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Sample records for intraoperative radiotherapy combined

  1. Intraoperative Radiotherapy Combined With Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fu Shen; Lu Jiade; Zhang Qing Yang Zhe; Peng Lihua; Xiong, Fei

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) followed by concurrent chemotherapy and external beam RT (EBRT) in the treatment of locally advanced gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 97 consecutive and nonselected patients with newly diagnosed Stage T3, T4, or N+ adenocarcinoma of the stomach underwent gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection between March 2003 and October 2005. Of the 97 patients, 51 received adjuvant concurrent chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, docetaxel, and cisplatin) and EBRT (EBRT group) and 46 received IORT (dose range, 12-15 Gy) immediately after gastrectomy and lymph node dissection before concurrent chemoradiotherapy (EBRT+IORT group). Results: After a median follow-up of 24 months, the 3-year locoregional control rate was 77% and 63% in the two groups with or without IORT, respectively (p = 0.05). The 3-year overall survival and disease-free survival rate was 47% and 36% in the EBRT group and 56% and 44% in the EBRT+IORT group, respectively (p > 0.05). Multivariate analyses revealed that the use of IORT, presence of residual disease after surgery, and pN category were independent prognostic factors for locoregional control and that IORT, pN, and pT categories were independent prognostic factors for overall survival (p < 0.05). Four patients experienced Grade 3 or 4 late complications, but no significant difference was observed between the two groups. Conclusions: Radical gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection and IORT followed by adjuvant chemoradiotherapy appeared to be feasible and well-tolerated in the treatment of locally advanced gastric cancer. The addition of IORT to the trimodality treatment significantly improved the 3-year locoregional control rate.

  2. Intraoperative radiotherapy: the Japanese experience. [Betatron

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, M.; Takahashi, M.

    1981-07-01

    Clinical results of intraoperative radiotherapy (IOR) which have been obtained since 1964 in Japan were reviewed. In this radiotherapy a cancerocidal dose can be delivered safely to the lesions, since critical organs are shifted from the field so that the lesions may be exposed directly to radiation. Intraoperative radiotherapy has spread in Japan and the number of institutions in which this radiotherapy is performed has continued to increase to a total of 26 in 1979. The total number of patients treated was 717. It has been demonstrated that intraoperative radiotherapy has definite effects on locally advanced abdominal neoplasms and unresectable radioresistant tumors.

  3. Intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Norman R.; Pigott, Katharine H.; Brew-Graves, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Intra-operative radiotherapy (IORT) as a treatment for breast cancer is a relatively new technique that is designed to be a replacement for whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in selected women suitable for breast-conserving therapy. This article reviews twelve reasons for the use of the technique, with a particular emphasis on targeted intra-operative radiotherapy (TARGIT) which uses X-rays generated from a portable device within the operating theatre immediately after the breast tumour (and surrounding margin of healthy tissue) has been removed. The delivery of a single fraction of radiotherapy directly to the tumour bed at the time of surgery, with the capability of adding EBRT at a later date if required (risk-adaptive technique) is discussed in light of recent results from a large multinational randomised controlled trial comparing TARGIT with EBRT. The technique avoids irradiation of normal tissues such as skin, heart, lungs, ribs and spine, and has been shown to improve cosmetic outcome when compared with EBRT. Beneficial aspects to both institutional and societal economics are discussed, together with evidence demonstrating excellent patient satisfaction and quality of life. There is a discussion of the published evidence regarding the use of IORT twice in the same breast (for new primary cancers) and in patients who would never be considered for EBRT because of their special circumstances (such as the frail, the elderly, or those with collagen vascular disease). Finally, there is a discussion of the role of the TARGIT Academy in developing and sustaining high standards in the use of the technique. PMID:25083504

  4. Intraoperative Radiotherapy in Childhood Malignant Astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Sohail R.; Haddy, Theresa B.; Ashayeri, Ebrahim; Goldson, Alfred L.

    1984-01-01

    A 12-year-old black male patient with glioblastoma multiforme was treated with intraoperative radiotherapy followed by conventional external beam radiation and chemotherapy. The authors' clinical experience with these therapeutic measures is discussed. PMID:6330375

  5. Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) combined with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for soft-tissue sarcomas – a retrospective evaluation of the Homburg experience in the years 1995–2007

    PubMed Central

    Niewald, Marcus; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Licht, Norbert; Bleuzen, Caroline; Ruebe, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To retrospectively evaluate the results after a regimen of surgery, IORT (intraoperative radiotherapy), and EBRT (external beam radiotherapy) for soft-tissue sarcomas Methods 38 consecutive patients underwent IORT for soft-tissue sarcoma; 29 were treated for primary tumours, 9 for recurrences. There were 14 cases with liposarcomas, 8 with leiomyosarcomas, 7 with malignant fibrous histiocytomas. 27/38 tumours were located in the extremities, the remaining ones in the retroperitoneum or the chest. Radical resection was attempted in all patients; a R0-resection was achieved in 15/38 patients, R1 in 12/38 pats and R2 in 4/38 pats. IORT was performed using a J-125 source and a HDR (high dose rate) afterloading machine after suturing silicone flaps to the tumour bed. The total dose applied ranged from 8–15 Gy/0.5 cm tissue depth measured from the flap surface. After wound healing external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was applied in 31/38 patients with total doses of 23–56 Gy dependent on resection status and wound situation. The mean duration of follow-up was 2.3 years. Results A local recurrence was found in 10/36 patients, lymph node metastases in 2/35, and distant metastases in 6/35 patients. The actuarial local control rate was 63%/5 years. The overall survival rate was 57%/5 years. There was no statistically significant difference between the results after treatment for primaries or for recurrences. Late toxicity to the skin was found in 13/31 patients, wound healing problems in 5/31 patients. A neuropathy was never seen. Conclusion The combination of surgery, IORT, and EBRT yields favourable local control and survival data which are well within the range of the results reported in the literature. The complication rates, however, are considerable although the complications are not severe, they should be taken into account when therapy decisions are made. PMID:19709420

  6. Combination of external-beam radiotherapy with intraoperative electron-beam therapy is effective in incompletely resected pediatric malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Oertel, Susanne; Niethammer, Andreas G.; Krempien, Robert . E-mail: robert_krempien@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Roeder, Falk; Eble, Michael J.; Baer, Claudia; Huber, Peter E.; Kulozik, Andreas; Waag, Karl-Ludwig; Treiber, Martina; Debus, Juergen

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Intraoperative electron-beam radiotherapy (IOERT) has been applied for local dose escalation in over 1,400 patients in Heidelberg since 1991. Among these were 30 children, in 18 of whom IOERT was employed in radiation treatment with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) on account of incomplete resection. We address the question whether IOERT is able to compensate for microscopic or macroscopic tumor residue if employed in the overall radiation regimen. Methods and Materials: The data of the aforementioned 18 children were analyzed with regard to local recurrence, overall survival, and complication rates. All children suffered from either sarcomas or neuroblastomas. In all children, IOERT was employed for local dose escalation after or before EBRT. Results: After a median follow-up of 60.5 months, 15 of the treated children are alive. One local failure has been observed. Six children show clinically significant late morbidity, including the loss of a treated limb (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 4 [RTOG 4]), a severe nerve lesion (RTOG 3), an orthopedic complication (RTOG 2), a ureteral stenosis (not clinically significant), and a kidney hypotrophy (not clinically significant). In 1 child a fracture due to radionecrosis (RTOG 4) was diagnosed; however, in the follow-up, local tumor relapse was diagnosed as another possible reason for the fracture. Conclusions: Regarding the low incidence of local failure, IOERT seems to be able to compensate incomplete tumor resection in childhood sarcoma and neuroblastoma patients. The incidence of late morbidity is low enough to justify the employment of IOERT as part of the radiation treatment regimen for pediatric patients.

  7. Rationale for intraoperative radiotherapy in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Frank A; Wenz, Frederik; Petrecca, Kevin

    2016-09-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive adult primary brain cancer. Despite multimodal therapy, it is associated with a survival of less than two years. Greater than 85% of recurrences occur within the original area of surgery and radiotherapy, suggesting a potential for improved local treatments. In addition to cancer cell invasion beyond surgical margins, a plethora of postinjury pro-proliferative stimuli are released from local healing brain, which both protect and nourish remaining cancer cells. This review compiles preclinical and clinical evidence for a dedicated treatment of both residual cancer cells and regional microenvironment using intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). PMID:26824195

  8. Long-Term Results of Targeted Intraoperative Radiotherapy (Targit) Boost During Breast-Conserving Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, Jayant S.; Baum, Michael; Tobias, Jeffrey S.; Wenz, Frederik; Massarut, Samuele; Keshtgar, Mohammed; Hilaris, Basil; Saunders, Christobel; Williams, Norman R.; Brew-Graves, Chris; Corica, Tammy; Roncadin, Mario; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Suetterlin, Marc; Bulsara, Max; Joseph, David

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: We have previously shown that delivering targeted radiotherapy to the tumour bed intraoperatively is feasible and desirable. In this study, we report on the feasibility, safety, and long-term efficacy of TARGeted Intraoperative radioTherapy (Targit), using the Intrabeam system. Methods and Materials: A total of 300 cancers in 299 unselected patients underwent breast-conserving surgery and Targit as a boost to the tumor bed. After lumpectomy, a single dose of 20 Gy was delivered intraoperatively. Postoperative external beam whole-breast radiotherapy excluded the usual boost. We also performed a novel individualized case control (ICC) analysis that computed the expected recurrences for the cohort by estimating the risk of recurrence for each patient using their characteristics and follow-up period. Results: The treatment was well tolerated. The median follow up was 60.5 months (range, 10-122 months). Eight patients have had ipsilateral recurrence: 5-year Kaplan Meier estimate for ipsilateral recurrence is 1.73% (SE 0.77), which compares well with that seen in the boosted patients in the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer study (4.3%) and the UK STAndardisation of breast RadioTherapy study (2.8%). In a novel ICC analysis of 242 of the patients, we estimated that there should be 11.4 recurrences; in this group, only 6 recurrences were observed. Conclusions: Lumpectomy and Targit boost combined with external beam radiotherapy results in a low local recurrence rate in a standard risk patient population. Accurate localization and the immediacy of the treatment that has a favorable effect on tumour microenvironment may contribute to this effect. These long-term data establish the long-term safety and efficacy of the Targit technique and generate the hypothesis that Targit boost might be superior to an external beam boost in its efficacy and justifies a randomized trial.

  9. Intraoperative Boost Radiotherapy during Targeted Oncoplastic Breast Surgery: Overview and Single Center Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Richters, Lisa; Fridrich, Claudius; Markiefka, Birgid; Bongartz, Rudolf; Semrau, Robert; Mallmann, Peter; Kraemer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Breast-conserving surgery followed by whole-breast irradiation is the standard local therapy for early breast cancer. The international discussion of reduced importance of wider tumor-free resection margins than “tumor not touching ink” leads to the development of five principles in targeted oncoplastic breast surgery. IORT improves local recurrence risk and diminishes toxicity since there is less irradiation of healthy tissue. Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) can be delivered in two settings: an IORT boost followed by a conventional regimen of external beam radiotherapy or a single IORT dose. The data from TARGIT-A and ELIOT reinforce the conviction that intraoperative radiotherapy during breast-conserving surgery is a reliable alternative to conventional postoperative fractionated irradiation, but only in a carefully selected population at low risk of local recurrence. We describe our experiences with IORT boost (50 kV energy X-rays; 20 Gy) in combination with targeted oncoplastic breast surgery in a routine clinical setting. Our experiences demonstrate the applicability and reliability of combining IORT boost with targeted oncoplastic breast surgery in breast-conserving therapy of early breast cancer. PMID:25587453

  10. Targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) yields very low recurrence rates when given as a boost

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, Jayant S. . E-mail: j.s.vaidya@dundee.ac.uk; Baum, Michael; Tobias, Jeffrey S.; Massarut, Samuele; Wenz, Frederik; Murphy, Olive; Hilaris, Basil; Houghton, Joan B.Sc.; Saunders, Christobel; Corica, Tammy; Roncadin, Mario; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Melchaert, Frank; Keshtgar, Mohammed; Sainsbury, Richard; Douek, Michael; Harrison, Elly; Thompson, Alastair; Joseph, David

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: Patients undergoing breast-conserving surgery were offered boost radiotherapy with targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) using the Intrabeam system to test the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of the new approach. Methods and Materials: We treated 302 cancers in 301 unselected patients. This was not a low-risk group. One-third of patients (98/301) were younger than 51 years of age. More than half of the tumors (172, 57%) were between 1 cm and 2 cm, and one-fifth (62, 21%) were >2 cm; 29% (86) had a Grade 3 tumor and, in 29% (87), axillary lymph nodes contained metastasis. After primary surgery, 20 Gy was delivered intraoperatively to the surface of the tumor bed, followed by external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT), but excluding the usual boost. Results: The treatment was well tolerated. The follow-up ranged from 3 to 80 months (164 and 90 patients completed 2 and 3 years follow-up, respectively). Four patients (1.3%) had local recurrence. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of local recurrence is 2.6% (SE = 1.7) at 5 years. This compares favorably with the 4.3% recurrence rate in boosted patients from the EORTC boost study, in which only 8.1% patients were node-positive, as opposed to 29% in our series. Conclusion: Targeted intraoperative radiotherapy combined with EBRT results in a low local recurrence rate. This could be attributed to both accurate targeting and timeliness of the treatment. These data support the need for a randomized trial to test whether the TARGIT boost is superior to conventional external boost, especially in high-risk women.

  11. Radiation exposure of personnel during intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT): radiation protection aspects.

    PubMed

    Strigari, L; Soriani, A; Landoni, V; Teodoli, S; Bruzzaniti, V; Benassi, M

    2004-09-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) is a multidisciplinary procedure which combines two conventional methods of cancer treatment surgery and radiation therapy. The purpose is to deliver a large single dose to the surgically exposed tumor bed while minimizing doses to normal tissues. Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) is a technique which allows irradiating the patient directly after the surgical operation using a linear accelerator that can be situated in the operating room. For medical accelerators with energy over 10MeV the need to characterize the neutron spectra for this particular situation arises from the fact that, when neutron spectra is not fully known, it becomes necessary to be more cautious introducing a weight factor wR of 20 (maximum value). This leads to overesteem the equivalent dose due to neutrons and it indicates to introduce additional (mobile) shields for photon and neutrons radiation not easily achievable in an operating room. PMID:15595641

  12. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Parotid Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Zeidan, Youssef H.; Shiue, Kevin; Weed, Daniel; Johnstone, Peter A.; Terry, Colin; Freeman, Stephen; Krowiak, Edward; Borrowdale, Robert; Huntley, Tod; Yeh, Alex

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Our practice policy has been to provide intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) at resection to patients with head-and-neck malignancies considered to be at high risk of recurrence. The purpose of the present study was to review our experience with the use of IORT for primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland. Methods and Materials: Between 1982 and 2007, 96 patients were treated with gross total resection and IORT for primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland. The median age was 62.9 years (range, 14.3-88.1). Of the 96 patients, 33 had previously undergone external beam radiotherapy as a component of definitive therapy. Also, 34 patients had positive margins after surgery, and 40 had perineural invasion. IORT was administered as a single fraction of 15 or 20 Gy with 4-6-MeV electrons. The median follow-up period was 5.6 years. Results: Only 1 patient experienced local recurrence, 19 developed regional recurrence, and 12 distant recurrence. The recurrence-free survival rate at 1, 3, and 5 years was 82.0%, 68.5%, and 65.2%, respectively. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rate after surgery and IORT was 88.4%, 66.1%, and 56.2%, respectively. No perioperative fatalities occurred. Complications developed in 26 patients and included vascular complications in 7, trismus in 6, fistulas in 4, radiation osteonecrosis in 4, flap necrosis in 2, wound dehiscence in 2, and neuropathy in 1. Of these 26 patients, 12 had recurrent disease, and 8 had undergone external beam radiotherapy before IORT. Conclusions: IORT results in effective local disease control at acceptable levels of toxicity and should be considered for patients with primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland.

  13. Intraoperative Electron Radiotherapy for the Management of Aggressive Fibromatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Roeder, Falk; Timke, Carmen; Oertel, Susanne; Hensley, Frank W.; Bischof, Marc; Muenter, Marc W.; Weitz, Juergen; Buchler, Markus W.; Lehner, Burkhard; Debus, Juergen; Krempien, Robert

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: We analyzed our experience with intraoperative electron radiotherapy (IOERT) followed by moderate doses of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) after organ-sparing surgery in patients with primary or recurrent aggressive fibromatosis. Methods and Materials: Indication for IOERT and postoperative EBRT as an individual treatment approach to avoid mutilating surgical procedures was seen when complete surgical removal seemed to be unlikely or impossible. A total of 31 lesions in 30 patients were treated by surgery and IOERT with a median dose of 12 Gy. Median age was 31 years (range, 13-59 years). Resection status was close margin in six lesions, microscopically positive in 13, and macroscopically positive in 12. Median tumor size was 9 cm. In all, 25 patients received additional EBRT, with a median dose of 45 Gy (range, 36-54 Gy). Results: After a median follow-up of 32 months (range, 3-139 months), no disease-related deaths occurred. A total of five local recurrences were seen, resulting in actuarial 3-year local control rates of 82% overall and 91% inside the IOERT areas. Trends to improved local control were seen for older age (>31 years) and negative margins, but none of these factors reached significance. Perioperative complications were found in six patients, in particular as wound healing disturbances in five patients and venous thrombosis in one patient. Late toxicity was seen in five patients. Conclusion: Introduction of IOERT into a multimodal treatment approach in patients with aggressive fibromatosis is feasible with low toxicity and yielded good local control rates even in patients with microscopical or gross residual disease.

  14. Response of canine esophagus to intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, W.F.; Hoekstra, H.J.; Kinsella, T.J.; Barnes, M.; DeLuca, A.M.; Tochner, Z.; Pass, H.I.; Kranda, K.C.; Terrill, R.E.

    1988-09-01

    Tolerance of esophagus to intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) was investigated in dogs. Thirteen adult foxhounds were subjected to right thoractomy, mobilization of the intrathoracic esophagus, and IORT to a 6 cm full-thickness esophageal segment using 9 MeV electrons at doses of 0, 2,000, or 3,000 cGy. Dogs were followed clinically and were evaluated at regular intervals after treatment with fiberoptic esophagoscopy, barium swallows, and postmortem histologic evaluations. One sham-irradiated control dog showed no abnormalities during follow-up of 24 months. Seven dogs receiving 2,000 cGy IORT showed transient mild dysphagia and mild esophagitis, but no clinically or pathologically significant complications. Five dogs receiving 3,000 cGy demonstrated severe ulcerative esophagitis within 6 weeks of treatment which progressed to chronic ulcerative esophagitis with stricture formation by 9 months following IORT. One 3,000 cGy dog died at 13 months from an esophageal perforation. On the basis of a pilot experience using 13 experimental animals, it was concluded that intact canine esophagus tolerates IORT well to doses of 2,000 cGy, but doses of 3,000 cGy pose serious and potentially lethal risks. The clinical application of IORT to the treatment of human intrathoracic neoplasms requiring esophageal irradiation should be approached with caution, particularly at doses exceeding 2,000 cGy.

  15. Threshold dose for peripheral neuropathy following intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in a large animal model

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, T.J.; DeLuca, A.M.; Barnes, M.; Anderson, W.; Terrill, R.; Sindelar, W.F. )

    1991-04-01

    Radiation injury to peripheral nerve is a dose-limiting toxicity in the clinical application of intraoperative radiotherapy, particularly for pelvic and retroperitoneal tumors. Intraoperative radiotherapy-related peripheral neuropathy in humans receiving doses of 20-25 Gy is manifested as a mixed motor-sensory deficit beginning 6-9 months following treatment. In a previous experimental study of intraoperative radiotherapy-related neuropathy of the lumbro-sacral plexus, an approximate inverse linear relationship was reported between the intraoperative dose (20-75 Gy range) and the time to onset of hind limb paresis (1-12 mos following intraoperative radiotherapy). The principal histological lesion in irradiated nerve was loss of large nerve fibers and perineural fibrosis without significant vascular injury. Similar histological changes in irradiated nerves were found in humans. To assess peripheral nerve injury to lower doses of intraoperative radiotherapy in this same large animal model, groups of four adult American Foxhounds received doses of 10, 15, or 20 Gy to the right lumbro-sacral plexus and sciatic nerve using 9 MeV electrons. The left lumbro-sacral plexus and sciatic nerve were excluded from the intraoperative field to allow each animal to serve as its own control. Following treatment, a complete neurological exam, electromyogram, and nerve conduction studies were performed monthly for 1 year. Monthly neurological exams were performed in years 2 and 3 whereas electromyogram and nerve conduction studies were performed every 3 months during this follow-up period. With follow-up of greater than or equal to 42 months, no dog receiving 10 or 15 Gy IORT shows any clinical or laboratory evidence of peripheral nerve injury. However, all four dogs receiving 20 Gy developed right hind limb paresis at 8, 9, 9, and 12 mos following intraoperative radiotherapy.

  16. Intraoperative radiotherapy in early stage breast cancer: potential indications and evidence to date

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, A M

    2015-01-01

    Following early results of recent studies of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in the adjuvant treatment of patients with early breast cancer, the clinical utility of IORT is a subject of much recent debate within the breast oncology community. This review describes the intraoperative techniques available, the potential indications and the evidence to date pertaining to local control and toxicity. We also discuss any implications for current practice and future research. PMID:25734489

  17. Development of a Novel Method for Intraoperative Radiotherapy During Kyphoplasty for Spinal Metastases (Kypho-IORT)

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Frank; Greineck, Fabian; Clausen, Sven; Mai, Sabine; Obertacke, Udo; Reis, Tina; Wenz, Frederik

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Approximately 30% of patients with cancer receive bone metastases, of which 50% are in the spine. Approximately 20% present with unstable lesions requiring surgical intervention, followed by fractionated radiotherapy over 2-4 weeks to prevent early regrowth. Because of the limited survival time of patients with metastatic cancer, novel treatment concepts shortening the overall treatment time or hospitalization are desirable. In this study, we established a novel approach for intraoperative radiotherapy during kyphoplasty (Kypho-IORT), a method that combines stabilizing surgery and radiotherapy within one visit, after estimating the percentage of eligible patients for this treatment. Methods and Materials: To estimate the percentage of eligible patients, 53 planning CTs (897 vertebrae) of patients with spinal metastases were evaluated. The number of infiltrated vertebrae were counted and classified in groups eligible or not eligible for Kypho-IORT. The Kypho-IORT was performed in a donated body during a standard balloon kyphoplasty using the INTRABEAM system and specially designed applicators. A single dose of 10 Gy (in 10 mm) was delivered over 4 min to the vertebra. This was verified using two ionization chambers and a Monte Carlo simulation. Results: The estimation of eligible patients resulted in 34% of the evaluated patients, and thus 34% of patients with instable spinal metastases are suitable for Kypho-IORT. This study shows also that, using the approach presented here, it is possible to perform an IORT during kyphoplasty with an additional 15 min operation time. The measurement in the donated body resulted in a maximum dose of 3.8 Gy in the spinal cord. However, the Monte Carlo depth dose simulation in bone tissue showed 68% less dose to the prescription depth. Conclusion: We present for the first time a system using an x-ray source that can be used for single-dose IORT during kyphoplasty. The described Kypho-IORT can decrease the overall treatment

  18. Intraoperative radiotherapy with low energy photons in recurrent colorectal cancer: a single centre retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Skórzewska, Magdalena; Mielko, Jerzy; Kurylcio, Andrzej; Romanek, Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) may improve outcome of surgical treatment of recurrent colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility, safety and long-term results of surgical treatment of recurrent CRC with orthovolt IORT. Material and methods Fifty-nine consecutive CRC patients with local recurrence (LR), undergoing surgery, were included in the retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. The modified Wanebo classification was used to stage LR (Tr). Twenty-five (43%) patients received IORT using INTRABEAM® PRS 500. The complications were classified according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Results There were 32 males and 27 females, with a median age of 63 years. Multi-visceral resections were performed in 37 (63%) patients. Median hospitalization time after surgery with IORT was 7 days. One (1.7%) in-hospital postoperative death was reported. Grade 3/4 postoperative complications were found in 11 (19%) patients. Intraoperative radiotherapy had no effect on the postoperative hospitalization time, morbidity and mortality. Median survival after R0 resection was 32 months. Complete resection (R0), no synchronous liver metastases (M0), and no lateral and posterior pelvic wall involvement, were significant predictors of improved survival. Stage of LR was found to be an independent prognostic factor in the multivariate analysis (p = 0.03); Cox regression model). In patients with LR stage < Tr5, a 3-year overall survival (OS) rate was 52%. Conclusions Combination of surgical resection and orthovolt IORT is a safe and feasible procedure that does not increase the risk of postoperative complications or prolongs the hospital stay. Despite aggressive surgery supported by IORT, the advanced stage of LR is a limiting factor of long-term survival. PMID:27095940

  19. Clinical toxicity of peripheral nerve to intraoperative radiotherapy in a canine model

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, P.A.S.; DeLuca, A.M.; Terrill, R.E.

    1995-07-15

    The clinical late effects of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) on peripheral nerve were investigated in a foxhound model. Between 1982 and 1987, 40 animals underwent laparotomy with intraoperative radiotherapy of doses from 0-75 Gy administered to the right lumbosacral plexus. Subsequently, all animals were monitored closely and sacrificed to assess clinical effects to peripheral nerve. This analysis reports final clinical results of all animals, with follow-up to 5 years. All animals treated with {>=} 25 Gy developed ipsilateral neuropathy. An inverse relationship was noted between intraoperative radiotherapy dose and time to neuropathy, with an effective dose for 50% paralysis (ED{sub 50}) of 17.2 Gy. One of the animals treated with 15 Gy IORT developed paralysis, after a much longer latency than the other animals. Doses of 15 Gy delivered intraoperatively may be accompanied by peripheral neuropathy with long-term follow-up. This threshold is less than that reported with shorter follow-up. The value of ED{sub 50} determined here is in keeping with data from other animal trials, and from clinical trials in humans. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Histopathological effects of intraoperative radiotherapy on pancreas and adjacent tissues: a postmortem analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, H.J.; Restrepo, C.; Kinsella, T.J.; Sindelar, W.F.

    1988-02-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) has been utilized in the treatment of resectable and unresectable pancreatic carcinoma at the National Cancer Institute. Detailed autopsy analyses of the radiation effects on the pancreas and adjacent tissues were performed on 13 patients dying at various times following therapy. IORT can induce a progressive retroperitoneal fibrosis and fibrosis of the porta hepatis in patients with resectable pancreatic carcinoma. In unresectable pancreatic carcinoma, the major expression of intraoperative irradiation with external beam irradiation is a progressive fibrosis of the pancreas with vascular sclerosis, nerve degeneration, atrophy of acinar cells, and atypical changes in the ducts of the pancreas, as well as degenerative changes of the pancreatic tumor.

  1. Intraoperative Radiotherapy Versus Whole-Breast External Beam Radiotherapy in Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Zhou, Zhirui; Mei, Xin; Yang, Zhaozhi; Ma, Jinli; Chen, Xingxing; Wang, Junqi; Liu, Guangyu; Yu, Xiaoli; Guo, Xiaomao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There has not been a clear answer about the efficacy of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for women with early-stage breast cancer. The aim of this meta-analysis was to summarize the available evidence comparing the efficacy and safety of IORT with those of whole-breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for women with early-stage breast cancer. MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library were searched up to October 2014. Two authors independently conducted the literature selection and data extraction. Studies that compared IORT with whole-breast EBRT were included in the systematic review. IORT was defined as a single dose of irradiation to the tumor bed during breast-conserving surgery rather than whole-breast irradiation. Qualities of RCTs were evaluated according to the PEDro scale. Qualities of non-RCTs were evaluated according to the Methodological Index for Non-Randomized Studies (MINORS). The risk ratios (RRs) of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence, overall mortality, breast cancer mortality, non-breast cancer mortality, and distant metastasis were pooled using a random-effects model. Four studies with 5415 patients were included in this meta-analysis, including 2 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 2 non-RCTs. Ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was significantly higher in patients with IORT compared to those with whole-breast EBRT (RR 2.83, 95% CI 1.23–6.51), but with significant heterogeneity (I2 = 58.5%, P = 0.065). Comparing IORT with whole-breast EBRT, the pooled RRs for overall mortality, breast cancer mortality, non-breast cancer mortality, and distant metastasis were 0.88 (95% CI: 0.66–1.17), 1.20 (95% CI: 0.77–1.86), 0.76 (95% CI: 0.44–1.31), and 0.95 (95% CI: 0.61–1.49), respectively. IORT had a significantly higher risk of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence than whole-breast EBRT. Overall mortality did not differ significantly. IORT should be used in conjunction with the prudent selection of

  2. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Retrospective Analysis of 144 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Ito, Yoshinori; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Jingu, Keiichi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Aoki, Shinichi; Wada, Hitoshi; Kokubo, Masaki; Ogo, Etsuyo; Etoh, Hidehiro; Kazumoto, Tomoko; Takayama, Makoto; Nemoto, Kenji; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the results of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) + external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for unresectable pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: The records of 144 patients treated with IORT, with or without, EBRT were reviewed. One hundred and thirteen patients (78.5%) were treated with IORT + EBRT and 114 patients (79.2%) were treated in conjunction with chemotherapy. The median doses of IORT and EBRT were 25 Gy and 45 Gy, respectively. The median follow-up of all 144 patients was 9.6 months (range, 0.5-69.7 months). Results: At the time of this analysis, 131 of 144 patients (91.0%) had disease recurrences. Local progression was observed in 60 patients (41.7%), and the 2-year local control (LC) rate in all patients was 44.6%. Patients treated with IORT, with or without, EBRT had significantly more favorable LC (2-year LC, 50.9%) than those treated with IORT without EBRT (p = 0.0004). The 2-year overall survival (OS) rate and the median survival time in all 144 patients were 14.7% and 10.5 months, respectively. Patients treated with chemotherapy had a significantly favorable OS than those treated without chemotherapy (p < 0.0001). On univariate analysis, chemotherapy use alone had a significant impact on OS and on multivariate analysis; chemotherapy use was a significant prognostic factor. Late gastrointestinal morbidity of National Cancer Institute-Common Terminology Criteria Grade 3 was observed in 2 patients (1.4%). Conclusion: IORT + EBRT yields a relatively favorable LC rate for unresectable pancreatic cancer with low frequency of severe late toxicity, and IORT combined with chemotherapy conferred a survival benefit compared with IORT without chemotherapy.

  3. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Resected Pancreatic Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Retrospective Analysis of 210 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Ito, Yoshinori; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Jingu, Keiichi

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the results of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) with or without external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for resected pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: The records of 210 patients treated with gross complete resection (R0: 147 patients; R1: 63 patients) and IORT with or without EBRT were reviewed. One hundred forty-seven patients (70.0%) were treated without EBRT and 114 patients (54.3%) were treated in conjunction with chemotherapy. The median doses of IORT and EBRT were 25 Gy (range, 20-30 Gy) and 45 Gy (range, 20-60Gy), respectively. The median follow-up of the surviving 62 patients was 26.3 months (range, 2.7-90.5 months). Results: At the time of this analysis, 150 of 210 patients (71.4%) had disease recurrences. Local failure was observed in 31 patients (14.8%), and the 2-year local control rate in all patients was 83.7%. The median survival time and the 2-year actuarial overall survival (OS) in all 210 patients were 19.1 months and 42.1%, respectively. Patients treated with IORT and chemotherapy had a significantly more favorable OS than those treated with IORT alone (p = 0.0011). On univariate analysis, chemotherapy use, degree of resection, carbohydrate antigen 19-9, and pathological N stage had a significant impact on OS and on multivariate analysis; these four factors were significant prognostic factors. Late gastrointestinal morbidity of NCI-CTC Grade 4 was observed in 7 patients (3.3%). Conclusion: IORT yields an excellent local control rate for resected pancreatic cancer with few frequencies of severe late toxicity, and IORT combined with chemotherapy confers a survival benefit compared with that of IORT alone.

  4. Long-Term Outcome and Toxicities of Intraoperative Radiotherapy for High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Gillis, Amy M.; Sutton, Elizabeth; DeWitt, Kelly D.; Matthay, Katherine K.; Weinberg, Vivian; Fisch, Benjamin M.; Chan, Albert; Gooding, Charles; Daldrup-Link, Heike; Wara, William M.; Farmer, Diana L.; Harrison, Michael R.; Haas-Kogan, Daphne

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To review a historical cohort of consecutively accrued patients with high-risk neuroblastoma treated with intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) to determine the therapeutic effect and late complications of this treatment. Methods and Materials: Between 1986 and 2002, 31 patients with newly diagnosed high-risk neuroblastoma were treated with IORT as part of multimodality therapy. Their medical records were reviewed to determine the outcome and complications. Kaplan-Meier probability estimates of local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival at 36 months after diagnosis were recorded. Results: Intraoperative radiotherapy to the primary site and associated lymph nodes achieved excellent local control at a median follow-up of 44 months. The 3-year estimate of the local recurrence rate was 15%, less than that of most previously published series. Only 1 of 22 patients who had undergone gross total resection developed recurrence at the primary tumor site. The 3-year estimate of local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival was 85%, 47%, and 60%, respectively. Side effects attributable to either the disease process or multimodality treatment were observed in 7 patients who developed either hypertension or vascular stenosis. These late complications resulted in the death of 2 patients. Conclusions: Intraoperative radiotherapy at the time of primary resection offers effective local control in patients with high-risk neuroblastoma. Compared with historical controls, IORT achieved comparable control and survival rates while avoiding many side effects associated with external beam radiotherapy in young children. Although complications were observed, additional analysis is needed to determine the relative contributions of the disease process and specific components of the multimodality treatment to these adverse events.

  5. In Vivo Dosimetry for Single-Fraction Targeted Intraoperative Radiotherapy (TARGIT) for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, David J.; Best, Bronagh; Brew-Graves, Chris; Duck, Stephen; Ghaus, Tabasom; Gonzalez, Regina; Pigott, Katharine; Reynolds, Claire; Williams, Norman R.; Keshtgar, Mohammed R.S.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: In vivo dosimetry provides an independent check of delivered dose and gives confidence in the introduction or consistency of radiotherapy techniques. Single-fraction intraoperative radiotherapy of the breast can be performed with the Intrabeam compact, mobile 50 kV x-ray source (Carl Zeiss Surgical, Oberkochen, Germany). Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) can be used to estimate skin doses during these treatments. Methods and Materials: Measurements of skin doses were taken using TLDs for 72 patients over 3 years of clinical treatments. Phantom studies were also undertaken to assess the uncertainties resulting from changes in beam quality and backscatter conditions in vivo. Results: The mean measured skin dose was 2.9 {+-} 1.6 Gy, with 11% of readings higher than the prescription dose of 6 Gy, but none of these patients showed increased complications. Uncertainties due to beam hardening and backscatter reduction were small compared with overall accuracy. Conclusions: TLDs are a useful and effective method to measure in vivo skin doses in intraoperative radiotherapy and are recommended for the initial validation or any modification to the delivery of this technique. They are also an effective tool to show consistent and safe delivery on a more frequent basis or to determine doses to other critical structures as required.

  6. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: The Lasting Effects of a Fleeting Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Anne L.

    2014-01-01

    In well-selected patients who choose to pursue breast conservation therapy (BCT) for early-stage breast cancer, partial breast irradiation (PBI) delivered externally or intraoperatively, may be a viable alternative to conventional whole breast irradiation. Two large, contemporary randomized trials have demonstrated breast intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) to be noninferior to whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) when assessing for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence in select patients. Additionally, IORT and other PBI techniques are likely to be more widely adopted in the future because they improve patient convenience by offering an accelerated course of treatment. Coupled with these novel techniques for breast radiotherapy (RT) are distinct toxicity profiles and unique cosmetic alterations that differ from conventional breast EBRT and have the potential to impact disease surveillance and patient satisfaction. This paper will review the level-one evidence for treatment efficacy as well as important secondary endpoints like RT toxicity, breast cosmesis, quality of life, patient satisfaction, and surveillance mammography following BCT with IORT. PMID:25180098

  7. Single-Fraction Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: Early Cosmetic Results

    SciTech Connect

    Beal, Kathryn McCormick, Beryl; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Borgen, Patrick; Fey, Jane; Goldberg, Jessica; Sacchini, Virgilio

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the cosmetic outcome of patients treated with wide local excision and intraoperative radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 50 women were treated on a pilot study to evaluate the feasibility of intraoperative radiotherapy at wide local excision. The eligibility criteria included age >60, tumor size {<=}2.0 cm, clinically negative lymph nodes, and biopsy-established diagnosis. After wide local excision, a custom breast applicator was placed in the excision cavity, and a dose of 20 Gy was prescribed to a depth of 1 cm. After 18 patients were treated, the dose was constrained laterally to 18 Gy. The cosmetic outcome was evaluated by photographs at baseline and at 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Four examiners graded the photographs for symmetry, edema, discoloration, contour, and scarring. The grades were evaluated in relationship to the volume of irradiated tissue, tumor location, and dose at the lateral aspects of the cavity. Results: The median volume of tissue receiving 100% of the prescription dose was 47 cm{sup 3} (range, 20-97 cm{sup 3}). Patients with {<=}47 cm{sup 3} of treated tissue had better cosmetic outcomes than did the women who had >47 cm{sup 3} of treated tissue. Women who had received 18 Gy at the lateral aspects of their cavities had better cosmetic outcomes than did women who had received 20 Gy at the lateral aspects. When comparing the 6- and 12-month results, the scores remained stable for 63%, improved for 17%, and worsened for 20%. Conclusion: Intraoperative radiotherapy appears feasible for selected patients. A favorable cosmetic outcome appears to be related to a smaller treatment volume. The cosmetic outcome is acceptable, although additional follow-up is necessary.

  8. Routine use of preoperative breast MRI for patients considered for intraoperative radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Small, William; Emami, Bahman

    2016-01-01

    This editorial comments on the study by Tallet et al. which reported on the incidence of ipsilateral second breast cancers (BC) detected by preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients being considered for intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). Any second BC was detected in 7% of patients; an ipsilateral BC was detected in 4% of patients, precluding them from IORT. The authors comment that in view of detection of a substantial rate of ipsilateral BCs by preoperative MRI, this exam should be used routinely for staging patients being considered for IORT. PMID:27162648

  9. Intraoperative Radiotherapy in the Management of Locally Recurrent Extremity Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Tinkle, Christopher L.; Weinberg, Vivian; Braunstein, Steve E.; Wustrack, Rosanna; Horvai, Andrew; Jahan, Thierry; O'Donnell, Richard J.; Gottschalk, Alexander R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the efficacy and morbidity of limb-sparing surgery with intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for patients with locally recurrent extremity soft tissue sarcoma (ESTS). Methods and Materials. Twenty-six consecutively treated patients were identified in a single institution retrospective analysis of patients with locally recurrent ESTS treated with IORT following salvage limb-sparing resection from May 2000 to July 2011. Fifteen (58%) patients received external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) prior to recurrence (median dose 63 Gy), while 11 (42%) patients received EBRT following IORT (median dose 52 Gy). The Kaplan-Meier product limit method was used to estimate disease control and survival and subsets were compared using a log rank statistic, Cox's regression model was used to determine independent predictors of disease outcome, and toxicity was reported according to CTCAE v4.0 guidelines. Results. With a median duration of follow-up from surgery and IORT of 34.9 months (range: 4 to 139 mos.), 10 patients developed a local recurrence with 4 subsequently undergoing amputation. The 5-year estimate for local control (LC) was 58% (95% CI: 36–75%), for amputation-free was 81% (95% CI: 57–93%), for metastasis-free control (MFC) was 56% (95% CI: 31–75%), for disease-free survival (DFS) was 35% (95% CI: 17–54%), and for overall survival (OS) was 50% (95% CI: 24–71%). Prior EBRT did not appear to influence disease control (LC, p = 0.74; MFC, p = 0.66) or survival (DFS, p = 0.16; OS, p = 0.58). Grade 3 or higher acute and late toxicities were reported for 6 (23%) and 8 (31%) patients, respectively. The frequency of both acute and late grade 3 or higher toxicities occurred equally between patients who received EBRT prior to or after IORT. Conclusions. IORT in combination with oncologic resection of recurrent ESTS yields good rates of local control and limb-salvage with acceptable morbidity. Within the limitations of small subsets, these data

  10. Intraoperative Radiotherapy During Radical Prostatectomy for Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Technical and Dosimetric Aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Krengli, Marco; Terrone, Carlo; Ballare, Andrea; Loi, Gianfranco; Tarabuzzi, Roberto; Marchioro, Giansilvio; Beldi, Debora; Mones, Eleonora; Bolchini, Cesare R.T.; Volpe, Alessandro; Frea, Bruno

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To analyze the feasibility of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer and candidates for radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: A total of 38 patients with locally advanced prostate cancer were enrolled. No patients had evidence of lymph node or distant metastases, probability of organ-confined disease >25%, or risk of lymph node involvement >15% according to the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Nomogram. The IORT was delivered after exposure of the prostate by a dedicated linear accelerator with beveled collimators using electrons of 9 to 12 MeV to a total dose of 10-12 Gy. Rectal dose was measured in vivo by radiochromic films placed on a rectal probe. Administration of IORT was followed by completion of radical prostatectomy and regional lymph node dissection. All cases with extracapsular extension and/or positive margins were scheduled for postoperative radiotherapy. Patients with pT3 to pT4 disease or positive nodes received adjuvant hormonal therapy. Results: Mean dose detected by radiochromic films was 3.9 Gy (range, 0.4-8.9 Gy) to the anterior rectal wall. The IORT procedure lasted 31 min on average (range, 15-45 min). No major intra- or postoperative complications occurred. Minor complications were observed in 10/33 (30%) of cases. Of the 27/31 patients who completed the postoperative external beam radiotherapy, 3/27 experienced Grade 2 rectal toxicity and 1/27 experienced Grade 2 urinary toxicity. Conclusions: Use of IORT during radical prostatectomy is feasible and allows safe delivery of postoperative external beam radiotherapy to the tumor bed without relevant acute rectal toxicity.

  11. Long-Term Outcomes With Intraoperative Radiotherapy as a Component of Treatment for Locally Advanced or Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Barney, Brandon M.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Dowdy, Sean C.; Bakkum-Gamez, Jamie N.; Haddock, Michael G.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To report our institutional experience with intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) as a component of treatment for women with locally advanced or recurrent uterine sarcoma. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 2010, 16 women with primary (n = 3) or locoregionally recurrent (n = 13) uterine sarcoma received IORT as a component of combined modality treatment. Tumor histology studies found leiomyosarcoma (n = 9), endometrial stromal sarcoma (n = 4), and carcinosarcoma (n = 3). Surgery consisted of gross total resection in 2 patients, subtotal resection in 6 patients, and resection with close surgical margins in 8 patients. The median IORT dose was 12.5 Gy (range, 10-20 Gy). All patients received perioperative external beam radiotherapy (EBRT; median dose, 50.4 Gy; range, 20-62.5 Gy), and 6 patients also received perioperative systemic therapy. Results: Seven of the 16 patients are alive at a median follow-up of 44 months (range, 11-203 months). The 3-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of local relapse (within the EBRT field) was 7%, and central control (within the IORT field) was 100%. No local failures occurred in any of the 6 patients who underwent subtotal resection. The 3-year freedom from distant relapse was 48%, with failures occurring most frequently in the lungs or mediastinum. Median survival was 18 months, and 3-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of cause-specific and overall survival were 58% and 53%, respectively. Three patients (19%) experienced late Grade 3 toxicity. Conclusions: A combined modality approach with perioperative EBRT, surgery, and IORT for locally advanced or recurrent uterine sarcoma resulted in excellent local disease control with acceptable toxicity, even in patients with positive resection margins. With this approach, some patients were able to experience long-term freedom from recurrence.

  12. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Cancer: 30-Year Experience in a Single Institution in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Jingu, Keiichi; Tanabe, Takaya; Nemoto, Kenji; Ariga, Hisanori; Umezawa, Rei; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Takeda, Ken; Koto, Masashi; Sugawara, Toshiyuki; Kubozono, Masaki; Shimizu, Eiji; Abe, Keiko; Yamada, Shogo

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the results of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) with or without external beam radiotherapy ({+-} EBRT) for localized pancreatic cancer in the past three decades and to analyze prognostic factors by multivariate analysis. Methods and Materials: Records for 322 patients with pancreatic cancer treated by IORT {+-} EBRT in Tohoku University Hospital between 1980 and 2009 were reviewed. One hundred ninety-two patients who had no distant organ metastases or dissemination at the time of laparotomy were enrolled in the present study. Results: Eighty-three patients underwent gross total resection (R0: 48 patients, R1: 35 patients), and 109 patients underwent only biopsy or palliative resection. Fifty-five patients underwent adjuvant EBRT, and 124 underwent adjuvant chemotherapy. The median doses of IORT and EBRT were 25 and 40 Gy, respectively. The median follow-up period was 37.5 months. At the time of the analysis, 166 patients had disease recurrence, and 35 patients had local failure. The 2-year local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) rates were 71.0% and 16.9%, respectively. Comparison of the results for each decade showed that OS was significantly improved decade by decade (2-year: 25.0% vs. 18.8% vs. 4.2%, p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that degree of resection (R0-1 vs. R2, hazard ratio = 1.97, p = 0.001) and adjuvant chemotherapy (yes vs. no, hazard ratio = 1.54, p = 0.028) had significant impacts on OS. Late gastrointestinal morbidity of Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 grade 4 or 5 was observed in four patients. Conclusion: Excellent local control for pancreatic cancer with few cases of severe late toxicity was achieved by using IORT. OS of patients with pancreatic cancer treated by IORT {+-} EBRT improved significantly decade by decade. Multivariate analysis showed that degree of resection and adjuvant chemotherapy had significant impacts on OS.

  13. Targeted Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer in Patients in Whom External Beam Radiation Is Not Possible

    SciTech Connect

    Keshtgar, Mohammed R.S.; Joseph, David; Stacey, Chris; Metaxas, Marinos G.; Corica, Tammy; Williams, Norman R.; Baum, Michael

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) following wide local excision of the primary tumor is the standard treatment in early breast cancer. In some circumstances this procedure is not possible or is contraindicated or difficult. The purpose of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) when EBRT is not feasible. Methods and Materials: We report our experience with TARGIT in three centers (Australia, Germany, and the United Kingdom) between 1999 and 2008. Patients at these centers received a single radiation dose of 20 Gy to the breast tissue in contact with the applicator (or 6 Gy at 1-cm distance), as they could not be given EBRT and were keen to avoid mastectomy. Results: Eighty patients were treated with TARGIT. Reasons for using TARGIT were 21 patients had previously received EBRT, and 31 patients had clinical reasons such as systemic lupus erythematosus, motor neuron disease, Parkinson's disease, ankylosing spondylitis, morbid obesity, and cardiovascular or severe respiratory disease. Three of these patients received percutaneous radiotherapy without surgery; 28 patients were included for compelling personal reasons, usually on compassionate grounds. After a median follow-up of 38 months, only two local recurrences were observed, an annual local recurrence rate of 0.75% (95% confidence interval, 0.09%-2.70%). Conclusions: While we await the results of the randomized trial (over 2,000 patients have already been recruited), TARGIT is an acceptable option but only in highly selected cases that cannot be recruited in the trial and in whom EBRT is not feasible/possible.

  14. Patient preferences regarding intraoperative versus external beam radiotherapy following breast-conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Michael D; Conolly, Jay; Park, Catherine; Sakata, Theadora; Mohan, Aron J; Harrison, Brittany L; Hayes, Mitchell; Esserman, Laura J; Ozanne, Elissa M

    2014-01-01

    The TARGIT-A Trial is an international randomized, prospective trial comparing intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for equivalence to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) following lumpectomy for invasive breast cancer in selected low-risk patients; early results suggest that outcomes are similar. In addition to effectiveness data and cost considerations, the preferences of patients should help inform practice. This study was undertaken to explore and quantify preference in choosing between IORT and the current standard, EBRT. Eligible subjects were current or past candidates for breast-conserving surgery and radiation being seen at the University of California, San Francisco Breast Care Center. A trade-off technique varying the risk of local recurrence for IORT was used to quantify any additional accepted risk that these patients would accept to receive either treatment. Patients were first presented with a slideshow comparing EBRT with the experimental IORT option before being asked their preferences given hypothetical 10-year local recurrence risks. Patients were then given a questionnaire on demographic, social and clinical factors. Data from 81 patients were analyzed. The median additional accepted risk to have IORT was 2.3 % (-9 to 39 %), mean 3.2 %. Only 7 patients chose to accept additional risk for EBRT; 22 accepted IORT at no additional risk; and the remaining 52 chose IORT with some additional risk. Patients weigh trade-offs of risks and benefits when presented with medical treatment choices. Our results show that the majority of breast cancer patients will accept a small increment of local risk for a simpler delivery of radiation. Further studies that incorporate outcome and side effect data from the TARGIT-A trial clarify the expected consequences of a local recurrence, and include an expanded range of radiation options that could help guide clinical decision making in this area. PMID:24292868

  15. Efficacy of intraoperative radiotherapy targeted to the abdominal lymph node area in patients with esophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tamaki, Yukihisa; Sasaki, Ryohei; Ejima, Yasuo; Ogura, Masakazu; Negoro, Yoshiharu; Nakajima, Toshifumi; Murakami, Masao; Kaji, Yasushi; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2012-01-01

    We investigated whether intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) during curative surgery for esophageal carcinoma is useful or not. The cases of 117 patients diagnosed with thoracoabdominal esophageal carcinoma who underwent curative surgery between 1986 and 2007 were reviewed: 72 patients received IORT (IORT group) and 45 did not (non-IORT group). Upper abdominal lymphadenectomy was performed in 115 patients (98.5%). Seventy patients (59.8%) received chemotherapy and 80 patients (68.4%) received external radiotherapy. IORT encompassed the upper abdominal lymph node area. A single-fraction dose of 20–30 Gy was delivered using high-energy electrons. Median follow-up duration for patients was 7.4 years. The 5-year overall survival rate did not significantly differ between the IORT and non-IORT groups. However, the 5-year abdominal control rate was significantly higher in the IORT group (89.2%) than in the non-IORT group (72.9%; P = 0.022). We next focused on a patient subgroup with a primary lesion in the lower thoracic or abdominal esophagus or measuring >6 cm in length since this subgroup is probably at high risk of upper abdominal lymph node metastasis. Of the 117 patients, 75 belonged to this subgroup, and among them 45 received IORT. Both univariate and multivariate analysis revealed the survival rate was significantly higher in patients who received IORT than in those who did not (P = 0.033 univariate; 0.026 multivariate). There were no obvious perioperative complications solely attributed to IORT. IORT for esophageal carcinoma will likely be effective for patients with a primary lesion in the lower thoracic or abdominal esophagus, or with a long lesion. PMID:22872778

  16. Long-term toxicity of an intraoperative radiotherapy boost using low energy X-rays during breast-conserving surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta . E-mail: uta.kraus-tiefenbacher@radonk.ma.uni-heidelberg.de; Bauer, Lelia; Scheda, Antonella; Fleckenstein, Katharina; Keller, Anke; Herskind, Carsten; Steil, Volker; Melchert, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) as a boost for breast cancer delivers a high single dose of radiation to a late-reacting tissue; therefore late toxicity is of particular interest, and long-term follow-up is warranted. To date there are only limited data available on breast cancer patients treated with IORT using low energy X-rays. We analyzed toxicity and cosmesis after IORT as a boost with a minimum follow-up of 18 months. Methods and Materials: A total of 73 patients treated with IORT (20 Gy/50 kV X-rays; INTRABEAM [Carl Zeiss Surgical, Oberkochen, Germany]) to the tumor bed during breast-conserving surgery as a boost followed by whole-breast radiotherapy (WBRT, 46 Gy) underwent a prospective, predefined follow-up (median, 25 months; range 18-44 months), including clinical examination and breast ultrasound at 6-months and mammographies at 1-year intervals. Toxicities were documented using the common toxicity criteria (CTC)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and the LENT-SOMA score. Cosmesis was evaluated with a score from 1 to 4. Results: The IORT in combination with WBRT was well tolerated, with no Grade 3 or 4 skin toxicities and no telangiectasias. Fibrosis of the entire breast was observed in 5% of the patients. A circumscribed fibrosis around the tumor bed was palpable in up to 27% with a peak around 18 months after therapy and a decline thereafter. The observed toxicitiy rates were not influenced by age, tumor stage, or systemic therapy. The cosmetic outcome was good to excellent in {>=}90% of cases. Conclusions: After IORT of the breast using low-energy X-rays, no unexpected toxicity rates were observed during long-term-follow-up.

  17. Intraoperative Radiotherapy in Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Results of the Montpellier Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Lemanski, Claire; Azria, David; Gourgon-Bourgade, Sophie; Gutowski, Marian; Rouanet, Phillippe; Saint-Aubert, Bernard; Ailleres, Norbert; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Dubois, Jean-Bernard

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: We recently presented the intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) technique given as a reliable alternative to conventional boost radiation after breast-conserving surgery. The low crude numbers of recurrence in elderly patients led us to investigate the feasibility and the efficacy of this procedure as a sole treatment. Methods and Materials: We included 94 patients older than 65 years in this phase II trial. Among them, 42 patients presented with all the inclusion criteria, i.e., stages pT0 to pT1 and pN0, ductal invasive unifocal carcinoma, and tumor-free margin of >2 mm. IORT was delivered using a dedicated linear accelerator. One 21-Gy fraction was prescribed and specified at the 90% isodose, using electrons. In vivo dosimetry was performed for all patients. The primary endpoint was the quality index. Secondary endpoints were quality of life, local recurrences, cosmetic results, and specific and overall rates of survival. Results: The median follow-up was 30 months (range, 12-49 months), and median age was 72 years (range, 66-80 years). The median tumor diameter was 10 mm. All patients received the total prescribed dose. No acute grade 3 toxicities were observed. Endpoints for all but one patient corresponded to acceptable quality index criteria. Pretreatment quality-of-life scores were maximal, and no significant decrease was observed during follow-up. Cosmesis was good to excellent at 6 months. Two patients experienced recurrence but underwent salvage mastectomy. Conclusion: Our results confirm that exclusive partial-breast IORT is feasible for treating early-stage breast cancer in the elderly. IORT may be considered an alternative treatment for a selected population and offers a safe one-step treatment.

  18. Long-Term Survivors Using Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Recurrent Gynecologic Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Phuoc T.; Su Zheng; Hara, Wendy; Husain, Amreen; Teng, Nelson; Kapp, Daniel S.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To analyze the outcomes of therapy and identify prognostic factors for patients treated with surgery followed by intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for gynecologic malignancies at a single institution. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of 36 consecutive patients treated with IORT to 44 sites with mean follow-up of 50 months. The primary site was the cervix in 47%, endometrium in 31%, vulva in 14%, vagina in 6%, and fallopian tubes in 3%. Previous RT had failed in 72% of patients, and 89% had recurrent disease. Of 38 IORT sessions, 84% included maximal cytoreductive surgery, including 18% exenterations. The mean age was 52 years (range, 30-74), mean tumor size was 5 cm (range, 0.5-12), previous disease-free interval was 32 months (range, 0-177), and mean IORT dose was 1,152 cGy (range, 600-1,750). RT and systemic therapy after IORT were given to 53% and 24% of the cohort, respectively. The outcomes measured were locoregional control (LRC), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and treatment-related complications. Results: The Kaplan-Meier 5-year LRC, DMFS, and DSS probability for the whole group was 44%, 51%, and 47%, respectively. For cervical cancer patients, the Kaplan-Meier 5-year LRC, DMFS, and DSS estimate was 45%, 60%, and 46%, respectively. The prognostic factors found on multivariate analysis (p {<=} 0.05) were the disease-free interval for LRC, tumor size for DMFS, and cervical primary, previous surgery, and locoregional relapse for DSS. Our cohort had 10 Grade 3-4 complications associated with treatment (surgery and IORT) and a Kaplan-Meier 5-year Grade 3-4 complication-free survival rate of 72%. Conclusions: Survival for pelvic recurrence of gynecologic cancer is poor (range, 0-25%). IORT after surgery seems to confer long-term local control in carefully selected patients.

  19. Tumor induction following intraoperative radiotherapy: Late results of the National Cancer Institute canine trials

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.; Duray, P.; DeLuca, A.; Anderson, W.; Sindelar, W.; Kinsella, T. )

    1990-09-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy has been employed in human cancer research for over a decade. Since 1979, trials to assess the acute and late toxicity of IORT have been carried out at the National Cancer Institute in an adult dog model in an attempt to establish dose tolerance guidelines for a variety of organs. Of the 170 animals entered on 12 studies with a minimum follow-up of 2 years, 148 dogs received IORT; 22 control animals received only surgery. Animals were sacrificed at designated intervals following IORT, usually at 1, 6, 12, 24, and 60 month intervals. 102 of 148 irradiated dogs were sacrificed less than 24 months; 46 dogs were followed greater than or equal to 24 months after IORT. To date, 34 of the 46 animals have been sacrificed; the 12 remaining animals are to be followed to 5 years. These 12 animals have minimum follow-up of 30 months. In the irradiated group followed for greater than or equal to 24 months, 10 tumors have arisen in 9 animals. One animal developed an incidental spontaneous breast carcinoma outside the IORT port, discovered only at scheduled post-mortem exam. The remaining nine tumors arose within IORT ports. Two tumors were benign neural tumors--a neuroma and a neurofibroma. One animal had a collision tumor comprised of grade I chondrosarcoma adjacent to grade III osteosarcoma arising in lumbar vertebrae. Two other grade III osteosarcomas, one grade III fibrosarcoma, and one grade III malignant fibrous histiocytoma arose in retroperitoneal/paravertebral sites. An embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (sarcoma botryoides) arose within the irradiated urinary bladder of one animal. No sham irradiated controls nor IORT animals sacrificed less than 24 months have developed any spontaneous or radiation-induced tumors. The time range of diagnoses of tumors was 24-58 months. The IORT dose range associated with tumor development was 20-35 Gy.

  20. Intraoperative radiotherapy during lung cancer surgery: Technical description and early clinical results

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, F.A.; Ortiz de Urbina, D.; Abuchaibe, O.; Azinovic, I.; Aristu, J.; Santos, M.; Escude, L.; Herreros, J.; Llorens, R. )

    1990-07-01

    A phase I-II study of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for Stage III lung cancer was performed in 34 patients during a period of 58 months. Loco-regional treatment included tumor resection if technically feasible, IORT boost of electron beams using moderate single doses (10-15 Gy) to tumor bearing areas and external photon beam irradiation (46-50 Gy in 5 weeks) using conventional fields. Indications for this study were unresectable hiliar tumors (14, 41%), and mediastinal, hiliar and/or chest wall residual disease following resection (20, 59%). Thirty-four procedures, with 40 IORT fields, have been analyzed to describe the relevant technical aspects and the toxicity. IORT was delivered using acrylic transparent cones of different diameters. Surgical approach consisted in a lateral thoracotomy in all patients (21 right side and 13 left side). Tissues included within the IORT field were: tumor or residual tumor tissues (34, 100%), collapsed lung parenchyma and main bronchus not surgically manipulated (14, 41%), bronchial stump and vascular suture following resection (19, 55%), mediastinal structures (20, 58%), and brachial plexus (1, 3%). The bronchial suture was covered with pleural or pericardial flap after IORT in 10 cases (29%). Life threatening toxicity related to IORT consisted in broncho-pleural fistula (1, 3%) and massive hemoptysis (1, 3%). Other reversible toxic events were acute pneumonitis (12, 85%) and esophagitis (10, 50%). Long term asymptomatic lung fibrosis was detected in 11 cases (32%). Median survival time for the entire group has been 12 months. With a median follow-up time of 12 months the freedom from thoracic recurrence rate is 30% (65% in cases with tumor resection). Projected actuarial survival rates at 4 years were 28% for resected group and 7% for unresected cases.

  1. Combined use of intraoperative indocyanine green and dynamic angiography in rotational vertebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Nauman S; Ambekar, Sudheer; Elhammady, Mohamed Samy; Riley, Jonathan P; Pradilla, Gustavo; Nogueira, Raul G; Ahmad, Faiz U

    2016-08-01

    Rotational vertebral artery occlusion, also known as bow hunter's syndrome, is a well-documented surgically amenable cause of vertebrobasilar insufficiency. Traditionally, patients have been imaged using dynamic rotational angiography. The authors sought to determine whether intraoperative indocyanine green (ICG) angiography could reliably assess the adequacy of surgical decompression of the vertebral artery (VA). The authors report two patients who presented with multiple transient episodes of syncope provoked by turning their head to the right. Rotational dynamic angiography revealed a dominant VA that became occluded with head rotation to the right side. The patients underwent successful surgical decompression of the VA via an anterior cervical approach. Intraoperative ICG angiography demonstrated patency of the VA with head rotation. This was further confirmed by intraoperative dynamic catheter angiography. To our knowledge, we present the first two cases of the use of ICG combined with intraoperative dynamic rotational angiography to document the adequacy of surgical decompression of the VA in a patient with rotational vertebral artery occlusion. Intraoperative ICG angiography is a useful adjunct and may potentially supplant the need for intraoperative catheter angiography. PMID:27041076

  2. Intraoperative portal vein insulin assay combined with occlusion of the pancreas for complex pancreatogenous hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhiying; Tan, Haidong; Sun, Yongliang; Si, Shuang; Xu, Li; Liu, Xiaolei; Liu, Liguo; Zhou, Wenying; Huang, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Intraoperative localization and confirmation of complete resection of the hypersecreting tissue are the 2 main challenges in the management of pancreatogenous hypoglycemia. Here, we report our experience with intraoperative portal vein insulin assay combined with occlusion of the pancreas in the management of pancreatogenous hypoglycemia. Clinical courses of 2 patients with biochemical evidence of a pancreatogenous hypoglycemia were studied. The preoperative diagnosis was multiple endocrine neoplasia 1 (MEN-1) and nesidioblastosis, respectively. Rapid intraoperative portal vein insulin assay combined with occlusion of the pancreas was used to localize and confirm complete excision of the hypersecreting tissue. Hypoglycemia was successfully treated in both the patients. In the MEN-1 patient, 2 small tumors in the head of pancreas were not resected, as they were deemed noninsulin secreting by intraoperative portal vein insulin assay, thus avoiding a total pancreatectomy. In the patient with nesidioblastosis, using intraoperative portal vein insulin assay combined with occlusion of the pancreas, an appropriate amount of pancreatic tissue was resected thereby avoiding recurrence and diabetes. This technique may be of particular value in patients with complex conditions such as MEN-1 and nesidioblastosis, to localize and achieve complete resection of hypersecreting pancreatic tissue. PMID:27367988

  3. Intraoperative electron boost radiation followed by moderate doses of external beam radiotherapy in limb-sparing treatment of patients with extremity soft-tissue sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Oertel, Susanne; Treiber, Martina; Zahlten-Hinguranage, Angelika; Eichin, Steffen; Roeder, Falk; Funk, Angela; Hensley, Frank W.; Timke, Carmen; Niethammer, Andreas G.; Huber, Peter E.; Weitz, Juergen; Eble, Micheal J.; Buchler, Markus W.; Bernd, Ludger; Debus, Juergen; Krempien, Robert C. . E-mail: robert_krempien@med.uni-heidelberg.de

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To analyze long-term prognosis and morbidity after limb-sparing treatment of patients with extremity soft-tissue sarcoma, with intraoperative electron boost radiotherapy (IOERT) followed by a moderate dose of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 153 patients who were treated in a single center from 1991 to 2004 were evaluated. Median IOERT dose was 15 Gy, mean EBRT dose 43 Gy (range, 40-50.4 Gy) in conventional fractionation (1.8-2 Gy). Median duration of follow-up was 33 months. Acute toxicity was assessed with Common Toxicity Criteria; late toxic effects were scored according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: Five-year overall survival and 5-year local control rates were 77% and 78%, respectively. Whereas tumor size, patient age, and EBRT dose did not significantly affect outcome, resection status and grading were significant for survival; resection status and IOERT dose were significant for local control. Extremity salvage until death or time of follow-up was achieved in 90% of our patients, 86% of whom showed excellent limb function without impairment in activities of daily life. Acute toxicity Grade 2-4 was observed in 23% and late toxicity Grade 2-4 in 17% of patients. Conclusions: Treatment with IOERT combined with moderate doses of external beam irradiation yields high local control and extremity preservation rates in resected extremity soft-tissue sarcoma.

  4. An experimental attenuation plate to improve the dose distribution in intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy for breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, T.; Aoyama, Y.; Shimozato, T.; Sawaki, M.; Imai, T.; Ito, Y.; Obata, Y.; Tabushi, K.

    2009-06-01

    Intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy (IOERT) is a technique in which a single-fraction high dose is intraoperatively delivered to subclinical tumour cells using an electron beam after breast-conserving surgery. In IOERT, an attenuation plate consisting of a pair of metal disks is commonly used to protect the normal tissues posterior to the breast. However, the dose in front of the plate is affected by backscatter, resulting in an unpredictable delivered dose to the tumour cells. In this study, an experimental attenuation plate, termed a shielding plate, was designed using Monte Carlo simulation, which significantly diminished the electron beam without introducing any backscatter radiation. The plate's performance was verified by measurements. It was made of two layers, a first layer (source side) of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and a second layer of copper, which was selected from among other metals (aluminium, copper and lead) after testing for shielding capability and the range and magnitude of backscatter. The optimal thicknesses of the PMMA (0.71 cm) and copper (0.3 cm) layers were determined by changing their thicknesses during simulations. On the basis of these results, a shielding plate was prototyped and depth doses with and without the plate were measured by radiophotoluminescence glass dosimeters using a conventional stationary linear accelerator and a mobile linear accelerator dedicated for IOERT. The trial shielding plate functioned as intended, indicating its applicability in clinical practice.

  5. Postoperative Seroma Formation After Intraoperative Radiotherapy Using Low-Kilovoltage X-Rays Given During Breast-Conserving Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Welzel, Grit; Brade, Joachim

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the frequency and volume of seroma after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) with or without intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). Methods and Materials: Seventy-one patients with 73 breast cancers (IORT group) treated with IORT (20 Gy Intrabeam) as a boost during BCS were compared with 86 patients with 88 breast tumors (NO-IORT group) treated without IORT. Clinical examination and measurement of seroma volume on treatment-planning CT (CT-seroma) was done at median interval of 35 days after BCS. Results: Seroma were found on palpation in 37 patients (23%) and on CT in 105 patients (65%; median volume, 26.3 mL). Interval between BCS and CT was significantly shorter in patients with palpable seroma (median, 33 days) or CT-seroma (33 days) compared with those with no palpable seroma (36.5 days; p = 0.027) or CT-seroma (52 days, p < 0.001). The rate of palpable seroma was not different (IORT n = 17, 23%; NO-IORT n = 20, 23%; p = 0.933), whereas fewer patients required puncture in the IORT group [3 (4%) vs. 10 (11%)]. In contrast, more patients showed CT-seroma after IORT (IORT n = 59, 81%; NO-IORT n = 46, 52%; p < 0.001). The interval between BCS and CT was significantly shorter in patients with IORT as compared with the NO-IORT patients (median, 33 days vs. 41.5 days; p = 0.036). Conclusion: Intraoperative radiotherapy with low-kilovoltage X-rays during BCS is not associated with an increased rate of palpable seroma or seroma requiring treatment. The rate of seroma formation on CT was higher after IORT compared with the NO-IORT group, which might be because of the shorter interval between BCS and CT.

  6. An intraoperative probe combining positron detection and OCT imaging for ovarian cancer detection and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi; Wang, Tianheng; Biswal, Nrusingh; Kumavor, Patrick; Wang, Xiaohong; Karimeddini, Mozafareddin; Vento, John; Sanders, Melinda; Brewer, Molly; Zhu, Quing

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we report an intraoperative approach by combining optical coherence tomography (OCT) and position detection to detect and characterize ovarian cancers. A total of 18 ovaries were studied ex vivo. Based on histopathology result, they were classified into normal and malignant groups, respectively. On average positron count rate of 8.0-fold higher was found between malignant and normal ovaries. OCT imaging of ovaries revealed many detailed morphologic features that could be potentially valuable for detecting early malignant changes in ovarian tissue. Optical scattering coefficients of these ovaries were estimated from OCT A-lines. Normal ovarian tissue showed higher scattering coefficient than that of malignant ovarian tissue. Using a threshold of 2.00 mm-1 for all ovaries, a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 100% were achieved. This initial data shows our intraoperative probe based on OCT and positron detection has a great potential for ovarian cancer detection and characterization.

  7. In vivo dosimetry with optically stimulated dosimeters and RTQA2 radiochromic film for intraoperative radiotherapy of the breast

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Caleb; Pederson, Aaron; Frazier, Chanté; Duttenhaver, John

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: Measurements were taken with optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) and with RTQA2 radiochromic film to evaluate the use of each for in vivo dosimetry with intraoperative radiotherapy of the breast.Methods: Nonlinear calibration curves were established for OSLDs and RTQA2 radiochromic film using the Intrabeam 50 kV{sub p} source. Measurements were taken in a water phantom and compared to absolute dose measurements taken with an ionization chamber to investigate the characteristics of both types of dosimeters, including energy response and radiative absorption. In vivo readings were taken on the skin and in the tumor cavity using OSLDs and RTQA2 radiochromic film for 10 patients and 20 patients respectively. A prescription of 20 Gy to the surface of the applicator was used for all in vivo measurements in this study.Results: OSLDs were found to have an approximate uncertainty of ±7% for readings near the surface of the applicator and ±17% for readings at distances typical to the skin. The radiative absorption by OSLD was negative, indicating that this type of dosimeter absorbs less radiation than water in the targeted intraoperative radiotherapy energy range. RTQA2 film exhibited no energy dependence and all film readings were within ±8% of the delivered dose. The maximum radiative absorption in film was 8.5%. Radiochromic film measurements were found to be on average 18.2 ± 3.3 Gy for the tumor cavity and 2.1 ± 0.8 Gy for positions on the skin superior and inferior to the Intrabeam applicator. Average cavity measurements taken with OSLDs were 15.9 ± 3.9 Gy and average skin doses were 1.4 ± 0.8 Gy.Conclusions: OSLDs produce results with an uncertainty comparable to other dosimeters near the surface of the applicator but the uncertainty increases to an unacceptably high level with distance from the applicator. RTQA2 radiochromic film is shown to be accurate both at the surface of the applicator and at distances of 1–2 cm.

  8. Late radiation toxicity after intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for breast cancer: results from the randomized phase III trial TARGIT A.

    PubMed

    Sperk, Elena; Welzel, Grit; Keller, Anke; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Gerhardt, Axel; Sütterlin, Marc; Wenz, Frederik

    2012-08-01

    The randomized phase III trial TARGIT A showed non-inferiority regarding local control after intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT 20 Gy which was followed by whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT) in patients with risk factors only) in comparison to standard WBRT (50-56 Gy) after breast-conserving surgery in selected patients. This is the first analysis of long-term toxicities in the setting of TARGIT. Between 02/2002 and 12/2008, 305 patients were treated within TARGIT A (Arm A: n = 34 IORT, n = 20 IORT + WBRT for risk factors; Arm B WBRT: n = 55) or received IORT as a planned boost (control group: n = 196) at a single center. Toxicity was assessed according to the LENT SOMA scales. No significant differences were seen between Arm A and Arm B regarding fibrosis, breast edema, retraction, ulceration, lymphedema, hyperpigmentation, and pain. Arm A had significantly less telangiectases compared to Arm B (p = 0.049). In the subanalysis (Arm A IORT vs. Arm A IORT + WBRT vs. Arm B), fibrosis had a cumulative rate of 5.9 versus 37.5 versus 18.4 %, respectively (38.2 % IORT boost control group), at 3 years. No telangiectases were seen after IORT alone (0 % Arm A IORT vs. 17.5 % Arm A IORT + WBRT vs. 17.7 % Arm B). The hazard ratio of higher grade toxicity as first event was 0.46 (95 % CI, 0.26-0.83) for Arm A IORT as compared to Arm B (p = 0.010). No recurrences were seen after a median follow-up of 40 months (Arm A) and 42 months (Arm B). With its very low chronic skin toxicity rates and outstanding long-term results regarding toxicity and local control, IORT with 50 kV X-rays is a safe and effective method for treatment of selected breast cancer patients. PMID:22842984

  9. Long-Term Outcomes After Maximal Surgical Resection and Intraoperative Electron Radiotherapy for Locoregionally Recurrent or Locoregionally Advanced Primary Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hallemeier, Christopher L.; Choo, Richard; Davis, Brian J.; Pisansky, Thomas M.; Gunderson, Leonard L.; Leibovich, Bradley C.; Haddock, Michael G.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes of a multimodality therapy combining maximal surgical resection and intraoperative electron radiotherapy (IOERT) for patients with locoregionally (LR) recurrent renal cell carcinoma (RCC) after radical nephrectomy or LR advanced primary RCC. Methods and Materials: From 1989 through 2005, a total of 22 patients with LR recurrent (n = 19) or LR advanced primary (n = 3) RCC were treated with this multimodality approach. The median patient age was 63 years (range 46-78). Twenty-one patients (95%) received perioperative external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) with a median dose of 4,500 cGy (range, 4,140-5,500). Surgical resection was R0 (negative margins) in 5 patients (23%) and R1 (residual microscopic disease) in 17 patients (77%). The median IOERT dose delivered was 1,250 cGy (range, 1,000-2,000). Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) and relapse patterns were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up for surviving patients was 9.9 years (range, 3.6-20 years). The OS and DFS at 1, 5, and 10 years were 91%, 40%, and 35% and 64%, 31%, and 31%, respectively. Central recurrence (within the IOERT field), LR relapse (tumor bed or regional lymph nodes), and distant metastases at 5 years were 9%, 27%, and 64%, respectively. Mortality within 30 days of surgery and IOERT was 0%. Five patients (23%) experienced acute or late National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (NCI-CTCAE) Version 4 Grade 3 to 5 toxicities. Conclusions: In patients with LR recurrent or LR advanced primary RCC, a multimodality approach of perioperative EBRT, maximal surgical resection, and IOERT yielded encouraging results. This regimen warrants further investigation.

  10. Surgical correction of cryptotia combined with intraoperative distention using isotonic saline injection and rotation flap method.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Tetsuji; Matsumoto, Naozumi; Tanabe, Tsuyoshi; Saitoh, Tomoichi; Matsushita, Shigeto; Mitsukawa, Nobuyuki

    2005-05-01

    The following report describes the combination of surgical correction with intraoperative distention using isotonic saline injection and the rotation flap method for correction of cryptotia. This technique provided extensive skin coverage of the upper portion of the auricle and was an easy and quick method of dissecting the cartilage of the posterior auricle. The main advantages of this technique include achievement of skin expansion without the need for expander material, simple design of the skin incision, and easy dissection of the cartilage. Although one patient experienced partial congestion in the upper tip of the rotation flap, no other complications occurred. Further, cryptotia did not recur. PMID:15915119

  11. Electrons for intraoperative radiotherapy in selected breast-cancer patients: late results of the Montpellier phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Montpellier cancer institute phase II trial started in 2004 and evaluated the feasibility of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) technique given as a sole radiation treatment for patients with an excellent prognostic and very low recurrence risk. Methods Forty-two patients were included between 2004 and 2007. Inclusion criteria were patients ≥ 65 years old, T0-T1, N0, ductal invasive unifocal carcinoma, free-margin > 2 mm. IORT was delivered using dedicated linear accelerator. One fraction of 21 Gy was prescribed and specified at the 90% isodose using electrons. In vivo dosimetry was performed for all patients. Primary end-point was the quality index. Secondary endpoints were quality of life, local recurrences, cosmetic results, specific and overall survival. Results At inclusion, median age was 72 years (range, 66–80). Median tumor diameter was 10 mm. All patients received the total prescribed dose. No acute grade 3 toxicities were observed. Late cosmetic results were good at 5 years despite the poor agreement of accuracy assessment between patients and physicians. Four patients (9.5%) experienced a local failure and underwent salvage mastectomy. The 5 year-disease free survival is 92.7% (range 79.1−97.6). All patients are still alive with a median follow-up of 72 months (range 66–74). Conclusion Our results confirm with a long-term follow-up that exclusive partial breast IORT is feasible for early-breast cancer in selected patients. IORT provides good late cosmetics results and should be considered as a safe and very comfortable “one-step” treatment procedure. Nevertheless, patient assessments are essential for long-term quality results. PMID:23902825

  12. Intraoperative Radiotherapy Versus Whole-Breast External Beam Radiotherapy in Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Zhou, Zhirui; Mei, Xin; Yang, Zhaozhi; Ma, Jinli; Chen, Xingxing; Wang, Junqi; Liu, Guangyu; Yu, Xiaoli; Guo, Xiaomao

    2015-07-01

    There has not been a clear answer about the efficacy of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for women with early-stage breast cancer.The aim of this meta-analysis was to summarize the available evidence comparing the efficacy and safety of IORT with those of whole-breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for women with early-stage breast cancer.MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library were searched up to October 2014. Two authors independently conducted the literature selection and data extraction.Studies that compared IORT with whole-breast EBRT were included in the systematic review. IORT was defined as a single dose of irradiation to the tumor bed during breast-conserving surgery rather than whole-breast irradiation.Qualities of RCTs were evaluated according to the PEDro scale. Qualities of non-RCTs were evaluated according to the Methodological Index for Non-Randomized Studies (MINORS). The risk ratios (RRs) of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence, overall mortality, breast cancer mortality, non-breast cancer mortality, and distant metastasis were pooled using a random-effects model.Four studies with 5415 patients were included in this meta-analysis, including 2 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 2 non-RCTs. Ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was significantly higher in patients with IORT compared to those with whole-breast EBRT (RR 2.83, 95% CI 1.23-6.51), but with significant heterogeneity (I = 58.5%, P = 0.065). Comparing IORT with whole-breast EBRT, the pooled RRs for overall mortality, breast cancer mortality, non-breast cancer mortality, and distant metastasis were 0.88 (95% CI: 0.66-1.17), 1.20 (95% CI: 0.77-1.86), 0.76 (95% CI: 0.44-1.31), and 0.95 (95% CI: 0.61-1.49), respectively.IORT had a significantly higher risk of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence than whole-breast EBRT. Overall mortality did not differ significantly. IORT should be used in conjunction with the prudent selection of suitable patients. It is

  13. Intraoperative radiofrequency ablation combined with 125iodine seed implantation for unresectable pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yi-Ping; Li, Wei-Min; Zheng, Fang; Li, Fu-Cheng; Huang, Hui; Du, Ji-Dong; Liu, Hao-Run

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility, efficacy and safety of intraoperative radiofrequency ablation (RFA) combined with 125iodine seed implantation for unresectable pancreatic cancer. METHODS: Thirty-two patients (21 males and 11 females) at the age of 68 years (range 48-90 years) with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer admitted to our hospital from January 2006 to May 2008 were enrolled in this study. The tumor, 4-12 cm in diameter, located in pancreatic head of 23 patients and in pancreatic body and tail of 9 patients, was found to be unresectable during operation. Diagnosis of pancreatic cancer was made through intraoperative biopsy. Patients were treated with FRA combined with 125iodine seed implantation. In brief, a RFA needle was placed, which was confirmed by intraoperative ultrasound to decrease the potential injury of surrounding vital structures, a 125iodine seed was implanted near the blood vessels and around the tumor border followed by bypass palliative procedure (cholangio-jejunostomy and/or gastrojejunostomy) in 29 patients. RESULTS: The serum CA 19-9 level was decreased from 512 ± 86 U/mL before operation to 176 ± 64 U/mL, 108 ± 42 U/mL and 114 ± 48 U/mL, respectively, 1, 3 and 6 mo after operation (P < 0.05). The pain score on day 7 after operation, 1 and 3 mo after combined therapy was decreased from 5.86 ± 1.92 before operation to 2.65 ± 1.04, 1.65 ± 0.88 and 2.03 ± 1.16, respectively, after operation (P < 0.05). The rate of complete response (CR), partial response (PR), stable disease (SD), progressive disease (PD) in 32 patients was 21.8% (7/32), 56.3% (18/32), 15.6% (5/32) and 6.3% (2/32), respectively, 6 mo after operation, with a median overall survival time of 17. 5 mo. The median survival time of patients at stage III was longer than that of those at stage IV (19 mo vs 10 mo, P = 0.0026). The median survival time of patients who received and did not receive chemotherapy after operation was 20 mo and 16 mo, respectively (P

  14. Single high dose intraoperative electrons for advanced stage pancreatic cancer: Phase I pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Goldson, A.L.; Ashaveri, E.; Espinoza, M.C.

