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Sample records for intravenous fluid restriction

  1. Management of meningitis in children with oral fluid restriction or intravenous fluid at maintenance volumes: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Duke, Trevor; Mokela, David; Frank, Dale; Michael, Audrey; Paulo, Theresa; Mgone, Joyce; Kurubi, Jonah

    2002-06-01

    A multi-centre randomised open trial was done to determine whether moderate oral fluid restriction or intravenous fluid at full maintenance volumes would result in a better outcome for children with bacterial meningitis in Papua New Guinea, and what clinical signs could guide fluid management. Children with clinical signs and cerebrospinal fluid suggestive of bacterial meningitis received either breast milk by nasogastric tube at 60% of normal maintenance volumes (n = 172) or intravenous half-normal saline and 5% dextrose at 100% of normal maintenance volumes (n = 174) for the 1st 48 hrs of treatment. An adverse outcome was death or severe neurological sequelae, and a good outcome was defined as intact survival or survival with at worst mild-to-moderate neurological sequelae. The probability of an adverse outcome was 24.7% in the intravenous group and 33.1% in the oral-restricted group, but the difference was not statistically significant (RR 0.75, 0.53-1.04, p = 0.08). Sunken eyes or reduced skin turgor at presentation were risk factors for an adverse outcome (OR 5.70, 95% CI 2.87-11.29) and were most strongly associated with adverse outcome in the fluid-restricted group. Eyelid oedema during treatment was also a risk factor for an adverse outcome (OR 2.54, 95% CI 1.36-4.75) and eyelid oedema was much more common in the intravenous group (26%) than in the restricted group (5%). For many children with bacterial meningitis in less developed countries, moderate fluid restriction is unnecessary and will be harmful; a normal state of hydration should be achieved but over-hydration should be avoided. Giving 100% of normal maintenance fluids, especially with intravenous hypotonic fluid, will lead to oedema in up to one quarter of children with bacterial meningitis. If additional intravenous fluids are required for children with meningitis, an isotonic solution should be used. PMID:12070950

  2. Intravenous Fluid Generation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John; McKay, Terri; Brown, Daniel; Zoldak, John

    2013-01-01

    The ability to stabilize and treat patients on exploration missions will depend on access to needed consumables. Intravenous (IV) fluids have been identified as required consumables. A review of the Space Medicine Exploration Medical Condition List (SMEMCL) lists over 400 medical conditions that could present and require treatment during ISS missions. The Intravenous Fluid Generation System (IVGEN) technology provides the scalable capability to generate IV fluids from indigenous water supplies. It meets USP (U.S. Pharmacopeia) standards. This capability was performed using potable water from the ISS; water from more extreme environments would need preconditioning. The key advantage is the ability to filter mass and volume, providing the equivalent amount of IV fluid: this is critical for remote operations or resource- poor environments. The IVGEN technology purifies drinking water, mixes it with salt, and transfers it to a suitable bag to deliver a sterile normal saline solution. Operational constraints such as mass limitations and lack of refrigeration may limit the type and volume of such fluids that can be carried onboard the spacecraft. In addition, most medical fluids have a shelf life that is shorter than some mission durations. Consequently, the objective of the IVGEN experiment was to develop, design, and validate the necessary methodology to purify spacecraft potable water into a normal saline solution, thus reducing the amount of IV fluids that are included in the launch manifest. As currently conceived, an IVGEN system for a space exploration mission would consist of an accumulator, a purifier, a mixing assembly, a salt bag, and a sterile bag. The accumulator is used to transfer a measured amount of drinking water from the spacecraft to the purifier. The purifier uses filters to separate any air bubbles that may have gotten trapped during the drinking water transfer from flowing through a high-quality deionizing cartridge that removes the impurities in

  3. Association between chloride-rich versus chloride-restrictive intravenous fluid administration and acute kidney injury in cardiovascular patients in ICU wards

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xudong; Zhang, Chao; Huang, Guangsu; Han, Dahe; Meng, Xiaoyan; Guo, Yi; Kan, Chen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the therapeutic effect of chloride-restrictive fluid to prevent acute kidney injury (AKI) in cardiovascular patients in intensive care unit (ICU) wards. Between January 2013 and September 2014, 456 patients admitted to ICU wards following diagnosis of cardiovascular disease were recruited and randomized to receive chloride-rich (232 patients) or chloride-restrictive (224 patients) fluid. The baseline characteristics and incidence of Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO)-defined AKI was then compared. No significant difference was identified in the baseline characteristics between the two groups. The incidence of moderate-to-severe KDIGO-defined AKI was significantly decreased in patients who received chloride-restrictive fluid. In conclusion, chloride-restrictive may be a novel effective intervention in preventing KDIGO-defined AKI in cardiovascular patients in ICU wards.

  4. Portable Intravenous Fluid Production Device for Ground Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarpa, Philip J.; Scheuer, Wolfgang K.

    2012-01-01

    There are several medical conditions that require intravenous (IV) fluids. Limitations of mass, volume, storage space, shelf-life, transportation, and local resources can restrict the availability of such important fluids. These limitations are expected in long-duration space exploration missions and in remote or austere environments on Earth. Current IV fluid production requires large factory-based processes. Easy, portable, on-site production of IV fluids can eliminate these limitations. Based on experience gained in developing a device for spaceflight, a ground-use device was developed. This design uses regular drinking water that is pumped through two filters to produce, in minutes, sterile, ultrapure water that meets the stringent quality standards of the United States Pharmacopeia for Water for Injection (Total Bacteria, Conductivity, Endotoxins, Total Organic Carbon). The device weighs 2.2 lb (1 kg) and is 10 in. long, 5 in. wide, and 3 in. high (.25, 13, and 7.5 cm, respectively) in its storage configuration. This handheld device produces one liter of medical-grade water in 21 minutes. Total production capacity for this innovation is expected to be in the hundreds of liters.

  5. Maintenance Intravenous Fluid Prescribing Practices Among Paediatric Residents

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Michael A; Ayus, Juan C; Moritz, Michael L

    2014-01-01

    Aim To investigate the sodium composition of maintenance intravenous fluids used by paediatric residents throughout the United States in common clinical scenarios of arginine vasopressin excess. Methods We distributed an online survey to paediatric residency programs asking what type of maintenance intravenous fluids (0.2%, 0.45%, 0.9% NaCl or Lactated Ringers) they would administer in four common clinical scenarios of arginine vasopressin excess (gastroenteritis, pneumonia, meningitis and post-operative) in both a 6-month-old (mo) and a 13-year-old (yo) child. Results We had 472 responses, representing 5% of the total paediatric residency population in the US. Hypotonic maintenance intravenous fluids were selected in 78% of children (88.2% of 6 mo and 68.5% of 13 yo). Isotonic maintenance intravenous fluids were selected approximately twice as often for patients with meningitis as for those without (21.4% vs 8.7% 6 mo and 42.8% vs 27.7% 13 yo; p <.0.001). Conclusions The majority of US paediatric residents would prescribe hypotonic maintenance intravenous fluids in disease states associated with arginine vasopressin excess. However, a significant number of residents are using isotonic maintenance intravenous fluids. Isotonic fluids are more likely to be prescribed in older children and children with meningitis. PMID:22765308

  6. Chronic cannulation for intermittent intravenous fluid administration.

    PubMed

    Mostardi, R A; Worsencroft, D; Stern, J; Vanessen, F

    1975-04-01

    A system is described for rapid and effective venous cannulation for long-term administration of fluids in rabbits. This method is completely free of any harness or sling-type apparatus and in no way interferes with the normal mobility of the animal. The animals maintained in this way have participated in programs of tri-weekly administration (2-3 ml/dose) of fluid for as long as 5 mo. PMID:1141108

  7. Portable Intravenous Fluid Production Device For Ground Use Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J.

    2014-01-01

    Several medical conditions require the administration of intravenous (IV) fluids,but limitations of mass, volume, shelf-life, transportation, and local resources can restrict the availability of these important fluids. Such limitations are expected in long-duration space exploration missions and in remote or austere places on Earth. This design uses regular drinking water that is pumped through two filters to produce, in minutes, sterile, ultrapure water that meets the stringent quality standards of the United States Pharmacopeia for Water for Injection (Total Bacteria, Conductivity, Endo - toxins, Total Organic Carbon). The device weighs 2.2 lb (1 kg) and is 10 in. long, 5 in. wide, and 3 in. high (˜25, 13, and 7.5 cm, respectively) in its storage configuration. This handheld device produces one liter of medical-grade water in 21 minutes. Total production capacity for this innovation is expected to be in the hundreds of liters. The device contains one battery powered electric mini-pump. Alternatively, a manually powered pump can be attached and used. Drinking water enters the device from a source water bag, flows through two filters, and final sterile production water exits into a sealed, medical-grade collection bag. The collection bag contains pre-placed crystalline salts to mix with product water to form isotonic intravenous medical solutions. Alternatively, a hypertonic salt solution can be injected into a filled bag. The filled collection bag is detached from the device and is ready for use or storage. This device currently contains one collection bag, but a manifold of several pre-attached bags or replacement of single collection bags under sterile needle technique is possible for the production of multiple liters. The entire system will be flushed, sealed, and radiation-sterilized. Operation of the device is easy and requires minimal training. Drinking water is placed into the collection bag. Inline stopcock flow valves at the source and collection bags

  8. Hydration and endocrine responses to intravenous fluid and oral glycerol.

    PubMed

    van Rosendal, S P; Strobel, N A; Osborne, M A; Fassett, R G; Coombes, J S

    2015-06-01

    Athletes use intravenous (IV) saline in an attempt to maximize rehydration. The diuresis from IV rehydration may be circumvented through the concomitant use of oral glycerol. We examined the effects of rehydrating with differing regimes of oral and IV fluid, with or without oral glycerol, on hydration, urine, and endocrine indices. Nine endurance-trained men were dehydrated by 4% bodyweight, then rehydrated with 150% of the fluid lost via four protocols: (a) oral = oral fluid only; (b) oral glycerol = oral fluid with added glycerol (1.5 g/kg); (c) IV = 50% IV fluid, 50% oral fluid; and (d) IV with oral glycerol = 50% IV fluid, 50% oral fluid with added glycerol (1.5 g/kg), using a randomized, crossover design. They then completed a cycling performance test. Plasma volume restoration was highest in IV with oral glycerol > IV > oral glycerol  > oral. Urine volume was reduced in both IV trials compared with oral. IV and IV with oral glycerol resulted in lower aldosterone levels during rehydration and performance, and lower cortisol levels during rehydration. IV with oral glycerol resulted in the greatest fluid retention. In summary, the IV conditions resulted in greater fluid retention compared with oral and lower levels of fluid regulatory and stress hormones compared with both oral conditions. PMID:25943662

  9. In-Use Contamination of Intravenous Infusion Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Dennis G.; Anderson, Roger L.; Shulman, Jonas A.

    1974-01-01

    During the 1970 to 1971 nationwide epidemic of septicemias caused by Enterobacter cloacae and Enterobacter agglomerans traced to intrinsic contamination of Abbott intravenous infusion products, 94 infusion systems manufactured by Baxter Laboratories were studied microbiologically and epidemiologically during hospital use. Intravenous fluid from 10 systems (11%) contained microorganisms, usually Staphylococcus or Bacillus species; one infusion was heavily contaminated with Klebsiella pneumoniae. No national epidemic organisms, E. cloacae or E. agglomerans (formerly Erwinia), were recovered, suggesting that during this period frequent contamination with these organisms was unique to Abbott's infusion products. Contamination in this study appeared to be extrinsic in origin (introduced during clinical use) and related to the duration of continuous intravenous therapy. Nine of 61 systems (15%) that had been used longer than 48 h were contaminated, whereas only 1 of 33 used less than 48 h (3%) contained microorganisms. This study and the recent national outbreak indicate that contamination of infusion fluid, both from intrinsic and extrinsic sources, must be recognized as an additional risk of intravenous therapy; however, a once-daily replacement of the delivery apparatus can significantly diminish this hazard. PMID:4613269

  10. Final Report for Intravenous Fluid Generation (IVGEN) Spaceflight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John B.; McKay, Terri L.; Griffin, DeVon W.; Brown, Dan F.; Zoldak, John T.

    2011-01-01

    NASA designed and operated the Intravenous Fluid Generation (IVGEN) experiment onboard the International Space Station (ISS), Increment 23/24, during May 2010. This hardware was a demonstration experiment to generate intravenous (IV) fluid from ISS Water Processing Assembly (WPA) potable water using a water purification technique and pharmaceutical mixing system. The IVGEN experiment utilizes a deionizing resin bed to remove contaminants from feedstock water to a purity level that meets the standards of the United States Pharmacopeia (USP), the governing body for pharmaceuticals in the United States. The water was then introduced into an IV bag where the fluid was mixed with USP-grade crystalline salt to produce USP normal saline (NS). Inline conductivity sensors quantified the feedstock water quality, output water purity, and NS mixing uniformity. Six 1.5-L bags of purified water were produced. Two of these bags were mixed with sodium chloride to make 0.9 percent NS solution. These two bags were returned to Earth to test for compliance with USP requirements. On-orbit results indicated that all of the experimental success criteria were met with the exception of the salt concentration. Problems with a large air bubble in the first bag of purified water resulted in a slightly concentrated saline solution of 117 percent of the target value of 0.9 g/L. The second bag had an inadequate amount of salt premeasured into the mixing bag resulting in a slightly deficient salt concentration of 93.8 percent of the target value. The USP permits a range from 95 to 105 percent of the target value. The testing plans for improvements for an operational system are also presented.

  11. Enterobacter sepsis in infants and children due to contaminated intravenous fluids.

    PubMed

    Matsaniotis, N S; Syriopoulou, V P; Theodoridou, M C; Tzanetou, K G; Mostrou, G I

    1984-10-01

    Sixty-three cases of nosocomial sepsis occurring from April through October 1981, in a 500-bed pediatric hospital, were traced to bacterial contamination of intravenous fluid produced by a single manufacturer. Two species of uncommon blood stream pathogens, Enterobacter cloacae and Enterobacter agglomerans contaminated the fluid. Infections with these organisms might have contributed to the death of four patients; two who were immunosuppressed, one who was asplenic and one premature infant. Epidemiologic and laboratory investigations identified the site of contamination to be within the screw-caps of the bottles containing the intravenous fluid. Contamination occurred during insertion of the intravenous fluid administration set into the bottle. The "epidemic" terminated when the hospital discontinued the use of infusion fluids from that manufacturer. We conclude that intravenous fluids should be examined during outbreaks of nosocomial bacteremia due to unusual pathogens. PMID:6567611

  12. Intravenous fluids: should we go with the flow?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Sensitive monitoring should be used when prescribing intravenous fluids for volume resuscitation. The extent and duration of tissue hypoperfusion determine the severity of cellular damage, which should be kept to a minimum with timely volume substitution. Optimizing the filling status to normovolaemia may boost the resuscitation success. Macrocirculatory pressure values are not sensitive in this indication. While the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines focus on these conventional pressure parameters, the guidelines from the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA) on perioperative bleeding management recommend individualized care by monitoring the actual volume status and correcting hypovolaemia promptly if present. The motto is: 'give what is missing'. The credo of the ESA guidelines is to use management algorithms with predefined intervention triggers. Stop signals should help in avoiding hyper-resuscitation. The high-quality evidence-based S3 guidelines on volume therapy in adults have recently been prepared by 14 German scientific societies. Statements include, for example, repeated clinical inspection including turgor of the skin and mucosa. Adjunctive laboratory parameters such as central venous oxygen saturation, lactate, base excess and haematocrit should be considered. The S3 guidelines propose the use of flow-based and/or dynamic preload parameters for guiding volume therapy. Fluid challenges and/or the leg-raising test (autotransfusion) should be performed. The statement from the Co-ordination group for Mutual Recognition and Decentralized Procedures--Human informs healthcare professionals to consider applying individualized medicine and using sensitive monitoring to assess hypovolaemia. The authorities encourage a personalized goal-directed volume resuscitation technique. PMID:26728428

  13. Antibiotic concentration in human wound fluid after intravenous administration.

    PubMed Central

    Bagley, D H; Mac Lowry, J; Beazley, R M; Gorschboth, C; Ketcham, A S

    1978-01-01

    Since the wound is the most common focus of infection in the surgical patient, adequate levels of antibiotic within the wound ar essential. This study examines the concentrations of antibiotic achieved in human wounds. Fluid was collected at timed intervals on the first postoperative day from the wounds of 56 patients receiving antibiotics after regional lymph node dissection. Antibiotic concentration was determined by bioassay. Six antibiotics were studied: cephalothin, cefazolin, cephapirin, oxacillin, ampicillin and clindamycin. The cephalosporins and penicillins showed similar patterns of appearance in the wound fluid. The peak level occurred early (1--1 1/2 hours) with subsequent slow decrease. Clindamycin produced nearly constant levels in wound fluid. The concentration of each antibiotic in wound fluid surpassed the serum levels after 2.5 hours. At the dosages studied each antibiotic produced wound fluid concentrations greater than the MIC for most susceptible organisms. Higher doses provided higher wound fluid levels. The rate of appearance and the levels achieved should be considered in the choice of antibiotics in the surgical subject. Images Fig. 1. PMID:686888

  14. [Azlocillin--synovial fluid levels after intravenous doses].

    PubMed

    Härle, A; Ritzerfeld, W; Wiynck, G; Knoche, U

    1983-01-01

    The corresponding levels of azlocillin in serum and in synovial fluid in the knee-joint were investigated in patients who had undergone aseptic surgery of the lower limbs. The mean synovial fluid concentrations for azlocillin were determined on the basis of 30 samples. Clinically relevant azlocillin levels of approximately 40 mu g/ml were recorded in synovial fluid 10 minutes after start of a short infusion of 5 gm. These increased until about 90 minutes after commencement of antibiotic administration when the maximum level was attained. Subsequently synovial fluid levels decreased slowly and approximately 170 minutes after commencement of the short infusion the mean for serum and synovial concentrations corresponded. The results confirm that with an i.v. infusion of 5 g azlocillin levels can be attained for 3 hours in the synovial fluid that are above the break-point for this antibiotic of 64 mu g/ml. However, despite these good pharmacokinetic data it should be remembered that experience has shown that surgical reintervention is often necessary in addition in joint infections to achieve ultimate cure. PMID:6405553

  15. Intravenous Fluid Therapy in Traumatic Brain Injury and Decompressive Craniectomy

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Castellar-Leones, Sandra Milena; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The patient with head trauma is a challenge for the emergency physician and for the neurosurgeon. Currently traumatic brain injury constitutes a public health problem. Knowledge of the various supportive therapeutic strategies in the pre-hospital and pre-operative stages is essential for optimal care. The immediate rapid infusion of large volumes of crystalloids to restore blood volume and blood pressure is now the standard treatment of patients with combined traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hemorrhagic shock (HS). The fluid in patients with brain trauma and especially in patients with brain injur y is a critical issue. In this context we present a review of the literature about the history, physiology of current fluid preparations, and a discussion regarding the use of fluid therapy in traumatic brain injury and decompressive craniectomy. PMID:27162857

  16. Pathophysiological Changes Resulting from Intravenous Injection of Ovine Hydatid Cyst Fluid to Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabai, M.; Ismaili, M. H.; Nazarian, I.; Daneshbod, K.

    1974-01-01

    The pathophysiological changes produced by intravenous administration of ovine hydatid fluid were studied in 40 sodium pentobarbitone-anaesthetized sheep. Hydatid fluid was obtained from the lung and liver cysts of freshly-slaughtered sheep. Fifty per cent of the animals died following intravenous injection of 5-10 ml hydatid fluid. In the latter group, postmortem examination revealed a great amount of mucus in the lower airway, intra-alveolar oedema and haemorrhage, congestion of the pulmonary capillaries and peribronchiolar vessels and of the central sinusoids of the liver. Eighty per cent of the animals (including those which died) developed hypotension and respiratory alterations such as transient apnoea and/or rapid respiration to hydatid fluid administration. The 20% non-reactive animals manifested low blood pressure and respiratory changes when they were reinjected hydatid fluid 48 hours or more after the first test. Pretreatment with the antihistamine chlorpheniramine substantially reduced the fall in blood pressure in 3 out of 8 reactive sheep. Atropine pretreatment failed to block the reactions to hydatid fluid. The responses brought about in sheep by hydatid fluid administration may be due to antigen-antibody reactions or due to pharmacological properties of the cyst fluid. ImagesFigs. 1-2Figs. 3-4Figs. 5-7 PMID:4835796

  17. Restrictive versus Standard Fluid Regimen in Elective Minilaparotomy Abdominal Aortic Repair-Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Piljic, Dragan; Petricevic, Mate; Piljic, Dilista; Ksela, Jus; Robic, Boris; Klokocovnik, Tomislav

    2016-06-01

    Objective Elective minilaparotomy abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair is associated with a significant number of complications involving respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and central nervous systems, with mortality ranging up to 5%. In our study, we tested the hypothesis that intra- and postoperative intravenous restrictive fluid regimen reduces postoperative morbidity and mortality, and improves the outcome of minilaparotomy AAA repair. Methods From March 2009 to July 2013, 60 patients operated due to AAA were included in a prospective randomized controlled trial (RCT). About the administration of fluid during the operation and in the early postoperative period, all the patients were randomized into two groups: the group of standard fluid administration (S-group, 30 patients) and the group of reduced fluid administration (R-group, 30 patients). The verification of the treatment success was measured by the length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay, duration of hospitalization after the procedure, as well as the number and type of postoperative complications and mortality. This prospective RCT was registered in a publicly accessible database ClinicalTrials.gov with unique Identifier ID: NTC01939652. Results Total fluid administration and administration of blood products were significantly lower in R-group as compared with S-group (2,445.5 mL vs. 3308.7 mL, p = 0.004). Though the number of nonlethal complications was significantly lower in R-group (2 vs. 9 patients, p = 0.042), the difference in lethal complications remained nonsignificant (0 vs. 1 patient, p = ns). The average ICU stay (1.2 vs. 1.97 days, p = 0.003) and duration of postoperative hospital stay (4.33 vs. 6.20 days, p = 0.035 for R-group and S-group, respectively) were found to be significantly shorter in R-group. Conclusion Intra- and postoperative restrictive intravenous fluid regimen in patients undergoing minilaparotomy AAA repair significantly reduces

  18. Liberal or restricted fluid administration: are we ready for a proposal of a restricted intraoperative approach?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fluid management in the perioperative period has been extensively studied but, despite that, “the right amount” still remains uncertain. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the state of the art of intraoperative fluid approach today. Discussion In the current medical literature there are only heterogeneous viewpoints that gives the idea of how confusing the situation is. The approach to the intraoperative fluid management is complex and it should be based on human physiology and the current evidence. Summary An intraoperative restrictive fluid approach in major surgery may be beneficial while Goal-directed Therapy should be superior to the liberal fluid strategy. Finally, we propose a rational approach currently used at our institution. PMID:25104915

  19. Fluid and electrolyte balance during 24-hour fluid and/or energy restriction.

    PubMed

    James, Lewis J; Shirreffs, Susan M

    2013-12-01

    Weight categorized athletes use a variety of techniques to induce rapid weight loss (RWL) in the days leading up to weigh in. This study examined the fluid and electrolyte balance responses to 24-hr fluid restriction (FR), energy restriction (ER) and fluid and energy restriction (F+ER) compared with a control trial (C), which are commonly used techniques to induce RWL in weight category sports. Twelve subjects (six male, six female) received adequate energy and water (C) intake, adequate energy and restricted water (~10% of C; FR) intake, restricted energy (~25% of C) and adequate water (ER) intake or restricted energy (~25% of C) and restricted (~10% of C) water intake (F+ER) in a randomized counterbalanced order. Subjects visited the laboratory at 0 hr, 12 hr, and 24 hr for blood and urine sample collection. Total body mass loss was 0.33% (C), 1.88% (FR), 1.97% (ER), and 2.44% (F+ER). Plasma volume was reduced at 24 hr during FR, ER, and F+ER, while serum osmolality was increased at 24 hr for FR and F+ER and was greater at 24 hr for FR compared with all other trials. Negative balances of sodium, potassium, and chloride developed during ER and F+ER but not during C and FR. These results demonstrate that 24 hr fluid and/ or energy restriction significantly reduces body mass and plasma volume, but has a disparate effect on serum osmolality, resulting in hypertonic hypohydration during FR and isotonic hypohydration during ER. These findings might be explained by the difference in electrolyte balance between the trials. PMID:24413436

  20. Use of cold intravenous fluid to induce hypothermia in a comatose child after cardiac arrest due to a lightning strike.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Min; Jeong, Ju-Hwan; Kyong, Yeon-Young; Kim, Han-Joon; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Park, Jeong-Ho; Park, Kyu-Nam

    2008-11-01

    We report a case in which mild hypothermia was induced successfully using a cold intravenous fluid infusion in a 12-year-old boy who was comatose following 21 min of cardiac arrest caused by a lightning strike. PMID:18805616

  1. Randomized study of intravenous fluid preload before epidural analgesia during labour.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, S M; Pirlet, M; Mills, M S; Tuckey, J P; Thomas, T A

    2000-08-01

    We performed a randomized controlled trial of the effect of intravenous fluid preload on maternal hypotension and fetal heart rate (FHR) changes in labour after the first epidural injection. Group 1 (49 women) received 1 litre of crystalloid preload. Group 2 (46 women) received no preload. No statistically significant difference was shown between the two groups for either of the outcomes. Hypotension was found in three women in group 1 and five in group 2 (P = 0.4). Deterioration in FHR pattern was found in four women in group 1 and 11 in group 2 (P = 0.08). This study has not shown a significant increase in the incidence of hypotension when intravenous preload is omitted before epidural analgesia using a low concentration of bupivacaine during labour. Because of the clinical importance of the difference in the rate of FHR deterioration between the two groups, we continue to administer preload for high-risk cases. PMID:10992845

  2. Medical Grade Water Generation for Intravenous Fluid Production on Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niederhaus, Charles E.; Barlow, Karen L.; Griffin, DeVon W.; Miller, Fletcher J.

    2008-01-01

    This document describes the intravenous (IV) fluids requirements for medical care during NASA s future Exploration class missions. It further discusses potential methods for generating such fluids and the challenges associated with different fluid generation technologies. The current Exploration baseline mission profiles are introduced, potential medical conditions described and evaluated for fluidic needs, and operational issues assessed. Conclusions on the fluid volume requirements are presented, and the feasibility of various fluid generation options are discussed. A separate report will document a more complete trade study on the options to provide the required fluids.At the time this document was developed, NASA had not yet determined requirements for medical care during Exploration missions. As a result, this study was based on the current requirements for care onboard the International Space Station (ISS). While we expect that medical requirements will be different for Exploration missions, this document will provide a useful baseline for not only developing hardware to generate medical water for injection (WFI), but as a foundation for meeting future requirements. As a final note, we expect WFI requirements for Exploration will be higher than for ISS care, and system capacity may well need to be higher than currently specified.

  3. Investigating the impact of clinical anaesthetic practice on bacterial contamination of intravenous fluids and drugs.

    PubMed

    Mahida, N; Levi, K; Kearns, A; Snape, S; Moppett, I

    2015-05-01

    Syringes (N = 426), ventilator machine swabs (N = 202) and intravenous (IV) fluid administration sets (N = 47) from 101 surgical cases were evaluated for bacterial contamination. Cultures from the external surface of syringe tips and syringe contents were positive in 46% and 15% of cases, respectively. The same bacterial species was cultured from both ventilator and syringe in 13% of cases, and was also detected in the IV fluid administration set in two cases. A significant association was found between emergency cases and contaminated syringes (odds ratio 4.5, 95% confidence interval 1.37-14.8; P = 0.01). Other risk factors included not using gloves and failure to cap syringes. PMID:25648939

  4. Effects on health of fluid restriction during fasting in Ramadan.

    PubMed

    Leiper, J B; Molla, A M; Molla, A M

    2003-12-01

    During the 9th month (Ramadan) of the Islamic calendar (Hijra) many millions of adult Muslims all over the world fast during the daylight hours. Since Hijra is a lunar calendar, Ramadan occurs at different times in the seasonal year over a 33-year cycle. Fasting during Ramadan is partial because the abstention from food, fluid, tobacco and caffeine is from sunrise to sunset. Several categories of people are exempt or can postpone the Ramadan fast. The effect on health and well being of the month-long intermittent fast and fluid restriction has been studied in various potentially vulnerable groups in addition to normal healthy individuals in many countries. The majority of the studies have found significant metabolic changes, but few health problems arising from the fast. A reduction in drug compliance was an inherent negative aspect of the fast. Common findings of the studies reviewed were increased irritability and incidences of headaches with sleep deprivation and lassitude prevalent. A small body mass loss is a frequent, but not universal, outcome of Ramadan. During the daylight hours of Ramadan fasting, practising Muslims are undoubtedly dehydrating, but it is not clear whether they are chronically hypohydrated during the month of Ramadan. No detrimental effects on health have as yet been directly attributed to negative water balance at the levels that may be produced during Ramadan. PMID:14681711

  5. Hypothermic preconditioning of donor organs prior to harvesting and ischaemia using ice-cold intravenous fluids.

    PubMed

    Kämäräinen, Antti; Virkkunen, Ilkka; Tenhunen, Jyrki

    2009-07-01

    To promote organ transplantation and viability, hypothermia has been applied as a protective agent for decades. Current management of organ preservation includes hypothermia as a component of static storage. In rare cases, hypothermic perfusion is initiated in the donor organs prior to harvesting but this requires invasive perfusion techniques. Therefore, hypothermic organ protection is currently achieved only after organ retrieval and onset of ischaemic injury cascades. The relevant mechanisms of cellular and organ damage involve ischaemia-reperfusion injury and apoptosis. In this hypothesis, we propose the possibility of inducing hypothermic protective effects prior to organ harvesting using infusion of ice-cold (+4 degrees C) intravenous fluid in the organ donor. This method of cooling to mild hypothermia (32-34 degrees C) has been found feasible in e.g. cardiac arrest victims and already during the ischaemic insult. We hypothesize that cooling with ice-cold fluid preceding organ harvesting would downregulate organ metabolism and oxygen consumption resulting in improved tolerance to ischaemia. Furthermore, according to existing evidence, mild hypothermia possesses anti-apoptotic effects and suppresses reperfusion associated inflammatory response. Finally, diabetes insipidus is often observed in the brain dead donor. Subsequent hypovolemia is conveniently treated with additional infusion of cold intravenous fluid. We offer this hypothesis as a simple method of improving donor organ viability via improved tolerance to ischaemia and reperfusion injury. This method of hypothermic preconditioning seems safe, inexpensive and easily applicable in virtually every institution treating organ donors. The feasibility and effects of this hypothesis could be further evaluated in comparison to current treatment protocols in laboratory settings including evaluation of organ preservation. PMID:19269108

  6. Intravenous Fluid Mixing in Normal Gravity, Partial Gravity, and Microgravity: Down-Selection of Mixing Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niederhaus, Charles E.; Miller, Fletcher J.

    2008-01-01

    The missions envisioned under the Vision for Space Exploration will require development of new methods to handle crew medical care. Medications and intravenous (IV) fluids have been identified as one area needing development. Storing certain medications and solutions as powders or concentrates can both increase the shelf life and reduce the overall mass and volume of medical supplies. The powders or concentrates would then be mixed in an IV bag with Sterile Water for Injection produced in situ from the potable water supply. Fluid handling in microgravity is different than terrestrial settings, and requires special consideration in the design of equipment. This document describes the analyses and down-select activities used to identify the IV mixing method to be developed that is suitable for ISS and exploration missions. The chosen method is compatible with both normal gravity and microgravity, maintains sterility of the solution, and has low mass and power requirements. The method will undergo further development, including reduced gravity aircraft experiments and computations, in order to fully develop the mixing method and associated operational parameters.

  7. Stability studies of lincomycin hydrochloride in aqueous solution and intravenous infusion fluids

    PubMed Central

    Czarniak, Petra; Boddy, Michael; Sunderland, Bruce; Hughes, Jeff D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the chemical stability of Lincocin® (lincomycin hydrochloride) in commonly used intravenous fluids at room temperature (25°C), at accelerated-degradation temperatures and in selected buffer solutions. Materials and methods The stability of Lincocin® injection (containing lincomycin 600 mg/2 mL as the hydrochloride) stored at 25°C±0.1°C in sodium lactate (Hartmann’s), 0.9% sodium chloride, 5% glucose, and 10% glucose solutions was investigated over 31 days. Forced degradation of Lincocin® in hydrochloric acid, sodium hydroxide, and hydrogen peroxide was performed at 60°C. The effect of pH on the degradation rate of lincomycin hydrochloride stored at 80°C was determined. Results Lincomycin hydrochloride w as found to maintain its shelf life at 25°C in sodium lactate (Hartmann’s) solution, 0.9% sodium chloride solution, 5% glucose solution, and 10% glucose solution, with less than 5% lincomycin degradation occurring in all intravenous solutions over a 31-day period. Lincomycin hydrochloride showed less rapid degradation at 60°C in acid than in basic solution, but degraded rapidly in hydrogen peroxide. At all pH values tested, lincomycin followed first-order kinetics. It had the greatest stability near pH 4 when stored at 80°C (calculated shelf life of 4.59 days), and was least stable at pH 2 (calculated shelf life of 0.38 days). Conclusion Lincocin® injection was chemically found to have a shelf life of at least 31 days at 25°C when added to sodium lactate (Hartmann’s) solution, 0.9% sodium chloride solution, 5% glucose solution, and 10% glucose solution. Solutions prepared at approximately pH 4 are likely to have optimum stability. PMID:27022242

  8. Antibiotic concentrations in serum and wound fluid after local gentamicin or intravenous dicloxacillin prophylaxis in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Friberg, Orjan; Jones, Ian; Sjöberg, Lennart; Söderquist, Bo; Vikerfors, Thomas; Källman, Jan

    2003-01-01

    One important aim of antibiotic prophylaxis in cardiac surgery is preventing mediastinitis and thus it would appear to be relevant to study the antibiotic concentrations in pericardial/mediastinal fluid. Local administration of gentamicin in the wound before sternal closure is a novel way of antibiotic prophylaxis and could be effective against bacteria resistant to intravenous antibiotics. This study measured dicloxacillin concentrations in 101 patients in serum and wound fluid following intravenous administration of dicloxacillin. Similarly, concentrations of gentamicin in serum and wound fluid were determined in 30 patients after administration of 260 mg gentamicin in the wound at sternal closure. Median dicloxacillin concentrations in serum and wound fluid at sternal closure were 59.4 and 55.35 mg/l, respectively. Gentamicin levels in the wound were very high (median 304 mg/l), whereas serum concentrations were low (peak median 2.05 mg/l). Dicloxacillin, 1 g given intravenously, according to the clinical protocol, resulted in levels in serum and wound fluid at sternal closure likely to prevent Staphylococcus aureus infections. Locally administered gentamicin resulted in high local concentrations, potentially effective against agents normally considered resistant. PMID:12839154

  9. An outbreak of neonatal deaths in Brazil associated with contaminated intravenous fluids.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Denise O; McDonald, L Clifford; Wanderley, Ailton; Wanderley, Celeste; Miller, Phyllis; Carr, Janice; Arduino, Matthew; Sehulster, Lynne; Anderson, Roger; Jarvis, William R

    2002-07-01

    A nursery outbreak of fever and clinical sepsis resulted in the deaths of 36 neonates in Roraima, Brazil. To determine the cause, epidemiologic studies were performed, along with culture and endotoxin analysis of intravenous (iv) fluids. Affected neonates were more likely to have lower birth weight (2.1 vs. 3.2 kg; P<.01), lower APGAR (activity, pulse, grimace, appearance, and respiration) score at 1 (7 vs. 8; P=.1) or 5 min (8 vs. 9; P=.03), lower gestational age (32 vs. 39 weeks; P=.001), or to receive iv medications (20/20 vs. 2/40; P<.0001). Fever occurred only after iv medication administration. Although culture results of unopened iv medications were negative, endotoxin levels of glucose and distilled water for injection were elevated (3.3 and 1.2 U/mL, respectively). Endotoxin-contaminated iv medications were distributed nationally and may have caused other outbreaks of unexplained death. These results highlight the importance of monitoring both pharmaceutical quality and postmarketing surveillance for adverse events. PMID:12089665

  10. Systemic Pharmacokinetics and Cerebrospinal Fluid Uptake of Intravenous Ceftriaxone in Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanli; Cudkowicz, Merit E.; Shefner, Jeremy; Krivickas, Lisa; David, William S.; Vriesendorp, Francine; Pestronk, Alan; Caress, James B.; Katz, Jonathan; Simpson, Ericka; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Pascuzzi, Robert; Glass, Jonathan; Rezania, Kourosh; Harmatz, Jerold S.; Schoenfeld, David; Greenblatt, David J

    2015-01-01

    The cephalosporin antibiotic ceftriaxone was evaluated as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The pharmacokinetics (PK) of ceftriaxone in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were investigated in 66 participants in a previously reported clinical trial. Their mean age was 51 years, and 65 % were male. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups receiving intravenous infusions (mean duration: 25 minutes) every 12 hours of either: placebo and placebo; 2 grams ceftriaxone and placebo; or 2 grams ceftriaxone twice. Mean steady-state plasma PK variables were: volume of distribution, 14 liters (0.17 liters/kg); elimination half-life, 8 - 9 hours; total clearance, 17-21 mL/min (0.22 - 0.25 mL/min/kg). Values were not different between dosage groups. CSF PK analysis, determined through sparse CSF sampling, indicated apparent entry and elimination half-life values of 1.0 and 34 hours, respectively. With both dosage regimens, CSF concentrations were maintained above the target threshold of 1.0 μM (0.55 μg/mL) as determined from in vitro models. The plasma and CSF PK profile of ceftriaxone were used as a basis for planning the Phase 3 clinical trial of ceftriaxone in ALS. PMID:24771634

  11. Restricted versus Standard Maintenance Fluid Volume in Management of Transient Tachypnea of Newborn: A Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dehdashtian, Masoud; Aramesh, Mohammad-Reza; Melekian, Arash; Aletayeb, Mohammad-Hasan; Ghaemmaghami, Anahita

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The incidence of Transient Tachypnea of Newborn (TTN) is higher in infants born by cesarean section than with  vaginal delivery. Treatment of transient tachypnea of newborn is supportive. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of restricted fluid volume intake on the course of respiratory distress in patients with TTN. Methods: This is a quasi-experimental clinical trial of 83 neonates diagnosed with TTN admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit in south west Iran. In this study the effect of restriction of maintenance fluid volume in the course of respiratory distress in newborns with transient tachypnea was assessed. Findings: In the standard fluid volume intake group 18 (42.8%) cases needed nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) and one (2.38%) case mechanical ventilation, and in restricted fluid volume intake group 13 (32.5%) cases needed NCPAP and two (5%) cases mechanical ventilation. 54.82% of cases were supported with oxyhood in the standard fluid volume and 62.5% in the restricted fluid volume intake group. Differences in duration of the needed NCPAP and oxygen hood between the two groups were significant. Fluid restriction had no adverse effect on the urine specific gravity or weight loss of the studied newborns. Conclusion: Limited fluid administered to newborns with transient tachypnea of newborn is safe and resulted in shorter duration of respiratory support. PMID:25793064

  12. Oral fluid cocaine and benzoylecgonine concentrations following controlled intravenous cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Ellefsen, Kayla N; Concheiro, Marta; Pirard, Sandrine; Gorelick, David A; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2016-03-01

    Limited oral fluid (OF) pharmacokinetic data collected with commercially available collection devices after controlled cocaine administration hinder OF result interpretations. Ten cocaine-using adults provided OF, collected with Oral-Eze(®) (OE) and StatSure Saliva Sampler™ (SS) devices, an hour prior to and up to 69 h after 25mg intravenous (IV) cocaine administration. Cocaine and benzoylecgonine (BE) were quantified by a validated 2D-GC-MS method. Large inter-subject variability was observed. Cocaine was detected in OF in the first 0.17 h sample after IV administration, with much more rapid elimination than BE. OE observed Cmax median (range) concentrations were 932 (394-1574)μg/L for cocaine and 248 (96.9-953)μg/L for BE. SS observed cocaine and BE Cmax median (range) concentrations trended lower at 732 (83.3-1892)μg/L and 360 (77.2-836)μg/L, respectively. OE and SS cocaine OF detection times were 12.5 and 6.5h and for BE 30.5 and 28.0 h, respectively at 1 μg/L. There were no significant pharmacokinetic differences between OE and SS OF collection devices, except cocaine half-life was significantly shorter in SS OF specimens. This difference could be attributed to differences in stabilizing buffers present in OF collection devices, which may affect cocaine stability in OF specimens, or decreased recovery from collection pads. Both OE and SS OF collection devices were effective in monitoring cocaine and metabolite concentrations with similar detection windows. Furthermore, we demonstrated that different confirmatory OF cutoffs can be selected to produce shorter or longer cocaine and metabolite detection windows to address specific needs of clinical and forensic drug testing programs. PMID:26851651

  13. Fluid management in patients with trauma: Restrictive versus liberal approach.

    PubMed

    Chatrath, Veena; Khetarpal, Ranjana; Ahuja, Jogesh

    2015-01-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of death worldwide, and almost 30% of trauma deaths are due to blood loss. A number of concerns have been raised regarding the advisability of the classic principles of aggressive crystalloid resuscitation in traumatic hemorrhagic shock. Some recent studies have shown that early volume restoration in certain types of trauma before definite hemostasis may result in accelerated blood loss, hypothermia, and dilutional coagulopathy. This review discusses the advances and changes in protocols in fluid resuscitation and blood transfusion for treatment of traumatic hemorrhage shock. The concept of low volume fluid resuscitation also known as permissive hypotension avoids the adverse effects of early aggressive resuscitation while maintaining a level of tissue perfusion that although lower than normal, is adequate for short periods. Permissive hypotension is part of the damage control resuscitation strategy, which targets the conditions that exacerbate hemorrhage. The elements of this strategy are permissive hypotension, minimization of crystalloid resuscitation, control of hypothermia, prevention of acidosis, and early use of blood products to minimize coagulopathy. PMID:26330707

  14. Fluid Restriction and Prophylactic Indomethacin in Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants

    PubMed Central

    Anabrees, Jasim A.; AIFaleh, Khalid M.

    2012-01-01

    Although survival of extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants dramatically improved over last decades, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) rate has not changed. The use of indomethacin prophylaxis in ELBW infants results in improved short-term outcomes with no effect on long-term outcomes. The addition of fluid restriction to the indomethacin prophylaxis policy could result in a reduction of BPD and improve long-term survival without neurosensory impairment at 18 months corrected age. To determine the effect of a policy of fluid restriction compared with a policy of no fluid restriction on morbidity and mortality in ELBW infants receiving indomethacin prophylaxis. The standard search strategy for the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group was used. This included search of OVID MEDLINE-National Library of Medicine, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 8, 2011). Additional search included conference proceedings, references in articles, and unpublished data. All randomized or quasi-randomized trials that compared fluid restriction and indomethacin prophylaxis vs. indomethacin prophylaxis alone in ELBW infants were included. Standard methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group were planned to assess the methodological quality of the trials. Review Manager 5 software was planned to be used for statistical analysis. We found no randomized controlled trials to investigate the possible interaction between fluid restriction and indomethacin prophylaxis vs. indomethacin prophylaxis alone in ELBW infants. A well-designed randomized trial is needed to address this question. PMID:24027673

  15. Intravenous Fluid Therapy Course for the Licensed Practical Nurse. Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a 10-unit intravenous (IV) therapy course for licensed practical nurses. Units contain from one to nine lessons. The first unit provides an introduction and orientation to the course. Subsequent units concern documentation, anatomy and physiology as applied to IV therapy, fundamental aspects of fluid…

  16. The effects of warmed intravenous fluids, combined warming (warmed intravenous fluids with humid-warm oxygen), and pethidine on the severity of shivering in general anesthesia patients in the recovery room

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri, Ahmad; Akbari, Ayob; Sharifzade, GholamReza; Derakhshan, Pooya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Shivering is a common complication of general and epidural anesthesia. Warming methods and many drugs are used for control of shivering in the recovery room. The present study is a randomized clinical trial aimed to investigate the effects of two interventions in comparison with pethidine which is the routine treatment on shivering in patients undergoing abdominal surgery with general anesthesia. Materials and Methods: Eighty-seven patients undergoing abdominal surgery by general anesthesia were randomly assigned to three groups (two intervention groups in comparison with pethidine as routine). Patients in warmed intravenous fluids group received pre-warmed Ringer serum (38°C), patients in combined warming group received pre-warmed Ringer serum (38°C) accompanied by humid-warm oxygen, and patients in pethidine group received intravenous pethidine routinely. The elapsed time of shivering and some hemodynamic parameters of the participants were assessed for 20 min postoperatively in the recovery room. Then the collected data were analyzed by software SPSS (v. 16) with the significance level being P < 0.05. Results: The mean of elapsed time in the warmed intravenous serum group, the combined warming group, and the pethidine group were 7 (1.5) min, 6 (1.5) min, and 2.8 (0.7) min, respectively, which was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The body temperatures in both combined warming and pethidine groups were increased significantly (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Combined warming can be effective in controlling postoperative shivering and body temperature increase. PMID:26793258

  17. Restrictive Fluid Resuscitation Leads to Better Oxygenation than Non-Restrictive Fluid Resuscitation in Piglets with Pulmonary or Extrapulmonary Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Shunan; Li, Qiujie; Yuan, Shiying; Shu, Huaqing; Yuan, Yin

    2015-01-01

    Background Early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) is used to reduce mortality from septic shock and could be used in early fluid resuscitation of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of restrictive (RFR) and nonrestrictive fluid resuscitation (NRFR) on hemodynamics, oxygenation, pulmonary function, tissue perfusion, and inflammation in piglets with pulmonary or extrapulmonary ARDS (ARDSp and ARDSexp). Material/Methods Chinese miniature piglets (6–8 weeks; 15±1 kg) were randomly divided into 2 groups (n=12/group) for establishing ARDSp and ARDSexp models, and were further divided into 2 subgroups (n=6/subgroup) for performing RFR and NRFR. Piglets were anesthetized and hemodynamic, pulmonary, and oxygenation indicators were collected at different time points for 6 hours. The goal of EGDT was set for PiCCO parameters (mean arterial pressure (MAP), urine output and cardiac index (CI), and central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2). Results Piglets under RFR had lower urine output compared with NRFR, as well as lower total fluid volume (P<0.05). EVLW was decreased in ARDSp+RFR and NRFR, as well as in ARDSexp+RFR, but EVLW increased in ARDSexp+NRFR (P<0.05). PaO2/FiO2 decreased in ARDSp using both methods, but was higher with RFR (P<0.05), and was increased in ARDSexp+RFR. Other pulmonary indicators were comparable. The anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and LXA4 were increased in ARDSexp after RFR (P<0.05), but not in the other groups. Conclusions RFR led to better oxygenation in ARDSp and ARDSexp compared with NRFR, but fluid restriction improved oxygenation in ARDSexp only. PMID:26166324

  18. Absorption, elimination and cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of nimodipine in healthy beagle dogs receiving human intravenous and oral formulation.

    PubMed

    Koskimäki, Janne; Tarkia, Miikka; Ahtola-Sätilä, Tuula; Saloranta, Lasse; Laakso, Aki; Frantzén, Janek

    2016-06-01

    Nimodipine is an L-type calcium channel blocker and is used to treat vasospasm in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Its putative mechanism of action is relaxation of smooth muscle cells in cerebral arteries. In addition, nimodipine may have pleiotropic effects against vasospasm. Systemic hypotension is an adverse effect when patients are treated with oral or intravenous nimodipine. Intracranial administration of nimodipine formulations may produce higher concentration of nimodipine in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) than is possible to achieve orally or intravenously, while resulting in lower incidence of systemic hypotension. The aim of this study was to provide information on plasma and CSF levels of nimodipine in beagle dogs as a comparative data for development of experimental intracranial treatment modalities. Plasma levels of nimodipine were measured after current 30 and 60 mg single oral dose of nimodipine (Nimotop(®) 30 mg tablets), a single intravenous bolus 0.72 mg/dog of nimodipine (Nimotop(®) 0.2 mg/ml infusion solution) and CSF levels after 60 mg single oral dose of nimodipine. CSF/Plasma concentration ratio of nimodipine after oral administration of 60 mg at 1 h was 0.013 ± 0.0005. The mean terminal elimination half-life of nimodipine after i.v. bolus dose 0.72 mg was 1.8 h and mean plasma clearance was 40.3 and 3.4 l/h/kg. Absolute bioavailability was 22 %. Maximum plasma concentration and area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time of administration until the last measurable plasma concentration increased in a dose-proportional manner comparing the exposure parameters at oral doses of 30 and 60 mg. Individual variation in the kinetic profile of nimodipine was measured. PMID:25652785

  19. Randomized comparison of oral and intravenous fluid regimens after gallbladder surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Cassell, O C; Oakley, N; Forrest, A R; Thomas, W E; Dennison, A R

    1996-01-01

    Numerous studies of post-operative fluid status have utilized sophisticated measurements of electrolyte distribution and fluid shift without relating results to clinical practice. The aim of this prospective randomized study was to investigate the response of patients undergoing abdominal surgery of moderate severity to conservative post-operative fluid administration. Forty-five patients undergoing open cholecystectomy were randomized to receive 2.51 of fluid (1 l normal saline and 1.51 5% dextrose), 1 l of normal saline, or free oral fluids (groups 1, 2, 3, respectively). Serum and urine osmolality and electrolytes were measured pre-operatively and at 24 and 48 h post-operatively. Patients remained in the study irrespective of the urine output. Plasma electrolytes and osmolality remained within normal limits in all three groups despite significant changes in urine electrolyte and osmolality in groups 2 and 3. This confirms that a conservative approach to fluid administration has no detrimental effect on hydration in fit patients with uncomplicated surgery. PMID:8778430

  20. Intraoperative Fluid Restriction in Pancreatic Surgery: A Double Blinded Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    van Samkar, Ganapathy; Eshuis, Wietse J.; Bennink, Roelof J.; van Gulik, Thomas M.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Preckel, Benedikt; de Hert, Stefan; Gouma, Dirk J.; Hollmann, Markus W.; Busch, Olivier R. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Perioperative fluid restriction in a variety of operations has shown improvement of: complications, recovery of gastrointestinal function and length of stay (LOS). We investigated effects of crystalloid fluid restriction in pancreatic surgery. Our hypothesis: enhanced recovery of gastrointestinal function. Methods In this double-blinded randomized trial, patients scheduled to undergo pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) were randomized: standard (S:10ml/kg/hr) or restricted (R:5ml/kg/hr) fluid protocols. Primary endpoint: gastric emptying scintigraphically assessed on postoperative day 7. Results In 66 randomized patients, complications and 6-year survival were analyzed. 54 patients were analyzed in intention to treat: 24 S-group and 30 R-group. 32 patients actually underwent a PD and 16 patients had a palliative gastrojejunostomy bypass operation in the full protocol analysis. The median gastric emptying time (T½) was 104 minutes (S-group, 95% confidence interval: 74–369) versus 159 minutes (R-group, 95% confidence interval: 61–204) (P = 0.893, NS). Delayed gastric emptying occurred in 10 patients in the S-group and in 13 patients in the R-group (45% and 50%, P = 0.779, NS). The primary outcome parameter, gastric emptying time, did not show a statistically significant difference between groups. Conclusion A fluid regimen of 10ml/kg/hr or 5ml/kg/hr during pancreatic surgery did not lead to statistically significant differences in gastric emptying. A larger study would be needed to draw definite conclusions about fluid restriction in pancreatic surgery. Trial registration ISRCTN62621488 PMID:26465290

  1. [Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. A cold intravenous fluid, a cooling helmet and a cooling blanket efficiently reduce body temperature].

    PubMed

    Friberg, Hans; Nielsen, Niklas; Karlsson, Torbjörn; Cronberg, Tobias; Widner, Håkan; Englund, Elisabet; Ersson, Anders

    2004-07-22

    Two controlled randomized trials have shown that mild systemic hypothermia after cardiac arrest is beneficial for neurological outcome and one of the studies shows an improved survival rate. A pilot study was performed to evaluate a model of induced hypothermia after cardiac arrest, using cold intravenous fluids and surface cooling with a cold helmet and a coldwater blanket (Thermowrap). The main purpose was to evaluate our cooling method regarding efficacy, safety and usability. Five unconscious patients after cardiac arrest were treated with induced hypothermia of whom three survived with good recovery to six-month follow up. Two patients died in the ICU without regaining consciousness. There were no adverse events during treatment. We conclude that our method is reasonably fast compared to other published methods, it is easy to perform and it offers a good temperature control during cooling and rewarming. Routines for evaluating prognosis and neurological outcome after cardiac arrest and hypothermia treatment need to be revised. PMID:15314936

  2. Dextrose containing intravenous fluid impairs outcome and increases death after eight minutes of cardiac arrest and resuscitation in dogs.

    PubMed

    D'Alecy, L G; Lundy, E F; Barton, K J; Zelenock, G B

    1986-09-01

    Use of dextrose in intravenous resuscitation fluids is common practice; however, this study indicates that 5% dextrose solutions, even if administered in physiologic quantities, greatly worsens the outcome of survivable cardiac arrest. Twelve adult male mongrel dogs were premedicated with morphine, anesthetized with halothane, instrumented, intubated, and ventilated. Each dog was first given 500 ml of either lactated Ringer's (LR) (n = 6) or 5% dextrose in LR (D5LR) (n = 6). Halothane was stopped and fibrillation was induced (60 Hz). Blood glucose just before cardiac arrest was 129 mg/dl in the LR dogs and was increased to 335 mg/dl in the D5LR dogs. After eight minutes of arrest, resuscitation, including internal cardiac massage and standard advanced cardiac life support drug protocols (modified for dogs), was begun. When stable cardiac rhythm was obtained, the chest was closed, and LR or D5LR continued until a total of 1L was given. A neurologic score (0 = normal to 100 = dead) was assigned at 1, 2, 6, and 24 hours. The LR group did not differ statistically from the D5LR group in operative time, number of defibrillatory shocks, time to spontaneous ventilation, time to extubation, or drugs required. Resuscitation was successful in all six LR and five of six D5LR group; however, by 2 hours after resuscitation and thereafter, D5LR group had a significantly greater neurologic deficit (p less than 0.05) than did the LR group. By 9 hours, four of six D5LR dogs displayed convulsive activity and died. At 24 hours the D5LR group had a greater (p less than 0.008) neurologic deficit (82 +/- 11) than did the LR group (21 +/- 7), which walked and ate. We conclude that the addition of 5% dextrose to standard intravenous fluids greatly increases the morbidity and mortality associated with cardiac resuscitation. PMID:3738770

  3. Effects of large volume, ice-cold intravenous fluid infusion on respiratory function in cardiac arrest survivors.

    PubMed

    Jacobshagen, Claudius; Pax, Anja; Unsöld, Bernhard W; Seidler, Tim; Schmidt-Schweda, Stephan; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Maier, Lars S

    2009-11-01

    International guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation recommend mild hypothermia (32-34 degrees C) for 12-24h in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. To induce therapeutic hypothermia a variety of external and intravascular cooling devices are available. A cheap and effective method for inducing hypothermia is the infusion of large volume, ice-cold intravenous fluid. There are concerns regarding the effects of rapid infusion of large volumes of fluid on respiratory function in cardiac arrest survivors. We have retrospectively studied the effects of high volume cold fluid infusion on respiratory function in 52 resuscitated cardiac arrest patients. The target temperature of 32-34 degrees C was achieved after 4.1+/-0.5h (cooling rate 0.48 degrees C/h). During this period 3427+/-210 mL ice-cold fluid was infused. Despite significantly reduced LV-function (EF 35.8+/-2.2%) the respiratory status of these patients did not deteriorate significantly. On intensive care unit admission the mean PaO(2) was 231.4+/-20.6 mmHg at a F(i)O(2) of 0.82+/-0.03 (PaO(2)/F(i)O(2)=290.0+/-24.1) and a PEEP level of 7.14+/-0.31 mbar. Until reaching the target temperature of fluid is an effective and inexpensive method for inducing therapeutic hypothermia. Resuscitation from cardiac arrest is associated with a deterioration in respiratory function. The infusion of large volumes of cold fluid does not cause a statistically significant further deterioration in respiratory function. A larger, randomized and prospective study is required to assess the efficacy and safety of ice-cold fluid infusion for

  4. Intravenous Inoculation with Chlamydia muridarum Leads to a Long-Lasting Infection Restricted to the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jin; Zhang, Tianyuan; Wang, Luying; Shao, Lili; Zhu, Cuiming; Zhang, Yuyang; Failor, Courtney; Schenken, Robert; Baseman, Joel; He, Cheng; Zhong, Guangming

    2016-08-01

    Chlamydia has been detected in the gastrointestinal tracts of both animals and humans. However, it remains unclear whether the chlamydial organisms can be introduced into the gastrointestinal tract via pathways independent of the oral and anal routes. We have recently shown that Chlamydia muridarum spreads from the genital tract to the gastrointestinal tract potentially via the circulatory system. To test whether hematogenous C. muridarum can spread to and establish a long-lasting colonization in the mouse gastrointestinal tract, we inoculated mice intravenously with a luciferase-expressing C. muridarum strain and monitored its distribution. After tail vein inoculation, most luciferase-generated bioluminescence signals were detected in the mouse abdominal area throughout the experiment. The ex vivo imaging revealed that the abdominal signals came from the gastrointestinal tract tissues. Simultaneous monitoring of chlamydial organisms in individual organs or tissues revealed an initial stage of systemic spreading followed by a long-lasting infection in the gastrointestinal tract. A retro-orbital vein inoculation of the C. muridarum organisms at a lower dose in a different mouse strain also led to colonization of the gastrointestinal tract. We have demonstrated that intravenous C. muridarum inoculation can result in colonization of the gastrointestinal tract, suggesting that the chlamydial organisms may use the sexual behavior-independent circulation pathway to infect the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27271744

  5. Zanamivir pharmacokinetics and pulmonary penetration into epithelial lining fluid following intravenous or oral inhaled administration to healthy adult subjects.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Mark J; Lovern, Mark; Ng-Cashin, Judith; Jones, Lori; Gould, Elizabeth; Gauvin, Jennifer; Rodvold, Keith A

    2011-11-01

    Zanamivir serum and pulmonary pharmacokinetics were characterized following intravenous (i.v.) or oral inhaled administration. I.v. zanamivir was given as intermittent doses of 100 mg, 200 mg, and 600 mg every 12 h (q12h) for two doses or as a continuous infusion (6-mg loading dose followed by 3 mg/h for 12 h). Oral inhaled zanamivir (two 5-mg inhalations q12h for two doses) was evaluated as well. Each zanamivir regimen was administered to six healthy subjects with serial pharmacokinetic sampling. In addition, a single bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid sample was collected at various time points and used to calculate epithelial lining fluid (ELF) drug concentrations for each subject. For intermittent i.v. administration of 100 mg, 200 mg, and 600 mg zanamivir, the median zanamivir concentrations in ELF collected 12 h after dosing were 74, 146, and 419 ng/ml, respectively, each higher than the historic mean 50% inhibitory concentrations for the neuraminidases of wild-type strains of influenza A and B viruses. Median ELF/serum zanamivir concentration ratios ranged from 55 to 79% for intermittent i.v. administration (when sampled 12 h after the last dose) and 43 to 45% for continuous infusion (when sampled 6 to 12 h after the start of the infusion). For oral inhaled zanamivir, the median zanamivir concentrations in ELF were 891 ng/ml for the first BAL fluid collection and 326 ng/ml for subsequent BAL fluid collections (when sampled 12 h after the last dose); corresponding serum drug concentrations were undetectable. This study demonstrates zanamivir's penetration into the human pulmonary compartment and supports the doses selected for the continuing development of i.v. zanamivir in clinical studies of influenza. PMID:21896909

  6. Zanamivir Pharmacokinetics and Pulmonary Penetration into Epithelial Lining Fluid following Intravenous or Oral Inhaled Administration to Healthy Adult Subjects▿

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Mark J.; Lovern, Mark; Ng-Cashin, Judith; Jones, Lori; Gould, Elizabeth; Gauvin, Jennifer; Rodvold, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    Zanamivir serum and pulmonary pharmacokinetics were characterized following intravenous (i.v.) or oral inhaled administration. I.v. zanamivir was given as intermittent doses of 100 mg, 200 mg, and 600 mg every 12 h (q12h) for two doses or as a continuous infusion (6-mg loading dose followed by 3 mg/h for 12 h). Oral inhaled zanamivir (two 5-mg inhalations q12h for two doses) was evaluated as well. Each zanamivir regimen was administered to six healthy subjects with serial pharmacokinetic sampling. In addition, a single bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid sample was collected at various time points and used to calculate epithelial lining fluid (ELF) drug concentrations for each subject. For intermittent i.v. administration of 100 mg, 200 mg, and 600 mg zanamivir, the median zanamivir concentrations in ELF collected 12 h after dosing were 74, 146, and 419 ng/ml, respectively, each higher than the historic mean 50% inhibitory concentrations for the neuraminidases of wild-type strains of influenza A and B viruses. Median ELF/serum zanamivir concentration ratios ranged from 55 to 79% for intermittent i.v. administration (when sampled 12 h after the last dose) and 43 to 45% for continuous infusion (when sampled 6 to 12 h after the start of the infusion). For oral inhaled zanamivir, the median zanamivir concentrations in ELF were 891 ng/ml for the first BAL fluid collection and 326 ng/ml for subsequent BAL fluid collections (when sampled 12 h after the last dose); corresponding serum drug concentrations were undetectable. This study demonstrates zanamivir's penetration into the human pulmonary compartment and supports the doses selected for the continuing development of i.v. zanamivir in clinical studies of influenza. PMID:21896909

  7. Prevalence of Sodium and Fluid Restriction Recommendations for Patients with Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zeiger, Tonya; Cueva Cobo, Giovanna; Dillingham, Christine; Burger, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) are often afflicted with the consequences of right heart failure including volume overload. Counseling to assist the patient in the dietary restriction of sodium and fluid may be underutilized. Methods: Consecutive patients seen in the PH Clinic at Mayo Clinic in Florida from June to November 2013. Results: 100 patients were included; 70 were women and most had group 1 PH (n = 69). Patient characteristics using mean (±SD) were: Age 63 ± 13 years, functional class 3 ± 1, brain natriuretic peptide 302 ± 696 pg/mL, 6-min walk 337 ± 116 m, right atrial pressure 8 ± 5 mmHg, and mean pulmonary artery pressure 42 ± 13 mmHg. Overall, 79 had had complete (32) or partial instruction (47) and 21 had no prior counseling to restrict sodium or fluid. Of the 47 with partial instruction, 42 received complete education during the PH Clinic visit. Of the 21 without prior instruction, 19 received complete education during the PH visit. Seven patients with the opportunity to have their education enhanced or provided did not receive any additional counseling during the PH visit. Conclusion: Sodium and fluid restriction is an important but perhaps underutilized strategy to manage volume overload in patients with right heart failure. Focused questioning and education may permit an increase in the patients receiving instruction in this regard.

