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Sample records for invasive ductal carcinomas

  1. Synchronous invasive ductal carcinoma in encapsulated papillary ductal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Regan, J.P.; Casaubon, J.T.; Genelus-Dominique, E.

    2016-01-01

    Encapsulated papillary ductal carcinoma (EPC) of the breast is a rare form of cancer with defining histopathology of encapsulation. These lesions are typically indolent but may rarely have concomitant, synchronous invasive lesions. This report details a 56-year-old black female who presented with a palpable left breast mass. Adenosis with focal fibrous and ductal hyperplasia characteristics were found on core needle biopsy. Excisional biopsy showed EPC with invasive components. A simple mastectomy was performed and a second lesion was identified as invasive ductal carcinoma. EPC typically has good prognosis and a low incidence of invasion. The risk increases in the presence of a second, synchronous lesion as in our case. Management is typically performed with breast conserving methods; however, missing a second lesion is possible. This report provides an overview of the literature and discussion of the role of MRI in preoperative workup. PMID:27562577

  2. Comparative proteomic analysis of ductal and lobular invasive breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, N C S; Gomig, T H B; Milioli, H H; Cordeiro, F; Costa, G G; Urban, C A; Lima, R S; Cavalli, I J; Ribeiro, E M S F

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide and the first among women. Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) are the two major histological subtypes, and the clinical and molecular differences between them justify the search for new markers to distinguish them. As proteomic analysis allows for a powerful and analytical approach to identify potential biomarkers, we performed a comparative analysis of IDC and ILC samples by using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Twenty-three spots were identified corresponding to 10 proteins differentially expressed between the two subtypes. ACTB, ACTG, TPM3, TBA1A, TBA1B, VIME, TPIS, PDIA3, PDIA6, and VTDB were upregulated in ductal carcinoma compared to in lobular carcinoma samples. Overall, these 10 proteins have a key role in oncogenesis. Their specific functions and relevance in cancer initiation and progression are further discussed in this study. The identified peptides represent promising biomarkers for the differentiation of ductal and lobular breast cancer subtypes, and for future interventions based on tailored therapy. PMID:27173185

  3. Basal cytokeratin as a potential marker of low risk of invasion in ductal carcinoma in situ

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Fernando N.; Mendes, Henrique N.; Cirqueira, Cinthya S.; Bacchi, Carlos E.; Carvalho, Filomena M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Biological markers that predict the development of invasive breast cancer are needed to improve personalized therapy for patients diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ. We investigated the role of basal cytokeratin 5/6 in the risk of invasion in breast ductal carcinoma in situ. METHODS: We constructed tissue microarrays using 236 ductal carcinoma in situ samples: 90 pure samples (group 1) and 146 samples associated with invasive carcinoma (group 2). Both groups had similar nuclear grades and were obtained from patients of similar ages. The groups were compared in terms of estrogen (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) expression, cytokeratin 5/6 immunostaining, human epidermal growth factor receptor 1 (EGFR) membrane staining and molecular subtype, as indicated by their immunohistochemistry profiles. RESULTS: ER/PR-negative status was predictive of invasion, whereas HER2 superexpression and cytokeratin 5/6-positive status were negatively associated with invasion. Among the high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ cases, a triple-positive profile (positive for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2) and cytokeratin 5/6 expression by neoplastic cells were negatively associated with invasion. In the low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ subgroup, only cytokeratin 5/6 expression exhibited a negative association with the probability of invasion. CONCLUSION: The immunohistochemical expression of cytokeratin 5/6 by ductal carcinoma in situ epithelial cells may provide clinically useful information regarding the risk of progression to invasive disease. PMID:23778411

  4. Gynecomastia With Atypical Ductal Hyperplasia and Ductal Carcinoma In Situ Associated With Invasive Breast Carcinoma in a Male Patient on Antiretroviral Therapy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Coyne, John D

    2016-04-01

    Breast carcinoma in males is rare although a 4-fold increased incidence is reported in HIV-infected men. Herein we report a case of invasive breast carcinoma in a HIV-positive man on antiretroviral therapy. The carcinoma was associated with features of florid gynecomastia, atypical ductal hyperplasia, ductal carcinoma in situ, and columnar cell change. This combination of morphological changes has not previously been reported in the context of male breast carcinoma and their etiopathological associations are discussed. PMID:26612847

  5. Synchronous unilateral triple breast cancers composed of invasive ductal carcinoma, invasive lobular carcinoma, and Paget's disease.

    PubMed

    Onoe, Shunsuke; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Akashi-Tanaka, Sadako; Hasebe, Takahiro; Iwamoto, Eriko; Hojo, Takashi; Kinoshita, Takayuki

    2014-03-01

    We report a case of synchronous unilateral triple breast cancers comprising invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC), and Paget's disease. A 57-year-old woman with a left breast mass was referred to our hospital. Mammography revealed only an isodense area with foci of microcalcification in the lateral area of the left breast. Ultrasonography revealed 2 hypoechoic masses in the outer lower and inner upper areas, and these 2 lesions were diagnosed by core needle biopsy as ILC and IDC, respectively. Left total mastectomy with sentinel lymph node biopsies was performed. In addition to the ILC and IDC, histological examination also identified Paget's disease. Breast cancer often manifests as multiple unilateral lesions; however, it is sometimes difficult to determine whether these tumors have developed multicentrically or have multifocally invaded from an intraductal carcinoma. This case was clearly diagnosed to have occurred multicentrically because of the absence of continuity among the 3 tumors, the presence of a non-invasive component in all 3 tumors, and different histopathological findings. The synchronous unilateral development of ILCs is well known. Cases of synchronous unilateral triple or more breast cancers were reviewed, and their histopathological characteristics, including the incidence of Paget's disease, is discussed. PMID:21140247

  6. Differences between invasive lobular and invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast: results and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Barroso-Sousa, Romualdo; Metzger-Filho, Otto

    2016-01-01

    Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) is the second most common histologic subtype of breast cancer (BC): ILC differs from invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) in its clinicopathological characteristics and responsiveness to systemic therapy. From the clinical standpoint, data suggest that ILC derives a distinct benefit from systemic therapy compared to IDC. In addition, comprehensive molecular analyses have been reported for ILCs, confirming that these tumors have specific genomic profiles compared to IDC. Despite these differences, clinical trials and practical clinical guidelines tend to treat BC as a single entity. Here we discuss these clinical and molecular data and their therapeutic implications. PMID:27482285

  7. In situ clinical evidence that zinc levels are decreased in breast invasive ductal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jing; Franklin, Renty B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Altered zinc levels in malignant cells versus their normal cells have important implications in the development and progression of several cancers. Prostate, pancreatic, and hepatocellular carcinomas exhibit consistent marked zinc decrease in situ in the malignant cells, and other cancers (such as kidney, lung, and thyroid) also exhibit decreased tissue zinc levels. However, zinc levels are increased in breast cancer tissue compared to breast normal tissue, and the contemporary dominant view is that zinc is increased in invasive ductal carcinoma. This has important implications regarding the role and effects of zinc in breast malignancy compared to other cancers, which caused us to initiate this study to either confirm or challenge the contemporary view of an increased zinc level in the invasive ductal malignant cells. Methods We employed dithizone staining of breast tissue sections and tissue cores to determine the relative in situ cellular zinc levels specifically in the invasive ductal malignant cells as compared to normal ductal epithelium. This approach had not been employed in any of the reported breast studies. Results The results revealed that the zinc levels are consistently and markedly decreased in the ductal malignant cells as compared with higher prominent zinc levels in the normal ductal epithelium. Decreased zinc is evident in Grade 1 well-differentiated malignancy and in Grade 2 and Grade 3 carcinomas. Among the twenty-five cancer cases in this study, none exhibited increased zinc in the invasive ductal carcinoma compared to the zinc level in the normal ductal epithelium. Conclusions The decreased zinc levels in breast invasive ductal carcinoma is consistent with prostate, pancreatic, and liver carcinomas in which the decrease in zinc is a required event in the development of malignancy to prevent cytotoxicity that would result from the higher zinc levels in the normal cells. This new understanding requires a redirection in elucidating the

  8. Genomic differences between pure ductal carcinoma in situ and synchronous ductal carcinoma in situ with invasive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Sung; Baek, In-Pyo; Lee, Sung Hak; Kim, Tae-Min; Chung, Yeun-Jun; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Although ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) precedes invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), the related genomic alterations remain unknown. To identify the genomic landscape of DCIS and better understand the mechanisms behind progression to IDC, we performed whole-exome sequencing and copy number profiling for six cases of pure DCIS and five pairs of synchronous DCIS and IDC. Pure DCIS harbored well-known mutations (e.g., TP53, PIK3CA and AKT1), copy number alterations (CNAs) and chromothripses, but had significantly fewer driver genes and co-occurrence of mutation/CNAs than synchronous DCIS-IDC. We found neither recurrent nor significantly mutated genes with synchronous DCIS-IDC compared to pure DCIS, indicating that there may not be a single determinant for pure DCIS progression to IDC. Of note, synchronous DCIS genomes were closer to IDC than pure DCIS. Among the clinicopathologic parameters, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative status was associated with increased mutations, CNAs, co-occurrence of mutations/CNAs and driver mutations. Our results indicate that although pure DCIS has already acquired some drivers, more changes are needed to progress to IDC. In addition, IDC-associated DCIS is more aggressive than pure DCIS at genomic level and should really be considered IDC. Finally, the data suggest that PR-negativity could be used to predict aggressive breast cancer genotypes. PMID:25831047

  9. Left adrenal gland metastasis of breast invasive ductal carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    HE, TAO; LIU, JIAJU; LI, YIFAN; JIN, LU; SUN, SHUOLEI; NI, LIANGCHAO; MAO, XIANGMING; YANG, SHANGQI; LAI, YONGQING

    2016-01-01

    The majority of the metastatic lesions of the adrenal gland normally originate from lung cancer, colon malignant tumor, renal cell carcinoma and melanoma. However, adrenal gland metastasis that metastasize from breast invasive ductal carcinoma are extremely rare. The present study reported a rare case of left adrenal gland metastasis in a 35-year-old female who was diagnosed as breast carcinoma 5 years ago with a mass located on the left adrenal gland, which was detected during a routine examination. The patient was asymptomatic and adrenal gland computed tomography revealed a mass in the left adrenal gland. Definitive preoperative diagnosis failed to be established. Left adrenal gland laparoscopic adrenalectomy was performed and the diagnosis of adrenal gland metastasis of breast invasive ductal carcinoma was confirmed by pathological and immunohistochemical examination. The patient remained in good condition by the time of writing. PMID:27123296

  10. Phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPx) expression is downregulated in poorly differentiated breast invasive ductal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cejas, P; García-Cabezas, M A; Casado, E; Belda-Iniesta, C; De Castro, J; Fresno, J A; Sereno, M; Barriuso, J; Espinosa, E; Zamora, P; Feliu, J; Redondo, A; Hardisson, D A; Renart, J; González-Barón, M

    2007-06-01

    Phospholipid Hydroperoxide Glutathione Peroxidase (PHGPx) is the only known enzyme able to reduce lipid peroxides bound to cell membranes. Moreover it has been involved in apoptosis and can influence intracellular signaling. To investigate the possible relationship between PHGPx and human cancer we have quantified PHGPx expression levels by real-time quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry in tissue samples of human breast invasive ductal carcinoma from 34 patients compared with their own controls of benign breast tissue. PHGPx expression levels were compared with the clinical and pathological data of these patients. The results showed that PHGPx expression levels are downregulated in poorly differentiated (grade 3) breast invasive ductal carcinoma (P = 0.0043). PHGPx expression levels decreased gradually with tumor grade from grade 1 to grade 3. We also found a downregulation of PHGPx in cases that showed p53 accumulation compared with cases without p53 immunostaining (P = 0.0011). PHGPx was also downregulated in cases without progesterone receptors (PR) immunostaining compared with cases with PR immunostaining (P = 0.0165). Grade 3, p53 immunostaining and absence of PR immunostaining are poor prognostic factors. These results suggest that PHGPx downregulation could be related with a poorer prognosis in breast invasive ductal carcinoma. PMID:17516241

  11. A case of renal cell carcinoma metastasizing to invasive ductal breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tai-Di; Lee, Li-Yu

    2014-02-01

    Tumor-to-tumor metastasis is an uncommon but well-documented phenomenon. We present a case of a clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) metastasizing to an invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast. A 74-year-old woman with a past history of clear cell RCC status after radical nephrectomy underwent right modified radical mastectomy for an enlarging breast mass 3 years after nephrectomy. Histological examination revealed a small focus with distinct morphological features similar to clear cell RCC encased in the otherwise typical IDC. Immunohistochemical studies showed that this focus was positive for CD10 and vimentin, in contrast to the surrounding IDC, which was negative for both markers and positive for Her2/neu. Based on the histological and immunohistochemical features, the patient was diagnosed with metastasis of clear cell RCC to the breast IDC. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a breast neoplasm as the recipient tumor in tumor-to-tumor metastasis. PMID:24530247

  12. Association between well-known histopathological criteria and overall survival in invasive ductal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Deger, Aysenur; Ozyigit, Filiz; Arik, Ozlem; Ekici, Fatih; Cinkaya, Ahmet; Tayfur, Mahir; Deger, Hakki

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of clinical features and well-known histomorphological parameters on survival of breast cancer. Material and methods: 44 patients with invasive ductal carcinoma were included in this study. We investigated the effect of age, breast cancer location (right/left), histological grade, largest diameter of the tumor, lymphovascular and perineural invasion on patient survival. IBM SPSS (Statistical Package for Social Sciences) 20 program was used for statistics. Cox proportional hazard regression model for survival analysis, log-log plot, life function graphs were used. Results were 95% confidence interval, significance (P < 0.05). Results: In univariate analysis, the left breast localization, high histological grade, large tumor size, lymphovascular invasion, perineural invasion has been shown that reduced the overall survival (P < 0.05). In multivariate analysis, only high histological grade, large tumor size and perineural invasion were identified as parameters negatively associated with patient survival (P < 0.05). On univariate and multivariate analysis, age was not associated with survival. Conclusion: The above results should be considered in the follow-up and treatment planning of invasive ductal carcinoma patients. PMID:26617687

  13. Confocal fluorescence microscopy to evaluate changes in adipocytes in the tumor microenvironment associated with invasive ductal carcinoma and ductal carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Dobbs, Jessica L; Shin, Dongsuk; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Kuerer, Henry; Yang, Wei; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2016-09-01

    Adipose tissue is a dynamic organ that provides endocrine, inflammatory and angiogenic factors, which can assist breast carcinoma cells with invasion and metastasis. Previous studies have shown that adipocytes adjacent to carcinoma, known as cancer-associated adipocytes, undergo extensive changes that correspond to an "activated phenotype," such as reduced size relative to adipocytes in non-neoplastic breast tissue. Optical imaging provides a tool that can be used to characterize adipocyte morphology and other features of the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we used confocal fluorescence microscopy to acquire images of freshly excised breast tissue stained topically with proflavine. We developed a computerized algorithm to identify and quantitatively measure phenotypic properties of adipocytes located adjacent to and far from normal collagen, ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive ductal carcinoma. Adipocytes were measured in confocal fluorescence images of fresh breast tissue collected from 22 patients. Results show that adipocytes adjacent to neoplastic tissue margins have significantly smaller area compared to adipocytes far from the margins of neoplastic lesions and compared to adipocytes adjacent to non-neoplastic collagenous stroma. These findings suggest that confocal microscopic images can be utilized to evaluate phenotypic properties of adipocytes in breast stroma which may be useful in defining alterations in microenvironment that may aid in the development and progression of neoplastic lesions. PMID:27116366

  14. Comparative genomic hybridization analysis of invasive ductal breast carcinomas in the Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JIANWEI; ZHANG, HONGYAN; XU, XIN; WANG, MINGRONG; YU, ZHONGHE

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in Chinese women. The aim of the present study was to investigate the genetic alterations that occur in breast cancer cells in Chinese women. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis was performed on 34 tumors obtained from patients with primary invasive ductal breast carcinoma (IDC). Recurrent genetic alterations in breast cancer include gains on chromosomes 1q (59%), 16p (50%), 17q (44%), 8q (38%), 11q (32%), 20q (32%), 1p (24%), 20p (24%), 19q (21%) and 19p (18%). Losses are common on chromosomes 6q (15%), 8p (12%), 18 (12%), 4q (9%), X (9%) and 17p (9%). In the present study, high-level amplifications were observed on chromosomes 1q32, 8p, 11q13, 17q and 20q. Overall, the chromosomal DNA gains observed were consistent with the changes reported in Caucasian populations. However, the incidence of chromosomal DNA loss was lower in the present study compared with the incidence reported in the literature. The present results demonstrate the pattern of chromosomal imbalances in the invasive ductal breast carcinomas of Chinese females. PMID:26622803

  15. Multiphoton microscopic imaging of fibrotic focus in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sijia; Nie, Yuting; Lian, Yuane; Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Wang, Chuan; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-11-01

    During the proliferation of breast cancer, the desmoplastic can evoke a fibrosis response by invading healthy tissue. Fibrotic focus (FF) in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast had been reported to be associated with significantly poorer survival rate than IDC without FF. As an important prognosis indicator, it's difficult to obtain the exact fibrotic information from traditional detection method such as mammography. Multiphoton imaging based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second-harmonic generation (SHG) has been recently employed for microscopic examination of unstained tissue. In this study, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was used to image the fibrotic focus in invasive ductal carcinoma tissue. The morphology and distribution of collagen in fibrotic focus can be demonstrated by the SHG signal. Variation of collagen between IDC with and without FF will be examined and further characterized, which may be greatly related to the metastasis of breast cancer. Our result suggested that the MPM can be efficient in identifying and locating the fibrotic focus in IDC. Combining with the pathology analysis and other detecting methods, MPM owns potential in becoming an advanced histological tool for detecting the fibrotic focus in IDC and collecting prognosis information, which may guide the subsequent surgery option and therapy procedure for patients.

  16. Synchronous presentation of invasive ductal carcinoma and mantle cell lymphoma: a diagnostic challenge in menopausal patients

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Edward J.; Baugh, Aaron D.; Ching, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous presentation of breast carcinoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is a rare occurrence (Bradford PT, Freedman DM, Goldstein AM, Tucker MA. Increased risk of second primary cancers after a diagnosis of melanoma. Arch Dermatol 2010;146:265–72; Dutta Roy S, Stafford JA, Scally J, Selvachandran SN. A rare case of breast carcinoma co-existing with axillary mantle cell lymphoma. World J Surg Oncol 2003;1:27; Suresh Attili VS, Dadhich HK, Rao CR, Bapsy PP, Batra U, Anupama G et al. A case of breast cancer coexisting with B-cell follicular lymphoma. Austral Asian J Cancer 2007;6:155–6). In particular, only two reported cases on synchronous presentation of invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) exist in the English literature. Owing to the rarity, there is a lack of consensus about underlying mechanism as well as optimal treatment strategy, and diagnosing both malignancies together without a delay remains a complex clinical challenge. We report a case of synchronous presentation of IDC and MCL in a 67-year-old female patient whose MCL diagnosis was delayed due to a misinterpretation of her B symptoms as postmenopausal, with a review of the literature on concurrently occurring breast carcinoma and NHL. PMID:26801778

  17. Synchronous presentation of invasive ductal carcinoma and mantle cell lymphoma: a diagnostic challenge in menopausal patients.

    PubMed

    Woo, Edward J; Baugh, Aaron D; Ching, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous presentation of breast carcinoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is a rare occurrence (Bradford PT, Freedman DM, Goldstein AM, Tucker MA. Increased risk of second primary cancers after a diagnosis of melanoma. Arch Dermatol 2010; 146: :265-72; Dutta Roy S, Stafford JA, Scally J, Selvachandran SN. A rare case of breast carcinoma co-existing with axillary mantle cell lymphoma. World J Surg Oncol 2003; 1: :27; Suresh Attili VS, Dadhich HK, Rao CR, Bapsy PP, Batra U, Anupama G et al. A case of breast cancer coexisting with B-cell follicular lymphoma. Austral Asian J Cancer 2007; 6: :155-6). In particular, only two reported cases on synchronous presentation of invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) exist in the English literature. Owing to the rarity, there is a lack of consensus about underlying mechanism as well as optimal treatment strategy, and diagnosing both malignancies together without a delay remains a complex clinical challenge. We report a case of synchronous presentation of IDC and MCL in a 67-year-old female patient whose MCL diagnosis was delayed due to a misinterpretation of her B symptoms as postmenopausal, with a review of the literature on concurrently occurring breast carcinoma and NHL. PMID:26801778

  18. Anal metastasis as the sentinel and isolated presentation of invasive ductal breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rengifo, C; Titi, S; Walls, J

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer currently affects 1 in 8 women in the UK during their lifetime. Common sites for breast cancer metastasis include the axillary lymph nodes, bones, lung, liver, brain, soft tissue and adrenal glands. There is well documented evidence detailing breast metastasis to the gastrointestinal tract but anal metastasis is exceptionally rare. We present the case of a 78-year-old woman with an anal metastasis as the sentinel and isolated presentation of an invasive ductal breast carcinoma. As advances in the treatment of breast cancer improve, and with an ageing and expanding population, there will be an increasing number of cancer survivors, and more of these unusual presentations may be encountered in the future. PMID:27087339

  19. Mass Spectrometric Characterization of Protein Structure Details Refines the Proteome Signature for Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röwer, Claudia; Koy, Cornelia; Hecker, Michael; Reimer, Toralf; Gerber, Bernd; Thiesen, Hans-Jürgen; Glocker, Michael O.

    2011-03-01

    Early diagnosis as well as individualized therapies are necessary to reduce the mortality of breast cancer, and personalized patient care strategies rely on novel prognostic or predictive factors. In this study, with six breast cancer patients, 2D gel analysis was applied for studying protein expression differences in order to distinguish invasive ductal breast carcinoma, the most frequent breast tumor subtype, from control samples. In total, 1203 protein spots were assembled in a 2D reference gel. Differentially abundant spots were subjected to peptide mass fingerprinting for protein identification. Twenty proteins with their corresponding 38 differentially expressed 2D gel spots were contained in our previously reported proteome signature, suggesting that distinct protein forms were contributing. In-depth MS/MS measurements enabled analyses of protein structure details of selected proteins. In protein spots that significantly contributed to our signature, we found that glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase was N-terminally truncated, pyruvate kinase M2 and nucleoside diphosphate kinase A but not other isoforms of these proteins were of importance, and nucleophosmin phosphorylation at serine residues 106 and 125 were clearly identified. Principle component analysis and hierarchical clustering with normalized quantitative data from the 38 spots resulted in accurate separation of tumor from control samples. Thus, separation of tissue samples as in our initial proteome signature could be confirmed even with a different proteome analysis platform. In addition, detailed protein structure investigations enabled refining our proteome signature for invasive ductal breast carcinoma, opening the way to structure-/function studies with respect to disease processes and/or therapeutic intervention.

  20. Estrogen Receptor Expression Is High But Is of Lower Intensity in Tubular Carcinoma Than in Well-Differentiated Invasive Ductal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jorns, Julie M.; Thomas, Dafydd G.; Healy, Patrick N.; Daignault, Stephanie; Vickery, Tammi L.; Snider, Jacqueline E.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Davies, Sherri R.; Ellis, Matthew J.; Visscher, Daniel W.

    2015-01-01

    Context Tubular carcinoma (TC) is a rare, luminal A subtype of breast carcinoma with excellent prognosis, for which adjuvant chemotherapy is usually contraindicated. Objective To examine the levels of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor expression in cases of TC and well-differentiated invasive ductal carcinoma as compared to normal breast glands and to determine if any significant differences could be detected via molecular testing. Design We examined ER and progesterone receptor via immunohistochemistry in tubular (N = 27), mixed ductal/tubular (N = 16), and well-differentiated ductal (N = 27) carcinomas with comparison to surrounding normal breast tissue. We additionally performed molecular subtyping of 10 TCs and 10 ductal carcinomas via the PAM50 assay. Results Although ER expression was high for all groups, TC had statistically significantly lower ER staining percentage (ER%) (P = .003) and difference in ER expression between tumor and accompanying normal tissue (P = .02) than well-differentiated ductal carcinomas, with mixed ductal/tubular carcinomas falling between these 2 groups. Mean ER% was 79%, 87%, and 94%, and mean tumor-normal ER% differences were 13.6%, 25.9%, and 32.6% in tubular, mixed, and ductal carcinomas, respectively. Most tumors that had molecular subtyping were luminal A (9 of 10 tubular and 8 of 10 ductal), and no significant differences in specific gene expression between the 2 groups were identified. Conclusions Tubular carcinoma exhibited decreased intensity in ER expression, closer to that of normal breast parenchyma, likely as a consequence of a high degree of differentiation. Lower ER% expression by TC may represent a potential pitfall when performing commercially available breast carcinoma prognostic assays that rely heavily on ER-related gene expression. PMID:25357113

  1. Neuroendocrine carcinoma of the pancreas with similar genetic alterations to invasive ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tetsuo; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Fukuya, Akira; Kitamura, Shinji; Okamoto, Koichi; Kimura, Masako; Muguruma, Naoki; Ikemoto, Tetsuya; Shimada, Mitsuo; Yoneda, Akiko; Bando, Yoshimi; Takishita, Makoto; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2016-08-01

    Neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) of the pancreas is very rare, and its origin is not fully elucidated. Here, we present a case of a small-size NEC of the pancreas that is genetically similar to invasive ductal adenocarcinoma (IDA). A 65-year-old man was referred to our hospital due to obstructive jaundice and found to have a 12-mm solid tumor in the pancreas head. The tumor exhibited low vascularity on enhanced computed tomography, and endoscopic retrograde pancreatographic imaging revealed an irregular obstruction in a branch duct of the pancreas. The patient was thereby diagnosed with a pancreatic ductal cancer, and stomach-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy with regional lymph node resection was performed. Histochemical analysis of the resected tumor showed that the neoplastic cells with scanty cytoplasm and hyperchromatic nuclei strongly expressed chromogranin A and synaptophysin. The Ki-67 index was 40 % in the most proliferative tumor regions, and the tumor was diagnosed as a NEC of the pancreas. However, in the analysis of genetic alterations of the tumor tissue, the neoplastic cells showed altered KRAS, TP53, and SMAD4/DPC4, suggesting that the NEC in our case is genetically related to IDA. Our data suggest that poorly differentiated IDAs may transform into NECs. PMID:27262570

  2. TRAIL Death Receptor-4 Expression Positively Correlates With the Tumor Grade in Breast Cancer Patients With Invasive Ductal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sanlioglu, Ahter D.; Korcum, Aylin F.; Pestereli, Elif; Erdogan, Gulgun; Karaveli, Seyda; Savas, Burhan; Griffith, Thomas S.; Sanlioglu, Salih V.

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) selectively induces apoptosis in cancer cells but not in normal cells, and a number of clinical trials have recently been initiated to test the safety and antitumoral potential of TRAIL in cancer patients. Four different receptors have been identified to interact with TRAIL: two are death-inducing receptors (TRAIL-R1 [DR4] and TRAIL-R2 [DR5]), whereas the other two (TRAIL-R3 [DcR1] and TRAIL-R4 [DcR2]) do not induce death upon ligation and are believed to counteract TRAIL-induced cytotoxicity. Because high levels of DcR2 expression have recently been correlated with carcinogenesis in the prostate and lung, this study investigated the importance of TRAIL and TRAIL receptor expression in breast cancer patients with invasive ductal carcinoma, taking various prognostic markers into consideration. Methods and Materials: Immunohistochemical analyses were performed on 90 breast cancer patients with invasive ductal carcinoma using TRAIL and TRAIL receptor-specific antibodies. Age, menopausal status, tumor size, lymph node status, tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion, perineural invasion, extracapsular tumor extension, presence of an extensive intraductal component, multicentricity, estrogen and progesterone receptor status, and CerbB2 expression levels were analyzed with respect to TRAIL/TRAIL receptor expression patterns. Results: The highest TRAIL receptor expressed in patients with invasive ductal carcinoma was DR4. Although progesterone receptor-positive patients exhibited lower DR5 expression, CerbB2-positive tissues displayed higher levels of both DR5 and TRAIL expressions. Conclusions: DR4 expression positively correlates with the tumor grade in breast cancer patients with invasive ductal carcinoma.

  3. Association of ultrasonographic features with NGX6 expression and prognosis in invasive ductal breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jidong; Zhou, Yuanquan; Zhu, Wenhui

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma-associated gene 6 (NGX6) is a newly discovered tumor suppressor gene. It contains one epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain. Many studies have shown that proteins contain (EGF)-like domain structure affect a variety of biological actions. However, little is known about the relationships between NGX6 expression and biological behaviors in invasive ductal breast carcinoma (IDBC). The study discussed the association of ultrasonographic features with NGX6 expression and prognosis in IDBC. Methods: Ultrasonographic feature and clinical data in 122 patients with IDBC were retrospectively analyzed. NGX6 expression of IDBC was measured using immunohistochemistry methods. Results: The incidence of the burr sign, lymph node metastasis and abundance blood flow in NGX6 expression negative groups were higher than those in positive groups. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the association between NGX6 positive expression and higher disease-free survival (DFS) or higher overall survival (OS); Lymph node metastasis is associated with lower DFS or lower OS; Lower blood flow grade is associated with higher DFS. In univariate and multivariate survival analysis, NGX6 expression, lymph node metastasis, TNM and the blood flow grade were the independent prognostic factors for DFS and OS of IDBC. Conclusions: ultrasonographic features are associated with NGX6 expression in IDBC. NGX6 is involved in the invasion and metastasis activity of IDBC. Our results suggest that NGX6 may be employed as a promising prognostic factor and useful therapeutic target for IDBC. Combination of ultrasonic findings and NGX6 detection may yield clinically useful information for IDBC prognosis. PMID:26261522

  4. White blood cell and platelet indices as prognostic markers in patients with invasive ductal breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mantas, Dimitrios; Kostakis, Ioannis D.; Machairas, Nikolaos; Markopoulos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that oncogenesis is associated with systemic inflammation. The present study investigated white blood cell and platelet indices, whose values change during the inflammatory response, in women with invasive ductal breast carcinoma. Preoperatively obtained white blood cell and platelet counts from 53 patients with early breast cancer, who developed systemic metastases over a mean follow-up period of 65 months, were analyzed and compared with those of a matching control group formed of 37 patients with the same characteristics, who remained recurrence-free during the same time period. Patients who developed distant metastasis had a significantly higher mean platelet volume and lower neutrophil count than patients who did not present with distant metastasis. Furthermore, time to distant metastasis development was longer in patients with a lower mean platelet volume, whilst patients with a lower neutrophil count had a shorter systemic disease-free time interval. However, receiver operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated that these parameters provided moderate accuracy in predicting which patients may develop distant metastasis. No differences were detected between patient groups regarding additional parameters. Patients who developed systemic disease during a mean follow-up period of 65 months were observed to have an increased mean platelet volume and decreased neutrophil count preoperatively. These results indicate that such parameters may be of prognostic value in patients with breast cancer. Studies with a larger number of patients are required to further investigate this hypothesis. PMID:27446480

  5. Invasive ductal breast carcinoma detector that is robust to image magnification in whole digital slides.

    PubMed

    Balazsi, Matthew; Blanco, Paula; Zoroquiain, Pablo; Levine, Martin D; Burnier, Miguel N

    2016-04-01

    Invasive ductal breast carcinomas (IDBCs) are the most frequent and aggressive subtypes of breast cancer, affecting a large number of Canadian women every year. Part of the diagnostic process includes grading the cancerous tissue at the microscopic level according to the Nottingham modification of the Scarff-Bloom-Richardson system. Although reliable, there exists a growing interest in automating the grading process, which will provide consistent care for all patients. This paper presents a solution for automatically detecting regions expressing IDBC in images of microscopic tissue, or whole digital slides. This represents the first stage in a larger solution designed to automatically grade IDBC. The detector first tessellated whole digital slides, and image features were extracted, such as color information, local binary patterns, and histograms of oriented gradients. These were presented to a random forest classifier, which was trained and tested using a database of 66 cases diagnosed with IDBC. When properly tuned, the detector balanced accuracy, F1 score, and Dice's similarity coefficient were 88.7%, 79.5%, and 0.69, respectively. Overall, the results seemed strong enough to integrate our detector into a larger solution equipped with components that analyze the cancerous tissue at higher magnification, automatically producing the histopathological grade. PMID:27226977

  6. Invasive ductal carcinoma arising from dense accessory breast visualized with 99mTc-MIBI breast-specific γ imaging.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hai-Jeon; Sung, Sun Hee; Moon, Byung In; Kim, Bom Sahn

    2014-08-01

    Primary accessory breast cancer is extremely rare, and the diagnostic efficacy of Tc-MIBI breast-specific γ imaging (BSGI) has not been reported elsewhere. We present a case of primary carcinoma arising from dense accessory breast that was visualized with BSGI. A 43-year-old female patient with a palpable axillary mass underwent mammography, which showed dense parenchyma on both of the anatomic and accessory breasts with no abnormality. Subsequent BSGI showed no abnormal uptake in bilateral anatomic breasts, but focal abnormal uptake was noted in the accessory breast. Permanent pathologic evaluation confirmed invasive ductal carcinoma (not otherwise specified type) of the accessory breast. PMID:24445272

  7. [Synchronous and ipsilateral invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast occurring near a phyllodes tumor - a case report].

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Saki; Sakurai, Kenichi; Suzuki, Shuhei; Sakagami, Masashi; Enomoto, Katsuhisa; Amano, Sadao; Koshinaga, Tsugumichi

    2014-11-01

    We report 2 cases of invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast occurring near a phyllodes tumor. The first case was ofa 58- year-old woman who had a tumor in her right breast and visited our hospital. Following a core needle biopsy (CNB), a malignant phyllodes tumor was diagnosed. We performed a lumpectomy for the phyllodes tumor, with 1.5-cm surgical margins. Pathological diagnosis of the resected specimen confirmed the malignant phyllodes tumor. A ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) was also discovered near the phyllodes tumor. The second case was of another 58-year-old woman who had a big tumor in her right breast and visited our hospital. CNB resulted in pathological diagnosis ofa benign phyllodes tumor. The tumor was removed by a lumpectomy with 1.5-cm surgical margins. The pathological diagnosis from the resected specimen was borderline phyllodes tumor with invasive ductal carcinoma in the proximity. In both cases, DCIS could not have been diagnosed preoperatively. PMID:25731391

  8. Clinicopathological Significance of Dual-Specificity Protein Phosphatase 4 Expression in Invasive Ductal Carcinoma of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunsung; Jang, Se Min; Ahn, Hyein; Sim, Jongmin; Yi, Kijong; Chung, Yumin; Han, Hulin; Rehman, Abdul; Chung, Min Sung; Jang, Kiseok

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Dual-specificity protein phosphatase 4 (DUSP4), also known as mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase (MKP) 2 is a member of the inducible nuclear MKP group. The role of DUSP4 in cancer development and progression appears to vary with the type of malignancy. The purpose of this study was to investigate DUSP4 expression in a case series of invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. Methods We constructed tissue microarrays consisting of 16, 14, 47, and 266 cases of normal breast tissue, usual ductal hyperplasia, ductal carcinoma in situ, and invasive ductal carcinoma, respectively. DUSP4 expression was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Results Cytoplasmic DUSP4 expression was observed. DUSP4 was more frequently expressed in malignant than in benign cases (p=0.024). The mean DUSP4 expression score was significantly higher in malignant tumors than in benign lesions (p=0.019). DUSP4 expression was significantly correlated with a larger tumor size (>2 cm, p=0.015). There was no significant correlation between overall survival or disease-free survival and DUSP4 expression in all 266 patients. We evaluated the impact of DUSP4 expression on the survival of 120 patients with T1-stage tumors. Interestingly, Kaplan-Meier survival curves revealed that DUSP4 expression had a significant effect on both overall patient survival (p=0.034, log-rank test) and disease-free survival (p=0.045, log-rank test). In early T-stage breast cancer, DUSP4 expression was associated with a worse prognosis. Conclusion DUSP4 is frequently upregulated in breast malignancy, and may play an important role in cancer development and progression. In addition, it may be a marker of adverse prognosis, especially in patients with early T1-stage cancer. PMID:25834604

  9. Automatic detection of invasive ductal carcinoma in whole slide images with convolutional neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Roa, Angel; Basavanhally, Ajay; González, Fabio; Gilmore, Hannah; Feldman, Michael; Ganesan, Shridar; Shih, Natalie; Tomaszewski, John; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a deep learning approach for automatic detection and visual analysis of invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) tissue regions in whole slide images (WSI) of breast cancer (BCa). Deep learning approaches are learn-from-data methods involving computational modeling of the learning process. This approach is similar to how human brain works using different interpretation levels or layers of most representative and useful features resulting into a hierarchical learned representation. These methods have been shown to outpace traditional approaches of most challenging problems in several areas such as speech recognition and object detection. Invasive breast cancer detection is a time consuming and challenging task primarily because it involves a pathologist scanning large swathes of benign regions to ultimately identify the areas of malignancy. Precise delineation of IDC in WSI is crucial to the subsequent estimation of grading tumor aggressiveness and predicting patient outcome. DL approaches are particularly adept at handling these types of problems, especially if a large number of samples are available for training, which would also ensure the generalizability of the learned features and classifier. The DL framework in this paper extends a number of convolutional neural networks (CNN) for visual semantic analysis of tumor regions for diagnosis support. The CNN is trained over a large amount of image patches (tissue regions) from WSI to learn a hierarchical part-based representation. The method was evaluated over a WSI dataset from 162 patients diagnosed with IDC. 113 slides were selected for training and 49 slides were held out for independent testing. Ground truth for quantitative evaluation was provided via expert delineation of the region of cancer by an expert pathologist on the digitized slides. The experimental evaluation was designed to measure classifier accuracy in detecting IDC tissue regions in WSI. Our method yielded the best quantitative

  10. Runx2 Expression as a Potential Prognostic Marker in Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    El-Gendi, Saba Mohamed; Mostafa, Mohamed Farouk

    2016-07-01

    The Runx family of transcription factors has been implicated in cancer progression, both positively and negatively. Recent studies assigned a role for Runx2 in promoting breast cancer metastasis. However, the role of Runx2 during the early stage of breast carcinoma and its association with clinical outcomes remain unknown. Assessing the clinicopathological significance of Runx2 expression in a cohort of breast invasive ductal carcinomas (IDC). The correlation of nuclear Runx2 LI with clinicopathological parameters was assessed in 84 IDCs. To study the association of Runx2 with patient outcomes, in addition to treating it as a continuous variable, Runx2 was categorized by its median value (65) and by an additional two cut-off points determined by ROC curve analyses, at 45 for disease free survival (DFS) and 40 for overall survival (OS). Multivariate Cox regression models were also constructed. We used the best subset regression to identify models that predict DFS and OS with as few predictors as possible, and validation was performed. Based on the "Predicted R(2)", the three best models were identified. Using Cox-regression, the interaction between Runx2 and other clinicopathological terms was tested. Runx2 LI was significantly associated only with positive Her-2 status, and did not correlate significantly with other clinicopathological parameters. Although Runx2 LI, in the continuous form and when categorized by the median, did not correlate significantly with DFS and OS; after it was categorized using the optimal cut-off points determined using ROC curve analysis, the patients with Runx2 LI >45 % showed a significantly higher event rate and shorter DFS (P = 0.047), whereas patients with Runx2 LI >40 % showed a significantly shorter OS (P = 0.050). Moreover, Runx2 LI contributed significantly in the models built to predict DFS and OS. For DFS, no interaction terms contributed significantly to the models. However, among stage IV cases, the interaction term

  11. Zinc presence in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and its correlation with oestrogen receptor status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, M. J.; Al-Ebraheem, A.; Geraki, K.; Leek, R.; Jubb, A.; Harris, A. L.

    2009-07-01

    Zinc is known to play an important role in many cellular processes, and the levels of zinc are controlled by specific transporters from the ZIP (SLC39A) influx transporter group and the ZnT (SLC30A) efflux transporter group. The distribution of zinc was measured in 59 samples of invasive ductal carcinoma of breast using synchrotron radiation micro probe x-ray fluorescence facilities. The samples were formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue micro arrays (TMAs) enabling a high throughput of samples and allowing us to correlate the distribution of trace metals with tumour cell distribution and, for the first time, important biological variables. The samples were divided into two classes, 34 oestrogen receptor positive (ER+ve) and 25 oestrogen receptor negative (ER-ve) based on quantitative immunohistochemistry assessment. The overall levels of zinc (i.e. in tumour and surrounding tissue) in the ER+ve samples were on average 60% higher than those in the ER-ve samples. The zinc levels were higher in the ER+ve tumour areas compared to the ER-ve tumour areas with the mean levels in the ER+ve samples being approximately 80% higher than the mean ER-ve levels. However, the non-tumour tissue regions of the samples contained on average the same levels of zinc in both types of breast cancers. The relative levels of zinc in tumour areas of the tissue were compared with levels in areas of non-tumour surrounding tissue. There was a significant increase in zinc in the tumour regions of the ER+ve samples compared to the surrounding regions (P < 0.001) and a non-significant increase in the ER-ve samples. When comparing the increase in zinc in the tumour regions expressed as a percentage of the surrounding non-tumour tissue zinc level in the same sample, a significant difference between the ER+ve and ER-ve samples was found (P < 0.01).

  12. Expression of multidrug resistance proteins in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiquan; Song, Maomin

    2014-11-01

    Chemotherapy is commonly used for the treatment of breast cancer. However, the resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, often mediated by multidrug resistance (MDR) mechanisms, is a common occurrence. The present study examined the expression of several MDR-related proteins (MRPs) in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast, and assessed their association with clinicopathological variables and their prognostic significance. In addition, immunohistochemistry was used to measure the expression of MRP, p-glycoprotein (P-gp), topoisomerase 2α (Topo2α), thymidylate synthase (TS) and glutathione-S-transferase π (GST-π) in 156 resected IDCs of the breast. Pearson's χ(2) test and Spearman's correlation coefficient were used to analyze the association between MDR protein expression and several clinicopathological variables. The association between each of the five MDR proteins was also examined. Furthermore, Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression modeling were used to assess overall survival. The expression of MRP, P-gp, Topo2α, TS and GST-π was detected in 20.5% (32/156), 25.0% (39/156), 84.0% (131/156), 41.7% (65/156) and 41.0% (64/156) of cases examined, respectively. No correlation was identified between MRP and Topo-2α and the clinicopathological variables examined. By contrast, P-gp (χ(2)=20.226; P<0.0001) and GST-π (χ(2)=35.032; P<0.0001) were found to positively correlate with tumor grade. In addition, staining for TS was associated with axillary lymph node metastasis (χ(2)=42.281; P<0.0001). The expression levels of P-gp and GST-π were found to be significantly correlated (r= 0.319; P<0.0001). Furthermore, GST-π expression was elevated in estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer (χ(2)=17.407; P<0.0001). Tumor histological grade, in addition to TS and GST-π expression, were significant predictors of a poor survival outcome. TS and GST-π are consequently useful prognostic biomarkers in IDC, therefore, when establishing a personalized

  13. Identification of the boundary between normal breast tissue and invasive ductal carcinoma during breast-conserving surgery using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Tongxin; Nie, Yuting; Lian, Yuane; Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Wang, Chuan; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-11-01

    Breast-conserving surgery has become an important way of surgical treatment for breast cancer worldwide nowadays. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has the ability to noninvasively visualize tissue architectures at the cellular level using intrinsic fluorescent molecules in biological tissues without the need for fluorescent dye. In this study, MPM is used to image the microstructures of terminal duct lobular unit (TDLU), invasive ductal carcinoma and the boundary region between normal and cancerous breast tissues. Our study demonstrates that MPM has the ability to not only reveal the morphological changes of the cuboidal epithelium, basement membrane and interlobular stroma but also identify the boundary between normal breast tissue and invasive ductal carcinoma, which correspond well to the Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E) images. Predictably, MPM can monitor surgical margins in real time and provide considerable accuracy for resection of breast cancerous tissues intraoperatively. With the development of miniature, real-time MPM imaging technology, MPM should have great application prospects during breast-conserving surgery.

  14. Comparative Long-term Study of a Large Series of Patients with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma and Invasive Lobular Carcinoma. Loco-Regional Recurrence, Metastasis, and Survival.

