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1

Investigation of factors affecting asphalt pavement recycling and asphalt compatibility  

SciTech Connect

Both economic and environmental factors dictate that asphalt pavement be recycled. Many recycling projects have been completed using a variety of recycling additives, but little work has been done on the physiochemical aspects of pavement recycling. The present exploratory study was undertaken to better define the physiochemical variables of recycling. Objectives of the present study include: (1) to determine if molecular structuring in the asphalt binder could be observed in oxidized (air-aged) asphalt-aggregate briquets, and if so, how was structuring affected during briquits, and if so, how was structuring affected during briquet recycling and (2) to determine if recycling agents penetrate the strongly adsorbed asphalt layer on the aggregate surface. Differences were seen in asphalt component compatibility as judged by the state of peptization parameters. In extreme cases the values of the parameters correlated with properties of asphalts of known compatibility; however, a relationship between the parameters determined on a series of asphalts in pavements was not established. The parameters might be useful in evaluating additives for pavement recycling; however, more systems need to be studied to fully assess their potential usefulness. Finally, the parameters need to be correlated with performance-related measurements such as asphalt rheological and mix properties. Examination of the parameters and their changes on asphalt oxidative aging may also be informative with regard to asphalt durability inasmuch as oxidation-induced changes are a major cause of asphalt pavement failure.

Venable, R.L.; Petersen, J.C.; Robertson, R.E.; Plancher, H.

1983-03-01

2

Investigating Factors that Affect Dissolved Oxygen Concentration in Water  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes activities that demonstrate the effects of factors such as wind velocity, water temperature, convection currents, intensity of light, rate of photosynthesis, atmospheric pressure, humidity, numbers of decomposers, presence of oxidizable ions, and respiration by plants and animals on the dissolved oxygen concentration in water. (MA)

Jantzen, Paul G.

1978-01-01

3

An exploratory investigation into factors affecting visual balance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Throughout the history of art more attention has been given to pictorial balance than to any other principle of visual composition.\\u000a When examining pictorial balance, the visual weights of significant elements within a given field must be taken into consideration.\\u000a This study, by means of ocular photography and the analysis of eye fixations, examined factors that have an effect upon

Walter Niekamp

1981-01-01

4

Investigation of factors affecting the quality of americium electroplating.  

PubMed

Four different electrolyte solutions were used in the electrodeposition of americium and their influences on the quality of the thin layer of deposited americium isotopes in combination with three different cathode disc materials were investigated. The relations between alpha spectral resolution and disc surface properties were established. PMID:22424746

Trdin, M; Benedik, L; Samardžija, Z; Pihlar, B

2012-09-01

5

Investigation of factors affecting the six-minute walk test results in hemodialysis patients.  

PubMed

Renal anemia, uremic myopathy, and malnutrition are some of the factors that affect the results of the 6-minute walk test (6MWT) in hemodialysis patients. We hypothesized that skeletal muscle dysfunction caused by skeletal myolysis, protein hypercatabolism, and mitochondrial deficiency are strongly related factors. The purpose of this study was to clarify the factors that affect the 6MWT results in hemodialysis patients to assess their exercise tolerance. The study included 43 outpatients from the hemodialysis unit. The 6MWT was performed, and knee extension strength, 1-leg standing time, and grip were measured. In addition, the subjects' characteristics such as age, preexisting coronary artery disease, hemoglobin level, total iron binding capacity, serum albumin level, creatinine generation rate, and normalized protein catabolic rate were investigated. A stepwise multiple regression model was used to examine the factors affecting the 6MWT results. Multiple regression analysis revealed that knee extension strength (?=0.446, P=0.001), total iron binding capacity (?=-0.299, P=0.021), and preexisting coronary artery disease (?=-0.272, P=0.035) significantly affected the 6MWT results (R=0.66, R(2)=0.44). The 6MWT in hemodialysis patients was strongly affected by muscle strength, iron deficiency anemia, and preexisting coronary artery disease, suggesting that resistance training is important for improving 6MWT results. Our findings indicate that iron deficiency and cardiac function should be assessed before exercising or undergoing an exercise tolerance test. PMID:24674327

Kono, Kenichi; Nishida, Yusuke; Moriyama, Yoshihumi; Yabe, Hiroki; Taoka, Masahiro; Sato, Takashi

2014-12-01

6

An Investigation of Factors Affecting the Degree of Naïve Impetus Theory Application  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates factors affecting the degree of novice physics students’ application of the naïve impetus theory. Six hundred and fourteen first-year university engineering physics students answered the Force Concept Inventory as a pre-test for their calculus-based course. We examined the degree to which students consistently applied the naïve impetus theory across different items. We used a 2-way repeated measures

Xiufeng Liu; Dan MacIsaac

2005-01-01

7

An Investigation of Factors Affecting Elementary School Students' BMI Values Based on the System Dynamics Modeling  

PubMed Central

This study used system dynamics method to investigate the factors affecting elementary school students' BMI values. The construction of the dynamic model is divided into the qualitative causal loop and the quantitative system dynamics modeling. According to the system dynamics modeling, this study consisted of research on the four dimensions: student's personal life style, diet-relevant parenting behaviors, advocacy and implementation of school nutrition education, and students' peer interaction. The results of this study showed that students with more adequate health concepts usually have better eating behaviors and consequently have less chance of becoming obese. In addition, this study also verified that educational attainment and socioeconomic status of parents have a positive correlation with students' amounts of physical activity, and nutrition education has a prominent influence on changing students' high-calorie diets. PMID:24701250

Chen, Kai-Ling; Ku, Chao-Tai; Chiu, Pei-Hsuan; Wang, Meng-Hsiang

2014-01-01

8

An Investigation of Factors Affecting the Degree of Naïve Impetus Theory Application  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigates factors affecting the degree of novice physics students' application of the naïve impetus theory. Six hundred and fourteen first-year university engineering physics students answered the Force Concept Inventory as a pre-test for their calculus-based course. We examined the degree to which students consistently applied the naïve impetus theory across different items. We used a 2-way repeated measures ANOVA and linear regression to analyze data coded from incorrect student responses. It was found that there were statistically significant main effects for item familiarity and item requirement for explanation vs. prediction on the measured degree of impetus theory application. Student course grades had no significant effect on impetus theory application. When faced with items that were unfamiliar and predictive, students appeared to rely on non-theoretical, knowledge-in-pieces reasoning. Reasoning characteristic of naïve theories was more frequently applied when students were completing familiar problem tasks that required explanation. When considering all the above factors simultaneously, we found that the degree of naïve impetus theory application by students is attributable to variables in the following order: familiarity, prediction, and explanation.

Liu, Xiufeng; MacIsaac, Dan

2005-03-01

9

An Investigation of Factors Affecting the Degree of Naïve Impetus Theory Application  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This study investigates factors affecting the degree of novice physics students application of the naïve impetus theory. Six hundred and fourteen first-year university engineering physics students answered the Force Concept Inventory as a pre-test for their calculus-based course. We examined the degree to which students consistently applied the naïve impetus theory across different items. We used a 2-way repeated measures ANOVA and linear regression to analyze data coded from incorrect student responses. It was found that there were statistically significant main effects for item familiarity and item requirement for explanation vs. prediction on the measured degree of impetus theory application. Student course grades had no significant effect on impetus theory application. When faced with items that were unfamiliar and predictive, students appeared to rely on non-theoretical, knowledge-in-pieces reasoning. Reasoning characteristic of naïve theories was more frequently applied when students were completing familiar problem tasks that required explanation. When considering all the above factors simultaneously, we found that the degree of naïve impetus theory application by students is attributable to variables in the following order: familiarity, prediction, and explanation.

Liu, Xiufeng; Macisaac, Dan

2013-05-28

10

Investigation of factors affecting terrestrial passive sampling device performance and uptake rates in laboratory chambers  

SciTech Connect

A rapid sampling method using passive sampling devices (PSDS) for soil contaminant characterization shows extreme promise. The use of PSDs increases ease and speed of analysis, decreases solvent usage and cost, and minimizes the transport of contaminated soils. Time and cost savings allow a high sampling frequency, providing a more thorough site characterization than traditional methods. The authors have conducted both laboratory and field studies with terrestrial PSDS. Laboratory studies demonstrated the concentration and moisture dependence of sampler uptake and provided an estimate of the optimal field sampling time for soils contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). These PSDs were also used to accurately estimate PCB concentrations at hazardous waste site where concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 200 ug PCB/g soil. However, PSDs in the field had sampling rates approximately three times greater than in the laboratory. As a result several factors affecting PSD sampling rates and/or performance in laboratory chambers were evaluated. The parameters investigated were soil bulk density or compactness, chamber size and air flow. The chemicals used in these studies included two PCB congeners (52 and 153), three organochlorine pesticides (DDT, dieldrin and methoxychlor), three organophosphate pesticides (chlorpyrifos, diazinon and terbufos) and three herbicides (alachlor, atrazine and metolachlor).

Johnson, K.A.; Weisskopf, C.P. [Clemson Univ., Pendleton, SC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Toxicology

1995-12-31

11

An Investigation into the Factors Affecting the Use of Language Learning Strategies by Persian EFL Learners  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As part of a larger study (Rahimi, 2004), this study investigates the use of language learning strategies by post-secondary level Persian EFL learners. Particular attention is paid to the variables affecting learners' choice of strategies, and the relationship, if any, between these variables and learners' patterns of strategy use. Data were…

Rahimi, Mohammad; Riazi, Abdolmehdi; Saif, Shahrzad

2008-01-01

12

A Preliminary Investigation of Factors Affecting Employment Motivation in People with Intellectual Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Relatively small numbers of people with intellectual disabilities (ID) are engaging in paid employment and those who are tend to be working only part-time. This preliminary study addressed the question of what factors motivate people with ID to work. The issue was investigated in a sample of 10 young work-age adults attending supported learning…

Andrews, Abbye; Rose, John L.

2010-01-01

13

Factors Affecting Business-to-Business Electronic Commerce Success: An Empirical Investigation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is generally believed that Business to Business (B2B) e-commerce has a great impact on business performance improvement. Considerable research also shows that another dependent variable, B2B e-commerce success, can be a good overall measure of B2B systems. This paper investigated and examined the impact of several factors, which are either…

Chen, Chun-I Philip

2010-01-01

14

Online Course Delivery: An Empirical Investigation of Factors Affecting Student Satisfaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors investigated potential factors impacting students' satisfaction with online course delivery using business students as participants. The findings suggest that the student who would be more satisfied with the delivery of online courses fits the following profile: graduate, married, resides more than 1 mile away from campus, and male.…

Beqiri, Mirjeta S.; Chase, Nancy M.; Bishka, Atena

2010-01-01

15

An investigation of the strains in an integral type oil-well tubing joint, and the factors affecting leakage  

E-print Network

AN INVESTIGATION OF THE STRAINS IN AN INTEGRAL TYPE OIL-WELL TUBING JOINT~ AND THE FA. CTORS AFFECTING LEAKAGE A Thesis JOHN HENRY ATTERBURY JR Approved as to style and content by AN INVESTIGATION OF THE STRAINS IN AN INTEGRAL TYPE OIL...-iVELL TUBING JOINT~ AND THE FACTORS AFFECTING ~GE JOHN HENRY ATTERBURY JR ~ A Thesis Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Vechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of llASTER OF SCIENCE Ma...

Atterbury, John Henry

1950-01-01

16

An investigation into the factors affecting the natural reproduction of Opsaridium peringueyi  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An endangered freshwater fish, Opsaridium peringueyi, was studied from January, 2009 to December, 2009. The analysis of the environmental conditions indicated that the fish is found in streams with moderate to fast flow, high oxygen levels, a depth greater than 0.6 m and temperatures between 10 and 24 °C. O. peringueyi is sexually dimorphic with males growing at a faster rate and attaining a larger size than females. The breeding biology of this species was investigated in glass aquarium tanks. The spawning behaviour is described for the first time. The breeding colour of the male is deep red on the operculum, ventral part, caudal and ventral fins. The breeding colour in the female is the same as the male except the red colour is lighter. The breeding of O. peringueyi is a four stage process which begins with the appearance of breeding colour culminating in the laying of eggs after courtship. Temperature, flow-rate, conductivity and substrate were identified as the environmental cues important in the reproduction of this species. All these factors had a significant effect on the breeding activity of O. peringueyi. The possible effect of climate change on O. peringueyi is discussed.

Moyo, N. A. G.

17

Factors Affecting Photosynthesis!  

E-print Network

Factors Affecting Photosynthesis! Temperature Eppley (1972) Light Sverdrup's Critical Depth-493, but the general concept is still valid! ! #12;PB opt & Temperature! #12;Photosynthesis & Temperature! Remember: in the laboratory, we can measure photosynthesis versus irradiance (PvsE) and calculate Ek, Pmax, and alpha

Kudela, Raphael M.

18

An Exploratory Analysis of Factors Affecting Homicide InvestigationsExamining the Dynamics of Murder Clearance Rates  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study seeks to examine the practices of law enforcement agencies in attempting to solve cases of homicide. Five key dimensions, as determined from the extant literature, are examined using data from a recent law enforcement agency study of homicide investigative practices and policies. These include management practices, investigative procedures, analytical methods, demographics of the population served, and the extent

Timothy G. Keel; John P. Jarvis; Yvonne E. Muirhead

2009-01-01

19

An investigation of factors affecting how engineers and scientists seek information  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated how 872 US aerospace scientists and engineers select information carriers. When considering oral and written information carriers, the principle of least effort was supported with a strong preference for oral communication over written communication. In examining how the respondents select written carriers, the decision to use or not to use a written carrier was found to be

Claire J. Anderson; Myron Glassman; R. Bruce McAfee; Thomas Pinelli

2001-01-01

20

Factors Affecting Wound Healing  

PubMed Central

Wound healing, as a normal biological process in the human body, is achieved through four precisely and highly programmed phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. For a wound to heal successfully, all four phases must occur in the proper sequence and time frame. Many factors can interfere with one or more phases of this process, thus causing improper or impaired wound healing. This article reviews the recent literature on the most significant factors that affect cutaneous wound healing and the potential cellular and/or molecular mechanisms involved. The factors discussed include oxygenation, infection, age and sex hormones, stress, diabetes, obesity, medications, alcoholism, smoking, and nutrition. A better understanding of the influence of these factors on repair may lead to therapeutics that improve wound healing and resolve impaired wounds. PMID:20139336

Guo, S.; DiPietro, L.A.

2010-01-01

21

Microfluidic device to investigate factors affecting performance in biosensors designed for transdermal applications.  

PubMed

In this work we demonstrate a novel microfluidic based platform to investigate the performance of 3D out-of-plane microspike array based glucose and lactate biosensors. The microspike array was bonded with a glass slide and modified with glucose oxidase or lactate oxidase using covalent coupling chemistry. An epoxy-polyurethane based membrane was used to extend the linear working range (from 0 to 25 mM of substrate) of these biosensors. Both lactate and glucose sensors performed well in the clinically relevant substrate concentration range. Glucose microspikes were further investigated with respect to the effects of substrate transfer by incorporation into a microfluidic system. Data from the microfluidic system revealed that the sensor response is mainly dependent on enzyme kinetics rather than membrane permeability to glucose. The robustness of the sensors was demonstrated by its consistency in performance extending over 48 h. PMID:22130554

Trzebinski, Jakub; Sharma, Sanjiv; Moniz, Anna Radomska-Botelho; Michelakis, Kostis; Zhang, Yangyang; Cass, Anthony E G

2012-01-21

22

Practical investigation of the factors that affect the selectivity in hydrophilic interaction chromatography.  

PubMed

Retention data for a series of 29 compounds comprising acids, bases and neutrals were obtained on six different hydrophilic interaction (HILIC) columns including bare silica, zwitterionic and those bonded with neutral bonded ligands. The principal aim of the work was to evaluate the effect of various experimental variables such as the nature of the stationary phase, buffer pH, buffer concentration, organic solvent and its concentration, and temperature, in order to determine which factors gave the most effect on the selectivity of the separation. The influence of solute properties on the separation, such as logD values, was also considered. In this way, it was hoped to provide a practical guide to aid in the selection of conditions to achieve a separation in HILIC. The nature of the stationary phase was found to have the greatest effect on selectivity. PMID:23332781

Kumar, Abhinav; Heaton, James C; McCalley, David V

2013-02-01

23

Investigation of factors affecting prediction of protein-protein interaction networks by phylogenetic profiling  

PubMed Central

Background The use of computational methods for predicting protein interaction networks will continue to grow with the number of fully sequenced genomes available. The Co-Conservation method, also known as the Phylogenetic profiles method, is a well-established computational tool for predicting functional relationships between proteins. Results Here, we examined how various aspects of this method affect the accuracy and topology of protein interaction networks. We have shown that the choice of reference genome influences the number of predictions involving proteins of previously unknown function, the accuracy of predicted interactions, and the topology of predicted interaction networks. We show that while such results are relatively insensitive to the E-value threshold used in defining homologs, predicted interactions are influenced by the similarity metric that is employed. We show that differences in predicted protein interactions are biologically meaningful, where judicious selection of reference genomes, or use of a new scoring scheme that explicitly considers reference genome relatedness, produces known protein interactions as well as predicted protein interactions involving coordinated biological processes that are not accessible using currently available databases. Conclusion These studies should prove valuable for future studies seeking to further improve phylogenetic profiling methodologies as well for efforts to efficiently employ such methods to develop new biological insights. PMID:17967189

Karimpour-Fard, Anis; Hunter, Lawrence; Gill, Ryan T

2007-01-01

24

Investigation of the factors affecting adult fly production in biosolid cake.  

PubMed

The seasonal pattern of adult fly production in both fresh and aged biosolid cake was established by the exposure of biosolid cake to natural conditions in the central coastal region of Perth, Western Australia, over the course of a year. Relationships between fly emergence and six factors (weeks exposed, pH, NH(4), rainfall, temperature, and moisture) suspected of facilitating the attraction of adult flies to biosolid cake were measured. The aim was to study the production of adult flies with regard to weeks exposed in different seasons to establish a "best practice" storage procedure for aged biosolid cake. Four fly species were collected during the study; Musca domestica L. (house fly), Stomoxys calcitrans L. (stable fly), Fannia canicularis L. (lesser house fly), and Muscina stabulans (Fallén) (false stable fly). Of the 5,303 flies identified, >97% of these were either M. domestica or S. calcitrans. Adult flies emerged from biosolid cake all year round with a sharp decline in winter. The number of emerged flies peaked in summer (3,163 flies) and declined during autumn (1,545 flies) and spring (532 flies). Significant positive relationships were observed between the number of adult flies emerging from biosolid cake and ambient temperature, NH(4) content, and weeks exposed. Higher ambient temperatures and a higher NH(4) content of the biosolid cake were associated with increased number of adult flies emerging from the biosolid cake. Similarly, the majority of flies emerged from biosolid cake in the first 10 wk of exposure to fly activity. PMID:19508771

Dadour, Ian R; Voss, Sasha C

2009-06-01

25

What factors affect the 5D0 energy of Eu3+? An investigation of nephelauxetic effects.  

PubMed

Relationships involving the interelectronic repulsion parameters, F(k) (k = 2, 4, 6), the spin-orbit coupling constant, ?f, and J-mixing, with the (5)D0-(7)F0 energy, E, have been investigated for Eu(3+) using various approaches. First, the linear relationship between E and the (7)F1 splitting (or the second rank crystal field parameter) is shown to be applicable not only to glasses but also to solid-state crystalline systems with Eu(3+) site symmetry of C2, C2v, or lower. In these cases, the change in (5)D0-(7)F0 energy is mainly due to the J-mixing effect of (7)F(J) (J = 2, 4, 6: most notably J = 2) which depresses (7)F0, whereas the (5)D0 energy is relatively constant. The (5)D0-(7)F0 energy also depends upon certain energy parameters in the Hamiltonian, in particular, F(k) and ?f. Model calculations show that increase in F(4) or F(6) produces an increase in E, whereas increase in F(2) produces a decrease in E. An increase in ?f produces a decrease in E. These findings are rationalized. Most previous 4f(6) crystal field calculations have only considered the F and D terms of Eu(3+) so that the Slater parameters are not well-determined. More reliable energy level data sets and crystal field calculations for Eu(3+) with fluoride, oxide, or chloride ligands have been selected, and certain of these have been repeated since most previous calculations have errors in matrix elements. The fitted Slater parameters have been corrected for the effects of three-body Coulomb interactions. Some systems do not follow the ligand trend F ~ O > Cl for Slater and spin-orbit parameters. From the limited data available, the average values of the corrected Slater parameters are greater for fluoride compared with chloride ligands, but the differences are comparable with the standard deviations of the parameters. There is no clear nephelauxetic series for these three types of ligands, with respect to spin-orbit coupling. Previous correlations of E with various parameters are of limited value because the (5)D0-(7)F0 energy difference not only depends upon the F(k) and ?f parameters but in addition is sensitive to the importance of J-mixing for low symmetry systems. PMID:23470230

Tanner, Peter A; Yeung, Yau Yuen; Ning, Lixin

2013-04-01

26

Body Dissatisfaction and Eating Disturbances in Early Adolescence: A Structural Modeling Investigation Examining Negative Affect and Peer Factors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study tested five proposed models of the relationship of negative affect and peer factors in early adolescent body dissatisfaction, dieting, and bulimic behaviors. A large community sample of girls in early adolescence was assessed via questionnaire (X[overbar] age = 12.3 years). Structural equation modeling (SEM) indicated that negative…

Hutchinson, Delyse M.; Rapee, Ronald M.; Taylor, Alan

2010-01-01

27

Factors Affecting Option Premium Values  

E-print Network

Factors Affecting Option Premium Values Jason Johnson, Jackie Smith, Kevin Dhuyvetter and Mark Waller* Put Options Hedging in the futures market with options is much like buying an insurance policy to protect commodity sellers against declining...

Johnson, Jason; Smith, Jackie; Dhuyvetter, Kevin C.; Waller, Mark L.

1999-06-23

28

Factors Affecting Willingness to Mentor  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The paper presents a survey among 300 employees in Northern Italy to assess the willingness to mentor and identify the factors that affect it. Men and respondents with previous mentoring experience indicate a higher willingness to be a mentor. Willingness is affected by personal characteristics that are perceived as necessary for a mentor and the…

Ghislieri, Chiara; Gatti, Paola; Quaglino, Gian Piero

2009-01-01

29

Factors affecting sorghum protein digestibility  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the semi-arid tropics worldwide, sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) is cultivated by farmers on a subsistence level and consumed as food by humans. A nutritional limitation to its use is the poor digestibility of sorghum protein when wet cooked. The factors affecting wet cooked sorghum protein digestibility may be categorised into two main groups: exogenous factors (grain organisational structure,

K. G Duodu; J. R. N Taylor; P. S Belton; B. R Hamaker

2003-01-01

30

Factors Affecting Survival and Satisfaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article consists of four parts. First, the authors review the literature on factors that affect job satisfaction and longevity among various professional groups. Second, they report the results of a pilot survey of 27 master's level oncology social workers in Michigan designed to explore the perceived impact of variables identified in the literature-personal history, patient-related factors, organizational dynamics, social

Linda Supple-Diaz; Debbie Mattison

1992-01-01

31

Factors Affecting Illegal Hacking Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

The damage caused by illegal hacking has become one of the serious problems facing society. Based on general deterrence theory, social bond theory and social learning theory, the paper proposes a model which examines the factors affecting the likelihood an individual will engage in illegal hacking behavior. Data was gathered from a survey of 127 individuals who attended a hacker’s

Randall Young; Lingling Zhang

2005-01-01

32

Psychological Factors Affecting Cardiologic Conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are substantial data supporting a strong relationship between cardiovascular diseases and psychological conditions. However, the criteria for scientific validation of the entities currently subsumed under the DSM-IV category of ’Psychological factors affecting a medical condition’ have never been clearly enumerated and the terms ’psychological symptoms’ and ’personality traits’ that do not satisfy traditional psychiatric criteria are not well defined;

C. Rafanelli; R. Roncuzzi; F. Ottolini; M. Rigatelli

2007-01-01

33

Investigating the book-tax income gap : factors which affect the gap and details regarding its most significant component  

E-print Network

(cont.) In total, my thesis suggests that recent changes in the book-tax income gap may be exogenous and transitory, due to changes to the calculation of book income, general business conditions or other factors which ...

Seidman, Jeri

2008-01-01

34

Factors Affecting Faculty Web Portal Usability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study investigated the factors that might significantly affect web portal usability. Results of the study were intended to serve as inputs for faculty web portal development of the University of the East-Manila. Descriptive statistics utilized questionnaire data from 82 faculty members. The data showed that most of the respondents were…

Bringula, Rex P.; Basa, Roselle S.

2011-01-01

35

An improved radioimmunoassay for urinary Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein. Investigation and resolution of factors affecting its quantification.  

PubMed Central

A rapid, specific radioimmunoassay has been used to measure Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein (TH glycoprotein) in urine. The apparent concentration increased with increasing dilution of urine in water, reaching a plateau at 1 in 20. This increase was greater the higher the osmolality and TH glycoprotein concentration and the lower the pH of the original sample. A dilution of 1 in 100 was chosen for routine assay. Whole urine was centrifuged and the dissolved precipitate and supernatant assayed to quantify the proportion of TH glycoprotein of TH glycoprotein initially present in highly aggregated form. This correlated positively and significantly with increasing osmolality, decreasing pH and increasing TH glycoprotein concentration. When the urine was diluted 1 in 100 in water, no TH glycoprotein was precipitated by centrifugation and the measured concentrations were unaffected by alterations of urine pH or calcium concentration or by addition of sodium dodecyl sulphate. Parallelism was demonstrated between the diluted samples and the disaggregated standard preparation. Recovery of added standard to diluted urine varied between 96 and 114%. The apparent concentration of TH glycoprotein in neat or diluted urine was not affected by freezing or by storage at 4 degrees C or room temperature for at least 2 days. A physiological range for the urinary excretion rate was established as 22--56 mg/24 h, based on samples from 29 individuals with normal renal function, as defined by their creatinine clearance. There was no significant correlation between serum concentrations of TH glycoprotein and its urinary excretion rate, nor between urinary excretion rate and creatinine clearance. PMID:7150257

Dawnay, A B; Thornley, C; Cattell, W R

1982-01-01

36

Investigation of factors affecting in vitro doxorubicin release from PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin for the development of in vitro release testing conditions.  

PubMed

Abstract Establishing appropriate drug release testing methods of liposomal products for assuring quality and performance requires the determination of factors affecting in vitro drug release. In this study, we investigated the effects of test conditions (human plasma lot, pH/salt concentration in the test media, dilution factor, temperature, ultrasound irradiation, etc.), and liposomal preparation conditions (pH/concentration of ammonium sulfate solution), on doxorubicin (DXR) release from PEGylated liposomal DXR. Higher temperature and lower pH significantly increased DXR release. The evaluation of DXR solubility indicated that the high DXR release induced by low pH may be attributed to the high solubility of DXR at low pH. Ultrasound irradiation induced rapid DXR release in an amplitude-dependent manner. The salt concentration in the test solution, human plasma lot, and dilution factor had a limited impact on DXR-release. Variations in the ammonium sulfate concentration used in solutions for the formation/hydration of liposomes significantly affected DXR release behavior, whereas differences in pH did not. In addition, heating condition in phosphate-buffered saline at lower pH (<6.5) exhibited higher discriminative ability for the release profiles from various liposomes with different concentrations of ammonium sulfate than did ultrasound irradiation. These results are expected to be helpful in the process of establishing appropriate drug release testing methods for PEGylated liposomal DXR. PMID:25170659

Shibata, Hiroko; Izutsu, Ken-Ichi; Yomota, Chikako; Okuda, Haruhiro; Goda, Yukihiro

2014-08-29

37

Factors affecting reciprocating compressor performance  

SciTech Connect

A reciprocating compressor is a positive displacement machine and, in principal, its capacity and horsepower can be calculated very easily. In practice, however, several loss mechanisms act to decrease capacity and increase horsepower from the ideal predicted values. Many of these effects are quite difficult to predict accurately and the only effective way of developing reciprocating compressor performance prediction methods is to run a large number of tests on different compressors under different operating conditions. Combined with an understanding of the physics controlling the losses, experimental results allow good empirical models of losses to be developed. However, without the benefit of a good understanding of the physics of the loss mechanisms, it is impossible to interpret test results. Some factors affecting the magnitude of losses are compressor design, compressor speed, suction and discharge pressure and temperature, gas composition, suction and discharge piping design, and valve design. Losses that are important in some applications may be negligible in others so it is essential that a wide range of compressor designs, valve designs, gas molecular weight and operating conditions be tested when developing a performance prediction model. The paper discusses the effects of clearance and pressure ratio; the primary losses affecting capacity and power, including valve and port pressure loss, valve springing, valve inertia, piston ring leakage, packing leakage, discharge valve leakage, suction valve leakage, pulsations, heat transfer in the suction passage, and heat transfer in the cylinder; heat transfer in compressor cylinders; performance prediction methods; and compressor diagnosis.

Woollatt, D. (Dresser-Rand Co., Painted Post, NY (United States))

1993-06-01

38

Use of a Generalized Additive Model to Investigate Key Abiotic Factors Affecting Microcystin Cellular Quotas in Heavy Bloom Areas of Lake Taihu  

PubMed Central

Lake Taihu is the third largest freshwater lake in China and is suffering from serious cyanobacterial blooms with the associated drinking water contamination by microcystin (MC) for millions of citizens. So far, most studies on MCs have been limited to two small bays, while systematic research on the whole lake is lacking. To explain the variations in MC concentrations during cyanobacterial bloom, a large-scale survey at 30 sites across the lake was conducted monthly in 2008. The health risks of MC exposure were high, especially in the northern area. Both Microcystis abundance and MC cellular quotas presented positive correlations with MC concentration in the bloom seasons, suggesting that the toxic risks during Microcystis proliferations were affected by variations in both Microcystis density and MC production per Microcystis cell. Use of a powerful predictive modeling tool named generalized additive model (GAM) helped visualize significant effects of abiotic factors related to carbon fixation and proliferation of Microcystis (conductivity, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), water temperature and pH) on MC cellular quotas from recruitment period of Microcystis to the bloom seasons, suggesting the possible use of these factors, in addition to Microcystis abundance, as warning signs to predict toxic events in the future. The interesting relationship between macrophytes and MC cellular quotas of Microcystis (i.e., high MC cellular quotas in the presence of macrophytes) needs further investigation. PMID:22384128

Tao, Min; Xie, Ping; Chen, Jun; Qin, Boqiang; Zhang, Dawen; Niu, Yuan; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Qing; Wu, Laiyan

2012-01-01

39

Factors affecting ostrich egg hatchability.  

PubMed

Ostrich eggs often have low hatchability (HATCH) rates because they do not lose sufficient weight during incubation. Because egg size, eggshell porosity and thickness (THICK), and length of preincubation egg storage are known to affect egg weight loss during incubation (EWL) and HATCH of chicken eggs, these factors were examined using ostrich eggs. The effects of eggshell porosity (number of large pores per cm2 of shell; LP); and THICK on EWL and HATCH were assessed by categorizing the eggs as having either low, intermediate, or high LP or low, intermediate, or high THICK. Mean EWL was higher (P<0.05) in eggs of the high LP group when compared with eggs in either the low or intermediate LP groups that lost similar amounts of weight during incubation. Mean HATCH was also higher (more than 25%; P<0.10) in eggs with high LP when compared with the HATCH found in eggs having low LP. Eggs from the intermediate LP group had an intermediate HATCH response. Moreover, numbers of LP were positively correlated to both EWL (r2 = 0.64; P<0.0001) and HATCH (r2 = 0.25; P<0.03). Inverse relationships existed between THICK and EWL and between THICK and HATCH according to the order (P< 0.05): eggs of low THICK, highest mean EWL and HATCH > eggs of intermediate THICK, intermediate mean EWL and HATCH > eggs of highest THICK, lowest mean EWL and HATCH. Shell thickness was not correlated to either EWL or HATCH. The influence of egg size on mean LP, THICK, EWL, HATCH, and chick weight (CWT) was assessed. Although THICK was unaffected by egg size, higher LP (P<0.10), EWL (P<0.05), and HATCH (P<0.10) were found in medium-sized eggs when compared with either small or large eggs. The CWT was associated with egg size (P<0.05) according to the order: large eggs, highest CWT > medium eggs, intermediate CWT > small eggs, lowest CWT. Neither EWL nor HATCH was affected by length of preincubation egg storage. Collectively, our findings suggest that 1) ostrich eggs that possess low LP and increased THICK hatched poorly, 2) intermediate-sized eggs hatch best, 3) large eggs produced large chicks, and 4) ostrich eggs can be stored under conditions typically used in the poultry industry for a minimum of 10 d without negatively impacting HATCH. PMID:10515354

Gonzalez, A; Satterlee, D G; Moharer, F; Cadd, G G

1999-09-01

40

Factors affecting growth factor activity in goat milk.  

PubMed

Growth factors that are present in goat milk may be responsible for its beneficial effects on the digestive system as described in ancient Chinese medical texts. To develop a nutraceutical product rich in growth factors for promoting gastrointestinal health, it is essential to collect milk with consistently high growth factor activity. Therefore, we investigated the factors affecting growth factor activity in goat milk. Among the 5 breeds of dairy goats tested, milk from Nubian goats had the highest growth factor activity. Tight-junction leakage induced by a 24-h milking interval did not increase growth factor activity in the milk. Milk collected from pregnant does had a significantly higher growth factor activity than milk collected postpartum. Growth factor activity decreased during the first 8 wk of lactation, fluctuated thereafter, and then increased dramatically after natural mating. During wk 1 to 8, growth factor activity was inversely correlated with milk yield and week of lactation. No correlation was observed during wk 9 to 29. After natural mating of the goats, the growth factor activity in the milk correlated significantly with somatic cell count and conductivity (a measure of membrane permeability), and correlated inversely with milk yield. Based on the above data, goat milk with higher growth factor activity could be selectively collected from Nubian pregnant does. PMID:16702258

Wu, F Y; Tsao, P H; Wang, D C; Lin, S; Wu, J S; Cheng, Y K

2006-06-01

41

Factors affecting the lipase activity of milk  

E-print Network

FACTORS AFFECTING THE LIPASE ACTIVITY OF MILK A Thesis By PAUL THOMAS TALLAMY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1969 Major... Subject: Food Technology FACTORS AFFECTING THE LIPASE ACTIVITY OF MILK A Thesis By PAUL THOMAS TALLAMY Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Commi tee fg M ber Head f Depar tmen Mem er Member January 1969 ABSTRACT Factors Affecting...

Tallamy, Paul Thomas

1969-01-01

42

76 FR 35912 - Business Jet Aircraft Industry: Structure and Factors Affecting Competitiveness; Institution of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...332-526] Business Jet Aircraft Industry: Structure and Factors Affecting Competitiveness...332-526, Business Jet Aircraft Industry: Structure and Factors Affecting Competitiveness...investigation and prepare a report on the structure and factors affecting the...

2011-06-20

43

Ecological Factors Affecting Community Invasibility  

Microsoft Academic Search

What makes a community invasible? For over a century ecologists have sought to understand the relative importance of biotic\\u000a and abiotic factors that determine community composition. The fact that we are still exploring this topic today hints at both\\u000a its importance and complexity. As the impacts from harmful non-native species accumulate, it has become increasingly urgent\\u000a to find answers to

Suzanne V. Olyarnik; Matthew E. S. Bracken; Jarrett E. Byrnes; A. Randall Hughes; Kristin M. Hultgren; John J. Stachowicz

44

Factors affecting sporoplasm release in Kudoa septempunctata.  

PubMed

The myxosporean parasite Kudoa septempunctata has been isolated from cultured olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) and was recently identified as a cause of food poisoning in humans. Since the sporoplasm plays an important role in causing diarrhea by invading intestinal cells, the specific factors affecting the release of sporoplasm from spores should be determined. Thus, we investigated the effect of digestive and serum enzymes, fetal bovine serum (FBS), temperature, and the role of glucose in cell culture media on the release of sporoplasm. Sporoplasm release was observed in the groups treated with FBS and media containing glucose. In addition, 1,10-phenanthroline inhibited the release of sporoplasm in the FBS medium. These results indicate that K. septempunctata uses glucose for releasing its sporoplasm and that zinc or metalloprotease is related to the release mechanism. The present study provides important information for the development of agents to prevent sporoplasm release and the consequent food poisoning caused by K. septempunctata. PMID:25563617

Shin, Sang Phil; Zenke, Kosuke; Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Yoshinaga, Tomoyoshi

2015-02-01

45

External Factors Affecting Fusion Energy Development  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A number of external factors affecting the pace and direction of fusion energy development are reviewed and discussed. These include the changing electric utility marketplace environment, the availability of fossil fuels, competing power sources, and environmental issues.

Dean, Stephen O.

1999-06-01

46

External Factors Affecting Fusion Energy Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

A number of external factors affecting the pace and direction of fusion energy development are reviewed and discussed. These include the changing electric utility marketplace environment, the availability of fossil fuels, competing power sources, and environmental issues.

Stephen O. Dean

1999-01-01

47

ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AFFECTING BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY  

EPA Science Inventory

Environmental Factors Affecting Breast Cancer Susceptibility Suzanne. E. Fenton US EPA, ORD, MD-67 NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711. Breast cancer is still the most common malignancy afflicting women in the Western world. Alt...

48

Factors affecting the nutritive value of bermudagrasses  

E-print Network

FACTORS AFFECTING THE NUTRITIVE VALUE OF BERMUDAGRASSES A Thesis by Nilliam Aylmer Rainwater Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December..., 1975 Major Subject: Animal Nutrition FACTORS AFFECTING THE NUTRITIVE VALUE OF BERMUDAGRASSES A Thesis by WILLIAM AYLMER RAINWATER Approved as to style and content by: , ~A; (' v'~ (Chairman of Committee) t-c-+ (Head of Departm t) d. ~ c . D...

Rainwater, William Aylmer

1975-01-01

49

Economic and Cultural Factors Affecting University Excellence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The ranking of top universities in the world has generated increased interest in the factors that enhance university performance. The purpose of this paper is to identify economic and cultural factors that affect the number of top ranking universities in each country. Design/methodology/approach: This paper first identifies the number of…

Jabnoun, Naceur

2009-01-01

50

Factors Affecting the Quality of Southern Short Cure Cheddar Cheese.  

E-print Network

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR, College Station, Texas BULLETIN NO. 646 FEBRUARY 1944 FACTORS AFFECTING THE QUALITY OF SOUTHERN SHORT CURE CHEDDAR CHEESE F. E. HANSON, W. S. ARBUCKLE and C. N. SHEPARDSON... contains the results of an investigation made to determine the factors which affect the quality of short cure ched- dar cheese. Studies have been made concerning the effect of ri- pening temperature, amount of rennet extract used and manufac- turing...

Shepardson, C. N. (Charles Noah); Arbuckle, W. S. (Wendel Sherwood); Hanson, F. E. (Frank Edwin)

1944-01-01

51

Micropropagation Factors affecting adventitious root formation  

E-print Network

Micropropagation Factors affecting adventitious root formation in microcuttings of Malus GJ De, la vitrification, la durée du cycle final de micropropagation et la concentration en acide indolebuty or by micropropagation. In the vegetative propagation of many crops, rooting of (micro)cuttings is the most crucial step

Boyer, Edmond

52

INTERNATIONAL DIFFERENCES IN FACTORS AFFECTING LABOUR MOBILITY.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THE GEOGRAPHICAL, OCCUPATIONAL, AND INTERFIRM MOBILITY, AND THE FACTORS AFFECTING THESE MOVEMENTS FOR WORKERS IN FRANCE, ITALY, GERMANY, AND SWEDEN IN THE PERIOD SINCE THE SECOND WORLD WAR ARE STUDIED. DATA OBTAINED FROM INDUSTRIAL SURVEYS AND GENERAL CENSUSES WERE USED TO COMPARE THE FOUR COUNTRIES WITH EACH OTHER AND WITH THE UNITED STATES.…

SELLIER, F.; ZARKA, C.

53

Research Article Factors Affecting Detectability of River  

E-print Network

Research Article Factors Affecting Detectability of River Otters During Sign Surveys MACKENZIE R for false absences. Multiple observers surveyed for river otter (Lontra canadensis) scat and tracks along, survey lengths, and near access points. We estimated detection probabilities (p) of river otters using

Sandercock, Brett K.

54

Factors Affecting Sea Lamprey Egg Survival  

Microsoft Academic Search

Factors that affect recruitment of sea lampreys Petromyzon marinus are not well understood; for example, the majority (85%) of sea lamprey eggs are washed out of the nest, and the survival rate of these eggs is unknown. We examined the role of predation and substrate on egg survival in the laboratory and egg predation and dispersion of eggs outside the

Stephen J. Smith; J. Ellen Marsden

2009-01-01

55

Factors Affecting Attitudes toward Juvenile Sex Offenders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated attitudes toward juvenile sex offenders and factors influencing those attitudes. Additionally, the influences of perpetrator characteristics such as age, gender, and ethnicity on societal attitudes towards intervention requirements were also investigated. Overall, attitudes toward juvenile sex offenders and their treatment…

Sahlstrom, Kimberly J.; Jeglic, Elizabeth L.

2008-01-01

56

Factors affecting mother-child play  

E-print Network

) Jennifer Colleen Welch, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Timothy A. Cavell This study examined the effects of various maternal life stressors in relation to their effects on maternal directiveness during mother-child play...FACTORS AFFECTING MOTHER-CHILD PLAY A Thesis by JENNIFER COLLEEN WELCH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject...

Welch, Jennifer Colleen

1993-01-01

57

Factors affecting small axial cooling fan performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many factors such as outer diameter, hub ratio, blade numbers, shape and stagger angle affect the performance of small cooling\\u000a fans. A small cooling fan was simulated using CFD software for three blade stagger angles (30.5°, 37.5°, 44.5°)and obtained\\u000a the internal flow field and the static characteristics. Research indicated that the stagger angle has an obvious effect on\\u000a the static

Lihong Wang; Yingzi Jin; Baoling Cui; Yuzhen Jin; Jin Lin; Yanping Wang; Chuanyu Wu

2010-01-01

58

Factors Affecting Intensive Care Units Nursing Workload  

PubMed Central

Background: The nursing workload has a close and strong association with the quality of services provided for the patients. Therefore, paying careful attention to the factors affecting nursing workload, especially those working in the intensive care units (ICUs), is very important. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the factors affecting nursing workload in the ICUs of the hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional and analytical-descriptive study that has done in Iran. All nurses (n = 400) who was working in the ICUs of the hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2014 were selected and studied using census method. The required data were collected using a researcher–made questionnaire which its validity and reliability were confirmed through getting the opinions of experts and using composite reliability and internal consistency (? = 0.89). The collected data were analyzed through exploratory factor analysis (EFA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and using SPSS 18.0 and AMOS 18.0. Results: Twenty-five factors were divided into three major categories through EFA, including structure, process, and activity. The following factors among the structure, process and activity components had the greatest importance: lack of clear responsibilities and authorities and performing unnecessary tasks (by a coefficient of 0.709), mismatch between the capacity of wards and the number of patients (by a coefficient of 0.639), and helping the students and newly employed staff (by a coefficient of 0.589). Conclusions: The nursing workload is influenced by many factors. The clear responsibilities and authorities of nurses, patients' admission according to the capacity of wards, use of the new technologies and equipment, and providing basic training for new nurses can decrease the workload of nurses. PMID:25389493

Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Ravangard, Ramin; Raadabadi, Mehdi; Mosavi, Seyed Masod; Gholami Fesharaki, Mohammad; Mehrabian, Fardin

2014-01-01

59

Factors affecting the determination of cerebrovascular reactivity  

PubMed Central

Background and Purpose Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR), measures the ability of the cerebrovasculature to respond to vasoactive stimuli such as CO2. CVR is often expressed as the ratio of cerebral blood flow change to CO2 change. We examine several factors affecting this measurement: blood pressure, stimulus pattern, response analysis and subject position. Methods Step and ramp increases in CO2 were implemented in nine subjects, seated and supine. Middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (MCAv), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were determined breath-by-breath. Cerebrovascular conductance (MCAc) was estimated as MCAv/MAP. CVR was calculated from both the relative and absolute measures of MCAc and MCAv responses. Results MAP increased with CO2 in some subjects so that relative CVR calculated from conductance responses were less than those calculated from CVR calculated from velocity responses. CVR measured from step responses were affected by the response dynamics, and were less than those calculated from CVR measured from ramp responses. Subject position did not affect CVR. Conclusions (1) MAP increases with CO2 and acts as a confounding factor for CVR measurement; (2) CVR depends on the stimulus pattern used; (3) CVR did not differ from the sitting versus supine in these experiments; (4) CVR calculated from absolute changes of MCAv was less than that calculated from relative changes. PMID:25328852

Regan, Rosemary E; Fisher, Joseph A; Duffin, James

2014-01-01

60

Genetic and environmental factors that affect gestation length  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Genetic and environmental factors that might affect gestation length (GL) were investigated so that more accurate predictions of calving dates could be provided to dairy producers. Data from >8 million calvings from 1999 through 2005 for 5 dairy breeds were assembled from lactation, reproduction, an...

61

Factors Affecting Thermally Induced Furan Formation  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Furan, a potential carcinogen, can be induced by heat from sugars and fatty acids. However, factors that contribute to its formation in foods are unclear. The objective of this research was to investigate the effects of pH, presence of phosphate, heating time and heating temperature on furan forma...

62

An investigation of factors associated with the health and well-being of HIV-infected or HIV-affected older people in rural South Africa  

PubMed Central

Background Despite the severe impact of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa, the health of older people aged 50+ is often overlooked owing to the dearth of data on the direct and indirect effects of HIV on older people’s health status and well-being. The aim of this study was to examine correlates of health and well-being of HIV-infected older people relative to HIV-affected people in rural South Africa, defined as participants with an HIV-infected or death of an adult child due to HIV-related cause. Methods Data were collected within the Africa Centre surveillance area using instruments adapted from the World Health Organization (WHO) Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE). A stratified random sample of 422 people aged 50+ participated. We compared the health correlates of HIV-infected to HIV-affected participants using ordered logistic regressions. Health status was measured using three instruments: disability index, quality of life and composite health score. Results Median age of the sample was 60 years (range 50–94). Women HIV-infected (aOR 0.15, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.08–0.29) and HIV-affected (aOR 0.20, 95% CI 0.08–0.50), were significantly less likely than men to be in good functional ability. Women’s adjusted odds of being in good overall health state were similarly lower than men’s; while income and household wealth status were stronger correlates of quality of life. HIV-infected participants reported better functional ability, quality of life and overall health state than HIV-affected participants. Discussion and conclusions The enhanced healthcare received as part of anti-retroviral treatment as well as the considerable resources devoted to HIV care appear to benefit the overall well-being of HIV-infected older people; whereas similar resources have not been devoted to the general health needs of HIV uninfected older people. Given increasing numbers of older people, policy and programme interventions are urgently needed to holistically meet the health and well-being needs of older people beyond the HIV-related care system. PMID:22471743

2012-01-01

63

Are Affective Factors a Good Predictor of Science Achievement? Examining the Role of Affective Factors Based on PISA 2006  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated how affective factors like attitude and motivation contribute to science achievement in PISA 2006 using linear structural modeling. The data set of PISA 2006 collected from 4942 fifteen-year-old Turkish students (2290 females, 2652 males) was used for the statistical analyses. A total of 42 selected items on a four point…

Ozel, Murat; Caglak, Serdar; Erdogan, Mehmet

2013-01-01

64

Factors affecting the quality of bottled water.  