  8. Tiludronate concentrations and cytologic findings in synovial fluid after intravenous regional limb perfusion with tiludronate in horses

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Barbara G.; Larson, Maureen K.

    2015-01-01

    Anecdotal accounts of tiludronate administration via intravenous regional limb perfusion (IVRLP) exist despite a lack of information regarding safety for synovial structures in the perfused area. The objective of this study was to determine whether tiludronate concentrations in synovial structures after IVRLP with low dose (0.5 mg, LDT) or high dose (50 mg, HDT) tiludronate remain below a value demonstrated in vitro to be safe for articular cartilage (<19,000 ng/ml), and to determine effects of tiludronate on synovial fluid cytology variables compared to saline perfused control limbs. Using a randomized controlled experimental study design, horses received IVRLP with LDT (n = 6) or HDT (n = 6) in one forelimb and IVRLP with saline in the contralateral limb. Synovial fluid cytology variables and tiludronate concentrations were evaluated in navicular bursae (NB), and distal interphalangeal (DIP) and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints one week before and 30–45 min after IVRLP, and in DIP and MCP joints 24 h after IVRLP. Data were analyzed with 2-way rmANOVA (p < 0.05). Highest measured synovial fluid tiludronate concentrations occurred 30–45 min post-perfusion. Mean tiludronate concentrations were lower in LDT limbs (MCP = 39.6 ± 14.3 ng/ml, DIP = 118.1 ± 66.6 ng/ml, NB = 82.1 ± 30.2 ng/ml) than in HDT limbs (MCP = 3,745.1 ± 1,536.6 ng/ml, DIP = 16,274.0 ± 5,460.2 ng/ml, NB = 6,049.3 ± 1,931.7 ng/ml). Tiludronate concentration was >19,000 ng/ml in DIP joints of two HDT limbs. Tiludronate was measurable only in synovial fluid from HDT limbs 24 h post-perfusion. There were no differences in synovial fluid cytology variables between control and treated limbs. Conclusions. In some horses, IVRLP with HDT may result in synovial fluid concentrations of tiludronate that may have adverse effects on articular cartilage, based on in vitro data. IVRLP with LDT is unlikely to promote articular cartilage degradation. Further studies to determine a safe and effective dose

  9. Evaluation of the Performance and Safety of a Newly Developed Intravenous Fluid Warmer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Jung; Yoo, Sung Mook; Son, Ho Sung; Ahn, Chi Bum; Shin, Yeon Soo; Chung, Jae Ho; Sun, Kyung

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the performance and safety of a newly developed blood warmer (ThermoSens), we tested its heating capability under various conditions using isotonic saline and hemolysis analysis with swine blood. The following two in vitro tests were performed: (i) To investigate the performance of the device, the inflow and outflow temperatures were measured at various flow rates (30, 50, and 100 mL/min) using cold (5°C) and room temperature (20°C) isotonic saline (0.9%). Several parameters were measured including the highest temperature of the outlet, the time required to reach the highest temperature, and the temperature of the intravenous line. (ii) To investigate the safety of the device, a hemolysis test was performed using swine blood. We obtained 320 mL of whole blood from swine and refrigerated the blood for 35 days at 3°C. In order to replicate the clinical situation, blood flow by gravity and pressure (300 mm Hg) was used. Before and after the heating test, blood samples were obtained and a comparison was made between these samples. Hemoglobin, hematocrit, lactate dehydrogenase, and plasma hemoglobin were used for red blood cell (RBC) damage analysis. The highest outlet temperatures obtained using flow rates of 30, 50, and 100 mL/min were 39.10 ± 0.59, 39.25 ± 0.69, and 37.63 ± 1.03°C, respectively, with cold saline, and 39.40 ± 0.40, 39.66 ± 0.36, and 39.49 ± 0.49°C, respectively, with room temperature saline. Hemolysis tests showed no significant changes in hemoglobin, hematocrit, lactate dehydrogenase, or plasma hemoglobin (P > 0.05) between before and after heating for both gravity and pressure blood flow. The ThermoSens blood warmer warms isotonic saline effectively, reaching temperatures up to 36°C under various conditions. Hemolysis tests showed no RBC damage. Therefore, the newly developed ThermoSens has good heating performance and is safe for RBC products. PMID:25865383

  10. The choice of the intravenous fluid influences the tolerance of acute normovolemic anemia in anesthetized domestic pigs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The correction of hypovolemia with acellular fluids results in acute normovolemic anemia. Whether the choice of the infusion fluid has an impact on the maintenance of oxygen (O2) supply during acute normovolemic anemia has not been investigated so far. Methods Thirty-six anesthetized and mechanically ventilated pigs were hemodiluted to their physiological limit of anemia tolerance, reflected by the individual critical hemoglobin concentration (Hbcrit). Hbcrit was defined as the Hb-concentration corresponding with the onset of supply-dependency of total body O2-consumption (VO2). The hemodilution protocol was randomly performed with either tetrastarch (6% HES 130/0.4, TS-group, n = 9), gelatin (3.5% urea-crosslinked polygeline, GEL-group, n = 9), hetastarch (6% HES 450/0.7, HS-group, n = 9) or Ringer's solution (RS-group, n = 9). The primary endpoint was the dimension of Hbcrit, secondary endpoints were parameters of central hemodynamics, O2 transport and tissue oxygenation. Results In each animal, normovolemia was maintained throughout the protocol. Hbcrit was met at 3.7 ± 0.6 g/dl (RS), 3.0 ± 0.6 g/dl (HS P < 0.05 vs. RS), 2.7 ± 0.6 g/dl (GEL, P < 0.05 vs. RS) and 2.1 ± 0.4 g/dl (TS, P < 0.05 vs. GEL, HS and RS). Hemodilution with RS resulted in a significant increase of extravascular lung water index (EVLWI) and a decrease of arterial oxygen partial pressure (paO2), and O2 extraction ratio was increased, when animals of the TS-, GEL- and HS-groups met their individual Hbcrit. Conclusions The choice of the intravenous fluid has an impact on the tolerance of acute normovolemic anemia induced by acellular volume replacement. Third-generation tetrastarch preparations (e.g., HES 130/0.4) appear most advantageous regarding maintenance of tissue oxygenation during progressive anemia. The underlying mechanism includes a lower degree of extravasation and favourable effects on microcirculatory function. PMID:22546374

  11. The effects of restricted energy and fluid intake on simulated amateur boxing performance.

    PubMed

    Smith, M; Dyson, R; Hale, T; Hamilton, M; Kelly, J; Wellington, P

    2001-06-01

    This study examined the effects of serial reductions in energy and fluid intake on two simulated boxing performances separated by 2 days recovery. Eight amateur boxers (age: 23.6 +/- 3.2 years; height 175 +/- 5 cm; body mass [BM] 73.3 +/- 8.3 kg [Mean +/- SD]) performed two simulated boxing bouts (BB) under normal (N-trial) and restricted (R-trial) diets in a counterbalanced design over 5 days. The trials were separated by a 9-day period of normal dietary behavior (X-trial). BM was recorded on days 1, 3, and 5 of each trial. Simulated bouts of three, 3-min rounds with 1-min recovery were completed on days 3 (BB1) and 5 (BB2) of each 5-day trial. Punching force (N) was recorded from 8 sets of 7 punches by a purpose-built boxing ergometer. Heart rate (fC) was monitored continuously (PE3000 Polar Sports Tester, Kempele, Finland), and blood lactate (BLa) and glucose (BG) were determined 4-min post-performance (2300 StaPlus, YSI, Ohio). Energy and fluid intakes were significantly lower in the R-trial (p < .05). Body mass was maintained during the N-trial but fell 3% (p < .05) during the R-trial. There were no significant differences in end-of-bout fC or post-bout BG, but BLa was higher in the N- than the R-trial (p < .05). R-trial punching forces were 3.2% and 4.6% lower, respectively, compared to the corresponding N-trial bouts, but the differences did not reach statistical significance. These results suggest that energy and fluid restrictions in weight-governed sports do not always lead to a significant decrease in performance, but because of the small sample size and big variations in individual performances, these findings should be interpreted with care. PMID:11426438

  12. MHC restriction of synovial fluid lymphocyte responses to the triggering organism in reactive arthritis. Absence of a class I-restricted response.

    PubMed Central

    Hassell, A B; Pilling, D; Reynolds, D; Life, P F; Bacon, P A; Gaston, J S

    1992-01-01

    Synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMC) from patients with reactive arthritis (ReA) show marked proliferative responses to preparations of the organism triggering the arthritis. Initial studies with MHC-specific MoAbs have indicated that a significant element of these proliferative responses is mediated by class II MHC-restricted CD4+ T cells. It is imperative to establish the presence or absence of a class I-restricted response, for two reasons. Firstly, the association of ReA with the MHC class I molecule, HLA B27, raises the possibility of there being a B27-restricted response to the triggering organism. Secondly, a number of the organisms associated with ReA are intracellular pathogens, whose antigens might be expected to be presented by class I MHC molecules. In an effort to identify a class I MHC-restricted pathogen-specific response in the SFMC of ReA patients, we have assessed the proliferative responses of SFMC depleted of CD4+ T cells. Responses were grossly diminished by CD4+ T cell depletion. We also investigated Chlamydia-specific cytotoxicity in the SFMC of patients with sexually acquired ReA in a system using productive chlamydial infection to produce both targets and effectors. Significant antigen specific cytotoxicity was not seen. These experiments do not provide evidence to support the existence of pathogen-specific responses by CD8+, class I-restricted synovial fluid T cells in ReA. PMID:1606728

  13. Evidence for locally synthesized and clonally restricted immunoglobulin in the synovial fluid from rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, A B; Huczko, E; Eisenbeis, C H; Kelly, R H

    1990-12-13

    In this study, we examined the immunoglobulin (Ig) present in synovial fluid (SF) from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to determine if it was locally produced and to assess the presence of clonally restricted (oligoclonal) immunoglobulin. We studied SF/serum pairs from 55 RA patients and 23 patients with degenerative joint disease (DJD). We found increases in total protein, IgG, IgA, and IgM in RA vs DJD SF (P less than 0.01). The immunoglobulin present in RA appeared to be locally produced as evidenced by significant increases (P less than 0.01) in the immunoglobulin indices. Regression analysis among the levels of IgG, IgA, and IgM RF and the Ig indices suggested that only a minority of the locally synthesized Ig present was specific for RF. To provide evidence of clonal restriction, we further analyzed the SF specimens by isoelectric focusing and assessed the presence of oligoclonal bands present only in RA SF. In 7/55 RA specimens (13%) we found unique SF IgG bands. All bands were of similar isoelectric point (pI), being quite cathodic with pI greater than 7.5. Our evidence supports synthesis of Ig within RA synovium, with a minority of patients showing prominent and unique SF Ig bands. This suggests an oligoclonal response in SF of some patients, but polyclonal Ig synthesis in most. PMID:2073742

  14. Effect of feed restriction on metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Laeger, T; Görs, S; Metges, C C; Kuhla, B

    2012-03-01

    Endocrines and metabolites in the circulation act as long-term hunger or satiety signals in the brain during negative energy balance and play an important role in the control of feed intake. These signals also occur in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which surrounds the hypothalamus and brainstem: 2 major centers of feed intake regulation. Thus CSF functions as a transport medium for fuel signals between blood and brain. The CSF metabolite concentrations are mainly under control of the blood-brain barriers, which provide specific carrier molecules facilitating the entry of substances required by the brain and protect the brain from factors that could impair neuronal function. The transport of small molecules such as amino acids (AA) across the blood-brain barriers may be limited by competing AA that share a common transporter for the uptake into brain. Consequently, CSF metabolite concentrations differ from those in blood. Thus it appears likely that central (CSF) rather than peripheral (blood) metabolites act as pivotal signals for the control of feed intake. However, the contribution of putative orexigenic and anorexigenic signals in CSF of cows has not been studied so far. Therefore, the aim of this study was to elucidate associations existing between both plasma and CSF metabolites, each in response to feed restriction-induced negative energy balance. Seven German Holstein dairy cows, between 87 and 96 DIM of the second lactation (milk yield, 27.9 L/d) were fed ad libitum (AL) for 4 d and CSF from the spinal cord and blood from the jugular vein was withdrawn before morning feeding at the fifth day. Subsequently, animals were feed restricted (R) to 50% of the previous AL intake for 4 d and CSF and plasma were collected at the ninth day. Body weight, feed intake, water intake, and milk production were determined. Thirty-one AA, β-hydroxybutyric acid, cholesterol, glucose, lactate, nonesterified fatty acids, urea, and osmolality were measured in both CSF and

  15. Effect of electrolyte addition to rehydration drinks consumed after severe fluid and energy restriction.

    PubMed

    James, Lewis J; Shirreffs, Susan M

    2015-02-01

    This study examined the effect of electrolyte addition to drinks ingested after severe fluid and energy restriction (FER). Twelve subjects (6 male and 6 female) completed 3 trials consisting of 24-hour FER (energy intake: 21 kJ·kg body mass; water intake: 5 ml·kg body mass), followed by a 2-hour rehydration period and a 4-hour monitoring period. During rehydration, subjects ingested a volume of drink equal to 125% of the body mass lost during FER in 6 aliquots, once every 20 minutes. Drinks were a sugar-free lemon squash (P) or the P drink with the addition of 50 mmol·L sodium chloride (Na) or 30 mmol·L potassium chloride (K). Total void urine samples were given before and after FER and every hour during rehydration and monitoring. Over all trials, FER produced a 2.1% reduction in body mass and negative sodium (-67 mmol), potassium (-48 mmol), and chloride (-84 mmol) balances. Urine output after drinking was 1627 (540) ml (P), 1391 (388) ml (K), and 1150 (438) ml (Na), with a greater postdrinking urine output during P than Na (p ≤ 0.05). Ingestion of drink Na resulted in a more positive sodium balance compared with P or K (p < 0.001), whereas ingestion of drink K resulted in a more positive potassium balance compared with P or Na (p < 0.001). These results demonstrate that after 24-hour FER, ingestion of a high sodium drink results in an increased sodium balance that augments greater drink retention compared with a low electrolyte placebo drink. PMID:25162651

  16. Clinical and economic evidence for intravenous acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yu-Chen; Reddy, Prabashni

    2012-06-01

    Intravenous acetaminophen received United States Food and Drug Administration approval in November 2010 for the management of mild-to-moderate pain, management of moderate-to-severe pain with adjunctive opioid analgesics, and reduction of fever. Although intravenous acetaminophen generally improved pain relief and demonstrated opioid-sparing effects compared with placebo, it did not consistently reduce the frequency of opioid-related adverse events (e.g., postoperative nausea and vomiting). The safety and efficacy of intravenous acetaminophen as an antipyretic agent have been documented in adults and children; however, its cost is several-fold higher than that of the oral and rectal formulations. Although use of intravenous acetaminophen has reduced other postoperative resource utilization (e.g., hospital length of stay) in some studies outside the United States in patients undergoing abdominal surgery, a full economic evaluation in the United States has yet to be undertaken. In addition, its administration time (15-min infusion) and packaging (glass, single-use vial) have the potential to adversely affect patient flow in the postanesthesia care unit, create burden on patient care units, and lead to drug waste. Furthermore, 1 g of intravenous acetaminophen is formulated in 100 ml of solution, which may be an issue for patients with fluid restrictions. Given the clinical and economic evidence currently available, intravenous acetaminophen should not replace oral or rectal acetaminophen, but its use may be considered in a limited number of patients who cannot receive drugs orally and rectally and who cannot tolerate other parenteral nonopioid analgesic or antipyretic agents. PMID:22570116

  17. Intravenous Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galliart, Barbara

    Intended for teaching licensed practical nurses, this curriculum guide provides information related to the equipment and skills required for nursing care of patients needing intravenous (IV) therapy. It also explains the roles and responsibilities of the licensed practical nurse with regard to intravenous therapy. Each of the 15 instructional…

  18. Intravenous conivaptan.

    PubMed

    Moen, Marit D; Keating, Gillian M

    2008-01-01

    *Conivaptan is an arginine vasopressin V1A and V2 receptor antagonist. The intravenous formulation is approved in the US for use in the treatment of euvolemic and hypervolemic hyponatremia. Conivaptan produces a dose-dependent electrolyte-sparing aquaresis (solute-free water excretion), increasing serum sodium levels. *In a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial in adults with euvolemic or hypervolemic hyponatremia, the area under the serum sodium concentration-time curve over a 4-day treatment duration (primary endpoint) was significantly greater in intravenous conivaptan 40 mg/day recipients than in placebo recipients. *The total time during treatment that patients had serum sodium levels > or = 4 mEq/L above baseline was significantly longer in intravenous conivaptan than placebo recipients. In conivaptan recipients, an increase in serum sodium levels of > or = 4 mEq/L above baseline was achieved approximately 1 day after the first dose of the drug. *In addition, the mean change from baseline in free water clearance and effective water clearance over the first day of treatment was significantly greater with intravenous conivaptan than with placebo. *Given the nature of the treatment, the tolerability profile for intravenous conivaptan was generally acceptable in patients with hyponatremia. The most common adverse events were injection related (e.g. injection-site phlebitis), hypotension, and pyrexia. PMID:18828645

  19. Intravenous Solutions for Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Fletcher J.; Niederhaus, Charles; Barlow, Karen; Griffin, DeVon

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the intravenous (IV) fluids requirements being developed for medical care during NASA s future exploration class missions. Previous research on IV solution generation and mixing in space is summarized. The current exploration baseline mission profiles are introduced, potential medical conditions described and evaluated for fluidic needs, and operational issues assessed. We briefly introduce potential methods for generating IV fluids in microgravity. Conclusions on the recommended fluid volume requirements are presented.

  20. Comparison of the Pharmacodynamics of Biapenem in Bronchial Epithelial Lining Fluid in Healthy Volunteers Given Half-Hour and Three-Hour Intravenous Infusions▿

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Eiki; Kikuchi, Junko; Nasuhara, Yasuyuki; Oizumi, Satoshi; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Nishimura, Masaharu

    2009-01-01

    The time above the MIC (T>MIC) is the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) parameter that correlates with the therapeutic efficacy of beta-lactam antibiotics. A prolonged infusion can provide plasma drug concentrations that remain above the MIC for a long period. The objective of this study was to compare the PK/PD parameters in bronchial epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of biapenem given as 0.5-h and 3-h infusions by using bronchoscopic microsampling (BMS). Six healthy adult volunteers received 0.5-h and 3-h infusions of 0.3 g of biapenem with a washout interval. BMS was performed repeatedly from 0.5 to 24 h after biapenem administration in order to determine the pharmacokinetics in bronchial ELF. The subjects received intravenous biapenem with the same regimens again and then underwent bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) at the end of infusion in order to determine the concentration of the drug in alveolar ELF. The percentages (means ± standard deviations) of T>MIC in bronchial ELF at MICs from 0.25 to 4 μg/ml ranged from zero to 34.6% ± 5.2% after the 0.5-h infusion and from 5.1% ± 5.6% to 52.2% ± 17.0% after the 3-h infusion. The percentage of T>MIC in bronchial ELF after the 3-h infusion tended to be higher than that after the 0.5-h infusion. The concentrations of the drug in alveolar ELF after 0.5-h and 3-h infusions were 3.5 ± 1.2 μg/ml and 1.3 ± 0.3 μg/ml, respectively. The present results support the use of prolonged infusions of beta-lactam antibiotics and may provide critical information for successful treatment of lower respiratory tract infections based on PK/PD parameters in bronchial ELF. PMID:19380601

  1. Comparison of the pharmacodynamics of biapenem in bronchial epithelial lining fluid in healthy volunteers given half-hour and three-hour intravenous infusions.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Eiki; Kikuchi, Junko; Nasuhara, Yasuyuki; Oizumi, Satoshi; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Nishimura, Masaharu

    2009-07-01

    The time above the MIC (T>MIC) is the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) parameter that correlates with the therapeutic efficacy of beta-lactam antibiotics. A prolonged infusion can provide plasma drug concentrations that remain above the MIC for a long period. The objective of this study was to compare the PK/PD parameters in bronchial epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of biapenem given as 0.5-h and 3-h infusions by using bronchoscopic microsampling (BMS). Six healthy adult volunteers received 0.5-h and 3-h infusions of 0.3 g of biapenem with a washout interval. BMS was performed repeatedly from 0.5 to 24 h after biapenem administration in order to determine the pharmacokinetics in bronchial ELF. The subjects received intravenous biapenem with the same regimens again and then underwent bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) at the end of infusion in order to determine the concentration of the drug in alveolar ELF. The percentages (means +/- standard deviations) of T>MIC in bronchial ELF at MICs from 0.25 to 4 microg/ml ranged from zero to 34.6% +/- 5.2% after the 0.5-h infusion and from 5.1% +/- 5.6% to 52.2% +/- 17.0% after the 3-h infusion. The percentage of T>MIC in bronchial ELF after the 3-h infusion tended to be higher than that after the 0.5-h infusion. The concentrations of the drug in alveolar ELF after 0.5-h and 3-h infusions were 3.5 +/- 1.2 microg/ml and 1.3 +/- 0.3 microg/ml, respectively. The present results support the use of prolonged infusions of beta-lactam antibiotics and may provide critical information for successful treatment of lower respiratory tract infections based on PK/PD parameters in bronchial ELF. PMID:19380601

  2. Maternal intravenous treatment with either azithromycin or solithromycin clears Ureaplasma parvum from the amniotic fluid in an ovine model of intrauterine infection.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yuichiro; Payne, Matthew S; Keelan, Jeffrey A; Noe, Andres; Carter, Sean; Watts, Rory; Spiller, Owen B; Jobe, Alan H; Kallapur, Suhas G; Saito, Masatoshi; Stock, Sarah J; Newnham, John P; Kemp, Matthew W

    2014-09-01

    Intrauterine infection with Ureaplasma spp. is strongly associated with preterm birth and adverse neonatal outcomes. We assessed whether combined intraamniotic (IA) and maternal intravenous (IV) treatment with one of two candidate antibiotics, azithromycin (AZ) or solithromycin (SOLI), would eradicate intrauterine Ureaplasma parvum infection in a sheep model of pregnancy. Sheep with singleton pregnancies received an IA injection of U. parvum serovar 3 at 85 days of gestational age (GA). At 120 days of GA, animals (n=5 to 8/group) received one of the following treatments: (i) maternal IV SOLI with a single IA injection of vehicle (IV SOLI only); (ii) maternal IV SOLI with a single IA injection of SOLI (IV+IA SOLI); (iii) maternal IV AZ and a single IA injection of vehicle (IV AZ only); (iv) maternal IV AZ and a single IA injection of AZ (IV+IA AZ); or (v) maternal IV and single IA injection of vehicle (control). Lambs were surgically delivered at 125 days of GA. Treatment efficacies were assessed by U. parvum culture, quantitative PCR, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and histopathology. Amniotic fluid (AF) from all control animals contained culturable U. parvum. AF, lung, and chorioamnion from all AZ- or SOLI-treated animals (IV only or IV plus IA) were negative for culturable U. parvum. Relative to the results for the control, the levels of expression of interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 2 (MCP-2) in fetal skin were significantly decreased in the IV SOLI-only group, the MCP-1 protein concentration in the amniotic fluid was significantly increased in the IV+IA SOLI group, and there was no significant difference in the histological inflammation scoring of lung or chorioamnion among the five groups. In the present study, treatment with either AZ or SOLI (IV only or IV+IA) effectively eradicated macrolide-sensitive U. parvum from the AF. There was no discernible difference in antibiotic therapy efficacy between IV-only and IV

  3. Restricted access magnetic materials prepared by dual surface modification for selective extraction of therapeutic drugs from biological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Yuxia; Chen, Lei; Wan, Qian-Hong

    2012-02-01

    Magnetic porous particles with dual functionality have been prepared by a two-step procedure and evaluated as novel restricted access materials for extraction of therapeutic agents from biological fluids. The magnetic silica particles served as scaffolds were first modified with diol groups, which were then converted to octadecyl esters through reaction with stearoyl chloride. In the second step, the octadecyl esters on the exterior surface were hydrolyzed by the action of lipase to yield magnetic particles with hydrophobic reversed-phase ligands on the inner surface and biocompatible diol groups on the outer surface. The restricted access behavior of the resulting materials was confirmed by differential binding of small molecules such as methotrexate (MTX), leucovorin (LV) and folic acid (FA) relative to bovine serum albumin. While MTX, LV and FA were all bound to the magnetic particles with high affinity, the adsorption of the protein was markedly reduced due to size exclusion effect. The utility of the magnetic particles for sample preparation was tested in solid-phase extraction of MTX, LV and FA from spiked human serum and the effects of the SPE conditions on the recovery of the analytes were systematically studied. Moreover, the magnetic particle-based sample preparation procedure coupled with reversed-phase liquid chromatography analysis was validated in terms of specificity, linearity and reproducibility. The method was shown to be free from interference of endogenous compounds and linear over the concentration range of 0.5-10 μg/mL for the three drugs studied. The limits of detection for the three drugs in serum were in the range of 0.160-0.302 μg/mL. Reproducibility expressed as the RSD of the recovery for ten replicated extractions at three different concentrations was found to be less than 8.93%. With a unique combination of surface functionality with magnetic cores, the restricted access magnetic particles may be adapted in automated and high

  4. Interstitial Fluid Flow Intensity Modulates Endothelial Sprouting in Restricted Src-Activated Cell Clusters During Capillary Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hernández Vera, Rodrigo; Genové, Elsa; Alvarez, Lery; Borrós, Salvador; Kamm, Roger; Lauffenburger, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Development of tissues in vitro with dimensions larger than 150 to 200 μm requires the presence of a functional vascular network. Therefore, we have studied capillary morphogenesis under controlled biological and biophysical conditions with the aim of promoting vascular structures in tissue constructs. We and others have previously demonstrated that physiological values of interstitial fluid flow normal to an endothelial monolayer in combination with vascular endothelial growth factor play a critical role during capillary morphogenesis by promoting cell sprouting. In the present work, we studied the effect that a range of interstitial flow velocities (0–50 μm/min) has in promoting the amount, length, and branching of developing sprouts during capillary morphogenesis. The number of capillary-like structures developed from human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers across the interstitial flow values tested was not significantly affected. Instead, the length and branching degree of the sprouts presented a significant maximum at flow velocities of 10 to 20 μm/min. More-over, at these same flow values, the phosphorylation level of Src also showed its peak. We discovered that capillary morphogenesis is restricted to patches of Src-activated cells (phosphorylated Src (pSrc)) at the monolayer, suggesting that the transduction pathway in charge of sensing the mechanical stimulus induced by flow is promoting predetermined mechanically sensitive areas (pSrc) to undergo capillary morphogenesis. PMID:18636940

  5. A prototype space flight intravenous injection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G. V.

    1985-01-01

    Medical emergencies, especially those resulting from accidents, frequently require the administration of intravenous fluids to replace lost body liquids. The development of a prototype space flight intravenous injection system is presented. The definition of requirements, injectable concentrates development, water polisher, reconstitution hardware development, administration hardware development, and prototype fabrication and testing are discussed.

  6. Screening and confirmatory analyses of flunixin in tissues and bodily fluids after intravenous or intramuscular administration to cull dairy cows with or without lipopolysaccharide challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty cull dairy cows (645 ± 83 kg) were treated with 2.2 mg/kg bw flunixin by intravenous (IV) or intramuscular (IM) administration with, or without, exposure to lipopolysaccharide in a two factor balanced design. The usefulness of screening assays to identify violative flunixin levels in a varie...

  7. Fluid Therapy and Outcome: Balance Is Best

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Sara J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: The use of intravenous fluids is routine in patients undergoing surgery or critical illness; however, controversy still exists regarding optimum fluid therapy. Recent literature has examined the effects of different types, doses, and timing of intravenous fluid therapy. Each of these factors may influence patient outcomes. Crystalloids consist of isotonic saline or balanced electrolyte solutions and widely distribute across extracellular fluid compartments, whereas colloids contain high-molecular-weight molecules suspended in crystalloid carrier solution and do not freely distribute across the extracellular fluid compartments. Colloids vary in composition and associated potential adverse effects. Recent evidence has highlighted safety and ethical concerns regarding the use of colloid solutions in critically ill patients, particularly the use of synthetic starch solutions. which have been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Crystalloid solutions with a chloride-rich composition (e.g., isotonic saline) have been associated with metabolic acidosis, hyperchloremia, increased incidence of acute kidney injury, and increased requirement for renal replacement therapy. An optimum dose of intravenous fluids remains controversial with no definitive evidence to support restrictive versus liberal approaches. Further high-quality trials are needed to elucidate the optimum fluid therapy for patients, but currently a balanced approach to type, dose, and timing of fluids is recommended. PMID:24779116

  8. Modulation of body fluids and angiotensin II receptors in a rat model of intra-uterine growth restriction

    PubMed Central

    Bédard, Sophie; Sicotte, Benoit; St-Louis, Jean; Brochu, Michèle

    2005-01-01

    We previously reported that sodium restriction during pregnancy reduces plasma volume expansion and promotes intra-uterine growth restriction (IUGR) in rats while it activates the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS). In the present study, we proceeded to determine whether expression of the two angiotensin II (ANGII) receptor subtypes (AT1 and AT2) change in relation to maternal water–electrolyte homeostasis and fetal growth. To this end, pregnant (gestation day 15) and non-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to two groups fed either normal, or Na+-restricted diets for 7 days. At the end of the treatment period, plasma aldosterone and renin activity as well as plasma and urine electrolytes were measured. Determinations for AT1 and AT2 mRNA and protein were made by RNase protection assay and photoaffinity labelling, respectively, using a number of tissues implicated in volume regulation and fetal growth. In non-pregnant rats, Na+ restriction decreases Na+ excretion without altering plasma volume, plasma Na+ concentration or the expression of AT1 and AT2 mRNA or protein in the tissues examined. In normally fed pregnant rats when compared to non-pregnant controls, AT1 mRNA increases in the hypothalamus as well as pituitary and declines in uterine arteries, while AT1 protein decreases in the kidney and AT2 mRNA declines in the adrenal cortex. In pregnant rats, Na+ restriction induces a decrease in plasma Na+, an increase in plasma urea, as well as a decline in renal urea and creatinine clearance rates. Protein levels for both AT1 and AT2 in the pituitary and AT2 mRNA in the adrenal cortex are lower in the Na+-restricted pregnant group when compared to normally fed pregnant animals. Na+ restriction also induces a decrease in AT1 protein in the placenta. In conclusion, these results suggest that pregnancy may increase sensitivity to Na+ depletion by the tissue-specific modulation of ANGII receptors. Finally, these receptors may be implicated

  9. Restricted accessed nanoparticles for direct magnetic solid phase extraction of trace metal ions from human fluids followed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ping; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2015-06-21

    Herein, restricted accessed magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized by self-assembly of a non-ionic surfactant (Tween-20) onto the 4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol (PAR) functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). A series of analytical techniques were employed for the characterization of the as-prepared restricted accessed Fe3O4@SiO2@PAR, and it was found that the as-prepared restricted accessed Fe3O4@SiO2@PAR nanoparticles have a porous structure with a BET surface area of around 99.4 m(2) g(-1), an average pore size of about 6.14 nm and a pore volume of 0.47 cm(3) g(-1). Besides, the prepared restricted accessed Fe3O4@SiO2@PAR showed good size exclusion properties toward proteins, providing application potential for the direct analysis of biological samples. Based on this, a novel method of restricted accessed magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) combined with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was developed for the direct determination of trace metal ions in human fluids. The parameters affecting the extraction of the target metals by MSPE were studied and the optimized conditions were established. Under the optimum conditions, the adsorption capacity of Cr(III), Cd(II), La(III), Nd(III) and Pb(II) on the as-prepared restricted accessed Fe3O4@SiO2@PAR was 62.9, 56.6, 33.7, 36.9 and 43.3 mg g(-1), respectively. With an enrichment factor of 30, the limits of detection for Cr(III), Cd(II), La(III), Nd(III) and Pb(II) were as low as 11.9, 0.8, 0.7, 1.6 and 4.1 ng L(-1), and the relative standard deviations were 7.6, 8.7, 8.4, 8.1 and 5.0 (C(Cr, Pb) = 0.05 μg L(-1), C(Cd, La) = 0.005 μg L(-1), C(Nd) = 0.01 μg L(-1), n = 7), respectively. The developed method was successfully applied for the direct analysis of free metal ions in human urine and serum samples, and has the advantages of good anti-interference ability, high sensitivity and exhibits great application potential in the direct analysis of trace metals in biological fluids. PMID:25943504

  10. Improving treatment of guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency: reduction of guanidinoacetic acid in body fluids by arginine restriction and ornithine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Schulze, A; Ebinger, F; Rating, D; Mayatepek, E

    2001-12-01

    Guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) deficiency (McKusick 601240), an inborn error of creatine biosynthesis, is characterized by creatine depletion and accumulation of guanidinoacetate (GAA) in the brain. Treatment by oral creatine supplementation had no effect on the intractable seizures. Based on the possible role of GAA as an epileptogenic agent, we evaluated a dietary treatment with arginine restriction and ornithine supplementation in order to achieve reduction of GAA. In an 8-year-old Kurdish girl with GAMT deficiency arginine intake was restricted to 15 mg/kg/day (0.4 g natural protein/kg/day) and ornithine was supplemented with 100 mg/kg/day over a period of 14 months. The diet was enriched with 0.4 g/kg/day of arginine-free essential amino acid mixture and creatine treatment remained unchanged (1.1 g/kg/day). Guanidino compounds in blood, urine, and CSF were measured by means of cation-exchange chromatography. The combination of arginine restriction and ornithine supplementation led to a substantial and permanent decrease of arginine without disturbance of nitrogen detoxification. Formation of GAA was effectively reduced after 4 weeks of treatment and sustained thereafter. Biochemical effects were accompanied by a marked clinical improvement. Distinctly reduced epileptogenic activities in electroencephalography accompanied by almost complete disappearance of seizures demonstrates the positive effect of GAA reduction. This indicates for the first time that GAA may exert an important epileptogenic potential in man. Arginine restriction in combination with ornithine supplementation represents a new and rationale therapeutic approach in GAMT deficiency. PMID:11749046

  11. Randomised placebo-controlled trial of teduglutide in reducing parenteral nutrition and/or intravenous fluid requirements in patients with short bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gilroy, R; Pertkiewicz, M; Allard, J P; Messing, B; O'Keefe, S J

    2011-01-01

    Background and aims Teduglutide, a GLP-2 analogue, may restore intestinal structural and functional integrity by promoting repair and growth of the mucosa and reducing gastric emptying and secretion, thereby increasing fluid and nutrient absorption in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS). This 24-week placebo-controlled study evaluated the ability of teduglutide to reduce parenteral support in patients with SBS with intestinal failure. Methods In 83 patients randomised to receive subcutaneous teduglutide 0.10 mg/kg/day (n=32), 0.05 mg/kg/day (n=35) or placebo (n=16) once daily, parenteral fluids were reduced at 4-week intervals if intestinal fluid absorption (48 h urine volumes) increased ≥10%. Responders were subjects who demonstrated reductions of ≥20% in parenteral volumes from baseline at weeks 20 and 24. The primary efficacy end point, a graded response score (GRS), took into account higher levels and earlier onset of response, leading to longer duration of response. The intensity of the response was defined as a reduction from baseline in parenteral volume (from 20% to 100%), and the duration of the response was considered the response at weeks 16, 20 and 24. The results were tested according to a step-down procedure starting with the 0.10 mg/kg/day dose. Results Using the GRS criteria, teduglutide in a dose of 0.10 mg/kg/day did not have a statistically significant effect compared with placebo (8/32 vs 1/16, p=0.16), while teduglutide in a dose of 0.05 mg/kg/day had a significant effect (16/35, p=0.007). Since parenteral volume reductions were equal (353±475 and 354±334 ml/day), the trend towards higher baseline parenteral volume (1816±1008 vs 1374±639 ml/day, p=0.11) in the 0.10 mg/kg/day group compared with the 0.05 mg/kg/day group may have accounted for this discrepancy. Three teduglutide-treated patients were completely weaned off parenteral support. Serious adverse events were distributed similarly between active

  12. Minimum intravenous infectious dose of ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The minimum intravenous infectious dose for ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) WLC1 was determined using twenty-four 6 month-old lambs. Twelve groups of two 6 month-old lambs were inoculated intravenously with tissue culture fluid containing ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) WLC1 titer...

  13. Intravenous paracetamol (acetaminophen).

    PubMed

    Duggan, Sean T; Scott, Lesley J

    2009-01-01

    Intravenous paracetamol (rINN)/intravenous acetaminophen (USAN) is an analgesic and antipyretic agent, recommended worldwide as a first-line agent for the treatment of pain and fever in adults and children. In double-blind clinical trials, single or multiple doses of intravenous paracetamol 1 g generally provided significantly better analgesic efficacy than placebo treatment (as determined by primary efficacy endpoints) in adult patients who had undergone dental, orthopaedic or gynaecological surgery. Furthermore, where evaluated, intravenous paracetamol 1 g generally showed similar analgesic efficacy to a bioequivalent dose of propacetamol, and a reduced need for opioid rescue medication. In paediatric surgical patients, recommended doses of intravenous paracetamol 15 mg/kg were not significantly different from propacetamol 30 mg/kg for the treatment of pain, and showed equivocal analgesic efficacy compared with intramuscular pethidine 1 mg/kg in several randomized, active comparator-controlled studies. In a randomized, noninferiority study in paediatric patients with an infection-induced fever, intravenous paracetamol 15 mg/kg treatment was shown to be no less effective than propacetamol 30 mg/kg in terms of antipyretic efficacy. Intravenous paracetamol was well tolerated in clinical trials, having a tolerability profile similar to placebo. Additionally, adverse reactions emerging from the use of the intravenous formulation of paracetamol are extremely rare (<1/10 000). [table: see text]. PMID:19192939

  14. Particle size measurement in intravenous fluids.

    PubMed

    Haines-Nutt, R F; Munton, T J

    1984-08-01

    The level of particulate contamination in a range of large volume injections has been measured using electrical resistance (Coulter) and light blockage (HIAC) techniques. Particle counts showed large variations between the two techniques and although a correlation could be shown for ionic solutions no such correlation could be found for sugar containing solutions. Shape factors alone cannot explain these discrepancies but other differences fundamental to the physics of the two measuring techniques play an important part. We conclude that results obtained using one technique cannot be correlated, theoretically or actually, with those obtained from the other technique. PMID:6148396

  15. Particulate contaminants of intravenous medications and infusions.

    PubMed

    Backhouse, C M; Ball, P R; Booth, S; Kelshaw, M A; Potter, S R; McCollum, C N

    1987-04-01

    Particulate contamination in small volume parenteral medications has been studied and compared with that found in a selection of large volume infusions. Particle counts in 39 commonly used small volume medications and 7 large volume infusions were performed by an automated light blockage method (HIAC) or by optical microscopy. Based on these results and a random survey of drug therapy of intensive care patients, it is concluded that the contribution of intravenous medications to the total particle load received by such patients is likely to be many times greater than from infusion fluids. Until firm evidence regarding the harmful systemic effects of drug particles is available and the manufacturing regulations adjusted appropriately, final in-line filtration of infusions immediately proximal to the intravenous cannula should be considered when drugs are being given intravenously. PMID:2884285

  16. Proctoclysis: emergency rectal fluid infusion.

    PubMed

    Tremayne, Vincent

    This article describes the use and effectiveness of proctoclysis (rectal fluid infusion) in providing fluid resuscitation in the absence of intravenous access in rural and remote environments. PMID:19856644

  17. Intravenous smart pumps.

    PubMed

    Harding, Andrew D

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous (IV) smart pumps provide substantial safety features during infusion. However, nurses need to understand the requisite education necessary to fully benefit from and improve IV smart pump use and clinical integration. Failure to use IV smart pumps places the nurse and patient at increased risk. PMID:23558918

  18. INTRAVENOUS ETHER ANESTHESIA

    PubMed Central

    Eger, Edmond I.; Johnson, Edward A.

    1963-01-01

    From a study of intravenous ether anesthesia, it was concluded that ether diluted to a 5 per cent solution in 5 per cent dextrose and water may be used to induce and maintain a smooth and easily controlled anesthetic state similar to that obtained with inhalation ether but without the dependence of the latter technique on ventilation. Cough and laryngospasm were absent. Adequate spontaneous respiration can be maintained with this technique. The technique is particularly useful in endoscopy during which the airway is often not available for anesthetic administration. PMID:14051486

  19. A comparison of intravenous and subcutaneous hydration in elderly acute stroke patients.

    PubMed Central

    Challiner, Y. C.; Jarrett, D.; Hayward, M. J.; al-Jubouri, M. A.; Julious, S. A.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of subcutaneous and intravenous fluid therapy in hydrating, elderly acute stroke patients. Thirty-four such patients, needing parenteral fluids because of impaired consciousness or dysphagia, were randomly allocated to receive either subcutaneous or intravenous fluids (2 litres of dextrose-saline/24 hours). Serum osmolality was measured before starting fluid therapy (Day 1) and on Days 2 and 3. An analysis of covariance of the osmolalities showed no statistical difference between the two groups (P = 0.12). The total cost of cannulae used over the 3 days for the subcutaneous route was approximately a third of that for the intravenous route. Complication rates were similar for the two groups. The results suggest that subcutaneous fluid therapy is an effective alternative to the intravenous route. PMID:8183752

  20. The Variable Rate Intravenous Insulin Infusion Protocol.

    PubMed

    Collard, Benjamin; Sturgeon, Jonathan; Patel, Natasha; Asharia, Shabbar

    2014-01-01

    Insulin use among inpatients is high and associated with severe and regular medication errors. An initial baseline audit showed a wide variation in the prescription of intravenous insulin within the trust. These included variation in the choice of fluid prescribed, electrolyte levels not consistently checked, handwritten illegible prescriptions, and varying parameters set for adjustment of the prescription. A Variable Rate Intravenous Insulin Infusion protocol (VRIII)) was introduced to standardize intravenous insulin prescription throughout the trust by all members of the clinical team. We looked at and measured uptake and effects of the VRIII protocol in improving standardization of insulin prescription for inpatients on insulin at St George's NHS trust. The protocol was uploaded to the intranet to allow access 24 hours a day and the staff educated about it. The VRIII protocol was routinely used successfully throughout the trust. Any initial problems were addressed through education of clinical staff. The protocol has shown decreased prescribing and administrative errors, whilst demonstrating good glucose and electrolyte control. Use of a standardized protocol helps reduce medication errors and demonstrates good glycaemic control. Regular and continued education of clinical staff is necessary to maintain its efficacy. PMID:26734228

  1. Assisting the Adult Receiving Inhalation and Intravenous Therapy. Care of the Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anoka-Hennepin Area Vocational Technical Inst., MN.

    These two units for students in a practical nursing program provide supplemental instruction in caring for adult patients receiving inhalation and intravenous therapy. Unit titles are The Administration of Intermittent Positive Pressure Breathing (IPPB RX) and Intravenous Therapy of Fluids and Blood. Each unit contains the following: objectives,…

  2. Intravenous acetaminophen use in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Shastri, Nirav

    2015-06-01

    Acetaminophen is a commonly used pediatric medication that has recently been approved for intravenous use in the United States. The purpose of this article was to review the pharmacodynamics, indications, contraindications, and precautions for the use of intravenous acetaminophen in pediatrics. PMID:26035501

  3. Restrictive cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood returns from the body (diastole). When the disease progresses, the heart may not pump blood strongly. The abnormal heart function can affect the lungs, liver, and other body systems. Restrictive cardiomyopathy may affect either or both of the ...

  4. Restrictive cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood returns from the body (diastole). When the disease progresses, the heart may not pump blood strongly. The abnormal heart function can affect the lungs, liver, and other body systems. Restrictive cardiomyopathy may affect ...

  5. Regolith and Environment Science and Oxygen and Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE): Lunar Advanced Volatile Analysis (LAVA) Capillary Fluid Dynamic Restriction Effects on Gas Chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Marianne; Quinn, Jacqueline; Captain, Janine; Santiago-Bond, Josephine; Starr, Stanley

    2015-01-01

    The Resource Prospector (RP) mission with the Regolith and Environment Science and Oxygen Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE) payload aims to show the presence of water in lunar regolith, and establish a proving ground for NASAs mission to Mars. One of the analysis is performed by the Lunar Advanced Volatiles Analysis (LAVA) subsystem, which consists of a fluid network that facilitates the transport of volatile samples to a gas chromatograph and mass spectrometer (GC-MS) instrument. The understanding of fluid dynamics directed from the GC to the MS is important due to the influence of flow rates and pressures that affect the accuracy of and prevent the damage to the overall GC-MS instrument. The micro-scale capillary fluid network within the GC alone has various lengths and inner-diameters; therefore, determination of pressure differentials and flow rates are difficult to model computationally, with additional complexity from the vacuum conditions in space and lack of a lunar atmosphere. A series of tests were performed on an experimental set-up of the system where the inner diameters of the GC transfer line connecting to the MS were varied. The effect on chromatography readings were also studied by applying these lines onto a GC instrument. It was found that a smaller inner diameter transfer line resulted in a lower flow rate, as well as a lower pressure differential across the thermal conductivity detector (TCD) unit of the GC and a negligible pressure drop across the mock-up capillary column. The chromatography was affected with longer retention times and broader peak integrations. It was concluded that a 0.050 mm inner diameter line still proved most suitable for the systems flow rate preferences. In addition, it was evident that this small transfer line portrayed some expense to GC signal characteristics and the wait time for steady-state operation.

  6. Appearance of D2O in sweat after oral and oral-intravenous rehydration in men.

    PubMed

    Emmanuel, Holly; Casa, Douglas J; Beasley, Kathleen N; Lee, Elaine C; McDermott, Brendon P; Yamamoto, Linda M; Armstrong, Lawrence E; Maresh, Carl M

    2011-08-01

    Intravenous (IV) rehydration is common in athletics, but its thermoregulatory benefits and ergogenicity have not been elucidated. Availability of orally ingested fluid is dependent on gastric emptying and intestinal absorption rate. Deuterium oxide (D2O) has been used to demonstrate that fluid ingested during exercise appears in sweat within 10 minutes. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of concurrent IV rehydration on D2O appearance in sweat samples after per ora rehydration with D2O labeled fluid. We hypothesized that the combination method would not be superior to the oral method. Ten fit men (age 23 ± 4, VO2max 59.49 ± 4.09 L·min(-1)) underwent 20 hours of fluid restriction resulting in 1.95 ± 0.25% body weight loss before beginning treadmill exercise and cycling. Exercise was performed in an environmental chamber (35.6 ± 0.2° C, 35.0 ± 1.8% relative humidity) for 2 hours at 55% VO2max, and the participants exhibited a mean body weight deficit of 4.50 ± 0.04%. Thermoregulatory measures were recorded while subjects were rehydrated with oral (OR) or oral combined with intravenous (IVO) fluid traced with D2O. After 30 minutes of rehydration and 30 minutes of seated recovery, the subjects began treadmill exercise at 55-60% VO2max. Forehead sweat samples were collected 0, 5, 10, 20, and 75 minutes from the start of rehydration. The samples were analyzed for D2O via isotope ratio mass spectrometry. D2O did not appear in the sweat within 20 minutes of rehydration; however, it did appear during the subsequent exercise bout. There was no significant difference between rehydration modes. Plasma volume increases and decreased volume of orally ingested fluid did not significantly alter transit time from ingestion to appearance in excreted sweat. The IVO method does not appear to be superior to the traditional OR method of rehydration. PMID:21747289

  7. Fluid therapy in calves.

    PubMed

    Smith, Geof W; Berchtold, Joachim

    2014-07-01

    Early and aggressive fluid therapy is critical in correcting the metabolic complications associated with calf diarrhea. Oral electrolyte therapy can be used with success in calves, but careful consideration should be given to the type of oral electrolyte used. Electrolyte solutions with high osmolalities can significantly slow abomasal emptying and can be a risk factor for abomasal bloat in calves. Milk should not be withheld from calves with diarrhea for more than 12 to 24 hours. Hypertonic saline and hypertonic sodium bicarbonate can be used effectively for intravenous fluid therapy on farms when intravenous catheterization is not possible. PMID:24980729

  8. Perioperative fluid administration: historical highlights and implications for practice.

    PubMed

    Srinivasa, Sanket; Hill, Andrew G

    2012-12-01

    Perioperative fluid administration is an important aspect of surgical care but is often poorly understood. Surgeons have historically made a considerable contribution to the evidence base governing current practice. This review provides an overview of the history of perioperative fluid therapy and its relevance to modern practice.Intravenous fluids (IVF) first gained therapeutic importance in the treatment of cholera in the 1830s. From the 1880s, IVF began to be administered perioperatively to compensate for the "injurious" effects of anaesthesia. Clinical improvements were consequently noted, though the adverse effects of saline were observed. The work of Ringer, Hartmann, and others emphasized the importance of the composition of IVF and laid the foundations for the balanced solutions in use today.The intravenous "drip" was introduced by Rudolph Matas in 1924. As the metabolic response to injury was increasingly investigated in the 1940s and 1950s, the cause of post-operative oliguria was debated widely with the most prominent surgeons being Moore and Shires. These differences in opinion, coupled with reports of injured soldiers from the Korean War receiving large IVF infusions and surviving, dictated the surgical practice of liberal IVF administration until very recently.Newer work in fluid therapy has explored the concept of fluid restriction. Shoemaker and colleagues also pioneered the concept of fluid administration to achieve supranormal indices of cardiorespiratory function, which has led to the advent of goal-directed fluid therapy. Alongside the development of balanced solutions, the renewed focus on perioperative fluid therapy has led to IVF administration being guided by physiological principles with a new consideration of the lessons gleaned from history. PMID:22824855

  9. Intravenous versus oral rehydration in athletes.

    PubMed

    van Rosendal, Simon Piet; Osborne, Mark Andrew; Fassett, Robert Gordon; Lancashire, Bill; Coombes, Jeff Scott

    2010-04-01

    Fluid is typically administered via intravenous (IV) infusion to athletes who develop clinical symptoms of heat illness, based on the perception that dehydration is a primary factor contributing to the condition. However, other athletes also voluntarily rehydrate with IV fluid as opposed to, or in conjunction with, oral rehydration. The voluntary use of IV fluids to accelerate rehydration in dehydrated, though otherwise healthy athletes, has recently been banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency. However, the technique remains appealing to many athletes. Given that it now violates the Anti-Doping Code, it is important to determine whether potential benefits of using this technique outweigh the risks involved. Several studies have shown that rehydration is more rapid with IV fluid. However, the benefits are generally transient and only small differences to markers of hydration status are seen when comparing IV and oral rehydration. Furthermore, several studies have shown improvements in cardiovascular function and thermoregulation with IV fluid, while others have indicated that oral fluid is superior. Subsequent exercise performance has not been improved to a greater extent with one technique over the other. The paucity of definitive findings is probably related to the small number of studies investigating these variables and the vast differences in the designs of studies that have been conducted. The major limitation of IV rehydration is that it bypasses oropharyngeal stimulation, which has an influence on factors such as thirst sensation, antidiuretic hormone (arginine vasopressin) release, cutaneous vasodilation and mean arterial pressure. Further research is necessary to determine the relative benefits of oral and IV rehydration for athletes. PMID:20364876

  10. Fatal kavalactone intoxication by suicidal intravenous injection.

    PubMed

    Ketola, Raimo A; Viinamäki, Jenni; Rasanen, Ilpo; Pelander, Anna; Goebeler, Sirkka

    2015-04-01

    Kavalactones are a group of compounds found in kava, a beverage or extract prepared from the rhizome of the kava plant (Piper methysticum). Traditionally kava extracts have been used for their anxiolytic and sedative properties. Sales of kava extracts were severely restricted or prohibited in European countries in 2002 following several cases of serious hepatotoxicity. Here we report a case where high concentrations of kavalactones and ethanol were detected in post mortem femoral blood. An injection needle with a 10-mL syringe containing 7.5 mL of slightly yellowish liquid was found next to the victim, and there were numerous needle prints on both lower arms following the venous tracks. No evidence of other cause of death was found in the medico-legal investigation. The case was therefore classified as suicide using an injection of kavalactones intravenously together with alcohol poisoning. PMID:25684328

  11. Emergency intravenous access through the femoral vein.

    PubMed

    Swanson, R S; Uhlig, P N; Gross, P L; McCabe, C J

    1984-04-01

    A study was undertaken to assess the efficacy and safety of femoral venous catheterization for resuscitation of critically ill patients in the emergency department setting. From May 1982 to April 1983, 100 attempts were made at percutaneous insertion of a large-bore catheter into the femoral veins of patients presenting to our emergency department in cardiac arrest or requiring rapid fluid resuscitation. Eighty-nine attempts were successful. Insertion was generally considered easy, and flow rates were excellent. The only noted complications were four arterial punctures and one minor groin hematoma. This study suggests that short-term percutaneous catheterization of the femoral vein provides rapid, safe, and effective intravenous access. PMID:6703430

  12. Orthostatic stability with intravenous levodopa

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqi, Shan H.; Creech, Mary L.

