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  1. Involvement of the atrial natriuretic peptide in cardiovascular pathophysiology and its relationship with exercise

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this minireview we describe the involvement of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in cardiovascular pathophysiology and exercise. The ANP has a broad homeostatic role and exerts complex effects on the cardio-circulatory hemodynamics, it is produced by the left atrium and has a key role in regulating sodium and water balance in mammals and humans. The dominant stimulus for its release is atrial wall tension, commonly caused by exercise. The ANP is involved in the process of lipolysis through a cGMP signaling pathway and, as a consequence, reducing blood pressure by decreasing the sensitivity of vascular smooth muscle to the action of vasoconstrictors and regulate fluid balance. The increase of this hormone is associated with better survival in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). This minireview provides new evidence based on recent studies related to the beneficial effects of exercise in patients with cardiovascular disease, focusing on the ANP. PMID:22313592

  2. Atrial natriuretic peptide frameshift mutation in familial atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Hodgson-Zingman, Denice M; Karst, Margaret L; Zingman, Leonid V; Heublein, Denise M; Darbar, Dawood; Herron, Kathleen J; Ballew, Jeffrey D; de Andrade, Mariza; Burnett, John C; Olson, Timothy M

    2008-07-10

    Atrial fibrillation is a common arrhythmia that is hereditary in a small subgroup of patients. In a family with 11 clinically affected members, we mapped an atrial fibrillation locus to chromosome 1p36-p35 and identified a heterozygous frameshift mutation in the gene encoding atrial natriuretic peptide. Circulating chimeric atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was detected in high concentration in subjects with the mutation, and shortened atrial action potentials were seen in an isolated heart model, creating a possible substrate for atrial fibrillation. This report implicates perturbation of the atrial natriuretic peptide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway in cardiac electrical instability. PMID:18614783

  3. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Inhibits Spontaneous Contractile Activity of Lymph Nodes.

    PubMed

    Lobov, G I; Pan'kova, M N

    2016-06-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide dose-dependently inhibited spontaneous phase and tonic activity of smooth muscle strips from the capsule of isolated bovine mesenteric lymph nodes. Pretreatment with L-NAME, diclofenac, and methylene blue had practically no effect on the peptide-induced relaxation responses. In contrast, glibenclamide significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of atrial natriuretic peptide. We suppose that the NO-dependent and cyclooxygenase signaling pathways are not involved in implementation of the inhibitory effects of atrial natriuretic peptide. ATP-sensitive K(+)-channels of the smooth muscle cell membrane are the last component in the signaling pathway leading to relaxation of smooth muscles of the lymph node capsule caused by atrial natriuretic peptide; activation of these channels leads to membrane hyperpolarization and smooth muscle relaxation. PMID:27383173

  4. An N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (NT-proANP) 'aggregation-prone' segment involved in isolated atrial amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Louros, Nikolaos N; Iconomidou, Vassiliki A; Tsiolaki, Paraskevi L; Chrysina, Evangelia D; Baltatzis, Georgios E; Patsouris, Efstratios S; Hamodrakas, Stavros J

    2014-01-01

    Isolated atrial amyloidosis (IAA) is a common localized form of amyloid deposition within the atria of the aging heart. The main constituents of amyloid fibrils are atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and the N-terminal part of its precursor form (NT-proANP). An 'aggregation-prone' heptapeptide ((114)KLRALLT(120)) was located within the NT-proANP sequence. This peptide self-assembles into amyloid-like fibrils in vitro, as electron microscopy, X-ray fiber diffraction, ATR FT-IR spectroscopy and Congo red staining studies reveal. Consequently, remedies/drugs designed to inhibit the aggregation tendency of this 'aggregation-prone' segment of NT-proANP may assist in prevention/treatment of IAA, congestive heart failure (CHF) or atrial fibrillation (AF). PMID:24220659

  5. Biochemical mechanisms of atrial natriuretic factor action.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, J; Hamet, P

    1989-09-01

    Since atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) is a natriuretic and vasodilatory hormone, its mechanisms of action expectedly involve so-called negative pathways of cell stimulation, notably cyclic nucleotides. Indeed, the guanylate cyclase-cyclic GMP (cGMP) system appears to be the principal mediator of ANF's action. Specifically, particulate guanylate cyclase, a membrane glycoprotein, transmits ANF's effects, as opposed to the activation of soluble guanylate cyclase such agents as sodium nitroprusside. The stimulation of particulate guanylate cyclase by ANF manifests several characteristics. One of them is the functional irreversibility of stimulation with its apparent physiological consequences: the extended impact of ANF on diuresis and vasodilation in vivo lasts beyond the duration of increased plasma ANF levels and is accompanied by a prolonged elevation of cGMP. Another characteristic is the parallelism between guanylate cyclase stimulation and increases of cGMP in extracellular fluids. cGMP egression appears to be an active process, yet its physiological implications remain to be uncovered. In heart failure, cGMP continues to reflect augmented ANF levels, suggesting that in this disease, the lack of an ANF effect on sodium excretion is due to a defect distal to cGMP generation. In hypertension, where ANF levels are either normal or slightly elevated, probably secondary to high blood pressure, the ANF responsiveness of the particulate guanylate cyclase-cGMP system, the hypotensive effects, diuresis and natriuresis are exaggerated. The implications of this exaggerated responsiveness of the ANF-cGMP system in the pathophysiology of hypertension and its potential therapeutic connotations remain to be evaluated. PMID:2574629

  6. Involvement of drinking and intestinal sodium absorption in hyponatremic effect of atrial natriuretic peptide in seawater eels.

