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  1. A systems biology approach to invasive behavior: comparing cancer metastasis and suburban sprawl development

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite constant progress, cancer remains the second leading cause of death in the United States. The ability of tumors to metastasize is central to this dilemma, as many studies demonstrate successful treatment correlating to diagnosis prior to cancer spread. Hence a better understanding of cancer invasiveness and metastasis could provide critical insight. Presentation of the hypothesis We hypothesize that a systems biology-based comparison of cancer invasiveness and suburban sprawl will reveal similarities that are instructive. Testing the hypothesis We compare the structure and behavior of invasive cancer to suburban sprawl development. While these two systems differ vastly in dimension, they appear to adhere to scale-invariant laws consistent with invasive behavior in general. We demonstrate that cancer and sprawl have striking similarities in their natural history, initiating factors, patterns of invasion, vessel distribution and even methods of causing death. Implications of the hypothesis We propose that metastatic cancer and suburban sprawl provide striking analogs in invasive behavior, to the extent that conclusions from one system could be predictive of behavior in the other. We suggest ways in which this model could be used to advance our understanding of cancer biology and treatment. PMID:20181145

  2. Cadherin-11 Promotes Invasive Behavior of Fibroblast-like Synoviocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kiener, Hans P.; Niederreiter, Birgit; Lee, David M.; Jimenez-Boj, Esther; Smolen, Josef S.; Brenner, Michael B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To define the expression pattern of cadherin-11 in destructive pannus tissue of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and to determine if cadherin-11 expression in fibroblast-like synoviocytes controls their invasive capacity. Methods Cadherin-11 expression in rheumatoid synovial tissue was evaluated using immunohistochemistry. To examine the role of cadherin-11 in regulating the invasive behavior of fibroblast-like synoviocytes, we generated L-cell clones expressing wild-type cadherin-11, mutant cadherin-11, and empty vector transfected controls. The invasive capacity of L-cell transfectants and cultured fibroblast-like synoviocytes treated with a blocking cadherin-11-Fc protein or control immunoglobulin was determined in Matrigel invasion assays. Results Immunohistochemistry revealed that cadherin-11 is abundantly expressed in cells at the cartilage-pannus junction in rheumatoid synovitis. Invasion assays demonstrate a twofold increased invasive capacity of cadherin-11 transfected L-cells compared to L-cells transfected with E-cadherin or control vector. The invasive behavior of the L-cells stably transfected with a cadherin-11 construct that lacked the juxta-membrane cytoplasmic domain (cadherin-11 ΔJMD) was diminished to the level of vector control L-cells. Further, treatment with the cadherin-11-Fc fusion protein diminished the invasive capacity of fibroblast-like synoviocytes. Conclusion These in vitro studies implicate a role for cadherin-11 in promoting cell invasion and contribute insight into the invasive nature of fibroblast-like synoviocytes in chronic synovitis and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:19404963

  3. The cytoskeleton significantly impacts invasive behavior of biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, Anatol; Käs, Josef; Seltman, Kristin; Magin, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Cell migration is a key determinant of cancer metastasis and nerve regeneration. The role of the cytoskeleton for the epithelial-meschenymal transition (EMT), i.e, for invasive behavior of cells, is only partially understood. Here, we address this issue in cells lacking all keratins upon genome engineering. In contrast to prediction, keratin-free cells show a 60% higher deformability compared to less pronounced softening effects for actin depolymerization. To relate these findings with functional consequences, we use invasion and three-dimensional growth assays. These reveal higher invasiveness of keratin-free cells. This study supports the view that downregulation of keratins observed during EMT directly contributes to the migratory and invasive behavior of tumor cells. Cancer cells that effectively move through tissues are softer and more contractile than cells that stay local in tissues. Soft and contractile avoids jamming. Naturally, softness has to have its limits. So neuronal growth cones are too soft to carry large loads to move efficiently through scar tissue, which is required for nerve regeneration. In synopsis, the physical bounds that the functional modules of a moving cell experience in tissues may provide an overarching motif for novel approaches in diagnosis and therapy.

  4. Behavioral flexibility and problem solving in an invasive bird

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral flexibility is considered an important trait for adapting to environmental change, but it is unclear what it is, how it works, and whether it is a problem solving ability. I investigated behavioral flexibility and problem solving experimentally in great-tailed grackles, an invasive bird species and thus a likely candidate for possessing behavioral flexibility. Grackles demonstrated behavioral flexibility in two contexts, the Aesop’s Fable paradigm and a color association test. Contrary to predictions, behavioral flexibility did not correlate across contexts. Four out of 6 grackles exhibited efficient problem solving abilities, but problem solving efficiency did not appear to be directly linked with behavioral flexibility. Problem solving speed also did not significantly correlate with reversal learning scores, indicating that faster learners were not the most flexible. These results reveal how little we know about behavioral flexibility, and provide an immense opportunity for future research to explore how individuals and species can use behavior to react to changing environments. PMID:27168984

  5. Behavioral flexibility in an invasive bird is independent of other behaviors.

    PubMed

    Logan, Corina J

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral flexibility is considered important for a species to adapt to environmental change. However, it is unclear how behavioral flexibility works: it relates to problem solving ability and speed in unpredictable ways, which leaves an open question of whether behavioral flexibility varies with differences in other behaviors. If present, such correlations would mask which behavior causes individuals to vary. I investigated whether behavioral flexibility (reversal learning) performances were linked with other behaviors in great-tailed grackles, an invasive bird. I found that behavioral flexibility did not significantly correlate with neophobia, exploration, risk aversion, persistence, or motor diversity. This suggests that great-tailed grackle performance in behavioral flexibility tasks reflects a distinct source of individual variation. Maintaining multiple distinct sources of individual variation, and particularly variation in behavioral flexibility, may be a mechanism for coping with the diversity of novel elements in their environments and facilitate this species' invasion success. PMID:27478705

  6. Behavioral flexibility in an invasive bird is independent of other behaviors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral flexibility is considered important for a species to adapt to environmental change. However, it is unclear how behavioral flexibility works: it relates to problem solving ability and speed in unpredictable ways, which leaves an open question of whether behavioral flexibility varies with differences in other behaviors. If present, such correlations would mask which behavior causes individuals to vary. I investigated whether behavioral flexibility (reversal learning) performances were linked with other behaviors in great-tailed grackles, an invasive bird. I found that behavioral flexibility did not significantly correlate with neophobia, exploration, risk aversion, persistence, or motor diversity. This suggests that great-tailed grackle performance in behavioral flexibility tasks reflects a distinct source of individual variation. Maintaining multiple distinct sources of individual variation, and particularly variation in behavioral flexibility, may be a mechanism for coping with the diversity of novel elements in their environments and facilitate this species’ invasion success. PMID:27478705

  7. Comparative Patterns of Plant Invasions in the Mediterranean Biome

    PubMed Central

    Arianoutsou, Margarita; Delipetrou, Pinelopi; Vilà, Montserrat; Dimitrakopoulos, Panayiotis G.; Celesti-Grapow, Laura; Wardell-Johnson, Grant; Henderson, Lesley; Fuentes, Nicol; Ugarte-Mendes, Eduardo; Rundel, Philip W.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work was to compare and contrast the patterns of alien plant invasions in the world’s five mediterranean-climate regions (MCRs). We expected landscape age and disturbance history to have bearing on levels of invasion. We assembled a database on naturalized alien plant taxa occurring in natural and semi-natural terrestrial habitats of all five regions (specifically Spain, Italy, Greece and Cyprus from the Mediterranean Basin, California, central Chile, the Cape Region of South Africa and Southwestern - SW Australia). We used multivariate (hierarchical clustering and NMDS ordination) trait and habitat analysis to compare characteristics of regions, taxa and habitats across the mediterranean biome. Our database included 1627 naturalized species with an overall low taxonomic similarity among the five MCRs. Herbaceous perennials were the most frequent taxa, with SW Australia exhibiting both the highest numbers of naturalized species and the highest taxonomic similarity (homogenization) among habitats, and the Mediterranean Basin the lowest. Low stress and highly disturbed habitats had the highest frequency of invasion and homogenization in all regions, and high natural stress habitats the lowest, while taxonomic similarity was higher among different habitats in each region than among regions. Our analysis is the first to describe patterns of species characteristics and habitat vulnerability for a single biome. We have shown that a broad niche (i.e. more than one habitat) is typical of naturalized plant species, regardless of their geographical area of origin, leading to potential for high homogenization within each region. Habitats of the Mediterranean Basin are apparently the most resistant to plant invasion, possibly because their landscapes are generally of relatively recent origin, but with a more gradual exposure to human intervention over a longer period. PMID:24244443

  8. Comparative proteomic analysis of ductal and lobular invasive breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, N C S; Gomig, T H B; Milioli, H H; Cordeiro, F; Costa, G G; Urban, C A; Lima, R S; Cavalli, I J; Ribeiro, E M S F

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide and the first among women. Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) are the two major histological subtypes, and the clinical and molecular differences between them justify the search for new markers to distinguish them. As proteomic analysis allows for a powerful and analytical approach to identify potential biomarkers, we performed a comparative analysis of IDC and ILC samples by using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Twenty-three spots were identified corresponding to 10 proteins differentially expressed between the two subtypes. ACTB, ACTG, TPM3, TBA1A, TBA1B, VIME, TPIS, PDIA3, PDIA6, and VTDB were upregulated in ductal carcinoma compared to in lobular carcinoma samples. Overall, these 10 proteins have a key role in oncogenesis. Their specific functions and relevance in cancer initiation and progression are further discussed in this study. The identified peptides represent promising biomarkers for the differentiation of ductal and lobular breast cancer subtypes, and for future interventions based on tailored therapy. PMID:27173185

  9. Unique behavior of Trypanosoma dionisii interacting with mammalian cells: invasion, intracellular growth, and nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Miriam Pires de Castro; Cortez, Mauro; Maeda, Fernando Yukio; Fernandes, Maria Cecilia; Haapalainen, Edna Freymuller; Yoshida, Nobuko; Mortara, Renato Arruda

    2009-04-01

    The phylogenetic proximity between Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum) dionisii suggests that these parasites might explore similar strategies to complete their life cycles. T. cruzi is the etiological agent of the life-threatening Chagas' disease, whereas T. dionisii is a bat trypanosome and probably not capable of infecting humans. Here we sought to compare mammalian cell invasion and intracellular traffic of both trypanosomes and determine the differences and similarities in this process. The results presented demonstrate that T. dionisii is highly infective in vitro, particularly when the infection process occurs without serum and that the invasion is similarly affected by agents known to interfere with T. cruzi invasion process. Our results indicate that the formation of lysosomal-enriched compartments is part of a cell-invasion mechanism retained by related trypanosomatids, and that residence and further escape from a lysosomal compartment may be a common requisite for successful infection. During intracellular growth, parasites share a few epitopes with T. cruzi amastigotes and trypomastigotes. Unexpectedly, in heavily infected cells, amastigotes and trypomastigotes were found inside the host cell nucleus. These findings suggest that T. dionisii, although sharing some features in host cell invasion with T. cruzi, has unique behaviors that deserve to be further explored. PMID:19283898

  10. Experimental evidence of impacts of an invasive parakeet on foraging behavior of native birds.

    PubMed

    Peck, Hannah L; Pringle, Henrietta E; Marshall, Harry H; Owens, Ian P F; Lord, Alexa M

    2014-05-01

    Resource competition is one potential behavioral mechanism by which invasive species can impact native species, but detecting this competition can be difficult due to the interactions that variable environmental conditions can have on species behavior. This is particularly the case in urban habitats where the disturbed environment can alter natural behavior from that in undisturbed habitats. The rose-ringed parakeet (Psittacula krameri), is an increasingly common invasive species, predominantly associated with large urban centers. Using an experimental approach, we tested the behavioral responses of native garden birds in response to the presence of a rose-ringed parakeet versus the presence of a similarly sized and dominant native bird, the great spotted woodpecker (Dendrocopos major). Parakeet presence significantly reduced feeding rates and increased vigilance among native birds compared with our control treatments. Of visits made by native birds in the presence of a parakeet, feeding was more likely to occur in sites within the parakeet range compared with sites outside, suggesting some habituation of native birds has occurred following prior exposure to parakeets but overall foraging behavior is still disrupted. The results of our study suggest that nonnative species can have complex and subtle impacts on native fauna and show that a nonnative competitor can impact native species simply through their presence near resources. PMID:24822022

  11. Experimental evidence of impacts of an invasive parakeet on foraging behavior of native birds

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Resource competition is one potential behavioral mechanism by which invasive species can impact native species, but detecting this competition can be difficult due to the interactions that variable environmental conditions can have on species behavior. This is particularly the case in urban habitats where the disturbed environment can alter natural behavior from that in undisturbed habitats. The rose-ringed parakeet (Psittacula krameri), is an increasingly common invasive species, predominantly associated with large urban centers. Using an experimental approach, we tested the behavioral responses of native garden birds in response to the presence of a rose-ringed parakeet versus the presence of a similarly sized and dominant native bird, the great spotted woodpecker (Dendrocopos major). Parakeet presence significantly reduced feeding rates and increased vigilance among native birds compared with our control treatments. Of visits made by native birds in the presence of a parakeet, feeding was more likely to occur in sites within the parakeet range compared with sites outside, suggesting some habituation of native birds has occurred following prior exposure to parakeets but overall foraging behavior is still disrupted. The results of our study suggest that nonnative species can have complex and subtle impacts on native fauna and show that a nonnative competitor can impact native species simply through their presence near resources. PMID:24822022

  12. Embryonic Chicken Transplantation is a Promising Model for Studying the Invasive Behavior of Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jayachandran, Aparna; McKeown, Sonja J.; Woods, Briannyn L.; Prithviraj, Prashanth; Cebon, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition is a hallmark event in the metastatic cascade conferring invasive ability to tumor cells. There are ongoing efforts to replicate the physiological events occurring during mobilization of tumor cells in model systems. However, few systems are able to capture these complex in vivo events. The embryonic chicken transplantation model has emerged as a useful system to assess melanoma cells including functions that are relevant to the metastatic process, namely invasion and plasticity. The chicken embryo represents an accessible and economical 3-dimensional in vivo model for investigating melanoma cell invasion as it exploits the ancestral relationship between melanoma and its precursor neural crest cells. We describe a methodology that enables the interrogation of melanoma cell motility within the developing avian embryo. This model involves the injection of melanoma cells into the neural tube of chicken embryos. Melanoma cells are labeled using fluorescent tracker dye, Vybrant DiO, then cultured as hanging drops for 24 h to aggregate the cells. Groups of approximately 700 cells are placed into the neural tube of chicken embryos prior to the onset of neural crest migration at the hindbrain level (embryonic day 1.5) or trunk level (embryonic day 2.5). Chick embryos are reincubated and analyzed after 48 h for the location of melanoma cells using fluorescent microscopy on whole mounts and cross-sections of the embryos. Using this system, we compared the in vivo invasive behavior of epithelial-like and mesenchymal-like melanoma cells. We report that the developing embryonic microenvironment confers motile abilities to both types of melanoma cells. Hence, the embryonic chicken transplantation model has the potential to become a valuable tool for in vivo melanoma invasion studies. Importantly, it may provide novel insights into and reveal previously unknown mediators of the metastatic steps of invasion and dissemination in melanoma

  13. Novel organisms: comparing invasive species, GMOs, and emerging pathogens.

    PubMed

    Jeschke, Jonathan M; Keesing, Felicia; Ostfeld, Richard S

    2013-09-01

    Invasive species, range-expanding species, genetically modified organisms (GMOs), synthetic organisms, and emerging pathogens increasingly affect the human environment. We propose a framework that allows comparison of consecutive stages that such novel organisms go through. The framework provides a common terminology for novel organisms, facilitating knowledge exchange among researchers, managers, and policy makers that work on, or have to make effective decisions about, novel organisms. The framework also indicates that knowledge about the causes and consequences of stage transitions for the better studied novel organisms, such as invasive species, can be transferred to more poorly studied ones, such as GMOs and emerging pathogens. Finally, the framework advances understanding of how climate change can affect the establishment, spread, and impacts of novel organisms, and how biodiversity affects, and is affected by, novel organisms. PMID:23456779

  14. Eastern mosquitofish resists invasion by nonindigenous poeciliids through agonistic behaviors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, Kevin A.; Hill, Jeffrey E.; Nico, Leo G.

    2012-01-01

    Florida is a hotspot for nonindigenous fishes with over 30 species established, although few of these are small-bodied species. One hypothesis for this pattern is that biotic resistance of native species is reducing the success of small-bodied, introduced fishes. The eastern mosquitofish Gambusia holbrooki is common in many freshwater habitats in Florida and although small-bodied (<50 mm), it is a predator and aggressive competitor. We conducted four mesocosm experiments to examine the potential for biotic resistance by eastern mosquitofish to two small-bodied nonindigenous fishes, variable platyfish (Xiphophorus variatus) and swordtail (X. hellerii). Experiments tested: (1) effect of eastern mosquitofish density on adult survival, (2) effect of eastern mosquitofish on a stage-structured population, (3) role of habitat structural complexity on nonindigenous adult survival, and (4) behavioral effects of eastern mosquitofish presence and habitat complexity. Eastern mosquitofish attacked and killed non-native poeciliids with especially strong effects on juveniles of both species. Higher eastern mosquitofish density resulted in greater effects. Predation on swordtails increased with increasing habitat complexity. Eastern mosquitofish also actively drove swordtails from cover, which could expose non-native fish to other predators under field conditions. Our results suggest that eastern mosquitofish may limit invasion success.

  15. Comparative Functional Responses Predict the Invasiveness and Ecological Impacts of Alien Herbivorous Snails

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Meng; Mu, Xidong; Dick, Jaimie T. A.; Fang, Miao; Gu, Dangen; Luo, Du; Zhang, Jiaen; Luo, Jianren; Hu, Yinchang

    2016-01-01

    Understanding determinants of the invasiveness and ecological impacts of alien species is amongst the most sought-after and urgent research questions in ecology. Several studies have shown the value of comparing the functional responses (FRs) of alien and native predators towards native prey, however, the technique is under-explored with herbivorous alien species and as a predictor of invasiveness as distinct from ecological impact. Here, in China, we conducted a mesocosm experiment to compare the FRs among three herbivorous snail species: the golden apple snail, Pomacea canaliculata, a highly invasive and high impact alien listed in “100 of the World's Worst Invasive Alien Species”; Planorbarius corneus, a non-invasive, low impact alien; and the Chinese native snail, Bellamya aeruginosa, when feeding on four locally occurring plant species. Further, by using a numerical response equation, we modelled the population dynamics of the snail consumers. For standard FR parameters, we found that the invasive and damaging alien snail had the highest “attack rates” a, shortest “handling times” h and also the highest estimated maximum feeding rates, 1/hT, whereas the native species had the lowest attack rates, longest handling times and lowest maximum feeding rates. The non-invasive, low impact alien species had consistently intermediate FR parameters. The invasive alien species had higher population growth potential than the native snail species, whilst that of the non-invasive alien species was intermediate. Thus, while the comparative FR approach has been proposed as a reliable method for predicting the ecological impacts of invasive predators, our results further suggest that comparative FRs could extend to predict the invasiveness and ecological impacts of alien herbivores and should be explored in other taxa and trophic groups to determine the general utility of the approach. PMID:26771658

  16. Comparative Functional Responses Predict the Invasiveness and Ecological Impacts of Alien Herbivorous Snails.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; Mu, Xidong; Dick, Jaimie T A; Fang, Miao; Gu, Dangen; Luo, Du; Zhang, Jiaen; Luo, Jianren; Hu, Yinchang

    2016-01-01

    Understanding determinants of the invasiveness and ecological impacts of alien species is amongst the most sought-after and urgent research questions in ecology. Several studies have shown the value of comparing the functional responses (FRs) of alien and native predators towards native prey, however, the technique is under-explored with herbivorous alien species and as a predictor of invasiveness as distinct from ecological impact. Here, in China, we conducted a mesocosm experiment to compare the FRs among three herbivorous snail species: the golden apple snail, Pomacea canaliculata, a highly invasive and high impact alien listed in "100 of the World's Worst Invasive Alien Species"; Planorbarius corneus, a non-invasive, low impact alien; and the Chinese native snail, Bellamya aeruginosa, when feeding on four locally occurring plant species. Further, by using a numerical response equation, we modelled the population dynamics of the snail consumers. For standard FR parameters, we found that the invasive and damaging alien snail had the highest "attack rates" a, shortest "handling times" h and also the highest estimated maximum feeding rates, 1/hT, whereas the native species had the lowest attack rates, longest handling times and lowest maximum feeding rates. The non-invasive, low impact alien species had consistently intermediate FR parameters. The invasive alien species had higher population growth potential than the native snail species, whilst that of the non-invasive alien species was intermediate. Thus, while the comparative FR approach has been proposed as a reliable method for predicting the ecological impacts of invasive predators, our results further suggest that comparative FRs could extend to predict the invasiveness and ecological impacts of alien herbivores and should be explored in other taxa and trophic groups to determine the general utility of the approach. PMID:26771658

  17. Exploring Stakeholders' Attitudes and Beliefs regarding Behaviors that Prevent the Spread of Invasive Species

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prinbeck, Gwenn; Lach, Denise; Chan, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    The Theory of Planned Behavior was used as a framework for investigating recreationists' attitudes, subjective norms, and behavioral control beliefs pertaining to behaviors that reduce the spread of invasive species. A series of focus groups comprised of gardeners, fishers, hunters, and boaters was convened in Oregon, USA. Findings indicate six…

  18. Aberrant hedgehog signaling is responsible for the highly invasive behavior of a subpopulation of hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Y-H; Ding, J; Nguyen, S; Liu, X-J; Xu, G; Zhou, H-Y; Duan, N-N; Yang, S-M; Zern, M A; Wu, J

    2016-01-01

    Hepatoma exhibits a series of heterogeneous subpopulations in its cell surface markers, tumorigenicity, invasion and metastatic capability. We previously demonstrated that the CD133(-)/EpCAM(-) hepatoma subpopulation was more metastatic than its counterpart; however, the controlling mechanisms are unexplored. The present study aimed to delineate the significance of aberrant hedgehog (Hh) signaling in the mediation of metastases. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting-enriched CD133(-)/EpCAM(-) (double negative, DN), Huh-7 cells underwent a transwell selection for metastatic cells (transwell-selected, TS). The TS cells displayed much greater metastatic activity as evidenced by an increased invasion rate, extremely upregulated expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1/2/9 genes compared with DN and double-positive (DP) subpopulations. In contrast to DP cells, TS cells lost E-cadherin and were all vimentin-positive as shown by immunocytochemistry. There was a transitional increase in Gli-1/2 gene expression levels from DP, DN to TS subpopulations, which was consistent with elevated Gli-1/2 or Twist-1 protein levels in the nuclear fraction. Furthermore, truncated Gli-1 (tGli-1), which transactivates molecules involved in metastasis, was detected in the highly invasive Huh-7 cell subpopulation, but not in less metastatic hepatoma cells or normal hepatocytes. The enhanced metastatic features with increased expression of MMPs as well as the presence of twist and snail genes in TS Huh-7 cells were reversed by LDE225, a potent Smoothened antagonist. In conclusion, the highly metastatic capability of a unique TS subpopulation was highly attributed to significant epithelial-mesenchymal transition, enhanced Hh activity and aberrant occurrence of a tGli-1 variant, which appears to be responsible for the highly invasive behavior. PMID:25772244

  19. Non-invasive Foetal ECG – a Comparable Alternative to the Doppler CTG?

    PubMed Central

    Reinhard, J.; Louwen, F.

    2012-01-01

    This review discusses the alternative of using the non-invasive foetal ECG compared with the conventionally used Doppler CTG. Non-invasive abdominal electrocardiograms (ECG) have been approved for clinical routine since 2008; subsequently they were also approved for antepartum and subpartum procedures. The first study results have been published. Non-invasive foetal ECG is especially indicated during early pregnancy, while the Doppler CTG is recommended for the vernix period. Beyond the vernix period no difference has been recorded in the success rate of either approach. The foetal ECG signal quality is independent of the BMI, whereas the success rate of the Doppler CTG is diminished with an increased BMI. During the first stage of labour, non-invasive foetal ECG demonstrates better signal quality; however during the second stage of labour no difference has been identified between the methods. PMID:25308981

  20. Comparative Perceptions of Practicum Counselor Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barak, Azy; Lacrosse, Michael B.

    1977-01-01

    Counseling interviews (N=19) were rated on the Counselor Rating Form in terms of perceived counselor expertness, attractiveness, and trustworthiness. Results indicated all three sources of perceptions were similar, although counselors rated their own behavior as significantly less expert than their clients. (Author)

  1. Comparative phylogenomics of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from invasive disease and nasopharyngeal carriage from West Africans

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We applied comparative phylogenomics (whole genome comparisons of microbes using DNA microarrays combined with Bayesian-based phylogenies) to investigate S. pneumoniae isolates from West Africa, with the aim of providing insights into the pathogenicity and other features related to the biology of the organism. The strains investigated comprised a well defined collection of 58 invasive and carriage isolates that were sequenced typed and included eight different S. pneumoniae serotypes (1, 3, 5, 6A, 11, 14, 19 F and 23 F) of varying invasive disease potential. Results The core genome of the isolates was estimated to be 38% and was mainly represented by gene functional categories associated with housekeeping functions. Comparison of the gene content of invasive and carriage isolates identified at least eleven potential genes that may be important in virulence including surface proteins, transport proteins, transcription factors and hypothetical proteins. Thirteen accessory regions (ARs) were also identified and did not show any loci association with the eleven virulence genes. Intraclonal diversity (isolates of the same serotype and MLST but expressing different patterns of ARs) was observed among some clones including ST 1233 (serotype 5), ST 3404 (serotype 5) and ST 3321 (serotype 14). A constructed phylogenetic tree of the isolates showed a high level of heterogeneity consistent with the frequent S. pneumoniae recombination. Despite this, a homogeneous clustering of all the serotype 1 strains was observed. Conclusions Comparative phylogenomics of invasive and carriage S. pneumoniae isolates identified a number of putative virulence determinants that may be important in the progression of S. pneumoniae from the carriage phase to invasive disease. Virulence determinants that contribute to S. pneumoniae pathogenicity are likely to be distributed randomly throughout its genome rather than being clustered in dedicated loci or islands. Compared to other S

  2. Behavioral plasticity mediates asymmetric competition between invasive wasps and native ants

    PubMed Central

    Grangier, Julien; Lester, Philip J.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most successful invasive species is the common wasp, Vespula vulgaris. We recently reported how foragers of this species have adopted previously unknown interference behavior when competing for food with native ants. Picking their opponents up in their mandibles, flying backward and dropping them some distance away from the disputed resource, wasps were shown to efficiently deal with a yet aggressive competitor and to modulate this behavior according to circumstances. Here we further discuss the nature and functioning of this unusual strategy. We first highlight the questions this interaction raises regarding the competitive advantages offered by asymmetries in body size and flight ability. Then, we argue that this study system illustrates the important role of behavioral plasticity in biological invasions; not only in the success of invaders but also in the ability of native species to coexist with these invaders. PMID:22808314

  3. Applying behavioral theories to invasive animal management: Towards an integrated framework.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Lynette J; Hine, Donald W; Please, Patricia M; Driver, Aaron B

    2015-09-15

    Invasive species wreak an estimated $1.4 trillion in damages globally, each year. To have any hope of reducing this damage, best-practice control strategies must incorporate behavior change interventions. Traditional interventions, based on the knowledge-transfer model, assume that if land managers are properly educated about risks and strategies, they will develop supportive attitudes and implement appropriate control strategies. However, the social sciences have produced a large number of behavioral models and frameworks that demonstrate that knowledge transfer, by itself, fails to change behavior. The challenge then lies in knowing which behavioral model to choose, and when, from a potentially overwhelming 'universe'. In this paper, we review nine behavior theories relevant to invasive species management. We then introduce the Behavior Change Wheel as a tool for integrating these theories into a single practical framework. This framework links drivers of and barriers to behavior change with intervention strategies and policies, in what we consider, from an applied perspective, to be an important advance. PMID:26151198

  4. Minimally Invasive Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Comparative Study to the Standard Approach

    PubMed Central

    Dabboussi, Naji; Sakr, Mazen; Girard, Julien; Fakih, Riad

    2012-01-01

    Background: Minimally invasive surgery has gained popularity over the past several years. Early results have shown better functional outcome with early recovery and rapid rehabilitation. Aim: Evaluation of the short-term clinical and functional outcome of minimally invasive surgery total knee arthroplasty (MIS-TKA) compared with the traditional total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Materials and Methods: During 2009, all cases scheduled for primary TKA through the modified mini-mid-vastus approach (MIS group) were studied. This group included 40 knees and was compared to a cohort control group of similar number of patients (40 knees) that underwent the procedure through the standard conventional technique (standard group). Results: Patients in the MIS group showed significant decrease in postoperative pain, blood loss in first 24 hours, and in hospital stay. Furthermore, they achieved motion considerably faster than the standard group with earlier return of quadriceps function and greater early flexion. Conclusion: This study proved that MIS-TPA has the ability to couple the benefits of less invasive surgical approach. PMID:22408753

  5. Stress detection in bivalve mollusk using non-invasive bioelectric monitoring of myoneural behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, E.L.; Hardison, B.S.; Dawson, V.K.; Waller, D.; Waller, W.T.; Dickson, K.L.; Allen, H.J.

    1995-12-31

    Few studies have demonstrated cause-and-effect linkages between extrinsic environmental factors and intrinsic bioelectric action potentials of bivalve mollusk using non-invasive, non-destructive approaches. A non-invasive, external probe configuration and detection system, similar to one used previously with native unionids, was developed for continuously monitoring bioelectric activities of clams and mussels. Using remote probes and differential amplifiers, bioelectric activities were recorded for cardiac, adductor, siphon and foot responses using a computer equipped with integrating software. To test if remote, non-invasive probes would detect similar information to that recorded by invasive needle electrodes, two individuals of zebra mussel (Dreissenia polymorpha), and Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) were each configured with two sets of probes. One set was inserted between the valves and along the inside surface of the shelf; the other set was positioned remotely about the outside margins of the valves. Signal validation was made by simultaneously recording bioelectric responses for the same animal from both sets of probes. In preliminary stress tests monitored bivalves were subjected to changes in temperatures over 2 to 3 hr intervals from ambient to potentially lethal levels (20 to 30 C for zebra, 25 C to 40 C for corbicula). Dramatic increases resulted in both number and amplitude of cardiac events as temperature increased. Planned studies will use this approach to evaluate bivalve myoneural behavior patterns in response to chemical and non-chemical stimuli.

  6. Comparative genomic hybridization analysis of invasive ductal breast carcinomas in the Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JIANWEI; ZHANG, HONGYAN; XU, XIN; WANG, MINGRONG; YU, ZHONGHE

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in Chinese women. The aim of the present study was to investigate the genetic alterations that occur in breast cancer cells in Chinese women. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis was performed on 34 tumors obtained from patients with primary invasive ductal breast carcinoma (IDC). Recurrent genetic alterations in breast cancer include gains on chromosomes 1q (59%), 16p (50%), 17q (44%), 8q (38%), 11q (32%), 20q (32%), 1p (24%), 20p (24%), 19q (21%) and 19p (18%). Losses are common on chromosomes 6q (15%), 8p (12%), 18 (12%), 4q (9%), X (9%) and 17p (9%). In the present study, high-level amplifications were observed on chromosomes 1q32, 8p, 11q13, 17q and 20q. Overall, the chromosomal DNA gains observed were consistent with the changes reported in Caucasian populations. However, the incidence of chromosomal DNA loss was lower in the present study compared with the incidence reported in the literature. The present results demonstrate the pattern of chromosomal imbalances in the invasive ductal breast carcinomas of Chinese females. PMID:26622803

  7. Fish gut microbiota analysis differentiates physiology and behavior of invasive Asian carp and indigenous American fish

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Lin; Amberg, Jon; Chapman, Duane; Gaikowski, Mark; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2014-01-01

    Gut microbiota of invasive Asian silver carp (SVCP) and indigenous planktivorous gizzard shad (GZSD) in Mississippi river basin were compared using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Analysis of more than 440 000 quality-filtered sequences obtained from the foregut and hindgut of GZSD and SVCP revealed high microbial diversity in these samples. GZSD hindgut (GZSD_H) samples (n=23) with >7000 operational taxonomy units (OTUs) exhibited the highest alpha-diversity indices followed by SVCP foregut (n=15), GZSD foregut (n=9) and SVCP hindgut (SVCP_H) (n=24). UniFrac distance-based non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) analysis showed that the microbiota of GZSD_H and SVCP_H were clearly separated into two clusters: samples in the GZSD cluster were observed to vary by sampling location and samples in the SVCP cluster by sampling date. NMDS further revealed distinct microbial community between foregut to hindgut for individual GZSD and SVCP. Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes were detected as the predominant phyla regardless of fish or gut type. The high abundance of Cyanobacteria observed was possibly supported by their role as the fish's major food source. Furthermore, unique and shared OTUs and OTUs in each gut type were identified, three OTUs from the order Bacteroidales, the genus Bacillariophyta and the genus Clostridium were found significantly more abundant in GZSD_H (14.9–22.8%) than in SVCP_H (0.13–4.1%) samples. These differences were presumably caused by the differences in the type of food sources including bacteria ingested, the gut morphology and digestion, and the physiological behavior between GZSD and SVCP. PMID:24132079

  8. Fish gut microbiota analysis differentiates physiology and behavior of invasive Asian carp and indigenous American fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ye, Lin; Amberg, Jon J.; Chapman, Duane C.; Gaikowski, Mark P.; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2014-01-01

    Gut microbiota of invasive Asian silver carp (SVCP) and indigenous planktivorous gizzard shad (GZSD) in Mississippi river basin were compared using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Analysis of more than 440 000 quality-filtered sequences obtained from the foregut and hindgut of GZSD and SVCP revealed high microbial diversity in these samples. GZSD hindgut (GZSD_H) samples (n=23) with >7000 operational taxonomy units (OTUs) exhibited the highest alpha-diversity indices followed by SVCP foregut (n=15), GZSD foregut (n=9) and SVCP hindgut (SVCP_H) (n=24). UniFrac distance-based non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) analysis showed that the microbiota of GZSD_H and SVCP_H were clearly separated into two clusters: samples in the GZSD cluster were observed to vary by sampling location and samples in the SVCP cluster by sampling date. NMDS further revealed distinct microbial community between foregut to hindgut for individual GZSD and SVCP. Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes were detected as the predominant phyla regardless of fish or gut type. The high abundance of Cyanobacteria observed was possibly supported by their role as the fish’s major food source. Furthermore, unique and shared OTUs and OTUs in each gut type were identified, three OTUs from the order Bacteroidales, the genus Bacillariophyta and the genus Clostridium were found significantly more abundant in GZSD_H (14.9–22.8%) than in SVCP_H (0.13–4.1%) samples. These differences were presumably caused by the differences in the type of food sources including bacteria ingested, the gut morphology and digestion, and the physiological behavior between GZSD and SVCP.