PubMed

The ever-increasing popularity of bottled water means that it is important to analyze not only its mineral content but also, above all, its content of possible contaminants, especially the organic ones. In this respect, bottled waters are a special case, because apart from organic chemical contaminants derived from the well from which they were acquired, their secondary contamination is always possible, during treatment or storage or transport in unsuitable conditions (sunlight and elevated temperature). This paper describes how various factors, from the area around the well, and the method of drawing and treating water, to the manner in which the finished product is stored and transported may affect the quality of bottled waters. It also summarizes literature information on the levels of organic contaminants in various kinds of bottled water samples. PMID:23093103

Diduch, Malwina; Polkowska, ?aneta; Namie?nik, Jacek

2013-03-01

65

Factors affecting alum-protein interactions.  

PubMed

Alum (or aluminum-containing) adjuvants are key components of many vaccines currently on the market. The immuno-potentiation effect of alum adjuvants is presumably due to their interaction with antigens, leading to adsorption on the alum particle surface. Understanding the mechanism of antigen adsorption/desorption and its influencing factors could provide guidance on formulation design and ensure proper in-vivo immuno-potentiation effect. In this paper, surface adsorption of several model proteins on two types of aluminum adjuvants (Alhydrogel(®) and Adjuphos(®)) are investigated to understand the underlying adsorption mechanisms, capacities, and potential influencing factors. It was found that electrostatic interactions are the major driving force for surface adsorption of all the model proteins except ovalbumin. Alhydrogel has a significantly higher adsorption capacity than Adjuphos. Several factors significantly change the adsorption capacity of both Alhydrogel and Adjuphos, including molecular weight of protein antigens, sodium chloride, phosphate buffer, denaturing agents, and size of aluminum particles. These important factors need to be carefully considered in the design of an effective protein antigen-based vaccine. PMID:24607202

Huang, Min; Wang, Wei

2014-05-15

66

76 FR 30195 - Brazil: Competitive Factors in Brazil Affecting U.S. and Brazilian Agricultural Sales in Selected...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 332-524] Brazil: Competitive Factors in Brazil Affecting U.S. and Brazilian Agricultural Sales...Commission) instituted investigation No. 332-524, Brazil: Competitive Factors in Brazil Affecting...

2011-05-24

67

77 FR 18862 - Brazil: Competitive Factors Affecting U.S. and Brazilian Agricultural Sales in Selected Third...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 332-524] Brazil: Competitive Factors Affecting U.S. and Brazilian...the Committee in investigation No. 332-524, Brazil: Competitive Factors In Brazil Affecting U.S. and Brazilian Agricultural...

2012-03-28

68

Mechanical factors affecting hemostasis and thrombosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Both physical and chemical factors can influence the activity of platelets and coagulation factors responsible for the formation of thrombotic and hemostatic masses in the vicinity of an injured vessel wall. Studies performed in controlled shear devices (viscometers) have indicated that physical factors alone can induce platelet aggregation, even in the absence of exogenous chemical factors. The physical considerations which

Vincent T. Turitto; Connie L. Hall

1998-01-01

69

Factors affecting the process performance of biofiltration  

SciTech Connect

Biofiltration is an emerging biological treatment technology for the removal of airborne VOCs from industrial process waste streams. Removal of air-phase VOCs by biofiltration is accomplished by contacting a process airstream with an active microbial biofilm attached to a solid phase packing. VOCs that partition into the biofilm are aerobically oxidized to the endproducts of water, carbon dioxide and salts. A multiple reactor biofiltration pilot plant test program has been in progress at the University of Minnesota Environmental Engineering Laboratories since 1992. The primary goal of the program is to study factors that affect biofiltration process performance. Initial results of this test program were reported in a previous conference paper and master`s thesis. This paper presents the results of more recent studies that focus on the effects of: (1) biofilm accumulation (which in turn causes a decrease in biofilter bed porosity and packing bed surface area), (2) rates of nutrient addition, and (3) chemical properties of the target contaminant, on biofiltration removal performance. Removal performance was evaluated by determining biofilter removal capacities and efficiencies for various substrate feeds. The performance parameters were measured under constant contaminant inlet concentrations and under constant temperature. Three VOCs were selected for study and they are: MEK, (methyl ethyl ketone), xylene, and hexane. MEK, xylene, and hexane were chosen because they are representative of widely used industrial solvents and they have significantly different Henry`s law constants relative to each other (the MEK value < Xylene value < Hexane value). Henry`s law constants quantify the partitioning of a chemical between the air and water-biofilm phase and therefore can be used to correlate the effect of chemical properties on biofilter removal capacities. This paper also introduces a new model for the biofiltration process.

Kopchynski, D.M.; Farmer, R.W.; Maier, W.J. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1996-11-01

70

An Activity on Factors Affecting Blood Flow  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson is designed to explore the relationship between pressure and vessel diameter and to create a model that represents how high blood pressure may affect weakened vessels. A collaborative work of Melvin Flores, Larie Laudato and Glenn Soltes

Glenn Soltes

2012-06-28

71

Factors affecting the degradation of amoxicillin in composting toilet.  

PubMed

The biological and non-biological factors that affect the degradation of amoxicillin in the composting process of feces have been investigated. The effect of living bacteria and the enzyme (beta-lactamase) on amoxicillin decay was examined, and our results indicated that the biological effects are likely to be negligible. Consequently, the effect of phosphate, ammonia and pH level as non-biological factors was investigated by monitoring the reduction rate of amoxicillin in phosphate and ammonia buffer solutions with several pH levels. Each reduction rate constant was integrated by a simulation model, and the each calculated amoxicillin reduction profile was compared to the reduction profiles of amoxicillin in the composting process of feces. The calculated results corresponded almost exactly to the experimental profiles. We therefore concluded that the degradation of amoxicillin in a toilet matrix was dependent on the concentration of ammonia, phosphate and hydroxyl ion. PMID:17109929

Kakimoto, Takashi; Funamizu, Naoyuki

2007-02-01

72

Rh Factor: How It Can Affect Your Pregnancy  

MedlinePLUS

... not carried to term? • How does Rh sensitization affect the fetus during pregnancy? • How can I find ... positive? • Glossary The Rh Factor: How It Can Affect Your Pregnancy How does Rh sensitization occur during ...

73

Factors Affecting Retention in Online Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to expand what is known regarding the factors that relate to successful completion of online, undergraduate college courses. It addressed 13 student factors available through archival data at Northern Kentucky University based on 1,493 students enrolled in fully online courses in fall 2008. It included programmatic…

Berling, Victoria L.

2010-01-01

74

How Student Satisfaction Factors Affect Perceived Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data from students in two sections of a general education course offered at a research university in spring 2009 were used to explore whether student satisfaction factors are associated with perceived learning as rated by students. A list of 22 elements in the learning environment was explored. The 22 were used in creating 3 satisfaction factors

Lo, Celia C.

2010-01-01

75

Aptitude in American Alligators: ecological factors affecting cognition and behavior.  

E-print Network

??American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) possess flexible cognitive abilities. Given these cognitive abilities, we hypothesized the capacity for flexible learning is significantly affected by ecological factors… (more)

Yowell, Jennifer Lauren

2011-01-01

76

Factors affecting the reproductive success of dominant male meerkats.  

PubMed

Identifying traits that affect the reproductive success of individuals is fundamental for our understanding of evolutionary processes. In cooperative breeders, a dominant male typically restricts mating access to the dominant female for extended periods, resulting in pronounced variation in reproductive success among males. This may result in strong selection for traits that increase the likelihood of dominance acquisition, dominance retention and reproductive rates while dominant. However, despite considerable research on reproductive skew, few studies have explored the factors that influence these three processes among males in cooperative species. Here we use genetic, behavioural and demographic data to investigate the factors affecting reproductive success in dominant male meerkats (Suricata suricatta). Our data show that dominant males sire the majority of all offspring surviving to 1 year. A male's likelihood of becoming dominant is strongly influenced by age, but not by weight. Tenure length and reproductive rate, both important components of dominant male reproductive success, are largely affected by group size and composition, rather than individual traits. Dominant males in large groups have longer tenures, but after this effect is controlled, male tenure length also correlates negatively to the number of adult females in the group. Male reproductive rate also declines as the number of intra- and extra-group competitors increases. As the time spent in the dominant position and reproductive rate while dominant explain > 80% of the total variance in reproductive success, group composition thus has major implications for male reproductive success. PMID:18410290

Spong, Göran F; Hodge, Sarah J; Young, Andrew J; Clutton-Brock, Tim H

2008-05-01

77

Factors Affecting Student Choices of Instructional Methodologies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To identify factors that caused the majority of students at Los Angeles City College to prefer the traditional lecture-discussion approach to the media approach, questionnaires were administered to students in three courses--three media and two traditional. Over 200 usable questionnaires were returned. Because of scheduling variations and other…

Gold, Ben K.

78

Factors Affecting Residents' Decisions to Moonlight.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since moonlighting by residents in addition to their demanding residency work schedule might jeopardize patient care, decisions to moonlight are examined. The results indicate that the main motivating factor behind their moonlighting is economic, and residents with higher levels of indebtedness were more likely to moonlight. (Author/MLW)

Bazzoli, Gloria J.; Culler, Steven D.

1986-01-01

79

Factors Affecting Information Literacy Perception and Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Information literacy, defined as, "the set of skills needed to find, retrieve, analyze, and use information" (American Library Association, 2003, paragraph 1), is necessary for success in life. The present study will examine whether the factors of gender, race, and/or socioeconomic status impact information literacy performance and information…

Zehner, Drusilla Charlene Beecher

2009-01-01

80

Human element factors affecting reliability and safety  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many system reliability predictive methods are based solely on equipment failures neglecting the human component of man-machine systems. These methods do not consider the identification of the root causes of human errors. The reliability and safety of industrial and commercial power systems and processes are dependent upon human characteristics and many dependent and dynamic interactive factors. The consequences of human

D. O. Koval

1997-01-01

81

Human element factors affecting reliability and safety  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many system reliability prediction methods are based solely on equipment failures, neglecting the human component of man-machine systems (MMS). These methods do not consider the identification of the root causes of human errors. The reliability and safety of industrial and commercial power systems and processes (i.e., MMS) are dependent upon human characteristics and many dependent and dynamic interactive factors. The

Don O. Koval; H. Landis Floyd

1998-01-01

82

Factors Affecting Patients' Compliance With Doctors' Advice  

PubMed Central

To what extent, and with what success, are family physicians advising patients to diet, exercise and reduce smoking? A study of 24 family physicians in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick and 66 patients with cardiovascular problems showed that two-thirds of the patients received some such advice during the audiotaped visit. Of those who did receive such advice, 29% reported at a home interview ten days later that they remembered the advice. The doctor's behavior in the interaction was found to influence the patient's memory of the advice. However, the patient's attitudes and problems were the only variables shown to affect whether or not he followed the advice. PMID:21286512

Stewart, Moira

1982-01-01

83

Political and institutional factors affecting systems engineering  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

External groups have a significant impact on NASA's programs. Ten groups affecting NASA are identified, and examples are given for some of the them. Methods of dealing with these external inputs are discussed, the most important being good and open two way communications and an objective attitude on the part of the NASA participants. The importance of planning ahead, of developing rapport with these groups, and of effective use of NASA contractors is covered. The need for an overall strategic plan for the U.S. space program is stressed.

Yardley, John F.

1993-01-01

84

Factors Affecting Learners' Discourse Participation in a Computer Conferencing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research examined what factors affect learners' discourse participation in a Web-conferencing environment operated in a graduate course. Subjects were nine master's degree students, majoring in Educational Technology at a women's university in Seoul, Korea. Results suggest seven factors that affect students' discourse in the following ways:…

Lee, In-Sook

85

FACTORS AFFECTING EXVESSEL PRICES OF SKIPJACK TUNA IN HAWAII  

E-print Network

FACTORS AFFECTING EXVESSEL PRICES OF SKIPJACK TUNA IN HAWAII Yung C . Shang The skipj ack -tuna to overfishing. On the other hand, the cost-revenue analysis indicates that, given the past input and tuna prices objective of this paper is to exam- ine the factors affecting the prices of skipj ack tuna. Skipjack

86

Factors which affect fatigue strength of fasteners  

SciTech Connect

Axial load cycling fatigue tests of threaded fasteners are useful in determining fastener fatigue failure or design properties. By using appropriate design factors between the failure and design fatigue strengths, such tests are used to establish fatigue failure and design parameters of fasteners for axial and bending cyclic load conditions. This paper reviews the factors which influence the fatigue strength of low Alloy steel threaded fasteners, identifies those most significant to fatigue strength, and provides design guidelines based on the direct evaluation of fatigue tests of threaded fasteners. Influences on fatigue strength of thread manufacturing process (machining and rolling of threads), effect of fastener membrane and bending stresses, thread root radii, fastener sizes, fastener tensile strength, stress relaxation, mean stress, and test temperature are discussed.

Skochko, G.W.; Herrmann, T.P.

1992-11-01

87

Factors which affect fatigue strength of fasteners  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Axial load cycling fatigue tests of threaded fasteners are useful in determining fastener fatigue failure or design properties. By using appropriate design factors between the failure and design fatigue strengths, such tests are used to establish fatigue failure and design parameters of fasteners for axial and bending cyclic load conditions. This paper reviews the factors which influence the fatigue strength of low alloy steel threaded fasteners, identifies those most significant to fatigue strength, and provides design guidelines based on the direct evaluation of fatigue tests of threaded fasteners. Influences on fatigue strength of thread manufacturing process (machining and rolling of threads), effect of fastener membrane and bending stresses, thread root radii, fastener sizes, fastener tensile strength, stress relaxation, mean stress, and test temperature are discussed.

Skochko, G. W.; Herrmann, T. P.

1992-11-01

88

Factors affecting quality of informed consent  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE--To examine the factors influencing quality of informed consent. DESIGN--Prospective study comprising interviews with patients and patients' completing standard questionnaires. SETTING--Academic surgical unit of large teaching hospital. PATIENTS--265 patients undergoing intrathoracic, intraperitoneal, and vascular surgical procedures. Of these patients, 192 have been followed up for six months. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Patients' recall of information at various points in the study; this

C Lavelle-Jones; D J Byrne; P Rice; A Cuschieri

1993-01-01

89

Factors affecting hispanic student transfer behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

Few studies examine transfer of nontraditional-age Hispanic community college students to four-year institutions. The present study examined attitudes, cognitive and noncognitive experiences, and transfer-related behaviors of students (N=277) who graduated from one two-year institution, in order to determine factors associated with successful transfer and make appropriate policy recommendations. An undergraduate survey based on Tinto's (1975, 1987) conceptual framework and Cabrera,

Barbara A. Kraemer

1995-01-01

90

Factors Affecting Resveratrol Content in Strawberries  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This study investigated the occurrence of resveratrol in Fragaria x ananassa Duchesne and the effect of preharvest conditions on resveratrol content. Both cis- and trans- resveratrol were detected in strawberry achenes (seeds) and pulp (receptacle tissue). Resveratrol was identified by LC-MS. Resver...

91

Environmental factors affecting corrosion of munitions  

SciTech Connect

Spent small arms munitions have accumulated for years at outdoor firing ranges operated by the DoD and other groups. Used bullets are often subjected to moisture sources. There is increasing concern that accumulations of lead-based munitions represent potential sources of water and soil pollution. To understand both the severity of and solutions to this problem, it is necessary to measure how rapidly bullets corrode and to determine the soil variables affecting the process. In this study M16 bullets were buried in samples of soil taken from Louisiana army firing ranges. Four environmental conditions were simulated; rain water, acid rain, sea water, and 50% sea water/50% acid rain. The three electrode technique was used to measure the bullet corrosion. Graphite rods served as counter electrodes. A saturated calomel reference electrode was used along with a specially constructed salt bridge. Electrochemical measurements were conducted using a computer-controlled potentiostat to determine corrosion potential, soil resistance, and corrosion current. The rate of corrosion was found to markedly increase with decreasing soil pH and increasing chloride and moisture contents, with the chloride content being the most influential variable. High soil resistance and noble corrosion potential were found to be associated with low corrosion rates. This is important since both parameters can be readily measured in the field.

Bundy, K. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States); Bricka, M.; Morales, A. [Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS (United States)

1995-12-31

92

Thermochemical factors affecting the dehalogenation of aromatics.  

PubMed

Halogenated aromatics are one of the largest chemical classes of environmental contaminants, and dehalogenation remains one of the most important processes by which these compounds are degraded and detoxified. The thermodynamic constraints of aromatic dehalogenation reactions are thus important for understanding the feasibility of such reactions and the redox conditions necessary for promoting them. Accordingly, the thermochemical properties of the (poly)fluoro-, (poly)chloro-, and (poly)bromobenzenes, including standard enthalpies of formation, bond dissociation enthalpies, free energies of reaction, and the redox potentials of Ar-X/Ar-H couples, were investigated using a validated density functional protocol combined with continuum solvation calculations when appropriate. The results highlight the fact that fluorinated aromatics stand distinct from their chloro- and bromo- counterparts in terms of both their relative thermodynamic stability toward dehalogenation and how different substitution patterns give rise to relevant properties, such as bond strengths and reduction potentials. PMID:24237268

Sadowsky, Daniel; McNeill, Kristopher; Cramer, Christopher J

2013-12-17

93

Factors Affecting the Reactvity of Granular Iron in contact with Chlorinated Solvents  

E-print Network

This study investigates, at various scales, the factors that affect the reactivity of granular iron (GI) toward chlorinated solvents and link these scale-specific processes with each other. The Kinetic Iron Model (KIM), ...

Firdous, Rubina

2013-12-31

94

Factors Affecting Teachers' Perceived Readiness for Online Collaborative Learning: A Case Study in Malaysia  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper investigates factors affecting the perceived readiness for online collaborative learning (OCL) of a sample of 86 mathematics teachers from 12 secondary schools. Descriptive analysis, factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis and structure equation modeling were used to analyze the data. A moderately fit model was generated and able to inform that time constraint and insufficient access to technology such

Ah-choo Koo

2008-01-01

95

Factors Affecting Teachers' Perceived Readiness for Online Collaborative Learning: A Case Study in Malaysia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper investigates factors affecting the perceived readiness for online collaborative learning (OCL) of a sample of 86 mathematics teachers from 12 secondary schools. Descriptive analysis, factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis and structure equation modeling were used to analyze the data. A moderately fit model was generated and able…

Koo, Ah-Choo

2008-01-01

96

Factors affecting interactions between prion protein isoforms.  

PubMed

Interactions between normal, protease-sensitive prion protein (PrP-sen or PrP(C)) and its protease-resistant isoform (PrP-res or PrP(Sc)) are critical in transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) diseases. To investigate the propagation of PrP-res between cells we tested whether PrP-res in scrapie brain microsomes can induce the conversion of PrP-sen to PrP-res if the PrP-sen is bound to uninfected raft membranes. Surprisingly, no conversion was observed unless the microsomal and raft membranes were fused or PrP-sen was released from raft membranes. These results suggest that the propagation of infection between cells requires transfer of PrP-res into the membranes of the recipient cell. To assess potential cofactors in PrP conversion, we used cell-free PrP conversion assays to show that heparan sulphate can stimulate PrP-res formation, supporting the idea that endogenous sulphated glycosaminoglycans can act as important cofactors or modulators of PrP-res formation in vivo. In an effort to develop therapeutics, the antimalarial drug quinacrine was identified as an inhibitor of PrP-res formation in scrapie-infected cell cultures. Confirmation of the latter result by others has led to the initiation of human clinical trials as a treatment for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. PrP-res formation can also be inhibited using a variety of other types of small molecule, specific synthetic PrP peptides, and an antiserum directed at the C-terminus of PrP-sen. The latter results help to localize the sites of interaction between PrP-sen and PrP-res. Disruption of those interactions with antibodies or peptidomimetic drugs may be an attractive therapeutic strategy. The likelihood that PrP-res inhibitors can rid TSE-infected tissues of PrP-res would presumably be enhanced if PrP-res formation were reversible. However, our attempts to measure dissociation of PrP-sen from PrP-res have failed under non-denaturing conditions. Finally, we have attempted to induce the spontaneous conversion of PrP-sen into PrP-res using low concentrations of detergents. A conformational conversion from alpha-helical monomers into high-beta-sheet aggregates and fibrils was induced by low concentrations of the detergent sarkosyl; however, the aggregates had neither infectivity nor the characteristic protease-resistance ofPrP-res. PMID:12196138

Caughey, B; Baron, G S

2002-08-01

97

Potential factors affecting accumulation of unsupported 210Pb in soil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Airborne 210Pb, daughter of 222Rn, is frequently used as a tracer in different studies concerning atmospheric transport, sedimentation, soil erosion, dating, etc. Concentration of 210Pb was measured in 40 soil samples collected in urban and industrial areas in order to get evidence of possible influence of some factors on accumulation of airborne 210Pb in soil. Different soil properties such as the content of organic matter, free CaCO3, and available phosphorus (P2O5) were measured to explore their possible correlation with the amount of 210Pb. Special attention was given to the correlation between 210Pb and stable lead accumulated in the soil. Several samples were taken near a battery manufacturer to check if extremely high concentrations of lead can affect the uptake of the airborne 210Pb in soil. Soil samples were also taken at different depths to investigate the penetration of lead through the soil.

Mihailovi?, Aleksandra; Vu?ini? Vasi?, Milica; Todorovi?, Nataša; Hansman, Jan; Vasin, Jovica; Krmar, Miodrag

2014-06-01

98

Factors affecting white cell content in platelet concentrates.  

PubMed

In this study, we investigated the factors affecting white cell content in platelet concentrates. White cell yields can be reduced 50 percent by stopping platelet-rich plasma expression when the interface is 1 cm from the top of the blood bag as compared to stopping expression when the interface reaches the top of the bag. Further reductions can be achieved by careful handling during transfer of units from the centrifuge cups to expressors (after the first spin) and by carefully balancing units against each other to ensure proper rotor balance during the first spin. Following these suggestions, blood banks should be able to produce platelet concentrates with white cell yields between 2 and 6 X 10(7) and with platelet yields between 7.5 and 8 X 10(10). Transfusion of this product may reduce febrile reactions and lower the incidence of alloimmunizations. PMID:4024231

Champion, A B; Carmen, R A

1985-01-01

99

Evaluation of Factors Affecting Earth Pressures on Buried Box Culverts.  

E-print Network

??Factors affecting the earth pressures acting on buried box culverts under deep embankments were evaluated by field instrumentation and numerical analyses. Two instrumented cast-in-place concrete… (more)

Yang, Michael Zhiqiang

2000-01-01

100

Spatial factors affecting statistical power in testing marine fauna displacement.  

PubMed

Impacts of offshore wind farms on marine fauna are largely unknown. Therefore, one commonly adheres to the precautionary principle, which states that one shall take action to avoid potentially damaging impacts on marine ecosystems, even when full scientific certainty is lacking. We implement this principle by means of a statistical power analysis including spatial factors. Implementation is based on geostatistical simulations, accommodating for zero-inflation in species data. We investigate scenarios in which an impact assessment still has to be carried out. Our results show that the environmental conditions at the time of the survey is the most influential factor on power. This is followed by survey effort and species abundance in the reference situation. Spatial dependence in species numbers at local scales affects power, but its effect is smaller for the scenarios investigated. Our findings can be used to improve effectiveness of the economical investment for monitoring surveys. In addition, unnecessary extra survey effort, and related costs, can be avoided when spatial dependence in species abundance is present and no improvement on power is achieved. PMID:22073657

Pérez Lapeña, B; Wijnberg, K M; Stein, A; Hulscher, S J M H

2011-10-01

101

Factors affecting weaning weights of Santa Gertrudis calves  

E-print Network

FACTORS AFFECTING WEANING WEIGHTS OF SANTA GERTRUDIS CALVES A Thesis by JAMES WILLIS FARRIS Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August... 1972 Ma)or Sub)ect: Animal Breeding FACTORS AFFECTING WEANING WEIGHTS OF SANTA GERTRUDIS CALVES A Thesis by JAMES WILLIS FARRIS Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) August 1972 ABSTRACT...

Farris, James Willis

2012-06-07

102

Original article Factors affecting the distribution of clinical mastitis  

E-print Network

Original article Factors affecting the distribution of clinical mastitis among udder quarters of clinical bovine mastitis between rear and front quar- ters were studied using data from a 4 year survey of commercial dairy herds in western France. The study involved 844 mastitis cases affecting 597 lactations

Boyer, Edmond

103

Factors Affecting Click-Through Behavior in Aggregated Search Interfaces  

E-print Network

affecting users click-through behav- ior on aggregated search interfaces. We tested two aggre- gated search interfaces are now a common paradigm for search result presentation. An aggregated search inter- faceFactors Affecting Click-Through Behavior in Aggregated Search Interfaces Shanu Sushmita University

Lalmas, Mounia

104

Factors affecting the pharmacokinetics of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin in patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  There is significant inter-patient variability in the pharmacokinetics of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD). Identification\\u000a of factors affecting the pharmacokinetics of PLD would enable personalization of therapy. We previously reported that age,\\u000a gender, body composition, and monocytes affect the clearance of other liposomal agents. Therefore, we evaluated how these\\u000a factors affect the pharmacokinetics of PLD.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Pharmacokinetic studies of PLD were performed

Ninh M. La-Beck; Beth A. Zamboni; Alberto Gabizon; Hilary Schmeeda; Michael Amantea; Paola A. Gehrig; William C. Zamboni

105

FACTORS ADVERSELY AFFECTING AMPHIBIAN POPULATIONS IN THE US  

EPA Science Inventory

Factors known or suspected to be adversely affecting native amphibian populations in the US were identified using information from species accounts written in a standardized format by multiple authors in a forthcoming book. Specific adverse factors were identified for 53 (58%) of...

106

Exploring Factors that Affect Purchase Intention of Athletic Team Merchandise  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to test a structural model to determine which psychosocial constructs affected the purchase intention of athletic team merchandise (ATM). Results from the analyses indicated that the twelve-factor ATM model fit the data from collegiate athletic events well, explaining the various impact factors that lead to purchase…

Lee, Donghun; Trail, Galen T.; Lee, Cindy; Schoenstedt, Linda J.

2013-01-01

107

Environmental Factors Affecting Tropical Cyclone Power Dissipation KERRY EMANUEL  

E-print Network

Environmental Factors Affecting Tropical Cyclone Power Dissipation KERRY EMANUEL Program by tropical cyclones in the Atlantic and western North Pacific are presented. These show considerable of the three factors are quantified, and implications for future trends and variability of tropical cyclone

Emanuel, Kerry A.

108

FACTORS AFFECTING CONSUMER NEGATIVE PERCEPTIONS ABOUT BEEF IRRADIATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study has identified several important factors affecting consumer negative perceptions about beef irradiation. The effects of these factors boil down to two main points: lack of trust in the adequacy and enforcement effectiveness of food safety regulations and consumer ignorance about the irradiation process. This implies dissemination of information about food irradiation and enhancement of consumer trust in the

Senhui He; Stanley M. Fletcher; Arbindra Rimal

2004-01-01

109

Factors affecting food decisions made by individual consumers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Food decisions made by individuals affect the healthfulness of their food intakes and influence the success or failure of food products in the consumer-oriented food marketplace of today. Because consumers develop their own systems of deciding what to eat and how to follow the Food Guide Pyramid, it is difficult to know which factors or combinations of factors that influence

Elaine H. Asp

1999-01-01

110

Exploring the Factors Affecting Hotel Outsourcing in Taiwan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two studies were conducted to examine factors affecting hotel outsourcing in Taiwan. In study 1, interviews with senior hotel managers were analyzed to explore the factors determining a hotel's outsourcing of different services. The results of the questionnaire survey used in study 2 indicated that the current and desired percentages of outsourcing for international tourist hotels in Taiwan were very

Chin-Sheng Wan; Allan Yen-Lun Su

2010-01-01

111

FACTORS AFFECTING ANTIOXIDANT AND ANTICANCER PROPERTIES OF BERRY FRUITS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Berry fruits have been shown to contain high levels of antioxidant compounds such as carotenoids, vitamins, phenols, flavonoids, dietary glutathionine, and endogenous metabolites. Many factors affect antioxidant levels in berry fruits. These factors include genotype variation and maturity, pre-har...

112

Human Factors in Cabin Accident Investigations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Human factors has become an integral part of the accident investigation protocol. However, much of the investigative process remains focussed on the flight deck, airframe, and power plant systems. As a consequence, little data has been collected regarding the human factors issues within and involving the cabin during an accident. Therefore, the possibility exists that contributing factors that lie within that domain may be overlooked. The FAA Office of Accident Investigation is sponsoring a two-day workshop on cabin safety accident investigation. This course, within the workshop, will be of two hours duration and will explore relevant areas of human factors research. Specifically, the three areas of discussion are: Information transfer and resource management, fatigue and other physical stressors, and the human/machine interface. Integration of these areas will be accomplished by providing a suggested checklist of specific cabin-related human factors questions for investigators to probe following an accident.

Chute, Rebecca D.; Rosekind, Mark R. (Technical Monitor)

1996-01-01

113

Methods of Combinatorial Optimization to Reveal Factors Affecting Gene Length  

PubMed Central

In this paper we present a novel method for genome ranking according to gene lengths. The main outcomes described in this paper are the following: the formulation of the genome ranking problem, presentation of relevant approaches to solve it, and the demonstration of preliminary results from prokaryotic genomes ordering. Using a subset of prokaryotic genomes, we attempted to uncover factors affecting gene length. We have demonstrated that hyperthermophilic species have shorter genes as compared with mesophilic organisms, which probably means that environmental factors affect gene length. Moreover, these preliminary results show that environmental factors group together in ranking evolutionary distant species. PMID:23300345

Bolshoy, Alexander; Tatarinova, Tatiana

2012-01-01

114

Web-based Factors Affecting Online Purchasing Behaviour  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The growing use of internet and online purchasing among young consumers in Malaysia provides a huge prospect in e-commerce market, specifically for B2C segment. In this market, if E-marketers know the web-based factors affecting online buyers' behaviour, and the effect of these factors on behaviour of online consumers, then they can develop their marketing strategies to convert potential customers into active one, while retaining existing online customers. Review of previous studies related to the online purchasing behaviour in B2C market has point out that the conceptualization and empirical validation of the online purchasing behaviour of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) literate users, or ICT professional, in Malaysia has not been clearly addressed. This paper focuses on (i) web-based factors which online buyers (ICT professional) keep in mind while shopping online; and (ii) the effect of web-based factors on online purchasing behaviour. Based on the extensive literature review, a conceptual framework of 24 items of five factors was constructed to determine web-based factors affecting online purchasing behaviour of ICT professional. Analysis of data was performed based on the 310 questionnaires, which were collected using a stratified random sampling method, from ICT undergraduate students in a public university in Malaysia. The Exploratory factor analysis performed showed that five factors affecting online purchase behaviour are Information Quality, Fulfilment/Reliability/Customer Service, Website Design, Quick and Details, and Privacy/Security. The result of Multiple Regression Analysis indicated that Information Quality, Quick and Details, and Privacy/Security affect positively online purchase behaviour. The results provide a usable model for measuring web-based factors affecting buyers' online purchase behaviour in B2C market, as well as for online shopping companies to focus on the factors that will increase customers' online purchase.

Ariff, Mohd Shoki Md; Sze Yan, Ng; Zakuan, Norhayati; Zaidi Bahari, Ahamad; Jusoh, Ahmad

2013-06-01

115

Factors Affecting Mortality in Elderly Patients Hospitalized for Nonmalignant Reasons  

PubMed Central

Elderly population is hospitalized more frequently than young people, and they suffer from more severe diseases that are difficult to diagnose and treat. The present study aimed to investigate the factors affecting mortality in elderly patients hospitalized for nonmalignant reasons. Demographic data, reason for hospitalization, comorbidities, duration of hospital stay, and results of routine blood testing at the time of first hospitalization were obtained from the hospital records of the patients, who were over 65 years of age and hospitalized primarily for nonmalignant reasons. The mean age of 1012 patients included in the study was 77.8 ± 7.6. The most common reason for hospitalization was diabetes mellitus (18.3%). Of the patients, 90.3% had at least a single comorbidity. Whilst 927 (91.6%) of the hospitalized patients were discharged, 85 (8.4%) died. Comparison of the characteristics of the discharged and dead groups revealed that the dead group was older and had higher rates of poor general status and comorbidity. Differences were observed between the discharged and dead groups in most of the laboratory parameters. Hypoalbuminemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hypopotassemia, hypernatremia, hyperuricemia, and high TSH level were the predictors of mortality. In order to meet the health necessities of the elderly population, it is necessary to well define the patient profiles and to identify the risk factors. PMID:25147737

Ayaz, Teslime; Rak?c?, Halil

2014-01-01

116

The experience sampling method: Investigating students' affective experience  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Improving non-cognitive outcomes such as attitudes, efficacy, and persistence in physics courses is an important goal of physics education. This investigation implemented an in-the-moment surveying technique called the Experience Sampling Method (ESM) to measure students' affective experience in physics. Measurements included: self-efficacy, cognitive efficiency, activation, intrinsic motivation, and affect. Data are presented that show contrasts in studentsâ experiences (e.g., in physics vs. non-physics courses).

Nissen, Jayson M.; Stetzer, Mackenzie R.; Shemwell, Jonathan T.

2014-02-19

117

Non-auditory factors affecting urban soundscape evaluation.  

PubMed

The aim of this study is to characterize urban spaces, which combine landscape, acoustics, and lighting, and to investigate people's perceptions of urban soundscapes through quantitative and qualitative analyses. A general questionnaire survey and soundwalk were performed to investigate soundscape perception in urban spaces. Non-auditory factors (visual image, day lighting, and olfactory perceptions), as well as acoustic comfort, were selected as the main contexts that affect soundscape perception, and context preferences and overall impressions were evaluated using an 11-point numerical scale. For qualitative analysis, a semantic differential test was performed in the form of a social survey, and subjects were also asked to describe their impressions during a soundwalk. The results showed that urban soundscapes can be characterized by soundmarks, and soundscape perceptions are dominated by acoustic comfort, visual images, and day lighting, whereas reverberance in urban spaces does not yield consistent preference judgments. It is posited that the subjective evaluation of reverberance can be replaced by physical measurements. The categories extracted from the qualitative analysis revealed that spatial impressions such as openness and density emerged as some of the contexts of soundscape perception. PMID:22225033

Jeon, Jin Yong; Lee, Pyoung Jik; Hong, Joo Young; Cabrera, Densil

2011-12-01

118

Ranking factors affecting emissions of GHG from incubated agricultural soils.  

PubMed

Agriculture significantly contributes to global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and there is a need to develop effective mitigation strategies. The efficacy of methods to reduce GHG fluxes from agricultural soils can be affected by a range of interacting management and environmental factors. Uniquely, we used the Taguchi experimental design methodology to rank the relative importance of six factors known to affect the emission of GHG from soil: nitrate (NO3 (-)) addition, carbon quality (labile and non-labile C), soil temperature, water-filled pore space (WFPS) and extent of soil compaction. Grassland soil was incubated in jars where selected factors, considered at two or three amounts within the experimental range, were combined in an orthogonal array to determine the importance and interactions between factors with a L16 design, comprising 16 experimental units. Within this L16 design, 216 combinations of the full factorial experimental design were represented. Headspace nitrous oxide (N2O), methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations were measured and used to calculate fluxes. Results found for the relative influence of factors (WFPS and NO3 (-) addition were the main factors affecting N2O fluxes, whilst glucose, NO3 (-) and soil temperature were the main factors affecting CO2 and CH4 fluxes) were consistent with those already well documented. Interactions between factors were also studied and results showed that factors with little individual influence became more influential in combination. The proposed methodology offers new possibilities for GHG researchers to study interactions between influential factors and address the optimized sets of conditions to reduce GHG emissions in agro-ecosystems, while reducing the number of experimental units required compared with conventional experimental procedures that adjust one variable at a time. PMID:25177207

García-Marco, S; Ravella, S R; Chadwick, D; Vallejo, A; Gregory, A S; Cárdenas, L M

2014-07-01

119

Factors Affecting the Supply of Recent College Graduates in New England. Policy Brief 09-1  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This policy brief investigates factors affecting New England's supply of recent college graduates and how those factors have changed over time, and suggests steps that states might take to expand this source of skilled labor. (Contains 3 figures.) [This brief summarizes analysis in NEPPC research report 08-1: "The Future of the Skilled Labor Force…

Sasser, Alicia

2009-01-01

120

Cognitive characteristics of seasonal affective disorder: A preliminary investigation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Light therapy, the current treatment for Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), does not help everyone suffering from SAD. This paper examines whether patients with SAD potentially might benefit from cognitive behaviour therapy by investigating whether they show a similar cognitive profile to those with non-seasonal depression for whom cognitive therapy has been shown to be effective. Ten subjects with SAD were

Sally Hodges; Melanie Marks

1998-01-01

121

Developing Worksheet Based on Science Process Skills: Factors Affecting Solubility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to develop a worksheet about the factors affecting solubility, which could be useful for the prospective science teachers (PST) to remind and regain their science process skills (SPS). The pilot study of the WS was carried out with 32 first grade PST during the 2007-2008 academic year in the education department at…

Karsli, Fethiye; Sahin, Cigdem

2009-01-01

122

Factors Affecting Active Participation in Sport by the Working Class  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey consisting of 585 structured, personal interviews was undertaken in the Republic of Ireland. The survey population was comprised of individuals deemed to be of a particular sub-culture within Irish society — namely the work ing class. The purpose of the study was to ascertain the factors affecting active participation in sport by the interviewees. Of the total sample

Mike Sleap; Pat Duffy

1982-01-01

123

FACTORS AFFECTING SECONDARY KILL OF THE GERMAN COCKROACH (DICTYOPTERA  

E-print Network

153 FACTORS AFFECTING SECONDARY KILL OF THE GERMAN COCKROACH (DICTYOPTERA: BLATTELLIDAE) BY GEL of Forestry, Nanning, Guangxi 530022, China Abstract Secondary kill of the German cockroach, Blattella of four cockroach gel baits against various developmental stages of a laboratory (Jwax) and a field (Dorie

Wang, Changlu

124

Factors affecting the activation of pulps with laccase  

Microsoft Academic Search

Activation of fibres by radical formation is the first step when aiming at oxidative coupling of new functional groups on the fibre bound lignin. In this work, factors affecting the amount of phenoxy radicals created to unbleached TMP, CTMP, softwood kraft and hardwood kraft pulp fibres in the laccase catalysed oxidation were determined by EPR. Laccase was able to catalyse

A. Suurnäkki; T. Oksanen; M. Orlandi; L. Zoia; C. Canevali; L. Viikari

2010-01-01

125

Factors Affecting Teen Involvement in Pennsylvania 4-H Programming  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study reported here determined the factors that affect teen involvement in 4-H programming. The design of the study was descriptive and correlational in nature. Using a purposive sampling procedure, a survey questionnaire was distributed to all (N=214) 4-H members attending the 4-H State Leadership Conference. The major findings of the study…

Gill, Bart E.; Ewing, John C.; Bruce, Jacklyn A.

2010-01-01

126

Factors affecting the protein quality of pigeonpea ( Cajanus cajan L.)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pigeonpea occupies an important place in human nutrition as a source of dietary proteins in several countries. Some of the important factors that affect the protein quality of pigeonpea have been reviewed and summarised in this paper. Among important food legumes, pigeonpea contained the lowest amount of limiting sulphur amino acids, methionine and cystine implicating the importance of these amino

U. SINGtt; B. O. Eggum

1984-01-01

127

ILLINOIS -RAILROAD ENGINEERING A Quantitative Analysis of Factors Affecting  

E-print Network

Slide 1 ILLINOIS - RAILROAD ENGINEERING A Quantitative Analysis of Factors Affecting Broken Rails Darwin H. Schafer II & Christopher P.L. Barkan May 9th, 2008 The William W. Hay Railroad Engineering Seminar Series University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign #12;Slide 2 ILLINOIS - RAILROAD ENGINEERING

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

128

Students' Views on Factors Affecting Empathy in Medical Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Empathy is a prominent goal of medical education that is too often underachieved. Using concept mapping, the authors constructed a student-generated conceptual model of factors viewed as affecting empathy during medical education. Methods: During the 2005-2006 academic year, 293 medical students and interns answered a brainstorming…

Winseman, Jeffrey; Malik, Abid; Morison, Julie; Balkoski, Victoria

2009-01-01

129

Newly Diagnosed with High Blood Pressure? 3 Factors Affect Prognosis  

MedlinePLUS

... this page, please enable JavaScript. Newly Diagnosed With High Blood Pressure? 3 Factors Affect Prognosis Systolic reading of 150 ... February 5, 2015 Related MedlinePlus Pages Heart Attack High Blood Pressure Stroke THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Prompt ...

130

Factors Affecting Fatty Acid Composition in Forage and Milk  

E-print Network

Factors Affecting Fatty Acid Composition in Forage and Milk Katarina Arvidsson Faculty of Natural in Forage and Milk Abstract The aims of the studies underlying this thesis were to evaluate variations on the FA contents of the milk. Initially, samples of timothy (Phleum pratense L.) were subjected

131

Factors Affecting Performance in an Introductory Sociology Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines factors affecting students' performances in an Introductory Sociology course over five semesters. Employing simple and ordered logit regression models, the author explains final grades by focusing on individual demographic and educational characteristics that students bring into the classroom. The results show that a student's…

Kwenda, Maxwell

2011-01-01

132

Research on Factors Affecting Customer's Interactions with Online Bank  

Microsoft Academic Search

An increasing number of people are processing transactions online and the numbers are likely to increase rapidly in the near future. This research focuses on the major considerations interacting with online bank and systematically measures factors affecting customer's interactions with online bank services. The results showed that trusting beliefs had the strongest relationship for users' intention to process transaction online.

Guozheng Zhang; Faming Zhou; Xi Wang; Ya Zhang

2008-01-01

133

Exploring the Factors that Affect Reading Comprehension of EAP Learners  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As far as academic reading comprehension is concerned, a network of linguistic skills and strategies operate in a complex and integrated matter. Since it is impossible to examine all the factors affecting reading comprehension all at once, it is more reasonable to compare and contrast the predictive effects of specific variables against each other…

Nergis, Aysegul

2013-01-01

134

Propagation and Perception of Bioluminescence: Factors Affecting Counterillumination  

E-print Network

Propagation and Perception of Bioluminescence: Factors Affecting Counterillumination as a Cryptic be able to detect any mismatch between the spectrum of the bioluminescence and that of the background: coastal water at a depth of 5 m and oceanic water at 5, 210, and 800 m. The appearance

Johnsen, Sönke

135

Factors affecting infection of citrus with Xanthomonas axonopodis pv citri.  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Xanthomonas axonopodis pv citri (Xac) causes citrus canker and is now considered endemic in Florida. Factors affecting dispersal and infection of the bacteria need to be understood to help optimize disease management strategies. Wind (0-18 m/sec) was simulated outdoors using a fan to study infection...

136

Factors Affecting the Acceptability of Microforms as a Reading Medium.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on visits to representative microform users and an extensive survey of relevant literature, a study was undertaken to assess the relative importance of factors affecting the acceptability of microforms as reading mediums. The following variables were considered: (1) microform characteristics; (2) equipment design; (3) work station design;…

Spencer, Herbert; Reynolds, Linda

137

REVIEW PAPER Factors and processes affecting plant biodiversity  

E-print Network

REVIEW PAPER Factors and processes affecting plant biodiversity in permanent grasslands. A review delivered convincing findings on the effect of biodiversity on ecosystem functioning and humankind. Indeed evaluation of biodiversity benefits remains challenging. This issue is due to valuation methods, subjective

Boyer, Edmond

138

Factors Affecting the Relative Efficiency of General Acid Catalysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A simple framework for evaluating experimental kinetic data to provide support for Specific Acid Catalysis (SAC) and General Acid Catalysis (GAC) is described based on the factors affecting their relative efficiency. Observations reveal that increasing the SAC-to-GAC rate constant ratio reduces the effective pH range for GAC.

Kwan, Eugene E.