    PubMed

    Tsukada, Takehiro; Rankin, J Cliff; Takei, Yoshio

    2005-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) decreases plasma Na+ concentration and promtes seawater (SW) adaptation in eels. The hyponatremia may most probably be caused by increased branchial extrusion of Na+, but the mechanism has not been determined yet. The present study examined initially the effects of ANP on branchial Na+ efflux in vivo using isotopic 22Na. However, the efflux rate was not altered by infusion of a hyponatremic dose of ANP (5 pmol.kg(-1).min(-1)). Therefore, we sought to examine whether the ANP-mediated hyponatremia is caused by a decrease in the uptake of Na+ from the environment. Since a decrease in drinking was highly correlated with a degree of hyponatremia, conscious SW eels were infused with dilute SW into the stomach at a normal drinking rate to offset the antidipsogenic effect of ANP. Under this regimen, the hyponatremic effect of ANP was abolished. Then, we examined the site of Na+ absorption in the alimentary tract by measuring the changes in ion composition of intraluminal fluid along the tract. Since Na+ was absorbed at the esophagus and anterior/middle intestine, a sac was prepared at each site and the effects of ANP were examined in situ in conscious SW eels. ANP infusion did not alter Na+ absorption at the esophagus, but it profoundly reduced the absorption at the intestine. Together with our previous finding that ANP does not alter renal Na+ excretion, we propose that ANP reduces plasma Na+ concentration in SW eels by inhibiting drinking and subsequent absorption of Na+ by the intestine. PMID:15684587

  7. Atrial natriuretic factor: is it responsible for hyponatremia and natriuresis in neurosurgery?

    PubMed Central

    Gasparotto, Ana Paula Devite Cardoso; Falcão, Antonio Luis Eiras; Kosour, Carolina; Araújo, Sebastião; Cintra, Eliane Araújo; de Oliveira, Rosmari Aparecida Rosa Almeida; Martins, Luiz Claudio; Dragosavac, Desanka

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the presence of hyponatremia and natriuresis and their association with atrial natriuretic factor in neurosurgery patients. Methods The study included 30 patients who had been submitted to intracranial tumor resection and cerebral aneurism clipping. Both plasma and urinary sodium and plasma atrial natriuretic factor were measured during the preoperative and postoperative time periods. Results Hyponatremia was present in 63.33% of the patients, particularly on the first postoperative day. Natriuresis was present in 93.33% of the patients, particularly on the second postoperative day. Plasma atrial natriuretic factor was increased in 92.60% of the patients in at least one of the postoperative days; however, there was no statistically significant association between the atrial natriuretic factor and plasma sodium and between the atrial natriuretic factor and urinary sodium. Conclusion Hyponatremia and natriuresis were present in most patients after neurosurgery; however, the atrial natriuretic factor cannot be considered to be directly responsible for these alterations in neurosurgery patients. Other natriuretic factors are likely to be involved. PMID:27410411

  8. Atrial natriuretic factor and postnatal diuresis in respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Rozycki, H J; Baumgart, S

    1991-01-01

    To find out if atrial natriuretic factor plays a part in the control of urine output during the initiation alone or throughout postnatal diuresis in neonates with respiratory distress syndrome, atrial natriuretic factor concentrations and clinical and renal variables were measured prospectively three times during the first three days of life in 13 premature infants. Atrial natriuretic factor concentrations rose significantly between the first and second sample times as did the urine output and output:input ratio. By the time that the third sample was taken, atrial natriuretic factor concentration had decreased significantly since the second sample had been taken, while urine flow was maintained. All subjects initiated a spontaneous diuresis that was related to the second concentration of atrial natriuretic factor. With partial correlation analysis a significant relationship was shown between the concentration of atrial natriuretic factor and the maintenance of urine output throughout the study period. Individual hormone concentrations did not, however, correlate with simultaneous renal variables. Changes in the concentrations of atrial natriuretic factor coincided with initiation of spontaneous diuresis in babies with respiratory distress syndrome, and may have a role in the complex mechanisms that maintain this diuresis. PMID:1825462

  9. Evidence for a novel natriuretic peptide receptor that prefers brain natriuretic peptide over atrial natriuretic peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Goy, M F; Oliver, P M; Purdy, K E; Knowles, J W; Fox, J E; Mohler, P J; Qian, X; Smithies, O; Maeda, N

    2001-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) exert their physiological actions by binding to natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPRA), a receptor guanylate cyclase (rGC) that synthesizes cGMP in response to both ligands. The family of rGCs is rapidly expanding, and it is plausible that there might be additional, as yet undiscovered, rGCs whose function is to provide alternative signalling pathways for one or both of these peptides, particularly given the low affinity of NPRA for BNP. We have investigated this hypothesis, using a genetically modified (knockout) mouse in which the gene encoding NPRA has been disrupted. Enzyme assays and NPRA-specific Western blots performed on tissues from wild-type mice demonstrate that ANP-activated cGMP synthesis provides a good index of NPRA protein expression, which ranges from maximal in adrenal gland, lung, kidney, and testis to minimal in heart and colon. In contrast, immunoreactive NPRA is not detectable in tissues isolated from NPRA knockout animals and ANP- and BNP-stimulatable GC activities are markedly reduced in all mutant tissues. However, testis and adrenal gland retain statistically significant, high-affinity responses to BNP. This residual response to BNP cannot be accounted for by natriuretic peptide receptor B, or any other known mammalian rGC, suggesting the presence of a novel receptor in these tissues that prefers BNP over ANP. PMID:11513736