    1981-07-01

    Phase I toxicity studies with intraoperative radiotherapy proved to be a feasible adjunct to surgery for unresectable malignancies of the pancreas at Howard University Hospital. There have been minimal side effects or complications related to the combination of limited surgical decompression and intraoperative radiotherapy alone. The toxic effects of intraoperative radiotherapy on normal tissues is being assessed on a dose volume basis. Doses of 2000 to 2500 rad in a single exposure to include the pancreas, regional nodes and duodenum are acceptable if the total treatment volume is less than or equal to 100 cm. The tumoricidal effects on the cancer are demonstratable when one reviews the pathological specimens that illustrate massive tumor necrosis and fibros replacement, but in all cases reviewed, viable cancer was noted. Intraoperative radiotherapy, therefore, represents a significant boost dose for resectable, partially resectable or non-resectable tumors when added to conventional external beam irradiation and/or chemotherapy. Preliminary clinical data and minimal toxicity justifies further investigation.

  15. Elevated transaortic valvular gradients after combined aortic valve and mitral valve replacement: an intraoperative dilemma.

    PubMed

    Essandoh, Michael; Portillo, Juan; Zuleta-Alarcon, Alix; Castellon-Larios, Karina; Otey, Andrew; Sai-Sudhakar, Chittoor B

    2015-03-01

    High transaortic valvular gradients, after combined aortic valve and mitral valve replacement, require prompt intraoperative diagnosis and appropriate management. The presence of high transaortic valvular gradients after cardiopulmonary bypass, in this setting, can be secondary to the following conditions: prosthesis dysfunction, left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, supravalvular obstruction, prosthesis-patient mismatch, hyperkinetic left ventricle from administration of inotropes, left ventricular intracavitary gradients, pressure recovery phenomenon, and increased transvalvular blood flow resulting from hyperdynamic circulation or anemia. Transesophageal echocardiography is an extremely useful tool for timely diagnosis and treatment of this complication. We describe a case of a critically ill patient with endocarditis and acute lung injury, who presented for combined aortic valve and mitral valve replacement. Transesophageal echocardiographic assessment, post-cardiopulmonary bypass, revealed high transaortic valvular gradients due to encroachment of the mitral prosthesis strut on the left ventricular outflow tract, which was compounded by a small, hypertrophied, and hyperkinetic left ventricle. Discontinuation of inotropic support, administration of fluids, phenylephrine, and esmolol led to resolution of the high gradients and prevented further surgery. PMID:25549635

  16. Combining radiotherapy and immunotherapy: A revived partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Demaria, Sandra; Bhardwaj, Nina; McBride, William H.; Formenti, Silvia C. . E-mail: silvia.formenti@med.nyu.edu

    2005-11-01

    Ionizing radiation therapy (RT) is an important local modality for the treatment of cancer. The current rationale for its use is based largely on the ability of RT to kill the cancer cells by a direct cytotoxic effect. Nevertheless, considerable evidence indicates that RT effects extend beyond the mere elimination of the more radiosensitive fraction of cancer cells present within a tumor at the time of radiation exposure. For instance, a large body of evidence is accumulating on the ability of RT to modify the tumor microenvironment and generate inflammation. This might have far-reaching consequences regarding the response of a patient to treatment, especially if radiation-induced tumor cell kill were to translate into the generation of effective antitumor immunity. Although much remains to be learned about how radiation can impact tumor immunogenicity, data from preclinical studies provide the proof of principle that different immunotherapeutic strategies can be combined with RT to enhance antitumor effects. Conversely, RT could be a useful tool to combine with immunotherapy. This article will briefly summarize what is known about the impact of RT on tumor immunity, including tumor-associated antigens, antigen-presenting cells, and effector mechanisms. In addition, the experimental evidence supporting the contention that RT can be used as a tool to induce antitumor immunity is discussed, and a new approach to radioimmunotherapy of cancer is proposed.

  17. Intraoperative Radiotherapy as a Boost During Breast-Conserving Surgery Using Low-Kilovoltage X-Rays: The First 5 Years of Experience With a Novel Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wenz, Frederik; Welzel, Grit; Blank, Elena; Hermann, Brigitte; Steil, Volker; Suetterlin, Marc; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) during breast-conserving surgery (BCS) has been recently introduced using different devices. We report the first 5 years of a single-center experience after introduction of a novel approach to deliver IORT as a tumor bed boost during BCS for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 155 breast cancers in 154 women (median age, 63 years; range, 30-83 years; T1/T2 = 100/55; N0/N+ = 108/47) were treated between February 2002 and December 2007 at the University Medical Center Mannheim, in whom IORT as tumor bed boost was applied using 50-kV X-rays (20 Gy) followed by 46-50 Gy whole-breast external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Chemotherapy, if indicated, was given before EBRT. The median interval between BCS plus IORT and EBRT was 40 days. Median follow-up was 34 months (maximum 80 months, 1 patient lost to follow-up). Overall survival and local relapse-free survival were calculated at 5 years using the Kaplan-Meier method. Seventy-nine patients were evaluated at 3-year follow-up for late toxicity according to the Late Effects in Normal Tissues-Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic system. Results: Ten patients died, 2 had in-breast relapse, and 8 developed distant metastases (5-year overall survival = 87.0%; 5-year local relapse-free survival = 98.5%). Grade 3 fibroses of the tumor bed were detected in 5% of the patients after 3 years. Skin toxicity was mild (telangiectases and hyperpigmentations in approximately 6% each). Conclusions: Intraoperative radiotherapy as a tumor bed boost during BCS for breast cancer using low-kilovoltage X-rays followed by EBRT yields low recurrence and toxicity rates.

  18. Improving external beam radiotherapy by combination with internal irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Koi, L; Zöphel, K; Sihver, W; Kotzerke, J; Baumann, M; Krause, M

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is dose dependent, but the dose that can be applied to solid tumour lesions is limited by the sensitivity of the surrounding tissue. The combination of EBRT with systemically applied radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is a promising approach to increase efficacy of radiotherapy. Toxicities of both treatment modalities of this combination of internal and external radiotherapy (CIERT) are not additive, as different organs at risk are in target. However, advantages of both single treatments are combined, for example, precise high dose delivery to the bulk tumour via standard EBRT, which can be increased by addition of RIT, and potential targeting of micrometastases by RIT. Eventually, theragnostic radionuclide pairs can be used to predict uptake of the radiotherapeutic drug prior to and during therapy and find individual patients who may benefit from this treatment. This review aims to highlight the outcome of pre-clinical studies on CIERT and resultant questions for translation into the clinic. Few clinical data are available until now and reasons as well as challenges for clinical implementation are discussed. PMID:25782328

  19. Combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy versus radiotherapy alone in locally advanced epidermoid bronchogenic carcinoma. A randomized study

    SciTech Connect

    Trovo, M.G.; Minatel, E.; Veronesi, A.; Roncadin, M.; De Paoli, A.; Franchin, G.; Magri, D.M.; Tirelli, U.; Carbone, A.; Grigoletto, E. )

    1990-02-01

    Between June 1980 and December 1983, 111 patients with inoperable epidermoid bronchogenic carcinoma (limited disease) were entered into a randomized trial comparing radiotherapy alone versus radiotherapy and combination chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, Adriamycin (doxorubicin), methotrexate, and procarbazine. Thirty-five of 62 (56.4%) patients treated with 4500 rad in 15 fractions in 3 weeks and 19 of 49 (38.8%) patients treated with the same radiation treatment and chemotherapy had an objective response. The difference in response rate was not significant (P = 0.900). Median time to progression was 5.9 and 7.02 months, respectively, for the radiation treatment and the combined treatment. Median survival was 11.74 and 10.03 months, respectively, without statistically significant differences between the two groups of patients. The toxicity was acceptable and no treatment-related death occurred in either treatment schedule. In this study no significant superiority of combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment over radiation therapy alone was evidenced. Whether different chemotherapy regimens may prove more effective in this context should be clarified by further studies.

  20. Intraoperative Combined Use of Somatosensory Evoked Potential, Microvascular Doppler Sonography, and Indocyanine Green Angiography in Clipping of Intracranial Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhili; Zhang, Guanni; Huang, Guangfu; Wang, Zhengyu; Tan, Haibin; Liu, Jinping; Li, Aiguo

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of combining application of somatosensory evoked potential (SEP), microvascular Doppler sonography (MDS), and indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) in intracranial aneurysm clipping surgery. Material/Methods A total of 158 patients undergoing an intracranial aneurysm clipping operation were recruited. All patients were evaluated with intraoperative SEP and MDS monitoring, and 28 of them were evaluated with intraoperative combined monitoring of SEP, MDS, and ICGA. Results The SEP waves dropped during temporary occlusion of arteries in 19 cases (12.0%), and returned to normal after the clips were repositioned. After aneurysms were clipped, the vortex flow signals were detected by MDS in 6 cases. The aneurysm neck remnants were detected by ICGA in 2 cases of olfactory artery (OA) and in 1 case of middle cerebral artery (MCA), which disappeared after the clips were repositioned. Postoperative CTA or DSA showed that aneurysms were clipped completely and parent arteries and perforating vessels were patent. GOS at 1 month after the surgery was good in 111 cases (70.3%), mild disability in 22 cases (13.9%), severe disability in 14 cases (8.9%), vegetative state in 5 cases (3.2%), and death in 6 cases (3.8%). Conclusions Intraoperative combining application of SEP, MDS, and ICGA can reduce brain tissue ischemia and damage and disability and mortality rate after effective clipping of intracranial aneurysms, thereby improving surgical outcomes. PMID:26845425

  1. Nimotuzumab in combination with radiotherapy in high grade glioma patients

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Maria Teresa; Miranda, Nederlay; Jorrín, Eugenia; Chon, Ivonne; Marinello, Jorge Juan; Alert, José; Lorenzo-Luaces, Patricia; Crombet, Tania

    2014-01-01

    Nimotuzumab, a humanized antibody targeting epidermal growth factor receptor, has potent anti-proliferative, anti-angiogenic, and pro-apoptotic effects in vitro and in vivo. It also reduces the number of radio-resistant CD133+ glioma stem cells. The antibody has been extensively evaluated in patients with advanced head and neck, glioma, lung, esophageal, pancreatic, and gastric cancer. In this single institution experience, 35 patients with anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) or glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) were treated with irradiation and 200 mg doses of nimotuzumab. The first 6 doses were administered weekly, together with radiotherapy, and then treatment continued every 21 days until 1 year. The median number of doses was 12, and the median cumulative dose was thus 2400 mg of nimotuzumab. The most frequent treatment-related toxicities were increase in liver function tests, fever, nausea, anorexia, asthenia, dizziness, and tremors. These adverse reactions were classified as mild and moderate. The median survival time was 12.4 mo or 27.0 mo for patients with GBM or AA patients, respectively, who received curative-intent radiotherapy in combination with the antibody. The survival time of a matched population treated at the same hospital with irradiation alone was decreased (median 8.0 and 12.2 mo for GBM and AA patients, respectively) compared with that of the patients who received nimotuzumab and curative-intent radiotherapy. We have thus confirmed that nimotuzumab is a very well-tolerated drug, lacking cumulative toxicity after maintenance doses. This study, in a poor prognosis population, validates the previous data of survival gain after combining nimotuzumab and radiotherapy, in newly diagnosed high-grade glioma patients. PMID:24521695

  2. Combined Modality Therapy Including Intraoperative Electron Irradiation for Locally Recurrent Colorectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Haddock, Michael G.; Miller, Robert C.; Nelson, Heidi; Pemberton, John H.; Dozois, Eric J.; Alberts, Steven R.; Gunderson, Leonard L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate survival, relapse patterns, and prognostic factors in patients with colorectal cancer relapse treated with curative-intent therapy, including intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT). Methods and Materials: From April 1981 through January 2008, 607 patients with recurrent colorectal cancer received IOERT as a component of treatment. IOERT was preceded or followed by external radiation (median dose, 45.5 Gy) in 583 patients (96%). Resection was classified as R0 in 227 (37%), R1 in 224 (37%), and R2 in 156 (26%). The median IOERT dose was 15 Gy (range, 7.5-30 Gy). Results: Median overall survival was 36 months. Five- and 10-year survival rates were 30% and 16%, respectively. Survival estimates at 5 years were 46%, 27%, and 16% for R0, R1, and R2 resection, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that R0 resection, no prior chemotherapy, and more recent treatment (in the second half of the series) were associated with improved survival. The 3-year cumulative incidence of central, local, and distant relapse was 12%, 23%, and 49%, respectively. Central and local relapse were more common in previously irradiated patients and in those with subtotal resection. Toxicity Grade 3 or higher partially attributable to IOERT was observed in 66 patients (11%). Neuropathy was observed in 94 patients (15%) and was more common with IOERT doses exceeding 12.5 Gy. Conclusions: Long-term survival and disease control was achievable in patients with locally recurrent colorectal cancer. Continued evaluation of curative-intent, combined-modality therapy that includes IOERT is warranted in this high-risk population.

  3. Surgical Management of Combined Intramedullary Arteriovenous Malformation and Perimedullary Arteriovenous Fistula within the Hybrid Operating Room after Five Years of Performing Focus Fractionated Radiotherapy: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    GEKKA, Masayuki; SEKI, Toshitaka; HIDA, Kazutoshi; OSANAI, Toshiya; HOUKIN, Kiyohiro

    2014-01-01

    Perimedullary arteriovenous fistula (AVF) shunts occur on the spinal cord surface and can be treated surgically or by endovascular embolization. In contrast, the nidus of an intramedullary arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is located in the spinal cord and is difficult to treat surgically or by endovascular techniques. The benefits of radiotherapy for treating intramedullary AVM have been published, but are anecdotal and consist largely of case reports. We present a case of combined cervical intramedullary AVM and perimedullary AVF which received surgical treatment within a hybrid operating room (OR) after 5 years of focus fractionated radiotherapy. A 37-year-old male presented with stepwise worsening myelopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging and spinal angiography revealed intramedullary AVM and perimedullary AVF at the C3 to C5 levels. In order to reduce nidus size and blood flow, we first performed focal fractionated radiotherapy. Five years later, the lesion volume was reduced. Following this, direct surgery was performed by an anterior approach using corpectomy in the hybrid OR. The spinal cord was monitored by motor-evoked potential throughout the surgery. Complete obliteration of the fistulous connection was confirmed by intraoperative indocyanine green video-angiography and intraoperative angiography, preserving the anterior spinal artery. We conclude that surgical treatment following focal fractionated radiotherapy may become one strategy for patients who are initially deemed ineligible for endovascular embolization and surgical treatment. Furthermore, the hybrid OR enables safe and precise treatment for spinal vascular disorders in the fields of endovascular treatment and neurosurgery. PMID:25367581

  4. Environmental and social benefits of the targeted intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer: data from UK TARGIT-A trial centres and two UK NHS hospitals offering TARGIT IORT

    PubMed Central

    Coombs, Nathan J; Coombs, Joel M; Vaidya, Uma J; Singer, Julian; Bulsara, Max; Tobias, Jeffrey S; Wenz, Frederik; Joseph, David J; Brown, Douglas A; Rainsbury, Richard; Davidson, Tim; Adamson, Douglas J A; Massarut, Samuele; Morgan, David; Potyka, Ingrid; Corica, Tammy; Falzon, Mary; Williams, Norman; Baum, Michael; Vaidya, Jayant S

    2016-01-01

    Objective To quantify the journeys and CO2 emissions if women with breast cancer are treated with risk-adapted single-dose targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) rather than several weeks' course of external beam whole breast radiotherapy (EBRT) treatment. Setting (1) TARGIT-A randomised clinical trial (ISRCTN34086741) which compared TARGIT with traditional EBRT and found similar breast cancer control, particularly when TARGIT was given simultaneously with lumpectomy, (2) 2 additional UK centres offering TARGIT. Participants 485 UK patients (249 TARGIT, 236 EBRT) in the prepathology stratum of TARGIT-A trial (where randomisation occurred before lumpectomy and TARGIT was delivered simultaneously with lumpectomy) for whom geographical data were available and 22 patients treated with TARGIT after completion of the TARGIT-A trial in 2 additional UK breast centres. Outcome measures The shortest total journey distance, time and CO2 emissions from home to hospital to receive all the fractions of radiotherapy. Methods Distances, time and CO2 emissions were calculated using Google Maps and assuming a fuel efficiency of 40 mpg. The groups were compared using the Student t test with unequal variance and the non-parametric Wilcoxon rank-sum (Mann-Whitney) test. Results TARGIT patients travelled significantly fewer miles: TARGIT 21 681, mean 87.1 (SE 19.1) versus EBRT 92 591, mean 392.3 (SE 30.2); had lower CO2 emissions 24.7 kg (SE 5.4) vs 111 kg (SE 8.6) and spent less time travelling: 3 h (SE 0.53) vs 14 h (SE 0.76), all p<0.0001. Patients treated with TARGIT in 2 hospitals in semirural locations were spared much longer journeys (753 miles, 30 h, 215 kg CO2 per patient). Conclusions The use of TARGIT intraoperative radiotherapy for eligible patients with breast cancer significantly reduces their journeys for treatment and has environmental benefits. If widely available, 5 million miles (8 000 000 km) of travel, 170 000 woman-hours and 1200

  5. Cosmetic Outcomes for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Before Surgical Excision of Early-Stage Breast Cancer Using Single-Dose Intraoperative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kimple, Randall J.; Klauber-DeMore, Nancy; Kuzmiak, Cherie M.; Pavic, Dag; Lian, Jun; Livasy, Chad A.; Esler, Laura; Moore, Dominic T.; Sartor, Carolyn I.; Ollila, David W.

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: Determine cosmetic outcome and toxicity profile of intraoperative radiation delivered before tumor excision for patients with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients age 48 or older with ultrasound-visible invasive ductal cancers <3 cm and clinically negative lymph nodes were eligible for treatment on this institutional review board-approved Phase II clinical trial. Treatment planning ultrasound was used to select an electron energy and cone size sufficient to cover the tumor plus a 1.5- to 2.0-cm circumferential margin laterally and a 1-cm-deep margin with the 90% isodose line. The dose was prescribed to a nominal 15 Gy and delivered using a Mobetron electron irradiator before tumor excision by segmental mastectomy. Physician- and patient-assessed cosmetic outcome and patient satisfaction were determined by questionnaire. Results: From March 2003 to July 2007, 71 patients were treated with intraoperative radiation therapy. Of those, 56 patients were evaluable, with a median follow-up of 3.1 years (minimum 1 year). Physician and patient assessment of cosmesis was 'good or excellent' (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group cosmesis scale) in 45/56 (80%) and 32/42 (76%) of all patients, respectively. Eleven patients who received additional whole breast radiation had similar rates of good or excellent cosmesis: 40/48 (83%) and 29/36 (81%), respectively). Grade 1 or 2 acute toxicities were seen in 4/71 (6%) patients. No Grade 3 or 4 toxicities or serious adverse events have been seen. Conclusion: Intraoperative radiotherapy delivered to an in situ tumor is feasible with acceptable acute tolerance. Patient and physician assessment of the cosmetic outcome is good to excellent.

  6. Clinical aspects of intraoperative radiotherapy in early breast cancer: short-term complications after IORT in women treated with low energy x-rays

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To assess postoperative complications, clinical outcome and histological findings in patients undergoing intraoperative radiotherapy with low energy x-rays for early breast cancer. Methods We retrospectively analysed data of 208 women who underwent intraoperative irradiation during breast conserving surgery (BCS) between 2002 and 2007. Demographic, clinical and surgical parameters as well as short-term complications within the first postoperative week and histological findings were evaluated. Toxicities were assessed using the CTC/EORTC Score. Results Postoperative complications were rare and the immediate toxicity low, without any grade 3/4 acute toxicity. The most frequent postoperative side effects were suggillation (24%) and palpable seroma (17.3%). In 78.6% of the axillary seroma and in 25% of the breast seroma a needle aspiration was inevitable. Erythema grade I-II of the breast was found in 27 women (13%); whereas in 7 patients (3.4%), mastitis was confirmed. In 57.7% of the cases, the pathological assessment revealed ductal invasive breast cancer and tumour size ranged between 0.1 and 4.5 cm (mean = 1.6 cm). Conclusion IORT using Intrabeam® during BCS is safe, although it is associated with postoperative adverse events such as seroma. These should be mentioned and explained to women in detail during the preoperative discussion. This explicitly clinical description is useful for daily clinical practice; especially for giving a detailed analysis of the postoperative side effects during preoperative counselling. PMID:23607703

  7. Combining radiotherapy and angiogenesis inhibitors: Clinical trial design

    SciTech Connect

    Citrin, Deborah . E-mail: citrind@mail.nih.gov; Menard, Cynthia; Camphausen, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) plays a vital role in the multimodality treatment of cancer. Recent advances in RT have primarily involved improvements in dose delivery. Future improvements in tumor control and disease outcomes will likely involve the combination of RT with targeted therapies. Preclinical evaluations of angiogenesis inhibitors in combination with RT have yielded promising results with increased tumor 'cure.' It remains to be seen whether these improvements in tumor control in the laboratory will translate into improved outcomes in the clinic. Multiple differences between these agents and cytotoxic chemotherapy must be taken into account when designing clinical trials evaluating their effectiveness in combination with RT. We discuss important considerations for designing clinical trials of angiogenesis inhibitors with RT.

  8. Are mammographic changes in the tumor bed more pronounced after intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer? Subgroup analysis from a randomized trial (TARGIT-A).

    PubMed

    Engel, Dorothee; Schnitzer, Andreas; Brade, Joachim; Blank, Elena; Wenz, Frederik; Suetterlin, Marc; Schoenberg, Stefan; Wasser, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) with low-energy x-rays is increasingly used in breast-conserving therapy (BCT). Previous non-randomized studies have observed mammographic changes in the tumor bed to be more pronounced after IORT. The purpose of this study was to reassess the postoperative changes in a randomized single-center subgroup of patients from a multicenter trial (TARGIT-A). In this subgroup (n = 48) 27 patients received BCT with IORT, 21 patients had BCT with standard whole-breast radiotherapy serving as controls. Overall 258 postoperative mammograms (median follow-up 4.3 years, range 3-8) were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists in consensus focusing on changes in the tumor bed. Fat necroses showed to be significantly more frequent (56% versus 24%) and larger (8.7 versus 1.6 sq cm, median) after IORT than those in controls. Scar calcifications were also significantly more frequent after IORT (63% versus 19%). The high incidence of large fat necroses in our study confirms previous study findings. However, the overall higher incidence of calcifications in the tumor bed after IORT represents a new finding, requiring further attention. PMID:23173717

  9. Radiation-related quality of life parameters after targeted intraoperative radiotherapy versus whole breast radiotherapy in patients with breast cancer: results from the randomized phase III trial TARGIT-A

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) is a new treatment approach for early stage breast cancer. This study reports on the effects of IORT on radiation-related quality of life (QoL) parameters. Methods Two hundred and thirty women with stage I-III breast cancer (age, 31 to 84 years) were entered into the study. A single-center subgroup of 87 women from the two arms of the randomized phase III trial TARGIT-A (TARGeted Intra-operative radioTherapy versus whole breast radiotherapy for breast cancer) was analyzed. Furthermore, results were compared to non-randomized control groups: n = 90 receiving IORT as a tumor bed boost followed by external beam whole breast radiotherapy (EBRT) outside of TARGIT-A (IORT-boost), and n = 53 treated with EBRT followed by an external-beam boost (EBRT-boost). QoL was collected using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaires C30 (QLQ-C30) and BR23 (QLQ-BR23). The mean follow-up period in the TARGIT-A groups was 32 versus 39 months in the non-randomized control groups. Results Patients receiving IORT alone reported less general pain (21.3 points), breast (7.0 points) and arm (15.1 points) symptoms, and better role functioning (78.7 points) as patients receiving EBRT (40.9; 19.0; 32.8; and 60.5 points, respectively, P < 0.01). Patients receiving IORT alone also had fewer breast symptoms than TARGIT-A patients receiving IORT followed by EBRT for high risk features on final pathology (IORT-EBRT; 7.0 versus 29.7 points, P < 0.01). There were no significant differences between TARGIT-A patients receiving IORT-EBRT compared to non-randomized IORT-boost or EBRT-boost patients and patients receiving EBRT without a boost. Conclusions In the randomized setting, important radiation-related QoL parameters after IORT were superior to EBRT. Non-randomized comparisons showed equivalent parameters in the IORT-EBRT group and the control groups. PMID:23294485

  10. Preoperative forced-air warming combined with intraoperative warming versus intraoperative warming alone in the prevention of hypothermia during gynecologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Adriani, Melissa Bucci; Moriber, Nancy

    2013-12-01

    Hypothermia in the perioperative setting can have serious consequences, including increased risk of infection or adverse cardiac events. Forced-air warming units commonly are used to prevent hypothermia. This study examined the impact of adding preoperative warming (Bair Paws, 3M) to conventional intraoperative forced-air warming modalities. Thirty patients received both preoperative and intraoperative forced-air warming, and 30 patients received intraoperative warming alone. Temperature readings were recorded across 3 time periods: preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and repeated-measures ANOVA. Demographics were similar in both groups with respect to age, body mass index, total intravenous fluids, and estimated blood loss. Statistically significant differences in temperature were seen over time (df = 2, P < .001), and for each intervention across all 3 time periods (P = .042). However, no statistically significant differences in temperature were demonstrated between groups over time. ASA status and type of procedure (laparoscopic vs open) also had no impact on results. These results suggest that preoperative warming with the Bair Paws gown offers no benefit over conventional therapy in maintaining normothermia in the perioperative period. PMID:24597006

  11. Combining Targeted Agents With Modern Radiotherapy in Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Philip; Houghton, Peter; Kirsch, David G.; Finkelstein, Steven E.; Monjazeb, Arta M.; Xu-Welliver, Meng; Dicker, Adam P.; Ahmed, Mansoor; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Teicher, Beverly A.; Coleman, C. Norman; Machtay, Mitchell; Curran, Walter J.

    2014-01-01

    Improved understanding of soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) biology has led to better distinction and subtyping of these diseases with the hope of exploiting the molecular characteristics of each subtype to develop appropriately targeted treatment regimens. In the care of patients with extremity STS, adjunctive radiation therapy (RT) is used to facilitate limb and function, preserving surgeries while maintaining five-year local control above 85%. In contrast, for STS originating from nonextremity anatomical sites, the rate of local recurrence is much higher (five-year local control is approximately 50%) and a major cause of death and morbidity in these patients. Incorporating novel technological advancements to administer accurate RT in combination with novel radiosensitizing agents could potentially improve local control and overall survival. RT efficacy in STS can be increased by modulating biological pathways such as angiogenesis, cell cycle regulation, cell survival signaling, and cancer-host immune interactions. Previous experiences, advancements, ongoing research, and current clinical trials combining RT with agents modulating one or more of the above pathways are reviewed. The standard clinical management of patients with STS with pretreatment biopsy, neoadjuvant treatment, and primary surgery provides an opportune disease model for interrogating translational hypotheses. The purpose of this review is to outline a strategic vision for clinical translation of preclinical findings and to identify appropriate targeted agents to combine with radiotherapy in the treatment of STS from different sites and/or different histology subtypes. PMID:25326640

  12. Combining targeted agents with modern radiotherapy in soft tissue sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Wong, Philip; Houghton, Peter; Kirsch, David G; Finkelstein, Steven E; Monjazeb, Arta M; Xu-Welliver, Meng; Dicker, Adam P; Ahmed, Mansoor; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Teicher, Beverly A; Coleman, C Norman; Machtay, Mitchell; Curran, Walter J; Wang, Dian

    2014-11-01

    Improved understanding of soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) biology has led to better distinction and subtyping of these diseases with the hope of exploiting the molecular characteristics of each subtype to develop appropriately targeted treatment regimens. In the care of patients with extremity STS, adjunctive radiation therapy (RT) is used to facilitate limb and function, preserving surgeries while maintaining five-year local control above 85%. In contrast, for STS originating from nonextremity anatomical sites, the rate of local recurrence is much higher (five-year local control is approximately 50%) and a major cause of death and morbidity in these patients. Incorporating novel technological advancements to administer accurate RT in combination with novel radiosensitizing agents could potentially improve local control and overall survival. RT efficacy in STS can be increased by modulating biological pathways such as angiogenesis, cell cycle regulation, cell survival signaling, and cancer-host immune interactions. Previous experiences, advancements, ongoing research, and current clinical trials combining RT with agents modulating one or more of the above pathways are reviewed. The standard clinical management of patients with STS with pretreatment biopsy, neoadjuvant treatment, and primary surgery provides an opportune disease model for interrogating translational hypotheses. The purpose of this review is to outline a strategic vision for clinical translation of preclinical findings and to identify appropriate targeted agents to combine with radiotherapy in the treatment of STS from different sites and/or different histology subtypes. PMID:25326640

  13. Is electron beam intraoperative radiotherapy (ELIOT) safe in pregnant women with early breast cancer? In vivo dosimetry to assess fetal dose.

    PubMed

    Galimberti, Viviana; Ciocca, Mario; Leonardi, Maria Cristina; Zanagnolo, Vanna; Paola, Baratella; Manuela, Sargenti; Sahium, Rafaela Cecilio; Lazzari, Roberta; Gentilini, Oreste; Peccatori, Fedro; Veronesi, Umberto; Orecchia, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Electron beam intraoperative radiotherapy (ELIOT) is a new technique permitting breast radiotherapy to be completed in a single session. Since ELIOT is associated with much reduced irradiation to nontarget tissues, we carried out a study on nonpregnant breast cancer patients to estimate doses to the uterus during ELIOT to better evaluate the possible use of ELIOT in pregnant breast cancer patients. We performed in vivo dosimetry with thermoluminescence radiation detectors (TLDs) in 15 premenopausal patients receiving ELIOT to the breast (prescribed dose 21 Gy) using two mobile linear accelerators. The TLDs were positioned subdiaphragmatically on the irradiated side, at the medial pubic position, and within the uterus. A shielding apron (2 mm lead equivalent) was placed over the viscera from the subcostal to the subpubic region. TLDs showed mean doses of 3.7 mGy (range 1-8.5 mGy) at subdiaphragm, 0.9 mGy (range 0.3-2 mGy) pubic, and 1.7 mGy (range 0.6-3.2 mGy) in utero, for beam energies in the range 5-9 MeV. These findings indicate that ELIOT with a mobile linear accelerator and shielding apron would be safe for the fetus, as doses of a few mGy are not associated with measurable increased risk of fetal damage, and the threshold dose for deterministic effects is estimated at 100-200 mGy. We conclude that studies on the use of ELIOT in pregnant women treated with conservative breast surgery are justified. PMID:18941842

  14. An Innovative Tool for Intraoperative Electron Beam Radiotherapy Simulation and Planning: Description and Initial Evaluation by Radiation Oncologists

    SciTech Connect

    Pascau, Javier; Santos Miranda, Juan Antonio; Calvo, Felipe A.; Bouche, Ana; Morillo, Virgina; Gonzalez-San Segundo, Carmen; Ferrer, Carlos; Lopez Tarjuelo, Juan; and others

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy (IOERT) involves a modified strategy of conventional radiation therapy and surgery. The lack of specific planning tools limits the spread of this technique. The purpose of the present study is to describe a new simulation and planning tool and its initial evaluation by clinical users. Methods and Materials: The tool works on a preoperative computed tomography scan. A physician contours regions to be treated and protected and simulates applicator positioning, calculating isodoses and the corresponding dose-volume histograms depending on the selected electron energy. Three radiation oncologists evaluated data from 15 IOERT patients, including different tumor locations. Segmentation masks, applicator positions, and treatment parameters were compared. Results: High parameter agreement was found in the following cases: three breast and three rectal cancer, retroperitoneal sarcoma, and rectal and ovary monotopic recurrences. All radiation oncologists performed similar segmentations of tumors and high-risk areas. The average applicator position difference was 1.2 {+-} 0.95 cm. The remaining cancer sites showed higher deviations because of differences in the criteria for segmenting high-risk areas (one rectal, one pancreas) and different surgical access simulated (two rectal, one Ewing sarcoma). Conclusions: The results show that this new tool can be used to simulate IOERT cases involving different anatomic locations, and that preplanning has to be carried out with specialized surgical input.

  15. Treatment of brain metastases of renal cell cancer with combined hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy and whole brain radiotherapy with hippocampal sparing

    PubMed Central

    VRÁNA, DAVID; ŠTUDENTOVÁ, HANA; MATZENAUER, MARCEL; VLACHOVÁ, ZUZANA; CWIERTKA, KAREL; GREMLICA, DAVID; KALITA, ONDŘEJ

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell cancer patients with brain metastatic disease generally have poor prognosis. Treatment options include surgery, radiotherapy, targeted therapy or best supportive care with respect to disease burden, patient preference and performance status. In the present case report the radiotherapy technique combining whole brain radiotherapy with hippocampal sparing (hippocampal avoidance whole brain radiotherapy HA-WBRT) and hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) of the brain metastases is performed in a patient with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. HA-WBRT was administered to 30 Gy in 10 fractions with sparing of the hippocampal structures and SRT of 21 Gy in 3 fractions to brain metastases which has preceded the HA-WBRT. Two single arc volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) plans were prepared using Monaco planning software. The HA-WBRT treatment plan achieved the following results: D2=33.91 Gy, D98=25.20 Gy, D100=14.18 Gy, D50=31.26 Gy. The homogeneity index was calculated as a deduction of the minimum dose in 2% and 98% of the planning target volume (PTV), divided by the minimum dose in 50% of the PTV. The maximum dose to the hippocampus was 17.50 Gy and mean dose was 11.59 Gy. The following doses to organs at risk (OAR) were achieved: Right opticus Dmax, 31.96 Gy; left opticus Dmax, 30.96 Gy; chiasma D max, 32,76 Gy. The volume of PTV for stereotactic radiotherapy was 3,736 cm3, with coverage D100=20.95 Gy and with only 0.11% of the PTV being irradiated to dose below the prescribed dose. HA-WBRT with SRT represents a feasible technique for radiotherapy of brain metastatic disease, however this technique is considerably demanding on departmental equipment and staff time/experience. PMID:27313693

  16. Combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy for high-grade brain tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barazzuol, Lara

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumour in adults and among the most aggressive of all tumours. For several decades, the standard care of GBM was surgical resection followed by radiotherapy alone. In 2005, a landmark phase III clinical trial coordinated by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and the National Cancer Institute of Canada (NCIC) demonstrated the benefit of radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy. With TMZ, the median life expectancy in optimally managed patients is still only 12-14 months, with only 25% surviving 24 months. There is an urgent need for new therapies in particular in those patients whose tumour has an unmethylated methylguanine methyltransferase gene (MGMT) promoter, which is a predictive factor of benefit from TMZ. In this dissertation, the nature of the interaction between TMZ and radiation is investigated using both a mathematical model, based on in vivo population statistics of survival, and in vitro experimentation on a panel of human GBM cell lines. The results show that TMZ has an additive effect in vitro and that the population-based model may be insufficient in predicting TMZ response. The combination of TMZ with particle therapy is also investigated. Very little preclinical data exists on the effects of charged particles on GBM cell lines as well as on the concomitant application of chemotherapy. In this study, human GBM cells are exposed to 3 MeV protons and 6 MeV alpha particles in concomitance with TMZ. The results suggest that the radiation quality does not affect the nature of the interaction between TMZ and radiation, showing reproducible additive cytotoxicity. Since TMZ and radiation cause DNA damage in cancer cells, there has been increased attention to the use of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. PARP is a family of enzymes that play a key role in the repair of DNA breaks. In this study, a novel PARP inhibitor, ABT-888

  17. Radiotherapy Combined With Androgen Deprivation for Bone Oligometastases After Primary Curative Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun-Xin; Lin, Li-Mei; He, Jun-Yan; Hong, Liang; Li, Jin-Luan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the effects and toxicity of radiotherapy (RT) combined with androgen deprivation (AD) for bone oligometastases after primary curative RT for prostate cancer (PCa). We retrospectively analyzed 30 consecutively treated PCa patients with bone oligometastases from April 2005 to July 2014. All patients underwent RT combined with AD for oligometastatic bones after curative RT for PCa. Measured outcomes included overall survival (OS) rate, local control (LC), progression-free survival (PFS), pain relief, and toxicities. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS17.0. The median follow-up was 32.5 months (range, 0.6–50.3). The 3-year PFS and OS rates were 22.8% (95% CI, 13.4–37.5%) and 69% (95% CI, 51.7–81.1%), respectively. The number of bone oligometastases and RT schedule were found to be significantly associated with OS on univariate analysis (P < 0.05, respectively). The 3-year OS for patients with 1 and >1 metastases was 78.8% versus 42.2%, respectively (P = 0.037). The long-course RT was associated with better 3-year OS compared with short-course (76.4% vs 44.1%, P = 0.03). A total of 15 (83.3%, 15/18) patients achieved pain relief. No grade 3 toxicity was observed. Long-course RT combined with ADT was effective and well-tolerated in PCa patients with bone oligometastases after curative RT for PCa. Further randomized controlled trials are needed to corroborate the findings. PMID:26871838

  18. Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Adamietz, Irenaus A

    2010-01-01

    The intrathoracic growth of the tumor causes several severe symptoms as cough, dyspnea, chest pain, hemoptysis, hoarseness, anorexia/nausea, and dysphagia. In patients with manifest or threatening symptoms radiotherapy (RT) as an effective measure should be implemented into the management concept. Palliative RT radiotherapy prefers short hypofractionated schemas (e.g. 10 x 3 Gy, 4 x 5 Gy, 2 x 8 Gy, 1 x 10 Gy). Careful radiation planning supports the precision of palliative RT and reduces significantly the complication rate. A good response and prolonged palliation effects (6-12 months) can be achieved in many cases. However, the minimum biologically equivalent dose should not be less than 35 Gy. RT produces a good outcome in all types of metastases of lung carcinoma. In emergencies like VCSS or spinal cord compression RT should be initiated immediately. The selection of the optimal therapy for locally advanced lung carcinoma with malignant airway obstruction is difficult. Both brachytherapy and percutaneous irradiation are effective, however published results including local a sum of response, functionality and life quality demonstrates more benefit by percutaneous RT. Due to different physical properties of these two methods the combination of brachytherapy and external beam irradiation may be advantageous. PMID:19955803

  19. Combinations of Radiotherapy and Immunotherapy for Melanoma: A Review of Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Christopher A.; Postow, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy has long played a role in the management of melanoma. Recent advances have also demonstrated the efficacy of immunotherapy in the treatment of melanoma. Preclinical data suggest a biologic interaction between radiotherapy and immunotherapy. Several clinical studies corroborate these findings. This review will summarize the outcomes of studies reporting on patients with melanoma treated with a combination of radiotherapy and immunotherapy. Vaccine therapies often use irradiated melanoma cells, and may be enhanced by radiotherapy. The cytokines interferon-alpha and interleukin-2 have been combined with radiotherapy in several small studies, with some evidence suggesting increased toxicity and/or efficacy. Ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody which blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4, has been combined with radiotherapy in several notable case studies and series. Finally, pilot studies of adoptive cell transfer have suggested radiotherapy may improve the efficacy of treatment. The review will demonstrate that the combination of radiotherapy and immunotherapy has been reported in several notable case studies, series and clinical trials. These clinical results suggest interaction and the need for further study. PMID:24661650

  20. Cisplatin combined with hyperthermia kills HepG2 cells in intraoperative blood salvage but preserves the function of erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin-ting; Tang, Li-hui; Liu, Yun-qing; Wang, Yin; Wang, Lie-ju; Zhang, Feng-jiang; Yan, Min

    2015-05-01

    The safe use of intraoperative blood salvage (IBS) in cancer surgery remains controversial. Here, we investigated the killing effect of cisplatin combined with hyperthermia on human hepatocarcinoma (HepG2) cells and erythrocytes from IBS in vitro. HepG2 cells were mixed with concentrated erythrocytes and pretreated with cisplatin (50, 100, and 200 μg/ml) alone at 37 °C for 60 min and cisplatin (25, 50, 100, and 200 μg/ml) combined with hyperthermia at 42 °C for 60 min. After pretreatment, the cell viability, colony formation and DNA metabolism in HepG2 and the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) concentration, free hemoglobin (Hb) level, osmotic fragility, membrane phosphatidylserine externalization, and blood gas variables in erythrocytes were determined. Pretreatment with cisplatin (50, 100, and 200 μg/ml) combined with hyperthermia (42 °C) for 60 min significantly decreased HepG2 cell viability, and completely inhibited colony formation and DNA metabolism when the HepG2 cell concentration was 5×10(4) ml(-1) in the erythrocyte (P<0.01). Erythrocytic Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity, 2,3-DPG level, phosphatidylserine externalization, and extra-erythrocytic free Hb were significantly altered by hyperthermia plus high concentrations of cisplatin (100 and 200 μg/ml) (P<0.05), but not by hyperthermia plus 50 μg/ml cisplatin (P>0.05). In conclusion, pretreatment with cisplatin (50 μg/ml) combined with hyperthermia (42 °C) for 60 min effectively eliminated HepG2 cells from IBS but did not significantly affect erythrocytes in vitro. PMID:25990057

  1. Review of hematological indices of cancer patients receiving combined chemotherapy & radiotherapy or receiving radiotherapy alone.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Saman

    2016-09-01

    We observed the outcomes of chemotherapy with radiotherapy (CR) or radiotherapy (RT) alone for cancer patients of larynx, breast, blood and brain origins through complete blood count (CBC). Following were more depressed in CR patients: mean corpuscular hemoglobin-MCH & lymphocytes-LYM, hematocrit, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration-MCHC, hemoglobin-HB and red blood cells-RBC. In RT patients, following were more depressed: LYM, MCH and MCHC. Overall, in all cancer patients, the lymphocytes were depressed 52%. There existed a significant difference between white blood cells and RBC in both CR and RT patients. A significant moderate negative correlation is found in HB with the dose range 30-78 (Gray) given to the CR cancer patients. More number of CBC parameters affected in patients treated with CR and RT; but in less percentage as compared to patients who treated with RT alone. The cancer patients suffered from anemia along with immune modulations from the treatments. PMID:27423975

  2. Outcomes after combined use of intraoperative MRI and 5-aminolevulinic acid in high-grade glioma surgery

    PubMed Central

    Schatlo, Bawarjan; Fandino, Javier; Smoll, Nicolas R.; Wetzel, Oliver; Remonda, Luca; Marbacher, Serge; Perrig, Wolfgang; Landolt, Hans; Fathi, Ali-Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown the individual benefits of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) and intraoperative (i)MRI in enhancing survival for patients with high-grade glioma. In this retrospective study, we compare rates of progression-free and overall survival between patients who underwent surgical resection with the combination of 5-ALA and iMRI and a control group without iMRI. Methods In 200 consecutive patients with high-grade gliomas, we recorded age, sex, World Health Organization tumor grade, and pre- and postoperative Karnofsky performance status (good ≥80 and poor <80). A 0.15-Tesla magnet was used for iMRI; all patients operated on with iMRI received 5-ALA. Overall and progression-free survival rates were compared using multivariable regression analysis. Results Median overall survival was 13.8 months in the non-iMRI group and 17.9 months in the iMRI group (P = .043). However, on identifying confounding variables (ie, KPS and resection status) in this univariate analysis, we then adjusted for these confounders in multivariate analysis and eliminated this distinction in overall survival (hazard ratio: 1.23, P = .34, 95% CI: 0.81, 1.86). Although 5-ALA enhanced the achievement of gross total resection (odds ratio: 3.19, P = .01, 95% CI: 1.28, 7.93), it offered no effect on overall or progression-free survival when adjusted for resection status. Conclusions Gross total resection is the key surgical variable that influences progression and survival in patients with high-grade glioma and more likely when surgical adjuncts, such as iMRI in combination with 5-ALA, are used to enhance resection. PMID:25858636

  3. Challenges of Using High-Dose Fractionation Radiotherapy in Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying-Chieh; Chiang, Chi-Shiun

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is crucial and substantially contributes to multimodal cancer treatment. The combination of conventional fractionation radiotherapy (CFRT) and systemic therapy has been established as the standard treatment for many cancer types. With advances in linear accelerators and image-guided techniques, high-dose fractionation radiotherapy (HFRT) is increasingly introduced in cancer centers. Clinicians are currently integrating HFRT into multimodality treatment. The shift from CFRT to HFRT reveals different effects on the tumor microenvironment and responses, particularly the immune response. Furthermore, the combination of HFRT and drugs yields different results in different types of tumors or using different treatment schemes. We have reviewed clinical trials and preclinical evidence on the combination of HFRT with drugs, such as chemotherapy, targeted therapy, and immune therapy. Notably, HFRT apparently enhances tumor cell killing and antigen presentation, thus providing opportunities and challenges in treating cancer. PMID:27446811

  4. Standard percutaneous nephrolithotomy alone versus in combination with intraoperative anterograde flexible nephroscopy for staghorn stones: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Goktug, Goksel; Karakoyunlu, Nihat; Sener, Nevzat Can; Zengin, Kursad; Nalbant, Ismail; Karabacak, Osman; Ozturk, Ufuk; Imamoglu, Abdurrahim

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to compare the outcomes of standard percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) to PCNL with intraoperative antegrade flexible nephroscopy (IAFN) for treating stones of staghorn nature. We retrospectively analyzed patients treated using PCNL between January 2007 and July 2013. A total of 1250 patients were treated using PCNL, and 166 patients had staghorn stones. All patients had been subjected to a complete blood count, routine biochemical analyses, coagulation tests, a complete urine analysis, and urine cultures. Patients with a positive urine culture had been treated with appropriate antibiotics until the urine culture became negative. After purchasing a flexible renoscope in March 2012, we routinely used this tool to improve the stone-free (SF) rate. The 105 patients who underwent standard PCNL prior to March 2012 were classified as Group 1, and the 61 patients who underwent PCNL + IAFN after that date were classified as Group 2. The two groups had similar and homogeneous demographic data. The fluoroscopy and total operative times were significantly higher in Group 2 than in Group 1 (p < 0.01). Additionally, the hospitalization time (p < 0.01) and the mean hematocrit decrease (p < 0.01) were significantly lower in Group 1. In both groups, the SF rates were higher than 85%, similar to those reported in the literature. Although Group 2 had a slightly better SF rates, this difference was not statistically significant. For staghorn calculi, PCNL combined with IAFN yields excellent outcomes. However, similar prospective studies on larger cohorts should be performed to support our findings. PMID:26678936

  5. Intraoperative electromyography.

    PubMed

    Holland, Neil R

    2002-10-01

    Intraoperative electromyography (EMG) provides useful diagnostic and prognostic information during spine and peripheral nerve surgeries. The basic techniques include free-running EMG, stimulus-triggered EMG, and intraoperative nerve conduction studies. These techniques can be used to monitor nerve roots during spine surgeries, the facial nerve during cerebellopontine angle surgeries, and peripheral nerves during brachial plexus exploration and repair. However, there are a number of technical limitations that can cause false-positive or false-negative results, and these must be recognized and avoided when possible. The author reviews these basic electrophysiologic techniques, how they are applied to specific surgical situations, and their limitations. PMID:12477989

  6. Combined hysteroscopy-laparoscopy approach for excision of pelvic nitinol fragment from Essure contraceptive device: Role of intraoperative fluoroscopy for uterine conservation.

    PubMed

    Sills, E Scott; Palermo, Gianpiero D

    2016-07-01

    We describe the successful removal of a pelvic contraceptive coil in a symptomatic 46-year-old patient who had Essure devices for four years, using a combined hysteroscopy-laparoscopy-fluoroscopy approach. Following normal hysteroscopy, at laparoscopy the right Essure implant was disrupted and its outer nitinol coil had perforated the fallopian tube. However, the inner rod (containing polyethylene terephthalate) had migrated to an extrapelvic location, near the proximal colon. In contrast, the left implant was situated within the corresponding tube. Intraoperative fluoroscopy was used to confirm complete removal of the device, which was further verified by postoperative computed tomography. The patient's condition improved after surgery and she continues to do well. This is the first report to describe this technique in managing Essure complications remote from time of insertion. Our case highlights the value and limitations of preoperative and intraoperative imaging to map Essure fragment location before surgery. PMID:27462605

  7. Combined hysteroscopy-laparoscopy approach for excision of pelvic nitinol fragment from Essure contraceptive device: Role of intraoperative fluoroscopy for uterine conservation

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Gianpiero D.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the successful removal of a pelvic contraceptive coil in a symptomatic 46-year-old patient who had Essure devices for four years, using a combined hysteroscopy-laparoscopy-fluoroscopy approach. Following normal hysteroscopy, at laparoscopy the right Essure implant was disrupted and its outer nitinol coil had perforated the fallopian tube. However, the inner rod (containing polyethylene terephthalate) had migrated to an extrapelvic location, near the proximal colon. In contrast, the left implant was situated within the corresponding tube. Intraoperative fluoroscopy was used to confirm complete removal of the device, which was further verified by postoperative computed tomography. The patient's condition improved after surgery and she continues to do well. This is the first report to describe this technique in managing Essure complications remote from time of insertion. Our case highlights the value and limitations of preoperative and intraoperative imaging to map Essure fragment location before surgery. PMID:27462605

  8. A review of hyperthermia combined with radiotherapy/chemotherapy on malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Rao, Wei; Deng, Zhong-Shan; Liu, Jing

    2010-01-01

    Therapeutic hyperthermia is a procedure that involves heating tissues to a higher temperature level, typically ranging from 41 degrees C to 45 degrees C. Its combination with radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy has been performed for many years, with remarkable success in treating advanced and recurrent cancers. The current hyperthermia strategies generally include local, regional, and whole-body hyperthermia, which can be implemented by many heating methods, such as microwave, radiofrequency, laser, and ultrasound. There are several hyperthermic treatment modalities in conjunction with radiotherapy/chemotherapy. Numerous studies have attempted to explain the mechanisms of thermosensitization from radiation and chemotherapy; however, a generalized standard for determining an optimal hyperthermia modality combined with radiotherapy/chemotherapy has not been established, so more research is needed. Fortunately, phase II/III clinical trials have demonstrated that hyperthermia combination therapy is beneficial for local tumor control and survival in patients with high-risk tumors of different types. The aim of this article is to present a comprehensive review of the latest advances in tumor hyperthermia combined with radiotherapy and/ or chemotherapy. We specifically focus on synergistic cellular and molecular mechanisms, thermal dose, treatment sequence, monitoring and imaging, and clinical outcomes of the combination therapy. The role of nanoparticles in sensitization during radio-/chemotherapy is also evaluated. Finally, research challenges and future trends in the related areas are presented. PMID:21175406

  9. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy combined with topotecan in recurrent malignant glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Wurm, Reinhard E. . E-mail: Reinhard.Wurm@charite.de; Kuczer, David A.; Schlenger, Lorenz; Matnjani, Gesa; Scheffler, Dirk; Cosgrove, Vivian P.; Ahlswede, Julia; Woiciechowsky, Christian; Budach, Volker

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To assess hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (H-SRT) with concurrent topotecan in patients with recurrent malignant glioma. Methods and Materials: Between February 1998 and December 2001, 25 patients with recurrent malignant glioma were treated in a phase I-II study (8 females and 17 males; median age, 45 years; range, 11-66 years; median Karnofsky performance status, 80%, range, 50-100%; median Mini Mental Standard Examination score, 25 points; range, 10-30 points). Of the 25 patients, 20% had World Health Organization Grade III and 80% World Health Organization Grade IV glioma. All patients had been treated previously by external beam radiotherapy with 54.4 Gy in 34 fractions twice daily, at least 6 h apart, within 3.5 weeks or 60 Gy in 30 fractions within 6 weeks. In addition, 84% had already received at least one chemotherapy regimen for recurrence. The median H-SRT dose at the 80% isodose was 25 Gy, and the maximal dose was 30 Gy delivered in five to six fractions on consecutive days. Topotecan (1.1 mg/m{sup 2}/d) was given as a continuous i.v. infusion during H-SRT. Depending on the toxicity and compliance, patients received an additional 48 topotecan courses. Results: For all patients, the actuarial median progression-free survival was 10.5 months (range, 1.4-47.8 months), the median functional survival was 12.6 months (range, 1.6-49.5 months), and the median overall survival was 14.5 months (range, 3-56.4 months). Twelve percent of patients developed presumed adverse radiation effects (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 2). According to the Common Toxicity Criteria, version 2.0, no topotecan-related Grade 4 toxicity was noted. Grade 3 neutropenia was documented after 14 and Grade 3 thrombopenia after 12 courses. Conclusion: H-SRT with topotecan is feasible and well-tolerated in patients with recurrent high-grade glioma and results in similar survival compared with other repeat treatment modalities.

  10. Tracer-cocktail injections for combined pre- and intraoperative multimodal imaging of lymph nodes in a spontaneous mouse prostate tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, Anne C.; Buckle, Tessa; Bendle, Gavin; Vermeeren, Lenka; Valdés Olmos, Renato; van de Poel, Henk G.; van Leeuwen, Fijs W. B.

    2011-01-01

    To improve surgical guidance toward prostate draining lymph nodes, we investigate the potential of intraoperative fluorescence imaging and combined pre- and intraoperative multimodality imaging approaches. Transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate mice with spontaneous prostate tumors are injected intratumorally with: 1. a cocktail of patent blue (Pb) and indocyanine green (ICG); 2. a cocktail of albumin radiocolloids (99mTc-NanoColl), Pb, and ICG; or 3. a cocktail of radiolabeled albumin (99mTc-Vasculosis), Pb, and ICG. The distribution of these imaging agents over the lymph nodes (LNs) are studied at different time points after injection. We find that at 60-min postinjection, ICG significantly improves the detection of the LNs compared to Pb, 53 versus 7%, respectively. Moreover, a cocktail of ICG and 99mTc-NanoColl improves the fluorescent detection rate to 86%, equalling that of the clinically applied 99mTc-NanoColl. A similar overlap is observed in our initial clinical pilot data. Fluorescent detection of the LNs using a ICG with 99mTc-Vasculosis gives similar results as ``free'' ICG (58% 60 min). A 99mTc-NanoColl, Pb, and cocktail ICG enriches the standard 99mTc-NanoColl approach by adding optical detection of the sentinel lymph nodes. Furthermore, this approach improves fluorescent-based guidance and enables both accurate surgical planning and intraoperative detection, based on a single injection.

  11. Chyloperitoneum and chylothorax: a combined rare occurrence after retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy and radiotherapy for testis tumor.

    PubMed

    Dharman, K; Temes, S P; Wetherell, F E; Kendrick, M J

    1984-02-01

    We report a case of chyloperitoneum and chylothorax 5 weeks after retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy and radiotherapy for embryonal cell carcinoma of the testis. To our knowledge, this is the second reported case of this rare combined complication. The patient was treated successfully with an alimental dietary regimen (medium chain triglycerides and Vivonex), coupled with thoracenteses and paracenteses. PMID:6699970

  12. A self-assembled multimodal complex for combined pre- and intraoperative imaging of the sentinel lymph node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckle, Tessa; van Leeuwen, Anne C.; Chin, Patrick T. K.; Janssen, Hans; Muller, Sara H.; Jonkers, Jos; van Leeuwen, Fijs W. B.

    2010-09-01

    Specific removal of the sentinel lymph node (SLN) during breast cancer surgery presents physicians with the opportunity to detect early metastatic disease. To increase the accuracy of intraoperative SLN detection, new methods with higher sensitivity and specificity are required. We have quantitatively compared conventional preoperative lymphoscintigraphy with albumin radiocolloids (99mTc-NanoColl) with optical intraoperative guidance using the near infrared dye indocyanine green (ICG) in an orthotopic mouse model for metastatic breast cancer. Furthermore, we have applied a self-assembled multimodal complex, in which ICG is non-covalently bound to the albumin radiocolloid, to attain identical dynamics of the radioactive and optical components. The SLN specificity of the multimodal complex is similar to conventional lymphoscintigraphy, while the fluorescent signal-to-noise ratio is improved by 86% compared to ICG alone. In addition, the multimodal complex permits scintigraphic validation of the fluorescent findings. The multimodal ICG-99mTc-NanoColl complex can be used both for lymphoscintigraphy by preoperative single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography and for surgical navigation by intraoperative fluorescence imaging.

  13. Intraoperative contrast-enhanced sonographic portography combined with indigo carmine dye injection for anatomic liver resection in hepatocellular carcinoma: a new technique.

    PubMed

    Park, Yang Shin; Lee, Chang Hee; Park, Pyoung-Jae; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Park, Cheol Min

    2014-07-01

    We present a method of intraoperative contrast-enhanced sonographic portography combined with indigo carmine dye injection for anatomic liver resection in hepatocellular carcinoma. During surgery, before dye infusion into the feeding portal vein, the targeted portal vein branch was directly punctured, and a microbubble contrast agent was administered under sonographic guidance. Simultaneous enhancement of the resected hepatic parenchyma with a microbubble contrast agent and blue dye improved estimation of the segmental border in the cutting plane and the tumor resection margin during liver surgery. PMID:24958416

  14. Combination ibandronate and radiotherapy for the treatment of bone metastases: Clinical evaluation and radiologic assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Vassiliou, Vassilios; Kalogeropoulou, Christine; Christopoulos, Christos; Solomou, Ekaterini; Leotsinides, Michael; Kardamakis, Dimitrios . E-mail: kardim@med.upatras.gr

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Ibandronate is a single-nitrogen, noncyclic bisphosphonate with proven efficacy for reducing metastatic bone pain. In this study, we assessed the palliative effects of combined ibandronate and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Forty-five patients with bone metastases from various solid tumors received external-beam radiotherapy, 30-40 Gy over 3-4.5, weeks combined with 10 cycles of monthly intravenous ibandronate, 6 mg. Results: After combined therapy, mean bone pain scores (graded from 0 to 10) were reduced from 6.3 at baseline to 0.8 after 3 months, with further reductions at later time points (all p < 0.001). Opioid use decreased from 84% of patients at baseline (38/45) to 24% (11/45) at 3 months, with further subsequent reductions (all p < 0.001). Mean performance status and functioning scores also significantly improved. Bone density (assessed by computed tomography scan) increased by 20% vs. baseline at 3 months, 46% at 6 months, and 73% at 10 months (all p < 0.001). Lesion improvement was also demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging. Treatment was well tolerated with no renal toxicity. Conclusions: In this pilot study, combined radiotherapy and ibandronate provided substantial bone pain relief and increased bone density. Computed tomography-based or magnetic resonance imaging-based evaluations offer objective methods for assessing therapeutic outcomes.

  15. Phase I/II Clinical Trial of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Malignant Gliomas: Combined X-Ray Radiotherapy, Chemotherapy, and Carbon Ion Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mizoe, Jun-Etsu Tsujii, Hirohiko; Hasegawa, Azusa D.D.S.; Yanagi, Tsuyoshi; Takagi, Ryo D.D.S.; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Takakura, Kintomo

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To report the results of a Phase I/II clinical trial for patients with malignant gliomas, treated with combined X-ray radiotherapy (XRT), chemotherapy, and carbon ion radiotherapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Between October 1994 and February 2002, 48 patients with histologically confirmed malignant gliomas (16 anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) and 32 glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) were enrolled in a Phase I/II clinical study. The treatment involved the application of 50 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks of XRT, followed by CRT at 8 fractions/2 weeks. Nimustine hydrochloride (ACNU) were administered at a dose of 100 mg/m{sup 2} concurrently in weeks 1, 4, or 5 of XRT. The carbon ion dose was increased from 16.8 to 24.8 Gray equivalent (GyE) in 10% incremental steps (16.8, 18.4, 20.0, 22.4, and 24.8 GyE, respectively). Results: There was no Grade 3 or higher acute reaction in the brain. The late reactions included four cases of Grade 2 brain morbidity and four cases of Grade 2 brain reaction among 48 cases. The median survival time (MST) of AA patients was 35 months and that of GBM patients 17 months (p = 0.0035). The median progression-free survival and MST of GBM showed 4 and 7 months for the low-dose group, 7 and 19 months for the middle-dose group, and 14 and 26 months for the high-dose group. Conclusion: The results of combined therapy using XRT, ACNU chemotherapy, and CRT showed the potential efficacy of CRT for malignant gliomas in terms of the improved survival rate in those patients who received higher carbon doses.

  16. Usefulness of HIF-1 Imaging for Determining Optimal Timing of Combining Bevacizumab and Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ou Guangfei; Itasaka, Satoshi Zeng Lihua; Shibuya, Keiko; Yi Junlin; Harada, Hiroshi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To study the relationship between the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) activity level after bevacizumab treatment and the antitumor effects of radiation to determine the optimal combination schedule of bevacizumab with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The tumor hypoxia changes induced after bevacizumab treatment were evaluated using optical imaging with a HIF-1-dependent reporter gene using the NCI-H441 human lung adenocarcinoma xenograft model. The combined effects of bevacizumab with radiation were evaluated according to the timing of combination. Results: In vivo imaging experiments revealed that bevacizumab treatment had little effect on intratumoral HIF-1 activity 1 day after bevacizumab treatment, but it dramatically upregulated it thereafter through increases in the hypoxic fractions of the tumors. When bevacizumab treatment was combined with 14 Gy of radiation at 24 h or 72 h after bevacizumab treatment, the former combination delayed, but the latter combination accelerated, tumor growth compared with irradiation alone. Conclusion: These data suggest that an optimal window exists for combining bevacizumab with radiotherapy that determines whether the combination will be beneficial and that the imaging of HIF-1 activity would be useful in determining this window.

  17. A rare combination of undiagnosed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy revealed by intraoperative anaphylaxis resulting in acute left ventricular outflow obstruction and cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Smith, Bradford B; Nickels, Andrew S; Sviggum, Hans P

    2016-06-01

    A 75-year-old female presented for left total hip reimplantation and suffered pulseless electrical activity arrest upon lateral positioning and administering vancomycin. Resuscitation was achieved according to Advanced Cardiac Life Support protocol. Post-event echocardiography showed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with asymmetrical septal thickening, an under-filled left ventricle, dynamic left ventricular outflow obstruction, and severe mitral regurgitation related to systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve. Laboratory analysis showed a tryptase level of 209 ng/mL. After multispecialty evaluation, it was concluded that the patient's arrest was due to vancomycin anaphylaxis in the setting of previously undiagnosed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy leading to acute left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. After medical optimization of the patient's cardiomyopathy and an evaluation of potential intraoperative allergic triggers, the patient underwent a successful hip reimplantation without incident. This case presents a novel combination of events leading to intraoperative cardiac arrest. Rapid identification and an understanding of the cause(s) of cardiac arrest in this setting are critical for effective perioperative care. PMID:27185714

  18. The combination of mannitol and albumin in the priming solution reduces positive intraoperative fluid balance during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, I R; Curtis, A P

    1995-09-01

    During cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) an adequate reservoir volume is maintained by the addition of crystalloid, colloid or packed cells to the reservoir. This volume contributes to the overall perioperative positive fluid balance. We studied the effect of the preoperative addition of either 75 g albumin, or 50 g mannitol followed by 50 g at commencement of rewarming or both of the above to a bypass circuit prime of lactated Ringer's solution (LR) on intraoperative fluid balance, postoperative indices of oxygenation and time to extubation. The study was a prospective, randomized, single-blinded controlled trial of 103 patients undergoing cardiac surgery requiring CPB. There was a large and highly significant reduction in volume of fluid added to the reservoir during CPB (2137 +/- 1499 ml versus 144 +/- 230 ml), the fluid balance during bypass, including prime volume (3236 +/- 650 ml versus 5876 +/- 1465 ml), and perioperative fluid balance (4470 +/- 936 ml versus 7023 +/- 1760 ml) in the group receiving both mannitol and albumin in the pump prime compared with the group receiving only lactated Ringer's solution. There were no differences between the groups with respect to both measured indices of oxygenation measured on return to ICU (alveolar-arterial oxygen tension difference (DA-aO2) or arterial oxygen tension to inspired oxygen fraction ratio (PaO2/FiO2), or time from ICU admission to extubation. PMID:8601041

  19. How Do the ASTRO Consensus Statement Guidelines for the Application of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Fit Intraoperative Radiotherapy? A Retrospective Analysis of Patients Treated at the European Institute of Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Leonardi, Maria Cristina; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Mastropasqua, Mauro Giuseppe; Morra, Anna; Lazzari, Roberta; Rotmensz, Nicole; Sangalli, Claudia; Luini, Alberto; Veronesi, Umberto; Orecchia, Roberto

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To verify how the classification according to the American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) consensus statement (CS) for the application of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) fits patients treated with intraoperative radiotherapy with electrons (ELIOT) at a single institution. Methods and Materials: The study included 1,822 patients treated with ELIOT as the sole radiation modality outside of a clinical trial at the European Institute of Oncology after breast-conserving surgery for invasive breast cancer, who were classified into CS groups of suitable, cautionary, and unsuitable. The outcome in terms of ipsilateral breast recurrence, regional node relapse, distant metastases, progression free-survival, cause-specific survival, and overall survival were assessed. Results: All the 1,822 cases except for 25 could be classified according to ASTRO CS: 294 patients met the criteria for inclusion into the suitable group, 691 patients into the cautionary group, and 812 patients into the unsuitable group. The 5-year rate of ipsilateral breast recurrence for suitable, cautionary, and unsuitable groups were 1.5%, 4.4%, and 8.8%, respectively (p = 0.0003). Whereas the regional node relapse showed no difference, the rate of distant metastases was significantly different in the unsuitable group compared with the suitable and cautionary groups, having a significant impact on survival. Conclusion: In the context of patients treated with ELIOT, the ASTRO guidelines identify well the groups for whom APBI might be considered as an effective alternative to whole breast radiotherapy and also identify groups for whom APBI is not indicated.

  20. Therapeutic and scintigraphic applications of polymeric micelles: combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ying-Hsia; Peng, Cheng-Liang; Chiang, Ping-Fang; Lin, Wuu-Jyh; Luo, Tsai-Yueh; Shieh, Ming-Jium

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated a multifunctional micelle simultaneously loaded with doxorubicin (Dox) and labeled with radionuclide rhenium-188 ((188)Re) as a combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma. We investigated the single photon emission computed tomography, biodistribution, antitumor efficacy, and pathology of (188)Re-Dox micelles in a murine orthotopic luciferase-transfected BNL tumor cells hepatocellular carcinoma model. The single photon emission computed tomography and computed tomography images showed high radioactivity in the liver and tumor, which was in agreement with the biodistribution measured by γ-counting. In vivo bioluminescence images showed the smallest size tumor (P<0.05) in mice treated with the combined micelles throughout the experimental period. In addition, the combined (188)Re-Dox micelles group had significantly longer survival compared with the control, (188)ReO4 alone (P<0.005), and Dox micelles alone (P<0.01) groups. Pathohistological analysis revealed that tumors treated with (188)Re-Dox micelles had more necrotic features and decreased cell proliferation. Therefore, (188)Re-Dox micelles may enable combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy to maximize the effectiveness of treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:26719687

  1. The combination of radiotherapy and immunotherapy using glycated chitosan as an immunological stimulant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chun-Yuan; Leu, Jyh-Der; Wang, Chung-Yi; Chen, Wei R.; Lee, Yi-Jang

    2015-03-01

    Immunotherapy has been reported to effectively treat various cancers. In addition, scientists are dedicated in finding whether the combination of radiotherapy and immunotherapy can efficiently suppress cancer progression and recurrence. Although radiotherapy has been widely used for breast cancer, better strategies to overcome the latestage breast cancer remains explored. The glycated chitosan (GC), a novel immunological stimulant, was demonstrated to trigger local immune response facilitating the enhancement of radiosensitivity. Our previous study also revealed that the cell mortality and invasive ability were decreased under GC treatment, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we used 4T1-3R-L, a derived murine breast cancer cell line from the spontaneous metastasized liver lesion. We combined ionizing radiation with GC to treat 4T1-3R-L and found the expression of DNA damage-related genes such as gamma-H2AX was more than radiation alone In addition, the cell cycle distribution and colony forming assay showed an increased sub-G1 population and decreased cell survival rate after IR combined GC treatment. Taken together, we sought to elucidate the underlying mechanism by the investigation of DNA damage repair process when IR combined with GC, and to explore another advantage of GC to aid other cancer treatments. Based on our most updated results, the GC treatment is able to effectively increase the radiosensitivity through an immune-responsive signaling transduction, indicating that GC could be a valuable therapeutic strategy for treating against advanced breast cancers.

  2. Therapeutic and scintigraphic applications of polymeric micelles: combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Ying-Hsia; Peng, Cheng-Liang; Chiang, Ping-Fang; Lin, Wuu-Jyh; Luo, Tsai-Yueh; Shieh, Ming-Jium

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated a multifunctional micelle simultaneously loaded with doxorubicin (Dox) and labeled with radionuclide rhenium-188 (188Re) as a combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma. We investigated the single photon emission computed tomography, biodistribution, antitumor efficacy, and pathology of 188Re-Dox micelles in a murine orthotopic luciferase-transfected BNL tumor cells hepatocellular carcinoma model. The single photon emission computed tomography and computed tomography images showed high radioactivity in the liver and tumor, which was in agreement with the biodistribution measured by γ-counting. In vivo bioluminescence images showed the smallest size tumor (P<0.05) in mice treated with the combined micelles throughout the experimental period. In addition, the combined 188Re-Dox micelles group had significantly longer survival compared with the control, 188ReO4 alone (P<0.005), and Dox micelles alone (P<0.01) groups. Pathohistological analysis revealed that tumors treated with 188Re-Dox micelles had more necrotic features and decreased cell proliferation. Therefore, 188Re-Dox micelles may enable combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy to maximize the effectiveness of treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:26719687

  3. Optimization of combination therapy of arsenic trioxide and fractionated radiotherapy for malignant glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Ning Shoucheng; Knox, Susan J. . E-mail: sknox@stanford.edu

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: The primary objective was to optimize the combined treatment regimen using arsenic trioxide (ATO) and fractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of malignant glioma. Methods and Materials: Nude mice with human glioma xenograft tumors were treated with fractionated local tumor radiation of 250 cGy/fraction/day and 5 mg/kg ATO for 5-10 days. Results: Time course experiments demonstrated that maximal tumor growth delay occurred when ATO was administered between 0 and 4 h after radiation. The combination treatment of ATO and radiation synergistically inhibited tumor growth and produced a tumor growth delay time of 13.2 days, compared with 1.4 days and 6.5 days for ATO and radiation alone (p < 0.01), respectively. The use of concurrent therapy of radiation and ATO initially, followed by ATO as maintenance therapy, was superior to the use of preloading with ATO before combined therapy and produced a tumor growth delay time of 22.7 days as compared with 11.7 days for the ATO preloading regimen (p < 0.01). The maintenance dose of ATO after concurrent therapy was effective and important for continued inhibition of tumor growth. Conclusions: The combined use of fractionated radiation and ATO is effective for the treatment of glioma xenograft tumors. ATO was most effective when administered 0-4 h after radiation without pretreatment with ATO. These results have important implications for the optimization of treatment regimen using ATO and fractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of brain tumors.

  4. Cytotoxic Effect of Erythroxylum suberosum Combined with Radiotherapy in Head and Neck Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Taysa B C; Elias, Silvia T; Torres, Hianne M; Yamamoto-Silva, Fernanda Paula; Silveira, Dâmaris; Magalhães, Pérola O; Lofrano-Porto, Adriana; Guerra, Eliete N S; Silva, Maria Alves G

    2016-01-01

    The mouth and oropharynx cancer is the 6th most common type of cancer in the world. The treatment may involve surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. More than 50% of drugs against cancer were isolated from natural sources, such as Catharanthus roseus and epipodophyllotoxin, isolated from Podophyllum. The biggest challenge is to maximize the control of the disease, while minimizing morbidity and toxicity to the surrounding normal tissues. The Erythroxylum suberosum is a common plant in the Brazilian Cerrado biome and is popularly known as "cabelo-de-negro". The objective of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic activity of Erythroxylum suberosum plant extracts of the Brazilian Cerrado biome associated with radiotherapy in human cell lines of oral and hypopharynx carcinomas. Cells were treated with aqueous, ethanolic and hexanic extracts of Erythroxylum suberosum and irradiated at 4 Gy, 6 Gy and 8 Gy. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by MTT assay and the absorbance was measured at 570 nm in a Beckman Counter reader. Cisplatin, standard chemotherapy, was used as positive control. The use of Erythroxylum suberosum extracts showed a possible radiosensitizing effect in vitro for head and neck cancer. The cytotoxicity effect in the cell lines was not selective and it is very similar to the effect of standard chemotherapy. The aqueous extract of Erythroxylum suberosum, combined with radiotherapy was the most cytotoxic extract to oral and hypopharynx carcinomas. PMID:27007356

  5. Radiotherapy combined with TLR7/8 activation induces strong immune responses against gastrointestinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Schölch, Sebastian; Rauber, Conrad; Tietz, Alexandra; Rahbari, Nuh N; Bork, Ulrich; Schmidt, Thomas; Kahlert, Christoph; Haberkorn, Uwe; Tomai, Mark A; Lipson, Kenneth E; Carretero, Rafael; Weitz, Jürgen; Koch, Moritz; Huber, Peter E

    2015-03-10

    In addition to local cytotoxic activity, radiotherapy may also elicit local and systemic antitumor immunity, which may be augmented by immunotherapeutic agents including Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7/8 agonists. Here, we investigated the ability of 3M-011 (854A), a TLR7/8 agonist, to boost the antigen-presenting activity of dendritic cells (DC) as an adjuvant to radiotherapy. The combined treatment induced marked local and systemic responses in subcutaneous and orthotopic mouse models of colorectal and pancreatic cancer. In vitro cytotoxicity assays as well as in vivo depletion experiments with monoclonal antibodies identified NK and CD8 T cells as the cell populations mediating the cytotoxic effects of the treatment, while in vivo depletion of CD11c+ dendritic cells (DC) in CD11c-DTR transgenic mice revealed DC as the pivotal immune hub in this setting. The specificity of the immune reaction was confirmed by ELISPOT assays. TLR7/8 agonists therefore seem to be potent adjuvants to radiotherapy, inducing strong local and profound systemic immune responses to tumor antigens released by conventional therapy. PMID:25609199

  6. Radiotherapy combined with TLR7/8 activation induces strong immune responses against gastrointestinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tietz, Alexandra; Rahbari, Nuh N.; Bork, Ulrich; Schmidt, Thomas; Kahlert, Christoph; Haberkorn, Uwe; Tomai, Mark A.; Lipson, Kenneth E.; Carretero, Rafael; Weitz, Jürgen; Koch, Moritz; Huber, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to local cytotoxic activity, radiotherapy may also elicit local and systemic antitumor immunity, which may be augmented by immunotherapeutic agents including Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7/8 agonists. Here, we investigated the ability of 3M-011 (854A), a TLR7/8 agonist, to boost the antigen-presenting activity of dendritic cells (DC) as an adjuvant to radiotherapy. The combined treatment induced marked local and systemic responses in subcutaneous and orthotopic mouse models of colorectal and pancreatic cancer. In vitro cytotoxicity assays as well as in vivo depletion experiments with monoclonal antibodies identified NK and CD8 T cells as the cell populations mediating the cytotoxic effects of the treatment, while in vivo depletion of CD11c+ dendritic cells (DC) in CD11c-DTR transgenic mice revealed DC as the pivotal immune hub in this setting. The specificity of the immune reaction was confirmed by ELISPOT assays. TLR7/8 agonists therefore seem to be potent adjuvants to radiotherapy, inducing strong local and profound systemic immune responses to tumor antigens released by conventional therapy. PMID:25609199

  7. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in combination with bevacizumab or fotemustine for patients with progressive malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Minniti, Giuseppe; Agolli, Linda; Falco, Teresa; Scaringi, Claudia; Lanzetta, Gaetano; Caporello, Paola; Osti, Mattia Falchetto; Esposito, Vincenzo; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy performed as reirradiation in combination with fotemustine or bevacizumab as salvage treatment in patients with recurrent malignant glioma. Between May 2006 and December 2013, 54 patients with recurrent malignant glioma received hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HSRT, 25 Gy in 5-Gy fractions) plus either fotemustine or bevacizumab at University of Rome Sapienza, Sant'Andrea Hospital. All patients had Karnofsky performance score (KPS) ≥ 60 and were previously treated with standard chemoradiotherapy. Forty-two patients had a GBM and 12 patients had an anaplastic astrocytoma (AA). The median overall survival (OS) time and 12-month OS rates after HSRT was 11 months and 30 % for patients treated with HSRT plus bevacizumab and 8.3 months and 5 % for those treated with HSRT plus fotemustine (p = 0.01). Median PFS times were 4 and 6 months for patients treated with HSRT plus fotemustine or bevacizumab, respectively (p = 0.01). KPS > 70 (p = 0.04), AA histology, and the treatment with bevacizumab were independent favourable prognostic factors for OS. In general, both treatments were well tolerated with relatively low treatment-related toxicity. HSRT combined with bevacizumab or fotemustine may represent a feasible treatment option for patients with progressive malignant gliomas, although most of the tumors recur in a few months. Efficacy of bevacizumab or alkylating agents in combination with different radiation schedules needs to be evaluated in prospective studies. PMID:25702193

  8. Effects of combined sunitinib and extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy on bone marrow hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Johnny; Timmins, Jonathan; Ozao-Choy, Junko; Packer, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable interest in deploying stereotactic body radiotherapy in combination with immune therapy for patients with extracranial oligometastases. In addition to angiogenesis inhibition, sunitinib appears to mediate antitumor immunity through effects on circulating monocytic cells. The current study investigated the effects of combined sunitinib and stereotactic radiotherapy on hematopoiesis. As part of a phase I/II clinical trial utilizing concurrent sunitinib (25–50 mg on days 1–28) and image-guided radiation therapy (40–50 Gy in 10 fractions starting on days 8–19) for patients with metastatic cancer, the complete blood count, platelet count and automatic differential were performed pretreatment and on days 8 and 19. On average, sunitinib monotherapy for 7 days resulted in a 33% decrease in monocytes and an 18% decrease in neutrophils (P<0.01 for all). Compared to sunitinib alone, combined sunitinib and radiation resulted in a further decrease in neutrophils, lymphocytes and platelets (P<0.05). Following sunitinib and radiation treatment, a greater than average decrease in monocytes (≥200/µl) was associated with a significant increase in progression-free and overall survival times. This exploratory study provides further evidence that monocytes represent a potential biomarker in patients with solid tumors treated with sunitinib. PMID:27602153

  9. Updating advances on recombinant human endostatin combined with radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer with brain metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yun

    2012-01-01

    Brain metastases (BM) heavily affects the prognosis of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Although whole-brain radiotherapy remains the mainstream therapy for BM caused by NSCLC, the effectiveness is unsatisfactory. Endostar, a recombinant human endostatin (RHES), has shown certain therapeutic effect on advanced NSCLC. This article reviews the feasibility of Endostar combined with radiotherapy in the treatment of BM caused by NSCLC. PMID:25806159

  10. ZD6474, an inhibitor of VEGFR and EGFR tyrosine kinase activity in combination with radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, Barbara; Gustafson, Dan; Bianco, Cataldo; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Dimery, Isaiah; Raben, David . E-mail: david.raben@uchsc.edu

    2006-01-01

    Radiation enhances both epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, which are a part of key pathways for tumor progression. Some tumors may not respond well to EGFR inhibitors alone or may develop resistance to EGFR inhibitors. Therefore, drug therapy targeted to VEGF receptors and EGFRs, when combined with radiotherapy (RT), may improve tumor control and provide wider applicability. This article focuses on ZD6474, an inhibitor of EGFR and VEGF receptor signaling in combination with RT. We discuss preclinical and clinical studies with RT and inhibitors of VEGF or EGFR signaling first. We then address issues associated with ZD6474 pharmacokinetic dosing, and scheduling when combined with RT. We also discuss ZD6474 in the context of anti-EGFR therapy resistance. Dual inhibition of EGFR and VEGF receptor signaling pathways shows promise in enhancing RT efficacy.