2005-01-01

139

Factors Affecting Recruitment into Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Training  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The authors studied the factors affecting the recruitment into child and adolescent psychiatry training in the United States. Methods: Medical students (n = 154) and general and child and adolescent psychiatry residents (n = 111) completed a questionnaire to evaluate career choice in child psychiatry (n = 265). Results: Compared with…

Shaw, Jon A.; Lewis, John E.; Katyal, Shalini

2010-01-01

140

Factors Affecting Stall Use for Different Freestall Bases  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to compare stall use (stall occupancy and cow position) by barn side for fac- tors affecting stall use. A closed circuit television sys- tem recorded stall use four times per day for a 9-mo period starting May 9, 2001. Six factors were analyzed: stall base, distance to water, stall location within stall basesection,stalllocationwithinbarn,insidebarntem- perature,

A. M. Wagner-Storch; R. W. Palmer; D. W. Kammel

2003-01-01

141

Factors affecting the online travel buying decision: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on theories affecting consumers' online purchase intention of travel products. It seeks to explore the literature on the theoretical foundation of factors influencing customers' online purchase intentions in general and in the travel industry specifically. It also suggests areas for further research on online travel buying decisions. Design\\/methodology\\/approach

Ivan Wen

2009-01-01

142

Factors Affecting Educational Innovation with in Class Electronic Response Systems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports the use of Rogers' diffusion of innovation perspective to understand the factors affecting educational innovation decisions, specifically in regard to in class electronic response systems. Despite decreasing costs and four decades of research showing strong student support, academic adoption is limited. Using data collected from…

Freeman, Mark; Bell, Amani; Comerton-Forde, Carole; Pickering, Joanne; Blayney, Paul

2007-01-01

143

Factors Affecting Environmental Knowledge and Attitudes among Lebanese College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This exploratory study aimed at assessing the variables that would positively affect the knowledge and attitude of a group of Lebanese college students regarding the environment, namely such factors as gender, age, previous hiking experience and living abroad. A purposeful sample of students attending the Lebanese American University, was asked to…

Oweini, Ahmad; Houri, Ahmad

2006-01-01

144

Research Article A Review of Environmental Factors Affecting Elk  

E-print Network

, these affect the harvesting costs and nutritional benefits of a given diet, among the potential diets defined by extrinsic factors. When using terms such as `diet' and `nutrition,' confusion can arise if it is not clear to the botanical composition of the forages selected; we use nutrition to refer to the nutrients of a given diet

Creel, Scott

145

Teaching the Factors Affecting Resistance Using Pencil Leads  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this paper is to provide a way of teaching the factors that affect resistance using mechanical pencil leads and the brightness of the light given out by a light bulb connected to an electrical circuit. The resistance of a conductor is directly proportional to its length (L) and inversely proportional to its cross-sectional area (A).…

Küçüközer, Asuman

2015-01-01

146

UNCORRECTED 2 Factors affecting land reconversion plans following a payment  

E-print Network

UNCORRECTED PROOF 1 2 Factors affecting land reconversion plans following a payment 3 for ecosystem a Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability, 1405 S. Harrison Road, Suite 115, Many Miles Building 2008 14 Received in revised form 5 March 2009 15 Accepted 8 March 2009 16 Available online xxxx 17

Lupi, Frank

147

Factors Affecting the Technology Readiness of Health Professionals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Federal government policies are promoting diffusion of technologies into the healthcare system. If health professionals reject the new technologies planned for the healthcare system, it could result in costly failures, delays, and workforce problems. There is a lack of knowledge about factors that affect technology readiness (TR), defined as the…

Myers, Stephanie E.

2010-01-01

148

ORIGINAL PAPER Factors affecting otter (Lutra lutra) abundance and breeding  

E-print Network

ORIGINAL PAPER Factors affecting otter (Lutra lutra) abundance and breeding success in freshwater online: 19 February 2011 # Springer-Verlag 2011 Abstract Otters are elusive semi-aquatic mammals tributaries of the Ebro River, with the aims to understand spatial and temporal changes in otter abundance

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

149

The Impact of CLIL on Affective Factors and Vocabulary Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this article is twofold: to assess the effectiveness of a CLIL (content and language integrated learning) module on affective factors (motivation and self-esteem), and to test the purported blurring effect of CLIL on gender differences in foreign language learning. Forty-six students in their fourth year of compulsory secondary…

Heras, Arantxa; Lasagabaster, David

2015-01-01

150

FACTORS AFFECTING SPECIES DISTRIBUTION PREDICTIONS: A SIMULATION MODELING EXPERIMENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

3 U.S. Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fort Collins, Colorado 80526 USA Abstract. Geospatial species sample data (e.g., records with location information from natural history museums or annual surveys) are rarely collected optimally, yet are increas- ingly used for decisions concerning our biological heritage. Using computer simulations, we examined factors that could affect the performance of autologistic regression (ALR)

Gordon C. Reese; Kenneth R. Wilson; Jennifer A. Hoeting; Curtis H. Flather

2005-01-01

151

Factors affecting butterfly use of filter strips in Midwestern USA  

E-print Network

Factors affecting butterfly use of filter strips in Midwestern USA Kathleen F. Reeder, Diane M between agricultural fields and streams. In 2002 and 2003, the butterfly community in filter strips butterfly abundance and diversity and measured vegetative variables in conjunction with each butterfly

Debinski, Diane M.

152

Arsenic in Drinking Water in Bangladesh: Factors Affecting Child Health  

PubMed Central

The focus of this paper is to present an empirical model of factors affecting child health by observing actions households take to avoid exposure to arsenic in drinking water. Millions of Bangladeshis face multiple health hazards from high levels of arsenic in drinking water. Safe water sources are either expensive or difficult to access, affecting people’s individuals’ time available for work and ultimately affecting the health of household members. Since children are particularly susceptible and live with parents who are primary decision makers for sustenance, parental actions linking child health outcomes is used in the empirical model. Empirical results suggest that child health is significantly affected by the age and gender of the household water procurer. Adults with a high degree of concern for children’s health risk from arsenic contamination, and who actively mitigate their arsenic contaminated water have a positive effect on child health. PMID:24982854

Aziz, Sonia N.; Aziz, Khwaja M. S.; Boyle, Kevin J.

2014-01-01

153

Factors Affecting Teachers' Student-Centered Classroom Computer Use  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study aims at investigating which factors are relevant to induce teachers' student-centered classroom computer use. Survey data were collected from 361 teachers at comprehensive schools. Based on a systemic view of technology use in schools, different individual teacher characteristics and school contextual factors were examined.…

Friedrich, Helmut Felix; Hron, Aemilian

2011-01-01

154

An Examination of Factors Affecting Mathematics Enrollment at Broward Community College, South Campus: Societal Factors Affecting Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Factors affecting mathematics enrollment at Broward Community College, South Campus (Florida) were examined. An analysis of demographic data reflects a huge population growth for the South Campus area. Increasing numbers of elderly, young professionals, Hispanics, and other minorities will move here primarily from the northeast and Dade County…

Martel, Henry J., Jr.; Mehallis, George

155

A Review of Affecting Factors on Sexual Satisfaction in Women  

PubMed Central

Background: Sex is a complex, important and sensitive issue in human being and interwoven with the whole of human existence. Given the serious changes in attitude, function and behavior in sex, the need to address sexual function, especially sexual satisfaction, is felt completely. Sexual satisfaction has a very important role in creating marital satisfaction and any defect in sexual satisfaction is significantly associated with risky sexual behaviors, serious mental illness, social crimes and ultimately divorce. Aim: The aim of this study was to explore affecting factors on sexual satisfaction in women based on an overview in scientific database. Methods: In this narrative review the researchers searched MEDLINE database, Google Scholar and Science Direct as well as Persian database like Scientific Information Database with search terms of sexual satisfaction and sexual function, restricted to English/ Persian language, during the 20 years ago. Then those articles written by renowned experts were selected. In this regard, 57 articles have been reviewed, which 30 articles related to this research have been extracted. Results: The findings were divided in to four categories including: Demographic factors, Pathophysiological factors, Psychological factors and Sociocultural factors. Conclusions: Sexuality, especially sexual intimacy is sophisticated and yet elegant affair that the other persons has different definitions and different functions. Discrepancies in the results of the studies show that analysis of factors affecting sexual satisfaction regardless of the women’s’ sociocultural context, religious beliefs, and personal attitudes is undoubtedly inefficient, unscientific and irrational.

Shahhosseini, Zohreh; Gardeshi, Zeinab Hamzeh; Pourasghar, Mehdi; Salehi, Fariba

2014-01-01

156

Factors affecting corticosteroid concentrations in yellow-bellied marmots.  

PubMed

1. Bound and total corticosteroid concentrations of yellow-bellied marmots (Marmota flaviventris) were lowest in May after emergence from hibernation and peaked in August prior to immergence. 2. Total corticosteroids were affected by age but not by sex or reproductive status. 3. There was no consistent relationship between measures of population density and concentrations of corticosteroids; when a significant relationship occurred, only 22-34% of the variation was explained. 4. Social status and social behavior were the major factors affecting corticosteroid concentrations. PMID:1673377

Armitage, K B

1991-01-01

157

Factors Affecting Zebra Mussel Kill by the Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens  

SciTech Connect

The specific purpose of this research project was to identify factors that affect zebra mussel kill by the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens. Test results obtained during this three-year project identified the following key variables as affecting mussel kill: treatment concentration, treatment duration, mussel siphoning activity, dissolved oxygen concentration, water temperature, and naturally suspended particle load. Using this latter information, the project culminated in a series of pipe tests which achieved high mussel kill inside power plants under once-through conditions using service water in artificial pipes.

Daniel P. Molloy

2004-02-24

158

Factors affecting the development of adverse drug reactions (Review article)  

PubMed Central

Objectives To discuss the effect of certain factors on the occurrence of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs). Data Sources A systematic review of the literature in the period between 1991 and 2012 was made based on PubMed, the Cochrane database of systematic reviews, EMBASE and IDIS. Key words used were: medication error, adverse drug reaction, iatrogenic disease factors, ambulatory care, primary health care, side effects and treatment hazards. Summary Many factors play a crucial role in the occurrence of ADRs, some of these are patient related, drug related or socially related factors. Age for instance has a very critical impact on the occurrence of ADRs, both very young and very old patients are more vulnerable to these reactions than other age groups. Alcohol intake also has a crucial impact on ADRs. Other factors are gender, race, pregnancy, breast feeding, kidney problems, liver function, drug dose and frequency and many other factors. The effect of these factors on ADRs is well documented in the medical literature. Taking these factors into consideration during medical evaluation enables medical practitioners to choose the best drug regimen. Conclusion Many factors affect the occurrence of ADRs. Some of these factors can be changed like smoking or alcohol intake others cannot be changed like age, presence of other diseases or genetic factors. Understanding the different effects of these factors on ADRs enables healthcare professionals to choose the most appropriate medication for that particular patient. It also helps the healthcare professionals to give the best advice to patients. Pharmacogenomics is the most recent science which emphasizes the genetic predisposition of ADRs. This innovative science provides a new perspective in dealing with the decision making process of drug selection. PMID:24648818

Alomar, Muaed Jamal

2013-01-01

159

Factors Affecting Students' Self-Efficacy in Higher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Researchers working in educational settings are increasingly paying attention to the role students' thoughts and beliefs play in the learning process. Self-efficacy, a key element of social cognitive theory, appears to be an important variable because it affects students' motivation and learning. This article investigates empirical literature…

van Dinther, Mart; Dochy, Filip; Segers, Mien

2011-01-01

160

Factors affecting water quality in the releases from hydropower reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Typical water quality concerns with releases from hydropower reservoirs include low dissolved oxygen, inappropriate temperature for downstream uses, supersaturation of total dissolved gases, and water quality constituents associated with low dissolved oxygen. Except for supersaturation of total dissolved gases, which is usually caused by by-passing turbines and spilling water, all of these concerns are related to the limnology of the upstream reservoir. Various limnological factors affect water quality, particularly dissolved oxygen (DO) in turbine releases. This paper describes three groups of reservoirs, thermal stratification characteristics for each group, DO effects for each group, the main factors that affect DO in TVA turbine releases, and other water quality constituents that are related to low DO.

Ruane, R.J.; Hauser, G.E. (Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga, TN (United States))

1990-01-01

161

Factors Affecting Perceptual Threshold in Argus II Retinal Prosthesis Subjects  

PubMed Central

Purpose The Argus II epiretinal prosthesis has been developed to provide partial restoration of vision to subjects blinded from outer retinal degenerative disease. Participants were surgically implanted with the system in the United States and Europe in a single arm, prospective, multicenter clinical trial. The purpose of this investigation was to determine which factors affect electrical thresholds in order to inform surgical placement of the device. Methods Electrode–retina and electrode–fovea distances were determined using SD-OCT and fundus photography, respectively. Perceptual threshold to electrical stimulation of electrodes was measured using custom developed software, in which current amplitude was varied until the threshold was found. Full field stimulus light threshold was measured using the Espion D-FST test. Relationships between electrical threshold and these three explanatory variables (electrode–retina distance, electrode–fovea distance, and monocular light threshold) were quantified using regression. Results Regression analysis showed a significant correlation between electrical threshold and electrode–retina distance (R2 = 0.50, P = 0.0002; n = 703 electrodes). 90.3% of electrodes in contact with the macula (n = 207) elicited percepts at charge densities less than 1 mC/cm2/phase. These threshold data also correlated well with ganglion cell density profile (P = 0.03). A weaker, but still significant, inverse correlation was found between light threshold and electrical threshold (R2 < 0.52, P = 0.01). Multivariate modeling indicated that electrode–retina distance and light threshold are highly predictive of electrode threshold (R2 = 0.87; P < 0.0005). Conclusions Taken together, these results suggest that while light threshold should be used to inform patient selection, macular contact of the array is paramount. Translational Relevance Reported Argus II clinical study results are in good agreement with prior in vitro and in vivo studies, and support the development of higher-density systems that employ smaller diameter electrodes. (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00407602) PMID:24049718

Ahuja, A. K.; Yeoh, J.; Dorn, J. D.; Caspi, A.; Wuyyuru, V.; McMahon, M. J.; Humayun, M. S.; Greenberg, R. J.; daCruz, L.

2013-01-01

162

Factors affecting the locus of control of the university students  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the research is to analyze and compare the factors affecting locus of control of the university students. It is found out that male students have more inner control than female students (t=4.890, p<.001). Students with high income level have more inner control than students with low and middle income level (F=5.171, p<.01). Students staying with their families

Nerguz Bulut Serin; O?uz Serin; F. Sülen ?ahin

2010-01-01

163

Factors Affecting Liquid-Metal Embrittlement in C-103  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results of a study of weld cracks on Space Shuttle control thrustors point toward better understanding of cracking problem in columbium metal, which has also plagued nonaerospace users. Although liquid-metal embrittlement is known to be cause of problem, factors affecting growth and severity of cracks are not well understood. New results tie crack growth to type of contaminants present, grain size and level of stress present while welding is done.

Mclemore, R.; Lampson, F. K.

1982-01-01

164

Factors Affecting Exhalation of Radon From a Gravelly Sandy Loam  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measurements of radon exhalation from a gravely sandy loam have been made in a semi-arid climate by using a combination of closed accumulation, flow-through accumulation, and 222Rn and 2Xøpb soil profiles. The meteorological factors that most affected the instantaneous value of exhalation of 222Rn were atmospheric pressure and rain. Effects due to other parameters such as wind or temperature were

S. D. Schery; D. H. Gaeddert; M. H. Wilkening

1984-01-01

165

Factors affecting sustainability of rural water schemes in Swaziland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Millennium Development Goal (MDG) target to reduce the proportion of people without sustainable access to safe drinking water by the year 2015 has been met as of 2010, but huge disparities exist. Some regions, particularly Sub-Saharan Africa are lagging behind it is also in this region where up to 30% of the rural schemes are not functional at any given time. There is need for more studies on factors affecting sustainability and necessary measures which when implemented will improve the sustainability of rural water schemes. The main objective of this study was to assess the main factors affecting the sustainability of rural water schemes in Swaziland using a Multi-Criteria Analysis Approach. The main factors considered were: financial, social, technical, environmental and institutional. The study was done in Lubombo region. Fifteen functional water schemes in 11 communities were studied. Data was collected using questionnaires, checklist and focused group discussion guide. A total of 174 heads of households were interviewed. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) was used to analyse the data and to calculate sustainability scores for water schemes. SPSS was also used to classify sustainability scores according to sustainability categories: sustainable, partially sustainable and non-sustainable. The averages of the ratings for the different sub-factors studied and the results on the sustainability scores for the sustainable, partially sustainable and non-sustainable schemes were then computed and compared to establish the main factors influencing sustainability of the water schemes. The results indicated technical and social factors as most critical while financial and institutional, although important, played a lesser role. Factors which contributed to the sustainability of water schemes were: functionality; design flow; water fetching time; ability to meet additional demand; use by population; equity; participation in decision making on operation and maintenance; existence of fund for operation and maintenance; willingness to contribute money; existence of a user’s committee; participation in the initial planning and design of the water scheme; and coordination between the local leaders and user’s committee. The main factors which made the schemes unsustainable were: long fetching time; non-involvement in decision making; lack of willingness to contribute funds; absence of users committee; and lack of cooperation between local leaders and the users committee. Water service providers should address the technical, social, financial and institutional factors identified affecting sustainability in their planning and implementation of rural water schemes.

Peter, Graciana; Nkambule, Sizwe E.

166

Factors Affecting Perceived Stigma in Leprosy Affected Persons in Western Nepal  

PubMed Central

Background There are various factors which construct the perception of stigma in both leprosy affected persons and unaffected persons. The main purpose of this study was to determine the level of perceived stigma and the risk factors contributing to it among leprosy affected person attending the Green Pastures Hospital, Pokhara municipality of western Nepal. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 135 people affected by leprosy at Green Pastures Hospital and Rehabilitation Centre. Persons above the age of 18 were interviewed using a set of questionnaire form and Explanatory Model Interview Catalogue (EMIC). In addition, two sets of focused group discussions each containing 10 participants from the ward were conducted with the objectives of answering the frequently affected EMIC items. Results Among 135 leprosy affected persons, the median score of perceived stigma was 10 while it ranged from 0–34. Higher perceived stigma score was found in illiterate persons (p?=?0.008), participants whose incomes were self-described as inadequate (p?=?0.014) and who had changed their occupation due to leprosy (p?=?0.018). Patients who lacked information on leprosy (p?=?0.025), knowledge about the causes (p?=?0.02) and transmission of leprosy (p?=?0.046) and those who had perception that leprosy is a severe disease (p<0.001) and is difficult to treat (p<0.001) had higher perceived stigma score. Participants with disfigurement or deformities (p?=?0.014), ulcers (p?=?0.022) and odorous ulcers (p?=?0.043) had higher perceived stigma score. Conclusion The factors associated with higher stigma were illiteracy, perceived economical inadequacy, change of occupation due to leprosy, lack of knowledge about leprosy, perception of leprosy as a severe disease and difficult to treat. Similarly, visible deformities and ulcers were associated with higher stigma. There is an urgent need of stigma reduction strategies focused on health education and health awareness programs in addition to the necessary rehabilitation support. PMID:24901307

Adhikari, Bipin; Kaehler, Nils; Chapman, Robert S.; Raut, Shristi; Roche, Paul

2014-01-01

167

Cardiovascular risk factor investigation: a pediatric issue  

PubMed Central

Objectives To correlate cardiovascular risk factors (e.g., hypertension, obesity, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperglycemia, sedentariness) in childhood and adolescence with the occurrence of cardiovascular disease. Sources A systematic review of books and selected articles from PubMed, SciELO and Cochrane from 1992 to 2012. Summary of findings Risk factors for atherosclerosis are present in childhood, although cardiovascular disease arises during adulthood. This article presents the main studies that describe the importance of investigating the risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in childhood and their associations. Significant rates of hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia, and sedentariness occur in children and adolescents. Blood pressure needs to be measured in childhood. An increase in arterial blood pressure in young people predicts hypertension in adulthood. The death rate from cardiovascular disease is lowest in children with lower cholesterol levels and in individuals who exercise regularly. In addition, there is a high prevalence of sedentariness in children and adolescents. Conclusions Studies involving the analysis of cardiovascular risk factors should always report the prevalence of these factors and their correlations during childhood because these factors are indispensable for identifying an at-risk population. The identification of risk factors in asymptomatic children could contribute to a decrease in cardiovascular disease, preventing such diseases as hypertension, obesity, and dyslipidemia from becoming the epidemics of this century. PMID:23515212

Rodrigues, Anabel N; Abreu, Glaucia R; Resende, Rogério S; Goncalves, Washington LS; Gouvea, Sonia Alves

2013-01-01

168

Factors affecting survival and recruitment of unionid mussels in small midwestern streams  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the present study was to investigate natural and anthropogenic factors affecting the survival and recruitment of unionid mussels in small midwestern streams. Unionid mussels have been undergoing a decline in many places, and it is thought that the juvenile is the most sensitive life stage. Because most studies have focused on larger rivers, the status of mussels

Melody Lynn Myers-Kinzie

1998-01-01

169

Factors affecting the efficiency of embryo transfer in the domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo)  

E-print Network

Factors affecting the efficiency of embryo transfer in the domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo 19 July 2005; accepted 30 October 2005 Abstract Embryo transfer (ET) to recipient females of transferred embryo were investigated. Unilateral and bilateral transfer of zygotes or blastocysts

Engelhardt, John F.

170

Factors Affecting Applications to Oxford and Cambridge--Repeat Survey. Executive Summary with Statistics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research follows up a study conducted in 1998 by the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER) to investigate teachers' and students' views on the factors affecting students' choices of whether or not to apply to Oxford and Cambridge universities. It identifies what has changed since 1998 and areas in which the universities could…

Ridley, Kate; White, Kerensa; Styles, Ben; Morrison, Jo

2005-01-01

171

Sociocultural and Motivational Factors Affecting Asian American Females Studying Physics and Engineering in High School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This quantitative study investigated whether and to what extent the motivational and sociocultural factors affect female Asian American high school physics students' achievement, their intended major in college, and their planned career goals at work fields. A survey of 62 questions, extracted from subscales of AAMAS,STPQ and PSE, were…

Sha, Saliha L.

2012-01-01

172

Risk-Taking among Adolescents: Associations with Social and Affective Factors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The research investigated the associations of social and affective factors with risk-taking in male and female adolescents. A sample of 269 Israeli adolescents completed questionnaires measuring frequency of involvement in risk-taking behaviours, relationships with parents, orientation towards peer group, depressive mood, and aggressive behaviour.…

Michael, Keren; Ben-Zur, Hasida

2007-01-01

173

Factors, Correlates, Problem Areas Affecting Career Decision Making of a Cross-Sectional Sample of Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was conducted to investigate the effects of the correlates and problem areas affecting career decision making and specifically to test the validity of the O'Neil, Meeker & Borgers' (1978) model. A cross-sectional sample of high school, undergraduate, and graduate students (N=1,436) responded to the Career Factor Checklist (CFC) and…

O'Neil, James M.; And Others

174

Who Should Mark What? A Study of Factors Affecting Marking Accuracy in a Biology Examination  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Accurate marking is crucial to the reliability and validity of public examinations, in England and internationally. Factors contributing to accuracy have been conceptualised as affecting either marking task demands or markers' personal expertise. The aim of this empirical study was to develop this conceptualisation through investigating the…

Suto, Irenka; Nadas, Rita; Bell, John

2011-01-01

175

Factors Affecting Accent Acquisition: The Case of Russian Immigrants in Israel  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A debate centers on whether the native accent is acquired early in life or whether it can be acquired at any time. This study investigated factors that may affect native accent acquisition in a second language. Participants in this study were 50 Russians who immigrated to Israel, 17 males and 33 females. Their age on arrival was 5 to 25 years.…

Abu-Rabia, Salim; Iliyan, Salman

2011-01-01

176

FACTORS AFFECTING THE FORMATION OF ORGANIC BY-PRODUCTS DURING WATER CHLORINATION  

E-print Network

FACTORS AFFECTING THE FORMATION OF ORGANIC BY-PRODUCTS DURING WATER CHLORINATION: A BENCH 2004) Abstract. The formation of chlorination by-products (CBPs) was investigated through bench-scale chlorination experiments with river water. The compounds selected for analysis belonged to the groups

Arhonditsis, George B.

177

Factors Affecting the Use of Prenatal Testing for Fetal Anomalities in a Traditional Society  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Bedouin Arabs of the southern part of Israel are a community at increased risk for genetic diseases and congenital anomalies as a result of frequent consanguineous marriages and underutilization of prenatal tests to detect fetal anomalies. Objective: To investigate factors affecting the use of prenatal tests to detect fetal anomalies in a traditional non-western minority who is offered modern

Dahlia Weitzman; Ilana Shoham-Vardi; Khalil Elbedour; Ilana Belmaker; Yafa Siton; Rivka Carmi

2000-01-01

178

Developmental and environmental factors affecting level of self-incompatibility response in Brassica rapa L  

Microsoft Academic Search

We performed artificial self-pollination throughout the period of sexual reproduction in six inbred lines of Brassica rapa, a plant with sporophytic self-incompatibility (SI). The level of SI changed between each pollination date in all lines,\\u000a suggesting the effects of both internal and external factors. To further investigate the potential factors affecting the changes\\u000a in the level of SI, multiple regression

Atsushi Horisaki; Satoshi Niikura

2008-01-01

179

Individual Differences: Factors Affecting Employee Utilization of Flexible Work Arrangements  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated individual and organizational factors that predict an individual's choice to use flexible work arrangements (FWAs). Survey data was collected from 144 employees in two different organizations. The results revealed several significant predictors of FWAs: tenure, hours worked per week, supervisory responsibilities,…

Lambert, Alysa D.; Marler, Janet H.; Gueutal, Hal G.

2008-01-01

180

Sociological Factors Affecting Agricultural Price Risk Management in Australia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The highly volatile auction system in Australia accounts for 85 percent of ex-farm wool sales, with the remainder sold by forward contract, futures, and other hedging methods. In this article, against the background of an extensive literature on price risk strategies, we investigate the behavioral factors associated with producers' adoption of…

Jackson, Elizabeth; Quaddus, Mohammed; Islam, Nazrul; Stanton, John

2009-01-01

181

Factors affecting the chemistry of precipitation and river water in an upland catchment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The chemistry of precipitation and river water was studied for one year in Glendye, a 41 km 2 moorland catchment in northeast Scotland. The precipitation was very dilute, weakly acidic, and highly variable in composition. River water was much less dilute, neutral, and less variable. Factor analysis was used to investigate the controls on water chemistry. This suggested three main processes affecting precipitation: aerosols of oceanic spray, which affected sodium, magnesium, chloride and total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations; emission of gaseous sulphur and nitrogen oxides from industrial processes and the burning of fossil fuels, which affected pH; wind-blown terrestrial dust. The factors affecting river water are quite different. The first factor represents cation-exchange and weathering reactions in the soil and affects calcium, magnesium, sodium, bicarbonate and silicon concentrations. The second factor affects the concentrations of iron, TOC, manganese and aluminium and represents the translocation of these elements down the soil profile and into the river at times of high discharge. The third factor affects the concentrations of ammonium and nitrate and reflects nitrogen demand and mineralisation in the soil. Phosphate, sulphate, potassium and chloride appear to vary independently, but all show low variability in river water compared with precipitation. The chemistry of river water from the catchment was also investigated during two storm events, and the results support the grouping of variables produced by factor analysis. The chemistry of the river water is thus controlled by processes in the soil, suggesting that nearly all the river water originates within the soil, and that direct surface runoff is of minor importance.

Reid, J. M.; MacLeod, D. A.; Cresser, M. S.

182

Factors affecting the prescribing patterns of antibiotics and injections.  

PubMed

There are serious problems concerning the inadequate prescription of antibiotics and overuse of injections in primary care. However, the determinants of prescription patterns in Korea are not well-documented. To examine the area characteristics affecting the prescription of antibiotics and injections in primary care practices in the treatment of respiratory tract infections (RTIs), a nationwide cross-sectional study was performed in all 250 administrative districts of Korea. The outcome was modeled as a binary variable: over-prescription or not compared with the nation-wide average. Over-prescription of antibiotics was associated with the ratio of specialists to general physicians and over-prescription in previous years in the area (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 4.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5-14.8; and aOR, 12.0; 95% CI 5.5-25.9, respectively). Over-use of injections was associated with younger population, urban living and the number of hospital beds in the area (aOR, 0.2; 95% CI 0.1-0.4; aOR, 0.3; 95% CI 0.1-0.8; and aOR, 0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.9; respectively). There were differences in the prescribing patterns in different districts; prescription patterns were affected more by supply factors than by demand factors. Highly competitive medical environment associated with supply factors is a significant determinant of prescription patterns in Korea. PMID:22323857

Choi, Kyung-Hyun; Park, Sang-Min; Lee, Ju-Hyun; Kwon, Soonman

2012-02-01

183

Recruitment and retention: factors that affect pericyte migration  

PubMed Central

Pericytes are critical for vascular morphogenesis and contribute to several pathologies, including cancer development and progression. The mechanisms governing pericyte migration and differentiation are complex and have not been fully established. Current literature suggests that platelet-derived growth factor/platelet-derived growth factor receptor-?, sphingosine 1-phosphate/endothelial differentiation gene-1, angiopoietin-1/tyrosine kinase with immunoglobulin-like and EGF-like domains 2, angiopoietin-2/tyros-ine kinase with immunoglobulin-like and EGF-like domains 2, transforming growth factor ?/activin receptor-like kinase 1, transforming growth factor ?/activin receptor-like kinase 5, Semaphorin-3A/Neuropilin, and matrix metalloproteinase activity regulate the recruitment of pericytes to nascent vessels. Interestingly, many of these pathways are directly affected by secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC). Here, we summarize the function of these factors in pericyte migration and discuss if and how SPARC might infuence these activities and thus provide an additional layer of control for the recruitment of vascular support cells. Additionally, the consequences of targeted inhibition of pericytes in tumors and the current understanding of pericyte recruitment in pathological environments are discussed. PMID:23912898

Aguilera, Kristina Y.

2013-01-01

184

Factors affecting quality of dried low-rank coals  

SciTech Connect

The chemical and physical properties of coal are strongly affected by the upgrading process employed. For high-moisture coals, upgrading involves thermal dehydration to improve the calorific value of the coal on mass basis. This study evaluates the feasibility of upgrading a low-rank/grade coal using the oven drying method. The objective of this research work is to study the drying characteristics of low-rank coals and to understand the factors affecting the quality of dried low-rank coals. This article describes laboratory experiments conducted on the characterization of the low-rank coals before and after the drying process. The results on drying kinetics, re-absorption of coal samples, and proximate analysis of coal samples before and after drying are discussed. It was found that the upgrading process produced coal with better heating value and combustion characteristics than those of the raw coal samples.

Karthikeyan, M.; Kuma, J.V.M.; Hoe, C.S.; Ngo, D.L.Y. [National University of Singapore, (Singapore)

2007-07-01

185

Environmental and genetic factors affecting cow survival of Israeli Holsteins.  

PubMed

The objectives were to investigate the effects of various environmental factors that may affect herd-life of Israeli Holsteins, including first-calving age and season, calving ease, number of progeny born, and service sire for first calving in complete and truncated records; and to estimate heritabilities and genetic correlations between herd-life and the other traits included in the Israeli breeding index. The basic data set consisted of 590,869 cows in milk recording herds with first freshening day between 1985 and at least 8 yr before the cut-off date of September 15, 2013. Herd-life was measured as days from first calving to culling. The phenotypic and genetic trends for herd-life were 5.7 and 16.8d/yr. The genetic trend was almost linear, whereas the phenotypic trend showed 4 peaks and 3 valleys. Cows born in February and March had the shortest herd-life, whereas cows born in September had the longest herd-life. Herd-life was maximal with calving age of 23mo, which is 1mo less than the mean calving age, and minimal at 19 and 31mo of calving age. Dystocia and twinning on first-parity calving reduced herd-life by approximately180 and 120d, but the interaction effect increased herd-life by 140d. Heritability for herd-life was 0.14. Despite the fact that the service sire effect was significant in the fixed model analysis, service sire effect accounted for <0.05% of the total variance. In the analysis of 1,431,938 truncated records, the effects of dystocia and twinning rate were very similar but less than 50% of the effects found in the analysis of complete records. Pregnancy at the truncation date increased expected herd-life by 432d. The correlation between actual herd-life and predicted herd-life based on truncated records was 0.44. Genetic correlations between the truncated records and actual herd-life were 0.75 for records truncated after 6mo but approached unity for records truncated after 3 yr. The genetic correlations of herd-life with first-parity milk, fat, and protein production, somatic cell score (SCS), and female fertility were all positive, except for SCS, in which negative values are economically favorable. The highest correlations with herd-life in absolute value were with female fertility and SCS. PMID:25468704

Weller, J I; Ezra, E

2015-01-01

186

Teaching the Factors Affecting Resistance Using Pencil Leads  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this paper is to provide a way of teaching the factors that affect resistance using mechanical pencil leads and the brightness of the light given out by a light bulb connected to an electrical circuit. The resistance of a conductor is directly proportional to its length (L) and inversely proportional to its cross-sectional area (A). Additionally, the resistance depends on the type of conductor. Resistance R can be thus be expressed as R = ?L/A, where ? is the resistivity of the conductor.

Küçüközer, Asuman

2015-01-01

187

Factors Affecting the Sensitivity of Permafrost to Climate Change  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Permafrost aggradation and degradation are affected by numerous geomorphological and ecological properties of the landscape that confound our ability to accurately predict the response of permafrost to climate change. Permafrost can persist at mean annual air temperatures (MAAT) of +2 °C and can degrade at MAAT of -15 °C with the help of surface water. Permafrost is decoupled from the atmosphere by the active layer, thus, its thermal regime is mediated by numerous factors such as topography, soil texture, organic-matter accumulation, vegetation, snow, surface water, groundwater movement, and disturbance. Topography affects the amount of solar radiation to the soil surface, causing permafrost in the discontinuous zone to occur generally on north-facing slopes that receive less direct radiation and on flat, low- lying areas where vegetation and organic soils have a greater insulating effect and where air temperatures tend to be colder during winter inversions. Soil texture affects soil moisture and thermal properties. For instance, gravelly soils tend to be well-drained with little difference between thermal conductivities when frozen or thawed. In contrast, surface organic soils, as well as clayey and silty soils, in lowland areas tend to be poorly drained and have much higher thermal conductivities when frozen in winter than unfrozen in summer. In well- drained upland sites, however, organic soils typically are well below saturation. Differences in frozen and unfrozen thermal conductivities lead to more rapid heat loss in winter, depending on snow, and slower heat penetration in summer. Vegetation has important effects through interception of solar radiation, growth of mosses, accumulation of organic matter, and interception of snow by trees and shrubs. Snow protects soil from cooling in winter. Thus, the seasonality (e.g., timing of snowfall in early winter) and depth of snow are very important. Surface water provides an important positive feedback that enhances degradation when water is impounded in sinking depressions. Thus, the amount of ground ice and potential thaw settlement greatly affects permafrost sensitivity. Water bodies (lakes, ponds, rivers) have a warming effect on permafrost and often create thawing zones for which their geometry is defined by water depth, sediment texture, and climate. Convective heat transfer associated with groundwater movement can create an unfrozen zone on top or within permafrost. Surface and groundwater flow, and surface impoundment, in turn are affected by topography and soil texture. Because permafrost is greatly affected by these ecological components, permafrost properties evolve along with the successional patterns of ecosystem development, which in turn affects the sensitivity of permafrost to degradation. We explore the relative effects of these factors through modeling and comparison of field measurements. Because there is no single model available that can include all these disparate factors, we evaluate factors separately and use differences in mean annual ground temperatures at the surface and at 2-m depth to compare the magnitude of each effect.

Jorgenson, T.; Romanovsky, V.; Harden, J.; Shur, Y.; Hinzman, L.; Marchenko, S.; Bolton, R.; O'Donnell, J.

2009-05-01

188

The Factors that Affect Science Teachers' Participation in Professional Development  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scientific literacy for our students and the possibilities for careers available in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) areas are important topics for economic growth as well as global competitiveness. The achievement of students in science learning is dependent upon the science teachers' effectiveness and experienced science teachers depend upon relevant professional development experiences to support their learning. In order to understand how to improve student learning in science, the learning of science teachers must also be understood. Previous research studies on teacher professional development have been conducted in other states, but Minnesota science teachers comprised a new and different population from those previously studied. The purpose of this two-phase mixed methods study was to identify the current types of professional development in which experienced, Minnesota secondary science teachers participated and the factors that affect their participation in professional development activities. The mixed-methods approach s utilized an initial online survey followed by qualitative interviews with five survey respondents. The results of the quantitative survey and the qualitative interviews indicated the quality of professional development experiences and the factors which affected the science teachers' participation in professional development activities. The supporting and inhibiting factors involved the availability of resources such as time and money, external relationships with school administrators, teacher colleagues, and family members, and personal intrinsic attributes such as desires to learn and help students. This study also describes implications for science teachers, school administrators, policymakers, and professional development providers. Recommendations for future research include the following areas: relationships between and among intrinsic and extrinsic factors, science-related professional development activities within local school districts, the use of formal and informal professional development, and the needs of rural science teachers compared to urban and suburban teachers.

Roux, Judi Ann

189

A review of factors affecting vaccine preventable disease in Japan.  

PubMed

Japan is well known as a country with a strong health record. However its incidence rates of vaccine preventable diseases (VPD) such as hepatitis B, measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella remain higher than other developed countries. This article reviews the factors that contribute to the high rates of VPD in Japan. These include historical and political factors that delayed the introduction of several important vaccines until recently. Access has also been affected by vaccines being divided into government-funded "routine" (eg, polio, pertussis) and self-pay "voluntary" groups (eg, hepatitis A and B). Routine vaccines have higher rates of administration than voluntary vaccines. Administration factors include differences in well child care schedules, the approach to simultaneous vaccination, vaccination contraindication due to fever, and vaccination spacing. Parental factors include low intention to fully vaccinate their children and misperceptions about side effects and efficacy. There are also provider knowledge gaps regarding indications, adverse effects, interval, and simultaneous vaccination. These multifactorial issues combine to produce lower population immunization rates and a higher incidence of VPD than other developed countries. This article will provide insight into the current situation of Japanese vaccinations, the issues to be addressed and suggestions for public health promotion. PMID:25628969

Kuwabara, Norimitsu; Ching, Michael Sl

2014-12-01

190

A Review of Factors Affecting Vaccine Preventable Disease in Japan  

PubMed Central

Japan is well known as a country with a strong health record. However its incidence rates of vaccine preventable diseases (VPD) such as hepatitis B, measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella remain higher than other developed countries. This article reviews the factors that contribute to the high rates of VPD in Japan. These include historical and political factors that delayed the introduction of several important vaccines until recently. Access has also been affected by vaccines being divided into government-funded “routine” (eg, polio, pertussis) and self-pay “voluntary” groups (eg, hepatitis A and B). Routine vaccines have higher rates of administration than voluntary vaccines. Administration factors include differences in well child care schedules, the approach to simultaneous vaccination, vaccination contraindication due to fever, and vaccination spacing. Parental factors include low intention to fully vaccinate their children and misperceptions about side effects and efficacy. There are also provider knowledge gaps regarding indications, adverse effects, interval, and simultaneous vaccination. These multifactorial issues combine to produce lower population immunization rates and a higher incidence of VPD than other developed countries. This article will provide insight into the current situation of Japanese vaccinations, the issues to be addressed and suggestions for public health promotion.

Ching, Michael SL

2014-01-01

191

Factors affecting sequestration and bioavailability of phenanthrene in soils  

SciTech Connect

A study was conducted to determine factors affecting the sequestration and changes in bioavailability as phenanthrene persists in soils. Phenanthrene became sequestered in seven soils differing appreciably in organic matter and clay content as measured by earthworm uptake, bacterial mineralization, or extractability. Phenanthrene also became sequestered as it aged in soil aggregates of various sizes as measured by decline in availability to a bacterium, a mild extractant, or both. Wetting and drying a soil during aging reduced the amount of phenanthrene recovered by a mild extractant and the rate and extent of bacterial mineralization of the hydrocarbon. After biodegradation of phenanthrene added to the soil, more of the compound remained if it had been aged than if it had not been aged. Wetting and drying the soil during aging further increased the amount of phenanthrene remaining after biodegradation. The rate and extent of bacterial mineralization of phenanthrene were less in leached than in unleached soil. Aging/sequestration is thus markedly affected by soil properties and environmental factors.

White, J.C.; Kelsey, J.W.; Hatzinger, P.B.; Alexander, M. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

1997-10-01

192

Factors Affecting the Toxicity of Methylmercury Injected into Eggs  

Microsoft Academic Search

We developed a standardized protocol for comparing the sensitivities of the embryos of different bird species to methylmercury\\u000a when methylmercury was injected into their eggs. During the course of developing this protocol, we investigated the effects\\u000a of various factors on the toxicity of the injected methylmercury. Most of our experiments were done with chicken (Gallus domesticus), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), and

G. H. Heinz; D. J. Hoffman; S. L. Kondrad; C. A. Erwin

2006-01-01

193

What Are Some Factors That Affect Seasonal Patterns?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The purpose of this resource is to have students use GLOBE data and graphing tools to compare the influence of latitude, elevation, and geography on seasonal patterns. Students analyze the graph of the past year's maximum and minimum temperatures at their site. They compare this graph to similar graphs for two other sites and list which factors that might cause the patterns to be different and investigate one in depth.

The GLOBE Program, University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR)

2003-08-01

194

Factors Affecting Hypocalcaemia Following Total Thyroidectomy: A Prospective Study  

PubMed Central

Objective: After thyroidectomy hypocalcaemia is the most significant complication for clinicians. In this study, we investigated the factors associated with development of hypocalcaemia after thyroidectomy. Materials and Methods: We investigated the patients prospectively for age, gender, preoperative diagnosis, hormonal status, operative time, operating surgeon, existence of parathyroid gland injury at the operation, parathyroid gland auto-transplantation, preoperative use of anti-thyroid drugs and amount of bleeding at the operation. After operation in 1 and 2 days, serum calcium and phosphor, and in the 1 day parathyroid hormone values were evaluated. The chi-square test was applied in the analysis of categorical variables. Logistic regression model was used to determine the risk of hypocalcaemia in the univariate analysis. Results: Hypocalcaemia developed in 47 of 196 patients. Female gender, preoperative diagnosis of thyroid cancer and toxic nodular goitre, <3cm nodule size, parathyroid injury and auto-transplantation and low vitamin D levels were factors found to be associated with hypocalcaemia in the Logistic regression analysis. Conclusion: The factors associated with hypocalcaemia were defined to be “gender, preoperative diagnosis, parathyroid gland injury, nodule size and vitamin D deficiency”, it is a multifactorial problem and it would not be proper to define a few etiological factors. PMID:25610288

Ozogul, Bunyami; Akcay, Mufide Nuran; Akcay, Gungor; Bulut, Ozgur Hakan

2014-01-01

195

Study of factors affecting the appearance of colors under microscopes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The variation of colors in microscopy systems can be quite critical for some users. To address this problem, a study is conducted to analyze how different factors such as size of the sample, intensity of the microscope's light source and the characteristics of the material like chroma and saturation can affect the color appearance through the eyepiece of the microscope. To study the changes in colors considering these factors, the spectral reflectance of 24 colors of GretagMacbeth Classic ColorChecker® and Mini ColorChecker® which are placed under a Nikon ECLIPSE MA200 microscope®2 using dark filed and bright field illuminations which result in different intensity levels, is measured using a spectroradiometer®3 which was placed in front of the eyepiece of the microscope. The results are compared with the original data from N. Ohta1. The evaluation is done by observing the shift in colors in the CIE 1931 Chromaticity Diagram and the CIELAB space, also by applying a wide set of color-difference formulas, namely: CIELAB, CMC, BFD, CIE94, CIEDE2000, DIN99d and DIN99b. Furthermore, to emphasize on the color regions in which the highest difference is observed, the authors have obtained the results from another microscope; Olympus SZX10®4, which in this case the measurement is done by mounting the spectroradiometer to the camera port of the microscope. The experiment leads to some interesting results, among which is the consistency in the highest difference observed considering different factors or how the change in saturation of the samples of the same hue can affect the results.

Zakizadeh, Roshanak; Martinez-Garcia, Juan; Raja, Kiran B.; Siakidis, Christos

2013-11-01

196

Environmental Factors Affecting Indole Production in Escherichia coli  

PubMed Central

A variety of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria produce large quantities of indole as an intracellular signal in microbial communities. Biosynthesis of indole is well-studied, and while carbon sources and amino acids are important environmental cues for indole production in Escherichia coli, other environmental factors affecting indole production for this strain are less clear. This study demonstrates that the environmental cue pH is an important factor for indole production that further controls biofilm formation of E. coli. Moreover, E. coli produced a higher level of extracellular indole in the presence of the antibiotics ampicillin and kanamycin, and the increased indole enhanced cell survival during antibiotic stress. Additionally, we found here that temperature is another important factor for indole production; E. coli produces and accumulates a large amount of indole at 50°C, even at low cell densities. Overall, our results suggest that indole is a stable biological compound, and E. coli may utilize indole to protect itself against other microorganisms. PMID:21145393

Han, Thi Hiep; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Cho, Moo Hwan; Wood, Thomas K.; Lee, Jintae

2011-01-01

197

Structural investigation of tumor differentiation factor.  

PubMed

Tumor differentiation factor (TDF) is a 17 kDa protein produced by the pituitary and secreted into the bloodstream, with no definitive function and incomplete characterization. TDF has the following four cysteine (Cys) residues: Cys17, Cys70, Cys97, and Cys98. To understand the function of TDF, we (1) overexpressed and characterized recombinant TDF (rTDF); (2) investigated native, secreted TDF; and (3) assessed potential disulfide connectivities using molecular modeling. Our results from Western blotting (WB) experiments suggest that rTDF is mostly expressed as insoluble, monomeric, and dimeric forms. Mass spectrometry analysis of the overexpressed rTDF identified a peptide that is a part of TDF protein. WB of the native, secreted TDF detected it as a 50 kDa band. In addition, investigation of TDF by molecular modeling suggests that the Cys residues may form disulfide bridges between Cys17-Cys98 and Cys70-Cys17. PMID:23586953

Roy, Urmi; Sokolowska, Izabela; Woods, Alisa G; Darie, Costel C

2012-01-01

198

Factors affecting the measurement of fatigue crack stress intensity factors using photoelastic coatings  

SciTech Connect

Photoelastic procedures to determine the stress intensity factors at the tip of a fatigue crack during dynamic and cyclic loading are described. To illustrate the techniques, tests were performed on a centered-cracked tensile panel under cyclic load. The measured SIFs were found to agree to within about 5% of an elastic solution. Finally, factors affecting the application of the procedures to more complex structures are considered.

Nurse, A.D. [Loughborough Univ. of Technology (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Patterson, E.A. [Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mechanical and Process Engineering

1995-12-31

199

Stereological investigation of the posterior hippocampus in affective disorders.  

