Science.gov

Sample records for intrinsically disordered protein

  1. Intrinsically disordered proteins and biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Boskey, Adele L; Villarreal-Ramirez, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    In vertebrates and invertebrates, biomineralization is controlled by the cell and the proteins they produce. A large number of these proteins are intrinsically disordered, gaining some secondary structure when they interact with their binding partners. These partners include the component ions of the mineral being deposited, the crystals themselves, the template on which the initial crystals form, and other intrinsically disordered proteins and peptides. This review speculates why intrinsically disordered proteins are so important for biomineralization, providing illustrations from the SIBLING (small integrin binding N-glycosylated) proteins and their peptides. It is concluded that the flexible structure, and the ability of the intrinsically disordered proteins to bind to a multitude of surfaces is crucial, but details on the precise-interactions, energetics and kinetics of binding remain to be determined. PMID:26807759

  2. Archaic chaos: intrinsically disordered proteins in Archaea

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many proteins or their regions known as intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) lack unique 3D structure in their native states under physiological conditions yet fulfill key biological functions. Earlier bioinformatics studies showed that IDPs and IDRs are highly abundant in different proteomes and carry out mostly regulatory functions related to molecular recognition and signal transduction. Archaea belong to an intriguing domain of life whose members, being microbes, are characterized by a unique mosaic-like combination of bacterial and eukaryotic properties and include inhabitants of some of the most extreme environments on the planet. With the expansion of the archaea genome data (more than fifty archaea species from five different phyla are known now), and with recent improvements in the accuracy of intrinsic disorder prediction, it is time to re-examine the abundance of IDPs and IDRs in the archaea domain. Results The abundance of IDPs and IDRs in 53 archaea species is analyzed. The amino acid composition profiles of these species are generally quite different from each other. The disordered content is highly species-dependent. Thermoproteales proteomes have 14% of disordered residues, while in Halobacteria, this value increases to 34%. In proteomes of these two phyla, proteins containing long disordered regions account for 12% and 46%, whereas 4% and 26% their proteins are wholly disordered. These three measures of disorder content are linearly correlated with each other at the genome level. There is a weak correlation between the environmental factors (such as salinity, pH and temperature of the habitats) and the abundance of intrinsic disorder in Archaea, with various environmental factors possessing different disorder-promoting strengths. Harsh environmental conditions, especially those combining several hostile factors, clearly favor increased disorder content. Intrinsic disorder is highly abundant

  3. Intrinsically disordered proteins from A to Z.

    PubMed

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2011-08-01

    The ideas that proteins might possess specific functions without being uniquely folded into rigid 3D-structures and that these floppy polypeptides might constitute a noticeable part of any given proteome would have been considered as a preposterous fiction 15 or even 10 years ago. The situation has changed recently, and the existence of functional yet intrinsically disordered proteins and regions has become accepted by a significant number of protein scientists. These fuzzy objects with fuzzy structures and fuzzy functions are among the most interesting and attractive targets for modern protein research. This review summarizes some of the major discoveries and breakthroughs in the field of intrinsic disorder by representing related concepts and definitions. PMID:21501695

  4. The role of protein intrinsic disorder in major psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Tovo-Rodrigues, Luciana; Recamonde-Mendoza, Mariana; Paixão-Côrtes, Vanessa Rodrigues; Bruxel, Estela M; Schuch, Jaqueline B; Friedrich, Deise C; Rohde, Luis A; Hutz, Mara H

    2016-09-01

    Although new candidate genes for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Schizophrenia (SCZ), Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and Bipolar Disorder (BD) emerged from genome-wide association studies (GWAS), their underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Evidences of the involvement of intrinsically disordered proteins in diseases have grown in the last decade. These proteins lack tridimensional structure under physiological conditions and are involved in important cellular functions such as signaling, recognition and regulation. The aim of the present study was to identify the role and abundance of intrinsically disordered proteins in a set of psychiatric diseases and to test whether diseases are different regarding protein intrinsic disorder. Our hypothesis is that differences across psychiatric illnesses phenotypes and symptoms may arise from differences in intrinsic protein disorder content and properties of each group. A bioinformatics prediction of intrinsic disorder was performed in proteins retrieved based on top findings from GWAS, Copy Number Variation and candidate gene investigations for each disease. This approach revealed that about 80% of studied proteins presented long stretches of disorder. This amount was significantly higher than that observed in general eukaryotic proteins, and those involved in cardiovascular diseases. These results suggest that proteins with intrinsic disorder are a common feature of neurodevelopment and synaptic transmission processes which are potentially involved in the etiology of psychiatric diseases. Moreover, we identified differences between ADHD and ASD when the binary prediction of structure and putative binding sites were compared. These differences may be related to variation in symptom complexity between both diseases. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27184105

  5. Intrinsically disordered proteins drive membrane curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, David J.; Houser, Justin R.; Hayden, Carl C.; Sherman, Michael B.; Lafer, Eileen M.; Stachowiak, Jeanne C.

    2015-07-01

    Assembly of highly curved membrane structures is essential to cellular physiology. The prevailing view has been that proteins with curvature-promoting structural motifs, such as wedge-like amphipathic helices and crescent-shaped BAR domains, are required for bending membranes. Here we report that intrinsically disordered domains of the endocytic adaptor proteins, Epsin1 and AP180 are highly potent drivers of membrane curvature. This result is unexpected since intrinsically disordered domains lack a well-defined three-dimensional structure. However, in vitro measurements of membrane curvature and protein diffusivity demonstrate that the large hydrodynamic radii of these domains generate steric pressure that drives membrane bending. When disordered adaptor domains are expressed as transmembrane cargo in mammalian cells, they are excluded from clathrin-coated pits. We propose that a balance of steric pressure on the two surfaces of the membrane drives this exclusion. These results provide quantitative evidence for the influence of steric pressure on the content and assembly of curved cellular membrane structures.

  6. Intrinsically disordered proteins drive membrane curvature

    PubMed Central

    Busch, David J.; Houser, Justin R.; Hayden, Carl C.; Sherman, Michael B.; Lafer, Eileen M.; Stachowiak, Jeanne C.

    2015-01-01

    Assembly of highly curved membrane structures is essential to cellular physiology. The prevailing view has been that proteins with curvature-promoting structural motifs, such as wedge-like amphipathic helices and crescent-shaped BAR domains, are required for bending membranes. Here we report that intrinsically disordered domains of the endocytic adaptor proteins, Epsin1 and AP180 are highly potent drivers of membrane curvature. This result is unexpected since intrinsically disordered domains lack a well-defined three-dimensional structure. However, in vitro measurements of membrane curvature and protein diffusivity demonstrate that the large hydrodynamic radii of these domains generate steric pressure that drives membrane bending. When disordered adaptor domains are expressed as transmembrane cargo in mammalian cells, they are excluded from clathrin-coated pits. We propose that a balance of steric pressure on the two surfaces of the membrane drives this exclusion. These results provide quantitative evidence for the influence of steric pressure on the content and assembly of curved cellular membrane structures. PMID:26204806

  7. Genome-Wide Prediction of Intrinsic Disorder; Sequence Alignment of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midic, Uros

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsic disorder (ID) is defined as a lack of stable tertiary and/or secondary structure under physiological conditions in vitro. Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are highly abundant in nature. IDPs possess a number of crucial biological functions, being involved in regulation, recognition, signaling and control, e.g. their functional…

  8. Characterization of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins by Analytical Ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Scott, David J; Winzor, Donald J

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins have traditionally been largely neglected by structural biologists because a lack of rigid structure precludes their study by X-ray crystallography. Structural information must therefore be inferred from physicochemical studies of their solution behavior. Analytical ultracentrifugation yields important information about the gross conformation of an intrinsically disordered protein. Sedimentation velocity studies provide estimates of the weight-average sedimentation and diffusion coefficients of a given macromolecular state of the protein. PMID:26412654

  9. The multifaceted roles of intrinsic disorder in protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2015-09-14

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDPRs) are important constituents of many protein complexes, playing various structural, functional, and regulatory roles. In such disorder-based protein complexes, functional disorder is used both internally (for assembly, movement, and functional regulation of the different parts of a given complex) and externally (for interactions of a complex with its external regulators). In complex assembly, IDPs/IDPRs serve as the molecular glue that cements complexes or as highly flexible scaffolds. Disorder defines the order of complex assembly and the ability of a protein to be involved in polyvalent interactions. It is at the heart of various binding mechanisms and interaction modes ascribed to IDPs. Disorder in protein complexes is related to multifarious applications of induced folding and induced functional unfolding, or defines the entropic chain activities, such as stochastic machines and binding rheostats. This review opens a FEBS Letters Special Issue on Dynamics, Flexibility, and Intrinsic Disorder in protein assemblies and represents a brief overview of intricate roles played by IDPs and IDPRs in various aspects of protein complexes. PMID:26073257

  10. Describing Sequence-Ensemble Relationships for Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Albert H.; Lyle, Nicholas; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Intrinsically disordered proteins participate in important protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions and control cellular phenotypes through their prominence as dynamic organizers of transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and signaling networks. These proteins challenge the tenets of the structure-function paradigm and their functional mechanisms remain a mystery given that they fail to fold autonomously into specific structures. Solving this mystery requires a first principles understanding of the quantitative relationships between information encoded in the sequences of disordered proteins and the ensemble of conformations they sample. Advances in quantifying sequence-ensemble relationships have been facilitated through a four-way synergy between bioinformatics, biophysical experiments, computer simulations, and polymer physics theories. Here, we review these advances and the resultant insights that allow us to develop a concise quantitative framework for describing sequence-ensemble relationships of intrinsically disordered proteins. PMID:23240611

  11. The unfoldomics decade: an update on intrinsically disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dunker, A Keith; Oldfield, Christopher J; Meng, Jingwei; Romero, Pedro; Yang, Jack Y; Chen, Jessica Walton; Vacic, Vladimir; Obradovic, Zoran; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2008-01-01

    Background Our first predictor of protein disorder was published just over a decade ago in the Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Neural Networks (Romero P, Obradovic Z, Kissinger C, Villafranca JE, Dunker AK (1997) Identifying disordered regions in proteins from amino acid sequence. Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Neural Networks, 1: 90–95). By now more than twenty other laboratory groups have joined the efforts to improve the prediction of protein disorder. While the various prediction methodologies used for protein intrinsic disorder resemble those methodologies used for secondary structure prediction, the two types of structures are entirely different. For example, the two structural classes have very different dynamic properties, with the irregular secondary structure class being much less mobile than the disorder class. The prediction of secondary structure has been useful. On the other hand, the prediction of intrinsic disorder has been revolutionary, leading to major modifications of the more than 100 year-old views relating protein structure and function. Experimentalists have been providing evidence over many decades that some proteins lack fixed structure or are disordered (or unfolded) under physiological conditions. In addition, experimentalists are also showing that, for many proteins, their functions depend on the unstructured rather than structured state; such results are in marked contrast to the greater than hundred year old views such as the lock and key hypothesis. Despite extensive data on many important examples, including disease-associated proteins, the importance of disorder for protein function has been largely ignored. Indeed, to our knowledge, current biochemistry books don't present even one acknowledged example of a disorder-dependent function, even though some reports of disorder-dependent functions are more than 50 years old. The results from genome-wide predictions of intrinsic disorder and the

  12. Molecular Recognition by Templated Folding of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toto, Angelo; Camilloni, Carlo; Giri, Rajanish; Brunori, Maurizio; Vendruscolo, Michele; Gianni, Stefano

    2016-02-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins often become structured upon interacting with their partners. The mechanism of this ‘folding upon binding’ process, however, has not been fully characterised yet. Here we present a study of the folding of the intrinsically disordered transactivation domain of c-Myb (c-Myb) upon binding its partner KIX. By determining the structure of the folding transition state for the binding of wild-type and three mutational variants of KIX, we found a remarkable plasticity of the folding pathway of c-Myb. To explain this phenomenon, we show that the folding of c-Myb is templated by the structure of KIX. This adaptive folding behaviour, which occurs by heterogeneous nucleation, differs from the robust homogeneous nucleation typically observed for globular proteins. We suggest that this templated folding mechanism may enable intrinsically disordered proteins to achieve specific and reliable binding with multiple partners while avoiding aberrant interactions.

  13. Phosphorylation of Intrinsically Disordered Regions in Remorin Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Macarena; Ott, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Plant-specific remorin proteins reside in subdomains of plasma membranes, originally termed membrane rafts. They probably facilitate cellular signal transduction by direct interaction with signaling proteins such as receptor-like kinases and may dynamically modulate their lateral segregation within plasma membranes. Recent evidence suggests such functions of remorins during plant–microbe interactions and innate immune responses, where differential phosphorylation of some of these proteins has been described to be dependent on the perception of the microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) flg22 and the presence of the NBS–LRR resistance protein RPM1. A number of specifically phosphorylated residues in their highly variable and intrinsically disordered N-terminal regions have been identified. Sequence diversity of these evolutionary distinct domains suggests that remorins may serve a wide range of biological functions. Here, we describe patterns and features of intrinsic disorder in remorin protein and discuss possible functional implications of phosphorylation within these rapidly evolving domains. PMID:22639670

  14. The importance of intrinsic disorder for protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Iakoucheva, Lilia M; Radivojac, Predrag; Brown, Celeste J; O'Connor, Timothy R; Sikes, Jason G; Obradovic, Zoran; Dunker, A Keith

    2004-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation provides a major regulatory mechanism in eukaryotic cells. Due to the high variability of amino acid residues flanking a relatively limited number of experimentally identified phosphorylation sites, reliable prediction of such sites still remains an important issue. Here we report the development of a new web-based tool for the prediction of protein phosphorylation sites, DISPHOS (DISorder-enhanced PHOSphorylation predictor, http://www.ist.temple. edu/DISPHOS). We observed that amino acid compositions, sequence complexity, hydrophobicity, charge and other sequence attributes of regions adjacent to phosphorylation sites are very similar to those of intrinsically disordered protein regions. Thus, DISPHOS uses position-specific amino acid frequencies and disorder information to improve the discrimination between phosphorylation and non-phosphorylation sites. Based on the estimates of phosphorylation rates in various protein categories, the outputs of DISPHOS are adjusted in order to reduce the total number of misclassified residues. When tested on an equal number of phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated residues, the accuracy of DISPHOS reaches 76% for serine, 81% for threonine and 83% for tyrosine. The significant enrichment in disorder-promoting residues surrounding phosphorylation sites together with the results obtained by applying DISPHOS to various protein functional classes and proteomes, provide strong support for the hypothesis that protein phosphorylation predominantly occurs within intrinsically disordered protein regions. PMID:14960716

  15. Functional correlations of respiratory syncytial virus proteins to intrinsic disorder.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Jillian N; Reddy, Krishna D; Uversky, Vladimir N; Teng, Michael N

    2016-04-26

    Protein intrinsic disorder is an important characteristic demonstrated by the absence of higher order structure, and is commonly detected in multifunctional proteins encoded by RNA viruses. Intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) of proteins exhibit high flexibility and solvent accessibility, which permit several distinct protein functions, including but not limited to binding of multiple partners and accessibility for post-translational modifications. IDR-containing viral proteins can therefore execute various functional roles to enable productive viral replication. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a globally circulating, non-segmented, negative sense (NNS) RNA virus that causes severe lower respiratory infections. In this study, we performed a comprehensive evaluation of predicted intrinsic disorder of the RSV proteome to better understand the functional role of RSV protein IDRs. We included 27 RSV strains to sample major RSV subtypes and genotypes, as well as geographic and temporal isolate differences. Several types of disorder predictions were applied to the RSV proteome, including per-residue (PONDR®-FIT and PONDR® VL-XT), binary (CH, CDF, CH-CDF), and disorder-based interactions (ANCHOR and MoRFpred). We classified RSV IDRs by size, frequency and function. Finally, we determined the functional implications of RSV IDRs by mapping predicted IDRs to known functional domains of each protein. Identification of RSV IDRs within functional domains improves our understanding of RSV pathogenesis in addition to providing potential therapeutic targets. Furthermore, this approach can be applied to other NNS viruses that encode essential multifunctional proteins for the elucidation of viral protein regions that can be manipulated for attenuation of viral replication. PMID:27062995

  16. Conformational Entropy of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins from Amino Acid Triads

    PubMed Central

    Baruah, Anupaul; Rani, Pooja; Biswas, Parbati

    2015-01-01

    This work quantitatively characterizes intrinsic disorder in proteins in terms of sequence composition and backbone conformational entropy. Analysis of the normalized relative composition of the amino acid triads highlights a distinct boundary between globular and disordered proteins. The conformational entropy is calculated from the dihedral angles of the middle amino acid in the amino acid triad for the conformational ensemble of the globular, partially and completely disordered proteins relative to the non-redundant database. Both Monte Carlo (MC) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are used to characterize the conformational ensemble of the representative proteins of each group. The results show that the globular proteins span approximately half of the allowed conformational states in the Ramachandran space, while the amino acid triads in disordered proteins sample the entire range of the allowed dihedral angle space following Flory’s isolated-pair hypothesis. Therefore, only the sequence information in terms of the relative amino acid triad composition may be sufficient to predict protein disorder and the backbone conformational entropy, even in the absence of well-defined structure. The predicted entropies are found to agree with those calculated using mutual information expansion and the histogram method. PMID:26138206

  17. Elastin-like Polypeptides as Models of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Stefan; Dzuricky, Michael; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) are a class of stimuli-responsive biopolymers inspired by the intrinsically disordered domains of tropoelastin that are composed of repeats of the VPGXG pentapeptide motif, where X is a “guest residue”. They undergo a reversible, thermally triggered lower critical solution temperature (LCST) phase transition, which has been utilized for a variety of applications including protein purification, affinity capture, immunoassays, and drug delivery. ELPs have been extensively studied as protein polymers and as biomaterials, but their relationship to other disordered proteins has heretofore not been established. The biophysical properties of ELPs that lend them their unique material behavior are similar to the properties of many intrinsically disordered proteins (IDP). Their low sequence complexity, phase behavior, and elastic properties make them an interesting “minimal” artificial IDP, and the study of ELPs can hence provide insights into the behavior of other more complex IDPs. Motivated by this emerging realization of the similarities between ELPs and IDPs, this review discusses the biophysical properties of ELPs, their biomedical utility, and their relationship to other disordered polypeptide sequences. PMID:26325592

  18. Natural protein sequences are more intrinsically disordered than random sequences.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jia-Feng; Cao, Zanxia; Yang, Yuedong; Wang, Chun-Ling; Su, Zhen-Dong; Zhao, Ya-Wei; Wang, Ji-Hua; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2016-08-01

    Most natural protein sequences have resulted from millions or even billions of years of evolution. How they differ from random sequences is not fully understood. Previous computational and experimental studies of random proteins generated from noncoding regions yielded inclusive results due to species-dependent codon biases and GC contents. Here, we approach this problem by investigating 10,000 sequences randomized at the amino acid level. Using well-established predictors for protein intrinsic disorder, we found that natural sequences have more long disordered regions than random sequences, even when random and natural sequences have the same overall composition of amino acid residues. We also showed that random sequences are as structured as natural sequences according to contents and length distributions of predicted secondary structure, although the structures from random sequences may be in a molten globular-like state, according to molecular dynamics simulations. The bias of natural sequences toward more intrinsic disorder suggests that natural sequences are created and evolved to avoid protein aggregation and increase functional diversity. PMID:26801222

  19. Context-dependent resistance to proteolysis of intrinsically disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Suskiewicz, Marcin J; Sussman, Joel L; Silman, Israel; Shaul, Yosef

    2011-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), also known as intrinsically unstructured proteins (IUPs), lack a well-defined 3D structure in vitro and, in some cases, also in vivo. Here, we discuss the question of proteolytic sensitivity of IDPs, with a view to better explaining their in vivo characteristics. After an initial assessment of the status of IDPs in vivo, we briefly survey the intracellular proteolytic systems. Subsequently, we discuss the evidence for IDPs being inherently sensitive to proteolysis. Such sensitivity would not, however, result in enhanced degradation if the protease-sensitive sites were sequestered. Accordingly, IDP access to and degradation by the proteasome, the major proteolytic complex within eukaryotic cells, are discussed in detail. The emerging picture appears to be that IDPs are inherently sensitive to proteasomal degradation along the lines of the “degradation by default” model. However, available data sets of intracellular protein half-lives suggest that intrinsic disorder does not imply a significantly shorter half-life. We assess the power of available systemic half-life measurements, but also discuss possible mechanisms that could protect IDPs from intracellular degradation. Finally, we discuss the relevance of the proteolytic sensitivity of IDPs to their function and evolution. PMID:21574196

  20. Introduction to the Thematic Minireview Series on Intrinsically Disordered Proteins.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Ruma

    2016-03-25

    In this thematic minireview series, the JBC presents six exciting articles on low complexity or intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). The dynamical and fluctuating structures of IDPs or of disordered regions within proteins result in virtually all of their primary sequence being exposed, at least at some time, to potential interacting partners. Their structural versatility underlies their often wide functional repertoires, which is further expanded by post-translational modifications. Given these characteristics, it is not surprising that IDPs serve as important hubs in signaling networks, scaffolding multivalent interactions. They are also important for organizing membrane-less protein organelles. This collection of reviews discusses biophysical approaches for studying IDPs and illuminates their importance to critical functions such as cell cycle control, transcription, and translation, as well as their regulation via cellular input signals. PMID:26851284

  1. Identification of Inhibitors of Biological Interactions Involving Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Marasco, Daniela; Scognamiglio, Pasqualina Liana

    2015-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions involving disordered partners have unique features and represent prominent targets in drug discovery processes. Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs) are involved in cellular regulation, signaling and control: they bind to multiple partners and these high-specificity/low-affinity interactions play crucial roles in many human diseases. Disordered regions, terminal tails and flexible linkers are particularly abundant in DNA-binding proteins and play crucial roles in the affinity and specificity of DNA recognizing processes. Protein complexes involving IDPs are short-lived and typically involve short amino acid stretches bearing few “hot spots”, thus the identification of molecules able to modulate them can produce important lead compounds: in this scenario peptides and/or peptidomimetics, deriving from structure-based, combinatorial or protein dissection approaches, can play a key role as hit compounds. Here, we propose a panoramic review of the structural features of IDPs and how they regulate molecular recognition mechanisms focusing attention on recently reported drug-design strategies in the field of IDPs. PMID:25849651

  2. Cryoprotective mechanism of a small intrinsically disordered dehydrin protein.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Stephanie; Graether, Steffen P

    2011-01-01

    Dehydration proteins (Dehydrins) are expressed during dehydration stress in plants and are thought to protect plant proteins and membranes from the loss of water during drought and at cold temperatures. Several different dehydrins have been shown to protect lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from damage from being frozen and thawed. We show here that a 48 residue K₂ dehydrin from Vitis riparia protects LDH more effectively than bovine serum albumin, a protein with known cryoprotective function. Light scattering and 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonate fluorescence experiments show that dehydrins prevent aggregation and unfolding of the enzyme. The cryoprotective effects of LDH are reduced by the addition of salt, suggesting that the positively charged K-segments are attracted to a negatively charged surface but this does not result in binding. Overall K₂ is an intrinsically disordered protein; nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation experiments indicate that the two-terminal, Lys-rich K-segments show a weak propensity for α-helicity and are flexible, and that the central, polar rich phi-segment has no secondary structure preference and is highly flexible. We propose that the phi-segments in dehydrins are important for maintaining the disordered structure so that the protein can act as a molecular shield to prevent partially denatured proteins from interacting with one another, whereas the K-segments may help to localize the dehydrin near the enzyme surface. PMID:21031484

  3. Cryoprotective mechanism of a small intrinsically disordered dehydrin protein

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Stephanie; Graether, Steffen P

    2011-01-01

    Dehydration proteins (Dehydrins) are expressed during dehydration stress in plants and are thought to protect plant proteins and membranes from the loss of water during drought and at cold temperatures. Several different dehydrins have been shown to protect lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from damage from being frozen and thawed. We show here that a 48 residue K2 dehydrin from Vitis riparia protects LDH more effectively than bovine serum albumin, a protein with known cryoprotective function. Light scattering and 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonate fluorescence experiments show that dehydrins prevent aggregation and unfolding of the enzyme. The cryoprotective effects of LDH are reduced by the addition of salt, suggesting that the positively charged K-segments are attracted to a negatively charged surface but this does not result in binding. Overall K2 is an intrinsically disordered protein; nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation experiments indicate that the two-terminal, Lys-rich K-segments show a weak propensity for α-helicity and are flexible, and that the central, polar rich phi-segment has no secondary structure preference and is highly flexible. We propose that the phi-segments in dehydrins are important for maintaining the disordered structure so that the protein can act as a molecular shield to prevent partially denatured proteins from interacting with one another, whereas the K-segments may help to localize the dehydrin near the enzyme surface. PMID:21031484

  4. Molecular signaling involving intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Anna; Manna, Sara La; Novellino, Ettore; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Marasco, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Investigations on cellular protein interaction networks (PINs) reveal that proteins that constitute hubs in a PIN are notably enriched in Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs) compared to proteins that constitute edges, highlighting the role of IDPs in signaling pathways. Most IDPs rapidly undergo disorder-to-order transitions upon binding to their biological targets to perform their function. Conformational dynamics enables IDPs to be versatile and to interact with a broad range of interactors under normal physiological conditions where their expression is tightly modulated. IDPs are involved in many cellular processes such as cellular signaling, transcriptional regulation, and splicing; thus, their high-specificity/low-affinity interactions play crucial roles in many human diseases including cancer. Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality in men worldwide. Therefore, identifying molecular mechanisms of the oncogenic signaling pathways that are involved in prostate carcinogenesis is crucial. In this review, we focus on the aspects of cellular pathways leading to PCa in which IDPs exert a primary role. PMID:27212129

  5. Molecular signaling involving intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Russo, Anna; Manna, Sara La; Novellino, Ettore; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Marasco, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Investigations on cellular protein interaction networks (PINs) reveal that proteins that constitute hubs in a PIN are notably enriched in Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs) compared to proteins that constitute edges, highlighting the role of IDPs in signaling pathways. Most IDPs rapidly undergo disorder-to-order transitions upon binding to their biological targets to perform their function. Conformational dynamics enables IDPs to be versatile and to interact with a broad range of interactors under normal physiological conditions where their expression is tightly modulated. IDPs are involved in many cellular processes such as cellular signaling, transcriptional regulation, and splicing; thus, their high-specificity/low-affinity interactions play crucial roles in many human diseases including cancer. Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality in men worldwide. Therefore, identifying molecular mechanisms of the oncogenic signaling pathways that are involved in prostate carcinogenesis is crucial. In this review, we focus on the aspects of cellular pathways leading to PCa in which IDPs exert a primary role. PMID:27212129

  6. Binding cavities and druggability of intrinsically disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yugang; Cao, Huaiqing; Liu, Zhirong

    2015-01-01

    To assess the potential of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) as drug design targets, we have analyzed the ligand-binding cavities of two datasets of IDPs (containing 37 and 16 entries, respectively) and compared their properties with those of conventional ordered (folded) proteins. IDPs were predicted to possess more binding cavity than ordered proteins at similar length, supporting the proposed advantage of IDPs economizing genome and protein resources. The cavity number has a wide distribution within each conformation ensemble for IDPs. The geometries of the cavities of IDPs differ from the cavities of ordered proteins, for example, the cavities of IDPs have larger surface areas and volumes, and are more likely to be composed of a single segment. The druggability of the cavities was examined, and the average druggable probability is estimated to be 9% for IDPs, which is almost twice that for ordered proteins (5%). Some IDPs with druggable cavities that are associated with diseases are listed. The optimism versus obstacles for drug design for IDPs is also briefly discussed. PMID:25611056

  7. Evolutionarily Conserved Network Properties of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rangarajan, Nivedita; Kulkarni, Prakash; Hannenhalli, Sridhar

    2015-01-01

    Background Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) lack a stable tertiary structure in isolation. Remarkably, however, a substantial portion of IDPs undergo disorder-to-order transitions upon binding to their cognate partners. Structural flexibility and binding plasticity enable IDPs to interact with a broad range of partners. However, the broader network properties that could provide additional insights into the functional role of IDPs are not known. Results Here, we report the first comprehensive survey of network properties of IDP-induced sub-networks in multiple species from yeast to human. Our results show that IDPs exhibit greater-than-expected modularity and are connected to the rest of the protein interaction network (PIN) via proteins that exhibit the highest betweenness centrality and connect to fewer-than-expected IDP communities, suggesting that they form critical communication links from IDP modules to the rest of the PIN. Moreover, we found that IDPs are enriched at the top level of regulatory hierarchy. Conclusion Overall, our analyses reveal coherent and remarkably conserved IDP-centric network properties, namely, modularity in IDP-induced network and a layer of critical nodes connecting IDPs with the rest of the PIN. PMID:25974317

  8. Calibrated Langevin-dynamics simulations of intrinsically disordered proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W. Wendell; Ho, Po-Yi; O'Hern, Corey S.

    2014-10-01

    We perform extensive coarse-grained (CG) Langevin dynamics simulations of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), which possess fluctuating conformational statistics between that for excluded volume random walks and collapsed globules. Our CG model includes repulsive steric, attractive hydrophobic, and electrostatic interactions between residues and is calibrated to a large collection of single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer data on the interresidue separations for 36 pairs of residues in five IDPs: α-, β-, and γ-synuclein, the microtubule-associated protein τ, and prothymosin α. We find that our CG model is able to recapitulate the average interresidue separations regardless of the choice of the hydrophobicity scale, which shows that our calibrated model can robustly capture the conformational dynamics of IDPs. We then employ our model to study the scaling of the radius of gyration with chemical distance in 11 known IDPs. We identify a strong correlation between the distance to the dividing line between folded proteins and IDPs in the mean charge and hydrophobicity space and the scaling exponent of the radius of gyration with chemical distance along the protein.

  9. Calibrated Langevin-dynamics simulations of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Smith, W Wendell; Ho, Po-Yi; O'Hern, Corey S

    2014-10-01

    We perform extensive coarse-grained (CG) Langevin dynamics simulations of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), which possess fluctuating conformational statistics between that for excluded volume random walks and collapsed globules. Our CG model includes repulsive steric, attractive hydrophobic, and electrostatic interactions between residues and is calibrated to a large collection of single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer data on the interresidue separations for 36 pairs of residues in five IDPs: α-, β-, and γ-synuclein, the microtubule-associated protein τ, and prothymosin α. We find that our CG model is able to recapitulate the average interresidue separations regardless of the choice of the hydrophobicity scale, which shows that our calibrated model can robustly capture the conformational dynamics of IDPs. We then employ our model to study the scaling of the radius of gyration with chemical distance in 11 known IDPs. We identify a strong correlation between the distance to the dividing line between folded proteins and IDPs in the mean charge and hydrophobicity space and the scaling exponent of the radius of gyration with chemical distance along the protein. PMID:25375525

  10. Structural biology of intrinsically disordered proteins: Revisiting unsolved mysteries.

    PubMed

    Sigalov, Alexander B

    2016-06-01

    The emergence of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) has challenged the classical protein structure-function paradigm by introducing a new paradigm of "coupled binding and folding". This paradigm suggests that IDPs fold upon binding to their partners. Further studies, however, revealed a novel and previously unrecognized phenomenon of "uncoupled binding and folding" suggesting that IDPs do not necessarily fold upon interaction with their lipid and protein partners. The complex and often unusual biophysics of IDPs makes structural characterization of these proteins and their complexes not only challenging but often resulting in opposite conclusions. For this reason, some crucial questions in this field remain unsolved for well over a decade. Considering an important role of IDPs in cellular regulation, signaling and control in health and disease, more efforts are needed to solve these mysteries. Here, I focus on two long-standing contradictions in the literature concerning dimerization and membrane-binding activities of IDPs. Molecular explanation of these discrepancies is provided. I also demonstrate how resolution of these critical issues in the field of IDPs results in our expanded understanding of cell function and has multiple applications in biology and medicine. PMID:27004461

  11. Rapid Evolution of Virus Sequences in Intrinsically Disordered Protein Regions

    PubMed Central

    Gitlin, Leonid; Hagai, Tzachi; LaBarbera, Anthony; Solovey, Mark; Andino, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Nodamura Virus (NoV) is a nodavirus originally isolated from insects that can replicate in a wide variety of hosts, including mammals. Because of their simplicity and ability to replicate in many diverse hosts, NoV, and the Nodaviridae in general, provide a unique window into the evolution of viruses and host-virus interactions. Here we show that the C-terminus of the viral polymerase exhibits extreme structural and evolutionary flexibility. Indeed, fewer than 10 positively charged residues from the 110 amino acid-long C-terminal region of protein A are required to support RNA1 replication. Strikingly, this region can be replaced by completely unrelated protein sequences, yet still produce a functional replicase. Structure predictions, as well as evolutionary and mutational analyses, indicate that the C-terminal region is structurally disordered and evolves faster than the rest of the viral proteome. Thus, the function of an intrinsically unstructured protein region can be independent of most of its primary sequence, conferring both functional robustness and sequence plasticity on the protein. Our results provide an experimental explanation for rapid evolution of unstructured regions, which enables an effective exploration of the sequence space, and likely function space, available to the virus. PMID:25502394

  12. Phenotypic plasticity in prostate cancer: role of intrinsically disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Steven M; Jolly, Mohit Kumar; Levine, Herbert; Kulkarni, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    A striking characteristic of cancer cells is their remarkable phenotypic plasticity, which is the ability to switch states or phenotypes in response to environmental fluctuations. Phenotypic changes such as a partial or complete epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) that play important roles in their survival and proliferation, and development of resistance to therapeutic treatments, are widely believed to arise due to somatic mutations in the genome. However, there is a growing concern that such a deterministic view is not entirely consistent with multiple lines of evidence, which indicate that stochasticity may also play an important role in driving phenotypic plasticity. Here, we discuss how stochasticity in protein interaction networks (PINs) may play a key role in determining phenotypic plasticity in prostate cancer (PCa). Specifically, we point out that the key players driving transitions among different phenotypes (epithelial, mesenchymal, and hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal), including ZEB1, SNAI1, OVOL1, and OVOL2, are intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and discuss how plasticity at the molecular level may contribute to stochasticity in phenotypic switching by rewiring PINs. We conclude by suggesting that targeting IDPs implicated in EMT in PCa may be a new strategy to gain additional insights and develop novel treatments for this disease, which is the most common form of cancer in adult men. PMID:27427552

  13. Phenotypic plasticity in prostate cancer: role of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Steven M; Jolly, Mohit Kumar; Levine, Herbert; Kulkarni, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    A striking characteristic of cancer cells is their remarkable phenotypic plasticity, which is the ability to switch states or phenotypes in response to environmental fluctuations. Phenotypic changes such as a partial or complete epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) that play important roles in their survival and proliferation, and development of resistance to therapeutic treatments, are widely believed to arise due to somatic mutations in the genome. However, there is a growing concern that such a deterministic view is not entirely consistent with multiple lines of evidence, which indicate that stochasticity may also play an important role in driving phenotypic plasticity. Here, we discuss how stochasticity in protein interaction networks (PINs) may play a key role in determining phenotypic plasticity in prostate cancer (PCa). Specifically, we point out that the key players driving transitions among different phenotypes (epithelial, mesenchymal, and hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal), including ZEB1, SNAI1, OVOL1, and OVOL2, are intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and discuss how plasticity at the molecular level may contribute to stochasticity in phenotypic switching by rewiring PINs. We conclude by suggesting that targeting IDPs implicated in EMT in PCa may be a new strategy to gain additional insights and develop novel treatments for this disease, which is the most common form of cancer in adult men. PMID:27427552

  14. Fuzzy regions in an intrinsically disordered protein impair protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Gruet, Antoine; Dosnon, Marion; Blocquel, David; Brunel, Joanna; Gerlier, Denis; Das, Rahul K; Bonetti, Daniela; Gianni, Stefano; Fuxreiter, Monika; Longhi, Sonia; Bignon, Christophe

    2016-02-01

    Despite the partial disorder-to-order transition that intrinsically disordered proteins often undergo upon binding to their partners, a considerable amount of residual disorder may be retained in the bound form, resulting in a fuzzy complex. Fuzzy regions flanking molecular recognition elements may enable partner fishing through non-specific, transient contacts, thereby facilitating binding, but may also disfavor binding through various mechanisms. So far, few computational or experimental studies have addressed the effect of fuzzy appendages on partner recognition by intrinsically disordered proteins. In order to shed light onto this issue, we used the interaction between the intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain of the measles virus (MeV) nucleoprotein (NTAIL ) and the X domain (XD) of the viral phosphoprotein as model system. After binding to XD, the N-terminal region of NTAIL remains conspicuously disordered, with α-helical folding taking place only within a short molecular recognition element. To study the effect of the N-terminal fuzzy region on NTAIL /XD binding, we generated N-terminal truncation variants of NTAIL , and assessed their binding abilities towards XD. The results revealed that binding increases with shortening of the N-terminal fuzzy region, with this also being observed with hsp70 (another MeV NTAIL binding partner), and for the homologous NTAIL /XD pairs from the Nipah and Hendra viruses. Finally, similar results were obtained when the MeV NTAIL fuzzy region was replaced with a highly dissimilar artificial disordered sequence, supporting a sequence-independent inhibitory effect of the fuzzy region. PMID:26684000

  15. Structural flexibility of intrinsically disordered proteins induces stepwise target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, Nobu C.; Kikuchi, Macoto

    2013-12-01

    An intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) lacks a stable three-dimensional structure, while it folds into a specific structure when it binds to a target molecule. In some IDP-target complexes, not all target binding surfaces are exposed on the outside, and intermediate states are observed in their binding processes. We consider that stepwise target recognition via intermediate states is a characteristic of IDP binding to targets with "hidden" binding sites. To investigate IDP binding to hidden target binding sites, we constructed an IDP lattice model based on the HP model. In our model, the IDP is modeled as a chain and the target is modeled as a highly coarse-grained object. We introduced motion and internal interactions to the target to hide its binding sites. In the case of unhidden binding sites, a two-state transition between the free states and a bound state is observed, and we consider that this represents coupled folding and binding. Introducing hidden binding sites, we found an intermediate bound state in which the IDP forms various structures to temporarily stabilize the complex. The intermediate state provides a scaffold for the IDP to access the hidden binding site. We call this process multiform binding. We conclude that structural flexibility of IDPs enables them to access hidden binding sites and this is a functional advantage of IDPs.

  16. Dancing Protein Clouds: The Strange Biology and Chaotic Physics of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins.