  11. Combined Proton and Photon Conformal Radiotherapy for Intracranial Atypical and Malignant Meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Boskos, Christos Feuvret, Loic; Noel, Georges; Habrand, Jean-Louis; Pommier, Pascal; Alapetite, Claire; Mammar, Hamid; Ferrand, Regis; Boisserie, Gilbert; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate retrospectively the efficacy of conformal fractionated radiotherapy combining proton and photon beams after primary surgery for treatment of atypical and malignant meningiomas. Patients and Methods: Between September 1999 and October 2006, 24 patients (12 male, 12 female) with histopathologically proven meningioma (atypical 19, malignant 5) received postoperative combined radiotherapy with a 201-MeV proton beam at the Centre Protontherapie d'Orsay and a high-energy photon beam. Six patients underwent gross total resection and 18 a subtotal resection. Median gross tumor volume and clinical target volume were 44.7 cm{sup 3} and 153.3 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Mean total irradiation dose was 65.01 CGE (cobalt gray equivalent), with a mean proton total dose of 34.05 CGE and a mean photon total dose 30.96 CGE. Results: The median (range) follow-up interval was 32.2 (1-72) months. The overall mean local relapse-free interval was 27.2 (10-50) months, 28.3 (10-50) months for atypical meningioma and 23 (13-33) months for malignant meningioma. Ten tumors recurred locally. One-, 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, and 8- year local control rates for the entire group of patients were 82.9% {+-} 7.8%, 82.9% {+-} 7.8%, 61.3% {+-} 11%, 61.3% {+-} 11%, 46.7% {+-} 12.3%, and 46.7% {+-} 12.3%, respectively. One-, 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, and 8- year overall survival rates were 100%, 95.5% {+-} 4.4%, 80.4% {+-} 8.8%, 65.3% {+-} 10.6%, 53.2% {+-} 11.6%, and 42.6% {+-} 13%, respectively. Survival was significantly associated with total dose. There was no acute morbidity of radiotherapy. One patient developed radiation necrosis 16 months after treatment. Conclusions: Postoperative combination of conformal radiotherapy with protons and photons for atypical and malignant meningiomas is a well-tolerated treatment producing long-term tumor stabilization.

  12. Low-Dose-Rate Californium-252 Neutron Intracavitary Afterloading Radiotherapy Combined With Conformal Radiotherapy for Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Min; Xu Hongde; Pan Songdan; Lin Shan; Yue Jianhua; Liu Jianren

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To study the efficacy of low-dose-rate californium-252 ({sup 252}Cf) neutron intracavitary afterloading radiotherapy (RT) combined with external pelvic RT for treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: The records of 96 patients treated for cervical cancer from 2006 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. For patients with tumors {<=}4 cm in diameter, external beam radiation was performed (1.8 Gy/day, five times/week) until the dose reached 20 Gy, and then {sup 252}Cf neutron intracavitary afterloading RT (once/week) was begun, and the frequency of external beam radiation was changed to four times/week. For patients with tumors >4 cm, {sup 252}Cf RT was performed one to two times before whole-pelvis external beam radiation. The tumor-eliminating dose was determined by using the depth limit of 5 mm below the mucosa as the reference point. In all patients, the total dose of the external beam radiation ranged from 46.8 to 50 Gy. For {sup 252}Cf RT, the dose delivered to point A was 6 Gy/fraction, once per week, for a total of seven times, and the total dose was 42 Gy. Results: The mean {+-} SD patient age was 54.7 {+-} 13.7 years. Six patients had disease assessed at stage IB, 13 patients had stage IIA, 49 patients had stage IIB, 3 patients had stage IIIA, 24 patients had stage IIIB, and 1 patient had stage IVA. All patients obtained complete tumor regression (CR). The mean {+-} SD time to CR was 23.5 {+-} 3.4 days. Vaginal bleeding was fully controlled in 80 patients within 1 to 8 days. The mean {+-} SD follow-up period was 27.6 {+-} 12.7 months (range, 6-48 months). Five patients died due to recurrence or metastasis. The 3-year survival and disease-free recurrence rates were 89.6% and 87.5 %, respectively. Nine patients experienced mild radiation proctitis, and 4 patients developed radiocystitis. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate {sup 252}Cf neutron RT combined with external pelvic RT is effective for treating cervical cancer, with a low incidence of

  13. Tumor Antivascular Effects of Radiotherapy Combined with Combretastatin A4 Phosphate in Human Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Q.-S.; Goh, Vicky; Carnell, Dawn; Meer, Khalda; Padhani, Anwar R.; Saunders, Michele I.; Hoskin, Peter J. . E-mail: peterhoskin@nhs.net

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: The tumor vascular effects of radiotherapy and subsequent administration of the vascular disrupting agent combretastatin A4 phosphate (CA4P) were studied in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer using volumetric dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT). Patients and Methods: Following ethical committee approval and informed consent, 8 patients receiving palliative radiotherapy (27 Gy in six fractions, twice weekly) also received CA4P (50 mg/m{sup 2}) after the second fraction of radiotherapy. Changes in dynamic CT parameters of tumor blood volume (BV) and permeability surface area product (PS) were measured for the whole tumor volume, tumor rim, and center after radiotherapy alone and after radiotherapy in combination with CA4P. Results: After the second fraction of radiotherapy, 6 of the 8 patients showed increases in tumor PS (23.6%, p = 0.011). Four hours after CA4P, a reduction in tumor BV (22.9%, p < 0.001) was demonstrated in the same 6 patients. Increase in PS after radiotherapy correlated with reduction in BV after CA4P (r = 0.77, p = 0.026). At 72 h after CA4P, there was a sustained reduction in tumor BV of 29.4% (p < 0.001). Both increase in PS after radiotherapy and reduction in BV after CA4P were greater at the rim of the tumor. The BV reduction at the rim was sustained to 72 h (51.4%, p 0.014). Conclusion: Radiotherapy enhances the tumor antivascular activity of CA4P in human non-small-cell lung cancer, resulting in sustained tumor vascular shutdown.

  14. Biomarkers of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Activity in a Phase 1 Combined-Modality Study with Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ree, Anne Hansen; Saelen, Marie Grøn; Kalanxhi, Erta; Østensen, Ingrid H. G.; Schee, Kristina; Røe, Kathrine; Abrahamsen, Torveig Weum; Dueland, Svein; Flatmark, Kjersti

    2014-01-01

    Background Following the demonstration that histone deacetylase inhibitors enhanced experimental radiation-induced clonogenic suppression, the Pelvic Radiation and Vorinostat (PRAVO) phase 1 study, combining fractionated radiotherapy with daily vorinostat for pelvic carcinoma, was designed to evaluate both clinical and novel biomarker endpoints, the latter relating to pharmacodynamic indicators of vorinostat action in clinical radiotherapy. Patients and Methods Potential biomarkers of vorinostat radiosensitizing action, not simultaneously manifesting molecular perturbations elicited by the radiation itself, were explored by gene expression array analysis of study patients' peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), sampled at baseline (T0) and on-treatment two and 24 hours (T2 and T24) after the patients had received vorinostat. Results This strategy revealed 1,600 array probes that were common for the comparisons T2 versus T0 and T24 versus T2 across all of the patients, and furthermore, that no significantly differential expression was observed between the T0 and T24 groups. Functional annotation analysis of the array data showed that a significant number of identified genes were implicated in gene regulation, the cell cycle, and chromatin biology. Gene expression was validated both in patients' PBMC and in vorinostat-treated human carcinoma xenograft models, and transient repression of MYC was consistently observed. Conclusion Within the design of the PRAVO study, all of the identified genes showed rapid and transient induction or repression and therefore, in principle, fulfilled the requirement of being pharmacodynamic biomarkers of vorinostat action in fractionated radiotherapy, possibly underscoring the role of MYC in this therapeutic setting. PMID:24587009

  15. Radiotherapy Combined with Novel STING-Targeting Oligonucleotides Results in Regression of Established Tumors.

    PubMed

    Baird, Jason R; Friedman, David; Cottam, Benjamin; Dubensky, Thomas W; Kanne, David B; Bambina, Shelly; Bahjat, Keith; Crittenden, Marka R; Gough, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxic therapies prime adaptive immune responses to cancer by stimulating the release of tumor-associated antigens. However, the tumor microenvironment into which these antigens are released is typically immunosuppressed, blunting the ability to initiate immune responses. Recently, activation of the DNA sensor molecule STING by cyclic dinucleotides was shown to stimulate infection-related inflammatory pathways in tumors. In this study, we report that the inflammatory pathways activated by STING ligands generate a powerful adjuvant activity for enhancing adaptive immune responses to tumor antigens released by radiotherapy. In a murine model of pancreatic cancer, we showed that combining CT-guided radiotherapy with a novel ligand of murine and human STING could synergize to control local and distant tumors. Mechanistic investigations revealed T-cell-independent and TNFα-dependent hemorrhagic necrosis at early times, followed by later CD8 T-cell-dependent control of residual disease. Clinically, STING was found to be expressed extensively in human pancreatic tumor and stromal cells. Our findings suggest that this novel STING ligand could offer a potent adjuvant for leveraging radiotherapeutic management of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26567136

  16. Combined high-field intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging and endoscopy increase extent of resection and progression-free survival for pituitary adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Sylvester, Peter T.; Evans, John A.; Zipfel, Gregory J.; Chole, Richard A.; Uppaluri, Ravindra; Haughey, Bruce H.; Getz, Anne E.; Silverstein, Julie; Rich, Keith M.; Kim, Albert H.; Dacey, Ralph G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The clinical benefit of combined intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) and endoscopy for transsphenoidal pituitary adenoma resection has not been completely characterized. This study assessed the impact of microscopy, endoscopy, and/or iMRI on progression-free survival, extent of resection status (gross-, near-, and subtotal resection), and operative complications. Methods Retrospective analyses were performed on 446 transsphenoidal pituitary adenoma surgeries at a single institution between 1998 and 2012. Multivariate analyses were used to control for baseline characteristics, differences during extent of resection status, and progression-free survival analysis. Results Additional surgery was performed after iMRI in 56/156 cases (35.9 %), which led to increased extent of resection status in 15/156 cases (9.6 %). Multivariate ordinal logistic regression revealed no increase in extent of resection status following iMRI or endoscopy alone; however, combining these modalities increased extent of resection status (odds ratio 2.05, 95 % CI 1.21–3.46) compared to conventional transsphenoidal microsurgery. Multivariate Cox regression revealed that reduced extent of resection status shortened progression-free survival for near- versus gross-total resection [hazard ratio (HR) 2.87, 95 % CI 1.24–6.65] and sub- versus near-total resection (HR 2.10; 95 % CI 1.00–4.40). Complication comparisons between microscopy, endoscopy, and iMRI revealed increased perioperative deaths for endoscopy versus microscopy (4/209 and 0/237, respectively), but this difference was non-significant considering multiple post hoc comparisons (Fisher exact, p = 0.24). Conclusions Combined use of endoscopy and iMRI increased pituitary adenoma extent of resection status compared to conventional transsphenoidal microsurgery, and increased extent of resection status was associated with longer progression-free survival. Treatment modality combination did not significantly impact

  17. Dosimetry for electron Intra-Operative RadioTherapy: Comparison of output factors obtained through alanine/EPR pellets, ionization chamber and Monte Carlo-GEANT4 simulations for IORT mobile dedicate accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrale, Maurizio; Longo, Anna; Russo, Giorgio; Casarino, Carlo; Candiano, Giuliana; Gallo, Salvatore; Carlino, Antonio; Brai, Maria

    2015-09-01

    In this work a comparison between the response of alanine and Markus ionization chamber was carried out for measurements of the output factors (OF) of electron beams produced by a linear accelerator used for Intra-Operative Radiation Therapy (IORT). Output factors (OF) for conventional high-energy electron beams are normally measured using ionization chamber according to international dosimetry protocols. However, the electron beams used in IORT have characteristics of dose per pulse, energy spectrum and angular distribution quite different from beams usually used in external radiotherapy, so the direct application of international dosimetry protocols may introduce additional uncertainties in dosimetric determinations. The high dose per pulse could lead to an inaccuracy in dose measurements with ionization chamber, due to overestimation of ks recombination factor. Furthermore, the electron fields obtained with IORT-dedicated applicators have a wider energy spectrum and a wider angular distribution than the conventional fields, due to the presence of electrons scattered by the applicator's wall. For this reason, a dosimetry system should be characterized by a minimum dependence from the beam energy and from angle of incidence of electrons. This become particularly critical for small and bevelled applicators. All of these reasons lead to investigate the use of detectors different from the ionization chamber for measuring the OFs. Furthermore, the complete characterization of the radiation field could be accomplished also by the use of Monte Carlo simulations which allows to obtain detailed information on dose distributions. In this work we compare the output factors obtained by means of alanine dosimeters and Markus ionization chamber. The comparison is completed by the Monte Carlo calculations of OFs determined through the use of the Geant4 application "iort _ therapy" . The results are characterized by a good agreement of response of alanine pellets and Markus

  18. Microwave-induced local hyperthermia in combination with radiotherapy of human malignant tumors

    SciTech Connect

    U, R.; Noell, K.T.; Woodward, K.T.; Worde, B.T.; Fishburn, R.I.; Miller, L.S.

    1980-02-15

    Since 1976, two groups of patients have been treated with local microwave hyperthermia immediately following ionizing radiation. Group A patients had measurable multiple lesions assigned radiotherapy only, microwave hyperthermia only, or combined treatment. Ionizing radiation in 200 to 600 rad fractions was used 2 to 5 times per week to a total of 1800 to 4200 rad in 5 to 14 fractions. Group B patients had combination treatment only, with radiation fractions of 200 to 600 rad 2 to 5 times per week to a total of 200 to 4800 rad total in 6 to 20 fractions. Both groups received hyperthermia (42 to 44 C) 2 to 3 times per week, maximum ten sessions in four weeks. The 19 patients treated have had squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, malignant melanoma, plasmacytoma, epithelioid sarcoma, and undifferentiated carcinoma. After more than 150 hyperthermia sessions, we find: (1) local hyperthermia with microwave alone or in combination with ionizing radiation can be used with excellent normal tissue tolerance provided local tissue temperatures are carefully monitored and controlled; (2) a higher level of heat induction in tumor tissue as compared to surrounding normal tissues; and (3) repeated hyperthermia at 42 to 43.5 C for 45 minutes per session immediately following photon irradiation yields a favorable therapeutic result, occasionally dramatic. Local microwave hyperthermia in combination withradiotherapy offers the possibility of substantial impact on clinical cancer therapy, whether of curative or palliative intent.

  19. The long term follow-up of early stage follicular lymphoma treated with radiotherapy, chemotherapy or combined modality treatment.

    PubMed

    Sancho, Juan-Manuel; García, Olga; Mercadal, Santiago; Pomares, Helena; Fernández-Alvarez, Rubén; González-Barca, Eva; Tapia, Gustavo; González-García, Esther; Moreno, Miriam; Domingo-Domènech, Eva; Sorigué, Marc; Navarro, José-Tomás; Motlló, Cristina; Fernández-de-Sevilla, Alberto; Feliu, Evarist; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2015-08-01

    Local (involved-field or recently involved-site) radiotherapy is the standard therapy in limited-stage follicular lymphoma (FL). We retrospectively analyzed the value of chemotherapy in 130 patients with limited-stage FL (46 treated with radiotherapy alone [RT group], 30 with radiotherapy plus chemotherapy [COMBINED group] and 43 with chemotherapy alone [CHEMO group], 11 were managed with observation). Ninety-six percent of patients responded (RT 98%, COMBINED 100%, CHEMO 91%, p=0.179), and 37% (40/107) of patients in complete response relapsed (RT 42%, COMBINED 27%, CHEMO 41%, p=0.371). Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) probabilities at 10 years were similar in RT, COMBINED and CHEMO patients (PFS 41%, 61% and 39% [p=0.167], and OS 77%, 81% and 72% [p=0.821], respectively), while the COMBINED group showed a trend to better time-to-progression (TTP 43%, 72% and 47% [p=0.055]). On multivariate analysis, only a FLIPI score ≥2 showed a trend to influence PFS (HR 2.1 [95% confidence interval 0.9-4.6], p=0.067), and OS (HR 2.4 [0.9-6.5], p=0.084), while patients treated with radiotherapy plus chemotherapy (COMBINED group) showed a significantly better TTP compared with those receiving only RT (HR 0.3 [0.1-0.8], p=0.024). In our study no benefit was observed in survival with the use of systemic therapy compared with local radiotherapy. PMID:26122511

  20. Endostatin combined with radiotherapy suppresses vasculogenic mimicry formation through inhibition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaochen; Zhang, Hao; Zhu, Hongcheng; Yang, Xi; Yang, Yuehua; Yang, Yan; Min, Hua; Chen, Guangzong; Liu, Jia; Lu, Jing; Cheng, Hongyan; Sun, Xinchen

    2016-04-01

    The growth of solid tumors requires angiogenesis to provide oxygen and nutrients and to support cell proliferation. The switch from an avascular to a vascular phenotype is typically related to acceleration of tumor growth. Anti-angiogenic therapy is becoming a very promising way for malignant tumors. Meanwhile, malignant tumor cells themselves were able to develop the formation of cell-lined vessels that contribute to tumor neovascularization and supply the nutrients and oxygen, which is called vasculogenic mimicry (VM). However, the molecular mechanism of VM remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of the novel recombinant human endostatin (rh-Endo) protein combined with radiotherapy on human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cell lines Eca-109 and TE13. Our results showed that rh-Endo combined with radiotherapy significantly inhibited the proliferation, migration, invasion, and VM of human esophageal cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner; however, it has no direct effect on apoptosis of carcinoma cells, which indicated that rh-Endo combined with radiotherapy significantly changed the microenvironment of esophageal carcinoma, and played an important role in preventing distant metastasis. Our findings suggested that rh-Endo inhibited the metastasis of esophageal cancer and the activation of AKT pathway, and the down-regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) may be associated with such effect of rh-Endo. These results also supported the bright prospect of rh-Endo combined with radiotherapy for clinical applications in the future. PMID:26511968

  1. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Might Increase Pneumonitis Risk Relative to Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy in Patients Receiving Combined Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy: A Modeling Study of Dose Dumping

    SciTech Connect

    Vogelius, Ivan S.; Westerly, David C.; Cannon, George M.; Mackie, Thomas R.; Mehta, Minesh P.; Sugie, Chikao; Bentzen, Soren M.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To model the possible interaction between cytotoxic chemotherapy and the radiation dose distribution with respect to the risk of radiation pneumonitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 18 non-small-cell lung cancer patients previously treated with helical tomotherapy at the University of Wisconsin were selected for the present modeling study. Three treatment plans were considered: the delivered tomotherapy plans; a three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plan; and a fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan. The IMRT and 3D-CRT plans were generated specifically for the present study. The plans were optimized without adjusting for the chemotherapy effect. The effect of chemotherapy was modeled as an independent cell killing process by considering a uniform chemotherapy equivalent radiation dose added to all voxels of the organ at risk. The risk of radiation pneumonitis was estimated for all plans using the Lyman and the critical volume models. Results: For radiotherapy alone, the critical volume model predicts that the two IMRT plans are associated with a lower risk of radiation pneumonitis than the 3D-CRT plan. However, when the chemotherapy equivalent radiation dose exceeds a certain threshold, the radiation pneumonitis risk after IMRT is greater than after 3D-CRT. This threshold dose is in the range estimated from clinical chemoradiotherapy data sets. Conclusions: Cytotoxic chemotherapy might affect the relative merit of competing radiotherapy plans. More work is needed to improve our understanding of the interaction between chemotherapy and the radiation dose distribution in clinical settings.

  2. Parotid Gland Function After Radiotherapy: The Combined Michigan and Utrecht Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Dijkema, Tim; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Roesink, Judith M.; Braam, Petra M.; Houweling, Anette C.; Moerland, Marinus A.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Terhaard, Chris H.J.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To analyze the combined and updated results from the University of Michigan and University Medical Center Utrecht on normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of the parotid gland 1 year after radiotherapy (RT) for head-and-neck (HN) cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 222 prospectively analyzed patients with various HN malignancies were treated with conventional and intensity-modulated RT. Stimulated individual parotid gland flow rates were measured before RT and 1 year after RT using Lashley cups at both centers. A flow ratio <25% of pretreatment was defined as a complication. The data were fitted to the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model. Results: A total of 384 parotid glands (Michigan: 157; Utrecht: 227 glands) was available for analysis 1 year after RT. Combined NTCP analysis based on mean dose resulted in a TD{sub 50} (uniform dose leading to 50% complication probability) of 39.9 Gy and m (steepness of the curve) of 0.40. The resulting NTCP curve had good qualitative agreement with the combined clinical data. Mean doses of 25-30 Gy were associated with 17-26% NTCP. Conclusions: A definite NTCP curve for parotid gland function 1 year after RT is presented, based on mean dose. No threshold dose was observed, and TD{sub 50} was equal to 40 Gy.

  3. Association between obesity and local control of advanced rectal cancer after combined surgery and radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yunseon; Lee, Yun-Han; Park, Sung Kwang; Cho, Heunglae; Ahn, Ki Jung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The association between metabolism and cancer has been recently emphasized. This study aimed to find the prognostic significance of obesity in advanced stage rectal cancer patients treated with surgery and radiotherapy (RT). Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 111 patients who were treated with combined surgery and RT for clinical stage 2–3 (T3 or N+) rectal cancer between 2008 and 2014. The prognostic significance of obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥25 kg/m2) in local control was evaluated. Results: The median follow-up was 31.2 months (range, 4.1 to 85.7 months). Twenty-five patients (22.5%) were classified as obese. Treatment failure occurred in 33 patients (29.7%), including local failures in 13 patients (11.7%), regional lymph node failures in 5, and distant metastases in 24. The 3-year local control, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival rates were 88.7%, 73.6%, and 87.7%, respectively. Obesity (n = 25) significantly reduced the local control rate (p = 0.045; 3-year local control, 76.2%), especially in women (n = 37, p = 0.021). Segregation of local control was best achieved by BMI of 25.6 kg/m2 as a cutoff value. Conclusion: Obese rectal cancer patients showed poor local control after combined surgery and RT. More effective local treatment strategies for obese patients are warranted. PMID:27306771

  4. Paclitaxel and cisplatin combined with intensity-modulated radiotherapy for upper esophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and concurrent paclitaxel plus cisplatin (TP regimen) for upper esophageal carcinoma. Methods 36 patients of upper esophageal carcinoma were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were treated with IMRT (median 60 Gy) combined with concurrent TP regimen chemotherapy. The Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed in statistical analysis. Toxicities were recorded according to the NCI CTC version 3.0. Results 36 patients aged 43–73 years (median 57 years). The median follow-up period was 14.0 months. The 1-year and 2-year survival rates were 83.3% and 42.8% respectively. The median progression-free survival (PFS) time and overall survival (OS) time were 12.0 (95% CI: 7.8–16.2 months) and 18.0 months (95% CI: 9.9–26.1 months), respectively. Grade 3 neutropenia, radiation-induced esophagitis and radiodermatitis were observed in 5 (13.9%), 3 (8.3%) and 8 (22.2%) patients respectively. There were two treatment-related deaths due to esophageal perforation and hemorrhea. Conclusions For those patients with upper esophageal carcinoma, IMRT combined with concurrent TP regimen chemotherapy was an effective treatment. However, more attention should be paid to the occurrence of perforation and hemorrhea. PMID:23531325

  5. Combination of Vandetanib, Radiotherapy, and Irinotecan in the LoVo Human Colorectal Cancer Xenograft Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wachsberger, Phyllis; Burd, Randy; Ryan, Anderson; Daskalakis, Constantine; Dicker, Adam P.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: The tumor growth kinetics of the human LoVo colorectal xenograft model was assessed in response to vandetanib, an orally available receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, radiotherapy (RT), or irinotecan (CPT-11), as single therapies and in combination. Methods and Materials: LoVo cells were injected subcutaneously into the right hind limb (5x10{sup 6} cells in 100muL phosphate-buffered saline) of athymic NCR NUM mice and tumors were grown to a volume of 200-300 mm{sup 3} before treatment. Vandetanib was administered at 50 mg/kg daily orally for 14 days starting on Day 1. RT was given as three fractions (3x3 Gy) on Days 1, 2, and 3. CPT-11 was given at 15 mg/kg intraperitoneally on Days 1 and 3. Tumor volumes were measured on a daily basis and calculated by measuring tumor diameters with digital calipers in two orthogonal dimensions. Results: All three single treatments (vandetanib, CPT-11, and radiation) significantly slowed LoVo colorectal tumor growth. Vandetanib significantly increased the antitumor effects of CPT-11 and radiation when given in combination with either of these treatments. These treatment combinations resulted in a slow tumor growth rate during the 2 weeks of vandetanib administration. The triple combination of vandetanib, CPT-11, and radiation produced the most marked improvement in response as observed by measurable shrinkage of tumors during the first week of treatment. Conclusions: The tumor growth delay kinetics observed in this study of the LoVo colorectal model suggest concurrent and sustained post-sequencing of vandetanib with cytotoxic therapy may be beneficial in tumors of this type.

  6. Stereotactic body radiotherapy combined with transarterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    KANG, JINGBO; NIE, QING; DU, RUI; ZHANG, LIPING; ZHANG, JUN; LI, QILIANG; LI, JIANGUO; QI, WENJIE

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy, toxicity and adverse effects of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) combined with transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT). A total of 101 patients diagnosed with primary HCC with PVTT were enrolled in this study and were randomly divided into three groups as follows: group A, 34 patients treated with γ-SBRT followed by TACE; group B, 37 patients treated with TACE followed by γ-SBRT; and group C, 30 patients treated with γ-SBRT alone. The effective response rate for the entire patient sample was 87.1% (88/101) following a 3-month treatment. The differences in the response rate, survival rate, α-fetoprotein level restoration rate and rate of improvement of abdominal distention and discomfort between groups A and B were not statistically significant (P>0.05). However, the rates of groups A and B were higher compared to those of group C (P<0.05). The exacerbation rate of liver function in group A was lower compared to that in group B (P<0.05), although it exhibited no statistically significant difference from that in group C (P>0.05). No severe radiation-related complications were reported during the follow-up period. The combination of γ-SBRT and TACE was shown to be a relatively effective local treatment for primary HCC patients with PVTT. Compared to γ-SBRT followed by TACE and γ-SBRT alone, TACE followed by γ-SBRT may exert a negative effect on liver function. These results suggested that the combination of TACE and γ-SBRT may be considered a relatively effective, safe and feasible treatment method for primary HCC patients with PVTT, although TACE followed by γ-SBRT may negatively affect liver function. PMID:24649306

  7. Percutaneous biliary stenting combined with radiotherapy as a treatment for unresectable hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    TAN, YONG; ZHU, JIAN-YONG; QIU, BAO-AN; XIA, NIAN-XIN; WANG, JING-HAN

    2015-01-01

    Hilar cholangiocarcinoma is often unresectable at the time of the initial diagnosis, and the provision of a definite palliative benefit is important in patients with unresectable hilar cholangiocarcinoma. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the safety of percutaneous biliary stenting and to analyze whether percutaneous biliary stenting combined with radiotherapy (RT) prolonged the stent patency and survival time of patients. In total, the cases of 38 patients with unresectable hilar cholangiocarcinoma that underwent percutaneous biliary stenting at the Navy General Hospital were retrospectively reviewed in the present study. Uncovered metallic stenting (UMS) combined with RT was administered to 25 patients, and UMS alone was administered to 13 patients. The records of early complications subsequent to percutaneous biliary stenting were collected, and the stent patency and survival times of patients were analyzed and compared between the two groups. The technical success rate of the procedure was 100% and the successful drainage rate was 86.8%. The overall early complication rate was 15.8% and the procedure-associated mortality rate was 2.6%. The median stent patency was 326 days in the UMS+RT group and 196 days in the UMS group (P=0.022). The UMS+RT group (median, 367 days) demonstrated a longer survival time compared with the UMS group (median, 267 days; P=0.025). Percutaneous biliary stenting offers a safe and effective method for the palliative treatment of patients with unresectable hilar cholangiocarcinoma, and percutaneous biliary stenting combined with RT may prolong stent patency and patient survival time. PMID:26622885

  8. Novel radiotherapy approaches for lung cancer: combining radiation therapy with targeted and immunotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Simone, Charles B.; Burri, Stuart H.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted therapies and immunotherapies have quickly become fixtures in the treatment armamentarium for metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Targeted therapies directed against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocations, and ROS-1 rearrangements have demonstrated improved progression free survival (PFS) and, in selected populations, improved overall survival (OS) compared with cytotoxic chemotherapy. Immunotherapies, including checkpoint inhibitor monoclonal antibodies against programmed death receptor 1 (PD-1) and programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1), have now also demonstrated improved survival compared with chemotherapy. The use of these novel systemic agents in non-metastatic patient populations and in combination with radiation therapy is not well defined. As radiation therapy has become more effective and more conformal with fewer toxicities, it has increasingly been used in the oligometastatic or oligoprogression setting. This has allowed improvement in PFS and potentially OS, and in the oligoprogressive setting may overcome acquired drug resistance of a specific lesion(s) to allow patients to remain on their targeted therapies. Molecularly targeted therapies and immunotherapies for patients with metastatic NSCLC have demonstrated much success. Advances in radiation therapy and stereotactic body radiotherapy, radiation therapy have led to combination strategies with targeted therapies among patients with lung cancer. Radiation therapy has also been combined with immunotherapies predominantly in the metastatic setting. In the metastatic population, radiation therapy has the ability to provide durable local control and also augment the immune response of systemic agents, which may lead to an abscopal effect of immune-mediated tumor response in disease sites outside of the radiation field in select patients. PMID:26629423

  9. Effect of bleomycin-radiotherapy combination in management of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, P.M.; Shukla, S.N.; Patel, K.M.; Patel, N.L.; Baboo, H.A.; Patel, D.D.

    1981-09-01

    Twenty-five patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma were treated with bleomycin-radiotherapy protocol, 15 mg bleomycin I.V. on alternate days followed by radiation within half an hour. The average total dose of bleomycin was 150 mg. Radiotherapy was given daily. Two patients were lost to follow-up very early in the course of the treatment and were removed from the study for statistical purposes. Thirty-six patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma who were treated with radiotherapy alone during the same period were used as controls. The patients were followed for two years. The incidence of response rate did not differ significantly between regimens; however, the incidence of side effects with bleomycin-radiotherapy, 82.61%, is significantly more than that of radiotherapy alone (52.78%). Median survial time (MST) of those responding to bleomycin-radiotherapy protocol was seven months and 12 days and for radiotherapy responders was six months. Neither the response rate nor the MST improve significantly after pretreatment with bleomycin. On the contrary, the incidence of side effects increased significantly.

  10. Radiation dose escalation by simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy for esophageal cancer: a phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Tiantian; Chang, Daniel; Chen, Zhijian; Huang, Ruihong; Zhang, Wuzhe; Lin, Kun; Guo, Longjia; Zhou, Mingzhen; Li, Dongsheng; Li, Derui; Chen, Chuangzhen

    2016-01-01

    The outcomes for patients with esophageal cancer (EC) underwent standard-dose radical radiotherapy were still disappointing. This phase II study investigated the feasibility, safety and efficacy of radiation dose escalation using simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy (SMART) combined with chemotherapy in 60 EC patients. Radiotherapy consisted of 66Gy at 2.2 Gy/fraction to the gross tumor and 54Gy at 1.8 Gy/fraction to subclinical diseases simultaneously. Chemotherapy including cisplatin and 5fluorouracil were administered to all patients during and after radiotherapy. The data showed that the majority of patients (98.3%) completed the whole course of radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy. The most common ≥ grade 3 acute toxicities were neutropenia (16.7%), followed by esophagitis (6.7%) and thrombopenia (5.0%). With a median follow-up of 24 months (5-38) for all patients and 30 months (18-38) for those still alive, 11 patients (18.3%) developed ≥ Grade 3 late toxicities and 2 (3.3%) of them died subsequently due to esophageal hemorrhage. The 1- and 2-year local-regional control, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 87.6% and 78.6%, 86.0% and 80.5%, 75.6% and 64.4%, 86.7% and 72.7%, respectively. SMART combined with concurrent chemotherapy is feasible in EC patients with tolerable acute toxicities. They showed a trend of significant improvements in local-regional control and overall survival. Further follow-up is needed to evaluate the late toxicities. PMID:26992206

  11. Combined Effects of Embolization and Hypofractionated Conformal Stereotactic Radiotherapy in Arteriovenous Malformations of the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lindvall, P.; Wikholm, G.; Bergström, P.; Löfroth, P.; Bergenheim, A.T.

    2005-01-01

    Summary There are three major treatment options for cerebral AVMs; surgery, embolization and radiosurgery. Embolization may be effective to reduce the size and density but completely obliterates AVMs only in a minority of cases. Radiosurgery may be an alternative to resection, especially in smaller AVMs. Large AVMs have been considered difficult to treat safely and effectively with single fraction radiosurgery. Hypofractionated conformal stereotactic radiotherapy (HCSRT) alone or in combination with embolization may be an alternative treatment. Embolization may reduce the volume and density of AVMs, followed by HCSRT, allowing a safe delivery of a higher total dose of radiation than possible with a single fraction. Sixteen patients with AVMs were treated with embolization and HCSRT. Embolization was performed in 1-6 (median 2) sessions. HCSRT was delivered in 5 fractions with 6-7 Gy each to the total dose of 30-35 Gy. Cerebral angiographies before and after embolization were digitally compared for calculation of volume reduction and luminescence as a measure of AVM density. The mean AVM volume in 15 patients was reduced from 11.9 ± 2.1 (1-29, median 10.0) ml to 6.5 ± 2.0 (0.5-28, median 3) ml by embolization. The luminescence for all AVMs was significantly higher after than before embolization, indicating that all AVMs were less dense after embolization. Thirteen out of 16 patients (13/16, 81%) treated with embolization and HCSRT have so far shown obliteration of their AVMs 2-9 (median 4) years after HCSRT. Three patients experienced neurological sequele after embolization, and three patients developed radionecrosis after HCSRT. Using a new method to compare cerebral angiographies in AVMs we report reduction in density and volume after embolization. The obliteration rate of a combined treatment with embolization and HCSRT seems comparable with single fraction radiosurgery although the AVMs in our series are larger than reported in most series treated with single

  12. Combination chemotherapy followed by surgery or radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Kirsten, F; Atkinson, K H; Coppleson, J V; Elliott, P M; Green, D; Houghton, R; Murray, J C; Russell, P; Solomon, H J; Friedlander, M

    1987-06-01

    Forty-seven patients with locally advanced cervical cancer at high risk of relapse received three cycles of chemotherapy with PVB (cisplatin, vinblastine and bleomycin) before definitive local treatment with either radical surgery or radiotherapy. Thirty-one of the 47 patients (66%) responded to initial chemotherapy, and 11 of them have relapsed compared with 13 of the 16 non-responders. Median time to recurrence was 31 weeks for PVB non-responders but has not yet been reached for PVB responders. After a median follow-up of 128 weeks, 14 of the 31 responders (45%) are alive and disease free compared with 3 of the 16 non-responders (19%). There was a positive correlation between response to chemotherapy and subsequent response to radiotherapy. PVB was in general well tolerated although one death is probably attributable to chemotherapy. A randomized study comparing radiotherapy alone with initial PVB chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy is in progress. PMID:2441736

  13. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Causes Fewer Side Effects than Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy When Used in Combination With Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, Kevin; Blacksburg, Seth; Stone, Nelson; Stock, Richard G.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To measure the benefits of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) when used in combination with brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of all patients with localized prostate cancer who received external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in combination with brachytherapy with at least 1 year follow-up (n = 812). Combination therapy consisted of {sup 103}Pd or {sup 125}I implant, followed by a course of EBRT. From 1993 to March 2003 521 patients were treated with 3D-CRT, and from April 2003 to March 2009 291 patients were treated with IMRT. Urinary symptoms were prospectively measured with the International Prostate Symptom Score questionnaire with a single quality of life (QOL) question; rectal bleeding was assessed per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Schema. The Pearson {chi}{sup 2} test was used to compare toxicities experienced by patients who were treated with either IMRT or 3D-CRT. Logistic regression analyses were also performed to rule out possible confounding factors. Results: Within the first 3 months after treatment, patients treated with 3D-CRT scored their urinary symptoms as follows: 19% mild, 44% moderate, and 37% severe; patients treated with IMRT scored their urinary symptoms as follows: 36% mild, 47% moderate, and 17% severe (p < 0.001). The 3D-CRT patients rated their QOL as follows: 35% positive, 20% neutral, and 45% negative; IMRT patients rated their QOL as follows: 51% positive, 18% neutral, and 31% negative (p < 0.001). After 1 year of follow-up there was no longer any difference in urinary morbidity between the two groups. Logistic regression confirmed the differences in International Prostate Symptom Score and QOL in the acute setting (p < 0.001 for both). Grade {>=}2 rectal bleeding was reported by 11% of 3D

  14. Combined treatment of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma with surgery, chemotherapy, and hyperfractionated accelerated external radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    De Crevoisier, Renaud . E-mail: rdecrevo@mdanderson.org; Baudin, Eric; Bachelot, Anne; Leboulleux, Sophie; Travagli, Jean-Paul; Caillou, Bernard; Schlumberger, Martin

    2004-11-15

    Purpose: To analyze a prospective protocol combining surgery, chemotherapy (CT), and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. Methods and materials: Thirty anaplastic thyroid carcinoma patients (mean age, 59 years) were treated during 1990-2000. Tumor extended beyond the capsule gland in 26 patients, with tracheal extension in 8. Lymph node metastases were present in 18 patients and lung metastases in 6. Surgery was performed before RT-CT in 20 patients and afterwards in 4. Two cycles of doxorubicin (60 mg/m{sup 2}) and cisplatin (120 mg/m{sup 2}) were delivered before RT and four cycles after RT. RT consisted of two daily fractions of 1.25 Gy, 5 days per week to a total dose of 40 Gy to the cervical lymph node areas and the superior mediastinum. Results: Acute toxicity (World Health Organization criteria) was Grade 3 or 4 pharyngoesophagitis in 10 patients; Grade 4 neutropenia in 21, with infection in 13; and Grade 3 or 4 anemia and thrombopenia in 8 and 4, respectively. At the end of the treatment, a complete local response was observed in 19 patients. With a median follow-up of 45 months (range, 12-78 months), 7 patients were alive in complete remission, of whom 6 had initially received a complete tumor resection. Overall survival rate at 3 years was 27% (95% confidence interval 10-44%) and median survival 10 months. In multivariate analysis, tracheal extension and macroscopic complete tumor resection were significant factors in overall survival. Death was related to local progression in 5% of patients, to distant metastases in 68%, and to both in 27%. Conclusions: Main toxicity was hematologic. High long-term survival was obtained when RT-CT was given after complete surgery. This protocol avoided local tumor progression, and death was mainly caused by distant metastases.

  15. Apoptosis-inducing effects of cetuximab combined with radiotherapy and hypothermia on human nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenqi; Kang, Min; Qin, Yutao; Wei, Zhuxin; Wang, Rensheng

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the apoptosis-inducing effects of cetuximab combined with radiotherapy and hypothermia in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE cells. CNE cells were treated with the radiation monotherapy, the radiation and hypothermia, the cetuximab and radiation, and the triple-combination treatment, respectively. MTT assay was performed to assess cell proliferation following treatments. Hoechst 33258 staining and flow cytometry analyses were used to detect apoptotic process. Western blot analysis was performed to determine the protein expression levels. Cetuximab monotherapy inhibited the proliferation of CNE cells. Hyperthermia alone inhibited EGFR expression, and prolonged hypothermia treatment resulted in declining EGFR expression levels in these cells. Moreover, Hoechst 33258 staining showed obvious apoptotic morphologies in the treatment groups. Flow cytometry analysis showed that the interventions dramatically increased the apoptosis rates in CNE cells, with the most potent effect for the triple-combination treatment. Western blot analysis showed that, in the treatment groups, the expression levels of Bax were increased, while the expression levels of Bcl-2 were decreased, leading to significantly elevated Bax/Bcl-2 ratios in these groups, with the highest ratio for the triple-combination treatment. Cetuximab combined with radiotherapy and hypothermia treatments could efficiently inhibit the proliferation of CNE cells, and enhance the cellular apoptotic processes via regulating the expression levels of Bax and Bcl-2. Our findings provide experimental evidence for the application of the combination therapy in clinical treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. PMID:25932149

  16. High-dose-rate Three-dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy Combined with Active Breathing Control for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Early-stage Non-small-cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruozheng; Yin, Yong; Qin, Yonghui; Yu, Jinming

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and benefits of using high-dose-rate three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with active breathing control (ABC) for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Eight patients with early-stage NSCLC underwent CT scans under standard free-breathing (FB) and moderately deep inspiration breath-hold (mDIBH) with ABC. Two high-dose-rate 3D-CRT plans (1000 Mu/min) were designed based on the CT scans with FB and mDIBH. The maximal dose (D1%), minimal dose (D99%), conformity index (CI), and homogeneity index (HI) of the planning target volume (PTV), and dose-volume indices of the organs at risk between each plan were compared. The mean PTV volume decreased from 158.04 cm(3) with FB to 76.90 cm(3) with mDIBH (p < 0.05). When mDIBH was used, increases in the affected lung volume (by 47%), contralateral lung volume (by 55%), and total lung volume (by 50%) were observed compared to FB (p < 0.05). The V5-V40 of the affected lung (Vx represented the percentage volume of organs receiving at least the x Gy), V5-V40 and the mean dose for the total lung, V5-V40 and mean dose of the chest wall, and the maximum dose of the spinal cord were less for mDIBH than FB (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in CI, HI, D1%, or D99% for the PTV between the plans. In conclusion, high-dose-rate 3D-CRT combined with ABC reduced the radiation dose to the lungs and chest wall without affecting the dose distribution in SBRT of early-stage NSCLC patients. PMID:24988055

  17. Impact of the radiotherapy combined with cisplatin plus paclitaxel chemotherapy on the immunologic functions in the patients with esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ru; Zhang, Jianlong; He, Chunyu; Jiang, Qiong; Liu, Jinsong; Fan, Ruitai

    2016-07-01

    To study the impact of radiotherapy combined with cisplatin plus paclitaxel chemotherapy on the immunologic functions in the patients with esophageal cancer, from July 2012 to September 2014, 82 patients of esophageal cancer which were receiving treatment in our hospital chose out for this research. Among them, 42 patients received radiotherapy only, as the control group; while the other 40 patients with concurrent cisplatin plus paclitaxel chemo radiotherapy was taken as the observation group. Then the immunologic functions, toxic and side effects were compared between the two groups as well as the survival rates after 3-year-followup-visit, Th level of the total T cells, Th cells and the ratio of Th cells to Ts cells after receiving treatment all increased significantly compared with prior treatment. And the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). After the treatment, the level of T cells, Th cells and the ratio of Th cells to Ts cells of the observation group were all significantly lower than the control group, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). While the difference of the ratio of Ts cells to natural killer cells (NK cells) between the two groups were not significant. The toxic and side effects were mainly myelosuppression, decrease leukocyte, esophagit, nausea and vomiting, and it was not statistically significant in the difference between the two groups (P >0.05), the survival rates from the first year to the third year in the observation group were respectively significantly higher than the control group, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Radiotherapy combined with cisplatin plus paclitaxel chemotherapy could properly increase the immunologic functions in patients with esophageal cancer, benefiting for the survival rate with a good security. Therefore, it was worth promoting. PMID:27592476

  18. Comparison of radiohaloanalogues of meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) for a combined gene- and targeted radiotherapy approach to bladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, Natasha E; Boyd, Marie; Ross, Susan C; Pimlott, Sally L; Babich, John; Kirk, David; Zalutsky, Michael R; Mairs, Robert J

    2005-11-01

    Targeted radiotherapy using radiolabelled meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is a promising treatment option for bladder cancer, restricting the effects of radiotherapy to malignant cells thereby increasing efficacy and decreasing morbidity of radiotherapy. We investigated the efficacy of a combined gene therapy and targeted radiotherapy approach for bladder cancer using radiolabelled MIBG. The effectiveness of alternative radiohalogens and alternative preparations of radiolabelled MIBG for this therapeutic strategy were compared. Bladder cancer cells, EJ138, were transfected with a gene encoding the noradrenaline transporter (NAT) under the control of a tumour specific telomerase promoter, enabling them to actively take up radiolabelled MIBG. This resulted in tumour-specific cell kill. Uptake and retention of radioactivity in cells transfected with the NAT gene were compared with that obtained in cells transfected with the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) gene. Substantially greater uptake and longer retention of radioactivity in NAT-transfected cells was observed. Carrier-added (c.a.) [131I]MIBG, no-carrier added (n.c.a.) [131I]MIBG, and [211At]-labelled benzylguanidine (i.e. [211At] meta-astatobenzylguanidine (MABG)) were compared with respect to efficiency of induction of cell kill. N.c.a[(131)I]MIBG was more cytotoxic than c.a.[131I]MIBG. However, the alpha-emitter [211At]MABG was, by three orders of magnitude, more effective in causing tumour cell kill than the beta-emitter [131I]MIBG. We conclude that NAT gene transfer combined with the administration of n.c.a.[131I]MIBG or [211At]MABG, is a promising novel treatment approach for bladder cancer therapy. PMID:16787344

  19. Optimal unified combination rule in application of Dempster-Shafer theory to lung cancer radiotherapy dose response outcome analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Yanyan; Hussaini, M Yousuff; Gong, Yutao U T; Xiao, Ying

    2016-01-01

     Our previous study demonstrated the application of the Dempster-Shafer theory of evidence to dose/volume/outcome data analysis. Specifically, it provided Yager's rule to fuse data from different institutions pertaining to radiotherapy pneumonitis versus mean lung dose. The present work is a follow-on study that employs the optimal unified combination rule, which optimizes data similarity among inde-pendent sources. Specifically, we construct belief and plausibility functions on the lung cancer radiotherapy dose outcome datasets, and then apply the optimal uni-fied combination rule to obtain combined belief and plausibility, which bound the probabilities of pneumonitis incidence. To estimate the incidence of pneumonitis at any value of mean lung dose, we use the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model to fit the combined belief and plausibility curves. The results show that the optimal unified combination rule yields a narrower uncertainty range (as represented by the belief-plausibility range) than Yager's rule, which is also theoretically proven. PMID:26894343

  20. What Is the Best Multimodality Combination for Intraoperative Spinal Cord Monitoring of Motor Function? A Multicenter Study by the Monitoring Committee of the Japanese Society for Spine Surgery and Related Research

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Zenya; Matsuyama, Yukihiro; Ando, Muneharu; Kawabata, Shigenori; Kanchiku, Tsukasa; Kida, Kazunobu; Fujiwara, Yasushi; Yamada, Kei; Yamamoto, Naoya; Kobayashi, Sho; Saito, Takanori; Wada, Kanichiro; Satomi, Kazuhiko; Shinomiya, Kenichi; Tani, Toshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Surgeon survey. Objective To analyze multimodal intraoperative monitoring (MIOM) for different combinations of methods based on the collected data and determine the best combination. Methods A questionnaire was sent to 72 training institutions to analyze and compile data about monitoring that had been conducted during the preceding 5 years to obtain data on the following: (1) types of monitoring; (2) names and number of diseases; (3) conditions of anesthesia; (4) condition of stimulation, the monitored muscle and its number; (5) complications; and (6) preoperative and postoperative manual muscle testing, presence of dysesthesia, and the duration of postoperative motor deficit. Sensitivity and specificity, false-positive rates, and false-negative rates were examined for each type of monitoring, along with the relationship between each type of monitoring and the period of postoperative motor deficit. Results Comparison of the various combinations showed transcranial electrical stimulation motor evoked potential (TcMEP) + cord evoked potential after stimulation to the brain (Br-SCEP) combination had the highest sensitivity (90%). The TcMEP + somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP) and TcMEP + spinal cord evoked potential after stimulation to the spinal cord (Sp-SCEP) combinations each had a sensitivity of 80%, exhibiting little difference between their sensitivity and that obtained when TcMEP alone was used. Meanwhile, the sensitivity was as low as 50% with Br-SCEP + Sp-SCEP (i.e., the cases where TcMEP was not included). Conclusions The best multimodality combination for intraoperative spinal cord monitoring is TcMEP + Br-SCEP, which had the highest sensitivity (90%), the lowest false-positive rate (6.1%), and the lowest false-negative rate (0.2%). PMID:27099814

  1. What Is the Best Multimodality Combination for Intraoperative Spinal Cord Monitoring of Motor Function? A Multicenter Study by the Monitoring Committee of the Japanese Society for Spine Surgery and Related Research.

    PubMed

    Ito, Zenya; Matsuyama, Yukihiro; Ando, Muneharu; Kawabata, Shigenori; Kanchiku, Tsukasa; Kida, Kazunobu; Fujiwara, Yasushi; Yamada, Kei; Yamamoto, Naoya; Kobayashi, Sho; Saito, Takanori; Wada, Kanichiro; Satomi, Kazuhiko; Shinomiya, Kenichi; Tani, Toshikazu

    2016-05-01

    Study Design Surgeon survey. Objective To analyze multimodal intraoperative monitoring (MIOM) for different combinations of methods based on the collected data and determine the best combination. Methods A questionnaire was sent to 72 training institutions to analyze and compile data about monitoring that had been conducted during the preceding 5 years to obtain data on the following: (1) types of monitoring; (2) names and number of diseases; (3) conditions of anesthesia; (4) condition of stimulation, the monitored muscle and its number; (5) complications; and (6) preoperative and postoperative manual muscle testing, presence of dysesthesia, and the duration of postoperative motor deficit. Sensitivity and specificity, false-positive rates, and false-negative rates were examined for each type of monitoring, along with the relationship between each type of monitoring and the period of postoperative motor deficit. Results Comparison of the various combinations showed transcranial electrical stimulation motor evoked potential (TcMEP) + cord evoked potential after stimulation to the brain (Br-SCEP) combination had the highest sensitivity (90%). The TcMEP + somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP) and TcMEP + spinal cord evoked potential after stimulation to the spinal cord (Sp-SCEP) combinations each had a sensitivity of 80%, exhibiting little difference between their sensitivity and that obtained when TcMEP alone was used. Meanwhile, the sensitivity was as low as 50% with Br-SCEP + Sp-SCEP (i.e., the cases where TcMEP was not included). Conclusions The best multimodality combination for intraoperative spinal cord monitoring is TcMEP + Br-SCEP, which had the highest sensitivity (90%), the lowest false-positive rate (6.1%), and the lowest false-negative rate (0.2%). PMID:27099814

  2. Perspectives on the combination of radiotherapy and targeted therapy with DNA repair inhibitors in the treatment of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shih-Hung; Kuo, Ting-Chun; Wu, Hsu; Guo, Jhe-Cyuan; Hsu, Chiun; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Tien, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Kuo, Sung-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly lethal. Current research that combines radiation with targeted therapy may dramatically improve prognosis. Cancerous cells are characterized by unstable genomes and activation of DNA repair pathways, which are indicated by increased phosphorylation of numerous factors, including H2AX, ATM, ATR, Chk1, Chk2, DNA-PKcs, Rad51, and Ku70/Ku80 heterodimers. Radiotherapy causes DNA damage. Cancer cells can be made more sensitive to the effects of radiation (radiosensitization) through inhibition of DNA repair pathways. The synergistic effects, of two or more combined non-lethal treatments, led to co-administration of chemotherapy and radiosensitization in BRCA-defective cells and patients, with promising results. ATM/Chk2 and ATR/Chk1 pathways are principal regulators of cell cycle arrest, following DNA double-strand or single-strand breaks. DNA double-stranded breaks activate DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). It forms a holoenzyme with Ku70/Ku80 heterodimers, called DNA-PK, which catalyzes the joining of nonhomologous ends. This is the primary repair pathway utilized in human cells after exposure to ionizing radiation. Radiosensitization, induced by inhibitors of ATM, ATR, Chk1, Chk2, Wee1, PP2A, or DNA-PK, has been demonstrated in preclinical pancreatic cancer studies. Clinical trials are underway. Development of agents that inhibit DNA repair pathways to be clinically used in combination with radiotherapy is warranted for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27621574

  3. Phase II Study of Vinorelbine and Estramustine in Combination With Conformational Radiotherapy for Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Carles, Joan; Nogue, Miguel; Sole, Josep M.; Foro, Palmira; Domenech, Montserrat; Suarez, Marta; Gallardo, Enrique; Garcia, Dario; Ferrer, Ferran; Gelabert-Mas, Antoni; Gayo, Javier; Fabregat, Xavier

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety profile of vinorelbine and estramustine in combination with three-dimensional conformational radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in patients with localized high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients received estramustine, 600 mg/m{sup 2} daily, and vinorelbine, 25 mg/m{sup 2}, on days 1 and 8 of a 21-day cycle for three cycles in combination with 8 weeks of 3D-CRT (total dose of 70.2 gray [Gy] at 1.8-Gy fractions or 70 Gy at 2.0-Gy fractions). Additionally, patients received luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogs for 3 years. Results: All patients were evaluated for response and toxicity. Progression-free survival at 5 years was 72% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 52-86). All patients who relapsed had only biochemical relapse. The most frequent severe toxicities were cystitis (16% of patients), leucopenia (10% of patients), diarrhea (10% of patients), neutropenia (8% of patients), and proctitis (8% of patients). Six patients (12%) did not complete study treatment due to the patient's decision (n = 1) and to adverse events such as hepatotoxicity, proctitis, paralytic ileus, and acute myocardial infarction. Conclusions: Vinorelbine and estramustine in combination with 3D-CRT is a safe and effective regimen for patients with localized high-risk prostate cancer. A randomized trial is needed to determine whether the results of this regimen are an improvement over the results obtained with radiotherapy and androgen ablation.

  4. Perspectives on the combination of radiotherapy and targeted therapy with DNA repair inhibitors in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shih-Hung; Kuo, Ting-Chun; Wu, Hsu; Guo, Jhe-Cyuan; Hsu, Chiun; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Tien, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Kuo, Sung-Hsin

    2016-08-28

    Pancreatic cancer is highly lethal. Current research that combines radiation with targeted therapy may dramatically improve prognosis. Cancerous cells are characterized by unstable genomes and activation of DNA repair pathways, which are indicated by increased phosphorylation of numerous factors, including H2AX, ATM, ATR, Chk1, Chk2, DNA-PKcs, Rad51, and Ku70/Ku80 heterodimers. Radiotherapy causes DNA damage. Cancer cells can be made more sensitive to the effects of radiation (radiosensitization) through inhibition of DNA repair pathways. The synergistic effects, of two or more combined non-lethal treatments, led to co-administration of chemotherapy and radiosensitization in BRCA-defective cells and patients, with promising results. ATM/Chk2 and ATR/Chk1 pathways are principal regulators of cell cycle arrest, following DNA double-strand or single-strand breaks. DNA double-stranded breaks activate DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). It forms a holoenzyme with Ku70/Ku80 heterodimers, called DNA-PK, which catalyzes the joining of nonhomologous ends. This is the primary repair pathway utilized in human cells after exposure to ionizing radiation. Radiosensitization, induced by inhibitors of ATM, ATR, Chk1, Chk2, Wee1, PP2A, or DNA-PK, has been demonstrated in preclinical pancreatic cancer studies. Clinical trials are underway. Development of agents that inhibit DNA repair pathways to be clinically used in combination with radiotherapy is warranted for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27621574

  5. Intraoperative Stem Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Mónica Beato; Cabral, Joaquim M.S.; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells hold significant promise for regeneration of tissue defects and disease-modifying therapies. Although numerous promising stem cell approaches are advancing in clinical trials, intraoperative stem cell therapies offer more immediate hope by integrating an autologous cell source with a well-established surgical intervention in a single procedure. Herein, the major developments in intraoperative stem cell approaches, from in vivo models to clinical studies, are reviewed, and the potential regenerative mechanisms and the roles of different cell populations in the regeneration process are discussed. Although intraoperative stem cell therapies have been shown to be safe and effective for several indications, there are still critical challenges to be tackled prior to adoption into the standard surgical armamentarium. PMID:22809140

  6. Intraoperative aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajmer; Mehta, Yatin

    2015-01-01

    Intraoperative aortic dissection is a rare but fatal complication of open heart surgery. By recognizing the population at risk and by using a gentle operative technique in such patients, the surgeon can usually avoid iatrogenic injury to the aorta. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography and epiaortic scanning are invaluable for prompt diagnosis and determination of the extent of the injury. Prevention lies in the strict control of blood pressure during cannulation/decannulation, construction of proximal anastomosis, or in avoiding manipulation of the aorta in high-risk patients. Immediate repair using interposition graft or Dacron patch graft is warranted to reduce the high mortality associated with this complication. PMID:26440240

  7. TOPICAL REVIEW (Non-targeted) radioactive/fluorescent nanoparticles and their potential in combined pre- and intraoperative imaging during sentinel lymph node resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckle, Tessa; Chin, Patrick T. K.; van Leeuwen, Fijs W. B.

    2010-12-01

    One clinical precedent for the use of nanosized imaging agents is the localization of the tumor draining sentinel lymph nodes. In this application, radiocolloids such as 99mTc-NanoColl are currently used to plan the surgical procedure and to provide acoustic guidance during the intervention. Additional injections of dyes are common to provide optical surgical guidance. Bimodal imaging agents, which are both radioactive and fluorescent, have the potential to be used for both surgical planning and intraoperative fluorescence guidance towards the sentinel lymph nodes. This review provides an overview of the radioactive, fluorescent, and size properties of (non-targeted) bimodal nanoparticles, and their (potential) value in sentinel lymph node detection.

  8. Intraoperative high-field magnetic resonance imaging combined with neuronavigation-guided resection of intracranial mesenchymal chondrosarcoma in Broca’s area: a rare case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jing; Cheng, Jingliang; Li, Hongwei; Liu, Xianzhi; Zheng, Yuan; Wang, Chaoyan; Luo, Wenzheng; Nie, Yunfei; Li, Zhengwei; Pang, Beibei; Yang, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Cranial Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma (MC) and those that occurred in brain parenchymal were fairly rare aggressive neoplasm commonly affecting the bone of young adults. Here, we reported a case with intracranial MC, invading Broca’s area, a rare site not previously reported, which was presumed to be a glioma. We performed a gross total resection guided by intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) combined with neuronavigation. Follow-up shows no language and other brain function loss. Furthermore, we present a review of literature. We emphasized the importance of gross total resection guiding by the combination of iMRI and neuronavigation, which was proved to be both reliable and effective in language preservation. PMID:26064406

  9. Recurrent myoepithelial carcinoma of the submandibular gland treated by rAd-p53 combined with radiotherapy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin; Chen, Xiangxun; Wang, Hongyan; Shi, Qingming

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to report the case of a patient with recurrent myoepithelial carcinoma of the submandibular gland without progression for five years following treatment. A 71-year-old male patient presented to hospital with a painless swelling in the region of the right submandibular gland, and received a radical neck dissection on January 29, 2008. A nodule of ~7×4×2 cm was identified at the site of the right submandibular gland, and the pathological results revealed a diagnosis of myoepithelial carcinoma of the right submandibular gland with no lymph node metastasis. However, this case developed local recurrence with wide-spread metastasis in the lungs. Between April and October 2008, the patient underwent several treatment regimens and demonstrated no improvement following 6 cycles of chemotherapy. From then on, the patient was treated with recombinant adenoviral-p53 (rAd-p53) combined with radiotherapy using a 6 millivolt medical linear accelerator. The foci were relieved and the cancer demonstrated no signs of progression during the 5-year follow-up. rAd-p53 combined with radiotherapy was useful for treating myoepithelial carcinoma of the submandibular gland.

  10. Combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, methotrexate, procarbazine (camp) in 64 consecutive patients with epidermoid bronchogenic carcinoma, limited disease: a prospective study. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Trovo, M.G.; Tirelli, U.; De Paloi, A., et. al.

    1982-06-01

    Sixty-four consecutive patients with inoperable epidermoid bronchogenic carcinoma (limited disease) were treated with radiotherapy to the primary and nodal areas and combination chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, methotrexate and procarbazine. The overall response rate (CR + PR) to combined treatment was 62%. The median survival time was 12.7 months. The toxicity was acceptable and no treatment-related death occurred.

  11. Cancer risk estimates from the combined Japanese A-bomb and Hodgkin cohorts for doses relevant to radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Uwe; Walsh, Linda

    2008-04-01

    Most information on the dose-response of radiation-induced cancer is derived from data on the A-bomb survivors who were exposed to gamma-rays and neutrons. Since, for radiation protection purposes, the dose span of main interest is between 0 and 1 Gy, the analysis of the A-bomb survivors is usually focused on this range. However, estimates of cancer risk for doses above 1 Gy are becoming more important for radiotherapy patients and for long-term manned missions in space research. Therefore in this work, emphasis is placed on doses relevant for radiotherapy with respect to radiation-induced solid cancer. The analysis of the A-bomb survivor's data was extended by including two extra high-dose categories (4-6 Sv and 6-13 Sv) and by an attempted combination with cancer data on patients receiving radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease. In addition, since there are some recent indications for a high neutron dose contribution, the data were fitted separately for three different values for the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the neutrons (10, 35 and 100) and a variable RBE as a function of dose. The data were fitted using a linear, a linear-exponential and a plateau-dose-response relationship. Best agreement was found for the plateau model with a dose-varying RBE. It can be concluded that for doses above 1 Gy there is a tendency for a nonlinear dose-response curve. In addition, there is evidence of a neutron RBE greater than 10 for the A-bomb survivor data. Many problems and uncertainties are involved in combing these two datasets. However, since very little is currently known about the shape of dose-response relationships for radiation-induced cancer in the radiotherapy dose range, this approach could be regarded as a first attempt to acquire more information on this area. The work presented here also provides the first direct evidence that the bending over of the solid cancer excess risk dose response curve for the A-bomb survivors, generally observed above 2 Gy

  12. PSA Decrease During Combined-Modality Radiotherapy Predicts for Treatment Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Kubicek, Gregory J.; Naguib, Marco; Redfield, Sandy; Grayback, Nola; Olszanski, Arthur; Dawson, George; Brown, Sam I.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is the well-used marker in the diagnosis, prognosis, and follow-up for prostate cancer patients. Although reports have focused on the importance of pretreatment PSA levels, doubling time, and posttreatment nadirs, there is little information on the value of PSA during the course of radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of PSA values obtained midway through a course of radiotherapy treatment for prostate cancer. Patients had a PSA (midPSA) measured after a course of external beam radiation (EBRT) before planned transperineal low-dose-rate brachytherapy implant (LDR). Results: A total of 717 patients were analyzed with a median follow-up of 5.8 years, all censored patients had a minimum follow-up of 2 years. A total of 277 patients had low-risk disease, 267 patients had intermediate risk, and 173 patients had high-risk disease. Androgen blockade was used in 512 patients. A total of 653 patients had a midPSA decrease after EBRT, the median decrease was 6.2 ng/mL. Patients who had a midPSA decrease {>=}25% compared with pretreatment PSA had improved overall survival of 10.0 vs. 7.4 years (p < 0.0004) and improved disease-free survival of 9.8 vs. 7.3 years (p < 0.01). When stratified by use of androgen blockade, midPSA remained significant for both androgen and non-androgen patients. Conclusions: PSA response after EBRT before brachytherapy predicts for long-term outcome; this may allow for risk stratification and intervention with higher LDR doses to improve outcomes.

  13. Intraoperative radiation therapy-induced sarcomas in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, H J; Sindelar, W F; Kinsella, T J; Mehta, D M

    1989-12-01

    In a canine model the tolerance of normal and surgically manipulated tissue to intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) was investigated to provide guidelines for the clinical use of IORT in human cancer patients. A dose of 20 Gy IORT, with or without external beam radiotherapy, was generally well tolerated without significant increased treatment morbidity. Higher doses of IORT (over 30 Gy) have produced radiation-induced sarcomas in some animals followed over a long period. Therefore IORT should be used only in human cancer patients in well controlled studies, in which complications are well documented, and the possibility of radiation-induced malignancies in long-term survival should be considered. PMID:2594971

  14. [Intraoperative pancreas puncture cytology].

    PubMed

    Eggert, A; Lattmann, E; Kopf, R; Pfeiffer, M; Klöppel, G

    1984-01-01

    In the case of 10 to 15% of surgical patients with a pancreatic disorder an intraoperative diagnosis had to be made when a preoperative diagnosis had not yielded a definite result. Fine needle aspiration biopsy ( FNAB ) of the pancreas provided the basis for intraoperative differentiation of malignant and benign pancreatic processes. 244 pancreatic biopsies were carried out in 100 patients. It was possible to make a statement in 99% of the cases, with 65 malignant and 35 benign changes. In 83% the cytological diagnosis was correct; the method yielded incorrect-negative results in 7% of the cases. In 9% the presence of tumour cells was only suspected. There were no incorrect positive cancer diagnoses. FNAB caused no postoperative complications. Intraoperative bleeding after FBAB had to be stopped with a suture in one case. Transitory, asymptomatic hyperamylasemy must be expected in 25% of the patients after FNAB . This diagnostic technique is recommended in preference to the histological tissue removal methods because of its low risk factor. At least 2 biopsies of the suspect area with 2 smears are required, as a training in this diagnostic technique. PMID:6730761

  15. Proton-Beam, Intensity-Modulated, and/or Intraoperative Electron Radiation Therapy Combined with Aggressive Anterior Surgical Resection for Retroperitoneal Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sam S.; Chen, Yen-Lin; Kirsch, David G.; Maduekwe, Ugwuji N.; Rosenberg, Andrew E.; Nielsen, G. Petur; Sahani, Dushyant V.; Choy, Edwin; Harmon, David C.; DeLaney, Thomas F.

    2010-01-01

    Background We sought to reduce local recurrence for retroperitoneal sarcomas by using a coordinated strategy of advanced radiation techniques and aggressive en-bloc surgical resection. Methods Proton-beam radiation therapy (PBRT) and/or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) were delivered to improve tumor target coverage and spare selected adjacent organs. Surgical resection of tumor and adjacent organs was performed to obtain a disease-free anterior margin. Intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) was delivered to any close posterior margin. Results Twenty patients had primary tumors and eight had recurrent tumors. Tumors were large (median size 9.75 cm), primarily liposarcomas and leiomyosarcomas (71%), and were mostly of intermediate or high grade (81%). PBRT and/or IMRT were delivered to all patients, preferably preoperatively (75%), to a median dose of 50 Gy. Surgical resection included up to five adjacent organs, most commonly the colon (n = 7) and kidney (n = 7). Margins were positive for disease, usually posteriorly, in 15 patients (54%). IOERT was delivered to the posterior margin in 12 patients (43%) to a median dose of 11 Gy. Surgical complications occurred in eight patients (28.6%), and radiation-related complications occurred in four patients (14%). After a median follow-up of 33 months, only two patients (10%) with primary disease experienced local recurrence, while three patients (37.5%) with recurrent disease experienced local recurrence. Conclusions Aggressive resection of retroperitoneal sarcomas can achieve a disease-negative anterior margin. PBRT and/or IMRT with IOERT may possibly deliver sufficient radiation dose to the posterior margin to control microscopic residual disease. This strategy may minimize radiation-related morbidity and reduce local recurrence, especially in patients with primary disease. PMID:20151216

  16. [Cryotherapy, combined drug therapy and radiotherapy in the treatment of oral cavity cancer: 3 years' experience].

    PubMed

    Vercellino, V; Goia, F; Gandolfo, S; Camoletto, D

    1980-01-01

    The medium-term (three years) result of a multidisciplinary association treatment of carcinoma of the oral cavity has been reviewed. Treatment was Cryosurgery-polychemotherapy-ratiotherapy and the technique has been described along with the times of association in an introduction that has already been published in this review (see bibliography). Thirty patients were treated with the association because they refused or could not be submitted to surgery at the intital therapeutic action. All these patients present fairly extensive lesions and a three-year follow-up. Results were positive: 56.6% of patients showed disappearance of any objective or subjective sign of cancer and, in all cases, appreciable remission in terms of both extent and duration. The easiness of the technique is confirmed as well as the excellent conversation of the anatomical structures involved. However, a critical review of cases presenting partial failure suggest a classifications of oral carcinomatous lesions (for therapeutic purposes only) on the basis of which the condition can be treated with cryo-polychemo-radiotherapy alone or with a variation of this which provides for the addition of local exersis. PMID:6935521

  17. MR-guided pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound enhancement of docetaxel combined with radiotherapy for prostate cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Zhaomei; Ma, C.-M.; Chen, Xiaoming; Cvetkovic, Dusica; Pollack, Alan; Chen, Lili

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the enhancement of docetaxel by pulsed focused ultrasound (pFUS) in combination with radiotherapy (RT) for treatment of prostate cancer in vivo. LNCaP cells were grown in the prostates of male nude mice. When the tumors reached a designated volume by MRI, tumor bearing mice were randomly divided into seven groups (n = 5): (1) pFUS alone; (2) RT alone; (3) docetaxel alone; (4) docetaxel + pFUS (5) docetaxel + RT (6) docetaxel + pFUS + RT, and (7) control. MR-guided pFUS treatment was performed using a focused ultrasound treatment system (InSightec ExAblate 2000) with a 1.5T GE MR scanner. Animals were treated once with pFUS, docetaxel, RT or their combinations. Docetaxel was given by i.v. injection at 5 mg kg-1 before pFUS. RT was given 2 Gy after pFUS. Animals were euthanized 4 weeks after treatment. Tumor volumes were measured on MRI at 1 and 4 weeks post-treatment. Results showed that triple combination therapies of docetaxel, pFUS and RT provided the most significant tumor growth inhibition among all groups, which may have potential for the treatment of prostate cancer due to an improved therapeutic ratio.

  18. Image-guided radiotherapy for prostate cancer by CT-linear accelerator combination: Prostate movements and dosimetric considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, James R.; Grimm, Lisa; Oren, Reva

    2005-02-01

    Purpose: Multiple studies have indicated that the prostate is not stationary and can move as much as 2 cm. Such prostate movements are problematic for intensity-modulated radiotherapy, with its associated tight margins and dose escalation. Because of these intrinsic daily uncertainties, a relative generous 'margin' is necessary to avoid marginal misses. Using the CT-linear accelerator combination in the treatment suite (Primatom, Siemens), we found that the daily intrinsic prostate movements can be easily corrected before each radiotherapy session. Dosimetric calculations were performed to evaluate the amount of discrepancy of dose to the target if no correction was done for prostate movement. Methods and materials: The Primatom consists of a Siemens Somatom CT scanner and a Siemens Primus linear accelerator installed in the same treatment suite and sharing a common table/couch. The patient is scanned by the CT scanner, which is movable on a pair of horizontal rails. During scanning, the couch does not move. The exact location of the prostate, seminal vesicles, and rectum are identified and localized. These positions are then compared with the planned positions. The daily movement of the prostate and rectum were corrected for and a new isocenter derived. The patient was treated immediately using the new isocenter. Results: Of the 108 patients with primary prostate cancer studied, 540 consecutive daily CT scans were performed during the last part of the cone down treatment. Of the 540 scans, 46% required no isocenter adjustments for the AP-PA direction, 54% required a shift of {>=}3 mm, 44% required a shift of >5 mm, and 15% required a shift of >10 mm. In the superoinferior direction, 27% required a shift of >3 mm, 25% required a shift of >5 mm, and 4% required a shift of >10 mm. In the right-left direction, 34% required a shift of >3 mm, 24% required a shift of >5 mm, and 5% required a shift of >10 mm. Dosimetric calculations for a typical case of prostate cancer

  19. Radiotherapy alone or combined with chemotherapy as definitive treatment for squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, William R; Herman, Michael P; Deraniyagala, Rohan L; Amdur, Robert J; Werning, John W; Dziegielewski, Peter; Kirwan, Jessica; Morris, Christopher G; Mendenhall, William M

    2016-08-01

    This study is aimed at updating our institution's experience with definitive radiotherapy (RT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil. We reviewed 531 patients treated between 1983 and 2012 with definitive RT for squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil. Of these, 179 patients were treated with either induction (n = 19) or concomitant (n = 160) chemotherapy. Planned neck dissection was performed on 217 patients: unilaterally in 199 and bilaterally in 18 patients. Median follow-up was 5.2 years for all patients (range 0.1-31.6 years) and 8.2 years for living patients (range 1.9-31.6 years). The 5-year local control rates by T stage were as follows: T1, 94 %; T2, 87 %; T3 79 %; T4, 70 %; and overall, 83 %. Multivariate analysis revealed that local control was significantly influenced by T stage and neck dissection. The 5-year cause-specific survival rates by overall stage were as follows: I, 94 %; II, 88 %; III, 87 %; IVA, 75 %; IVB, 52 %; and overall, 78 %. Multivariate analysis revealed that cause-specific survival was significantly influenced by T stage, N stage, overall stage, fractionation, neck dissection, sex, and ethnicity. Of 77 patients treated with ipsilateral fields only, contralateral neck failure occurred in 1 %. The rate of severe complications was 12 %. Definitive RT for patients with tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma provides control rates equivalent to other modalities with a comparatively low incidence of late complications. Patients with anterior tonsillar pillar or tonsillar fossa primaries that are well lateralized with no base of tongue or soft palate extension may be treated with ipsilateral fields. PMID:27059836

  20. Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy Should Be Combined With a Hypoxic Cell Radiosensitizer

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J. Martin; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of tumor hypoxia on the expected level of cell killing by regimens of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) and to determine the extent to which the negative effect of hypoxia could be prevented using a clinically available hypoxic cell radiosensitizer. Results and Discussion: We have calculated the expected level of tumor cell killing from regimens of SABR, both with and without the assumption that 20% of the tumor cells are hypoxic, using the standard linear quadratic model and the universal survival curve modification. We compare the results obtained with our own clinical data for lung tumors of different sizes and with published data from other studies. We also have calculated the expected effect on cell survival of adding the hypoxic cell sensitizer etanidazole at clinically achievable drug concentrations. Modeling tumor cell killing with any of the currently used regimens of SABR produces results that are inconsistent with the majority of clinical findings if tumor hypoxia is not considered. However, with the assumption of tumor hypoxia, the expected level of cell killing is consistent with clinical data. For only some of the smallest tumors are the clinical data consistent with no tumor hypoxia, but there could be other reasons for the sensitivity of these tumors. The addition of etanidazole at clinically achievable tumor concentrations produces a large increase in the expected level of tumor cell killing from the large radiation doses used in SABR. Conclusions: The presence of tumor hypoxia is a major negative factor in limiting the curability of tumors by SABR at radiation doses that are tolerable to surrounding normal tissues. However, this negative effect of hypoxia could be overcome by the addition of clinically tolerable doses of the hypoxic cell radiosensitizer etanidazole.

  1. Intraoperative virtual brain counseling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhaowei; Grosky, William I.; Zamorano, Lucia J.; Muzik, Otto; Diaz, Fernando

    1997-06-01

    Our objective is to offer online real-tim e intelligent guidance to the neurosurgeon. Different from traditional image-guidance technologies that offer intra-operative visualization of medical images or atlas images, virtual brain counseling goes one step further. It can distinguish related brain structures and provide information about them intra-operatively. Virtual brain counseling is the foundation for surgical planing optimization and on-line surgical reference. It can provide a warning system that alerts the neurosurgeon if the chosen trajectory will pass through eloquent brain areas. In order to fulfill this objective, tracking techniques are involved for intra- operativity. Most importantly, a 3D virtual brian environment, different from traditional 3D digitized atlases, is an object-oriented model of the brain that stores information about different brain structures together with their elated information. An object-oriented hierarchical hyper-voxel space (HHVS) is introduced to integrate anatomical and functional structures. Spatial queries based on position of interest, line segment of interest, and volume of interest are introduced in this paper. The virtual brain environment is integrated with existing surgical pre-planning and intra-operative tracking systems to provide information for planning optimization and on-line surgical guidance. The neurosurgeon is alerted automatically if the planned treatment affects any critical structures. Architectures such as HHVS and algorithms, such as spatial querying, normalizing, and warping are presented in the paper. A prototype has shown that the virtual brain is intuitive in its hierarchical 3D appearance. It also showed that HHVS, as the key structure for virtual brain counseling, efficiently integrates multi-scale brain structures based on their spatial relationships.This is a promising development for optimization of treatment plans and online surgical intelligent guidance.

  2. Treatment complications after sequential combination chemotherapy and radiotherapy with or without surgery in previously untreated squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Posner, M.R.; Weichselbaum, R.R.; Fitzgerald, T.J.; Clark, J.R.; Rose, C.; Fabian, R.L.; Norris, C.M. Jr.; Miller, D.; Tuttle, S.A.; Ervin, T.J.

    1985-11-01

    One hundred consecutive patients with previously untreated advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were treated with induction combination chemotherapy followed by definitive surgery and/or radiotherapy, and were evaluated for radiotherapy related toxicity. The induction regimen consisted of cisplatin, bleomycin and methotrexate/leucovorin. Acute toxicity consisted predominantly of mucositis and weight loss, and was mild or moderate by degree in 94% of patients. Six percent of patients experienced severe or life threatening acute toxicities. Two acute toxic deaths were noted in this series, one from a combination of mucositis, weight loss and infection and one from hypoglycemia of unknown origin. Thirty-five percent of patients had radiation treatment interrupted briefly because of acute toxicity. Radiotherapy dose, surgical intervention and age did not have an impact on the presence or degree of acute toxicity. Late toxicities included: hypothyroidism in 32% of patients tested: osteoradionecrosis in 5% of patients, associated primarily with a composite resection (4 of 5 cases); and soft tissue ulcerations in 3%. Taken together, these data indicate that induction combination chemotherapy did not significantly increase the toxicity of subsequent radiotherapy with or without surgery.

  3. [Bone metastases relapse after cementoplasty: Case report and discussion about the combination of radiotherapy and cementoplasty].

    PubMed

    Brahimi, Y; Antoni, D; Buy, X; Gangi, A; Noël, G

    2016-04-01

    Interventional radiology techniques - vertebroplasty, kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty - are part of the therapeutic arsenal in oncology. They are not, however, antitumoural by themselves. A combination of these techniques with an antitumoral treatment is thus required. We present the case of a patient with a spinal metastasis who received antitumor vertebroplasty without additional treatment. The follow-up has found a tumour development around the cement. This case illustrates the need for a complementary antitumor treatment following a consolidative procedure. Many combinations of treatment and techniques have been published; however, no study reached a sufficient proof of efficiency for any combination to be recommended. Prospective trials are needed to guide clinicians. PMID:26948512

  4. The Art of Intraoperative Glioma Identification

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zoe Z.; Shields, Lisa B. E.; Sun, David A.; Zhang, Yi Ping; Hunt, Matthew A.; Shields, Christopher B.