  10. Sibjotang Increases Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Secretion in Beating Rabbit Atria

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Oh Jeong; Oh, Hyun Cheol; Lee, Yun Jung; Kim, Hye Yoom; Tan, Rui; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub

    2015-01-01

    Sibjotang (Shizaotang), traditional herbal medicine formula, which was first documented in the Shanghanlun, has long been prescribed for the treatment of impairment of the body fluid homeostasis. The purpose of the present study was to identify the effects of Sibjotang on the secretion of a cardiac hormone, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), one of the main hormones involved in the regulation of the body fluid and blood pressure homeostasis. Water extract of Sibjotang increased ANP secretion concomitantly with an increase in atrial dynamics in a concentration-dependent manner. Sibjotang-induced increase in ANP secretion and positive inotropic effect were attenuated by GO6976 and LY333531, selective inhibitors of conventional protein kinase C, but not Rottlerin, an inhibitor of novel PKCδ. Similarly to the effect of Sibjotang, extracts of components of Sibjotang, Euphorbia kansui, and Daphne genkwa, but not Euphorbia pekinensis and Ziziphus jujuba, increased ANP secretion and atrial dynamics. Ingredients of Sibjotang, apigenin, rosmarinic acid, and salvianolic acid B decreased ANP secretion and atrial dynamics. These findings suggest that Sibjotang increases ANP secretion and atrial dynamics via activation of conventional protein kinase C signaling. This finding provides experimental evidence for the rationale in the use of Sibjotang in the treatment of impairment of the regulation of body fluid and blood pressure homeostasis. PMID:26495007

  11. Atrial natriuretic factor increases vascular permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Lockette, W.; Brennaman, B. )

    1990-12-01

    An increase in central blood volume in microgravity may result in increased plasma levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF). Since elevations in plasma ANF are found in clinical syndromes associated with edema, and since space motion sickness induced by microgravity is associated with an increase in central blood volume and facial edema, we determined whether ANF increases capillary permeability to plasma protein. Conscious, bilaterally nephrectomized male rats were infused with either saline, ANF + saline, or hexamethonium + saline over 2 h following bolus injections of 125I-albumin and 14C-dextran of similar molecular size. Blood pressure was monitored and serial determinations of hematocrits were made. Animals infused with 1.0 micrograms.kg-1.min-1 ANF had significantly higher hematocrits than animals infused with saline vehicle. Infusion of ANF increased the extravasation of 125I-albumin, but not 14C-dextran from the intravascular compartment. ANF also induced a depressor response in rats, but the change in blood pressure did not account for changes in capillary permeability to albumin; similar depressor responses induced by hexamethonium were not accompanied by increased extravasation of albumin from the intravascular compartment. ANF may decrease plasma volume by increasing permeability to albumin, and this effect of ANF may account for some of the signs and symptoms of space motion sickness.

  12. Atrial natriuretic factor increases vascular permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockette, Warren; Brennaman, Bruce

    1990-01-01

    An increase in central blood volume in microgravity may result in increased plasma levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF). In this study, it was determined whether ANF increases capillary permeability to plasma protein. Conscious, bilaterally nephrectomized male rats were infused with either saline, ANF + saline, or hexamethonium + saline over 2 h following bolus injections of (I-125)-albumin and (C-14)-dextran of similar molecular size. Blood pressure was monitored, and serial determinations of hematocrits were made. Animals infused with 1.0 microg/kg per min ANF had significantly higher hematocrits than animals infused with saline vehicle. Infusion of ANF increased the extravasation of (I-125)-albumin, but not (C-14)-dextran from the intravascular compartment. ANF also induced a depressor response in rats, but the change in blood pressure did not account for changes in capillary permeability to albumin; similar depressor responses induced by hexamethonium were not accompanied by increased extravasation of albumin from the intravascular compartment. ANF may decrease plasma volume by increasing permeability to albumin, and this effect of ANF may account for some of the signs and symptoms of space motion sickness.

  13. Are endogenous cardenolides controlled by atrial natriuretic peptide.

    PubMed

    Brar, Kanwarjeet S; Gao, Yonglin; El-Mallakh, Rif S

    2016-07-01

    Endogenous cardenolides are digoxin-like substances and ouabain-like substances that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension and mood disorders in clinical and pre-clinical studies. Regulatory signals for endogenous cardenolides are still unknown. These endogenous compounds are believed to be produced by the adrenal gland in the periphery and the hypothalamus in the central nervous system, and constitute part of an hormonal axis that may regulate the catalytic activity of the α subunit of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. A review of literature suggests that there is great overlap in physiological environments that are associated with either elevations or reductions in the levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and endogenous cardenolides. This suggests that these two factors may share a common regulatory signal or perhaps that ANP may be involved in the regulation of endogenous cardenolides. PMID:27241248

  14. Guanylyl Cyclase/Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-A: Role in the Pathophysiology of Cardiovascular Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash N.