  9. Comparative ecophysiology of cold-tolerance-related traits: assessing range expansion potential for an invasive insect at high latitude.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Philipp; Kaunisto, Sirpa; Koštál, Vladimir; Margus, Aigi; Zahradníčková, Helena; Lindström, Leena

    2015-01-01

    Survival at high latitude requires the capability to cope with seasonally imposed stress, such as low winter temperatures or large temperature fluctuations. The Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, is an invasive pest of potato that has rapidly spread from low latitudes to higher latitudes. During the last 30 years, a decrease in range expansion speed is apparent in Europe. We use a comparative approach to assess whether this could be due to an inability of L. decemlineata to cope with the harsher winters encountered at high latitude, when compared to two native northern chrysomelid beetles with similar overwintering ecology. We investigated several cold-tolerance-related physiological traits at different time points during winter. Cold tolerance followed a latitudinal pattern; the northern species were more tolerant to short-term subzero temperatures than the invasive L. decemlineata. The other northern species, the knotgrass leaf beetle, Chrysolina polita, was found to tolerate internal freezing. Interestingly, the pattern for overwinter survival at 5°C was the opposite and higher in L. decemlineata than the northern species and could be related to behavioral differences between species in overwintering location selection and a potential physiological trade-off between tolerance to cold shock and to chronic cold exposure. Furthermore, while the northern species accumulated large amounts of different sugars and polyols with probable cryoprotectant functions, none were detected in L. decemlineata at high concentrations. This lack of cryoprotectant accumulation could explain the difference in cold tolerance between the species and also suggests that a lack of physiological capacity to tolerate low temperatures could slow further latitudinal range expansion of L. decemlineata. PMID:25860825

  10. Comparing Supervised Exercise Therapy to Invasive Measures in the Management of Symptomatic Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aherne, Thomas; McHugh, Seamus; Kheirelseid, Elrasheid A.; Lee, Michael J.; McCaffrey, Noel; Moneley, Daragh; Leahy, Austin L.; Naughton, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Consensus rightly demands the incorporation of supervised exercise training (SET) into PAD treatment protocols. However, the exact role of SET particularly its relationship with intervention requires further clarification. While supervised exercise is undoubtedly an excellent tool in the conservative management of mild PAD its use in more advanced disease as an adjunct to open or endovascular intervention is not clearly defined. Indeed its use in isolation in this cohort is incompletely reported. The aim of this review is to clarify the exact role of SET in the management of symptomatic PAD and in particular to assess its role in comparison with or as an adjunct to invasive intervention. A systematic literature search revealed a total 11 randomised studies inclusive of 969 patients. All studies compared SET and intervention with monotherapy. Study results suggest that exercise is a complication-free treatment. Furthermore, it appears to offer significant improvements in patients walk distances with a combination of both SET and intervention offering a superior walking outcome to monotherapy in those requiring invasive measures. PMID:26601122

  11. Dysregulation of cell polarity proteins synergize with oncogenes or the microenvironment to induce invasive behavior in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Samit; Seifried, Laurie; Feigin, Michael E; Gibbons, Don L; Scuoppo, Claudio; Lin, Wei; Rizvi, Zain H; Lind, Evan; Dissanayake, Dilan; Kurie, Jonathan; Ohashi, Pam; Muthuswamy, Senthil K

    2012-01-01

    Changes in expression and localization of proteins that regulate cell and tissue polarity are frequently observed in carcinoma. However, the mechanisms by which changes in cell polarity proteins regulate carcinoma progression are not well understood. Here, we report that loss of polarity protein expression in epithelial cells primes them for cooperation with oncogenes or changes in tissue microenvironment to promote invasive behavior. Activation of ErbB2 in cells lacking the polarity regulators Scribble, Dlg1 or AF-6, induced invasive properties. This cooperation required the ability of ErbB2 to regulate the Par6/aPKC polarity complex. Inhibition of the ErbB2-Par6 pathway was sufficient to block ErbB2-induced invasion suggesting that two polarity hits may be needed for ErbB2 to promote invasion. Interestingly, in the absence of ErbB2 activation, either a combined loss of two polarity proteins, or exposure of cells lacking one polarity protein to cytokines IL-6 or TNFα induced invasive behavior in epithelial cells. We observed the invasive behavior only when cells were plated on a stiff matrix (Matrigel/Collagen-1) and not when plated on a soft matrix (Matrigel alone). Cells lacking two polarity proteins upregulated expression of EGFR and activated Akt. Inhibition of Akt activity blocked the invasive behavior identifying a mechanism by which loss of polarity promotes invasion of epithelial cells. Thus, we demonstrate that loss of polarity proteins confers phenotypic plasticity to epithelial cells such that they display normal behavior under normal culture conditions but display aggressive behavior in response to activation of oncogenes or exposure to cytokines. PMID:22529912

  12. Muscle tissue saturation in humans studied with two non-invasive optical techniques: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaharin, Alfi; Krite Svanberg, Emilie; Ellerström, Ida; Subash, Arman Ahamed; Khoptyar, Dmitry; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Åkeson, Jonas

    2013-11-01

    Muscle tissue saturation (StO2) has been measured with two non-invasive optical techniques and the results were compared. One of the techniques is widely used in the hospitals - the CW-NIRS technique. The other is the photon timeof- flight spectrometer (pTOFS) developed in the Group of Biophotonics, Lund University, Sweden. The wavelengths used in both the techniques are 730 nm and 810 nm. A campaign was arranged to perform measurements on 21 (17 were taken for comparison) healthy adult volunteers (8 women and 13 men). Oxygen saturations were measured at the right lower arm of each volunteer. To observe the effects of different provocations on the oxygen saturation a blood pressure cuff was attached in the upper right arm. For CW-NIRS, the tissue saturation values were in the range from 70-90%, while for pTOFS the values were in the range from 55-60%.

  13. Minimally invasive oesophagectomy in prone versus lateral decubitus position: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Amit; Manipadam, John Mathew; Jain, Amit; Kalayarasan, R.; Uppal, Rajeev; Agarwal, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thoracoscopic oesophageal mobilisation during a minimally invasive oesophagectomy (MIE) is most commonly performed with the patient placed in the lateral decubitus position (LDP). The prone position (PP) for thoracoscopic oesophageal mobilisation has been proposed as an alternative. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a retrospective, comparative study designed to compare early outcomes following a minimally invasive thoracolaparoscopic oesophagectomy for oesophageal cancer in LDP and in PP. RESULTS: During the study period, between January 2011 and February 2014, 104 patients underwent an oesophagectomy for cancer. Of these, 42 were open procedures (transhiatal and transthoracic oesophagectomy) and 62 were minimally invasive. The study group included patients who underwent thoracolaparoscopic oesophagectomy in LDP (n = 23) and in PP (n = 25). The median age of the study population was 55 (24-71) years, and there were 25 males. Twenty-one (21) patients had tumours in the middle third of the oesophagus, 24 in the lower third, and 3 arising from the gastro-oesophageal junction. The most common histology was squamous cell cancer (85.4%). The median duration of surgery was similar in the two groups; however, the estimated median intraoperative blood loss was less in the PP group [200 (50-400) mL vs 300 (100-600) mL; P = 0.01)]. In the post-operative period, 26.1% patients in the LDP group and 8% in the PP group (8%) developed respiratory complications. The incidence of other post-operative complications, including cervical oesophagogastric anastomosis, hoarseness of voice and chylothorax, was not different in the two groups. The T stage of the tumour was similar in the two groups, with the majority (37) having T3 disease. A mean of 8 lymph nodes (range 2-33) were retrieved in the LDP group, and 17.5 (range 5-41) lymph nodes were retrieved in the PP group (P = 0.0004). The number of patients with node-positive disease was also higher in the PP group (19 vs 10, P

  14. Comparative performance of invasive and native Celastrus species across environmental gradients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leicht-Young, S. A.; Silander, J.A., Jr.; Latimer, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    The ability to understand and predict the success of invasive plant species in their new ranges is increased when there is a sympatric native congener available for comparison. Celastrus orbiculatus (oriental bittersweet) is a liana introduced into the United States in the mid-1800s from East Asia as an ornamental plant. Its native congener, Celastrus scandens (American bittersweet), ranges from the east coast of the United States as far west as Wyoming. In the Northeastern United States, C. orbiculatus is continuing to expand its range while C. scandens appears to be in serious decline. One hypothesis for this decline is that C. scandens does not have such a wide range of ecological tolerances in the current landscape as C. orbiculatus, which seems to tolerate a greater range of resource conditions. To investigate this hypothesis, we transplanted these two species into ten sites that spanned a full range of light and soil moisture conditions to compare their establishment and performance in terms of aboveground growth (biomass and height) and mortality. After two years, C. orbiculatus showed significantly lower mortality and greater biomass across all resource conditions compared to C. scandens. In addition, C. orbiculatus preferred more mesic soil moisture conditions, while C. scandens performed better in drier soil moisture conditions. Since much of the Northeastern United States is now forested, this preference for mesic soil conditions could make it more successful than C. scandens in the region. This study shows the utility of manipulative experiments, particularly those using congeneric native species as benchmarks, for assessing the causes and predicting the course of invasions. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  15. Effect of an Invasive Plant and Moonlight on Rodent Foraging Behavior in a Coastal Dune Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew D.; De León, Yesenia L.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how invasive plants may alter predator avoidance behaviors is important for granivorous rodents because their foraging can trigger ripple effects in trophic webs. Previous research has shown that European beach grass Ammophila arenaria, an invasive species in coastal California, affects the predation of other seeds by the rodents Microtus californicus, Peromyscus maniculatus, and Reithrodontomys megalotis. This may be due to lower perceived predation risk by rodents foraging in close proximity to the cover provided by Ammophila, but this mechanism has not yet been tested. We examined the perceived predation risk of rodents by measuring the ‘giving up density’ of food left behind in experimental patches of food in areas with and without abundant cover from Ammophila and under varying amount of moonlight. We found strong evidence that giving up density was lower in the thick uniform vegetation on Ammophila-dominated habitat than it was in the more sparsely and diversely vegetated restored habitat. There was also evidence that moonlight affected giving up density and that it mediated the effects of habitat, although with our design we were unable to distinguish the effects of lunar illumination and moon phase. Our findings illustrate that foraging rodents, well known to be risk-averse during moonlit nights, are also affected by the presence of an invasive plant. This result has implications for granivory and perhaps plant demography in invaded and restored coastal habitats. Future research in this system should work to unravel the complex trophic links formed by a non-native invasive plant (i.e., Ammophila) providing cover favored by native rodents, which likely forage on and potentially limit the recruitment of native and non-native plants, some of which have ecosystem consequences of their own. PMID:25679785

  16. Non-invasive monitoring of chewing and swallowing for objective quantification of ingestive behavior

    PubMed Central

    Sazonov, Edward; Schuckers, Stephanie; Lopez-Meyer, Paulo; Makeyev, Oleksandr; Sazonova, Nadezhda; Melanson, Edward L.; Neuman, Michael

    2008-01-01

    A methodology of studying of ingestive behavior by non-invasive monitoring of swallowing (deglutition) and chewing (mastication) has been developed. The target application for the developed methodology is to study the behavioral patterns of food consumption and producing volumetric and weight estimates of energy intake. Monitoring is non-invasive based on detecting swallowing by a sound sensor located over laryngopharynx or by a bone conduction microphone and detecting chewing through a below-the-ear strain sensor. Proposed sensors may be implemented in a wearable monitoring device, thus enabling monitoring of ingestive behavior in free living individuals. In this paper, the goals in the development of this methodology are two-fold. First, a system comprised of sensors, related hardware and software for multimodal data capture is designed for data collection in a controlled environment. Second, a protocol is developed for manual scoring of chewing and swallowing for use as a gold standard. The multi-modal data capture was tested by measuring chewing and swallowing in twenty one volunteers during periods of food intake and quiet sitting (no food intake). Video footage and sensor signals were manually scored by trained raters. Inter-rater reliability study for three raters conducted on the sample set of 5 subjects resulted in high average intra-class correlation coefficients of 0.996 for bites, 0.988 for chews, and 0.98 for swallows. The collected sensor signals and the resulting manual scores will be used in future research as a gold standard for further assessment of sensor design, development of automatic pattern recognition routines, and study of the relationship between swallowing/chewing and ingestive behavior. PMID:18427161

  17. Commonly Rare and Rarely Common: Comparing Population Abundance of Invasive and Native Aquatic Species

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Gretchen J. A.; Vander Zanden, M. Jake; Blum, Michael J.; Clayton, Murray K.; Hain, Ernie F.; Hauxwell, Jennifer; Izzo, Marit; Kornis, Matthew S.; McIntyre, Peter B.; Mikulyuk, Alison; Nilsson, Erika; Olden, Julian D.; Papeş, Monica; Sharma, Sapna

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species are leading drivers of environmental change. Their impacts are often linked to their population size, but surprisingly little is known about how frequently they achieve high abundances. A nearly universal pattern in ecology is that species are rare in most locations and abundant in a few, generating right-skewed abundance distributions. Here, we use abundance data from over 24,000 populations of 17 invasive and 104 native aquatic species to test whether invasive species differ from native counterparts in statistical patterns of abundance across multiple sites. Invasive species on average reached significantly higher densities than native species and exhibited significantly higher variance. However, invasive and native species did not differ in terms of coefficient of variation, skewness, or kurtosis. Abundance distributions of all species were highly right skewed (skewness>0), meaning both invasive and native species occurred at low densities in most locations where they were present. The average abundance of invasive and native species was 6% and 2%, respectively, of the maximum abundance observed within a taxonomic group. The biological significance of the differences between invasive and native species depends on species-specific relationships between abundance and impact. Recognition of cross-site heterogeneity in population densities brings a new dimension to invasive species management, and may help to refine optimal prevention, containment, control, and eradication strategies. PMID:24194883

  18. Commonly rare and rarely common: comparing population abundance of invasive and native aquatic species.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Gretchen J A; Vander Zanden, M Jake; Blum, Michael J; Clayton, Murray K; Hain, Ernie F; Hauxwell, Jennifer; Izzo, Marit; Kornis, Matthew S; McIntyre, Peter B; Mikulyuk, Alison; Nilsson, Erika; Olden, Julian D; Papeş, Monica; Sharma, Sapna

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species are leading drivers of environmental change. Their impacts are often linked to their population size, but surprisingly little is known about how frequently they achieve high abundances. A nearly universal pattern in ecology is that species are rare in most locations and abundant in a few, generating right-skewed abundance distributions. Here, we use abundance data from over 24,000 populations of 17 invasive and 104 native aquatic species to test whether invasive species differ from native counterparts in statistical patterns of abundance across multiple sites. Invasive species on average reached significantly higher densities than native species and exhibited significantly higher variance. However, invasive and native species did not differ in terms of coefficient of variation, skewness, or kurtosis. Abundance distributions of all species were highly right skewed (skewness>0), meaning both invasive and native species occurred at low densities in most locations where they were present. The average abundance of invasive and native species was 6% and 2%, respectively, of the maximum abundance observed within a taxonomic group. The biological significance of the differences between invasive and native species depends on species-specific relationships between abundance and impact. Recognition of cross-site heterogeneity in population densities brings a new dimension to invasive species management, and may help to refine optimal prevention, containment, control, and eradication strategies. PMID:24194883

  19. No Evolutionary Response to Four Generations of Laboratory Selection on Antipredator Behavior of Aedes albopictus: Potential Implications for Biotic Resistance to Invasion

    PubMed Central

    KESAVARAJU, BANUGOPAN; JULIANO, STEVEN A.

    2009-01-01

    Aedes albopictus (Skuse) is an invasive container-dwelling mosquito and an important disease vector that co-occurs with the native mosquito, Aedes triseriatus (Say), and the predatory midge, Corethrella appendiculata (Grabham). Larval Ae. triseriatus show significantly greater antipredatory responses when compared to larval Ae. albopictus in the presence of predation cues from C. appendiculata. The potential for evolution of antipredatory behavioral responses to C. appendiculata in Ae. albopictus is unknown. We used a controlled laboratory selection experiment to test whether Ae. albopictus could evolve antipredatory behavioral responses to C. appendiculata predation. We subjected replicate Ae. albopictus populations to four generations of predation by C. appendiculata or a predator-free control treatment and compared the behavior and life history of Ae. albopictus in the two treatments in each generation. There were no differences in Ae. albopictus behavioral responses between predation and control lines in any of the four generations. There was also no evidence of differences in life histories between predation and control lines. Ae. albopictus is superior as a competitor compared with Ae. triseriatus, which it has replaced in areas where C. appendiculata are rare. Our results suggest limited potential for Ae. albopictus to evolve stronger antipredatory behavioral responses to C. appendiculata predation and imply that C. appendiculata will continue to act as an impediment to invasion by Ae. albopictus and replacement of Ae. triseriatus and to promote coexistence of these competitors. PMID:19645279

  20. Levels of novel hybridization in the saltcedar invasion compared over seven decades

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hybridization is proposed as one process that can enhance a plant species’ invasive ability. We quantified the levels of hybridization of 180 saltcedar plants (Tamarix spp.) of varying ages that span the history of an invasion along the Green River, UT, USA. Plants ranging in establishment dates fro...

  1. Comparing Results from the Clinical Assessment of Behavior and Child Behavior Checklist with Referred Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Carl L.

    2013-01-01

    Behavior rating scales are popular assessment tools but more research is needed on the preschool versions of the instruments, particularly with referred samples of preschoolers. This study examined the comparability of results from parent ratings on the preschool versions of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL/1.5-5, Achenbach & Rescorla, 2000) and…

  2. Comparative Gene Expression Analyses Identify Luminal and Basal Subtypes of Canine Invasive Urothelial Carcinoma That Mimic Patterns in Human Invasive Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Deepika; Paoloni, Melissa; Shukradas, Shweta; Choudhury, Dipanwita Roy; Craig, Bruce A; Ramos-Vara, José A; Hahn, Noah; Bonney, Patty L; Khanna, Chand; Knapp, Deborah W

    2015-01-01

    More than 160,000 people are expected to die from invasive urothelial carcinoma (iUC) this year worldwide. Research in relevant animal models is essential to improving iUC management. Naturally-occurring canine iUC closely resembles human iUC in histopathology, metastatic behavior, and treatment response, and could provide a relevant model for human iUC. The molecular characterization of canine iUC, however, has been limited. Work was conducted to compare gene expression array results between tissue samples from iUC and normal bladder in dogs, with comparison to similar expression array data from human iUC and normal bladder in the literature. Considerable similarities between enrichment patterns of genes in canine and human iUC were observed. These included patterns mirroring basal and luminal subtypes initially observed in human breast cancer and more recently noted in human iUC. Canine iUC samples also exhibited enrichment for genes involved in P53 pathways, as has been reported in human iUC. This is particularly relevant as drugs targeting these genes/pathways in other cancers could be repurposed to treat iUC, with dogs providing a model to optimize therapy. As part of the validation of the results and proof of principal for evaluating individualized targeted therapy, the overexpression of EGFR in canine bladder iUC was confirmed. The similarities in gene expression patterns between dogs and humans add considerably to the value of naturally-occurring canine iUC as a relevant and much needed animal model for human iUC. Furthermore, the finding of expression patterns that cross different pathologically-defined cancers could allow studies of dogs with iUC to help optimize cancer management across multiple cancer types. The work is also expected to lead to a better understanding of the biological importance of the gene expression patterns, and the potential application of the cross-species comparisons approach to other cancer types as well. PMID:26352142

  3. Comparative Gene Expression Analyses Identify Luminal and Basal Subtypes of Canine Invasive Urothelial Carcinoma That Mimic Patterns in Human Invasive Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dhawan, Deepika; Paoloni, Melissa; Shukradas, Shweta; Choudhury, Dipanwita Roy; Craig, Bruce A.; Ramos-Vara, José A.; Hahn, Noah; Bonney, Patty L.; Khanna, Chand; Knapp, Deborah W.

    2015-01-01

    More than 160,000 people are expected to die from invasive urothelial carcinoma (iUC) this year worldwide. Research in relevant animal models is essential to improving iUC management. Naturally-occurring canine iUC closely resembles human iUC in histopathology, metastatic behavior, and treatment response, and could provide a relevant model for human iUC. The molecular characterization of canine iUC, however, has been limited. Work was conducted to compare gene expression array results between tissue samples from iUC and normal bladder in dogs, with comparison to similar expression array data from human iUC and normal bladder in the literature. Considerable similarities between enrichment patterns of genes in canine and human iUC were observed. These included patterns mirroring basal and luminal subtypes initially observed in human breast cancer and more recently noted in human iUC. Canine iUC samples also exhibited enrichment for genes involved in P53 pathways, as has been reported in human iUC. This is particularly relevant as drugs targeting these genes/pathways in other cancers could be repurposed to treat iUC, with dogs providing a model to optimize therapy. As part of the validation of the results and proof of principal for evaluating individualized targeted therapy, the overexpression of EGFR in canine bladder iUC was confirmed. The similarities in gene expression patterns between dogs and humans add considerably to the value of naturally-occurring canine iUC as a relevant and much needed animal model for human iUC. Furthermore, the finding of expression patterns that cross different pathologically-defined cancers could allow studies of dogs with iUC to help optimize cancer management across multiple cancer types. The work is also expected to lead to a better understanding of the biological importance of the gene expression patterns, and the potential application of the cross-species comparisons approach to other cancer types as well. PMID:26352142

  4. Comparative phosphoproteomics reveals components of host cell invasion and post-transcriptional regulation during Francisella infection

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Tempel, Rebecca; Cambronne, Xiaolu A.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Jones, Marcus B.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Yang, Feng; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Heffron, Fred

    2013-09-22

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes the deadly disease tularemia. Most evidence suggests that Francisella is not well recognized by the innate immune system that normally leads to cytokine expression and cell death. In previous work, we identified new bacterial factors that were hyper-cytotoxic to macrophages. Four of the identified hyper-cytotoxic strains (lpcC, manB, manC and kdtA) had an impaired lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis and produced an exposed lipid A lacking the O-antigen. These mutants were not only hyper-cytotoxic but also were phagocytosed at much higher rates compared to the wild type parent strain. To elucidate the cellular signaling underlying this enhanced phagocytosis and cell death, we performed a large-scale comparative phosphoproteomic analysis of cells infected with wild-type and delta-lpcC F. novicida. Our data suggest that not only actin but also intermediate filaments and microtubules are important for F. novicida entry into the host cells. In addition, we observed differential phosphorylation of tristetraprolin (TTP), a key component of the mRNA-degrading machinery that controls the expression of a variety of genes including many cytokines. Infection with the delta-lpcC mutant induced the hyper-phosphorylation and inhibition of TTP, leading to the production of cytokines such as IL-1beta and TNF-alpha which may kill the host cells by triggering apoptosis. Together, our data provide new insights for Francisella invasion and a post-transcriptional mechanism that prevents the expression of host immune response factors that controls infection by this pathogen.

  5. Overexpression of miR-9 in mast cells is associated with invasive behavior and spontaneous metastasis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background While microRNA (miRNA) expression is known to be altered in a variety of human malignancies contributing to cancer development and progression, the potential role of miRNA dysregulation in malignant mast cell disease has not been previously explored. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential contribution of miRNA dysregulation to the biology of canine mast cell tumors (MCTs), a well-established spontaneous model of malignant mast cell disease. Methods We evaluated the miRNA expression profiles from biologically low-grade and biologically high-grade primary canine MCTs using real-time PCR-based TaqMan Low Density miRNA Arrays and performed real-time PCR to evaluate miR-9 expression in primary canine MCTs, malignant mast cell lines, and normal bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Mouse mast cell lines and BMMCs were transduced with empty or pre-miR-9 expressing lentiviral constructs and cell proliferation, caspase 3/7 activity, and invasion were assessed. Transcriptional profiling of cells overexpressing miR-9 was performed using Affymetrix GeneChip Mouse Gene 2.0 ST arrays and real-time PCR was performed to validate changes in mRNA expression. Results Our data demonstrate that unique miRNA expression profiles correlate with the biological behavior of primary canine MCTs and that miR-9 expression is increased in biologically high grade canine MCTs and malignant cell lines compared to biologically low grade tumors and normal canine BMMCs. In transformed mouse malignant mast cell lines expressing either wild-type (C57) or activating (P815) KIT mutations and mouse BMMCs, miR-9 overexpression significantly enhanced invasion but had no effect on cell proliferation or apoptosis. Transcriptional profiling of normal mouse BMMCs and P815 cells possessing enforced miR-9 expression demonstrated dysregulation of several genes, including upregulation of CMA1, a protease involved in activation of matrix metalloproteases and extracellular matrix

  6. Parasites alter freshwater communities in mesocosms by modifying invasive crayfish behavior.

    PubMed

    Reisinger, Lindsey S; Lodge, David M

    2016-06-01

    Parasites can alter communities by reducing densities of keystone hosts, but few studies have examined how trait-mediated indirect effects of parasites can alter ecological communities. We test how trematode parasites (Microphallus spp.) that affect invasive crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) behavior alter how crayfish impact lake littoral communities. O. rusticus drive community composition in north temperate lakes, and predatory fish can reduce crayfish activity and feeding. In laboratory studies, Microphallus parasites also alter O. rusticus behavior: infected O. rusticus eat fewer macroinvertebrates and are bolder near predatory fish than uninfected individuals. We used a 2 x 2 factorial experiment to test how predatory fish and parasites affect O. rusticus impacts in large mesocosms over 4 weeks. We predicted (1) that when predators were absent, infected crayfish would have lower impacts than uninfected crayfish on macrophytes and macroinvertebrates (as well as reduced growth and higher mortality). However, (2) when predators were present but unable to consume crayfish, infected crayfish would have greater impacts (as well as greater growth and lower mortality) than uninfected crayfish because of increased boldness. Because of its effect on crayfish feeding behavior, we also predicted (3) that infection would alter macrophyte and macroinvertebrate community composition. In contrast to our first hypothesis, we found that infected and uninfected crayfish had similar impacts on lower trophic levels when predators were absent. Across all treatments, infected crayfish were more likely to be outside shelters and had greater growth than uninfected crayfish, suggesting that the reduced feeding observed in short-term experiments does not occur over longer timescales. However, in support of the second hypothesis, when predatory fish were present, infected crayfish ate more macroinvertebrates than did uninfected crayfish, likely due to increased boldness. We also observed a

  7. Effects of phosphate supplementation on Pseudomonas aeruginosa invasive behavior in burn wound infections: A simple approach to a big problem.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi-Samani, Soliman; Kouroshfard, Shahriyar; Azarpira, Negar

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of inorganic phosphate supplementation on invasive behavior of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in burn wound infections. An emulsion-based lotion containing sodium dihydrogen phosphate was formulated and then 50 female Sprague-Dawley rats with burn wounds were used to assess the effect of phosphate supplementation on swarming motility of P. aeruginosa. On the second day after burn, four groups of rats were inoculated with P. aeruginosa and one group was left as negative control. The treatment was started on day 3 and the animals were followed up for 4 weeks. Significant improvement in wound healing was observed in the phosphate-receiving group after the 4-week follow-up, compared to the negative control, positive control, and silver sulfadiazine-receiving groups. Histopathological assessment of the tissue samples also indicated the healing process in phosphate-enriched lotion receiving group. The results showed that inorganic phosphate supplementation results in alteration of the virulence behavior of P. aeruginosa and improvement in the wound healing process. In conclusion, phosphate supplementation would be a rational strategy in the eradication of P. aeruginosa wound infection. PMID:26787129

  8. Non-invasive brain stimulation: an interventional tool for enhancing behavioral training after stroke.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Maximilian J; Zimerman, Máximo; Hummel, Friedhelm C

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of disability among adults. Motor deficit is the most common impairment after stroke. Especially, deficits in fine motor skills impair numerous activities of daily life. Re-acquisition of motor skills resulting in improved or more accurate motor performance is paramount to regain function, and is the basis of behavioral motor therapy after stroke. Within the past years, there has been a rapid technological and methodological development in neuroimaging leading to a significant progress in the understanding of the neural substrates that underlie motor skill acquisition and functional recovery in stroke patients. Based on this and the development of novel non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) techniques, new adjuvant interventional approaches that augment the response to behavioral training have been proposed. Transcranial direct current, transcranial magnetic, and paired associative (PAS) stimulation are NIBS techniques that can modulate cortical excitability, neuronal plasticity and interact with learning and memory in both healthy individuals and stroke patients. These techniques can enhance the effect of practice and facilitate the retention of tasks that mimic daily life activities. The purpose of the present review is to provide a comprehensive overview of neuroplastic phenomena in the motor system during learning of a motor skill, recovery after brain injury, and of interventional strategies to enhance the beneficial effects of customarily used neurorehabilitation after stroke. PMID:26029083

  9. Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation: An Interventional Tool for Enhancing Behavioral Training after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wessel, Maximilian J.; Zimerman, Máximo; Hummel, Friedhelm C.

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of disability among adults. Motor deficit is the most common impairment after stroke. Especially, deficits in fine motor skills impair numerous activities of daily life. Re-acquisition of motor skills resulting in improved or more accurate motor performance is paramount to regain function, and is the basis of behavioral motor therapy after stroke. Within the past years, there has been a rapid technological and methodological development in neuroimaging leading to a significant progress in the understanding of the neural substrates that underlie motor skill acquisition and functional recovery in stroke patients. Based on this and the development of novel non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) techniques, new adjuvant interventional approaches that augment the response to behavioral training have been proposed. Transcranial direct current, transcranial magnetic, and paired associative (PAS) stimulation are NIBS techniques that can modulate cortical excitability, neuronal plasticity and interact with learning and memory in both healthy individuals and stroke patients. These techniques can enhance the effect of practice and facilitate the retention of tasks that mimic daily life activities. The purpose of the present review is to provide a comprehensive overview of neuroplastic phenomena in the motor system during learning of a motor skill, recovery after brain injury, and of interventional strategies to enhance the beneficial effects of customarily used neurorehabilitation after stroke. PMID:26029083

  10. Comparable ecological dynamics underlie early cancer invasion and species dispersal, involving self-organizing processes

    PubMed Central

    Marco, Diana E.; Cannas, Sergio A.; Montemurro, Marcelo A.; Hu, Bo; Cheng, Shi-Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Occupancy of new habitats through dispersion is a central process in nature. In particular, long-distance dispersal is involved in the spread of species and epidemics, although it has not been previously related with cancer invasion, a process that involves cell spreading to tissues far away from the primary tumour. Using simulations and real data we show that the early spread of cancer cells is similar to the species individuals spread and we suggest that both processes are represented by a common spatio-temporal signature of long-distance dispersal and subsequent local proliferation. This signature is characterized by a particular fractal geometry of the boundaries of patches generated, and a power-law scaled, disrupted patch size distribution. In contrast, invasions involving only dispersal but not subsequent proliferation (“physiological invasions”) like trophoblast cells invasion during normal human placentation did not show the patch size power-law pattern. Our results are consistent under different temporal and spatial scales, and under different resolution levels of analysis. We conclude that the scaling properties are a hallmark and a direct result of long-distance dispersal and proliferation, and that they could reflect homologous ecological processes of population self-organization during cancer and species spread. Our results are significant for the detection of processes involving long-range dispersal and proliferation like cancer local invasion and metastasis, biological invasions and epidemics, and for the formulation of new cancer therapeutical approaches. PMID:18930739

  11. Comparing open and minimally invasive surgical procedures for oesophagectomy in the treatment of cancer: the ROMIO (Randomised Oesophagectomy: Minimally Invasive or Open) feasibility study and pilot trial.

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, Chris; Avery, Kerry; Berrisford, Richard; Barham, Paul; Noble, Sian M; Fernandez, Aida Moure; Hanna, George; Goldin, Robert; Elliott, Jackie; Wheatley, Timothy; Sanders, Grant; Hollowood, Andrew; Falk, Stephen; Titcomb, Dan; Streets, Christopher; Donovan, Jenny L; Blazeby, Jane M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Localised oesophageal cancer can be curatively treated with surgery (oesophagectomy) but the procedure is complex with a risk of complications, negative effects on quality of life and a recovery period of 6-9 months. Minimal-access surgery may accelerate recovery. OBJECTIVES The ROMIO (Randomised Oesophagectomy: Minimally Invasive or Open) study aimed to establish the feasibility of, and methodology for, a definitive trial comparing minimally invasive and open surgery for oesophagectomy. Objectives were to quantify the number of eligible patients in a pilot trial; develop surgical manuals as the basis for quality assurance; standardise pathological processing; establish a method to blind patients to their allocation in the first week post surgery; identify measures of postsurgical outcome of importance to patients and clinicians; and establish the main cost differences between the surgical approaches. DESIGN Pilot parallel three-arm randomised controlled trial nested within feasibility work. SETTING Two UK NHS departments of upper gastrointestinal surgery. PARTICIPANTS Patients aged ≥ 18 years with histopathological evidence of oesophageal or oesophagogastric junctional adenocarcinoma, squamous cell cancer or high-grade dysplasia, referred for oesophagectomy or oesophagectomy following neoadjuvant chemo(radio)therapy. INTERVENTIONS Oesophagectomy, with patients randomised to open surgery, a hybrid open chest and minimally invasive abdomen or totally minimally invasive access. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE The primary outcome measure for the pilot trial was the number of patients recruited per month, with the main trial considered feasible if at least 2.5 patients per month were recruited. RESULTS During 21 months of recruitment, 263 patients were assessed for eligibility; of these, 135 (51%) were found to be eligible and 104 (77%) agreed to participate, an average of five patients per month. In total, 41 patients were allocated to open surgery, 43 to the

  12. COMPARATIVE CORROSION BEHAVIOR OF TWO PALLADIUM CONTAINING TITANIUM ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    T. Lian, T. Yashiki, T. Nakayama, T. Nakanishi, R. B. Rebak

    2006-07-23

    The ASTM standard B 265 provides the requirements for the chemical composition of titanium (Ti) alloys. It is planned to use corrosion resistant and high strength titanium alloys to fabricate the drip shield at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository. Titanium grade (Gr) 7 (R52400) and other Ti alloys are currently being characterized for this application. Ti Gr 7 contains 0.15% Palladium (Pd) to increase its corrosion performance. In this article we report results on the comparative short term corrosion behavior of Ti Gr 7 and a Ruthenium (Ru) containing alloy (Ti Gr 33). Ti Gr 33 also contains a small amount of Pd. Limited electrochemical testing such as polarization resistance and cyclic potentiodynamic curves showed that both alloys have a similar corrosion behavior in the tested environments.

  13. Extracellular matrix composition and rigidity regulate invasive behavior and response to PDT in 3D pancreatic tumor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, Gwendolyn; El-Hamidi, Hamid; Jafari, Seyedehrojin; Jones, Dustin P.; Celli, Jonathan P.

    2016-03-01

    The composition and mechanical compliance of the extracellular matrix (ECM) have been shown to serve as regulators of tumor growth and invasive behavior. These effects may be particularly relevant in tumors of the pancreas, noted for a profound desmoplastic reaction and an abundance of stroma rich in ECM. In view of recent progress in the clinical implementation of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for pancreatic tumors, in this report we examine how ECM composition and rheological properties impact upon invasive behavior and response to PDT in 3D multicellular pancreatic tumor spheroids in ECM environments with characterized rheological properties. Tumor spheroids were cultured initially in attachment-free conditions to form millimeter-sized spheroids that were transplanted into reconstituted ECM microenvironments (Matrigel and Type I Collagen) that were characterized using bulk oscillatory shear rheology. Analysis of growth behavior shows that the soft collagen ECM promoted growth and extensive invasion and this microenvironment was used in subsequent assessment of PDT and chemotherapy response. Evaluation of treatment response revealed that primary tumor nodule growth is inhibited more effectively with PDT, while verteporfin PDT response is significantly enhanced in the ECM-infiltrating populations that are non-responsive to oxaliplatin chemotherapy. This finding is potentially significant, suggesting the potential for PDT to target these clinically problematic invasive populations that are associated with aggressive metastatic progression and chemoresistance. Experiments to further validate and identify the mechanistic basis of this observation are ongoing.

  14. Family history of later-onset breast cancer, breast healthy behavior and invasive breast cancer among postmenopausal women: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction A family history of later-onset breast cancer (FHLBC) may suggest multi-factorial inheritance of breast cancer risk, including unhealthy lifestyle behaviors that may be shared within families. We assessed whether adherence to lifestyle behaviors recommended for breast cancer prevention--including maintaining a healthful body weight, being physically active and limiting alcohol intake--modifies breast cancer risk attributed to FHLBC in postmenopausal women. Methods Breast cancer outcomes through August 2003 were analyzed in relationship to lifestyle and risk factors collected by questionnaire during enrollment (between 1993 and 1998) of 85,644 postmenopausal women into the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study. Results During a mean follow-up of 5.4 years, 1997 women were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer. The rate of invasive breast cancer among women with an FHLBC who participated in all three behaviors was 5.94 per 1,000 woman-years, compared with 6.97 per 1,000 woman-years among women who participated in none of the behaviors. The rate among women with no FHLBC who participated in all three behavioral conditions was 3.51 per 1,000 woman-years compared to 4.67 per 1,000 woman-years for those who participated in none. We did not observe a clinically important departure from additive effects (Interaction Contrast: 0.00014; 95% CI: -0.00359, 0.00388). Conclusions Participating in breast healthy behaviors was beneficial to postmenopausal women and the degree of this benefit was the same for women with and without an FHLBC. PMID:20939870

  15. Prey-tracking behavior in the invasive terrestrial planarian Platydemus manokwari (Platyhelminthes, Tricladida)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, Noriko; Sugiura, Shinji; Chiba, Satoshi

    2010-11-01

    Platydemus manokwari is a broadly distributed invasive terrestrial flatworm that preys heavily on land snails and has been credited with the demise of numerous threatened island faunas. We examined whether P. manokwari tracks the mucus trails of land snail prey, investigated its ability to determine trail direction, and evaluated prey preference among various land snail species. A plastic treatment plate with the mucus trail of a single species and a control plate without the trail were placed side by side at the exit of cages housing P. manokwari. All trials were then videotaped overnight. The flatworms moved along plates with mucus trails, but did not respond to plates without trails, blank control (distilled water), or with conspecific flatworm trails. When presented at the midpoint of a snail mucus trail, the flatworms followed the trail in a random direction. The flatworms showed a preference when choosing between two plates, each with a mucus trail of different land snail species. Our results suggest that P. manokwari follows snail mucus trails based on chemical cues to increase the chance of encountering prey; however, trail-tracking behavior showed no directionality.

  16. Lysine-specific demethylase-1 contributes to malignant behavior by regulation of invasive activity and metabolic shift in esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kosumi, Keisuke; Baba, Yoshifumi; Sakamoto, Akihisa; Ishimoto, Takatsugu; Harada, Kazuto; Nakamura, Kenichi; Kurashige, Junji; Hiyoshi, Yukiharu; Iwatsuki, Masaaki; Iwagami, Shiro; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Miyamoto, Yuji; Yoshida, Naoya; Oki, Eiji; Watanabe, Masayuki; Hino, Shinjiro; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Baba, Hideo

    2016-01-15

    Lysine-specific demethylase-1 (LSD1) removes the methyl groups from mono- and di-methylated lysine 4 of histone H3. Previous studies have linked LSD1 to malignancy in several human tumors, and LSD1 is considered to epigenetically regulate the energy metabolism genes in adipocytes and hepatocellular carcinoma. This study investigates the function of LSD1 in the invasive activity and the metabolism of esophageal cancer cells. We investigated whether LSD1 immunohistochemical expression levels are related to clinical and pathological features, including the maximum standard uptake value in fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography assay. The influence of LSD1 on cell proliferation, invasion and glucose uptake was evaluated in vitro by using specific small interfering RNA for LSD1, and an LSD1 inhibitor. We also evaluated two major energy pathways (glycolytic pathway and mitochondrial respiration) by measuring the extracellular acidification rate (ECAR) and the oxygen consumption rate (OCR) with an extracellular flux analyzer. High LSD1 immunohistochemical expression was significantly associated with high tumor stage, lymphovascular invasion, poor prognosis, and high maximum standard uptake value in esophageal cancer patients. In the in vitro analysis, LSD1 knockdown significantly suppressed the invasive activity and glucose uptake of cancerous cells, reduced their ECAR and increased their OCR and OCR/ECAR. LSD1 may contribute to malignant behavior by regulating the invasive activity and metabolism, activating the glycolytic pathway and inhibiting the mitochondrial respiration of esophageal cancer cells. The results support LSD1 as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26240060

  17. Comparative Long-term Study of a Large Series of Patients with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma and Invasive Lobular Carcinoma. Loco-Regional Recurrence, Metastasis, and Survival.