    2015-01-01

    A major dilemma in brain-tumor surgery is the identification of tumor boundaries to maximize tumor excision and minimize postoperative neurological damage. Gliomas, especially low-grade tumors, and normal brain have a similar color and texture, which poses a challenge to the neurosurgeon. Advances in glioma resection techniques combine the experience of the neurosurgeon and various advanced technologies. Intraoperative methods to delineate gliomas from normal tissue consist of (1) image-based navigation, (2) intraoperative sampling, (3) electrophysiological monitoring, and (4) enhanced visual tumor demarcation. The advantages and disadvantages of each technique are discussed. A combination of these methods is becoming widely accepted in routine glioma surgery. Gross total resection in conjunction with radiation, chemotherapy, or immune/gene therapy may increase the rates of cure in this devastating disease. PMID:26284196

  5. Intraoperative vagal nerve monitoring.

    PubMed

    Leonetti, J P; Jellish, W S; Warf, P; Hudson, E

    1996-08-01

    A variety of benign and malignant neoplasms occur in the superior cervical neck, parapharyngeal space or the infratemporal fossa. The surgical resection of these lesions may result in postoperative iatrogenic injury to the vagus nerve with associated dysfunctional swallowing and airway protection. Anatomic and functional preservation of this critical cranial nerve will contribute to a favorable surgical outcome. Fourteen patients with tumors of the cervical neck or adjacent skull base underwent intraoperative vagal nerve monitoring in an attempt to preserve neural integrity following tumor removal. Of the 11 patients with anatomically preserved vagal nerves in this group, seven patients had normal vocal cord mobility following surgery and all 11 patients demonstrated normal vocal cord movement by six months. In an earlier series of 23 patients with tumors in the same region who underwent tumor resection without vagal nerve monitoring, 18 patients had anatomically preserved vagal nerves. Within this group, five patients had normal vocal cord movement at one month and 13 patients demonstrated normal vocal cord movement at six months. This paper will outline a technique for intraoperative vagal nerve monitoring utilizing transcricothyroid membrane placement of bipolar hook-wire electrodes in the vocalis muscle. Our results with the surgical treatment of cervical neck and lateral skull base tumors for patients with unmonitored and monitored vagal nerves will be outlined. PMID:8828272

  6. Intraoperative BiPAP in OSA Patients.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhavna P; Ns, Kodandaram

    2015-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) is characterized by recurrent episodes of partial or complete upper airway obstructions during sleep. Severe OSA presents with a number of challenges to the anesthesiologist, the most life threatening being loss of the airway. We are reporting a case where we successfully used intraoperative bi level positive pressure ventilation (BiPAP) with moderate sedation and a regional technique in a patient with severe OSA posted for total knee replacement (TKR). A 55-year-old lady with osteoarthritis of right knee joint was posted for total knee replacement. She had severe OSA with an apnea-hypopnea index of 35. She also had moderate pulmonary hypertension due to her long standing OSA. We successfully used in her a combined spinal epidural technique with intraoperative BiPAP and sedation. She had no complications intraoperatively or post operatively and was discharged on day 5. Patients with OSA are vulnerable to sedatives, anaesthesia and analgesia which even in small doses can cause complete airway collapse. The problem, with regional techniques is that it requires excellent patient cooperation. We decided to put our patient on intraoperative BiPAP hoping that this would allow us to sedate her adequately for the surgery. As it happened we were able to successfully sedate her with slightly lesser doses of the commonly used sedatives without any episodes of desaturation, snoring or exacerbation of pulmonary hypertension. Many more trials are required before we can conclusively say that intraoperative BiPAP allows us to safely sedate OSA patients but we hope that our case report draws light on this possibility. Planning ahead and having a BiPAP machine available inside the operating may allow us to use sedatives in these patients to keep them comfortable under regional anaesthesia. PMID:26023625

  7. Intraoperative BiPAP in OSA Patients

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhavna P

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) is characterized by recurrent episodes of partial or complete upper airway obstructions during sleep. Severe OSA presents with a number of challenges to the anesthesiologist, the most life threatening being loss of the airway. We are reporting a case where we successfully used intraoperative bi level positive pressure ventilation (BiPAP) with moderate sedation and a regional technique in a patient with severe OSA posted for total knee replacement (TKR). A 55-year-old lady with osteoarthritis of right knee joint was posted for total knee replacement. She had severe OSA with an apnea-hypopnea index of 35. She also had moderate pulmonary hypertension due to her long standing OSA. We successfully used in her a combined spinal epidural technique with intraoperative BiPAP and sedation. She had no complications intraoperatively or post operatively and was discharged on day 5. Patients with OSA are vulnerable to sedatives, anaesthesia and analgesia which even in small doses can cause complete airway collapse. The problem, with regional techniques is that it requires excellent patient cooperation. We decided to put our patient on intraoperative BiPAP hoping that this would allow us to sedate her adequately for the surgery. As it happened we were able to successfully sedate her with slightly lesser doses of the commonly used sedatives without any episodes of desaturation, snoring or exacerbation of pulmonary hypertension. Many more trials are required before we can conclusively say that intraoperative BiPAP allows us to safely sedate OSA patients but we hope that our case report draws light on this possibility. Planning ahead and having a BiPAP machine available inside the operating may allow us to use sedatives in these patients to keep them comfortable under regional anaesthesia. PMID:26023625

  8. Nuclear probes and intraoperative gamma cameras.

    PubMed

    Heller, Sherman; Zanzonico, Pat

    2011-05-01

    Gamma probes are now an important, well-established technology in the management of cancer, particularly in the detection of sentinel lymph nodes. Intraoperative sentinel lymph node as well as tumor detection may be improved under some circumstances by the use of beta (negatron or positron), rather than gamma detection, because the very short range (∼ 1 mm or less) of such particulate radiations eliminates the contribution of confounding counts from activity other than in the immediate vicinity of the detector. This has led to the development of intraoperative beta probes. Gamma camera imaging also benefits from short source-to-detector distances and minimal overlying tissue, and intraoperative small field-of-view gamma cameras have therefore been developed as well. Radiation detectors for intraoperative probes can generally be characterized as either scintillation or ionization detectors. Scintillators used in scintillation-detector probes include thallium-doped sodium iodide, thallium- and sodium-doped cesium iodide, and cerium-doped lutecium orthooxysilicate. Alternatives to inorganic scintillators are plastic scintillators, solutions of organic scintillation compounds dissolved in an organic solvent that is subsequently polymerized to form a solid. Their combined high counting efficiency for beta particles and low counting efficiency for 511-keV annihilation γ-rays make plastic scintillators well-suited as intraoperative beta probes in general and positron probes in particular Semiconductors used in ionization-detector probes include cadmium telluride, cadmium zinc telluride, and mercuric iodide. Clinical studies directly comparing scintillation and semiconductor intraoperative probes have not provided a clear choice between scintillation and ionization detector-based probes. The earliest small field-of-view intraoperative gamma camera systems were hand-held devices having fields of view of only 1.5-2.5 cm in diameter that used conventional thallium

  9. VEGF Trap in Combination With Radiotherapy Improves Tumor Control in U87 Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wachsberger, Phyllis R. . E-mail: Phyllis.Wachsberger@mail.tju.edu; Burd, Randy; Cardi, Chris; Thakur, Mathew; Daskalakis, Constantine; Holash, Jocelyn; Yancopoulos, George D.; Dicker, Adam P.

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of vascular endothelial growth factor VEGF Trap (Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Tarrytown, NY), a humanized soluble vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor protein, and radiation (RT) on tumor growth in U87 glioblastoma xenografts in nude mice. Methods and Materials: U87 cell suspensions were implanted subcutaneously into hind limbs of nude mice. VEGF Trap (2.5-25 mg/kg) was administered every 3 days for 3 weeks alone or in combination with a single dose of 10 Gy or fractionated RT (3 x 5 Gy). In addition, three scheduling protocols for VEGF Trap plus fractionated RT were examined. Results: Improved tumor control was seen when RT (either single dose or fractionated doses) was combined with the lowest dose of VEGF Trap (2.5 mg/kg). Scheduling did not significantly affect the efficacy of combined therapy. Although high-dose VEGF Trap (10 mg/kg or 25 mg/kg) significantly reduced tumor growth over that of RT alone, there was no additional benefit to combining high-dose VEGF Trap with RT. Conclusions: Vascular endothelial growth factor Trap plus radiation is clearly better than radiation alone in a U87 subcutaneous xenograft model. Although high doses of VEGF Trap alone are highly efficacious, it is unclear whether such high doses can be used clinically without incurring normal tissue toxicities. Thus, information on lower doses of VEGF Trap and ionizing radiation is of clinical relevance.

  10. Combined effect of gefitinib ('Iressa', ZD1839) and targeted radiotherapy with 211At-EGF.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, Asa Liljegren; Almqvist, Ylva; Orlova, Anna; Blomquist, Erik; Jensen, Holger J; Gedda, Lars; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Carlsson, Jörgen

    2003-10-01

    The EGFR-TKI (epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor) gefitinib ['Iressa' (trademark of the AstraZeneca group of companies), ZD1839] increases the cellular uptake of radiolabelled epidermal growth factor (EGF). We investigated gefitinib treatment combined with astatine-211 EGF targeting in vitro using two cell lines expressing high levels of EGFR: A431 (sensitive to gefitinib) and U343MGaCl2:1 (resistant to gefitinib). In both cell lines, the uptake of 211At-EGF was markedly increased by concomitant treatment with gefitinib. Survival was investigated using both a clonogenic survival assay and a cell growth assay. Combined gefitinib and 211At-EGF treatment reduced the survival of U343 cells 3.5-fold compared with 211At-EGF alone. In A431 cells, 211At-EGF treatment resulted in very low survival, but combined treatment with gefitinib increased the survival by about 20-fold. These results indicate that combined treatment with gefitinib might increase the effect of ligand-mediated radionuclide therapy in gefitinib-resistant tumours and decrease the effect of such therapy in gefitinib-sensitive tumours. PMID:12937952

  11. SU-E-T-573: The Robustness of a Combined Margin Recipe for Uncertainties During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stroom, J; Vieira, S; Greco, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the variability of a safety margin recipe that combines CTV and PTV margins quadratically, with several tumor, treatment, and user related factors. Methods: Margin recipes were calculated by monte-carlo simulations in 5 steps. 1. A spherical tumor with or without isotropic microscopic was irradiated with a 5 field dose plan2. PTV: Geometric uncertainties were introduced using systematic (Sgeo) and random (sgeo) standard deviations. CTV: Microscopic disease distribution was modelled by semi-gaussian (Smicro) with varying number of islets (Ni)3. For a specific uncertainty set (Sgeo, sgeo, Smicro(Ni)), margins were varied until pre-defined decrease in TCP or dose coverage was fulfilled. 4. First, margin recipes were calculated for each of the three uncertainties separately. CTV and PTV recipes were then combined quadratically to yield a final recipe M(Sgeo, sgeo, Smicro(Ni)).5. The final M was verified by simultaneous simulations of the uncertainties.Now, M has been calculated for various changing parameters like margin criteria, penumbra steepness, islet radio-sensitivity, dose conformity, and number of fractions. We subsequently investigated A: whether the combined recipe still holds in all these situations, and B: what the margin variation was in all these cases. Results: We found that the accuracy of the combined margin recipes remains on average within 1mm for all situations, confirming the correctness of the quadratic addition. Depending on the specific parameter, margin factors could change such that margins change over 50%. Especially margin recipes based on TCP-criteria are more sensitive to more parameters than those based on purely geometric Dmin-criteria. Interestingly, measures taken to minimize treatment field sizes (by e.g. optimizing dose conformity) are counteracted by the requirement of larger margins to get the same tumor coverage. Conclusion: Margin recipes combining geometric and microscopic uncertainties quadratically are

  12. Californium-252 Brachytherapy Combined With External-Beam Radiotherapy for Cervical Cancer: Long-Term Treatment Results

    SciTech Connect

    Lei Xin; Qian Chengyuan; Qing Yi; Zhao Kewei; Yang Zhengzhou; Dai Nan; Zhong Zhaoyang; Tang Cheng; Li Zheng; Gu Xianqing; Zhou Qian; Feng Yan; Xiong Yanli; Shan Jinlu; Wang Dong

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To observe, by retrospective analysis, the curative effects and complications due to californium-252 ({sup 252}Cf) neutron intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) combined with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in the treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From February 1999 to December 2007, 696 patients with cervical cancer (Stages IB to IIIB) were treated with {sup 252}Cf-ICBT in combination of EBRT. Of all, 31 patients were at Stage IB, 104 at IIA, 363 at IIB, 64 at IIIA, and 134 at IIIB. Californium-252 ICBT was delivered at 7-12 Gy per insertion per week, with a total dose of 29-45 Gy to reference point A in three to five insertions. The whole pelvic cavity was treated with 8-MV X-ray external irradiation at 2 Gy per fraction, four times per week. After 16-38 Gy of external irradiation, the center of the whole pelvic field was blocked with a 4-cm-wide lead shield, with a total external irradiation dose of 44-56 Gy. The total treatment course was 5 to 6 weeks. Results: Overall survival rate at 3 and 5 years for all patients was 76.0% and 64.9%, respectively. Disease-free 3- and 5-year survival rates of patients were 71.2% and 58.4%, respectively. Late complications included vaginal contracture and adhesion, radiation proctitis, radiation cystitis, and inflammatory bowel, which accounted for 5.8%, 7.1%, 6.2%, and 4.9%, respectively. Univariate analysis results showed significant correlation of stage, age, histopathologic grade, and lymph node status with overall survival. Cox multiple regression analysis showed that the independent variables were stage, histopathologic grade, tumor size, and lymphatic metastasis in all patients. Conclusion: Results of this series suggest that the combined use of {sup 252}Cf-ICBT with EBRT is an effective method for treatment of cervical cancer.

  13. Neoadjuvant short-course hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (SC-HART) combined with S-1 for locally advanced rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Doi, Hiroshi; Beppu, Naohito; Odawara, Soichi; Tanooka, Masao; Takada, Yasuhiro; Niwa, Yasue; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Kimura, Fumihiko; Yanagi, Hidenori; Yamanaka, Naoki; Kamikonya, Norihiko; Hirota, Shozo

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the safety and feasibility of a novel protocol of neoadjuvant short-course hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (SC-HART) combined with S-1 for locally advanced rectal cancer. A total of 56 patients with lower rectal cancer of cT3N1M0 (Stage III b) was treated with SC-HART followed by radical surgery, and were analyzed in the present study. SC-HART was performed with a dose of 2.5 Gy twice daily, with an interval of at least 6 hours between fractions, up to a total dose of 25 Gy (25 Gy in 10 fractions for 5 days) combined with S-1 for 10 days. Radical surgery was performed within three weeks following the end of the SC-HART. The median age was 64.6 (range, 39-85) years. The median follow-up term was 16.3 (range, 2-53) months. Of the 56 patients, 53 (94.4%) had no apparent adverse events before surgery; 55 (98.2%) completed the full course of neoadjuvant therapy, while one patient stopped chemotherapy because of Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity (CTCAE v.3). The sphincter preservation rate was 94.6%. Downstaging was observed in 45 patients (80.4%). Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered to 43 patients (76.8%). The local control rate, disease-free survival rate and disease-specific survival rate were 100%, 91.1% and 100%, respectively. To conclude, SC-HART combined with S-1 for locally advanced rectal cancer was well tolerated and produced good short-term outcomes. SC-HART therefore appeared to have a good feasibility for use in further clinical trials. PMID:23658415

  14. The efficacy of combination of ondansetron and aprepitant on preventing the radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Emami, Hamid; Hematti, Simin; Saeidian, Seyed Masoud; Feizi, Awat; Taheri, Shahin; Adeli, Pourya; Mahmoudi, Golshan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Depending on the site of irradiation, about 40-80% of patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT) will experience nausea and/or vomiting. The current study aimed to investigate the efficacy of ondansetronas as a single agent and with a combination to aprepitant on preventing RT-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV). Materials and Methods: In a clinical randomized controlled trial (from September 2010 to September 2011), conducted in Radiation Oncology Department of Seyed-al-Shohada Hospital, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, 40 abdominopelvic malignancies cancer patients were allocated into two aliquots using block randomization of size. Patients in the first group (group I) received ondansetron alone while those patients in the remaining group (group II) received ondansetron and aprepitant. Then, developing of RINV and its severity and benefit of adding aprepitant to ondansetron, in comparison with ondansetron as a single drug therapy were evaluated. Results: The average age of the patients in group I was 61.15 ± 12.27 years while in group II it was 50.1 ± 13.27 years. No statistically significant gender differences were found between the two groups. In patients treated with ondansetron single drug therapy (group I), frequency and grade of RINV were significantly more than the group treated simultaneously by aprepitant and ondansetron (group II) (odds ratio [OR] = 21.2; P < 0.01). Compared with RT alone, the patients whom underwent RT along with chemotherapy showed lower probability of experiencing RINV (OR = 0.13; P < 0.05). Conclusion: The present study indicated a significant superiority of combination of ondansetron and aprepitant in management of RINV, in patients undergoing RT, compared to ondansetron as a single agent therapy. More accurate follow-up studies are needed for the evaluation of the efficacy of ondansetron with combination to aprepitant on preventing the RINV. PMID:26109986

  15. Predicting Lung Radiotherapy-Induced Pneumonitis Using a Model Combining Parametric Lyman Probit With Nonparametric Decision Trees

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Shiva K. . E-mail: shiva.das@duke.edu; Zhou Sumin; Zhang, Junan; Yin, F.-F.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To develop and test a model to predict for lung radiation-induced Grade 2+ pneumonitis. Methods and Materials: The model was built from a database of 234 lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy (RT), of whom 43 were diagnosed with pneumonitis. The model augmented the predictive capability of the parametric dose-based Lyman normal tissue complication probability (LNTCP) metric by combining it with weighted nonparametric decision trees that use dose and nondose inputs. The decision trees were sequentially added to the model using a 'boosting' process that enhances the accuracy of prediction. The model's predictive capability was estimated by 10-fold cross-validation. To facilitate dissemination, the cross-validation result was used to extract a simplified approximation to the complicated model architecture created by boosting. Application of the simplified model is demonstrated in two example cases. Results: The area under the model receiver operating characteristics curve for cross-validation was 0.72, a significant improvement over the LNTCP area of 0.63 (p = 0.005). The simplified model used the following variables to output a measure of injury: LNTCP, gender, histologic type, chemotherapy schedule, and treatment schedule. For a given patient RT plan, injury prediction was highest for the combination of pre-RT chemotherapy, once-daily treatment, female gender and lowest for the combination of no pre-RT chemotherapy and nonsquamous cell histologic type. Application of the simplified model to the example cases revealed that injury prediction for a given treatment plan can range from very low to very high, depending on the settings of the nondose variables. Conclusions: Radiation pneumonitis prediction was significantly enhanced by decision trees that added the influence of nondose factors to the LNTCP formulation.

  16. Differential action on cancer and normal tissue by adrenochrome monoaminoguanidine methanesulfonate and cytochrome C combined with radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsugawa, S. ); Sugahara, T. )

    1994-06-15

    The possibility that radioprotective effects on potent natural killer (NK) cells by adrenochrome monoaminoguanidine methanesulfonate (AMM) + cytochrome C during radiotherapy (RT) for lung cancer might result in the radiosensitization of human lung cancer cells in vivo is examined. Human lung cancer xenografts in the right hind legs of KSN mice (10 weeks old) were locally irradiated with 20 Gy of X ray. AMM (10 mg/kg/day) and/or cytochrome C (CCC) (5 mg/kg/day) were given intraperitoneally immediately before or after RT, followed by daily administration for 4 days. Natural killer activities of host splenocytes were also tested with the standard [sup 51]Cr releasing assay with YAC-1 cells as target cells. In a clinical study, 65 patients with lung cancer were treated with more than 50 Gy of RT with or without combination with AMM + CCC, OK-432 or AMM + CCC + OK-432. Before and after RT, lymphocyte subsets in the peripheral blood were examined with dichromatic analysis using an Ortho Spectrum IIIFCM system and fluorescent MABs. In this study, the change in the absolute number of each subset was investigated. AMM + cytochrome C augumented NK activity in KSN nude mice, protected potent NK cells in patients with lung cancer against RT and sensitized the human lung cancer xenografts to RT. AMM + cytochrome C may have potential as a differential modulator of radiosensitivity of normal tissues and of tumors. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Combination effects of tissue heterogeneity and geometric targeting error in stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer using CyberKnife.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ki Mun; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Choi, Hoon-Sik; Yoo, Seung Hoon; Hwang, Ui-Jung; Lim, Young Kyung; Jeong, Hojin

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the combined effect of tissue heterogeneity and its variation associated with geometric error in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. The treatment plans for eight lung cancer patients were calculated using effective path length (EPL) correction and Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms, with both having the same beam configuration for each patient. These two kinds of plans for individual patients were then subsequently recalculated with adding systematic and random geometric errors. In the ordinary treatment plans calculated with no geometric offset, the EPL calculations, compared with the MC calculations, largely overestimated the doses to PTV by ~ 21%, whereas the overestimation were markedly lower in GTV by ~ 12% due to relatively higher density of GTV than of PTV. When recalculating the plans for individual patients with assigning the systematic and random geometric errors, no significant changes in the relative dose distribution, except for overall shift, were observed in the EPL calculations, whereas largely altered in the MC calculations with a consistent increase in dose to GTV. Considering the better accuracy of MC than EPL algorithms, the present results demonstrated the strong coupling of tissue heterogeneity and geometric error, thereby emphasizing the essential need for simultaneous correction for tissue heterogeneity and geometric targeting error in SBRT of lung cancer. PMID:26699300

  18. Improved five year survival after combined radiotherapy-chemotherapy for Stage I-II non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Monfardini, S.; Banfi, A.; Bonadonna, G.; Rilke, F.; Milani, F.; Valagussa, P.; Lattuada, A.

    1980-02-01

    In order to improve the prognosis of patients with localized non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) who are treated with radiotherapy (RT), a prospective controlled study utilizing a combined modality approach was carried out in patients with pathologic Stage I-II NHL. After treatment with regional RT, patients in complete remission were randomized to receive either no further therapy or 6 cycles of cyclophosphamide, vincristine and prednisolone (CVP). At 5 years from completion of irradiation, the relapse-free survival was 46.3% after RT and 72.1% after RT plus CVP (P=0.005). The corresponding findings for the overall survival calculated from the beginning of irradiation were 55.8 and 82.8% respectively (P=0.03). The favorable effects of adjuvant chemotherapy on relapse-free survival were statistically significant only in the subgroup with diffuse histology. In patients who relapsed after RT alone, the salvage therapy failed to induce a high incidence of second durable remission. Adjuvant chemotherapy is indicated to improve the curve rate in pathologic stage I-II NHL with diffuse histology when regional RT is utilized.

  19. GNRs@SiO2-FA in combination with radiotherapy induces the apoptosis of HepG2 cells by modulating the expression of apoptosis-related proteins

    PubMed Central

    GAO, BIN; SHEN, LEI; HE, KE-WU; XIAO, WEI-HUA

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the apoptosis of the hepatocellular carcinoma cell line, HepG2, induced by treatment with folic acid-conjugated silica-coated gold nanorods (GNRs@SiO2-FA) in combination with radiotherapy, and to determine the involvement of apoptosis-related proteins. An MTT colorimetric assay was used to assess the biocompatibility of GNRs@SiO2-FA. The distribution of GNRs@SiO2-FA into the cells was observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). HepG2 cells cultured in vitro were divided into the following 4 groups: i)the control group (untreated), ii) the GNRs@SiO2-FA group, iii) the radiotherapy group (iodine 125 seeds) and iv) the combination group (treated with GNRs@SiO2-FA and iodine 125 seeds) groups. The apoptosis of the HepG2 cells was detected by flow cytometry. The concentration range of <40 µg/ml GNRs@SiO2-FA was found to be safe for the biological activity of the HepG2 cells. GNRs@SiO2-FA entered the cytoplasm through endocytosis. The apoptotic rates of the HepG2 cells were higher in the GNRs@SiO2-FA and radiotherapy groups than in the control group (P<0.05). The apoptotic rate was also significantly higher in the combination group than the GNRs@SiO2-FA and radiotherapy groups (P<0.05). Taken together, these findings demonstrate that the combination of GNRs@SiO2-FA and radiotherapy more effectively induces the apoptosis of HepG2 cells. These apoptotic effects are achieved by increasing the protein expression of Bax and caspase-3, and inhibiting the protein expression of Bcl-2 and Ki-67. The combination of GNRs@SiO2-FA and radiotherapy may thus prove to be a new approach in the treatment of primary liver cancer. PMID:26648274

  20. GNRs@SiO₂-FA in combination with radiotherapy induces the apoptosis of HepG2 cells by modulating the expression of apoptosis-related proteins.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bin; Shen, Lei; He, Ke-Wu; Xiao, Wei-Hua

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the apoptosis of the hepatocellular carcinoma cell line, HepG2, induced by treatment with folic acid-conjugated silica-coated gold nanorods (GNRs@SiO2-FA) in combination with radiotherapy, and to determine the involvement of apoptosis-related proteins. An MTT colorimetric assay was used to assess the biocompatibility of GNRs@SiO2-FA. The distribution of GNRs@SiO2-FA into the cells was observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). HepG2 cells cultured in vitro were divided into the following 4 groups: i)the control group (untreated), ii) the GNRs@SiO2-FA group, iii) the radiotherapy group (iodine 125 seeds) and iv) the combination group (treated with GNRs@SiO2-FA and iodine 125 seeds) groups. The apoptosis of the HepG2 cells was detected by flow cytometry. The concentration range of <40 µg/ml GNRs@SiO2-FA was found to be safe for the biological activity of the HepG2 cells. GNRs@SiO2-FA entered the cytoplasm through endocytosis. The apoptotic rates of the HepG2 cells were higher in the GNRs@SiO2-FA and radiotherapy groups than in the control group (P<0.05). The apoptotic rate was also significantly higher in the combination group than the GNRs@SiO2-FA and radiotherapy groups (P<0.05). Taken together, these findings demonstrate that the combination of GNRs@SiO2-FA and radiotherapy more effectively induces the apoptosis of HepG2 cells. These apoptotic effects are achieved by increasing the protein expression of Bax and caspase-3, and inhibiting the protein expression of Bcl-2 and Ki-67. The combination of GNRs@SiO2-FA and radiotherapy may thus prove to be a new approach in the treatment of primary liver cancer. PMID:26648274

  1. Combined {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT Imaging in Radiotherapy Target Delineation for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Guido, Alessandra; Fuccio, Lorenzo; Rombi, Barbara; Castellucci, Paolo; Cecconi, Agnese; Bunkheila, Feisal; Fuccio, Chiara; Spezi, Emiliano; Angelini, Anna Lisa; Barbieri, Enza

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of the use of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in radiotherapy target delineation for head-and-neck cancer compared with CT alone. Methods and Materials: A total of 38 consecutive patients with head-and-neck cancer were included in this study. The primary tumor sites were as follow: 20 oropharyngeal tumors, 4 laryngeal tumors, 2 hypopharyngeal tumors, 2 paranasal sinuses tumors, 9 nasopharyngeal tumors, and 1 parotid gland tumor. The FDG-PET and CT scans were performed with a dedicated PET/CT scanner in one session and then fused. Subsequently, patients underwent treatment planning CT with intravenous contrast enhancement. The radiation oncologist defined all gross tumor volumes (GTVs) using both the PET/CT and CT scans. Results: In 35 (92%) of 38 cases, the CT-based GTVs were larger than the PET/CT-based GTVs. The average total GTV from the CT and PET/CT scans was 34.54 cm{sup 3} (range, 3.56-109) and 29.38 cm{sup 3} (range, 2.87-95.02), respectively (p < 0.05). Separate analyses of the difference between the CT- and PET/CT-based GTVs of the primary tumor compared with the GTVs of nodal disease were not statistically significant. The comparison between the PET/CT-based and CT-based boost planning target volumes did not show a statistically significant difference. All patients were alive at the end of the follow-up period (range, 3-38 months). Conclusion: GTVs, but not planning target volumes, were significantly changed by the implementation of combined PET/CT. Large multicenter studies are needed to ascertain whether combined PET/CT in target delineation can influence the main clinical outcomes.

  2. Treatment of early clinically staged Hodgkin's disease with a combination of ABVD chemotherapy plus limited field radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Karmiris, T D; Grigoriou, E; Tsantekidou, M; Spanou, E; Mihalakeas, H; Baltadakis, J; Apostolidis, J; Pagoni, M; Karakasis, D; Bakiri, M; Mitsouli, C; Harhalakis, N; Nikiforakis, E

    2003-09-01

    The current management of early stage Hodgkin's disease (HD) is usually based on clinical staging, combined modality therapy and the use of less toxic chemotherapy regimens. This approach entails high cure rates, while ensures less long term toxicity with avoidance of laparotomy. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a brief course of Adriamycin, Bleomycin, Vinblastine, Dacarbazine (ABVD) chemotherapy followed by limited field radiotherapy (RT) in favorable clinical stage (CS) I and IIA HD. Forty patients, aged 17-68 (median 34) years, with favorable CS I and IIA HD, without bulky mediastinal disease, have been treated with 4-6 (median 4) cycles of ABVD plus limited field RT. Twenty seven (67%) patients received 4 cycles of chemotherapy, while 13 received 5-6 cycles. Thirty five (87%) patients received limited field RT with dose 24-36 Gy and five (13%) received extended field with 36-46 Gy. All patients responded completely to chemotherapy. One patient experienced a relapse two months after the end of therapy. All patients are alive; 39 in continuous complete remission. With a median follow-up period of 44 months (range 18-101) the actuarial overall and progress free survival was 100 and 97% at 5 years. We did not observe any case of secondary leukemia or solid tumor. Pulmonary toxicity was mild in cases of mediastinal irradiation. Considering the short follow-up time and the small number of patients, the combination of a brief course of ABVD plus regional RT is a very efficacious treatment of favorable CS I and IIA HD with mild toxicity. However, long term survival data are needed, which could give confident answers regarding the risk of late therapy related complications, particularly second malignancies. PMID:14565654

  3. Immune-modulating properties of ionizing radiation: rationale for the treatment of cancer by combination radiotherapy and immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Derer, Anja; Frey, Benjamin; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S

    2016-07-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) utilizes the DNA-damaging properties of ionizing radiation to control tumor growth and ultimately kill tumor cells. By modifying the tumor cell phenotype and the tumor microenvironment, it may also modulate the immune system. However, out-of-field reactions of RT mostly assume further immune activation. Here, the sequence of the applications of RT and immunotherapy is crucial, just as the dose and fractionation may be. Lower single doses may impact on tumor vascularization and immune cell infiltration in particular, while higher doses may impact on intratumoral induction and production of type I interferons. The induction of immunogenic cancer cell death seems in turn to be a common mechanism for most RT schemes. Dendritic cells (DCs) are activated by the released danger signals and by taking up tumor peptides derived from irradiated cells. DCs subsequently activate T cells, a process that has to be tightly controlled to ensure tolerance. Inhibitory pathways known as immune checkpoints exist for this purpose and are exploited by tumors to inhibit immune responses. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) on T cells are two major checkpoints. The biological concepts behind the findings that RT in combination with anti-CTLA-4 and/or anti-PD-L1 blockade stimulates CD8+ T cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity are reviewed in detail. On this basis, we suggest clinically significant combinations and sequences of RT and immune checkpoint inhibition. We conclude that RT and immune therapies complement one another. PMID:26590829

  4. Evaluation of Acute Locoregional Toxicity in Patients With Breast Cancer Treated With Adjuvant Radiotherapy in Combination With Bevacizumab

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Sharad

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: Preclinical studies have shown that bevacizumab combined with radiotherapy (RT) induces a radiosensitizing effect. Published reports regarding the safety of combination therapy involving bevacizumab and RT are lacking. The purpose of this study was to analyze acute locoregional toxicity in patients with breast cancer receiving concurrent bevacizumab plus RT. Methods and Materials: After institutional review board approval was obtained, patients with breast cancer who received bevacizumab were identified; these patients were then cross-referenced with patients receiving RT. Toxicity was scored by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Patients were matched 1:1 with those who did not receive bevacizumab. Statistical analysis was performed to analyze toxicity between the two groups. Results: Fourteen patients were identified to have received bevacizumab plus RT. All patients receivedbevacizumab during RT without delay or treatment breaks; there were no RT treatment breaks in all patients. No patient receiving bevacizumab plus RT experienced {>=}Grade 3 toxicity; 3 matched control patients experienced a Grade 3 skin reaction. There was no difference in fatigue, radiation fibrosis, pneumonitis, or lymphedema between the two groups. Five patients (35%) developed reduction in ejection fraction; 2 with right-sided and 3 with left-sided treatment. Patients with left-sided treatment experienced a persistent reduction in ejection fraction compared with those receiving right-sided treatment. Conclusion: Concurrent bevacizumab and RT did not increase acute locoregional toxicity in comparison with matched control patients who did not receive RT alone. The addition of concurrent RT when treating the intact breast, chest wall, and associated nodal regions in breast cancer seems to be safe and well tolerated.

  5. Clinical efficacy of percutaneous vertebroplasty combined with intensity-modulated radiotherapy for spinal metastases in patients with NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Qing, Yi; Zhang, Zhimin; Li, Mengxia; Xie, Jiaying; Wang, Ge; Wang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) combined with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for metastatic lesions of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) at centrum vertebrae. Methods A total of 39 patients with spinal metastatic NSCLC (stage IV) were treated with PVP followed by IMRT (30 Gy/10F/2 W) for metastatic lesion at centrum vertebrae under local anesthesia. Retrospective analysis was done with medical records and radiological data. The change of visual analog scale (VAS), activities of daily living, and kyphotic angle was measured preoperatively. The presence of complications was assessed preoperatively (baseline) at 24 hours, 1 week, and 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively, or until the patient died or was lost to follow-up. Survival was assessed in the group. Results A total of 39 consecutive patients were successfully treated with PVP via a translateral approach and IMRT. Their mean VAS score decreased from 7.93±1.09 preoperatively to 4.14±1.15 by the 24-hour postoperative time point and was 3.92±1.23 at 1 week, 4.27±1.93 at 1 month, 3.24±1.35 at 3 months, 2.27±0.96 at 6 months, and 2.59±1.55 at 12 months after the procedure. The mean VAS score at all of the postoperative time points was decreased significantly from the preoperative baseline score (P<0.05). Activities of daily living evaluation showed that the patients had a significantly high life quality after the combined approach (50.9±11.7 vs 82.3±9.9, P<0.05). No severe complications were observed. Mild complications included two cases (5.13%) of asymptomatic cement leakage into the epidural space and one case (2.56%) of paravertebral leakage. Median survival time was extended to 13 months. Conclusion The safety and efficacy of PVP combined with IMRT in patients with NSCLC with metastatic lesions at centrum vertebrae and the ability to prevent the diseased vertebrae from further deformation and tumor

  6. Extramedullary Plasmacytoma of the Paranasal Sinuses: Combining Surgery with External Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vlad, Diana; Trombitas, Veronica; Albu, Silviu

    2016-03-01

    Extramedullary plasmacytomas (EMP) are rare neoplasms characterized by the proliferation of a single B-lymphoid cell clone, arising primarily in the head and neck region. The purpose of this study is to report our experience in the management of EMPs arising in the paranasal sinuses. We retrospectively reviewed clinical records of 7 patients (4 men and 3 women), admitted between 1995 and 2010 for EMPs of the paranasal sinuses-5 within the ethmoid and 2 in the maxillary sinus. Treatment consisted in endoscopic resection followed by external RT. The mean follow-up period is 50 months (range 9-67 months). Local recurrences developed in 2 out of 7 cases. Both recurrences occurred in maxillary EMPs and they underwent salvage treatment-combination of RT and surgery. At the time of analyzing these data 5 patients (70 %) were alive and two (30 %) have died of their disease. A single patient, presenting local relapse at 6 months, died due to the disease at 9 months. One patient progressed to multiple myeloma. Larger controlled clinical trials are necessary to establish an optimal treatment of choice that implies an individualized management of these patients. PMID:27066407

  7. Clinical assessment of 252Californium neutron intracavitary brachytherapy using a two-channel Y applicator combined with external beam radiotherapy for endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qian; Cheng Tang; Zhao, Ke-Wei; Xiong, Yan-Li; Chen, Shu; Xu, Wen-Jing; Lei, Xin

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of 252Californium neutron intracavitary brachytherapy using a two-channel Y applicator combined with external beam radiotherapy for the treatment of endometrial cancer. METHODS: Thirty-one patients with stage I–III endometrial cancer were recruited for this study. The stage I patients received only 252Californium neutron intracavitary brachytherapy with a two-channel applicator. The stage II and III patients received both 252Californium neutron intracavitary brachytherapy using a two-channel applicator and parallel-opposed whole pelvic radiotherapy. RESULTS: The five-year local control rate was 80.6% (25/31), the overall survival rate was 51.6% (16/31), and the disease-free survival rate was 54.8% (17/31). The incidence of serious late complications was 12.9% (4/31). CONCLUSIONS: 252Californium neutron intracavitary brachytherapy using a two-channel applicator combined with external beam radiotherapy was effective for treating endometrial cancer and the incidence of serious late complications related to this combination was within an acceptable range. PMID:26872078

  8. Phase I/II Study of Erlotinib Combined With Cisplatin and Radiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Herchenhorn, Daniel; Dias, Fernando L.; Viegas, Celia M.P.; Federico, Miriam H.; Araujo, Carlos Manoel M.; Small, Isabelle; Bezerra, Marcos; Fontao, Karina M.D.; Knust, Renata E.; Ferreira, Carlos G.; Martins, Renato G.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: Erlotinib, an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is active against head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and possibly has a synergistic interaction with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. We investigated the safety and efficacy of erlotinib added to cisplatin and radiotherapy in locally advanced HNSCC. Methods and Materials: In this Phase I/II trial 100 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin was administered on Days 8, 29, and 50, and radiotherapy at 70 Gy was started on Day 8. During Phase I, the erlotinib dose was escalated (50 mg, 100 mg, and 150 mg) in consecutive cohorts of 3 patients, starting on Day 1 and continuing during radiotherapy. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any Grade 4 event requiring radiotherapy interruptions. Phase II was initiated 8 weeks after the last Phase I enrollment. Results: The study accrued 9 patients in Phase I and 28 in Phase II; all were evaluable for efficacy and safety. No dose-limiting toxicity occurred in Phase I, and the recommended Phase II dose was 150 mg. The most frequent nonhematologic toxicities were nausea/vomiting, dysphagia, stomatitis, xerostomia and in-field dermatitis, acneiform rash, and diarrhea. Of the 31 patients receiving a 150-mg daily dose of erlotinib, 23 (74%; 95% confidence interval, 56.8%-86.3%) had a complete response, 3 were disease free after salvage surgery, 4 had inoperable residual disease, and 1 died of sepsis during treatment. With a median 37 months' follow-up, the 3-year progression-free and overall survival rates were 61% and 72%, respectively. Conclusions: This combination appears safe, has encouraging activity, and deserves further studies in locally advanced HNSCC.

  9. Experience with combination of nimotuzumab and intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Rui-ping; Ying, Hong-mei; Kong, Fang-fang; Du, Cheng-run; Huang, Shuang; Zhou, Jun-jun; Hu, Chao-su

    2015-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the efficacy and safety of using nimotuzumab in combination with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the primary treatment of locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods Between December 2009 and December 2013, 38 newly diagnosed patients with stage III–IV nasopharyngeal carcinoma were treated with IMRT and nimotuzumab concomitantly. The distribution of disease was stage III in 20 (52.6%), stage IV A in 9 (23.7%), and stage IV B in 9 (23.7%). All the patients received at least two cycles of cisplatin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by nimotuzumab 200 mg/week concurrently with IMRT. Acute and late radiation-related toxicities were graded according to the Acute and Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. Results With a median follow-up of 39.7 months (range, 13.3–66.5 months), the estimated 3-year local recurrence-free survival, regional recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, progression failure-free survival, and overall survival rates were 92.8%, 92.9%, 89.5%, 78.7%, and 87.5%, respectively. The median cycle for nimotuzumab addition was 6 weeks. Grade 3 radiation-induced mucositis accounted for 36.8% of treated people. No skin rash and infusion reaction were observed, distinctly from what is reported in cetuximab-treated patients. Conclusion Nimotuzumab plus IMRT showed promising outcomes in terms of locoregional control and survival, without increasing the incidence of radiation-related toxicities for patients. PMID:26604795

  10. Combination of Transarterial Chemoembolization and Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma With Inferior Vena Cava Tumor Thrombus

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, Ja Eun; Kim, Jong Hoon; Lim, Young-Suk

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (CRT) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and inferior vena cava tumor thrombus (IVCTT). Methods and Materials: A total of 42 consecutive patients who underwent TACE and CRT (TACE+CRT group) for the treatment of HCC with IVCTT were prospectively enrolled from July 2004 to October 2006. As historical controls, 29 HCC patients with IVCTT who received TACE alone (TACE group) between July 2003 and June 2004 were included. CRT was designed to target only the IVCTT and to deliver a median total dose of 45 Gy (range, 28-50 Gy). Results: Most baseline characteristics of the two groups were similar (p > 0.05). The response and progression-free rates of IVCTT were significantly higher in the TACE+CRT group than in the TACE group (42.9% and 71.4% vs. 13.8% and 37.9%, respectively; p < 0.01 for both rates). Overall, patient survival was significantly higher in the TACE+CRT group than in the TACE group (p < 0.01), with a median survival time of 11.7 months and 4.7 months, respectively. Treatment with TACE+CRT (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.20-0.71), progression of IVCTT (HR = 4.05; 95% CI, 2.00-8.21), Child-Pugh class B (HR = 3.44; 95% CI, 1.79-6.61), and portal vein invasion (HR = 2.31; 95% CI, 1.19-4.50) were identified as independent predictors of mortality by multivariable analysis. Conclusions: The combination of TACE and CRT is more effective in the control of IVCTT associated with HCC and improves patient survival compared with TACE alone.

  11. Patterns of Failure After Combined-Modality Approaches Incorporating Radiotherapy for Sinonasal Undifferentiated Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M. Daly, Megan E.; El-Sayed, Ivan; Garcia, Joaquin; Lee, Nancy Y.; Bucci, M. Kara; Kaplan, Michael J.

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcome of patients treated with combined-modality approaches for sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma (SNUC) of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: The records of 21 patients with SNUC treated with curative intent at University of California, San Francisco between 1990 and 2004 were analyzed. Patient age ranged from 33 to 71 years (median, 47 years). Primary tumor sites included the nasal cavity (11 patients), maxillary sinus (5 patients), and ethmoid sinus (5 patients). All patients had T3 (4 patients) or T4 (17 patients) tumors. Local-regional treatment included surgery followed by postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) with or without adjuvant chemotherapy for 17 patients; neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery for 2 patients; and definitive chemoradiotherapy for 2 patients. Median follow-up among surviving patients was 58 months (range, 12-70 months). Results: The 2- and 5-year estimates of local control were 60% and 56%, respectively. There was no difference in local control according to initial treatment approach, but among the 19 patients who underwent surgery the 5-year local control rate was 74% for those with gross tumor resection, compared with 24% for those with subtotal tumor resection (p = 0.001). The 5-year rates of overall and distant metastasis-free survival were 43% and 64%, respectively. Late complications included cataracts (2 patients), lacrimal stenosis (1 patient), and sino-cutaneous fistula (1 patient). Conclusion: The suboptimal outcomes suggest a need for more effective therapies. Gross total resection should be the goal of all treatments whenever possible.

  12. Intraoperative radiation therapy following pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D B; Termuhlen, P M; Byrd, D R; Ames, F C; Ochran, T G; Rich, T A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the morbidity and mortality of pancreaticoduodenectomy followed by electron-beam intraoperative radiation therapy (EB-IORT). SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Local recurrence following pancreaticoduodenectomy occurs in 50% to 90% of patients who undergo a potentially curative surgical resection for adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic head. To improve local disease control, a more aggressive retroperitoneal dissection has been combined with adjuvant EB-IORT. METHODS: Forty-one patients with malignant neoplasms of the periampullary region underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy followed by EB-IORT between January 1989 and May 1992. EB-IORT was delivered in a dedicated operative suite, eliminating the need for patient relocation. Electron-beam energies of 6 to 12 MeV were used to deliver 10 to 20 Gy to the treatment field following resection but before pancreatic, biliary, and gastrointestinal reconstruction. RESULTS: Median operative time was 9 hours, blood loss was 1 L, perioperative transfusion requirement was 2 units, and hospital stay was 20 days. One patient died of a postoperative myocardial infarction, and four patients required reoperation, one for an anastomotic leak. No patient failed to receive EB-IORT because of operative complications during the time period of this study. CONCLUSION: Adjuvant EB-IORT after pancreaticoduodenectomy can be delivered safely, with low mortality and acceptable morbidity. Images Figure 1. Figure 1. PMID:8101073

  13. Dosimetric Comparison of Combined Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) and Proton Therapy Versus IMRT Alone for Pelvic and Para-Aortic Radiotherapy in Gynecologic Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Berman Milby, Abigail; Both, Stefan; Ingram, Mark; Lin, Lilie L.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To perform a dosimetric comparison of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), passive scattering proton therapy (PSPT), and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) to the para-aortic (PA) nodal region in women with locally advanced gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: The CT treatment planning scans of 10 consecutive patients treated with IMRT to the pelvis and PA nodes were identified. The clinical target volume was defined by the primary tumor for patients with cervical cancer and by the vagina and paravaginal tissues for patients with endometrial cancer, in addition to the regional lymph nodes. The IMRT, PSPT, and IMPT plans were generated using the Eclipse Treatment Planning System and were analyzed for various dosimetric endpoints. Two groups of treatment plans including proton radiotherapy were created: IMRT to pelvic nodes with PSPT to PA nodes (PSPT/IMRT), and IMRT to pelvic nodes with IMPT to PA nodes (IMPT/IMRT). The IMRT and proton RT plans were optimized to deliver 50.4 Gy or Gy (relative biologic effectiveness [RBE)), respectively. Dose-volume histograms were analyzed for all of the organs at risk. The paired t test was used for all statistical comparison. Results: The small-bowel V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, V{sub 35}, andV{sub 40} were reduced in PSPT/IMRT by 11%, 18%, 27%, and 43%, respectively (p < 0.01). Treatment with IMPT/IMRT demonstrated a 32% decrease in the small-bowel V{sub 20}. Treatment with PSPT/IMRT showed statistically significant reductions in the body V{sub 5-20}; IMPT/IMRT showed reductions in the body V{sub 5-15}. The dose received by half of both kidneys was reduced by PSPT/IMRT and by IMPT/IMRT. All plans maintained excellent coverage of the planning target volume. Conclusions: Compared with IMRT alone, PSPT/IMRT and IMPT/IMRT had a statistically significant decrease in dose to the small and large bowel and kidneys, while maintaining excellent planning target volume coverage. Further studies should be done to

  14. Radiation Therapy for Soft Tissue Sarcoma: Indications and Controversies for Neoadjuvant Therapy, Adjuvant Therapy, Intraoperative Radiation Therapy, and Brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Larrier, Nicole A; Czito, Brian G; Kirsch, David G

    2016-10-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas are rare mesenchymal cancers that pose a treatment challenge. Although small superficial soft tissue sarcomas can be managed by surgery alone, adjuvant radiotherapy in addition to limb-sparing surgery substantially increases local control of extremity sarcomas. Compared with postoperative radiotherapy, preoperative radiotherapy doubles the risk of a wound complication, but decreases the risk for late effects, which are generally irreversible. For retroperitoneal sarcomas, intraoperative radiotherapy can be used to safely escalate the radiation dose to the tumor bed. Patients with newly diagnosed sarcoma should be evaluated before surgery by a multidisciplinary team that includes a radiation oncologist. PMID:27591502

  15. In vivo virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seunghoon Kim, Sehui Kim, Jeehyun E-mail: chulhong@postech.edu; Lee, Changho Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Chulhong E-mail: chulhong@postech.edu

    2013-11-11

    We developed a virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy system by combining with a commercial surgical microscope and photoacoustic microscope (PAM). By sharing the common optical path in the microscope and PAM system, we could acquire the PAM and microscope images simultaneously. Moreover, by employing a beam projector to back-project 2D PAM images onto the microscope view plane as augmented reality, the conventional microscopic and 2D cross-sectional PAM images are concurrently mapped on the plane via an ocular lens of the microscope in real-time. Further, we guided needle insertion into phantom ex vivo and mice skins in vivo.

  16. Prospective multicenter study of combined treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy in breast cancer women with the rare clinical scenario of ipsilateral supraclavicular node recurrence without distant metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Pergolizzi, Stefano . E-mail: Stefano.Pergolizzi@unime.it; Adamo, Vincenzo; Russi, Elvio; Santacaterina, Anna; Maisano, Roberto; Numico, Gianmauro; Palazzolo, Carmela; Ferrau, Francesco; Settineri, Nicola; Altavilla, Giuseppe; Girlando, Andrea; Spadaro, Pietro; Cascinu, Stefano

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of chemotherapy combined with curative radiotherapy in breast cancer patients who presented with recurrent ipsilateral supraclavicular lymph node metastases (ISLM) without 'nonregional disease,' we designed an observational study performed prospectively. Patients and Methods: Forty-four consecutive patients with ISLM from breast cancer as part of recurrent regional disease without distant metastases were included in this study. All patients received chemotherapy with doxorubicin-based schema or paclitaxel for six courses and curative radiotherapy (60 Gy/30 fractions of 2 Gy/5 days a week). An 'involved field' radiation was delivered during the interval between the third and fourth chemotherapy course; hormonal therapy was given based on receptor status. Results: The rate of overall clinical response after chemotherapy and radiotherapy was 94.9%. Median time to progression and overall survival were 28 and 40 months, respectively; the 5-year actuarial overall survival and disease-free survival rates were 35% (95% confidence interval, 19-51) and 20% (95% confidence interval, 6-34), respectively. Conclusion: A curative course of intravenous chemotherapy and radical irradiation is feasible in patients with ISLM. All patients presenting recurrence in supraclavicular nodes should be treated with definitive locoregional treatments and systemic therapy because the outcomes are better than might be historically assumed.

  17. Combined postoperative radiotherapy and weekly cisplatin infusion for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck: Preliminary report of a randomized trial

    SciTech Connect

    Bachaud, J.M.; David, J.M.; Boussin, G.; Daly, N. )

    1991-02-01

    A prospective clinical trial was designed to evaluate efficacy, toxicity, and patient compliance of concomitant postoperative radiotherapy and Cisplatin infusion in patients with Stage III or IV S.C.C. of the head and neck and histological evidence of extra-capsular spread of tumor in lymph node metastase(s). Cisplatin 50 mg IV with forced hydration was given or not every week (i.e., 7 to 9 cycles) concurrently with radiotherapy. Between 1984 and 1988, 83 patients were randomized: 44 were treated by irradiation without chemotherapy (RT group) and 39 by the combined modality (CM group). There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of patient characteristics, primary sites, tumor differentiation, T.N. stages, or postoperative prognostic factors. All patients completed the planned radiotherapy. There were seven severe toxicities (greater than grade 3) in the RT group. In the CM group, 30 severe toxicities occurred in 16/39 (41%) patients but none was life-threatening. Seven of 39 (18%) patients received less than two-thirds of the scheduled Cisplatin courses because of intolerance, mainly nausea and vomiting. Preliminary results show a better disease-free survival for the CM group (65% at 24 months) than for the RT group (41% at 24 months). This significant difference is largely due to increased loco-regional control in the CM group (79% vs 59%), the actuarial distant metastasis rates in patients controlled above the clavicles not being statistically different in the two groups.

  18. Current advances in radiotherapy of head and neck malignancies.

    PubMed

    Roopashri, G; Baig, Muqeet

    2013-12-01

    Necessity is the mother of all inventions. This is also true in case of cancer therapy. With increasing incidence of head and neck malignancies, remarkable developments have been made towards cancer development and treatment which continues to be a major challenge. Approximately fifty percent of all cancer patients receive radiotherapy which contributes towards forty percent of curative treatment for cancer. New developments in radiation oncology have helped to improve outlook for patients and find more effective treatment. With the advent of new technologies, radiotherapy seems to be promising in patients with head and neck malignancies these advancements include Altered fractionation, Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, Intensity-modulated radiotherapy, Image Guided Radiotherapy, Stereotactic radiation, Charged-particle radiotherapy, and Intraoperative radiotherapy. How to cite this article: Roopashri G, Baig M. Current advances in radiotherapy of head and neck malignancies. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(6):119-23 . PMID:24453456

  19. Monitoring of Circulating Tumor Cells and Their Expression of EGFR/Phospho-EGFR During Combined Radiotherapy Regimens in Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Tinhofer, Ingeborg; Hristozova, Tsvetana; Stromberger, Carmen; KeilhoIz, Ulrich; Budach, Volker

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: The numbers of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and their expression/activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) during the course of combined chemo- or bioradiotherapy regimens as potential biomarkers of treatment efficacy in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) were determined. Methods and Materials: Peripheral blood samples from SCCHN patients with locally advanced stage IVA/B disease who were treated with concurrent radiochemotherapy or induction chemotherapy followed by bioradiation with cetuximab were included in this study. Using flow cytometry, the absolute number of CTCs per defined blood volume as well as their expression of EGFR and its phosphorylated form (pEGFR) during the course of treatment were assessed. Results: Before treatment, we detected {>=}1 CTC per 3.75 mL blood in 9 of 31 patients (29%). Basal expression of EGFR was detected in 100% and pEGFR in 55% of the CTC+ cases. The frequency of CTC detection was not influenced by induction chemotherapy. However, the number of CTC+ samples significantly increased after radiotherapy. This radiation-induced increase in CTC numbers was less pronounced when radiotherapy was combined with cetuximab compared to its combination with cisplatin/5-fluorouracil. The former treatment regimen was also more effective in reducing pEGFR expression in CTCs. Conclusions: Definitive radiotherapy regimens of locally advanced SCCHN can increase the number of CTCs and might thus contribute to a systemic spread of tumor cells. Further studies are needed to evaluate the predictive value of the radiation-induced increase in CTC numbers and the persistent activation of the EGFR signalling pathway in individual CTC+ cases.

  20. Phase I Study of Oxaliplatin in Combination With Capecitabine and Radiotherapy as Postoperative Treatment for Stage II and III Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Jing

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: A Phase I study was conducted to determine the maximal tolerated dose and the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of oxaliplatin (OXA) combined with capecitabine and radiotherapy as adjuvant treatment in patients with operable rectal cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 21 patients with Stage II or III rectal adenocarcinoma after curative surgery were treated with radiotherapy to a total dose of 50 Gy in 5 weeks. OXA was administered at a dosage of 40 (n = 6), 50 (n = 3),60 (n = 3), 70 (n = 3), or 80 mg/m{sup 2} (n = 6) once a week for 2 weeks (first cycle) followed by a second cycle after a 7-day break. Capecitabine at a fixed dose of 1,300 mg/m{sup 2}/d was administered orally at the same schedule as for OXA. DLT was defined as Grade 3 or 4 hematologic and nonhematologic toxicity. Results: Grade 1-3 leukopenia, diarrhea, and nausea/vomiting were the most common toxic side effects, and most were Grade 1-2. A DLT was first observed in 1 of 3 patients at 40 mg/m{sup 2} (Grade 3 diarrhea) but was not observed in the next 3 patients at the same level or in patients who received a dose level of 50-70 mg/m{sup 2}. At 80 mg/m{sup 2}, DLT occurred in 3 of 6 patients (1 Grade 4 leukopenia and 2 Grade 3 diarrhea). Conclusions: OXA combined with a fixed dose of capecitabine at 625 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily by mouth plus radiotherapy in the adjuvant setting was tolerable and clinically feasible. The maximal tolerated dose of OXA in this setting was 80 mg/m{sup 2}, comparable to the maximal tolerated dose of OXA in the neoadjuvant setting.

  1. [Intraoperative navigation, with focus on the skull base].

    PubMed

    Wirtz, C R

    2016-09-01

    Intraoperative navigation systems are widely used in ENT, oral and maxillofacial, and neurosurgery. The benefits of such systems have been demonstrated in various applications, including intracranial and skull base surgery. Intraoperative shift, "brain shift" and changes in anatomy caused by the surgical procedure itself impair the accuracy of navigation and represent factors limiting its application, particularly in glioma and metastatic brain surgery. For this reason, intraoperative imaging was incorporated into neurosurgery. A specific application of navigation is thus skull base surgery, where shifts are often negligible due to the bony structures in which pathologies are embedded. Development of new systems with seamless integration into the operative workflow propagated routine use of navigation in neuro- and ENT surgery. Navigation proved especially helpful in interdisciplinary surgery with pathologies located in anatomic regions where competences of different surgical disciplines overlap, as in the skull base. While this increased radicality in tumour resection, there was a high risk of morbidity. The integration of electrophysiological function monitoring served to preserve function and reduce morbidity, and has led to less invasive and radical strategies in skull base surgery. New radiosurgical methods to adjuvantly treat possible tumour remnants have also supported this development. Systems allowing resection borders to be marked in the navigational coordinates would enable direct linking of these data to radiotherapy planning and better interpretation of follow-up imaging. Navigation is thus a valuable tool supporting interdisciplinary cooperation in skull base surgery for the benefit of patients. PMID:27566369

  2. Perspectives in Intraoperative Diagnostics of Human Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Tyurikova, O.; Dembitskaya, Y.; Yashin, K.; Mishchenko, M.; Vedunova, M.; Medyanik, I.; Kazantsev, V.

    2015-01-01

    Amongst large a variety of oncological diseases, malignant gliomas represent one of the most severe types of tumors. They are also the most common type of the brain tumors and account for over half of the astrocytic tumors. According to different sources, the average life expectancy of patients with various glioblastomas varies between 10 and 12 months and that of patients with anaplastic astrocytic tumors between 20 and 24 months. Therefore, studies of the physiology of transformed glial cells are critical for the development of treatment methods. Modern medical approaches offer complex procedures, including the microsurgical tumor removal, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, supplemented with photodynamic therapy and immunotherapy. The most radical of them is surgical resection, which allows removing the largest part of the tumor, reduces the intracranial hypertension, and minimizes the degree of neurological deficit. However, complete removal of the tumor remains impossible. The main limitations are insufficient visualization of glioma boundaries, due to its infiltrative growth, and the necessity to preserve healthy tissue. This review is devoted to the description of advantages and disadvantages of modern intraoperative diagnostics of human gliomas and highlights potential perspectives for development of their treatment. PMID:26543495

  3. Robust endoscopic pose estimation for intraoperative organ-mosaicking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichard, Daniel; Bodenstedt, Sebastian; Suwelack, Stefan; Wagner, Martin; Kenngott, Hannes; Müller-Stich, Beat Peter; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Speidel, Stefanie

    2016-03-01

    The number of minimally invasive procedures is growing every year. These procedures are highly complex and very demanding for the surgeons. It is therefore important to provide intraoperative assistance to alleviate these difficulties. For most computer-assistance systems, like visualizing target structures with augmented reality, a registration step is required to map preoperative data (e.g. CT images) to the ongoing intraoperative scene. Without additional hardware, the (stereo-) endoscope is the prime intraoperative data source and with it, stereo reconstruction methods can be used to obtain 3D models from target structures. To link reconstructed parts from different frames (mosaicking), the endoscope movement has to be known. In this paper, we present a camera tracking method that uses dense depth and feature registration which are combined with a Kalman Filter scheme. It provides a robust position estimation that shows promising results in ex vivo and in silico experiments.

  4. Intraoperative transfusion practices in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Meier, J.; Filipescu, D.; Kozek-Langenecker, S.; Llau Pitarch, J.; Mallett, S.; Martus, P.; Matot, I.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Transfusion of allogeneic blood influences outcome after surgery. Despite widespread availability of transfusion guidelines, transfusion practices might vary among physicians, departments, hospitals and countries. Our aim was to determine the amount of packed red blood cells (pRBC) and blood products transfused intraoperatively, and to describe factors determining transfusion throughout Europe. Methods. We did a prospective observational cohort study enrolling 5803 patients in 126 European centres that received at least one pRBC unit intraoperatively, during a continuous three month period in 2013. Results. The overall intraoperative transfusion rate was 1.8%; 59% of transfusions were at least partially initiated as a result of a physiological transfusion trigger- mostly because of hypotension (55.4%) and/or tachycardia (30.7%). Haemoglobin (Hb)- based transfusion trigger alone initiated only 8.5% of transfusions. The Hb concentration [mean (sd)] just before transfusion was 8.1 (1.7) g dl−1 and increased to 9.8 (1.8) g dl−1 after transfusion. The mean number of intraoperatively transfused pRBC units was 2.5 (2.7) units (median 2). Conclusion. Although European Society of Anaesthesiology transfusion guidelines are moderately implemented in Europe with respect to Hb threshold for transfusion (7–9 g dl−1), there is still an urgent need for further educational efforts that focus on the number of pRBC units to be transfused at this threshold. Clinical trial registration. NCT 01604083. PMID:26787795

  5. Intraoperative cell salvage in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Grainger, Hannah; Catling, Sue

    2011-08-01

    The use of Intraoperative Cell Salvage (ICS) in obstetrics has been slow to develop as a result of theoretical concerns relating to amniotic fluid embolism and fetal red cell contamination. In this article we examine the current UK position on the use of ICS in this clinical speciality and the recommendations for its safe and appropriate use. PMID:22029206

  6. Safety and efficacy of the combination of T-DM1 with radiotherapy of the central nervous system in a patient with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer: case study and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Giuliano Santos; Rovere, Rodrigo Kraft; Dias, Stéphanie Mereniuk Kappel; Chong, Fernando Henrique; Morais, Mayara dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 35% of patients with confirmed HER2 breast cancer progress to metastases of the central nervous system (CNS). Total cerebral radiotherapy is considered as standard treatment for these cases; however, studies have shown that some chemotherapy drugs can be used during radiotherapy without significantly increasing its toxicity. In this article, we report the case of a patient with HER2-positive breast cancer who showed isolated progression of the illness in the CNS, which was observed during the treatment period using T-DM1 concomitantly with radiotherapy of the CNS without apparent toxicity of the combination and keeping the illness controlled. Through a review of the literature on the use of radiotherapy and chemotherapy with T-DM1 for the treatment of cerebral metastases in HER2-positive breast cancer, we describe the efficacy and tolerance of the concomitant application of these treatments. PMID:26557884

  7. Combining Carbon Ion Radiotherapy and Local Injection of {alpha}-Galactosylceramide-Pulsed Dendritic Cells Inhibits Lung Metastases in an In Vivo Murine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, Yu; Iwakawa, Mayumi; Seino, Ken-Ichiro; Nakawatari, Miyako; Wada, Haruka; Kamijuku, Hajime; Nakamura, Etsuko; Nakano, Takashi; Imai, Takashi

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Our previous report indicated that carbon ion beam irradiation upregulated membrane-associated immunogenic molecules, underlining the potential clinical application of radioimmunotherapy. The antimetastatic efficacy of local combination therapy of carbon ion radiotherapy and immunotherapy was examined by use of an in vivo murine model. Methods and Materials: Tumors of mouse squamous cell carcinoma (NR-S1) cells inoculated in the legs of C3H/HeSlc mice were locally irradiated with a single 6-Gy dose of carbon ions (290 MeV/nucleon, 6-cm spread-out Bragg peak). Thirty-six hours after irradiation, {alpha}-galactosylceramide-pulsed dendritic cells (DCs) were injected into the leg tumor. We investigated the effects on distant lung metastases by counting the numbers of lung tumor colonies, making pathologic observations, and assessing immunohistochemistry. Results: The mice with no treatment (control) presented with 168 {+-} 53.8 metastatic nodules in the lungs, whereas the mice that received the combination therapy of carbon ion irradiation and DCs presented with 2.6 {+-} 1.9 (P = 0.009) at 2 weeks after irradiation. Immunohistochemistry showed that intracellular adhesion molecule 1, which activates DCs, increased from 6 h to 36 h after irradiation in the local tumors of the carbon ion-irradiated group. The expression of S100A8 in lung tissue, a marker of the lung pre-metastatic phase, was decreased only in the group with a combination of carbon ions and DCs. Conclusions: The combination of carbon ion radiotherapy with the injection of {alpha}-galactosylceramide-pulsed DCs into the primary tumor effectively inhibited distant lung metastases.

  8. Phase II Trial of Full-Dose Gemcitabine and Bevacizumab in Combination With Attenuated Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy in Patients With Localized Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Small, William; Mulcahy, Mary F.; Rademaker, Alfred; Bentrem, David J.; Benson, Al B.; Weitner, Bing Bing; Talamonti, Mark S.

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate response rate, survival, and toxicity in patients with nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer treated with gemcitabine, bevacizumab, and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients received three cycles of therapy over 10 weeks. In total, treatment consisted of intravenous (IV) gemcitabine, 1,000 mg/m{sup 2}, every 1 to 2 weeks (7 doses), IV bevacizumab, 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks (5 doses), and 36 Gy of radiotherapy (2.4-Gy fractions during cycle two). Response was assessed by cross-sectional imaging and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) levels. Patients with resectable tumors underwent surgery 6 to 8 weeks after the last dose of bevacizumab. Maintenance gemcitabine and bevacizumab doses were delivered to patients who had unresected tumors and no progression. Results: Twenty-eight of the 32 enrolled patients completed all three cycles. The median follow-up was 11.07 months. Most grade 3 or 4 toxicities occurred in the initial treatment phase; the most frequent toxicities were leukopenia (21%), neutropenia (17%), and nausea (17%). At week 10, 1 patient (4%) had a complete response, 2 patients (7%) had partial responses, 21 patients (75%) had stable disease, and 4 patients (14%) had progressive disease. The median pretreatment and posttreatment CA 19-9 levels (25 patients) were 184.3 and 57.9 U/ml, respectively (p = 0.0006). One of 10 patients proceeding to surgery experienced a major complication. Two of 6 patients undergoing resection had complete pathologic responses. The median progression-free and overall survival durations were 9.9 months and 11.8 months, respectively. Conclusions: The combination of full-dose gemcitabine, bevacizumab, and radiotherapy was active and was not associated with a high rate of major surgical complications.

  9. Physics-based shape matching for intraoperative image guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Suwelack, Stefan Röhl, Sebastian; Bodenstedt, Sebastian; Reichard, Daniel; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Speidel, Stefanie; Santos, Thiago dos; Maier-Hein, Lena; Wagner, Martin; Wünscher, Josephine; Kenngott, Hannes; Müller, Beat P.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Soft-tissue deformations can severely degrade the validity of preoperative planning data during computer assisted interventions. Intraoperative imaging such as stereo endoscopic, time-of-flight or, laser range scanner data can be used to compensate these movements. In this context, the intraoperative surface has to be matched to the preoperative model. The shape matching is especially challenging in the intraoperative setting due to noisy sensor data, only partially visible surfaces, ambiguous shape descriptors, and real-time requirements. Methods: A novel physics-based shape matching (PBSM) approach to register intraoperatively acquired surface meshes to preoperative planning data is proposed. The key idea of the method is to describe the nonrigid registration process as an electrostatic–elastic problem, where an elastic body (preoperative model) that is electrically charged slides into an oppositely charged rigid shape (intraoperative surface). It is shown that the corresponding energy functional can be efficiently solved using the finite element (FE) method. It is also demonstrated how PBSM can be combined with rigid registration schemes for robust nonrigid registration of arbitrarily aligned surfaces. Furthermore, it is shown how the approach can be combined with landmark based methods and outline its application to image guidance in laparoscopic interventions. Results: A profound analysis of the PBSM scheme based on in silico and phantom data is presented. Simulation studies on several liver models show that the approach is robust to the initial rigid registration and to parameter variations. The studies also reveal that the method achieves submillimeter registration accuracy (mean error between 0.32 and 0.46 mm). An unoptimized, single core implementation of the approach achieves near real-time performance (2 TPS, 7–19 s total registration time). It outperforms established methods in terms of speed and accuracy. Furthermore, it is shown that the

  10. [Intraoperative ABR Monitoring in Neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Sato, Sumito; Onozawa, Yuya; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Okamoto, Hirotsugu

    2015-05-01

    Monitoring of the intraoperative auditory brainstem response (ABR) is a less invasive, easy, and useful method for hearing preservation in patient undergoing cerebellopontine angle surgery such as microvascular decompression (MVD) and excision of an acoustic neurinoma. The ABR is tolerant of both inhalation and intravenous anesthesia. However, ABR recordings are highly susceptible to electrical noise from surgical devices. Therefore, for ABR recordings to be reliable, noise must be minimized and appropriate evaluation of waveform changes is critical. Electrode setting with low contact impedance and bilateral derivation effectively address these issues. Prolongation of the wave V latency alerts to surgical stress on the cochlear nerve due to nerve stretching from cerebellar retraction. According to Sekiya, the surgeon performing MVD or acoustic neurinoma excision should be warned as soon as latency prolongation exceeds 1.5 msec or characteristics of ABR must be understood. even less than 0.5 msec, respectively. However, hearing was preserved in some patients with false-positive results with respect to intraoperative wave V diminution. To use it as a useful intraoperative modality, the Characteristics of ABR must be understood. PMID:26422957

  11. Phase I trial of cetuximab in combination with capecitabine, weekly irinotecan, and radiotherapy as neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter . E-mail: ralf.hofheinz@med3.ma.uni-heidelberg.de; Horisberger, Karoline; Woernle, Christoph; Wenz, Frederik; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Kaehler, Georg; Dinter, Dietmar; Grobholz, Rainer; Heeger, Steffen; Post, Stefan; Hochhaus, Andreas; Willeke, Frank

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: To establish the feasibility and efficacy of chemotherapy with capecitabine, weekly irinotecan, cetuximab, and pelvic radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and materials: Twenty patients with rectal cancer (clinical Stage uT3-T4 or N+) received a standard dosing regimen of cetuximab (400 mg/m{sup 2} on Day 1 and 250 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 8, 15, 22, and 29) and escalating doses of irinotecan and capecitabine according to phase I methods: dose level I, irinotecan 40 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, 15, 22, and 29 and capecitabine 800 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1-38; dose level II, irinotecan 40 mg/m{sup 2} and capecitabine 1000 mg/m{sup 2}; and dose level III, irinotecan 50 mg/m{sup 2} and capecitabine 1000 mg/m{sup 2}. Radiotherapy was given to a dose of 50.4 Gy (45 Gy plus 5.4 Gy). Resection was scheduled 4-5 weeks after termination of chemoradiotherapy. Results: On dose level I, no dose-limiting toxicities occurred; however, Grade 3 diarrhea affected 1 of 6 patients on dose level II. Of 5 patients treated at dose level III, 2 exhibited dose-limiting toxicity (diarrhea in 2 and nausea/vomiting in 1). Therefore, dose level II was determined as the recommended dose for future studies. A total of 10 patients were treated on dose level II and received a mean relative dose intensity of 100% of cetuximab, 94% of irinotecan, and 95% of capecitabine. All patients underwent surgery. Five patients had a pathologically complete remission and six had microfoci of residual tumor only. Conclusion: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy with cetuximab, capecitabine, and weekly irinotecan is feasible and well tolerated. The preliminary efficacy is very promising. Larger phase II trials are ongoing.

  12. Future perspectives for intraoperative MRI.

    PubMed

    Jolesz, Ferenc A

    2005-01-01

    MRI-guided neurosurgery not only represents a technical challenge but a transformation from conventional hand-eye coordination to interactive navigational operations. In the future, multimodality-based images will be merged into a single model, in which anatomy and pathologic changes are at once distinguished and integrated into the same intuitive framework. The long-term goals of improving surgical procedures and attendant outcomes, reducing costs, and achieving broad use can be achieved with a three-pronged approach: 1. Improving the presentation of preoperative and real-time intraoperative image information 2. Integrating imaging and treatment-related technology into therapy delivery systems 3. Testing the clinical utility of image guidance in surgery The recent focus in technology development is on improving our ability to understand and apply medical images and imaging systems. Areas of active research include image processing, model-based image analysis, model deformation, real-time registration, real-time 3D (so-called "four-dimensional") imaging, and the integration and presentation of image and sensing information in the operating room. Key elements of the technical matrix also include visualization and display platforms and related software for information and display, model-based image understanding, the use of computing clusters to speed computation (ie, algorithms with partitioned computation to optimize performance), and advanced devices and systems for 3D device tracking (navigation). Current clinical applications are successfully incorporating real-time and/or continuously up-dated image-based information for direct intra-operative visualization. In addition to using traditional imaging systems during surgery, we foresee optimized use of molecular marker technology, direct measures of tissue characterization (ie, optical measurements and/or imaging), and integration of the next generation of surgical and therapy devices (including image

  13. Intraoperative laparoscopic complications for urological cancer procedures

    PubMed Central

    Montes, Sergio Fernández-Pello; Rodríguez, Ivan Gonzalez; Ugarteburu, Rodrigo Gil; Villamil, Luis Rodríguez; Mendez, Begoña Diaz; Gil, Patricio Suarez; Madera, Javier Mosquera

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To structure the rate of intraoperative complications that requires an intraoperative or perioperative resolution. METHODS: We perform a literature review of Medline database. The research was focused on intraoperative laparoscopic procedures inside the field of urological oncology. General rate of perioperative complications in laparoscopic urologic surgery is described to be around 12.4%. Most of the manuscripts published do not make differences between pure intraoperative, intraoperative with postoperative consequences and postoperative complications. RESULTS: We expose a narrative statement of complications, possible solutions and possible preventions for most frequent retroperitoneal and pelvic laparoscopic surgery. We expose the results with the following order: retroperitoneal laparoscopic surgery (radical nephrectomy, partial nephrectomy, nephroureterectomy and adrenalectomy) and pelvic laparoscopic surgery (radical prostatectomy and radical cystectomy). CONCLUSION: Intraoperative complications vary from different series. More scheduled reports should be done in order to better understand the real rates of complications. PMID:25984519

  14. Intraoperative ultrasonography (IOUS) in thoracolumbar fractures.

    PubMed

    Blumenkopf, B; Daniels, T

    1988-01-01

    The thoracolumbar levels are the second most common region for spinal trauma. A major surgical effort often entails removal of retropulsed bone fragments with decompression of the spinal contents or realignment of vertebral subluxations. The ability to determine intraoperatively the completeness of such a procedure could impact on the surgical approach and, ultimately, the operative result. The intraoperative use of ultrasonography has gained popularity and applicability. This comparison study of intraoperative ultrasonography versus postoperative computed tomography (CT) assessed the accuracy of intraoperative ultrasonography in determining the status of the spinal canal following surgical intervention in a group of 21 patients with thoracolumbar fractures. In all cases a patent ventral subarachnoid space or complete spinal canal decompression was deduced following intraoperative ultrasonography. The postoperative assessment by CT concurred in 20 of 21 (95%) situations. Intraoperative ultrasonography proved useful during the operative management of these fractures and gave good supportive evidence that the neural elements were decompressed by surgical procedure. PMID:2980067

  15. Site-specific dose-response relationships for cancer induction from the combined Japanese A-bomb and Hodgkin cohorts for doses relevant to radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Most information on the dose-response of radiation-induced cancer is derived from data on the A-bomb survivors. Since, for radiation protection purposes, the dose span of main interest is between zero and one Gy, the analysis of the A-bomb survivors is usually focused on this range. However, estimates of cancer risk for doses larger than one Gy are becoming more important for radiotherapy patients. Therefore in this work, emphasis is placed on doses relevant for radiotherapy with respect to radiation induced solid cancer. Materials and methods For various organs and tissues the analysis of cancer induction was extended by an attempted combination of the linear-no-threshold model from the A-bomb survivors in the low dose range and the cancer risk data of patients receiving radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease in the high dose range. The data were fitted using organ equivalent dose (OED) calculated for a group of different dose-response models including a linear model, a model including fractionation, a bell-shaped model and a plateau-dose-response relationship. Results The quality of the applied fits shows that the linear model fits best colon, cervix and skin. All other organs are best fitted by the model including fractionation indicating that the repopulation/repair ability of tissue is neither 0 nor 100% but somewhere in between. Bone and soft tissue sarcoma were fitted well by all the models. In the low dose range beyond 1 Gy sarcoma risk is negligible. For increasing dose, sarcoma risk increases rapidly and reaches a plateau at around 30 Gy. Conclusions In this work OED for various organs was calculated for a linear, a bell-shaped, a plateau and a mixture between a bell-shaped and plateau dose-response relationship for typical treatment plans of Hodgkin's disease patients. The model parameters (α and R) were obtained by a fit of the dose-response relationships to these OED data and to the A-bomb survivors. For any three

  16. 3D Radiotherapy Can Be Safely Combined With Sandwich Systemic Gemcitabine Chemotherapy in the Management of Pancreatic Cancer: Factors Influencing Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Spry, Nigel Harvey, Jennifer; MacLeod, Craig; Borg, Martin; Ngan, Samuel Y.; Millar, Jeremy L.; Graham, Peter; Zissiadis, Yvonne; Kneebone, Andrew; Carroll, Susan; Davies, Terri; Reece, William H.H.; Iacopetta, Barry; Goldstein, David

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: The aim of this Phase II study was to examine whether concurrent continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil (CI 5FU) plus three-dimensional conformal planning radiotherapy sandwiched between gemcitabine chemotherapy is effective, tolerable, and safe in the management of pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients were enrolled in two strata: (1) resected pancreatic cancer at high risk of local relapse (postsurgery arm, n = 22) or (2) inoperable pancreatic cancer in head or body without metastases (locally advanced arm, n = 41). Gemcitabine was given at 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} weekly for 3 weeks followed by 1 week rest then 5-6 weeks of radiotherapy and concurrent CI 5FU (200 mg/m{sup 2}/day). After 4 weeks' rest, gemcitabine treatment was reinitiated for 12 weeks. Results: For the two arms combined, treatment-related Grade 3 and 4 toxicities were reported by 25 (39.7%) and 7 (11.1%) patients, respectively. No significant late renal or hepatic toxicity was observed. In the postsurgery arm (R1 54.5%), median time to progressive disease from surgery was 11.0 months, median time to failure of local control was 32.9 months, and median survival time was 15.6 months. The 1- and 2-year survival rates were 63.6% and 31.8%. No significant associations between outcome and mutations in K-ras or TP53 or microsatellite instability were identified. Post hoc investigation of cancer antigen 19-9 levels found baseline levels and increases postbaseline were associated with shorter survival (p = 0.0061 and p < 0.0001, respectively). Conclusions: This three-dimensional chemoradiotherapy regimen is safe and promising, with encouraging local control for a substantial proportion of patients, and merits testing in a randomized trial.

  17. Late toxicities and outcomes of adjuvant radiotherapy combined with concurrent bevacizumab in patients with triple-negative non-metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pernin, V; Belin, L; Cottu, P; Bontemps, P; Lemanski, C; De La Lande, B; Baumann, P; Missohou, F; Levy, C; Peignaux, K; Reynaud-Bougnoux, A; Denis, F; Gobillion, A; Bollet, M; Vago, N A; Dendale, R; Campana, F; Fourquet, A

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety of the concurrent combination of bevacizumab with adjuvant radiotherapy (B-RT) in breast cancer (BC). Methods: Multicentre, prospective study, of the toxicity of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) alone or B-RT in patients with non-metastatic BC enrolled in randomized Phase 3 BEATRICE trial. Early and late toxicities were assessed by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v. 3.0 during and 12 months after the completion of RT. Results: From 2007 to 2012, 39 females received adjuvant B-RT and 45 received adjuvant RT alone. Median follow-up was 21.5 months. All patients had triple-negative non-metastatic BC and received adjuvant chemotherapy followed by RT. 90% of the 39 females treated by concurrent B-RT received whole breast irradiation (WBI) with a boost and 4 (10%) received post-mastectomy RT. Lymph node RT was delivered in 49% of the females with internal mammary chain irradiation. The mean duration of bevacizumab was 11.7 months. 38 (84%) females treated by RT alone received WBI with a boost and 16% of the females received post-mastectomy RT. Lymph node RT was delivered in 47% of the females with internal mammary chain RT in 31%. Grade 3 acute dermatitis was observed in 9% of patients receiving B-RT and 5% of patients receiving RT alone with no significant difference. 1 year after the completion of RT, the most common late grade 1–2 toxicities in the B-RT group were pain (18%), fibrosis (8%) and telangiectasia (5%). Conclusion: The concurrent bevacizumab with locoregional RT is associated with acceptable early and late 1-year toxicities in patients with BC. Advances in knowledge: The largest series of this association. PMID:25645108

  18. Intraoperative radiation therapy in recurrent ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, O.W. Stephanie . E-mail: stbeast@stanford.edu; Kapp, Daniel S.; Teng, Nelson N.H.; Husain, Amreen

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate disease outcomes and complications in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer treated with cytoreductive surgery and intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective study of 24 consecutive patients with ovarian carcinoma who underwent secondary cytoreduction and intraoperative radiation therapy at our institution between 1994 and 2002 was conducted. After optimal cytoreductive surgery, IORT was delivered with orthovoltage X-rays (200 kVp) using individually sized and beveled cone applications. Outcomes measures were local control of disease, progression-free interval, overall survival, and treatment-related complications. Results: Of these 24 patients, 22 were available for follow-up analysis. Additional treatment at the time of and after IORT included whole abdominopelvic radiation, 9; pelvic or locoregional radiation, 5; chemotherapy, 6; and no adjuvant treatment, 2. IORT doses ranged from 9-14 Gy (median, 12 Gy). The anatomic sites treated were pelvis (sidewalls, vaginal cuff, presacral area, anterior pubis), para-aortic and paracaval lymph node beds, inguinal region, or porta hepatitis. At a median follow-up of 24 months, 5 patients remain free of disease, whereas 17 patients have recurred, of whom 4 are alive with disease and 13 died from disease. Five patients recurred within the radiation fields for a locoregional relapse rate of 32% and 12 patients recurred at distant sites with a median time to recurrence of 13.7 months. Five-year overall survival was 22% with a median survival of 26 months from time of IORT. Nine patients (41%) experienced Grade 3 toxicities from their treatments. Conclusion: In carefully selected patients with locally recurrent ovarian cancer, combined IORT and tumor reductive surgery is reasonably tolerated and may contribute to achieving local control and disease palliation.

