated TDP-43 (p-TDP-43) are the pathological hallmarks of motor neuron disease/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (MND/ALS) and FTLD-TDP. The vast majority of NCIs in the brain and spinal cord also label for ubiquitin and p62, however, we have previously reported a subset of TDP-43 proteinopathy patients who have unusual and abundant p62 positive, TDP-43 negative inclusions in the cerebellum and hippocampus. Here we sought to determine whether these cases carry the hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9orf72. Repeat primer PCR was performed in 36 MND/ALS, FTLD-MND/ALS and FTLD-TDP cases and four controls. Fourteen individuals with the repeat expansion were detected. In all the 14 expansion mutation cases there were abundant globular and star-shaped p62 positive NCIs in the pyramidal cell layer of the hippocampus, the vast majority of which were p-TDP-43 negative. p62 positive NCIs were also abundant in the cerebellar granular and molecular layers in all cases and in Purkinje cells in 12/14 cases but they were only positive for p-TDP-43 in the granular layer of one case. Abundant p62 positive, p-TDP-43 negative neuronal intranuclear inclusions (NIIs) were seen in 12/14 cases in the pyramidal cell layer of the hippocampus and in 6/14 cases in the cerebellar granular layer. This unusual combination of inclusions appears pathognomonic for C9orf72 repeat expansion positive MND/ALS and FTLD-TDP which we believe form a pathologically distinct subset of TDP-43 proteinopathies. Our results suggest that proteins other than TDP-43 are binding p62 and aggregating in response to the mutation which may play a mechanistic role in neurodegeneration. PMID:22101323

  4. G1-checkpoint function including a cyclin-dependent kinase 2 regulatory pathway as potential determinant of 7-hydroxystaurosporine (UCN-01)-induced apoptosis and G1-phase accumulation.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, T; Sugiyama, K; Shimizu, M; Tamaoki, T; Akinaga, S

    1999-12-01

    7-Hydroxystaurosporine (UCN-01), which was originally identified as a protein kinase C selective inhibitor, is currently in clinical trials as an anti-cancer drug. We previously showed that UCN-01 induced preferential G1-phase accumulation in tumor cells and this effect was associated with the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein and its regulatory factors, such as cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and CDK inhibitors p21Cip1/WAF1 and p27Kip1. We demonstrate here that G1-phase accumulation was induced by UCN-01 in Rb-proficient cell lines (WiDr and HCT116 human colon carcinomas and WI-38 human lung fibroblast), and it was accompanied by dephosphorylation of Rb. In addition, UCN-01-induced G1-phase accumulation was also demonstrated in a Rb-defective cell line (Saos-2 human osteosarcoma), but not in a simian virus 40 (SV40)-transformed cell line (WI-38 VA13). Apoptosis was induced by UCN-01 in the two Rb-deficient cell lines, but not in the other Rb-proficient cell lines. These observations suggest that G1-checkpoint function might be important for cell survival during UCN-01 treatment. In addition, there may be a UCN-01-responsive factor in the G1-checkpoint machinery other than Rb which is targeted by SV40. Further studies revealed a correlation between UCN-01-induced G1-phase accumulation and reduction of cellular CDK2 kinase activity. This reduction was strictly dependent on down-regulation of the Thr160-phosphorylated form of CDK2 protein, and coincided in part with up-regulation of p27Kip1, but it was independent of the level of the p21Cip1/WAF1 protein. These results suggest that G1-checkpoint function, including a CDK2-regulatory pathway, may be a significant determinant of the sensitivity of tumor cells to UCN-01. PMID:10665655

  5. Extension of the Liège intranuclear cascade model at incident energies between 2 and 12 GeV. Aspects of pion production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedoux, Sophie; Cugnon, Joseph

    2011-09-01

    The validity of the standard version of the Liège Intra-Nuclear Cascade (INCL4) model, which has been shown to be quite successful for the description of spallation reactions, is limited to an upper incident energy of ˜2 GeV, because inelastic elementary processes are restricted to the excitation and de-excitation of the Delta resonance. In this paper, the INCL4 model is extended to higher incident energy by including other inelastic elementary collisions. However, excitation of heavier baryonic resonances is replaced by direct multipion production in elementary nucleon-nucleon and pion-nucleon collisions. The predictions of the modified model for production of charged pions by proton and pion beams off nuclei are compared with experimental data of the HARP Collaboration for beam energies between 2 and 12 GeV. The apparent duality between the approach based on excitation of numerous baryonic resonances and our approach is briefly discussed.

  6. Kick-starting the cell cycle: From growth-factor stimulation to initiation of DNA replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguda, Baltazar D.

    2001-03-01

    The essential genes, proteins and associated regulatory networks involved in the entry into the mammalian cell cycle are identified, from activation of growth-factor receptors to intracellular signal transduction pathways that impinge on the cell cycle machinery and ultimately on the initiation of DNA replication. Signaling pathways mediated by the oncoproteins Ras and Myc induce the activation of cyclin-dependent kinases CDK4 and CDK2, and the assembly and firing of pre-replication complexes require a collaboration among E2F, CDK2, and Cdc7 kinase. A proposed core mechanism of the restriction point, the major checkpoint prior to commitment to DNA synthesis, involves cyclin E/CDK2, the phosphatase Cdc25A, and the CDK inhibitor p27Kip1.

  7. Proliferation and differentiation characteristics of neural stem cells during course of cerebral cortical histogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Takayuki; Takahashi, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Recent advancements in the research field of stem cell biology have enabled the realization of regenerative medicine in various systems of the body, including the central nervous system. However, fundamental knowledge regarding how neural stem cells divide and generate young neurons in mammals, especially in vivo, is still inadequate. In this article, we shall summarize the concept of cell cycle/division of neural stem cells that generate projection neurons in the murine cerebral cortex. We shall also review the molecular mechanisms that modulate the critical parameters related to the cell cycle regulatory mechanisms, with special reference to the cell cycle regulatory protein p27(Kip1) , an inhibitor of progression of the cell cycle at the G1 phase. A better understanding of the mechanisms controlling cell cycle progression is expected to contribute to the development of novel strategies to increase the efficiency of neural cell/tissue production, both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:26058879

  8. Development and molecular characterization of polymeric micro-nanofibrous scaffold of a defined 3-D niche for in vitro chemosensitivity analysis against acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Maya S; Mony, Ullas; Menon, Deepthy; Koyakutty, Manzoor; Sidharthan, Neeraj; Pavithran, Keechilat; Nair, Shantikumar V; Menon, Krishnakumar N

    2015-01-01

    Standard in vitro drug testing employs 2-D tissue culture plate systems to test anti-leukemic drugs against cell adhesion-mediated drug-resistant leukemic cells that harbor in 3-D bone marrow microenvironments. This drawback necessitates the fabrication of 3-D scaffolds that have cell adhesion-mediated drug-resistant properties similar to in vivo niches. We therefore aimed at exploiting the known property of polyurethane (PU)/poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) in forming a micro-nanofibrous structure to fabricate unique, not presented before, as far as we are aware, 3-D micro-nanofibrous scaffold composites using a thermally induced phase separation technique. Among the different combinations of PU/PLLA composites generated, the unique PU/PLLA 60:40 composite displayed micro-nanofibrous morphology similar to decellularized bone marrow with increased protein and fibronectin adsorption. Culturing of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) KG1a cells in FN-coated PU/PLLA 60:40 shows increased cell adhesion and cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance to the drugs cytarabine and daunorubicin without changing the original CD34+/CD38−/CD33− phenotype for 168 hours compared to fibronectin tissue culture plate systems. Molecularly, as seen in vivo, increased chemoresistance is associated with the upregulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl2 and the cell cycle regulatory protein p27Kip1 leading to cell growth arrest. Abrogation of Bcl2 activity by the Bcl2-specific inhibitor ABT 737 led to cell death in the presence of both cytarabine and daunorubicin, demonstrating that the cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance induced by Bcl2 and p27Kip1 in the scaffold was similar to that seen in vivo. These results thus show the utility of a platform technology, wherein drug testing can be performed before administering to patients without the necessity for stromal cells. PMID:26028971

  9. In Vitro and in Vivo Anti-tumor Activity of miR-221/222 Inhibitors in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Di Martino, Maria Teresa; Gullà, Annamaria; Cantafio, Maria Eugenia Gallo; Lionetti, Marta; Leone, Emanuela; Amodio, Nicola; Guzzi, Pietro Hiram; Foresta, Umberto; Conforti, Francesco; Cannataro, Mario; Neri, Antonino; Giordano, Antonio; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco

    2013-01-01

    A rising body of evidence suggests that silencing microRNAs (miRNAs) with oncogenic potential may represent a successful therapeutic strategy for human cancer. We investigated the therapeutic activity of miR-221/222 inhibitors against human multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Enforced expression of miR-221/222 inhibitors triggered in vitro anti-proliferative effects and up-regulation of canonic miR-221/222 targets, including p27Kip1, PUMA, PTEN and p57Kip2, in MM cells highly expressing miR-221/222. Conversely, transfection of miR-221/222 mimics increased S-phase and down-regulated p27Kip1 protein expression in MM with low basal miR-221/222 levels. The effects of miR-221/222 inhibitors was also evaluated in MM xenografts in SCID/NOD mice. Significant anti-tumor activity was achieved in xenografted mice by the treatment with miR-221/222 inhibitors, together with up-regulation of canonic protein targets in tumors retrieved from animals. These findings provide proof of principle that silencing the miR-221/222 cluster exerts significant therapeutic activity in MM cells with high miR-221/222 level of expression, which mostly occurs in TC2 and TC4 MM groups. These findings suggest that MM genotyping may predict the therapeutic response. All together our results support a framework for clinical development of miR-221/222 inhibitors-based therapeutic strategy in this still incurable disease. PMID:23479461

  10. In vitro and in vivo anti-tumor activity of miR-221/222 inhibitors in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Maria Teresa; Gullà, Annamaria; Cantafio, Maria Eugenia Gallo; Lionetti, Marta; Leone, Emanuela; Amodio, Nicola; Guzzi, Pietro Hiram; Foresta, Umberto; Conforti, Francesco; Cannataro, Mario; Neri, Antonino; Giordano, Antonio; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco

    2013-02-01

    A rising body of evidence suggests that silencing microRNAs (miRNAs) with oncogenic potential may represent a successful therapeutic strategy for human cancer. We investigated the therapeutic activity of miR-221/222 inhibitors against human multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Enforced expression of miR-221/222 inhibitors triggered in vitro anti-proliferative effects and up-regulation of canonic miR-221/222 targets, including p27Kip1, PUMA, PTEN and p57Kip2, in MM cells highly expressing miR-221/222. Conversely, transfection of miR-221/222 mimics increased S-phase and down-regulated p27Kip1 protein expression in MM with low basal miR-221/222 levels. The effects of miR-221/222 inhibitors was also evaluated in MM xenografts in SCID/ NOD mice. Significant anti-tumor activity was achieved in xenografted mice by the treatment with miR-221/222 inhibitors, together with up-regulation of canonic protein targets in tumors retrieved from animals. These findings provide proof of principle that silencing the miR-221/222 cluster exerts significant therapeutic activity in MM cells with high miR-221/222 level of expression, which mostly occurs in TC2 and TC4 MM groups. These findings suggest that MM genotyping may predict the therapeutic response. All together our results support a framework for clinical development of miR-221/222 inhibitors-based therapeutic strategy in this still incurable disease. PMID:23479461

  11. Chimeric DNA-RNA hammerhead ribozyme targeting transforming growth factor-beta 1 mRNA inhibits neointima formation in rat carotid artery after balloon injury.

    PubMed

    Ando, Hideyuki; Fukuda, Noboru; Kotani, Motoko; Yokoyama, Shin ichiro; Kunimoto, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Koichi; Saito, Satoshi; Kanmatsuse, Katsuo; Mugishima, Hideo

    2004-01-12

    We designed and synthesized a chimeric DNA-RNA hammerhead ribozyme targeting transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1 mRNA and found that this ribozyme effectively and specifically inhibited growth of vascular smooth muscle cells. We examined the effects of the chimeric DNA-RNA hammerhead ribozyme targeting TGF-beta 1 mRNA on neointima formation and investigated the underlying mechanism to develop a possible gene therapy for coronary artery restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. Expression of mRNAs encoding TGF-beta 1, p27kip1, and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in carotid artery increased after balloon injury. Fluorescein-isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled ribozyme was taken up into the midlayer smooth muscle of the injured carotid artery. Both 2 and 5 mg of ribozyme reduced neointima formation by 65% compared to that of controls. Ribozyme markedly decreased expression of TGF-beta 1 mRNA and protein in injured vessel. Mismatch ribozyme had no effect on expression of TGF-beta 1 mRNA protein in injured vessel. Ribozyme markedly decreased expression of fibronectin, p27kip1, and CTGF mRNAs in injured vessel, whereas a mismatch ribozyme had no effect on these mRNAs. These findings indicate that the chimeric DNA-RNA hammerhead ribozyme targeting TGF-beta 1 mRNA inhibits neointima formation in rat carotid artery after balloon injury with suppression of TGF-beta 1 and inhibition of extracellular matrix and CTGF. In conclusion, the hammerhead ribozyme against TGF-beta 1 may have promise as a therapy for coronary artery restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. PMID:14729108

  12. Retinoic acid inhibits the proliferative response induced by CD40 activation and interleukin-4 in mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Guidoboni, Massimo; Zancai, Paola; Cariati, Roberta; Rizzo, Silvana; Dal Col, Jessica; Pavan, Alessandro; Gloghini, Annunziata; Spina, Michele; Cuneo, Antonio; Pomponi, Fabrizio; Bononi, Antonio; Doglioni, Claudio; Maestro, Roberta; Carbone, Antonino; Boiocchi, Mauro; Dolcetti, Riccardo

    2005-01-15

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with poor response to therapy and unfavorable prognosis. Here, we show that retinoic acid (RA) isomers significantly inhibit the proliferation of both primary MCL cultures (n = 7) and established cell lines (Granta 519 and SP-53) as shown by [(3)H]thymidine uptake and carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester labeling coupled with cyclin D1 staining. RA induces cell accumulation in G(0)-G(1) together with a marked up-regulation of p27(Kip1) by inhibiting ubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation of the protein. The p21(Cip1) inhibitor was also up-regulated by RA in Granta 519 cells, whereas the expression of cyclin D1 is unaffected. Most of RA-induced p27(Kip1) was bound to cyclin D1/cyclin-dependent kinase 4 complexes, probably contributing to the decreased cyclin-dependent kinase 4 kinase activity and pRb hypophosphorylation observed in RA-treated cells. Experiments with receptor-selective ligands indicate that RA receptor alpha cooperates with retinoid X receptors in mediating RA-dependent MCL cell growth inhibition. Notably, RA isomers, and particularly 9-cis-RA, also inhibited the growth-promoting effect induced in primary MCL cells by CD40 activation alone or in combination with interleukin-4. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that significant numbers of CD40L-expressing lymphoid cells are present in lymph node biopsies of MCL patients. These results therefore further strengthen the possibility that triggering of CD40 by infiltrating CD40L+ cells may continuously promote the growth of MCL cells in vivo. On these grounds, our findings that RA inhibits basal MCL proliferation as well as MCL growth-promoting effects exerted by microenvironmental factors make these compounds highly attractive in terms of potential clinical efficacy in this setting. PMID:15695403

  13. Hadronic event generation for hadron cascade calculations and detector simulation, Part IV: The application of the intranuclear cascade model to reactions of pions, nucleons, kaons, and their antiparticles with nuclei below 6 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Haenbssgen, K.

    1987-02-01

    An extension of the intranuclear cascade model is described. The primary hadrons may be pions, kaons, nucleons, and their antiparticles. Secondary particles produced include hyperons or antihyperons. A large amount of experimental data is described by the model. The model is constructed via the Monte Carlo generation of complete events, based on a model of the nucleus structure and the hadron/nucleon interaction inside the nucleus. Calculated average multiplicities and single and double differential cross sections are compared with experimental data.

  14. Hydroxyurea-induced replication stress causes poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-2 accumulation and changes its intranuclear location in root meristems of Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    Rybaczek, Dorota

    2016-07-01

    Replication stress induced by 24 and 48h exposure to 2.5mM hydroxyurea (HU) increased the activity of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-2 (PARP-2; EC 2.4.2.30) in root meristem cells of Vicia faba. An increase in the number of PARP-2 foci was accompanied by their delocalization from peripheral areas to the interior of the nucleus. Our results indicate that the increase in PARP-2 was connected with an increase in S139-phosphorylated H2AX histones. The findings suggest the possible role of PARP-2 in replication stress. We also confirm that the intranuclear location of PARP-2 depends on the duration of HU-induced replication stress, confirming the role of PARP-2 as an indicator of stress intensity. Finally, we conclude that the more intense the HU-mediated replication stress, the greater the probability of PARP-2 activation or H2AXS139 phosphorylation, but also the greater the chance of increasing the efficiency of repair processes and a return to normal cell cycle progression. PMID:27155387

  15. PICA95: An intranuclear-cascade code for 25-MeV to 3.5-GeV photon-induced nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, C.Y.; Gabriel, T.A.; Lillie, R.A.

    1997-05-01

    PICA95, an intranuclear-cascade code for calculating photon-induced nuclear reactions for incident photon energies up to 3.5 GeV, is an extension of the original PICA code package that works for incident photon energies up to 400 MeV. The original code includes the quasi-deuteron breakup and single-pion production channels. The extension to an incident photon energy of 3.5 GeV requires the addition of multiple-pion production channels capable of emitting up to five pions. Relativistic phase-space relations are used to conserve energy and momentum in multi-body breakups. Fermi motion of the struck nucleon is included in the phase-space calculations as well as secondary nuclear collisions of the produced particles. Calculated doubly differential cross sections for the productions of protons, neutrons, {pi}{sup +}, {pi}{sup 0}, and {pi}{sup {minus}} for incident photon energies of 500 MeV, 1 GeV, and 2 GeV are compared with predictions by other codes. Due to the sparsity of experimental data, more experiments are needed in order to refine the gamma nuclear collision model.

  16. Intra-Nuclear Single-Particle Tracking (I-SPT) to Reveal the Functional Architecture of Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Récamier, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome architecture needs to be investigated in relation with the chemical function of DNA. The kinetics of gene expression, DNA replication, and repair are driven by the mechanisms by which a functional nuclear protein finds its substrate in the nucleus. Single-particle tracking (SPT) is a method to quantify fluorescent molecules dynamics from the tracks of the single molecules recorded by high-resolution microscopes. SPT offers direct observation of the movement and single-molecule resolution. Usually SPT is performed on membranes because of higher contrast. Here, we introduce a novel method to record the trajectories of weakly fluorescent molecules in the nucleus of living cells. I-SPT uses some specific detection and analysis tools to enable the computation of reliable statistics on nuclear particle movement. PMID:27283314

  17. Polyreactive anti-DNA monoclonal antibodies and a derived peptide as vectors for the intracytoplasmic and intranuclear translocation of macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Avrameas, A; Ternynck, T; Nato, F; Buttin, G; Avrameas, S

    1998-05-12

    Naturally occurring polyreactive anti-DNA mAbs derived from a nonimmunized (NZB x NZW)F1 mouse with spontaneous lupus erythematosus penetrated and accumulated in the nuclei of a variety of cultured cells. These mAbs and their F(ab')2 and Fab' fragments, covalently coupled to fluorescein, peroxidase, or a 15-mer polynucleotide, also translocated to the cell nuclei. A 30-amino acid peptide corresponding to the combined sequences of the complementary-determining regions 2 and 3 of the heavy chain variable region of one mAb was able to penetrate into the cytoplasm and nucleus of cells of several lines. This peptide recognized DNA and was strongly polyreactive. Streptavidin-peroxidase conjugates complexed with the N-biotinylated peptide were rapidly translocated into cells. Similarly, peroxidase or anti-peroxidase polyclonal antibodies covalently coupled to the N-cysteinylated peptide through an heterobifunctional maleimide cross-linker were also rapidly internalized and frequently accumulated in nuclei. The peptide carrying 19 lysine residues at its N-terminal was highly effective in transfecting 3T3 cells with a plasmid containing the luciferase gene. Thus, penetrating mAbs and derived peptides are versatile vectors for the intracellular delivery of proteins and genes. PMID:9576929

  18. Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells in the body. They are macromolecules that comprise 1 or more chains of amino acids that vary in their sequence and length and are folded into specific 3-dimensional structures. The sizes and conformations of proteins, therefor...

  19. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  20. Hsp105 reduces the protein aggregation and cytotoxicity by expanded-polyglutamine proteins through the induction of Hsp70

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagishi, Nobuyuki; Goto, Kazumasa; Nakagawa, Satomi; Saito, Youhei; Hatayama, Takumi

    2010-09-10

    Hsp105{alpha} and Hsp105{beta} are major heat shock proteins in mammalian cells and belong to the HSP105/110 family. Hsp105{alpha} is expressed constitutively in the cytoplasm of cells, while Hsp105{beta}, an alternatively spliced form of Hsp105{alpha}, is expressed specifically in the nucleus of cells during mild heat shock. Here, we show that not only Hsp105{beta} but also Hsp105{alpha} accumulated in the nucleus of cells following the expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein with a pathological length polyQ tract (EGFP-polyQ97) and suppressed the intranuclear aggregation of polyQ proteins and apoptosis induced by EGFP-polyQ97. Mutants of Hsp105{alpha} and Hsp105{beta} with changes in the nuclear localization signal sequences, which localized exclusively in the cytoplasm with or without the expression of EGFP-polyQ97, did not suppress the intranuclear aggregation of polyQ proteins and apoptosis induced by EGFP-polyQ97. Furthermore, Hsp70 was induced by the co-expression of Hsp105{alpha} and EGFP-polyQ97, and the knockdown of Hsp70 reduced the inhibitory effect of Hsp105{alpha} and Hsp105{beta} on the intranuclear aggregation of polyQ proteins and apoptosis induced by EGFP-polyQ97. These observations suggested that Hsp105{alpha} and Hsp105{beta} suppressed the expanded polyQ tract-induced protein aggregation and apoptosis through the induction of Hsp70.

  1. The slow Wallerian degeneration protein, WldS, binds directly to VCP/p97 and partially redistributes it within the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Laser, Heike; Conforti, Laura; Morreale, Giacomo; Mack, Till G M; Heyer, Molly; Haley, Jane E; Wishart, Thomas M; Beirowski, Bogdan; Walker, Simon A; Haase, Georg; Celik, Arzu; Adalbert, Robert; Wagner, Diana; Grumme, Daniela; Ribchester, Richard R; Plomann, Markus; Coleman, Michael P

    2006-03-01

    Slow Wallerian degeneration (Wld(S)) mutant mice express a chimeric nuclear protein that protects sick or injured axons from degeneration. The C-terminal region, derived from NAD(+) synthesizing enzyme Nmnat1, is reported to confer neuroprotection in vitro. However, an additional role for the N-terminal 70 amino acids (N70), derived from multiubiquitination factor Ube4b, has not been excluded. In wild-type Ube4b, N70 is part of a sequence essential for ubiquitination activity but its role is not understood. We report direct binding of N70 to valosin-containing protein (VCP; p97/Cdc48), a protein with diverse cellular roles including a pivotal role in the ubiquitin proteasome system. Interaction with Wld(S) targets VCP to discrete intranuclear foci where ubiquitin epitopes can also accumulate. Wld(S) lacking its N-terminal 16 amino acids (N16) neither binds nor redistributes VCP, but continues to accumulate in intranuclear foci, targeting its intrinsic NAD(+) synthesis activity to these same foci. Wild-type Ube4b also requires N16 to bind VCP, despite a more C-terminal binding site in invertebrate orthologues. We conclude that N-terminal sequences of Wld(S) protein influence the intranuclear location of both ubiquitin proteasome and NAD(+) synthesis machinery and that an evolutionary recent sequence mediates binding of mammalian Ube4b to VCP. PMID:16371511

  2. The Slow Wallerian Degeneration Protein, WldS, Binds Directly to VCP/p97 and Partially Redistributes It within the NucleusD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Laser, Heike; Conforti, Laura; Morreale, Giacomo; Mack, Till G.M.; Heyer, Molly; Haley, Jane E.; Wishart, Thomas M.; Beirowski, Bogdan; Walker, Simon A.; Haase, Georg; Celik, Arzu; Adalbert, Robert; Wagner, Diana; Grumme, Daniela; Ribchester, Richard R.; Plomann, Markus; Coleman, Michael P.

    2006-01-01

    Slow Wallerian degeneration (WldS) mutant mice express a chimeric nuclear protein that protects sick or injured axons from degeneration. The C-terminal region, derived from NAD+ synthesizing enzyme Nmnat1, is reported to confer neuroprotection in vitro. However, an additional role for the N-terminal 70 amino acids (N70), derived from multiubiquitination factor Ube4b, has not been excluded. In wild-type Ube4b, N70 is part of a sequence essential for ubiquitination activity but its role is not understood. We report direct binding of N70 to valosin-containing protein (VCP; p97/Cdc48), a protein with diverse cellular roles including a pivotal role in the ubiquitin proteasome system. Interaction with WldS targets VCP to discrete intranuclear foci where ubiquitin epitopes can also accumulate. WldS lacking its N-terminal 16 amino acids (N16) neither binds nor redistributes VCP, but continues to accumulate in intranuclear foci, targeting its intrinsic NAD+ synthesis activity to these same foci. Wild-type Ube4b also requires N16 to bind VCP, despite a more C-terminal binding site in invertebrate orthologues. We conclude that N-terminal sequences of WldS protein influence the intranuclear location of both ubiquitin proteasome and NAD+ synthesis machinery and that an evolutionary recent sequence mediates binding of mammalian Ube4b to VCP. PMID:16371511

  3. Molecular control of brain size: Regulators of neural stem cell life, death and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, Bertrand; Hermanson, Ola

    2010-05-01

    The proper development of the brain and other organs depends on multiple parameters, including strictly controlled expansion of specific progenitor pools. The regulation of such expansion events includes enzymatic activities that govern the correct number of specific cells to be generated via an orchestrated control of cell proliferation, cell cycle exit, differentiation, cell death etc. Certain proteins in turn exert direct control of these enzymatic activities and thus progenitor pool expansion and organ size. The members of the Cip/Kip family (p21Cip1/p27Kip1/p57Kip2) are well-known regulators of cell cycle exit that interact with and inhibit the activity of cyclin-CDK complexes, whereas members of the p53/p63/p73 family are traditionally associated with regulation of cell death. It has however become clear that the roles for these proteins are not as clear-cut as initially thought. In this review, we discuss the roles for proteins of the Cip/Kip and p53/p63/p73 families in the regulation of cell cycle control, differentiation, and death of neural stem cells. We suggest that these proteins act as molecular interfaces, or 'pilots', to assure the correct assembly of protein complexes with enzymatic activities at the right place at the right time, thereby regulating essential decisions in multiple cellular events.

  4. New approach to description of (d,xn) spectra at energies below 50 MeV in Monte Carlo simulation by intra-nuclear cascade code with Distorted Wave Born Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, S.; Iwamoto, Y.; Sato, T.; Niita, K.; Boudard, A.; Cugnon, J.; David, J.-C.; Leray, S.; Mancusi, D.

    2014-08-01

    A new approach to describing neutron spectra of deuteron-induced reactions in the Monte Carlo simulation for particle transport has been developed by combining the Intra-Nuclear Cascade of Liège (INCL) and the Distorted Wave Born Approximation (DWBA) calculation. We incorporated this combined method into the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS) and applied it to estimate (d,xn) spectra on natLi, 9Be, and natC targets at incident energies ranging from 10 to 40 MeV. Double differential cross sections obtained by INCL and DWBA successfully reproduced broad peaks and discrete peaks, respectively, at the same energies as those observed in experimental data. Furthermore, an excellent agreement was observed between experimental data and PHITS-derived results using the combined method in thick target neutron yields over a wide range of neutron emission angles in the reactions. We also applied the new method to estimate (d,xp) spectra in the reactions, and discussed the validity for the proton emission spectra.

  5. A Novel Mutation in the Upstream Open Reading Frame of the CDKN1B Gene Causes a MEN4 Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Occhi, Gianluca; Regazzo, Daniela; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Boaretto, Francesca; Ciato, Denis; Bobisse, Sara; Ferasin, Sergio; Cetani, Filomena; Pardi, Elena; Korbonits, Márta; Pellegata, Natalia S.; Sidarovich, Viktoryia; Quattrone, Alessandro; Opocher, Giuseppe; Mantero, Franco; Scaroni, Carla

    2013-01-01

    The CDKN1B gene encodes the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27KIP1, an atypical tumor suppressor playing a key role in cell cycle regulation, cell proliferation, and differentiation. Impaired p27KIP1 expression and/or localization are often observed in tumor cells, further confirming its central role in regulating the cell cycle. Recently, germline mutations in CDKN1B have been associated with the inherited multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 4, an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by varying combinations of tumors affecting at least two endocrine organs. In this study we identified a 4-bp deletion in a highly conserved regulatory upstream ORF (uORF) in the 5′UTR of the CDKN1B gene in a patient with a pituitary adenoma and a well-differentiated pancreatic neoplasm. This deletion causes the shift of the uORF termination codon with the consequent lengthening of the uORF–encoded peptide and the drastic shortening of the intercistronic space. Our data on the immunohistochemical analysis of the patient's pancreatic lesion, functional studies based on dual-luciferase assays, site-directed mutagenesis, and on polysome profiling show a negative influence of this deletion on the translation reinitiation at the CDKN1B starting site, with a consequent reduction in p27KIP1 expression. Our findings demonstrate that, in addition to the previously described mechanisms leading to reduced p27KIP1 activity, such as degradation via the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway or non-covalent sequestration, p27KIP1 activity can also be modulated by an uORF and mutations affecting uORF could change p27KIP1 expression. This study adds the CDKN1B gene to the short list of genes for which mutations that either create, delete, or severely modify their regulatory uORFs have been associated with human diseases. PMID:23555276

  6. YSY01A, a Novel Proteasome Inhibitor, Induces Cell Cycle Arrest on G2 Phase in MCF-7 Cells via ERα and PI3K/Akt Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Bingjie; Huang, Wei; Yuan, Xia; Xu, Bo; Lou, Yaxin; Zhou, Quan; Ran, Fuxiang; Ge, Zemei; Li, Runtao; Cui, Jingrong

    2015-01-01

    Given that the proteasome is essential for multiple cellular processes by degrading diverse regulatory proteins, inhibition of the proteasome has emerged as an attractive target for anti-cancer therapy. YSY01A is a novel small molecule compound targeting the proteasome. The compound was found to suppress viability of MCF-7 cells and cause limited cell membrane damage as determined by sulforhodamine B assay (SRB) and CytoTox 96® non-radioactive cytotoxicity assay. High-content screening (HCS) further shows that YSY01A treatment induces cell cycle arrest on G2 phase within 24 hrs. Label-free quantitative proteomics (LFQP), which allows extensive comparison of cellular responses following YSY01A treatment, suggests that various regulatory proteins including cell cycle associated proteins and PI3K/Akt pathway may be affected. Furthermore, YSY01A increases p-CDC-2, p-FOXO3a, p53, p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 but decreases p-Akt, p-ERα as confirmed by Western blotting. Therefore, YSY01A represents a potential therapeutic for breast cancer MCF-7 by inducing G2 phase arrest via ERα and PI3K/Akt pathways. PMID:25767601

  7. Calpain Genetic Disruption and HSP90 Inhibition Combine To Attenuate Mammary Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Grieve, Stacy; Gao, Yan; Hall, Christine; Hu, Jing; Greer, Peter A

    2016-08-01

    Calpain is an intracellular Ca(2+)-regulated protease system whose substrates include proteins involved in proliferation, survival, migration, invasion, and sensitivity to therapeutic drugs. Genetic disruption of calpain attenuated the tumorigenic potential of breast cancer cells and hypersensitized cells to 17AAG, an inhibitor of the molecular chaperone HSP90. Calpain-1 or -2 overexpression rendered cells resistant to 17AAG, whereas downregulation or inhibition of calpain-1/2 led to increased cell death in multiple breast cancer cell lines, including models of HER2(+) (SKBR3) and triple-negative basal-cell-like (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer. In an MDA-MB-231 orthotopic xenograft model, calpain knockdown or 17AAG treatment independently attenuated tumor growth and metastasis, while the combination was most effective. Calpain knockdown was associated with increased 17AAG-induced degradation of the HSP90 clients cyclin D1 and AKT and multidrug resistance protein 2, which correlated with increased expression of antimitogenic p27(KIP1) and proapoptotic BIM proteins. Like other therapeutics, 17AAG can be effluxed by specific ABC transporters. Calpain expression positively correlated with the expression of P glycoprotein in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Importantly, we show that calpain affects ABC transporter function and efflux of clinically relevant doxorubicin. These observations provide a compelling rationale for exploring the combination of calpain inhibition with new or existing cancer therapeutics. PMID:27215381

  8. Euphol from Euphorbia tirucalli selectively inhibits human gastric cancer cell growth through the induction of ERK1/2-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Wei; Lin, An-Shen; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Wang, Sophie S W; Chang, Fang-Rong; Wu, Yang-Chang; Huang, Yaw-Bin

    2012-12-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies worldwide, and the main cause of cancer-related death in Asia. The present study assessed the anticancer effects of euphol, a triterpene alcohol with anti-inflammatory and antiviral activities on human gastric cancer cells. Euphol showed higher cytotoxicity activity against human gastric CS12 cancer cells than against noncancer CSN cells. In addition, it up-regulated the pro-apoptotic protein BAX and down-regulated the prosurvival protein Bcl-2, causing mitochondrial dysfunction, possibly by caspase-3 activation. The anti-proliferative effects of euphol were associated with the increased p27(kip1) levels and decreased cyclin B1 levels. Inhibition of ERK1/2 activation by PD98059 reversed euphol-induced pro-apoptotic protein expression and cell death. Taken together, these findings suggest that euphol selectively induced gastric cancer cells apoptosis by modulation of ERK signaling, and could thus be of value for cancer therapy. PMID:22634261

  9. Induction of cell cycle arrest in prostate cancer cells by the dietary compound isoliquiritigenin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeo Myeong; Lim, Do Young; Choi, Hyun Ju; Jung, Jae In; Chung, Won-Yoon; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2009-02-01

    Isoliquiritigenin (ISL), a flavonoid chalcone that is present in licorice, shallot, and bean sprouts, is known to have antitumorigenic activities. The present study examined whether ISL alters prostate cancer cell cycle progression. DU145 human and MatLyLu (MLL) rat prostate cancer cells were cultured with various concentrations of ISL. In both DU145 and MLL cells treated with ISL, the percentage of cells in the G1 phase increased, and the incorporation of [(3)H]thymidine decreased. ISL decreased the protein levels of cyclin D1, cyclin E, and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4, whereas cyclin A and CDK2 expressions were unaltered in cells treated with ISL. The expression of the CDK inhibitor p27(KIP1) was increased in cells treated with 20 micromol/L ISL. In addition, treatment of cells with 20 micromol/L ISL for 24 hours led to G2/M cell cycle arrest. Cell division control (CDC) 2 protein levels remained unchanged. The protein levels of phospho-CDC2 (Tyr15) and cyclin B1 were increased, and the CDC25C level was decreased by ISL dose-dependently. We demonstrate that ISL promotes cell cycle arrest in DU145 and MLL cells, thereby providing insights into the mechanisms underlying its antitumorigenic activities. PMID:19298190

  10. Dendrotoxin-κ suppresses tumor growth induced by human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Soo Hwa; Ryu, Pan Dong

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels have been considered to be a regulator of membrane potential and neuronal excitability. Recently, accumulated evidence has indicated that several Kv channel subtypes contribute to the control of cell proliferation in various types of cells and are worth noting as potential emerging molecular targets of cancer therapy. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the Kv1.1-specific blocker, dendrotoxin-κ (DTX-κ), on tumor formation induced by the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 in a xenograft model. Kv1.1 mRNA and protein was expressed in A549 cells and the blockade of Kv1.1 by DTX-κ, reduced tumor formation in nude mice. Furthermore, treatment with DTX-κ significantly increased protein expression of p21Waf1/Cip1, p27Kip1, and p15INK4B and significantly decreased protein expression of cyclin D3 in tumor tissues compared to the control. These results suggest that DTX-κ has anti-tumor effects in A549 cells through the pathway governing G1-S transition. PMID:21368561

  11. Novel dichlorophenyl urea compounds inhibit proliferation of human leukemia HL-60 cells by inducing cell cycle arrest, differentiation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Figarola, James L; Weng, Yehua; Lincoln, Christopher; Horne, David; Rahbar, Samuel

    2012-08-01

    Two novel dichlorophenyl urea compounds, SR4 and SR9, were synthesized in our laboratory and evaluated for anti-cancer activities. Specifically, we investigated the antiproliferative properties of these new compounds on promyelocytic HL-60 leukemia cells by analyzing their effects on cell differentiation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis. SR4 and SR9 were both cytotoxic to HL-60 cells in a dose-and time-dependent manner, with IC(50) of 1.2 μM and 2.2 μM, respectively, after 72 h treatment. Both compounds strongly suppressed growth of HL-60 cells by promoting cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 transition, with concomitant decrease in protein levels of cyclins D1 and E2 and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK 2 and CDK 4), and increased protein expression of CDK inhibitors p21(WAF1/Cip1) and p27(Kip1). In addition, either compounds induce cell differentiation as detected by increased NBT staining and expression of CD11b and CD14. Treatment with SR compounds also promoted mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis as confirmed by Annexin V-FITC double staining, DNA fragmentation, increased expression of caspase 3, 7 and 9, cytochrome c release, PARP degradation, and collapse in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(MT)). Collectively, these results provide evidence that SR4 and SR9 have the potential for the treatment of human leukemia and merit further investigation as therapeutic agents against other types of cancer. PMID:21728022

  12. KSHV vCyclin Counters the Senescence/G1 Arrest Response Triggered by NF-κB Hyper-activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Huijun; Zahoor, Muhammad Atif; Druck Shudofsky, Abigail M.; Giam, Chou-Zen

    2014-01-01

    Many oncogenic viruses activate NF-κB as a part of their replicative cycles. We have shown recently that persistent and potentially oncogenic activation of NF-κB by the human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1) oncoprotein Tax immediately triggers a host senescence response mediated by cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors: p21CIP1/WAF1 (p21) and p27Kip1 (p27) Here we demonstrate that RelA/NF-κB activation by Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) latency protein vFLIP also leads to p21/p27 up-regulation and G1 cell cycle arrest. Remarkably, KSHV vCyclin, another latency protein co-expressed with vFLIP from a bicistronic latency-specific mRNA, was found to prevent the senescence and G1 arrest induced by HTLV-1 Tax and vFLIP respectively. This is due to the known ability of vCyclin/CDK6 complex to resist p21 and p27 inhibition and cause p27 degradation23. In KSHV-transformed BCBL-1 cells, sustained vFLIP expression with shRNA-mediated vCyclin depletion resulted in G1 arrest. The functional interdependence of vFLIP and vCyclin explains why they are co-translated from the same viral mRNA. Importantly, deregulation of the G1 cyclin-dependent kinase can facilitate chronic IKK/NF-κB activation. PMID:24469036

  13. Fusarochromanone Induces G1 Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in COS7 and HEK293 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ying; Chen, Xin; Shang, Chaowei; Singh, Karnika; Barzegar, Mansoureh; Mahdavian, Elahe; Salvatore, Brian A.; Jiang, Shanxiang; Huang, Shile

    2014-01-01

    Fusarochromanone (FC101), a mycotoxin produced by the fungus Fusarium equiseti, is frequently observed in the contaminated grains and feedstuffs, which is toxic to animals and humans. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains to be defined. In this study, we found that FC101 inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell death in COS7 and HEK293 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Flow cytometric analysis showed that FC101 induced G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in the cells. Concurrently, FC101 downregulated protein expression of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK4 and CDK6), and Cdc25A, and upregulated expression of the CDK inhibitors (p21Cip1 and p27Kip1), resulting in hypophosphorylation of Rb. FC101 also inhibited protein expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Mcl-1 and survivin, and induced expression of BAD, leading to activation of caspase 3 and cleavage of PARP, indicating caspase-dependent apoptosis. However, Z-VAD-FMK, a pan-caspase inhibitor, only partially prevented FC101-induced cell death, implying that FC101 may induce cell death through both caspase-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Our results support the notion that FC101 executes its toxicity at least by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing cell death. PMID:25384025

  14. Non-CDK-bound p27 (p27{sup NCDK}) is a marker for cell stress and is regulated through the Akt/PKB and AMPK-kinase pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Bjoerklund, Mia A.; Vaahtomeri, Kari; Peltonen, Karita; Viollet, Benoit; Maekelae, Tomi P.; Band, Arja M.; Laiho, Marikki

    2010-03-10

    p27Kip1 (p27) tumour suppressor protein is regulated by multiple mechanisms including its turnover, localization and complex formation with its key targets, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) and cyclins. We have earlier shown that p27 exists in cells in a form that lacks cyclin/CDK interactions (hence non-CDK, p27{sup NCDK}) but the nature of p27{sup NCDK} has remained unresolved. Here we demonstrate that the epitope recognized by the p27{sup NCDK}-specific antibody resides in the p27 CDK-interaction domain and that p27{sup NCDK} is regulated by the balance of CDK inhibitors and cyclin-CDK complexes. We find that signalling by cellular growth promoting pathways, like phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and specifically Akt/PKB kinase, inversely correlates with p27{sup NCDK} levels whereas total p27 levels are unaffected. p27{sup NCDK}, but not total p27, is increased by cellular perturbations such as hyperosmotic and metabolic stress and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). By using AMPK catalytic subunit proficient and deficient cells we further demonstrate that the AMPK pathway governs p27{sup NCDK} responses to metabolic stress and PI3K inhibition. These results indicate that p27{sup NCDK} is a sensitive marker for both cell stress and proliferation over and above p27 and is regulated by Akt/PKB and AMPK pathways.