    PubMed

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-03-25

    Biologically active but floppy proteins represent a new reality of modern protein science. These intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and hybrid proteins containing ordered and intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDPRs) constitute a noticeable part of any given proteome. Functionally, they complement ordered proteins, and their conformational flexibility and structural plasticity allow them to perform impossible tricks and be engaged in biological activities that are inaccessible to well folded proteins with their unique structures. The major goals of this minireview are to show that, despite their simplified amino acid sequences, IDPs/IDPRs are complex entities often resembling chaotic systems, are structurally and functionally heterogeneous, and can be considered an important part of the structure-function continuum. Furthermore, IDPs/IDPRs are everywhere, and are ubiquitously engaged in various interactions characterized by a wide spectrum of binding scenarios and an even wider spectrum of structural and functional outputs. PMID:26851286

  17. Content of intrinsic disorder influences the outcome of cell-free protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tokmakov, Alexander A.; Kurotani, Atsushi; Ikeda, Mariko; Terazawa, Yumiko; Shirouzu, Mikako; Stefanov, Vasily; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis is used to produce proteins with various structural traits. Recent bioinformatics analyses indicate that more than half of eukaryotic proteins possess long intrinsically disordered regions. However, no systematic study concerning the connection between intrinsic disorder and expression success of cell-free protein synthesis has been presented until now. To address this issue, we examined correlations of the experimentally observed cell-free protein expression yields with the contents of intrinsic disorder bioinformatically predicted in the expressed sequences. This analysis revealed strong relationships between intrinsic disorder and protein amenability to heterologous cell-free expression. On the one hand, elevated disorder content was associated with the increased ratio of soluble expression. On the other hand, overall propensity for detectable protein expression decreased with disorder content. We further demonstrated that these tendencies are rooted in some distinct features of intrinsically disordered regions, such as low hydrophobicity, elevated surface accessibility and high abundance of sequence motifs for proteolytic degradation, including sites of ubiquitination and PEST sequences. Our findings suggest that identification of intrinsically disordered regions in the expressed amino acid sequences can be of practical use for predicting expression success and optimizing cell-free protein synthesis. PMID:26359642

  18. Autophagy-related intrinsically disordered proteins in intra-nuclear compartments.

    PubMed

    Na, Insung; Meng, Fanchi; Kurgan, Lukasz; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-08-16

    Recent analyses indicated that autophagy can be regulated via some nuclear transcriptional networks and many important players in the autophagy and other forms of programmed cell death are known to be intrinsically disordered. To this end, we analyzed similarities and differences in the intrinsic disorder distribution of nuclear and non-nuclear proteins related to autophagy. We also looked at the peculiarities of the distribution of the intrinsically disordered autophagy-related proteins in various intra-nuclear organelles, such as the nucleolus, chromatin, Cajal bodies, nuclear speckles, promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies, nuclear lamina, nuclear pores, and perinucleolar compartment. This analysis revealed that the autophagy-related proteins constitute about 2.5% of the non-nuclear proteins and 3.3% of the nuclear proteins, which corresponds to a substantial enrichment by about 32% in the nucleus. Curiously, although, in general, the autophagy-related proteins share similar characteristics of disorder with a generic set of all non-nuclear proteins, chromatin and nuclear speckles are enriched in the intrinsically disordered autophagy proteins (29 and 37% of these proteins are disordered, respectively) and have high disorder content at 0.24 and 0.27, respectively. Therefore, our data suggest that some of the nuclear disordered proteins may play important roles in autophagy. PMID:27377881

  19. Origins of Myc Proteins – Using Intrinsic Protein Disorder to Trace Distant Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Mahani, Amir; Henriksson, Johan; Wright, Anthony P. H.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian Myc proteins are important determinants of cell proliferation as well as the undifferentiated state of stem cells and their activity is frequently deregulated in cancer. Based mainly on conservation in the C-terminal DNA-binding and dimerization domain, Myc-like proteins have been reported in many simpler organisms within and outside the Metazoa but they have not been found in fungi or plants. Several important signature motifs defining mammalian Myc proteins are found in the N-terminal domain but the extent to which these are found in the Myc-like proteins from simpler organisms is not well established. The extent of N-terminal signature sequence conservation would give important insights about the evolution of Myc proteins and their current function in mammalian physiology and disease. In a systematic study of Myc-like proteins we show that N-terminal signature motifs are not readily detectable in individual Myc-like proteins from invertebrates but that weak similarities to Myc boxes 1 and 2 can be found in the N-termini of the simplest Metazoa as well as the unicellular choanoflagellate, Monosiga brevicollis, using multiple protein alignments. Phylogenetic support for the connections of these proteins to established Myc proteins is however poor. We show that the pattern of predicted protein disorder along the length of Myc proteins can be used as a complementary approach to making dendrograms of Myc proteins that aids the classification of Myc proteins. This suggests that the pattern of disorder within Myc proteins is more conserved through evolution than their amino acid sequence. In the disorder-based dendrograms the Myc-like proteins from simpler organisms, including M. brevicollis, are connected to established Myc proteins with a higher degree of certainty. Our results suggest that protein disorder based dendrograms may be of general significance for studying distant relationships between proteins, such as transcription factors, that have high

  20. Consequences of inducing intrinsic disorder in a high-affinity protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Papadakos, Grigorios; Sharma, Amit; Lancaster, Lorna E; Bowen, Rebecca; Kaminska, Renata; Leech, Andrew P; Walker, Daniel; Redfield, Christina; Kleanthous, Colin

    2015-04-29

    The kinetic and thermodynamic consequences of intrinsic disorder in protein-protein recognition are controversial. We address this by inducing one partner of the high-affinity colicin E3 rRNase domain-Im3 complex (K(d) ≈ 10(-12) M) to become an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP). Through a variety of biophysical measurements, we show that a single alanine mutation at Tyr507 within the hydrophobic core of the isolated colicin E3 rRNase domain causes the enzyme to become an IDP (E3 rRNase(IDP)). E3 rRNase(IDP) binds stoichiometrically to Im3 and forms a structure that is essentially identical to the wild-type complex. However, binding of E3 rRNase(IDP) to Im3 is 4 orders of magnitude weaker than that of the folded rRNase, with thermodynamic parameters reflecting the disorder-to-order transition on forming the complex. Critically, pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of the E3 rRNase(IDP)-Im3 complex demonstrates that the decrease in affinity is mostly accounted for by a drop in the electrostatically steered association rate. Our study shows that, notwithstanding the advantages intrinsic disorder brings to biological systems, this can come at severe kinetic and thermodynamic cost. PMID:25856265

  1. Compartmentalization and Functionality of Nuclear Disorder: Intrinsic Disorder and Protein-Protein Interactions in Intra-Nuclear Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanchi; Na, Insung; Kurgan, Lukasz; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2015-01-01

    The cell nucleus contains a number of membrane-less organelles or intra-nuclear compartments. These compartments are dynamic structures representing liquid-droplet phases which are only slightly denser than the bulk intra-nuclear fluid. They possess different functions, have diverse morphologies, and are typically composed of RNA (or, in some cases, DNA) and proteins. We analyzed 3005 mouse proteins localized in specific intra-nuclear organelles, such as nucleolus, chromatin, Cajal bodies, nuclear speckles, promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies, nuclear lamina, nuclear pores, and perinuclear compartment and compared them with ~29,863 non-nuclear proteins from mouse proteome. Our analysis revealed that intrinsic disorder is enriched in the majority of intra-nuclear compartments, except for the nuclear pore and lamina. These compartments are depleted in proteins that lack disordered domains and enriched in proteins that have multiple disordered domains. Moonlighting proteins found in multiple intra-nuclear compartments are more likely to have multiple disordered domains. Protein-protein interaction networks in the intra-nuclear compartments are denser and include more hubs compared to the non-nuclear proteins. Hubs in the intra-nuclear compartments (except for the nuclear pore) are enriched in disorder compared with non-nuclear hubs and non-nuclear proteins. Therefore, our work provides support to the idea of the functional importance of intrinsic disorder in the cell nucleus and shows that many proteins associated with sub-nuclear organelles in nuclei of mouse cells are enriched in disorder. This high level of disorder in the mouse nuclear proteins defines their ability to serve as very promiscuous binders, possessing both large quantities of potential disorder-based interaction sites and the ability of a single such site to be involved in a large number of interactions. PMID:26712748

  2. Protein intrinsic disorder within the Potyvirus genus: from proteome-wide analysis to functional annotation.

    PubMed

    Charon, Justine; Theil, Sébastien; Nicaise, Valérie; Michon, Thierry

    2016-02-01

    Within proteins, intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) are devoid of stable secondary and tertiary structures under physiological conditions and rather exist as dynamic ensembles of inter-converting conformers. Although ubiquitous in all domains of life, the intrinsic disorder content is highly variable in viral genomes. Over the years, functional annotations of disordered regions at the scale of the whole proteome have been conducted for several animal viruses. But to date, similar studies applied to plant viruses are still missing. Based on disorder prediction tools combined with annotation programs and evolutionary studies, we analyzed the intrinsic disorder content in Potyvirus, using a 10-species dataset representative of this genus diversity. In this paper, we revealed that: (i) the Potyvirus proteome displays high disorder content, (ii) disorder is conserved during Potyvirus evolution, suggesting a functional advantage of IDRs, (iii) IDRs evolve faster than ordered regions, and (iv) IDRs may be associated with major biological functions required for the Potyvirus cycle. Notably, the proteins P1, Coat protein (CP) and Viral genome-linked protein (VPg) display a high content of conserved disorder, enriched in specific motifs mimicking eukaryotic functional modules and suggesting strategies of host machinery hijacking. In these three proteins, IDRs are particularly conserved despite their high amino acid polymorphism, indicating a link to adaptive processes. Through this comprehensive study, we further investigate the biological relevance of intrinsic disorder in Potyvirus biology and we propose a functional annotation of potyviral proteome IDRs. PMID:26699268

  3. Translational diffusion of hydration water correlates with functional motions in folded and intrinsically disordered proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirò, Giorgio; Fichou, Yann; Gallat, Francois-Xavier; Wood, Kathleen; Gabel, Frank; Moulin, Martine; Härtlein, Michael; Heyden, Matthias; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Orecchini, Andrea; Paciaroni, Alessandro; Wuttke, Joachim; Tobias, Douglas J.; Weik, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Hydration water is the natural matrix of biological macromolecules and is essential for their activity in cells. The coupling between water and protein dynamics has been intensively studied, yet it remains controversial. Here we combine protein perdeuteration, neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations to explore the nature of hydration water motions at temperatures between 200 and 300 K, across the so-called protein dynamical transition, in the intrinsically disordered human protein tau and the globular maltose binding protein. Quasi-elastic broadening is fitted with a model of translating, rotating and immobile water molecules. In both experiment and simulation, the translational component markedly increases at the protein dynamical transition (around 240 K), regardless of whether the protein is intrinsically disordered or folded. Thus, we generalize the notion that the translational diffusion of water molecules on a protein surface promotes the large-amplitude motions of proteins that are required for their biological activity.

  4. Translational diffusion of hydration water correlates with functional motions in folded and intrinsically disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Schirò, Giorgio; Fichou, Yann; Gallat, Francois-Xavier; Wood, Kathleen; Gabel, Frank; Moulin, Martine; Härtlein, Michael; Heyden, Matthias; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Orecchini, Andrea; Paciaroni, Alessandro; Wuttke, Joachim; Tobias, Douglas J.; Weik, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Hydration water is the natural matrix of biological macromolecules and is essential for their activity in cells. The coupling between water and protein dynamics has been intensively studied, yet it remains controversial. Here we combine protein perdeuteration, neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations to explore the nature of hydration water motions at temperatures between 200 and 300 K, across the so-called protein dynamical transition, in the intrinsically disordered human protein tau and the globular maltose binding protein. Quasi-elastic broadening is fitted with a model of translating, rotating and immobile water molecules. In both experiment and simulation, the translational component markedly increases at the protein dynamical transition (around 240 K), regardless of whether the protein is intrinsically disordered or folded. Thus, we generalize the notion that the translational diffusion of water molecules on a protein surface promotes the large-amplitude motions of proteins that are required for their biological activity. PMID:25774711

  5. MobiDB 2.0: an improved database of intrinsically disordered and mobile proteins

    PubMed Central

    Potenza, Emilio; Domenico, Tomás Di; Walsh, Ian; Tosatto, Silvio C.E.

    2015-01-01

    MobiDB (http://mobidb.bio.unipd.it/) is a database of intrinsically disordered and mobile proteins. Intrinsically disordered regions are key for the function of numerous proteins. Here we provide a new version of MobiDB, a centralized source aimed at providing the most complete picture on different flavors of disorder in protein structures covering all UniProt sequences (currently over 80 million). The database features three levels of annotation: manually curated, indirect and predicted. Manually curated data is extracted from the DisProt database. Indirect data is inferred from PDB structures that are considered an indication of intrinsic disorder. The 10 predictors currently included (three ESpritz flavors, two IUPred flavors, two DisEMBL flavors, GlobPlot, VSL2b and JRONN) enable MobiDB to provide disorder annotations for every protein in absence of more reliable data. The new version also features a consensus annotation and classification for long disordered regions. In order to complement the disorder annotations, MobiDB features additional annotations from external sources. Annotations from the UniProt database include post-translational modifications and linear motifs. Pfam annotations are displayed in graphical form and are link-enabled, allowing the user to visit the corresponding Pfam page for further information. Experimental protein–protein interactions from STRING are also classified for disorder content. PMID:25361972

  6. Relating sequence encoded information to form and function of intrinsically disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Das, Rahul K.; Ruff, Kiersten M.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) showcase the importance of conformational plasticity and heterogeneity in protein function. We summarize recent advances that connect information encoded in IDP sequences to their conformational properties and functions. We focus on insights obtained through a combination of atomistic simulations and biophysical measurements that are synthesized into a coherent framework using polymer physics theories. PMID:25863585

  7. Functional Advantages of Conserved Intrinsic Disorder in RNA-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Varadi, Mihaly; Zsolyomi, Fruzsina; Guharoy, Mainak; Tompa, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Proteins form large macromolecular assemblies with RNA that govern essential molecular processes. RNA-binding proteins have often been associated with conformational flexibility, yet the extent and functional implications of their intrinsic disorder have never been fully assessed. Here, through large-scale analysis of comprehensive protein sequence and structure datasets we demonstrate the prevalence of intrinsic structural disorder in RNA-binding proteins and domains. We addressed their functionality through a quantitative description of the evolutionary conservation of disordered segments involved in binding, and investigated the structural implications of flexibility in terms of conformational stability and interface formation. We conclude that the functional role of intrinsically disordered protein segments in RNA-binding is two-fold: first, these regions establish extended, conserved electrostatic interfaces with RNAs via induced fit. Second, conformational flexibility enables them to target different RNA partners, providing multi-functionality, while also ensuring specificity. These findings emphasize the functional importance of intrinsically disordered regions in RNA-binding proteins. PMID:26439842

  8. Serine/arginine-rich splicing factors belong to a class of intrinsically disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Chad; Iakoucheva, Lilia M.

    2006-01-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) splicing factors play an important role in constitutive and alternative splicing as well as during several steps of RNA metabolism. Despite the wealth of functional information about SR proteins accumulated to-date, structural knowledge about the members of this family is very limited. To gain a better insight into structure-function relationships of SR proteins, we performed extensive sequence analysis of SR protein family members and combined it with ordered/disordered structure predictions. We found that SR proteins have properties characteristic of intrinsically disordered (ID) proteins. The amino acid composition and sequence complexity of SR proteins were very similar to those of the disordered protein regions. More detailed analysis showed that the SR proteins, and their RS domains in particular, are enriched in the disorder-promoting residues and are depleted in the order-promoting residues as compared to the entire human proteome. Moreover, disorder predictions indicated that RS domains of SR proteins were completely unstructured. Two different classification methods, the charge-hydropathy measure and the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the disorder scores, were in agreement with each other, and they both strongly predicted members of the SR protein family to be disordered. This study emphasizes the importance of the disordered structure for several functions of SR proteins, such as for spliceosome assembly and for interaction with multiple partners. In addition, it demonstrates the usefulness of order/disorder predictions for inferring protein structure from sequence. PMID:16407336

  9. Modulation of Intrinsically Disordered Protein Function by Post-translational Modifications.

    PubMed

    Bah, Alaji; Forman-Kay, Julie D

    2016-03-25

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) produce significant changes in the structural properties of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) by affecting their energy landscapes. PTMs can induce a range of effects, from local stabilization or destabilization of transient secondary structure to global disorder-to-order transitions, potentially driving complete state changes between intrinsically disordered and folded states or dispersed monomeric and phase-separated states. Here, we discuss diverse biological processes that are dependent on PTM regulation of IDPs. We also present recent tools for generating homogenously modified IDPs for studies of PTM-mediated IDP regulatory mechanisms. PMID:26851279

  10. Beyond the random coil: stochastic conformational switching in intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ucheor B; McCann, James J; Weninger, Keith R; Bowen, Mark E

    2011-04-13

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) participate in critical cellular functions that exploit the flexibility and rapid conformational fluctuations of their native state. Limited information about the native state of IDPs can be gained by the averaging over many heterogeneous molecules that is unavoidable in ensemble approaches. We used single molecule fluorescence to characterize native state conformational dynamics in five synaptic proteins confirmed to be disordered by other techniques. For three of the proteins, SNAP-25, synaptobrevin and complexin, their conformational dynamics could be described with a simple semiflexible polymer model. Surprisingly, two proteins, neuroligin and the NMDAR-2B glutamate receptor, were observed to stochastically switch among distinct conformational states despite the fact that they appeared intrinsically disordered by other measures. The hop-like intramolecular diffusion found in these proteins is suggested to define a class of functionality previously unrecognized for IDPs. PMID:21481779

  11. Exploring the relationship between hub proteins and drug targets based on GO and intrinsic disorder.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yuanyuan; Guo, Yanzhi; Wang, Yuelong; Luo, Jiesi; Pu, Xuemei; Li, Menglong; Zhang, Zhihang

    2015-06-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) play essential roles in many biological processes. In protein-protein interaction networks, hubs involve in numbers of PPIs and may constitute an important source of drug targets. The intrinsic disorder proteins (IDPs) with unstable structures can promote the promiscuity of hubs and also involve in many disease pathways, so they also could serve as potential drug targets. Moreover, proteins with similar functions measured by semantic similarity of gene ontology (GO) terms tend to interact with each other. Here, the relationship between hub proteins and drug targets based on GO terms and intrinsic disorder was explored. The semantic similarities of GO terms and genes between two proteins, and the rate of intrinsic disorder residues of each protein were extracted as features to characterize the functional similarity between two interacting proteins. Only using 8 feature variables, prediction models by support vector machine (SVM) were constructed to predict PPIs. The accuracy of the model on the PPI data from human hub proteins is as high as 83.72%, which is very promising compared with other PPI prediction models with hundreds or even thousands of features. Then, 118 of 142 PPIs between hubs are correctly predicted that the two interacting proteins are targets of the same drugs. The results indicate that only 8 functional features are fully efficient for representing PPIs. In order to identify new targets from IDP dataset, the PPIs between hubs and IDPs are predicted by the SVM model and the model yields a prediction accuracy of 75.84%. Further research proves that 3 of 5 PPIs between hubs and IDPs are correctly predicted that the two interacting proteins are targets of the same drugs. All results demonstrate that the model with only 8-dimensional features from GO terms and intrinsic disorder still gives a good performance in predicting PPIs and further identifying drug targets. PMID:25854804

  12. The Nuanced Interplay of Intrinsic Disorder and Other Structural Properties Driving Protein Evolution.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Joseph; Dos Santos, Helena G; Siltberg-Liberles, Jessica

    2016-09-01

    Protein evolution often occurs at unequal rates in different sites along an amino acid chain. Site-specific evolutionary rates have been linked to several structural and functional properties of proteins. Previous analyses of this phenomenon have involved relatively small datasets and, in some cases, the interaction among multiple structural factors is not evaluated. Here, we present the results of a large-scale phylogenetic and statistical analysis, testing the effects and interactions of three structural properties on amino acid replacement rates. We used sequence-based computational methods to predict (i) intrinsic disorder propensity, (ii) secondary structure, and (iii) functional domain involvement across millions of amino acid sites in thousands of sequence alignments of metazoan proteins. Our results somewhat corroborate earlier findings that intrinsically disordered sites tend to be more variable than ordered sites, but there is considerable overlap among their rate distributions, and a significant confounding interaction exists between intrinsic disorder and secondary structure. Notably, protein sites that are consistently predicted to be both intrinsically disordered and involved in secondary structures tend to be the most conserved at the amino acid level, suggesting that they are highly constrained and functionally important. In addition, a significant interaction exists between functional domain involvement and secondary structure. These findings suggest that multiple structural drivers of protein evolution should be evaluated simultaneously in order to get a clear picture of their individual effects as well as any confounding interactions among them. PMID:27189555

  13. The Lifestyle Switch Protein Bd0108 of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus Is an Intrinsically Disordered Protein

    PubMed Central

    Prehna, Gerd; Ramirez, Benjamin E.; Lovering, Andrew L.

    2014-01-01

    Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus is a δ-proteobacterium that preys upon Salmonella spp., E. coli, and other Gram-negative bacteria. Bdellovibrio can grow axenically (host-independent, HI, rare and mutation-driven) or subsist via a predatory lifecycle (host-dependent, HD, the usual case). Upon contact with prey, B. bacteriovorus enters the host periplasm from where it slowly drains the host cytosol of nutrients for its own replication. At the core of this mechanism is a retractile pilus, whose architecture is regulated by the protein Bd0108 and its interaction with the neighboring gene product Bd0109. Deletion of bd0108 results in negligible pilus formation, whereas an internal deletion (the one that instigates host-independence) causes mis-regulation of pilus length. These mutations, along with a suite of naturally occurring bd0108 mutant strains, act to control the entry to HI growth. To further study the molecular mechanism of predatory regulation, we focused on the apparent lifecycle switch protein Bd0108. Here we characterize the solution structure and dynamics of Bd0108 using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy complemented with additional biophysical methods. We then explore the interaction between Bd0108 and Bd0109 in detail utilizing isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and NMR spectroscopy. Together our results demonstrate that Bd0108 is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) and that the interaction with Bd0109 is of low affinity. Furthermore, we observe that Bd0108 retains an IDP nature while binding Bd0109. From our data we conclude that Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus utilizes an intrinsically disordered protein to regulate its pilus and control predation signaling. PMID:25514156

  14. Expanding the proteome of an RNA virus by phosphorylation of an intrinsically disordered viral protein.

    PubMed

    Cordek, Daniel G; Croom-Perez, Tayler J; Hwang, Jungwook; Hargittai, Michele R S; Subba-Reddy, Chennareddy V; Han, Qingxia; Lodeiro, Maria Fernanda; Ning, Gang; McCrory, Thomas S; Arnold, Jamie J; Koc, Hasan; Lindenbach, Brett D; Showalter, Scott A; Cameron, Craig E

    2014-08-29

    The human proteome contains myriad intrinsically disordered proteins. Within intrinsically disordered proteins, polyproline-II motifs are often located near sites of phosphorylation. We have used an unconventional experimental paradigm to discover that phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA) occurs in the intrinsically disordered domain of hepatitis C virus non-structural protein 5A (NS5A) on Thr-2332 near one of its polyproline-II motifs. Phosphorylation shifts the conformational ensemble of the NS5A intrinsically disordered domain to a state that permits detection of the polyproline motif by using (15)N-, (13)C-based multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. PKA-dependent proline resonances were lost in the presence of the Src homology 3 domain of c-Src, consistent with formation of a complex. Changing Thr-2332 to alanine in hepatitis C virus genotype 1b reduced the steady-state level of RNA by 10-fold; this change was lethal for genotype 2a. The lethal phenotype could be rescued by changing Thr-2332 to glutamic acid, a phosphomimetic substitution. Immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy showed that the inability to produce Thr(P)-2332-NS5A caused loss of integrity of the virus-induced membranous web/replication organelle. An even more extreme phenotype was observed in the presence of small molecule inhibitors of PKA. We conclude that the PKA-phosphorylated form of NS5A exhibits unique structure and function relative to the unphosphorylated protein. We suggest that post-translational modification of viral proteins containing intrinsic disorder may be a general mechanism to expand the viral proteome without a corresponding expansion of the genome. PMID:25031324

  15. Direct Observation of the Intrinsic Backbone Torsional Mobility of Disordered Proteins.

    PubMed

    Jain, Neha; Narang, Dominic; Bhasne, Karishma; Dalal, Vijit; Arya, Shruti; Bhattacharya, Mily; Mukhopadhyay, Samrat

    2016-08-23

    The fundamental backbone dynamics of unfolded proteins arising due to intrinsic ϕ-ψ dihedral angle fluctuations dictate the course of protein folding, binding, assembly, and function. These internal fluctuations are also critical for protein misfolding associated with a range of human diseases. However, direct observation and unambiguous assignment of this inherent dynamics in chemically denatured proteins is extremely challenging due to various experimental limitations. To directly map the backbone torsional mobility in the ϕ-ψ dihedral angle space, we used a model intrinsically disordered protein, namely, α-synuclein, that adopts an expanded state under native conditions. We took advantage of nonoccurrence of tryptophan in α-synuclein and created a number of single-tryptophan variants encompassing the entire polypeptide chain. We then utilized highly sensitive picosecond time-resolved fluorescence depolarization measurements that allowed us to discern the site-specific torsional relaxation at a low protein concentration under physiological conditions. For all the locations, the depolarization kinetics exhibited two well-separated rotational-correlation-time components. The shorter, subnanosecond component arises due to the local mobility of the indole side chain, whereas the longer rotational-correlation-time component (1.37 ± 0.15 ns), independent of global tumbling, represents a characteristic timescale for short-range conformational exchange in the ϕ-ψ dihedral space. This correlation time represents an intrinsic timescale for torsional relaxation and is independent of position, which is expected for an extended polypeptide chain having little or no propensity to form persistent structures. We were also able to capture this intrinsic timescale at the N-terminal unstructured domain of the prion protein. Our estimated timescale of the segmental mobility is similar to that of unfolded proteins studied by nuclear magnetic resonance in conjunction with

  16. Multifarious Roles of Intrinsic Disorder in Proteins Illustrate Its Broad Impact on Plant Biology

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaolin; Rikkerink, Erik H.A.; Jones, William T.; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are highly abundant in eukaryotic proteomes. Plant IDPs play critical roles in plant biology and often act as integrators of signals from multiple plant regulatory and environmental inputs. Binding promiscuity and plasticity allow IDPs to interact with multiple partners in protein interaction networks and provide important functional advantages in molecular recognition through transient protein–protein interactions. Short interaction-prone segments within IDPs, termed molecular recognition features, represent potential binding sites that can undergo disorder-to-order transition upon binding to their partners. In this review, we summarize the evidence for the importance of IDPs in plant biology and evaluate the functions associated with intrinsic disorder in five different types of plant protein families experimentally confirmed as IDPs. Functional studies of these proteins illustrate the broad impact of disorder on many areas of plant biology, including abiotic stress, transcriptional regulation, light perception, and development. Based on the roles of disorder in the protein–protein interactions, we propose various modes of action for plant IDPs that may provide insight for future experimental approaches aimed at understanding the molecular basis of protein function within important plant pathways. PMID:23362206

  17. Structural Diversity in Free and Bound States of Intrinsically Disordered Protein Phosphatase 1 Regulators

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, J.A.; Allaire, M.; Dancheck, B.; Ragusa, M.J.; Forman-Kay, J.D.; Peti, Wolfgang

    2010-09-08

    Complete folding is not a prerequisite for protein function, as disordered and partially folded states of proteins frequently perform essential biological functions. In order to understand their functions at the molecular level, we utilized diverse experimental measurements to calculate ensemble models of three nonhomologous, intrinsically disordered proteins: I-2, spinophilin, and DARPP-32, which bind to and regulate protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). The models demonstrate that these proteins have dissimilar propensities for secondary and tertiary structure in their unbound forms. Direct comparison of these ensemble models with recently determined PP1 complex structures suggests a significant role for transient, preformed structure in the interactions of these proteins with PP1. Finally, we generated an ensemble model of partially disordered I-2 bound to PP1 that provides insight into the relationship between flexibility and biological function in this dynamic complex.

  18. Influence of drying on the secondary structure of intrinsically disordered and globular proteins.

    PubMed

    Hundertmark, Michaela; Popova, Antoaneta V; Rausch, Saskia; Seckler, Robert; Hincha, Dirk K

    2012-01-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy of five Arabidopsis late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins constituting the plant specific families LEA_5 and LEA_6 showed that they are intrinsically disordered in solution and partially fold during drying. Structural predictions were comparable to these results for hydrated LEA_6, but not for LEA_5 proteins. FTIR spectroscopy showed that verbascose, but not sucrose, strongly affected the structure of the dry proteins. The four investigated globular proteins were only mildly affected by drying in the absence, but strongly in the presence of sugars. These data highlight the larger structural flexibility of disordered compared to globular proteins and the impact of sugars on the structure of both disordered and globular proteins during drying. PMID:22155233

  19. Unfoldomics of prostate cancer: on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Landau, Kevin S; Na, Insung; Schenck, Ryan O; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic diseases such as prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia are highly prevalent among men. The number of studies focused on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer is rather limited. The goal of this study is to analyze the prevalence and degree of disorder in proteins that were previously associated with the prostate cancer pathogenesis and to compare these proteins to the entire human proteome. The analysis of these datasets provides means for drawing conclusions on the roles of disordered proteins in this common male disease. We also hope that the results of our analysis can potentially lead to future experimental studies of these proteins to find novel pathways associated with this disease. PMID:27453073

  20. Unfoldomics of prostate cancer: on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Landau, Kevin S; Na, Insung; Schenck, Ryan O; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic diseases such as prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia are highly prevalent among men. The number of studies focused on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer is rather limited. The goal of this study is to analyze the prevalence and degree of disorder in proteins that were previously associated with the prostate cancer pathogenesis and to compare these proteins to the entire human proteome. The analysis of these datasets provides means for drawing conclusions on the roles of disordered proteins in this common male disease. We also hope that the results of our analysis can potentially lead to future experimental studies of these proteins to find novel pathways associated with this disease. PMID:27453073

  1. Intrinsically disordered proteins aggregate at fungal cell-to-cell channels and regulate intercellular connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Julian; Koh, Chuan Hock; Tjota, Monika; Pieuchot, Laurent; Raman, Vignesh; Chandrababu, Karthik Balakrishna; Yang, Daiwen; Wong, Limsoon; Jedd, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Like animals and plants, multicellular fungi possess cell-to-cell channels (septal pores) that allow intercellular communication and transport. Here, using a combination of MS of Woronin body-associated proteins and a bioinformatics approach that identifies related proteins based on composition and character, we identify 17 septal pore-associated (SPA) proteins that localize to the septal pore in rings and pore-centered foci. SPA proteins are not homologous at the primary sequence level but share overall physical properties with intrinsically disordered proteins. Some SPA proteins form aggregates at the septal pore, and in vitro assembly assays suggest aggregation through a nonamyloidal mechanism involving mainly α-helical and disordered structures. SPA loss-of-function phenotypes include excessive septation, septal pore degeneration, and uncontrolled Woronin body activation. Together, our data identify the septal pore as a complex subcellular compartment and focal point for the assembly of unstructured proteins controlling diverse aspects of intercellular connectivity. PMID:22955885

  2. Intrinsic Disorder in Transmembrane Proteins: Roles in Signaling and Topology Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Bürgi, Jérôme; Xue, Bin; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) are peculiar stretches of amino acids that lack stable conformations in solution. Intrinsic Disorder containing Proteins (IDP) are defined by the presence of at least one large IDR and have been linked to multiple cellular processes including cell signaling, DNA binding and cancer. Here we used computational analyses and publicly available databases to deepen insight into the prevalence and function of IDRs specifically in transmembrane proteins, which are somewhat neglected in most studies. We found that 50% of transmembrane proteins have at least one IDR of 30 amino acids or more. Interestingly, these domains preferentially localize to the cytoplasmic side especially of multi-pass transmembrane proteins, suggesting that disorder prediction could increase the confidence of topology prediction algorithms. This was supported by the successful prediction of the topology of the uncharacterized multi-pass transmembrane protein TMEM117, as confirmed experimentally. Pathway analysis indicated that IDPs are enriched in cell projection and axons and appear to play an important role in cell adhesion, signaling and ion binding. In addition, we found that IDP are enriched in phosphorylation sites, a crucial post translational modification in signal transduction, when compared to fully ordered proteins and to be implicated in more protein-protein interaction events. Accordingly, IDPs were highly enriched in short protein binding regions called Molecular Recognition Features (MoRFs). Altogether our analyses strongly support the notion that the transmembrane IDPs act as hubs in cellular signal events. PMID:27391701

  3. Liquid demixing of intrinsically disordered proteins is seeded by poly(ADP-ribose)

    PubMed Central

    Altmeyer, Matthias; Neelsen, Kai J.; Teloni, Federico; Pozdnyakova, Irina; Pellegrino, Stefania; Grøfte, Merete; Rask, Maj-Britt Druedahl; Streicher, Werner; Jungmichel, Stephanie; Nielsen, Michael Lund; Lukas, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins can phase separate from the soluble intracellular space, and tend to aggregate under pathological conditions. The physiological functions and molecular triggers of liquid demixing by phase separation are not well understood. Here we show in vitro and in vivo that the nucleic acid-mimicking biopolymer poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) nucleates intracellular liquid demixing. PAR levels are markedly induced at sites of DNA damage, and we provide evidence that PAR-seeded liquid demixing results in rapid, yet transient and fully reversible assembly of various intrinsically disordered proteins at DNA break sites. Demixing, which relies on electrostatic interactions between positively charged RGG repeats and negatively charged PAR, is amplified by aggregation-prone prion-like domains, and orchestrates the earliest cellular responses to DNA breakage. We propose that PAR-seeded liquid demixing is a general mechanism to dynamically reorganize the soluble nuclear space with implications for pathological protein aggregation caused by derailed phase separation. PMID:26286827

  4. Test and Evaluation of ff99IDPs Force Field for Intrinsically Disordered Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wei; Ji, Dingjue; Wang, Wei; Luo, Ray; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2015-05-26

    Over 40% of eukaryotic proteomic sequences have been predicted to be intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) or intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) and confirmed to be associated with many diseases. However, widely used force fields cannot well reproduce the conformers of IDPs. Previously the ff99IDPs force field was released to simulate IDPs with CMAP energy corrections for the eight disorder-promoting residues. In order to further confirm the performance of ff99IDPs, three representative IDP systems (arginine-rich HIV-1 Rev, aspartic proteinase inhibitor IA3, and α-synuclein) were used to test and evaluate the simulation results. The results show that for free disordered proteins, the chemical shifts from the ff99IDPs simulations are in quantitative agreement with those from reported NMR measurements and better than those from ff99SBildn. Thus, ff99IDPs can sample more clusters of disordered conformers than ff99SBildn. For structural proteins, both ff99IDPs and ff99SBildn can well reproduce the conformations. In general, ff99IDPs can successfully be used to simulate the conformations of IDPs and IDRs in both bound and free states. However, relative errors could still be found at the boundaries of ordered residues scattered in long disorder-promoting sequences. Therefore, polarizable force fields might be one of the possible ways to further improve the performance on IDPs. PMID:25919886

  5. Conformational propensities of intrinsically disordered proteins influence the mechanism of binding and folding

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Munehito; Sugase, Kenji; Dyson, H. Jane; Wright, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) frequently function in protein interaction networks that regulate crucial cellular signaling pathways. Many IDPs undergo transitions from disordered conformational ensembles to folded structures upon binding to their cellular targets. Several possible binding mechanisms for coupled folding and binding have been identified: folding of the IDP after association with the target (“induced fit”), or binding of a prefolded state in the conformational ensemble of the IDP to the target protein (“conformational selection”), or some combination of these two extremes. The interaction of the intrinsically disordered phosphorylated kinase-inducible domain (pKID) of the cAMP-response element binding (CREB) protein with the KIX domain of a general transcriptional coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP) provides an example of the induced-fit mechanism. Here we show by NMR relaxation dispersion experiments that a different intrinsically disordered ligand, the transactivation domain of the transcription factor c-Myb, interacts with KIX at the same site as pKID but via a different binding mechanism that involves elements of conformational selection and induced fit. In contrast to pKID, the c-Myb activation domain has a strong propensity for spontaneous helix formation in its N-terminal region, which binds to KIX in a predominantly folded conformation. The C-terminal region of c-Myb exhibits a much smaller helical propensity and likely folds via an induced-fit process after binding to KIX. We propose that the intrinsic secondary structure propensities of pKID and c-Myb determine their binding mechanisms, consistent with their functions as inducible and constitutive transcriptional activators. PMID:26195786

  6. Targeting intrinsically disordered proteins in neurodegenerative and protein dysfunction diseases: another illustration of the D2 concept

    PubMed Central

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2010-01-01

    Many biologically active proteins, which are usually called intrinsically disordered or natively unfolded proteins, lack stable tertiary and/or secondary structure under physiological conditions in vitro. Their functions complement the functional repertoire of ordered proteins, with intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) often being involved in regulation, signaling and control. Their amino acid sequences and compositions are very different from those of ordered proteins, making reliable identification of IDPs possible at the proteome level. IDPs are highly abundant in various human diseases, including neurodegeneration and other protein dysfunction maladies and, therefore, represent attractive novel drug targets. Some of the aspects of IDPs, as well as their roles in neurodegeneration and protein dysfunction diseases, are discussed in this article, together with the peculiarities of IDPs as potential drug targets. PMID:20653509

  7. IDEAL in 2014 illustrates interaction networks composed of intrinsically disordered proteins and their binding partners

    PubMed Central

    Fukuchi, Satoshi; Amemiya, Takayuki; Sakamoto, Shigetaka; Nobe, Yukiko; Hosoda, Kazuo; Kado, Yumiko; Murakami, Seiko D.; Koike, Ryotaro; Hiroaki, Hidekazu; Ota, Motonori

    2014-01-01

    IDEAL (Intrinsically Disordered proteins with Extensive Annotations and Literature, http://www.ideal.force.cs.is.nagoya-u.ac.jp/IDEAL/) is a collection of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) that cannot adopt stable globular structures under physiological conditions. Since its previous publication in 2012, the number of entries in IDEAL has almost tripled (120 to 340). In addition to the increase in quantity, the quality of IDEAL has been significantly improved. The new IDEAL incorporates the interactions of IDPs and their binding partners more explicitly, and illustrates the protein–protein interaction (PPI) networks and the structures of protein complexes. Redundant experimental data are arranged based on the clustering of Protein Data Bank entries, and similar sequences with the same binding mode are grouped. As a result, the new IDEAL presents more concise and informative experimental data. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) disorder is annotated in a systematic manner, by identifying the regions with large deviations among the NMR models. The ordered/disordered and new domain predictions by DICHOT are available, as well as the domain assignments by HMMER. Some examples of the PPI networks and the highly deviated regions derived from NMR models will be described, together with other advances. These enhancements will facilitate deeper understanding of IDPs, in terms of their flexibility, plasticity and promiscuity. PMID:24178034

  8. Intrinsically disordered energy landscapes.

    PubMed

    Chebaro, Yassmine; Ballard, Andrew J; Chakraborty, Debayan; Wales, David J

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) reveals an underlying multifunnel structure for the energy landscape. We suggest that such 'intrinsically disordered' landscapes, with a number of very different competing low-energy structures, are likely to characterise IDPs, and provide a useful way to address their properties. In particular, IDPs are present in many cellular protein interaction networks, and several questions arise regarding how they bind to partners. Are conformations resembling the bound structure selected for binding, or does further folding occur on binding the partner in a induced-fit fashion? We focus on the p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) protein, which adopts an α-helical conformation when bound to its partner, and is involved in the activation of apoptosis. Recent experimental evidence shows that folding is not necessary for binding, and supports an induced-fit mechanism. Using a variety of computational approaches we deduce the molecular mechanism behind the instability of the PUMA peptide as a helix in isolation. We find significant barriers between partially folded states and the helix. Our results show that the favoured conformations are molten-globule like, stabilised by charged and hydrophobic contacts, with structures resembling the bound state relatively unpopulated in equilibrium. PMID:25999294

  9. Biophysical Methods to Investigate Intrinsically Disordered Proteins: Avoiding an "Elephant and Blind Men" Situation.

    PubMed

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and hybrid proteins possessing ordered domains and intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDPRs) are highly abundant in various proteomes. They are different from ordered proteins at many levels, and an unambiguous representation of an IDP structure is a difficult task. In fact, IDPs show an extremely wide diversity in their structural properties, being able to attain extended conformations (random coil-like) or to remain globally collapsed (molten globule-like). Disorder can differently affect different parts of a protein, with some regions being more ordered than others. IDPs and IDPRs exist as dynamic ensembles, resembling "protein-clouds". IDP structures are best presented as conformational ensembles that contain highly dynamic structures interconverting on a number of timescales. The determination of a unique high-resolution structure is not possible for an isolated IDP, and a detailed structural and dynamic characterization of IDPs cannot typically be provided by a single tool. Therefore, accurate descriptions of IDPs/IDPRs rely on a multiparametric approach that includes a host of biophysical methods that can provide information on the overall compactness of IDPs and their conformational stability, shape, residual secondary structure, transient long-range contacts, regions of restricted or enhanced mobility, etc. The goal of this chapter is to provide a brief overview of some of the components of this multiparametric approach. PMID:26387104

  10. From Sequence and Forces to Structure, Function and Evolution of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Forman-Kay, Julie D.; Mittag, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), which lack persistent structure, are a challenge to structural biology due to the inapplicability of standard methods for characterization of folded proteins as well as their deviation from the dominant structure/function paradigm. Their widespread presence and involvement in biological function, however, has spurred the growing acceptance of the importance of IDPs and the development of new tools for studying their structure, dynamics and function. The interplay of folded and disordered domains or regions for function and the existence of a continuum of protein states with respect to conformational energetics, motional timescales and compactness is shaping a unified understanding of structure-dynamics-disorder/function relationships. On the 20th anniversary of this journal, Structure, we provide a historical perspective on the investigation of IDPs and summarize the sequence features and physical forces that underlie their unique structural, functional and evolutionary properties. PMID:24010708

  11. Hydrodynamic Radii of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins Determined from Experimental Polyproline II Propensities

    PubMed Central

    Tomasso, Maria E.; Tarver, Micheal J.; Devarajan, Deepa; Whitten, Steven T.