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, Antonio; Lain, Josep María; Chabrera, Carol; García Font, Marc; Fraile, Manel; Barco, Israel; Torras, Merçe; Reñe, Asumpta; González, Sonia; González, Clarissa; Piqueras, Mercedes; Veloso, Enrique; Cirera, Lluís; Pessarrodona, Antoni; Giménez, Nuria

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to compare histologic and immunohistochemical features, surgical treatment and clinical course, including disease recurrence, distant metastases, and mortality between patients with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) or invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC). We included 1,745 patients operated for 1,789 breast tumors, with 1,639 IDC (1,600 patients) and 145 patients with ILC and 150 breast tumors. The median follow-up was 76 months. ILC was significantly more likely to be associated with a favorable phenotype. Prevalence of contralateral breast cancer was slightly higher for ILC patients than for IDC patients (4.0% versus 3.2%; p = n.s). ILC was more likely multifocal, estrogen receptor positive, Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-2 (HER2) negative, and with lower proliferative index compared to IDC. Considering conservative surgery, ILC patients required more frequently re-excision and/or mastectomy. Prevalence of stage IIB and III stages were significantly more frequent in ILC patients than in IDC patients (37.4% versus 25.3%, p = 0.006). Positive nodes were significantly more frequent in the ILC patients (44.6% versus 37.0%, p = 0.04). After adjustment for tumor size and nodal status, frequencies of recurrence/metastasis, disease-free and specific survival were similar among patients with IDC and patients with ILC. In conclusion, women with ILC do not have worse clinical outcomes than their counterparts with IDC. Management decisions should be based on individual patient and tumor biologic characteristics rather than on lobular versus ductal histology. PMID:26190560

  18. Flowering phenology of invasive alien plant species compared with native species in three Mediterranean-type ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Oscar; Richardson, David M.; Valladares, Fernando; Castro-Díez, Pilar

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Flowering phenology is a potentially important component of success of alien species, since elevated fecundity may enhance invasiveness. The flowering patterns of invasive alien plant species and related natives were studied in three regions with Mediterranean-type climate: California, Spain and South Africa's Cape region. Methods A total of 227 invasive–native pairs were compared for seven character types across the regions, with each pair selected on the basis that they shared the same habitat type within a region, had a common growth form and pollination type, and belonged to the same family or genus. Key Results Invasive alien plant species have different patterns of flowering phenology from native species in the three regions. Whether the alien species flower earlier, later or at the same time as natives depends on the climatic regime in the native range of the aliens and the proportion of species in the invasive floras originating from different regions. Species invading at least two of the regions displayed the same flowering pattern, showing that flowering phenology is a conservative trait. Invasive species with native ranges in temperate climates flower earlier than natives, those from Mediterranean-type climates at the same time, and species from tropical climates flower later. In California, where the proportion of invaders from the Mediterranean Basin is high, the flowering pattern did not differ between invasive and native species, whereas in Spain the high proportion of tropical species results in a later flowering than natives, and in the Cape region early flowering than natives was the result of a high proportion of temperate invaders. Conclusions Observed patterns are due to the human-induced sympatry of species with different evolutionary histories whose flowering phenology evolved under different climatic regimes. The severity of the main abiotic filters imposed by the invaded regions (e.g. summer drought) has not been

  19. Impact comparative study of phone carcasses behavior by FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, Cărăuşu; Plăvănescu, Simona; Dumitru, Nedelcu

    2015-07-01

    A constant concern of scientific research is based on plastics replace with biodegradable materials that reduce the adverse impact of waste on the environment. A biodegradable material that arouses interest lately is Arboform which is made of lignin, a component of wood and woody plants. Replacing plastic with Arboform in carrying components of products requires technical and economic studies on the implications of such replacement. Numerical simulation methods are a fast and economical way of analyzing the behavior of a product in various mechanical, thermal, electromagnetic and so on. The paper presents comparative results of numerical simulation using the software package SolidWorks impact behavior through the “Drop Test” of half shells made of High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) and of the Arboform LV3 Nature. Simulation watched the half-carcass behavior in three cases of accidental impact, “head”, “corner” and the “back side”. We analyzed the size and location of the maximum voltage and maximum deformation resulting from impact. Simulations have shown for all three cases a maximum voltage increase when using Arboform to use PEDH 93% for impact “forward” and “corner” and only 48.77% “back side” impact. If the maximum displacement, it increasing from carcasses of Arboform 4% for impact “head” and 6% for impact “corner”, but fell by 2.7% for the “back side” impact. The significant increase of stress can be attributed to the higher density of Arboform to PEDH, which led to different weights of the two half-carcasses.

  20. Nucleolin identified by comparative mass‑spectra analysis is a potential marker for invasive progression of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Qian, Bin; Yao, Yusheng; Liu, Yihong; Yan, Maolin; Huang, Ying; Chen, Yanqing

    2014-09-01

    At present, the diagnosis and prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) metastasis remains poor. Recently, a number of proteins associated with the metastasis and invasion of HCC were identified; however, the effective markers require further elucidation. In the current study, a nucleolin expression was observed in MHCC97L and HCCLM9 HCC cell lines, with low and high metastatic potentials respectively, using comparative proteomics. The data indicated that nucleolin expression in the nucleus was significantly higher in HCCLM9 cells, and it primarily influenced the migration of HCC cells in vitro. Thus, to the best of our knowledge this is the first study to hypothesize that nucleolin may be a novel marker for HCC invasive progression. PMID:24927373

  1. Projecting future expansion of invasive species: comparing and improving methodologies for species distribution modeling.

    PubMed

    Mainali, Kumar P; Warren, Dan L; Dhileepan, Kunjithapatham; McConnachie, Andrew; Strathie, Lorraine; Hassan, Gul; Karki, Debendra; Shrestha, Bharat B; Parmesan, Camille

    2015-12-01

    Modeling the distributions of species, especially of invasive species in non-native ranges, involves multiple challenges. Here, we developed some novel approaches to species distribution modeling aimed at reducing the influences of such challenges and improving the realism of projections. We estimated species-environment relationships for Parthenium hysterophorus L. (Asteraceae) with four modeling methods run with multiple scenarios of (i) sources of occurrences and geographically isolated background ranges for absences, (ii) approaches to drawing background (absence) points, and (iii) alternate sets of predictor variables. We further tested various quantitative metrics of model evaluation against biological insight. Model projections were very sensitive to the choice of training dataset. Model accuracy was much improved using a global dataset for model training, rather than restricting data input to the species' native range. AUC score was a poor metric for model evaluation and, if used alone, was not a useful criterion for assessing model performance. Projections away from the sampled space (i.e., into areas of potential future invasion) were very different depending on the modeling methods used, raising questions about the reliability of ensemble projections. Generalized linear models gave very unrealistic projections far away from the training region. Models that efficiently fit the dominant pattern, but exclude highly local patterns in the dataset and capture interactions as they appear in data (e.g., boosted regression trees), improved generalization of the models. Biological knowledge of the species and its distribution was important in refining choices about the best set of projections. A post hoc test conducted on a new Parthenium dataset from Nepal validated excellent predictive performance of our 'best' model. We showed that vast stretches of currently uninvaded geographic areas on multiple continents harbor highly suitable habitats for parthenium

  2. Comparative genetics of the inv-spa invasion gene complex of Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Boyd, E F; Li, J; Ochman, H; Selander, R K

    1997-03-01

    The chromosomal region containing the Salmonella enterica pathogenic island inv-spa was present in the last common ancestor of all the contemporary lineages of salmonellae. For multiple strains of S. enterica, representing all eight subspecies, nucleotide sequences were obtained for five genes of the inv-spa invasion complex, invH, invE, invA, spaM, and spaN, al of which encode proteins that are required for entry of the bacteria into cultured epithelial cells. The invE, invA, spaM, and spaN genes were present in all eight subspecies of S. enterica, and for invE and invA and their products, levels of sequence variation among strains were within the ranges reported for housekeeping genes. In contrast, the InvH, SpaM, and SpaN proteins were unusually variable in amino acid sequence. Furthermore, invH was absent from the subspecies V isolates examined. The SpaM and SpaN proteins provide further evidence of a relationship (first detected by Li et al. [J. Li, H. Ochman, E. A. Groisman, E. F. Boyd, F. Solomon, K. Nelson, and R. K. Selander, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92:7252-7256, 1995]) between the cellular location of the products of the inv-spa genes and evolutionary rate, as reflected in the level of polymorphism within S. enterica. Invasion proteins that are membrane bound or membrane associated are relatively conserved in amino acid sequence, whereas those that are exported to the extracellular environment are hypervariable, possibly reflecting the action of diversifying selection. PMID:9068645

  3. Do invaders always perform better? Comparing the response of native and invasive shrimps to temperature and salinity gradients in south-west Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejeusne, Christophe; Latchere, Oïhana; Petit, Nicolas; Rico, Ciro; Green, Andy J.

    2014-01-01

    Invasive species are often thought to benefit from climate change, outcompeting native species as temperatures increase. However, the physiological tolerance has been little explored as a potential mechanism explaining biological invasion success. In this study, we used empirical data from both invasive and native estuarine species as a case study to address the hypotheses that (1) invasive species show a better resistance to acute thermal stress, (2) invasive species present lower oxygen consumption rates owing to greater resistance to environmental stressors, and (3) native species have lower survival rates under chronic temperature and salinity stress. We conducted various comparative experiments on three sympatric and syntopic closely related shrimp species (one invasive Palaemon macrodactylus, and two natives Palaemon longirostris and Palaemonetes varians). We evaluated their critical temperature maxima, their oxygen consumption rates under different salinities and temperatures, and their survival rates under chronic salinity and temperature. We found that the invasive species was the most tolerant to rapid increase in temperature, and consistently consumed less oxygen over a broad range of temperatures and salinities. Palaemon macrodactylus also had lower mortality rates at high temperatures than P. longirostris. These results support previously reported differences in physiological tolerance between native and invasive species, with the invasive species always performing better. The consistently higher tolerance of the non-indigenous species to temperature variation suggests that climate change will increase the success of invaders.

  4. Loss of MLCK leads to disruption of cell-cell adhesion and invasive behavior of breast epithelial cells via increased expression of EGFR and ERK/JNK signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, D Y; Helfman, D M

    2016-08-25

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) expression is downregulated in breast cancer, including invasive ductal carcinoma compared with ductal breast carcinoma in situ and metastatic breast tumors. However, little is known about how loss of MLCK expression contributes to tumor progression. MLCK is a component of the actin cytoskeleton and its known role is the phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain of myosin II. To gain insights into the role of MLCK in breast cancer, we perturbed its function using small interfering RNA (siRNA) or pharmacological inhibition in untransformed breast epithelial cells (MCF10A). Loss of MLCK by siRNAs led to increased cell migration and invasion, disruption of cell-cell adhesions and enhanced formation of focal adhesions at the leading edge of migratory cells. In addition, downregulation of MLCK cooperated with HER2 in MCF10A cells to promote cell migration and invasion and low levels of MLCK is associated with a poor prognosis in HER2-positive breast cancer patients. Associated with these altered migratory behaviors were increased expression of epidermal growth factor receptor and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathways in MLCK downregulated MCF10A cells. By contrast, inhibition of the kinase function of MLCK using pharmacological agents inhibited cell migration and invasion, and did not affect cellular adhesions. Our results show that loss of MLCK contributes to the migratory properties of epithelial cells resulting from changes in cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions, and increased epidermal growth factor receptor signaling. These findings suggest that decreased expression of MLCK may have a critical role during tumor progression by facilitating the metastatic potential of tumor cells. PMID:26876209

  5. Comparative flight morphology in queens of invasive and native Patagonian bumblebees (Hymenoptera: Bombus).

    PubMed

    Polidori, Carlo; Nieves-Aldrey, José Luis

    2015-02-01

    Since its introduction in Chile, the European Bombus terrestris L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae) has progressively reduced the abundance of the native Patagonian bumblebee, Bombus dahlbomii Guérin. Because an important cause of successful invasion of a species may depend on a potentially advantageous phenotype, we studied morphologies related to flight performance (flight muscle ratio (FMR), wing loading (WL), excess power index (EPI, which integrates FMR and WL) and wing aspect ratio (AR)) in the queens of the two species. Previous empirical studies showed that greater FMR, AR and EPI, and lower WL increase flight performance. In the Patagonian Chilean fjord where the study was carried out, B. dahlbomii was 40% heavier than B. terrestris, a difference theoretically allowing the queens of the native species to take off with heavier loads, despite the fact that the two species have virtually identical FMRs. However, FMR negatively depended on body mass at the intra-specific level. The total wing area was 35% greater in B. dahlbomii, but the difference in forewing length was only of 16%. Once taken into account the effect of body size, WL, was significantly lower in B. terrestris. AR increased with body mass and did not differ between species. EPI was weakly but significantly higher in B. terrestris. Experiments formally linking such parameters with flight performance may help to explain the observed quick and wide spread of this alien species in Patagonia in the last few years. PMID:25499798

  6. Comparative and functional studies of Drosophila species invasion by the gypsy endogenous retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Mejlumian, Lucine; Pélisson, Alain; Bucheton, Alain; Terzian, Christophe

    2002-01-01

    Gypsy is an endogenous retrovirus of Drosophila melanogaster. Phylogenetic studies suggest that occasional horizontal transfer events of gypsy occur between Drosophila species. gypsy possesses infective properties associated with the products of the envelope gene that might be at the origin of these interspecies transfers. We report here the existence of DNA sequences putatively encoding full-length Env proteins in the genomes of Drosophila species other than D. melanogaster, suggesting that potentially infective gypsy copies able to spread between sexually isolated species can occur. The ability of gypsy to invade the genome of a new species is conditioned by its capacity to be expressed in the naive genome. The genetic basis for the regulation of gypsy activity in D. melanogaster is now well known, and it has been assigned to an X-linked gene called flamenco. We established an experimental simulation of the invasion of the D. melanogaster genome by gypsy elements derived from other Drosophila species, which demonstrates that these non- D. melanogaster gypsy elements escape the repression exerted by the D. melanogaster flamenco gene. PMID:11805056

  7. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Common and Specific Tags for Root Hair and Crack-Entry Invasion in Sesbania rostrata1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Capoen, Ward; Den Herder, Jeroen; Rombauts, Stephane; De Gussem, Jeroen; De Keyser, Annick; Holsters, Marcelle; Goormachtig, Sofie

    2007-01-01

    The tropical legume Sesbania rostrata provides its microsymbiont Azorhizobium caulinodans with versatile invasion strategies to allow nodule formation in temporarily flooded habitats. In aerated soils, the bacteria enter via the root hair curling mechanism. Submergence prevents this epidermal invasion by accumulation of inhibiting concentrations of ethylene and, under these conditions, the bacterial colonization occurs via intercellular cortical infection at lateral root bases. The transcriptome of both invasion ways was compared by cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis. Clusters of gene tags were identified that were specific for either epidermal or cortical invasion or were shared by both. The data provide insight into mechanisms that control infection and illustrate that entry via the epidermis adds a layer of complexity to rhizobial invasion. PMID:17600136

  8. Selenium exposure results in reduced reproduction in an invasive ant species and altered competitive behavior for a native ant species.

    PubMed

    De La Riva, Deborah G; Trumble, John T

    2016-06-01

    Competitive ability and numerical dominance are important factors contributing to the ability of invasive ant species to establish and expand their ranges in new habitats. However, few studies have investigated the impact of environmental contamination on competitive behavior in ants as a potential factor influencing dynamics between invasive and native ant species. Here we investigated the widespread contaminant selenium to investigate its potential influence on invasion by the exotic Argentine ant, Linepithema humile, through effects on reproduction and competitive behavior. For the fecundity experiment, treatments were provided to Argentine ant colonies via to sugar water solutions containing one of three concentrations of selenium (0, 5 and 10 μg Se mL(-1)) that fall within the range found in soil and plants growing in contaminated areas. Competition experiments included both the Argentine ant and the native Dorymyrmex bicolor to determine the impact of selenium exposure (0 or 15 μg Se mL(-1)) on exploitation- and interference-competition between ant species. The results of the fecundity experiment revealed that selenium negatively impacted queen survival and brood production of Argentine ants. Viability of the developing brood was also affected in that offspring reached adulthood only in colonies that were not given selenium, whereas those in treated colonies died in their larval stages. Selenium exposure did not alter direct competitive behaviors for either species, but selenium exposure contributed to an increased bait discovery time for D. bicolor. Our results suggest that environmental toxins may not only pose problems for native ant species, but may also serve as a potential obstacle for establishment among exotic species. PMID:27038576

  9. Comparing the Invasibility of Experimental “Reefs” with Field Observations of Natural Reefs and Artificial Structures

    PubMed Central

    Dafforn, Katherine A.; Glasby, Tim M.; Johnston, Emma L.

    2012-01-01

    Natural systems are increasingly being modified by the addition of artificial habitats which may facilitate invasion. Where invaders are able to disperse from artificial habitats, their impact may spread to surrounding natural communities and therefore it is important to investigate potential factors that reduce or enhance invasibility. We surveyed the distribution of non-indigenous and native invertebrates and algae between artificial habitats and natural reefs in a marine subtidal system. We also deployed sandstone plates as experimental ‘reefs’ and manipulated the orientation, starting assemblage and degree of shading. Invertebrates (non-indigenous and native) appeared to be responding to similar environmental factors (e.g. orientation) and occupied most space on artificial structures and to a lesser extent reef walls. Non-indigenous invertebrates are less successful than native invertebrates on horizontal reefs despite functional similarities. Manipulative experiments revealed that even when non-indigenous invertebrates invade vertical “reefs”, they are unlikely to gain a foothold and never exceed covers of native invertebrates (regardless of space availability). Community ecology suggests that invertebrates will dominate reef walls and algae horizontal reefs due to functional differences, however our surveys revealed that native algae dominate both vertical and horizontal reefs in shallow estuarine systems. Few non-indigenous algae were sampled in the study, however where invasive algal species are present in a system, they may present a threat to reef communities. Our findings suggest that non-indigenous species are less successful at occupying space on reef compared to artificial structures, and manipulations of biotic and abiotic conditions (primarily orientation and to a lesser extent biotic resistance) on experimental “reefs” explained a large portion of this variation, however they could not fully explain the magnitude of differences. PMID

  10. Does minimally invasive oesophagectomy provide a benefit in hospital length of stay when compared with open oesophagectomy?

    PubMed

    Rodham, Paul; Batty, Jonathan A; McElnay, Philip J; Immanuel, Arul

    2016-03-01

    A best evidence topic in thoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: 'in patients undergoing oesophagectomy, does a minimally invasive approach convey a benefit in hospital length of stay (LOS), when compared to an open approach?' A total of 647 papers were identified, using an a priori defined search strategy; 24 papers represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date, country of publication, patient group, study type, relevant outcomes and key results are tabulated. Of the studies identified, data from two randomized controlled trials were available. The first randomized study compared the use of open thoracotomy and laparotomy versus thoracoscopy and laparoscopy. Those undergoing minimally invasive oesophagectomy (MIO) left hospital on average 3 days earlier than those treated with the open oesophagectomy (OO) technique (P = 0.044). The other randomized trial, which compared thoracotomy with thoracoscopy and laparoscopy, demonstrated a reduction of 1.8 days in the LOS when employing the MIO technique (P < 0.001). With the addition of the remaining 22 non-randomized studies, comprising 3 prospective and 19 retrospective cohort studies, which are heterogeneous with regard to their design, study populations and outcomes; data are available representing 3173 MIO and 25 691 OO procedures. In total, 13 studies (including the randomized trials) demonstrate a significant reduction in hospital LOS associated with MIO; 10 suggest no significant difference between techniques; and only 1 suggests a significantly greater length of stay associated with MIO. The only two randomized trials comparing MIO and OO demonstrated a reduction in length of stay in the MIO group, without compromising survival or increasing complication rates. All bar one of the non-randomized studies demonstrated either a significant reduction in length of stay with MIO or no difference. The benefit in reduced

  11. French invasive Asian tiger mosquito populations harbor reduced bacterial microbiota and genetic diversity compared to Vietnamese autochthonous relatives

    PubMed Central

    Minard, G.; Tran, F. H.; Van, Van Tran; Goubert, C.; Bellet, C.; Lambert, G.; Kim, Khanh Ly Huynh; Thuy, Trang Huynh Thi; Mavingui, P.; Valiente Moro, C.

    2015-01-01

    The Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus is one of the most significant pathogen vectors of the twenty-first century. Originating from Asia, it has invaded a wide range of eco-climatic regions worldwide. The insect-associated microbiota is now recognized to play a significant role in host biology. While genetic diversity bottlenecks are known to result from biological invasions, the resulting shifts in host-associated microbiota diversity has not been thoroughly investigated. To address this subject, we compared four autochthonous Ae. albopictus populations in Vietnam, the native area of Ae. albopictus, and three populations recently introduced to Metropolitan France, with the aim of documenting whether these populations display differences in host genotype and bacterial microbiota. Population-level genetic diversity (microsatellite markers and COI haplotype) and bacterial diversity (16S rDNA metabarcoding) were compared between field-caught mosquitoes. Bacterial microbiota from the whole insect bodies were largely dominated by Wolbachia pipientis. Targeted analysis of the gut microbiota revealed a greater bacterial diversity in which a fraction was common between French and Vietnamese populations. The genus Dysgonomonas was the most prevalent and abundant across all studied populations. Overall genetic diversities of both hosts and bacterial microbiota were significantly reduced in recently established populations of France compared to the autochthonous populations of Vietnam. These results open up many important avenues of investigation in order to link the process of geographical invasion to shifts in commensal and symbiotic microbiome communities, as such shifts may have dramatic impacts on the biology and/or vector competence of invading hematophagous insects. PMID:26441903

  12. A comparative toxicity study between an autochthonous Artemia and a non native invasive species.

    PubMed

    Leis, Marilena; Manfra, Loredana; Taddia, Lucia; Chicca, Milvia; Trentini, Pierluigi; Savorelli, Federica

    2014-08-01

    Acute heavy metal toxicity was compared in nauplii of an autochthonous Artemia parthenogenetica (Branchiopoda, Anostraca) from Saline di Cervia (Ravenna, Italy) and of a non native commercially available A. franciscana. No significant difference in sensitivity was detected between two species. PMID:24825725

  13. A Comparative Evaluation of the Effect of Bonding Agent on the Tensile Bond Strength of Two Pit and Fissure Sealants Using Invasive and Non-invasive Techniques: An in–vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shamsher; Adlakha, Vivek; Babaji, Prashant; Chandna, Preetika; Thomas, Abi M.; Chopra, Saroj

    2013-01-01

    Background: Newer technologies and the development of pit and fissure sealants have shifted the treatment philosophy from ‘drill and fill’ to that of ‘seal and heal’. Aims: The purpose of this in–vitro study was to evaluate the effects of bonding agents on the tensile bond strengths of two pit and fissure sealants by using invasive and non-invasive techniques. Study Design and Methods: One hundred and twenty bicuspids were collected and teeth were divided into two groups: Group-I (Clinpro) and Group-II (Conseal f) with 60 teeth in each group. For evaluating tensile bond strengths, occlusal surfaces of all the teeth were flattened by reducing buccal and lingual cusps without disturbing fissures. Standardised polyvinyl tube was bonded to occlusal surfaces with respective materials. Sealants were applied, with or without bonding agents, in increments and they were light cured. Tensile bond strengths were determined by using Universal Testing Machine. Statistical Analysis: Data were then statistically analysed by using Student t–test for comparison. Results: A statistically significant difference was found in tensile bond strength in invasive with bonding agent group than in non-invasive with bonding agent group. Conclusion: This study revealed that invasive techniques increase the tensile bond strengths of sealants as compared to non- invasive techniques and that the use of a bonding agent as an intermediate layer between the tooth and fissure sealant is beneficial for increasing the bond strength. PMID:24298525

  14. Comparing the ecological impacts of native and invasive crayfish: could native species' translocation do more harm than good?

    PubMed

    James, J; Slater, F M; Vaughan, I P; Young, K A; Cable, J

    2015-05-01

    Biological invasions are a principal threat to global biodiversity. Omnivores, such as crayfish, are among the most important groups of invaders. Their introduction often results in biodiversity loss, particularly of their native counterparts. Managed relocations of native crayfish from areas under threat from invasive crayfish into isolated 'ark sites' are sometimes suggested as a conservation strategy for native crayfish; however, such relocations may have unintended detrimental consequences for the recipient ecosystem. Despite this, there have been few attempts to quantify the relative impacts of native and invasive crayfish on aquatic ecosystems. To address this deficiency we conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of native and invasive crayfish on nine ecosystem components: decomposition rate, primary productivity, plant biomass, invertebrate density, biomass and diversity, fish biomass and refuge use, and amphibian larval survival. Native and invasive crayfish significantly reduced invertebrate density and biomass, fish biomass and amphibian survival rate and significantly increased decomposition rates. Invasive crayfish also significantly reduced plant biomass and invertebrate diversity and increased primary productivity. These results show that native and invasive crayfish have wide-ranging impacts on aquatic ecosystems that may be exacerbated for invasive species. Subsequent analysis showed that the impacts of invasive crayfish were significantly greater, in comparison to native crayfish, for decomposition and primary productivity but not invertebrate density, biomass and diversity. Overall, our findings reconfirm the ecosystem altering abilities of both native and invasive crayfish, enforcing the need to carefully regulate managed relocations of native species as well as to develop control programs for invasives. PMID:25549809

  15. The impacts of an invasive species citizen science training program on participant attitudes, behavior, and science literacy.

    PubMed

    Crall, Alycia W; Jordan, Rebecca; Holfelder, Kirstin; Newman, Gregory J; Graham, Jim; Waller, Donald M

    2013-08-01

    Citizen science can make major contributions to informal science education by targeting participants' attitudes and knowledge about science while changing human behavior towards the environment. We examined how training associated with an invasive species citizen science program affected participants in these areas. We found no changes in science literacy or overall attitudes between tests administered just before and after a one-day training program, matching results from other studies. However, we found improvements in science literacy and knowledge using context-specific measures and in self-reported intention to engage in pro-environmental activities. While we noted modest change in knowledge and attitudes, we found comparison and interpretation of these data difficult in the absence of other studies using similar measures. We suggest that alternative survey instruments are needed and should be calibrated appropriately to the pre-existing attitudes, behavior, and levels of knowledge in these relatively sophisticated target groups. PMID:23825234

  16. Comparative Studies on Root Invasion, Root Galling, and Fecundity of Three Meloidogyne spp. on a Susceptible Tobacco Cultivar

    PubMed Central

    Arens, M. L.; Rich, J. R.; Dickson, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    Root invasion, root galling, and fecundity of Meloidogyne javanica, M. arenaria, and M. incognita on tobacco was compared in greenhouse and controlled environment experiments. Significantly more M. javanica than M. arenaria or M. incognita larvae were found in tobacco roots at 2, 4, and 6 d after inoculation. Eight days after inoculation there were significantly more M. arenaria and M. javanica than M. incognita larvae. Ten days after inoculation no significant differences were found among the three Meloidogyne species inside the roots. Galls induced by a single larva or several larvae of M. javanica were significantly larger than galls induced by M. incognita: M. arenaria galls were intermediate in size. Only slight differences in numbers of egg masses or numbers of eggs produced by the three Meloidogyne species were observed up to 35 d after inoculation. PMID:19300745

  17. Comparative Effects of Snoring Sound between Two Minimally Invasive Surgeries in the Treatment of Snoring: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Li-Ang; Yu, Jen-Fang; Lo, Yu-Lun; Chen, Ning-Hung; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Huang, Chung-Guei; Cheng, Wen-Nuan; Li, Hsueh-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive surgeries of the soft palate have emerged as a less-invasive treatment for habitual snoring. To date, there is only limited information available comparing the effects of snoring sound between different minimally invasive surgeries in the treatment of habitual snoring. Objective To compare the efficacy of palatal implant and radiofrequency surgery, in the reduction of snoring through subjective evaluation of snoring and objective snoring sound analysis. Patients and Method Thirty patients with habitual snoring due to palatal obstruction (apnea-hypopnea index ≤15, body max index ≤30) were prospectively enrolled and randomized to undergo a single session of palatal implant or temperature-controlled radiofrequency surgery of the soft palate under local anesthesia. Snoring was primarily evaluated by the patient with a 10 cm visual analogue scale (VAS) at baseline and at a 3-month follow-up visit and the change in VAS was the primary outcome. Moreover, life qualities, measured by snore outcomes survey, and full-night snoring sounds, analyzed by a sound analytic program (Snore Map), were also investigated at the same time. Results Twenty-eight patients completed the study; 14 received palatal implant surgery and 14 underwent radiofrequency surgery. The VAS and snore outcomes survey scores were significantly improved in both groups. However, the good response (postoperative VAS ≤3 or postoperative VAS ≤5 plus snore outcomes survey score ≥60) rate of the palatal implant group was significantly higher than that of the radiofrequency group (79% vs. 29%, P = 0.021). The maximal loudness of low-frequency (40–300 Hz) snores was reduced significantly in the palatal implant group. In addition, the snoring index was significantly reduced in the radiofrequency group. Conclusions Both palatal implants and a single-stage radiofrequency surgery improve subjective snoring outcomes, but palatal implants have a greater effect on most measures

  18. A Comparative Analysis of Three Non-Invasive Human-Machine Interfaces for the Disabled

    PubMed Central

    Ravindra, Vikram; Castellini, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    In the framework of rehabilitation robotics, a major role is played by the human–machine interface (HMI) used to gather the patient’s intent from biological signals, and convert them into control signals for the robotic artifact. Surprisingly, decades of research have not yet declared what the optimal HMI is in this context; in particular, the traditional approach based upon surface electromyography (sEMG) still yields unreliable results due to the inherent variability of the signal. To overcome this problem, the scientific community has recently been advocating the discovery, analysis, and usage of novel HMIs to supersede or augment sEMG; a comparative analysis of such HMIs is therefore a very desirable investigation. In this paper, we compare three such HMIs employed in the detection of finger forces, namely sEMG, ultrasound imaging, and pressure sensing. The comparison is performed along four main lines: the accuracy in the prediction, the stability over time, the wearability, and the cost. A psychophysical experiment involving ten intact subjects engaged in a simple finger-flexion task was set up. Our results show that, at least in this experiment, pressure sensing and sEMG yield comparably good prediction accuracies as opposed to ultrasound imaging; and that pressure sensing enjoys a much better stability than sEMG. Given that pressure sensors are as wearable as sEMG electrodes but way cheaper, we claim that this HMI could represent a valid alternative/augmentation to sEMG to control a multi-fingered hand prosthesis. PMID:25386135

  19. MIS-behavior: practical heuristics for precise pediatric minimally invasive surgery.

    PubMed

    Blinman, Thane A

    2015-02-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has changed pediatric urology and general surgery, offering less morbidity and new surgical options for many procedures. This promise goes unrealized when technical methods lag. Application of MIS in children is uneven after more than 2 decades of application. Principles of versatile and proficient technique may remain unstated and implicit in surgical training, often leaving surgical training an exercise in inference and imitation. This article describes some essential practical principles of precision MIS applied to patients of any size. PMID:25455179

  20. Suppression of growth and invasive behavior of human prostate cancer cells by ProstaCaid™: mechanism of activity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiahua; Eliaz, Isaac; Sliva, Daniel

    2011-06-01

    Since the use of dietary supplements as alternative treatments or adjuvant therapies in cancer treatment is growing, a scientific verification of their biological activity and the detailed mechanisms of their action are necessary for the acceptance of dietary supplements in conventional cancer treatments. In the present study we have evaluated the anti-cancer effects of dietary supplement ProstaCaid™ (PC) which contains mycelium from medicinal mushrooms (Ganoderma lucidum, Coriolus versicolor, Phellinus linteus), saw palmetto berry, pomegranate, pumpkin seed, green tea [40% epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG)], Japanese knotweed (50% resveratrol), extracts of turmeric root (BCM-95®), grape skin, pygeum bark, sarsaparilla root, Scutellaria barbata, eleuthero root, Job's tears, astragalus root, skullcap, dandelion, coptis root, broccoli, and stinging nettle, with purified vitamin C, vitamin D3, selenium, quercetin, citrus bioflavonoid complex, β sitosterolzinc, lycopene, α lipoic acid, boron, berberine and 3.3'-diinodolymethane (DIM). We show that PC treatment resulted in the inhibition of cell proliferation of the highly invasive human hormone refractory (independent) PC-3 prostate cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner with IC50 56.0, 45.6 and 39.0 µg/ml for 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively. DNA-microarray analysis demonstrated that PC inhibits proliferation through the modulation of expression of CCND1, CDK4, CDKN1A, E2F1, MAPK6 and PCNA genes. In addition, PC also suppresses metastatic behavior of PC-3 by the inhibition of cell adhesion, cell migration and cell invasion, which was associated with the down-regulation of expression of CAV1, IGF2, NR2F1, and PLAU genes and suppressed secretion of the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) from PC-3 cells. In conclusion, the dietary supplement PC is a promising natural complex with the potency to inhibit invasive human prostate cancer. PMID:21468543

  1. Socially Responsible Knowledge and Behaviors: Comparing Upper vs. Lower Classmen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozar, Joy M.; Connell, Kim Y. Hiller

    2010-01-01

    Utilizing a sample of undergraduate students and survey research methods, this study examined knowledge on issues of social responsibility within the apparel and textiles industry, comparing the sophistication among upper- versus lower-classmen. The study also investigated the differences between students in their socially responsible apparel…

  2. New York Times First Day Coverage of Two U.S. Caribbean Invasions: A Comparative Content Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tino, Richard

    A study examined reports of the American invasions of the Dominican Republic (1965) and Grenada (1983) to determine whether there were substantive differences in coverage as a result of differing journalistic conditions. First-day New York Times reports of both invasions were analyzed both quantitatively (number of stories published, amount of…

  3. Comparative behavior of plutonium and americium in the equatorial Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Noshkin, V.E.; Wong, K.M.; Jokela, T.A.; Brunk, J.L.; Eagle, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Inventories of /sup 239 +240/Pu and /sup 241/Am greatly in excess of global fallout levels persist in the benthic environments of Bikini and Enewetak Atolls. The amount of /sup 239 +240/Pu mobilized to solution at the atolls can be predicted from a distribution coefficient K/sub d/ of 2.3 x 10/sup 5/ and the mean sediment concentrations. The mobilized /sup 239 +240/Pu has solute-like characteristics and different valence states coexist in solution - the largest fraction of the soluble plutonium is in an oxidized form (+V,VI). The adsorption of plutonium to sediments is not completely reversible because of changes that occur in the relative amounts of the mixed oxidation states in solution with time. Characteristics of /sup 239 +240/Pu described at one location may not necessarily describe its behavior elsewhere. The relative amounts of /sup 241/Am to /sup 239 +240/Pu may be altered in future years because of mobilization and radiological decay.

  4. Osteoactivin (GPNMB) ectodomain protein promotes growth and invasive behavior of human lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Oyewumi, Moses O.; Manickavasagam, Dharani; Novak, Kimberly; Wehrung, Daniel; Paulic, Nikola; Moussa, Fouad M.; Sondag, Gregory R.; Safadi, Fayez F.