  15. Overexpression of the human ZNF300 gene enhances growth and metastasis of cancer cells through activating NF-kB pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Xian-guo; Xu, Jun-hua; Wu, Xiang-Peng; Qiu, Hong-ling; Yi, Hong; Li, Wen-Xin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Zinc finger proteins (ZNF) play important roles in various physiological processes. Here we report that ZNF300, a novel zinc finger protein, identified specifically in humans, promotes tumour development by modulating the NF-κB pathway. Inflammatory factors were found to induce ZNF300 expression in HeLa cell line, and ZNF300 expression further enhanced NF-κB signalling by activating TRAF2 and physically interacting with IKKβ. Furthermore, ZNF300 overexpression increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation and the expression of c-myc, IL-6, and IL-8 but decreased the expression of p21waf-1 and p27Kip1; whose down-regulation led to the opposite effect. Most importantly, ZNF300 overexpression stimulated cancer cell proliferation in vitro and significantly enhanced tumour development and metastasis in mouse xenograft model, while knocking down ZNF300 led to the opposite effects. We have identified a novel function for ZNF300 in tumour development that may uniquely link inflammation and NF-κB to tumourigenesis in humans but not in mice. PMID:21777376

  16. REGULATION OF PTEN EXPRESSION IN INTESTINAL EPITHELIAL CELLS BY JNK ACTIVATION AND NF-κB INHIBITION

    PubMed Central

    Wang, QingDing; Zhou, Yuning; Wang, Xiaofu; Chung, Dai H.; Evers, B. Mark

    2008-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein PTEN plays an important role in intestinal cell proliferation and differentiation and tumor suppression by antagonizing phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). Despite its importance, the molecular mechanisms regulating PTEN expression are largely undefined. Here, we show that treatment of the colon cancer cell line, HT29, with the differentiating agent sodium butyrate (NaBT) increased PTEN protein and mRNA expression and induced JNK activation. Inhibition of c-Jun-NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) by chemical or genetic methods attenuated NaBT-induced PTEN expression. In addition, our findings demonstrated a cross-talk between NF-κB and JNK with respect to PTEN regulation. Overexpression of the NF-κB superrepressor increased PTEN expression and JNK activity, whereas overexpression of the p65 NF-κB subunit reduced both basal and NaBT-mediated JNK activation and PTEN expression. Moreover, we showed that overexpression of PTEN or treatment with NaBT increased expression of the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p27kip1 in HT29 cells; this induction was attenuated by inhibition of PTEN or JNK expression or overexpression of p65. Finally, we demonstrate a role for PTEN in NaBT-mediated cell death and differentiation. Our findings suggest that the NF-κB/JNK/PTEN pathway plays a critical role in normal intestinal homeostasis and colon carcinogenesis. PMID:17699782

  17. Integrin signaling at the M/G1 transition induces expression of cyclin E.

    PubMed

    Hulleman, E; Bijvelt, J J; Verkleij, A J; Verrips, C T; Boonstra, J

    1999-12-15

    The activities of the mammalian G1 cyclins, cyclin D and cyclin E, during cell cycle progression (G1/S) are believed to be regulated by cell attachment and the presence of growth factors. In order to study the importance of cell attachment and concomitant integrin signaling on the expression of G1 cyclins during the natural adhesion process from mitosis to interphase, protein expression was monitored in cells that were synchronized by mitotic shake off. Here we show that in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and neuroblastoma (N2A) cells, expression of cyclin E at the M/G1 transition is regulated by both growth factors and cell attachment, while expression of cyclin D seems to be entirely dependent on the presence of serum. Expression of cyclin E appears to be correlated with the phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein, suggesting a link with the activity of the cyclin D/cdk4 complex. Expression of the cdk inhibitors p21(cip1/Waf1) and p27(Kip1) is not changed upon serum depletion or detachment of cells during early G1, suggesting no direct role for these CKIs in the regulation of cyclin activity. Although inhibition of cyclin E/cdk2 kinase activity has been reported previously, this is the first time that cyclin E expression is shown to be dependent on cell attachment. PMID:10585265

  18. Direct interactions with both p27 and Cdk2 regulate Spy1-mediated proliferation in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Al Sorkhy, Mohammad; Fifield, Bre-Anne; Myers, Dorothy; Porter, Lisa A

    2016-01-01

    Families of cyclin-like proteins have emerged that bind and activate cyclin dependent kinases (Cdk)s, directing the phosphorylation of noncanonical Cdk substrates. One of these proteins, Spy1, has demonstrated the unique ability to directly bind and activate both Cdk1 and Cdk2, as well as binding and promoting the degradation of at least one Cdk inhibitor, p27(Kip1). Spy1 accelerates somatic cell growth and proliferation and is implicated in a number of human cancers including the breast, brain and liver. Herein we isolate key residues mediating the direct interaction with p27. We use mutants of Spy1 to determine the physiological role of direct interactions with distinct binding partners Cdk2 and p27. We demonstrate that disrupting the direct interaction with either Spy1 binding partner decreased endogenous activity of Cdk2, as well as Spy1-mediated proliferation. However, only the direct interaction with p27 was essential for Spy1-mediated effects on p27 stability. In vivo neither mutation completely prevented tumorigenesis, although each mutation slowed the rate of Spy1-mediated tumorigenesis and decreased overall tumor volumes. This work supports the conclusion that direct interaction with both p27 and Cdk2 contribute to Spy1-mediated effects on cell growth. It is important to elucidate the dynamics of these interactions and to consider these data when assessing functional outcomes. PMID:26771716

  19. Flavokawain A induces deNEDDylation and Skp2 degradation leading to inhibition of tumorigenesis and cancer progression in the TRAMP transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuesen; Yokoyama, Noriko N.; Zhang, Saiyang; Ding, Lina; Liu, Hong-min; Lilly, Michael B.; Mercola, Dan; Zi, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    S phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2) has been shown to be required for spontaneous tumor development that occurs in the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) deficient mice. Here we have demonstrated that flavokawain A (FKA), a novel chalcone from the kava plant, selectively inhibited the growth of pRb deficient cell lines and resulted in a proteasome-dependent and ubiquitination-mediated Skp2 degradation. Degradation of Skp2 by FKA was found to be involved in a functional Cullin1, but independent of Cdh1 expression. Further studies have demonstrated that FKA docked into the ATP binding pocket of the precursor cell-expressed developmentally down-regulated 8 (NEDD8)-activating enzyme (NAE) complex, inhibited NEDD8 conjugations to both Cullin1 and Ubc12 in PC3 cells and Ubc12 NEDDylation in an in vitro assay. Finally, dietary feeding of the autochthonous transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice with FKA inhibited the formation of high-grade prostatic intra-epithelial neoplasia lesions (HG-PIN) and prostate adenocarcinomas, reduced the tumor burden and completely abolished distant organ metastasis. Immunohistochemistry studies revealed that dietary FKA feeding resulted in marked anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects via down-regulation of Skp2 and NEDD8 and up-regulation of p27/Kip1 in the prostate of TRAMP mice. Our findings therefore provide evidence that FKA is a promising NEDDylation inhibitor for targeting Skp2 degradation in prostate cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:26497688

  20. Flavokawain A induces deNEDDylation and Skp2 degradation leading to inhibition of tumorigenesis and cancer progression in the TRAMP transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuesen; Yokoyama, Noriko N; Zhang, Saiyang; Ding, Lina; Liu, Hong-min; Lilly, Michael B; Mercola, Dan; Zi, Xiaolin

    2015-12-01

    S phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2) has been shown to be required for spontaneous tumor development that occurs in the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) deficient mice. Here we have demonstrated that flavokawain A (FKA), a novel chalcone from the kava plant, selectively inhibited the growth of pRb deficient cell lines and resulted in a proteasome-dependent and ubiquitination-mediated Skp2 degradation. Degradation of Skp2 by FKA was found to be involved in a functional Cullin1, but independent of Cdh1 expression. Further studies have demonstrated that FKA docked into the ATP binding pocket of the precursor cell-expressed developmentally down-regulated 8 (NEDD8)-activating enzyme (NAE) complex, inhibited NEDD8 conjugations to both Cullin1 and Ubc12 in PC3 cells and Ubc12 NEDDylation in an in vitro assay. Finally, dietary feeding of the autochthonous transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice with FKA inhibited the formation of high-grade prostatic intra-epithelial neoplasia lesions (HG-PIN) and prostate adenocarcinomas, reduced the tumor burden and completely abolished distant organ metastasis. Immunohistochemistry studies revealed that dietary FKA feeding resulted in marked anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects via down-regulation of Skp2 and NEDD8 and up-regulation of p27/Kip1 in the prostate of TRAMP mice. Our findings therefore provide evidence that FKA is a promising NEDDylation inhibitor for targeting Skp2 degradation in prostate cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:26497688

  1. G1/S Cell Cycle Arrest Provides Anoikis Resistance through Erk-Mediated Bim Suppression†

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Nicole L.; Reginato, Maurico J.; Paulus, Jessica K.; Sgroi, Dennis C.; LaBaer, Joshua; Brugge, Joan S.

    2005-01-01

    Proper attachment to the extracellular matrix is essential for cell survival. Detachment from the extracellular matrix results in an apoptotic process termed anoikis. Anoikis induction in MCF-10A mammary epithelial cells is due not only to loss of survival signals following integrin disengagement, but also to consequent downregulation of epidermal growth factor (EGFR) and loss of EGFR-induced survival signals. Here we demonstrate that G1/S arrest by overexpression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p16INK4a, p21Cip1, or p27Kip1 or by treatment with mimosine or aphidicolin confers anoikis resistance in MCF-10A cells. G1/S arrest-mediated anoikis resistance involves suppression of the BH3-only protein Bim. Furthermore, in G1/S-arrested cells, Erk phosphorylation is maintained in suspension and is necessary for Bim suppression. Following G1/S arrest, known proteins upstream of Erk, including Raf and Mek, are not activated. However, retained Erk activation under conditions in which Raf and Mek activation is lost is observed, suggesting that G1/S arrest acts at the level of Erk dephosphorylation. Thus, anoikis resistance by G1/S arrest is mediated by a mechanism involving Bim suppression through maintenance of Erk activation. These results provide a novel link between cell cycle arrest and survival, and this mechanism could contribute to the survival of nonreplicating, dormant tumor cells that avert apoptosis during early stages of metastasis. PMID:15923641

  2. Intranuclear binding in space and time of exon junction complex and NXF1 to premRNPs/mRNPs in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Björk, Petra; Persson, Jan-Olov

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic gene expression requires the ordered association of numerous factors with precursor messenger RNAs (premRNAs)/messenger RNAs (mRNAs) to achieve efficiency and regulation. Here, we use the Balbiani ring (BR) genes to demonstrate the temporal and spatial association of the exon junction complex (EJC) core with gene-specific endogenous premRNAs and mRNAs. The EJC core components bind cotranscriptionally to BR premRNAs during or very rapidly after splicing. The EJC core does not recruit the nonsense-mediated decay mediaters UPF2 and UPF3 until the BR messenger RNA protein complexes (mRNPs) enter the interchromatin. Even though several known adapters for the export factor NXF1 become part of BR mRNPs already at the gene, NXF1 binds to BR mRNPs only in the interchromatin. In steady state, a subset of the BR mRNPs in the interchromatin binds NXF1, UPF2, and UPF3. This binding appears to occur stochastically, and the efficiency approximately equals synthesis and export of the BR mRNPs. Our data provide unique in vivo information on how export competent eukaryotic mRNPs are formed. PMID:26459599

  3. Intranuclear binding in space and time of exon junction complex and NXF1 to premRNPs/mRNPs in vivo.

    PubMed

    Björk, Petra; Persson, Jan-Olov; Wieslander, Lars

    2015-10-12

    Eukaryotic gene expression requires the ordered association of numerous factors with precursor messenger RNAs (premRNAs)/messenger RNAs (mRNAs) to achieve efficiency and regulation. Here, we use the Balbiani ring (BR) genes to demonstrate the temporal and spatial association of the exon junction complex (EJC) core with gene-specific endogenous premRNAs and mRNAs. The EJC core components bind cotranscriptionally to BR premRNAs during or very rapidly after splicing. The EJC core does not recruit the nonsense-mediated decay mediaters UPF2 and UPF3 until the BR messenger RNA protein complexes (mRNPs) enter the interchromatin. Even though several known adapters for the export factor NXF1 become part of BR mRNPs already at the gene, NXF1 binds to BR mRNPs only in the interchromatin. In steady state, a subset of the BR mRNPs in the interchromatin binds NXF1, UPF2, and UPF3. This binding appears to occur stochastically, and the efficiency approximately equals synthesis and export of the BR mRNPs. Our data provide unique in vivo information on how export competent eukaryotic mRNPs are formed. PMID:26459599

  4. Transgenic Expression of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4 Results in Epidermal Hyperplasia, Hypertrophy, and Severe Dermal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Miliani de Marval, Paula L.; Gimenez-Conti, Irma B.; LaCava, Margaret; Martinez, Luis A.; Conti, Claudio J.; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L.

    2001-01-01

    In a previous report we have described the effects of expression of D-type cyclins in epithelial tissues of transgenic mice. To study the involvement of the D-type cyclin partner cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) in epithelial growth and differentiation, transgenic mice were generated carrying the CDK4 gene under the control of a keratin 5 promoter. As expected, transgenic mice showed expression of CDK4 in the epidermal basal-cell layer. Epidermal proliferation increased dramatically and basal cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy were observed. The hyperproliferative phenotype of these transgenic mice was independent of D-type cyclin expression because no overexpression of these proteins was detected. CDK4 and CDK2 kinase activities increased in transgenic animals and were associated with elevated binding of p27Kip1 to CDK4. Expression of CDK4 in the epidermis results in an increased spinous layer compared with normal epidermis, and a mild hyperkeratosis in the cornified layer. In addition to epidermal changes, severe dermal fibrosis was observed and part of the subcutaneous adipose tissue was replaced by connective tissue. Also, abnormal expression of keratin 6 associated with the hyperproliferative phenotype was observed in transgenic epidermis. This model provides in vivo evidence for the role of CDK4 as a mediator of proliferation in epithelial cells independent of D-type cyclin expression. PMID:11438484

  5. Lysophosphatidic acid induces YAP-promoted proliferation of human corneal endothelial cells via PI3K and ROCK pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Yi-Jen; Chen, Hung-Chi; Wu, Sung-En; Wang, Tze-Kai; Chen, Jan-Kan; Ma, David Hui-Kang

    2015-01-01

    The first two authors contributed equally to this work.Silence of p120-catenin has shown promise in inducing proliferation in human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs), but there is concern regarding off-target effects in potential clinical applications. We aimed to develop ex vivo expansion of HCECs using natural compounds, and we hypothesized that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) can unlock the mitotic block in contact-inhibited HCECs via enhancing nuclear translocation of yes-associated protein (YAP). Firstly, we verified that exogenous YAP could induce cell proliferation in contact-inhibited HCEC monolayers and postconfluent B4G12 cells. In B4G12 cells, enhanced cyclin D1 expression, reduced p27KIP1/p21CIP1 levels, and the G1/S transition were detected upon transfection with YAP. Secondly, we confirmed that LPA induced nuclear expression of YAP and promoted cell proliferation. Moreover, PI3K and ROCK, but not ERK or p38, were required for LPA-induced YAP nuclear translocation. Finally, cells treated with LPA or transfected with YAP remained hexagonal in shape, in addition to unchanged expression of ZO-1, Na/K-ATPase, and smooth muscle actin (SMA), suggestive of a preserved phenotype, without endothelial–mesenchymal transition. Collectively, our findings indicate an innovative strategy for ex vivo cultivation of HCECs for transplantation and cell therapy. PMID:26029725

  6. Testing the importance of p27 degradation by the SCFskp2 pathway in murine models of lung and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Timmerbeul, Inke; Garrett-Engele, Carrie M; Kossatz, Uta; Chen, Xueyan; Firpo, Eduardo; Grünwald, Viktor; Kamino, Kenji; Wilkens, Ludwig; Lehmann, Ulrich; Buer, Jan; Geffers, Robert; Kubicka, Stefan; Manns, Michael P; Porter, Peggy L; Roberts, James M; Malek, Nisar P

    2006-09-19

    Decreased expression of the CDK inhibitor p27kip1 in human tumors directly correlates with increased resistance to chemotherapies, increased rates of metastasis, and an overall increased rate of patient mortality. It is thought that decreased p27 expression in tumors is caused by increased proteasomal turnover, in particular activation of the pathway governed by the SCFskp2 E3 ubiquitin protein ligase. We have directly tested the importance of the SCFskp-mediated degradation of p27 in tumorigenesis by analyzing the tumor susceptibility of mice that express a form of p27 that cannot be ubiquitinated and degraded by this pathway (p27T187A). In mouse models of both lung and colon cancer down-regulation of p27 promotes tumorigenesis. However, we found that preventing p27 degradation by the SCFskp2 pathway had no impact on tumor incidence or overall survival in either tumor model. Our study unveiled a previously unrecognized role for the control of p27 mRNA abundance in the development of non-small cell lung cancers. In the colon cancer model, the frequency of intestinal adenomas was similarly unaffected by the p27T187A mutation, but, unexpectedly, we found that it inhibited progression of intestinal adenomas to carcinomas. These studies may guide the choice of clinical settings in which pharmacologic inhibitors of the Skp2 pathway might be of therapeutic value. PMID:16966613

  7. A Dihydroxy-pentamethoxyflavone from Gardenia obtusifolia suppresses proliferation and promotes apoptosis of tumor cells through modulation of multiple cell signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Phromnoi, Kanokkarn; Reuter, Simone; Sung, Bokyung; Limtrakul, Pornngarm; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2010-09-01

    We sought to determine the molecular basis for the anticancer activities of 5,3'-dihydroxy-3,6,7,8,4'-pentamethoxyflavone (DH-PMF), isolated from Gardenia obtusifolia traditionally used in Thailand for a variety of ailments. As little as 1 μM DH-PMF inhibited the proliferation of prostate, colon, kidney, lung, head and neck, pancreas, breast, leukemia, and myeloma cancer cell lines. DH-PMF also suppressed the colony-forming ability of tumor cells, with 50% inhibition occurring at a dose less than 10 nM. DH-PMF induced G(2)/M and subG(1) cell cycle arrest, increased the levels of p21(WAF1/CIP1) and p27(KIP1), and reduced the expression of cyclin D1, CDC2, and c-MYC. Furthermore, DH-PMF inhibited AKT and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) activation, reduced cell survival proteins, and induced apoptosis, as indicated by annexin V staining, TUNEL assay, and activation of caspase-8, -9 and -3. Overall, our results demonstrate that DH-PMF induces suppression of cell proliferation through modulation of AKT-GSK3β pathways and induction of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors. PMID:20944143

  8. Cycle Inhibiting Factors (CIFs) Are a Growing Family of Functional Cyclomodulins Present in Invertebrate and Mammal Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Jubelin, Grégory; Chavez, Carolina Varela; Taieb, Frédéric; Banfield, Mark J.; Samba-Louaka, Ascel; Nobe, Rika; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Zumbihl, Robert; Givaudan, Alain; Escoubas, Jean-Michel; Oswald, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The cycle inhibiting factor (Cif) produced by enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli was the first cyclomodulin to be identified that is injected into host cells via the type III secretion machinery. Cif provokes cytopathic effects characterized by G1 and G2 cell cycle arrests, accumulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CKIs) p21waf1/cip1 and p27kip1 and formation of actin stress fibres. The X-ray crystal structure of Cif revealed it to be a divergent member of a superfamily of enzymes including cysteine proteases and acetyltransferases that share a conserved catalytic triad. Here we report the discovery and characterization of four Cif homologs encoded by different pathogenic or symbiotic bacteria isolated from vertebrates or invertebrates. Cif homologs from the enterobacteria Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, Photorhabdus luminescens, Photorhabdus asymbiotica and the β-proteobacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei all induce cytopathic effects identical to those observed with Cif from pathogenic E. coli. Although these Cif homologs are remarkably divergent in primary sequence, the catalytic triad is strictly conserved and was shown to be crucial for cell cycle arrest, cytoskeleton reorganization and CKIs accumulation. These results reveal that Cif proteins form a growing family of cyclomodulins in bacteria that interact with very distinct hosts including insects, nematodes and humans. PMID:19308257

  9. Biological mechanisms of action of novel C-10 non-acetal trioxane dimers in prostate cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Alagbala, Adebusola A; McRiner, Andrew J; Borstnik, Kristina; Labonte, Tanzina; Chang, Wonsuk; D'Angelo, John G; Posner, Gary H; Foster, Barbara A

    2006-12-28

    The mechanisms of action of three C-10 non-acetal trioxane dimers (TDs) were examined in human (LNCaP) and mouse (TRAMP-C1A and -C2H) prostate cancer cell lines. 1 (AJM3/23), 2 (GHP-TM-III-07w), and 3 (GHP-KB-06) inhibited cell growth with 3 being the most potent in C1A (GI50 = 18.0 nM), C2H (GI50 = 17.0 nM), and LNCaP (GI50 = 17.9 nM) cells. In comparison to a standard cytotoxic agent such as doxorubicin (GI50 = 45.3 nM), 3 (GI50 = 17.9 nM) inhibited LNCaP cell growth more potently. TDs induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in LNCaP cells and decreased cells in the S phase. These changes correlated with modulation of G1 phase cell cycle proteins including decreased cyclin D1, cyclin E, and cdk2 and increased p21waf1 and p27Kip1. TDs also promoted apoptosis in LNCaP cells with increased expression of proapoptotic bax. These results demonstrate that TDs are potentially useful agents that warrant further preclinical development for treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:17181166

  10. Casticin induces ovarian cancer cell apoptosis by repressing FoxM1 through the activation of FOXO3a

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, LING; CAO, XIAO-CHENG; CAO, JIAN-GUO; LIU, FEI; QUAN, MEI-FANG; SHENG, XI-FENG; REN, KAI-QUN

    2013-01-01

    Casticin, a polymethoxyflavone, is reported to have anticancer activities. The aim of the present study was to examine the molecular mechanisms by which casticin induces apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells. The human ovarian cancer cell lines SKOV3 and A2780 were cultured in vitro. Various molecular techniques, including histone/DNA enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blot analysis and gene transfection, were used to assess the expression of FOXO3a and forkhead box protein M1 (FoxM1) in casticin-treated ovarian cancer cell lines. Casticin-induced apoptotic cell death was accompanied by the activation of transcription factor FOXO3a, with a concomitant decrease in the expression levels of FoxM1 and its downstream target factors, namely survivin and polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), and an increase in p27KIP1. A small inhibitory RNA (siRNA) knockout of FoxM1 potentiated casticin-induced apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells. Silencing FOXO3a expression using siRNA increased FoxM1 expression levels and clearly attenuated the induction of apoptosis by casticin treatment. These results show that casticin-induced apoptosis in ovarian cancer may be caused by the activation of FOXO3a, leading to FoxM1 inhibition. PMID:23761826

  11. Pterostilbine, an active component of blueberries, sensitizes colon cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Tolba, Mai F; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z

    2015-01-01

    Although colorectal cancer (CRC) treatment with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is the first line of therapy for this debilitating disease, treatment effectiveness is often hampered by the development of drug resistance and toxicity at high doses. ER-β can play an important role in CRC development and possibly in its response to therapy. Pterostilbene (PT) possesses antioxidant and anticancer effects that are mediated by ER-β. In the current study, we test the hypothesis that PT sensitizes colon cancer cells to 5-FU and we examine the underlying mechanism(s) by which PT exerts its cytotoxic effects in CRC cells. Our data indicate that PT exhibited a more potent cytotoxic effect in Caco-2 compared to HCT-116 cells. PT/5-FU co-treatment was more effective in Caco-2 cells. Our data indicate that ER-β is expressed at higher levels in Caco-2 cells and its levels are further boosted with PT treatment. PT significantly suppressed Akt and ERK phosphorylations, and enhanced FOXO-1 and p27(kip1) levels in Caco-2 cells. PT also induced a significant increase in Caco-2 cells at pre-G phase coupled with increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and PARP cleavage. These results provide a rationale for novel combination treatment strategies, especially for patients with 5-FU-resistant tumors expressing ER-β protein. PMID:26472352

  12. Novel analogs targeting histone deacetylase suppress aggressive thyroid cancer cell growth and induce re-differentiation.

    PubMed

    Jang, S; Yu, X-M; Odorico, S; Clark, M; Jaskula-Sztul, R; Schienebeck, C M; Kupcho, K R; Harrison, A D; Winston-McPherson, G N; Tang, W; Chen, H

    2015-08-01

    To develop novel therapies for aggressive thyroid cancers, we have synthesized a collection of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor analogs named AB1 to AB13, which have different linkers between a metal chelating group and a hydrophobic cap. The purpose of this study was to screen out the most effective compounds and evaluate the therapeutic efficacy. AB2, AB3 and AB10 demonstrated the lowest half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values in one metastatic follicular and two anaplastic thyroid cancer cell lines. Treatment with each of the three ABs resulted in an increase in apoptosis markers, including cleaved poly adenosine diphosphate ribose polymerase (PARP) and cleaved caspase 3. Additionally, the expression of cell-cycle regulatory proteins p21(WAF1) and p27(Kip1) increased with the treatment of ABs while cyclin D1 decreased. Furthermore, AB2, AB3 and AB10 were able to induce thyrocyte-specific genes in the three thyroid cancer cell lines indicated by increased expression levels of sodium iodide symporter, paired box gene 8, thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF1), TTF2 and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptors. AB2, AB3 and AB10 suppress thyroid cancer cell growth via cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. They also induce cell re-differentiation, which could make aggressive cancer cells more susceptible to radioactive iodine therapy. PMID:26251030

  13. FGFR1-Frs2/3 Signalling Maintains Sensory Progenitors during Inner Ear Hair Cell Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Kazuya; Kita, Tomoko; Sato, Shigeru; O'Neill, Paul; Mak, Siu-Shan; Paschaki, Marie; Ito, Masataka; Gotoh, Noriko; Kawakami, Kiyoshi; Sasai, Yoshiki; Ladher, Raj K.

    2014-01-01

    Inner ear mechanosensory hair cells transduce sound and balance information. Auditory hair cells emerge from a Sox2-positive sensory patch in the inner ear epithelium, which is progressively restricted during development. This restriction depends on the action of signaling molecules. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signalling is important during sensory specification: attenuation of Fgfr1 disrupts cochlear hair cell formation; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here we report that in the absence of FGFR1 signaling, the expression of Sox2 within the sensory patch is not maintained. Despite the down-regulation of the prosensory domain markers, p27Kip1, Hey2, and Hes5, progenitors can still exit the cell cycle to form the zone of non-proliferating cells (ZNPC), however the number of cells that form sensory cells is reduced. Analysis of a mutant Fgfr1 allele, unable to bind to the adaptor protein, Frs2/3, indicates that Sox2 maintenance can be regulated by MAP kinase. We suggest that FGF signaling, through the activation of MAP kinase, is necessary for the maintenance of sensory progenitors and commits precursors to sensory cell differentiation in the mammalian cochlea. PMID:24465223

  14. FGFR1-Frs2/3 signalling maintains sensory progenitors during inner ear hair cell formation.

    PubMed

    Ono, Kazuya; Kita, Tomoko; Sato, Shigeru; O'Neill, Paul; Mak, Siu-Shan; Paschaki, Marie; Ito, Masataka; Gotoh, Noriko; Kawakami, Kiyoshi; Sasai, Yoshiki; Ladher, Raj K

    2014-01-01

    Inner ear mechanosensory hair cells transduce sound and balance information. Auditory hair cells emerge from a Sox2-positive sensory patch in the inner ear epithelium, which is progressively restricted during development. This restriction depends on the action of signaling molecules. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signalling is important during sensory specification: attenuation of Fgfr1 disrupts cochlear hair cell formation; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here we report that in the absence of FGFR1 signaling, the expression of Sox2 within the sensory patch is not maintained. Despite the down-regulation of the prosensory domain markers, p27(Kip1), Hey2, and Hes5, progenitors can still exit the cell cycle to form the zone of non-proliferating cells (ZNPC), however the number of cells that form sensory cells is reduced. Analysis of a mutant Fgfr1 allele, unable to bind to the adaptor protein, Frs2/3, indicates that Sox2 maintenance can be regulated by MAP kinase. We suggest that FGF signaling, through the activation of MAP kinase, is necessary for the maintenance of sensory progenitors and commits precursors to sensory cell differentiation in the mammalian cochlea. PMID:24465223

  15. Pterostilbine, an active component of blueberries, sensitizes colon cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Tolba, Mai F.; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z.

    2015-01-01

    Although colorectal cancer (CRC) treatment with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is the first line of therapy for this debilitating disease, treatment effectiveness is often hampered by the development of drug resistance and toxicity at high doses. ER-β can play an important role in CRC development and possibly in its response to therapy. Pterostilbene (PT) possesses antioxidant and anticancer effects that are mediated by ER-β. In the current study, we test the hypothesis that PT sensitizes colon cancer cells to 5-FU and we examine the underlying mechanism(s) by which PT exerts its cytotoxic effects in CRC cells. Our data indicate that PT exhibited a more potent cytotoxic effect in Caco-2 compared to HCT-116 cells. PT/5-FU co-treatment was more effective in Caco-2 cells. Our data indicate that ER-β is expressed at higher levels in Caco-2 cells and its levels are further boosted with PT treatment. PT significantly suppressed Akt and ERK phosphorylations, and enhanced FOXO-1 and p27kip1 levels in Caco-2 cells. PT also induced a significant increase in Caco-2 cells at pre-G phase coupled with increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and PARP cleavage. These results provide a rationale for novel combination treatment strategies, especially for patients with 5-FU-resistant tumors expressing ER-β protein. PMID:26472352

  16. Bortezomib induces apoptosis and growth suppression in human medulloblastoma cells, associated with inhibition of AKT and NF-ĸB signaling, and synergizes with an ERK inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Jove, Veronica; Chang, Shirley; Hedvat, Michael; Liu, Lucy; Buettner, Ralf; Tian, Yan; Scuto, Anna; Wen, Wei; Yip, M.L. Richard; Van Meter, Timothy; Yen, Yun; Jove, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common brain tumor in children. Here, we report that bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor, induced apoptosis and inhibited cell proliferation in two established cell lines and a primary culture of human medulloblastomas. Bortezomib increased the release of cytochrome c to cytosol and activated caspase-9 and caspase-3, resulting in cleavage of PARP. Caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) could rescue medulloblastoma cells from the cytotoxicity of bortezomib. Phosphorylation of AKT and its upstream regulator mTOR were reduced by bortezomib treatment in medulloblastoma cells. Bortezomib increased the expression of Bad and Bak, pro-apoptotic proteins, and p21Cip1 and p27Kip1, negative regulators of cell cycle progression, which are associated with the growth suppression and induction of apoptosis in these tumor cells. Bortezomib also increased the accumulation of phosphorylated IĸBα, and decreased nuclear translocation of NF-ĸB. Thus, NF-ĸB signaling and activation of its downstream targets are suppressed. Moreover, ERK inhibitors or downregulating ERK with ERK siRNA synergized with bortezomib on anticancer effects in medulloblastoma cells. Bortezomib also inhibited the growth of human medulloblastoma cells in a mouse xenograft model. These findings suggest that proteasome inhibitors are potentially promising drugs for treatment of pediatric medulloblastomas. PMID:22313636

  17. Inhibition of liver trans-sulphuration pathway by propargylglycine mimics gene expression changes found in the mammary gland of weaned lactating rats: role of glutathione.

    PubMed Central

    Zaragozá, Rosa; García, Concha; Rus, A Diana; Pallardó, Federico V; Barber, Teresa; Torres, Luis; Miralles, Vicente J; Viña, Juan R

    2003-01-01

    In the lactating mammary gland, weaning produces mitochondrial cytochrome c release and nuclear DNA fragmentation, as determined by gel electrophoresis. This is followed by a significant decrease in lactation. Weaning for 2 h produces an early induction of the tumour suppressor/transcription factor p53, whereas the oncoprotein c-Jun and c-Jun N-terminal kinase are elevated after 24 h of weaning when compared with controls. The expression of p21(cip1) and p27(kip1), cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, was significantly higher in weaned rats when compared with control lactating rats. All the changes mentioned above also happen in the lactating mammary gland when propargylglycine, an inhibitor of the liver trans-sulphuration pathway, is administered. This effect is partially reversed by N -acetylcysteine administration. The administration of buthionine sulphoximine, an irreversible inhibitor of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase, to lactating rats produces a decrease in GSH levels and changes in protein concentrations and gene transcripts similar to those in rats with impaired trans-sulphuration pathway. These data suggest that the inter-tissue flux of GSH is an important mechanism of L-cysteine delivery to the lactating mammary gland and emphasize the importance of this physiological event in maintaining the gene expression required to sustain lactation. PMID:12723969

  18. Myc-induced SUMOylation is a therapeutic vulnerability for B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Hoellein, Alexander; Fallahi, Mohammad; Schoeffmann, Stephanie; Steidle, Sabine; Schaub, Franz X.; Rudelius, Martina; Laitinen, Iina; Nilsson, Lisa; Goga, Andrei; Peschel, Christian; Nilsson, Jonas A.; Cleveland, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Myc oncogenic transcription factors (c-Myc, N-Myc, and L-Myc) coordinate the control of cell growth, division, and metabolism. In cancer, Myc overexpression is often associated with aggressive disease, which is in part due to the destruction of select targets by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (eg, SCFSkp2-directed destruction of the Cdk inhibitor p27Kip1). We reasoned that Myc would also regulate SUMOylation, a related means of posttranslational modification of proteins, and that this circuit would play essential roles in Myc-dependent tumorigenesis. Here, we report marked increases in the expression of genes that encode regulators and components of the SUMOylation machinery in mouse and human Myc-driven lymphomas, resulting in hyper-SUMOylation in these tumors. Further, inhibition of SUMOylation by genetic means disables Myc-induced proliferation, triggering G2/M cell-cycle arrest, polyploidy, and apoptosis. Using genetically defined cell models and conditional expression systems, this response was shown to be Myc specific. Finally, in vivo loss-of-function and pharmacologic studies demonstrated that inhibition of SUMOylation provokes rapid regression of Myc-driven lymphoma. Thus, targeting SUMOylation represents an attractive therapeutic option for lymphomas with MYC involvement. PMID:25143484

  19. Laminin α5 influences the architecture of the mouse small intestinal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Zhen X.; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Miner, Jeffrey H.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The mammalian intestine displays two distinct patterns of mucosal organization. The small intestine contains mucosal epithelial invaginations called crypts of Lieberkühn that are continuous with evaginations into the lumen called villi. The colon also contains crypts, but its epithelial surface is lined by flat surface cuffs. The epithelial cells of both organs communicate with the underlying mesenchyme through a basement membrane that is composed of a variety of extracellular matrix proteins, including members of the laminin family. The basement membranes of the small intestine and colon contain distinct laminin subtypes; notably, the villus basement membrane is rich in laminin α5. Here we show that diminution of laminin α5 in a mouse model led to a compensatory deposition of colonic laminins that resulted in a transformation from a small intestinal to a colonic mucosal architecture. The alteration in mucosal architecture was associated with reduced levels of nuclear p27Kip1, a cell cycle regulator, and altered intestinal epithelial cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Our results suggest that laminin α5 plays a crucial role in establishing and maintaining the specific mucosal pattern of the mouse small intestine. PMID:18628307

  20. Age-specific functional epigenetic changes in p21 and p16 in injury-activated satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ju; Han, Suhyoun; Cousin, Wendy; Conboy, Irina M

    2015-03-01

    The regenerative capacity of muscle dramatically decreases with age because old muscle stem cells fail to proliferate in response to tissue damage. Here, we uncover key age-specific differences underlying this proliferative decline: namely, the genetic loci of cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors (CDKIs) p21 and p16 are more epigenetically silenced in young muscle stem cells, as compared to old, both in quiescent cells and those responding to tissue injury. Interestingly, phosphorylated ERK (pERK) induced in these cells by ectopic FGF2 is found in association with p21 and p16 promoters, and moreover, only in the old cells. Importantly, in the old satellite cells, FGF2/pERK silences p21 epigenetically and transcriptionally, which leads to reduced p21 protein levels and enhanced cell proliferation. In agreement with the epigenetic silencing of the loci, young muscle stem cells do not depend as much as old on ectopic FGF/pERK for their myogenic proliferation. In addition, other CDKIs, such asp15(INK4B) and p27(KIP1) , become elevated in satellite cells with age, confirming and explaining the profound regenerative defect of old muscle. This work enhances our understanding of tissue aging, promoting strategies for combating age-imposed tissue degeneration. PMID:25447026

  1. Age-specific functional epigenetic changes in p21 and p16 in injury-activated satellite cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ju; Han, Suhyoun; Cousin, Wendy; Conboy, Irina M.

    2014-01-01

    The regenerative capacity of muscle dramatically decreases with age because old muscle stem cells fail to proliferate in response to tissue damage. Here we uncover key age-specific differences underlying this proliferative decline: namely, the genetic loci of CDK inhibitors (CDKI) p21 and p16 are more epigenetically silenced in young muscle stem cells, as compared to old, both in quiescent cells and those responding to tissue injury. Interestingly, phosphorylated ERK (pERK) induced in these cells by ectopic FGF-2 is found in association with p21 and p16 promoters, and moreover, only in the old cells. Importantly, in the old satellite cells FGF-2/pERK silences p21 epigenetically and transcriptionally, which leads to reduced p21 protein levels and enhanced cell proliferation. In agreement with the epigenetic silencing of the loci, young muscle stem cells do not depend as much as old on ectopic FGF/pERK for their myogenic proliferation. In addition, other CDKIs, such asp15INK4B and p27KIP1, become elevated in satellite cells with age, confirming and explaining the profound regenerative defect of old muscle. This work enhances our understanding of tissue aging, promoting strategies for combating age-imposed tissue degeneration. PMID:25447026

  2. Novel functions of core cell cycle regulators in neuronal migration.

    PubMed

    Godin, Juliette D; Nguyen, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The cerebral cortex is one of the most intricate regions of the brain, which required elaborated cell migration patterns for its development. Experimental observations show that projection neurons migrate radially within the cortical wall, whereas interneurons migrate along multiple tangential paths to reach the developing cortex. Tight regulation of the cell migration processes ensures proper positioning and functional integration of neurons to specific cerebral cortical circuits. Disruption of neuronal migration often lead to cortical dysfunction and/or malformation associated with neurological disorders. Unveiling the molecular control of neuronal migration is thus fundamental to understand the physiological or pathological development of the cerebral cortex. Generation of functional cortical neurons is a complex and stratified process that relies on decision of neural progenitors to leave the cell cycle and generate neurons that migrate and differentiate to reach their final position in the cortical wall. Although accumulating work shed some light on the molecular control of neuronal migration, we currently do not have a comprehensive understanding of how cell cycle exit and migration/differentiation are coordinated at the molecular level. The current chapter tends to lift the veil on this issue by discussing how core cell cycle regulators, and in particular p27(Kip1) acts as a multifunctional protein to control critical steps of neuronal migration through activities that go far beyond cell cycle regulation. PMID:24243100

  3. Maduramicin Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in Myoblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Gu, Ying; Singh, Karnika; Shang, Chaowei; Barzegar, Mansoureh; Jiang, Shanxiang; Huang, Shile

    2014-01-01

    Maduramicin, a polyether ionophore antibiotic derived from the bacterium Actinomadura yumaensis, is currently used as a feed additive against coccidiosis in poultry worldwide. It has been clinically observed that maduramicin can cause skeletal muscle and heart cell damage, resulting in skeletal muscle degeneration, heart failure, and even death in animals and humans, if improperly used. However, the mechanism of its toxic action in myoblasts is not well understood. Using mouse myoblasts (C2C12) and human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD and Rh30) cells as an experimental model for myoblasts, here we found that maduramicin inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Further studies revealed that maduramicin induced accumulation of the cells at G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, and induced apoptosis in the cells. Concurrently, maduramicin downregulated protein expression of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK4 and CDK6), and CDC25A, and upregulated expression of the CDK inhibitors (p21Cip1 and p27Kip1), resulting in decreased phosphorylation of Rb. Maduramicin also induced expression of BAK, BAD, DR4, TRADD and TRAIL, leading to activation of caspases 8, 9 and 3 as well as cleavage of poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP). Taken together, our results suggest that maduramicin executes its toxicity in myoblasts at least by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptotic cell death. PMID:25531367

  4. Maduramicin inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in myoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Gu, Ying; Singh, Karnika; Shang, Chaowei; Barzegar, Mansoureh; Jiang, Shanxiang; Huang, Shile

    2014-01-01

    Maduramicin, a polyether ionophore antibiotic derived from the bacterium Actinomadura yumaensis, is currently used as a feed additive against coccidiosis in poultry worldwide. It has been clinically observed that maduramicin can cause skeletal muscle and heart cell damage, resulting in skeletal muscle degeneration, heart failure, and even death in animals and humans, if improperly used. However, the mechanism of its toxic action in myoblasts is not well understood. Using mouse myoblasts (C2C12) and human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD and Rh30) cells as an experimental model for myoblasts, here we found that maduramicin inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Further studies revealed that maduramicin induced accumulation of the cells at G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, and induced apoptosis in the cells. Concurrently, maduramicin downregulated protein expression of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK4 and CDK6), and CDC25A, and upregulated expression of the CDK inhibitors (p21Cip1 and p27Kip1), resulting in decreased phosphorylation of Rb. Maduramicin also induced expression of BAK, BAD, DR4, TRADD and TRAIL, leading to activation of caspases 8, 9 and 3 as well as cleavage of poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP). Taken together, our results suggest that maduramicin executes its toxicity in myoblasts at least by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptotic cell death. PMID:25531367

  5. A Dihydroxy-pentamethoxyflavone from Gardenia obtusifolia Suppresses Proliferation and Promotes Apoptosis of Tumor Cells Through Modulation of Multiple Cell Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    PHROMNOI, KANOKKARN; REUTER, SIMONE; SUNG, BOKYUNG; LIMTRAKUL, PORNNGARM; AGGARWAL, BHARAT B.