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous levodopa has been used in a multitude of research studies due to its more predictable pharmacokinetics compared to the oral form, which is used frequently as a treatment for Parkinson’s disease (PD). Levodopa is the precursor for dopamine, and intravenous dopamine would strongly affect vascular tone, but peripheral decarboxylase inhibitors are intended to block such effects. Pulse and blood pressure, with orthostatic changes, were recorded before and after intravenous levodopa or placebo—after oral carbidopa—in 13 adults with a chronic tic disorder and 16 tic-free adult control subjects. Levodopa caused no statistically or clinically significant changes in blood pressure or pulse. These data add to previous data that support the safety of i.v. levodopa when given with adequate peripheral inhibition of DOPA decarboxylase. PMID:26336641

  13. Caloric restriction.

    PubMed

    Speakman, John R; Mitchell, Sharon E

    2011-06-01

    Restricting the intake of calories has been practiced as a method for increasing both the length and quality of life for over 500 years. Experimental work confirming the success of this approach in animals has accumulated over the last 100 years. Lifelong caloric restriction (CR) may extend life by up to 50% in rodents, with progressively less impact the later in life it is started. This effect is matched by profound impacts on age related diseases including reduced risk of cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, autoimmune disease, cardiovascular disease and type II diabetes mellitus. The disposable soma theory of ageing suggests that CR evolved as a somatic protection response to enable animals to survive periods of food shortage. The shutdown of reproductive function during CR is consistent with this suggestion, but other features of the phenomenon are less consistent with this theory, and some have suggested that in rodents it may be mostly an artifact of domestication. CR induces profound effects on animals at all levels from the transcriptome to whole animal physiology and behavior. Animals under CR lose weight which is disproportionately contributed to by white adipose tissue. Generally animals on CR change their activity patterns so that they are more active prior to food delivery each day but total activity may be unchanged or reduced. Considerable debate has occurred over the effects of CR on resting metabolic rate (RMR). Total RMR declines, but as body mass and body composition also change it is unclear whether metabolism at the tissue level also declines, is unchanged or even increases. Body temperature universally decreases. Hunger is increased and does not seem to abate even with very long term restriction. Circulating adipokines are reduced reflecting the reduction in white adipose tissue (WAT) mass under restriction and there is a large reduction in circulating insulin and glucose levels. There are profound tissue level changes in metabolism with a

  14. Pathophysiology and clinical implications of peroperative fluid management in elective surgery.

    PubMed

    Holte, Kathrine

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to describe pathophysiological aspects of perioperative fluid administration and create a rational background for future, clinical outcome studies. In laparoscopic cholecystectomy, we have found "liberal" crystalloid administration ( approximately 3 liters) to improve perioperative physiology and clinical outcome, which has implication for fluid management in other laparoscopic procedures such as laparoscopic fundoplication, laparoscopic repair of ventral hernia, hysterectomy etc., where 2-3 liters crystalloid should be administered based on the present evidence. That equal amounts of fluid caused adverse physiologic effects in healthy volunteers indicates that addition of the surgical trauma per se increases fluid requirements. Volume kinetic analysis applied 4 hours postoperatively was not able to detect the presence of either overhydration or hypovolemia regardless of the administered fluid volume intraoperatively. In knee arthroplasty a approximately 4 vs. approximately 2 liters crystalloid-based fluid regimen lead to significant hypercoagulability (although with unknown clinical implications), but no over-all differences in functional recovery. Dehydration caused by bowel preparation leads to functional hypovolemia and the deficits should be corrected, in particular in elderly patients, where preoperative intravenous fluid substitution of approximately 2-3 liters crystalloid is recommended. We did not find thoracic epidural anesthesia to be accompanied by intravascular fluid mobilization. In major (colonic) surgery with a standardized multimodal rehabilitation regimen, over-all functional recovery was not affected with a "liberal" ( approximately 5 liters) vs. "restrictive" 1.5 liter crystalloid-based regimen, however based on three anastomotic leakages in the "restrictive" group, it may be hypothesized that a too "restrictive" fluid administration strategy could be detrimental in patients with anastomoses and need further

  15. Rhabdomyolysis After Performing Blood Flow Restriction Training: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Shogo; Suzuki, Yukio; Azuma, Koichiro; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2016-07-01

    Tabata, S, Suzuki, Y, Azuma, K, and Matsumoto, H. Rhabdomyolysis after performing blood flow restriction training: a case report. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 2064-2068, 2016-Rhabdomyolysis is a serious and potentially life-threatening condition related to resistance training. Despite numerous reports of low-intensity blood flow restriction (BFR) training inducing muscle hypertrophy and increasing strength, few reports of rhabdomyolysis related to BFR training have been published. Here, we report a 30-year-old obese Japanese man admitted to our hospital the day after his first BFR training session with complaints of severe muscle pain in his upper and lower extremities, high fever, and pharyngeal pain. He was diagnosed with acute rhabdomyolysis based on a serum creatine phosphokinase level of 56,475 U·L and a urine myoglobin level of >3,000 ng·ml, and with acute tonsillitis based on a white blood cell count of 17,390 and C-reactive protein level of 10.43 mg·dl. A number of factors are suspected to be related to the onset and exacerbation of rhabdomyolysis, including excessive muscular training with BFR, bacterial infection, and medication. After 10 days of hospitalization with intravenous fluids and antibacterial drugs, he recovered without complications. This case indicates that BFR training should be conducted with careful consideration of the physical condition and strength of the individual to prevent serious complications, such as rhabdomyolysis. PMID:26677831

  16. [Lethal intravenous injection of benzine].

    PubMed

    Zirwes, Christian; Ritz-Timme, Stefanie; Hinsch, Nora; Kardel, Bernd; Hartung, Benno

    2015-01-01

    A man who suffered from chronic pain syndrome died two days after intravenous injection of 2 ml benzine. Previous suicide attempts by drug intoxication and strangulation had failed. Death occurred due to multi-organ failure. We present the results of the clinical, morphological and toxicological examinations performed. PMID:26548034

  17. Intravenous magnetic nanoparticle cancer hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hui S; Hainfeld, James F

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles heated by an alternating magnetic field could be used to treat cancers, either alone or in combination with radiotherapy or chemotherapy. However, direct intratumoral injections suffer from tumor incongruence and invasiveness, typically leaving undertreated regions, which lead to cancer regrowth. Intravenous injection more faithfully loads tumors, but, so far, it has been difficult achieving the necessary concentration in tumors before systemic toxicity occurs. Here, we describe use of a magnetic nanoparticle that, with a well-tolerated intravenous dose, achieved a tumor concentration of 1.9 mg Fe/g tumor in a subcutaneous squamous cell carcinoma mouse model, with a tumor to non-tumor ratio > 16. With an applied field of 38 kA/m at 980 kHz, tumors could be heated to 60°C in 2 minutes, durably ablating them with millimeter (mm) precision, leaving surrounding tissue intact. PMID:23901270

  18. Anaphylactic reaction to intravenous diclofenac.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranju; Bansal, Deepak; Baduni, Neha; Vajifdar, Homay

    2011-01-01

    Diclofenac sodium is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug widely used as an opioid sparing agent for postoperative analgesia. Anaphylaxis due to intravenous diclofenac sodium is very rare. We report a case of anaphylactic reaction to IV diclofenac sodium, occurring postoperatively in a 25-year-old primigravida, the clinical features of which mimicked pulmonary embolism. The rarity, clinical importance and the diagnostic dilemma associated prompted us to report this case. PMID:21633544

  19. Fluid imbalance

    MedlinePlus

    ... up in the body. This is called fluid overload (volume overload). This can lead to edema (excess fluid in ... Water imbalance; Fluid imbalance - dehydration; Fluid buildup; Fluid overload; Volume overload; Loss of fluids; Edema - fluid imbalance; ...

  20. Venipuncture and intravenous infusion access during zero-gravity flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krupa, Debra T.; Gosbee, John; Billica, Roger; Bechtle, Perry; Creager, Gerald J.; Boyce, Joey B.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment is to establish the difficulty associated with securing an intravenous (IV) catheter in place in microgravity flight and the techniques applicable in training the Crew Medical Officer (CMO) for Space Station Freedom, as well as aiding in the selection of appropriate hardware and supplies for the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF). The objectives are the following: (1) to determine the difficulties associated with venipuncture in a microgravity environment; (2) to evaluate the various methods of securing an IV catheter and attached tubing for infusion with regard to the unique environment; (3) to evaluate the various materials available for securing an intravenous catheter in place; and (4) to evaluate the fluid therapy administration system when functioning in a complete system. The inflight test procedures and other aspects of the KC-135 parabolic flight test to simulate microgravity are presented.

  1. Restricted Transport in Small Pores

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, John L.; Quinn, John A.

    1974-01-01

    The basic hydrodynamic equations governing transport in submicron pores are reexamined. Conditions necessary for a simplified, one-dimensional treatment of the diffusion/convection process are established. Steric restrictions and Brownian motion are incorporated directly into the resulting model. Currently available fluid mechanical results are used to evaluate an upper limit on hindered diffusion; this limit is valid for small particle-to-pore ratios. Extensions of the analysis are shown to depend on numerical solutions of the related hydrodynamic problem, that of asymmetrical particle motion in a bounded fluid. PMID:4813157

  2. Evaluation of Cerebral Perfusion in Patients Undergoing Intravenous Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator Thrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    HIRANO, Teruyuki

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the indication for thrombolytic therapy using intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) is restricted strictly to patients with acute ischemic stroke within 4.5 h of onset. The effect of rt-PA declines over time; therefore, we need to minimize the time delay while generating imaging information. The use of cerebral blood flow imaging is not recommended within this time window. Conversely, the balance of efficacy and the risk of bleeding complications differ among patients > 4.5 h after onset. Several ongoing studies are using mismatch concepts to extend the therapeutic time window for rt-PA. Long-awaited reliable software, such as RAPID and PMA, are now available to analyze computed tomography/magnetic resonance perfusion data. Patients with wake-up stroke (WUS) are another group that can be used to expand rt-PA candidates. Diffusion fluid- attenuated inversion recovery mismatch is a promising imaging surrogate to select good candidates with WUS. These trials will cause a therapeutic paradigm shift from time-based to tissue-based strategies in the near future. PMID:26369875

  3. [Intravenous and subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy].

    PubMed

    Thon, Vojtěch

    2013-07-01

    Patients with agammaglobulinaemia and hypogammaglobulinaemia require immunoglobulin G (IgG) replacement therapy to prevent serious infections. Since the 1950s, therapy with human immune globulin products has been the standard of treatment. Currently, the most common routes of administration of IgG replacement therapy are intravenous (IVIG) or subcutaneous (SCIG). The home therapy may improve the quality of life in patients who require lifelong IgG replacement. The -anti-IgA antibody test identifies the patients with the risk of anaphylactoid reactions in IVIG replacement. The SCIG delivery may be used in patients with anti-IgA antibodies and previous systemic reactions to IVIG. PMID:23964967

  4. Hypersensitivity from intravenous iron products.

    PubMed

    Bircher, Andreas J; Auerbach, Michael

    2014-08-01

    In the last several years, intravenous therapy with iron products has been more widely used. Although it has been a standard procedure in dialysis-associated anemia since the early 1990s, its use is expanding to a host of conditions associated with iron deficiency, especially young women with heavy uterine bleeding and pregnancy. Free iron is associated with unacceptable high toxicity inducing severe, hemodynamically significant symptoms. Subsequently, formulations that contain the iron as an iron carbohydrate nanoparticle have been designed. With newer formulations, including low-molecular-weight iron dextran, iron sucrose, ferric gluconate, ferumoxytol, iron isomaltoside, and ferric carboxymaltose, serious adverse events are rare. PMID:25017687

  5. Pharmacokinetics and Bioavailability of a Therapeutic Enzyme (Idursulfase) in Cynomolgus Monkeys after Intrathecal and Intravenous Administration

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hongsheng; Chung, Jou-Ku; Mascelli, Mary Ann; McCauley, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous enzyme replacement therapy with iduronate-2-sulfatase is an approved treatment for Hunter syndrome, however, conventional intravenous delivery cannot treat the neurologic manifestations of the disease due to its limited central nervous system penetration. Intrathecal administration of iduronate-2-sulfatase for delivery to the central nervous system is currently under investigation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of idursulfase in the central nervous system of cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fasicularis) after intravenous and intrathecal administration. Twenty-seven monkeys, treatment-naïve to enzyme replacement therapy, were placed into 4 groups according to body weight: Group 1 was administered 0.5 mg/kg idursulfase intravenously, Groups 2–4 were administered an intrathecal formulation (1-, 10-, and 30-mg doses). Blood samples and cerebrospinal fluid (sampled at the cisterna magna or lumbar level) were collected at the same time points for 72 hours post dosing. Following intravenous administration, a high maximum serum concentration and rapid distribution of iduronate-2-sulfatase out of the central compartment were observed (elimination half-life: 4.3 hours). Iduronate-2-sulfatase exposure in the cerebrospinal fluid was limited, suggesting intravenous administration provided minimal penetration of the blood–brain barrier. Following intrathecal administration, a high maximum observed concentration was immediately noted and elimination half-life ranged between 7.8–10 hours and 5.9–6.7 hours (cisterna magna and lumbar sampling, respectively). Cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetic profiles at different doses of iduronate-2-sulfatase were similar and the dose/exposure relationship was proportional. After intrathecal administration, movement of iduronate-2-sulfatase from cerebrospinal fluid to serum was observed (systemic bioavailability was 40–83%). The clear penetration of iduronate-2-sulfatase into the cerebrospinal

  6. Clinical applications of intravenous immunoglobulins in neurology.

    PubMed

    Hughes, R A C; Dalakas, M C; Cornblath, D R; Latov, N; Weksler, M E; Relkin, N

    2009-12-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is used increasingly in the management of patients with neurological conditions. The efficacy and safety of IVIg treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) have been established clearly in randomized controlled trials and summarized in Cochrane systematic reviews. However, questions remain regarding the dose, timing and duration of IVIg treatment in both disorders. Reports about successful IVIg treatment in other neurological conditions exist, but its use remains investigational. IVIg has been shown to be efficacious as second-line therapy in patients with dermatomyositis and suggested to be of benefit in some patients with polymyositis. In patients with inclusion body myositis, IVIg was not shown to be effective. IVIg is also a treatment option in exacerbations of myasthenia gravis. Studies with IVIg in patients with Alzheimer's disease have reported increased plasma anti-Abeta antibody titres associated with decreased Abeta peptide levels in the cerebrospinal fluid following IVIg treatment. These changes at the molecular level were accompanied by improved cognitive function, and large-scale randomized trials are under way. PMID:19883422

  7. Drug Utilization, Dosing, and Costs After Implementation of Intravenous Acetaminophen Guidelines for Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Nicholas M.; Parbuoni, Kristine; Morgan, Jill A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The objectives of this evaluation of medication use were to characterize the use of intravenous acetaminophen at our institution and to determine if acetaminophen was prescribed at age-appropriate dosages per institutional guidelines, as well as to evaluate compliance with restrictions for use. Total acquisition costs associated with intravenous acetaminophen usage is described as well. METHODS This retrospective study evaluated the use of acetaminophen in pediatric patients younger than 18 years of age, admitted to a tertiary care hospital, who received at least 1 dose of intravenous acet-aminophen between August 1, 2011, and January 31, 2012. RESULTS A total of 52 doses of intravenous acetaminophen were administered to 31 patients during the 6-month study period. Most patients were admitted to the otorhinolaryngology service (55%), and the majority of doses were administered either in the operating room (46%) or in the intensive care unit (46%). Nineteen doses (37%) of intravenous acetaminophen were administered to patients who did not meet institutional guidelines' eligibility criteria. Three patients received single doses of intravenous acetaminophen that were greater than the dose recommended for their age. One patient during the study period received more than the recommended 24-hour maximum cumulative dose for acetaminophen. Total acquisition cost of intravenous acetaminophen therapy over the 6-month study period was $530.40. CONCLUSIONS Intravenous acetaminophen was used most frequently among pediatric patients admitted to the otorhinolaryngology service during the perioperative period. Nineteen doses (37%) were administered to patients who did not meet the institutional guidelines' eligibility criteria. Our data support reinforcing the availability of institutional guidelines to promote cost-effective use of intravenous acetaminophen while minimizing the prescription of inappropriate doses. PMID:24782690

  8. Pancreatic enzyme secretion during intravenous fat infusion.

    PubMed

    Burns, G P; Stein, T A

    1987-01-01

    The nutritional support of patients with pancreatic and high gastrointestinal fistulas and severe pancreatitis frequently involves intravenous fat infusion. There are conflicting reports on the effect of intravenous fat on pancreatic exocrine secretion. In 10 dogs with chronic pancreatic fistulas, pancreatic juice was collected during secretin (n = 10) or secretin + cholecystokinin (n = 4) stimulation, with and without intravenous fat infusion (5 g/hr). The hormonal-stimulated secretion of lipase, amylase, trypsin, total protein, bicarbonate, and water was unchanged during fat infusion. This study supports the use of intravenous fat as a nutritional source when it is desirable to avoid stimulation of the pancreas. PMID:2434670

  9. Energy sources for intravenous nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Rowlands, B J

    1987-01-01

    Controversy exists concerning the appropriate use of carbohydrate solutions and fat emulsions as energy sources in intravenous nutritional regimens. Current evidence suggests that glucose is the carbohydrate energy source of choice and that when infused with appropriate quantities of protein it provides cheap and effective nutritional support in the majority of patients and clinical circumstances. During glucose infusion, blood glucose and acid-base balance should be closely monitored and, when indicated, exogenous insulin should be added to the regimen to combat hyperglycaemia and improve protein anabolism. Fat emulsions, although expensive, may justifiably be used in patients with moderate or severe stress to provide up to 50% of non-protein energy, especially in circumstances where attempts to satisfy energy requirements exclusively with glucose would impose an additional metabolic stress. PMID:3109093

  10. Sepsis Resuscitation: Fluid Choice and Dose.

    PubMed

    Semler, Matthew W; Rice, Todd W

    2016-06-01

    Sepsis is a common and life-threatening inflammatory response to severe infection treated with antibiotics and fluid resuscitation. Despite the central role of intravenous fluid in sepsis management, fundamental questions regarding which fluid and in what amount remain unanswered. Recent advances in understanding the physiologic response to fluid administration, and large clinical studies examining resuscitation strategies, fluid balance after resuscitation, colloid versus crystalloid solutions, and high- versus low-chloride crystalloids, inform the current approach to sepsis fluid management and suggest areas for future research. PMID:27229641

  11. Disposition of intravenous radioactive acyclovir

    SciTech Connect

    de Miranda, P.; Good, S.S.; Laskin, O.L.; Krasny, H.C.; Connor, J.D.; Lietman, P.S.

    1981-11-01

    The kinetic and metabolic disposition of (8-14C)acyclovir (ACV) was investigated in five subjects with advanced malignancy. The drug was administered by 1-hr intravenous infusion at doses of 0.5 and 2.5 mg/kg. Plasma and blood radioactivity-time, and plasma concentration-time data were defined by a two-compartment open kinetic model. There was nearly equivalent distribution of radioactivity in blood and plasma. The overall mean plasma half-life and total body clearance +/- SD of ACV were 2.1 +/- 0.5 hr and 297 +/- 53 ml/min/1.73 m2. Binding of ACV to plasma proteins was 15.4 +/- 4.4%. Most of the radioactive dose excreted was recovered in the urine (71% to 99%) with less than 2% excretion in the feces and only trace amounts in the expired Co2. Analyses by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography indicated that 9-(carboxymethoxymethyl)guanine was the only significant urinary metabolite of ACV, accounting for 8.5% to 14.1% of the dose. A minor metabolite (less than 0.2% of dose) had the retention time of 8-hydroxy-9-((2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl)guanine. Unchanged urinary ACV ranged from 62% to 91% of the dose. There was no indication of ACV cleavage to guanine. Renal clearance of ACV was approximately three times the corresponding creatinine clearances.

  12. Intravenous thrombolytics for ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Andrew D

    2011-07-01

    For many decades, intravenous (IV) thrombolytics have been delivered to treat acute thrombosis. Although these medications were originally effective for coronary thrombosis, their mechanisms have proven beneficial for many other disease processes, including ischemic stroke. Treatment paradigms for acute ischemic stroke have largely followed those of cardiology. Specifically, the aim has been to recanalize the occluded artery and to restore perfusion to the brain that remains salvageable. To that end, rapid clot lysis was sought using thrombolytic medicines already proven effective in the coronary arteries. IV-thrombolysis for ischemic stroke began its widespread adoption in the late 1990s after the publication of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke study. Since that time, other promising IV-thrombolytics have been developed and tested in human trials, but as of yet, none have been proven better than a placebo. Adjunctive treatments are also being evaluated. The challenge remains balancing reperfusion and salvaging brain tissue with the potential risks of brain hemorrhage. PMID:21638138

  13. Intravenous iron-containing products: EMA procrastination.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    A European reassessment has led to identical changes in the summaries of product characteristics (SPCs) for all intravenous iron-containing products: the risk of serious adverse effects is now highlighted, underlining the fact that intravenous iron-containing products should only be used when the benefits clearly outweigh the harms. Unfortunately, iron dextran still remains on the market despite a higher risk of hypersensitivity reactions than with iron sucrose. PMID:25162093

  14. Intravenous balanced solutions: from physiology to clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Langer, Thomas; Santini, Alessandro; Scotti, Eleonora; Van Regenmortel, Niels; Malbrain, Manu L N G; Caironi, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    "Balanced" solutions are commonly defined as intravenous fluids having an electrolyte composition close to that of plasma. As such, they should minimally affect acid-base equilibrium, as compared to the commonly reported 0.9% NaCl-related hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis. Recently, the term "balanced" solution has been also employed to indicate intravenous fluids with low chloride content, being the concentration of this electrolyte the most altered and supra-physiologic in 0.9% NaCl as compared to plasma, and based upon a suggested detrimental effect on renal function associated with hyperchloremia. Despite efforts for its identification, the ideal balanced solution, with minimal effects on acid-base status, low chloride content, and adequate tonicity, is not yet available. After the accumulation of pre-clinical and clinical physiologic data, in the last three years, several clinical trials, mostly observational and retrospective, have addressed the question of whether the use of balanced solutions has beneficial effects as compared to the standard of care, sometimes even suggesting an improvement in survival. Nonetheless, the first large randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of a balanced vs. unbalanced solution on renal function in critically-ill patients (SPLIT trial, the 0.9% Saline vs Plasma-Lyte 148 for Intensive Cate Unit Fluid Therapy), just recently published, showed identical equipoise between the two treatments. In the present review, we offer a comprehensive and updated summary on this issue, firstly, by providing a full physiological background of balanced solutions, secondly, by summarizing their potential pathophysiologic effects, and lastly, by presenting the clinical evidence available to support, at the moment, their use. PMID:26588483

  15. Pharmacokinetics of non-intravenous formulations of fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Lötsch, Jörn; Walter, Carmen; Parnham, Michael J; Oertel, Bruno G; Geisslinger, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    Fentanyl was structurally designed by Paul Janssen in the early 1960s as a potent opioid analgesic (100-fold more potent than morphine). It is a full agonist at μ-opioid receptors and possesses physicochemical properties, in particular a high lipophilicity (octanol:water partition coefficient >700), which allow it to cross quickly between plasma and central nervous target sites (transfer half-life of 4.7-6.6 min). It undergoes first-pass metabolism via cytochrome P450 3A (bioavailability ~30 % after rapid swallowing), which can be circumvented by non-intravenous formulations (bioavailability 50-90 % for oral transmucosal or intranasal formulations). Non-intravenous preparations deliver fentanyl orally-transmucosally, intranasally or transdermally. Passive transdermal patches release fentanyl at a constant zero-order rate for 2-3 days, making them suitable for chronic pain management, as are iontophoretic transdermal systems. Oral transmucosal and intranasal routes provide fast delivery (time to reach maximum fentanyl plasma concentrations 20 min [range 20-180 min] and 12 min [range 12-21 min], respectively) suitable for rapid onset of analgesia in acute pain conditions with time to onset of analgesia of 5 or 2 min, respectively. Intranasal formulations partly bypass the blood-brain barrier and deliver a fraction of the dose directly to relevant brain target sites, providing ultra-fast analgesia for breakthrough pain. Thanks to the development of non-intravenous pharmaceutical formulations, fentanyl has become one of the most successful opioid analgesics, and can be regarded as an example of a successful reformulation strategy of an existing drug based on pharmacokinetic research and pharmaceutical technology. This development broadened the indications for fentanyl beyond the initial restriction to intra- or perioperative clinical uses. The clinical utility of fentanyl could be expanded further by more comprehensive mathematical characterizations of its parametric

  16. Synthetic Base Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M.; Fotheringham, J. D.; Hoyes, T. J.; Mortier, R. M.; Orszulik, S. T.; Randles, S. J.; Stroud, P. M.

    The chemical nature and technology of the main synthetic lubricant base fluids is described, covering polyalphaolefins, alkylated aromatics, gas-to-liquid (GTL) base fluids, polybutenes, aliphatic diesters, polyolesters, polyalkylene glycols or PAGs and phosphate esters.Other synthetic lubricant base oils such as the silicones, borate esters, perfluoroethers and polyphenylene ethers are considered to have restricted applications due to either high cost or performance limitations and are not considered here.Each of the main synthetic base fluids is described for their chemical and physical properties, manufacture and production, their chemistry, key properties, applications and their implications when used in the environment.

  17. An Unexpected Transient Breakdown of the Blood Brain Barrier Triggers Passage of Large Intravenously Administered Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nicole M.; Gachulincova, Ivana; Ho, Diwei; Bailey, Charlotte; Bartlett, Carole A.; Norret, Marck; Murphy, John; Buckley, Alysia; Rigby, Paul J.; House, Michael J.; St. Pierre, Timothy; Fitzgerald, Melinda; Iyer, K. Swaminathan; Dunlop, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    The highly restrictive blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays a critically important role in maintaining brain homeostasis and is pivotal for proper neuronal function. The BBB is currently considered the main limiting factor restricting the passage of large (up to 200 nm) intravenously administered nanoparticles to the brain. Breakdown of the barrier occurs as a consequence of cerebrovascular diseases and traumatic brain injury. In this article, we report that remote injuries in the CNS are also associated with BBB dysfunction. In particular, we show that a focal partial transection of the optic nerve triggers a previously unknown transient opening of the mammalian BBB that occurs in the visual centres. Importantly, we demonstrate that this transient BBB breakdown results in a dramatic change in the biodistribution of intravenously administered large polymeric nanoparticles which were previously deemed as BBB-impermeable. PMID:26940762

  18. An Unexpected Transient Breakdown of the Blood Brain Barrier Triggers Passage of Large Intravenously Administered Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nicole M.; Gachulincova, Ivana; Ho, Diwei; Bailey, Charlotte; Bartlett, Carole A.; Norret, Marck; Murphy, John; Buckley, Alysia; Rigby, Paul J.; House, Michael J.; St. Pierre, Timothy; Fitzgerald, Melinda; Iyer, K. Swaminathan; Dunlop, Sarah A.

    2016-03-01

    The highly restrictive blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays a critically important role in maintaining brain homeostasis and is pivotal for proper neuronal function. The BBB is currently considered the main limiting factor restricting the passage of large (up to 200 nm) intravenously administered nanoparticles to the brain. Breakdown of the barrier occurs as a consequence of cerebrovascular diseases and traumatic brain injury. In this article, we report that remote injuries in the CNS are also associated with BBB dysfunction. In particular, we show that a focal partial transection of the optic nerve triggers a previously unknown transient opening of the mammalian BBB that occurs in the visual centres. Importantly, we demonstrate that this transient BBB breakdown results in a dramatic change in the biodistribution of intravenously administered large polymeric nanoparticles which were previously deemed as BBB-impermeable.

  19. The immunomodulatory effects of intravenous immunoglobulin therapy in Kawasaki disease

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Jane C.; Franco, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Summary The introduction of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) for modulation of inflammation in acute Kawasaki disease (KD) was a great therapeutic triumph. However, three decades later, the mechanisms underlying immune regulation by IVIG are only beginning to be revealed. Stimulation of an immature myeloid population of dendritic cells (DC) that secretes IL-10 and the elucidation of Fc-specific, HLA-restricted natural regulatory T cells (Treg) provide insights into mechanisms of IVIG. Other potential mechanisms include provision of agent-specific neutralizing antibody, anti-idiotype and anti-cytokine antibodies, blockade of activating Fcγ receptors, and stimulation of the inhibitory FcγRIIb receptor. New initiatives must seek to understand the mechanisms of IVIG in order to one day replace it with more affordable and more targeted therapies. PMID:26099344

  20. Muscle chemistry of critically ill surgical patients and the effects of a course of intravenous nutrition.

    PubMed

    King, R F; Collins, J P; Morgan, D B; Hill, G L

    1978-07-01

    The water, electrolyte and nitrogen contents of muscle were measured in 15 critically ill surgical patients before and after a course (approximately 2 weeks) of intravenous nutrition and in 8 normal individuals. The muscle from the surgical patients contained a significantly increased ratio of water to fat-free dry weight (P less than 0.01) due to an increase in the proportion of extracellular to intracellular water, and this was not corrected by intravenous nutrition. These changes could be due to an accumulation of extracellular fluid alone or to a loss of cell cytoplasm or a loss of whole muscle fibres. Intracellular chemistry was normal in the ill surgical patients and was not changed by intravenous nutrition. PMID:96905

  1. Flow-test device fits into restricted access passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, J. J.; Oberschmidt, M.; Rosenbaum, B. J.

    1967-01-01

    Test device using a mandrel with a collapsible linkage assembly enables a fluid flow sensor to be properly positioned in a restricted passage by external manipulation. This device is applicable to the combustion chamber of a rocket motor.

  2. Cerebral infarction 3 weeks after intravenous immunoglobulin for Miller Fisher syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Intravenous immunoglobulin is considered generally safe and is used widely as proven, and sometimes empiric, treatment for an expanding list of autoimmune diseases. Thromboembolic complications following intravenous immunoglobulin therapy are rare and there have been only five previous reports of stroke occurring within 2 to 10 days of infusion. This is the first report of cerebral infarction occurring after a longer latency of 3 weeks following intravenous immunoglobulin therapy in a patient presenting with Miller Fisher syndrome. Case presentation A previously well, 44-year-old Sri Lankan man progressively developed ophthalmoplegia, facial paralysis, ataxia and areflexia with neurophysiological and cerebrospinal fluid evidence consistent with the Miller Fisher syndrome. He made an unremarkable recovery with intravenous immunoglobulin therapy (0.4g/kg/day for 5 days, total 180g), but developed a cerebral infarct with haemorrhagic transformation 25 days later. He was noted to have a low blood pressure. Extensive investigations ruled out vasculopathic, embolic, thrombophilic and inflammatory aetiologies. Circulating intravenous immunoglobulins combined with a low blood pressure was considered the most probable cause of his stroke. Conclusions Cerebral infarction following intravenous immunoglobulin is thought to be secondary to hyperviscosity, thromboemboli, vasculitis, or cerebral vasospasm and reported to occur after a short latency when the immunoglobulin load is highest. Even though the immunoglobulin load is halved by 3 weeks, our case suggests that that the predisposition to thromboembolism persists over a longer period and may result in vascular complications if synergised with other vascular risk factors. It is recommended that intravenous immunoglobulin be infused at a rate of not less than 8 hours per day and that factors predisposing to thromboembolism such as dehydration, immobilisation and low blood pressure be avoided for the duration of

  3. Treatment of serious infections with intravenous ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Scully, B E; Neu, H C

    1987-04-27

    Thirty-four patients were treated with intravenous ciprofloxacin. Thirty infections occurring in 28 patients were assessable for the efficacy analysis. The drug dosage was 300 mg every 12 hours in 19 patients and 200 mg intravenously every 12 hours in nine patients. Twelve patients were also given ciprofloxacin orally after initial intravenous therapy. The mean duration of total therapy was 31 days. The overall clinical response rate was 87 percent, and the bacteriologic response rate was 70 percent. Favorable responses were observed in 10 of 12 patients with osteomyelitis/septic arthritis; seven of eight with soft tissue infection; four of four with pneumonitis; one of two with cystic fibrosis; and four of four with urinary tract infections. Resistance to ciprofloxacin developed in three Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. Toxicity was minor: phlebitis occurred in six patients, nausea in six, and rash in one. Intravenously administered ciprofloxacin or intravenous ciprofloxacin followed by oral ciprofloxacin is a safe and effective therapy for serious infections. PMID:3555062

  4. International prevalence of the use of peripheral intravenous catheters.

    PubMed

    Alexandrou, Evan; Ray-Barruel, Gillian; Carr, Peter J; Frost, Steven; Inwood, Sheila; Higgins, Niall; Lin, Frances; Alberto, Laura; Mermel, Leonard; Rickard, Claire M

    2015-08-01

    Over a billion peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) are inserted each year in hospitalized patients worldwide. However, international data on prevalence and management of these devices are lacking. The study assessed the prevalence of PIVCs and their management practices across different regions of the world. This global audit involved 14 hospitals across 13 countries, with 479 patients screened for the presence of a PIVC. We found 59% of patients had at least 1 PIVC in place, and 16% had other types of vascular devices. We also found that overall, 25% of patients had no vascular device in place. The majority of PIVCs were inserted by nursing staff or a specialist team. The prevalence of idle PIVCs in place with no fluid or medication orders was 16%, and 12% of PIVCs had at least 1 symptom of phlebitis. PMID:26041384

  5. Precocious emphysema in intravenous drug abusers.

    PubMed

    Weisbrod, G L; Rahman, M; Chamberlain, D; Herman, S J

    1993-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that obstructive airway disease and early emphysema occur in some drug addicts who intravenously abuse drugs intended for oral use. We report four patients with such a history who had clinical, pathophysiologic, and radiologic evidence of severe obstructive airway disease with hyperinflation. Three patients had bullae. All had radiologic changes of intravenous talc granulomatosis. One patient had moderately severe emphysema at autopsy. The pathogenesis of this disease is uncertain but may involve synergism with cigarette smoke, direct toxic effects of the drug, or induced intravascular leukocyte sequestration causing proteolytic pulmonary injury. PMID:8320766

  6. Predicting and measuring fluid responsiveness with echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Mandeville, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Echocardiography is ideally suited to guide fluid resuscitation in critically ill patients. It can be used to assess fluid responsiveness by looking at the left ventricle, aortic outflow, inferior vena cava and right ventricle. Static measurements and dynamic variables based on heart–lung interactions all combine to predict and measure fluid responsiveness and assess response to intravenous fluid resuscitation. Thorough knowledge of these variables, the physiology behind them and the pitfalls in their use allows the echocardiographer to confidently assess these patients and in combination with clinical judgement manage them appropriately. PMID:27249550

  7. Predicting and measuring fluid responsiveness with echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ashley; Mandeville, Justin

    2016-06-01

    Echocardiography is ideally suited to guide fluid resuscitation in critically ill patients. It can be used to assess fluid responsiveness by looking at the left ventricle, aortic outflow, inferior vena cava and right ventricle. Static measurements and dynamic variables based on heart-lung interactions all combine to predict and measure fluid responsiveness and assess response to intravenous fluid resuscitation. Thorough knowledge of these variables, the physiology behind them and the pitfalls in their use allows the echocardiographer to confidently assess these patients and in combination with clinical judgement manage them appropriately. PMID:27249550

  8. Fluid as a Drug: Balancing Resuscitation and Fluid Overload in the Intensive Care Setting.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Matthew D; Heung, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Intravenous fluid resuscitation is ubiquitous throughout medicine and is often considered a benign procedure. Yet, there is now clear recognition of the potential harms of fluid overload after initial resuscitation. In recent years, there has also been an increasing focus on comparing various resuscitation fluids with respect to both benefits and risks. Studies have examined colloids, such as albumin and starches, against the clinical standard of crystalloids. In addition, evidence has emerged to suggest that outcomes may be different between resuscitation with chloride-rich vs balanced crystalloid solutions. In this article, we review the current literature regarding choice of intravenous fluids for resuscitation in the intensive care setting and describe the dangers associated with fluid overload in critically ill patients. PMID:27113691

  9. Amniotic fluid

    MedlinePlus

    Amniotic fluid is a clear, slightly yellowish liquid that surrounds the unborn baby (fetus) during pregnancy. It is ... in the womb, the baby floats in the amniotic fluid. The amount of amniotic fluid is greatest at ...

  10. Eastern Equine Encephalitis Treated With Intravenous Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Mukerji, Shibani S.; Lam, Alice D.

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 68-year-old man from southeastern Massachusetts presenting with encephalitis due to eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus. Despite the high morbidity and mortality rate of EEE, the patient made a near complete recovery in the setting of receiving early intravenous immunoglobulins. PMID:26740855

  11. Health Instruction Packages: Venipuncture and Intravenous Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, P. Allen, Jr.; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these five learning modules to instruct nursing students in techniques for initiating intravenous (I.V.) therapy. The first module, "Selection of a Venipuncture Site: Arm" by P. Allen Gray, Jr., describes the utilization of a tourniquet in locating filled veins in the arm. The second module,…

  12. Intravenous/oral ciprofloxacin therapy versus intravenous ceftazidime therapy for selected bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Gaut, P L; Carron, W C; Ching, W T; Meyer, R D

    1989-11-30

    The efficacy and toxicity of sequential intravenous and oral ciprofloxacin therapy was compared with intravenously administered ceftazidime in a prospective, randomized, controlled, non-blinded trial. Thirty-two patients (16 patients receiving ciprofloxacin and 16 patients receiving ceftazidime) with 38 infections caused by susceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa, enteric gram-negative rods, Salmonella group B, Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas cepacia, and Xanthomonas maltophilia at various sites were evaluable for determination of efficacy. Length of therapy varied from seven to 25 days. Concomitant antimicrobials included intravenously administered beta-lactams for gram-positive organisms, intravenous/oral metronidazole and clindamycin for anaerobes, and intravenous/local amphotericin B for Candida albicans. Intravenous administration of 200 mg ciprofloxacin every 12 hours to 11 patients produced peak serum levels between 1.15 and 3.12 micrograms/ml; trough levels ranged between 0.08 and 0.86 micrograms/ml. Overall response rates were similar for patients receiving ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime. Emergence of resistance was similar in both groups--one Enterobacter cloacae and two P. aeruginosa became resistant after ciprofloxacin therapy and two P. aeruginosa became resistant after ceftazidime therapy. The frequency of superinfection with a variety of organisms was also similar in both groups. Adverse events related to ciprofloxacin included transient pruritus at the infusion site and generalized rash leading to drug discontinuation (one patient each), and with ceftazidime adverse effects included pain at the site of infusion and the development of allergic interstitial nephritis (one patient each). Overall, intravenous/oral ciprofloxin therapy appears to be as safe and effective as intravenous ceftazidime therapy in the treatment of a variety of infections due to susceptible aerobic gram-negative organisms. PMID:2686417

  13. Efficacy of Intravenous Paracetamol Versus Intravenous Morphine in Acute Limb Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Jalili, Mohammad; Mozaffarpour Noori, Ali; Sedaghat, Mojtaba; Safaie, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Background: Efficient pain management is one of the most important components of care in the field of emergency medicine. Objectives: This study was conducted to compare intravenous paracetamol and intravenous morphine sulfate for acute pain reduction in patients with limb trauma. Patients and Methods: In a randomized double-blinded clinical trial, all patients (aged 18 years and older) with acute limb trauma and a pain score of greater than 3/10 in the emergency department were recruited; they received either 1 g intravenous paracetamol or 0.1 mg/kg intravenous morphine sulfate over 15 minutes. The primary outcome was the pain score measured on a numerical rating scale at 0, 15 and 30 minutes after commencing drug administration. The requirement for rescue analgesia and the frequency of adverse reactions were also recorded. Results: Sixty patients randomly received either IV paracetamol (n = 30) or IV morphine (n = 30). The mean reduction in numerical rating scale pain intensity scores at 30 minutes was 3.86 (± 1.61) for paracetamol, and 2.16 (± 1.39) for morphine. However, pain relief was significantly higher in the paracetamol group compared to the morphine group (P < 0.001). Four patients in the paracetamol group and 15 patients in the morphine group needed rescue analgesia and the difference was significant (P = 0.05). Conclusions: Intravenous paracetamol appears to provide better analgesia than intravenous morphine in acute limb trauma. Further larger studies are required. PMID:27218042

  14. Hydrothorax, hydromediastinum and pericardial effusion: a complication of intravenous alimentation.

    PubMed

    Damtew, B; Lewandowski, B

    1984-06-15

    Complications secondary to intravenous alimentation are rare but potentially lethal. Massive bilateral pleural effusions and a pericardial effusion developed in a patient receiving prolonged intravenous alimentation. Severe respiratory distress and renal failure ensued. He recovered with appropriate treatment. PMID:6428731

  15. Activity of outpatient intravenous interleukin-2 and famotidine in metastatic clear cell kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Quan, Walter D Y; Quan, Francine Marie

    2014-03-01

    Outpatient daily intravenous infusions of interleukin-2 (IL-2) have been developed to maintain anticancer activity and decrease toxicity of this agent against kidney cancer. Lymphokine activated killer cell (LAK) numbers are increased with these IL-2 schedules. Famotidine may enhance the LAK activity by increasing IL-2 internalization by the IL-2 receptor on lymphocytes. Fifteen patients with metastatic clear cell kidney cancer received IL-2 18 million IU/M² intravenously over 15-30 minutes preceded by famotidine 20 mg IV daily for 3 days for 6 consecutive weeks as outpatients. Cycles were repeated every 8 weeks. Patient characteristics were seven males/eight females, median age 59 (range: 28-70), median Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status-1; common metastatic sites were lungs (14), lymph nodes (9), liver (4), bone (4), and pancreas (4). Prior systemic therapies were oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor (8), IL-2 (6), and mTor inhibitor (2). Most common toxicities were rigors, arthralgia/myalgia, nausea/emesis, fever, and hypotension. All episodes of hypotension were reversible with intravenous fluid. No patients required hospitalization due to toxicity. One complete response (7%) and four partial responses (26%) were seen (total response rate=33%; 95% confidence interval: 15%-59%). Responses occurred in the lungs, liver, lymph nodes, and bone. Outpatient intravenous IL-2 with famotidine has activity in metastatic clear cell kidney cancer. PMID:24251758

  16. Visualization of Coronary Arteries from Intravenous Angiograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selzer, Robert H.

    1985-01-01

    Under most circumstances, the coronary arteries are not satisfactorily visualized in intravenous angiograms. The objective of this study is to develop computer image enhancement methods that will improve the quality of the latent coronary images to a degree sufficient to detect an obstructive lesion. Such a technique, if successful, could be used as a first step alternative to conventional coronary angiography for individuals with ambiguous noninvasive cardiac tests. The determination of no lesion from the intravenous procedure would relieve the need for the conventional angiogram, while verification of an obstructive lesion could be followed by a conventional angiogram. The nature of the imaging problem and a description of the methods and initial processing results are described in this paper.

  17. Intravenous immunoglobulin in pediatrics: A review

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, A.N.; Chaudhary, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    There has been a rapid expansion of the use of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) for an ever-growing number of conditions. IVIG is used at a ‘replacement dose’ (400–600 mg/kg/month) in antibody deficiencies and is used at a high dose (2 g/kg) as an ‘immunomodulatory’ agent in an increasing number of immune and inflammatory disorders.1 The limitations for IVIG are the cost of the preparation and the need for intravenous infusions. Due to the cost, shortages and growing use of IVIG there have been attempts to develop evidence-based guidelines for the use of IVIG in a wide variety of immune disorders in children and neonates. This commentary provides the recommendations and recent publication regarding the use of IVIG in various conditions in children. PMID:25378784

  18. [High-dose intravenous immunoglobulin treatment].

    PubMed

    Taneichi, Hiromichi; Miyawaki, Toshio

    2011-03-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment was introduced as replacement therapy for patients with congenital agammaglobulinemia. For the last three decades, high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (HD-IVIg) has been used for autoimmune diseases and systemic inflammatory diseases, such as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, Kawasaki disease, myasthenia gravis and Guillain-Barré/syndrome. Although the immunomodulatory mechanisms of HD-IVIg remains unclear. Its use in many other diseases have been expected. Acute encephalitis/encephalopathy is a complex neurological syndrome associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The pathogenicity of brain dysfunction is still unknown. This review provides an overview and discussion of mechanisms that may be responsible for HD-IVIg effects in acute encephalitis/encephalopathy. PMID:21400848

  19. [How to control postoperative pain: intravenous route].

    PubMed

    Occella, P; Vivaldi, F

    2003-12-01

    Intravenous administration of analgesic drugs is one of the most common ways to control post-operative pain. It can be used in almost all kinds of surgical interventions and particularly those of medium and high complexity. Besides, when other techniques are contraindicated because of clinical and/or managing problems, intravenous way finds its best application. Among analgesic drugs NSAID (ketorolac) and opioids (tramadol, morphine, buprenorphine) are most frequently used. As to administration techniques, elastomeric pump is, according to personal experience, a simple-to-manage, practical and precise device with lower cost respect to other administration set. Elastomeric pump is a single use reservoir that allows continuous administration of drugs with a uniform pre-set infusion speed. Finally, guide-lines, showing pre-load and infusion doses of analgesic drugs, based on pain intensity, are presented. PMID:14663417

  20. Intravenous Lipid Emulsions in Parenteral Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Fell, Gillian L; Nandivada, Prathima; Gura, Kathleen M; Puder, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Fat is an important macronutrient in the human diet. For patients with intestinal failure who are unable to absorb nutrients via the enteral route, intravenous lipid emulsions play a critical role in providing an energy-dense source of calories and supplying the essential fatty acids that cannot be endogenously synthesized. Over the last 50 y, lipid emulsions have been an important component of parenteral nutrition (PN), and over the last 10-15 y many new lipid emulsions have been manufactured with the goal of improving safety and efficacy profiles and achieving physiologically optimal formulations. The purpose of this review is to provide a background on the components of lipid emulsions, their role in PN, and to discuss the lipid emulsions available for intravenous use. Finally, the role of parenteral fat emulsions in the pathogenesis and management of PN-associated liver disease in PN-dependent pediatric patients is reviewed. PMID:26374182

  1. Diurnal Variation in Response to Intravenous Glucose*

    PubMed Central

    Whichelow, Margaret J.; Sturge, R. A.; Keen, H.; Jarrett, R. J.; Stimmler, L.; Grainger, Susan

    1974-01-01

    Intravenous glucose tolerance tests (25 g) were performed in the morning and afternoon on 13 apparently normal persons. The individual K values (rate of decline of blood sugar) were all higher in the morning tests, and the mean values were significantly higher in the morning. Fasting blood sugar levels were slightly lower in the afternoon. There was no difference between the fasting morning and afternoon plasma insulin levels, but the levels after glucose were lower in the afternoon. Growth hormone levels were low at all times in non-apprehensive subjects and unaffected by glucose. The results suggest that the impaired afternoon intravenous glucose tolerance, like oral glucose tolerance, is associated with impaired insulin release and insulin resistance. PMID:4817160

  2. Intravenous access: a comparison of two methods.

    PubMed

    Duffy, B L; Lee, J S

    1983-05-01

    The reliability in providing a continued venous route to the circulation is compared between a winged needle (Abbott "Butterfly--23 INT") and a plastic catheter (Jelco Teflon "Catheter Placement Unit", 22 gauge). The catheter remained within the vein in all cases and had a much lower incidence of total obstruction during the study period. Where an intravenous infusion is not in place, a plastic catheter provides a more reliable access route to the circulation than does a winged needle. PMID:6869776

  3. Disinfection practices in intravenous drug administration.

    PubMed

    Helder, Onno K; Kornelisse, René F; Reiss, Irwin K M; Ista, Erwin

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effectiveness of a feedback intervention on adherence to disinfection procedures during intravenous medication preparation and administration. We found that full adherence to the protocols significantly improved from 7.3% to 21.5% (P < .001) regarding medication preparation and from 7.9% to 15.5% (P = .012) regarding medication administration. However, disinfection practices still need improvement. PMID:26899528

  4. Intravenous Lipids for Preterm Infants: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Ghassan SA; Kaabneh, Mahmmoud AF; Almasaeed, Mai N; Alquran, Mohammad IA

    2015-01-01

    Extremely low birth weight infants (ELBW) are born at a time when the fetus is undergoing rapid intrauterine brain and body growth. Continuation of this growth in the first several weeks postnatally during the time these infants are on ventilator support and receiving critical care is often a challenge. These infants are usually highly stressed and at risk for catabolism. Parenteral nutrition is needed in these infants because most cannot meet the majority of their nutritional needs using the enteral route. Despite adoption of a more aggressive approach with amino acid infusions, there still appears to be a reluctance to use early intravenous lipids. This is based on several dogmas that suggest that lipid infusions may be associated with the development or exacerbation of lung disease, displace bilirubin from albumin, exacerbate sepsis, and cause CNS injury and thrombocytopena. Several recent reviews have focused on intravenous nutrition for premature neonate, but very little exists that provides a comprehensive review of intravenous lipid for very low birth and other critically ill neonates. Here, we would like to provide a brief basic overview, of lipid biochemistry and metabolism of lipids, especially as they pertain to the preterm infant, discuss the origin of some of the current clinical practices, and provide a review of the literature, that can be used as a basis for revising clinical care, and provide some clarity in this controversial area, where clinical care is often based more on tradition and dogma than science. PMID:25698888

  5. Contrast agent choice for intravenous coronary angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Zeman, H.D.; Siddons, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    The screening of the general population for coronary artery disease would be practical if a method existed for visualizing the extent of occlusion after an intravenous injection of contrast agent. Measurements performed with monochromatic synchrotron radiation x-rays and an iodine containing contrast agent at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory have shown that such an intravenous angiography procedure would be possible with an adequately intense monochromatic x-ray source. Because of the size and cost of synchrotron radiation facilities it would be desirable to make the most efficient use of the intensity available, while reducing as much as possible the radiation dose experienced by the patient. By choosing contrast agents containing elements with a higher atomic number than iodine, it is possible to both improve the image quality and reduce the patient radiation dose, while using the same synchrotron source. By using Si monochromator crystals with a small mosaic spread, it is possible to increase the x-ray flux available for imaging by over an order of magnitude, without any changes in the storage ring or wiggler magnet. The most critical imaging task for intravenous coronary angiography utilizing synchrotron radiation x-rays is visualizing a coronary artery through the left ventricle or aorta which also contains a contrast agent. Calculations have been made of the signal to noise ratio expected for this imaging task for various contrast agents with atomic numbers between that of iodine and bismuth.

  6. Comparing the Efficacy of Intravenous Acetaminophen and Intravenous Meperidine in Pain Relief After Outpatient Urological Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kolahdouzan, Khosro; Eydi, Mahmood; Mohammadipour Anvari, Hassan; Golzari, Samad EJ; Abri, Reyhaneh; Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Ojaghihaghighi, Seyed Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pain relief after surgery is an essential component of postoperative care. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of intravenous acetaminophen and intravenous meperidine in pain relief after outpatient urological surgery. Patients and Methods: In a prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical trial, 100 outpatients of urological surgery were studied in two groups of acetaminophen (A) and meperidine (M). Patients in group A received 1g of acetaminophen in 100 mL saline within 15 minutes and patients in group M received a single intravenous injection of meperidine 0.5 mg/kg, 15 minutes prior to the end of operation. Postoperative pain was recorded using visual analog scale (VAS). Vital signs, nausea, vomiting, dizziness and respiratory depressions were compared between the two groups. Results: Pain severity in patients treated with intravenous acetaminophen six hours after the operation within one-hour interval was significantly lower than meperidine group (P < 0.0001). Ninety patients in the meperidine group and five patients in the acetaminophen group required additional doses of analgesics. Nausea was significantly lower in acetaminophen group than meperidine group. Conclusions: Intravenous acetaminophen reduced pain following outpatient urological surgery more significantly than meperidine. PMID:25798377

  7. Fluid infusion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    Development of a fluid infusion system was undertaken in response to a need for an intravenous infusion device operable under conditions of zero-g. The initial design approach, pursued in the construction of the first breadboard instrument, was to regulate the pressure of the motive gas to produce a similar regulated pressure in the infusion liquid. This scheme was not workable because of the varying bag contact area, and a major design iteration was made. A floating sensor plate in the center of the bag pressure plate was made to operate a pressure regulator built into the bellows assembly, effectively making liquid pressure the directly controlled variable. Other design changes were made as experience was gained with the breadboard. Extensive performance tests were conducted on both the breadboard and the prototype device; accurately regulated flows from 6 m1/min to 100 m1/min were achieved. All system functions were shown to operate satisfactorily.

  8. Amniotic fluid

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002220.htm Amniotic fluid To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amniotic fluid is a clear, slightly yellowish liquid that surrounds ...

  9. Neuroaesthetics: range and restrictions.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Anjan

    2013-04-01

    Bullot & Reber (B&R) should be commended for highlighting tensions between scientific aesthetics and art history. The question of how each tradition can learn from the other is timely. While I am sympathetic to their views, their diagnosis of the problem appears exaggerated and their solution partial. They underestimate the reach of scientific aesthetics while failing to identify its inherent restrictions. PMID:23507092

  10. Fluid Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drazin, Philip

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the contents of Volume II of "Principia" by Sir Isaac Newton. Reviews the contributions of subsequent scientists to the physics of fluid dynamics. Discusses the treatment of fluid mechanics in physics curricula. Highlights a few of the problems of modern research in fluid dynamics. Shows that problems still remain. (CW)

  11. Anti-inflammatory effects of intravenous methotrexate associated with lipid nanoemulsions on antigen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Suzana B V; Tavares, Elaine R; Guido, Maria Carolina; Bonfá, Eloisa; Maranhão, Raul C

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that intravenous use of methotrexate associated with lipid nanoemulsions can achieve superior anti-inflammatory effects in the joints of rabbits with antigen-induced arthritis compared with commercial methotrexate. METHODS: Arthritis was induced in New Zealand rabbits sensitized with methylated bovine serum albumin and subsequently intra-articularly injected with the antigen. A nanoemulsion of methotrexate labeled with 3H-cholesteryl ether (4 mg/kg methotrexate) was then intravenously injected into four rabbits to determine the plasma decaying curves and the biodistribution of the methotrexate nanoemulsion by radioactive counting. Additionally, the pharmacokinetics of the methotrexate nanoemulsion were determined by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Twenty-four hours after arthritis induction, the animals were allocated into three groups, with intravenous injection with saline solution (n=9), methotrexate nanoemulsion (0.5 µmol/kg methotrexate, n=7), or commercial methotrexate (0.5 µmol/kg, n=4). The rabbits were sacrificed 24 h afterward. Synovial fluid was then collected for protein leakage and cell content analyses and synovial membranes were collected for histopathological analysis. RESULTS: The methotrexate nanoemulsion was taken up mainly by the liver and the uptake by arthritic joints was two-fold greater than that by control joints. The methotrexate nanoemulsion treatment reduced leukocyte influx into the synovial fluid by nearly 65%; in particular, mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cells were reduced by 47 and 72%, respectively. In contrast, cell influx was unaffected following treatment with commercial methotrexate. Protein leakage into the arthritic knees of the rabbits was also more limited following methotrexate nanoemulsion treatment than following commercial methotrexate treatment. CONCLUSIONS: The intravenous methotrexate nanoemulsion showed anti-inflammatory effects on the synovia of arthritic joints that were

  12. Intravenous infusions in chronic pain management.

    PubMed

    Kosharskyy, Boleslav; Almonte, Wilson; Shaparin, Naum; Pappagallo, Marco; Smith, Howard

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, millions of Americans are affected by chronic pain, which adds heavily to national rates of morbidity, mortality, and disability, with an ever-increasing prevalence. According to a 2011 report titled Relieving Pain in America: A Blueprint for Transforming Prevention, Care, Education, and Research by the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, pain not only exacts its toll on people's lives but also on the economy with an estimated annual economic cost of at least $560 - 635 billion in health care costs and the cost of lost productivity attributed to chronic pain. Intravenous infusions of certain pharmacologic agents have been known to provide substantial pain relief in patients with various chronic painful conditions. Some of these infusions are better, and although not necessarily the first therapeutic choice, have been widely used and extensively studied. The others show promise, however are in need of further investigations. This article will focus on non-opiate intravenous infusions that have been utilized for chronic painful disorders such as fibromyalgia, neuropathic pain, phantom limb pain, post-herpetic neuralgia, complex regional pain syndromes (CRPS), diabetic neuropathy, and central pain related to stroke or spinal cord injuries. The management of patients with chronic pain conditions is challenging and continues to evolve as new treatment modalities are explored and tested. The following intravenous infusions used to treat the aforementioned chronic pain conditions will be reviewed: lidocaine, ketamine, phentolamine, dexmedetomidine, and bisphosphonates. This overview is intended to familiarize the practitioner with the variety of infusions for patients with chronic pain. It will not, however, be able to provide guidelines for their use due to the lack of sufficient evidence. PMID:23703410

  13. Intravenous immune globulin in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Gamm, H; Huber, C; Chapel, H; Lee, M; Ries, F; Dicato, M A

    1994-01-01

    The most common complication of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is infection, which occurs mainly in advanced stages of disease or in those patients with hypogammaglobulinaemia. Intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) has been shown to be a useful prophylactic therapy against infections in such patients. A randomized, double-blind study on 36 patients receiving either 500 mg/kg or 250 mg/kg IVIG every 4 weeks was undertaken to determine the dose regimen required. There was no significant difference in the two treatment groups and we found that CLL patients were equally protected with low-dose IVIG. PMID:8033428

  14. Cystic fibrosis, intravenous antibiotics, and home therapy.

    PubMed

    Hammond, L J; Caldwell, S; Campbell, P W

    1991-01-01

    The survival rate of patients with cystic fibrosis has improved considerably in the last 20 years. Although not all of the factors accounting for this change are understood, aggressive nutritional management and treatment of pulmonary exacerbations certainly play a role. Home intravenous (IV) antibiotic delivery for pulmonary exacerbation has proved to be as effective as hospital treatment and offers significant advantages to the patient and family. This article examines the microbiology of pulmonary infections in patients with cystic fibrosis, as well as antimicrobial therapy, methods of IV administration, home IV therapy, and the nurse practitioner's role in this home program in the future. PMID:1990112

  15. Advances in Pediatric Intravenous Iron Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mantadakis, Elpis

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) continues to be very common worldwide. Intravenous (IV) iron is an infrequently used therapeutic option in children with IDA despite numerous studies in adults and several small but notable pediatric studies showing efficacy and safety. Presently, the availability of newer IV iron products allows for replacement of the total iron deficit at a single setting. These products appear safer compared to the high molecular weight iron dextrans of the past. Herein, we review the medical literature and suggest that front line use of IV iron should be strongly considered in diseases associated with IDA in children. PMID:26376214

  16. Intravenous paracetamol in patients with renal colic.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Sara

    2011-02-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opioids have been the mainstay of pain relief in patients with renal colic, but both have side effects. Research on the efficacy of intravenous (IV) paracetamol shows that it is comparable to morphine, diclofenac and ketoralac. This article discusses the role of IV paracetamol for patients with this condition. It examines the effectiveness, mechanism of action and pharmacokinetics of IV paracetamol, and suggests that non-clinical prescribers can use the method to relieve patients' pain quickly. PMID:21384782

  17. The Human Experience with Intravenous Levodopa

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqi, Shan H.; Abraham, Natalia K.; Geiger, Christopher L.; Karimi, Morvarid; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Black, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compile a comprehensive summary of published human experience with levodopa given intravenously, with a focus on information required by regulatory agencies. Background: While safe intravenous (IV) use of levodopa has been documented for over 50 years, regulatory supervision for pharmaceuticals given by a route other than that approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has become increasingly cautious. If delivering a drug by an alternate route raises the risk of adverse events, an investigational new drug (IND) application is required, including a comprehensive review of toxicity data. Methods: Over 200 articles referring to IV levodopa were examined for details of administration, pharmacokinetics, benefit, and side effects. Results: We identified 142 original reports describing IVLD use in humans, beginning with psychiatric research in 1959–1960 before the development of peripheral decarboxylase inhibitors. At least 2760 subjects have received IV levodopa, and reported outcomes include parkinsonian signs, sleep variables, hormone levels, hemodynamics, CSF amino acid composition, regional cerebral blood flow, cognition, perception and complex behavior. Mean pharmacokinetic variables were summarized for 49 healthy subjects and 190 with Parkinson's disease. Side effects were those expected from clinical experience with oral levodopa and dopamine agonists. No articles reported deaths or induction of psychosis. Conclusion: At least 2760 patients have received IV levodopa with a safety profile comparable to that seen with oral administration. PMID:26779024

  18. Panlobular emphysema in young intravenous Ritalin abusers

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, R.A.; Glenny, R.W.; Godwin, J.D.; Hampson, N.B.; Cantino, M.E.; Reichenbach, D.D. )

    1991-03-01

    We studied a distinctive group of young intravenous Ritalin abusers with profound obstructive lung disease. Clinically, they seemed to have severe emphysema, but the pathologic basis of their symptoms had not been investigated previously. Seven patients have died and been autopsied: in four, the lungs were fixed, inflated, dried, and examined in detail radiologically, grossly, microscopically, and by electron probe X-ray microanalysis. All seven patients had severe panlobular (panacinar) emphysema that tended to be more severe in the lower lung zones and that was associated with microscopic talc granulomas. Vascular involvement by talc granulomas was variable, but significant interstitial fibrosis was not present. Five patients were tested for alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and found to be normal, as were six similar living patients. These findings indicate that some intravenous drug abusers develop emphysema that clinically, radiologically, and pathologically resembles that caused by alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency but which must have a different pathogenesis. Talc from the Ritalin tablets may be important, but the mechanism remains to be elucidated.