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, Antonio; Lain, Josep María; Chabrera, Carol; García Font, Marc; Fraile, Manel; Barco, Israel; Torras, Merçe; Reñe, Asumpta; González, Sonia; González, Clarissa; Piqueras, Mercedes; Veloso, Enrique; Cirera, Lluís; Pessarrodona, Antoni; Giménez, Nuria

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to compare histologic and immunohistochemical features, surgical treatment and clinical course, including disease recurrence, distant metastases, and mortality between patients with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) or invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC). We included 1,745 patients operated for 1,789 breast tumors, with 1,639 IDC (1,600 patients) and 145 patients with ILC and 150 breast tumors. The median follow-up was 76 months. ILC was significantly more likely to be associated with a favorable phenotype. Prevalence of contralateral breast cancer was slightly higher for ILC patients than for IDC patients (4.0% versus 3.2%; p = n.s). ILC was more likely multifocal, estrogen receptor positive, Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-2 (HER2) negative, and with lower proliferative index compared to IDC. Considering conservative surgery, ILC patients required more frequently re-excision and/or mastectomy. Prevalence of stage IIB and III stages were significantly more frequent in ILC patients than in IDC patients (37.4% versus 25.3%, p = 0.006). Positive nodes were significantly more frequent in the ILC patients (44.6% versus 37.0%, p = 0.04). After adjustment for tumor size and nodal status, frequencies of recurrence/metastasis, disease-free and specific survival were similar among patients with IDC and patients with ILC. In conclusion, women with ILC do not have worse clinical outcomes than their counterparts with IDC. Management decisions should be based on individual patient and tumor biologic characteristics rather than on lobular versus ductal histology. PMID:26190560

  15. Association between ALDH1+/CD133+ stem-like cells and tumor angiogenesis in invasive ductal breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    LV, XINQUAN; WANG, YINGZI; SONG, YIMIN; PANG, XIA; LI, HUIXIANG

    2016-01-01

    The growth and metastasis of tumors is dependent on angiogenesis; however, the association between tumor stem cells (TSCs) and tumor angiogenesis remains to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the expression of the TSC markers aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) and cluster of differentiation 133 (CD133) in invasive ductal breast carcinoma, and identify their correlation with tumor angiogenesis. Stem-like cells from the breast tissue of 120 patients, who were diagnosed with invasive ductal breast carcinoma at The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University (Zhengzhou, Henan, China) between January 2009 and December 2010, were collected by surgical resection and analyzed using immunohistochemical double staining. The expression of the vascular markers CD34, CD105 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were determined using single staining. Overall, 25.83% (31/120) of the specimens contained a large number of ALDH1+/CD133+ stem-like cells (ALDH1+/CD133+ tumor). ALDH1+/CD133+ expression is associated with microvessel density, VEGF-positive rate and estrogen receptor expression (P<0.05); however, ALDH1+/CD133+ expression was not associated with age, tumor diameter, lymph node metastasis, histological classification, progesterone receptor expression or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 expression (P>0.05). The ALDH1+/CD133+ tumor phenotype and expression of VEGF were identified to be correlated in the present study (P=0.020). The present study revealed a close association between breast cancer TSC markers, including ALDH1 and CD133, and tumor angiogenesis. The results of the present study may provide a novel target and treatment strategy for future studies investigating tumor growth and metastasis. PMID:26998072

  16. Current management of ductal carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Barth, A; Brenner, R J; Giuliano, A E

    1995-10-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ represents a biologically and histologically heterogeneous group of lesions characterized by the proliferation of neoplastic epithelial cells confined to the ducts of the breast. Before screening mammography, ductal carcinoma in situ was considered uncommon; patients were usually diagnosed by a breast mass or bloody nipple discharge, and their treatment was mastectomy. Today it represents 20% to 30% of mammographically detected breast cancers and 10% to 15% of all diagnosed breast cancers in the United States. The invariable progression of this cancer to invasive breast cancer requiring mastectomy has been challenged, but because most patients have been treated with mastectomy, knowledge about ductal carcinoma in situ is limited and primarily based on retrospective data. Further insight will emerge from randomized prospective studies that are near completion. Currently available data indicate that breast-conserving treatments are valid alternatives to mastectomy for most patients with this disease. PMID:7483593

  17. Molecular Features of Subtype-Specific Progression from Ductal Carcinoma In Situ to Invasive Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lesurf, Robert; Aure, Miriam Ragle; Mørk, Hanne Håberg; Vitelli, Valeria; Lundgren, Steinar; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Kristensen, Vessela; Wärnberg, Fredrik; Hallett, Michael; Sørlie, Therese

    2016-07-26

    Breast cancer consists of at least five main molecular "intrinsic" subtypes that are reflected in both pre-invasive and invasive disease. Although previous studies have suggested that many of the molecular features of invasive breast cancer are established early, it is unclear what mechanisms drive progression and whether the mechanisms of progression are dependent or independent of subtype. We have generated mRNA, miRNA, and DNA copy-number profiles from a total of 59 in situ lesions and 85 invasive tumors in order to comprehensively identify those genes, signaling pathways, processes, and cell types that are involved in breast cancer progression. Our work provides evidence that there are molecular features associated with disease progression that are unique to the intrinsic subtypes. We additionally establish subtype-specific signatures that are able to identify a small proportion of pre-invasive tumors with expression profiles that resemble invasive carcinoma, indicating a higher likelihood of future disease progression. PMID:27396337

  18. Methylation status and overexpression of COX-2 in Tunisian patients with ductal invasive breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Karray-Chouayekh, Sondes; Trifa, Fatma; Khabir, Abdelmajid; Boujelbene, Noureddine; Sellami-Boudawara, Tahia; Daoud, Jamel; Frikha, Mounir; Gargouri, Ali; Mokdad-Gargouri, Raja

    2011-06-01

    Inflammation and hormonal signalling induce the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in solid tumours including breast cancer, which in turn affects cell proliferation, apoptosis and metastasis. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of COX-2 and its association with clinical parameters, patient's survival, hormones receptors (oestrogen, progesterone), ERBB2 and TP53 expression in 83 cases of infiltrating ductal breast carcinomas. Moreover, the methylation status at the CpG islands of the COX-2 gene promoter was also explored in 70 specimens. We showed that tumours exhibiting moderate to intense COX-2 immunostaining were significantly more frequent in patients over 45 years old (p = 0.027). Moreover, a high level of COX-2 expression correlated with a shorter survival time (p log-rank = 0.04) and was an independent prognostic factor (p = 0.022; HR 6.4; 95% CI = 1.3-31.4). On the other hand, hypermethylation of the COX-2 gene promoter was observed in 27% of cases and strongly associated with smaller tumours (<5 cm, p = 0.011). Furthermore, patients with methylated COX-2 pattern have a better 4-year disease-free survival (p = 0.022) as well as a prolonged overall survival (p log-rank test = 0.034). In conclusion, we showed that high COX-2 expression was associated with reduced survival and was an independent prognostic factor. However, hypermethylation of the COX-2 promoter correlated with a better overall survival in Tunisian patients with breast carcinoma. PMID:21153458

  19. Impact of the presence and quantity of ductal carcinoma in situ component on the outcome of invasive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cedolini, Carla; Bertozzi, Serena; Londero, Ambrogio P; Seriau, Luca; Andretta, Michela; Agakiza, Diane; Fongione, Sandro; Uzzau, Alessandro; Risaliti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The role of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) component on the outcome of invasive breast cancer is not yet completely clear. Our study aims to assess the impact of the presence and quantity of DCIS component on the outcome of patients operated for invasive breast cancer. Materials and methods: We collected retrospective data about patients operated at their breast for invasive cancer between 2007 and 2012, focusing on the presence of DCIS component. Then, we divided patients into four groups based on the quantity of DCIS component as follows: not found (group A), minimal (group B, <25%), extensive (group C, 25-75%), and prevalent (group D, >75%). We further defined “extensive intraductal component” (EIC) groups C and D together. Results: DCIS component was associated with young age, familial history of breast cancer and worse biological characteristics, including high grading, higher prevalence of Her2/Neu overexpression, hormone receptors negativity, comedo-like necrosis and multifocality/multicentricity. Despite the unfavorable prognostic factors, invasive cancers associated with EIC were frequently treated with radical surgery and resulted to have long disease-free survival and low local recurrence rate. In patients with DCIS component (groups B, C, and D) the extension of this component resulted indirectly correlated with local recurrence rate, tumor lymphovascular invasion, and lymphnode extracapsular invasion. The highest prevalence of local recurrences was found in group B, which tended to be less frequently treated with radical surgery than group D (P<0.05) and C (P=n.s.). Conclusions: Different clinical and tumor features among invasive breast cancer with and without DCIS component indicate that they are distinct entities probably originating by different pathways that deserve to be studied. Furthermore, the controversial results about the management of cancer with minimal intraductal component require further studies in order to reduce

  20. Invasive ductal carcinoma within borderline phyllodes tumor with lymph node metastases: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    WU, DI; ZHANG, HAIPENG; GUO, LIANG; YAN, XU; FAN, ZHIMIN

    2016-01-01

    Phyllodes tumor (PT) is a rare type of biphasic fibroepithelial neoplasm that may coexist with a breast tumor in rare cases. In the current study, a 52-year-old female presented with a left breast lump. Mammography and sonographic examination results suggested a diagnosis of malignant tumor. Histological analysis revealed a borderline PT with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) within the tumor. Due to the presence of a single micrometastasis in three of the sentinel lymph nodes, the patient underwent modified radical mastectomy. The excised tumor contained triple negative breast cancer; therefore, postoperative treatment included six cycles of chemotherapy and 25 cycles of radiotherapy. The patient exhibited no recurrence and no metastatic disease at the 23-month follow-up examination. Thus, the present study discussed the case of a female patient that presented with IDC within borderline PT and reviewed the literature on this rare type of neoplasm. Various types of breast carcinoma have been identified to coexist with PT in different masses; however, no standard therapeutic regimen has been established for the coexistence of PT and breast cancer in the same mass. The present study indicates that determination of an appropriate treatment strategy predominantly depends on the characteristics of the individual breast tumor. PMID:27073506

  1. An N-terminal splice variant of human Stat5a that interacts with different transcription factors is the dominant form expressed in invasive ductal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Dunyong; Chen, KuanHui E.; Deng, Changhui; Tang, Peizhi; Huang, Jianjun; Mansour, Trina; Luben, Richard A.; Walker, Ameae M.

    2014-01-01

    We have identified a new variant of human Stat5a, found at higher ratios to full-length Stat5a in invasive ductal carcinoma versus contiguous normal tissue. The variant, missing exon 5, inhibits p21 and Bax production and increases cell number. After prolactin stimulation, only full-length Stat5a interacts with the vitamin D and retinoid X receptors, whereas only Δ5 Stat5a interacts with activating protein 1–2 and specificity protein 1. Prolactin also oppositely regulates interaction of the two Stat5a forms with β-catenin. We propose that a change in splicing leading to upregulation of this new isoform is a pathogenic aspect of invasive ductal carcinoma. PMID:24384092

  2. Comparison of 18F-FDG PET/CT for Systemic Staging of Newly Diagnosed Invasive Lobular Carcinoma Versus Invasive Ductal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Molly P.; Goldman, Debra A.; Dashevsky, Brittany; Riedl, Christopher C.; Gönen, Mithat; Osborne, Joseph R.; Jochelson, Maxine; Hudis, Clifford; Morrow, Monica; Ulaner, Gary A.

    2016-01-01

    Although guidelines such as those of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network consider 18F-FDG PET/CT for systemic staging of newly diagnosed stage III breast cancer patients, factors in addition to stage may influence the utility of PET/CT. Because invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) is less conspicuous than invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) on 18F-FDG PET, we hypothesized that tumor histology may be one such factor. We evaluated PET/CT systemic staging of patients newly diagnosed with ILC compared with IDC. Methods In this Institutional Review Board–approved retrospective study, our Hospital Information System was screened for ILC patients who underwent PET/CT in 2006–2013 before systemic or radiation therapy. Initial stage was determined from examination, mammography, ultrasound, MR, or surgery. PET/CT was performed to identify unsuspected distant metastases. A sequential cohort of stage III IDC patients was evaluated for comparison. Upstaging rates were compared using the Pearson χ2 test. Results The study criteria were fulfilled by 146 ILC patients. PET/CT revealed unsuspected distant metastases in 12 (8%): 0 of 8 with initial stage I, 2 of 50 (4%) stage II, and 10 of 88 (11%) stage III. Upstaging to IV by PET/CT was confirmed by biopsy in all cases. Three of 12 upstaged patients were upstaged only by the CT component of the PET/CT, as the metastases were not 18F-FDG–avid. In the comparison stage III IDC cohort, 22% (20/89) of patients were upstaged to IV by PET/CT. All 20 demonstrated 18F-FDG–avid metastases. The relative risk of PET/CT revealing unsuspected distant metastases in stage III IDC patients was 1.98 times (95% confidence interval, 0.98–3.98) that of stage III ILC patients (P = 0.049). For 18F-FDG–avid metastases, the relative risk of PET/CT revealing unsuspected 18F-FDG–avid distant metastases in stage III IDC patients was 2.82 times (95% confidence interval, 1.26–6.34) that of stage III ILC patients (P = 0.007). Conclusion 18F

  3. A Pilot Study of Ultrasound-Guided Cryoablation of Invasive Ductal Carcinomas up to 15 mm With MRI Follow-Up and Subsequent Surgical Resection

    PubMed Central

    Poplack, Steven P.; Levine, Gary M.; Henry, Lisa; Wells, Wendy A.; Heinemann, F. Scott; Hanna, Cheryl M.; Deneen, Daniel R.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Barth, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of ultrasound-guided cryoablation in treating small invasive ductal carcinoma and to assess the role of contrast-enhanced (CE) MRI in determining the outcome of cryoablation. SUBJECTS AND METHODS Twenty consecutive participants with invasive ductal carcinomas up to 15 mm, with limited or no ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), underwent ultrasound-guided cryoablation. Preablation mammography, ultrasound, and CE-MRI were performed to assess eligibility. Clinical status was evaluated at 1 day, 7–10 days, and 2 weeks after ablation. CE-MRI was performed 25–40 days after ablation, followed by surgical resection within 5 days. RESULTS Ultrasound-guided cryoablation was uniformly technically successful, and postablation clinical status was good to excellent in all participants. Cryoablation was not clinically successful in 15% (three of 20 patients). Three participants had residual cancer at the periphery of the cryoablation site. Two participants had viable nonmalignant tissue within the central zone of cryoablation-induced necrosis. Postablation CE-MRI had a sensitivity of 0% (0/3) and specificity of 88% (15/17). The predictive value of negative findings on CE-MRI was 83% (15/18). Correlations between cancer characteristics, cryoablation procedural variables, postablation CE-MRI findings, and surgical specimen features were not statistically significant. There were also no significant differences in participants with or without residual cancer. CONCLUSION In our pilot experience, ultrasound-guided cryoablation of invasive ductal carcinomas up to 15 mm has a clinical failure rate of 15% but is technically feasible and well tolerated by patients. The majority of cryoablation failures are manifest as DCIS outside the cryoablation field. Postablation CE-MRI does not reliably predict cryoablation outcome. PMID:25905948

  4. Frequent methylation of the KLOTHO gene and overexpression of the FGFR4 receptor in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Dallol, Ashraf; Buhmeida, Abdelbaset; Merdad, Adnan; Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah; Gari, Mamdooh A; Abu-Elmagd, Muhammad M; Elaimi, Aisha; Assidi, Mourad; Chaudhary, Adeel G; Abuzenadah, Adel M; Nedjadi, Taoufik; Ermiah, Eramah; Alkhayyat, Shadi S; Al-Qahtani, Mohammed H

    2015-12-01

    Invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast is the most common cancer affecting women worldwide. The marked heterogeneity of breast cancer is matched only with the heterogeneity in its associated or causative factors. Breast cancer in Saudi Arabia is apparently an early onset with many of the affected females diagnosed before they reach the age of 50 years. One possible rationale underlying this observation is that consanguinity, which is widely spread in the Saudi community, is causing the accumulation of yet undetermined cancer susceptibility mutations. Another factor could be the accumulation of epigenetic aberrations caused by the shift toward a Western-like lifestyle in the past two decades. In order to shed some light into the molecular mechanisms underlying breast cancer in the Saudi community, we identified KLOTHO (KL) as a tumor-specific methylated gene using genome-wide methylation analysis of primary breast tumors utilizing the MBD-seq approach. KL methylation was frequent as it was detected in 55.3 % of breast cancer cases from Saudi Arabia (n = 179) using MethyLight assay. Furthermore, KL is downregulated in breast tumors with its expression induced following treatment with 5-azacytidine. The involvement of KL in breast cancer led us to investigate its relationship in the context of breast cancer, with one of the protagonists of its function, fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4). Overexpression of FGFR4 in breast cancer is frequent in our cohort and this overexpression is associated with poor overall survival. Interestingly, FGFR4 expression is higher in the absence of KL methylation and lower when KL is methylated and presumably silenced, which is suggestive of an intricate relationship between the two factors. In conclusion, our findings further implicate "metabolic" genes or pathways in breast cancer that are disrupted by epigenetic mechanisms and could provide new avenues for understanding this disease in a new context. PMID:26152288

  5. Predictors for local invasive recurrence of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xining; Dai, Hongji; Liu, Ben; Song, Fengju

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of mammographic screening has considerably increased the detection rate of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), which has a high probability of recurrence. We carried out a meta-analysis to evaluate the predictive factors including biomarkers, tumor characteristics, and modes of detection on the risk of local invasive recurrence (LIR) following DCIS. Searches were performed in PubMed and EMBASE up to 8 July 2014. Risk estimates (hazard ratios, odds ratios, and relative risks) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were extracted to calculate the strength of the associations between predictive factors and the risk of LIR after treatment of DCIS. STATA 12.0 was used to combine results in this meta-analysis. A total of 18 articles were included in the analysis. Pooled risk estimates and 95% CIs were 1.36 (1.04–1.69) for the positive margin, 1.38 (1.12–1.63) for the nonscreening detection method, 1.04 (0.84–1.24) for high nuclear grade 1, 1.32 (0.98–1.66) for intermediate nuclear grade 2, 1.18 (0.98–1.37) for comedonecrosis, 1.00 (0.92–1.08) for large tumor size, 1.34 (0.82–1.87) for multifocality, 0.74 (0.36–1.12) for estrogen receptor-positive tumors, 0.89 (0.47–1.31) for progesterone receptor-positive tumors, and 1.25 (0.7–1.81) for HER2/neu-positive tumors. Positive margin and non-screening-detected cancers were associated with a higher risk of LIR following DCIS. These predictive factors, after further validation, could be considered to tailor treatment for individual patients. PMID:25714649

  6. Proteomic analysis of O-GlcNAcylated proteins in invasive ductal breast carcinomas with and without lymph node metastasis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Kuan; Gao, Yang; Hou, Weiwei; Tian, Fang; Ying, Wantao; Li, Ling; Bai, Bingyang; Hou, Gang; Wang, Peng George; Zhang, Lianwen

    2016-02-01

    The potential role of protein O-GlcNAcylation in cancer has been studied extensively, and the spread of cancer cells to regional lymph nodes is the first step in the dissemination of breast cancer. However, the correlation between O-GlcNAcylation and lymphatic metastasis in breast cancer remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrated that the overall O-GlcNAcylation as well as O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) tends to decrease in response to the augmentation of lymph node metastasis (LNM) in invasive ductal breast carcinomas (IDCs). Although accumulating evidence indicates that individual O-GlcNAcylation may be important in the pathogenesis of breast cancer, O-GlcNAcylated proteins in IDCs are still largely unexplored. Herein, O-GlcNAcylated proteins of IDCs were chemo-enzymatically enriched and identified via liquid chromatography combined with tandem mass spectrometry. In total, 155 O-GlcNAcylated proteins were determined, of which 41 were only observed in LNM tissues, while 40 were unique in non-LNM samples. Gene ontology analysis showed that O-GlcNAc is primarily a nucleocytoplasmic post-translational modification, and most enriched functional terms were related to cancer development in both metastatic and non-metastatic IDCs. Moreover, several O-GlcNAcylated proteins involved in glycolysis and its accessory pathway were identified from LNM and non-LNM groups, respectively. These results indicate that the O-GlcNAcylation statuses of individual proteins were independent of the overall O-GlcNAcylation levels of metastatic and non-metastatic IDCs. Aberrant O-GlcNAc modification of these proteins might be associated with LNM progression. PMID:26374642

  7. Paired Ductal Carcinoma In Situ and Invasive Breast Cancer Lesions in the D-Loop of the Mitochondrial Genome Indicate a Cancerization Field Effect

    PubMed Central

    Maggrah, Andrea; Robinson, Kerry; Creed, Jennifer; Wittock, Roy; Gehman, Ken; Gehman, Teresa; Brown, Helen; Harbottle, Andrew; Froberg, M. Kent; Klein, Daniel; Reguly, Brian; Parr, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in the mitochondrial genome have been chronicled in most solid tumors, including breast cancer. The intent of this paper is to compare and document somatic mitochondrial D-loop mutations in paired samples of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive breast cancer (IBC) indicating a potential breast ductal epithelial cancerization field effect. Paired samples of these histopathologies were laser-captured microdissected (LCM) from biopsy, lumpectomy, and mastectomy tissues. Blood samples were collected as germplasm control references. For each patient, hypervariable region 1 (HV1) in the D-loop portion of the mitochondrial genome (mtGenome) was sequenced for all 3 clinical samples. Specific parallel somatic heteroplasmic alterations between these histopathologies, particularly at sites 16189, 16223, 16224, 16270, and 16291, suggest the presence of an epithelial, mitochondrial cancerization field effect. These results indicate that further characterization of the mutational pathway of DCIS and IBC may help establish the invasive potential of DCIS. Moreover, this paper indicates that biofluids with low cellularity, such as nipple aspirate fluid and/or ductal lavage, warrant further investigation as early and minimally invasive detection mediums of a cancerization field effect within breast tissue. PMID:23509716

  8. Paired ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive breast cancer lesions in the D-loop of the mitochondrial genome indicate a cancerization field effect.

    PubMed

    Maggrah, Andrea; Robinson, Kerry; Creed, Jennifer; Wittock, Roy; Gehman, Ken; Gehman, Teresa; Brown, Helen; Harbottle, Andrew; Froberg, M Kent; Klein, Daniel; Reguly, Brian; Parr, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in the mitochondrial genome have been chronicled in most solid tumors, including breast cancer. The intent of this paper is to compare and document somatic mitochondrial D-loop mutations in paired samples of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive breast cancer (IBC) indicating a potential breast ductal epithelial cancerization field effect. Paired samples of these histopathologies were laser-captured microdissected (LCM) from biopsy, lumpectomy, and mastectomy tissues. Blood samples were collected as germplasm control references. For each patient, hypervariable region 1 (HV1) in the D-loop portion of the mitochondrial genome (mtGenome) was sequenced for all 3 clinical samples. Specific parallel somatic heteroplasmic alterations between these histopathologies, particularly at sites 16189, 16223, 16224, 16270, and 16291, suggest the presence of an epithelial, mitochondrial cancerization field effect. These results indicate that further characterization of the mutational pathway of DCIS and IBC may help establish the invasive potential of DCIS. Moreover, this paper indicates that biofluids with low cellularity, such as nipple aspirate fluid and/or ductal lavage, warrant further investigation as early and minimally invasive detection mediums of a cancerization field effect within breast tissue. PMID:23509716

  9. Difference in characteristics and outcomes between medullary breast carcinoma and invasive ductal carcinoma: a population based study from SEER 18 database

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun-Jing; Song, Chuan-Gui; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Medullary breast carcinoma (MBC) is a unique histological subtype of breast cancer. Our study was designed to identify difference in characteristics and outcomes between MBC and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), and further confirm the prognostic factors of MBC. Utilizing Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER), we identified 84,764 eligible patients, including 309 MBC and 84,455 IDC. Compared with the IDC group, the MBC group was associated with younger age at diagnosis, higher grade, more advanced stage, larger tumor size, and higher proportion of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Kaplan-Meier analysis and univariate Cox proportional hazard regression model showed that patients with IDC had significantly better breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) compared to MBC, but they had similar overall survival (OS). However, MBC histology was no longer a surrogate for worse BCSS or OS after 1:1 matching by age, American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, grade and breast subtype. In addition, it was exposed that not married status, high grade, large tumor size, positive nodal status, the subtype of TNBC and no receipt of radiation therapy were significantly associated with poor BCSS and OS. In conclusion, MBC demonstrated more aggressive behavior but similar outcomes compared to IDC, which may be determined by prognostic factors such as breast subtype. These results not only confer deeper insight into MBC but contribute to individualized and tailored therapy, and thereby may improve clinical management and outcomes. PMID:27009810

  10. High Expression of Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Is Associated with Lymph Node Metastasis of Invasive Ductal Carcinoma of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Do, Sung-Im; Hyun, Keehoon; Park, Yong Lai; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Chae, Seoung Wan; Sohn, Jin Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the present study, we evaluated the levels of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) by performing immunohistochemical staining to determine whether they were reliable prognostic markers in patients with breast cancer. Methods Demographic and clinicopathological parameters of 214 patients with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and 80 patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) who were diagnosed and treated from 2006 to 2010 were analyzed. Tissue microarray was constructed and immunohistochemical staining was performed for each specimen. Results Univariate analyses showed that age at diagnosis, history of hormone replacement therapy, radiation therapy, skin and chest wall invasion, Paget disease, lymphovascular invasion, estrogen receptor positivity, and triple-negative subtype were significantly associated with patient prognosis (p<0.005). Patients with DCIS showed higher PAI-1 expression than patients with IDC (82.5% and 36.2%, respectively; p=0.012). Lymph node metastasis was more frequent in patients with high uPA levels than in patients with low uPA levels (p=0.001). Conclusion Our results suggested that PAI-1 was involved in tumor progression in the early stages of breast cancer, such as DCIS. In addition, our results suggested that high uPA levels were associated with the lymph node metastasis of IDC. PMID:27382391

  11. Differential copy number aberrations in novel candidate genes associated with progression from in situ to invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shaoxi; Desouki, Mohamed M; Gaile, Daniel P; Shepherd, Lori; Nowak, Norma J; Conroy, Jeffrey; Barry, William T; Geradts, Joseph

    2012-12-01

    Only a minority of intraductal carcinomas of the breast give rise to stromally invasive disease. We microdissected 206 paraffin blocks representing 116 different cases of low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Fifty-five were pure DCIS (PD) cases without progression to invasive carcinoma. Sixty-one cases had a small invasive component. DNA was extracted from microdissected sections and hybridized to high-density bacterial artificial chromosome arrays. Array comparative genomic hybridization analysis of 118 hybridized DNA samples yielded data on 69 samples that were suitable for further statistical analysis. This cohort included 20 pure DCIS cases, 25 mixed DCIS (MD), and 24 mixed invasive carcinoma samples. PD cases had a higher frequency of DNA copy number changes than MD cases, and the latter had similar DNA profiles compared to paired invasive carcinomas. Copy number changes on 13 chromosomal arms occurred at different rates in PD versus MD lesions. Eight of 19 candidate genes residing at those loci were confirmed to have differential copy number changes by quantitative PCR. NCOR2/SMRT and NR4A1 (both on 12q), DYNLRB2 (16q), CELSR1, UPK3A, and ST13 (all on 22q) were more frequently amplified in PD. Moreover, NCOR2, NR4A1, and DYNLRB2 showed more frequent copy number losses in MD. GRAP2 (22q) was more often amplified in MD, whereas TAF1C (16q) was more commonly deleted in PD. A multigene model comprising these candidate genes discriminated between PD and MD lesions with high accuracy. These findings suggest that the propensity to invade the stroma may be encoded in the genome of intraductal carcinomas. PMID:22887771

  12. Optical diagnosis of mammary ductal carcinoma using advanced optical technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Lian, Yuane; Nie, Yuting; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Jianxin

    2015-02-01

    Clinical imaging techniques for diagnosing breast cancer mainly include X-ray mammography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which have respective drawbacks. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has become a potentially attractive optical technique to bridge the current gap in clinical utility. In this paper, MPM was used to image normal and ductal cancerous breast tissues, based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG). Our results showed that MPM has the ability to exhibit the microstructure of normal breast tissue, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) lesions at the molecular level comparable to histopathology. These findings indicate that, with integration of MPM into currently accepted clinical imaging system, it has the potential to make a real-time histological diagnosis of mammary ductal carcinoma in vivo.

  13. Intracystic papillary carcinoma associated with ductal carcinoma in situ in a male breast: a case report

    PubMed Central

    El M’rabet, Fatema Zahra; Akesbi, Yusra; Benbrahim, Zineb; El Hind, fatemi; Znati, Kawtar; Benlemlih, Amal; Tbaili, Naima; Maaroufi, Mustapha; Tizniti, Siham; Amarti, Afaf; El Mesbahi, Omar

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Intracystic papillary carcinoma represents a small distinctive subgroup of noninvasive breast cancer, accounts for <0.5% of breast malignancies and is extremely rare in men, it was originally reported as a localized non-invasive carcinoma, but is usually associated with ductal carcinoma in situ around the main tumor or invasive carcinoma. Case presentation We report a case of 50-year-old man with intracystic papillary carcinoma in man with ductal carcinoma in situ who underwent a tumorectomy following by a radical Patey intervention (Halsted). Conclusion Nowadays, there is still no clear consensus regarding optimal treatment of intracystic papillary carcinoma. Most papers reinforce the importance of an adequate surgical margin in conservative treatment. Surgeons must pay much attention to the potential for ductal carcinoma in situ around the tumor when selecting the operative procedure. PMID:19829939

  14. Synchronous invasive ductal carcinoma and intravascular large B-cell lymphoma of the breast: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Primary breast lymphomas (PBLs) represent less than 1% of all breast malignancies. Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (ILBCL) is a rare, aggressive form of extranodal lymphoma. Breast involvement has only been described in the literature once previously. ILBCL is characterized by the proliferation of tumour cells within the lumen of small vessels of involved organs, resulting in their eventual occlusion. Clinical features are often vague, diagnosis is difficult and delayed, and prognosis is usually poor. We report the first ever case of synchronous ILBCL and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast in a patient presenting with pyrexia of unknown origin and altered mental status who underwent modified radical mastectomy and subsequent chemotherapy, and review the literature regarding intravascular large B-cell lymphoma, PBLs and synchronous carcinomas and lymphomas of the breast. PMID:24708809

  15. Clinical-Pathologic Features and Long-Term Outcomes of Tubular Carcinoma of the Breast Compared With Invasive Ductal Carcinoma Treated With Breast Conservation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Gene-Fu F.; Yang Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G.; Moran, Meena S.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate our institutional experience of treating tubular carcinoma of the breast (TC) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) with conservative surgery and radiation therapy, to compare clinical-pathologic features and long-term outcomes. Methods and Materials: A review of our institution's tumor registry from 1975 to 2007, followed by a central pathology review of available slides, yielded 71 cases of Stage I/II TC and 2,238 cases of Stage I/II IDC treated with breast conservation therapy. Clinical-pathologic features and outcomes were analyzed by subtype to detect significant differences. Results: The median follow-up was 7 years. The TC cohort presented more frequently with pT1 disease (97% vs. 80%, p = 0.0007), pN0 disease (95% vs. 74%, p = 0.0004), hormone-receptor positivity (ER+, 89% vs. 62%, p = 0.0001; PR+, 81% vs. 52%, p = 0.0001), and HER-2 negativity (89% vs. 71%, p = 0.04). Clinical outcomes also favored the TC cohort, with lower rates of breast cancer-related death (1% vs. 10%; p = 0.0109) and distant metastasis (1% vs. 13%; p = 0.0028) and higher rates of 10-year overall (90% vs. 80%; p = 0.033), cause-specific (99% vs. 86%; p = 0.011), and disease-free (99% vs. 82%; p = 0.003) survival. There was a nonsignificant trend toward improved breast cancer relapse-free survival for the TC cohort (95% vs. 87%; p = 0.062) but no difference in nodal relapse-free survival or contralateral breast cancer relapse-free survival (all p values >0.05) between the cohorts. Conclusion: Our institutional experience suggests that TC, when compared with IDC, is associated with more favorable clinical-pathologic features and comparable, if not superior, outcomes after breast conservation therapy, suggesting the appropriateness of a conservative approach to this rare subtype.

  16. Correlations in survivin expression with the expression of p53 and bcl-2 in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Al-Joudi, F S; Iskandar, Z A; Imran, A K

    2007-09-01

    This work studied the correlations between survivin, bcl-2 and p53 in infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast. A total number of 382 cases were collected from 3 hospitals in northeastern Malaysia. Survivin, bcl-2 and p53 were detected by immunohistochemistry on samples prepared from tissue blocks. Significant correlations were found between tumor histological grades and tumor size and lymph node involvement. Highly significant statistical correlations (p<0.001) were found in expression of the markers under study. It is concluded that such significant correlations may imply that the alterations in the expression take place in a concerted fashion, implying that many of these cases may share common abnormalities. PMID:18041310

  17. Effectiveness of Breast MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT for the Preoperative Staging of Invasive Lobular Carcinoma versus Ductal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Na Young; Kim, Sung Hun; Seo, Ye Young; Oh, Jin Kyoung; Choi, Hyun Su; You, Won Jong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) for the preoperative staging of invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) of the breast and compared the results with those of invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). Methods The study included pathologically proven 32 ILCs and 73 IDCs. We compared clinical and histopathological characteristics and the diagnostic performances of MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT for the primary mass, additional ipsilateral and/or contralateral lesion(s), and axillary lymph node metastasis between the ILC and IDC groups. Results Primary ILCs were greater in size, but demonstrated lower maximum standardized uptake values than IDCs. All primary masses were detected on MRI. The detection rate for ILCs (75.0%) was lower than that for IDCs (83.6%) on 18F-FDG PET/CT, but the difference was not significant. For additional ipsilateral lesion(s), the sensitivities and specificities of MRI were 87.5% and 58.3% for ILC and 100.0% and 66.7% for IDC, respectively; whereas the sensitivities and specificities of 18F-FDG PET/CT were 0% and 91.7% for ILC and 37.5% and 94.7% for IDC, respectively. The sensitivity of 18F-FDG PET/CT for ipsilateral lesion(s) was significantly lower in the ILC group than the IDC group. The sensitivity for ipsilateral lesion(s) was significantly higher with MRI; however, specificity was higher with 18F-FDG PET/CT in both tumor groups. There was no significant difference in the diagnostic performance for additional contralateral lesion(s) or axillary lymph node metastasis on MRI or 18F-FDG PET/CT for ILC versus IDC. Conclusion The MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT detection rates for the primary cancer do not differ between the ILC and IDC groups. Although 18F-FDG PET/CT demonstrates lower sensitivity for primary and additional ipsilateral lesions, it shows higher specificity for additional ipsilateral lesions, and could play a complementary role in

  18. Notch1 single nucleotide polymorphism rs3124591 is associated with the risk of development of invasive ductal breast carcinoma in a Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yu-Wen; Wan, Guo-Xing; Zhao, Chun-Xia; Hu, Jian-Ming; Li, Li; Liang, Wei-Hua; Li, Wen-Qin; Li, Yu-Cong; Li, Yi-Xiao; Du, Xiao-Ming; Yu, Shi-Ying; Li, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Accumulated evidence has revealed the presence of Notch receptor polymorphisms in non-tumorous diseases; however, few studies have investigated the association of Notch polymorphisms with breast cancer risk. A total of 100 invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and 50 ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) patients and 100 usual ductal hyperplasia (UDH) controls were genotyped for the following Notch receptor single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry: Notch1, rs3124591; Notch2, rs11249433; Notch3, rs3815188, and rs1043994; and Notch4, rs367398, and rs520692. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine the effect of Notch polymorphisms on corresponding Notch protein expression in successfully genotyped patients. The frequency of rs3124591 TC genotype was significantly higher in IDC (24.7%, 20/81) and DCIS (30%, 12/40) patients than in UDH controls (8%, 8/97) (P = 0.002 and P = 0.011, respectively). However, the distribution of other SNP genotypes was not significantly different between IDC and DCIS patients and UDH controls. The frequency of TC genotype was significantly higher in poorly differentiated tumors than in well-differentiated and moderately differentiated tumors (P = 0.022). Importantly, a positive correlation between the rs3124591 TC genotype and high Notch1 protein expression was observed in DCIS patients (P = 0.043) but not in IDC patients. This is the first study to suggest an increased risk of IDC and DCIS of the breast for the Notch1 rs3124591 variant. Furthermore, given the inconsistent associations between the rs3124591 variant and Notch1 expression in IDC and DCIS, this variant may affect breast cancer risk through mechanisms in the latter stage other than alterations in Notch1 protein expression. PMID:25120811

  19. Trends in Detection of Invasive Cancer and Ductal Carcinoma In Situ at Biennial Screening Mammography in Spain: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Román, Marta; Rué, Montse; Sala, Maria; Ascunce, Nieves; Baré, Marisa; Baroja, Araceli; De la Vega, Mariola; Galcerán, Jaume; Natal, Carmen; Salas, Dolores; Sánchez-Jacob, Mercedes; Zubizarreta, Raquel; Castells, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Background Breast cancer incidence has decreased in the last decade, while the incidence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) has increased substantially in the western world. The phenomenon has been attributed to the widespread adaption of screening mammography. The aim of the study was to evaluate the temporal trends in the rates of screen detected invasive cancers and DCIS, and to compare the observed trends with respect to hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use along the same study period. Methods Retrospective cohort study of 1,564,080 women aged 45–69 years who underwent 4,705,681 screening mammograms from 1992 to 2006. Age-adjusted rates of screen detected invasive cancer, DCIS, and HRT use were calculated for first and subsequent screenings. Poisson regression was used to evaluate the existence of a change-point in trend, and to estimate the adjusted trends in screen detected invasive breast cancer and DCIS over the study period. Results The rates of screen detected invasive cancer per 100.000 screened women were 394.0 at first screening, and 229.9 at subsequent screen. The rates of screen detected DCIS per 100.000 screened women were 66.8 at first screen and 43.9 at subsequent screens. No evidence of a change point in trend in the rates of DCIS and invasive cancers over the study period were found. Screen detected DCIS increased at a steady 2.5% per year (95% CI: 1.3; 3.8), while invasive cancers were stable. Conclusion Despite the observed decrease in breast cancer incidence in the population, the rates of screen detected invasive cancer remained stable during the study period. The proportion of DCIS among screen detected breast malignancies increased from 13% to 17% throughout the study period. The rates of screen detected invasive cancer and DCIS were independent of the decreasing trend in HRT use observed among screened women after 2002. PMID:24376649

  20. Genomic and mutational profiling of ductal carcinomas in situ and matched adjacent invasive breast cancers reveals intra-tumour genetic heterogeneity and clonal selection

    PubMed Central

    Lambros, Maryou B; Campion-Flora, Adriana; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Gauthier, Arnaud; Cabral, Cecilia; Pawar, Vidya; Mackay, Alan; A’Hern, Roger; Marchiò, Caterina; Palacios, Jose; Natrajan, Rachael; Weigelt, Britta; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the progression from ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast are yet to be fully elucidated. Several hypotheses have been put forward to explain the progression from DCIS to IDC, including the selection of a subpopulation of cancer cells with specific genetic aberrations, the acquisition of new genetic aberrations or non-genetic mechanisms mediated by the tumour microenvironment. To determine whether synchronously diagnosed ipsilateral DCIS and IDCs have modal populations with distinct repertoires of gene copy number aberrations and mutations in common oncogenes, matched frozen samples of DCIS and IDCs were retrieved from 13 patients and subjected to microarray-based comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH), and Sequenom MassARRAY (Oncocarta v1.0 panel). Fluorescence in situ hybridisation and Sanger sequencing were employed to validate the aCGH and Sequenom findings, respectively. Although the genomic profiles of matched DCIS and IDCs were similar, in three of 13 matched pairs amplification of distinct loci (i.e. 1q41, 2q24.2, 6q22.31, 7q11.21, 8q21.2 and 9p13.3) was either restricted to, or more prevalent in, the modal population of cancer cells of one of the components. Sequenom MassARRAY identified PIK3CA mutations restricted to the DCIS component in two cases, and in a third case, the frequency of the PIK3CA mutant allele reduced from 49% in the DCIS to 25% in the IDC component. Despite the genomic similarities between synchronous DCIS and IDC, our data provide strong circumstantial evidence to suggest that in some cases the progression from DCIS to IDC is driven by the selection of non-modal clones that harbour a specific repertoire of genetic aberrations. PMID:22252965

  1. Features of CD44+/CD24-low phenotypic cell distribution in relation to predictive markers and molecular subtypes of invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Gudadze, M; Kankava, Q; Mariamidze, A; Burkadze, G

    2014-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most widespread pathology among women. Despite the current progresses in research and treatment of metastatic breast cancer, mortality caused by this disease is still high, because above mentioned therapy is limited due to existence of cells resistant to therapy . Cancer stem cells are the only cells with ability of unlimited proliferative activity and cancerous potential, thus, they participate in the growth, progression and dissemination of cancer. Cancer stem cells are resistant to various forms of therapy, including chemotherapy and radiotherapy . Results of examination showed that 50% of all cases are positive on so called markers of stem cells, thus 45% of cases are negative. CD44+/CD24-low cases (cases that reveal stem cell-phenotype) in the group of invasive ductal carcinoma of Luminal A molecular subtype are almost as many as CD44+/CD24+ and CD44-/CD24+ phenotype cancers. In this group non-stem phenotype cases are 65%, so 5 times more than stem cell phenotype cancers. 1324 postoperative breast materials studied through 2008-2012 at the laboratory of "Pathgeo-Union of Pathologists" LTD and Academician N. Kipshidze Central University Clinic were used as test materials and specimens from 393 patients with invasive ductal carcinoma were selected. CD44/CD24 markers' expression in phenotypically different cancers and clinic-pathologic parameters as well as various biological features was conducted by the Pearson's correlation analysis and using X2 test. Statistical analysis of obtained numeral data was held using SPSS V.19.0 program. Confidence interval of 95% was considered statistically significant. Stem cell phenotype positive cases are with the highest percentage represented in Luminal B and basal-like molecular subgroup that to our minds is associated with their aggressive behavior and resistance to chemotherapy. Relatively good prognosis and response to chemotherapy of Luminal A molecular subtype cancers are to be stipulated by lower

  2. Diagnostic pitfall in a case of ductal carcinoma-in situ with microinvasion.

    PubMed

    Momin, Yasmin A; Kulkarni, Medha P; Deshmukh, Bhakti D; Sulhyan, Kalpana R

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of microinvasive carcinoma of the breast cytologically diagnosed as ductal carcinoma - in situ in an 80-year-old lady with a breast lump. Extensive sampling of mastectomy specimen showed ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Many ducts showed stromal reaction - periductal sclerosis and lymphocytic infiltration-features suggestive of microinvasion. However, no definite invasion was noted histologically. Immunohistochemical study highlighted the microinvasive foci. PMID:27279686

  3. Immunohistochemical detection and clinicopathological significance of JARID1B/KDM5B and P16 expression in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Zhao, L H; Liu, H G

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the expression of the H3K4 demethylase, jumonji AT-rich interactive domain 1B (JARID1B/KDM5B) and of p16 (multiple tumor suppressor gene MTS1) in breast cancer tissue and determine its clinicopathological significance. JARID1B/KDM5B and P16 protein expression in 176 resected breast cancer specimens and adjacent normal breast tissue was detected by the streptavidin-peroxidase (S-P) immunohistochemical method. The TNM staging grade was assigned according to the World Health Organization (2012) breast classification system. The positive staining rate of JARID1B/KDM5B and p16 protein in cancer tissue was 74.43 and 35.8%, respectively. JARID1B/KDM5B protein expression was positively associated with T grade, Bloom and Richardson (B&R) score and axillary lymph node metastasis (P < 0.05). p16 protein expression was negatively associated with T grade, B&R score, and axillary lymph node metastasis (P < 0.05). JARID1B/KDM5B and p16 protein expression in breast cancer and adjacent normal breast tissue were negatively correlated (r = -0.303, P < 0.001). The data demonstrated that protein expression of p16 and JARID1B/KDM5B is negatively correlated in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. PMID:26125737

  4. Three-Dimensional Assessment of Automated Breast Volume Scanner Compared with Handheld Ultrasound in Pre-Operative Breast Invasive Ductal Carcinomas: A Pilot Study of 51 Cases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chaoli; Wei, Shuping; Xie, Yingdong; Guan, Xiaoxiang; Yang, Bin

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the work described here was to compare the accuracy of conventional handheld ultrasound (HHUS) with that of an automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) in 3-D assessment of pre-operative invasive ductal carcinomas. HHUS and ABVS were used in 51 patients to obtain the largest tumor diameter, tumor volume and tumor surface area. The volumetric measurement was also obtained from ABVS data with medical software. With tumor size and volume on pathology as the gold standard, Bland-Altman analysis was used to compare variability. Correlation coefficients and receiver operating characteristic curves were established for all measurements for T2 classification. The correlation coefficients of all ABVS measurements were stronger than those of HHUS measurements, with the ABVS volumetric measurement significantly different with a higher accuracy of 88.24% (45/51) and predicting T-classification with higher area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (0.936). Therefore, 3-D measurements provide stronger correlations with pathology in tumor size measurement. However, more clinical trials are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:27339762

  5. Ki67/SATB1 ratio is an independent prognostic factor of overall survival in patients with early hormone receptor-positive invasive ductal breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Laurinavicius, Arvydas; Green, Andrew R.; Laurinaviciene, Aida; Smailyte, Giedre; Ostapenko, Valerijus; Meskauskas, Raimundas; Ellis, Ian O.