    2016-01-01

    The properties of disordered proteins are thought to depend on intrinsic conformational propensities for polyproline II (PPII) structure. While intrinsic PPII propensities have been measured for the common biological amino acids in short peptides, the ability of these experimentally determined propensities to quantitatively reproduce structural behavior in intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) has not been established. Presented here are results from molecular simulations of disordered proteins showing that the hydrodynamic radius (Rh) can be predicted from experimental PPII propensities with good agreement, even when charge-based considerations are omitted. The simulations demonstrate that Rh and chain propensity for PPII structure are linked via a simple power-law scaling relationship, which was tested using the experimental Rh of 22 IDPs covering a wide range of peptide lengths, net charge, and sequence composition. Charge effects on Rh were found to be generally weak when compared to PPII effects on Rh. Results from this study indicate that the hydrodynamic dimensions of IDPs are evidence of considerable sequence-dependent backbone propensities for PPII structure that qualitatively, if not quantitatively, match conformational propensities measured in peptides. PMID:26727467

  12. Intrinsic disorder in transcription factors†

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiangang; Perumal, Narayanan B.; Oldfield, Christopher J.; Su, Eric W.; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Dunker, A. Keith

    2008-01-01

    Intrinsic disorder (ID) is highly abundant in eukaryotes, which reflect the greater need for disorder-associated signaling and transcriptional regulation in nucleated cells. Although several well-characterized examples of intrinsically disordered proteins in transcriptional regulation have been reported, no systematic analysis has been reported so far. To test for a general prevalence of intrinsic disorder in transcriptional regulation, we used the Predictor Of Natural Disorder Regions (PONDR) to analyze the abundance of intrinsic disorder in three transcription factor datasets and two control sets. This analysis revealed that from 94.13% to 82.63% of transcription factors posses extended regions of intrinsic disorder, relative to 54.51% and 18.64% of the proteins in two control datasets, which indicates the significant prevalence of intrinsic disorder in transcription factors. This propensity of transcription factors for intrinsic disorder was confirmed by cumulative distribution function analysis and charge-hydropathy plots. The amino acid composition analysis showed that all three transcription factor datasets were substantially depleted in order-promoting residues, and significantly enriched in disorder-promoting residues. Our analysis of the distribution of disorder within the transcription factor datasets revealed that: (a) The AT-hooks and basic regions of transcription factor DNA-binding domains are highly disordered; (b) The degree of disorder in transcription factor activation regions is much higher than that in DNA-binding domains; (c) The degree of disorder is significantly higher in eukaryotic transcription factors than in prokaryotic transcription factors; (d) The level of α-MoRFs (molecular recognition feature) prediction is much higher in transcription factors. Overall, our data reflected the fact that the eukaryotes with well-developed gene transcription machinery require transcription factor flexibility to be more efficient. PMID:16734424

  13. GADIS: Algorithm for designing sequences to achieve target secondary structure profiles of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Tyler S; Crabtree, Michael D; Shammas, Sarah L; Posey, Ammon E; Clarke, Jane; Pappu, Rohit V

    2016-09-01

    Many intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) participate in coupled folding and binding reactions and form alpha helical structures in their bound complexes. Alanine, glycine, or proline scanning mutagenesis approaches are often used to dissect the contributions of intrinsic helicities to coupled folding and binding. These experiments can yield confounding results because the mutagenesis strategy changes the amino acid compositions of IDPs. Therefore, an important next step in mutagenesis-based approaches to mechanistic studies of coupled folding and binding is the design of sequences that satisfy three major constraints. These are (i) achieving a target intrinsic alpha helicity profile; (ii) fixing the positions of residues corresponding to the binding interface; and (iii) maintaining the native amino acid composition. Here, we report the development of a G: enetic A: lgorithm for D: esign of I: ntrinsic secondary S: tructure (GADIS) for designing sequences that satisfy the specified constraints. We describe the algorithm and present results to demonstrate the applicability of GADIS by designing sequence variants of the intrinsically disordered PUMA system that undergoes coupled folding and binding to Mcl-1. Our sequence designs span a range of intrinsic helicity profiles. The predicted variations in sequence-encoded mean helicities are tested against experimental measurements. PMID:27503953

  14. Polymer scaling laws of unfolded and intrinsically disordered proteins quantified with single-molecule spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Hagen; Soranno, Andrea; Borgia, Alessandro; Gast, Klaus; Nettels, Daniel; Schuler, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    The dimensions of unfolded and intrinsically disordered proteins are highly dependent on their amino acid composition and solution conditions, especially salt and denaturant concentration. However, the quantitative implications of this behavior have remained unclear, largely because the effective theta-state, the central reference point for the underlying polymer collapse transition, has eluded experimental determination. Here, we used single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and two-focus correlation spectroscopy to determine the theta points for six different proteins. While the scaling exponents of all proteins converge to 0.62 ± 0.03 at high denaturant concentrations, as expected for a polymer in good solvent, the scaling regime in water strongly depends on sequence composition. The resulting average scaling exponent of 0.46 ± 0.05 for the four foldable protein sequences in our study suggests that the aqueous cellular milieu is close to effective theta conditions for unfolded proteins. In contrast, two intrinsically disordered proteins do not reach the Θ-point under any of our solvent conditions, which may reflect the optimization of their expanded state for the interactions with cellular partners. Sequence analyses based on our results imply that foldable sequences with more compact unfolded states are a more recent result of protein evolution. PMID:22984159

  15. Correlating Flavivirus virulence and levels of intrinsic disorder in shell proteins: protective roles vs. immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Goh, Gerard Kian-Meng; Dunker, A Keith; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-05-24

    Computational analyses revealed correlations between the intrinsic disorder propensity of shell proteins and case fatality rates (CFRs) among Flaviviruses and within at least two Flavivirus species, such as tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) and dengue virus (DENV). The shell proteins analyzed in this study are capsid (C) and membrane (PrM, Pr, and M) proteins. The highest correlations can be found when regression analyses were conducted using Pr (Flavivirus: r(2) = 0.78, p < 0.01) or M (Flavivirus: r(2) = 0.91, p < 0.01) as an independent variable with C and CFR as co-explanatory and dependent variables, respectively. Interestingly, while predicted intrinsic disorder levels (PIDs) of both C and M are positively correlated with the virulence, the PIDs of Pr and CFR are negatively correlated. This is likely due to the fact that the Pr portion of PrM plays various roles in protecting the virion from damage, whereas M and C are assisted by greater potential in binding promiscuity as a result of greater disorder. The C protein of yellow fever virus (YFV), which is the most virulent virus in the sample, has the highest PID levels, whereas the second most virulent TBEV FE subtype has the second highest PID score due to its C protein, and the least virulent West Nile virus (WNV) has the least disordered C protein. This knowledge can be used while working on the development and identification of attenuated strains for vaccine. Curiously, unlike Flaviviruses, a disordered outer shell was described for hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and human simplex virus 2 (HSV-2), which currently have no effective vaccine. PMID:27102744

  16. Sequence heuristics to encode phase behaviour in intrinsically disordered protein polymers.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Felipe García; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2015-11-01

    Proteins and synthetic polymers that undergo aqueous phase transitions mediate self-assembly in nature and in man-made material systems. Yet little is known about how the phase behaviour of a protein is encoded in its amino acid sequence. Here, by synthesizing intrinsically disordered, repeat proteins to test motifs that we hypothesized would encode phase behaviour, we show that the proteins can be designed to exhibit tunable lower or upper critical solution temperature (LCST and UCST, respectively) transitions in physiological solutions. We also show that mutation of key residues at the repeat level abolishes phase behaviour or encodes an orthogonal transition. Furthermore, we provide heuristics to identify, at the proteome level, proteins that might exhibit phase behaviour and to design novel protein polymers consisting of biologically active peptide repeats that exhibit LCST or UCST transitions. These findings set the foundation for the prediction and encoding of phase behaviour at the sequence level. PMID:26390327

  17. Sequence heuristics to encode phase behaviour in intrinsically disordered protein polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiroz, Felipe García; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2015-11-01

    Proteins and synthetic polymers that undergo aqueous phase transitions mediate self-assembly in nature and in man-made material systems. Yet little is known about how the phase behaviour of a protein is encoded in its amino acid sequence. Here, by synthesizing intrinsically disordered, repeat proteins to test motifs that we hypothesized would encode phase behaviour, we show that the proteins can be designed to exhibit tunable lower or upper critical solution temperature (LCST and UCST, respectively) transitions in physiological solutions. We also show that mutation of key residues at the repeat level abolishes phase behaviour or encodes an orthogonal transition. Furthermore, we provide heuristics to identify, at the proteome level, proteins that might exhibit phase behaviour and to design novel protein polymers consisting of biologically active peptide repeats that exhibit LCST or UCST transitions. These findings set the foundation for the prediction and encoding of phase behaviour at the sequence level.

  18. Sequence heuristics to encode phase behaviour in intrinsically disordered protein polymers

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz, Felipe García; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and synthetic polymers that undergo aqueous phase transitions mediate self-assembly in nature and in man-made material systems. Yet little is known about how the phase behaviour of a protein is encoded in its amino acid sequence. Here, by synthesizing intrinsically disordered, repeat proteins to test motifs that we hypothesized would encode phase behaviour, we show that the proteins can be designed to exhibit tunable lower or upper critical solution temperature (LCST and UCST, respectively) transitions in physiological solutions. We also show that mutation of key residues at the repeat level abolishes phase behaviour or encodes an orthogonal transition. Furthermore, we provide heuristics to identify, at the proteome level, proteins that might exhibit phase behaviour and to design novel protein polymers consisting of biologically active peptide repeats that exhibit LCST or UCST transitions. These findings set the foundation for the prediction and encoding of phase behaviour at the sequence level. PMID:26390327

  19. Intrinsically Disordered Energy Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Chebaro, Yassmine; Ballard, Andrew J.; Chakraborty, Debayan; Wales, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) reveals an underlying multifunnel structure for the energy landscape. We suggest that such ‘intrinsically disordered’ landscapes, with a number of very different competing low-energy structures, are likely to characterise IDPs, and provide a useful way to address their properties. In particular, IDPs are present in many cellular protein interaction networks, and several questions arise regarding how they bind to partners. Are conformations resembling the bound structure selected for binding, or does further folding occur on binding the partner in a induced-fit fashion? We focus on the p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) protein, which adopts an -helical conformation when bound to its partner, and is involved in the activation of apoptosis. Recent experimental evidence shows that folding is not necessary for binding, and supports an induced-fit mechanism. Using a variety of computational approaches we deduce the molecular mechanism behind the instability of the PUMA peptide as a helix in isolation. We find significant barriers between partially folded states and the helix. Our results show that the favoured conformations are molten-globule like, stabilised by charged and hydrophobic contacts, with structures resembling the bound state relatively unpopulated in equilibrium. PMID:25999294

  20. Intrinsically Disordered Energy Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chebaro, Yassmine; Ballard, Andrew J.; Chakraborty, Debayan; Wales, David J.

    2015-05-01

    Analysis of an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) reveals an underlying multifunnel structure for the energy landscape. We suggest that such ‘intrinsically disordered’ landscapes, with a number of very different competing low-energy structures, are likely to characterise IDPs, and provide a useful way to address their properties. In particular, IDPs are present in many cellular protein interaction networks, and several questions arise regarding how they bind to partners. Are conformations resembling the bound structure selected for binding, or does further folding occur on binding the partner in a induced-fit fashion? We focus on the p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) protein, which adopts an -helical conformation when bound to its partner, and is involved in the activation of apoptosis. Recent experimental evidence shows that folding is not necessary for binding, and supports an induced-fit mechanism. Using a variety of computational approaches we deduce the molecular mechanism behind the instability of the PUMA peptide as a helix in isolation. We find significant barriers between partially folded states and the helix. Our results show that the favoured conformations are molten-globule like, stabilised by charged and hydrophobic contacts, with structures resembling the bound state relatively unpopulated in equilibrium.

  1. Absence of residual structure in the intrinsically disordered regulatory protein CP12 in its reduced state.

    PubMed

    Launay, Hélène; Barré, Patrick; Puppo, Carine; Manneville, Stéphanie; Gontero, Brigitte; Receveur-Bréchot, Véronique

    2016-08-12

    The redox switch protein CP12 is a key player of the regulation of the Benson-Calvin cycle. Its oxidation state is controlled by the formation/dissociation of two intramolecular disulphide bridges during the day/night cycle. CP12 was known to be globally intrinsically disordered on a large scale in its reduced state, while being partly ordered in the oxidised state. By combining Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Small Angle X-ray Scattering experiments, we showed that, contrary to secondary structure or disorder predictions, reduced CP12 is fully disordered, with no transient or local residual structure likely to be precursor of the structures identified in the oxidised active state and/or in the bound state with GAPDH or PRK. These results highlight the diversity of the mechanisms of regulation of conditionally disordered redox switches, and question the stability of oxidised CP12 scaffold. PMID:27268235

  2. Insights into the Immunological Properties of Intrinsically Disordered Malaria Proteins Using Proteome Scale Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Andrew J.; Irani, Vashti; MacRaild, Christopher A.; Anders, Robin F.; Norton, Raymond S.; Beeson, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains a significant global health burden. The development of an effective malaria vaccine remains as a major challenge with the potential to significantly reduce morbidity and mortality. While Plasmodium spp. have been shown to contain a large number of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) or disordered protein regions, the relationship of protein structure to subcellular localisation and adaptive immune responses remains unclear. In this study, we employed several computational prediction algorithms to identify IDPs at the proteome level of six Plasmodium spp. and to investigate the potential impact of protein disorder on adaptive immunity against P. falciparum parasites. IDPs were shown to be particularly enriched within nuclear proteins, apical proteins, exported proteins and proteins localised to the parasitophorous vacuole. Furthermore, several leading vaccine candidates, and proteins with known roles in host-cell invasion, have extensive regions of disorder. Presentation of peptides by MHC molecules plays an important role in adaptive immune responses, and we show that IDP regions are predicted to contain relatively few MHC class I and II binding peptides owing to inherent differences in amino acid composition compared to structured domains. In contrast, linear B-cell epitopes were predicted to be enriched in IDPs. Tandem repeat regions and non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms were found to be strongly associated with regions of disorder. In summary, immune responses against IDPs appear to have characteristics distinct from those against structured protein domains, with increased antibody recognition of linear epitopes but some constraints for MHC presentation and issues of polymorphisms. These findings have major implications for vaccine design, and understanding immunity to malaria. PMID:26513658

  3. Insights into the Immunological Properties of Intrinsically Disordered Malaria Proteins Using Proteome Scale Predictions.

    PubMed

    Guy, Andrew J; Irani, Vashti; MacRaild, Christopher A; Anders, Robin F; Norton, Raymond S; Beeson, James G; Richards, Jack S; Ramsland, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains a significant global health burden. The development of an effective malaria vaccine remains as a major challenge with the potential to significantly reduce morbidity and mortality. While Plasmodium spp. have been shown to contain a large number of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) or disordered protein regions, the relationship of protein structure to subcellular localisation and adaptive immune responses remains unclear. In this study, we employed several computational prediction algorithms to identify IDPs at the proteome level of six Plasmodium spp. and to investigate the potential impact of protein disorder on adaptive immunity against P. falciparum parasites. IDPs were shown to be particularly enriched within nuclear proteins, apical proteins, exported proteins and proteins localised to the parasitophorous vacuole. Furthermore, several leading vaccine candidates, and proteins with known roles in host-cell invasion, have extensive regions of disorder. Presentation of peptides by MHC molecules plays an important role in adaptive immune responses, and we show that IDP regions are predicted to contain relatively few MHC class I and II binding peptides owing to inherent differences in amino acid composition compared to structured domains. In contrast, linear B-cell epitopes were predicted to be enriched in IDPs. Tandem repeat regions and non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms were found to be strongly associated with regions of disorder. In summary, immune responses against IDPs appear to have characteristics distinct from those against structured protein domains, with increased antibody recognition of linear epitopes but some constraints for MHC presentation and issues of polymorphisms. These findings have major implications for vaccine design, and understanding immunity to malaria. PMID:26513658

  4. Structural transitions in the intrinsically disordered Parkinson's protein alpha-synuclein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliezer, David

    2013-03-01

    The protein alpha-synuclein is genetically and histopathologically associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease. Although considered to belong to the category of intrinsically disordered proteins for well over a decade, recent reports have suggested that synuclein may actually exist predominantly in a native, well-structured, tetrameric form. Experiments using in-cell NMR, which bypass potential structural perturbations caused by purification protocols, conclusively demonstrate that recombinant synuclein is in fact highly disordered and monomeric. In the presence of membranes, however, the protein undergoes a coil-to-helix transition to adopt several highly helical conformations, which are proposed to mediate both its normal function and its membrane-induced aggregation into amyloid fibrils. Supported by NIH grant R37AG019391

  5. Mapping the potential energy landscape of intrinsically disordered proteins at amino acid resolution.

    PubMed

    Ozenne, Valéry; Schneider, Robert; Yao, Mingxi; Huang, Jie-rong; Salmon, Loïc; Zweckstetter, Markus; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Blackledge, Martin

    2012-09-12

    Intrinsically disordered regions are predicted to exist in a significant fraction of proteins encoded in eukaryotic genomes. The high levels of conformational plasticity of this class of proteins endows them with unique capacities to act in functional modes not achievable by folded proteins, but also places their molecular characterization beyond the reach of classical structural biology. New techniques are therefore required to understand the relationship between primary sequence and biological function in this class of proteins. Although dependences of some NMR parameters such as chemical shifts (CSs) or residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) on structural propensity are known, so that sampling regimes are often inferred from experimental observation, there is currently no framework that allows for a statistical mapping of the available Ramachandran space of each amino acid in terms of conformational propensity. In this study we develop such an approach, combining highly efficient conformational sampling with ensemble selection to map the backbone conformational sampling of IDPs on a residue specific level. By systematically analyzing the ability of NMR data to map the conformational landscape of disordered proteins, we identify combinations of RDCs and CSs that can be used to raise conformational degeneracies inherent to different data types, and apply these approaches to characterize the conformational behavior of two intrinsically disordered proteins, the K18 domain from Tau protein and N(TAIL) from measles virus nucleoprotein. In both cases, we identify the enhanced populations of turn and helical regions in key regions of the proteins, as well as contiguous strands that show clear and enhanced polyproline II sampling. PMID:22901047

  6. Conserved RNA helicase FRH acts nonenzymatically to support the intrinsically disordered neurospora clock protein FRQ.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Jennifer M; Larrondo, Luis F; Loros, Jennifer J; Dunlap, Jay C

    2013-12-26

    Protein conformation dictates a great deal of protein function. A class of naturally unstructured proteins, termed intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), demonstrates that flexibility in structure can be as important mechanistically as rigid structure. At the core of the circadian transcription/translation feedback loop in Neurospora crassa is the protein FREQUENCY (FRQ), shown here shown to share many characteristics of IDPs. FRQ in turn binds to FREQUENCY-Interacting RNA Helicase (FRH), whose clock function has been assumed to relate to its predicted helicase function. However, mutational analyses reveal that the helicase function of FRH is not essential for the clock, and a region of FRH distinct from the helicase region is essential for stabilizing FRQ against rapid degradation via a pathway distinct from its typical ubiquitin-mediated turnover. These data lead to the hypothesis that FRQ is an IDP and that FRH acts nonenzymatically, stabilizing FRQ to enable proper clock circuitry/function. PMID:24316221

  7. Rational design of antibodies targeting specific epitopes within intrinsically disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sormanni, Pietro; Aprile, Francesco A.; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are powerful tools in life sciences research, as well as in diagnostic and therapeutic applications, because of their ability to bind given molecules with high affinity and specificity. Using current methods, however, it is laborious and sometimes difficult to generate antibodies to target specific epitopes within a protein, in particular if these epitopes are not effective antigens. Here we present a method to rationally design antibodies to enable them to bind virtually any chosen disordered epitope in a protein. The procedure consists in the sequence-based design of one or more complementary peptides targeting a selected disordered epitope and the subsequent grafting of such peptides on an antibody scaffold. We illustrate the method by designing six single-domain antibodies to bind different epitopes within three disease-related intrinsically disordered proteins and peptides (α-synuclein, Aβ42, and IAPP). Our results show that all these designed antibodies bind their targets with good affinity and specificity. As an example of an application, we show that one of these antibodies inhibits the aggregation of α-synuclein at substoichiometric concentrations and that binding occurs at the selected epitope. Taken together, these results indicate that the design strategy that we propose makes it possible to obtain antibodies targeting given epitopes in disordered proteins or protein regions. PMID:26216991

  8. The Intrinsically Disordered Regions of the Drosophila melanogaster Hox Protein Ultrabithorax Select Interacting Proteins Based on Partner Topology

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Hao-Ching; Gonzalez, Kim L.; Catanese, Daniel J.; Jordy, Kristopher E.; Matthews, Kathleen S.; Bondos, Sarah E.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between structured proteins require a complementary topology and surface chemistry to form sufficient contacts for stable binding. However, approximately one third of protein interactions are estimated to involve intrinsically disordered regions of proteins. The dynamic nature of disordered regions before and, in some cases, after binding calls into question the role of partner topology in forming protein interactions. To understand how intrinsically disordered proteins identify the correct interacting partner proteins, we evaluated interactions formed by the Drosophila melanogaster Hox transcription factor Ultrabithorax (Ubx), which contains both structured and disordered regions. Ubx binding proteins are enriched in specific folds: 23 of its 39 partners include one of 7 folds, out of the 1195 folds recognized by SCOP. For the proteins harboring the two most populated folds, DNA-RNA binding 3-helical bundles and α-α superhelices, the regions of the partner proteins that exhibit these preferred folds are sufficient for Ubx binding. Three disorder-containing regions in Ubx are required to bind these partners. These regions are either alternatively spliced or multiply phosphorylated, providing a mechanism for cellular processes to regulate Ubx-partner interactions. Indeed, partner topology correlates with the ability of individual partner proteins to bind Ubx spliceoforms. Partners bind different disordered regions within Ubx to varying extents, creating the potential for competition between partners and cooperative binding by partners. The ability of partners to bind regions of Ubx that activate transcription and regulate DNA binding provides a mechanism for partners to modulate transcription regulation by Ubx, and suggests that one role of disorder in Ubx is to coordinate multiple molecular functions in response to tissue-specific cues. PMID:25286318

  9. Primary structure and solution conditions determine conformational ensemble properties of intrinsically disordered proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Hsuan-Han Alberto

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are a class of proteins that do not exhibit well-defined three-dimensional structures. The absence of structure is intrinsic to their amino acid sequences, which are characterized by low hydrophobicity and high net charge per residue compared to folded proteins. Contradicting the classic structure-function paradigm, IDPs are capable of interacting with high specificity and affinity, often acquiring order in complex with protein and nucleic acid binding partners. This phenomenon is evident during cellular activities involving IDPs, which include transcriptional and translational regulation, cell cycle control, signal transduction, molecular assembly, and molecular recognition. Although approximately 30% of eukaryotic proteomes are intrinsically disordered, the nature of IDP conformational ensembles remains unclear. In this dissertation, we describe relationships connecting characteristics of IDP conformational ensembles to their primary structures and solution conditions. Using molecular simulations and fluorescence experiments on a set of base-rich IDPs, we find that net charge per residue segregates conformational ensembles along a globule-to-coil transition. Speculatively generalizing this result, we propose a phase diagram that predicts an IDP's average size and shape based on sequence composition and use it to generate hypotheses for a broad set of intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs). Simulations reveal that acid-rich IDRs, unlike their oppositely charged base-rich counterparts, exhibit disordered globular ensembles despite intra-chain repulsive electrostatic interactions. This apparent asymmetry is sensitive to simulation parameters for representing alkali and halide salt ions, suggesting that solution conditions modulate IDP conformational ensembles. We refine the ion parameters using a calibration procedure that relies exclusively on crystal lattice properties. Simulations with these parameters recover swollen

  10. An Overview of Predictors for Intrinsically Disordered Proteins over 2010–2014

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianzong; Feng, Yu; Wang, Xiaoyun; Li, Jing; Liu, Wen; Rong, Li; Bao, Jinku

    2015-01-01

    The sequence-structure-function paradigm of proteins has been changed by the occurrence of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Benefiting from the structural disorder, IDPs are of particular importance in biological processes like regulation and signaling. IDPs are associated with human diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative diseases, amyloidoses, and several other maladies. IDPs attract a high level of interest and a substantial effort has been made to develop experimental and computational methods. So far, more than 70 prediction tools have been developed since 1997, within which 17 predictors were created in the last five years. Here, we presented an overview of IDPs predictors developed during 2010–2014. We analyzed the algorithms used for IDPs prediction by these tools and we also discussed the basic concept of various prediction methods for IDPs. The comparison of prediction performance among these tools is discussed as well. PMID:26426014

  11. Cooperative folding of intrinsically disordered domains drives assembly of a strong elongated protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruszka, Dominika T.; Whelan, Fiona; Farrance, Oliver E.; Fung, Herman K. H.; Paci, Emanuele; Jeffries, Cy M.; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Baldock, Clair; Baumann, Christoph G.; Brockwell, David J.; Potts, Jennifer R.; Clarke, Jane

    2015-06-01

    Bacteria exploit surface proteins to adhere to other bacteria, surfaces and host cells. Such proteins need to project away from the bacterial surface and resist significant mechanical forces. SasG is a protein that forms extended fibrils on the surface of Staphylococcus aureus and promotes host adherence and biofilm formation. Here we show that although monomeric and lacking covalent cross-links, SasG maintains a highly extended conformation in solution. This extension is mediated through obligate folding cooperativity of the intrinsically disordered E domains that couple non-adjacent G5 domains thermodynamically, forming interfaces that are more stable than the domains themselves. Thus, counterintuitively, the elongation of the protein appears to be dependent on the inherent instability of its domains. The remarkable mechanical strength of SasG arises from tandemly arrayed `clamp' motifs within the folded domains. Our findings reveal an elegant minimal solution for the assembly of monomeric mechano-resistant tethers of variable length.

  12. Proteins with Intrinsically Disordered Domains Are Preferentially Recruited to Polyglutamine Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    O’Meally, Robert; Sonnenberg, Jason L.; Cole, Robert N.; Shewmaker, Frank P.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular protein aggregation is the hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases. Aggregates formed by polyglutamine (polyQ)-expanded proteins, such as Huntingtin, adopt amyloid-like structures that are resistant to denaturation. We used a novel purification strategy to isolate aggregates formed by human Huntingtin N-terminal fragments with expanded polyQ tracts from both yeast and mammalian (PC-12) cells. Using mass spectrometry we identified the protein species that are trapped within these polyQ aggregates. We found that proteins with very long intrinsically-disordered (ID) domains (≥100 amino acids) and RNA-binding proteins were disproportionately recruited into aggregates. The removal of the ID domains from selected proteins was sufficient to eliminate their recruitment into polyQ aggregates. We also observed that several neurodegenerative disease-linked proteins were reproducibly trapped within the polyQ aggregates purified from mammalian cells. Many of these proteins have large ID domains and are found in neuronal inclusions in their respective diseases. Our study indicates that neurodegenerative disease-associated proteins are particularly vulnerable to recruitment into polyQ aggregates via their ID domains. Also, the high frequency of ID domains in RNA-binding proteins may explain why RNA-binding proteins are frequently found in pathological inclusions in various neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26317359

  13. A decade and a half of protein intrinsic disorder: Biology still waits for physics

    PubMed Central

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2013-01-01

    The abundant existence of proteins and regions that possess specific functions without being uniquely folded into unique 3D structures has become accepted by a significant number of protein scientists. Sequences of these intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and IDP regions (IDPRs) are characterized by a number of specific features, such as low overall hydrophobicity and high net charge which makes these proteins predictable. IDPs/IDPRs possess large hydrodynamic volumes, low contents of ordered secondary structure, and are characterized by high structural heterogeneity. They are very flexible, but some may undergo disorder to order transitions in the presence of natural ligands. The degree of these structural rearrangements varies over a very wide range. IDPs/IDPRs are tightly controlled under the normal conditions and have numerous specific functions that complement functions of ordered proteins and domains. When lacking proper control, they have multiple roles in pathogenesis of various human diseases. Gaining structural and functional information about these proteins is a challenge, since they do not typically “freeze” while their “pictures are taken.” However, despite or perhaps because of the experimental challenges, these fuzzy objects with fuzzy structures and fuzzy functions are among the most interesting targets for modern protein research. This review briefly summarizes some of the recent advances in this exciting field and considers some of the basic lessons learned from the analysis of physics, chemistry, and biology of IDPs. PMID:23553817

  14. Detection of Helical Intermediates During Amyloid Formation by Intrinsically Disordered Polypeptides and Proteins.

    PubMed

    Abedini, Andisheh; Cao, Ping; Raleigh, Daniel P

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid formation and aberrant protein aggregation are hallmarks of more than 30 different human diseases. The proteins that form amyloid can be divided into two structural classes: those that form compact, well-ordered, globular structures in their unaggregated state and those that are intrinsically disordered in their unaggregated states. The latter include the Aβ peptide of Alzheimer's disease, islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP, amylin) implicated in type 2 diabetes and α-synuclein, which is linked to Parkinson's disease. Work in the last 10 years has highlighted the potential role of pre-amyloid intermediates in cytotoxicity and has focused attention on their properties. A number of intrinsically disordered proteins appear to form helical intermediates during amyloid formation. We discuss the spectroscopic methods employed to detect and characterize helical intermediates in homogenous solution and in membrane-catalyzed amyloid formation, with the emphasis on the application of circular dichroism (CD). IAPP is used as an example, but the methods are generally applicable. PMID:26453205

  15. Prediction of Spontaneous Protein Deamidation from Sequence-Derived Secondary Structure and Intrinsic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, J. Ramiro; Alonso, Leonardo G.; Sánchez, Ignacio E.

    2015-01-01

    Asparagine residues in proteins undergo spontaneous deamidation, a post-translational modification that may act as a molecular clock for the regulation of protein function and turnover. Asparagine deamidation is modulated by protein local sequence, secondary structure and hydrogen bonding. We present NGOME, an algorithm able to predict non-enzymatic deamidation of internal asparagine residues in proteins in the absence of structural data, using sequence-based predictions of secondary structure and intrinsic disorder. Compared to previous algorithms, NGOME does not require three-dimensional structures yet yields better predictions than available sequence-only methods. Four case studies of specific proteins show how NGOME may help the user identify deamidation-prone asparagine residues, often related to protein gain of function, protein degradation or protein misfolding in pathological processes. A fifth case study applies NGOME at a proteomic scale and unveils a correlation between asparagine deamidation and protein degradation in yeast. NGOME is freely available as a webserver at the National EMBnet node Argentina, URL: http://www.embnet.qb.fcen.uba.ar/ in the subpage “Protein and nucleic acid structure and sequence analysis”. PMID:26674530

  16. Structure of an Intrinsically Disordered Stress Protein Alone and Bound to a Membrane Surface.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, John; Clarke, Matthew W; Warnica, Josephine M; Boddington, Kelly F; Graether, Steffen P

    2016-08-01

    Dehydrins are a group of intrinsically disordered proteins that protect plants from damage caused by drought, cold, and high salinity. Like other intrinsically disordered proteins, dehydrins can gain structure when bound to a ligand. Previous studies have shown that dehydrins are able to protect liposomes from cold damage, but the interactions that drive membrane binding and the detailed structure of the bound and unbound forms are not known. We use an ensemble-structure approach to generate models of a dehydrin known as K2 in the presence and absence of sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles, and we docked the bound structure to the micelle. The collection of residual dipolar coupling data, amide protection factors, and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement distances, in combination with chemical shifts and relaxation measurements, allows for determining plausible structures that are not otherwise visible in time-averaged structural data. The results show that in the bound structure, the conserved lysines are important for membrane binding, whereas the flanking hydrophobic residues play a lesser role. The unbound structure shows a high level of disorder and an extended structure. We propose that the structural differences between bound and unbound forms allow dehydrins to act as molecular shields in their unbound state and as membrane protectants in their bound state. Unlike α-synuclein, the significant gain of α-helicity in K2 at low concentrations of sodium dodecyl sulfate is not due to a decrease in the critical micelle concentration. The study provides structural insight into how a disordered protein can interact with a membrane surface. PMID:27508433

  17. KMAD: knowledge-based multiple sequence alignment for intrinsically disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Joanna; Wyrwicz, Lucjan S.; Vriend, Gert

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) lack tertiary structure and thus differ from globular proteins in terms of their sequence–structure–function relations. IDPs have lower sequence conservation, different types of active sites and a different distribution of functionally important regions, which altogether make their multiple sequence alignment (MSA) difficult. The KMAD MSA software has been written specifically for the alignment and annotation of IDPs. It augments the substitution matrix with knowledge about post-translational modifications, functional domains and short linear motifs. Results: MSAs produced with KMAD describe well-conserved features among IDPs, tend to agree well with biological intuition, and are a good basis for designing new experiments to shed light on this large, understudied class of proteins. Availability and implementation: KMAD web server is accessible at http://www.cmbi.ru.nl/kmad/. A standalone version is freely available. Contact: vriend@cmbi.ru.nl PMID:26568635

  18. Simple biophysics underpins collective conformations of the intrinsically disordered proteins of the Nuclear Pore Complex.

    PubMed

    Vovk, Andrei; Gu, Chad; Opferman, Michael G; Kapinos, Larisa E; Lim, Roderick Yh; Coalson, Rob D; Jasnow, David; Zilman, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Pore Complexes (NPCs) are key cellular transporter that control nucleocytoplasmic transport in eukaryotic cells, but its transport mechanism is still not understood. The centerpiece of NPC transport is the assembly of intrinsically disordered polypeptides, known as FG nucleoporins, lining its passageway. Their conformations and collective dynamics during transport are difficult to assess in vivo. In vitro investigations provide partially conflicting results, lending support to different models of transport, which invoke various conformational transitions of the FG nucleoporins induced by the cargo-carrying transport proteins. We show that the spatial organization of FG nucleoporin assemblies with the transport proteins can be understood within a first principles biophysical model with a minimal number of key physical variables, such as the average protein interaction strengths and spatial densities. These results address some of the outstanding controversies and suggest how molecularly divergent NPCs in different species can perform essentially the same function. PMID:27198189

  19. SLiMPrints: conservation-based discovery of functional motif fingerprints in intrinsically disordered protein regions

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Norman E.; Cowan, Joanne L.; Shields, Denis C.; Gibson, Toby J.; Coldwell, Mark J.; Edwards, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Large portions of higher eukaryotic proteomes are intrinsically disordered, and abundant evidence suggests that these unstructured regions of proteins are rich in regulatory interaction interfaces. A major class of disordered interaction interfaces are the compact and degenerate modules known as short linear motifs (SLiMs). As a result of the difficulties associated with the experimental identification and validation of SLiMs, our understanding of these modules is limited, advocating the use of computational methods to focus experimental discovery. This article evaluates the use of evolutionary conservation as a discriminatory technique for motif discovery. A statistical framework is introduced to assess the significance of relatively conserved residues, quantifying the likelihood a residue will have a particular level of conservation given the conservation of the surrounding residues. The framework is expanded to assess the significance of groupings of conserved residues, a metric that forms the basis of SLiMPrints (short linear motif fingerprints), a de novo motif discovery tool. SLiMPrints identifies relatively overconstrained proximal groupings of residues within intrinsically disordered regions, indicative of putatively functional motifs. Finally, the human proteome is analysed to create a set of highly conserved putative motif instances, including a novel site on translation initiation factor eIF2A that may regulate translation through binding of eIF4E. PMID:22977176

  20. Folding Factors and Partners for the Intrinsically Disordered Protein Micro-Exon Gene 14 (MEG-14)

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Jose Luiz S.; Orcia, Debora; Araujo, Ana Paula U.; DeMarco, Ricardo; Wallace, B.A.