PubMed

Hippocampus volumes have been shown to be decreased in patients with major depression, but volume measurements are inconsistent in patients with bipolar disorder. Both disorders are associated with deficits in hippocampus-mediated cognitive functions. However, the underlying pathophysiology is widely unknown. In this post-mortem study, we used design-based stereology on Nissl-stained serial sections to investigate the number of neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes in substructures of the posterior hippocampus in eight patients with major depression, eight patients with bipolar disorder and ten control patients without a neuropsychiatric disorder. Compared to controls, patients with bipolar disorder had significantly more neurons in the cornu ammonis subfield 1 (CA1) and the subiculum, while the number of oligodendrocytes was higher only in CA1. In patients with major depression, the density of oligodendrocytes was higher in CA2/3, CA4 and the subiculum. The dose of antidepressants correlated with the density and number of oligodendrocytes in CA2/3, indicating that antidepressants may affect our results. Treatment with neuroleptics expressed in chlorpromazine equivalents and benzodiazepines expressed in diazepam equivalents correlated negatively with the number of oligodendrocytes in CA2/3 and CA4, respectively, suggesting that treatment with these drugs do not influence cell number. We did not detect alterations in either volumes of substructures or numbers of astrocytes. Increased cell numbers argue for a denser packing of neurons and oligodendrocytes as a result of a decreased neuropils. This neuropathological process may be based on neurodevelopmental disturbances and may contribute to altered microconnectivity and cognitive deficits in affective disorders. PMID:25307869

Malchow, Berend; Strocka, Steffen; Frank, Friederike; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Steiner, Johann; Schneider-Axmann, Thomas; Hasan, Alkomiet; Reich-Erkelenz, Daniela; Schmitz, Christoph; Bogerts, Bernhard; Falkai, Peter; Schmitt, Andrea

2014-10-12

200

Multilevel Factors Affecting Quality: Examples From the Cancer Care Continuum  

PubMed Central

The complex environmental context must be considered as we move forward to improve cancer care and, ultimately, patient and population outcomes. The cancer care continuum represents several care types, each of which includes multiple technical and communication steps and interfaces among patients, providers, and organizations. We use two case scenarios to 1) illustrate the variability, diversity, and interaction of factors from multiple levels that affect care quality and 2) discuss research implications and provide hypothetical examples of multilevel interventions. Each scenario includes a targeted literature review to illustrate contextual influences upon care and sets the stage for theory-informed interventions. The screening case highlights access issues in older women, and the survivorship case illustrates the multiple transition challenges faced by patients, families, and organizations. Example interventions show the potential gains of implementing intervention strategies that work synergistically at multiple levels. While research examining multilevel intervention is a priority, it presents numerous study design, measurement, and analytic challenges. PMID:22623591

Taplin, Stephen H.; Ganz, Patricia; Grunfeld, Eva; Sterba, Katherine

2012-01-01

201

[Early mother-infant interaction and factors negatively affecting parenting].  

PubMed

The social information-processing model contributes to identifying the psychological processes underlying the construct "sensitivity" in early mother-child interaction. Negative emotional states associated with inadequate self-regulation in coping with stressors affect the mother's attention skills and the processing of the baby's signals. This leads to less synchronous parental practices, particularly unsatisfactory when the baby is unhappy, or crying because the required self-regulation is not provided. This micro-social research studies the sequential profile of maternal reactions to the baby's positive/neutral vs. difficult behaviours and compares them in two groups of dyads, one with mothers who reported high levels of distress and other negative factors for parenting and another group with low levels. The unfavourable circumstances of the high stress group and their negative effects on interaction were observed in some indiscriminate maternal responses and particularly as they reacted to their baby's difficult behaviour, when the mother's regulatory role is more necessary. PMID:17296085

Cerezo, María Angeles; Trenado, Rosa María; Pons-Salvador, Gemma

2006-08-01

202

Factors affecting use of industrial onsite gas storage  

SciTech Connect

Retention of the industrial market is critical to the growth of the gas industry, and competitive costs and supply reliability are the keys. Many industrial gas consumers use onsite gas storage or standby fuel storage to assure low cost and good reliability. The technological, economic and institutional factors that will affect the use of onsite storage for gas are examined. The natural gas storage methods that are now used, and new methods that may find use, are evaluated. The industrial gas consumers' requirements for onsite gas storage are defined, and the research needed to meet these requirements is identified. The R and D program of the Gas Research Institute is reviewed. 12 references, 10 figures.

Joyce, T.J.; Biederman, N.P.; Shikari, Y.A.

1986-01-01

203

Factors Affecting on Serum Lactate After Cardiac Surgery  

PubMed Central

Background: The relation between elevated blood lactate level and mortality and morbidity rates after coronary bypass surgery is a proven subject. One of the factors that seems to affect directly the blood lactate level is the storage duration of packed red blood cells. Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of storage duration of transfused blood on serum lactate during cardiac surgery and up to 24 hours after that in the ICU. Patients and Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 228 patients referred to three hospitals of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences for open cardiac surgery, was enrolled using systematic random sampling method. Immediately after accessing arterial line, the first sample of arterial blood gas (ABG) was obtained. For evaluation of lactate levels, the next samples were obtained at the end of surgery and after 24 hours of staying ICU. Results: Among 5 factors which affected lactate level during surgery, diabetes and higher ejection fraction (EF) reduced changes of the lactate level. On the other hand, the number of infused blood units, duration of on-pump time, and the mean storage duration of blood units were associated with elevated serum lactate during surgery. A significant relationship was found between blood storage duration and serum lactate levels 24 hours after surgery. Conclusions: Comparing the serum lactate level before operation and 24 hours after the operation showed that the number of received blood units had a significant effect on serum lactate. We found no significant effect for blood storage duration; however, the number of given blood units was more significant.

Joudi, Marjan; Fathi, Mehdi; Soltani, Ghasem; Izanloo, Azra

2014-01-01

204

Factors affecting the adsorption of trichloroethylene onto activated carbons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work, an experimental study aimed at the assessment of the factors affecting the adsorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) from water solutions onto activated carbons is presented. The influence of sorbent properties, such as B.E.T. surface area, micropore volume, chemical composition and acid/basic surface functional groups on TCE adsorption capacity is experimentally assessed by testing a set of 12 sorbents. Moreover, the effect of the presence of other species in solution, such as sodium acetate and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), is studied through parametric TCE adsorption isotherms realization. The experimental results show that the TCE adsorption capacity is promoted by a high B.E.T. surface area, micropore volume and C content and it is significantly affected by the presence of a non-ionic compound of similar structure (PCE), however it does not depend on the presence of an organic salt (sodium acetate). These results confirm that neither TCE-carbon ionic interaction nor sorbent ionization phenomena are involved in the TCE adsorption, since its mechanism is based on dispersion forces (London-Van Der Walls interaction). A thorough analysis of the experimental data set suggests that, in consideration of the TCE adsorption mechanism, the maximization of basal plane extent (as the B.E.T. surface area) and its effective fraction (as the C content) is a valid criterion to select or synthesize a new suitable sorbent for TCE adsorption from waters.

Erto, A.; Andreozzi, R.; Lancia, A.; Musmarra, D.

2010-06-01

205

Factors affecting the valve movements in freshwater unionids  

SciTech Connect

In order to avoid harmful conditions, freshwater unionids are able to close their valves and to resist extended long periods of complete anoxia. Xenobiotics and diverse abiotic and biotic factors can change the rhythm of valve movements and thus affect the accumulation of heavy metals in these bivalves. When bivalves are used a bioindicators in the field and when the accumulation of toxicants are studied under the laboratory conditions, the effects of valve movements and shell closure have to be involved. In this study, the authors have recorded valve movements of two different unionid species (Anodonta anatina, Unio tumidus) in the field and in the laboratory using a digital monitoring system. Several experimental arrangements were compared (caged mussels vs. sediment dwelling mussels, flow-through vials vs. static aquaria with and without sediment). Some parameters of the mussel hemolymph, such as electrolytes, gases and acid base status, were compared with the results on the valve activity (time with valves open, number of adductions). The natural valve activity of the two unionid species differed clearly. In the field, effects of transfer and caging were found, and in the laboratory, sediment and water flow changed their behavior. The level of the blood oxygen was most affected, whereas, the acid-base status and the concentrations of electrolytes were effectively regulated by the unionids. The correlation between valve movements and the hemolymph parameters was weaker than expected.

Pynnoenen, K.S.; Englund, V.P.M. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)

1994-12-31

206

Institutional factors affecting DOE waste management and environmental restoration planning  

SciTech Connect

The magnitude and impact of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) waste management and environmental restoration program requires a drastic change in DOE's culture to include the participation of all levels of government, public forum representatives, and the public. Early in the process of developing a new, comprehensive five-year plan for environmental restoration and waste management, Secretary Watkins invited affected States, Indian Nations, and organizations of elected officials to form the State and Tribal Government Working Group to comment on two formulative drafts of the plan. Management Systems Laboratories of Virginia Tech was asked to help plan and facilitate two review sessions in the spring and summer of 1989, based on perception of impartiality, experience with similar groups, and active affiliations with State governments. A third session in the fall was devoted to reviewing the draft applied R D plan and guiding institutional factors affecting DOE's future: the need for ongoing, pervasive culture change; the need to display this change through truly cooperative planning; and the need to involve the regulatory community in the process of technology development so innovative solutions can be applied with the least possible delay.

Walker, J. A.; Middleman, L. I.

1990-01-01

207

Major factors affecting severity of obstructive sleep apnea.  

PubMed

Computed tomography (CT) has become a common method for evaluating obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The aim of this study was to analyze the relationships between CT parameters and clinical parameters in OSA patients to determine major factors affecting the severity of OSA. The records of 128 consecutive snoring patients (98 males, 30 females) diagnosed with OSA were retrospectively reviewed. Polysomnography was performed for each patient. On CT scans, airway areas were measured at the level of the hard palate, the soft palate, and the base of the tongue. Polysomnographic parameters were compared by gender and age using the Mann-Whitney U test. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to analyze relationships between variables and the AHI in each age group. The women were significantly older than the men (p < 0.01). The AHI and apnea index were significantly higher in men than in women. Stage 1 sleep and rapid eye movement sleep were more frequent in men than in women. The area at the base of the tongue was significantly smaller in women than in men (p = 0.027). In the 50-60 age group, the AHI was significantly higher in men (41.47 ± 19.67) than in women (17.14 ± 15.63) (p = 0.001). OSA severity varies with age, gender, and upper airway area. The OSA prognosis could be improved by evaluating the major factors and treating OSA patients according to epidemiological characteristics and anatomical structures. PMID:25621265

Kim, Sung Won; Kim, Boo-Young; Han, Jung Ju; Hwang, Jae Hyung; Jung, Kihwan; Kim, Min; Kim, Soo Whan

2015-03-01

208

Factors affecting colony size, reproductive success, and foraging patterns of double-crested cormorants nesting on East Sand Island in the Columbia River Estuary.  

E-print Network

??The purpose of this study was to investigate the primary factors affecting colony size, reproductive success, and foraging patterns of Double-crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus albociliatus)… (more)

Anderson, Cynthia D.

2002-01-01

209

Factors affecting outdoor exposure in winter: population-based study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The extent of outdoor exposure during winter and factors affecting it were examined in a cross-sectional population study in Finland. Men and women aged 25-74 years from the National FINRISK 2002 sub-study ( n=6,591) were queried about their average weekly occupational, leisure-time and total cold exposure during the past winter. The effects of gender, age, area of residence, occupation, ambient temperature, self-rated health, physical activity and education on cold exposure were analysed. The self-reported median total cold exposure time was 7 h/week (8 h men, 6 h women),<1 h/week (2 h men, 0 h women) at work, 4 h/week (5 h men, 4 h women) during leisure time and 1 h/week (1 h men, 1.5 h women) while commuting to work. Factors associated with increased occupational cold exposure among men were: being employed in agriculture, forestry and industry/mining/construction or related occupations, being less educated and being aged 55-64 years. Factors associated with increased leisure-time cold exposure among men were: employment in industry/mining/construction or related occupations, being a pensioner or unemployed, reporting at least average health, being physically active and having college or vocational education. Among women, being a housewife, pensioner or unemployed and engaged in physical activity increased leisure-time cold exposure, and young women were more exposed than older ones. Self-rated health was positively associated with leisure time cold exposure in men and only to a minor extent in women. In conclusion, the subjects reported spending 4% of their total time under cold exposure, most of it (71%) during leisure time. Both occupational and leisure-time cold exposure is greater among men than women.

Mäkinen, Tiina M.; Raatikka, Veli-Pekka; Rytkönen, Mika; Jokelainen, Jari; Rintamäki, Hannu; Ruuhela, Reija; Näyhä, Simo; Hassi, Juhani

2006-09-01

210

Factors affecting detection of burrowing owl nests during standardized surveys  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Identifying causes of declines and evaluating effects of management practices on persistence of local populations of burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia) requires accurate estimates of abundance and population trends. Moreover, regulatory agencies in the United States and Canada typically require surveys to detect nest burrows prior to approving developments or other activities in areas that are potentially suitable for nesting burrowing owls. In general, guidelines on timing of surveys have been lacking and surveys have been conducted at different times of day and in different stages of the nesting cycle. We used logistic regression to evaluate 7 factors that could potentially affect probability of a surveyor detecting a burrowing owl nest. We conducted 1,444 detection trials at 323 burrowing owl nests within 3 study areas in Washington and Wyoming, USA, between February and August 2000-2002. Detection probability was highest during the nestling period and increased with ambient temperature. The other 5 factors that we examined (i.e., study area, time of day, timing within the breeding season, wind speed, % cloud cover) interacted with another factor to influence detection probability. Use of call-broadcast surveys increased detection probability, even during daylight hours when we detected >95% of owls visually. Optimal timing of surveys will vary due to differences in breeding phenology and differences in nesting behavior across populations. Nevertheless, we recommend ???3 surveys per year: one that coincides with the laying and incubation period, another that coincides with the early nestling period, and a third that coincides with the late nestling period. In northern latitudes, surveys can be conducted throughout the day.

Conway, C.J.; Garcia, V.; Smith, M.D.; Hughes, K.

2008-01-01

211

Geographical factors affecting variability of precipitation regime in Iran  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study compares the precipitation regimes by using harmonic analysis during the last four decades (1965-2004). We used the measured precipitation data from 428 rain-gauge sites and weather stations distributed across Iran by applying 15 × 15 km spatial grids to generate the interpolated data. Data validations were carried out by statistical tests. In this study, first three harmonics of precipitation variances were evaluated. Variability of precipitation regime was explored by using three harmonic analysis methods. In addition, the effect of geographical factors (GF) (site elevation, latitude, and longitude) affecting the precipitation regime (P) was verified by multivariate regression method. The resulted regression equation between P and GF for spring showed the highest correlation coefficient (r = 0.79). For other seasons, r was lower than for spring and varied between 0.26 (summer) to 0.58 (autumn). Analysis of the first harmonic proved that the main precipitation regime in Iran tends to concentrate in one specific season (winter) as a result of large-scale Mediterranean systems passing over the country. In other words, the first harmonic is able to explain most of the precipitation variations which are caused by large-scale atmospheric circulation. For all the three harmonics, variances of precipitation were mainly a function of the geographical factors. This effect was more evident in the third harmonic; in such a way that increasing the latitudes caused higher precipitation variance. This means that the precipitation regime in northern sites is more sensitive to the local factors than those of southern sites. The results of this research can be used for reliable estimation of precipitation in ungauged sites.

Sabziparvar, A. A.; Movahedi, S.; Asakereh, H.; Maryanaji, Z.; Masoodian, S. A.

2014-05-01

212

Factors affecting N 2 fixation by the cyanobacterium Trichodesmium sp. GBRTRLI101  

Microsoft Academic Search

Various factors affecting N2 fixation of a cultured strain of Trichodesmium sp. (GBRTRLI101) from the Great Barrier Reef Lagoon were investigated. The diurnal pattern of N2 fixation demonstrated that it was primarily light-induced although fixation continued to occur for at least 1 h in the dark in samples that had been actively fixing N2. N2 fixation was dependent on the

Fei-Xue Fu; P. R. F Bell

2003-01-01

213

Factor adjustment spikes and interrelation: an empirical investigation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We take a descriptive look at interrelated factor demand starting from the observation that adjustment of capital and labor is lumpy. We find that the adjustment dynamics of an input factor are affected by large adjustments in the other.

Wilko A. Letterie; Gerard A. Pfann; J. Michael Polder

2004-01-01

214

Undergraduate nursing students' perceptions regarding factors that affect math abilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A review of the nursing literature reveals many undergraduate nursing students lack proficiency with basic mathematical skills, those necessary for safe medication preparation and administration. Few studies exploring the phenomenon from the undergraduate nursing student perspective are reported in the nursing literature. The purpose of this study was to explore undergraduate nursing students’ perceptions of math abilities, factors that affect math abilities, the use of math in nursing, and the extent to which specific math skills were addressed throughout a nursing curriculum. Polya’s Model for Problem Solving and the Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, Affective Domain served as the theoretical background for the study. Qualitative and quantitative methods were utilized to obtain data from a purposive sample of undergraduate nursing students from a private university in western Pennsylvania. Participants were selected based on the proficiency level with math skills, as determined by a score on the Elsevier’s HESI™ Admission Assessment (A2) Exam, Math Portion. Ten students from the “Excellent” benchmark group and eleven students from the “Needing Additional Assistance or Improvement” benchmark group participated in one-on-one, semi-structured interviews, and completed a 25-item, 4-point Likert scale survey that rated confidence levels with specific math skills and the extent to which these skills were perceived to be addressed in the nursing curriculum. Responses from the two benchmark groups were compared and contrasted. Eight themes emerged from the qualitative data. Findings related to mathematical approach and confidence levels with specific math skills were determined to be statistically significant.

Pyo, Katrina A.

2011-07-01

215

Investigating Change in Intraindividual Factor Structure Over Time  

Microsoft Academic Search

The investigation of change in factor structure over time can provide new opportunities for the development of theory in psychology. The method proposed to investigate change in intraindividual factor structure over time is an extension of P-technique factor analysis, in which the P-technique factor model is fit within relatively small windows of time, followed by modeling the factor model parameter

Joseph R. Rausch

2009-01-01

216

Elimination of error factors, affecting EM and seismic inversions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

EM or seismic data inversions are affected by many factors, which may conceal the responses from target objects. We address here the contributions from the following effects: 1) Pre-survey spectral sensitivity factor. Preliminary information about a target layer can be used for a pre-survey estimation of the required frequency domain and signal level. A universal approach allows making such estimations in real time, helping the survey crew to optimize an acquisition process. 2) Preliminary velocities' identification and their dispersions for all the seismic waves, arising in a stratified media became a fast working tool, based on the exact analytical solution. 3) Vertical gradients effect. For most layers the log data scatter, requiring an averaging pattern. A linear gradient within each representative layer is a reasonable compromise between required inversion accuracy and forward modeling complexity. 4) An effect from the seismic source's radial component becomes comparable with vertical part for explosive sources. If this effect is not taken into account, a serious modeling error takes place. This problem has an algorithmic solution. 5) Seismic modeling is often based on different representations for a source formulated either for a force or to a potential. The wave amplitudes depend on the formulation, making an inversion result sensitive to it. 6) Asymmetrical seismic waves (modified Rayleigh) in symmetrical geometry around liquid fracture come from S-wave and merge with the modified Krauklis wave at high frequencies. A detail analysis of this feature allows a spectral range optimization for the proper wave's extraction. 7) An ultrasonic experiment was conducted to show different waves appearance for a super-thin water-saturated fracture between two Plexiglas plates, being confirmed by comparison with theoretical computations. 8) A 'sandwich effect' was detected by comparison with averaged layer's effect. This opens an opportunity of the shale gas direct identification from the surface measurements.

Magomedov, M.; Zuev, M. A.; Korneev, V. A.; Goloshubin, G.; Zuev, J.; Brovman, Y.

2013-12-01

217

Ecological Factors Affecting Efficiency and Health in Warships*  

PubMed Central

The environment of those who live and work in warships is closely related to the way the ships are built and employed. In stating the requirements for the atmosphere between decks the emphasis has swung during the past 50 years from the need for controlling the chemical constituents to the control of the factors which comprise the thermal environment, and now, with the advent of the nuclear-powered submarine, to the need for achieving, as nearly as possible, complete physical, chemical, and microbiological control. Between 1944 and 1953 the thermal factors between decks were investigated in a series of studies carried out in H.M. Ships. The average effective temperatures on the mess decks and in the work places of 11 ships in the Eastern Fleet in 1944 exceeded 84°F. (28·9°C.). In compartments where radiant heat was an added factor the average corrected effective temperature levels were 1° or 2°F. (0·55-1·1°C.) higher than the corresponding effective temperatures. The effects of climatic conditions on naval personnel were investigated by psychological studies to determine the levels of warmth at which performance deteriorated; by physiological experiments to show the levels of warmth at which the collapse of men working at different work rates might be expected; by comfort surveys in ships and on shore to determine the levels of warmth at which the majority enjoyed optimum comfort; and by relating the monthly incidence of the common causes of ill-health to the average monthly upper-deck temperature as recorded at noon each day in order to determine the temperature level above which sickness increased. It was concluded that the upper desirable level of warmth to consider when designing ships for hot climates was an effective temperature of 78°F. (25·5°C.). As it is usually impracticable in many compartments to achieve temperatures below 78°F. (25·5°C.) in the tropics without the generous application of air cooling, attention was then directed to the associated effects on the chemical and bacterial constituents of restricting air supplies, an unavoidable feature of most air conditioning systems, and to defining the permissible lower limits for fresh air requirements. The nuclear submarine with its capacity for remaining submerged for very long periods raises new problems relating to life in a confined space and involving very prolonged exposure to the submarine environment. These problems have still to be investigated. PMID:13726470

Ellis, F. P.

1960-01-01

218

Investigation of Various Essential Factors for Optimum Infrared Thermography  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT We investigated various essential factors for optimum infrared thermography for cattle clinics. The effect of various factors on the detection of surface temperature was investigated in an experimental room with a fixed ambient temperature using a square positioned on a wall. Various factors of animal objects were examined using cattle to determine the relationships among presence of hair, body surface temperature, surface temperature of the eyeball, the highest temperature of the eye circle, rectum temperature and ambient temperature. Also, the surface temperature of the flank at different time points after eating was examined. The best conditions of thermography for cattle clinics were determined and were as follows: (1) The distance between a thermal camera and an object should be fixed, and the camera should be set within a 45-degree angle with respect to the objects using the optimum focal length. (2) Factors that affect the camera temperature, such as extreme cold or heat, direct sunshine, high humidity and wind, should be avoided. (3) For the comparison of thermographs, imaging should be performed under identical conditions. If this is not achievable, hairless parts should be used. PMID:23759714

OKADA, Keiji; TAKEMURA, Kei; SATO, Shigeru

2013-01-01

219

Analysis of factors affecting satisfaction level on problem based learning approach using structural equation modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nowadays, in the job market demand, graduates are expected not only to have higher performance in academic but they must also be excellent in soft skill. Problem-Based Learning (PBL) has a number of distinct advantages as a learning method as it can deliver graduates that will be highly prized by industry. This study attempts to determine the satisfaction level of engineering students on the PBL Approach and to evaluate their determinant factors. The Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was used to investigate how the factors of Good Teaching Scale, Clear Goals, Student Assessment and Levels of Workload affected the student satisfaction towards PBL approach.

Hussain, Nur Farahin Mee; Zahid, Zalina

2014-12-01

220

Investigating Learner Affective Performance in Web-Based Learning by Using Entrepreneurship as a Metaphor  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the era of the Internet, factors which influence effective learning in a Web-based learning environment are well worth exploring. In addition to knowledge acquisition and skills training, affect is also an important factor, since successful learning requires excellent affective performance. Thus this study focuses on learners' affective

Liu, Ming-Chou; Chi, Ming-Hsiao

2012-01-01

221

Identification of factors affecting birth rate in Czech Republic  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article is concerned with identifying economic factors primarily that affect birth rates in Czech Republic. To find the relationship between the magnitudes, we used the multivariate regression analysis and for modeling, we used a time series of annual values (1994-2011) both economic indicators and indicators related to demographics. Due to potential problems with apparent dependence we first cleansed all series obtained from the Czech Statistical Office using first differences. It is clear from the final model that meets all assumptions that there is a positive correlation between birth rates and the financial situation of households. We described the financial situation of households by GDP per capita, gross wages and consumer price index. As expected a positive correlation was proved for GDP per capita and gross wages and negative dependence was proved for the consumer price index. In addition to these economic variables in the model there were used also demographic characteristics of the workforce and the number of employed people. It can be stated that if the Czech Republic wants to support an increase in the birth rate, it is necessary to consider the financial support for households with small children.

Zámková, Martina; Blašková, Veronika

2013-10-01

222

Hydrologic and geologic factors affecting land subsidence near Eloy, Arizona  

USGS Publications Warehouse

At an extensometer site near Eloy, Arizona, 1.09 m of land subsidence caused by groundwater withdrawal were measured by leveling in 1965-83. The extensometer, which partially penetrates the compressible sediments, recorded 0.82 m of compaction during the same period. By use of a one-dimensional model, cumulative daily compaction values were simulated to within an average of 0.0038 m of the actual values. Land subsidence was simulated to within an average of 0.011 m using the same model in conjunction with geohydrologic data of the sediments below the extensometer. A highly compressible clay layer that is 24.38 m thick was partially penetrated by the extensometer. The simulation indicated that the layer was driving compaction and land subsidence linearly with respect to time, despite the presence of other compacting layers. Because of its thickness and compressibility, this layer can be expected to continue to compact after applied vertical stresses have stopped increasing and other layers have stopped compacting. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the compressibility of fine-grained sediments (expressed as specific storage) is one of the factors to which compact is most sensitive. Preconsolidation stress and hydraulic conductivity also affect land subsidence near Eloy, Arizona. (Author 's abstract)

Epstein, V.J.

1987-01-01

223

Factors affecting the success of influenza laboratory diagnosis.  

PubMed

Influenza is one of the most common human infectious diseases, and has profound health and economic consequences. The laboratory diag- nosis of influenza virus infections plays an important role in the global surveillance of influenza. Therefore, there is a growing demand for highly sensitive and rapid methods for detecting influenza. The performance of particular diagnostic methods is affected by various factors. In this study, we assess the effects of patients' age and time to diagnosis on the probability of detecting influenza using four diagnostic methods (virus isolation, rapid test, RT-PCR and real-time RT-PCR). We examined 3,546 samples from central and eastern Slovakia during the influenza seasons from 2005-2006 to 2010-2011. In general, the probability of influenza detection significantly decreased with the time from onset of illness to sample collection (T1) as well as with patients' age (AGE). On the contrary, time from sample collection to delivery (T2) did not play a role in the prob- ability of influenza detection. As judged by odds ratios, the virus isolation method was most sensitive to T1, followed by the rapid test and RT-PCR methods. For the effect of AGE, the rapid test and virus isolation methods were more sensitive than PCR-based methods. The effects of T1 and AGE were independent of each other. Laboratories which participate in inifluenza surveillance should use several methods to enable rapid and accurate influenza A and B virus detection. PMID:25438393

Kissová, Renáta; Svitok, Marek; Klement, Cyril; Mad'arová, Lucia

2014-09-01

224

Chronotype and personality factors of predisposition to seasonal affective disorder.  

PubMed

The study aimed to recognize the personality factors of a predisposition to seasonal mood fluctuations in a non-clinical sample. A group of 101 subjects (57 women, 44 men; mean age 26.4?±?6.5 years) completed a battery of tests comprising a Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire (SPAQ), Chronotype Questionnaire (ChQ), a NEO-Five Factor Inventory and a Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS). A smaller sample (n?=?44) completed a Winter Blues Scale (WBS). Women scored significantly higher than men in seasonality (p?=?0.014), neuroticism (p?=?0.049), agreeableness (p?=?0.010), and avoidance-oriented coping style (p?=?0.041). Subjects with seasonal affective disorder (SAD) (n?=?41) or sub-SAD (n?=?33), as diagnosed with SPAQ, exhibited higher levels of neuroticism (p?=?0.017) and openness (p?=?0.016) in comparison to non-SAD individuals. The latter declared a less frequent avoidance coping style. Both measures of seasonality, i.e. the SPAQ Global Seasonality Score and WBS, correlated significantly (r?=?0.28 and 0.44, respectively) with the subjective amplitude of the circadian rhythm, as described with the "distinctness" scale of ChQ. Female gender, neuroticism and openness were confirmed as factors linked to seasonal mood variability. Additionally, the study revealed an association between susceptibility to mild winter depression and an avoidance-oriented coping style. The avoidance coping style was correlated positively with all the aspects of seasonality described by SPAQ (correlation coefficients from 0.21 to 0.34). Both sub-types of avoidance-oriented style, i.e. distraction and social diversion, were associated with marked subjective seasonal changes in sleep length, mood and the energy level. While the subjective amplitude of circadian rhythm proved to be connected with seasonality, the subjective acrophase of the rhythm (morningness-eveningness preference) did not. It may be hypothesized that sensitivity to natural environmental conditions/synchronizers is a separate individual trait shaping the subject's proneness to energy and mood changes both in diurnal and year scale, i.e. circadian and seasonal mood variations. PMID:24397301

Oginska, Halszka; Oginska-Bruchal, Katarzyna

2014-05-01

225

Factors Affecting the Habitability of Earth-like Planets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Habitability is a measure of an environment's potential to support life. For exoplanets, the concept of habitability can be used broadly - to inform our calculations of the possibility and distribution of life elsewhere - or as a practical tool to inform mission designs and to prioritize specific targets in the search for extrasolar life. Although a planet's habitability does depend critically on the effect of stellar type and planetary semi-major axis on climate balance, work in the interdisciplinary field of astrobiology has identified many additional factors that can affect a planet's environment and its potential ability to support life. Life requires material for metabolism and structures, a liquid medium for chemical transport, and an energy source to drive metabolism and other life processes. Whether a planet's surface or sub-surface can provide these requirements is the result of numerous planetary and astrophysical processes that affect the planet's formation and evolution. Many of these factors are interdependent, and fall into three main categories: stellar effects, planetary effects and planetary system effects. Key abiotic processes affecting the resultant planetary environment include photochemistry (e.g. Segura et al., 2003; 2005), stellar effects on climate balance (e.g. Joshii et al., 2012; Shields et al., 2013), atmospheric loss (e.g. Lopez and Fortney, 2013), and gravitational interactions with the star (e.g. Barnes et al., 2013). In many cases, the effect of these processes is strongly dependent on a specific planet's existing environmental properties. Examples include the resultant UV flux at a planetary surface as a product of stellar activity and the strength of a planet's atmospheric UV shield (Segura et al., 2010); and the amount of tidal energy available to a planet to drive plate tectonics and heat the surface (Barnes et al., 2009), which is in turn due to a combination of stellar mass, planetary mass and composition, planetary orbital parameters and the gravitational influence of other planets in the system. A thorough assessment of a planet's environment and its potential habitability is a necessary first step in the search for biosignatures. Targeted environmental characteristics include surface temperature and pressure (e.g. Misra et al., 2013), a census of bulk and trace atmospheric gases, and whether there are signs of liquid water on the planetary surface (e.g. Robinson et al., 2010). The robustness of a planetary biosignature is dependent on being able to characterize the environment sufficiently well, and to understand likely star-planet interactions, to preclude formation of a biosignature gas via abiotic processes such as photochemistry (e.g. Segura et al., 2007; Domagal-Goldman et al., 2011; Grenfell et al., 2012). Here we also discuss potential false positives for O2 and O3, which, in large quantities, are often considered robust biosignatures for oxygenic photosynthesis. There is clearly significant future work required to better identify and understand the key environmental processes and interactions that allow a planet to support life, and to distinguish life's global impact on an environment from the environment itself.

Meadows, Victoria; NAI-Virtual Planetary Laboratory Team

2014-03-01

226

Factors affecting age of walking by children with mental retardation.  

PubMed

The relationship between age of walking and two factors of severity of intellectual disability and clinical types (autism, Down syndrome, epilepsy, and "residual") in children with mental retardation was investigated. Subjects were 118 children whose disabilities ranged from severe to mild. Measures by clinical type were significant, and the differences of any two clinical types except between children with epilepsy and the "residual" group were significant, but severity of intellectual disability was not significant. Most children with autism (27 subjects, 93%) walked by the normal time limit of 18 months. Only 3 children (11%) with Down syndrome began to walk within that limit, and 9 of them (33%) walked after 2 years of age. In the "residual" group (including children with epilepsy), 37 children (60%) walked within the normal limit but 15 (25%) only after 2 years of age. PMID:7675588

Kokubun, M; Haishi, K; Okuzumi, H; Hosobuchi, T

1995-04-01

227

FACTORS AFFECTING THE USE OF CAF2:MN THERMOLUMINESCENT DOSIMETERS FOR LOW-LEVEL ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION MONITORING  

EPA Science Inventory

An investigation was made of factors affecting the use of commercially-produced CaF2:Mn thermoluminescent dosimeters for low level environmental radiation monitoring. Calibration factors and self-dosing rates were quantified for 150 thermoluminescent dosimeters. Laboratory studie...

228

Investigating Factors Affecting the Uptake of Automated Assessment Technology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Automated assessment is an emerging innovation in educational praxis, however its pedagogical potential is not fully utilised in Australia, particularly regarding automated essay grading. The rationale for this research is that the usage of automated assessment currently lags behind the capacity that the technology provides, thus restricting the…

Dreher, Carl; Reiners, Torsten; Dreher, Heinz

2011-01-01

229

Urban vs. rural factors that affect adult asthma.  

PubMed

In this review, our aim was to examine the influence of geographic variations on asthma prevalence and morbidity among adults, which is important for improving our understanding, identifying the burden, and for developing and implementing interventions aimed at reducing asthma morbidity. Asthma is a complex inflammatory disease of multifactorial origin, and is influenced by both environmental and genetic factors. The disparities in asthma prevalence and morbidity among the world's geographic locations are more likely to be associated with environmental exposures than genetic differences. In writing this article, we found that the indoor factors most consistently associated with asthma and asthma-related symptoms in adults included fuel combustion, mold growth, and environmental tobacco smoke in both urban and rural areas. Asthma and asthma-related symptoms occurred more frequently in urban than in rural areas, and that difference correlated with environmental risk exposures, SES, and healthcare access. Environmental risk factors to which urban adults were more frequently exposed than rural adults were dust mites,high levels of vehicle emissions, and a westernized lifestyle.Exposure to indoor biological contaminants in the urban environment is common.The main risk factors for developing asthma in urban areas are atopy and allergy to house dust mites, followed by allergens from animal dander. House dust mite exposure may potentially explain differences in diagnosis of asthma prevalence and morbidity among adults in urban vs. rural areas. In addition, the prevalence of asthma morbidity increases with urbanization. High levels of vehicle emissions,Western lifestyles and degree of urbanization itself, may affect outdoor and thereby indoor air quality. In urban areas, biomass fuels have been widely replaced by cleaner energy sources at home, such as gas and electricity, but in most developing countries, coal is still a major source of fuel for cooking and heating, particularly in winter. Moreover, exposure to ETS is common at home or at work in urban areas.There is evidence that asthma prevalence and morbidity is less common in rural than in urban areas. The possible reasons are that rural residents are exposed early in life to stables and to farm milk production, and such exposures are protective against developing asthma morbidity. Even so, asthma morbidity is disproportionately high among poor inner-city residents and in rural populations. A higher proportion of adult residents of nonmetropolitan areas were characterized as follows:aged 55 years or older, no previous college admission, low household income, no health insurance coverage, and could not see a doctor due to healthcare service availability, etc. In rural areas, biomass fuels meet more than 70% of the rural energy needs. Progress in adopting modern energy sources in rural areas has been slow. The most direct health impact comes from household energy use among the poor, who depend almost entirely on burning biomass fuels in simple cooking devices that are placed in inadequately ventilated spaces. Prospective studies are needed to assess the long-term effects of biomass smoke on lung health among adults in rural areas.Geographic differences in asthma susceptibility exist around the world. The reason for the differences in asthma prevalence in rural and urban areas may be due to the fact that populations have different lifestyles and cultures, as well as different environmental exposures and different genetic backgrounds. Identifying geographic disparities in asthma hospitalizations is critical to implementing prevention strategies,reducing morbidity, and improving healthcare financing for clinical asthma treatment. Although evidence shows that differences in the prevalence of asthma do exist between urban and rural dwellers in many parts of the world, including in developed countries, data are inadequate to evaluate the extent to which different pollutant exposures contribute to asthma morbidity and severity of asthma between urban and rural areas. PMID:23625129

Jie, Yu; Isa, Zaleha Md; Jie, Xu; Ju, Zhang Long; Ismail, Noor Hassim

2013-01-01

230

Evaluation of Factors Affecting Powdered Drug Reconstitution in Microgravity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Owing to the high cost of transporting mass into space, and the small volume available for equipment in the Space Shuttle Orbiter and the International Space Station, refrigeration space is extremely limited. For this reason, there exists strong motivation for transporting certain drugs in powdered form so that they do not require refrigeration. When needed, the powdered drug will be mixed with saline to obtain a liquid form that may be injected intravenously. While this is a relatively simple task in a 1-G environment, there are some difficulties that may be encountered in 0-G. In non-accelerated spaceflight, gravitational and inertial forces are eliminated allowing other smaller forces, such as capillary forces and surface tension, to dominate the behavior of fluids. For instance, water slowly ejected from a straw will tend to form a sphere, while fluid in a container will tend to wet the inside surface forming a highly rounded meniscus. Initial attempts at mixing powdered drugs with saline in microgravity have shown a tendency toward forming foamy emulsions instead of the desired homogeneous solution. The predominance of adhesive forces between the drug particles and the interface tensions at the gas/liquid and solid/liquid interfaces drastically reduce the rate of deaggregation of the drug powder and also reduce the rate of absorption of saline by the powder mass. In addition, the capillary forces cause the saline to wet the inside of the container, thus trapping air bubbles within the liquid. The rate of dissolution of a powder drug is directly proportional to the amount of surface area of the solid that is exposed to liquid solvent. The surface area of drug that is in contact with the liquid is greatly reduced in microgravity and, as a result, the dissolution rate is reduced as well. The KC-135 research described here was aimed at evaluating the extent to which it is possible to perform drug reconstitution in the weightlessness of parabolic flight using standard pharmacological supplies. The experiment included a parametric assessment of possible factors affecting the reconstitution process. The specific questions that we wished to answer were: (1) Is it possible to reconstitute powdered drugs in weightlessness using standard pharmacological equipment? (2) What are the differences between drug reconstitution in a 1-G and a 0-G environment? (3) What techniques of mixing the drug powder and diluent are more successful? (4) What physical and chemical factors play a role in determining the success of mixing and dissolution? (5) Is it necessary to employ crewmember and equipment restraints during the reconstitution process?

Schaffner, Grant; Johnston, Smith; Marshburn, Tom

1999-01-01

231

Factors affecting stall use for different freestall bases.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to compare stall use (stall occupancy and cow position) by barn side for factors affecting stall use. A closed circuit television system recorded stall use four times per day for a 9-mo period starting May 9, 2001. Six factors were analyzed: stall base, distance to water, stall location within stall base section, stall location within barn, inside barn temperature, and length of time cows were exposed to stall bases. Two barn sides with different stocking densities were analyzed: low (66%), with cows milked by robotic milker; and high (100%), with cows milked 2X in parlor. Six stall base types were tested: two mattresses, a waterbed, a rubber mat, concrete, and sand (high side only). The base types were grouped 3 to 7 stalls/section and randomly placed in each row. Cows spent more time in mattress-based stalls, but the highest percentage lying was in sand-based stalls. The following significant stall occupancy percentages were found: sand had the highest percentage of cows lying on the high stocking density side (69%), followed by mattress type 1 (65%) > mattress type 2 (57%) > waterbed (45%) > rubber mat (33%) > concrete (23%). Mattress type 1 had the highest percentage stalls occupied (88%), followed by mattress type 2 (84%) > sand (79%) > soft rubber mat (65%) > waterbed (62%) > concrete (39%). On the low stocking rate side, mattress type 1 had the highest percentage cows lying (45%) and occupied (59.6%), followed by mattress type 2 > waterbed > soft rubber mat > concrete. Cow lying and stalls occupied percentages were highest for stalls 1) not at the end of a section, and 2) on the outside row, and varied by base type for time cows exposed to stalls and inside barn temperature. Lying and occupied percentages were different for different mattress types. The percentage of stalls with cows standing was higher for mat and mattress-based stalls. Results show mattress type 1 and sand to be superior and rubber mats and concrete inferior stall bases. PMID:12836963

Wagner-Storch, A M; Palmer, R W; Kammel, D W

2003-06-01

232

Prognostic Factors Affecting Visual Outcome in Acanthamoeba Keratitis  

PubMed Central

Objective To identify clinical and demographic factors associated with a worse visual outcome in Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK). Design Retrospective, case control study. Participants A total of 72 eyes of 65 patients with AK who were diagnosed at the University of Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary between May of 2003 and May of 2007 with treatment complete by October of 2007. The first affected eye was analyzed in bilateral disease. Methods Patient demographic, clinical characteristics, treatment methods, and final visual outcome data were collected through medical record reviews for all patients diagnosed with AK. Cases were defined as patients with AK with a visual outcome worse than 20/25 or those requiring penetrating keratoplasty (PKP). Controls were defined as patients with AK with a visual outcome of 20/25 or better. Logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) identifying prognostic factors associated with a worse visual outcome. Main Outcome Measures Final visual outcome worse than 20/25. Results AK was confirmed through microbiologic evidence in 48 of 65 eyes (73.8%) or with confocal microscopy in 62 of 65 eyes (95.4%). Final visual acuity data were available in 61 of 65 eyes (93.8%); of these 61 eyes, 40 (65.6%) achieved a final visual acuity of 20/25 or better. In multivariable analysis, deep stromal involvement or the presence of a ring infiltrate at presentation was independently associated with worse visual outcomes (OR, 10.27; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.91–36.17). Symptom duration before diagnosis was statistically predictive of disease stage at presentation (OR, 4.43; 95% CI, 0.99–19.83; multivariable analysis) but not final visual outcome (OR, 2.55; 95% CI, 0.83–7.88; univariate analysis). PKP was performed in 11 of 12 eyes with active disease. Conclusions Corneal disease staging at presentation with slit-lamp examination was highly predictive of worse outcomes, allowing the identification of patients who might benefit from more aggressive medical or surgical intervention. Unlike in previous reports, patient-reported duration of symptoms before treatment was not reliable in predicting the final visual result in our series. PMID:18571729

Tu, Elmer Y.; Joslin, Charlotte E.; Sugar, Joel; Shoff, Megan E.; Booton, Gregory C.

2013-01-01

233

Factors affecting a climber's ability to ascend Mont Blanc.  

PubMed

The aim of the study was to determine the factors affecting a climber's ability to ascend Mont Blanc using a number of variables collected at the Gouter Hut (3,817 m) before and after an attempted ascent on the Mont Blanc summit. Subjects (n=285) were tested at 3,817 m prior to their ascent of Mont Blanc. Maximum height ascended in the last 14 days was recorded. End tidal CO2, arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), heart rate and respiratory rate were measured using a Capnograph (Nellcor Patrick NPB75). Acute mountain sickness (AMS) was assessed using the Lake Louise scoring system. Summit information is available for 216 subjects. None of the subjects who attained 4,000 m in the previous 14 days failed to reach the summit (P=0.04). Previous recent exposure to an altitude of 4,000 m resulted in faster ascent times to the summit than those who had not been above 3,000 m in the previous 14 days (4.02+/-0.6 vs. 4.46+/-0.8 h, P=0.009), higher SaO2 on arrival at the Gouter Hut on day 1 (88.6+/-5 vs. 86.3+/-6%, P=0.004) and lower AMS scores upon arrival at the Gouter Hut after the attempted ascent to the summit 2.5+/-1.8 versus 4.7+/-2.5 U (P=0.001), respectively. It is concluded that recent exposure to 4,000 m confers an advantage to those who wish to ascend a 4,800 m peak. PMID:16235066

Tsianos, G; Woolrich-Burt, L; Aitchison, T; Peacock, A; Watt, M; Montgomery, H; Watt, I; Grant, S

2006-01-01

234

Investigating facial affect processing in psychosis: a study using the Comprehensive Affective Testing System.  

PubMed

Facial affect processing (FAP) deficits in schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) have been widely reported; although effect sizes vary across studies, and there are limited direct comparisons of the two groups. Further, there is debate as to the influence of both psychotic and mood symptoms on FAP. This study aimed to address these limitations by recruiting groups of psychosis patients with either a diagnosis of SZ or BD and comparing them to healthy controls (HC) on a well validated battery of four FAP subtests: affect discrimination, name affect, select affect and match affect. Overall, both groups performed more poorly than controls in terms of accuracy. In SZ, this was largely driven by impairments on three of the four subtests. The BD patients showed impaired performance specifically on the match affect subtest, a task that had a high cognitive load. FAP performance in the psychosis patients was correlated with severity of positive symptoms and mania. This study confirmed that FAP deficits are a consistent finding in SZ that occur independent of task specific methodology; whilst FAP deficits in BD are more subtle. Further work in this group is needed to replicate these results. PMID:24924406

Rossell, Susan L; Van Rheenen, Tamsyn E; Joshua, Nicole R; O'Regan, Alison; Gogos, Andrea

2014-08-01

235

Factors Affecting Hospital Employees' Knowledge Sharing Intention and Behavior, and Innovation Behavior  

PubMed Central

Objectives To investigate the factors affecting employees' knowledge sharing intention, knowledge sharing behavior, and innovation behavior of the four top-ranked university hospitals in South Korea. Methods Data were collected from employees at three university hospitals in Seoul, Korea and one university hospital in Gyeonggi-Do, Korea through self-administered questionnaires. The survey was conducted from May 29, 2013 to July 17, 2013. A total of 779 questionnaires were analyzed by SPSS version 18.0 and AMOS version 18.0. Results Factors affecting hospital employees' knowledge sharing intention, knowledge sharing behavior, and innovation behavior are reciprocity, behavioral control, and trust. Conclusion It is important to select employees who have a propensity for innovation and continuously educate them about knowledge management based on trust. PMID:25180147

Lee, Hyun Sook; Hong, Seong Ae

2014-01-01

236

Investigating Change in Intraindividual Factor Structure over Time  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The investigation of change in factor structure over time can provide new opportunities for the development of theory in psychology. The method proposed to investigate change in intraindividual factor structure over time is an extension of P-technique factor analysis, in which the P-technique factor model is fit within relatively small windows of…

Rausch, Joseph R.

2009-01-01

237

Temperature can interact with landscape factors to affect songbird productivity.  