    2015-01-01

    Biological diversity of breast cancer presents challenges for personalized therapy and necessitates multiparametric approaches to understand and manage the disease. Multiple protein biomarkers tested by immunohistochemistry (IHC), followed by digital image analysis and multivariate statistics of the data, have been shown to be effective in exploring latent profiles of tumor tissue immunophenotype. In this study, based on tissue microarrays of 107 patients with hormone receptor (HR) positive invasive ductal breast carcinoma, we investigated the prognostic value of the integrated immunophenotype to predict overall survival (OS) of the patients. A set of 10 IHC markers (ER, PR, HER2, Ki67, AR, BCL2, HIF-1α, SATB1, p53, and p16) was used. The main factor of the variance was characterized by opposite loadings of ER/PR/AR/BCL2 and Ki67/HIF-1α; it was associated with histological grade but did not predict OS. The second factor was driven by SATB1 expression along with moderate positive HIF-1α and weak negative Ki67 loadings. Importantly, this factor did not correlate with any clinicopathologic parameters, but was an independent predictor of better OS. Ki67 and SATB1 did not reach statistical significance as single predictors; however, high Ki67/SATB1 ratio was an independent predictor of worse OS. In addition, our data indicate potential double prognostic meaning of HIF-1α expression in breast cancer and necessitate focused studies, taking into account the immunophenotype interactions and tissue heterogeneity aspects. PMID:26512778

  6. Cystosarcoma phylloides with lobular and ductal carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, P J; Ostergaard, J

    1987-09-01

    Malignant change of the epithelium in cystosarcoma phylloides is a rare occurrence, the most frequent occurrence being infiltrating carcinoma of various types and lobular carcinoma in situ, while ductal carcinoma in situ is much more rare. We describe a case of lobular and ductal carcinoma in situ in the same case of cystosarcoma phylloides. PMID:2820345

  7. Regression of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ After Treatment with Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This report describes a case of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) that regressed after treatment with acupuncture, Chinese herbs, and other complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The natural history of DCIS remains to be elucidated, and it is unclear whether all DCIS cases progress to invasive breast cancer. Surgery plus radiation therapy or mastectomy is recommended for women in whom this potentially nonprogressive cancer is detected. This case supports the developing trend toward active surveillance in lieu of breast-disfiguring surgery and offers evidence that CAM therapies may be of value in preventing progression of DCIS to invasive breast cancer. PMID:23536964

  8. Conservation therapy for breast cancers other than infiltrating ductal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, J M; Jacquemier, J; Torhorst, J; Spitalier, J M; Amalric, R; Hünig, R; Walther, E; Harder, F; Almendral, A; Brandone, H

    1989-04-15

    Pathologic review of 861 Stage I and II breast cancers yielded 152 patients (18%) with histologic types other than invasive ductal carcinoma. All patients had been treated by breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy, including supplemental radiation to the tumor bed. For 67 patients with predominantly lobular carcinomas, the actuarial overall 5-year survival was 100% and 77% for node-negative and node-positive patients, respectively. The actuarial probability of recurrence in the treated breast (13.5% at 5 years) appeared to be somewhat greater than that observed after treatment of invasive ductal cancers (8.8% at 5 years, P = 0.11). Of 12 mammary recurrences in patients with lobular carcinoma, four occurred at a considerable distance from the original primary and seven were multifocal, involving more than one quadrant in five patients. Of 47 patients with strictly in situ carcinomas, one patient whose axillary nodal status had not been determined subsequently developed distant metastases. Three additional patients developed mammary recurrence, two at the primary tumor site and one in another quadrant. The actuarial 5-year mammary recurrence and overall survival rates were 4% and 98%, respectively. For 27 patients with true medullary cancers, overall survival at 5 years was 90%. One localized mammary recurrence was observed at the site of the original primary. Actuarial mammary recurrence rate was 4% at 5 years. No relapse was observed in ten patients with colloid and one patient with adenoid cystic carcinoma. The authors conclude that, in addition to its well-established efficacy in the treatment of infiltrating ductal carcinomas, the combination of tumor excision and radiotherapy appears to provide adequate local control for other histologic types as well. However, patients with lobular cancer appear to be at somewhat greater risk of mammary failure, and recurrences in such patients tend to be multifocal and multicentric. PMID:2538219

  9. Lectin histochemistry reveals SNA as a prognostic carbohydrate-dependent probe for invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast: a clinicopathological and immunohistochemical auxiliary tool

    PubMed Central

    dos-Santos, Petra B; Zanetti, Juliana S; Vieira-de-Mello, Gabriela S; Rêgo, Moacyr BM; A, Alfredo Ribeiro-Silva; Beltrão, Eduardo Isidoro Carneiro

    2014-01-01

    Increased sialylation and β1,6-branched oligosaccharides has been associated with a variety of structural changes in cell surface carbohydrates, most notably in tumorigenesis. Lectins are defined as proteins that preferentially recognize and bind carbohydrate complexes protruding from glycolipids and glycoproteins. This interaction with carbohydrates can be as specific as the interaction between antigen and antibody. Due to this type of interaction lectins have been used as experimental auxiliary tools in histopathological diagnosis of cancer. This study was designed to evaluate the differential expression of sialic acids and β1,6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (MGAT5) in invasive (IDC) and in situ (DCIS) ductal carcinoma of the breast and its possible application as prognostic biomarkers. A possible transition between pre-malign and malign lesions was evaluated using DCIS samples. Biopsies were analyzed regarding the expression of MUC1, p53, Ki-67, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, HER-2 and MGAT5. α2,6-linked sialic acids residues recognized by SNA lectin was overexpressed in 33.3% of IDC samples and it was related with Ki-67 (p=0.042), PR (p=0.029), lymphnodes status (p=0.017) and death (p=0.011). Regarding survival analysis SNA was the only lectin able to correlate with specific-disease survival and disease-free survival (p=0.024 and p=0.041, respectively), besides, it presents itself as an independent variable by Cox Regression analysis (p= 0.004). Comparing IDC and DCIS cases, only SNA showed different staining pattern (p=0.034). The presence of sialic acids on tumor cell surface can be an indicative of poor prognosis and our study provides further evidence that SNA lectin can be used as a prognostic probe in IDC and DCIS patients. PMID:24966944

  10. CHANGES IN CpG ISLANDS METHYLATION PATTERNS DURING DUCTAL BREAST CARCINOMA PROGRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Hoque, Mohammad Obaidul; Prencipe, Maria; Poeta, Maria Luana; Valori, Vanna Maria; Gallo, Antonietta Pia; Ostrow, Kimberly; Bonghi, Loriana; Vitale, Rita; Maiello, Evaristo; Apicella, Adolfo; Rossiello, Raffaele; Zito, Francesco; Stefania, Tommasi; Paradiso, Angelo; Schittulli, Francesco; Carella, Massimo; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Murgo, Roberto; Carosi, Illuminato; Bisceglia, Michele; Fazio, Vito Michele; Sidransky, David; Parrella, Paola

    2013-01-01

    CpG island hypermethylation is emerging as one of the main mechanisms for inactivation of cancer related genes in breast tumorigenesis. We examined the changes in methylation patterns during ductal breast cancer progression from atypical ductal hyperplasia to in situ and invasive carcinoma. Paired samples of synchronous pre invasive lesions (Atypical Ductal Hyperplasia and/or Ductal Carcinoma in situ) and invasive ductal breast carcinoma from 31 patients, together with isolated lesions from additional 24 patients were studied. Overall, 95 pathological samples and 20 normal breast tissues were analyzed by Quantitative Methylation Specific PCR (QMSP) on a panel of 9 gene promoters (ESR1, APC, CDH1, CTNNB1, GSTPI, THBS1, MGMT, TMS1 and TIMP3). APC, CDH1, and CTNNB1 promoter regions showed an increase in frequency of methylation and increased methylation levels in pathological samples when compared with normal breast tissues. The analysis of the syncronous paired breast lesions demonstrated also an increase in methylation frequency and level for APC, CDH1, and CTNNB1 genes during progression. By establishing a cutoff value, we were able to distinguish among -invasive and invasive lesions. Synchronous methylation of APC, CDH1, and CTNNB1 was associated only with invasive lesions, whereas simultaneous methylation of APC and CDH1 or APC and CTNNB1 were more frequent in ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive carcinoma. Our data point to direct involvement of APC, CDH1, and CTNNB1 CpG island promoter methylation in the early stages of breast cancer progression, and suggest that these molecular alterations might be involved in the transition to an invasive phenotype. PMID:19789364

  11. The Role of High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Predicting the Invasive Component in Patients with Ductal Carcinoma In Situ Diagnosed on Preoperative Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Chae, Eun Young; Shin, Hee Jung; Kim, Suhkmann; Baek, Hyeon-Man; Yoon, Dahye; Kim, Siwon; Shim, Ye Eun; Kim, Hak Hee; Cha, Joo Hee; Choi, Woo Jung; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Shin, Ji Hoon; Lee, Hee Jin; Gong, Gyungyub

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) diagnosed on preoperative biopsy. We investigated whether the metabolic profiling of tissue samples using HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy could be used to distinguish between DCIS lesions with or without an invasive component. Our institutional review board approved this combined retrospective and prospective study. Tissue samples were collected from 30 patients with pure DCIS and from 30 with DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma. All patients were diagnosed with DCIS by preoperative core-needle biopsy and underwent surgical resection. The metabolic profiling of tissue samples was performed by HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy. All observable metabolite signals were identified and quantified in all tissue samples. Metabolite intensity normalized by total spectral intensities was compared according to the tumor type using the Mann-Whitney test. Multivariate analysis was performed with orthogonal projections to latent structure-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). By univariate analysis, the metabolite concentrations of choline-containing compounds obtained with HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy did not differ significantly between the pure DCIS and DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma groups. However, the GPC/PC ratio was higher in the pure DCIS group than in the DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma group (p = 0.004, Bonferroni-corrected p = 0.064), as well as the concentration of myo-inositol and succinate. By multivariate analysis, the OPLS-DA models built with HR-MAS MR metabolic profiles could clearly discriminate between pure DCIS and DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma. Our preliminary results suggest that HR-MAS MR metabolomics on breast tissue may be able to distinguish between DCIS lesions with or without an invasive component. PMID:27560937

  12. The Role of High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Predicting the Invasive Component in Patients with Ductal Carcinoma In Situ Diagnosed on Preoperative Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Eun Young; Kim, Suhkmann; Baek, Hyeon-Man; Yoon, Dahye; Kim, Siwon; Shim, Ye Eun; Kim, Hak Hee; Cha, Joo Hee; Choi, Woo Jung; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Shin, Ji Hoon; Lee, Hee Jin; Gong, Gyungyub

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) diagnosed on preoperative biopsy. We investigated whether the metabolic profiling of tissue samples using HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy could be used to distinguish between DCIS lesions with or without an invasive component. Our institutional review board approved this combined retrospective and prospective study. Tissue samples were collected from 30 patients with pure DCIS and from 30 with DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma. All patients were diagnosed with DCIS by preoperative core-needle biopsy and underwent surgical resection. The metabolic profiling of tissue samples was performed by HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy. All observable metabolite signals were identified and quantified in all tissue samples. Metabolite intensity normalized by total spectral intensities was compared according to the tumor type using the Mann-Whitney test. Multivariate analysis was performed with orthogonal projections to latent structure-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). By univariate analysis, the metabolite concentrations of choline-containing compounds obtained with HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy did not differ significantly between the pure DCIS and DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma groups. However, the GPC/PC ratio was higher in the pure DCIS group than in the DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma group (p = 0.004, Bonferroni-corrected p = 0.064), as well as the concentration of myo-inositol and succinate. By multivariate analysis, the OPLS-DA models built with HR-MAS MR metabolic profiles could clearly discriminate between pure DCIS and DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma. Our preliminary results suggest that HR-MAS MR metabolomics on breast tissue may be able to distinguish between DCIS lesions with or without an invasive component. PMID:27560937

  13. Protein expression and methylation of MGMT, a DNA repair gene and their correlation with clinicopathological parameters in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Asiaf, Asia; Ahmad, Shiekh Tanveer; Malik, Ajaz Ahmad; Aziz, Shiekh Aejaz; Rasool, Zubaida; Masood, Akbar; Zargar, Mohammad Afzal

    2015-08-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation are being increasingly recognized to play an important role in cancer and may serve as a cancer biomarker. The aim of this study was to evaluate the promoter methylation status of MGMT (O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase) and a possible correlation with the expression of MGMT and standard clinicopathological parameters in invasive ductal breast carcinoma patients (IDC) of Kashmir. Methylation-specific PCR was carried out to investigate the promoter methylation status of MGMT in breast tumors paired with the corresponding normal tissue samples from 128 breast cancer patients. The effect of promoter methylation on protein expression in the primary breast cancer and adjacent normal tissues was evaluated by immunohistochemistry (n = 128) and western blotting (n = 30). The frequency of tumor hypermethylation was 39.8 % and a significant difference in methylation frequency among breast tumors were found (p < 0.001) when compared with the corresponding normal tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis showed no detectable expression of MGMT in 68/128 (53.1 %) tumors. MGMT promoter methylation mediated gene silencing was associated with loss of its protein expression (rs = -0.285, p = 0.001, OR = 3.38, 95 % CI = 1.59-7.17). A significant correlation was seen between loss of MGMT and lymph node involvement (p = 0.030), tumor grade (p < 0.0001), loss of estrogen receptors (ER; p = 0.021) and progesterone receptors (PR) (p = 0.016). Also, MGMT methylation was found to be associated with tumor grade (p = 0.011), tumor stage (p = 0.009), and loss of ER (p = 0.003) and PR receptors (p = 0.009). To our knowledge, our findings, for the first time, in Kashmiri population, indicate that MGMT is aberrantly methylated in breast cancer and promoter hypermethylation could be attributed to silencing of MGMT gene expression in breast cancer. Our data suggests that MGMT promoter

  14. Intraductal Therapy of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ: A Presurgery Study

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, M. Ellen; Gordon, Eva J.; Rao, Jian Yu; Jin, Yusheng; Hylton, Nola; Love, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Many women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) are treated with extensive surgery, radiation, and hormone therapy due to the inability to monitor the disease and to determine which cases will progress to invasive cancer. We assessed the safety and feasibility of administering chemotherapy directly into DCIS-containing ducts in 13 women before definitive surgery. The treatment was safe, feasible, and well tolerated, supporting further development of this strategy for management of DCIS. Introduction Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a noninvasive breast cancer wherein malignant cells are confined within a ductal lobular unit. Although less than half the cases of DCIS will progress to invasive disease, most women are treated aggressively with surgery, radiation, and/or hormone therapy due to the inability to clinically evaluate the extent and location of the disease. Intraductal therapy, in which a drug is administered directly into the mammary duct through the nipple, is a promising approach for treating DCIS, but the feasibility of instilling drug into a diseased duct has not been established. Patients and Methods Four to 6 weeks before their scheduled surgery, 13 women diagnosed with DCIS were subjected to cannulation of the affected duct. After both the absence of perforation and presence of dye in the duct were confirmed by ductogram, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin was instilled. Histopathologic assessment was performed after surgery to assess the treatment effects. Results Of the 13 women enrolled in the study, 6 had their DCIS duct successfully cannulated without perforation and instilled with the drug. The treatment was well tolerated, and no serious adverse events have been reported. Biomarker studies indicated a general decrease in Ki-67 levels but an increase in annexin-1 and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine in the lumen of DCIS-containing ducts, which suggests a local response to pegylated liposomal doxorubicin treatment. Conclusions Intraductal therapy offers

  15. Squamoid Eccrine Ductal Carcinoma: A Clinicopathologic Study of 30 Cases.

    PubMed

    van der Horst, Michiel P J; Garcia-Herrera, Adriana; Markiewicz, Dorota; Martin, Blanca; Calonje, Eduardo; Brenn, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Squamoid eccrine ductal carcinoma is a poorly documented skin adnexal carcinoma showing squamous and duct differentiation. It is regarded to be of low-grade malignant potential, but limited follow-up information is available. To study their clinical behavior and histologic features, 30 squamoid eccrine ductal carcinomas were identified from departmental and referral files. Hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections were reviewed, and immunohistochemistry for carcinoembryonic antigen and epithelial membrane antigen was examined to confirm duct differentiation. Clinical follow-up was obtained from patient records and referring pathologists. The tumors presented as nodules or plaques (median size, 1.0 cm; range, 0.5 to 2.5 cm) with a predilection for the head and neck (77%). The patients were elderly (median age, 79.5 y; range, 10 to 96 y) with a male predominance. Histologically, these poorly demarcated tumors were characterized by an infiltrative growth pattern within the dermis and additional invasion of subcutis in 70%. Median tumor thickness was 4.3 mm (range, 1.5 to 18 mm). Superficially, the tumors resembled well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. In the deeper reaches, they were organized in cords and strands showing duct differentiation in a desmoplastic stroma. Cytologic atypia was moderate to severe. Ulceration (47%), necrosis (23%), and perineural and lymphovascular infiltration (27% and 6%, respectively) were additional features. Follow-up data (median, 29 mo; range, 7 to 99), available for 24 patients (80%), revealed a local recurrence rate of 25%. Three patients had lymph node metastasis, and 1 patient died of metastatic disease. Our study outlines the histologic characteristics of squamoid eccrine carcinoma and emphasizes its clinical behavior with risk for local recurrence and potential for more aggressive behavior with metastasis and rare disease-related mortality. PMID:26796504

  16. The immune microenvironment of breast ductal carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Elizabeth; Taube, Janis M; Elwood, Hillary; Sharma, Rajni; Meeker, Alan; Warzecha, Hind Nassar; Argani, Pedram; Cimino-Mathews, Ashley; Emens, Leisha A

    2016-03-01

    The host immune response has a key role in breast cancer progression and response to therapy. However, relative to primary invasive breast cancers, the immune milieu of breast ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is less understood. Here, we profile tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and expression of the immune checkpoint ligand programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) in 27 cases of DCIS with known estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER-2) expression using tissue microarrays. Twenty-four cases were pure DCIS and three had associated invasive ductal carcinoma. Tumors were stained by immunohistochemistry for PD-L1, as well as the lymphocyte markers CD3, CD4, CD8, FoxP3, and CD20. The expression of PD-L1 by DCIS carcinoma cells and tumor infiltrating lymphocytes was determined, and the average tumor infiltrating lymphocytes per high power field were manually scored. None of the DCIS cells expressed PD-L1, but 81% of DCIS lesions contained PD-L1+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes. DCIS with moderate-diffuse tumor infiltrating lymphocytes was more likely to have PD-L1+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (P=0.004). Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes with high levels of PD-L1 expression (>50% cells) were seen only in triple-negative DCIS (P=0.0008), and PD-L1-tumor infiltrating lymphocytes were seen only in ER+/HER-2-DCIS (P=0.12). The presence of PD-L1+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes was associated with a younger mean patient age (P=0.01). Further characterization of the DCIS immune microenvironment may identify useful targets for immune-based therapy and breast cancer prevention. PMID:26769139

  17. Immunohistochemistry applied to the differential diagnosis between ductal and lobular carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    de Deus Moura, Rafael; Wludarski, Sheila C L; Carvalho, Filomena M; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2013-01-01

    The distinction between classic lobular and ductal carcinoma, both in situ and invasive, has important therapeutic and management implications. Most ductal and lobular carcinomas are distinguished readily on hematoxylin-eosin-stained sections because of distinct histomorphologic features. In cases with ambiguous morphologic features, however, categorization in one or another type can be a challenge. Several immunohistochemical markers, including epithelial cadherin, p120, β-catenin, and low-molecular-weight and high-molecular-weight cytokeratins among others, have been introduced to help better discriminate between lobular neoplasia and ductal carcinoma. In this critical review of the literature, we comment about the usefulness and the limitations of these markers to improve the accuracy in the differential diagnosis of breast pathology. PMID:22595945

  18. Management of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast.

    PubMed Central

    Carty, N. J.; Carter, C.; Royle, G. T.; Johnson, C. D.

    1995-01-01

    The advent of mammographic breast screening has increased the detection of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), which now accounts for 15-20% of all breast cancer. While symptomatic DCIS has been treated satisfactorily by mastectomy, this may be an overtreatment of smaller screen-detected lesions. Although local excision, with or without radiotherapy, is associated with a significant risk of local recurrence of DCIS or invasive cancer, salvage surgery is usually successful. The long-term breast-specific mortality rate of treatment by mastectomy and local excision are similar. Whereas mastectomy is still appropriate for women with lesions > 30 mm in diameter or centrally placed and for those women who demand the best possible disease-free survival, local surgery should otherwise be considered. PMID:7598411

  19. Comparative serum proteome analysis of human lymph node negative/positive invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and benign breast disease controls via label-free semiquantitative shotgun technology.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaofang; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Aili; Li, Yingzi; Zhu, Zhenmin; Shao, Zhimin; Zeng, Rong; Xu, Lisa X

    2009-08-01

    Serum proteomics provides a useful tool to identify potential biomarkers associated with cancer progression. In the present study, a two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS) on a linear ion trap was utilized to identify and compare serum proteins from breast cancer patients. Three groups of 21 human sera, 7 from patients with lymph node-negative invasive ductal carcinoma (IDCB), 7 from patients with lymph node-positive IDCB, and 7 controls from patients with benign breast diseases, were analyzed. Through proteomic analysis, a total of 2,078 proteins were identified with at least two unique peptide hits. By quantification with label-free spectral counting, a fruitful list of serum proteins with significant differences in abundance accompanying the progression of breast cancer was found. Through hierarchical cluster analysis based on the differently expressed proteins in selection, we found that different groups of sera could be distinguished. Among the selected proteins, tenascin-XB (TNXB) was further validated by the ELISA method in 131 serum samples as a promising biomarker for early metastasis of breast cancer. These experiments revealed the valuable potential of label-free quantitative 2D-LC-MS/MS for identification of novel biomarkers for disease progression. PMID:19624269

  20. SMAD4 expression in breast ductal carcinoma correlates with prognosis

    PubMed Central

    LIU, NANNAN; YU, CHUNYAN; SHI, YANFEN; JIANG, JING; LIU, YUHE

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined SMAD4 expression in fine-needle aspiration cell blocks from patients with breast ductal carcinoma, in order to assess its viability as a prognostic marker. Using immunohistochemistry, the SMAD4 protein status of 86 breast ductal carcinoma fine-needle biopsies, from patients who underwent tumor resection at Beihua University Affiliated Hospital (Jilin, China) between 2002 and 2008, was characterized. The association between SMAD4 expression and clinicopathological parameters, as well as prognosis was assessed using the Mantel-Haenszel method and Cox proportional hazards regression. SMAD4 staining was observed in the cytoplasm and nucleus, and its expression was found to be decreased in ductal breast carcinoma as compared with adjacent normal breast epithelia. Patients with reduced SMAD4 expression levels tended to exhibit more poorly differentiated tumors, a higher risk of recurrence and shorter overall survival. These results demonstrated that the evaluation of SMAD4 protein status in fine-needle biopsy specimens of breast ductal carcinoma may provide additional prognostic information. PMID:26622737

  1. Infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast associated with primary breast lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Arlen, Myron; Freiman, Jacob J; Ionescu, Marina

    2011-01-01

    We report on the development of an uncommon association of pathologic processes, where an invasive adenocarcinoma of the breast developed concomitantly with a primary lymphoma arising in the same breast. The patient, a 78 year old female, presented with two palpable breast lesions in her left breast and an additional lesion in the right breast. Core needle biopsies of the lesions revealed both ductal carcinoma and lymphoma existing adjacent to each other in the left breast and a second primary lymphoma in her right breast. The mammogram, which also defined the lesions, illustrated collision tumors of the left breast and a separate pathologic process in the right breast. Excision of the lesions confirmed the two independent lesions on the left side, one an infiltrating ductal carcinoma and the second a large B-cell lymphoma. Biopsy of the right breast also demonstrated existence of a large B-cell lymphoma. Left axillary biopsy using sentinel node technology indicated that there was no evidence of nodal metastasis. The question arose as to possible etiologic factors related to viral transfection at the DNA level, that could cause transformation within the ductal epithelium of the breast with similar transfection of the lymphocytes of an adjacent intramammary node, that led to the development of the simultaneous pathologic processes of ductal carcinoma and B-cell lymphoma, defined on biopsy. PMID:21475637

  2. Optimal management of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast.

    PubMed

    Sakorafas, George H; Farley, David R

    2003-12-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) represents a breast lesion that is diagnosed with increasing frequency, mainly due to the wide use of screening mammography. Today, DCIS comprises 15-25% of all breast cancers detected at population screening programs. Consequently, the concepts of properly managing such patients assume a greater importance in everyday practice. Mammographically detected microcalcifications are the most common presentation of DCIS. Despite recent technological advances (including Stereotactic-guided directional vacuum-assisted biopsy), mammographically guided wire biopsy remains the "gold-standard" for obtaining a histological diagnosis in patients with non-palpable, mammographically detected DCIS. Management options include mastectomy, local excision combined with radiation therapy, and local excision alone. Given that DCIS is a heterogeneous group of lesions rather than a single entity, and because patients have a wide variety of personal needs that must be addressed during treatment selection, it is obvious that no single approach will be appropriate for all forms of DCIS or for all patients. Careful patient selection is of key importance in order to achieve the best results in the management of the individual patient with DCIS. Axillary lymph node dissection is unnecessary in the treatment of pure DCIS, but it is indicated when microinvasion is present. In these cases, sentinel lymph node biopsy may be an excellent alternative. In the NSABP B-24 trial, tamoxifen reduced both the invasive and non-invasive breast cancer events in either breast by 37%. Nearly all patients who develop a non-invasive recurrence following breast-sparing surgery are cured with mastectomy, and approximately 75% of those with an invasive recurrence are salvaged. Selected patients initially treated by lumpectomy alone may also undergo breast-conservation therapy at the time of relapse according to the same strict guidelines of tumor margin clearance required for the

  3. Continued observation of the natural history of low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ reaffirms proclivity for local recurrence even after more than 30 years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Melinda E; Schuyler, Peggy A; Simpson, Jean F; Page, David L; Dupont, William D

    2015-05-01

    Opportunities to study the natural history of ductal carcinoma in situ are rare. A few studies of incompletely excised lesions in the premammographic era, retrospectively recognized as ductal carcinoma in situ, have demonstrated a proclivity for local recurrence in the original site. The authors report a follow-up study of 45 women with low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ treated by biopsy only, recognized retrospectively during a larger review of surgical pathology diagnoses and original histological slides for 26 539 consecutive breast biopsies performed at Vanderbilt, Baptist and St Thomas Hospitals in Nashville, TN from 1950 to 1989. Long-term follow-up was previously reported on 28 of these women. Sixteen women (36%) developed invasive breast carcinoma, all in the same breast and quadrant as their incident ductal carcinoma in situ. Eleven invasive breast carcinomas were diagnosed within 10 years of the ductal carcinoma in situ biopsy. Subsequent cases were diagnosed at 12, 23, 25, 29 and 42 years. Seven women, including one who developed invasive breast cancer 29 years after her ductal carcinoma in situ biopsy, developed distant metastasis, resulting in death 1-7 years postdiagnosis of invasive breast carcinoma. The natural history of low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ may extend more than four decades, with invasive breast cancer developing at the same site as the index lesion. This protracted natural history differs markedly from that of patients with high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ or any completely delimited ductal carcinoma in situ excised to negative margins. This study reaffirms the importance of complete margin evaluation in women treated with breast conservation for ductal carcinoma in situ as well as balancing recurrence risk with possible treatment-related morbidity for older women. PMID:25502729

  4. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy for Breast Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    SciTech Connect

    Hathout, Lara; Hijal, Tarek; Théberge, Valérie; Fortin, Bernard; Vulpe, Horia; Hogue, Jean-Charles; Lambert, Christine; Bahig, Houda; and others

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Conventional radiation therapy (RT) administered in 25 fractions after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is the standard treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. Although accelerated hypofractionated regimens in 16 fractions have been shown to be equivalent to conventional RT for invasive breast cancer, few studies have reported results of using hypofractionated RT in DCIS. Methods and Materials: In this multicenter collaborative effort, we retrospectively reviewed the records of all women with DCIS at 3 institutions treated with BCS followed by hypofractionated whole-breast RT (WBRT) delivered in 16 fractions. Results: Between 2003 and 2010, 440 patients with DCIS underwent BCS followed by hypofractionated WBRT in 16 fractions for a total dose of 42.5 Gy (2.66 Gy per fraction). Boost RT to the surgical bed was given to 125 patients (28%) at a median dose of 10 Gy in 4 fractions (2.5 Gy per fraction). After a median follow-up time of 4.4 years, 14 patients had an ipsilateral local relapse, resulting in a local recurrence-free survival of 97% at 5 years. Positive surgical margins, high nuclear grade, age less than 50 years, and a premenopausal status were all statistically associated with an increased occurrence of local recurrence. Tumor hormone receptor status, use of adjuvant hormonal therapy, and administration of additional boost RT did not have an impact on local control in our cohort. On multivariate analysis, positive margins, premenopausal status, and nuclear grade 3 tumors had a statistically significant worse local control rate. Conclusions: Hypofractionated RT using 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions provides excellent local control for patients with DCIS undergoing BCS.

  5. A Catalogue of Altered Salivary Proteins Secondary to Invasive Ductal Carcinoma: A Novel In Vivo Paradigm to Assess Breast Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Streckfus, Charles F.; Bigler, Lenora

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this manuscript is to introduce a catalogue of salivary proteins that are altered secondary to carcinoma of the breast. The catalogue of salivary proteins is a compilation of twenty years of research by the authors and consists of 233 high and low abundant proteins which have been identified by LC-MS/MS mass spectrometry, 2D-gel analysis and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The body of research suggests that saliva is a fluid suffused with solubilized by-products of oncogenic expression and that these proteins may be useful in the study of breast cancer progress, treatment efficacy and the tailoring of individualized patient care. PMID:27477923

  6. The Myoepithelial Cell Layer May Serve As a Potential Trigger Factor for Different Outcomes of Stage-Matched Invasive Lobular and Ductal Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Yi-Hsuan; Tsai, Horng-Der; Chou, Ming-Chih; Man, Yan-gao

    2011-01-01

    Invasive lobular cancer (ILC) tends to be significantly larger in size with significantly more positive lymph nodes, whereas ILC has a significantly more favorable outcome, compared to stage-matched invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). The mechanism accounting for such differences remains elusive. Based on morphological, immunohistochemical, and molecular studies of over 1,000 cases of human breast cancers, we hypothesize that the differences may result from the structural and/or functional differences of their surrounding myoepithelial cell layers, which dictate lobular and ductal tumor cells to follow different pathways of invasion or metastasis. The background, rationale, supportive data, and implications of our hypothesis are presented and discussed. PMID:21326853

  7. [Association of pulmonary carcinoma and ductal breast cancer].

    PubMed

    El Khattabi, W; Lakhdar, N; Jabri, H; Afif, H

    2016-08-01

    Multiple primary cancers are relatively rare. The association between lung and breast cancer is exceptional and requires genetic research and predisposing factors. We report the case of a female patient of 43years, hospitalized for atelectasis of the left lung with breast lumps. Bronchial biopsies have concluded a primary lung adenocarcinoma. Breast biopsy objectified ductal invasive breast cancer. The treatment was a palliative chemotherapy. The evolution is marked by the early death of the patient. Although the association of multiple cancers is rare, their discovery requires a particular treatment regimen depends on the staging of each cancer. PMID:27349825

  8. Ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast: the importance of morphologic and molecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Mardekian, Stacey K; Bombonati, Alessandro; Palazzo, Juan P

    2016-03-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast is a lesion characterized by significant heterogeneity, in terms of morphology, immunohistochemical staining, molecular signatures, and clinical expression. For some patients, surgical excision provides adequate treatment, but a subset of patients will experience recurrence of DCIS or progression to invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). Recent years have seen extensive research aimed at identifying the molecular events that characterize the transition from normal epithelium to DCIS and IDC. Tumor epithelial cells, myoepithelial cells, and stromal cells undergo alterations in gene expression, which are most important in the early stages of breast carcinogenesis. Epigenetic modifications, such as DNA methylation, together with microRNA alterations, play a major role in these genetic events. In addition, tumor proliferation and invasion is facilitated by the lesional microenvironment, which includes stromal fibroblasts and macrophages that secrete growth factors and angiogenesis-promoting substances. Characterization of DCIS on a molecular level may better account for the heterogeneity of these lesions and how this manifests as differences in patient outcome and response to therapy. Molecular assays originally developed for assessing likelihood of recurrence in IDC are recently being applied to DCIS, with promising results. In the future, the classification of DCIS will likely incorporate molecular findings along with histologic and immunohistochemical features, allowing for personalized prognostic information and therapeutic options for patients with DCIS. This review summarizes current data regarding the molecular characterization of DCIS and discusses the potential clinical relevance. PMID:26826418

  9. Microvascular invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ünal, Emre; İdilman, İlkay Sedakat; Akata, Deniz; Özmen, Mustafa Nasuh; Karçaaltıncaba, Muşturay

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular invasion is a crucial histopathologic prognostic factor for hepatocellular carcinoma. We reviewed the literature and aimed to draw attention to clinicopathologic and imaging findings that may predict the presence of microvascular invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma. Imaging findings suggesting microvascular invasion are disruption of capsule, irregular tumor margin, peritumoral enhancement, multifocal tumor, increased tumor size, and increased glucose metabolism on positron emission tomography-computed tomography. In the presence of typical findings, microvascular invasion may be predicted. PMID:26782155

  10. Invasive breast carcinoma arising in microglandular adenosis: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung Eun; Bae, Young Kyung

    2013-12-01

    Microglandular adenosis (MGA) is a rare benign disease that shows an infiltrative growth pattern of small glands, and it may progress to include atypia and carcinoma. Here we report two cases of breast carcinoma arising in MGA. Case 1 was a 44-year-old woman with a previous history of ductal carcinoma in situ in her right breast. During a follow-up, a 1.8 cm mass-like lesion was found in her left breast. An excisional biopsy suggested that the lesion was breast carcinoma. Case 2 was a 57-year-old woman with a 2.9 cm mass in her right breast. A core needle biopsy of the lesion suggested invasive carcinoma. Both patients underwent modified radical mastectomy with sentinel lymph node biopsy. Both tumors lacked a myoepithelial cell layer and stained positively for S-100, lysozyme, and α1-antitrypsin, which is typical of MGA. Both cases showed invasive carcinoma arising in MGA. PMID:24454466

  11. Down-regulation of ANAPC13 and CLTCL1: Early Events in the Progression of Preinvasive Ductal Carcinoma of the Breast.

    PubMed

    Sens-Abuázar, Carolina; Napolitano E Ferreira, Elisa; Osório, Cynthia Aparecida Bueno Toledo; Krepischi, Ana Cristina Victorino; Ricca, Tatiana Iervolino; Castro, Nadia Pereira; da Cunha, Isabela Werneck; Maciel, Maria do Socorro; Rosenberg, Carla; Brentani, Maria Mitzi; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Rocha, Rafael Malagoli; Carraro, Dirce Maria

    2012-04-01

    Alterations in the gene expression profile in epithelial cells during breast ductal carcinoma (DC) progression have been shown to occur mainly between pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to the in situ component of a lesion with coexisting invasive ductal carcinoma (DCIS-IDC) implying that the molecular program for invasion is already established in the preinvasive lesion. For assessing early molecular alterations in epithelial cells that trigger tumorigenesis and testing them as prognostic markers for breast ductal carcinoma progression, we analyzed, by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, eight genes previously identified as differentially expressed between epithelial tumor cells populations captured from preinvasive lesions with distinct malignant potential, pure DCIS and the in situ component of DCIS-IDC. ANAPC13 and CLTCL1 down-regulation revealed to be early events of DC progression that anticipated the invasiveness manifestation. Further down-regulation of ANAPC13 also occurred after invasion appearance and the presence of the protein in invasive tumor samples was associated with higher rates of overall and disease-free survival in breast cancer patients. Furthermore, tumors with low levels of ANAPC13 displayed increased copy number alterations, with significant gains at 1q (1q23.1-1q32.1), 8q, and 17q (17q24.2), regions that display common imbalances in breast tumors, suggesting that down-regulation of ANAPC13 contributes to genomic instability in this disease. PMID:22496928

  12. Multiple calcified brain metastases in a man with invasive ductal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ressl, Nadine; Oberndorfer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 52-year-old Caucasian man with invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. One year after initial diagnosis, he developed a generalised epileptic seizure and neuroimaging showed multiple, calcified intracerebral lesions. Owing to these atypical cerebral imaging findings, comprehensive serological and cerebrospinal fluid analysis was conducted and a latent toxoplasmosis was suspected. In order to distinguish between metastases and an infectious disease, a cerebral biopsy was performed, which verified brain metastases. The patient received whole-brain radiotherapy. The last cerebral CT scan, 18 months later showed stable disease. Calcification of brain metastases in patients with breast cancer is very rare. Owing to their non-characteristic radiological appearance with a lack of contrast enhancement, diagnosis of metastases can be difficult. Infectious diseases should be considered within the diagnostic work up. Owing to possible pitfalls, we recommend a widespread differential diagnostic work up in similar cases, and even in cases with a confirmed primary tumour. PMID:26472289

  13. Opportunities for molecular epidemiological research on ductal carcinoma in-situ and breast carcinogenesis: interdisciplinary approaches.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Mark E; Mies, Carolyn; Gierach, Gretchen L

    2014-01-01

    Most invasive breast cancers arise from ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS), a non-obligate precursor of invasive breast cancer. Given that the natural history of individual DCIS lesions is unpredictable, many women with DCIS receive extensive treatments, which may include surgery, radiation and endocrine therapy, even though many of these lesions may have limited potential to progress to invasion and metastasize. In contrast to valid concerns about overtreatment, the fact that invasive breast cancers outnumber DCIS lesions by more than three-to-one, suggests that many cancer precursors (particularly DCIS, but LCIS also) progress to invasion prior to detection. Thus, DCIS poses a dual problem of overdiagnosis among some women and failure of early detection among others. These concerns are heightened by the multifold increase in rates of DCIS in conjunction with widespread use of mammographic screening and access to outpatient radiologically-guided biopsies. Accordingly, methods are needed to both specifically detect and identify DCIS lesions with potential to progress to invasive cancer and to discover techniques to triage and conservatively manage indolent cases of DCIS. PMID:24225267

  14. Opportunities for Molecular Epidemiological Research on Ductal Carcinoma In-situ and Breast Carcinogenesis: Interdisciplinary Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Mark E.; Mies, Carolyn; Gierach, Gretchen L.

    2014-01-01

    Most invasive breast cancers arise from ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS), a non-obligate precursor of invasive breast cancer. Given that the natural history of individual DCIS lesions is unpredictable, many women with DCIS receive extensive treatments, which may include surgery, radiation and endocrine therapy, even though many of these lesions may have limited potential to progress to invasion and metastasize. In contrast to valid concerns about over-treatment, the fact that invasive breast cancers outnumber DCIS lesions by more than three-to-one, suggests that many cancer precursors (particularly DCIS, but LCIS also) progress to invasion prior to detection. Thus, DCIS poses a dual problem of over diagnosis among some women and failure of early detection among others. These concerns are heightened by the multi-fold increase in rates of DCIS in conjunction with widespread use of mammographic screening and access to outpatient radiologically-guided biopsies. Accordingly, methods are needed to both specifically detect and identify DCIS lesions with potential to progress to invasive cancer and to discover techniques to triage and conservatively manage indolent cases of DCIS. PMID:24225267

  15. Prioritization of research addressing management strategies for ductal carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Gierisch, Jennifer M; Myers, Evan R; Schmit, Kristine M; Crowley, Matthew J; McCrory, Douglas C; Chatterjee, Ranee; Coeytaux, Remy R; Kendrick, Amy; Sanders, Gillian D

    2014-04-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ is a common finding in women having mammography screening, and there is considerable uncertainty about the balance of harms and benefits of different management options. This article outlines the process for developing a prioritized research agenda for the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute as informed by a diverse group of stakeholders on the management of ductal carcinoma in situ. Evidence gaps were identified by reviewing existing literature and engaging diverse stakeholders to refine these gaps. Stakeholders ranked evidence gaps by importance from their perspectives using a forced-ranking prioritization method. PubMed was searched for relevant recent studies, and ClinicalTrials.gov was searched for relevant ongoing trials for the 10 highest-ranked evidence gaps. Strengths and limitations of different study designs were assessed to address gaps. Stakeholders prioritized evidence gaps related to incorporation of patient-centered outcomes into future research, development of better methods to predict risk for invasive cancer, evaluation of a strategy of active surveillance, and testing of decision-making tools. The degree to which prioritized evidence gaps may have already been addressed is uncertain because a comprehensive systematic review has not been done. PMID:24567146

  16. Correlation of histopathologic features of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast with the oncotype DX DCIS score.

    PubMed

    Knopfelmacher, Adriana; Fox, Jana; Lo, Yungtai; Shapiro, Nella; Fineberg, Susan

    2015-09-01

    The Oncotype DX Breast Cancer Assay for ductal carcinoma in situ is used to determine local recurrence risk in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ. The results help select patients with low-risk ductal carcinoma in situ who could forgo radiation therapy after conservative surgery. The genes assessed include five proliferation genes, progesterone receptor (PR), and GSTM-1. Our objective was to determine if PR, mitotic counting, or any other pathologic feature of ductal carcinoma in situ could predict the Oncotype DX DCIS Score. We identified 46 cases of ductal carcinoma in situ with a Oncotype DX DCIS Score. In addition to information obtained from routine pathology, we counted mitotic figures in the ductal carcinoma in situ and noted presence of dense chronic inflammatory infiltrate surrounding ductal carcinoma in situ. We found that PR ≥ 90% (P = 0.004), mitotic count ≤ 1 (P = 0.045), estrogen receptor ≥ 90% (P = 0.046), and low nuclear grade (P < 0.0001) were associated with a low score. Dense chronic inflammation surrounding ductal carcinoma in situ was associated with a high score (P = 0.034).All 13 cases with PR ≥ 90%, ≤ 1 mitotic figure and absence of dense chronic inflammation around ductal carcinoma in situ had a low score (100% specificity). A low score was not observed in any case with at least two of the following--negative PR, >1 mitotic figure, and/or presence of dense chronic inflammation around ductal carcinoma in situ (100% specificity). Our study suggests using a combination of PR (≥ 90% vs negative) with mitotic count in ductal carcinoma in situ (≤ 1 vs >1) and dense chronic inflammation around ductal carcinoma in situ one could predict the Oncotype DX DCIS score. Mitotic counting and evaluation of immune response might provide prognostic information in ductal carcinoma in situ. PMID:26111975

  17. Squamous cell carcinoma - invasive (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This irregular red nodule is an invasive squamous cell carcinoma (a form of skin cancer). Initial appearance, shown here, may be very similar to a noncancerous growth called a keratoacanthoma. Squamous cell cancers ...

  18. Squamous cell carcinoma - invasive (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... invasive squamous cell carcinoma (a form of skin cancer). Initial appearance, shown here, may be very similar to a noncancerous growth called a keratoacanthoma. Squamous cell cancers can metastasize (spread) and should be removed surgically ...