    2013-01-01

    The micro-exon genes (MEG) of Schistosoma mansoni, a parasite responsible for the second most widely spread tropical disease, code for small secreted proteins with sequences unique to the Schistosoma genera. Bioinformatics analyses suggest the soluble domain of the MEG-14 protein will be largely disordered, and using synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy, its secondary structure was shown to be essentially completely unfolded in aqueous solution. It does, however, show a strong propensity to fold into more ordered structures under a wide range of conditions. Partial folding was produced by increasing temperature (in a reversible process), contrary to the behavior of most soluble proteins. Furthermore, significant folding was observed in the presence of negatively charged lipids and detergents, but not in zwitterionic or neutral lipids or detergents. Absorption onto a surface followed by dehydration stimulated it to fold into a helical structure, as it did when the aqueous solution was replaced by nonaqueous solvents. Hydration of the dehydrated folded protein was accompanied by complete unfolding. These results support the identification of MEG-14 as a classic intrinsically disordered protein, and open the possibility of its interaction/folding with different partners and factors being related to multifunctional roles and states within the host. PMID:23746524

  1. The acidic domains of the Toc159 chloroplast preprotein receptor family are intrinsically disordered protein domains

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The Toc159 family of proteins serve as receptors for chloroplast-destined preproteins. They directly bind to transit peptides, and exhibit preprotein substrate selectivity conferred by an unknown mechanism. The Toc159 receptors each include three domains: C-terminal membrane, central GTPase, and N-terminal acidic (A-) domains. Although the function(s) of the A-domain remains largely unknown, the amino acid sequences are most variable within these domains, suggesting they may contribute to the functional specificity of the receptors. Results The physicochemical properties of the A-domains are characteristic of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Using CD spectroscopy we show that the A-domains of two Arabidopsis Toc159 family members (atToc132 and atToc159) are disordered at physiological pH and temperature and undergo conformational changes at temperature and pH extremes that are characteristic of IDPs. Conclusions Identification of the A-domains as IDPs will be important for determining their precise function(s), and suggests a role in protein-protein interactions, which may explain how these proteins serve as receptors for such a wide variety of preprotein substrates. PMID:20042108

  2. Disordered nucleiome: Abundance of intrinsic disorder in the DNA- and RNA-binding proteins in 1121 species from Eukaryota, Bacteria and Archaea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Uversky, Vladimir N; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2016-05-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are abundant in various proteomes, where they play numerous important roles and complement biological activities of ordered proteins. Among functions assigned to IDPs are interactions with nucleic acids. However, often, such assignments are made based on the guilty-by-association principle. The validity of the extension of these correlations to all nucleic acid binding proteins has never been analyzed on a large scale across all domains of life. To fill this gap, we perform a comprehensive computational analysis of the abundance of intrinsic disorder and intrinsically disordered domains in nucleiomes (∼548 000 nucleic acid binding proteins) of 1121 species from Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota. Nucleiome is a whole complement of proteins involved in interactions with nucleic acids. We show that relative to other proteins in the corresponding proteomes, the DNA-binding proteins have significantly increased disorder content and are significantly enriched in disordered domains in Eukaryotes but not in Archaea and Bacteria. The RNA-binding proteins are significantly enriched in the disordered domains in Bacteria, Archaea and Eukaryota, while the overall abundance of disorder in these proteins is significantly increased in Bacteria, Archaea, animals and fungi. The high abundance of disorder in nucleiomes supports the notion that the nucleic acid binding proteins often require intrinsic disorder for their functions and regulation. PMID:27037624

  3. Microsecond Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins Involved in the Oxidative Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Cino, Elio A.; Wong-ekkabut, Jirasak; Karttunen, Mikko; Choy, Wing-Yiu

    2011-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are abundant in cells and have central roles in protein-protein interaction networks. Interactions between the IDP Prothymosin alpha (ProTα) and the Neh2 domain of Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), with a common binding partner, Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1(Keap1), are essential for regulating cellular response to oxidative stress. Misregulation of this pathway can lead to neurodegenerative diseases, premature aging and cancer. In order to understand the mechanisms these two disordered proteins employ to bind to Keap1, we performed extensive 0.5–1.0 microsecond atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and isothermal titration calorimetry experiments to investigate the structure/dynamics of free-state ProTα and Neh2 and their thermodynamics of bindings. The results show that in their free states, both ProTα and Neh2 have propensities to form bound-state-like β-turn structures but to different extents. We also found that, for both proteins, residues outside the Keap1-binding motifs may play important roles in stabilizing the bound-state-like structures. Based on our findings, we propose that the binding of disordered ProTα and Neh2 to Keap1 occurs synergistically via preformed structural elements (PSEs) and coupled folding and binding, with a heavy bias towards PSEs, particularly for Neh2. Our results provide insights into the molecular mechanisms Neh2 and ProTα bind to Keap1, information that is useful for developing therapeutics to enhance the oxidative stress response. PMID:22125611

  4. How Random are Intrinsically Disordered Proteins? A Small Angle Scattering Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Receveur-Bréchot, Véronique; Durand, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    While the crucial role of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) in the cell cycle is now recognized, deciphering their molecular mode of action at the structural level still remains highly challenging and requires a combination of many biophysical approaches. Among them, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) has been extremely successful in the last decade and has become an indispensable technique for addressing many of the fundamental questions regarding the activities of IDPs. After introducing some experimental issues specific to IDPs and in relation to the latest technical developments, this article presents the interest of the theory of polymer physics to evaluate the flexibility of fully disordered proteins. The different strategies to obtain 3-dimensional models of IDPs, free in solution and associated in a complex, are then reviewed. Indeed, recent computational advances have made it possible to readily extract maximum information from the scattering curve with a special emphasis on highly flexible systems, such as multidomain proteins and IDPs. Furthermore, integrated computational approaches now enable the generation of ensembles of conformers to translate the unique flexible characteristics of IDPs by taking into consideration the constraints of more and more various complementary experiment. In particular, a combination of SAXS with high-resolution techniques, such as x-ray crystallography and NMR, allows us to provide reliable models and to gain unique structural insights about the protein over multiple structural scales. The latest neutron scattering experiments also promise new advances in the study of the conformational changes of macromolecules involving more complex systems. PMID:22044150

  5. Wrecked regulation of intrinsically disordered proteins in diseases: pathogenicity of deregulated regulators

    PubMed Central

    Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2014-01-01

    Biologically active proteins without stable tertiary structure are common in all known proteomes. Functions of these intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are typically related to regulation, signaling, and control. Cellular levels of these important regulators are tightly regulated by a variety mechanisms ranging from firmly controlled expression to precisely targeted degradation. Functions of IDPs are controlled by binding to specific partners, alternative splicing, and posttranslational modifications among other means. In the norm, right amounts of precisely activated IDPs have to be present in right time at right places. Wrecked regulation brings havoc to the ordered world of disordered proteins, leading to protein misfolding, misidentification, and missignaling that give rise to numerous human diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative diseases, and diabetes. Among factors inducing pathogenic transformations of IDPs are various cellular mechanisms, such as chromosomal translocations, damaged splicing, altered expression, frustrated posttranslational modifications, aberrant proteolytic degradation, and defective trafficking. This review presents some of the aspects of deregulated regulation of IDPs leading to human diseases. PMID:25988147

  6. Bioinformatics analysis identifies several intrinsically disordered human E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Sofie V.; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system targets misfolded proteins for degradation. Since the accumulation of such proteins is potentially harmful for the cell, their prompt removal is important. E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases mediate substrate ubiquitination by bringing together the substrate with an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, which transfers ubiquitin to the substrate. For misfolded proteins, substrate recognition is generally delegated to molecular chaperones that subsequently interact with specific E3 ligases. An important exception is San1, a yeast E3 ligase. San1 harbors extensive regions of intrinsic disorder, which provide both conformational flexibility and sites for direct recognition of misfolded targets of vastly different conformations. So far, no mammalian ortholog of San1 is known, nor is it clear whether other E3 ligases utilize disordered regions for substrate recognition. Here, we conduct a bioinformatics analysis to examine >600 human and S. cerevisiae E3 ligases to identify enzymes that are similar to San1 in terms of function and/or mechanism of substrate recognition. An initial sequence-based database search was found to detect candidates primarily based on the homology of their ordered regions, and did not capture the unique disorder patterns that encode the functional mechanism of San1. However, by searching specifically for key features of the San1 sequence, such as long regions of intrinsic disorder embedded with short stretches predicted to be suitable for substrate interaction, we identified several E3 ligases with these characteristics. Our initial analysis revealed that another remarkable trait of San1 is shared with several candidate E3 ligases: long stretches of complete lysine suppression, which in San1 limits auto-ubiquitination. We encode these characteristic features into a San1 similarity-score, and present a set of proteins that are plausible candidates as San1 counterparts in humans. In conclusion, our work indicates that San1 is

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins: Force Field Evaluation and Comparison with Experiment.

    PubMed

    Henriques, João; Cragnell, Carolina; Skepö, Marie

    2015-07-14

    An increasing number of studies using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of unfolded and intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) suggest that current force fields sample conformations that are overly collapsed. Here, we study the applicability of several state-of-the-art MD force fields, of the AMBER and GROMOS variety, for the simulation of Histatin 5, a short (24 residues) cationic salivary IDP with antimicrobial and antifungal properties. The quality of the simulations is assessed in three complementary analyses: (i) protein shape and size comparison with recent experimental small-angle X-ray scattering data; (ii) secondary structure prediction; (iii) energy landscape exploration and conformational class analysis. Our results show that, indeed, standard force fields sample conformations that are too compact, being systematically unable to reproduce experimental evidence such as the scattering function, the shape of the protein as compared with the Kratky plot, and intrapeptide distances obtained through the pair distance distribution function, p(r). The consistency of this deviation suggests that the problem is not mainly due to protein-protein or water-water interactions, whose parametrization varies the most between force fields and water models. In fact, as originally proposed in [ Best et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2014, 10, 5113 - 5124.], balanced protein-water interactions may be the key to solving this problem. Our simulations using this approach produce results in very good agreement with experiment. PMID:26575776

  8. Identification of Intrinsic Order and Disorder in the DNA Repair Protein XPA

    SciTech Connect

    Iakoucheva, Lilia M.; Kimzey, Amy L.; Masselon, Christophe D.; Bruce, James E.; Garner, Ethan C.; Brown, Celeste J.; Dunker, A. K.; Smith, Richard D.; Ackerman, Eric J.

    2001-03-01

    The damage recognition protein XPA is required to recognize a wide variety of bulky lesions during nucleotide excision repair (NER). Independent NMR solution structures of a human XPA protein (hXPA) fragment comprising approximately one-third of the full-length protein, the minimal DNA-binding domain (MBD), revealed that ~30% of the molecule was structurally disordered. To better characterize structural features of XPA, we performed time-resolved trypsin proteolysis on active, full-length recombinant Xenopus XPA protein (xXPA). The resulting proteolytic fragments were analyzed by electrospray ionization interface coupled to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ESI-FTICR) mass spectrometry, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), and selected N-terminal sequence determinations. The mass spectrum of the full-length xXPA was consistent with the predicted sequence, 30922.02 vs. 30922.45 Da; respectively. Moreover, the mass spectrometric data allowed the assignment of multiple xXPA fragments not resolvable by SDS PAGE. Full-length xXPA exhibited aberrant mobility on SDS-PAGE with an apparent MW of ~40 kDa. To test predictions that a Glu-rich region (E70-E76) or other local regions of high charge were responsible for this ~40% aberrant SDS-PAGE mobility, the MW's of partial proteolytic fragments from ~5 to 25 kDa precisely determined by ESI-FTICR MS were correlated with their gel positions. Surprisingly, all tested partial tryptic fragments within this size-range exhibited 10-42% divergence between calculated MW and that estimated by SDS-PAGE, thus indicating the origin of anomalous migration of XPA is not localized. The computer program Predictor of Natural Disordered Regions (PONDR) correctly identified several regions of xXPA either sensitive or resistant to partial proteolysis, thereby indicating that disorder in XPA shares sequence features with other well-characterized intrinsically unstructured proteins.

  9. pE-DB: a database of structural ensembles of intrinsically disordered and of unfolded proteins.

    PubMed

    Varadi, Mihaly; Kosol, Simone; Lebrun, Pierre; Valentini, Erica; Blackledge, Martin; Dunker, A Keith; Felli, Isabella C; Forman-Kay, Julie D; Kriwacki, Richard W; Pierattelli, Roberta; Sussman, Joel; Svergun, Dmitri I; Uversky, Vladimir N; Vendruscolo, Michele; Wishart, David; Wright, Peter E; Tompa, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The goal of pE-DB (http://pedb.vib.be) is to serve as an openly accessible database for the deposition of structural ensembles of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and of denatured proteins based on nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering and other data measured in solution. Owing to the inherent flexibility of IDPs, solution techniques are particularly appropriate for characterizing their biophysical properties, and structural ensembles in agreement with these data provide a convenient tool for describing the underlying conformational sampling. Database entries consist of (i) primary experimental data with descriptions of the acquisition methods and algorithms used for the ensemble calculations, and (ii) the structural ensembles consistent with these data, provided as a set of models in a Protein Data Bank format. PE-DB is open for submissions from the community, and is intended as a forum for disseminating the structural ensembles and the methodologies used to generate them. While the need to represent the IDP structures is clear, methods for determining and evaluating the structural ensembles are still evolving. The availability of the pE-DB database is expected to promote the development of new modeling methods and leads to a better understanding of how function arises from disordered states. PMID:24174539

  10. pE-DB: a database of structural ensembles of intrinsically disordered and of unfolded proteins

    PubMed Central

    Varadi, Mihaly; Kosol, Simone; Lebrun, Pierre; Valentini, Erica; Blackledge, Martin; Dunker, A. Keith; Felli, Isabella C.; Forman-Kay, Julie D.; Kriwacki, Richard W.; Pierattelli, Roberta; Sussman, Joel; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Vendruscolo, Michele; Wishart, David; Wright, Peter E.; Tompa, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The goal of pE-DB (http://pedb.vib.be) is to serve as an openly accessible database for the deposition of structural ensembles of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and of denatured proteins based on nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering and other data measured in solution. Owing to the inherent flexibility of IDPs, solution techniques are particularly appropriate for characterizing their biophysical properties, and structural ensembles in agreement with these data provide a convenient tool for describing the underlying conformational sampling. Database entries consist of (i) primary experimental data with descriptions of the acquisition methods and algorithms used for the ensemble calculations, and (ii) the structural ensembles consistent with these data, provided as a set of models in a Protein Data Bank format. PE-DB is open for submissions from the community, and is intended as a forum for disseminating the structural ensembles and the methodologies used to generate them. While the need to represent the IDP structures is clear, methods for determining and evaluating the structural ensembles are still evolving. The availability of the pE-DB database is expected to promote the development of new modeling methods and leads to a better understanding of how function arises from disordered states. PMID:24174539

  11. Quantification of Compactness and Local Order in the Ensemble of the Intrinsically Disordered Protein FCP1.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Eric B; Showalter, Scott A

    2016-09-01

    Intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDRs) partially or completely lack a cooperatively folded structure under native conditions, preventing their equilibrium state from being adequately described by a single structural model. As a direct consequence of their disorder, remarkably few experimental studies have quantified the ensembles IDRs adopt in solution. Here, we conduct unbiased computer simulations of the RAP74 interaction motif from the human phosphatase FCP1 in the unbound state, which provides an ensemble in quantitative agreement with both experimental NMR chemical shift information and small-angle X-ray scattering data. The partially α-helical short linear motif found in the C-terminus of FCP1 has been the subject of extensive biophysical characterization aimed at developing a molecular description for the mechanism of coupled folding and binding and establishing the functional relevance of partial order in the unbound state. The analysis presented here yields a remarkably consistent molecular picture enumerating the diversity of structures present in a "partially formed" helix. Specific interactions, including anticorrelations in backbone dihedral angle fluctuations as well as the transient formation of a helix-stabilizing salt bridge, stabilize the preformed structure in the unbound state. The general consequences of these findings for mechanistic analysis of protein-protein interactions are discussed. PMID:27551949

  12. A Method for Systematic Assessment of Intrinsically Disordered Protein Regions by NMR.

    PubMed

    Goda, Natsuko; Shimizu, Kana; Kuwahara, Yohta; Tenno, Takeshi; Noguchi, Tamotsu; Ikegami, Takahisa; Ota, Motonori; Hiroaki, Hidekazu

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) that lack stable conformations and are highly flexible have attracted the attention of biologists. Therefore, the development of a systematic method to identify polypeptide regions that are unstructured in solution is important. We have designed an "indirect/reflected" detection system for evaluating the physicochemical properties of IDPs using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). This approach employs a "chimeric membrane protein"-based method using the thermostable membrane protein PH0471. This protein contains two domains, a transmembrane helical region and a C-terminal OB (oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding)-fold domain (named NfeDC domain), connected by a flexible linker. NMR signals of the OB-fold domain of detergent-solubilized PH0471 are observed because of the flexibility of the linker region. In this study, the linker region was substituted with target IDPs. Fifty-three candidates were selected using the prediction tool POODLE and 35 expression vectors were constructed. Subsequently, we obtained 15N-labeled chimeric PH0471 proteins with 25 IDPs as linkers. The NMR spectra allowed us to classify IDPs into three categories: flexible, moderately flexible, and inflexible. The inflexible IDPs contain membrane-associating or aggregation-prone sequences. This is the first attempt to use an indirect/reflected NMR method to evaluate IDPs and can verify the predictions derived from our computational tools. PMID:26184172

  13. Identification of Dynamic Modes in an Intrinsically Disordered Protein Using Temperature-Dependent NMR Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Abyzov, Anton; Salvi, Nicola; Schneider, Robert; Maurin, Damien; Ruigrok, Rob W H; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Blackledge, Martin

    2016-05-18

    The dynamic modes and time scales sampled by intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) define their function. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin relaxation is probably the most powerful tool for investigating these motions delivering site-specific descriptions of conformational fluctuations from throughout the molecule. Despite the abundance of experimental measurement of relaxation in IDPs, the physical origin of the measured relaxation rates remains poorly understood. Here we measure an extensive range of auto- and cross-correlated spin relaxation rates at multiple magnetic field strengths on the C-terminal domain of the nucleoprotein of Sendai virus, over a large range of temperatures (268-298 K), and combine these data to describe the dynamic behavior of this archetypal IDP. An Arrhenius-type relationship is used to simultaneously analyze up to 61 relaxation rates per amino acid over the entire temperature range, allowing the measurement of local activation energies along the chain, and the assignment of physically distinct dynamic modes. Fast (τ ≤ 50 ps) components report on librational motions, a dominant mode occurs on time scales around 1 ns, apparently reporting on backbone sampling within Ramachandran substates, while a slower component (5-25 ns) reports on segmental dynamics dominated by the chain-like nature of the protein. Extending the study to three protein constructs of different lengths (59, 81, and 124 amino acids) substantiates the assignment of these contributions. The analysis is shown to be remarkably robust, accurately predicting a broad range of relaxation data measured at different magnetic field strengths and temperatures. The ability to delineate intrinsic modes and time scales from NMR spin relaxation will improve our understanding of the behavior and function of IDPs, adding a new and essential dimension to the description of this biologically important and ubiquitous class of proteins. PMID:27112095

  14. Structure-based Inhibitor Design for the Intrinsically Disordered Protein c-Myc

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chen; Niu, Xiaogang; Jin, Fan; Liu, Zhirong; Jin, Changwen; Lai, Luhua

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are associated with various diseases and have been proposed as promising drug targets. However, conventional structure-based approaches cannot be applied directly to IDPs, due to their lack of ordered structures. Here, we describe a novel computational approach to virtually screen for compounds that can simultaneously bind to different IDP conformations. The test system used c-Myc, an oncoprotein containing a disordered basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLH-LZ) domain that adopts a helical conformation upon binding to Myc-associated factor X (Max). For the virtual screen, we used three binding pockets in representative conformations of c-Myc370–409, which is part of the disordered bHLH-LZ domain. Seven compounds were found to directly bind c-Myc370–409 in vitro, and four inhibited the growth of the c-Myc-overexpressing cells by affecting cell cycle progression. Our approach of IDP conformation sampling, binding site identification, and virtual screening for compounds that can bind to multiple conformations provides a useful strategy for structure-based drug discovery targeting IDPs. PMID:26931396

  15. Structure-based Inhibitor Design for the Intrinsically Disordered Protein c-Myc.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chen; Niu, Xiaogang; Jin, Fan; Liu, Zhirong; Jin, Changwen; Lai, Luhua

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are associated with various diseases and have been proposed as promising drug targets. However, conventional structure-based approaches cannot be applied directly to IDPs, due to their lack of ordered structures. Here, we describe a novel computational approach to virtually screen for compounds that can simultaneously bind to different IDP conformations. The test system used c-Myc, an oncoprotein containing a disordered basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLH-LZ) domain that adopts a helical conformation upon binding to Myc-associated factor X (Max). For the virtual screen, we used three binding pockets in representative conformations of c-Myc370-409, which is part of the disordered bHLH-LZ domain. Seven compounds were found to directly bind c-Myc370-409 in vitro, and four inhibited the growth of the c-Myc-overexpressing cells by affecting cell cycle progression. Our approach of IDP conformation sampling, binding site identification, and virtual screening for compounds that can bind to multiple conformations provides a useful strategy for structure-based drug discovery targeting IDPs. PMID:26931396

  16. Identifying intrinsically disordered protein regions likely to undergo binding-induced helical transitions.

    PubMed

    Glover, Karen; Mei, Yang; Sinha, Sangita C

    2016-10-01

    Many proteins contain intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) lacking stable secondary and ordered tertiary structure. IDRs are often implicated in macromolecular interactions, and may undergo structural transitions upon binding to interaction partners. However, as binding partners of many protein IDRs are unknown, these structural transitions are difficult to verify and often are poorly understood. In this study we describe a method to identify IDRs that are likely to undergo helical transitions upon binding. This method combines bioinformatics analyses followed by circular dichroism spectroscopy to monitor 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE)-induced changes in secondary structure content of these IDRs. Our results demonstrate that there is no significant change in the helicity of IDRs that are not predicted to fold upon binding. IDRs that are predicted to fold fall into two groups: one group does not become helical in the presence of TFE and includes examples of IDRs that form β-strands upon binding, while the other group becomes more helical and includes examples that are known to fold into helices upon binding. Therefore, we propose that bioinformatics analyses combined with experimental evaluation using TFE may provide a general method to identify IDRs that undergo binding-induced disorder-to-helix transitions. PMID:27179590

  17. Calcium ion binding properties and the effect of phosphorylation on the intrinsically disordered Starmaker protein.

    PubMed

    Wojtas, Magdalena; Hołubowicz, Rafał; Poznar, Monika; Maciejewska, Marta; Ożyhar, Andrzej; Dobryszycki, Piotr

    2015-10-27

    Starmaker (Stm) is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) involved in otolith biomineralization in Danio rerio. Stm controls calcium carbonate crystal formation in vivo and in vitro. Phosphorylation of Stm affects its biomineralization properties. This study examined the effects of calcium ions and phosphorylation on the structure of Stm. We have shown that CK2 kinase phosphorylates 25 or 26 residues in Stm. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that Stm's affinity for calcium binding is dependent on its phosphorylation state. Phosphorylated Stm (StmP) has an estimated 30 ± 1 calcium binding sites per protein molecule with a dissociation constant (KD) of 61 ± 4 μM, while the unphosphorylated protein has 28 ± 3 sites and a KD of 210 ± 22 μM. Calcium ion binding induces a compaction of the Stm molecule, causing a significant decrease in its hydrodynamic radius and the formation of a secondary structure. The screening effect of Na(+) ions on calcium binding was also observed. Analysis of the hydrodynamic properties of Stm and StmP showed that Stm and StmP molecules adopt the structure of native coil-like proteins. PMID:26445027

  18. Cooperative folding of intrinsically disordered domains drives assembly of a strong elongated protein

    PubMed Central

    Gruszka, Dominika T.; Whelan, Fiona; Farrance, Oliver E.; Fung, Herman K. H.; Paci, Emanuele; Jeffries, Cy M.; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Baldock, Clair; Baumann, Christoph G.; Brockwell, David J.; Potts, Jennifer R.; Clarke, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria exploit surface proteins to adhere to other bacteria, surfaces and host cells. Such proteins need to project away from the bacterial surface and resist significant mechanical forces. SasG is a protein that forms extended fibrils on the surface of Staphylococcus aureus and promotes host adherence and biofilm formation. Here we show that although monomeric and lacking covalent cross-links, SasG maintains a highly extended conformation in solution. This extension is mediated through obligate folding cooperativity of the intrinsically disordered E domains that couple non-adjacent G5 domains thermodynamically, forming interfaces that are more stable than the domains themselves. Thus, counterintuitively, the elongation of the protein appears to be dependent on the inherent instability of its domains. The remarkable mechanical strength of SasG arises from tandemly arrayed ‘clamp' motifs within the folded domains. Our findings reveal an elegant minimal solution for the assembly of monomeric mechano-resistant tethers of variable length. PMID:26027519

  19. Time Window Expansion for HDX Analysis of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Devrishi; Devarakonda, Srikripa; Chalmers, Michael J.; Pascal, Bruce D.; Spiegelman, Bruce M.; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2013-10-01

    Application of typical HDX methods to examine intrinsically disordered proteins (IDP), proteins that are natively unstructured and highly dynamic at physiological pH, is limited because of the rapid exchange of unprotected amide hydrogens with solvent. The exchange rates of these fast exchanging amides are usually faster than the shortest time scale (10 s) employed in typical automated HDX-MS experiments. Considering the functional importance of IDPs and their association with many diseases, it is valuable to develop methods that allow the study of solution dynamics of these proteins as well as the ability to probe the interaction of IDPs with their wide range of binding partners. Here, we report the application of time window expansion to the millisecond range by altering the on-exchange pH of the HDX experiment to study a well-characterized IDP; the activation domain of the nuclear receptor coactivator, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α). This method enabled mapping the regions of PGC-1α that are stabilized upon binding the ligand binding domain (LBD) of the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). We further demonstrate the method's applicability to other binding partners of the IDP PGC-1α and pave the way for characterizing many other biologically important ID proteins.

  20. Troponins, intrinsic disorder, and cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Na, Insung; Kong, Min J; Straight, Shelby; Pinto, Jose R; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac troponin is a dynamic complex of troponin C, troponin I, and troponin T (TnC, TnI, and TnT, respectively) found in the myocyte thin filament where it plays an essential role in cardiac muscle contraction. Mutations in troponin subunits are found in inherited cardiomyopathies, such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The highly dynamic nature of human cardiac troponin and presence of numerous flexible linkers in its subunits suggest that understanding of structural and functional properties of this important complex can benefit from the consideration of the protein intrinsic disorder phenomenon. We show here that mutations causing decrease in the disorder score in TnI and TnT are significantly more abundant in HCM and DCM than mutations leading to the increase in the disorder score. Identification and annotation of intrinsically disordered regions in each of the troponin subunits conducted in this study can help in better understanding of the roles of intrinsic disorder in regulation of interactomes and posttranslational modifications of these proteins. These observations suggest that disease-causing mutations leading to a decrease in the local flexibility of troponins can trigger a whole plethora of functional changes in the heart. PMID:27074551

  1. Simple biophysics underpins collective conformations of the intrinsically disordered proteins of the Nuclear Pore Complex

    PubMed Central

    Vovk, Andrei; Gu, Chad; Opferman, Michael G; Kapinos, Larisa E; Lim, Roderick YH; Coalson, Rob D; Jasnow, David; Zilman, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Pore Complexes (NPCs) are key cellular transporter that control nucleocytoplasmic transport in eukaryotic cells, but its transport mechanism is still not understood. The centerpiece of NPC transport is the assembly of intrinsically disordered polypeptides, known as FG nucleoporins, lining its passageway. Their conformations and collective dynamics during transport are difficult to assess in vivo. In vitro investigations provide partially conflicting results, lending support to different models of transport, which invoke various conformational transitions of the FG nucleoporins induced by the cargo-carrying transport proteins. We show that the spatial organization of FG nucleoporin assemblies with the transport proteins can be understood within a first principles biophysical model with a minimal number of key physical variables, such as the average protein interaction strengths and spatial densities. These results address some of the outstanding controversies and suggest how molecularly divergent NPCs in different species can perform essentially the same function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10785.001 PMID:27198189

  2. Caught in Action: Selecting Peptide Aptamers Against Intrinsically Disordered Proteins in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cobbert, Jacqueline D.; DeMott, Christopher; Majumder, Subhabrata; Smith, Eric A.; Reverdatto, Sergey; Burz, David S.; McDonough, Kathleen A.; Shekhtman, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) or unstructured segments within proteins play an important role in cellular physiology and pathology. Low cellular concentration, multiple binding partners, frequent post-translational modifications and the presence of multiple conformations make it difficult to characterize IDP interactions in intact cells. We used peptide aptamers selected by using the yeast-two-hybrid scheme and in-cell NMR to identify high affinity binders to transiently structured IDP and unstructured segments at atomic resolution. Since both the selection and characterization of peptide aptamers take place inside the cell, only physiologically relevant conformations of IDPs are targeted. The method is validated by using peptide aptamers selected against the prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein, Pup, of the mycobacterium proteasome. The selected aptamers bind to distinct sites on Pup and have vastly different effects on rescuing mycobacterial proteasome substrate and on the survival of the Bacille-Calmette-Guèrin, BCG, strain of M. bovis. This technology can be applied to study the elusive action of IDPs under near physiological conditions. PMID:25801767

  3. Intrinsic disorder within an AKAP-protein kinase A complex guides local substrate phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, F Donelson; Reichow, Steve L; Esseltine, Jessica L; Shi, Dan; Langeberg, Lorene K; Scott, John D; Gonen, Tamir

    2013-01-01

    Anchoring proteins sequester kinases with their substrates to locally disseminate intracellular signals and avert indiscriminate transmission of these responses throughout the cell. Mechanistic understanding of this process is hampered by limited structural information on these macromolecular complexes. A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) spatially constrain phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinases (PKA). Electron microscopy and three-dimensional reconstructions of type-II PKA-AKAP18γ complexes reveal hetero-pentameric assemblies that adopt a range of flexible tripartite configurations. Intrinsically disordered regions within each PKA regulatory subunit impart the molecular plasticity that affords an ∼16 nanometer radius of motion to the associated catalytic subunits. Manipulating flexibility within the PKA holoenzyme augmented basal and cAMP responsive phosphorylation of AKAP-associated substrates. Cell-based analyses suggest that the catalytic subunit remains within type-II PKA-AKAP18γ complexes upon cAMP elevation. We propose that the dynamic movement of kinase sub-structures, in concert with the static AKAP-regulatory subunit interface, generates a solid-state signaling microenvironment for substrate phosphorylation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01319.001 PMID:24192038

  4. Caught in action: selecting peptide aptamers against intrinsically disordered proteins in live cells.

    PubMed

    Cobbert, Jacqueline D; DeMott, Christopher; Majumder, Subhabrata; Smith, Eric A; Reverdatto, Sergey; Burz, David S; McDonough, Kathleen A; Shekhtman, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) or unstructured segments within proteins play an important role in cellular physiology and pathology. Low cellular concentration, multiple binding partners, frequent post-translational modifications and the presence of multiple conformations make it difficult to characterize IDP interactions in intact cells. We used peptide aptamers selected by using the yeast-two-hybrid scheme and in-cell NMR to identify high affinity binders to transiently structured IDP and unstructured segments at atomic resolution. Since both the selection and characterization of peptide aptamers take place inside the cell, only physiologically relevant conformations of IDPs are targeted. The method is validated by using peptide aptamers selected against the prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein, Pup, of the mycobacterium proteasome. The selected aptamers bind to distinct sites on Pup and have vastly different effects on rescuing mycobacterial proteasome substrate and on the survival of the Bacille-Calmette-Guèrin, BCG, strain of M. bovis. This technology can be applied to study the elusive action of IDPs under near physiological conditions. PMID:25801767

  5. Determinants of the pKa values of ionizable residues in an intrinsically disordered protein.

    PubMed

    Neira, José L; Rizzuti, Bruno; Iovanna, Juan L

    2016-05-15

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are prevalent in eukaryotes; in humans, they are often associated with diseases. The protein NUPR1 is a multifunctional IDP involved in the development and progression of pancreatic cancer; therefore, it constitutes a target for drug design. In an effort to contribute to the understanding of the conformational features of NUPR1 and to provide clues on amino acid interactions in disordered states of proteins, we measured the pKa values of all its acidic groups (aspartic and glutamic residues, and backbone C terminus) by using NMR spectroscopy at low (100 mM) and high (500 mM) NaCl concentration. At low ionic strength, the pKa values were similar to those reported for random-coil models, except for Glu18 and Asp19, suggesting electrostatic interactions around these residues. Molecular modelling and simulation indicate an additional, significant role of nearby proline residues in determining the polypeptide conformational features and water accessibility in the region around Glu18, modulating the titration properties of these amino acids. In the other acidic residues of NUPR1, the small deviations of pKa values (compared to those expected for a random-coil) are likely due to electrostatic interactions with charged adjacent residues, which should be reduced at high NaCl concentrations. In fact, at high ionic strength, the pKa values of the aspartic residues were similar to those in a random coil, but there were still small differences for those of glutamic acids, probably due to hydrogen-bond formation. The overall findings suggest that local interactions and hydrophobic effects play a major role in determining the electrostatic features of NUPR1, whereas long-range charge contributions appear to be of lesser importance. PMID:27046343

  6. Order propensity of an intrinsically disordered protein, the cyclin-dependent-kinase inhibitor Sic1

    PubMed Central

    Brocca, Stefania; Šamalíková, Mária; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Lotti, Marina; Vanoni, Marco; Alberghina, Lilia; Grandori, Rita

    2009-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) carry out important biological functions and offer an instructive model system for folding and binding studies. However, their structural characterization in the absence of interactors is hindered by their highly dynamic conformation. The cyclin-dependent-kinase inhibitor (Cki) Sic1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a key regulator of the yeast cell cycle, which controls entrance into S phase and coordination between cell growth and proliferation. Its last 70 out of 284 residues display functional and structural homology to the inhibitory domain of mammalian p21 and p27. Sic1 has escaped systematic structural characterization until now. Here, complementary biophysical methods are applied to the study of conformational properties of pure Sic1 in solution. Based on sequence analysis, gel filtration, circular dichroism (CD), electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and limited proteolysis, it can be concluded that the whole molecule exists in a highly disordered state and can, therefore, be classified as an IDP. However, the results of these experiments indicate, at the same time, that the protein displays some content in secondary and tertiary structure, having properties similar to those of molten globules or pre-molten globules. Proteolysis-hypersensitive sites cluster at the N-terminus and in the middle of the molecule, while the most structured region resides at the C-terminus, including part of the inhibitory domain and the casein-kinase-2 (CK2) phosphorylation target S201. The mutations S201A and S201E, which are known to affect Sic1 function, do not have significant effects on the conformational properties of the pure protein. PMID:19280601

  7. Probing the Action of Chemical Denaturant on an Intrinsically Disordered Protein by Simulation and Experiment.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenwei; Borgia, Alessandro; Buholzer, Karin; Grishaev, Alexander; Schuler, Benjamin; Best, Robert B

    2016-09-14

    Chemical denaturants are the most commonly used agents for unfolding proteins and are thought to act by better solvating the unfolded state. Improved solvation is expected to lead to an expansion of unfolded chains with increasing denaturant concentration, providing a sensitive probe of the denaturant action. However, experiments have so far yielded qualitatively different results concerning the effects of chemical denaturation. Studies using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and other methods found an increase in radius of gyration with denaturant concentration, but most small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies found no change. This discrepancy therefore challenges our understanding of denaturation mechanism and more generally the accuracy of these experiments as applied to unfolded or disordered proteins. Here, we use all-atom molecular simulations to investigate the effect of urea and guanidinium chloride on the structure of the intrinsically disordered protein ACTR, which can be studied by experiment over a wide range of denaturant concentration. Using unbiased molecular simulations with a carefully calibrated denaturant model, we find that the protein chain indeed swells with increasing denaturant concentration. This is due to the favorable association of urea or guanidinium chloride with the backbone of all residues and with the side-chains of almost all residues, with denaturant-water transfer free energies inferred from this association in reasonable accord with experimental estimates. Interactions of the denaturants with the backbone are dominated by hydrogen bonding, while interactions with side-chains include other contributions. By computing FRET efficiencies and SAXS intensities at each denaturant concentration, we show that the simulation trajectories are in accord with both experiments on this protein, demonstrating that there is no fundamental inconsistency between the two types of experiment. Agreement with experiment also supports the

  8. Dynamical Coupling of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins and Their Hydration Water: Comparison with Folded Soluble and Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gallat, F.-X.; Laganowsky, A.; Wood, K.; Gabel, F.; van Eijck, L.; Wuttke, J.; Moulin, M.; Härtlein, M.; Eisenberg, D.; Colletier, J.-P.; Zaccai, G.; Weik, M.

    2012-01-01

    Hydration water is vital for various macromolecular biological activities, such as specific ligand recognition, enzyme activity, response to receptor binding, and energy transduction. Without hydration water, proteins would not fold correctly and would lack the conformational flexibility that animates their three-dimensional structures. Motions in globular, soluble proteins are thought to be governed to a certain extent by hydration-water dynamics, yet it is not known whether this relationship holds true for other protein classes in general and whether, in turn, the structural nature of a protein also influences water motions. Here, we provide insight into the coupling between hydration-water dynamics and atomic motions in intrinsically disordered proteins (IDP), a largely unexplored class of proteins that, in contrast to folded proteins, lack a well-defined three-dimensional structure. We investigated the human IDP tau, which is involved in the pathogenic processes accompanying Alzheimer disease. Combining neutron scattering and protein perdeuteration, we found similar atomic mean-square displacements over a large temperature range for the tau protein and its hydration water, indicating intimate coupling between them. This is in contrast to the behavior of folded proteins of similar molecular weight, such as the globular, soluble maltose-binding protein and the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin, which display moderate to weak coupling, respectively. The extracted mean square displacements also reveal a greater motional flexibility of IDP compared with globular, folded proteins and more restricted water motions on the IDP surface. The results provide evidence that protein and hydration-water motions mutually affect and shape each other, and that there is a gradient of coupling across different protein classes that may play a functional role in macromolecular activity in a cellular context. PMID:22828339

  9. DisoMCS: Accurately Predicting Protein Intrinsically Disordered Regions Using a Multi-Class Conservative Score Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiheng; Yang, Qianqian; Li, Tonghua; Cong, Peisheng

    2015-01-01

    The precise prediction of protein intrinsically disordered regions, which play a crucial role in biological procedures, is a necessary prerequisite to further the understanding of the principles and mechanisms of protein function. Here, we propose a novel predictor, DisoMCS, which is a more accurate predictor of protein intrinsically disordered regions. The DisoMCS bases on an original multi-class conservative score (MCS) obtained by sequence-order/disorder alignment. Initially, near-disorder regions are defined on fragments located at both the terminus of an ordered region connecting a disordered region. Then the multi-class conservative score is generated by sequence alignment against a known structure database and represented as order, near-disorder and disorder conservative scores. The MCS of each amino acid has three elements: order, near-disorder and disorder profiles. Finally, the MCS is exploited as features to identify disordered regions in sequences. DisoMCS utilizes a non-redundant data set as the training set, MCS and predicted secondary structure as features, and a conditional random field as the classification algorithm. In predicted near-disorder regions a residue is determined as an order or a disorder according to the optimized decision threshold. DisoMCS was evaluated by cross-validation, large-scale prediction, independent tests and CASP (Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction) tests. All results confirmed that DisoMCS was very competitive in terms of accuracy of prediction when compared with well-established publicly available disordered region predictors. It also indicated our approach was more accurate when a query has higher homologous with the knowledge database. Availability The DisoMCS is available at http://cal.tongji.edu.cn/disorder/. PMID:26090958

  10. Polymorphism Analysis Reveals Reduced Negative Selection and Elevated Rate of Insertions and Deletions in Intrinsically Disordered Protein Regions

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Tahsin; Douglas, Gavin M.; Patel, Priyenbhai; Nguyen Ba, Alex N.; Moses, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered protein regions are abundant in eukaryotic proteins and lack stable tertiary structures and enzymatic functions. Previous studies of disordered region evolution based on interspecific alignments have revealed an increased propensity for indels and rapid rates of amino acid substitution. How disordered regions are maintained at high abundance in the proteome and across taxa, despite apparently weak evolutionary constraints, remains unclear. Here, we use single nucleotide and indel polymorphism data in yeast and human populations to survey the population variation within disordered regions. First, we show that single nucleotide polymorphisms in disordered regions are under weaker negative selection compared with more structured protein regions and have a higher proportion of neutral non-synonymous sites. We also confirm previous findings that nonframeshifting indels are much more abundant in disordered regions relative to structured regions. We find that the rate of nonframeshifting indel polymorphism in intrinsically disordered regions resembles that of noncoding DNA and pseudogenes, and that large indels segregate in disordered regions in the human population. Our survey of polymorphism confirms patterns of evolution in disordered regions inferred based on longer evolutionary comparisons. PMID:26047845

  11. Structured and Unstructured Binding of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein as Revealed by Atomistic Simulations.