    2011-01-01

    We sought to determine the molecular basis for the anticancer activities of 5,3′-dihydroxy-3,6,7,8,4′-pentamethoxyflavone (DH-PMF), isolated from Gardenia obtusifolia traditionally used in Thailand for a variety of ailments. As little as 1 μM DH-PMF inhibited the proliferation of prostate, colon, kidney, lung, head and neck, pancreas, breast, leukemia, and myeloma cancer cell lines. DH-PMF also suppressed the colony-forming ability of tumor cells, with 50% inhibition occurring at a dose less than 10 nM. DH-PMF induced G2/M and subG1 cell cycle arrest, increased the levels of p21WAF1/CIP1 and p27KIP1, and reduced the expression of cyclin D1, CDC2, and c-MYC. Furthermore, DH-PMF inhibited AKT and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) activation, reduced cell survival proteins, and induced apoptosis, as indicated by annexin V staining, TUNEL assay, and activation of caspase-8, -9 and -3. Overall, our results demonstrate that DH-PMF induces suppression of cell proliferation through modulation of AKT-GSK3β pathways and induction of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors. PMID:20944143

  6. Synthesis, Characterization and Anti-Cancer Activity of Hydrazide Derivatives Incorporating a Quinoline Moiety.

    PubMed

    Bingul, Murat; Tan, Owen; Gardner, Christopher R; Sutton, Selina K; Arndt, Greg M; Marshall, Glenn M; Cheung, Belamy B; Kumar, Naresh; Black, David StC

    2016-01-01

    Identification of the novel (E)-N'-((2-chloro-7-methoxyquinolin-3-yl)methylene)-3-(phenylthio)propanehydrazide scaffold 18 has led to the development of a new series of biologically active hydrazide compounds. The parent compound 18 and new quinoline derivatives 19-26 were prepared from the corresponding quinoline hydrazones and substituted carboxylic acids using EDC-mediated peptide coupling reactions. Further modification of the parent compound 18 was achieved by replacement of the quinoline moiety with other aromatic systems. All the newly synthesized compounds were evaluated for their anti-cancer activity against the SH-SY5Y and Kelly neuroblastoma cell lines, as well as the MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cell lines. Analogues 19 and 22 significantly reduced the cell viability of neuroblastoma cancer cells with micromolar potency and significant selectivity over normal cells. The quinoline hydrazide 22 also induced G₁ cell cycle arrest, as well as upregulation of the p27(kip1) cell cycle regulating protein. PMID:27428941

  7. Antitumor Effects of Flavopiridol on Human Uterine Leiomyoma In Vitro and in a Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Gyo; Baek, Jong-Woo; Shin, So-Jin; Kwon, Sang-Hoon; Cha, Soon-Do; Park, Won-Jin; Chung, Rosa; Choi, Eun-Som; Lee, Gun-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulated cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are considered a potential target for cancer therapy. Flavopiridol is a potent CDK inhibitor. In this study, the antiproliferative effect of the flavonoid compound flavopiridol and its mechanism in human uterine leiomyoma cells were investigated. The present study focused on the effect of flavopiridol in cell proliferation and cell cycle progression in primary cultured human uterine leiomyoma cells. Cell viability and cell proliferation assays were conducted. Flow cytometry was performed to determine the effect of flavopiridol on cell cycle. The expression of cell cycle regulatory-related proteins was evaluated by Western blotting. Cell viability and proliferation of uterine leiomyoma cells were significantly reduced by flavopiridol treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometry results showed that flavopiridol induced G1 phase arrest. Flavopiridol-induced growth inhibition in uterine leiomyoma cells was associated with increased expression of p21cip/wafl and p27kip1 in a dose-dependent manner. Downregulation of CDK2/4 and Cyclin A with a concomitant increase in dephosphorylation of retinoblastoma was observed. This study demonstrates that flavopiridol inhibits cell proliferation by initiating G1 cell cycle arrest in human uterine leiomyoma. We also found that flavopiridol is effective in inhibiting xenografted human uterine leiomyoma growth. These results indicate that flavopiridol could prove to be a promising chemopreventive and therapeutic agent for human uterine leiomyoma. PMID:24572052

  8. TLE4 promotes colorectal cancer progression through activation of JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Dan-Ling; Cai, Juan-Juan; Xiao, Zhi-Yuan; He, Liu-Qing; Jiao, Hong-Li; Ye, Ya-Ping; Yang, Run-Wei; Li, Ting-Ting; Liang, Li; Liao, Wen-Ting; Ding, Yan-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The Groucho transcriptional co-repressor TLE4 protein has been shown to be a tumor suppressor in a subset of acute myeloid leukemia. However, little is known about its role in development and progression of solid tumor. In this study, we found that the expression of TLE4 in colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues was significantly higher than that in their matched adjacent intestine epithelial tissues. In addition, high expression of TLE4 was significantly correlated with advanced Dukes stage, lymph node metastasis and poor prognosis of CRC. Moreover, enforced expression of TLE4 in CRC cell lines significantly enhanced proliferation, invasion and tumor growth. On the contrary, knock down of TLE4 repressed cell proliferation, invasion and tumor growth. Furthermore, our study exhibited that the TLE4 promoted cell proliferation and invasion partially via activation of JNK-c-Jun pathway and subsequently increased cyclinD1 and decreased P27Kip1 expression. In conclusion, these results suggested that TLE4, a potential prognostic biomarker for CRC, plays an important role in the development and progression of human CRC. PMID:26701208

  9. Synchronized Cell Cycle Arrest Promotes Osteoclast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Minsuk; Kim, Jin-Man; Lee, Kyunghee; Park, So-Young; Lim, Hyun-Sook; Kim, Taesoo; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclast progenitors undergo cell cycle arrest before differentiation into osteoclasts, induced by exposure to macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL). The role of such cell cycle arrest in osteoclast differentiation has remained unclear, however. We here examined the effect of synchronized cell cycle arrest on osteoclast formation. Osteoclast progenitors deprived of M-CSF in culture adopted a uniform morphology and exhibited cell cycle arrest at the G0–G1 phase in association with both down-regulation of cyclins A and D1 as well as up-regulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1. Such M-CSF deprivation also promoted the differentiation of osteoclast progenitors into multinucleated osteoclasts expressing high levels of osteoclast marker proteins such as NFATc1, c-Fos, Atp6v0d2, cathepsin K, and integrin β3 on subsequent exposure to M-CSF and RANKL. Our results suggest that synchronized arrest and reprogramming of osteoclast progenitors renders them poised to respond to inducers of osteoclast formation. Further characterization of such effects may facilitate induction of the differentiation of heterogeneous and multipotent cells into desired cell lineages. PMID:27517906

  10. Growth-Inhibitory and Antiangiogenic Activity of the MEK Inhibitor PD0325901 in Malignant Melanoma with or without BRAF Mutations12

    PubMed Central

    Ciuffreda, Ludovica; Del Bufalo, Donatella; Desideri, Marianna; Di Sanza, Cristina; Stoppacciaro, Antonella; Ricciardi, Maria Rosaria; Chiaretti, Sabina; Tavolaro, Simona; Benassi, Barbara; Bellacosa, Alfonso; Foà, Robin; Tafuri, Agostino; Cognetti, Francesco; Anichini, Andrea; Zupi, Gabriella; Milella, Michele

    2009-01-01

    The Raf/MEK/ERK pathway is an important mediator of tumor cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Here, we investigated the growth-inhibitory and antiangiogenic properties of PD0325901, a novel MEK inhibitor, in human melanoma cells. PD0325901 effects were determined in a panel of melanoma cell lines with different genetic aberrations. PD0325901 markedly inhibited ERK phosphorylation and growth of both BRAF mutant and wild-type melanoma cell lines, with IC50 in the nanomolar range even in the least responsive models. Growth inhibition was observed both in vitro and in vivo in xenograft models, regardless of BRAF mutation status, and was due to G1-phase cell cycle arrest and subsequent induction of apoptosis. Cell cycle (cyclin D1, c-Myc, and p27KIP1) and apoptosis (Bcl-2 and survivin) regulators were modulated by PD0325901 at the protein level. Gene expression profiling revealed profound modulation of several genes involved in the negative control of MAPK signaling and melanoma cell differentiation, suggesting alternative, potentially relevant mechanisms of action. Finally, PD0325901 inhibited the production of the proangiogenic factors vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin 8 at a transcriptional level. In conclusion, PD0325901 exerts potent growth-inhibitory, proapoptotic, and antiangiogenic activity in melanoma lines, regardless of their BRAF mutation status. Deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms of action of MEK inhibitors will likely translate into more effective treatment strategies for patients experiencing malignant melanoma. PMID:19649202

  11. Encorafenib (LGX818), a potent BRAF inhibitor, induces senescence accompanied by autophagy in BRAFV600E melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Jiang, Ke; Zhu, Xiaofang; Lin, Guibin; Song, Fei; Zhao, Yongfu; Piao, Yongjun; Liu, Jiwei; Cheng, Wei; Bi, Xiaolin; Gong, Peng; Song, Zhiqi; Meng, Songshu

    2016-01-28

    Encorafenib (LGX818) is a new-generation BRAF inhibitor that is under evaluation in clinical trials. However, the underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated. Here we show that LGX818 potently decreased ERK phosphorylation and inhibited proliferation in BRAFV600E melanoma cell lines. Moreover, LGX818 downregulated CyclinD1 in a glycogen synthase kinase 3β-independent manner and induced cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase, Surprisingly, LGX818 triggered cellular senescence in BRAFV600E melanoma cells, as evidenced by increased β-galactosidase staining, while no appreciable induction of apoptosis was detected, as determined by Annexin V and propidium iodide staining and immunoblot analysis of caspase-3 processing and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. Increased p27KIP1 expression and retinoblastoma protein activation were detected during LGX818-induced senescence. Additionally, inhibition of dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1B by AZ191 reversed LGX818-induced CyclinD1 turnover and senescence. Interestingly, autophagy is triggered through inhibition of the mTOR/70S6K pathway during LGX818-induced senescence. Moreover, autophagy inhibition by pharmacological and genetic regulation attenuates LGX818-induced senescence. Notably, combining LGX818 with autophagy modulators has anti-proliferative effect in LGX818-resistant BRAF mutant melanoma cells. Altogether, we uncovered a mechanism by which LGX818 exerts its anti-tumor activity in BRAFV600E melanoma cells. PMID:26586345

  12. Upregulation of sex-determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9) promotes cell proliferation and tumorigenicity in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yingcai; Chen, Wen; Du, Xiaojun; Ning, Huiwen; Chen, Huaisheng; Shi, Ruiqing; Lin, Shaolin; Xu, Rongyu; Zhu, Jinrong; Wu, Shu; Zhou, Haiyu

    2015-01-01

    Sex-determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9), a vital transcription factor, play important roles in numerous biological and pathological processes. However, the clinical significance and biological role of SOX9 expression has not been characterized in human esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC). Herein, we found that SOX9 was markedly upregulated, at both mRNA and protein level, in ESCC cell lines and ESCC tissues and that SOX9 expression was significantly correlated with tumor clinical stage, T classification, N classification, M classification, pathological differentiation, and shorter overall survival. The proliferation and tumorigenicity of ESCC cells were dramatically induced by SOX9 overexpression but were inhibited by SOX9 knockdown both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we demonstrated that upregulation of SOX9 increased the expression of phosphorylated Akt, the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) regulator cyclin D1, phosphorylated forkhead box O (FOXO)1, and phosphorylated FOXO3, but SOX9 downregulation decreased their expression, whereas the levels of the CDK inhibitors p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 were attenuated in SOX9-transduced cells. Taken together, our results suggest that SOX9 plays an important role in promoting the proliferation and tumorigenesis of ESCC and may represent a novel prognostic marker for the disease. PMID:26384302

  13. Synchronized Cell Cycle Arrest Promotes Osteoclast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Minsuk; Kim, Jin-Man; Lee, Kyunghee; Park, So-Young; Lim, Hyun-Sook; Kim, Taesoo; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclast progenitors undergo cell cycle arrest before differentiation into osteoclasts, induced by exposure to macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL). The role of such cell cycle arrest in osteoclast differentiation has remained unclear, however. We here examined the effect of synchronized cell cycle arrest on osteoclast formation. Osteoclast progenitors deprived of M-CSF in culture adopted a uniform morphology and exhibited cell cycle arrest at the G₀-G₁ phase in association with both down-regulation of cyclins A and D1 as well as up-regulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(Kip1). Such M-CSF deprivation also promoted the differentiation of osteoclast progenitors into multinucleated osteoclasts expressing high levels of osteoclast marker proteins such as NFATc1, c-Fos, Atp6v0d2, cathepsin K, and integrin β3 on subsequent exposure to M-CSF and RANKL. Our results suggest that synchronized arrest and reprogramming of osteoclast progenitors renders them poised to respond to inducers of osteoclast formation. Further characterization of such effects may facilitate induction of the differentiation of heterogeneous and multipotent cells into desired cell lineages. PMID:27517906

  14. Fangchinoline induces G1 arrest in breast cancer cells through cell-cycle regulation.

    PubMed

    Xing, Zhibo; Zhang, Youxue; Zhang, Xianyu; Yang, Yanmei; Ma, Yuyan; Pang, Da

    2013-12-01

    Fangchinoline, an alkaloid derived from the dry roots of Stephaniae tetrandrine S. Moore (Menispermaceae), has been shown to possess cytotoxic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties. In this study, we used Fangchinoline to inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation and to investigate its underlying molecular mechanisms. Human breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, were both used in this study. We found that Fangchinoline significantly decreased cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner and induced G1-phase arrest in both cell lines. In addition, upon analysis of expression of cell cycle-related proteins, we found that Fangchinoline reduced expression of cyclin D1, cyclin D3, and cyclin E, and increased expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, p21/WAF1, and p27/KIP1. Moreover, Fangchinoline also inhibited the kinase activities of CDK2, CDK4, and CDK6. These results suggest that Fangchinoline can inhibit human breast cancer cell proliferation and thus may have potential applications in cancer therapy. PMID:23401195

  15. CK2 regulates in vitro the activity of the yeast cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor Sic1.

    PubMed

    Barberis, Matteo; Pagano, Mario A; Gioia, Luca De; Marin, Oriano; Vanoni, Marco; Pinna, Lorenzo A; Alberghina, Lilia

    2005-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (Cki) Sic1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is phosphorylated in vitro by the CK2 kinase on Ser(201) residue. Moreover, we have collected evidence showing that Sic1 is functionally and structurally related to mammalian Cki p27(Kip1) and binds to the mammalian Cdk2/cyclin A complex with a similar mode of inhibition. In this paper, we use SPR analysis to investigate the binding of Sic1 to the catatytic and regulatory subunits of CK2. Evidence is presented showing that phosphorylation of Sic1 at the CK2 consensus site QES(201)EDEED increases the binding of a Sic1-derived peptide to the Cdk2/cyclin A complex, a functional homologue of the yeast Cdk1/Clb5,6. Moreover, Sic1 fully phosphorylated in vitro on Ser(201) by CK2 is shown to be a stronger inhibitor of the Cdk/cyclin complexes than the unphosphorylated protein. Taken together, these data disclose the possibility that CK2 plays a role in the regulation of Sic1 activity. PMID:16168390

  16. Formation of nucleoplasmic protein aggregates impairs nuclear function in response to SiO2 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; von Mikecz, Anna

    2005-04-15

    Despite of their exponentially growing use, little is known about cell biological effects of nanoparticles. Here, we report uptake of silica (SiO(2)) nanoparticles to the cell nucleus where they induce aberrant clusters of topoisomerase I (topo I) in the nucleoplasm that additionally contain signature proteins of nuclear domains, and protein aggregation such as ubiquitin, proteasomes, cellular glutamine repeat (polyQ) proteins, and huntingtin. Formation of intranuclear protein aggregates (1) inhibits replication, transcription, and cell proliferation; (2) does not significantly alter proteasomal activity or cell viability; and (3) is reversible by Congo red and trehalose. Since SiO(2) nanoparticles trigger a subnuclear pathology resembling the one occurring in expanded polyglutamine neurodegenerative disorders, we suggest that integrity of the functional architecture of the cell nucleus should be used as a read out for cytotoxicity and considered in the development of safe nanotechnology. PMID:15777787

  17. Genetics Home Reference: intranuclear rod myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 10.1055/s-2008-1065356. Citation on PubMed Laing NG, Dye DE, Wallgren-Pettersson C, Richard G, Monnier ... Wallgren-Pettersson C, Romero N, Nonaka I, Laing NG. Muscle disease caused by mutations in the skeletal ...

  18. PTEN regulation of the proliferation and differentiation of auditory progenitors through the PTEN/PI3K/Akt-signaling pathway in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chen; Zhao, Jing; Jin, Yecheng; Hou, Congzhe; Zong, Wen; Lu, Tingting

    2014-01-01

    The organ of Corti, which is the sensory organ of hearing, consists of a single row of inner hair cells and three rows of outer hair cells in mice. The auditory hair cells develop from auditory progenitors. Hair cell development is related to several genes, including PTEN. Homozygous null mutant (PTEN−/−) mice die at around embryonic day 9, when hair cells are extremely immature. Moreover, in heterozygous PTEN knockout mice, it was found that PTEN regulates the proliferation of auditory progenitors. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying this regulation. In the present study, we generated PTEN conditional knockout in the inner ear of mice and studied the aforementioned molecular mechanisms. Our results showed that PTEN knockout resulted in supernumerary hair cells, increased p-Akt level, and decreased p27kip1 level. Furthermore, the presence of supernumerary hair cells could be explained by the delayed withdrawal of auditory progenitors from the cell cycle. The increased p-Akt level correlates with p27kip1 downregulation in the cochlea in the Pax2-PTEN−/− mice. The reduced p27kip1 could not maintain the auditory progenitors in the nonproliferative state and some progenitors continued to divide. Consequently, additional progenitors differentiated into supernumerary hair cells. We suggest that PTEN regulates p27kip1 through p-Akt, thereby regulating the proliferation and differentiation of auditory progenitors. PMID:24481416

  19. Cks1 is required for tumor cell proliferation but not sufficient to induce hematopoietic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Kratzat, Susanne; Nikolova, Viktoriya; Miething, Cornelius; Hoellein, Alexander; Schoeffmann, Stephanie; Gorka, Oliver; Pietschmann, Elke; Illert, Anna-Lena; Ruland, Jürgen; Peschel, Christian; Nilsson, Jonas; Duyster, Justus; Keller, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    The Cks1 component of the SCF(Skp2) complex is necessary for p27(Kip1) ubiquitylation and degradation. Cks1 expression is elevated in various B cell malignancies including Burkitt lymphoma and multiple myeloma. We have previously shown that loss of Cks1 results in elevated p27(Kip1) levels and delayed tumor development in a mouse model of Myc-induced B cell lymphoma. Surprisingly, loss of Skp2 in the same mouse model also resulted in elevated p27(Kip1) levels but exhibited no impact on tumor onset. This raises the possibility that Cks1 could have other oncogenic activities than suppressing p27(Kip1). To challenge this notion we have targeted overexpression of Cks1 to B cells using a conditional retroviral bone marrow transduction-transplantation system. Despite potent ectopic overexpression, Cks1 was unable to promote B cell hyperproliferation or B cell malignancies, indicating that Cks1 is not oncogenic when overexpressed in B cells. Since Skp2 overexpression can drive T-cell tumorigenesis or other cancers we also widened the quest for oncogenic activity of Cks1 by ubiquitously expressing Cks1 in hematopoetic progenitors. At variance with c-Myc overexpression, which caused acute myeloid leukemia, Cks1 overexpression did not induce myeloproliferation or leukemia. Therefore, despite being associated with a poor prognosis in various malignancies, sole Cks1 expression is insufficient to induce lymphoma or a myeloproliferative disease in vivo. PMID:22624029

  20. Defined pattern of Sertoli cell differentiation in pubertal porcine testes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Number of Sertoli cells is a primary determinant of mature testicular size and sperm production. In boars, formation of the blood/testis barrier, which occurs by 4 mo of age in commercial breeds, signals the end of Sertoli cell proliferation. Previous studies established that expression of p27Kip1, ...

  1. Formation of nucleoplasmic protein aggregates impairs nuclear function in response to SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Min; Mikecz, Anna von . E-mail: mikecz@uni-duesseldorf.de

    2005-04-15

    Despite of their exponentially growing use, little is known about cell biological effects of nanoparticles. Here, we report uptake of silica (SiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles to the cell nucleus where they induce aberrant clusters of topoisomerase I (topo I) in the nucleoplasm that additionally contain signature proteins of nuclear domains, and protein aggregation such as ubiquitin, proteasomes, cellular glutamine repeat (polyQ) proteins, and huntingtin. Formation of intranuclear protein aggregates (1) inhibits replication, transcription, and cell proliferation; (2) does not significantly alter proteasomal activity or cell viability; and (3) is reversible by Congo red and trehalose. Since SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles trigger a subnuclear pathology resembling the one occurring in expanded polyglutamine neurodegenerative disorders, we suggest that integrity of the functional architecture of the cell nucleus should be used as a read out for cytotoxicity and considered in the development of safe nanotechnology.

  2. Function and subnuclear distribution of Rpp21, a protein subunit of the human ribonucleoprotein ribonuclease P.

    PubMed Central

    Jarrous, N; Reiner, R; Wesolowski, D; Mann, H; Guerrier-Takada, C; Altman, S

    2001-01-01

    Rpp21, a protein subunit of human nuclear ribonuclease P (RNase P) was cloned by virtue of its homology with Rpr2p, an essential subunit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae nuclear RNase P. Rpp21 is encoded by a gene that resides in the class I gene cluster of the major histocompatibility complex, is associated with highly purified RNase P, and binds precursor tRNA. Rpp21 is predominantly localized in the nucleoplasm but is also observed in nucleoli and Cajal bodies when expressed at high levels. Intron retention and splice-site selection in Rpp21 precursor mRNA regulate the intranuclear distribution of the protein products and their association with the RNase P holoenzyme. Our study reveals that dynamic nuclear structures that include nucleoli, the perinucleolar compartment and Cajal bodies are all involved in the production and assembly of human RNase P. PMID:11497433

  3. The Inhibition of Heat Shock Protein 90 Facilitates the Degradation of Poly-Alanine Expanded Poly (A) Binding Protein Nuclear 1 via the Carboxyl Terminus of Heat Shock Protein 70-Interacting Protein

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chao; Huang, Xuan; Zhang, Bin; Zhu, Dan; Luo, Huqiao; Lu, Quqin; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin; Luo, Shiwen

    2015-01-01

    Background Since the identification of poly-alanine expanded poly(A) binding protein nuclear 1 (PABPN1) as the genetic cause of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD), considerable progress has been made in our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the onset and progression of the disease remain unclear. Results In this study, we show that PABPN1 interacts with and is stabilized by heat shock protein 90 (HSP90). Treatment with the HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG disrupted the interaction of mutant PABPN1 with HSP90 and reduced the formation of intranuclear inclusions (INIs). Furthermore, mutant PABPN1 was preferentially degraded in the presence of 17-AAG compared with wild-type PABPN1 in vitro and in vivo. The effect of 17-AAG was mediated through an increase in the interaction of PABPN1 with the carboxyl terminus of heat shock protein 70-interacting protein (CHIP). The overexpression of CHIP suppressed the aggregation of mutant PABPN1 in transfected cells. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the HSP90 molecular chaperone system plays a crucial role in the selective elimination of abnormal PABPN1 proteins and also suggest a potential therapeutic application of the HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG for the treatment of OPMD. PMID:26414348

  4. Piperine, an alkaloid from black pepper, inhibits growth of human colon cancer cells via G1 arrest and apoptosis triggered by endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Yaffe, Paul B; Power Coombs, Melanie R; Doucette, Carolyn D; Walsh, Mark; Hoskin, David W

    2015-10-01

    Piperine, a piperidine alkaloid present in black pepper, inhibits the growth of cancer cells, although the mechanism of action is not well understood. In this study, we show that piperine (75-150 µM) inhibited the growth of several colon cancer cell lines but had little effect on the growth of normal fibroblasts and epithelial cells. Piperine inhibited HT-29 colon carcinoma cell proliferation by causing G1 phase cell cycle arrest that was associated with decreased expression of cyclins D1 and D3 and their activating partner cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6, as well as reduced phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein and up-regulation of p21/WAF1 and p27/KIP1 expression. In addition, piperine caused hydroxyl radical production and apoptosis that was partially dependent on the production of reactive oxygen species. Piperine-treated HT-29 cells showed loss of mitochondrial membrane integrity and cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1, as well as caspase activation and reduced apoptosis in the presence of the pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD-FMK. Increased expression of the endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated proteins inositol-requiring 1α protein, C/EBP homologous protein, and binding immunoglobulin protein, and activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, as well as decreased phosphorylation of Akt and reduced survivin expression were also observed in piperine-treated HT-29 cells. Furthermore, piperine inhibited colony formation by HT-29 cells, as well as the growth of HT-29 spheroids. Cell cycle arrest and endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated apoptosis following piperine treatment of HT-29 cells provides the first evidence that piperine may be useful in the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:24819444

  5. Inhibition of IRE1α-driven pro-survival pathways is a promising therapeutic application in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Masouleh, Behzad Kharabi; Gery, Sigal; Cao, Qi; Alkan, Serhan; Ikezoe, Takayuki; Akiba, Chie; Paquette, Ronald; Chien, Wenwen; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Jing, Yang; Agelopoulos, Konstantin; Müschen, Markus; Koeffler, H. Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Survival of cancer cells relies on the unfolded protein response (UPR) to resist stress triggered by the accumulation of misfolded proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The IRE1α-XBP1 pathway, a key branch of the UPR, is activated in many cancers. Here, we show that the expression of both mature and spliced forms of XBP1 (XBP1s) is up-regulated in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines and AML patient samples. IRE1α RNase inhibitors [MKC-3946, 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde (HNA), STF-083010 and toyocamycin] blocked XBP1 mRNA splicing and exhibited cytotoxicity against AML cells. IRE1α inhibition induced caspase-dependent apoptosis and G1 cell cycle arrest at least partially by regulation of Bcl-2 family proteins, G1 phase controlling proteins (p21cip1, p27kip1 and cyclin D1), as well as chaperone proteins. Xbp1 deleted murine bone marrow cells were resistant to growth inhibition by IRE1α inhibitors. Combination of HNA with either bortezomib or AS2O3 was synergistic in AML cytotoxicity associated with induction of p-JNK and reduction of p-PI3K and p-MAPK. Inhibition of IRE1α RNase activity increased expression of many miRs in AML cells including miR-34a. Inhibition of miR-34a conferred cellular resistance to HNA. Our results strongly suggest that targeting IRE1α driven pro-survival pathways represent an exciting therapeutic approach for the treatment of AML. PMID:26934650

  6. Phosphorylation-dependent control of Pc2 SUMO E3 ligase activity by its substrate protein HIPK2.

    PubMed

    Roscic, Ana; Möller, Andreas; Calzado, Marco A; Renner, Florian; Wimmer, Verena C; Gresko, Ekaterina; Lüdi, Katharina Schmid; Schmitz, M Lienhard

    2006-10-01

    Sumoylation serves to control key cellular functions, but the regulation of SUMO E3 ligase activity is largely unknown. Here we show that the polycomb group protein Pc2 binds to and colocalizes with homeodomain interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) and serves as a SUMO E3 ligase for this kinase. DNA damage-induced HIPK2 directly phosphorylates Pc2 at multiple sites, which in turn controls Pc2 sumoylation and intranuclear localization. Inducible phosphorylation of Pc2 at threonine 495 is required for its ability to increase HIPK2 sumoylation in response to DNA damage, thereby establishing an autoregulatory feedback loop between a SUMO substrate and its cognate E3 ligase. Sumoylation enhances the ability of HIPK2 to mediate transcriptional repression, thus providing a mechanistic link for DNA damage-induced transcriptional silencing. PMID:17018294

  7. Translation initiation factor eIF3b expression in human cancer and its role in tumor growth and lung colonization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Ru, Yuanbin; Sanchez-Carbayo, Marta; Wang, Xuejiao; Kieft, Jeffrey S.; Theodorescu, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Discovery transcriptomic analyses suggest eukaryotic initiation factor 3b (eIF3b) is elevated in human bladder and prostate cancer, yet its role as a prognostic factor or its requirement in the maintenance or progression of human cancer is not established. Here we determine the therapeutic potential of eIF3b by examining the clinical relevance of its expression in human cancer tissues and its role in experimental tumor models. Experimental Design We examined mRNA expression of eIF3b in bladder (N=317) and prostate (N=566) tissue samples and protein expression by immunohistochemistry in 143 bladder tumor samples as a function of clinicopathologic features. The impact of eIF3b depletion by siRNA in human cancer lines was evaluated in regards to in vitro cell growth, cell cycle, migration, in vivo subcutaneous tumor growth and lung colonization. Results eIF3b mRNA expression correlated to tumor grade, stage and survival in human bladder and prostate cancer. eIF3b protein expression stratified survival in human bladder cancer. eIF3b depletion reduced in vitro cancer cell growth; inhibited G1/S cell cycle transition by changing protein but not RNA expression of Cyclin A, E, Rb and p27Kip1; inhibited migration and disrupted actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions. These changes were associated with decreased protein expression of integrin α5. Integrin α5 depletion phenocopied effects observed with eIF3b. eIF3b depleted bladder cancer cells formed fewer subcutaneous tumors that grew more slowly and had reduced lung colonization. Conclusion eIF3b expression relates to human bladder and prostate cancer prognosis, is required for tumor growth and thus a candidate therapeutic target. PMID:23575475

  8. SIAH ubiquitin ligases regulate breast cancer cell migration and invasion independent of the oxygen status

    PubMed Central

    Adam, M Gordian; Matt, Sonja; Christian, Sven; Hess-Stumpp, Holger; Haegebarth, Andrea; Hofmann, Thomas G; Algire, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Seven-in-absentia homolog (SIAH) proteins are evolutionary conserved RING type E3 ubiquitin ligases responsible for the degradation of key molecules regulating DNA damage response, hypoxic adaptation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and cell proliferation. Many studies suggest a tumorigenic role for SIAH2. In breast cancer patients SIAH2 expression levels correlate with cancer aggressiveness and overall patient survival. In addition, SIAH inhibition reduced metastasis in melanoma. The role of SIAH1 in breast cancer is still ambiguous; both tumorigenic and tumor suppressive functions have been reported. Other studies categorized SIAH ligases as either pro- or antimigratory, while the significance for metastasis is largely unknown. Here, we re-evaluated the effects of SIAH1 and SIAH2 depletion in breast cancer cell lines, focusing on migration and invasion. We successfully knocked down SIAH1 and SIAH2 in several breast cancer cell lines. In luminal type MCF7 cells, this led to stabilization of the SIAH substrate Prolyl Hydroxylase Domain protein 3 (PHD3) and reduced Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α (HIF1α) protein levels. Both the knockdown of SIAH1 or SIAH2 led to increased apoptosis and reduced proliferation, with comparable effects. These results point to a tumor promoting role for SIAH1 in breast cancer similar to SIAH2. In addition, depletion of SIAH1 or SIAH2 also led to decreased cell migration and invasion in breast cancer cells. SIAH knockdown also controlled microtubule dynamics by markedly decreasing the protein levels of stathmin, most likely via p27Kip1. Collectively, these results suggest that both SIAH ligases promote a migratory cancer cell phenotype and could contribute to metastasis in breast cancer. PMID:26654769

  9. MicroRNA-340 Inhibits Tumor Cell Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in Endometrial Carcinoma Cell Line RL 95-2.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei; Qin, Wen; Kang, Yalin; Zhou, Ziyan; Qin, Aiping

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The purpose of our study was to investigate the functional role of microRNA-340 (miR-340) in endometrial carcinoma (EC). MATERIAL AND METHODS Human EC cell line RL 95-2 was transfected with miR-340 mimics, inhibitors, or controls. After 48 h of transfection, the cell viability was determined by 3-(4, 5-dimethyl-2- thiazolyl)-2, 5-diphenyl -2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The BrdU assay and apoptosis assay were performed to determine the effects of miR-340 mimics or inhibitors on cell proliferation and apoptosis, respectively. The underlying mechanisms involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis were explored by measuring the protein levels of cell cycle regulators (p27 kinase inhibition protein (KIP) 1 and p21) and apoptosis-related factors (B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), Bax, pro-Caspase 3, and active-Caspase-3). RESULTS Overexpression of miR-340 significantly inhibited the cell viability (P<0.05) and cell proliferation (P<0.01) of RL 95-2 cells compared with the control group, but increased the apoptosis (P<0.01). However, suppression of miR-340 had opposite results. Moreover, the protein levels of p27 KIP1, Bax, pro-Caspase 3, and active-Caspase-3 were significantly increased by overexpression of miR-340 but were statistically decreased by suppression of miR-340. Contrary results were found in the protein levels of Bcl-2. However, no significant differences were found in p21 expression. CONCLUSIONS MiRNA-340 acts as an anti-oncogene in EC cell line RL 95-2 by inhibition of tumor cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. PMID:27153225

  10. Lung Tumorigenesis in a Conditional Cul4A Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi-Lin; Hung, Ming-Szu; Wang, Yang; Ni, Jian; Mao, Jian-Hua; Hsieh, David; Au, Alfred; Kumar, Atul; Quigley, David; Fang, Li Tai; Yeh, Che-Chung; Xu, Zhidong; Jablons, David M.; You, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Cullin4A (Cul4A) is a scaffold protein that assembles cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase (E3) complexes and regulates many cellular events, including cell survival, development, growth, and cell cycle control. Our previous study suggested that Cul4A is oncogenic in vitro, but its oncogenic role in vivo has not been studied. Here, we used a Cul4A transgenic mouse model to study the potential oncogenic role of Cul4A in lung tumor development. After Cul4A overexpression was induced in the lungs for 32 weeks, atypical epithelial cells were observed. After 40 weeks, lung tumors were visible and were characterized as Grade I or II adenocarcinomas. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) revealed decreased levels of Cul4A associated proteins p21CIP1 and tumor suppressor p19ARF in the lung tumors, suggesting Cul4A regulated their expression in these tumors. Increased levels of p27KIP1 and p16INK4a were also detected in these tumors. Moreover, protein level of DNA replication licensing factor CDT1 was decreased. Genomic instability in the lung tumors was further analyzed by the results from pericentrin protein expression and array Comparative Genomic Hybridization analysis. Furthermore, knocking down Cul4A expression in lung cancer H2170 cells increased their sensitivity to the chemotherapy drug cisplatin in vitro, suggesting that Cul4A overexpression is associated with cisplatin resistance in the cancer cells. Our findings indicate that Cul4A is oncogenic in vivo, and this Cul4A mouse model is a tool in understanding the mechanisms of Cul4A in human cancers and for testing experimental therapies targeting Cul4A. PMID:24648314

  11. MicroRNA-340 Inhibits Tumor Cell Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in Endometrial Carcinoma Cell Line RL 95-2

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wei; Qin, Wen; Kang, Yalin; Zhou, Ziyan; Qin, Aiping

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of our study was to investigate the functional role of microRNA-340 (miR-340) in endometrial carcinoma (EC). Material/Methods Human EC cell line RL 95-2 was transfected with miR-340 mimics, inhibitors, or controls. After 48 h of transfection, the cell viability was determined by 3-(4, 5-dimethyl-2- thiazolyl)-2, 5-diphenyl -2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The BrdU assay and apoptosis assay were performed to determine the effects of miR-340 mimics or inhibitors on cell proliferation and apoptosis, respectively. The underlying mechanisms involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis were explored by measuring the protein levels of cell cycle regulators (p27 kinase inhibition protein (KIP) 1 and p21) and apoptosis-related factors (B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), Bax, pro-Caspase 3, and active-Caspase-3). Results Overexpression of miR-340 significantly inhibited the cell viability (P<0.05) and cell proliferation (P<0.01) of RL 95-2 cells compared with the control group, but increased the apoptosis (P<0.01). However, suppression of miR-340 had opposite results. Moreover, the protein levels of p27 KIP1, Bax, pro-Caspase 3, and active-Caspase-3 were significantly increased by overexpression of miR-340 but were statistically decreased by suppression of miR-340. Contrary results were found in the protein levels of Bcl-2. However, no significant differences were found in p21 expression. Conclusions MiRNA-340 acts as an anti-oncogene in EC cell line RL 95-2 by inhibition of tumor cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. PMID:27153225

  12. Regulation of the cell cycle and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway by tanshinone I in human breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    WANG, LI; WU, JIANZHONG; LU, JIANWEI; MA, RONG; SUN, DAWEI; TANG, JINHAI

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality in females worldwide. Therefore, identifying alternative strategies to combat the disease mortality is important. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of tanshinone I (Tan I) on the tumorigenicity of estrogen-responsive MCF-7 and estrogen-independent MDA-MB-453 human breast cancer cells. The cytotoxicity of Tan I was evaluated using a Cell Counting Kit-8 assay, the apoptosis and cell cycle distribution were detected using flow cytometry and the cell morphology was observed using a fluorescence microscope. In addition, the cell cycle regulatory proteins and apoptosis-associated proteins involved in the phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway were detected using western blot analysis using specific protein antibodies. The MCF-7 and MDA-MB-453 cells were equally sensitive to Tan I regardless of their responsiveness to estrogen. Tan I exerted similar antiproliferative activities and induction of apoptosis, resulting in S phase arrest accompanied by decreases in cyclin B and increases in cyclin E and cyclin A proteins, which may have been associated with the upregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21Cip1 and p27Kip1. In addition, Tan I was found to downregulate anti-apoptotic and upregulate associated apoptotic components of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. Notably, treatment with the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002, decreased the levels of phosphorylated (p)-PI3K, p-Akt and p-mTOR. These results clearly indicated that the mechanism of action of Tan I involved, at least partially, an effect on the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, providing new information for anticancer drug design and development. PMID:25355053

  13. Increased Proliferation but Decreased Steroidogenic Capacity in Leydig Cells from Mice Lacking Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor 1B1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Han; Hu, Guo-Xin; Dong, Lei; Dong, Qiang; Mukai, Motoko; Chen, Bing-Bing; Holsberger, Denise R.; Sottas, Chantal M.; Cooke, Paul S.; Lian, Qing-Quan; Li, Xiao-Kun; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2009-01-01

    Proliferating cells express cyclins, cell cycle regulatory proteins that regulate the activity of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). The actions of CDKs are regulated by specific inhibitors, the CDK inhibitors (CDKIs), which are comprised of the Cip/Kip and INK4 families. Expression of the Cip/Kip CDKI 1B (Cdkn1b, encoding protein CDKN1B, also called p27kip1) in developing Leydig cells (LCs) has been reported, but the function of CDKN1B in LCs is unclear. The goal of the present study was to determine the effects of CDKN1B on LC proliferation and steroidogenesis by examining these parameters in Cdkn1b knockout (Cdkn1b−/−) mice. LC proliferation was measured by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. Testicular testosterone levels, mRNA levels, and enzyme activities of steroidogenic enzymes were compared in Cdkn1b−/− and Cdkn1b+/+ mice. The labeling index of LCs in Cdkn1b−/− mice was 1.5% ± 0.2%, almost 7-fold higher than 0.2% ± 0.08% (P < 0.001) in the Cdkn1b+/+ control mice. LC number per testis in Cdkn1b−/− mice was 2-fold that seen in the Cdkn1b+/+ control mice. However, testicular testosterone levels, mRNA levels of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (Star), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (Cyp11a1), and 3beta-hydroxtsteroid dehydrogenase 6 (Hsd3b6), and their respective proteins, were significantly lower in Cdkn1b−/− mice. We conclude that deficiency of CDKN1B increased LC proliferation, but decreased steroidogenesis. Thus, CDKN1B is an important regulator of LC development and function. PMID:19211806

  14. Disulfiram Suppresses Growth of the Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma Cells in Part by Inducing Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Muthu, Magesh; Jamal, Shazia; Chen, Di; Yang, Huanjie; Polin, Lisa A.; Tarca, Adi L.; Pass, Harvey I.; Dou, Q. Ping; Sharma, Sunita; Wali, Anil; Rishi, Arun K.

    2014-01-01

    Dithiocarbamate compound Disulfiram (DSF) that binds with copper and functions as an inhibitor of aldehyde dehydrogenase is a Food and Drug Administration approved agent for treatment of alcoholism. Copper complexed DSF (DSF-Cu) also possesses anti-tumor and chemosensitizing properties; however, its molecular mechanisms of action remain unclear. Here we investigated malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) suppressive effects of DSF-Cu and the molecular mechanisms involved. DSF-Cu inhibited growth of the murine as well as human MPM cells in part by increasing levels of ubiquitinated proteins. DSF-Cu exposure stimulated apoptosis in MPM cells that involved activation of stress-activated protein kinases (SAPKs) p38 and JNK1/2, caspase-3, and cleavage of poly-(ADP-ribose)-polymerase, as well as increased expression of sulfatase 1 and apoptosis transducing CARP-1/CCAR1 protein. Gene-array based analyses revealed that DSF-Cu suppressed cell growth and metastasis-promoting genes including matrix metallopeptidase 3 and 10. DSF inhibited MPM cell growth and survival by upregulating cell cycle inhibitor p27Kip1, IGFBP7, and inhibitors of NF-κB such as ABIN 1 and 2 and Inhibitory κB (IκB)α and β proteins. DSF-Cu promoted cleavage of vimentin, as well as serine-phosphorylation and lysine-63 linked ubiquitination of podoplanin. Administration of 50 mg/kg DSF-Cu by daily i.p injections inhibited growth of murine MPM cell-derived tumors in vivo. Although podoplanin expression often correlates with metastatic disease and poor prognosis, phosphorylation of serines in cytoplasmic domain of podoplanin has recently been shown to interfere with cellular motility and migration signaling. Post-translational modification of podoplanin and cleavage of vimentin by DSF-Cu underscore a metastasis inhibitory property of this agent and together with our in vivo studies underscore its potential as an anti-MPM agent. PMID:24690739

  15. Monitoring dynamic binding of chromatin proteins in vivo by single-molecule tracking.

    PubMed

    Mazza, Davide; Ganguly, Sourav; McNally, James G

    2013-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy has been used for decades to quantify macromolecular dynamics occurring in specimens that are in direct contact with a coverslip. This has permitted in vitro analysis of single-molecule motion in various biochemically reconstituted systems as well as in vivo studies of single-molecule motion on cell membranes. More recently, thanks to improvements in fluorescent tags and microscopes, it has been possible to follow individual molecules inside thicker specimens such as the nucleus of living cells. This has enabled a detailed description of the live-cell binding of nuclear proteins to DNA. In this protocol we describe a method to quantify intranuclear binding using single-molecule tracking (SMT). PMID:23980004

  16. miR-139-5p controls translation in myeloid leukemia through EIF4G2.

    PubMed

    Emmrich, S; Engeland, F; El-Khatib, M; Henke, K; Obulkasim, A; Schöning, J; Katsman-Kuipers, J E; Michel Zwaan, C; Pich, A; Stary, J; Baruchel, A; de Haas, V; Reinhardt, D; Fornerod, M; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Klusmann, J H

    2016-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are crucial components of homeostatic and developmental gene regulation. In turn, dysregulation of miRNA expression is a common feature of different types of cancer, which can be harnessed therapeutically. Here we identify miR-139-5p suppression across several cytogenetically defined acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subgroups. The promoter of mir-139 was transcriptionally silenced and could be reactivated by histone deacetylase inhibitors in a dose-dependent manner. Restoration of mir-139 expression in cell lines representing the major AML subgroups (t[8;21], inv[16], mixed lineage leukemia-rearranged and complex karyotype AML) caused cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in vitro and in xenograft mouse models in vivo. During normal hematopoiesis, mir-139 is exclusively expressed in terminally differentiated neutrophils and macrophages. Ectopic expression of mir-139 repressed proliferation of normal CD34(+)-hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and perturbed myelomonocytic in vitro differentiation. Mechanistically, mir-139 exerts its effects by repressing the translation initiation factor EIF4G2, thereby reducing overall protein synthesis while specifically inducing the translation of cell cycle inhibitor p27(Kip1). Knockdown of EIF4G2 recapitulated the effects of mir-139, whereas restoring EIF4G2 expression rescued the mir-139 phenotype. Moreover, elevated miR-139-5p expression is associated with a favorable outcome in a cohort of 165 pediatric patients with AML. Thus, mir-139 acts as a global tumor suppressor-miR in AML by controlling protein translation. As AML cells are dependent on high protein synthesis rates controlling the expression of mir-139 constitutes a novel path for the treatment of AML. PMID:26165837

  17. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 induces monocytic differentiation of human myeloid leukemia cells by regulating C/EBPβ expression through MEF2C.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ruifang; Wang, Xuening; Studzinski, George P

    2015-04-01

    Myogenic enhancer factor2 (Mef2) consists of a family of transcription factors involved in morphogenesis of skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscle cells. Among the four isoforms (Mef2A, 2B, 2C, and 2D), Mef2C was also found to play important roles in hematopoiesis. At myeloid progenitor level, Mef2C expression favors monocytic differentiation. Previous studies from our laboratory demonstrated that ERK5 was activated in 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D)-induced monocytic differentiation in AML cells and ERK5 activation was accompanied by increased Mef2C phosphorylation. We therefore examined the role of Mef2C in 1,25D-induced monocytic differentiation in AML cell lines (HL60, U937 and THP1) and found that knockdown of Mef2C with small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly decreases the expression of the monocytic marker, CD14, without affecting the expression of the general myeloid marker, CD11b. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) β, which can bind to CD14 promoter and increase its transcription, has been shown to be the downstream effector of 1,25D-induced monocytic differentiation in AML cells. When Mef2C was knocked down, expression of C/EBPβ was reduced at both mRNA and protein levels. The protein expression levels of cell cycle regulators, p27(Kip1) and cyclin D1, were not affected by Mef2C knockdown, nor the monopoiesis related transcription factor, ATF2 (activating transcription factor 2). Thus, we conclude that 1,25D-induced monocytic differentiation, and CD14 expression in particular, are mediated through activation of ERK5-Mef2C-C/EBPβ signaling pathway, and that Mef2C does not seem to modulate cell cycle progression. PMID:25448741

  18. Flavokawain C Inhibits Cell Cycle and Promotes Apoptosis, Associated with Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Regulation of MAPKs and Akt Signaling Pathways in HCT 116 Human Colon Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Phang, Chung-Weng; Karsani, Saiful Anuar; Sethi, Gautam; Abd Malek, Sri Nurestri

    2016-01-01

    Flavokawain C (FKC) is a naturally occurring chalcone which can be found in Kava (Piper methysticum Forst) root. The present study evaluated the effect of FKC on the growth of various human cancer cell lines and the underlying associated mechanisms. FKC showed higher cytotoxic activity against HCT 116 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner in comparison to other cell lines (MCF-7, HT-29, A549 and CaSki), with minimal toxicity on normal human colon cells. The apoptosis-inducing capability of FKC on HCT 116 cells was evidenced by cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation and increased phosphatidylserine externalization. FKC was found to disrupt mitochondrial membrane potential, resulting in the release of Smac/DIABLO, AIF and cytochrome c into the cytoplasm. Our results also revealed that FKC induced intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis via upregulation of the levels of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bak) and death receptors (DR5), while downregulation of the levels of anti-apoptotic proteins (XIAP, cIAP-1, c-FlipL, Bcl-xL and survivin), resulting in the activation of caspase-3, -8 and -9 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). FKC was also found to cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as suggested by the elevation of GADD153 protein after FKC treatment. After the cells were exposed to FKC (60μM) over 18hrs, there was a substantial increase in the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2. The expression of phosphorylated Akt was also reduced. FKC also caused cell cycle arrest in the S phase in HCT 116 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner and with accumulation of cells in the sub-G1 phase. This was accompanied by the downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK2 and CDK4), consistent with the upregulation of CDK inhibitors (p21Cip1 and p27Kip1), and hypophosphorylation of Rb. PMID:26859847

  19. GNA13 as a prognostic factor and mediator of gastric cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie-Wei; Weng, Hui-Wen; Zheng, Zou-San; Chen, Cui; Xie, Dan; Ye, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein), alpha 13 (GNA13) has been implicated as an oncogenic protein in several human cancers. In this study, GNA13 was characterized for its role in gastric cancer (GC) progression and underlying molecular mechanisms. The expression dynamics of GNA13 were examined by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in two independent cohorts of GC samples. A series of in-vivo and in-vitro assays was performed to elucidate the function of GNA13 in GC and its underlying mechanisms. In both two cohorts of GC samples, we observed that GNA13 was markedly overexpressed in GC tissues and associated closely with aggressive magnitude of GC progression and poor patients' survival. Further study showed that upregulation of GNA13 expression increased the proliferation and tumorigenicity of GC cells in vitro and in vivo, by promoting cell growth rate, colony formation, and tumor formation in nude mice. By contrast, knockdown of GNA13 effectively suppressed the proliferation and tumorigenicity of GC cells in vitro and in vivo. Our results also demonstrated that the molecular mechanisms of the effect of GNA13 in GC included promotion of G1/S cell cycle transition through upregulation of c-Myc, activation of AKT and ERK activity, suppression of FOXO1 activity, upregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) regulator cyclin D1 and downregulation of CDK inhibitor p21Cip1 and p27Kip1. Our present study illustrated that GNA13 has an important role in promoting proliferation and tumorigenicity of GC, and may represent a novel prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target for this disease. PMID:26735177

  20. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax releases cell cycle arrest induced by p16INK4a.