  19. Impact of hormonal treatment duration in combination with radiotherapy for locally advanced prostate cancer: Meta-analysis of randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hormone therapy plus radiotherapy significantly decreases recurrences and mortality of patients affected by locally advanced prostate cancer. In order to determine if difference exists according to the hormonal treatment duration, a literature-based meta-analysis was performed. Methods Relative risks (RR) were derived through a random-effect model. Differences in primary (biochemical failure, BF; cancer-specific survival, CSS), and secondary outcomes (overall survival, OS; local or distant recurrence, LR/DM) were explored. Absolute differences (AD) and the number needed to treat (NNT) were calculated. Heterogeneity, a meta-regression for clinic-pathological predictors and a correlation test for surrogates were conducted. Results Five trials (3,424 patients) were included. Patient population ranged from 267 to 1,521 patients. The longer hormonal treatment significantly improves BF (with significant heterogeneity) with an absolute benefit of 10.1%, and a non significant trend in CSS. With regard to secondary end-points, the longer hormonal treatment significantly decrease both the LR and the DM with an absolute difference of 11.7% and 11.5%. Any significant difference in OS was observed. None of the three identified clinico-pathological predictors (median PSA, range 9.5-20.35, Gleason score 7-10, 27-55% patients/trial, and T3-4, 13-77% patients/trial), did significantly affect outcomes. At the meta-regression analysis a significant correlation between the overall treatment benefit in BF, CSS, OS, LR and DM, and the length of the treatment was found (p≤0.03). Conclusions Although with significant heterogeneity (reflecting different patient' risk stratifications), a longer hormonal treatment duration significantly decreases biochemical, local and distant recurrences, with a trend for longer cancer specific survival. PMID:21143897

  20. Is current clinical practice modified about intraoperative breast irradiation?

    PubMed

    Massa, Michela; Franchelli, Simonetta; Panizza, Renzo; Massa, Tiberio

    2016-04-01

    After the results obtained in the two randomized clinical trial, the ELIOT trial and the TARGIT-A trial, a heated debate is going on concerning the question of applying intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) instead of postoperative whole breast irradiation (WBI) after breast conservative treatment. Currently, many centers are applying the IORT following the strict selection criteria dictated by the working groups American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie-European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) and monitoring the oncological outcome together with radiation toxicity on breast tissue. The clinical experience of the Geneva University Hospital regarding the use of the Intrabeam system is evaluated and compared with current evidences. PMID:27199511

  1. Is current clinical practice modified about intraoperative breast irradiation?

    PubMed Central

    Massa, Michela; Franchelli, Simonetta; Panizza, Renzo; Massa, Tiberio

    2016-01-01

    After the results obtained in the two randomized clinical trial, the ELIOT trial and the TARGIT-A trial, a heated debate is going on concerning the question of applying intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) instead of postoperative whole breast irradiation (WBI) after breast conservative treatment. Currently, many centers are applying the IORT following the strict selection criteria dictated by the working groups American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie-European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) and monitoring the oncological outcome together with radiation toxicity on breast tissue. The clinical experience of the Geneva University Hospital regarding the use of the Intrabeam system is evaluated and compared with current evidences. PMID:27199511

  2. Minimalism through intraoperative functional mapping.

    PubMed

    Berger, M S

    1996-01-01

    Intraoperative stimulation mapping may be used to avoid unnecessary risk to functional regions subserving language and sensori-motor pathways. Based on the data presented here, language localization is variable in the entire population, with only certainty existing for the inferior frontal region responsible for motor speech. Anatomical landmarks such as the anterior temporal tip for temporal lobe language sites and the posterior aspect of the lateral sphenoid wing for the frontal lobe language zones are unreliable in avoiding postoperative aphasias. Thus, individual mapping to identify essential language sites has the greatest likelihood of avoiding permanent deficits in naming, reading, and motor speech. In a similar approach, motor and sensory pathways from the cortex and underlying white matter may be reliably stimulated and mapped in both awake and asleep patients. Although these techniques require an additional operative time and equipment nominally priced, the result is often gratifying, as postoperative morbidity has been greatly reduced in the process of incorporating these surgical strategies. The patients quality of life is improved in terms of seizure control, with or without antiepileptic drugs. This avoids having to perform a second costly operative procedure, which is routinely done when extraoperative stimulation and recording is done via subdural grids. In addition, an aggressive tumor resection at the initial operation lengthens the time to tumor recurrence and often obviates the need for a subsequent reoperation. Thus, intraoperative functional mapping may be best alluded to as a surgical technique that results in "minimalism in the long term". PMID:9247814

  3. Combined chemotherapy plus endostar with sequential stereotactic radiotherapy as salvage treatment for recurrent esophageal cancer with severe dyspnea: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    XU, MINGFANG; HUANG, HUAN; XIONG, YANLI; PENG, BO; ZHOU, ZEJUN; WANG, DONG; YANG, XUEQIN

    2014-01-01

    For the majority of inoperable esophageal cancer cases, chemoradiotherapy is the most suitable treatment option. Cetuximab may provide certain benefits, however, this can be an expensive therapy. Additionally, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is typically contraindicated for esophageal cancer due to the potential for esophageal perforation and stenosis. The use of combined chemotherapy plus endostar with sequential SBRT for the treatment of esophageal squamous cancer has not been reported. In the current study, the case of a 71-year-old female with esophageal squamous cancer diagnosed 2 years prior is presented. Surgery and four cycles of cisplatin plus 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy had been administered. The patient showed recurrence at the paratracheal lymph node, exhibited severe dyspnea (grade III) and required a semi-liquid diet. Four cycles of the docetaxel, 5-fluorouracil and nedaplatin regimen plus endostar (3 mg; days 1–14; intravenously) with sequential SBRT (3300 cGy in 10 fractions) was administered. Following treatment, the symptoms of the patient completely disappeared, and objective efficacy evaluation indicated complete remission. At the time of writing, the patient is living without discomfort and the progression-free survival is >8 months. In conclusion, the present case indicates that combined treatment of chemotherapy and endostar with sequential stereotactic radiotherapy is a safe and effective option for the management of esophageal cancer. PMID:24959263

  4. Intraoperative cholangiography and bile duct injury.

    PubMed

    Sarli, L; Costi, R; Roncoroni, L

    2006-01-01

    We are not in agreement with the opinion that the credit for excellent results after laparoscopic cholecystectomy is to be attributed to the routine performing of intraoperative cholangiography. We performed 2538 laparoscopic cholecystectomies without routine intraoperative cholangiography and we obtained very low rate and severity of common bile duct injuries: there was a total of four common bile duct injuries (0.16%), in no case was the injury a major transaction, and injuries were detected intraoperatively and easily repaired with a T-tube. Cholangiography could prevent bile duct transaction, but that it is not necessary for intraoperative cholangiography to be routinely performed for this purpose. It is sufficient for intraoperative cholangiography to be performed whenever the surgeon is in doubt as to the biliary anatomy or common bile duct clearance, and that when dissection of the cholecystic peduncle proves difficult he does not hesitate to convert to open access. PMID:16333543

  5. Intraoperative OCT in Surgical Oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    South, Fredrick A.; Marjanovic, Marina; Boppart, Stephen A.

    The global incidence of cancer is rising, putting an increasingly heavy burden upon health care. The need to effectively detect and treat cancer is one of the most significant problems faced in health care today. Effective cancer treatment typically depends upon early detection and, for most solid tumors, successful removal of the cancerous tumor tissue via surgical procedures. Difficulties arise when attempting to differentiate between normal and tumor tissue during surgery. Unaided visual examination of the tissue provides only superficial, low-resolution information and often with little visual contrast. Many imaging modalities widely used for cancer screening and diagnostics are of limited use in the operating room due to low spatial resolution. OCT provides cellular resolution allowing for more precise localization of the tumor tissue. It is also relatively inexpensive and highly portable, making it well suited for intraoperative applications.

  6. A Preclinical Study Combining the DNA Repair Inhibitor Dbait with Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Melanoma1

    PubMed Central

    Biau, Julian; Devun, Flavien; Jdey, Wael; Kotula, Ewa; Quanz, Maria; Chautard, Emmanuel; Sayarath, Mano; Sun, Jian-Sheng; Verrelle, Pierre; Dutreix, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Melanomas are highly radioresistant tumors, mainly due to efficient DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Dbait (which stands for DNA strand break bait) molecules mimic DSBs and trap DNA repair proteins, thereby inhibiting repair of DNA damage induced by radiation therapy (RT). First, the cytotoxic efficacy of Dbait in combination with RT was evaluated in vitro in SK28 and 501mel human melanoma cell lines. Though the extent of RT-induced damage was not increased by Dbait, it persisted for longer revealing a repair defect. Dbait enhanced RT efficacy independently of RT doses. We further assayed the capacity of DT01 (clinical form of Dbait) to enhance efficacy of “palliative” RT (10 × 3 Gy) or “radical” RT (20 × 3 Gy), in an SK28 xenografted model. Inhibition of repair of RT-induced DSB by DT01 was revealed by the significant increase of micronuclei in tumors treated with combined treatment. Mice treated with DT01 and RT combination had significantly better tumor growth control and longer survival compared to RT alone with the “palliative” protocol [tumor growth delay (TGD) by 5.7-fold; median survival: 119 vs 67 days] or the “radical” protocol (TGD by 3.2-fold; median survival: 221 vs 109 days). Only animals that received the combined treatment showed complete responses. No additional toxicity was observed in any DT01-treated groups. This preclinical study provides encouraging results for a combination of a new DNA repair inhibitor, DT01, with RT, in the absence of toxicity. A first-in-human phase I study is currently under way in the palliative management of melanoma in-transit metastases (DRIIM trial). PMID:25379020

  7. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Expression Modulates Antitumor Efficacy of Vandetanib or Cediranib Combined With Radiotherapy in Human Glioblastoma Xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Wachsberger, Phyllis R.; Lawrence, Yaacov R.; Liu Yi; Daroczi, Borbala; Xu Xia; Dicker, Adam P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of radiation therapy (RT) combined with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) vandetanib (antiepidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR] plus antivascular endothelial growth factor receptor [anti-VEGFR]) and cediranib (anti-VEGFR) to inhibit glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) growth. A secondary aim was to investigate how this regimen is modulated by tumor EGFR expression. Methods and Materials: Radiosensitivity was assessed by clonogenic cell survival assay. VEGF secretion was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. GBM (U87MG wild-type EGFR [wtEGFR] and U87MG EGFR-null) xenografts were treated with vandetanib, cediranib, and RT, alone or in combinations. Excised tumor sections were stained for proliferative and survival biomarkers. Results: In vitro, U87MG wtEGFR and U87 EGFR-null cells had similar growth kinetics. Neither TKI affected clonogenic cell survival following RT. However, in vivo, exogenous overexpression of wtEGFR decreased tumor doubling time (T2x) in U87MG xenografts (2.70 vs. 4.41 days for U87MG wtEGFR vs. U87MG vector, respectively). In U87MG EGFR-null cells, TKI combined with radiation was no better than radiation therapy alone. In U87MG wtEGFR, RT in combination with vandetanib (but not with cediranib) significantly increased tumor T2x compared with RT alone (T2x, 10.4 days vs. 4.8 days; p < 0.001). In vivo, growth delay correlated with suppression of pAkt, survivin, and Ki67 expression in tumor samples. The presence of EGFR augmented RT-stimulated VEGF release; this effect was inhibited by vandetanib. Conclusions: EGFR expression promoted tumor growth in vivo but not in vitro, suggesting a microenvironmental effect. GBM xenografts expressing EGFR exhibited greater sensitivity to both cediranib and vandetanib than EGFR-null tumors. Hence EGFR status plays a major role in determining a tumor's in vivo response to radiation combined with TKI, supporting a 'personalized' approach to

  8. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma: Defining high-risk patients who may benefit before concurrent chemotherapy combined with intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiao-Jing; Tang, Ling-Long; Chen, Lei; Mao, Yan-Ping; Guo, Rui; Liu, Xu; Sun, Ying; Zeng, Mu-Sheng; Kang, Tie-Bang; Shao, Jian-Yong; Lin, Ai-Hua; Ma, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to create a prognostic model for distant metastasis in patients with locally advanced NPC who accept concurrent chemotherapy combined with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (CCRT) to identify high-risk patients who may benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT). A total of 881 patients with newly-diagnosed, non-disseminated, biopsy-proven locoregionally advanced NPC were retrospectively reviewed; 411 (46.7%) accepted CCRT and 470 (53.3%) accepted NACT followed by CCRT. Multivariate analysis demonstrated N2–3 disease, plasma Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) DNA > 4000 copies/mL, serum albumin ≤46 g/L and platelet count >300 k/cc were independent prognostic factors for distant metastasis in the CCRT group. Using these four factors, a prognostic model was developed, as follows: 1) low-risk group: 0–1 risk factors; and 2) high-risk group: 2–4 risk factors. In the high-risk group, patients who accepted NACT + CCRT had significantly higher distant metastasis-free survival and progression-free survival rates than the CCRT group (P = 0.001; P = 0.011). This simple prognostic model for distant metastasis in locoregionally advanced NPC may facilitate with the selection of high-risk patients who may benefit from NACT prior to CCRT. PMID:26564805

  9. Effect of combined treatment with salvage radiotherapy plus androgen suppression on quality of life in patients with recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Pearce, Andrew; Choo, Richard . E-mail: choo.c@mayo.edu; Danjoux, Cyril; Morton, Gerard; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Szumacher, Ewa; Cheung, Patrick; Deboer, Gerrit; Chander, Sarat

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of salvage radiotherapy (RT) plus 2-year androgen suppression (AS) on quality of life (QOL). Methods and Materials: A total of 74 patients with biopsy-proven local recurrence or PSA relapse after radical prostatectomy were treated with salvage RT plus 2-year AS, as per a phase II study. Quality of life was prospectively assessed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire 30-Item Version 3.0 with the added prostate cancer-specific module at baseline and predefined follow-up visits. Results: Patients experienced a significant increase in bowel dysfunction (23%) by the end of RT (p < 0.0001). This bowel dysfunction improved after RT but remained slightly elevated (5-10%) throughout the 2-year AS period. This extent of residual bowel dysfunction would be considered of minimal clinical importance. A similar, but less pronounced, pattern of change did occur for urinary dysfunction. Erectile function showed no change during RT, but had an abrupt decline (10%) with initiation of AS that was of moderate clinical significance (p < 0.01). None of the other QOL domains demonstrated a persistent, significant change from baseline that would be considered of major clinical significance. Conclusion: The combined treatment with salvage RT plus 2-year AS had relatively minor long-term effects on QOL.

  10. [Prolonged remission achieved by using bevacizumab plus paclitaxel therapy combined with sequential radiotherapy for a rapidly growing chest wall recurrence of triple negative breast cancer - a case report].

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Masahiro; Fujii, Kazuhiro; Kiso, Marina; Takeyama, Osamu; Kan, Shugen; Tanaka, Mitsuru

    2015-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman, who was diagnosed with right triple negative breast cancer (cT1cN1M0, stage I ) and underwent right modified radical mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection, showed recurrent disease in the right parasternal lymph node 4 years after the operation. Computed tomography (CT) revealed rapid growth of the tumor along with pain, accompanied by the destruction of the sternal bone. Five cycles of bevacizumab plus paclitaxel (BEV+wPTX) treatment (10 mg/kg of bevacizumab on days 1 and 15 plus 90 mg/m² of paclitaxel on days 1, 8, and 15 every 4 weeks)achieved remarkable tumor regression. Parasternal irradiation (30 Gy/15 Fr) followed by oral capecitabine treatment (600 mg b. i. d; 3 week administration followed by a week of rest) as maintenance therapy showed complete tumor regression and helped to achieve good quality of life (QOL) without any unfavorable symptoms at the 2-year follow-up, although the estimated progression free survival of this treatment is about 6 months. As BEV+wPTX had a high response rate for recurrent breast cancer, its combination with sequential radiotherapy could provide a favorable local control rate and good QOL for patients with rapidly growing, solitary, recurrent breast cancers. PMID:25596684

  11. The basics of intraoperative diagnosis in neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han S; Tihan, Tarik

    2015-03-01

    Intraoperative pathologic consultation continues to be an essential tool during neurosurgical procedures, helping to ensure adequacy of material for achieving a pathologic diagnosis and to guide surgeons. For pathologists, successful consultation with central nervous system lesions involves not only a basic familiarity with the pathologic features of such lesions but also an understanding of their clinical and radiologic context. This review discusses a basic approach to intraoperative diagnosis for practicing pathologists, including preparation for, performance of, and interpretation of an intraoperative neuropathologic evaluation. The cytologic and frozen section features of select examples of common pathologic entities are described. PMID:25783820

  12. Prognostic value of serum γ-glutamyl transferase in unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma patients treated with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization combined with conformal radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, DONG; WANG, RENBEN; MENG, XIANGJIAO; YAN, HONGJIANG; JIANG, SHUMEI; FENG, RUI; ZHU, KUNLI; XU, XIAOQING; DOU, XUE; JIN, LINZHI

    2014-01-01

    The detection of γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) has previously been reported to be useful in the diagnosis in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of the present study was to investigate the baseline serum GGT levels in patients with intermediate HCC (Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stage B) following treatment with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) combined with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). A total of 154 intermediate HCC patients with Child-Pugh grade A were retrospectively investigated. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to determine the optimal threshold for the GGT serum levels, and univariate and multivariate analyses were used to establish the prognostic factors. The median overall survival (OS) time was 24.3 months. The optimal threshold for GGT was 85 U/L (sensitivity, 75.13%; specificity, 69.81%; and area under the ROC curve, 0.763). The one-, three- and five-year OS rates were 79.9, 49.7 and 17.2%, respectively, for patients with low GGT levels (≤85 U/l) and 52.3, 22.1 and 8.5%, respectively, for patients with high GGT levels (>85 U/l) (P=0.007). The results indicated that the serum GGT level was an independent prognostic factor (hazard ratio=2.32; P=0.007) for OS. Furthermore, in subgroups stratified according to serum α-fetoprotein, gross tumor volume and radiation dose, serum GGT was also found to correlate with OS (P<0.05). Therefore, the baseline GGT level may be a significant prognostic factor for intermediate HCC patients with Child-Pugh grade A following TACE combined with 3DCRT. PMID:25289109

  13. Cetuximab in Combination With Capecitabine, Irinotecan, and Radiotherapy for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: Results of a Phase II MARGIT Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Horisberger, Karoline; Treschl, Anne; Mai, Sabine; Barreto-Miranda, Manuel; Kienle, Peter; Stroebel, Philipp; Erben, Philipp; Woernle, Christoph; Dinter, Dietmar; Kaehler, Georg; Hochhaus, Andreas; Post, Stefan; Willeke, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of preoperative radiotherapy (RT) in combination with cetuximab, capecitabine, and irinotecan in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with rectal cancer (clinical stage T3/4 or N+) were scheduled to receive cetuximab (400 mg/m{sup 2} Day 1, 250 mg/m{sup 2} Days 8, 15, 22, 29) in combination with weekly irinotecan 40 mg/m{sup 2} and capecitabine 500 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily (Days 1-38). RT was given to a dose of 50.4 Gy (45 + 5.4 Gy). Primary endpoint was toxicity, and antitumor activity as assessed by the pathologic complete remission (pCR) rate was a secondary endpoint. Results: Fifty patients were enrolled; 88% showed T3 or T4 and 76% nodal-positive tumors with a median distance from the anal verge of 7.5 cm. The actual dose intensity was as follows (median/mean, %): cetuximab 100/92, irinotecan 100/91, capecitabine 100/89). Main adverse events Grades 2/3/4 were (National Cancer Institute common toxicity criteria version 3.0, %): leukocytopenia 6/2/2, nausea/vomiting 4/2/0, diarrhea 34/30/0, proctitis 26/2/0, elevation of liver transaminases 8/10/0, and acnelike skin rash 46/6/0. All patients underwent surgery, and no postoperative deaths occurred. Eighty-four percent underwent low-anterior resection, and 68% of the specimen exhibited moderate or good tumor regression, but only 4 patients had a pCR. Conclusion: Preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab-CapIri-RT has manageable toxicity, with diarrhea being the most commonly observed adverse event. Nevertheless, the efficacy of this regimen with a pCR rate of only 8% was significantly lower than that observed in a previous Phase I trial.

  14. Potential use of radiolabeled glucuronide prodrugs with auger and/or alpha emitters in combined chemo- and radio-therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Unak, T

    2000-07-01

    Nowadays, the scientists from different disciplines have focused their attentions to new anticancer drug design for cancer chemotherapy. An effective anticancer drug should ensure the selective drug incorporation into the targeted tumor cells without principally incorporation into the normal cells. So, the targeted tumor cells can selectively be damaged by the cytotoxic effectiveness of the drug. The basic principles of drug design have involved "prodrug" concept, which means a chemical agent which is not itself active as an anticancer drug, but it can be transformed to an active form after its administration. Prodrugs can finally be activated onto the tumor cells by some kind of enzymes. In this context, the activation of glucuronide prodrugs by b-glucuronidase have a large potential applications in cancer chemotherapy. On the other hand, combined chemo- and radio-therapy of cancer (CCRTC) concept aims to combine the cytotoxicity of an aglycone with the radiotoxicity of an appropriate radionuclide on the same prodrug. So, the cytotoxic and radiotoxic effectiveness' will be able to be concentrated into the same tumor cell to increase obviously its damage. For experimental realization of this concept an effective anticancer prodrug should be radiolabeled with a radionuclide having high level of radiotoxic effectiveness such as Auger and/or alpha-emitter radionuclides. Iodine-125 and astatine-211 are very interesting radionuclides as being effective Auger and/or alpha-emitters. Briefly, the glucuronide prodrugs radiolabeled with iodine-125 or astatine-211 promise to be designed very effective anticancer agents in the future applications of cancer chemotherapy. PMID:10903386

  15. Phase II Study of Weekly Intravenous Oxaliplatin Combined With Oral Daily Capecitabine and Radiotherapy With Biologic Correlates in Neoadjuvant Treatment of Rectal Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fakih, Marwan G. BullardDunn, Kelli; Yang, Gary Y.; Pendyala, Lakshmi; Toth, Karoly; Andrews, Chris; Rustum, Youcef M.; Ross, Mary Ellen; LeVea, Charles; Puthillath, Ajithkumar; Park, Young-Mee; Rajput, Ashwani

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of a combination of capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiotherapy (RT) in the neoadjuvant treatment of Stage II and III rectal cancers. Methods: Capecitabine was given at 725 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily Monday through Friday concurrently with RT. Oxaliplatin was given intravenously at 50 mg/m{sup 2} once weekly five times starting the first day of RT. The radiation dose was 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions (1.8 Gy/fraction), five fractions weekly. Endorectal tumor biopsies were obtained before treatment and on the third day of treatment to explore the effects of treatment on thymidine phosphorylase, thymidylate synthase, excision repair cross-complementing rodent repair deficiency complementation group 1 (ERCC1), and apoptosis. Results: A total of 25 patients were enrolled in this study; 6 patients (24%) had a complete pathologic response. T-downstaging occurred in 52% of patients, and N-downstaging occurred in 53%. Grade 3 diarrhea was the most common Grade 3-4 toxicity, occurring in 20% of patients. Only 2 patients experienced disease recurrence, with a median of 20 months of follow-up. Thymidylate synthase, thymidine phosphorylase, ERCC1, and apoptosis did not vary significantly between the pretreatment and Day 3 tumor biopsies, nor did they predict for T-downstaging or a complete pathologic response. Conclusion: Capecitabine at 725 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily, oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2}/wk, and RT at 50.4 Gy is an effective neoadjuvant combination for Stage II and III rectal cancer and results in a greater rate of complete pathologic responses than historically shown in fluoropyrimidine plus RT controls.

  16. Californium versus cobalt brachytherapy combined with external-beam radiotherapy for IIB stage cervical cancer: long-term experience of a single institute

    PubMed Central

    Janulionis, Ernestas; Valuckas, Konstantinas Povilas; Samerdokiene, Vitalija; Atkocius, Vydmantas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper was to observe and compare long-term curative effects and complications of FIGO stage IIB cervical cancer patients (n = 232) treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) californium (252Cf) neutron or cobalt (60Co) photon intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) combined with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Material and methods The EBRT dose to the small pelvis was 50 Gy in both groups. The brachytherapy component of 252Cf or 60Co was added in the 3rd week of EBRT, 5 fractions were performed once per week resulting in a total ICBT dose of 40 Gy/Gyeq (point A). Results Overall survival (OS) at 5, 10 and 15 years was 63.6%, 50.4% and 38.8% in the 252Cf group and 62.2%, 50.5%, 39.9%, in the 60Co group, respectively (p = 0.74). The percentage of tumour recurrence was statistically significantly lower in the 252Cf group with 7.4% versus 17.1% in the 60Co group (p = 0.02). Second primary cancers have developed similarly 9.1% and 8.1% cases for 252Cf and 60Co groups, respectively. Conclusions Our long-term retrospective study comparing 252Cf and 60Co isotopes with brachytherapy in combined treatment of FIGO IIB stage cervix carcinoma patients shows, that overall survival in the both groups are similar. However, the recurrence of tumour was significantly lower in the 252Cf group. The incidence of second primary cancers was similar in both groups. PMID:26622239

  17. Combined action of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and whole-brain radiotherapy on EGFR-mutated non-small-cell lung cancer patients with brain metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yunyun; Fan, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the most common type of cancer to spread to the brain (brain metastasis [BM]). This study assessed the effect of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in combination with whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) on EGFR-mutant non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with BM. Patients and methods Thirty-nine patients, who had receieved different EGFR TKIs plus 30 Gy WBRT until disease progression, were retrospectively analyzed between 2010 and 2014. Treatment response was evaluated and survival data were collected and analyzed. Results Among the 39 patients, 18 had an EGFR exon 19 deletion and 21 had an EGFR exon 21 point mutation. After therapy, 19 (48.7%) patients had complete remission, 12 (30.8%) had partial remission, and eight (20.5%) had stable disease in the intracranial lesions. Besides, there was no single case of complete remission, 21 (53.8%) had partial remission, and 18 (46.2%) had stable disease of the extracranial lesions. The median progression-free survival (PFS) of intracranial lesions and extracranial lesions was 18 and 12 months, respectively. The median overall survival (OS) was 26 months. The univariate analysis showed that graded prognostic assessment (P=0.006) and Karnofsky Performance Scale (P=0.045) were associated with intracranial progression-free survival (iPFS), while recursive partitioning analysis (P=0.049) was associated with OS of patients. Conclusion EGFR TKIs plus concomitant WBRT controlled intracranial lesions of lung cancer metastasis and significantly improved OS of patients. Further studies will be needed to confirm whether this combination treatment could be used as a standard therapy for EGFR-mutated NSCLC patients with BM. PMID:27022274

  18. Combining multiple FDG-PET radiotherapy target segmentation methods to reduce the effect of variable performance of individual segmentation methods

    SciTech Connect

    McGurk, Ross J.; Bowsher, James; Das, Shiva K.; Lee, John A

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Many approaches have been proposed to segment high uptake objects in 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography images but none provides consistent performance across the large variety of imaging situations. This study investigates the use of two methods of combining individual segmentation methods to reduce the impact of inconsistent performance of the individual methods: simple majority voting and probabilistic estimation. Methods: The National Electrical Manufacturers Association image quality phantom containing five glass spheres with diameters 13-37 mm and two irregularly shaped volumes (16 and 32 cc) formed by deforming high-density polyethylene bottles in a hot water bath were filled with 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose and iodine contrast agent. Repeated 5-min positron emission tomography (PET) images were acquired at 4:1 and 8:1 object-to-background contrasts for spherical objects and 4.5:1 and 9:1 for irregular objects. Five individual methods were used to segment each object: 40% thresholding, adaptive thresholding, k-means clustering, seeded region-growing, and a gradient based method. Volumes were combined using a majority vote (MJV) or Simultaneous Truth And Performance Level Estimate (STAPLE) method. Accuracy of segmentations relative to CT ground truth volumes were assessed using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and the symmetric mean absolute surface distances (SMASDs). Results: MJV had median DSC values of 0.886 and 0.875; and SMASD of 0.52 and 0.71 mm for spheres and irregular shapes, respectively. STAPLE provided similar results with median DSC of 0.886 and 0.871; and median SMASD of 0.50 and 0.72 mm for spheres and irregular shapes, respectively. STAPLE had significantly higher DSC and lower SMASD values than MJV for spheres (DSC, p < 0.0001; SMASD, p= 0.0101) but MJV had significantly higher DSC and lower SMASD values compared to STAPLE for irregular shapes (DSC, p < 0.0001; SMASD, p= 0.0027). DSC was not significantly

  19. Apricot attenuates oxidative stress and modulates of Bax, Bcl-2, caspases, NFκ-B, AP-1, CREB expression of rats bearing DMBA-induced liver damage and treated with a combination of radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Karabulut, Aysun Bay; Karadag, Nese; Gurocak, Simay; Kiran, Tugba; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Sahin, Kazım

    2014-08-01

    We evaluated the ability of apricot to attenuate apoptosis and oxidative stress developed during the process of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) and radiotherapy in the liver of rats bearing liver damage. Fifty female Wistar rats were divided into 7 groups; (i) normal control rats; (ii) rats fed with standard diet with apricot (20%), (ii) rats fed with standard diet and administrated 6 gray radiotherapy with Co 60 device applied to a single fraction, (iv) rats fed with standard diet and administered intraperitoneally DMBA (20mg/kg), (v) rats fed with standard diet and administered DMBA and 6 gray radiotherapy, (vi) rats fed with standard rat diet and administered DMBA and supplemented apricot, (vii) rats fed with standard diet supplemented apricot administered DMBA and radiotherapy (RT) for 6weeks. Expression of Bax, caspase 3, and glutathione activity decreased in the liver but liver expression of NF-κB, AP-1, CREB, Bcl-2 and ALT, AST, 5'NT, MDA, NO levels increased in DMBA-induced liver damage rats. In conclusion, the results suggest that apricot supplementation and irradiation given in combination, offer maximum protection against DMBA-induced hepatic carcinogenesis. PMID:24819963

  20. Value of Intraoperative Sonography in Pancreatic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Stefanie; Morgan, Tara; Poder, Liina; Shin, Lewis; Jeffrey, R Brooke; Aslam, Rizwan; Yee, Judy

    2015-07-01

    The utility of intraoperative sonography for pancreatic disease has been well described for detection and evaluation of neoplastic and inflammatory pancreatic disease. Intraoperative sonography can help substantially reduce surgical time as well as decrease potential injury to tissues and major structures. Imaging with sonography literally at the point of care--the surgeon's scalpel--can precisely define the location of pancreatic lesions and their direct relationship with surrounding structures in real time during surgery. This article highlights our experience with intraoperative sonography at multiple institutional sites for both open and laparoscopic surgical procedures. We use intraoperative sonography for a wide range of pancreatic disease to provide accurate localization and staging of disease, provide guidance for enucleation of nonpalpable, nonvisible tumors, and in planning the most direct and least invasive surgical approach, avoiding injury to the pancreatic duct or other vital structures. PMID:26112636

  1. [Stereotactic radiotherapy in brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Dhermain, F; Reyns, N; Colin, P; Métellus, P; Mornex, F; Noël, G

    2015-02-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy of brain metastases is increasingly proposed after polydisciplinary debates among experts. Its definition and modalities of prescription, indications and clinical interest regarding the balance between efficacy versus toxicity need to be discussed. Stereotactic radiotherapy is a 'high precision' irradiation technique (within 1mm), using different machines (with invasive contention or frameless, photons X or gamma) delivering high doses (4 to 25Gy) in a limited number of fractions (usually 1 to 5, ten maximum) with a high dose gradient. Dose prescription will depend on materials, dose constraints to organs at risk varying with fractionation. Stereotactic radiotherapy may be proposed: (1) in combination with whole brain radiotherapy with the goal of increasing (modestly) overall survival of patients with a good performance status, 1 to 3 brain metastases and a controlled extracranial disease; (2) for recurrence of 1-3 brain metastases after whole brain radiotherapy; (3) after complete resection of a large and/or symptomatic brain metastases; (4) after diagnosis of 3-5 asymptomatic new or progressing brain metastases during systemic therapy, with the aim of delaying whole brain radiotherapy (avoiding its potential neurotoxicity) and maintaining a high focal control rate. Only a strict follow-up with clinical and MRI every 3 months will permit to deliver iterative stereotactic radiotherapies without jeopardizing survival. Simultaneous delivering of stereotactic radiotherapy with targeted medicines should be carefully discussed. PMID:25640215

  2. Gliadel wafer implantation combined with standard radiotherapy and concurrent followed by adjuvant temozolomide for treatment of newly diagnosed high-grade glioma: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Lynn S; Smith, Kris A; Stea, Baldassarre

    2016-01-01

    Since 2003, only two chemotherapeutic agents, evaluated in phase III trials, have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of newly diagnosed high-grade glioma (HGG): Gliadel wafers (intracranially implanted local chemotherapy) and temozolomide (TMZ) (systemic chemotherapy). Neither agent is curative, but each has been shown to improve median overall survival (OS) compared to radiotherapy (RT) alone. To date, no phase III trial has tested these agents when used in sequential combination; however, a number of smaller trials have reported favorable results. We performed a systematic literature review to evaluate the combination of Gliadel wafers with standard RT (60 Gy) plus concurrent and adjuvant TMZ (RT/TMZ) for newly diagnosed HGG. A literature search was conducted for the period of January 1995 to September 2015. Data were extracted and categorized, and means and ranges were determined. A total of 11 publications met criteria, three prospective trials and eight retrospective studies, representing 411 patients who received Gliadel plus standard RT/TMZ. Patients were similar in age, gender, and performance status. The weighted mean of median OS was 18.2 months (ten trials, n = 379, range 12.7 to 21.3 months), and the weighted mean of median progression-free survival was 9.7 months (seven trials, n = 287, range 7 to 12.9 months). The most commonly reported grade 3 and 4 adverse events were myelosuppression (10.22 %), neurologic deficit (7.8 %), and healing abnormalities (4.3 %). Adverse events reflected the distinct independent safety profiles of Gliadel wafers and RT/TMZ, with little evidence of enhanced toxicity from their use in sequential combination. In the 11 identified trials, an increased benefit from sequentially combining Gliadel wafers with RT/TMZ was strongly suggested. Median OS tended to be improved by 3 to 4 months beyond that observed for Gliadel wafers or TMZ when used alone in the respective phase III

  3. SEP Montage Variability Comparison during Intraoperative Neurophysiologic Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Christine; Lolis, Athena Maria; Beric, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative monitoring is performed to provide real-time assessment of the neural structures that can be at risk during spinal surgery. Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) are the most commonly used modality for intraoperative monitoring. SEP stability can be affected by many factors during the surgery. This study is a prospective review of SEP recordings obtained during intraoperative monitoring of instrumented spinal surgeries that were performed for chronic underlying neurologic and neuromuscular conditions, such as scoliosis, myelopathy, and spinal stenosis. We analyzed multiple montages at the baseline, and then followed their development throughout the procedure. Our intention was to examine the stability of the SEP recordings throughout the surgical procedure on multiple montages of cortical SEP recordings, with the goal of identifying the appropriate combination of the least number of montages that gives the highest yield of monitorable surgeries. Our study shows that it is necessary to have multiple montages for SEP recordings, as it reduces the number of non-monitorable cases, improves IOM reliability, and therefore could reduce false positives warnings to the surgeons. Out of all the typical montages available for use, our study has shown that the recording montage Cz-C4/Cz-C3 (Cz-Cc) is the most reliable and stable throughout the procedure and should be the preferred montage followed throughout the surgery. PMID:27445969

  4. Anesthesia for intraoperative radiation therapy in children

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, R.H.; Morrison, J.E. Jr.; Verbrugge, J.J.; Daniel, W.E.; Aarestad, N.O.; Burrington, J.D.

    1987-06-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) is a relatively new mode of cancer treatment which is being used with increasing frequency. IORT presents several challenges to the anesthesiologist, including patients who are debilitated from their disease or chemotherapy, operations involving major tumor resections, intraoperative interdepartmental transport of patients, and remote monitoring of patients during electron beam therapy. This report discusses the anesthetic management of ten children undergoing IORT. With adequate preparation and interdepartmental communication, complications can be avoided during these challenging cases.

  5. Refractory intraoperative hypotension with elevated serum tryptase

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Kelly J.; Divekar, Rohit D.; Butterfield, Joseph H.; Schwartz, Lawrence B.; Weingarten, Toby N.

    2015-01-01

    Severe intraoperative hypotension has been reported in patients on angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor subtype 1 antagonists. We describe a patient on lisinopril who developed refractory intraoperative hypotension associated with increased serum tryptase level suggesting mast cell activation (allergic reaction). However, allergology workup ruled out an allergic etiology as well as mastocytosis, and hypotension recalcitrant to treatment was attributed to uninterrupted lisinopril therapy. Elevated serum tryptase was attributed to our patient's chronic renal insufficiency. PMID:25653920

  6. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring in spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Hwa; Hyun, Seung-Jae

    2015-09-16

    Recently, many surgeons have been using intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IOM) in spinal surgery to reduce the incidence of postoperative neurological complications, including level of the spinal cord, cauda equina and nerve root. Several established technologies are available and combined motor and somatosensory evoked potentials are considered mandatory for practical and successful IOM. Spinal cord evoked potentials are elicited compound potentials recorded over the spinal cord. Electrical stimulation is provoked on the dorsal spinal cord from an epidural electrode. Somatosensory evoked potentials assess the functional integrity of sensory pathways from the peripheral nerve through the dorsal column and to the sensory cortex. For identification of the physiological midline, the dorsal column mapping technique can be used. It is helpful for reducing the postoperative morbidity associated with dorsal column dysfunction when distortion of the normal spinal cord anatomy caused by an intramedullary cord lesion results in confusion in localizing the midline for the myelotomy. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) consist of spinal, neurogenic and muscle MEPs. MEPs allow selective and specific assessment of the functional integrity of descending motor pathways, from the motor cortex to peripheral muscles. Spinal surgeons should understand the concept of the monitoring techniques and interpret monitoring records adequately to use IOM for the decision making during the surgery for safe surgery and a favorable surgical outcome. PMID:26380823

  7. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring in spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Hwa; Hyun, Seung-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Recently, many surgeons have been using intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IOM) in spinal surgery to reduce the incidence of postoperative neurological complications, including level of the spinal cord, cauda equina and nerve root. Several established technologies are available and combined motor and somatosensory evoked potentials are considered mandatory for practical and successful IOM. Spinal cord evoked potentials are elicited compound potentials recorded over the spinal cord. Electrical stimulation is provoked on the dorsal spinal cord from an epidural electrode. Somatosensory evoked potentials assess the functional integrity of sensory pathways from the peripheral nerve through the dorsal column and to the sensory cortex. For identification of the physiological midline, the dorsal column mapping technique can be used. It is helpful for reducing the postoperative morbidity associated with dorsal column dysfunction when distortion of the normal spinal cord anatomy caused by an intramedullary cord lesion results in confusion in localizing the midline for the myelotomy. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) consist of spinal, neurogenic and muscle MEPs. MEPs allow selective and specific assessment of the functional integrity of descending motor pathways, from the motor cortex to peripheral muscles. Spinal surgeons should understand the concept of the monitoring techniques and interpret monitoring records adequately to use IOM for the decision making during the surgery for safe surgery and a favorable surgical outcome. PMID:26380823

  8. Virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changho; Lee, Donghyun; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Jeehyun; Kim, Chulhong

    2015-07-01

    A virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy at 1064 nm wavelength (VISPAM) system was designed and fabricated by integrating a commercial type surgical microscope and laser scanning photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) with a 1064 nm pulsed laser. Based on simple augmented reality device, VISPAM could simultaneously provide 2D depth-resolved photoacoustic and magnified microscope images of surgery regions on the same vision of surgeon via an eyepiece of the microscope. The invisible 1064 nm laser removed the interruption of surgical sight due to visible laser scanning of previous report, and decreased the danger of tissue damage caused by over irradiated laser. In addition, to approach the real practical surgery application, a needle-type transducer was utilized without a water bath for PA signal coupling. In order to verify our system's performance, we conducted needle guiding as ex vivo phantom study and needle guiding and injection of carbon particles mixtures into a melanoma tumor region as in vivo study. We expect that VISPAM can be essential tool of brain and ophthalmic microsurgery.

  9. Bowel sparing in pediatric cranio-spinal radiotherapy: a comparison of combined electron and photon and helical TomoTherapy techniques to a standard photon method

    SciTech Connect

    Harron, Elizabeth; Lewis, Joanne

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the dose to organs at risk (OARs) from different craniospinal radiotherapy treatment approaches available at the Northern Centre for Cancer Care (NCCC), with a particular emphasis on sparing the bowel. Method: Treatment plans were produced for a pediatric medulloblastoma patient with inflammatory bowel disease using 3D conformal 6-MV photons (3DCP), combined 3D 6-MV photons and 18-MeV electrons (3DPE), and helical photon TomoTherapy (HT). The 3DPE plan was a modification of the standard 3DCP technique, using electrons to treat the spine inferior to the level of the diaphragm. The plans were compared in terms of the dose-volume data to OARs and the nontumor integral dose. Results: The 3DPE plan was found to give the lowest dose to the bowel and the lowest nontumor integral dose of the 3 techniques. However, the coverage of the spine planning target volume (PTV) was least homogeneous using this technique, with only 74.6% of the PTV covered by 95% of the prescribed dose. HT was able to achieve the best coverage of the PTVs (99.0% of the whole-brain PTV and 93.1% of the spine PTV received 95% of the prescribed dose), but delivered a significantly higher integral dose. HT was able to spare the heart, thyroid, and eyes better than the linac-based techniques, but other OARs received a higher dose. Conclusions: Use of electrons was the best method for reducing the dose to the bowel and the integral dose, at the expense of compromised spine PTV coverage. For some patients, HT may be a viable method of improving dose homogeneity and reducing selected OAR doses.

  10. Dosimetric Benefits of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Combined With the Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Technique in Patients With Mediastinal Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Paumier, Amaury; Ghalibafian, Mithra; Gilmore, Jennifer; Beaudre, Anne; Blanchard, Pierre; El Nemr, Mohammed; Azoury, Farez; Al Hamokles, Hweej; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Girinsky, Theodore

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the additional benefits of using the deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in terms of the protection of organs at risk for patients with mediastinal Hodgkin's disease. Methods and Materials: Patients with early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma with mediastinal involvement were entered into the study. Two simulation computed tomography scans were performed for each patient: one using the free-breathing (FB) technique and the other using the DIBH technique with a dedicated spirometer. The clinical target volume, planning target volume (PTV), and organs at risk were determined on both computed tomography scans according to the guidelines of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer. In both cases, 30 Gy in 15 fractions was prescribed. The dosimetric parameters retrieved for the statistical analysis were PTV coverage, mean heart dose, mean coronary artery dose, mean lung dose, and lung V20. Results: There were no significant differences in PTV coverage between the two techniques (FB vs. DIBH). The mean doses delivered to the coronary arteries, heart, and lungs were significantly reduced by 15% to 20% using DIBH compared with FB, and the lung V20 was reduced by almost one third. The dose reduction to organs at risk was greater for masses in the upper part of the mediastinum. IMRT with DIBH was partially implemented in 1 patient. This combination will be extended to other patients in the near future. Conclusions: Radiation exposure of the coronary arteries, heart, and lungs in patients with mediastinal Hodgkin's lymphoma was greatly reduced using DIBH with IMRT. The greatest benefit was obtained for tumors in the upper part of the mediastinum. The possibility of a wider use in clinical practice is currently under investigation in our department.

  11. Prognostic value of post-treatment 18F-FDG PET/CT for advanced head and neck cancer after combined intra-arterial chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Shimoji, Keigo; Miyata, Yoko; Kamiya, Kouhei; Minamimoto, Ryogo; Kubota, Kazuo; Okasaki, Momoko; Morooka, Miyako; Yokoyama, Jyunkichi

    2014-01-01

    Objective To clarify the prognostic value of post-treatment 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in patients with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) after combined intra-arterial chemotherapy and radiotherapy (IACR). Methods Thirty-six patients with HNSCC who underwent IACR were recruited. The period from the end of IACR to the last post-treatment 18F-FDG PET/CT examination was 8-12 weeks. Both patient-based and lesion-based analyses were used to evaluate the PET/CT images. For lesion-based analysis, 36 regions (12 lesions of recurrences and 24 scars at primary sites) were selected. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to assess the overall survival (OS) stratified by 18F-FDG uptake or visual interpretation results. Results Twelve patients with recurrence were identified by six months after IACR. The sensitivity and specificity in the patient-based analysis were 67% (8/12) and 88% (21/24), respectively. The mean OS was estimated to be 12.1 months (95% CI, 6.3-18.0 months) for the higher maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) group (n=7) and 44.6 months (95% CI, 39.9-49.3 months) for the lower SUVmax group (n=29). OS in the higher SUVmax group (cut-off point, 6.1) or positive visual interpretation group was significantly shorter than that in the lower SUVmax or negative visual interpretation group (P<0.001 and P<0.05, respectively). Conclusions The SUVmax and visual interpretation of HNSCC on post-IACR 18F-FDG PET/CT can provide prognostic survival estimates. PMID:24653624

  12. A phase II study of capecitabine and irinotecan in combination with concurrent pelvic radiotherapy (CapIri-RT) as neoadjuvant treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Willeke, F; Horisberger, K; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, U; Wenz, F; Leitner, A; Hochhaus, A; Grobholz, R; Willer, A; Kähler, G; Post, S; Hofheinz, R-D

    2007-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety data of a combination regimen using weekly irinotecan in combination with capecitabine and concurrent radiotherapy (CapIri-RT) as neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer in a phase-II trial. Patients with rectal cancer clinical stages T3/4 Nx or N+ were recruited to receive irinotecan (50 mg m−2 weekly) and capecitabine (500 mg m−2 bid days 1–38) with a concurrent RT dose of 50.4 Gy. Surgery was scheduled 4–6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. A total of 36 patients (median age 62 years; m/f: 27:9) including three patients with local recurrence were enclosed onto the trial. The median distance of the tumour from the anal verge was 5 cm. The main toxicity observed was (NCI-CTC grades 1/2/3/4 (n)): Anaemia 23/9/−/−; leucocytopenia 12/7/7/2, diarrhoea 13/15/4/−, nausea/vomiting 9/10/2/−, and increased activity of transaminases 3/3/1/−. One patient had a reversible episode of ventricular fibrillation during chemoradiation, most probably caused by capecitabine. The relative dose intensity was (median/mean (%)): irinotecan 95/91, capecitabine 100/92). Thirty-four patients underwent surgery (anterior resection n=25; abdomino-perineal resection n=6; Hartmann's procedure n=3). R0-resection was accomplished in all patients. Two patients died in the postoperative course from septic complications. Pathological complete remission was observed in five out of 34 resected patients (15%), and nine patients showed microfoci of residual tumour (26%). After a median follow-up of 28 months one patient had developed a local recurrence, and five patients distant metastases. Three-year overall survival for all patients with surgery (excluding three patients treated for local relapse or with primary metastatic disease) was 80%. In summary, preoperative chemoradiation with CapIri-RT exhibits promising efficacy whereas showing managable toxicity. The local recurrence and distant failure rates observed after

  13. Real-time 3D internal marker tracking during arc radiotherapy by the use of combined MV kV imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Wiersma, R. D.; Mao, W.; Luxton, G.; Xing, L.

    2008-12-01

    To minimize the adverse dosimetric effect caused by tumor motion, it is desirable to have real-time knowledge of the tumor position throughout the beam delivery process. A promising technique to realize the real-time image guided scheme in external beam radiation therapy is through the combined use of MV and onboard kV beam imaging. The success of this MV-kV triangulation approach for fixed-gantry radiation therapy has been demonstrated. With the increasing acceptance of modern arc radiotherapy in the clinics, a timely and clinically important question is whether the image guidance strategy can be extended to arc therapy to provide the urgently needed real-time tumor motion information. While conceptually feasible, there are a number of theoretical and practical issues specific to the arc delivery that need to be resolved before clinical implementation. The purpose of this work is to establish a robust procedure of system calibration for combined MV and kV imaging for internal marker tracking during arc delivery and to demonstrate the feasibility and accuracy of the technique. A commercially available LINAC equipped with an onboard kV imager and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) was used for the study. A custom built phantom with multiple ball bearings was used to calibrate the stereoscopic MV-kV imaging system to provide the transformation parameters from imaging pixels to 3D world coordinates. The accuracy of the fiducial tracking system was examined using a 4D motion phantom capable of moving in accordance with a pre-programmed trajectory. Overall, spatial accuracy of MV-kV fiducial tracking during the arc delivery process for normal adult breathing amplitude and period was found to be better than 1 mm. For fast motion, the results depended on the imaging frame rates. The RMS error ranged from ~0.5 mm for the normal adult breathing pattern to ~1.5 mm for more extreme cases with a low imaging frame rate of 3.4 Hz. In general, highly accurate real

  14. Feasibility of integrating a multi-camera optical tracking system in intra-operative electron radiation therapy scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Vázquez, V.; Marinetto, E.; Santos-Miranda, J. A.; Calvo, F. A.; Desco, M.; Pascau, J.

    2013-12-01

    Intra-operative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) combines surgery and ionizing radiation applied directly to an exposed unresected tumour mass or to a post-resection tumour bed. The radiation is collimated and conducted by a specific applicator docked to the linear accelerator. The dose distribution in tissues to be irradiated and in organs at risk can be planned through a pre-operative computed tomography (CT) study. However, surgical retraction of structures and resection of a tumour affecting normal tissues significantly modify the patient's geometry. Therefore, the treatment parameters (applicator dimension, pose (position and orientation), bevel angle, and beam energy) may require the original IOERT treatment plan to be modified depending on the actual surgical scenario. We propose the use of a multi-camera optical tracking system to reliably record the actual pose of the IOERT applicator in relation to the patient's anatomy in an environment prone to occlusion problems. This information can be integrated in the radio-surgical treatment planning system in order to generate a real-time accurate description of the IOERT scenario. We assessed the accuracy of the applicator pose by performing a phantom-based study that resembled three real clinical IOERT scenarios. The error obtained (2 mm) was below the acceptance threshold for external radiotherapy practice, thus encouraging future implementation of this approach in real clinical IOERT scenarios.

  15. Critical role of bevacizumab scheduling in combination with pre-surgical chemo-radiotherapy in MRI-defined high-risk locally advanced rectal cancer: results of the branch trial

    PubMed Central

    Avallone, Antonio; Pecori, Biagio; Bianco, Franco; Aloj, Luigi; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Romano, Carmela; Granata, Vincenza; Marone, Pietro; Leone, Alessandra; Botti, Gerardo; Petrillo, Antonella; Caracò, Corradina; Iaffaioli, Vincenzo R.; Muto, Paolo; Romano, Giovanni; Comella, Pasquale; Budillon, Alfredo; Delrio, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Background We have previously shown that an intensified preoperative regimen including oxaliplatin plus raltitrexed and 5-fluorouracil/folinic acid (OXATOM/FUFA) during preoperative pelvic radiotherapy produced promising results in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Preclinical evidence suggests that the scheduling of bevacizumab may be crucial to optimize its combination with chemo-radiotherapy. Patients and methods This non-randomized, non-comparative, phase II study was conducted in MRI-defined high-risk LARC. Patients received three biweekly cycles of OXATOM/FUFA during RT. Bevacizumab was given 2 weeks before the start of chemo-radiotherapy, and on the same day of chemotherapy for 3 cycles (concomitant-schedule A) or 4 days prior to the first and second cycle of chemotherapy (sequential-schedule B). Primary end point was pathological complete tumor regression (TRG1) rate. Results The accrual for the concomitant-schedule was early terminated because the number of TRG1 (2 out of 16 patients) was statistically inconsistent with the hypothesis of activity (30%) to be tested. Conversely, the endpoint was reached with the sequential-schedule and the final TRG1 rate among 46 enrolled patients was 50% (95% CI 35%–65%). Neutropenia was the most common grade ≥3 toxicity with both schedules, but it was less pronounced with the sequential than concomitant-schedule (30% vs. 44%). Postoperative complications occurred in 8/15 (53%) and 13/46 (28%) patients in schedule A and B, respectively. At 5 year follow-up the probability of PFS and OS was 80% (95%CI, 66%–89%) and 85% (95%CI, 69%–93%), respectively, for the sequential-schedule. Conclusions These results highlights the relevance of bevacizumab scheduling to optimize its combination with preoperative chemo-radiotherapy in the management of LARC. PMID:26320185

  16. Preoperative characteristics predicting intraoperative hypotension and hypertension among hypertensives and diabetics undergoing noncardiac surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Charlson, M E; MacKenzie, C R; Gold, J P; Ales, K L; Topkins, M; Shires, G T

    1990-01-01

    We prospectively studied patients with hypertension and diabetes undergoing elective noncardiac surgery with general anesthesia to test the hypothesis that patients at high risk for prognostically significant intraoperative hemodynamic instability could be identified by their preoperative characteristics. Specifically we hypothesized that patients with a low functional capacity, decreased plasma volume, or significant cardiac comorbidity would be at high risk for intraoperative hypotension and those with a history of severe hypertension would be at risk for intraoperative hypertension. Patients who had a preoperative mean arterial pressure (MAP) greater than or equal to 110, a walking distance of less than 400 m, or a plasma volume less than 3000 cc were at increased risk of intraoperative hypotension (i.e., more than 1 hour of greater than or equal to 20 mmHg decreases in the MAP). Hypotension was also more common among patients having intra-abdominal or vascular surgery, and among those who had operations longer than 2 hours. Patients older than 70 years or with a decreased plasma volume were at increased risk of having more than 15 minutes of intraoperative elevations of greater than or equal to 20 mmHg over the preoperative MAP in combination with intraoperative hypotension; this was also more common when surgery lasted more than 2 hours. Patients who had intraoperative hypotension tended to have an immediate decrease in MAP at the onset of anesthesia and were often purposefully maintained at MAPs less than their usual level during surgery with fentanyl and neuromuscular blocking agents. Patients who had intraoperative hyper/hypotension tended to have repeated elevations in MAP above their preoperative levels during the course of surgery, and such elevations precipitated interventions with neuromuscular blocking agents and/or fentanyl. Neither pattern was more common among patients who developed net intraoperative negative fluid balances. Both hypotension and

  17. Intraoperative cerebral blood flow imaging of rodents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hangdao; Li, Yao; Yuan, Lu; Wu, Caihong; Lu, Hongyang; Tong, Shanbao

    2014-09-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is of interest to neuroscience researchers, which offers the assessment of hemodynamic responses throughout the process of neurosurgery and provides an early biomarker for surgical guidance. However, intraoperative CBF imaging has been challenging due to animal's motion and position change during the surgery. In this paper, we presented a design of an operation bench integrated with laser speckle contrast imager which enables monitoring of the CBF intraoperatively. With a specially designed stereotaxic frame and imager, we were able to monitor the CBF changes in both hemispheres during the rodent surgery. The rotatable design of the operation plate and implementation of online image registration allow the technician to move the animal without disturbing the CBF imaging during surgery. The performance of the system was tested by middle cerebral artery occlusion model of rats.

  18. New insights into the functional significance of the frontal aslant tract: an anatomo-functional study using intraoperative electrical stimulations combined with diffusion tensor imaging-based fiber tracking.

    PubMed

    Vassal, François; Boutet, Claire; Lemaire, Jean-Jacques; Nuti, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    We used the method of direct electrostimulation combined with navigated tractography to map the frontal "aslant" tract, enabling us to perform reliable anatomo-functional correlation in a patient undergoing awake surgery to remove a left frontal glioma. The findings enhanced our understanding of the organization of language within the human brain. PMID:24552256

  19. SU-E-T-620: Dosimetric Compliance Study for a New Prostate Protocol of Combined High Dose Rate Brachytherapy and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, C; Giaddui, T; Den, R; Harrison, A; Yu, Y

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the adherence of treatment plans of prostate cancer patients with the dosimetric compliance criteria of the new in house phase I trial of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for intermediate risk prostate cancer patients. Methods: Ten prostate cancer patients were treated using this trial. They received one fraction of HDR to 15Gy, followed by external beam(EB) boost of 3.2Gy(Level 1, five patients) or 3.94Gy(level 2, five patients) per fraction for 10 or 7 fractions, respectively, both equivalent to EB treatments of 113.5Gy in 2Gy fractions. The EB plans were either IMRT or VMAT plans. DVH analysis was performed to verify the adherence of treatment plans to the dosimetric criteria of the trial. Results: For Level 1 patients, target coverage were adequate, with CTV V32Gy(%) of 99.0±1.0 (mean ± 1 standard deviation), and PTV V31Gy(%) of 99.6±0.3. PTV V32.9Gy(%) is 1.4±3.1 and PTVmax is 32.9±0.2Gy. Rectum, bladder and femoral heads sparing were well within protocol criteria. For Level 2 patients, CTV V27.6Gy(%) is 98.7±1.8; PTV V26.7Gy(%) is 99.0±1.4. PTV V28.4Gy(%) is 1.3±1.4, with three patients having minor deviation from protocol. Again critical structures were spared compliant to the protocol. The analysis of HDR plans show similar results, with adequate dose coverage to the prostate and sparing of critical structures including urethra and rectum. V100(%) and V90(%) of prostate are 96.0±1.1 and 98.9±0.5. Urethra D10(%) is 113.1±2.9. Rectum V80(cc) is 1.4±0.5. Hotspot in prostate is substantially higher than what the protocol specifies. But the criteria for hotspot are only guidelines, serving to lower the dose to urethra . Conclusion: This new high biological equivalent dose prostate trial has been carried out successfully for ten patients. Based on dosimetric analysis, all HDR and external plans were compliant to the protocol criteria, with only minor deviations.

  20. Prognostic Significance of 5-Year PSA Value for Predicting Prostate Cancer Recurrence After Brachytherapy Alone and Combined With Hormonal Therapy and/or External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, Richard G. Klein, Thomas J.; Cesaretti, Jamie A.; Stone, Nelson N.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To analyze the prognosis and outcomes of patients who remain free of biochemical failure during the first 5 years after treatment. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2002, 742 patients with prostate cancer were treated with brachytherapy alone (n = 306), brachytherapy and hormonal therapy (n = 212), or combined implantation and external beam radiotherapy (with or without hormonal therapy; n = 224). These patients were free of biochemical failure (American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology [ASTRO] definition) during the first 5 post-treatment years and had a documented 5-year prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value. The median follow-up was 6.93 years. Results: The actuarial 10-year freedom from PSA failure rate was 97% using the ASTRO definition and 95% using the Phoenix definition. The median 5-year PSA level was 0.03 ng/mL (range, 0-3.6). The 5-year PSA value was {<=}0.01 in 47.7%, >0.01-0.10 in 31.1%, >0.10-0.2 in 10.2%, >0.2-0.5 in 7.82%, and >0.5 in 3.10%. The 5-year PSA value had prognostic significance, with a PSA value of {<=}0.2 ng/mL (n = 661) corresponding to a 10-year freedom from PSA failure rate of 99% with the ASTRO definition and 98% with the Phoenix definition vs. 86% (ASTRO definition) and 81% (Phoenix definition) for a PSA value {>=}0.2 ng/mL (n = 81; p < .0001). The treatment regimen had no effect on biochemical failure. None of the 742 patients in this study developed metastatic disease or died of prostate cancer. Conclusion: The results of this study have shown that the prognosis for patients treated with brachytherapy and who remain biochemically free of disease for {>=}5 years is excellent and none developed metastatic disease during the first 10 years after treatment. The 5-year PSA value is prognostic, and patients with a PSA value <0.2 ng/mL are unlikely to develop subsequent biochemical relapse.

  1. Intraoperative Tension Pneumothorax in a Patient With Remote Trauma and Previous Tracheostomy

    PubMed Central

    Mavarez-Martinez, Ana; Soghomonyan, Suren; Sandhu, Gurneet; Rankin, Demicha

    2016-01-01

    Many trauma patients present with a combination of cranial and thoracic injury. Anesthesia for these patients carries the risk of intraoperative hemodynamic instability and respiratory complications during mechanical ventilation. Massive air leakage through a lacerated lung will result in inadequate ventilation and hypoxemia and, if left undiagnosed, may significantly compromise the hemodynamic function and create a life-threatening situation. Even though these complications are more characteristic for the early phase of trauma management, in some cases, such a scenario may develop even months after the initial trauma. We report a case of a 25-year-old patient with remote thoracic trauma, who developed an intraoperative tension pneumothorax and hemodynamic instability while undergoing an elective cranioplasty. The intraoperative patient assessment was made even more challenging by unexpected massive blood loss from the surgical site. Timely recognition and management of intraoperative pneumothorax along with adequate blood replacement stabilized the patient and helped avoid an unfavorable outcome. This case highlights the risks of intraoperative pneumothorax in trauma patients, which may develop even months after injury. A high index of suspicion and timely decompression can be life saving in this type of situation. PMID:27006957

  2. Rapid Intraoperative Molecular Characterization of Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Ganesh M.; Francis, Joshua M.; Rinne, Mikael L.; Ramkissoon, Shakti H.; Huang, Franklin W.; Venteicher, Andrew S.; Akama-Garren, Elliot H.; Kang, Yun Jee; Lelic, Nina; Kim, James C.; Brown, Loreal E.; Charbonneau, Sarah K.; Golby, Alexandra J.; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Hoang, Mai P.; Sullivan, Ryan J.; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Garraway, Levi A.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat; Reardon, David A.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Brastianos, Priscilla K.; Curry, William T.; Barker, Fred G.; Hahn, William C.; Nahed, Brian V.; Ligon, Keith L.; Louis, David N.; Cahill, Daniel P.; Meyerson, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Conclusive intraoperative pathologic confirmation of diffuse infiltrative glioma guides the decision to pursue definitive neurosurgical resection. Establishing the intraoperative diagnosis by histologic analysis can be difficult in low-cellularity infiltrative gliomas. Therefore, we developed a rapid and sensitive genotyping assay to detect somatic single-nucleotide variants in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter and isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1). OBSERVATIONS This assay was applied to tissue samples from 190 patients with diffuse gliomas, including archived fixed and frozen specimens and tissue obtained intraoperatively. Results demonstrated 96% sensitivity (95% CI, 90%–99%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 95%–100%) for World Health Organization grades II and III gliomas. In a series of live cases, glioma-defining mutations could be identified within 60 minutes, which could facilitate the diagnosis in an intraoperative timeframe. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The genotyping method described herein can establish the diagnosis of low-cellularity tumors like glioma and could be adapted to the point-of-care diagnosis of other lesions that are similarly defined by highly recurrent somatic mutations. PMID:26181761

  3. Intraoperative aortic dissection in pediatric heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Hibino, Narutoshi; Harada, Yorikazu; Hiramatsu, Takeshi; Yasukochi, Satoshi; Satomi, Gengi

    2006-06-01

    Intraoperative aortic dissection occurred in a 3-year-old-boy undergoing repair of an atrial septal defect. Transesophageal echocardiography was useful for the diagnosis, and conservative medical treatment under close observation was feasible in this case which involved a limited intimal tear. PMID:16714685

  4. Daily targeting of liver tumors: Screening patients with a mock treatment and using a combination of internal and external fiducials for image-guided respiratory-gated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Sunil; Briere, Tina Marie; Dong Lei; Murthy, Ravi; Ng, Chaan; Balter, Peter; Mohan, Radhe; Gillin, Michael T.; Beddar, A. Sam

    2007-12-15

    The feasibility and accuracy of using a mock treatment to screen suitable patients for respiratory-gated image-guided radiotherapy was investigated. Radio-opaque fiducials implanted adjacent to the liver tumor were used for online positioning to minimize the systematic error in patient positioning. The consistency in the degree of correlation between the external and internal fiducials was analyzed during a mock treatment. This technique could screen patients for gated therapy, reduce setup inaccuracy, and possibly individualize treatment margins.

  5. Surgery Combined with Radiotherapy Improved Survival in Metastatic Esophageal Cancer in a Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results Population-based Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, San-Gang; Xie, Wei-Hao; Zhang, Zhao-Qiang; Sun, Jia-Yuan; Li, Feng-Yan; Lin, Huan-Xin; Yong Bao; He, Zhen-Yu

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective study used a population-based national registry to determine the impact of local treatment modalities on survival in patients with metastatic esophageal cancer (EC). The Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database was used to identify patients with metastatic EC from 1988 to 2012. A total of 9,125 patients were identified. There were 426 patients underwent primary surgery, 4,786 patients were administered radiotherapy (RT) alone, 847 patients underwent surgery plus RT, and 3,066 patients without any local treatment. Multivariate analysis results indicated that year of diagnosis, age, race, histologic subtype, grade, and local treatment modalities were independent prognostic factors for overall survival (OS). The 5-year OS were 8.4%, 4.5%, 17.5%, and 3.4% in primary surgery, RT only, surgery plus RT, and no local treatment, respectively (P < 0.001). Subgroup analyses showed that the impact of RT was mainly reflected by preoperative radiotherapy, as patients received preoperative radiotherapy had significantly better OS than patients who underwent primary surgery alone and postoperative RT, the 5-year OS rates were 24.7%, 6.5%, and 7.8%, respectively, respectively (P < 0.001). Surgery plus RT, especially preoperative RT, may improve long-term survival of patients with metastatic EC. PMID:27323696

  6. Surgery Combined with Radiotherapy Improved Survival in Metastatic Esophageal Cancer in a Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results Population-based Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, San-Gang; Xie, Wei-Hao; Zhang, Zhao-Qiang; Sun, Jia-Yuan; Li, Feng-Yan; Lin, Huan-Xin; Yong Bao; He, Zhen-Yu

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective study used a population-based national registry to determine the impact of local treatment modalities on survival in patients with metastatic esophageal cancer (EC). The Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database was used to identify patients with metastatic EC from 1988 to 2012. A total of 9,125 patients were identified. There were 426 patients underwent primary surgery, 4,786 patients were administered radiotherapy (RT) alone, 847 patients underwent surgery plus RT, and 3,066 patients without any local treatment. Multivariate analysis results indicated that year of diagnosis, age, race, histologic subtype, grade, and local treatment modalities were independent prognostic factors for overall survival (OS). The 5-year OS were 8.4%, 4.5%, 17.5%, and 3.4% in primary surgery, RT only, surgery plus RT, and no local treatment, respectively (P < 0.001). Subgroup analyses showed that the impact of RT was mainly reflected by preoperative radiotherapy, as patients received preoperative radiotherapy had significantly better OS than patients who underwent primary surgery alone and postoperative RT, the 5-year OS rates were 24.7%, 6.5%, and 7.8%, respectively, respectively (P < 0.001). Surgery plus RT, especially preoperative RT, may improve long-term survival of patients with metastatic EC. PMID:27323696

  7. Phase I-II Study of Intraoperative Radiation Therapy (IORT) After Radical Prostatectomy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Saracino, Biancamaria Gallucci, Michele; De Carli, Piero; Soriani, Antonella; Papalia, Rocco; Marzi, Simona; Landoni, Valeria; Petrongari, Maria Grazia; Arcangeli, Stefano; Forastiere, Ester; Sentinelli, Steno; Arcangeli, Giorgio

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: Recent studies have suggested an {alpha}/{beta} ratio in prostate cancer of 1.5-3 Gy, which is lower than that assumed for late-responsive normal tissues. Therefore the administration of a single, intraoperative dose of irradiation should represent a convenient irradiation modality in prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Between February 2002 and June 2004, 34 patients with localized prostate cancer with only one risk factor (Gleason score {>=}7, Clinical Stage [cT] {>=}2c, or prostate-specific antigen [PSA] of 11-20 ng/mL) and without clinical evidence of lymph node metastases were treated with radical prostatectomy (RP) and intraoperative radiotherapy on the tumor bed. A dose-finding procedure based on the Fibonacci method was employed. Dose levels of 16, 18, and 20 Gy were selected, which are biologically equivalent to total doses of about 60-80 Gy administered with conventional fractionation, using an {alpha}/{beta} ratio value of 3. Results: At a median follow-up of 41 months, 24 (71%) patients were alive with an undetectable PSA value. No patients died from disease, whereas 2 patients died from other malignancies. Locoregional failures were detected in 3 (9%) patients, 2 in the prostate bed and 1 in the common iliac node chain outside the radiation field. A PSA rise without local or distant disease was observed in 7 (21%) cases. The overall 3-year biochemical progression-free survival rate was 77.3%. Conclusions: Our dose-finding study demonstrated the feasibility of intraoperative radiotherapy in prostate cancer also at the highest administered dose.

  8. Evaluation of a combined respiratory-gating system comprising the TrueBeam linear accelerator and a new real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Shiinoki, Takehiro; Kawamura, Shinji; Uehara, Takuya; Yuasa, Yuki; Fujimoto, Koya; Koike, Masahiro; Sera, Tatsuhiro; Emoto, Yuki; Hanazawa, Hideki; Shibuya, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    A combined system comprising the TrueBeam linear accelerator and a new real-time, tumor-tracking radiotherapy system, SyncTraX, was installed in our institution. The goals of this study were to assess the capability of SyncTraX in measuring the position of a fiducial marker using color fluoroscopic images, and to evaluate the dosimetric and geometric accuracy of respiratory-gated radiotherapy using this combined system for the simple geometry. For the fundamental evaluation of respiratory-gated radiotherapy using SyncTraX, the following were performed:1) determination of dosimetric and positional characteristics of sinusoidal patterns using a motor-driven base for several gating windows; 2) measurement of time delay using an oscilloscope; 3) positional verification of sinusoidal patterns and the pattern in the case of a lung cancer patient; 4) measurement of the half-value layer (HVL in mm AL), effective kVp, and air kerma, using a solid-state detector for each fluoroscopic condition, to determine the patient dose. The dose profile in a moving phantom with gated radiotherapy having a gating window ≤ 4 mm was in good agreement with that under static conditions for each photon beam. The total time delay between TrueBeam and SyncTraX was < 227 ms for each photon beam. The mean of the positional tracking error was < 0.4 mm for sinusoidal patterns and for the pattern in the case of a lung cancer patient. The air-kerma rates from one fluoroscopy direction were 1.93 ± 0.01, 2.86 ± 0.01, 3.92 ± 0.04, 5.28 ± 0.03, and 6.60 ± 0.05 mGy/min for 70, 80, 90, 100, and 110 kV X-ray beams at 80 mA, respectively. The combined system comprising TrueBeam and SyncTraX could track the motion of the fiducial marker and control radiation delivery with reasonable accuracy; therefore, this system provides significant dosimetric improvement. However, patient exposure dose from fluoroscopy was not clinically negligible. PMID:27455483

  9. Combination chemotherapy-radiotherapy with and without the methanol-extraction residue of bacillus Calmette-Guerin (MER) in small cell carcinoma of the lung: a prospective randomized trial of the Piedmont Oncology Association

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D.V.; Paschal, B.R.; Ferree, C.

    1982-07-01

    The effect of addition of the nonspecific immunostimulant, MER, to combined treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy in small cell carcinoma of the lung was evaluated in a prospective randomized trial involving 102 evaluable patients. Chemotherapy consisted of cyclophosphamide, Adriamycin, vincristine, methotrexate, and CCNU; and radiotherapy was administered to the primary lesion, mediastinum, supraclavicular areas, and whole brain. Of 47 patients administered MER 400 mcg intradermally every six weeks, 12 (26%) attained complete remission with a median survival of 22.9 months. Complete remission was observed in 17 (31%) of 55 patients who received no MER with a median survival of 20.0 months (p > 0.05). Survival greater than or equal to 2 years has been observed in five patients who received MER and two patients who did not receive MER. The response rate and duration, survival, and toxicity of the two treatment arms were similar with the exception of cutaneous and occasional systemic reaction to MER. MER as used in this study has not influenced the overall results of a combined modality treatment program for patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung.

  10. Phase II Trial of Combined High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and External Beam Radiotherapy for Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate: Preliminary Results of RTOG 0321

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, I-Chow; Bae, Kyounghwa; Shinohara, Katsuto; Pouliot, Jean; Purdy, James; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Speight, Joycelyn; Vigneault, Eric; Ivker, Robert M.D.; Sandler, Howard M.D.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To estimate the rate of late Grade 3 or greater genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) adverse events (AEs) after treatment with external beam radiotherapy and prostate high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Each participating institution submitted computed tomography-based HDR brachytherapy dosimetry data electronically for credentialing and for each study patient. Patients with locally confined Stage T1c-T3b prostate cancer were eligible for the present study. All patients were treated with 45 Gy in 25 fractions using external beam radiotherapy and one HDR implant delivering 19 Gy in two fractions. All AEs were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Late GU/GI AEs were defined as those occurring >9 months from the start of the protocol treatment, in patients with {>=}18 months of potential follow-up. Results: A total of 129 patients from 14 institutions were enrolled in the present study. Of the 129 patients, 125 were eligible, and AE data were available for 112 patients at analysis. The pretreatment characteristics of the patients were as follows: Stage T1c-T2c, 91%; Stage T3a-T3b, 9%; prostate-specific antigen level {<=}10 ng/mL, 70%; prostate-specific antigen level >10 but {<=}20 ng/mL, 30%; and Gleason score 2-6, 10%; Gleason score 7, 72%; and Gleason score 8-10, 18%. At a median follow-up of 29.6 months, three acute and four late Grade 3 GU/GI AEs were reported. The estimated rate of late Grade 3-5 GU and GI AEs at 18 months was 2.56%. Conclusion: This is the first prospective, multi-institutional trial of computed tomography-based HDR brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy. The technique and doses used in the present study resulted in acceptable levels of AEs.

  11. Intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring in spine surgery. Developments and state of the art in France in 2011.

    PubMed

    Gavaret, M; Jouve, J L; Péréon, Y; Accadbled, F; André-Obadia, N; Azabou, E; Blondel, B; Bollini, G; Delécrin, J; Farcy, J-P; Fournet-Fayard, J; Garin, C; Henry, P; Manel, V; Mutschler, V; Perrin, G; Sales de Gauzy, J

    2013-10-01

    Intraoperative spinal cord monitoring consists in a subcontinuous evaluation of spinal cord sensory-motor functions and allows the reduction the incidence of neurological complications resulting from spinal surgery. A combination of techniques is used: somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP), motor evoked potentials (MEP), neurogenic motor evoked potentials (NMEP), D waves, and pedicular screw testing. In absence of intraoperative neurophysiological testing, the intraoperative wake-up test is a true form of monitoring even if its latency long and its precision variable. A 2011 survey of 117 French spinal surgeons showed that only 36% had neurophysiological monitoring available (public healthcare facilities, 42%; private facilities, 27%). Monitoring can be performed by a neurophysiologist in the operating room, remotely using a network, or directly by the surgeon. Intraoperative alerts allow real-time diagnosis of impending neurological injury. Use of spinal electrodes, moved along the medullary canal, can determine the lesion level (NMEP, D waves). The response to a monitoring alert should take into account the phase of the surgical intervention and does not systematically lead to interruption of the intervention. Multimodal intraoperative monitoring, in presence of a neurophysiologist, in collaboration with the anesthesiologist, is the most reliable technique available. However, no monitoring technique can predict a delayed-onset paraplegia that appears after the end of surgery. In cases of preexisting neurological deficit, monitoring contributes little. Monitoring of the L1-L4 spinal roots also shows low reliability. Therefore, monitoring has no indication in discal and degenerative surgery of the spinal surgery. However, testing pedicular screws can be useful. All in all, thoracic and thoracolumbar vertebral deviations, with normal preoperative neurological examination are currently the essential indication for spinal cord monitoring. Its absence in this

  12. Intraoperative tracking of aortic valve plane.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, D L H; Garreau, M; Auffret, V; Le Breton, H; Verhoye, J P; Haigron, P

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to track the aortic valve plane in intra-operative fluoroscopic images in order to optimize and secure Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) procedure. This paper is focused on the issue of aortic valve calcifications tracking in fluoroscopic images. We propose a new method based on the Tracking-Learning-Detection approach, applied to the aortic valve calcifications in order to determine the position of the aortic valve plane in intra-operative TAVI images. This main contribution concerns the improvement of object detection by updating the recursive tracker in which all features are tracked jointly. The approach has been evaluated on four patient databases, providing an absolute mean displacement error less than 10 pixels (≈2mm). Its suitability for the TAVI procedure has been analyzed. PMID:24110703

  13. Intraoperative identification of adrenal-renal fusion.

    PubMed

    Boll, Griffin; Rattan, Rishi; Yilmaz, Osman; Tarnoff, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal - renal fusion is a rare entity defined as incomplete encapsulation of the adrenal gland and kidney with histologically adjacent functional tissue. This report describes the first published intraoperative identification of this anomaly during laparoscopic adrenalectomy. The patient was a 59-year-old man with chronic hypertension refractory to multiple antihypertensives found to be caused by a right-sided aldosterone-producing adrenal adenoma in the setting of bilateral adrenal hyperplasia. During laparoscopic adrenalectomy, the normal avascular plane between the kidney and adrenal gland was absent. Pathologic evaluation confirmed adrenal - renal fusion without adrenal heterotopia. Identified intraoperatively, this may be misdiagnosed as invasive malignancy, and thus awareness of this anomaly may help prevent unnecessarily morbid resection. PMID:26195881

  14. Fluorescence goggle for intraoperative breast cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Bauer, Adam Q.; Akers, Walter; Sudlow, Gail; Liang, Kexian; Charanya, Tauseef; Mondal, Suman; Culver, Joseph P.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2012-03-01

    We have developed a fluorescence goggle device for intraoperative oncologic imaging. With our system design, the surgeon can directly visualize the fluorescence information from the eyepieces in real time without any additional monitor, which can improve one's coordination and surgical accuracy. In conjunction with targeting fluorescent dyes, the goggle device can successfully detect tumor margins and small nodules that are not obvious to naked eye. This can potentially decrease the incidence of incomplete resection.