    2012-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), also known as atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), is an endogenous and potent hypotensive hormone that elicits natriuretic, diuretic, vasorelaxant, and anti-proliferative effects, which are important in the control of blood pressure and cardiovascular events. One principal locus involved in the regulatory action of ANP and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA). Studies on ANP, BNP, and their receptor, GC-A/NPRA, have greatly increased our knowledge of the control of hypertension and cardiovascular disorders. Cellular, biochemical, and molecular studies have helped to delineate the receptor function and signaling mechanisms of NPRA. Gene-targeted and transgenic mouse models have advanced our understanding of the importance of ANP, BNP, and GC-A/NPRA in disease states at the molecular level. Importantly, ANP and BNP are used as critical markers of cardiac events; however, their therapeutic potentials for the diagnosis and treatment of hypertension, heart failure, and stroke have just begun to be realized. We are now just at the initial stage of molecular therapeutics and pharmacogenomic advancement of the natriuretic peptides. More investigations should be undertaken and ongoing ones be extended in this important field. PMID:21815745

  15. Guanylyl cyclase / atrial natriuretic peptide receptor-A: role in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular regulation.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Kailash N

    2011-08-01

    Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), also known as atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), is an endogenous and potent hypotensive hormone that elicits natriuretic, diuretic, vasorelaxant, and anti-proliferative effects, which are important in the control of blood pressure and cardiovascular events. One principal locus involved in the regulatory action of ANP and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is guanylyl cyclase / natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA). Studies on ANP, BNP, and their receptor, GC-A/NPRA, have greatly increased our knowledge of the control of hypertension and cardiovascular disorders. Cellular, biochemical, and molecular studies have helped to delineate the receptor function and signaling mechanisms of NPRA. Gene-targeted and transgenic mouse models have advanced our understanding of the importance of ANP, BNP, and GC-A/NPRA in disease states at the molecular level. Importantly, ANP and BNP are used as critical markers of cardiac events; however, their therapeutic potentials for the diagnosis and treatment of hypertension, heart failure, and stroke have just begun to be realized. We are now just at the initial stage of molecular therapeutics and pharmacogenomic advancement of the natriuretic peptides. More investigations should be undertaken and ongoing ones be extended in this important field. PMID:21815745

  16. Kinetic study of atrial natriuretic peptide in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: evidence for resistance to biologic effects of the hormone even in patients with mild myocardial involvement.

    PubMed

    Iervasi, G; Clerico, A; Pilo, A; Berti, S; Vitek, F; Biagini, A; Bianchi, R; Donato, L

    1994-10-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) kinetics was studied in 12 patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy at different sodium excretion (30-175 mmol/day) and variable degrees of hemodynamic dysfunction [New York Heart Association (NYHA) class range I-III] to investigate whether differences in renewal and distribution of this hormone (as compared with those of a control group) play a role in pathogenesis and evolution of heart failure. [125I]Labeled ANP was injected as a bolus, and a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) procedure was used to purify the labeled hormone in venous plasma samples collected for < or = 50 min after injection; the main ANP kinetic parameters were then derived from the disappearance curve of the labeled hormone. As in controls, a positive linear regression between ANP metabolic clearance rate (MCR, ml/min/m2) values and daily urinary excretion of sodium (NaUE, mmol/day) was noted in patients. The different linear regression coefficients between normal subjects (MCR = 365 +/- 8.08 NaUE, r = 0.986, p < 0.0001) and patients (MCR = 497 + 18.5 NaUE, r = 0.867, p = 0.001) indicate that in patients a higher peptide clearance rate is needed to obtain the same biologic effect (sodium excretion) and suggest that resistance to biologic effects of the hormone exists in patients at an early stage of disease (NYHA class I). When the efficiency of the ANP system in excreting sodium was expressed as the ratio of NaUE to ANP production rate (PR = MCR x ANP plasma concentration, microgram/day/m2) patients showed significantly lower values (p = 0.0126) than normal volunteers, thus confirming resistance to the hormone effects. Significantly lower values for ANP total distribution volume (16.5 +/- 8.4 L/m2), mean residence time in the sampling space (4.04 +/- 1.14 min), mean residence time in the body (7.25 +/- 2.13 min), and fewer recycles through the initial (sampling) space (0.27 +/- 0.16) were noted in patients, indicating an altered mechanism

  17. Atrial distension of isolated rabbit hearts and release of atrial natriuretic factor

    SciTech Connect

    Synhorst, D.P.; Gutkowska, J. Clinical Research Institute of Montreal, Quebec )

    1988-08-01

    Interventions that increase atrial pressures in humans or laboratory animals release atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) into the circulation. The authors studied the relation between distension of the right or left atrium and release of ANF in retrograde-perfused isolated rabbit hearts. A fluid-filled balloon within the right or left atrium was inflated to a mean pressure of 5, 10, 15, or 20 mmHg, and ANF in the cardiac effluent was measured by radioimmunoassay. The slope of the regression line relating ANF release to atrial distending pressure was steeper for the left than right atrium, indicating that, at comparable increases in mean pressures, the left atrium releases more ANF than does the right atrium. Left atrial tissue concentration ANF was greater than right atrial. In contrast to previous studies showing right atrial dominance in rats, the left atria of isolated, perfused rabbit hearts contain more ANF and release more in response to atrial distension.