  19. Ductal carcinoma in situ in a benign phyllodes tumor of breast: A rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Prithwijit; Saha, Kaushik

    2014-07-01

    Phyllodes tumor (PT) is an uncommon tumor of female breast. The tumor clinically, radiologically, cytologically as well as histologically can mimic fibroadenoma which is a common tumor of fibroepithelial group. Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in the epithelial component of PT is very rare. We report a rare case of intermediate grade DCIS arising in a benign PT in a 42-year-old lady. The patient presented with a small nodule in right breast along with serosanguineous discharge from nipple. Ultrasonography and cytology failed to distinguish between fibroadenoma and PT. Histopathological examination following wide local excision displayed the biphasic tumor comprising of benign looking cellular stroma and epithelial lining. It also demonstrated the foci of intermediate grade DCIS without any invasive component. Considering the clinicoradiological profile along with histopathological features, the diagnosis of DCIS in a benign PT of breast was made. PMID:25097439

  20. Contemporary management of ductal carcinoma in situ and lobular carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Obeng-Gyasi, Samilia; Ong, Cecilia; Hwang, E Shelley

    2016-06-01

    The management of in situ lesions ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) continues to evolve. These diagnoses now comprise a large burden of mammographically diagnosed cancers, and with a global trend towards more population-based screening, the incidence of these lesions will continue to rise. Because outcomes following treatment for DCIS and LCIS are excellent, there is emerging controversy about what extent of treatment is optimal for both diseases. Here we review the current approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of both DCIS and LCIS. In addition, we will consider potential directions for future management of these lesions. PMID:27197512

  1. Biomarker signatures of mitochondrial NDUFS3 in invasive breast carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Suhane, Sonal; Berel, Dror; Ramanujan, V. Krishnan

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} We monitored mitochondrial NDUFS3 expression in clinical breast cancer specimens. {yields} NDUFS3 expression is significantly higher in highly invasive cancer specimens. {yields} Increased NDUFS3 expression correlates with tumor nuclear grade. {yields} NDUFS3 expression in invasive ductal carcinoma is a potential hypoxia marker. -- Abstract: We present evidence for potential biomarker utility of a mitochondrial complex I subunit, (NDUFS3) in discriminating normal and highly invasive breast carcinoma specimens obtained from clinical patients. Besides being a robust indicator of breast cancer aggressiveness, NDUFS3 also shows clear signatures of a hypoxia/necrosis marker in invasive ductal carcinoma specimens. Statistically significant positive correlation was observed between nuclear grade and NDUFS3 expression level in the tumor specimens analyzed. We support these findings with a plausible mechanism involving mitochondrial complex I assembly defects and/or redox buffering induced mitochondrial dysfunction during the process of cancer cell transformation. From a clinical standpoint, this novel observation adds value in augmenting the current receptor-based biomarkers for better accuracy in diagnosis and predicting survival rate in patients with breast carcinoma.

  2. Sentinel lymph node biopsy in clinically detected ductal carcinoma in situ

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ameer, Ahmed Yahia; Al Nefaie, Sahar; Al Johani, Badria; Anwar, Ihab; Al Tweigeri, Taher; Tulbah, Asma; Alshabanah, Mohmmed; Al Malik, Osama

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study the indications for sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in clinically-detected ductal carcinoma in situ (CD-DCIS). METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 20 patients with an initial diagnosis of pure DCIS by an image-guided core needle biopsy (CNB) between June 2006 and June 2012 was conducted at King Faisal Specialist Hospital. The accuracy of performing SLNB in CD-DCIS, the rate of sentinel and non-sentinel nodal metastasis, and the histologic underestimation rate of invasive cancer at initial diagnosis were analyzed. The inclusion criteria were a preoperative diagnosis of pure DCIS with no evidence of invasion. We excluded any patient with evidence of microinvasion or invasion. There were two cases of mammographically detected DCIS and 18 cases of CD-DCIS. All our patients were diagnosed by an image-guided CNB except two patients who were diagnosed by fine needle aspiration (FNA). All patients underwent breast surgery, SLNB, and axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) if the SLN was positive. RESULTS: Twenty patients with an initial diagnosis of pure DCIS underwent SLNB, 2 of whom had an ALND. The mean age of the patients was 49.7 years (range, 35-70). Twelve patients (60%) were premenopausal and 8 (40%) were postmenopausal. CNB was the diagnostic procedure for 18 patients, and 2 who were diagnosed by FNA were excluded from the calculation of the underestimation rate. Two out of 20 had a positive SLNB and underwent an ALND and neither had additional non sentinel lymph node metastasis. Both the sentinel visualization rate and the intraoperative sentinel identification rate were 100%. The false negative rate was 0%. Only 2 patients had a positive SLNB (10%) and neither had additional metastasis following an ALND. After definitive surgery, 3 patients were upstaged to invasive ductal carcinoma (3/18 = 16.6%) and 3 other patients were upstaged to DCIS with microinvasion (3/18 = 16.6%). Therefore the histologic underestimation rate of invasive disease was 33

  3. Invasive Ductular Carcinoma in 2 Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Amanda P; Brooks, Amos; Zeiss, Caroline J

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women, with an estimated lifetime incidence of approximately 12% in American women. Invasive ductal carcinoma is the most common form of breast cancer in women, accounting for approximately 60% of all breast carcinomas. Prognostic markers are used to assess aggressiveness, invasiveness, and extent of spread of a neoplasm and thus may be correlated with patient survival. Immunohistochemistry is currently widely used for this purpose, with a variety of prognostication markers available. Classic markers for breast cancer in women include estrogen and progesterone receptor steroid hormone proteins and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Many additional markers have been used in diagnosis and prognostication, including p53, p63, and E-cadherin and cell proliferation markers such as Ki67. Despite an estimated lifetime incidence of approximately 6.1%, naturally occurring mammary neoplasms in nonhuman primates are uncommonly reported, with only sporadic references over the past 75 y. The majority of reported tumors occur in rhesus macaques, although this prevalence has been suggested to be a consequence of their high frequency of usage in biomedical research. Here we present 2 cases of mammary carcinoma in adult female intact rhesus macaques, with cytology, histopathology, and extensive immunohistochemical analysis. According to current classifications for human breast tumors, both tumors were classified as invasive ductal carcinoma. The prognostic value of immunohistochemical markers in human breast cancer and in reported cases in nonhuman primates is discussed. PMID:25296018

  4. Mutation of the TP53 gene and allelic imbalance at chromosome 17p13 in ductal carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed Central

    Munn, K. E.; Walker, R. A.; Menasce, L.; Varley, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    A panel of 36 cases of preinvasive breast lesions, including 35 cases of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), has been examined for mutation of TP53, allelic imbalance (AI) on 17p13, and expression of TP53, in a number of cases, has been studied using immunohistochemistry. Areas of DCIS, with or without adjacent invasive or benign cells, have been separately microdissected from paraffin-embedded sections and analysed by PCR for genetic changes to chromosome 17p13. TP53 mutations and AI on 17p have been identified in cases of 'pure' DCIS as well as those with associated invasive carcinoma and, furthermore, have been identified in well-differentiated lesions as well as poorly differentiated ones. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:8932338

  5. Effect of Metformin on Breast Ductal Carcinoma In Situ Proliferation in a Randomized Presurgical Trial.

    PubMed

    DeCensi, Andrea; Puntoni, Matteo; Guerrieri-Gonzaga, Aliana; Cazzaniga, Massimiliano; Serrano, Davide; Lazzeroni, Matteo; Vingiani, Andrea; Gentilini, Oreste; Petrera, Marilena; Viale, Giuseppe; Cuzick, Jack; Bonanni, Bernardo; Pruneri, Giancarlo

    2015-10-01

    Metformin is associated with lower breast cancer risk in epidemiologic studies and showed decreased proliferation in HER2-positive breast cancer in a presurgical trial. To provide insight into its preventive potential, we measured proliferation by Ki-67 labeling index (LI) of intraepithelial lesions surrounding breast cancer. We randomly assigned 200 nondiabetic patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer in core biopsies to metformin, 1,700 mg or placebo once daily for 28 days before surgery. Upon surgery, five to seven specimens of cancer adjacent (≤1 cm) and distant (>1 cm) tissue were screened for LCIS, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and ductal hyperplasia (DH). The prevalence of LCIS, DCIS, and DH was 4.5% (9/200), 67% (133/200), and 35% (69/200), respectively. Overall, metformin did not affect Ki-67 LI in premalignant disorders. The median posttreatment Ki-67 LI (IQR) in the metformin and placebo arm was, respectively, 15% (5-15) versus 5% (4-6) in LCIS (P = 0.1), 12% (8-20) versus 10% (7-24) in DCIS (P = 0.9), and 3% (1-4) versus 3% (1-4) in DH (P = 0.5). However, posttreatment Ki-67 in HER2-positive DCIS lesions was significantly lower in women randomized to metformin especially when ER was coexpressed: 22% (11-32) versus 35% (30-40) in HER2-positive DCIS (n = 22, P = .06); 12% (7-18) versus 32% (27-42) in ER-positive/HER2-positive DCIS (n = 15, P = .004). Eight of 22 (36%) HER2-positive DCIS were adjacent to HER2-negative invasive breast cancer. In tissue samples obtained following 4 weeks of study drug, proliferation was lower in HER2-positive DCIS for women randomized to metformin versus placebo. An adjuvant trial incorporating metformin in HER2-positive DCIS is warranted. PMID:26276754

  6. A Molecular Portrait of High-Grade Ductal Carcinoma In Situ.

    PubMed

    Abba, Martin C; Gong, Ting; Lu, Yue; Lee, Jaeho; Zhong, Yi; Lacunza, Ezequiel; Butti, Matias; Takata, Yoko; Gaddis, Sally; Shen, Jianjun; Estecio, Marcos R; Sahin, Aysegul A; Aldaz, C Marcelo

    2015-09-15

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a noninvasive precursor lesion to invasive breast carcinoma. We still have no understanding on why only some DCIS lesions evolve to invasive cancer whereas others appear not to do so during the life span of the patient. Here, we performed full exome (tumor vs. matching normal), transcriptome, and methylome analysis of 30 pure high-grade DCIS (HG-DCIS) and 10 normal breast epithelial samples. Sixty-two percent of HG-DCIS cases displayed mutations affecting cancer driver genes or potential drivers. Mutations were observed affecting PIK3CA (21% of cases), TP53 (17%), GATA3 (7%), MLL3 (7%) and single cases of mutations affecting CDH1, MAP2K4, TBX3, NF1, ATM, and ARID1A. Significantly, 83% of lesions displayed numerous large chromosomal copy number alterations, suggesting they might precede selection of cancer driver mutations. Integrated pathway-based modeling analysis of RNA-seq data allowed us to identify two DCIS subgroups (DCIS-C1 and DCIS-C2) based on their tumor-intrinsic subtypes, proliferative, immune scores, and in the activity of specific signaling pathways. The more aggressive DCIS-C1 (highly proliferative, basal-like, or ERBB2(+)) displayed signatures characteristic of activated Treg cells (CD4(+)/CD25(+)/FOXP3(+)) and CTLA4(+)/CD86(+) complexes indicative of a tumor-associated immunosuppressive phenotype. Strikingly, all lesions showed evidence of TP53 pathway inactivation. Similarly, ncRNA and methylation profiles reproduce changes observed postinvasion. Among the most significant findings, we observed upregulation of lncRNA HOTAIR in DCIS-C1 lesions and hypermethylation of HOXA5 and SOX genes. We conclude that most HG-DCIS lesions, in spite of representing a preinvasive stage of tumor progression, displayed molecular profiles indistinguishable from invasive breast cancer. PMID:26249178

  7. Mixed acinar-neuroendocrine-ductal carcinoma of the pancreas: a tale of three lineages.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mark J; Kwong, Christina A; Atieh, Mohammed; Pappas, Sam G

    2016-01-01

    Most pancreatic cancers arise from a single cell type, although mixed pancreatic carcinomas represent a rare exception. The rarity of these aggressive malignancies and the limitations of fine-needle aspiration (FNA) pose significant barriers to diagnosis and appropriate management. We report a case of a 54-year-old man presenting with abdominal pain, jaundice and a hypodense lesion within the uncinate process on CT. FNA suggested poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, which was subsequently resected via pancreaticoduodenectomy. Pathological analysis yielded diagnosis of invasive mixed acinar-neuroendocrine-ductal pancreatic carcinoma. Given the rare and deadly nature of these tumours, clinicians must be aware of their pathophysiology and do practice with a high degree of clinical suspicion, when appropriate. Surgical resection and thorough pathological analysis with immunohistochemical staining and electron microscopy remain the standards of care for mixed pancreatic tumours without gross evidence of metastasis. Diligent characterisation of the presentation and histological findings associated with these neoplasms should continue in order to promote optimal diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:27257019

  8. KLF4 is a novel candidate tumor suppressor gene in pancreatic ductal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zammarchi, Francesca; Morelli, Mariangela; Menicagli, Michele; Di Cristofano, Claudio; Zavaglia, Katia; Paolucci, Alessandra; Campani, Daniela; Aretini, Paolo; Boggi, Ugo; Mosca, Franco; Cavazzana, Andrea; Cartegni, Luca; Bevilacqua, Generoso; Mazzanti, Chiara Maria

    2011-01-01

    Ductal pancreatic carcinoma (DPC) is a deadly disease with an incidence of 9 cases in 100,000 people per year and a mortality rate close to 100%. Allelic losses in the long arm of chromosome 9 are commonly encountered in many human malignancies but no data are yet available about DPC. We screened 40 laser-microdissected DPC samples and 6 pre-invasive lesions for 9 microsatellite mapping markers of region 9q21.3 through 9q34.2. A small overlapping region of deletion, spanning 8 million base pairs, was identified between D9S127 and D9S105. Two genes, RSG3 and KLF4, mapped to 9q31.1 through 9q32, were further investigated. A highly significant association was found between KLF4 gene expression levels and genomic status. Similarly, absence of immunohistochemical expression of KLF4 protein was found in 86.8% cases of DPC (33/38). Overexpression of KLF4 in a human pancreatic carcinoma cell line induced a significant decrease in the proliferation associated with up-regulation of p21 and the down-regulation of cyclin D1. In conclusion, we identified a novel oncosuppressor region located at the 9q 31.1-3 locus that is lost in DPC at high frequency. Loss of KLF4 expression is closely related to the genomic loss, and its restoration inhibits cancer cell proliferation, suggesting a key suppressor role in pancreatic tumorigenesis. PMID:21224073

  9. Dietary patterns and risk of ductal carcinoma of the breast: a factor analysis in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Ronco, Alvaro L; De Stefani, Eduardo; Deneo-Pellegrini, Hugo; Boffetta, Paolo; Aune, Dagfinn; Silva, Cecilia; Landó, Gabriel; Luaces, María E; Acosta, Gisele; Mendilaharsu, María

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) shows very high incidence rates in Uruguayan women. The present factor analysis of ductal carcinoma of the breast, the most frequent histological type of this malignancy both in Uruguay and in the World, was conducted at a prepaid hospital of Montevideo, Uruguay. We identified 111 cases with ductal BC and 222 controls with normal mammograms. A factor analysis was conducted using 39 food groups, allowing retention of six factors analyzed through logistic regression in order to obtain odds ratios (OR) associated with ductal BC. The low fat and non-alcoholic beverage patterns were inversely associated (OR=0.30 and OR=0.45, respectively) with risk. Conversely, the fatty cheese pattern was positively associated (OR=4.17) as well as the fried white meat (OR=2.28) and Western patterns (OR 2.13). Ductal BC shared similar dietary risk patterns as those identified by studies not discriminating between histologic type of breast cancer. PMID:21198261

  10. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation for Pure Ductal Carcinoma in Situ

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sean S.; Grills, Inga Siiner; Chen, Peter Y.; Kestin, Larry L.; Ghilezan, Michel I.; Wallace, Michelle; Martinez, Alvaro M.; Vicini, Frank A.

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) treated with breast-conserving therapy using accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: From March 2001 to February 2009, 53 patients with Stage 0 breast cancer were treated with breast conserving surgery and adjuvant APBI. Median age was 62 years. All patients underwent excision with margins negative by {>=}1 mm before adjuvant radiotherapy (RT). A total of 39 MammoSite brachytherapy (MS) patients and 14 three-dimensional conformal external beam RT (3DCRT) patients were treated to the lumpectomy bed alone with 34 Gy and 38.5 Gy, respectively. Of the DCIS cases, 94% were mammographically detected. All patients with calcifications had either specimen radiography or postsurgical mammography confirmation of clearance. Median tumor size was 6 mm, and median margin distance was 5 mm. There were no statistically significant differences according to APBI method for race/ethnicity, tumor detection method, tumor grade, estrogen receptor (ER) status, or use of tamoxifen (p = NS). Recurrence and survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cosmesis was scored by the Harvard criteria. Results: With a median follow-up of 3.6 years (range, 0.4-6.3 years), the overall and cause-specific survival rates were 98% and 100%, respectively. Three-year actuarial ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was 2%. One failure was observed at the resection bed 11 months post-RT. No other elsewhere breast failures, regional recurrences, or distant metastases were noted. Cosmesis was excellent or good in 92.4% of cases, with no statistically significant differences according to the APBI method (92.3% with MammoSite and 92.8% with 3DCRT; p = 0.649). Conclusions: APBI as part of breast-conserving therapy for pure DCIS was associated with excellent local control and survival rates, with the vast majority of patients having good to excellent cosmesis. This finding supports the recent analysis by the

  11. Design and synthesis of pyrimidinyl acyl thioureas as novel Hsp90 inhibitors in invasive ductal breast cancer and its bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Koca, İrfan; Özgür, Aykut; Er, Muhammet; Gümüş, Mehmet; Açikalin Coşkun, Kübra; Tutar, Yusuf

    2016-10-21

    Invasive ductal carcinoma is the most common breast malignancies tumors and has tendency to bone metastases. Many oncogenic client proteins involved in formation of metastatic pathways. Stabilization, regulation, and maintenance of these oncogenic client proteins are provided with Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90). Hsp90 perform these processes through its ATP binding and subsequent hydrolysis energy. Therefore, designing Hsp90 inhibitors is a novel cancer treatment method. However, many Hsp90 inhibitors have solubility problems and showed adverse effects in clinical trials. Thus, we designed and synthesized novel pyrimidinyl acyl thiourea derivatives to selectively inhibit Hsp90 alpha in human invasive ductal breast (MCF-7) and human bone osteosarcoma (Saos-2) cell lines. In vitro experiments showed that the compounds inhibited cell proliferation, ATP hydrolysis, and exhibited cytotoxic effect on these cancer cell lines. Further, gene expression was analyzed by microarray studies on MCF-7 cell lines. Several genes that play vital roles in breast cancer pathogenesis displayed altered gene expression in the presence of a selected pyrimidinyl acyl thiourea compound. Molecular docking studies were also performed to determine interaction between Hsp90 ATPase domain and pyrimidinyl acyl thiourea derivatives. The results indicated that the compounds are able to interact with Hsp90 ATP binding pocket and inhibit ATPase function. The designed compounds powerfully inhibit Hsp90 by an average of 1 μM inhibition constant. And further, the compounds perturb Hsp90 N terminal domain proper orientation and ATP may not provide required conformational change for Hsp90 function as evidenced by in silico experiments. Therefore, the designed compounds effectively inhibited both invasive ductal breast carcinoma and bone metastasis. Pyrimidinyl acyl thiourea derivatives may provide a drug template for effective treatment of invasive ductal breast carcinoma and its bone metastasis as

  12. Next-Generation Sequencing: A powerful tool for the discovery of molecular markers in breast ductal carcinoma in situ

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Hitchintan; Mao, Shihong; Shah, Seema; Gorski, David H.; Krawetz, Stephen A.; Sloane, Bonnie F.; Mattingly, Raymond R.

    2013-01-01

    Mammographic screening leads to frequent biopsies and concomitant overdiagnosis of breast cancer, particularly ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Some DCIS lesions rapidly progress to invasive carcinoma whereas others remain indolent. Because we cannot yet predict which lesions will not progress, all DCIS is regarded as malignant, and many women are overtreated. Thus, there is a pressing need for a panel of molecular markers in addition to the current clinical and pathologic factors to provide prognostic information. Genomic technologies such as microarrays have made major contributions to defining sub-types of breast cancer. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) modalities offer unprecedented depth of expression analysis through revealing transcriptional boundaries, mutations, rare transcripts and alternative splice variants. NGS approaches are just beginning to be applied to DCIS. Here, we review the applications and challenges of NGS in discovering novel potential therapeutic targets and candidate biomarkers in the premalignant progression of breast cancer. PMID:23477556

  13. Identification of lesion subtypes in biopsies of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast using biomarker ratio imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Clark, Andrea J; Petty, Howard R

    2016-01-01

    Although epidemiological studies propose aggressive and non-aggressive forms of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), they cannot be identified with conventional histopathology. We now report a retrospective study of human biopsy samples using biomarker ratio imaging microscopy (BRIM). Using BRIM, micrographs of biomarkers whose expression correlates with breast cancer aggressiveness are divided by micrographs of biomarkers whose expression negatively correlates with aggressiveness to create computed micrographs reflecting aggressiveness. The biomarker pairs CD44/CD24, N-cadherin/E-cadherin, and CD74/CD59 stratified DCIS samples. BRIM identified subpopulations of DCIS lesions with ratiometric properties resembling either benign fibroadenoma or invasive carcinoma samples. Our work confirms the existence of distinct subpopulations of DCIS lesions, which will likely have utility in breast cancer research and clinical practice. PMID:27247112

  14. Identification of lesion subtypes in biopsies of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast using biomarker ratio imaging microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Andrea J.; Petty, Howard R.

    2016-01-01

    Although epidemiological studies propose aggressive and non-aggressive forms of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), they cannot be identified with conventional histopathology. We now report a retrospective study of human biopsy samples using biomarker ratio imaging microscopy (BRIM). Using BRIM, micrographs of biomarkers whose expression correlates with breast cancer aggressiveness are divided by micrographs of biomarkers whose expression negatively correlates with aggressiveness to create computed micrographs reflecting aggressiveness. The biomarker pairs CD44/CD24, N-cadherin/E-cadherin, and CD74/CD59 stratified DCIS samples. BRIM identified subpopulations of DCIS lesions with ratiometric properties resembling either benign fibroadenoma or invasive carcinoma samples. Our work confirms the existence of distinct subpopulations of DCIS lesions, which will likely have utility in breast cancer research and clinical practice. PMID:27247112

  15. Regulation of in situ to invasive breast carcinoma transition

    SciTech Connect

    Polyak, Kornelia; Hu, Min; Yao, Jun; Carroll, Danielle K.; Weremowicz, Stanislawa; Chen, Haiyan; Carrasco, Daniel; Richardson, Andrea; Violette, Shelia; Gelman, Rebecca S.; Bissell, Mina J.; Schnitt, Stuart; Polyak, Kornelia

    2008-05-07

    The transition of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive carcinoma is a key event in breast tumor progression that is poorly understood. Comparative molecular analysis of tumor epithelial cells from in situ and invasive tumors has failed to identify consistent tumor stage-specific differences. However, the myoepithelial cell layer, present only in DCIS, is a key distinguishing and diagnostic feature. To determine the contribution of non-epithelial cells to tumor progression, we analyzed the role of myoepithelial cells and fibroblasts in the progression of in situ carcinomas using a xenograft model of human DCIS. Progression to invasion was promoted by fibroblasts, but inhibited by normal myoepithelial cells. The invasive tumor cells from these progressed lesions formed DCIS rather than invasive cancers when re-injected into naive mice. Molecular profiles of myoepithelial and epithelial cells isolated from primary normal and cancerous human breast tissue samples corroborated findings obtained in the xenograft model. These results provide the proof of principle that breast tumor progression could occur in the absence of additional genetic alterations and that tumor growth and progression could be controlled by replacement of normal myoepithelial inhibitory signals.

  16. Regulation of In Situ to Invasive Breast CarcinomaTransition

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Min; Carroll, Danielle K.; Weremowicz, Stanislawa; Chen,Haiyan; Carrasco, Daniel; Richardson, Andrea; Bissell, Mina; Violette,Shelia; Gelman, Rebecca S.; Schnitt, Stuart; Polyak, Kornelia

    2007-03-13

    The transition of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive carcinoma is a key event in breast tumor progression that is poorly understood. Comparative molecular analysis of tumor epithelial cells from in situ and invasive tumors has failed to identify consistent tumor stage-specific differences. However, the myoepithelial cell layer, present only in DCIS, is a key distinguishing and diagnostic feature. To determine the contribution of non-epithelial cells to tumor progression, we analyzed the role of myoepithelial cells and fibroblasts in the progression of in situ carcinomas using a xenograft model of human DCIS. Progression to invasion was promoted by fibroblasts, but inhibited by normal myoepithelial cells. The invasive tumor cells from these progressed lesions formed DCIS rather than invasive cancers when re-injected into naive mice. Molecular profiles of myoepithelial and epithelial cells isolated from primary normal and cancerous human breast tissue samples corroborated findings obtained in the xenograft model. These results provide the proof of principle that breast tumor progression could occur in the absence of additional genetic alterations and that tumor growth and progression could be controlled by replacement of normal myoepithelial inhibitory signals.

  17. Identifying three different architectural subtypes of mammary ductal carcinoma in situ using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Lian, Yuane; Nie, Yuting; Zhuo, shuangmu; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Jianxin

    2015-10-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is often considered as the precursor of invasive breast cancer, and the risk of DCIS progression to IBC has been estimated based on the evaluation of pathological features, among which the architectural subtype is the most common one. In this study, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is applied to identify three different architectural subtypes of DCIS (solid, cribriform and comedo). It is found that MPM has the capability to visualize the proliferating pattern of tumor cells, the presence of intraluminal necrosis and the morphology of basement membrane, which are all taken into account in subtyping DCIS. In addition, MPM also can be used to quantify the cellular metabolism, for quantitatively identifying tumor staging during tumor progression. This result highlights the potential of MPM as an advanced technique to assess the pathological characters of the breast tumor in real-time and reflect the degree of tumor progression in vivo, by integrating into the intra-fiberoptic ductoscopy or transdermal biopsy needle.

  18. Overview of the randomized trials of radiotherapy in ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast.

    PubMed

    Correa, C; McGale, P; Taylor, C; Wang, Y; Clarke, M; Davies, C; Peto, R; Bijker, N; Solin, L; Darby, S

    2010-01-01

    Individual patient data were available for all four of the randomized trials that began before 1995, and that compared adjuvant radiotherapy vs no radiotherapy following breast-conserving surgery for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). A total of 3729 women were eligible for analysis. Radiotherapy reduced the absolute 10-year risk of any ipsilateral breast event (ie, either recurrent DCIS or invasive cancer) by 15.2% (SE 1.6%, 12.9% vs 28.1% 2 P <.00001), and it was effective regardless of the age at diagnosis, extent of breast-conserving surgery, use of tamoxifen, method of DCIS detection, margin status, focality, grade, comedonecrosis, architecture, or tumor size. The proportional reduction in ipsilateral breast events was greater in older than in younger women (2P < .0004 for difference between proportional reductions; 10-year absolute risks: 18.5% vs 29.1% at ages <50 years, 10.8% vs 27.8% at ages ≥ 50 years) but did not differ significantly according to any other available factor. Even for women with negative margins and small low-grade tumors, the absolute reduction in the 10-year risk of ipsilateral breast events was 18.0% (SE 5.5, 12.1% vs 30.1%, 2P = .002). After 10 years of follow-up, there was, however, no significant effect on breast cancer mortality, mortality from causes other than breast cancer, or all-cause mortality. PMID:20956824

  19. Tamoxifen Citrate, Letrozole, Anastrozole, or Exemestane With or Without Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Invasive RxPONDER Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor and/or Progesterone Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Multicentric Breast Carcinoma; Multifocal Breast Carcinoma; Synchronous Bilateral Breast Carcinoma

  20. Radiologic Findings of Ductal Carcinoma in Situ Arising Within a Juvenile Fibroadenoma: Mammographic, Sonographic and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Breast MRI Features.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Kyung; Cho, Kyu Ran; Seo, Bo Kyoung; Woo, Ok Hee; Lee, Jeong Hyeon; Song, Sung Eun; Bae, Jeong Won

    2015-04-01

    Juvenile fibroadenoma is an uncommon histologic variant of fibroadenoma that frequently shows a remarkable and rapid growth. The development of a carcinoma within a fibroadenoma, either in situ or invasive, is a rare condition. We encountered a 36-year-old woman with a palpable mass in the right breast. The radiologic findings were indicative of a fibroadenoma in the breast. Sonographic guided biopsy using a 14G core needle revealed the presence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) within the juvenile fibroadenoma. Focal excision was performed and the patient underwent radiation therapy in the right breast after surgery. PMID:26060554

  1. Radiologic Findings of Ductal Carcinoma in Situ Arising Within a Juvenile Fibroadenoma: Mammographic, Sonographic and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Breast MRI Features

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun Kyung; Cho, Kyu Ran; Seo, Bo Kyoung; Woo, Ok Hee; Lee, Jeong Hyeon; Song, Sung Eun; Bae, Jeong Won

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile fibroadenoma is an uncommon histologic variant of fibroadenoma that frequently shows a remarkable and rapid growth. The development of a carcinoma within a fibroadenoma, either in situ or invasive, is a rare condition. We encountered a 36-year-old woman with a palpable mass in the right breast. The radiologic findings were indicative of a fibroadenoma in the breast. Sonographic guided biopsy using a 14G core needle revealed the presence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) within the juvenile fibroadenoma. Focal excision was performed and the patient underwent radiation therapy in the right breast after surgery. PMID:26060554

  2. Five Year Outcome of 145 Patients With Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) After Accelerated Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ciervide, Raquel; Dhage, Shubhada; Guth, Amber; Shapiro, Richard L.; Axelrod, Deborah M.; Roses, Daniel F.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2012-06-01

    Background: Accelerated whole-breast radiotherapy (RT) with tumor bed boost in the treatment of early invasive breast cancer has demonstrated equivalent local control and cosmesis when compared with standard RT. Its efficacy in the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) remains unknown. Methods and Materials: Patients treated for DCIS with lumpectomy and negative margins were eligible for 2 consecutive hypofractionated whole-breast RT clinical trials. The first trial (New York University [NYU] 01-51) prescribed to the whole breast 42 Gy (2.8 Gy in 15 fractions) and the second trial (NYU 05-181) 40.5 Gy (2.7 Gy in 15 fractions) with an additional daily boost of 0.5 Gy to the surgical cavity. Results: Between 2002 and 2009, 145 DCIS patients accrued, 59 to the first protocol and 86 to the second trial. Median age was 56 years and 65% were postmenopausal at the time of treatment. Based on optimal sparing of normal tissue, 79% of the patients were planned and treated prone and 21% supine. At 5 years' median follow-up (60 months; range 2.6-105.5 months), 6 patients (4.1%) experienced an ipsilateral breast recurrence in all cases of DCIS histology. In 3/6 patients, recurrence occurred at the original site of DCIS and in the remaining 3 cases outside the original tumor bed. New contralateral breast cancers arose in 3 cases (1 DCIS and 2 invasive carcinomas). Cosmetic self-assessment at least 2 years after treatment is available in 125 patients: 91% reported good-to-excellent and 9% reported fair-to-poor outcomes. Conclusions: With a median follow-up of 5 years, the ipsilateral local recurrence rate is 4.1%, comparable to that reported from the NSABP (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project) trials that employed 50 Gy in 25 fractions of radiotherapy for DCIS. There were no invasive recurrences. These results provide preliminary evidence that accelerated hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy is a viable option for DCIS.

  3. Genome and transcriptome delineation of two major oncogenic pathways governing invasive ductal breast cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Aswad, Luay; Yenamandra, Surya Pavan; Ow, Ghim Siong; Grinchuk, Oleg; Ivshina, Anna V.; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) is a major histo-morphologic type of breast cancer. Histological grading (HG) of IDC is widely adopted by oncologists as a prognostic factor. However, HG evaluation is highly subjective with only 50%–85% inter-observer agreements. Specifically, the subjectivity in the assignment of the intermediate grade (histologic grade 2, HG2) breast cancers (comprising ~50% of IDC cases) results in uncertain disease outcome prediction and sub-optimal systemic therapy. Despite several attempts to identify the mechanisms underlying the HG classification, their molecular bases are poorly understood. We performed integrative bioinformatics analysis of TCGA and several other cohorts (total 1246 patients). We identified a 22-gene tumor aggressiveness grading classifier (22g-TAG) that reflects global bifurcation in the IDC transcriptomes and reclassified patients with HG2 tumors into two genetically and clinically distinct subclasses: histological grade 1-like (HG1-like) and histological grade 3-like (HG3-like). The expression profiles and clinical outcomes of these subclasses were similar to the HG1 and HG3 tumors, respectively. We further reclassified IDC into low genetic grade (LGG = HG1+HG1-like) and high genetic grade (HGG = HG3-like+HG3) subclasses. For the HG1-like and HG3-like IDCs we found subclass-specific DNA alterations, somatic mutations, oncogenic pathways, cell cycle/mitosis and stem cell-like expression signatures that discriminate between these tumors. We found similar molecular patterns in the LGG and HGG tumor classes respectively. Our results suggest the existence of two genetically-predefined IDC classes, LGG and HGG, driven by distinct oncogenic pathways. They provide novel prognostic and therapeutic biomarkers and could open unique opportunities for personalized systemic therapies of IDC patients. PMID:26474389

  4. Molecular evidence for progression of microglandular adenosis (MGA) to invasive carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sandra J; Simpson, Peter T; Da Silva, Leonard; Jayanthan, Janani; Reid, Lynne; Lakhani, Sunil R; Rosen, Paul Peter

    2009-04-01

    Microglandular adenosis (MGA) is an uncommon, benign breast lesion that is characterized by a proliferation of small uniform, round glands lined by a single layer of epithelial cells around open lumina with haphazard infiltrative growth in fibrous and fatty breast tissue. Although MGA usually has an indolent course, there is morphologic evidence that MGA can be a precursor for the development of intraductal and invasive ductal carcinoma. To investigate the possibility of such a transition, we studied 17 cases of MGA or atypical MGA some of which had given rise to carcinoma in situ (CIS) and/or invasive ductal carcinoma using the reticulin stain, immunohistochemistry (S-100, p63, Ki-67, and p53), and a molecular approach involving microdissection and high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization and MYC chromogenic in situ hybridization. MGA and carcinomas arising from MGA were typically negative for p63 and positive for S-100 and Ki-67 and occasionally positive for p53. High-resolution comparative genomic hybridization identified recurrent gains and losses in MGA (2q+, 5q-, 8q+, and 14q-) and atypical MGA (1q+, 5q-, 8q+, 14q-, and 15q-). Some examples of MGA and carcinomas arising from MGA harbored few gross chromosomal abnormalities whereas others had considerable genetic instability with widespread aberrations affecting numerous chromosomal arms. Such widespread genetic changes, together with recurrent loss of 5q and gain of 8q were reminiscent of those reported specifically for basal-like, estrogen receptor-negative, and BRCA1-associated breast tumors. Concordant genetic alterations were identified between MGA, atypical MGA, and higher risk lesions (CIS and invasive ductal carcinoma) and in some cases there was an accumulation of genetic alterations as cases "progressed" from MGA to atypical MGA, CIS, and invasive ductal carcinoma. The molecular data suggests that MGA, atypical MGA, and carcinoma arising in MGA in a single case were clonally related. This

  5. Outcomes in Patients Treated With Mastectomy for Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Dawn; Tyldesley, Scott; Alexander, Cheryl; Speers, Caroline; Truong, Pauline; Nichol, Alan; Wai, Elaine S.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To examine, in a large, population-based cohort of women, the risk factors for recurrence after mastectomy for pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and to identify which patients may benefit from postmastectomy radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Data were analyzed for 637 subjects with pure DCIS, diagnosed between January 1990 and December 1999, treated initially with mastectomy. Locoregional relapse (LRR), breast cancer-specific survival, and overall survival were described using the Kaplan-Meier method. Reported risk factors for LRR (age, margins, size, Van Nuys Prognostic Index, grade, necrosis, and histologic subtype) were analyzed by univariate (log-rank) and multivariate (Cox modeling) methods. Results: Median follow-up was 12.0 years. Characteristics of the cohort were median age 55 years, 8.6% aged ≤40 years, 30.5% tumors >4 cm, 42.5% grade 3 histology, 37.7% multifocal disease, and 4.9% positive margins. At 10 years, LRR was 1.0%, breast cancer-specific survival was 98.0%, and overall survival was 90.3%. All recurrences (n=12) involved ipsilateral chest wall disease, with the majority being invasive disease (11 of 12). None of the 12 patients with recurrence died of breast cancer; all were successfully salvaged (median follow-up of 4.4 years). Ten-year LRR was higher with age ≤40 years (7.5% vs 1.5%; P=.003). Conclusion: Mastectomy provides excellent locoregional control for DCIS. Routine use of postmastectomy radiation therapy is not justified. Young age (≤40 years) predicts slightly higher LRR, but possibly owing to the small number of cases with multiple risk factors for relapse, a subgroup with a high risk of LRR (ie, approximately 15%) was not identified.

  6. Predictors of Recurrent Ductal Carcinoma In Situ after Breast-Conserving Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Yeon; Kang, Guhyun; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Gwak, Geumhee; Shin, Young-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Local recurrence is a major concern in patients who have undergone surgery for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). The present study assessed whether the expression levels of hormone receptors, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and Ki-67, as well as resection margin status, tumor grade, age at diagnosis, and adjuvant hormonal therapy and radiotherapy (RT) are associated with recurrence in women with DCIS. Methods In total, 111 patients with DCIS were included in the present study. The invasive and noninvasive recurrence events were recorded. The clinicopathological features; resection margins; administration of hormonal therapy and RT; expression statuses of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and HER2; Ki-67 expression; and molecular subtypes were evaluated. Logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the risk factors for recurrence. Results Recurrence was noted in 27 of 111 cases (24.3%). Involvement of resection margins, low tumor grade, high Ki-67 expression, and RT were independently associated with an increase in the recurrence rate (p<0.05, Pearson chi-square test). The recurrence rate was not significantly associated with patient age; ER, PR, and HER2 statuses; molecular subtype; and hormonal therapy. Conclusion The results of the present study suggested that the involvement of resection margins, low tumor grade, high Ki-67 index, and the absence of adjuvant RT were independently associated with increased recurrence in patients with DCIS. Future studies should be conducted in a larger cohort of patients to further improve the identification of patients at high-risk for DCIS recurrence. PMID:27382395

  7. Impact of Margin Status on Local Recurrence After Mastectomy for Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Stephanie K.; Chen, Yu-Hui; Duggan, Margaret M.; Golshan, Mehra; Pochebit, Stephen; Punglia, Rinaa S.; Wong, Julia S.; Bellon, Jennifer R.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To examine the rate of local recurrence according to the margin status for patients with pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) treated by mastectomy. Methods and Materials: One hundred forty-five consecutive women who underwent mastectomy with or without radiation therapy for DCIS from 1998 to 2005 were included in this retrospective analysis. Only patients with pure DCIS were eligible; patients with microinvasion were excluded. The primary endpoint was local recurrence, defined as recurrence on the chest wall; regional and distant recurrences were secondary endpoints. Outcomes were analyzed according to margin status (positive, close (≤2 mm), or negative), location of the closest margin (superficial, deep, or both), nuclear grade, necrosis, receptor status, type of mastectomy, and receipt of hormonal therapy. Results: The primary cohort consisted of 142 patients who did not receive postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT). For those patients, the median follow-up time was 7.6 years (range, 0.6-13.0 years). Twenty-one patients (15%) had a positive margin, and 23 patients (16%) had a close (≤2 mm) margin. The deep margin was close in 14 patients and positive in 6 patients. The superficial margin was close in 13 patients and positive in 19 patients. One patient experienced an isolated invasive chest wall recurrence, and 1 patient had simultaneous chest wall, regional nodal, and distant metastases. The crude rates of chest wall recurrence were 2/142 (1.4%) for all patients, 1/21 (4.8%) for those with positive margins, 1/23 (4.3%) for those with close margins, and 0/98 for patients with negative margins. PMRT was given as part of the initial treatment to 3 patients, 1 of whom had an isolated chest wall recurrence. Conclusions: Mastectomy for pure DCIS resulted in a low rate of local or distant recurrences. Even with positive or close mastectomy margins, the rates of chest wall recurrences were so low that PMRT is likely not warranted.

  8. Developing in vitro models of human ductal carcinoma in situ from primary tissue explants.

    PubMed

    Brown, Daniel D; Dabbs, David J; Lee, Adrian V; McGuire, Kandace P; Ahrendt, Gretchen M; Bhargava, Rohit; Davidson, Nancy E; Brufsky, Adam M; Johnson, Ronald R; Oesterreich, Steffi; McAuliffe, Priscilla F

    2015-09-01

    Because there are currently no reliable predictors for progression of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive disease, nearly all patients receive comprehensive therapy, leading to over-treatment in many cases. Few in vitro models for studying DCIS progression have been developed. We report here the successful culture and expansion of primary DCIS from surgical specimens using a conditional reprogramming protocol. Patients with percutaneous core-needle biopsy demonstrating DCIS were enrolled in a tissue banking protocol after informed consent was received. Fresh tissue was taken from lumpectomy or mastectomy specimens, mechanically and enzymatically dissociated, cultured in medium conditioned by irradiated mouse fibroblasts and supplemented with rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, and characterized by immunocytochemistry. Out of 33 DCIS cases, 58% (19) were expanded for up to 2 months in culture, and 42% (14) were frozen immediately after mechanical dissociation for future growth. The cultures are almost exclusively composed of cytokeratin 8- and EpCAM-positive luminal and cytokeratin 14-, cytokeratin 5-, and p63-positive basal mammary epithelial cells, suggesting maintenance of heterogeneity in vitro. Furthermore, as assessed by luminal and basal marker expression, these cells retain their cellular identities both in the "conditionally reprogrammed" proliferative state and after conditioned media and ROCK inhibitor withdrawal. When grown to 100 % confluency, the cultures organize into luminal and basal layers as well as luminal compartments surrounded by basal cells. Primary cultures of DCIS derived directly from patient tissues can be generated and may serve as in vitro models for the study of DCIS. PMID:26283301

  9. Extent of ductal carcinoma in situ according to breast cancer subtypes: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Doebar, Shusma C; van den Broek, Esther C; Koppert, Linetta B; Jager, Agnes; Baaijens, Margreet H A; Obdeijn, Inge-Marie A M; van Deurzen, Carolien H M

    2016-07-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a precursor of invasive breast carcinoma (IBC). The DCIS component is often more extensive than the invasive component, which affects local control. The aim of our study was to analyze features of DCIS within different IBC subtypes, which may contribute to the optimization of personalized approaches for patients with IBC. Patients with IBC reported according to the synoptic reporting module in the Netherlands between 2009 and 2015 were included. Data extraction included characteristics of the invasive component and, if present, several features of the DCIS component. Resection margin status analyses were restricted to patients undergoing breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Differences between subtypes were tested by a Chi-square test, spearman's Rho test or a one-way ANOVA test. Overall, 36.937 cases of IBC were included. About half of the IBCs (n = 16.014; 43.4 %) were associated with DCIS. Her2+ IBC (irrespective of ER status) was associated with a higher prevalence of adjacent DCIS, a larger extent of DCIS and a higher rate of irradicality of the DCIS component as compared to ER+/Her2- and triple-negative subtypes (P < 0.0001 for all variables). The prevalence of DCIS in triple-negative IBC on the other hand was lowest. In this large population-based cohort study, we showed significant differences between the prevalence and extent of DCIS according to IBC subtypes, which is also reflected in the resection margin status in patients treated with BCS. Our data provide important information regarding the optimization of local therapy according to IBC subtypes. PMID:27318854

  10. Impact of Boost Radiation in the Treatment of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ: A Population-Based Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rakovitch, Eileen; Narod, Steven A.; Nofech-Moses, Sharon; Hanna, Wedad; Thiruchelvam, Deva; Saskin, Refik; Taylor, Carole; Tuck, Alan; Youngson, Bruce; Miller, Naomi; Done, Susan J.; Sengupta, Sandip; Elavathil, Leela; Jani, Prashant A.; Bonin, Michel; Metcalfe, Stephanie; Paszat, Lawrence

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To report the outcomes of a population of women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation and to evaluate the independent effect of boost radiation on the development of local recurrence. Methods and Materials: All women diagnosed with DCIS and treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy in Ontario from 1994 to 2003 were identified. Treatments and outcomes were identified through administrative databases and validated by chart review. The impact of boost radiation on the development of local recurrence was determined using survival analyses. Results: We identified 1895 cases of DCIS that were treated by breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy; 561 patients received boost radiation. The cumulative 10-year rate of local recurrence was 13% for women who received boost radiation and 12% for those who did not (P=.3). The 10-year local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) rate among women who did and who did not receive boost radiation was 88% and 87%, respectively (P=.27), 94% and 93% for invasive LRFS (P=.58), and was 95% and 93% for DCIS LRFS (P=.31). On multivariable analyses, boost radiation was not associated with a lower risk of local recurrence (hazard ratio = 0.82, 95% confidence interval 0.59-1.15) (P=.25). Conclusions: Among a population of women treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation for DCIS, additional (boost) radiation was not associated with a lower risk of local or invasive recurrence.