  15. Infusional 5-Fluorouracil and ZD1839 (Gefitinib-Iressa) in Combination With Preoperative Radiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Phase I and II Trial (1839IL/0092)

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, Vincenzo; De Paoli, Antonino; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta Mantini, Giovanna; Ratto, Carlo; Vecchio, Fabio Maria; Barbaro, Brunella; Innocente, Roberto; Rossi, Carlo; Boz, Giovanni; Barba, Maria Cristina; Frattegiani, Alessandro; Lupattelli, Marco; Doglietto, Giovan Battista

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To report the final data of a Phase I and II study (1839IL/0092) on the combination of an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor drug (gefitinib), infusional 5-fluorouracil, and preoperative radiotherapy in locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients received 45 Gy in the posterior pelvis plus a boost of 5.4 Gy on the tumor and corresponding mesorectum. Infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and gefitinib (250 and 500 mg/day) were delivered during all radiotherapy course. An IORT boost of 10 Gy was allowed. The main endpoints of the study were to establish dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and to evaluate the rate of pathologic response according to the tumor regression grade (TRG) Mandard score. Results: A total of 41 patients were enrolled. The DLT was not reached in the 6 patients enrolled in the dose-escalation part of the study. Of the 33 patients in the Phase II, TRG 1 was recorded in 10 patients (30.3%) and TRG 2 in 7 patients (21.2 %); overall 17 of 33 patients (51.5%) had a favorable endpoint. Overall, Grade 3+ toxicity was recorded in 16 patients (41%); these included Grade 3+ gastrointestinal toxicity in 8 patients (20.5%), Grade 3+ skin toxicity in 6 (15.3%), and Grade 3+ genitourinary toxicity in 4 (10.2%). A dose reduction of gefitinib was necessary in 24 patients (61.5%). Conclusions: Gefitinib can be associated with 5-FU-based preoperative chemoradiation at the dose of 500 mg without any life-threatening toxicity and with a high pCR (30.3%). The relevant rate of Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity suggests that 250 mg would be more tolerable dose in a neaoadjuvant approach with radiotherapy and infusional 5-FU.

  16. Intraoperative lung ultrasound: A clinicodynamic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Amit Kumar; Gupta, Namrata

    2016-01-01

    In the era of evidence-based medicine, ultrasonography has emerged as an important and indispensable tool in clinical practice in various specialties including critical care. Lung ultrasound (LUS) has a wide potential in various surgical and clinical situations for timely and easy detection of an impending crisis such as pulmonary edema, endobronchial tube migration, pneumothorax, atelectasis, pleural effusion, and various other causes of desaturation before it clinically ensues to critical level. Although ultrasonography is frequently used in nerve blocks, airway handling, and vascular access, LUS for routine intraoperative monitoring and in crisis management still necessitates recognition. After reviewing the various articles regarding the use of LUS in critical care, we found, that LUS can be used in various intraoperative circumstances similar to Intensive Care Unit with some limitations. Except for few attempts in the intraoperative detection of pneumothorax, LUS is hardly used but has wider perspective for routine and crisis management in real-time. If anesthesiologists add LUS in their routine monitoring armamentarium, it can assist to move a step ahead in the dynamic management of critically ill and high-risk patients.

  17. Intraoperative lung ultrasound: A clinicodynamic perspective.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Amit Kumar; Gupta, Namrata

    2016-01-01

    In the era of evidence-based medicine, ultrasonography has emerged as an important and indispensable tool in clinical practice in various specialties including critical care. Lung ultrasound (LUS) has a wide potential in various surgical and clinical situations for timely and easy detection of an impending crisis such as pulmonary edema, endobronchial tube migration, pneumothorax, atelectasis, pleural effusion, and various other causes of desaturation before it clinically ensues to critical level. Although ultrasonography is frequently used in nerve blocks, airway handling, and vascular access, LUS for routine intraoperative monitoring and in crisis management still necessitates recognition. After reviewing the various articles regarding the use of LUS in critical care, we found, that LUS can be used in various intraoperative circumstances similar to Intensive Care Unit with some limitations. Except for few attempts in the intraoperative detection of pneumothorax, LUS is hardly used but has wider perspective for routine and crisis management in real-time. If anesthesiologists add LUS in their routine monitoring armamentarium, it can assist to move a step ahead in the dynamic management of critically ill and high-risk patients. PMID:27625474

  18. [Postoperative radiotherapy of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Guérif, S; Latorzeff, I; Lagrange, J-L; Hennequin, C; Supiot, S; Garcia, A; François, P; Soulié, M; Richaud, P; Salomon, L

    2014-10-01

    Between 10 and 40% of patients who have undergone a radical prostatectomy may have a biologic recurrence. Local or distant failure represents the possible patterns of relapse. Patients at high-risk for local relapse have extraprostatic disease, positive surgical margins or seminal vesicles infiltration or high Gleason score at pathology. Three phase-III randomized clinical trials have shown that, for these patients, adjuvant irradiation reduces the risk of tumoral progression without higher toxicity. Salvage radiotherapy for late relapse allows a disease control in 60-70% of the cases. Several research in order to improve the therapeutic ratio of the radiotherapy after prostatectomy are evaluate in the French Groupe d'Étude des Tumeurs Urogénitales (Gétug) and of the French association of urology (Afu). The Gétug-Afu 17 trial will provide answers to the question of the optimal moment for postoperative radiotherapy for pT3-4 R1 pN0 Nx patients, with the objective of comparing an immediate treatment to a differed early treatment initiated at biological recurrence. The Gétug-Afu 22 questions the place of a short hormonetherapy combined with image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in adjuvant situation for a detectable prostate specific antigen (PSA). The implementation of a multicenter quality control within the Gétug-Afu in order to harmonize a modern postoperative radiotherapy will allow the development of a dose escalation IMRT after surgery. PMID:25195116

  19. Small animal radiotherapy research platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaegen, Frank; Granton, Patrick; Tryggestad, Erik

    2011-06-01

    Advances in conformal radiation therapy and advancements in pre-clinical radiotherapy research have recently stimulated the development of precise micro-irradiators for small animals such as mice and rats. These devices are often kilovolt x-ray radiation sources combined with high-resolution CT imaging equipment for image guidance, as the latter allows precise and accurate beam positioning. This is similar to modern human radiotherapy practice. These devices are considered a major step forward compared to the current standard of animal experimentation in cancer radiobiology research. The availability of this novel equipment enables a wide variety of pre-clinical experiments on the synergy of radiation with other therapies, complex radiation schemes, sub-target boost studies, hypofractionated radiotherapy, contrast-enhanced radiotherapy and studies of relative biological effectiveness, to name just a few examples. In this review we discuss the required irradiation and imaging capabilities of small animal radiation research platforms. We describe the need for improved small animal radiotherapy research and highlight pioneering efforts, some of which led recently to commercially available prototypes. From this, it will be clear that much further development is still needed, on both the irradiation side and imaging side. We discuss at length the need for improved treatment planning tools for small animal platforms, and the current lack of a standard therein. Finally, we mention some recent experimental work using the early animal radiation research platforms, and the potential they offer for advancing radiobiology research.

  20. Potential of Adaptive Radiotherapy to Escalate the Radiation Dose in Combined Radiochemotherapy for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Wilbert, Juergen; Richter, Anne; Baier, Kurt; Flentje, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential of adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for advanced-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in terms of lung sparing and dose escalation. Methods and Materials: In 13 patients with locally advanced NSCLC, weekly CT images were acquired during radio- (n = 1) or radiochemotherapy (n = 12) for simulation of ART. Three-dimensional (3D) conformal treatment plans were generated: conventionally fractionated doses of 66 Gy were prescribed to the planning target volume without elective lymph node irradiation (Plan{sub 3}D). Using a surface-based algorithm of deformable image registration, accumulated doses were calculated in the CT images acquired during the treatment course (Plan{sub 4}D). Field sizes were adapted to tumor shrinkage once in week 3 or 5 and twice in weeks 3 and 5. Results: A continuous tumor regression of 1.2% per day resulted in a residual gross tumor volume (GTV) of 49% {+-} 15% after six weeks of treatment. No systematic differences between Plan{sub 3}D and Plan{sub 4}D were observed regarding doses to the GTV, lung, and spinal cord. Plan adaptation to tumor shrinkage resulted in significantly decreased lung doses without compromising GTV coverage: single-plan adaptation in Week 3 or 5 and twice-plan adaptation in Weeks 3 and 5 reduced the mean lung dose by 5.0% {+-} 4.4%, 5.6% {+-} 2.9% and 7.9% {+-} 4.8%, respectively. This lung sparing with twice ART allowed an iso-mean lung dose escalation of the GTV dose from 66.8 Gy {+-} 0.8 Gy to 73.6 Gy {+-} 3.8 Gy. Conclusions: Adaptation of radiotherapy to continuous tumor shrinkage during the treatment course reduced doses to the lung, allowed significant dose escalation and has the potential of increased local control.

  1. Treatment Outcomes of Locally Advanced Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Comparison Between Combined Modality Radio-Chemotherapy and Two Variants of Single Modality Altered Fractionation Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kader, Hosam A.; Mydin, Aminudin R.; Wilson, Matthew; Alexander, Cheryl; Shahi, Jeevin; Pathak, Irvin; Wu, Jonn S.; Truong, Pauline T.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To compare outcomes in patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer treated with radio-chemotherapy (RT-CT), accelerated fractionation radiotherapy (AccRT), or hypofractionated radiotherapy (HypoRT). Methods and Materials: Subjects were 321 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed oropharyngeal cancer, Stage III or IVA/B, treated between January 2001 and December 2005 at the BC Cancer Agency with RT-CT (n = 157), AccRT (n = 57), or HypoRT (n = 107). Outcomes examined were disease-specific survival (DSS), locoregional control (LRC), overall survival (OS), rate of G-tube use, and rate of hospitalization for acute complications. Results: Median follow-up was 3.4 years. Three-year Kaplan-Meier DSS with RT-CT, AccRT, and HypoRT were 80%, 81%, and 74%, respectively (p = 0.219). Cox regression analysis identified treatment modality as a significant factor affecting DSS (p = 0.038). Compared with RT-CT, the hazard ratio (HR) for DSS was 1.0 with AccRT and 2.0 with HypoRT (p = 0.021). Kaplan-Meier pairwise comparisons found no significant difference in LRC and OS between RT-CT and AccRT. HypoRT was associated with significantly lower LRC (p = 0.005) and OS (p = 0.008) compared with RT-CT. There were significant differences in the rates of G-tube use (p < 0.001) and of hospitalization (p = 0.036) among the three treatment groups, with the most frequent rates observed in the RT-CT group. Conclusions: In patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer, AccRT conferred DSS, LRC, and OS comparable to that of RT-CT. Patients treated with RT-CT experienced higher rates of treatment-related acute toxicities. HypoRT was associated with the least favorable outcomes.

  2. Role of preoperative localization and intraoperative localization maneuvers including intraoperative PTH assay determination for patients with persistent or recurrent hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Alexander, H Richard; Chen, Clara C; Shawker, Thomas; Choyke, Peter; Chan, Teresa J; Chang, Richard; Marx, Stephen J

    2002-11-01

    Patients with recurrent or persistent primary hyperparathyroidism have increased operative risk because of scarring in the operative field and the frequent presence of an ectopic gland. Preoperative imaging studies will identify the hyperfunctioning parathyroid gland in the majority of circumstances. The best types or combination of imaging tests has not been definitely established. However, because of their wide availability and demonstrated sensitivity, US and sestamibi scans are most commonly obtained. Based on the clinical setting, additional tests including CT or MRI may be useful. In circumstances when the noninvasive imaging modalities are inconclusive, invasive imaging tests including selective angiography venous sampling and/or direct fine needle aspiration should be used. IOUS, MIRP, and intraoperative PTH determination are useful adjuncts to the safe and successful conduct of reoperative parathyroid surgery: however, the benefit of the routine use of these modalities in reoperative parathyroid surgery has yet to be critically determined. PMID:12412790

  3. Vaccination with autologous dendritic cells loaded with autologous tumor lysate or homogenate combined with immunomodulating radiotherapy and/or preleukapheresis IFN-α in patients with metastatic melanoma: a randomised “proof-of-principle” phase II study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vaccination with dendritic cells (DC) loaded with tumor antigens elicits tumor-specific immune responses capable of killing cancer cells without inducing meaningful side-effects. Patients with advanced melanoma enrolled onto our phase II clinical studies have been treated with autologous DC loaded with autologous tumor lysate/homogenate matured with a cytokine cocktail, showing a clinical benefit (PR + SD) in 55.5% of evaluable cases to date. The beneficial effects of the vaccine were mainly restricted to patients who developed vaccine-specific immune response after treatment. However, immunological responses were only induced in about two-thirds of patients, and treatments aimed at improving immunological responsiveness to the vaccine are needed. Methods/Design This is a phase II, “proof-of-principle”, randomized, open-label trial of vaccination with autologous DC loaded with tumor lysate or homogenate in metastatic melanoma patients combined with immunomodulating RT and/or preleukapheresis IFN-α. All patients will receive four bi-weekly doses of the vaccine during the induction phase and monthly doses thereafter for up to a maximum of 14 vaccinations or until confirmed progression. Patients will be randomized to receive: (1.) three daily doses of 8 Gy up to 12 Gy radiotherapy delivered to one non-index metastatic field between vaccine doses 1 and 2 and, optionally, between doses 7 and 8, using IMRT-IMAT techniques; (2.) daily 3 MU subcutaneous IFN-α for 7 days before leukapheresis; (3.) both 1 and 2; (4.) neither 1 nor 2. At least six patients eligible for treatment will be enrolled per arm. Daily 3 MU IL-2 will be administered subcutaneously for 5 days starting from the second day after each vaccine dose. Serial DTH testing and blood sampling to evaluate treatment-induced immune response will be performed. Objective response will be evaluated according to immune-related response criteria (irRC). Discussion Based upon the emerging role of

  4. Image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) combined with whole pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (WP-IMRT) for locally advanced cervical cancer: a prospective study from Chiang Mai University Hospital, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Wanwilairat, Somsak; Chakrabandhu, Somvilai; Klunklin, Pitchayaponne; Onchan, Wimrak; Tippanya, Damrongsak; Nopnop, Wannapa; Galalae, Razvan; Chitapanarux, Imjai

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A report of preliminary results and toxicity profiles using image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) combined with whole pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (WP-IMRT) for locally advanced cervical cancer. Material and methods Fifteen patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were enrolled into the study. WP-IMRT was used to treat the Clinical Target Volume (CTV) with a dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions. Concurrent cisplatin (40 mg/m2) was prescribed during radiotherapy (RT) on weekly basis. IGBT using computed tomography was performed at the dose of 7 Gy × 4 fractions to the High-Risk Clinical Target Volume (HR-CTV). Results The mean cumulative doses – in terms of equivalent dose of 2 Gy (EQD2) – of IGBT plus WP-IMRT to HR-CTV, bladder, rectum, and sigmoid colon were 88.3, 85.0, 68.2 and 73.6 Gy, respectively. In comparison with standard (point A prescription) dose-volume histograms, volume-based image-guided brachytherapy improved the cumulative doses for bladder of 67%, rectum of 47% and sigmoid of 46%. At the median follow-up time of 14 months, the local control, metastasis-free survival and overall survival rates were 93%, 100% and 93%, respectively. No grade 3-4 acute and late toxicities were observed. Conclusion The combination of image-guided brachytherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy improved the dose distribution to tumor volumes and avoided overdose in OARs which could be converted in excellent local control and toxicity profiles. PMID:23634150

  5. Neurophysiologic intraoperative monitoring: II. Facial nerve function.

    PubMed

    Niparko, J K; Kileny, P R; Kemink, J L; Lee, H M; Graham, M D

    1989-01-01

    Intraoperative facial nerve monitoring provides a potentially useful adjunct to recent surgical advances in neurotology and neurosurgery. These measures further aid the surgeon in preserving facial nerve function by enhancing visual identification with electrical monitoring of mechanically evoked facial muscle activation. Facial nerve monitoring in neurotologic surgery may achieve the following goals: (1) early recognition of surgical trauma to the facial nerve, with immediate feedback made available to the surgeon through monitoring of mechanical activation; (2) assistance in distinguishing the facial nerve from regional cranial nerves and from adjacent soft tissue and tumor with selective electrical stimulation; (3) facilitation of tumor excision by electrical mapping of portions of tumor that are remote from the facial nerve; (4) confirmation of nerve stimulability at the completion of surgery; and (5) identification of the site and degree of neural dysfunction in patients undergoing nerve exploration for suspected facial nerve neoplasm or undergoing decompression in acute facial palsy. This paper provides an overview of intraoperative facial nerve monitoring principles and methodology and reports a recent clinical investigation that demonstrates the utility of facial nerve monitoring in translabyrinthine acoustic neuroma surgery. PMID:2655465

  6. Intracardiac leiomyomatosis presenting as an intraoperative consultation.

    PubMed

    Alves, António Joaquim Teixeira; Ferreira, Marco António; Gallego-Poveda, Javier; Matos, Ana; Costa-Silva, Artur; Nobre, Ângelo; Lopez-Beltran, António

    2016-06-01

    Intravenous leiomyomatosis (IVL) is an extremely rare variant of leiomyoma in which nodular masses of tumor grow within venous channels. Rarely, the tumor can reach the vena cava and right heart. We present a case of a 45-year-old woman, admitted with rapidly evolving exertional dyspnea. Cardiac ultrasonography revealed a "mass in the right chambers". She was submitted to right atriotomy plus tumorectomy, with intraoperative consultation requested. Grossly, the tumor was polypoid, firm, with a smooth surface. The frozen section showed a lesion composed of tortuous vessels and some areas with a fibrillar eosinophil extracellular matrix and others with spindle cells, without significant atypia, mitosis or necrosis. The diagnosis was deferred for definitive paraffin sections. In the definitive H&E and immunohistochemical stains, the case was diagnosed as an IVL and confirmed in the hysterectomy specimen. This is the first case report describing an intraoperative consultation of an intracardiac leiomyomatosis. Clinical information and pathologist awareness to this entity are essential for the correct diagnosis in frozen section. PMID:27067811

  7. Intraoperative MRI in pediatric brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Choudhri, Asim F; Siddiqui, Adeel; Klimo, Paul; Boop, Frederick A

    2015-09-01

    Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) has emerged as an important tool in guiding the surgical management of children with brain tumors. Recent advances have allowed utilization of high field strength systems, including 3-tesla MRI, resulting in diagnostic-quality scans that can be performed while the child is on the operating table. By providing information about the possible presence of residual tumor, it allows the neurosurgeon to both identify and resect any remaining tumor that is thought to be safely accessible. By fusing the newly obtained images with the surgical guidance software, the images have the added value of aiding in navigation to any residual tumor. This is important because parenchyma often shifts during surgery. It also gives the neurosurgeon insight into whether any immediate postoperative complications have occurred. If any complications have occurred, the child is already in the operating room and precious minutes lost in transport and communications are saved. In this article we review the three main approaches to an iMRI system design. We discuss the possible roles for iMRI during intraoperative planning and provide guidance to help radiologists and neurosurgeons alike in the collaborative management of these children. PMID:26346145

  8. [Radiotherapy in the combined therapy of limited stage pulmonary microcytoma. The experience of the Department of Oncologic Therapy at the Multiregional Hospital of Varese (1980-1989)].

    PubMed

    Cerizza, L; Källi, M; Reso, M; Stucchi, F; Vavassori, V; Tordiglione, M

    1991-06-01

    From January 1980 to December 1989, 86 patients with limited small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) were treated in our Institution. Sixty-eight of them were males, 18 females; mean age was 58 years (range: 40-74); Karnofsky index was 80 or higher. All patients received induction multiagent chemotherapy (CAV or CAVE), usually fractionated into 3/4 cycles. Radiotherapy was administered by means of a 10 MV Linear Accelerator, 2-3 Gy/day, 5 days/week. Radiation dose was 60 Gy for 39 patients, 50 Gy for 25 patients, and 30 Gy for 22 patients. Parallel opposed fields (AP and PA) were used for administering the 30-Gy dose, while higher doses were delivered by multiportal arrangement (3/4 fields). Overall survival (corrected Kaplan-Meier) was 21.3% and 13.4% at 2 and 3 years, respectively; 2 years' survival according to dose was 24.5% for 60 Gy, 19.9% and 11% for 50 and 30 Gy, respectively. Mean survival time (MST) was 14 months for 60 Gy, 13 months and 10 months, respectively, for 50 and 30 Gy. Survival and disease-free survival rates were similar in patients who received 50 and 60 Gy. No major complications related to irradiation were observed, not even in the group receiving the highest dose. Our data are similar to those reported in the literature. PMID:1650012

  9. Is a Clinical Target Volume (CTV) Necessary in the Treatment of Lung Cancer in the Modern Era Combining 4-D Imaging and Image-guided Radiotherapy (IGRT)?

    PubMed Central

    Kilburn, Jeremy M; Lucas, John T; Soike, Michael H; Ayala-Peacock, Diandra N; Blackstock, Arthur W; Hinson, William H; Munley, Michael T; Petty, William J

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We hypothesized that omission of clinical target volumes (CTV) in lung cancer radiotherapy would not compromise control by determining retrospectively if the addition of a CTV would encompass the site of failure. Methods: Stage II-III patients were treated from 2009-2012 with daily cone-beam imaging and a 5 mm planning target volume (PTV) without a CTV. PTVs were expanded 1 cm and termed CTVretro. Recurrences were scored as 1) within the PTV, 2) within CTVretro, or 3) outside the PTV. Locoregional control (LRC), distant control (DC), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were estimated. Result: Among 110 patients, Stage IIIA 57%, IIIB 32%, IIA 4%, and IIB 7%. Eighty-six percent of Stage III patients received chemotherapy. Median dose was 70 Gy (45-74 Gy) and fraction size ranged from 1.5-2.7 Gy. Median follow-up was 12 months, median OS was 22 months (95% CI 19-30 months), and LRC at two years was 69%. Fourteen local and eight regional events were scored with two CTVretro failures equating to a two-year CTV failure-free survival of 98%. Conclusion: Omission of a 1 cm CTV expansion appears feasible based on only two events among 110 patients and should be considered in radiation planning. PMID:26929893

  10. Persistent and automatic intraoperative 3D digitization of surfaces under dynamic magnifications of an operating microscope

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ankur N.; Miga, Michael I.; Pheiffer, Thomas S.; Chambless, Lola B.; Thompson, Reid C.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2014-01-01

    One of the major challenges impeding advancement in image-guided surgical (IGS) systems is the soft-tissue deformation during surgical procedures. These deformations reduce the utility of the patient’s preoperative images and may produce inaccuracies in the application of preoperative surgical plans. Solutions to compensate for the tissue deformations include the acquisition of intraoperative tomographic images of the whole organ for direct displacement measurement and techniques that combines intraoperative organ surface measurements with computational biomechanical models to predict subsurface displacements. The later solution has the advantage of being less expensive and amenable to surgical workflow. Several modalities such as textured laser scanners, conoscopic holography, and stereo-pair cameras have been proposed for the intraoperative 3D estimation of organ surfaces to drive patient-specific biomechanical models for the intraoperative update of preoperative images. Though each modality has its respective advantages and disadvantages, stereo-pair camera approaches used within a standard operating microscope is the focus of this article. A new method that permits the automatic and near real-time estimation of 3D surfaces (at 1Hz) under varying magnifications of the operating microscope is proposed. This method has been evaluated on a CAD phantom object and on full-length neurosurgery video sequences (~1 hour) acquired intraoperatively by the proposed stereovision system. To the best of our knowledge, this type of validation study on full-length brain tumor surgery videos has not been done before. The method for estimating the unknown magnification factor of the operating microscope achieves accuracy within 0.02 of the theoretical value on a CAD phantom and within 0.06 on 4 clinical videos of the entire brain tumor surgery. When compared to a laser range scanner, the proposed method for reconstructing 3D surfaces intraoperatively achieves root mean square

  11. Persistent and automatic intraoperative 3D digitization of surfaces under dynamic magnifications of an operating microscope.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ankur N; Miga, Michael I; Pheiffer, Thomas S; Chambless, Lola B; Thompson, Reid C; Dawant, Benoit M

    2015-01-01

    One of the major challenges impeding advancement in image-guided surgical (IGS) systems is the soft-tissue deformation during surgical procedures. These deformations reduce the utility of the patient's preoperative images and may produce inaccuracies in the application of preoperative surgical plans. Solutions to compensate for the tissue deformations include the acquisition of intraoperative tomographic images of the whole organ for direct displacement measurement and techniques that combines intraoperative organ surface measurements with computational biomechanical models to predict subsurface displacements. The later solution has the advantage of being less expensive and amenable to surgical workflow. Several modalities such as textured laser scanners, conoscopic holography, and stereo-pair cameras have been proposed for the intraoperative 3D estimation of organ surfaces to drive patient-specific biomechanical models for the intraoperative update of preoperative images. Though each modality has its respective advantages and disadvantages, stereo-pair camera approaches used within a standard operating microscope is the focus of this article. A new method that permits the automatic and near real-time estimation of 3D surfaces (at 1 Hz) under varying magnifications of the operating microscope is proposed. This method has been evaluated on a CAD phantom object and on full-length neurosurgery video sequences (∼1 h) acquired intraoperatively by the proposed stereovision system. To the best of our knowledge, this type of validation study on full-length brain tumor surgery videos has not been done before. The method for estimating the unknown magnification factor of the operating microscope achieves accuracy within 0.02 of the theoretical value on a CAD phantom and within 0.06 on 4 clinical videos of the entire brain tumor surgery. When compared to a laser range scanner, the proposed method for reconstructing 3D surfaces intraoperatively achieves root mean square

  12. Experimental chemotherapy and radiotherapy to paratesticular rhabdomyosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Motoyama, T.; Watanabe, H.; Watanabe, T.; Yamamoto, T.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental chemotherapy and radiotherapy were tried in transplanted tumors derived from a paratesticular embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. There was no significant difference on the therapeutic effect between a combination chemotherapy composed of vincristine, actinomycin D and cyclophosphamide, so-called VAC regimen, and a single therapy of radiation. However, morphologic analyses suggest that VAC is effective in embryonal rhabdomyosarcomas in which undifferentiated rhabdomyoblasts predominate, while radiotherapy is preferable for those containing variously differentiated rhabdomyoblasts.

  13. Improved Visualization of Intracranial Vessels with Intraoperative Coregistration of Rotational Digital Subtraction Angiography and Intraoperative 3D Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Podlesek, Dino; Meyer, Tobias; Morgenstern, Ute; Schackert, Gabriele; Kirsch, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasound can visualize and update the vessel status in real time during cerebral vascular surgery. We studied the depiction of parent vessels and aneurysms with a high-resolution 3D intraoperative ultrasound imaging system during aneurysm clipping using rotational digital subtraction angiography as a reference. Methods We analyzed 3D intraoperative ultrasound in 39 patients with cerebral aneurysms to visualize the aneurysm intraoperatively and the nearby vascular tree before and after clipping. Simultaneous coregistration of preoperative subtraction angiography data with 3D intraoperative ultrasound was performed to verify the anatomical assignment. Results Intraoperative ultrasound detected 35 of 43 aneurysms (81%) in 39 patients. Thirty-nine intraoperative ultrasound measurements were matched with rotational digital subtraction angiography and were successfully reconstructed during the procedure. In 7 patients, the aneurysm was partially visualized by 3D-ioUS or was not in field of view. Post-clipping intraoperative ultrasound was obtained in 26 and successfully reconstructed in 18 patients (69%) despite clip related artefacts. The overlap between 3D-ioUS aneurysm volume and preoperative rDSA aneurysm volume resulted in a mean accuracy of 0.71 (Dice coefficient). Conclusions Intraoperative coregistration of 3D intraoperative ultrasound data with preoperative rotational digital subtraction angiography is possible with high accuracy. It allows the immediate visualization of vessels beyond the microscopic field, as well as parallel assessment of blood velocity, aneurysm and vascular tree configuration. Although spatial resolution is lower than for standard angiography, the method provides an excellent vascular overview, advantageous interpretation of 3D-ioUS and immediate intraoperative feedback of the vascular status. A prerequisite for understanding vascular intraoperative ultrasound is image quality and a successful match with preoperative

  14. Development and Validation of a Prognostic Model Using Blood Biomarker Information for Prediction of Survival of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Combined Chemotherapy and Radiation or Radiotherapy Alone (NCT00181519, NCT00573040, and NCT00572325)

    SciTech Connect

    Dehing-Oberije, Cary; Aerts, Hugo; Yu Shipeng; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Menheere, Paul; Hilvo, Mika; Weide, Hiska van der; Rao, Bharat; Lambin, Philippe

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: Currently, prediction of survival for non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with (chemo)radiotherapy is mainly based on clinical factors. The hypothesis of this prospective study was that blood biomarkers related to hypoxia, inflammation, and tumor load would have an added prognostic value for predicting survival. Methods and Materials: Clinical data and blood samples were collected prospectively (NCT00181519, NCT00573040, and NCT00572325) from 106 inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer patients (Stages I-IIIB), treated with curative intent with radiotherapy alone or combined with chemotherapy. Blood biomarkers, including lactate dehydrogenase, C-reactive protein, osteopontin, carbonic anhydrase IX, interleukin (IL) 6, IL-8, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and cytokeratin fragment 21-1, were measured. A multivariate model, built on a large patient population (N = 322) and externally validated, was used as a baseline model. An extended model was created by selecting additional biomarkers. The model's performance was expressed as the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic and assessed by use of leave-one-out cross validation as well as a validation cohort (n = 52). Results: The baseline model consisted of gender, World Health Organization performance status, forced expiratory volume, number of positive lymph node stations, and gross tumor volume and yielded an AUC of 0.72. The extended model included two additional blood biomarkers (CEA and IL-6) and resulted in a leave-one-out AUC of 0.81. The performance of the extended model was significantly better than the clinical model (p = 0.004). The AUC on the validation cohort was 0.66 and 0.76, respectively. Conclusions: The performance of the prognostic model for survival improved markedly by adding two blood biomarkers: CEA and IL-6.

  15. High-dose-rate brachytherapy and hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy combined with long-term hormonal therapy for high-risk and very high-risk prostate cancer: outcomes after 5-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Satoh, Takefumi; Kitano, Masashi; Tabata, Ken-ichi; Komori, Shouko; Ikeda, Masaomi; Soda, Itaru; Kurosaka, Shinji; Sekiguchi, Akane; Kimura, Masaki; Kawakami, Shogo; Iwamura, Masatsugu; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the outcomes of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy and hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) combined with long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) criteria-defined high-risk (HR) and very high-risk (VHR) prostate cancer. Data from 178 HR (n = 96, 54%) and VHR (n = 82, 46%) prostate cancer patients who underwent 192Ir-HDR brachytherapy and hypofractionated EBRT with long-term ADT between 2003 and 2008 were retrospectively analyzed. The mean dose to 90% of the planning target volume was 6.3 Gy/fraction of HDR brachytherapy. After five fractions of HDR treatment, EBRT with 10 fractions of 3 Gy was administered. All patients initially underwent ≥6 months of neoadjuvant ADT, and adjuvant ADT was continued for 36 months after EBRT. The median follow-up was 61 months (range, 25–94 months) from the start of radiotherapy. The 5-year biochemical non-evidence of disease, freedom from clinical failure and overall survival rates were 90.6% (HR, 97.8%; VHR, 81.9%), 95.2% (HR, 97.7%; VHR, 92.1%), and 96.9% (HR, 100%; VHR, 93.3%), respectively. The highest Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-defined late genitourinary toxicities were Grade 2 in 7.3% of patients and Grade 3 in 9.6%. The highest late gastrointestinal toxicities were Grade 2 in 2.8% of patients and Grade 3 in 0%. Although the 5-year outcome of this tri-modality approach seems favorable, further follow-up is necessary to validate clinical and survival advantages of this intensive approach compared with the standard EBRT approach. PMID:24222312

  16. Radiotherapy and Concomitant Intra-Arterial Docetaxel Combined With Systemic 5-Fluorouracil and Cisplatin for Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Preliminary Report-Improvement of Locoregional Control of Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Oikawa, Hirobumi Nakamura, Ryuji; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Nishimura, Kohji; Sato, Hiroaki; Ehara, Shigeru

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To confirm the advantage of chemoradiotherapy using intra-arterial docetaxel with intravenous cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil. Patients and Methods: A total of 26 oropharyngeal cancer patients (1, 2, 2, and 21 patients had Stage I, II, III, and IVa-IVc, respectively) were treated with two sessions of this chemoradiotherapy regimen. External beam radiotherapy was delivered using large portals that included the primary site and the regional lymph nodes initially (range, 40-41.4 Gy) and the metastatic lymph nodes later (60 or 72 Gy). All tumor-supplying branches of the carotid arteries were cannulated, and 40 mg/m{sup 2} docetaxel was individually infused on Day 1. The other systemic chemotherapy agents included 60 mg/m{sup 2} cisplatin on Day 2 and 500 mg/m{sup 2} 5-fluorouracil on Days 2-6. Results: The primary response of the tumor was complete in 21 (81%), partial in 4 (15%), and progressive in 1 patient. Grade 4 mucositis, leukopenia, and dermatitis was observed in 3, 2, and 1 patients, respectively. During a median follow-up of 10 months, the disease recurred at the primary site and at a distant organ in 2 (8%) and 3 (12%) patients, respectively. Three patients died because of cancer progression. Two patients (8%) with a partial response were compromised by lethal bleeding from the tumor bed or chemotherapeutic toxicity. The 3-year locoregional control rate and the 3-year overall survival rate was 73% and 77%, respectively. Conclusion: This method resulted in an excellent primary tumor response rate (96%) and moderate acute toxicity. Additional follow-up is required to ascertain the usefulness of this modality.

  17. Development of Late Toxicity and International Prostate Symptom Score Resolution After External-Beam Radiotherapy Combined With Pulsed Dose Rate Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pieters, Bradley R.; Rezaie, Elisa; Geijsen, Elisabeth D.; Koedooder, Kees; Grient, Johan N.B. van der; Blank, Leo E.C.M.; Reijke, Theo M. de; Koning, Caro C.E.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the development of gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity, genitourinary (GU) toxicity, erectile dysfunction, and International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) resolution in a cohort of patients treated with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) followed by a brachytherapy pulsed dose rate (PDR) boost. Methods and Materials: Between 2002 and 2008, 110 patients were treated with 46-Gy EBRT followed by PDR brachytherapy (24.96-28.80 Gy). The investigated outcome variables, GI toxicity, GU toxicity, erectile dysfunction, and IPSS were prospectively scored at several time points during follow-up. Association between time (as continuous and categorical variable) and the outcome variables was assessed using generalized linear models. Results: No statistically significant association was found between time (continuous) and GI toxicity (odds ratio [OR], 0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.89-1.06), GU toxicity (OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.91-1.03), erectile dysfunction (OR, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.99-1.11), and IPSS (-0.11; 95% CI, -0.41-0.20). Also, no statistically significant association was found between these variables and time as a categorical variable. GU toxicity was associated with IPSS resolution (OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.09-1.24). Posttreatment IPSS was associated with pretreatment IPSS (0.52; 95% CI, 0.25-0.79). Conclusions: No accumulation of high-grade toxicity over time could be established for a group of patients treated with EBRT and PDR brachytherapy for prostate cancer, probably because high-grade late toxicity resolves with time. Also, differences in IPSS values among patients are smaller after treatment than before treatment.

  18. Surgical Pathology and Intraoperative Consultation: An Audit

    PubMed Central

    GOLAM, Mostafa; QUEEN, Zarat

    2015-01-01

    Background: While intraoperative consultation has been used in Bangladesh for a long period of time, to date, there has been no published reporting on the performance of frozen sections. The current audit evaluates the performance of frozen sections in a well reputed medical center in Bangladesh, Anowara Medical Services. Objective: This retrospective study has been designed to measure the accuracy of frozen section diagnosis in a medical center in a third-world country, where many surgical procedures rely on intraoperative consultation. Methods: A series of 1379 intra- and peri-operative frozen section cases, from 2007 to 2014, was reviewed. Intraoperative tissue specimens received at Anowara Medical Services were processed for frozen sections. After examination of the frozen section that yielded the initial frozen section diagnoses, the frozen tissues were reprocessed for regular paraffin sectioning. These paraffin sections were examined by a second pathologist, and a final diagnosis was issued. The frozen section diagnosis and final diagnoses of all cases were retrospectively analysed to determine the accuracy of frozen section examination. Results: Overall, accurate diagnosis was made on frozen sections in 98.2% of the cases. The discrepant diagnoses were all clinically significant, i.e., there were discrepancies between benign and malignant diagnoses on frozen and paraffin sections. In 1% of the cases, diagnosis was deferred. Fifty percent of the deferred cases were benign. Two cases, received in formalin, were excluded. In both cases, the diagnosis was positive for malignancy. The number of false negative results (4 false negatives) was slightly lower than that of false positives (5 false positives). Specificity and sensitivity of 99.3% and 99.4% were achieved, respectively. In this study, the positive predictive value was 99.2% and the negative predictive value was 99.5%. Over the years, the number of discrepant diagnoses remained fairly constant. Conclusion

  19. Optical technologies for intraoperative neurosurgical guidance.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Pablo A; Roberts, David W; Lu, Fa-Ke; PhD; Golby, Alexandra

    2016-03-01

    Biomedical optics is a broadly interdisciplinary field at the interface of optical engineering, biophysics, computer science, medicine, biology, and chemistry, helping us understand light-tissue interactions to create applications with diagnostic and therapeutic value in medicine. Implementation of biomedical optics tools and principles has had a notable scientific and clinical resurgence in recent years in the neurosurgical community. This is in great part due to work in fluorescence-guided surgery of brain tumors leading to reports of significant improvement in maximizing the rates of gross-total resection. Multiple additional optical technologies have been implemented clinically, including diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and imaging, optical coherence tomography, Raman spectroscopy and imaging, and advanced quantitative methods, including quantitative fluorescence and lifetime imaging. Here we present a clinically relevant and technologically informed overview and discussion of some of the major clinical implementations of optical technologies as intraoperative guidance tools in neurosurgery. PMID:26926066

  20. Intraoperative neuromonitoring in major vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    So, V C; Poon, C C M

    2016-09-01

    There has been a growing interest in using intraoperative neuromonitoring to reduce the incidence of stroke and paralysis in major vascular interventions. Electroencephalography, various neurophysiological evoked potential measurements, transcranial Doppler, and near-infrared spectroscopy are some of the modalities currently used to detect neural injuries. A good understanding of these modalities and their interactions with anaesthesia is important to maximize their value and to allow meaningful interpretation of their results. In view of the inter-individual differences in anatomy, physiological reserves, and severity of pathological processes, neuromonitoring may be a valuable method to evaluate the well-being of the nervous system during and after surgical interventions. In this review, we summarize some of their applications, efficacies, and drawbacks in major carotid and aortic surgeries. PMID:27566804

  1. Isolated limb perfusion with biochemotherapy and oncolytic virotherapy combines with radiotherapy and surgery to overcome treatment resistance in an animal model of extremity soft tissue sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Michelle J; Smith, Henry G; Pencavel, Timothy D; Mansfield, David C; Kyula-Currie, Joan; Khan, Aadil A; McEntee, Gráinne; Roulstone, Victoria; Hayes, Andrew J; Harrington, Kevin J

    2016-09-15

    The management of locally advanced or recurrent extremity sarcoma often necessitates multimodal therapy to preserve a limb, of which isolated limb perfusion (ILP) is a key component. However, with standard chemotherapeutic agents used in ILP, the duration of response is limited. Novel agents or treatment combinations are urgently needed to improve outcomes. Previous work in an animal model has demonstrated the efficacy of oncolytic virotherapy when delivered by ILP and, in this study, we report further improvements from combining ILP-delivered oncolytic virotherapy with radiation and surgical resection. In vitro, the combination of radiation with an oncolytic vaccinia virus (GLV-1h68) and melphalan demonstrated increased cytotoxicity in a panel of sarcoma cell lines. The effects were mediated through activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. In vivo, combinations of radiation, oncolytic virotherapy and standard ILP resulted in delayed tumour growth and prolonged survival when compared with standard ILP alone. However, local disease control could only be secured when such treatment was combined with surgical resection, the timing of which was crucial in determining outcome. Combinations of oncolytic virotherapy with surgical resection and radiation have direct clinical relevance in extremity sarcoma and represent an exciting prospect for improving outcomes in this pathology. PMID:27116656

  2. [The primary radiotherapy of inoperable or recurrent pancreatic carcinoma--Heidelberg patients from 1982 to 1992].

    PubMed

    Latz, D; Schraube, P; Eble, M J

    1993-07-01

    Between 1982 and 1992, 34 patients with locally advanced or relapsed adenocarcinoma of the pancreas were treated at the Department of Radiotherapy in Heidelberg. 14 patients were treated with a combined radiochemotherapy with 5-FU, the other patients were irradiated alone. In all cases irradiation was done with high energy photons. 15 patients received an irradiation with doses between 30 and 44 Gy, and twelve patients between 45 and 66 Gy (median 50 Gy). Seven patients were treated intraoperatively during an exploration laparotomy with fast electrons (10 to 18 MeV, 15 to 20 Gy) and postoperatively with additional 30 to 41 Gy. The median survival of the patients treated with the higher doses or in combination with the IORT showed a significant advantage of nine vs. 2.9 months. There was no benefit in median survival for the patients treated with radiochemotherapy. In retrospective analysis of the percutaneous treated patient collective a pain relief was observed in nine patients. In the prospective treatment protocol of the IORT in 4/4 patients a pain relief was rapidly reached. PMID:8342111

  3. A Phase II Study of Bevacizumab in Combination With Definitive Radiotherapy and Cisplatin Chemotherapy in Untreated Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Carcinoma: Preliminary Results of RTOG 0417

    SciTech Connect

    Schefter, Tracey E.; Winter, Kathryn; Kwon, Janice S.; Stuhr, Kelly; Balaraj, Khalid; Yaremko, Brian P.; Small, William; Gaffney, David K.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Concurrent cisplatin-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the standard treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer. RTOG 0417 was a Phase II study exploring the safety and efficacy of the addition of bevacizumab to standard CRT. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients with bulky tumors (Stage IB-IIIB) were treated with once-weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}) chemotherapy and standard pelvic radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Bevacizumab was administered at 10 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks for three cycles. Treatment-related serious adverse event (SAE) and other adverse event (AE) rates within the first 90 days from treatment start were determined. Treatment-related SAEs were defined as any Grade {>=}4 vaginal bleeding or thrombotic event or Grade {>=}3 arterial event, gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, or bowel/bladder perforation, or any Grade 5 treatment-related death. Treatment-related AEs included all SAEs and Grade 3 or 4 GI toxicity persisting for >2 weeks despite medical intervention, Grade 4 neutropenia or leukopenia persisting for >7 days, febrile neutropenia, Grade 3 or 4 other hematologic toxicity, and Grade 3 or 4 GI, renal, cardiac, pulmonary, hepatic, or neurologic AEs. All AEs were scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria (CTCAE) v 3.0 (MedDRA version 6.0). Results: A total of 60 patients from 28 institutions were enrolled between 2006 and 2009, and of these, 49 patients were evaluable. The median follow-up was 12.4 months (range, 4.6-31.4 months).The median age was 45 years (range, 22-80 years). Most patients had FIGO Stage IIB (63%) and were of Zubrod performance status of 0 (67%). 80% of cases were squamous. There were no treatment-related SAEs. There were 15 (31%) protocol-specified treatment-related AEs within 90 days of treatment start; the most common were hematologic (12/15; 80%). 18 (37%) occurred during treatment or follow-up at any time. 37 of the 49 patients (76%) had cisplatin and bevacizumab

  4. Final Report of the Intergroup Randomized Study of Combined Androgen-Deprivation Therapy Plus Radiotherapy Versus Androgen-Deprivation Therapy Alone in Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Malcolm D.; Parulekar, Wendy R.; Sydes, Matthew R.; Brundage, Michael; Kirkbride, Peter; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Cowan, Richard; Kostashuk, Edmund C.; Anderson, John; Swanson, Gregory; Parmar, Mahesh K.B.; Hayter, Charles; Jovic, Gordana; Hiltz, Andrea; Hetherington, John; Sathya, Jinka; Barber, James B.P.; McKenzie, Michael; El-Sharkawi, Salah; Souhami, Luis; Hardman, P.D. John; Chen, Bingshu E.; Warde, Padraig

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We have previously reported that radiotherapy (RT) added to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) improves survival in men with locally advanced prostate cancer. Here, we report the prespecified final analysis of this randomized trial. Patients and Methods NCIC Clinical Trials Group PR.3/Medical Research Council PR07/Intergroup T94-0110 was a randomized controlled trial of patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. Patients with T3-4, N0/Nx, M0 prostate cancer or T1-2 disease with either prostate-specific antigen (PSA) of more than 40 μg/L or PSA of 20 to 40 μg/L plus Gleason score of 8 to 10 were randomly assigned to lifelong ADT alone or to ADT+RT. The RT dose was 64 to 69 Gy in 35 to 39 fractions to the prostate and pelvis or prostate alone. Overall survival was compared using a log-rank test stratified for prespecified variables. Results One thousand two hundred five patients were randomly assigned between 1995 and 2005, 602 to ADT alone and 603 to ADT+RT. At a median follow-up time of 8 years, 465 patients had died, including 199 patients from prostate cancer. Overall survival was significantly improved in the patients allocated to ADT+RT (hazard ratio [HR], 0.70; 95% CI, 0.57 to 0.85; P < .001). Deaths from prostate cancer were significantly reduced by the addition of RT to ADT (HR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.34 to 0.61; P < .001). Patients on ADT+RT reported a higher frequency of adverse events related to bowel toxicity, but only two of 589 patients had grade 3 or greater diarrhea at 24 months after RT. Conclusion This analysis demonstrates that the previously reported benefit in survival is maintained at a median follow-up of 8 years and firmly establishes the role of RT in the treatment of men with locally advanced prostate cancer. PMID:25691677

  5. Photoacoustic intra-operative nodal staging using clinically approved superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grootendorst, Diederik J.; Fratila, Raluca M.; Visscher, Martijn; Ten Haken, Bennie; van Wezel, Richard; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang; Ruers, Theo J. M.

    2013-02-01

    Detection of tumor metastases in the lymphatic system is essential for accurate staging of various malignancies, however fast, accurate and cost-effective intra-operative evaluation of the nodal status remains difficult to perform with common available medical imaging techniques. In recent years, numerous studies have confirmed the additional value of superparamagnetic iron oxide dispersions (SPIOs) for nodal staging purposes, prompting the clearance of different SPIO dispersions for clinical practice. We evaluate whether a combination of photoacoustic (PA) imaging and a clinically approved SPIO dispersion, could be applied for intra-operative nodal staging. Metastatic adenocarcinoma was inoculated in Copenhagen rats for 5 or 8 days. After SPIO injection, the lymph nodes were photoacoustically imaged both in vivo and ex vivo whereafter imaging results were correlated with MR and histology. Results were compared to a control group without tumor inoculation. In the tumor groups clear irregularities, as small as 1 mm, were observed in the PA contrast pattern of the nodes together with an decrease of PA response. These irregularities could be correlated to the absence of contrast in the MR images and could be linked to metastatic deposits seen in the histological slides. The PA and MR images of the control animals did not show these features. We conclude that the combination of photoacoustic imaging with a clinically approved iron oxide nanoparticle dispersion is able to detect lymph node metastases in an animal model. This approach opens up new possibilities for fast intra-operative nodal staging in a clinical setting.

  6. Intravenous administration of the selective toll-like receptor 7 agonist DSR-29133 leads to anti-tumor efficacy in murine solid tumor models which can be potentiated by combination with fractionated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dovedi, Simon J.; Adlard, Amy L.; Ota, Yosuke; Murata, Masashi; Sugaru, Eiji; Koga-Yamakawa, Erina; Eguchi, Ken; Hirose, Yuko; Yamamoto, Setsuko; Umehara, Hiroki; Honeychurch, Jamie; Cheadle, Eleanor J.; Hughes, Gareth; Jewsbury, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    Strategies to augment anti-cancer immune responses have recently demonstrated therapeutic utility. To date clinical success has been achieved through targeting co-inhibitory checkpoints such as CTLA-4, PD-1, and PD-L1. However, approaches that target co-activatory pathways are also being actively being developed. Here we report that the novel TLR7-selective agonist DSR-29133 is well tolerated in mice and leads to acute immune activation. Administration of DSR-29133 leads to the induction of IFNα/γ, IP-10, TNFα, IL-1Ra and IL-12p70, and to a reduction in tumor burden in syngeneic models of renal cancer (Renca), metastatic osteosarcoma (LM8) and colorectal cancer (CT26). Moreover, we show that the efficacy of DSR-29133 was significantly improved when administered in combination with low-dose fractionated radiotherapy (RT). Effective combination therapy required weekly administration of DSR-29133 commencing on day 1 of a fractionated RT treatment cycle, whereas no enhancement of radiation response was observed when DSR-29133 was administered at the end of the fractionated RT cycle. Combined therapy resulted in curative responses in a high proportion of mice bearing established CT26 tumors which was dependent on the activity of CD8+ T-cells but independent of CD4+ T-cells and NK/NKT cells. Moreover, long-term surviving mice originally treated with DSR-29133 and RT were protected by a tumor-specific memory immune response which could prevent tumor growth upon rechallenge. These results demonstrate that DSR-29133 is a potent selective TLR7 agonist that when administered intravenously can induce anti-tumor immune responses that can be further enhanced through combination with low-dose fractionated RT. PMID:26959743

  7. Pelvic intraoperative neuromonitoring during robotic-assisted low anterior resection for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Grade, Marian; Beham, Alexander W; Schüler, P; Kneist, Werner; Ghadimi, B Michael

    2016-06-01

    While the oncological outcome of patients with rectal cancer has been considerably improved within the last decades, anorectal, urinary and sexual functions remained impaired at high levels, regardless of whether radical surgery was performed open or laparoscopically. Consequently, intraoperative monitoring of the autonomic pelvic nerves with simultaneous electromyography of the internal anal sphincter and manometry of the urinary bladder has been introduced to advance nerve-sparing surgery and to improve functional outcome. Initial results suggested that pelvic neuromonitoring may result in better functional outcomes. Very recently, it has also been demonstrated that minimally invasive neuromonitoring is technically feasible. Because, to the best of our knowledge, pelvic neuromonitoring has not been performed during robotic surgery, we report the first case of robotic-assisted low anterior rectal resection combined with intraoperative monitoring of the autonomic pelvic nerves. PMID:26705113

  8. Phase II Trial of Radiation Dose Escalation With Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy and High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Combined With Long-Term Androgen Suppression in Unfavorable Prostate Cancer: Feasibility Report

    SciTech Connect

    Valero, Jeanette; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Galan, Carlos; Teijeira, Mercedes; Romero, Pilar; Zudaire, Javier; Moreno, Marta; Ciervide, Raquel; Aristu, Jose Javier; Martinez-Monge, Rafael

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of combined long-term luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist-based androgen suppressive therapy (AST) and dose escalation with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for high-risk (HRPC) or very-high-risk prostate cancer (VHRPC). Methods and Materials: Between January 2001 and October 2006, 134 patients (median age, 70 years) with either National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria-defined HRPC (n = 47, 35.1%) or VHRPC (n = 87, 64.9%) were prospectively enrolled in this Phase II trial. Tumor characteristics included a median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level of 14.6 ng/mL, a median clinical stage of T2c, and a median Gleason score of 7. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (54 Gy in 30 fractions) was followed by HDR brachytherapy (19 Gy in 4 b.i.d. treatments). Androgen suppressive therapy started 0-3 months before three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and continued for 2 years. Results: One implant was repositioned with a new procedure (0.7%). Five patients (3.7%) discontinued AST at a median of 13 months (range, 6-18 months) because of disease progression (n = 1), hot flashes (n = 2), fatigue (n = 1), and impotence (n = 1). After a median follow-up of 37.4 months (range, 24-90 months), the highest Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-defined late urinary toxicities were Grade 0 in 47.8%, Grade 1 in 38.1%, Grade 2 in 7.5%, and Grade 3 in 6.7% of patients. Maximal late gastrointestinal toxicities were Grade 0 in 73.1%, Grade 1 in 16.4%, Grade 2 in 7.5%, and Grade 3 in 2.9% of patients. There were no Grade 4 or 5 events. Conclusions: Intermediate-term results show that dose escalation with HDR brachytherapy combined with long-term AST is feasible and has a toxicity profile similar to that reported by previous HDR brachytherapy studies.

  9. Intraoperative neurosonography revisited: effective neuronavigation in pediatric neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Intraoperative ultrasonography (IOUS) is a widely used noninvasive method to evaluate the morphology, vasculature, and pathologies of the brain. The advantages of IOUS include realtime depiction of neuroanatomy, accurate localization and characterization of a lesion, reduced surgical exploration and surgical time, and presumably decreased patient morbidity. IOUS is useful in the intraoperative monitoring of lesion resection as well as intraoperative localization and characterization of focal parenchymal lesions. This review aims to provide an overview of the clinical application of IOUS in pediatric intracranial neurosurgery. PMID:25672771

  10. Goal-directed therapy in intraoperative fluid and hemodynamic management

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Maria Cristina; Moore, Peter G.; Liu, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Intraoperative fluid management is pivotal to the outcome and success of surgery, especially in high-risk procedures. Empirical formula and invasive static monitoring have been traditionally used to guide intraoperative fluid management and assess volume status. With the awareness of the potential complications of invasive procedures and the poor reliability of these methods as indicators of volume status, we present a case scenario of a patient who underwent major abdominal surgery as an example to discuss how the use of minimally invasive dynamic monitoring may guide intraoperative fluid therapy. PMID:24086168

  11. Combination of External Beam Radiotherapy (EBRT) With Intratumoral Injection of Dendritic Cells as Neo-Adjuvant Treatment of High-Risk Soft Tissue Sarcoma Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, Steven E.; Iclozan, Cristina; Bui, Marilyn M.; Cotter, Matthew J.; Ramakrishnan, Rupal; Ahmed, Jamil; Noyes, David R.; Cheong, David; Gonzalez, Ricardo J.; Heysek, Randy V.; Berman, Claudia; Lenox, Brianna C.; Janssen, William; Zager, Jonathan S.; Sondak, Vernon K.; Letson, G. Douglas; Antonia, Scott J.; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to determine the effect of combination of intratumoral administration of dendritic cells (DC) and fractionated external beam radiation (EBRT) on tumor-specific immune responses in patients with soft-tissue sarcoma (STS). Methods and Material: Seventeen patients with large (>5 cm) high-grade STS were enrolled in the study. They were treated in the neoadjuvant setting with 5,040 cGy of EBRT, split into 28 fractions and delivered 5 days per week, combined with intratumoral injection of 10{sup 7} DCs followed by complete resection. DCs were injected on the second, third, and fourth Friday of the treatment cycle. Clinical evaluation and immunological assessments were performed. Results: The treatment was well tolerated. No patient had tumor-specific immune responses before combined EBRT/DC therapy; 9 patients (52.9%) developed tumor-specific immune responses, which lasted from 11 to 42 weeks. Twelve of 17 patients (70.6%) were progression free after 1 year. Treatment caused a dramatic accumulation of T cells in the tumor. The presence of CD4{sup +} T cells in the tumor positively correlated with tumor-specific immune responses that developed following combined therapy. Accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells but not regulatory T cells negatively correlated with the development of tumor-specific immune responses. Experiments with {sup 111}In labeled DCs demonstrated that these antigen presenting cells need at least 48 h to start migrating from tumor site. Conclusions: Combination of intratumoral DC administration with EBRT was safe and resulted in induction of antitumor immune responses. This suggests that this therapy is promising and needs further testing in clinical trials design to assess clinical efficacy.

  12. [Radiotherapy for Thyroid Cancer].

    PubMed

    Jingu, Keiichi; Maruoka, Shin; Umezawa, Rei; Takahashi, Noriyoshi

    2015-06-01

    Radioactive 131I therapy for differentiated thyroid cancer has been used since the 1940s and is an established and effective treatment. In contrast, external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was considered to be effective for achieving local control but not for prolonging survival. Although clinicians were hesitant to administer EBRT owing to the potential radiation-induced adverse effects of 2 dimensional (2D)-radiotherapy until 2000, it is expected that adverse effects will be reduced and treatment efficacy improved through the introduction of more advanced techniques for delivering radiation (eg, 3D-radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy [IMRT]). The prognosis of undifferentiated thyroid cancer is known to be extremely bad, although in very rare cases, multimodality therapy (total or subtotal resection, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy) has allowed long-term survival. Here, we report the preliminary results of using hypofractionated radiotherapy for undifferentiated thyroid cancer in our institution. PMID:26199238

  13. Migratory intradural disk herniation and a strategy for intraoperative localization.

    PubMed

    Daffner, Scott D; Sedney, Cara L; Rosen, Charles L

    2015-02-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective Describe a case of intradural disk herniation and a method for intraoperative localization. Methods Intradural disk herniations are uncommon but well described. The diagnosis of these lesions is often difficult, and sometimes they may be diagnosed only through an intradural exploration after an expected disk fragment cannot be located. We report the case of an intradural disk herniation with an additional diagnostic difficulty-a migrated intradural disk. Results We present the first intraoperative imaging evidence of disk migration and propose a strategy to locate intradural disk fragments prior to durotomy. Conclusion Intradural disk herniations should be suspected when intraoperative findings are not congruent with imaging findings. An intraoperative myelogram may be helpful. PMID:25648315

  14. Anatomy-based inverse optimization in high-dose-rate brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer: Comparison of incidence of acute genitourinary toxicity between anatomy-based inverse optimization and geometric optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Akimoto, Tetsuo . E-mail: takimoto@showa.gunma-u.ac.jp; Katoh, Hiroyuki; Kitamoto, Yoshizumi; Shirai, Katsuyuki; Shioya, Mariko; Nakano, Takashi

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the advantages of anatomy-based inverse optimization (IO) in planning high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 114 patients who received HDR brachytherapy (9 Gy in two fractions) combined with hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) were analyzed. The dose distributions of HDR brachytherapy were optimized using geometric optimization (GO) in 70 patients and by anatomy-based IO in the remaining 44 patients. The correlation between the dose-volume histogram parameters, including the urethral dose and the incidence of acute genitourinary (GU) toxicity, was evaluated. Results: The averaged values of the percentage of volume receiving 80-150% of the prescribed minimal peripheral dose (V{sub 8}-V{sub 15}) of the urethra generated by anatomy-based IO were significantly lower than the corresponding values generated by GO. Similarly, the averaged values of the minimal dose received by 5-50% of the target volume (D{sub 5}-D{sub 5}) obtained using anatomy-based IO were significantly lower than those obtained using GO. Regarding acute toxicity, Grade 2 or worse acute GU toxicity developed in 23% of all patients, but was significantly lower in patients for whom anatomy-based IO (16%) was used than in those for whom GO was used (37%), consistent with the reduced urethral dose (p <0.01). Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that anatomy-based IO is superior to GO for dose optimization in HDR brachytherapy for prostate cancer.

  15. Bone necrosis and tumor induction following experimental intraoperative irradiation.

    PubMed

    Powers, B E; Gillette, E L; McChesney, S L; LeCouteur, R A; Withrow, S J

    1989-09-01

    The bone of the lumbar vertebrae of 153 dogs was examined 2 and 5 years after intraoperative irradiation (IORT), fractionated external beam irradiation (EBRT), or the combination. Groups of dogs received 15 to 55 Gy IORT only, 10 to 47.5 Gy IORT combined with 50 Gy EBRT in 2 Gy fractions or 60 to 80 Gy EBRT in 30 fractions. Six MeV electrons were used for IORT, and EBRT was done using photons from a 6 MV linear accelerator. The paraaortic region was irradiated and the ventral part of the lumbar vertebrae was in the 90% isodose level. Two years after irradiation, the dose causing significant bone necrosis as determined by at least 50% empty lacunae in the vertebral cortex was 38.2 Gy IORT alone and 32.5 Gy IORT combined with EBRT. Five years after irradiation, the dose causing 50% empty lacunae was 28.5 Gy IORT only and 14.4 Gy IORT combined with EBRT. The ED50 for lesions of the ventral vertebral artery was 21.7 Gy IORT only and 20.1 Gy IORT combined with 50 Gy EBRT 2 years after irradiation and 27.0 Gy IORT only and 20.0 Gy IORT combined with 50 Gy EBRT 5 years after irradiation. All lesions after EBRT only were mild. Eight dogs developed osteosarcomas 4 to 5 years after irradiation, one at 47.5 Gy IORT only and the remainder at 25.0 Gy IORT and above combined with 50 Gy EBRT. In conclusion, the extent of empty lacunae, indicating bone necrosis, was more severe 5 years after irradiation than after 2 years. The effect of 50 Gy EBRT in 2 Gy fractions was equivalent to about 6 Gy IORT 2 years after irradiation and to about 14 Gy 5 years after irradiation. Based on these estimates, IORT doses of 10 to 15 Gy have an effect 5 times or greater than the amount given in 2 Gy fractions. Osteosarcomas occurred in 21% of dogs which received doses greater than 25 Gy IORT. Doses of 15 to 20 Gy IORT in combination with 50 Gy EBRT in 2 Gy fractions may be near the tolerance level for late developing bone injury. PMID:2506159

  16. An intraoperative diagnosis of parotid gland tumors using Raman spectroscopy and support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bing; Wen, Zhining; Li, Yi; Li, Longjiang; Xue, Lili

    2014-11-01

    The preoperative and intraoperative diagnosis of parotid gland tumors is difficult, but is important for their surgical management. In order to explore an intraoperative diagnostic method, Raman spectroscopy is applied to detect the normal parotid gland and tumors, including pleomorphic adenoma, Warthin’s tumor and mucoepidermoid carcinoma. In the 600-1800 cm-1 region of the Raman shift, there are numerous spectral differences between the parotid gland and tumors. Compared with Raman spectra of the normal parotid gland, the Raman spectra of parotid tumors show an increase of the peaks assigned to nucleic acids and proteins, but a decrease of the peaks related to lipids. Spectral differences also exist between the spectra of parotid tumors. Based on these differences, a remarkable classification and diagnosis of the parotid gland and tumors are carried out by support vector machine (SVM), with high accuracy (96.7~100%), sensitivity (93.3~100%) and specificity (96.7~100%). Raman spectroscopy combined with SVM has a great potential to aid the intraoperative diagnosis of parotid tumors and could provide an accurate and rapid diagnostic approach.

  17. Safe use of subdermal needles for intraoperative monitoring with MRI.

    PubMed

    Darcey, Terrance M; Kobylarz, Erik J; Pearl, Michael A; Krauss, Patricia J; Ferri, Stephanie A; Roberts, David W; Bauer, David F

    2016-03-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to develop safe, site-specific procedures for placing and leaving subdermal needle leads for intraoperative monitoring (IOM) during intraoperative MRI procedures. METHODS The authors tested a variety of standard subdermal needle electrodes designed and FDA-approved for IOM in the conventional operating room. Testing was used to determine the conditions necessary to avoid thermal injury and significant image artifacts with minimal disruption of IOM and MRI procedures. Phantom testing was performed with a fiber optic (lead) temperature monitoring system and was followed by testing of leads placed in a healthy volunteer. The volunteer testing used electrode placements typical of standard IOM cases, together with radiofrequency (RF) coil placement and imaging sequences routinely employed for these case types. Lead length was investigated to assess heating effects for electrodes placed within the RF coil. RESULTS The authors found that conventional stainless steel (SS) and platinum/iridium (Pt/Ir) subdermal needles can be used safely without significant heating when placed outside the RF coil, and this accounts for the majority or entirety of electrode placements. When placed within the RF coil, Pt/Ir leads produced minimal image artifacts, while SS leads produced potentially significant artifacts. In phantom testing, significant heating was demonstrated in both SS and Pt/Ir leads placed within the RF coil, but only during high-resolution T2-weighted scanning. This problem was largely, but not completely, eliminated when leads were shortened to 25 cm. Human testing was unremarkable except for nonpainful heating detected in a few electrodes during thin-slice (1.5 mm) FLAIR scanning. Transient irritation (skin reddening along the needle tract) was noted at 2 of the electrodes with detectable heating. CONCLUSIONS The authors were satisfied with the safety of their site-specific procedures and have begun with off-label use (following

  18. Combined low initial DNA damage and high radiation-induced apoptosis confers clinical resistance to long-term toxicity in breast cancer patients treated with high-dose radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Either higher levels of initial DNA damage or lower levels of radiation-induced apoptosis in peripheral blood lymphocytes have been associated to increased risk for develop late radiation-induced toxicity. It has been recently published that these two predictive tests are inversely related. The aim of the present study was to investigate the combined role of both tests in relation to clinical radiation-induced toxicity in a set of breast cancer patients treated with high dose hyperfractionated radical radiotherapy. Methods Peripheral blood lymphocytes were taken from 26 consecutive patients with locally advanced breast carcinoma treated with high-dose hyperfractioned radical radiotherapy. Acute and late cutaneous and subcutaneous toxicity was evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity scoring schema. The mean follow-up of survivors (n = 13) was 197.23 months. Radiosensitivity of lymphocytes was quantified as the initial number of DNA double-strand breaks induced per Gy and per DNA unit (200 Mbp). Radiation-induced apoptosis (RIA) at 1, 2 and 8 Gy was measured by flow cytometry using annexin V/propidium iodide. Results Mean DSB/Gy/DNA unit obtained was 1.70 ± 0.83 (range 0.63-4.08; median, 1.46). Radiation-induced apoptosis increased with radiation dose (median 12.36, 17.79 and 24.83 for 1, 2, and 8 Gy respectively). We observed that those "expected resistant patients" (DSB values lower than 1.78 DSB/Gy per 200 Mbp and RIA values over 9.58, 14.40 or 24.83 for 1, 2 and 8 Gy respectively) were at low risk of suffer severe subcutaneous late toxicity (HR 0.223, 95%CI 0.073-0.678, P = 0.008; HR 0.206, 95%CI 0.063-0.677, P = 0.009; HR 0.239, 95%CI 0.062-0.929, P = 0.039, for RIA at 1, 2 and 8 Gy respectively) in multivariate analysis. Conclusions A radiation-resistant profile is proposed, where those patients who presented lower levels of initial DNA damage and higher levels of radiation induced apoptosis were at low risk of suffer severe

  19. Intraoperative and external beam irradiation for locally advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gunderson, L L; Martin, J K; Bèart, R W; Nagorney, D M; Fieck, J M; Wieand, H S; Martinez, A; O'Connell, M J; Martenson, J A; McIlrath, D C

    1988-01-01

    In view of poor local control rates obtained with standard treatment, intraoperative radiation (IORT) using electrons was combined with external beam irradiation and surgical resection, with or without 5-fluorouracil (5FU), in 51 patients with locally advanced colorectal cancer (recurrent, 36 patients; primary, 15 patients). Patients received 4500-5500 cGy (rad) of fractionated, multiple field external beam irradiation and an IORT dose of 1000-2000 cGy. Thirty of 51 patients (59%) are alive and 22 patients (43%) are free of disease. In 44 patients at risk greater than or equal to 1 year, local progression within the IORT field has occurred in 1 of 44 (2%) and within the external beam field in 8 of 44 (18%). All local failures have occurred in patients with recurrence or with gross residual after partial resection, and the risk was less in patients who received 5FU during external irradiation (1 of 11, 9% vs. 6 of 31, 19%). The incidence of distant metastases is high in patients with recurrence, but subsequent peritoneal failures are infrequent. Acute and chronic tolerance have been acceptable, but peripheral nerve appears to be a dose-limiting structure. Randomized trials are needed to determine whether potential gains with IORT are real. PMID:3337561

  20. An orthopedic tissue adhesive for targeted delivery of intraoperative biologics.

    PubMed

    Simson, Jacob; Crist, Joshua; Strehin, Iossif; Lu, Qiaozhi; Elisseeff, Jennifer H

    2013-03-01

    Tissue adhesives can bind together damaged tissues and serve as tools to deliver and localize therapeutics to facilitate regeneration. One emerging therapeutic trend in orthopedics is the use of intraoperative biologics (IOB), such as bone marrow (BM) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP), to stimulate healing. Here, we introduce the application of the biomaterial chondroitin sulfate succinimidyl succinate (CS-NHS) to deliver IOB in a hydrogel adhesive. We demonstrate the biomaterial's ability to bind various tissue types and its cellular biocompatibility with encapsulated human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Further, we examine in detail the CS-NHS adhesive combined with BM aspirate for use in bone applications. hMSCs were encapsulated in CS-BM and cultured for 5 weeks in osteogenic medium. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated osteogenesis via upregulation of the osteogenic transcription factor Runx2 and bone markers alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin. Significant deposition of calcium and osteocalcin was detected using biochemical, histological, and immunohistochemical techniques. Shear testing demonstrated that the CS-BM adhesive exhibited an adhesive strength approximately an order of magnitude stronger than fibrin glue and approaching that of a cyanoacrylate adhesive. These results indicate that CS-NHS is a promising delivery tool for IOB in orthopedic applications requiring a strong, degradable, and biocompatible adhesive that supports bone growth. PMID:23097279

  1. Intraoperative Conversion to ALPPS in a Case of Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Oldhafer, F; Ringe, K I; Timrott, K; Kleine, M; Ramackers, W; Cammann, S; Jäger, M D; Klempnauer, J; Bektas, H; Vondran, F W R

    2015-01-01

    Background. Surgical resection remains the best treatment option for intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). Two-stage liver resection combining in situ liver transection with portal vein ligation (ALPPS) has been described as a promising method to increase the resectability of liver tumors also in the case of ICC. Presentation of Case. A 46-year-old male patient presented with an ICC-typical lesion in the right liver. The indication for primary liver resection was set and planed as a right hepatectomy. In contrast to the preoperative CT-scan, the known lesion showed further progression in a macroscopically steatotic liver. Therefore, the decision was made to perform an ALPPS-procedure to avoid an insufficient future liver remnant (FLR). The patient showed an uneventful postoperative course after the first and second step of the ALPPS-procedure, with sufficient increase of the FLR. Unfortunately, already 2.5 months after resection the patient had developed new tumor lesions found by the follow-up CT-scan. Discussion. The presented case demonstrates that an intraoperative conversion to an ALPPS-procedure is safely applicable when the FLR surprisingly seems to be insufficient. Conclusion. ALPPS should also be considered a treatment option in well-selected patients with ICC. However, the experience concerning the outcome of ALPPS in case of ICC remains fairly small. PMID:26649219

  2. Intraoperative Conversion to ALPPS in a Case of Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Oldhafer, F.; Ringe, K. I.; Timrott, K.; Kleine, M.; Ramackers, W.; Cammann, S.; Jäger, M. D.; Klempnauer, J.; Bektas, H.; Vondran, F. W. R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Surgical resection remains the best treatment option for intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). Two-stage liver resection combining in situ liver transection with portal vein ligation (ALPPS) has been described as a promising method to increase the resectability of liver tumors also in the case of ICC. Presentation of Case. A 46-year-old male patient presented with an ICC-typical lesion in the right liver. The indication for primary liver resection was set and planed as a right hepatectomy. In contrast to the preoperative CT-scan, the known lesion showed further progression in a macroscopically steatotic liver. Therefore, the decision was made to perform an ALPPS-procedure to avoid an insufficient future liver remnant (FLR). The patient showed an uneventful postoperative course after the first and second step of the ALPPS-procedure, with sufficient increase of the FLR. Unfortunately, already 2.5 months after resection the patient had developed new tumor lesions found by the follow-up CT-scan. Discussion. The presented case demonstrates that an intraoperative conversion to an ALPPS-procedure is safely applicable when the FLR surprisingly seems to be insufficient. Conclusion. ALPPS should also be considered a treatment option in well-selected patients with ICC. However, the experience concerning the outcome of ALPPS in case of ICC remains fairly small. PMID:26649219

  3. Radiotherapy of Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vordermark, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Curative-intent radical radiotherapy of cervical cancer consists of external-beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, and concomitant chemotherapy with cisplatin. For each element, new developments aim to improve tumor control rates or treatment tolerance. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has been shown to reduce gastrointestinal toxicity and can be used to selectively increase the radiotherapy dose. Individualized, image-guided brachytherapy enables better adaptation of high-dose volumes to the tumor extension. Intensification of concomitant or sequential systemic therapy is under evaluation. PMID:27614991

  4. Quality Assurance in Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mckenzie, Alan

    A common feature of the Radiotherapy Centres where there have been major accidents involving incorrect radiotherapy treatment is that they did not operate good Quality Assurance systems. A Quality Assurance system is sometimes called a Quality Management system, and it is designed to give assurance that quality standards are being met. One of the "spin offs" from operating a Quality Management system is that it reduces the likelihood of a radiotherapy accident. A detailed account of how to set up a quality system in radiotherapy has been given in an ESTRO booklet.2

  5. Synergistic Effects of Gold Nanocages in Hyperthermia and Radiotherapy Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ai-wei; Guo, Wei-hua; Qi, Ya-fei; Wang, Jian-zhen; Ma, Xiang-xing; Yu, De-xin

    2016-06-01

    Gold nanocages (GNCs) are a promising material that not only converts near infrared (NIR) light to heat for the ablation of tumors but also acts as a radiosensitizer. The combination of hyperthermia and radiotherapy has a synergistic effect that can lead to significant tumor cell necrosis. In the current study, we synthesized GNCs that offered the combined effects of hyperthermia and radiotherapy. This combination strategy resulted in increased tumor cell apoptosis and significant tumor tissue necrosis. We propose that GNCs can be used for clinical treatment and to potentially overcome resistance to radiotherapy by clearly increasing the antitumor effect.

  6. Synergistic Effects of Gold Nanocages in Hyperthermia and Radiotherapy Treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ai-Wei; Guo, Wei-Hua; Qi, Ya-Fei; Wang, Jian-Zhen; Ma, Xiang-Xing; Yu, De-Xin

    2016-12-01

    Gold nanocages (GNCs) are a promising material that not only converts near infrared (NIR) light to heat for the ablation of tumors but also acts as a radiosensitizer. The combination of hyperthermia and radiotherapy has a synergistic effect that can lead to significant tumor cell necrosis. In the current study, we synthesized GNCs that offered the combined effects of hyperthermia and radiotherapy. This combination strategy resulted in increased tumor cell apoptosis and significant tumor tissue necrosis. We propose that GNCs can be used for clinical treatment and to potentially overcome resistance to radiotherapy by clearly increasing the antitumor effect. PMID:27255899

  7. Thin-Profile Transducers for Intraoperative Hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zderic, Vesna; Mera, Thomas; Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-03-01

    Our goal has been to develop thin-profile HIFU applicators for intraoperative hemostasis. The HIFU device consisted of a concave PZT element encased in a spoon-shaped aluminum housing with the diameter of 4 cm and thickness of 1 cm. The housing front surface had a thickness of 3/4 ultrasound wavelength in aluminum (0.92 mm) to provide acoustic matching. The device had a resonant frequency of 6.26 MHZ, and efficiency of 42%. The ultrasound field was observed using hydrophone field mapping and radiation force balance. The full-width half-maximum (FWHM) dimensions of the focal region were 0.6 mm and 2.2 mm in lateral and axial direction, respectively. The maximal intensity at the focus was 9,500 W/cm2 (in water). The device was tested using BSA-polyacrylamide gel phantom and rabbit kidney in vivo. HIFU application for 10 s produced lesions in the gel phantom (lesion width of 3 mm), and rabbit kidney in vivo (lesion width of 8 mm). A thin-profile HIFU applicator has advantages of high efficiency, simple design, and small dimensions.

  8. Safe thyroidectomy with intraoperative methylene blue spraying

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We aimed to minimalize operative complications by spraying of methylene blue stain on thyroid glands and the perithyroidal area. Material and methods The intra-operative methylene blue spraying technique was used prospectively on a total of 56 patients who had undergone primary (not recurrent) thyroid surgery for a variety of thyroid diseases. Bilateral total thyroidectomy was performed in all cases. After superior but before inferior pole ligation, 0.5ml of methylene blue was sprayed over the thyroid lobe and perilober area. Tissues, especially parathyroides, the recurrent laryngeal nerve, and the inferior thyroid artery, were identified and evaluated. Results Recurrent laryngeal nerve and arteries were not stained and thus they remained white in all cases while all other tissues were stained blue. Within three minutes parathyroid glands washed out the blue stain and the original yellow color was regained. Thyroid tissue wash-out time was not less than 15 minutes; perithyroideal muscles, tendinous and lipoid structures took no less than 25 minutes. Conclusion The safety of intravascular methylene blue guidance on thyroid surgery is known. This research demonstrates the effectiveness of the spraying technique, a new technique which ensures not only identification of parathyroid glands within three minutes, but also identification of recurrent laryngeal nerves and inferior thyroid arteries. PMID:23148801

  9. Intraoperative imaging using intravascular contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Jeffrey R.; Martirosyan, Nikolay; Garland, Summer; Lemole, G. Michael; Romanowski, Marek

    2016-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) contrast agents are becoming more frequently studied in medical imaging due to their advantageous characteristics, most notably the ability to capture near-infrared signal across the tissue and the safety of the technique. This produces a need for imaging technology that can be specific for both the NIR dye and medical application. Indocyanine green (ICG) is currently the primary NIR dye used in neurosurgery. Here we report on using the augmented microscope we described previously for image guidance in a rat glioma resection. Luc-C6 cells were implanted in a rat in the left-frontal lobe and grown for 22 days. Surgical resection was performed by a neurosurgeon using augmented microscopy guidance with ICG contrast. Videos and images were acquired to evaluate image quality and resection margins. ICG accumulated in the tumor tissue due to enhanced permeation and retention from the compromised bloodbrain- barrier. The augmented microscope was capable of guiding the rat glioma resection and intraoperatively highlighted tumor tissue regions via ICG fluorescence under normal illumination of the surgical field.

  10. Intraoperative Electroretinograms before and after Core Vitrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Yagura, Kazuma; Shinoda, Kei; Matsumoto, Soiti; Terauchi, Gaku; Watanabe, Emiko; Matsumoto, Harue; Akiyama, Goichi; Mizota, Atsushi; Miyake, Yozo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate retinal function by intraoperative electroretinograms (ERGs) before and after core vitrectomy. Design Retrospective consecutive case series. Method Full-field photopic ERGs were recorded prior to the beginning and just after core vitrectomy using a sterilized contact lens electrode in 20 eyes that underwent non-complicated vitreous surgery. A light-emitted diode was embedded into the contact lens, and a stimulus of 150 ms on and 350 ms off at 2 Hz was delivered. The amplitudes and latencies of the a-, b-, and d-waves, photopic negative response (PhNR), and oscillatory potentials (OPs) were analyzed. The intraocular temperature at the mid-vitreous was measured at the beginning and just after the surgery with a thermoprobe. Results The intraocular temperature was 33.2 ± 1.3°C before and 29.4 ± 1.7°C after the vitrectomy. The amplitudes of the PhNR and OPs were significantly smaller after surgery, and the latencies of all components were prolonged after the surgery. These changes were not significantly correlated with the changes of the temperature. Conclusion Retinal function is reduced just after core vitrectomy in conjunction with significant temperature reduction. The differences in the degree of alterations of each ERG component suggests different sensitivity of each type of retinal neuron. PMID:27010332

  11. Phase II Trial of Combined Modality Therapy With Concurrent Topotecan Plus Radiotherapy Followed by Consolidation Chemotherapy for Unresectable Stage III and Selected Stage IV Non-Small-Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Seung, Steven K. Ross, Helen J.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: The optimal combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy (RT) and the role of consolidation chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are unknown. Topotecan is active against NSCLC, can safely be combined with RT at effective systemic doses, and can be given by continuous infusion, making it an attractive study agent against locally advanced NSCLC. Methods and Materials: In this pilot study, 20 patients were treated with infusion topotecan 0.4 mg/m{sup 2}/d with three-dimensional conformal RT to 63 Gy both delivered Monday through Friday for 7 weeks. Patients without progression underwent consolidation chemotherapy with etoposide and a platinum agent for one cycle followed by two cycles of docetaxel. The study endpoints were treatment response, time to progression, survival, and toxicity. Results: Of the 20 patients, 19 completed induction chemoradiotherapy and 13 completed consolidation. Of the 20 patients, 18 had a partial response and 1 had stable disease after induction chemoradiotherapy. The 3-year overall survival rate was 32% (median, 18 months). The local and distant progression-free survival rate was 30% (median, 21 months) and 58% (median, not reached), respectively. Three patients developed central nervous system metastases, 1 within 228 days, 1 within 252 days, and 1 within 588 days. Three patients had pulmonary emboli. Therapy was well tolerated with 1 of 20 developing Grade 4 lymphopenia. Grade 3 hematologic toxicity was seen in 17 of 20 patients but was not clinically significant. Other Grade 3 toxicities included esophagitis in 3, esophageal stricture in 2, fatigue in 8, and weight loss in 1. Grade 3 pneumonitis occurred in 6 of 20 patients. Conclusion: Continuous infusion topotecan with RT was well tolerated and active in the treatment of poor-risk patients with unresectable Stage III NSCLC.