PubMed

Increased temperatures and more extreme weather patterns associated with global climate change can interact with other factors that regulate animal populations, but many climate change studies do not incorporate other threats to wildlife in their analyses. We used 20 years of nest-monitoring data from study sites across a gradient of habitat fragmentation in Missouri, USA, to investigate the relative influence of weather variables (temperature and precipitation) and landscape factors (forest cover and edge density) on the number of young produced per nest attempt (i.e., productivity) for three species of songbirds. We detected a strong forest cover × temperature interaction for the Acadian Flycatcher (Empidonax virescens) on productivity. Greater forest cover resulted in greater productivity because of reduced brood parasitism and increased nest survival, whereas greater temperatures reduced productivity in highly forested landscapes because of increased nest predation but had no effect in less forested landscapes. The Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea) exhibited a similar pattern, albeit with a marginal forest cover × temperature interaction. By contrast, productivity of the Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) was not influenced by landscape effects or temperature. Our results highlight a potential difficulty of managing wildlife in response to global change such as habitat fragmentation and climate warming, as the habitat associated with the greatest productivity for flycatchers was also that most negatively influenced by high temperatures. The influence of high temperatures on nest predation (and therefore, nest predators) underscores the need to acknowledge the potential complexity of species' responses to climate change by incorporating a more thorough consideration of community ecology in the development of models of climate impacts on wildlife. PMID:23504884

Cox, W Andrew; Thompson, Frank R; Reidy, Jennifer L; Faaborg, John

2013-04-01

238

Investigating the factors influencing RDX shock sensitivity.  

E-print Network

??The shock sensitivity of RDX (cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine) is dependent upon factors including crystal size, morphology, internal defects, surface defects and HMX content. With the arrival of… (more)

Hudson, R J

239

FACTORS AFFECTING THE PHOTOCHEMICAL TREATMENT OF HAZARDOUS WASTE  

EPA Science Inventory

The photochemical treatment of hazardous waste can be optimized by taking into account several factors that influence the rates of photochemical reactions. Physical factors that facilitate photochemical treatment include: (1) maximizing the irradiated surface to volume ratio of t...

240

FACTORS AFFECTING THE PHOTOCHEMICAL TREATMENT OF HAZARDOUS WASTE (JOURNAL VERSION)  

EPA Science Inventory

The photochemical treatment of hazardous waste can be optimized by taking into account various factors that influence the rates of photochemical reactions. Physical factors that facilitate photochemical treatment include: (1) maximizing the irradiated surface to volume ratio of t...

241

Factors affecting superovulation in heifers treated with PMSG  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study we determined 1) if the immunoneutralization of PMSG affected the ovulatory response, the number of large follicles and embryo yield compared with that of PMSG alone or pFSH, and 2) whether the stage of the estrous cycle at which PMSG was injected affected the ovulatory response and yield of embryos in superovulated heifers. Estrus was synchronized in

D. Goulding; D. H. Williams; J. F. Roche; M. P. Boland

1996-01-01

242

Factors Affecting the Intensity of Solar Energetic Particle Events  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper updates the influence of environmental and source factors of shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that are likely to influence the solar energetic particle (SEP) events. The intensity variation due to CME interaction reported that is confirmed by expanding the investigation to all the large SEP events of solar cycle 23. The large SEP events are separated into two groups, one associated with CMEs running into other CMEs, and the other with CMEs running into the ambient solar wind. SEP events with CME interaction generally have a higher intensity. New possibilities such as the influence of coronal holes on the SEP intensity are also discussed. For example, the presence of a large coronal hole between a well-connected eruption and the solar disk center may render the shock poorly connected because of the interaction between the CME and the coronal hole. This point is illustrated using the 2004 December 3 SEP event delayed by about 12 hours from the onset of the associated CME. There is no other event at the Sun that can be associated with the SEP onset. This event is consistent with the possibility that the coronal hole interaction influences the connectivity of the CMEs that produce SEPs, and hence the intensity of the SEP event.

Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk

2011-01-01

243

Oxytocin and Psychological Factors Affecting Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus  

PubMed Central

Background. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of oxytocin with trait and state psychological factors in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods. OXT and psychological variables were analyzed from 86 controlled diabetic patients (glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) < 7%) from 45 uncontrolled diabetic patients (HbA1c ? 7). Psychological characteristics were assessed with the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ), while state psychological characteristics were measured with the Symptom Checklist 90-R (SCL 90-R). Blood samples were taken for measuring oxytocin in both subgroups during the initial phase of the study. One year later, the uncontrolled diabetic patients were reevaluated with the use of the same psychometric instruments. Results. During the first evaluation of the uncontrolled diabetic patients, a statistically significant positive relationship between the levels of OXT and psychoticism in EPQ rating scale (P < 0.013) was observed. For controlled diabetic patients, a statistically significant negative relationship between oxytocin and somatization (P < 0.030), as well as obsessive-compulsive scores (P < 0.047) in SCL-90 rating scale, was observed. During the second assessment, the values of OXT decreased when the patients managed to control their metabolic profile. Conclusions. The OXT is in association with psychoticism, somatization, and obsessionality may be implicated in T2DM. PMID:22997507

Kontoangelos, K.; Raptis, A. E.; Papageorgiou, C. C.; Tsiotra, P. C.; Papadimitriou, G. N.; Rabavilas, A. D.; Dimitriadis, G.; Raptis, S. A.

2012-01-01

244

Factors Affecting the Musculoskeletal Symptoms of Korean Police Officers  

PubMed Central

] This study was conducted to investigate efficient, systematic management of the Korean police and to examine the status and prevention of musculoskeletal disorders in Korean police officers. [Subjects and Methods] A survey of police officers (353 subjects) who visited the National Police Hospital from March 2013 to May 2013 was conducted using a structured questionnaire. [Results] The incidence of pain was 44.2% in the shoulder, 41.4% in the waist, 31.2% in the neck, 26.1% in the legs/foot, 16.7% in the hand/wrist/finger, and 14.7% in the arm/elbow. The comparative risk of the relevant part factors was analyzed by multiple regression analysis. The shoulder had a 4.87 times higher risk in police lieutenants compared with those under the rank of corporal and a 1.78 times higher risk in people with chronic diseases than those without chronic diseases. The arm/elbow had a 2.37 times higher risk in people who exercised than those who did not exercise and a 1.78 times higher risk in people with a chronic disease than those without chronic diseases. Generally, people with a chronic disease showed a higher risk than those without chronic diseases. [Conclusion] The results of this study could be useful as basic data for improvement of police welfare, specialized treatment for the health safety of the police, and efficient management of police resources. PMID:25013298

Cho, Taek-Sang; Jeon, Woo-Jin; Lee, Jin-Gu; Seok, Jong-Min; Cho, Jae-Hwan

2014-01-01

245

A study of some factors affecting reproductive performance in gilts  

E-print Network

data on age at puberty are not available for Texas conditions. Improvement of reproductive performance in swine has been rel? atively slow in this country. For the period 1928 to 19U8, sow productivity rose from 5 RI to 6.U pigs raised per litter... in which nutrition affects the fertility of farm animals. At present, practically nothing is known about how nutrition affects reproductive phenomena such as attainment of puberty, ovulation rates, fertilization rates, and embryonic death rates...

Fowler, Stewart Hampton

2013-10-04

246

Factors affecting the adoption of fertilizers by rice farmers in Côte d'Ivoire  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper analyzed the factors that affect the adoption of chemical fertilizers by rice farmers in Côte d'Ivoire using a Tobit model. The results show that the major factors that positively influence farmers' use of fertilizers in rice fields are cultivation of lowlands, use of mechanization, farm size, land pressure and availability of non-farm income. Factors found to negatively affect

Akinwumi A. Adesina

1996-01-01

247

Risk Factors for Alcoholism Among Women Religious: Affect Regulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Risk factors for addiction have received extensive empirical attention. Specific risk factors for women Religious (nuns),\\u000a however, are not well known. This report examines risk factors for alcoholism in a retrospective study of 148 chemically dependent\\u000a women Religious in treatment. Negative emotionality, a personality measure, was the only significant predictor of alcoholism\\u000a severity in a joint multiple regression with childhood

Elizabeth M. Hill

248

ACCURACY OF PESTICIDE REFERENCE STANDARD SOLUTIONS. PART I. FACTORS AFFECTING ORGANIC SOLVENT EVAPORATION  

EPA Science Inventory

A gravimetric experiment was undertaken to identify the factors affecting solvent evaporation from analytical reference standard solutions and to establish the magnitude of the resultant solvent evaporation. The evaporation of organic solvent from standard solutions is affected b...

249

Cognitive Factors Affecting Student Understanding of Geologic Time.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a model that describes how students reconstruct geological transformations over time. Defines the critical factors influencing reconstructive thinking: (1) the transformation scheme, which influences the other diachronic schemes; (2) knowledge of geological processes; and (3) extracognitive factors. (Author/KHR)

Dodick, Jeff; Orion, Nir

2003-01-01

250

Factors affecting the transfer of organochlorine pesticide residues to breastmilk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Existing studies monitoring organochlorine pesticide residues in breastmilk were examined to identify whether common factors determine the extent of transfer of these residues. A structured review of the English language literature was conducted. Papers were reviewed and assessed using a structured protocol. A total of 77 papers were initially identified, 46 of which contained conclusions relating to the factors which

Caroline A. Harris; Michael W. Woolridge; Alastair W. M. Hay

2001-01-01

251

An evaluation of factors affecting duration of orthodontic treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the first questions asked by new orthodontic patients is: How long will I need to wear my braces? A multitude of factors have the potential to influence the answer to this question. The purpose of this retrospective study was to identify some of the primary factors that influence orthodontic treatment duration. Few studies have attempted to evaluate these

F. Richard Beckwith; Richard J. Ackerman; Charles M Cobb; Daniel E. Tira

1999-01-01

252

Factors Affecting Survival of Bacteriophage on Tomato Leaf Surfaces  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The ability of bacteriophage to persist in the phyllosphere for extended periods is limited by many factors, including sunlight irradiation, especially in the UV zone, temperature, desiccation, and exposure to copper bactericides. The effects of these factors on persistence of phage and formulated p...

253

Factors Affecting EWS-FLI1 Activity in Ewing's Sarcoma  

PubMed Central

Ewing's sarcoma family tumors (ESFT) are characterized by specific chromosomal translocations, which give rise to EWS-ETS chimeric proteins. These aberrant transcription factors are the main pathogenic drivers of ESFT. Elucidation of the factors influencing EWS-ETS expression and/or activity will guide the development of novel therapeutic agents against this fatal disease. PMID:22135504

Herrero-Martin, David; Fourtouna, Argyro; Niedan, Stephan; Riedmann, Lucia T.; Schwentner, Raphaela; Aryee, Dave N. T.

2011-01-01

254

The “Musical Emotional Bursts”: a validated set of musical affect bursts to investigate auditory affective processing  

PubMed Central

The Musical Emotional Bursts (MEB) consist of 80 brief musical executions expressing basic emotional states (happiness, sadness and fear) and neutrality. These musical bursts were designed to be the musical analog of the Montreal Affective Voices (MAV)—a set of brief non-verbal affective vocalizations portraying different basic emotions. The MEB consist of short (mean duration: 1.6 s) improvisations on a given emotion or of imitations of a given MAV stimulus, played on a violin (10 stimuli × 4 [3 emotions + neutral]), or a clarinet (10 stimuli × 4 [3 emotions + neutral]). The MEB arguably represent a primitive form of music emotional expression, just like the MAV represent a primitive form of vocal, non-linguistic emotional expression. To create the MEB, stimuli were recorded from 10 violinists and 10 clarinetists, and then evaluated by 60 participants. Participants evaluated 240 stimuli [30 stimuli × 4 (3 emotions + neutral) × 2 instruments] by performing either a forced-choice emotion categorization task, a valence rating task or an arousal rating task (20 subjects per task); 40 MAVs were also used in the same session with similar task instructions. Recognition accuracy of emotional categories expressed by the MEB (n:80) was lower than for the MAVs but still very high with an average percent correct recognition score of 80.4%. Highest recognition accuracies were obtained for happy clarinet (92.0%) and fearful or sad violin (88.0% each) MEB stimuli. The MEB can be used to compare the cerebral processing of emotional expressions in music and vocal communication, or used for testing affective perception in patients with communication problems. PMID:23964255

Paquette, Sébastien; Peretz, Isabelle; Belin, Pascal

2013-01-01

255

Human factors with nonhumans - Factors that affect computer-task performance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There are two general strategies that may be employed for 'doing human factors research with nonhuman animals'. First, one may use the methods of traditional human factors investigations to examine the nonhuman animal-to-machine interface. Alternatively, one might use performance by nonhuman animals as a surrogate for or model of performance by a human operator. Each of these approaches is illustrated with data in the present review. Chronic ambient noise was found to have a significant but inconsequential effect on computer-task performance by rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). Additional data supported the generality of findings such as these to humans, showing that rhesus monkeys are appropriate models of human psychomotor performance. It is argued that ultimately the interface between comparative psychology and technology will depend on the coordinated use of both strategies of investigation.

Washburn, David A.

1992-01-01

256

Hemolymph factors affecting respiratory pumping in Aplysia californica  

E-print Network

for triggering RPS is a hemolymph-borne factor(s). Biochemical analysis of hemolymph showed: 1) the potential triggering factor in the hemolymph was not adsorbed to a C18 silica (SepPak) cartridge; 2) there was no significant difference between amino acid...C and the supernate was lyophilized for approximately 12 hours at 20oC. The residue was then resuspended in sterile saline and run through the C18 SepPak as described above (see Research Protocol 2a). The samples were then lyophilized, and again resuspended in 1...

Tigert, Susan Jill

1991-01-01

257

Light and Temperature: Key Factors Affecting Walleye Abundance and Production  

Microsoft Academic Search

We used published information to determine optimum light and temperature conditions for walleye Sander vitreus (formerly Stizostedion vitreum) and then applied this simple niche definition to predict how water clarity, temperature, and bathymetry affect walleye habitat availability. Our model calculated thermal–optical habitat area (TOHA), the benthic area of a lake that supplies optimum light, and temperature conditions for walleye during

Nigel P. Lester; Alan J. Dextrase; Robert S. Kushneriuk; Michael R. Rawson; Phil A. Ryan

2004-01-01

258

Factors Affecting Sea Lamprey Egg Survival STEPHEN J. SMITH  

E-print Network

is a nuisance parasitic fish in Lake Champlain that negatively affects important sport fish populations lamprey abundance (Marsden et al. 2003). Lake Champlain is 193 km long, has a maximum width of 19 km nontarget mortality in regularly treated tributaries. A population model of sea lampreys in Lake Champlain

Marsden, Ellen

259

Institutional Factors Affecting Biophysical Outcomes in Forest Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although there is considerable interest in the impact of diverse policies affecting the biophysical outcomes in forests, gaining a substantial sample over time of forests under different institutional arrangements has been difficult. This article analyzes data from 46 forests located in six countries over time. In forests where policies have been…

Coleman, Eric A.

2009-01-01

260

Factors, Correlates, Emotional Barriers Affecting Career Decisions of College Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The correlates of career choice and the problem areas affecting career decisions are important to counseling psychologists. They are important to understanding the complexities of vocational behavior, facilitating differential treatment in counseling, and developing preventive career programs for men, women, and special groups. The effects of the…

O'Neil, James M.; And Others

261

Factors affecting bleedthrough of phenolic resin adhesive in hardwood plywood  

Microsoft Academic Search

Some variables affecting the bleedthrough of phenolic resin adhesives in hardwood plywood were studied quantitatively. Variables included resin age, age of adhesive mix, extender\\/water ratio, amount of glue spread, aseembly time, veneer moisture content, species differences, grain angle, platen pressure, pressure cycle, platen temperature and rate of temperature rise.

Ben S. Bryant; Jose M. Ramos Garcia

1967-01-01

262

ANALYSIS OF FACTORS AFFECTING METHANE GAS RECOVERY FROM SIX LANDFILLS  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of a pilot study of six U.S. landfills that have methane (CH4) gas recovery systems. NOTE: The study was a first step in developing a field testing program to gather data to identify key variables that affect CH4 generation and to develop an empirical mod...

263

Factors Affecting Science Teaching Efficacy of Preservice Elementary Teachers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Preservice elementary teachers entering the specialized coursework designed to prepare them for science teaching responsibilities have a broad range of efficacy beliefs about their success as future science teachers. As they progress through science methods and practicum courses, and on to complete their student teaching, their efficacy beliefs may change. Knowing the variables that affect the development of positive efficacy

Pamela Cantrell; Suzanne Young; Alan Moore

2003-01-01

264

Environmental factors affecting flowering of rice flower ( Ozothamnus diosmifolius, Vent.)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rice flower (Ozothamnus diosmifolius, Vent.), native to east Australia, is a spring flowering perennial shrub. It is a new cut flower plant, recently introduced into cultivation in Australia and in Israel. Its response to environmental conditions, which affect growth and flowering, are not yet known. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of growth temperature, photoperiod

Abraham H. Halevy; Eitan Shlomo; Michal Shvartz

2001-01-01

265

Factors that affect the fatigue strength of power transmission shafting  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A long standing objective in the design of power transmission shafting is to eliminate excess shaft material without compromising operational reliability. A shaft design method is presented which accounts for variable amplitude loading histories and their influence on limited life designs. The effects of combined bending and torsional loading are considered along with a number of application factors known to influence the fatigue strength of shafting materials. Among the factors examined are surface condition, size, stress concentration, residual stress and corrosion fatigue.

Loewenthal, S. H.

1984-01-01

266

FACTORS AFFECTING SENSITIVITY OF CHEMICAL AND ECOLOGICAL RESPONSES OF MARINE EMBAYMEMTS TO NITROGEN LOADING  

EPA Science Inventory

This paper summarizes an ongoing examination of the primary factors that affect sensitivity of marine embayment responses to nitrogen loading. Included is a discussion of two methods for using these factors: classification of embayments into discrete sensitivity classes and norma...

267

Factors affecting engorgement behavior in the salt marsh horse fly, Tabanus nigrovittatus Macquart (Diptera: Tabanidae)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Female Tabanus nigrovittatus were field collected and used in laboratory experimentation to further elucidate the physiological and behavioral factors that affect engorgement. Previous studies have shown that sulfakinins are feeding satiety factors in invertebrates. This study demonstrates that sulf...

268

How Enzymes Work: Investigating their specificity and susceptibility to environmental factors using Jell-O.  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity is a lab investigation in which students design and conduct experiments using pineapple juice containing the enzyme bromelain and its affect on the substrate gelatin found in Jell-O. The focus of student driven investigations are on enzyme specificity, activity and the impact of environmental factors on enzyme functioning.

Heather Netland, Jefferson High School, Alexandria, MN, based on the original activities from School Improvement in Maryland; "Pineapple/Jell-O Lab," Access Excellence Activities Exchange; "Enzyme Labs Using Jell-O" by Anne McDonald and Michael O'Hare, and AP & Regents Biology; "Lab 8: Pineapple Enzymes and Jell-O Molds" by Kim B. Foglia.

269

Investigation of Solder Fatigue Acceleration Factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Solder fatigue was investigated experimentally for effects of the strain loading waveform in isothermal mechanical fatigue, and frequency and strain range in true thermal cycling. Rapid strain loading followed by a long hold period at constant strain was found to be very damaging compared to constant rate cycling at the same peak amplitude and period. Thermal cycle fatigue data showed

L. R. FOX; J. W. SOFIA; M. C. SHINE

1985-01-01

270

Factors affecting the toxicity of methylmercury injected into eggs.  

PubMed

We developed a standardized protocol for comparing the sensitivities of the embryos of different bird species to methylmercury when methylmercury was injected into their eggs. During the course of developing this protocol, we investigated the effects of various factors on the toxicity of the injected methylmercury. Most of our experiments were done with chicken (Gallus domesticus), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), and ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) eggs, all of which were purchased in large numbers from game farms. A smaller amount of work was done with double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) eggs collected from the wild. Several solvents were tested, and corn oil at a rate of 1 microl/g egg contents was selected for the final standardized protocol because it had minimal toxicity to embryos and because methylmercury dissolved in corn oil yielded a dose-response curve in a range of egg concentrations that was similar to the range that causes reproductive impairment when the mother deposits methylmercury into her own eggs. The embryonic stage at which eggs were injected with corn oil altered mercury toxicity; at early stages, the corn oil itself was toxic. Therefore, in the final protocol we standardized the time of injection to occur when each species reached the morphologic equivalent of a 3-day-old chicken embryo. Although solvents can be injected directly into the albumen of an egg, high embryo mortality can occur in the solvent controls because of the formation of air bubbles in the albumen. Our final protocol used corn oil injections into the air cell, which are easier and safer than albumen injections. Most of the methylmercury, when dissolved in corn oil, injected into the air cell passes through the inner shell membrane and into the egg albumen. Most commercial incubators incubate eggs in trays with the air cell end of the egg pointing upward, but we discovered that mercury-induced mortality was too great when eggs were held in this orientation. In addition, some species of bird eggs require incubation on their sides with the eggs being rolled 180 degrees for them to develop normally. Therefore, we adopted a procedure of incubating the eggs of all species on their sides and rolling them 180 degrees every hour. Little has been published about the conditions of temperature, humidity, and the movements to which eggs of wild birds need to be subjected for them to hatch optimally under artificial incubation. Not unexpectedly, hatching success in an artificial incubator is generally less than what natural incubation by the parents can achieve. However, the survival of control embryos of most wild bird species was good (generally > or = 80%) up to within 1 or 2 days of hatching when we incubated the eggs at 37.5 degrees C (or 37.6 degrees C for gallinaceous species) at a relative humidity that resulted in an approximate 15% to 16% loss in egg weight by the end of incubation and by incubating the eggs on their sides and rolling them 180 degrees /h. To improve statistical comparisons, we used survival through 90% of incubation as our measurement to compare survival of controls with survival of eggs injected with graded concentrations of mercury. PMID:16307214

Heinz, G H; Hoffman, D J; Kondrad, S L; Erwin, C A

2006-02-01

271

Metallurgical factors affecting fracture toughness of aluminum alloys  

Microsoft Academic Search

Crack extension in commercial aluminum alloys proceeds by the “ductile” or fibrous mode. The process involves the large, ~1\\u000a ?m to ~10?m, Fe-, Si-, and Cu-bearing inclusions which break easily, and the growth of voids at the cracked particles. The\\u000a linking-up of the voids is accomplished by the rupture of the intervening ligaments, and this is affected by the fine,

G. T. Hahn; A. R. Rosenfield

1975-01-01

272

Rotating biological contactors: a review on main factors affecting performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rotating biological contactors (RBCs) constitute a very unique and superior alternative for biodegradable matter and nitrogen\\u000a removal on account of their feasibility, simplicity of design and operation, short start-up, low land area requirement, low\\u000a energy consumption, low operating and maintenance cost and treatment efficiency. The present review of RBCs focus on parameters\\u000a that affect performance like rotational speed, organic and

S. Cortez; P. Teixeira; R. Oliveira; M. Mota

2008-01-01

273

Factors affecting the energy consumption of two refrigerator-freezers  

SciTech Connect

Two refrigerator-freezers, one with a top-mounted freezer and one with side-by-side doors, were tested in the laboratory to determine the sensitivity of their energy consumption to various operational factors. Room temperature, room humidity, door openings, and the setting of the anti-sweat heater switch were the factors examined. The results indicated that the room temperature and door openings had a significantly greater effect on energy consumption than the other two factors. More detailed tests were then performed under different room temperature and door-opening combinations. The relationship of door openings and the equivalent test room temperature was established. Finally, the effect on energy of different temperature settings was studied. Test results are presented and discussed.

Kao, J.Y.; Kelley, G.E. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Building and Fire Research Lab.

1996-12-31

274

Factors affecting the repeatability of gamma camera calibration for quantitative imaging applications using a sealed source.  

PubMed

Several applications in nuclear medicine require absolute activity quantification of single photon emission computed tomography images. Obtaining a repeatable calibration factor that converts voxel values to activity units is essential for these applications. Because source preparation and measurement of the source activity using a radionuclide activity meter are potential sources of variability, this work investigated instrumentation and acquisition factors affecting repeatability using planar acquisition of sealed sources. The calibration factor was calculated for different acquisition and geometry conditions to evaluate the effect of the source size, lateral position of the source in the camera field-of-view (FOV), source-to-camera distance (SCD), and variability over time using sealed Ba-133 sources. A small region of interest (ROI) based on the source dimensions and collimator resolution was investigated to decrease the background effect. A statistical analysis with a mixed-effects model was used to evaluate quantitatively the effect of each variable on the global calibration factor variability. A variation of 1?cm in the measurement of the SCD from the assumed distance of 17?cm led to a variation of 1-2% in the calibration factor measurement using a small disc source (0.4?cm diameter) and less than 1% with a larger rod source (2.9?cm diameter). The lateral position of the source in the FOV and the variability over time had small impacts on calibration factor variability. The residual error component was well estimated by Poisson noise. Repeatability of better than 1% in a calibration factor measurement using a planar acquisition of a sealed source can be reasonably achieved. The best reproducibility was obtained with the largest source with a count rate much higher than the average background in the ROI, and when the SCD was positioned within 5?mm of the desired position. In this case, calibration source variability was limited by the quantum noise. PMID:25592130

Anizan, N; Wang, H; Zhou, X C; Wahl, R L; Frey, E C

2015-02-01

275

Factors affecting the repeatability of gamma camera calibration for quantitative imaging applications using a sealed source  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several applications in nuclear medicine require absolute activity quantification of single photon emission computed tomography images. Obtaining a repeatable calibration factor that converts voxel values to activity units is essential for these applications. Because source preparation and measurement of the source activity using a radionuclide activity meter are potential sources of variability, this work investigated instrumentation and acquisition factors affecting repeatability using planar acquisition of sealed sources. The calibration factor was calculated for different acquisition and geometry conditions to evaluate the effect of the source size, lateral position of the source in the camera field-of-view (FOV), source-to-camera distance (SCD), and variability over time using sealed Ba-133 sources. A small region of interest (ROI) based on the source dimensions and collimator resolution was investigated to decrease the background effect. A statistical analysis with a mixed-effects model was used to evaluate quantitatively the effect of each variable on the global calibration factor variability. A variation of 1?cm in the measurement of the SCD from the assumed distance of 17?cm led to a variation of 1–2% in the calibration factor measurement using a small disc source (0.4?cm diameter) and less than 1% with a larger rod source (2.9?cm diameter). The lateral position of the source in the FOV and the variability over time had small impacts on calibration factor variability. The residual error component was well estimated by Poisson noise. Repeatability of better than 1% in a calibration factor measurement using a planar acquisition of a sealed source can be reasonably achieved. The best reproducibility was obtained with the largest source with a count rate much higher than the average background in the ROI, and when the SCD was positioned within 5?mm of the desired position. In this case, calibration source variability was limited by the quantum noise.

Anizan, N.; Wang, H.; Zhou, X. C.; Wahl, R. L.; Frey, E. C.

2015-02-01

276

Factors Affecting Technology Uses in Schools: An Ecological Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Why is technology not used more in schools? Many researchers have tried to solve this persistent puzzle. The authors of this article report on their study of technology uses in 19 schools. They suggest an ecological metaphor, using the example of the introduction of the zebra mussel into the Great Lakes, to integrate and organize sets of factors

Zhao, Yong; Frank, Kenneth A.

2003-01-01

277

Caregiver Support Groups: Factors Affecting Use of Services.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined effects of factors on support group attendance among family caregivers to frail elderly relatives. Found that attendance by primary caregivers was greater for those who were older, who had secondary informal caregiver involved in providing care, or who had significant health problems. Attendance was greater for those caring for…

Monahan, Deborah J.; And Others

1992-01-01

278

Factors Affecting the Shape of Current-Potential Curves.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Voltammetry, the fundamental electrochemical experiment, is the measurement of the current which flows at an electrode as a function of the potential applied to the electrode. Such an experiment is discussed, focusing on factors which influence the shape of the current potential curve. (JN)

Maloy, J. T.

1983-01-01

279

Factors Affecting Zinc Content of Bovine Hair1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ten experiments were conducted to study the effects of potentially important factors on the zinc content of cattle hair. In Holsteins the order of descending amounts of zinc in hair were white tail, black body, and white body. Jersey fawn had slightly more zinc than black Holstein hair. The distal and proxinml ends of the hair contained the same amounts.

W. J. Miller; G. W. Powell; W. J. Pitts; H. F. Perkins

1965-01-01

280

School-Related Factors Affecting High School Seniors' Methamphetamine Use  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data from the 2005 Monitoring the Future survey were used to examine relationships between school-related factors and high school seniors' lifetime methamphetamine use. The study applied logistic regression techniques to evaluate effects of social bonding variables and social learning variables on likelihood of lifetime methamphetamine use. The…

Stanley, Jarrod M.; Lo, Celia C.

2009-01-01

281

Historic Factors Affecting Educational Administration in Korean Higher Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An official of the Korean Education Department Institute analyzes the effect of historic factors on current educational administration in Korea. He suggests that Confucianism, Shinto-Confucianism, Christianity, and Western ideas mainly dominate current Korean educational administration's organizational structure, culture, and leadership, while…

Lee, Jeong-Kyu

1999-01-01

282

Factors Affecting Junior High School Students' Interest in Physics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We report the results of a study on students' interest in physics at the end of their compulsory schooling in Israel carried out in the framework of the ROSE Project. Factors studied were their opinions about science classes, their out-of-school experiences in physics, and their attitudes toward science and technology. Students' overall interest…

Trumper, Ricardo

2006-01-01

283

FACTORS AFFECTING DISINFECTION AND STABILIZATION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE  

EPA Science Inventory

Effective disinfection and stabilization of sewage sludge prior to land application is essential to not only protect human health, but also to convince the public of its benefits and safety. A basic understanding of the key factors involved in producing a stable biosolid product ...

284

Factors affecting lake whitefish recruitment in the Laurentian Great Lakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent ecological changes in the upper Laurentian Great Lakes have led to reduced growth and condition of several lake whitefish stocks. These changes have raised concerns over age estimate reliability and the role of intrinsic biotic factors in reproduction and subsequent recruitment. To address these issues, I: (1) examined variation and efficacy of three age estimation methods for the Bailey's

Andrew M Muir

2008-01-01

285

Meteorological factors affecting ozone profiles over the western North Atlantic  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ozone measurements taken with an aircraft over the western North Ariantie in the summer of 1992 revealed numerous profiles that consisted of two principal layers with different, nearly constant mixing ratios in each layer. The lower layer was char- acterized by relatively low mixing ratios (< 25-30 parts per billion by volume), while the upper layer had values a factor

J. C. Doran; S. Zhong; C. M. Berkowitz

1996-01-01

286

Meteorological factors affecting ozone profiles over the western North Atlantic  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ozone measurements taken with an aircraft over the western North Atlantic in the summer of 1992 revealed numerous profiles that consisted of two principal layers with different, nearly constant mixing ratios in each layer. The lower layer was characterized by relatively low mixing ratios (<25-30 parts per billion by volume), while the upper layer had values a factor of 2

J. C. Doran; S. Zhong; C. M. Berkowitz

1996-01-01

287

Factors That Affect Initial Enrollment of Working Adult, Graduate Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

What factors lead working adults to initially enroll in graduate programs? Is the undergraduate degree no longer enough to sustain a rewarding career? Little is known as to why this segment of graduate students are building careers and pursuing advanced degrees simultaneously. Traditional institutions of higher learning have primarily focused on…

Adrignola, Matt Nolan

2010-01-01

288

Factors Affecting Principal Turnover: A Study of Three Midwestern Cities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose. This dissertation addresses the problem of principal turnover. Using state and city level administrative data, a study of principals and their schools in greater Kansas City, Missouri, St. Louis, Missouri, and Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was conducted with the goal of discovering themes that emerge regarding the factors associated with turnover…

Belt, Charles M.

2009-01-01

289

FACTORS AFFECTING PREDATION AT SONGBIRD NESTS IN OLD FIELDS  

Microsoft Academic Search

We determined the effects of microhabitat, year, weather, time of season, stage of the nesting cycle, and brood parasitism on nest predation from a 7-year dataset on field sparrows (Spizella pusilla) and indigo buntings (Passerina cyanea) in-central Missouri, USA. Year, site, and the interaction of species and 2-week interval of the sea- son were important factors explaining nest predation. The

DIRK E. BURHANS; DONALD DEARBORN; FRANK R. THOMPSON; JOHN FAABORG

290

FACTORS AFFECTING THE DEPOSITION OF INHALED POROUS DRUG PARTICLES  

EPA Science Inventory

Abstract Recent findings indicate that the inhalation of large manufactured porous particles may be particularly effective for drug delivery. In this study, a mathematical model was employed to systematically investigate the effects of particle size, particle density, aerosol ...

291

Factors affecting the performance of membrane bioreactor for piggery wastewater treatment.  

PubMed

This study was conducted to identify the factors affecting the performance of membrane bioreactor (MBR) for piggery wastewater treatment. The change of organic and nitrogen concentrations in piggery wastewater was studied to investigate the treatment efficiency. The increase of COD, BOD and NH(3)-N from 1150 to 2050 mg/L, 683 to 1198 mg/L and 154 to 248 mg/L has led to the decrease of treatment efficiency. Removal efficiencies of COD, BOD and NH(3)-N have decreased from 96.0% to 92.0%, 97.0% to 92.7% and 93.2% to 69.5%, respectively. The effects of biomass characteristics on membrane fouling were determined based on Pearson's correlation coefficient (r(p)). It was found that MLSS had a negative correlation with permeate flux (r(p)=-0.745, at significant level of 0.05) while sludge floc size a positive correlation (r(p)=0.731, at significant level of 0.05). MLSS and sludge floc size were found to be the dominant factors that controlled the membrane filterability while sludge viscosity, EPS, SMP and SV(30) have taken as the sub-factors affecting membrane fouling. PMID:19268579

Kornboonraksa, Thipsuree; Lee, Seung Hwan

2009-06-01

292

Factors Affecting Diurnal Activity of Fishers in North-Central British Columbia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mustelids, with their long, thin bodies and poor fat storage capabilities, perform an energetic balancing act when making decisions about energy expenditure. Activity rates provide vital insights into the factors that may affect these energy balances. Using radiotelemetry, we examined factors that affected the likelihood of diurnal activity of fishers (Martes pennanti) in north-central British Columbia, Canada. We assessed the

Richard D. Weir; Fraser B. Corbould

2007-01-01

293

The Internal Structure of Positive and Negative Affect: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the PANAS  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study tested five confirmatory factor analytic (CFA) models of the Positive Affect Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) to provide validity evidence based on its internal structure. A sample of 223 club sport athletes indicated their emotions during the past week. Results revealed that an orthogonal two-factor CFA model, specifying error…

Tuccitto, Daniel E.; Giacobbi, Peter R., Jr.; Leite, Walter L.

2010-01-01

294

Factors Affecting the Tunneling Behavior of the Western Subterranean Termite, Reticulitermes hesperus Banks1  

E-print Network

Factors Affecting the Tunneling Behavior of the Western Subterranean Termite, Reticulitermes factors that affect the tunneling behavior of the western subterranean termite (Reticulitermes hesperus. Termites did not tunnel in soils treated with as little as 1 ppm bifenthrin or cypermethrin. Exposure

Standiford, Richard B.

295

FACTORS AFFECTING THE VOCAL BEHAVIOUR OF EAGLE OWLS BUBO BUBO: EFFECTS OF SEX AND TERRITORIAL STATUS  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY.—Factors affecting the vocal behaviour of Eagle Owls Bubo bubo: effects of sex and territo- rial status. We performed a playback experiment in order to assess the efficiency of two methods for detec- ting Eagle Owls Bubo bubo and to assess factors affecting detection rates. On each experimental visit we re- corded the number and sex of the responding owls,

José Antonio M ARTÍNEZ; Iñigo ZUBEROGOITIA

296

Management and Conservation Article Factors Affecting Daily Nest Survival of Burrowing Owls  

E-print Network

Management and Conservation Article Factors Affecting Daily Nest Survival of Burrowing Owls Within survival for a migratory population of burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia) breeding in black-tailed prairie also examined whether 8 intrinsic and extrinsic factors affected daily nest survival in burrowing owls

Conway, Courtney J.

297

29 CFR 784.118 - The exemption is intended for work affected by natural factors.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...for work affected by natural factors. 784.118 Section 784.118 Labor...Character and Scope of the Section 13(a)(5) Exemption...for work affected by natural factors. As indicated...the purpose of the section 13(a)(5)...

2010-07-01

298

29 CFR 784.118 - The exemption is intended for work affected by natural factors.  

...for work affected by natural factors. 784.118 Section 784.118 Labor...Character and Scope of the Section 13(a)(5) Exemption...for work affected by natural factors. As indicated...the purpose of the section 13(a)(5)...

2014-07-01

299

29 CFR 784.118 - The exemption is intended for work affected by natural factors.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for work affected by natural factors. 784.118 Section 784.118 Labor...Character and Scope of the Section 13(a)(5) Exemption...for work affected by natural factors. As indicated...the purpose of the section 13(a)(5)...

2012-07-01

300

29 CFR 784.118 - The exemption is intended for work affected by natural factors.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for work affected by natural factors. 784.118 Section 784.118 Labor...Character and Scope of the Section 13(a)(5) Exemption...for work affected by natural factors. As indicated...the purpose of the section 13(a)(5)...

2013-07-01

301

29 CFR 784.118 - The exemption is intended for work affected by natural factors.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for work affected by natural factors. 784.118 Section 784.118 Labor...Character and Scope of the Section 13(a)(5) Exemption...for work affected by natural factors. As indicated...the purpose of the section 13(a)(5)...

2011-07-01

302

FACTORS AFFECTING MACROPHYTE AND FISH DISTRIBUTION IN COASTAL WETLANDS OF GEORGIAN BAY  

E-print Network

FACTORS AFFECTING MACROPHYTE AND FISH DISTRIBUTION IN COASTAL WETLANDS OF GEORGIAN BAY #12;FACTORS AFFECTING MACROPHYTE AND FISH DISTRIBUTION IN COASTAL WETLANDS OF GEORGIAN BAY By MAJA CVETKOVIC, B and fish distribution in coastal wetlands of Georgian Bay AUTHOR: Maja Cvetkovic, B.Sc. (Mc

McMaster University

303

Factors affecting retention in science-based curriculums at HBCUs  

SciTech Connect

A systematic and comprehensive study of the retention of minority students enrolled in college-level engineering was conducted. The majority of prior work in this area focused on institutional retention factors for students in non-specified majors and considered students ``dropouts`` whenever there was a break in enrollment. This study looked only at students whose beginning major was engineering, enrolled primarily at historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), including a comparison sample from a predominantly white institution (PWI). Science persisters were defined as those students who continuously enrolled in post-secondary institutions full- and part-time -- whether or not they transferred between institutions. The critical factor was their continued enrollment in engineering. Study participants provided four types of information: (1) a measure of academic motivation, (2) an objective measure of science interest, (3) a measure of nine aspects of normal personality functioning, and (4) an assessment of selected demographic variables. 64 refs.

Pelham, J.

1991-12-31

304

Factors affecting retention in science-based curriculums at HBCUs  

SciTech Connect

A systematic and comprehensive study of the retention of minority students enrolled in college-level engineering was conducted. The majority of prior work in this area focused on institutional retention factors for students in non-specified majors and considered students dropouts'' whenever there was a break in enrollment. This study looked only at students whose beginning major was engineering, enrolled primarily at historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), including a comparison sample from a predominantly white institution (PWI). Science persisters were defined as those students who continuously enrolled in post-secondary institutions full- and part-time -- whether or not they transferred between institutions. The critical factor was their continued enrollment in engineering. Study participants provided four types of information: (1) a measure of academic motivation, (2) an objective measure of science interest, (3) a measure of nine aspects of normal personality functioning, and (4) an assessment of selected demographic variables. 64 refs.

Pelham, J.

1991-01-01

305

Factors that affect adolescents' adherence to diabetes treatment.  

PubMed

There is strong evidence suggesting young people with type 1 diabetes experience difficulties adhering to their treatment regimens. The purpose of this literature review is to identify reasons for a lack of compliance in adolescents to allow nurses to develop knowledge to help improve treatment adherence. A literature search was undertaken by searching databases using key terms and inclusion criteria identified. The three themes are: parental influence, peer influence and depression. Findings indicate parental influence may be the main contributing factor towards non-compliance; however, associations between themes imply non-compliance is a result of a combination of factors. Limitations have been highlighted from the articles reviewed and provide opportunity for future research. PMID:25671752

Cox, Laura; Hunt, Jane

2015-02-01

306

Environmental factors affecting song control and song perception in songbirds  

Microsoft Academic Search

In songbirds, the differentiation of song and the song control system in the brain is mediated by the action of gonadal steroid\\u000a hormones that are influenced by environmental factors such as day length, food availability, and social relationships. In\\u000a particular, the Canary (Serinus canaria) and the Zebra Finch (Taeniopygia guttata) have become widely used animal models to study these brain

Stefan Leitner

2007-01-01

307

Factors affecting attitudinal patterns toward education in the Dominican Republic  

E-print Network

to maintain some form of equilibrium. In order to effectively change the norms that may impede organized change, the attitudes toward these norms must be understood and taken into account. This thesis was concerned with one small aspecr of rhe total... The general objective of this thesis was to determine the attitude toward education of people in the Dominican Republic. Subsequent objectives included establishing the effect the following factors might have in relation to attitude toward education: age...

Carpenter, Edwin Hugh

1968-01-01

308

Factors affecting statistical power in the detection of genetic association  

PubMed Central

The mapping of disease genes to specific loci has received a great deal of attention in the last decade, and many advances in therapeutics have resulted. Here we review family-based and population-based methods for association analysis. We define the factors that determine statistical power and show how study design and analysis should be designed to maximize the probability of localizing disease genes. PMID:15931375

Gordon, Derek; Finch, Stephen J.

2005-01-01

309

Israeli women entrepreneurs: An examination of factors affecting performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines individual factors influencing performance of 200 Israeli women-owned businesses. Whereas research on women entrepreneurs is extensive in developed countries, especially in the United States and Europe, there are comparatively few studies of performance of women-owned businesses in non-OECD countries. There is evidence that social structures (work, family, and organized social life) vary among developed and developing countries

Robert Hisrich; Candida Brush

1997-01-01

310

Factors Affecting Dynamic Populations (title provided or enhanced by cataloger)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson plan teaches students that populations are dynamic with identifiable characteristics and measurable growth patterns. Factors of population survival that are taught include immigration and emigration, environmental resistance, carrying capacity, and homeostasis. The lesson plan provides objectives, skills, time needed, a content outline, materials, and significant terms. The overarching goal is for students to develop an understanding of the interdependence of all organisms and the need for conserving natural resources.

311

Factors Affecting HIV Contraceptive Decision-Making Among Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined contraceptive decision-making among African American, Latina, and European American women ages 18–50 years. Logistic regressions examined relationships between demographic and religious factors, unintended pregnancies, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), reasons for sex, and contraceptive decision-making. Women who were older, single, African American, used pregnancy prevention, and had histories of STDs and unintended pregnancies made contraceptive decisions alone. Older and

Gail E. Wyatt; JenniferVargas Carmona; TamraBurns Loeb; Donald Guthrie; Dorothy Chin; Gwen Gordon

2000-01-01

312

Factors affecting hexavalent chromium reduction in pure cultures of bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Batch studies were conducted to evaluate the effect of environmental factors on the rate of Cr(VI) reduction by two organisms, Bacillus sp. (a new isolate), and Pseudomonas fluorescens LB 300. Both organisms utilized glucose for Cr(VI) reduction under aerobic conditions. Higher Cr(VI) reduction rates were obtained with higher initial cell concentrations, but the specific rate (normalized against initial cell concentration),

Yi-Tin Wang; Changsong Xiao

1995-01-01

313

Factors affecting the morphology of isocitrate lyase crystals  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Isocitrate lyase crystals have been grown by the hanging drop vapor equilibration method in both 1-g and microgravity and by vapor equilibrium in small capillaries. The crystal morphologies obtained have ranged from dendritic to 'octagonal' prisms. Theoretical evaporation models have been applied to these growth regimes. The results of these analyses along with other experimental results, indicate the factors which must be controlled to produce good growth morphologies.

Demattei, Robert C.; Feigelson, Robert S.; Weber, Patricia C.

1992-01-01

314

Factors Affecting Nitrate Delivery to Streams from Shallow Ground Water in the North Carolina Coastal Plain  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An analysis of data collected at five flow-path study sites between 1997 and 2006 was performed to identify the factors needed to formulate a comprehensive program, with a focus on nitrogen, for protecting ground water and surface water in the North Carolina Coastal Plain. Water-quality protection in the Coastal Plain requires the identification of factors that affect the transport of nutrients from recharge areas to streams through the shallow ground-water system. Some basins process or retain nitrogen more readily than others, and the factors that affect nitrogen processing and retention were the focus of this investigation to improve nutrient management in Coastal Plain streams and to reduce nutrient loads to coastal waters. Nitrate reduction in ground water was observed at all five flow-path study sites in the North Carolina Coastal Plain, although the extent of reduction at each site was influenced by various environmental, hydrogeologic, and geochemical factors. Denitrification was the most common factor responsible for decreases in nitrate along the ground-water flow paths. Specific factors, some of which affect denitrification rates, that appeared to influence ground-water nitrate concentrations along the flow paths or in the streams include soil drainage, presence or absence of riparian buffers, evapotranspiration, fertilizer use, ground-water recharge rates and residence times, aquifer properties, subsurface tile drainage, sources and amounts of organic matter, and hyporheic processes. The study data indicate that the nitrate-reducing capacity of the buffer zone combined with that of the hyporheic zone can substantially lower the amount of ground-water nitrate discharged to streams in agricultural settings of the North Carolina Coastal Plain. At the watershed scale, the effects of ground-water discharge on surface-water quality appear to be greatly influenced by streamflow conditions and the presence of extensive riparian vegetation. Streamflow statistics that reflect base flow and the general hydrologic dynamics of a stream are important in understanding nutrient transport from a watershed and may be useful indicators of watersheds that are likely to have higher yields of nutrients and water. Combining streamflow statistics with information on such factors as land use, soil drainage, extent of riparian vegetation, geochemical conditions, and subsurface tile drainage in the Coastal Plain can be useful in identifying watersheds that are most likely to export excessive nitrogen due to nonpoint-source loadings and watersheds that are effective in processing nitrogen.

Harden, Stephen L.; Spruill, Timothy B.

2008-01-01

315

Factors Affecting Children’s Adjustment to the Death of a Parent: The Social Work Professional’s Viewpoint  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated factors affecting the adjustment of parentally bereaved children by reviewing existing literature and comparing it to observations made by professional social workers. Interviewees had between 1 1\\/2 and 22 years of experience in counseling bereaved children. The specific factors examined were age and sex of the bereaved child, circumstances of the death, and adjustment of remaining caregiver. Participants (n = 5)

Rebecca M. Hope; Diane M. Hodge

2006-01-01

316

Hydrostatic factors affect the gravity responses of algae and roots  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The hypothesis of Wayne et al. (1990) that plant cells perceive gravity by sensing a pressure differential between the top and the bottom of the cell was tested by subjecting rice roots and cells of Caracean algae to external solutions of various densities. It was found that increasing the density of the external medium had a profound effect on the polar ratio (PR, the ratio between velocities of the downwardly and upwardly streaming cytoplasm) of the Caracean algae cells. When these cells were placed in solutions of denser compound, the PR decreased to less than 1, as the density of the external medium became higher than that of the cell; thus, the normal gravity-induced polarity was reversed, indicating that the osmotic pressure of the medium affects the cell's ability to respond to gravity. In rice roots, an increase of the density of the solution inhibited the rate of gravitropism. These results agree with predictions of a hydrostatic model for graviperception.