  11. Is Radiation Indicated in Patients With Ductal Carcinoma In Situ and Close or Positive Mastectomy Margins?

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Linda W.; Rabban, Joseph; Hwang, E. Shelley; Bevan, Alison; Alvarado, Michael; Ewing, Cheryl; Esserman, Laura; Fowble, Barbara

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: Resection margin status is one of the most significant factors for local recurrence in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) treated with breast-conserving surgery with or without radiation. However, its impact on chest wall recurrence in patients treated with mastectomy is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine chest wall recurrence rates in women with DCIS and close (<5 mm) or positive mastectomy margins in order to evaluate the potential role of radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1985 and 2005, 193 women underwent mastectomy for DCIS. Fifty-five patients had a close final margin, and 4 patients had a positive final margin. Axillary surgery was performed in 17 patients. Median follow-up was 8 years. Formal pathology review was conducted to measure and verify margin status. Nuclear grade, architectural pattern, and presence or absence of necrosis was recorded. Results: Median pathologic size of the DCIS in the mastectomy specimen was 4.5 cm. Twenty-two patients had DCIS of >5 cm or diffuse disease. Median width of the close final margin was 2 mm. Nineteen patients had margins of <1 mm. One of these 59 patients experienced a chest wall recurrence with regional adenopathy, followed by distant metastases 2 years following skin-sparing mastectomy. The DCIS was high-grade, 4 cm, with a 5-mm deep margin. A second patient developed an invasive cancer in the chest wall 20 years after her mastectomy for DCIS. This cancer was considered a new primary site arising in residual breast tissue. Conclusions: The risk of chest wall recurrence in this series of patients is 1.7% for all patients and 3.3% for high-grade DCIS. One out of 20 (5%) patients undergoing skin sparing or total skin-sparing mastectomy experienced a chest wall recurrence. This risk of a chest wall recurrence appears sufficiently low not to warrant a recommendation for postmastectomy radiation therapy for patients with margins of <5 mm. There were too few patients

  12. Large palpable ductal carcinoma in situ is Her-2 positive with high nuclear grade

    PubMed Central

    Monabati, Ahmad; Sokouti, Ali-Reza; Noori, Sadat Noori; Safaei, Akbar; Talei, Abd-Rasul; Omidvari, Shapoor; Azarpira, Negar

    2015-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast is a heterogeneous group with variable clinical presentation. The exact molecular mechanism is not known why some ductal carcinomas may reach to such a large size but still remains in situ. Although, molecular classification of DCIS lesions and nuclear grading are important for identification of more aggressive lesions but it is not sufficient. Our aim was to examine the expression pattern of immunohistochemical (IHC) markers of ER, PR, HER-2 in palpable DCIS lesions and compare with clinicopathological findings. Our center is referral hospital from South of Iran. Samples were obtained from fifty four patients with a diagnosis of palpable DCIS. Equivocal (2+) case in HER-2 IHC testing was more characterized by chromogenic in situ hybridization. The positive frequency of HER2, ER, and PR was 92%, 48%, and 37% respectively. Palpable DCIS lesions were significantly more HER-2 positive (92%). The DCIS cases were more likely to be of high nuclear grade (grade III) and Her-2 positive cases were more likely to be of high nuclear grade than intermediate grade. All ER negative tumors had high nuclear grade. The Her-2 positivity is suggested as the most important factor responsible for marked in situ proliferation and production of palpable mass. PMID:26097582

  13. Tumor antigens as proteogenomic biomarkers in invasive ductal carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of genetic biomarkers for human cancers are defined by statistical screening of high-throughput genomics data. While a large number of genetic biomarkers have been proposed for diagnostic and prognostic applications, only a small number have been applied in the clinic. Similarly, the use of proteomics methods for the discovery of cancer biomarkers is increasing. The emerging field of proteogenomics seeks to enrich the value of genomics and proteomics approaches by studying the intersection of genomics and proteomics data. This task is challenging due to the complex nature of transcriptional and translation regulatory mechanisms and the disparities between genomic and proteomic data from the same samples. In this study, we have examined tumor antigens as potential biomarkers for breast cancer using genomics and proteomics data from previously reported laser capture microdissected ER+ tumor samples. Results We applied proteogenomic analyses to study the genetic aberrations of 32 tumor antigens determined in the proteomic data. We found that tumor antigens that are aberrantly expressed at the genetic level and expressed at the protein level, are likely involved in perturbing pathways directly linked to the hallmarks of cancer. The results found by proteogenomic analysis of the 32 tumor antigens studied here, capture largely the same pathway irregularities as those elucidated from large-scale screening of genomics analyses, where several thousands of genes are often found to be perturbed. Conclusion Tumor antigens are a group of proteins recognized by the cells of the immune system. Specifically, they are recognized in tumor cells where they are present in larger than usual amounts, or are physiochemically altered to a degree at which they no longer resemble native human proteins. This proteogenomic analysis of 32 tumor antigens suggests that tumor antigens have the potential to be highly specific biomarkers for different cancers. PMID:25521819

  14. Preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging and contralateral breast cancer occurrence among older women with ductal carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-Yi; Long, Jessica B; Killelea, Brigid K; Evans, Suzanne B; Roberts, Kenneth B; Silber, Andrea; Gross, Cary P

    2016-07-01

    Although preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect mammographically occult contralateral breast cancers (CBCs) among women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), the impact of MRI on the incidence of subsequent CBC events is unclear. We examined whether MRI use decreases CBC occurrences and detection of invasive disease among women who develop a CBC. Utilizing the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare dataset, we assessed overall, synchronous (<6 months after primary cancer diagnosis), and subsequent (≥6 months after diagnosis, i.e., metachronous) CBC occurrence in women aged 67-94 years diagnosed with DCIS during 2004-2009, with follow-up through 2011. We applied a matched propensity score approach to compare the stage-specific incidence rate of CBC according to MRI use. Our sample consisted of 9166 beneficiaries, 1258 (13.7 %) of whom received preoperative MRI. After propensity score matching, preoperative MRI use was significantly associated with a higher synchronous CBC detection rate (108.6 vs. 29.7 per 1000 person-years; hazard ratio [HR] = 3.65; p < .001) with no significant differences in subsequent CBC rate (6.7 vs. 6.8 per 1000 person-years; HR = 0.90; p = .71). The 6-year cumulative incidence of any CBC (in situ plus invasive) remained significantly higher among women undergoing MRI, compared with those not undergoing MRI (9 vs. 4 %, p < .001). Women undergoing MRI also had a higher incidence of invasive CBC (4 vs. 3 %, p = .04). MRI use resulted in an increased detection of synchronous CBC but did not prevent subsequent CBC occurrence, suggesting that many of the undetected CBC lesions may not become clinically evident. PMID:27287780

  15. Diagnostic pitfall in a case of ductal carcinoma—in situ with microinvasion

    PubMed Central

    Momin, Yasmin A; Kulkarni, Medha P; Deshmukh, Bhakti D; Sulhyan, Kalpana R

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of microinvasive carcinoma of the breast cytologically diagnosed as ductal carcinoma — in situ in an 80-year-old lady with a breast lump. Extensive sampling of mastectomy specimen showed ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Many ducts showed stromal reaction — periductal sclerosis and lymphocytic infiltration—features suggestive of microinvasion. However, no definite invasion was noted histologically. Immunohistochemical study highlighted the microinvasive foci. PMID:27279686

  16. A Self-Folding Hydrogel In Vitro Model for Ductal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kwag, Hye Rin; Serbo, Janna V; Korangath, Preethi; Sukumar, Saraswati; Romer, Lewis H; Gracias, David H

    2016-04-01

    A significant challenge in oncology is the need to develop in vitro models that accurately mimic the complex microenvironment within and around normal and diseased tissues. Here, we describe a self-folding approach to create curved hydrogel microstructures that more accurately mimic the geometry of ducts and acini within the mammary glands, as compared to existing three-dimensional block-like models or flat dishes. The microstructures are composed of photopatterned bilayers of poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA), a hydrogel widely used in tissue engineering. The PEGDA bilayers of dissimilar molecular weights spontaneously curve when released from the underlying substrate due to differential swelling ratios. The photopatterns can be altered via AutoCAD-designed photomasks so that a variety of ductal and acinar mimetic structures can be mass-produced. In addition, by co-polymerizing methacrylated gelatin (methagel) with PEGDA, microstructures with increased cell adherence are synthesized. Biocompatibility and versatility of our approach is highlighted by culturing either SUM159 cells, which were seeded postfabrication, or MDA-MB-231 cells, which were encapsulated in hydrogels; cell viability is verified over 9 and 15 days, respectively. We believe that self-folding processes and associated tubular, curved, and folded constructs like the ones demonstrated here can facilitate the design of more accurate in vitro models for investigating ductal carcinoma. PMID:26831041

  17. Health behavior change following a diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ: An opportunity to improve health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Berkman, Amy M; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Dittus, Kim; Hart, Vicki; Vatovec, Christine M; King, John G; James, Ted A; Lakoski, Susan G; Sprague, Brian L

    2015-11-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a non-invasive breast cancer that comprises approximately 20% of new breast cancer diagnoses. DCIS is predominantly detected by screening mammography prior to the development of any clinical symptoms. Prognosis following a DCIS diagnosis is excellent, due to both the availability of effective treatments and the frequently benign nature of the disease. However, a DCIS diagnosis and its treatment have psychological and physical impacts that often lead to adverse changes in health-related behaviors, including changes in physical activity, body weight, alcohol intake, and smoking, which may represent a greater threat to the woman's overall health than the DCIS itself. Depending on age at diagnosis, women diagnosed with DCIS are 3-13 times more likely to die from non-breast cancer related causes, such as cardiovascular disease, than from breast cancer. Thus, the maintenance and improvement of healthy behaviors that influence a variety of outcomes after diagnosis may warrant increased attention during DCIS management. This may also represent an important opportunity to promote the adoption of healthy behaviors, given that DCIS carries the psychological impact of a cancer diagnosis but also a favorable prognosis. Particular focus is needed to address these issues in vulnerable patient subgroups with pre-existing higher rates of unhealthy behaviors and demonstrated health disparities. PMID:25858806

  18. Glucose Uptake and Intracellular pH in a Mouse Model of Ductal Carcinoma In situ (DCIS) Suggests Metabolic Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Rebecca C.; Hubbard, Neil E.; Damonte, Patrizia; Mori, Hidetoshi; Pénzváltó, Zsófia; Pham, Cindy; Koehne, Amanda L.; Go, Aiza C.; Anderson, Steve E.; Cala, Peter M.; Borowsky, Alexander D.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms for the progression of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive breast carcinoma remain unclear. Previously we showed that the transition to invasiveness in the mammary intraepithelial neoplastic outgrowth (MINO) model of DCIS does not correlate with its serial acquisition of genetic mutations. We hypothesized instead that progression to invasiveness depends on a change in the microenvironment and that precancer cells might create a more tumor-permissive microenvironment secondary to changes in glucose uptake and metabolism. Immunostaining for glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) and the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase 9 (CAIX) in tumor, normal mammary gland and MINO (precancer) tissue showed differences in expression. The uptake of the fluorescent glucose analog dye, 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl) amino]-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-NBDG), reflected differences in the cellular distributions of glucose uptake in normal mammary epithelial cells (nMEC), MINO, and Met1 cancer cells, with a broad distribution in the MINO population. The intracellular pH (pHi) measured using the fluorescent ratio dye 2′,7′-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-155 carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) revealed expected differences between normal and cancer cells (low and high, respectively), and a mixed distribution in the MINO cells, with a subset of cells in the MINO having an increased rate of acidification when proton efflux was inhibited. Invasive tumor cells had a more alkaline baseline pHi with high rates of proton production coupled with higher rates of proton export, compared with nMEC. MINO cells displayed considerable variation in baseline pHi that separated into two distinct populations: MINO high and MINO low. MINO high had a noticeably higher mean acidification rate compared with nMEC, but relatively high baseline pHi similar to tumor cells. MINO low cells also had an increased acidification rate compared with nMEC, but with a more acidic pHi similar to nMEC. These findings

  19. Differentiating fibroadenoma and ductal carcinoma in situ from normal breast tissue by multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Yuting; Wu, Yan; Lian, Yuane; Fu, Fangmeng; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    Fibroadenoma (FA) is the most common benign tumor of the female breast and several studies have reported that women with it have increased risk of breast cancer. While the ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a very early form of breast cancer. Thus, early detections of FA and DCIS are critical for improving breast tumor outcome and survival. In this paper, we use multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to obtain the high-contrast images of fresh, unfixed, unstained human breast specimens (normal breast tissue, FA and DCIS). Our results show that MPM has the ability to identify the characteristics of FA and DCIS including changes of duct architecture and collagen morphology. These results are consistent with the histological results. With the advancement of MPM, the technique has potential ability to serve as a real-time noninvasive imaging tool for early detection of breast tumor.

  20. Issues Affecting the Loco-regional and Systemic Management of Patients with Invasive Lobular Carcinoma of the Breast.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Carmel; Clemons, Mark; Addison, Christina; Robertson, Susan; Arnaout, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) of the breast is the second most common type of invasive breast carcinoma accounting for 8-14% of all breast cancers. Traditional management of ILC has followed similar paradigms as that for invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). However, ILC represents a pathologically, clinically and biologically unique variant of breast cancer with particular management challenges. These challenges are seen in both the loco-regional management of ILC; where ILC tumors tend to avoid detection and hence present as more clinically advanced and surgically challenging carcinomas, and the systemic management with a unique response pattern to standard systemic therapies. Because of these challenges, the outcome for patients with ILC has likely lagged behind the continued improvements seen in outcome for patients with IDC. Here, we discuss some of the unique challenges ILC presents and discuss possible management strategies to best overcome the difficulties in the loco-regional and systemic management of patients with ILC. PMID:26782951

  1. Efficacy of Contrast-enhanced Harmonic Endoscopic Ultrasonography in the Diagnosis of Pancreatic Ductal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Uekitani, Toshiyuki; Kaino, Seiji; Harima, Hirofumi; Suenaga, Shigeyuki; Sen-yo, Manabu; Sakaida, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Distinguishing pancreatic ductal carcinoma (DC) from other pancreatic masses remains challenging. This study aims at evaluating the efficacy of contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasonography (CEH-EUS) in the diagnosis of DC. Patients and Methods: Forty-nine patients with solid pancreatic mass lesions underwent CEH-EUS. EUS (B-mode) was used to evaluate the inner echoes, distributions, and borders of the masses. The vascular patterns of the masses were evaluated with CEH-EUS at 30–50 s (early phase) and 70–90 s (late phase) after the administration of Sonazoid®. Results: The final diagnoses included DCs (37), mass-forming pancreatitis (6), endocrine neoplasms (3), a solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (1), a metastatic carcinoma (1), and an acinar cell carcinoma (1). The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the diagnoses of DC in hypoechoic masses using EUS (B-mode) were 89.2%, 16.7%, and 71.4%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for the diagnosis of DC in hypovascular masses using CEH-EUS were 73.0%, 91.7%, and 77.6% in the early phase and 83.8%, 91.7%, and 85.7% in the late phase, respectively. Conclusions: CEH-EUS for the diagnosis of DC is superior to EUS. CEH-EUS in the late phase was particularly efficacious in the diagnosis of DC. PMID:27184637

  2. A comparison of cell cycle markers in well-differentiated lobular and ductal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Soslow, R A; Carlson, D L; Horenstein, M G; Osborne, M P

    2000-05-01

    Infiltrating lobular carcinoma (ILC) and infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) are similar in many respects and their histologic features occasionally overlap. Despite the many similarities, some clinical follow-up data and the patterns of metastasis suggest that ILC and IDC are biologically distinct. Unfortunately, most breast cancer research has focused almost exclusively on the ductal subtype or has not stressed the biologic or molecular genetic distinctions between breast carcinoma subtypes. Several reports have suggested the possibility that ILCs and IDCs differ with respect to expression of antigens involved in proliferation and cell cycle regulation. Therefore, we undertook an immunohistochemical evaluation of cell cycle related antigens in ILCs, including histologic variants thought to represent aggressive neoplasms, and IDCs matched for histologic grade (Modified Bloom-Richardson Grade I). We believe that different antigen expression profiles could elucidate the biological distinctiveness of breast carcinoma subtypes and possibly provide diagnostically relevant information. We studied the expression of the following antigens in 28 archived, formalin-fixed ILCs and 34 well-differentiated IDCs: estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), Her 2-neu, mib-1, cyclin D1, p27, p53, mdm-2 and bcl-2. 94% of ILCs and 100% of IDCs expressed ER; 75% of ILCs and 76% of IDCs expressed PR; 4% of ILCs and 13% of IDCs expressed c cerb B-2; ILCs and IDCs both expressed mib-1 in approximately 10% of lesional cells; 82% of ILCs and 54% of IDCs expressed cyclin D1; 90% of ILCs and 83% IDCs expressed p27 strongly; 4% of ILCs and 4% of IDCs expressed p53, 25% of ILCs and 33% of IDCs expressed mdm-2; 96% of ILCs and 100% of IDCs expressed bcl-2. None of the apparent differences were statistically significant. The ILC variants demonstrated immunophenotypes that were essentially similar to ILCs of the usual type. We conclude that ILCs and well-differentiated IDCs show similar

  3. Monoclonal antibody BrE-3 participation in a multivariate prognostic model for infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Chan, C M; Baratta, F S; Ozzello, L; Ceriani, R L

    1994-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (MoAb) BrE-3, an anti-human milk fat globule (HMFG) MoAb, is used here as a novel prognostic indicator for survival and relapse time in patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast. A scoring system (4-Score method) was developed to this effect that measured, in a statistically reliable fashion, the level of expression of the epitope for MoAb BrE-3 in the cytoplasm and membranes of breast carcinoma cells in paraffin-embedded sections. In univariate analysis, data obtained by the 4-Score Method as well as data from traditional prognostic indicators (tumor size, axillary node status, and grade of differentiation) were found to be associated with patient survival and relapse. In multivariate analysis, using a Cox proportional hazards regression model, levels of expression of BrE-3 epitope plus tumor size and axillary node status were weighted and combined in an Individual Linear Composite Prognostic Score (ILCPS) that had a high level of association with survival and relapse time in this sample model of patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast. This level of association was found to be higher than the level of association for any other combination of traditional or 4-Score method variables. The level of expression of BrE-3 significantly adds to the prognostic capacity of traditional prognostic markers for infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast. PMID:7981443

  4. Association between dynamic contrast enhanced MRI imaging features and WHO histopathological grade in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, JUAN; YU, JIANQUN; PENG, YULAN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and World Health Organization (WHO) histopathological grade in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer. A retrospective analysis on the results of DCE-MRI of 92 patients, who were diagnosed with invasive ductal breast cancer following surgery or biopsy, and these results were correlated with WHO histopathological grade. The statistical analysis demonstrated that the tumor size, shape and characteristics of early enhancement were associated with the WHO histopathological grade: The larger the lesion's long diameter, the higher the WHO histopathological grade; the WHO histopathological grades of round and oval masses were relatively lower, while those of lobulated and irregular masses were higher; and tumors with heterogeneous and ring-like enhancement exhibited higher WHO histopathological grades, while those of homogeneous enhancement were lower. The lesion's margin shape was not associated with the WHO histopathological grade. The present study demonstrates that features of DCE-MRI and WHO histopathological grade in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer are correlated, and these MRI features could be used to evaluate the biological behavior and prognosis of lesions. PMID:27123145

  5. Morphometric grading of invasive ductal breast cancer. I. Thresholds for nuclear grade.

    PubMed Central

    Kronqvist, P.; Kuopio, T.; Collan, Y.

    1998-01-01

    We analysed 170 histological samples of invasive ductal breast cancer from years 1988-91 by computerized nuclear morphometry, to find objective and quantitative thresholds for nuclear grade. Based on Kaplan-Meier curves reflecting survival and recurrence of disease and univariate analysis by Cox's regression, optimal thresholds were determined for features related to nuclear size and size variation. In our material, with mean follow-up time of 5 years 9 months, the determined thresholds for nuclear profile area (32 microm2 and 47 microm2), nuclear diameter (6.4 microm and 7.4 microm) and mean shortest nuclear axis (4.8 microm and 6.4 microm) best separated the cases with favourable, intermediate and unfavourable course of disease. In this material from the era of mammography and adjuvant therapy, the mean shortest nuclear axis was found to be a significant prognostic factor, with a risk ratio (RR) exceeded only by that of tumour size (RRs 2.9- and 3.5-fold respectively). The results suggest that morphometric grading criteria can be developed for application in Bloom-Richardson grading and in the Nottingham Prognostic Index. PMID:9743304

  6. Predictors of Microvascular Invasion in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yo-Ichi; Shirabe, Ken; Aishima, Shinichi; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2015-09-01

    This chapter covers a range of important topics in the evaluation of the microvascular invasion (MVI) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) before treatment. The malignant potential of HCC is reflected by the types of MVI such as portal venous (vp), hepatic vein (vv) or bile duct (b) infiltration. The identification of the type of MVI in HCC has a key role in decisions regarding the effective treatment of HCC. Here, we describe the possible and important predictors of MVI in HCC. PMID:26398341

  7. Diagnostic underestimation of atypical ductal hyperplasia and ductal carcinoma in situ at percutaneous core needle and vacuum-assisted biopsies of the breast in a Brazilian reference institution*

    PubMed Central

    Badan, Gustavo Machado; Roveda Júnior, Decio; Piato, Sebastião; Fleury, Eduardo de Faria Castro; Campos, Mário Sérgio Dantas; Pecci, Carlos Alberto Ferreira; Ferreira, Felipe Augusto Trocoli; D'Ávila, Camila

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the rates of diagnostic underestimation at stereotactic percutaneous core needle biopsies (CNB) and vacuum-assisted biopsies (VABB) of nonpalpable breast lesions, with histopathological results of atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) or ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) subsequently submitted to surgical excision. As a secondary objective, the frequency of ADH and DCIS was determined for the cases submitted to biopsy. Materials and Methods Retrospective review of 40 cases with diagnosis of ADH or DCIS on the basis of biopsies performed between February 2011 and July 2013, subsequently submitted to surgery, whose histopathological reports were available in the internal information system. Biopsy results were compared with those observed at surgery and the underestimation rate was calculated by means of specific mathematical equations. Results The underestimation rate at CNB was 50% for ADH and 28.57% for DCIS, and at VABB it was 25% for ADH and 14.28% for DCIS. ADH represented 10.25% of all cases undergoing biopsy, whereas DCIS accounted for 23.91%. Conclusion The diagnostic underestimation rate at CNB is two times the rate at VABB. Certainty that the target has been achieved is not the sole determining factor for a reliable diagnosis. Removal of more than 50% of the target lesion should further reduce the risk of underestimation. PMID:26929454

  8. Cost-effectiveness of radiation therapy following conservative surgery for ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, W. Warren . E-mail: wsuh@lroc.harvard.edu; Hillner, Bruce E.; Pierce, Lori J.; Hayman, James A.

    2005-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the cost-effectiveness of radiation therapy (RT) in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Methods and materials: A Markov model was constructed for a theoretical cohort of 55-year-old women with DCIS over a life-time horizon. Probability estimates for local noninvasive (N-INV), local invasive (INV), and distant recurrences were obtained from National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) B-17. Utilities for eight nonmetastatic health states were collected from both healthy women and DCIS patients. Direct medical (2002 Medicare fee schedule) and nonmedical costs (time and transportation) of RT were ascertained. Results: For BCS + RT vs. BCS alone, the estimated N-INV and INV rates at 12 years were 9% and 8% vs. 16% and 18%, respectively. The incremental cost of adding RT was $3300 despite an initial RT cost of $8700 due to higher local recurrence-related salvage costs incurred with the BCS alone strategy. An increase of 0.09 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) primarily reflected the lower risk of INV with RT, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $36,700/QALY. Sensitivity analyses revealed the ICER to be affected by baseline probability of a local recurrence, relative efficacy of RT in preventing INV, negative impact of an INV on quality of life, and cost of initial RT. Cost of salvage BCS + RT and source of utilities (healthy women vs. DCIS patients) influenced the ICER albeit to a lesser degree. Conclusions: Addition of RT following BCS for patients with DCIS should not be withheld because of concerns regarding its cost-effectiveness.

  9. Ductal carcinoma in situ: knowledge of associated risks and prognosis among Latina and non-Latina white women.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Aparna R; Kaplan, Celia Patricia; Burke, Nancy J; Livaudais-Toman, Jennifer; Hwang, E Shelley; Karliner, Leah S

    2013-09-01

    While not itself life-threatening, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) can progress to invasive disease if untreated, and confers an increased risk of future breast cancer. We investigated knowledge of DCIS among a cohort of English- and Spanish-speaking Latina and English-speaking non-Latina white women previously treated for DCIS. We examined knowledge of DCIS with four true/false statements about risk of invasive disease, breast cancer recurrence, and prognosis. For each knowledge statement, we modeled the odds of a correct answer by language-ethnicity (English-speaking Latinas, Spanish-speaking Latinas, and English-speaking whites) adjusting for demographics, health history, and treatment factors. Of 710 participants, 52 % were English-speaking whites, 21 % English-speaking Latinas, and 27 % Spanish-speaking Latinas. Less than half (41 %) of participants were aware that DCIS is not life-threatening and only 32 % knew that surgical treatment choice does not impact mortality; whereas two-thirds (67 %) understood that DCIS confers increased risk of future breast cancer, and almost all (92 %) knew that DCIS, if untreated, could become invasive. Only three Spanish-speakers used professional interpreters during discussions with their physicians. In adjusted analyses, compared to English-speaking whites, both English- and Spanish-speaking Latinas had significantly lower odds of knowing that DCIS was not life-threatening (OR, 95 % CI 0.6, 0.4-0.9 and 0.5, 0.3-0.9, respectively). In contrast, Spanish-speaking Latinas had a twofold higher odds of knowing that DCIS increases risk of future breast cancer (OR, 95 % CI 2.6, 1.6-4.4), but English-speaking Latinas were no different from English-speaking whites. Our data suggest that physicians are more successful at conveying the risks conferred by DCIS than the nuances of DCIS as a non-life-threatening diagnosis. This uneven communication is most marked for Spanish-speaking Latinas. In addition to the use of professional

  10. Mucocele-like tumor associated with ductal carcinoma in situ diagnosed as mucinous carcinoma by fine-needle aspiration cytology: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Shoichi; Nishimura, Reiki; Osako, Tomofumi; Okumura, Yasuhiro; Hayashi, Mitsuhiro; Toyozumi, Yasuo; Arima, Nobuyuki

    2012-02-01

    Mucocele-like tumors (MLTs) of the breast are rare, with only 11 cases reported from Japan and 35 cases from other countries. MLTs of the breast were first described by Rosen in 1986. They are believed to be related to atypical ductal hyperplasia, ductal carcinoma, or mucinous carcinoma. It is difficult to diagnose this tumor preoperatively, and especially difficult to differentiate between benign and malignant forms. We report a case of MLT associated with ductal carcinoma in situ, which was initially diagnosed as fibroadenoma by mammography and ultrasonography, and as mucinous carcinoma by fine-needle aspiration cytology. We discuss the characteristic findings of imaging and the appropriate clinical treatment of this tumor. The characteristic image first signals the possibility of this tumor, following which the diagnosis can be confirmed by pathological examination of a fully excised tumor specimen. Breast-conserving surgery is recommended because of the low risk of high-grade malignancy, even when malignancy is confirmed, and lymph node dissection may be avoided. PMID:22237901

  11. The Polycomb group protein RING1B is overexpressed in ductal breast carcinoma and is required to sustain FAK steady state levels in breast cancer epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Almudena; Panoutsopoulou, Konstantina; Corominas, Josep Maria; Gimeno, Ramón; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; Martín-Caballero, Juan; Morales, Saleta; Lobato, Tania; Martínez-Romero, Carles; Farias, Eduardo F.; Mayol, Xavier; Cano, Amparo; Hernández-Muáoz, Inmaculada

    2014-01-01

    In early stages of metastasis malignant cells must acquire phenotypic changes to enhance their migratory behavior and their ability to breach the matrix surrounding tumors and blood vessel walls. Epigenetic regulation of gene expression allows the acquisition of these features that, once tumoral cells have escape from the primary tumor, can be reverted. Here we report that the expression of the Polycomb epigenetic repressor Ring1B is enhanced in tumoral cells that invade the stroma in human ductal breast carcinoma and its expression is coincident with that of Fak in these tumors. Ring1B knockdown in breast cancer cell lines revealed that Ring1B is required to sustain Fak expression in basal conditions as well as in Tgfβ-treated cells. Functionally, endogenous Ring1B is required for cell migration and invasion in vitro and for in vivo invasion of the mammary fat pad by tumoral cells. Finally we identify p63 as a target of Ring1B to regulate Fak expression: Ring1B depletion results in enhanced p63 expression, which in turns represses Fak expression. Importantly, Fak downregulation upon Ring1B depletion is dependent on p63 expression. Our findings provide new insights in the biology of the breast carcinoma and open new avenues for breast cancer prognosis and therapy. PMID:24742605

  12. Minimally invasive follicular thyroid carcinomas: prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Stenson, Gustav; Nilsson, Inga-Lena; Mu, Ninni; Larsson, Catharina; Lundgren, Catharina Ihre; Juhlin, C Christofer; Höög, Anders; Zedenius, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Although minimally invasive follicular thyroid carcinoma (MI-FTC) is regarded as an indolent tumour, treatment strategies remain controversial. Our aim was to investigate the outcome for patients with MI-FTC and to identify prognostic parameters to facilitate adequate treatment and follow-up. This retrospective follow-up study involved all cases of MI-FTC operated at the Karolinska University Hospital between 1986 and 2009. Outcome was analysed using death from MI-FTC as endpoint. Fifty-eight patients (41 women and 17 men) with MI-FTC were identified. The median follow-up time was 140 (range 21-308) months. Vascular invasion was observed in 36 cases and was associated with larger tumour size [median 40 (20-76) compared with 24 (10-80) mm for patients with capsular invasion only (P = 0.001)] and older patients [54 (20-92) vs. 44 (11-77) years; P = 0.019]. Patients with vascular invasion were more often treated with thyroidectomy (21/36 compared to 7/22 with capsular invasion only; P = 0.045). Five patients died from metastatic disease of FTC after a median follow-up of 114 (range 41-193) months; all were older than 50 years (51-72) at the time of the initial surgery; vascular invasion was present in all tumours and all but one were treated with thyroidectomy. Univariate analysis identified combined capsular and vascular invasion (P = 0.034), age at surgery ≥50 years (P = 0.023) and male gender (P = 0.005) as related to risk of death from MI-FTC. MI-FTC should not be considered a purely indolent disease. Age at diagnosis and the existence of combined capsular and vascular invasion were identified as important prognostic factors. PMID:26858184

  13. Classification of ductal carcinoma in-situ by image analysis of calcifications from mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jon; Dance, David R.; Davies, David H.; Yeoman, L. J.; Michell, M. J.; Humphreys, S.

    1993-07-01

    Image analysis methods have been developed to characterize calcifications associated with Ductal Carcinoma in-Situ (DCIS), and to differentiate between those having comedo or non- comedo histology. Cases were selected from the U.K. breast screening program, and in each case the histology and a magnified mammographic view were obtained. The films were digitized at 25 micron sampling size and 8 bit grey level resolution. Calcifications were manually segmented from the normal breast background, and a radiologist, experienced in breast screening, checked the labelling of a calcifications. An algorithm was developed to classify firstly the individual objects within a film, and secondly the film itself. The algorithm automatically selected the combination of features giving the least estimated Bayes error for a set of object-oriented features evaluated for each calcification. The k-nearest neighbors statistical approach was then used to classify individual objects giving a ratio of comedo to non-comedo objects for a set of training films. Films were classified by applying a threshold to this ratio. In the classification of typical comedo from typical non-comedo the success rate of the algorithm was 100% for a training set of 4 cases and test set of 16 cases.

  14. Long-term Survival after Resection of HER2+ Infiltrating Ductal Carcinoma Metastasis to the Brainstem.

    PubMed

    Awad, Al-Wala; Zaidi, Hasan A; Awad, Al-Homam; Spetzler, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system is a common site of metastatic spread from neoplasms in distant organs, including breast, bone, and lung. The decision to surgically treat these metastatic lesions is often challenging, especially in the setting of systemic disease or when eloquent brain regions are involved. Treating metastatic disease in the brainstem can be technically difficult, and in many institutions, considered a contraindication to surgical intervention, given the relatively high risk of new postoperative neurological deficits. Herein, we report a case of metastatic ductal carcinoma of the breast with spread to the pontine-medullary junction that was treated with aggressive surgical resection and chronic hormonal therapy. After surgical excision of the brainstem lesion, the patient remained asymptomatic and was maintained on trastuzumab therapy over a 10-year follow-up period, with no radiographic or clinical evidence of recurrent disease. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient treated for a solitary metastasis to the brainstem with long-term survival. PMID:26929889

  15. Proteomic profiling of 13 paired ductal infiltrating breast carcinomas and non-tumoral adjacent counterparts.

    PubMed

    Pucci-Minafra, Ida; Cancemi, Patrizia; Marabeti, Maria Rita; Albanese, Nadia Ninfa; Di Cara, Gianluca; Taormina, Pietra; Marrazzo, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    According to recent statistics, breast cancer remains one of the leading causes of death among women in Western countries. Breast cancer is a complex and heterogeneous disease, presently classified into several subtypes according to their cellular origin. Among breast cancer histotypes, infiltrating ductal carcinoma represents the most common and potentially aggressive form. Despite the current progress achieved in early cancer detection and treatment, including the new generation of molecular therapies, there is still need for identification of multiparametric biomarkers capable of discriminating between cancer subtypes and predicting cancer progression for personalized therapies. One established step in this direction is the proteomic strategy, expected to provide enough information on breast cancer profiling. To this aim, in the present study we analyzed 13 breast cancer tissues and their matched non-tumoral tissues by 2-DE. Collectively, we identified 51 protein spots, corresponding to 34 differentially expressed proteins, which may represent promising candidate biomarkers for molecular-based diagnosis of breast cancer and for pattern discovery. The relevance of these proteins as factors contributing to breast carcinogenesis is discussed. PMID:21136615

  16. Do screen-detected lobular and ductal carcinoma present with different mammographic features?

    PubMed

    Garnett, S; Wallis, M; Morgan, G

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate any difference in the shape and location of infiltrating lobular carcinoma (ILC) with respect to the parenchymal density between the cranio-caudal (CC) and medio-lateral oblique (MLO) mammographic views. Six film-readers independently re-read 59 ILC mammograms and a matched sample of 59 infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) mammograms from one 3-year screening round to quantify lesion characteristics. There is fair to moderate reader agreement for parenchymal pattern, lesion shape and location (kappa = 0.41-0.60). Both ILC (33/60, 55%) and IDC (22/65, 37%) appear as a spiculate mass more often on the CC view than on the MLO view. 41% (25/60) of the ILC spiculate masses become architectural distortions or asymmetric densities on the MLO view. No more ILC lesions (4/60, 7%) are seen in dense breasts than IDC (5/65, 8%), but ILC is mainly associated with (58/60, 97%), and rarely isolated from (2/60, 3%), the main glandular density. The appearance of ILC is significantly different between the MLO and CC views (paired Wilcoxon test: z = -17.059; significance level

  17. Imaging approaches to diagnosis and management of common ductal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Ferris-James, Diana M; Iuanow, Elaine; Mehta, Tejas S; Shaheen, Rola M; Slanetz, Priscilla J

    2012-01-01

    Ductal disease is an important, often overlooked, and poorly understood issue in breast imaging that results in delays in diagnosis and patient care. The differential diagnosis for an intraductal mass is broad and includes inspissated secretions, infection, hemorrhage, solitary or multiple papillomas, and malignancy. Each breast is composed of eight or more ductal systems, with most disease arising in the terminal ductal-lobular unit. Imaging evaluation of the ductal system usually entails a combination of mammography, galactography, ultrasonography (US), and in some cases magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The most common finding with all modalities is ductal dilatation with a focal or diffuse abnormality. Benign diseases of the ducts include duct ectasia, blocked ducts, inflammatory infiltrates, periductal mastitis, apocrine metaplasia, intraductal papillomas, and papillomatosis. Malignant diseases of the ducts include ductal carcinoma in situ, invasive ductal carcinoma, and Paget disease. Most commonly performed with US or MR imaging guidance, percutaneous biopsy methods are helpful in diagnosis and management of ductal findings. Because most findings are smaller than 1 cm, located within a duct, and thus sometimes not visible after a single pass, vacuum-assisted devices help improve the accuracy of sampling. PMID:22786991

  18. Gastric Metastasis of Triple Negative Invasive Lobular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Geredeli, Caglayan; Dogru, Osman; Omeroglu, Ethem; Yilmaz, Farise; Cicekci, Faruk

    2015-05-01

    Invasive lobular carcinomas are the second most common type (5% to 15%) of invasive breast carcinomas. The most frequent sites of breast cancer metastasis are the local and distant lymph nodes, brain, lung, liver, and bones; metastasis to the gastrointestinal system, especially to the stomach, is rare. When a mass is detected in an unusual place in a patient with invasive lobular carcinoma, it should be kept in mind that such a mass may be either a second primary carcinoma or the metastasis of an invasive lobular carcinoma. In this report, we present a case of gastric metastasis from triple-negative invasive lobular breast cancer. It is important to make an accurate diagnosis by distinguishing gastric metastasis from breast cancer in order to select the best initial treatment for systemic diseases of breast cancer. Considering our case, healthcare professionals should take into account that cases with invasive lobular breast cancer may experience unusual metastases. PMID:26266010

  19. Risk prediction for local versus regional/metastatic tumors after initial ductal carcinoma in situ diagnosis treated by lumpectomy.

    PubMed

    Molinaro, Annette M; Sison, Jennette D; Ljung, Britt-Marie; Tlsty, Thea D; Kerlikowske, Karla

    2016-06-01

    Among women diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), we identified factors associated with local invasive cancer (LIC) and regional/metastatic invasive cancer (RMIC) and provide 10-year risks based on clinically relevant factors. We created a retrospective, population-based cohort of 1492 women with an initial diagnosis of DCIS (1983-1996) treated by lumpectomy alone. Histological and molecular markers (Ki67, ER, PR, COX-2, p16, ERBB2) were collected on DCIS cases with a subsequent tumor (DCIS, LIC, or RMIC) and a subsample of frequency-matched controls without subsequent tumors. Competing risks methods were used to identify factors associated with LIC and RMIC and cumulative incidence methods to estimate 10-year risks for combinations of factors. Median follow-up time was 12.6 years (range 0.5-29.5 years). The overall 10-year risk of LIC (11.9 %) was higher than for RMIC (3.8 %). About half of women with initial DCIS lesions are detected by mammography and p16 negative and have a 10-year risk of LIC of 6.2 % (95 % CI 5.8-6.8 %) and RMIC of 1.2 % (95 % CI 1.1-1.3 %). Premenopausal women whose DCIS lesion was p16 positive or p16 negative and detected by palpation had high 10-year risk of LIC of 23.0 % (95 % CI 19.3-27.4 %). Ten-year risk of RMIC was highest at 22.5 % (95 % CI 13.8-48.1 %) for those positive for p16, COX-2, and ERRB2, and negative for ER, but prevalence of this group is low at 3 %. Ten-year risk of LIC and RMIC is low for the majority diagnosed with DCIS. Combinations of molecular markers and method of detection of initial DCIS lesion can differentiate women at low and high risk of LIC and RMIC. PMID:27146587

  20. Reporting the greatest linear extent of ductal carcinoma in situ on needle core biopsy.

    PubMed

    Reisenbichler, Emily S; Hameed, Omar

    2016-04-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast is staged as pTis regardless of size; however, extent of DCIS correlates with local recurrence rates and likelihood of close or positive margins. As a result, DCIS extent influences patient management and is an important element in the College of American Pathologists tumor summary checklist for excision specimens. There are no recommendations regarding routine reporting of DCIS extent on needle core biopsy material, and to our knowledge, no systematic studies have evaluated the impact of reporting this in biopsy material. Consecutive cases of DCIS performed or reviewed at our institution were identified by pathology report search over a 7-year period. The greatest linear extent of DCIS on core biopsy was compared with the estimated extent in the excision. Of 241 total cases, there were 157 (65%) cases in which the DCIS extent on biopsy was smaller, 13 (5%) cases in which the sizes were equal, and 70 (29%) cases in which the biopsy size was greater, including 30 (12%) with no residual tumor on excision. Mean extent was greater on excision than on core biopsy (16.0 versus 5.7 mm; P < .0001); however, the opposite was seen when only small tumors (≤10 mm final size) were considered (4.5 versus. 3.6 mm; P = .0161). There was strong linear correlation (r = 0.9761; P < .0001) between the size change (excision size minus biopsy size) and final pathologic size. For accurate tumor summary checklist completion, DCIS extent should be reported for needle biopsy material, particularly in the setting of small tumors. PMID:26997448

  1. Prospective Multicenter Trial Evaluating Balloon-Catheter Partial-Breast Irradiation for Ductal Carcinoma in Situ

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, Andrea M.; Portschy, Pamela R.; Lee, Chung; Le, Chap T.; Han, Linda K.; Washington, Tara; Kinney, Michael; Bretzke, Margit; Tuttle, Todd M.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To determine outcomes of accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) with MammoSite in the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) after breast-conserving surgery. Methods and Materials: We conducted a prospective, multicenter trial between 2003 and 2009. Inclusion criteria included age >18 years, core needle biopsy diagnosis of DCIS, and no prior breast cancer history. Patients underwent breast-conserving surgery plus MammoSite placement. Radiation was given twice daily for 5 days for a total of 34 Gy. Patients were evaluated for development of toxicities, cosmetic outcome, and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Results: A total of 41 patients (42 breasts) completed treatment in the study, with a median follow up of 5.3 years. Overall, 28 patients (68.3%) experienced an adverse event. Skin changes and pain were the most common adverse events. Cosmetic outcome at 6 months was judged excellent/good by 100% of physicians and by 96.8% of patients. At 12 months, 86.7% of physicians and 92.3% of patients rated the cosmetic outcome as excellent/good. Overall, 4 patients (9.8%) developed an IBTR (all DCIS), with a 5-year actuarial rate of 11.3%. All IBTRs were outside the treatment field. Among patients with IBTRs, the mean time to recurrence was 3.2 years. Conclusions: Accelerated partial-breast irradiation using MammoSite seems to provide a safe and cosmetically acceptable outcome; however, the 9.8% IBTR rate with median follow-up of 5.3 years is concerning. Prospective randomized trials are necessary before routine use of APBI for DCIS can be recommended.

  2. Rates of Second Malignancies After Definitive Local Treatment for Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of the Breast

    SciTech Connect

    Shaitelman, Simona F.; Grills, Inga S.; Kestin, Larry L.; Ye Hong; Nandalur, Sirisha; Huang Jiayi; Vicini, Frank A.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: We analyzed the risk of second malignancies developing in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) undergoing surgery and radiotherapy (S+RT) vs. surgery alone. Methods and Materials: The S+RT cohort consisted of 256 women treated with breast-conserving therapy at William Beaumont Hospital. The surgery alone cohort consisted of 2,788 women with DCIS in the regional Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database treated during the same time period. A matched-pair analysis was performed in which each S+RT patient was randomly matched with 8 surgery alone patients (total of 2,048 patients). Matching criteria included age {+-} 2 years. The rates of second malignancies were analyzed overall and as contralateral breast vs. non-breast cancers and by organ system. Results: Median follow-up was 13.7 years for the S+RT cohort and 13.3 years for the surgery alone cohort. The overall 10-/15-year rates of second malignancies among the S+RT and surgery alone cohorts were 14.2%/24.2% and 16.4%/22.6%, respectively (p = 0.668). The 15-year second contralateral breast cancer rate was 14.2% in the S+RT cohort and 10.3% in the surgery alone cohort (p = 0.439). The 15-year risk of a second non-breast malignancy was 14.2% for the S+RT cohort and 13.4% for the surgery alone cohort (p = 0.660). When analyzed by organ system, the 10- and 15-year rates of second malignancies did not differ between the S+RT and surgery alone cohorts for pulmonary, gastrointestinal, central nervous system, gynecologic, genitourinary, lymphoid, sarcomatoid, head and neck, or unknown primary tumors. Conclusions: Compared with surgery alone, S+RT is not associated with an overall increased risk of second malignancies in women with DCIS.