  19. Methylprednisolone pharmacokinetics after intravenous and oral administration.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Habet, S M; Rogers, H J

    1989-01-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics of methylprednisolone (MP) were studied in five normal subjects following intravenous doses of 20, 40 and 80 mg methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS) and an oral dose of 20 mg methylprednisolone as 4 x 5 mg tablets. Plasma concentrations of MP and MPSS were measured by both high performance thin layer (h.p.t.l.c.) and high pressure liquid chromatography (h.p.l.c.). 2. The mean values (+/- s.d.) of half-life, mean residence time (MRT), systemic clearance (CL) and volume of distribution at steady state (Vss) of MP following intravenous administration were 1.93 +/- 0.35 h, 3.50 +/- 1.01 h, 0.45 +/- 0.12 lh-1 kg-1 and 1.5 +/- 0.63 1 kg-1, respectively. There was no evidence of dose-related changes in these values. The plasma MP concentration-time curves were superimposable when normalized for dose. 3. The bioavailability of methylprednisolone from the 20 mg tablet was 0.82 +/- 0.11 (s.d.). 4. In vivo hydrolysis of MPSS was rapid with a half-life of 4.14 +/- 1.62 (s.d.) min, and was independent of dose. In contrast, in vitro hydrolysis in plasma, whole blood and red blood cells was slow; the process continuing for more than 7 days. Sodium fluoride did not prevent the hydrolysis of MPSS. PMID:2655680

  20. Efficacy of Intravenous Immunoglobulin in Neurological Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lünemann, Jan D; Quast, Isaak; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2016-01-01

    Owing to its anti-inflammatory efficacy in various autoimmune disease conditions, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG)-pooled IgG obtained from the plasma of several thousands individuals-has been used for nearly three decades and is proving to be efficient in a growing number of neurological diseases. IVIG therapy has been firmly established for the treatment of Guillain-Barré syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, and multifocal motor neuropathy, either as first-line therapy or adjunctive treatment. IVIG is also recommended as rescue therapy in patients with worsening myasthenia gravis and is beneficial as a second-line therapy for dermatomyositis and stiff-person syndrome. Subcutaneous rather than intravenous administration of IgG is gaining momentum because of its effectiveness in patients with primary immunodeficiency and the ease with which it can be administered independently from hospital-based infusions. The demand for IVIG therapy is growing, resulting in rising costs and supply shortages. Strategies to replace IVIG with recombinant products have been developed based on proposed mechanisms that confer the anti-inflammatory activity of IVIG, but their efficacy has not been tested in clinical trials. This review covers new developments in the immunobiology and clinical applications of IVIG in neurological diseases. PMID:26400261

  1. Intravenous radionuclide cystography for the detection of vesicorenal reflux

    SciTech Connect

    Pollet, J.E.; Sharp, P.F.; Smith, F.W.; Davidson, A.I.; Miller, S.S.

    1981-01-01

    Intravenous radionuclide cystography using a single intravenous injection of 99mtechnetium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid, provides information on individual kidney function, coarse anatomy and vesicorenal reflux. This study investigates the effectiveness of intravenous radionuclide cystography in detecting reflux. In 58 children intravenous radionuclide cystography detected 53 ureters with reflux compared to 32 detected by voiding cystography. This difference was investigated further with patients in whom other test suggested reflux. While there was no statistically significant difference for patients having pyelonephritis or hydronephrosis, intravenous radionuclide cystography detected significantly more ureters with reflux in patients with abnormal ureteral orifices or infected urine and, therefore, predisposed to reflux. Intravenous radionuclide cystography is a more comprehensive and sensitive test for vesicorenal reflux than voiding cystography.

  2. License restrictions at Barnwell

    SciTech Connect

    Autry, V.R.

    1991-12-31

    The State of South Carolina was delegated the authority by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to regulate the receipt, possession, use and disposal of radioactive material as an Agreement State. Since 1970, the state has been the principal regulatory authority for the Barnwell Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility operated by Chem-Nuclear Systems, Inc. The radioactive material license issued authorizing the receipt and disposal of low-level waste contains numerous restrictions to ensure environmental protection and compliance with shallow land disposal performance criteria. Low-level waste has evolved from minimally contaminated items to complex waste streams containing high concentrations of radionuclides and processing chemicals which necessitated these restrictions. Additionally, some waste with their specific radionuclides and concentration levels, many classified as low-level radioactive waste, are not appropriate for shallow land disposal unless additional precautions are taken. This paper will represent a number of these restrictions, the rationale for them, and how they are being dealt with at the Barnwell disposal facility.

  3. Covariates of intravenous paracetamol pharmacokinetics in adults

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pharmacokinetic estimates for intravenous paracetamol in individual adult cohorts are different to a certain extent, and understanding the covariates of these differences may guide dose individualization. In order to assess covariate effects of intravenous paracetamol disposition in adults, pharmacokinetic data on discrete studies were pooled. Methods This pooled analysis was based on 7 studies, resulting in 2755 time-concentration observations in 189 adults (mean age 46 SD 23 years; weight 73 SD 13 kg) given intravenous paracetamol. The effects of size, age, pregnancy and other clinical settings (intensive care, high dependency, orthopaedic or abdominal surgery) on clearance and volume of distribution were explored using non-linear mixed effects models. Results Paracetamol disposition was best described using normal fat mass (NFM) with allometric scaling as a size descriptor. A three-compartment linear disposition model revealed that the population parameter estimates (between subject variability,%) were central volume (V1) 24.6 (55.5%) L/70 kg with peripheral volumes of distribution V2 23.1 (49.6%) L/70 kg and V3 30.6 (78.9%) L/70 kg. Clearance (CL) was 16.7 (24.6%) L/h/70 kg and inter-compartment clearances were Q2 67.3 (25.7%) L/h/70 kg and Q3 2.04 (71.3%) L/h/70 kg. Clearance and V2 decreased only slightly with age. Sex differences in clearance were minor and of no significance. Clearance, relative to median values, was increased during pregnancy (FPREG = 1.14) and decreased during abdominal surgery (FABDCL = 0.715). Patients undergoing orthopaedic surgery had a reduced V2 (FORTHOV = 0.649), while those in intensive care had increased V2 (FICV = 1.51). Conclusions Size and age are important covariates for paracetamol pharmacokinetics explaining approximately 40% of clearance and V2 variability. Dose individualization in adult subpopulations would achieve little benefit in the scenarios explored. PMID:25342929

  4. Contrast agent choice for intravenous coronary angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeman, H. D.; Siddons, D. P.

    1990-05-01

    The screening of the general population for coronary artery disease would be practical if a method existed for visualizing the extent of occlusion after an intravenous injection of contrast agent. Measurements performed with monochromatic synchrotron radiation X-rays and an iodine-containing contrast agent at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory have shown that such an intravenous angiography procedure would be possible with an adequately intense monochromatic X-ray source. Because of the size and cost of synchrotron radiation facilities it would be desirable to make the most efficient use of the intensity available, while reducing as much as possible the radiation dose experienced by the patient. By choosing contrast agents containing elements with a higher atomic number than iodine, it is possible to both improve the image quality and reduce the patient radiation dose, while using the same synchrotron radiation source. By using Si monochromator crystals with a small mosaic spread, it is possible to increase the X-ray flux available for imaging by over an order of magnitude, without any changes in the storage ring or wiggler magnet. The most critical imaging task for intravenous coronary angiography utilizing synchrotron radiation X-rays is visualizing a coronary artery through the left ventricle or aorta which also contain contrast agent. Calculations have been made of the signal to noise ratio expected for this imaging task for various contrast agents with atomic numbers between that of iodine and bismuth. The X-ray energy spectrum of the X-17 superconduction wiggler beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been used for these calculations. Both perfect Si crystals and Si crystals with a small mosaic spread are considered as monochromators. Contrast agents containing Gd or Yb seem to have about the optimal calculated signal to noise ratio. Gd-DTPA is already approved for use as a contrast agent for

  5. Spacer fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.N.; Bradshaw, R.D.; Wilton, B.S.; Carpenter, R.B.

    1992-05-19

    This patent describes a method for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a conduit extends, the wellbore having a space occupied by a drilling fluid. It comprises displacing the drilling fluid from the space with a spacer fluid comprising: sulfonated styrene-maleic anhydride copolymer, bentonite, welan gum, surfactant and a weighting agent; and displacing the spacer composition and filling the wellbore space with a settable cement composition.

  6. Managing leg ulceration in intravenous drug users.

    PubMed

    Geraghty, Jemell

    2015-09-01

    Chronic venous leg ulceration is a long-term condition commonly associated with lower-limb injecting and chronic venous hypertension caused by collapsed veins, incompetent valves, deep vein thrombosis and reflux. It is not usually a medical emergency, but intravenous (IV) drug users with leg ulcers can attend emergency departments (EDs) with a different primary complaint such as pain or because they cannot access local primary care or voluntary services. Leg ulceration might then be identified during history taking, so it is important that ED nurses know how to assess and manage these wounds. This article explains how to assess and manage chronic venous leg ulcers in patients with a history of IV drug use, and highlights the importance of referral to specialist services when required, and to local primary care or voluntary services, before discharge to prevent admission and re-attendance. PMID:26344539

  7. Neuromyelitis optica: potential roles for intravenous immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Wingerchuk, Dean M

    2013-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an idiopathic central nervous system inflammatory demyelinating disease that causes optic neuritis, transverse myelitis, and other CNS syndromes. It is distinct from multiple sclerosis and is associated with autoantibodies that target aquaporin-4 (AQP4), an astrocyte water channel. Evidence indicating antibody-mediated immune injury in NMO includes its association with other autoimmune diseases, lesional pathology that reveals prominent complement activation and immunoglobulin deposition, pathogenic potential of AQP4 autoantibodies based on in vitro studies, and reports of putative animal models of the disease. The rationale and potential role for intravenous immunoglobulin in NMO will be discussed in the context of both relapse treatment and relapse prevention. PMID:22976554

  8. Ferrous iron content of intravenous iron formulations.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ajay; Pratt, Raymond D; Crumbliss, Alvin L

    2016-06-01

    The observed biological differences in safety and efficacy of intravenous (IV) iron formulations are attributable to physicochemical differences. In addition to differences in carbohydrate shell, polarographic signatures due to ferric iron [Fe(III)] and ferrous iron [Fe(II)] differ among IV iron formulations. Intravenous iron contains Fe(II) and releases labile iron in the circulation. Fe(II) generates toxic free radicals and reactive oxygen species and binds to bacterial siderophores and other in vivo sequestering agents. To evaluate whether differences in Fe(II) content may account for some observed biological differences between IV iron formulations, samples from multiple lots of various IV iron formulations were dissolved in 12 M concentrated HCl to dissociate and release all iron and then diluted with water to achieve 0.1 M HCl concentration. Fe(II) was then directly measured using ferrozine reagent and ultraviolet spectroscopy at 562 nm. Total iron content was measured by adding an excess of ascorbic acid to reduce Fe(III) to Fe(II), and Fe(II) was then measured by ferrozine assay. The Fe(II) concentration as a proportion of total iron content [Fe(III) + Fe(II)] in different lots of IV iron formulations was as follows: iron gluconate, 1.4 and 1.8 %; ferumoxytol, 0.26 %; ferric carboxymaltose, 1.4 %; iron dextran, 0.8 %; and iron sucrose, 10.2, 15.5, and 11.0 % (average, 12.2 %). The average Fe(II) content in iron sucrose was, therefore, ≥7.5-fold higher than in the other IV iron formulations. Further studies are needed to investigate the relationship between Fe(II) content and increased risk of oxidative stress and infections with iron sucrose. PMID:26956439

  9. Safety of rapid intravenous of infusion acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous acetaminophen, Ofirmev®, is approved for management of mild to moderate pain, management of moderate to severe pain with adjunctive opioids, and reduction of fever. The product is supplied as a 100 mL glass vial. As stated in the prescribing information, it is recommended to be infused over 15 minutes. This recommendation is related to the formulation propacetamol, the prodrug to acetaminophen, approved in Europe, which caused pain on infusion, and data from the clinical development of acetaminophen. The objective of this retrospective chart review study was to show the lack of side effects of rapidly infusing intravenous acetaminophen. Charts of American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) Class I–III ambulatory surgical patients who received only acetaminophen in the preoperative setting were reviewed for any infusion-related side effects. Using standard binomial proportion analyses and employing SAS/JMP software, all vital signs were analyzed for statistically significant changes between pre- and postinfusion values. One hundred charts were reviewed. Only one patient had pain on infusion, which lasted 10 seconds. No reported side effects or erythema was seen at the injection site. No infusions had to be slowed or discontinued. The median infusion time was 3:41 minutes. Of the vital signs monitored, only the systolic (P < 0.0001) and diastolic (P < 0.0099) blood pressures had statistically significant changes from pre- to postinfusion; however, they were of no clinical relevance. Acetaminophen can be administered as a rapid infusion with no significant infusion-related side effects or complications. PMID:23814378

  10. Safety of rapid intravenous of infusion acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Needleman, Steven M

    2013-07-01

    Intravenous acetaminophen, Ofirmev®, is approved for management of mild to moderate pain, management of moderate to severe pain with adjunctive opioids, and reduction of fever. The product is supplied as a 100 mL glass vial. As stated in the prescribing information, it is recommended to be infused over 15 minutes. This recommendation is related to the formulation propacetamol, the prodrug to acetaminophen, approved in Europe, which caused pain on infusion, and data from the clinical development of acetaminophen. The objective of this retrospective chart review study was to show the lack of side effects of rapidly infusing intravenous acetaminophen. Charts of American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) Class I-III ambulatory surgical patients who received only acetaminophen in the preoperative setting were reviewed for any infusion-related side effects. Using standard binomial proportion analyses and employing SAS/JMP software, all vital signs were analyzed for statistically significant changes between pre- and postinfusion values. One hundred charts were reviewed. Only one patient had pain on infusion, which lasted 10 seconds. No reported side effects or erythema was seen at the injection site. No infusions had to be slowed or discontinued. The median infusion time was 3:41 minutes. Of the vital signs monitored, only the systolic (P < 0.0001) and diastolic (P < 0.0099) blood pressures had statistically significant changes from pre- to postinfusion; however, they were of no clinical relevance. Acetaminophen can be administered as a rapid infusion with no significant infusion-related side effects or complications. PMID:23814378

  11. Brain microdialysate, CSF and plasma pharmacokinetics of ligustrazine hydrochloride in rats after intranasal and intravenous administration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiao; Tang, Zhan; Zhang, Wanggang

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of ligustrazine hydrochloride (LZH) in plasma, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and cerebral cortex after intranasal (10 mg/kg) or intravenous administration (10 mg/kg) in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Plasma, CSF and cerebral cortex microdialysates were collected at timed intervals for the measurement of LZH by a quick and sensitive HPLC-UV method. LZH entered the brain quickly following both routes of administration. No significant difference was observed between the AUCCSF or cortex /AUCplasma ratio of LZH after intranasal administration (38.4%, 17.4%) and that after intravenous injection (45.9%, 19.9%). The drug targeting index (DTI) was 0.85 and 0.91 in the CSF and cortex, respectively. In conclusion, LZH is rapidly absorbed into the systemic circulation following intranasal administration. There is no direct pathway for LZH transport from the nasal cavity to the brain. The rapidity and magnitude of LZH penetration into the brain indicate that intranasal administration of this agent is a promising alternative to intravenous administration. PMID:23868712

  12. APOBECs and Virus Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Reuben S.; Dudley, Jaquelin P.

    2015-01-01

    The APOBEC family of single-stranded DNA cytosine deaminases comprises a formidable arm of the vertebrate innate immune system. Pre-vertebrates express a single APOBEC, whereas some mammals produce as many as eleven enzymes. The APOBEC3 subfamily displays both copy number variation and polymorphisms, consistent with ongoing pathogenic pressures. These enzymes restrict the replication of many DNA-based parasites, such as exogenous viruses and endogenous transposable elements. APOBEC1 and activation-induced cytosine deaminase (AID) have specialized functions in RNA editing and antibody gene diversification, respectively, whereas APOBEC2 and APOBEC4 appear to have different functions. Nevertheless, the APOBEC family protects against both periodic viral zoonoses as well as exogenous and endogenous parasite replication. This review highlights viral pathogens that are restricted by APOBEC enzymes, but manage to escape through unique mechanisms. The sensitivity of viruses that lack counterdefense measures highlights the need to develop APOBEC-enabling small molecules as a new class of anti-viral drugs. PMID:25818029

  13. Range Restriction and Attenuation Corrections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mumford, Michael D.; Mendoza, Jorge L.

    The present paper reviews the techniques commonly used to correct an observed correlation coefficient for the simultaneous influence of attenuation and range restriction effects. It is noted that the procedure which is currently in use may be somewhat biased because it treats range restriction and attenuation as independent restrictive influences.…

  14. Hydrothorax, hydromediastinum and pericardial effusion: a complication of intravenous alimentation.

    PubMed Central

    Damtew, B; Lewandowski, B

    1984-01-01

    Complications secondary to intravenous alimentation are rare but potentially lethal. Massive bilateral pleural effusions and a pericardial effusion developed in a patient receiving prolonged intravenous alimentation. Severe respiratory distress and renal failure ensued. He recovered with appropriate treatment. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:6428731

  15. 27 CFR 19.649 - Restrictions on alcohol content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Production of Vinegar by the Vaporizing Process Rules for Operating Vinegar Plants § 19.649 Restrictions on alcohol content. No person may remove from the vinegar plant premises vinegar or other fluid or any other material containing more...

  16. 27 CFR 19.649 - Restrictions on alcohol content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Production of Vinegar by the Vaporizing Process Rules for Operating Vinegar Plants § 19.649 Restrictions on alcohol content. No person may remove from the vinegar plant premises vinegar or other fluid or any other material containing more...

  17. 27 CFR 19.649 - Restrictions on alcohol content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Production of Vinegar by the Vaporizing Process Rules for Operating Vinegar Plants § 19.649 Restrictions on alcohol content. No person may remove from the vinegar plant premises vinegar or other fluid or any other material containing more...

  18. 27 CFR 19.649 - Restrictions on alcohol content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Production of Vinegar by the Vaporizing Process Rules for Operating Vinegar Plants § 19.649 Restrictions on alcohol content. No person may remove from the vinegar plant premises vinegar or other fluid or any other material containing more...

  19. Help Desk Answers: Are IV fluids better than oral rehydration for children with acute diarrhea and vomiting?

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Suvag; Nanda, Mitali; Tiburicio, Jose

    2016-04-01

    Intravenous fluid therapy (IVF) has a slightly lower failure rate than oral replacement therapy (ORT) in children with acute gastroenteritis, but the clinical significance is questionable. IVF takes longer to initiate than ORT and lengthens the hospital stay. PMID:27262252

  20. Peripheral intravenous therapy-related phlebitis rates in an adult population.

    PubMed

    White, S A

    2001-01-01

    To determine the incidence of peripheral intravenous therapy-related phlebitis in an adult population, 305 peripheral i.v. catheter sites were observed from the time of admission of the patient (or initiation of the first peripheral i.v. catheter) to the time of the participant's discharge from the facility (or 48 hours after the removal of the final catheter). Parameters monitored included patient demographics, diagnosis, i.v. fluids and medications, type of peripheral catheter, dwell time, and dressing integrity. Results showed that of the 10 cases of phlebitis found in nine study subjects, all were associated with catheters indwelling less than 72 hours. In three cases, although the catheter site was clear at the time of catheter removal, postinfusion phlebitis developed within 24 hours. Catheter site locations, diagnoses, medications, and i.v. fluids in these cases were varied. PMID:11836840

  1. Fluid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Firouzjahi, H.; Namjoo, M.H.; Sasaki, M. E-mail: firouz@ipm.ir E-mail: misao@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2013-09-01

    In this work we present an inflationary mechanism based on fluid dynamics. Starting with the action for a single barotropic perfect fluid, we outline the procedure to calculate the power spectrum and the bispectrum of the curvature perturbation. It is shown that a perfect barotropic fluid naturally gives rise to a non-attractor inflationary universe in which the curvature perturbation is not frozen on super-horizon scales. We show that a scale-invariant power spectrum can be obtained with the local non-Gaussianity parameter f{sub NL} = 5/2.

  2. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Lauriie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Ribeiro, L.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R.; Chang, D.; Johnston, S.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S.

    2016-01-01

    NASA is focusing on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low-Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but more than 50% of ISS astronauts experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural and functional findings such as papilledema and choroidal folds. Globe flattening, optic nerve sheath dilation, and optic nerve tortuosity also are apparent. This pattern is referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with the spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight, and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, is predicted by the crewmember's preflight conditions and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations (such as head-down tilt). Lastly, we will evaluate the patterns of fluid distribution in ISS astronauts during acute reversal of fluid shifts through application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) interventions to characterize and explain general and individual responses. METHODS: We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the Figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, calcaneus tissue thickness (by

  3. Therapeutic potential of ghrelin in restricting-type anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Mari; Ohwada, Rina; Akamizu, Takashi; Shibasaki, Tamotsu; Kangawa, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is an eating disorder characterized by a decrease in caloric intake and malnutrition. It is associated with a variety of medical morbidities as well as significant mortality. Nutritional support is of paramount importance to prevent impaired quality of life later in life in affected patients. Some patients with restricting-type AN who are fully motivated to gain body weight cannot increase their food intake because of malnutrition-induced gastrointestinal dysfunction. Chronicity of AN prevents participation in social activities and leads to increased medical expenses. Therefore, there is a pressing need for effective appetite-stimulating therapies for patients with AN. Ghrelin is the only orexigenic hormone that can be given intravenously. Intravenous infusion of ghrelin is reported to increase food intake and body weight in healthy subjects as well as in patients with poor nutritional status. Here, we introduce the results of a pilot study that investigated the effects of ghrelin on appetite, energy intake, and nutritional parameters in five patients with restricting-type AN, who are fully motivated to gain body weight but could not increase their food intake because of malnutrition-induced gastrointestinal dysfunction. PMID:22975066

  4. Intraoperative Fluids and Fluid Management for Ambulatory Dental Sedation and General Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Saraghi, Mana

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous fluids are administered in virtually every parenteral sedation and general anesthetic. The purpose of this article is to review the physiology of body-water distribution and fluid dynamics at the vascular endothelium, evaluation of fluid status, calculation of fluid requirements, and the clinical rationale for the use of various crystalloid and colloid solutions. In the setting of elective dental outpatient procedures with minor blood loss, isotonic balanced crystalloid solutions are the fluids of choice. Colloids, on the other hand, have no use in outpatient sedation or general anesthesia for dental or minor oral surgery procedures but may have several desirable properties in long and invasive maxillofacial surgical procedures where advanced hemodynamic monitoring may assess the adequacy of intravascular volume. PMID:26650497

  5. Maternal Intravenous Administration of Azithromycin Results in Significant Fetal Uptake in a Sheep Model of Second Trimester Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Yuichiro; Payne, Matthew S.; Jobe, Alan H.; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Saito, Masatoshi; Stock, Sarah J.; Spiller, O. Brad; Ireland, Demelza J.; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Clarke, Michael; Hahne, Dorothee; Rodger, Jennifer; Keelan, Jeffrey A.; Newnham, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of intrauterine infection is likely key to preventing a significant proportion of preterm deliveries before 32 weeks of gestation. Azithromycin (AZ) may be an effective antimicrobial in pregnancy; however, few gestation age-approriate data are available to inform the design of AZ-based treatment regimens in early pregnancy. We aimed to determine whether a single intra-amniotic AZ dose or repeated maternal intravenous (i.v.) AZ doses would safely yield therapeutic levels of AZ in an 80-day-gestation (term is 150 days) ovine fetus. Fifty sheep carrying single pregnancies at 80 days gestation were randomized to receive either: (i) a single intra-amniotic AZ administration or (ii) maternal intravenous AZ administration every 12 h. Amniotic fluid, maternal plasma, and fetal AZ concentrations were determined over a 5-day treatment regimen. Markers of liver injury and amniotic fluid inflammation were measured to assess fetal injury in response to drug exposure. A single intra-amniotic administration yielded significant AZ accumulation in the amniotic fluid and fetal lung. In contrast, repeated maternal intravenous administrations achieved high levels of AZ accumulation in the fetal lung and liver and a statistically significant increase in the fetal plasma drug concentration at 120 h. There was no evidence of fetal injury in response to drug exposure. These data suggest that (i) repeated maternal i.v. AZ dosing yields substantial fetal tissue uptake, although fetal plasma drug levels remain low; (ii) transfer of AZ from the amniotic fluid is less than transplacental transfer; and (iii) exposure to high concentrations of AZ did not elicit overt changes in fetal white blood cell counts, amniotic fluid monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 concentrations, or hepatotoxicity, all consistent with an absence of fetal injury. PMID:25155606

  6. Maternal intravenous administration of azithromycin results in significant fetal uptake in a sheep model of second trimester pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Matthew W; Miura, Yuichiro; Payne, Matthew S; Jobe, Alan H; Kallapur, Suhas G; Saito, Masatoshi; Stock, Sarah J; Spiller, O Brad; Ireland, Demelza J; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Clarke, Michael; Hahne, Dorothee; Rodger, Jennifer; Keelan, Jeffrey A; Newnham, John P

    2014-11-01

    Treatment of intrauterine infection is likely key to preventing a significant proportion of preterm deliveries before 32 weeks of gestation. Azithromycin (AZ) may be an effective antimicrobial in pregnancy; however, few gestation age-approriate data are available to inform the design of AZ-based treatment regimens in early pregnancy. We aimed to determine whether a single intra-amniotic AZ dose or repeated maternal intravenous (i.v.) AZ doses would safely yield therapeutic levels of AZ in an 80-day-gestation (term is 150 days) ovine fetus. Fifty sheep carrying single pregnancies at 80 days gestation were randomized to receive either: (i) a single intra-amniotic AZ administration or (ii) maternal intravenous AZ administration every 12 h. Amniotic fluid, maternal plasma, and fetal AZ concentrations were determined over a 5-day treatment regimen. Markers of liver injury and amniotic fluid inflammation were measured to assess fetal injury in response to drug exposure. A single intra-amniotic administration yielded significant AZ accumulation in the amniotic fluid and fetal lung. In contrast, repeated maternal intravenous administrations achieved high levels of AZ accumulation in the fetal lung and liver and a statistically significant increase in the fetal plasma drug concentration at 120 h. There was no evidence of fetal injury in response to drug exposure. These data suggest that (i) repeated maternal i.v. AZ dosing yields substantial fetal tissue uptake, although fetal plasma drug levels remain low; (ii) transfer of AZ from the amniotic fluid is less than transplacental transfer; and (iii) exposure to high concentrations of AZ did not elicit overt changes in fetal white blood cell counts, amniotic fluid monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 concentrations, or hepatotoxicity, all consistent with an absence of fetal injury. PMID:25155606

  7. Dietary restriction with and without caloric restriction for healthy aging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Changhan; Longo, Valter

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction is the most effective and reproducible dietary intervention known to regulate aging and increase the healthy lifespan in various model organisms, ranging from the unicellular yeast to worms, flies, rodents, and primates. However, caloric restriction, which in most cases entails a 20–40% reduction of food consumption relative to normal intake, is a severe intervention that results in both beneficial and detrimental effects. Specific types of chronic, intermittent, or periodic dietary restrictions without chronic caloric restriction have instead the potential to provide a significant healthspan increase while minimizing adverse effects. Improved periodic or targeted dietary restriction regimens that uncouple the challenge of food deprivation from the beneficial effects will allow a safe intervention feasible for a major portion of the population. Here we focus on healthspan interventions that are not chronic or do not require calorie restriction. PMID:26918181

  8. Restrictive vs. non-restrictive composition: a magnetoencephalography study

    PubMed Central

    Leffel, Timothy; Lauter, Miriam; Westerlund, Masha; Pylkkänen, Liina

    2014-01-01

    Recent research on the brain mechanisms underlying language processing has implicated the left anterior temporal lobe (LATL) as a central region for the composition of simple phrases. Because these studies typically present their critical stimuli without contextual information, the sensitivity of LATL responses to contextual factors is unknown. In this magnetoencephalography (MEG) study, we employed a simple question-answer paradigm to manipulate whether a prenominal adjective or determiner is interpreted restrictively, i.e., as limiting the set of entities under discussion. Our results show that the LATL is sensitive to restriction, with restrictive composition eliciting higher responses than non-restrictive composition. However, this effect was only observed when the restricting element was a determiner, adjectival stimuli showing the opposite pattern, which we hypothesise to be driven by the special pragmatic properties of non-restrictive adjectives. Overall, our results demonstrate a robust sensitivity of the LATL to high level contextual and potentially also pragmatic factors. PMID:25379512

  9. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael B.; Hargens, Alan R.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Ebert, Douglas J.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Laurie, Steven S.; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Martin, David S.; Liu, John; Macias, Brandon R.; Arbeille, Philippe; Danielson, Richard; Chang, Douglas; Gunga, Hanns-Christian; Johnston, Smith L.; Westby, Christian M.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert J.; Smith, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesize that microgravity-induced cephalad fluid shifts elevate intracranial pressure (ICP) and contribute to VIIP. We will test this hypothesis and a possible countermeasure in ISS astronauts.

  10. Pharmacokinetic interaction of intravenous fentanyl with ketoconazole.

    PubMed

    Ziesenitz, Victoria C; König, Sonja K; Mahlke, Nina S; Skopp, Gisela; Haefeli, Walter E; Mikus, Gerd

    2015-06-01

    Fentanyl is primarily metabolized by CYP3A, but has also been suggested to act as a weak inhibitor of CYP3A. We investigated the influence of CYP3A inhibition by ketoconazole on the pharmacokinetics of intravenously administered fentanyl and the effect of fentanyl on CYP3A activity. A prospective, open-label, randomized, monocentre, crossover study was conducted in 16 healthy volunteers. They received fentanyl alone (5 microgram per kilogram) or fentanyl plus ketoconazole (200 milligram orally B.I.D. over 2 days). Naloxone (2 × 0.2 milligram i.v.) was given simultaneously with fentanyl to mitigate any opioid effect. Midazolam was administered as a CYP3A probe drug. Fentanyl and its metabolites were quantified by LC/MS/MS in blood and urine samples obtained over 24 hour. Exposure of fentanyl (AUC0- ∞ ) was significantly increased to 133% and systemic clearance was reduced to 78% by ketoconazole, norfentanyl formation was significantly delayed and partial metabolic clearance decreased to 18%. Fentanyl had no influence on midazolam exposure and CYP3A activity whereas ketoconazole decreased CYP3A activity to 13%. Although fentanyl N-dealkylation is substantially inhibited by ketoconazole, exposure of fentanyl itself increased by one third only. Clinically fentanyl dosage adjustments may become necessary when ketoconazole or other strong CYP3A inhibitors are given simultaneously. Fentanyl itself does not influence CYP3A activity. PMID:25651378

  11. Multiple Intravenous Infusions Phase 1b

    PubMed Central

    Cassano-Piché, A; Fan, M; Sabovitch, S; Masino, C; Easty, AC

    2012-01-01

    Background Minimal research has been conducted into the potential patient safety issues related to administering multiple intravenous (IV) infusions to a single patient. Previous research has highlighted that there are a number of related safety risks. In Phase 1a of this study, an analysis of 2 national incident-reporting databases (Institute for Safe Medical Practices Canada and United States Food and Drug Administration MAUDE) found that a high percentage of incidents associated with the administration of multiple IV infusions resulted in patient harm. Objectives The primary objectives of Phase 1b of this study were to identify safety issues with the potential to cause patient harm stemming from the administration of multiple IV infusions; and to identify how nurses are being educated on key principles required to safely administer multiple IV infusions. Data Sources and Review Methods A field study was conducted at 12 hospital clinical units (sites) across Ontario, and telephone interviews were conducted with program coordinators or instructors from both the Ontario baccalaureate nursing degree programs and the Ontario postgraduate Critical Care Nursing Certificate programs. Data were analyzed using Rasmussen’s 1997 Risk Management Framework and a Health Care Failure Modes and Effects Analysis. Results Twenty-two primary patient safety issues were identified with the potential to directly cause patient harm. Seventeen of these (critical issues) were categorized into 6 themes. A cause-consequence tree was established to outline all possible contributing factors for each critical issue. Clinical recommendations were identified for immediate distribution to, and implementation by, Ontario hospitals. Future investigation efforts were planned for Phase 2 of the study. Limitations This exploratory field study identifies the potential for errors, but does not describe the direct observation of such errors, except in a few cases where errors were observed. Not all

  12. Intravenous buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine pharmacokinetics in humans

    PubMed Central

    Huestis, M.A.; Cone, E.J.; Pirnay, S.O.; Umbricht, A.; Preston, K.L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prescribed sublingual (SL) buprenorphine is sometimes diverted for intravenous (IV) abuse, but no human pharmacokinetic data are available following high-dose IV buprenorphine. Methods Plasma was collected for 72 h after administration of placebo or 2, 4, 8, 12, or 16 mg IV buprenorphine in escalating order (single-blind, double-dummy) in 5 healthy male non-dependent opioid users. Buprenorphine and its primary active metabolite, norbuprenorphine, were quantified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with limits of quantitation of 0.1 μg/L. Results Maximum buprenorphine concentrations (mean ± SE) were detected 10 min after 2, 4, 8, 12, 16 mg IV: 19.3±1.0, 44.5±4.8, 85.2±7.7, 124.6±16.6, and 137.7±18.8 μg/L, respectively. Maximum norbuprenorphine concentrations occurred 10–15 min (3.7±0.7 μg/L) after 16 mg IV administration. Conclusions Buprenorphine concentrations increased in a significantly linear dose-dependent manner up to 12 mg IV buprenorphine. Thus, previously demonstrated pharmacodynamic ceiling effects (over 2–16 mg) are not due to pharmacokinetic adaptations within this range, although they may play a role at doses higher than 12 mg. PMID:23246635

  13. Influence of Intravenous Immunoglobulin Treatment on Thrombopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Oliver; Winter, Oliver; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2012-06-01

    AIM: The mechanisms by which intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg) result in an increase in platelet counts in most patients with autoimmune thrombocytopenia (ITP) have not yet been fully explained. One of these mechanisms may be related to stimulation of thrombopoiesis. METHODS: A total of 13 adult patients who received IVIg were studied: 11 patients with primary ITP, 1 patient with ITP related to common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), and 1 patient with uncharacterized thrombocytopenia. IVIg (0.5-1.5 g/kg body weight) was administered on consecutive days (days 1-3). Endogenous thrombopoietin (eTPO) was measured prior to and at least 1 day following treatment. In addition, IL-6 was measured in 5 of the treated patients. RESULTS: In 10 of 13 patients, IVIg treatment resulted in an increase in platelet counts. eTPO remained unchanged or elevated in almost all cases where the platelet count remained low (<100 × 10(3)/μ0. In all cases with normal or increased platelet counts (>100 × 10(3)/μ0, the eTPO concentration decreased. Furthermore, IVIg induced IL-6 synthesis in all 5 examined patients. CONCLUSION: Our data indicate that the induction of eTPO synthesis by IL-6 may be a potential mechanism in which IVIg may stimulate thrombopoiesis. Further studies are required to characterize this mechanism. PMID:22851938

  14. Repeated intravenous doxapram induces phrenic motor facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, MS; Lee, KZ; Gonzalez-Rothi, EJ; Fuller, DD

    2013-01-01

    Doxapram is a respiratory stimulant used to treat hypoventilation. Here we investigated whether doxapram could also trigger respiratory neuroplasticity. Specifically, we hypothesized that intermittent delivery of doxapram at low doses would lead to long-lasting increases (i.e., facilitation) of phrenic motor output in anesthetized, vagotomized, and mechanically-ventilated rats. Doxapram was delivered intravenously in a single bolus (2 or 6 mg/kg) or as a series of 3 injections (2 mg/kg) at 5 min intervals. Control groups received pH-matched saline injections (vehicle) or no treatment (anesthesia time control). Doxapram evoked an immediate increase in phrenic output in all groups, but a persistent increase in burst amplitude only occurred after repeated dosing with 2 mg/kg. At 60 min following the last injection, phrenic burst amplitude was 168±24% of baseline (%BL) in the group receiving 3 injections (P < 0.05 vs. controls), but was 103±8%BL and 112±4%BL in the groups receiving a single dose of 2 or 6 mg/kg, respectively. Following bilateral section of the carotid sinus nerves, the acute phrenic response to doxapram (2 mg/kg) was reduced by 68% suggesting that at low doses the drug was acting primarily via the carotid chemoreceptors. We conclude that intermittent application of doxapram can trigger phrenic neuroplasticity, and this approach might be of use in the context of respiratory rehabilitation following neurologic injury. PMID:24013015

  15. [Treatment of renal colic with intravenous ketoprofen].

    PubMed

    Pourrat, J P; Dueymes, J M; Conte, J J

    1984-10-01

    In view of the part played by renal prostaglandins in the mechanisms responsible for pain in renal colic, it was worth trying to find out whether nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, which inhibit prostaglandin synthesis, have an analgesic effect of their own. In a double-blind trial the effects of ketoprofen 100 mg administered intravenously alone or associated with noramidopyrine were investigated in 62 patients divided at random into two equal groups. A rapid analgesic effect was observed with no significant difference between the groups. No severe side-effects were recorded. The double-blind method made it possible to confirm that ketoprofen administered alone relieved pain in 97% of the patients (with complete sedation in 45%) and acted within 5 minutes. Owing to their effectiveness and safety nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (especially ketoprofen) may be proposed as an alternative to conventional treatments of renal colic. But because of their activity they should not be prescribed until a firm diagnosis has been made. The cause of the colic should also be rapidly determined in order to treat it as well as the pain it produces. PMID:6238315

  16. Intravenous pamidronate: infusion rate and safety.

    PubMed

    Tyrrell, C J; Collinson, M; Madsen, E L; Ford, J M; Coleman, T

    1994-01-01

    In view of previous animal studies showing that pamidronate (Aredia) can cause renal damage, and human data indicating that pamidronate in doses of 60-90 mg is more effective in the control of tumor-induced hypercalcemia than when given at lower doses, we decided to investigate whether pamidronate 90 mg infused over 60 minutes at weekly intervals had any adverse effects on renal function in patients with bone metastases. Twelve patients, 7 female (all with breast cancer) and 5 male (4 with prostate cancer, 1 with bladder cancer) were entered into the trial. Each patient received weekly intravenous infusions of pamidronate 90 mg in 250 ml normal saline over 60 minutes for 4 weeks. 51Cr-EDTA clearances showed no significant changes in renal function. Urinary N-acetyl-B-D-glucosaminidase/creatinine ratios fluctuated considerably, but no consistent changes were found. No patient with a normal level of urinary beta 2-microglobulin had elevated levels at the end of the trial. Serum creatinine levels did not change significantly, though 1 patient had a corrected serum calcium level of < 2 mmol/L on a single occasion on day 8. No evidence of renal toxicity was detected. However, the possibility that neprohtoxicity would ultimately appear cannot be excluded, and these favourable short-term results cannot be extrapolated to patients with impaired renal function. PMID:7873459

  17. Wellbore fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, B.L.

    1984-06-19

    The water loss properties of well completion and well workover fluids are improved by the addition of an effective amount of at least one adjuvant selected from (1) sodium carbonate with either sodium bicarbonate or an organic polycarboxylic acid or polycarboxylic acid anhydride or (2) sodium bicarbonate alone. In another embodiment, the adjuvants are added to stabilize water loss control agents in wellbore fluids, especially at elevated temperatures.

  18. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Laurie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R.; Chang, D.; Gunga, H.; Johnston, S.; Westby, C.; Ribeiro, L.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mechanisms responsible for the ocular structural and functional changes that characterize the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (ICP) syndrome (VIIP) are unclear, but hypothesized to be secondary to the cephalad fluid shift experienced in spaceflight. This study will relate the fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight with VIIP symptoms. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, can be predicted preflight with acute hemodynamic manipulations, and also if lower body negative pressure (LBNP) can reverse the VIIP effects. METHODS: Physiologic variables will be examined pre-, in- and post-flight in 10 International Space Station crewmembers including: fluid compartmentalization (D2O and NaBr dilution); interstitial tissue thickness (ultrasound); vascular dimensions and dynamics (ultrasound and MRI (including cerebrospinal fluid pulsatility)); ocular measures (optical coherence tomography, intraocular pressure, ultrasound); and ICP measures (tympanic membrane displacement, otoacoustic emissions). Pre- and post-flight measures will be assessed while upright, supine and during 15 deg head-down tilt (HDT). In-flight measures will occur early and late during 6 or 12 month missions. LBNP will be evaluated as a countermeasure during HDT and during spaceflight. RESULTS: The first two crewmembers are in the preflight testing phase. Preliminary results characterize the acute fluid shifts experienced from upright, to supine and HDT postures (increased stroke volume, jugular dimensions and measures of ICP) which are reversed with 25 millimeters Hg LBNP. DISCUSSION: Initial results indicate that acute cephalad fluid shifts may be related to VIIP symptoms, but also may be reversible by LBNP. The effect of a chronic fluid shift has yet to be evaluated. Learning Objectives: Current spaceflight VIIP research is described

  19. Plasma atropine concentrations via intravenous, endotracheal, and intraosseous administration.

    PubMed

    Prete, M R; Hannan, C J; Burkle, F M

    1987-03-01

    To date, there have been limited studies on the pharmacokinetics of intravenous atropine and no pharmacokinetic studies on the endotracheal or intraosseous administration of atropine. This study examines the time to peak plasma concentration of atropine following intravenous, endotracheal, and intraosseous administration in anesthetized monkeys using a triple crossover design. Plasma atropine was assayed by a radioreceptor method. The time to peak plasma concentration of atropine was shortest with intravenous administration; and longest with endotracheal administration. The mean plasma concentration of atropine was significantly higher in intravenous administrations than in endotracheal administrations at 0.75 and 2 minutes; compared to that noted in intraosseous administrations, the concentration was significantly higher only at 0.75 minutes. The mean plasma concentration of atropine administered intraosseously was significantly higher than that of endotracheal administrations at 5 minutes and was greater than that of intravenous and endotracheal administrations for the samples collected from 5 to 30 minutes. The endotracheal and intraosseous routes provide alternatives to the intravenous administration of atropine when intravenous access is limited or not available. PMID:3828010

  20. Guiding principles of fluid and volume therapy.

    PubMed

    Aditianingsih, Dita; George, Yohanes W H

    2014-09-01

    Fluid therapy is a core concept in the management of perioperative and critically ill patients for maintenance of intravascular volume and organ perfusion. Recent evidence regarding the vascular barrier and its role in terms of vascular leakage has led to a new concept for fluid administration. The choice of fluid used should be based on the fluid composition and the underlying pathophysiology of the patient. Avoidance of both hypo- and hypervolaemia is essential when treating circulatory failure. In daily practice, the assessment of individual thresholds in order to optimize cardiac preload and avoid hypovolaemia or deleterious fluid overload remains a challenge. Liberal versus restrictive fluid management has been challenged by recent evidence, and the ideal approach appears to be goal-directed fluid therapy. PMID:25208960

  1. Electrorheological fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Halsey, T.C.; Martin, J.E.

    1993-10-01

    An electrorheological fluid is a substance whose form changes in the presence of electric fields. Depending on the strength of the field to which it is subjected, an electrorheological fluid can run freely like water, ooze like honey or solidify like gelatin. Indeed, the substance can switch from ne state to another within a few milliseconds. Electrorheological fluids are easy to make; they consist of microscopic particles suspended in an insulating liquid. Yet they are not ready for most commercial applications. They tend to suffer from a number of problems, including structural weakness as solids, abrasiveness as liquids and chemical breakdown, especially at high temperatures. Automotive engineers could imagine, for instance, constructing an electrorheological clutch. It was also hoped that electrorheological fluids would lead to valveless hydraulic systems, in which solidifying fluid would shut off flow through a thin section of pipe. Electrorheological fluids also offer the possibility of a shock absorber that provides response times of milliseconds and does not require mechanical adjustments. 3 refs.

  2. Comparison of analgesic efficacy of intravenous Paracetamol and intravenous dexketoprofen trometamol in multimodal analgesia after hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ünal, Çiğdem; Çakan, Türkay; Baltaci, Bülent; Başar, Hülya

    2013-01-01

    Backround: We aimed to evaluate analgesic efficacy, opioid-sparing, and opioid-related adverse effects of intravenous paracetamol and intravenous dexketoprofen trometamol in combination with iv morphine after total abdominal hysterectomy. Materials and Methods: Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologist Physical Status Classification I-II patients scheduled for total abdominal hysterectomy were enrolled to this double-blinded, randomized, placebo controlled, and prospective study. Patients were divided into three groups as paracetamol, dexketoprofen trometamol, and placebo (0.9% NaCl) due to their post-operative analgesic usage. Intravenous patient controlled analgesia morphine was used as a rescue analgesic in all groups. Pain scores, hemodynamic parameters, morphine consumption, patient satisfaction, and side-effects were evaluated. Results: Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores were not statistically significantly different among the groups in all evaluation times, but decrease in VAS scores was statistically significant after the evaluation at 12th h in all groups. Total morphine consumption (morphine concentration = 0.2 mg/ml) in group paracetamol (72.3 ± 38.0 ml) and dexketoprofen trometamol (69.3 ± 24.1 ml) was significantly lower than group placebo (129.3 ± 22.6 ml) (P < 0.001). Global satisfaction scores of the patients in group placebo was significantly lower than group dexketoprofen trometamol after surgery and the increase in global satisfaction score was significant only in group placebo. Conclusion: Dexketoprofen trometamol and Paracetamol didn’t cause significant change on pain scores, but increased patients’ comfort. Although total morphine consumption was significantly decreased by both drugs, the incidence of nausea and vomiting were similar among the groups. According to results of the present study routine addition of dexketoprofen trometamol and paracetamol to patient controlled analgesia morphine after hysterectomies is not recommended. PMID

  3. Fluid Management System (FMS) fluid systems overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. S.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on fluid management system (FMS) fluid systems overview are presented. Topics addressed include: fluid management system description including system requirements (integrated nitrogen system, integrated water system, and integrated waste gas system) and physical description; and fluid management system evolution.

  4. Restricting retrotransposons: a review.

    PubMed

    Goodier, John L

    2016-01-01

    Retrotransposons have generated about 40 % of the human genome. This review examines the strategies the cell has evolved to coexist with these genomic "parasites", focussing on the non-long terminal repeat retrotransposons of humans and mice. Some of the restriction factors for retrotransposition, including the APOBECs, MOV10, RNASEL, SAMHD1, TREX1, and ZAP, also limit replication of retroviruses, including HIV, and are part of the intrinsic immune system of the cell. Many of these proteins act in the cytoplasm to degrade retroelement RNA or inhibit its translation. Some factors act in the nucleus and involve DNA repair enzymes or epigenetic processes of DNA methylation and histone modification. RISC and piRNA pathway proteins protect the germline. Retrotransposon control is relaxed in some cell types, such as neurons in the brain, stem cells, and in certain types of disease and cancer, with implications for human health and disease. This review also considers potential pitfalls in interpreting retrotransposon-related data, as well as issues to consider for future research. PMID:27525044

  5. Dietary restrictions and cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, R W; Turturro, A

    1997-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) alters a significant environmental factor in carcinogenesis, dietary intake, thus inhibiting both spontaneous and induced tumorigenesis. Potential mechanisms for the inhibition of spontaneous cancer may include the effects of DR to do the following: decrease body weight, which decreases cellular proliferation and increases apoptosis in a number of organs that increase and decrease with body size; decrease body temperature, thereby lowering the amount of endogenous DNA damage temperature generates; decrease oxidative damage, by increasing antioxidant damage defense systems; decrease, generally, cellular proliferation; and protect the fidelity of the genome by decreasing DNA damage, increasing DNA repair, and preventing aberrant gene expression. Potential mechanisms for reducing induced tumor incidence include lowering agent activation, changing agent disposition, decreasing the adducts most associated with agent toxicity, and inhibiting tumor progression through mechanisms similar to those that can effect spontaneous tumorigenesis. As a method to control a major source of environmental cancer, and as the major modulator of the agent induction of this disease, understanding how DR works may significantly contribute to the efforts to explain how diet impacts on development of cancer in the United States, and may suggest methods to reduce the adverse impacts of other environmental agents on the disease. PMID:9255593

  6. Establishment of intravenous lines for long-term intravenous therapy and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Parsa, M H; Tabora, F

    1985-08-01

    Our experience at this institution indicates that the greater the individual and the institutional experience, the lower the complications of central venous lines. The techniques of double catheter insertions in one vein or region, as described, are safe, cost-effective, and useful. These catheters can remain in place for up to 8 weeks. Insertion of double catheters is ideal for intravenous feeding to avoid premixing amino acids and glucose, thus minimizing the hazards of contamination as well as saving time and cost for mixing. Special unconventional techniques for vascular access when indicated in patients who have limited accessible sites may be lifesaving. Except for fibrinous clots around the catheters, the complications in our series have diminished as our experience has grown. Vascular access techniques and long-term care should be formally taught to committed individuals. Well-trained, concerned, experienced personnel available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week is the most important factor in the reduction of complications of vascular access technique and the long-term maintenance of intravenous lines. PMID:3931265

  7. No space left for intravenous thrombolysis in acute stroke: CONS.

    PubMed

    Muir, Keith

    2016-08-01

    Recent successful clinical trials of endovascular thrombectomy for large artery ischaemic stroke have established the value of this treatment modality as an adjunct to intravenous thrombolysis, not as an alternative: thrombectomy delivery was undertaken in the context of highly efficient networks for acute thrombolysis delivery and the great majority of patients received IV thrombolytic drug treatment. Even for the minority of acute stroke patients for whom thrombectomy is potentially relevant, access will be limited by geography and service infrastructure. Developments in intravenous thrombolysis in the near future will likely produce safer and more effective intravenous treatments. Intravenous thrombolysis will remain the first line of treatment for the great majority of acute stroke patients. PMID:27084182

  8. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Platts, S.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is focusing on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but more than 30% of ISS astronauts experience more profound, chronic changes with objective structural and functional findings such as papilledema and choroidal folds. Globe flattening, optic nerve sheath dilation, and optic nerve tortuosity also are apparent. This pattern is referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with the space flight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration space flight, and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during space flight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, is predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight condition and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations (such as head-down tilt). Lastly, we will evaluate the patterns of fluid distribution in ISS astronauts during acute reversal of fluid shifts through application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) interventions to characterize and explain general and individual responses. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the Figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound

  9. Unit-Dose Bags For Formulating Intravenous Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, Mike; Kipp, Jim; Scharf, Mike; Packard, Jeff; Owens, Jim

    1993-01-01

    Smaller unit-dose flowthrough bags devised for use with large-volume parenteral (LVP) bags in preparing sterile intravenous solutions. Premeasured amount of solute stored in such unit-dose bag flushed by predetermined amount of water into LVP bag. Relatively small number of LVP bags used in conjunction with smaller unit-dose bags to formulate large number of LVP intravenous solutions in nonsterile environment.

  10. Monitoring of propofol and its metabolite during total intravenous anesthesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizarov, A. Yu.; Ershov, T. D.; Levshankov, A. I.

    2011-12-01

    Intravenous hypnotic propofol and its metabolite are detected in real time during total intravenous anesthesia by an electron ionization mass spectrometer. The mass spectrometer is connected directly to the breathing circuit of an apparatus for inhalational anesthesia. Ratios between the propofol concentrations in expired air and blood serum are measured. It is concluded that real-time noninvasive monitoring of the propofol concentration in blood using electron ionization mass spectrometry is feasible.