  18. Atrial natriuretic factor-like activity in rat posterior pituitary

    SciTech Connect

    Gutkowska, J.; Debinski, W.; Racz, K.; Thibault, G.; Garcia, R.; Kuchel, O.; Genest, J.; Cantin, M.

    1986-03-05

    The presence of a biologically active peptide: Atrial Natriuretic Factor (ANF) has been demonstrated in rat and human circulation and ANF is considered now as a new hormone. ANF may be involved in body fluid regulation. A very sensitive radioimmunoassay for rat ANF allowed the authors to search for immunoreactive ANF (IR-ANF) in rat posterior pituitary. Serial dilutions of homogenates of rat posterior pituitary showed a good parallelism with a reference curve in a radioimmunoassay system. The IR-ANF was extracted from rat posterior pituitary homogenates by activated Vycor glass beads. The lyophilized extract was purified by HPLC on C/sub 18/ ..mu.. Bondapak column. The HPLC yielded two IR-ANF peaks. Both isolated ANF-like material showed biological activity. The IR-ANF eluted with 33% acetonitrile, inhibited ACTH-stimulated aldosterone secretion with a similar potency as synthetic (Arg 101 - Tyr 126) ANF (0.7 x 10/sup -10/M). A much less potent ANF-like material was found in the second peak eluted with 36% acetonitrile. They conclude that ANF-like material is present in rat posterior pituitary and this suggest a possible role in ANF on AVP secretion directly in situ.

  19. Atrial natriuretic polypeptide-like material in rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.K.; Chang, D.; Xie, C.W.; Song, D.L.; Li, X.R.; Zhang, S.X.; Wang, T.L.; Tang, J.

    1986-03-05

    Atrial natriuretic polypeptide-like immunoreactive material (ANP-IR) was found in rat lung by radioimmunoassay, with the concentration ranging from 0.6-1.2 pmol/g of tissue in each lobe. PAP-immunohistochemical study demonstrated that specific staining of granules for ..cap alpha..-human ANP are mainly located in the muscular layer of the pulmonary vein. Fractionation of lung extract by gel filtration and reserve phase HPLC revealed the presence of multiple forms of ANP-IR, which possibly possessed molecular structure partially different from rat ANP, atriopeptin I and III. Intravenous injection of lung extract induced potent diuresis and natriuresis in rats. These responses could be abolished when the lung extract was preincubated with antiserum for ..cap alpha..-human ANP. Specific binding sites for /sup 125/I-labeled rat ANP were also found in lung membrane preparation by radioreceptor assay. Incubation of synthetic atriopeptin III (10/sup -9/ to 10/sup -6/M) with lung tissue induced 1-28 fold increase in lung cGMP content. The results suggest that ANP-IR and its receptors existing in rat lung may be involved in the regulation of pulmonary function and have a synergic effect with ANP of cardiac origin in the control of water-electrolytes balance.

  20. Regulation of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Saavedra, J.M.

    1987-06-01

    We have studied the localization, kinetics, and regulation of receptors for the circulating form of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP; 99-126) in the rat brain. Quantitative autoradiographic techniques and a /sup 125/I-labeled ligand, /sup 125/I-ANP (99-126), were employed. After in vitro autoradiography, quantification was achieved by computerized microdensitometry followed by comparison with /sup 125/I-standards. ANP receptors were discretely localized in the rat brain, with the highest concentrations in circumventricular organs, the choroid plexus, and selected hypothalamic nuclei involved in the production of the antidiuretic hormone vasopressin and in blood-pressure control. Spontaneously (genetic) hypertensive rats showed much lower numbers of ANP receptors than normotensive controls in the subfornical organ, the area postrema, the nucleus of the solitary tract, and the choroid plexus. These changes are in contrast to those observed for receptors of angiotensin II, another circulating peptide with actions opposite to those of ANP. Under conditions of acute dehydration after water deprivation, as well as under conditions of chronic dehydration such as those present in homozygous Brattleboro rats, there was an up-regulation of ANP receptors in the subfornical organ. Our results indicate that in the brain, circumventricular organs contain ANP receptors which could respond to variations in the concentration of circulating ANP. In addition, brain areas inside the blood-brain barrier contain ANP receptors probably related to the endogenous, central ANP system. The localization of ANP receptors and the alterations in their regulation present in genetically hypertensive rats and after dehydration indicate that brain ANP receptors are probably related to fluid regulation, including the secretion of vasopressin, and to cardiovascular function.