    PubMed Central

    Low, K G; Dorner, L F; Fernando, D B; Grossman, J; Jeang, K T; Comb, M J

    1997-01-01

    The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax oncoprotein causes cellular transformation by deregulating important cellular processes such as DNA repair, transcription, signal transduction, proliferation, and growth. Although it is clear that normal cell cycle control is deregulated during HTLV-1-induced cellular transformation, the effects of Tax on cell cycle control are not well understood. Flow cytometric analyses of human T cells indicate that cell cycle arrest in late G1, at or before the G1/S restriction point, by p16INK4a is relieved by Tax. Furthermore, Tax-dependent stimulation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation and transcriptional activation is inhibited by p16INK4a. This result suggests that p16INK4a is able to block Tax-dependent stimulation of DNA synthesis and cell cycle progression into S phase. In vitro binding assays with recombinant glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins and [35S]methionine-labeled proteins indicate that Tax binds specifically with p16INK4a but not with either p21cip1 or p27kip1. Furthermore, sequential immunoprecipitation assays with specific antisera and [35S]methionine-labeled cell lysates subsequent to coexpression with Tax and p16INK4a indicate that the two proteins form complexes in vivo. Immunocomplex kinase assays with cyclin-dependent kinase 4 antiserum indicate that Tax blocks the inhibition of cdk4 kinase activity by p16INK4a. This study identifies p16INK4a as a novel cellular target for Tax and suggests that the inactivation of p16INK4a function is a mechanism of cell cycle deregulation by Tax. PMID:9032327

  1. Flavokawain C Inhibits Cell Cycle and Promotes Apoptosis, Associated with Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Regulation of MAPKs and Akt Signaling Pathways in HCT 116 Human Colon Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Phang, Chung-Weng; Karsani, Saiful Anuar; Sethi, Gautam; Abd Malek, Sri Nurestri

    2016-01-01

    Flavokawain C (FKC) is a naturally occurring chalcone which can be found in Kava (Piper methysticum Forst) root. The present study evaluated the effect of FKC on the growth of various human cancer cell lines and the underlying associated mechanisms. FKC showed higher cytotoxic activity against HCT 116 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner in comparison to other cell lines (MCF-7, HT-29, A549 and CaSki), with minimal toxicity on normal human colon cells. The apoptosis-inducing capability of FKC on HCT 116 cells was evidenced by cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation and increased phosphatidylserine externalization. FKC was found to disrupt mitochondrial membrane potential, resulting in the release of Smac/DIABLO, AIF and cytochrome c into the cytoplasm. Our results also revealed that FKC induced intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis via upregulation of the levels of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bak) and death receptors (DR5), while downregulation of the levels of anti-apoptotic proteins (XIAP, cIAP-1, c-FlipL, Bcl-xL and survivin), resulting in the activation of caspase-3, -8 and -9 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). FKC was also found to cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as suggested by the elevation of GADD153 protein after FKC treatment. After the cells were exposed to FKC (60μM) over 18hrs, there was a substantial increase in the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2. The expression of phosphorylated Akt was also reduced. FKC also caused cell cycle arrest in the S phase in HCT 116 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner and with accumulation of cells in the sub-G1 phase. This was accompanied by the downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK2 and CDK4), consistent with the upregulation of CDK inhibitors (p21Cip1 and p27Kip1), and hypophosphorylation of Rb. PMID:26859847

  2. D-alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate (TPGS) induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis selectively in Survivin-overexpressing breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Neophytou, Christiana M; Constantinou, Constantina; Papageorgis, Panagiotis; Constantinou, Andreas I

    2014-05-01

    D-alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate (TPGS) is a vitamin E derivative that has been intensively applied as a vehicle for drug delivery systems to enhance drug solubility and increase the oral bioavailability of anti-cancer drugs. Recently, it has been reported that TPGS acts as an anti-cancer agent alone or synergistically with chemotherapeutic drugs and increases the efficacy of nanoparticle formulations. In this study, we investigated the antitumor efficacy and the molecular mechanism of action of TPGS in breast cancer cell lines. Our results show that TPGS can induce G1/S cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) but not in "normal" (non-tumorigenic) immortalized cells (MCF-10A and MCF-12F). An investigation of the molecular mechanism of action of TPGS reveals that induction of G1/S phase cell cycle arrest is associated with upregulation of P21 and P27Kip1 proteins. Induction of apoptosis by TPGS involves the inhibition of phospho-AKT and the downregulation of the anti-apoptotic proteins Survivin and Bcl-2. Interestingly, our results also suggest that TPGS induces both caspase -dependent and -independent apoptotic signaling pathways and that this vitamin E derivative is selectively cytotoxic in breast cancer cell lines. When compared to the Survivin inhibitor YM155, TPGS was shown to be more selective for cancer cell growth inhibition. Overall our results suggest that TPGS may not only be useful as a carrier molecule for drug delivery, but may also exert intrinsic therapeutic effects suggesting that it may promote a synergistic interaction with formulated chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:24560876

  3. Carbohydrate Metabolism Is Essential for the Colonization of Streptococcus thermophilus in the Digestive Tract of Gnotobiotic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Muriel; Wrzosek, Laura; Ben-Yahia, Leila; Noordine, Marie-Louise; Gitton, Christophe; Chevret, Didier; Langella, Philippe; Mayeur, Camille; Cherbuy, Claire; Rul, Françoise

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus is the archetype of lactose-adapted bacterium and so far, its sugar metabolism has been mainly investigated in vitro. The objective of this work was to study the impact of lactose and lactose permease on S. thermophilus physiology in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of gnotobiotic rats. We used rats mono-associated with LMD-9 strain and receiving 4.5% lactose. This model allowed the analysis of colonization curves of LMD-9, its metabolic profile, its production of lactate and its interaction with the colon epithelium. Lactose induced a rapid and high level of S. thermophilus in the GIT, where its activity led to 49 mM of intra-luminal L-lactate that was related to the induction of mono-carboxylic transporter mRNAs (SLC16A1 and SLC5A8) and p27Kip1 cell cycle arrest protein in epithelial cells. In the presence of a continuous lactose supply, S. thermophilus recruited proteins involved in glycolysis and induced the metabolism of alternative sugars as sucrose, galactose, and glycogen. Moreover, inactivation of the lactose transporter, LacS, delayed S. thermophilus colonization. Our results show i/that lactose constitutes a limiting factor for colonization of S. thermophilus, ii/that activation of enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism constitutes the metabolic signature of S. thermophilus in the GIT, iii/that the production of lactate settles the dialogue with colon epithelium. We propose a metabolic model of management of carbohydrate resources by S. thermophilus in the GIT. Our results are in accord with the rationale that nutritional allegation via consumption of yogurt alleviates the symptoms of lactose intolerance. PMID:22216112

  4. Impact of the Metabolic Activity of Streptococcus thermophilus on the Colon Epithelium of Gnotobiotic Rats*

    PubMed Central

    Rul, Françoise; Ben-Yahia, Leila; Chegdani, Fatima; Wrzosek, Laura; Thomas, Stéphane; Noordine, Marie-Louise; Gitton, Christophe; Cherbuy, Claire; Langella, Philippe; Thomas, Muriel

    2011-01-01

    The thermophilic lactic acid bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus is widely and traditionally used in the dairy industry. Despite the vast level of consumption of S. thermophilus through yogurt or probiotic functional food, very few data are available about its physiology in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The objective of the present work was to explore both the metabolic activity and host response of S. thermophilus in vivo. Our study profiles the protein expression of S. thermophilus after its adaptation to the GIT of gnotobiotic rats and describes the impact of S. thermophilus colonization on the colonic epithelium. S. thermophilus colonized progressively the GIT of germ-free rats to reach a stable population in 30 days (108 cfu/g of feces). This progressive colonization suggested that S. thermophilus undergoes an adaptation process within GIT. Indeed, we showed that the main response of S. thermophilus in the rat's GIT was the massive induction of the glycolysis pathway, leading to formation of lactate in the cecum. At the level of the colonic epithelium, the abundance of monocarboxylic acid transporter mRNAs (SLC16A1 and SLC5A8) and a protein involved in the cell cycle arrest (p27kip1) increased in the presence of S. thermophilus compared with germ-free rats. Based on different mono-associated rats harboring two different strains of S. thermophilus (LMD-9 or LMG18311) or weak lactate-producing commensal bacteria (Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and Ruminococcus gnavus), we propose that lactate could be a signal produced by S. thermophilus and modulating the colon epithelium. PMID:21239485

  5. In vitro synergistic anticancer activity of the combination of T-type calcium channel blocker and chemotherapeutic agent in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Byun, Joon Seok; Sohn, Joo Mi; Leem, Dong Gyu; Park, Byeongyeon; Nam, Ji Hye; Shin, Dong Hyun; Shin, Ji Sun; Kim, Hyoung Ja; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Lee, Jae Yeol

    2016-02-01

    As a result of our continuous research, new 3,4-dihydroquinazoline derivative containing ureido group, KCP10043F was synthesized and evaluated for T-type Ca(2+) channel (Cav3.1) blockade, cytotoxicity, and cell cycle arrest against human non-small cell lung (A549) cells. KCP10043F showed both weaker T-type Ca(2+) channel blocking activity and less cytotoxicity against A549 cells than parent compound KYS05090S [4-(benzylcarbamoylmethyl)-3-(4-biphenylyl)-2-(N,N',N'-trimethyl-1,5-pentanediamino)-3,4-dihydroquinazoline 2 hydrochloride], but it exhibited more potent G1-phase arrest than KYS05090S in A549 cells. This was found to be accompanied by the downregulations of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2, CDK4, CDK6, cyclin D2, cyclin D3, and cyclin E at the protein levels. However, p27(KIP1) as a CDK inhibitor was gradually upregulated at the protein levels and increased recruitment to CDK2, CDK4 and CDK6 after KCP10043F treatment. Based on the strong G1-phase cell cycle arrest of KCP10043F in A549 cells, the combination of KCP10043F with etoposide (or cisplatin) resulted in a synergistic cell death (combination index=0.2-0.8) via the induction of apoptosis compared with either agent alone. Taken together with these overall results and the favorable in vitro ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) profiles of KCP10043F, therefore, it could be used as a potential agent for the combination therapy on human lung cancer. PMID:26739776

  6. PKCη promotes senescence induced by oxidative stress and chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zurgil, U; Ben-Ari, A; Atias, K; Isakov, N; Apte, R; Livneh, E

    2014-01-01

    Senescence is characterized by permanent cell-cycle arrest despite continued viability and metabolic activity, in conjunction with the secretion of a complex mixture of extracellular proteins and soluble factors known as the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Cellular senescence has been shown to prevent the proliferation of potentially tumorigenic cells, and is thus generally considered a tumor suppressive process. However, some SASP components may act as pro-tumorigenic mediators on premalignant cells in the microenvironment. A limited number of studies indicated that protein kinase C (PKC) has a role in senescence, with different isoforms having opposing effects. It is therefore important to elucidate the functional role of specific PKCs in senescence. Here we show that PKCη, an epithelial specific and anti-apoptotic kinase, promotes senescence induced by oxidative stress and DNA damage. We further demonstrate that PKCη promotes senescence through its ability to upregulate the expression of the cell cycle inhibitors p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 and enhance transcription and secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6). Moreover, we demonstrate that PKCη creates a positive loop for reinforcing senescence by increasing the transcription of both IL-6 and IL-6 receptor, whereas the expression of IL-8 is specifically suppressed by PKCη. Thus, the presence/absence of PKCη modulates major components of SASP. Furthermore, we show that the human polymorphic variant of PKCη, 374I, that exhibits higher kinase activity in comparison to WT-374V, is also more effective in IL-6 secretion, p21Cip1 expression and the promotion of senescence, further supporting a role for PKCη in senescence. As there is now considerable interest in senescence activation/elimination to control tumor progression, it is first crucial to reveal the molecular regulators of senescence. This will improve our ability to develop new strategies to harness senescence as a potential cancer therapy in the

  7. FOXO3a is involved in the apoptosis of naked oocytes and oocytes of primordial follicles from neonatal rat ovaries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Luo, Li-Li; Qian, Yuan-Shu; Fu, Yu-Cai; Sui, Xu-Xia; Geng, Yi-Jie; Huang, Da-Na; Gao, Shi-Tong; Zhang, Ren-Li

    2009-04-17

    Inhibition of the forkhead transcription factor, FOXO3a, can promote the transition from primordial to primary follicle and subsequent follicle development in mammalian ovaries. Stem cell factor (SCF) initiates anti-apoptotic signaling from its membrane receptor, c-kit, to Bcl-2 family members through PI3K/AKT in oocytes of primordial follicles. However, whether FOXO3a mediates the apoptosis of naked oocytes and oocytes of primordial follicles remains unknown. In the present study, oocytes from nests and primordial follicles from neonatal rat ovaries were cultured, and oocyte apoptosis was examined using the TUNEL technique. The pro-apoptotic action of FOXO3a and the potential signal transduction pathways were investigated using RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunocytochemistry. Culturing oocytes in the presence of SCF did not affect the level of total FOXO3a protein, but rapidly elevated the level of phosphorylated FOXO3a (indicating functional suppression). As phosphorylated FOXO3a increased, oocyte apoptosis was inhibited. The specific PI3K/Akt inhibitor, LY 294002, abolished the phosphorylation of FOXO3a and the anti-apoptotic action of SCF. SCF down-regulated the expression of p27KIP1 and pro-apoptotic factors such as Bim, Bad, and Bax, and this activity was reversed by LY 294002. SCF up-regulated the expression of MnSOD, which was also inhibited by LY 294002. However, SCF had no effect on Bcl-2 protein. These results suggest that FOXO3a is involved in oocyte apoptosis in the neonatal rat ovary, and the SCF-PI3K/Akt-FOXO3a signaling pathway mediates oocyte apoptosis and primordial follicle formation. PMID:19258007

  8. Deficiency of CDKN1A or Both CDKN1A and CDKN1B Affects the Pubertal Development of Mouse Leydig Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Han; Huang, Yadong; Su, Zhijian; Zhu, Qiqi; Ge, Yufei; Wang, Guimin; Wang, Claire Q.F.; Mukai, Motoko; Holsberger, Denise R.; Cooke, Paul S.; Lian, Qing-Quan; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21Cip1 (CDKN1A) and p27Kip1 (CDKN1B) are expressed in Leydig cells. Previously, we reported that Cdkn1b knockout in the mouse led to increased Leydig cell proliferative capacity and lower steroidogenesis. However, the relative importance of CDKN1A and CDKN1B in these regulations was unclear. In the present study, we examined the relative importance of CDKN1A and CDKN1B in regulation of Leydig cell proliferation and steroidogenesis by whole-body knockout of CDKN1A (Cdkn1a−/−) and CDKN1A/CDKN1B double knockout (DBKO). The cell number, 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine incorporation rate, steroidogenesis, and steroidogenic enzyme mRNA levels and activities of Leydig cells were compared among wild-type (WT), Cdkn1a−/−, and DBKO mice. Relative to WT mice, Leydig cell number per testis was doubled in the DBKO and unchanged in the Cdkn1a−/− mice. Testicular testosterone levels and mRNA levels for luteinizing hormone receptor (Lhcgr), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (Star), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (Cyp11a1), 17alpha-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (Cyp17a1), and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 (Hsd17b3) and their respective proteins were significantly lower in the DBKO mice. However, testicular testosterone level was unchanged in the Cdkn1a−/− mice, although Lhcgr mRNA levels were significantly lower relative to those in the WT control. We conclude that Cdkn1a−/− did not increase Leydig cell numbers (although a defect of Leydig cell function was noted), whereas DBKO caused a significant increase of Leydig cell numbers but a decrease of steroidogenesis. PMID:25609837

  9. NFV, an HIV-1 protease inhibitor, induces growth arrest, reduced Akt signalling, apoptosis and docetaxel sensitisation in NSCLC cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Ikezoe, T; Nishioka, C; Bandobashi, K; Takeuchi, T; Adachi, Y; Kobayashi, M; Takeuchi, S; Koeffler, H P; Taguchi, H

    2006-12-18

    HIV-1 protease inhibitor (PI), nelfinavir (NFV) induced growth arrest and apoptosis of NCI-H460 and -H520, A549, EBC-1 and ABC-1 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells in association with upregulation of p21waf1, p27kip1 and p53, and downregulation of Bcl-2 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 proteins. We found that NFV blocked Akt signalling in these cells as measured by Akt kinase assay with glycogen synthase kinase-3alpha/beta (GSK-3alpha/beta) as a substrate. To explore the role of Akt signalling in NFV-mediated growth inhibition of NSCLC cells, we blocked this signal pathway by transfection of Akt small interfering RNA (siRNA) in these cells; transient transfection of Akt siRNA in NCI-H460 cells decreased the level of Bcl-2 protein and slowed their proliferation compared to the nonspecific siRNA-transfected cells. Conversely, forced-expression of Akt partially reversed NFV-mediated growth inhibition of these cells, suggesting that Akt may be a molecular target of NFV in NSCLC cells. Also, we found that inhibition of Akt signalling by NFV enhanced the ability of docetaxel to inhibit the growth of NCI-H460 and -H520 cells, as measured by MTT assay. Importantly, NFV slowed the proliferation and induced apoptosis of NCI-H460 cells present as tumour xenografts in nude mice without adverse systemic effects. Taken together, this family of compounds might be useful for the treatment of individuals with NSCLC. PMID:17133272

  10. Combined inhibition of EZH2 and histone deacetylases as a potential epigenetic therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Takashina, Taichi; Kinoshita, Ichiro; Kikuchi, Junko; Shimizu, Yasushi; Sakakibara-Konishi, Jun; Oizumi, Satoshi; Nishimura, Masaharu; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi

    2016-07-01

    Recent discoveries have revealed that human cancer involves aberrant epigenetic alterations. We and others have previously shown that the histone methyltransferase EZH2, the catalytic subunit of polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), is frequently overexpressed in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and that an EZH2 inhibitor, 3-deazaneplanocin A, inhibits the proliferation of NSCLC cells. Transcriptional silencing by EZH2 was recently shown to be required for the activity of histone deacetylases (HDACs) that interact with another PRC2 protein, EED. To develop a more effective epigenetic therapy for NSCLC, we determined the effects of co-treatment with 3-deazaneplanocin A and the HDAC inhibitor vorinostat (SAHA) in NSCLC cells. The co-treatment synergistically suppressed the proliferation of all tested NSCLC cell lines, regardless of their epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) status. The synergistic effect was associated with slightly decreased histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation, modestly increased histone acetylation, and the depletion of EZH2 and other PRC2 proteins. The co-treatment resulted in an accumulation of p27Kip1, decrease in cyclin A, and increased apoptotic fraction in an additive/synergistic manner. Interestingly, the co-treatment strongly suppressed EGFR signaling, not only in EGFR-wild-type NSCLC cells, but also in EGFR-mutant cells, mainly through dephosphorylation of EGFR. Furthermore, the co-treatment suppressed the in vivo tumor growth of EGFR-mutant, EGFR-tyrosine kinase-resistant H1975 cells more effectively than did each agent alone, without visible toxicity. These results suggest that the combined pharmacological targeting of EZH2 and HDACs may provide more effective epigenetic therapeutics for NSCLC. PMID:27116120

  11. Latex of Euphorbia antiquorum-induced S-phase arrest via active ATM kinase and MAPK pathways in human cervical cancer HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Wen-Tsong; Lin, Hui-Yi; Chen, Jou-Hsuan; Lin, Wen-Chung; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Wood, W Gibson; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-09-01

    Latex of Euphorbia antiquorum (EA) has demonstrated great chemotherapeutic potential for cancer. However, the mechanisms of anti-proliferation of EA on cancer cell remain to be further investigated. The purpose of this study was to explore the influence of EA in human cervical cancer cells. Here, the cell cycle distribution by flow cytometry was examined and the protein expression by the western blotting methods was analyzed. From the cytometric results it was shown that EA-induced S-phase arrest in a concentration manner both in human cervical cancer HeLa and CaSki cells. According the western blot results it was illustrated that EA could downregulate early cyclin E1-Cdk2; and cyclin A-Cdc2 provides a significant additional quantity of S-phase promotion, that in turn promoted the expression of p21(waf1/cip1) and p27(kip1) which were the inhibitors in the complex of cyclin A and Cdc2 that led to cell cycle arrest. Moreover, EA promoted the activation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and check-point kinase-2 (Chk2); however, it negatively regulated the expression of Topoisomerases I and II, Cdc25A, and Cdc25C signaling. Caffeine, an ATM/ATR inhibitor significantly reversed EA downregulation in the levels of Cdc25A. Furthermore, JNK inhibitor SP600125 and p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 both could reverse the EA upregulation of the protein of Chk2 level, significantly. This study, therefore, revealed that EA could downregulate topoisomerase, and activate ATM kinase, which then induce parallel Chk 1/2 and MAPK signaling pathways to promote the degradation of Cdc25A to induced S-phase arrest in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. PMID:24706497

  12. Superior efficacy of co-treatment with dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor NVP-BEZ235 and pan-histone deacetylase inhibitor against human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Venkannagari, Sreedhar; Fiskus, Warren; Peth, Karissa; Atadja, Peter; Hidalgo, Manuel; Maitra, Anirban; Bhalla, Kapil N

    2012-11-01

    Genetic alterations activating K-RAS and PI3K/AKT signaling are also known to induce the activity of mTOR kinase through TORC1 and TORC2 complexes in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Here, we determined the effects of the dual PI3K and mTOR inhibitor, NVP-BEZ235 (BEZ235), and the pan-histone deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat (PS) against human PDAC cells. Treatment with BEZ235 or PS inhibited cell cycle progression with induction of the cell cycle inhibitory proteins, p21waf1 and p27kip1. BEZ235 and PS also dose dependently induced loss of cell viability of the cultured PDAC cells, associated with depletion of phosphorylated (p) AKT, as well as of the TORC1 substrates 4EBP1 and p70S6 kinase. While inhibiting p-AKT, treatment with PS induced the levels of the pro-apoptotic proteins BIM and BAK. Co-treatment with BEZ235 and PS synergistically induced apoptosis of the cultured PDAC cells. This was accompanied by marked attenuation of the levels of p-AKT and Bcl-xL but induction of BIM. Although in vivo treatment with BEZ235 or PS reduced tumor growth, co-treatment with BEZ235 and PS was significantly more effective in controlling the xenograft growth of Panc1 PDAC cells in the nude mice. Furthermore, co-treatment with BEZ235 and PS more effectively blocked tumor growth of primary PDAC heterotransplants (possessing K-RAS mutation and AKT2 amplification) subcutaneously implanted in the nude mice than each agent alone. These findings demonstrate superior activity and support further in vivo evaluation of combined treatment with BEZ235 and PS against PDAC that possess heightened activity of RAS-RAF-ERK1/2 and PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathways. PMID:23232026

  13. Accelerated renal disease is associated with the development of metabolic syndrome in a glucolipotoxic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-García, Cristina; Izquierdo, Adriana; Velagapudi, Vidya; Vivas, Yurena; Velasco, Ismael; Campbell, Mark; Burling, Keith; Cava, Fernando; Ros, Manuel; Orešič, Matej; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Medina-Gomez, Gema

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Individuals with metabolic syndrome are at high risk of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD) through unclear pathogenic mechanisms. Obesity and diabetes are known to induce glucolipotoxic effects in metabolically relevant organs. However, the pathogenic role of glucolipotoxicity in the aetiology of diabetic nephropathy is debated. We generated a murine model, the POKO mouse, obtained by crossing the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2 (PPARγ2) knockout (KO) mouse into a genetically obese ob/ob background. We have previously shown that the POKO mice showed: hyperphagia, insulin resistance, hyperglycaemia and dyslipidaemia as early as 4 weeks of age, and developed a complete loss of normal β-cell function by 16 weeks of age. Metabolic phenotyping of the POKO model has led to investigation of the structural and functional changes in the kidney and changes in blood pressure in these mice. Here we demonstrate that the POKO mouse is a model of renal disease that is accelerated by high levels of glucose and lipid accumulation. Similar to ob/ob mice, at 4 weeks of age these animals exhibited an increased urinary albumin:creatinine ratio and significantly increased blood pressure, but in contrast showed a significant increase in the renal hypertrophy index and an associated increase in p27Kip1 expression compared with their obese littermates. Moreover, at 4 weeks of age POKO mice showed insulin resistance, an alteration of lipid metabolism and glomeruli damage associated with increased transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) and parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) expression. At this age, levels of proinflammatory molecules, such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and fibrotic factors were also increased at the glomerular level compared with levels in ob/ob mice. At 12 weeks of age, renal damage was fully established. These data suggest an accelerated lesion through glucolipotoxic effects in the renal pathogenesis in POKO mice

  14. Loss of G1/S Checkpoint in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Infected Cells Is Associated with a Lack of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21/Waf1

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Elizabeth; Santiago, Francisco; Deng, Longwen; Chong, Siew yen; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Wang, Lai; Fu, Peng; Stein, Dana; Denny, Thomas; Lanka, Venkata; Mozafari, Fariba; Okamoto, Takashi; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2000-01-01

    Productive high-titer infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) requires the activation of target cells. Infection of quiescent peripheral CD4 lymphocytes by HIV-1 results in incomplete, labile reverse transcripts and lack of viral progeny formation. An interplay between Tat and p53 has previously been reported, where Tat inhibited the transcription of the p53 gene, which may aid in the development of AIDS-related malignancies, and p53 expression inhibited HIV-1 long terminal repeat transcription. Here, by using a well-defined and -characterized stress signal, gamma irradiation, we find that upon gamma irradiation, HIV-1-infected cells lose their G1/S checkpoints, enter the S phase inappropriately, and eventually apoptose. The loss of the G1/S checkpoint is associated with a loss of p21/Waf1 protein and increased activity of a major G1/S kinase, namely, cyclin E/cdk2. The p21/Waf1 protein, a known cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, interacts with the cdk2/cyclin E complex and inhibits progression of cells into S phase. We find that loss of the G1/S checkpoint in HIV-1-infected cells may in part be due to Tat's ability to bind p53 (a known activator of the p21/Waf1 promoter) and sequester its transactivation activity, as seen in both in vivo and in vitro transcription assays. The loss of p21/Waf1 in HIV-1-infected cells was specific to p21/Waf1 and did not occur with other KIP family members, such as p27 (KIP1) and p57 (KIP2). Finally, the advantage of a loss of the G1/S checkpoint for HIV-1 per se may be that it pushes the host cell into the S phase, which may then allow subsequent virus-associated processes, such as RNA splicing, transport, translation, and packaging of virion-specific genes, to occur. PMID:10799578

  15. ING5 Is Phosphorylated by CDK2 and Controls Cell Proliferation Independently of p53

    PubMed Central

    Linzen, Ulrike; Lilischkis, Richard; Pandithage, Ruwin; Schilling, Britta; Ullius, Andrea; Lüscher-Firzlaff, Juliane; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Lüscher, Bernhard; Vervoorts, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitor of growth (ING) proteins have multiple functions in the control of cell proliferation, mainly by regulating processes associated with chromatin regulation and gene expression. ING5 has been described to regulate aspects of gene transcription and replication. Moreover deregulation of ING5 is observed in different tumors, potentially functioning as a tumor suppressor. Gene transcription in late G1 and in S phase and replication is regulated by cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) in complex with cyclin E or cyclin A. CDK2 complexes phosphorylate and regulate several substrate proteins relevant for overcoming the restriction point and promoting S phase. We have identified ING5 as a novel CDK2 substrate. ING5 is phosphorylated at a single site, threonine 152, by cyclin E/CDK2 and cyclin A/CDK2 in vitro. This site is also phosphorylated in cells in a cell cycle dependent manner, consistent with it being a CDK2 substrate. Furthermore overexpression of cyclin E/CDK2 stimulates while the CDK2 inhibitor p27KIP1 represses phosphorylation at threonine 152. This site is located in a bipartite nuclear localization sequence but its phosphorylation was not sufficient to deregulate the subcellular localization of ING5. Although ING5 interacts with the tumor suppressor p53, we could not establish p53-dependent regulation of cell proliferation by ING5 and by phospho-site mutants. Instead we observed that the knockdown of ING5 resulted in a strong reduction of proliferation in different tumor cell lines, irrespective of the p53 status. This inhibition of proliferation was at least in part due to the induction of apoptosis. In summary we identified a phosphorylation site at threonine 152 of ING5 that is cell cycle regulated and we observed that ING5 is necessary for tumor cell proliferation, without any apparent dependency on the tumor suppressor p53. PMID:25860957

  16. Ghrelin regulates cell cycle-related gene expression in cultured hippocampal neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hyunju; Park, Seungjoon

    2016-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that ghrelin stimulates the cellular proliferation of cultured adult rat hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs). However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which ghrelin regulates cell cycle progression. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential effects of ghrelin on cell cycle regulatory molecules in cultured hippocampal NSCs. Ghrelin treatment increased proliferation assessed by CCK-8 proliferation assay. The expression levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cell division control 2, well-known cell-proliferating markers, were also increased by ghrelin. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis revealed that ghrelin promoted progression of cell cycle from G0/G1 to S phase, whereas this progression was attenuated by the pretreatment with specific inhibitors of MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin, and janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. Ghrelin-induced proliferative effect was associated with increased expression of E2F1 transcription factor in the nucleus, as determined by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. We also found that ghrelin caused an increase in protein levels of positive regulators of cell cycle, such as cyclin A and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2. Moreover, p27(KIP1) and p57(KIP2) protein levels were reduced when cell were exposed to ghrelin, suggesting downregulation of CDK inhibitors may contribute to proliferative effect of ghrelin. Our data suggest that ghrelin targets both cell cycle positive and negative regulators to stimulate proliferation of cultured hippocampal NSCs. PMID:27325242

  17. Placental Estrogen Suppresses Cyclin D1 Expression in the Nonhuman Primate Fetal Adrenal Cortex*

    PubMed Central

    Dumitrescu, Adina; Aberdeen, Graham W.; Pepe, Gerald J.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that estrogen selectively suppresses growth of the fetal zone of the baboon fetal adrenal cortex, which produces the C19-steroid precursors, eg, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, which are aromatized to estrogen within the placenta. In the present study, we determined whether fetal adrenal expression of cell cycle regulators are altered by estrogen and thus provide a mechanism by which estrogen regulates fetal adrenocortical development. Cyclin D1 mRNA levels in the whole fetal adrenal were increased 50% (P < .05), and the number of cells in the fetal adrenal definitive zone expressing cyclin D1 protein was increased 2.5-fold (P < .05), whereas the total number of cells in the fetal zone and fetal serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels were elevated 2-fold (P < .05) near term in baboons in which fetal serum estradiol levels were decreased by 95% (P < .05) after maternal administration of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and restored to normal by concomitant administration of letrozole plus estradiol throughout second half of gestation. However, fetal adrenocortical expression of cyclin D2, the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)-2, Cdk4, and Cdk6, and Cdk regulatory proteins p27Kip1 and p57Kip2 were not changed by letrozole or letrozole plus estradiol administration. We suggest that estrogen controls the growth of the fetal zone of the fetal adrenal by down-regulating cyclin D1 expression and thus proliferation of progenitor cells within the definitive zone that migrate to the fetal zone. We propose that estrogen restrains growth and function of the fetal zone via cyclin D1 to maintain estrogen levels in a physiological range during primate pregnancy. PMID:25247468

  18. Combined treatment by octreotide and everolimus: Octreotide enhances inhibitory effect of everolimus in aggressive meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Graillon, Thomas; Defilles, Céline; Mohamed, Amira; Lisbonis, Christophe; Germanetti, Anne-Laure; Chinot, Olivier; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Roche, Pierre-Hugues; Adetchessi, Tarek; Fuentes, Stéphane; Metellus, Philippe; Dufour, Henry; Enjalbert, Alain; Barlier, Anne

    2015-08-01

    Treatment for recurrent and aggressive meningiomas remains an unmet medical need in neuro-oncology, and chemotherapy exhibits limited clinical activity, if any. Merlin expression, encoded by the NF2 gene, is lost in a majority of meningiomas, and merlin is a negative regulator of mTORC1. The sst2 somatostatin receptor, targeted by octreotide, is highly expressed in meningiomas. To investigate new therapeutic strategies, we evaluated the activity of everolimus (mTOR inhibitor), BKM-120 and BEZ-235 (new Pi3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors), octreotide and a combined treatment (octreotide plus everolimus), on cell proliferation, signaling pathways, and cell cycle proteins, respectively. The in vitro study was conducted on human meningioma primary cells extracted from fresh tumors, allowing the assessment of somatostatin analogs at the concentration levels used in patients. The results were correlated to WHO grades. Further, everolimus decreased cell viability of human meningiomas, but concomitantly, induced Akt activation, reducing the antiproliferative effect of the drug. The new Pi3K inhibitors were not more active than everolimus alone, limiting their clinical relevance. In contrast, a clear cooperative inhibitory effect of octreotide and everolimus was observed on cell proliferation in all tested meningiomas, including WHO grades II-III. Octreotide not only reversed everolimus-induced Akt phosphorylation but also displayed additive and complementary effects with everolimus on downstream proteins involved in translation (4EB-P1), and controlling cell cycle (p27Kip1 and cyclin D1). We have demonstrated a co-operative action between everolimus and octreotide on cell proliferation in human meningiomas, including aggressive ones, establishing the basis for a clinical trial. PMID:26015296

  19. Loss of G(1)/S checkpoint in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected cells is associated with a lack of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21/Waf1.

    PubMed

    Clark, E; Santiago, F; Deng, L; Chong, S; de La Fuente, C; Wang, L; Fu, P; Stein, D; Denny, T; Lanka, V; Mozafari, F; Okamoto, T; Kashanchi, F

    2000-06-01

    Productive high-titer infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) requires the activation of target cells. Infection of quiescent peripheral CD4 lymphocytes by HIV-1 results in incomplete, labile reverse transcripts and lack of viral progeny formation. An interplay between Tat and p53 has previously been reported, where Tat inhibited the transcription of the p53 gene, which may aid in the development of AIDS-related malignancies, and p53 expression inhibited HIV-1 long terminal repeat transcription. Here, by using a well-defined and -characterized stress signal, gamma irradiation, we find that upon gamma irradiation, HIV-1-infected cells lose their G(1)/S checkpoints, enter the S phase inappropriately, and eventually apoptose. The loss of the G(1)/S checkpoint is associated with a loss of p21/Waf1 protein and increased activity of a major G(1)/S kinase, namely, cyclin E/cdk2. The p21/Waf1 protein, a known cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, interacts with the cdk2/cyclin E complex and inhibits progression of cells into S phase. We find that loss of the G(1)/S checkpoint in HIV-1-infected cells may in part be due to Tat's ability to bind p53 (a known activator of the p21/Waf1 promoter) and sequester its transactivation activity, as seen in both in vivo and in vitro transcription assays. The loss of p21/Waf1 in HIV-1-infected cells was specific to p21/Waf1 and did not occur with other KIP family members, such as p27 (KIP1) and p57 (KIP2). Finally, the advantage of a loss of the G(1)/S checkpoint for HIV-1 per se may be that it pushes the host cell into the S phase, which may then allow subsequent virus-associated processes, such as RNA splicing, transport, translation, and packaging of virion-specific genes, to occur. PMID:10799578

  20. Force-specific activation of Smad1/5 regulates vascular endothelial cell cycle progression in response to disturbed flow.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Lee, Pei-Ling; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Lee, Chih-I; Yang, Tung-Lin; Chuang, Han-Sheng; Lin, Wei-Wen; Lin, Ting-Er; Lim, Seh Hong; Wei, Shu-Yi; Chen, Yuh-Lien; Chien, Shu; Chiu, Jeng-Jiann

    2012-05-15

    Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) are constantly exposed to blood flow-induced shear stress, but the mechanism of force-specific activation of their signaling to modulate cellular function remains unclear. We have demonstrated that bone morphogenetic protein receptor (BMPR)-specific Smad1/5 can be force-specifically activated by oscillatory shear stress (OSS) in ECs to cause cell cycle progression. Smad1/5 is highly activated in ECs of atherosclerotic lesions in diseased human coronary arteries from patients with end-stage heart failure undergoing heart transplantation and from apolipoprotein E-deficient mice. Application of OSS (0.5 ± 4 dyn/cm(2)) causes the sustained activation of Smad1/5 in ECs through activations of mammalian target of rapamycin and p70S6 kinase, leading to up-regulation of cyclin A and down-regulations of p21(CIP1) and p27(KIP1) and, hence, EC cycle progression. En face examination of rat aortas reveals high levels of phospho-Smad1/5 in ECs of the inner, but not the outer, curvature of aortic arch, nor the straight segment of thoracic aorta [corrected]. Immunohistochemical and en face examinations of the experimentally stenosed abdominal aorta in rats show high levels of phospho-Smad1/5 in ECs at poststenotic sites, where OSS occurs. These OSS activations of EC Smad1/5 in vitro and in vivo are not inhibited by the BMP-specific antagonist Noggin and, hence, are independent of BMP ligand. Transfecting ECs with Smad1/5-specific small interfering RNAs inhibits the OSS-induced EC cycle progression. Our findings demonstrate the force-specificity of the activation of Smad1/5 and its contribution to cell cycle progression in ECs induced by disturbed flow. PMID:22550179

  1. Muscarinic signaling influences the patterning and phenotype of cholinergic amacrine cells in the developing chick retina

    PubMed Central

    Stanke, Jennifer J; Lehman, Bret; Fischer, Andy J

    2008-01-01

    Background Many studies in the vertebrate retina have characterized the differentiation of amacrine cells as a homogenous class of neurons, but little is known about the genes and factors that regulate the development of distinct types of amacrine cells. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to characterize the development of the cholinergic amacrine cells and identify factors that influence their development. Cholinergic amacrine cells in the embryonic chick retina were identified by using antibodies to choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). Results We found that as ChAT-immunoreactive cells differentiate they expressed the homeodomain transcription factors Pax6 and Islet1, and the cell-cycle inhibitor p27kip1. As differentiation proceeds, type-II cholinergic cells, displaced to the ganglion cell layer, transiently expressed high levels of cellular retinoic acid binding protein (CRABP) and neurofilament, while type-I cells in the inner nuclear layer did not. Although there is a 1:1 ratio of type-I to type-II cells in vivo, in dissociated cell cultures the type-I cells (ChAT-positive and CRABP-negative) out-numbered the type-II cells (ChAT and CRABP-positive cells) by 2:1. The relative abundance of type-I to type-II cells was not influenced by Sonic Hedgehog (Shh), but was affected by compounds that act at muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. In addition, the abundance and mosaic patterning of type-II cholinergic amacrine cells is disrupted by interfering with muscarinic signaling. Conclusion We conclude that: (1) during development type-I and type-II cholinergic amacrine cells are not homotypic, (2) the phenotypic differences between these subtypes of cells is controlled by the local microenvironment, and (3) appropriate levels of muscarinic signaling between the cholinergic amacrine cells are required for proper mosaic patterning. PMID:18254959

  2. Cucurbitacin IIb exhibits anti-inflammatory activity through modulating multiple cellular behaviors of mouse lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Zhao, Gao-Xiang; Xu, Li-Hui; Liu, Kun-Peng; Pan, Hao; He, Jian; Cai, Ji-Ye; Ouyang, Dong-Yun; He, Xian-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Cucurbitacin IIb (CuIIb) is one of the major active compounds in Hemsleyadine tablets which have been used for clinical treatment of bacillary dysentery, enteritis and acute tonsilitis. However, its action mechanism has not been completely understood. This study aimed to explore the anti-inflammatory activity of CuIIb and its underlying mechanism in mitogen-activated lymphocytes isolated from mouse mesenteric lymph nodes. The results showed that CuIIb inhibited the proliferation of concanavalin A (Con A)-activated lymphocytes in a time- and dose-dependent manner. CuIIb treatment arrested their cell cycle in S and G2/M phases probably due to the disruption of the actin cytoskeleton and the modulation of p27(Kip1) and cyclin levels. Moreover, the surface expression of activation markers CD69 and CD25 on Con A-activated CD3(+) T lymphocytes was suppressed by CuIIb treatment. Both Con A- and phorbol ester plus ionomycin-induced expression of TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-6 proteins was attenuated upon exposure to CuIIb. Mechanistically, CuIIb treatment suppressed the phosphorylation of JNK and Erk1/2 but not p38 in Con A-activated lymphocytes. Although CuIIb unexpectedly enhanced the phosphorylation of IκB and NF-κB (p65), it blocked the nuclear translocation of NF-κB (p65). In support of this, CuIIb significantly decreased the mRNA levels of IκBα and TNF-α, two target genes of NF-κB, in Con A-activated lymphocytes. In addition, CuIIb downregulated Con A-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and increased cell apoptosis. Collectively, these results suggest that CuIIb exhibits its anti-inflammatory activity through modulating multiple cellular behaviors and signaling pathways, leading to the suppression of the adaptive immune response. PMID:24587010

  3. Cucurbitacin IIb Exhibits Anti-Inflammatory Activity through Modulating Multiple Cellular Behaviors of Mouse Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kun-Peng; Pan, Hao; He, Jian; Cai, Ji-Ye; Ouyang, Dong-Yun; He, Xian-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Cucurbitacin IIb (CuIIb) is one of the major active compounds in Hemsleyadine tablets which have been used for clinical treatment of bacillary dysentery, enteritis and acute tonsilitis. However, its action mechanism has not been completely understood. This study aimed to explore the anti-inflammatory activity of CuIIb and its underlying mechanism in mitogen-activated lymphocytes isolated from mouse mesenteric lymph nodes. The results showed that CuIIb inhibited the proliferation of concanavalin A (Con A)-activated lymphocytes in a time- and dose-dependent manner. CuIIb treatment arrested their cell cycle in S and G2/M phases probably due to the disruption of the actin cytoskeleton and the modulation of p27Kip1 and cyclin levels. Moreover, the surface expression of activation markers CD69 and CD25 on Con A-activated CD3+ T lymphocytes was suppressed by CuIIb treatment. Both Con A- and phorbol ester plus ionomycin-induced expression of TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-6 proteins was attenuated upon exposure to CuIIb. Mechanistically, CuIIb treatment suppressed the phosphorylation of JNK and Erk1/2 but not p38 in Con A-activated lymphocytes. Although CuIIb unexpectedly enhanced the phosphorylation of IκB and NF-κB (p65), it blocked the nuclear translocation of NF-κB (p65). In support of this, CuIIb significantly decreased the mRNA levels of IκBα and TNF-α, two target genes of NF-κB, in Con A-activated lymphocytes. In addition, CuIIb downregulated Con A-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and increased cell apoptosis. Collectively, these results suggest that CuIIb exhibits its anti-inflammatory activity through modulating multiple cellular behaviors and signaling pathways, leading to the suppression of the adaptive immune response. PMID:24587010

  4. Dasatinib Induces Autophagic Cell Death in Human Ovarian Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Le, Xiao-Feng; Mao, Weiqun; Lu, Zhen; Carter, Bing Z.; Bast, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Dasatinib, an inhibitor of Src/Abl family kinases, can inhibit tumor growth of a number of solid tumors. However, the effect and mechanism of action of dasatinib in human ovarian cancer cells remains unknown. METHODS Dasatinib-induced autophagy was determined by acridine orange staining, punctate localization of GFP-LC3, LC3 protein blotting and electron microscopy. Significance of Beclin-1, AKT and Bcl-2 in dasatinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition was assayed by small interfering RNA silencing and/or overexpression of gene of interest. RESULTS Dasatinib inhibited cell growth by inducing little apoptosis, but substantial autophagy in SKOv3 and HEY ovarian cancer cells. In vivo studies showed dasatinib inhibited tumor growth and induced both autophagy and apoptosis in a HEY xenograft model. Knockdown of Beclin 1 and Atg12 expression with their respective siRNAs diminished dasatinib-induced autophagy, whereas knockdown of p27Kip1 with specific siRNAs did not. shRNA knockdown of Beclin-1 expression reduced dasatinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. Dasatinib reduced the phosphorylation of AKT, mTOR, p70S6K and S6 kinase expression. Constitutive expression of AKT1 and AKT2 inhibited dasatinib-induced autophagy in both HEY and SKOv3 cells. Dasatinib also reduced Bcl-2 expression and activity. Overexpression of Bcl-2 partially prevented dasatinib-induced autophagy. CONCLUSIONS We conclude that dasatinib induces autophagic cell death in ovarian cancer that partially depends on Beclin-1, AKT and Bcl-2. These results may have implications for clinical use of dasatinib. PMID:20629079

  5. Constitutive expression of ectopic c-Myc delays glucocorticoid-evoked apoptosis of human leukemic CEM-C7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Medh, Rheem D; Wang, Aixia; Zhou, Feng; Thompson, E Brad

    2009-01-01

    Sensitivity to glucocorticoid (GC)-evoked apoptosis in lymphoid cell lines correlates closely with GC-mediated suppression of c-Myc expression. To establish a functional role for c-Myc in GC-mediated apoptosis, we have stably expressed MycER™, the human c-Myc protein fused to the modified ligand-binding domain of the murine estrogen receptor α, in GC-sensitive CEM-C7-14 cells. In CEM-C7-14 cells, MycER™ constitutively imparts c-Myc functions. Cells expressing MycER™ (C7-MycER™) exhibited a marked reduction in cell death after 72 h in 100 nM dexamethasone (Dex), with 10 – 20-fold more viable cells when compared to the parental CEM-C7-14 clone. General GC responsiveness was not compromised, as evidenced by Dex-mediated suppression of endogenous c-Myc and cyclin D3, and induction of c-Jun and the glucocorticoid receptor. MycER™ also blunted Dex-mediated upregulation of p27kip1 and suppression of the Myc target p53. In comparison to parental CEM-C7-14 cells, Dex-evoked DNA strand breaks were negligible and caspase activation was delayed, but the extent of G1 cell cycle arrest was similar in C7-MycER™ cells. Myc-ER™ did not result in permanent, complete resistance to GC however, and the GC-treated cells eventually died, indicative of redundant or interactive mechanisms in the GC-evoked lytic response of lymphoid cells. Our results emphasize the importance of c-Myc suppression in GC-evoked apoptosis of CEM-C7-14 cells. PMID:11498786

  6. Chalcone-based small-molecule inhibitors attenuate malignant phenotype via targeting deubiquitinating enzymes.

    PubMed

    Issaenko, Olga A; Amerik, Alexander Yu

    2012-05-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is usurped by many if not all cancers to regulate their survival, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis. Bioflavonoids curcumin and chalcones exhibit anti-neoplastic selectivity through inhibition of the 26S proteasome-activity within the UPS. Here, we provide evidence for a novel mechanism of action of chalcone-based derivatives AM146, RA-9 and RA-14, which exert anticancer activity by targeting deubiquitinating enzymes (DUB) without affecting 20S proteasome catalytic-core activity. The presence of the α,β-unsaturated carbonyl group susceptible to nucleophilic attack from the sulfhydryl of cysteines in the active sites of DUB determines the capacity of novel small-molecules to act as cell-permeable, partly selective DUB inhibitors and induce rapid accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins and deplete the pool of free ubiquitin. These chalcone-derivatives directly suppress activity of DUB UCH-L1, UCH-L3, USP2, USP5 and USP8, which are known to regulate the turnover and stability of key regulators of cell survival and proliferation. Inhibition of DUB-activity mediated by these compounds downregulates cell-cycle promoters, e.g., cyclin D1 and upregulates tumor suppressors p53, p27(Kip1) and p16(Ink4A). These changes are associated with arrest in S-G 2/M, abrogated anchorage-dependent growth and onset of apoptosis in breast, ovarian and cervical cancer cells without noticeable alterations in primary human cells. Altogether, this work provides evidence of antitumor activity of novel chalcone-based derivatives mediated by their DUB-targeting capacity; supports the development of pharmaceuticals to directly target DUB as a most efficient strategy compared with proteasome inhibition and also provides a clear rationale for the clinical evaluation of these novel small-molecule DUB inhibitors. PMID:22510564

  7. Apoptosis, cell proliferation and modulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(cip1) in vascular remodelling during vein arterialization in the rat.