  3. Axillary evaluation and lymphedema in women with ductal carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Coromilas, Ellie J; Wright, Jason D; Huang, Yongmei; Feldman, Sheldon; Neugut, Alfred I; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Chen, Ling; Hershman, Dawn L

    2016-07-01

    Axillary evaluation in women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is increasing; however, this may introduce additional morbidity with unclear benefit. Our objective was to examine the morbidity and mortality associated with axillary evaluation in DCIS. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 10,504 women aged 65-90 years with DCIS who underwent breast conserving surgery between 2002 and 2012 using SEER-Medicare database. Patients were categorized by receipt of axillary evaluation with either sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) or axillary node dissection (ALND). We determined the incidence of lymphedema treatment as defined by diagnostic and procedural codes, as well as 10-year breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality. 18.3 % of those treated with BCS and 69.4 % of those treated with mastectomy had an axillary evaluation. One year after treatment, 8.2 % of women who had an axillary evaluation developed lymphedema, compared to 5.9 % of those who did not. In a multivariable Cox proportional hazard model, the incidence of lymphedema was higher among those who underwent axillary evaluation (HR 1.22, 95 % CI 1.04-1.45). Overall 10-year breast cancer-specific survival was similar between both groups (HR 0.83, 95 % CI 0.40-1.74). Only 44 (0.40 %) women died of breast cancer; receipt of axillary evaluation did not alter overall survival. Axillary evaluation is commonly performed in women with DCIS, especially those undergoing mastectomy. However, women who receive an axillary evaluation have higher rates of lymphedema, without breast cancer-specific or overall survival benefit. Efforts should be made to determine the population of women with DCIS who benefit from this procedure. PMID:27365080

  4. Interobserver reproducibility of the Lagios nuclear grading system for ductal carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Sneige, N; Lagios, M D; Schwarting, R; Colburn, W; Atkinson, E; Weber, D; Sahin, A; Kemp, B; Hoque, A; Risin, S; Sabichi, A; Boone, C; Dhingra, K; Kelloff, G; Lippman, S

    1999-03-01

    Several studies have shown an association between high nuclear grade or necrosis of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) lesions and the risk of local disease recurrence in patients with DCIS treated surgically with less than mastectomy. Although criteria for separating low from high nuclear grade lesions have been published, no information exists regarding interobserver reproducibility (IR). To assess IR in the classification of DCIS, six surgical pathologists from four institutions used the Lagios grading system to grade 125 DCIS lesions. Before meeting to evaluate the cases, a training set of 12 glass slides, including cases chosen to present conflicting cues for classification, was mailed to the participants with a written criteria summary. This was followed by a working session in which criteria were reviewed and agreed on. The pathologists then graded the lesions independently. The area of interest was marked on each slide before grading. After initial grading, the pathologists met again to resolve discrepant lesion classifications. A complete agreement among raters was achieved in 43 (35%) cases, with five of six raters agreeing in another 45 (36%) cases. In no case did two raters differ by more than one grade. The pairwise kappa agreement values ranged from fair to substantial (0.30 to 0.61). Generalized kappa value indicated moderate agreement (0.46, standard error = 0.02). Kappa statistics for the distinction between grades 1 and 2 and 2 and 3 were 0.29 and 0.48, respectively, (standard error = 0.02). Only one of the six raters differed significantly in scoring. With adherence to specific criteria, IR in the classification of DCIS cases can be obtained in most cases. Although these pathologists made a few grading system modifications, further refinements are needed, especially if grading will influence future therapy. PMID:10088542

  5. Ductal Carcinoma in Situ-The Influence of the Radiotherapy Boost on Local Control

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Philip; Lambert, Christine; Agnihotram, Ramanakumar V.; David, Marc; Duclos, Marie; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Local recurrence (LR) of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is reduced by whole-breast irradiation after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). However, the benefit of adding a radiotherapy boost to the surgical cavity for DCIS is unclear. We sought to determine the impact of the boost on LR in patients with DCIS treated at the McGill University Health Centre. Methods and Materials: A total of 220 consecutive cases of DCIS treated with BCS and radiotherapy between January 2000 and December 2006 were reviewed. Of the patients, 36% received a radiotherapy boost to the surgical cavity. Median follow-up was 46 months for the boost and no-boost groups. Kaplan-Meier survival analyses and Cox regression analyses were performed. Results: Compared with the no-boost group, patients in the boost group more frequently had positive and <0.1-cm margins (48% vs. 8%) (p < 0.0001) and more frequently were in higher-risk categories as defined by the Van Nuys Prognostic (VNP) index (p = 0.006). Despite being at higher risk for LR, none (0/79) of the patients who received a boost experienced LR, whereas 8 of 141 patients who did not receive a boost experienced an in-breast LR (log-rank p = 0.03). Univariate analysis of prognostic factors (age, tumor size, margin status, histological grade, necrosis, and VNP risk category) revealed only the presence of necrosis to significantly correlate with LR (log-rank p = 0.003). The whole-breast irradiation dose and fractionation schedule did not affect LR rate. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the use of a radiotherapy boost improves local control in DCIS and may outweigh the poor prognostic effect of necrosis.

  6. Digital Mammography Screening: Does Age Influence the Detection Rates of Low-, Intermediate-, and High-Grade Ductal Carcinoma in Situ?

    PubMed

    Weigel, Stefanie; Hense, Hans W; Heidrich, Jan; Berkemeyer, Shoma; Heindel, Walter; Heidinger, Oliver

    2016-03-01

    Purpose To investigate the association between age at screening and detection rates for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) separately for different nuclear grades after introduction of a population-based digital mammography screening program. Materials and Methods The retrospective study was approved by the ethics board and did not require informed consent. In 733 905 women aged 50-69 years who participated in a screening program for the first time in 2005-2008 (baseline examinations were performed with digital mammography), DCIS detection rates were determined for 5-year age groups (detection rates per 1000 women screened) to distinguish high-, intermediate-, and low-grade DCIS. Multivariable logistic regression was used to compare detection rates between age groups by adjusting for screening units (P < .05). Results There were 989 graded DCIS diagnoses among 733 905 women (detection rate, 1.35‰): 419 diagnoses of high-grade DCIS (detection rate, 0.57‰), 388 diagnoses of intermediate-grade DCIS (detection rate, 0.53‰), and 182 diagnoses of low-grade DCIS (detection rate, 0.25‰). Detection rate for types of DCIS combined increased significantly across age groups (50-54 years, detection rate of 1.15‰ [254 of 220 985 women]; 55-59 years, detection rate of 1.23‰ [218 of 177 782 women]; 60-64 years, detection rate of 1.34‰ [201 of 150 415 women]; and 65-69 years, detection rate of 1.71‰ [316 of 184 723 women]; P < .001). Of note, the detection rate for high-grade DCIS showed a significant increase with age (odds ratio, 1.18 per 5-year age group; P < .0001). The increase was lower for intermediate-grade DCIS (odds ratio, 1.11; P = .016) and not significant for low-grade DCIS (P = .10). Conclusion Total DCIS detection rates increase with age, mostly because of an increase in high- and intermediate-grade DCIS, which are precursor lesions that carry a higher risk for transition to more aggressive invasive breast cancer than low-grade DCIS. (©) RSNA, 2015

  7. Prognostic significance of oncogenic markers in ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast: a clinicopathologic study.

    PubMed

    Altintas, Sevilay; Lambein, Kathleen; Huizing, Manon T; Braems, Geert; Asjoe, Fernando Tjin; Hellemans, Hilde; Van Marck, Eric; Weyler, Joost; Praet, Marleen; Van den Broecke, Rudy; Vermorken, Jan B; Tjalma, Wiebren A

    2009-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a heterogeneous malignant condition of the breast with an excellent prognosis. Until recently mastectomy was the standard treatment. As the results of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project-17 trial and the introduction of the Van Nuys Prognostic Index (VNPI) less radical therapies are used. Objectives are to identify clinicopathologic and biologic factors that may predict outcome. Cases of DCIS diagnosed in two Belgian University Centers were included. Paraffin-embedded material and Hematoxylin and Eosin stained slides of DCIS cases were reviewed and tumor size, margin width, nuclear grade, and comedo necrosis were assessed. Molecular markers (estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, HER1-4, Ki67, and c-myc) were assayed immunohistochemically. Applied treatment strategies were correlated with the prospective use of the VNPI score. Kaplan-Meier survival plots were generated with log-rank significance and multiple regression analysis was carried out using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis; 159 patients were included with a median age of 54 years (range 29-78); 141 had DCIS and 18 DCIS with microinvasion. The median time of follow-up was 54 months (range 5-253). Twenty-three patients developed a recurrence (14.5%). The median time to recurrence was 46 months (range 5-253). Before the introduction of the VNPI, 37.5% of the DCIS patients showed a recurrence while thereafter 6.7% recurred (p < 0.005). Two recurrences occurred in the VNPI group I (7.1%); seven in the VNPI group II (8.5%) (median time to recurrence 66.3 months) and 14 in the VNPI group III (28.5%) (median time to recurrence 40.2 months) (disease-free survival [DFS]: p < 0.05). A Cox proportional hazards regression analysis indicated that tumor size, margin width, pathologic class, and age were independent predictors of recurrence, but none of the studied molecular markers showed this. Overexpression of HER4 in the presence of HER3 was found

  8. High-throughput proteomic analysis of human infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Somiari, Richard I; Sullivan, Anthony; Russell, Stephen; Somiari, Stella; Hu, Hai; Jordan, Rick; George, Alisha; Katenhusen, Richard; Buchowiecka, Alicja; Arciero, Cletus; Brzeski, Henry; Hooke, Jeff; Shriver, Craig

    2003-10-01

    Large-scale proteomics will play a critical role in the rapid display, identification and validation of new protein targets, and elucidation of the underlying molecular events that are associated with disease development, progression and severity. However, because the proteome of most organisms are significantly more complex than the genome, the comprehensive analysis of protein expression changes will require an analytical effort beyond the capacity of standard laboratory equipment. We describe the first high-throughput proteomic analysis of human breast infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDCA) using OCT (optimal cutting temperature) embedded biopsies, two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) technology and a fully automated spot handling workstation. Total proteins from four breast IDCAs (Stage I, IIA, IIB and IIIA) were individually compared to protein from non-neoplastic tissue obtained from a female donor with no personal or family history of breast cancer. We detected differences in protein abundance that ranged from 14.8% in stage I IDCA versus normal, to 30.6% in stage IIB IDCA versus normal. A total of 524 proteins that showed > or = three-fold difference in abundance between IDCA and normal tissue were picked, processed and identified by mass spectrometry. Out of the proteins picked, approximately 80% were unambiguously assigned identities by matrix-assisted laser desorbtion/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry or liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in the first pass. Bioinformatics tools were also used to mine databases to determine if the identified proteins are involved in important pathways and/or interact with other proteins. Gelsolin, vinculin, lumican, alpha-1-antitrypsin, heat shock protein-60, cytokeratin-18, transferrin, enolase-1 and beta-actin, showed differential abundance between IDCA and normal tissue, but the trend was not consistent in all samples. Out of the proteins with database hits, only heat shock

  9. Carcinoma-Associated Fibroblasts Lead the Invasion of Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma Cells by Creating an Invasive Track

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiao; Jia, Zhuqiang; Kong, Jing; Zhang, Fuyin; Fang, Shimeng; Li, Xiaojie; Li, Wuwei; Yang, Xuesong; Luo, Yong; Lin, Bingcheng; Liu, Tingjiao

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are critical in determining tumor invasion and metastasis. However the role of CAFs in the invasion of salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is poorly understood. In this study, we isolated primary CAFs from two ACC patients. ACC-derived CAFs expressed typical CAF biomarkers and showed increased migration and invasion activity. Conditioned medium collected from CAFs significantly promoted ACC cell migration and invasion. Co-culture of CAFs with ACC cells in a microfluidic device further revealed that CAFs localized at the invasion front and ACC cells followed the track behind the CAFs. Interfering of both matrix metalloproteinase and CXCL12/CXCR4 pathway inhibited ACC invasion promoted by CAFs. Overall, our study demonstrates that ACC-derived CAFs exhibit the most important defining feature of CAFs by promoting cancer invasion. In addition to secretion of soluble factors, CAFs also lead ACC invasion by creating an invasive track in the ECM. PMID:26954362

  10. Inactivation of Brca2 cooperates with Trp53R172H to induce invasive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas in mice

    PubMed Central

    Feldmann, Georg; Karikari, Collins; dal Molin, Marco; Duringer, Stephanie; Volkmann, Petra; Bartsch, Detlef K; Bisht, Savita; Koorstra, Jan-Bart; Brossart, Peter

    2011-01-01

    An inactivating germline mutation in BRCA2 is the most common known genetic basis for familial pancreatic cancer (FPC), accounting for 5–10% of inherited cases. A genetically engineered mouse model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) arising on the backdrop of Brca2 deficiency is likely to elucidate valuable diagnostic and therapeutic insights for FPC. Both Brca2 alleles were conditionally deleted during development within the pancreatic epithelium by generating Pdx1-Cre; Brca2f/f (CB) mice; in addition, triple transgenic Pdx1-Cre; Brca2f/f; LSL-Trp53R172H (CBP) mice were generated, in order to determine the impact of p53 deregulation on Brca2-deficient carcinogenesis. Both CB and CBP mice developed non-invasive ductal precursor lesions (murine pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia or mPanIN), although these were observed at an earlier time point (5 versus 8 months) and with higher prevalence in CBP mice. A minority of CB mice (15%) developed invasive and metastatic PDAC at a latency of 15 months or greater; in contrast, CBP mice of comparable age uniformly developed PDAC with variable histological features. Mortality in the absence of neoplasia in CB and CBP mice was associated with profound loss of pancreatic parenchyma, consistent with progressive elimination of Brca2-deficient cells. Widespread DNA damage, as evidenced by overexpression of the phosphorylated histone H2AXSer139, was observed in the non-neoplastic exocrine pancreas, as well as in the mPanIN and PDAC lesions of Brca2-deficient mice, independent of p53 status. Loss of Brca2 function predisposes the exocrine pancreas to profound DNA damage, and the frequency of invasive neoplasia is accentuated by the concomitant deregulation of p53. PMID:21455033

  11. Why the term 'low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ' should be changed to 'borderline breast disease': diagnostic and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Masood, Shahla

    2012-01-01

    During the last several years, increased public awareness, advances in breast imaging and enhanced screening programs have led to early breast cancer detection and attention to cancer prevention. The number of image-detected biopsies has increased, and pathologists are expected to provide more information with smaller tissue samples. These biopsies have resulted in detection of increasing numbers of high-risk proliferative breast disease and in situ cancers. The general hypothesis is that some forms of breast cancers may arise from established forms of ductal carcinoma in situ and atypical ductal hyperplasia, and possibly from more common forms of ductal hyperplasia. However, this is an oversimplification of a very complex process given the fact that the majority of breast cancers appear to arise de novo or from a yet unknown precursor lesion. Currently, atypical ductal hyperplasia and ductal carcinoma in situ are considered as morphologic risk factors and precursor lesions for breast cancer. However, morphologic distinction between these two entities has remained a real issue that continues to lead to overdiagnosis and overtreatment. Aside from morphologic similarities between atypical ductal hyperplasia and low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ, biomarker studies and molecular genetic testing have shown that morphologic overlaps are reflected at the molecular level and raise questions about the validity of separating these two entities. It is hoped that as we better understand the genetic basis of these entities in relation to ultimate patient outcome, the suggested use of the term 'borderline breast disease' can minimize the number of patients who are subject to overtreatment. PMID:22171775

  12. Eliminating "ductal carcinoma in situ" and "lobular carcinoma in situ" (DCIS and LCIS) terminology in clinical breast practice: The cognitive psychology point of view.

    PubMed

    Pravettoni, Gabriella; Yoder, Whitney R; Riva, Silvia; Mazzocco, Ketti; Arnaboldi, Paola; Galimberti, Viviana

    2016-02-01

    There is evidence from the literature that the terms "ductal carcinoma in situ" and "lobular carcinoma in situ" (DCIS and LCIS) should be eliminated in clinical breast cancer practice and replaced with the new "ductal intraepithelial neoplasia" (DIN) and "lobular intraepithelial neoplasia" (LIN) terminology. The main purpose of the present article is to expand on this argument from a cognitive psychology perspective and offer suggestions for further research, emphasizing how the elimination of the term "carcinoma" in "in situ" breast cancer diagnoses has the potential to reduce both patient and health care professional confusion and misperceptions that are often associated with the DCIS and LCIS diagnoses, as well as limit the adverse psychological effects of women receiving a DCIS or LCIS diagnosis. We comment on the recent peer-reviewed literature on the clinical implications and psychological consequences for breast cancer patients receiving a DCIS or LCIS diagnosis and we use a cognitive perspective to offer new insight into the benefits of embracing the new DIN and LIN terminology. Using cognitive psychology and cognitive science in general, as a foundation, further research is advocated in order to yield data in support of changing the terminology and therefore, offer a chance to significantly improve the lives and psychological sequelae of women facing such a diagnosis. Typology: Controversies/Short Commentary. PMID:26614547

  13. A new rabbit monoclonal E-cadherin antibody [EP700Y] shows higher sensitivity than mouse monoclonal E-cadherin [HECD-1] antibody in breast ductal carcinomas and does not stain breast lobular carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Laura L; Tang, Ping; Hicks, David G; Chen, Huijiao; Yang, Qi; Haas, Thomas S; Bremer, Ryan E; Tacha, David

    2014-09-01

    Immunohistochemical studies have shown E-cadherin to be expressed in breast carcinomas showing a ductal histology, with a corresponding loss of expression in tumors with a lobular histology. As a result, mouse monoclonal anti-E-cadherin [HECD-1] has been used by pathologists to differentiate between ductal and lobular carcinomas, with currently published sensitivity and specificity rates of approximately 90%. Rabbit monoclonal antibodies may combine the best properties of both mouse monoclonal antibodies and rabbit antisera. Therefore, this study compares the staining sensitivity and specificity of a new rabbit monoclonal E-cadherin and the standard mouse monoclonal E-cadherin [HECD-1] in breast ductal carcinomas, and evaluates a cocktail of rabbit monoclonal E-cadherin and p120 catenin in the discrimination of ductal from lobular carcinomas. The rabbit E-cadherin showed sharper staining and increased sensitivity (80/81, 99%) than the mouse E-cadherin (75/81, 93%). The rabbit E-cadherin achieved a score of 3+ in 85.2% (69/81) of cases as compared with a 3+ in only 21.0% (17/81) of cases stained with mouse E-cadherin. All lobular carcinomas (n=37) were confirmed by the absence of E-cadherin and the diffuse cytoplasmic expression of p120 catenin. Although both the single mouse E-cadherin and dual stain can differentiate ductal from lobular lesions, the dual stain is helpful in challenging cases because of its bright pink p120 catenin and dark brown rabbit E-cadherin staining. The highly sensitive rabbit E-cadherin antibody is the preferred antibody for evaluating ductal carcinomas and for distinguishing ductal versus lobular lesions, and the dual stain was superior to the single E-cadherin stain. PMID:24569788

  14. Initiation of Metastatic Breast Carcinoma by Targeting of the Ductal Epithelium with Adenovirus-Cre: A Novel Transgenic Mouse Model of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Svoronos, Nikolaos; Tesone, Amelia J.; Stephen, Tom L.; Perales-Puchalt, Alfredo; Nguyen, Jenny; Zhang, Paul J.; Fiering, Steven N.; Tchou, Julia; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease involving complex cellular interactions between the developing tumor and immune system, eventually resulting in exponential tumor growth and metastasis to distal tissues and the collapse of anti-tumor immunity. Many useful animal models exist to study breast cancer, but none completely recapitulate the disease progression that occurs in humans. In order to gain a better understanding of the cellular interactions that result in the formation of latent metastasis and decreased survival, we have generated an inducible transgenic mouse model of YFP-expressing ductal carcinoma that develops after sexual maturity in immune-competent mice and is driven by consistent, endocrine-independent oncogene expression. Activation of YFP, ablation of p53, and expression of an oncogenic form of K-ras was achieved by the delivery of an adenovirus expressing Cre-recombinase into the mammary duct of sexually mature, virgin female mice. Tumors begin to appear 6 weeks after the initiation of oncogenic events. After tumors become apparent, they progress slowly for approximately two weeks before they begin to grow exponentially. After 7-8 weeks post-adenovirus injection, vasculature is observed connecting the tumor mass to distal lymph nodes, with eventual lymphovascular invasion of YFP+ tumor cells to the distal axillary lymph nodes. Infiltrating leukocyte populations are similar to those found in human breast carcinomas, including the presence of αβ and γδ T cells, macrophages and MDSCs. This unique model will facilitate the study of cellular and immunological mechanisms involved in latent metastasis and dormancy in addition to being useful for designing novel immunotherapeutic interventions to treat invasive breast cancer. PMID:24748051

  15. Metastases to breast simulating ductal carcinoma in situ: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gupta, D; Merino, M I; Farhood, A; Middleton, L P

    2001-02-01

    The breast is an uncommon site for metastases. Nevertheless, it is important to differentiate primary from secondary tumors of the breast, because clinical management and expected outcomes are vastly different. We report two examples of tumors with a papillary histologic pattern metastasizing to the breast. One of the cases occurred in a 31-year-old woman with a primary renal cell carcinoma, the other was in a 42-year-old woman with an ovarian papillary serous adenocarcinoma. In the first case, the patient's previous history of cancer was not known to the pathologist. The cases highlight the difficulty in distinguishing primary from metastatic tumors in the breast. In both cases the tumors infiltrated in a pattern that mimicked in situ ductal carcinoma changes. Additionally, in both cases, the metastasizing tumor was unusual with the tumor cells diffusely permeating the lymphatic spaces, not in a solid mass. These cases and a review of the literature indicated that breast metastases, although rare, must be recognized and differentiated from primary breast tumors to avoid unnecessary radical surgery to the breast. Moreover, the presence of changes similar to in situ carcinoma of the breast are not conclusive evidence that one is evaluating a primary breast carcinoma. When there is any unusual histomorphology, a good degree of suspicion is necessary. Ann Diagn Pathol 5:15-20, 2001. PMID:11172202

  16. Soft tissue invasion of papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jen-Der; Hsueh, Chuen; Chao, Tzu-Chieh

    2016-08-01

    Extrathyroidal extension (ETE) of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is common and clinical presentation can vary from minimal to extensive locoregional involvement. Although PTC is generally considered the most benign among all thyroid carcinomas, it may present with local invasion with poor prognosis. Our retrospective study involved 3267 PTC patients undergoing regular follow-up at Chang Gung Medical Center in Linkou, Taiwan. Among them, 269 were PTC cases with ETE, having tumors greater than 1 cm in size and treated with total or complete thyroidectomy with or without lymph node dissection for which the follow-up period was over 10 years. The mean age of 269 cases was 46.8 ± 15.1 (range 11-83 years) years. The number of females was 204 (75.8 %). Patients were categorized into minimal ETE (175 cases) and extensive ETE (94 cases) groups according to surgical findings and pathological reports. Mean follow-up period was 13.3 ± 5.5 (range 0.2-29.3) years, during which 28 (10.4 %) patients died of thyroid cancer; and 63 (23.4 %) of all-cause mortality. Multivariate analysis showed that age, gender, extensive ETE, and lymph node metastasis had a statistically significant effect on thyroid cancer mortality. Survival rates were significantly different between minimal ETE and extensive ETE groups (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, perithyroidal soft tissue involvement by PTC is an important factor that determines patient prognosis and a closer follow-up and more aggressive treatment is necessary for patients who are old, male, extensive ETE, and with lymph node involvement. PMID:27154220

  17. Biventricular metastatic invasion from cervical squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Karan; Evans, Matthew C; Shkullaku, Melsjan; Schillinger, Rachel; White, Charles S; Roque, Dana M

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis to the heart has been previously described with primary lung and breast carcinoma, lymphoma, leukaemia, mesothelioma and melanoma. However, left-ventricular cardiac metastasis from primary cervical squamous cell carcinoma is poorly described. This report describes the clinical presentation of a patient with cardiac metastatic invasion from cervical cancer. PMID:27371746

  18. Adenomyoepithelioma of the breast coexisting with ductal carcinoma in situ: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Mirei; Daa, Tsutomu; Miyawaki, Michiyo; Suehiro, Shuji; Sugio, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    We herein report a case of adenomyoepithelioma (AME) of the breast with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) involving a 71-year-old Japanese woman. She presented with bloody discharge from the left nipple. Mammography and ultrasonography showed a well-defined polygonal tumor. Fine-needle aspiration cytology of the mass and stamp cytology of the bloody nipple discharge showed malignancy. Mastectomy and a sentinel lymph node biopsy were performed. The final diagnosis was AME of the breast with DCIS. There are no reports of AME of the breast presenting with bloody nipple discharge; upon a diagnosis of AME of the breast with bloody nipple discharge, the possibility of the coexistence of breast cancer should thus be considered when encountering such cases. PMID:26380805

  19. Breast-conserving surgery with or without radiotherapy vs mastectomy for ductal carcinoma in situ: French Survey experience

    PubMed Central

    Cutuli, B; Lemanski, C; Fourquet, A; de Lafontan, B; Giard, S; Meunier, A; Pioud-Martigny, R; Campana, F; Marsiglia, H; Lancrenon, S; Mery, E; Penault-Llorca, F; Fondrinier, E; Tunon de Lara, C

    2009-01-01

    From March 2003 to April 2004, 77 physicians throughout France prospectively recruited 1289 ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) patients and collected data on diagnosis, patient and tumour characteristics, and treatments. Median age was 56 years (range, 30–84). Ductal carcinoma in situ was diagnosed by mammography in 87.6% of patients. Mastectomy, conservative surgery alone (CS) and CS with radiotherapy (CS+RT) were performed in 30.5, 7.8 and 61.7% of patients, respectively. Thus, 89% of patients treated by CS received adjuvant RT. Sentinel node biopsy (SNB) and axillary dissection (AD) were performed in 21.3 and 10.4% of patients, respectively. Hormone therapy was administered to 13.4% of the patients (80% tamoxifen). Median tumour size was 14.5 mm (6, 11 and 35 mm for CS, CS+RT and mastectomy, respectively, P<0.0001). Nuclear grade was high in 21% of patients, intermediate in 38.5% and low in 40.5%. Excision was considered complete in 92% (CS) and 88.3% (CS+RT) of patients. Oestrogen receptors were positive in 69.8% of assessed cases (31%). Treatment modalities varied widely according to region: mastectomy rate, 20–37%; adjuvant RT, 84–96%; hormone treatment, 6–34%. Our survey on current DCIS management in France has highlighted correlations between pathological features (tumour size, margin and grade) and treatment options, with several similar variations to those observed in recent UK and US studies. PMID:19277037

  20. Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma with Invasion through Ear Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Boisen, Julie; Malone, C. Helen; Kelly, Brent; Wagner, Richard F.

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma of the ear represents a high-risk tumor location with an increased risk of metastasis and local tissue invasion. However, it is uncommon for these cancers to invade through nearby cartilage. Cartilage invasion is facilitated by matrix metalloproteases, specifically collagenase 3. We present the unusual case of a 76-year-old man with an auricular squamous cell carcinoma that exhibited full-thickness perforation of the scapha cartilage. Permanent sections through the eroded cartilage confirmed tumor invasion extending to the posterior ear skin. PMID:27293916

  1. Implications of the Notch1-Snail/Slug-epithelial to mesenchymal transition axis for lymph node metastasis in infiltrating ductal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yu-Wen; Wan, Guo-Xing; Sun, Jian-Ping; Cui, Xiao-Bin; Hu, Jian-Ming; Liang, Wei-Hua; Zheng, Yu-Qin; Li, Wen-Qin; Li, Feng

    2015-02-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that activation of the Notch1 signaling pathway inducing epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) mediated by Snail/Slug promotes invasion and metastasis of breast cancer cells in vitro. However, the implication of the Notch1-Snail/Slug-EMT axis in breast cancer patients remains unclear. A total of 200 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples of invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), and 37 adjacent non-neoplastic tissue (ANNT) samples from patients who had not been treated with neoadjuvant therapy were examined. Expression of Notch1, Slug, Snail, E-cadherin, N-cadherin, and vimentin was determined by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays (TMAs). The correlation between protein expression and clinicopathological characteristics of breast cancer patients was also evaluated. Results showed that a significantly high percentage of cases with high expression of Notch1 (74%, 148/200), Slug (36%, 72/200), Snail (62%, 124/200), and N-cadherin (77%, 153/200) and a low percentage of cases with high expression of E-cadherin (27%, 54/200) were observed in IDC compared to those in ANNTs. High Notch1, Slug, Snail, and N-cadherin expression and low E-cadherin expression in patients with IDC were significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis. In addition, correlation analysis results revealed that high Notch1 expression was significantly associated with high Slug, Snail, and N-cadherin expression and low E-cadherin expression in IDC. Furthermore, a high Snail expression was significantly associated with low E-cadherin expression, and a high Slug expression was found to be significantly associated with increased N-cadherin expression in patients with IDC. Hence, our study suggested that the Notch1-Snail/Slug-EMT axis may be implicated in the lymph node metastasis affecting patients with IDC. PMID:25645984

  2. Mandibular Destruction Secondary to Invasion by Carcinoma Cuniculatum.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Michael C; Wong, Brian; O'Brien, Michael J; Salama, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Carcinoma cuniculatum is a rare form of well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma that is often misdiagnosed. It has a propensity for local invasion and rarely metastasizes. Oral carcinoma cuniculatum is exceedingly rare, with very few reported cases in the English-language literature. Classically, its presentation mimics osteomyelitis or a dental abscess, resulting in misdiagnosis, multiple biopsy examinations, and procedures before a final diagnosis of carcinoma cuniculatum. This case report describes the case of a 71-year-old woman who was referred to the authors' clinic for evaluation of persistent pain and swelling of the mandible. Multiple biopsy examinations were negative for malignancy, and the patient was misdiagnosed with osteomyelitis and dental abscess before obtaining an accurate diagnosis of carcinoma cuniculatum. The aim of this report is to provide a thorough clinical and histopathologic report of carcinoma cuniculatum of the mandible, provide a brief review of the literature, and highlight the difficulties in arriving at this uncommon diagnosis. PMID:26072180

  3. Hyperactivated mTOR and JAK2/STAT3 Pathways: Molecular Drivers and Potential Therapeutic Targets of Inflammatory and Invasive Ductal Breast Cancers After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Jhaveri, Komal; Teplinsky, Eleonora; Silvera, Deborah; Valeta-Magara, Amanda; Arju, Rezina; Giashuddin, Shah; Sarfraz, Yasmeen; Alexander, Melissa; Darvishian, Farbod; Levine, Paul H.; Hashmi, Salman; Zolfaghari, Ladan; Hoffman, Heather J.; Singh, Baljit; Goldberg, Judith D.; Hochman, Tsivia; Formenti, Silvia; Esteva, Francisco J.; Moran, Meena S.; Schneider, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is an aggressive and rare cancer with a poor prognosis and a need for novel targeted therapeutic strategies. Preclinical IBC data demonstrates strong activation of the PI3K/mTOR and JAK/STAT pathways, expression of inflammatory cytokines and tumor associated macrophages (TAMs). Methods Archival tumor tissue from three disease types (IBC treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) (n=45); invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) treated with NAC (n=24; ‘treated IDC’); and untreated IDC (n=27; ‘untreated IDC’)) was analyzed for the expression of biomarkers pS6 (mTOR), pJAK2, pSTAT3, IL6, CD68 (monocytes, macrophages) and CD163 (TAMs). Surrounding non-tumor tissue was also analyzed. Results Biomarker levels and surrogate activity by site-specific phosphorylation were demonstrated in the tumor tissue of all three disease types but were highest in IBC and treated IDC and lowest in untreated IDC for pS6, pJAK2, pSTAT3 and IL6. Of 37 IBC patients with complete biomarker data available, 100% were pS6 positive and 95% were pJAK2 positive. In non-tumor tissue, biomarker levels were observed in all groups but were generally highest in untreated IDC and lowest in IBC, except for JAK2. Conclusions IBC and treated IDC display similar levels of mTOR and JAK2 biomarker activation, suggesting a potential mechanism of resistance after NAC. Biomarker levels in surrounding non-tumor tissue suggest that the stroma may be activated by chemotherapy and resembles the oncogenic tumor-promoting environment. Activation of both pS6 and pJAK2 in IBC may support dual targeting of mTOR and JAK/STAT pathways, and the need for prospective studies to investigate combinatorial targeted therapies in IBC. PMID:26774497

  4. Clinical Outcomes Using Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Patients With Invasive Lobular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Chirag; Wilkinson, J. Ben; Shaitelman, Simona; Grills, Inga; Wallace, Michelle; Mitchell, Christina; Vicini, Frank

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: We compared clinical outcomes of women diagnosed with either invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) or invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: A total of 16 patients with ILC received APBI as part of their breast-conservation therapy (BCT) and were compared with 410 patients with IDC that received APBI as part of their BCT. Clinical, pathologic, and treatment related variables were analyzed including age, tumor size, hormone receptor status, surgical margins, lymph node status, adjuvant hormonal therapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, and APBI modality. Clinical outcomes including local recurrence (LR), regional recurrence (RR), disease-free survival (DFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. Results: Median follow-up was 3.8 years for the ILC patients and 6.0 years for the IDC patients. ILC patients were more likely to have positive margins (20.0% vs. 3.9%, p = 0.006), larger tumors (14.1 mm vs. 10.9 mm, p = 0.03) and less likely to be node positive (0% vs. 9.5%, p < 0.001) when compared with patients diagnosed with IDC. The 5-year rate of LR was 0% for the ILC cohort and 2.5% for the IDC cohort (p = 0.59). No differences were seen in the rates of RR (0% vs. 0.7%, p = 0.80), distant metastases (0% vs. 3.5%, p = 0.54), DFS (100% vs. 94%, p = 0.43), CSS (100% vs. 97%, p = 0.59), or OS (92% vs. 89%, p = 0.88) between the ILC and IDC patients, respectively. Additionally, when node-positive patients were excluded from the IDC cohort, no differences in the rates of LR (0% vs. 2.2%, p = 0.62), RR (0% vs. 0%), DFS (100% vs. 95%, p = 0.46), CSS (100% vs. 98%, p = 0.63), or OS (92% vs. 89%, p = 0.91) were noted between the ILC and IDC patients. Conclusion: Women with ILC had excellent clinical outcomes after APBI. No difference in local control was seen between patients with invasive lobular versus invasive ductal histology.

  5. Metastatic ductal carcinoma of the breast to the thyroid gland diagnosed with fine needle aspiration: A case report with emphasis on morphologic and immunophenotypic features.

    PubMed

    Magers, Martin J; Dueber, Julie C; Lew, Madelyn; Pang, Judy C; Davenport, Robertson D

    2016-06-01

    Metastases to the thyroid are uncommon [<0.2% of thyroid fine needle aspirations (FNA)]. Of metastases to the thyroid, breast carcinoma is relatively common. The diagnosis of metastasis to the thyroid has important therapeutic and prognostic implications. To our knowledge, a morphologic and immunophenotypic comparison of metastatic ductal carcinoma of the breast and primary thyroid carcinomas has not been reported. Here, we report the case of a 37-year-old female with a history of metastatic ductal carcinoma of the breast (modified Bloom-Richardson grade 2; ER+, PgR+, HER2+) diagnosed 6 years prior. She developed hoarseness, prompting a CT scan. Multiple thyroid nodules were found, including a 1.5 cm hypoechoic, solid, irregularly-shaped nodule. On FNA, cells were arranged singly and in crowded groups, varied in size and degree of pleomorphism, and exhibited rare nuclear grooves, inconspicuous nucleoli, and rare intracytoplasmic lumina with no nuclear pseudoinclusions or colloid (Figs. 1A and B). These findings raised the differential of papillary thyroid carcinoma (Fig. 1C), follicular neoplasm (Fig. 1D), medullary carcinoma (Fig. 1E), parathyroid (Fig. 1F), and metastatic breast carcinoma. Immunostaining for GATA-3 (+), ER (+), PAX-8 (-), and TTF-1 (-) was consistent with metastatic breast carcinoma (Fig. 2). We conclude that metastatic breast carcinoma to the thyroid may morphologically mimic primary thyroid carcinoma on FNA; a panel of immunomarkers, such as GATA-3, hormonal marker(s), PAX-8, and TTF-1, may be useful in some cases. GATA-3 immunostaining for metastatic breast carcinoma was helpful in our case and has not been previously reported in a thyroid metastasis sampled by FNA. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2016;44:530-534. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26932153

  6. Primary Gastric Invasive Micropapillary Carcinoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Vardar, Enver; Yardim, Bengü Günay; Vardar, Rukiye; Ölmez, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Invasive micropapillary carcinoma is a recently identified neoplasm. A 77-year-old-female was admitted to the hospital due to progressive loss of weight and nausea. Endoscopic biopsy of the antral/prepyloric located mass was diagnosed as moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Subtotal gastrectomy and regional lymph node resection were performed. The tumor was composed of moderately differentiated cells arranged in micropapillary structures with only a few poorly formed glandular foci in lamina propria. Immunohistochemically, neoplastic cells of micropapillary and focal conventional adenocarcinoma areas were diffusely positive for pancytokeratin, cytokeratin 7 and epithelial membrane antigen. In micropapillary areas, membranous and peripheral cytoplasmic positivity with epithelial membrane antigen in outside of the cell clusters called "inside-out polarity" pattern that is characteristic for invasive micropapillary carcinoma were seen. Invasive micropapillary carcinoma is very rare in the stomach in the English literature. PMID:26456969

  7. Cricotracheal resection for laryngeal invasion by thyroid carcinoma: our experience.

    PubMed

    Morisod, Benoît; Monnier, Philippe; Simon, Christian; Sandu, Kishore

    2014-08-01

    Invasion of the laryngeal framework by thyroid carcinoma requires specific surgical techniques and carries a higher rate of complications that deserve to be highlighted. We reviewed our data from 1995 to 2012 and found six patients with laryngotracheal invasion by thyroid carcinoma. All underwent total thyroidectomy and single-stage cricotracheal resection, plus anterolateral neck dissection. Three had airway obstruction that necessitated prior endoscopic debulking. None of the patients needed a tracheotomy. There were four cases of papillary carcinoma, and two cases of undifferentiated carcinoma. One patient died of complications of the procedure (anastomotic dehiscence and tracheo-innominate artery fistula). Another died 2 months after the procedure from local recurrence and aspiration pneumonia. One case presented recurrence at 15 months, which was managed by re-excision and adjuvant radiotherapy; after 26 months of follow-up, he has no evidence of locoregional recurrence. The three other patients are alive without evidence of disease at 6, 18 and 41 months, respectively. Cricotracheal resection for subglottic invasion by thyroid carcinoma is an effective procedure, but carries significant risks of complications. This could be attributed to the devascularisation of the tracheal wall due to the simultaneous neck dissection, sacrifice of the strap muscles or of a patch of oesophageal muscle layer. We advocate a sternocleidomastoid flap to cover the anastomosis. Cricotracheal resection for subglottic invasion can be curative with good functional outcomes, even for the advanced stages of thyroid cancer. Endoscopic debulking of the airway prior to the procedure avoids tracheotomy. PMID:24129693

  8. [Accuracy of pretherapeutic diagnosis of early invasive cervical carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Basta, A; Loster, A; Pawlina, W

    1993-01-01

    In 114 women treated at the First Department of Gynecology Medical Academy in Cracow, between the years 1967-1985 there was compared the agreement of the histological examination of a colposcopy directed biopsy specimen with the histological examination of the operative specimen in cervical carcinoma with early invasion. In 103 cases (90.4%) histological examination of a guided biopsy specimen of early invasive carcinoma confirmed the results of the operative specimen. In 1 case the operative specimen confirmed severe dysplasia as in the guided biopsy specimen early invasive carcinoma. In 10 cases the guided biopsy specimen confirmed CIN 3 (6 cases severe dysplasia and 4 cases ca in situ), the results of operative specimen confirmed early invasive carcinoma. In 5 out the above 10 cases, the results were altered due to a 3-8 mouth delay of surgery. The divergence regards to the remaining 5 cases (4.4%). This high agreement of histological examination of a colposcopy guided biopsy specimen and operative specimen shows a significant accurate meaning of colposcopy in confirming early lesions of cervical carcinoma. PMID:8359715

  9. An iPS Cell Line From Human Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Undergoes Early to Invasive Stages of Pancreatic Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jungsun; Hoffman, John P.; Alpaugh, R. Katherine; Rhim, Andrew D.; Reichert, Maximilian; Stanger, Ben Z.; Furth, Emma E.; Sepulveda, Antonia R.; Yuan, Chao-Xing; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Donahue, Greg; Sands, Jessica; Gumbs, Andrew A.; Zaret, Kenneth S.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) carries a dismal prognosis and lacks a human cell model of early disease progression. When human PDAC cells are injected into immunodeficient mice, they generate advanced stage cancer. We hypothesized that if human PDAC cells were converted to pluripotency and then allowed to differentiate back into pancreatic tissue, they might undergo early stages of cancer. Although most induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell lines were not of the expected cancer genotype, one PDAC line, 10-22 cells, when injected into immunodeficient mice, generates pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) precursors to PDAC that progress to the invasive stage. The PanIN-like cells secrete or release proteins corresponding to genes and networks expressed in human pancreatic cancer progression and which predicted an HNF4α network also seen a mouse model. Thus, rare events allow iPS technology to provide a live human cell model of early pancreatic cancer and new insights into disease progression. PMID:23791528

  10. Accessory breast cancer occurring concurrently with bilateral primary invasive breast carcinomas: a report of two cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jin-Yan; Yang, Cui-Cui; Liu, Fang-Fang; Yang, Yi-Ling; Li, Shuai; Li, Wei-Dong; Li, Ya-Qing; Lang, Rong-Gang; Fan, Yu; Paulos, Estifanos; Zhang, Xin-Min; Fu, Li

    2012-09-01

    The development of accessory breast tissue, which is found anywhere along the milk line, is attributed to the failure of milk line remnants to regress during embryogenesis. Primary tumors may arise from any ectopic breast tissue. Accessory breast cancer occurring concurrently with primary invasive breast cancer is extremely rare. Two such cases were reported in this article. One was a 43-year-old Chinese female who exhibited bilateral breast cancer (invasive ductal carcinoma, not otherwise specified, IDC-NOS) and an accessory breast carcinoma (IDC-NOS) incidentally identified in her left axilla. The ectopic breast tissue in her right axilla presented with adenosis. The patient was surgically treated, followed by postoperative docetaxel epirubicin (TE) chemotherapy. The second case was a 53-year-old Chinese female with bilateral breast cancer (apocrine carcinoma) accompanied by an accessory breast carcinoma (IDC-NOS) in her right axilla that was also incidentally identified. The patient was surgically treated after three doses of cyclophosphamide epirubicin docetaxel (CET) neoadjuvant chemotherapy, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy of the same regimen. PMID:23691479

  11. Cutaneous invasion from sarcomatoid urothelial carcinoma: clinical and dermatopathologic features*

    PubMed Central

    Bernardes Filho, Fred; de Melo, Alessandro Severo Alves; Pires, Andréa Rodriguez Cordovil; Lupi, Omar; Neves, Daniel Gama das; da Cruz, Margareth Fernandes; Kac, Bernard Kawa

    2016-01-01

    In Brazil, without considering the non-melanoma skin tumors, bladder cancer in men is the eighth most common, and the urothelial carcinoma or transitional cell carcinoma is the most common among these. Cutaneous metastases from urothelial neoplasms appear as single or multiple erythematous, infiltrated nodules or plaques, and like other cases of distant disease, it is indicative of poor prognosis. The invasive urothelial carcinoma is recognized for its ability to present divergent differentiation and morphological variants. The sarcomatoid urothelial carcinoma is a rare cancer that consists of two different components: one composed of epithelial tissue and the other with sarcomatoid features of mesenchymal origin. The authors describe a case of cutaneous metastasis of sarcomatoid urothelial carcinoma in a 63-year-old male patient. PMID:26982782