Staves, Mark P.; Wayne, Randy; Leopold, A. C.

1991-01-01

317

Environmental factors affecting pregnancy: Endocrine disrupters, nutrients and metabolic pathways.  

PubMed

Uterine adenogenesis, a unique post-natal event in mammals, is vulnerable to endocrine disruption by estrogens and progestins resulting in infertility or reduced prolificacy. The absence of uterine glands results in insufficient transport of nutrients into the uterine lumen to support conceptus development. Arginine, a component of histotroph, is substrate for production of nitric oxide, polyamines and agmatine and, with secreted phosphoprotein 1, it affects cytoskeletal organization of trophectoderm. Arginine is critical for development of the conceptus, pregnancy recognition signaling, implantation and placentation. Conceptuses of ungulates and cetaceans convert glucose to fructose which is metabolized via multiple pathways to support growth and development. However, high fructose corn syrup in soft drinks and foods may increase risks for metabolic disorders and increase insulin resistance in adults. Understanding endocrine disrupters and dietary substances, and novel pathways for nutrient metabolism during pregnancy can improve survival and growth, and prevent chronic metabolic diseases in offspring. PMID:25224489

Bazer, Fuller W; Wu, Guoyao; Johnson, Gregory A; Wang, Xiaoqiu

2014-12-01

318

Factors Affecting School District Performance Scores in Louisiana  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between District Performance Scores (DPS) in Louisiana and (a) socio-economic status of students, (b) academic achievement using average ACT scores, (c) percentage of certified teachers, (d) district class size, (e) per pupil expenditure, and (f) percentage of minority students in…

Harrison, Ronnie

2010-01-01

319

A STUDY OF CERTAIN FACTORS AFFECTING CHILDRENS' SCHOOL PERFORMANCE.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

AS PART OF THE RESEARCH ON THE INFLUENCE OF RESPONSE-CONTINGENT REINFORCERS ON THE LEARNING AND PROBLEM-SOLVING BEHAVIOR OF CHILDREN, THE EFFECTS OF A LIMITED NUMBER OF VARIABLES ON THE PERFORMANCE OF CHILDREN OF THREE AGE LEVELS (4-5, 7-8, AND 10-11), SELECTED EQUALLY FROM MIDDLE- AND LOWER-CLASS BACKGROUNDS, WERE INVESTIGATED. THE EXPERIMENTAL…

SPENCE, JANET T.

320

Factors Affecting Middle School Students' Reading Motivation in Taiwan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study employed a triangulated mixed method to investigate reading motivation of Chinese middle school students in Taiwan. A total of 247 seventh grade students (122 boys and 125 girls) participated voluntarily by completing the Chinese Motivation for Research Questionnaire (CMRQ). Sixteen of the 247 students were purposely selected to…

Huang, SuHua

2013-01-01

321

Some factors affecting lipase activity in goat milk  

Microsoft Academic Search

The influence of different temperatures (20 °C, 37 °C and 50 °C), pasteurization (71 °C for 15 s), boiling (100 °C), agitation for 5 and 10 min, pH changes (milk on acidic and alkaline side of pH), certain chemicals (copper sulphate, silver nitrate, lead nitrate and sodium chloride) on the lipase activity in local goat and cow milks was investigated.

J. M. Jandal

1995-01-01

322

Factors Affecting Second Language Achievement in Primary School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates achievement in second language learning (Chinese) in primary school in relation to learner variables such as amount and duration of instruction and home language background. Currently in the State of Victoria it is recommended that all students learn a second language from the beginning of primary school to the end of Year…

Iwashita, Noriko; Liem, Irene

2005-01-01

323

Factors affecting the color of corn tortillas and tortilla chips  

E-print Network

The effects of phenols, amino acids, reducing sugars, pH and bleaching agents on color of tortillas and tortilla chips were investigated. Baked tortillas were equilibrated for 0, 5, 15, 30, 60 min and 24 hr prior to frying to examine the effect...

Mireles, Raquel C

1995-01-01

324

Factors Affecting High School Students' Academic Motivation in Taiwan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this research is to investigate predictive relationships among student characteristics that influence motivation for learning and achievement. A non-Western sample was chosen to test the generalisability of findings outside the Western cultural and social models. The participants were 6,539 students from 14 public high schools distributed across the western half of Taiwan. They were from three grade

Patricia L. Hardré; Ching-Huei Chen; Su-Hua Huang; Chen-Ting Chiang; Fen-Lan Jen; Leslie Warden

2006-01-01

325

Factors affecting the retirement of commercial transport jet aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The historical background of the technology and economics of aircraft replacement and retirement in the prejet era is reviewed in order to determine whether useful insights can be obtained applicable to the jet era. Significant differences between the two periods are noted. New factors are identified and examined. Topics discussed include concern over current policies regarding deregulation, regulatory reform, and retroactive noise regulations; financing and compliance legislation; aging; economic environment and inflation; technological progress; fuel efficiency and cost; and a financial perspective of replacement decisions.

Spencer, F. A.

1979-01-01

326

Factors Affecting Long-term Abstinence from Substances Use  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  The purpose of this study is to explore the attitudes of abstainers from drug use that relate to the factors leading to long-term\\u000a abstinence.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and Methods  Cross-sectional study was carried out in Al-Amal Hospital to examine, which attitudes of abstainers related to long-term abstinence.\\u000a A random survey was conducted on 62 subjects from extended care units. All participants were male

Salah Elgaily Elsheikh

2008-01-01

327

Factors Affecting the Detection Rate of Human Papillomavirus  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Maximizing the accuracy of human papillomavirus (HPV) detection from a single sample is important for clinical and research purposes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether cyclic hormonal variation, recent sexual intercourse, interval between samplings, and the technique used to sample affect the detection of HPV. METHODS This study was a prospective, longitudinal, randomized controlled trial. Three techniques for self-sampling (2 consecutive synthetic polyester fiber [Dacron] swabs, a single Dacron swab, and a tampon) were repeated at 3 different sampling times during a period of 4 to 6 weeks in addition to 1 clinician-directed sampling of the ectocervix and endocervix at the first sampling time. All self-samplings were taken in a proscribed randomized order. Women (aged 18 to 68 years) attending a colposcopy clinic for abnormal cytology or abnormal cervical appearance participated in the study. The outcome measure was the detection of HPV by polymerase chain reaction amplification. RESULTS The 103 participants provided 1,189 cervicovaginal samplings. Logistic regression indicated that intercourse within 48 hours of sampling did not result in a greater detection of high-risk or any HPV type (odds ratio [OR] = 1.05, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.65–1.69; OR = 1.08, 95% CI, 0.73–1.60, respectively). Among those women who have regular menstrual cycles, there was no cyclic effect on HPV detection for high-risk and any HPV types. Time from previous sampling did not affect HPV detection. Among the self-sampling techniques, using a single self-swab and the tampon resulted in the detection of HPV between 10% and 35% less often than using 2 consecutive swabs (P < .025). Self-sampling with 2 swabs was not significantly different from clinician sampling for detecting high-risk HPV types (OR for self-sampling = 0.87 (95% CI, 0.66–1.13)). CONCLUSIONS HPV detection is not dependent on menstrual cycle timings, the recency of intercourse, or the time between samplings, but it is dependent on the sampling technique. PMID:15055412

Harper, Diane M.; Longacre, Meghan R.; Noll, Walter W.; Belloni, Dorothy R.; Cole, Bernard F.

2003-01-01

328

Plasmid Transfer of Plasminogen K1-5 Reduces Subcutaneous Hepatoma Growth by Affecting Inflammatory Factors  

PubMed Central

There is evidence that plasminogen K1-5 (PlgK1-5) directly affects tumour cells and inflammation. Therefore, we analysed if PlgK1-5 has immediate effects on hepatoma cells and inflammatory factors in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, effects of plasmid encoding PlgK1-5 (pK1-5) on Hepa129, Hepa1-6, and HuH7 cell viability, apoptosis, and proliferation as well as VEGF and TNF-alpha expression and STAT3-phosphorylation were investigated. In vivo, tumour growth, proliferation, vessel density, and effects on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) expression were examined following treatment with pK1-5. In vivo, pK1-5 halved cell viability; cell death was increased by up to 15% compared to the corresponding controls. Proliferation was not affected. VEGF, TNF-alpha, and STAT3-phosphorylation were affected following treatment with pK1-5. In vivo, ten days after treatment initiation, pK1-5 reduced subcutaneous tumour growth by 32% and mitosis by up to 77% compared to the controls. Vessel density was reduced by 50%. TNF-alpha levels in tumour and liver tissue were increased, whereas VEGF levels in tumours and livers were reduced after pK1-5 treatment. Taken together, plasmid gene transfer of PlgK1-5 inhibits hepatoma (cell) growth not only by reducing vessel density but also by inducing apoptosis, inhibiting proliferation, and triggering inflammation. PMID:24895598

Koch, Lea A.; Strassburg, Christian P.; Raskopf, Esther

2014-01-01

329

Identification of Factors Which Affect Combustion Efficiency and Environmental Impacts from Woodstoves.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this task report is to document the nature and magnitude of factors which affect pollutant emission rates from residential woodstoves. Four areas of investigation for improving woodstove performance are covered under this task: Step 1--pellet- fueled stoves; Step 2--catalytic retrofit devices; Step 3--stove and fuel load size effects; and Step 4--in situ field testing of stove performance. Steps 1 and 2 address innovative technologies which may be used to reduce pollutant emissions from woodstoves. Pellet-fueled stoves and catalytic add-on devices were evaluated in a laboratory environment to document efficiency and emissions. Step 3 investigated factors for reducing emissions from conventional stove technologies. These factors included stove size and fuel load testing in the laboratory. Field testing was conducted in Step 4 to document ''real world'' stove operation and to assess particulate emissions from woodstoves during such operation. Testing for Task D was completed in March 1986 and results submitted as a draft report in December 1986. 12 figs., 6 tabs.

Burnet, Paul G.; Simons, Carl A.

1988-07-01

330

Factors affecting the rheology and processability of highly filled suspensions.  

PubMed

Suspensions filled with rigid particles at volume-loading levels that approach their maximum packing fraction are widely encountered, especially in the energetics, ceramics, pharmaceutical, magnetics, composites, food, and personal care industries. Highly filled suspensions, regardless of industrial application, exhibit a number of common rheological and processability traits, including viscoplasticity and wall slip, that necessitate special rheometers and appropriate characterization and numerical simulation methods. Furthermore, various factors, including the dispersion and distribution of the particles and their agglomerates, the entrainment of air, the filtration-based migration of the binder phase, and the shear-induced migration of particles, play important roles and must be considered in the design and optimization of manufacturing operations for processing of highly filled suspensions. PMID:24910916

Kalyon, Dilhan M; Akta?, Seda

2014-01-01

331

Factors affecting oral feeding with severe traumatic brain injury.  

PubMed

Safe and adequate nutrition, vital to the recovery from a traumatic brain injury, can be severely compromised by the presence of dysphagia. This study identified injury severity and swallowing factors that were associated with impaired oral intake in patients with severe brain injury. An admitting Glasgow Coma Scale (GSC) 3-5; a Rancho Los Amigos Scale of Cognitive Functioning (RLA) Level II; a computed tomography (CT) scan exhibiting midline shift, brainstem involvement, or brain pathology requiring emergent operative procedures; or ventilation time >/=15 days identified patients at highest risk for abnormal swallowing, aspiration, and delay in initiation of oral feeding and achievement of total oral feeding. When combined in multivariate models, RLA Level, CT scan, ventilation time and aspiration emerged as significant independent predictors of impaired oral intake. PMID:10653939

Mackay, L E; Morgan, A S; Bernstein, B A

1999-10-01

332

Factors affecting the regulation of pacing: current perspectives  

PubMed Central

During prolonged dynamic and rhythmic exercise, muscular pain and discomfort arises as a result of an increased concentration of deleterious metabolites. Sensed by peripheral nociceptors and transmitted via afferent feedback to the brain, this provides important information regarding the physiological state of the muscle. These sensations ultimately contribute to what is termed “exercise-induced pain”. Despite being well recognized by athletes and coaches, and suggested to be integral to exercise performance, this construct has largely escaped attention in experimental work. This perspective article highlights the current understanding of pacing in endurance performance, and the causes of exercise-induced pain. A new perspective is described, which proposes how exercise-induced pain may be a contributing factor in helping individuals to regulate their work rate during exercise and thus provides an important construct in pacing. PMID:25228823

Mauger, Alexis R

2014-01-01

333

Factors affecting the academic progression of associate degree graduates.  

PubMed

The Oregon Consortium for Nursing Education (OCNE) is a coalition of community colleges and the campuses of the Oregon Health & Sciences University (OHSU), created to share a competency-based curriculum by which associate degree graduates from an OCNE campus are eligible to complete requirements for the bachelor's degree after 1 year of additional full-time study. Since 2006, three graduating classes from consortium community college programs have graduated 760 students eligible for direct transfer to OHSU; however, only 228 (30%) have actually transferred. This study aimed to explore the factors that influenced the 208 graduates in the class of 2010 not to transfer. The primary reasons for discontinuing their nursing education, in ranked order, were financial concerns, conflict with time and energy for work, and conflict with time and energy for family. This study has implications for achieving the academic progression goals recommended in the Institute of Medicine's The Future of Nursing report. PMID:22356360

Munkvold, Julia; Tanner, Christine A; Herinckx, Heidi

2012-04-01

334

Factors Affecting Time-to-Contact Calculations During Quiet Standing.  

PubMed

Time-to-contact (TtC) is an alternative measure of postural stability to center of pressure (CoP) velocity. TtC is based on both spatial and temporal aspects of CoP displacement, definition of the boundary shape and quantity of minima analyzed. Three boundary shapes and three minima selection methods were used to compute TtC during bipedal quiet standing. The results suggest that there is a strong positive correlation between TtC values obtained using each of the calculation methods (r ? 0.73) and mean CoP velocity (r ? -0.70). TtC was significantly affected by boundary shape and minima selection method. This limits the ability to compare absolute values, but relative levels of stability computed using TtC can be compared due to strong correlations. Given the task parameters studied, mean CoP velocity may even be adequate to assess levels of stability. Future studies are needed to examine the generalizability of these findings for different groups and task parameters. PMID:24718897

Didomenico, Angela; McGorry, Raymond W; Banks, Jacob J

2014-04-01

335

Natural and anthropogenic factors affecting the groundwater quality in Serbia.  

PubMed

Various chemometric techniques were used to analyze the quality of groundwater data sets. Seventeen water quality parameters: the cations Na, K, Ca, Mg, the anions Cl, SO4, NO3, HCO3 and nine trace elements Pb, As, Mn, Ni, Cu, Cd, Fe, Zn and Cr were measured at 66 different key sampling sites in ten representative areas (low land-Northern Autonomous Province of Serbia, Vojvodina and central Serbia) for the summer period of 2009. HCA grouped the sample sites into four clusters based on the similarities of the characteristics of the groundwater quality. DA showed two parameters, HCO3 and Zn, affording more than 90% correct assignments in the spatial analysis of four/three different regions in Serbia. Factor analysis was applied on the log-transformed data sets and allowed the identification of a reduced number of factors with hydrochemical meaning. The results showed severe pollution with Mn, As, NO3, Ni, Pb whereby anthropogenic origin of these contaminants was indicated. The pollution comes from both scattered point sources (industrial and urban effluent) and diffuse source agricultural activity. These samples may not be suitable for human consumption; the water quality belongs to class III/IV (contaminated). The Fe anomalies (7.1mg/L) in the water from the Vetrnica site can be attributed to natural sources, such as the dissolution of rock masses and rock fragments. The serious groundwater contamination with As (25.7-137.8 ?g/L) in the area of Banat (Northern Autonomous Province of Serbia, Vojvodina) and a sample No. 9 at the Great Morava River requires urgent attention. PMID:24080418

Devic, Gordana; Djordjevic, Dragana; Sakan, Sanja

2014-01-15

336

Factors affecting the healing of the perineum following surgery  

PubMed Central

Introduction The aim of this study was to establish patient and procedural factors associated with the development of an unhealed perineum in patients undergoing a proctectomy or excision of an ileoanal pouch. Methods A review of 194 case notes for procedures performed between 1997 and 2009 was carried out. All patients had at least 12 months’ follow-up. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed in 16 parameters. For those patients who developed an unhealed perineum, Cox regression analysis was performed to establish healing over a 12-month period. Results Two hundred patients were included in the study, of which six had unknown wound status and were subsequently excluded. This left 194 study patients. Of these, 86 (44%) achieved primary wound healing with a fully healed perineum and 108 (56%) experienced primary wound failure. With reference to the latter, 63 (58%) healed by 12 months. Comparing patients with an initially intact perineum with those with initial wound failure showed pre-existing sepsis was highly relevant (odds ratio: 4.32, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.16–8.62, p<0.001). In patients who had an unhealed perineum initially, perineal sepsis and surgical treatment were both significantly associated with time to healing (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.54, 95% CI: 0.31–0.93, p=0.03; and HR: 0.42, 95% CI: 0.21–0.84, p=0.01). Conclusions The presence of pre-existing perineal sepsis is associated with an unhealed perineum following proctectomy in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and non-IBD surgery. Further studies are indicated to establish perineal sepsis as a causative factor. PMID:23676808

Jones, M; Bassett, P; Phillips, R

2013-01-01

337

Digestibility as a factor affecting bioavailability of food proteins  

E-print Network

. In this investigation digestibility is consid- ered to play a role in the bioavailability of amino acids in cereal protein namely wheat gluten. An in vitro diges- tion of wheat gluten, using the enzymes pepsin and pancrea- tin was carried out simulating... AND DISCUSSION CONCLUSIONS Page Vl. ix 13 16 17 17 18 19 21 22 23 24 25 35 58 TABLE OF CONTENTS cont'd LITEBATURE CITED Page 62 APPENDIX VITA 67 68 LIST OF TABLES Table Page Protein digestibility by the Hsu multi- ' enzyme, in vitro...

Padmanabhan, Dhanakoti

2012-06-07

338

Factors affecting embryo donor performance in Brahman cows  

E-print Network

) reported data from a group of 53 grade Brahman heifers. These investigators found a mean estrus length of 6. 7 hz. with a range of 2. 0 to 22. 0 hr, in 35 observations. Of all estrous periods, 94. 3% ranged from 2. 0 to 13. 5 hours (mean 6. 0 hr); 65. 7... interval (19. 3 hr) from estradiol-178 injection to behavioral estrus than either Brahman x Hereford (12. 8 hr) or Hereford (10. 1 hr) cows (Rhodes and Randel, 1978). Please et al. (1970) reported that Brahman heifers ovulated 25. 6 hr after...

Bastidas, Pedro Segundo

1986-01-01

339

Clinical factors affecting pathological fracture and healing of unicameral bone cysts  

PubMed Central

Background Unicameral bone cyst (UBC) is the most common benign lytic bone lesion seen in children. The aim of this study is to investigate clinical factors affecting pathological fracture and healing of UBC. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 155 UBC patients who consulted Nagoya musculoskeletal oncology group hospitals in Japan. Sixty of the 155 patients had pathological fracture at presentation. Of 141 patients with follow-up periods exceeding 6 months, 77 were followed conservatively and 64 treated by surgery. Results The fracture risk was significantly higher in the humerus than other bones. In multivariate analysis, ballooning of bone, cyst in long bone, male sex, thin cortical thickness and multilocular cyst were significant adverse prognostic factors for pathological fractures at presentation. The healing rates were 30% and 83% with observation and surgery, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that fracture at presentation and history of biopsy were good prognostic factors for healing of UBC in patients under observation. Conclusion The present results suggest that mechanical disruption of UBC such as fracture and biopsy promotes healing, and thus watchful waiting is indicated in these patients, whereas patients with poor prognostic factors for fractures should be considered for surgery. PMID:24884661

2014-01-01

340

Factors affecting outcomes of corneal collagen crosslinking treatment  

PubMed Central

Purpose To assess the effects of preoperative patient characteristics on clinical outcomes of corneal crosslinking (CXL) treatment in patients with progressive keratoconus. Methods This retrospective study comprised 96 eyes of 96 patients who had unilateral CXL treatment for progressive keratoconus. All patients underwent a complete ophthalmological examination and corneal topography at baseline and 1 year. Subgroup analyses were performed according to the age (<30 and?30 years), gender, preoperative corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA, <0.3 and ?0.3 logMAR (log of the minimum angle of resolution)), preoperative maximum keratometry (K, <54 and ?54?D), baseline topographic cone location (central, paracentral, and peripheral), and preoperative thinnest pachymetry (<450 and ?450??m) to determine the associations between preoperative patient characteristics and outcomes (changes in visual acuity and maximum keratometry) of CXL treatment. Results In the entire study population, mean CDVA and maximum K significantly improved after CXL treatment (P<0.001). Patients with a preoperative CDVA of 20/40 Snellen equivalent or worse (?0.3 logMAR) experienced more visual improvement after CXL treatment (P<0.001). However, an age ?30 years and a baseline thinnest pachymetry less than 450??m were found significantly associated with more flattening in maximum keratometry (P=0.024, P=0.005 respectively). Gender, preoperative maximum K, and baseline topographic cone location did not show significant effect on postoperative visual acuity and maximum keratometry (P>0.05). Conclusions In patients with progressive keratoconus, age, baseline visual acuity, and baseline thinnest pachymetry seem to affect the success of the CXL treatment. PMID:24136568

Toprak, I; Yaylal?, V; Yildirim, C

2014-01-01

341

Factors that affect Pickering emulsions stabilized by graphene oxide.  

PubMed

Stable Pickering emulsions were prepared using only graphene oxide (GO) as a stabilizer, and the effects of the type of oil, the sonication time, the GO concentration, the oil/water ratio, and the pH value on the stability, type, and morphology of these emulsions were investigated. In addition, the effects of salt and the extent of GO reduction on emulsion formation and stability were studied and discussed. The average droplet size decreased with sonication time and with GO concentration, and the emulsions tended to achieve good stability at intermediate oil/water ratios and at low pH values. In all solvents, the emulsions were of the oil-in-water type, but interestingly, some water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) multiple emulsion droplets were also observed with low GO concentrations, low pH values, high oil/water ratios, high salt concentrations, or moderately reduced GO in the benzyl chloride-water system. A Pickering emulsion stabilized by Ag/GO was also prepared, and its catalytic performance for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol was investigated. This research paves the way for the fabrication of graphene-based functional materials with novel nanostructures and microstructures. PMID:23647467

He, Yongqiang; Wu, Fei; Sun, Xiying; Li, Ruqiang; Guo, Yongqin; Li, Chuanbao; Zhang, Lu; Xing, Fubao; Wang, Wei; Gao, Jianping

2013-06-12

342

Factors Affecting the Efficiency of Krypton Hall Thrusters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of krypton as a propellant for Hall thrusters is attractive for NASA missions that require both high-specific impulse and high-propellant throughput. Due to its low molecular weight, the theoretical specific impulse for krypton is 20due to the lower sputtering yield and reduced fraction of multiply-charged ions. While investigators at other laboratories have observed reductions in krypton thruster efficiency up to 20evaluations of several NASA Hall thrusters have shown only a 5-10current efforts are focused on measuring the efficiency loss mechanisms of the NASA-173Mv2 operating on krypton through the use of several plume diagnostics. We are deploying gridded Faraday probes, RPA's, and ExB probes to quantify the ion flux, energy, and charge-state. Combined with our past performance evaluations and on-going modeling efforts, we are using the data to guide the development of Hall thrusters designed for krypton. We will present our latest performance and probe measurements and discuss the lessons learned from these investigations.

Hofer, Richard; Peterson, Peter; Manzella, David; Jacobson, David

2004-11-01

343

An Analysis of Factors Affecting Community College Students' Expectations on E-Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There are many factors that affect the e-learning process. Instructor, assessment and evaluation, communication, and technical support are among the leading factors. It is obvious that these factors influence the effectiveness of e-learning and may be related to different expectations of e-learners. Therefore, this study focuses on examining the…

Kilic-Cakmak, Ebru; Karatas, Sercin; Ocak, Mehmet Akif

2009-01-01

344

Environmental Factors Affecting the Occurrence of Mycobacteria in Brook Waters  

PubMed Central

To evaluate the impact of environmental factors on the occurrence of environmental mycobacteria, viable counts of mycobacteria were measured in samples of brook water collected from 53 drainage areas located in a linear belt crossing Finland at 63° north latitude. The numbers of mycobacteria were correlated with characteristics of the drainage area, climatic parameters, chemical and physical characteristics of the water, and counts of other heterotrophic bacteria in the water. The numbers of mycobacteria in the water ranged from 10 to 2,200 CFU/liter. The counts correlated positively (P < 0.001) with the presence of peatlands, precipitation data, chemical oxygen demand, water color, and concentrations of Fe, Al, Cu, Co, and Cr. The mycobacterial counts correlated negatively (P < 0.001) with water pH, whereas other heterotrophic bacterial counts lacked any correlation with pH. A linear regression model with four independent variables (i.e., peatlands in the drainage area, chemical oxygen demand, concentration of potassium, and pH) explained 83% of the variation in mycobacterial counts in brook waters. Our results suggest that acidification may enhance the growth of environmental mycobacteria. PMID:16348866

Iivanainen, E. K.; Martikainen, P. J.; Väänänen, P. K.; Katila, M.-L.

1993-01-01

345

Factors affecting static stratification of thermal water storage  

SciTech Connect

The thermal shortage is a key component of any successful solar thermal system. A good thermal storage should allow minimum thermal energy losses while permitting the highest possible extraction efficiency of the stored thermal energy. Despite the many available examples of successful designs of solar thermal storage tanks, the static behavior of the solar thermal storage is not fully understood. Among the many factors influencing such behavior are heat losses, tank geometry, dead zones, and tank wall material. In this study, laboratory-scale models with different geometries were built for the purpose of examining thermal behavior during the period after charging. During this period, called the thermal diffusion period, the extraction efficiency was temporarily decreased until natural stratification was achieved. After the thermal period, the extraction efficiency decreased primarily as a result of thermal losses to the environment and thermal degradation caused by the storage tank walls. Increasing the ratio of length to diameter up to 3 or 4 significantly increases the extraction efficiency. Storages with length-to-diameter ratios larger than 4 are not desirable because the added cost does not result in improvement of the thermal extraction efficiency.

AlMarafie, A. (Mechanical Engineering Dept., Kuwait Univ., Kuwait City (KW)); Moustafa, S.M. (Mechanical Engineering Dept., California Polytechnic State Univ., San Luis Obispo, CA (US)); Al-Kandarie, A. (Energy Dept., Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, Kuwait City (KW))

1989-01-01

346

Experimental and environmental factors affect spurious detection of ecological thresholds  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Threshold detection methods are increasingly popular for assessing nonlinear responses to environmental change, but their statistical performance remains poorly understood. We simulated linear change in stream benthic macroinvertebrate communities and evaluated the performance of commonly used threshold detection methods based on model fitting (piecewise quantile regression [PQR]), data partitioning (nonparametric change point analysis [NCPA]), and a hybrid approach (significant zero crossings [SiZer]). We demonstrated that false detection of ecological thresholds (type I errors) and inferences on threshold locations are influenced by sample size, rate of linear change, and frequency of observations across the environmental gradient (i.e., sample-environment distribution, SED). However, the relative importance of these factors varied among statistical methods and between inference types. False detection rates were influenced primarily by user-selected parameters for PQR (?) and SiZer (bandwidth) and secondarily by sample size (for PQR) and SED (for SiZer). In contrast, the location of reported thresholds was influenced primarily by SED. Bootstrapped confidence intervals for NCPA threshold locations revealed strong correspondence to SED. We conclude that the choice of statistical methods for threshold detection should be matched to experimental and environmental constraints to minimize false detection rates and avoid spurious inferences regarding threshold location.

Daily, Jonathan P.; Hitt, Nathaniel P.; Smith, David R.; Snyder, Craig D.

2012-01-01

347

A review of factors affecting fat absorption in hot chips.  

PubMed

Consumption of hot chips is a convenience food in most countries. Unfortunately, these are high in fat and contribute to fat-related diseases in societies with a high fat consumption. There is substantial scope through best-practice deep-frying techniques for producing lower fat, high-quality chips. From a review of the literature, the main factors associated with a lower-fat content of chips are thick (>12 mm), straight cut chips; cryogenic freezing methods; low moisture content of potatoes (specific gravity >1.1); frying fat: chip volume ratio of 6:1; frying at optimal temperature (180 to 185 degrees C) during cooking and turning the temperature down (approximately 140 degrees C) and covering the vats during slack periods; vigorously shaking the basket and hanging it over the deep fryer to drain after frying; maintaining the quality of the frying fat by regularly skimming the cracklings, filtering the fat, and topping up the fryer with fresh fat; keeping the fat turnover <5 days; regular cleaning of frying equipment. It is important that all deep frying operators are adequately trained in these techniques. It is also important that the frying medium is low in saturated and trans fatty acids (<20%) because of their effects on blood lipids and low in linolenic acid (<3%) because it is readily degraded. The widespread implementation of best-practice deep-frying would reduce fat content of hot chips and thus lower overall fat consumption. PMID:11214763

Mehta, U; Swinburn, B

2001-01-01

348

Extracorporeal model for study of factors affecting thrombus formation.  

PubMed

Factors determining thrombus formation on a foreign surface were studied with the use of plastic flow chambers introduced into extracorporeal shunts. Silicone rubber shunts, joining the carotid artery and jugular vein, were implanted in dogs and remained patent for several weeks. The flow chamber geometry consisted of a 4.8 mm diameter straight tube having a 3.2 X 3.2 mm circumferential cavity in the wall. Chambers were introduced sequentially into the shunts for exposure times of 10 to 30 minutes and regulated blood flow rates of 100 to 400 ml/min. The dry weight of thrombus accumulated in the chamber (5 to 50 mg) was found to increase with exposure time up to 20 minutes and to decrease with increasing flow rate. Various components of the process of thrombus formation were altered by the administration of acetylsalicylic acid, heparin and lysozyme, used alone and in pairs. Heparin was found to be the most effective antithrombotic agent, dry weights of accumulated thrombus being on the order of 50 percent lower when compared to control values. The efficacy of heparin was found to be unaffected by the presence of aspirin and lysozyme, which themselves were not effective antithrombotic agents under the conditions of these experiments. The technique described here may provide a useful animal model for studying the influence of blood flow and different biomaterials on thrombus formation. PMID:1103356

Benis, A M; Nossel, H L; Aledort, L M; Koffsky, R M; Stevenson, J F; Leonard, E F; Shiang, H; Litwak, R S

1975-09-30

349

Intrinsic factors affecting apoptosis in bovine in vitro produced embryos.  

PubMed

The main purpose for human assisted reproductive technologies (ART) is clearly to bypass reproductive failures. This purpose is totally different from the aims in animal ART, being genetic improvement and more recently conservation of endangered species. Apoptosis or programmed cell death has been detected before implantation in in vivo as well as in vitro embryos and might contribute to lower developmental competence and embryonic losses of in vitro embryos. In vitro embryo quality is clearly jeopardized by quality of the gametes (oocytes and spermatozoa) and suboptimal culture condition, but there is no consensus on which factor is most important in the incidence of apoptosis during early embryo development. The objective of the present study was to unravel the contribution of both male and female gamete quality to the incidence of apoptosis of bovine embryos produced in vitro. In vivo bull fertility expressed a very low correlation with cleavage rate and blastocyst yield. In contrast, developmental kinetics and oocyte diameter are important markers of embryo developmental potential and embryo quality in terms of the appearance of apoptosis, indicating a significant maternal effect on embryo quality. PMID:22276397

Vandaele, L; Van Soom, A

2011-01-01

350

"Receptivity": an important factor affecting supportive care provision.  

PubMed

The research on psychosocial need provides the foundation informing the drive for the provision of supportive care services for patients and their families. The work on patient access, barriers to participation, and service evaluation are providing some insights that can help guide practitioners in their efforts to ensure that services designed to meet psychosocial need reach and involve the appropriate individuals. However, this direction is presently in its infancy leaving many questions unanswered. This article makes a contribution to advancing and strengthening this line of research through a fresh perspective on the topic provided by consumer research with individuals diagnosed with a hematological malignancy. The research was initiated and funded by the Leukaemia Foundation of Queensland (LFQ) with the aim of exploring the experience of survivorship for individuals diagnosed with a hematological malignancy to inform supportive care service provision and development. The findings from the research posit the notion of "receptivity" as an important new concept that can contribute to the deepening of our understanding of the myriad of factors associated with effectively engaging with individuals in supportive care service provision. PMID:23311970

McGrath, Pamela

2013-01-01

351

Factors affecting thermal infrared images at selected field sites  

SciTech Connect

A thermal infrared (TIR) survey was conducted to locate surface ordnance in and around the Naval Ordnance Disposal Area, and a thermal anomaly was found. This report documents studies conducted to identify the position of cause of the thermal anomaly. Also included are results of a long path Fourier transform infrared survey, soil sampling activities, soil gas surveys, and buried heater studies. The results of these studies indicated that the thermal anomaly was caused by a gravel pad, which had thermal properties different than those of the surrounding soil. Results from this investigation suggest that TIR is useful for locating surface objects having a high thermal inertia compared to the surrounding terrain, but TIR is of very limited use for characterizing buried waste or other similar buried objects at the INEL.

Sisson, J.B.; Ferguson, J.S.

1993-07-01

352

Some Factors Affecting Combustion in an Internal-Combustion Engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation of the combustion of gasoline, safety, and diesel fuels was made in the NACA combustion apparatus under conditions of temperature that permitted ignition by spark with direct fuel injection, in spite of the compression ratio of 12.7 employed. The influence of such variables as injection advance angle, jacket temperature, engine speed, and spark position was studied. The most pronounced effect was that an increase in the injection advance angle (beyond a certain minimum value) caused a decrease in the extent and rate of combustion. In almost all cases combustion improved with increased temperature. The results show that at low air temperatures the rates of combustion vary with the volatility of the fuel, but that at high temperatures this relationship does not exist and the rates depend to a greater extent on the chemical nature of the fuel.

Rothrock, A M; Cohn, Mildred

1936-01-01

353

Evaluation of nursing students' attitudes towards seeking psychological help and factors affecting their attitudes.  

PubMed

Psychological help-seeking means to benefit different sources of support system for the difficulties people have. It is important to find out help-seeking attitudes and factors which affect these attitudes, earlier to protect, and to advance mental health. The aim of this study was to investigate nursing students' attitudes towards seeking psychological help and factors which affect their attitudes. The study sample included 248 nursing students exposed to problem based learning at Dokuz Eylül University School of Nursing in the academic year of 2006-2007. Data were collected with Help-Seeking Scale. Obtained data were evaluated with variance analysis, t-test and Mann-Whitney U test. The third and fourth year students had more favorable mean scores for interpersonal openness, being forced and confidence in counselor than the first and second year students. In view of the obtained results, it can be recommended that first and second year students should be followed more carefully in terms of psychological problems and that a longitudinal study should be conducted on students' attitudes towards seeking psychological help throughout their study period. PMID:20430489

Cankaya, Pinar; Duman, Zekiye Cetinkaya

2010-11-01

354

Factors Affecting Public-Supply Well Vulnerability in Two Karst Aquifers  

PubMed Central

Karst aquifers occur in a range of climatic and geologic settings. Nonetheless, they are commonly characterized by their vulnerability to water-quality impairment. Two karst aquifers, the Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas and the Upper Floridan aquifer in western Florida, were investigated to assess factors that control the movement of contaminants to public-supply wells (PSWs). The geochemistry of samples from a selected PSW or wellfield in each aquifer was compared with that from nearby monitoring wells and regional PSWs. Geochemistry results were integrated with age tracers, flow modeling, and depth-dependent data to refine aquifer conceptual models and to identify factors that affect contaminant movement to PSWs. The oxic Edwards aquifer is vertically well mixed at the selected PSW/wellfield, although regionally the aquifer is geochemically variable downdip. The mostly anoxic Upper Floridan aquifer is affected by denitrification and also is geochemically variable with depth. In spite of considerable differences in geology and hydrogeology, the two aquifers are similarly vulnerable to anthropogenic contamination. Vulnerability in studied PSWs in both aquifers is strongly influenced by rapid karst flowpaths and the dominance of young (<10 years) groundwater. Vulnerability was demonstrated by the frequent detection of similar constituents of concern in both aquifers (nitrate, atrazine, deethylatrazine, tetrachloroethene, and chloroform). Specific consideration of water-quality protection efforts, well construction and placement, and aquifer response times to land-use changes and contaminant loading are discussed, with implications for karst groundwater management. PMID:24841501

Musgrove, MaryLynn; Katz, Brian G; Fahlquist, Lynne S; Crandall, Christy A; Lindgren, Richard J

2014-01-01

355

Factors affecting public-supply well vulnerability in two karst aquifers.  

PubMed

Karst aquifers occur in a range of climatic and geologic settings. Nonetheless, they are commonly characterized by their vulnerability to water-quality impairment. Two karst aquifers, the Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas and the Upper Floridan aquifer in western Florida, were investigated to assess factors that control the movement of contaminants to public-supply wells (PSWs). The geochemistry of samples from a selected PSW or wellfield in each aquifer was compared with that from nearby monitoring wells and regional PSWs. Geochemistry results were integrated with age tracers, flow modeling, and depth-dependent data to refine aquifer conceptual models and to identify factors that affect contaminant movement to PSWs. The oxic Edwards aquifer is vertically well mixed at the selected PSW/wellfield, although regionally the aquifer is geochemically variable downdip. The mostly anoxic Upper Floridan aquifer is affected by denitrification and also is geochemically variable with depth. In spite of considerable differences in geology and hydrogeology, the two aquifers are similarly vulnerable to anthropogenic contamination. Vulnerability in studied PSWs in both aquifers is strongly influenced by rapid karst flowpaths and the dominance of young (<10 years) groundwater. Vulnerability was demonstrated by the frequent detection of similar constituents of concern in both aquifers (nitrate, atrazine, deethylatrazine, tetrachloroethene, and chloroform). Specific consideration of water-quality protection efforts, well construction and placement, and aquifer response times to land-use changes and contaminant loading are discussed, with implications for karst groundwater management. PMID:24841501

Musgrove, MaryLynn; Katz, Brian G; Fahlquist, Lynne S; Crandall, Christy A; Lindgren, Richard J

2014-09-01

356

Factors affecting ovarian compensation after unilateral ovariectomy in gilts.  

PubMed

Two experiments were conducted to identify the temporal limits of an ovarian compensatory response after unilateral ovariectomy (ULO) in gilts and to examine ovarian and hormonal factors that might be related to this response. In the first study, all eight gilts that were unilaterally ovariectomized on d 12, 14 or 16 of an estrous cycle and two of four ULO on d 18 had a significant compensatory increase in ovulation rate per ovary compared with controls. Ovulatory compensation failed to occur, however, in two of four and four of four gilts ULO on d 18 or 19 of an estrous cycle, respectively. In the second study, blood samples were collected from 26 gilts beginning on d 14 of an estrous cycle, and animals were assigned to sham-surgery or ULO on d 17, 18 or 19. Ovarian compensation occurred after ULO on all 3 d of surgery in the second study, but most follicles failed to ovulate and formed large luteinized cysts. The ability to compensate was related positively to the number of medium-sized follicles on the intact ovary at the time of ULO, to an increase in concentrations of follicle-stimulating hormone 12 to 18 h after ULO and to the interval from ULO to the preovulatory surge of luteinizing hormone. In a third experiment, interruption of the ovulatory mechanism and development of cystic follicles similar to those observed in the second study were induced simply by physical manipulation of the d 19 preovulatory ovary while contralateral untouched ovaries ovulated normally. PMID:6430861

Coleman, D A; Fleming, M W; Dailey, R A

1984-07-01

357

Factors affecting levels of genetic diversity in natural populations.  

PubMed Central

Genetic variability is the clay of evolution, providing the base material on which adaptation and speciation depend. It is often assumed that most interspecific differences in variability are due primarily to population size effects, with bottlenecked populations carrying less variability than those of stable size. However, we show that population bottlenecks are unlikely to be the only factor, even in classic case studies such as the northern elephant seal and the cheetah, where genetic polymorphism is virtually absent. Instead, we suggest that the low levels of variability observed in endangered populations are more likely to result from a combination of publication biases, which tend to inflate the level of variability which is considered 'normal', and inbreeding effects, which may hasten loss of variability due to drift. To account for species with large population sizes but low variability we advance three hypotheses. First, it is known that certain metapopulation structures can result in effective population sizes far below the census size. Second, there is increasing evidence that heterozygous sites mutate more frequently than equivalent homozygous sites, plausibly because mismatch repair between homologous chromosomes during meiosis provides extra opportunities to mutate. Such a mechanism would undermine the simple relationship between heterozygosity and effective population size. Third, the fact that related species that differ greatly in variability implies that large amounts of variability can be gained or lost rapidly. We argue that such cases are best explained by rapid loss through a genome-wide selective sweep, and suggest a mechanism by which this could come about, based on forced changes to a control gene inducing coevolution in the genes it controls. Our model, based on meiotic drive in mammals, but easily extended to other systems, would tend to facilitate population isolation by generating molecular incompatabilities. Circumstances can even be envisioned in which the process could provide intrinsic impetus to speciation. PMID:9533122

Amos, W; Harwood, J

1998-01-01

358

Assessment of factors affecting industrial electricity demand. Final report (revision version)  

SciTech Connect

In Chapter 2, we identify those factors affecting the industrial product mix - taste, relative output prices, and relative input prices - and isolate several determinants which have not been adequately accounted for to date in industrial electricity demand forecasts. We discuss how the lower energy prices of foreign producers affect domestic producers and how the growth in the number of substitutes for intermediate products such as steel and aluminum with plastics and composites affects the composition of production and, hence, the demand for electricity. We also investigate how the changing age structure of the population brought on by the baby boom could change the mix of outputs produced by the industrial sector. In Chapter 3, we review the history of the 1970s with regard to changes in output mix and the manufacturing demand for electricity, and with regard to changes in the use of electricity vis-a-vis the other inputs in the production process. In Chapter 4, we generate forecasts using two models which control for efficiency changes, but in different ways. In this chapter we present the sensitivity of these projections using three sets of assumptions about product mix. The last chapter summarizes our results and draw from those results implications regarding public policy and industrial electricity demand. Two appendices present ISTUM2 results from selected electricity intensive industries, describes the ISTUM and ORIM models.

None

1983-07-01

359

Factors affecting motion characteristics of frozen-thawed stallion spermatozoa.  

PubMed

Five experiments were conducted to evaluate damage incurred in each processing step for cryopreservation of stallion spermatozoa. In Experiment 1, semen was centrifuged for 9 centrifugation times and the percentage of spermatozoa recovered after each treatment was calculated and spermatozoal motion characteristics analysed. Recovery of spermatozoa was > or = 80% when spermatozoa were centrifuged for > or = 10 min. Experiment 2 evaluated spermatozoa cryopreserved at 5 different concentrations in each of 2 extenders (skim milk-egg yolk-glycerol, SM-EYG; and lactose-EDTA, LAC). In SM-EYG, TMOT and PMOT were higher at spermatozoal concentrations of 20, 200 and 400 x 10(6)/ml (51%/41%, 52%/44%, 50%/43%, respectively) than for samples frozen at > or = 800 x 10(6) spermatozoa/ml (41%/35%, 32%/27%; P < 0.05). Spermatozoa frozen in LAC at a concentration of 20 x 10(6)/ml resulted in the highest TMOT and PMOT (43% and 30%, respectively, P < 0.05). The effect of freezing rate on motion characteristics of spermatozoa was evaluated in Experiment 3. The VCL of spermatozoa frozen in SM-EYG was the only parameter affected by freezing rate (P < 0.05). Experiment 4 evaluated motion characteristics after cryopreservation of spermatozoa in different sized straws (0.5 or 2.5 ml) in each of 2 extenders (SM-EYG and LAC). In SM-EYG, PMOT (38%) and VCL (109 microns/s) were highest when spermatozoa were frozen in 0.5 ml straws (P < 0.05). In Experiment 5, spermatozoa thawed immediately after cryopreservation or thawed after storage in liquid nitrogen for 24-48 h were evaluated. There was no effect of length of storage in liquid nitrogen on spermatozoal motion characteristics (P < 0.05). Experiment 6 evaluated the effects of cooling time to 5 degrees C (0, 2.5 and 5 h) on motion characteristics of spermatozoa cryopreserved in 2 extenders (SM-EYG and LAC). TMOT and PMOT were effected by cooling time, and there was a cooling-time-by-extender interaction (P < 0.05). In SM-EYG, TMOT and PMOT were higher if spermatozoa were cooled to 5 degrees C prior to initiation of freezing than if freezing was initiated at 20 degrees C (P < 0.05). A suggested protocol for cryopreservation of stallion spermatozoa would include: 1) centrifugation at 400 g for 14 to 16 min; 2) extension at 23 degrees C with SM-EYG to 400 x 10(6) spermatozoa/ml; 3) cool to 5 degrees C for 2.5 h; 4) package in 0.5 ml straws at 5 degrees C; 5) freeze in liquid nitrogen vapour at -160 degrees C; and 6) thaw for 30 s in 37 degrees C water. PMID:8565953

Heitland, A V; Jasko, D J; Squires, E L; Graham, J K; Pickett, B W; Hamilton, C

1996-01-01

360

The Affect and Arousal Scales: Psychometric Properties of the Dutch Version and Multigroup Confirmatory Factor Analyses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the Affect and Arousal Scales (AFARS) were inspected in a combined clinical and population sample (N = 1,215). The validity of the tripartite structure and the relations between Negative Affect, Positive Affect, and Physiological Hyperarousal (PH) were investigated for boys and girls, younger (8-11…

De Bolle, Marleen; De Fruyt, Filip; Decuyper, Mieke

2010-01-01

361

Some factors affecting the uptake of iodoamphetamine (IAMP)  

SciTech Connect

The uptake and distribution of IAMP is believed to reflect the regional blood flow, and distribution of catecholamine binding sites. With the increasing use of this substance for clinical investigation, it appears to be of interest to assess the effect of some hormones and drugs on the biodistribution of IAMP as well as the effects of hypertension. For this purpose the effects of ACTH, metyrapone, and propranolol were studies in mice. ACTH 0.2 U/mouse was injected IM 12 hrs prior to IAMP, metyrapone 0.75 mg/mouse IP 3 hrs prior to IAMP and propranolol 0.15 mg/mouse was given IV 2 hrs before IAMP injection. The IAMP distribution was determined in normotensive and hypertensive Dahl salt-sensitive rats. I-125 IAMP was prepared by a modification of the Winchell method. Tissue distribution was assessed by direct counting of samples and results were expressed as percent injected activity per organ and per gram. Pre-treatment with ACTH was found to lower IAMP concentration (% injected act./g) in brain and adrenals and total activity (% injected act.) in liver. Propranolol caused a decrease in IAMP concentration in blood and brain and metyrapone lowered IAMP concentration in the kidneys. In hypertensive rats IAMP blood concentration and total activity were higher than in the genetically identical normotensive controls. In the heart the concentration remained while the total activity increased. The possible mechanisms of these findings and their clinical significance are discussed.