    PubMed

    Borin, Thaiz Ferraz; Miyakawa, Ayumi Aurea; Cardoso, Leandro; de Figueiredo Borges, Luciano; Gonçalves, Giovana Aparecida; Krieger, Jose Eduardo

    2009-06-01

    Neo-intima development and atherosclerosis limit long-term vein graft use for revascularization of ischaemic tissues. Using a rat model, which is technically less challenging than smaller rodents, we provide evidence that the temporal morphological, cellular, and key molecular events during vein arterialization resemble the human vein graft adaptation. Right jugular vein was surgically connected to carotid artery and observed up to 90 days. Morphometry demonstrated gradual thickening of the medial layer and important formation of neo-intima with deposition of smooth muscle cells (SMC) in the subendothelial layer from day 7 onwards. Transmission electron microscopy showed that SMCs switch from the contractile to synthetic phenotype on day 3 and new elastic lamellae formation occurs from day 7 onwards. Apoptosis markedly increased on day 1, while alpha-actin immunostaining for SMC almost disappeared by day 3. On day 7, cell proliferation reached the highest level and cellular density gradually increased until day 90. The relative magnitude of cellular changes was higher in the intima vs. the media layer (100 vs. 2 times respectively). Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs) p27(Kip1) and p16(INKA) remained unchanged, whereas p21(Cip1) was gradually downregulated, reaching the lowest levels by day 7 until day 90. Taken together, these data indicate for the first time that p21(Cip1) is the main CDKI protein modulated during the arterialization process the rat model of vein arterialization that may be useful to identify and validate new targets and interventions to improve the long-term patency of vein grafts. PMID:19563615

  8. Combination of carmustine and selenite effectively inhibits tumor growth by targeting androgen receptor, androgen receptor-variants, and Akt in preclinical models: New hope for patients with castration resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Thamilselvan, Vijayalakshmi; Menon, Mani; Thamilselvan, Sivagnanam

    2016-10-01

    Despite established androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, AR/AR-variants signaling remain a major obstacle for the successful treatment of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In addition, CRPC cells adapt to survive via AR-independent pathways to escape next generation therapies. Therefore, there is an urgent need for drugs that can target these signaling pathways in CRPC. In this study, we sought to determine whether carmustine and selenite in combination could induce apoptosis and inhibit growth of CRPC in-vitro and in-vivo. CRPC (22Rv1, VCaP, and PC-3) cell lines in culture and xenograft mouse were used. Combination of carmustine and selenite treatment significantly increased reactive oxygen species, apoptosis and growth inhibition in CRPC cells with down regulation of anti-apoptotic (Bcl-2 and Mcl-1) and proliferative proteins (c-Myc and cyclin-D1). This effect was associated with complete reduction of AR/AR-variants, AR-V7, PSA and significant induction of p27Kip1. Combination treatment substantially abolished phospho-Akt, phospho-GSK-3β, and anchorage-independent growth in AR-positive and AR-negative cells. Consistent with in-vitro results, combination treatment effectively induced apoptosis and completely inhibited xenograft tumor growth and markedly reduced AR/AR-variants, AR-V7, PSA, and Bcl-2 in xenograft tumors without causing genotoxicity in host mice. Individual agent treatment showed only partial effect. The combination treatment showed a significant synergistic effect. The present study is the first to demonstrate that the combination of carmustine and selenite treatment completely suppressed CRPC tumor growth by reducing AR/AR-variants and Akt signaling. Our findings suggest that the combination of carmustine and selenite could constitute a promising next-generation therapy for successful treatment of patients with CRPC. PMID:27198552

  9. Iroquois homeobox transcription factor (Irx5) promotes G1/S-phase transition in vascular smooth muscle cells by CDK2-dependent activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Pattabiraman, Vaishnavi; Bacanamwo, Methode; Anderson, Leonard M

    2016-08-01

    The Iroquois homeobox (Irx5) gene is essential in embryonic development and cardiac electrophysiology. Although recent studies have reported that IRX5 protein is involved in regulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis in prostate cancer cells, little is known about the role of IRX5 in the adult vasculature. Here we report novel observations on the role of IRX5 in adult vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) during proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Comparative studies using primary human endothelial cells, VSMCs, and intact carotid arteries to determine relative expression of Irx5 in the peripheral vasculature demonstrate significantly higher expression in VSMCs. Sprague-Dawley rat carotid arteries were subjected to balloon catherization, and the presence of IRX5 was examined by immunohistochemistry after 2 wk. Results indicate markedly elevated IRX5 signal at 14 days compared with uninjured controls. Total RNA was isolated from injured and uninjured arteries, and Irx5 expression was measured by RT-PCR. Results demonstrate a significant increase in Irx5 expression at 3-14 days postinjury compared with controls. Irx5 genetic gain- and loss-of-function studies using thymidine and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation assays resulted in modulation of DNA synthesis in primary rat aortic VSMCs. Quantitative RT-PCR results revealed modulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (p27(kip1)), E2F transcription factor 1 (E2f1), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (Pcna) expression in Irx5-transduced VSMCs compared with controls. Subsequently, apoptosis was observed and confirmed by morphological observation, caspase-3 cleavage, and enzymatic activation compared with control conditions. Taken together, these results indicate that Irx5 plays an important role in VSMC G1/S-phase cell cycle checkpoint control and apoptosis. PMID:27170637

  10. Electrical inhibition of lens epithelial cell proliferation: an additional factor in secondary cataract?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Entong; Reid, Brian; Lois, Noemi; Forrester, John V.; McCaig, Colin D.; Zhao, Min

    2005-01-01

    Cataract is the most common cause of blindness but is at least curable by surgery. Unfortunately, many patients gradually develop the complication of posterior capsule opacification (PCO) or secondary cataract. This arises from stimulated cell growth within the lens capsule and can greatly impair vision. It is not fully understood why residual lens epithelial cell growth occurs after surgery. We propose and show that cataract surgery might remove an important inhibitory factor for lens cell growth, namely electric fields. The lens generates a unique pattern of electric currents constantly flowing out from the equator and entering the anterior and posterior poles. We show here that cutting and removing part of the anterior capsule as in cataract surgery significantly decreases the equatorial outward electric currents. Application of electric fields in culture inhibits proliferation of human lens epithelial cells. This inhibitory effect is likely to be mediated through a cell cycle control mechanism that decreases entry of cells into S phase from G1 phase by decreasing the G1-specific cell cycle protein cyclin E and increasing the cyclin-Cdk complex inhibitor p27kip1. Capsulorrhexis in vivo, which reduced endogenous lens electric fields, significantly increased LEC growth. This, together with our previous findings that electric fields have significant effects on the direction of lens cell migration, points to a controlling mechanism for the aberrant cell growth in posterior capsule opacification. A novel approach to control growth of lens epithelial cells using electric fields combined with other controlling mechanisms may be more effective in the prevention and treatment of this common complication of cataract surgery. PMID:15764648

  11. Early colonizing Escherichia coli elicits remodeling of rat colonic epithelium shifting toward a new homeostatic state

    PubMed Central

    Tomas, Julie; Reygner, Julie; Mayeur, Camille; Ducroc, Robert; Bouet, Stephan; Bridonneau, Chantal; Cavin, Jean-Baptiste; Thomas, Muriel; Langella, Philippe; Cherbuy, Claire

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of early colonizing bacteria on the colonic epithelium. We isolated dominant bacteria, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Lactobacillus intestinalis, Clostridium innocuum and a novel Fusobacterium spp., from the intestinal contents of conventional suckling rats and transferred them in different combinations into germfree (GF) adult rats. Animals were investigated after various times up to 21 days. Proliferative cell markers (Ki67, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, phospho-histone H3, cyclin A) were higher in rats monocolonized with E. coli than in GF at all time points, but not in rats monocolonized with E. faecalis. The mucin content of goblet cells declined shortly after E. coli administration whereas the mucus layer doubled in thickness. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses revealed that E. coli resides in this mucus layer. The epithelial mucin content progressively returned to baseline, following an increase in KLF4 and in the cell cycle arrest-related proteins p21CIP1 and p27KIP1. Markers of colonic differentiated cells involved in electrolyte (carbonic anhydrase II and slc26A3) and water (aquaglyceroporin3 (aqp3)) transport, and secretory responses to carbachol were modulated after E. coli inoculation suggesting that ion transport dynamics were also affected. The colonic responses to simplified microbiotas differed substantially according to whether or not E. coli was combined with the other four bacteria. Thus, proliferation markers increased substantially when E. coli was in the mix, but very much less when it was absent. This work demonstrates that a pioneer strain of E. coli elicits sequential epithelial remodeling affecting the structure, mucus layer and ionic movements and suggests this can result in a microbiota-compliant state. PMID:25012905

  12. The goya mouse mutant reveals distinct newly identified roles for MAP3K1 in the development and survival of cochlear sensory hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Andrew; Cross, Sally H.; Jackson, Ian J.; Hardisty-Hughes, Rachel; Morse, Susan; Nicholson, George; Coghill, Emma; Bowl, Michael R.; Brown, Steve D. M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitogen-activated protein kinase, MAP3K1, plays an important role in a number of cellular processes, including epithelial migration during eye organogenesis. In addition, studies in keratinocytes indicate that MAP3K1 signalling through JNK is important for actin stress fibre formation and cell migration. However, MAP3K1 can also act independently of JNK in the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis. We have identified a mouse mutant, goya, which exhibits the eyes-open-at-birth and microphthalmia phenotypes. In addition, these mice also have hearing loss. The goya mice carry a splice site mutation in the Map3k1 gene. We show that goya and kinase-deficient Map3k1 homozygotes initially develop supernumerary cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) that subsequently degenerate, and a progressive profound hearing loss is observed by 9 weeks of age. Heterozygote mice also develop supernumerary OHCs, but no cellular degeneration or hearing loss is observed. MAP3K1 is expressed in a number of inner-ear cell types, including outer and inner hair cells, stria vascularis and spiral ganglion. Investigation of targets downstream of MAP3K1 identified an increase in p38 phosphorylation (Thr180/Tyr182) in multiple cochlear tissues. We also show that the extra OHCs do not arise from aberrant control of proliferation via p27KIP1. The identification of the goya mutant reveals a signalling molecule involved with hair-cell development and survival. Mammalian hair cells do not have the ability to regenerate after damage, which can lead to irreversible sensorineural hearing loss. Given the observed goya phenotype, and the many diverse cellular processes that MAP3K1 is known to act upon, further investigation of this model might help to elaborate upon the mechanisms underlying sensory hair cell specification, and pathways important for their survival. In addition, MAP3K1 is revealed as a new candidate gene for human sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:26542706

  13. Piperine inhibits platelet-derived growth factor-BB-induced proliferation and migration in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Pa; Lee, Kwan; Park, Won-Hwan; Kim, Hyuck; Hong, Heeok

    2015-02-01

    The proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in blood vessels are important in the pathogenesis of vascular disorders such as atherosclerosis and restenosis. Piperine, a major component of black pepper, has antioxidant, anticancer, and anti-inflammatory activity. However, the antiatherosclerotic effects of piperine have not been investigated. In this study, the effects of piperine on platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced proliferation and migration of VSMCs were investigated. The antiproliferative effects of piperine were determined using MTT assays, cell counting, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and western blots. Our results showed that piperine significantly attenuated the proliferation of VSMCs by increasing the expression of p27(kip1), regulating the mRNA expression of cell cycle enzymes (cyclin D, cyclin E, and PCNA), and decreasing the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 in a noncytotoxic concentration-dependent manner (30-100 μM). Moreover, we examined the effects of piperine on the migration of PDGF-BB-stimulated VSMCs, as determined by the Boyden chamber assay, H2DCFDA staining, and western blots. Our results showed that 100 μM piperine decreased cell migration, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and phosphorylation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Taken together, our results suggest that piperine inhibits PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and the migration of VSMCs by inducing cell cycle arrest and suppressing MAPK phosphorylation and ROS. These findings suggest that piperine may be beneficial for the treatment of vascular-related disorders and diseases. PMID:25384161

  14. Epithelial-myoepithelial tumour of the lung: a case report referring to its molecular histogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Tracheobronchial submucous glands can be considered the pulmonary equivalent of minor salivary glands and therefore they can develop most of the tumours originated in these. Nevertheless, in spite of the wide distribution of this kind of glands along the tracheobronchial tree, pulmonary salivary gland-like neoplasms are not very frequent. Among them, the most frequent are mucoepidermoid and adenoid cystic carcinomas. On the contrary, pulmonary neoplasms showing a mixture of epithelial and myoepithelial elements are extraordinary infrequent, with only 11 cases collected from literature. We present the case of a 76 year-old woman with no interesting pathological history, to whom a pulmonary nodule is detected during a study of unknown origin neutropenia. An upper right lobectomy is performed. After macro and microscopic study, the diagnosis of pulmonary epithelial-myoepithelial tumour is made. It is a low malignant potential tumour with capacity to locally recur and less frequently to metastasize. Our case has the peculiarity of not being connected neither to visceral pleura nor to bronchial tree; we have not found this characteristic in any literature reviewed case. These tumours have been named in a lot of different ways, including adenomyoepithelioma, epithelial-myoepithelial tumour, epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma or epithelial-myoepithelial tumour of uncertain malignant potential. The p27/kip-1 protein plays a fundamental role in the development of these neoplasms. As we have verified in our case, its aberrant cytoplasmic location, besides its proved oncogenic function, would favour the proliferation of stem cells, which would explain both dual phenotype with presence of myoepithelial cells without connection with the bronchial tree, and TTF-1 immunostaining in epithelial cells. PMID:21798017

  15. Epithelial-myoepithelial tumour of the lung: a case report referring to its molecular histogenesis.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Guillermo; Felipo, Francesc; Marquina, Isabel; Del Agua, Celia

    2011-01-01

    Tracheobronchial submucous glands can be considered the pulmonary equivalent of minor salivary glands and therefore they can develop most of the tumours originated in these. Nevertheless, in spite of the wide distribution of this kind of glands along the tracheobronchial tree, pulmonary salivary gland-like neoplasms are not very frequent. Among them, the most frequent are mucoepidermoid and adenoid cystic carcinomas. On the contrary, pulmonary neoplasms showing a mixture of epithelial and myoepithelial elements are extraordinary infrequent, with only 11 cases collected from literature.We present the case of a 76 year-old woman with no interesting pathological history, to whom a pulmonary nodule is detected during a study of unknown origin neutropenia. An upper right lobectomy is performed.After macro and microscopic study, the diagnosis of pulmonary epithelial-myoepithelial tumour is made. It is a low malignant potential tumour with capacity to locally recur and less frequently to metastasize. Our case has the peculiarity of not being connected neither to visceral pleura nor to bronchial tree; we have not found this characteristic in any literature reviewed case.These tumours have been named in a lot of different ways, including adenomyoepithelioma, epithelial-myoepithelial tumour, epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma or epithelial-myoepithelial tumour of uncertain malignant potential.The p27/kip-1 protein plays a fundamental role in the development of these neoplasms. As we have verified in our case, its aberrant cytoplasmic location, besides its proved oncogenic function, would favour the proliferation of stem cells, which would explain both dual phenotype with presence of myoepithelial cells without connection with the bronchial tree, and TTF-1 immunostaining in epithelial cells. PMID:21798017

  16. Pioglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, attenuates PDGF-induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation through AMPK-dependent and AMPK-independent inhibition of mTOR/p70S6K and ERK signaling.

    PubMed

    Osman, Islam; Segar, Lakshman

    2016-02-01

    Pioglitazone (PIO), a PPARγ agonist that improves glycemic control in type 2 diabetes through its insulin-sensitizing action, has been shown to exhibit beneficial effects in the vessel wall. For instance, it inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, a major event in atherosclerosis and restenosis after angioplasty. Although PPARγ-dependent and PPARγ-independent mechanisms have been attributed to its vasoprotective effects, the signaling events associated with PIO action in VSMCs are not fully understood. To date, the likely intermediary role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) toward PIO inhibition of VSMC proliferation has not been examined. Using human aortic VSMCs, the present study demonstrates that PIO activates AMPK in a sustained manner thereby contributing in part to inhibition of key proliferative signaling events. In particular, PIO at 30μM concentration activates AMPK to induce raptor phosphorylation, which diminishes PDGF-induced mTOR activity as evidenced by decreased phosphorylation of p70S6K, 4E-BP1, and S6 and increased accumulation of p27(kip1), a cell cycle inhibitor. In addition, PIO inhibits the basal phosphorylation of ERK in VSMCs. Downregulation of endogenous AMPK by target-specific siRNA reveals an AMPK-independent effect for PIO inhibition of ERK, which contributes in part to diminutions in cyclin D1 expression and Rb phosphorylation and the suppression of VSMC proliferation. Furthermore, AMPK-dependent inhibition of mTOR/p70S6K and AMPK-independent inhibition of ERK signaling occur regardless of PPARγ expression/activation in VSMCs as evidenced by gene silencing and pharmacological inhibition of PPARγ. Strategies that utilize nanoparticle-mediated PIO delivery at the lesion site may limit restenosis after angioplasty without inducing PPARγ-mediated systemic adverse effects. PMID:26643070

  17. Vinpocetine suppresses pathological vascular remodeling by inhibiting vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yujun; Knight, Walter E; Guo, Shujie; Li, Jian-Dong; Knight, Peter A; Yan, Chen

    2012-11-01

    Abnormal vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) activation is associated with various vascular disorders such as atherosclerosis, in-stent restenosis, vein graft disease, and transplantation-associated vasculopathy. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has long been used as a cerebral blood flow enhancer for treating cognitive impairment. However, its role in pathological vascular remodeling remains unexplored. Herein, we show that systemic administration of vinpocetine significantly reduced neointimal formation in carotid arteries after ligation injury. Vinpocetine also markedly decreased spontaneous remodeling of human saphenous vein explants in ex vivo culture. In cultured SMCs, vinpocetine dose-dependently suppressed cell proliferation and caused G1-phase cell cycle arrest, which is associated with a decrease in cyclin D1 and an increase in p27Kip1 levels. In addition, vinpocetine dose-dependently inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated SMC migration as determined by the two-dimensional migration assays and three-dimensional aortic medial explant invasive assay. Moreover, vinpocetine significantly reduced PDGF-induced type I collagen and fibronectin expression. It is noteworthy that PDGF-stimulated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), but not protein kinase B, was specifically inhibited by vinpocetine. Vinpocetine powerfully attenuated intracellular reactive oxidative species (ROS) production, which largely mediates the inhibitory effects of vinpocetine on ERK1/2 activation and SMC growth. Taken together, our results reveal a novel function of vinpocetine in attenuating neointimal hyperplasia and pathological vascular remodeling, at least partially through suppressing ROS production and ERK1/2 activation in SMCs. Given the safety profile of vinpocetine, this study provides insight into the therapeutic potential of vinpocetine in proliferative vascular disorders. PMID:22915768

  18. Vinpocetine Suppresses Pathological Vascular Remodeling by Inhibiting Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yujun; Knight, Walter E.; Guo, Shujie; Li, Jian-Dong; Knight, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) activation is associated with various vascular disorders such as atherosclerosis, in-stent restenosis, vein graft disease, and transplantation-associated vasculopathy. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has long been used as a cerebral blood flow enhancer for treating cognitive impairment. However, its role in pathological vascular remodeling remains unexplored. Herein, we show that systemic administration of vinpocetine significantly reduced neointimal formation in carotid arteries after ligation injury. Vinpocetine also markedly decreased spontaneous remodeling of human saphenous vein explants in ex vivo culture. In cultured SMCs, vinpocetine dose-dependently suppressed cell proliferation and caused G1-phase cell cycle arrest, which is associated with a decrease in cyclin D1 and an increase in p27Kip1 levels. In addition, vinpocetine dose-dependently inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated SMC migration as determined by the two-dimensional migration assays and three-dimensional aortic medial explant invasive assay. Moreover, vinpocetine significantly reduced PDGF-induced type I collagen and fibronectin expression. It is noteworthy that PDGF-stimulated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), but not protein kinase B, was specifically inhibited by vinpocetine. Vinpocetine powerfully attenuated intracellular reactive oxidative species (ROS) production, which largely mediates the inhibitory effects of vinpocetine on ERK1/2 activation and SMC growth. Taken together, our results reveal a novel function of vinpocetine in attenuating neointimal hyperplasia and pathological vascular remodeling, at least partially through suppressing ROS production and ERK1/2 activation in SMCs. Given the safety profile of vinpocetine, this study provides insight into the therapeutic potential of vinpocetine in proliferative vascular disorders. PMID:22915768

  19. Overexpressed CISD2 has prognostic value in human gastric cancer and promotes gastric cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenesis via AKT signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lan; Ouyang, Fei; Liu, Xiaobo; Wu, Shu; Wu, Hong-Mei; Xu, Yuandong; Wang, Bin; Zhu, Jinrong; Xu, Xuehu; Zhang, Liang

    2016-01-26

    CDGSH iron sulfur domain 2 (CISD2) is localized in the outer mitochondrial membrane and mediates mitochondrial integrity and lifespan in mammals, but its role in cancer is unknown. In the current study, we reported that CISD2 mRNA and protein expression levels were significantly upregulated in gastric cancer cells compared to normal gastric epithelial cells (P < 0.001). Immunohistochemical analysis of 261 paraffin-embedded archived gastric cancer tissues showed that high CISD2 expression was significantly associated with clinical stage, TNM classifications, venous invasion and lymphatic invasion. Univariate and multivariate analysis indicated that high CISD2 expression was an independent prognostic factor for poorer overall survival in the entire cohort. Overexpressing CISD2 promoted, while silencing CISD2 inhibited, the proliferation of gastric cancer cells. Furthermore, we found that silencing endogenous CISD2 also significantly inhibited the proliferation and tumorigenicity of MGC-803 and SGC-7901 cells not only in vitro but also in vivo in NOD/SCID mice (P < 0.05). Furthermore, we found that CISD2 affected cell proliferation and tumorigenicity of gastric cancer cells through mediating the G1-to-S phase transition. Moreover, we demonstrated that the pro-proliferative effect of CISD2 on gastric cancer cells was associated with downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21Cip1 and p27Kip1, and activation of AKT signaling. The findings of this study indicate that CISD2 may promote proliferation and tumorigenicity, potentially representing a novel prognostic marker for overall survival in gastric cancer. PMID:26565812

  20. The histopathology of a human mesenchymal stem cell experimental tumor model: support for an hMSC origin for Ewing's sarcoma?

    PubMed

    Burns, J S; Abdallah, B M; Schrøder, H D; Kassem, M

    2008-10-01

    Sarcomas display varied degrees of karyotypic abnormality, vascularity and mesenchymal differentiation. We have reported that a strain of telomerized adult human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC-TERT20) spontaneously evolved a tumorigenic phenotype after long-term continuous culture. We asked to what extent our hMSC-TERT20 derived tumors reflected events found in human sarcomas using routine histopathological procedures. Early versus late passage hMSC-TERT20 cultures persistently expressed mesenchymal lineage proteins e.g. CD105, CD44, CD99 and vimentin. However, late passage cultures, showed increased immunohistochemical staining for CyclinD1 and p21WAF1/Cip1, whereas p27Kip1 staining was reduced. Notably, spectral karyotyping showed that tumorigenic hMSC-TERT20 cells retained a normal diploid karyotype, with no detectable chromosome abnormalities. Consistent with the bone-forming potential of early passage hMSC-TERT20 cells, tumors derived from late passage cells expressed early biomarkers of osteogenesis. However, hMSC-TERT20 cells were heterogeneous for alpha smooth muscle actin (ASMA) expression and one out of six hMSC-TERT20 derived single cell clones was strongly ASMA positive. Tumors from this ASMA+ clone had distinctive vascular qualities with hot spots of high CD34+ murine endothelial cell density, together with CD34- regions with a branching periodic acid Schiff reaction pattern. Such clone-specific differences in host vascular response provide novel models to explore interactions between mesenchymal stem and endothelial cells. Despite the lack of a characteristic chromosomal translocation, the histomorphology, biomarkers and oncogenic changes were similar to those prevalent for Ewing's sarcomas. The phenotype and ontogenesis of hMSC-TERT20 tumors was consistent with the hypothesis that sarcomas may arise from hMSC, providing a unique diploid model for exploring human sarcoma biology. PMID:18712675

  1. Overexpressed CISD2 has prognostic value in human gastric cancer and promotes gastric cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenesis via AKT signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan; Ouyang, Fei; Liu, Xiaobo; Wu, Shu; Wu, Hong-mei; Xu, Yuandong; Wang, Bin; Zhu, Jinrong; Xu, Xuehu; Zhang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    CDGSH iron sulfur domain 2 (CISD2) is localized in the outer mitochondrial membrane and mediates mitochondrial integrity and lifespan in mammals, but its role in cancer is unknown. In the current study, we reported that CISD2 mRNA and protein expression levels were significantly upregulated in gastric cancer cells compared to normal gastric epithelial cells (P < 0.001). Immunohistochemical analysis of 261 paraffin-embedded archived gastric cancer tissues showed that high CISD2 expression was significantly associated with clinical stage, TNM classifications, venous invasion and lymphatic invasion. Univariate and multivariate analysis indicated that high CISD2 expression was an independent prognostic factor for poorer overall survival in the entire cohort. Overexpressing CISD2 promoted, while silencing CISD2 inhibited, the proliferation of gastric cancer cells. Furthermore, we found that silencing endogenous CISD2 also significantly inhibited the proliferation and tumorigenicity of MGC-803 and SGC-7901 cells not only in vitro but also in vivo in NOD/SCID mice (P < 0.05). Furthermore, we found that CISD2 affected cell proliferation and tumorigenicity of gastric cancer cells through mediating the G1-to-S phase transition. Moreover, we demonstrated that the pro-proliferative effect of CISD2 on gastric cancer cells was associated with downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21Cip1 and p27Kip1, and activation of AKT signaling. The findings of this study indicate that CISD2 may promote proliferation and tumorigenicity, potentially representing a novel prognostic marker for overall survival in gastric cancer. PMID:26565812

  2. Crystal structure of human cyclin K, a positive regulator of cyclin-dependent kinase 9.

    PubMed

    Baek, Kyuwon; Brown, Raymond S; Birrane, Gabriel; Ladias, John A A

    2007-02-16

    Cyclin K and the closely related cyclins T1, T2a, and T2b interact with cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) forming multiple nuclear complexes, referred to collectively as positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). Through phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II largest subunit, distinct P-TEFb species regulate the transcriptional elongation of specific genes that play central roles in human physiology and disease development, including cardiac hypertrophy and human immunodeficiency virus-1 pathogenesis. We have determined the crystal structure of human cyclin K (residues 11-267) at 1.5 A resolution, which represents the first atomic structure of a P-TEFb subunit. The cyclin K fold comprises two typical cyclin boxes with two short helices preceding the N-terminal box. A prominent feature of cyclin K is an additional helix (H4a) in the first cyclin box that obstructs the binding pocket for the cell-cycle inhibitor p27(Kip1). Modeling of CDK9 bound to cyclin K provides insights into the structural determinants underlying the formation and regulation of this complex. A homology model of human cyclin T1 generated using the cyclin K structure as a template reveals that the two proteins have similar structures, as expected from their high level of sequence identity. Nevertheless, their CDK9-interacting surfaces display significant structural differences, which could potentially be exploited for the design of cyclin-targeted inhibitors of the CDK9-cyclin K and CDK9-cyclin T1 complexes. PMID:17169370

  3. Crystal Structure of Human Cyclin K, a Positive Regulator of Cyclin-dependent Kinase 9

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Kyuwon; Brown, Raymond S.; Birrane, Gabriel; Ladias, John A.A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Cyclin K and the closely related cyclins T1, T2a, and T2b interact with cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) forming multiple nuclear complexes, collectively referred to as positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). Through phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II largest subunit, distinct P-TEFb species regulate the transcriptional elongation of specific genes that play central roles in human physiology and disease development, including cardiac hypertrophy and human immunodeficiency virus-1 pathogenesis. We have determined the crystal structure of human cyclin K (residues 11-267) at 1.5 Å resolution, which represents the first atomic structure of a P-TEFb subunit. The cyclin K fold comprises two typical cyclin boxes with two short helices preceding the N-terminal box. A prominent feature of cyclin K is an additional helix (H4a) in the first cyclin box that obstructs the binding pocket for the cell cycle inhibitor p27Kip1. Modeling of CDK9 bound to cyclin K provides insights into the structural determinants underlying the formation and regulation of this complex. A homology model of human cyclin T1 generated using the cyclin K as a template reveals that the two proteins have similar structures, as expected from their high sequence identity. Nevertheless, their CDK9-interacting surfaces display significant structural differences, which could potentially be exploited for the design of cyclin-targeted inhibitors of the CDK9–cyclin K and CDK9–cyclin T1 complexes. PMID:17169370

  4. Targeting polo-like kinase 1 suppresses essential functions of alloreactive T cells.

    PubMed

    Berges, Carsten; Chatterjee, Manik; Topp, Max S; Einsele, Hermann

    2016-06-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGvHD) is still a major cause of transplant-related mortality after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (ASCT). It requires immunosuppressive treatments that broadly abrogate T cell responses including beneficial ones directed against tumor cells or infective pathogens. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is overexpressed in many cancer types including leukemia, and clinical studies demonstrated that targeting PLK1 using selective PLK1 inhibitors resulted in inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis predominantly in tumor cells, supporting the feasibility of PLK1 as target for anticancer therapy. Here, we show that activation of alloreactive T cells (Tallo) up-regulate expression of PLK1, suggesting that PLK1 is a potential new candidate for dual therapy of aGvHD and leukemia after ASCT. Inhibition of PLK1, using PLK1-specific inhibitor GSK461364A selectively depletes Tallo by preventing activation and by inducing apoptosis in already activated Tallo, while memory T cells are preserved. Activated Tallo cells which survive exposure to PLK1 undergo inhibition of proliferation by induction of G2/M cell cycle arrest, which is accompanied by accumulation of cell cycle regulator proteins p21(WAF/CIP1), p27(Kip1), p53 and cyclin B1, whereas abundance of CDK4 decreased. We also show that suppressive effects of PLK1 inhibition on Tallo were synergistically enhanced by concomitant inhibition of molecular chaperone Hsp90. Taken together, our data suggest that PLK1 inhibition represents a reasonable dual strategy to suppress residual tumor growth and efficiently deplete Tallo, and thus provide a rationale to selectively prevent and treat aGvHD. PMID:26724940

  5. Largazole and Its Derivatives Selectively Inhibit Ubiquitin Activating Enzyme (E1)

    PubMed Central

    Nasveschuk, Christopher G.; Wang, Wei; Quade, Bettina; Zhang, Gan; Kuchta, Robert D.; Phillips, Andrew J.; Liu, Xuedong

    2012-01-01

    Protein ubiquitination plays an important role in the regulation of almost every aspect of eukaryotic cellular function; therefore, its destabilization is often observed in most human diseases and cancers. Consequently, developing inhibitors of the ubiquitination system for the treatment of cancer has been a recent area of interest. Currently, only a few classes of compounds have been discovered to inhibit the ubiquitin-activating enzyme (E1) and only one class is relatively selective in E1 inhibition in cells. We now report that Largazole and its ester and ketone analogs selectively inhibit ubiquitin conjugation to p27Kip1 and TRF1 in vitro. The inhibitory activity of these small molecules on ubiquitin conjugation has been traced to their inhibition of the ubiquitin E1 enzyme. To further dissect the mechanism of E1 inhibition, we analyzed the effects of these inhibitors on each of the two steps of E1 activation. We show that Largazole and its derivatives specifically inhibit the adenylation step of the E1 reaction while having no effect on thioester bond formation between ubiquitin and E1. E1 inhibition appears to be specific to human E1 as Largazole ketone fails to inhibit the activation of Uba1p, a homolog of E1 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Moreover, Largazole analogs do not significantly inhibit SUMO E1. Thus, Largazole and select analogs are a novel class of ubiquitin E1 inhibitors and valuable tools for studying ubiquitination in vitro. This class of compounds could be further developed and potentially be a useful tool in cells. PMID:22279528

  6. Digoxin inhibits PDGF-BB-induced VSMC proliferation and migration through an increase in ILK signaling and attenuates neointima formation following carotid injury.

    PubMed

    Yan, Gaoliang; Wang, Qingjie; Hu, Shengda; Wang, Dong; Qiao, Yong; Ma, Genshan; Tang, Chengchun; Gu, Yuchun

    2015-10-01

    The increased proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are key events in the development of artery restenosis following percutaneous coronary intervention. Digoxin has long been used in the treatment of heart failure and has been shown to inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells through multiple pathways. However, the potential role of digoxin in the regulation of VSMC proliferation and migration and its effectiveness in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, such as restenosis, remains unexplored. In the present study, we demonstrate that digoxin-induced growth inhibition is associated with the downregulation of CDK activation and the restoration of p27Kip1 levels in platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated VSMCs. In addition, we found that digoxin restored the PDGF‑BB-induced inhibition of integrin linked kinase (ILK) expression and prevented the PDGF‑BB-induced activation of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β. Furthermore, digoxin inhibited adhesion molecule and extracellular matrix relative protein expression. Finally, we found that digoxin significantly inhibited neointima formation, accompanied by a decrease in cell proliferation following vascular injury in rats. These effects of digoxin were shown to be mediated, at least in part, through an increase in ILK/Akt signaling and a decrease in GSK-3β signaling in PDGF‑BB-stimulated VSMCs. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that digoxin exerts an inhibitory effect on the PDGF‑BB-induced proliferation, migration and phenotypic modulation of VSMCs, and prevents neointima formation in rats. These observations indicate the potential therapeutic application of digoxin in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, such as restenosis. PMID:26311435

  7. Sodium Channel Inhibitors Reduce DMPK mRNA and Protein.

    PubMed

    Witherspoon, Luke; O'Reilly, Sean; Hadwen, Jeremiah; Tasnim, Nafisa; MacKenzie, Alex; Farooq, Faraz

    2015-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by an expanded trinucleotide (CTG)n tract in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene. This results in the aggregation of an expanded mRNA forming toxic intranuclear foci which sequester splicing factors. We believe down-regulation of DMPK mRNA represents a potential, and as yet unexplored, DM1 therapeutic avenue. Consequently, a computational screen for agents which down-regulate DMPK mRNA was undertaken, unexpectedly identifying the sodium channel blockers mexiletine, prilocaine, procainamide, and sparteine as effective suppressors of DMPK mRNA. Analysis of DMPK mRNA in C2C12 myoblasts following treatment with these agents revealed a reduction in the mRNA levels. In vivo analysis of CD1 mice also showed DMPK mRNA and protein down-regulation. The role of DMPK mRNA suppression in the documented efficacy of this class of compounds in DM1 is worthy of further investigation. PMID:26011798

  8. An integrated protein localization and interaction map for Potato yellow dwarf virus, type species of the genus Nucleorhabdovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, Anindya; Kopperud, Kristin; Anderson, Gavin; Martin, Kathleen; Goodin, Michael

    2010-06-20

    The genome of Potato yellow dwarf virus (PYDV; Nucleorhabdovirus type species) was determined to be 12,875 nucleotides (nt). The antigenome is organized into seven open reading frames (ORFs) ordered 3'-N-X-P-Y-M-G-L-5', which likely encode the nucleocapsid, phospho, movement, matrix, glyco and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase proteins, respectively, except for X, which is of unknown function. The ORFs are flanked by a 3' leader RNA of 149 nt and a 5' trailer RNA of 97 nt, and are separated by conserved intergenic junctions. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that PYDV is closely related to other leafhopper-transmitted rhabdoviruses. Functional protein assays were used to determine the subcellular localization of PYDV proteins. Surprisingly, the M protein was able to induce the intranuclear accumulation of the inner nuclear membrane in the absence of any other viral protein. Finally, bimolecular fluorescence complementation was used to generate the most comprehensive protein interaction map for a plant-adapted rhabdovirus to date.

  9. Decreased Skp2 Expression Is Necessary but Not Sufficient for Therapy-Induced Senescence in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ewald, Jonathan A; Jarrard, David F

    2012-01-01

    Therapy-induced senescence (TIS), a cytostatic stress response in cancer cells, is induced inefficiently by current anticancer agents and radiation. The mechanisms that mediate TIS in cancer cells are not well defined. Herein, we characterize a robust senescence response both in vitro and in vivo to the quinone diaziquone (AZQ), previously identified in a high-throughput senescence-induction small-molecule screen. Using AZQ and several other agents that induce senescence, we screened a series of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and found that p27Kip1 was induced in all investigated prostate cancer cell lines. The ubiquitin-ligase Skp2 negatively regulates p27Kip1 and, during TIS, is translocated to the cytoplasm before its expression is decreased in senescent cells. Overexpression of Skp2 blocks the effects of AZQ on senescence and p27Kip1 induction. We also find that stable long-term short hairpin RNA knockdown of Skp2 decreases proliferation but does not generate the complete senescence phenotype. We conclude that Skp2 participates in regulating TIS but, alone, is insufficient to induce senescence in cancer cells. PMID:22937180

  10. Definition of a Skp2-c-Myc Pathway to Expand Human Beta-cells

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Shiwani; Roel, Chris; Tanwir, Mansoor; Wills, Rachel; Perianayagam, Nidhi; Wang, Peng; Fiaschi-Taesch, Nathalie M.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is characterized by insulin resistance and reduced functional β-cell mass. Developmental differences, failure of adaptive expansion and loss of β-cells via β-cell death or de-differentiation have emerged as the possible causes of this reduced β-cell mass. We hypothesized that the proliferative response to mitogens of human β-cells from T2D donors is reduced, and that this might contribute to the development and progression of T2D. Here, we demonstrate that the proliferative response of human β-cells from T2D donors in response to cdk6 and cyclin D3 is indeed dramatically impaired. We show that this is accompanied by increased nuclear abundance of the cell cycle inhibitor, p27kip1. Increasing nuclear abundance of p27kip1 by adenoviral delivery decreases the proliferative response of β-cells from non-diabetic donors, mimicking T2D β-cells. However, while both p27kip1 gene silencing and downregulation by Skp2 overexpression increased similarly the proliferative response of human β-cells, only Skp2 was capable of inducing a significant human β-cell expansion. Skp2 was also able to double the proliferative response of T2D β-cells. These studies define c-Myc as a central Skp2 target for the induction of cell cycle entry, expansion and regeneration of human T2D β-cells. PMID:27380896

  11. PABPN1 overexpression leads to upregulation of genes encoding nuclear proteins that are sequestered in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy nuclear inclusions.