    2016-01-01

    The potential application of GPNMB/OA as a therapeutic target for lung cancer will require a greater understanding of the impact of GPNMB/OA ectodomain (ECD) protein shedding into tumor tissues. Thus, in this work we characterized GPNMB/OA expression and extent of shedding of its ECD protein while evaluating the impact on lung cancer progression using three non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines: A549, SK-MES-1 and calu-6. We observed a direct correlation (R2 = 0.89) between GPNMB/OA expression on NSCLC cells and the extent of GPNMB/OA ECD protein shedding. Meanwhile, siRNA-mediated knockdown of GPNMB/OA in cancer cells significantly reduced GPNMB/OA ECD protein shedding, migration, invasion and adhesion to extracellular matrix materials. Also, exogenous treatment of cancer cells (expressing low GPNMB/OA) with recombinant GPNMB/OA protein (rOA) significantly facilitated cell invasion and migration, but the effects of rOA was negated by inclusion of a selective RGD peptide. Further studies in athymic (nu/nu) mice-bearing calu-6 showed that intratumoral supplementation with rOA effectively facilitated in vivo tumor growth as characterized by a high number of proliferating cells (Ki67 staining) coupled with a low number of apoptotic cells. Taken together, our results accentuate the relevance of GPNMB/OA ECD protein shedding to progression of lung cancer. Thus, strategies that suppress GPNMB/OA expression on lung cancer cells as well as negate shedding of GPNMB/OA ECD protein are worthy of consideration in lung cancer therapeutics. PMID:26883195

  5. Comparative transcriptomic analysis reveals the oncogenic fusion protein PAX3-FOXO1 globally alters mRNA and miRNA to enhance myoblast invasion

    PubMed Central

    Loupe, J M; Miller, P J; Bonner, B P; Maggi, E C; Vijayaraghavan, J; Crabtree, J S; Taylor, C M; Zabaleta, J; Hollenbach, A D

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma, one of the most common childhood sarcomas, is comprised of two main subtypes, embryonal and alveolar (ARMS). ARMS, the more aggressive subtype, is primarily characterized by the t(2;13)(p35;p14) chromosomal translocation, which fuses two transcription factors, PAX3 and FOXO1 to generate the oncogenic fusion protein PAX3-FOXO1. Patients with PAX3-FOXO1-postitive tumors have a poor prognosis, in part due to the enhanced local invasive capacity of these cells, which leads to the increased metastatic potential for this tumor. Despite this knowledge, little is known about the role that the oncogenic fusion protein has in this increased invasive potential. In this report we use large-scale comparative transcriptomic analyses in physiologically relevant primary myoblasts to demonstrate that the presence of PAX3-FOXO1 is sufficient to alter the expression of 70 mRNA and 27 miRNA in a manner predicted to promote cellular invasion. In contrast the expression of PAX3 alters 60 mRNA and 23 miRNA in a manner predicted to inhibit invasion. We demonstrate that these alterations in mRNA and miRNA translate into changes in the invasive potential of primary myoblasts with PAX3-FOXO1 increasing invasion nearly 2-fold while PAX3 decreases invasion nearly 4-fold. Taken together, these results allow us to build off of previous reports and develop a more expansive molecular model by which the presence of PAX3-FOXO1 alters global gene regulatory networks to enhance the local invasiveness of cells. Further, the global nature of our observed changes highlights the fact that instead of focusing on a single-gene target, we must develop multi-faceted treatment regimens targeting multiple genes of a single oncogenic phenotype or multiple genes that target different oncogenic phenotypes for tumor progression. PMID:27454080

  6. Comparative transcriptomic analysis reveals the oncogenic fusion protein PAX3-FOXO1 globally alters mRNA and miRNA to enhance myoblast invasion.

    PubMed

    Loupe, J M; Miller, P J; Bonner, B P; Maggi, E C; Vijayaraghavan, J; Crabtree, J S; Taylor, C M; Zabaleta, J; Hollenbach, A D

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma, one of the most common childhood sarcomas, is comprised of two main subtypes, embryonal and alveolar (ARMS). ARMS, the more aggressive subtype, is primarily characterized by the t(2;13)(p35;p14) chromosomal translocation, which fuses two transcription factors, PAX3 and FOXO1 to generate the oncogenic fusion protein PAX3-FOXO1. Patients with PAX3-FOXO1-postitive tumors have a poor prognosis, in part due to the enhanced local invasive capacity of these cells, which leads to the increased metastatic potential for this tumor. Despite this knowledge, little is known about the role that the oncogenic fusion protein has in this increased invasive potential. In this report we use large-scale comparative transcriptomic analyses in physiologically relevant primary myoblasts to demonstrate that the presence of PAX3-FOXO1 is sufficient to alter the expression of 70 mRNA and 27 miRNA in a manner predicted to promote cellular invasion. In contrast the expression of PAX3 alters 60 mRNA and 23 miRNA in a manner predicted to inhibit invasion. We demonstrate that these alterations in mRNA and miRNA translate into changes in the invasive potential of primary myoblasts with PAX3-FOXO1 increasing invasion nearly 2-fold while PAX3 decreases invasion nearly 4-fold. Taken together, these results allow us to build off of previous reports and develop a more expansive molecular model by which the presence of PAX3-FOXO1 alters global gene regulatory networks to enhance the local invasiveness of cells. Further, the global nature of our observed changes highlights the fact that instead of focusing on a single-gene target, we must develop multi-faceted treatment regimens targeting multiple genes of a single oncogenic phenotype or multiple genes that target different oncogenic phenotypes for tumor progression. PMID:27454080

  7. Early parenting styles and sexual offending behavior: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Sigre-Leirós, Vera; Carvalho, Joana; Nobre, Pedro J

    2016-01-01

    Sexual offenders, in general, report problematic rearing practices from their parents, lacking however more empirical research on this topic regarding particular subtypes of offenders. The current study examined the relationship between early parenting styles and different types of sexual offending. A total of 113 sexual offenders (rapists, pedophilic and nonpedophilic child molesters), and 51 nonsexual offenders completed the EMBU (My Memories of Upbringing), the Brief Symptom Inventory, and the Socially Desirable Response Set Measure. Results showed that rapists were less likely to remember their fathers as being emotionally warm compared with nonsexual offenders and pedophilic child molesters. In addition, compared with rapists, pedophilic offenders perceived their mothers as having been less emotionally warm to them. Overall, results showed that certain developmental experiences with parents were able to distinguish between subtypes of offenders supporting an association between distal interpersonal factors and sexual offending. These findings may have important implications for early intervention and prevention of sexual crimes. Further research using larger samples of pedophilic child molesters is recommended. PMID:27019974

  8. Observations on the Invasion and Endoparasitic Behavior of the Root Lesion Nematode Pratylenchus penetrans

    PubMed Central

    Zunke, Ulrich

    1990-01-01

    The endoparasitic behavior of Pratylenchus penetrans was examined using video-enhanced contrast microscopy to observe living nematodes inside root tissue. Feeding behavior could be separated into phases of probing, cell penetration by the stytet, salivation, and food ingestion for brief and extended periods. After cell penetration, a small "salivation zone" was formed around the stylet tip. No feeding tubes were observed. Feeding and migration were interrupted by rest phases when a nematode became characteristically coiled inside a cell. Tissue damage was caused primarily by migration and extended feeding periods. Aspects of egg laying and molting are also described. PMID:19287726

  9. Observational study comparing non-invasive blood pressure measurement at the arm and ankle during caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Drake, M J P; Hill, J S

    2013-05-01

    Upper-arm non-invasive blood pressure measurement during caesarean section can be uncomfortable and unreliable because of movement artefact in the conscious parturient. We aimed to determine whether ankle blood pressure measurement could be used instead in this patient group by comparing concurrent arm and ankle blood pressure measured throughout elective caesarean section under regional anaesthesia in 64 term parturients. Bland-Altman analysis of mean difference (95% limits of agreement [range]) between the ankle and arm was 11.2 (-20.3 to +42.7 [-67 to +102]) mmHg for systolic arterial pressure, -0.5 (-21.0 to +19.9 [-44 to +91]) mmHg for mean arterial pressure and -3.8 (-25.3 to +17.8 [-41 to +94]) mmHg for diastolic arterial pressure. Although ankle blood pressure measurement is well tolerated and allows greater mobility of the arms than measurement from the arm, the degree of discrepancy between the two sites is unacceptable to allow routine use of ankle blood pressure measurement, especially for systolic arterial pressure. However, ankle blood pressure measurement may be a useful alternative in situations where arm blood pressure measurement is difficult or impossible. PMID:23480469

  10. Investigating Issues in the Laboratory: The Behavior of Red Swamp Crayfish as an Invasive Species

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Krissi M.; Kayes, Lori J.; Hubert, David; Chouinard, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Recent reform initiatives in undergraduate biology call for curricula that prepare students for dealing with real-world issues and making important links between science and society. In response to this call, we have developed an issues-based laboratory module that uses guided inquiry to integrate the concepts of animal behavior and population…

  11. Biology, behavior, and olive orchard IPM of Bactrocera oleae (Rossi) fifteen years after invasion in California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae L., has become a key pest in California commercial olive orchards used for canned fruit and oil since it was first discovered in 1998. Elucidation of the biology and behavior of olive fruit fly in relation to its host has been a key factor in development...

  12. Fate and behavior of rotenone in Diamond Lake, Oregon, USA following invasive tui chub eradication.

    PubMed

    Finlayson, Brian J; Eilers, Joseph M; Huchko, Holly A

    2014-07-01

    In September 2006, Diamond Lake (OR, USA) was treated by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife with a mixture of powdered and liquid rotenone in the successful eradication of invasive tui chub Gila bicolor. During treatment, the lake was in the middle of a phytoplankton (including cyanobacteria Anabaena sp.) bloom, resulting in an elevated pH of 9.7. Dissipation of rotenone and its major metabolite rotenolone from water, sediment, and macrophytes was monitored. Rotenone dissipated quickly from Diamond Lake water; approximately 75% was gone within 2 d, and the average half-life (t½) value, estimated by using first-order kinetics, was 4.5 d. Rotenolone persisted longer (>46 d) with a short-term t½ value of 16.2 d. Neither compound was found in groundwater, sediments, or macrophytes. The dissipation of rotenone and rotenolone appeared to occur in 2 stages, which was possibly the result of a release of both compounds from decaying phytoplankton following their initial dissipation. Fisheries managers applying rotenone for fish eradication in lentic environments should consider the following to maximize efficacy and regulatory compliance: 1) treat at a minimum of twice the minimum dose demonstrated for complete mortality of the target species and possibly higher depending on the site's water pH and algae abundance, and 2) implement a program that closely monitors rotenone concentrations in the posttreatment management of a treated water body. PMID:24733691

  13. Cavity disinfection in minimally invasive dentistry - comparative evaluation of Aloe vera and propolis: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, A. R.; Karuna, Y. M.; Yavagal, C.; Deepak, B. M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The survival of atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) restorations would probably increase if near total elimination of cariogenic microorganisms could be done in the process of cavity cleaning before going ahead with the restoration. Thus, use of naturally occurring disinfecting agents for achieving this goal could herald a new beginning in the field of contemporary minimum intervention dentistry. Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of hand instruments in excavating dental caries and comparatively evaluate the roles of Aloe vera and propolis as potential cavity disinfecting agents after minimally invasive hand excavation of dental caries. Settings and Designs: Experimental, in vivo intergroup split mouth, randomized clinical trial. Subjects and Methods: The study included Group I (Control), Group II (A. vera) and Group III (propolis). Ten patients with three teeth each have occlusal/occlusoproximal lesions suitable for ART were selected. Dentinal samples were collected three times from each tooth viz., preexcavation, postexcavation and postdisinfection of the cavities. These dentinal samples were subjected to microbiological analyses for total viable count. Statistical Analysis Used: Repeated measures of analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni post-hoc test and one-way ANOVA with Tukey post-hoc test. Results: In all the three groups, significant amount of bacteria were left behind after hand excavation. Group II and Group III, in which cavities were treated with A. vera and propolis extracts respectively, showed a significant reduction in the bacterial counts when compared to control the group. Conclusions: Hand excavation alone does not completely eliminate bacteria, which may predispose treated teeth to secondary caries. Both propolis and A. vera extracts can be used as potential natural disinfecting agents, thereby embracing the concept of phytotherapy in minimum intervention dentistry. PMID:25821369

  14. R-Ketorolac Targets Cdc42 and Rac1 and Alters Ovarian Cancer Cell Behaviors Critical for Invasion and Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuna; Kenney, S Ray; Muller, Carolyn Y; Adams, Sarah; Rutledge, Teresa; Romero, Elsa; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Prekeris, Rytis; Sklar, Larry A; Hudson, Laurie G; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2015-10-01

    Cdc42 (cell division control protein 42) and Rac1 (Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1) are attractive therapeutic targets in ovarian cancer based on established importance in tumor cell migration, adhesion, and invasion. Despite a predicted benefit, targeting GTPases has not yet been translated to clinical practice. We previously established that Cdc42 and constitutively active Rac1b are overexpressed in primary ovarian tumor tissues. Through high-throughput screening and computational shape homology approaches, we identified R-ketorolac as a Cdc42 and Rac1 inhibitor, distinct from the anti-inflammatory, cyclooxygenase inhibitory activity of S-ketorolac. In the present study, we establish R-ketorolac as an allosteric inhibitor of Cdc42 and Rac1. Cell-based assays validate R-ketorolac activity against Cdc42 and Rac1. Studies on immortalized human ovarian adenocarcinoma cells (SKOV3ip) and primary patient-derived ovarian cancer cells show that R-ketorolac is a robust inhibitor of growth factor or serum-dependent Cdc42 and Rac1 activation with a potency and cellular efficacy similar to small-molecule inhibitors of Cdc42 (CID2950007/ML141) and Rac1 (NSC23766). Furthermore, GTPase inhibition by R-ketorolac reduces downstream p21-activated kinases (PAK1/PAK2) effector activation by >80%. Multiple assays of cell behavior using SKOV3ip and primary patient-derived ovarian cancer cells show that R-ketorolac significantly inhibits cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. In summary, we provide evidence for R-ketorolac as a direct inhibitor of Cdc42 and Rac1 that is capable of modulating downstream GTPase-dependent, physiologic responses, which are critical to tumor metastasis. Our findings demonstrate the selective inhibition of Cdc42 and Rac1 GTPases by an FDA-approved drug, racemic ketorolac, that can be used in humans. PMID:26206334

  15. Divergent behaviors and underlying mechanisms of cell migration and invasion in non-metastatic T24 and its metastatic derivative T24T bladder cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Young; Lu, Chris; Li, Jingxia; Gu, Jiayan; Zhang, Liping; Huang, Haishan; Zhang, Dongyun; Wu, Xue-Ru; Gao, Jimin; Huang, Chuanshu

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies on cancer cell invasion were primarily focused on its migration because these two events were often considered biologically equivalent. Here we found that T24T cells exhibited higher invasion but lower migration abilities than T24 cells. Expression of Rho-GDPases was much lower and expression of SOD2 was much higher in T24T cells than those in T24 cells. Indeed, knockdown of SOD2 in T24T cells can reverse the cell migration but without affecting cell invasion. We also found that SOD2 inhibited the JNK/c-Jun cascade, and the inhibition of c-Jun activation by ectopic expression of TAM67 impaired Rho-GDPases expression and cell migration in T24T shSOD2 cells. Further, we found that Sp1 can upregulate SOD2 transcription in T24T cells. Importantly, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) was overexpressed in T24T and participated in increasing its invasion, and MMP-2 overexpression was mediated by increasing nuclear transport of nucleolin, which enhanced mmp-2 mRNA stability. Taken together, our study unravels an inverse relationship between cell migration and invasion in human bladder cancer T24T cells and suggests a novel mechanism underlying the divergent roles of SOD2 and MMP-2 in regulating metastatic behaviors of human bladder T24T in cell migration and invasion. PMID:25402510

  16. Long-term Outcome after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Compared with Minimally Invasive Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Barsoum, Emad A.; Azab, Basem; Patel, Nileshkumar; Spagnola, Jonathan; Shariff, Masood A.; Kaleem, Umar; Morcus, Rewais; Asti, Deepak; McGinn, Joseph T.; Lafferty, James; McCord, Donald A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Elderly patients with unstable coronary artery disease (CAD) have better outcomes with coronary revascularization than conservative treatment. With the improvement in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) techniques using drug eluting-stents, this became an attractive option in elderly. Minimally invasive coronary artery bypass grafting (MICS-CABG) is a safe and effective alternative to conventional CABG. We aimed to explore the long-term outcomes after PCI vs MICS-CABG in ≥75 year-old patients with severe CAD. Methods: A total of 1454 elderly patients (≥75 year-old patients) underwent coronary artery revascularization between January 2005 and December 2009. Patients were selected in the study if they have one of the Class-I indications for CABG. Groups were divided according to the type of procedure, PCI or MICS-CABG, and 5 year follow-up. Results: Among 175 elderly patients, 109 underwent PCI and 66 had MICS-CABG. There was no significant difference observed in both groups with long-term all-cause mortality (31 PCI vs 21% MICS-CABG, p=0.151) and the overall 5 year survival was similar on Kaplan-Meier curve (Log rank p=0.318). The average length of stay in hospital was significantly shorter in the PCI than in the MICS-CABG group (4.3 vs 7.8 days, p<0.001). Only 4.7% of the PCI group were discharged to rehabilitation facility compared with 43.9% of the MICS-CABG group (p<0.001). The rate of repeat revascularization was significantly higher in the PCI group than in the MICS-CABG group (15 vs 3%, p=0.014). Conclusion: Among elderly patients, long-term all-cause mortality is similar after PCI and MICS-CABG. However, there is a significantly higher rate of repeat revascularization after PCI. PMID:27014373

  17. Non-invasive manipulation of Drosophila behavior by two-photon excited red-activatable channelrhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Po-Yen; Tsai, Chia-Lun; Chen, Ming-Chang; Lin, Yen-Yin; Yang, Shang-Da; Chiang, Ann-Shyn

    2015-01-01

    Scattering and absorption limit light penetration through inhomogeneous tissue. To reduce scattering, biochemists have shifted the wavelengths of excitation light for optogenetic actuators and fluorescent proteins to the orange-red range, while physicists have developed multiphoton technologies for deep tissue stimulation. We have built a rapid multiphoton spectroscopic screening system of genetically encoded red-activatable channelrhodopsin (ReaChR), and considered specific behaviors in transgenic Drosophila melanogaster as readouts to optimize the laser parameters for two-photon optogenetic activation. A wavelength-tunable optical parametric amplifier was adopted as the major light source for widefield two-photon excitation (TPE) of ReaChR. Our assays suggest that the optimized TPE wavelength of ReaChR is 1250 nm. Exploiting its capacity for optogenetic manipulation to induce macroscopic behavioral change, we realized rapid spectroscopic screening of genetically encoded effectors or indicators in vivo, and used modulation of ReaChR in the fly as a successful demonstration of such a system. PMID:26601000

  18. Feeding Behavior of Aplysia: A Model System for Comparing Cellular Mechanisms of Classical and Operant Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Douglas A.; Byrne, John H.

    2006-01-01

    Feeding behavior of Aplysia provides an excellent model system for analyzing and comparing mechanisms underlying appetitive classical conditioning and reward operant conditioning. Behavioral protocols have been developed for both forms of associative learning, both of which increase the occurrence of biting following training. Because the neural…

  19. A Comparative Analysis of Communicative Behavior in CEDA Lincoln-Douglas Debate and CEDA Team Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Harold L.; Skaggs, Edward C.

    Keeping debate communicative is a great and recurring concern. A study investigated whether debate format may influence debaters' communicative behavior, by comparing behavior in Cross Examination Debate Association (CEDA) Lincoln-Douglas debate (LD) and in CEDA Team debate. Videotapes of the two first affirmative speeches of each, at the…

  20. Evaluating Empathy in Interviewing: Comparing Self-Report with Actual Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamburrino, Marijo B.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A study compared medical students' self-assessments of patient interview behavior with external ratings of actual interviews. Focus was on behaviors reflecting empathy. Results suggest the self-report questionnaire is not an adequate measure of actual interviewing skills. (MSE)

  1. A meta-analysis of interlaminar minimally invasive discectomy compared to conventional microdiscectomy for lumbar disk herniation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Song; Sun, Rui-Fu; Ji, Qiang; Zhao, Bing; Niu, Xuan-Min; Wang, Rong; Peng, Lei; Tian, Xiao-Dong

    2014-12-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the evidence that compared the safety and efficacy of interlaminar minimally invasive discectomy (ILMI) and conventional microdiscectomy (MD) for treating lumbar disk herniation (LDH) patients and to develop GRADE based recommendations for using the procedures to treat LDH. Eleven studies, encompassing 1012 patients, met the inclusion criteria. Overall, the results of the meta-analysis indicated that there were significant differences between the two groups in blood loss (SMD=-0.93, 95% CI -1.84, -0.02; p=0.05), and the number of days stays in hospital (SMD=-0.79, 95% CI -1.55, -0.04; p=0.04). However, there were no significant differences in the short-term back visual analog scale (VAS) scores (SMD=-0.34, 95% CI -0.81, 0.14; p=0.16), the long-term back VAS scores (SMD=0.13, 95% CI -0.04, 0.30; p=0.14), the short-term leg VAS scores (SMD=0.14, 95% CI -0.01, 0.29; p=0.07), the long-term leg VAS scores (SMD=0.12, 95% CI -0.05, 0.30; p=0.17), the short-term Oswestry disability index (ODI) scores (SMD=0.01, 95% CI -0.14, 0.15; p=0.92), the long-term ODI scores (SMD=0.11, 95% CI -0.03, 0.25; p=0.14), and the incidence of complications (RR=1.22, 95% CI 0.88, 1.69; p=0.24). The results of this meta-analysis demonstrate that ILMI and MD are both safe and effective surgical procedures for treating LDH. Compared with MD, ILMI can shorten days in hospital, decrease the mounts of blood loss during surgery. However, the overall GRADE evidence quality was very low. Therefore, further validation is required, and medical institutions should conduct high-quality studies. PMID:25459263

  2. Auditory Evoked Potential Audiograms Compared with Behavioral Audiograms in Aquatic Animals.

    PubMed

    Sisneros, Joseph A; Popper, Arthur N; Hawkins, Anthony D; Fay, Richard R

    2016-01-01

    Auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) have become popular for estimating hearing thresholds and audiograms. What is the utility of these measurements? How do AEP audiograms compare with behavioral audiograms? In general, AEP measurements for fishes and marine mammals often underestimate behavioral thresholds, but comparisons are especially complicated when the AEP and behavioral measures are obtained under different acoustic conditions. There is no single representative relationship between AEP and behavioral audiograms and these audiograms should not be considered equivalent. We suggest that the most valuable comparisons are those made by the same researcher using similar acoustic conditions for both measurements. PMID:26611067

  3. Comparing Children's Fears in Alabama: An Investigation Using Post-9/11 and Post-Invasion of Iraq Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnham, Joy J.

    2006-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the fears of children and adolescents in Alabama in the aftermath of 9/11 and after the initial invasion of Iraq in 2003. The American Fear Survey Schedule for Children (FSSC-AM; Burnham, 1995, 2005) was utilized to measure the fears of youth in Grades 2-12. (Contains 4 tables.)

  4. The efficacy of minimally invasive discectomy compared with open discectomy: a meta-analysis of prospective randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Dasenbrock, Hormuzdiyar H.; Juraschek, Stephen P.; Schultz, Lonni R.; Witham, Timothy F.; Sciubba, Daniel M.; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Bydon, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Object Advocates of minimally invasive discectomy (MID) have promoted this operation as an alternative to open discectomy (OD), arguing that there may be less injury to the paraspinal muscles, decreased postoperative pain, and a faster recovery time. However, a recently published large randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing these approaches reported inferior relief of leg pain in patients undergoing MID. The authors conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate complications and improvement in leg pain in patients with radiculopathy enrolled in RCTs comparing OD to MID. Methods The authors performed a literature search using Medline and EMBASE of studies indexed between January 1990 and January 2011. Predetermined RCT eligibility included the usage of tubular retractors during MID, a minimum follow-up duration of 1 year, and quantification of pain with the visual analog scale (VAS). Trials that only evaluated patients with recurrent disc herniation were excluded. Data on operative parameters, complications, and VAS scores of leg pain were extracted by 2 investigators. A meta-analysis was performed assuming random effects to determine the difference in mean change for continuous outcomes and the risk ratio for binary outcomes. Results Six trials comprising 837 patients (of whom 388 were randomized to MID and 449 were randomized to OD) were included. The mean operative time was 49 minutes during MID and 44 minutes during OD; this difference was not statistically significant. Incidental durotomies occurred significantly more frequently during MID (5.67% compared with 2.90% for OD; RR 2.05, 95% CI 1.05–3.98). Intraoperative complications (incidental durotomies and nerve root injuries) were also significantly more common in patients undergoing MID (RR 2.01, 95% CI 1.07–3.77). The mean preoperative VAS score for leg pain was 6.9 in patients randomized to MID and 7.2 in those randomized to OD. With long-term follow-up (1–2 years postoperatively), the mean VAS score

  5. Comparing Versions of the Good Behavior Game: Can a Positive Spin Enhance Effectiveness?

    PubMed

    Wahl, Elaine; Hawkins, Renee O; Haydon, Todd; Marsicano, Richard; Morrison, Julie Q

    2016-07-01

    Disruptions can prevent the classroom from being an effective learning environment. The Good Behavior Game (GBG) is a group contingency that has been proven to effectively prevent disruptions and increase engagement. However, the traditional methods of the GBG include teacher scanning for negative student behaviors, and may not align with Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS), which is becoming widely adopted in many schools. Extending the findings of Wright and McCurdy, the current study compared the effects of the GBG and a positive version of the GBG, called the Caught Being Good Game (CBGG), on student behavior, including engagement and off-task behaviors, as well as teachers' use of positive and negative statements. Results showed both the GBG and the CBGG improved student behavior, with data not clearly indicating one was superior. Neither intervention led to an increase in positive teacher statements. Implications for teachers and suggestions for further research are discussed. PMID:27118053

  6. Comparison of a minimally invasive posterior approach and the standard posterior approach for total hip arthroplasty A prospective and comparative study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It is not clear whether total hip arthroplasty performed via a minimally invasive approach leads to less muscle trauma compared to the standard approach. Materials and methods To investigate whether a minimally invasive posterior approach for total hip arthroplasty results in lower levels of muscle-derived enzymes and better post-operative clinical results than those obtained with the standard posterolateral approach fifty patients in both groups were compared in a prospective and comparative study. The following parameters were examined: muscle-derived enzymes CPK, CK-MM and myoglobin pre-operatively, 24 and 48 hours post-operatively, CRP and hemoglobin on the third postoperative day, loss of blood, daily pain levels, the rate of recovery (time taken to attain predefined functional parameters), the Oxford Hip Score, the SF-36 score and the WOMAC score pre-operatively and six weeks post-surgery, the position of the implant and the cement coating by post-operative X-ray examination. Results and Conclusions The minimally invasive operated patients exhibited a significantly lower loss of blood, significantly less pain at rest and a faster rate of recovery but the clinical chemistry values and the other clinical parameters were comparable. PMID:20663200

  7. A meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials comparing conventional to minimally invasive approaches for repair of an Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Samuel E; Smith, Toby O; Hing, Caroline B

    2011-12-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures are a common injury afflicting predominantly the young male occasional sportsman. Previous studies have shown that outcome is better with surgical repair for the young active patient. There is no consensus as to whether there is a difference in outcome between open and percutaneous minimally invasive surgery (MIS). A meta-analysis was undertaken to compare the clinical outcomes of MIS with conventional open surgical repair. Six randomised controlled trials of 277 Achilles tendon repairs were eligible for review. This included 136 minimally invasive repairs and 141 conventional open repairs. On analysis, there was no significant difference between the two surgical approaches in respect to the incidence of re-rupture, tissue adhesion, sural nerve injury, deep infection and deep vein thrombosis (p>0.05). However, MIS had a significantly reduced risk of superficial wound infection, with three times greater patient satisfaction for good to excellent results compared with conventional open surgical approaches. PMID:22017889

  8. Ancient and historic steel in Japan, India and Europe, a non-invasive comparative study using thermal neutron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Grazzi, F; Civita, F; Williams, A; Scherillo, A; Barzagli, E; Bartoli, L; Edge, D; Zoppi, M

    2011-05-01

    The production and refinement of steel has followed very different paths in different parts of the Eurasian continent. In aiming to characterize the similarities and differences between various smelting and smithing methods, we have analysed steel samples from four different areas and historic periods: the Kotō Age in Japan (twelfth-sixteenth century), the Moghul Empire in India (seventeenth-nineteenth century), the Ottoman Turkish Empire (seventeenth century) and the late Middle Ages (fifteenth century) in Italy. The best quality steel was employed for forging arms and armour of high quality, so that we have selected samples from Japan, India, the Middle East and Italy belonging to such a category. Traditional methods, such as metallography, used to characterize different steels in terms of their carbon contents, microconstituents and slag inclusions, entailed an invasive approach. Since many of the selected artefacts are in a very good state of conservation, a different and non-invasive approach was desirable. To this aim, we have used time of flight neutron diffraction on the Italian Neutron Experimental Station diffractometer, located at the pulsed neutron source ISIS in the United Kingdom. By this technique, we were able to quantify the phase distribution of the metal phases, the slag inclusion content, and the oxidation state of the samples, both as average concentration on the whole artefact and in selected gauge volumes. The results of the present investigation offer an interesting picture of the steel metallurgy in different areas of the world. PMID:21400072

  9. Social Behaviors Increase in Children with Autism in the Presence of Animals Compared to Toys

    PubMed Central

    O'Haire, Marguerite E.; McKenzie, Samantha J.; Beck, Alan M.; Slaughter, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous research has demonstrated the capacity of animal presence to stimulate social interaction among humans. The purpose of this study was to examine the interactions of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) with an adult and their typically-developing peers in the presence of animals (two guinea pigs) compared to toys. Methods Ninety-nine children from 15 classrooms in 4 schools met the inclusion criteria and participated in groups of three (1 child with ASD and 2 typically-developing peers). Each group was video-recorded during three 10-minute, free-play sessions with toys and three 10-minute, free-play sessions with two guinea pigs. Two blinded observers coded the behavior of children with ASD and their peers. To account for the nested study design, data were analyzed using hierarchical generalized linear modeling. Results Participants with ASD demonstrated more social approach behaviors (including talking, looking at faces, and making tactile contact) and received more social approaches from their peers in the presence of animals compared to toys. They also displayed more prosocial behaviors and positive affect (i.e., smiling and laughing) as well as less self-focused behaviors and negative affect (i.e., frowning, crying, and whining) in the presence of animals compared to toys. Conclusions These results suggest that the presence of an animal can significantly increase positive social behaviors among children with ASD. PMID:23468902

  10. Gender identification of Grasshopper Sparrows comparing behavioral, morphological, and molecular techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ammer, F.K.; Wood, P.B.; McPherson, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    Correct gender identification in monomorphic species is often difficult especially if males and females do not display obvious behavioral and breeding differences. We compared gender specific morphology and behavior with recently developed DNA techniques for gender identification in the monomorphic Grasshopper Sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum). Gender was ascertained with DNA in 213 individuals using the 2550F/2718R primer set and 3% agarose gel electrophoresis. Field observations using behavior and breeding characteristics to identify gender matched DNA analyses with 100% accuracy for adult males and females. Gender was identified with DNA for all captured juveniles that did not display gender specific traits or behaviors in the field. The molecular techniques used offered a high level of accuracy and may be useful in studies of dispersal mechanisms and winter assemblage composition in monomorphic species.

  11. A systematic review comparing cognitive-behavioral therapy and contingency management for cocaine dependence.

    PubMed

    Farronato, Nadine S; Dürsteler-Macfarland, Kenneth M; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Petitjean, Sylvie A

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this review was to compare the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy and contingency management for cocaine dependence. Contingency management alone reliably reduced cocaine use during active treatment in all cited trials, whereas the positive effect of cognitive-behavioral therapy emerged after treatment in 3 of 5 trials. Synergistic effects of the combination of contingency management plus cognitive-behavioral therapy are shown in 2 trials, but another 3 trials found no additive effects. Positive, rapid, and enduring effects on cocaine use are reliably seen with contingency management interventions, whereas measurable effects of cognitive-behavioral therapy emerge after treatment and are not as reliable as effects with contingency management. PMID:24074193

  12. Parenting and Adolescent Problem Behaviors: A Comparative Study of Sons and Daughters in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Rhucharoenpornpanich, Orratai; Chamratrithirong, Aphichat; Fongkaew, Warunee; Rosati, Michael J.; Miller, Brenda A.; Cupp, Pamela K.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates parenting practices and the reported sexual and delinquent behaviors among Thai adolescents, by focusing on the difference between sons and daughters. Data were derived from 420 families whose adolescents aged 13–14 were randomly selected from seven districts in Bangkok using the probability proportional to size (PPS) method. Interviews were conducted with one parent and one adolescent. Female adolescents reported higher levels of parental monitoring, parental rules, communication about sex and parental disapproval of sex, as compared to males. There were no gender differences in the reported sexual and delinquent behaviors among the adolescents. For males, high levels of parental monitoring, greater perception of parent disapproval of sex, and being raised by authoritative parents were associated with less delinquent behaviors. Among females, parental monitoring and parental closeness served as protective factors against sexual and delinquent behaviors. These findings should be useful for developing a body of knowledge and understanding on adolescent rearing among Thai parents. PMID:20420103

  13. Comparing Classroom Interactive Behaviors of Science and Non-Science Pre-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Daniel; Morphew, Jason

    2014-01-01

    This study compared classroom interactive behaviors of science pre-service teachers and pre-service teachers of other subjects. Participants included pre-service teachers enrolled in a general methods course for secondary educators and its school-based fieldwork counterpart. Statistical tests found that science pre-service teachers had fewer…

  14. Attributions for Smoking Behavior: Comparing Smokers with Nonsmokers and Predicting Smokers' Cigarette Consumption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinke, Chris L.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Compared smokers' (214) and nonsmokers' (220) explanations for cigarette smoking behavior to determine predictors of cigarette consumption. Results showed addiction and affective smoking were the most important motives predicting consumption. Presented at the meeting of the Southeastern Psychological Association, Washington, DC, 1980. (WAS)

  15. COMPARING BEHAVIORAL DOSE-EFFECT CURVES FOR HUMANS AND LABORATORY ANIMALS ACUTELY EXPOSED TO TOLUENE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The utility of laboratory animal data in toxicology depends upon the ability to generalize the results quantitatively to humans. To compare the acute behavioral effects of inhaled toluene in humans to those in animals, dose-effect curves were fitted by meta-analysis of published...

  16. Developmental Differences in Parenting Behavior: Comparing Adolescent, Emerging Adult, and Adult Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewin, Amy; Mitchell, Stephanie J.; Ronzio, Cynthia R.