    PubMed

    Ithuralde, Raúl Esteban; Roitberg, Adrián Enrique; Turjanski, Adrián Gustavo

    2016-07-20

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are a set of proteins that lack a definite secondary structure in solution. IDPs can acquire tertiary structure when bound to their partners; therefore, the recognition process must also involve protein folding. The nature of the transition state (TS), structured or unstructured, determines the binding mechanism. The characterization of the TS has become a major challenge for experimental techniques and molecular simulations approaches since diffusion, recognition, and binding is coupled to folding. In this work we present atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations that sample the free energy surface of the coupled folding and binding of the transcription factor c-myb to the cotranscription factor CREB binding protein (CBP). This process has been recently studied and became a model to study IDPs. Despite the plethora of available information, we still do not know how c-myb binds to CBP. We performed a set of atomistic biased MD simulations running a total of 15.6 μs. Our results show that c-myb folds very fast upon binding to CBP with no unique pathway for binding. The process can proceed through both structured or unstructured TS's with similar probabilities. This finding reconciles previous seemingly different experimental results. We also performed Go-type coarse-grained MD of several structured and unstructured models that indicate that coupled folding and binding follows a native contact mechanism. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first atomistic MD simulation that samples the free energy surface of the coupled folding and binding processes of IDPs. PMID:27348048

  12. Phosphorylation Regulates the Bound Structure of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein: The p53-TAZ2 Case

    PubMed Central

    Ithuralde, Raúl Esteban; Turjanski, Adrián Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Disordered regions and Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs) are involved in critical cellular processes and may acquire a stable three-dimensional structure only upon binding to their partners. IDPs may follow a folding-after-binding process, known as induced folding, or a folding-before-binding process, known as conformational selection. The transcription factor p53 is involved in the regulation of cellular events that arise upon stress or DNA damage. The p53 domain structure is composed of an N-terminal transactivation domain (p53TAD), a DNA Binding Domain and a tetramerization domain. The activity of TAD is tightly regulated by interactions with cofactors, inhibitors and phosphorylation. To initiate transcription, p53TAD binds to the TAZ2 domain of CBP, a co-transcription factor, and undergoes a folding and binding process, as revealed by the recent NMR structure of the complex. The activity of p53 is regulated by phosphorylation at multiple sites on the TAD domain and recent studies have shown that modifications at three residues affect the binding towards TAZ2. However, we still do not know how these phosphorylations affect the structure of the bound state and, therefore, how they regulate the p53 function. In this work, we have used computational simulations to understand how phosphorylation affects the structure of the p53TAD:TAZ2 complex and regulates the recognition mechanism. Phosphorylation has been proposed to enhance binding by direct interaction with the folded protein or by changing the unbound conformation of IDPs, for example by pre-folding the protein favoring the recognition mechanism. Here, we show an interesting turn in the p53 case: phosphorylation mainly affects the bound structure of p53TAD, highlighting the complexity of IDP protein-protein interactions. Our results are in agreement with previous experimental studies, allowing a clear picture of how p53 is regulated by phosphorylation and giving new insights into how post

  13. Multiple Interactions of the Intrinsically Disordered Region between the Helicase and Nuclease Domains of the Archaeal Hef Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Ishino, Sonoko; Yamagami, Takeshi; Kitamura, Makoto; Kodera, Noriyuki; Mori, Tetsuya; Sugiyama, Shyogo; Ando, Toshio; Goda, Natsuko; Tenno, Takeshi; Hiroaki, Hidekazu; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2014-01-01

    Hef is an archaeal protein that probably functions mainly in stalled replication fork repair. The presence of an unstructured region was predicted between the two distinct domains of the Hef protein. We analyzed the interdomain region of Thermococcus kodakarensis Hef and demonstrated its disordered structure by CD, NMR, and high speed atomic force microscopy (AFM). To investigate the functions of this intrinsically disordered region (IDR), we screened for proteins interacting with the IDR of Hef by a yeast two-hybrid method, and 10 candidate proteins were obtained. We found that PCNA1 and a RecJ-like protein specifically bind to the IDR in vitro. These results suggested that the Hef protein interacts with several different proteins that work together in the pathways downstream from stalled replication fork repair by converting the IDR structure depending on the partner protein. PMID:24947516

  14. Multiple interactions of the intrinsically disordered region between the helicase and nuclease domains of the archaeal Hef protein.

    PubMed

    Ishino, Sonoko; Yamagami, Takeshi; Kitamura, Makoto; Kodera, Noriyuki; Mori, Tetsuya; Sugiyama, Shyogo; Ando, Toshio; Goda, Natsuko; Tenno, Takeshi; Hiroaki, Hidekazu; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2014-08-01

    Hef is an archaeal protein that probably functions mainly in stalled replication fork repair. The presence of an unstructured region was predicted between the two distinct domains of the Hef protein. We analyzed the interdomain region of Thermococcus kodakarensis Hef and demonstrated its disordered structure by CD, NMR, and high speed atomic force microscopy (AFM). To investigate the functions of this intrinsically disordered region (IDR), we screened for proteins interacting with the IDR of Hef by a yeast two-hybrid method, and 10 candidate proteins were obtained. We found that PCNA1 and a RecJ-like protein specifically bind to the IDR in vitro. These results suggested that the Hef protein interacts with several different proteins that work together in the pathways downstream from stalled replication fork repair by converting the IDR structure depending on the partner protein. PMID:24947516

  15. Structural Ensembles of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins Depend Strongly on Force Field: A Comparison to Experiment.

    PubMed

    Rauscher, Sarah; Gapsys, Vytautas; Gajda, Michal J; Zweckstetter, Markus; de Groot, Bert L; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2015-11-10

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are notoriously challenging to study both experimentally and computationally. The structure of IDPs cannot be described by a single conformation but must instead be described as an ensemble of interconverting conformations. Atomistic simulations are increasingly used to obtain such IDP conformational ensembles. Here, we have compared the IDP ensembles generated by eight all-atom empirical force fields against primary small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and NMR data. Ensembles obtained with different force fields exhibit marked differences in chain dimensions, hydrogen bonding, and secondary structure content. These differences are unexpectedly large: changing the force field is found to have a stronger effect on secondary structure content than changing the entire peptide sequence. The CHARMM 22* ensemble performs best in this force field comparison: it has the lowest error in chemical shifts and J-couplings and agrees well with the SAXS data. A high population of left-handed α-helix is present in the CHARMM 36 ensemble, which is inconsistent with measured scalar couplings. To eliminate inadequate sampling as a reason for differences between force fields, extensive simulations were carried out (0.964 ms in total); the remaining small sampling uncertainty is shown to be much smaller than the observed differences. Our findings highlight how IDPs, with their rugged energy landscapes, are highly sensitive test systems that are capable of revealing force field deficiencies and, therefore, contributing to force field development. PMID:26574339

  16. Hyperphosphorylation of Intrinsically Disordered Tau Protein Induces an Amyloidogenic Shift in Its Conformational Ensemble

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shaolong; Shala, Agnesa; Bezginov, Alexandr; Sljoka, Adnan; Audette, Gerald; Wilson, Derek J.

    2015-01-01

    Tau is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) whose primary physiological role is to stabilize microtubules in neuronal axons at all stages of development. In Alzheimer's and other tauopathies, tau forms intracellular insoluble amyloid aggregates known as neurofibrillary tangles, a process that appears in many cases to be preceded by hyperphosphorylation of tau monomers. Understanding the shift in conformational bias induced by hyperphosphorylation is key to elucidating the structural factors that drive tau pathology, however, as an IDP, tau is not amenable to conventional structural characterization. In this work, we employ a straightforward technique based on Time-Resolved ElectroSpray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TRESI-MS) and Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange (HDX) to provide a detailed picture of residual structure in tau, and the shifts in conformational bias induced by hyperphosphorylation. By comparing the native and hyperphosphorylated ensembles, we are able to define specific conformational biases that can easily be rationalized as enhancing amyloidogenic propensity. Representative structures for the native and hyperphosphorylated tau ensembles were generated by refinement of a broad sample of conformations generated by low-computational complexity modeling, based on agreement with the TRESI-HDX profiles. PMID:25767879

  17. An Intrinsically Disordered Motif Mediates Diverse Actions of Monomeric C-reactive Protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-Yun; Wang, Jing; Meng, Fan; Jia, Zhe-Kun; Su, Yang; Bai, Qi-Feng; Lv, Ling-Ling; Ma, Fu-Rong; Potempa, Lawrence A; Yan, Yong-Bin; Ji, Shang-Rong; Wu, Yi

    2016-04-15

    Most proinflammatory actions of C-reactive protein (CRP) are only expressed following dissociation of its native pentameric assembly into monomeric form (mCRP). However, little is known about what underlies the greatly enhanced activities of mCRP. Here we show that a single sequence motif, i.e. cholesterol binding sequence (CBS; a.a. 35-47), is responsible for mediating the interactions of mCRP with diverse ligands. The binding of mCRP to lipoprotein component ApoB, to complement component C1q, to extracellular matrix components fibronectin and collagen, to blood coagulation component fibrinogen, and to membrane lipid component cholesterol, are all found to be markedly inhibited by the synthetic CBS peptide but not by other CRP sequences tested. Likewise, mutating CBS in mCRP also greatly impairs these interactions. Functional experiments further reveal that CBS peptide significantly reduces the effects of mCRP on activation of endothelial cells in vitro and on acute induction of IL-6 in mice. The potency and specificity of CBS are critically determined by the N-terminal residues Cys-36, Leu-37, and His-38; while the versatility of CBS appears to originate from its intrinsically disordered conformation polymorphism. Together, these data unexpectedly identify CBS as the major recognition site of mCRP and suggest that this motif may be exploited to tune the proinflammatory actions of mCRP. PMID:26907682

  18. A Set of Efficient nD NMR Protocols for Resonance Assignments of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Christoph; Bellstedt, Peter; Häfner, Sabine; Herbst, Christian; Bordusa, Frank; Görlach, Matthias; Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Ramachandran, Ramadurai

    2016-07-01

    The RF pulse scheme RN[N-CA HEHAHA]NH, which provides a convenient approach to the acquisition of different multidimensional chemical shift correlation NMR spectra leading to backbone resonance assignments, including those of the proline residues of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), is experimentally demonstrated. Depending on the type of correlation data required, the method involves the generation of in-phase ((15) N)(x) magnetisation via different magnetisation transfer pathways such as H→N→CO→N, HA→CA→CO→N, H→N→CA→N and H→CA→N, the subsequent application of (15) N-(13) C(α) heteronuclear Hartmann-Hahn mixing over a period of ≈100 ms, chemical-shift labelling of relevant nuclei before and after the heteronuclear mixing step and amide proton detection in the acquisition dimension. It makes use of the favourable relaxation properties of IDPs and the presence of (1) JCαN and (2) JCαN couplings to achieve efficient correlation of the backbone resonances of each amino acid residue "i" with the backbone amide resonances of residues "i-1" and "i+1". It can be implemented in a straightforward way through simple modifications of the RF pulse schemes commonly employed in protein NMR studies. The efficacy of the approach is demonstrated using a uniformly ((15) N,(13) C) labelled sample of α-synuclein. The different possibilities for obtaining the amino-acid-type information, simultaneously with the connectivity data between the backbone resonances of sequentially neighbouring residues, have also been outlined. PMID:27061973

  19. Simulation of coupled folding and binding of an intrinsically disordered protein in explicit solvent with metadynamics.

    PubMed

    Han, Mengzhi; Xu, Ji; Ren, Ying; Li, Jinghai

    2016-07-01

    The C-terminal domain of measles virus nucleoprotein is an intrinsically disordered protein that could bind to the X domain (XD) of phosphoprotein P to exert its physiological function. Experiments reveal that the minimal binding unit is a 21-residue α-helical molecular recognition element (α-MoRE-MeV), which adopts a fully helical conformation upon binding to XD. Due to currently limited computing power, direct simulation of this coupled folding and binding process with atomic force field in explicit solvent cannot be achieved. In this work, two advanced sampling methods, metadynamics and parallel tempering, are combined to characterize the free energy surface of this process and investigate the underlying mechanism. Starting from an unbound and partially folded state of α-MoRE-MeV, multiple folding and binding events are observed during the simulation and the energy landscape was well estimated. The results demonstrate that the isolated α-MoRE-MeV resembles a molten globule and rapidly interconverts between random coil and multiple partially helical states in solution. The coupled folding and binding process occurs through the induced fit mechanism, with the residual helical conformations providing the initial binding sites. Upon binding, α-MoRE-MeV can easily fold into helical conformation without obvious energy barriers. Two mechanisms, namely, the system tending to adopt the structure in which the free energy of isolated α-MoRE-MeV is the minimum, and the binding energy of α-MoRE-MeV to its partner protein XD tending to the minimum, jointly dominate the coupled folding and binding process. With the advanced sampling approach, more IDP systems could be simulated and common mechanisms concerning the coupled folding and binding process could be investigated in the future. PMID:27423742

  20. Large-scale Analysis of Thermo-stable, Mammalian Proteins Provides Insights into the Intrinsically Disordered Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Galea, Charles A.; High, Anthony; Obenauer, John C.; Mishra, Ashutosh; Park, Cheon-Gil; Punta, Marco; Schlessinger, Avner; Ma, Jing; Rost, Burkhard; Slaughter, Clive A.; Kriwacki, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins are predicted to be highly abundant and play broad biological roles in eukaryotic cells. In particular, by virtue of their structural malleability and propensity to interact with multiple binding partners, disordered proteins are thought to be specialized for roles in signaling and regulation. However, these concepts are based on in silico analyses of translated whole genome sequences, not on large-scale analyses of proteins expressed in living cells. Therefore, whether these concepts broadly apply to expressed proteins is currently unknown. Previous studies have shown that heat-treatment of cell extracts lead to partial enrichment of soluble, disordered proteins. Based on this observation, we sought to address the current dearth of knowledge about expressed, disordered proteins by performing a large-scale proteomics study of thermo-stable proteins isolated from mouse fibroblast cells. Using novel multidimensional chromatography methods and mass spectrometry, we identified a total of 1,320 thermo-stable proteins from these cells. Further, we used a variety of bioinformatics methods to analyze the structural and biological properties of these proteins. Interestingly, more than 900 of these expressed proteins were predicted to be substantially disordered. These were divided into two categories, with 514 predicted to be predominantly disordered and 395 predicted to exhibit both disordered and ordered/folded features. In addition, 411 of the thermo-stable proteins were predicted to be folded. Despite the use of heat treatment (60 min. at 98 °C) to partially enrich for disordered proteins, which might have been expected to select for small proteins, the sequences of these proteins exhibited a wide range of lengths (622 ± 555 residues (average length ± standard deviation) for disordered proteins and 569 ± 598 residues for folded proteins). Computational structural analyses revealed several unexpected features of the thermo

  1. Conformations of intrinsically disordered proteins are influenced by linear sequence distributions of oppositely charged residues.

    PubMed

    Das, Rahul K; Pappu, Rohit V

    2013-08-13

    The functions of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are governed by relationships between information encoded in their amino acid sequences and the ensembles of conformations that they sample as autonomous units. Most IDPs are polyampholytes, with sequences that include both positively and negatively charged residues. Accordingly, we focus here on the sequence-ensemble relationships of polyampholytic IDPs. The fraction of charged residues discriminates between weak and strong polyampholytes. Using atomistic simulations, we show that weak polyampholytes form globules, whereas the conformational preferences of strong polyampholytes are determined by a combination of fraction of charged residues values and the linear sequence distributions of oppositely charged residues. We quantify the latter using a patterning parameter κ that lies between zero and one. The value of κ is low for well-mixed sequences, and in these sequences, intrachain electrostatic repulsions and attractions are counterbalanced, leading to the unmasking of preferences for conformations that resemble either self-avoiding random walks or generic Flory random coils. Segregation of oppositely charged residues within linear sequences leads to high κ-values and preferences for hairpin-like conformations caused by long-range electrostatic attractions induced by conformational fluctuations. We propose a scaling theory to explain the sequence-encoded conformational properties of strong polyampholytes. We show that naturally occurring strong polyampholytes have low κ-values, and this feature implies a selection for random coil ensembles. The design of sequences with different κ-values demonstrably alters the conformational preferences of polyampholytic IDPs, and this ability could become a useful tool for enabling direct inquiries into connections between sequence-ensemble relationships and functions of IDPs. PMID:23901099

  2. Conformations of intrinsically disordered proteins are influenced by linear sequence distributions of oppositely charged residues

    PubMed Central

    Das, Rahul K.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2013-01-01

    The functions of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are governed by relationships between information encoded in their amino acid sequences and the ensembles of conformations that they sample as autonomous units. Most IDPs are polyampholytes, with sequences that include both positively and negatively charged residues. Accordingly, we focus here on the sequence–ensemble relationships of polyampholytic IDPs. The fraction of charged residues discriminates between weak and strong polyampholytes. Using atomistic simulations, we show that weak polyampholytes form globules, whereas the conformational preferences of strong polyampholytes are determined by a combination of fraction of charged residues values and the linear sequence distributions of oppositely charged residues. We quantify the latter using a patterning parameter κ that lies between zero and one. The value of κ is low for well-mixed sequences, and in these sequences, intrachain electrostatic repulsions and attractions are counterbalanced, leading to the unmasking of preferences for conformations that resemble either self-avoiding random walks or generic Flory random coils. Segregation of oppositely charged residues within linear sequences leads to high κ-values and preferences for hairpin-like conformations caused by long-range electrostatic attractions induced by conformational fluctuations. We propose a scaling theory to explain the sequence-encoded conformational properties of strong polyampholytes. We show that naturally occurring strong polyampholytes have low κ-values, and this feature implies a selection for random coil ensembles. The design of sequences with different κ-values demonstrably alters the conformational preferences of polyampholytic IDPs, and this ability could become a useful tool for enabling direct inquiries into connections between sequence–ensemble relationships and functions of IDPs. PMID:23901099

  3. Interplay between partner and ligand facilitates the folding and binding of an intrinsically disordered protein

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Joseph M.; Oleinikovas, Vladimiras; Shammas, Sarah L.; Wong, Chi T.; De Sancho, David; Baker, Christopher M.; Clarke, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions are at the heart of regulatory and signaling processes in the cell. In many interactions, one or both proteins are disordered before association. However, this disorder in the unbound state does not prevent many of these proteins folding to a well-defined, ordered structure in the bound state. Here we examine a typical system, where a small disordered protein (PUMA, p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis) folds to an α-helix when bound to a groove on the surface of a folded protein (MCL-1, induced myeloid leukemia cell differentiation protein). We follow the association of these proteins using rapid-mixing stopped flow, and examine how the kinetic behavior is perturbed by denaturant and carefully chosen mutations. We demonstrate the utility of methods developed for the study of monomeric protein folding, including β-Tanford values, Leffler α, Φ-value analysis, and coarse-grained simulations, and propose a self-consistent mechanism for binding. Folding of the disordered protein before binding does not appear to be required and few, if any, specific interactions are required to commit to association. The majority of PUMA folding occurs after the transition state, in the presence of MCL-1. We also examine the role of the side chains of folded MCL-1 that make up the binding groove and find that many favor equilibrium binding but, surprisingly, inhibit the association process. PMID:25313042

  4. NMR assignment of intrinsically disordered self-processing module of the FrpC protein of Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Kubáň, Vojtěch; Nováček, Jiří; Bumba, Ladislav; Žídek, Lukáš

    2015-10-01

    The self-processing module (SPM) is an internal segment of the FrpC protein (P415-F591) secreted by the pathogenic Gram-negative bacterium Neisseria meningitidis during meningococcal infection of human upper respiratory tract. SPM mediates 'protein trans-splicing', a unique natural mechanism for editing of proteins, which involves a calcium-dependent autocatalytic cleavage of the peptide bond between D414 and P415 and covalent linkage of the cleaved fragment through its carboxy-terminal group of D414 to [Formula: see text]-amino group of lysine residue within a neighboring polypeptide chain. We present an NMR resonance assignment of the calcium-free SPM, which displays characteristic features of intrinsically disordered proteins. Non-uniformly sampled 5D HN(CA)CONH, 4D HCBCACON, and HCBCANCO spectra were recorded to resolve poorly dispersed resonance frequencies of the disordered protein and 91 % of SPM residues were unambiguously assigned. Analysis of the chemical shifts revealed that two regions of the intrinsically disordered SPM (A95-S101 and R120-I127) have a tendency to form a helical structure, whereas the residues P1-D7 and G36-A40 have the propensity to adopt a [Formula: see text]-structure. PMID:26138689

  5. Monitoring structural changes in intrinsically disordered proteins using QCM-D: application to the bacterial cell division protein ZipA.

    PubMed

    Mateos-Gil, Pablo; Tsortos, Achilleas; Vélez, Marisela; Gizeli, Electra

    2016-05-01

    The sensitivity of QCM-D to molecular hydrodynamic properties is applied in this work to study conformational changes of the intrinsically disordered protein ZipA. Acoustic measurements can clearly follow ZipA's unstructured domain expansion and contraction with salt content and be correlated with changes in the hydrodynamic radius of 1.8 nm or less. PMID:27109863

  6. Biochemical and Molecular Characterization of a Novel Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase from Amaranthus hypochondriacus L.: an Intrinsically Disordered Protein.

    PubMed

    Montero-Morán, Gabriela M; Sampedro, José G; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Cervantes-González, Miguel A; Huerta-Ocampo, José Á; De León-Rodríguez, Antonio; Barba de la Rosa, Ana P

    2015-08-01

    A novel Cu/ZnSOD from Amaranthus hypochondriacus was cloned, expressed, and characterized. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed an open reading frame (ORF) of 456 bp, which was predicted to encode a 15.6-kDa molecular weight protein with a pI of 5.4. Structural analysis showed highly conserved amino acid residues involved in Cu/Zn binding. Recombinant amaranth superoxide dismutase (rAhSOD) displayed more than 50 % of catalytic activity after incubation at 100 °C for 30 min. In silico analysis of Amaranthus hypochondriacus SOD (AhSOD) amino acid sequence for globularity and disorder suggested that this protein is mainly disordered; this was confirmed by circular dichroism, which showed the lack of secondary structure. Intrinsic fluorescence studies showed that rAhSOD undergoes conformational changes in two steps by the presence of Cu/Zn, which indicates the presence of two binding sites displaying different affinities for metals ions. Our results show that AhSOD could be classified as an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) that is folded when metals are bound and with high thermal stability. PMID:26129702

  7. A collection of intrinsic disorder characterizations from eukaryotic proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Michael; Schnell, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins and protein regions lack a stable three-dimensional structure under physiological conditions. Several proteomic investigations of intrinsic disorder have been performed to date and have found disorder to be prevalent in eukaryotic proteomes. Here we present descriptive statistics of intrinsic disorder features for ten model eukaryotic proteomes that have been calculated from computational disorder prediction algorithms. The data descriptor also provides consensus disorder annotations as well as additional physical parameters relevant to protein disorder, and further provides protein existence information for all proteins included in our analysis. The complete datasets can be downloaded freely, and it is envisaged that they will be updated periodically with new proteomes and protein disorder prediction algorithms. These datasets will be especially useful for assessing protein disorder, and conducting novel analyses that advance our understanding of intrinsic disorder and protein structure. PMID:27326998

  8. A collection of intrinsic disorder characterizations from eukaryotic proteomes.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Michael; Schnell, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins and protein regions lack a stable three-dimensional structure under physiological conditions. Several proteomic investigations of intrinsic disorder have been performed to date and have found disorder to be prevalent in eukaryotic proteomes. Here we present descriptive statistics of intrinsic disorder features for ten model eukaryotic proteomes that have been calculated from computational disorder prediction algorithms. The data descriptor also provides consensus disorder annotations as well as additional physical parameters relevant to protein disorder, and further provides protein existence information for all proteins included in our analysis. The complete datasets can be downloaded freely, and it is envisaged that they will be updated periodically with new proteomes and protein disorder prediction algorithms. These datasets will be especially useful for assessing protein disorder, and conducting novel analyses that advance our understanding of intrinsic disorder and protein structure. PMID:27326998

  9. Discriminating binding mechanisms of an intrinsically disordered protein via a multi-state coarse-grained model

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, Michael; Best, Robert B.

    2014-05-07

    Many proteins undergo a conformational transition upon binding to their cognate binding partner, with intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) providing an extreme example in which a folding transition occurs. However, it is often not clear whether this occurs via an “induced fit” or “conformational selection” mechanism, or via some intermediate scenario. In the first case, transient encounters with the binding partner favour transitions to the bound structure before the two proteins dissociate, while in the second the bound structure must be selected from a subset of unbound structures which are in the correct state for binding, because transient encounters of the incorrect conformation with the binding partner are most likely to result in dissociation. A particularly interesting situation involves those intrinsically disordered proteins which can bind to different binding partners in different conformations. We have devised a multi-state coarse-grained simulation model which is able to capture the binding of IDPs in alternate conformations, and by applying it to the binding of nuclear coactivator binding domain (NCBD) to either ACTR or IRF-3 we are able to determine the binding mechanism. By all measures, the binding of NCBD to either binding partner appears to occur via an induced fit mechanism. Nonetheless, we also show how a scenario closer to conformational selection could arise by choosing an alternative non-binding structure for NCBD.

  10. Discriminating binding mechanisms of an intrinsically disordered protein via a multi-state coarse-grained model

    PubMed Central

    Knott, Michael; Best, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    Many proteins undergo a conformational transition upon binding to their cognate binding partner, with intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) providing an extreme example in which a folding transition occurs. However, it is often not clear whether this occurs via an “induced fit” or “conformational selection” mechanism, or via some intermediate scenario. In the first case, transient encounters with the binding partner favour transitions to the bound structure before the two proteins dissociate, while in the second the bound structure must be selected from a subset of unbound structures which are in the correct state for binding, because transient encounters of the incorrect conformation with the binding partner are most likely to result in dissociation. A particularly interesting situation involves those intrinsically disordered proteins which can bind to different binding partners in different conformations. We have devised a multi-state coarse-grained simulation model which is able to capture the binding of IDPs in alternate conformations, and by applying it to the binding of nuclear coactivator binding domain (NCBD) to either ACTR or IRF-3 we are able to determine the binding mechanism. By all measures, the binding of NCBD to either binding partner appears to occur via an induced fit mechanism. Nonetheless, we also show how a scenario closer to conformational selection could arise by choosing an alternative non-binding structure for NCBD. PMID:24811666

  11. A practical guide to small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) of flexible and intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Kikhney, Alexey G; Svergun, Dmitri I

    2015-09-14

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is a biophysical method to study the overall shape and structural transitions of biological macromolecules in solution. SAXS provides low resolution information on the shape, conformation and assembly state of proteins, nucleic acids and various macromolecular complexes. The technique also offers powerful means for the quantitative analysis of flexible systems, including intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Here, the basic principles of SAXS are presented, and profits and pitfalls of the characterization of multidomain flexible proteins and IDPs using SAXS are discussed from the practical point of view. Examples of the synergistic use of SAXS with high resolution methods like X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), as well as other experimental and in silico techniques to characterize completely, or partially unstructured proteins, are presented. PMID:26320411

  12. Compaction Properties of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein: Sic1 and Its Kinase-Inhibitor Domain

    PubMed Central

    Brocca, Stefania; Testa, Lorenzo; Sobott, Frank; Šamalikova, Maria; Natalello, Antonino; Papaleo, Elena; Lotti, Marina; De Gioia, Luca; Doglia, Silvia Maria; Alberghina, Lilia; Grandori, Rita

    2011-01-01

    IDPs in their unbound state can transiently acquire secondary and tertiary structure. Describing such intrinsic structure is important to understand the transition between free and bound state, leading to supramolecular complexes with physiological interactors. IDP structure is highly dynamic and, therefore, difficult to study by conventional techniques. This work focuses on conformational analysis of the KID fragment of the Sic1 protein, an IDP with a key regulatory role in the cell-cycle of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. FT-IR spectroscopy, ESI-MS, and IM measurements are used to capture dynamic and short-lived conformational states, probing both secondary and tertiary protein structure. The results indicate that the isolated Sic1 KID retains dynamic helical structure and populates collapsed states of different compactness. A metastable, highly compact species is detected. Comparison between the fragment and the full-length protein suggests that chain length is crucial to the stabilization of compact states of this IDP. The two proteins are compared by a length-independent compaction index. PMID:21539793

  13. Small angle neutron scattering for the structural study of intrinsically disordered proteins in solution: a practical guide.

    PubMed

    Gabel, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) allows studying bio-macromolecular structures and interactions in solution. It is particularly well-suited to study structural properties of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) over a wide range of length-scales ranging from global aspects (radii of gyration and molecular weight) down to short-distance properties (e.g., cross-sectional analysis). In this book chapter, we provide a practical guide on how to carry out SANS experiments on IDPs and discuss the complementary aspects and strengths of SANS with respect to small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). PMID:22821521

  14. Conformational characterization of the intrinsically disordered protein Chibby: Interplay between structural elements in target recognition.

    PubMed

    Killoran, Ryan C; Sowole, Modupeola A; Halim, Mohammad A; Konermann, Lars; Choy, Wing-Yiu

    2016-08-01

    The protein Chibby (Cby) is an antagonist of the Wnt signaling pathway, where it inhibits the binding between the transcriptional coactivator β-catenin and the Tcf/Lef transcription factors. The 126 residue Cby is partially disordered; its N-terminal half is unstructured while its C-terminal half comprises a coiled-coil domain. Previous structural analyses of Cby using NMR spectroscopy suffered from severe line broadening for residues within the protein's C-terminal half, hindering detailed characterization of the coiled-coil domain. Here, we use hydrogen/deuterium exchange-mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to examine Cby's C-terminal half. Results reveal that Cby is divided into three structural elements: a disordered N-terminal half, a coiled-coil domain, and a C-terminal unstructured extension consisting of the last ∼ 25 residues (which we term C-terminal extension). A series of truncation constructs were designed to assess the roles of individual structural elements in protein stability and Cby binding to TC-1, a positive regulator of the Wnt signaling pathway. CD and NMR data show that Cby maintains coiled-coil structure upon deletion of either disordered region. NMR and ITC binding experiments between Cby and TC-1 illustrate that the interaction is retained upon deletion of either Cby's N-terminal half or its C-terminal extension. Intriguingly, Cby's C-terminal half alone binds to TC-1 with significantly greater affinity compared to full-length Cby, implying that target binding of the coiled-coil domain is affected by the flanking disordered regions. PMID:27082063

  15. A reduced dimensionality NMR pulse sequence and an efficient protocol for unambiguous assignment in intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Jithender G; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2014-07-01

    Resonance assignment in intrinsically disordered proteins poses a great challenge because of poor chemical shift dispersion in most of the nuclei that are commonly monitored. Reduced dimensionality (RD) experiments where more than one nuclei are co-evolved simultaneously along one of the time axes of a multi-dimensional NMR experiment help to resolve this problem partially, and one can conceive of different combinations of nuclei for co-evolution depending upon the magnetization transfer pathways and the desired information content in the spectrum. Here, we present a RD experiment, (4,3)D-hNCOCAnH, which uses a combination of CO and CA chemical shifts along one of the axes of the 3-dimensional spectrum, to improve spectral dispersion on one hand, and provide information on four backbone atoms of every residue-HN, N, CA and CO chemical shifts-from a single experiment, on the other. The experiment provides multiple unidirectional sequential (i → i - 1) amide (1)H correlations along different planes of the spectrum enabling easy assignment of most nuclei along the protein backbone. Occasional ambiguities that may arise due to degeneracy of amide proton chemical shifts are proposed to be resolved using the HNN experiment described previously (Panchal et al. in J Biomol NMR 20:135-147, 2001). Applications of the experiment and the assignment protocol have been demonstrated using intrinsically disordered α-synuclein (140 aa) protein. PMID:24854885

  16. Rejuvenation of CcdB-poisoned gyrase by an intrinsically disordered protein domain.

    PubMed

    De Jonge, Natalie; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Buts, Lieven; Haesaerts, Sarah; Charlier, Daniel; Zangger, Klaus; Wyns, Lode; De Greve, Henri; Loris, Remy

    2009-07-31

    Toxin-antitoxin modules are small regulatory circuits that ensure survival of bacterial populations under challenging environmental conditions. The ccd toxin-antitoxin module on the F plasmid codes for the toxin CcdB and its antitoxin CcdA. CcdB poisons gyrase while CcdA actively dissociates CcdB:gyrase complexes in a process called rejuvenation. The CcdA:CcdB ratio modulates autorepression of the ccd operon. The mechanisms behind both rejuvenation and regulation of expression are poorly understood. We show that CcdA binds consecutively to two partially overlapping sites on CcdB, which differ in affinity by six orders of magnitude. The first, picomolar affinity interaction triggers a conformational change in CcdB that initiates the dissociation of CcdB:gyrase complexes by an allosteric segmental binding mechanism. The second, micromolar affinity binding event regulates expression of the ccd operon. Both functions of CcdA, rejuvenation and autoregulation, are mechanistically intertwined and depend crucially on the intrinsically disordered nature of the CcdA C-terminal domain. PMID:19647513

  17. The Intrinsically Disordered C-RING Biomineralization Protein, AP7, Creates Protein Phases That Introduce Nanopatterning and Nanoporosities into Mineral Crystals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report an interesting process whereby the formation of nanoparticle assemblies on and nanoporosities within calcite crystals is directed by an intrinsically disordered C-RING mollusk shell nacre protein, AP7. Under mineralization conditions, AP7 forms protein phases that direct the nucleation of ordered calcite nanoparticles via a repetitive protein phase deposition process onto calcite crystals. These organized nanoparticles are separated by gaps or spaces that become incorporated into the forming bulk crystal as nanoporosities. This is an unusual example of organized nanoparticle biosynthesis and mineral modification directed by a C-RING protein phase. PMID:24977921

  18. Structural models of intrinsically disordered and calcium-bound folded states of a protein adapted for secretion

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Darragh P.; Hernandez, Belen; Durand, Dominique; Hourdel, Véronique; Sotomayor-Pérez, Ana-Cristina; Vachette, Patrice; Ghomi, Mahmoud; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Ladant, Daniel; Brier, Sébastien; Chenal, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria use Type I secretion systems, T1SS, to secrete virulence factors that contain calcium-binding Repeat-in-ToXin (RTX) motifs. Here, we present structural models of an RTX protein, RD, in both its intrinsically disordered calcium-free Apo-state and its folded calcium-bound Holo-state. Apo-RD behaves as a disordered polymer chain comprising several statistical elements that exhibit local rigidity with residual secondary structure. Holo-RD is a folded multi-domain protein with an anisometric shape. RTX motifs thus appear remarkably adapted to the structural and mechanistic constraints of the secretion process. In the low calcium environment of the bacterial cytosol, Apo-RD is an elongated disordered coil appropriately sized for transport through the narrow secretion machinery. The progressive folding of Holo-RD in the extracellular calcium-rich environment as it emerges form the T1SS may then favor its unidirectional export through the secretory channel. This process is relevant for hundreds of bacterial species producing virulent RTX proteins. PMID:26374675

  19. Solvent effects in the helix-coil transition model can explain the unusual biophysics of intrinsically disordered proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badasyan, Artem; Mamasakhlisov, Yevgeni Sh.; Podgornik, Rudolf; Parsegian, V. Adrian

    2015-07-01

    We analyze a model statistical description of the polypeptide chain helix-coil transition, where we take into account the specificity of its primary sequence, as quantified by the phase space volume ratio of the number of all accessible states to the number corresponding to a helical conformation. The resulting transition phase diagram is then juxtaposed with the unusual behavior of the secondary structures in Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs) and a number of similarities are observed, even if the protein folding is a more complex transition than the helix-coil transition. In fact, the deficit in bulky and hydrophobic amino acids observed in IDPs, translated into larger values of phase space volume, allows us to locate the region in parameter space of the helix-coil transition that would correspond to the secondary structure transformations that are intrinsic to conformational transitions in IDPs and that is characterized by a modified phase diagram when compared to globular proteins. Here, we argue how the nature of this modified phase diagram, obtained from a model of the helix-coil transition in a solvent, would illuminate the turned-out response of IDPs to the changes in the environment conditions that follow straightforwardly from the re-entrant (cold denaturation) branch in their folding phase diagram.

  20. Combining a PagP fusion protein system with nickel ion-catalyzed cleavage to produce intrinsically disordered proteins in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Zahran, Somaya; Pan, Jonathan S; Liu, Philip B; Hwang, Peter M

    2015-12-01

    Many proteins contain intrinsically disordered regions that are highly solvent-exposed and susceptible to post-translational modifications. Studying these protein segments is critical to understanding their physiologic regulation, but proteolytic degradation can make them difficult to express and purify. We have designed a new protein expression vector that fuses the target protein to the N-terminus of the integral membrane protein, PagP. The two proteins are connected by a short linker containing the sequence SRHW, previously shown to be optimal for nickel ion-catalyzed cleavage. The methodology is demonstrated for an intrinsically disordered segment of cardiac troponin I. cTnI[135-209]-SRHW-PagP-His6 fusion protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, accumulating in insoluble inclusion bodies. The protein was solubilized, purified using nickel affinity chromatography, and then cleaved with 0.5mM NiSO4 at pH 9.0 and 45 °C, all in 6M guanidine-HCl. Nickel ion-catalyzed peptide bond hydrolysis is an effective chemical cleavage technique under denaturing conditions that preclude the use of proteases. Moreover, nickel-catalyzed cleavage is more specific than the most commonly used agent, cyanogen bromide, which cleaves C-terminal to methionine residues. We were able to produce 15 mg of purified cTnI[135-209] from 1L of M9 minimal media using this protocol. The methodology is more generally applicable to the production of intrinsically disordered protein segments. PMID:26297994

  1. Predicting intrinsic disorder from amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Obradovic, Zoran; Peng, Kang; Vucetic, Slobodan; Radivojac, Predrag; Brown, Celeste J; Dunker, A Keith

    2003-01-01

    Blind predictions of intrinsic order and disorder were made on 42 proteins subsequently revealed to contain 9,044 ordered residues, 284 disordered residues in 26 segments of length 30 residues or less, and 281 disordered residues in 2 disordered segments of length greater than 30 residues. The accuracies of the six predictors used in this experiment ranged from 77% to 91% for the ordered regions and from 56% to 78% for the disordered segments. The average of the order and disorder predictions ranged from 73% to 77%. The prediction of disorder in the shorter segments was poor, from 25% to 66% correct, while the prediction of disorder in the longer segments was better, from 75% to 95% correct. Four of the predictors were composed of ensembles of neural networks. This enabled them to deal more efficiently with the large asymmetry in the training data through diversified sampling from the significantly larger ordered set and achieve better accuracy on ordered and long disordered regions. The exclusive use of long disordered regions for predictor training likely contributed to the disparity of the predictions on long versus short disordered regions, while averaging the output values over 61-residue windows to eliminate short predictions of order or disorder probably contributed to the even greater disparity for three of the predictors. This experiment supports the predictability of intrinsic disorder from amino acid sequence. PMID:14579347

  2. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Fluctuating Conformational Dynamics of the Intrinsically Disordered Proteins α-Synuclein and τ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W.; Schreck, Carl; Nath, Abhinav; Rhoades, Elizabeth; O'Hern, Corey

    2013-03-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) do not possess well-defined three-dimensional structures in solution under physiological conditions. We develop united-atom and coarse-grained Langevin dynamics simulations for the IDPs α-synuclein and τ that include geometric,attractive hydrophobic, and screened electrostatic interactions and are calibrated to the inter-residue separations measured in recent smFRET experiments. We find that these IDPs have conformational statistics that are intermediate between random walk and collapsed globule behavior and demonstrate close resemblance to the known experimental data, with both electrostatics and hydrophobicity strongly influencing the dynamics. We investigate the propensity of α-synuclein to aggregate and form oligomers, and present preliminary results for the aggregation of τ and interactions between these IDPs and small molecules such as heparin and spermine which are known to induce aggregation.