    PubMed

    Corbeil-Girard, Louis-Philippe; Klein, Arnaud F; Sasseville, A Marie-Josée; Lavoie, Hugo; Dicaire, Marie-Josée; Saint-Denis, Anik; Pagé, Martin; Duranceau, André; Codère, François; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Karpati, George; Rouleau, Guy A; Massie, Bernard; Langelier, Yves; Brais, Bernard

    2005-04-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is an adult-onset disease caused by expanded (GCN)12-17 stretches encoding the N-terminal polyalanine domain of the poly(A) binding protein nuclear 1 (PABPN1). OPMD is characterized by intranuclear inclusions (INIs) in skeletal muscle fibers, which contain PABPN1, molecular chaperones, ubiquitin, proteasome subunits, and poly(A)-mRNA. We describe an adenoviral model of PABPN1 expression that produces INIs in most cells. Microarray analysis revealed that PABPN1 overexpression reproducibly changed the expression of 202 genes. Sixty percent of upregulated genes encode nuclear proteins, including many RNA and DNA binding proteins. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that all tested nuclear proteins encoded by eight upregulated genes colocalize with PABPN1 within the INIs: CUGBP1, SFRS3, FKBP1A, HMG2, HNRPA1, PRC1, S100P, and HSP70. In addition, CUGBP1, SFRS3, and FKBP1A were also found in OPMD muscle INIs. This study demonstrates that a large number of nuclear proteins are sequestered in OPMD INIs, which may compromise cellular function. PMID:15755682

  12. G-protein beta-subunit specificity in the fast membrane-delimited inhibition of Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    García, D E; Li, B; García-Ferreiro, R E; Hernández-Ochoa, E O; Yan, K; Gautam, N; Catterall, W A; Mackie, K; Hille, B

    1998-11-15

    We investigated which subtypes of G-protein beta subunits participate in voltage-dependent modulation of N-type calcium channels. Calcium currents were recorded from cultured rat superior cervical ganglion neurons injected intranuclearly with DNA encoding five different G-protein beta subunits. Gbeta1 and Gbeta2 strongly mimicked the fast voltage-dependent inhibition of calcium channels produced by many G-protein-coupled receptors. The Gbeta5 subunit produced much weaker effects than Gbeta1 and Gbeta2, whereas Gbeta3 and Gbeta4 were nearly inactive in these electrophysiological studies. The specificity implied by these results was confirmed and extended using the yeast two-hybrid system to test for protein-protein interactions. Here, Gbeta1 or Gbeta2 coupled to the GAL4-activation domain interacted strongly with a channel sequence corresponding to the intracellular loop connecting domains I and II of a alpha1 subunit of the class B calcium channel fused to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain. In this assay, the Gbeta5 subunit interacted weakly, and Gbeta3 and Gbeta4 failed to interact. Together, these results suggest that Gbeta1 and/or Gbeta2 subunits account for most of the voltage-dependent inhibition of N-type calcium channels and that the linker between domains I and II of the calcium channel alpha1 subunit is a principal receptor for this inhibition. PMID:9801356

  13. HMGB1 Protein Binds to Influenza Virus Nucleoprotein and Promotes Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Moisy, Dorothée; Avilov, Sergiy V.; Jacob, Yves; Laoide, Brid M.; Ge, Xingyi; Baudin, Florence; Jestin, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    Influenza virus has evolved replication strategies that hijack host cell pathways. To uncover interactions between viral macromolecules and host proteins, we applied a phage display strategy. A library of human cDNA expression products displayed on filamentous phages was submitted to affinity selection for influenza viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs). High-mobility-group box (HMGB) proteins were found to bind to the nucleoprotein (NP) component of vRNPs. HMGB1 and HMGB2 bind directly to the purified NP in the absence of viral RNA, and the HMG box A domain is sufficient to bind the NP. We show that HMGB1 associates with the viral NP in the nuclei of infected cells, promotes viral growth, and enhances the activity of the viral polymerase. The presence of a functional HMGB1 DNA-binding site is required to enhance influenza virus replication. Glycyrrhizin, which reduces HMGB1 binding to DNA, inhibits influenza virus polymerase activity. Our data show that the HMGB1 protein can play a significant role in intranuclear replication of influenza viruses, thus extending previous findings on the bornavirus and on a number of DNA viruses. PMID:22696656

  14. The Marek’s disease virus (MDV) protein encoded by the UL17 ortholog is essential for virus growth

    PubMed Central

    Chbab, Najat; Chabanne-Vautherot, Danièle; Francineau, Annick; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Denesvre, Caroline; Vautherot, Jean-François

    2009-01-01

    Marek’s disease virus type 1 (MDV-1) shows a strict dependency on the direct cell-to-cell spread for its propagation in cell culture. As MDV-1 shows an impaired nuclear egress in cell culture, we wished to address the characterization of capsid/tegument genes which may intervene in the maturation of intranuclear capsids. Orthologs of UL17 are present in all herpesviruses and, in all reported case, were shown to be essential for viral growth, playing a role in capsid maturation and DNA packaging. As only HSV-1 and PrV UL17 proteins have been characterized so far, we wished to examine the role of MDV-1 pUL17 in virus replication. To analyze MDV-1 UL17 gene function, we created deletion mutants or point mutated the open reading frame (ORF) to interrupt its coding phase. We established that a functional ORF UL17 is indispensable for MDV-1 growth. We chose to characterize the virally encoded protein by tagging the 729 amino-acid long protein with a repeat of the HA peptide that was fused to its C-terminus. Protein pUL17 was identified in infected cell extracts as an 82 kDa protein which localized to the nucleus, colocalizing with VP5, the major capsid protein, and VP13/14, a major tegument protein. By using green fluorescent protein fusion and HA tagged proteins expressed under the cytomegalovirus IE gene enhancer/promoter (PCMV IE), we showed that MDV-1 pUL17 nuclear distribution in infected cells is not an intrinsic property. Although our results strongly suggest that another viral protein retains (or relocate) pUL17 to the nucleus, we report that none of the tegument protein tested so far were able to mediate pUL17 relocation to the nucleus. PMID:19284966

  15. Protein Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunton, James D.; Shiryayev, Andrey; Pagan, Daniel L.

    2007-09-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Globular protein structure; 3. Experimental methods; 4. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics; 5. Protein-protein interactions; 6. Theoretical studies of equilibrium; 7. Nucleation theory; 8. Experimental studies of nucleation; 9. Lysozyme; 10. Some other globular proteins; 11. Membrane proteins; 12. Crystallins and cataracts; 13. Sickle hemoglobin and sickle cell anemia; 14, Alzheimer's disease; Index.

  16. Protein Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunton, James D.; Shiryayev, Andrey; Pagan, Daniel L.

    2014-07-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Globular protein structure; 3. Experimental methods; 4. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics; 5. Protein-protein interactions; 6. Theoretical studies of equilibrium; 7. Nucleation theory; 8. Experimental studies of nucleation; 9. Lysozyme; 10. Some other globular proteins; 11. Membrane proteins; 12. Crystallins and cataracts; 13. Sickle hemoglobin and sickle cell anemia; 14, Alzheimer's disease; Index.

  17. Subnuclear Localization and Intranuclear Trafficking of Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Sayyed K.; Medina, Ricardo F.; Pockwinse, Shirwin M.; Bakshi, Rachit; Kota, Krishna P.; Ali, Syed A.; Young, Daniel W.; Nickerson, Jeffery A.; Javed, Amjad; Montecino, Martin; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Lian, Jane B.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear microenvironments are architecturally organized subnuclear sites where the regulatory machinery for gene expression, replication, and repair resides. This compartmentalization is necessary to attain required stoichiometry for organization and assembly of regulatory complexes for combinatorial control. Combined and methodical application of molecular, cellular, biochemical, and in vivo genetic approaches is required to fully understand complexities of biological control. Here we provide methodologies to characterize nuclear organization of regulatory machinery by in situ immunofluorescence microscopy. PMID:20694661

  18. Total protein

    MedlinePlus

    The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes of proteins found in the fluid portion of your ... nutritional problems, kidney disease or liver disease . If total protein is abnormal, you will need to have more ...

  19. Storage Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Toru; Nambara, Eiji; Yamagishi, Kazutoshi; Goto, Derek B.; Naito, Satoshi

    2002-01-01

    Plants accumulate storage substances such as starch, lipids and proteins in certain phases of development. Storage proteins accumulate in both vegetative and reproductive tissues and serve as a reservoir to be used in later stages of plant development. The accumulation of storage protein is thus beneficial for the survival of plants. Storage proteins are also an important source of dietary plant proteins. Here, we summarize the genome organization and regulation of gene expression of storage protein genes in Arabidopsis. PMID:22303197

  20. Distribution of dipeptide repeat proteins in cellular models and C9orf72 mutation cases suggests link to transcriptional silencing.

    PubMed

    Schludi, Martin H; May, Stephanie; Grässer, Friedrich A; Rentzsch, Kristin; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Küpper, Clemens; Klopstock, Thomas; Arzberger, Thomas; Edbauer, Dieter

    2015-10-01

    A massive expansion of a GGGGCC repeat upstream of the C9orf72 coding region is the most common known cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. Despite its intronic localization and lack of a canonical start codon, both strands are translated into aggregating dipeptide repeat (DPR) proteins: poly-GA, poly-GP, poly-GR, poly-PR and poly-PA. To address conflicting findings on the predominant toxicity of the different DPR species in model systems, we compared the expression pattern of the DPR proteins in rat primary neurons and postmortem brain and spinal cord of C9orf72 mutation patients. Only poly-GA overexpression closely mimicked the p62-positive neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions commonly observed for all DPR proteins in patients. In contrast, overexpressed poly-GR and poly-PR formed nucleolar p62-negative inclusions. In patients, most of the less common neuronal intranuclear DPR inclusions were para-nucleolar and p62 positive. Neuronal nucleoli in C9orf72 cases showed normal size and morphology regardless of the presence of poly-GR and poly-PR inclusions arguing against widespread nucleolar stress, reported in cellular models. Colocalization of para-nucleolar DPR inclusions with heterochromatin and a marker of transcriptional repression (H3K9me2) indicates a link to gene transcription. In contrast, we detected numerous intranuclear DPR inclusions not associated with nucleolar structures in ependymal and subependymal cells. In patients, neuronal inclusions of poly-GR, poly-GP and the poly-GA interacting protein Unc119 were less abundant than poly-GA inclusions, but showed similar regional and subcellular distribution. Regardless of neurodegeneration, all inclusions were most abundant in neocortex, hippocampus and thalamus, with few inclusions in brain stem and spinal cord. In the granular cell layer of the cerebellum, poly-GA and Unc119 inclusions were significantly more abundant in cases with FTLD than in cases with MND and FTLD/MND. Poly

  1. VCP binding influences intracellular distribution of the slow Wallerian degeneration protein, Wld(S).

    PubMed

    Wilbrey, Anna L; Haley, Jane E; Wishart, Thomas M; Conforti, Laura; Morreale, Giacomo; Beirowski, Bogdan; Babetto, Elisabetta; Adalbert, Robert; Gillingwater, Thomas H; Smith, Trevor; Wyllie, David J A; Ribchester, Richard R; Coleman, Michael P

    2008-07-01

    Wallerian degeneration slow (Wld(S)) mice express a chimeric protein that delays axonal degeneration. The N-terminal domain (N70), which is essential for axonal protection in vivo, binds valosin-containing protein (VCP) and targets both Wld(S) and VCP to discrete nuclear foci. We characterized the formation, composition and localization of these potentially important foci. Missense mutations show that the N-terminal sixteen residues (N16) of Wld(S) are essential for both VCP binding and targeting Wld(S) to nuclear foci. Removing N16 abolishes foci, and VCP binding sequences from ataxin-3 or HrdI restore them. In vitro, these puncta co-localize with proteasome subunits. In vivo, Wld(S) assumes a range of nuclear distribution patterns, including puncta, and its neuronal expression and intranuclear distribution is region-specific and varies between spontaneous and transgenic Wld(S) models. We conclude that VCP influences Wld(S) intracellular distribution, and thus potentially its function, by binding within the N70 domain required for axon protection. PMID:18468455

  2. Herpes simplex virus 2 UL13 protein kinase disrupts nuclear lamins

    SciTech Connect

    Cano-Monreal, Gina L.; Wylie, Kristine M.; Cao, Feng; Tavis, John E.; Morrison, Lynda A.

    2009-09-15

    Herpesviruses must cross the inner nuclear membrane and underlying lamina to exit the nucleus. HSV-1 US3 and PKC can phosphorylate lamins and induce their dispersion but do not elicit all of the phosphorylated lamin species produced during infection. UL13 is a serine threonine protein kinase conserved among many herpesviruses. HSV-1 UL13 phosphorylates US3 and thereby controls UL31 and UL34 nuclear rim localization, indicating a role in nuclear egress. Here, we report that HSV-2 UL13 alone induced conformational changes in lamins A and C and redistributed lamin B1 from the nuclear rim to intranuclear granular structures. HSV-2 UL13 directly phosphorylated lamins A, C, and B1 in vitro, and the lamin A1 tail domain. HSV-2 infection recapitulated the lamin alterations seen upon expression of UL13 alone, and other alterations were also observed, indicating that additional viral and/or cellular proteins cooperate with UL13 to alter lamins during HSV-2 infection to allow nuclear egress.

  3. Recruitment of phosphorylated small heat shock protein Hsp27 to nuclear speckles without stress

    SciTech Connect

    Bryantsev, A.L.; Chechenova, M.B.; Shelden, E.A. . E-mail: eshelden@wsu.edu

    2007-01-01

    During stress, the mammalian small heat shock protein Hsp27 enters cell nuclei. The present study examines the requirements for entry of Hsp27 into nuclei of normal rat kidney (NRK) renal epithelial cells, and for its interactions with specific nuclear structures. We find that phosphorylation of Hsp27 is necessary for the efficient entry into nuclei during heat shock but not sufficient for efficient nuclear entry under control conditions. We further report that Hsp27 is recruited to an RNAse sensitive fraction of SC35 positive nuclear speckles, but not other intranuclear structures, in response to heat shock. Intriguingly, Hsp27 phosphorylation, in the absence of stress, is sufficient for recruitment to speckles found in post-anaphase stage mitotic cells. Additionally, pseudophosphorylated Hsp27 fused to a nuclear localization peptide (NLS) is recruited to nuclear speckles in unstressed interphase cells, but wildtype and nonphosphorylatable Hsp27 NLS fusion proteins are not. The expression of NLS-Hsp27 mutants does not enhance colony forming abilities of cells subjected to severe heat shock, but does regulate nuclear speckle morphology. These data demonstrate that phosphorylation, but not stress, mediates Hsp27 recruitment to an RNAse soluble fraction of nuclear speckles and support a site-specific role for Hsp27 within the nucleus.

  4. Vesicle formation from the nuclear membrane is induced by coexpression of two conserved herpesvirus proteins

    PubMed Central

    Klupp, Barbara G.; Granzow, Harald; Fuchs, Walter; Keil, Günther M.; Finke, Stefan; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.

    2007-01-01

    Although the nuclear envelope is a dynamic structure that disassembles and reforms during mitosis, the formation of membranous vesicles derived from the nuclear envelope has not yet been described in noninfected cells. However, during herpesvirus maturation, intranuclear capsids initiate transit to the cytosol for final maturation by budding at the inner nuclear membrane. Two conserved herpesvirus proteins are required for this primary envelopment, designated in the alphaherpesviruses as pUL31 and pUL34. Here, we show that simultaneous expression of pUL31 and pUL34 of the alphaherpesvirus pseudorabies virus in stably transfected rabbit kidney cells resulted in the formation of vesicles in the perinuclear space that resemble primary envelopes without a nucleocapsid. They contain pUL31 and pUL34 as shown by immunolabeling and are derived from the nuclear envelope. Thus, coexpression of only two conserved herpesvirus proteins without any other viral factor is sufficient to induce the formation of vesicles from the nuclear membrane. This argues for the contribution of cellular factors in this process either recruited from their natural cytoplasmic location or not yet identified as components of the nuclear compartment. PMID:17426144

  5. Herpes simplex virus 2 UL13 protein kinase disrupts nuclear lamins

    PubMed Central

    Cano-Monreal, Gina L.; Wylie, Kristine M.; Cao, Feng; Tavis, John E.; Morrison, Lynda A.

    2009-01-01

    Herpesviruses must cross the inner nuclear membrane and underlying lamina to exit the nucleus. HSV-1 US3 and PKC can phosphorylate lamins and induce their dispersion but do not elicit all of the phosphorylated lamin species produced during infection. UL13 is a serine threonine protein kinase conserved among many herpesviruses. HSV-1 UL13 phosphorylates US3 and thereby controls UL31 and UL34 nuclear rim localization, indicating a role in nuclear egress. Here, we report that HSV-2 UL13 alone induced conformational changes in lamins A and C and redistributed lamin B1 from the nuclear rim to intranuclear granular structures. HSV-2 UL13 directly phosphorylated lamins A, C, and B1 in vitro, and the lamin A1 tail domain. HSV-2 infection recapitulated the lamin alterations seen upon expression of UL13 alone, and other alterations were also observed, indicating that additional viral and/or cellular proteins cooperate with UL13 to alter lamins during HSV-2 infection to allow nuclear egress. PMID:19640559

  6. Doxycycline Attenuates Protein Aggregation in Cardiomyocytes and Improves Survival of a Mouse Model of Cardiac Proteinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hanqiao; Tang, Mingxin; Zheng, Qingwen; Kumarapeli, Asangi R. K.; Horak, Kathleen M.; Tian, Zongwen; Wang, Xuejun

    2010-01-01

    Objective The goal of this preclinical study was to assess the therapeutic efficacy of doxycycline (Doxy) for desmin-related cardiomyopathy (DRC) and to elucidate the potential mechanisms involved. Background DRC, exemplifying cardiac proteinopathy, is characterized by intrasarcoplasmic protein aggregation and cardiac insufficiency. No effective treatment for DRC is presently available. Doxy was shown to attenuate aberrant intranuclear aggregation and toxicity of misfolded proteins in non-cardiac cells and animal models of other proteinopathies. Methods Mice and cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes with transgenic (TG) expression of a human DRC-linked missense mutant αB-crystallin (CryABR120G) were used for testing the effect of Doxy. Doxy was administered via drinking water (6 mg/ml) initiated at 8 or 16 weeks of age. Results Doxy treatment initiated at 16 weeks of age significantly delayed the premature death of CryABR120G TG mice, with a median lifespan of 30.4 weeks (placebo group 25 weeks, p<0.01). In another cohort of CryABR120G TG mice, Doxy treatment initiated at 8 weeks of age significantly attenuated cardiac hypertrophy in one month. Further investigation revealed that Doxy significantly reduced the abundance of CryAB-positive microscopic aggregates, detergent-resistant CryAB oligomers, and total ubiquitinated proteins in CryABR120G TG hearts. In cell culture, Doxy treatment dose-dependently suppressed the formation of both microscopic protein aggregates and detergent-resistant soluble CryABR120G oligomers, and reversed the upregulation of p62 protein induced by adenovirus-mediated CryABR120G expression. Conclusions Doxy suppresses CryABR120G induced aberrant protein aggregation in cardiomyocytes and prolongs CryABR120G based DRC mouse survival. PMID:20947000

  7. Urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator (uPA) Promotes Angiogenesis by Attenuating Proline-rich Homeodomain Protein (PRH) Transcription Factor Activity and De-repressing Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Receptor Expression.

    PubMed

    Stepanova, Victoria; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Zaitsev, Sergei V; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Bdeir, Khalil; Kershaw, Rachael; Holman, Kelci R; Parfyonova, Yelena V; Semina, Ekaterina V; Beloglazova, Irina B; Tkachuk, Vsevolod A; Cines, Douglas B

    2016-07-15

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) regulates angiogenesis and vascular permeability through proteolytic degradation of extracellular matrix and intracellular signaling initiated upon its binding to uPAR/CD87 and other cell surface receptors. Here, we describe an additional mechanism by which uPA regulates angiogenesis. Ex vivo VEGF-induced vascular sprouting from Matrigel-embedded aortic rings isolated from uPA knock-out (uPA(-/-)) mice was impaired compared with vessels emanating from wild-type mice. Endothelial cells isolated from uPA(-/-) mice show less proliferation and migration in response to VEGF than their wild type counterparts or uPA(-/-) endothelial cells in which expression of wild type uPA had been restored. We reported previously that uPA is transported from cell surface receptors to nuclei through a mechanism that requires its kringle domain. Intranuclear uPA modulates gene transcription by binding to a subset of transcription factors. Here we report that wild type single-chain uPA, but not uPA variants incapable of nuclear transport, increases the expression of cell surface VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR1) and VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) by translocating to the nuclei of ECs. Intranuclear single-chain uPA binds directly to and interferes with the function of the transcription factor hematopoietically expressed homeodomain protein or proline-rich homeodomain protein (HHEX/PRH), which thereby lose their physiologic capacity to repress the activity of vehgr1 and vegfr2 gene promoters. These studies identify uPA-dependent de-repression of vegfr1 and vegfr2 gene transcription through binding to HHEX/PRH as a novel mechanism by which uPA mediates the pro-angiogenic effects of VEGF and identifies a potential new target for control of pathologic angiogenesis. PMID:27151212

  8. AHM1, a novel type of nuclear matrix-localized, MAR binding protein with a single AT hook and a J domain-homologous region.

    PubMed

    Morisawa, G; Han-Yama, A; Moda, I; Tamai, A; Iwabuchi, M; Meshi, T

    2000-10-01

    Interactions between the nuclear matrix and special regions of chromosomal DNA called matrix attachment regions (MARs) have been implicated in various nuclear functions. We have identified a novel protein from wheat, AT hook-containing MAR binding protein1 (AHM1), that binds preferentially to MARs. A multidomain protein, AHM1 has the special combination of a J domain-homologous region and a Zn finger-like motif (a J-Z array) and an AT hook. For MAR binding, the AT hook at the C terminus was essential, and an internal portion containing the Zn finger-like motif was additionally required in vivo. AHM1 was found in the nuclear matrix fraction and was localized in the nucleoplasm. AHM1 fused to green fluorescent protein had a speckled distribution pattern inside the nucleus. AHM1 is most likely a nuclear matrix component that functions between intranuclear framework and MARs. J-Z arrays can be found in a group of (hypothetical) proteins in plants, which may share some functions, presumably to recruit specific Hsp70 partners as co-chaperones. PMID:11041885

  9. Dietary Proteins

    MedlinePlus

    ... grains and beans. Proteins from meat and other animal products are complete proteins. This means they supply all of the amino acids the body can't make on its own. Most plant proteins are incomplete. You should eat different types of plant proteins every day to get ...

  10. Danusertib, a potent pan-Aurora kinase and ABL kinase inhibitor, induces cell cycle arrest and programmed cell death and inhibits epithelial to mesenchymal transition involving the PI3K/Akt/mTOR-mediated signaling pathway in human gastric cancer AGS and NCI-N78 cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chun-Xiu; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Yang, Yin-Xue; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhang, Xueji; Wang, Dong; Yang, Tianxing; Pan, Si-Yuan; Chen, Xiao-Wu; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, with a poor response to current chemotherapy. Danusertib is a pan-inhibitor of the Aurora kinases and a third-generation Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor with potent anticancer effects, but its antitumor effect and underlying mechanisms in the treatment of human gastric cancer are unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effects of danusertib on cell growth, apoptosis, autophagy, and epithelial to mesenchymal transition and the molecular mechanisms involved in human gastric cancer AGS and NCI-N78 cells. The results showed that danusertib had potent growth-inhibitory, apoptosis-inducing, and autophagy-inducing effects on AGS and NCI-N78 cells. Danusertib arrested AGS and NCI-N78 cells in G2/M phase, with downregulation of expression of cyclin B1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 and upregulation of expression of p21 Waf1/Cip1, p27 Kip1, and p53. Danusertib induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, with an increase in expression of proapoptotic protein and a decrease in antiapoptotic proteins in both cell lines. Danusertib induced release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol and triggered activation of caspase 9 and caspase 3 in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. Further, danusertib induced autophagy, with an increase in expression of beclin 1 and conversion of microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3-I) to LC3-II in both cell lines. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways as well as activation of 5′ AMP-activated protein kinase contributed to the proautophagic effect of danusertib in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. SB202191 and wortmannin enhanced the autophagy-inducing effect of danusertib in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. In addition, danusertib inhibited epithelial to mesenchymal transition with an increase in expression of E-cadherin and a decrease in expression

  11. Nuclear inclusions mimicking poly(A)-binding protein nuclear 1 inclusions in a case of inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia with a novel mutation in the valosin-containing protein gene.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Shiro; Shimizu, Toshio; Komori, Takashi; Mori-Yoshimura, Madoka; Minami, Narihiro; Hayashi, Yukiko K

    2016-07-01

    A middle-aged Japanese man presented with slowly progressive asymmetric weakness of legs and arm but had neither ptosis nor dysphagia. He had a family history of similar condition suggestive of autosomal dominant inheritance. A muscle biopsy showed mixture of neurogenic atrophy and myopathy with rimmed vacuoles. Furthermore we found intranuclear inclusions that had a fine structure mimicking that of inclusions reported in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). Immunohistochemical staining for polyadenylate-binding nuclear protein 1, which is identified within the nuclear inclusions of OPMD, demonstrated nuclear positivity in this case. However, OPMD was thought unlikely based on the clinical features and results of genetic analyses. Instead, a novel mutation in valosin-containing protein, c.376A>T (p.Ile126Phe), was revealed. A diagnosis of inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia was made. This is the first report of polyadenylate-binding nuclear protein 1-positive nuclear inclusions in the muscle of this condition. PMID:27209344

  12. Protein Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Sam K. C.

    Proteins are an abundant component in all cells, and almost all except storage proteins are important for biological functions and cell structure. Food proteins are very complex. Many have been purified and characterized. Proteins vary in molecular mass, ranging from approximately 5000 to more than a million Daltons. They are composed of elements including hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur. Twenty α-amino acids are the building blocks of proteins; the amino acid residues in a protein are linked by peptide bonds. Nitrogen is the most distinguishing element present in proteins. However, nitrogen content in various food proteins ranges from 13.4 to 19.1% (1) due to the variation in the specific amino acid composition of proteins. Generally, proteins rich in basic amino acids contain more nitrogen.

  13. Cmr1/WDR76 defines a nuclear genotoxic stress body linking genome integrity and protein quality control

    PubMed Central

    Gallina, Irene; Colding, Camilla; Henriksen, Peter; Beli, Petra; Nakamura, Kyosuke; Offman, Judith; Mathiasen, David P.; Silva, Sonia; Hoffmann, Eva; Groth, Anja; Choudhary, Chunaram; Lisby, Michael

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication stress is a source of genomic instability. Here we identify changed mutation rate 1 (Cmr1) as a factor involved in the response to DNA replication stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and show that Cmr1—together with Mrc1/Claspin, Pph3, the chaperonin containing TCP1 (CCT) and 25 other proteins—define a novel intranuclear quality control compartment (INQ) that sequesters misfolded, ubiquitylated and sumoylated proteins in response to genotoxic stress. The diversity of proteins that localize to INQ indicates that other biological processes such as cell cycle progression, chromatin and mitotic spindle organization may also be regulated through INQ. Similar to Cmr1, its human orthologue WDR76 responds to proteasome inhibition and DNA damage by relocalizing to nuclear foci and physically associating with CCT, suggesting an evolutionarily conserved biological function. We propose that Cmr1/WDR76 plays a role in the recovery from genotoxic stress through regulation of the turnover of sumoylated and phosphorylated proteins. PMID:25817432

  14. Plumbagin induces G2/M arrest, apoptosis, and autophagy via p38 MAPK- and PI3K/Akt/mTOR-mediated pathways in human tongue squamous cell carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Shu-Ting; Qin, Yiru; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhang, Xueji; Yang, Tianxin; Yang, Yin-Xue; Wang, Dong; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Plumbagin (5-hydroxy-2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone; PLB), a naturally occurring naphthoquinone isolated from the roots of Plumbaginaceae plants, has been reported to possess anticancer activities in both in vitro and in vivo studies, but the effect of PLB on tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC) is not fully understood. This study aimed to investigate the effects of PLB on cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, and autophagy, and the underlying mechanisms in the human TSCC cell line SCC25. The results have revealed that PLB exerted potent inducing effects on cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and autophagy in SCC25 cells. PLB arrested SCC25 cells at the G2/M phase in a concentration- and time-dependent manner with a decrease in the expression level of cell division cycle protein 2 homolog (Cdc2) and cyclin B1 and increase in the expression level of p21 Waf1/Cip1, p27 Kip1, and p53 in SCC25 cells. PLB markedly induced apoptosis and autophagy in SCC25 cells. PLB decreased the expression of the anti-apoptotic proteins B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xl) while increasing the expression level of the pro-apoptotic protein Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) in SCC25 cells. Furthermore, PLB inhibited phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) pathways as indicated by the alteration in the ratio of phosphorylation level over total protein expression level, contributing to the autophagy inducing effect. In addition, we found that wortmannin (a PI3K inhibitor) and SB202190 (a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK) strikingly enhanced PLB-induced autophagy in SCC25 cells, suggesting the involvement of PI3K- and p38 MAPK-mediated signaling pathways. Moreover, PLB induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and this effect was attenuated by l-glutathione (GSH) and n-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC). Taken

  15. Total protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003483.htm Total protein To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes ...

  16. Whey Protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... shows that taking whey protein in combination with strength training increases lean body mass, strength, and muscle size. ... grams/kg of whey protein in combination with strength training for 6-10 weeks. For HIV/AIDS-related ...

  17. Protein Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard-Blum, S.

    Proteins are key actors in the life of the cell, involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Since variations in the expression of messenger RNA are not systematically correlated with variations in the protein levels, the latter better reflect the way a cell functions. Protein microarrays thus supply complementary information to DNA chips. They are used in particular to analyse protein expression profiles, to detect proteins within complex biological media, and to study protein-protein interactions, which give information about the functions of those proteins [3-9]. They have the same advantages as DNA microarrays for high-throughput analysis, miniaturisation, and the possibility of automation. Section 18.1 gives a brief overview of proteins. Following this, Sect. 18.2 describes how protein microarrays can be made on flat supports, explaining how proteins can be produced and immobilised on a solid support, and discussing the different kinds of substrate and detection method. Section 18.3 discusses the particular format of protein microarrays in suspension. The diversity of protein microarrays and their applications are then reported in Sect. 18.4, with applications to therapeutics (protein-drug interactions) and diagnostics. The prospects for future developments of protein microarrays are then outlined in the conclusion. The bibliography provides an extensive list of reviews and detailed references for those readers who wish to go further in this area. Indeed, the aim of the present chapter is not to give an exhaustive or detailed analysis of the state of the art, but rather to provide the reader with the basic elements needed to understand how proteins are designed and used.

  18. Protein Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asmus, Elaine Garbarino

    2007-01-01

    Individual students model specific amino acids and then, through dehydration synthesis, a class of students models a protein. The students clearly learn amino acid structure, primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure in proteins and the nature of the bonds maintaining a protein's shape. This activity is fun, concrete, inexpensive and…

  19. Polyalanine-independent Conformational Conversion of Nuclear Poly(A)-binding Protein 1 (PABPN1)*

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Reno; Kühn, Uwe; Hause, Gerd; Schwarz, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy is a late-onset disease caused by an elongation of a natural 10-alanine segment within the N-terminal domain of the nuclear poly(A)-binding protein 1 (PABPN1) to maximally 17 alanines. The disease is characterized by intranuclear deposits consisting primarily of PABPN1. In previous studies, we could show that the N-terminal domain of PABPN1 forms amyloid-like fibrils. Here, we analyze fibril formation of full-length PABPN1. Unexpectedly, fibril formation was independent of the presence of the alanine segment. With regard to fibril formation kinetics and resistance against denaturants, fibrils formed by full-length PABPN1 had completely different properties from those formed by the N-terminal domain. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and limited proteolysis showed that fibrillar PABPN1 has a structure that differs from native PABPN1. Circumstantial evidence is presented that the C-terminal domain is involved in fibril formation. PMID:22570486

  20. A-type lamins regulate retinoblastoma protein function by promoting subnuclear localization and preventing proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brett R; Nitta, Ryan T; Frock, Richard L; Mounkes, Leslie; Barbie, David A; Stewart, Colin L; Harlow, Ed; Kennedy, Brian K

    2004-06-29

    The retinoblastoma protein (pRB) is a critical regulator of cell proliferation and differentiation and an important tumor suppressor. In the G(1) phase of the cell cycle, pRB localizes to perinucleolar sites associated with lamin A/C intranuclear foci. Here, we examine pRB function in cells lacking lamin A/C, finding that pRB levels are dramatically decreased and that the remaining pRB is mislocalized. We demonstrate that A-type lamins protect pRB from proteasomal degradation. Both pRB levels and localization are restored upon reintroduction of lamin A. Lmna(-/-) cells resemble Rb(-/-) cells, exhibiting altered cell-cycle properties and reduced capacity to undergo cell-cycle arrest in response to DNA damage. These findings establish a functional link between a core nuclear structural component and an important cell-cycle regulator. They further raise the possibility that altered pRB function may be a contributing factor in dystrophic syndromes arising from LMNA mutation. PMID:15210943

  1. Larger aggregates of mutant seipin in Celia's Encephalopathy, a new protein misfolding neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Riquelme, Alejandro; Sánchez-Iglesias, Sofía; Rábano, Alberto; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; Domingo-Jiménez, Rosario; Ramos, Adriana; Rosa, Isaac; Senra, Ana; Nilsson, Peter; García, Ángel; Araújo-Vilar, David; Requena, Jesús R

    2015-11-01

    Celia's Encephalopathy (MIM #615924) is a recently discovered fatal neurodegenerative syndrome associated with a new BSCL2 mutation (c.985C>T) that results in an aberrant isoform of seipin (Celia seipin). This mutation is lethal in both homozygosity and compounded heterozygosity with a lipodystrophic BSCL2 mutation, resulting in a progressive encephalopathy with fatal outcomes at ages 6-8. Strikingly, heterozygous carriers are asymptomatic, conflicting with the gain of toxic function attributed to this mutation. Here we report new key insights about the molecular pathogenic mechanism of this new syndrome. Intranuclear inclusions containing mutant seipin were found in brain tissue from a homozygous patient suggesting a pathogenic mechanism similar to other neurodegenerative diseases featuring brain accumulation of aggregated, misfolded proteins. Sucrose gradient distribution showed that mutant seipin forms much larger aggregates as compared with wild type (wt) seipin, indicating an impaired oligomerization. On the other hand, the interaction between wt and Celia seipin confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation (CoIP) assays, together with the identification of mixed oligomers in sucrose gradient fractionation experiments can explain the lack of symptoms in heterozygous carriers. We propose that the increased aggregation and subsequent impaired oligomerization of Celia seipin leads to cell death. In heterozygous carriers, wt seipin might prevent the damage caused by mutant seipin through its sequestration into harmless mixed oligomers. PMID:26282322

  2. Protein folds and protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, R. Dustin; Daggett, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    The classification of protein folds is necessarily based on the structural elements that distinguish domains. Classification of protein domains consists of two problems: the partition of structures into domains and the classification of domains into sets of similar structures (or folds). Although similar topologies may arise by convergent evolution, the similarity of their respective folding pathways is unknown. The discovery and the characterization of the majority of protein folds will be followed by a similar enumeration of available protein folding pathways. Consequently, understanding the intricacies of structural domains is necessary to understanding their collective folding pathways. We review the current state of the art in the field of protein domain classification and discuss methods for the systematic and comprehensive study of protein folding across protein fold space via atomistic molecular dynamics simulation. Finally, we discuss our large-scale Dynameomics project, which includes simulations of representatives of all autonomous protein folds. PMID:21051320

  3. Protein kinase A activation enhances β-catenin transcriptional activity through nuclear localization to PML bodies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mei; Mahoney, Emilia; Zuo, Tao; Manchanda, Parmeet K; Davuluri, Ramana V; Kirschner, Lawrence S

    2014-01-01

    The Protein Kinase A (PKA) and Wnt signaling cascades are fundamental pathways involved in cellular development and maintenance. In the osteoblast lineage, these pathways have been demonstrated functionally to be essential for the production of mineralized bone. Evidence for PKA-Wnt crosstalk has been reported both during tumorigenesis and during organogenesis, and the nature of the interaction is thought to rely on tissue and cell context. In this manuscript, we analyzed bone tumors arising from mice with activated PKA caused by mutation of the PKA regulatory subunit Prkar1a. In primary cells from these tumors, we observed relocalization of β-catenin to intranuclear punctuate structures, which were identified as PML bodies. Cellular redistribution of β-catenin could be recapitulated by pharmacologic activation of PKA. Using 3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts as a model system, we found that PKA phosphorylation sites on β-catenin were required for nuclear re-localization. Further, β-catenin's transport to the nucleus was accompanied by an increase in canonical Wnt-dependent transcription, which also required the PKA sites. PKA-Wnt crosstalk in the cells was bi-directional, including enhanced interactions between β-catenin and the cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) and transcriptional crosstalk between the Wnt and PKA signaling pathways. Increases in canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling were associated with a decrease in the activity of the non-canonical Wnt/Ror2 pathway, which has been shown to antagonize canonical Wnt signaling. Taken together, this study provides a new understanding of the complex regulation of the subcellular distribution of β-catenin and its differential protein-protein interaction that can be modulated by PKA signaling. PMID:25299576

  4. Endogenous lectins from cultured cells: nuclear localization of carbohydrate-binding protein 35 in proliferating 3T3 fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Moutsatsos, I K; Wade, M; Schindler, M; Wang, J L

    1987-01-01

    Proliferating 3T3 mouse fibroblasts contain higher levels of the lectin carbohydrate-binding protein 35 (CBP35) than do quiescent cultures of the same cells. An immunofluorescence study was carried out with a rabbit antiserum directed against CBP35 to map the cellular fluorescence distribution in a large population of cells under different growth conditions. This cytometric analysis showed that the lectin is predominantly localized in the nucleus of the proliferating cells. In quiescent 3T3 cultures, the majority of the cells lost their nuclear staining and underwent a general decrease in the overall fluorescence intensity. Stimulation of serum-starved quiescent 3T3 cells by the addition of serum resulted in an increase in the level of CBP35. The percentage of cells showing distinct punctate intranuclear staining reached a maximum at about the same time as the onset of the first S-phase of the cell cycle. All of these results suggest that CBP35 may be a protein whose presence in the nucleus, in discrete punctate distribution, is coordinated with the proliferation state of the cell. Images PMID:3306680

  5. Protein Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frauenfelder, Hans

    2011-03-01

    Proteins combine properties of solids, liquids, and glasses. Schrödinger anticipated the main features of biomolecules long ago by stating that they had to be solid-like, but able to assume many different conformations. Indeed proteins can assume a gigantic number of conformational substates with the same primary sequence but different conformations. The different substates are described as craters in a very-high-dimensional energy landscape. The energy landscape is organized in a hierarchy of tiers, craters within craters within craters. Protein motions are pictured as transition between substates - jumps from crater to crater. Initially we assumed that these jumps were controlled by internal barriers between substates, but experiments have shown that nature selected a different approach. Proteins are surrounded by one to two layers of water and are embedded in a bulk solvent. Structural motions of the protein are controlled by the alpha fluctuations in the solvent surrounding the protein. Some internal motions most likely involving side chains are controlled electrostatically by beta fluctuations in the hydration shell. The dynamics of proteins is consequently dominated by the environment (H. Frauenfelder et al. PNAS 106, 5129 (2009). One can speculate that this organization permits exchange of information among biomolecules. The energy landscape is not just organized into two tiers, alpha and beta, but cryogenic experiments have revealed more tiers and protein more properties similar to that of glasses. While proteins function at ambient temperatures, cryogenic studies are necessary to understand the physics relevant for biology.

  6. Ectopic expression of a polyalanine expansion mutant of poly(A)-binding protein N1 in muscle cells in culture inhibits myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qishan; Bag, Jnanankur

    2006-02-17

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is an adult-onset dominant genetic disease caused by the expansion of a GCG trinucleotide repeat that encodes the polyalanine tract at the N-terminus of the nuclear poly(A)-binding protein (PABPN1). Presence of intranuclear inclusions (INIs) containing PABPN1 aggregates in the skeletal muscles is the hallmark of OPMD. Here, we show that ectopic expression of the mutant PABPN1 produced INIs in a muscle cell culture model and reduced expression of several muscle-specific proteins including alpha-actin, slow troponin C, muscle creatine kinase, and two myogenic transcription factors, myogenin and MyoD. However, the levels of two upstream regulators of the MyoD gene, the Myf-5 and Pax3/7, were not affected, but both proteins co-localized with the PABPN1 aggregates in the mutant PABPN1 overexpressing cells. In these cells, although myogenin and MyoD levels were reduced, these two transcription factors did not co-localize with the mutant PABPN1 aggregates. Therefore, sequestration of Myf5 and Pax3/7 by the mutant PABPN1 aggregates was a specific effect on these factors. Our results suggest that trapping of these two important myogenic determinants may interfere with an early step in myogenesis. PMID:16378590

  7. Ectopic expression of a polyalanine expansion mutant of poly(A)-binding protein N1 in muscle cells in culture inhibits myogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qishan; Bag, Jnanankur . E-mail: jbag@uoguelph.ca

    2006-02-17

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is an adult-onset dominant genetic disease caused by the expansion of a GCG trinucleotide repeat that encodes the polyalanine tract at the N-terminus of the nuclear poly(A)-binding protein (PABPN1). Presence of intranuclear inclusions (INIs) containing PABPN1 aggregates in the skeletal muscles is the hallmark of OPMD. Here, we show that ectopic expression of the mutant PABPN1 produced INIs in a muscle cell culture model and reduced expression of several muscle-specific proteins including {alpha}-actin, slow troponin C, muscle creatine kinase, and two myogenic transcription factors, myogenin and MyoD. However, the levels of two upstream regulators of the MyoD gene, the Myf-5 and Pax3/7, were not affected, but both proteins co-localized with the PABPN1 aggregates in the mutant PABPN1 overexpressing cells. In these cells, although myogenin and MyoD levels were reduced, these two transcription factors did not co-localize with the mutant PABPN1 aggregates. Therefore, sequestration of Myf5 and Pax3/7 by the mutant PABPN1 aggregates was a specific effect on these factors. Our results suggest that trapping of these two important myogenic determinants may interfere with an early step in myogenesis.

  8. Alisertib induces cell cycle arrest and autophagy and suppresses epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition involving PI3K/Akt/mTOR and sirtuin 1-mediated signaling pathways in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Li, Hai; Yan, Xiao-Gang; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Yi, Zhi-Gang; He, Zhi-Xu; Pan, Shu-Ting; Yang, Yin-Xue; Wang, Zuo-Zheng; Zhang, Xueji; Yang, Tianxing; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the most aggressive cancer worldwide with poor response to current therapeutics. Alisertib (ALS), a potent and selective Aurora kinase A inhibitor, exhibits potent anticancer effects in preclinical and clinical studies; however, the effect and underlying mechanism of ALS in the pancreatic cancer treatment remain elusive. This study aimed to examine the effects of ALS on cell growth, autophagy, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and to delineate the possible molecular mechanisms in human pancreatic cancer PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells. The results showed that ALS exerted potent cell growth inhibitory, pro-autophagic, and EMT-suppressing effects in PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells. ALS remarkably arrested PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells in G2/M phase via regulating the expression of cyclin-dependent kinases 1 and 2, cyclin B1, cyclin D1, p21 Waf1/Cip1, p27 Kip1, and p53. ALS concentration-dependently induced autophagy in PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells, which may be attributed to the inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (Erk1/2) but activation of 5'-AMP-dependent kinase signaling pathways. ALS significantly inhibited EMT in PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells with an increase in the expression of E-cadherin and a decrease in N-cadherin. In addition, ALS suppressed the expression of sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) and pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor/visfatin in both cell lines with a rise in the level of acetylated p53. These findings show that ALS induces cell cycle arrest and promotes autophagic cell death but inhibits EMT in pancreatic cancer cells with the involvement of PI3K/Akt/mTOR, p38 MAPK, Erk1/2, and Sirt1-mediated signaling pathways. Taken together, ALS may represent a promising anticancer drug for pancreatic cancer treatment. More studies are warranted to investigate other molecular targets and

  9. Adenovirus-mediated FIR demonstrated TP53-independent cell-killing effect and enhanced antitumor activity of carbon-ion beams.