    2013-01-01

    The nationally representative Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth cohort data set was used to compare parenting behaviors of adolescent mothers (less than 19 years old), emerging adult mothers (19-25 years old), and adult mothers (greater than 25 years old) when their children were 2 years old. Regression models controlling for socioeconomic…

  17. A Comparative Study of the Seriousness Attributed to Disruptive Classroom Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gotzens, Concepcion; Badia, Mar; Genovard, Candido; Dezcallar, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: In this paper we present a comparative analysis of three samples of teachers from Coimbra, Barcelona and Murcia that provides insight into the importance teachers attach to disruptive behavior and how different perspectives and values affect their daily work. Method: This research is framed within a quantitative empirical-analytic…

  18. Comparing the Behaviors and Social Environments of Offending and Non-Offending African-American Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodney, H. Elaine; Mupier, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Compares behaviors and social environments of African-American males in juvenile detention (N=106) with those not in detention (N=106). Factors which increased the likelihood of being in detention include: (1) drinking alcohol and getting into fights; (2) being suspended from school; and (3) breaking into property. Mother's time spent with the…

  19. Comparing Cognitive Behavior Therapy, Problem Solving Therapy, and Treatment as Usual in a High Risk Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Carment D.; Quinn, Andrea; Plever, Sally; Emmerson, Brett

    2009-01-01

    Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), problem-solving therapy (PST), or treatment as usual (TAU) were compared in the management of suicide attempters. Participants completed the Beck Hopelessness Scale, Beck Scale for Suicidal Ideation, Social Problem-Solving Inventory, and Client Satisfaction Questionnaire at pre- and posttreatment. Both CBT and PST…

  20. Prompting Safety Belt Use: Comparative Impact on the Target Behavior and Relevant Body Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Matthew G.; Geller, E. Scott

    2010-01-01

    Researchers used two behavioral prompts to compare increases in safety belt use: a Click It or Ticket prompt or a Flash-for-Life prompt. Participants were 1,822 unbuckled drivers exiting two student parking lots of a large university. Research assistants identified unbuckled drivers, flashed one of the two prompts, and recorded whether drivers…

  1. Comparing the Criminal Behavior of Youth Gangs and At-Risk Youths. Research in Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huff, C. Ronald

    A study was conducted to compare the criminal behavior of gang members and nongang at-risk youths in four urban and suburban communities, Denver (Colorado), Aurora (Colorado), Broward County (Florida), and Cleveland (Ohio). The first three communities were emergent, rather than chronic, gang environments, but in Cleveland, information on gangs…

  2. Using Cover, Copy, and Compare Spelling with and without Timing for Elementary Students with Behavior Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darrow, Danette; McLaughlin, T. F.; Derby, K. Mark; Johnson, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of cover, copy, and compare (CCC) procedures on spelling performance with two students. The participants were two elementary students enrolled in a self-contained behavior intervention classroom. A multiple baseline design across participants was employed to evaluate the effects of CCC…

  3. Comparative analysis of the behaviors evoked by bromocriptine and quinpirole (LY 171555) in adult cats.

    PubMed

    Motles, E; Tetas, M; Gonzalez, M; Gomez, A

    1994-05-01

    The aim of this work was to compare the behavioral effects of bromocriptine and quinpirole, two agonists of the D-2 dopaminergic receptor, either injected alone or combined with the D-1 dopaminergic receptor, SKF 38393. In ten adult mongrel cats the following experimental series were carried out: i) a dose-response study with bromocriptine administering 0.5-1.0-4.0 and 8.0 mg/kg s.c.; ii) a behavioral study injecting 4.0 mg/kg of bromocriptine plus 2.0 mg/kg of SKF 38393; iii) the same analysis administering 0.5 mg/kg of LY 171555 plus 1.0 mg/kg of SKF 38393, compared with the same dose of LY 171555 plus 4.0 mg/kg of SKF 38393; iv) an analysis of the behavioral effects of 8.0 mg/kg of bromocriptine compared with 1.0 mg/kg of quinpirole. The main findings were: i) bromocriptine injected, in four different doses evoked decrease in locomotion, and increase in indifference, inappetence, pupillary dilation and limb flicks; ii) the combined administration of 4.0 mg/kg of bromocriptine plus 2.0 mg/kg of SKF 38393 did not elicit behavioral changes different to those produced by bromocriptine alone; iii) quinpirole (1.0 mg/kg) evoked more intense behaviors than bromocriptine (8.0 mg/kg); iv) comparing quinpirole injected alone with the combination of quinpirole plus SKF 38393, this latter treatment produced more intense behaviors than the former. It is concluded: i) SKF 38393 potentiates the behavioral effects produced by quinpirole; this potentiation was not found when bromocriptine was combined with SKF 38393 and ii) the more intense behavioral effect elicited by quinpirole compared with bromocriptine may be explained by the fact that the latter drug is a selective D-2 agonist, whereas the former one is an agonist of the D-2 and the D-3 receptors. PMID:7915847

  4. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Whole-Gut Lavage Fluid and Pancreatic Juice Reveals a Less Invasive Method of Sampling Pancreatic Secretions

    PubMed Central

    Rocker, Jana M; Tan, Marcus C; Thompson, Lee W; Contreras, Carlo M; DiPalma, Jack A; Pannell, Lewis K

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: There are currently no reliable, non-invasive screening tests for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. The fluid secreted from the pancreatic ductal system (“pancreatic juice”) has been well-studied as a potential source of cancer biomarkers. However, it is invasive to collect. We recently observed that the proteomic profile of intestinal effluent from the bowel in response to administration of an oral bowel preparation solution (also known as whole-gut lavage fluid, WGLF) contains large amounts of pancreas-derived proteins. We therefore hypothesized that the proteomic profile is similar to that of pancreatic juice. In this study, we compared the proteomic profiles of 77 patients undergoing routine colonoscopy with the profiles of 19 samples of pure pancreatic juice collected during surgery. METHODS: WGLF was collected from patients undergoing routine colonoscopy, and pancreatic juice was collected from patients undergoing pancreatic surgery. Protein was isolated from both samples using an optimized method and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Identified proteins were compared between samples and groups to determine similarity of the two fluids. We then compared our results with literature reports of pancreatic juice-based studies to determine similarity. RESULTS: We found 104 proteins in our pancreatic juice samples, of which 90% were also found in our WGLF samples. The majority (67%) of the total proteins found in the WGLF were common to pancreatic juice, with intestine-specific proteins making up a smaller proportion. CONCLUSIONS: WGLF and pancreatic juice appear to have similar proteomic profiles. This supports the notion that WGLF is a non-invasive, surrogate bio-fluid for pancreatic juice. Further studies are required to further elucidate its role in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27228405

  5. PANI and Graphene/PANI Nanocomposite Films — Comparative Toluene Gas Sensing Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Mitesh; Balamurugan, Chandran; Lee, Dong-Weon

    2013-01-01

    The present work discusses and compares the toluene sensing behavior of polyaniline (PANI) and graphene/polyaniline nanocomposite (C-PANI) films. The graphene–PANI ratio in the nanocomposite polymer film is optimized at 1:2. For this, N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) solvent is used to prepare PANI-NMP solution as well as graphene-PANI-NMP solution. The films are later annealed at 230 °C, characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as well Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and tested for their sensing behavior towards toluene. The sensing behaviors of the films are analyzed at different temperatures (30, 50 and 100 °C) for 100 ppm toluene in air. The nanocomposite C-PANI films have exhibited better overall toluene sensing behavior in terms of sensor response, response and recovery time as well as repeatability. Although the sensor response of PANI (12.6 at 30 °C, 38.4 at 100 °C) is comparatively higher than that of C-PANI (8.4 at 30 °C, 35.5 at 100 °C), response and recovery time of PANI and C-PANI varies with operating temperature. C-PANI at 50 °C seems to have better toluene sensing behavior in terms of response time and recovery time. PMID:24300600

  6. COMPARING SAFE VS. AT-RISK BEHAVIORAL DATA TO PREDICT ACCIDENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey C. Joe

    2001-11-01

    The Safety Observations Achieve Results (SOAR) program at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) encourages employees to perform in-field observations of each other’s behaviors. One purpose for performing these observations is that it gives the observers the opportunity to correct, if needed, their co-worker’s at-risk work practices and habits (i.e., behaviors). The underlying premise of doing this is that major injuries (e.g., OSHA-recordable events) are prevented from occurring because the lower level at-risk behaviors are identified and corrected before they can propagate into culturally accepted unsafe behaviors that result in injuries or fatalities. However, unlike other observation programs, SOAR also emphasizes positive reinforcement for safe behaviors observed. The underlying premise of doing this is that positive reinforcement of safe behaviors helps establish a strong positive safety culture. Since the SOAR program collects both safe and at-risk leading indicator data, this provides a unique opportunity to assess and compare the two kinds of data in terms of their ability to predict future adverse safety events. This paper describes the results of analyses performed on SOAR data to assess their relative predictive ability. Implications are discussed.

  7. Health behavior in teens with epilepsy: how do they compare with controls?

    PubMed

    Yu, C G; Lee, A; Wirrell, Elaine; Sherman, E M S; Hamiwka, Lorie

    2008-07-01

    The goal of the study was to determine if adolescents with epilepsy have poorer health behavior than healthy controls. Health behavior was compared in two cohorts: cognitively normal teens aged 11-16 with epilepsy and similarly aged controls. Teens completed the Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children (HBSC) and Piers-Harris II, and the primary caregiver completed the Family Assessment Measure III. Forty-four teens with epilepsy and 119 orthopedic controls returned questionnaires. Adolescents with epilepsy had poorer health behavior than controls (P<0.003). They felt significantly less positive about their health (P<0.01) and were less physically active (P<0.02). Poorer family function (P<0.05) and lower self-esteem (P<0.001) were predictors of poorer health behavior. Given the increased prevalence of comorbid diseases in adults with epilepsy, clinicians should routinely query teens with epilepsy regarding health behavior and provide anticipatory guidance and appropriate interventions for poor health behavior choices. PMID:18555203

  8. Comparative Analysis of Behavioral Models for Adaptive Learning in Changing Environments.

    PubMed

    Marković, Dimitrije; Kiebel, Stefan J

    2016-01-01

    Probabilistic models of decision making under various forms of uncertainty have been applied in recent years to numerous behavioral and model-based fMRI studies. These studies were highly successful in enabling a better understanding of behavior and delineating the functional properties of brain areas involved in decision making under uncertainty. However, as different studies considered different models of decision making under uncertainty, it is unclear which of these computational models provides the best account of the observed behavioral and neuroimaging data. This is an important issue, as not performing model comparison may tempt researchers to over-interpret results based on a single model. Here we describe how in practice one can compare different behavioral models and test the accuracy of model comparison and parameter estimation of Bayesian and maximum-likelihood based methods. We focus our analysis on two well-established hierarchical probabilistic models that aim at capturing the evolution of beliefs in changing environments: Hierarchical Gaussian Filters and Change Point Models. To our knowledge, these two, well-established models have never been compared on the same data. We demonstrate, using simulated behavioral experiments, that one can accurately disambiguate between these two models, and accurately infer free model parameters and hidden belief trajectories (e.g., posterior expectations, posterior uncertainties, and prediction errors) even when using noisy and highly correlated behavioral measurements. Importantly, we found several advantages of Bayesian inference and Bayesian model comparison compared to often-used Maximum-Likelihood schemes combined with the Bayesian Information Criterion. These results stress the relevance of Bayesian data analysis for model-based neuroimaging studies that investigate human decision making under uncertainty. PMID:27148030

  9. Comparative Analysis of Behavioral Models for Adaptive Learning in Changing Environments

    PubMed Central

    Marković, Dimitrije; Kiebel, Stefan J.

    2016-01-01

    Probabilistic models of decision making under various forms of uncertainty have been applied in recent years to numerous behavioral and model-based fMRI studies. These studies were highly successful in enabling a better understanding of behavior and delineating the functional properties of brain areas involved in decision making under uncertainty. However, as different studies considered different models of decision making under uncertainty, it is unclear which of these computational models provides the best account of the observed behavioral and neuroimaging data. This is an important issue, as not performing model comparison may tempt researchers to over-interpret results based on a single model. Here we describe how in practice one can compare different behavioral models and test the accuracy of model comparison and parameter estimation of Bayesian and maximum-likelihood based methods. We focus our analysis on two well-established hierarchical probabilistic models that aim at capturing the evolution of beliefs in changing environments: Hierarchical Gaussian Filters and Change Point Models. To our knowledge, these two, well-established models have never been compared on the same data. We demonstrate, using simulated behavioral experiments, that one can accurately disambiguate between these two models, and accurately infer free model parameters and hidden belief trajectories (e.g., posterior expectations, posterior uncertainties, and prediction errors) even when using noisy and highly correlated behavioral measurements. Importantly, we found several advantages of Bayesian inference and Bayesian model comparison compared to often-used Maximum-Likelihood schemes combined with the Bayesian Information Criterion. These results stress the relevance of Bayesian data analysis for model-based neuroimaging studies that investigate human decision making under uncertainty. PMID:27148030

  10. The ichnologic record of the continental invertebrate invasion: evolutionary trends in environmental expansion, ecospace utilization, and behavioral complexity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buatois, L.A.; Mangano, M.G.; Genise, J.F.; Taylor, T.N.

    1998-01-01

    The combined study of continental trace fossils and associated sedimentary facies provides valuable evidence of colonization trends and events throughout the Phanerozoic. Colonization of continental environments was linked to the exploitation of empty or under-utilized ecospace. Although the nonmarine trace fossil record probably begins during the Late Ordovician, significant invasion of nonmarine biotopes began close to the Silurian-Devonian transition with the establishment of a mobile arthropod epifauna (Diplichnites ichnoguild) in coastal marine to alluvial plain settings. Additionally, the presence of vertical burrows in Devonian high-energy fluvial deposits reflects the establishment of a stationary, deep suspension-feeding infauna of the Skolithos ichnoguild. The earliest evidence of plant-arthropod interaction occurred close to the Silurian-Devonian boundary, but widespread and varied feeding patterns are known from the Carboniferous. During the Carboniferous, permanent subaqueous lacustrine settings were colonized by a diverse, mobile detritus-feeding epifauna of the Mermia ichnoguild, which reflects a significant palaeoenvironmental expansion of trace fossils. Paleozoic ichnologic evidence supports direct routes to the land from marginal marine environments, and migration to lakes from land settings. All nonmarine sedimentary environments were colonized by the Carboniferous, and subsequent patterns indicate an increase in ecospace utilization within already colonized depositional settings. During the Permian, back-filled traces of the Scoyenia ichnoguild record the establishment of a mobile, intermediate-depth, deposit-feeding in-fauna in alluvial and transitional alluvial-lacustrine sediment. Diversification of land plants and the establishment of ecologically diverse plant communities through time provided new niches to be exploited by arthropods. Nevertheless, most ot the evolutionary feeding innovations took place relatively early, during the Late

  11. Efficacy and cost-effectiveness of the 13C-urea breath test as the primary diagnostic investigation for the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection compared to invasive and non-invasive diagnostic tests

    PubMed Central

    Nocon, Marc; Kuhlmann, Alexander; Leodolter, Andreas; Roll, Stephanie; Vauth, Christoph; Willich, Stefan N.; Greiner, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most common bacterial infections in humans. There is a risk factor for gastric or duodenal ulcers, gastric cancer and MALT (Mucosa Associated Lymphoid Tissue)-Lymphomas. There are several invasive and non-invasive methods available for the diagnosis of H. pylori. The 13C-urea breath test is a non-invasive method recommended for monitoring H. pylori eradication therapy. However, this test is not yet used for primary assessment of H. pylori in Germany. Objectives What are the clinical and health economic benefits of the 13C-urea breath test in the primary assessment of H. pylori compared to other invasive and non-invasive methods? Methods A systematic literature search including a hand search was performed for studies investigating test criteria and cost-effectiveness of the 13C-urea breath test in comparison to other methods used in the primary assessment of H. pylori. Only studies that directly compared the 13C-urea breath test to other H. pylori-tests were included. For the medical part, biopsy-based tests were used as the gold standard. Results 30 medical studies are included. Compared to the immunoglobulin G (IgG) test, the sensitivity of the 13C-urea breath test is higher in twelve studies, lower in six studies and one study reports no differences. The specificity is higher in 13 studies, lower in three studies and two studies report no differences. Compared to the stool antigen test, the sensitivity of the 13C-urea breath test is higher in nine studies, lower in three studies and one study reports no difference. The specificity is higher in nine studies, lower in two studies and two studies report no differences. Compared to the urease test, the sensitivity of the 13C-urea breath test is higher in four studies, lower in three studies and four studies report no differences. The specificity is higher in five studies, lower in five studies and one study reports no difference. Compared to histology, the

  12. Toxicity of an herbicide and adjuvant to saltmarsh invertebrates in the management of invasive grass; Comparative laboratory and field tests.

    PubMed

    Kleinhenz, Linda S; Nugegoda, Dayanthi; Verspaandonk, Emily R; Coombes, Darcy C; Howe, Steffan; Shimeta, Jeff

    2016-08-15

    Coastal weeds are often treated with herbicides without knowledge of non-target impacts, and toxicity data from standardized test species can have limited applicability. We evaluated toxicity to invertebrates from Fusilade Forte® and the adjuvant Hasten® in the control of invasive salt marsh grass, Spartina anglica. For 3 of 4 local invertebrates, Fusilade Forte® was moderately toxic (96h LC50 5.4-144mgL(-1)), whereas Hasten® was less toxic (14.2-450mgL(-1)). For most species, the mixture was more toxic than the herbicide alone, with 96h LC50 reduced 23-45%. However, a field experiment applying typical concentrations (1000×the lowest 96h LC50) showed low concentrations of herbicide residues and no detrimental impacts on invertebrates over 6months. The results reveal the importance of testing locally relevant species for potential toxicity, and of comparison tests with field exposures to determine the realised toxicity in nature. PMID:27262496

  13. Very-late-antigen-4 (VLA-4)-mediated brain invasion by neutrophils leads to interactions with microglia, increased ischemic injury and impaired behavior in experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Jens; Riek-Burchardt, Monika; Herz, Josephine; Doeppner, Thorsten R; König, Rebecca; Hütten, Heiko; Etemire, Eloho; Männ, Linda; Klingberg, Anika; Fischer, Thomas; Görtler, Michael W; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Reichardt, Peter; Schraven, Burkhart; Hermann, Dirk M; Reymann, Klaus G; Gunzer, Matthias

    2015-02-01

    Neuronal injury from ischemic stroke is aggravated by invading peripheral immune cells. Early infiltrates of neutrophil granulocytes and T-cells influence the outcome of stroke. So far, however, neither the timing nor the cellular dynamics of neutrophil entry, its consequences for the invaded brain area, or the relative importance of T-cells has been extensively studied in an intravital setting. Here, we have used intravital two-photon microscopy to document neutrophils and brain-resident microglia in mice after induction of experimental stroke. We demonstrated that neutrophils immediately rolled, firmly adhered, and transmigrated at sites of endothelial activation in stroke-affected brain areas. The ensuing neutrophil invasion was associated with local blood-brain barrier breakdown and infarct formation. Brain-resident microglia recognized both endothelial damage and neutrophil invasion. In a cooperative manner, they formed cytoplasmic processes to physically shield activated endothelia and trap infiltrating neutrophils. Interestingly, the systemic blockade of very-late-antigen-4 immediately and very effectively inhibited the endothelial interaction and brain entry of neutrophils. This treatment thereby strongly reduced the ischemic tissue injury and effectively protected the mice from stroke-associated behavioral impairment. Behavioral preservation was also equally well achieved with the antibody-mediated depletion of myeloid cells or specifically neutrophils. In contrast, T-cell depletion more effectively reduced the infarct volume without improving the behavioral performance. Thus, neutrophil invasion of the ischemic brain is rapid, massive, and a key mediator of functional impairment, while peripheral T-cells promote brain damage. Acutely depleting T-cells and inhibiting brain infiltration of neutrophils might, therefore, be a powerful early stroke treatment. PMID:25391494

  14. Comparative locomotor behavior of chimpanzees and bonobos: the influence of morphology on locomotion.

    PubMed

    Doran, D M

    1993-05-01

    Results from a 10 month study of adult male and female bonobos (Pan paniscus) in the Lomako Forest, Zaire, and those from a 7 month study of adult male and female chimpanzees in the Tai Forest, Ivory Coast (Pan troglodytes verus), were compared in order to determine whether there are species differences in locomotor behavior and substrate use and, if so, whether these differences support predictions made on the basis of interspecific morphological differences. Results indicate that bonobos are more arboreal than chimpanzees and that male bonobos are more suspensory than their chimpanzee counterpart. This would be predicted on the basis of male bonobo's longer and more narrow scapula. This particular finding is contrary to the prediction that the bonobo is a "scaled reduced version of a chimpanzee" with little or no positional behavior difference as had been suggested. This study provides the behavioral data necessary to untangle contradictory interpretations of the morphological differences between chimpanzees and bonobos, and raises a previously discussed (Fleagle: Size and Scaling in Primate Biology, pp. 1-19, 1985) but frequently overlooked point--that isometry in allometric studies does not necessarily equate with behavioral equivalence. Several researchers have demonstrated that bonobos and chimpanzees follow the same scaling trends for many features, and are in some sense functionally equivalent, since they manage to feed and reproduce. However, as reflected in their morphologies, they do so through different types and frequencies of locomotor behaviors. PMID:8512056

  15. Perceptions of relationship satisfaction and addictive behavior: Comparing pornography and marijuana use.

    PubMed

    Pyle, Tara M; Bridges, Ana J

    2012-12-01

    Background and aims Research indicates that excessive pornography use can negatively impact romantic relationships. However, it is unclear whether these negative outcomes are different than negative outcomes produced by other compulsive or addictive behaviors, such as drug use. This study compared perceptions of relationship outcomes from either a romantic partner's excessive marijuana or pornography use. Furthermore, this study experimentally manipulated four factors potentially related to perceptions of relationship satisfaction and addictive behavior. Methods A total of 186 college-aged women read 16 scenarios describing heterosexual romantic relationships in which one partner used either pornography or marijuana. Each scenario varied on four variables: relationship commitment, secrecy of partner's behavior, frequency of partner's behavior, and context of partner's behavior. Results Results suggest that partner pornography and marijuana use are perceived to impact romantic relationships similarly and are influenced by similar factors, such as greater frequency, higher secrecy, and partner's availability for interaction. Conclusions Such findings are consistent with recommendations by professionals that compulsive pornography use be considered worthy of treatment intervention. PMID:26165604

  16. Comparative Development of Heterosexual and Homosexual Behaviors in Free-Ranging Female Japanese Macaques.

    PubMed

    Leca, Jean-Baptiste; Gunst, Noëlle; Vasey, Paul L

    2015-07-01

    We used cross-sectional focal data collected in adolescent and adult females to elucidate the comparative development of heterosexual and homosexual behaviors in female Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) living at Arashiyama, Japan, in a group where adult females routinely exhibit sexual interactions with both males and females. Our data fully or partially supported most of our predictions (20 out of 30) related to the "learning hypothesis," which postulated that adolescence would serve to provide young females with a period in which to practice, and gradually acquire, three types of adult female-like heterosexual and homosexual behavioral patterns, namely sexual solicitations, sexual mounts, and spatio-temporal coordination during consortships. However, there were marked differences in the development of heterosexual and homosexual behaviors. The percentage of homosexual mounts was significantly higher in adolescent than in adult females. Of the fully or partially supported predictions, 13 of 15 pertained to heterosexual activity whereas only seven of 15 pertained to homosexual activity. A number of sexual behavioral patterns (e.g., demonstrative solicitations, range of solicitation patterns and mounting postures, and grasping behavior during consortships) emerged earlier and developed faster when directed to females than when directed to males. We explain such differences in terms of risk of male aggression, males' disinterest in adolescent females' sexual solicitations, presence of motivated same-sex sexual partners, social facilitation, and sexual reward. PMID:25420900

  17. Deletion of Ovarian Hormones Induces a Sickness Behavior in Rats Comparable to the Effect of Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Azizi-Malekabadi, Hamid; Hosseini, Mahmoud; Pourganji, Masoume; Zabihi, Hoda; Saeedjalali, Mohsen; Anaeigoudari, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimmune factors have been proposed as the contributors to the pathogenesis of sickness behaviors. The effects of female gonadal hormones on both neuroinflammation and depression have also been well considered. In the present study, the capability of deletion of ovarian hormones to induce sickness-like behaviors in rats was compared with the effect lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The groups were including Sham, OVX, Sham-LPS, and OVX-LPS. The Sham-LPS and OVX-LPS groups were treated with LPS (250 μg/kg) two hours before conducting the behavioral tests. In the forced swimming (FST), the immobility times in both OVX and Sham-LPS groups were higher than that of Sham (P < 0.001). In open-field (OP) test, the central crossing number by OVX and Sham-LPS groups were lower than Sham (P < 0.001) while there were no significant differences between OVX-LPS and OVX groups. In elevated plus maze (EPM), the percent of entries to the open arm by both OVX and Sham-LPS groups was lower than that of Sham group (P < 0.001). The results of present study showed that deletion of ovarian hormones induced sickness behaviors in rats which were comparable to the effects of LPS. Moreover, further investigations are required in order to better understand the mechanism(s) involved. PMID:25705518

  18. Establishing the behavioral basis for an attract-and-kill strategy to manage the invasive Halyomorpha halys in apple orchards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Halyomorpha halys (Stål) is an invasive, polyphagous insect that inflicts serious economic injury on specialty crops in the United States. Growers have been forced to respond by increasing the frequency of broad-spectrum insecticide applications. One strategy to reduce reliance on insecticides is ...

  19. Robot-assisted coronary artery bypass grafting improves short-term outcomes compared with minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass grafting

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Wenhui; Cai, Junfeng; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Anqing; Ye, Xiaofeng; Li, Haiqing

    2016-01-01

    Background Robot-assisted coronary artery bypass grafts (RACAB) utilizing the da Vinci surgical system are increasingly used and allow the surgeon to conveniently harvest internal mammary arteries (IMAs). The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of off-pump RACAB and minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass grafting (MIDCAB) in the short and medium term. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 132 patients with single- or multiple-vessel coronary artery disease who underwent minimally invasive off-pump CABG (OPCAB) between May 2009 and May 2014. The patients were divided into two groups based on the surgical approach, MIDCAB and RACAB group. The anastomosis of the left internal mammary artery (LIMA) to the left anterior descending artery (LAD) was performed as regular OPCAB through the incision on the beating heart using regular stabilization devices (Genzyme Corporation). The preoperative, intraoperative, postoperative, and follow-up data, including major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE), were compared. Results The preoperative data were similar. RACAB significantly shorten the intensive care unit (ICU) stay and postoperative compared with the MIDCAB group (P<0.05). There were 12 (19.7%) patients treated with a two-stage hybrid procedure in the MIDCAB group and 34 (47.9%) patients in the RACAB group (P=0.001). Thirty-day mortality was 1.6% in the MIDCAB group. There were 9 (14.7%) MIDCAB patients and 2 (2.8%) RACAB patients (P=0.013) that developed new arrhythmia. The two groups showed comparable mid-term survival (P=0.246), but the MACCEs were significantly different (P=0.038). Conclusions RACAB may be a valuable alternative for patients requiring single or simple multi-vessel coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Although the mid-term mortality outcomes are similar, RACAB improves short-term outcomes and mid-term MACCE-free survival compared with MIDCAB. PMID:27076941

  20. Oxytocin--a neuropeptide for affiliation: evidence from behavioral, receptor autoradiographic, and comparative studies.

    PubMed

    Insel, T R

    1992-01-01

    Oxytocin (OT) is a nine amino acid peptide synthesized in hypothalamic cells which project either to the neurohypophysis or to sites within the central nervous system. Although neurohypophyseal OT release has long been associated with uterine contraction and milk ejection, the function of intracerebral OT remains unclear. On the basis of behavioral, cellular, and comparative studies, this review suggests that brain OT influences the formation of social bonds. The first part of this review examines evidence linking central OT to several forms of affiliation. Central administration of OT induces maternal and reproductive behaviors in rats primed with gonadal steroids. OT antagonists and hypothalamic lesions block the initiation of maternal and reproductive behaviors but have no effects on these behaviors once established. Our new studies in rat pups demonstrate that central OT selectively decreases the separation response, an effect which mimics social contact. These studies of parental, reproductive, and attachment behaviors suggest that exogenous OT has "prosocial" effects and that endogenous OT may be essential for initiating social interaction. In a second series of experiments, we investigated the cellular mechanisms for OT's effects on social behavior by means of autoradiographic receptor binding. In the rat forebrain, OT receptors are expressed in several limbic regions believed to be involved in the integration of sensory processing. The regulation of these receptors is surprisingly resistant to either ablation of OT cells or repeated central administration of OT. However, receptors in two regions, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) and the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMN), appear selectively induced by exogenous or endogenous increases in gonadal steroids. At parturition, binding to OT receptors increases 84% in the BNST, and at estrus, binding increases 35% in the VMN. These results demonstrate that physiologic changes in gonadal

  1. Functions of behavior change interventions when implementing multi-professional teamwork at an emergency department: a comparative case study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background While there is strong support for the benefits of working in multi-professional teams in health care, the implementation of multi-professional teamwork is reported to be complex and challenging. Implementation strategies combining multiple behavior change interventions are recommended, but the understanding of how and why the behavior change interventions influence staff behavior is limited. There is a lack of studies focusing on the functions of different behavior change interventions and the mechanisms driving behavior change. In this study, applied behavior analysis is used to analyze the function and impact of different behavior change interventions when implementing multi-professional teamwork. Methods A comparative case study design was applied. Two sections of an emergency department implemented multi-professional teamwork involving changes in work processes, aimed at increasing inter-professional collaboration. Behavior change interventions and staff behavior change were studied using observations, interviews and document analysis. Using a hybrid thematic analysis, the behavior change interventions were categorized according to the DCOM® model. The functions of the behavior change interventions were then analyzed using applied behavior analysis. Results The two sections used different behavior change interventions, resulting in a large difference in the degree of staff behavior change. The successful section enabled staff performance of teamwork behaviors with a strategy based on ongoing problem-solving and frequent clarification of directions. Managerial feedback initially played an important role in motivating teamwork behaviors. Gradually, as staff started to experience positive outcomes of the intervention, motivation for teamwork behaviors was replaced by positive task-generated feedback. Conclusions The functional perspective of applied behavior analysis offers insight into the behavioral mechanisms that describe how and why behavior

  2. A Prefrontal-Hippocampal Comparator for Goal-Directed Behavior: The Intentional Self and Episodic Memory

    PubMed Central

    Numan, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The hypothesis of this article is that the interactions between the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus play a critical role in the modulation of goal-directed self-action and the strengthening of episodic memories. We describe various theories that model a comparator function for the hippocampus, and then elaborate the empirical evidence that supports these theories. One theory which describes a prefrontal-hippocampal comparator for voluntary action is emphasized. Action plans are essential for successful goal-directed behavior, and are elaborated by the prefrontal cortex. When an action plan is initiated, the prefrontal cortex transmits an efference copy (or corollary discharge) to the hippocampus where it is stored as a working memory for the action plan (which includes the expected outcomes of the action plan). The hippocampus then serves as a response intention-response outcome working memory comparator. Hippocampal comparator function is enabled by the hippocampal theta rhythm allowing the hippocampus to compare expected action outcomes to actual action outcomes. If the expected and actual outcomes match, the hippocampus transmits a signal to prefrontal cortex which strengthens or consolidates the action plan. If a mismatch occurs, the hippocampus transmits an error signal to the prefrontal cortex which facilitates a reformulation of the action plan, fostering behavioral flexibility and memory updating. The corollary discharge provides the self-referential component to the episodic memory, affording the personal and subjective experience of what behavior was carried out, when it was carried out, and in what context (where) it occurred. Such a perspective can be applied to episodic memory in humans, and episodic-like memory in non-human animal species. PMID:26635567

  3. Comparative analysis of the behavioral and biomolecular parameters of four mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Nesher, Elimelech; Peskov, Vladimir; Rylova, Anna; Raz, Olga; Pinhasov, Albert

    2012-02-01

    The use of mice as experimental models in pharmacological and biochemical research began over 100 years ago, during which time different mice strains with specific features were developed. Numerous studies demonstrate that the pharmacological efficacy of various compounds significantly varies among different animal strains, a factor which must be considered when analyzing experimental data. The Sabra strain, developed more than 35 years ago, is widely used for research in Israel but has an unclear origin and is not characterized as well as other strains. Comparative analyses of the molecular characteristics of Sabra and other strains should help to understand their characteristics and to enhance the validity of their experimental use. Thus, four mouse strains-outbred ICR and Sabra as well as inbred C57Bl/6J and Balb/c were compared. Animals' weight, blood corticosterone and hippocampal BDNF mRNA levels were measured, and animals' behavior was compared using the EPM, open field, FST, and hot plate tests. We found that although Sabra mice are bigger and heavier than other tested lines, this is not reflected in behavior or in biomolecular features, wherein Sabra mice lay within the diapason of other tested animals. Thus, behavioral tests of anxiety-like behavior and locomotor activity revealed that Sabra mice scored close to the mean of all tested lines. Analysis of blood corticosterone levels did not show significant differences among tested strains. We also found a correlation between general and locomotor activity of the tested strains and their hippocampal BDNF mRNA expression. In summary, we may conclude that Sabra mice have traits similar to the better known lines, and therefore they are good subjects for neuroscience research. PMID:21598024

  4. Investigating Invasives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightbody, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Invasive species, commonly known as "invasives," are nonnative plants, animals, and microbes that completely take over and change an established ecosystem. The consequences of invasives' spread are significant. In fact, many of the species that appear on the Endangered Species list are threatened by invasives. Therefore, the topic of invasive…

  5. On the Importance of Comparative Research for the Understanding of Human Behavior and Development: A Reply to Gottlieb & Lickliter (2004)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maestripieri, Dario

    2005-01-01

    Comparative behavioral research is important for a number of reasons and can contribute to the understanding of human behavior and development in many different ways. Research with animal models of human behavior and development can be a source not only of general principles and testable hypotheses but also of empirical information that may be…

  6. Comparing Thin Slices of Verbal Communication Behavior of Varying Number and Duration

    PubMed Central

    Carcone, April Idalski; Naar-King, Sylvie; Eggly, Susan; Foster, Tanina; Albrecht, Terrance; Brogan, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of thin slices to characterize the verbal communication behavior of counselors and patients engaged in Motivational Interviewing sessions relative to fully coded sessions. Methods Four thin slice samples that varied in number (four versus six slices) and duration (one- versus two-minutes) were extracted from a previously coded dataset. In the parent study, an observational code scheme was used to characterize specific counselor and patient verbal communication behaviors. For the current study, we compared the frequency of communication codes and the correlations among the full dataset and each thin slice sample. Results Both the proportion of communication codes and strength of the correlation demonstrated the highest degree of accuracy when a greater number (i.e., six versus four) and duration (i.e., two- versus one-minute) of slices were extracted. Conclusion These results suggest that thin slice sampling may be a useful and accurate strategy to reduce coding burden when coding specific verbal communication behaviors within clinical encounters. Practice Implications We suggest researchers interested in using thin slice sampling in their own work conduct preliminary research to determine the number and duration of thin slices required to accurately characterize the behaviors of interest. PMID:25441095

  7. Population-based sexual behavior surveys in China: Liuzhou compared with other prefectural cities

    PubMed Central

    Yingying, Huang; Abler, Laurie; Suiming, Pan; Henderson, Gail E.; Xin, Wang; Xingliang, Yao; Parish, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Sexual behaviors in China are rapidly changing; simultaneously, STI/HIV prevalence is increasing in the general population. To investigate these major shifts, we examined sexual behaviors and self-reported sexually transmitted infections (STI) in one prefectural city in southern China, Liuzhou, and compared it to other prefectural cities throughout China. We used adults age 18-39 from two sets of population-based surveys that paralleled each other in both content and method. The first set was the Liuzhou survey conducted in 2008 (n=398). The second set consisted of two national surveys collected in 2006 and 2010 (n=2186). Liuzhou respondents reported more active social and sexual behaviors than their national counterparts, including more socializing, dancing, drinking excessively, sexual activity among never married men and women, purchasing commercial sex among men, one-night stands among men, multiple sexual partnerships and self-reported STI among both men and women. Women in Liuzhou reported greater sexual risk behavior than their national counterparts, although overall they reported less than their male counterparts; they were also more likely to have had an abortion than women in other prefectural cities. Our findings provide a comprehensive overview of the sexual context of Liuzhou among the general population, which may help explain the greater STI/HIV prevalence in Liuzhou. PMID:24174289

  8. Population-based sexual behavior surveys in China: Liuzhou compared with other prefectural cities.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yingying; Abler, Laurie; Pan, Suiming; Henderson, Gail E; Wang, Xin; Yao, Xingliang; Parish, William L

    2014-02-01

    Sexual behaviors in China are rapidly changing; simultaneously, sexually transmitted infections (STI)/HIV prevalence is increasing in the general population. To investigate these major shifts, we examined sexual behaviors and self-reported STI in one prefectural city in southern China, Liuzhou, and compared it to other prefectural cities throughout China. We used adults age 18-39 from two sets of population-based surveys that paralleled each other in both content and method. The first set was the Liuzhou survey conducted in 2008 (n = 398). The second set consisted of two national surveys collected in 2006 and 2010 (n = 2,186). Liuzhou respondents reported more active social and sexual behaviors than their national counterparts, including more socializing, dancing, drinking excessively, sexual activity among never married men and women, purchasing commercial sex among men, one-night stands among men, multiple sexual partnerships and self-reported STI among both men and women. Women in Liuzhou reported greater sexual risk behavior than their national counterparts, although overall they reported less than their male counterparts; they were also more likely to have had an abortion than women in other prefectural cities. Our findings provide a comprehensive overview of the sexual context of Liuzhou among the general population, which may help explain the greater STI/HIV prevalence in Liuzhou. PMID:24174289

  9. Of humans and hamsters: a comparative evaluation of carcinogen activation, DNA damage, cell proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, and angiogenesis in oral cancer patients and hamster buccal pouch carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Nagini, Siddavaram; Letchoumy, Paramasivame Vidjaya; A, Thangavelu; Cr, Ramachandran

    2009-06-01

    The hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis model is one of the most well characterized animal systems for analyzing the development of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), a common malignancy worldwide. HBP carcinomas that closely mimic human OSCC are useful in understanding the molecular mechanisms of neoplastic transformation. The present study is a comparative evaluation of markers of carcinogen activation, oxidative stress, cell proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, and angiogenesis in human and hamster OSCCs. Enhanced expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 isoforms in both human and hamster oral tumours was associated with significantly increased expression of 8-hydroxy 2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) indicating oxidative DNA damage. Analysis of markers of cell survival and proliferation revealed increased expression of PCNA, GST-P, and NF-kappaB with downregulation of p21, p53 and IkappaB in both human and hamster OSCCs. In addition, both human and hamster oral carcinomas displayed invasive, and angiogenic properties as revealed by dysregulated cytokeratin expression, downregulation of RECK, and increased expression of uPA, MMP-2 and-9, HIF-1alpha, and VEGF. The results reveal aberrant expression of multiple molecules in key signaling pathways in both human OSCCs and HBP carcinomas rendering the HBP model as an important tool for monitoring oral oncogenesis. PMID:19250857

  10. Unique behavior of Trypanosoma cruzi mevalonate kinase: A conserved glycosomal enzyme involved in host cell invasion and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Éden Ramalho; Horjales, Eduardo; Bonfim-Melo, Alexis; Cortez, Cristian; da Silva, Claudio Vieira; De Groote, Michel; Sobreira, Tiago José Paschoal; Cruz, Mário Costa; Lima, Fabio Mitsuo; Cordero, Esteban Mauricio; Yoshida, Nobuko; da Silveira, José Franco; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Bahia, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Mevalonate kinase (MVK) is an essential enzyme acting in early steps of sterol isoprenoids biosynthesis, such as cholesterol in humans or ergosterol in trypanosomatids. MVK is conserved from bacteria to mammals, and localizes to glycosomes in trypanosomatids. During the course of T. cruzi MVK characterization, we found that, in addition to glycosomes, this enzyme may be secreted and modulate cell invasion. To evaluate the role of TcMVK in parasite-host cell interactions, TcMVK recombinant protein was produced and anti-TcMVK antibodies were raised in mice. TcMVK protein was detected in the supernatant of cultures of metacyclic trypomastigotes (MTs) and extracellular amastigotes (EAs) by Western blot analysis, confirming its secretion into extracellular medium. Recombinant TcMVK bound in a non-saturable dose-dependent manner to HeLa cells and positively modulated internalization of T. cruzi EAs but inhibited invasion by MTs. In HeLa cells, TcMVK induced phosphorylation of MAPK pathway components and proteins related to actin cytoskeleton modifications. We hypothesized that TcMVK is a bifunctional enzyme that in addition to playing a classical role in isoprenoid synthesis in glycosomes, it is secreted and may modulate host cell signaling required for T. cruzi invasion. PMID:27113535

  11. Unique behavior of Trypanosoma cruzi mevalonate kinase: A conserved glycosomal enzyme involved in host cell invasion and signaling.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Éden Ramalho; Horjales, Eduardo; Bonfim-Melo, Alexis; Cortez, Cristian; da Silva, Claudio Vieira; De Groote, Michel; Sobreira, Tiago José Paschoal; Cruz, Mário Costa; Lima, Fabio Mitsuo; Cordero, Esteban Mauricio; Yoshida, Nobuko; da Silveira, José Franco; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Bahia, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Mevalonate kinase (MVK) is an essential enzyme acting in early steps of sterol isoprenoids biosynthesis, such as cholesterol in humans or ergosterol in trypanosomatids. MVK is conserved from bacteria to mammals, and localizes to glycosomes in trypanosomatids. During the course of T. cruzi MVK characterization, we found that, in addition to glycosomes, this enzyme may be secreted and modulate cell invasion. To evaluate the role of TcMVK in parasite-host cell interactions, TcMVK recombinant protein was produced and anti-TcMVK antibodies were raised in mice. TcMVK protein was detected in the supernatant of cultures of metacyclic trypomastigotes (MTs) and extracellular amastigotes (EAs) by Western blot analysis, confirming its secretion into extracellular medium. Recombinant TcMVK bound in a non-saturable dose-dependent manner to HeLa cells and positively modulated internalization of T. cruzi EAs but inhibited invasion by MTs. In HeLa cells, TcMVK induced phosphorylation of MAPK pathway components and proteins related to actin cytoskeleton modifications. We hypothesized that TcMVK is a bifunctional enzyme that in addition to playing a classical role in isoprenoid synthesis in glycosomes, it is secreted and may modulate host cell signaling required for T. cruzi invasion. PMID:27113535

  12. Comparative metabolic behavior and interrelationships of Tc and S in soybean plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cataldo, D.A.; Garland, T.R.; Wildung, R.E.; Fellows, R.J. )

    1989-08-01

    The comparative behavior of sulfur (S) and technetium (Tc) in soybean seedlings shows gross subcellular distributions to be similar for these oxyanions. More than 75% of the tissue-deposited Tc remains soluble and extractable. Differences in Tc fixation/incorporation were noted for the nuclear and chloroplast fractions of leaf and root cells. Pulse studies showed that soluble protein and nitrate reductase levels rose in response to Tc accumulation by sink leaves but not source leaves. In vitro assay of chloroplast-based S reduction and incorporation systems showed Tc to be reduced and incorporated into amino nitrogen-containing products. A hypothesis related to the metabolic behavior of Tc in plants is presented.