  3. IDPT: Insights into potential intrinsically disordered proteins through transcriptomic analysis of genes for prostate carcinoma epigenetic data.

    PubMed

    Mallik, Saurav; Sen, Sagnik; Maulik, Ujjwal

    2016-07-15

    Involvement of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) with various dreadful diseases like cancer is an interesting research topic. In order to gain novel insights into the regulation of IDPs, in this article, we perform a transcriptomic analysis of mRNAs (genes) for transcripts encoding IDPs on a human multi-omics prostate carcinoma dataset having both gene expression and methylation data. In this regard, firstly the genes that consist of both the expression and methylation data, and that are corresponding to the cancer-related prostate-tissue-specific disordered proteins of MobiDb database, are selected. We apply standard t-test for determining differentially expressed genes as well as differentially methylated genes. A network having these genes and their targeter miRNAs from Diana Tarbase v7.0 database and corresponding Transcription Factors from TRANSFAC and ITFP databases, is then built. Thereafter, we perform literature search, and KEGG pathway and Gene Ontology analyses using DAVID database. Finally, we report several significant potential gene-markers (with the corresponding IDPs) that have inverse relationship between differential expression and methylation patterns, and that are hub genes of the TF-miRNA-gene network. PMID:27060408

  4. Structural ensembles reveal intrinsic disorder for the multi-stimuli responsive bio-mimetic protein Rec1-resilin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balu, Rajkamal; Knott, Robert; Cowieson, Nathan P.; Elvin, Christopher M.; Hill, Anita J.; Choudhury, Namita R.; Dutta, Naba K.

    2015-06-01

    Rec1-resilin is the first recombinant resilin-mimetic protein polymer, synthesized from exon-1 of the Drosophila melanogaster gene CG15920 that has demonstrated unusual multi-stimuli responsiveness in aqueous solution. Crosslinked hydrogels of Rec1-resilin have also displayed remarkable mechanical properties including near-perfect rubber-like elasticity. The structural basis of these extraordinary properties is not clearly understood. Here we combine a computational and experimental investigation to examine structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solution. The structure of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solutions is investigated experimentally using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Both bench-top and synchrotron SAXS are employed to extract structural data sets of Rec1-resilin and to confirm their validity. Computational approaches have been applied to these experimental data sets in order to extract quantitative information about structural ensembles including radius of gyration, pair-distance distribution function, and the fractal dimension. The present work confirms that Rec1-resilin is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) that displays equilibrium structural qualities between those of a structured globular protein and a denatured protein. The ensemble optimization method (EOM) analysis reveals a single conformational population with partial compactness. This work provides new insight into the structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in solution.

  5. Free energy surface of an intrinsically disordered protein: comparison between temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics and bias-exchange metadynamics.

    PubMed

    Zerze, Gül H; Miller, Cayla M; Granata, Daniele; Mittal, Jeetain

    2015-06-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), which are expected to be largely unstructured under physiological conditions, make up a large fraction of eukaryotic proteins. Molecular dynamics simulations have been utilized to probe structural characteristics of these proteins, which are not always easily accessible to experiments. However, exploration of the conformational space by brute force molecular dynamics simulations is often limited by short time scales. Present literature provides a number of enhanced sampling methods to explore protein conformational space in molecular simulations more efficiently. In this work, we present a comparison of two enhanced sampling methods: temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics and bias exchange metadynamics. By investigating both the free energy landscape as a function of pertinent order parameters and the per-residue secondary structures of an IDP, namely, human islet amyloid polypeptide, we found that the two methods yield similar results as expected. We also highlight the practical difference between the two methods by describing the path that we followed to obtain both sets of data. PMID:26575570

  6. Structural ensembles reveal intrinsic disorder for the multi-stimuli responsive bio-mimetic protein Rec1-resilin

    PubMed Central

    Balu, Rajkamal; Knott, Robert; Cowieson, Nathan P.; Elvin, Christopher M.; Hill, Anita J.; Choudhury, Namita R.; Dutta, Naba K.

    2015-01-01

    Rec1-resilin is the first recombinant resilin-mimetic protein polymer, synthesized from exon-1 of the Drosophila melanogaster gene CG15920 that has demonstrated unusual multi-stimuli responsiveness in aqueous solution. Crosslinked hydrogels of Rec1-resilin have also displayed remarkable mechanical properties including near-perfect rubber-like elasticity. The structural basis of these extraordinary properties is not clearly understood. Here we combine a computational and experimental investigation to examine structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solution. The structure of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solutions is investigated experimentally using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Both bench-top and synchrotron SAXS are employed to extract structural data sets of Rec1-resilin and to confirm their validity. Computational approaches have been applied to these experimental data sets in order to extract quantitative information about structural ensembles including radius of gyration, pair-distance distribution function, and the fractal dimension. The present work confirms that Rec1-resilin is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) that displays equilibrium structural qualities between those of a structured globular protein and a denatured protein. The ensemble optimization method (EOM) analysis reveals a single conformational population with partial compactness. This work provides new insight into the structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in solution. PMID:26042819

  7. Structural ensembles reveal intrinsic disorder for the multi-stimuli responsive bio-mimetic protein Rec1-resilin.

    PubMed

    Balu, Rajkamal; Knott, Robert; Cowieson, Nathan P; Elvin, Christopher M; Hill, Anita J; Choudhury, Namita R; Dutta, Naba K

    2015-01-01

    Rec1-resilin is the first recombinant resilin-mimetic protein polymer, synthesized from exon-1 of the Drosophila melanogaster gene CG15920 that has demonstrated unusual multi-stimuli responsiveness in aqueous solution. Crosslinked hydrogels of Rec1-resilin have also displayed remarkable mechanical properties including near-perfect rubber-like elasticity. The structural basis of these extraordinary properties is not clearly understood. Here we combine a computational and experimental investigation to examine structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solution. The structure of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solutions is investigated experimentally using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Both bench-top and synchrotron SAXS are employed to extract structural data sets of Rec1-resilin and to confirm their validity. Computational approaches have been applied to these experimental data sets in order to extract quantitative information about structural ensembles including radius of gyration, pair-distance distribution function, and the fractal dimension. The present work confirms that Rec1-resilin is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) that displays equilibrium structural qualities between those of a structured globular protein and a denatured protein. The ensemble optimization method (EOM) analysis reveals a single conformational population with partial compactness. This work provides new insight into the structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in solution. PMID:26042819

  8. Rethinking gene regulatory networks in light of alternative splicing, intrinsically disordered protein domains, and post-translational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Niklas, Karl J.; Bondos, Sarah E.; Dunker, A. Keith; Newman, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Models for genetic regulation and cell fate specification characteristically assume that gene regulatory networks (GRNs) are essentially deterministic and exhibit multiple stable states specifying alternative, but pre-figured cell fates. Mounting evidence shows, however, that most eukaryotic precursor RNAs undergo alternative splicing (AS) and that the majority of transcription factors contain intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) domains whose functionalities are context dependent as well as subject to post-translational modification (PTM). Consequently, many transcription factors do not have fixed cis-acting regulatory targets, and developmental determination by GRNs alone is untenable. Modeling these phenomena requires a multi-scale approach to explain how GRNs operationally interact with the intra- and intercellular environments. Evidence shows that AS, IDP, and PTM complicate gene expression and act synergistically to facilitate and promote time- and cell-specific protein modifications involved in cell signaling and cell fate specification and thereby disrupt a strict deterministic GRN-phenotype mapping. The combined effects of AS, IDP, and PTM give proteomes physiological plasticity, adaptive responsiveness, and developmental versatility without inefficiently expanding genome size. They also help us understand how protein functionalities can undergo major evolutionary changes by buffering mutational consequences. PMID:25767796

  9. Hug1 is an intrinsically disordered protein that inhibits ribonucleotide reductase activity by directly binding Rnr2 subunit.

    PubMed

    Meurisse, Julie; Bacquin, Agathe; Richet, Nicolas; Charbonnier, Jean-Baptiste; Ochsenbein, Françoise; Peyroche, Anne

    2014-12-01

    Rad53 is a conserved protein kinase with a central role in DNA damage response and nucleotide metabolism. We observed that the expression of a dominant-lethal form of RAD53 leads to significant expression changes for at least 16 genes, including the RNR3 and the HUG1 genes, both of which are involved in the control of nucleotide metabolism. We established by multiple biophysical and biochemical approaches that Hug1 is an intrinsically disordered protein that directly binds to the small RNR subunit Rnr2. We characterized the surface of interaction involved in Hug1 binding to Rnr2, and we thus defined a new binding region to Rnr2. Moreover, we show that Hug1 is deleterious to cell growth in the context of reduced RNR activity. This inhibitory effect of Hug1 on RNR activity depends on the binding of Hug1 to Rnr2. We propose a model in which Hug1 modulates Rnr2-Rnr1 association by binding Rnr2. We show that Hug1 accumulates under various physiological conditions of high RNR induction. Hence, both the regulation and the mode of action of Hug1 are different from those of the small protein inhibitors Dif1 and Sml1, and Hug1 can be considered as a regulator for fine-tuning of RNR activity. PMID:25378334

  10. Intrinsic disorder accelerates dissociation rather than association.

    PubMed

    Umezawa, Koji; Ohnuki, Jun; Higo, Junichi; Takano, Mitsunori

    2016-08-01

    The intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) has distinct properties both physically and biologically: it often becomes folded when binding to the target and is frequently involved in signal transduction. The physical property seems to be compatible with the biological property where fast association and dissociation between IDP and the target are required. While fast association has been well studied, fueled by the fly-casting mechanism, the dissociation kinetics has received less attention. We here study how the intrinsic disorder affects the dissociation kinetics, as well as the association kinetics, paying attention to the interaction strength at the binding site (i.e., the quality of the "fly lure"). Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation of the pKID-KIX system, a well-studied IDP system, shows that the association rate becomes larger as the disorder-inducing flexibility that was imparted to the model is increased, but the acceleration is marginal and turns into deceleration as the quality of the fly lure is worsened. In contrast, the dissociation rate is greatly enhanced as the disorder is increased, indicating that intrinsic disorder serves for rapid signal switching more effectively through dissociation than association. Proteins 2016; 84:1124-1133. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27122223

  11. Regulation of RNA granule dynamics by phosphorylation of serine-rich, intrinsically disordered proteins in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jennifer T; Smith, Jarrett; Chen, Bi-Chang; Schmidt, Helen; Rasoloson, Dominique; Paix, Alexandre; Lambrus, Bramwell G; Calidas, Deepika; Betzig, Eric; Seydoux, Geraldine

    2014-01-01

    RNA granules have been likened to liquid droplets whose dynamics depend on the controlled dissolution and condensation of internal components. The molecules and reactions that drive these dynamics in vivo are not well understood. In this study, we present evidence that a group of intrinsically disordered, serine-rich proteins regulate the dynamics of P granules in C. elegans embryos. The MEG (maternal-effect germline defective) proteins are germ plasm components that are required redundantly for fertility. We demonstrate that MEG-1 and MEG-3 are substrates of the kinase MBK-2/DYRK and the phosphatase PP2APPTR−½. Phosphorylation of the MEGs promotes granule disassembly and dephosphorylation promotes granule assembly. Using lattice light sheet microscopy on live embryos, we show that GFP-tagged MEG-3 localizes to a dynamic domain that surrounds and penetrates each granule. We conclude that, despite their liquid-like behavior, P granules are non-homogeneous structures whose assembly in embryos is regulated by phosphorylation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04591.001 PMID:25535836

  12. Reconfiguration dynamics in folded and intrinsically disordered protein with internal friction: Effect of solvent quality and denaturant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Nairhita; Chakrabarti, Rajarshi

    2016-05-01

    We consider a flexible chain with internal friction in a harmonic confinement and extend it to include the effects of solvent quality at the mean field level by introducing a Flory type exponent ν. The strength of the harmonic confinement (kc) accounts for the denaturant concentration and connects to the internal friction of the chain (ξint) through an ansatz. Our calculated reconfiguration times falling in the range of 5-50 ns are found out to be within 10%-15% of the experimentally measured reconfiguration times of the folded cold shock protein and the intrinsically disordered protein prothymosin α. In addition, our calculations show that the reconfiguration time scales with the chain length N as ∼Nα, where α depends weakly on the internal friction but has rather stronger dependence on the solvent quality. In the absence of any internal friction, α = 2 ν + 1 and it goes down in the presence of internal friction, but chain reconfiguration slows down in general. On the contrary, in a poorer solvent chain reconfiguration and looping become faster even though the internal friction is higher in the collapsed state.

  13. Intrinsic disorder in the C-terminal domain of the Shaker voltage-activated K+ channel modulates its interaction with scaffold proteins

    PubMed Central

    Magidovich, Elhanan; Orr, Irit; Fass, Deborah; Abdu, Uri; Yifrach, Ofer

    2007-01-01

    The interaction of membrane-embedded voltage-activated potassium channels (Kv) with intracellular scaffold proteins, such as the postsynaptic density 95 (PSD-95) protein, is mediated by the channel C-terminal segment. This interaction underlies Kv channel clustering at unique membrane sites and is important for the proper assembly and functioning of the synapse. In the current study, we address the molecular mechanism underlying Kv/PSD-95 interaction. We provide experimental evidence, based on hydrodynamic and spectroscopic analyses, indicating that the isolated C-terminal segment of the archetypical Shaker Kv channel (ShB-C) is a random coil, suggesting that ShB-C belongs to the recently defined class of intrinsically disordered proteins. We show that isolated ShB-C is still able to bind its scaffold protein partner and support protein clustering in vivo, indicating that unfoldedness is compatible with ShB-C activity. Pulldown experiments involving C-terminal chains differing in flexibility or length further demonstrate that intrinsic disorder in the C-terminal segment of the Shaker channel modulates its interaction with the PSD-95 protein. Our results thus suggest that the C-terminal domain of the Shaker Kv channel behaves as an entropic chain and support a “fishing rod” molecular mechanism for Kv channel binding to scaffold proteins. The importance of intrinsically disordered protein segments to the complex processes of synapse assembly, maintenance, and function is discussed. PMID:17666528

  14. Insights into the regulation of intrinsically disordered proteins in the human proteome by analyzing sequence and gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Yvonne JK; Lobley, Anna E; Pentony, Melissa M; Jones, David T

    2009-01-01

    Background Disordered proteins need to be expressed to carry out specified functions; however, their accumulation in the cell can potentially cause major problems through protein misfolding and aggregation. Gene expression levels, mRNA decay rates, microRNA (miRNA) targeting and ubiquitination have critical roles in the degradation and disposal of human proteins and transcripts. Here, we describe a study examining these features to gain insights into the regulation of disordered proteins. Results In comparison with ordered proteins, disordered proteins have a greater proportion of predicted ubiquitination sites. The transcripts encoding disordered proteins also have higher proportions of predicted miRNA target sites and higher mRNA decay rates, both of which are indicative of the observed lower gene expression levels. The results suggest that the disordered proteins and their transcripts are present in the cell at low levels and/or for a short time before being targeted for disposal. Surprisingly, we find that for a significant proportion of highly disordered proteins, all four of these trends are reversed. Predicted estimates for miRNA targets, ubiquitination and mRNA decay rate are low in the highly disordered proteins that are constitutively and/or highly expressed. Conclusions Mechanisms are in place to protect the cell from these potentially dangerous proteins. The evidence suggests that the enrichment of signals for miRNA targeting and ubiquitination may help prevent the accumulation of disordered proteins in the cell. Our data also provide evidence for a mechanism by which a significant proportion of highly disordered proteins (with high expression levels) can escape rapid degradation to allow them to successfully carry out their function. PMID:19432952

  15. Quantitative analysis of multisite protein ligand interactions by NMR: binding of intrinsically disordered p53 transactivation subdomains with the TAZ2 domain of CBP

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Munehito; Ferreon, Josephine C.; Wright, Peter E.

    2012-01-01

    Determination of affinities and binding sites involved in protein-ligand interactions is essential for understanding molecular mechanisms in biological systems. Here we combine singular value decomposition, and global analysis of NMR chemical shift perturbations caused by protein-protein interactions to determine the number and location of binding sites on the protein surface and to measure the binding affinities. Using this method we show that the isolated AD1 and AD2 binding motifs, derived from the intrinsically disordered N-terminal transactivation domain of the tumor suppressor p53, both interact with the TAZ2 domain of the transcriptional coactivator CBP at two binding sites. Simulations of titration curves and lineshapes show that a primary dissociation constant as small as 1~10 nM can be accurately estimated by NMR titration methods, provided that the primary and secondary binding processes are coupled. Unexpectedly, the site of binding of AD2 on the hydrophobic surface of TAZ2 overlaps with the binding site for AD1, but AD2 binds TAZ2 more tightly. The results highlight the complexity of interactions between intrinsically disordered proteins and their targets. Furthermore, the association rate of AD2 to TAZ2 is estimated to be 1.7 × 1010 M−1 s−1, approaching the diffusion-controlled limit and indicating that intrinsic disorder plus complementary electrostatics can significantly accelerate protein binding interactions. PMID:22280219

  16. Kinesin tail domains are intrinsically disordered.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Mark A; Zhang, Yongbo; Rice, Sarah E

    2012-10-01

    Kinesin motor proteins transport a wide variety of molecular cargoes in a spatially and temporally regulated manner. Kinesin motor domains, which hydrolyze ATP to produce a directed mechanical force along a microtubule, are well conserved throughout the entire superfamily. Outside of the motor domains, kinesin sequences diverge along with their transport functions. The nonmotor regions, particularly the tails, respond to a wide variety of structural and molecular cues that enable kinesins to carry specific cargoes in response to particular cellular signals. Here, we demonstrate that intrinsic disorder is a common structural feature of kinesins. A bioinformatics survey of the full-length sequences of all 43 human kinesins predicts that significant regions of intrinsically disordered residues are present in all kinesins. These regions are concentrated in the nonmotor domains, particularly in the tails and near sites for ligand binding or post-translational modifications. In order to experimentally verify these predictions, we expressed and purified the tail domains of kinesins representing three different families (Kif5B, Kif10, and KifC3). Circular dichroism and NMR spectroscopy experiments demonstrate that the isolated tails are disordered in vitro, yet they retain their functional microtubule-binding activity. On the basis of these results, we propose that intrinsic disorder is a common structural feature that confers functional specificity to kinesins. PMID:22674872

  17. Kinesin Tail Domains Are Intrinsically Disordered

    PubMed Central

    Seeger, Mark A.; Zhang, Yongbo; Rice, Sarah E.

    2012-01-01

    Kinesin motor proteins transport a wide variety of molecular cargoes in a spatially and temporally regulated manner. Kinesin motor domains, which hydrolyze ATP to produce a directed mechanical force along a microtubule, are well conserved throughout the entire superfamily. Outside of the motor domains, kinesin sequences diverge along with their transport functions. The non-motor regions, particularly the tails, respond to a wide variety of structural and molecular cues that enable kinesins to carry specific cargoes in response to particular cellular signals. Here, we demonstrate that intrinsic disorder is a common structural feature of kinesins. A bioinformatics survey of the full-length sequences of all 43 human kinesins predicts that significant regions of intrinsically disordered residues are present in all kinesins. These regions are concentrated in the non-motor domains, particularly in the tails and near sites for ligand binding or post-translational modifications. In order to experimentally verify these predictions, we expressed and purified the tail domains of kinesins representing three different families (Kif5B, Kif10, and KifC3). Circular dichroism (CD) and NMR spectroscopy experiments demonstrate that the isolated tails are disordered in vitro, yet they retain their functional microtubule-binding activity. Based on these results, we propose that intrinsic disorder is a common structural feature that confers functional specificity to kinesins. PMID:22674872

  18. Impact of hydrostatic pressure on an intrinsically disordered protein: a high-pressure NMR study of α-synuclein.

    PubMed

    Roche, Julien; Ying, Jinfa; Maltsev, Alexander S; Bax, Ad

    2013-09-23

    The impact of pressure on the backbone (15) N, (1) H and (13) C chemical shifts in N-terminally acetylated α-synuclein has been evaluated over a pressure range 1-2500 bar. Even while the chemical shifts fall very close to random coil values, as expected for an intrinsically disordered protein, substantial deviations in the pressure dependence of the chemical shifts are seen relative to those in short model peptides. In particular, the nonlinear pressure response of the (1) H(N) chemical shifts, which commonly is associated with the presence of low-lying "excited states", is much larger in α-synuclein than in model peptides. The linear pressure response of (1) H(N) chemical shift, commonly linked to H-bond length change, correlates well with those in short model peptides, and is found to be anticorrelated with its temperature dependence. The pressure dependence of (13) C chemical shifts shows remarkably large variations, even when accounting for residue type, and do not point to a clear shift in population between different regions of the Ramachandran map. However, a nearly universal decrease in (3) JHN-Hα by 0.22 ± 0.05 Hz suggests a slight increase in population of the polyproline II region at 2500 bar. The first six residues of N-terminally acetylated synuclein show a transient of approximately 15% population of α-helix, which slightly diminishes at 2500 bar. The backbone dynamics of the protein is not visibly affected beyond the effect of slight increase in water viscosity at 2500 bar. PMID:23813793

  19. Tick receptor for outer surface protein A from Ixodes ricinus — the first intrinsically disordered protein involved in vector-microbe recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanowicz, Anna; Lewandowski, Dominik; Szpotkowski, Kamil; Figlerowicz, Marek

    2016-04-01

    The tick receptor for outer surface protein A (TROSPA) is the only identified factor involved in tick gut colonization by various Borrelia species. TROSPA is localized in the gut epithelium and can recognize and bind the outer surface bacterial protein OspA via an unknown mechanism. Based on earlier reports and our latest observations, we considered that TROSPA would be the first identified intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) involved in the interaction between a vector and a pathogenic microbe. To verify this hypothesis, we performed structural studies of a TROSPA mutant from Ixodes ricinus using both computational and experimental approaches. Irrespective of the method used, we observed that the secondary structure content of the TROSPA polypeptide chain is low. In addition, the collected SAXS data indicated that this protein is highly extended and exists in solution as a set of numerous conformers. These features are all commonly considered hallmarks of IDPs. Taking advantage of our SAXS data, we created structural models of TROSPA and proposed a putative mechanism for the TROSPA-OspA interaction. The disordered nature of TROSPA may explain the ability of a wide spectrum of Borrelia species to colonize the tick gut.

  20. Tick receptor for outer surface protein A from Ixodes ricinus - the first intrinsically disordered protein involved in vector-microbe recognition.

    PubMed

    Urbanowicz, Anna; Lewandowski, Dominik; Szpotkowski, Kamil; Figlerowicz, Marek

    2016-01-01

    The tick receptor for outer surface protein A (TROSPA) is the only identified factor involved in tick gut colonization by various Borrelia species. TROSPA is localized in the gut epithelium and can recognize and bind the outer surface bacterial protein OspA via an unknown mechanism. Based on earlier reports and our latest observations, we considered that TROSPA would be the first identified intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) involved in the interaction between a vector and a pathogenic microbe. To verify this hypothesis, we performed structural studies of a TROSPA mutant from Ixodes ricinus using both computational and experimental approaches. Irrespective of the method used, we observed that the secondary structure content of the TROSPA polypeptide chain is low. In addition, the collected SAXS data indicated that this protein is highly extended and exists in solution as a set of numerous conformers. These features are all commonly considered hallmarks of IDPs. Taking advantage of our SAXS data, we created structural models of TROSPA and proposed a putative mechanism for the TROSPA-OspA interaction. The disordered nature of TROSPA may explain the ability of a wide spectrum of Borrelia species to colonize the tick gut. PMID:27112540

  1. Tick receptor for outer surface protein A from Ixodes ricinus — the first intrinsically disordered protein involved in vector-microbe recognition

    PubMed Central

    Urbanowicz, Anna; Lewandowski, Dominik; Szpotkowski, Kamil; Figlerowicz, Marek

    2016-01-01

    The tick receptor for outer surface protein A (TROSPA) is the only identified factor involved in tick gut colonization by various Borrelia species. TROSPA is localized in the gut epithelium and can recognize and bind the outer surface bacterial protein OspA via an unknown mechanism. Based on earlier reports and our latest observations, we considered that TROSPA would be the first identified intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) involved in the interaction between a vector and a pathogenic microbe. To verify this hypothesis, we performed structural studies of a TROSPA mutant from Ixodes ricinus using both computational and experimental approaches. Irrespective of the method used, we observed that the secondary structure content of the TROSPA polypeptide chain is low. In addition, the collected SAXS data indicated that this protein is highly extended and exists in solution as a set of numerous conformers. These features are all commonly considered hallmarks of IDPs. Taking advantage of our SAXS data, we created structural models of TROSPA and proposed a putative mechanism for the TROSPA-OspA interaction. The disordered nature of TROSPA may explain the ability of a wide spectrum of Borrelia species to colonize the tick gut. PMID:27112540

  2. N-terminal segments modulate the α-helical propensities of the intrinsically disordered basic regions of bZIP proteins.

    PubMed

    Das, Rahul K; Crick, Scott L; Pappu, Rohit V

    2012-02-17

    Basic region leucine zippers (bZIPs) are modular transcription factors that play key roles in eukaryotic gene regulation. The basic regions of bZIPs (bZIP-bRs) are necessary and sufficient for DNA binding and specificity. Bioinformatic predictions and spectroscopic studies suggest that unbound monomeric bZIP-bRs are uniformly disordered as isolated domains. Here, we test this assumption through a comparative characterization of conformational ensembles for 15 different bZIP-bRs using a combination of atomistic simulations and circular dichroism measurements. We find that bZIP-bRs have quantifiable preferences for α-helical conformations in their unbound monomeric forms. This helicity varies from one bZIP-bR to another despite a significant sequence similarity of the DNA binding motifs (DBMs). Our analysis reveals that intramolecular interactions between DBMs and eight-residue segments directly N-terminal to DBMs are the primary modulators of bZIP-bR helicities. We test the accuracy of this inference by designing chimeras of bZIP-bRs to have either increased or decreased overall helicities. Our results yield quantitative insights regarding the relationship between sequence and the degree of intrinsic disorder within bZIP-bRs, and might have general implications for other intrinsically disordered proteins. Understanding how natural sequence variations lead to modulation of disorder is likely to be important for understanding the evolution of specificity in molecular recognition through intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs). PMID:22226835

  3. A New Family of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins: Structural Characterization of the Major Phasin PhaF from Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    PubMed Central

    Maestro, Beatriz; Galán, Beatriz; Alfonso, Carlos; Rivas, Germán; Prieto, Maria A.; Sanz, Jesús M.

    2013-01-01

    Phasins are intracellular polyhydroxyalkanoat4e (PHA)-associated proteins involved in the stabilization of these bacterial carbon storage granules. Despite its importance in PHA metabolism and regulation, only few reports have focused so far on the structure of these proteins. In this work we have investigated the structure and stability of the PhaF phasin from Pseudomonas putida KT2440, a protein that is involved in PHA granule stabilization and distribution to daughter cells upon cell division. A structural, three-dimensional model of the protein was built from homology modeling procedures and consensus secondary structure predictions. The model predicts that PhaF is an elongated protein, with a long, amphipathic N-terminal helix with PHA binding capacity, followed by a short leucine zipper involved in protein oligomerization and a superhelical C-terminal domain wrapped around the chromosomal DNA. Hydrodynamic, spectroscopical and thermodynamic experiments validated the model and confirmed both that free PhaF is a tetramer in solution and that most part of the protein is intrinsically disordered in the absence of its ligands. The results lay a molecular basis for the explanation of the biological role of PhaF and, along with an exhaustive analysis of phasin sequence databases, suggest that intrinsic disorder and oligomerization through coiled-coils may be a widespread mechanism among these proteins. PMID:23457638

  4. Phylogeny of major intrinsic proteins.

    PubMed

    Danielson, Jonas A H; Johanson, Urban

    2010-01-01

    Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) form a large superfamily of proteins that can be divided into different subfamilies and groups according to phylogenetic analyses. Plants encode more MIPs than o ther organisms and se ven subfamilies have been defined, whereofthe Nodulin26-like major intrinsic proteins (NIPs) have been shown to permeate metalloids. In this chapter we review the phylogeny of MIPs in general and especially of the plant MIPs. We also identify bacterial NIP-like MIPs and discuss the evolutionary implications of this finding regarding the origin and ancestral transport specificity of the NIPs. PMID:20666221

  5. Phosphorylation at intrinsically disordered regions of PAM2 motif-containing proteins modulates their interactions with PABPC1 and influences mRNA fate.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai-Lieh; Chadee, Amanda B; Chen, Chyi-Ying A; Zhang, Yueqiang; Shyu, Ann-Bin

    2013-03-01

    Cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) C1 recruits different interacting partners to regulate mRNA fate. The majority of PABP-interacting proteins contain a PAM2 motif to mediate their interactions with PABPC1. However, little is known about the regulation of these interactions or the corresponding functional consequences. Through in silico analysis, we found that PAM2 motifs are generally embedded within an extended intrinsic disorder region (IDR) and are located next to cluster(s) of potential serine (Ser) or threonine (Thr) phosphorylation sites within the IDR. We hypothesized that phosphorylation at these Ser/Thr sites regulates the interactions between PAM2-containing proteins and PABPC1. In the present study, we have tested this hypothesis using complementary approaches to increase or decrease phosphorylation. The results indicate that changing the extent of phosphorylation of three PAM2-containing proteins (Tob2, Pan3, and Tnrc6c) alters their ability to interact with PABPC1. Results from experiments using phospho-blocking or phosphomimetic mutants in PAM2-containing proteins further support our hypothesis. Moreover, the phosphomimetic mutations appreciably affected the functions of these proteins in mRNA turnover and gene silencing. Taken together, these results provide a new framework for understanding the roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in the dynamic and signal-dependent control of cytoplasmic mRNA functions. PMID:23340509

  6. 4D non-uniformly sampled HCBCACON and ¹J(NCα)-selective HCBCANCO experiments for the sequential assignment and chemical shift analysis of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Nováček, Jiří; Haba, Noam Y; Chill, Jordan H; Zídek, Lukáš; Sklenář, Vladimír

    2012-06-01

    A pair of 4D NMR experiments for the backbone assignment of disordered proteins is presented. The experiments exploit (13)C direct detection and non-uniform sampling of the indirectly detected dimensions, and provide correlations of the aliphatic proton (H(α), and H(β)) and carbon (C(α), C(β)) resonance frequencies to the protein backbone. Thus, all the chemical shifts regularly used to map the transient secondary structure motifs in the intrinsically disordered proteins (H(α), C(α), C(β), C', and N) can be extracted from each spectrum. Compared to the commonly used assignment strategy based on matching the C(α) and C(β) chemical shifts, inclusion of the H(α) and H(β) provides up to three extra resonance frequencies that decrease the chance of ambiguous assignment. The experiments were successfully applied to the original assignment of a 12.8 kDa intrinsically disordered protein having a high content of proline residues (26 %) in the sequence. PMID:22580891

  7. An Intrinsically Disordered Region of the DNA Repair Protein Nbs1 Is a Species-Specific Barrier to Herpes Simplex Virus 1 in Primates.

    PubMed

    Lou, Dianne I; Kim, Eui Tae; Meyerson, Nicholas R; Pancholi, Neha J; Mohni, Kareem N; Enard, David; Petrov, Dmitri A; Weller, Sandra K; Weitzman, Matthew D; Sawyer, Sara L

    2016-08-10

    Humans occasionally transmit herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) to captive primates, who reciprocally harbor alphaherpesviruses poised for zoonotic transmission to humans. To understand the basis for the species-specific restriction of HSV-1 in primates, we simulated what might happen during the cross-species transmission of HSV-1 and found that the DNA repair protein Nbs1 from only some primate species is able to promote HSV-1 infection. The Nbs1 homologs that promote HSV-1 infection also interact with the HSV-1 ICP0 protein. ICP0 interaction mapped to a region of structural disorder in the Nbs1 protein. Chimeras reversing patterns of disorder in Nbs1 reversed titers of HSV-1 produced in the cell. By extending this analysis to 1,237 virus-interacting mammalian proteins, we show that proteins that interact with viruses are highly enriched in disorder, suggesting that viruses commonly interact with host proteins through intrinsically disordered domains. PMID:27512903

  8. Biophysical characterization of the structural change of Nopp140, an intrinsically disordered protein, in the interaction with CK2α.

    PubMed

    Na, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Won-Kyu; Kim, Yuyoung; Jeong, Cherlhyun; Song, Seung Soo; Cha, Sun-Shin; Han, Kyou-Hoon; Shin, Yeon-Kyun; Yu, Yeon Gyu

    2016-08-19

    Nucleolar phosphoprotein 140 (Nopp140) is a nucleolar protein, more than 80% of which is disordered. Previous studies have shown that the C-terminal region of Nopp140 (residues 568-596) interacts with protein kinase CK2α, and inhibits the catalytic activity of CK2. Although the region of Nopp140 responsible for the interaction with CK2α was identified, the structural features and the effect of this interaction on the structure of Nopp140 have not been defined due to the difficulty of structural characterization of disordered protein. In this study, the disordered feature of Nopp140 and the effect of CK2α on the structure of Nopp140 were examined using single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The interaction with CK2α was increased conformational rigidity of the CK2α-interacting region of Nopp140 (Nopp140C), suggesting that the disordered and flexible conformation of Nopp140C became more rigid conformation as it binds to CK2α. In addition, site specific spin labeling and EPR analysis confirmed that the residues 574-589 of Nopp140 are critical for binding to CK2α. Similar technical approaches can be applied to analyze the conformational changes in other IDPs during their interactions with binding partners. PMID:27297113

  9. Molecular Basis for Structural Heterogeneity of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein Bound to a Partner by Combined ESI-IM-MS and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Urzo, Annalisa; Konijnenberg, Albert; Rossetti, Giulia; Habchi, Johnny; Li, Jinyu; Carloni, Paolo; Sobott, Frank; Longhi, Sonia; Grandori, Rita

    2015-03-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) form biologically active complexes that can retain a high degree of conformational disorder, escaping structural characterization by conventional approaches. An example is offered by the complex between the intrinsically disordered NTAIL domain and the phosphoprotein X domain (PXD) from measles virus (MeV). Here, distinct conformers of the complex are detected by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and ion mobility (IM) techniques yielding estimates for the solvent-accessible surface area (SASA) in solution and the average collision cross-section (CCS) in the gas phase. Computational modeling of the complex in solution, based on experimental constraints, provides atomic-resolution structural models featuring different levels of compactness. The resulting models indicate high structural heterogeneity. The intermolecular interactions are predominantly hydrophobic, not only in the ordered core of the complex, but also in the dynamic, disordered regions. Electrostatic interactions become involved in the more compact states. This system represents an illustrative example of a hydrophobic complex that could be directly detected in the gas phase by native mass spectrometry. This work represents the first attempt to modeling the entire NTAIL domain bound to PXD at atomic resolution.

  10. Quantitative proteome-based guidelines for intrinsic disorder characterization.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Michael; Whidden, Mark; Schnell, Santiago

    2016-06-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins fail to adopt a stable three-dimensional structure under physiological conditions. It is now understood that many disordered proteins are not dysfunctional, but instead engage in numerous cellular processes, including signaling and regulation. Disorder characterization from amino acid sequence relies on computational disorder prediction algorithms. While numerous large-scale investigations of disorder have been performed using these algorithms, and have offered valuable insight regarding the prevalence of protein disorder in many organisms, critical proteome-based descriptive statistical guidelines that would enable the objective assessment of intrinsic disorder in a protein of interest remain to be established. Here we present a quantitative characterization of numerous disorder features using a rigorous non-parametric statistical approach, providing expected values and percentile cutoffs for each feature in ten eukaryotic proteomes. Our estimates utilize multiple ab initio disorder prediction algorithms grounded on physicochemical principles. Furthermore, we present novel threshold values, specific to both the prediction algorithms and the proteomes, defining the longest primary sequence length in which the significance of a continuous disordered region can be evaluated on the basis of length alone. The guidelines presented here are intended to improve the interpretation of disorder content and continuous disorder predictions from the proteomic point of view. PMID:27085142

  11. Intrinsic Localized Modes in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nicolaï, Adrien; Delarue, Patrice; Senet, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Protein dynamics is essential for proteins to function. Here we predicted the existence of rare, large nonlinear excitations, termed intrinsic localized modes (ILMs), of the main chain of proteins based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of two fast-folder proteins and of a rigid α/β protein at 300 K and at 380 K in solution. These nonlinear excitations arise from the anharmonicity of the protein dynamics. The ILMs were detected by computing the Shannon entropy of the protein main-chain fluctuations. In the non-native state (significantly explored at 380 K), the probability of their excitation was increased by a factor between 9 and 28 for the fast-folder proteins and by a factor 2 for the rigid protein. This enhancement in the non-native state was due to glycine, as demonstrated by simulations in which glycine was mutated to alanine. These ILMs might play a functional role in the flexible regions of proteins and in proteins in a non-native state (i.e. misfolded or unfolded states). PMID:26658321

  12. Intrinsic Localized Modes in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Nicolaï, Adrien; Delarue, Patrice; Senet, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Protein dynamics is essential for proteins to function. Here we predicted the existence of rare, large nonlinear excitations, termed intrinsic localized modes (ILMs), of the main chain of proteins based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of two fast-folder proteins and of a rigid α/β protein at 300 K and at 380 K in solution. These nonlinear excitations arise from the anharmonicity of the protein dynamics. The ILMs were detected by computing the Shannon entropy of the protein main-chain fluctuations. In the non-native state (significantly explored at 380 K), the probability of their excitation was increased by a factor between 9 and 28 for the fast-folder proteins and by a factor 2 for the rigid protein. This enhancement in the non-native state was due to glycine, as demonstrated by simulations in which glycine was mutated to alanine. These ILMs might play a functional role in the flexible regions of proteins and in proteins in a non-native state (i.e. misfolded or unfolded states). PMID:26658321

  13. Intrinsic disorder and metal binding in UreG proteins from Archae hyperthermophiles: GTPase enzymes involved in the activation of Ni(II) dependent urease.