    PubMed

    Kano, M; Matsushita, K; Rahmutulla, B; Yamada, S; Shimada, H; Kubo, S; Hiwasa, T; Matsubara, H; Nomura, F

    2016-01-01

    Combination therapy of carbon-ion beam with the far upstream element-binding protein (FBP)-interacting repressor, FIR, which interferes with DNA damage repair proteins, was proposed as an approach for esophageal cancer treatment with low side effects regardless of TP53 status. In vivo therapeutic antitumor efficacy of replication-defective adenovirus (E1 and E3 deleted adenovirus serotype 5) encoding human FIR cDNA (Ad-FIR) was demonstrated in the tumor xenograft model of human esophageal squamous cancer cells, TE-2. Bleomycin (BLM) is an anticancer agent that introduces DNA breaks. The authors reported that Ad-FIR involved in the BLM-induced DNA damage repair response and thus applicable for other DNA damaging agents. To examine the effect of Ad-FIR on DNA damage repair, BLM, X-ray and carbon-ion irradiation were used as DNA damaging agents. The biological effects of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiotherapy used with carbon-ion irradiation are more expansive than low-LET conventional radiotherapy, such as X-rays or γ rays. High LET radiotherapy is suitable for the local control of tumors because of its high relative biological effectiveness. Ad-FIR enhanced BLM-induced DNA damage indicated by γH2AX in vitro. BLM treatment increased endogenous nuclear FIR expression in TE-2 cells, and P27Kip1 expression was suppressed by TP53 siRNA and BLM treatment. Further, Ad-FIRΔexon2, a dominant-negative form of FIR that lacks exon2 transcriptional repression domain, decreased Ku86 expression. The combination of Ad-FIR and BLM in TP53 siRNA increased DNA damage. Additionally, Ad-FIR showed synergistic cell toxicity with X-ray in vitro and significantly increased the antitumor efficacy of carbon-ion irradiation in the xenograft mouse model of TE-2 cells (P=0.03, Mann-Whitney's U-test) and was synergistic with the sensitization enhancement ratio (SER) value of 1.15. Therefore, Ad-FIR increased the cell-killing activity of the carbon-ion beam that avoids late

  10. Nuclear actions of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Robert C

    2015-09-10

    In addition to its actions outside the cell, cellular uptake and nuclear import of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) has been recognized for almost two decades, but knowledge of its nuclear actions has been slow to emerge. IGFBP-3 has a functional nuclear localization signal and interacts with the nuclear transport protein importin-β. Within the nucleus IGFBP-3 appears to have a role in transcriptional regulation. It can bind to the nuclear receptor, retinoid X receptor-α and several of its dimerization partners, including retinoic acid receptor, vitamin D receptor (VDR), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ). These interactions modulate the functions of these receptors, for example inhibiting VDR-dependent transcription in osteoblasts and PPARγ-dependent transcription in adipocytes. Nuclear IGFBP-3 can be detected by immunohistochemistry in cancer and other tissues, and its presence in the nucleus has been shown in many cell culture studies to be necessary for its pro-apoptotic effect, which may also involve interaction with the nuclear receptor Nur77, and export from the nucleus. IGFBP-3 is p53-inducible and in response to DNA damage, forms a complex with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), translocating to the nucleus to interact with DNA-dependent protein kinase. Inhibition of EGFR kinase activity or downregulation of IGFBP-3 can inhibit DNA double strand-break repair by nonhomologous end joining. IGFBP-3 thus has the ability to influence many cell functions through its interactions with intranuclear pathways, but the importance of these interactions in vivo, and their potential to be targeted for therapeutic benefit, require further investigation. PMID:26074086

  11. The implication and potential applications of high-mobility group box 1 protein in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sohun, Moonindranath

    2016-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a highly conserved, non-histone and ubiquitous chromosomal protein found enriched in active chromatin forming part of the high mobility group family of proteins and is encoded by the HMGB1 gene (13q12) in human beings. It has various intranuclear and extracellular functions. It plays an important role in the pathogenesis of many diseases including cancer. In 2012, there was approximately 1.67 million new breast cancer cases diagnosed which makes it the second most frequent cancer in the world after lung cancer (25% of all cancers) and the commonest cancer among women. Both pre-clinical and clinical studies have suggested that HMGB1 might be a useful target in the management of breast cancer. This review summarises the structure and functions of HMGB1 and its dual role in carcinogenesis both as a pro-tumorigenic and anti-tumorigenic factor. It also sums up evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies using breast cancer cell lines and samples which demonstrate its influence in radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormonal therapy in breast cancer. It may have particular importance in HER2 positive and metastatic breast cancer. It might pave the way for new breast cancer treatments through development of novel drugs, use of microRNAs (miRNAs), targeting breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) and breast cancer immunotherapy. It may also play a role in determining breast cancer prognosis. Thus HMGB1 may open up novel avenues in breast cancer management. PMID:27386491

  12. The implication and potential applications of high-mobility group box 1 protein in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sohun, Moonindranath; Shen, Huiling

    2016-06-01

    High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a highly conserved, non-histone and ubiquitous chromosomal protein found enriched in active chromatin forming part of the high mobility group family of proteins and is encoded by the HMGB1 gene (13q12) in human beings. It has various intranuclear and extracellular functions. It plays an important role in the pathogenesis of many diseases including cancer. In 2012, there was approximately 1.67 million new breast cancer cases diagnosed which makes it the second most frequent cancer in the world after lung cancer (25% of all cancers) and the commonest cancer among women. Both pre-clinical and clinical studies have suggested that HMGB1 might be a useful target in the management of breast cancer. This review summarises the structure and functions of HMGB1 and its dual role in carcinogenesis both as a pro-tumorigenic and anti-tumorigenic factor. It also sums up evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies using breast cancer cell lines and samples which demonstrate its influence in radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormonal therapy in breast cancer. It may have particular importance in HER2 positive and metastatic breast cancer. It might pave the way for new breast cancer treatments through development of novel drugs, use of microRNAs (miRNAs), targeting breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) and breast cancer immunotherapy. It may also play a role in determining breast cancer prognosis. Thus HMGB1 may open up novel avenues in breast cancer management. PMID:27386491

  13. ALS-associated peripherin spliced transcripts form distinct protein inclusions that are neuroprotective against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    McLean, Jesse R; Smith, Gaynor A; Rocha, Emily M; Osborn, Teresia M; Dib, Samar; Hayes, Melissa A; Beagan, Jonathan A; Brown, Tana B; Lawson, Tristan F S; Hallett, Penelope J; Robertson, Janice; Isacson, Ole

    2014-11-01

    Intracellular proteinaceous inclusions are well-documented hallmarks of the fatal motor neuron disorder amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The pathological significance of these inclusions remains unknown. Peripherin, a type III intermediate filament protein, is upregulated in ALS and identified as a component within different types of ALS inclusions. The formation of these inclusions may be associated with abnormal peripherin splicing, whereby an increase in mRNA retaining introns 3 and 4 (Per-3,4) leads to the generation of an aggregation-prone isoform, Per-28. During the course of evaluating peripherin filament assembly in SW-13 cells, we identified that expression of both Per-3,4 and Per-28 transcripts formed inclusions with categorically distinct morphology: Per-3,4 was associated with cytoplasmic condensed/bundled filaments, small inclusions (<10μM), or large inclusions (≥10μM); while Per-28 was associated with punctate inclusions in the nucleus and/or cytoplasm. We found temporal and spatial changes in inclusion morphology between 12 and 48h post-transfected cells, which were accompanied by unique immunofluorescent and biochemical changes of other ALS-relevant proteins, including TDP-43 and ubiquitin. Despite mild cytotoxicity associated with peripherin transfection, Per-3,4 and Per-28 expression increased cell viability during H2O2-mediated oxidative stress in BE(2)-M17 neuroblastoma cells. Taken together, this study shows that ALS-associated peripherin isoforms form dynamic cytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusions, effect changes in local endogenous protein expression, and afford cytoprotection against oxidative stress. These findings may have important relevance to understanding the pathophysiological role of inclusions in ALS. PMID:24907400

  14. Interfacial Protein-Protein Associations

    PubMed Central

    Langdon, Blake B.; Kastantin, Mark; Walder, Robert; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2014-01-01

    While traditional models of protein adsorption focus primarily on direct protein-surface interactions, recent findings suggest that protein-protein interactions may play a central role. Using high-throughput intermolecular resonance energy transfer (RET) tracking, we directly observed dynamic, protein-protein associations of bovine serum albumin on poly(ethylene glycol) modified surfaces. The associations were heterogeneous and reversible, and associating molecules resided on the surface for longer times. The appearance of three distinct RET states suggested a spatially heterogeneous surface – with areas of high protein density (i.e. strongly-interacting clusters) coexisting with mobile monomers. Distinct association states exhibited characteristic behavior, i.e. partial-RET (monomer-monomer) associations were shorter-lived than complete-RET (protein-cluster) associations. While the fractional surface area covered by regions with high protein density (i.e. clusters) increased with increasing concentration, the distribution of contact times between monomers and clusters was independent of solution concentration, suggesting that associations were a local phenomenon, and independent of the global surface coverage. PMID:24274729

  15. A112, a tamibarotene dimethylaminoethyl ester, may inhibit human leukemia cell growth more potently than tamibarotene.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chao; Zhang, Yu-Sheng; Cheng, Yan-Na; Xue, Xia; Xu, Wen-Fang; Qu, Xian-Jun

    2012-02-01

    A112 is a tamibarotene dimethylaminoethyl ester considered a candidate compound for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Our goal in this study was to evaluate the efficacy of anti-cancer activity, beginning by studying its inhibitory effects on leukemia cells and then comparing it to tamibarotene. A112 effectively inhibited the growth of HL-60 and NB4 cells as estimated by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The inhibitory effect of A112 was confirmed in mice in which A112 delayed the growth of HL-60 xenografts after 3 weeks' injection. The efficacy of A112 on leukemia cell growth was stronger than that of tamibarotene at the same dosage. The detection of A112 and tamibarotene in plasma of rats showed that A112 might sustain release of its hydrolysate tamibarotene, and the concentration was maintained at a higher level and for a longer time than that of tamibarotene injection. We studied the differentiation morphologies of leukemic cells exposed to A112 or tamibarotene. The number of differentiated NB4 cells was increased, suggesting that A112 possessed differentiation activity in the inhibition of leukemia growth. Further studies showed that the expression of CD11b, a marker of terminal granulocyte differentiation, was increased as estimated by flow cytometry with a direct immunofluorescence assay. A112 was found to induce the activation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p21(Waf1/cip1) and p27(Kip1) while cell growth was inhibited. These activities of A112 were greater than those of tamibarotene. The higher efficacy of A112 was also evidenced by induction of apoptosis in leukemia cells. A112 induced a greater number of annexin V-positive cells than did tamibarotene as measured by flow cytometry analysis. Treatment of mice with A112 resulted in stronger terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling

  16. The anti-erbB3 antibody MM-121/SAR256212 in combination with trastuzumab exerts potent antitumor activity against trastuzumab-resistant breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Elevated expression of erbB3 receptor has been reported to induce resistance to therapeutic agents, including trastuzumab in erbB2-overexpressing breast cancer. Our recent studies indicate that erbB3 interacts with both erbB2 and IGF-1 receptor to form a heterotrimeric complex in trastuzumab-resistant breast cancer cells. Herein, we investigate the antitumor activity of MM-121/SAR256212, a fully human anti-erbB3 antibody (Ab), against two erbB2-overexpressing breast cancer cell lines resistant to trastuzumab. Methods MTS-based proliferation assays were used to determine cell viability upon treatment of trastuzumab and/or MM-121/SAR256212. Cell cycle progression was examined by flow cytometric analysis. Western blot analyses were performed to determine the expression and activation of proteins. Tumor xenografts were established by inoculation of the trastuzumab-resistant BT474-HR20 cells into nude mice. The tumor-bearing mice were treated with trastuzumab and/or MM-121/SAR256212 via i.p injection to determine the Abs’ antitumor activity. Immunohistochemical analyses were carried out to study the Abs’ inhibitory effects on tumor cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in vivo. Results MM-121 significantly enhanced trastuzumab-induced growth inhibition in two sensitive and two resistant breast cancer cell lines. MM-121 in combination with trastuzumab resulted in a dramatic reduction of phosphorylated erbB3 (P-erbB3) and Akt (P-Akt) in the in vitro studies. MM-121 combined with trastuzumab did not induce apoptosis in the trastuzumab-resistant cell lines under our cell culture condition, rather induced cell cycle G1 arrest mainly associated with the upregulation of p27kip1. Interestingly, in the tumor xenograft model established from the trastuzumab-resistant cells, MM-121 in combination with trastuzumab as compared to either agent alone dramatically inhibited tumor growth correlated with a significant reduction of Ki67 staining and increase of

  17. miR-340 inhibits tumor cell proliferation and induces apoptosis by targeting multiple negative regulators of p27 in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, S; Risolino, M; Mandia, N; Talotta, F; Soini, Y; Incoronato, M; Condorelli, G; Banfi, S; Verde, P

    2015-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) control cell cycle progression by targeting the transcripts encoding for cyclins, CDKs and CDK inhibitors, such as p27(KIP1) (p27). p27 expression is controlled by multiple transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms, including translational inhibition by miR-221/222 and posttranslational regulation by the SCF(SKP2) complex. The oncosuppressor activity of miR-340 has been recently characterized in breast, colorectal and osteosarcoma tumor cells. However, the mechanisms underlying miR-340-induced cell growth arrest have not been elucidated. Here, we describe miR-340 as a novel tumor suppressor in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Starting from the observation that the growth-inhibitory and proapoptotic effects of miR-340 correlate with the accumulation of p27 in lung adenocarcinoma and glioblastoma cells, we have analyzed the functional relationship between miR-340 and p27 expression. miR-340 targets three key negative regulators of p27. The miR-340-mediated inhibition of both Pumilio family RNA-binding proteins (PUM1 and PUM2), required for the miR-221/222 interaction with the p27 3'-UTR, antagonizes the miRNA-dependent downregulation of p27. At the same time, miR-340 induces the stabilization of p27 by targeting SKP2, the key posttranslational regulator of p27. Therefore, miR-340 controls p27 at both translational and posttranslational levels. Accordingly, the inhibition of either PUM1 or SKP2 partially recapitulates the miR-340 effect on cell proliferation and apoptosis. In addition to the effect on tumor cell proliferation, miR-340 also inhibits intercellular adhesion and motility in lung cancer cells. These changes correlate with the miR-340-mediated inhibition of previously validated (MET and ROCK1) and potentially novel (RHOA and CDH1) miR-340 target transcripts. Finally, we show that in a small cohort of NSCLC patients (n=23), representative of all four stages of lung cancer, miR-340 expression inversely correlates with clinical

  18. miR-340 inhibits tumor cell proliferation and induces apoptosis by targeting multiple negative regulators of p27 in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Serena; Risolino, Maurizio; Mandia, Nadia; Talotta, Francesco; Soini, Ylermi; Incoronato, Mariarosaria; Condorelli, Gerolama; Banfi, Sandro; Verde, Pasquale

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) control cell cycle progression by targeting the transcripts encoding for cyclins, CDKs and CDK inhibitors, such as p27KIP1 (p27). p27 expression is controlled by multiple transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms, including translational inhibition by miR-221/222 and posttranslational regulation by the SCFSKP2 complex. The oncosuppressor activity of miR-340 has been recently characterized in breast, colorectal and osteosarcoma tumor cells. However, the mechanisms underlying miR-340-induced cell growth arrest have not been elucidated. Here we describe miR-340 as a novel tumor suppressor in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Starting from the observation that the growth-inhibitory and proapoptotic effects of miR-340 correlate with the accumulation of p27 in lung adenocarcinoma and glioblastoma cells, we have analyzed the functional relationship between miR-340 and p27 expression. miR-340 targets three key negative regulators of p27. The miR-340-mediated inhibition of both Pumilio-family RNA-binding proteins (PUM1 and PUM2), required for the miR-221/222 interaction with the p27 3′UTR, antagonizes the miRNA-dependent downregulation of p27. At the same time, miR-340 induces the stabilization of p27 by targeting SKP2, the key posttranslational regulator of p27. Therefore, miR-340 controls p27 at both translational and posttranslational levels. Accordingly, the inhibition of either PUM1 or SKP2 partially recapitulates the miR-340 effect on cell proliferation and apoptosis. In addition to the effect on tumor cell proliferation, miR-340 also inhibits intercellular adhesion and motility in lung cancer cells. These changes correlate with the miR-340-mediated inhibition of previously validated (MET and ROCK1) and potentially novel (RHOA and CDH1) miR-340 target transcripts. Finally, we show that in a small cohort of NSCLC patients (n=23), representative of all four stages of lung cancer, miR-340 expression inversely correlates with clinical

  19. Male breast cancer is not congruent with the female disease.

    PubMed

    Fentiman, Ian S

    2016-05-01

    It has become customary to extrapolate from the results of treatment trials for female breastcancer and apply them to males with the disease. In the absence of results from national and international randomised trials for male breast cancer (MBC) this appears superficially to be an appropriate response. Closer examination of available data reveals that aspects of the aetiology and treatment of MBC do not fit the simplistic model that men usually have endocrine sensitive tumours which behave like those in postmenopausal women. Most females and males with breast cancer have none of the recognised risk factors, indicating the gaps in our knowledge of the epidemiology of this disease. Several studies have compared epidemiological risk factors for MBC and female breast cancer (FBC) but many have been blighted by small numbers. In comparison with FBC there is a larger proportion of BRCA2 tumours, (occurring in 10% of MBC), and underrepresentation of BRCA1 tumours (found in only 1%), suggesting significant differences in the genetic aetiology of MBC and FBC. Genome-wide association studies in FBC reported single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 12 novel independent loci were consistently associated with disease but for MBC 2 SNPs had a significantly increased risk. Molecular profiles of matched cancers in males and females showed a gender-associated modulation of major processes including energy metabolism, regulation of translation, matrix remodelling and immune recruitment. Immunohistochemistry for kinase inhibitor proteins (KIPs) p27Kip1 and p21Waf1 indicate a significant difference in the immunostaining of tumours from male patients compared with females. MBC is almost always estrogen receptor positive (ER+ve) and so systemic treatment is usually endocrine. With evidence in FBC that aromatase inhibitors are more effective than tamoxifen in the postmenopausal it was seemingly logical that the same would be true for MBC. Results however suggest less efficacy with AIs

  20. Whey Protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... intolerance, for replacing or supplementing milk-based infant formulas, and for reversing weight loss and increasing glutathione ( ... allergic reactions compared to infants who receive standard formula. However, taking why protein might not be helpful ...

  1. Physical requirements and functional consequences of complex formation between the cytomegalovirus IE1 protein and human STAT2.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Steffen; Kaps, Julia; Czech, Nathalie; Paulus, Christina; Nevels, Michael

    2009-12-01

    Our previous work has shown that efficient evasion from type I interferon responses by human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) requires expression of the 72-kDa immediate-early 1 (IE1) protein. It has been suggested that IE1 inhibits interferon signaling through intranuclear sequestration of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 2 (STAT2) protein. Here we show that physical association and subnuclear colocalization of IE1 and STAT2 depend on short acidic and serine/proline-rich low-complexity motifs in the carboxy-terminal region of the 491-amino-acid viral polypeptide. These motifs compose an essential core (amino acids 373 to 420) and an adjacent ancillary site (amino acids 421 to 445) for STAT2 interaction that are predicted to form part of a natively unstructured domain. The presence of presumably "disordered" carboxy-terminal domains enriched in low-complexity motifs is evolutionarily highly conserved across all examined mammalian IE1 orthologs, and the murine cytomegalovirus IE1 protein appears to interact with STAT2 just like the human counterpart. A recombinant hCMV specifically mutated in the IE1 core STAT2 binding site displays hypersensitivity to alpha interferon, delayed early viral protein accumulation, and attenuated growth in fibroblasts. However, replication of this mutant virus is specifically restored by knockdown of STAT2 expression. Interestingly, complex formation with STAT2 proved to be entirely separable from disruption of nuclear domain 10 (ND10), another key activity of IE1. Finally, our results demonstrate that IE1 counteracts the antiviral interferon response and promotes viral replication by at least two distinct mechanisms, one depending on sequestration of STAT2 and the other one likely involving ND10 interaction. PMID:19812155

  2. Insights into the mechanism of cell death induced by saporin delivered into cancer cells by an antibody fusion protein targeting the transferrin receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Daniels-Wells, Tracy R; Helguera, Gustavo; Rodríguez, José A; Leoh, Lai Sum; Erb, Michael A; Diamante, Graciel; Casero, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Penichet, Manuel L

    2013-02-01

    We previously developed an antibody-avidin fusion protein (ch128.1Av) that targets the human transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) and exhibits direct cytotoxicity against malignant B cells in an iron-dependent manner. ch128.1Av is also a delivery system and its conjugation with biotinylated saporin (b-SO6), a plant ribosome-inactivating toxin, results in a dramatic iron-independent cytotoxicity, both in malignant cells that are sensitive or resistant to ch128.1Av alone, in which the toxin effectively inhibits protein synthesis and triggers caspase activation. We have now found that the ch128.1Av/b-SO6 complex induces a transcriptional response consistent with oxidative stress and DNA damage, a response that is not observed with ch128.1Av alone. Furthermore, we show that the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine partially blocks saporin-induced apoptosis suggesting that oxidative stress contributes to DNA damage and ultimately saporin-induced cell death. Interestingly, the toxin was detected in nuclear extracts by immunoblotting, suggesting the possibility that saporin might induce direct DNA damage. However, confocal microscopy did not show a clear and consistent pattern of intranuclear localization. Finally, using the long-term culture-initiating cell assay we found that ch128.1Av/b-SO6 is not toxic to normal human hematopoietic stem cells suggesting that this critical cell population would be preserved in therapeutic interventions using this immunotoxin. PMID:23085102

  3. A novel nuclear pore protein Nup133p with distinct roles in poly(A)+ RNA transport and nuclear pore distribution.

    PubMed Central

    Doye, V.; Wepf, R.; Hurt, E. C.

    1994-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive nucleoporin nup49-316 mutant cells accumulate poly(A)+ RNA inside the nucleus when shifted to restrictive temperature. We performed a synthetic lethal screen with this mutant allele to identify further components of the mRNA export machinery. A synthetic lethal mutant slv21 was isolated, which exhibited a ts phenotype and showed nuclear accumulation of poly(A)+ RNA at 37 degrees C. The wild-type gene complementing slv21 was cloned and sequenced. It encodes a novel protein Nup133p which is located at the nuclear pore complex. NUP133 is not an essential gene, but cells in which NUP133 is disrupted grow slowly at permissive temperatures and stop growing at 37 degrees C. Concomitant with the growth inhibition, nup133- cells accumulate poly(A)+ RNA inside the nucleus whereas nuclear import of a karyophilic reporter protein is not altered. Strikingly, nup133- cells display extensive clustering of nuclear pore complexes at a few sites on the nuclear envelope. However, the nuclear pore clustering phenotype and intranuclear accumulation of poly(A)+ RNA are not obligatorily linked, since an amino-terminally truncated Nup133p allows normal poly(A)+ RNA export, but does not complement the clustering phenotype of nup133- cells. Images PMID:7813444

  4. Designed protein-protein association.

    PubMed

    Grueninger, Dirk; Treiber, Nora; Ziegler, Mathias O P; Koetter, Jochen W A; Schulze, Monika-Sarah; Schulz, Georg E

    2008-01-11

    The analysis of natural contact interfaces between protein subunits and between proteins has disclosed some general rules governing their association. We have applied these rules to produce a number of novel assemblies, demonstrating that a given protein can be engineered to form contacts at various points of its surface. Symmetry plays an important role because it defines the multiplicity of a designed contact and therefore the number of required mutations. Some of the proteins needed only a single side-chain alteration in order to associate to a higher-order complex. The mobility of the buried side chains has to be taken into account. Four assemblies have been structurally elucidated. Comparisons between the designed contacts and the results will provide useful guidelines for the development of future architectures. PMID:18187656

  5. Protein Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation, growth and perfection of protein crystals will be overviewed along with crystal mechanical properties. The knowledge is based on experiments using optical and force crystals behave similar to inorganic crystals, though with a difference in orders of magnitude in growing parameters. For example, the low incorporation rate of large biomolecules requires up to 100 times larger supersaturation to grow protein, rather than inorganic crystals. Nucleation is often poorly reproducible, partly because of turbulence accompanying the mixing of precipitant with protein solution. Light scattering reveals fluctuations of molecular cluster size, its growth, surface energies and increased clustering as protein ages. Growth most often occurs layer-by-layer resulting in faceted crystals. New molecular layer on crystal face is terminated by a step where molecular incorporation occurs. Quantitative data on the incorporation rate will be discussed. Rounded crystals with molecularly disordered interfaces will be explained. Defects in crystals compromise the x-ray diffraction resolution crucially needed to find the 3D atomic structure of biomolecules. The defects are immobile so that birth defects stay forever. All lattice defects known for inorganics are revealed in protein crystals. Contribution of molecular conformations to lattice disorder is important, but not studied. This contribution may be enhanced by stress field from other defects. Homologous impurities (e.g., dimers, acetylated molecules) are trapped more willingly by a growing crystal than foreign protein impurities. The trapped impurities induce internal stress eliminated in crystals exceeding a critical size (part of mni for ferritin, lysozyme). Lesser impurities are trapped from stagnant, as compared to the flowing, solution. Freezing may induce much more defects unless quickly amorphysizing intracrystalline water.

  6. From microRNA functions to microRNA therapeutics: Novel targets and novel drugs in breast cancer research and treatment

    PubMed Central

    PIVA, ROBERTA; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; GAMBARI, ROBERTO

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) are a family of small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by the sequence-selective targeting of mRNAs, leading to translational repression or mRNA degradation, depending on the degree of complementarity with target mRNA sequences. miRNAs play a crucial role in cancer. In the case of breast tumors, several studies have demonstrated a correlation between: i) the expression profile of oncogenic miRNAs (oncomiRs) or tumor suppressor miRNAs and ii) the tumorigenic potential of triple-negative [estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and Her2/neu] primary breast cancers. Among the miRNAs involved in breast cancer, miR-221 plays a crucial role for the following reasons: i) miR-221 is significantly overexpressed in triple-negative primary breast cancers; ii) the oncosuppressor p27 Kip1 , a validated miR-221 target, is downregulated in aggressive cancer cell lines; and iii) the upregulation of a key transcription factor, Slug, appears to be crucial, since it binds to the miR-221/miR-222 promoter and is responsible for the high expression of the miR-221/miR-222 cluster in breast cancer cells. A Slug/miR-221 network has been suggested, linking miR-221 activity with the downregulation of a Slug repressor, leading to Slug/miR-221 upregulation and p27 Kip1 downregulation. Interference with this process can be achieved using antisense miRNA (antagomiR) molecules targeting miR-221, inducing the down-regulation of Slug and the upregulation of p27 Kip1 . PMID:23939688

  7. Hypersensitivity to contact inhibition provides a clue to cancer resistance of naked mole-rat.

    PubMed

    Seluanov, Andrei; Hine, Christopher; Azpurua, Jorge; Feigenson, Marina; Bozzella, Michael; Mao, Zhiyong; Catania, Kenneth C; Gorbunova, Vera

    2009-11-17

    The naked mole-rat is the longest living rodent with a maximum lifespan exceeding 28 years. In addition to its longevity, naked mole-rats have an extraordinary resistance to cancer as tumors have never been observed in these rodents. Furthermore, we show that a combination of activated Ras and SV40 LT fails to induce robust anchorage-independent growth in naked mole-rat cells, while it readily transforms mouse fibroblasts. The mechanisms responsible for the cancer resistance of naked mole-rats were unknown. Here we show that naked mole-rat fibroblasts display hypersensitivity to contact inhibition, a phenomenon we termed "early contact inhibition." Contact inhibition is a key anticancer mechanism that arrests cell division when cells reach a high density. In cell culture, naked mole-rat fibroblasts arrest at a much lower density than those from a mouse. We demonstrate that early contact inhibition requires the activity of p53 and pRb tumor suppressor pathways. Inactivation of both p53 and pRb attenuates early contact inhibition. Contact inhibition in human and mouse is triggered by the induction of p27(Kip1). In contrast, early contact inhibition in naked mole-rat is associated with the induction of p16(Ink4a). Furthermore, we show that the roles of p16(Ink4a) and p27(Kip1) in the control of contact inhibition became temporally separated in this species: the early contact inhibition is controlled by p16(Ink4a), and regular contact inhibition is controlled by p27(Kip1). We propose that the additional layer of protection conferred by two-tiered contact inhibition contributes to the remarkable tumor resistance of the naked mole-rat. PMID:19858485

  8. Two inhibitory systems and CKIs regulate cell cycle exit of mammalian cardiomyocytes after birth.

    PubMed

    Tane, Shoji; Okayama, Hitomi; Ikenishi, Aiko; Amemiya, Yuki; Nakayama, Keiichi I; Takeuchi, Takashi

    2015-10-16

    Mammalian cardiomyocytes actively proliferate during embryonic stages, following which they exit their cell cycle after birth, and the exit is maintained. Previously, we showed that two inhibitory systems (the G1-phase inhibitory system: repression of cyclin D1 expression; the M-phase inhibitory system: inhibition of CDK1 activation) maintain the cell cycle exit of mouse adult cardiomyocytes. We also showed that two CDK inhibitors (CKIs), p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1), regulate the cell cycle exit in a portion of postnatal cardiomyocytes. It remains unknown whether the two inhibitory systems are involved in the cell cycle exit of postnatal cardiomyocytes and whether p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1) also inhibit entry to M-phase. Here, we showed that more than 40% of cardiomyocytes entered an additional cell cycle by induction of cyclin D1 expression at postnatal stages, but M-phase entry was inhibited in the majority of cardiomyocytes. Marked cell cycle progression and endoreplication were observed in cardiomyocytes of p21(Cip1) knockout mice at 4 weeks of age. In addition, tri- and tetranucleated cardiomyocytes increased significantly in p21(Cip1) knockout mice. These data showed that the G1-phase inhibitory system and two CKIs (p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1)) inhibit entry to an additional cell cycle in postnatal cardiomyocytes, and that the M-phase inhibitory system and p21(Cip1) inhibit M-phase entry of cardiomyocytes which have entered the additional cell cycle. PMID:26363457

  9. 1, 25(OH)2D3 Inhibits Hepatocellular Carcinoma Development Through Reducing Secretion of Inflammatory Cytokines from Immunocytes

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jian; Ma, Zhenhua; Ma, Qingyong; Wu, Zheng; Fan, Ping; Zhou, Xiaojie; Chen, Lulu; Zhou, Shuang; Goltzman, David; Miao, Dengshun; Wu, Erxi

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies have indicated that low vitamin D activity is not only associated with an increased cancer risk and a more aggressive tumor growth, but also connected with an aggravated liver damage caused by chronic inflammation. Meanwhile, increasing evidence has demonstrated that 1,25(OH)2D3 (the most biologically active metabolite of vitamin D) can inhibit inflammatory response in some chronic inflammatory associated cancer, which is considered to have the anti-tumor potency. However, the interaction between 1,25(OH)2D3 and inflammation during hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) initiation and progression is not yet clear. Here, we report an anti-tumorigenesis effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 via decreasing inflammatory cytokine secretion in HCC and hypothesize the possible underlying mechanism. Firstly, we show that the enhanced tumor growth is associated with elevated inflammatory cytokine IL-6 and TNF-α in 1α(OH)ase gene-knockout mice. Secondly, 1,25(OH)2D3 can inhibit vitamin D receptor (VDR) shRNA interfered tumor cell growth through decreasing inflammatory cytokine secretion in vitro and in vivo. Finally, using p27kip1 gene knock-out mouse model, we demonstrate that the effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 in inhibiting immune cell related inflammatory cytokine secretion, exerts in a p27kip1 gene dependent way. Collectively, 1,25(OH)2D3 inhibits HCC development through up-regulating the expression of p27kip1 in immune cell and reducing inflammatory cytokine production. PMID:23992309

  10. Bacteriophage protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Häuser, Roman; Blasche, Sonja; Dokland, Terje; Haggård-Ljungquist, Elisabeth; von Brunn, Albrecht; Salas, Margarita; Casjens, Sherwood; Molineux, Ian; Uetz, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophages T7, λ, P22, and P2/P4 (from Escherichia coli), as well as ϕ29 (from Bacillus subtilis), are among the best-studied bacterial viruses. This chapter summarizes published protein interaction data of intraviral protein interactions, as well as known phage-host protein interactions of these phages retrieved from the literature. We also review the published results of comprehensive protein interaction analyses of Pneumococcus phages Dp-1 and Cp-1, as well as coliphages λ and T7. For example, the ≈55 proteins encoded by the T7 genome are connected by ≈43 interactions with another ≈15 between the phage and its host. The chapter compiles published interactions for the well-studied phages λ (33 intra-phage/22 phage-host), P22 (38/9), P2/P4 (14/3), and ϕ29 (20/2). We discuss whether different interaction patterns reflect different phage lifestyles or whether they may be artifacts of sampling. Phages that infect the same host can interact with different host target proteins, as exemplified by E. coli phage λ and T7. Despite decades of intensive investigation, only a fraction of these phage interactomes are known. Technical limitations and a lack of depth in many studies explain the gaps in our knowledge. Strategies to complete current interactome maps are described. Although limited space precludes detailed overviews of phage molecular biology, this compilation will allow future studies to put interaction data into the context of phage biology. PMID:22748812

  11. Recombinant protein production technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant protein production is an important technology for antibody production, biochemical activity study, and structural determination during the post-genomic era. Limiting factors in recombinant protein production include low-level protein expression, protein precipitation, and loss of protein...

  12. Targeting prostate cancer based on signal transduction and cell cycle pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, John T.; Lehmann, Brian D.; Terrian, David M.; Chappell, William H.; Stivala, Franca; Libra, Massimo; Martelli, Alberto M.; Steelman, Linda S.

    2008-01-01

    Prostate cancer remains a leading cause of death in men despite increased capacity to diagnose at earlier stages. After prostate cancer has become hormone independent, which often occurs after hormonal ablation therapies, it is difficult to effectively treat. Prostate cancer may arise from mutations and dysregulation of various genes involved in regulation signal transduction (e.g., PTEN, Akt, etc.,) and the cell cycle (e.g., p53, p21Cip1, p27Kip1, Rb, etc.,). This review focuses on the aberrant interactions of signal transduction and cell cycle genes products and how they can contribute to prostate cancer and alter therapeutic effectiveness. PMID:18594202

  13. Protein inference: A protein quantification perspective.

    PubMed

    He, Zengyou; Huang, Ting; Liu, Xiaoqing; Zhu, Peijun; Teng, Ben; Deng, Shengchun

    2016-08-01

    In mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics, protein quantification and protein identification are two major computational problems. To quantify the protein abundance, a list of proteins must be firstly inferred from the raw data. Then the relative or absolute protein abundance is estimated with quantification methods, such as spectral counting. Until now, most researchers have been dealing with these two processes separately. In fact, the protein inference problem can be regarded as a special protein quantification problem in the sense that truly present proteins are those proteins whose abundance values are not zero. Some recent published papers have conceptually discussed this possibility. However, there is still a lack of rigorous experimental studies to test this hypothesis. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of using protein quantification methods to solve the protein inference problem. Protein inference methods aim to determine whether each candidate protein is present in the sample or not. Protein quantification methods estimate the abundance value of each inferred protein. Naturally, the abundance value of an absent protein should be zero. Thus, we argue that the protein inference problem can be viewed as a special protein quantification problem in which one protein is considered to be present if its abundance is not zero. Based on this idea, our paper tries to use three simple protein quantification methods to solve the protein inference problem effectively. The experimental results on six data sets show that these three methods are competitive with previous protein inference algorithms. This demonstrates that it is plausible to model the protein inference problem as a special protein quantification task, which opens the door of devising more effective protein inference algorithms from a quantification perspective. The source codes of our methods are available at: http://code.google.com/p/protein-inference/. PMID:26935399

  14. Quantitative analysis and clinico-pathological correlations of different dipeptide repeat protein pathologies in C9ORF72 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Ian R A; Frick, Petra; Grässer, Friedrich A; Gendron, Tania F; Petrucelli, Leonard; Cashman, Neil R; Edbauer, Dieter; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Prudlo, Johannes; Troost, Dirk; Neumann, Manuela

    2015-12-01

    Hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9ORF72 is the most common genetic cause of frontotemporal dementia and motor neuron disease. One consequence of the mutation is the formation of different potentially toxic polypeptides composed of dipeptide repeats (DPR) (poly-GA, -GP, -GR, -PA, -PR) generated by repeat-associated non-ATG (RAN) translation. While previous studies focusing on poly-GA pathology have failed to detect any clinico-pathological correlations in C9ORF72 mutation cases, recent data from animal and cell culture models suggested that it may be only specific DPR species that are toxic and only when accumulated in certain intracellular compartments. Therefore, we performed a systematic clinico-pathological correlative analysis with counting of actual numbers of distinct types of inclusion (neuronal cytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusions, dystrophic neurites) for each DPR protein in relevant brain regions (premotor cortex, lower motor neurons) in a cohort of 35 C9ORF72 mutation cases covering the clinical spectrum from those with pure MND, mixed FTD/MND and pure FTD. While each DPR protein pathology had a similar pattern of anatomical distribution, the total amount of inclusions for each DPR protein varied remarkably (poly-GA > GP > GR > PR/PA), indicating that RAN translation seems to be more effective from sense than from antisense transcripts. Importantly, with the exception of moderate associations for the amount of poly-GA-positive dystrophic neurites with degeneration in the frontal cortex and total burden of poly-GA pathology with disease onset, no relationship was identified for any other DPR protein pathology with degeneration or phenotype. Biochemical analysis revealed a close correlation between insoluble DPR protein species and numbers of visible inclusions, while we did not find any evidence for the presence of soluble DPR protein species. Thus, overall our findings strongly argue against a role of DPR protein aggregation as major and

  15. Human C9ORF72 Hexanucleotide Expansion Reproduces RNA Foci and Dipeptide Repeat Proteins but Not Neurodegeneration in BAC Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Peters, Owen M; Cabrera, Gabriela Toro; Tran, Helene; Gendron, Tania F; McKeon, Jeanne E; Metterville, Jake; Weiss, Alexandra; Wightman, Nicholas; Salameh, Johnny; Kim, Juhyun; Sun, Huaming; Boylan, Kevin B; Dickson, Dennis; Kennedy, Zachary; Lin, Ziqiang; Zhang, Yong-Jie; Daughrity, Lillian; Jung, Chris; Gao, Fen-Biao; Sapp, Peter C; Horvitz, H Robert; Bosco, Daryl A; Brown, Solange P; de Jong, Pieter; Petrucelli, Leonard; Mueller, Christian; Brown, Robert H

    2015-12-01

    A non-coding hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the C9ORF72 gene is the most common mutation associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). To investigate the pathological role of C9ORF72 in these diseases, we generated a line of mice carrying a bacterial artificial chromosome containing exons 1 to 6 of the human C9ORF72 gene with approximately 500 repeats of the GGGGCC motif. The mice showed no overt behavioral phenotype but recapitulated distinctive histopathological features of C9ORF72 ALS/FTD, including sense and antisense intranuclear RNA foci and poly(glycine-proline) dipeptide repeat proteins. Finally, using an artificial microRNA that targets human C9ORF72 in cultures of primary cortical neurons from the C9BAC mice, we have attenuated expression of the C9BAC transgene and the poly(GP) dipeptides. The C9ORF72 BAC transgenic mice will be a valuable tool in the study of ALS/FTD pathobiology and therapy. PMID:26637797

  16. Developmental and adult expression patterns of the G-protein-coupled receptor GPR88 in the rat: Establishment of a dual nuclear-cytoplasmic localization.

    PubMed

    Massart, Renaud; Mignon, Virginie; Stanic, Jennifer; Munoz-Tello, Paola; Becker, Jerôme A J; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Darmon, Michèle; Sokoloff, Pierre; Diaz, Jorge

    2016-10-01

    GPR88 is a neuronal cerebral orphan G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that has been linked to various psychiatric disorders. However, no extensive description of its localization has been provided so far. Here, we investigate the spatiotemporal expression of the GPR88 in prenatal and postnatal rat tissues by using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. GPR88 protein was initially detected at embryonic day 16 (E16) in the striatal primordium. From E16-E20 to adulthood, the highest expression levels of both protein and mRNA were observed in striatum, olfactory tubercle, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, and neocortex, whereas in spinal cord, pons, and medulla GPR88 expression remains discrete. We observed an intracellular redistribution of GPR88 during cortical lamination. In the cortical plate of the developing cortex, GPR88 presents a classical GPCR plasma membrane/cytoplasmic localization that shifts, on the day of birth, to nuclei of neurons progressively settling in layers V to II. This intranuclear localization remains throughout adulthood and was also detected in monkey and human cortex as well as in the amygdala and hypothalamus of rats. Apart from the central nervous system, GPR88 was transiently expressed at high levels in peripheral tissues, including adrenal cortex (E16-E21) and cochlear ganglia (E19-P3), and also at moderate levels in retina (E18-E19) and spleen (E21-P7). The description of the GPR88 anatomical expression pattern may provide precious functional insights into this novel receptor. Furthermore, the GRP88 nuclear localization suggests nonclassical GPCR modes of action of the protein that could be relevant for cortical development and psychiatric disorders. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2776-2802, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26918661

  17. Sleep Loss Activates Cellular Inflammation and Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT) Family Proteins in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Witarama, Tuff; Caudill, Marissa; Olmstead, Richard; Breen, Elizabeth Crabb

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disturbance and short sleep duration are associated with inflammation and related disorders including cardiovascular disease, arthritis, diabetes mellitus, and certain cancers. This study was undertaken to test the effects of experimental sleep loss on spontaneous cellular inflammation and activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) family proteins, which together promote an inflammatory microenvironment. In 24 healthy adults (16 females; 8 males), spontaneous production of IL-6 and TNF in monocytes and spontaneous intranuclear expression of activated STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), monocyte-, and lymphocyte populations were measured in the morning after uninterrupted baseline sleep, partial sleep deprivation (PSD, sleep period from 3 a.m. to 7 a.m.), and recovery sleep. Relative to baseline, spontaneous monocytic expression of IL-6 and TNF-α was significantly greater after PSD (P<0.02) and after recovery sleep (P<0.01). Relative to baseline, spontaneous monocytic expression of activated STAT 1 and STAT 5 was significantly greater after recovery sleep (P<0.007P<0.02, respectively) but not STAT 3 (P=0.09). No changes in STAT1, STAT3, or STAT5 were found in lymphocyte populations. Sleep loss induces activation of spontaneous cellular innate immunity and of STAT family proteins, which together map the dynamics of sleep loss on the molecular signaling pathways that regulate inflammatory and other immune responses. Treatments that target short sleep duration have the potential to constrain inflammation and reduce the risk for inflammatory disorders and some cancers in humans. PMID:25451613

  18. Crosstalk between G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and tyrosine kinase receptor (TXR) in the heart after morphine withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Almela, Pilar; García-Carmona, Juan-Antonio; Martínez-Laorden, Elena; Milanés, María-Victoria; Laorden, María-Luisa

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise a large family of membrane receptors involved in signal transduction. These receptors are linked to a variety of physiological and biological processes such as regulation of neurotransmission, growth, and cell differentiation among others. Some of the effects of GPCRs are known to be mediated by the activation of mitogen-activated extracellular kinase (MAPK) pathways. Cross-talk among various signal pathways plays an important role in activation of intracellular and intranuclear signal transduction cascades. Naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal leads to an up-regulation of adenyl cyclase-mediated signaling, resulting in high expression of protein kinase (PK) A. In addition, there is also an increased expression of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK), one member of MAPK. For this reason, the crosstalk between these GPCRs and receptors with tyrosine kinase activity (TKR) can be considered a possible mechanism for adaptive changes that occurs after morphine withdrawal. Morphine withdrawal activates ERK1/2 and phosphorylated tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) at Ser31 in the right and left ventricle. When N-(2-guanidinoethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (HA-1004), a PKA inhibitor was infused, the ability of morphine withdrawal to activate ERK, which phosphorylates TH at Ser31, was reduced. The present finding demonstrated that the enhancement of ERK1/2 expression and the phosphorylation state of TH at Ser31 during morphine withdrawal are dependent on PKA and suggest cross-talk between PKA and ERK1/2 transduction pathway mediating morphine withdrawal-induced activation of TH. Increasing understanding of the mechanisms that interconnect the two pathway regulated by GPCRs and TKRs may facilitate the design of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:24409147

  19. TMEM106B p.T185S regulates TMEM106B protein levels: implications for frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Alexandra M; Finch, Nicole A; Wojtas, Aleksandra; Baker, Matt C; Perkerson, Ralph B; Castanedes-Casey, Monica; Rousseau, Linda; Benussi, Luisa; Binetti, Giuliano; Ghidoni, Roberta; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R; Mackenzie, Ian R; Finger, Elizabeth; Boeve, Bradley F; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Dickson, Dennis W; Rademakers, Rosa

    2013-09-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is the second leading cause of dementia in individuals under age 65. In many patients, the predominant pathology includes neuronal cytoplasmic or intranuclear inclusions of ubiquitinated TAR DNA binding protein 43 (FTLD-TDP). Recently, a genome-wide association study identified the first FTLD-TDP genetic risk factor, in which variants in and around the TMEM106B gene (top SNP rs1990622) were significantly associated with FTLD-TDP risk. Intriguingly, the most significant association was in FTLD-TDP patients carrying progranulin (GRN) mutations. Here, we investigated to what extent the coding variant, rs3173615 (p.T185S) in linkage disequilibrium with rs1990622, affects progranulin protein (PGRN) biology and transmembrane protein 106 B (TMEM106B) regulation. First, we confirmed the association of TMEM106B variants with FTLD-TDP in a new cohort of GRN mutation carriers. We next generated and characterized a TMEM106B-specific antibody for investigation of this protein. Enzyme-linked immunoassay analysis of progranulin protein levels showed similar effects upon T185 and S185 TMEM106B over-expression. However, over-expression of T185 consistently led to higher TMEM106B protein levels than S185. Cycloheximide treatment experiments revealed that S185 degrades faster than T185 TMEM106B, potentially due to differences in N-glycosylation at residue N183. Together, our results provide a potential mechanism by which TMEM106B variants lead to differences in FTLD-TDP risk. We studied the p.T185S TMEM106B genetic variant previously implicated in frontotemporal dementia with TAR DNA binding protein 43 pathology caused by progranulin mutations. Our cell culture studies provide evidence that the protective S185 isoform is degraded more rapidly than T185 TMEM106B, potentially due to differences in glycosylation. These findings suggest that low TMEM106B levels might protect against FTLD-TDP in these patients. PMID:23742080

  20. Localization of BRCA1 protein in breast cancer tissue and cell lines with mutations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene (BRCA1) encodes a tumor suppressor. The BRCA1 protein is found primarily in cell nuclei and plays an important role in the DNA damage response and transcriptional regulation. Deficiencies in DNA repair capabilities have been associated with higher histopathological grade and worse prognosis in breast cancer. Methods In order to investigate the subcellular distribution of BRCA1 in tumor tissue we randomly selected 22 breast carcinomas and tested BRCA1 protein localization in frozen and contiguous formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue, using pressure cooker antigen-retrieval and the MS110 antibody staining. To assess the impact of BRCA1 germline mutations on protein localization, we retrospectively tested 16 of the tumor specimens to determine whether they contained the common Ashkenazi Jewish founder mutations in BRCA1 (185delAG, 5382insC), and BRCA2 (6174delT). We also compared co-localization of BRCA1 and nucleolin in MCF7 cells (wild type) and a mutant BRCA1 cell line, HCC1937 (5382insC). Results In FFPE tissue, with MS110 antibody staining, we frequently found reduced BRCA1 nuclear staining in breast tumor tissue compared to normal tissue, and less BRCA1 staining with higher histological grade in the tumors. However, in the frozen sections, BRCA1 antibody staining showed punctate, intra-nuclear granules in varying numbers of tumor, lactating, and normal cells. Two mutation carriers were identified and were confirmed by gene sequencing. We have also compared co-localization of BRCA1 and nucleolin in MCF7 cells (wild type) and a mutant BRCA1 cell line, HCC1937 (5382insC) and found altered sub-nuclear and nucleolar localization patterns consistent with a functional impact of the mutation on protein localization. Conclusions The data presented here support a role for BRCA1 in the pathogenesis of sporadic and inherited breast cancers. The use of well-characterized reagents may lead to further

  1. Interfacing protein lysine acetylation and protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Hue T.; Uhrig, R. Glen; Nimick, Mhairi; Moorhead, Greg B.