  12. Sustained long-term immune responses after in situ gene therapy combined with radiotherapy and hormonal therapy in prostate cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Tetsuo; Teh, Bin S.; Mai, W.-Y.; Kusaka, Nobuyuki; Naruishi, Koji; Fattah, Elmoataz Abdel; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo; Butler, E. Brian; Thompson, Timothy C.

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To explore long-term immune responses after combined radio-gene-hormonal therapy. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three patients with prostate specific antigen 10 or higher or Gleason score of 7 or higher or clinical stage T2b to T3 were treated with gene therapy that consisted of 3 separate intraprostatic injections of AdHSV-tk on Days 0, 56, and 70. Each injection was followed by 2 weeks of valacyclovir. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was delivered 2 days after the second AdHSV-tk injection for 7 weeks. Hormonal therapy was initiated on Day 0 and continued for 4 months or 2.3 years. Blood samples were taken before, during, and after treatment. Lymphocytes were analyzed by fluorescent antibody cell sorting (FACS). Results: Median follow-up was 26 months (range, 4-48 months). The mean percentages of DR{sup +}CD8{sup +} T cells were increased at all timepoints up to 8 months. The mean percentages of DR{sup +}CD4{sup +} T cells were increased later and sustained longer until 12 months. Long-term (2.3 years) use of hormonal therapy did not affect the percentage of any lymphocyte population. Conclusions: Sustained long-term (up to 8 to 12 months) systemic T-cell responses were noted after combined radio-gene-hormonal therapy for prostate cancer. Prolonged use of hormonal therapy does not suppress this response. These results suggest the potential for sustained activation of cell-mediated immune responses against cancer.

  13. Effectiveness of Combined Modality Radiotherapy of Orthotopic Human Squamous Cell Carcinomas in Nu/Nu Mice Using Cetuximab, Tirapazamine and MnSOD-Plasmid Liposome Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    EPPERLY, MICHAEL W.; LAI, STEPHEN Y.; KANAI, ANTHONY J.; MASON, NEAL; LOPRESI, BRIAN; DIXON, TRACEY; FRANICOLA, DARCY; NIU, YUNYUN; WILSON, WILLIAM R.; GREENBERGER, JOEL S.

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxic regions limit the radiocontrollability of head and neck carcinomas. Whether or not combinations of plasmid/liposome mediated overexpression of normal tissue protective manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), cetuximab (C225), and the hypoxic cytotoxin tirapazamine (TPZ) enhanced radiotherapeutic effects was tested in a CAL-33 orthotopic mouse cheek tumor model. The tumor volume continued to increase in the control (untreated) mice, with a ninefold increase by 10 days when the tumors exceeded 2 cm3. The mice receiving 14 Gy only showed reduced tumor growth to 3.1±0.1 fold at day 10. The mice receiving MnSOD-PL, C225, TPZ plus 14 Gy had the best outcome with 0.7±0.1 fold increase in tumor volume by 10 days (p=0.015) compared to irradiation only. The addition of MnSOD-PL, TPZ, and C225 to irradiation optimized the therapeutic ratio for the local control of hypoxic region-containing CAL-33 orthotopic tumors. PMID:20133969

  14. Effectiveness of combined modality radiotherapy of orthotopic human squamous cell carcinomas in Nu/Nu mice using cetuximab, tirapazamine and MnSOD-plasmid liposome gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Epperly, Michael W; Lai, Stephen Y; Kanai, Anthony J; Mason, Neal; Lopresi, Brian; Dixon, Tracey; Franicola, Darcy; Niu, Yunyun; Wilson, William R; Greenberger, Joel S

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxic regions limit the radiocontrollability of head and neck carcinomas. Whether or not combinations of plasmid/liposome mediated overexpression of normal tissue protective manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), cetuximab (C225), and the hypoxic cytotoxin tirapazamine (TPZ) enhanced radiotherapeutic effects was tested in a CAL-33 orthotopic mouse cheek tumor model. The tumor volume continued to increase in the control (untreated) mice, with a ninefold increase by 10 days when the tumors exceeded 2 cm(3). The mice receiving 14 Gy only showed reduced tumor growth to 3.1+/-0.1 fold at day 10. The mice receiving MnSOD-PL, C225, TPZ plus 14 Gy had the best outcome with 0.7+/-0.1 fold increase in tumor volume by 10 days (p=0.015) compared to irradiation only. The addition of MnSOD-PL, TPZ, and C225 to irradiation optimized the therapeutic ratio for the local control of hypoxic region-containing CAL-33 orthotopic tumors. PMID:20133969

  15. Misonidazole combined with radiotherapy in the treatment of inoperable squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. A double-blind randomized trial

    SciTech Connect

    Panduro, J.; Kjaer, M.; Wolff-Jensen, J.; Hansen, H.H.

    1983-07-01

    Sixty-seven patients with inoperable squamous cell carcinoma of the lung were randomized to receive split-course irradiation therapy, 40 Gy in 10 fractions over 5 weeks plus either placebo or misonidazole 1.200 mg/m2 orally on each treatment day. The target area was the primary tumor, both hilar regions, mediastinum, and both supraclavicular regions. Thirty-three patients received misonidazole, while 34 patients received placebo. Mean observation time for the study was 27 months (range, 17-36+ months. 31% of the patients in the misonidazole group obtained a complete response (CR) or a partial response (PR) as compared to 29% in the placebo group. No difference was demonstrated in the relapse pattern comparing the two groups. The death intensity was significantly higher (P . 0.03) in the misonidazole than in the placebo group, with the median survival being 4.2 and 6.7 months, respectively. Eight patients in the misonidazole group (31%) developed sensoric neuropathy while one patient in the placebo group developed irradiation myelopathy of the Brown-Sequard type. The group of patients who later developed neuropathy had significantly higher plasma misonidazole concentrations on treatment days than the group of patients who did not. It is concluded that the combination of misonidazole and irradiation therapy for inoperable squamous cell carcinoma of the lung has no effect on response rate and relapse pattern, but a significant unexplained adverse effect on survival.

  16. [Radiotherapy of skin cancers].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Rio, E; Mahé, M-A

    2016-09-01

    The indications of radiotherapy for skin cancers are not clearly defined because of the lack of randomised trials or prospective studies. For basal cell carcinomas, radiotherapy frequently offers a good local control, but a randomized trial showed that surgery is more efficient and less toxic. Indications of radiotherapy are contra-indications of surgery for patients older than 60, non-sclerodermiform histology and occurring in non-sensitive areas. Adjuvant radiotherapy could be proposed to squamous cell carcinomas, in case of poor prognostic factors. Dose of 60 to 70Gy are usually required, and must be modulated to the size of the lesions. Adjuvant radiotherapy seems beneficial for desmoplastic melanomas but not for the other histological types. Prophylactic nodal irradiation (45 to 50Gy), for locally advanced tumours (massive nodal involvement), decreases the locoregional failure rate but do not increase survival. Adjuvant radiotherapy (50 to 56Gy) for Merckel cell carcinomas increases also the local control rate, as demonstrated by meta-analysis and a large epidemiological study. Nodal areas must be included, if there is no surgical exploration (sentinel lymph node dissection). Kaposi sarcomas are radiosensitive and could be treated with relatively low doses (24 to 30Gy). Also, cutaneous lymphomas are good indications for radiotherapy: B lymphomas are electively treated with limited fields. The role of total skin electron therapy for T-lymphomas is still discussed; but palliative radiotherapy is very efficient in case of cutaneous nodules. PMID:27522189

  17. Planning National Radiotherapy Services

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblatt, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Countries, states, and island nations often need forward planning of their radiotherapy services driven by different motives. Countries without radiotherapy services sponsor patients to receive radiotherapy abroad. They often engage professionals for a feasibility study in order to establish whether it would be more cost-beneficial to establish a radiotherapy facility. Countries where radiotherapy services have developed without any central planning, find themselves in situations where many of the available centers are private and thus inaccessible for a majority of patients with limited resources. Government may decide to plan ahead when a significant exodus of cancer patients travel to another country for treatment, thus exposing the failure of the country to provide this medical service for its citizens. In developed countries, the trigger has been the existence of highly visible waiting lists for radiotherapy revealing a shortage of radiotherapy equipment. This paper suggests that there should be a systematic and comprehensive process of long-term planning of radiotherapy services at the national level, taking into account the regulatory infrastructure for radiation protection, planning of centers, equipment, staff, education programs, quality assurance, and sustainability aspects. Realistic budgetary and cost considerations must also be part of the project proposal or business plan. PMID:25505730

  18. 3.4 Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, H.-M.; Selbach, H.-J.; Vatnitsky, S.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '3.4 Radiotherapy' of the Chapter '3 Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology and Radiotherapy' with the contents:

  19. Proton beam therapy for invasive bladder cancer: A prospective study of bladder-preserving therapy with combined radiotherapy and intra-arterial chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, Masaharu . E-mail: mhata@syd.odn.ne.jp; Miyanaga, Naoto; Tokuuye, Koichi; Saida, Yukihisa; Ohara, Kiyoshi; Sugahara, Shinji; Kagei, Kenji; Igaki, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Hattori, Kazunori; Shimazui, Toru; Akaza, Hideyuki; Akine, Yasuyuki

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To present outcomes of bladder-preserving therapy with proton beam irradiation in patients with invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder, cT2-3N0M0, underwent transurethral resection of bladder tumor(s), followed by pelvic X-ray irradiation combined with intra-arterial chemotherapy with methotrexate and cisplatin. Upon completion of these treatments, patients were evaluated by transurethral resection biopsy. Patients with no residual tumor received proton irradiation boost to the primary sites, whereas patients demonstrating residual tumors underwent radical cystectomy. Results: Of 25 patients, 23 (92%) were free of residual tumor at the time of re-evaluation; consequently, proton beam therapy was applied. The remaining 2 patients presenting with residual tumors underwent radical cystectomy. Of the 23 patients treated with proton beam therapy, 9 experienced recurrence at the median follow-up time of 4.8 years: local recurrences and distant metastases in 6 and 2 patients, respectively, and both situations in 1. The 5-year overall, disease-free, and cause-specific survival rates were 60%, 50%, and 80%, respectively. The 5-year local control and bladder-preservation rates were 73% and 96%, respectively, in the patients treated with proton beam therapy. Therapy-related toxicities of Grade 3-4 were observed in 9 patients: hematologic toxicities in 6, pulmonary thrombosis in 1, and hemorrhagic cystitis in 2. Conclusions: The present bladder-preserving regimen for invasive bladder cancer was feasible and effective. Proton beam therapy might improve local control and facilitate bladder preservation.

  20. Two-fraction high-dose-rate brachytherapy within a single day combined with external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer: single institution experience and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junyang; Kaidu, Motoki; Sasamoto, Ryuta; Ayukawa, Fumio; Yamana, Nobuko; Sato, Hiraku; Tanaka, Kensuke; Kawaguchi, Gen; Ohta, Atsushi; Maruyama, Katsuya; Abe, Eisuke; Kasahara, Takashi; Nishiyama, Tsutomu; Tomita, Yoshihiko; Aoyama, Hidefumi

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the outcomes of treatment for patients with localized prostate cancer (PCa) treated with 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) followed by two-fraction high-dose-rate brachytherapy within a single day (2-fr.-HDR-BT/day) at a single institution. A total of 156 consecutive Asian males (median age, 67 years) were enrolled. To compare our findings with those of other studies, we analyzed our results using the D'Amico classification, assigning the patients to low- (n =5; 3.2%), intermediate- (n =36; 23.1%) and high-risk (n =115; 73.7%) groups (Stage T3 PCa patients were classified as high-risk). One patient in the D'Amico low-risk group (20%), 13 intermediate-risk patients (36.1%) and 99 high-risk patients (86.1%) underwent androgen deprivation therapy. We administered a prescription dose of 39 Gy in 13 fractions of 3D-CRT combined with 18 Gy of HDR-BT in two 9-Gy fractions delivered within a single day. We did not distinguish between risk groups in determining the prescription dose. The median follow-up period was 38 months. Of the 156 patients, one died from primary disease and five died from other diseases. The 3-year overall survival (OS) rates were 100%, 100% and 93.7%, and the 3-year ‘biochemical no evidence of disease (bNED)’ rates were 100%, 100% and 96.9% for the D'Amico low-, intermediate- and high-risk groups, respectively. No patient developed ≥ Grade 3 early toxicity. The Grade 3 late genitourinary toxicity rate was 2.6%, and no ≥ Grade 3 late gastrointestinal toxicity occurred. The efficacy and safety of this study were satisfactory, and longer-term follow-up is necessary. PMID:26983988

  1. A light blanket for intraoperative photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yida; Wang, Ken; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2009-06-01

    A novel light source - light blanket composed of a series of parallel cylindrical diffusing fibers (CDF) is designed to substitute the hand-held point source in the PDT treatment of the malignant pleural or intraperitoneal diseases. It achieves more uniform light delivery and less operation time in operating room. The preliminary experiment was performed for a 9cmx9cm light blanket composed of 8 9-cm CDFs. The linear diffusers were placed in parallel fingerlike pockets. The blanket is filled with 0.2 % intralipid scattering medium to improve the uniformity of light distribution. 0.3-mm aluminum foil is used to shield and reflect the light transmission. The full width of the profile of light distribution at half maximum along the perpendicular direction is 7.9cm and 8.1cm with no intralipid and with intralipid. The peak value of the light fluence rate profiles per input power is 11.7mW/cm2/W and 8.6mW/cm2/W respectively. The distribution of light field is scanned using the isotropic detector and the motorized platform. The average fluence rate per input power is 8.6 mW/cm2/W and the standard deviation is 1.6 mW/cm2/W for the scan in air, 7.4 mW/cm2/W and 1.1 mW/cm2/W for the scan with the intralipid layer. The average fluence rate per input power and the standard deviation are 20.0 mW/cm2/W and 2.6 mW/cm2/W respectively in the tissue mimic phantom test. The light blanket design produces a reasonably uniform field for effective light coverage and is flexible to confirm to anatomic structures in intraoperative PDT. It also has great potential value for superficial PDT treatment in clinical application.

  2. Monitoring of Motor and Somatosensory Evoked Potentials During Spine Surgery: Intraoperative Changes and Postoperative Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether the combination of muscle motor evoked potentials (mMEPs) and somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) measured during spinal surgery can predict immediate and permanent postoperative motor deficits. Methods mMEP and SEP was monitored in patients undergoing spinal surgery between November 2012 and July 2014. mMEPs were elicited by a train of transcranial electrical stimulation over the motor cortex and recorded from the upper/lower limbs. SEPs were recorded by stimulating the tibial and median nerves. Results Combined mMEP/SEP recording was successfully achieved in 190 operations. In 117 of these, mMEPs and SEPs were stable and 73 showed significant changes. In 20 cases, motor deficits in the first 48 postoperative hours were observed and 6 patients manifested permanent neurological deficits. The two potentials were monitored in a number of spinal surgeries. For surgery on spinal deformities, the sensitivity and specificity of combined mMEP/SEP monitoring were 100% and 92.4%, respectively. In the case of spinal cord tumor surgeries, sensitivity was only 50% but SEP changes were observed preceding permanent motor deficits in some cases. Conclusion Intraoperative monitoring is a useful tool in spinal surgery. For spinal deformity surgery, combined mMEP/SEP monitoring showed high sensitivity and specificity; in spinal tumor surgery, only SEP changes predicted permanent motor deficits. Therefore, mMEP, SEP, and joint monitoring may all be appropriate and beneficial for the intraoperative monitoring of spinal surgery. PMID:27446784

  3. Weekly Gemcitabine and Cisplatin in Combination With Radiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect

    Arruda Viani, Gustavo; Afonso, Sergio Luis; Cardoso Tavares, Vivian; Bernardes Godoi da Silva, Lucas; Stefano, Eduardo Jose

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose by describing the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of weekly gemcitabine and cisplatin in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck (LAHN) cancer concomitant to irradiation. Methods and Materials: Patients with LAHN cancer were enrolled in a prospective, dose-escalation Phase I study. Toxicity was graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria score. Maximum tolerated dose was defined when DLT developed in 2 of 6 patients. The starting dose of cisplatin was 20 mg/m{sup 2} and that of gemcitabine was 10 mg/m{sup 2} in 3 patients, with a subsequent dose escalation of 10 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin only for 3 new patients. In the next levels, only a dose escalation of gemcitabine with 10 mg/m{sup 2} for each new cohort was used (Level 1, 10 mg/m{sup 2} of gemcitabine and 20 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin; Level 2, 10 mg/m{sup 2} of gemcitabine and 30 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin; and Level 3, 20 mg/m{sup 2} of gemcitabine and 30 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin). Radiation therapy was administered by use of a conformal technique over a period of 6 to 7 weeks in 2.0-Gy daily fractions for 5 consecutive days per week to a total dose of 70 Gy. Results: From 2008 to 2009, 12 patients completing 3 dose levels were included in the study. At Dose Level 3, 1 of 3 patients had DLT with Grade 3 mucositis. Of the next 3 required patients, 2 showed DLT with Grade 3 dermatitis. At a follow-up of 3 months, 10 of 12 evaluable patients (83.3%) obtained a complete response and 1 patient (8.3%) obtained a partial response. Among the complete responders, at a median follow-up of 10 months (range, 6-14 months), 9 patients are alive and disease free. Conclusion: Gemcitabine at low doses combined with cisplatin is a potent radiosensitizer effective in patients with LAHN cancer. The recommended Phase II dose is 10 mg/m{sup 2} of gemcitabine and 30 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin with an acceptable tolerability profile.

  4. Intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy with particular reference to the treatment of rectal carcinomas--primary and recurrent

    SciTech Connect

    Sischy, B.

    1986-11-01

    Radiation therapy is being used alone or in combination with surgery with increasing frequency in the treatment of colorectal malignancies. Preoperative or postoperative irradiation may be offered to patients with marginally resectable lesions who are at high risk for local recurrence. Dose levels required for cure, however, may be such that the complications are unacceptable. The use of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) has increased the possibility of a higher local control rate and possible cure. The ability to increase the therapeutic ratio between local control and complications using IORT is achieved only with close interaction between the surgeon and radiation oncologist. Furthermore, intraoperative radiation therapy may be offered for patients with recurrent rectal tumors. The technique of intraoperative radiation therapy will be described briefly and recent results regarding colorectal cancers from larger centers will be reviewed. It appears from many reports that the three-to-five-year results for marginally resectable disease are approximately 50 percent and for recurrent disease, approximately 40 percent. The incidence of complications following intraoperative radiation therapy does not appear to increase as a result of this aggressive treatment modality. The number of centers offering this modality is increasing rapidly.

  5. Motexafin Gadolinium Combined With Prompt Whole Brain Radiotherapy Prolongs Time to Neurologic Progression in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients With Brain Metastases: Results of a Phase III Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, Minesh P. Shapiro, William R.; Phan, See C.; Gervais, Radj; Carrie, Christian; Chabot, Pierre; Patchell, Roy A.; Glantz, Michael J.; Recht, Lawrence; Langer, Corey; Sur, Ranjan K.; Roa, Wilson H.; Mahe, Marc A.; Fortin, Andre; Nieder, Carsten; Meyers, Christina A.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Miller, Richard A.; Renschler, Markus F.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of motexafin gadolinium (MGd) in combination with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) for the treatment of brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: In an international, randomized, Phase III study, patients with brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer were randomized to WBRT with or without MGd. The primary endpoint was the interval to neurologic progression, determined by a centralized Events Review Committee who was unaware of the treatment the patients had received. Results: Of 554 patients, 275 were randomized to WBRT and 279 to WBRT+MGd. Treatment with MGd was well tolerated, and 92% of the intended doses were administered. The most common MGd-related Grade 3+ adverse events included liver function abnormalities (5.5%), asthenia (4.0%), and hypertension (4%). MGd improved the interval to neurologic progression compared with WBRT alone (15 vs. 10 months; p = 0.12, hazard ratio [HR] = 0.78) and the interval to neurocognitive progression (p = 0.057, HR = 0.78). The WBRT patients required more salvage brain surgery or radiosurgery than did the WBRT+MGd patients (54 vs. 25 salvage procedures, p < 0.001). A statistically significant interaction between the geographic region and MGd treatment effect (which was in the prespecified analysis plan) and between treatment delay and MGd treatment effect was found. In North American patients, where treatment was more prompt, a statistically significant prolongation of the interval to neurologic progression, from 8.8 months for WBRT to 24.2 months for WBRT+MGd (p = 0.004, HR = 0.53), and the interval to neurocognitive progression (p = 0.06, HR = 0.73) were observed. Conclusion: In the intent-to-treat analysis, MGd exhibited a favorable trend in neurologic outcomes. MGd significantly prolonged the interval to neurologic progression in non-small-cell lung cancer patients with brain metastases receiving prompt WBRT. The toxicity was acceptable.

  6. Orbit-associated tumors: navigation and control of resection using intraoperative computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Terpolilli, Nicole A; Rachinger, Walter; Kunz, Mathias; Thon, Niklas; Flatz, Wilhelm H; Tonn, Jörg-Christian; Schichor, Christian

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Treatment of skull base lesions is complex and usually requires a multidisciplinary approach. In meningioma, which is the most common tumor entity in this region, resection is considered to be the most important therapeutic step to avoid tumor recurrence. However, resection of skull base lesions with orbital or optic nerve involvement poses a challenge due to their anatomical structure and their proximity to eloquent areas. Therefore the main goal of surgery should be to achieve the maximum extent of resection while preserving neurological function. In the postoperative course, medical and radiotherapeutic strategies may then be successfully used to treat possible tumor residues. Methods to safely improve the extent of resection in skull base lesions therefore are desirable. The current study reports the authors' experience with the use of intraoperative CT (iCT) combined with neuronavigation with regard to feasibility and possible benefits of the method. METHODS Those patients with tumorous lesions in relationship to the orbit, sphenoid wing, or cavernous sinus who were surgically treated between October 2008 and December 2013 using iCT-based neuronavigation and in whom an intraoperative scan was obtained for control of resection were included. In all cases a second iCT scan was performed under sterile conditions after completion of navigation-guided microsurgical tumor resection. The surgical strategy was adapted accordingly; if necessary, resection was continued. RESULTS Twenty-three patients (19 with WHO Grade I meningioma and 4 with other lesions) were included. The most common clinical symptoms were loss of visual acuity and exophthalmus. Intraoperative control of resection by iCT was successfully obtained in all cases. Intraoperative imaging changed the surgical approach in more than half (52.2%) of these patients, either because iCT demonstrated unexpected residual tumor masses or because the second scan revealed additional tumor tissue that was not

  7. Comparison of intraoperative completion flowmeter versus duplex ultrasonography and contrast arteriography for carotid endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Gabor A; Calligaro, Keith D; Kolakowski, Steven; Doerr, Kevin J; McAffee-Bennett, Sandy; Muller, Kathy; Dougherty, Matthew J

    Intraoperative completion studies of the internal carotid artery following carotid endarterectomy are recommended to ensure technical perfection of the repair. Transit time ultrasound flowmeter does not require trained technicians, requires less time than other completion studies such as duplex ultrasonography and contrast arteriography, and is noninvasive. Flowmetry was compared with duplex ultrasonography and contrast arteriography to determine if the relatively simpler flowmetry could replace these two more widely accepted completion studies in the intraoperative assessment of carotid endarterectomy. Comparative intraoperative assessment was performed in 116 carotid endarterectomies using all three techniques between December 1, 2000 and November 30, 2003. Eversion endarterectomy was performed in 51 cases and standard endarterectomy with prosthetic patching in 65 cases. Patients underwent completion flowmetry, duplex ultrasonography, and contrast arteriography studies of the exposed arteries, which were performed by vascular fellows or senior surgical residents under direct supervision of board-certified vascular surgeons. Duplex ultrasonography surveillance was performed 1 and 6 months postoperatively and annually thereafter. Mean follow-up was 18 months (range, 6-42 months). The combined ipsilateral stroke and death rate was 0%. The mean internal carotid artery flow using flowmetry was 249 mL/min (range, 60-750 mL/min). Five (4.3%) patients had flow < 100 mL/min as measured with flowmetry, but completion contrast arteriography and duplex ultrasonography were normal and none of the arteries were re-explored. One carotid endarterectomy was re-explored based on completion duplex ultrasonography that showed markedly elevated internal carotid artery peak systolic velocity (> 500 cm/sec); however, exploration was normal and completion flowmetry and contrast arteriography were normal. Duplex ultrasonography studies revealed internal carotid artery peak systolic

  8. Endovenectomy of the common femoral vein and intraoperative iliac vein recanalization for chronic iliofemoral venous occlusion.

    PubMed

    Comerota, Anthony J; Grewal, Nina K; Thakur, Subhash; Assi, Zacaria

    2010-07-01

    Chronic postthrombotic occlusion of the iliofemoral venous segments produces severe morbidity, which can be alleviated if venous drainage is restored. The common femoral vein (CFV) cannot always be fully recanalized with percutaneous endovenous techniques alone. We report the technique combining operative endovenectomy and patch venoplasty of the CFV with intraoperative iliac vein venoplasty and stenting to restore unobstructed venous drainage from the infrainguinal venous system to the vena cava. This procedure led to reduced pain, edema, and healing of a long-standing venous ulcer, with a marked reduction in postthrombotic morbidity. PMID:20620770

  9. Use of intraoperative ultrasonography in canine spinal cord lesions.

    PubMed

    Nanai, Beatrix; Lyman, Ronald; Bichsel, Pierre S

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe the intraoperative appearance of various spinal cord conditions, and to investigate how intraoperative ultrasonography assisted in modification of surgical and postoperative treatment plans. Intraoperative ultrasonography (B-mode, and power Doppler mode) was used in 25 dogs undergoing spinal surgery. The neurologic conditions included cervical spondylomyelopathy, intervertebral disc (IVD) protrusion, IVD extrusion, spinal tumors, nerve sheath mass, granulomatous myelitis, and discospondylitis. All of these diagnoses were supported by histopathologic and/or cytologic evaluation. It was possible to visualize the spinal cord and the abnormal spinal tissue in all of the patients. Power Doppler imaging allowed assessment of the spinal cord microcirculation, and assisted in judgment of the degree of decompression. Ultrasound imaging directly impacted the surgical and the medical treatment plans in four patients. Owing to the intraoperative imaging, two hemilaminectomies were extended cranially and caudally, and additional disc spaces were fenestrated, one hemilaminectomy site was extended dorsally to retrieve the disc material from the opposite side, and one intramedullary cervical spinal cord lesion was discovered, aspirated, and consequently diagnosed as granulomatous inflammation, which altered the long-term medication protocol in that dog. This study suggests that intraoperative sonographic spinal cord imaging is a useful and viable technique. PMID:17508514

  10. Multifocal Insulinoma in Pancreas and Effect of Intraoperative Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Borazan, Ersin; Aytekin, Alper; Yilmaz, Latif; Elci, Muhsin; Karaca, Mehmet Salih; Kervancioglu, Selim; Balik, Ahmet Abdulhalik

    2015-01-01

    Insulinoma is the most frequently seen functional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. The incidence of multifocal insulinoma is lower than 10%. Its treatment is direct or laparoscopic excision. The present case was examined with the findings of hypoglycemia and hypercalcemia, and as there was high insulin and C-peptide levels the initial diagnosis was insulinoma. The case was investigated in terms of MEN 1. During preoperative screening for localization, there was one focus in the head of the pancreas in the abdominal tomography and two foci in endoscopic ultrasonography. No other focus was detected through intraoperative visual or manual palpation. However, five foci were detected during operation by intraoperative ultrasonography. The relation of masses with the main pancreatic canal was evaluated and they were excised by enucleation method. There was no recurrence during the postoperative 18-month follow-up of the patient. As a result, during treatment for insulinoma, it should be kept in mind that there might be multifocal foci. In all insulinomas, the whole pancreas should be evaluated with intraoperative ultrasonography because none of the current preoperative diagnostic methods are as sensitive as manual palpation of pancreas and intraoperative ultrasonography. The intraoperative detection of synchronous five foci in pancreas is quite a rare condition. PMID:26295000

  11. Rate of intraoperative complications during cataract surgery following intravitreal injections.

    PubMed

    Hahn, P; Jiramongkolchai, K; Stinnett, S; Daluvoy, M; Kim, T

    2016-08-01

    PurposeTo investigate the effect of prior intravitreal injections on intraoperative and postoperative complication rates associated with cataract surgery.MethodsA retrospective cohort analysis reviewed 10 105 cataract surgery procedures performed by experienced surgeons at the Duke Eye Center from 1 January 2005 to 10 December 2012. A group of 197 eyes with prior intravitreal injections was compared with an equal number of matched control eyes without prior injection using the Fisher's exact test of difference in proportions and the Wilcoxon rank-sum test of difference in means. Outcomes analyzed included baseline demographic information, preoperative clinical characteristics, prevalence of intraoperative complications, and postoperative intraocular pressure, glaucoma surgery, and glaucoma medication requirement through 1 year following cataract surgery.ResultsAn increased rate of intraoperative complications was identified during cataract surgery in eyes with prior intravitreal injections compared with control eyes (3 vs 0%, P=0.030). Injection eyes required more glaucoma medications at 1 year, but no difference was identified if steroid injections were excluded. No difference in postoperative IOP or glaucoma surgery was identified. No cases of endophthalmitis were reported.ConclusionsA history of intravitreal injections may be a risk factor for cataract surgery-related intraoperative complications. We hypothesize this may be due to unidentified iatrogenic lens trauma during intravitreal injections. Particular attention to the posterior capsule during preoperative assessment and intraoperatively is recommended in eyes undergoing cataract surgery with a prior history of intravitreal injections. PMID:27229705

  12. Intraoperative Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound Evaluates the Grade of Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ling-Gang; He, Wen; Zhang, Hong-Xia; Song, Qian; Ning, Bin; Li, Hui-Zhan; He, Yan; Lin, Song

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of our study was to investigate the value of intraoperative contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) for evaluating the grade of glioma and the correlation between microvessel density (MVD) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Methods. We performed intraoperative conventional ultrasound (CUS) and CEUS on 88 patients with gliomas. All of the patients have undergone surgery and obtained the results of pathology. All patients have undergone intraoperative CUS and CEUS to compare the characteristics of different grade gliomas and the results of CUS and CEUS were compared with pathological results. Results. The time to start (TTS) and time to peak (TTP) of low grade glioma (LGG) were similar to those of edema and normal brain surrounding glioma. The enhanced extent of LGG was higher than that of the normal brain and edema. The TTS and TTP of high grade glioma were earlier than those of the edema and normal brain surrounding glioma. The enhancement of HGG was higher than that of LGG. The absolute peak intensity (API) was correlated with MVD and VEGF. Conclusion. Intraoperative CEUS could help in determining boundary of peritumoral brain edema of glioma. Intraoperative CEUS parameters in cerebral gliomas could indirectly reflect the information of MVD and VEGF. PMID:27069921

  13. Indocyanine green for intraoperative localization of ureter.

    PubMed

    Siddighi, Sam; Yune, Junchan Joshua; Hardesty, Jeffrey

    2014-10-01

    Intraurethral injection of indocyanine green (ICG; Akorn, Lake Forest, IL) and visualization under near-infrared (NIR) light allows for real-time delineation of the ureter. This technology can be helpful to prevent iatrogenic ureteral injury during pelvic surgery. Patients were scheduled to undergo robot-assisted laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy. Before the robotic surgery started, the tip of a 6-F ureteral catheter was inserted into the ureteral orifice. Twenty-five milligrams of ICG was dissolved in 10-mL of sterile water and injected through the open catheter. The same procedure was repeated on the opposite side. The ICG reversibly stained the inside lining of the ureter by binding to proteins on urothelial layer. During the course of robotic surgery, the NIR laser on the da Vinci Si surgical robot (Intuitive Surgical, Inc, Sunnyvale, CA) was used to excite ICG molecules, and infrared emission was captured by the da Vinci filtered lens system and electronically converted to green color. Thus, the ureter fluoresced green, which allowed its definitive identification throughout the entire case. In all cases of >10 patients, we were able to visualize bilateral ureters with this technology, even though there was some variation in brightness that depended on the depth of the ureter from the peritoneal surface. For example, in a morbidly obese patient, the ureters were not as bright green. There were no intraoperative or postoperative adverse effects attributable to ICG administration for up to 2 months of observation. In our experience, this novel method of intraurethral ICG injection was helpful to identify the entire course of ureter and allowed a safe approach to tissues that were adjacent to the urinary tract. The advantage of our technique is that it requires the insertion of just the tip of ureteral catheter. Despite our limited cohort of patients, our findings are consistent with previous reports of the excellent safety profile of intravenous and intrabiliary ICG

  14. Intraoperative delivery of cell-killing boost radiation - a review of current and future methods.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Anke; van Oepen, Alexander; Friebe, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Techniques for intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT), the applications of tumor bed radiation immediately after surgery or utilising intracavitary access, have evolved in recent years. They are designed to substitute or complement conventional external beam radiation therapy in selected patients. IORT has become an excellent treatment option because of good long-term therapy outcomes. The combination of IORT with external beam radiation therapy has the potential to improve local control. The purpose of this paper is to present IORT techniques using gamma and electronic sources, as well as more conventional nuclide-based approaches and to evaluate their effectiveness. Common techniques for radiation of tumor cavities are listed and compared. Radionuclide IORT methods are represented by balloon and hybrid multi-catheter devices in combination with appropriate afterloaders. Electron beam therapy dedicated for use as intraoperative radiation system is reviewed and miniature x-ray sources in electronic radiation therapy are presented. These systems could further simplify IORT, because they are easy to use and require no shielding due to their relatively low photon energies. In combination with additional imaging techniques (MRI, US, CT and NucMed) the application of these miniature x-ray sources or catheter-based nuclide therapies could be the future of IORT. PMID:27161210

  15. The Use of Optical Coherence Tomography in Intraoperative Ophthalmic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Paul; Migacz, Justin; O’Connell, Rachelle; Maldonado, Ramiro S.; Izatt, Joseph A.; Toth, Cynthia A.

    2012-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has transformed diagnostic ophthalmic imaging but until recently has been limited to the clinic setting. The development of spectral-domain OCT (SD-OCT), with its improved speed and resolution, along with the development of a handheld OCT scanner, enabled portable imaging of patients unable to sit in a conventional tabletop scanner. This handheld SD-OCT unit has proven useful in examinations under anesthesia and, more recently, in intraoperative imaging of preoperative and postoperative manipulations. Recently, several groups have pioneered the development of novel OCT modalities, such as microscope-mounted OCT systems. Although still immature, the development of these systems is directed toward real-time imaging of surgical maneuvers in the intraoperative setting. This article reviews intraoperative imaging of the posterior and anterior segment using the handheld SD-OCT and recent advances toward real-time microscope-mounted intrasurgical imaging. PMID:21790116

  16. Intraoperative fluorescent imaging of intracranial tumors: a review.

    PubMed

    Behbahaninia, Milad; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Georges, Joseph; Udovich, Joshua A; Kalani, M Yashar S; Feuerstein, Burt G; Nakaji, Peter; Spetzler, Robert F; Preul, Mark C

    2013-05-01

    A review of fluorescent imaging for intracranial neoplasms is presented. Complete resection of brain cancer is seldom possible because of the goal to preserve brain tissue and the inability to visualize individual infiltrative tumor cells. Verification of histology and identification of tumor invasion in macroscopically normal-appearing brain tissue determine prognosis after resection of malignant gliomas. Therefore, imaging modalities aim to facilitate intraoperative decision-making. Intraoperative fluorescent imaging techniques have the potential to enable precise histopathologic diagnosis and to detect tumor remnants in the operative field. Macroscopic fluorescence imaging is effective for gross tumor detection. Microscopic imaging techniques enhance the sensitivity of the macroscopic observations and provide real-time histological information. Further development of clinical grade fluorescent agents specifically targeting tumor cells could improve the diagnostic and prognostic yield of intraoperative imaging. PMID:23523009

  17. Navigation, robotics, and intraoperative imaging in spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Ringel, Florian; Villard, Jimmy; Ryang, Yu-Mi; Meyer, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Spinal navigation is a technique gaining increasing popularity. Different approaches as CT-based or intraoperative imaging-based navigation are available, requiring different methods of patient registration, bearing certain advantages and disadvantages. So far, a large number of studies assessed the accuracy of pedicle screw implantation in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, elucidating the advantages of image guidance. However, a clear proof of patient benefit is missing, so far. Spinal navigation is closely related to intraoperative 3D imaging providing an imaging dataset for navigational use and the opportunity for immediate intraoperative assessment of final screw position giving the option of immediate screw revision if necessary. Thus, postoperative imaging and a potential revision surgery for screw correction become dispensable.Different concept of spinal robotics as the DaVinci system and SpineAssist are under investigation. PMID:24309918

  18. [Intraoperative monitoring of oxygen tissue pressure: Applications in vascular neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Arikan, Fuat; Vilalta, Jordi; Torne, Ramon; Chocron, Ivette; Rodriguez-Tesouro, Ana; Sahuquillo, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic lesions related to surgical procedures are a major cause of postoperative morbidity in patients with cerebral vascular disease. There are different systems of neuromonitoring to detect intraoperative ischemic events, including intraoperative monitoring of oxygen tissue pressure (PtiO2). The aim of this article was to describe, through the discussion of 4 cases, the usefulness of intraoperative PtiO2 monitoring during vascular neurosurgery. In presenting these cases, we demonstrate that monitoring PtiO2 is a reliable way to detect early ischemic events during surgical procedures. Continuous monitoring of PtiO2 in an area at risk allows the surgeon to resolve the cause of the ischemic event before it evolves to an established cerebral infarction. PMID:24934513

  19. Intraoperative laser speckle contrast imaging with retrospective motion correction for quantitative assessment of cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Lisa M.; Towle, Erica L.; Fox, Douglas J.; Dunn, Andrew K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Although multiple intraoperative cerebral blood flow (CBF) monitoring techniques are currently available, a quantitative method that allows for continuous monitoring and that can be easily integrated into the surgical workflow is still needed. Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is an optical imaging technique with a high spatiotemporal resolution that has been recently demonstrated as feasible and effective for intraoperative monitoring of CBF during neurosurgical procedures. This study demonstrates the impact of retrospective motion correction on the quantitative analysis of intraoperatively acquired LSCI images. LSCI images were acquired through a surgical microscope during brain tumor resection procedures from 10 patients under baseline conditions and after a cortical stimulation in three of those patients. The patient’s electrocardiogram (ECG) was recorded during acquisition for postprocess correction of pulsatile artifacts. Automatic image registration was retrospectively performed to correct for tissue motion artifacts, and the performance of rigid and nonrigid transformations was compared. In baseline cases, the original images had 25%±27% noise across 16 regions of interest (ROIs). ECG filtering moderately reduced the noise to 20%±21%, while image registration resulted in a further noise reduction of 15%±4%. Combined ECG filtering and image registration significantly reduced the noise to 6.2%±2.6% (p<0.05). Using the combined motion correction, accuracy and sensitivity to small changes in CBF were improved in cortical stimulation cases. There was also excellent agreement between rigid and nonrigid registration methods (15/16 ROIs with <3% difference). Results from this study demonstrate the importance of motion correction for improved visualization of CBF changes in clinical LSCI images. PMID:26157974

  20. Intraoperative Ultrasound-Fluoroscopy Fusion can Enhance Prostate Brachytherapy Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Orio, Peter F.; Tutar, Ismail B.; Narayanan, Sreeram; Arthurs, Sandra; Cho, Paul S.; Kim, Yongmin; Merrick, Gregory; Wallner, Kent E.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-fluoroscopy fusion-based intraoperative dosimetry system. Method and Materials: Twenty-five patients were treated for prostate cancer with Pd-103 implantation. After the execution of the treatment plan, two sets of TRUS images were collected using the longitudinal and axial transducers of a biplanar probe. Then, three fluoroscopic images were acquired at 0, -15 and +15{sup o}. The three-dimensional locations of all implanted seeds were reconstructed from fluoroscopic images. A subset of the implanted seeds was manually identified in TRUS images and used as fiducial markers to perform TRUS-fluoroscopy fusion. To improve the implant quality, additional seeds were placed if adverse isodose patterns were identified during visual inspection. If additional seeds were placed, intraoperative dosimetry was repeated. Day 0 computed tomography-based dosimetry was compared with final intraoperative dosimetry to validate dosimetry achieved in the implant suite. Results: An average of additional 4.0 seeds was implanted in 16 patients after initial intraoperative dose evaluation. Based on TRUS-fluoroscopy fusion-based dosimetry, the V100 improved from 86% to 93% (p = 0.005), whereas D90 increased from 94% to 109% (p = 0.011) with the guided additional seed implantation. No statistical difference was observed in V200 and V300 values. V100 and D90 values were 95 {+-} 4% and 120 {+-} 24%, respectively, based on the final intraoperative dosimetry evaluation, compared with 95 {+-} 4% and 122 {+-} 24%, respectively, based on Day 0 computed tomography-based dosimetry. Conclusions: Implantation of extra seeds based on TRUS-fluoroscopy fusion-based intraoperative dosimetry can improve the final V100 and D90 values with minimal increase in V200 and V300 values.

  1. Experience with carbon ion radiotherapy at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäkel, O.; Schulz-Ertner, D.; Karger, C. P.; Heeg, P.; Debus, J.

    2005-12-01

    At GSI, a radiotherapy facility was established using beam scanning and active energy variation. Between December 1997 and April 2004, 220 patients have been treated at this facility with carbon ions. Most patients are treated for chordoma and chondrosarcoma of the base of skull, using a dose of 60 Gye (Gray equivalent) in 20 fractions. Carbon ion therapy is also offered in a combination with conventional radiotherapy for a number of other tumors (adenoidcystic carcinoma, chordoma of the cervical spine and sacrum, atypical menningeoma). The patients treated for skull base tumors showed an overall local control rate after two years of 90%. The overall treatment toxicity was mild. This shows that carbon ion radiotherapy can safely be applied using a scanned beam and encouraged the Heidelberg university hospital to build a hospital based facility for ion therapy.

  2. CNS intraoperative consultation: a survival guide for non-neuropathologists.

    PubMed

    Kresak, Jesse Lee; Rivera-Zengotita, Marie; Foss, Robin M; Yachnis, Anthony T

    2014-01-01

    Intraoperative consultations for central nervous system disease may be challenging due to limitations of sample size, lack of familiarity with neurosurgical procedures, or poor access to neuroimaging studies. Despite these challenges, the surgical pathologist is charged with determining if the tissue sample is representative of the pathologic process while ensuring that enough diagnostic tissue has been retained for routine histology, immunohistochemistry, fluorescence in situ hybridization, molecular testing, and in some cases, tissue banking. Here, we present basic methods and a practical approach for CNS intraoperative consultation including critical pre-analytic considerations that promote optimal tissue management. PMID:25015160

  3. Intraoperative peripheral nerve injury in colorectal surgery. An update.

    PubMed

    Colsa Gutiérrez, Pablo; Viadero Cervera, Raquel; Morales-García, Dieter; Ingelmo Setién, Alfredo

    2016-03-01

    Intraoperative peripheral nerve injury during colorectal surgery procedures is a potentially serious complication that is often underestimated. The Trendelenburg position, use of inappropriately padded armboards and excessive shoulder abduction may encourage the development of brachial plexopathy during laparoscopic procedures. In open colorectal surgery, nerve injuries are less common. It usually involves the femoral plexus associated with lithotomy position and self-retaining retractor systems. Although in most cases the recovery is mostly complete, treatment consists of physical therapy to prevent muscular atrophy, protection of hypoesthesic skin areas and analgesics for neuropathic pain. The aim of the present study is to review the incidence, prevention and management of intraoperative peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26008880

  4. Minimally Invasive Spinal Surgery with Intraoperative Image-Guided Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Terrence T.; Johnson, J. Patrick; Pashman, Robert; Drazin, Doniel

    2016-01-01

    We present our perioperative minimally invasive spine surgery technique using intraoperative computed tomography image-guided navigation for the treatment of various lumbar spine pathologies. We present an illustrative case of a patient undergoing minimally invasive percutaneous posterior spinal fusion assisted by the O-arm system with navigation. We discuss the literature and the advantages of the technique over fluoroscopic imaging methods: lower occupational radiation exposure for operative room personnel, reduced need for postoperative imaging, and decreased revision rates. Most importantly, we demonstrate that use of intraoperative cone beam CT image-guided navigation has been reported to increase accuracy. PMID:27213152

  5. Intraoperative Fluorescence Imaging and Multimodal Surgical Navigation Using Goggle System.

    PubMed

    Mela, Christopher A; Papay, Francis A; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative imaging is an invaluable tool in many surgical procedures. We have developed a wearable stereoscopic imaging and display system entitled Integrated Imaging Goggle, which can provide real-time multimodal image guidance. With the Integrated Imaging Goggle, wide field-of-view fluorescence imaging is tracked and registered with intraoperative ultrasound imaging and preoperative tomography-based surgical navigation, to provide integrated multimodal imaging capabilities in real-time. Herein we describe the system instrumentation and the methods of using the Integrated Imaging Goggle to guide surgeries. PMID:27283420

  6. Minimally Invasive Spinal Surgery with Intraoperative Image-Guided Navigation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Terrence T; Johnson, J Patrick; Pashman, Robert; Drazin, Doniel

    2016-01-01

    We present our perioperative minimally invasive spine surgery technique using intraoperative computed tomography image-guided navigation for the treatment of various lumbar spine pathologies. We present an illustrative case of a patient undergoing minimally invasive percutaneous posterior spinal fusion assisted by the O-arm system with navigation. We discuss the literature and the advantages of the technique over fluoroscopic imaging methods: lower occupational radiation exposure for operative room personnel, reduced need for postoperative imaging, and decreased revision rates. Most importantly, we demonstrate that use of intraoperative cone beam CT image-guided navigation has been reported to increase accuracy. PMID:27213152

  7. Intraoperative neurophysiology in deep brain surgery for psychogenic dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Vesper Fe Marie L; Pillai, Ajay S; Lungu, Codrin; Ostrem, Jill; Starr, Philip; Hallett, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Psychogenic dystonia is a challenging entity to diagnose and treat because little is known about its pathophysiology. We describe two cases of psychogenic dystonia who underwent deep brain stimulation when thought to have organic dystonia. The intraoperative microelectrode recordings in globus pallidus internus were retrospectively compared with those of five patients with known DYT1 dystonia using spontaneous discharge parameters of rate and bursting, as well as movement-related discharges. Our data suggest that simple intraoperative neurophysiology measures in single subjects do not differentiate psychogenic dystonia from DYT1 dystonia. PMID:26125045

  8. Recruitment in Radiotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeley, T. J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The Faculty Board of Radiotherapy and Oncology of the Royal College of Radiobiologists surveyed the factors thought to influence recruitment into the specialty. Possible factors listed in replies of 36 questionnaires are offered. (LBH)

  9. Assessment of Macular Function during Vitrectomy: New Approach Using Intraoperative Focal Macular Electroretinograms

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Celso Soiti; Shinoda, Kei; Terauchi, Gaku; Matsumoto, Harue; Mizota, Atsushi; Miyake, Yozo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe a new technique to record focal macular electroretinograms (FMERGs) during vitrectomy to assess macular function. Methods Intraoperative FMERGs (iFMERGs) were recorded in ten patients (10 eyes) who undergo vitrectomy. iFMERGs were elicited by focal macular stimulation. The stimulus light was directed to the macular area through a 25 gauge (25G) glass fiber optic bundle. Background light was delivered through a dual chandelier-type light fiber probe. Focal macular responses elicited with combinations of stimulus and background luminances were analyzed. Results A stimulus luminance that was approximately 1.75 log units brighter than the background light was able to elicit focal macular responses that were not contaminated by stray light responses. Thus, a stimulus luminance of 160 cd/m2 delivered on a background of 3 cd/m2 elicited iFMEGs from only the stimulated area. This combination of stimulus and background luminances did not elicit a response when the stimulus was projected onto the optic nerve head. The iFMERGs elicited by a 10° stimulus with a duration of 100 ms and an interstimulus interval of 150 ms consisted of an a-, b-, and d-waves, the oscillatory potentials, and the photopic negative response (PhNR). Conclusions Focal ERGs with all components can be recorded from the macula and other retinal areas during vitreous surgery. This new technique will allow surgeons to assess the function of focal areas of the retina intraoperatively. PMID:26658489

  10. Fusion of intraoperative force sensoring, surface reconstruction and biomechanical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röhl, S.; Bodenstedt, S.; Küderle, C.; Suwelack, S.; Kenngott, H.; Müller-Stich, B. P.; Dillmann, R.; Speidel, S.

    2012-02-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is medically complex and can heavily benefit from computer assistance. One way to help the surgeon is to integrate preoperative planning data into the surgical workflow. This information can be represented as a customized preoperative model of the surgical site. To use it intraoperatively, it has to be updated during the intervention due to the constantly changing environment. Hence, intraoperative sensor data has to be acquired and registered with the preoperative model. Haptic information which could complement the visual sensor data is still not established. In addition, biomechanical modeling of the surgical site can help in reflecting the changes which cannot be captured by intraoperative sensors. We present a setting where a force sensor is integrated into a laparoscopic instrument. In a test scenario using a silicone liver phantom, we register the measured forces with a reconstructed surface model from stereo endoscopic images and a finite element model. The endoscope, the instrument and the liver phantom are tracked with a Polaris optical tracking system. By fusing this information, we can transfer the deformation onto the finite element model. The purpose of this setting is to demonstrate the principles needed and the methods developed for intraoperative sensor data fusion. One emphasis lies on the calibration of the force sensor with the instrument and first experiments with soft tissue. We also present our solution and first results concerning the integration of the force sensor as well as accuracy to the fusion of force measurements, surface reconstruction and biomechanical modeling.

  11. Integration of 3D intraoperative ultrasound for enhanced neuronavigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, Keith D.; Ji, Songbai; Hartov, Alex; Fan, Xiaoyao; Roberts, David W.

    2012-03-01

    True three-dimensional (3D) volumetric ultrasound (US) acquisitions stand to benefit intraoperative neuronavigation on multiple fronts. While traditional two-dimensional (2D) US and its tracked, hand-swept version have been recognized for many years to advantage significantly image-guided neurosurgery, especially when coregistered with preoperative MR scans, its unregulated and incomplete sampling of the surgical volume of interest have limited certain intraoperative uses of the information that are overcome through direct volume acquisition (i.e., through 2D scan-head transducer arrays). In this paper, we illustrate several of these advantages, including image-based intraoperative registration (and reregistration) and automated, volumetric displacement mapping for intraoperative image updating. These applications of 3D US are enabled by algorithmic advances in US image calibration, and volume rasterization and interpolation for multi-acquisition synthesis that will also be highlighted. We expect to demonstrate that coregistered 3D US is well worth incorporating into the standard neurosurgical navigational environment relative to traditional tracked, hand-swept 2D US.

  12. High-accuracy registration of intraoperative CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oentoro, A.; Ellis, R. E.

    2010-02-01

    Image-guided interventions using intraoperative 3D imaging can be less cumbersome than systems dependent on preoperative images, especially by needing neither potentially invasive image-to-patient registration nor a lengthy process of segmenting and generating a 3D surface model. In this study, a method for computer-assisted surgery using direct navigation on intraoperative imaging is presented. In this system the registration step of a navigated procedure was divided into two stages: preoperative calibration of images to a ceiling-mounted optical tracking system, and intraoperative tracking during acquisition of the 3D medical image volume. The preoperative stage used a custom-made multi-modal calibrator that could be optically tracked and also contained fiducial spheres for radiological detection; a robust registration algorithm was used to compensate for the very high false-detection rate that was due to the high physical density of the optical light-emitting diodes. Intraoperatively, a tracking device was attached to plastic bone models that were also instrumented with radio-opaque spheres; A calibrated pointer was used to contact the latter spheres as a validation of the registration. Experiments showed that the fiducial registration error of the preoperative calibration stage was approximately 0.1 mm. The target registration error in the validation stage was approximately 1.2 mm. This study suggests that direct registration, coupled with procedure-specific graphical rendering, is potentially a highly accurate means of performing image-guided interventions in a fast, simple manner.

  13. Laser Doppler imaging for intraoperative human brain mapping.

    PubMed

    Raabe, A; Van De Ville, D; Leutenegger, M; Szelényi, A; Hattingen, E; Gerlach, R; Seifert, V; Hauger, C; Lopez, A; Leitgeb, R; Unser, M; Martin-Williams, E J; Lasser, T

    2009-02-15

    The identification and accurate location of centers of brain activity are vital both in neuro-surgery and brain research. This study aimed to provide a non-invasive, non-contact, accurate, rapid and user-friendly means of producing functional images intraoperatively. To this end a full field Laser Doppler imager was developed and integrated within the surgical microscope and perfusion images of the cortical surface were acquired during awake surgery whilst the patient performed a predetermined task. The regions of brain activity showed a clear signal (10-20% with respect to the baseline) related to the stimulation protocol which lead to intraoperative functional brain maps of strong statistical significance and which correlate well with the preoperative fMRI and intraoperative cortical electro-stimulation. These initial results achieved with a prototype device and wavelet based regressor analysis (the hemodynamic response function being derived from MRI applications) demonstrate the feasibility of LDI as an appropriate technique for intraoperative functional brain imaging. PMID:19049824

  14. Clinical impact of intraoperative navigation using a Doppler ultrasonographic guided vessel tracking technique for pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Maemura, Kosei; Mataki, Yuko; Kurahara, Hiroshi; Iino, Satoshi; Sakoda, Masahiko; Ueno, Shinichi; Shinchi, Hiroyuki; Takao, Sonshin; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2014-01-01

    During pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), early ligation of critical vessels such as the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (IPDA) has been reported to reduce blood loss. Color Doppler flow imaging has become the useful diagnostic methods for the delineation of the anatomy. In this study, we assessed the utility of the intraoperative Doppler ultrasonography (Dop-US) guided vessel detection and tracking technique (Dop-Navi) for identifying critical arteries in order to reduce operative bleeding. Ninety patients who received PD for periampullary or pancreatic disease were enrolled. After 14 patients were excluded because of combined resection of portal vein or other organs, the remaining were assigned to 1 of 2 groups: patients for whom Dop-Navi was used (n = 37) and those for whom Dop-Navi was not used (n = 39; controls). We compared the ability of Dop-Navi to identify critical vessels to that of preoperative multi-detector computed tomography (MD-CT), using MD-CT data, as well as compared the perioperative status and postoperative outcome between the 2 patient groups. Intraoperative Dop-US was significantly superior to MD-CT in terms of identifying number of vessels and the ability to discriminate the IPDA from the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) based on blood flow velocity. The Dop-Navi patients had shorter operation times (531 min versus 577 min; no significance) and smaller bleeding volumes (1120 mL versus 1590 mL; P < 0.01) than the control patients without increasing postoperative complications. Intraoperative Dop-Navi method allows surgeons to clearly identify the IPDA during PD and to avoid injuries to major arteries. PMID:25437586

  15. Gold Nanoparticle Hyperthermia Reduces Radiotherapy Dose

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lynn; Slatkin, Daniel N.; Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Vadas, Timothy M.; Smilowitz, Henry M.

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles can absorb near infrared light, resulting in heating and ablation of tumors. Gold nanoparticles have also been used for enhancing the dose of X-rays in tumors during radiotherapy. The combination of hyperthermia and radiotherapy is synergistic, importantly allowing a reduction in X-ray dose with improved therapeutic results. Here we intratumorally infused small 15 nm gold nanoparticles engineered to be transformed from infrared-transparent to infrared-absorptive by the tumor, which were then heated by infrared followed by X-ray treatment. Synergy was studied using a very radioresistant subcutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCCVII) in mice. It was found that the dose required to control 50% of the tumors, normally 55 Gy, could be reduced to <15 Gy (a factor of >3.7). Gold nanoparticles therefore provide a method to combine hyperthermia and radiotherapy to drastically reduce the X-ray radiation needed, thus sparing normal tissue, reducing the side effects, and making radiotherapy more effective. PMID:24990355

  16. The Role of Radiotherapy in Acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Mark J; Barkan, Ariel L; Drake, William M

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy has, historically, played a central role in the management of acromegaly, and the last 30 years have seen substantial improvements in the technology used in the delivery of radiation therapy. More recently, the introduction of highly targeted radiotherapy, or 'radiosurgery', has further increased the therapeutic options available in the management of secretory pituitary tumors. Despite these developments, improvements in primary surgical outcomes, an increase in the range and effectiveness of medical therapy options, and long-term safety concerns have combined to dictate that, although still deployed in selected cases, the use of radiotherapy in the management of acromegaly has declined steadily over the past 2 decades. In this article, we review some of the main studies that have documented the efficacy of pituitary radiotherapy on growth hormone hypersecretion and summarize the data around its potential deleterious effects, including hypopituitarism, cranial nerve damage, and the development of radiation-related intracerebral tumors. We also give practical recommendations to guide its future use in patients with acromegaly, generally, as a third-line intervention after neurosurgical intervention in combination with various medical therapy options. PMID:26088716

  17. Persistent seroma after intraoperative placement of MammoSite for accelerated partial breast irradiation: Incidence, pathologic anatomy, and contributing factors

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Suzanne B.; Kaufman, Seth A.; Price, Lori Lyn; Cardarelli, Gene; Dipetrillo, Thomas A.; Wazer, David E. . E-mail: dwazer@tufts-nemc.org

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence of, and possible factors associated with, seroma formation after intraoperative placement of the MammoSite catheter for accelerated partial breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: This study evaluated 38 patients who had undergone intraoperative MammoSite catheter placement at lumpectomy or reexcision followed by accelerated partial breast irradiation with 34 Gy in 10 fractions. Data were collected regarding dosimetric parameters, including the volume of tissue enclosed by the 100%, 150%, and 200% isodose shells, dose homogeneity index, and maximal dose at the surface of the applicator. Clinical and treatment-related factors were analyzed, including patient age, patient weight, history of diabetes and smoking, use of reexcision, interval between surgery and radiotherapy, total duration of catheter placement, total excised specimen volume, and presence or absence of postprocedural infection. Seroma was verified by clinical examination, mammography, and/or ultrasonography. Persistent seroma was defined as seroma that was clinically detectable >6 months after radiotherapy completion. Results: After a median follow-up of 17 months, the overall rate of any detectable seroma was 76.3%. Persistent seroma (>6 months) occurred in 26 (68.4%) of 38 patients, of whom 46% experienced at least modest discomfort at some point during follow-up. Of these symptomatic patients, 3 required biopsy or complete cavity excision, revealing squamous metaplasia, foreign body giant cell reaction, fibroblasts, and active collagen deposition. Of the analyzed dosimetric, clinical, and treatment-related variables, only body weight correlated positively with the risk of seroma formation (p = 0.04). Postprocedural infection correlated significantly (p = 0.05) with a reduced risk of seroma formation. Seroma was associated with a suboptimal cosmetic outcome, because excellent scores were achieved in 61.5% of women with seroma compared with 83% without seroma

  18. Transcutaneous vs. intraoperative quantitative ultrasound for staging bovine hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Weijers, Gert; Starke, Alexander; Thijssen, Johan M; Haudum, Alois; Wohlsein, Peter; Rehage, Juergen; de Korte, Chris L

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that quantitative analysis of transcutaneous (Transc) ultrasound (US) images can predict the liver fat content with similar accuracy and precision as using intraoperative (Intraop) US. The second goal was to investigate if a tissue mimicking phantom (TMP) might be used as reference for automatic gain compensation (AGC) vs. depth instead of using the data of a set of cows without hepatic alterations. A study was performed in post partum dairy cows (N = 151), as an animal model of human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), to test these hypotheses. Five Transc and five Intraop US liver images were acquired in each animal and a liver biopsy was taken. In liver tissue samples, triacylglycerol (TAG) content was measured by biochemical analysis and hepatic alterations, other than hepatic steatosis, were excluded by clinical examination. Several preprocessing steps were performed before the ultrasound tissue characteristics (UTC) parameters of B-mode images were derived. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis was performed on a training set (N = 76) and the results were used on the test group (N = 75) to predict the TAG content in the liver. In all cases, the residual attenuation coefficient (ResAtt) was the only selected parameter. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was applied to assess the performance and area under the curve (AUC) of predicting TAG and to compare the sensitivity and specificity of the methods used. High ROC values for AUC (95%), sensitivity (87%) and specificity (83%) for both Intraop and Transc applications with control group as well as with phantom-based AGC were obtained. Consequently, it can be concluded that Transc results are equivalent to Intraop results. Furthermore, equivalent ROC values, when using TMP AGC, indicates the potential use of TMP-based corrections instead of normal group-based corrections. The high predictive values indicate that noninvasive quantitative

  19. Intraoperative tissue expansion in the surgical correction of craniosynostosis

    PubMed Central

    Doshier, Laura J; Fowler, Daniel; McEwan, Thomas; Baker, C Lynette; Muzaffar, Arshad R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Wound healing complications can occur after calvarial vault expansion due to tension on the scalp flaps. OBJECTIVES: To compare wound healing outcomes in patients with craniosynostosis undergoing calvarial vault expansion with and without intraoperative tissue expansion of the scalp. METHODS: The present analysis was an institutional review board-approved, retrospective cohort study involving 40 consecutive patients at the University of Missouri Hospitals and Clinics (Columbia, Missouri, USA) who underwent calvarial vault expansion for nonsyndromic craniosynostosis between June 1, 2009 and June 30, 2012. Patients were divided into two sequential cohorts: the first 20 underwent calvarial vault expansion without intraoperative tissue expansion; the second 20 underwent calvarial vault expansion with intraoperative tissue expansion. The main outcome measures included presence or absence of wound healing complications (persistent scabbing or slow-healing wounds, hardware exposure, need for operative wound revision or healed but widened scars), with documented postoperative follow-up of at least three months. The primary end point was the presence of a well-healed scar; the secondary end point was the need for an operative revision. RESULTS: Patients in the intraoperative tissue expansion group had a higher percentage of well-healed scars (73.6%) than those in the nonexpansion group (42.1%) (P=0.0487). This difference was primarily due to scar widening in the nonexpansion group. CONCLUSIONS: The present study demonstrated that the use of intraoperative tissue expansion in patients with nonsyndromic craniosynostosis who underwent calvarial vault expansion resulted in a greater likelihood of a well-healed incision with a lower rate of poor scarring. PMID:25821768

  20. [Radiotherapy of larynx cancers].

    PubMed

    Pointreau, Y; Lafond, C; Legouté, F; Trémolières, P; Servagi-Vernat, S; Giraud, P; Maingon, P; Calais, G; Lapeyre, M

    2016-09-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy is the gold standard in the treatment of larynx cancers (except T1 glottic tumour). Early T1 and T2 tumours may be treated by exclusive radiation or surgery. For tumours requiring total laryngectomy (T2 or T3), induction chemotherapy followed by exclusive radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy is possible. For T4 tumour, surgery must be proposed. The treatment of lymph nodes is based on the initial treatment of the primary tumour. In non-surgical procedure, in case of sequential radiotherapy, the curative dose is 70Gy and the prophylactic dose is 50Gy. An integrated simultaneous boost radiotherapy is allowed (70Gy in 2Gy per fraction and 56Gy in 1.8Gy per fraction or 70Gy in 2.12Gy per fraction). Postoperatively, radiotherapy is used in locally advanced cancer with dose levels based on pathologic criteria (66Gy for R1 resection, 50 to 54Gy for complete resection). Volume delineation was based on guidelines. PMID:27521037

  1. Radiotherapy of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.S.

    1985-04-01

    The role of radiotherapy in the treatment of malignant melanoma is limited, and surgery generally forms the mainstay of medical practice. However, there are some circumstances in which radiotherapy should be considered the treatment of choice. Symptomatic metastatic lesions in bone or brain can effectively be palliated in a substantial proportion of instances. At the current stage of our knowledge, conventionally fractionated treatment of such lesions forms the standard against which other treatments should be measured. In contrast, metastatic lesions to skin or lymph nodes that do not overlie critical normal structures probably are better treated by high-dose-per-fraction techniques. Radiotherapy may play a definitive role in the treatment of lentigo maligna. The precise optimal energy of the beam to be used remains to be defined. Slightly more penetrating radiation appears to be required for lentigo maligna melanomas. Here, too, the optimal energy remains to be defined. The treatment of nonlentigenous melanomas primarily by radiotherapy is unproved in my opinion. Certainly, the data from the Princess Margaret Hospital is exciting, but I believe it must be corroborated by a well-designed trial before it can be accepted without question. Future directions in treatment of malignant melanoma are likely to include further trials of unconventional fractionation and the use of radiosensitizing agents in conjunction with radiotherapy. The time for dermatologists and radiation therapists to cooperate in such studies is at hand.

  2. Cardiac Side-effects From Breast Cancer Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Taylor, C W; Kirby, A M

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer radiotherapy reduces the risk of cancer recurrence and death. However, it usually involves some radiation exposure of the heart and analyses of randomised trials have shown that it can increase the risk of heart disease. Estimates of the absolute risks of radiation-related heart disease are needed to help oncologists plan each individual woman's treatment. The risk for an individual woman varies according to her estimated cardiac radiation dose and her background risk of ischaemic heart disease in the absence of radiotherapy. When it is known, this risk can then be compared with the absolute benefit of the radiotherapy. At present, many UK cancer centres are already giving radiotherapy with mean heart doses of less than 3 Gy and for most women the benefits of the radiotherapy will probably far outweigh the risks. Technical approaches to minimising heart dose in breast cancer radiotherapy include optimisation of beam angles, use of multileaf collimator shielding, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, treatment in a prone position, treatment in deep inspiration (including the use of breath-hold and gating techniques), proton therapy and partial breast irradiation. The multileaf collimator is suitable for many women with upper pole left breast cancers, but for women with central or lower pole cancers, breath-holding techniques are now recommended in national UK guidelines. Ongoing work aims to identify ways of irradiating pan-regional lymph nodes that are effective, involve minimal exposure of organs at risk and are feasible to plan, deliver and verify. These will probably include wide tangent-based field-in-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy or arc radiotherapy techniques in combination with deep inspiratory breath-hold, and proton beam irradiation for women who have a high predicted heart dose from intensity-modulated radiotherapy. PMID:26133462

  3. Intraoperative /sup 99m/Tc bone imaging in the treatment of benign osteoblastic tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Sty, J.; Simons, G.

    1982-05-01

    Benign bone tumors can be successfully treated by local resection with the use of intraoperative bone imaging. Intraoperative bone imaging provided accurate localization of an osteoid osteoma in a patella of a 16-year-old girl when standard radiographs failed to demonstrate the lesion. In a case of osteoblastoma of the sacrum in a 12-year old girl, intraoperative scanning was used repeatedly to guide completeness of resection. In these cases in which routine intraoperative radiographs would have failed, intraoperative scanning proved to be essential for success.

  4. Intra-operative volume imaging of the left atrium and pulmonary veins with rotational X-ray angiography.

    PubMed

    Manzke, Robert; Reddy, Vivek Y; Dalal, Sandeep; Hanekamp, Annemarie; Rasche, Volker; Chan, Raymond C

    2006-01-01

    Complex electrophysiology (EP) procedures, such as catheter-based ablation in the left atrium and pulmonary veins (LAPV) for treatment of atrial fibrillation, require knowledge of heart chamber anatomy. Electroanatomical mapping (EAM) is typically used to define cardiac structures by combining electromagnetic spatial catheter localization with surface models which interpolate the anatomy between EAM point locations in 3D. Recently, the incorporation of pre-operative volumetric CT or MR data sets has allowed for more detailed maps of LAPV anatomy to be used intra-operatively. Preoperative data sets are however a rough guide since they can be acquired several days to weeks prior to EP intervention. Due to positional and physiological changes, the intra-operative cardiac anatomy can be different from that depicted in the pre-operative data. We present a novel application of contrast-enhanced rotational X-ray imaging for CT-like reconstruction of 3D LAPV anatomy during the intervention itself. We perform two selective contrast-enhanced rotational acquisitions and reconstruct CT-like volumes with 3D filtered back projection. Two volumes depicting the left and right portions of the LAPV are registered and fused. The combined data sets are then visualized and segmented intra-procedurally to provide anatomical data and surface models for intervention guidance. Our results from animal and human experiments indicate that the anatomical information from intra-operative CT-like reconstructions compares favorably with pre-acquired CT data and can be of sufficient quality for intra-operative guidance. PMID:17354940

  5. [Prostate cancer external beam radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Pommier, P; Latorzeff, I; Chapet, O; Chauvet, B; Hennequin, C

    2016-09-01

    The prostate external beam radiotherapy techniques are described, when irradiating the prostate or after prostatectomy, with and without pelvic lymph nodes. The following parts are presented: indications of radiotherapy, total dose and fractionation, planning CT image acquisition, volume of interest delineation (target volumes and organs at risk) and margins, Intensity modulated radiotherapy planning and corresponding dose-volume constraints, and finally Image guided radiotherapy. PMID:27516051

  6. Radiotherapy of inoperable lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Namer, M.; Lalanne, C.M.; Boublil, J.L.; Hery, M.; Chauvel, P.; Verschoore, J.; Aubanel, J.M.; Bruneton, J.N.

    1980-08-01

    Evaluation of loco-regional results obtained by radiotherapy for 31 patients with inoperable epidermoid lung cancer revealed objective remission (over 50%) in only 25% of patients. These results emphasize the limited effectiveness of radiotherapy in such cases and point out the need for increased research in radiotherapy techniques if survival rates are to be improved.

  7. [Radiotherapy for brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Latorzeff, I; Antoni, D; Gaudaire-Josset, S; Feuvret, L; Tallet-Richard, A; Truc, G; Noël, G

    2016-09-01

    Radiotherapy for brain metastases has become more multifaceted. Indeed, with the improvement of the patient's life expectancy, side effects must be undeniably avoided and the retreatments or multiple treatments are common. The cognitive side effects should be warned and the most modern techniques of radiation therapy are used regularly to reach this goal. The new classifications of patients with brain metastases help guiding treatment more appropriately. Stereotactic radiotherapy has supplanted whole brain radiation therapy both for patients with metastases in place and for those who underwent surgery. Hippocampus protection is possible with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Its relevance in terms of cognitive functioning should be more clearly demonstrated but the requirement, for using it, is increasingly strong. While addressing patients in palliative phase, the treatment of brain metastases is one of the localisations where technical thinking is the most challenging. PMID:27523410

  8. [Radiotherapy in Europe].

    PubMed

    Verheij, M; Slotman, B J

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important part in the curing of cancer patients and is an effective treatment for tumour-related symptoms. However, in many countries the level of access to this treatment modality is unacceptably low due to shortage of infrastructure, modern apparatus and trained staff. In Europe it is mainly the Eastern European countries that are behind in the provision of and accessibility to radiotherapy. Worldwide investment to narrow the gap would put an end to these undesirable differences. In addition, these investments would deliver economic benefits, especially in low-to-middle income countries. In this article, on the basis of a number of recently published reports, we discuss the differences that exist in the geographical spread of radiotherapy departments and the availability of apparatus within Europe. In conclusion we also take a short look at the Dutch situation. PMID:27334085

  9. Real-time Near-infrared Virtual Intraoperative Surgical Photoacoustic Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Changho; Lee, Donghyun; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Jeehyun; Kim, Chulhong

    2015-01-01

    We developed a near infrared (NIR) virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy (NIR-VISPAM) system that combines a conventional surgical microscope and an NIR light photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) system. NIR-VISPAM can simultaneously visualize PA B-scan images at a maximum display rate of 45 Hz and display enlarged microscopic images on a surgeon's view plane through the ocular lenses of the surgical microscope as augmented reality. The use of the invisible NIR light eliminated the disturbance to the surgeon's vision caused by the visible PAM excitation laser in a previous report. Further, the maximum permissible laser pulse energy at this wavelength is approximately 5 times more than that at the visible spectral range. The use of a needle-type ultrasound transducer without any water bath for acoustic coupling can enhance convenience in an intraoperative environment. We successfully guided needle and injected carbon particles in biological tissues ex vivo and in melanoma-bearing mice in vivo. PMID:26640772

  10. Intraoperative imaging during Mohs surgery with reflectance confocal microscopy: initial clinical experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Eileen S.; Cordova, Miguel; Kose, Kivanc; Phillips, William; Rossi, Anthony; Nehal, Kishwer; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2015-06-01

    Mohs surgery for the removal of nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) is performed in stages, while being guided by the examination for residual tumor with frozen pathology. However, preparation of frozen pathology at each stage is time consuming and labor intensive. Real-time intraoperative reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM), combined with video mosaicking, may enable rapid detection of residual tumor directly in the surgical wounds on patients. We report our initial experience on 25 patients, using aluminum chloride for nuclear contrast. Imaging was performed in quadrants in the wound to simulate the Mohs surgeon's examination of pathology. Images and videos of the epidermal and dermal margins were found to be of clinically acceptable quality. Bright nuclear morphology was identified at the epidermal margin and detectable in residual NMSC tumors. The presence of residual tumor and normal skin features could be detected in the peripheral and deep dermal margins. Intraoperative RCM imaging may enable detection of residual tumor directly on patients during Mohs surgery, and may serve as an adjunct for frozen pathology. Ultimately, for routine clinical utility, a stronger tumor-to-dermis contrast may be necessary, and also a smaller microscope with an automated approach for imaging in the entire wound in a rapid and controlled manner.

  11. Computer-assisted surgical planning and intraoperative navigation in the treatment of condylar osteochondroma.

    PubMed

    Yu, H B; Li, B; Zhang, L; Shen, S G; Wang, X D

    2015-01-01

    Mandibular condylar osteochondroma (OC) results in asymmetric prognathism with facial morphology and functional disturbances. The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility of computer-assisted surgical planning combined with intraoperative navigation in the treatment of condylar OC. Five patients with mandibular condylar OC were enrolled in this study. Surgical planning and simulation was performed based on a computed tomography reconstruction model using SurgiCase software. Under the guidance of navigation, a condylar OC resection and conservative condylectomy was carried out via intraoral approach. Simultaneous orthognathic surgery was used to correct the facial asymmetry and malocclusion. All patients healed uneventfully. No facial nerve injury or salivary fistula occurred. Facial symmetry and morphology were greatly improved and stable occlusion was obtained in all cases. Good matching between preoperative planning and postoperative results was achieved. Patients showed no signs of recurrence or temporomandibular joint ankylosis during follow-up of 12-30 months. Computer-assisted surgical planning and intraoperative navigation is a valuable option in the treatment of mandibular condylar OC. PMID:25442742

  12. Intraoperative imaging during Mohs surgery with reflectance confocal microscopy: initial clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Eileen S.; Cordova, Miguel; Kose, Kivanc; Phillips, William; Rossi, Anthony; Nehal, Kishwer; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Mohs surgery for the removal of nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) is performed in stages, while being guided by the examination for residual tumor with frozen pathology. However, preparation of frozen pathology at each stage is time consuming and labor intensive. Real-time intraoperative reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM), combined with video mosaicking, may enable rapid detection of residual tumor directly in the surgical wounds on patients. We report our initial experience on 25 patients, using aluminum chloride for nuclear contrast. Imaging was performed in quadrants in the wound to simulate the Mohs surgeon’s examination of pathology. Images and videos of the epidermal and dermal margins were found to be of clinically acceptable quality. Bright nuclear morphology was identified at the epidermal margin and detectable in residual NMSC tumors. The presence of residual tumor and normal skin features could be detected in the peripheral and deep dermal margins. Intraoperative RCM imaging may enable detection of residual tumor directly on patients during Mohs surgery, and may serve as an adjunct for frozen pathology. Ultimately, for routine clinical utility, a stronger tumor-to-dermis contrast may be necessary, and also a smaller microscope with an automated approach for imaging in the entire wound in a rapid and controlled manner. PMID:25706821

  13. Registration of liver images to minimally invasive intraoperative surface and subsurface data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yifei; Rucker, D. C.; Conley, Rebekah H.; Pheiffer, Thomas S.; Simpson, Amber L.; Geevarghese, Sunil K.; Miga, Michael I.

    2014-03-01

    Laparoscopic liver resection is increasingly being performed with results comparable to open cases while incurring less trauma and reducing recovery time. The tradeoff is increased difficulty due to limited visibility and restricted freedom of movement. Image-guided surgical navigation systems have the potential to help localize anatomical features to improve procedural safety and achieve better surgical resection outcome. Previous research has demonstrated that intraoperative surface data can be used to drive a finite element tissue mechanics organ model such that high resolution preoperative scans are registered and visualized in the context of the current surgical pose. In this paper we present an investigation of using sparse data as imposed by laparoscopic limitations to drive a registration model. Non-contact laparoscopicallyacquired surface swabbing and mock-ultrasound subsurface data were used within the context of a nonrigid registration methodology to align mock deformed intraoperative surface data to the corresponding preoperative liver model as derived from pre-operative image segmentations. The mock testing setup to validate the potential of this approach used a tissue-mimicking liver phantom with a realistic abdomen-port patient configuration. Experimental results demonstrates a range of target registration errors (TRE) on the order of 5mm were achieving using only surface swab data, while use of only subsurface data yielded errors on the order of 6mm. Registrations using a combination of both datasets achieved TRE on the order of 2.5mm and represent a sizeable improvement over either dataset alone.

  14. Real-time Near-infrared Virtual Intraoperative Surgical Photoacoustic Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Changho; Lee, Donghyun; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Jeehyun; Kim, Chulhong

    2015-09-01

    We developed a near infrared (NIR) virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy (NIR-VISPAM) system that combines a conventional surgical microscope and an NIR light photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) system. NIR-VISPAM can simultaneously visualize PA B-scan images at a maximum display rate of 45 Hz and display enlarged microscopic images on a surgeon's view plane through the ocular lenses of the surgical microscope as augmented reality. The use of the invisible NIR light eliminated the disturbance to the surgeon's vision caused by the visible PAM excitation laser in a previous report. Further, the maximum permissible laser pulse energy at this wavelength is approximately 5 times more than that at the visible spectral range. The use of a needle-type ultrasound transducer without any water bath for acoustic coupling can enhance convenience in an intraoperative environment. We successfully guided needle and injected carbon particles in biological tissues ex vivo and in melanoma-bearing mice in vivo. PMID:26640772

  15. Multispectral real-time fluorescence imaging for intraoperative detection of the sentinel lymph node in gynecologic oncology.

    PubMed

    Crane, Lucia M A; Themelis, George; Buddingh, K Tim; Buddingh, Tim; Harlaar, Niels J; Pleijhuis, Rick G; Sarantopoulos, Athanasios; van der Zee, Ate G J; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; van Dam, Gooitzen M

    2010-01-01

    The prognosis in virtually all solid tumors depends on the presence or absence of lymph node metastases. Surgical treatment most often combines radical excision of the tumor with a full lymphadenectomy in the drainage area of the tumor. However, removal of lymph nodes is associated with increased morbidity due to infection, wound breakdown and lymphedema. As an alternative, the sentinel lymph node procedure (SLN) was developed several decades ago to detect the first draining lymph node from the tumor. In case of lymphogenic dissemination, the SLN is the first lymph node that is affected (Figure 1). Hence, if the SLN does not contain metastases, downstream lymph nodes will also be free from tumor metastases and need not to be removed. The SLN procedure is part of the treatment for many tumor types, like breast cancer and melanoma, but also for cancer of the vulva and cervix. The current standard methodology for SLN-detection is by peritumoral injection of radiocolloid one day prior to surgery, and a colored dye intraoperatively. Disadvantages of the procedure in cervical and vulvar cancer are multiple injections in the genital area, leading to increased psychological distress for the patient, and the use of radioactive colloid. Multispectral fluorescence imaging is an emerging imaging modality that can be applied intraoperatively without the need for injection of radiocolloid. For intraoperative fluorescence imaging, two components are needed: a fluorescent agent and a quantitative optical system for intraoperative imaging. As a fluorophore we have used indocyanine green (ICG). ICG has been used for many decades to assess cardiac function, cerebral perfusion and liver perfusion. It is an inert drug with a safe pharmaco-biological profile. When excited at around 750 nm, it emits light in the near-infrared spectrum around 800 nm. A custom-made multispectral fluorescence imaging camera system was used. The aim of this video article is to demonstrate the detection of

  16. Multispectral Real-time Fluorescence Imaging for Intraoperative Detection of the Sentinel Lymph Node in Gynecologic Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Lucia M.A.; Themelis, George; Buddingh, K. Tim; Harlaar, Niels J.; Pleijhuis, Rick G.; Sarantopoulos, Athanasios; van der Zee, Ate G.J.; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; van Dam, Gooitzen M.