  1. Atrial natriuretic peptide mediates oxytocin secretion induced by osmotic stimulus.

    PubMed

    Chriguer, Rosengela S; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Franci, Celso R

    2003-02-15

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), first discovered in the heart, has been also detected in various brain regions involved in the control of cardiovascular function and water and sodium balance. The anteroventral region of the third ventricle (AV3V) and the subfornical organ (SFO) have ANP-immunoreactive projections towards the paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic (SON) nuclei of the hypothalamus. Extracellular fluid (ECF) hyperosmolality stimulates the secretion of oxytocin (OT) which induces ANP release by the atrium. On the other hand, passive immunoneutralization of ANP reduces OT secretion in response to ECF hypertonicity. Previous studies have shown the co-localization of ANP and OT in PVN and SON neurons and in the periventricular region, as well as the presence of ANPergic and oxytocinergic neurons in the median eminence. The aim of the present study was to investigate the OT and ANP content in the SON and PVN of the hypothalamus and in the posterior pituitary (PP) after an osmotic stimulus that induces OT secretion. The results showed that intracerebroventricular microinjection of normal rabbit serum (NRS) or of ANP antiserum followed or not by an intraperitoneal injection of isotonic saline did not alter OT secretion or OT content in the PVN, SON, and PP; passive ANP immunoneutralization reduced the basal content of ANP in the PVN, SON, and PP of animals in a situation of isotonicity; the ANP antiserum inhibited the increase of OT secretion and content of OT and ANP in the PVN, SON and PP induced by the osmotic stimulus. Thus, the increase in plasma OT and oxytocinergic neurons of the hypothalamus-posterior pituitary system in response to hypertonicity depends on the action of endogenous ANP, i.e., ECF hypertonicity must activate ANPergic neurons which directly or indirectly stimulate OT release. PMID:12576148

  2. Atrial natriuretic peptide, B-type natriuretic peptide, and serum collagen markers after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Magga, Jarkko; Puhakka, Mikko; Hietakorpi, Seppo; Punnonen, Kari; Uusimaa, Paavo; Risteli, Juha; Vuolteenaho, Olli; Ruskoaho, Heikki; Peuhkurinen, Keijo

    2004-04-01

    Experimental data suggest that atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) act locally as antifibrotic factors in heart. We investigated the interrelationships of natriuretic peptides and collagen markers in 93 patients receiving thrombolytic treatment for their first acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Collagen formation following AMI, evaluated as serum levels of amino terminal propeptide of type III procollagen, correlated with NH(2)-terminal proANP (r = 0.45, P < 0.001), BNP (r = 0.55, P < 0.001) and NH(2)-terminal proBNP (r = 0.50, P < 0.01) on day 4 after thrombolysis. Levels of intact amino terminal propeptide of type I procollagen decreased by 34% (P < 0.001), and levels of carboxy terminal cross-linked telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) increased by 65% (P < 0.001). ICTP levels correlated with NH(2)-terminal proBNP (r = 0.25, P < 0.05) and BNP (r = 0.28, P < 0.05) on day 4. Our results suggest that ANP and BNP may act as regulators of collagen scar formation and left ventricular remodeling after AMI in humans. Furthermore, degradation of type I collagen is increased after AMI and may be regulated by BNP. PMID:14607848

  3. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide and Renal Dopaminergic System: A Positive Friendly Relationship?

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Marcelo Roberto; Rukavina Mikusic, Natalia Lucía; Kouyoumdzian, Nicolás Martín; Kravetz, María Cecilia; Fernández, Belisario Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Sodium metabolism by the kidney is accomplished by an intricate interaction between signals from extrarenal and intrarenal sources and between antinatriuretic and natriuretic factors. Renal dopamine plays a central role in this interactive network. The natriuretic hormones, such as the atrial natriuretic peptide, mediate some of their effects by affecting the renal dopaminergic system. Renal dopaminergic tonus can be modulated at different steps of dopamine metabolism (synthesis, uptake, release, catabolism, and receptor sensitization) which can be regulated by the atrial natriuretic peptide. At tubular level, dopamine and atrial natriuretic peptide act together in a concerted manner to promote sodium excretion, especially through the overinhibition of Na+, K+-ATPase activity. In this way, different pathological scenarios where renal sodium excretion is dysregulated, as in nephrotic syndrome or hypertension, are associated with impaired action of renal dopamine and/or atrial natriuretic peptide, or as a result of impaired interaction between these two natriuretic systems. The aim of this review is to update and comment on the most recent evidences demonstrating how the renal dopaminergic system interacts with atrial natriuretic peptide to control renal physiology and blood pressure through different regulatory pathways. PMID:25013796

  4. Attenuated response to atrial natriuretic peptide in rats with myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Kohzuki, M; Hodsman, G P; Johnston, C I

    1989-02-01

    The natriuretic, diuretic, and hypotensive effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) were examined in rats 4 wk after myocardial infarction induced by left coronary artery ligation. Synthetic rat ANP (fragment 1-28) was infused intravenously in doses of 0.1, 0.3, and 1.0 micrograms.kg-1.min-1 for 30 min. There was a significant decrease in systolic blood pressure in controls and rats with infarction, although only in control rats was there a significant decrease in diastolic blood pressure. Changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure were attenuated in rats with infarction compared with controls (P less than 0.01). The diuretic and natriuretic effects of ANP were observed in both groups of rats, but the effects were significantly less in rats with infarction (P less than 0.01). The ANP infusion did not induce significant changes in heart rate or hematocrit in controls or rats with infarction. The results indicate that rats with chronic left heart failure are less sensitive to the natriuretic, diuretic, and hypotensive effects of ANP when compared with controls. The attenuated renal response to ANP may contribute to the impaired sodium and water excretion in chronic heart failure, although other mechanisms are involved. PMID:2521777

  5. [Atrial natriuretic factor in physiological conditions and pathological states].