    2012-01-01

    Recognition that different protein covalent modifications can operate in concert to regulate a single protein has forced us to re-think the relationship between amino acid side chain modifications and protein function. Results presented by Tran et al. 2012 demonstrate the association of a protein phosphatase (PP2A) with a histone/lysine deacetylase (HDA14) on plant microtubules along with a histone/lysine acetyltransferase (ELP3). This finding reveals a regulatory interface between two prevalent covalent protein modifications, protein phosphorylation and acetylation, emphasizing the integrated complexity of post-translational protein regulation found in nature. PMID:22827947

  2. Length, protein protein interactions, and complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Taison; Frenkel, Daan; Gupta, Vishal; Deem, Michael W.

    2005-05-01

    The evolutionary reason for the increase in gene length from archaea to prokaryotes to eukaryotes observed in large-scale genome sequencing efforts has been unclear. We propose here that the increasing complexity of protein-protein interactions has driven the selection of longer proteins, as they are more able to distinguish among a larger number of distinct interactions due to their greater average surface area. Annotated protein sequences available from the SWISS-PROT database were analyzed for 13 eukaryotes, eight bacteria, and two archaea species. The number of subcellular locations to which each protein is associated is used as a measure of the number of interactions to which a protein participates. Two databases of yeast protein-protein interactions were used as another measure of the number of interactions to which each S. cerevisiae protein participates. Protein length is shown to correlate with both number of subcellular locations to which a protein is associated and number of interactions as measured by yeast two-hybrid experiments. Protein length is also shown to correlate with the probability that the protein is encoded by an essential gene. Interestingly, average protein length and number of subcellular locations are not significantly different between all human proteins and protein targets of known, marketed drugs. Increased protein length appears to be a significant mechanism by which the increasing complexity of protein-protein interaction networks is accommodated within the natural evolution of species. Consideration of protein length may be a valuable tool in drug design, one that predicts different strategies for inhibiting interactions in aberrant and normal pathways.

  3. Expression pattern in retinal photoreceptors of POMGnT1, a protein involved in muscle-eye-brain disease

    PubMed Central

    Uribe, Mary Luz; Haro, Carmen; Campello, Laura; Cruces, Jesús; Martín-Nieto, José

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The POMGNT1 gene, encoding protein O-linked-mannose β-1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 1, is associated with muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB) and other dystroglycanopathies. This gene’s lack of function or expression causes hypoglycosylation of α-dystroglycan (α-DG) in the muscle and the central nervous system, including the brain and the retina. The ocular symptoms of patients with MEB include retinal degeneration and detachment, glaucoma, and abnormal electroretinogram. Nevertheless, the POMGnT1 expression pattern in the healthy mammalian retina has not yet been investigated. In this work, we address the expression of the POMGNT1 gene in the healthy retina of a variety of mammals and characterize the distribution pattern of this gene in the adult mouse retina and the 661W photoreceptor cell line. Methods Using reverse transcription (RT)–PCR and immunoblotting, we studied POMGNT1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels in various mammalian species, from rodents to humans. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy analyses were performed to characterize the distribution profile of its protein product in mouse retinal sections and in 661W cultured cells. The intranuclear distribution of POMT1 and POMT2, the two enzymes preceding POMGnT1 in the α-DG O-mannosyl glycosylation pathway, was also analyzed. Results POMGNT1 mRNA and its encoded protein were expressed in the neural retina of all mammals studied. POMGnT1 was located in the cytoplasmic fraction in the mouse retina and concentrated in the myoid portion of the photoreceptor inner segments, where the protein colocalized with GM130, a Golgi complex marker. The presence of POMGnT1 in the Golgi complex was also evident in 661W cells. However, and in contrast to retinal tissue, POMGnT1 additionally accumulated in the nucleus of the 661W photoreceptors. Colocalization was found within this organelle between POMGnT1 and POMT1/2, the latter associated with euchromatic regions of the nucleus. Conclusions

  4. An N-terminal nuclear localization sequence but not the calmodulin-binding domain mediates nuclear localization of nucleomorphin, a protein that regulates nuclear number in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Myre, Michael A; O'Day, Danton H

    2005-06-24

    Nucleomorphin is a novel nuclear calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein (CaMBP) containing an extensive DEED (glu/asp repeat) domain that regulates nuclear number. GFP-constructs of the 38 kDa NumA1 isoform localize as intranuclear patches adjacent to the inner nuclear membrane. The translocation of CaMBPs into nuclei has previously been shown by others to be mediated by both classic nuclear localization sequences (NLSs) and CaM-binding domains (CaMBDs). Here we show that NumA1 possesses a CaMBD (171EDVSRFIKGKLLQKQQKIYKDLERF195) containing both calcium-dependent-binding motifs and an IQ-like motif for calcium-independent binding. GFP-constructs containing only NumA1 residues 1-129, lacking the DEED and CaMBDs, still localized as patches at the internal periphery of nuclei thus ruling out a direct role for the CaMBD in nuclear import. These constructs contained the amino acid residues 48KKSYQDPEIIAHSRPRK64 that include both a putative bipartite and classical NLS. GFP-bipartite NLS constructs localized uniformly within nuclei but not as patches. As with previous work, removal of the DEED domain resulted in highly multinucleate cells. However as shown here, multinuclearity only occurred when the NLS was present allowing the protein to enter nuclei. Site-directed mutation analysis in which the NLS was changed to 48EF49 abolished the stability of the GFP fusion at the protein but not RNA level preventing subcellular analyses. Cells transfected with the 48EF49 construct exhibited slowed growth when compared to parental AX3 cells and other GFP-NumA1 deletion mutants. In addition to identifying an NLS that is sufficient for nuclear translocation of nucleomorphin and ruling out CaM-binding in this event, this work shows that the nuclear localization of NumA1 is crucial to its ability to regulate nuclear number in Dictyostelium. PMID:15896312

  5. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Since the birth of modern day medicine, during the times of Hippocrates in ancient Greece, the profession has developed from the rudimentary classification of disease into a rigorous science with an inspiring capability to treat and cure. Scientific methodology has distilled clinical diagnostic tools from the early arts of prognosis, which used to rely as much on revelation and prophecy, as intuition and judgement [1]. Over the past decade, research into the interactions between proteins and nanosystems has provided some ingenious and apt techniques for delving into the intricacies of anatomical systems. In vivo biosensing has emerged as a vibrant field of research, as much of medical diagnosis relies on the detection of substances or an imbalance in the chemicals in the body. The inherent properties of nanoscale structures, such as cantilevers, make them well suited to biosensing applications that demand the detection of molecules at very low concentrations. Measurable deflections in cantilevers functionalised with antibodies provide quantitative indicators of the presence of specific antigens when the two react. Such developments have roused mounting interest in the interactions of proteins with nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes [3], which have demonstrated great potential as generic biomarkers. Plasmonic properties are also being exploited in sensing applications, such as the molecular sentinel recently devised by researchers in the US. The device uses the plasmonic properties of a silver nanoparticle linked to a Raman labelled hairpin DNA probe to signal changes in the probe geometry resulting from interactions with substances in the environment. Success stories so far include the detection of two specific genes associated with breast cancer [4]. A greater understanding of how RNA interference regulates gene expression has highlighted the potential of using this natural process as another agent for combating disease in personalized medicine. However, the

  6. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Since the birth of modern day medicine, during the times of Hippocrates in ancient Greece, the profession has developed from the rudimentary classification of disease into a rigorous science with an inspiring capability to treat and cure. Scientific methodology has distilled clinical diagnostic tools from the early arts of prognosis, which used to rely as much on revelation and prophecy, as intuition and judgement [1]. Over the past decade, research into the interactions between proteins and nanosystems has provided some ingenious and apt techniques for delving into the intricacies of anatomical systems. In vivo biosensing has emerged as a vibrant field of research, as much of medical diagnosis relies on the detection of substances or an imbalance in the chemicals in the body. The inherent properties of nanoscale structures, such as cantilevers, make them well suited to biosensing applications that demand the detection of molecules at very low concentrations. Measurable deflections in cantilevers functionalised with antibodies provide quantitative indicators of the presence of specific antigens when the two react. Such developments have roused mounting interest in the interactions of proteins with nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes [3], which have demonstrated great potential as generic biomarkers. Plasmonic properties are also being exploited in sensing applications, such as the molecular sentinel recently devised by researchers in the US. The device uses the plasmonic properties of a silver nanoparticle linked to a Raman labelled hairpin DNA probe to signal changes in the probe geometry resulting from interactions with substances in the environment. Success stories so far include the detection of two specific genes associated with breast cancer [4]. A greater understanding of how RNA interference regulates gene expression has highlighted the potential of using this natural process as another agent for combating disease in personalized medicine. However, the

  7. Shotgun protein sequencing.

    SciTech Connect

    Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Heffelfinger, Grant S.

    2009-06-01

    A novel experimental and computational technique based on multiple enzymatic digestion of a protein or protein mixture that reconstructs protein sequences from sequences of overlapping peptides is described in this SAND report. This approach, analogous to shotgun sequencing of DNA, is to be used to sequence alternative spliced proteins, to identify post-translational modifications, and to sequence genetically engineered proteins.

  8. Protein Crystal Based Nanomaterials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Jeffrey A.; VanRoey, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on a NASA Grant. It concerns a description of work done, which includes: (1) Protein crystals cross-linked to form fibers; (2) Engineering of protein to favor crystallization; (3) Better knowledge-based potentials for protein-protein contacts; (4) Simulation of protein crystallization.

  9. Protein folding, protein homeostasis, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Van Drie, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Proteins fold into their functional 3-dimensional structures from a linear amino acid sequence. In vitro this process is spontaneous; while in vivo it is orchestrated by a specialized set of proteins, called chaperones. Protein folding is an ongoing cellular process, as cellular proteins constantly undergo synthesis and degradation. Here emerging links between this process and cancer are reviewed. This perspective both yields insights into the current struggle to develop novel cancer chemotherapeutics and has implications for future chemotherapy discovery. PMID:21272445

  10. The proteolysis of mitotic cyclins in mammalian cells persists from the end of mitosis until the onset of S phase.

    PubMed

    Brandeis, M; Hunt, T

    1996-10-01

    We have studied how the cell cycle-specific oscillations of mitotic B-type cyclins are generated in mouse fibroblasts. A reporter enzyme comprising the N-terminus of a B-type cyclin fused to bacterial chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) was degraded at the end of mitosis like endogenous cyclins. Point mutations in the destruction box of this construct completely abolished its mitotic instability. When the destructible reporter was driven by the cyclin B2 promoter, CAT activity mimicked the oscillations in the level of the endogenous cyclin B2. These oscillations were largely conserved when the reporter was transcribed constitutively from the SV40 promoter. Pulse-chase experiments or addition of the proteasome inhibitors lactacystin and ALLN showed that cyclin synthesis continued after the end of mitosis. The destruction box-specific degradation of cyclins normally ceases at the onset of S phase, and is active in fibroblasts arrested in G0 and in differentiated C2 myoblasts. We were able to reproduce this proteolysis in vitro in extracts of synchronized cells. Extracts of G1 cells degraded cyclin B1 whereas p27Kip1 was stable, in contrast, cyclin B1 remained stable and p27Kip1 was degraded in extracts of S phase cells. PMID:8895573

  11. Over-expression of CKS1B activates both MEK/ERK and JAK/STAT3 signaling pathways and promotes myeloma cell drug-resistance

    PubMed Central

    Zangari, Maurizio; Xu, Hongwei; Cao, Thai M.; Xu, Chunjiao; Wu, Yong; Xiao, Fang; Liu, Yinghong; Yang, Ye; Salama, Mohamed; Li, Guiyuan; Tricot, Guido; Zhan, Fenghuang

    2010-01-01

    Here we demonstrate the crucial role of CKS1B in multiple myeloma (MM) progression and define CKS1B-mediated SKP2/p27Kip1-independent down-stream signaling pathways. Forced-expression of CKS1B in MM cells increased cell multidrug-resistance. CKS1B activates STAT3 and MEK/ERK pathways. In contrast, SKP2 knockdown or p27Kip1 over-expression resulted in activation of the STAT3 and MEK/ERK pathways. Further investigations showed that BCL2 is a downstream target of MEK/ERK signaling. Stimulation of STAT3 and MEK/ERK signaling pathways partially abrogated CKS1B knockdown induced MM cell death and growth inhibition. Targeting STAT3 and MEK/ ERK signaling pathways by specific inhibitors induced significant MM cell death and growth inhibition in CKS1B-overexpressing MM cells and their combinations resulted in synergy. Thus, our findings provide a rationale for targeting STAT3 and MEK/ERK/ BCL2 signaling in aggressive CKS1B-overexpressing MM. PMID:20930946

  12. Glucose-Induced Oxidative Stress Reduces Proliferation in Embryonic Stem Cells via FOXO3A/β-Catenin-Dependent Transcription of p21(cip1).

    PubMed

    McClelland Descalzo, Darcie L; Satoorian, Tiffany S; Walker, Lauren M; Sparks, Nicole R L; Pulyanina, Polina Y; Zur Nieden, Nicole I

    2016-07-12

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs), which are derived from a peri-implantation embryo, are routinely cultured in medium containing diabetic glucose (Glc) concentrations. While pregnancy in women with pre-existing diabetes may result in small embryos, whether such high Glc levels affect ESC growth remains uncovered. We show here that long-term exposure of ESCs to diabetic Glc inhibits their proliferation, thereby mimicking in vivo findings. Molecularly, Glc exposure increased oxidative stress and activated Forkhead box O3a (FOXO3a), promoting increased expression and activity of the ROS-removal enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase and the cell-cycle inhibitors p21(cip1) and p27(kip1). Diabetic Glc also promoted β-catenin nuclear localization and the formation of a complex with FOXO3a that localized to the promoters of Sod2, p21(cip1), and potentially p27(kip1). Our results demonstrate an adaptive response to increases in oxidative stress induced by diabetic Glc conditions that promote ROS removal, but also result in a decrease in proliferation. PMID:27411103

  13. Aberrant activation of CaMKIIγ accelerates chronic myeloid leukemia blast crisis.

    PubMed

    Gu, Y; Zheng, W; Zhang, J; Gan, X; Ma, X; Meng, Z; Chen, T; Lu, X; Wu, Z; Huang, W; Xu, R

    2016-06-01

    Blast crisis (BC) is the final deadly phase of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), but its molecular basis remains poorly understood. Here, we show that CML BC is regulated by calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase IIγ (CaMKIIγ). Genetic deletion of CaMKIIγ greatly inhibits disease progression via selectively impairing the self-renewal of leukemia stem cells (LSCs) in mouse models, whereas overexpression of CaMKIIγ has the opposite effects. In human CML, phosphorylated CaMKIIγ abundance is significantly associated with BC. Moreover, CaMKIIγ phosphorylates and reduces the nuclear cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1, a critical brake that maintains LSC quiescence. These findings suggest that CaMKIIγ might be an important switch for the transition of CML BC and identify a unique mechanism by which CaMKIIγ promotes the self-renewal of LSCs by deceasing nuclear p27Kip1 to wake up dormant LSCs. Therefore, CaMKIIγ may provide a new therapeutic target to treat CML BC. PMID:27012864

  14. The ER membrane-anchored ubiquitin ligase Hrd1 is a positive regulator of T-cell immunity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuanming; Zhao, Fang; Qiu, Quan; Chen, Kun; Wei, Juncheng; Kong, Qingfei; Gao, Beixue; Melo-Cardenas, Johanna; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Jinping; Song, Jianxun; Zhang, Donna D.; Zhang, Jianing; Fan, Yunping; Li, Huabin; Fang, Deyu

    2016-01-01

    Identification of positive regulators of T-cell immunity induced during autoimmune diseases is critical for developing novel therapies. The endoplasmic reticulum resident ubiquitin ligase Hrd1 has recently emerged as a critical regulator of dendritic cell antigen presentation, but its role in T-cell immunity is unknown. Here we show that genetic deletion of Hrd1 in mice inhibits T-cell proliferation, production of IL-2, and differentiation of Th1 and Th17 cells, and consequently protects mice from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Hrd1 facilitates T-cell proliferation by the destruction of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27kip1, and deletion of p27kip1 in Hrd1-null T-cells rescues proliferative capacity but not the production of cytokines, including IL-2, IFN-γ and IL-17. T-cell expression of Hrd1 is higher in patients with multiple sclerosis than in healthy individuals, and knockdown of Hrd1 in human CD4+ T cells inhibits activation and differentiation to Th1 and Th17 cells. Our study identifies Hrd1 as a previously unappreciated positive regulator of T cells and implies that Hrd1 is a potential therapeutic target for autoimmune diseases. PMID:27417417

  15. Genetic insights into Map3k-dependent proliferative expansion of T cells.

    PubMed

    Suddason, Tesha; Gallagher, Ewen

    2016-08-01

    Mapks are important regulators of T cell proliferative expansion and cell cycle progression. Detailed genetic analysis of unconventional iNKT cells in both Map3k1(ΔKD) and Lck(Cre/+)Map3k1(f/f) mice demonstrated that Mekk1 (encoded by Map3k1) signaling activates Mapks to regulate Cdkn1b (encoding p27(Kip1)) expression and p27(Kip1)-dependent proliferative expansion in response to antigen. Mekk1 signaling and activation of E3 ubiquitin ligase Itch, by a phosphorylation-dependent conformational change, is also an important regulatory mechanism for the control of T helper cell cytokine production. Cdkn1b expression is regulated by Mekk1-dependent signaling in differentiated Th17 cells. Mekk1 is one of the 19 Ste11-like Map3ks, and Mekk1 signaling regulates iNKT cell proliferative expansion in response to glycolipid antigens and T cell homeostasis in the liver. Tak1 (encoded by Map3k7), a related Map3k to Mekk1, similarly regulates the proliferative expansion and homeostasis of T cells in the liver, and this illustrates the importance of multiple Map3ks for mammalian Mapk signaling. PMID:27246297

  16. Elevation of miR-221 and -222 in the internal mammary arteries of diabetic subjects and normalization with metformin.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Chasity B; Lightell, Daniel J; Moss, Stephanie C; Bates, Michael; Parrino, Patrick E; Woods, T Cooper

    2013-07-15

    Diabetes is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and is associated with increased intimal thickening and accelerated vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation. We measured the expression of two microRNAs that promote intimal thickening, miR-221/222, and mRNA encoding a downstream target, p27(Kip1), in internal mammary artery (IMA) segments collected from 37 subjects undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. The segments were stratified into three groups: non-diabetic subjects (ND), diabetic subjects not on metformin (DMMet-), and diabetic subjects on metformin (DMMet+). The DMMet- group exhibited a significant increase in miR-221/222 and decrease in p27(Kip1) mRNA compared to both the ND and DMMet+ groups. miR-221/222 levels inversely correlated with metformin dose. VSMCs isolated from the IMAs of the DMMet- group proliferate at a faster rate than those of the ND and DMMet+ groups. Further studies into the importance of miR-221/222 in the increased intimal thickening observed in diabetic subjects is warranted. PMID:23648338

  17. Ovarian cancer has frequent loss of heterozygosity at chromosome 12p12.3-13.1 (region of TEL and Kip1 loci) and chromosome 12q23-ter: evidence for two new tumour-suppressor genes.

    PubMed Central

    Hatta, Y.; Takeuchi, S.; Yokota, J.; Koeffler, H. P.

    1997-01-01

    Identification of the key genetic alterations leading to ovarian cancer is in its infancy. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based analysis of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) is a powerful method for detecting regions of altered tumour-suppressor genes. Focusing on chromosome 12, we examined 23 ovarian cancer samples for LOH using 31 highly polymorphic microsatellite markers and found the chromosomal localization of two putative tumour-suppressor genes. Two commonly deleted regions were 12p12.3-13.1 in 6/23 (26%) and 12q23-ter in 7/23 (30%) samples. LOH on chromosome 12 was more common in late-stage ovarian carcinomas. The region of LOH at 12p12.3-13.1 includes the genes that code for the ETS-family transcriptional factor, known as TEL, and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, known as p27Kip1. Mutational analysis of both TEL and p27Kip1 using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) showed no abnormalities, suggesting that the altered gene in this region is neither of these genes. Taken together, our data suggest that new tumour-suppressor genes in the region of chromosomes 12p12.3-13.1 and 12q23-ter may be involved in the development of ovarian cancer. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:9155043

  18. The ER membrane-anchored ubiquitin ligase Hrd1 is a positive regulator of T-cell immunity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuanming; Zhao, Fang; Qiu, Quan; Chen, Kun; Wei, Juncheng; Kong, Qingfei; Gao, Beixue; Melo-Cardenas, Johanna; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Jinping; Song, Jianxun; Zhang, Donna D; Zhang, Jianing; Fan, Yunping; Li, Huabin; Fang, Deyu

    2016-01-01

    Identification of positive regulators of T-cell immunity induced during autoimmune diseases is critical for developing novel therapies. The endoplasmic reticulum resident ubiquitin ligase Hrd1 has recently emerged as a critical regulator of dendritic cell antigen presentation, but its role in T-cell immunity is unknown. Here we show that genetic deletion of Hrd1 in mice inhibits T-cell proliferation, production of IL-2, and differentiation of Th1 and Th17 cells, and consequently protects mice from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Hrd1 facilitates T-cell proliferation by the destruction of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(kip1), and deletion of p27(kip1) in Hrd1-null T-cells rescues proliferative capacity but not the production of cytokines, including IL-2, IFN-γ and IL-17. T-cell expression of Hrd1 is higher in patients with multiple sclerosis than in healthy individuals, and knockdown of Hrd1 in human CD4(+) T cells inhibits activation and differentiation to Th1 and Th17 cells. Our study identifies Hrd1 as a previously unappreciated positive regulator of T cells and implies that Hrd1 is a potential therapeutic target for autoimmune diseases. PMID:27417417

  19. Astaxanthin Inhibits Proliferation of Human Gastric Cancer Cell Lines by Interrupting Cell Cycle Progression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Ha; Park, Jong-Jae; Lee, Beom Jae; Joo, Moon Kyung; Chun, Hoon Jai; Lee, Sang Woo; Bak, Young-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Astaxanthin is a carotenoid pigment that has antioxidant, antitumoral, and anti-inflammatory properties. In this in vitro study, we investigated the mechanism of anticancer effects of astaxanthin in gastric carcinoma cell lines. Methods The human gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines AGS, KATO-III, MKN-45, and SNU-1 were treated with various concentrations of astaxanthin. A cell viability test, cell cycle analysis, and immunoblotting were performed. Results The viability of each cancer cell line was suppressed by astaxanthin in a dose-dependent manner with significantly decreased proliferation in KATO-III and SNU-1 cells. Astaxanthin increased the number of cells in the G0/G1 phase but reduced the proportion of S phase KATO-III and SNU-1 cells. Phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was decreased in an inverse dose-dependent correlation with astaxanthin concentration, and the expression of p27kip-1 increased the KATO-III and SNU-1 cell lines in an astaxanthin dose-dependent manner. Conclusions Astaxanthin inhibits proliferation by interrupting cell cycle progression in KATO-III and SNU-1 gastric cancer cells. This may be caused by the inhibition of the phosphorylation of ERK and the enhanced expression of p27kip-1. PMID:26470770

  20. Split-Protein Systems: Beyond Binary Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Shekhawat, Sujan S.; Ghosh, Indraneel

    2011-01-01

    It has been estimated that 650,000 protein-protein interactions exist in the human interactome [1], a subset of all possible macromolecular partnerships that dictate life. Thus there is a continued need for the development of sensitive and user-friendly methods for cataloguing biomacromolecules in complex environments and for detecting their interactions, modifications, and cellular location. Such methods also allow for establishing differences in the interactome between a normal and diseased cellular state and for quantifying the outcome of therapeutic intervention. A promising approach for deconvoluting the role of macromolecular partnerships is split-protein reassembly, also called protein fragment complementation. This approach relies on the appropriate fragmentation of protein reporters, such as the green fluorescent protein or firefly luciferase, which when attached to possible interacting partners can reassemble and regain function, thereby confirming the partnership. Split-protein methods have been effectively utilized for detecting protein-protein interactions in cell-free systems, E. coli, yeast, mammalian cells, plants, and live animals. Herein, we present recent advances in engineering split-protein systems that allow for the rapid detection of ternary protein complexes, small molecule inhibitors, as well as a variety of macromolecules including nucleic acids, poly(ADP) ribose, and iron sulfur clusters. We also present advances that combine split-protein systems with chemical inducers of dimerization strategies that allow for regulating the activity of orthogonal split-proteases as well as aid in identifying enzyme inhibitors. Finally, we discuss autoinhibition strategies leading to turn-on sensors as well as future directions in split-protein methodology including possible therapeutic approaches. PMID:22070901

  1. Split-protein systems: beyond binary protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Sujan S; Ghosh, Indraneel

    2011-12-01

    It has been estimated that 650,000 protein-protein interactions exist in the human interactome (Stumpf et al., 2008), a subset of all possible macromolecular partnerships that dictate life. Thus there is a continued need for the development of sensitive and user-friendly methods for cataloguing biomacromolecules in complex environments and for detecting their interactions, modifications, and cellular location. Such methods also allow for establishing differences in the interactome between a normal and diseased cellular state and for quantifying the outcome of therapeutic intervention. A promising approach for deconvoluting the role of macromolecular partnerships is split-protein reassembly, also called protein fragment complementation. This approach relies on the appropriate fragmentation of protein reporters, such as the green fluorescent protein or firefly luciferase, which when attached to possible interacting partners can reassemble and regain function, thereby confirming the partnership. Split-protein methods have been effectively utilized for detecting protein-protein interactions in cell-free systems, Escherichia coli, yeast, mammalian cells, plants, and live animals. Herein, we present recent advances in engineering split-protein systems that allow for the rapid detection of ternary protein complexes, small molecule inhibitors, as well as a variety of macromolecules including nucleic acids, poly(ADP) ribose, and iron sulfur clusters. We also present advances that combine split-protein systems with chemical inducers of dimerization strategies that allow for regulating the activity of orthogonal split-proteases as well as aid in identifying enzyme inhibitors. Finally, we discuss autoinhibition strategies leading to turn-on sensors as well as future directions in split-protein methodology including possible therapeutic approaches. PMID:22070901

  2. Protein in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... basic structure of protein is a chain of amino acids. You need protein in your diet to help ... Protein foods are broken down into parts called amino acids during digestion. The human body needs a number ...

  3. Protein-losing enteropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007338.htm Protein-losing enteropathy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Protein-losing enteropathy is an abnormal loss of protein ...

  4. Protein electrophoresis - serum

    MedlinePlus

    ... digestive tract to absorb proteins ( protein-losing enteropathy ) Malnutrition Kidney disorder called nephrotic syndrome Scarring of the ... may indicate: Abnormally low level of LDL cholesterol Malnutrition Increased gamma globulin proteins may indicate: Bone marrow ...

  5. Silencing of OSBP-related protein 8 (ORP8) modifies the macrophage transcriptome, nucleoporin p62 distribution, and migration capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Beaslas, Olivier; Vihervaara, Terhi; Li, Jiwei; Laurila, Pirkka-Pekka; Yan, Daoguang; Olkkonen, Vesa M.

    2012-09-10

    ORP8 is an oxysterol/cholesterol binding protein anchored to the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear envelope, and is abundantly expressed in the macrophage. We created and characterized mouse RAW264.7 macrophages with ORP8 stably silenced using shRNA lentiviruses. A microarray transcriptome and gene ontology pathway analysis revealed significant alterations in several nuclear pathways and ones associated with centrosome and microtubule organization. ORP8 knockdown resulted in increased expression and altered subcellular distribution of an interaction partner of ORP8, nucleoporin NUP62, with an intranuclear localization aspect and association with cytoplasmic vesicular structures and lamellipodial edges of the cells. Moreover, ORP8 silenced cells displayed enhanced migration, and a more pronounced microtubule cytoskeleton than controls expressing a non-targeting shRNA. ORP8 was shown to compete with Exo70 for interaction with NUP62, and NUP62 knockdown abolished the migration enhancement of ORP8-silenced cells, suggesting that the endogenous ORP8 suppresses migration via binding to NUP62. As a conclusion, the present study reveals new, unexpected aspects of ORP8 function in macrophages not directly involving lipid metabolism, but rather associated with nuclear functions, microtubule organization, and migration capacity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phenotype of Raw264.7 macrophage with ORP8 silenced is characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ORP8 silencing alters mRNA levels of nuclear and microtubule/centrosome pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ORP8 silencing results in increased expression and altered distribution of NUP62. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ORP8 silenced macrophages show enhanced migration and altered microtubule cytoskeleton. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ORP8 competes in vitro with Exo70 for binding to NUP62.

  6. Domains mediate protein-protein interactions and nucleate protein assemblies.

    PubMed

    Costa, S; Cesareni, G

    2008-01-01

    Cell physiology is governed by an intricate mesh of physical and functional links among proteins, nucleic acids and other metabolites. The recent information flood coming from large-scale genomic and proteomic approaches allows us to foresee the possibility of compiling an exhaustive list of the molecules present within a cell, enriched with quantitative information on concentration and cellular localization. Moreover, several high-throughput experimental and computational techniques have been devised to map all the protein interactions occurring in a living cell. So far, such maps have been drawn as graphs where nodes represent proteins and edges represent interactions. However, this representation does not take into account the intrinsically modular nature of proteins and thus fails in providing an effective description of the determinants of binding. Since proteins are composed of domains that often confer on proteins their binding capabilities, a more informative description of the interaction network would detail, for each pair of interacting proteins in the network, which domains mediate the binding. Understanding how protein domains combine to mediate protein interactions would allow one to add important features to the protein interaction network, making it possible to discriminate between simultaneously occurring and mutually exclusive interactions. This objective can be achieved by experimentally characterizing domain recognition specificity or by analyzing the frequency of co-occurring domains in proteins that do interact. Such approaches allow gaining insights on the topology of complexes with unknown three-dimensional structure, thus opening the prospect of adopting a more rational strategy in developing drugs designed to selectively target specific protein interactions. PMID:18491061

  7. Drugging Membrane Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hang; Flynn, Aaron D

    2016-07-11

    The majority of therapeutics target membrane proteins, accessible on the surface of cells, to alter cellular signaling. Cells use membrane proteins to transduce signals into cells, transport ions and molecules, bind cells to a surface or substrate, and catalyze reactions. Newly devised technologies allow us to drug conventionally "undruggable" regions of membrane proteins, enabling modulation of protein-protein, protein-lipid, and protein-nucleic acid interactions. In this review, we survey the state of the art of high-throughput screening and rational design in drug discovery, and we evaluate the advances in biological understanding and technological capacity that will drive pharmacotherapy forward against unorthodox membrane protein targets. PMID:26863923

  8. Replication-competent influenza A virus that encodes a split-green fluorescent protein-tagged PB2 polymerase subunit allows live-cell imaging of the virus life cycle.

    PubMed

    Avilov, Sergiy V; Moisy, Dorothée; Munier, Sandie; Schraidt, Oliver; Naffakh, Nadia; Cusack, Stephen

    2012-02-01

    Studies on the intracellular trafficking of influenza virus ribonucleoproteins are currently limited by the lack of a method enabling their visualization during infection in single cells. This is largely due to the difficulty of encoding fluorescent fusion proteins within the viral genome. To circumvent this limitation, we used the split-green fluorescent protein (split-GFP) system (S. Cabantous, T. C. Terwilliger, and G. S. Waldo, Nat. Biotechnol. 23:102-107, 2005) to produce a quasi-wild-type recombinant A/WSN/33/influenza virus which allows expression of individually fluorescent PB2 polymerase subunits in infected cells. The viral PB2 proteins were fused to the 16 C-terminal amino acids of the GFP, whereas the large transcomplementing GFP fragment was supplied by transient or stable expression in cultured cells that were permissive to infection. This system was used to characterize the intranuclear dynamics of PB2 by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and to visualize the trafficking of viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs) by dynamic light microscopy in live infected cells. Following nuclear export, vRNPs showed a transient pericentriolar accumulation and intermittent rapid (∼1 μm/s), directional movements in the cytoplasm, dependent on both microtubules and actin filaments. Our data establish the potential of split-GFP-based recombinant viruses for the tracking of viral proteins during a quasi-wild-type infection. This new virus, or adaptations of it, will be of use in elucidating many aspects of influenza virus host cell interactions as well as in screening for new antiviral compounds. Furthermore, the existence of cell lines stably expressing the complementing GFP fragment will facilitate applications to many other viral and nonviral systems. PMID:22114331

  9. Protein sensing with engineered protein nanopores*

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Mohammad M.; Movileanu, Liviu

    2013-01-01

    The use of nanopores is a powerful new frontier in single-molecule sciences. Nanopores have been used effectively in exploring various biophysical features of small polypeptides and proteins, such as their folding state and structure, ligand interactions, and enzymatic activity. In particular, the α-hemolysin protein pore (αHL) has been used extensively for the detection, characterization and analysis of polypeptides, because this protein nanopore is highly robust, versatile and tractable under various experimental conditions. Inspired by the mechanisms of protein translocation across the outer membrane translocases of mitochondria, we have shown the ability to use nanopore-probe techniques in controlling a single protein using engineered αHL pores. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for the preparation of αHL protein nanopores. Moreover, we demonstrate that placing attractive electrostatic traps is instrumental in tackling single-molecule stochastic sensing of folded proteins. PMID:22528256

  10. Nanotechnologies in protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Krizkova, Sona; Heger, Zbynek; Zalewska, Marta; Moulick, Amitava; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Protein microarray technology became an important research tool for study and detection of proteins, protein-protein interactions and a number of other applications. The utilization of nanoparticle-based materials and nanotechnology-based techniques for immobilization allows us not only to extend the surface for biomolecule immobilization resulting in enhanced substrate binding properties, decreased background signals and enhanced reporter systems for more sensitive assays. Generally in contemporarily developed microarray systems, multiple nanotechnology-based techniques are combined. In this review, applications of nanoparticles and nanotechnologies in creating protein microarrays, proteins immobilization and detection are summarized. We anticipate that advanced nanotechnologies can be exploited to expand promising fields of proteins identification, monitoring of protein-protein or drug-protein interactions, or proteins structures. PMID:26039143

  11. PREFACE: Protein protein interactions: principles and predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussinov, Ruth; Tsai, Chung-Jung

    2005-06-01

    Proteins are the `workhorses' of the cell. Their roles span functions as diverse as being molecular machines and signalling. They carry out catalytic reactions, transport, form viral capsids, traverse membranes and form regulated channels, transmit information from DNA to RNA, making possible the synthesis of new proteins, and they are responsible for the degradation of unnecessary proteins and nucleic acids. They are the vehicles of the immune response and are responsible for viral entry into the cell. Given their importance, considerable effort has been centered on the prediction of protein function. A prime way to do this is through identification of binding partners. If the function of at least one of the components with which the protein interacts is known, that should let us assign its function(s) and the pathway(s) in which it plays a role. This holds since the vast majority of their chores in the living cell involve protein-protein interactions. Hence, through the intricate network of these interactions we can map cellular pathways, their interconnectivities and their dynamic regulation. Their identification is at the heart of functional genomics; their prediction is crucial for drug discovery. Knowledge of the pathway, its topology, length, and dynamics may provide useful information for forecasting side effects. The goal of predicting protein-protein interactions is daunting. Some associations are obligatory, others are continuously forming and dissociating. In principle, from the physical standpoint, any two proteins can interact, but under what conditions and at which strength? The principles of protein-protein interactions are general: the non-covalent interactions of two proteins are largely the outcome of the hydrophobic effect, which drives the interactions. In addition, hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions play important roles. Thus, many of the interactions observed in vitro are the outcome of experimental overexpression. Protein disorder

  12. Protein sequence comparison and protein evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, W.R.

    1995-12-31

    This tutorial was one of eight tutorials selected to be presented at the Third International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology which was held in the United Kingdom from July 16 to 19, 1995. This tutorial examines how the information conserved during the evolution of a protein molecule can be used to infer reliably homology, and thus a shared proteinfold and possibly a shared active site or function. The authors start by reviewing a geological/evolutionary time scale. Next they look at the evolution of several protein families. During the tutorial, these families will be used to demonstrate that homologous protein ancestry can be inferred with confidence. They also examine different modes of protein evolution and consider some hypotheses that have been presented to explain the very earliest events in protein evolution. The next part of the tutorial will examine the technical aspects of protein sequence comparison. Both optimal and heuristic algorithms and their associated parameters that are used to characterize protein sequence similarities are discussed. Perhaps more importantly, they survey the statistics of local similarity scores, and how these statistics can both be used to improve the selectivity of a search and to evaluate the significance of a match. They them examine distantly related members of three protein families, the serine proteases, the glutathione transferases, and the G-protein-coupled receptors (GCRs). Finally, the discuss how sequence similarity can be used to examine internal repeated or mosaic structures in proteins.

  13. Sorghum and millet proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sorghum and millet proteins are an important source of dietary protein for significant numbers of people living throughout Africa and parts of Asia. Compared to other food proteins, such as those found in milk, eggs and wheat, little is known about the functionality of sorghum and millet proteins. ...

  14. Whey protein fractionation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concentrated whey protein products from cheese whey, such as whey protein concentrate (WPC) and whey protein isolate (WPI), contain more than seven different types of proteins: alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA), beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG), bovine serum albumin (BSA), immunoglobulins (Igs), lactoferrin ...

  15. Protein in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... protein. The basic structure of protein is a chain of amino acids. You need protein in your diet to help your body repair cells and make new ones. Protein is also important for growth and development in children, teens, and pregnant women.

  16. Techniques in protein methylation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaeho; Cheng, Donghang; Bedford, Mark T

    2004-01-01

    Proteins can be methylated on the side-chain nitrogens of arginine and lysine residues or on carboxy-termini. Protein methylation is a way of subtly changing the primary sequence of a peptide so that it can encode more information. This common posttranslational modification is implicated in the regulation of a variety of processes including protein trafficking, transcription and protein-protein interactions. In this chapter, we will use the arginine methyltransferases to illustrate different approaches that have been developed to assess protein methylation. Both in vivo and in vitro methylation techniques are described, and the use of small molecule inhibitors of protein methylation will be demonstrated. PMID:15173617

  17. Biochemical Approaches for Discovering Protein-Protein Interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein-protein interactions or protein complexes are indigenous to nearly all cellular processes, ranging from metabolism to structure. Elucidating both individual protein associations and complex protein interaction networks, while challenging, is an essential goal of functional genomics. For ex...

  18. Urine Protein and Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Urine Protein and Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: 24-Hour Urine Protein; Urine Total Protein; Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio; ...

  19. [Protein expression and purification].

    PubMed

    Růčková, E; Müller, P; Vojtěšek, B

    2014-01-01

    Production of recombinant proteins is essential for many applications in both basic research and also in medicine, where recombinant proteins are used as pharmaceuticals. This review summarizes procedures involved in recombinant protein expression and purification, including molecular cloning of target genes into expression vectors, selection of the appropriate expression system, and protein purification techniques. Recombinant DNA technology allows protein engineering to modify protein stability, activity and function or to facilitate protein purification by affinity tag fusions. A wide range of cloning systems enabling fast and effective design of expression vectors is currently available. A first choice of protein expression system is usually the bacteria Escherichia coli. The main advantages of this prokaryotic expression system are low cost and simplicity; on the other hand this system is often unsuitable for production of complex mammalian proteins. Protein expression mediated by eukaryotic cells (yeast, insect and mammalian cells) usually produces properly folded and posttranslationally modified proteins. How-ever, cultivation of insect and, especially, mammalian cells is time consuming and expensive. Affinity tagged recombinant proteins are purified efficiently using affinity chromatography. An affinity tag is a protein or peptide that mediates specific binding to a chromatography column, unbound proteins are removed during a washing step and pure protein is subsequently eluted. PMID:24945544

  20. Protein- protein interaction detection system using fluorescent protein microdomains

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2010-02-23

    The invention provides a protein labeling and interaction detection system based on engineered fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins that require fused interacting polypeptides to drive the association of the fragments, and further are soluble and stable, and do not change the solubility of polypeptides to which they are fused. In one embodiment, a test protein X is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 10, amino acids 198-214), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. A second test protein Y is fu