    PubMed

    Miraula, Manfredi; Ciurli, Stefano; Zambelli, Barbara

    2015-06-01

    Urease is a Ni(II) enzyme present in every domain of life, in charge for nitrogen recycling through urea hydrolysis. Its activity requires the presence of two Ni(II) ions in the active site. These are delivered by the concerted action of four accessory proteins, named UreD, UreF, UreG and UreE. This process requires protein flexibility at different levels and some disorder-to-order transition events that coordinate the mechanism of protein-protein interaction. In particular, UreG, the GTPase in charge of nucleotide hydrolysis required for urease activation, presents a significant degree of intrinsic disorder, existing as a conformational ensemble featuring characteristics that recall a molten globule. Here, the folding properties of UreG were explored in Archaea hyperthermophiles, known to generally feature significantly low level of structural disorder in their proteome. UreG proteins from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (Mj) and Metallosphaera sedula (Ms) were structurally and functionally analyzed by integrating circular dichroism, NMR, light scattering and enzymatic assays. Metal-binding properties were studied using isothermal titration calorimetry. The results indicate that, as the mesophilic counterparts, both proteins contain a significant amount of secondary structure but maintain a flexible fold and a low GTPase activity. As opposed to other UreGs, secondary structure is lost at high temperatures (68 and 75 °C, respectively) with an apparent two-state mechanism. Both proteins bind Zn(II) and Ni(II), with affinities two orders of magnitude higher for Zn(II) than for Ni(II). No major modifications of the average conformational ensemble are observed, but binding of Zn(II) yields a more compact dimeric form in MsUreG. PMID:25846143

  14. Regulation and aggregation of intrinsically disordered peptides

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Zachary A.; Larini, Luca; LaPointe, Nichole E.; Feinstein, Stuart C.; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are a unique class of proteins that have no stable native structure, a feature that allows them to adopt a wide variety of extended and compact conformations that facilitate a large number of vital physiological functions. One of the most well-known IDPs is the microtubule-associated tau protein, which regulates microtubule growth in the nervous system. However, dysfunctions in tau can lead to tau oligomerization, fibril formation, and neurodegenerative disease, including Alzheimer’s disease. Using a combination of simulations and experiments, we explore the role of osmolytes in regulating the conformation and aggregation propensities of the R2/wt peptide, a fragment of tau containing the aggregating paired helical filament (PHF6*). We show that the osmolytes urea and trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) shift the population of IDP monomer structures, but that no new conformational ensembles emerge. Although urea halts aggregation, TMAO promotes the formation of compact oligomers (including helical oligomers) through a newly proposed mechanism of redistribution of water around the perimeter of the peptide. We put forth a “superposition of ensembles” hypothesis to rationalize the mechanism by which IDP structure and aggregation is regulated in the cell. PMID:25691742

  15. Regulation and aggregation of intrinsically disordered peptides.

    PubMed

    Levine, Zachary A; Larini, Luca; LaPointe, Nichole E; Feinstein, Stuart C; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2015-03-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are a unique class of proteins that have no stable native structure, a feature that allows them to adopt a wide variety of extended and compact conformations that facilitate a large number of vital physiological functions. One of the most well-known IDPs is the microtubule-associated tau protein, which regulates microtubule growth in the nervous system. However, dysfunctions in tau can lead to tau oligomerization, fibril formation, and neurodegenerative disease, including Alzheimer's disease. Using a combination of simulations and experiments, we explore the role of osmolytes in regulating the conformation and aggregation propensities of the R2/wt peptide, a fragment of tau containing the aggregating paired helical filament (PHF6*). We show that the osmolytes urea and trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) shift the population of IDP monomer structures, but that no new conformational ensembles emerge. Although urea halts aggregation, TMAO promotes the formation of compact oligomers (including helical oligomers) through a newly proposed mechanism of redistribution of water around the perimeter of the peptide. We put forth a "superposition of ensembles" hypothesis to rationalize the mechanism by which IDP structure and aggregation is regulated in the cell. PMID:25691742

  16. The gene expression profiling of hepatocellular carcinoma by a network analysis approach shows a dominance of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) between hub nodes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sakshi; Colonna, Giovanni; Di Bernardo, Giovanni; Bergantino, Francesca; Cammarota, Marcella; Castello, Giuseppe; Costantini, Susan

    2015-11-01

    We have analyzed the transcriptomic data from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after viral HCV infection at the various stages of the disease by means of a networking analysis using the publicly available E-MTAB-950 dataset. The data was compared with those obtained in our group from HepG2 cells, a cancer cell line that lacks the viral infection. By sequential pruning of data, and also taking into account the data from cells of healthy patients as blanks, we were able to obtain a distribution of hub genes for the various stages that characterize the disease and finally, we isolated a metabolic sub-net specific to HCC alone. The general picture is that the basic organization to energetically and metabolically sustain the cells in both the normal and diseased conditions is the same, but a complex cluster of sub-networks controlled by hub genes drives the HCC progression with high metabolic flexibility and plasticity. In particular, we have extracted a sub-net of genes strictly correlated to other hub genes of the network from HepG2 cells, but specific for the HCC and mainly devoted to: (i) control at chromatin levels of cell division; (ii) control of ergastoplasmatic stress through protein degradation and misfolding; (iii) control of the immune response also through an increase of mature T-cells in the thymus. This sub-net is characterized by 26 hub genes coding for intrinsically disordered proteins with a high ability to interact with numerous molecular partners. Moreover, we have also noted that periphery molecules, that is, with one or very few interactions (e.g., cytokines or post-translational enzymes), which do not have a central role in the clusters that make up the global metabolic network, essentially have roles as information transporters. The results evidence a strong presence of intrinsically disordered proteins with key roles as hubs in the sub-networks that characterize the various stages of the disease, conferring a structural plasticity to

  17. A maximum entropy approach to the study of residue-specific backbone angle distributions in α-synuclein, an intrinsically disordered protein

    PubMed Central

    Mantsyzov, Alexey B; Maltsev, Alexander S; Ying, Jinfa; Shen, Yang; Hummer, Gerhard; Bax, Ad

    2014-01-01

    α-Synuclein is an intrinsically disordered protein of 140 residues that switches to an α-helical conformation upon binding phospholipid membranes. We characterize its residue-specific backbone structure in free solution with a novel maximum entropy procedure that integrates an extensive set of NMR data. These data include intraresidue and sequential HN–Hα and HN–HN NOEs, values for 3JHNHα, 1JHαCα, 2JCαN, and 1JCαN, as well as chemical shifts of 15N, 13Cα, and 13C′ nuclei, which are sensitive to backbone torsion angles. Distributions of these torsion angles were identified that yield best agreement to the experimental data, while using an entropy term to minimize the deviation from statistical distributions seen in a large protein coil library. Results indicate that although at the individual residue level considerable deviations from the coil library distribution are seen, on average the fitted distributions agree fairly well with this library, yielding a moderate population (20–30%) of the PPII region and a somewhat higher population of the potentially aggregation-prone β region (20–40%) than seen in the database. A generally lower population of the αR region (10–20%) is found. Analysis of 1H–1H NOE data required consideration of the considerable backbone diffusion anisotropy of a disordered protein. PMID:24976112

  18. Induced Secondary Structure and Polymorphism in an Intrinsically Disordered Structural Linker of the CNS: Solid-State NMR and FTIR Spectroscopy of Myelin Basic Protein Bound to Actin

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Mumdooh A.M.; Bamm, Vladimir V.; Shi, Lichi; Steiner-Mosonyi, Marta; Dawson, John F.; Brown, Leonid; Harauz, George; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The 18.5 kDa isoform of myelin basic protein (MBP) is a peripheral membrane protein that maintains the structural integrity of the myelin sheath of the central nervous system by conjoining the cytoplasmic leaflets of oligodendrocytes and by linking the myelin membrane to the underlying cytoskeleton whose assembly it strongly promotes. It is a multifunctional, intrinsically disordered protein that behaves primarily as a structural stabilizer, but with elements of a transient or induced secondary structure that represent binding sites for calmodulin or SH3-domain-containing proteins, inter alia. In this study we used solid-state NMR (SSNMR) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to study the conformation of 18.5 kDa MBP in association with actin microfilaments and bundles. FTIR spectroscopy of fully 13C,15N-labeled MBP complexed with unlabeled F-actin showed induced folding of both protein partners, viz., some increase in β-sheet content in actin, and increases in both α-helix and β-sheet content in MBP, albeit with considerable extended structure remaining. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy revealed that MBP in MBP-actin assemblies is structurally heterogeneous but gains ordered secondary structure elements (both α-helical and β-sheet), particularly in the terminal fragments and in a central immunodominant epitope. The overall conformational polymorphism of MBP is consistent with its in vivo roles as both a linker (membranes and cytoskeleton) and a putative signaling hub. PMID:19134474

  19. Characterisation of an intrinsically disordered protein complex of Swi5-Sfr1 by ion mobility mass spectrometry and small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Saikusa, Kazumi; Kuwabara, Naoyuki; Kokabu, Yuichi; Inoue, Yu; Sato, Mamoru; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Toshiyuki; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori; Akashi, Satoko

    2013-03-01

    It is now recognized that intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) play important roles as hubs in intracellular networks, and their structural characterisation is of significance. However, due to their highly dynamic features, it is challenging to investigate the structures of IDPs solely by conventional methods. In the present study, we demonstrate a novel method to characterise protein complexes using electrospray ionization ion mobility mass spectrometry (ESI-IM-MS) in combination with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). This method enables structural characterisation even of proteins that have difficulties in crystallisation. With this method, we have characterised the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Swi5-Sfr1 complex, which is expected to have a long disordered region at the N-terminal portion of Sfr1. ESI-IM-MS analysis of the Swi5-Sfr1 complex revealed that its experimental collision cross-section (CCS) had a wide distribution, and the CCS values of the most dominant ions were ∼56% of the theoretically calculated value based on the SAXS low-resolution model, suggesting a significant size reduction in the gas phase. The present study demonstrates that the newly developed method for calculation of the theoretical CCSs of the SAXS low-resolution models of proteins allows accurate evaluation of the experimental CCS values of IDPs provided by ESI-IM-MS by comparing with the low-resolution solution structures. Furthermore, it was revealed that the combination of ESI-IM-MS and SAXS is a promising method for structural characterisation of protein complexes that are unable to crystallise. PMID:23324799

  20. Intrinsically Disordered Enamel Matrix Protein Ameloblastin Forms Ribbon-like Supramolecular Structures via an N-terminal Segment Encoded by Exon 5*

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Tomas; Osickova, Adriana; Sulc, Miroslav; Benada, Oldrich; Semeradtova, Alena; Rezabkova, Lenka; Veverka, Vaclav; Bednarova, Lucie; Maly, Jan; Macek, Pavel; Sebo, Peter; Slaby, Ivan; Vondrasek, Jiri; Osicka, Radim

    2013-01-01

    Tooth enamel, the hardest tissue in the body, is formed by the evolutionarily highly conserved biomineralization process that is controlled by extracellular matrix proteins. The intrinsically disordered matrix protein ameloblastin (AMBN) is the most abundant nonamelogenin protein of the developing enamel and a key element for correct enamel formation. AMBN was suggested to be a cell adhesion molecule that regulates proliferation and differentiation of ameloblasts. Nevertheless, detailed structural and functional studies on AMBN have been substantially limited by the paucity of the purified nondegraded protein. With this study, we have developed a procedure for production of a highly purified form of recombinant human AMBN in quantities that allowed its structural characterization. Using size exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation, transmission electron, and atomic force microscopy techniques, we show that AMBN self-associates into ribbon-like supramolecular structures with average widths and thicknesses of 18 and 0.34 nm, respectively. The AMBN ribbons exhibited lengths ranging from tens to hundreds of nm. Deletion analysis and NMR spectroscopy revealed that an N-terminal segment encoded by exon 5 comprises two short independently structured regions and plays a key role in self-assembly of AMBN. PMID:23782691

  1. Novel circular single-stranded DNA viruses identified in marine invertebrates reveal high sequence diversity and consistent predicted intrinsic disorder patterns within putative structural proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rosario, Karyna; Schenck, Ryan O.; Harbeitner, Rachel C.; Lawler, Stephanie N.; Breitbart, Mya

    2015-01-01

    Viral metagenomics has recently revealed the ubiquitous and diverse nature of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) viruses that encode a conserved replication initiator protein (Rep) in the marine environment. Although eukaryotic circular Rep-encoding ssDNA (CRESS-DNA) viruses were originally thought to only infect plants and vertebrates, recent studies have identified these viruses in a number of invertebrates. To further explore CRESS-DNA viruses in the marine environment, this study surveyed CRESS-DNA viruses in various marine invertebrate species. A total of 27 novel CRESS-DNA genomes, with Reps that share less than 60.1% identity with previously reported viruses, were recovered from 21 invertebrate species, mainly crustaceans. Phylogenetic analysis based on the Rep revealed a novel clade of CRESS-DNA viruses that included approximately one third of the marine invertebrate associated viruses identified here and whose members may represent a novel family. Investigation of putative capsid proteins (Cap) encoded within the eukaryotic CRESS-DNA viral genomes from this study and those in GenBank demonstrated conserved patterns of predicted intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs), which can be used to complement similarity-based searches to identify divergent structural proteins within novel genomes. Overall, this study expands our knowledge of CRESS-DNA viruses associated with invertebrates and explores a new tool to evaluate divergent structural proteins encoded by these viruses. PMID:26217327

  2. Fairy “tails”: flexibility and function of intrinsically disordered extensions in the photosynthetic world

    PubMed Central

    Thieulin-Pardo, Gabriel; Avilan, Luisana; Kojadinovic, Mila; Gontero, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs), or protein fragments also called Intrinsically Disordered Regions (IDRs), display high flexibility as the result of their amino acid composition. They can adopt multiple roles. In globular proteins, IDRs are usually found as loops and linkers between secondary structure elements. However, not all disordered fragments are loops: some proteins bear an intrinsically disordered extension at their C- or N-terminus, and this flexibility can affect the protein as a whole. In this review, we focus on the disordered N- and C-terminal extensions of globular proteins from photosynthetic organisms. Using the examples of the A2B2-GAPDH and the α Rubisco activase isoform, we show that intrinsically disordered extensions can help regulate their “host” protein in response to changes in light, thereby participating in photosynthesis regulation. As IDPs are famous for their large number of protein partners, we used the examples of the NAC, bZIP, TCP, and GRAS transcription factor families to illustrate the fact that intrinsically disordered extremities can allow a protein to have an increased number of partners, which directly affects its regulation. Finally, for proteins from the cryptochrome light receptor family, we describe how a new role for the photolyase proteins may emerge by the addition of an intrinsically disordered extension, while still allowing the protein to absorb blue light. This review has highlighted the diverse repercussions of the disordered extension on the regulation and function of their host protein and outlined possible future research avenues. PMID:26042223

  3. Interaction of two intrinsically disordered plant stress proteins (COR15A and COR15B) with lipid membranes in the dry state.

    PubMed

    Thalhammer, Anja; Hundertmark, Michaela; Popova, Antoaneta V; Seckler, Robert; Hincha, Dirk K

    2010-09-01

    COR15A and COR15B form a tandem repeat of highly homologous genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Both genes are highly cold induced and the encoded proteins belong to the Pfam LEA_4 group (group 3) of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins. Both proteins were predicted to be intrinsically disordered in solution. Only COR15A has previously been characterized and it was shown to be localized in the soluble stroma fraction of chloroplasts. Ectopic expression of COR15A in Arabidopsis resulted in increased freezing tolerance of both chloroplasts after freezing and thawing of intact leaves and of isolated protoplasts frozen and thawed in vitro. In the present study we have generated recombinant mature COR15A and COR15B for a comparative study of their structure and possible function as membrane protectants. CD spectroscopy showed that both proteins are predominantly unstructured in solution and mainly alpha-helical after drying. Both proteins showed similar effects on the thermotropic phase behavior of dry liposomes. A decrease in the gel to liquid-crystalline phase transition temperature depended on both the unsaturation of the fatty acyl chains and lipid headgroup structure. FTIR spectroscopy indicated no strong interactions between the proteins and the lipid phosphate and carbonyl groups, but significant interactions with the galactose headgroup of the chloroplast lipid monogalactosyldiacylglycerol. These findings were rationalized by modeling the secondary structure of COR15A and COR15B. Helical wheel projection indicated the presence of amphipathic alpha-helices in both proteins. The helices lacked a clear separation of positive and negative charges on the hydrophilic face, but contained several hydroxylated amino acids. PMID:20510170

  4. Molecular crowding stabilizes both the intrinsically disordered calcium-free state and the folded calcium-bound state of a repeat in toxin (RTX) protein.

    PubMed

    Sotomayor-Pérez, Ana-Cristina; Subrini, Orso; Hessel, Audrey; Ladant, Daniel; Chenal, Alexandre

    2013-08-14

    Macromolecular crowding affects most chemical equilibria in living cells, as the presence of high concentrations of macromolecules sterically restricts the available space. Here, we characterized the influence of crowding on a prototypical RTX protein, RC(L). RTX (Repeat in ToXin) motifs are calcium-binding nonapeptide sequences that are found in many virulence factors produced by Gram-negative bacteria and secreted by dedicated type 1 secretion systems. RC(L) is an attractive model to investigate the effect of molecular crowding on ligand-induced protein folding, as it shifts from intrinsically disordered conformations (apo-form) to a stable structure upon calcium binding (holo-form). It thus offers the rare opportunity to characterize the crowding effects on the same polypeptide chain under two drastically distinct folding states. We showed that the crowding agent Ficoll70 did not affect the structural content of the apo-state and holo-state of RC(L) but increased the protein affinity for calcium. Moreover, Ficoll70 strongly stabilized both states of RC(L), increasing their half-melting temperature, without affecting enthalpy changes. The power law dependence of the melting temperature increase (ΔT(m)) on the volume fraction (φ) followed theoretical excluded volume predictions and allowed the estimation of the Flory exponent (ν) of the thermally unfolded polypeptide chain in both states. Altogether, our data suggest that, in the apo-state as found in the crowded bacterial cytosol, RTX proteins adopt extended unfolded conformations that may facilitate protein export by the type I secretion machinery. Subsequently, crowding also enhances the calcium-dependent folding and stability of RTX proteins once secreted in the extracellular milieu. PMID:23941183

  5. An intrinsically disordered region of methyl-CpG binding domain protein 2 (MBD2) recruits the histone deacetylase core of the NuRD complex

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Megha A.; Webb, Heather D.; Sinanan, Leander M.; Scarsdale, J. Neel; Walavalkar, Ninad M.; Ginder, Gordon D.; Williams, David C.

    2015-01-01

    The MBD2-NuRD (Nucleosome Remodeling and Deacetylase) complex is an epigenetic reader of DNA methylation that regulates genes involved in normal development and neoplastic diseases. To delineate the architecture and functional interactions of the MBD2-NuRD complex, we previously solved the structures of MBD2 bound to methylated DNA and a coiled-coil interaction between MBD2 and p66α that recruits the CHD4 nucleosome remodeling protein to the complex. The work presented here identifies novel structural and functional features of a previously uncharacterized domain of MBD2 (MBD2IDR). Biophysical analyses show that the MBD2IDR is an intrinsically disordered region (IDR). However, despite this inherent disorder, MBD2IDR increases the overall binding affinity of MBD2 for methylated DNA. MBD2IDR also recruits the histone deacetylase core components (RbAp48, HDAC2 and MTA2) of NuRD through a critical contact region requiring two contiguous amino acid residues, Arg286 and Leu287. Mutating these residues abrogates interaction of MBD2 with the histone deacetylase core and impairs the ability of MBD2 to repress the methylated tumor suppressor gene PRSS8 in MDA-MB-435 breast cancer cells. These findings expand our knowledge of the multi-dimensional interactions of the MBD2-NuRD complex that govern its function. PMID:25753662

  6. Yersinia pestis Caf1 Protein: Effect of Sequence Polymorphism on Intrinsic Disorder Propensity, Serological Cross-Reactivity and Cross-Protectivity of Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Kopylov, Pavel Kh; Platonov, Mikhail E; Ablamunits, Vitaly G; Kombarova, Tat'yana I; Ivanov, Sergey A; Kadnikova, Lidiya A; Somov, Aleksey N; Dentovskaya, Svetlana V; Uversky, Vladimir N; Anisimov, Andrey P

    2016-01-01

    Yersinia pestis Caf1 is a multifunctional protein responsible for antiphagocytic activity and is a key protective antigen. It is generally conserved between globally distributed Y. pestis strains, but Y. pestis subsp. microtus biovar caucasica strains circulating within populations of common voles in Georgia and Armenia were reported to carry a single substitution of alanine to serine. We investigated polymorphism of the Caf1 sequences among other Y. pestis subsp. microtus strains, which have a limited virulence in guinea pigs and in humans. Sequencing of caf1 genes from 119 Y. pestis strains belonging to different biovars within subsp. microtus showed that the Caf1 proteins exist in three isoforms, the global type Caf1NT1 (Ala48 Phe117), type Caf1NT2 (Ser48 Phe117) found in Transcaucasian-highland and Pre-Araks natural plague foci #4-7, and a novel Caf1NT3 type (Ala48 Val117) endemic in Dagestan-highland natural plague focus #39. Both minor types are the progenies of the global isoform. In this report, Caf1 polymorphism was analyzed by comparing predicted intrinsic disorder propensities and potential protein-protein interactivities of the three Caf1 isoforms. The analysis revealed that these properties of Caf1 protein are minimally affected by its polymorphism. All protein isoforms could be equally detected by an immunochromatography test for plague at the lowest protein concentration tested (1.0 ng/mL), which is the detection limit. When compared to the classic Caf1NT1 isoform, the endemic Caf1NT2 or Caf1NT3 had lower immunoreactivity in ELISA and lower indices of self- and cross-protection. Despite a visible reduction in cross-protection between all Caf1 isoforms, our data suggest that polymorphism in the caf1 gene may not allow the carriers of Caf1NT2 or Caf1NT3 variants escaping from the Caf1NT1-mediated immunity to plague in the case of a low-dose flea-borne infection. PMID:27606595

  7. HN-NCA heteronuclear TOCSY-NH experiment for (1)H(N) and (15)N sequential correlations in ((13)C, (15)N) labelled intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Christoph; Goradia, Nishit; Häfner, Sabine; Herbst, Christian; Görlach, Matthias; Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Ramachandran, Ramadurai

    2015-10-01

    A simple triple resonance NMR experiment that leads to the correlation of the backbone amide resonances of each amino acid residue 'i' with that of residues 'i-1' and 'i+1' in ((13)C, (15)N) labelled intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) is presented. The experimental scheme, {HN-NCA heteronuclear TOCSY-NH}, exploits the favourable relaxation properties of IDPs and the presence of (1) J CαN and (2) J CαN couplings to transfer the (15)N x magnetisation from amino acid residue 'i' to adjacent residues via the application of a band-selective (15)N-(13)C(α) heteronuclear cross-polarisation sequence of ~100 ms duration. Employing non-uniform sampling in the indirect dimensions, the efficacy of the approach has been demonstrated by the acquisition of 3D HNN chemical shift correlation spectra of α-synuclein. The experimental performance of the RF pulse sequence has been compared with that of the conventional INEPT-based HN(CA)NH pulse scheme. As the availability of data from both the HCCNH and HNN experiments will make it possible to use the information extracted from one experiment to simplify the analysis of the data of the other and lead to a robust approach for unambiguous backbone and side-chain resonance assignments, a time-saving strategy for the simultaneous collection of HCCNH and HNN data is also described. PMID:26282620

  8. Protein intrinsic disorder in Arabidopsis NAC transcription factors: transcriptional activation by ANAC013 and ANAC046 and their interactions with RCD1.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Charlotte; Kryger, Mikael; Stender, Emil G P; Kragelund, Birthe B; Willemoës, Martin; Skriver, Karen

    2015-01-15

    Protein ID (intrinsic disorder) plays a significant, yet relatively unexplored role in transcription factors (TFs). In the present paper, analysis of the transcription regulatory domains (TRDs) of six phylogenetically representative, plant-specific NAC [no apical meristem, ATAF (Arabidopsis transcription activation factor), cup-shaped cotyledon] TFs shows that the domains are present in similar average pre-molten or molten globule-like states, but have different patterns of order/disorder and MoRFs (molecular recognition features). ANAC046 (Arabidopsis NAC 046) was selected for further studies because of its simple MoRF pattern and its ability to interact with RCD1 (radical-induced cell death 1). Experiments in yeast and thermodynamic characterization suggest that its single MoRF region is sufficient for both transcriptional activation and interaction with RCD1. The remainder of the large regulatory domain is unlikely to contribute to the interaction, since the domain and truncations thereof have similar affinities for RCD1, which are also similar for ANAC013-RCD1 interactions. However, different enthalpic and entropic contributions to binding were revealed for ANAC046 and ANAC013, suggestive of differences in binding mechanisms. Although substitution of both hydrophobic and acidic residues of the ANAC046 MoRF region abolished binding, substitution of other residues, even with α-helix-breaking proline, was less disruptive. Together, the biophysical analyses suggest that RCD1-ANAC046 complex formation does not involve folding-upon-binding, but rather fuzziness or an unknown structure in ANAC046. We suggest that the ANAC046 regulatory domain functions as an entropic chain with a terminal hot spot interacting with RCD1. RCD1, a cellular hub, may be able to interact with many different TFs by exploiting their ID-based flexibility, as demonstrated for its interactions with ANAC046 and ANAC013. PMID:25348421

  9. Structure of Yeast Poly(A) Polymerase in Complex with a Peptide from Fip1, an Intrinsically Disordered Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Meinke,G.; Ezeokonkwo, C.; Balbo, P.; Stafford, W.; Moore, C.; Bohm, A.

    2008-01-01

    In yeast, the mRNA processing enzyme poly(A) polymerase is tethered to the much larger 3'-end processing complex via Fip1, a 36 kDa protein of unknown structure. We report the 2.6 Angstroms crystal structure of yeast poly(A) polymerase in complex with a peptide containing residues 80-105 of Fip1. The Fip1 peptide binds to the outside surface of the C-terminal domain of the polymerase. On the basis of this structure, we designed a mutant of the polymerase (V498Y, C485R) that is lethal to yeast. The mutant is unable to bind Fip1 but retains full polymerase activity. Fip1 is found in all eukaryotes and serves to connect poly(A) polymerase to pre-mRNA processing complexes in yeast, plants, and mammals. However, the Fip1 sequence is highly divergent, and residues on both Pap1 and Fip1 at the observed interaction surface are poorly conserved. Herein we demonstrate using analytical ultracentrifugation, circular dichroism, proteolytic studies, and other techniques that, in the absence of Pap1, Fip1 is largely, if not completely, unfolded. We speculate that flexibility may be important for Fip1's function as a molecular scaffold.

  10. Coarse-grained modeling of the intrinsically disordered protein Histatin 5 in solution: Monte Carlo simulations in combination with SAXS.

    PubMed

    Cragnell, Carolina; Durand, Dominique; Cabane, Bernard; Skepö, Marie

    2016-06-01

    Monte Carlo simulations and coarse-grained modeling have been used to analyze Histatin 5, an unstructured short cationic salivary peptide known to have anticandidical properties. The calculated scattering functions have been compared with intensity curves and the distance distribution function P(r) obtained from small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), at both high and low salt concentrations. The aim was to achieve a molecular understanding and a physico-chemical insight of the obtained SAXS results and to gain information of the conformational changes of Histatin 5 due to altering salt content, charge distribution, and net charge. From a modeling perspective, the accuracy of the electrostatic interactions are of special interest. The used coarse-grained model was based on the primitive model in which charged hard spheres differing in charge and in size represent the ionic particles, and the solvent only enters the model through its relative permittivity. The Hamiltonian of the model comprises three different contributions: (i) excluded volumes, (ii) electrostatic, and (iii) van der Waals interactions. Even though the model can be considered as gross omitting all atomistic details, a great correspondence is obtained with the experimental results. Proteins 2016; 84:777-791. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26914439

  11. Advantages of proteins being disordered

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhirong; Huang, Yongqi

    2014-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed great advances in our understanding of protein structure-function relationships in terms of the ubiquitous existence of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs). The structural disorder of IDPs/IDRs enables them to play essential functions that are complementary to those of ordered proteins. In addition, IDPs/IDRs are persistent in evolution. Therefore, they are expected to possess some advantages over ordered proteins. In this review, we summarize and survey nine possible advantages of IDPs/IDRs: economizing genome/protein resources, overcoming steric restrictions in binding, achieving high specificity with low affinity, increasing binding rate, facilitating posttranslational modifications, enabling flexible linkers, preventing aggregation, providing resistance to non-native conditions, and allowing compatibility with more available sequences. Some potential advantages of IDPs/IDRs are not well understood and require both experimental and theoretical approaches to decipher. The connection with protein design is also briefly discussed. PMID:24532081

  12. Intrinsic Disorder in the Kinesin Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Mark A; Rice, Sarah E

    2013-09-01

    Kinesin molecular motors perform a myriad of intracellular transport functions. While their mechanochemical mechanisms are well understood and well-conserved throughout the superfamily, the cargo-binding and regulatory mechanisms governing the activity of kinesins are highly diverse and in general, are incompletely characterized. Here we present evidence from bioinformatic predictions indicating that most kinesin superfamily members contain significant regions of intrinsically disordered (ID) residues. ID regions can bind to multiple partners with high specificity, and are highly labile to post-translational modification and degradation signals. In kinesins, the predicted ID regions are primarily found in areas outside the motor domains, where primary sequences diverge by family, suggesting that ID may be a critical structural element for determining the functional specificity of individual kinesins. To support this idea, we present a systematic analysis of the kinesin superfamily, family by family, for predicted regions of ID. We combine this analysis with a comprehensive review of kinesin binding partners and post-translational modifications. We find two key trends across the entire kinesin superfamily. First, ID residues tend to be in the tail regions of kinesins, opposite the superfamily-conserved motor domains. Second, predicted ID regions correlate to regions that are known to bind to cargoes and/or undergo post-translational modifications. We therefore propose that ID is a structural element utilized by the kinesin superfamily in order to impart functional specificity to individual kinesins. PMID:24244223

  13. Intrinsic Disorder in the Kinesin Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Seeger, Mark A.; Rice, Sarah E.

    2012-01-01

    Kinesin molecular motors perform a myriad of intracellular transport functions. While their mechanochemical mechanisms are well understood and well-conserved throughout the superfamily, the cargo-binding and regulatory mechanisms governing the activity of kinesins are highly diverse and in general, are incompletely characterized. Here we present evidence from bioinformatic predictions indicating that most kinesin superfamily members contain significant regions of intrinsically disordered (ID) residues. ID regions can bind to multiple partners with high specificity, and are highly labile to post-translational modification and degradation signals. In kinesins, the predicted ID regions are primarily found in areas outside the motor domains, where primary sequences diverge by family, suggesting that ID may be a critical structural element for determining the functional specificity of individual kinesins. To support this idea, we present a systematic analysis of the kinesin superfamily, family by family, for predicted regions of ID. We combine this analysis with a comprehensive review of kinesin binding partners and post-translational modifications. We find two key trends across the entire kinesin superfamily. First, ID residues tend to be in the tail regions of kinesins, opposite the superfamily-conserved motor domains. Second, predicted ID regions correlate to regions that are known to bind to cargoes and/or undergo post-translational modifications. We therefore propose that ID is a structural element utilized by the kinesin superfamily in order to impart functional specificity to individual kinesins. PMID:24244223

  14. Resolving the ambiguity: Making sense of intrinsic disorder when PDB structures disagree.

    PubMed

    DeForte, Shelly; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-03-01

    Missing regions in X-ray crystal structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) have played a foundational role in the study of intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDPRs), especially in the development of in silico predictors of intrinsic disorder. However, a missing region is only a weak indication of intrinsic disorder, and this uncertainty is compounded by the presence of ambiguous regions, where more than one structure of the same protein sequence "disagrees" in terms of the presence or absence of missing residues. The question is this: are these ambiguous regions intrinsically disordered, or are they the result of static disorder that arises from experimental conditions, ensembles of structures, or domain wobbling? A novel way of looking at ambiguous regions in terms of the pattern between multiple PDB structures has been demonstrated. It was found that the propensity for intrinsic disorder increases as the level of ambiguity decreases. However, it is also shown that ambiguity is more likely to occur as the protein region is placed within different environmental conditions, and even the most ambiguous regions as a set display compositional bias that suggests flexibility. The results suggested that ambiguity is a natural result for many IDPRs crystallized under different conditions and that static disorder and wobbling domains are relatively rare. Instead, it is more likely that ambiguity arises because many of these regions were conditionally or partially disordered. PMID:26683124

  15. An intrinsically disordered domain has a dual function coupled to compartment-dependent redox control.

    PubMed

    Banci, Lucia; Bertini, Ivano; Cefaro, Chiara; Ciofi-Baffoni, Simone; Gajda, Karolina; Felli, Isabella C; Gallo, Angelo; Pavelkova, Anna; Kallergi, Emmanouela; Andreadaki, Maria; Katrakili, Nitsa; Pozidis, Charalambos; Tokatlidis, Kostas

    2013-02-01

    The functional role of unstructured protein domains is an emerging field in the frame of intrinsically disordered proteins. The involvement of intrinsically disordered domains (IDDs) in protein targeting and biogenesis processes in mitochondria is so far not known. Here, we have characterized the structural/dynamic and functional properties of an IDD of the sulfhydryl oxidase ALR (augmenter of liver regeneration) located in the intermembrane space of mitochondria. At variance to the unfolded-to-folded structural transition of several intrinsically disordered proteins, neither substrate recognition events nor redox switch of its shuttle cysteine pair is linked to any such structural change. However, this unstructured domain performs a dual function in two cellular compartments: it acts (i) as a mitochondrial targeting signal in the cytosol and (ii) as a crucial recognition site in the disulfide relay system of intermembrane space. This domain provides an exciting new paradigm for IDDs ensuring two distinct functions that are linked to intracellular organelle targeting. PMID:23207295

  16. The roles of intrinsic disorder in orchestrating the Wnt-pathway.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bin; Dunker, A Keith; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2012-01-01

    The canonical Wnt-pathway plays a number of crucial roles in the development of organism. Malfunctions of this pathway lead to various diseases including cancer. In the inactivated state, this pathway involves five proteins, Axin, CKI-α, GSK-3β, APC, and β-catenin. We analyzed these proteins by a number of computational tools, such as PONDR(r)VLXT, PONDR(r)VSL2, MoRF-II predictor and Hydrophobic Cluster Analysis (HCA) to show that each of the Wnt-pathway proteins contains several intrinsically disordered regions. Based on a comprehensive analysis of published data we conclude that these disordered regions facilitate protein-protein interactions, post-translational modifications, and signaling. The scaffold protein Axin and another large protein, APC, act as flexible concentrators in gathering together all other proteins involved in the Wnt-pathway, emphasizing the role of intrinsically disordered regions in orchestrating the complex protein-protein interactions. We further explore the intricate roles of highly disordered APC in regulation of β-catenin function. Intrinsically disordered APC helps the collection of β-catenin from cytoplasm, facilitates the b-catenin delivery to the binding sites on Axin, and controls the final detachment of β-catenin from Axin. PMID:22292947

  17. On the intrinsic disorder status of the major players in programmed cell death pathways

    PubMed Central

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2013-01-01

    Earlier computational and bioinformatics analysis of several large protein datasets across 28 species showed that proteins involved in regulation and execution of programmed cell death (PCD) possess substantial amounts of intrinsic disorder. Based on the comprehensive analysis of these datasets by a wide array of modern bioinformatics tools it was concluded that disordered regions of PCD-related proteins are involved in a multitude of biological functions and interactions with various partners, possess numerous posttranslational modification sites, and have specific evolutionary patterns (Peng et al. 2013). This study extends our previous work by providing information on the intrinsic disorder status of some of the major players of the three major PCD pathways: apoptosis, autophagy, and necroptosis. We also present a detailed description of the disorder status and interactomes of selected proteins that are involved in the p53-mediated apoptotic signaling pathways. PMID:24358900

  18. Functional Anthology of Intrinsic Disorder. II. Cellular Components, Domains, Technical Terms, Developmental Processes and Coding Sequence Diversities Correlated with Long Disordered Regions

    PubMed Central

    Vucetic, Slobodan; Xie, Hongbo; Iakoucheva, Lilia M.; Oldfield, Christopher J.; Dunker, A. Keith; Obradovic, Zoran; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2008-01-01

    Biologically active proteins without stable ordered structure (i.e., intrinsically disordered proteins) are attracting increased attention. Functional repertoires of ordered and disordered proteins are very different, and the ability to differentiate whether a given function is associated with intrinsic disorder or with a well-folded protein is crucial for modern protein science. However, there is a large gap between the number of proteins experimentally confirmed to be disordered and their actual number in nature. As a result, studies of functional properties of confirmed disordered proteins, while helpful in revealing the functional diversity of protein disorder, provide only a limited view. To overcome this problem, a bioinformatics approach for comprehensive study of functional roles of protein disorder was proposed in the first paper of this series (Xie H., Vucetic S., Iakoucheva L.M., Oldfield C.J., Dunker A.K., Obradovic Z., Uversky V.N. (2006) Functional anthology of intrinsic disorder. I. Biological processes and functions of proteins with long disordered regions. J. Proteome Res.). Applying this novel approach to Swiss-Prot sequences and functional keywords, we found over 238 and 302 keywords to be strongly positively or negatively correlated, respectively, with long intrinsically disordered regions. This paper describes ~90 Swiss-Prot keywords attributed to the cellular components, domains, technical terms, developmental processes and coding sequence diversities possessing strong positive and negative correlation with long disordered regions. PMID:17391015

  19. Major intrinsic proteins in biomimetic membranes.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Claus Hélix

    2010-01-01

    Biological membranes define the structural and functional boundaries in living cells and their organelles. The integrity of the cell depends on its ability to separate inside from outside and yet at the same time allow massive transport of matter in and out the cell. Nature has elegantly met this challenge by developing membranes in the form of lipid bilayers in which specialized transport proteins are incorporated. This raises the question: is it possible to mimic biological membranes and create a membrane based sensor and/or separation device? In the development of a biomimetic sensor/separation technology, a unique class of membrane transport proteins is especially interesting-the major intrinsic proteins (MIPs). Generally, MIPs conduct water molecules and selected solutes in and out of the cell while preventing the passage of other solutes, a property critical for the conservation of the cells internal pH and salt concentration. Also known as water channels or aquaporins they are highly efficient membrane pore proteins some of which are capable of transporting water at very high rates up to 10(9) molecules per second. Some MIPs transport other small, uncharged solutes, such as glycerol and other permeants such as carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, ammonia, hydrogen peroxide and the metalloids antimonite, arsenite, silicic and boric acid depending on the effective restriction mechanism of the protein. The flux properties of MIPs thus lead to the question ifMIPs can be used in separation devices or as sensor devices based on, e.g., the selective permeation of metalloids. In principle a MIP based membrane sensor/separation device requires the supporting biomimetic matrix to be virtually impermeable to anything but water or the solute in question. In practice, however, a biomimetic support matrix will generally have finite permeabilities to both electrolytes and non-electrolytes. The feasibility of a biomimetic MIP device thus depends on the relative transport

  20. TOP-IDP-Scale: A New Amino Acid Scale Measuring Propensity for Intrinsic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Campen, Andrew; Williams, Ryan M.; Brown, Celeste J.; Meng, Jingwei; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Dunker, A. Keith

    2009-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins carry out various biological functions while lacking ordered secondary and/or tertiary structure. In order to find general intrinsic properties of amino acid residues that are responsible for the absence of ordered structure in intrinsically disordered proteins we surveyed 517 amino acid scales. Each of these scales was taken as an independent attribute for the subsequent analysis. For a given attribute value X, which is averaged over a consecutive string of amino acids, and for a given data set having both ordered and disordered segments, the conditional probabilities P(so | x) and P(sd | x) for order and disorder, respectively, can be determined for all possible values of X. Plots of the conditional probabilities P(so | x) and P(sd | x) versus X give a pair of curves. The area between these two curves divided by the total area of the graph gives the area ratio value (ARV), which is proportional to the degree of separation of the two probability curves and, therefore, provides a measure of the given attribute’s power to discriminate between order and disorder. As ARV falls between zero and one, larger ARV corresponds to the better discrimination between order and disorder. Starting from the scale with the highest ARV, we applied a simulated annealing procedure to search for alternative scale values and have managed to increase the ARV by more than 10%. The ranking of the amino acids in this new TOP-IDP scale is as follows (from order promoting to disorder promoting): W, F, Y, I, M, L, V, N, C, T, A, G, R, D, H, Q, K, S, E, P. A web-based server has been created to apply the TOP-IDP scale to predict intrinsically disordered proteins (http://www.disprot.org/dev/disindex.php). PMID:18991772

  1. Structural transitions in the intrinsically disordered plant dehydration stress protein LEA7 upon drying are modulated by the presence of membranes.