    PubMed

    Fontana, F; Bernardi, P; Puddu, P; Lenzi, S

    1990-09-30

    Having outlined the principal physiological and pathological aspects of the atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) on the basis of data found in the literature, the authors report the results of their research on variations of ANF plasma level during hyperkinetic atrial arrhythmia, acute myocardial infarction with and without complications as well as hypotensive and renal effects of synthetic ANF in congestive heart failure. Regardless of the cause of hyperkinetic atrial arrhythmia, high ANF levels were normalized or significantly reduced after the return to sinus rhythm whereas with the sole reduction of ventricular rate ANF remained raised. In uncomplicated myocardial infarction ANF level was raised to an extent inversely proportional to the ejection fraction. In cardiogenic shock, ANF values were high and correlated to the high central venous pressure and heart rate. On the contrary, in the hypotensive bradycardia syndrome ANF values were normal even when the syndrome had occurred in the acute stage of infarction. In congestive heart failure, ANF administration had contradictory effects in that diuresis was induced by lower doses, and hypotension by higher ones. PMID:2149534

  6. Relationship in humans between atrial natriuretic peptide and arginine vasopressin during dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Burnett, J.C. Jr.; Wilson, D.M.; Kao, P.C.; Schwab, T.R.; Heublein, D.M.; Heser, D.W.

    1986-03-01

    The present study was designed to define in normal humans (n=6) the relationship between atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) during thirty-six hours of dehydration. Atrial natriuretic peptide was measured from extracted plasma by radioimmunoassay to alpha-human atrial natriuretic peptide; arginine vasopressin was measured from platelet free plasma by specific radioimmunoassay to AVP. Determinations were obtained of ANP, AVP and plasma osmolality (Posm) prior to and following fluid deprivation for thirty-six hours. The present study demonstrates that dehydration in humans increases plasma osmolality and arginine vasopressin but does not increase atrial natriuretic peptide. These investigations importantly dissociate these two peptide hormonal systems during the physiologic adaptation to fluid deprivation.

  7. Atrial natriuretic peptide in cardiovascular biology and disease (NPPA).

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Wang, Hao; Wu, Qingyu

    2015-09-10

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a cardiac hormone that regulates salt-water balance and blood pressure by promoting renal sodium and water excretion and stimulating vasodilation. ANP also has an anti-hypertrophic function in the heart, which is independent of its systemic blood pressure-lowering effect. In mice, ANP deficiency causes salt-sensitive hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. Recent studies have shown that ANP plays an important role in regulating vascular remodeling and energy metabolism. Variants in the human NPPA gene, encoding the ANP precursor, are associated with hypertension, stroke, coronary artery disease, heart failure (HF) and obesity. ANP and related peptides are used as biomarkers for heart disease. Recombinant proteins and small molecules that enhance the ANP pathway have been developed to treat patients with HF. In this review, we discuss the role of ANP in cardiovascular biology and disease. PMID:26074089

  8. Pharmacologic Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Reduces Human Leg Capillary Filtration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Vissing, Susanne F.; Lane, Lynda D.; Buckey, Jay C.; Firth, Brian G.; Erdman, William; Hargens, Alan R.; Blomqvist, C. Gunnar

    1995-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is produced and secreted by atrial cells. We measured calf capillary filtration rate with prolonged venous-occlusion plethys-mography of supine health male subjects during pharmacologic infusion of ANP (48 pmol/kg/min for 15 min; n equals 6) and during placebo infusion (n equals 7). Results during infusions were compared to prior control measurements. ANP infusion increased plasma (ANP) from 30 plus or minus 4 to 2,568 plus or minus 595 pmol/L. Systemic hemoconcentration occurred during ANP infusion; mean hematocrit and plasma colloid osmotic pressure increased 4.6 and 11.3 percent respectively, relative to pre-infusion baseline values (p is less than 0.05). Mean calf filtration, however was significantly reduced from 0.15 to 0.08 ml/100 ml/min with ANP. Heart rate increased 20 percent with ANP infusion, wheras blood pressure was unchanged. Calf conductance (blood flow/arterial pressure) and venous compliance were unaffected by ANP infusion. Placebo infusion had no effect relative to prior baseline control measurements. Although ANP induced systemic capillary filtration, in the calf, filtration was reduced with ANP. Therefore, phamacologic ANP infusion enhances capillary filtration from the systemic circulation, perhaps at upper body or splanchic sites or both, while having the opposite effect in the leg.

  9. Pharmacologic Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Reduces Human Leg Capillary Filtration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Vissing, Susanne F.; Lane, Lynda D.; Buckey, Jay C.; Firth, Brian G.; Erdman, William; Hargens, Alan R.; Blomqvist, C. Gunnar

    1995-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is produced and secreted by atrial cells. We measured calf capillary filtration rate with prolonged venous-occlusion plethysmography of supine healthy male subjects during pharmacologic infusion of ANP (48 pmol/kg/min for 15 min; n = 6) and during placebo infusion (n = 7). Results during infusions were compared to prior control measurements. ANP infusion increased plasma (ANP) from 30 +/- 4 to 2,568 +/- 595 pmol/L. Systemic hemoconcentration occurred during ANP infusion: mean hematocrit and plasma colloid osmotic pressure increased 4.6 and 11.3%, respectively, relative to preinfusion baseline values (p less than 0.05). Mean calf filtration, however, was significantly reduced from 0.15 to 0.08 ml/100 ml/min with ANP. Heart rate increased 20% with ANP infusion, whereas blood pressure was unchanged. Calf conductance (blood flow/ arterial pressure) and venous compliance were unaffected by ANP infusion. Placebo infusion had no effect relative to prior baseline control measurements. Although ANP induced systemic capillary filtration, in the calf, filtration was reduced with ANP. Therefore, pharmacologic ANP infusion enhances capillary filtration from the systemic circulation, perhaps at upper body or splanchnic sites or both, while having the opposite effect in the leg.