  11. Intravenous lidocaine as a suppressant of coughing during tracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Yukioka, H; Yoshimoto, N; Nishimura, K; Fujimori, M

    1985-12-01

    Effects of intravenously administered lidocaine on cough suppression during tracheal intubation under general anesthesia were evaluated in two studies. In study 1, 100 patients received either a placebo or 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, or 2.0 mg/kg lidocaine intravenously 1 min before tracheal intubation. All visible coughs were classified as coughing. The incidence of coughing decreased as the dose of lidocaine increased. A dose of 1 mg/kg or more of intravenous lidocaine suppressed the cough reflex significantly (P less than 0.01). Coughing was suppressed completely by 2 mg/kg of intravenous lidocaine. In study 2, 108 patients received 2 mg/kg lidocaine intravenously or a placebo 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, or 15 min before intubation. The same criteria for determining whether a patient did or did not cough during tracheal intubation were used as in study 1. The incidence of coughing decreased significantly (P less than 0.01) when 2 mg/kg of lidocaine was injected intravenously between 1 and 5 min before our attempting intubation. Cough reflex was suppressed completely by plasma concentrations of lidocaine in excess of 3 micrograms/ml. PMID:4061901

  12. Slip mechanisms in complex fluid flows.

    PubMed

    Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G

    2015-10-28

    The classical no-slip boundary condition of fluid mechanics is not always a valid assumption for the flow of several classes of complex fluids including polymer melts, their blends, polymer solutions, microgels, glasses, suspensions and pastes. In fact, it appears that slip effect in these systems is the rule and not the exemption. The occurrence of slip complicates the analysis of rheological data, although it provides new opportunities to understand their behavior in restricted environments delineating additional molecular mechanisms i.e. entropic restrictions due to limitations in the number of molecular conformations. This article discusses these complexities and provides future research opportunities. PMID:26345121

  13. Intravenous to oral antibiotic switch therapy.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A.

    2001-05-01

    I.v.-to-p.o. switch therapy has become the mainstay of antibiotic therapy for the majority of patients. I.v.-to-p.o. switch therapy is inappropriate for critically ill patients who require i.v. antibiotic therapy and should not be considered in patients who have the inability to absorb drugs. These exceptions constitute a very small percentage of hospitalized patients for which i.v.-to-p.o. switch therapy is ideal. I.v.-to-p.o. switch therapy is best achieved with antibiotics that have high bioavailability that result in the same blood and tissue concentrations of antibiotic as their intravenous counterpart and have few gastrointestinal side effects. Antibiotics ideal for i.v.-to-p.o. switch programs include chloramphenicol, clindamycin, metronidazole, TMP-SMX, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, doxycycline, minocycline, levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin and linezolid. Antibiotics that may be used in i.v.-to-p.o. switch programs that have lower bioavailability but are effective include beta-lactams and macrolides. For antibiotics with no oral formulation, e.g., carbapenems, equivalent coverage must be provided with an oral antibiotic from an unrelated class. Excluding gastrointestinal malabsorptive disorders, disease state is not a determinant of suitability for i.v.-to-p.o. switch programs. I.v.-to-p.o. switch programs should be used in patients with any infectious disease disorder for which there is effective oral therapy and is not limited to certain infectious diseases. Oral absorption of antibiotics is near normal in all but the most critically ill patients. Therefore, even in sick, hospitalized individuals, p.o. therapy is appropriate. I.v-to-p.o. switch therapy has several important advantages including decreasing drug cost (i.v. vs. p.o.), decreasing length of stay permitting earlier discharge and optimal reimbursement and decreasing or eliminating i.v. line phlebitis and sepsis with its cost implications. Clinicians should consider all

  14. Total intravenous anesthesia for major burn surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cancio, Leopoldo C; Cuenca, Phillip B; Walker, Stephen C; Shepherd, John M

    2013-01-01

    Total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) is frequently used for major operations requiring general anesthesia in critically ill burn patients. We reviewed our experience with this approach. Methods: During a 22-month period, 547 major burn surgeries were performed in this center’s operating room and were staffed by full-time burn anesthesiologists. The records of all 123 TIVA cases were reviewed; 112 records were complete and were included. For comparison, 75 cases were selected at random from a total of 414 non-TIVA general anesthetics. Some patients had more than one operation during the study: as appropriate for the analysis in question, each operation or each patient was entered as an individual case. For inter-patient analysis, exposure to 1 or more TIVAs was used to categorize a patient as member of the TIVA group. Results: Excision and grafting comprised 78.2% of the operations. 14 TIVA regimens were used, employing combinations of 4 i.v. drugs: ketamine (K, 91 cases); i.v. methadone (M, 62); fentanyl (F, 58); and propofol (P, 21). The most common regimens were KM (34 cases); KF (26); KMF (16); and K alone (8). Doses used often exceeded those used in non-burn patients. TIVA was preferred for those patients who were more critically ill prior to surgery, with a higher ASA score (3.87 vs. 3.11). Consistent with this, inhalation injury (26.7 vs. 1.6%), burn size (TBSA, 36.3 vs. 15.8%), and full-thickness burn size (FULL, 19.8 vs. 6.5%) were higher in TIVA than in non-TIVA patients. Despite this, intraoperative pressor use was as common in TIVA as in non-TIVA cases (23.9 vs. 22.7%). Conclusions: TIVA was used in patients whose inhalation injury rate and TBSA were greater than those of non-TIVA patients. TIVA cases were not associated with increased hemodynamic instability. TIVA is a viable approach to general anesthesia in critically ill burn patients. PMID:23638329

  15. Recovery of fibrinogen concentrate after intraosseous application is equivalent to the intravenous route in a porcine model of hemodilution

    PubMed Central

    Schlimp, Christoph J.; Solomon, Cristina; Keibl, Claudia; Zipperle, Johannes; Nürnberger, Sylvia; Öhlinger, Wolfgang; Redl, Heinz; Schöchl, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fibrinogen concentrate is increasingly considered as a hemostatic agent for trauma patients experiencing bleeding. Placing a venous access is sometimes challenging during severe hemorrhage. Intraosseous access may be considered instead. Studies of intraosseous infusion of coagulation factor concentrates are limited. We investigated in vivo recovery following intraosseous administration of fibrinogen concentrate and compared the results with intravenous administration. METHODS This study was performed on 12 pigs (mean [SD] body weight, 34.1 [2.8] kg). Following controlled blood loss (35 mL/kg) and fluid replacement with balanced crystalloid solution, intraosseous (n = 6) administration of fibrinogen concentrate (80 mg per kilogram of bodyweight) in the proximal tibia was compared with intravenous (n = 6) administration of the same dose (fibrinogen infusion time approximately 5 minutes in both groups). The following laboratory parameters were assessed: blood cell count, prothrombin time index, activated partial thromboplastin time, and plasma fibrinogen concentration (Clauss assay). Coagulation status was also assessed by thromboelastometry. RESULTS All tested laboratory parameters were comparable between the intraosseous and intravenous groups at baseline, hemodilution, and 30 minutes after fibrinogen concentrate administration. In vivo recovery of fibrinogen was also similar in the two groups (89% [23%] and 91% [22%], respectively). There were no significant between-group differences in any of the thromboelastometric parameters. Histologic examination indicated no adverse effects on the tissue surrounding the intraosseous administration site. CONCLUSION This study suggests that intraosseous administration of fibrinogen concentrate results in a recovery of fibrinogen similar to that of intravenous administration. The intraosseous route of fibrinogen concentrate could be a valuable alternative in situations where intravenous access is not feasible or would

  16. A Kinetic-fluid Model

    SciTech Connect

    First Author = C.Z. Cheng; Jay R. Johnson

    1998-07-10

    A nonlinear kinetic-fluid model for high-beta plasmas with multiple ion species which can be applied to multiscale phenomena is presented. The model embeds important kinetic effects due to finite ion Larmor radius (FLR), wave-particle resonances, magnetic particle trapping, etc. in the framework of simple fluid descriptions. When further restricting to low frequency phenomena with frequencies less than the ion cyclotron frequency the kinetic-fluid model takes a simpler form in which the fluid equations of multiple ion species collapse into single-fluid density and momentum equations and a low frequency generalized Ohm's law. The kinetic effects are introduced via plasma pressure tensors for ions and electrons which are computed from particle distribution functions that are governed by the Vlasov equation or simplified plasma dynamics equations such as the gyrokinetic equation. The ion FLR effects provide a finite parallel electric field, a perpendicular velocity that modifies the ExB drift, and a gyroviscosity tensor, all of which are neglected in the usual one-fluid MHD description. Eigenmode equations are derived which include magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling effects for low frequency waves (e.g., kinetic/inertial Alfven waves and ballooning-mirror instabilities).

  17. Outcomes and costs of positron emission tomography: comparison of intravenous adenosine and intravenous dipyridamole.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, M J; Mohiuddin, S M; Hilleman, D E; Lucas, B D; Wadibia, E C

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the cost of intravenous adenosine and intravenous dipyridamole in positron emission tomography (PET) in patients with coronary artery disease. A retrospective, open-label, case-control, cost-effectiveness analysis was performed in the out-patient nuclear medicine department of a university hospital. Thirty-six patients underwent dipyridamole PET, and 72 matched patients underwent adenosine PET. A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted using a direct cost accounting approach to estimate institutional costs. Key costs evaluated included acquisition cost, administration cost, monitoring cost, cost of management of side effects, and cost of follow-up care. The total cost of adenosine PET and dipyridamole PET was divided by their respective predictive accuracies to provide a total cost adjusted for efficacy. Adenosine increased heart rate and lowered systolic blood pressure to a significantly greater extent than dipyridamole. The number of patients experiencing adverse drug reactions was significantly greater for adenosine (82%) than for dipyridamole (67%), but the frequency of prolonged (> 5 minutes) and late-onset side effects was significantly greater for dipyridamole than for adenosine. The frequency of side effects requiring medical intervention was also significantly greater for dipyridamole (53%) than for adenosine (6%). Although adenosine had a significantly greater acquisition cost than dipyridamole, costs of monitoring, management of side effects, and follow-up care were significantly less for adenosine than for dipyridamole. As a result, the total cost of using dipyridamole is significantly greater ($928.00 per patient) than the total cost of using adenosine ($672.00 per patient). Based on these results, adenosine may be the drug of choice for pharmacologic vasodilation for PET. PMID:9220220

  18. Improved Arterial Blood Oxygenation Following Intravenous Infusion of Cold Supersaturated Dissolved Oxygen Solution

    PubMed Central

    Grady, Daniel J; Gentile, Michael A; Riggs, John H; Cheifetz, Ira M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND One of the primary goals of critical care medicine is to support adequate gas exchange without iatrogenic sequelae. An emerging method of delivering supplemental oxygen is intravenously rather than via the traditional inhalation route. The objective of this study was to evaluate the gas-exchange effects of infusing cold intravenous (IV) fluids containing very high partial pressures of dissolved oxygen (>760 mm Hg) in a porcine model. METHODS Juvenile swines were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. Each animal received an infusion of cold (13 °C) Ringer’s lactate solution (30 mL/kg/hour), which had been supersaturated with dissolved oxygen gas (39.7 mg/L dissolved oxygen, 992 mm Hg, 30.5 mL/L). Arterial blood gases and physiologic measurements were repeated at 15-minute intervals during a 60-minute IV infusion of the supersaturated dissolved oxygen solution. Each animal served as its own control. RESULTS Five swines (12.9 ± 0.9 kg) were studied. Following the 60-minute infusion, there were significant increases in PaO2 and SaO2 (P < 0.05) and a significant decrease in PaCO2 (P < 0.05), with a corresponding normalization in arterial blood pH. Additionally, there was a significant decrease in core body temperature (P < 0.05) when compared to the baseline preinfusion state. CONCLUSIONS A cold, supersaturated dissolved oxygen solution may be intravenously administered to improve arterial blood oxygenation and ventilation parameters and induce a mild therapeutic hypothermia in a porcine model. PMID:25249764

  19. Sleep restriction increases free fatty acids in healthy men

    PubMed Central

    Broussard, Josiane L.; Chapotot, Florian; Abraham, Varghese; Day, Andrew; Delebecque, Fanny; Whitmore, Harry R.; Tasali, Esra

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Sleep loss is associated with insulin resistance and an increased risk for type 2 diabetes, yet underlying mechanisms are not understood. Elevation of circulating non-esterified (i.e. free) fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations can lead to insulin resistance and plays a central role in the development of metabolic diseases. Circulating NEFA in healthy individuals shows a marked diurnal variation with maximum levels occurring at night, yet the impact of sleep loss on NEFA levels across the 24 h cycle remains unknown. We hypothesised that sleep restriction would alter hormones that are known to stimulate lipolysis and lead to an increase in NEFA levels. Methods We studied 19 healthy young men under controlled laboratory conditions with four consecutive nights of 8.5 h in bed (normal sleep) and 4.5 h in bed (sleep restriction) in randomised order. The 24 h blood profiles of NEFA, growth hormone (GH), noradrenaline (norepinephrine), cortisol, glucose and insulin were simultaneously assessed. Insulin sensitivity was estimated by a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test. Results Sleep restriction relative to normal sleep resulted in increased NEFA levels during the nocturnal and early-morning hours. The elevation in NEFA was related to prolonged nocturnal GH secretion and higher early-morning noradrenaline levels. Insulin sensitivity was decreased after sleep restriction and the reduction in insulin sensitivity was correlated with the increase in nocturnal NEFA levels. Conclusions/interpretation Sleep restriction in healthy men results in increased nocturnal and early-morning NEFA levels, which may partly contribute to insulin resistance and the elevated diabetes risk associated with sleep loss. PMID:25702040

  20. Fluid extraction

    DOEpatents

    Wai, Chien M.; Laintz, Kenneth E.

    1999-01-01

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated .beta.-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  1. Intravenously administered vitamin C as cancer therapy: three cases.

    PubMed

    Padayatty, Sebastian J; Riordan, Hugh D; Hewitt, Stephen M; Katz, Arie; Hoffer, L John; Levine, Mark

    2006-03-28

    Early clinical studies showed that high-dose vitamin C, given by intravenous and oral routes, may improve symptoms and prolong life in patients with terminal cancer. Double-blind placebo-controlled studies of oral vitamin C therapy showed no benefit. Recent evidence shows that oral administration of the maximum tolerated dose of vitamin C (18 g/d) produces peak plasma concentrations of only 220 micromol/L, whereas intravenous administration of the same dose produces plasma concentrations about 25-fold higher. Larger doses (50-100 g) given intravenously may result in plasma concentrations of about 14,000 micromol/L. At concentrations above 1000 micromol/L, vitamin C is toxic to some cancer cells but not to normal cells in vitro. We found 3 well-documented cases of advanced cancers, confirmed by histopathologic review, where patients had unexpectedly long survival times after receiving high-dose intravenous vitamin C therapy. We examined clinical details of each case in accordance with National Cancer Institute (NCI) Best Case Series guidelines. Tumour pathology was verified by pathologists at the NCI who were unaware of diagnosis or treatment. In light of recent clinical pharmacokinetic findings and in vitro evidence of anti-tumour mechanisms, these case reports indicate that the role of high-dose intravenous vitamin C therapy in cancer treatment should be reassessed. PMID:16567755

  2. Intravenously administered vitamin C as cancer therapy: three cases

    PubMed Central

    Padayatty, Sebastian J.; Riordan, Hugh D.; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Katz, Arie; Hoffer, L. John; Levine, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Early clinical studies showed that high-dose vitamin C, given by intravenous and oral routes, may improve symptoms and prolong life in patients with terminal cancer. Double-blind placebo-controlled studies of oral vitamin C therapy showed no benefit. Recent evidence shows that oral administration of the maximum tolerated dose of vitamin C (18 g/d) produces peak plasma concentrations of only 220 μmol/L, whereas intravenous administration of the same dose produces plasma concentrations about 25-fold higher. Larger doses (50–100 g) given intravenously may result in plasma concentrations of about 14 000 μmol/L. At concentrations above 1000 μmol/L, vitamin C is toxic to some cancer cells but not to normal cells in vitro. We found 3 well-documented cases of advanced cancers, confirmed by histopathologic review, where patients had unexpectedly long survival times after receiving high-dose intravenous vitamin C therapy. We examined clinical details of each case in accordance with National Cancer Institute (NCI) Best Case Series guidelines. Tumour pathology was verified by pathologists at the NCI who were unaware of diagnosis or treatment. In light of recent clinical pharmacokinetic findings and in vitro evidence of anti-tumour mechanisms, these case reports indicate that the role of high-dose intravenous vitamin C therapy in cancer treatment should be reassessed. PMID:16567755

  3. Long-Term Efficacy of Postpartum Intravenous Iron Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Background. The potential benefits of administering a dose of intravenous iron in patients with moderate postpartum anaemia rather than oral iron alone remains unproven. Aims. To determine whether a single injection of intravenous iron followed by a 6-week course of oral iron is as effective over 6 months in restoring normal haemoglobin levels and replenishing iron stores in women with moderate postpartum anaemia as a course of oral iron alone in women with mild postpartum anaemia. Materials and Methods. Retrospective two-arm cohort study in women with mild postpartum anaemia (haemoglobin 9.6–10.5 g/dL) prescribed iron daily for 6 weeks (N = 150) and women with moderate postpartum anaemia (haemoglobin 8.5–9.5 g/dL), given a single 500 mg injection of intravenous iron followed by iron daily for 6 weeks (N = 75). Haemoglobin and ferritin were measured 6 months postpartum. Results. Haemoglobin returned to similar mean levels in both groups. Ferritin levels were statistically significantly higher in the intravenous + oral group (57.7 ± 49.3 μg/L versus 32.9 ± 20.1 μg/L). Conclusions. Despite lower baseline haemoglobin, intravenous iron carboxymaltose was superior to oral iron alone in replenishing iron stores in moderate postpartum anaemia and may prove similarly beneficial in mild postpartum anaemia. PMID:25431768

  4. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Friedrisch, João Ricardo; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency anemia is the most common deficiency disorder, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia, but in many conditions, oral iron is less than ideal mainly because of gastrointestinal adverse events and the long course needed to treat the disease and replenish body iron stores. Intravenous iron compounds consist of an iron oxyhydroxide core, which is surrounded by a carbohydrate shell made of polymers such as dextran, sucrose or gluconate. The first iron product for intravenous use was the high molecular weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to use intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia over many years. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is a stable complex with the advantage of being non-dextran-containing and a very low immunogenic potential and therefore not predisposed to anaphylactic reactions. Its properties permit the administration of large doses (15 mg/kg; maximum of 1000 mg/infusion) in a single and rapid session (15-minute infusion) without the requirement of a test dose. The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, and safety profile of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of patients with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:26670403

  5. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Friedrisch, João Ricardo; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency anemia is the most common deficiency disorder, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia, but in many conditions, oral iron is less than ideal mainly because of gastrointestinal adverse events and the long course needed to treat the disease and replenish body iron stores. Intravenous iron compounds consist of an iron oxyhydroxide core, which is surrounded by a carbohydrate shell made of polymers such as dextran, sucrose or gluconate. The first iron product for intravenous use was the high molecular weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to use intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia over many years. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is a stable complex with the advantage of being non-dextran-containing and a very low immunogenic potential and therefore not predisposed to anaphylactic reactions. Its properties permit the administration of large doses (15mg/kg; maximum of 1000mg/infusion) in a single and rapid session (15-minute infusion) without the requirement of a test dose. The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, and safety profile of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of patients with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:26670403

  6. Methionine restriction and lifespan control

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung Cheon; Kaya, Alaattin; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) without malnutrition is associated with longevity in various organisms. However, it has also been shown that reduced calorie intake is often ineffective in extending lifespan. Selecting optimal dietary regimens for DR studies is complicated, as the same regimen may lead to different outcomes depending on genotype and environmental factors. Recent studies suggested that interventions such as moderate protein restriction with/without adequate nutrition (e.g. particular amino acids or carbohydrates) may have additional beneficial effects mediated by certain metabolic and hormonal factors implicated in the biology of aging, regardless of total calorie intake. In particular, it was shown that restriction of a single amino acid, methionine, can mimic the effects of DR and extend lifespan in various model organisms. We discuss beneficial effects of methionine-restricted (MR) diet, the molecular pathways involved, and the use of this regimen in longevity interventions. PMID:26663138

  7. Time Varying Apparent Volume of Distribution and Drug Half-Lives Following Intravenous Bolus Injections

    PubMed Central

    Wesolowski, Carl A.; Wesolowski, Michal J.; Babyn, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    We present a model that generalizes the apparent volume of distribution and half-life as functions of time following intravenous bolus injection. This generalized model defines a time varying apparent volume of drug distribution. The half-lives of drug remaining in the body vary in time and become longer as time elapses, eventually converging to the terminal half-life. Two example fit models were substituted into the general model: biexponential models from the least relative concentration error, and gamma variate models using adaptive regularization for least relative error of clearance. Using adult population parameters from 41 studies of the renal glomerular filtration marker 169Yb-DTPA, simulations of extracellular fluid volumes of 5, 10, 15 and 20 litres and plasma clearances of 40 and 100 ml/min were obtained. Of these models, the adaptively obtained gamma variate models had longer times to 95% of terminal volume and longer half-lives. PMID:27403663

  8. Incidence of infusion-site reactions associated with peripheral intravenous administration of fosaprepitant

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, Jordan D.; Crawford, Brooke Sorgen; Phillips, Gary; Berger, Michael J.; Wesolowski, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Fosaprepitant is known to cause infusion-site reactions. However, there is limited data regarding these reactions including the effect of peripheral intravenous administration or other potential factors on their incidence. This single-institution retrospective study was undertaken to investigate the incidence of infusion-site reactions with single-dose intravenous (IV) fosaprepitant when given through a peripheral line prior to administration of chemotherapy. Risk factors for the development of infusion-site reactions with fosaprepitant were also explored. Methods Medical records of patients with cancer receiving IV fosaprepitant through a peripheral line were reviewed. The primary objective of this study was to estimate the incidence of infusion-site reactions at our institution. Data collection included demographics, fosaprepitant infusion information, and grading of reactions. Results We found a 15 % incidence of infusion-site reactions among all peripherally administered doses of fosaprepitant. The 50 reactions occurred in 43 unique patients representing an incidence per patient of 28.7 % (43/150; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 21.6–36.6). Factors found to be associated with infusion-site reactions included age [odds ratio (OR) 0.97 (95 % CI 0.94–0.99)], location of IV line [OR forearm vs. hand 0.41 (95% CI 0.20–0.85); OR antecubital fossa vs. hand 0.31 (95 % CI 0.11–0.87)], and simultaneous maintenance IV fluid rate ≥100 mL/h during fosaprepitant infusion [OR 0.19 (95 % CI 0.08–0.44)]. Conclusions The incidence of infusion-site reactions with peripherally administered fosaprepitant as seen in this study is higher than that reported in the package insert. Risk factors for developing infusion-site reactions in our patient population include age, location of IV line, and simultaneous maintenance IV fluid rate of <100 mL/h. PMID:24402412

  9. Asymmetric generalization and interaction profiles in rhesus monkeys discriminating intravenous cocaine or intravenous heroin from vehicle.

    PubMed

    Platt, Donna M; Rowlett, James K; Spealman, Roger D

    2010-03-01

    Many polydrug abusers combine cocaine with heroin in the form of a "speedball." This study investigated the discriminative stimulus (DS) effects of speedballs in rhesus monkeys trained to discriminate either intravenous cocaine or intravenous heroin from vehicle. Initial substitution tests revealed an asymmetry in the generalization profile of dopamine and opioid agonists such that mu agonists partially substituted for cocaine, but direct and indirect dopamine agonists did not substitute for heroin. Subsequent speedball tests in which drug mixtures were administered by coinjecting the component drugs while keeping the dose-ratio constant revealed an additional asymmetry. In cocaine-trained monkeys, coadministration of cocaine and heroin produced leftward shifts in the cocaine dose-response function. Heroin's cocaine-enhancing effects were mimicked by the mu agonists fentanyl and methadone and less consistently by the delta agonist (+)-4-[(alphaR)-alpha-((2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-methoxybenzyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide (SNC 80) and reversed by the mu antagonist naltrexone and the delta antagonist naltrindole. In heroin-trained monkeys, coadministration of cocaine and heroin attenuated the DS effects of heroin. Cocaine's heroin-attenuating effects were mimicked by the D1-like agonist 6-chloro-7,8-dihydroxy-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-(1H)-3-benzazepine (SKF 81297) and the D2-like agonist R-(-)-propylnorapomorphine and reversed by the D1-like antagonist (6aS-trans)-11-chloro-6,6a,7,8,9,13b-hexahydro-7-methyl-5H- benzo[d] aphtha[2,1-b]azepin-12-ol hydrobromide (SCH 39166) and the D2-like antagonist raclopride. Attenuation of the effects of heroin was accompanied by decreases in response rate. These results suggest that heroin enhances the DS effects of cocaine via mu, and to a lesser extent delta, receptor mechanisms; whereas cocaine-induced inhibition of the DS effects of heroin probably was due at least in part to masking of the heroin DS presumably

  10. Heparin is not required for peripheral intravenous locks in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Krista; Tay-Uyboco, Jean S; McMillan, Douglas D

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the relative efficacy and safety of peripheral intravenous locks maintained with heparin saline solutions compared with those maintained with normal saline. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled trial comparing the two methods of maintaining peripheral intravenous locks. SETTING: Infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Foothills Hospital, Calgary, Alberta. PATIENTS: Neonates requiring the maintenance of intravenous locks for medications, primarily antibiotics, were randomly placed in either a heparin saline (n=93) or normal saline (n=93) group. INTERVENTIONS: Patients were chosen to receive either heparinized saline (5 units/mL) or normal saline, 0.3 mL in the intravenous catheter every 6 h, administered by nursing staff in a blinded manner. RESULTS: There was no difference in catheter lifespan (39±24 h for the heparinized saline group; 34±22 h for the normal saline group) and no difference in the number of intravenous catheters per patient (1.9 heparinized group, 1.6 normal saline group). There were no differences in the reasons for catheter removal, complications at the skin site or systemic bleeding including intracranial hemorrhage between the two groups. The risk of catheter occlusion was inversely correlated with gestational age and the administration of vancomycin and cefotaxime versus ampicillin and gentamicin. CONCLUSIONS: Heparin is not required for the maintenance of peripheral intravenous locks in neonates regardless of the solution used. Catheter occlusion is more likely to be associated with a low gestational age and the administration of vancomycin and cefotaxime versus ampicillin and gentamicin. PMID:20212988

  11. Stability of esmolol hydrochloride in intravenous solutions.

    PubMed

    Baaske, D M; Dykstra, S D; Wagenknecht, D M; Karnatz, N N

    1994-11-01

    The stability of esmolol hydrochloride in a variety of i.v. solutions was studied. Solutions of esmolol hydrochloride 10 mg/mL were prepared separately in 0.45% sodium chloride injection, 0.9% sodium chloride injection, 5% dextrose injection, 5% dextrose and 0.45% sodium chloride injection, 5% dextrose and 0.9% sodium chloride injection, 5% dextrose with lactated Ringer's injection, lactated Ringer's injection, 5% sodium bicarbonate injection, and 5% dextrose injection with potassium chloride 40 meq/L. One glass and one polyvinyl chloride container of each solution (except glass only in the case of the solution in 5% sodium bicarbonate injection) were stored in the dark at 5 degrees C, under ambient room light at 23-27 degrees C, in the dark at 40 degrees C, and under intense light at 25-30 degrees C. At storage intervals up to 168 hours, samples were tested for esmolol hydrochloride concentration by high-performance liquid chromatography. Optical density and pH were also measured. Esmolol hydrochloride was stable in the various i.v. fluids for at least 168 hours when stored at 5 degrees C or 23-27 degrees C, for at least 24 hours when stored under intense light, and, with one exception, for at least 48 hours when stored at 40 degrees C. When mixed with 5% sodium bicarbonate injection, the drug was stable for only about 24 hours at 40 degrees C. There were no substantial changes in optical density or pH. The type of container had no effect on stability. With one exception, esmolol hydrochloride was stable in all the i.v. solutions under all the conditions tested. PMID:7856582

  12. Suicide by injecting lispro insulin with an intravenous cannula.

    PubMed

    Behera, C; Swain, Rajanikanta; Mridha, Asit Ranjan; Pooniya, Shashank

    2015-09-01

    Suicide by injecting insulin is not uncommon both in diabetic and non-diabetic people. The victim usually uses an insulin syringe or a traditional syringe attached to a needle for the injection of insulin, of either animal or synthetic origin. We report a case of suicide by a non-diabetic physician by injecting lispro insulin through an intravenous cannula. To the best of our knowledge, the use of an intravenous cannula for the injection of insulin for suicide is unusual and is rarely reported in the medico-legal literature. PMID:25748289

  13. Safe intravenous thrombolysis in acute stroke despite treatment with rivaroxaban.

    PubMed

    Bornkamm, Katharina; Harloff, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Data regarding intravenous thrombolysis in stroke patients receiving new oral anticoagulant drugs (nOAC) is sparse. In the near future, however, an increasing number of patients with atrial fibrillation will suffer recurrent stroke despite treatment with nOAC. This will cause a significant therapeutic dilemma as thrombolysis is contraindicated under such circumstances. We describe an 81-year-old patient presenting with acute ischemic stroke who was successfully treated with intravenous thrombolysis despite ongoing treatment with rivaroxaban. Our case report indicates that thrombolysis under nOAC may be safe under certain conditions and emphasizes the importance of establishing and performing specific anticoagulation tests for nOAC. PMID:24938385

  14. Intramuscular versus Intravenous Therapy for Prehospital Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Silbergleit, Robert; Durkalski, Valerie; Lowenstein, Daniel; Conwit, Robin; Pancioli, Arthur; Palesch, Yuko; Barsan, William

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Early termination of prolonged seizures with intravenous administration of benzodiazepines improves outcomes. For faster and more reliable administration, paramedics increasingly use an intramuscular route. METHODS This double-blind, randomized, noninferiority trial compared the efficacy of intramuscular midazolam with that of intravenous lorazepam for children and adults in status epilepticus treated by paramedics. Subjects whose convulsions had persisted for more than 5 minutes and who were still convulsing after paramedics arrived were given the study medication by either intramuscular autoinjector or intravenous infusion. The primary outcome was absence of seizures at the time of arrival in the emergency department without the need for rescue therapy. Secondary outcomes included endotracheal intubation, recurrent seizures, and timing of treatment relative to the cessation of convulsive seizures. This trial tested the hypothesis that intramuscular midazolam was noninferior to intravenous lorazepam by a margin of 10 percentage points. RESULTS At the time of arrival in the emergency department, seizures were absent without rescue therapy in 329 of 448 subjects (73.4%) in the intramuscular-midazolam group and in 282 of 445 (63.4%) in the intravenous-lorazepam group (absolute difference, 10 percentage points; 95% confidence interval, 4.0 to 16.1; P<0.001 for both noninferiority and superiority). The two treatment groups were similar with respect to need for endotracheal intubation (14.1% of subjects with intramuscular midazolam and 14.4% with intravenous lorazepam) and recurrence of seizures (11.4% and 10.6%, respectively). Among subjects whose seizures ceased before arrival in the emergency department, the median times to active treatment were 1.2 minutes in the intramuscular-midazolam group and 4.8 minutes in the intravenous-lorazepam group, with corresponding median times from active treatment to cessation of convulsions of 3.3 minutes and 1.6 minutes

  15. Anaphylaxis following intravenous paracetamol: the problem is the solution.

    PubMed

    Jain, S S; Green, S; Rose, M

    2015-11-01

    Paracetamol is a ubiquitous analgesic and antipyretic that is widely administered, including by anaesthetists. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions to intravenous paracetamol are particularly rare. We report two cases involving four separate episodes of anaphylaxis to intravenous paracetamol in different perioperative settings without a past history of intolerance to the oral form. The allergological investigations are described, during which it became evident that both patients were allergic to an excipient (mannitol) present in the formulation and that neither was allergic to the principal agent (paracetamol). The importance of referral and investigation of perioperative drug reactions is underscored by these two cases. PMID:26603804

  16. [The development of multifunction intravenous infusion quantitative packaging device].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shufang; Li, Ruihua; Shen, Lianhong

    2012-11-01

    Aimed at tackling the compatibility issues arising from the drug reaction in intravenous infusion tube, we developed a simple, suitable and multi-function intravenous infusion tube for the special use for rescuing critical patients, the elderly, children etc. Each drug in a transfusion process can be filtered to realize quantitative packet and packet delivery. Thus, the drugs in the infusion tube are prevented from meeting with each other. No overlap, no particle pollution occurred. Stable performance and accurate dosage are maintained. As a result safety is ensured during drug delivery. PMID:23461118

  17. Drilling fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, J.A.; Patel, B.B.

    1987-11-03

    A drilling fluid additive mixture is described consisting essentially of a sulfoalkylated tannin in admixture with a non-sulfoalkylated alkali-solubilized lignite wherein the weight ratio of the sulfoalkylated tannin to the non-sulfoalkylated lignite is in the range from about 2:1 to about 1:1. The sulfoalkylated tannin has been sulfoalkylated with at least one -(C(R-)/sub 2/-SO/sub 3/M side chain, wherein each R is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen and alkyl radicals containing from 1 to about 5 carbon atoms, and M is selected from the group consisting of ammonium and the alkali metals.

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Jerrard, D A; Hanna, J R; Schindelheim, G L

    2001-08-01

    A quick and accurate diagnosis of maladies affecting the central nervous system (CNS) is imperative. Procurement and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are paramount in helping the clinician determine a patient's clinical condition. Various staining methods, measurement of white blood cell counts, glucose and protein levels, recognition of xanthochromia, and microbiologic studies are CSF parameters that are collectively important in the ultimate determination by a clinician of the presence or absence of a catastrophic CNS condition. Many of these CNS parameters have significant limitations that should be recognized to minimize under treating patients with catastrophic illness. PMID:11489408

  19. Peritoneal Fluid Analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Peritoneal Fluid Analysis Share this page: Was this page helpful? Formal name: Peritoneal Fluid Analysis Related tests: Pleural Fluid Analysis , Pericardial Fluid ...

  20. Pleural Fluid Analysis Test

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    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Pleural Fluid Analysis Share this page: Was this page helpful? Formal name: Pleural Fluid Analysis Related tests: Pericardial Fluid Analysis , Peritoneal Fluid ...

  1. 48 CFR 225.7003-2 - Restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Other Statutory Restrictions on Foreign Acquisition 225.7003-2 Restrictions. The following restrictions...) Missile or space systems. (3) Ships. (4) Tank or automotive items. (5) Weapon systems. (6) Ammunition....

  2. 48 CFR 225.7003-2 - Restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Other Statutory Restrictions on Foreign Acquisition 225.7003-2 Restrictions. The following restrictions...) Missile or space systems. (3) Ships. (4) Tank or automotive items. (5) Weapon systems. (6) Ammunition....

  3. 48 CFR 225.7003-2 - Restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Other Statutory Restrictions on Foreign Acquisition 225.7003-2 Restrictions. The following restrictions...) Missile or space systems. (3) Ships. (4) Tank or automotive items. (5) Weapon systems. (6) Ammunition....

  4. 48 CFR 225.7003-2 - Restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Other Statutory Restrictions on Foreign Acquisition 225.7003-2 Restrictions. The following restrictions...) Missile or space systems. (3) Ships. (4) Tank or automotive items. (5) Weapon systems. (6) Ammunition....

  5. 48 CFR 225.7003-2 - Restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Other Statutory Restrictions on Foreign Acquisition 225.7003-2 Restrictions. The following restrictions...) Missile or space systems. (3) Ships. (4) Tank or automotive items. (5) Weapon systems. (6) Ammunition....

  6. A comparative study of intravenous paracetamol and intravenous tramadol for postoperative analgesia in laparotomies

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Mohammed; Manjula, B. P.; Sunil, B. V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pain in the perioperative setting or thereafter plays a significant role in delaying an otherwise successful recovery. Hence, mitigation of such postoperative pain assumes importance. Among the various agents employed for such mitigation, opioids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have for some time taken center stage. However, alas they are not without their share of adverse effects. This study was undertaken with the purpose of elucidating the efficacy of intravenous (IV) paracetamol as compared to IV tramadol in mitigating postoperative pain while observing its effect on hemodynamic stability and the presence of adverse drug reactions, if any. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 randomized cases aged ranges from 20 to 60 years of both sexes divided into two groups (each for paracetamol and tramadol) scheduled for laparotomies were administered IV paracetamol and tramadol for postoperative pain relief and assessed with visual analog scale (VAS) score and variations in vital parameters to ascertain extent of pain relief and post-operative nausea vomiting (PONV). Results: Data so collected was statistically interpreted, and observations extrapolated. Save for a perceptible decline in PONV with paracetamol group compared with tramadol group with a statistically significant P < 0.001, nothing statistically significant was observed in any other parameter, including VAS scores between either group. Conclusion: IV paracetamol is a safer alternative to tramadol with lesser PONV in the postoperative period translates into the lesser duration of hospitalization and hence earlier discharge. PMID:26712966

  7. Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mender, Ilgen; Shay, Jerry W.

    2016-01-01

    While telomerase is expressed in ~90% of primary human tumors, most somatic tissue cells except transiently proliferating stem-like cells do not have detectable telomerase activity (Shay and Wright, 1996; Shay and Wright, 2001). Telomeres progressively shorten with each cell division in normal cells, including proliferating stem-like cells, due to the end replication (lagging strand synthesis) problem and other causes such as oxidative damage, therefore all somatic cells have limited cell proliferation capacity (Hayflick limit) (Hayflick and Moorhead, 1961; Olovnikov, 1973). The progressive telomere shortening eventually leads to growth arrest in normal cells, which is known as replicative senescence (Shay et al., 1991). Once telomerase is activated in cancer cells, telomere length is stabilized by the addition of TTAGGG repeats to the end of chromosomes, thus enabling the limitless continuation of cell division (Shay and Wright, 1996; Shay and Wright, 2001). Therefore, the link between aging and cancer can be partially explained by telomere biology. There are many rapid and convenient methods to study telomere biology such as Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF), Telomere Repeat Amplification Protocol (TRAP) (Mender and Shay, 2015b) and Telomere dysfunction Induced Foci (TIF) analysis (Mender and Shay, 2015a). In this protocol paper we describe Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF) analysis to determine average telomeric length of cells. Telomeric length can be indirectly measured by a technique called Telomere Restriction Fragment analysis (TRF). This technique is a modified Southern blot, which measures the heterogeneous range of telomere lengths in a cell population using the length distribution of the terminal restriction fragments (Harley et al., 1990; Ouellette et al., 2000). This method can be used in eukaryotic cells. The description below focuses on the measurement of human cancer cells telomere length. The principle of this method relies on the lack of

  8. Oxygen supersaturated fluid using fine micro/nanobubbles

    PubMed Central

    Matsuki, Noriaki; Ishikawa, Takuji; Ichiba, Shingo; Shiba, Naoki; Ujike, Yoshihito; Yamaguchi, Takami

    2014-01-01

    Microbubbles show peculiar properties, such as shrinking collapse, long lifetime, high gas solubility, negative electric charge, and free radical production. Fluids supersaturated with various gases can be easily generated using microbubbles. Oxygen microbubble fluid can be very useful for oxygen delivery to hypoxic tissues. However, there have been no reports of comparative investigations into adding fluids containing oxygen fine micro/nanobubbles (OFM-NBs) to common infusion solutions in daily medical care. In this study, it was demonstrated that OFMNBs can generate oxygen-supersaturated fluids, and they may be sufficiently small to infuse safely into blood vessels. It was found that normal saline solution is preferable for generating an oxygen-rich infusion fluid, which is best administered as a 30-minute intravenous infusion. It was also concluded that dextran solution is suitable for drug delivery substances packing oxygen gas over a 1-hour intravenous infusion. In addition, normal saline solution containing OFMNBs was effective for improving blood oxygenation. Thus, the use of OFMNB-containing fluids is a potentially effective novel method for improving blood oxygenation in cases involving hypoxia, ischemic diseases, infection control, and anticancer chemoradiation therapies. PMID:25285003

  9. Oxygen supersaturated fluid using fine micro/nanobubbles.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Noriaki; Ishikawa, Takuji; Ichiba, Shingo; Shiba, Naoki; Ujike, Yoshihito; Yamaguchi, Takami

    2014-01-01

    Microbubbles show peculiar properties, such as shrinking collapse, long lifetime, high gas solubility, negative electric charge, and free radical production. Fluids supersaturated with various gases can be easily generated using microbubbles. Oxygen microbubble fluid can be very useful for oxygen delivery to hypoxic tissues. However, there have been no reports of comparative investigations into adding fluids containing oxygen fine micro/nanobubbles (OFM-NBs) to common infusion solutions in daily medical care. In this study, it was demonstrated that OFMNBs can generate oxygen-supersaturated fluids, and they may be sufficiently small to infuse safely into blood vessels. It was found that normal saline solution is preferable for generating an oxygen-rich infusion fluid, which is best administered as a 30-minute intravenous infusion. It was also concluded that dextran solution is suitable for drug delivery substances packing oxygen gas over a 1-hour intravenous infusion. In addition, normal saline solution containing OFMNBs was effective for improving blood oxygenation. Thus, the use of OFMNB-containing fluids is a potentially effective novel method for improving blood oxygenation in cases involving hypoxia, ischemic diseases, infection control, and anticancer chemoradiation therapies. PMID:25285003

  10. Intravenous Sedation for Dental Patients with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miyawaki, T.; Kohjitani, A.; Maeda, S.; Egusa, M.; Mori, T.; Higuchi, H.; Kita, F.; Shimada, M.

    2004-01-01

    The poor quality of oral health care for people with intellectual disability (ID) has been recognized, and the strong fears about dental treatment suggested as a major reason for disturbances of visits to dentists by such patients. Intravenous sedation is a useful method for relieving the anxiety and fear of such patients about dental treatment,…

  11. Intravenous Cocaine Priming Reinstates Cocaine-Induced Conditioned Place Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombas, Andres S.; Freeman, Kevin B.; Roma, Peter G.; Riley, Anthony L.

    2007-01-01

    Separate groups of rats underwent an unbiased conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure involving alternate pairings of distinct environments with intravenous (IV) injections of cocaine (0.75 mg/kg) or saline immediately or 15 min after injection. A subsequent extinction phase consisted of exposure to both conditioning environments preceded by…

  12. Purple glove syndrome: a dreadful complication of intravenous phenytoin administration

    PubMed Central

    Lalla, Rakesh; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Sahu, Ritesh

    2012-01-01

    Purple glove syndrome is an uncommon but dreaded complication of intravenous phenytoin administration characterised by pain, oedema and purple-blue discolouration of the limb distal to the site of injection. We describe a 37-year-old gentleman having the characteristic purple glove appearance after phenytoin loading, and discuss the salient features of this syndrome highlighting the pathophysiological and preventive aspects. PMID:22922927

  13. Intravenous Therapy Instruction for Licensed Practical Nurses. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Pam; Carey, Jean

    This Idaho instructor's guide lists tasks and enabling objectives, outlines instruction, and provides handout masters, overhead masters, and tests for intravenous therapy (IV) instruction for licensed practical nurses. Following an introduction and a list of criteria for successful completion of IV therapy courses, the document lists tasks and…

  14. Solute-Filled Syringe For Formulating Intravenous Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Jim; Bindokas, AL; Dudar, Tom; Finley, Mike; Scharf, Mike

    1993-01-01

    Prefilled syringe contains premeasured amount of solute in powder or concentrate form used to deliver solute to sterile interior of large-volume parenteral (LVP) bag. Predetermined amount of sterile water also added to LVP bag through sterilizing filter, and mixed with contents of syringe, yielding sterile intravenous solution of specified concentration.

  15. Candida costochondritis associated with recent intravenous drug use

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Simeon J.; Swan, Christopher D.; Boutlis, Craig S.; Reid, Alistair B.

    2016-01-01

    Candida osteoarticular infections are being reported with increasing frequency, possibly due to an expanding population at risk. However, Candida costochondritis is uncommon. We report two cases of Candida costochondritis in patients who presented with subacute-onset chest wall swelling and whose only identifiable risk factor was a history of recent intravenous drug use. PMID:27182491

  16. Stability of Ceftiofur Sodium and Cefquinome Sulphate in Intravenous Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Jelińska, Anna; Bębenek, Marcelina

    2014-01-01

    Stability of ceftiofur sodium and cefquinome sulphate in intravenous solutions was studied. Chromatographic separation and quantitative determination were performed by using a high-performance liquid chromatography with UV-DAD detection. During the stability study, poly(vinylchloride) minibags were filled with a solution containing 5 mg of ceftiofur sodium or cefquinome sulphate and diluted to 0.2 mg/mL with suitable intravenous solution depending on the test conditions. The solutions for the study were protected from light and stored at room temperature (22°C), refrigerated (6°C), frozen (−20°C) for 30 days, and then thawed at room temperature. A comparison of results obtained at 22°C and 6°C for the same intravenous solutions showed that temperature as well as components of solutions and their concentration had an influence on the stability of ceftiofur sodium and cefquinome sulphate. It was found that ceftiofur sodium and cefquinome sulphate dissolved in intravenous solutions used in this study may be stored at room temperature and at 6°C for up to 48 h. PMID:25025091

  17. Saccharomyces cerevisiae boulardii transient fungemia after intravenous self-inoculation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Lola; Ranque, Stéphane; Raoult, Didier

    2013-02-14

    We report the case of a young psychotic intravenous drug user injecting herself with Saccharomyces cervisiae (boulardii). She experienced a 24 h fever, resolving spontaneously confirming, quasi experimentally, the inocuity of this yeast in a non-immunocompromised host. PMID:24432219

  18. Candida costochondritis associated with recent intravenous drug use.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Simeon J; Swan, Christopher D; Boutlis, Craig S; Reid, Alistair B

    2016-01-01

    Candida osteoarticular infections are being reported with increasing frequency, possibly due to an expanding population at risk. However, Candida costochondritis is uncommon. We report two cases of Candida costochondritis in patients who presented with subacute-onset chest wall swelling and whose only identifiable risk factor was a history of recent intravenous drug use. PMID:27182491

  19. [Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome. Successful therapy with intravenous immunoglobulins].

    PubMed

    Staubach-Renz, P; von Stebut, E; Bräuninger, W; Maurer, M; Steinbrink, K

    2007-08-01

    Autoimmune diseases can initially present as chronic urticaria. We describe the course of a patient with hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome (HUVS) as well as his successful treatment with high-dose intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG). HUVS was diagnosed clinically and confirmed by histology and laboratory studies. After only one cycle with IVIG (2 g/kg) all HUVS symptoms were significantly decreased. PMID:17453168

  20. Increased digitalis-like activity in human cerebrospinal fluid after expansion of the extracellular fluid volume

    SciTech Connect

    Halperin, J.A.; Martin, A.M.; Malave, S.

    1985-08-12

    The present study was designed to determine whether acute expansion of the extracellular fluid volume influenced the digitalis-like activity of human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), previously described. Human CSF samples, drawn before and 30 minutes after the intravenous infusion of 1 liter of either saline or glucose solutions, were assayed for digitalis-like activity by inhibition of either the /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ uptake into human erythrocytes or by the activity of a purified Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ ATPase. The CSF inhibitory activity on both systems significantly increased after the infusion of sodium solutions but did not change after the infusion of glucose. These results indicate that the digitalis-like factor of human CSF might be involved in the regulation of the extracellular fluid volume and electrolyte content and thereby in some of the physiological responses to sodium loading. 31 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  1. Gyroelastic fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Kerbel, G.D.

    1981-01-20

    A study is made of a scale model in three dimensions of a guiding center plasma within the purview of gyroelastic (also known as finite gyroradius-near theta pinch) magnetohydrodynamics. The (nonlinear) system sustains a particular symmetry called isorrhopy which permits the decoupling of fluid modes from drift modes. Isorrhopic equilibria are analyzed within the framework of geometrical optics resulting in (local) dispersion relations and ray constants. A general scheme is developed to evolve an arbitrary linear perturbation of a screwpinch equilibrium as an invertible integral transform (over the complete set of generalized eigenfunctions defined naturally by the equilibrium). Details of the structure of the function space and the associated spectra are elucidated. Features of the (global) dispersion relation owing to the presence of gyroelastic stabilization are revealed. An energy principle is developed to study the stability of the tubular screwpinch.

  2. Nerve involvement in fluid transport in the inflamed rat jejunum.

    PubMed Central

    Jodal, M; Wingren, U; Jansson, M; Heidemann, M; Lundgren, O

    1993-01-01

    Net fluid transport was measured in denervated jejunal segments of rats infected with larvae of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. On days 6-9 after nematode inoculation, when the jejunal segment exhibited macroscopic and microscopic signs of inflammation, net fluid absorption was noticeably attenuated compared with control, and in eight of 26 experiments a net fluid secretion was seen. To determine whether enteric nerves participated in the response, intravenous hexamethonium (10 mg/kg body weight) was given or lidocaine (1% solution) was placed on the serosa of the intestinal segment. Both drugs significantly reduced fluid secretion or increased fluid absorption. The effect was more pronounced the lower the rate of fluid absorption or the higher the rate of fluid secretion. The inflammatory response influenced intestinal fluid transport partly via activation of the enteric nervous system. It was estimated that 50-60% of the change in fluid transport caused by the parasite could be ascribed to activation of intramural nervous reflexes. The effect of hexamethonium indicates that a cholinergic synapse is present in the secretory nervous reflux activated by inflammation. Experiments were also performed on animals on days 11-14 after infection when the nematodes had been expelled from the animal. A large net fluid absorption was then recorded. PMID:8244137

  3. Rehydration with fluid of varying tonicities: effects on fluid regulatory hormones and exercise performance in the heat.

    PubMed

    Kenefick, R W; Maresh, C M; Armstrong, L E; Riebe, D; Echegaray, M E; Castellani, J W

    2007-05-01

    This study examined the effects of rehydration (Rehy) with fluids of varying tonicities and routes of administration after exercise-induced hypohydration on exercise performance, fluid regulatory hormone responses, and cardiovascular and thermoregulatory strain during subsequent exercise in the heat. On four occasions, eight men performed an exercise-dehydration protocol of approximately 185 min (33 degrees C) to establish a 4% reduction in body weight. Following dehydration, 2% of the fluid lost was replaced during the first 45 min of a 100-min rest period by one of three random Rehy treatments (0.9% saline intravenous; 0.45% saline intravenous; 0.45% saline oral) or no Rehy (no fluid) treatment. Subjects then stood for 20 min at 36 degrees C and then walked at 50% maximal oxygen consumption for 90 min. Subsequent to dehydration, plasma Na(+), osmolality, aldosterone, and arginine vasopressin concentrations were elevated (P < 0.05) in each trial, accompanied by a -4% hemoconcentration. Following Rehy, there were no differences (P > 0.05) in fluid volume restored, post-rehydration (Post-Rehy) body weight, or urine volume. Percent change in plasma volume was 5% above pre-Rehy values, and plasma Na(+), osmolality, and fluid regulatory hormones were lower compared with no fluid. During exercise, skin and core temperatures, heart rate, and exercise time were not different (P > 0.05) among the Rehy treatments. Plasma osmolality, Na(+), percent change in plasma volume, and fluid regulatory hormones responded similarly among all Rehy treatments. Neither a fluid of greater tonicity nor the route of administration resulted in a more rapid or greater fluid retention, nor did it enhance heat tolerance or diminish physiological strain during subsequent exercise in the heat. PMID:17317877

  4. Fluid channeling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Donald Y. (Inventor); Hitch, Bradley D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A fluid channeling system includes a fluid ejector, a heat exchanger, and a fluid pump disposed in series flow communication The ejector includes a primary inlet for receiving a primary fluid, and a secondary inlet for receiving a secondary fluid which is mixed with the primary fluid and discharged therefrom as ejector discharge. Heat is removed from the ejector discharge in the heat exchanger, and the heat exchanger discharge is compressed in the fluid pump and channeled to the ejector secondary inlet as the secondary fluid In an exemplary embodiment, the temperature of the primary fluid is greater than the maximum operating temperature of a fluid motor powering the fluid pump using a portion of the ejector discharge, with the secondary fluid being mixed with the primary fluid so that the ejector discharge temperature is equal to about the maximum operating temperature of the fluid motor.

  5. Alphavirus Restriction by IFITM Proteins.

    PubMed

    Weston, Stuart; Czieso, Stephanie; White, Ian J; Smith, Sarah E; Wash, Rachael S; Diaz-Soria, Carmen; Kellam, Paul; Marsh, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Interferon inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) are broad-spectrum antiviral factors. In cell culture the entry of many enveloped viruses, including orthomyxo-, flavi-, and filoviruses, is inhibited by IFITMs, though the mechanism(s) involved remain unclear and may vary between viruses. We demonstrate that Sindbis and Semliki Forest virus (SFV), which both use endocytosis and acid-induced membrane fusion in early endosomes to infect cells, are restricted by the early endosomal IFITM3. The late endosomal IFITM2 is less restrictive and the plasma membrane IFITM1 does not inhibit normal infection by either virus. IFITM3 inhibits release of the SFV capsid into the cytosol, without inhibiting binding, internalization, trafficking to endosomes or low pH-induced conformational changes in the envelope glycoprotein. Infection by SFV fusion at the cell surface was inhibited by IFITM1, but was equally inhibited by IFITM3. Furthermore, an IFITM3 mutant (Y20A) that is localized to the plasma membrane inhibited infection by cell surface fusion more potently than IFITM1. Together, these results indicate that IFITMs, in particular IFITM3, can restrict alphavirus infection by inhibiting viral fusion with cellular membranes. That IFITM3 can restrict SFV infection by fusion at the cell surface equivalently to IFITM1 suggests that IFITM3 has greater antiviral potency against SFV. PMID:27219333

  6. Generalized Pump-restriction Theorem

    SciTech Connect

    Sinitsyn, Nikolai A; Chernyak, Vladimir Y

    2008-01-01

    We formulate conditions under which periodic modulations of parameters on a finite graph with stochastic transitions among its nodes do not lead to overall pump currents through any given link. Our theorem unifies previously known results with the new ones and provides a universal approach to explore futher restrictions on stochastic pump effect in non-adiabatically driven systems with detailed balance.

  7. Intravenous non-opioid analgesia for peri- and postoperative pain management: a scientific review of intravenous acetaminophen and ibuprofen

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Wonuk; Nguyen, Kimngan Pham

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a predictable consequence following operations, but the management of postoperative pain is another challenge for anesthesiologists and inappropriately controlled pain may lead to unwanted outcomes in the postoperative period. Opioids are indeed still at the mainstream of postoperative pain control, but solely using only opioids for postoperative pain management may be connected with risks of complications and adverse effects. As a consequence, the concept of multimodal analgesia has been proposed and is recommended whenever possible. Acetaminophen is one of the most commonly used analgesic and antipyretic drug for its good tolerance and high safety profiles. The introduction of intravenous form of acetaminophen has led to a wider flexibility of its use during peri- and postoperative periods, allowing the early initiation of multimodal analgesia. Many studies have revealed the efficacy, safety and opioid sparing effects of intravenous acetaminophen. Intravenous ibuprofen has also shown to be well tolerated and demonstrated to have significant opioid sparing effects during the postoperative period. However, the number of randomized controlled trials confirming the efficacy and safety is small and should be used in caution in certain group of patients. Intravenous acetaminophen and ibuprofen are important options for multimodal postoperative analgesia, improving pain and patient satisfaction. PMID:25664148

  8. Pharmacokinetics of tramadol in horses after intravenous, intramuscular and oral administration.

    PubMed

    Shilo, Y; Britzi, M; Eytan, B; Lifschitz, T; Soback, S; Steinman, A

    2008-02-01

    Tramadol is a centrally acting analgesic drug that has been used clinically for the last two decades to treat moderate to moderately severe pain in humans. The present study investigated tramadol administration in horses by intravenous, intramuscular, oral as immediate-release and oral as sustained-release dosage-form routes. Seven horses were used in a four-way crossover study design in which racemic tramadol was administered at 2 mg/kg by each route of administration. Altogether, 23 blood samples were collected between 0 and 2880 min. The concentration of tramadol and its M1 metabolite were determined in the obtained plasma samples by use of an LC/MS/MS method and were used for pharmacokinetic calculations. Tramadol clearance, apparent volume of distribution at steady-state, mean residence time (MRT) and half-life after intravenous administration were 26+/-3 mL/min/kg, 2.17+/-0.52 L/kg, 83+/-10 min, and 82+/-10 min, respectively. The MRT and half-life after intramuscular administration were 155+/-23 and 92+/-14 min. The mean absorption time was 72+/-22 min and the bioavailability 111+/-39%. Tramadol was poorly absorbed after oral administration and only 3% of the administered dose was found in systemic circulation. The fate of the tramadol M1 metabolite was also investigated. M1 appeared to be a minor metabolite in horses, which could hardly be detected in plasma samples. The poor bioavailability after oral administration and the short half-life of tramadol may restrict its usefulness in clinical applications. PMID:18177320

  9. Restricted Diffusion in Biophysical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Robert L.; Chang, David B.; Young, Allan C.; Martin, Carroll J.; Ancker-Johnson, Betsy

    1974-01-01

    The pulsed-gradient spin echo nuclear magnetic resonance (PGSENMR) technique was used to measure restricted diffusion of water in three types of animal tissue: human blood plasma and red cells; rat and rabbit heart; rat and rabbit liver. Characteristic lengths (L) for restriction of diffusion are estimated from dependence on the measuring time. Limitations on the range of observable restrictive lengths (1.5-15 μm) are discussed. The decrease in diffusivity due to 1 μm alumina powder (volume fraction = 0.18) in glycerin/water mixtures agrees with the Wang theory assuming spherical particles and no hydration. The characteristic length (L ≃ 4 μm) is larger than the particle size (1 μm) or separation (1.8 μm). Comparison of the diffusivities in tissues at short diffusion times with the Wang theory indicates some bound or trapped water. For packed red blood cells, a restriction (L ≃ 2.3 μm) was attributed tothe red cell membrane. A permeability p ≃ 0.014 cm/s may be estimated from the decrease in diffusivity. Average values of diffusivity ratio in heart were: 0.36 ± 0.02 for rat; and 0.26 ± 0.03 for rabbit; and in liver: 0.25 ± 0.01 for rat; 0.25 ± .04 for 10-day old rabbit; and 0.195 ± 0.03 for 2-yr old rabbit. A restriction (L ≃ 2.7 μm) in rat liver probably results from the mitochondria. PMID:4823458

  10. 49 CFR 215.203 - Restricted cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Restricted cars. 215.203 Section 215.203..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Restricted Equipment § 215.203 Restricted cars. (a) This section restricts the operation of any railroad freight car that is— (1) More than...

  11. 49 CFR 215.203 - Restricted cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Restricted cars. 215.203 Section 215.203..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Restricted Equipment § 215.203 Restricted cars. (a) This section restricts the operation of any railroad freight car that is— (1) More than...

  12. 49 CFR 215.203 - Restricted cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Restricted cars. 215.203 Section 215.203..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Restricted Equipment § 215.203 Restricted cars. (a) This section restricts the operation of any railroad freight car that is— (1) More than...

  13. 14 CFR 1203.305 - Restricted data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Restricted data. 1203.305 Section 1203.305... Classification Principles and Considerations § 1203.305 Restricted data. Restricted Data or Formerly Restricted Data is so classified when originated, as required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  14. 14 CFR 1203.305 - Restricted data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Restricted data. 1203.305 Section 1203.305... Classification Principles and Considerations § 1203.305 Restricted data. Restricted Data or Formerly Restricted Data is so classified when originated, as required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  15. 14 CFR 1203.305 - Restricted data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Restricted data. 1203.305 Section 1203.305... Classification Principles and Considerations § 1203.305 Restricted data. Restricted Data or Formerly Restricted Data is so classified when originated, as required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  16. 14 CFR 1203.305 - Restricted data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restricted data. 1203.305 Section 1203.305... Classification Principles and Considerations § 1203.305 Restricted data. Restricted Data or Formerly Restricted Data is so classified when originated, as required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  17. 49 CFR 215.203 - Restricted cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restricted cars. 215.203 Section 215.203 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Restricted Equipment § 215.203 Restricted cars. (a) This section restricts...

  18. 49 CFR 215.203 - Restricted cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Restricted cars. 215.203 Section 215.203..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Restricted Equipment § 215.203 Restricted cars. (a) This section restricts the operation of any railroad freight car that is— (1) More than...

  19. Preclinical development and characterization of an intravenous dosage form for the ACE inhibitor RS-10029.

    PubMed

    Visor, G C; Lin, L H; Henry, P; Singer, L

    1989-01-01

    Preclinical development of an intravenous dosage form for the ACE inhibitor RS-10029 involved the formulation and characterization of the drug's chemical/physical stability in two prototype formulations (injectable solution and lyophilized powder). Included in these studies were quantitative evaluations of various processing and administration parameters (membrane qualification, terminal sterilization, compatibility/delivery of the drug with typical infusion fluids and administration sets) on finished product integrity and quality. Analytical methodology used in these studies consisted primarily of a stability specific HPLC assay and a light obscuration based sensor (HIAC) for particulate matter analysis. Results of these studies indicate that the drug is relatively stable at ambient temperature and under accelerated storage conditions (predicted T90 at 25 degrees C greater than 2 yr, and T90 at 50 degrees C greater than 2 mo). However, the ability of the product to withstand a full terminal sterilization cycle is limited, and therefore other approaches toward sterile processing were examined. With regard to the stability and compatibility of the drug in a variety of fluids and devices there appears to be no overt limitations in its use for either bolus or infusion delivery. PMID:2600732

  20. Thermophysical Properties of Fluids and Fluid Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Sengers, Jan V.; Anisimov, Mikhail A.