  12. The relationship between histologic grades of invasive carcinoma of breast ducts and mast cell infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Fakhrjou, Ashraf; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad; Montazeri, Vahid; Karkon-Shayan, Farid; Norouzi-Panahi, Leila; Piri, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Breast carcinoma is the most prevalent tumors among women. Transformation of inflated cells in immune response leads to increase in inflammatory cells such as macrophages, mast cells (MC) and fibroblasts. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between grades of invasive carcinoma of the breast ducts and MC infiltration around tumoral cells. Methods: During the present study, 75 female patients suffering from invasive ductal carcinoma who underwent surgery or diagnostic biopsy during 2010 and 2013 in Educational-Medical centers of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, were included in the study. Based on Bloom-Richardson grading system, 25 cases were selected from each grade. To better observe of MCs, samples were stained by Toluidine blue and MCs were counted in 10 40 × 10 fields. Results: The mean age was 47.56 ± 10.84 and the number of MCs was between 6 and 96 and their overall average was 43.01. Average count of MCs in grade 1, 2 and 3 were 15.92 ± 10.07, 45.32 ± 10.47, and 67.8 ± 20.70, respectively. There was a significant relationship between the number of MCs and increase in disease grade (P < 0.001). With increasing grade of malignancy, the number of MCs had grown. No significant relationship was observed between age and grade of disease or age and number of MC. Conclusion: According to obtained results, number of MC around tumoral cells increased significantly with an increase in the grade of disease. In order to treat in the first stages of the disease, recognizing primary changes in the stroma of cells could be helpful. PMID:27169108

  13. Patient-calibrated agent-based modelling of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS): From microscopic measurements to macroscopic predictions of clinical progression

    PubMed Central

    Macklin, Paul; Edgerton, Mary E.; Thompson, Alastair M.; Cristini, Vittorio

    2012-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)—a significant precursor to invasive breast cancer—is typically diagnosed as microcalcifications in mammograms. However, the effective use of mammograms and other patient data to plan treatment has been restricted by our limited understanding of DCIS growth and calcification. We develop a mechanistic, agent-based cell model and apply it to DCIS. Cell motion is determined by a balance of biomechanical forces. We use potential functions to model interactions with the basement membrane and amongst cells of unequal size and phenotype. Each cell’s phenotype is determined by genomic/proteomic- and microenvironment-dependent stochastic processes. Detailed “sub-models” describe cell volume changes during proliferation and necrosis; we are the first to account for cell calcification. We introduce the first patient-specific calibration method to fully constrain the model based upon clinically-accessible histopathology data. After simulating 45 days of solid-type DCIS with comedonecrosis, the model predicts: necrotic cell lysis acts as a biomechanical stress relief, and is responsible for the linear DCIS growth observed in mammography; the rate of DCIS advance varies with the duct radius; the tumour grows 7 to 10 mm per year—consistent with mammographic data; and the mammographic and (post-operative) pathologic sizes are linearly correlated—in quantitative agreement with the clinical literature. Patient histopathology matches the predicted DCIS microstructure: an outer proliferative rim surrounds a stratified necrotic core with nuclear debris on its outer edge and calcification in the centre. This work illustrates that computational modelling can provide new insight on the biophysical underpinnings of cancer. It may one day be possible to augment a patient’s mammography and other imaging with rigorously-calibrated models that help select optimal surgical margins based upon the patient’s histopathologic data. PMID:22342935

  14. Cell biological factors in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast-relationship to ipsilateral local recurrence and histopathological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ringberg, A; Anagnostaki, L; Anderson, H; Idvall, I; Fernö, M

    2001-08-01

    All cases of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) diagnosed from 1987 to 1991 in the Southern Health Care Region of Sweden, and operated upon with breast conserving treatment (BCT) with (n=66) or without (n=121) postoperative radiation (RT) were clinically followed, morphologically re-evaluated and analysed for cell biological factors (immunohistochemical assays or DNA flow cytometry). Median age at diagnosis was 58 years (range 29--83 years) and median follow-up was 62 months. Oestrogen (ER)- and progesterone receptor (PR)-negativity, c-erbB-2 overexpression, low bcl-2 expression, p53 accumulation, DNA non-diploidy and high Ki67, were strongly associated with high grade DCIS, and comedo-type necrosis. In contrast, significant associations to growth pattern (not diffuse versus diffuse) were seen only for c-erbB-2 and PgR. There was also a strong relationship between the cell biological factors, and a summary cell biological index based on principal component analysis was introduced (CBI-7). In the group that had not received postoperative RT, 31 ipsilateral local recurrences occurred (13 invasive, 18 DCIS). Ipsilateral recurrence-free interval (IL-RFI) was in univariate analyses significantly, or almost significantly, shorter for patients showing p53 accumulation, high Ki67 or low bcl-2, compared with patients with normal p53, low Ki67 and high bcl-2. The prognostic importance of the remaining cell biological factors was less pronounced. On the other hand, the index CBI-7, was a strong predictor for recurrence. PMID:11506959

  15. A Nationwide Cross-Sectional Survey of UK Breast Surgeons' Views on the Management of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    PubMed Central

    Mannu, Gurdeep S.; Bettencourt-Silva, Joao H.; Ahmed, Farid; Cunnick, Giles

    2015-01-01

    Background. There is wide variation in the management of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) nationwide. We aimed to investigate whether the attitudes of surgeons towards different aspects of DCIS treatment varied by seniority of surgeon or by geographical region within the UK. Materials and Methods. A nationwide online survey targeted at UK breast surgeons was undertaken. The anonymous survey contained questions regarding demographics of respondents and specific questions regarding DCIS management that were identified as areas of uncertainty during a systematic search of the literature. Results. Responses from 80 surgeons were obtained. Approximately 57% were male and the majority were consultant or specialist registrar. Approximately 63% of participants were based in district general hospitals with all training deaneries represented. Surgeons' views on the prognosis and management of DCIS varied geographically across the UK and terminology for DCIS varied with surgeon seniority. Surgeons' views particularly differed from national guidance on indications for SLNB, tamoxifen, and follow-up practice. Conclusion. Our survey reaffirms that, irrespective of national guidelines and attempts at uniformity, there continues to be a wide variety of views amongst breast surgeons regarding the ideal management of DCIS. However, by quantifying this variation, it may be possible to take it into account when examining long-term trends in nationwide treatment data. PMID:26697227

  16. Breast ductal carcinoma and metastatic lymphoma to the contralateral breast in patient with cutaneous non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Di Nubila, B; Meroni, S; Bonello, L; Peccatori, F; Cassano, E; Bellomi, M

    2011-01-01

    Breast lymphoma is a rare condition, both as a primary and a metastatic manifestation. The primary form has an incidence ranging from 0.04% to 0.5% of all breast neoplasms, whereas the metastatic form has an incidence of 0.07%. We hereby report a clinical case of a patient who presented with cutaneous non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in the left scapulohumeral region treated with surgery followed by radiotherapy (40 Gy total). Three years following radiotherapy, the patient was diagnosed with a left breast infiltrating ductal carcinoma, treated with conservative surgery and adjuvant therapy. The following year, i.e. four years after the initial diagnosis of NHL, two lymphoproliferative relapses occurred: in the left cutaneous scapulohumeral region at the original site of disease, and in the right breast. The aim of this paper is to highlight an uncommon oncologic disorder such as breast lymphoma, highlighting its clinical and radiological manifestations. Some studies reported a possible aetiological role of radiotherapy in the development of breast cancer following treatment of NHL, and in the development of breast cancer following treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma, which could potentially explain our findings. PMID:21607043

  17. Correlation of ER, PR and HER-2/Neu with other Prognostic Factors in Infiltrating Ductal Carcinoma of Breast

    PubMed Central

    Siadati, Sepideh; Sharbatdaran, Majid; Nikbakhsh, Novin; Ghaemian, Naser

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women in the world. The aim of this study was to assess estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and HER-2/neu of infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) with tumor size, histologic grade, lymph node metastasis and age. Methods: This study was carried out on 300 tissue blocks of patients with IDC who underwent mastectomy from 2007 to 2011 in Shahid Beheshti Hospital, affiliated to Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol, Iran. Data including age, tumor size, and histologic grade and lymph node status retrieved from pathology department. Result: The mean age of the patients was 40.2±2.3 (ranged 19-82 years). ER and PR were positively correlated with each other ( P = 0.001) and they inversely correlated with HER-2/neu ( P =0.001). We observed correlation between ER and PR expression and low histologic grade ( P = 0.001) and HER-2/neu expression and high histologic grade ( P = 0.003). There was correlation between HER-2/neu expression and lymph node involvement ( P =0.03). None of these makers showed correlation with age and tumor size ( P > 0.05). Conclusion: Our findings indicate the importance of ER, PR and HER-2/neu expression as prognostic factors for therapeutic decision. PMID:26351488

  18. Intratumoral concentration of estrogens and clinicopathological changes in ductal carcinoma in situ following aromatase inhibitor letrozole treatment

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, K; Ishida, T; Miki, Y; Hirakawa, H; Kakugawa, Y; Amano, G; Ebata, A; Mori, N; Nakamura, Y; Watanabe, M; Amari, M; Ohuchi, N; Sasano, H; Suzuki, T

    2013-01-01

    Background: Estrogens have important roles in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. However, the significance of presurgical aromatase inhibitor treatment remains unclear. Therefore, we examined intratumoral concentration of estrogens and changes of clinicopathological factors in DCIS after letrozole treatment. Methods: Ten cases of postmenopausal oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive DCIS were examined. They received oral letrozole before the surgery, and the tumour size was evaluated by ultrasonography. Surgical specimens and corresponding biopsy samples were used for immunohistochemistry. Snap-frozen specimens were also available in a subset of cases, and used for hormone assays and microarray analysis. Results: Intratumoral oestrogen levels were significantly lower in DCIS treated with letrozole compared with that in those without the therapy. A great majority of oestrogen-induced genes showed low expression levels in DCIS treated with letrozole by microarray analysis. Moreover, letrozole treatment reduced the greatest dimension of DCIS, and significantly decreased Ki-67 and progesterone receptor immunoreactivity in DCIS tissues. Conclusion: These results suggest that estrogens are mainly produced by aromatase in DCIS tissues, and aromatase inhibitors potently inhibit oestrogen actions in postmenopausal ER-positive DCIS through rapid deprivation of intratumoral estrogens. PMID:23756858

  19. Multicentric ductal and lobular atypia and occult carcinoma in prophylactic subcutaneous mastectomies: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Goin, J M; Kern, W H

    1979-02-01

    A report is made on 2 patients undergoing prophylactic subcutaneous mastectomy and reconstruction following treatment for carcinoma of the opposite breast. The dangers of augmenting, reducing, or correcting the shape of the remaining breast to match the reconstructed one are also examined. PMID:426453

  20. Pedunculated-type T1 colorectal carcinoma with lung carcinoma metastasis at the deepest invasive portion.

    PubMed

    Asayama, Naoki; Oka, Shiro; Tanaka, Shinji; Hirano, Daiki; Sumimoto, Kyoku; Ninomiya, Yuki; Tamaru, Yuzuru; Shigita, Kenjiro; Hayashi, Nana; Shimamoto, Fumio; Arihiro, Koji; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2016-08-01

    We present a rare case of colorectal T1 carcinoma with metastasis of previous lung carcinoma found at the deepest invasive portion. A 61-year-old man presented with cervical lymphadenopathy 18 years after undergoing surgery for right lung carcinoma [poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma stage IIb (T3N0M0)]. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed enlarged lymph nodes (LNs) in the neck and mediastinal regions. Combined hybrid-F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission-computerized tomography showed increased radionuclide uptake in multiple cervical LNs and mediastinal LNs. LN biopsy revealed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, suspected to be a metastatic tumor of the lung. Subsequent colonoscopy revealed a pedunculated-type lesion with a depressed area in the ascending colon. We performed polypectomy as total excisional biopsy; this tumor was composed mainly of moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, partially mixed with mucinous adenocarcinoma. The pathological findings of the invasive front of the colorectal carcinoma showed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma with a morphological pattern similar to that of the previous lung carcinoma. Furthermore, immunohistochemical results for the histological type of the deepest invasive portion of the tissue specimen were positive for thyroid transcription factor-1 but negative for Caudal-type homeobox 2. From these morphological and immunohistochemical findings, the final diagnosis was moderately differentiated lung carcinoma, pTX N3 M1b (LN, colon) Stage IV. PMID:27259703

  1. Validation of an oligo-gene signature for the prognostic stratification of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS).

    PubMed

    Geradts, Joseph; Groth, Jeffrey; Wu, Yuan; Jin, Genglin

    2016-06-01

    Current evidence suggests that the majority of DCIS lesions do not progress to invasive carcinoma, and overtreatment of DCIS is a significant problem. We previously reported an 8-gene signature that differentiated microdissected low-grade (LG) DCIS lesions with and without associated stromal invasion, based on differential DNA copy number changes detected by quantitative (q) PCR. The current study was undertaken to validate our candidate breast cancer invasion gene panel in a larger series of non-microdissected LG DCIS cases, and to investigate its potential utility in intermediate-grade (IG) and high-grade (HG) DCIS. Representative paraffin blocks were selected from 267 resected DCIS cases with 5-15 years of follow-up (139 pure DCIS ["PD"] and 128 mixed DCIS with associated invasion ["MD"]). These included 171 LG, 46 IG and 50 HG DCIS cases. Gene copy number changes were determined by qPCR, and their differential distribution in the PD and MD subgroups was evaluated. As an alternate platform, we employed immunohistochemistry (IHC). Novel IHC assays were developed for all eight candidate genes, and increased or reduced protein expression was manually scored. Separate multi-gene models were developed for qPCR and IHC to distinguish progressing and non-progressing DCIS lesions. By qPCR analysis, a panel of six genes, as well as CELSR1 alone (a potential invasion suppressor), differentiated PD and MD cases in LG and IG, but not in HG DCIS. By IHC, a panel of three genes, as well as GRAP2 alone (a potential invasion promoter), also distinguished PD and MD cases in LG and IG, but not in HG DCIS. The combination of CELSR1 (by qPCR) and GRAP2 (by IHC) had the best discriminatory power (p = 0.00004). Assays testing either or both of these genes have the potential to become important adjuncts for choosing appropriate treatment for LG/IG DCIS patients. PMID:27250000

  2. Bronchogenic Carcinoma with Cardiac Invasion Simulating Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anirban; Das, Sibes K.; Pandit, Sudipta; Karmakar, Rathindra Nath

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac metastases in bronchogenic carcinoma may occur due to retrograde lymphatic spread or by hematogenous dissemination of tumour cells, but direct invasion of heart by adjacent malignant lung mass is very uncommon. Pericardium is frequently involved in direct cardiac invasion by adjacent lung cancer. Pericardial effusion, pericarditis, and tamponade are common and life threatening presentation in such cases. But direct invasion of myocardium and endocardium is very uncommon. Left atrial endocardium is most commonly involved in such cases due to anatomical contiguity with pulmonary hilum through pulmonary veins, and in most cases left atrial involvement is asymptomatic. But myocardial compression and invasion by adjacent lung mass may result in myocardial ischemia and may present with retrosternal, oppressive chest pain which clinically may simulate with the acute myocardial infarction (AMI). As a result, it leads to misdiagnosis and delayed diagnosis of lung cancer. Here we report a case of non-small-cell carcinoma of right lung which was presented with asymptomatic invasion in left atrium and retrosternal chest pain simulating AMI due to myocardial compression by adjacent lung mass, in a seventy-four-year-old male smoker. PMID:27042370

  3. Clinical implications for imaging of vascular invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Baheti, Akshay D; Dunham, Gregor M; Ingraham, Christopher R; Moshiri, Mariam; Lall, Chandana; Park, James O; Li, David; Katz, Douglas S; Madoff, David C; Bhargava, Puneet

    2016-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second largest cause of cancer mortality in the world, with vascular invasion being one of the most important prognostic factors. HCC with tumor thrombus was traditionally considered to have very limited treatment options. However, multiple promising treatment strategies have emerged in recent years, with diagnostic and interventional radiologists playing a major role in patient management. We provide a comprehensive update on the diagnosis and management of HCC with vascular invasion and the role of the radiologist in this condition. PMID:27142384

  4. Molecular evidence that invasive adenocarcinoma can mimic prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and intraductal carcinoma through retrograde glandular colonization.

    PubMed

    Haffner, Michael C; Weier, Christopher; Xu, Meng Meng; Vaghasia, Ajay; Gürel, Bora; Gümüşkaya, Berrak; Esopi, David M; Fedor, Helen; Tan, Hsueh-Li; Kulac, Ibrahim; Hicks, Jessica; Isaacs, William B; Lotan, Tamara L; Nelson, William G; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; De Marzo, Angelo M

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer often manifests as morphologically distinct tumour foci and is frequently found adjacent to presumed precursor lesions such as high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN). While there is some evidence to suggest that these lesions can be related and exist on a pathological and morphological continuum, the precise clonal and temporal relationships between precursor lesions and invasive cancers within individual tumours remain undefined. Here, we used molecular genetic, cytogenetic, and histological analyses to delineate clonal, temporal, and spatial relationships between HGPIN and cancer lesions with distinct morphological and molecular features. First, while confirming the previous finding that a substantial fraction of HGPIN lesions associated with ERG-positive cancers share rearrangements and overexpression of ERG, we found that a significant subset of such HGPIN glands exhibit only partial positivity for ERG. This suggests that such ERG-positive HGPIN cells either rapidly invade to form adenocarcinoma or represent cancer cells that have partially invaded the ductal and acinar space in a retrograde manner. To clarify these possibilities, we used ERG expression status and TMPRSS2-ERG genomic breakpoints as markers of clonality, and PTEN deletion status to track temporal evolution of clonally related lesions. We confirmed that morphologically distinct HGPIN and nearby invasive cancer lesions are clonally related. Further, we found that a significant fraction of ERG-positive, PTEN-negative HGPIN and intraductal carcinoma (IDC-P) lesions are most likely clonally derived from adjacent PTEN-negative adenocarcinomas, indicating that such PTEN-negative HGPIN and IDC-P lesions arise from, rather than give rise to, the nearby invasive adenocarcinoma. These data suggest that invasive adenocarcinoma can morphologically mimic HGPIN through retrograde colonization of benign glands with cancer cells. Similar clonal relationships were also seen for

  5. Molecular evidence that invasive adenocarcinoma can mimic prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and intraductal carcinoma through retrograde glandular colonization

    PubMed Central

    Haffner, Michael C; Weier, Christopher; Xu, Meng Meng; Vaghasia, Ajay; Gürel, Bora; Gümüşkaya, Berrak; Esopi, David M; Fedor, Helen; Tan, Hsueh-Li; Kulac, Ibrahim; Hicks, Jessica; Isaacs, William B; Lotan, Tamara L; Nelson, William G; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; De Marzo, Angelo M

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer often manifests as morphologically distinct tumour foci and is frequently found adjacent to presumed precursor lesions such as high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN). While there is some evidence to suggest that these lesions can be related and exist on a pathological and morphological continuum, the precise clonal and temporal relationships between precursor lesions and invasive cancers within individual tumours remain undefined. Here, we used molecular genetic, cytogenetic, and histological analyses to delineate clonal, temporal, and spatial relationships between HGPIN and cancer lesions with distinct morphological and molecular features. First, while confirming the previous finding that a substantial fraction of HGPIN lesions associated with ERG-positive cancers share rearrangements and overexpression of ERG, we found that a significant subset of such HGPIN glands exhibit only partial positivity for ERG. This suggests that such ERG-positive HGPIN cells either rapidly invade to form adenocarcinoma or represent cancer cells that have partially invaded the ductal and acinar space in a retrograde manner. To clarify these possibilities, we used ERG expression status and TMPRSS2–ERG genomic breakpoints as markers of clonality, and PTEN deletion status to track temporal evolution of clonally related lesions. We confirmed that morphologically distinct HGPIN and nearby invasive cancer lesions are clonally related. Further, we found that a significant fraction of ERG-positive, PTEN-negative HGPIN and intraductal carcinoma (IDC-P) lesions are most likely clonally derived from adjacent PTEN-negative adenocarcinomas, indicating that such PTEN-negative HGPIN and IDC-P lesions arise from, rather than give rise to, the nearby invasive adenocarcinoma. These data suggest that invasive adenocarcinoma can morphologically mimic HGPIN through retrograde colonization of benign glands with cancer cells. Similar clonal relationships were also seen for

  6. Primary Invasive Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nipple

    PubMed Central

    Pendse, Avani A.; O'Connor, Siobhan M.

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma is one of the most common cutaneous cancers; however, primary squamous cell carcinoma of the nipple is extremely rare. Among the few reported cases, the majority have occurred in older women with rare cases seen in younger women and male patients. Our patient presented with an exophytic mass of the right nipple while pregnant. A superficial biopsy was reviewed at an outside institution and then at our institution and diagnosed as squamous papilloma and then as hyperkeratosis of the nipple, respectively. The subsequent excisional biopsy revealed multiple nests of tumor cells extending into the dermis with associated chronic inflammatory infiltrate, and the lesion was diagnosed as a primary invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the nipple. Following that, a wide local excision of the excision site and sampling of the regional lymph nodes were negative for carcinoma. Due to the rarity of this diagnosis, it is not known whether prognosis and response to therapy differ from cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma at other sites. Therefore, risk stratification and therapy have been based on those for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:26798535

  7. Invasive lobular carcinoma: a rare presentation in the male breast.

    PubMed

    Melo Abreu, Elisa; Pereira, Pedro; Marques, José Carlos; Esteves, Gonçalo

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer in men is uncommon, accounting for <1% of all breast cancers. Even though lobular structures are quite infrequent in the male breast, rare cases of invasive lobular breast carcinoma have been described, representing 1-2% of all breast cancers in men. Risk factors include undescended testes, congenital inguinal hernia, orchiectomy, orchitis, testicular injury, infertility and Klinefelter's syndrome, previous thoracic radiotherapy, alterations of the oestrogen-testosterone ratio and familial history (BRCA 2 and 1). The authors present a case of a 52-year-old man with no relevant predisposing factors to breast cancer, who presented with a painless, firm nodule, fixed to the nipple on the left breast, associated with nipple retraction and ulceration, and fully characterised by mammogram and ultrasound. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis revealed the diagnosis of invasive lobular breast carcinoma and the patient underwent left radical mastectomy, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormonotherapy. A brief review of the literature is presented. PMID:27151060

  8. Different Biological Action of Oleic Acid in ALDHhigh and ALDHlow Subpopulations Separated from Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoe Suk; Jung, Minji; Choi, Sul Ki; Moon, Woo Kyung; Kim, Seung Ja

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying breast cancer progression of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) associated with fatty acids are largely unknown. In the present study, we compared the action of oleic acid (OA) on two human DCIS cell lines, MCF10DCIS.COM (ER/PR/HER2-negative) and SUM225 (HER2 overexpressed). OA led to a significant increase in proliferation, migration, lipid accumulation and the expression of lipogenic proteins, such as SREBP-1, FAS and ACC-1, in MCF10DCIS.COM cells but not SUM225 cells. The ALDHhigh subpopulation analyzed by the ALDEFLUOR assay was approximately 39.2±5.3% of MCF10DCIS.COM cells but was small (3.11±0.9%) in SUM225 cells. We further investigated the different biological action of OA in the distinct ALDHlow and ALDHhigh subpopulations of MCF10DCIS.COM cells. OA led to an increase in the expression of ALDH1A1, ALDH1A2 and ALDH1A3 in MCF10DCIS.COM cells. SREBP-1 and ACC-1 were highly expressed in ALDHhigh cells relative to ALDHlow cells, whereas FAS was higher in ALDHlow cells. In the presence of OA, ALDHhigh cells were more likely to proliferate and migrate and displayed significantly high levels of SREBP-1 and FAS and strong phosphorylation of FAK and AKT relative to ALDHlow cells. This study suggests that OA could be a critical risk factor to promote the proliferation and migration of ALDHhigh cells in DCIS, leading to breast cancer progression. PMID:27589390

  9. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation through Brachytherapy for Ductal Carcinoma in situ: Factors Influencing Utilization and Risks of Second Breast Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Schloemann, Derek T.; Lian, Min; Colditz, Graham A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine influencing factors and outcomes of accelerated partial breast irradiation through brachytherapy (APBIb) versus whole breast irradiation (WBI) for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Patients and Methods From the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results program, we identified 40749 women who were diagnosed with first primary DCIS between 2002 and 2011 and treated with breast conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy. A multi-level logistic regression analysis was performed to estimate odds ratios of APBIb use. Hazard ratios (HRs) of developing ipsilateral breast tumors (IBTs) and contralateral breast tumors (CBTs) were analyzed in 1962 patients with APBIb and 7203 propensity score-matched patients with WBI, using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results Overall, 2212 (4.5%) of 40749 women (the whole cohort) received APBIb. Factors associated with the increased use of APBIb included older age, non-Hispanic white race/ethnicity, smaller tumor size, hormone receptor positivity, comedo subtypes and urban residence. During the 46-month follow-up, 74 (0.8%) and 131 (1.4%) of 9165 propensity score-matched patients developed IBTs and CBTs, respectively. Compared with WBI, APBIb was associated with a significantly increased risk of IBTs (HR, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.06 to 2.85) but not CBTs (OR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.59 to 1.41). Conclusion This population-based study suggests that APBIb use for DCIS was influenced by patient and tumor characteristics as well as urbanization of residence. We observed a moderately increased IBT risk associated with APBIb versus WBI, suggesting that APBIb should be used with caution for DCIS before data from randomized controlled trials with long-term followups are available. PMID:25893591

  10. Outcomes of Low-Risk Ductal Carcinoma In Situ in Southeast Asian Women Treated With Breast Conservation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Fuh Yong; Wang, Fuqiang; Chen, John Ju; Tan, Chiew Har; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To examine the outcomes of Southeast Asian (SEA) women with low-risk ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) treated with breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Retrospective chart reviews of patients treated with BCS for DCIS from 1995 to 2011 were performed. Patients meeting the selection criteria from Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 5194 were included. Most patients received adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) consisting of whole-breast RT delivered to 50 Gy followed by a 10-Gy boost to the tumor bed. Results: Of 744 patients with pathologic diagnosis of pure DCIS identified, 273 met the selection criteria: low-intermediate grade (LIG), n=219; high grade (HG), n=54. Median follow-up for these patients was 60 months. There were 8 ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTRs) in total, 7 of which were DCIS. The estimated actuarial IBTR rates at 5 and 10 years for the entire cohort are 1.8% and 4.3%, respectively. Of the 219 patients with LIG DCIS, 210 received RT and 9 did not. There were 7 IBTRs in LIG DCIS, 2 among the 9 patients who did not receive RT. The IBTR rates in LIG DCIS at 5 and 10 years are 2.3% and 4.2%, respectively. All patients with HG DCIS received RT. There was only 1 IBTR occurring beyond 5 years, giving an estimated IBTR rate of 4.5% at 10 years. Conclusions: SEA women with screen-detected DCIS have exceedingly low rates of IBTR after BCS, comparable to that observed in reports of similar patients with low-risk DCIS treated with adjuvant radiation.

  11. Invasive breast carcinoma cells from patients exhibit MenaINV- and macrophage-dependent transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Pignatelli, Jeanine; Goswami, Sumanta; Jones, Joan G; Rohan, Thomas E; Pieri, Evan; Chen, Xiaoming; Adler, Esther; Cox, Dianne; Maleki, Sara; Bresnick, Anne; Gertler, Frank B; Condeelis, John S; Oktay, Maja H

    2014-11-25

    Metastasis is a complex, multistep process of cancer progression that has few treatment options. A critical event is the invasion of cancer cells into blood vessels (intravasation), through which cancer cells disseminate to distant organs. Breast cancer cells with increased abundance of Mena [an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-responsive cell migration protein] are present with macrophages at sites of intravasation, called TMEM sites (for tumor microenvironment of metastasis), in patient tumor samples. Furthermore, the density of these intravasation sites correlates with metastatic risk in patients. We found that intravasation of breast cancer cells may be prevented by blocking the signaling between cancer cells and macrophages. We obtained invasive breast ductal carcinoma cells of various subtypes by fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsies from patients and found that, in an in vitro transendothelial migration assay, cells that migrated through a layer of human endothelial cells were enriched for the transcript encoding Mena(INV), an invasive isoform of Mena. This enhanced transendothelial migration required macrophages and occurred with all of the breast cancer subtypes. Using mouse macrophages and the human cancer cells from the FNAs, we identified paracrine and autocrine activation of colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R). The paracrine or autocrine nature of the signal depended on the breast cancer cell subtype. Knocking down Mena(INV) or adding an antibody that blocks CSF-1R function prevented transendothelial migration. Our findings indicate that Mena(INV) and TMEM frequency are correlated prognostic markers and CSF-1 and Mena(INV) may be therapeutic targets to prevent metastasis of multiple breast cancer subtypes. PMID:25429076

  12. Mapping the chromosome 16 cadherin gene cluster to a minimal deleted region in ductal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, I J; Aubele, M; Hartmann, E; Braungart, E; Werner, M; Höfler, H; Atkinson, M J

    2001-04-01

    The cadherin family of cell adhesion molecules has been implicated in tumor metastasis and progression. Eight family members have been mapped to the long arm of chromosome 16. Using radiation hybrid mapping, we have located six of these genes within a cluster at 16q21-q22.1. In invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast frequent LOH and accompanying mutation affect the CDH1 gene, which is a member of this chromosome 16 gene cluster. CDH1 LOH also occurs in invasive ductal carcinoma, but in the absence of gene mutation. The proximity of other cadherin genes to 16q22.1 suggests that they may be affected by LOH in invasive ductal carcinomas. Using the mapping data, microsatellite markers were selected which span regions of chromosome 16 containing the cadherin genes. In breast cancer tissues, a high rate of allelic loss was found over the gene cluster region, with CDH1 being the most frequently lost marker. In invasive ductal carcinoma a minimal deleted region was identified within part of the chromosome 16 cadherin gene cluster. This provides strong evidence for the existence of a second 16q22 suppressor gene locus within the cadherin cluster. PMID:11343777

  13. Preliminary results of centralized HER2 testing in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS): NSABP B-43

    PubMed Central

    Siziopikou, Kalliopi P.; Anderson, Stewart J.; Cobleigh, Melody A.; Arthur, Douglas W.; Zheng, Ping; Mamounas, Eleftherios P.; Pajon, Eduardo R.; Behrens, Robert J.; Eakle, Janice F.; Leasure, Nick C.; Atkins, James N.; Polikoff, Jonathan A.; Seay, Thomas E.; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta J.; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Costantino, Joseph P.; Wolmark, Norman

    2016-01-01

    NSABP B-43 is the first prospective, randomized phase III multi-institution clinical trial targeting high-risk, HER2-positive DCIS. It compares whole breast irradiation alone with WBI given concurrently with trastuzumab in women with HER2-positive DCIS treated by lumpectomy. The primary aim is to determine if trastuzumab plus radiation will reduce in-breast tumor recurrence. HER2-positive DCIS was previously estimated at >50 %, occurring primarily in ER-negative, comedo-type DCIS of high nuclear grade. There has been no documented centralized multi-institutional HER2 analysis of DCIS. NSABP B-43 provides a unique opportunity to evaluate this in a large cohort of DCIS patients. Patients undergoing lumpectomy for DCIS without evidence of an invasive component are eligible. A central review of each patient’s pure DCIS lesion is carried out by immunohistochemistry analysis. If the lesion is 2+, FISH analysis is performed. Patients whose tumors are HER2 3+ or FISH-positive are randomly assigned to receive two doses of trastuzumab during WBI or WBI alone. NSABP B-43 opened 11/9/08. As of 7/31/2013, 5,861 patients have had specimens received centrally, and 5,645 of those had analyzable blocks; 1,969 (34.9 %) were HER2 positive. A total of 1,428 patients have been accrued, 1,137 (79.6 %) of whom have follow-up information. The average follow-up time for the 1,137 patients is 23.3 months. No grade 4 or 5 toxicity has been observed. In NSABP B-43 the HER2-positive rate for pure DCIS among patients undergoing breast-preserving surgery is 34.9 %, lower than the previously reported rate. No trastuzumab-related safety signals have been observed. Interest in this trial has been robust. PMID:24202240

  14. Preliminary results of centralized HER2 testing in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS): NSABP B-43.

    PubMed

    Siziopikou, Kalliopi P; Anderson, Stewart J; Cobleigh, Melody A; Julian, Thomas B; Arthur, Douglas W; Zheng, Ping; Mamounas, Eleftherios P; Pajon, Eduardo R; Behrens, Robert J; Eakle, Janice F; Leasure, Nick C; Atkins, James N; Polikoff, Jonathan A; Seay, Thomas E; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta J; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Costantino, Joseph P; Wolmark, Norman

    2013-11-01

    NSABP B-43 is the first prospective, randomized phase III multi-institution clinical trial targeting high-risk, HER2-positive DCIS. It compares whole breast irradiation alone with WBI given concurrently with trastuzumab in women with HER2-positive DCIS treated by lumpectomy. The primary aim is to determine if trastuzumab plus radiation will reduce in-breast tumor recurrence. HER2-positive DCIS was previously estimated at >50 %, occurring primarily in ER-negative, comedo-type DCIS of high nuclear grade. There has been no documented centralized multi-institutional HER2 analysis of DCIS. NSABP B-43 provides a unique opportunity to evaluate this in a large cohort of DCIS patients. Patients undergoing lumpectomy for DCIS without evidence of an invasive component are eligible. A central review of each patient's pure DCIS lesion is carried out by immunohistochemistry analysis. If the lesion is 2+, FISH analysis is performed. Patients whose tumors are HER2 3+ or FISH-positive are randomly assigned to receive two doses of trastuzumab during WBI or WBI alone. NSABP B-43 opened 11/9/08. As of 7/31/2013, 5,861 patients have had specimens received centrally, and 5,645 of those had analyzable blocks; 1,969 (34.9 %) were HER2 positive. A total of 1,428 patients have been accrued, 1,137 (79.6 %) of whom have follow-up information. The average follow-up time for the 1,137 patients is 23.3 months. No grade 4 or 5 toxicity has been observed. In NSABP B-43 the HER2-positive rate for pure DCIS among patients undergoing breast-preserving surgery is 34.9 %, lower than the previously reported rate. No trastuzumab-related safety signals have been observed. Interest in this trial has been robust. PMID:24202240

  15. Genetic Predisposition to In Situ and Invasive Lobular Carcinoma of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Petridis, Christos; Brook, Mark N.; Nowinski, Salpie; Papouli, Efterpi; Fletcher, Olivia; Pinder, Sarah; Hanby, Andrew; Kohut, Kelly; Gorman, Patricia; Caneppele, Michele; Peto, Julian; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Johnson, Nichola; Swann, Ruth; Dwek, Miriam; Perkins, Katherine-Anne; Gillett, Cheryl; Houlston, Richard; Ross, Gillian; De Ieso, Paolo; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Provenzano, Elena; Apicella, Carmel; Wesseling, Jelle; Cornelissen, Sten; Keeman, Renske; Fasching, Peter A.; Jud, Sebastian M.; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Kerin, Michael J.; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Therese; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Kerbrat, Pierre; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L.; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; Benitez, Javier; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Lichtner, Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Lochmann, Magdalena; Brauch, Hiltrud; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Investigators, kConFab; Lambrechts, Diether; Weltens, Caroline; Van Limbergen, Erik; Hatse, Sigrid; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Volorio, Sara; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Mclean, Catriona A.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Devillee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline M.; Kriege, Mieke; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Sherman, Mark E.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Li, Jingmei; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Shah, Mitul; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nicholas; Schoemaker, Minouk; Couch, Fergus J.; Hallberg, Emily; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dunning, Alison M.; Hall, Per; Easton, Doug; Pharoah, Paul; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Tomlinson, Ian; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC) accounts for 10–15% of all invasive breast carcinomas. It is generally ER positive (ER+) and often associated with lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 70 common polymorphisms that predispose to breast cancer, but these studies included predominantly ductal (IDC) carcinomas. To identify novel common polymorphisms that predispose to ILC and LCIS, we pooled data from 6,023 cases (5,622 ILC, 401 pure LCIS) and 34,271 controls from 36 studies genotyped using the iCOGS chip. Six novel SNPs most strongly associated with ILC/LCIS in the pooled analysis were genotyped in a further 516 lobular cases (482 ILC, 36 LCIS) and 1,467 controls. These analyses identified a lobular-specific SNP at 7q34 (rs11977670, OR (95%CI) for ILC = 1.13 (1.09–1.18), P = 6.0×10−10; P-het for ILC vs IDC ER+ tumors = 1.8×10−4). Of the 75 known breast cancer polymorphisms that were genotyped, 56 were associated with ILC and 15 with LCIS at P<0.05. Two SNPs showed significantly stronger associations for ILC than LCIS (rs2981579/10q26/FGFR2, P-het = 0.04 and rs889312/5q11/MAP3K1, P-het = 0.03); and two showed stronger associations for LCIS than ILC (rs6678914/1q32/LGR6, P-het = 0.001 and rs1752911/6q14, P-het = 0.04). In addition, seven of the 75 known loci showed significant differences between ER+ tumors with IDC and ILC histology, three of these showing stronger associations for ILC (rs11249433/1p11, rs2981579/10q26/FGFR2 and rs10995190/10q21/ZNF365) and four associated only with IDC (5p12/rs10941679; rs2588809/14q24/RAD51L1, rs6472903/8q21 and rs1550623/2q31/CDCA7). In conclusion, we have identified one novel lobular breast cancer specific predisposition polymorphism at 7q34, and shown for the first time that common breast cancer polymorphisms predispose to LCIS. We have shown that many of the ER+ breast cancer predisposition loci also predispose to ILC, although there

  16. Genetic predisposition to in situ and invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Elinor; Roylance, Rebecca; Petridis, Christos; Brook, Mark N; Nowinski, Salpie; Papouli, Efterpi; Fletcher, Olivia; Pinder, Sarah; Hanby, Andrew; Kohut, Kelly; Gorman, Patricia; Caneppele, Michele; Peto, Julian; Dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Johnson, Nichola; Swann, Ruth; Dwek, Miriam; Perkins, Katherine-Anne; Gillett, Cheryl; Houlston, Richard; Ross, Gillian; De Ieso, Paolo; Southey, Melissa C; Hopper, John L; Provenzano, Elena; Apicella, Carmel; Wesseling, Jelle; Cornelissen, Sten; Keeman, Renske; Fasching, Peter A; Jud, Sebastian M; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Kerin, Michael J; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Therese; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Kerbrat, Pierre; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; Benitez, Javier; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Lichtner, Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K; Lochmann, Magdalena; Brauch, Hiltrud; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Investigators, Kconfab; Lambrechts, Diether; Weltens, Caroline; Van Limbergen, Erik; Hatse, Sigrid; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Volorio, Sara; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Catriona A; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Devillee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Kriege, Mieke; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J; Sherman, Mark E; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Li, Jingmei; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Shah, Mitul; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nicholas; Schoemaker, Minouk; Couch, Fergus J; Hallberg, Emily; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dunning, Alison M; Hall, Per; Easton, Doug; Pharoah, Paul; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Tomlinson, Ian; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2014-04-01

    Invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC) accounts for 10-15% of all invasive breast carcinomas. It is generally ER positive (ER+) and often associated with lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 70 common polymorphisms that predispose to breast cancer, but these studies included predominantly ductal (IDC) carcinomas. To identify novel common polymorphisms that predispose to ILC and LCIS, we pooled data from 6,023 cases (5,622 ILC, 401 pure LCIS) and 34,271 controls from 36 studies genotyped using the iCOGS chip. Six novel SNPs most strongly associated with ILC/LCIS in the pooled analysis were genotyped in a further 516 lobular cases (482 ILC, 36 LCIS) and 1,467 controls. These analyses identified a lobular-specific SNP at 7q34 (rs11977670, OR (95%CI) for ILC = 1.13 (1.09-1.18), P = 6.0 × 10(-10); P-het for ILC vs IDC ER+ tumors = 1.8 × 10(-4)). Of the 75 known breast cancer polymorphisms that were genotyped, 56 were associated with ILC and 15 with LCIS at P<0.05. Two SNPs showed significantly stronger associations for ILC than LCIS (rs2981579/10q26/FGFR2, P-het = 0.04 and rs889312/5q11/MAP3K1, P-het = 0.03); and two showed stronger associations for LCIS than ILC (rs6678914/1q32/LGR6, P-het = 0.001 and rs1752911/6q14, P-het = 0.04). In addition, seven of the 75 known loci showed significant differences between ER+ tumors with IDC and ILC histology, three of these showing stronger associations for ILC (rs11249433/1p11, rs2981579/10q26/FGFR2 and rs10995190/10q21/ZNF365) and four associated only with IDC (5p12/rs10941679; rs2588809/14q24/RAD51L1, rs6472903/8q21 and rs1550623/2q31/CDCA7). In conclusion, we have identified one novel lobular breast cancer specific predisposition polymorphism at 7q34, and shown for the first time that common breast cancer polymorphisms predispose to LCIS. We have shown that many of the ER+ breast cancer predisposition loci also predispose to ILC, although there is some heterogeneity

  17. Ductal Carcinoma In Situ With Microinvasion: Prognostic Implications, Long-Term Outcomes, and Role of Axillary Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Parikh, Rahul R.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Lannin, Donald; Moran, Meena S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the clinical-pathologic features and long-term outcomes for women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) vs. DCIS with microinvasion (DCISM) treated with breast conservation therapy (BCT), to assess the impact of microinvasion. Patients and Methods: A total of 393 patients with DCIS/DCISM from our database were analyzed to assess differences in clinical-pathologic features and outcomes for the two cohorts. Results: The median follow-up was 8.94 years, and the mean age was 55.8 years for the entire group. The DCISM cohort was comprised of 72 of 393 patients (18.3%). Surgical evaluation of the axilla was performed in 58.3% (n = 42) of DCISM vs. 18.1% (n = 58) of DCIS, with only 1 of 42 DCISM (2.3%) vs. 0 of 58 DCIS with axillary metastasis. Surgical axillary evaluation was not an independent predictor of local-regional relapse (LRR), distant relapse-free survival (DRFS), or overall survival (OS) in Cox proportional hazards analysis (p > 0.05). For the DCIS vs. DCISM groups, respectively, the 10-year breast relapse-free survival was 89.0% vs. 90.7% (p = 0.36), DRFS was 98.5% vs. 97.9% (p = 0.78), and OS was 93.2% vs. 95.7% (p = 0.95). The presence of microinvasion did not correlate with LRR, age, presentation, race, family history, margin status, and use of adjuvant hormonal therapy (all p > 0.05). In univariate analysis, pathology (DCIS vs. DCISM) was not an independent predictor of LRR (hazard ratio [HR], 1.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.58-4.30; p = 0.36), DRFS (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.07-6.95; p = 0.77), or OS (HR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.28-3.82; p = 0.95). Conclusions: Our data imply that the natural history of DCISM closely resembles that of DCIS, with a low incidence of local-regional and distant failures. On the basis of our large dataset, the incidence of axillary metastasis in DCISM appears to be small and not appear to correlate to outcomes, and thus, microinvasion alone should not be the sole criterion for more aggressive treatment.