Som, P.; Oster, Z.H.; Yamamoto, K.; Meinken, G.E.; Atkins, H.L.; Brill, A.B.

1984-01-01

362

Thirdhand cigarette smoke: factors affecting exposure and remediation.  

PubMed

Thirdhand smoke (THS) refers to components of secondhand smoke that stick to indoor surfaces and persist in the environment. Little is known about exposure levels and possible remediation measures to reduce potential exposure in contaminated areas. This study deals with the effect of aging on THS components and evaluates possible exposure levels and remediation measures. We investigated the concentration of nicotine, five nicotine related alkaloids, and three tobacco specific nitrosamines (TSNAs) in smoke exposed fabrics. Two different extraction methods were used. Cotton terry cloth and polyester fleece were exposed to smoke in controlled laboratory conditions and aged before extraction. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used for chemical analysis. Fabrics aged for 19 months after smoke exposure retained significant amounts of THS chemicals. During aqueous extraction, cotton cloth released about 41 times as much nicotine and about 78 times the amount of tobacco specific nitrosamines (TSNAs) as polyester after one hour of aqueous extraction. Concentrations of nicotine and TSNAs in extracts of terry cloth exposed to smoke were used to estimate infant/toddler oral exposure and adult dermal exposure to THS. Nicotine exposure from THS residue can be 6.8 times higher in toddlers and 24 times higher in adults and TSNA exposure can be 16 times higher in toddlers and 56 times higher in adults than what would be inhaled by a passive smoker. In addition to providing exposure estimates, our data could be useful in developing remediation strategies and in framing public health policies for indoor environments with THS. PMID:25286392

Bahl, Vasundhra; Jacob, Peyton; Havel, Christopher; Schick, Suzaynn F; Talbot, Prue

2014-01-01

363

Factors affecting enzymatic degradation of microgel-bound peptides.  

PubMed

Proteolytic degradation and release of microgel-bound peptides was investigated for trypsin, poly(acrylic acid-co-acrylamide) microgels (70-90 ?m in diameter), and oppositely charged polylysine, using a method combination of confocal microscopy and micromanipulator-assisted light microscopy. Results show that trypsin-induced release of polylysine increased with increasing trypsin concentration, decreasing microgel charge density and decreasing peptide molecular weight. While the microgel offered good protection against enzymatic degradation at high microgel charge density, it was also observed that the cationic peptide enabled trypsin to bind throughout the peptide-loaded microgels, even when it did not bind to the peptide-void ones. With the exception of highly charged microgels, proteolytic degradation throughout the peptide-loaded microgel resulted in the generation of short and non-adsorbing peptide stretches, giving rise to the concentration and peptide length dependence observed. A simple random scission model was able to qualitatively capture these experimental findings. Collectively, the results demonstrate that microgel charge density, peptide molecular weight, and enzyme concentration greatly influence degradation/release of microgel-bound peptides and need to be considered in the use of microgels, e.g., as carriers for protein and peptide drugs. PMID:23731406

Månsson, Ronja; Frenning, Göran; Malmsten, Martin

2013-07-01

364

Factors affecting ranging behaviour in young and adult laying hens.  

PubMed

1. A study was conducted to investigate the effect of environment on ranging in 33 flocks reared with (16) or without (17) range access. Ranging was observed at 8, 16 and 35 weeks. Information on house layout, weather conditions and range characteristics was used to create models predicting the percentage of the flock out on the range and the percentage of ranging birds observed away from the house. 2. Three flocks had range access at 8 weeks. The percentage of birds ranging averaged 28%, with 22% of these ranging away from the house. For the 13 flocks with range access at 16 weeks, the percentage of pullets on the range was 12%, with 29% of these ranging away from the house. At 35 weeks, all flocks had range access and the average percentage of birds out on the range was 13%, with 42% of these ranging away from the house. 3. The percentage of birds seen using the range was higher with reduced flock size and stocking density, increased pop hole availability (cm/bird) and light intensity inside the house. More birds ranged on cooler days and on farms located in areas with fewer days of rain per year and lower average rainfall. The percentage of birds ranging varied with season and was lowest in May. More birds ranged away from the house when cover and more artificial structures were present on the range. The proportion of ranging birds located away from the house increased with lower outdoor humidity levels, higher air pressure, and on warmer days. Lastly, birds ranged away from the house more as they got older. PMID:24571397

Gilani, A-M; Knowles, T G; Nicol, C J

2014-01-01

365

Wintertime factors affecting contaminant distribution in a swine farrowing room.  

PubMed

An estimated 200,000 to 500,000 U.S. workers in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are at risk of adverse respiratory outcomes from exposures to indoor contaminants. In the wintertime, general ventilation is minimized in the Midwest due to high heating costs required to maintain indoor temperatures optimal for animal production. Pit fans typically operate to exhaust under-floor manure pits, but little other fresh air intake exists. Many operators believe that these systems are sufficient to reduce contaminant concentrations within the building during winter. Investigating whether these pit fans provide sufficient protection against classic CAFO contaminants during minimal wintertime ventilation was warranted. Direct-reading instruments were used to measure and record concentrations of multiple contaminants using both fixed-area and mobile contaminant mapping in a farrowing room during a Midwest winter. With the exception of CO, concentrations were significantly (p<0.001) higher with the pit fan off compared with those with the pit fan on. Additional analyses identified that significant changes (p<0.001) in mean room concentrations of respirable dust (decreased, 77% with pit fan off and 87% with pit fan on) and CO2 (increased, 24%) over the 5-hr study periods and that multiple fixed-area monitors rather than the much-used, single center-of-room monitor provided a more conservative (e.g., protective) assessment of room concentrations. While concentrations did not exceed occupational exposure limits from OSHA or ACGIH for individual contaminants, recommended agricultural health limits from exposure-response studies suggested in the literature were exceeded for respirable dust, CO2, and NH3, indicating a need to consider personal exposures and control options to reduce contaminant concentrations in farrowing rooms. Pit fans reduced NH3 and H2S concentrations, but these fans may not be sufficient to control dust and eliminate the need for secondary exposure prevention methods. PMID:23548103

Reeve, Kelsie A; Peters, Thomas M; Anthony, T Renée

2013-01-01

366

Factors affecting UV/H2O2 inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus spores in drinking water.  

PubMed

This study aims at estimating the performance of the Bacillus atrophaeus spores inactivation by the UV treatment with addition of H2O2. The effect of factors affecting the inactivation was investigated, including initial H2O2 dose, UV irradiance, initial cell density, initial solution pH and various inorganic anions. Under the experimental conditions, the B. atrophaeus spores inactivation followed both the modified Hom Model and the Chick's Model. The results revealed that the H2O2 played dual roles in the reactions, while the optimum reduction of 5.88lg was received at 0.5mM H2O2 for 10min. The inactivation effect was affected by the UV irradiance, while better inactivation effect was achieved at higher irradiance. An increase in the initial cell density slowed down the inactivation process. A slight acid condition at pH 5 was considered as the optimal pH value. The inactivation effect within 10min followed the order of pH 5>pH 7>pH 9>pH 3>pH 11. The effects of three added inorganic anions were investigated and compared, including sulfate (SO4(2)(-)), nitrate (NO3(-)) and carbonate (CO3(2)(-)). The sequence of inactivation effect within 10min followed the order of control group>SO4(2)(-)>NO3(-)>CO3(2)(-). PMID:24792469

Zhang, Yongji; Zhang, Yiqing; Zhou, Lingling; Tan, Chaoqun

2014-05-01

367

Factors affecting temporal H2S emission at construction and demolition (C&D) debris landfills.  

PubMed

Odor problems associated with H2S emissions often result in odor complaints from nearby residents of C&D debris landfills, especially in the early morning. As part of a field study conducted on H2S removal ability using different cover materials, daily and seasonal H2S emissions through a soil cover layer were monitored at a C&D debris landfill to investigate factors affecting H2S emissions. H2S emission rates were not a constant, but varied seasonally, with an average emission rate of 4.67×10(-6)mgm(-2)s(-1). During a the 10-month field study, as the H2S concentration increased from 140ppm to about 3500ppm underneath the cover soil in the testing cell, H2S emissions ranged from zero to a maximum emission rate of 1.24×10(-5)mgm(-2)s(-1). Continuous emission monitoring indicated that H2S emissions even changed over time throughout the day, generally increasing from morning to afternoon, and were affected by soil moisture and temperature. Laboratory experiments were also conducted to investigate the effects of H2S concentration and cover soil moisture content on H2S emissions. The results showed that increased soil moisture reduced H2S emissions by retarding H2S migration through cover soil and dissolving H2S into soil water. The field study also indicated that due to atmospheric dispersion, high H2S emissions may not cause odor problems. PMID:23968554

Xu, Qiyong; Townsend, Timothy

2014-02-01

368

Biogeochemical factors affecting the presence of 210Po in groundwater  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The discovery of natural 210Po enrichment at levels exceeding 500 mBq/L in numerous domestic wells in northern Nevada, USA, led to a geochemical investigation of the processes responsible for its mobilization. 210Po activities in 63 domestic and public-supply wells ranged from below 1 mBq/L to 6590 ± 590 mBq/L, among the highest reported levels in the USA. There is little spatial or depth variability in 210Pb activity in study-area sediments and mobilization of a few percent of the 210Po in the sediments would account for all of the 210Po in water. Stable-isotope measurements indicate SO4 reduction has occurred in all 210Po contaminated wells. Sulfide species are not accumulating in the groundwater in much of Lahontan Valley, probably because of S cycling involving microbial SO4 reduction, abiotic oxidation of H2S to S0 by Mn(IV), followed by microbial disproportionation of S0 to H2S and SO4. The high pH, Ca depletion, MnCO3 saturation, and presence of S0 in Lahontan Valley groundwater may be consequences of the anaerobic S cycling. Consistent with data from naturally-enriched wells in Florida, 210Po activities begin to decrease when aqueous sulfide species begin to accumulate. This may be due to formation and precipitation of PoS, however, Eh–pH diagrams suggest PoS would not be stable in study-area groundwater. An alternative explanation for the study area is that H2S accumulation begins when anaerobic S cycling stops because Mn oxides are depleted and their reduction is no longer releasing 210Po. Common features of 210Po-enriched groundwater were identified by comparing the radiological and geochemical data from Nevada with data from naturally-enriched wells in Finland, and Florida and Maryland in the USA. Values of pH ranged from 9 in Nevada wells, indicating that pH is not critical in determining whether 210Po is present. Where U is present in the sediments, the data suggest 210Po levels may be elevated in aquifers with (1) SO4-reducing waters with low H2S concentrations, or (2) anoxic or oxic waters with extremely high Rn activities, particularly if the water is turbid.

Seiler, R.L.; Stillings, L.L.; Cutler, N.; Salonen, L.; Outola, I.

2011-01-01

369

MY NASA DATA: Investigating Factors that Influence Climate  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson plan employs inquiry-based methods to investigate how latitude and longitude (and distance from oceans) impact climatic factors such as temperature range, average temperature, and precipitation.

2008-10-14

370

41 CFR 101-27.304-2 - Factors affecting the economic retention limit.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 27-INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 27.3-Maximizing Use of Inventories § 101-27.304-2 Factors affecting the economic...

2013-07-01

371

41 CFR 101-27.304-2 - Factors affecting the economic retention limit.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 27-INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 27.3-Maximizing Use of Inventories § 101-27.304-2 Factors affecting the economic...

2012-07-01

372

41 CFR 101-27.304-2 - Factors affecting the economic retention limit.  

...Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 27-INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 27.3-Maximizing Use of Inventories § 101-27.304-2 Factors affecting the economic...

2014-07-01

373

Management and Conservation Article Factors Affecting Detection of Burrowing Owl Nests  

E-print Network

Management and Conservation Article Factors Affecting Detection of Burrowing Owl Nests During practices on persistence of local populations of burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia) requires accurate in areas that are potentially suitable for nesting burrowing owls. In general, guidelines on timing

Conway, Courtney J.

374

Intergenomic Rearrangements after Polyploidization of Kengyilia thoroldiana (Poaceae: Triticeae) Affected by Environmental Factors  

PubMed Central

Polyploidization is a major evolutionary process. Approximately 70–75% species of Triticeae (Poaceae) are polyploids, involving 23 genomes. To investigate intergenomic rearrangements after polyploidization of Triticeae species and to determine the effects of environmental factors on them, nine populations of a typical polyploid Triticeae species, Kengyilia thoroldiana (Keng) J.L.Yang et al. (2n?=?6x?=?42, StStPPYY), collected from different environments, were studied using genome in situ hybridization (GISH). We found that intergenomic rearrangements occurred between the relatively large P genome and the small genomes, St (8.15%) and Y (22.22%), in polyploid species via various types of translocations compared to their diploid progenitors. However, no translocation was found between the relatively small St and Y chromosomes. Environmental factors may affect rearrangements among the three genomes. Chromosome translocations were significantly more frequent in populations from cold alpine and grassland environments than in populations from valley and lake-basin habitats (P<0.05). The relationship between types of chromosome translocations and altitude was significant (r?=?0.809, P<0.01). Intergenomic rearrangements associated with environmental factors and genetic differentiation of a single basic genome should be considered as equally important genetic processes during species' ecotype evolution. PMID:22363542

Wang, Qiuxia; Liu, Huitao; Gao, Ainong; Yang, Xinming; Liu, Weihua; Li, Xiuquan; Li, Lihui

2012-01-01

375

Factors affecting the outcome of artificial insemination using cryopreserved spermatozoa in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).  

PubMed

Artificial insemination (AI) is an important component of captive breeding programs for endangered species, such as the giant panda. The panda has been the subject of increasingly successful captive breeding programs involving a compilation of assisted breeding techniques, including AI using cryopreserved spermatozoa. AI implementation is currently hampered by a lack of understanding of the factors that may cause failure. We investigated factors influencing the probability of success of AI for 14 giant panda females housed at the China Center for Research and Conservation of the Giant Panda (CCRCGP) inseminated in a total of 20 instances using cryopreserved spermatozoa from 11 males currently residing in 6 different captive breeding institutions. One of the pandas was the oldest giant panda female to ever successfully conceive from AI (20.5 years old). The success of AI was significantly affected by the timing of AI in relationship to both timing of peak urinary estrogen of the female and percent decline in urinary estrogen between the peak level and the first AI attempt. Our results suggest that the window for successful AI in giant pandas may be narrower than previously suspected, although individual differences in rates of decline in urinary estrogen may reflect some degree of variation in this crucial window across females. Our results are consistent with recent research on pandas and other species that demonstrates the efficacy of cryopreserved spermatozoa for AI and highlights the need for more in-depth analysis of factors related to female physiology that may influence its success. PMID:21932329

Huang, Yan; Li, Desheng; Zhou, Yingmin; Zhou, Qiang; Li, Rengui; Wang, Chengdong; Huang, Zhi; Hull, Vanessa; Zhang, Hemin

2012-01-01

376

Factors affecting vegetable growers' exposure to fungal bioaerosols and airborne dust.  

PubMed

We have quantified vegetable growers' exposure to fungal bioaerosol components including (1?3)-?-d-glucan (?-glucan), total fungal spores, and culturable fungal units. Furthermore, we have evaluated factors that might affect vegetable growers' exposure to fungal bioaerosols and airborne dust. Investigated environments included greenhouses producing cucumbers and tomatoes, open fields producing cabbage, broccoli, and celery, and packing facilities. Measurements were performed at different times during the growth season and during execution of different work tasks. Bioaerosols were collected with personal and stationary filter samplers. Selected fungal species (Beauveria spp., Trichoderma spp., Penicillium olsonii, and Penicillium brevicompactum) were identified using different polymerase chain reaction-based methods and sequencing. We found that the factors (i) work task, (ii) crop, including growth stage of handled plant material, and (iii) open field versus greenhouse significantly affected the workers' exposure to bioaerosols. Packing of vegetables and working in open fields caused significantly lower exposure to bioaerosols, e.g. mesophilic fungi and dust, than harvesting in greenhouses and clearing of senescent greenhouse plants. Also removing strings in cucumber greenhouses caused a lower exposure to bioaerosols than harvest of cucumbers while removal of old plants caused the highest exposure. In general, the exposure was higher in greenhouses than in open fields. The exposures to ?-glucan during harvest and clearing of senescent greenhouse plants were very high (median values ranging between 50 and 1500 ng m(-3)) compared to exposures reported from other occupational environments. In conclusion, vegetable growers' exposure to bioaerosols was related to the environment, in which they worked, the investigated work tasks, and the vegetable crop. PMID:22003240

Hansen, Vinni M; Meyling, Nicolai Vitt; Winding, Anne; Eilenberg, Jørgen; Madsen, Anne Mette

2012-03-01

377

Understanding the factors affecting the postpartum depression in the mothers of Isfahan city  

PubMed Central

Background and Objective: Depression is one of the most common and specific problems during pregnancy and after it. Maternal postpartum depression compromises mother's health and affects social relationship, and has negative effect on infant development. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of postpartum depression and its related factors in Isfahanian mothers. Materials and Methods: This is a cross - sectional study. The study populations were 133 women who at the last 8-4 weeks of labor referred to Isfahan health centers. Demographic information and obstetric and Beck Depression Inventory were applied. Three categories emerged according to the degree of scale: Mild, moderate, and severe depression. Statistical analysis was used with the Pearson correlation and linear regression in SPSS version 18. Results: A total of 73 mothers had mild depression (10-19) and 56 had moderate depressions (20-29). Among the factors related to depression such as maternal education, financial status, unwanted pregnancy, premenstrual syndrome, and maternal occupational history, there was a significant correlation with postpartum depression (P > 0.05). Variables in the regression analysis include maternal education, financial status, unwanted pregnancy, history of premenstrual syndrome, maternal occupation, type of delivery, history of miscarriage, and having a satisfaction with baby gender. And, a total of 27.7% variance explains the postpartum depression. Among these factors, the predictive variables of maternal education, type of delivery, financial condition, unwanted pregnancy, premenstrual syndrome, and maternal occupational history were significant in the meantime; the prediction of unplanned pregnancy was more than other variables (ß = 0.24). Conclusions: With attention to factors associated with postpartum depression, the healthcare planner will help to better manage the problem. The results of this study will help to better understand the factors influencing mothers in the labor process, and mothers in the labor process, experiences minimum mental health disorders. PMID:25077158

Mazaheri, Maryam Amidi; Rabiei, Leili; Masoudi, Reza; Hamidizadeh, Saeid; Nooshabadi, Mohammad Reza Rashidi; Najimi, Arash

2014-01-01

378

Which Factors Affect the Success or Failure of Eradication Campaigns against Alien Species?  

PubMed Central

Although issues related to the management of invasive alien species are receiving increasing attention, little is known about which factors affect the likelihood of success of management measures. We applied two data mining techniques, classification trees and boosted trees, to identify factors that relate to the success of management campaigns aimed at eradicating invasive alien invertebrates, plants and plant pathogens. We assembled a dataset of 173 different eradication campaigns against 94 species worldwide, about a half of which (50.9%) were successful. Eradications in man-made habitats, greenhouses in particular, were more likely to succeed than those in (semi-)natural habitats. In man-made habitats the probability of success was generally high in Australasia, while in Europe and the Americas it was higher for local infestations that are easier to deal with, and for international campaigns that are likely to profit from cross-border cooperation. In (semi-) natural habitats, eradication campaigns were more likely to succeed for plants introduced as an ornamental and escaped from cultivation prior to invasion. Averaging out all other factors in boosted trees, pathogens, bacteria and viruses were most, and fungi the least likely to be eradicated; for plants and invertebrates the probability was intermediate. Our analysis indicates that initiating the campaign before the extent of infestation reaches the critical threshold, starting to eradicate within the first four years since the problem has been noticed, paying special attention to species introduced by the cultivation pathway, and applying sanitary measures can substantially increase the probability of eradication success. Our investigations also revealed that information on socioeconomic factors, which are often considered to be crucial for eradication success, is rarely available, and thus their relative importance cannot be evaluated. Future campaigns should carefully document socioeconomic factors to enable tests of their importance. PMID:23110197

Pluess, Therese; Jarošík, Vojt?ch; Pyšek, Petr; Cannon, Ray; Pergl, Jan; Breukers, Annemarie; Bacher, Sven

2012-01-01

379

PERCEIVED VISUAL AESTHETICS OF EMOTIONALLY EVOCATIVE HOMEPAGES: AN INVESTIGATION OF AFFECTIVE QUALITIES IDENTIFIED  

E-print Network

PERCEIVED VISUAL AESTHETICS OF EMOTIONALLY EVOCATIVE HOMEPAGES: AN INVESTIGATION OF AFFECTIVE Results for Predicting Aesthetics with Demographics, Homepages, and Color Mappings 50 #12;vii LIST. .......................................... 31 Figure 3: MDS visualization for South Korean groupings of aesthetic adjectives........... 33

Zhou, Yaoqi

380

Factors affecting total alkaloid and nitrate levels in pearl millet (Pennisetum americanum (L.) Leeke)  

E-print Network

for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1981 Major Subject: Agronomy FACTORS AFFECTING TOTAL ALKALOID AND NITRATE LEVELS IN PEARL MILLET (PENNISETUM AMERICANUM (L. ) LEEKE) A Thesis by BEVERLY BLOHOWIAK KREJSA Approved as to style and content by...: (Co-chairman of Committee) ( o-chsi an Committee) J (Member) C~?. (Member) Head of e ment) y" December 1981 ABSTRACT Factors Affecting Total Alkaloid and Nitrate Levels in Pearl Millet (P' t *(L)Lk) Beverly Blohowiak Krejsa, B. S. , Texas A...

Krejsa, Beverly Blohowiak

1981-01-01

381

Factors affecting the recovery of petroleum in projects involving the injection of liquefied petroleum gases (LPG)  

E-print Network

FACTORS AFFECTING THE RECOVERY OF PETROLEUM IN PROJECTS INVOLVING THE INJECTION OF LIQUEFIED PETROLEUM GASES (LPG) A Thesis By GERRY A. GRAHAM Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1961 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering GERRY A. GRAHAM FACTORS AFFECTING THE RECOVERY OF PETROLEUM IN PROJECTS INVOLVING THE INJECTION OF LIQUEFIED PETROLEUM GASES (LPG) A...

Graham, Gerry A

2012-06-07

382

A New Hybrid Approach for Analysis of Factors Affecting Crude Oil Price  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, a new hybrid approach is presented to analyze factors affecting crude oil price using rough set and wavelet\\u000a neural network. Related factors that affect crude oil price are found using text mining technique and Brent oil price is chosen\\u000a as the decision price because it plays an important role in world crude oil markets. The relevant subsets

Wei Xu; Jue Wang; Xun Zhang; Wen Zhang; Shouyang Wang

2007-01-01

383

Factors affecting the within-river spawning migration of Atlantic salmon, with emphasis on human impacts  

Microsoft Academic Search

We review factors affecting the within-river spawning migration of Atlantic salmon. With populations declining across the\\u000a entire distribution range, it is important that spawners survive in the last phase of the spawning migration. Knowledge on\\u000a the factors affecting migration is essential for the protection of populations, and to increase the success of reintroduction\\u000a programmes. A number of studies have documented

Eva B. Thorstad; Finn Økland; Kim Aarestrup; Tor G. Heggberget

2008-01-01

384

Examining factors affecting the safety performance and design of exclusive truck facilities  

E-print Network

EXAMINING POTENTIAL FACTORS AFFECTING THE SAFETY PERFORMANCE AND DESIGN OF EXCLUSIVE TRUCK FACILITIES A Thesis by VICHIKA IRAGAVARAPU Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2007 Major Subject: Civil Engineering EXAMINING POTENTIAL FACTORS AFFECTING THE SAFETY PERFORMANCE AND DESIGN OF EXCLUSIVE TRUCK FACILITIES A Thesis...

Iragavarapu, Vichika

2008-10-10

385

Distribution of practice as a factor affecting learning and/or performance.  

PubMed

Earlier studies considering distribution of practice as a factor affecting learning and/or performance have employed a transfer design and consequently have failed to provide the means for refuting the contention that postrest performance was the manifestation of extended practice, a temporary performance variation, or some form of the "Hawthorne effect" rather than the result of the independent variable. The present experiment provided adequate control, and results indicated that distribution of practice was a factor affecting performance rather than learning. PMID:23961934

Dunham, P

1976-12-01

386

An analysis of selected factors controlling or affecting the hydraulic conductivity of compacted soil liners  

E-print Network

AN ANALYSIS OF SELECTED FACTORS CONTROLLING OR AFFECTING THE HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF COMPACTED SOIL LINERS A Thesis by ROBERT CARY SPEAKE, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 19B6 Major Subject: Civil Engineering AM ANALYSIS OF SELECTED FACTORS CONTROLLING OR AFFECTING THE HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF COMPACTED SOIL LINERS A Thesis by ROBERT CARY SPEAKE, JR. Approved...

Speake, Robert Cary

1986-01-01

387

Factors affecting the relationship between calving interval of cows and weaning weights of calves  

E-print Network

FACTORS AFFECTING THE R'LATIONSHIP BETWEEN CALVING INTERVAL OF COWS AND WEANING WEIGHTS OF CALVES A Thesis PHILIP ERICH DOREN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1982 Major Subject: Animal Breeding FACTORS AFFECTING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CALVING INTERVAL OF COWS AND WEANING WEIGHTS OF CALVES A Thesis by PHILIP ERICH DOREN Approved as to style and content by: (C airman...

Doren, Philip Erich

2012-06-07

388

Factors affecting weaning weights of calves produced in Hereford and rotational crossbred herds  

E-print Network

FACTORS AFFECTING WEANING WEIGHTS OF CALVES PRODUCED IN HEREFORD AND ROTATIONAL CROSSBRED HERDS A Thesis By jORGE TOVAR R. Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1965 Major Subject: Animal Production FACTORS AFFECTING WEANING WEIGHTS OF CALVES PRODUCED IN HEREFORD AND ROTATIONAL CROSSBRED HERDS A Thesis By JORGE TOVAR R. Approved as to style an content by: ( ' an of Committee...

Tovar-Rodriguez, Jorge

2012-06-07

389

Ecological Factors Affecting Hispanic Urban Middle School and High School Adolescents’ College and Career Aspirations  

E-print Network

ECOLOGICAL FACTORS AFFECTING HISPANIC URBAN MIDDLE SCHOOL AND HIGH SCHOOL ADOLESCENTS? COLLEGE AND CAREER ASPIRATIONS A Dissertation by JUDY ANN HOSTRUP Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2011 Major Subject: Curriculum and Instruction ECOLOGICAL FACTORS AFFECTING HISPANIC URBAN MIDDLE SCHOOL AND HIGH SCHOOL ADOLESCENTS? COLLEGE...

Hostrup, Judy Ann

2011-08-08

390

Factors affecting release rate of diltiazem hydrochloride from poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) matrices.  

PubMed

Sustained release diltiazem hydrochloride (DIL) formulation is widely used over 110 countries worldwide, and is among the drugs recommended as a first-line therapy in the major guidelines for the management of hypertension. In search for a most suitable controlled release formulation of DIL, we investigated poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) matrix (pHEMA matrix) synthesized by photopolymerization. Factors affecting the release rate of DIL from pHEMA matrices were investigated, focusing on the internal structure of the matrices. The effects of the porosity (epsilon), the fractal dimensions (Df) and the microscopic viscosity (eta matrix) of the matrices on the release rate of DIL were investigated on the basis of the linear least square equation as well as the Higuchi's equation. A relation between the actual value and predicted value based on the linear least square equation exhibited a fairly good linearity (r=0.979). Furthermore, the release rate of DIL was represented based on the Higuchi's equation including the values of epsilon, Df and eta matrix. It is likely that the release rate of DIL from pHEMA matrices is mainly controlled by epsilon and Df, but eta matrix was less effective. PMID:18242964

Yanagawa, F; Ishii, Y; Onuki, Y; Morishita, M; Takayama, K

2008-05-01

391

Chadwick et al TRB 12-4396 1 Analysis of Factors Affecting Train Derailments2  

E-print Network

consequences for the public and the railroads alike, especially28 in the form of train derailments. The goalChadwick et al TRB 12-4396 1 1 Analysis of Factors Affecting Train Derailments2 at Highway of this research is to identify and understand the factors29 leading to these derailments. This paper focuses

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

392

Ageing Human Bone: Factors Affecting its Biomechanical Properties and the Role of Collagen  

Microsoft Academic Search

The incidence of fractures increases with age. This is partly due to extraosseous factors and partly to the increased fragility of the bone material itself. Ageing adversely affects the “quality” of human bone material, its elastic and ultimate properties. The hypothesis here is that these effects are caused by factors such as architectural changes, compositional changes, physicochemical changes, changes at

P. Zioupos

2001-01-01

393

Factors Affecting Career Decision Making of Mexican and Mexican-American Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this research was to identify the self-reported factors affecting the career decision making of Mexican and Mexican-American students. It was hypothesized that the factor clusters would differ between the two sample populations, Mexican and Mexican-American. It was also hypothesized that these clusters would differ from six clusters…

Newlon, Betty J.; Borboa, Roman

394

A MULTI-YEAR STUDY OF FACTORS AFFECTING FRUIT PRODUCTION IN ARISTOLOCHIA PAUCINERVIS  

E-print Network

A MULTI-YEAR STUDY OF FACTORS AFFECTING FRUIT PRODUCTION IN ARISTOLOCHIA PAUCINERVIS limitation, resource limitation, fruit abortion, and predation have all been proposed as factors explaining low fruit set in hermaphroditic plants. We conducted a 5-year study combining field observations

Herrera, Carlos M.

395

A Quantitative Study of Factors Affecting Learner Acceptance of a Computer-Based Training Support Tool  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study identifies and empirically tests factors that may influence learners' use of a computer-based training support system (TSS). The areas of research and theory were drawn from human-computer interaction, information and business management, and adult education. The factors suggested in the literature that may affect learner's use of a TSS…

Wagner, G. Dale; Flannery, Daniele D.

2004-01-01

396

A Review of Foreign Researches on Influential Factors Affecting Students' Engagement in English Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students' active engagement constitutes the core of the process of learning and teaching in the student-oriented classroom. The paper centers on a review of foreign researches on influential factors affecting students' engagement in English classroom. It is expected to figure out the relevant factors in order to promote students' active engagement.

Zhou, Chun-hong

2010-01-01

397

Factors affecting ammonium uptake in streams an inter-biome perspective  

E-print Network

Factors affecting ammonium uptake in streams ­ an inter-biome perspective JACKSON R. WEBSTER Nitrogen eXperiment (LINX) was a coordinated study of the relationships between North American biomes and factors governing ammonium uptake in streams. Our objective was to relate inter-biome variability

Webster, Jackson R.

398

Factors Affecting the Prevalence of Gastro-oesophageal Reflux in Childhood Corrosive Oesophageal Strictures  

PubMed Central

Background: Gastro-oesophageal reflux may accompany the corrosive oesophageal damage caused by the ingestion of corrosive substances and affect its treatment. The factors that affect the development of reflux in these cases and their effects on treatment still remain unclear. Aims: Our aim is to investigate the prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux in children with corrosive oesophageal strictures, the risk factors affecting this prevalence and the effects of gastro-oesophageal reflux on treatment. Study Design: Case-control study. Methods: We enrolled 52 patients with oesophageal stricture due to corrosive substance ingestion who were referred to our clinic between 2003 and 2010. Groups, which were determined according to the presence of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GER), were compared with each other in terms of clinical findings, results of examination methods, characteristics of the stricture and success of the treatment. Results: The total number of patients in our study was 52; 30 of them were male and 22 of them were female. The mean age of our study population was 4.2±2.88 years. Thirty-three patients had gastrooesophageal reflux (63.5%). Patients who had strictures caused by the ingestion of alkali substances were 1.6-times more likely to have reflux. There were no differences between patients with or without reflux in terms of number and localisation of strictures. Mean distance of stricture was longer in patients with reflux (3.7±1.8 cm) than in patients without (2.2±1.0 cm) (p<0.005). Only one patient among 17 who had a long stricture (?4 cm) did not suffer from reflux. Patients with long stricture were 1.9-times more likely to have reflux. Dilatation treatment was successful in 69.6% of patients with reflux and in 78.9% of patients without. The mean treatment period was 8.41±6.1 months in patients with reflux and 8.21±8.4 months in the other group. There was no significant difference between groups in terms of frequency of dilatation and dilator diameters (p>0.05). Conclusion: Corrosive oesophageal stricture was usually accompanied by gastro-oesophageal reflux and the length of stricture is an important risk factor. Negative effects of reflux over dilatation treatment have not yet been demonstrated in the short-term. Nevertheless, this frequent rate of reflux may eventually increase the risk of oesophagitis and Barrett’s oesophagus; therefore, we suggest that these effects should be prospectively evaluated in a large number of patients and these patients should be followed-up routinely in terms of the long-term effects of reflux. PMID:25207185

?skit, Serdar H.; Özçelik, Zerrin; Alkan, Murat; Türker, Selcan; Zorludemir, Ünal

2014-01-01

399

[Advances in the endocrine factors affecting the development of gubernaculum testis].  

PubMed

The testicular gubernaculum plays an important role in testicular descent and development. Its differentiation and development are affected by many factors. Androgens, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), insulin-like factor 3 (INSL3), Müllerian inhibiting substance (MIS), epidermal growth factor (EGF) and environmental estrogens (EEs) are involved in gubernacular development. The effect of CGRP, INSL3 and especially EEs on genital system has been attracted more attention. PMID:16755880

Deng, Wang-Dong; Jiang, Xue-Wu

2006-05-01

400

Peripheral lipopolysaccharide administration transiently affects expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, corticotropin and proopiomelanocortin in mouse brain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Peripheral inflammation induced by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is known to cause functional impairments in the brain affecting memory and learning. One of mechanisms may be the interference with neurotrophin (NT) expression and function. In the current study we administered a single, high dose of LPS (3mg\\/kg, i.p.) into mice and investigated changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)

Sabine Schnydrig; Lukas Korner; Svenja Landweer; Beat Ernst; Gaby Walker; Uwe Otten; Dieter Kunz

2007-01-01

401

Do climatic and physical factors affect populations of the blow fly Chrysomya megacephala and house fly Musca domestica ?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The blow fly, Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius), and house fly, Musca domestica L., are medically and forensically important flies. The population dynamic of these flies is essential for both control and\\u000a forensical aspects. The aim of this study was to investigate the climatic and physical factors affecting the population trend\\u000a of both species in Chiang Mai province, northern Thailand, using the

Ratchadawan Ngoen-klan; Kittikhun Moophayak; Tunwadee Klong-klaew; Kim N. Irvine; Kabkaew L. Sukontason; Chira Prangkio; Pradya Somboon; Kom Sukontason

402

The Cervical Range of Motion as a Factor Affecting Outcome in Patients With Congenital Muscular Torticollis  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate the factors affecting rehabilitation outcomes in children with congenital muscular torticollis (CMT). Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 347 patients who were clinically suspected as having CMT and performed neck ultrasonography to measure sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle thickness. Fifty-four patients met the inclusion criteria. Included were demographic characteristics as well as measurements of cervical range of motion (ROM), SCM muscle thickness, and the abnormal/normal (A/N) ratio, defined as the ratio of SCM muscle thickness on the affected to the unaffected side. Results Subjects were divided into three groups depending on degree of cervical ROM (group 1A: ROM>60, n=12; group 1B: 60?ROM>30, n=31; group 1C: ROM?30, n=11), the SCM muscle thickness (Th) (group 2A: Th<1.2 cm, n=23; group 2B: 1.2?Th<1.4 cm, n=18; group 2C: Th?1.4 cm, n=13), and the A/N ratio (R) (group 3A: R<2.2, n=19; group 3B: 2.2?R<2.8, n=20; group 3C: R?2.8, n=15). We found that more limited cervical ROM corresponded to longer treatment duration. The average treatment duration was 4.55 months in group 1A, 5.87 months in group 1B, and 6.50 months in group 1C. SCM muscle thickness and the A/N ratio were not correlated with treatment duration. Conclusion Infants with CMT who were diagnosed earlier and had an earlier intervention had a shorter duration of rehabilitation. Initial cervical ROM is an important prognostic factor for predicting the rehabilitation outcome of patients with CMT. PMID:23705112

Lee, Jin-Youn; Lee, In-Sik; Jung, Heeyoune; Lee, Jongmin; Kang, Jung-Il; Bang, Hyun

2013-01-01

403

Factors That Affect Suicidal Attempt Risk Among Korean Elderly Adults: A Path Analysis  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Among the Korean elderly (those 65 years of age and older), the suicide rate is 80.3/100 000 people, which is ten times higher than the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development average. Because South Korea is rapidly becoming an aging population, this high elderly suicidal rate will only get worse. Although the size of the elderly suicide problem is quite large, previous research in South Korea has surveyed restricted areas and not the entire country. Even though the factors that affect elderly suicide are complicated, there has been little research into these influencing factors. Thus, this research uses the national survey data (Community Health Survey) that was obtained in 2009. Additionally, we analyze factors affecting elderly suicidal ideation and attempts as well as the paths of these effects. Methods: Community Health Survey data obtained by the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2009 was used for this study. We additionally examined the factors that affect suicide with chi-squared tests, t-tests, Pearson’s correlation test, and path analysis. Results: Depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation are the only factors that directly affect suicidal attempts. Demographic, behavioral, and physical activity factors have indirect effects on suicidal attempts. Conclusions: Depression has the strongest influence on suicidal ideation and attempts. Demographic, behavioral, and physical activity factors affect suicidal attempts mostly through depressive symptoms. In addition, there is a path that suggests that demographic, behavioral, and physical activity factors affect suicidal attempts not through depression symptoms but only through suicidal ideation. This means that the elderly who do not have depression symptoms attempt suicide according to their own situations and characteristics. PMID:25652708

Ro, Junsoo; Park, Jongheon; Lee, Jinsuk; Jung, Hyemin

2015-01-01

404

Environmental Factors Affecting Large-Bodied Coral Reef Fish Assemblages in the Mariana Archipelago  

PubMed Central

Large-bodied reef fishes represent an economically and ecologically important segment of the coral reef fish assemblage. Many of these individuals supply the bulk of the reproductive output for their population and have a disproportionate effect on their environment (e.g. as apex predators or bioeroding herbivores). Large-bodied reef fishes also tend to be at greatest risk of overfishing, and their loss can result in a myriad of either cascading (direct) or indirect trophic and other effects. While many studies have investigated habitat characteristics affecting populations of small-bodied reef fishes, few have explored the relationship between large-bodied species and their environment. Here, we describe the distribution of the large-bodied reef fishes in the Mariana Archipelago with an emphasis on the environmental factors associated with their distribution. Of the factors considered in this study, a negative association with human population density showed the highest relative influence on the distribution of large-bodied reef fishes; however, depth, water temperature, and distance to deep water also were important. These findings provide new information on the ecology of large-bodied reef fishes can inform discussions concerning essential fish habitat and ecosystem-based management for these species and highlight important knowledge gaps worthy of additional research. PMID:22384014

Richards, Benjamin L.; Williams, Ivor D.; Vetter, Oliver J.; Williams, Gareth J.

2012-01-01

405

Psychiatric Morbidity and Other Factors Affecting Treatment Adherence in Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients  

PubMed Central

As the overall prevalence of TB remains high among certain population groups, there is growing awareness of psychiatric comorbidity, especially depression and its role in the outcome of the disease. The paper attempts a holistic approach to the effects of psychiatric comorbidity to the natural history of tuberculosis. In order to investigate factors associated with medication nonadherence among patients suffering from tuberculosis, with emphasis on psychopathology as a major barrier to treatment adherence, we performed a systematic review of the literature on epidemiological data and past medical reviews from an historical perspective, followed by theoretical considerations upon the relationship between psychiatric disorders and tuberculosis. Studies reporting high prevalence rates of psychiatric comorbidity, especially depression, as well as specific psychological reactions and disease perceptions and reviews indicating psychiatric complications as adverse effects of anti-TB medication were included. In sum, data concerning factors affecting medication nonadherence among TB patients suggested that better management of comorbid conditions, especially depression, could improve the adherence rates, serving as a framework for the effective control of tuberculosis, but further studies are necessary to identify the optimal way to address such issues among these patients. PMID:23691305

Pachi, Argiro; Bratis, Dionisios; Moussas, Georgios; Tselebis, Athanasios

2013-01-01

406

What factors affect the carriage of epinephrine auto-injectors by teenagers?  

PubMed Central

Background Teenagers with allergies are at particular risk of severe and fatal reactions, but epinephrine auto-injectors are not always carried as prescribed. We investigated barriers to carriage. Methods Patients aged 12-18 years old under a specialist allergy clinic, who had previously been prescribed an auto-injector were invited to participate. Semi-structured interviews explored the factors that positively or negatively impacted on carriage. Results Twenty teenagers with food or venom allergies were interviewed. Only two patients had used their auto-injector in the community, although several had been treated for severe reactions in hospital. Most teenagers made complex risk assessments to determine whether to carry the auto-injector. Most but not all decisions were rational and were at least partially informed by knowledge. Factors affecting carriage included location, who else would be present, the attitudes of others and physical features of the auto-injector. Teenagers made frequent risk assessments when deciding whether to carry their auto-injectors, and generally wanted to remain safe. Their decisions were complex, multi-faceted and highly individualised. Conclusions Rather than aiming for 100% carriage of auto-injectors, which remains an ambitious ideal, personalised education packages should aim to empower teenagers to make and act upon informed risk assessments. PMID:22409884

2012-01-01

407

Factors affecting the stability and performance of ipratropium bromide; fenoterol hydrobromide pressurized-metered dose inhalers.  

PubMed

The aim of the study was to investigate the factors affecting the stability and performance of ipratropium bromide and fenoterol hydrobromide in a pressurized-metered dose inhaler (pMDI). A factorial design was applied to investigate the effects of three parameters (propellant, water, and ethanol) on the performance of 27 designed formulations of a solution-based pMDI. The formulations that contained a hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) propellant lower than 72% v/v and an ethanol concentration higher than 27% v/v remained as clear solutions. Nine formulations that contained the HFA propellant higher than 74% v/v precipitated. The results indicated that it was not only the HFA propellant content of the formulations that was related to the formulation instability but also ethanol content. Only six formulations from the 18 formulations, that did not precipitate, produced drug contents that were within the acceptable range (80-120%). These six formulations generated aerosols with mass median aerodynamic diameters (MMAD) of approximately 2 ?m with a fine particle fraction (FPF; particle size, <6.4 ?m) between 45% and 52%. The MMAD and FPF did not change significantly after 6 months of storage (P?>?0.05). PMID:23975571

Ninbovorl, Jenjira; Sawatdee, Somchai; Srichana, Teerapol

2013-12-01

408

Cancer history and other personal factors affect quality of life in patients with hepatitis C  

PubMed Central

Background Although patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) have been found to have reduced quality of life, little is known about how other characteristics affect their quality of life. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of other characteristics, including history of cancer, on quality of life in patients with CHC. Methods One hundred forty patients from clinics at three hospitals in New York City completed a detailed epidemiologic interview about demographic and lifestyle characteristics and the SF-36 measuring health-related quality of life. We compared results from our patients to normative data using t-tests of differences between means. We used multivariate analyses to determine other personal and health-related factors associated with quality of life outcomes. Results Compared to normative data, these patients had reduced quality of life, particularly on physical functioning. The summary Physical Component Score (PCS) was 45.4 ± 10.6 and the Mental Component Score (MCS) was 48.2 ± 11.1, vs norms of 50 ± 10.0; p-values were <0.0001 and <0.05, respectively. In multivariate analyses, the PCS was significantly lower among those with cancer history, ? 2 other chronic conditions, less education, low physical activity, and higher alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels. Cancer was more important for men, while other chronic conditions were more important for women. On the MCS, history of depression, low physical activity, alcohol use, and female gender were independently associated with poorer scores. Conclusion Several health and lifestyle factors independently influence quality of life in CHC patients. Different factors are important for men and women. PMID:15960844

Olson, Sara H; Iyer, Sandy; Scott, Jennifer; Erez, Orry; Samuel, Shelby; Markovits, Temima; Schwartz, Myron; Toro, Charlene; Gambarin-Gelwan, Maya; Kurtz, Robert C

2005-01-01

409

Advanced Glycation End-Products affect transcription factors regulating insulin gene expression  

SciTech Connect

Advanced Glycation End-Products (AGEs) are generated by the covalent interaction of reducing sugars with proteins, lipids or nucleic acids. AGEs are implicated in diabetic complications and pancreatic {beta}-cell dysfunction. We previously demonstrated that exposure of the pancreatic islet cell line HIT-T15 to high concentrations of AGEs leads to a significant decrease of insulin secretion and content. Insulin gene transcription is positively regulated by the beta cell specific transcription factor PDX-1 (Pancreatic and Duodenal Homeobox-1). On the contrary, the forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 inhibits PDX-1 gene transcription. Activity of FoxO1 is regulated by post-translational modifications: phosphorylation deactivates FoxO1, and acetylation prevents FoxO1 ubiquitination. In this work we investigated whether AGEs affect expression and subcellular localization of PDX-1 and FoxO1. HIT-T15 cells were cultured for 5 days in presence of AGEs. Cells were then lysed and processed for subcellular fractionation. We determined intracellular insulin content, then we assessed the expression and subcellular localization of PDX-1, FoxO1, phosphoFoxO1 and acetylFoxO1. As expected intracellular insulin content was lower in HIT-T15 cells cultured with AGEs. The results showed that AGEs decreased expression and nuclear localization of PDX-1, reduced phosphorylation of FoxO1, and increased expression and acetylation of FoxO1. These results suggest that AGEs decrease insulin content unbalancing transcription factors regulating insulin gene expression.