    2004-05-03

    The major goal of the project was to study the effect of critical fluctuations on the thermophysical properties and phase behavior of fluids and fluid mixtures. Long-range fluctuations appear because of the presence of critical phase transitions. A global theory of critical fluctuations was developed and applied to represent thermodynamic properties and transport properties of molecular fluids and fluid mixtures. In the second phase of the project, the theory was extended to deal with critical fluctuations in complex fluids such as polymer solutions and electrolyte solutions. The theoretical predictions have been confirmed by computer simulations and by light-scattering experiments. Fluctuations in fluids in nonequilibrium states have also been investigated.

  1. Fluid sampling tool

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Anthony R.; Johnston, Roger G.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    2000-01-01

    A fluid-sampling tool for obtaining a fluid sample from a container. When used in combination with a rotatable drill, the tool bores a hole into a container wall, withdraws a fluid sample from the container, and seals the borehole. The tool collects fluid sample without exposing the operator or the environment to the fluid or to wall shavings from the container.

  2. Joint fluid Gram stain

    MedlinePlus

    Gram stain of joint fluid ... A sample of joint fluid is needed. The fluid sample is sent to a lab where a small drop is placed in a ... on how to prepare for the removal of joint fluid, see joint fluid aspiration .

  3. Cellular Biotechnology Operations Support System Fluid Dynamics Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Aboard the International Space Station (ISS), the Tissue Culture Medium (TCM) is the bioreactor vessel in which cell cultures are grown. With its two syringe ports, it is much like a bag used to administer intravenous fluid, except it allows gas exchange needed for life. The TCM contains cell culture medium, and when frozen cells are flown to the ISS, they are thawed and introduced to the TCM through the syringe ports. In the Cellular Biotechnology Operations Support System-Fluid Dynamics Investigation (CBOSS-FDI) experiment, several mixing procedures are being assessed to determine which method achieves the most uniform mixing of growing cells and culture medium.

  4. 78 FR 58318 - Clinical Trial Design for Intravenous Fat Emulsion Products; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Design for Intravenous Fat Emulsion Products... ``Clinical Trial Design for Intravenous Fat Emulsion Products.'' This workshop will provide a forum to discuss trial design of clinical trials intended to support registration of intravenous fat...

  5. Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Fluid Management in the PICU

    PubMed Central

    Ingelse, Sarah A.; Wösten-van Asperen, Roelie M.; Lemson, Joris; Daams, Joost G.; Bem, Reinout A.; van Woensel, Job B.

    2016-01-01

    The administration of an appropriate volume of intravenous fluids, while avoiding fluid overload, is a major challenge in the pediatric intensive care unit. Despite our efforts, fluid overload is a very common clinical observation in critically ill children, in particular in those with pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (PARDS). Patients with ARDS have widespread damage of the alveolar–capillary barrier, potentially making them vulnerable to fluid overload with the development of pulmonary edema leading to prolonged course of disease. Indeed, studies in adults with ARDS have shown that an increased cumulative fluid balance is associated with adverse outcome. However, age-related differences in the development and consequences of fluid overload in ARDS may exist due to disparities in immunologic response and body water distribution. This systematic review summarizes the current literature on fluid imbalance and management in PARDS, with special emphasis on potential differences with adult patients. It discusses the adverse effects associated with fluid overload and the corresponding possible pathophysiological mechanisms of its development. Our intent is to provide an incentive to develop age-specific fluid management protocols to improve PARDS outcomes. PMID:27047904

  6. Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Fluid Management in the PICU.

    PubMed

    Ingelse, Sarah A; Wösten-van Asperen, Roelie M; Lemson, Joris; Daams, Joost G; Bem, Reinout A; van Woensel, Job B

    2016-01-01

    The administration of an appropriate volume of intravenous fluids, while avoiding fluid overload, is a major challenge in the pediatric intensive care unit. Despite our efforts, fluid overload is a very common clinical observation in critically ill children, in particular in those with pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (PARDS). Patients with ARDS have widespread damage of the alveolar-capillary barrier, potentially making them vulnerable to fluid overload with the development of pulmonary edema leading to prolonged course of disease. Indeed, studies in adults with ARDS have shown that an increased cumulative fluid balance is associated with adverse outcome. However, age-related differences in the development and consequences of fluid overload in ARDS may exist due to disparities in immunologic response and body water distribution. This systematic review summarizes the current literature on fluid imbalance and management in PARDS, with special emphasis on potential differences with adult patients. It discusses the adverse effects associated with fluid overload and the corresponding possible pathophysiological mechanisms of its development. Our intent is to provide an incentive to develop age-specific fluid management protocols to improve PARDS outcomes. PMID:27047904

  7. Ciliary fluid transport enhanced by viscoelastic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hanliang; Kanso, Eva

    2015-11-01

    Motile cilia encounter complex, non-Newtonian fluids as they beat to gain self-propulsion of cells, transport fluids, and mix particles. Recently there have been many studies on swimming in complex fluids, both experimentally and theoretically. However the role of the non-Newtonian fluid in the ciliary transport system remains largely unknown. Here we use a one-way-coupled immersed boundary method to evaluate the impacts of viscoelastic fluid (Oldroyd-B fluid) on the fluid transport generated by an array of rabbit tracheal cilia beating in a channel at low Reynolds number. Our results show that the viscoelasticity could enhance the fluid transport generated by the rabbit tracheal cilia beating pattern and the flow is sensitive to the Deborah number in the range we investigate.

  8. Prevention of surgery-induced suppression of granulocyte function by intravenous application of a fermented extract from Viscum album L. in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Büssing, Arndt; Bischof, Mechtild; Hatzmann, Wolfgang; Bartsch, Felix; Soto-Vera, Danyl; Fronk, Eva-Maria; Gmeindl, Martin; Stein, Gerburg M

    2005-01-01

    Surgical stress and anaesthetics are able to suppress the immune system. This may accelerate the growth and metastasis of residual cancer cells. As Viscum album L. extracts (VA-E) are known to exert both effects, immunomodulating and apoptosis-inducing properties, a Good-Clinical-Practice-guided, prospective bi-centric phase II study was conducted to measure the influence of a perioperative intravenous application of a VA-E on granulocyte function. In 98 patients with breast cancer, it was shown that a single intravenous application of the standardized VA-E "Iscador M special" in a final concentration of 1 mg/individual prior to surgery prevented the surgery-associated inhibition of the oxidative burst. As no VA-E-related side-effects were observed, this distinct route of application may be a rationale to restrict immunosuppression by surgical stress and anaesthesia. PMID:16334172

  9. Overcoming Communication Restrictions in Collectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Kagan; Agogino, Adrian K.

    2004-01-01

    Many large distributed system are characterized by having a large number of components (eg., agents, neurons) whose actions and interactions determine a %orld utility which rates the performance of the overall system. Such collectives are often subject to communication restrictions, making it difficult for components which try to optimize their own private utilities, to take actions that also help optimize the world utility. In this article we address that coordination problem and derive four utility functions which present different compromises between how aligned a component s private utility is with the world utility and how readily that component can determine the actions that optimize its utility. The results show that the utility functions specifically derived to operate under communication restrictions outperform both traditional methods and previous collective-based methods by up to 75%.

  10. Temperature based Restricted Boltzmann Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guoqi; Deng, Lei; Xu, Yi; Wen, Changyun; Wang, Wei; Pei, Jing; Shi, Luping

    2016-01-01

    Restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs), which apply graphical models to learning probability distribution over a set of inputs, have attracted much attention recently since being proposed as building blocks of multi-layer learning systems called deep belief networks (DBNs). Note that temperature is a key factor of the Boltzmann distribution that RBMs originate from. However, none of existing schemes have considered the impact of temperature in the graphical model of DBNs. In this work, we propose temperature based restricted Boltzmann machines (TRBMs) which reveals that temperature is an essential parameter controlling the selectivity of the firing neurons in the hidden layers. We theoretically prove that the effect of temperature can be adjusted by setting the parameter of the sharpness of the logistic function in the proposed TRBMs. The performance of RBMs can be improved by adjusting the temperature parameter of TRBMs. This work provides a comprehensive insights into the deep belief networks and deep learning architectures from a physical point of view.

  11. Pharmacokinetics of benzydamine in dairy cows following intravenous or intramuscular administration.

    PubMed

    Anfossi, P; Malvisi, J; Catraro, N; Bolognini, M; Tomasi, L; Stracciari, G L

    1993-01-01

    Five lactating cows were given benzydamine hydrochloride by rapid intravenous (0.45 mg/kg) and by intramuscular (0.45 and 1.2 mg/kg) injection in a crossover design. The bioavailability, pharmacokinetic parameters and excretion in milk of benzydamine were evaluated. After intravenous administration, the disposition kinetics of benzydamine was best described using a two-compartment open model. Drug disposition and elimination were fast (t1/2 alpha: 11.13 +/- 3.76 min; t1/2 beta: 71.98 +/- 24.75 min; MRT 70.69 +/- 11.97 min). Benzydamine was widely distributed in the body fluids and tissues (Vd(area): 3.549 +/- 1.301 L/kg) and characterized by a high value for body clearance (33.00 +/- 5.54 ml/kg per min). After intramuscular administration the serum concentration-time curves fitted a one-compartment open model. Following a dose of 0.45 mg/kg, the Cmax value was 38.13 +/- 4.2 ng/ml at a tmax of 67.13 +/- 4.00 min; MAT and MRT were 207.33 +/- 22.64 min and 278.01 +/- 12.22 min, respectively. Benzydamine bioavailability was very high (92.07% +/- 7.08%). An increased intramuscular dose (1.2 mg/kg) resulted in longer serum persistence (MRT 420.34 +/- 86.39 min) of the drug, which was also detectable in milk samples collected from both the first and second milking after treatment. PMID:8146956

  12. Safety recommendations for administering intravenous prostacyclins in the hospital.

    PubMed

    Kingman, Martha S; Chin, Kelly

    2013-10-01

    Prostacyclins are a high-risk category of continuous intravenous infusions increasingly used in hospitals to treat advanced pulmonary arterial hypertension, a rare condition characterized by vasoconstriction and vascular proliferation of the pulmonary arteries. Prostacyclins are given in doses of nanograms per kilogram per minute and have a narrow therapeutic dosing range for each patient. Sudden increases or decreases in dose can be life threatening. Previous studies revealed errors in the administration of these high-risk infusions, which in some instances led to serious adverse events, including death. The literature was reviewed for safety measures in administration of high-risk intravenous medications and input was obtained from leading experts in pulmonary arterial hypertension to create a set of safety recommendations for infusion of prostacyclins. PMID:24085826

  13. Intravenous Medication Administration in Intensive Care: Opportunities for Technological Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Jacqueline; Berner, Eta; Bothe, Olaf; Rymarchuk, Irina

    2008-01-01

    Medication administration errors have been shown to be frequent and serious. Error is particularly prevalent in highly technical specialties such as critical care. The purpose of this study was to describe the characteristics of intravenous medication administration in five intensive care units. These data were used within the context of a larger study to design information system decision support to decrease medication administration errors in these settings. Nurses were observed during the course of their work and their intravenous medication administration process, medication order source, references used, calculation method, number of medications prepared simultaneously, and any interruptions occurring during the preparation and delivery phases of the administration event were recorded. In addition, chart reviews of medication administration records were completed and nurses were asked to complete an anonymous drop-box questionnaire regarding their experiences with medication administration error. The results of this study are discussed in terms of potential informatics solutions for reducing medication administration error. PMID:18998790

  14. Scurvy in an alcoholic patient treated with intravenous vitamins.

    PubMed

    Ong, John; Randhawa, Rabinder

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin C deficiency is rare in developed countries but there is an increased prevalence in chronic alcohol abusers. In the UK, it is common practice to treat patients with chronic alcoholism who are admitted to hospital with intravenous vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6 and C for 2-3 days, followed by oral thiamine and vitamin B-compound tablets. This is a case of a 57-year-old man with a history of chronic alcoholism and chronic obstructive lung disease who was admitted to the intensive care unit for pneumonia requiring ventilatory support. He was given high doses of intravenous vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6 and C for 3 days then oral thiamine and vitamin B compound tablets but developed scurvy 4 days later. He was restarted on oral vitamin C supplementation and showed signs of improvement within 3 days of treatment. PMID:24728889

  15. Scurvy in an alcoholic patient treated with intravenous vitamins

    PubMed Central

    Ong, John; Randhawa, Rabinder

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin C deficiency is rare in developed countries but there is an increased prevalence in chronic alcohol abusers. In the UK, it is common practice to treat patients with chronic alcoholism who are admitted to hospital with intravenous vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6 and C for 2–3 days, followed by oral thiamine and vitamin B-compound tablets. This is a case of a 57-year-old man with a history of chronic alcoholism and chronic obstructive lung disease who was admitted to the intensive care unit for pneumonia requiring ventilatory support. He was given high doses of intravenous vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6 and C for 3 days then oral thiamine and vitamin B compound tablets but developed scurvy 4 days later. He was restarted on oral vitamin C supplementation and showed signs of improvement within 3 days of treatment. PMID:24728889

  16. [Serious bacterial and fungal infections in intravenous drug addicts].

    PubMed

    Jensenius, M; Heger, B; Dalgard, O; Stiris, M; Ringertz, S H

    1999-05-10

    Invasive infections caused by bacteria and fungi are common complications of intravenous drug abuse. Various vital organs and structures may be affected, e.g. the cardiac valves, the larger arteries, the bones, the joints and the central nervous system. However, due to the high frequency of low-virulent microbes of skin and oral origin, the clinical picture may be atypical with subacute course and few focal signs and symptoms. The complexity of this problem is illustrated by eight cases of serious bacterial and fungal infections recently diagnosed at our hospitals. All patients were HIV negative intravenous heroin addicts. The clinical spectrum was wide and included skin abscesses, pyomyositis, spondylodiscitis, septic arthritis, costal osteomyelitis, infective endocarditis, recurrent bacteraemia, and multiple brain abscesses. PMID:10380592

  17. Successful treatment of refractory Trichomonas vaginalis infection using intravenous metronidazole.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Isobel; Carne, Christopher; Sonnex, Christopher; Carmichael, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a sexually transmitted protozoan infection resulting in a vulvo-vaginitis and altered vaginal discharge in symptomatic women. Since its introduction in the 1960 s, metronidazole has been the first-line drug for trichomonal infection. Other nitroimidazoles, such as tinidazole, are used as alternative regimens with similar activity but at a greater expense. Treatment failure usually represents patient non-compliance or reinfection, although metronidazole resistance has previously been documented. Sensitivity testing is currently not available in the UK. Patients with disease unresponsive to first-line treatments pose a major challenge, as therapeutic options are limited. This case looks at a patient with refractory disease over an 18-month period, where intravenous infusion of metronidazole resulted in cure after multiple previous therapy failures. There is limited evidence to endorse the use of intravenous metronidazole, and this case report provides further support for its efficacy. PMID:25161176

  18. Pharmacokinetics of paracetamol (acetaminophen) after intravenous and oral administration.

    PubMed

    Rawlins, M D; Henderson, D B; Hijab, A R

    1977-04-20

    Plasma paracetamol concentrations were measured in 6 volunteers after single intravenous (1000 mg) and oral (500 mg, 1000 mg and 2000 mg) doses of the drug. Paracetamol levels declined multiphasically with a mean clearance after intravenous administration of 352 +/- 40 ml/min. A two-compartment open model appeared to describe the decline adequately. Comparison of the areas under the plasma concentration-time curves (AUC) indicated that oral bioavailability increased from 0.63 +/- 0.02 after 500 mg, to 0.89 +/- 0.04 and 0.87 +/- 0.08 after 1000 mg and 2000 mg, respectively. As a consequence of the incomplete bioavailability of paracetamol, as well as its multicompartmental distribution, accurate estimates of its distribution volume and clearance cannot be obtained if the drug is given orally. However, an estimate of its total plasma clearance may be derived from the AUC after a 500 mg oral dose. PMID:862649

  19. Comparison of Perioperative Outcomes for Epidural versus Intravenous Patient-Controlled Analgesia after Radical Cystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Winer, Andrew G.; Sfakianos, John P.; Puttanniah, Vinay G.; Bochner, Bernard H.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Use of patient-controlled epidural analgesia after various operations has been associated with earlier return of bowel function and thus decrease the length of stay (LOS). The primary aim of this study was to compare LOS after radical cystectomy between patients who received epidural analgesia versus those who received intravenous patient controlled analgesia. Our secondary analysis included the assessment of other metrics such as total opioid requirements, pain scores, return of bowel function and complication rates between the two groups. Methods We conducted a retrospective review using the electronic medical records of 308 patients who underwent radical cystectomies at Memorial Sloan Kettering between 2006 and 2011. We aimed to understand if epidural analgesia was associated with a reduced length of stay compared to patient controlled intravenous opioid analgesia. We also aimed to identify performance improvements as a function of epidural analgesia status using various metrics such as pain management, bowel function return, and complication rates. We used both univariate and multivariable analyses to identify if epidural analgesia was associated with meaningful differences in the aforementioned metrics. Results Median age at radical cystectomy, body mass index, sex, ASA score, and T stage were similar for both groups. For our primary objective of LOS, we found no significant difference between the two cohorts (8 vs 7 days, p=0.2). Analysis of our secondary outcome measures revealed that epidural analgesia use was associated with less total opioid requirement for the first three post-operative days (p=0.0001). Additionally, epidural analgesia was found to be associated with improved post-operative pain scores compared to intravenous patient-controlled analgesia on post-operative days 1 (p=0.0001) and 2 (p=0.004), and there was a slight improvement on post-operative day 3, but this was not significant (p=0.77). In contrast, we found no

  20. Intravenous fish oil in adult intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Heller, Axel R

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids contained in fish oils have shown efficacy in the treatment of chronic and acute inflammatory diseases due to their pleiotropic effects on inflammatory cell signalling pathways. In a variety of experimental and clinical studies, omega-3 fatty acids attenuated hyperinflammatory conditions and induced faster recovery. This chapter will shed light on the effects of intravenous fish oil in adult intensive care unit (ICU) patients and will discuss clinical data and recent meta-analyses on the topic. While significant beneficial effects on infection rates and the lengths of ICU and hospital stays have concordantly been identified in three recent meta-analyses on non-ICU surgical patients, the level of evidence is not so clear for critically ill patients. Three meta-analyses published in 2012 or 2013 explored data on the ICU population. Although the present data suggest the consideration of enteral nutrition enriched with fish oil, borage oil and antioxidants in mild to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, only one of the three meta-analyses found a trend (p = 0.08) of lower mortality in ICU patients receiving intravenous omega-3 fatty acids. Two of the meta-analyses indicated a significantly shorter hospital stay (5.17-9.49 days), and one meta-analysis found a significant reduction in ICU days (1.92). As a result of these effects, cost savings were postulated. Unlike in surgical patients, the effects of fish oil on infection rates were not found to be statistically significant in ICU patients, and dose-effect relationships were not established for any cohort. Thus, obvious positive secondary outcome effects with intravenous fish oil have not yet been shown to transfer to lower mortality in critically ill patients. There is a need for adequately powered, well-planned and well-conducted randomized trials to give clear recommendations on the individual utility and dosage of intravenous omega-3 fatty acids in critical illness. PMID:25471809

  1. Intravenous support for the patient in sickle cell crisis.

    PubMed

    Odesina, V

    2001-01-01

    Sickle cell episodes (otherwise known as crises) are inevitable complications of sickle cell disease (SCD). Successful management of these episodes includes hydration, medication administration, and blood transfusion. Intravenous support is an essential component in the management of sickle cell-related complications. This article gives an overview of SCD and its complications and treatments, focusing on infusion therapy support of the patient during a sickle cell episode. PMID:11836842

  2. Intravenous Tranexamic Acid Decreases Allogeneic Transfusion Requirements in Periacetabular Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Andrew J; Sanders, Thomas L; Trousdale, Robert T; Sierra, Rafael J

    2016-01-01

    Bernese (Ganz) periacetabular osteotomy is associated with significant blood loss and the need for perioperative transfusion. Tranexamic acid decreases blood loss and minimizes transfusion rates in total joint arthroplasty. However, no reports have described its use in patients undergoing Bernese periacetabular osteotomy. This study reports the use of intravenous tranexamic acid in these patients. The study included 137 patients (150 hips) who underwent isolated periacetabular osteotomy at a single institution between 2003 and 2014. Of these, 68 patients (75 hips) received intravenous tranexamic acid 1 g at the time of incision and 1 g at the time of closure. A group of 69 patients (75 hips) served as control subjects who underwent periacetabular osteotomy without administration of intravenous tranexamic acid. Thromboembolic disease was defined as deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism occurring within 6 weeks of surgery. Outcomes measured included transfusion requirements, pre- and postoperative hemoglobin values, operative times, and thromboembolic disease rates. Aspirin was used as the thromboembolic prophylactic regimen in 95% of patients. The rate of allogeneic transfusion was 0 in the tranexamic acid group compared with 21% in the control group (P=.0001). No significant difference was found in the autologous cell salvage requirement (.96 vs 1.01; P=.43) or the thromboembolic disease rate between the tranexamic acid group and the control group (2.67% vs 1.33%; P=.31). The use of intravenous tranexamic acid led to a decreased transfusion requirement with no increased risk of thromboembolic disease in this contemporary cohort of patients undergoing periacetabular osteotomy. PMID:26726988

  3. Neuroprotective Effects of Intravenous Anesthetics: A New Critical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bilotta, Federico; Stazi, Elisabetta; Zlotnik, Alexander; Gruenbaum, Shaun E.; Rosa, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Perioperative cerebral damage can result in various clinical sequela ranging from minor neurocognitive deficits to catastrophic neurological morbidity with permanent impairment and death. The goal of neuroprotective treatments is to reduce the clinical effects of cerebral damage through two major mechanisms: increased tolerance of neurological tissue to ischemia and changes in intra-cellular responses to energy supply deprivation. In this review, we present the clinical evidence of intravenous anesthetics on perioperative neuroprotection, and we also provide a critical perspective for future studies. The neuroprotective efficacy of the intravenous anesthetics thiopental, propofol and etomidate is unproven. Lidocaine may be neuroprotective in non-diabetic patients who have undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CBP) or with a 48-hour infusion, but conclusive data are lacking. There are several limitations of clinical studies that evaluate postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), including difficulties in identifying patients at high-risk and a lack of consensus for defining the “gold-standard” neuropsychological testing. Although a battery of neurocognitive tests remains the primary method for diagnosing POCD, recent evidence suggests a role for novel biomarkers and neuroimaging to preemptively identify patients more susceptible to cognitive decline in the perioperative period. Current evidence, while inconclusive, suggest that intravenous anesthetics may be both neuroprotective and neurotoxic in the perioperative period. A critical analysis on data recorded from randomized control trials (RCTs) is essential in identifying patients who may benefit or be harmed by a particular anesthetic. RCTs will also contribute to defining methodologies for future studies on the neuroprotective effects of intravenous anesthetics. PMID:24669972

  4. Aplastic anemia and membranous nephropathy induced by intravenous mercury

    PubMed Central

    Priya, N.; Nagaprabhu, V. N.; Kurian, G.; Seethalakshmi, N.; Rao, G. G.; Unni, V. N.

    2012-01-01

    Self-injection of mercury can be life-threatening. We report a case of attempted suicide by self-intravenous injection of elemental mercury. The patient suffered from two side effects : membranous nephropathy and aplastic anemia. She was treated and the systemic effects of mercury were reversed after 4 years. The toxicology of mercury, mechanisms of renal and systemic toxicities, and the various therapeutic measures for mercury poisoning are discussed. PMID:23439491

  5. Treatment of multifocal motor neuropathy with intravenous immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Koski, Carol Lee

    2014-07-01

    Multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) is a rare inflammatory, chronically progressive, unremitting disorder affecting the peripheral nervous system. Although the etiology of this condition is not known, high titers of IgM Ab to GM1 may serve as a biomarker for this disease. Clinical findings of motor weakness are associated with focal conduction blocks and with time, axonal destruction. Evidence supporting an immune etiology as well as the use of intravenous immunoglobulin to limit the disease progression is reviewed. PMID:24699885

  6. Single dose intravenous dexmedetomidine prolongs spinal anesthesia with hyperbaric bupivacaine

    PubMed Central

    Kubre, Jyotsna; Sethi, Ashish; Mahobia, Mamta; Bindal, Deeksha; Narang, Neeraj; Saxena, Anudeep

    2016-01-01

    Background and Introduction: Spinal block, a known technique to obtain anaesthesia for infraumblical surgeries. Now physician have advantage of using adjuvant to prolong the effect of intrathecal block, which can be given either intravenously or intrathecally, dexmedetomidine is one of them. We studied effect of intravenous dexmedetomidine for prolongation of duration of intrathecal block of 0.5% bupivacaine block. Objective: To evaluate the effect of intravenous dexmedetomidine on sensory regression, hemodynamic profile, level of sedation and postoperative analgesia. Methodology: 60 patients of ASA grade I and II posted for elective infraumblical surgeries were included in the study and randomly allocated into two groups. Group D recieved intrathecal 0.5% bupivacaine heavy, followed by infusion of intravenous dexmedetomidine 0.5mic/kg over 10 min, patients in group C received intrathecal 0.5% bupivacaine heavy 3ml followed by infusion of same volume of normal saline as placebo. Results: Two segment regression of sensory block was achieved at 139.0 ± 13.797 in group D whereas in group C it was only 96.67 ± 7.649min, the total duration of analgesia achieved in both study groups was 234.67 ± 7.649min and 164.17 ± 6.170min respectively in group D and group C. The time at which first analgesic was given to the patients when VAS >3 achieved that is in group D at 234.67 ± 7.649min and in group C at 164.17 ± 6.170min. Inj diclofenac sodium 75mg intramuscular was used as rescue analgesic. PMID:27212760

  7. The role of intravenous vasodilators in acute heart failure management.

    PubMed

    Piper, Susan; McDonagh, Theresa

    2014-08-01

    Acute heart failure is a major cause of emergency hospital admission, with significant impact on health resources and patient outcomes. With no new treatments for over 20 years, the advent of new innovative therapies may facilitate a radical change in our approach to such patients. In this article, we examine the current evidence for the use of current intravenous vasodilators in AHF management, and review the potential of novel therapies currently in development. PMID:25100108

  8. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dilley, Lorie

    2013-01-01

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  9. Synovial fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    Joint fluid analysis; Joint fluid aspiration ... El-Gabalawy HS. Synovial fluid analysis, synovial biopsy, and synovial pathology. In: Firestein GS, Budd RC, Gabriel SE, McInnes IB, O'Dell JR, eds. Kelly's Textbook of ...

  10. Pleural fluid Gram stain

    MedlinePlus

    Gram stain of pleural fluid ... lungs fill a person's chest with air. If fluid builds up in the space outside the lungs ... chest, it can cause many problems. Removing the fluid can relieve a person's breathing problems and help ...

  11. Pericardial fluid culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - pericardial fluid ... the heart (the pericardium). A small amount of fluid is removed. You may have an ECG and ... x-ray after the test. Sometimes the pericardial fluid is taken during open heart surgery. The sample ...

  12. Pleural fluid culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - pleural fluid ... is used to get a sample of pleural fluid. The sample is sent to a laboratory and ... the chest wall into the pleural space. As fluid drains into a collection bottle, you may cough ...

  13. Obstetric management of intrauterine growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Marsál, Karel

    2009-12-01

    The aim of obstetric management is to identify growth-restricted foetuses at risk of severe intrauterine hypoxia, to monitor their health and to deliver when the adverse outcome is imminent. After 30-32 gestational weeks, a Doppler finding of absent or reverse end-diastolic flow in the umbilical artery of a small-for-gestational age foetus is in itself an indication for delivery. In very preterm foetuses, the intrauterine risks have to be balanced against the risk of prematurity. All available diagnostic information (e.g., Doppler velocimetry of umbilical artery, foetal central arteries and veins and of maternal uterine arteries; foetal heart rate with computerised analysis of short-term variability; amniotic fluid amount; and foetal gestational age-related weight) should be collected to support the timing of delivery. If possible, the delivery should optimally take place before the onset of late signs of foetal hypoxia (pathological foetal heart rate pattern, severely abnormal ductus venosus blood velocity waveform, pulsations in the umbilical vein). PMID:19854682

  14. Differential pharmacology of drugs used for intravenous pre-medication.

    PubMed

    Dionne, R A

    1984-06-01

    The differential effects of drugs used for intravenous pre-medication are reviewed using the results of controlled clinical trials in dental outpatients. The evaluation of clinical success requires experimental control of factors which can confound both the therapeutic and evaluation processes. The evaluation of drugs which are given primarily to alleviate anxiety requires that this effect be assessed by the patient's self-report rather than by the clinician's estimate of drug effect based on external manifestations. The results of the studies reviewed suggest that intravenous diazepam accomplishes the therapeutic objectives of anxiety relief, decreased pain perception, and amnesia. The addition of a narcotic, while reducing the diazepam dose, does not result in any greater effect, but does improve patient cooperation. It is concluded that diazepam, administered to clinical end-point, accomplishes most of the goals of intravenous pre-medication with minimal potential for adverse effects. The use of additional agents may improve patient cooperation, but this possible advantage must be weighed against the potential for increased systemic effects. PMID:6145734

  15. Backscattering measuring system for optimization of intravenous laser irradiation dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusina, Tatyana V.; Popov, V. D.; Melnik, Ivan S.; Dets, Sergiy M.

    1996-11-01

    Intravenous laser blood irradiation as an effective method of biostimulation and physiotherapy becomes a more popular procedure. Optimal irradiation conditions for each patient are needed to be established individually. A fiber optics feedback system combined with conventional intravenous laser irradiation system was developed to control of irradiation process. The system consists of He-Ne laser, fiber optics probe and signal analyzer. Intravenous blood irradiation was performed in 7 healthy volunteers and 19 patients with different diseases. Measurements in vivo were related to in vitro blood irradiation which was performed in the same conditions with force-circulated venous blood. Comparison of temporal variations of backscattered light during all irradiation procedures has shown a strong discrepancy on optical properties of blood in patients with various health disorders since second procedure. The best cure effect was achieved when intensity of backscattered light was constant during at least five minutes. As a result, the optical irradiation does was considered to be equal 20 minutes' exposure of 3 mW He-Ne laser light at the end of fourth procedure.

  16. Intravenous linezolid administered orally: a novel desensitization strategy.

    PubMed

    Cawley, Michael J; Lipka, Ozana

    2006-04-01

    A 41-year-old woman with a history of myasthenia gravis was admitted to a local hospital because of severe muscle weakness, ptosis, shortness of breath, nausea and vomiting, and fever. Blood cultures revealed Enterococcus faecium resistant to several antimicrobial agents. The organism had minimum inhibitory concentrations above 16 microg/ml for vancomycin and above 2 microg/ml for quinupristin-dalfopristin. In the absence of therapeutic alternatives, treatment with linezolid was required (minimum inhibitory concentration 1.5 microg/ml). The first dose of linezolid resulted in a hypersensitivity reaction consistent with an immunoglobulin E-mediated response requiring medical intervention. Because of a lack of intravenous access and because of limited availability of the oral suspension from the manufacturer, a desensitization protocol was implemented in which the intravenous formulation of linezolid was given orally. The patient was successfully desensitized by using an escalating, 14-dose procedure. We believe this is the first case in the English language literature to describe successful desensitization with the oral administration of intravenous linezolid in a patient with E. faecium bacteremia who was allergic to oxazolidinone. PMID:16553517

  17. Oral, subcutaneous, and intravenous pharmacokinetics of ondansetron in healthy cats

    PubMed Central

    Quimby, J. M.; Lake, R. C.; Hansen, R. J.; Lunghofer, P. J.; Gustafson, D. L.

    2014-01-01

    Ondansetron is a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist that is an effective anti-emetic in cats. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of ondansetron in healthy cats. Six cats with normal complete blood count, serum biochemistry, and urinalysis received 2 mg oral (mean 0.43 mg/kg), subcutaneous (mean 0.4 mg/kg), and intravenous (mean 0.4 mg/kg) ondansetron in a cross-over manner with a 5-day wash out. Serum was collected prior to, and at 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 h after administration of ondansetron. Ondansetron concentrations were measured using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic modeling and dose interval modeling were performed. Repeated measures anova was used to compare parameters between administration routes. Bioavailability of ondansetron was 32% (oral) and 75% (subcutaneous). Calculated elimination half-life of ondansetron was 1.84 ± 0.58 h (intravenous), 1.18 ± 0.27 h (oral) and 3.17 ± 0.53 h (subcutaneous). The calculated elimination half-life of subcutaneous ondansetron was significantly longer (P < 0.05) than oral or intravenous administration. Subcutaneous administration of ondansetron to healthy cats is more bioavailable and results in a more prolonged exposure than oral administration. This information will aid management of emesis in feline patients. PMID:24330064

  18. High-Dose Intravenous Corticosteroids for Ocular Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Charkoudian, Leon D.; Ying, Gui-shuang; Pujari, Siddharth S.; Gangaputra, Sapna; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Foster, C. Stephen; Jabs, Douglas A.; Levy-Clarke, Grace A.; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Rosenbaum, James T.; Suhler, Eric B.; Kempen, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effectiveness and risk of complications of high-dose intravenous pulsed corticosteroids for non-infectious ocular inflammatory diseases. Methods Retrospective cohort study. One hundred four eyes of seventy patients who received high-dose intravenous corticosteroids for treatment of active ocular inflammation were identified from five centers. The main outcome measures were control of inflammation and occurrence of ocular or systemic complications within one month after treatment. Results Within ≤1 month of starting treatment, 57% of eyes achieved complete control of inflammation (95% confidence interval (CI): 33-83%), improving to 82% when near-complete control was included (95% CI: 61-96%). Most eyes (85%; 95% CI: 70-95%) gained clinically significant improvement in anterior chamber inflammation. One patient developed a colon perforation during treatment. No other major complications were recorded. Conclusions Treatment of ocular inflammation with high-dose intravenous corticosteroids resulted in substantial clinical improvement for most cases within one month. Complications of therapy were infrequent. PMID:22409561

  19. Oral, subcutaneous, and intravenous pharmacokinetics of ondansetron in healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Quimby, J M; Lake, R C; Hansen, R J; Lunghofer, P J; Gustafson, D L

    2014-08-01

    Ondansetron is a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist that is an effective anti-emetic in cats. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of ondansetron in healthy cats. Six cats with normal complete blood count, serum biochemistry, and urinalysis received 2 mg oral (mean 0.43 mg/kg), subcutaneous (mean 0.4 mg/kg), and intravenous (mean 0.4 mg/kg) ondansetron in a cross-over manner with a 5-day wash out. Serum was collected prior to, and at 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 h after administration of ondansetron. Ondansetron concentrations were measured using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic modeling and dose interval modeling were performed. Repeated measures anova was used to compare parameters between administration routes. Bioavailability of ondansetron was 32% (oral) and 75% (subcutaneous). Calculated elimination half-life of ondansetron was 1.84 ± 0.58 h (intravenous), 1.18 ± 0.27 h (oral) and 3.17 ± 0.53 h (subcutaneous). The calculated elimination half-life of subcutaneous ondansetron was significantly longer (P < 0.05) than oral or intravenous administration. Subcutaneous administration of ondansetron to healthy cats is more bioavailable and results in a more prolonged exposure than oral administration. This information will aid management of emesis in feline patients. PMID:24330064

  20. Management of the adverse effects associated with intravenous bisphosphonates.

    PubMed

    Tanvetyanon, T; Stiff, P J

    2006-06-01

    Intravenous bisphosphonates are widely used to treat hypercalcemia and to reduce skeletal-related morbidity among cancer patients. However, serious complications, generally occurring in less than 2% of patients participated in phase III clinical trials, including acute systemic inflammatory reaction, ocular inflammation, renal failure, nephrotic syndrome, electrolyte imbalance, and osteonecrosis of the maxilla and mandible have all been increasingly reported. Yet, strategies to deal with these complications are becoming clear. Acute systemic inflammatory reaction is often self-limited and becomes less intense during subsequent treatments. For patients who develop ocular symptoms, prompt ophthalmologic evaluation is crucial to determine the safety of a subsequent bisphosphonate therapy. Patients who receive long-term pamidronate should be evaluated at intervals for early sign of nephritic syndrome as timely cessation of the agent may result in a full recovery. To reduce the risk of severe electrolyte abnormalities, particularly hypocalcemia, correcting any pre-treatment electrolyte abnormality and supplementing vitamin D and calcium may be helpful. Finally, to reduce the risk of osteonecrosis of the maxilla and mandible, obtaining a full dental evaluation before treatment and avoidance of invasive dental procedures is suggested. The three commonly used intravenous bisphosphonates (pamidronate, zoledronic acid, and ibandronate), are generally safe; ibandronate has to date been the least reported to be associated with renal side effects. As clinical indications of intravenous bisphosphonates continue to expand, prescribing clinicians should be familiar with these possible adverse effects and discuss them with patients before commencing or continuing on therapy. PMID:16547070

  1. Lung peptidases, including carboxypeptidase, modulate airway reactivity to intravenous bradykinin.

    PubMed

    Chodimella, V; Skidgel, R A; Krowiak, E J; Murlas, C G

    1991-10-01

    We investigated the effect of inhibition of carboxypeptidase, neutral endopeptidase, or angiotensin converting enzyme on airway reactivity to intravenous bradykinin in guinea pigs. Bradykinin reactivity in intact, unanesthetized, spontaneously breathing animals was determined by measuring specific airway resistance in response to increasing doses of intravenous bradykinin or acetylcholine. We found that phosphoramidon and/or captopril (specific antagonists of neutral endopeptidase and angiotensin converting enzyme, respectively) increased airway reactivity to bradykinin, but the combination had no effect on muscarinic reactivity. Although 2-mercaptomethyl-3-guanidinoethylthiopropanoic acid (MGTA, a carboxypeptidase inhibitor) alone did not alter bradykinin reactivity, MGTA in the presence of both phosphoramidon and captopril significantly potentiated bradykinin-induced airway reactivity. In comparison, this did not affect reactivity to acetylcholine. Having found that carboxypeptidase inhibition could augment kinin-induced airway reactivity, we subsequently assayed for and identified carboxypeptidase M activity in guinea pig lung. We found considerable carboxypeptidase M activity in guinea pig lung subcellular fractions, the 100,000 x g membrane pellet having the highest specific activity. Our data indicate that airway reactivity to intravenous bradykinin is modulated by the activity of endogenous neutral endopeptidase, angiotensin converting enzyme, and carboxypeptidase, all of which are present in lung cell membranes. This study also suggests that the influence of carboxypeptidase per se may be substantially enhanced if endogenous pulmonary neutral endopeptidase and angiotensin converting enzyme activities are reduced. PMID:1928964

  2. A History of Intravenous Anesthesia in War (1656-1988).

    PubMed

    Roberts, Matthew; Jagdish, S

    2016-01-01

    The practice of anesthesia in war places significant restraints on the choice of anesthetic technique used; these include, but are not limited to, safety, simplicity, and portability. Ever since intravenous anesthesia became a practical alternative, there have been military doctors who felt that this technique was particularly suited to this environment. The challenge, as in civilian practice, has been to find the appropriate drugs as well as simple and safe delivery systems. The urgency of war has always stimulated innovation in medicine to counteract the ongoing development of weapons of war and their effects on the human body and to achieve improved survival as public expectations rise. This article traces the development of and the use of intravenous anesthesia by military physicians for battle casualties. The story starts long before the era of modern anesthesia, and the discussion concludes in the dog days of the cold war. The rapidly increasing interest in intravenous anesthesia in both civilian and military practice since the early 1990s is left for other authors to examine. PMID:26898141

  3. Intravenous Clomipramine for Treatment-Resistant Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Khani, Munir

    2016-01-01

    Background: This open trial was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of intravenous clomipramine (CMI) in refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Methods: Thirty OCD poor responders to previous multiple trials of anti-obsessive medications were selected and admitted to the hospital. Severity of the illness and response to treatment were primarily assessed by the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS). CMI was gradually administered intravenously for one week. All patients were thereafter switched to oral CMI with a maximum dose of 225mg/day. Results: The Y-BOCS total score mean at admission was in the severe range (24–31), and dropped on discharge and follow-ups to the moderate range (16–23). At discharge, 23 patients (76.7%) had a decrease in Y-BOCS ≥25% and were considered responders, while only 18 (60%) were still responders at 24 weeks. No relevant persistent side effects were reported. Conclusion: Intravenous clomipramine could be of benefit for severe OCD cases that have not adequately responded to several therapies, including oral clomipramine. PMID:26221004

  4. Fluid sampling device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studenick, D. K. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An inlet leak is described for sampling gases, more specifically, for selectively sampling multiple fluids. This fluid sampling device includes a support frame. A plurality of fluid inlet devices extend through the support frame and each of the fluid inlet devices include a longitudinal aperture. An opening device that is responsive to a control signal selectively opens the aperture to allow fluid passage. A closing device that is responsive to another control signal selectively closes the aperture for terminating further fluid flow.

  5. Fluid flow monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    McKay, M.D.; Sweeney, C.E.; Spangler, B.S. Jr.

    1993-11-30

    A flow meter and temperature measuring device are described comprising a tube with a body centered therein for restricting flow and a sleeve at the upper end of the tube to carry several channels formed longitudinally in the sleeve to the appropriate axial location where they penetrate the tube to allow pressure measurements and temperature measurements with thermocouples. The high pressure measurement is made using a channel penetrating the tube away from the body and the low pressure measurement is made at a location at the widest part of the body. An end plug seals the end of the device and holes at its upper end allow fluid to pass from the interior of the tube into a plenum. The channels are made by cutting grooves in the sleeve, the grooves widened at the surface of the sleeve and then a strip of sleeve material is welded to the grooves closing the channels. Preferably the sleeve is packed with powdered graphite before cutting the grooves and welding the strips. 7 figures.

  6. Fluid flow monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    McKay, Mark D.; Sweeney, Chad E.; Spangler, Jr., B. Samuel

    1993-01-01

    A flow meter and temperature measuring device comprising a tube with a body centered therein for restricting flow and a sleeve at the upper end of the tube to carry several channels formed longitudinally in the sleeve to the appropriate axial location where they penetrate the tube to allow pressure measurements and temperature measurements with thermocouples. The high pressure measurement is made using a channel penetrating the tube away from the body and the low pressure measurement is made at a location at the widest part of the body. An end plug seals the end of the device and holes at its upper end allow fluid to pass from the interior of the tube into a plenum. The channels are made by cutting grooves in the sleeve, the grooves widened at the surface of the sleeve and then a strip of sleeve material is welded to the grooves closing the channels. Preferably the sleeve is packed with powdered graphite before cutting the grooves and welding the strips.

  7. The optimal intravenous dose of midazolam after intravenous ketamine in healthy awake cats.

    PubMed

    Ilkiw, J E; Suter, C; McNeal, D; Farver, T B; Steffey, E P

    1998-02-01

    The effects of intravenous administration of variable-dose midazolam (0, 0.05, 0.075, 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 mg/kg) and ketamine (3 mg/kg) were studied in twenty-four healthy unmedicated cats from time of administration until full recovery. End-points were chosen to determine the optimal dose to allow a short period of restraint without noxious stimuli, a short period of restraint with noxious stimuli and endotracheal intubation. Recovery characteristics, as well as undesirable behaviours observed during recovery, were also recorded. The dose of midazolam to achieve lateral recumbency with head down was found to be 0.016 mg/kg in 50% of the population (ED50) and 0.054 mg/kg in 95% (ED95) of the population. A midazolam dose of 0.286 mg/kg was required to prevent conscious perception of a stimulus to the ulnar nerve in 50% of the population and 0.652 mg/kg in 95% of the population. The ED50 and ED95 of midazolam required to prevent swallowing in response to a laryngoscope placed on the back of the tongue were found to be 0.265 mg/kg and 0.583 mg/kg, respectively. The ED50 doses of 0.265 mg/kg for intubation and 0.286 mg/kg for restraint with noxious stimulation were close to the tested dose of 0.3 mg/kg. At that dose, the lack of responses lasted 3.67 +/- 2.27 min for laryngoscope and 2.50 +/- 2.20 min for ulnar nerve stimulation, with recovery to walking with ataxia taking 41.50 +/- 15.18 min and complete recovery taking 3.6 +/- 1.3 h. The predominant behavioural pattern during recovery was found to be normal, but some cats also exhibited abnormal behavioural patterns. Nine of the twelve cats exhibited an abnormal arousal state, with 4 being restless and 5 being sedated. Seven of the twelve cats exhibited an abnormal behaviour when approached, with three of the cats being more difficult to approach and four of the cats being easier to approach. Eight of the twelve cats exhibited an abnormal behavioural pattern when restrained, with the cats equally divided between more

  8. Effect of preoperative intravenous methocarbamol and intravenous acetaminophen on opioid use after primary total hip and knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Looke, Thomas D; Kluth, Cameron T

    2013-02-01

    Between 2010 and 2011, a perioperative pain protocol for primary total hip and knee replacement at one Florida medical center replaced preoperative oral analgesics with intravenous methocarbamol and intravenous acetaminophen. This is a retrospective cohort study of 300 patients, with 150 patients using the new pain protocol and 150 patients using a 2008 pain protocol that did not include these medications. The 2 cohorts were similar in patient gender, age, and body mass index. Opioid consumption was evaluated for a period of 48 hours after incision and was divided into 3 separate time intervals, as well as total 48-hour consumption. Mean opiate use decreased significantly from 2008 to 2011 in all time intervals and total consumption (7.5±3.4 mg to 6.1±3.0 mg; P<.01). Subgroup analysis suggested that changes to the hip protocol were responsible for decreased opioid use in the operating room and the postanesthesia care unit, and changes to the knee protocol were responsible for decreased opioid use on the hospital floor and total consumption. The difference between the 2 protocol groups was not due to differences in individual surgeon practice patterns. Physical therapy progress of knee flexion, average walking distance, and maximum walking distance were significantly improved. Hospital discharge was shorter in the 2011 group (4.0±1.1 days in 2008 group and 3.6±1.0 days in 2011 group). This study shows significant improvement in patient care from 2008 to 2011 that is at least partially due to the change to the use of preoperative intravenous methocarbamol and intravenous acetaminophen. PMID:23379573

  9. Pediatric Diabetic Ketoacidosis, Fluid Therapy and Cerebral Injury: The Design of a Factorial Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Nicole S.; Ghetti, Simona; Casper, T. Charles; Dean, J. Michael; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Treatment protocols for pediatric diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) vary considerably among centers in the United States and worldwide. The optimal protocol for intravenous fluid administration is an area of particular controversy, mainly in regard to possible associations between rates of intravenous fluid infusion and the development of cerebral edema, the most common and most feared complication of DKA in children. Theoretical concerns about associations between osmotic fluid shifts and cerebral edema have prompted recommendations for conservative fluid infusion during DKA. However, recent data suggest that cerebral hypoperfusion may play a role in cerebral injury associated with DKA. Currently there are no existing data from prospective clinical trials to determine the optimal fluid treatment protocol for pediatric DKA. The Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network FLUID (Fluid Therapies Under Investigation in DKA) Study is the first prospective randomized trial to evaluate fluid regimens for pediatric DKA. This 13-center nationwide factorial-design study will evaluate the effects of rehydration rate and fluid sodium content on neurological status during DKA treatment, the frequency of clinically-overt CE, and long-term neurocognitive outcomes following DKA. PMID:23490311

  10. Stability analysis of restricted non-static axial symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sharif, M.; Bhatti, M. Zaeem Ul Haq E-mail: mzaeem.math@gmail.com

    2013-11-01

    This paper aims to investigate the instability of very restricted class of non-static axially symmetric spacetime with anisotropic matter configuration. The perturbation scheme is established for the Einstein field equations and conservation laws. The instability range in the Newtonian and post-Newtonian regions are explored by constructing the collapse equation in this scenario. It is found that the adiabatic index plays an important role in the stability analysis which depends upon the physical parameters i.e., energy density and anisotropic pressure of the fluid distribution.

  11. 9 CFR 78.20 - General restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS BRUCELLOSIS Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Bison Because of Brucellosis § 78.20 General restrictions. Bison may not be...

  12. 9 CFR 78.5 - General restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS BRUCELLOSIS Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.5 General restrictions. Cattle may not be...

  13. 9 CFR 78.20 - General restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS BRUCELLOSIS Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Bison Because of Brucellosis § 78.20 General restrictions. Bison may not be...

  14. 9 CFR 78.5 - General restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS BRUCELLOSIS Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.5 General restrictions. Cattle may not be...

  15. Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professional Version Eating Disorders Definition of Eating Disorders Anorexia Nervosa Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder Binge Eating ... they eat. Eating Disorders Definition of Eating Disorders Anorexia Nervosa Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder Binge Eating ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: familial restrictive cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... CARDIOMYOPATHY, FAMILIAL RESTRICTIVE, 3 Sources for This Page Elliott P, Andersson B, Arbustini E, Bilinska Z, Cecchi ... Sebire N, Ashworth M, Deanfield JE, McKenna WJ, Elliott PM. Idiopathic restrictive cardiomyopathy in children is caused ...

  17. Simultaneous immunohistochemical detection of IUdR and BrdU infused intravenously to cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Miller, M A; Mazewski, C M; Yousuf, N; Sheikh, Y; White, L M; Yanik, G A; Hyams, D M; Lampkin, B C; Raza, A

    1991-04-01

    Cell cycle kinetics of solid tumors in the past have been restricted to an in vitro labeling index (LI) measurement. Two thymidine analogues, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and iododeoxyuridine (IUdR), can be used to label S-phase cells in vivo because they can be detected in situ by use of monoclonal antibodies (MAb) against BrdU (Br-3) or IUdR (3D9). Patients with a variety of solid tumors (lymphoma, brain, colon cancers) received sequential intravenous IUdR and BrdU. Tumor tissue removed at the end of infusion was embedded in plastic and treated with MAb Br-3 and 3D9 sequentially, using a modification of a previously described method. Clearly single and double labeled cells were visible, which enabled us to determine the duration of S-phase (Ts) and the total cell cycle time (Tc), in addition to the LI in these tumors. Detailed control experiments using tissue culture cell lines as well as bone marrow cells from leukemic patients are described, including the comparison of this double label technique with our previously described BrdU-tritiated thymidine technique. We conclude that the two methods are comparable and that the IUdR/BrdU method permits rapid and reliable cell cycle measurements in solid tumors. PMID:2005370

  18. Fluid mechanics in fluids at rest.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Howard

    2012-07-01

    Using readily available experimental thermophoretic particle-velocity data it is shown, contrary to current teachings, that for the case of compressible flows independent dye- and particle-tracer velocity measurements of the local fluid velocity at a point in a flowing fluid do not generally result in the same fluid velocity measure. Rather, tracer-velocity equality holds only for incompressible flows. For compressible fluids, each type of tracer is shown to monitor a fundamentally different fluid velocity, with (i) a dye (or any other such molecular-tagging scheme) measuring the fluid's mass velocity v appearing in the continuity equation and (ii) a small, physicochemically and thermally inert, macroscopic (i.e., non-Brownian), solid particle measuring the fluid's volume velocity v(v). The term "compressibility" as used here includes not only pressure effects on density, but also temperature effects thereon. (For example, owing to a liquid's generally nonzero isobaric coefficient of thermal expansion, nonisothermal liquid flows are to be regarded as compressible despite the general perception of liquids as being incompressible.) Recognition of the fact that two independent fluid velocities, mass- and volume-based, are formally required to model continuum fluid behavior impacts on the foundations of contemporary (monovelocity) fluid mechanics. Included therein are the Navier-Stokes-Fourier equations, which are now seen to apply only to incompressible fluids (a fact well-known, empirically, to experimental gas kineticists). The findings of a difference in tracer velocities heralds the introduction into fluid mechanics of a general bipartite theory of fluid mechanics, bivelocity hydrodynamics [Brenner, Int. J. Eng. Sci. 54, 67 (2012)], differing from conventional hydrodynamics in situations entailing compressible flows and reducing to conventional hydrodynamics when the flow is incompressible, while being applicable to both liquids and gases. PMID:23005525

  19. Temperature based Restricted Boltzmann Machines

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guoqi; Deng, Lei; Xu, Yi; Wen, Changyun; Wang, Wei; Pei, Jing; Shi, Luping

    2016-01-01

    Restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs), which apply graphical models to learning probability distribution over a set of inputs, have attracted much attention recently since being proposed as building blocks of multi-layer learning systems called deep belief networks (DBNs). Note that temperature is a key factor of the Boltzmann distribution that RBMs originate from. However, none of existing schemes have considered the impact of temperature in the graphical model of DBNs. In this work, we propose temperature based restricted Boltzmann machines (TRBMs) which reveals that temperature is an essential parameter controlling the selectivity of the firing neurons in the hidden layers. We theoretically prove that the effect of temperature can be adjusted by setting the parameter of the sharpness of the logistic function in the proposed TRBMs. The performance of RBMs can be improved by adjusting the temperature parameter of TRBMs. This work provides a comprehensive insights into the deep belief networks and deep learning architectures from a physical point of view. PMID:26758235

  20. 28 CFR 68.51 - Restricted access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Restricted access. 68.51 Section 68.51... ALIENS, UNFAIR IMMIGRATION-RELATED EMPLOYMENT PRACTICES, AND DOCUMENT FRAUD § 68.51 Restricted access. On... be a restricted access portion of the record to contain any material in the record to which...

  1. 29 CFR 18.56 - Restricted access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Restricted access. 18.56 Section 18.56 Labor Office of the... ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES General § 18.56 Restricted access. On his or her own motion, or on the motion of any party, the administrative law judge may direct that there be a restricted access portion of the...

  2. 29 CFR 18.56 - Restricted access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Restricted access. 18.56 Section 18.56 Labor Office of the... ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES General § 18.56 Restricted access. On his or her own motion, or on the motion of any party, the administrative law judge may direct that there be a restricted access portion of the...

  3. 28 CFR 68.51 - Restricted access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Restricted access. 68.51 Section 68.51... ALIENS, UNFAIR IMMIGRATION-RELATED EMPLOYMENT PRACTICES, AND DOCUMENT FRAUD § 68.51 Restricted access. On... be a restricted access portion of the record to contain any material in the record to which...

  4. Problem-Solving Test: Restriction Endonuclease Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2011-01-01

    The term "restriction endonuclease mapping" covers a number of related techniques used to identify specific restriction enzyme recognition sites on small DNA molecules. A method for restriction endonuclease mapping of a 1,000-basepair (bp)-long DNA molecule is described in the fictitious experiment of this test. The most important fact needed to…

  5. Restriction Enzyme Mapping: A Simple Student Practical.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Stephen J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    An experiment that uses the recombinant plasmid pX1108 to illustrate restriction mapping is described. The experiment involves three restriction enzymes and employs single and double restriction enzyme digestions. A list of needed materials, procedures, safety precautions, results, and discussion are included. (KR)

  6. Restricted Schur polynomials and finite N counting

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Storm

    2009-01-15

    Restricted Schur polynomials have been posited as orthonormal operators for the change of basis from N=4 SYM to type IIB string theory. In this paper we briefly expound the relationship between the restricted Schur polynomials and the operators forwarded by Brown, Heslop, and Ramgoolam. We then briefly examine the finite N counting of the restricted Schur polynomials.

  7. 5 CFR 330.205 - Employment restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employment restrictions. 330.205 Section 330.205 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS RECRUITMENT, SELECTION, AND PLACEMENT (GENERAL) Reemployment Priority List (RPL) § 330.205 Employment restrictions. (a) The restrictions in paragraph (b)...

  8. 47 CFR 1.1208 - Restricted proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Restricted proceedings. 1.1208 Section 1.1208 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Grants by Random Selection Ex Parte Communications Restricted Proceedings § 1.1208 Restricted proceedings. Unless otherwise provided by the Commission or its...

  9. Microbial Populations Associated with Restricted Shell Eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Restricted shell eggs are found in all shell egg processing facilities. The manner with which companies handle them can vary greatly. In most cases, restricted eggs are diverted to further processing. Some facilities do not rewash eggs, choosing instead to include dirts in restricted eggs. Eggs ...

  10. 36 CFR 13.1176 - Speed restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Speed restrictions. 13.1176... Operating Restrictions § 13.1176 Speed restrictions. (a) From May 15 through September 30, in designated whale waters the following are prohibited: (1) Operating a motor vessel at more than 20 knots...

  11. 36 CFR 13.1176 - Speed restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Speed restrictions. 13.1176... Operating Restrictions § 13.1176 Speed restrictions. (a) From May 15 through September 30, in designated whale waters the following are prohibited: (1) Operating a motor vessel at more than 20 knots...

  12. 7 CFR 982.14 - Restricted hazelnuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Restricted hazelnuts. 982.14 Section 982.14... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 982.14 Restricted hazelnuts. Restricted hazelnuts...

  13. 7 CFR 982.14 - Restricted hazelnuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Restricted hazelnuts. 982.14 Section 982.14... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 982.14 Restricted hazelnuts. Restricted hazelnuts...

  14. 7 CFR 982.14 - Restricted hazelnuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Restricted hazelnuts. 982.14 Section 982.14... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 982.14 Restricted hazelnuts. Restricted hazelnuts...

  15. 7 CFR 982.14 - Restricted hazelnuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restricted hazelnuts. 982.14 Section 982.14... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 982.14 Restricted hazelnuts. Restricted hazelnuts...

  16. 7 CFR 982.14 - Restricted hazelnuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Restricted hazelnuts. 982.14 Section 982.14... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 982.14 Restricted hazelnuts. Restricted hazelnuts...