  13. Noninvasive and invasive positive pressure ventilation for acute respiratory failure in critically ill patients: a comparative cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Meeder, Annelijn M.; Tjan, Dave H. T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) for acute respiratory failure in the intensive care unit (ICU) is associated with a marked reduction in intubation rate, complications, hospital length of stay and mortality. Multiple studies have indicated that patients failing NPPV have worse outcomes compared with patients with successful NPPV treatment; however limited data is available on risks associated with NPPV failure resulting in (delayed) intubation and outcomes compared with initial intubation. The purpose of this study is to assess rates and predictors of NPPV failure and to compare hospital outcomes of patients with NPPV failure with those patients primarily intubated without a prior NPPV trial. Methods A retrospective observational study using data from patients with acute respiratory failure admitted to the ICU in the period 2013–2014. All patients treated with NPPV were evaluated. A sample of patients who were primarily intubated was randomly selected to serve as controls for the group of patients who failed NPPV. Results NPPV failure was recorded in 30.8% of noninvasively ventilated patients and was associated with longer ICU stay [OR, 1.16, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.04–1.30] and lower survival rates (OR, 0.10, 95% CI: 0.02–0.59) compared with NPPV success. Multivariate analysis showed presence of severe sepsis at study entry, higher Simplified Acute Physiology II Score (SAPS-II) score, lower ratio of arterial oxygen tension to fraction of inspired oxygen (PF-ratio) and lower plasma glucose were predictors for NPPV failure. After controlling for potential confounders, patients with NPPV failure did not show any difference in hospital outcomes compared with patients who were primarily intubated. Conclusions Patients with acute respiratory failure and NPPV failure have worse outcomes compared with NPPV success patients, however not worse than initially intubated patients. An initial trial of NPPV therefore may be suitable

  14. A rapid, non-invasive and non-destructive method for studying swelling behavior and microstructure variations of hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaqiong; Li, Xiunan; Chen, Chao; Zhao, Dawei; Su, Zhiguo; Ma, Guanghui; Yu, Rong

    2016-10-20

    A new method for studying swelling behavior of hydrogels was developed based on low field NMR (LF-NMR). This method is established on these facts: firstly, internal water (water trapped in hydrogel) and external water (water outside of hydrogel) correspond to different components of transverse relaxation time (T2); secondly, T2 component amplitude is proportional to relative water content; and finally, T2 value is closely related to mesh size of hydrogel network, the main effect being due to the overall concentration (degree of swelling). This method was successfully applied to swelling ratio determination of chitosan/glutaraldehyde (CS/GA) hydrogels in situ, and the results had better accuracy and repeatability compared with that of weighing method. Furthermore, swelling kinetics at different pH and microstructure of CS/GA hydrogels was well elucidated based on T2. It is clearly showed that LF-NMR provides a powerful tool for probing processes related to water transport and microstructure variation of hydrogels. PMID:27474678

  15. The ubiquitous plasmid pXap41 in the invasive phytopathogen Xanthomonas arboricola pv. pruni: complete sequence and comparative genomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Pothier, Joël F; Vorhölter, Frank-Jörg; Blom, Jochen; Goesmann, Alexander; Pühler, Alfred; Smits, Theo H M; Duffy, Brion

    2011-10-01

    The complete DNA sequence of the 41 102-bp plasmid pXap41 from the invasive plant pathogen Xanthomonas arboricola pv. pruni CFBP 5530 was determined and its 44 coding regions were annotated. Comparative analysis with 15 Xanthomonas plasmids and 19 complete genomes revealed that nearly one-fourth of this plasmid has high sequence identity to plasmid pXAC64 and an 8.8-kb chromosomal region of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri strain 306 carrying genes that encode type III effectors and helper proteins. The presence of pXap41 in all X. arboricola pv. pruni genotypes was confirmed for eight strains by plasmid profiling and for 35 X. arboricola pv. pruni isolates with a new plasmid multiplex PCR assay. This plasmid was not detected in any other X. arboricola pathovars (n=12), indicating the potential for the application of the pXap41 PCR method as a pathovar-level detection and identification tool. PMID:21732961

  16. Adoptive and Nonadoptive Mother–Child Behavioral Interaction: A Comparative Study at 4 Years of Age

    PubMed Central

    Suwalsky, Joan T. D.; Padilla, Christina M.; Yuen, Cynthia X.; Horn, E. Parham; Bradley, Alexandra L.; Putnick, Diane L.; Bornstein, Marc H.

    2016-01-01

    Comparable samples of low-risk adopted and nonadopted children and mothers were observed during 3 tasks at age 4 years. Quality of mother-child interactions, child level of functioning in 4 domains, and maternal parenting satisfaction and social support were assessed. Adopted children were as competent as nonadopted children on measures of developmental functioning. Both groups of mothers expressed high satisfaction and support as parents. However, ratings of child, maternal, and dyadic behavior when interacting were all lower for adoptive dyads than for nonadoptive dyads, and adoptive dyads with boys accounted for the maternal and dyadic group differences. PMID:27134518

  17. Comparative in vitro activity of faropenem and 11 other antimicrobial agents against 250 invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from France.

    PubMed

    Decousser, J W; Pina, P; Picot, F; Allouch, P Y

    2003-09-01

    The aim of the study presented here was to evaluate the in vitro activity of faropenem, a new member of the penem class intended for oral administration, compared with 11 other antimicrobial agents against a large number of Streptococcus pneumoniae strains isolated from adults and children with bloodstream infections in France. The minimum inhibitory concentration of faropenem against 90% of the pediatric strains tested was generally one to two dilutions lower than the most potent beta-lactam agents (i.e., 0.5 micro g/ml for faropenem vs. 1 for amoxicillin, 1 for cefotaxime and 0.5 micro g/ml for ceftriaxone). Against the adult strains, only moxifloxacin had a MIC(90) value similar to faropenem (i.e., 0.25 micro g/ml for both agents). Faropenem seems to be a promising antimicrobial agent for the treatment of adult and pediatric Streptococcus pneumoniae infections. PMID:12942341

  18. Comparative Performance in Single-Port Versus Multiport Minimally Invasive Surgery, and Small Versus Large Operative Working Spaces

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Hani J.; Seneci, Carlo A.; Hughes-Hallett, Archie; Cundy, Thomas P.; Nandi, Dipankar; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Darzi, Ara

    2015-01-01

    Background. Surgical approaches such as transanal endoscopic microsurgery, which utilize small operative working spaces, and are necessarily single-port, are particularly demanding with standard instruments and have not been widely adopted. The aim of this study was to compare simultaneously surgical performance in single-port versus multiport approaches, and small versus large working spaces. Methods. Ten novice, 4 intermediate, and 1 expert surgeons were recruited from a university hospital. A preclinical randomized crossover study design was implemented, comparing performance under the following conditions: (1) multiport approach and large working space, (2) multiport approach and intermediate working space, (3) single-port approach and large working space, (4) single-port approach and intermediate working space, and (5) single-port approach and small working space. In each case, participants performed a peg transfer and pattern cutting tasks, and each task repetition was scored. Results. Intermediate and expert surgeons performed significantly better than novices in all conditions (P < .05). Performance in single-port surgery was significantly worse than multiport surgery (P < .01). In multiport surgery, there was a nonsignificant trend toward worsened performance in the intermediate versus large working space. In single-port surgery, there was a converse trend; performances in the intermediate and small working spaces were significantly better than in the large working space. Conclusions. Single-port approaches were significantly more technically challenging than multiport approaches, possibly reflecting loss of instrument triangulation. Surprisingly, in single-port approaches, in which triangulation was no longer a factor, performance in large working spaces was worse than in intermediate and small working spaces. PMID:26464468

  19. Conspicuous by Their Absence: Studies Comparing and Combining Risperidone and Applied Behavior Analysis to Reduce Challenging Behavior in Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeden, Marc; Ehrhardt, Kristal; Poling, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Both risperidone, an atypical antipsychotic drug, and function-based behavior-analytic interventions are popular and empirically validated treatments for reducing challenging behavior in children with autism. The kind of research that supports their effectiveness differs, however, and no published study has directly compared their effects or…

  20. Alternative Education: A Comparative Case Study of the Behavior Modification Programs of Two Upstate South Carolina Alternative Schools for Youth Who Exhibit Behavior That Is Disruptive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scipio, Timothy Lamont

    2013-01-01

    This study examined behavior modification programs in schools designed to focus on discipline and that aim to reform disruptive behavior in students, usually over a limited period of time. This was a comparative case study of two type II alternative schools in the Upstate of South Carolina. The findings contributed to the research base regarding…

  1. Comparative Cost Analysis of Sequential, Adaptive, Behavioral, Pharmacological, and Combined Treatments for Childhood ADHD.

    PubMed

    Page, Timothy F; Pelham, William E; Fabiano, Gregory A; Greiner, Andrew R; Gnagy, Elizabeth M; Hart, Katie C; Coxe, Stefany; Waxmonsky, James G; Foster, E Michael; Pelham, William E

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a cost analysis of the behavioral, pharmacological, and combined interventions employed in a sequential, multiple assignment, randomized, and adaptive trial investigating the sequencing and enhancement of treatment for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD; Pelham et al., 201X; N = 146, 76% male, 80% Caucasian). The quantity of resources expended on each child's treatment was determined from records that listed the type, date, location, persons present, and duration of all services provided. The inputs considered were the amount of physician time, clinician time, paraprofessional time, teacher time, parent time, medication, and gasoline. Quantities of these inputs were converted into costs in 2013 USD using national wage estimates from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the prices of 30-day supplies of prescription drugs from the national Express Scripts service, and mean fuel prices from the Energy Information Administration. Beginning treatment with a low-dose/intensity regimen of behavior modification (large-group parent training) was less costly for a school year of treatment ($961) than beginning treatment with a low dose of stimulant medication ($1,669), regardless of whether the initial treatment was intensified with a higher "dose" or if the other modality was added. Outcome data from the parent study (Pelham et al., 201X) found equivalent or superior outcomes for treatments beginning with low-intensity behavior modification compared to intervention beginning with medication. Combined with the present analyses, these findings suggest that initiating treatment with behavior modification rather than medication is the more cost-effective option for children with ADHD. PMID:26808137

  2. Leadership Behaviors of Athletic Training Leaders Compared With Leaders in Other Fields

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Timothy G; Bradney, Debbie A

    2007-01-01

    Context: Athletic trainers are in positions of leadership. Objective: To determine self-reported leadership practices of head athletic trainers (HATCs) and program directors (PDs). Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Respondents' academic institutions. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 238 athletic training leaders completed the Leadership Practices Inventory. Of these, 50.4% (n = 120) were HATCs and 49.6% (n = 118) were PDs; 69.3% (n = 165) were men and 30.7% (n = 73) were women; almost all respondents (97.1%, n = 231) were white. Respondents typically reported having 11 to 15 years of experience as an athletic trainer (n = 57, 23.9%) and being between the ages of 30 and 39 years (n = 109, 45.8%). Main Outcome Measure(s): Categories of leadership behaviors (ie, Model, Inspire, Challenge, Encourage, and Enable) were scored from 1 (almost never) to 10 (almost always). Item scores were summed to compute mean category scores. We analyzed demographic information; used t ratios to compare the data from athletic training leaders (PDs and HATCs) with normative data; compared sex, age, position, ethnicity, and years of experience with leadership practices; and computed mean scores. Results: Athletic training leaders reported using leadership behaviors similar to those of other leaders. The PDs reported using inspiring, challenging, enabling, and encouraging leadership behaviors more often than did the HATCs. No differences were found by ethnicity, age, years of experience, or leadership practices. Conclusions: Athletic training leaders are transformational leaders. Athletic training education program accreditation requirements likely account for the difference in leadership practices between PDs and HATCs. PMID:17597953

  3. Plasma etching behavior of Y2O3 ceramics: Comparative study with Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yu-Chao; Zhao, Lei; Luo, Jin; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Bo-Ping; Yokota, Hiroki; Ito, Yoshiyasu; Li, Jing-Feng

    2016-03-01

    The plasma etching behavior of Y2O3 coating was investigated and compared with that of Al2O3 coating under various conditions, including chemical etching, mixing etching and physical etching. The etching rate of Al2O3 coating declined with decreasing CF4 content under mixing etching, while that of Y2O3 coating first increased and then decreased. In addition, the Y2O3 coating demonstrated higher erosion-resistance than Al2O3 coating after exposing to fluorocarbon plasma. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis confirmed the formations of YF3 and AlF3 on the Y2O3 and Al2O3 coatings, respectively, which acted as the protective layer to prevent the surface from further erosion with fluorocarbon plasma. It was revealed that the etching behavior of Y2O3 depended not only on the surface fluorination but also on the removal of fluoride layer. To analyze the effect of porosity, Y2O3 bulk samples with high density were prepared by spark plasma sintering, and they demonstrated higher erosion-resistances compared with Y2O3 coating.

  4. Decreased morbidity following long saphenous vein harvesting using a minimally invasive technique: a randomised controlled trial comparing two techniques for long saphenous vein harvest

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Zahid; Al Benna, Sammy; Nkere, Udim; Murday, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to compare the morbidity associated with long saphenous vein harvesting using the traditional open technique (A) against a minimally invasive technique using the Mayo vein stripper (B) that involves multiple short incisions. Design We conducted a prospective randomized controlled study in 80 patients undergoing first time coronary artery bypass grafting. Pain and healing was assessed on each postoperative day. Rings of long saphenous vein were subjected to organ-bath evaluation of endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent relaxation. Results Three patients were excluded from the study, leaving 38 patients in Group A and 39 in Group B. With respect to operative procedure, Group A had a greater length of vein harvested than Group B. There was no statistical difference in pain scores and endothelium-dependent or endothelium-independent relaxation between the two groups. However there were significantly more infections in Group A compared with Group B. Conclusion Harvesting vein through multiple incisions using the Mayo vein stripper is quicker, results in fewer infections and has no deleterious effect on endothelial function compared to open technique. PMID:16759395

  5. Phenotypic plasticity of invasive Alternanthera philoxeroides in relation to different water availability, compared to its native congener

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Yu-Peng; Pan, Xiao-Yun; Xu, Cheng-Yuan; Zhang, Wen-Ju; Li, Bo; Chen, Jia-Kuan

    2006-11-01

    Phenotypic plasticity and genetic differentiation are two possible mechanisms that plants use to cope with varying environments. Although alligator weed ( Alternanthera philoxeroides) possesses very low genetic diversity, this alien weed has successfully invaded diverse habitats with considerably varying water availability (from swamps to dry lands) in China. In contrast, its native congener ( Alternanthera sessilis) has a much narrower ecological breadth, and is usually found in moist habitats. To understand the mechanisms underlying the contrasting pattern, we performed a greenhouse experiment to compare the reaction norms of alligator weed with those of its native congener, in which water availability was manipulated. Our results revealed that the two congeners had similar direction of phenotypic plasticity. However, A. philoxeroides showed greater plasticity in amount than did A. sessilis in many traits examined during the switch from wet to drought treatment. Nearly all of the phenotypic variance in A. philoxeroides could be ascribed to plasticity, while A. sessilis had a much higher fraction of phenotypic variance that could be explained by genotypic variation. These interspecific differences in plastic responses to variable water availability partially explained the difference in spatial distribution of the two congeners.

  6. Invasive Candidiasis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Invasive candidiasis is an infection caused by a yeast (a type of fungus) called Candida . Unlike Candida ... mouth and throat (also called “thrush”) or vaginal “yeast infections,” invasive candidiasis is a serious infection that ...

  7. Comparing beef cow behavioral syndromes to measures of productivity and spatial use of rangelands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Individuals within animal groups exhibit consistent behavioral patterns within or across situations known as behavioral syndromes. Proactive (nervous) vs. reactive (calm) behavioral syndromes are observed in many animal species and influence how individuals cope with stress. We investigated the rela...

  8. Use and Limits of (1-3)-β-d-Glucan Assay (Fungitell), Compared to Galactomannan Determination (Platelia Aspergillus), for Diagnosis of Invasive Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Porcher, Raphael; Bergeron, Anne; Touratier, Sophie; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Menotti, Jean; Derouin, Francis; Ribaud, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the performance of the Fungitell β-glucan (BG) assay, to compare it with that of the galactomannan (GM) test for the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis (IA) in patients with hematological malignancies, and to examine the rates of false-positive BG and GM test results due to β-lactam antibiotics among sera of patients with Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacteremia and selected sera with false-positive results from the GM test. Serum samples from 105 patients with proven (n = 14) or probable (n = 91) IA, 97 hematology patients at risk for invasive fungal infections, 50 healthy blood donors, and 60 patients with bacteremia were used to study the sensitivities and specificities of the assays. The GM test was more specific than the BG assay (97% versus 82%, respectively; P = 0.0001) and the BG assay was more sensitive than the GM test (81% versus 49%, respectively; P < 0.0001) for IA diagnosis. The study of 49 separate batches of β-lactam antibiotics showed high and very similar rates of false-positive results for the GM and BG assays (29 and 33%, respectively; P = 0.82) but with an almost complete lack of concordance between the 2 assays. For patients with bacteremia, the rate of false-positive results was much higher with the BG test than with the GM test (37% versus 2%, respectively; P < 0.0001), with no significant difference between Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteremia. In conclusion, the BG test may be useful for the diagnosis of IA because of its high sensitivity in comparison with the GM test, but the overall benefit of this assay remains limited because of its inadequate specificity and its cost. PMID:24740084

  9. Differentially Expressed miRNAs in Ewing Sarcoma Compared to Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Low miR-31 Expression with Effects on Proliferation and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Karnuth, Bianca; Dedy, Nicolas; Spieker, Tilmann; Lawlor, Elizabeth R.; Gattenlöhner, Stefan; Ranft, Andreas; Dirksen, Uta; Jürgens, Heribert; Bräuninger, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma, the second most common bone tumor in children and young adults, is an aggressive malignancy with a strong potential to metastasize. Ewing sarcoma is characterised by translocations encoding fusion transcription factors with an EWSR1 transactivation domain fused to an ETS family DNA binding domain. microRNAs are post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression and aberrantly expressed microRNAs have been identified as tumor suppressors or oncogenes in most cancer types. To identify potential oncogenic and tumor suppressor microRNAs in Ewing sarcoma, we determined and compared the expression of 377 microRNAs in 40 Ewing sarcoma biopsies, 6 Ewing sarcoma cell lines and mesenchymal stem cells, the putative cellular origin of Ewing sarcoma, from 6 healthy donors. Of the 35 differentially expressed microRNAs identified (fold change >4 and q<0.05), 19 were higher and 16 lower expressed in Ewing sarcoma. In comparisons between Ewing sarcoma samples with EWS-FLI or EWS-ERG translocations, with differing dissemination characteristics and of primary samples and metastases no significantly differential expressed microRNAs were detected using various stringency criteria. For miR-31, the microRNA with lowest expression in comparison to mesenchymal stem cells, functional analyses were performed to determine its potential as a tumor suppressor in Ewing sarcoma. Two of four miR-31 transfected Ewing sarcoma cell lines showed a significantly reduced proliferation (19% and 33% reduction) due to increased apoptosis in one and increased length of G1-phase in the other cell line. All three tested miR-31 transfected Ewing sarcoma cell lines showed significantly reduced invasiveness (56% to 71% reduction). In summary, we identified 35 microRNAs differentially expressed in Ewing sarcoma and demonstrate that miR-31 affects proliferation and invasion of Ewing sarcoma cell lines in ex vivo assays. PMID:24667836

  10. Use and limits of (1-3)-β-d-glucan assay (Fungitell), compared to galactomannan determination (Platelia Aspergillus), for diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Sulahian, Annie; Porcher, Raphael; Bergeron, Anne; Touratier, Sophie; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Menotti, Jean; Derouin, Francis; Ribaud, Patricia

    2014-07-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the performance of the Fungitell β-glucan (BG) assay, to compare it with that of the galactomannan (GM) test for the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis (IA) in patients with hematological malignancies, and to examine the rates of false-positive BG and GM test results due to β-lactam antibiotics among sera of patients with Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacteremia and selected sera with false-positive results from the GM test. Serum samples from 105 patients with proven (n = 14) or probable (n = 91) IA, 97 hematology patients at risk for invasive fungal infections, 50 healthy blood donors, and 60 patients with bacteremia were used to study the sensitivities and specificities of the assays. The GM test was more specific than the BG assay (97% versus 82%, respectively; P = 0.0001) and the BG assay was more sensitive than the GM test (81% versus 49%, respectively; P < 0.0001) for IA diagnosis. The study of 49 separate batches of β-lactam antibiotics showed high and very similar rates of false-positive results for the GM and BG assays (29 and 33%, respectively; P = 0.82) but with an almost complete lack of concordance between the 2 assays. For patients with bacteremia, the rate of false-positive results was much higher with the BG test than with the GM test (37% versus 2%, respectively; P < 0.0001), with no significant difference between Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteremia. In conclusion, the BG test may be useful for the diagnosis of IA because of its high sensitivity in comparison with the GM test, but the overall benefit of this assay remains limited because of its inadequate specificity and its cost. PMID:24740084

  11. Comparative Pathology and Ecological Implications of Two Myxosporean Parasites in Native Australian Frogs and the Invasive Cane Toad

    PubMed Central

    Hartigan, Ashlie; Dhand, Navneet K.; Rose, Karrie; Šlapeta, Jan; Phalen, David N.

    2012-01-01

    Myxosporean parasites Cystodiscus axonis and C. australis are pathogens of native and exotic Australian frog species. The pathology and ecological outcomes of infection with these parasites were investigated in this study. Gliosis was correlated to Cystodiscus axonis plasmodia in the brains of (9/60) tadpoles and (3/9) adult endangered Green and golden bell frogs using ordinal regression. Severe host reactions to C. axonis (haemorrhage, necrosis, and vasulitis) were observed in the brains of threatened Southern bell frogs (8/8), critically endangered Booroolong frogs (15/44) and Yellow spotted bell frogs (3/3). Severe brain lesions were associated with behavioural changes, neurological dysfunction, and spontaneous death. Both C. axonis and C. australis develop in the bile ducts of tadpoles, the plasmodia were significantly associated with biliary hyperplasia, inflammation and the loss of hepatocytes in (34/72) Green and golden bell frog tadpoles using ordinal regression. These lesions were so severe that in some cases 70% of the total liver was diseased. Normal liver function in tadpoles is necessary for metamorphosis, metabolism, and immune function. We postulate that this extensive liver damage would have significant host health impacts. Severe hepatic myxosporidiosis was more prevalent in tadpoles examined in autumn and winter (overwintered), suggestive of delayed metamorphosis in infected tadpoles, which would have serious flow-on effects in small populations. We compared the sensitivity of histopathology and species-specific PCR in the detection of C. australis and C. axonis. PCR was determined to be the most sensitive method (detection limit 1 myxospore equivalent of ribosomal DNA). Histology, however, had the advantage of assessing the impact of the parasite on the host. It was concluded that these parasites have the potential for significant ecological impacts, because of their high prevalence of infection and their ability to cause disease in some frogs

  12. Comparative Study of the Activity of Brain Behavioral Systems in Methamphetamine and Opiate Dependents

    PubMed Central

    Alemikhah, Marjan; Faridhosseini, Farhad; Kordi, Hassan; Rasouli-Azad, Morad; Shahini, Najmeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Substance dependency is a major problem for the general health of a society. Different approaches have investigated the substance dependency in order to explain it. Gray’s reinforcement sensitivity theory (RST) is an advanced and important neuropsychological theory in this area. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare three systems of the revised reinforcement sensitivity theory the behavioral activation system (r-BAS), the revised behavioral inhibition system (r-BIS), and the revised fight/flight/freezing system (r-FFFS) between patients dependent on methamphetamine and opiates, and a group of controls. Patients and Methods: This research was a causal-comparative study that was conducted in the first six months of 2012. The population of the study was males of Mashhad city, who were dependent on methamphetamine or opiates, and ruling out psychotic disorders and prominent Axis II. Twenty-five people were selected by the convenient sampling method. Also, 25 non-dependent people from the patients’ relatives were selected and matched for the variables of age, gender, and education to participate in this study. Participants were evaluated using a structured clinical interview (SCID) for DSM-IV, demographic questionnaire information, and a Jackson-5 questionnaire (2009). Data were analyzed by Chi-square, K-S, and independent t-test. Results: The methamphetamine dependent group had a higher sensitivity in the r-BAS, r-BIS, and the r-Fight and r-Freezing systems compared to the control group (P < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference in r-Flight between the two groups (P > 0.05). “The scores of r-BIS were also significantly higher in the methamphetamine-dependent group than the opioid-dependent and control groups. For the r-Fight variable, the methamphetamine-dependent group was higher than the opioid-dependent group”. Conclusions: The personality patterns of patients dependent on methamphetamines were different from the controls

  13. C1GALT1 overexpression promotes the invasive behavior of colon cancer cells through modifying O-glycosylation of FGFR2.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ji-Shiang; Huang, John; Lin, Yo-Chuen; Huang, Miao-Juei; Lee, Po-Huang; Lai, Hong-Shiee; Liang, Jin-Tung; Huang, Min-Chuan

    2014-04-30

    Core 1 β1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1GALT1) transfers galactose (Gal) to N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) to form Galβ1,3GalNAc (T antigen). Aberrant O-glycans, such as T antigen, are commonly found in colorectal cancer. However, the role of C1GALT1 in colorectal cancer remains unclear. Here we showed that C1GALT1 was frequently overexpressed in colorectal tumors and is associated with poor survival. C1GALT1 overexpression promoted cell survival, migration, invasion, and sphere formation as well as tumor growth and metastasis of colon cancer cells. Conversely, knockdown of C1GALT1 with small interference (si) RNA was sufficient to suppress these malignant phenotypes in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we are the first to show that fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) 2 carried O-glycans in colon cancer cells. Mechanistic investigations showed that C1GALT1 modified the O-glycans on FGFR2 and enhanced bFGF-triggered activation of FGFR2 as well as increased bFGF-mediated malignant phenotypes. In addition, BGJ398, a selective inhibitor of FGFR, blocked the effects of C1GALT1. These findings suggest that C1GALT1 overexpression modifies O-glycans on FGFR2 and enhances its phosphorylation to promote the invasive behavior and cancer stem-like property in colon cancer cells, indicating a critical role of O-glycosylation in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. PMID:24758762

  14. C1GALT1 overexpression promotes the invasive behavior of colon cancer cells through modifying O-glycosylation of FGFR2

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ji-Shiang; Huang, John; Lin, Yo-Chuen; Huang, Miao-Juei; Lee, Po-Huang; Lai, Hong-Shiee; Liang, Jin-Tung; Huang, Min-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Core 1 β1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1GALT1) transfers galactose (Gal) to N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) to form Galβ1,3GalNAc (T antigen). Aberrant O-glycans, such as T antigen, are commonly found in colorectal cancer. However, the role of C1GALT1 in colorectal cancer remains unclear. Here we showed that C1GALT1 was frequently overexpressed in colorectal tumors and is associated with poor survival. C1GALT1 overexpression promoted cell survival, migration, invasion, and sphere formation as well as tumor growth and metastasis of colon cancer cells. Conversely, knockdown of C1GALT1 with small interference (si) RNA was sufficient to suppress these malignant phenotypes in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we are the first to show that fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) 2 carried O-glycans in colon cancer cells. Mechanistic investigations showed that C1GALT1 modified the O-glycans on FGFR2 and enhanced bFGF-triggered activation of FGFR2 as well as increased bFGF-mediated malignant phenotypes. In addition, BGJ398, a selective inhibitor of FGFR, blocked the effects of C1GALT1. These findings suggest that C1GALT1 overexpression modifies O-glycans on FGFR2 and enhances its phosphorylation to promote the invasive behavior and cancer stem-like property in colon cancer cells, indicating a critical role of O-glycosylation in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. PMID:24758762

  15. A comparative appraisal of hydrological behavior of SRTM DEM at catchment level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Arabinda; Tiwari, K. N.

    2014-11-01

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data has emerged as a global elevation data in the past one decade because of its free availability, homogeneity and consistent accuracy compared to other global elevation dataset. The present study explores the consistency in hydrological behavior of the SRTM digital elevation model (DEM) with reference to easily available regional 20 m contour interpolated DEM (TOPO DEM). Analysis ranging from simple vertical accuracy assessment to hydrological simulation of the studied Maithon catchment, using empirical USLE model and semidistributed, physical SWAT model, were carried out. Moreover, terrain analysis involving hydrological indices was performed for comparative assessment of the SRTM DEM with respect to TOPO DEM. Results reveal that the vertical accuracy of SRTM DEM (±27.58 m) in the region is less than the specified standard (±16 m). Statistical analysis of hydrological indices such as topographic wetness index (TWI), stream power index (SPI), slope length factor (SLF) and geometry number (GN) shows a significant differences in hydrological properties of the two studied DEMs. Estimation of soil erosion potentials of the catchment and conservation priorities of microwatersheds of the catchment using SRTM DEM and TOPO DEM produce considerably different results. Prediction of soil erosion potential using SRTM DEM is far higher than that obtained using TOPO DEM. Similarly, conservation priorities determined using the two DEMs are found to be agreed for only 34% of microwatersheds of the catchment. ArcSWAT simulation reveals that runoff predictions are less sensitive to selection of the two DEMs as compared to sediment yield prediction. The results obtained in the present study are vital to hydrological analysis as it helps understanding the hydrological behavior of the DEM without being influenced by the model structural as well as parameter uncertainty. It also reemphasized that SRTM DEM can be a valuable dataset for

  16. A novel nuclear Src and p300 signaling axis controls migratory and invasive behavior in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paladino, David; Yue, Peibin; Furuya, Hideki; Acoba, Jared; Rosser, Charles J.; Turkson, James

    2016-01-01

    The presence of Src in the nuclear compartment has been previously reported, although its significance has remained largely unknown. We sought to delineate the functions of the nuclear pool of Src within the context of malignant progression. Active Src is localized within the nuclei of human pancreatic cancer cells and mouse fibroblasts over-expressing c-Src where it is associated with p300. Nuclear Src additionally promotes the tyrosine phosphorylation of p300 in pancreatic cancer Panc-1 cells. Src, together with p300, is associated with the high-mobility group AT-hook (HMGA)2 and SET and MYND domain-containing protein (SMYD)3 gene promoters and regulates their expression in a Src-dependent manner. These nuclear Src-dependent events correlate with anchorage-independent soft-agar growth and the migratory properties in both pancreatic Panc-1 cells and mouse fibroblasts over-expressing Src. Moreover, analyses of human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) tumor tissues detected the association of nuclear Src with the HMGA2 and SMYD3 gene promoters. Our findings for the first time show the critical importance of nuclear Src and p300 function in the migratory properties of pancreatic cancer cells. Further, data together identify a previously unknown role of nuclear Src in the regulation of gene expression in association with p300 within the context of cells harboring activated or over-expressing Src. This novel mechanism of nuclear Src-p300 axis in PDAC invasiveness and metastasis may provide an opportunity for developing more effective early clinical interventions for this lethal disease. Active Src is complexed with and phosphorylates p300 in the nucleus, and the complex is bound to HMGA2 and SMYD3 genes, thereby regulating their expression to promote pancreatic tumor cell migration and invasiveness. PMID:26695438

  17. Three-Dimensional Assessment of Automated Breast Volume Scanner Compared with Handheld Ultrasound in Pre-Operative Breast Invasive Ductal Carcinomas: A Pilot Study of 51 Cases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chaoli; Wei, Shuping; Xie, Yingdong; Guan, Xiaoxiang; Yang, Bin

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the work described here was to compare the accuracy of conventional handheld ultrasound (HHUS) with that of an automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) in 3-D assessment of pre-operative invasive ductal carcinomas. HHUS and ABVS were used in 51 patients to obtain the largest tumor diameter, tumor volume and tumor surface area. The volumetric measurement was also obtained from ABVS data with medical software. With tumor size and volume on pathology as the gold standard, Bland-Altman analysis was used to compare variability. Correlation coefficients and receiver operating characteristic curves were established for all measurements for T2 classification. The correlation coefficients of all ABVS measurements were stronger than those of HHUS measurements, with the ABVS volumetric measurement significantly different with a higher accuracy of 88.24% (45/51) and predicting T-classification with higher area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (0.936). Therefore, 3-D measurements provide stronger correlations with pathology in tumor size measurement. However, more clinical trials are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:27339762

  18. Blunted HPA Axis Activity in Suicide Attempters Compared to those at High Risk for Suicidal Behavior.

    PubMed

    Melhem, Nadine M; Keilp, John G; Porta, Giovanna; Oquendo, Maria A; Burke, Ainsley; Stanley, Barbara; Cooper, Thomas B; Mann, J John; Brent, David A

    2016-05-01

    Studies looking at the relationship of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis to suicidal behavior and its risk factors, such as depression, childhood abuse, and impulsive aggression, report inconsistent results. These studies also do not always differentiate between subjects who go on to attempt suicide, suicidal subjects who never attempted suicide, and non-suicidal subjects with psychiatric disorders. In this study, we examined cortisol responses to an experimental stressor, the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), in 208 offspring of parents with mood disorder. Offspring suicide attempters showed lower total cortisol output (β=-0.47, 95% CI (-0.83, -0.11), p=0.01) compared with offspring with suicide-related behavior (SRB) but never attempted, non-suicidal offspring, and a healthy control group. The result remained significant even after controlling for sex, age, race, ethnicity, site, socio-economic status, and hour of the day when the TSST was conducted. Suicide attempters also showed lower baseline cortisol before the TSST (β=-0.45, 95% CI (-0.74, -0.17), p=0.002). However, there were no significant differences between the groups on cortisol reactivity to stress (β=4.5, 95% CI (-12.9, 22), p=0.61). Although subjects with suicide attempt and SRB have similar clinical and psychosocial characteristics, this is the first study to differentiate them biologically on HPA axis indices. Blunted HPA axis activity may increase risk for suicide attempt among individuals with psychopathology by reducing their ability to respond adaptively to ongoing stressors. These results may help better identify subjects at high risk for suicidal behavior for targeted prevention and intervention efforts. PMID:26450815

  19. Use of Comparative Genomics and Eukaryotic Cell Adherence/Invasion Assays of the Food-Borne Pathogen Campylobacter jejuni for the Identification of Putative Virulence Factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter, the leading bacterial etiology of acute humans gastroenteritis, is commonly associated with the handling/consumption of poultry. Eukaryotic cell adhesion/invasion assays were performed on fifty-one C. jejuni isolates. A range of adhesion/invasion abilities was exhibited. To identify ...