Puddu, A., E-mail: alep100@hotmail.com [Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, Viale Benedetto XV 6, 16132 Genova (Italy); Storace, D.; Odetti, P.; Viviani, G.L. [Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, Viale Benedetto XV 6, 16132 Genova (Italy)] [Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, Viale Benedetto XV 6, 16132 Genova (Italy)

2010-04-23

410

Individual and Center-Level Factors Affecting Mortality Among Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To examine factors affecting center differences in mortality for extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants. METHODS: We analyzed data for 5418 ELBW infants born at 16 Neonatal Research Network centers during 2006–2009. The primary outcomes of early mortality (?12 hours after birth) and in-hospital mortality were assessed by using multilevel hierarchical models. Models were developed to investigate associations of center rates of selected interventions with mortality while adjusting for patient-level risk factors. These analyses were performed for all gestational ages (GAs) and separately for GAs <25 weeks and ?25 weeks. RESULTS: Early and in-hospital mortality rates among centers were 5% to 36% and 11% to 53% for all GAs, 13% to 73% and 28% to 90% for GAs <25 weeks, and 1% to 11% and 7% to 26% for GAs ?25 weeks, respectively. Center intervention rates significantly predicted both early and in-hospital mortality for infants <25 weeks. For infants ?25 weeks, intervention rates did not predict mortality. The variance in mortality among centers was significant for all GAs and outcomes. Center use of interventions and patient risk factors explained some but not all of the center variation in mortality rates. CONCLUSIONS: Center intervention rates explain a portion of the center variation in mortality, especially for infants born at <25 weeks’ GA. This finding suggests that deaths may be prevented by standardizing care for very early GA infants. However, differences in patient characteristics and center intervention rates do not account for all of the observed variability in mortality; and for infants with GA ?25 weeks these differences account for only a small part of the variation in mortality. PMID:23753096

Alleman, Brandon W.; Li, Lei; Dagle, John M.; Smith, P. Brian; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Laughon, Matthew M.; Stoll, Barbara J.; Goldberg, Ronald N.; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Cotten, C. Michael; Shankaran, Seetha; Walsh, Michele C.; Laptook, Abbot R.; Ellsbury, Dan L.; Hale, Ellen C.; Newman, Nancy S.; Wallace, Dennis D.; Das, Abhik; Higgins, Rosemary D.

2013-01-01

411

Development of Hospital Information Systems: User Participation and Factors Affecting It  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Given the large volume of data generated in hospitals, in order to efficiently management them; using hospital information system (HIS) is critical. User participation is one of the major factors in the success of HIS that in turn leads Information needs and processes to be correctly predicted and also their commitment to the development of HIS to be augmented. The purpose of this study is to investigate the participation rate of users in different stages of HIS development as well as to identify the factors affecting it. Method and materials: This is a descriptive–cross sectional study which was inducted in 2014. The study population consists of 140 HIS users (from different types of job including physicians, nurses, laboratory, radiology and HIM staffs) from Teaching Hospitals Affiliated to Urmia University of Medical Sciences. Data were collected using a self-structured questionnaire which was estimated as both reliable and valid. The data were analyzed by SPSS software descriptive statistics and analytical statistics (t-test and chi-square). Results: The highest participation rate of users in the four-stage development of the HIS was related to the implementation phase (2.88) and the lowest participation rate was related to analysis (1.23). The test results showed that the rate of user participation was not satisfactory in none of the stages of development (P< 0.05). The most important factors in increasing user participation include established teamwork from end-users and the support of top managers from HIS development. Conclusion: According to the results obtained from the study, it seems that health care administrators must have a detailed plan for user participation prior to the development and purchase of HIS so that they identify the real needs as well as increase their commitment and motivations to develop, maintain and upgrade the system, and in this way, the success of the system will be assured.

Rahimi, Bahlol; Safdari, Reza; Jebraeily, Mohamad

2014-01-01

412

Factors affecting use of CR-39 surface monitor technology to estimate past exposure to indoor radon.  

PubMed

In an epidemiologic study investigating influences of life-style and environment on lung cancer risk, CR-39 alpha-particle detectors, identified here as surface monitors, were affixed to subjects' selected household glass, ceramic, or enameled objects to measure residual radioactivity form embedded radon (Rn) decay products. The purpose was to estimate past cumulative indoor Rn concentrations to which the object was exposed to infer past exposures of the subjects. This approach was used to supplement exposure information obtained by methods traditionally used in Rn epidemiologic studies. In addition, surface monitors were affixed to objects of selected study subjects with complete exposure information to evaluate whether surface monitors provided estimates of cumulative past residual Rn exposure comparable to estimates obtained from year-long, ambient alpha track-etch measurements in each present and previous residence. These ambient measurements were time-weighted to estimate integrated exposure of objects and were adjusted for decay and ingrowth so as to be comparable to surface monitor measurements. A regression relationship was estimated between the two estimates of cumulative RN exposure. Surface monitor measurements had a satisfactory correlation (0.63) with adjusted ambient Rn measurements for new, nonceramic objects. Although not included in the study design, factors that might affect use of the technology were also investigated. Regression relationships were compared in graduated smoking environment (as judged by the subjects) to investigate possible differential plate out of radon progeny. In addition, regression relationships for windows were compared with those for other objects to investigate whether there was a significant difference between windows and other objects. It has been suggested that windows may have a higher plate out rate because of locally increased air flow. Results suggested that surface monitor information was useful to fill time gaps in estimates of historical radon exposure data obtained by ambient measurements. Glass samples provided the best correlation. Ceramic materials sometimes provided excessively high radon estimates, probably due to glazes that contained significant uranium or thorium. Due to small sample sizes, investigations of other factors were inconclusive. PMID:9087863

Mahaffey, J A; Parkhurst, M A; Hui, T E; Brownson, R C; Alavanja, M C

1996-01-01

413

Nurses' Experiences of Nonpatient Factors That Affect Nursing Workload: A Study of the PAONCIL Instrument's Nonpatient Factors  

PubMed Central

In the RAFAELA patient classification system, the professional assessment of optimal nursing care intensity level (PAONCIL) instrument is used to assess the optimal nursing intensity level per unit. The PAONCIL instrument contains an overall assessment of the actual nursing intensity level and an additional list of central nonpatient factors that may increase or decrease the total nursing workload (NWL). The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess and determine which nonpatient factors affect nurses' experiences of their total NWL in both outpatient settings and hospitals, as captured through the PAONCIL instrument. The data material consisted of PAONCIL questionnaires from 38 units and 37 outpatient clinics at 11 strategically selected hospitals in Finland, and included nurses' answers (n = 1307) to the question of which factors, other than nursing intensity, affect total NWL. The methods for data analyses were qualitative content analyses. The nonpatient factors that affected nurses' experiences of total NWL are “organization of work,” “working conditions,” “self-control,” and “cooperation.” The actual list of nonpatient factors in the PAONCIL instrument is to a reasonable extent relevant, but the list should be improved to include nurses' actual working conditions and self-control. PMID:25050179

Fagerström, Lisbeth; Vainikainen, Paula

2014-01-01

414

Factors affecting chick provisioning by Caspian Terns nesting in the Columbia River estuary  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We investigated factors affecting chick provisioning by radio-tagged Caspian Terns (Sterna caspia) nesting in a large colony on East Sand Island in the Columbia River estuary during 2001. Caspian Tern predation on juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) in the estuary prompted resource managers to relocate ca. 9,000 pairs of terns nesting on Rice Island (river km 34) to East Sand Island (river km 8), where terns were expected to consume fewer salmonids in favor of marine forage fishes. This study investigated factors influencing foraging success, diet composition, and overall reproductive success at the managed Caspian Tern colony. Our results indicated that daytime colony attendance by nesting terns averaged 64% and decreased throughout the chick-rearing period, while duration of foraging trips averaged 47 min and increased during the same period; these seasonal changes were more strongly related to date than chick age. Average meal delivery rates to 2-chick broods (0.88 meals h-1) were 2.6 times greater than to 1-chick broods (0.33 meals h-1). Parents delivered more juvenile salmonids to chicks during ebb tides than flood tides, but meal delivery rates to the nest remained constant, suggesting diet composition tracks relative availability of prey species. Foraging trips resulting in delivery of juvenile salmonids averaged 68% longer than foraging trips for schooling marine forage fishes, indicating higher availability of marine prey near the colony. High availability of marine forage fish in the Columbia River estuary during 2001 was apparently responsible for high colony attendance, short foraging trips, high chick meal delivery rates, and high nesting success of Caspian Terns on East Sand Island.

Anderson, S.K.; Roby, D.D.; Lyons, D.E.; Collis, K.

2005-01-01

415

School factors affecting postsecondary career pursuits of high-achieving girls in mathematics and science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study examined the influences of secondary school experiences of high-achieving girls in math and science on their postsecondary career pursuits in science fields. Specifically, using the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 (NELS:88), the study investigated how science class experiences in high school affect science career persistence of high-achieving girls over and above personal and family factors. Selecting the top 10% on the 8 th grade math and science achievement tests from two panel samples of 1988--1994 and 1988--2000, this study examined which science instructional experiences (i.e., lecture-oriented, experiment-oriented, and student-oriented) best predicted college major choices and postsecondary degree attainments in the fields of science after controlling for personal and family factors. A two-stage test was employed for the analysis of each panel sample. The first test examined the dichotomous career pursuits between science careers and non-science careers and the second test examined the dichotomous pursuits within science careers: "hard" science and "soft" science. Logistic regression procedures were used with consideration of panel weights and design effects. This study identified that experiment-oriented and student-oriented instructional practices seem to positively affect science career pursuits of high-achieving females, while lecture-oriented instruction negatively affected their science career pursuits, and that the longitudinal effects of the two positive instructional contributors to science career pursuits appear to be differential between major choice and degree attainment. This study also found that the influences of instructional practices seem to be slight for general females, while those for high-achieving females were highly considerable, regardless of whether negative or positive. Another result of the study found that only student-oriented instruction seemed to have positive effects for high-achieving males. In addition, this study found that the lecture-oriented and experiment-oriented instructional practices were more likely to contribute to the choice of soft sciences for general and high-achieving females, while student-oriented instructional practices were more likely to contribute to the degree attainment in hard sciences for high-achieving females in science. The results should provide information for educational policies regarding school instruction and curriculum and career development targeted towards improving gender equity in science career pursuits.

Yoo, Hyunsil

416

Some genetic and environmental factors affecting weaning weight in Santa Gertrudis range cattle  

E-print Network

SOME GENE TIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL FAC T0RS AFFECTING WEANING WEIGHT IN SANTA GERTRUDIS RANGE CATTLE A Thesis by ALVARO CASTRO H. Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A!4M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1968 Major Subject: Animal Science SOME GENETIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AFFECTING WEANING WEIGHT IN SANTA GERTRUDIS RANGE CATTLE A Thesis by ALVARO CASTRO H. Approved as to style and content by: (Cha rman...

Castro-Hernandez, Alvaro

2012-06-07

417

Intranasal nerve growth factor bypasses the blood-brain barrier and affects spinal cord neurons in spinal cord injury  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this work was to investigate whether, by intranasal administration, the nerve growth factor bypasses the blood-brain barrier and turns over the spinal cord neurons and if such therapeutic approach could be of value in the treatment of spinal cord injury. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats with intact and injured spinal cord received daily intranasal nerve growth factor administration in both nostrils for 1 day or for 3 consecutive weeks. We found an increased content of nerve growth factor and enhanced expression of nerve growth factor receptor in the spinal cord 24 hours after a single intranasal administration of nerve growth factor in healthy rats, while daily treatment for 3 weeks in a model of spinal cord injury improved the deficits in locomotor behaviour and increased spinal content of both nerve growth factor and nerve growth factor receptors. These outcomes suggest that the intranasal nerve growth factor bypasses blood-brain barrier and affects spinal cord neurons in spinal cord injury. They also suggest exploiting the possible therapeutic role of intranasally delivered nerve growth factor for the neuroprotection of damaged spinal nerve cells. PMID:25206755

Aloe, Luigi; Bianchi, Patrizia; De Bellis, Alberto; Soligo, Marzia; Rocco, Maria Luisa

2014-01-01

418

Factors affecting motivation and retention of primary health care workers in three disparate regions in Kenya  

PubMed Central

Background The World Health Organization (WHO) and the Government of Kenya alike identify a well-performing health workforce as key to attaining better health. Nevertheless, the motivation and retention of health care workers (HCWs) persist as challenges. This study investigated factors influencing motivation and retention of HCWs at primary health care facilities in three different settings in Kenya - the remote area of Turkana, the relatively accessible region of Machakos, and the disadvantaged informal urban settlement of Kibera in Nairobi. Methods A cross-sectional cluster sample design was used to select 59 health facilities that yielded interviews with 404 health care workers, grouped into 10 different types of service providers. Data were collected in November 2011 using structured questionnaires and a Focus Group Discussion guide. Findings were analyzed using bivariate and multivariate methods of the associations and determinants of health worker motivation and retention. Results The levels of education and gender factors were lowest in Turkana with female HCWs representing only 30% of the workers against a national average of 53%. A smaller proportion of HCWs in Turkana feel that they have adequate training for their jobs. Overall, 13% of the HCWs indicated that they had changed their job in the last 12 months and 20% indicated that they could leave their current job within the next two years. In terms of work environment, inadequate access to electricity, equipment, transport, housing, and the physical state of the health facility were cited as most critical, particularly in Turkana. The working environment is rated as better in private facilities. Adequate training, job security, salary, supervisor support, and manageable workload were identified as critical satisfaction factors. Family health care, salary, and terminal benefits were rated as important compensatory factors. Conclusions There are distinct motivational and retention factors that affect HCWs in the three regions. Findings and policy implications from this study point to a set of recommendations to be implemented at national and county levels. These include gender mainstreaming, development of appropriate retention schemes, competitive compensation packages, strategies for career growth, establishment of a model HRH community, and the conduct of a discrete choice experiment. PMID:24906964

2014-01-01

419

[Application effect, affecting factors, and evaluation of nitrification inhibitor: a review].  

PubMed

The agronomic, environmental, and ecological significances of applying nitrification inhibitor (NI) have been demonstrated by many researches, but the efficiency of NI application was affected by many factors. In this paper, the effects of NI on soil N transformation, nitrate leaching and greenhouse gases emission, fertilizer N use efficiency, yield and quality of agricultural products, and availability of soil nutrients besides N were reviewed, and the factors affecting the efficiency of NI application as well as the evaluation criteria of NI were summarized. PMID:18839927

Sun, Zhi-Mei; Wu, Zhi-Jie; Chen, Li-Jun; Ma, Xing-Zhu

2008-07-01

420

A model assay to demonstrate how intrinsic factors affect diffusion of bacteriocins.  

PubMed

A rapid and simple method to elucidate how intrinsic factors in a given food product affect bacteriocin diffusion and efficacy is described. The basic idea of this assay is to help predict which bacteriocin or other inhibitory substance to select for a given product, where increased security towards specific microorganisms is wanted. In an agar plate model system the effect of five factors (number of indicator cells, pH and concentration of NaCl, agar and soy oil) on the diffusion of the bacteriocins sakacin A, sakacin P, pediocin PA-1, piscicolin 61 and nisin was studied. An experimental design permitting simultaneous evaluation of the effect of all factors was used. The results indicated that each bacteriocin has a characteristic intrinsic factor effect profile. However, pH and load of indicator cells affect all the bacteriocins. PMID:9506275

Blom, H; Katla, T; Hagen, B F; Axelsson, L

1997-09-16

421

Factors Associated with Substance Use Problem among Maryland Medicaid Enrollees Affected by Serious Mental Illness  

PubMed Central

The objective of this study was to identify long term factors associated with substance use problem among individuals affected by severe mental illness. Prospective data come from the 1994, 1998, and 2000 waves of the Maryland Mental Health Outcomes Survey conducted among a sub-cohort of adult Medicaid recipients affected by serious mental illness. We estimated factors associated with alcohol and drug problem, as well as a hierarchy of substance use problem severity constructed from the alcohol and drug problem outcomes. Drug problem was the strongest factor associated with alcohol problem, and vice versa. Conceptualizing alcohol and drug problem separately, and as a hierarchy of severity, revealed distinct profiles of significant factors. Further research is warranted to explore the utility of modeling substance use problem in terms of a hierarchy of severity. PMID:19487082

Schladweiler, Krista; Alexandre, Pierre K.; Steinwachs, Donald M.

2009-01-01

422

Analyzing the Factors Affecting the Success in University Entrance Examination through the use of Artificial Neural Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There are many factors that affect the success of students in university entrance examination. These factors can be mainly categorized as follows; social factors, environmental factors, economical factors etc. The main aim of this study is to find whether there is a relation between these factors and the success in the university entrance…

Agdelen, Zafer; Haydar, Ali; Kanani, Andisheh

2007-01-01

423

UNIVERSITY of CALIFORNIA INVESTIGATION OF HOW ANGLE OF ATTACK AFFECTS ROTOR SPEED  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY of CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ INVESTIGATION OF HOW ANGLE OF ATTACK AFFECTS ROTOR SPEED OF SCIENCE in APPLIED PHYSICS by Geno Thomas Viscuso June 2011 The thesis of Geno Thomas Viscuso is approved. Belanger Chair, Department of Physics #12;i Abstract A small wind turbine designed with variable

Belanger, David P.

424

Investigating affective color association of media content in language and perception based on online RGB experiment  

Microsoft Academic Search

As an investigation of color categorization in language and perception, this research intends to study the affective associations between certain colors and different media content (i.e., movie genres). Compared to non-entertainment graphics (medical imaging and engineering graphics), entertainment graphics (video games and movies) are designed to deliver emotionally stimulating content to audiences. Based on an online color survey of 19

Kyung Jae Lee

2005-01-01

425

[Study on different factors affecting the bionic enzymatic hydrolysis of icariin].  

PubMed

This study aims to observe different factors which affected the bionic enzymatic hydrolysis of icariin into baohuoside I and to optimize the reaction conditions in order to provide research foundation for building a novel bionic enzymolysis drug delivery system. To simulate the environment in vivo, 37 degrees C was set as the temperature and artificial intestinal juice and gastric juice were selected as the buffer solutions. Taking the conversion of baohuoside I as index, the effects of the kinds of enzyme, enzyme activity, substrate concentration, reaction time, pancreatin in artificial intestinal juice and surfactant on the conversion of baohuoside I were investigated. The results showed that cellulase, beta-glucosidase and snailase were all inactive in artificial gastric juice and no baohuoside I generated. Pancreatin in artificial intestinal juice couldn't significantly influence the activity of beta-glucosidase or snailase (P > 0.05), but noticeably decrease the activity of cellulase (P < 0.05). In artificial intestinal juice, the conversion of baohuoside I was highest by using beta-glucosidase, and the optimum reaction conditions were determined as follows: enzyme activity 10 U x mL(-1), substrate concentration 1 mg x mL(-1), 3 g x L(-1) rhamnolipid and reaction time 3 h. Under this condition, the conversion of baohuoside I was 99.8%. PMID:24475711

Gao, Xia; Chen, Yan; Wang, Ying; Sun, Wen-jie; Jia, Xiao-bin

2013-11-01

426

Factors affecting the efficiency of embryo transfer in the domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo).  

PubMed

Embryo transfer (ET) to recipient females is a foundational strategy for a number of assisted reproductive technologies, including cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer. In an attempt to develop efficient ET in domestic ferrets, factors affecting development of transferred embryo were investigated. Unilateral and bilateral transfer of zygotes or blastocysts in the oviduct or uterus was evaluated in recipient nulliparous or primiparous females. Developing fetuses were collected from recipient animals 21 days post-copulation and examined. The percentage of fetal formation was different (P<0.05) for unilateral and bilateral transfer of zygotes (71%) in nulliparous females with bilateral transfer (56%) in primiparous recipients. The percentage (90%) of fetal formation in nulliparous recipients following unilateral transfer of blastocysts was higher (P<0.05) than that observed in primiparous recipients with bilateral ET (73%). Notably, the percentage of fetal formation was higher (P<0.05) when blastocyts were transferred as compared to zygotes (90% versus 71%). Transuterine migration of embryos occurred following all unilateral transfers and also in approximately 50% of bilateral transfers with different number of embryos in each uterine horn. These data will help to facilitate the development of assisted reproductive strategies in the ferret and could lead to the use of this species for modeling human disease and for conservation of the endangered Mustelidae species such as black-footed ferret and European mink. PMID:16330092

Li, Ziyi; Sun, Xingshen; Chen, Juan; Leno, Gregory H; Engelhardt, John F

2006-07-15

427

Factors Affecting the Hydrogen Environment Assisted Cracking Resistance of an AL-Zn-Mg-(Cu) Alloy  

SciTech Connect

Precipitation hardenable Al-Zn-Mg alloys are susceptible to hydrogen environment assisted cracking (HEAC) when exposed to aqueous environments. In Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys, overaged tempers are used to increase HEAC resistance at the expense of strength but overaging has little benefit in low copper alloys. However, the mechanism or mechanisms by which overaging imparts HEAC resistance is poorly understood. The present research investigated hydrogen uptake, diffusion, and crack growth rate in 90% relative humidity (RH) air for both a commercial copper bearing Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy (AA 7050) and a low copper variant of this alloy in order to better understand the factors which affect HEAC resistance. Experimental methods used to evaluate hydrogen concentrations local to a surface and near a crack tip include nuclear reaction analysis (NRA), focused ion beam, secondary ion mass spectroscopy (FIB/SIMS) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). Results show that overaging the copper bearing alloys both inhibits hydrogen ingress from oxide covered surfaces and decreases the apparent hydrogen diffusion rates in the metal.

G.A. Young; J.R. Scully

2002-04-09

428

Introduction How a corn crop develops is affected by many factors  

E-print Network

Introduction How a corn crop develops is affected by many factors: fertilization, rainfall, sunny to temperature in determining when a corn crop tassels or is ready to harvest. Many years of observation have schedules. This bulletin describes the temperature-driven stages of development through which corn plants

Liskiewicz, Maciej

429

vol. 171, no. 2 the american naturalist february 2008 Factors Affecting the Evolution of Bleaching  

E-print Network

of Bleaching Resistance in Corals Troy Day,1,2,* Laura Nagel,3, Madeleine J. H. van Oppen,3, and M. Julian understand factors affecting the potential evo- lution of bleaching resistance in corals in response-offs among fitness components, (ii) different proximate mechanisms of coral bleaching, (iii) the genetic

Day, Troy

430

FACTORS AFFECTING BLACK CRAPPIE RECRUITMENT IN FOUR WEST-CENTRAL MINNESOTA LAKES1  

Microsoft Academic Search

We evaluated the factors affecting recruitment of black crappie Pomoxis nigromaculatus in four small lakes in west-central Minnesota. Recruitment to age 2+ was relatively consistent across years (1992-2001) in Brophy and Louise lakes, but was much more variable in Blackwell and Freeborn lakes. The only year with a very weak year class in all four lakes was 1992, which was

Bradford G. Parsons; Jeffrey R. Reed; Howard G. Fullhart; Vaughn A. Snook; Jodene K. Hirsch

431

Alternative Reproductive Tactics in Atlantic Salmon: Factors Affecting Mature Parr Success  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Atlantic salmon, as in most salmonids, males can mature early in the life cycle, as small freshwater fish, termed parr, and\\/or undergo a sea migration before maturing as full-size adults. The alternative life histories are contingent on environmental and social circumstances, such as growth rate, territory quality or any other factor that affects the individual's state. In order to

D. Thomaz; E. Beall; T. Burke

1997-01-01

432

Factors affecting ambulatory dispersal in the predaceous mite Neoseiulus californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experiments conducted in the laboratory showed that different biotic and abiotic factors affected the ambulatory dispersal behaviour of Neoseiulus californicus. The experimental set-up comprised dwarf alfalfa (Medicago polymorpha) infested or unifested by Tetranychus urticae. Temperatures were measured with thermocouples. Trials were performed at three temperatures, three prey densities, three light intensities, two relative humidities (RHs) and two vegetative states of

Philippe Auger; Marie-Stéphane Tixier; Serge Kreiter; Guy Fauvel

1999-01-01

433

The Transcription Factor DBP Affects Circadian Sleep Consolidation and Rhythmic EEG Activity  

E-print Network

; non-REM sleep intensity; knock-out mice; clock-genes; EEG and circadian oscillations; simulationThe Transcription Factor DBP Affects Circadian Sleep Consolidation and Rhythmic EEG Activity Paul clock out- puts. We studied the role of DBP in the circadian and homeo- static aspects of sleep

Halazonetis, Thanos

434

FACTORS AFFECTING SOCIAL WORK STUDENTS' WILLINGNESS TO WORK WITH ELDERS WITH ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study sought to determine factors that affect social work students' willingness to work with the growing number of elders with Alzheimer's disease. An in-class survey of 333 BSW and MSW students at three Florida universities throughout 1996 produced data on measures of the dependent variable (willingness to work with elders with Alzheimer's disease) and 16 independent variables (potential influences).

Michael N. Kane

1999-01-01

435

Factors affecting natural regeneration of Abies lasiocarpa and Picea engelmannii in a subalpine  

E-print Network

Factors affecting natural regeneration of Abies lasiocarpa and Picea engelmannii in a subalpine of Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii Parry) and subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa (Hook.) Nutt.) in three stand) et du sapin subalpin (Abies lasiocarpa (Hook.) Nutt.), dans trois types de structure du peuplement

Coxson, Darwyn

436

Factors affecting mito-nuclear codon usage interactions in the OXPHOS system of Drosophila melanogaster  

Microsoft Academic Search

Codon usage bias varies considerably among genomes and even within the genes of the same genome. In eukaryotic organisms, energy production in the form of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) is the only process under control of both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Although factors affecting codon usage in a single genome have been studied, this has not occurred when both interactional genomes

Zheng Sun; Liang Ma; Robert W. Murphy; Xiansheng Zhang; Dawei Huang

2008-01-01

437

Factors that Affect Emergent Literacy Development When Engaging with Electronic Books  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reviews extant literature with the purpose of identifying factors that affect the potential efficacy of electronic books to support literacy development during early childhood. Selection criteria include experimental, quasi-experimental, and observational studies from peer-reviewed journals from 2000 to 2013 with a target population…

Salmon, Lynda G.

2014-01-01

438

Factors Affecting Literacy Achievement of Eighth Grade Middle School Instrumental Music Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this pretest-posttest comparative efficacy study was to analyze factors affecting literacy achievement of eighth grade middle school instrumental music students (n = 38) including (a) socioeconomic status (SES), (b) gender, (c) grade point average (GPA), (d) music motivation, (e) music involvement, and (f) instrument section. The…

Kurt, Johnny T.

2010-01-01

439

Factors Affecting Mothers' Healthcare-Seeking Behaviour for Childhood Illnesses in a Rural Nigerian Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Appropriate healthcare-seeking behaviour could prevent a significant number of child deaths and complications due to ill health. Improving mothers' care-seeking behaviour could also contribute in reducing a large number of child morbidity and mortality in developing countries. This article aims to determine factors affecting healthcare-seeking…

Abdulraheem, I. S.; Parakoyi, D. B.

2009-01-01

440

Evaluation of factors affecting nitrous oxide emission and N transformation in a sandy loam soil  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A better understanding of the complex factors affecting nitrous oxide (N2O) emission and potential mitigation practices will assist in developing strategies to improve the sustainability of agricultural production systems. Using surface soil collected from a pomegranate orchard, a series of laborato...

441

Personal Informatics and Context: Using Context to Reveal Factors That Affect Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Personal informatics systems help people collect and reflect on behavioral information to better understand their own behavior. Because most systems only show one type of behavioral information, finding factors that affect one's behavior is difficult. Supporting exploration of multiple types of contextual and behavioral information in a…

Li, Ian Anthony Rosas

2011-01-01

442

Statistical Analysis of Different Socio Economic Factors Affecting Education of N-W.F.P (Pakistan)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A data of students in the urban and rural area institutions of N-W.F.P (Pakistan) and control group was collected to examine the different socio-economic factor which affects our education system. The logistic regression was applied to analyze the data and to select a parsimonious model. The response variable for the study is literate (illiterate)…

Rahman, Atta Ur; Uddin, Salah

2009-01-01

443

Factors affecting the prevalence of mange-mite infestations in stray dogs of Yucatán, Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the present study was to determine the factors affecting the prevalence of mange-mite infestations in stray dogs of Yucatán, Mexico. The study was carried out in 200 stray dogs of Mérida capital city of Yucatán, Mexico. Four samples (head, thoracic-abdominal area, extremities and ear) were taken from each animal by skin scraping and examined microscopically in 10%

R. I. Rodriguez-Vivas; A. Ortega-Pacheco; J. A. Rosado-Aguilar; G. M. E. Bolio

2003-01-01

444

Factors Affecting Business Students' Performance: The Case of Students in United Arab Emirates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, the authors found that the most important factor that affected student performance was their competence in speaking English. The sample was a group of 864 business and economics students in United Arab Emirates. The authors used regression analysis for the study. The results of the study showed that students who participated in…

Harb, Nasri; El-Shaarawi, Ahmed

2007-01-01

445

Precalving factors affecting conception risk in Holstein dairy cows in tropical conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to identify precalving nutritional risk factors that may affect variation in first service conception risk in 21 commercial Holstein dairy herds in a tropical environment (Reunion Island). The data set included 473 lactation records in 404 cows. A multivariate logistic-regression model including herd as a random effect was used to analyse the relationship between

Emmanuel Tillard; Patrice Humblot; Bernard Faye; Philippe Lecomte; Ian Dohoo; François Bocquier

2007-01-01

446

Factors affecting attitude towards seeking professional help for mental illness: a UK Arab perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined various factors affecting attitude towards seeking professional psychological help (ATSPPH) in Arabs living in the UK: causal beliefs, shame-focused attitudes, confidentiality concerns, ethnic identity and demographic variables. Participants completed an online questionnaire and results indicated that Arabs showed significantly less positive ATSPPH and had stronger causal beliefs in supernatural and non-Western physiology than British Caucasians. Confidentiality concerns,

Aseel Hamid; Adrian Furnham

2012-01-01

447

UNCORRECTED 2 Large-scale stress factors affecting coral reefs: open ocean sea  

E-print Network

UNCORRECTED PROOF REPORT1 2 Large-scale stress factors affecting coral reefs: open ocean sea 3-Verlag 2011 8 Abstract One-third of the world's coral reefs have dis- 9 appeared over the last 30 years on coral reefs have been identified as changes 12 in sea surface temperature (SST) and changes in surface

Gupta, Alex Sen

448

Factors Affecting Individual Education Demand at the Entrance to University: Adnan Menderes University Sample  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this research is to determine the factors affecting individual education demands at the entrance to university. The research is in survey model. The universe of the study consists of 1630 freshmen at the faculties and vocational schools of Adnan Menderes University, Aydin. 574 students from 7 schools were included in the sample. The…

Sarpkaya, Ruhi

2010-01-01

449

Identifying the Key Factors Affecting Warning Message Dissemination in VANET Real Urban Scenarios  

PubMed Central

In recent years, new architectures and technologies have been proposed for Vehicular Ad Hoc networks (VANETs). Due to the cost and complexity of deploying such networks, most of these proposals rely on simulation. However, we find that most of the experiments made to validate these proposals tend to overlook the most important and representative factors. Moreover, the scenarios simulated tend to be very simplistic (highways or Manhattan-based layouts), which could seriously affect the validity of the obtained results. In this paper, we present a statistical analysis based on the 2k factorial methodology to determine the most representative factors affecting traffic safety applications under real roadmaps. Our purpose is to determine which are the key factors affecting Warning Message Dissemination in order to concentrate research tests on such parameters, thus avoiding unnecessary simulations and reducing the amount of simulation time required. Simulation results show that the key factors affecting warning messages delivery are the density of vehicles and the roadmap used. Based on this statistical analysis, we consider that VANET researchers must evaluate the benefits of their proposals using different vehicle densities and city scenarios, to obtain a broad perspective on the effectiveness of their solution. Finally, since city maps can be quite heterogeneous, we propose a roadmap profile classification to further reduce the number of cities evaluated. PMID:23604026

Fogue, Manuel; Garrido, Piedad; Martinez, Francisco J.; Cano, Juan-Carlos; Calafate, Carlos T.; Manzoni, Pietro

2013-01-01

450

Hormonal and follicular factors affecting maturation of sheep oocytes in vitro and their subsequent developmental capacity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary. Oocytes removed from, or retained within, non-atretic and atretic follicles of different sizes were cultured for 24 h in the presence of a variety of hormones in an attempt to identify the factors affecting oocyte maturation in vitro. Resumption of meiosis was assessed morphologically; the developmental capacity of oocytes after culture was determined by transfer to the oviducts of

R. M. Moor; A. O. Trounson

1977-01-01

451

FACTORS AFFECTING VOLUNTARY FOOD INTAKE BY SHEEP W.L. GROVUM  

E-print Network

FACTORS AFFECTING VOLUNTARY FOOD INTAKE BY SHEEP W.L. GROVUM Department of Biochemical Sciences act as signals of satiety and thus limit the amount of food that sheep would consume in a meal if the above treatment would suppress the intake of food by hungry sheep - sheep that had been deprived

Boyer, Edmond

452

FACTORS AFFECTING VARIABILITY IN THE DISTRIBUTION OF ELEPHANTS AT NAZINGA GAME RANCH (BURKINA FASO, WEST AFRICA)  

E-print Network

FACTORS AFFECTING VARIABILITY IN THE DISTRIBUTION OF ELEPHANTS AT NAZINGA GAME RANCH (BURKINA FASO VARIABILITY IN THE DISTRIBUTION OF ELEPHANTS AT NAZINGA GAME RANCH (BURKINA FASO, WEST AFRICA) This thesis IN THE DISTRIBUTION OF ELEPHANTS AT NAZINGA GAME RANCH (BURKINA FASO, WEST AFRICA) BERNARD M. HIEN December 2005

453

Factors affecting the emulsifying and rheological properties of gum acacia in beverage emulsions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gum acacia, a natural hydrocolloid, is extensively used as an emulsifier\\/stabilizer in beverage emulsions. Factors that may affect emulsion formation, emulsion stability and viscosity of the emulsion concentrate were studied to assess their significance, including proximal composition of the gum (protein content and mineral content), gum processing prior to emulsion preparation (pasteurization and demineralization), and pH of the dilute emulsion.

R. A Buffo; G. A Reineccius; G. W Oehlert

2001-01-01

454

A Research on Economic Factors Affecting China's Tax Growth Based on Panel Error Correction Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses how various kinds of major economic factors affect China's tax growth. We apply the panel unit root testing, panel cointegration testing and panel-based error correction models to analyze the long-term stable relationship among tax growth, GDP growth, optimization of industrial structure and import for 30 provinces during 1994- 2008 periods. The empirical results show that in the

Sun Jian; Tong Jinzhi

2011-01-01

455

Factors Affecting Differential Sensitivity of Sweet Corn to HPPD-Inhibiting Herbicides  

E-print Network

Factors Affecting Differential Sensitivity of Sweet Corn to HPPD-Inhibiting Herbicides Martin M a common genetic basis for herbicide metabolism, genotypic classes of sweet corn hybrids did not have corn, Zea mays L. Key words: Cross-sensitivity, cytochrome P450, dose­response, herbicide tolerance

Sims, Gerald K.

456

Factors Affecting Retention of New Students in Their First Semester: Fall 1992 Cohort.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To determine factors affecting new students in their first semester, a study was conducted at Diablo Valley College, in California, to draw a profile and track 4,251 students who applied or were identified as new in fall 1992. Percentage distributions were calculated for the sample and for the sub-groups who applied only, completed testing only,…

Birdsall, Les

457

Analysis of Factors Affecting the Accuracy, Reproducibility, and Interpretation of Microbial Community Carbon Source Utilization Patterns  

Microsoft Academic Search

We determined factors that affect responses of bacterial isolates and model bacterial communities to the 95 carbon substrates in Biolog microtiter plates. For isolates and communities of three to six bacterial strains, substrate oxidation rates were typically nonlinear and were delayed by dilution of the inoculum. When inoculum density was controlled, patterns of positive and negative responses exhibited by microbial

SHERIDAN KIDD HAACK; HELEN GARCHOW; MICHAEL J. KLUG

1995-01-01

458

Photoautotrophic symbiont and geography are major factors affecting highly structured and diverse  

E-print Network

Photoautotrophic symbiont and geography are major factors affecting highly structured and diverse that lichen thalli consistently host hyperdiverse fungi (other than the fungal partner forming the lichen thallus), which are more closely related to endophytic fungi found in healthy above ground tissues

Lutzoni, François M.

459

FACTORS AFFECTING THE PRESENCE OF NESTING BURROWING OWLS IN AN AGRICULTURAL LANDSCAPE  

E-print Network

FACTORS AFFECTING THE PRESENCE OF NESTING BURROWING OWLS IN AN AGRICULTURAL LANDSCAPE NICKOLAS D Western Burrowing Owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea) along roadsides and irrigation water of roadside attributes and agricultural crops that were associated with the presence of nesting Burrowing Owls

Conway, Courtney J.

460

Dispositional Factors Affecting Motivation during Learning in Adult Basic and Secondary Education Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research indicates that about a quarter of adult students separate from formal adult basic and secondary education (ABE/ASE) programs before completing one educational level. This retrospective study explores individual dispositional factors that affect motivation during learning, particularly students' goals, goal-directed thinking and action…

Mellard, Daryl F.; Krieshok, Thomas; Fall, Emily; Woods, Kari

2013-01-01

461

Should ecological factors affect the evolution of age at maturity in freshwater clams?  

E-print Network

Should ecological factors affect the evolution of age at maturity in freshwater clams? MIKKO HEINO in freshwater clams of the genus Anodonta in relation to their ecology. We analysed an age-structured density-dependent population dynamics model, which we developed for freshwater clams, using several different options

Heino, Mikko

462

Factors affecting life and death in Serengeti cheetahs: environment, age, and sociality  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined environmental and social factors affecting reproductive success across a 20-year data set of individually known cheetahs on the Serengeti Plains of Tanzania. Because cheetahs are seen infrequently and are not amenable to mark--recapture techniques, we devised a model to estimate time of death for individuals that disappeared from our records. We found that males had markedly lower survival

Sarah M. Durant; Marcella Kelly; Tim M. Carob

2004-01-01

463

Factors Affecting Teachers' Adoption of Educational Computer Games: A Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Even though computer games hold considerable potential for engaging and facilitating learning among today's children, the adoption of modern educational computer games is still meeting significant resistance in K-12 education. The purpose of this paper is to inform educators and instructional designers on factors affecting teachers' adoption of…

Kebritchi, Mansureh

2010-01-01

464

Factors affecting the recognition of mental health problems among adolescent offenders in custody  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adolescent offenders have high levels of mental health problems leading to poor short-term and long-term outcomes. However, many problems still go undetected despite recent screening initiatives, and little is known about the factors affecting recognition of their problems. A random sample of 115 detained boys was interviewed following reception into custody to compare the differences between those whose problems were

Paul Mitchell; Jenny Shaw

2011-01-01

465

Environmental Factors Affecting Computer Assisted Language Learning Success: A Complex Dynamic Systems Conceptual Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This conceptual, interdisciplinary inquiry explores Complex Dynamic Systems as the concept relates to the internal and external environmental factors affecting computer assisted language learning (CALL). Based on the results obtained by de Rosnay ["World Futures: The Journal of General Evolution", 67(4/5), 304-315 (2011)], who observed…

Marek, Michael W.; Wu, Wen-Chi Vivian

2014-01-01

466

Factors Affecting the Functional Properties of Whey Protein Products: A Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Numerous why protein products (WPP) have been developed as excellent food ingredients with unique functional properties. However, the functional properties of WPP are affected by several compositional and processing factors. Recently, novel processing technologies such as high hydrostatic pressure, ultrasound, extrusion and tribomechanical activation have been used to modify the functional properties of WPP. Also, WPP have been used as

M. H. Abd El-Salam; Safinaz El-Shibiny; Aida Salem

2009-01-01

467

Factors Affecting Student Retention in Online Courses: Overcoming This Critical Problem  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to determine what a panel of 15 experts would identify as critical factors affecting student retention in online courses that will serve as implications for educational leaders to guide their student retention strategies, online organizational structures, institutional policies, and online instructional activities. A…

Gaytan, Jorge

2013-01-01

468

STATUS OF SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION IN THE UNITED STATES AND FACTORS AFFECTING ITS USE  

EPA Science Inventory

This paper reviews the status of using solidification/stabilization to treat hazardous waste and contaminated soil in the United States. echnical and regulatory factors affecting use of the technology are also discussed. Selected U.S. Environmental Protection Agency research proj...

469

Factors Affecting the Management of Women Groups' Micro and Small Enterprises in Kakamega District, Kenya  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to highlight the main factors that affect the management of the WGs' Micro and Small Enterprises (MSEs) in Kakamega District and Africa in general. Design/methodology/approach: The study adopted a descriptive research design. This is because the study was concerned about a univariate question in which the…

Wawire, Nelson H. W.; Nafukho, Fredrick M.

2010-01-01

470

Factors Affecting Ni and Zn Hydroxide Precipitate Formation in Soils. (S02-peltier222185-oral)  

E-print Network

Factors Affecting Ni and Zn Hydroxide Precipitate Formation in Soils. (S02-peltier222185-oral of polynuclear metal hydroxide complexes and surface precipitates can be an important mechanism for metal has been shown to result in the formation of mixed metal-Al hydroxide precipitates

Sparks, Donald L.

471

Factors affecting innovation in logistics technologies for logistics service providers in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – With the fast growth in China's economy and China's accession into WTO, the demand for logistics services has been growing significantly in China. China's logistics service providers need to pay more attention to adopt more efficient logistics technologies to provide better services for their customers. The purpose of this paper is to study the factors affecting the innovation

Chieh-Yu Lin

2007-01-01

472

Factors affecting land reconversion plans following a payment for ecosystem service program  

E-print Network

Factors affecting land reconversion plans following a payment for ecosystem service program Xiaodong Chen a,*, Frank Lupi b , Guangming He a , Zhiyun Ouyang c , Jianguo Liu a a Center for Systems in revised form 5 March 2009 Accepted 8 March 2009 Available online 7 April 2009 Keywords: China Grain

473

Scale-dependent Factors Affecting North American River Otter Distribution in the Midwest  

E-print Network

Scale-dependent Factors Affecting North American River Otter Distribution in the Midwest MACKENZIE American river otter (Lontra canadensis) is recovering from near extirpation throughout much of its range of river otters in the Midwest, little is known about how their distribution is influenced by local

Sandercock, Brett K.

474

Factors Affecting Students' Choice to Enroll at HCC: Implications for Marketing, Recruitment, and Advising.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was conducted to analyze the factors which affect students' decisions to enroll at Harford Community College (HCC), Harford County, Maryland. An entrant follow-up survey was sent in spring 1984 to all students who were enrolled in a Maryland community college for the first time in fall 1982. The survey sought to evaluate the extent to…

Quinley, John W.

475

Euro Working Group on Transportation 2014 Isolating Different Factors Affecting Travel Time Reliability in an  

E-print Network

Euro Working Group on Transportation 2014 Isolating Different Factors Affecting Travel Time Newton 77447 Champs sur Marne France Abstract It is increasingly recognized that travel time reliability for average travel time (congestion) and for variability of that travel time (reliability). The impacts

Boyer, Edmond

476

Prognostic Factors Affecting the Clinical Outcome of Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Head and Neck  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is an uncommon tumor, constituting approxi- mately 10% of all head and neck tumors. Classically, ACC has been described as a tumor with indolent, but persistent and recurrent, growth and late onset of metastases, leading even- tually to death. This study assessed the prognostic factors affecting the clinical outcome in patients with ACC in the

Yoon Ho Ko; Myung Ah Lee; Yeong Seon Hong; Kyung Shik Lee; Chan-Kwon Jung; Yeon Sil Kim

477

Identifying the key factors affecting warning message dissemination in VANET real urban scenarios.  

PubMed

In recent years, new architectures and technologies have been proposed for Vehicular Ad Hoc networks (VANETs). Due to the cost and complexity of deploying such networks, most of these proposals rely on simulation. However, we find that most of the experiments made to validate these proposals tend to overlook the most important and representative factors. Moreover, the scenarios simulated tend to be very simplistic (highways or Manhattan-based layouts), which could seriously affect the validity of the obtained results. In this paper, we present a statistical analysis based on the 2k factorial methodology to determine the most representative factors affecting traffic safety applications under real roadmaps. Our purpose is to determine which are the key factors affecting Warning Message Dissemination in order to concentrate research tests on such parameters, thus avoiding unnecessary simulations and reducing the amount of simulation time required. Simulation results show that the key factors affecting warning messages delivery are the density of vehicles and the roadmap used. Based on this statistical analysis, we consider that VANET researchers must evaluate the benefits of their proposals using different vehicle densities and city scenarios, to obtain a broad perspective on the effectiveness of their solution. Finally, since city maps can be quite heterogeneous, we propose a roadmap profile classification to further reduce the number of cities evaluated. PMID:23604026

Fogue, Manuel; Garrido, Piedad; Martinez, Francisco J; Cano, Juan-Carlos; Calafate, Carlos T; Manzoni, Pietro

2013-01-01

478

The Fox News Factor: How the Spread of Fox News Affects Position Taking in Congress  

E-print Network

! ! The Fox News Factor: How the Spread of Fox News Affects Position Taking in Congress ! ! Joshua to the US House take more conservative positions once Fox News begins broadcasting in their congressional that the Fox News Channel was launched in October 1996 and it gradually spread across congressional districts

Bordenstein, Seth

479

High School 9th Grade Students' Understanding Level and Misconceptions about Temperature and Factors Affecting It  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to explore students' understanding levels and misconceptions about temperature and factors affecting it. The concept of the study was chosen from Geography National Curriculum. In this study, a questionnaire was developed after a pilot study with an aim to ascertain the students' understanding levels of temperature and…

Akbas, Yavuz

2012-01-01

480

Affecting Factors and Outcome on Intermittent Internet Pulling Behavior in Taiwan's Undergraduate Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nowadays people's lives heavily rely on Internet facilities. Internet users generally have constant Internet connectivity and intermittently click on sites they want to access even amidst studying or working. In this study, we sought to examine the factors affecting intermittent Internet pulling behavior on undergraduate students. Furthermore, the…

Yang, Hui-Jen; Lay, Yun-Long

2011-01-01