  17. Effects of irrigation fluid in shoulder arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Surbhi; Manjuladevi, M; Vasudeva Upadhyaya, KS; Kutappa, AM; Amaravathi, Rajkumar; Arpana, J

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Extravasation of irrigation fluid used in shoulder arthroscopy can lead to life-threatening airway and systemic complications. This study was conducted to assess the effect of irrigation fluid absorption on measurable anthropometric parameters and to identify whether these parameters predict airway/respiratory compromise. Methods: Thirty six American Society of Anaesthesiologists physical status one or two patients aged 15–60 years undergoing shoulder arthroscopy under general anaesthesia were recruited. Measured variables preoperatively (baseline) and at the end of surgery were neck, chest, midarm and midthigh circumferences, weight, haemoglobin and serum sodium. Temperature, endotracheal tube cuff pressure, airway pressure, duration of surgery, amount of irrigation fluid and intravenous fluid used were also noted. Measured parameters were correlated with the duration of surgery and the amount of irrigation fluid used. Results: Postoperatively, the changes in variables showed a significant increase in the mean values (cm) for neck, chest, midarm and midthigh circumference (mean ± standard deviation: 2.35 ± 1.9, P < 0.001; 2.9 ± 3.88 cm, P < 0.001; 3.28 ± 2.44, P < 0.001 and 0.39 ± 0.71, P = 0.002, respectively) and weight (kg) (1.17 ± 1.24, P < 0.001). The post-operative haemoglobin (g/dL) levels decreased significantly (0.89 ± 1.23, P < 0.001) as compared to the baseline. No significant change was found in the serum sodium levels (P = 0.92). No patient experienced airway/respiratory compromise. Conclusion: Regional and systemic absorption of irrigation fluid in arthroscopic shoulder surgery is reflected in the degree of change in the measured anthropometric variables. However, this change was not significant enough to cause airway/respiratory compromise. PMID:27053783

  18. Fluid transport container

    DOEpatents

    DeRoos, Bradley G.; Downing, Jr., John P.; Neal, Michael P.

    1995-01-01

    An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitment for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container.

  19. Fluid transport container

    DOEpatents

    DeRoos, B.G.; Downing, J.P. Jr.; Neal, M.P.

    1995-11-14

    An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitting for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container. 13 figs.

  20. High dose intravenous ciprofloxacin in febrile neutropenic patients.

    PubMed

    Johnson, P R; Yin, J A; Tooth, J A

    1990-12-01

    We have evaluated the use of high-dose intravenous ciprofloxacin as monotherapy in the empirical therapy of febrile episodes in neutropenic patients during the course of a randomized trial comparing ciprofloxacin with a standard combination regimen. Sixty-four episodes of fever were studied in a high risk population of 42 patients mostly undergoing intensive chemotherapy for leukaemia. Ciprofloxacin achieved clinical responses as follows: completely successful in 39%, partially successful in 20%, and unsuccessful in 41%. Infections were microbiologically documented in 37 (58%), with Gram-positive bacteria (of which 37% were coagulase negative staphylococci and 34% were streptococci) accounting for 81% of all organisms cultured. Responses in documented infections were as follows; completely successful in 32%, partially successful in 27%, and unsuccessful in 41%. One infection-related death occurred 30 h after starting ciprofloxacin, and a further three patients died before the resolution of neutropenia. The early death was caused by fulminant infection with a ciprofloxacin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. No other ciprofloxacin resistance was seen amongst eight Gram-negative isolates. There was no evidence of emerging ciprofloxacin resistance during the course of the study. Ciprofloxacin was associated with a low incidence of adverse events with skin rash (five cases) and nausea (one case) being reported as possibly or probably related to ciprofloxacin. We conclude that high-dose intravenous ciprofloxacin may be safely employed as monotherapy in the empirical treatment of febrile episodes in neutropenic patients. It has the additional advantages of twice daily administration, the availability of intravenous and oral presentations, and absence of cross-allergy in beta-lactam antibiotic hypersensitive patients. PMID:2292537

  1. Evaluation of intravenous fluorescein in intradermal allergy testing in psittacines.

    PubMed

    Nett, Claudia S; Hosgood, Giselle; Heatley, J Jill; Foil, Carol S; Tully, Thomas N

    2003-12-01

    This study was designed to improve the clinical feasibility of intradermal skin testing of psittacine birds using intravenous fluorescein stain. Twenty-five healthy, anaesthetized Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis) were injected intravenously with 10 mg kg-1 fluorescein-sodium 1% followed by intradermal injections of 0.02 mL phosphate-buffered saline, histamine phosphate (1:100,000 w/v) and codeine phosphate (1:100,000 w/v) at the sternal apteria. Wheal diameters of reaction sites were measured grossly and under illumination with a Wood's lamp after 5 and 10 min. Fluorescence-enhanced injection sites were scored between 0 and 2, with 0 equivalent to normal skin and 2 equivalent to a plucked feather follicle. The presence of a fluorescent halo around intradermal injections was also recorded. Under Wood's light illumination at 10 min, histamine and saline were evaluated as positive and negative controls, respectively, based on a positive test having a halo and a score of 2. Sensitivity and specificity were each 76% for halo, 84 and 42% for score and 64 and 77% for combination of score and halo, respectively. Further, mean histamine reactions were significantly larger than codeine phosphate and saline (8.8 +/- 0.4 mm; 7.2 +/- 0.3 mm; 5.9 +/- 0.6 mm); however, this finding was not consistent in individual birds. Wheal size, halo presence and score were affected by site location independent from the injected compound. Intravenous fluorescein improved the readability of avian skin tests; however, the compounds tested raised inconsistent reactions in wheal size, score or halo presence. The compound-independent site effect raises concern on the validity of avian skin testing and warrants investigation of other techniques such as in vitro allergy testing. Based on our findings, intradermal allergy testing in psittacines with or without fluorescein is unreliable and cannot be recommended for practical clinical use. PMID:14678444

  2. Orthomolecular oncology: a mechanistic view of intravenous ascorbate's chemotherapeutic activity.

    PubMed

    González, Michael J; Miranda-Massari, Jorge R; Mora, Edna M; Jiménez, Ivonne Z; Matos, María Isabel; Riordan, Hugh D; Casciari, Joseph J; Riordan, Neil H; Rodríguez, Marielys; Guzmán, Angelik

    2002-03-01

    The effect of vitamin C in cancer has been a subject of great controversy; mainly because of the inconsistent results obtained by oral intakes of ascorbate when used as an anticancer agent. We believe the intravenous application of ascorbate will provide more consistent results in cancer patients since Vitamin C blood levels attained are substantially higher in a range proven cytotoxic to malignant cells. In this article we will present and discuss our proposed mechanism on the chemotherapeutic activity exhibited by ascorbate. PMID:12013679

  3. Intravenous zoledronate for osteoporosis: less might be more

    PubMed Central

    Grey, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Annual administration of 5 mg intravenous zoledronate is moderately effective in reducing fracture risk in older adults, decreasing the relative risk of clinical fracture by 33%. However, almost 10 years after its approval for use in clinical practice there remain very substantial uncertainties about the optimal treatment regimen, that is, the lowest dose and/or longest dosing interval that is efficacious. Several pieces of clinical research suggest that the current recommendation for annual administration of 5 mg zoledronate might represent overtreatment. Clinical trials to clarify the optimal use of zoledronate for reduction of fracture risk should be undertaken. PMID:27493690

  4. Conscious Intravenous Sedation in Dentistry: A Review of Current Therapy.

    PubMed

    Southerland, Janet H; Brown, Lawrence R

    2016-04-01

    Several sedation options are used to minimize pain, anxiety, and discomfort during oral surgery procedures. Minimizing or eliminating pain and anxiety for dental care is the primary goal for conscious sedation. Intravenous conscious sedation is a drug-induced depression of consciousness during which patients respond purposefully to verbal commands. No interventions are required to maintain a patent airway, and spontaneous ventilation is adequate as well as cardiovascular function. Patients must retain their protective airway reflexes, and respond to and understand verbal communication. The drugs and techniques used must therefore carry a broad margin of safety. PMID:27040288

  5. [Intravenous drop of calcium gluconate for phosphorus burns].

    PubMed

    Hu, A J

    1993-07-01

    20 patients with phosphor burn (TBSA 2%-75%) were cured by i.v. drop of calcium gluconate combined with other therapies including eschar conservation. Our experimental data showed that dogs with burn by spreading 85% phosphoric acid and napalm locally increased the level of plasma phosphorus and pathological damages to the heart, lung, kidney and etc were similar to those previously reported phosphorus burns. Intravenous drop of calcium gluconate after phosphate burn reduced the level of plasma phosphorus to normal rapidly and lessened the visceral damages. We consider that i.v. drop of calcium gluconate can accelerate the elimination of phosphorus, and prevent phosphorus poisoning after phosphorus burns. PMID:8313772

  6. Cholescintigraphy in acute cholecystitis: use of intravenous morphine

    SciTech Connect

    Choy, D.; Shi, E.C.; McLean, R.G.; Hoschl, R.; Murray, I.P.C.; Ham, J.M.

    1984-04-01

    Conventional cholescintigraphy (60 patients) and a modified protocol (59 patients) were compared in 74 females and 45 males with acute cholecystitis. In the modified protocol, intravenous morphine was administered whenever the gallbladder was not seen 40 minutes after injection of Tc-99m-pyroxylidene-glutamate. Accuracy was 98% with morphine, compared with 88% for the conventional protocol; specificity improved from 83% to 100% with no loss of sensitivity. Low doses of morphine are well tolerated and can result in a highly accurate diagnosis of acute cholecystitis without the need for delayed imaging.

  7. Acute toxicity of nickel nanoparticles in rats after intravenous injection

    PubMed Central

    Magaye, Ruth R; Yue, Xia; Zou, Baobo; Shi, Hongbo; Yu, Hongsheng; Liu, Kui; Lin, Xialu; Xu, Jin; Yang, Cui; Wu, Aiguo; Zhao, Jinshun

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to add scientific data in regard to the use of metallic nanoparticles in nanomedicine. The acute toxicity of nickel (Ni) nanoparticles (50 nm), intravenously injected through the dorsal penile vein of Sprague Dawley rats was evaluated in this study. Fourteen days after injection, Ni nanoparticles induced liver and spleen injury, lung inflammation, and caused cardiac toxicity. These results indicate that precautionary measures should be taken with regard to the use of Ni nanoparticles or Ni compounds in nanomedicine. PMID:24648736

  8. Quantitative determination of particulate contamination in intravenous administration sets.

    PubMed

    Di Paolo, E R; Hirschi, B; Pannatier, A

    1990-10-19

    Particle counts were performed on 1,000 intravenous administration sets from ten suppliers on the Swiss market using a HIAC/Royco electronic counter. The following main conclusions may be drawn from the results of this study: --the small particles were the most numerous, regardless of the type of set; --the differences in the counts obtained for the different suppliers' sets tended to level off for particles larger than 10 microns; --the drip chamber and latex connector may be two important sources of particles; --the particulate contamination from the sets is relatively low compared with the amount of particles contained in the parenteral solutions. PMID:2255588

  9. ECMO for Cardiac Rescue after Accidental Intravenous Mepivacaine Application

    PubMed Central

    Froehle, Michael; Haas, Nikolaus A.; Kirchner, Guenther; Kececioglu, Deniz; Sandica, Eugen

    2012-01-01

    Mepivacaine is a potent local anaesthetic and used for infiltration and regional anaesthesia in adults and pediatric patients. Intoxications with mepivacaine affect mainly the CNS and the cardiovascular system. We present a case of accidental intravenous mepivacaine application and intoxication of an infant resulting in seizure, broad complex bradyarrhythmia, arterial hypotension and finally cardiac arrest. The patient could be rescued by prolonged resuscitations and a rapid initiation of ECMO and survived without neurological damage. The management strategies of this rare complication including promising other treatment options with lipid emulsions are discussed. PMID:22966472

  10. The groin hit: complications of intravenous drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Roszler, M H; McCarroll, K A; Donovan, K R; Rashid, T; Kling, G A

    1989-05-01

    We are seeing an increased number of complications in intravenous drug abusers who resort to injecting the groin for vascular access (the "groin hit"). Vascular complications include venous thrombosis, arteriovenous fistula, mycotic aneurysm, ruptured pseudoaneurysm, and dissecting hematoma. Soft tissue complications include cellulitis and abscess. The latter may dissect into the extraperitoneal space. Skeletal complications include osteomyelitis and septic arthritis. This paper illustrates the radiographic spectrum of these complications. An algorithm will illustrate the radiographic evaluation of a groin mass in a drug addict. PMID:2727357

  11. Intravenous digital subtraction angiography in the investigation of intracranial disease

    SciTech Connect

    DeFilipp, G.J.; Pinto, R.S.; Lin, J.P.; Kricheff, I.I.

    1983-07-01

    Eighty-six patients who presented with a variety of intracranial lesions were examined with intravenous digital subtraction angiogrphy (IV-DSA). A grading system was used to evaluate the ability IV-DSA to answer specific diagnostic questions regarding intracranial tumors, vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage, lesions of the sella, dural sinus occlusion, and post-therapeutic embolization. Eighty-four percent of the examinations provided clinically useful information. In 15% of the cases limited but useful information was obtained; only 1% of the examinations provided no useful information. We conclude that IV-DSA can routinely provide useful information in the evaluation of the variety of intracranial lesions described above.

  12. Restrictive lung disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    King, T E

    1992-12-01

    Restrictive ventilatory defects characterized by a reduction in lung volumes and an increase in the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity occur when lung expansion is limited because of alterations in the lung parenchyma or because of abnormalities in the pleura, chest wall, or neuromuscular apparatus. Few studies have examined pregnant women with carefully defined restrictive lung disorders. The majority of pulmonary diseases have their onset after the childbearing years. When present, most do not alter fertility. Further, these disorders are only a relative contraindication to pregnancy because both the fetus and mother are able to survive without a high risk of increased morbidity or mortality. The clinical course of sarcoidosis is generally not altered by pregnancy. Factors indicative of a poor prognosis in sarcoidosis and pregnancy include parenchymal lesions on chest radiography, advanced roentgenologic staging, advanced maternal age, low inflammatory activity, requirement for drugs other than corticosteroids, and the presence of extrapulmonary sarcoidosis. Pregnancy seldom has a significant effect on the course of the connective tissue diseases. In PSS with significant renal involvement, pregnancy has the potential for poor fetal prognosis and the risk of maternal death due to a lethal progression of renal failure. Worsening of SLE is uncommon in pregnancy, and prophylactic therapy is generally not necessary. Most women with LAM are advised to avoid pregnancy or the use of estrogens because of the concern that it will lead to worsening of their disease. The incidence of kyphoscoliosis in pregnancy is relatively high. Premature birth rates are higher than that in the normal population. The risk of progression of the abnormal curve in a scoliotic patient appears low. However, women with unstable scolioses at the time of pregnancy can demonstrate progression of the curve with the pregnancy. Respiratory complications during

  13. An Infinite Restricted Boltzmann Machine.

    PubMed

    Côté, Marc-Alexandre; Larochelle, Hugo

    2016-07-01

    We present a mathematical construction for the restricted Boltzmann machine (RBM) that does not require specifying the number of hidden units. In fact, the hidden layer size is adaptive and can grow during training. This is obtained by first extending the RBM to be sensitive to the ordering of its hidden units. Then, with a carefully chosen definition of the energy function, we show that the limit of infinitely many hidden units is well defined. As with RBM, approximate maximum likelihood training can be performed, resulting in an algorithm that naturally and adaptively adds trained hidden units during learning. We empirically study the behavior of this infinite RBM, showing that its performance is competitive to that of the RBM, while not requiring the tuning of a hidden layer size. PMID:27171012

  14. 10 CFR 1045.16 - Criteria for evaluation of restricted data and formerly restricted data information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Criteria for evaluation of restricted data and formerly restricted data information. 1045.16 Section 1045.16 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) NUCLEAR CLASSIFICATION AND DECLASSIFICATION Identification of Restricted Data and Formerly Restricted Data Information § 1045.16 Criteria...

  15. The effect of oral vs. Intravenous rehydration on circulating myoglobin and creatine kinase.

    PubMed

    Beasley, Kathleen N; Lee, Elaine C; McDermott, Brendon P; Yamamoto, Linda M; Emmanuel, Holly; Casa, Douglas J; Armstrong, Lawrence E; Kraemer, William J; Maresh, Carl M

    2010-01-01

    Physical activity of significant intensity and duration may cause varying degrees of skeletal muscle damage, but it is unclear whether mode of rehydration will attenuate muscle tissue disruption caused by exercise in the heat. To examine the effects of the mode of rehydration on markers of muscle damage (myoglobin and creatine kinase [CK]), 11 healthy active men (age = 23 +/- 4 years, body mass = 80.9 +/- 3.9 kg, height = 180.5 +/- 5.4 cm) completed 4 experimental trials consisting of an exercise dehydration protocol (to -4% of baseline body mass), followed by a rehydration period (oral, intravenous [IV], oral and IV combined, and ad libitum), and finishing with an intense exercise challenge that included treadmill running and sprinting and a box lifting protocol. During rehydration, subjects returned to -2% of baseline body mass unless completing the ad libitum trial during which they consumed fluids as thirst dictated. Myoglobin (Mb) and CK were measured during euhydrated rest. Post-exercise blood was drawn at 1 and 24 hours post exercise challenge for Mb and CK, respectively. Urine was collected during euhydrated rest and 1-hour post exercise challenge for measurement of Mb clearance. Mb concentrations increased significantly from pre (1.06 +/- 0.20, 0.88 +/- 0.07, 1.15 +/- 0.25 and 0.92 +/- 0.06 nmol.L) to post (1.52 +/- 0.28, 1.44 +/- 0.11, 1.71 +/- 0.45 and 1.58 +/- 0.39) for IV, oral, oral and IV combined, and ad libitum, respectively, but were not significantly different among trials. Serum CK concentrations remained within the normal physiological range for all trials. Thus, despite previous research that clearly indicates the benefit of ingesting fluids during exercise to attenuate muscle damage, there were no significant differences between the modes of rehydration on circulating Mb and CK. PMID:20042925

  16. Speciation of arsenic in urine following intravenous administration of arsthinol in mice.

    PubMed

    Ajana, Imane; Astier, Alain; Gibaud, Stéphane

    2010-09-01

    Recent investigations have shown that arsthinol, a trivalent organoarsenic compound (dithiarsolane), has been active in vitro on leukemia cell lines and offers a better therapeutic index than arsenic trioxide, as estimated by the ratio LD50/IC50. To complete our understanding of its urinary excretion, a sensitive method using liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was used. Mice were injected intravenously with a single dose of arsthinol at 0.2 mmol/kg of body weight. The amount of total arsenic in tissues and body fluids was determined by a colorimetric method and urine metabolites were analyzed on a C18 Acclaim PepMap 100 A column by LC-MS. Our results showed that only three arsenic species (acetarsol, acetarsol oxide and arsthinol) were detected in the first 24-h urine. Overall, this study confirms that the hydrolysis of dithiarsolanes to arsenoxides (i.e. acetarsol oxide) can be followed by an oxidation in arsonic acids (i.e. acetarsol). All these compounds are excreted in the urine. PMID:21495268

  17. Reproductive failure in mink and ferrets after intravenous or oral inoculation of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, J A; Manning, D D

    1990-01-01

    Four pregnant mink and seven pregnant ferrets, including five with previous exposure and specific antibody, were injected intravenously with 10(8)-10(10) colony-forming units of Campylobacter jejuni. All 11 pregnancies failed 1-16 days after infection, with results ranging from fetal resorption to expulsion of dead or premature living kits. In every case, uterine contents (placenta, uterine fluid and/or kits) were culture-positive for C. jejuni. Three pregnant mink and nine pregnant ferrets, including four with previous exposure and antibody, were fed 10(9)-10(11) C. jejuni. Two of the mink aborted; kits of all three were culture-positive, but those of one female survived. Seven of the nine ferrets aborted, with two having culture-positive uterine contents. None of 28 uninfected ferret control pregnancies ended in abortion. The most prominent histological feature observed was severe placentitis, which appears to be a more likely cause of Campylobacter-induced abortion than direct pathogenic effects on infected kits. These results suggest that infection of mink or ferrets with C. jejuni during pregnancy poses a serious risk of reproductive failure, even for previously exposed females. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2249178

  18. Quantum cosmological perturbations of multiple fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Patrick; Pinto-Neto, N.; Vitenti, Sandro D. P.

    2016-01-01

    The formalism to treat quantization and evolution of cosmological perturbations of multiple fluids is described. We first construct the Lagrangian for both the gravitational and matter parts, providing the necessary relevant variables and momenta leading to the quadratic Hamiltonian describing linear perturbations. The final Hamiltonian is obtained without assuming any equations of motions for the background variables. This general formalism is applied to the special case of two fluids, having in mind the usual radiation and matter mix which made most of our current Universe history. Quantization is achieved using an adiabatic expansion of the basis functions. This allows for an unambiguous definition of a vacuum state up to the given adiabatic order. Using this basis, we show that particle creation is well defined for a suitable choice of vacuum and canonical variables, so that the time evolution of the corresponding quantum fields is unitary. This provides constraints for setting initial conditions for an arbitrary number of fluids and background time evolution. We also show that the common choice of variables for quantization can lead to an ill-defined vacuum definition. Our formalism is not restricted to the case where the coupling between fields is small, but is only required to vary adiabatically with respect to the ultraviolet modes, thus paving the way to consistent descriptions of general models not restricted to single-field (or fluid).

  19. Pediatric use of intravenous and intramuscular phenytoin: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Wheless, J W

    1998-10-01

    First developed in 1950, parenterally administered phenytoin offered substantial advantages over parenterally administered phenobarbital and paraldehyde, which were the treatments for status epilepticus until the 1960s. During the 1950s, clinical research established the pediatric dosage of parenteral phenytoin for the treatment of seizures, which was based on the adult dosage adjusted to each child's weight. Studies in the late 1970s and early 1980s established more appropriate dosing for neonates and children on a milligram-per-kilogram basis. Scientifically derived dosing guidelines have been available only for the past 12 years. Side effects associated with parenteral phenytoin, caused primarily by its high pH level and the propylene glycol content needed to increase its solubility, were frequently reported during the 1970s and 1980s, after 25 years of clinical use. Intravenous administration of phenytoin caused burning at the infusion site and was associated with severe local cutaneous reactions following infiltration into surrounding tissue, leading to a recommendation that intravenous phenytoin be avoided in young children and the elderly. The propylene glycol solvent was linked to seizures, arrhythmia, asystole, and hepatic and renal damage. When administered intramuscularly, phenytoin is poorly absorbed and can cause hemorrhagic necrosis of the soft tissues at the injection site. Many of these side effects can be avoided in children with the use of fosphenytoin. PMID:9796746

  20. Formulation and pharmacokinetics evaluation of puerarin nanocrystals for intravenous delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yancai; Ma, Yi; Ma, Yingying; Du, Yongli; Liu, Zhaoping; Zhang, Dianrui; Zhang, Qiang

    2012-08-01

    Puerarin is a very widely used drug for treating coronary heart disease. Owing to its poor water solubility and the adverse drug reactions caused by cosolvents having been confirmed by SFDA, the aim of present study was to construction and evaluation the puerarin nanocrystals in vitro and in vivo. The nanocrystals prepared were characterized using PCS, AFM, TEM, SEM and DSC. For the assessment of the pharmacokinetic parameters the developed formulations have been intravenous administered to beagle dogs. Results revealed that a narrow size distributed nanocrystals composed of crystallized spherical particles with a mean particle size of 423.6 +/- 17.3 nm, a poly-dispersity index of 0.13 +/- 0.07 and a negative charges around -30 mV was obtained. Puerarin dissolution velocity and saturation solubility were enhanced by the nanocrystals. DSC analysis revealed that the crystallinity of the puerarin was preserved during the high pressure homogenization and freeze-drying processes. Administration of the nanocrystals led to a mean plasma profile with almost similarly low variations in comparison to the reference solution, however with no initial blood peak as observed with the solution formulation. The puerarin nanocrystals exhibited a significantly (P < 0.05) reduced Cmax and clearance, and a significantly (P < 0.05) greater MRT, clearance and elimination half-life compared to the puerarin solution. These results revealed the opportunity to formulate puerarin in nanocrystals for intravenous delivery with higher safety. PMID:22962724

  1. Safety of approved MR contrast media for intravenous injection.

    PubMed

    Runge, V M

    2000-08-01

    In the last 10 years, the use of intravenous contrast media in magnetic resonance (MR) has become well-established clinical practice. Contrast media provide critical additional diagnostic information in many instances. The gadolinium chelates constitute the largest group of MR contrast media and are considered to be very safe. These agents are thought to be safer than nonionic iodinated contrast agents. Unlike x-ray agents, the gadolinium chelates are not nephrotoxic. Minor adverse reactions, including nausea (1%-2% for all agents) and hives (<1% for all agents), occur in a very low percent of cases. Health care personnel should be aware of the (extremely uncommon) potential for severe anaphylactoid reactions in association with the use of MR contrast media and be prepared should complications arise. The four gadolinium chelates currently available worldwide, gadopentetate dimeglumine, gadoteridol, gadodiamide, and gadoterate meglumine, cannot be differentiated on the basis of adverse reactions. Far fewer patients have been examined to date with the two other agents that have widespread approval, mangafodipir trisodium and ferumoxides. These latter two agents are considered to be very safe but have a higher percentage of associated adverse reactions (7%-17% with mangafodipir trisodium and 15% with ferumoxides). This review discusses the safety issues involved with administration of intravenous contrast media in MR imaging, focusing on the six agents (four gadolinium chelates, one manganese chelate, and the last a large iron particle) with widespread use world-wide. PMID:10931582

  2. Intravenous estrogens increase insulin clearance and action in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Van Pelt, R. E.; Gozansky, W. S.; Schwartz, R. S.; Kohrt, W. M.

    2010-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that estrogens alter insulin action, we evaluated the effects of intravenous conjugated estrogens (CE) on insulin-stimulated steady-state glucose infusion rate (SSGIR) and suppression of plasma glycerol in postmenopausal women (mean ± SD; 56 ± 4 yr; n = 12) not using hormone replacement. SSGIR and glycerol were measured during a two-stage (8 and 40 mU · m−2· min−1) hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp on 2 days, with or without a 2.5-mg intravenous CE bolus. Serum estradiol concentrations were increased ~200% on the estrogen (EST) compared with the control (CON) days. Serum insulin was reduced (P < 0.01) during stage 2 of the clamp for EST (63.3 ± 12.8 μU/ml) vs. CON (78.2 ± 15.8 μU/ml). Mean SSGIR and plasma glycerol did not differ between CON and EST days. With adjustment for differences in insulin concentration between conditions, stage 2 glucose disposals were significantly higher (8.63 vs. 7.20 mg · kg−1 · min−1) and plasma glycerol concentrations were significantly lower (29.4 vs. 35.0 μmol/l) for EST vs. CON. Our findings suggest that acute CE administration increases insulin clearance and action in postmenopausal women. PMID:12684221

  3. Pharmacokinetics of cephalexin in calves after intravenous and subcutaneous administration.

    PubMed

    Garg, S K; Chaudhary, R K; Srivastava, A K

    1996-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of cephalexin was investigated in male calves following a single intravenous (i.v.) and subcutaneous (s.c.) administration (10 mg/kg). The distribution rate constant and distribution half-life were 3.34 +/- 1.22 h-1 and 0.32 +/- 0.08 h, respectively. The values of elimination half-lives following i.v. and s.c. administration were 3.17 +/- 1.30 and 2.56 +/- 0.24 h, respectively. The absorption half-life following s.c. administration was 0.09 +/- 0.01 h. The apparent volume of distribution was 0.65 +/- 0.16 and 0.46 +/- 0.07 L/kg and total body clearance was 2.96 +/- 0.46 and 1.66 +/- 0.31 ml/kg/min, respectively, following i.v. and s.c. administration. Systemic availability following subcutaneous administration was found to be almost complete (103.08%). The satisfactory intravenous dosage regimen of cephalexin for calves would be 11.3 mg/kg as the priming dose followed by 10.0 mg/kg as the maintenance dose to be repeated at 6-h intervals. However, the subcutaneous dosage regimen of cephalexin in calves would be 8.0 mg/kg followed by 7.05 mg/kg at 8-h intervals. PMID:8908743

  4. A pilot intravenous cannulation team: an Irish perspective.

    PubMed

    Carr, Peter J; Glynn, Ronan W; Dineen, Brendan; Kropmans, Thomas Jb

    Peripheral intravenous cannulation (PIVC) is a potentially painful and distressing procedure for patients, and is traditionally carried out by medical personnel. A university hospital in Ireland was chosen to initiate a pilot intravenous (IV) cannulation team, to ascertain whether this procedure could be performed effectively by a team of nurses. The team was introduced to support the implementation of the European working time directive (EWTD). A team of four registered general nurses, led by a senior phlebotomist, provided PIVC. Request books were placed on each ward and data was recorded before and after each insertion. A constantly increasing percentage of first-time cannulation success is displayed from the first five months of the study. In-depth analysis on an orthopaedic ward reveal a preference for distal site insertion and routine change at 72 hours. IV teams performing IV cannulation can effectively reduce insertion rate attempts, and potentially offer a solution to the manpower issues arising as a result of implementation of the EWTD. PMID:20622770

  5. Bronchodilating effect of intravenous magnesium sulfate in bronchial astham

    SciTech Connect

    Okayama, H.; Aikawa, T.; Okayama, M.; Sasaki, H.; Mue, S.; Takishima, T.

    1987-02-27

    The bronchodilating effect of magnesium sulfate (MgSO/sub 4/) was studied in ten asthmatic patients with mild attacks. In five patients, 0.5 mmol/min of MgSO/sub 4/ was administered intravenously for 20 minutes, and the time courses of respiratory resistance, forced vital capacity, and forced expiratory volume at 1 s were studied. In another five patients, MgSO/sub 4/ dose-response curves were obtained. Soon after administration began, MgSO/sub 4/ relieved bronchoconstriction in a dose-dependent manner. Maximum responses of respiratory resistance, forced vital capacity, and forced expiratory volume were 71%, 117%, and 118% of initial values, respectively, and were similar to the effects of additional albuterol inhalation. The infusion of MgSO/sub 4/ also improved dyspnea and piping rales in three other asthmatic patients with a severe attack. The authors conclude that intravenous infusion of MgSO/sub 4/ produces a rapid and marked bronchodilation in both mild and severe asthma and may be a unique bronchodilating agent.

  6. Electrophysiological study of intravenous pinaverium bromide in cardiology.

    PubMed

    Guerot, C; Khemache, A; Sebbah, J; Noel, B

    1988-01-01

    Pinaverium bromide is a musculotropic spasmolytic agent which acts by inhibiting transmembrane calcium movements, an effect similar to that of verapamil. Because of this, an investigation was carried out to see if it had any electrophysiological effects in patients with various cardiac disorders. In an open study, 10 patients received 2 mg pinaverium bromide intravenously. In a double-blind study, 10 patients received 4 mg pinaverium bromide intravenously and 10 patients placebo. Patients included those with either normal or pathological basal conduction, such as bundle-branch block and 1st degree atrioventricular block. Measurements were made of electrophysiological parameters before and 10 minutes after injection. The results showed that neither of the two doses of pinaverium bromide had any effect on atrial excitability, sino-atrial conduction, node and trunk atrioventricular conduction or on intraventricular conduction. No significant difference was seen in comparison with placebo. Pinaverium bromide had no anti-arrhythmic properties in these studies. Local, cardiac and general clinical tolerability was good in all patients. PMID:3219882

  7. Preparation of intravenous cholesterol tracer using current good manufacturing practices.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaobo; Ma, Lina; Racette, Susan B; Swaney, William P; Ostlund, Richard E

    2015-12-01

    Studies of human reverse cholesterol transport require intravenous infusion of cholesterol tracers. Because insoluble lipids may pose risk and because it is desirable to have consistent doses of defined composition available over many months, we investigated the manufacture of cholesterol tracer under current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) conditions appropriate for phase 1 investigation. Cholesterol tracer was prepared by sterile admixture of unlabeled cholesterol or cholesterol-d7 in ethanol with 20% Intralipid(®). The resulting material was filtered through a 1.2 micron particulate filter, stored at 4°C, and tested at time 0, 1.5, 3, 6, and 9 months for sterility, pyrogenicity, autoxidation, and particle size and aggregation. The limiting factor for stability was a rise in thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances of 9.6-fold over 9 months (P < 0.01). The emulsion was stable with the Z-average intensity-weighted mean droplet diameter remaining at 60 nm over 23 months. The zeta potential (a measure of negative surface charge protecting from aggregation) was unchanged at -36.2. Rapid cholesterol pool size was 25.3 ± 1.3 g. Intravenous cholesterol tracer was stable at 4°C for 9 months postproduction. CGMP manufacturing methods can be achieved in the academic setting and need to be considered for critical components of future metabolic studies. PMID:26416797

  8. Fluoropolymer-Based Emulsions for the Intravenous Delivery of Sevoflurane

    PubMed Central

    Fast, Jonathan P.; Perkins, Mark G.; Pearce, Robert A.; Waters, Ralph M.; Mecozzi, Sandro

    2009-01-01

    Background The intravenous delivery of halogenated volatile anesthetics has been previously achieved using phospholipid-stabilized emulsions, e.g. Intralipid. However, fluorinated volatile anesthetics, such as sevoflurane, are partially fluorophilic and do not mix well with classic non-fluorinated lipids. This effect limits the maximum amount of sevoflurane that can be stably emulsified in Intralipid to 3.5% v/v. This is a significant limitation to the potential clinical use of Intralipid-based emulsions. Methods The authors prepared a 20% v/v sevoflurane emulsion using a novel fluorinated surfactant and tested its effectiveness and therapeutic index by administering it to male Sprague-Dawley rats via intravenous injection into the jugular vein. The median effective dose to induce anesthesia (ED50), median lethal dose (LD50), and therapeutic index (LD50 / ED50) were determined. Anesthesia was measured by loss of the forepaw righting reflex. Results The ED50 and LD50 values were found to be 0.41 and 1.05 mL emulsion / kg body weight, respectively. These lead to a therapeutic index of 2.6, which compares favorably to previously determined values of emulsified isoflurane, as well as values for propofol and thiopental. Conclusions A novel semi-fluorinated surfactant was able to considerably increase the maximum amount of stably emulsified sevoflurane compared to Intralipid. These formulations can be used to rapidly induce anesthesia with bolus dosing from which recovery is smooth and rapid. PMID:18813044

  9. Effects of intravenous fat emulsion on respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Hwang, T L; Huang, S L; Chen, M F

    1990-04-01

    The effects of intravenous fat emulsion on ventilated normal, diseased or distressed lungs were studied. Forty-eight patients with different types of respiratory failure were divided into four groups. Group A was composed of the patients with a normal lung condition; group B, patients with infectious pulmonary condition and respiratory failure; group C, patients with COPD and respiratory failure; and, group D was composed of the patients with ARDS due to various causes. Five hundred milliliters of 10 percent fat emulsion was infused within 4 h as partial parenteral nutritional support. We concluded that intravenous fat infusion decreased PaO2/FIO2 and increased P(A-a)O2 and intrapulmonary shunt in the patients with ARDS, while it had little effect on the patients with infectious pulmonary disease or COPD. The infusion of fat emulsion had positive effects on the patients with normal lung condition with increased PaO2/FIO2 and decreased P(A-a)O2 and shunt. PMID:2108849

  10. Intravenous glutamine for severe acute pancreatitis: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xin; Liang, Cui-Ping; Gong, Shu

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of intravenous glutamine on the patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). METHODS: The Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, and EBM review databases were searched up to June 2012. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared non-glutamine nutrition with intravenous glutamine supplemented nutrition in patients with SAP were included. A method recommended by the Cochrane Collaboration was used to perform a meta-analysis of those RCTs. RESULTS: Four RCTs involving a total of 190 participants were included. Analysis of these RCTs revealed the presence of statistical homogeneity among them. Results showed that glutamine dipeptide has a positive effect in reducing the mortality rate (OR = 0.26, 95%CI: 0.09-0.73, P = 0.01), length of hospital stay (weighted mean difference = -4.85, 95%CI: 6.67--3.03, P < 0.001), and the rate of complications (OR = 0.41, 95%CI: 0.22-0.78, P = 0.006). No serious adverse effects were found. CONCLUSION: Current best evidence demonstrates that glutamine is effective for SAP. Further high quality trials are required and parameters of nutritional condition and hospital cost should be considered in future RCTs with sufficient size and rigorous design. PMID:24701410

  11. Safety and efficacy of phage therapy via the intravenous route.

    PubMed

    Speck, Peter; Smithyman, Anthony

    2016-02-01

    Increasing development of antimicrobial resistance is driving a resurgence in interest in phage therapy: the use of bacteriophages to treat bacterial infections. As the lytic action of bacteriophages is unaffected by the antibiotic resistance status of their bacterial target, it is thought that phage therapy may have considerable potential in the treatment of a wide range of topical and localized infections. As yet this interest has not extended to intravenous (IV) use, which is surprising given that the historical record shows that phages are likely to be safe and effective when delivered by this route. Starting almost 100 years ago, phages were administered intravenously in treatment of systemic infections including typhoid, and Staphylococcal bacteremia. There was extensive IV use of phages in the 1940s to treat typhoid, reportedly with outstanding efficacy and safety. The safety of IV phage administration is also underpinned by the detailed work of Ochs and colleagues in Seattle who have over four decades' experience with IV injection into human subjects of large doses of highly purified coliphage PhiX174. Though these subjects included a large number of immune-deficient children, no serious side effects were observed over this extended time period. The large and continuing global health problems of typhoid and Staphylococcus aureus are exacerbated by the increasing antibiotic resistance of these pathogens. We contend that these infections are excellent candidates for use of IV phage therapy. PMID:26691737

  12. Dietary Restrictions in Dialysis Patients: Is There Anything Left to Eat?

    PubMed Central

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Brown, Amanda; Chen, Joline L. T.; Kamgar, Mohammad; Lau, Wei-Ling; Moradi, Hamid; Rhee, Connie M.; Streja, Elani; Kovesdy, Csaba P.

    2015-01-01

    A significant number of dietary restrictions are imposed traditionally and uniformly on maintenance dialysis patients, whereas there is very little data to support their benefits. Recent studies indicate that dietary restrictions of phosphorus may lead to worse survival and poorer nutritional status. Restricting dietary potassium may deprive dialysis patients of heart-healthy diets and lead to intake of more atherogenic diets. There is little data about the survival benefits of dietary sodium restriction, and limiting fluid intake may inherently lead to lower protein and calorie consumption, when in fact dialysis patients often need higher protein intake to prevent and correct protein-energy wasting. Restricting dietary carbohydrates in diabetic dialysis patients may not be beneficial in those with burnt-out diabetes. Dietary fat including omega-3 fatty acids may be important caloric sources and should not be restricted. Data to justify other dietary restrictions related to calcium, vitamins and trace elements are scarce and often contradictory. The restriction of eating during hemodialysis treatment is likely another incorrect practice that may worsen hemodialysis induced hypoglycemia and nutritional derangements. We suggest careful relaxation of most dietary restrictions and adoption of a more balanced and individualized approach, thereby easing some of these overzealous restrictions that have not been proven to offer major advantages to patients and their outcomes and which may in fact worsen patients’ quality of life and satisfaction. This manuscript critically reviews the current paradigms and practices of recommended dietary regimens in dialysis patients including those related to dietary protein, carbohydrate, fat, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, and calcium, and discusses the feasibility and implications of adherence to ardent dietary restrictions. PMID:25649719

  13. Histamine-induced airway mucosal exudation of bulk plasma and plasma-derived mediators is not inhibited by intravenous bronchodilators.

    PubMed

    Svensson, C; Alkner, U; Pipkorn, U; Persson, C G

    1994-01-01

    Experimental data suggest the possibility that common bronchodilators, such as the xanthines and beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists, may produce microvascular anti-permeability effects in the subepithelial microcirculation of the airways. In this study, we have examined the effect of bronchodilators given intravenously on exudation of different-sized plasma proteins (albumin and fibrinogen) and the generation of plasma-derived peptides (bradykinins) in human nasal airways challenged with histamine. In a double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled and randomised trial, 12 normal volunteers were given i.v.infusions of terbutaline sulphate, theophylline and enprofylline to produce therapeutic drug levels. The effect of topical nasal provocation with histamine was closely followed by frequently nasal lavage with saline. The lavage fluid levels of albumin, fibrinogen and bradykinins increased significantly after each histamine provocation. The ratio of albumin-to-fibrinogen in plasma and the lavage fluid was 24 and 56, respectively, indicating that topical histamine provocation induced a largely non-sieved flux of macromolecules across the endothelial-epithelial barriers. The systemically administered drugs did not affect the nasal symptoms (sneezing, secretion and blockage), nor did they significantly reduce the levels of plasma proteins and plasma-derived mediators in the nasal lavage fluids. The present data suggest that systemic xanthines and beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists, at clinically employed plasma levels, may not affect the microvascular (and epithelial) exudative permeability and the bradykinin forming capacity of human airways. PMID:8005188

  14. Pharmacokinetics of a combination of amikacin sulfate and penicillin G sodium for intravenous regional limb perfusion in adult horses.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Jorge E; Trela, Jan; Stanley, Scott D; Yamout, Sawsan; Snyder, Jack R

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics of amikacin and penicillin G sodium when administered in combination as an intravenous regional limb perfusion (IVRLP) to horses. Seven healthy adult horses underwent an IVRLP in the cephalic vein with 2 g of amikacin sulfate and 10 mill IU of penicillin G sodium diluted to 60 mL in 0.9% saline. A pneumatic tourniquet set at 450 mmHg was left in place for 30 min. Synovial fluid was collected from the metacarpophalangeal joint 35 min and 2, 6, 12, and 24 h after infusion of the antimicrobials. Concentrations of amikacin and penicillin in synovial fluid were quantitated by liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry analysis. Therapeutic concentrations of amikacin and penicillin for equine-susceptible pathogens were achieved in the synovial fluid. Maximum synovial concentrations (Cmax) (mean ± SE) for amikacin and penicillin were 132 ± 33 μg/mL and 8474 ± 5710 ng/mL, respectively. Only 3 horses had detectable levels of penicillin at 6 h and 1 at the 12 h sample. The combination of amikacin with penicillin G sodium via IVDLP resulted in reported therapeutic concentrations of both antibiotics in the synovial fluid. The Cmax:MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) ratio for amikacin was 8:1 and Time > MIC for penicillin was 6 h. At 24 h, the mean concentration of amikacin was still above 4 μg/mL. Terminal elimination rate constants (T1/2 lambdaz) were 13.6 h and 2.8 h for amikacin and penicillin, respectively. The use of IVDLP with penicillin may therefore not be practical as rapid clearance of penicillin from the synovial fluid requires frequent perfusions to maintain acceptable therapeutic concentrations. PMID:27408337

  15. Comparative evaluation of prophylactic single-dose intravenous antibiotic with postoperative antibiotics in elective urologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Moslemi, Mohammad K; Movahed, Seyed M Moosavi; Heidari, Akram; Saghafi, Hossein; Abedinzadeh, Mehdi

    2010-01-01

    Background Unrestricted antibiotic use is very common in Iran. As a result, emergence of resistant organisms is commonplace. Antibiotic prophylaxis in surgery consists of a short antibiotic course given immediately before the procedure in order to prevent development of a surgical site infection. The basic principle of prophylaxis is to maintain effective concentrations of an antibiotic active against the commonest pathogens during the entire surgery. Materials and methods We prospectively investigated 427 urologic surgery cases in our department between August 2008 and September 2009 (Group1). As reference cases, we retrospectively reviewed 966 patients who underwent urologic surgery between May 2004 and May 2008 (Group 2) who were administered antibiotics without any restriction. Prophylactic antibiotics such as cefazolin were administered intravenously according to our protocol. Postoperative body temperature, peripheral white blood cell counts, urinalysis, and urine culture were checked. Results To judge perioperative infections, wound condition and general condition were evaluated in terms of surgical site infection, as well as remote infection and urinary tract infection, up to postoperative day 30. Surgical site infection was defined as the presence of swelling, tenderness, redness, or drainage of pus from the wound, superficially or deeply. Remote infection was defined as occurrence of pneumonia, sepsis, or urinary tract infection. Perioperative infection rates (for surgical site and remote infection) in Group 1 and Group 2 were nine of 427 (2.6%) and 24 of 966 (2.5%), respectively. Surgical site infection rates of categories A and B in Group 1 were 0 and two (0.86%), respectively, while those in Group 2 were 0 and five (0.92%), respectively. There was no significant difference in infection rates in terms of remote infection and surgical site infection between Group 1 and Group 2 (P = 0.670). The amounts, as well as the prices, for intravenously

  16. Subcutaneous fluid administration and the hydration of older people.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Janice

    Hypodermoclysis, or the subcutaneous administration of fluids, is a method of rehydration that is not routinely used in the UK. Yet it is a simple and effective method of fluid administration for individuals with mild-to-moderate dehydration, especially for the frail and elderly (Sasson and Shvartzman, 2001). Subcutaneous infusion is an alternative route of parenteral administration. It provides a number of advantages over the intravenous route for those individuals unable to tolerate enteral fluids, as it is associated with fewer complications, as well as a wider range of infusion sites. This makes it particularly advantageous for frail and/or older patients requiring low-volume hydration in the community setting. This article discusses indications and contraindications for subcutaneous infusions, as well as patient assessment, placement, securement and potential complications. PMID:25158361

  17. Subcutaneous fluid administration and the hydration of older people.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Janice

    2014-07-01

    Hypodermoclysis, or the subcutaneous administration of fluids, is a method of rehydration that is not routinely used in the UK. Yet it is a simple and effective method of fluid administration for individuals with mild-to-moderate dehydration, especially for the frail and elderly ( Sasson and Shvartzman, 2001 ). Subcutaneous infusion is an alternative route of parenteral administration. It provides a number of advantages over the intravenous route for those individuals unable to tolerate enteral fluids, as it is associated with fewer complications, as well as a wider range of infusion sites. This makes it particularly advantageous for frail and/or older patients requiring low-volume hydration in the community setting. This article discusses indications and contraindications for subcutaneous infusions, as well as patient assessment, placement, securement and potential complications. PMID:25062366

  18. Sleep restriction acutely impairs glucose tolerance in rats.

    PubMed

    Jha, Pawan K; Foppen, Ewout; Kalsbeek, Andries; Challet, Etienne

    2016-06-01

    Chronic sleep curtailment in humans has been related to impairment of glucose metabolism. To better understand the underlying mechanisms, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of acute sleep deprivation on glucose tolerance in rats. A group of rats was challenged by 4-h sleep deprivation in the early rest period, leading to prolonged (16 h) wakefulness. Another group of rats was allowed to sleep during the first 4 h of the light period and sleep deprived in the next 4 h. During treatment, food was withdrawn to avoid a postmeal rise in plasma glucose. An intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) was performed immediately after the sleep deprivation period. Sleep deprivation at both times of the day similarly impaired glucose tolerance and reduced the early-phase insulin responses to a glucose challenge. Basal concentrations of plasma glucose, insulin, and corticosterone remained unchanged after sleep deprivation. Throughout IVGTTs, plasma corticosterone concentrations were not different between the control and sleep-deprived group. Together, these results demonstrate that independent of time of day and sleep pressure, short sleep deprivation during the resting phase favors glucose intolerance in rats by attenuating the first-phase insulin response to a glucose load. In conclusion, this study highlights the acute adverse effects of only a short sleep restriction on glucose homeostasis. PMID:27354542

  19. Treatment of Iron Deficiency With Intravenous Ferric Carboxymaltose in General Practice: A Retrospective Database Study

    PubMed Central

    Kuster, Martina; Meli, Damian N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency is a frequent problem in general practice. Oral supplementation may in some cases not be well tolerated or not be efficient. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose may be an alternative for iron supplementation in general practice. The aim of the present study was to analyze the indications for and the efficacy of intravenous ferric carboxymaltose in a primary care center. Methods We retropectively analyzed electronic data from 173 patients given intravenous ferric carboxymaltose between 2011 and 2013 in primary care center with 18 GPs in Bern, Switzerland. Results Of all patients, 34% were treated intravenously due to an inappropriate increase in ferritin levels after oral therapy, 24% had side effects from oral treatment, 10% were treated intravenously due to the patients explicit wish, and in 39% of all cases, no obvious reason of intravenous instead of oral treatment could be found. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose led to a significant increase in hemoglobin and serum ferritin levels. Side effects of intravenous treatment were found in 2% of all cases. Conclusion We conclude that treatment with intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is an efficient alternative for patients with iron deficiency in general practice, when oral products are not well tolarated or effective. As treatment with iron carboxymaltose is more expensive and potentially dangerous due to side effects, the indication should be placed with (more) care. PMID:25368700

  20. [Segmental testicular infarction. Unusual complication of intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for multifocal motor neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Rüb, J; Rehmann, R; von Landenberg, N; Roghmann, F; Stude, P; Tegenthoff, M; Noldus, J; Pastor, J

    2015-10-01

    We describe the previously unknown case of segmental testicular infarction as an iatrogenic complication of intravenous immunoglobulin administration in a patient with multifocal motor neuropathy. PMID:26303740

  1. Rapid identification of mycobacteria to the species level by polymerase chain reaction and restriction enzyme analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Telenti, A; Marchesi, F; Balz, M; Bally, F; Böttger, E C; Bodmer, T

    1993-01-01

    A method for the rapid identification of mycobacteria to the species level was developed on the basis of evaluation by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the gene encoding for the 65-kDa protein. The method involves restriction enzyme analysis of PCR products obtained with primers common to all mycobacteria. Using two restriction enzymes, BstEII and HaeIII, medically relevant and other frequent laboratory isolates were differentiated to the species or subspecies level by PCR-restriction enzyme pattern analysis. PCR-restriction enzyme pattern analysis was performed on isolates (n = 330) from solid and fluid culture media, including BACTEC, or from frozen and lyophilized stocks. The procedure does not involve hybridization steps or the use of radioactivity and can be completed within 1 working day. Images PMID:8381805

  2. In-flight demonstration of the Space Station Freedom Health Maintenance Facility fluid therapy system (E300/E05)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, Charles W.

    1993-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom (SSF) Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) will provide medical care for crew members for up to 10 days. An integral part of the required medical care consists of providing intravenous infusion of fluids, electrolyte solutions, and nutrients to sustain an ill or injured crew member. In terrestrial health care facilities, intravenous solutions are normally stored in large quantities. However, due to the station's weight and volume constraints, an adequate supply of the required solutions cannot be carried onboard SSF. By formulating medical fluids onboard from concentrates and station water as needed, the Fluid Therapy System (FTS) eliminates weight and volume concerns regarding intravenous fluids. The first full-system demonstration of FTS is continuous microgravity will be conducted in Spacelab-Japan (SL-J). The FTS evaluation consists of two functional objectives and an in-flight demonstration of intravenous administration of fluids. The first is to make and store sterile water and IV solutions onboard the spacecraft. If intravenous fluids are to be produced in SSF, successful sterilization of water and reconstituting of IV solutions must be achieved. The second objective is to repeat the verification of the FTS infusion pump, which had been performed in Spacelab Life Sciences - 1 (SLS-1). during SLS-1, the FTS IV pump was operated in continuous microgravity for the first time. The pump functioned successfully, and valuable knowledge on its performance in continuous microgravity was obtained. Finally, the technique of starting an IF in microgravity will be demonstrated. The IV technique requires modifications in microgravity, such as use of restraints for equipment and crew members involved.

  3. Environmentally safe fluid extractor

    DOEpatents

    Sungaila, Zenon F.

    1993-07-06

    An environmentally safe fluid extraction device for use in mobile laboratory and industrial settings comprising a pump, compressor, valving system, waste recovery tank, fluid tank, and a exhaust filtering system.

  4. Environmentally safe fluid extractor

    DOEpatents

    Sungaila, Zenon F.

    1993-01-01

    An environmentally safe fluid extraction device for use in mobile laboratory and industrial settings comprising a pump, compressor, valving system, waste recovery tank, fluid tank, and a exhaust filtering system.

  5. Peritoneal fluid culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - peritoneal fluid ... sent to the laboratory for Gram stain and culture. The sample is checked to see if bacteria ... based on more than just the peritoneal fluid culture (which may be negative even if you have ...

  6. Pleural fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fluid that has collected in the pleural space. This is the space between the lining of the outside of the ... the chest. When fluid collects in the pleural space, the condition is called pleural effusion .

  7. Peritoneal fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... at fluid that has built up in the space in the abdomen around the internal organs. This area is called the peritoneal space. ... sample of fluid is removed from the peritoneal space using a needle and syringe. Your health care ...

  8. Pleural fluid smear

    MedlinePlus

    ... the fluid that has collected in the pleural space. This is the space between the lining of the outside of the ... the chest. When fluid collects in the pleural space, the condition is called pleural effusion .

  9. Amniotic fluid (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Amniotic fluid surrounds the growing fetus in the womb and protects the fetus from injury and temperature changes. ... of fetal movement and permits musculoskeletal development. The amniotic fluid can be withdrawn in a procedure called amniocentsis ...

  10. Electric fluid pump

    DOEpatents

    Van Dam, Jeremy Daniel; Turnquist, Norman Arnold; Raminosoa, Tsarafidy; Shah, Manoj Ramprasad; Shen, Xiaochun

    2015-09-29

    An electric machine is presented. The electric machine includes a hollow rotor; and a stator disposed within the hollow rotor, the stator defining a flow channel. The hollow rotor includes a first end portion defining a fluid inlet, a second end portion defining a fluid outlet; the fluid inlet, the fluid outlet, and the flow channel of the stator being configured to allow passage of a fluid from the fluid inlet to the fluid outlet via the flow channel; and wherein the hollow rotor is characterized by a largest cross-sectional area of hollow rotor, and wherein the flow channel is characterized by a smallest cross-sectional area of the flow channel, wherein the smallest cross-sectional area of the flow channel is at least about 25% of the largest cross-sectional area of the hollow rotor. An electric fluid pump and a power generation system are also presented.

  11. Amniotic fluid (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Amniotic fluid surrounds the growing fetus in the womb and protects the fetus from injury and temperature changes. It ... fetal movement and permits musculoskeletal development. The amniotic fluid can be withdrawn in a procedure called amniocentsis ...

  12. Fluid and Electrolyte Balance

    MedlinePlus

    ... They are in your blood, urine and body fluids. Maintaining the right balance of electrolytes helps your ... them from the foods you eat and the fluids you drink. Levels of electrolytes in your body ...

  13. Fluid sampling tool

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Roger G.; Garcia, Anthony R. E.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    2001-09-25

    The invention includes a rotatable tool for collecting fluid through the wall of a container. The tool includes a fluid collection section with a cylindrical shank having an end portion for drilling a hole in the container wall when the tool is rotated, and a threaded portion for tapping the hole in the container wall. A passageway in the shank in communication with at least one radial inlet hole in the drilling end and an opening at the end of the shank is adapted to receive fluid from the container. The tool also includes a cylindrical chamber affixed to the end of the shank opposite to the drilling portion thereof for receiving and storing fluid passing through the passageway. The tool also includes a flexible, deformable gasket that provides a fluid-tight chamber to confine kerf generated during the drilling and tapping of the hole. The invention also includes a fluid extractor section for extracting fluid samples from the fluid collecting section.