  20. Peer Influence and Selection Processes in Adolescent Smoking Behavior: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Adolescent smoking studies find evidence of active peer influence and selection processes. However, studies have shown that these processes operate differently depending on context. This study uses SIENA to model coevolutionary processes between smoking and changes in friendship ties, comparing two high schools in which data were collected in identical fashion to explore influence and selection mechanisms with respect to current smoking, and smoking levels. Methods: This is a longitudinal survey with 2 waves of data. In-home surveys were conducted with students from 2 large high schools in the United States: a West Coast school, and a Midwestern school. Participants were consented students in 10th and 11th grades at the first wave of data collection. The primary measures were self-reported smoking behavior and friendship nominations. Results: There is evidence of influence and selection in both schools for adolescents’ smoking status (1 = any smoking) and for level of smoking. Conclusions: These models reflect great similarities in influence and selection processes across schools for different smoking behaviors. However, smoking prevalence may impact the exact mechanisms by which influence and selection operate. Researchers should consider smoking interventions with independent modules addressing different selection and influence processes, implemented based on contextual factors such as the prevalence of smoking. PMID:22944605

  1. A comparative investigation of the behaviors of H in Au and Ag from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Quan-Fu; Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Ma, Yuming; Liu, Yue-Lin

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen (H) is a common impurity in metals and has a significant effect on their purification, even at concentrations of only a few parts per million. Here we present a comparative analysis of the behaviors of H in Au and Ag based on first-principles calculations. In bulk Au and Ag, the results demonstrate that the tetrahedral position is energetically more stable for a single H atom than the octahedral site. The concentration of H dissolving in the interstitial sites as a function of temperature is calculated in both metals. To characterize the dynamic behaviors, in bulk Au and Ag we determine the theoretical diffusivity and permeation of H, which are in quantitative agreement with the experimental data. Further, we investigate the role of vacancy on the formation of the H n -vacancy (H n V) via a clustering reaction. One vacancy can accommodate up to 9 H atoms in Au and capture as many as 7 H atoms in Ag. The H2 molecule in the vacancy is energetically unstable in both metals. These research results will provide a very useful reference for the refinement of Ag/Au as noble metals in industry.

  2. Comparing Perceptions with Actual Reports of Close Friend's HIV Testing Behavior Among Urban Tanzanian Men.

    PubMed

    Mulawa, Marta; Yamanis, Thespina J; Balvanz, Peter; Kajula, Lusajo J; Maman, Suzanne

    2016-09-01

    Men have lower rates of HIV testing and higher rates of AIDS-related mortality compared to women in sub-Saharan Africa. To assess whether there is an opportunity to increase men's uptake of testing by correcting misperceptions about testing norms, we compare men's perceptions of their closest friend's HIV testing behaviors with the friend's actual testing self-report using a unique dataset of men sampled within their social networks (n = 59) in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. We examine the accuracy and bias of perceptions among men who have tested for HIV (n = 391) and compare them to the perceptions among men who never tested (n = 432). We found that testers and non-testers did not differ in the accuracy of their perceptions, though non-testers were strongly biased towards assuming that their closest friends had not tested. Our results lend support to social norms approaches designed to correct the biased misperceptions of non-testers to promote men's HIV testing. PMID:26880322

  3. Biomechanical behavior of valgus foot in children with cerebral palsy: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junchao; Wang, Lizhen; Mo, Zhongjun; Chen, Wei; Fan, Yubo

    2015-09-18

    Valgus foot (VF) is the most common foot deformity in children with cerebral palsy (CP), which seriously affects the foot balance in standing and posture control in walking. Little information about the locus and stress of internal bones was available. To accurately describe the biomechanical behavior of the internal bones of VF in CP, we compared the locus and stress of internal bones between the normal foot (NF) and VF by finite element models. Compared with the NF, displacement of the talus and navicular drop in VF increased by 109% and 171% in vertical direction respectively, and the locus of talus had a tendency to clockwise rotation and downward movement in coronal plane. In addition, the abduction angle of forefoot in VF increased up to 10.3°, which was twice more than that in the NF. Moreover, the lateral metatarsophalangeal joints were upward tilted 6.3° comparing with touchdown posture of NF, and peak von Mises stress of the internal bones in VF model concentrated on the fourth metatarsal. The simulation showed that locus of the forefoot, downward rotation of talus head and navicular drop were meaningful to quantify the collapse of medial longitudinal arch. It would provide some suggestions to the rehabilitation treatments of the CP children's VF. PMID:26209085

  4. Unexpected morphological and karyological changes in invasive Carpobrotus (Aizoaceae) in Provence (S-E France) compared to native South African species.

    PubMed

    Verlaque, Régine; Affre, Laurence; Diadema, Katia; Suehs, Carey M; Médail, Frédéric

    2011-04-01

    Hybridization processes can lead to evolutionary changes, particularly in co-introduced congeneric plant species, such as Carpobrotus spp. which are recognized as invasive in Mediterranean climate regions. Morphological and karyological comparisons have therefore been made between native Carpobrotus edulis and C. acinaciformis in South Africa and their invasive counterparts in Provence (C. edulis and C. aff. acinaciformis). Morphological data exhibited the most significant differences in invasive C. aff. acinaciformis that forms a new phenotypic variant. Unexpected chromosomal restructuring has been highlighted for both taxa in Provence, with in particular a clear decrease in asymmetry, an increase in the intraspecific variability, and an interspecific convergence of karyotypes. These changes suggest a drift that has facilitated various crosses, and has been amplified through hybridization/introgression. Furthermore, several morphological and karyological transgressive characters have been found in the two invasive taxa. These results stress the important role and the rapidity of karyological changes in invasive processes. PMID:21513901

  5. Solar still versus solar evaporator: A comparative study between their thermal behaviors

    SciTech Connect

    Sartori, E.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a theoretical comparison between the thermal behavior of a basin type solar still and that from a solar evaporator. The analyses are twofold: (a) comparing the system temperatures and the heat and mass transfer rates in the transient mode; (b) obtaining parametric representations from both systems using their heat and mass transfer equations. Such comparisons had never been done before. It is shown, among other things, that the evaporation in solar stills is much less than that in open evaporation despite the higher water temperatures in the former system. This is also true even when the water temperature of both systems is the same. It is also observed that the distillation and evaporation rates increase with the increasing water temperature and temperature difference. For relatively high water temperatures of each system the evaporative fraction is equivalent to more than 50% of the corresponding total heat transfer rate. 32 refs., 15 figs.

  6. Why can't rodents vomit? A comparative behavioral, anatomical, and physiological study.

    PubMed

    Horn, Charles C; Kimball, Bruce A; Wang, Hong; Kaus, James; Dienel, Samuel; Nagy, Allysa; Gathright, Gordon R; Yates, Bill J; Andrews, Paul L R

    2013-01-01

    The vomiting (emetic) reflex is documented in numerous mammalian species, including primates and carnivores, yet laboratory rats and mice appear to lack this response. It is unclear whether these rodents do not vomit because of anatomical constraints (e.g., a relatively long abdominal esophagus) or lack of key neural circuits. Moreover, it is unknown whether laboratory rodents are representative of Rodentia with regards to this reflex. Here we conducted behavioral testing of members of all three major groups of Rodentia; mouse-related (rat, mouse, vole, beaver), Ctenohystrica (guinea pig, nutria), and squirrel-related (mountain beaver) species. Prototypical emetic agents, apomorphine (sc), veratrine (sc), and copper sulfate (ig), failed to produce either retching or vomiting in these species (although other behavioral effects, e.g., locomotion, were noted). These rodents also had anatomical constraints, which could limit the efficiency of vomiting should it be attempted, including reduced muscularity of the diaphragm and stomach geometry that is not well structured for moving contents towards the esophagus compared to species that can vomit (cat, ferret, and musk shrew). Lastly, an in situ brainstem preparation was used to make sensitive measures of mouth, esophagus, and shoulder muscular movements, and phrenic nerve activity-key features of emetic episodes. Laboratory mice and rats failed to display any of the common coordinated actions of these indices after typical emetic stimulation (resiniferatoxin and vagal afferent stimulation) compared to musk shrews. Overall the results suggest that the inability to vomit is a general property of Rodentia and that an absent brainstem neurological component is the most likely cause. The implications of these findings for the utility of rodents as models in the area of emesis research are discussed. PMID:23593236

  7. Why Can’t Rodents Vomit? A Comparative Behavioral, Anatomical, and Physiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Charles C.; Kimball, Bruce A.; Wang, Hong; Kaus, James; Dienel, Samuel; Nagy, Allysa; Gathright, Gordon R.; Yates, Bill J.; Andrews, Paul L. R.

    2013-01-01

    The vomiting (emetic) reflex is documented in numerous mammalian species, including primates and carnivores, yet laboratory rats and mice appear to lack this response. It is unclear whether these rodents do not vomit because of anatomical constraints (e.g., a relatively long abdominal esophagus) or lack of key neural circuits. Moreover, it is unknown whether laboratory rodents are representative of Rodentia with regards to this reflex. Here we conducted behavioral testing of members of all three major groups of Rodentia; mouse-related (rat, mouse, vole, beaver), Ctenohystrica (guinea pig, nutria), and squirrel-related (mountain beaver) species. Prototypical emetic agents, apomorphine (sc), veratrine (sc), and copper sulfate (ig), failed to produce either retching or vomiting in these species (although other behavioral effects, e.g., locomotion, were noted). These rodents also had anatomical constraints, which could limit the efficiency of vomiting should it be attempted, including reduced muscularity of the diaphragm and stomach geometry that is not well structured for moving contents towards the esophagus compared to species that can vomit (cat, ferret, and musk shrew). Lastly, an in situ brainstem preparation was used to make sensitive measures of mouth, esophagus, and shoulder muscular movements, and phrenic nerve activity–key features of emetic episodes. Laboratory mice and rats failed to display any of the common coordinated actions of these indices after typical emetic stimulation (resiniferatoxin and vagal afferent stimulation) compared to musk shrews. Overall the results suggest that the inability to vomit is a general property of Rodentia and that an absent brainstem neurological component is the most likely cause. The implications of these findings for the utility of rodents as models in the area of emesis research are discussed. PMID:23593236

  8. Increasing organizational energy conservation behaviors: Comparing the theory of planned behavior and reasons theory for identifying specific motivational factors to target for change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlinson, Scott Michael

    Social scientists frequently assess factors thought to underlie behavior for the purpose of designing behavioral change interventions. Researchers commonly identify these factors by examining relationships between specific variables and the focal behaviors being investigated. Variables with the strongest relationships to the focal behavior are then assumed to be the most influential determinants of that behavior, and therefore often become the targets for change in a behavioral change intervention. In the current proposal, multiple methods are used to compare the effectiveness of two theoretical frameworks for identifying influential motivational factors. Assessing the relative influence of all factors and sets of factors for driving behavior should clarify which framework and methodology is the most promising for identifying effective change targets. Results indicated each methodology adequately predicted the three focal behaviors examined. However, the reasons theory approach was superior for predicting factor influence ratings compared to the TpB approach. While common method variance contamination had minimal impact on the results or conclusions derived from the present study's findings, there were substantial differences in conclusions depending on the questionnaire design used to collect the data. Examples of applied uses of the present study are discussed.

  9. Clinical-Pathologic Features and Long-Term Outcomes of Tubular Carcinoma of the Breast Compared With Invasive Ductal Carcinoma Treated With Breast Conservation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Gene-Fu F.; Yang Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G.; Moran, Meena S.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate our institutional experience of treating tubular carcinoma of the breast (TC) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) with conservative surgery and radiation therapy, to compare clinical-pathologic features and long-term outcomes. Methods and Materials: A review of our institution's tumor registry from 1975 to 2007, followed by a central pathology review of available slides, yielded 71 cases of Stage I/II TC and 2,238 cases of Stage I/II IDC treated with breast conservation therapy. Clinical-pathologic features and outcomes were analyzed by subtype to detect significant differences. Results: The median follow-up was 7 years. The TC cohort presented more frequently with pT1 disease (97% vs. 80%, p = 0.0007), pN0 disease (95% vs. 74%, p = 0.0004), hormone-receptor positivity (ER+, 89% vs. 62%, p = 0.0001; PR+, 81% vs. 52%, p = 0.0001), and HER-2 negativity (89% vs. 71%, p = 0.04). Clinical outcomes also favored the TC cohort, with lower rates of breast cancer-related death (1% vs. 10%; p = 0.0109) and distant metastasis (1% vs. 13%; p = 0.0028) and higher rates of 10-year overall (90% vs. 80%; p = 0.033), cause-specific (99% vs. 86%; p = 0.011), and disease-free (99% vs. 82%; p = 0.003) survival. There was a nonsignificant trend toward improved breast cancer relapse-free survival for the TC cohort (95% vs. 87%; p = 0.062) but no difference in nodal relapse-free survival or contralateral breast cancer relapse-free survival (all p values >0.05) between the cohorts. Conclusion: Our institutional experience suggests that TC, when compared with IDC, is associated with more favorable clinical-pathologic features and comparable, if not superior, outcomes after breast conservation therapy, suggesting the appropriateness of a conservative approach to this rare subtype.

  10. Comparing Reactivation Behavior of TIG and Laser Beam Welded Alloy 690

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Geogy J.; Bhambroo, Rajan; Kain, V.; Dey, G. K.; Raja, V. S.

    2013-02-01

    The nickel base Alloy 690 was subjected to simulated autogenous welding treatment employing two different techniques, laser beam welding (LBW) and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding. The resultant weld fusion zone (WFZ) and heat-affected zone (HAZ) were compared by studying the reactivation behavior. The chromium depletion effect was assessed by measuring the degree of sensitization (DOS) from the electrochemical potentiodynamic reactivation (EPR) test. A double-loop EPR test for Alloy 690 was employed to measure the DOS at different regions of weldments by masking the remaining regions. The results clearly demonstrated that Alloy 690 showed no sensitization in the parent material and the WFZ region of both TIG and laser weldments. However, it exhibited reactivation in the HAZ region of both the weldments. The DOS values measured for Alloy 690 were very low for all the regions of the LBW weldment as compared to that in the TIG weldment. The HAZ region of the LBW weldment showed the highest DOS value in any region of the weldment but even this value was quite low indicating absence of sensitization in LBW weldment. The attack along the grain boundaries for the weldments after EPR experiments were studied using optical and scanning electron microscopy.

  11. Non-invasive continuous arterial pressure and pulse pressure variation measured with Nexfin(®) in patients following major upper abdominal surgery: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    de Wilde, R B P; de Wit, F; Geerts, B F; van Vliet, A L; Aarts, L P H J; Vuyk, J; Jansen, J R C

    2016-07-01

    We compared the accuracy and precision of the non-invasive Nexfin(®) device for determining systolic, diastolic, mean arterial pressure and pulse pressure variation, with arterial blood pressure values measured from a radial artery catheter in 19 patients following upper abdominal surgery. Measurements were taken at baseline and following fluid loading. Pooled data results of the arterial blood pressures showed no difference between the two measurement modalities. Bland-Altman analysis of pulse pressure variation showed significant differences between values obtained from the radial artery catheter and Nexfin finger cuff technology (mean (SD) 1.49 (2.09)%, p < 0.001, coefficient of variation 24%, limits of agreement -2.71% to 5.69%). The effect of volume expansion on pulse pressure variation was identical between methods (concordance correlation coefficient 0.848). We consider the Nexfin monitor system to be acceptable for use in patients after major upper abdominal surgery without major cardiovascular compromise or haemodynamic support. PMID:27291598

  12. Diffusion-weighted imaging for non-invasive and quantitative monitoring of bone marrow infiltration in patients with monoclonal plasma cell disease: a comparative study with histology.

    PubMed

    Hillengass, Jens; Bäuerle, Tobias; Bartl, Reiner; Andrulis, Mindaugas; McClanahan, Fabienne; Laun, Frederik B; Zechmann, Christian Martin; Shah, Rajiv; Wagner-Gund, Barbara; Simon, Dirk; Heiss, Christiane; Neben, Kai; Ho, Anthony D; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Delorme, Stefan; Stieltjes, Bram

    2011-06-01

    Bone marrow plasma cell infiltration is a crucial parameter of disease activity in monoclonal plasma cell disorders. Until now, the only way to quantify such infiltration was bone marrow biopsy or aspiration. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a magnetic resonance imaging-technique that may mirror tissue cellularity by measuring random movements of water molecules. To investigate if DWI is capable of assessing bone marrow cellularity in monoclonal plasma cell disease, we investigated 56 patients with multiple myeloma or monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, and 30 healthy controls using DWI of the pelvis and/or the lumbar spine. In 25 of 30 patients who underwent biopsy, bone marrow trephine and DWI could be compared. Of the patients with symptomatic disease 15 could be evaluated after systemic treatment. There was a positive correlation between the DWI-parameter apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and bone marrow cellularity as well as micro-vessel density (P<0·001 respectively). ADC was significantly different between patients and controls (P<0·01) and before and after systemic therapy (P<0·001). In conclusion, DWI enabled bone marrow infiltration to be monitored in a non-invasive, quantitative way, suggesting that after further investigations on larger patient groups this might become an useful tool in the clinical work-up to assess tumour burden. PMID:21517815

  13. Dietary flexibility aids Asian earthworm invasion in North American forests.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weixin; Hendrix, Paul F; Snyder, Bruce A; Molina, Marirosa; Li, Jianxiong; Rao, Xingquan; Siemann, Evan; Fu, Shenglei

    2010-07-01

    On a local scale, invasiveness of introduced species and invasibility of habitats together determine invasion success. A key issue in invasion ecology has been how to quantify the contribution of species invasiveness and habitat invasibility separately. Conventional approaches, such as comparing the differences in traits and/or impacts of species between native and/or invaded ranges, do not determine the extent to which the performance of invaders is due to either the effects of species traits or habitat characteristics. Here we explore the interaction between two of the most widespread earthworm invaders in the world (Asian Amynthas agrestis and European Lumbricus rubellus) and study the effects of species invasiveness and habitat invasibility separately through an alternative approach of "third habitat" in Tennessee, USA. We propose that feeding behaviors of earthworms will be critical to invasion success because trophic ecology of invasive animals plays a key role in the invasion process. We found that (1) the biomass and isotopic abundances (delta13C and delta15N) of A. agrestis were not impacted by either direct effects of L. rubellus competition or indirect effects of L. rubellus-preconditioned habitat; (2) A. agrestis disrupted the relationship between L. rubellus and soil microorganisms and consequently hindered litter consumption by L. rubellus; and (3) compared to L. rubellus, A. agrestis shifted its diet more readily to consume more litter, more soil gram-positive (G+) bacteria (which may be important for litter digestion), and more non-microbial soil fauna when soil microorganisms were depleted. In conclusion, A. agrestis showed strong invasiveness through its dietary flexibility through diet shifting and superior feeding behavior and its indirectly negative effect of habitat invasibility on L. rubellus via changes in the soil microorganism community. In such context, our results expand on the resource fluctuation hypothesis and support the superior

  14. Comparing Growth Trajectories of Risk Behaviors from Late Adolescence through Young Adulthood: An Accelerated Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodbeck, Jeannette; Bachmann, Monica S.; Croudace, Tim J.; Brown, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Risk behaviors such as substance use or deviance are often limited to the early stages of the life course. Whereas the onset of risk behavior is well studied, less is currently known about the decline and timing of cessation of risk behaviors of different domains during young adulthood. Prevalence and longitudinal developmental patterning of…

  15. Separating the Domains of Oppositional Behavior: Comparing Latent Models of the Conners' Oppositional Subscale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuny, Ana V.; Althoff, Robert R.; Copeland, William; Bartels, Meike; Van Beijsterveldt, C. E. M.; Baer, Julie; Hudziak, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Although oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) is usually considered the mildest of the disruptive behavior disorders, it is a key factor in predicting young adult anxiety and depression and is distinguishable from normal childhood behavior. In an effort to understand possible subsets of oppositional defiant behavior (ODB) that may…

  16. Influence of Leader Behaviors on Creativity: A Comparative Study between South Korea and the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Seog Joo

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates what are the relationships between different leader behaviors (i.e. supportive, participative, and controlling leader behaviors) and follower creativity, and whether the relationships differ between South Korea and the United States. Although creativity research suggests that supportive leader behaviors tend to enhance…

  17. Comparative mRNA analysis of behavioral and genetic mouse models of aggression.

    PubMed

    Malki, Karim; Tosto, Maria G; Pain, Oliver; Sluyter, Frans; Mineur, Yann S; Crusio, Wim E; de Boer, Sietse; Sandnabba, Kenneth N; Kesserwani, Jad; Robinson, Edward; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Asherson, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Mouse models of aggression have traditionally compared strains, most notably BALB/cJ and C57BL/6. However, these strains were not designed to study aggression despite differences in aggression-related traits and distinct reactivity to stress. This study evaluated expression of genes differentially regulated in a stress (behavioral) mouse model of aggression with those from a recent genetic mouse model aggression. The study used a discovery-replication design using two independent mRNA studies from mouse brain tissue. The discovery study identified strain (BALB/cJ and C57BL/6J) × stress (chronic mild stress or control) interactions. Probe sets differentially regulated in the discovery set were intersected with those uncovered in the replication study, which evaluated differences between high and low aggressive animals from three strains specifically bred to study aggression. Network analysis was conducted on overlapping genes uncovered across both studies. A significant overlap was found with the genetic mouse study sharing 1,916 probe sets with the stress model. Fifty-one probe sets were found to be strongly dysregulated across both studies mapping to 50 known genes. Network analysis revealed two plausible pathways including one centered on the UBC gene hub which encodes ubiquitin, a protein well-known for protein degradation, and another on P38 MAPK. Findings from this study support the stress model of aggression, which showed remarkable molecular overlap with a genetic model. The study uncovered a set of candidate genes including the Erg2 gene, which has previously been implicated in different psychopathologies. The gene networks uncovered points at a Redox pathway as potentially being implicated in aggressive related behaviors. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26888158

  18. Comparable effect with minimal morbidity of low-dose Tokyo 172 strain compared with regular dose Connaught strain as an intravesical bacillus Calmette–Guérin prophylaxis in nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer: Results of a randomized prospective comparison

    PubMed Central

    Inamoto, Teruo; Ubai, Takanobu; Nishida, Takeshi; Fujisue, Yutaka; Katsuoka, Yoji; Azuma, Haruhito

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to compare patients' morbidity and response of bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) prophylaxis after the intravesical instillation of low-dose Tokyo 172 strain and regular dose Connaught strain in patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Patients and Methods: This was a randomized, active-controlled, open-label, monocenter study. Thirty-eight, NMIBC patients were treated sequentially, in a random order, with low-dose Tokyo 172 strain and regular dose Connaught strain, receiving each therapy for 6 weeks. A total of 18 and 20 patients were randomly assigned to a Tokyo 172 strain arm and a Connaught strain arm, respectively. Complication, morbidity, and recurrence-free survival (RFS) after each treatment were compared. Results: There was no significant difference in the 1-year RFS rate in patients treated with Tokyo 172 strain and Connaught strain (72.2% vs. 83.5%, respectively; P = 0.698). There were no significant differences in adverse events between the arms. Severe adverse events (>Grade 3) were seen in 15% of the Connaught strain group while no severe adverse events were observed as a result of Tokyo 172 strain. Conclusion: Our results indicated that low-dose Tokyo 172 strain decreased adverse events although it was not significant, and the RFS difference was not statistically significant between the two arms. Further investigation is warranted. PMID:23662001

  19. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Phenotype Is Associated with Clinicopathological Factors That Indicate Aggressive Biological Behavior and Poor Clinical Outcomes in Invasive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung Eun; Kang, Su Hwan; Lee, Soo Jung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Cancer tissue may display a wide spectrum of expression phenotypes of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related proteins. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of EMT phenotypes in breast cancer. Methods We evaluated the expression pattern of the EMT-related proteins E-cadherin and fibronectin in samples from 1,495 patients with invasive breast carcinoma (IBC) on tissue microarrays using immunohistochemistry to investigate the clinical significance of EMT phenotypes in IBC. EMT phenotypes were divided into complete type (E-cadherin-negative/fibronectin-positive), incomplete type (hybrid type, E-cadherinpositive/fibronectin-positive; null type, E-cadherin-negative/fibronectin-negative), and wild-type (E-cadherin-positive/fibronectin-negative). We analyzed the correlation of EMT phenotype with clinicopathological factors and patient survival. Results Loss of E-cadherin was observed in 302 patients (20.2%), and fibronectin was expressed in the cancer cells of 354 patients (23.7%). In total, 64 (4.3%), 290 (19.4%), 238 (15.9%), and 903 (60.4%) samples were categorized as complete, hybrid, null, and wild-type, respectively. The complete EMT phenotype exhibited significant associations with young age (p=0.017), advanced pT (p<0.001) and pN (p<0.001) stages, higher histological grade (p<0.001), lymphovascular invasion (p<0.001), and triple negativity (p<0.001). Patients with complete and hybrid EMT phenotypes had poorer overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) than those with the wild-type phenotype (OS, p=0.001; DFS, p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, the hybrid EMT phenotype was an independent prognostic factor for DFS in patients with IBC (p=0.032). Conclusion EMT phenotypes exhibited significant associations with clinicopathological factors indicating aggressive biologic behavior and poor outcome in patients with IBC. PMID:26472976

  20. Comparing three attitude-behavior theories for predicting science teachers' intentions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zint, Michaela

    2002-11-01

    Social psychologists' attitude-behavior theories can contribute to understanding science teachers' behaviors. Such understanding can, in turn, be used to improve professional development. This article describes leading attitude-behavior theories and summarizes results from past tests of these theories. A study predicting science teachers' intention to incorporate environmental risk education based on these theories is also reported. Data for that study were collected through a mail questionnaire (n = 1336, radjusted = 80%) and analyzed using confirmatory factor and multiple regression analysis. All determinants of intention to act in the Theory of Reasoned Action and Theory of Planned Behavior and some determinants in the Theory of Trying predicted science teachers' environmental risk education intentions. Given the consistency of results across studies, the Theory of Planned Behavior augmented with past behavior is concluded to provide the best attitude-behavior model for predicting science teachers' intention to act. Thus, science teachers' attitude toward the behavior, perceived behavioral control, and subjective norm need to be enhanced to modify their behavior. Based on the Theory of Trying, improving their attitude toward the process and toward success, and expectations of success may also result in changes. Future research should focus on identifying determinants that can further enhance the ability of these theories to predict and explain science teachers' behaviors.

  1. Difference in Feeding Behaviors of Two Invasive Whiteflies on Host Plants with Different Suitability: Implication for Competitive Displacement

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baiming; Yan, Fengming; Chu, Dong; Pan, Huipeng; Jiao, Xiaoguo; Xie, Wen; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Xu, Baoyun; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Youjun

    2012-01-01

    In China, Bemisia tabaci Q (commonly known as biotype Q) has rapidly displaced B (commonly known as biotype B) in the past 6 years. The mechanisms underlying such phenomenon have been studied extensively in recent years; however, we have not come to a definitive conclusion yet. In the present study, the differences in host suitability between B and Q whitefly adults to five host plants (cabbage, cotton, cucumber, poinsettia, and tomato) were evaluated based on their respective feeding behaviors using a direct-current electrical penetration graph (DC-EPG) system. Pair-wise comparisons of B. tabaci B and Q feeding on each of the five host plants clearly indicate that Q feeds better than B on tomato, cotton and poinsettia, while B feeds better than Q on cabbage and cucumber. The EPG parameters related to both phloem and non-phloem phases confirm that cabbage and cucumber are best suited to B, while tomato, cotton, and poinsettia are best suited to Q. Our present results support the contention that host suitability and adult feeding behavior contribute to the competitive displacement of biotype B by biotype Q. The discrepancy between field (previous studies) and laboratory results (this study), however, suggests that 1) whitefly displacement is apparently contributed by multiple factors; and 2) factor(s) other than the host plant suitability may play a vital role in dictating the whitefly biotypes in the field. PMID:22701340

  2. Comparative Efficacy of Behavior Therapy, Cognitive Therapy and Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Chronic Insomnia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Allison G.; Bélanger, Lynda; Talbot, Lisa; Eidelman, Polina; Beaulieu-Bonneau, Simon; Fortier-Brochu, Émilie; Ivers, Hans; Lamy, Manon; Hein, Kerrie; Soehner, Adriane M.; Mérette, Chantal; Morin, Charles M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the unique contribution of behavior therapy (BT) and cognitive therapy (CT) relative to the full cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for persistent insomnia. Method Participants were 188 adults (117 women; M age = 47.4 years old, SD=12.6) with persistent insomnia (average of 14.5 years duration). They were randomized to eight, weekly, individual sessions consisting of BT (n = 63), CT (n = 65), or CBT (n = 60). Results Full CBT was associated with greatest improvements, the improvements associated with BT were faster but not as sustained and the improvements associated with CT were slower and sustained. The proportion of treatment responders was significantly higher in the CBT (67.3%) and BT (67.4%) relative to CT (42.4%) groups at post treatment, while 6-months later CT made significant further gains (62.3%), BT had significant loss (44.4%) and CBT retained its initial response (67.6%). Remission rates followed a similar trajectory, with higher remission rates at post treatment in CBT (57.3%) relative to CT (30.8%), with BT falling in between (39.4%); CT made further gains from post treatment to follow up (30.9% to 51.6%). All three therapies produced improvements of daytime functioning at both post treatment and follow up, with few differential changes across groups. Conclusions Full CBT is the treatment of choice. Both BT and CT are effective, with a more rapid effect for BT and a delayed action for CT. These different trajectories of changes provide unique insights into the process of behavior change via behavioral versus cognitive routes. PMID:24865869

  3. A Comparative Study of Material Flow Behavior in Friction Stir Welding Using Laminar and Turbulent Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadian, Arun Kumar; Biswas, Pankaj

    2015-10-01

    Friction stir welding has been quite successful in joining aluminum alloy which has gained importance in almost all industrial sectors over the past two decades. It is a newer technique and therefore needs more attention in many sectors, flow of material being one among them. The material flow pattern actually helps in deciding the parameters required for particular tool geometry. The knowledge of material flow is very significant in removing defects from the weldment. In the work presented in this paper, the flow behavior of AA6061 under a threaded tool has been studied. The convective heat loss has been considered from all the surfaces, and a comparative study has been made with and without the use of temperature-dependent properties and their significance in the finite volume method model. The two types of models that have been implemented are turbulent and laminar models. Their thermal histories have been studied for all the cases. The material flow velocity has been analyzed to predict the flow of material. A swirl inside the weld material has been observed in all the simulations.

  4. Comparative fatigue behavior and toughness of remelted and annealed highly crosslinked polyethylenes.

    PubMed

    Medel, Francisco J; Peña, P; Cegoñino, José; Gómez-Barrena, E; Puértolas, J A

    2007-11-01

    Highly cross-linked polyethylenes (HXLPEs) have been incorporated into the hip replacement armamentarium based on their improved wear resistance. However, two different methods of thermal treatment separate the orthopedic community as strategies to control potential long-term oxidation, and controversy remains with problems in the long-term use of acetabular liners (long-term oxidation, rim fracture after impingement, etc.). Meanwhile, the mechanical properties of HXLPEs that may alleviate these problems are still unclear. On the other hand, HXLPEs are scarcely used in knee replacements, as there exists concern about the probably reduced fatigue and fracture performances of these materials. Thus, our aim was to compare the effects of both thermal treatment regimes on mechanical properties and to associate these findings with the material microstructure. The fatigue behavior of annealed and remelted HXLPEs was characterized using short-term cyclic stress-strain, long-term fatigue, and fatigue crack propagation tests. On the other hand, impact tests, tensile experiments, and the J-integral multispecimen method allowed us to assess toughness. Microstructure features such as crosslink density, crystallinity percentage, and lamellar thickness were investigated by swelling measurements, differential scanning calorimetry, and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. This study confirms that annealing preserves mechanical properties better than remelting from both fatigue and fracture resistance points of view, and it remarks that a suitable selection of irradiation and stabilization conditions is needed to achieve optimal mechanical performances of ultra high molecular weight polyethylenes for each specific total joint replacement. PMID:17680670

  5. Assessing treatment integrity in cognitive-behavioral therapy: comparing session segments with entire sessions.

    PubMed

    Weck, Florian; Grikscheit, Florian; Höfling, Volkmar; Stangier, Ulrich

    2014-07-01

    The evaluation of treatment integrity (therapist adherence and competence) is a necessary condition to ensure the internal and external validity of psychotherapy research. However, the evaluation process is associated with high costs, because therapy sessions must be rated by experienced clinicians. It is debatable whether rating session segments is an adequate alternative to rating entire sessions. Four judges evaluated treatment integrity (i.e., therapist adherence and competence) in 84 randomly selected videotapes of cognitive-behavioral therapy for major depressive disorder, social anxiety disorder, and hypochondriasis (from three different treatment outcome studies). In each case, two judges provided ratings based on entire therapy sessions and two on session segments only (i.e., the middle third of the entire sessions). Interrater reliability of adherence and competence evaluations proved satisfactory for ratings based on segments and the level of reliability did not differ from ratings based on entire sessions. Ratings of treatment integrity that were based on entire sessions and session segments were strongly correlated (r=.62 for adherence and r=.73 for competence). The relationship between treatment integrity and outcome was comparable for ratings based on session segments and those based on entire sessions. However, significant relationships between therapist competence and therapy outcome were only found in the treatment of social anxiety disorder. Ratings based on segments proved to be adequate for the evaluation of treatment integrity. The findings demonstrate that session segments are an adequate and cost-effective alternative to entire sessions for the evaluation of therapist adherence and competence. PMID:24912466

  6. Comparative mitochondrial genomics in zygomycetes: bacteria-like RNase P RNAs, mobile elements and a close source of the group I intron invasion in angiosperms

    PubMed Central

    Seif, Elias; Leigh, Jessica; Liu, Yu; Roewer, Ingeborg; Forget, Lise; Lang, B. Franz

    2005-01-01

    To generate data for comparative analyses of zygomycete mitochondrial gene expression, we sequenced mtDNAs of three distantly related zygomycetes, Rhizopus oryzae, Mortierella verticillata and Smittium culisetae. They all contain the standard fungal mitochondrial gene set, plus rnpB, the gene encoding the RNA subunit of the mitochondrial RNase P (mtP-RNA) and rps3, encoding ribosomal protein S3 (the latter lacking in R.oryzae). The mtP-RNAs of R.oryzae and of additional zygomycete relatives have the most eubacteria-like RNA structures among fungi. Precise mapping of the 5′ and 3′ termini of the R.oryzae and M.verticillata mtP-RNAs confirms their expression and processing at the exact sites predicted by secondary structure modeling. The 3′ RNA processing of zygomycete mitochondrial mRNAs, SSU-rRNA and mtP-RNA occurs at the C-rich sequence motifs similar to those identified in fission yeast and basidiomycete mtDNAs. The C-rich motifs are included in the mature transcripts, and are likely generated by exonucleolytic trimming of RNA 3′ termini. Zygomycete mtDNAs feature a variety of insertion elements: (i) mtDNAs of R.oryzae and M.verticillata were subject to invasions by double hairpin elements; (ii) genes of all three species contain numerous mobile group I introns, including one that is closest to an intron that invaded angiosperm mtDNAs; and (iii) at least one additional case of a mobile element, characterized by a homing endonuclease insertion between partially duplicated genes [Paquin,B., Laforest,M.J., Forget,L., Roewer,I., Wang,Z., Longcore,J. and Lang,B.F. (1997) Curr. Genet., 31, 380–395]. The combined mtDNA-encoded proteins contain insufficient phylogenetic signal to demonstrate monophyly of zygomycetes. PMID:15689432

  7. Radical cystectomy versus bladder preserving therapy for muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma: examining confounding and misclassification bias in cancer observational comparative effectiveness research

    PubMed Central

    Bekelman, Justin E.; Handorf, Elizabeth A.; Guzzo, Thomas; Pollack, Craig Evan; Christodouleas, John; Resnick, Matthew J.; Swisher-McClure, Samuel; Vaughn, David; Have, Thomas Ten; Polsky, Daniel; Mitra, Nandita

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Radical cystectomy (RC) is the standard treatment for muscle-invasive Urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB). Tri-modality bladder preserving therapy (BPT) is an alternative to RC, but randomized comparisons of RC versus BPT have proven infeasible. To compare RC versus BPT, we undertook an observational cohort study using registry and administrative claims data from the SEER-Medicare database. Methods We identified patients age 65 years or older diagnosed between 1995 and 2005 who received RC (n=1,426) or BPT (n=417). We examined confounding and stage misclassification in the comparison of RC and BPT using multivariable adjustment, propensity score-based adjustment, instrumental variable (IV) analysis and simulations. Results Patients who received BPT were older and more likely to have comorbid disease. After propensity score adjustment, BPT was associated with an increased hazard of death from any cause (HR 1.26; 95% CI, 1.05 – 1.53) and from bladder cancer (HR 1.31; 95% CI, 0.97 – 1.77). Using the local area cystectomy rate as an instrument, IV analysis demonstrated no differences in survival between BPT and RC (death from any cause HR 1.06; 95% CI, 0.78 – 1.31; death from bladder cancer HR 0.94; 95% CI, 0.55 – 1.18). Simulation studies for stage misclassification yielded results consistent with the IV analysis. Conclusions Survival estimates in an observational cohort of patients who underwent RC versus BPT differ by analytic method. Multivariable and propensity score adjustment revealed greater mortality associated with BPT relative to RC, while IV analysis and simulation studies suggest that the two treatments are associated with similar survival outcomes. PMID:23796296

  8. Comparing Main and Collateral Effects of Extinction and Differential Reinforcement of Alternative Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petscher, Erin Seligson; Bailey, Jon S.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects and collateral effects of extinction (EXT) and differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA) interventions with inappropriate vocalizations and work refusal. Both interventions have been used frequently to reduce problem behaviors. The benefits of these interventions have been established yet may be…

  9. A Comparative Study of Educational Leadership Behavior by Gender and Race

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Sonya B.