    2010-01-01

    The prognosis in virtually all solid tumors depends on the presence or absence of lymph node metastases.1-3 Surgical treatment most often combines radical excision of the tumor with a full lymphadenectomy in the drainage area of the tumor. However, removal of lymph nodes is associated with increased morbidity due to infection, wound breakdown and lymphedema.4,5 As an alternative, the sentinel lymph node procedure (SLN) was developed several decades ago to detect the first draining lymph node from the tumor.6 In case of lymphogenic dissemination, the SLN is the first lymph node that is affected (Figure 1). Hence, if the SLN does not contain metastases, downstream lymph nodes will also be free from tumor metastases and need not to be removed. The SLN procedure is part of the treatment for many tumor types, like breast cancer and melanoma, but also for cancer of the vulva and cervix.7 The current standard methodology for SLN-detection is by peritumoral injection of radiocolloid one day prior to surgery, and a colored dye intraoperatively. Disadvantages of the procedure in cervical and vulvar cancer are multiple injections in the genital area, leading to increased psychological distress for the patient, and the use of radioactive colloid. Multispectral fluorescence imaging is an emerging imaging modality that can be applied intraoperatively without the need for injection of radiocolloid. For intraoperative fluorescence imaging, two components are needed: a fluorescent agent and a quantitative optical system for intraoperative imaging. As a fluorophore we have used indocyanine green (ICG). ICG has been used for many decades to assess cardiac function, cerebral perfusion and liver perfusion.8 It is an inert drug with a safe pharmaco-biological profile. When excited at around 750 nm, it emits light in the near-infrared spectrum around 800 nm. A custom-made multispectral fluorescence imaging camera system was used.9. The aim of this video article is to demonstrate the

  17. Montecarlo simulation code in optimisation of the IntraOperative Radiation Therapy treatment with mobile dedicated accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, M.; Agosteo, S.; Moretti, R.; Andreoli, S.

    2007-06-01

    back scatter factor (BSF) and comparing percent depth dose curves in different target volume thicknesses for disks of different Z. Since measuring BSF can be quiet complicated a Monte Carlo study was performed. The main goal of the paper is to study the optimal combination of shielding disks to be used in intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for a dedicated LINAC with a beam mean energy of 7.2 MeV. Simulated depth-dose curves without shields were compared with measured data obtained (1) with motorised diode in water phantom and with (2) gaf-chromic film in RW3 slab phantom. The simulated depth dose curve in presence of the shields was compared with preliminary gaf-chromic HS film data, obtained for a target volume of 2,0 cm thickness; the material of the disk in contact with the target volume is aluminium (Al), copper (Cu) or lead (Pb), while the disk below is always lead or copper in order to protect tissues below. Work is in progress for the comparison of all the simulated data with measured data for all the disk combinations at different target volume thicknesses.

  18. Radiotherapy for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bleehen, N.M.; Cox, J.D.

    1985-05-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the management of lung cancer was reviewed at a workshop held in Cambridge, England, in June 1984. It was concluded that there was a continuing role for radiation therapy in the primary management of small cell lung cancer, including the loco-regional treatment for patients with limited disease. Radical radiotherapy for patients with non-small cell carcinoma could be curative for a proportion of patients with limited disease. Careful planning and quality control was essential. Palliative radiotherapy provided useful treatment for many other patients. Other related aspects of treatment are also presented.

  19. [Intraoperative ultrasound diagnosis in the removal of intraocular foreign bodies].

    PubMed

    Andreev, A A; Gundarova, R A; Kodzov, M B

    2008-01-01

    The paper provides a rationale and indications for diascleral removal of foreign bodies from the anterior chamber of the eyeball, by intraoperatively using ultrasound study. The clinical material presents 148 cases of diascleral removal of foreign (49 magnetic and 49 amagnetic) bodes impacted into the tunics of the anterior eye without evident opacities of optical media and without signs of endophthalmitis. The paper provides a pathogenetic rationale for the method that is lowly traumatic and highly effective (foreign bodies being removed in 99.9% of cases) due to the high precision of location of a scleral cut in the projection of foreign body bedding owing to intraoperative sound usage. A model clinical case of fragment removal is also shown in the paper. The specific features of criteria for using the method are described, by taking into account the anatomic characteristics of orbital eyeball location. PMID:18756799

  20. Trajectory optimization for intra-operative nuclear tomographic imaging.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Jakob; Lasser, Tobias; Gardiazabal, José; Navab, Nassir

    2013-10-01

    Diagnostic nuclear imaging modalities like SPECT typically employ gantries to ensure a densely sampled geometry of detectors in order to keep the inverse problem of tomographic reconstruction as well-posed as possible. In an intra-operative setting with mobile freehand detectors the situation changes significantly, and having an optimal detector trajectory during acquisition becomes critical. In this paper we propose an incremental optimization method based on the numerical condition of the system matrix of the underlying iterative reconstruction method to calculate optimal detector positions during acquisition in real-time. The performance of this approach is evaluated using simulations. A first experiment on a phantom using a robot-controlled intra-operative SPECT-like setup demonstrates the feasibility of the approach. PMID:23706624

  1. Toward Intraoperative Image-Guided Transoral Robotic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen P; Reaugamornrat, Sureerat; Deguet, Anton; Sorger, Jonathan M; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Richmon, Jeremy; Taylor, Russell H

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents the development and evaluation of video augmentation on the stereoscopic da Vinci S system with intraoperative image guidance for base of tongue tumor resection in transoral robotic surgery (TORS). Proposed workflow for image-guided TORS begins by identifying and segmenting critical oropharyngeal structures (e.g., the tumor and adjacent arteries and nerves) from preoperative computed tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. These preoperative planned data can be deformably registered to the intraoperative endoscopic view using mobile C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) [1, 2]. Augmentation of TORS endoscopic video defining surgical targets and critical structures has the potential to improve navigation, spatial orientation, and confidence in tumor resection. Experiments in animal specimens achieved statistically significant improvement in target localization error when comparing the proposed image guidance system to simulated current practice. PMID:25525474

  2. Transsphenoidal pituitary resection with intraoperative MR guidance: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pergolizzi, Richard S., Jr.; Schwartz, Richard B.; Hsu, Liangge; Wong, Terence Z.; Black, Peter M.; Martin, Claudia; Jolesz, Ferenc A.

    1999-05-01

    The use of intraoperative MR image guidance has the potential to improve the precision, extent and safety of transsphenoidal pituitary resections. At Brigham and Women's Hospital, an open-bore configuration 0.5T MR system (SIGNA SP, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI) has been used to provide image guidance for nine transsphenoidal pituitary adenoma resections. The intraoperative MR system allowed the radiologist to direct the surgeon toward the sella turcica successfully while avoiding the cavernous sinus, optic chiasm and other sensitive structures. Imaging performed during the surgery monitored the extent of resection and allowed for removal of tumor beyond the surgeon's view in five cases. Dynamic MR imaging was used to distinguish residual tumor from normal gland and postoperative changes permitting more precise tumor localization. A heme-sensitive long TE gradient echo sequence was used to evaluate for the presence of hemorrhagic debris. All patients tolerated the procedure well without significant complications.

  3. Intraoperative Dexmedetomidine Promotes Postoperative Analgesia in Patients After Abdominal Colectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Dong-Jian; Qi, Bin; Tang, Gang; Li, Jin-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Surgery-induced acute postoperative pain may lead to prolonged convalescence. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of intraoperative dexmedetomidine on postoperative analgesia following abdominal colectomy surgeries. Eighty patients scheduled for abdominal colectomy surgery under general anesthesia were divided into 2 groups, which were maintained using propofol/remifentanil/dexmedetomidine (PRD) or propofol/remifentanil/saline (PRS). During surgery, patients in the PRD group had a lower bispectral index (BIS) value, which indicated a deeper anesthetic state, and a higher sedation score right after extubation than patients in the PRS group. During the first 24 hours post surgery, PRD patients consumed less morphine in patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and had a lower score in the visual analog scale (VAS) testing than their controls from the PRS group. Intraoperative administration of dexmedetomidine appears to promote the analgesic property of morphine-based PCA in patients after abdominal colectomy. PMID:26376397

  4. Intraoperative blood loss in orthotopic liver transplantation: The predictive factors

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Chandra Kant; Singh, Anshuman; Kajal, Kamal; Dhankhar, Mandeep; Tandon, Manish; Pandey, Vijay Kant; Karna, Sunaina Tejpal

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation has been associated with massive blood loss and considerable transfusion requirements. Bleeding in orthotopic liver transplantation is multifactorial. Technical difficulties inherent to this complex surgical procedure and pre operative derangements of the primary and secondary coagulation system are thought to be the principal causes of perioperative hemorrhage. Intraoperative practices such as massive fluid resuscitation and resulting hypothermia and hypocalcemia secondary to citrate toxicity further aggravate the preexisting coagulopathy and worsen the perioperative bleeding. Excessive blood loss and transfusion during orthotopic liver transplant are correlated with diminished graft survival and increased septic episodes and prolonged ICU stay. With improvements in surgical skills, anesthetic technique, graft preservation, use of intraoperative cell savers and overall perioperative management, orthotopic liver transplant is now associated with decreased intra operative blood losses. The purpose of this review is to discuss the risk factors predictive of increased intra operative bleeding in patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplant. PMID:26131330

  5. A tool for intraoperative visualization of registration results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Franklin; Lasso, Andras; Pinter, Csaba; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2014-03-01

    PURPOSE: Validation of image registration algorithms is frequently accomplished by the visual inspection of the resulting linear or deformable transformation due to the lack of ground truth information. Visualization of transformations produced by image registration algorithms during image-guided interventions allows for a clinician to evaluate the accuracy of the result transformation. Software packages that perform the visualization of transformations exist, but are not part of a clinically usable software application. We present a tool that visualizes both linear and deformable transformations and is integrated in an open-source software application framework suited for intraoperative use and general evaluation of registration algorithms. METHODS: A choice of six different modes are available for visualization of a transform. Glyph visualization mode uses oriented and scaled glyphs, such as arrows, to represent the displacement field in 3D whereas glyph slice visualization mode creates arrows that can be seen as a 2D vector field. Grid visualization mode creates deformed grids shown in 3D whereas grid slice visualization mode creates a series of 2D grids. Block visualization mode creates a deformed bounding box of the warped volume. Finally, contour visualization mode creates isosurfaces and isolines that visualize the magnitude of displacement across a volume. The application 3D Slicer was chosen as the platform for the transform visualizer tool. 3D Slicer is a comprehensive open-source application framework developed for medical image computing and used for intra-operative registration. RESULTS: The transform visualizer tool fulfilled the requirements for quick evaluation of intraoperative image registrations. Visualizations were generated in 3D Slicer with little computation time on realistic datasets. It is freely available as an extension for 3D Slicer. CONCLUSION: A tool for the visualization of displacement fields was created and integrated into 3D Slicer

  6. Intraoperative findings in revision chronic otitis media surgery.

    PubMed

    Faramarzi, Abolhassan; Motasaddi-Zarandy, Masoud; Khorsandi, Mohammad-Taghi

    2008-03-01

    In this study, we reviewed the surgical findings in a series of revision tympanomastoidectomy to determine the most common causes of failure in chronic otitis media surgery. The intraoperative findings at revision mastoidectomy with tympanoplasty of 116 patients were analyzed. The most common sites of pathologic tissue at revision surgery (with cholesteatoma and/ or granulation tissue) were unexenterated cells of the sinodural angle. The most common mechanical cause of retention of debris in canal wall down procedures was facial ridge. PMID:18298298

  7. Macular Surgery Using Intraoperative Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Riazi-Esfahani, Mohammad; Khademi, Mohammad Reza; Mazloumi, Mehdi; Khodabandeh, Alireza; Riazi-Esfahani, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To report the use of intraoperative spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) for detecting anatomical changes during macular surgery. Methods: In a consecutive case series, 32 eyes of 32 patients undergoing concurrent pars plana vitrectomy and intraoperative SD-OCT for macular hole (MH), epiretinal membrane (ERM) and vitreomacular traction (VMT) were enrolled. Intraoperative changes in retinal thickness and dimensions of the macular hole were measured in patients with ERM and VMT following surgical manipulation using a hand-held SD-OCT device (iVue, Optovue Inc., Fremont, CA, USA). Results: SD-OCT images of sixteen eyes with macular hole were subjected to quantitative and qualitative analysis. All MH dimensions remained stable during consecutive stages of surgery except for MH apex diameter, which showed a significant decrease after internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling (P=0.025). Quantitative analysis of ten patients with ERM showed a significant decrease in retinal thickness after membrane removal (P=0.018) which did not remain significant until the end of the procedure (P=0.8). In three cases, subretinal fluid was formed after ILM peeling. Quantitative analysis of five patients with VMT showed a decrease in retinal thickness during consecutive steps of the surgery, although these changes were not significant. In two cases, subretinal fluid was formed after ILM peeling. Conclusion: Intraoperative SD-OCT is a useful imaging technique which provides vitreoretinal surgeons with rapid awareness of changes in macular anatomy during surgery and may therefore result in better anatomical and visual outcomes. PMID:26730318

  8. Intraoperative MRI in pediatric neurosurgery—an update

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Since the advent of intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (ioMRI) at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in 1994, ioMRI has spread widely and in many different forms. This article traces the developmental history of ioMRI and reviews the relevant literature regarding it’s effectiveness in pediatric neurosurgery. While of considerable expense, current trends in healthcare essentially mandate the use of ioMRI in a growing number of cases. PMID:26835341

  9. Supra-complete surgery via dual intraoperative visualization approach (DiVA) prolongs patient survival in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Eyüpoglu, Ilker Y; Hore, Nirjhar; Merkel, Andreas; Buslei, Rolf; Buchfelder, Michael; Savaskan, Nicolai

    2016-05-01

    Safe and complete resection represents the first step in the treatment of glioblastomas and is mandatory in increasing the effectiveness of adjuvant therapy to prolong overall survival. With gross total resection currently limited in extent to MRI contrast enhancing areas, the extent to which supra-complete resection beyond obvious contrast enhancement could have impact on overall survival remains unclear. DiVA (dual intraoperative visualization approach) redefines gross total resection as currently accepted by enabling for the first time supra-complete surgery without compromising patient safety. This approach exploits the advantages of two already accepted surgical techniques combining intraoperative MRI with integrated functional neuronavigation and 5-ALA by integrating them into a single surgical approach. We investigated whether this technique has impact on overall outcome in GBM patients. 105 patients with GBM were included. We achieved complete resection with intraoperative MRI alone according to current best-practice in glioma surgery in 75 patients. 30 patients received surgery with supra-complete resection. The control arm showed a median life expectancy of 14 months, reflecting current standards-of-care and outcome. In contrast, patients receiving supra-complete surgery displayed significant increase in median survival time to 18.5 months with overall survival time correlating directly with extent of supra-complete resection. This extension of overall survival did not come at the cost of neurological deterioration. We show for the first time that supra-complete glioma surgery leads to significant prolongation of overall survival time in GBM patients. PMID:27036027

  10. Use of Kaolin-impregnated Gauze for Improvement of Intraoperative Hemostasis and Postoperative Wound Healing in Blepharoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Czyz, Craig N.; Stacey, Andrew W.; Cahill, Kenneth V.; Foster, Jill A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Kaolin is a mineral shown to be effective in controlling hemorrhage when combined with standard gauze and applied to wounds. This study investigates the application of kaolin to control intraoperative bleeding and promote wound healing in eyelid surgery. Methods: This prospective, randomized, double-blind study recruited patients who underwent eyelid surgery. Following skin incision, kaolin-impregnated gauzewas placed in one eyelid wound bed and cotton gauze in the other, then removed. Distinct, individual areas of bleeding were recorded. Standardized photographs were obtained postoperatively on Day 1, 4, and 7. Photographs were graded for edema and ecchymosis by four blinded observers. Patients also completed a survey inquiring which side had more bruising, swelling, and pain at each return visit. Results: A total of 46 patients completed the study. The number of intraoperative bleeding sites for kaolin versus plain gauze was not significantly different (p=0.96). Photographic grading by blinded observers did not identify any statistically significant differences in postoperative edema at any time point between lids. There was a statistically significant difference for ecchymosis at postoperative Day 4 (p=0.009) and Day 7 (p=0.016). Patient surveys did not show any difference in perceived edema, ecchymosis, or pain between lids. Conclusion: Intraoperative hemostasis was not affected by the use of kaolin-impregnated gauze. The effectiveness of kaolin in wound healing showed improved ecchymosis at Days 4 and 7 when assessed by blinded observers. Patients did not notice any improvement in postoperative edema, ecchymosis, or pain. PMID:27386052

  11. Intraoperative diagnostics and elimination of residual microtumours with plasmonic nanobubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y.; Kim, Yoo-Shin; Belatsarkouski, Ihor; Gillenwater, Ann M.; O'Neill, Brian E.; Lapotko, Dmitri O.

    2016-06-01

    Failure of cancer surgery to intraoperatively detect and eliminate microscopic residual disease (MRD) causes lethal recurrence and metastases, and the removal of important normal tissues causes excessive morbidity. Here, we show that a plasmonic nanobubble (PNB), a non-stationary laser pulse-activated nanoevent, intraoperatively detects and eliminates MRD in the surgical bed. PNBs were generated in vivo in head and neck cancer cells by systemically targeting tumours with gold colloids and locally applying near-infrared, low-energy short laser pulses, and were simultaneously detected with an acoustic probe. In mouse models, between 3 and 30 residual cancer cells and MRD (undetectable with current methods) were non-invasively detected up to 4 mm deep in the surgical bed within 1 ms. In resectable MRD, PNB-guided surgery prevented local recurrence and delivered 100% tumour-free survival. In unresectable MRD, PNB nanosurgery improved survival twofold compared with standard surgery. Our results show that PNB-guided surgery and nanosurgery can rapidly and precisely detect and remove MRD in simple intraoperative procedures.

  12. A geometric analysis of mastectomy incisions: Optimizing intraoperative breast volume

    PubMed Central

    Chopp, David; Rawlani, Vinay; Ellis, Marco; Johnson, Sarah A; Buck, Donald W; Khan, Seema; Bethke, Kevin; Hansen, Nora; Kim, John YS

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The advent of acellular dermis-based tissue expander breast reconstruction has placed an increased emphasis on optimizing intraoperative volume. Because skin preservation is a critical determinant of intraoperative volume expansion, a mathematical model was developed to capture the influence of incision dimension on subsequent tissue expander volumes. METHODS: A mathematical equation was developed to calculate breast volume via integration of a geometrically modelled breast cross-section. The equation calculates volume changes associated with excised skin during the mastectomy incision by reducing the arc length of the cross-section. The degree of volume loss is subsequently calculated based on excision dimensions ranging from 35 mm to 60 mm. RESULTS: A quadratic relationship between breast volume and the vertical dimension of the mastectomy incision exists, such that incrementally larger incisions lead to a disproportionally greater amount of volume loss. The vertical dimension of the mastectomy incision – more so than the horizontal dimension – is of critical importance to maintain breast volume. Moreover, the predicted volume loss is more profound in smaller breasts and primarily occurs in areas that affect breast projection on ptosis. CONCLUSIONS: The present study is the first to model the relationship between the vertical dimensions of the mastectomy incision and subsequent volume loss. These geometric principles will aid in optimizing intra-operative volume expansion during expander-based breast reconstruction. PMID:22654531

  13. Intraoperative brain tumor resection cavity characterization with conoscopic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Amber L.; Burgner, Jessica; Chen, Ishita; Pheiffer, Thomas S.; Sun, Kay; Thompson, Reid C.; Webster, Robert J., III; Miga, Michael I.

    2012-02-01

    Brain shift compromises the accuracy of neurosurgical image-guided interventions if not corrected by either intraoperative imaging or computational modeling. The latter requires intraoperative sparse measurements for constraining and driving model-based compensation strategies. Conoscopic holography, an interferometric technique that measures the distance of a laser light illuminated surface point from a fixed laser source, was recently proposed for non-contact surface data acquisition in image-guided surgery and is used here for validation of our modeling strategies. In this contribution, we use this inexpensive, hand-held conoscopic holography device for intraoperative validation of our computational modeling approach to correcting for brain shift. Laser range scan, instrument swabbing, and conoscopic holography data sets were collected from two patients undergoing brain tumor resection therapy at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. The results of our study indicate that conoscopic holography is a promising method for surface acquisition since it requires no contact with delicate tissues and can characterize the extents of structures within confined spaces. We demonstrate that for two clinical cases, the acquired conoprobe points align with our model-updated images better than the uncorrected images lending further evidence that computational modeling approaches improve the accuracy of image-guided surgical interventions in the presence of soft tissue deformations.

  14. Intraoperative echocardiographic detection of regurgitant jets after valve replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morehead, A. J.; Firstenberg, M. S.; Shiota, T.; Qin, J.; Armstrong, G.; Cosgrove, D. M. 3rd; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Paravalvular jets, documented by intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography, have prompted immediate valve explantation by others, yet the significance of these jets is unknown. METHODS: Twenty-seven patients had intraoperative transesophageal two-dimensional color Doppler echocardiography, performed to assess the number and area of regurgitant jets after valve replacement, before and after protamine. Patients were grouped by first time versus redo operation, valve position and type. RESULTS: Before protamine, 55 jets were identified (2.04+/-1.4 per patient) versus 29 jets after (1.07+/-1.2 per patient, p = 0.0002). Total jet area improved from 2.0+/-2.2 cm2 to 0.86+/-1.7 cm2 with protamine (p<0.0001). In all patients jet area decreased (average decrease, 70.7%+/-27.0%). First time and redo operations had similar improvements in jet number and area (both p>0.6). Furthermore, mitral and mechanical valves each had more jets and overall greater jet area when compared to aortic and tissue valves, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Following valve replacement, multiple jets are detected by intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography. They are more common and larger in the mitral position and with mechanical valves. Improvement occurs with reversal of anticoagulation.

  15. Intraoperative diagnostics and elimination of residual microtumours with plasmonic nanobubbles.

    PubMed

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y; Kim, Yoo-Shin; Belatsarkouski, Ihor; Gillenwater, Ann M; O'Neill, Brian E; Lapotko, Dmitri O

    2016-06-01

    Failure of cancer surgery to intraoperatively detect and eliminate microscopic residual disease (MRD) causes lethal recurrence and metastases, and the removal of important normal tissues causes excessive morbidity. Here, we show that a plasmonic nanobubble (PNB), a non-stationary laser pulse-activated nanoevent, intraoperatively detects and eliminates MRD in the surgical bed. PNBs were generated in vivo in head and neck cancer cells by systemically targeting tumours with gold colloids and locally applying near-infrared, low-energy short laser pulses, and were simultaneously detected with an acoustic probe. In mouse models, between 3 and 30 residual cancer cells and MRD (undetectable with current methods) were non-invasively detected up to 4 mm deep in the surgical bed within 1 ms. In resectable MRD, PNB-guided surgery prevented local recurrence and delivered 100% tumour-free survival. In unresectable MRD, PNB nanosurgery improved survival twofold compared with standard surgery. Our results show that PNB-guided surgery and nanosurgery can rapidly and precisely detect and remove MRD in simple intraoperative procedures. PMID:26878142

  16. Intraoperative nerve monitoring during total shoulder arthroplasty surgery

    PubMed Central

    Aresti, Nick; Plumb, Karen; Cowan, Joseph; Higgs, Deborah; Lambert, Simon; Falworth, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background Nerve injury is an acknowledged complication of total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA). Although the incidence of postoperative neurological deficit has been reported to be between 1% and 16%, the true incidence of nerve damage is considered to be higher. The present study aimed to identify the rate of intraoperative nerve injury during total shoulder arthroplasty and to determine potential risk factors. Methods A prospective study of nerve conduction in 21 patients who underwent primary or revision TSA was carried out over a 12-month period. Nerve conduction was monitored by measuring intraoperative sensory evoked potentials (SEP). A significant neurophysiological signal change was defined as either a unilateral or bilateral decrease in SEP signal of ≥50%, a latency increase of ≥10% or a change in waveform morphology, not caused by operative or anaesthetic technique. Results Seven (33%) patients had a SEP signal change. The only significant risk factor identified for signal change was male sex (odds ratio 15.00, 95% confidence interval). The median nerve was the most affected nerve in the operated arm. All but one signal change returned to normal before completion of the operation and no patient had a persisting postoperative clinical neurological deficit. Conclusions The incidence of intraoperative nerve damage may be more common than previously reported. However, the loss of SEP signal is reversible and does not correlate with persisting clinical neurological deficits. The median nerve appears to be most at risk. Monitoring SEPs in the operated limb during TSA may be a valuable tool during TSA.

  17. The role of intraoperative scrape cytology in vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Inuganti, Renuka Venkata; Mettu, Rami Reddy; Surath, Harsha Vardhan; Surath, Amarnath

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To assess the adequacy of intraoperative scrape cytology during percutaneous vertebroplasty by correlating results with corresponding histopathology. Settings and Design: Vertebroplasty is a procedure increasingly used to treat painful vertebral compression fractures. The history and presentation of osteoporotic fractures are straightforward, but difficulty arises in differentiating infective from neoplastic lesions, especially in cases where the magnetic resonance imaging is equivocal. The procedure involves injection of polymethyl methacrylate (bone cement) into the pathological vertebral body and gives dramatic pain relief. It is indicated in osteoporotic and neoplastic lesions but contraindicated in infections. Hence, intraoperative evaluation of a specimen is essential to aid in the decision of performing vertebroplasty. Subjects and Methods: A total of 128 patients with vertebral lesions underwent core biopsy and scrape cytology from June 2006 to June 2015. Based on the findings of cytological examination, malignant lesions were subjected to vertebroplasty. In lesions with infective etiology, vertebroplasty was abandoned and antibiotic or antituberculous therapy started. Results: The overall diagnostic accuracy of scrape cytology was excellent with 97.58% cases correlating with the final histopathological diagnosis. Specificity was 100%, positive predictive value was 100% and negative predictive value was 33.33%. Conclusion: Scrape cytology is a simple, rapid, accurate cytodiagnostic technique and should be routinely utilized in vertebral lesions for intraoperative consultation and decision making during vertebroplasty. PMID:27298628

  18. Radiotherapy and brachytherapy for recurrent colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, S. )

    1991-05-01

    Radical surgical excision of locoregional recurrence of colorectal carcinoma usually produces the best survival and should be attempted whenever possible. However, recurrences are often unresectable; hence palliative local therapy may be indicated. There are several options for the radiation therapy of local, unresectable, recurrent, or metastatic colorectal cancer. Whole pelvis irradiation of 4,000-5,000 cGy followed by a coned-down boost of 1,000-1,500 cGy generally provides good symptomatic palliation in 80-90% of patients, but long-term control or cure is rarely achieved. External beam irradiation of 2,000-3,000 cGy to the whole liver with or without concurrent chemotherapy may be used for palliation of metastatic disease to the liver. A combination of intraoperative radiation therapy applied directly to the tumor bed and external beam irradiation may improve local control and survival rates. Multiple options are available for the intraoperative use of brachytherapy which can deliver high radiation doses to the residual tumor, or tumor bed, sparing normal tissue.

  19. SU-E-T-545: A MLC-Equipped Robotic Radiosurgery-Radiotherapy Combined System in Treating Hepatic Lesions: Delivery Efficiency as Compared to a Standard Linac for Treating Hepatic Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, L; Price, R; Wang, L; Meyer, J; Ma, C; Fan, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The CyberKnife (CK) M6 Series introduced a mulitleaf collimator (MLC) beam for extending its capability to the conventional radiotherapy. This work is to investigate delivery efficiency of this system as compared to a standard Varian linac when treating hepatic lesions. Methods: Nine previously treated patients were divided into three groups with three patients in each. Group one: fractionated radiotherapy; Group two: SBRT-like treatments and Group three: fractionated radiotherapy targeting two PTVs. The clinically used plans were generated with the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS). We re-planned these cases using a Mulitplan (MP) TPS for the CK M6 and normalized to the same PTV dose coverage. CK factors (CF) (defined as modulation scaling factor in this work), number of nodes (NN), number of MLC segments (NS) and beam delivery time (BT) with an estimated image interval of 60 seconds, were used for evaluation of delivery efficiency. Results: Generated plans from the MP and Eclipse TPS demonstrated the similar quality in terms of PTV confomality index, minimum and maximum PTV doses, and doses received by critical structures. Group one: CF ranged from 8.1 to 8.7, NN from 30 to 40, NS from 120 to 155 and BT from 20 to 23 minutes; group two: CF from 4.7 to 8.5, NN from 15 to 19, NS from 82 to 141 and BT from 18 to 24 minutes; and group three: CF from 7.9 to 10, NN from 47 to 49, NS from 110 to 113 and BT from 20 to 22 minutes. Conclusions: Delivery time is longer for the CK M6 than for the Varian linac (7.8 to 13.7 minutes). Further investigation will be necessary to determine if a PTV reduction from the tracking feature will shorten the delivery time without decreasing plan quality.

  20. Surgery for intramedullary spinal cord tumors: the role of intraoperative (neurophysiological) monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sala, Francesco; Bricolo, Albino; Faccioli, Franco; Lanteri, Paola; Gerosa, Massimo

    2007-11-01

    In spite of advancements in neuro-imaging and microsurgical techniques, surgery for intramedullary spinal cord tumors (ISCT) remains a challenging task. The rationale for using intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IOM) is in keeping with the goal of maximizing tumor resection and minimizing neurological morbidity. For many years, before the advent of motor evoked potentials (MEPs), only somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) were monitored. However, SEPs are not aimed to reflect the functional integrity of motor pathways and, nowadays, the combined used of SEPs and MEPs in ISCT surgery is almost mandatory because of the possibility to selectively injury either the somatosensory or the motor pathways. This paper is aimed to review our perspective in the field of IOM during ISCT surgery and to discuss it in the light of other intraoperative neurophysiologic strategies that have recently appeared in the literature with regards to ISCT surgery. Besides standard cortical SEP monitoring after peripheral stimulation, both muscle (mMEPs) and epidural MEPs (D-wave) are monitored after transcranial electrical stimulation (TES). Given the dorsal approach to the spinal cord, SEPs must be monitored continuously during the incision of the dorsal midline. When the surgeon starts to work on the cleavage plane between tumor and spinal cord, attention must be paid to MEPs. During tumor removal, we alternatively monitor D-wave and mMEPs, sustaining the stimulation during the most critical steps of the procedure. D-waves, obtained through a single pulse TES technique, allow a semi-quantitative assessment of the functional integrity of the cortico-spinal tracts and represent the strongest predictor of motor outcome. Whenever evoked potentials deteriorate, temporarily stop surgery, warm saline irrigation and improved blood perfusion have proved useful for promoting recovery, Most of intraoperative neurophysiological derangements are reversible and therefore IOM is able to

  1. Usefulness of intraoperative coronary angioplasty in aorto-coronary bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Ban, T; Sakata, R; Soneda, J; Matsuda, M; Nishimura, K; Hirata, K; Mochizuki, T

    1985-10-01

    Seven patients underwent aorto-coronary bypass grafting combined with intraoperative transluminal coronary angioplasty (OTCA), because of multiple obliteration of the coronary arteries with poor distal run-off. The patients were all males with a mean age of 52.6 years. For OTCA, a SIMPSON-ROBERT vascular dilator system was used. Eight stenoses in seven patients, four in the left anterior descending artery (LAD) and three in the right coronary artery (RCA) were dilated by means of OTCA. In five patients the results were satisfactory but in two patients the procedures resulted in failure. Dilatation failed because of severe calcification of LAD in one case and, in the other, distal RCA was completely obstructed by a compressed atherosclerotic plaque at the bifurcation after the procedure. From these limited experiences we believe that OTCA might be a method of selection to treat the patients with coronary sclerosis with poor distal run-off. PMID:2935652

  2. The potential of radiotherapy to enhance the efficacy of renal cell carcinoma therapy

    PubMed Central

    De Wolf, Katrien; Vermaelen, Karim; De Meerleer, Gert; Lambrecht, Bart N; Ost, Piet

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is an immunogenic tumor, but uses several immune-suppressive mechanisms to shift the balance from tumor immune response toward tumor growth. Although RCC has traditionally been considered to be radiation resistant, recent evidence suggests that hypofractionated radiotherapy contributes to systemic antitumor immunity. Because the efficacy of antitumor immune responses depends on the complex balance between diverse immune cells and progressing tumor cells, radiotherapy alone is unlikely to induce persistent antitumor immunity. Therefore, the combination of radiotherapy with drugs having synergistic immunomodulatory properties holds great promise with the optimal timing and sequence of modalities depending on the agent used. We highlight the immunomodulatory properties of targeted therapies, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) neutralizing antibodies, and will suggest a combination schedule with radiotherapy based on the available literature. We also address the combination of radiotherapy with innovative treatments in the field of immunotherapy. PMID:26464810

  3. Phase I trial of split-dose induction docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (TPF) chemotherapy followed by curative surgery combined with postoperative radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer (TISOC-1)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Induction chemotherapy (ICT) with docetaxel, cisplatin and fluorouracil (TPF) followed by radiotherapy is an effective treatment option for unresectable locally advanced head and neck cancer. This phase I study was designed to investigate the safety and tolerability of a split-dose TPF ICT regimen prior to surgery for locally advanced resectable oral and oropharyngeal cancer. Methods Patients received TPF split on two dosages on day 1 and 8 per cycle for one or three 3-week cycles prior to surgery and postoperative radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy. Docetaxel was escalated in two dose levels, 40 mg/m2 (DL 0) and 30 mg/m2 (DL −1), plus 40 mg/m2 cisplatin and 2000 mg/m2 fluorouracil per week using a 3 +3 dose escalation algorithm. Results Eighteen patients were enrolled and were eligible for toxicity and response. A maximum tolerated dose of 30 mg/m2 docetaxel per week was reached. The most common grade 3+ adverse event was neutropenia during ICT in 10 patients. Surgery reached R0 resection in all cases. Nine patients (50%) showed complete pathologic regression. Conclusions A split-dose regime of TPF prior to surgery is feasible, tolerated and merits additional investigation in a phase II study with a dose of 30 mg/m docetaxel per week. Trial registration number NCT01108042 (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier) PMID:23083061

  4. Application of Failure Mode and Effects Analysis to Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Using Mobile Electron Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ciocca, Mario; Cantone, Marie-Claire; Veronese, Ivan; Cattani, Federica; Pedroli, Guido; Molinelli, Silvia; Vitolo, Viviana; Orecchia, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) represents a prospective approach for risk assessment. A multidisciplinary working group of the Italian Association for Medical Physics applied FMEA to electron beam intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) delivered using mobile linear accelerators, aiming at preventing accidental exposures to the patient. Methods and Materials: FMEA was applied to the IORT process, for the stages of the treatment delivery and verification, and consisted of three steps: 1) identification of the involved subprocesses; 2) identification and ranking of the potential failure modes, together with their causes and effects, using the risk probability number (RPN) scoring system, based on the product of three parameters (severity, frequency of occurrence and detectability, each ranging from 1 to 10); 3) identification of additional safety measures to be proposed for process quality and safety improvement. RPN upper threshold for little concern of risk was set at 125. Results: Twenty-four subprocesses were identified. Ten potential failure modes were found and scored, in terms of RPN, in the range of 42-216. The most critical failure modes consisted of internal shield misalignment, wrong Monitor Unit calculation and incorrect data entry at treatment console. Potential causes of failure included shield displacement, human errors, such as underestimation of CTV extension, mainly because of lack of adequate training and time pressures, failure in the communication between operators, and machine malfunctioning. The main effects of failure were represented by CTV underdose, wrong dose distribution and/or delivery, unintended normal tissue irradiation. As additional safety measures, the utilization of a dedicated staff for IORT, double-checking of MU calculation and data entry and finally implementation of in vivo dosimetry were suggested. Conclusions: FMEA appeared as a useful tool for prospective evaluation of patient safety in radiotherapy. The

  5. Neutron production from a mobile linear accelerator operating in electron mode for intraoperative radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loi, G.; Dominietto, M.; Cannillo, B.; Ciocca, M.; Krengli, M.; Mones, E.; Negri, E.; Brambilla, M.

    2006-02-01

    Intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy is increasingly performed using mobile linac delivering therapeutic radiation doses in unshielded operating rooms. While no special neutron-shielding problem should arise for operation at 10 MeV or less, it is not clear whether this holds true for operation at higher energies. This paper reports the measured neutron production from a Mobetron mobile electron linac, operated at 12 MeV, and compares the results with those from a conventional linac, also operated at 12 MeV in electron mode. Neutron leakage measurements were performed by means of passive bubble detectors in the scattering foil, patient and floor planes. Neutron dose equivalent rates per unit of electron dose delivered by the Mobetron at its normal treatment distance (50 cm SSD) were 0.33 µSv Gy-1 at the accelerator head, 0.18 µSv Gy-1 in the patient plane at 15 cm from the beam axis and 0.31 µSv Gy-1 at the floor plane, on the beam axis and under the beam stopper. For a weekly workload of 250 Gy, the weekly neutron dose equivalents at 12 MeV for the Mobetron at a distance of 300 cm from the scattering foil were 14.3 and 1.7 µSv/week for floor below and adjoining areas on the same floor, respectively. Neutron dose equivalent rates generated from Mobetron are at least one order of magnitude lower than ones produced by a conventional linac operated at the same energy in electron mode. Mobetron can be used at 12 MeV in an unshielded operating room for a weekly workload of up to 250 Gy if the bremsstrahlung x-rays are shielded to negligible levels.

  6. Tolerance of the canine bladder to intraoperative radiation therapy: an experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, T.J.; Sindelar, W.F.; DeLuca, A.M.; Barnes, M.; Tochner, Z.; Mixon, A.; Glatstein, E.

    1988-05-01

    An experimental study of bladder tolerance to intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) was designed using a large animal model (adult American Foxhounds, weight 25-30 kg) to access acute and late radiation effects. Dogs were subjected to laparotomy where the bladder was mobilized and IORT was delivered using a 5 cm circular cone through a cystotomy incision with 12 MeV electrons. The bladder trigone including both ureteral orifices and the proximal urethra was irradiated in groups of 3 dogs with doses of 0, 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40 Gy. Dogs were followed clinically with repeat urinalysis, intravenous pyelogram (IVP), and cystometrogram at 1 month and then Q6 months for up to 4 years. One dog from each dose group was sacrificed electively at 1 and 2 years, whereas the other dog is being followed clinically for a minimum of 4 years. Complete autopsies were performed with particular attention to genitourinary and pelvic structures. No clinically detectable acute toxicity resulted from IORT to the bladder. Three of 15 IORT dogs (1 each at 25, 35, and 40 Gy) showed obstruction of a ureteral orifice with 2 dogs dying of renal failure secondary to bilateral hydronephrosis within 1-2 years of treatment. The remaining 12 IORT dogs and 3 control dogs have normal repeat IVP's and renal function with up to 4 years of follow-up. Serial cystometry demonstrates no major loss of bladder contractility or volume. At autopsy, histological changes of mucosal thinning and telangiectasia with submucosal fibrosis were confined to the IORT field and appeared dose-related. However, the bladder epithelium remained intact at all doses. The ureterovesical junction in animals receiving 20 Gy showed mild fibrosis of the lamina propria and moderate chronic inflammation. Above 20 Gy, these histological changes at the U-V junction were more pronounced with gross stenosis in 3 animals as predicted by the IVP.

  7. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Henderson, D R; Tree, A C; van As, N J

    2015-05-01

    The use of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for localised prostate cancer is now supported by a substantial body of non-randomised data, with medium-term outcomes consistent with current standard radiotherapy. The ability to deliver profoundly hypofractionated treatment, combined with the relatively low α/β ratio of prostate cancer, may result in a more favourable therapeutic ratio, presenting an opportunity for isotoxic dose escalation. Furthermore, as treatment can be given in five attendances, SBRT has the potential both to reduce costs and improve patient quality of life. However, in a treatment landscape with many competing options of broadly similar efficacy, randomised trials are essential to define the relative benefits of this approach. SBRT also has an emerging application in oligometastatic prostate cancer, with promising early outcomes for delaying disease progression and deferring the need for androgen deprivation therapy. PMID:25707911

  8. Definitive surgery and intraoperative photodynamic therapy: a prospective study of local control and survival for patients with pleural dissemination of non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Simone, Charles B.; Cengel, Keith A.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with pleural dissemination have very limited survivals often of just 6–9 months. Prior reports of aggressive surgical resection of pleural metastases have shown no consistent improvements in overall survival and very high rates of local recurrences. Based on this and the generally very diffuse pleural dissemination seen in patients, chemotherapy and palliative interventions are standard of care. By attempting to sterile microscopic residual disease after surgical resection, intraoperative photodynamic therapy (PDT) could improve local pleural control and overall survival compared with surgery alone for patients with NSCLC with pleural metastasis. Prior attempts to demonstrate an improvement in clinical outcomes with PDT as an intraoperative adjuvant combined with definitive surgery to treat pleural malignancies have not been successful, perhaps due, in part, to limited ability to perform real-time dosimetry and ensure adequate and even light distribution throughout the chest cavity. A stratified phase II trial assessed the efficacy of definitive surgery and intraoperative PDT with real-time dosimetry in patients with NSCLC with pleural dissemination demonstrated prolonged local control and a higher than expected 21.7-month median survival from the time of surgery and PDT among 22 enrolled patients. This is the first ever report describing optimal methods, techniques, and dosimetry that could be used to safely and reproducibly deliver intraoperative PDT to the chest cavity as part of multimodality therapy for NSCLC with pleural metastasis.

  9. Translational Research to Improve the Efficacy of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy: Experience of Gunma University

    PubMed Central

    Oike, Takahiro; Sato, Hiro; Noda, Shin-ei; Nakano, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Carbon ion radiotherapy holds great promise for cancer therapy. Clinical data show that carbon ion radiotherapy is an effective treatment for tumors that are resistant to X-ray radiotherapy. Since 1994 in Japan, the National Institute of Radiological Sciences has been heading the development of carbon ion radiotherapy using the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba. The Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center (GHMC) was established in the year 2006 as a proof-of-principle institute for carbon ion radiotherapy with a view to facilitating the worldwide spread of compact accelerator systems. Along with the management of more than 1900 cancer patients to date, GHMC engages in translational research to improve the treatment efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy. Research aimed at guiding patient selection is of utmost importance for making the most of carbon ion radiotherapy, which is an extremely limited medical resource. Intratumoral oxygen levels, radiation-induced cellular apoptosis, the capacity to repair DNA double-strand breaks, and the mutational status of tumor protein p53 and epidermal growth factor receptor genes are all associated with X-ray sensitivity. Assays for these factors are useful in the identification of X-ray-resistant tumors for which carbon ion radiotherapy would be beneficial. Research aimed at optimizing treatments based on carbon ion radiotherapy is also important. This includes assessment of dose fractionation, normal tissue toxicity, tumor cell motility, and bystander effects. Furthermore, the efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy will likely be enhanced by research into combined treatment with other modalities such as chemotherapy. Several clinically available chemotherapeutic drugs (carboplatin, paclitaxel, and etoposide) and drugs at the developmental stage (Wee-1 and heat shock protein 90 inhibitors) show a sensitizing effect on tumor cells treated with carbon ions. Additionally, the efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy can be improved by

  10. Use of radionuclide method in preoperative and intraoperative diagnosis of osteoid osteoma of the spine. Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Israeli, A.; Zwas, S.T.; Horoszowski, H.; Farine, I.

    1983-05-01

    A 24-year-old man with persistent low back pain and right sciatica, was found to have an osteoid osteoma of the right pedicle of the second lumbar vertebra. /sup 99m/Tc-MDP bone scan and CAT scan produced an early diagnosis of the lesion. Intraoperative /sup 99m/Tc-MDP in vitro combined with imaging and quantitative activity measurements were useful for accurate localization and complete removal. The method is simple and can be performed in every nuclear medicine department, with no need for special operating room facilities.

  11. Intraoperative heart rate reduction--alinidine versus metoprolol.

    PubMed

    Gombotz, H; Metzler, H; Winkler, G; Rehak, P

    1988-11-01

    In a double-blind randomized protocol the effectiveness of the specific bradycardic agent alinidine (0.6 mg.kg-1 i.v.) was compared to that of the betablocker metoprolol (0.035 mg.kg-1 i.v.). Twenty-four coronary artery disease patients undergoing a bypass procedure with an intraoperative heart rate increase of more than 20% were included. Patients with a concomitant intraoperative mean arterial pressure increase of more than 30% or with an intraoperative wedge pressure higher than 15 mmHg (2.0 kPa) were excluded. After application of alinidine and metoprolol, heart rate decreased significantly (P less than 0.01) in the alinidine group from 88 +/- 19 beats per min to 72 +/- 13 and in the metoprolol group from 82 +/- 16 to 72 +/- 12. Baseline values were not obtained. Compared to the hemodynamic changes in the metoprolol group, the alterations of pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) (P less than 0.05), stroke volume index (SVI) (P less than 0.05), left ventricular stroke work index (LVSWI) (P less than 0.01) and right ventricular stroke work index (RVSWI) (P less than 0.05) in the alinidine group were statistically significantly different. PCWP remained unchanged after alinidine and increased in the metoprolol group (1.4 +/- 0.4 to 1.6 +/- 0.4 kPa). In the alinidine group LVSWI (43.1 +/- 15 to 49.2 +/- 18 g-m.m-2), RVSWI (5.1 +/- 4 to 6.6 +/- 3 g-m.m-2) and SVI (37.2 +/- 12.2 to 42.5 +/- 12.8 ml.m-2) increased.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3063047

  12. Dermographism: A Rare Cause of Intraoperative Hypotension and Urticaria.

    PubMed

    Burbridge, Mark

    2016-07-15

    A 54-year-old man with dermographism presented for spine surgery, and shortly after induction of anesthesia, he experienced severe hypotension and urticaria, resulting in cancellation of the case on suspicion of allergic reaction. For subsequent ventral hernia repair, a perioperative management strategy was devised, which resulted in an uneventful perioperative course. This case report is the first to demonstrate severe intraoperative hypotension and urticaria from dermographism. We discuss the strategy that made the subsequent surgery a success and provide guidance for practitioners who face a patient with a severe form of this chronic disease. PMID:27434310

  13. Intraoperative photodynamic therapy in laryngeal part of pharynx cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loukatch, Erwin V.; Trojan, Vasily; Loukatch, Vjacheslav

    1996-12-01

    In clinic intraoperative photodynamic therapy (IPT) was done in patients with primal squamous cells cancer of the laryngeal part of the pharynx. The He-Ne laser and methylene blue as a photosensibilizator were used. Cobalt therapy in the postoperative period was done in dose 45 Gr. Patients of control groups (1-th group) with only laser and (2-th group) only methylene blue were controlled during three years with the main group. The statistics show certain differences of recidives in the main group compared to the control groups. These facts are allowing us to recommend the use of IPT as an additional method in ENT-oncology diseases treatment.

  14. Necrotizing Fasciitis: A Life-threatening Complication of Intraoperative Electromyography

    PubMed Central

    Shoakazemi, Alireza; Tubbs, R. Shane; Wingerson, Mary; Ajayi, Olaide; Zwillman, Michael E; Gottlieb, Jourdan; Hanscom, David

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring is a commonly used practice during spine surgery. Complications of electromyography (EMG) needle electrode placement are very uncommon. We present a patient who was infected with necrotizing fasciitis in her left thigh due to an EMG needle electrode during a two-stage complex spine procedure. This case demonstrates that providers should continue to meticulously adhere to protocol when inserting and removing EMG needles, but also be cognizant during postoperative observation of the possibility of infection caused by EMG needles. PMID:26973803

  15. [Importance of preoperative and intraoperative imaging for operative strategies].

    PubMed

    Nitschke, P; Bork, U; Plodeck, V; Podlesek, D; Sobottka, S B; Schackert, G; Weitz, J; Kirsch, M

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in preoperative and postoperative imaging have an increasing influence on surgical decision-making and make more complex surgical interventions possible. This improves the possibilities for frequently occurring challenges and promoting improved functional and oncological outcome. This manuscript reviews the role of preoperative and intraoperative imaging in surgery. Various techniques are explained based on examples from hepatobiliary surgery and neurosurgery, in particular real-time procedures, such as the online use of augmented reality and in vivo fluorescence, as well as new and promising optical techniques including imaging of intrinsic signals and vibrational spectroscopy. PMID:26939896

  16. Does the Surgical Apgar Score Measure Intraoperative Performance?

    PubMed Central

    Regenbogen, Scott E.; Lancaster, R. Todd; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Greenberg, Caprice C.; Hutter, Matthew M.; Gawande, Atul A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether Surgical Apgar Scores measure the relationship between intraoperative care and surgical outcomes. Summary Background Data With preoperative risk-adjustment now well-developed, the role of intraoperative performance in surgical outcomes may be considered. We previously derived and validated a ten-point Surgical Apgar Score—based on intraoperative blood loss, heart rate, and blood pressure—that effectively predicts major postoperative complications within 30 days of general and vascular surgery. This study evaluates whether the predictive value of this score comes solely from patients’ preoperative risk, or also measures care in the operating room. Methods Among a systematic sample of 4,119 general and vascular surgery patients at a major academic hospital, we constructed a detailed risk-prediction model including 27 patient-comorbidity and procedure-complexity variables, and computed patients’ propensity to suffer a major postoperative complication. We evaluated the prognostic value of patients’ Surgical Apgar Scores before and after adjustment for this preoperative risk. Results After risk-adjustment, the Surgical Apgar Score remained strongly correlated with postoperative outcomes (p<0.0001). Odds of major complications among average-scoring patients (scores 7–8) were equivalent to preoperative predictions (likelihood ratio (LR) 1.05, 95%CI 0.78–1.41), significantly decreased for those who achieved the best scores of 9–10 (LR 0.52, 95%CI 0.35–0.78), and were significantly poorer for those with low scores—LRs 1.60 (1.12–2.28) for scores 5–6, and 2.80 (1.50–5.21) for scores 0–4. Conclusions Even after accounting for fixed preoperative risk—due to patients’ acute condition, comorbidities and/or operative complexity—the Surgical Apgar Score appears to detect differences in intraoperative management that reduce odds of major complications by half, or increase them by nearly three-fold. PMID:18650644

  17. Intraoperative Neurophysiologic Monitoring: Basic Principles and Recent Update

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Min; Kim, Seung Hyun; Seo, Dae-Won

    2013-01-01

    The recent developments of new devices and advances in anesthesiology have greatly improved the utility and accuracy of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IOM). Herein, we review the basic principles of the electrophysiological methods employed under IOM in the operating room. These include motor evoked potentials, somatosensory evoked potentials, electroencephalography, electromyography, brainstem auditory evoked potentials, and visual evoked potentials. Most of these techniques have certain limitations and their utility is still being debated. In this review, we also discuss the optimal stimulation/recording method for each of these modalities during individual surgeries as well as the diverse criteria for alarm signs. PMID:24015028

  18. A case of refractory intraoperative hypotension treated with vasopressin infusion.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Adam D; Turchiano, John; Tobias, Joseph D

    2008-03-01

    A 56-year-old man, treated with an angiotensin II receptor antagonist for hypertension, presented for placement of a cochlear implant during general anesthesia. Intraoperatively, there was profound hypotension that was resistant to decreasing the anesthetic depth, fluid administration, as well as bolus doses of phenylephrine, ephedrine, and epinephrine. Hypotension was eventually successfully treated with a vasopressin infusion (0.06 U/min). Vasopressin may be a useful agent in such scenarios because its effect is not dependent on either adrenergic or angiotensin receptors, both of which may be affected by angiotensin II receptor antagonists. PMID:18410871

  19. Minimally invasive radioguided parathyroidectomy using intraoperative sestamibi localization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wha-Joon; Ruda, James; Stack, Brendan C

    2004-08-01

    This article presents the authors' technique of minimally invasive radio guided parathyroidectomy (MIRP) with intra-operative use of the hand-held gamma probe for primary HPT caused by a solitary adenoma. It points out how this approach varies from that of others who perform MIRP. It also illustrates ways to troubleshoot common problems with the technique in inexperienced hands. The goal is to present an understandable and systematic approach to MIRP for surgeons who do not currently use this technique. This article is not intended to replace formalized training, which is essential to master the technique. PMID:15262516

  20. Dose reconstruction technique using non-rigid registration to evaluate spatial correspondence between high-dose region and late radiation toxicity: a case of tracheobronchial stenosis after external beam radiotherapy combined with endotracheal brachytherapy for tracheal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Naoya; Inaba, Koji; Wakita, Akihisa; Nakamura, Satoshi; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Sato, Jun; Umezawa, Rei; Takahashi, Kana; Igaki, Hiroshi; Ito, Yoshinori; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Itami, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Small organ subvolume irradiated by a high-dose has been emphasized to be associated with late complication after radiotherapy. Here, we demonstrate a potential use of surface-based, non-rigid registration to investigate how high-dose volume topographically correlates with the location of late radiation morbidity in a case of tracheobronchial radiation stenosis. Material and methods An algorithm of point set registration was implemented to handle non-rigid registration between contour points on the organ surfaces. The framework estimated the global correspondence between the dose distribution and the varying anatomical structure. We applied it to an 80-year-old man who developed tracheobronchial stenosis 2 years after high-dose-rate endobronchial brachytherapy (HDR-EBT) (24 Gy in 6 Gy fractions) and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (40 Gy in 2 Gy fractions) for early-stage tracheal cancer. Results and conclusions Based on the transformation function computed by the non-rigid registration, irradiated dose distribution was reconstructed on the surface of post-treatment tracheobronchial stenosis. For expressing the equivalent dose in a fractional dose of 2 Gy in HDR-EBT, α/β of linear quadratic model was assumed as 3 Gy for the tracheal bronchus. The tracheobronchial surface irradiated by more than 100 Gyαβ3 tended to develop severe stenosis, which attributed to a more than 50% decrease in the luminal area. The proposed dose reconstruction technique can be a powerful tool to predict late radiation toxicity with spatial consideration. PMID:27257421

  1. Dose factor entry and display tool for BNCT radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Wessol, Daniel E.; Wheeler, Floyd J.; Cook, Jeremy L.

    1999-01-01

    A system for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) radiotherapy planning where a biological distribution is calculated using a combination of conversion factors and a previously calculated physical distribution. Conversion factors are presented in a graphical spreadsheet so that a planner can easily view and modify the conversion factors. For radiotherapy in multi-component modalities, such as Fast-Neutron and BNCT, it is necessary to combine each conversion factor component to form an effective dose which is used in radiotherapy planning and evaluation. The Dose Factor Entry and Display System is designed to facilitate planner entry of appropriate conversion factors in a straightforward manner for each component. The effective isodose is then immediately computed and displayed over the appropriate background (e.g. digitized image).

  2. Effects of Intraoperative Dexmedetomidine on Postoperative Pain in Highly Nicotine-Dependent Patients After Thoracic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xingzhi; Zhang, Ping; Lu, Sufen; Zhang, Zongwang; Yu, Ailan; Liu, Donghua; Wu, Shanshan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the effects of intraoperative dexmedetomidine on pain in highly nicotine-dependent patients after thoracic surgery. Highly nicotine-dependent men underwent thoracic surgery and received postoperative patient-controlled intravenous analgesia with sufentanil. In dexmedetomidine group (experimental group, n = 46), dexmedetomidine was given at a loading dose of 1 μg/kg for 10 minutes, followed by continuous infusion at 0.5 μg/kg/h until 30 minutes before the end of surgery. The saline group (control group, n = 48) received the same volume of saline. General anesthesia was administered via a combination of inhalation and intravenous anesthetics. If necessary, patients were administered a loading dose of sufentanil by an anesthesiologist immediately after surgery (0 hours). Patient-controlled analgesia was started when the patient's resting numerical rating scale (NRS) score was less than 4. Resting and coughing NRS scores and sufentanil dosage were recorded 0, 1, 4 hours, and every 4 hours until 48 hours after surgery. Dosages of other rescue analgesics were converted to the sufentanil dosage. Surgical data, adverse effects, and degree of satisfaction were obtained. Cumulative sufentanil dosage, resting NRS, and coughing NRS in the first 24 hours after surgery and heart rate were lower in the experimental compared with the control group (P <0.05). No patient experienced sedation or respiratory depression. Frequency of nausea and vomiting and degree of satisfaction were similar in both groups. Intraoperative dexmedetomidine was associated with reduced resting and coughing NRS scores and a sufentanil-sparing effect during the first 24 hours after thoracic surgery. PMID:27258524

  3. Multimodal optical imaging and spectroscopy for the intraoperative mapping of nonmelanoma skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomatina, Elena; Muzikansky, Alona; Neel, Victor; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.

    2009-05-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common human malignancy, and its incidence increases yearly. In this contribution we investigate the feasibility of combining multimodal reflectance and fluorescence polarization imaging (RFPI) with spectroscopic analysis of the reflectance images for facilitating intraoperative delineation of BCCs. Twenty fresh thick BCC specimens were obtained within 1 h after Mohs micrographic surgeries. The samples were soaked for up to 2 min in an aqueous 0.2 mg/ml solution of methylene blue, briefly rinsed in saline solution, and imaged. Reflectance images were acquired in the range from 395 to 735 nm, with steps of 10 nm. Fluorescence polarization images were excited at 630 nm and registered in the range between 660 and 750 nm. The results yielded by RFPI were qualitatively compared to each other and to histopathology. From the copolarized reflectance images the spectral responses including the optical densities and their wavelength derivatives were calculated. The differences in the spectral responses of the benign and malignant stained skin structures were assessed. Statistical analysis, i.e., Student's t-test, was employed to verify the significance of the discovered differences. Both reflectance and fluorescence polarization images correlated well with histopathology in all the cases. Reflectance polarization images provided more detailed information on skin morphology, with the appearance of skin structures resembling that of histopathology. Fluorescence polarization images exhibited higher contrast of cancerous tissue as compared to reflectance imaging. The analysis of the optical densities and their wavelength derivatives for tumor and normal tissues has confirmed statistical significance of the differences that can be used for intraoperative cancer delineation. The results of the study indicate that spectral analysis is a useful adjunct to RFPI for facilitating skin cancer delineation.

  4. Which colours are seen by the patient during cataract surgery? Results of an intraoperative interview.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, M; Schulze Schwering, M

    2016-03-01

    PurposeTo discover what cataract patients see during phacoemulsification and if these light phenomena influence their anxiety levels during surgery.MethodsIn all, 200 patients were interviewed intraoperatively at the Eye Hospital, Petrisberg, Trier, Germany. The quality of the visual experiences was described and if these were pleasant, neutral or unpleasant. Systemic sedation was noted.ResultsAmong 200 patients (209 eyes): 88 were men (91 eyes; 44%) and 112 were women (118 eyes; 56%). Median age (years): men (71), women (70). Mean operating time was 8 min. 49/209 (23%) were not anxious before and during surgery. 110/209 (52%) were more anxious before than during surgery, 50/209 (24%) were still anxious during surgery, 27/209 (13%) got sedation with midazolam (1-5 mg). Colours in descending order seen: blue, red, pink, yellow, green, purple, turquois, and orange. The most dominant colour combination was red/blue. Structures were seen by 162/209 (78%). Most (61%) intraoperative visual experiences were pleasant, 38% were neutral, and 1% found them transiently unpleasant. Three patients felt blinded by the light of the operating microscope.ConclusionsThe experience of colours and other light phenomena was pleasant for most patients during phacoemulsification under topical anaesthesia. They occur spontaneously when the patient is fixating on the operating light. They are not dependent on the individual or environment. Sedation only in 13%. Direct questioning for visual sensations by the operating surgeon may lead to less need for sedation and lead to less side effects for elderly and multimorbidity people postoperatively. The surgeon can use this knowledge to reassure patients during surgery. PMID:26563653

  5. Multimodal nonlinear microscopy of biopsy specimen: towards intraoperative diagnostics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Michael; Heuke, Sandro; Meyer, Tobias; Chernavskaia, Olga; Bocklitz, Thomas W.; Popp, Juergen

    2016-03-01

    The realization of label-free molecule specific imaging of morphology and chemical composition of tissue at subcellular spatial resolution in real time is crucial for many envisioned applications in medicine, e.g., precise surgical guidance and non-invasive histopathologic examination of tissue. Thus, new approaches for a fast and reliable in vivo and near in vivo (ex corpore in vivo) tissue characterization to supplement routine pathological diagnostics is needed. Spectroscopic imaging approaches are particularly important since they have the potential to provide a pathologist with adequate support in the form of clinically-relevant information under both ex vivo and in vivo conditions. In this contribution it is demonstrated, that multimodal nonlinear microscopy combining coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), two photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) enables the detection of characteristic structures and the accompanying molecular changes of widespread diseases, particularly of cancer and atherosclerosis. The detailed images enable an objective evaluation of the tissue samples for an early diagnosis of the disease status. Increasing the spectral resolution and analyzing CARS images at multiple Raman resonances improves the chemical specificity. To facilitate handling and interpretation of the image data characteristic properties can be automatically extracted by advanced image processing algorithms, e.g., for tissue classification. Overall, the presented examples show the great potential of multimodal imaging to augment standard intraoperative clinical assessment with functional multimodal CARS/SHG/TPEF images to highlight functional activity and tumor boundaries. It ensures fast, label-free and non-invasive intraoperative tissue classification paving the way towards in vivo optical pathology.

  6. Ultrashort courses of adjuvant breast radiotherapy: wave of the future or a fool's errand?

    PubMed

    Khan, Atif J; Dale, Roger G; Arthur, Douglas W; Haffty, Bruce G; Todor, Dorin A; Vicini, Frank A

    2012-04-15

    In accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI), the most commonly used fractionation schemes include 340 or 385 centigrays delivered in a twice daily administration. A further progression of the APBI literature has been the recent interest in extremely short courses of adjuvant radiotherapy, usually delivered by intraoperative radiotherapy techniques. This newer area of single-fraction radiotherapy approaches remains highly contentious. In particular, the recently reported TARGIT trial has been the subject of both praise and scorn, and a critical examination of the trial data and the underlying hypotheses is warranted. Short-term outcomes of the related Italian ELIOT approach have also been reported. Although the assumptions of linear quadratic formalism are likely to hold true in the range of 2 to 8 grays, equating different schedules beyond this range is problematic. A major problem of current single-fraction approaches is that the treatment doses are chosen empirically, or are based on tolerability, or on the physical dose delivery characteristics of the chosen technology rather than radiobiological rationale. This review article summarizes the current data on ultrashort courses of adjuvant breast radiotherapy and highlights both the promise and the potential pitfalls of the abbreviated treatment. PMID:22009259

  7. Toward Microendoscopic Electrical Impedance Tomography for Intraoperative Surgical Margin Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Halter, Ryan J.; Kim, Young-Joong

    2015-01-01

    No clinical protocols are routinely used to intraoperatively assess surgical margin status during prostate surgery. Instead, margins are evaluated through pathological assessment of the prostate following radical prostatectomy, when it is too late to provide additional surgical intervention. An intraoperative device potentially capable of assessing surgical margin status based on the electrical property contrast between benign and malignant prostate tissue has been developed. Specifically, a microendoscopic electrical impedance tomography (EIT) probe has been constructed to sense and image, at near millimeter resolution, the conductivity contrast within heterogeneous biological tissues with the goal of providing surgeons with real-time assessment of margin pathologies. This device consists of a ring of eight 0.6-mm diameter electrodes embedded in a 5-mm diameter probe tip to enable access through a 12-mm laparoscopic port. Experiments were performed to evaluate the volume of tissue sensed by the probe. The probe was also tested with inclusions in gelatin, as well as on a sample of porcine tissue with clearly defined regions of adipose and muscle. The probe's area of sensitivity consists of a circular area of 9.1 mm2 and the maximum depth of sensitivity is approximately 1.5 mm. The probe is able to distinguish between high contrast muscle and adipose tissue on a sub-mm scale (~500 μm). These preliminary results suggest that EIT is possible in a probe designed to fit within a 12-mm laparoscopic access port. PMID:24951675

  8. Intra-operative nuclear medicine in surgical practice.

    PubMed

    Perkins, A C; Hardy, J G

    1996-12-01

    The use of radionuclides for the intra-operative localization of tumours has increased steadily over the past 15 years. We reviewed more than 15 years experience of a peripatetic service using a sterilizable probe system in operating theatres throughout the UK for localizing bone and soft tissue lesions. The technique requires the positive concentration of an appropriate radiopharmaceutical, together with a suitably designed detector system which can be sterilized for use during surgery. All surgical procedures were undertaken following initial positive imaging studies. A well-collimated nuclear probe with a 5 mm diameter CdTe detector was sterilized with ethylene oxide gas and coupled to a digital counter and ratemeter for use in the operating theatre. A total of 68 surgical procedures have been undertaken at 35 hospitals. Fifty-eight patients underwent excision of osteoid osteoma subsequently proven by histology. The other lesions successfully resected included osteoblastoma, hamartoma, Brodie's abscess, chronic bone infection, ectopic parathyroid adenoma and metastatic neuroblastoma. The technique can now be regarded as the method of choice for the surgical localization of osteoid osteoma. The successful detection of lesions at surgery can be assured providing that clear localization of the radiopharmaceutical occurs on the pre-operative images. The intra-operative use of conventional and new tumour-specific radiopharmaceuticals is reviewed and we confirm an increasing role for the surgical-probe-guided localization of primary and metastatic tumours. PMID:9004295

  9. Simulated microsurgery monitoring using intraoperative multimodal surgical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Donghyun; Lee, Changho; Kim, Sehui; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Jeehyun; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    We have developed an intraoperative multimodal surgical microscopy system that provides simultaneous real-time enlarged surface views and subsurface anatomic information during surgeries by integrating spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), and conventional surgical microscopy. By sharing the same optical path, both OCT and PAM images were simultaneously acquired. Additionally, the custom-made needle-type transducer received the generated PA signals enabling convenient surgical operation without using a water bath. Using a simple augmented device, the OCT and PAM images were projected on the view plane of the surgical microscope. To quantify the performance of our system, we measured spatial resolutions of our system. Then, three microsurgery simulation and analysis were processed: (1) ex vivo needle tracking and monitoring injection of carbon particles in biological tissues, (2) in vivo needle tracking and monitoring injection of carbon particles in tumor-bearing mice, and (3) in vivo guiding of melanoma removal in melanoma-bearing mice. The results indicate that this triple modal system is useful for intraoperative purposes, and can potentially be a vital tool in microsurgeries.

  10. Stereoscopic Integrated Imaging Goggles for Multimodal Intraoperative Image Guidance.

    PubMed

    Mela, Christopher A; Patterson, Carrie; Thompson, William K; Papay, Francis; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    We have developed novel stereoscopic wearable multimodal intraoperative imaging and display systems entitled Integrated Imaging Goggles for guiding surgeries. The prototype systems offer real time stereoscopic fluorescence imaging and color reflectance imaging capacity, along with in vivo handheld microscopy and ultrasound imaging. With the Integrated Imaging Goggle, both wide-field fluorescence imaging and in vivo microscopy are provided. The real time ultrasound images can also be presented in the goggle display. Furthermore, real time goggle-to-goggle stereoscopic video sharing is demonstrated, which can greatly facilitate telemedicine. In this paper, the prototype systems are described, characterized and tested in surgeries in biological tissues ex vivo. We have found that the system can detect fluorescent targets with as low as 60 nM indocyanine green and can resolve structures down to 0.25 mm with large FOV stereoscopic imaging. The system has successfully guided simulated cancer surgeries in chicken. The Integrated Imaging Goggle is novel in 4 aspects: it is (a) the first wearable stereoscopic wide-field intraoperative fluorescence imaging and display system, (b) the first wearable system offering both large FOV and microscopic imaging simultaneously, PMID:26529249

  11. Risk factors for intraoperative floppy iris syndrome: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Chatziralli, I P; Peponis, V; Parikakis, E; Maniatea, A; Patsea, E; Mitropoulos, P

    2016-08-01

    PurposeTo evaluate risk factors for intraoperative floppy iris syndrome (IFIS) in patients undergoing phacoemulsification.MethodsParticipants in the study were 1274 consecutive patients, who underwent routine phacoemulsification cataract surgery. The following data were recorded and evaluated as possible risk factors: ophthalmological conditions, axial length of the eye, sociodemographic features, clinical data (hypertension and diabetes mellitus), medications being taken at the time of surgery, and duration of their intake. Cases were characterized intraoperatively as IFIS and non-IFIS. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed.ResultsIFIS was observed in 63/1274 eyes (4.9%, 95% CI: 3.9-6.7%). Current use of tamsulosin, alfuzosin, terazosin, benzodiazepines, quetiapine, and finasteride, as well as hypertension, were all independently associated with IFIS. Significant associations were noted for male sex, rivastigmine, and short axial length, which did not reach significance at the multivariate analysis. Duration of α-blockers intake was not found to be associated with IFIS.ConclusionApart from the well-established associations with α-blockers, this prospective study points to benzodiazepines, quetiapine, finasteride, and hypertension as potential risk factors for IFIS. Short axial length and rivastigmine were significantly associated with IFIS only at the univariate analysis. PMID:27367744

  12. Intraoperative Evaluation of Breast Tumor Margins with Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Freddy T.; Zysk, Adam M.; Chaney, Eric J.; Kotynek, Jan G.; Oliphant, Uretz J.; Bellafiore, Frank J.; Rowland, Kendrith M.; Johnson, Patricia A.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    As breast cancer screening rates increase, smaller and more numerous lesions are being identified earlier, leading to more breast-conserving surgical procedures. Achieving a clean surgical margin represents a technical challenge with important clinical implications. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is introduced as an intraoperative high-resolution imaging technique that assesses surgical breast tumor margins by providing real-time microscopic images up to 2 mm beneath the tissue surface. In a study of 37 patients split between training and study groups, OCT images covering 1 cm2 regions were acquired from surgical margins of lumpectomy specimens, registered with ink, and correlated with corresponding histological sections. A 17 patient training set used to establish standard imaging protocols and OCT evaluation criteria demonstrated that areas of higher scattering tissue with a heterogeneous pattern were indicative of tumor cells and tumor tissue, in contrast to lower scattering adipocytes found in normal breast tissue. The remaining 20 patients were enrolled into the feasibility study. Of these lumpectomy specimens, 11 were identified with a positive or close surgical margin and 9 were identified with a negative margin under OCT. Based on histological findings, 9 true positives, 9 true negatives, 2 false positives, and 0 false negatives were found, yielding a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 82%. These results demonstrate the potential of OCT as a real-time method for intraoperative margin assessment in breast conserving surgeries. PMID:19910294

  13. Intraoperative Indocyanine Green Laser Angiography in Pediatric Autologous Ear Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Martins, Deborah B; Farias-Eisner, Gina; Mandelbaum, Rachel S; Hoang, Han; Bradley, James P; Lee, Justine C

    2016-05-01

    Skin flap vascularity is a critical determinant of aesthetic results in autologous ear reconstruction. In this study, we investigate the use of intraoperative laser-assisted indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) as an adjunctive measure of skin flap vascularity in pediatric autologous ear reconstruction. Twenty-one consecutive pediatric patients undergoing first-stage autologous total ear reconstruction were retrospectively evaluated. The first 10 patients were treated traditionally (non-ICGA), and the latter 11 patients were evaluated with ICGA intraoperatively after implantation of the cartilage construct and administration of suction. Relative and absolute perfusion units in the form of contour maps were generated. Statistical analyses were performed using independent sample Student t test. Statistically significant differences in exposure and infection were not found between the 2 groups. However, decreased numbers of surgical revisions were required in cases with ICGA versus without ICGA (P = 0.03), suggesting that greater certainty in skin flap perfusion correlated with a reduction in revision surgeries. In cases of exposure, we found an average lowest absolute perfusion unit of 14.3, whereas cases without exposure had an average of 26.1 (P = 0.02), thereby defining objective parameters for utilizing ICGA data in tailoring surgical decision making for this special population of patients. Defined quantitative parameters for utilizing ICGA in evaluating skin flap vascularity may be a useful adjunctive technique in pediatric autologous ear reconstruction. PMID:27579233

  14. Intraoperative neuromonitoring techniques in the surgical management of acoustic neuromas.

    PubMed

    Oh, Taemin; Nagasawa, Daniel T; Fong, Brendan M; Trang, Andy; Gopen, Quinton; Parsa, Andrew T; Yang, Isaac

    2012-09-01

    Unfavorable outcomes such as facial paralysis and deafness were once unfortunate probable complications following resection of acoustic neuromas. However, the implementation of intraoperative neuromonitoring during acoustic neuroma surgery has demonstrated placing more emphasis on quality of life and preserving neurological function. A modern review demonstrates a great degree of recent success in this regard. In facial nerve monitoring, the use of modern electromyography along with improvements in microneurosurgery has significantly improved preservation. Recent studies have evaluated the use of video monitoring as an adjunctive tool to further improve outcomes for patients undergoing surgery. Vestibulocochlear nerve monitoring has also been extensively studied, with the most popular techniques including brainstem auditory evoked potential monitoring, electrocochleography, and direct compound nerve action potential monitoring. Among them, direct recording remains the most promising and preferred monitoring method for functional acoustic preservation. However, when compared with postoperative facial nerve function, the hearing preservation is only maintained at a lower rate. Here, the authors analyze the major intraoperative neuromonitoring techniques available for acoustic neuroma resection. PMID:22937857

  15. Prevention of intraoperative wound contamination with chlorhexidine shower and scrub.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, R A

    1988-04-01

    In a prospective, controlled, clinical trial, we found that preoperative showering and scrubbing with 4% chlorhexidine gluconate was more effective than povidone-iodine or triclocarban medicated soap in reducing skin colonization at the site of surgical incision. Mean log colony counts of the incision site were one half to one log lower for patients who showered with chlorhexidine compared to those who showered with the other regimens. No growth was observed on 43% of the post shower skin cultures from patients in the chlorhexidine group compared with 16% of the cultures from patients who had povidone-iodine showers and 5% of those from patients who used medicated soap and water. The frequency of positive intraoperative wound cultures was 4% with chlorhexidine, 9% with povidone-iodine and 14% with medicated soap and water. This study demonstrates that chlorhexidine gluconate is a more effective skin disinfectant than either povidone-iodine or triclocarban soap and water and that its use is associated with lower rates of intraoperative wound contamination. PMID:2898503

  16. Trends in electrocardiographic R-wave amplitude during intraoperative pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Yoshinobu; Higashijima, Sachiyo; Kadota, Takako; Kume, Katsuyoshi; Kawahara, Tomiya; Ohshita, Naohiro

    2014-01-01

    Tension pneumothorax is a rare but potentially life-threating complication of laparoscopic fundoplication. Electrocardiogram (ECG) changes may be used in the diagnosis of intraoperative tension pneumothorax. This case study examines a pediatric patient who underwent laparoscopic fundoplication. Sudden decreases in oxygen saturation were observed during dissection, although the patient's decrease in blood pressure was less marked. Manual ventilation with high inspiratory pressure and inspiratory pause improved oxygenation. The amplitude of the R-wave decreased from 0.8 mV to 0.3 mV in 5 seconds. Twenty minutes later, oxygen saturation decreased again, the R-wave amplitude decreased from 0.3 mV to 0.1 mV in 1 second, and the decrease in blood pressure was marked. Manual ventilation with high inspiratory pressure improved oxygenation, blood pressure, and R-wave amplitude within two minutes. After conversion to open surgery, the cardiorespiratory condition gradually improved, but the R-wave amplitude did not fully recover, even at the end of surgery. Right-side pneumothorax was subsequently confirmed by postoperative chest X-ray. Chest drains were inserted after surgery. This case suggests that trends in R-wave amplitude are potential indicators of intraoperative tension pneumothorax. PMID:25264070

  17. Stereoscopic Integrated Imaging Goggles for Multimodal Intraoperative Image Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Mela, Christopher A.; Patterson, Carrie; Thompson, William K.; Papay, Francis; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    We have developed novel stereoscopic wearable multimodal intraoperative imaging and display systems entitled Integrated Imaging Goggles for guiding surgeries. The prototype systems offer real time stereoscopic fluorescence imaging and color reflectance imaging capacity, along with in vivo handheld microscopy and ultrasound imaging. With the Integrated Imaging Goggle, both wide-field fluorescence imaging and in vivo microscopy are provided. The real time ultrasound images can also be presented in the goggle display. Furthermore, real time goggle-to-goggle stereoscopic video sharing is demonstrated, which can greatly facilitate telemedicine. In this paper, the prototype systems are described, characterized and tested in surgeries in biological tissues ex vivo. We have found that the system can detect fluorescent targets with as low as 60 nM indocyanine green and can resolve structures down to 0.25 mm with large FOV stereoscopic imaging. The system has successfully guided simulated cancer surgeries in chicken. The Integrated Imaging Goggle is novel in 4 aspects: it is (a) the first wearable stereoscopic wide-field intraoperative fluorescence imaging and display system, (b) the first wearable system offering both large FOV and microscopic imaging simultaneously, (c) the first wearable system that offers both ultrasound imaging and fluorescence imaging capacities, and (d) the first demonstration of goggle-to-goggle communication to share stereoscopic views for medical guidance. PMID:26529249

  18. Intraoperative Indocyanine Green Laser Angiography in Pediatric Autologous Ear Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Deborah B.; Farias-Eisner, Gina; Mandelbaum, Rachel S.; Hoang, Han; Bradley, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Skin flap vascularity is a critical determinant of aesthetic results in autologous ear reconstruction. In this study, we investigate the use of intraoperative laser-assisted indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) as an adjunctive measure of skin flap vascularity in pediatric autologous ear reconstruction. Twenty-one consecutive pediatric patients undergoing first-stage autologous total ear reconstruction were retrospectively evaluated. The first 10 patients were treated traditionally (non-ICGA), and the latter 11 patients were evaluated with ICGA intraoperatively after implantation of the cartilage construct and administration of suction. Relative and absolute perfusion units in the form of contour maps were generated. Statistical analyses were performed using independent sample Student t test. Statistically significant differences in exposure and infection were not found between the 2 groups. However, decreased numbers of surgical revisions were required in cases with ICGA versus without ICGA (P = 0.03), suggesting that greater certainty in skin flap perfusion correlated with a reduction in revision surgeries. In cases of exposure, we found an average lowest absolute perfusion unit of 14.3, whereas cases without exposure had an average of 26.1 (P = 0.02), thereby defining objective parameters for utilizing ICGA data in tailoring surgical decision making for this special population of patients. Defined quantitative parameters for utilizing ICGA in evaluating skin flap vascularity may be a useful adjunctive technique in pediatric autologous ear reconstruction. PMID:27579233

  19. Radiotherapy Issues in Elderly Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kunkler, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Summary Breast cancer in the elderly is a rising health care challenge. Under-treatment is common. While the proportion of older patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) is rising, the proportion undergoing breast-conserving surgery without irradiation has also risen. The evidence base for loco-regional treatment is limited, reflecting the historical exclusion of older patients from randomised trials. The 2011 Oxford overview shows that the risk of first recurrence is halved in all age groups by adjuvant RT after breast-conserving surgery, although the absolute benefit in older ‘low-risk’ patients is small. There is level 1 evidence that a breast boost after breast-conserving surgery and whole-breast irradiation reduces local recurrence in older as in younger women, although in the former the absolute reduction is modest. Partial br