  14. Human intravenous pharmacokinetics and absolute oral bioavailability of cefatrizine.

    PubMed Central

    Pfeffer, M; Gaver, R C; Ximenez, J

    1983-01-01

    Cefatrizine was administered intravenously and orally at dose levels of 250, 500, and 1,000 mg to normal male volunteers in a crossover study. Intravenous pharmacokinetics were dose linear over this range; mean peak plasma concentrations at the end of 30-min infusions were, respectively, 18, 37, and 75 micrograms/ml, total body clearance was 218 ml/min per 1.73 m2, renal clearance was 176 ml/min per 1.73 m2, and mean retention time in the body was 1.11 h. Cumulative urinary excretion of intact cefatrizine was 80% of the dose, and half-lives ranged from 1 to 1.4 h. Steady-state volume of distribution was 0.22 liters/kg. On oral administration, the absolute bioavailabilities of cefatrizine were 75% at 250 and 500 mg and 50% at 1,000 mg. The mean peak plasma concentrations and peak times were, respectively, 4.9, 8.6, and 10.2 micrograms/ml at 1.4, 1.6, and 2.0 h, mean residence times were 2.4, 2.6, and 3.1 h, and mean absorption times were 1.3, 1.6, and 1.9 h. Oral renal clearance and half-life values corresponded well to the intravenous values. Cumulative urinary excretion of intact cefatrizine (as percentage of dose) was 60 at 250 mg, 56 at 500 mg, and 42 at 1,000 mg. It is hypothesized that the lack of oral dose linearity between the 500- and 1,000-mg doses is due to a component of cefatrizine absorption by a saturable transport process. Relative absorption at the high dose would be sufficiently slow that an absorption "window" would be passed before maximum bioavailability could be attained. It is not expected that the observed bioavailability decrease at doses exceeding 500 mg will have any therapeutic significance, since clinical studies are establishing efficacy for a recommended unit dosage regimen of 500 mg. PMID:6660858

  15. Human intravenous pharmacokinetics and absolute oral bioavailability of cefatrizine.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, M; Gaver, R C; Ximenez, J

    1983-12-01

    Cefatrizine was administered intravenously and orally at dose levels of 250, 500, and 1,000 mg to normal male volunteers in a crossover study. Intravenous pharmacokinetics were dose linear over this range; mean peak plasma concentrations at the end of 30-min infusions were, respectively, 18, 37, and 75 micrograms/ml, total body clearance was 218 ml/min per 1.73 m2, renal clearance was 176 ml/min per 1.73 m2, and mean retention time in the body was 1.11 h. Cumulative urinary excretion of intact cefatrizine was 80% of the dose, and half-lives ranged from 1 to 1.4 h. Steady-state volume of distribution was 0.22 liters/kg. On oral administration, the absolute bioavailabilities of cefatrizine were 75% at 250 and 500 mg and 50% at 1,000 mg. The mean peak plasma concentrations and peak times were, respectively, 4.9, 8.6, and 10.2 micrograms/ml at 1.4, 1.6, and 2.0 h, mean residence times were 2.4, 2.6, and 3.1 h, and mean absorption times were 1.3, 1.6, and 1.9 h. Oral renal clearance and half-life values corresponded well to the intravenous values. Cumulative urinary excretion of intact cefatrizine (as percentage of dose) was 60 at 250 mg, 56 at 500 mg, and 42 at 1,000 mg. It is hypothesized that the lack of oral dose linearity between the 500- and 1,000-mg doses is due to a component of cefatrizine absorption by a saturable transport process. Relative absorption at the high dose would be sufficiently slow that an absorption "window" would be passed before maximum bioavailability could be attained. It is not expected that the observed bioavailability decrease at doses exceeding 500 mg will have any therapeutic significance, since clinical studies are establishing efficacy for a recommended unit dosage regimen of 500 mg. PMID:6660858

  16. Intravenous heparin dosing strategy in hospitalized patients with atrial dysrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Roswell, Robert O; Greet, Brian; Shah, Sunny; Bernard, Samuel; Milin, Alexandra; Lobach, Iryna; Guo, Yu; Radford, Martha J; Berger, Jeffrey S

    2016-08-01

    Patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) have an elevated stroke risk that is 2-7 times greater than in those without AF. Intravenous unfractionated heparin (UFH) is commonly used for hospitalized patients with atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter (AFL) to prevent stroke. Dosing strategies exist for intravenous anticoagulation in patients with acute coronary syndromes and venous thromboembolic diseases, but there are no data to guide providers on a dosing strategy for intravenous anticoagulation in patients with AF/AFL. 996 hospitalized patients with AF/AFL on UFH were evaluated. Bolus dosing and initial infusion rates of UFH were recorded along with rates of stroke, thromboemobolic events, and bleeding events as defined by the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis criteria. Among 226 patients included in the analysis, 76 bleeding events occurred. Using linear regression analysis, initial rates of heparin infusion ranging from 9.7 to 11.8 units/kilogram/hour (U/kg/h) resulted in activated partial thromboplastin times that were within therapeutic range. The median initial infusion rate in patients with bleeding was 13.3 U/kg/h, while in those without bleeding it was 11.4 U/kg/h; p = 0.012. An initial infusion rate >11.0 U/kg/h yielded an OR 1.95 (1.06-3.59); p = 0.03 for any bleeding event. Using IV heparin boluses neither increased the probability of attaining a therapeutic aPTT (56.1 vs 56.3 %; p = 0.99) nor did it significantly increase bleeding events in the study (35.7 vs 31.3 %; p = 0.48). The results suggest that higher initial rates of heparin are associated with increased bleeding risk. From this dataset, initial heparin infusion rates of 9.7-11.0 U/kg/h without a bolus can result in therapeutic levels of anticoagulation in hospitalized patients with AF/AFL without increasing the risk of bleeding. PMID:26951166

  17. Prenatal Depression Restricts Fetal Growth

    PubMed Central

    Diego, Miguel A.; Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Schanberg, Saul; Kuhn, Cynthia; Gonzalez-Quintero, Victor Hugo

    2009-01-01

    Objective To identify whether prenatal depression is a risk factor for fetal growth restriction. Methods Midgestation (18-20 weeks GA) estimated fetal weight and urine cortisol and birth weight and gestational age at birth data were collected on a sample of 40 depressed and 40 non-depressed women. Estimated fetal weight and birthweight data were then used to compute fetal growth rates. Results Depressed women had a 13% greater incidence of premature delivery (Odds Ratio (OR) = 2.61) and 15% greater incidence of low birthweight (OR = 4.75) than non-depressed women. Depressed women also had elevated prenatal cortisol levels (p = .006) and fetuses who were smaller (p = .001) and who showed slower fetal growth rates (p = .011) and lower birthweights (p = .008). Mediation analyses further revealed that prenatal maternal cortisol levels were a potential mediator for the relationship between maternal symptoms of depression and both gestational age at birth and the rate of fetal growth. After controlling for maternal demographic variables, prenatal maternal cortisol levels were associated with 30% of the variance in gestational age at birth and 14% of the variance in the rate of fetal growth. Conclusion Prenatal depression was associated with adverse perinatal outcomes, including premature delivery and slower fetal growth rates. Prenatal maternal cortisol levels appear to play a role in mediating these outcomes. PMID:18723301

  18. Placental Adaptations in Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Song; Regnault, Timothy R.H.; Barker, Paige L.; Botting, Kimberley J.; McMillen, Isabella C.; McMillan, Christine M.; Roberts, Claire T.; Morrison, Janna L.

    2015-01-01

    The placenta is the primary interface between the fetus and mother and plays an important role in maintaining fetal development and growth by facilitating the transfer of substrates and participating in modulating the maternal immune response to prevent immunological rejection of the conceptus. The major substrates required for fetal growth include oxygen, glucose, amino acids and fatty acids, and their transport processes depend on morphological characteristics of the placenta, such as placental size, morphology, blood flow and vascularity. Other factors including insulin-like growth factors, apoptosis, autophagy and glucocorticoid exposure also affect placental growth and substrate transport capacity. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is often a consequence of insufficiency, and is associated with a high incidence of perinatal morbidity and mortality, as well as increased risk of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases in later life. Several different experimental methods have been used to induce placental insufficiency and IUGR in animal models and a range of factors that regulate placental growth and substrate transport capacity have been demonstrated. While no model system completely recapitulates human IUGR, these animal models allow us to carefully dissect cellular and molecular mechanisms to improve our understanding and facilitate development of therapeutic interventions. PMID:25580812

  19. Fluid force transducer

    DOEpatents

    Jendrzejczyk, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    An electrical fluid force transducer for measuring the magnitude and direction of fluid forces caused by lateral fluid flow, includes a movable sleeve which is deflectable in response to the movement of fluid, and a rod fixed to the sleeve to translate forces applied to the sleeve to strain gauges attached to the rod, the strain gauges being connected in a bridge circuit arrangement enabling generation of a signal output indicative of the magnitude and direction of the force applied to the sleeve.

  20. Fluid Movement and Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slepian, Michael L.; Ambady, Nalini

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive scientists describe creativity as fluid thought. Drawing from findings on gesture and embodied cognition, we hypothesized that the physical experience of fluidity, relative to nonfluidity, would lead to more fluid, creative thought. Across 3 experiments, fluid arm movement led to enhanced creativity in 3 domains: creative generation,…

  1. Aqueous drilling fluids containing fluid loss additives

    SciTech Connect

    Bardoliwalla, D.F.; Villa, J.L.

    1987-03-03

    This patent describes an aqueous clay containing drilling fluid having present in an amount sufficient to reduce fluid loss of the drilling fluid, a copolymer of (1) from about 80% to about 98% by weight of acrylic acid and (2) from about 2% to about 20% by weight of itaconic acid. The copolymer has a weight average molecular weight of between about 50,000 to about 1,000,000, being in its free acid or partially or completely neutralized salt form and being at least water dispersible.

  2. 42 CFR 73.13 - Restricted experiments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Restricted experiments: (1) Experiments utilizing recombinant DNA that involve the deliberate transfer of a... agriculture. (2) Experiments involving the deliberate formation of recombinant DNA containing genes for...

  3. 42 CFR 73.13 - Restricted experiments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Restricted experiments: (1) Experiments utilizing recombinant DNA that involve the deliberate transfer of a... agriculture. (2) Experiments involving the deliberate formation of recombinant DNA containing genes for...

  4. 42 CFR 73.13 - Restricted experiments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Restricted experiments: (1) Experiments utilizing recombinant DNA that involve the deliberate transfer of a... agriculture. (2) Experiments involving the deliberate formation of recombinant DNA containing genes for...

  5. Protection against chronic cadmium toxicity by caloric restriction.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Z A; Jordan, S A; Tang, W

    1999-04-15

    Exposure to cadmium (Cd) can result in nephrotoxicity and osteotoxicity. Because Cd-induced nephrotoxicity involves oxidative stress and caloric restriction decreases oxidative stress, we examined whether reduced caloric intake will protect against Cd-induced nephrotoxicity. In addition, the protection against the osteotoxicity was also examined. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were provided drinking water containing 100 mg Cd/l. Since fluid intake relative to the body weight was higher in females as compared to the males, the Cd concentration in their water was reduced to 80 mg/l after 3 months and 65 mg/l after 6.5 months. During the 27 month exposure period the males and females consumed a total of about 5 g Cd/kg body weight. Food was restricted to 20 g/day after the first 3 months. During the unrestricted food intake period Cd exposure reduced the bone density in females by 23%, with a partial recovery and stabilization during the caloric restriction phase. Hepatic and renal Cd accumulation and corresponding metallothionein (MT) levels were very similar in both sexes. The reported critical Cd concentration for nephrotoxicity was reached by 9 months. Renal MT levels were maximum at this time. Despite a 1.5-fold increase in renal Cd concentration over the next 18 months, there was no significant increase in renal MT levels. In spite of high renal Cd levels and lack of availability of sufficient MT, there was no sign of nephrotoxicity, as measured by urinary protein and glucose excretion. It is concluded that caloric restriction prevents Cd-induced nephrotoxicity and also appears to control the osteotoxicity of Cd. PMID:10378476

  6. Intravenous ampicillin pharmacokinetics in the third trimester of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kubacka, R T; Johnstone, H E; Tan, H S; Reeme, P D; Myre, S A

    1983-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of a single dose of intravenous ampicillin were studied in nine patients during their third trimester of pregnancy. Each volunteer was given either 500 mg (5.7-8.8 mg/kg) or 1 g (15.4-21.4 mg/kg) of sodium ampicillin by rapid infusion. Postinfusion plasma concentration-time curves followed biexponential decay in all subjects. Calculated parameters included a mean plasma distribution volume of 177.1 +/- 97.5 ml/kg, tissue or peripheral distribution volume of 246.2 +/- 143.9 ml/kg, elimination half-life of 1.60 +/- 0.51 h, and total body clearance of 4.59 +/- 1.48 ml/min/kg. Dose-dependent disposition was not observed. Gestation-specific drug therapy research during pregnancy is discussed. PMID:6845399

  7. Modelling Framework and Assistive Device for Peripheral Intravenous Injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kam, Kin F.; Robinson, Martin P.; Gilbert, Mathew A.; Pelah, Adar

    2016-02-01

    Intravenous access for blood sampling or drug administration that requires peripheral venepuncture is perhaps the most common invasive procedure practiced in hospitals, clinics and general practice surgeries.We describe an idealised mathematical framework for modelling the dynamics of the peripheral venepuncture process. Basic assumptions of the model are confirmed through motion analysis of needle trajectories during venepuncture, taken from video recordings of a skilled practitioner injecting into a practice kit. The framework is also applied to the design and construction of a proposed device for accurate needle guidance during venepuncture administration, assessed as consistent and repeatable in application and does not lead to over puncture. The study provides insights into the ubiquitous peripheral venepuncture process and may contribute to applications in training and in the design of new devices, including for use in robotic automation.

  8. Intravenous Immunoglobulin Responsive Persistent Thrombocytopenia after Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Charaniya, Riyaz; Ghosh, Anindya; Sahoo, Ratnakar

    2016-01-01

    Dengue outbreak is common in Indian subcontinent and causes significant morbidity and mortality. Year 2015 has witnessed yet another Dengue epidemic in northern India and the number of cases this year is maximum in a decade. Dengue infection is a viral disease and there are 4 different serotypes DENV1, DENV2, DENV3 and DENV4. This year DENV2 and DENV4 have been isolated from most of the patients. Thrombocytopenia is hallmark of dengue infection and generally recovers within ten days of onset of symptoms. We report a case of dengue haemorrhagic fever in which thrombocytopenia persisted for almost a month and improved after Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) administration. This is the first case where IVIG has been successfully used for treating persisting thrombocytopenia after dengue infection. PMID:27190868

  9. Treatment of pieris ingestion in goats with intravenous lipid emulsion.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Karyn; Smith, Mary C; Stump, Samuel

    2014-12-01

    Seven goats and one ram presented with clinical signs including regurgitation, obtundation, anorexia, apparent pain, and bloat. The animals had escaped from their barn, and it was discovered that they had ingested leaves of Pieris japonica, Japanese pieris, a grayanotoxin-containing plant. Animals were treated with antibiotics, calcium borogluconate, B vitamins, and activated charcoal within the first 24-h postexposure, which was followed by the recovery of the ram and two goats and the death of two goats. Approximately 36 h after Japanese pieris ingestion, one of the three remaining anorectic goats was dosed with intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE). This goat recovered within a few hours. The remaining two goats were given ILE the next day and appeared to recover, but one died a week later of aspiration pneumonia. PMID:25193885

  10. Infective endocarditis in intravenous drug abusers: an update.

    PubMed

    Sousa, C; Botelho, C; Rodrigues, D; Azeredo, J; Oliveira, R

    2012-11-01

    Infective endocarditis despite advances in diagnosis remains a common cause of hospitalization, with high morbidity and mortality rates. Through literature review it is possible to conclude that polymicrobial endocarditis occurs mainly in intravenous drug abusers with predominance in the right side of the heart, often with tricuspid valve involvement. This fact can be associated with the type of drug used by the patients; therefore, knowledge of the patient's history is critical for adjustment of the therapy. It is also important to emphasize that the most common combinations of organisms in polymicrobial infective endocarditis are: Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumonia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as well as mixed cultures of Candida spp. and bacteria. A better understanding of the epidemiology and associated risk factors are required in order to develop an efficient therapy, although PE studies are difficult to perform due to the rarity of cases and lack of prospective cohorts. PMID:22714640

  11. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia treated with low dose intravenous bevacizumab

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Jee Wan; Jeon, Young Woo; Eun, Jun Young; Kim, Han Jo; Bae, Sang Byung

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant disorder that leads to mucocutaneous telangiectasias, epistaxis, and gastrointestinal bleeding. Depending on the severity and manifestation of the disease, various therapeutic modalities have been used, from local bleeding control to surgery or concomitant drug therapy. Several articles under review have presented guidelines for treatment of HHT with bevacizumab as a direct anti-angiogenesis strategy. Still, neither the exact optimal dose nor the minimum effective dose of intravenous bevacizumab in patients with severe HHT has been reported. A 55-year-old man presented with long-standing epistaxis, recent melena, dizziness, and a three-generation family history of chronic epistaxis, anemia, and regular blood transfusions. Treatment with argon plasma coagulation (APC) for the gastrointestinal bleeding failed to raise hemoglobin levels, we considered using the bevacizumab. We report a patient with severe HHT, who was treated with low-dose bevacizumab (2 mg/kg) and improved substantially. PMID:25325040

  12. Myocardial ischemia during intravenous DSA in patients with cardiac disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hesselink, J.R.; Hayman, L.A.; Chung, K.J.; McGinnis, B.D.; Davis, K.R.; Taveras, J.M.

    1984-12-01

    A prospective study was performed for 48 patients who had histories of angina and were referred for digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Cardiac disease was graded according to the American Heart Association (AHA) functional classification system. Each patient received 2-5 injections of 40-ml diatrizoate meglumine and diatrizoate sodium at 15 ml per second in the superior vena cava. Of the 28 patients in functional Classes I or II, 11% had angina and 32% had definite ischemic ECG changes after the DSA injections. Of the patients in functional Class III 63% had angina, and 58% had definite ischemic ECG changes after the injections. These observed cardiac effects following bolus injections of hypertonic ionic contrast media indicate that special precautions are necessary when performing intravenous DSA examinations on this group of high risk patients.

  13. A case of intravenous leiomyomatosis with high levels of hyaluronan.

    PubMed

    Yaguchi, Chizuko; Oi, Hidekazu; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Miura, Katsutoshi; Kanayama, Naohiro

    2010-04-01

    Intravenous leiomyomatosis (IVL) is a rare benign tumor. The clinical behavior can be life-threatening due to extension through the pelvic veins. A 70-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with IVL originating from a uterine leiomyoma and extending to the inferior vena cava. The patient was diagnosed on the basis of the results of various studies, and the tumor was resected completely through a single-stage approach. The intravascular tumor was 20 cm long, multinodular and rubbery. Microscopic findings showed benign smooth muscle that was partly hyalinized and fibrous. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that hyaluronan was expressed more prominently in IVL than in uterine leiomyomas. IVL has viscoelastic properties and contains a large amount of hyaluronan, which may promote invasion during pathogenesis. PMID:20492407

  14. Intravenously administered nanoparticles increase survival following blast trauma

    PubMed Central

    Lashof-Sullivan, Margaret M.; Shoffstall, Erin; Atkins, Kristyn T.; Keane, Nickolas; Bir, Cynthia; VandeVord, Pamela; Lavik, Erin B.

    2014-01-01

    Explosions account for 79% of combat-related injuries, leading to multiorgan hemorrhage and uncontrolled bleeding. Uncontrolled bleeding is the leading cause of death in battlefield traumas as well as in civilian life. We need to stop the bleeding quickly to save lives, but, shockingly, there are no treatments to stop internal bleeding. A therapy that halts bleeding in a site-specific manner and is safe, stable at room temperature, and easily administered is critical for the advancement of trauma care. To address this need, we have developed hemostatic nanoparticles that are administered intravenously. When tested in a model of blast trauma with multiorgan hemorrhaging, i.v. administration of the hemostatic nanoparticles led to a significant improvement in survival over the short term (1 h postblast). No complications from this treatment were apparent out to 3 wk. This work demonstrates that these particles have the potential to save lives and fundamentally change trauma care. PMID:24982180

  15. Development of an intravenous skills module for graduate nurses.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Graduate nurses (GNs) are a major part of hospital recruitment. Forty-two percent of new hires are likely to be GNs. Many GNs feel ill prepared in intravenous (i.v.) catheter insertion and central line care. The purpose of this evidence-based practice project was to determine if an i.v. skills workshop would have a positive impact on GNs' comfort and skills. Casey-Fink Graduate Nurse Experience Survey data indicate that 29% of graduate nurse residents participating in the first cohort of this workshop list i.v. skills as most challenging. Postsurvey data showed that GN comfort level improved. Supporting the GN in this challenging transition by providing focused education and skills practice may alleviate this discomfort. PMID:25723836

  16. Intravenous artesunate for severe malaria in travelers, Europe.

    PubMed

    Zoller, Thomas; Junghanss, Thomas; Kapaun, Annette; Gjorup, Ida; Richter, Joachim; Hugo-Persson, Mats; Mørch, Kristine; Foroutan, Behruz; Suttorp, Norbert; Yürek, Salih; Flick, Holger

    2011-05-01

    Multicenter trials in Southeast Asia have shown better survival rates among patients with severe malaria, particularly those with high parasitemia levels, treated with intravenous (IV) artesunate than among those treated with quinine. In Europe, quinine is still the primary treatment for severe malaria. We conducted a retrospective analysis for 25 travelers with severe malaria who returned from malaria-endemic regions and were treated at 7 centers in Europe. All patients survived. Treatment with IV artesunate rapidly reduced parasitemia levels. In 6 patients at 5 treatment centers, a self-limiting episode of unexplained hemolysis occurred after reduction of parasitemia levels. Five patients required a blood transfusion. Patients with posttreatment hemolysis had received higher doses of IV artesunate than patients without hemolysis. IV artesunate was an effective alternative to quinine for treatment of malaria patients in Europe. Patients should be monitored for signs of hemolysis, especially after parasitologic cure. PMID:21529383

  17. Intravenous Artesunate for Severe Malaria in Travelers, Europe

    PubMed Central

    Junghanss, Thomas; Kapaun, Annette; Gjørup, Ida; Richter, Joachim; Hugo-Persson, Mats; Mørch, Kristine; Foroutan, Behruz; Suttorp, Norbert; Yürek, Salih; Flick, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Multicenter trials in Southeast Asia have shown better survival rates among patients with severe malaria, particularly those with high parasitemia levels, treated with intravenous (IV) artesunate than among those treated with quinine. In Europe, quinine is still the primary treatment for severe malaria. We conducted a retrospective analysis for 25 travelers with severe malaria who returned from malaria-endemic regions and were treated at 7 centers in Europe. All patients survived. Treatment with IV artesunate rapidly reduced parasitemia levels. In 6 patients at 5 treatment centers, a self-limiting episode of unexplained hemolysis occurred after reduction of parasitemia levels. Five patients required a blood transfusion. Patients with posttreatment hemolysis had received higher doses of IV artesunate than patients without hemolysis. IV artesunate was an effective alternative to quinine for treatment of malaria patients in Europe. Patients should be monitored for signs of hemolysis, especially after parasitologic cure. PMID:21529383

  18. Successful Treatment of Propafenone Intoxication With Intravenous Lipid Emulsion.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Başak; Köse, Işıl; Avcı, Sinem; Arslan, Abdulla; Acara, Çağdaş

    2015-10-01

    Severe cardiac effects, including cardiac arrest, are a rare complication of high-dose propafenone intake. Among patients who experience cardiac arrest, the survival rate is low. This report presents the case of a young female patient who developed cardiac arrest linked to propafenone intake. While spontaneous circulation was restored with cardiopulmonary resuscitation, vital signs did not recover despite supportive treatment. However, after the administration of intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE), vital signs and cardiac functions resolved and the patient survived. This case is the second to describe the successful use of ILE for propafenone intoxication. However, as all of the findings of this patient were clearly linked to propafenone, we believe the benefits of ILE were more clearly defined in this case than in the other. PMID:26497484

  19. Intravenous Immunoglobulin in the Management of Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Wenderfer, Scott E.; Thacker, Trisha

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of nephritis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The pathogenesis of lupus nephritis is complex, involving innate and adaptive cellular and humoral immune responses. Autoantibodies in particular have been shown to be critical in the initiation and progression of renal injury, via interactions with both Fc-receptors and complement. One approach in the management of patients with lupus nephritis has been the use of intravenous immunoglobulin. This therapy has shown benefit in the setting of many forms of autoantibody-mediated injury; however, the mechanisms of efficacy are not fully understood. In this paper, the data supporting the use of immunoglobulin therapy in lupus nephritis will be evaluated. In addition, the potential mechanisms of action will be discussed with respect to the known involvement of complement and Fc-receptors in the kidney parenchyma. Results are provocative and warrant additional clinical trials. PMID:23056926

  20. Management of Intravenous Leiomyomatosis of Uterus with Extension to Heart.

    PubMed

    Alizade, Kambiz; Maddah, Godratollah; Jafarian, Amir Hosein; Khamene Bagheri, Arash; Jafarzadeh Esfehani, Reza; Mirzaeian, Sara

    2016-02-01

    Leiomyoma is a benign smooth muscle tumor. Intra-venous extensions of these tumors occur due to tumor growth within uterine vein or lymphatic vessels. In rare cases, intracaval and intracardiac extension can also be seen. Clinical suspicion of this disease should become certain by use of imaging techniques. While the treatment is complete resection of the tumor, one or two-stage surgery can be planned for patient depending on tumor extension and patient's condition. In this report, a 52-year-old woman with a rare presentation of uterine leiomyoma will be discussed. While the tumor was extended toward right atrium, the patient had nonspecific symptoms. By use of two-stage surgery, separated laparotomy and cardiopulmonary bypass, the tumor was completely removed. PMID:26838087

  1. Intravenous Immunoglobulin Responsive Persistent Thrombocytopenia after Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prabhat; Charaniya, Riyaz; Ghosh, Anindya; Sahoo, Ratnakar

    2016-04-01

    Dengue outbreak is common in Indian subcontinent and causes significant morbidity and mortality. Year 2015 has witnessed yet another Dengue epidemic in northern India and the number of cases this year is maximum in a decade. Dengue infection is a viral disease and there are 4 different serotypes DENV1, DENV2, DENV3 and DENV4. This year DENV2 and DENV4 have been isolated from most of the patients. Thrombocytopenia is hallmark of dengue infection and generally recovers within ten days of onset of symptoms. We report a case of dengue haemorrhagic fever in which thrombocytopenia persisted for almost a month and improved after Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) administration. This is the first case where IVIG has been successfully used for treating persisting thrombocytopenia after dengue infection. PMID:27190868

  2. Assessment of the pharmacodynamics of intranasal, intravenous and oral scopolamine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tietze, Karen J.

    1990-01-01

    Space motion sickness is an important issue in the space medical sciences program. One of the objectives of the ongoing clinical experimental protocol Pharmacokinetics of Intranasal Scopolamine in Normal Subjects is to evaluate the pharmacodynamics of scopolamine using salivary flow rate and pH profiles and cognitive performance tests as pharmacodynamic parameters. Normal volunteers collected saliva and performed the NTI Multiresource Performance Battery tests at designed time intervals to establish control saliva flow rates, salivary pH profiles, and the characteristics of the learning curve for the performance program under normal conditions. In the clinical part of the study, saliva samples and performance test scores are collected from healthy nonsmoking subjects after receiving a single 0.4 mg dose of either intranasal, intravenous, or oral scopolamine.

  3. Intravenous tacrolimus and cyclosporine induced anaphylaxis: what is next?

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sung-Yoon; Sohn, Kyoung-Hee; Lee, Jeong-Ok; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Cho, Sang-Heon

    2015-01-01

    Tacrolimus and cyclosporine have been used in various formulations, but their hypersensitivity reactions are rare in practice. Castor oil derivatives are nonionic surfactants used in aqueous preparations of hydrophobic active pharmaceutical ingredients. Castor oil derivatives that can be used as additives to tacrolimus and cyclosporine may play a role in the development of hypersensitivity reactions, especially anaphylaxis. Various immunologic and nonimmunologic mechanisms have been implicated in hypersensitivity reactions induced by castor oil derivatives. Physicians should be aware that not only the drug itself, but also its additives or metabolites could induce hypersensitivity reactions. We report a case of anaphylaxis caused by vitamin K (phytonadine), serotonin antagonist (granisetron), intravenous tacrolimus, and cyclosporine. Interestingly, the patient tolerated oral cyclosporine, which did not contain Cremophor EL or polysorbate 80. PMID:26240796

  4. Use of intramuscular methadone in managing intravenous drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Bezant, Edward Michael

    2014-01-01

    A 30-year-old woman was referred to the Acute Pain Team for their advice on how to manage her current pain, in light of her unique pre-admission medications. On questioning it was discovered that the patient was receiving 50 mg of intramuscular methadone daily, in the community. She was a former intravenous drug user who had been enrolled into a methadone substitution programme for 10 years and had been receiving her methadone intramuscularly for the past 6 years. It had been discovered that her addiction was not solely to opioids but, moreover, to the process of injecting as well. She was diagnosed with obsessive compulsive disorder, with a needle fixation, and started on the intramuscular methadone regimen on which she has maintained abstinence from heroin for 6 years. PMID:25414219

  5. Control of light backscattering in blood during intravenous laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, Ivan S.; Popov, V. D.; Rusina, Tatyana V.; Dets, Sergiy M.

    1997-02-01

    One of the most important problems in modern laser medicine is the determination of system response on laser treatment. Reaction of living system is significant during many kinds of laser procedures like surgery, therapy and biostimulation. Our study was aimed to optimize laser exposure using feed-back fiber system for intravenous laser irradiation of blood (ILIB). This system consisted of helium-neon laser (633 nm, 5 mW) with coupled fiber unit, photodetector and PC interface. Photodetector signals produced due to light backscattering were storaged and processed during all blood irradiation procedure. Significant time-dependent variations were observed within 9-15 min after beginning of treatment procedure and were correlated with number of trials, stage and character of disease. The designed feed-back system allows us to register a human blood response on laser irradiation to achieve better cure effect.

  6. Intravenous tacrolimus and cyclosporine induced anaphylaxis: what is next?

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Yoon; Sohn, Kyoung-Hee; Lee, Jeong-Ok; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Cho, Sang-Heon; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2015-07-01

    Tacrolimus and cyclosporine have been used in various formulations, but their hypersensitivity reactions are rare in practice. Castor oil derivatives are nonionic surfactants used in aqueous preparations of hydrophobic active pharmaceutical ingredients. Castor oil derivatives that can be used as additives to tacrolimus and cyclosporine may play a role in the development of hypersensitivity reactions, especially anaphylaxis. Various immunologic and nonimmunologic mechanisms have been implicated in hypersensitivity reactions induced by castor oil derivatives. Physicians should be aware that not only the drug itself, but also its additives or metabolites could induce hypersensitivity reactions. We report a case of anaphylaxis caused by vitamin K (phytonadine), serotonin antagonist (granisetron), intravenous tacrolimus, and cyclosporine. Interestingly, the patient tolerated oral cyclosporine, which did not contain Cremophor EL or polysorbate 80. PMID:26240796

  7. Impact of a needleless intravenous system in a university hospital.

    PubMed

    Gartner, K

    1993-09-01

    Needlestick injuries are a serious, but preventable problem in the healthcare industry. Industry has developed better devices to protect the healthcare worker. This study evaluates the impact of a "needleless" intravenous system on needlestick exposures and whether the increased cost of this new system could be justified. Exposures were defined and injury reports analyzed retrospectively and following introduction of the needleless IV system. This study indicates that the introduction of a needleless IV system can significantly reduce the number of IV-related injuries that occur in an institution, and is economically feasible. Other categories of exposure (needle-related, related to other sharps, and trash-related) also showed a drop, whereas exposure from the disposal of sharp devices into needle boxes showed a significant increase. This seems to support other findings that in-room needle-box containers have not thus far reduced the number of injuries related to sharps disposal. PMID:10128146

  8. Successful treatment of idiopathic pulmonary capillaritis with intravenous cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Frances; Glackin, Louisa; Slattery, Dubhfeasa M

    2013-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH), a subtype of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is a rare condition, first described by Virchow in 1864. Historically, it manifests in children in the first decade of life with the combination of hemoptysis, iron deficiency anemia, and alveolar infiltrates on chest radiograph. More recently, diffuse alveolar hemorrhage has been classified by the absence or presence of pulmonary capillaritis (PC), the latter carrying a potential for a poorer outcome. While systemic corticosteroids remain the first line treatment option, other immune modulators have been trailed including hydroxychloroquine, azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine, and cyclophosphamide with varying results. Our case demonstrates for the first time, the successful use of intravenous cyclophosphamide in the management of chronic idiopathic PC. PMID:22573417

  9. Intravenous microinjections of zebrafish larvae to study acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Cianciolo Cosentino, Chiara; Roman, Beth L; Drummond, Iain A; Hukriede, Neil A

    2010-01-01

    In this video article we describe a zebrafish model of AKI using gentamicin as the nephrotoxicant. The technique consists of intravenous microinjections on 2 dpf zebrafish. This technique represents an efficient and rapid method to deliver soluble substances into the bloodstream of zebrafish larvae, allowing for the injection of 15-20 fish per hour. In addition to AKI studies, this microinjection technique can also be used for other types of experimental studies such as angiography. We provide a detailed protocol of the technique from equipment required to visual measures of decreased kidney function. In addition, we also demonstrate the process of fixation, whole mount immunohistochemistry with a kidney tubule marker, plastic embedding and sectioning of the larval zebrafish. We demonstrate that zebrafish larvae injected with gentamicin show morphological features consistent with AKI: edema, loss of cell polarity in proximal tubular epithelial cells, and morphological disruption of the tubule. PMID:20729805

  10. Quinine-induced thrombocytopenia following intravenous use of heroin

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, D.J.; Walker, R.H.; Kolins, M.D.; Wilner, F.M.; Aster, R.H.

    1983-06-01

    Profound thrombocytopenia developed in a 22-year-old man after intravenous use of heroin. A high-titer, quinine-dependent, platelet-specific antibody was detected in his serum using lysis of normal platelets labeled with chromium 51 and an electroimmunoassay for measurement of platelet-associated IgG. The antibody was specific for quinine and failed to react with platelets in the presence of quinidine hydrochloride or two structural analogues of heroin. Quinine, a common adulterant found in heroin, was detected in the patient's blood and urine. On the basis of these observations, the patient was judged to have quinine-induced immunologic thrombocytopenia. To our knowledge, this report is the first to confirm that quinine used as an adulterant can induce immunologic thrombocytopenia following an injection of heroin.

  11. Clinical perspectives of intravenous ketamine anaesthesia in peafowl (Pavo cristatus).

    PubMed

    Athar, M; Shakoor, A; Muhammad, G; Sarwar, M N; Chaudhry, N I

    1996-01-01

    A total of 29 peafowl (Pavo cristatus), rectified surgically for infraorbital abscesses (n = 22), lacerated wounds (n = 4), and fractures of tibia (n = 2) and radius (n = 1), were anaesthetized by the intravenous administration of ketamine hydrochloride (Inj. Calypsol, Gedeon Richter, Hungary) in a dose of 15 20 mg/kg body weight. Divided doses (10 mg + 5 mg + 5 mg) were used with an interval of 1-2 min. No premedication was undertaken in any of the birds. Anaesthesia lasted for about 15 min and the birds gained their feet completely after 30 min to 3 hours. The respiration rate was markedly depressed (8-10/min) and the respiratory pattern was deep abdominal. Only a slight increase was observed in the heart rate. Analgesia was incomplete and muscle relaxation was not satisfactory. Mild salivation was also noticed in some of the birds (n = 3). Recovery, although not smooth, was uneventful. PMID:9055460

  12. Feasibility of Modified Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines in a Resource-Restricted Setting Based on a Cohort Study of Severe S. Aureus Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Srisomang, Pramot; Teparrukkul, Prapit; Lorvinitnun, Pichet; Wongyingsinn, Mingkwan; Chierakul, Wirongrong; Hongsuwan, Maliwan; West, T. Eoin; Day, Nicholas P.; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2012-01-01

    Background The Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) guidelines describe best practice for the management of severe sepsis and septic shock in developed countries, but most deaths from sepsis occur where healthcare is not sufficiently resourced to implement them. Our objective was to define the feasibility and basis for modified guidelines in a resource-restricted setting. Methods and Findings We undertook a detailed assessment of sepsis management in a prospective cohort of patients with severe sepsis caused by a single pathogen in a 1,100-bed hospital in lower-middle income Thailand. We compared their management with the SSC guidelines to identify care bundles based on existing capabilities or additional activities that could be undertaken at zero or low cost. We identified 72 patients with severe sepsis or septic shock associated with S. aureus bacteraemia, 38 (53%) of who died within 28 days. One third of patients were treated in intensive care units (ICUs). Numerous interventions described by the SSC guidelines fell within existing capabilities, but their implementation was highly variable. Care available to patients on general wards covered the fundamental principles of sepsis management, including non-invasive patient monitoring, antimicrobial administration and intravenous fluid resuscitation. We described two additive care bundles, one for general wards and the second for ICUs, that if consistently performed would be predicted to improve outcome from severe sepsis. Conclusion It is feasible to implement modified sepsis guidelines that are scaled to resource availability, and that could save lives prior to the publication of international guidelines for developing countries. PMID:22363410

  13. In vitro clearance of intravenous acetaminophen in extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Gillogly, A; Kilbourn, C; Waldvogel, J; Martin, J; Annich, G; Wagner, D

    2013-03-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a life support system used as a bridge to transplantation in critically ill patients who suffer from acute respiratory or cardiac failure with resultant hypoxemia and tissue hypoxia. This is not amendable to conventional support intervention. Previous studies have shown significant drug losses in the components of an ECMO circuit, leading to decreased plasma drug levels. An in vitro study was conducted to determine: (1) changes in intravenous acetaminophen levels over time and (2) changes in concentration observed between different sites of the ECMO circuit. A single bolus dose of intravenous (IV) acetaminophen was injected into a standard blood-primed ECMO circuit. Plasma drug concentrations in the circuit were then measured at specific time points at three different locations to determine concentrations of the drug at time 0, 15, 30, 60, 240 and 360 minutes. The three samples were drawn pre- and post-membrane oxygenator and the polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubing. A second bolus dose was administered 24 hours after the first in order to compare "new" and "old" circuits. This entire process was repeated a total of three times. The results show that acetaminophen concentrations do not change significantly over time, with consistent levels seen in both new and old circuits (N=9). Average old circuit concentrations were approximately two times greater than the average new circuit concentrations after the circuit was re-dosed at 24 hours. Drug sequestration in the circuit was not significant in any of the three sites measured. It appears that, while acetaminophen levels remain relatively constant over a six hour period, dosing adjustments may be required for use in a circuit beyond the initial 24 hour period, depending on physiologic clearance of the drug. Assuming a six-hour dosing interval, levels should remain constant. PMID:23201817

  14. Pharmacokinetics of intravenous and subcutaneous cefovecin in alpacas.

    PubMed

    Cox, S; Sommardahl, C; Seddighi, R; Videla, R; Hayes, J; Pistole, N; Hamill, M; Doherty, T

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics of cefovecin after intravenous and subcutaneous dose of 8 mg/kg to alpacas. Bacterial infections requiring long-term antibiotic therapy such as neonatal bacteremia, pneumonia, peritonitis, dental, and uterine infections are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in this species. However, few antimicrobials have been evaluated and proven to have favorable pharmacokinetics for therapeutic use. Most antimicrobials that are currently used require daily injections for many days. Cefovecin is a long-acting cephalosporin that is formulated for subcutaneous administration, and its long-elimination half-life allows for 14-day dosing intervals in dogs and cats. The properties of cefovecin may be advantageous for medical treatment of camelids due to its broad spectrum, route of administration, and long duration of activity. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of antimicrobial drugs in camelids is essential for the proper treatment and prevention of bacterial disease, and to minimize development of antibiotic resistant bacterial strains due to inadequate antibiotic concentrations. Cefovecin mean half-life, volume of distribution at steady-state, and clearance after intravenous administration were 10.3 h, 86 mL/kg, and 7.07 mL·h/kg. The bioavailability was 143%, while half-life, C(max), and T(max) were 16.9 h, 108 μg/mL, and 2.8 h following subcutaneous administration. In the absence of additional microbial susceptibility data for alpaca pathogens, the current cefovecin dosage regimen prescribed for dogs (8 mg/kg SC every 14 days) may need to be optimized for the treatment of infections in this species. PMID:25407784

  15. Comparison of Intrapulmonary and Systemic Pharmacokinetics of Colistin Methanesulfonate (CMS) and Colistin after Aerosol Delivery and Intravenous Administration of CMS in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Boisson, Matthieu; Jacobs, Matthieu; Grégoire, Nicolas; Gobin, Patrice; Marchand, Sandrine; Mimoz, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Colistin is an old antibiotic that has recently gained a considerable renewal of interest for the treatment of pulmonary infections due to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Nebulization seems to be a promising form of administration, but colistin is administered as an inactive prodrug, colistin methanesulfonate (CMS); however, differences between the intrapulmonary concentrations of the active moiety as a function of the route of administration in critically ill patients have not been precisely documented. In this study, CMS and colistin concentrations were measured on two separate occasions within the plasma and epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of critically ill patients (n = 12) who had received 2 million international units (MIU) of CMS by aerosol delivery and then intravenous administration. The pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted using a population approach and completed by pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) modeling and simulations. The ELF colistin concentrations varied considerably (9.53 to 1,137 mg/liter), but they were much higher than those in plasma (0.15 to 0.73 mg/liter) after aerosol delivery but not after intravenous administration of CMS. Following CMS aerosol delivery, typically, 9% of the CMS dose reached the ELF, and only 1.4% was presystemically converted into colistin. PK-PD analysis concluded that there was much higher antimicrobial efficacy after CMS aerosol delivery than after intravenous administration. These new data seem to support the use of aerosol delivery of CMS for the treatment of pulmonary infections in critical care patients. PMID:25267660

  16. Comparison of intrapulmonary and systemic pharmacokinetics of colistin methanesulfonate (CMS) and colistin after aerosol delivery and intravenous administration of CMS in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Boisson, Matthieu; Jacobs, Matthieu; Grégoire, Nicolas; Gobin, Patrice; Marchand, Sandrine; Couet, William; Mimoz, Olivier

    2014-12-01

    Colistin is an old antibiotic that has recently gained a considerable renewal of interest for the treatment of pulmonary infections due to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Nebulization seems to be a promising form of administration, but colistin is administered as an inactive prodrug, colistin methanesulfonate (CMS); however, differences between the intrapulmonary concentrations of the active moiety as a function of the route of administration in critically ill patients have not been precisely documented. In this study, CMS and colistin concentrations were measured on two separate occasions within the plasma and epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of critically ill patients (n = 12) who had received 2 million international units (MIU) of CMS by aerosol delivery and then intravenous administration. The pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted using a population approach and completed by pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) modeling and simulations. The ELF colistin concentrations varied considerably (9.53 to 1,137 mg/liter), but they were much higher than those in plasma (0.15 to 0.73 mg/liter) after aerosol delivery but not after intravenous administration of CMS. Following CMS aerosol delivery, typically, 9% of the CMS dose reached the ELF, and only 1.4% was presystemically converted into colistin. PK-PD analysis concluded that there was much higher antimicrobial efficacy after CMS aerosol delivery than after intravenous administration. These new data seem to support the use of aerosol delivery of CMS for the treatment of pulmonary infections in critical care patients. PMID:25267660

  17. Fluid resuscitation strategies in the Israeli army.

    PubMed

    Krausz, Michael M

    2003-05-01

    Medical training in the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) is currently based on the principles of the Advanced Trauma Life Support course of the American College of Surgeons termed Military Trauma Life Support. The Advanced Trauma Life Support guidelines provide a systematic standardized approach to the treatment of trauma casualties that has been very successful in civilian trauma. On the battlefield, however, these guidelines have been modified according to the combat environment. The factors that influence these changes are tactical considerations, availability and level of training of medical personal, direct enemy fire, medical equipment limitations, means of transportation of casualties, and the variable transportation time from the front line to the first medical echelon. The basic strategy of the IDF is to bring the military physician or paramedic and airlifted surgical units as close as possible to the front line, to minimize evacuation time. Also, evacuation helicopters that land in the combat zone close to the front line, sometimes under direct fire, usually have a military physician on board. The dilemma of "scoop and run" or "stay and stabilize" in hemorrhagic shock has been solved in the IDF toward early rapid evacuation of casualties to a surgical unit. Immediately after airway and breathing have been secured, if evacuation time is less than 1 hour, the intravenous line and fluid resuscitation is started en route to the medical facility. When evacuation time is longer than 1 hour, an intravenous line is always started before evacuation. In controlled hemorrhagic shock, where the source of bleeding has been controlled and evacuation time is less than 1 hour, fluid resuscitation with lactated Ringer's solution or normal saline is started, to achieve normalization of hemodynamic parameters. When evacuation time exceeds 60 minutes, colloids such as Hemaccel or hydroxyethyl starch are added. In uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock, where internal bleeding has

  18. Fluid inclusion geothermometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, C.G., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Fluid inclusions trapped within crystals either during growth or at a later time provide many clues to the histories of rocks and ores. Estimates of fluid-inclusion homogenization temperature and density can be obtained using a petrographic microscope with thin sections, and they can be refined using heating and freezing stages. Fluid inclusion studies, used in conjunction with paragenetic studies, can provide direct data on the time and space variations of parameters such as temperature, pressure, density, and composition of fluids in geologic environments. Changes in these parameters directly affect the fugacity, composition, and pH of fluids, thus directly influencing localization of ore metals. ?? 1977 Ferdinand Enke Verlag Stuttgart.

  19. Pulmonary responses to lower body negative pressure and fluid loading during head-down tilt bedrest.

    PubMed

    Hillebrecht, A; Schulz, H; Meyer, M; Baisch, F; Beck, L; Blomqvist, C G

    1992-01-01

    Exposure to microgravity redistributes body fluids with important secondary effects on cardiovascular function. We tested the hypothesis that the fluid shifts also affect pulmonary gas exchange. Microgravity was simulated in six male volunteers by a 10-day period of bedrest at 6 degrees head-down tilt (HDT). Lower body negative pressure (LBNP) and intravenous saline loading superimposed acute changes in fluid distribution on the prolonged effects of HDT. HDT produced relative dehydration and hypovolemia with decreased pulmonary blood flow and diffusing capacity. Before bedrest, pulmonary blood flow decreased by 24% during LBNP and diffusing capacity by 7%, while functional residual capacity increased by 14% (p less than 0.05). Intravenous saline loading caused a 24% increase in pulmonary blood-flow (p less than 0.05). Functional residual capacity decreased by 10% and diffusing capacity by 6% (p less than 0.05). Lung tissue volume did not change significantly. Head-down tilt had only minor effects on the responses to LBNP and saline loading. We conclude that LBNP and intravenous saline loading produce major changes in pulmonary blood-flow and minor effects on pulmonary gas exchange, and that the response to acute changes in fluid distribution is not significantly altered during simulated microgravity. PMID:1509892

  20. Lagrangian fluid dynamics using the Voronoi-Delauanay mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Dukowicz, J.K.

    1981-01-01

    A Lagrangian technique for numerical fluid dynamics is described. This technique makes use of the Voronoi mesh to efficiently locate new neighbors, and it uses the dual (Delaunay) triangulation to define computational cells. This removes all topological restrictions and facilitates the solution of problems containing interfaces and multiple materials. To improve computational accuracy a mesh smoothing procedure is employed.

  1. Fluid cooled electrical assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Rinehart, Lawrence E.; Romero, Guillermo L.

    2007-02-06

    A heat producing, fluid cooled assembly that includes a housing made of liquid-impermeable material, which defines a fluid inlet and a fluid outlet and an opening. Also included is an electrical package having a set of semiconductor electrical devices supported on a substrate and the second major surface is a heat sink adapted to express heat generated from the electrical apparatus and wherein the second major surface defines a rim that is fit to the opening. Further, the housing is constructed so that as fluid travels from the fluid inlet to the fluid outlet it is constrained to flow past the opening thereby placing the fluid in contact with the heat sink.

  2. Spinning fluids reactor

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

    2012-11-20

    A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

  3. Bolus intravenous 0.9% saline, but not 4% albumin or 5% glucose, causes interstitial pulmonary edema in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Bihari, Shailesh; Wiersema, Ubbo F; Schembri, David; De Pasquale, Carmine G; Dixon, Dani-Louise; Prakash, Shivesh; Lawrence, Mark D; Bowden, Jeffrey J; Bersten, Andrew D

    2015-10-01

    Rapid intravenous (iv) infusion of 0.9% saline alters respiratory mechanics in healthy subjects. However, the relative cardiovascular and respiratory effects of bolus iv crystalloid vs. colloid are unknown. Six healthy male volunteers were given 30 ml/kg iv 0.9% saline, 4% albumin, and 5% glucose at a rate of 100 ml/min on 3 separate days in a double-blinded, randomized crossover study. Impulse oscillometry, spirometry, lung volumes, diffusing capacity (DLCO), and blood samples were measured before and after fluid administration. Lung ultrasound B-line score (indicating interstitial pulmonary edema) and Doppler echocardiography indices of cardiac preload were measured before, midway, immediately after, and 1 h after fluid administration. Infusion of 0.9% saline increased small airway resistance at 5 Hz (P = 0.04) and lung ultrasound B-line score (P = 0.01) without changes in Doppler echocardiography measures of preload. In contrast, 4% albumin increased DLCO, decreased lung volumes, and increased the Doppler echocardiography mitral E velocity (P = 0.001) and E-to-lateral/septal e' ratio, estimated blood volume, and N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (P = 0.01) but not lung ultrasound B-line score, consistent with increased pulmonary blood volume without interstitial pulmonary edema. There were no significant changes with 5% glucose. Plasma angiopoietin-2 concentration increased only after 0.9% saline (P = 0.001), suggesting an inflammatory mechanism associated with edema formation. In healthy subjects, 0.9% saline and 4% albumin have differential pulmonary effects not attributable to passive fluid filtration. This may reflect either different effects of these fluids on active signaling in the pulmonary circulation or a protective effect of albumin. PMID:26228998

  4. Development of an Intravenous Therapy Module for Second Year Registered Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balint, Marilyn

    A study aimed at developing an intravenous therapy module for second-year registered nursing students is described in this practicum report. The report's five chapters define the underlying problem and purpose of the study; discuss the history of intravenous therapy and the significance of the module to the host institution; review the relevant…

  5. Thermodynamic Model for Fluid-Fluid Interfacial Areas in Porous Media for Arbitrary Drainage-Imbibition Sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Schroth, Martin H.; Oostrom, Mart; Dobson, Richard; Zeyer, Josef

    2008-08-01

    Fluid/fluid interfacial areas are important in controlling the rate of mass and energy transfer between fluid phases in porous media. We present a modified thermodynamically based model (TBM) to predict fluid/fluid interfacial areas in porous media for arbitrary drainage/imbibition sequences. The TBM explicitly distinguishes between interfacial areas associated with continuous (free) and isolated (entrapped) nonwetting fluids. The model is restricted to two-fluid systems in which (1) no significant conversion of mechanical work into heat occurs, (2) the wetting fluid completely wets the porous medium’s solid surfaces, and (3) no changes in interfacial area due to mass transfer between phases occur. We show example calculations for two different drainage/imbibition sequences in two porous media: a highly uniform silica sand and a well-graded silt. The TBM’s predictions for interfacial area associated with free nonwetting-fluid are identical to those of a previously published geometry-based model (GBM). However, predictions for interfacial area associated with entrapped nonwetting-fluid are consistently larger in the TBM than in the GBM. Although a comparison of model predictions with experimental data is currently only possible to a limited extent, good general agreement was found for the TBM. As required model parameters are commonly used as inputs for or tracked during multifluid-flow simulations, the modified TBM may be easily incorporated in numerical codes.

  6. 12 CFR 1807.904 - Lobbying restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Lobbying restrictions. 1807.904 Section 1807.904 Banks and Banking COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS FUND, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CAPITAL MAGNET FUND Terms and Conditions of Assistance § 1807.904 Lobbying restrictions. No...

  7. 12 CFR 1807.904 - Lobbying restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Lobbying restrictions. 1807.904 Section 1807.904 Banks and Banking COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS FUND, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CAPITAL MAGNET FUND Terms and Conditions of Assistance § 1807.904 Lobbying restrictions. No...

  8. 12 CFR 1807.904 - Lobbying restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Lobbying restrictions. 1807.904 Section 1807.904 Banks and Banking COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS FUND, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CAPITAL MAGNET FUND Terms and Conditions of Assistance § 1807.904 Lobbying restrictions. No...

  9. 12 CFR 1807.904 - Lobbying restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Lobbying restrictions. 1807.904 Section 1807.904 Banks and Banking COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS FUND, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CAPITAL MAGNET FUND Terms and Conditions of Assistance § 1807.904 Lobbying restrictions. No...

  10. 40 CFR 1033.740 - Credit restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... restrictions. Use of emission credits generated under this part 1033 or 40 CFR part 92 is restricted depending on the standards against which they were generated. (a) Credits from 40 CFR part 92. NOX and PM credits generated under 40 CFR part 92 may be used under this part in the same manner as NOX and...

  11. 40 CFR 1033.740 - Credit restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... restrictions. Use of emission credits generated under this part 1033 or 40 CFR part 92 is restricted depending on the standards against which they were generated. (a) Credits from 40 CFR part 92. NOX and PM credits generated under 40 CFR part 92 may be used under this part in the same manner as NOX and...

  12. 40 CFR 1033.740 - Credit restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... restrictions. Use of emission credits generated under this part 1033 or 40 CFR part 92 is restricted depending on the standards against which they were generated. (a) Credits from 40 CFR part 92. NOX and PM credits generated under 40 CFR part 92 may be used under this part in the same manner as NOX and...

  13. 40 CFR 1033.740 - Credit restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... restrictions. Use of emission credits generated under this part 1033 or 40 CFR part 92 is restricted depending on the standards against which they were generated. (a) Credits from 40 CFR part 92. NOX and PM credits generated under 40 CFR part 92 may be used under this part in the same manner as NOX and...

  14. 10 CFR 110.29 - Restricted destinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Restricted destinations. 110.29 Section 110.29 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL Licenses § 110.29 Restricted destinations. Afghanistan Andorra Angola Burma (Myanmar) Djibouti India Israel...

  15. 10 CFR 110.29 - Restricted destinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Restricted destinations. 110.29 Section 110.29 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL Licenses § 110.29 Restricted destinations. Afghanistan Andorra Angola Burma (Myanmar) Djibouti India Israel...

  16. 10 CFR 110.29 - Restricted destinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Restricted destinations. 110.29 Section 110.29 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL Licenses § 110.29 Restricted destinations. Afghanistan Andorra Angola Burma (Myanmar) Djibouti India Israel...

  17. 10 CFR 110.29 - Restricted destinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Restricted destinations. 110.29 Section 110.29 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL Licenses § 110.29 Restricted destinations. Afghanistan Andorra Angola Burma (Myanmar) Djibouti India Israel...

  18. 10 CFR 110.29 - Restricted destinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restricted destinations. 110.29 Section 110.29 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL Licenses § 110.29 Restricted destinations. Afghanistan Andorra Angola Burma (Myanmar) Djibouti India Israel...

  19. 9 CFR 78.30 - General restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS BRUCELLOSIS Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Swine Because of Brucellosis § 78.30 General restrictions. (a) Brucellosis reactor swine, brucellosis exposed swine, feral swine, sows, and boars may not be moved interstate or...

  20. 9 CFR 78.30 - General restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS BRUCELLOSIS Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Swine Because of Brucellosis § 78.30 General restrictions. (a) Brucellosis reactor swine, brucellosis exposed swine, feral swine, sows, and boars may not be moved interstate or...

  1. 18 CFR 1304.410 - Navigation restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Navigation restrictions... Miscellaneous § 1304.410 Navigation restrictions. (a) Except for the placement of riprap along the shoreline... established for commercial navigation. (b) Structures shall not be located in such a way as to block...

  2. 18 CFR 1304.410 - Navigation restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Navigation restrictions... Miscellaneous § 1304.410 Navigation restrictions. (a) Except for the placement of riprap along the shoreline... established for commercial navigation. (b) Structures shall not be located in such a way as to block...

  3. 18 CFR 1304.410 - Navigation restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Navigation restrictions... Miscellaneous § 1304.410 Navigation restrictions. (a) Except for the placement of riprap along the shoreline... established for commercial navigation. (b) Structures shall not be located in such a way as to block...

  4. 18 CFR 1304.410 - Navigation restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Navigation restrictions... Miscellaneous § 1304.410 Navigation restrictions. (a) Except for the placement of riprap along the shoreline... established for commercial navigation. (b) Structures shall not be located in such a way as to block...

  5. 18 CFR 1304.410 - Navigation restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Navigation restrictions... Miscellaneous § 1304.410 Navigation restrictions. (a) Except for the placement of riprap along the shoreline... established for commercial navigation. (b) Structures shall not be located in such a way as to block...

  6. 7 CFR 400.407 - Restricted access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Restricted access. 400.407 Section 400.407 Agriculture... Social Security Account Numbers and Employer Identification Numbers § 400.407 Restricted access. The Manager, other officer, or employee of FCIC or an authorized person may have access to the SSNs and...

  7. 7 CFR 400.407 - Restricted access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restricted access. 400.407 Section 400.407 Agriculture... Social Security Account Numbers and Employer Identification Numbers § 400.407 Restricted access. The Manager, other officer, or employee of FCIC or an authorized person may have access to the SSNs and...

  8. 46 CFR 119.405 - Fuel restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fuel restrictions. 119.405 Section 119.405 Shipping... Machinery Requirements § 119.405 Fuel restrictions. The use of a fuel, other than diesel fuel, as an alternative fuel for an internal combustion engine, except gasoline when used as a fuel for outboard motors...

  9. 46 CFR 182.405 - Fuel restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fuel restrictions. 182.405 Section 182.405 Shipping...) MACHINERY INSTALLATION Specific Machinery Requirements § 182.405 Fuel restrictions. The use of alternative fuels, other than diesel fuel or gasoline, as fuel for an internal combustion engine will be reviewed...

  10. 46 CFR 119.405 - Fuel restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fuel restrictions. 119.405 Section 119.405 Shipping... Machinery Requirements § 119.405 Fuel restrictions. The use of a fuel, other than diesel fuel, as an alternative fuel for an internal combustion engine, except gasoline when used as a fuel for outboard motors...

  11. 46 CFR 182.405 - Fuel restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fuel restrictions. 182.405 Section 182.405 Shipping...) MACHINERY INSTALLATION Specific Machinery Requirements § 182.405 Fuel restrictions. The use of alternative fuels, other than diesel fuel or gasoline, as fuel for an internal combustion engine will be reviewed...

  12. 46 CFR 182.405 - Fuel restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fuel restrictions. 182.405 Section 182.405 Shipping...) MACHINERY INSTALLATION Specific Machinery Requirements § 182.405 Fuel restrictions. The use of alternative fuels, other than diesel fuel or gasoline, as fuel for an internal combustion engine will be reviewed...

  13. 46 CFR 119.405 - Fuel restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fuel restrictions. 119.405 Section 119.405 Shipping... Machinery Requirements § 119.405 Fuel restrictions. The use of a fuel, other than diesel fuel, as an alternative fuel for an internal combustion engine, except gasoline when used as a fuel for outboard motors...

  14. 46 CFR 119.405 - Fuel restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fuel restrictions. 119.405 Section 119.405 Shipping... Machinery Requirements § 119.405 Fuel restrictions. The use of a fuel, other than diesel fuel, as an alternative fuel for an internal combustion engine, except gasoline when used as a fuel for outboard motors...

  15. 46 CFR 182.405 - Fuel restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fuel restrictions. 182.405 Section 182.405 Shipping...) MACHINERY INSTALLATION Specific Machinery Requirements § 182.405 Fuel restrictions. The use of alternative fuels, other than diesel fuel or gasoline, as fuel for an internal combustion engine will be reviewed...

  16. 46 CFR 119.405 - Fuel restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fuel restrictions. 119.405 Section 119.405 Shipping... Machinery Requirements § 119.405 Fuel restrictions. The use of a fuel, other than diesel fuel, as an alternative fuel for an internal combustion engine, except gasoline when used as a fuel for outboard motors...

  17. 46 CFR 182.405 - Fuel restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fuel restrictions. 182.405 Section 182.405 Shipping...) MACHINERY INSTALLATION Specific Machinery Requirements § 182.405 Fuel restrictions. The use of alternative fuels, other than diesel fuel or gasoline, as fuel for an internal combustion engine will be reviewed...

  18. 7 CFR 3550.118 - Grant restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Grant restrictions. 3550.118 Section 3550.118... AGRICULTURE DIRECT SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Section 504 Origination and Section 306C Water and Waste Disposal Grants § 3550.118 Grant restrictions. (a) Maximum grant. Lifetime assistance to...

  19. 7 CFR 3550.118 - Grant restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Grant restrictions. 3550.118 Section 3550.118... AGRICULTURE DIRECT SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Section 504 Origination and Section 306C Water and Waste Disposal Grants § 3550.118 Grant restrictions. (a) Maximum grant. Lifetime assistance to...

  20. 50 CFR 648.102 - Time restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Time restrictions. 648.102 Section 648.102... Flounder Fisheries § 648.102 Time restrictions. Unless otherwise specified pursuant to § 648.107, vessels... possession limit may fish for summer flounder from May 1 through September 30. This time period may...