  18. Snail promotes an invasive phenotype in lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Snail is a transcriptional factor which is known to influence the epitheliomesenchymal transition (EMT) by regulating adhesion proteins such as E-cadherin and claudins as well as matrix metalloproteases (MMP). Methods To evaluate the functional importance of snail, a transciptional factor involved in EMT in lung tumors, we investigated its expression in a large set of lung carcinomas by immunohistochemistry. Expression of snail and effects of snail knockdown was studied in cell lines. Results Nuclear snail expression was seen in 21% of cases this being strongest in small cell lung carcinomas (SCLC). There was significantly greater snail expression in SCLC compared to squamous cell or adenocarcinoma. Positive snail expression was associated with poor survival in the whole material and separately in squamous cell and adenocarcinomas. In Cox regression analysis, snail expression showed an independent prognostic value in all of these groups. In several cell lines knockdown of snail reduced invasion in both matrigel assay and in the myoma tissue model for invasion. The influence of snail knockdown on claudin expression was cell type specific. Snail knockdown in these cell lines modified the expression of MMP2 and MMP9 but did not influence the activation of these MMPs to any significant degree. Conclusions The results show that snail plays an important role in the invasive characteristics of lung carcinoma influencing the survival of the patients. Snail knockdown might thus be one option for targeted molecular therapy in lung cancer. Snail knockdown influenced the expression of claudins individually in a cell-line dependent manner but did not influence MMP expressions or activations to any significant degree. PMID:23157169

  19. Genomic alterations of primary tumor and blood in invasive ductal carcinoma of breast

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Genomic alterations are important events in the origin and progression of various cancers, with DNA copy number changes associated with progression and treatment response in cancer. Array CGH is potentially useful in the identification of genomic alterations from primary tumor and blood in breast cancer patients. The aim of our study was to compare differences of DNA copy number changes in blood and tumor tissue in breast cancer. Methods DNA copy number changes in blood were compared to those in tumor tissue using array-comparative genomic hybridization in samples obtained from 30 breast cancer patients. The relative degree of chromosomal changes was analyzed using log2 ratios and data was validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Forty-six regions of gains present in more than 30% of the tissues and 70 regions of gains present in more than 30% of blood were identified. The most frequently gained region was chromosome 8q24. In total, agreement of DNA copy numbers between primary tumor and blood was minimal (Kappa = 0.138, p < 0.001). Conclusion Although there was only a slight agreement of DNA copy number alterations between the primary tumor and the blood samples, the blood cell copy number variation may have some clinical significance as compared to the primary tumor in IDC breast cancer patients. PMID:20409316

  20. Breaking down barriers: the importance of the stromal microenvironment in acquiring invasiveness in young women's breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schedin, Pepper; Borges, Virginia

    2009-01-01

    Gene expression profiling was performed on laser captured breast stroma and epithelium obtained from 14 breast cancer patients. As with breast epithelium, of the stromal gene expression changes observed between normal tissue and invasive ductal carcinoma, greater than 90% occurred early, at the normal to ductal carcinoma in situ transition. Only 10% of stromal and 0% of epithelial genes were differentially regulated between non-invasive ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive disease. These data suggest that the majority of gene expression changes required for transformation occur early, prior to histological evidence of an invasive phenotype, the stroma cooperates closely with epithelium in this transformation, and for acquisition of the invasive phenotype, the stroma is dominant over the epithelium. PMID:19344495

  1. ADAM33 gene silencing by promoter hypermethylation as a molecular marker in breast invasive lobular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background ADAM33 protein is a member of the family of transmembrane glycoproteins composed of multidomains. ADAM family members have different activities, such as proteolysis and adhesion, making them good candidates to mediate the extracellular matrix remodelling and changes in cellular adhesion that characterise certain pathologies and cancer development. It was reported that one family member, ADAM23, is down-regulated by promoter hypermethylation. This seems to correlate with tumour progression and metastasis in breast cancer. In this study, we explored the involvement of ADAM33, another ADAM family member, in breast cancer. Methods First, we analysed ADAM33 expression in breast tumour cell lines by RT-PCR and western blotting. We also used 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5azadCR) treatment and DNA bisulphite sequencing to study the promoter methylation of ADAM33 in breast tumour cell lines. We evaluated ADAM33 methylation in primary tumour samples by methylation specific PCR (MSP). Finally, ADAM33 promoter hypermethylation was correlated with clinicopathological data using the chi-square test and Fisher's exact test. Results The expression analysis of ADAM33 in breast tumour cell lines by RT-PCR revealed gene silencing in 65% of tumour cell lines. The corresponding lack of ADAM33 protein was confirmed by western blotting. We also used 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dCR) demethylation and bisulphite sequencing methodologies to confirm that gene silencing is due to ADAM33 promoter hypermethylation. Using MSP, we detected ADAM33 promoter hypermethylation in 40% of primary breast tumour samples. The correlation between methylation pattern and patient's clinicopathological data was not significantly associated with histological grade; tumour stage (TNM); tumour size; ER, PR or ERBB2 status; lymph node status; metastasis or recurrence. Methylation frequency in invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) was 76.2% compared with 25.5% in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), and this

  2. Muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Malkowicz, S Bruce; van Poppel, Hendrik; Mickisch, Gerald; Pansadoro, Vito; Thüroff, Joachim; Soloway, Mark S; Chang, Sam; Benson, Mitchell; Fukui, Iwao

    2007-01-01

    Muscle-invasive urothelial (transitional cell) carcinoma is a potentially lethal condition for which an attempt at curative surgery is required. Clinical staging does not allow for accurate determination of eventual pathologic status. Muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma is a highly progressive disease, and initiation of definitive therapy within 3 months of diagnosis is worthwhile. Age is not a contraindication for aggressive surgical care, and surgical candidates should be evaluated in the context of overall medical comorbidity. In those patients who undergo surgery, clinical pathways may streamline care. Radical cystectomy remains the "gold standard" of therapy, providing 5-year survival rates of 75% to 80% in patients with organ-confined disease, yet organ-sparing procedures demonstrate clinical effectiveness as well. Cystectomy should be undertaken with the intent of performing complete pelvic lymph node dissection and attaining surgically negative margins. In younger female patients, the preservation of reproductive organs may be achieved in many cases. Prostate- and seminal vesicle-preserving cystectomy has been performed, yet the long-term safety and efficacy of such a procedure remains to be determined. Laparoscopic and robotic cystectomy procedures continue to be explored by several investigators. The role of "radical transurethral resection" in muscle-invasive disease is limited to a small cohort of patients, and, when it is performed, cystectomy may be required to consolidate therapy. Postoperative follow-up after cystectomy should occur over short intervals during the first 2 years and can be extended, but not discontinued, beyond that time. Currently, no tumor markers have been prospectively validated to help guide clinical decision making, and prospective trials incorporating marker data should be encouraged. PMID:17280906

  3. Diagnosis of Columnar Cell Lesions and Atypical Ductal Hyperplasia by Ultrasound-Guided Core Biopsy: Findings Associated with Underestimation of Breast Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hye Shin; Jang, Mijung; Kim, Sun Mi; Yun, Bo La; Kim, Sung-Won; Kang, Eun Young; Park, So Yeon

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study described here was to determine underestimation rates and identify radiologic predictors of underestimation for columnar cell lesions (CCLs) and atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) detected by ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy. A total of 103 CCLs and ADH lesions in 100 patients diagnosed by ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy were evaluated. Breast sonographic and mammographic findings were reviewed, and underestimation rates were determined by surgical excision, percutaneous vacuum-assisted excision or 2-y imaging follow-up. All underestimated lesions were ductal carcinoma in situ, and the underestimation rates of flat epithelial atypia (FEA), FEA + ADH and ADH were 5.9% (1/17), 44.4% (4/9) and 27.3% (12/44), respectively. There was no underestimation of CCLs without atypia. The presence of calcifications on ultrasound was significantly associated with underestimation (p = 0.010). Therefore, except for CCLs without atypia, all other lesions may require excision, especially when calcification is present on ultrasound or when FEA + ADH is found. PMID:27067419

  4. Long-Term Outcome in Patients With Ductal Carcinoma In Situ Treated With Breast-Conserving Therapy: Implications for Optimal Follow-up Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Shaitelman, Simona F.; Wilkinson, J. Ben; Kestin, Larry L.; Ye Hong; Goldstein, Neal S.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Vicini, Frank A.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To determine 20-year rates of local control and outcome-associated factors for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) after breast-conserving therapy (BCT). Methods and Materials: All DCIS cases receiving BCT between 1980 and 1993 were reviewed. Patient demographics and pathologic factors were analyzed for effect on outcomes, including ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) and survival. Results: One hundred forty-five cases were evaluated; the median follow-up time was 19.3 years. IBTR developed in 25 patients, for 5-, 10-, 15-, and 20-year actuarial rates of 9.9%, 12.2%, 13.7%, and 17.5%, respectively. One third of IBTRs were elsewhere failures, and 68% of IBTRs occurred <10 years after diagnosis. Young age and cancerization of lobules predicted for IBTR at <10 years, and increased slide involvement and atypical ductal hyperplasia were associated with IBTR at later time points. Conclusions: Patients with DCIS treated with BCT have excellent long-term rates of local control. Predictors of IBTR vary over time, and the risk of recurrence seems highest within 10 to 12 years after diagnosis.

  5. Curcumin suppresses migration and invasion of human endometrial carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, QIAN; GAO, QING; CHEN, KUNLUN; WANG, YIDONG; CHEN, LIJUAN; LI, XU

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin, a widely used Chinese herbal medicine, has historically been used in anti-cancer therapies. However, the anti-metastatic effect and molecular mechanism of curcumin in endometrial carcinoma (EC) are still poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to detect the anti-metastatic effects of curcumin and the associated mechanism(s) in EC. Based on assays carried out in EC cell lines, it was observed that curcumin inhibited EC cell migration and invasion in vitro. Furthermore, following treatment with curcumin for 24 h, there was a decrease in the expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 as well as proteinase activity in EC cells. Moreover, curcumin treatment significantly decreased the levels of the phosphorylated form of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2. MEK1 overexpression partially blocked the anti-metastatic effects of curcumin. Combined treatment with ERK inhibitor U0126 and curcumin resulted in a synergistic reduction in MMP-2/-9 expression; the invasive capabilities of HEC-1B cells were also inhibited. In conclusion, curcumin inhibits tumor cell migration and invasion by reducing the expression and activity of MMP-2/9 via the suppression of the ERK signaling pathway, suggesting that curcumin is a potential therapeutic agent for EC. PMID:26622667

  6. Downregulation of CCR1 inhibits human hepatocellular carcinoma cell invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Xiaofeng; Fan Jia; E-mail: jiafan99@yahoo.com; Wang Xiaoying; Zhou Jian; Qiu Shuangjian; Yu Yao; Liu Yinkun; Tang Zhaoyou

    2007-04-20

    CC chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1) has an important role in the recruitment of leukocytes to the site of inflammation. The migration and metastasis of tumor cells shares many similarities with leukocyte trafficking, which is mainly regulated by chemokine receptor-ligand interactions. CCR1 is highly expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and tissues with unknown functions. In this study, we silenced CCR1 expression in the human HCC cell line HCCLM3 using artificial microRNA (miRNA)-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) and examined the invasiveness and proliferation of CCR1-silenced HCCLM3 cells and the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. The miRNA-mediated knockdown expression of CCR1 significantly inhibited the invasive ability of HCCLM3 cells, but had only a minor effect on the cellular proliferation rate. Moreover, CCR1 knockdown significantly reduced the secretion of MMP-2. Together, these findings indicate that CCR1 has an important role in HCCLM3 invasion and that CCR1 might be a new target of HCC treatment.

  7. Clinicopathological Characteristics and Survival Outcomes in Invasive Papillary Carcinoma of the Breast: A SEER Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yi-Zi; Hu, Xin; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the clinicopathological characteristics and survival outcomes of invasive papillary carcinoma (IPC), we identified 233,171 female patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database who had IPC (n = 524) or infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) (n = 232,647). Generally, IPCs occurred in older women (≥50 years old) and presented with smaller sizes, lower grades, higher rates of oestrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) positivity, and reduced lymph node (LN) involvement and were less likely to be treated with mastectomy than patients with IDC. The five-year disease-specific survival (DSS) rates were significantly better in IPC than in IDC (97.5% vs. 93%, respectively; P < 0.001). In the multivariate analysis, patients with IPC showed a DSS that was similar to that of IDC (hazard ratio = 0.556, 95% confidence interval 0.289–1.070, P = 0.079). No significant difference was observed in DSS between matched IPC and IDC groups (P = 0.085). Differences in outcomes may be partially explained by differences in tumour grade, LN status, and ER and PR status between the 2 groups. Gaining an improved clinical and biological understanding of IPC might result in more tailored and effective therapies in breast cancer patients. PMID:27053333

  8. Clinicopathological Characteristics and Survival Outcomes in Invasive Papillary Carcinoma of the Breast: A SEER Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi-Zi; Hu, Xin; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the clinicopathological characteristics and survival outcomes of invasive papillary carcinoma (IPC), we identified 233,171 female patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database who had IPC (n = 524) or infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) (n = 232,647). Generally, IPCs occurred in older women (≥ 50 years old) and presented with smaller sizes, lower grades, higher rates of oestrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) positivity, and reduced lymph node (LN) involvement and were less likely to be treated with mastectomy than patients with IDC. The five-year disease-specific survival (DSS) rates were significantly better in IPC than in IDC (97.5% vs. 93%, respectively; P < 0.001). In the multivariate analysis, patients with IPC showed a DSS that was similar to that of IDC (hazard ratio = 0.556, 95% confidence interval 0.289-1.070, P = 0.079). No significant difference was observed in DSS between matched IPC and IDC groups (P = 0.085). Differences in outcomes may be partially explained by differences in tumour grade, LN status, and ER and PR status between the 2 groups. Gaining an improved clinical and biological understanding of IPC might result in more tailored and effective therapies in breast cancer patients. PMID:27053333

  9. Predicting tumor sizes of ductal carcinoma in situ from immunohistochemical images using a novel approach of mathematical pathology: preliminary results, potentials and challenges ahead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Yao-Li; Edgerton, Mary; Macklin, Paul; Yang, Wei; Bearer, Elaine; Cristini, Vittorio

    2012-02-01

    Differential equation models have recently drawn increasing attentions as a useful tool to help advance the knowledge in cancer research. However, challenges remain for applying such models to clinical practices on a patient-specific basis to assist surgical decisions. Clinical diagnoses essentially at a single time point are often insufficient to fully constrain the time-dependent differential equations. Here we present a novel mathematical pathology approach, identifying robust indicators for time-invariant predictions of the model that can be used for surgical planning. We demonstrate this approach by predicting the sizes of ductal carcinoma in situ by calibrating model parameters from immunohistochemical images. Our preliminary studies of 17 excised tumor cases resulted in a better agreement with the actual measured sizes than the other estimates available to us, showing the potential of our approach for patient-specific cancer diagnosis. Conversely, our studies also revealed challenges to overcome before we can take this approach to the next level.

  10. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression is related to nuclear grade in ductal carcinoma in situ and is increased in its normal adjacent epithelium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shim, Veronica; Gauthier, Mona L.; Sudilovsky, Daniel; Mantei, Kristin; Chew, Karen L.; Moore, Dan H.; Cha, Imok; Tlsty, Thea D.; Esserman, Laura J.

    2003-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is emerging as an important cancer biomarker and is now an experimental target for solid tumor treatment.However, no study has exclusively focused on COX-2 expression in early lesions such as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). We examined COX-2 expression by immunohistochemistry in 46 cases of women undergoing surgical resection for DCIS. We found that COX-2 expression was detected in 85% of all DCIS specimens, with increased COX-2 staining correlating with higher nuclear grade. Strikingly, COX-2 staining intensity in the normal adjacent epithelium was stronger than in the DCIS lesion itself. Our observations demonstrate that COX-2 is up-regulated in the normal adjacent epithelium and supports the hypothesis that the surrounding epithelial tissue is part of the disease process in DCIS.

  11. Factors associated with local recurrence and cause-specific survival in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast treated with breast-conserving therapy or mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos; Kestin, Larry; Go, Nel; Krauss, Daniel; Chen, Peter; Goldstein, Neal; Martinez, Alvaro; Vicini, Frank A. . E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: We reviewed our institution's experience treating patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast to determine risk factors for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) and cause-specific survival (CSS) after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) or mastectomy. Materials and Methods: Between 1981 and 1999, 410 cases of DCIS (405 patients) were treated at our institution; 367 were managed with breast-conserving surgery (54 with lumpectomy alone and 313 with adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) [median dose, 45 Gy]). Of these 313 patients, 298 received also a supplemental boost of RT to the lumpectomy cavity (median dose, 16 Gy). Forty-three patients underwent mastectomy; 2 (5%) received adjuvant RT to the chest wall. A true recurrence/marginal miss (TR/MM) IBTR was defined as failure within or adjacent to the tumor bed in patients undergoing BCT. Median follow-up for all patients was 7 years (mean: 6.1 years). Results: Thirty patients (8.2%) experienced an IBTR after BCT (25 [8%] after RT, 5 [9.3%] after no RT), and 2 patients (4.7%) developed a chest wall recurrence after mastectomy. Of the 32 local failures, 20 (63%) were invasive (18/30 [60%] after BCT and 2/2 [100%] after mastectomy), and 37% were DCIS alone. Twenty-four (80%) of the IBTRs were classified as TR/MM. The 10-year freedom from local failure, CSS, and overall survival after BCT or mastectomy were 89% vs. 90% (p = 0.4), 98% vs. 100% (p = 0.7), and 89% vs. 100% (p = 0.3), respectively. Factors associated with IBTR on Cox multivariate analysis were younger age (p = 0.02, hazard ratio [HR] 1.06 per year), electron boost energy {<=}9 MeV (p = 0.03, HR 1.41), final margins {<=}2 mm (p = 0.007; HR, 3.65), and no breast radiation (p = 0.002, HR 5.56). On Cox univariate analysis for BCT patients, IBTR, TR/MM failures, and predominant nuclear Grade 3 were associated with an increased risk of distant metastases and a reduced CSS. Conclusions: After treatment for DCIS, 10-year rates of local control

  12. Current Status of Minimally Invasive Surgery for Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Smith, Zachary L

    2016-06-01

    Over the last three decades, the incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has continuously risen, generally attributed to the increased use of cross-sectional imaging across all medical disciplines. Fortunately, despite this rising incidence, the estimated 5-year relative survival rate has improved. This survival improvement likely parallels the stage migration of the last two decades toward an increased incidence of small renal masses (SRMs). However, this survival improvement may be secondary to improved surgical techniques and medical therapies for these malignancies. The increased incidence of SRMs has led to an expected evolution in the treatment of RCC. Minimally invasive surgical applications for the treatment of RCC have gained widespread popularity, and now these approaches to renal malignancies have surpassed open techniques in frequency of utilization. Laparoscopic and robotic-assisted techniques have now been applied to both radical and partial nephrectomy procedures of varying complexity. Additionally, percutaneous ablative procedures have been applied to the treatment of some SRMs, increasing the urologist's armamentarium further. Below, we provide a review of these minimally invasive surgical (MIS) procedures for the treatment of RCC. PMID:27021911

  13. Gene Expression Profiling of Microdissected Pancreatic Ductal Carcinomas Using High-Density DNA Microarrays1,3

    PubMed Central

    Grützmann, Robert; Pilarsky, Christian; Ammerpohl, Ole; Lüttges, Jutta; Böhme, Armin; Sipos, Bence; Foerder, Melanie; Alldinger, Ingo; Jahnke, Beatrix; Schackert, Hans Konrad; Kalthoff, Holger; Kremer, Bernd; Klöppel, Günter; Saeger, Hans Detlev

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains an important cause of malignancy-related death and is the eighth most common cancer with the lowest overall 5-year relative survival rate. To identify new molecular markers and candidates for new therapeutic regimens, we investigated the gene expression profile of microdissected cells from 11 normal pancreatic ducts, 14 samples of PDAC, and 4 well-characterized pancreatic cancer cell lines using the Affymetrix U133 GeneChip set. RNA was extracted from microdissected samples and cell lines, amplified, and labeled using a repetitive in vitro transcription protocol. Differentially expressed genes were identified using the significance analysis of microarrays program. We found 616 differentially expressed genes. Within these, 140 were also identified in PDAC by others, such as Galectin-1, Galectin-3, and MT-SP2. We validated the differential expression of several genes (e.g., CENPF, MCM2, MCM7, RAMP, IRAK1, and PTTG1) in PDAC by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. We present a whole genome expression study of microdissected tissues from PDAC, from microdissected normal ductal pancreatic cells and pancreatic cancer cell lines using highdensity microarrays. Within the panel of genes, we identified novel differentially expressed genes, which have not been associated with the pathogenesis of PDAC before. PMID:15548371

  14. Comparison of metastatic neuroendocrine neoplasms to the breast and primary invasive mammary carcinomas with neuroendocrine differentiation.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sambit K; Kim, Stacey A; DeLair, Deborah F; Bose, Shikha; Laury, Anna R; Chopra, Shefali; Mertens, Richard B; Dhall, Deepti

    2016-08-01

    Metastatic neuroendocrine neoplasms to the breast may show considerable morphologic overlap with primary mammary carcinomas, particularly those showing evidence of neuroendocrine differentiation, and may be misdiagnosed as such. Accurate distinction between these two entities is crucial for determination of appropriate clinical management. The histologic and immunohistochemical features of metastatic neuroendocrine neoplasms to the breast were studied and compared with the features of primary invasive mammary carcinomas with neuroendocrine differentiation, which served as controls. Of the metastatic neuroendocrine neoplasms, 15 were well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors with carcinoid tumor-type morphology and 7 were poorly differentiated/high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas with small-cell or large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma morphology. The majority of the metastatic neoplasms originated in the lung and gastrointestinal tract. There were histologic similarities between metastatic neuroendocrine neoplasms and invasive mammary carcinomas with neuroendocrine differentiation, both of which exhibited neuroendocrine histologic features (nested and trabecular architecture, minimal tubular differentiation, and characteristic nuclear features). Only one case of the invasive mammary carcinomas with neuroendocrine differentiation was modified Bloom-Richardson grade 1 (largely due to minimal tubular differentiation on most such tumors), and the invasive mammary carcinomas with neuroendocrine differentiation were often associated with in situ carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry was helpful in distinguishing metastatic neuroendocrine neoplasms from invasive mammary carcinomas with neuroendocrine differentiation. Whereas the majority of invasive mammary carcinomas with neuroendocrine differentiation were positive for estrogen receptor and GATA3, metastatic neuroendocrine neoplasms were typically negative for estrogen receptor and GATA3, and metastatic well

  15. The cell surface GRP78 facilitates the invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiu-Xiu; Li, Hong-Dan; Zhao, Song; Zhao, Liang; Song, Hui-Juan; Wang, Guan; Guo, Qing-Jun; Luan, Zhi-Dong; Su, Rong-Jian

    2013-01-01

    Invasion is a major characteristic of hepatocellular carcinoma and one of the main causes of refractory to treatment. We have previously reported that GRP78 promotes the invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma although the mechanism underlying this change remains uncertain. In this paper, we explored the role of the cell surface GRP78 in the regulation of cancer cell invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. We found that neutralization of the endogenous cell surface GRP78 with the anti-GRP78 antibody inhibited the adhesion and invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines Mahlavu and SMMC7721. However, forced expression of the cell surface GRP78 facilitated the adhesion and invasion in SMMC7721. We further demonstrated that inhibition of the endogenous cell surface GRP78 specifically inhibited the secretion and activity of MMP-2 but did not affect the secretion and activity of MMP-9. We also found that inhibition of the cell surface GRP78 increased E-Cadherin expression and decreased N-Cadherin level. On the contrary, forced expression of the cell surface GRP78 increased N-Cadherin expression and decreased E-Cadherin level, suggesting that the cell surface GRP78 plays critical role in the regulation of EMT process. These findings suggest that the cell surface GRP78 plays a stimulatory role in the invasion process and may be a potential anti-invasion target for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:24383061

  16. The impact of lobular carcinoma in situ in association with invasive breast cancer on the rate of local recurrence in patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jolly, Shruti; Kestin, Larry L. . E-mail: lkestin@beaumont.edu; Goldstein, Neal S.; Vicini, Frank A.

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: The significance of lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) associated with invasive breast cancer in patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy (BCT) remains controversial. We examined the impact of the presence and extent of LCIS associated with invasive breast cancer on clinical outcome in BCT patients. Methods and Materials: From 1980 to 1996, 607 cases of invasive breast cancer were treated with BCT. All slides were reviewed by a single pathologist. Positive margin was defined as presence of invasive carcinoma/ductal carcinoma in situ at the inked margin. Multiple clinical, pathologic, and treatment-related variables were analyzed for their association with ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) and true recurrence/marginal miss (TR/MM). Median follow-up was 8.7 years. Results: Fifty-six patients (9%) had LCIS in association with invasive cancer. On univariate analysis, positive final margin, positive/no reexcision, smaller maximum specimen dimension, and the presence of LCIS predicted for IBTR. The 10-year IBTR rate was 14% for cases with LCIS vs. 7% without LCIS (p = 0.04). On multivariate analysis, positive margin (p < 0.01), positive/no reexcision (p = 0.04), and presence of LCIS (p = 0.02) remained independently associated with IBTR; positive margin (p < 0.01) and LCIS (p = 0.04) were also associated with TR/MM failure. When examining only cases with negative final margins, the presence of LCIS remained associated with higher IBTR and TR/MM rates (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The presence of LCIS was independently associated with higher rate of IBTR and TR/MM after BCT for invasive breast cancer. LCIS may have significant premalignant potential and progress to an invasive IBTR at the site of index lesion. The adequacy of excision of LCIS associated with invasive carcinoma should be considered in patients undergoing BCT.

  17. Osteoradionecrosis of the skull after radiation therapy for invasive carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Michaela T; Billington, Alicia; Habal, Mutaz B

    2011-09-01

    Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the skull is a rare but fatal complication of radiation therapy for the treatment of head and neck malignancies. The pathogenesis of ORN follows the "3Hs Theory" proposed by Marx (J Oral Maxillofac Surg 1983;41:283-288) in which radiation induces tissue injury by causing vessel thrombosis (hypovascularity), which leads to hypoxia, and results in cell death of the skin and the underlying structure of the bony element (hypocellularity) including the deep visceral structures. This note details a patient with severe and extensive ORN of the parietooccipital region of the skull because of a large dose of radiation therapy for the treatment of an invasive basal cell carcinoma of the scalp. The patient's condition was further complicated by an extensive infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, which leads to meningitis and cerebral edema as well as cerebritis. The patient was successfully treated with interdisciplinary medical and surgical aggressive therapy and radical procedures involving 4 separate trips to the operating room for an 18-month period. Success was achieved because of early clinical diagnosis of ORN, aggressive eradication of infected and necrotic tissues including the brain, and restoration of functioning and viable tissues through the use of local flaps to change an open wound to a closed wound. PMID:21959411

  18. MicroRNA-323-3p inhibits cell invasion and metastasis in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma via direct suppression of SMAD2 and SMAD3

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Heshui; Cui, Pengfei; Li, Yongfeng; Liu, Yao; Liu, Zhiqiang; Gou, Shanmiao

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), which accounts for 96% of all pancreatic cancer cases, is characterized by rapid progression, invasion and metastasis. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling is an essential pathway in metastatic progression and microRNAs (miRNA) play central roles in the regulation of various biological and pathologic processes including cancer metastasis. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in regulation of miRNAs and activation of TGF-β signaling in PDAC remain to be established. The results of this study suggested that miR-323-3p expression in PDAC tissues and cell lines was significantly decreased compared to levels in normal pancreatic tissues and primary cultured pancreatic duct epithelial cells. Further investigation revealed that miR-323-3p directly targeted and suppressed SMAD2 and SMAD3, both key components in TGF-β signaling. Lower levels of miR-323-3p predicted poorer prognosis in patients with PDAC. Ectopic overexpression of miR-323-3p significantly inhibited, while silencing of miR-323-3p increased the migration and invasion abilities of PDAC cells in vitro. Moreover, using an in vivo mouse model, we demonstrated that overexpressing of miR-323-3p significantly reduced, while knockdown of miR-323-3p enhanced lung metastatic colonization of PANC-1 cells. Furthermore, miR-323-3p-induced TGF-b signaling inhibition and cell motility suppression were partially rescued by overexpressing of Smad2 and Smad3 in PDAC cells. Our findings suggest that re-expression of miR-323-3p might offer a novel therapeutic target against metastasis in patients with PDAC. PMID:26908446

  19. Management of thyroid gland invasion in laryngeal and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Arslanoğlu, Seçil; Eren, Erdem; Özkul, Yılmaz; Ciğer, Ejder; Kopar, Aylin; Önal, Kazım; Etit, Demet; Tütüncü, G Yazgı

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of thyroid gland invasion in laryngeal and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma; and the association between clinicopathological parameters and thyroid gland invasion. Medical records of 75 patients with laryngeal and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma who underwent total laryngectomy with thyroidectomy were reviewed, retrospectively. Preoperative computed tomography scans, clinical and operative findings, and histopathological data of the specimens were evaluated. There were 73 male and two female patients with an age range of 41-88 years (mean 60.4 years). Hemithyroidectomy was performed in 62 (82.7 %) and total thyroidectomy was performed in 13 patients (17.3 %). Four patients had histopathologically proven thyroid gland invasion (5.3 %). In three patients, thyroid gland involvement was by means of direct invasion. Thyroid gland invasion was significantly correlated with thyroid cartilage invasion. Therefore, prophylactic thyroidectomy should not be a part of the treatment policy for these tumors. PMID:26547312

  20. MALT1 Inhibition of Oral Carcinoma Cell Invasion and ERK/MAPK Activation.

    PubMed

    Chiba, T; Soeno, Y; Shirako, Y; Sudo, H; Yagishita, H; Taya, Y; Kawashiri, S; Okada, Y; Imai, K

    2016-04-01

    The expression of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue 1 (MALT1) that activates nuclear factor (NF)-κB in lymphocyte lineages is rapidly inactivated in oral carcinoma cells at the invasive front and the patients with worst prognosis. However, its mechanism to accelerate carcinoma progression remains unknown, and this study was carried out to examine the role in invasion. HSC2 oral carcinoma cells stably expressing wild-type MALT1 (wtMALT1) reduced the invasion of basement membrane matrices and collagen gels, and the dominant-negative form (∆MALT1)-expressing cells aggressively invaded into collagen gels. MALT1 decelerated proliferation and migration of cells and downregulated expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 and 9, which were confirmed by short interfering RNA transfections. Reporter assays and immunoblot analysis showed that MALT1 does not affect the NF-κB pathway but inhibits ERK/MAPK activation. This was confirmed by endogenous MALT1 expression in oral carcinoma cell lines. Orthotopic implantation of ∆MALT1-expressing HSC2 cells in mice grew rapid expansive and invasive tongue tumors in contrast to an absence of tumor formation by wtMALT1-expressing cells. These results demonstrate that MALT1 suppresses oral carcinoma invasion by inhibiting proliferation, migration, and extracellular matrix degradation and that the ERK/MAPK pathway is a target of MALT1 and further suggests a role as a suppressor of carcinoma progression. PMID:26701346

  1. Invasive urothelial carcinoma within a calyceal diverticulum associated with renal stones: A case report

    PubMed Central

    NAKANO, TAITO; KITAGAWA, YASUHIDE; IZUMI, KOUJI; IKEDA, HIROKO; NAMIKI, MIKIO

    2015-01-01

    Calyceal diverticula are rare outpouchings of the upper collecting system lying within the renal parenchyma. These often contain stones, however, carcinoma within a calyceal diverticulum is uncommon. The present study reports a case of invasive urothelial carcinoma within a calyceal diverticulum associated with renal stones. A 70-year-old male with a left renal mass identified by abdominal computed tomography was referred to the Department of Urology, Kanazawa University Hospital. Pre-operative diagnosis was difficult owing to an atypical imaging finding of a hypovascular renal mass with calcification. A laparoscopic nephroureterectomy was performed, and the surgical specimens showed invasive high-grade urothelial carcinoma within a calyceal diverticulum, and the calcifications were renal stones consisting of 97% calcium oxalate. Urothelial carcinoma in calyceal diverticula is a rare condition, however, a pre-operative definite diagnosis is difficult and a high potential for invasion of the renal parenchyma is suspected in this disease. PMID:26622866

  2. NOTE: Characterizing early contrast uptake of ductal carcinoma in situ with high temporal resolution dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of the breast: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, S. A.; Fan, X.; Medved, M.; Abe, H.; Shimauchi, A.; Yang, C.; Zamora, M.; Foxley, S.; Olopade, O. I.; Karczmar, G. S.; Newstead, G. M.

    2010-10-01

    Improvements in the reliable diagnosis of preinvasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) are needed. In this study, we present a new characterization of early contrast kinetics of DCIS using high temporal resolution (HiT) DCE-MRI and compare it with other breast lesions and normal parenchyma. Forty patients with mammographic calcifications suspicious for DCIS were selected for HiT imaging using T1-weighted DCE-MRI with ~7 s temporal resolution for 90 s post-contrast injection. Pixel-based and whole-lesion kinetic curves were fit to an empirical mathematical model (EMM) and several secondary kinetic parameters derived. Using the EMM parameterized and fitted concentration time curve for subsequent analysis allowed for calculation of kinetic parameters that were less susceptible to fluctuations due to noise. The parameters' initial area under the curve (iAUC) and contrast concentration at 1 min (C1 min) provided the highest diagnostic accuracy in the task of distinguishing pathologically proven DCIS from normal tissue. There was a trend for DCIS lesions with solid architectural pattern to exhibit a negative slope at 1 min (i.e. increased washout rate) compared to those with a cribriform pattern (p < 0.04). This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility of quantitative analysis of early contrast kinetics at high temporal resolution and points to the potential for such an analysis to improve the characterization of DCIS.

  3. Are cellular polarisation and mitotic frequency prognostic factors for local recurrence in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast?

    PubMed

    Idvall, I; Anderson, H; Ringberg, A; Fernö, M

    2003-08-01

    There is still no generally accepted histopathological classification system for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. Nuclear grade, with or without other histopathological parameters (i.e. comedo-type necrosis and cellular polarisation), has been demonstrated to yield prognostic information. A detailed method for the evaluation of the mitotic frequency in DCIS, based on an approach by Contesso, was used in this study. We also investigated if cellular polarisation and mitotic frequency were important for the ipsilateral local recurrence-free interval (IL-RFI) in 121 DCIS patients who had been operated upon with breast-conserving treatment (BCT) without radiotherapy. Both cellular polarisation and the mitotic frequency were associated with histopathological and cellular biological factors (in previous evaluations), and were of borderline significance for IL-RFI in the univariate analyses. However, when nuclear grade was included in the multivariate analyses (with or without the growth pattern), neither cellular polarisation nor the mitotic frequency were of any independent prognostic value. PMID:12888365

  4. Cathepsin K Is Present in Invasive Oral Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bitu, Carolina C.; Kauppila, Joonas H.; Bufalino, Andréia; Nurmenniemi, Sini; Teppo, Susanna; Keinänen, Meeri; Vilen, Suvi-Tuuli; Lehenkari, Petri; Nyberg, Pia; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Salo, Tuula

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Cathepsin K, a lysosomal cysteine protease, is expressed in the tumor microenvironment (TME) of skin carcinoma, but nothing is known about cathepsin K in oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC). Our aim was to describe the expression of cathepsin K in invasive OTSCC in vitro and in a series of clinical cancer specimens. Materials and Methods OTSCC invasion in vitro was studied using invasive HSC-3 tongue carcinoma cells in 3D organotypic models. In total, 121 mobile tongue OTSCCs and 10 lymph node metastases were analyzed for cathepsin K expression. The association between cathepsin K expression and clinicopathological factors was evaluated. Results Cysteine protease inhibitor E64 and cathepsin K silencing significantly (p<0.0001) reduced HSC-3 cell invasion in the 3D models. Cathepsin K was expressed in a majority of carcinoma and metastatic cells, but the expression pattern in carcinoma cells did not correlate with clinical parameters. Instead, the weak expression of cathepsin K in the invasive TME front correlated with increased overall recurrence (p<0.05), and in early-stage tumors this pattern predicted both cancer recurrence and cancer-specific mortality (p<0.05 and p<0.005, respectively). Conclusions Cathepsin K is expressed in OTSCC tissue in both carcinoma and TME cells. Although the diminished activity and expression in aggressive tongue HSC-3 cells reduced 3D invasion in vitro, the amount of cathepsin K in carcinoma cells was not associated with the outcome of cancer patients. Instead, cathepsin K in the invasive TME front seems to have a protective role in the complex progression of tongue cancer. PMID:23951042

  5. Epithelial lesions associated with invasive penile squamous cell carcinoma: a pathologic study of 288 cases.

    PubMed

    Cubilla, Antonio L; Velazquez, Elsa F; Young, Robert H

    2004-10-01

    A heterogeneous spectrum of epithelial alterations and atypical lesions affect the squamous epithelium of penile mucosal anatomical compartments. Analogous to other genital sites, the terminology utilized to define the lesions is variable. The few pathologic studies of penile precancerous lesions are mostly related to carcinoma in situ and human papilloma virus (HPV), and the information on low-grade atypical lesions is limited. The objective of this study was to comprehensively describe the morphologic features of all epithelial alterations, benign and atypical, low grade and high grade, associated with invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the penis and to investigate their relation with each other and with subtypes of invasive carcinoma. We also propose herein a simple and reproducible nomenclature for penile precancerous abnormalities until more biological, molecular, or epidemiologic information on the lesions is available. Two hundred and eighty-eight penectomy and circumcision specimens with invasive squamous cell carcinoma were pathologically evaluated. Carcinomas were classified as usual, verrucous, papillary not otherwise specified, warty (condylomatous), basaloid, and mixed. Associated lesions were classified as squamous hyperplasia and squamous intraepithelial lesions of low and high grade (LGSIL and HGSIL). In LGSIL, atypia was confined to the lower third, and in HGSIL, atypical cells affected at least two thirds of the squamous epithelium. Subtypes of SIL were squamous, warty, basaloid, warty-basaloid, and papillary. Squamous hyperplasia, the most common lesion, was found in 83% of the cases, followed by LGSIL (59%) and HGSIL (44%). In 62% of the cases more than 1 associated lesion was present per specimen. A sequence from squamous hyperplasia to low-grade to high-grade SIL was seen frequently. Squamous hyperplasia was more commonly associated with usual squamous, papillary, and verrucous than with warty and basaloid invasive carcinomas. LGSIL was

  6. Reflex Estrogen Receptor (ER) and Progesterone Receptor (PR) Analysis of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) in Breast Needle Core Biopsy Specimens: An Unnecessary Exercise That Costs the United States $35 Million/y.

    PubMed

    VandenBussche, Christopher J; Cimino-Mathews, Ashley; Park, Ben Ho; Emens, Leisha A; Tsangaris, Theodore N; Argani, Pedram

    2016-08-01

    Most institutions reflexively test all breast core needle biopsy specimens showing ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) for estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR). However, 5 factors suggest that this reflex testing unnecessarily increases costs. First, ER/PR results do not currently impact the next step in standard therapy; namely, surgical excision. Second, a subset of surgical excisions performed for DCIS diagnosed on core needle biopsy will harbor infiltrating mammary carcinoma, which will then need to be retested for ER/PR. Third, because ER and PR labeling is often heterogeneous in DCIS, negative results for ER/PR on small core needle biopsy specimens should logically be repeated on surgical excision specimens with larger amounts of DCIS to be sure that the result is truly negative. Fourth, many patients with pure ER/PR-positive DCIS after surgical excision will decline hormone therapy, so any ER/PR testing of their DCIS is unnecessary. Fifth, PR status in DCIS has no proven independent value. We now examine the unnecessary added costs associated with reflex ER/PR testing of DCIS on core needle biopsy specimens due to these factors. We reviewed 58 core needle biopsies showing pure DCIS that also had a resulting surgical excision specimen at our institution over a period of 2 years. No patient received neoadjuvant hormone therapy. On surgical excision, 5 (8.6%) had only benign findings, 44 (75.9%) had pure DCIS, and 9 (15.5%) had DCIS with invasive mammary carcinoma. The 9 cases with invasive mammary carcinoma in the surgical excision specimen (16%) and the 4 pure DCIS in surgical excision specimens that were ER/PR negative on core needle biopsy would need repeat ER/PR testing. The total unnecessary increased cost of core needle biopsy specimen testing of these 13 cases was $8148.92 ($140/patient for the 58 patients in the study). We found that ER/PR testing results impacted patient management in only 16/49 pure DCIS cases after surgical excision (33

  7. PIK3CA-AKT pathway mutations in micropapillary breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Flatley, Ellen; Ang, Daphne; Warrick, Andrea; Beadling, Carol; Corless, Christopher L; Troxell, Megan L

    2013-07-01

    Micropapillary carcinoma of the breast is associated with increased rates of lymph node metastasis and lymphovascular invasion. While activating point mutations in PIK3CA (encoding phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase catalytic subunit) or AKT1 are found in 25% to 30% of invasive ductal carcinomas, the mutational profile of invasive micropapillary carcinomas has not been characterized in detail. Micropapillary carcinomas, concurrent metastatic and precursor breast lesions from 19 patients were identified. Lesional tissue was punched from paraffin-tissue blocks, and genomic DNA was extracted and screened for a large panel of known hotspot mutations using multiplex polymerase chain reaction and mass-spectroscopy analysis (643 mutations in 53 genes). Hotspot point mutations were identified in 35% (7/20) of micropapillary breast carcinomas, including PIK3CA exons 7, 9 and 20 hotspots, as well as the AKT1 plekstrin homology domain mutation (E17K); mutations in TP53 and KRAS were each found in a single patient. In 6 patients, micropapillary and non-micropapillary components of the same tumor were separately tested, yielding concordant results in five; one had a wild type micropapillary component, but a PIK3CA mutation in the invasive ductal component. Concurrent lymph node metastases were mostly wild type (2/8 mutant). Accompanying ductal carcinoma in situ had point mutations in 45% (5/11), mostly concordant with invasive carcinoma; however, mutational status of other breast proliferative lesions was generally discordant with accompanying carcinoma. The rate of PIK3CA mutations in this series of micropapillary carcinomas is similar to invasive ductal carcinomas; however, there may be an enrichment of AKT1 mutations (10%). The non-micropapillary components and precursor lesions occasionally had different mutations. PMID:23352210

  8. Stratified mucin-producing intraepithelial lesion with invasive carcinoma: 12 cases with immunohistochemical and ultrastructural findings.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Junji; Sato, Yuichiro; Sawaguchi, Akira; Yamashita, Atsushi; Maekawa, Kazunari; Sameshima, Hiroshi; Asada, Yujiro

    2016-09-01

    Stratified mucin-producing intraepithelial lesion (SMILE) is considered to be a variant of adenocarcinoma in situ (defined as intraepithelial malignant glandular epithelium without invasion) or adenosquamous carcinoma in situ of the uterine cervix. However, recent study suggested that SMILE is more similar to high-grade squamous epithelial lesion by their immunohistochemical findings. An invasive form of SMILE "invasive stratified mucin-producing carcinoma (ISMC)" has been also proposed, but immunohistochemical features are not well documented. Therefore, this study aimed to clarify the immunohistochemical characteristics of SMILE and ISMC. Twelve cases of SMILE were found among 445 patients (2.7%) with high-grade intraepithelial lesions or invasive carcinomas, 3 of whom had solely intraepithelial disease with SMILE component (mean age, 37 years; range, 30-48 years) and 9 with invasive carcinomas (mean age, 47 years; range, 37-66 years; including ISMC). Immunohistochemically, SMILE and ISMC were diffusely positive for p16 and CAM5.2, focally for IMP3, and almost negative or only focally positive for p63. Nuclear signals in SMILE and invasive carcinomas were detected by human papillomavirus (HPV) in situ hybridization; 5 cases showed HPV16 and/or HPV18 polymerase chain reaction products. The ultrastructural study of 1 case showed surface microvilli and small vacuolar structure in SMILE; ISMC had mucous-like vacuoles, many mitochondria and intracytoplasmic lumen but lacked tonofilament. These findings were more similar to adenocarcinoma in situ or adenocarcinoma than squamous intraepithelial lesion or squamous cell carcinoma. We suggest that SMILE is an intraepithelial neoplasm and ISMC is an invasive form of SMILE. PMID:27237368

  9. Positive association of long telomeres with the invasive capacity of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Eunkyong; Jung, Guhung

    2014-05-01

    Invasion, the representative feature of malignant tumors, leads to an increase in mortality. The malignant liver tumor - hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) - has an enhanced invasive capacity that results in increased patient mortality. Moreover, this enhanced invasive capacity is due to the up-regulation of invasion promoters such as zinc finger protein SNAI1 (Snail) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and the down-regulation of invasion suppressor molecules such as E-cadherin. Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), which encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase, is highly expressed in a variety of invasive cancers, including HCC. Telomerase activation induces telomere elongation, thereby leading to cell immortalization during malignant tumor progression. However, the relationship between telomere length and invasion is yet to be experimentally corroborated. In this paper, we revealed that invasive HCC cells passing through the Matrigel display significantly longer telomeres than non-invasive HCC cells. Moreover, we established a method that can distinguish and sort cells containing long telomeres and short telomeres. Using this system, we observed that the HCC cells containing long telomeres had a high-level expression of invasion-promoting genes and a low-level expression of invasion-suppressing E-cadherin. Furthermore, HCC cells containing long telomeres exhibited a higher invasive capacity than HCC cells containing short telomeres. Taken together, our findings suggest that long telomeres are positively associated with the invasive capacity of HCC cells and may be a potent target for malignant liver cancer treatment. PMID:24732358

  10. Angiogenesis in the Progression of Breast Ductal Proliferations

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Philip M.; Chen, Wen-Pin; Mendez, Aaron; McLaren, Christine E.; Su, Min-Ying

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of blood vessels, is necessary for a tumor to grow, but when angiogenesis first appears in the progression of breast ductal carcinomas is unknown. To determine when this occurs, the authors examined microvessel density (MVD) by CD31 and CD105 immunostaining in normal ducts, 32 cases of usual hyperplasia, 19 cases of atypical hyperplasia, and 29 cases of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Simple hyperplasia had a 22-fold greater MVD than normal ducts (P < .0001). An increase during the progression of ductal changes was highly significant (P < .0001). To determine a possible mechanism, immunohistochemistry for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was evaluated. VEGF staining intensity of ductal epithelium increased during the progression from normal to hyperplastic to DCIS. This study shows that the first significant increase in angiogenesis occurs very early in the evolution of ductal proliferations as ductal cells become hyperplastic. PMID:19403546