    2010-01-01

    The philosophies and behaviors of a leader constitute his or her leadership style. Historically, studies of educational leadership have focused on the philosophies and behaviors of white males. Over the past forty years, there have been a number of studies conducted that seek to identify differences between male and female leadership styles.…

  10. Differences in Health Behaviors of Overweight or Obese College Students Compared to Healthy Weight Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, M. Rachel; Ickes, Melinda J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obesity continues to be an epidemic in college students, yet research is warranted to determine whether obesity increases the likelihood of risky health behaviors in this population. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the association between body mass index (BMI) and health behaviors in college students. Methods: A…

  11. Comparative Effectiveness of Three Approaches to Changing Dental Hygiene Behaviors of Seventh Graders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albino, Judith E.; And Others

    This study evaluates two approaches to changing dental care behaviors of seventh graders. After receiving instruction in brushing and flossing, students in one experimental group were confronted with inconsistencies between expressed beliefs and actual oral hyginene behaviors, as demonstrated with photographs of their own mouths. Data analyses…

  12. Cognitive-Behavioral and Pharmacological Interventions for Hyperactive Boys: Comparative and Combined Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinshaw, Stephen P.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Assessed the effects of two interventions on hyperactive children's (N=24) social behavior. Results indicated that both methylphenidate (Ritalin) and reinforced self-evaluation were superior to the contrast treatments. Medication plus cognitive-behavioral self-evaluation proved optimal, and placebo plus reinforcement alone was significantly worse…

  13. Comparative genetic approaches to the evolution of human brain and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Vallender, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    With advances in genomic technologies the amount of genetic data available to scientists today is vast. Genomes are now available or planned for fourteen different primate species and complete resequencing of numerous human individuals from numerous populations is underway. Moreover, high-throughput deep sequencing is quickly making whole genome efforts within the reach of single laboratories allowing for unprecedented studies. Comparative genetic approaches to the identification of the underlying basis of human brain, behavior and cognitive ability are moving to the forefront. Two approaches predominate: inter-species divergence comparisons and intra-species polymorphism studies. These methodological differences are useful for different time scales of evolution and necessarily focus on different evolutionary events in the history of primate and hominin evolution. Inter-species divergence is more useful in studying large scale primate, or hominoid, evolution whereas intra-species polymorphism can be more illuminating of recent hominin evolution. These differences in methodological utility also extend to studies of differing genetic substrates; current divergence studies focus primarily on protein evolution while polymorphism studies are substrate ambivalent. Some of the issues inherent in these studies can be ameliorated by current sequencing capabilities while others remain intractable. New avenues are also being opened that allow for the incorporation of novel substrates and approaches. In the post-genomic era the study of human evolution, specifically as it relates to the brain, is becoming more complete focusing increasingly on the totality of the system and better conceptualizing the entirety of the genetic changes that have lead to the human phenotype today. PMID:21140466

  14. Ascites-induced shift along epithelial-mesenchymal spectrum in ovarian cancer cells: enhancement of their invasive behavior partly dependant on αv integrins.

    PubMed

    Carduner, L; Leroy-Dudal, J; Picot, C R; Gallet, O; Carreiras, F; Kellouche, S

    2014-08-01

    At least one-third of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer (OC) present ascites at diagnosis and almost all have ascites at recurrence. The presence of ascites, which acts as a dynamic reservoir of active molecules and cellular components, correlates with the OC peritoneal metastasis and is associated with poor prognosis. Since epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is involved in different phases of OC progression, we have investigated the effect of the unique ascitic tumor microenvironment on the EMT status and the behavior of OC cells. The exposure of three OC cell lines to ascites leads to changes in cellular morphologies. Within ascites, OC cells harboring an initial intermediate epithelial phenotype are characterized by marked dislocation of epithelial markers (E-cadherin, ZO-1 staining) while OC cells initially harboring an intermediate mesenchymal phenotype strengthen their mesenchymal markers (N-cadherin, vimentin). Ascites differentially triggers a dissemination phenotype related to the initial cell features by either allowing the proliferation and the formation of spheroids and the extension of colonies for cells that present an initial epithelial intermediate phenotype, or favoring the migration of cells with a mesenchymal intermediate phenotype. In an ascitic microenvironment, a redeployment of αv integrins into cells was observed and the ascites-induced accentuation of the two different invasive phenotypes (i.e. spheroids formation or migration) was shown to involve αv integrins. Thus, ascites induces a shift toward an unstable intermediate state of the epithelial-mesenchymal spectrum and confers a more aggressive cell behavior that takes on a different pathway based on the initial epithelial-mesenchymal cell features. PMID:24946950

  15. Sexual behavior and perceived peer norms: Comparing perinatally infected and affected youth

    PubMed Central

    Bauermeister, Jose A.; Elkington, Katherine; Brackis-Cott, Elizabeth; Dolezal, Curtis; Mellins, Claude

    2009-01-01

    A large proportion of perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV) children are becoming adolescents and exploring their sexuality. This study explored the prevalence of sexual behaviors (kissing, touching, engaging in oral sex, or having vaginal/anal intercourse) in a sample of predominantly ethnic minority youths (N = 339; 54.1% Black and 30.4% Latino; 51% female; ages 9–16) perinatally exposed to HIV (61% HIV+). Using logistic regression, we tested the association between sexual behavior and HIV status, demographic characteristics, and peer influences regarding sexual behavior. PHIV youth were less likely to be sexually active. Among sexually active youth, PHIV youth were more likely to engage in touching behavior than HIV-negative youth and were less likely to engage in penetrative sex. Youths reporting that a greater number of their peers believed that sexually active boys were “cool” or “popular” were more likely to report sexual behavior. The association between sexual behavior and peers believing sexually active girls were “cool” or “popular” varied by age, gender, and HIV status. Furthermore, friends’ sexual activity was associated with sexual intercourse. Prevention programs should strengthen messages addressing peer norms regarding sexuality, as well as address specific issues related to adolescent HIV. PMID:19636775

  16. Scientific practices and social behaviors in managing landslide risks: comparing experiences between developing and developed countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devoli, G.

    2012-04-01

    A successful landslide risk reduction program requires that the society is aware and understand the landslide problems within the geographic area involved. Central organizations that manage national landslide risks should: a) create and systematically applied natural hazard laws/national landslide strategies, where roles and limits of responsibilities of federal, state, provincial, municipal and private entities are well defined; c) establish fruitful multidisciplinary and interinstitutional collaboration among scientists; d) provide good risk assessments in which landslide experts report transparently what is really known and the limitations of methods and tools used; e) share and systematically communicate their knowledge more effectively with all private and public stakeholders involved, paying attention to providing balanced information about risks and addressing inevitable uncertainties; f) support the mass-media in spreading correct scientific information; g) perform serious risk and cost-benefit analyses before mitigation measures are realized; h) assist local authorities in the application of land-use planning policies and g) built trust and confidence by means of a continuous contact and communication with the public and local authorities. However, this is not yet achieved, not even in developed countries where, in theory, more economical resources are available and people are better educated then in developing countries. Herein I make some observations on how national landslide prevention efforts are being organized in two countries (Nicaragua and Norway), where I have been worked at governmental agencies as landslide expert in the last 10 years. I start describing similarities and differences between the countries and try to compare practices and experiences. The analysis was motivated by the following questions: Why after so many years of landslide mapping and investigations, landslide prevention is not good and effective as it should be? Is this

  17. Evaluating potential artefacts of photo-reversal on behavioral studies with nocturnal invasive sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnett, Matthew; Imre, Istvan; Wagner, Michael C.; Di Rocco, Richard T.; Johnson, Nicholas; Brown, Grant E

    2016-01-01

    Sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus L., 1758) are nocturnal, so experiments evaluating their behaviour to chemosensory cues have typically been conducted at night. However, given the brief timeframe each year that adult P. marinus are available for experimentation, we investigated whether P. marinus exposed to a 12 h shifted diurnal cycle (reversed photoperiod) could be tested in a darkened arena during the day and show the same response to chemosensory cues as natural photoperiod P. marinus that were tested during the night. Ten replicates of 10 P. marinus, from each photoperiod, were exposed to deionized water (negative control), 2-phenylethylamine hydrochloride (PEA HCl, putative predator cue), or P. marinus whole-body extract (conspecific alarm cue). All P. marinus demonstrated a significant avoidance response to both cues. No significant differences were found in avoidance to PEA HCl between photoperiods. Avoidance of P. marinus whole-body extract was significantly stronger in natural compared with reversed photoperiod P. marinus. The use of reversed photoperiod subjects is suitable for examining the presence or absence of avoidance in response to novel chemosensory alarm cues, or the change in the magnitude of antipredator response. Studies investigating the natural magnitude of antipredator response should use natural photoperiod experimental subjects.

  18. Comparative water fluxes through leaf litter of tropical plantation trees and the invasive grass Saccharum spontaneum in the Republic of Panama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Andrew; Friesen, Patrick; Serrud, Aneth Aracelly Sarmiento

    2010-03-01

    SummaryThe hydrological properties of leaf litter layers remain relatively unexplored, especially in tropical vegetation communities. In this paper we explore the hydrological dynamics of litter samples from reforestation plots of tropical hardwoods and the invasive sugar cane Saccharum spontaneum, which these trees were planted to replace. Water holding capacity (WHC) and drying rates were compared under controlled conditions, and throughfall interception, drainage and calculated evaporation were measured in two field experiments (A and B) conducted with different sets of samples. The WHC of samples varied from 3.4 to 6.5 mm in experiment A, and from 1.6 to 7.1 mm in experiment B. Drainage through the litter samples averaged 78.3 ± 34.4% and 61.2 ± 34.70% TF in experiments A and B, respectively. Daily water storage was 70.8 ± 14.25% of total WHC in experiment A and 78.6 ± 25.35% of total WHC in experiment B. Estimated evaporation averaged 34.8 ± 12.52% of WHC in experiment A and 34.3 ± 14.91% of WHC in experiment B. Although significant interspecific differences in WHC, interception of TF and evaporation were recorded, species rankings tended to be different in experiments A and B. The exception was litter from the leguminous tree Gliricidia sepium, which maintained the lowest WHC and water storage in the field in both experiments, but which evaporated water more rapidly than other species. The depth of throughfall draining through litter samples in the field was similar among all species in both experiments. Comparisons of regression slopes also showed that drainage depth increased with increasing throughfall at similar rates among species. On the other hand, both slopes and slope elevations differed among species when drainage was expressed in l kg -1. Patterns of water storage and drainage in our samples were in broad agreement with those of other studies, although WHC and litter necromass in our young tree plantations fell into the lower end of the range

  19. Quantitative parameters to compare image quality of non-invasive coronary angiography with 16-slice, 64-slice and dual-source computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Burgstahler, Christof; Reimann, Anja; Brodoefel, Harald; Daferner, Ulrike; Herberts, Tina; Tsiflikas, Ilias; Thomas, Christoph; Drosch, Tanja; Schroeder, Stephen; Heuschmid, Martin

    2009-03-01

    Multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) is a non-invasive modality to visualize coronary arteries with an overall good image quality. Improved spatial and temporal resolution of 64-slice and dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) scanners are supposed to have a positive impact on diagnostic accuracy and image quality. However, quantitative parameters to compare image quality of 16-slice, 64-slice MSCT and DSCT are missing. A total of 256 CT examinations were evaluated (Siemens, Sensation 16: n = 90; Siemens Sensation 64: n = 91; Siemens Definition: n = 75). Mean Hounsfield units (HU) were measured in the cavum of the left ventricle (LV), the ascending aorta (Ao), the left ventricular myocardium (My) and the proximal part of the left main (LM), the left anterior descending artery (LAD), the right coronary artery (RCA) and the circumflex artery (CX). Moreover, the ratio of intraluminal attenuation (HU) to myocardial attenuation was assessed for all coronary arteries. Clinical data [body mass index (BMI), gender, heart rate] were accessible for all patients. Mean attenuation (CA) of the coronary arteries was significantly higher for DSCT in comparison to 64- and 16-slice MSCT within the RCA [347 +/- 13 vs. 254 +/- 14 (64-MSCT) vs. 233 +/- 11 (16-MSCT) HU], LM (362 +/- 11/275 +/- 12/262 +/- 9), LAD (332 +/- 17/248 +/- 19/219 +/- 14) and LCX (310 +/- 12/210 +/- 13/221 +/- 10, all p < 0.05), whereas there was no significant difference between DSCT and 64-MSCT for the LV, the Ao and My. Heart rate had a significant impact on CA ratio in 16-slice and 64-slice CT only (p < 0.05). BMI had no impact on the CA ratio in DSCT only (p < 0.001). Improved spatial and temporal resolution of dual-source CT is associated with better opacification of the coronary arteries and a better contrast with the myocardium, which is independent of heart rate. In comparison to MSCT, opacification of the coronary arteries at DSCT is not affected by BMI. The main advantage of DSCT lies with the

  20. Couple and Individual Adjustment for 2 Years Following a Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Traditional versus Integrative Behavioral Couple Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Andrew; Atkins, David C.; Yi, Jean; Baucom, Donald H.; George, William H.

    2006-01-01

    Follow-up data across 2 years were obtained on 130 of 134 couples who were originally part of a randomized clinical trial comparing traditional versus integrative behavioral couple therapy (TBCT vs. IBCT; A. Christensen et al., 2004). Both treatments produced similar levels of clinically significant improvement at 2 years posttreatment (69% of…

  1. Effects of lamotrigine on cognition and behavior compared to carbamazepine as monotherapy for children with partial epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Eun, So-Hee; Eun, Baik-Lin; Lee, Joon Soo; Hwang, Yong Seung; Kim, Ki Joong; Lee, Young-Mock; Lee, In Goo; Lee, Munhyang; Ko, Tae-Sung; Kim, Jeong Tae; Eom, Soyong; Kim, Heung Dong

    2012-11-01

    To compare the cognitive and behavioral effects of lamotrigine (LTG) to carbamazepine (CBZ) as monotherapy for pediatric epilepsy. A multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel-group clinical trial was conducted in children with partial-onset seizures. LTG or CBZ was prescribed as monotherapy for previously untreated children and titrated over 8 weeks, followed by maintenance for 24 weeks. Outcome measures were change in cognition and behavior in a combined analysis of standardized measures from screening to the end of the maintenance phase, as well as antiepileptic efficacy and tolerability. A total of 67 children completed the study, including 32 of 43 (74.4%) treated with LTG and 35 of 41 (85.4%) treated with CBZ. Seizure-free outcomes did not differ between the intent-to-treat populations (53.5% LTG, 56.1% CBZ; p=0.81). There were no statistically significant differences in the intelligence of the two groups after treatment. Externalizing behavior problems improved in the CBZ group (p<0.05). However, there were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of externalizing behavior. The parents' report on the Conner scale showed an improvement in the CBZ group compared to the LTG group (p<0.05). LTG and CBZ showed similar efficacy and cognitive effects in treating childhood partial epilepsy. However, CBZ showed more benefits in improving externalizing behaviors. PMID:22521904

  2. Comparative cost-effectiveness of the components of a behavior change communication campaign on HIV/AIDS in North India.

    PubMed

    Sood, Suruchi; Nambiar, Devaki

    2006-01-01

    Numerous studies show that exposure to entertainment-education-based mass media campaigns is associated with reduction in risk behaviors. Concurrently, there is a growing interest in comparing the cost-effectiveness of HIV prevention interventions taking into account infrastructural and programmatic costs. In such analyses, though few in number, mass media campaigns have fared well. Using data from a mass media communication campaign in the low HIV prevalence states of Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, and Delhi in Northern India, in this article we examine the following: (1) factors that mediate behavior change in different components of the campaign, comprising a TV drama, reality show for youth audiences, and TV spots; (2) the relative impact of campaign components on the behavioral outcome: condom use; and (3) the cost-effectiveness calculations arising from this analysis. Results suggest that recall of the TV spots and the TV drama influences behavior change and is strongly associated with interpersonal communication and positive gender attitudes. The TV drama, in spite of being the costliest, emerges as the most cost-effective component when considering the behavioral outcome of interest. The analysis of the comparative cost-effectiveness of individual campaign components provides insights into the planning of resources for communication interventions globally. PMID:17148103

  3. A Comparative Study on Information-Seeking Behaviors of Domestic and International Business Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Yoo-Seong

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates information-seeking behavior of one particular segment of international students--international students seeking degrees in the field of business. The author surveyed domestic and international business students enrolled in the College of Business at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The survey was designed to…

  4. Deformation Behaviors of HIPped Foil Compared with Those of Sheet Titanium Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castelli, Michael G.

    1999-01-01

    Micromechanics-based modeling of composite material behaviors requires an accurate assessment of the constituent properties and behaviors. For the specific case of continuous-fiber-reinforced metal matrix composites (MMC's) manufactured from a foil/fiber/foil process, much emphasis has been placed on characterizing foil-based matrix materials that have been fabricated in the same way as the composite. Such materials are believed to yield mechanical properties and behaviors that are representative of the matrix constituent within the composite (in situ matrix). Therefore, these materials are desired for micromechanics modeling input. Unfortunately, such foils are extremely expensive to fabricate and procure because of the labor-intensive rolling process needed to produce them. As a potential solution to this problem that would maintain appropriately representative in situ properties, the matrix constituent could be characterized with sheet-based materials, which are considerably less expensive to manufacture than foils, are more readily procured, and result in fewer plies to obtain a desired panel thickness. The critical question is, however, does the consolidated sheet material exhibit the same properties and behaviors as do the consolidated foils? Researchers at NASA Lewis Research Center's Life Prediction Branch completed a detailed experimental investigation to answer this question for three titanium alloys commonly used in metal matrix composite form.

  5. Bullying Behaviors and Self Efficacy among Nursing Students at Clinical Settings: Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassem, Awatef Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nursing students who experienced bullying behaviors feel anger and missing their concentration, their capability to achieve a desired outcome. Also self-efficacy, often referred to as self-confidence, is essential to nursing students' ability and performance in the clinical setting. Aim: Study aimed to examine relation between bullying…

  6. Sexual Behavior and Perceived Peer Norms: Comparing Perinatally HIV-Infected and HIV-Affected Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauermeister, Jose A.; Elkington, Katherine; Brackis-Cott, Elizabeth; Dolezal, Curtis; Mellins, Claude Ann

    2009-01-01

    A large proportion of perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV) children are becoming adolescents and exploring their sexuality. This study explored the prevalence of sexual behaviors (kissing, touching, engaging in oral sex, or having vaginal/anal intercourse) in a sample of predominantly ethnic minority youths (N = 339; 54.1% Black and 30.4% Latino; 51%…

  7. An Empirical Study Comparing the Effect of Feedback, Training and Executive Coaching on Leadership Behavior Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saling, Nona

    2005-01-01

    Despite the phenomenal growth of executive coaching in recent years, there has been little empirical research on its effectiveness. Executive coaching is typically delivered with 360 degree feedback and training. This study tests whether there are significant differences in leadership behavior change for participants who: received feedback alone;…

  8. Comparative Study of Several Behaviors in Caenorhabditis Elegans Following High-Let Radiation Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakashita, Tetsuya

    Learning and behavioral impairments following ionizing radiation exposure are an important potential risk in manned space missions. We previously reported the effects of γ-ray exposure on olfactory adaptation [1], salt chemotaxis learning [2], and locomotion - learning behavior relationship [3] in Caenorhabditis elegans. However, little is known about the effects of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. We investigated various behavioral responses of wellfed adult Caenorhabditis elegans exposed to accelerated carbon ions (1 2C, 18.3M eV /u, LET = 113.3keV /µm). Following carbon-ion irradiation, locomotion, basal slowing response and salt chemotaxis learning were not significantly affected, whereas chemosensation to NaCl of animals during learning was altered. These results suggest that sensitivity of the C. elegans nervous system to high-LET heavy ions differs with the types of behaviors. References: [1] Sakashita et al., Biol. Sci. Space 21, 117-20 (2007), [2] Sakashita et al., FASEB J 22, 713-20 (2008), [3] Sakashita et al., J. Radiat. Res. 49, in press (2008).

  9. Comparative Effects Of Training In External And Internal Concentration On Two Counseling Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Paul

    1973-01-01

    A training procedure that appears to facilitate both empathic understanding and selective response to client statements is one built around the training of Zen Buddhist monks. Subjects trained in Zen techniques of external and internal concentration were found to increase their ability in these two counseling behaviors. (Author/LA)

  10. Determining the Presence of a Problem: Comparing Two Approaches for Detecting Youth Behavioral Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamphaus, R. W.; DiStefano, Christine; Dowdy, Erin; Eklund, Katie; Dunn, Alnita Rettig

    2010-01-01

    Universal screening has been routinely advised for determining the presence of problems for initiating problem-solving processes and models. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of two screener development methods on the validity of score inferences for two teacher screeners of child behavioral and emotional risk. The reliability and…

  11. A Comparative Outcome Study of Behavioral Marital Therapy and Communication Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, K. Daniel; Turkewitz, Hillary

    1981-01-01

    Distressed couples were assigned to behavioral marital therapy, communication therapy, or a wait-list. Treated couples demonstrated more change than controls in marital problems and general communication patterns, but not in feelings toward spouse or communication during conflict resolution discussions. No overall differences were reported between…

  12. A comparative study of high strain rate behavior of three martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Last, H. R.; Garrett, R. K.; Rajendran, A. M.

    1996-05-01

    This paper describes the high strain rate response of HY100, HY130 and AF1410 steels determined from the split Hopkinson bar and quasi-static experiments under room and high temperatures. Differences in the macroscopic high strain rate response of these steels were observed. Metallurgical fracture surface analysis provided insight into the microstructural response and the observed macroscopic behavior of each steel.

  13. The Influence of Place-Based Communities on Information Behavior: A Comparative Grounded Theory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Amelia N.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the effect of experiential place and local community on information access and behavior for two communities of parents of children with Down syndrome. It uncovers substantive issues associated with health information seeking, government and education-related information access, and information overload and avoidance within the…

  14. Classroom Behavior of Participants with ADHD Compared with Peers: Influence of Teaching Format and Grade Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner, Naomi J.; Sheldrick, R. Chris; Frenette, Elizabeth C.; Rene, Kirsten M.; Perrin, Ellen C.

    2014-01-01

    Few studies examine the classroom behavior of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in comparison with classroom peers and which teaching formats best support classroom engagement. Observations (N = 312) of second- and fourth-grade students with ADHD and their randomly selected classroom peers were conducted using a…

  15. Comparing Relaxation Training and Cognitive-Behavioral Group Therapy for Women with Breast Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Miri; Fried, Georgeta

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effectiveness of cognitive-behavior (CB) group intervention versus relaxation and guided imagery (RGI) group training. Method: A total of 114 early-stage breast cancer patients were randomly assigned to CB, RGI, or control groups, and instruments were completed at pre- and postintervention and 4 months later. Results:…

  16. A Behavioral Economic Reward Index Predicts Drinking Resolutions: Moderation Revisited and Compared with Other Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Jalie A.; Roth, David L.; Vignolo, Mary J.; Westfall, Andrew O.

    2009-01-01

    Data were pooled from 3 studies of recently resolved community-dwelling problem drinkers to determine whether a behavioral economic index of the value of rewards available over different time horizons distinguished among moderation (n = 30), abstinent (n = 95), and unresolved (n = 77) outcomes. Moderation over 1- to 2-year prospective follow-up…

  17. A Comparative Study of Environmental Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviors among University Students in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Xueqin; Hong, Ting; Liu, Lan; Tiefenbacher, John

    2011-01-01

    Environmental problems in China are intensifying and it is vital to evaluate the environmental knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of the generation poised to inherit their management. This study examines a survey of environmental awareness among Chinese students (aged between 16 and 20 years). Considering the contrasting levels of regional…

  18. Comparing Learner Community Behavior in Multiple Presentations of a Massive Open Online Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Silvia Elena; Savage, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs) can create large scale communities of learners who collaborate, interact and discuss learning materials and activities. MOOCs are often delivered multiple times with similar content to different cohorts of learners. However, research into the differences of learner communication, behavior and expectation between…

  19. Comparative Effects of Cognitive-Behavioral and Brief Psychodynamic Psychotherapies for Depressed Family Caregivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher-Thompson, Dolores; Steffen, Ann M.

    1994-01-01

    Randomly assigned depressed family caregivers (n=66) of frail elderly relatives to 20 sessions of cognitive-behavioral (CB) or brief psychodynamic (PD) individual psychotherapy. At posttreatment, 71% of caregivers were no longer clinically depressed, with no differences found between two treatments. Found interaction between treatment modality and…

  20. Sexual Predators and Prey: A Comparative Study of the Hunting Behavior of Rapists and Child Molesters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebocho, Maria Francisca; Goncalves, Rui Abrunhosa

    2012-01-01

    Although there has been an increase in research on sex offenders' modus operandi, geographic decision making, and hunting behavior, most studies still tend to emphasize criminal motivation while overlooking the role of situational and environmental factors. Studies of mixed samples of rapists and child molesters typically neglect to conduct…

  1. Testing Jessor's problem behavior theory and syndrome: a nationally representative comparative sample of Latino and African American adolescents.

    PubMed

    Mobley, Michael; Chun, Heejung

    2013-04-01

    Based on Jessor's problem behavior theory (PBT; R. Jessor, 1987, Problem-behavior theory, psychosocial development, and adolescent problem drinking, British Journal of Addiction, Vol. 82, pp. 331-342), the comparability of a second-order problem behavior model (SPBM) was investigated employing structural equation modeling (SEM) and latent mean differences in problem behavior engagement were examined among racial/ethnic adolescents. Within a span of nearly 25 years, this study represents the first nationally representative sample of Latino and African American adolescents utilized in testing Jessor's PBT and problem behavior syndrome (PBS). Using a sample of 5,831 Latino, African American, and European American adolescents drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, a series of invariance tests evidenced support for Jessor's PBT and PBS. Latent mean difference test results evidenced significant differences in problem behaviors (e.g., academic failure [AF], aggression [AG], substance use [SU], and risky sexual activity[RSA]) across racial/ethnic adolescent groups, which could be explained partially by PBS. A discussion of findings, limitations, and recommendations for future research is presented. PMID:23647329

  2. Separating the Domains of Oppositional Behavior: Comparing Latent Models of the Conners’ Oppositional Subscale

    PubMed Central

    Kuny, Ana V.; Althoff, Robert R.; Copeland, William; Bartels, Meike; Beijsterveldt, Van; Baer, Julie; Hudziak, James J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Although Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) is usually considered the mildest of the disruptive behavior disorders, it is a key factor in predicting young adult anxiety and depression and is distinguishable from normal childhood behavior. In an effort to understand possible subsets of oppositional defiant behavior (ODB) which may differentially predict outcome, we used Latent Class Analysis (LCA) of mother’s report on the Conners’ Parent Rating Scales Revised Short Forms (CPRS-R:S). METHOD Data were obtained from mother’s report for Dutch twins (7 year-old [n = 7,597], 10 year-old [n = 6,548], and 12 year-old [n = 5,717]) from the Netherlands Twin Registry. Samples partially overlapped at ages 7 and 10 (19% overlapping) and at ages 10 and 12 (30% overlapping), but not at ages 7 and 12. Oppositional defiant behavior was measured using the 6-item Oppositional subscale of the CPRS-R:S. Multilevel LCA with robust standard error estimates was performed using Latent Gold to control for twin-twin dependence in the data. Class assignment across ages was determined and an estimate of heritability for each class was calculated. Comparisons to maternal report Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) scores were examined using linear mixed models at each age, corrected for multiple comparisons. RESULTS The LCA identified an optimal solution of 4-classes across age groups: Class 1 was associated with no or low symptom endorsement (69–75% of the children), class 2 was characterized by defiance (11–12%), class 3 was characterized by irritability (9–11%), and class 4 was associated with elevated scores on all symptoms (5–8%). Odds ratios for twins being in the same class at each successive age point were higher within classes across ages than between classes. Heritability within the two “intermediate” classes was nearly as high as for the class with all symptoms, except for boys at age 12. Children in the Irritable Class were more likely to have mood symptoms

  3. Invasive mammals.

    PubMed

    Moutou, F; Pastoret, P P

    2010-08-01

    Every region of the world is concerned by potential mammal invasions, as humans are already present on all the world's land masses. All these invasions are a result of species introductions by humans for one reason or another. The authors briefly review the known movements and observed consequences of mammal-related invasions. They take examples from all five continents, as well as from a few island systems. The ancient introduction of game species, and later of domestic species, has been followed more recently by movements of commercial species. We are now seeing the emergence of what are known as entertainment species. In a number of cases, such introductions have led to the establishment of new epidemiological cycles that previously might never have been thought possible. According to current indicators, this phenomenon is not on the wane. PMID:20919577

  4. Comparative study of the corrosion behavior of MA-956 and conventional metallic biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Escudero, M L; López, M F; Ruiz, J; García-Alonso, M C; Canahua, H

    1996-07-01

    In this work the corrosion behavior of a new biomaterial, the MA-956 superalloy, immersed in Hank's solution is evaluated. A comparison with conventional metallic alloys used as articular implants is established. To determine the corrosion behavior we employed electrochemical methods: evaluation of corrosion potential Ecorr, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and anodic polarization curves. The corrosion resistance of the MA-956 superalloy preoxidized at 1100 degrees C during 100 h is at least two orders of magnitude higher than for the other alloys. This satisfactory behavior is stationary with time. Also the probability of the appearance of the pitting corrosion process is very low. When cracking is generated in the alpha-alumina layer the repassivation process is assured because of the high Cr content in the superalloy. This study is the first step in proposing this new alloy as a biomaterial. The low toxicity of these metallic alloys in the physiological environment suggests that in vivo their biocompatibility could be satisfactory. PMID:8806056

  5. Foraging and ranging behavior during a fallback episode: Hylobates albibarbis and Pongo pygmaeus wurmbii compared.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Erin R; Haag, Livia; Mitra-Setia, Tatang; van Schaik, Carel P; Dominy, Nathaniel J

    2009-12-01

    Periodic episodes of food scarcity may highlight the adaptive value of certain anatomical traits, particularly those that facilitate the acquisition and digestion of exigent fallback foods. To better understand the selective pressures that favored the distinctive dental and locomotor morphologies of gibbons and orangutans, we examined the foraging and ranging behavior of sympatric Hylobates albibarbis and Pongo pygmaeus wurmbii during an episode of low fruit availability at Tuanan, Kalimantan Tengah, Indonesia. We found that Hylobates ranged 0.5 km day(-1) or 33% farther than did Pongo, but the overall daily ranging of both species did not vary as fruit availability decreased by as much as 50%. Among gibbons, we observed dietary switching to fallback foods; in particular, there was a progressively greater reliance on figs, liana products, and unripe fruit. Orangutans relied heavily on unripe fruit and fracture-resistant bark and pith tissues. Despite these divergent fallback patterns, the stiffness of fruit mesocarp consumed by Hylobates and Pongo did not differ. We discuss canine and molar functional morphology with respect to dietary mechanics. Next, to contextualize these results, we discuss our findings with respect to forest structure. The rain forests of Southeast Asia have been described as having open, discontinuous canopies. Such a structure may inform our understanding of the ranging behavior and distinctive locomotion of apes in the region, namely richochetal brachiation and quadrumanous clambering. Our approach of integrating behavioral ecology with physical measures of food may be a powerful tool for understanding the functional adaptations of primates. PMID:19890870

  6. Predicting university undergraduates' binge-drinking behavior: a comparative test of the one- and two-component theories of planned behavior.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Mark A; Ainsworth, Kirsty

    2012-01-01

    This study provides a comparative test of the one- and two-component theories of planned behavior (TPB) in the context of university undergraduates' binge-drinking. Participants (N=120) self-completed questionnaire measures of all TPB constructs at time 1 and subsequent binge-drinking at time 2 (two-weeks later). The data were analyzed using a combination of path analyses and bootstrapping procedures. Both models accounted for a substantial proportion of the variation in behavior. However, the two-component TPB provided a significantly better fit to the data, with the total direct and indirect effects accounting for 90% of the variance. Intention was the only direct predictor of behavior. Instrumental attitude, affective attitude and self-efficacy had indirect effects. Although health interventions could usefully target these cognitive antecedents, simulation analyses, modeling the effects of cognition change on behavior, showed that only large-sized (0.8 SD) changes to affective attitude, or moderate-sized changes to all of these cognitions in combination were sufficient to reduce binge-drinking. PMID:21945010

  7. A comparative study of wide plate behavior of a range of structural steels using the failure assessment diagram

    SciTech Connect

    Bannister, A.C.; Harrison, P.L.

    1995-12-31

    In the field of structural integrity assessments, attention is currently focused on the ability of such methods to conservatively predict the deformation and fracture behavior of structural steels and their weldments. In the current paper, the results of a series of wide plate tests on a range of structural steels are presented and the results assessed in terms of CTOD-strain relationships, BS PD 6493 Levels 2 and 3, and the crack driving force approach. The behavior of the large scale tests and the results of the various analyses are assessed with regard to the stress-strain characteristics of the individual steels. In a second step, the approach is extended to the assessment of a number of wide plate tests comprising welded joints with mismatched strength levels. Over, under and even-matched welded plates are compared with the behavior of normalized and Quenched and Tempered parent plates. The study demonstrates that the behavior of parent material wide plate tests can vary widely depending on the stress-strain characteristics of the material. The different behavior is a result of the consecutive effects of different steel processing conditions, microstructure, yield to tensile strength ratio and strain hardening exponent. These features are also manifested, to a lesser or greater extent, in the results of wide plate tests on welded plates of mismatched strength. Studies on mismatch effects should therefore include equal attention to the stress-strain characteristics of the parent materials as this may, in some circumstances, dominate any effects of weld strength mismatch.

  8. Comparing an Emotion- and a Behavior-Focused Parenting Program as Part of a Multsystemic Intervention for Child Conduct Problems.

    PubMed

    Duncombe, Melissa E; Havighurst, Sophie S; Kehoe, Christiane E; Holland, Kerry A; Frankling, Emma J; Stargatt, Robyn

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a multisystemic early intervention that included a comparison of an emotion- and behavior-focused parenting program for children with emerging conduct problems. The processes that moderated positive child outcomes were also explored. A repeated measures cluster randomized group design methodology was employed with three conditions (Tuning in to Kids, Positive Parenting Program, and waitlist control) and two periods (preintervention and 6-month follow-up). The sample consisted of 320 predominantly Caucasian 4- to 9-year-old children who were screened for disruptive behavior problems. Three outcome measures of child conduct problems were evaluated using a parent (Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory) and teacher (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire) rating scale and a structured child interview (Home Interview With Child). Six moderators were assessed using family demographic information and a parent-rated measure of psychological well-being (Depression Anxiety and Stress Scales short form). The results indicated that the multisystemic intervention was effective compared to a control group and that, despite different theoretical orientations, the emotion- and behavior-focused parenting programs were equally effective in reducing child conduct problems. Child age and parent psychological well-being moderated intervention response. This effectiveness trial supports the use of either emotion- or behavior-focused parenting programs in a multisystemic early intervention and provides greater choice for practitioners in the selection of specific programs. PMID:25469889

  9. A multidimensional approach to explore cross-cultural differences in coping behavior: comparing Druze and Jews in Israel.

    PubMed

    Israelashvili, Moshe; Taubman-Ben-Ari, Orit; Hochdorf, Zipora

    2011-01-01

    Assuming that culture is a multidimensional variable, the current study explored the possibility that the interactions between ethnicity and other culture-related variables--rather than ethnicity alone--will better describe differences in coping behavior. In the study, cross-cultural differences among Israeli Jews and Israeli Druze in the use of various ways of coping were examined while also taking into account respondents' gender, age, self-esteem, sense of coherence, national identification, and religiosity. Comparing Israeli Jews and Israeli Druze, results indicate significant differences in levels of religiosity and coherence. Referring to coping behavior, findings show that differences in ways of coping could be attributed mainly to gender differences rather than ethnic differences Thus, at least in the case of comparing Israeli Jews vs. Israeli Druze, religiosity and gender are powerful determinants of coping behavior, while ethnicity has only a limited contribution in explaining variance in a preferred way of coping. It is suggested that ethnicity has a moderating role in shaping coping behavior, as it might influence person's self-perception and level of emotionality, which in turn shape the person's ways of coping. Future explorations among various age and ethnic groups are needed to enable generalization of the current study findings. PMID:21375124

  10. Early Adolescent Sexual Initiation as a Problem Behavior: A Comparative Study of Five Nations

    PubMed Central

    Madkour, Aubrey Spriggs; Farhat, Tilda; Halpern, Carolyn Tucker; Godeau, Emmanuelle; Gabhainn, Saoirse Nic

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Using a Problem Behavior Theory (PBT) framework, this paper examines the extent to which psychosocial correlates of early sexual initiation (before age 16) vary across developed nations. Methods Fifteen-year-old participants (n=5,624) in the 1997-1998 WHO collaborative Health Behavior in School-Aged Children survey (Finland, Scotland, France and Poland) and the 1996 US Add Health survey self-reported substance use (alcohol and tobacco), school attachment, positive parental communication, and early sexual intercourse experience. Stratifying by gender, we performed univariate, bivariate, and multivariable analyses controlling for family socioeconomic status, family structure, and nation fixed effects. Results Self-reported early sexual experience, substance use, school attachment and positive communication with parents varied significantly across nations for both boys and girls. In both crude and adjusted analyses, substance use was positively associated with early sexual experience among boys and girls across nations, although associations were stronger in Europe than the US (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] range 1.56-3.74). School attachment was similarly inversely related to early sexual experience among boys and girls across nations (AOR range 0.63-0.94). However, positive parent communication was significantly inversely related to early sexual experience only among US females (AOR 0.50). Conclusions Findings overall supported the fit of early adolescent sexual initiation as a risk behavior within a PBT framework cross-nationally, suggesting that similar factors could be targeted to prevent early sexual initiation across some developed nations. However further research is warranted examining the temporality of these relationships. PMID:20864009