    PubMed

    Popova, Antoaneta V; Hundertmark, Michaela; Seckler, Robert; Hincha, Dirk K

    2011-07-01

    Dehydration stress-related late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins have been found in plants, invertebrates and bacteria. Most LEA proteins are unstructured in solution, but some fold into amphipathic α-helices during drying. The Pfam LEA_4 (Group 3) protein LEA7 from the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana was predicted to be 87% α-helical, while CD spectroscopy showed it to be largely unstructured in solution and only 35% α-helical in the dry state. However, the dry protein contained 15% β-sheets. FTIR spectroscopy revealed the β-sheets to be largely due to aggregation. β-Sheet content was reduced and α-helix content increased when LEA7 was dried in the presence of liposomes with secondary structure apparently influenced by lipid composition. Secondary structure was also affected by the presence of membranes in the fully hydrated state. A temperature-induced increase in the flexibility of the dry protein was also only observed in the presence of membranes. Functional interactions of LEA7 with membranes in the dry state were indicated by its influence on the thermotropic phase transitions of the lipids and interactions with the lipid headgroup phosphates. PMID:21443857

  2. The intrinsically disordered protein LEA7 from Arabidopsis thaliana protects the isolated enzyme lactate dehydrogenase and enzymes in a soluble leaf proteome during freezing and drying.

    PubMed

    Popova, Antoaneta V; Rausch, Saskia; Hundertmark, Michaela; Gibon, Yves; Hincha, Dirk K

    2015-10-01

    The accumulation of Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins in plants is associated with tolerance against stresses such as freezing and desiccation. Two main functions have been attributed to LEA proteins: membrane stabilization and enzyme protection. We have hypothesized previously that LEA7 from Arabidopsis thaliana may stabilize membranes because it interacts with liposomes in the dry state. Here we show that LEA7, contrary to this expectation, did not stabilize liposomes during drying and rehydration. Instead, it partially preserved the activity of the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) during drying and freezing. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed no evidence of aggregation of LDH in the dry or rehydrated state under conditions that lead to complete loss of activity. To approximate the complex influence of intracellular conditions on the protective effects of a LEA protein in a convenient in-vitro assay, we measured the activity of two Arabidopsis enzymes (glucose-6-P dehydrogenase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase) in total soluble leaf protein extract (Arabidopsis soluble proteome, ASP) after drying and rehydration or freezing and thawing. LEA7 partially preserved the activity of both enzymes under these conditions, suggesting its role as an enzyme protectant in vivo. Further FTIR analyses indicated the partial reversibility of protein aggregation in the dry ASP during rehydration. Similarly, aggregation in the dry ASP was strongly reduced by LEA7. In addition, mixtures of LEA7 with sucrose or verbascose reduced aggregation more than the single additives, presumably through the effects of the protein on the H-bonding network of the sugar glasses. PMID:25988244

  3. Effects of Crowding and Environment on the Evolution of Conformational Ensembles of the Multi-Stimuli-Responsive Intrinsically Disordered Protein, Rec1-Resilin: A Small-Angle Scattering Investigation.

    PubMed

    Balu, Rajkamal; Mata, Jitendra P; Knott, Robert; Elvin, Christopher M; Hill, Anita J; Choudhury, Namita R; Dutta, Naba K

    2016-07-14

    In this study, we explore the overall structural ensembles and transitions of a biomimetic, multi-stimuli-responsive, intrinsically disordered protein (IDP), Rec1-resilin. The structural transition of Rec1-resilin with change in molecular crowding and environment is evaluated using small-angle neutron scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering. The quantitative analyses of the experimental scattering data using a combination of computational models allowed comprehensive description of the structural evolution, organization, and conformational ensembles of Rec1-resilin in response to the changes in concentration, pH, and temperature. Rec1-resilin in uncrowded solutions demonstrates the equilibrium intrinsic structure quality of an IDP with radius of gyration Rg ∼ 5 nm, and a scattering function for the triaxial ellipsoidal model best fit the experimental dataset. On crowding (increase in concentration >10 wt %), Rec1-resilin molecules exert intermolecular repulsive force of interaction, the Rg value reduces with a progressive increase in concentration, and molecular chains transform from a Gaussian coil to a fully swollen coil. It is also revealed that the structural organization of Rec1-resilin dynamically transforms from a rod (pH 2) to coil (pH 4.8) and to globular (pH 12) as a function of pH. The findings further support the temperature-triggered dual-phase-transition behavior of Rec1-resilin, exhibiting rod-shaped structural organization below the upper critical solution temperature (∼4 °C) and a large but compact structure above the lower critical solution temperature (∼75 °C). This work attempted to correlate unusual responsiveness of Rec1-resilin to the evolution of conformational ensembles. PMID:27281267

  4. Tonoplast-Bound Protein Kinase Phosphorylates Tonoplast Intrinsic Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kenneth D.; Chrispeels, Maarten J.

    1992-01-01

    Tonoplast intrinsic protein (TIP) is a member of a family of putative membrane channels found in bacteria, animals, and plants. Plants have seed-specific, vegetative/reproductive organ-specific, and water-stress-induced forms of TIP. Here, we report that the seed-specific TIP is a phosphoprotein whose phosphorylation can be monitored in vivo by allowing bean cotyledons to take up [32P]orthophosphate and in vitro by incubating purified tonoplasts with γ-labeled [32P]ATP. Characterization of the in vitro phosphorylation of TIP indicates that a membrane-bound protein kinase phosphorylates TIP in a Ca2+-dependent manner. The capacity of the isolated tonoplast membranes to phosphorylate TIP declined markedly during seed germination, and this decline occurred well before the development-mediated decrease in TIP occurs. Phosphoamino acid analysis of purified, radiolabeled TIP showed that serine is the major, if not only, phosphorylated residue, and cyanogen bromide cleavage yielded a single radioactive peptide peak on a reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatogram. Estimation of the molecular mass of the cyanogen bromide phosphopeptide by laser desorption mass spectroscopy led to its identification as the hydrophilic N-terminal domain of TIP. The putative phosphate-accepting serine residue occurs in a consensus phosphorylation site for serine/threonine protein kinases. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:16653198

  5. Phosphorylation in intrinsically disordered regions regulates the activity of Neurogenin2

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuronal differentiation is largely under the control of basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) proneural transcription factors that play key roles during development of the embryonic nervous system. In addition to well-characterised regulation of their expression, increasing evidence is emerging for additional post-translational regulation of proneural protein activity. Of particular interest is the bHLH proneural factor Neurogenin2 (Ngn2), which orchestrates progression from neural progenitor to differentiated neuron in several regions of the central nervous system. Previous studies have demonstrated a key role for cell cycle-dependent multi-site phosphorylation of Ngn2 protein at Serine-Proline (SP) sites for regulation of its neuronal differentiation activity, although the potential structural and functional consequences of phosphorylation at different regions of the protein are unclear. Results Here we characterise the role of phosphorylation of specific regions of Ngn2 on the stability of Ngn2 protein and on its neuronal differentiation activity in vivo in the developing embryo, demonstrating clearly that the location of SP sites is less important than the number of SP sites available for control of Ngn2 activity in vivo. We also provide structural evidence that Ngn2 contains large, intrinsically disordered regions that undergo phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks). Conclusions Phosphorylation of Ngn2 occurs in both the N- and C-terminal regions, either side of the conserved basic Helix-Loop-Helix domain. While these phosphorylation events do not change the intrinsic stability of Ngn2, phosphorylation on multiple sites acts to limit its ability to drive neuronal differentiation in vivo. Phosphorylated regions of Ngn2 are predicted to be intrinsically disordered and cdk-dependent phosphorylation of these intrinsically disordered regions contributes to Ngn2 regulation. PMID:25374254

  6. Expression, fermentation and purification of a predicted intrinsically disordered region of the transcription factor, NFAT5.

    PubMed

    DuMond, Jenna F; He, Yi; Burg, Maurice B; Ferraris, Joan D

    2015-11-01

    Hypertonicity stimulates Nuclear Factor of Activated T-cells 5 (NFAT5) nuclear localization and transactivating activity. Many transcription factors are known to contain intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) which become more structured with local environmental changes such as osmolality, temperature and tonicity. The transactivating domain of NFAT5 is predicted to be intrinsically disordered under normal tonicity, and under high NaCl, the activity of this domain is increased. To study the binding of co-regulatory proteins at IDRs a cDNA construct expressing the NFAT5 TAD was created and transformed into Escherichia coli cells. Transformed E. coli cells were mass produced by fermentation and extracted by cell lysis to release the NFAT5 TAD. The NFAT5 TAD was subsequently purified using a His-tag column, cation exchange chromatography as well as hydrophobic interaction chromatography and then characterized by mass spectrometry (MS). PMID:26256058

  7. Defining the Intrinsically Disordered C-Terminal Domain of SSB Reveals DNA-Mediated Compaction.

    PubMed

    Green, Matthew; Hatter, Louise; Brookes, Emre; Soultanas, Panos; Scott, David J

    2016-01-29

    The bacterial single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein SSB is a strictly conserved and essential protein involved in diverse functions of DNA metabolism, including replication and repair. SSB comprises a well-characterized tetrameric core of N-terminal oligonucleotide binding OB folds that bind ssDNA and four intrinsically disordered C-terminal domains of unknown structure that interact with partner proteins. The generally accepted, albeit speculative, mechanistic model in the field postulates that binding of ssDNA to the OB core induces the flexible, undefined C-terminal arms to expand outwards encouraging functional interactions with partner proteins. In this structural study, we show that the opposite is true. Combined small-angle scattering with X-rays and neutrons coupled to coarse-grained modeling reveal that the intrinsically disordered C-terminal arms are relatively collapsed around the tetrameric OB core and collapse further upon ssDNA binding. This implies a mechanism of action, in which the disordered C-terminal domain collapse traps the ssDNA and pulls functional partners onto the ssDNA. PMID:26707201

  8. An intrinsically disordered linker plays a critical role in bacterial cell division

    PubMed Central

    Buske, P. J.; Mittal, Anuradha; Pappu, Rohit V.; Levin, Petra Anne

    2014-01-01

    In bacteria, animals, fungi, and many single celled eukaryotes, division is initiated by the formation of a ring of cytoskeletal protein at the nascent division site. In bacteria, the tubulin-like GTPase FtsZ serves as the foundation for the cytokinetic ring. A conserved feature of FtsZ is an intrinsically disordered peptide known as the C-terminal linker. Chimeric experiments suggest the linker acts as a flexible boom allowing FtsZ to associate with the membrane through a conserved C-terminal domain and also modulates interactions both between FtsZ subunits and between FtsZ and modulatory proteins in the cytoplasm. PMID:25305578

  9. An intrinsically disordered linker plays a critical role in bacterial cell division.

    PubMed

    Buske, P J; Mittal, Anuradha; Pappu, Rohit V; Levin, Petra Anne

    2015-01-01

    In bacteria, animals, fungi, and many single celled eukaryotes, division is initiated by the formation of a ring of cytoskeletal protein at the nascent division site. In bacteria, the tubulin-like GTPase FtsZ serves as the foundation for the cytokinetic ring. A conserved feature of FtsZ is an intrinsically disordered peptide known as the C-terminal linker. Chimeric experiments suggest the linker acts as a flexible boom allowing FtsZ to associate with the membrane through a conserved C-terminal domain and also modulates interactions both between FtsZ subunits and between FtsZ and modulatory proteins in the cytoplasm. PMID:25305578

  10. The interplay of intrinsic disorder and macromolecular crowding on α-synuclein fibril formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, Nobu C.; Kikuchi, Macoto

    2016-02-01

    α-synuclein (α-syn) is an intrinsically disordered protein which is considered to be one of the causes of Parkinson's disease. This protein forms amyloid fibrils when in a highly concentrated solution. The fibril formation of α-syn is induced not only by increases in α-syn concentration but also by macromolecular crowding. In order to investigate the coupled effect of the intrinsic disorder of α-syn and macromolecular crowding, we construct a lattice gas model of α-syn in contact with a crowding agent reservoir based on statistical mechanics. The main assumption is that α-syn can be expressed as coarse-grained particles with internal states coupled with effective volume; and disordered states are modeled by larger particles with larger internal entropy than other states. Thanks to the simplicity of the model, we can exactly calculate the number of conformations of crowding agents, and this enables us to prove that the original grand canonical ensemble with a crowding agent reservoir is mathematically equivalent to a canonical ensemble without crowding agents. In this expression, the effect of macromolecular crowding is absorbed in the internal entropy of disordered states; it is clearly shown that the crowding effect reduces the internal entropy. Based on Monte Carlo simulation, we provide scenarios of crowding-induced fibril formation. We also discuss the recent controversy over the existence of helically folded tetramers of α-syn, and suggest that macromolecular crowding is the key to resolving the controversy.

  11. An intrinsic mechanism of secreted protein aging and turnover

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Won Ho; Aziz, Peter V.; Heithoff, Douglas M.; Mahan, Michael J.; Smith, Jeffrey W.; Marth, Jamey D.

    2015-01-01

    The composition and functions of the secreted proteome are controlled by the life spans of different proteins. However, unlike intracellular protein fate, intrinsic factors determining secreted protein aging and turnover have not been identified and characterized. Almost all secreted proteins are posttranslationally modified with the covalent attachment of N-glycans. We have discovered an intrinsic mechanism of secreted protein aging and turnover linked to the stepwise elimination of saccharides attached to the termini of N-glycans. Endogenous glycosidases, including neuraminidase 1 (Neu1), neuraminidase 3 (Neu3), beta-galactosidase 1 (Glb1), and hexosaminidase B (HexB), possess hydrolytic activities that temporally remodel N-glycan structures, progressively exposing different saccharides with increased protein age. Subsequently, endocytic lectins with distinct binding specificities, including the Ashwell–Morell receptor, integrin αM, and macrophage mannose receptor, are engaged in N-glycan ligand recognition and the turnover of secreted proteins. Glycosidase inhibition and lectin deficiencies increased protein life spans and abundance, and the basal rate of N-glycan remodeling varied among distinct proteins, accounting for differences in their life spans. This intrinsic multifactorial mechanism of secreted protein aging and turnover contributes to health and the outcomes of disease. PMID:26489654

  12. Fully reduced granulin-B is intrinsically disordered and displays concentration-dependent dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ghag, Gaurav; Wolf, Lauren M; Reed, Randi G; Van Der Munnik, Nicholas P; Mundoma, Claudius; Moss, Melissa A; Rangachari, Vijayaraghavan

    2016-05-01

    Granulins (Grns) are a family of small, cysteine-rich proteins that are generated upon proteolytic cleavage of their precursor, progranulin (Pgrn). All seven Grns (A-G) contain 12 conserved cysteines that form 6 intramolecular disulfide bonds, rendering this family of proteins unique. Grns are known to play multi-functional roles, including wound healing, embryonic growth, and inflammation and are implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. Despite their manifold functions, there exists a dearth of information regarding their structure-function relationship. Here, we sought to establish the role of disulfide bonds in promoting structure by investigating the fully reduced GrnB (rGrnB). We report that monomeric rGrnB is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) at low concentrations. rGrnB undergoes dimerization at higher concentrations to form a fuzzy complex without a net gain in the structure-a behavior increasingly identified as a hallmark of some IDPs. Interestingly, we show that rGrnB is also able to activate NF-κB in human neuroblastoma cells in a concentration-dependent manner. This activation correlates with the observed monomer-dimer dynamics. Collectively, the presented data establish that the intrinsic disorder of rGrnB governs conformational dynamics within the reduced form of the protein, and suggest that the overall structure of Grns could be entirely dictated by disulfide bonds. PMID:26957645

  13. Electrostatics and Intrinsic Disorder Drive Translocon Binding of the SRP Receptor FtsY.

    PubMed

    Lakomek, Nils-Alexander; Draycheva, Albena; Bornemann, Thomas; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    Integral membrane proteins in bacteria are co-translationally targeted to the SecYEG translocon for membrane insertion via the signal recognition particle (SRP) pathway. The SRP receptor FtsY and its N-terminal A domain, which is lacking in any structural model of FtsY, were studied using NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy. The A domain is mainly disordered and highly flexible; it binds to lipids via its N terminus and the C-terminal membrane targeting sequence. The central A domain binds to the translocon non-specifically and maintains disorder. Translocon targeting and binding of the A domain is driven by electrostatic interactions. The intrinsically disordered A domain tethers FtsY to the translocon, and because of its flexibility, allows the FtsY NG domain to scan a large area for binding to the NG domain of ribosome-bound SRP, thereby promoting the formation of the quaternary transfer complex at the membrane. PMID:27346853

  14. The Intrinsic Geometric Structure of Protein-Protein Interaction Networks for Protein Interaction Prediction.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yi; Sun, Mengtian; Dai, Guoxian; Ramain, Karthik

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in high-throughput technologies for measuring protein-protein interaction (PPI) have profoundly advanced our ability to systematically infer protein function and regulation. However, inherently high false positive and false negative rates in measurement have posed great challenges in computational approaches for the prediction of PPI. A good PPI predictor should be 1) resistant to high rate of missing and spurious PPIs, and 2) robust against incompleteness of observed PPI networks. To predict PPI in a network, we developed an intrinsic geometry structure (IGS) for network, which exploits the intrinsic and hidden relationship among proteins in network through a heat diffusion process. In this process, all explicit PPIs participate simultaneously to glue local infinitesimal and noisy experimental interaction data to generate a global macroscopic descriptions about relationships among proteins. The revealed implicit relationship can be interpreted as the probability of two proteins interacting with each other. The revealed relationship is intrinsic and robust against individual, local and explicit protein interactions in the original network. We apply our approach to publicly available PPI network data for the evaluation of the performance of PPI prediction. Experimental results indicate that, under different levels of the missing and spurious PPIs, IGS is able to robustly exploit the intrinsic and hidden relationship for PPI prediction with a higher sensitivity and specificity compared to that of recently proposed methods. PMID:26886733

  15. Intrinsic structural disorder of mouse proNGF.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Francesca; Covaceuszach, Sonia; Konarev, Peter V; Gonfloni, Stefania; Malerba, Francesca; Schwarz, Elisabeth; Svergun, Dmitri I; Cattaneo, Antonino; Lamba, Doriano

    2009-06-01

    The unprocessed precursor of the Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), proNGF, has additional functions, besides its initially described role as a chaperone for NGF folding. The precursor protein endows apoptotic and/or neurotrophic properties, in contrast to the mature part. The structural and molecular basis for such distinct activities are presently unknown. Aiming to gain insights into the specific molecular interactions that govern rm-proNGF biological activities versus those of its mature counterpart, a structural study by synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) in solution was carried out. The different binding properties of the two proteins were investigated by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) using, as structural probes, a panel of anti-NGF antibodies and the soluble forms of TrkA and p75(NTR) receptors. SAXS measurements revealed the rm-proNGF to be dimeric and anisometric, with the propeptide domain being intrinsically unstructured. Ab initio reconstructions assuming twofold symmetry generated two types of structural models, a globular "crab-like" and an elongated shape that resulted in equally good fits of the scattering data. A novel method accounting for possible coexistence of different conformations contributing to the experimental scattering pattern, with no symmetry constraints, suggests the "crab-like" to be a more likely proNGF conformation. To exploit the potential of chemical stabilizers affecting the existing conformational protein populations, SAXS data were also collected in the presence of ammonium sulphate. An increase of the proNGF compactness was observed. SPR data pinpoints that the propeptide of proNGF may act as an intrinsically unstructured protein domain, characterized by a molecular promiscuity in the interaction/binding to multiple partners (TrkA and p75(NTR) receptors and a panel of neutralizing anti-NGF antibodies) depending on the physiological conditions of the cell. These data provide a first insight into the structural basis

  16. Disordered regions in transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Tusnády, Gábor E; Dobson, László; Tompa, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The functions of transmembrane proteins in living cells are widespread; they range from various transport processes to energy production, from cell-cell adhesion to communication. Structurally, they are highly ordered in their membrane-spanning regions, but may contain disordered regions in the cytosolic and extra-cytosolic parts. In this study, we have investigated the disordered regions in transmembrane proteins by a stringent definition of disordered residues on the currently available largest experimental dataset, and show a significant correlation between the spatial distributions of positively charged residues and disordered regions. This finding suggests a new role of disordered regions in transmembrane proteins by providing structural flexibility for stabilizing interactions with negatively charged head groups of the lipid molecules. We also find a preference of structural disorder in the terminal--as opposed to loop--regions in transmembrane proteins, and survey the respective functions involved in recruiting other proteins or mediating allosteric signaling effects. Finally, we critically compare disorder prediction methods on our transmembrane protein set. While there are no major differences between these methods using the usual statistics, such as per residue accuracies, Matthew's correlation coefficients, etc.; substantial differences can be found regarding the spatial distribution of the predicted disordered regions. We conclude that a predictor optimized for transmembrane proteins would be of high value to the field of structural disorder. PMID:26275590

  17. Disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Swastik; Bykova, Elena; Dey, Somnath; Ali, Sk Imran; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; van Smaalen, Sander

    2016-01-01

    A unique combination of useful properties in boron-carbide, such as extreme hardness, excellent fracture toughness, a low density, a high melting point, thermoelectricity, semi-conducting behavior, catalytic activity and a remarkably good chemical stability, makes it an ideal material for a wide range of technological applications. Explaining these properties in terms of chemical bonding has remained a major challenge in boron chemistry. Here we report the synthesis of fully ordered, stoichiometric boron-carbide B13C2 by high-pressure–high-temperature techniques. Our experimental electron-density study using high-resolution single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data conclusively demonstrates that disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide, contrary to what was hitherto supposed. A detailed analysis of the electron density distribution reveals charge transfer between structural units in B13C2 and a new type of electron-deficient bond with formally unpaired electrons on the C–B–C group in B13C2. Unprecedented bonding features contribute to the fundamental chemistry and materials science of boron compounds that is of great interest for understanding structure-property relationships and development of novel functional materials. PMID:26777140

  18. Disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Swastik; Bykova, Elena; Dey, Somnath; Ali, Sk Imran; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; van Smaalen, Sander

    2016-01-01

    A unique combination of useful properties in boron-carbide, such as extreme hardness, excellent fracture toughness, a low density, a high melting point, thermoelectricity, semi-conducting behavior, catalytic activity and a remarkably good chemical stability, makes it an ideal material for a wide range of technological applications. Explaining these properties in terms of chemical bonding has remained a major challenge in boron chemistry. Here we report the synthesis of fully ordered, stoichiometric boron-carbide B13C2 by high-pressure-high-temperature techniques. Our experimental electron-density study using high-resolution single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data conclusively demonstrates that disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide, contrary to what was hitherto supposed. A detailed analysis of the electron density distribution reveals charge transfer between structural units in B13C2 and a new type of electron-deficient bond with formally unpaired electrons on the C-B-C group in B13C2. Unprecedented bonding features contribute to the fundamental chemistry and materials science of boron compounds that is of great interest for understanding structure-property relationships and development of novel functional materials.

  19. Disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Swastik; Bykova, Elena; Dey, Somnath; Ali, Sk Imran; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; van Smaalen, Sander

    2016-01-01

    A unique combination of useful properties in boron-carbide, such as extreme hardness, excellent fracture toughness, a low density, a high melting point, thermoelectricity, semi-conducting behavior, catalytic activity and a remarkably good chemical stability, makes it an ideal material for a wide range of technological applications. Explaining these properties in terms of chemical bonding has remained a major challenge in boron chemistry. Here we report the synthesis of fully ordered, stoichiometric boron-carbide B13C2 by high-pressure-high-temperature techniques. Our experimental electron-density study using high-resolution single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data conclusively demonstrates that disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide, contrary to what was hitherto supposed. A detailed analysis of the electron density distribution reveals charge transfer between structural units in B13C2 and a new type of electron-deficient bond with formally unpaired electrons on the C-B-C group in B13C2. Unprecedented bonding features contribute to the fundamental chemistry and materials science of boron compounds that is of great interest for understanding structure-property relationships and development of novel functional materials. PMID:26777140

  20. The inverted free energy landscape of an intrinsically disordered peptide by simulations and experiments.

    PubMed

    Granata, Daniele; Baftizadeh, Fahimeh; Habchi, Johnny; Galvagnion, Celine; De Simone, Alfonso; Camilloni, Carlo; Laio, Alessandro; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The free energy landscape theory has been very successful in rationalizing the folding behaviour of globular proteins, as this representation provides intuitive information on the number of states involved in the folding process, their populations and pathways of interconversion. We extend here this formalism to the case of the Aβ40 peptide, a 40-residue intrinsically disordered protein fragment associated with Alzheimer's disease. By using an advanced sampling technique that enables free energy calculations to reach convergence also in the case of highly disordered states of proteins, we provide a precise structural characterization of the free energy landscape of this peptide. We find that such landscape has inverted features with respect to those typical of folded proteins. While the global free energy minimum consists of highly disordered structures, higher free energy regions correspond to a large variety of transiently structured conformations with secondary structure elements arranged in several different manners, and are not separated from each other by sizeable free energy barriers. From this peculiar structure of the free energy landscape we predict that this peptide should become more structured and not only more compact, with increasing temperatures, and we show that this is the case through a series of biophysical measurements. PMID:26498066

  1. The inverted free energy landscape of an intrinsically disordered peptide by simulations and experiments

    PubMed Central

    Granata, Daniele; Baftizadeh, Fahimeh; Habchi, Johnny; Galvagnion, Celine; De Simone, Alfonso; Camilloni, Carlo; Laio, Alessandro; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The free energy landscape theory has been very successful in rationalizing the folding behaviour of globular proteins, as this representation provides intuitive information on the number of states involved in the folding process, their populations and pathways of interconversion. We extend here this formalism to the case of the Aβ40 peptide, a 40-residue intrinsically disordered protein fragment associated with Alzheimer’s disease. By using an advanced sampling technique that enables free energy calculations to reach convergence also in the case of highly disordered states of proteins, we provide a precise structural characterization of the free energy landscape of this peptide. We find that such landscape has inverted features with respect to those typical of folded proteins. While the global free energy minimum consists of highly disordered structures, higher free energy regions correspond to a large variety of transiently structured conformations with secondary structure elements arranged in several different manners, and are not separated from each other by sizeable free energy barriers. From this peculiar structure of the free energy landscape we predict that this peptide should become more structured and not only more compact, with increasing temperatures, and we show that this is the case through a series of biophysical measurements. PMID:26498066

  2. Intrinsically disordered amphiphilic peptides as potential targets in drug delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Vincenzi, Marian; Accardo, Antonella; Costantini, Susan; Scala, Stefania; Portella, Luigi; Trotta, Annamaria; Ronga, Luisa; Guillon, Jean; Leone, Marilisa; Colonna, Giovanni; Rossi, Filomena; Tesauro, Diego

    2015-11-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins/peptides play a crucial role in many physiological and pathological events and may assume a precise conformation upon binding to a specific target. Recently, we have described the conformational and functional properties of two linear ester peptides provided with the following sequences: Y-G-E-C-P-C-K-OAllyl (PepK) and Y-G-E-C-P-C-E-OAllyl (PepE). Both peptides are characterized by the presence of the "CPC" motif together with a few amino acids able to promote disorder. The CPC sequence is a binding motif for the CXCR4 receptor that represents a well-known target for cancer therapies. In this paper, we report on synthetic amphiphilic peptides that consist of lipophilic derivatives of PepE and PepK bearing two stearic alkyl chains and/or an ethoxylic spacer. These peptide amphiphiles form stable supramolecular aggregates; they present conformational features that are typical of intrinsically disordered molecules as shown by CD spectroscopy. Solution fluorescence and DLS studies have been performed to evaluate Critical Micellar Concentrations and the dimension of supramolecular aggregates. Moreover, preliminary in vitro cell-based assays have been conducted to investigate the molecular recognition processes involving the CXCR4 receptor. In the end, the results obtained have been compared with the previous data generated by the corresponding non-amphiphilic peptides (PepE and PepK). PMID:26263446

  3. Native globular actin has a thermodynamically unstable quasi-stationary structure with elements of intrinsic disorder.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Irina M; Povarova, Olga I; Uversky, Vladimir N; Turoverov, Konstantin K

    2016-02-01

    The native form of globular actin, G-actin, is formed in vivo as a result of complex post-translational folding processes that require ATP energy expenditure and are assisted by the 70 kDa heat shock protein, prefoldin and chaperonin containing TCP-1. G-actin is stabilized by the binding of one ATP molecule and one Ca(2+) ion (or Mg(2+) in vivo). Chemical denaturants, heating or Ca(2+) removal transform native actin (N) into 'inactivated actin' (I), a compact oligomer comprising 14-16 subunits. Viscogenic and crowding agents slow this process but do not stop it. The lack of calcium in the solution accelerates the spontaneous N → I transition. Thus, native G-actin has a kinetically stable (as a result of the high free energy barrier between the N and I states) but thermodynamically unstable structure, which, in the absence of Ca(2+) or other bivalent metal ions, spontaneously converts to the thermodynamically stable I state. It was noted that native actin has much in common with intrinsically disordered proteins: it has functionally important disordered regions; it is constantly in complex with one of its numerous partners; and it plays key roles in many cellular processes, in a manner similar to disordered hub proteins. By analyzing actin folding in vivo and unfolding in vitro, we advanced the hypothesis that proteins in a native state may have a thermodynamically unstable quasi-stationary structure. The kinetically stable native state of these proteins appears forcibly under the influence of intracellular folding machinery. The denaturation of such proteins is always irreversible because the inactivated state, for which the structure is determined by the amino acid sequence of a protein, comprises the thermodynamically stable state under physiological conditions. PMID:26460158

  4. Minute Time Scale Prolyl Isomerization Governs Antibody Recognition of an Intrinsically Disordered Immunodominant Epitope*

    PubMed Central

    Fassolari, Marisol; Chemes, Lucia B.; Gallo, Mariana; Smal, Clara; Sánchez, Ignacio E.; de Prat-Gay, Gonzalo

    2013-01-01

    Conformational rearrangements in antibody·antigen recognition are essential events where kinetic discrimination of isomers expands the universe of combinations. We investigated the interaction mechanism of a monoclonal antibody, M1, raised against E7 from human papillomavirus, a prototypic viral oncoprotein and a model intrinsically disordered protein. The mapped 12-amino acid immunodominant epitope lies within a “hinge” region between the N-terminal intrinsically disordered and the C-terminal globular domains. Kinetic experiments show that despite being within an intrinsically disordered region, the hinge E7 epitope has at least two populations separated by a high energy barrier. Nuclear magnetic resonance traced the origin of this barrier to a very slow (t½ ∼4 min) trans-cis prolyl isomerization event involving changes in secondary structure. The less populated (10%) cis isomer is the binding-competent species, thus requiring the 90% of molecules in the trans configuration to isomerize before binding. The association rate for the cis isomer approaches 6 × 107 m−1 s−1, a ceiling for antigen-antibody interactions. Mutagenesis experiments showed that Pro-41 in E7Ep was required for both binding and isomerization. After a slow postbinding unimolecular rearrangement, a consolidated complex with KD = 1.2 × 10−7 m is reached. Our results suggest that presentation of this viral epitope by the antigen-presenting cells would have to be “locked” in the cis conformation, in opposition to the most populated trans isomer, in order to select the specific antibody clone that goes through affinity and kinetic maturation. PMID:23504368

  5. Conformational Dissection of a Viral Intrinsically Disordered Domain Involved in Cellular Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Perrone, Sebastián; Salvay, Andres G.; Chemes, Lucía B.; de Prat-Gay, Gonzalo

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsic disorder is abundant in viral genomes and provides conformational plasticity to its protein products. In order to gain insight into its structure-function relationships, we carried out a comprehensive analysis of structural propensities within the intrinsically disordered N-terminal domain from the human papillomavirus type-16 E7 oncoprotein (E7N). Two E7N segments located within the conserved CR1 and CR2 regions present transient α-helix structure. The helix in the CR1 region spans residues L8 to L13 and overlaps with the E2F mimic linear motif. The second helix, located within the highly acidic CR2 region, presents a pH-dependent structural transition. At neutral pH the helix spans residues P17 to N29, which include the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor LxCxE binding motif (residues 21–29), while the acidic CKII-PEST region spanning residues E33 to I38 populates polyproline type II (PII) structure. At pH 5.0, the CR2 helix propagates up to residue I38 at the expense of loss of PII due to charge neutralization of acidic residues. Using truncated forms of HPV-16 E7, we confirmed that pH-induced changes in α-helix content are governed by the intrinsically disordered E7N domain. Interestingly, while at both pH the region encompassing the LxCxE motif adopts α-helical structure, the isolated 21–29 fragment including this stretch is unable to populate an α-helix even at high TFE concentrations. Thus, the E7N domain can populate dynamic but discrete structural ensembles by sampling α-helix-coil-PII-ß-sheet structures. This high plasticity may modulate the exposure of linear binding motifs responsible for its multi-target binding properties, leading to interference with key cell signaling pathways and eventually to cellular transformation by the virus. PMID:24086265

  6. Intrinsic Disorder to Order Transitions in the Scaffold Phosphoprotein P from the Respiratory Syncytial Virus RNA Polymerase Complex.

    PubMed

    Noval, María G; Esperante, Sebastian A; Molina, Ivana G; Chemes, Lucía B; Prat-Gay, Gonzalo de

    2016-03-15

    Intrinsic disorder is at the center of biochemical regulation and is particularly overrepresented among the often multifunctional viral proteins. Replication and transcription of the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) relies on a RNA polymerase complex with a phosphoprotein cofactor P as the structural scaffold, which consists of a four-helix bundle tetramerization domain flanked by two domains predicted to be intrinsically disordered. Because intrinsic disorder cannot be reduced to a defined atomic structure, we tackled the experimental dissection of the disorder-order transitions of P by a domain fragmentation approach. P remains as a tetramer above 70 °C but shows a pronounced reversible secondary structure transition between 10 and 60 °C. While the N-terminal module behaves as a random coil-like IDP in a manner independent of tetramerization, the isolated C-terminal module displays a cooperative and reversible metastable transition. When linked to the tetramerization domain, the C-terminal module becomes markedly more structured and stable, with strong ANS binding. Therefore, the tertiary structure in the C-terminal module is not compact, conferring "late" molten globule-like IDP properties, stabilized by interactions favored by tetramerization. The presence of a folded structure highly sensitive to temperature, reversibly and almost instantly formed and broken, suggests a temperature sensing activity. The marginal stability allows for exposure of protein binding sites, offering a thermodynamic and kinetic fine-tuning in order-disorder transitions, essential for the assembly and function of the RSV RNA polymerase complex. PMID:26901160

  7. The effect of chirality and steric hindrance on intrinsic backbone conformational propensities: tools for protein design.

    PubMed

    Childers, Matthew Carter; Towse, Clare-Louise; Daggett, Valerie

    2016-07-01

    The conformational propensities of amino acids are an amalgamation of sequence effects, environmental effects and underlying intrinsic behavior. Many have attempted to investigate neighboring residue effects to aid in our understanding of protein folding and improve structure prediction efforts, especially with respect to difficult to characterize states, such as disordered or unfolded states. Host-guest peptide series are a useful tool in examining the propensities of the amino acids free from the surrounding protein structure. Here, we compare the distributions of the backbone dihedral angles (φ/ψ) of the 20 proteogenic amino acids in two different sequence contexts using the AAXAA and GGXGG host-guest pentapeptide series. We further examine their intrinsic behaviors across three environmental contexts: water at 298 K, water at 498 K, and 8 M urea at 298 K. The GGXGG systems provide the intrinsic amino acid propensities devoid of any conformational context. The alanine residues in the AAXAA series enforce backbone chirality, thereby providing a model of the intrinsic behavior of amino acids in a protein chain. Our results show modest differences in φ/ψ distributions due to the steric constraints of the Ala side chains, the magnitudes of which are dependent on the denaturing conditions. One of the strongest factors modulating φ/ψ distributions was the protonation of titratable side chains, and the largest differences observed were in the amino acid propensities for the rarely sampled αL region. PMID:27284086

  8. SilE is an intrinsically disordered periplasmic "molecular sponge" involved in bacterial silver resistance.

    PubMed

    Asiani, Karishma R; Williams, Huw; Bird, Louise; Jenner, Matthew; Searle, Mark S; Hobman, Jon L; Scott, David J; Soultanas, Panos

    2016-09-01

    Ag(+) resistance was initially found on the Salmonella enetrica serovar Typhimurium multi-resistance plasmid pMG101 from burns patients in 1975. The putative model of Ag(+) resistance, encoded by the sil operon from pMG101, involves export of Ag(+) via an ATPase (SilP), an effluxer complex (SilCFBA) and a periplasmic chaperon of Ag(+) (SilE). SilE is predicted to be intrinsically disordered. We tested this hypothesis using structural and biophysical studies and show that SilE is an intrinsically disordered protein in its free apo-form but folds to a compact structure upon optimal binding to six Ag(+) ions in its holo-form. Sequence analyses and site-directed mutagenesis established the importance of histidine and methionine containing motifs for Ag(+) -binding, and identified a nucleation core that initiates Ag(+) -mediated folding of SilE. We conclude that SilE is a molecular sponge for absorbing metal ions. PMID:27085056

  9. Mechanism and rate constants of the Cdc42 GTPase binding with intrinsically disordered effectors.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2016-05-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are often involved in signaling and regulatory functions, through binding to cellular targets. Many IDPs undergo disorder-to-order transitions upon binding. Both the binding mechanisms and the magnitudes of the binding rate constants can have functional importance. Previously we have found that the coupled binding and folding of any IDP generally follows a sequential mechanism that we term dock-and-coalesce, whereby one segment of the IDP first docks to its subsite on the target surface and the remaining segments subsequently coalesce around their respective subsites. Here we applied our TransComp method within the framework of the dock-and-coalesce mechanism to dissect the binding kinetics of two Rho-family GTPases, Cdc42 and TC10, with two intrinsically disordered effectors, WASP and Pak1. TransComp calculations identified the basic regions preceding the GTPase binding domains (GBDs) of the effectors as the docking segment. For Cdc42 binding with both WASP and Pak1, the calculated docking rate constants are close to the observed overall binding rate constants, suggesting that basic-region docking is the rate-limiting step and subsequent conformational coalescence of the GBDs on the Cdc42 surface is fast. The possibility that conformational coalescence of the WASP GBD on the TC10 surface is slow warrants further experimental investigation. The account for the differences in binding rate constants among the three GTPase-effector systems and mutational effects therein yields deep physical and mechanistic insight into the binding processes. Our approach may guide the selection of mutations that lead to redesigned binding pathways. Proteins 2016; 84:674-685. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26879470

  10. Isolating Intrinsic Processing Disorders from Second Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lock, Robin H.; Layton, Carol A.

    2002-01-01

    Evaluation of the validity of the Learning Disabilities Diagnostic Inventory with limited-English-proficient (LEP) students in grades 2-7 found that nondisabled LEP students were over-identified as having intrinsic processing deficits. Examination of individual student protocols highlighted the need to train teacher-raters in language acquisition…