  10. [ATRIAL AND BRAIN NATRIURETIC PEPTIDES OF CARDIAC MUSCLE CELLS IN POSTREPERFUSION PERIOD IN RATS].

    PubMed

    Bugrova, M L

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation and release of atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) in right atrial cardiac muscle cells has been investigated in rats after 60 minutes and 60 days after the reperfusion start. The total ischemia was simulated by the method of V. G. Korpachev. Immunocytochemical localization of peptides in cardiomyocytes was performed in ultrathin sections using polyclonal antibodies. The intensity of accumulation/excretion of ANP and BNP were analyzed by the method of counting the number of granules (A- and B-types) with immunoreactive labels in 38 x 38 mkm2 visual fields in transmission electron microscope Morgagni 268D (FEI). The results were assessed using Mann-Whitney U-test (p < 0.05). After 60 minutes and 60 days post-reperfusion period, we detected an increase in the synthesis and release of ANP and BNP. The reaction of BNP was more pronounced than ANP. This is due to the fact that ANP is the main hormone of the natriuretic peptide system involved in the regulation of blood pressure in normal conditions, while BNP is the principal regulator of pressure in cardiovascular pathology. PMID:27228659

  11. Specific binding of atrial natriuretic factor in brain microvessels

    SciTech Connect

    Chabrier, P.E.; Roubert, P.; Braquet, P.

    1987-04-01

    Cerebral capillaries constitute the blood-brain barrier. Studies of specific receptors (neurotransmitters or hormones) located on this structure can be performed by means of radioligand-binding techniques on isolated brain microvessels. The authors examined on pure bovine cerebral microvessel preparations the binding of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), using /sup 125/I-labeled ANF. Saturation and competition experiments demonstrated the presence of a single class of ANF-binding sites with high affinity and with a binding capacity of 58 fmol/mg of protein. The binding of /sup 125/I-labeled ANF to brain microvessels is specific, reversible, and time dependent, as is shown by association-dissociation experiments. The demonstration of specific ANF-binding sites on brain microvessels supposes a physiological role of ANF on brain microvasculature. The coexistence of ANF and angiotensin II receptors on this cerebrovascular tissue suggests that the two circulating peptides may act as mutual antagonists in the regulation of brain microcirculation and/or blood-brain barrier function.

  12. Atrial natriuretic factor binding sites in experimental congestive heart failure

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, C.; Thibault, G.; Wrobel-Konrad, E.; De Lean, A.; Genest, J.; Cantin, M. )

    1989-10-01

    A quantitative in vitro autoradiographic study was performed on the aorta, renal glomeruli, and adrenal cortex of cardiomyopathic hamsters in various stages of heart failure and correlated, in some instances, with in vivo autoradiography. The results indicate virtually no correlation between the degree of congestive heart failure and the density of 125I-labeled atrial natriuretic factor ((Ser99, Tyr126)ANF) binding sites (Bmax) in the tissues examined. Whereas the Bmax was increased in the thoracic aorta in moderate and severe heart failure, there were no significant changes in the zona glomerulosa. The renal glomeruli Bmax was lower in mild and moderate heart failure compared with control and severe heart failure. The proportion of ANF B- and C-receptors was also evaluated in sections of the aorta, adrenal, and kidney of control and cardiomyopathic hamsters with severe heart failure. (Arg102, Cys121)ANF (des-(Gln113, Ser114, Gly115, Leu116, Gly117) NH2) (C-ANF) at 10(-6) M displaced approximately 505 of (Ser99, Tyr126)125I-ANF bound in the aorta and renal glomeruli and approximately 20% in the adrenal zona glomerulosa in both series of animals. These results suggest that ANF may exert a buffering effect on the vasoconstriction of heart failure and to a certain extent may inhibit aldosterone secretion. The impairment of renal sodium excretion does not appear to be related to glomerular ANF binding sites at any stage of the disease.

  13. Atrial natriuretic peptide increases resistance to venous return in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Y.W.; Frohlich, E.D.; Trippodo, N.C.

    1987-05-01

    To examine mechanisms by which administration of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) decreases venous return, the authors compared the hemodynamic effects of ANP furosemide (FU), and hexamethonium (HEX) with those of vehicle (VE) in anesthetized rats. Compared with VE, ANP reduced mean arterial pressure, central venous pressure, and cardiac index and increased calculated resistance to venous return. /sup 141/Ce-labeled microspheres were used to determine cardiac output. Mean circulatory filling pressure, distribution of blood flow between splanchnic organs and skeletal muscles, and total peripheral resistance remained unchanged. FU increased urine output similar to that of ANP, yet produced no hemodynamic changes, dissociating diuresis, and decreased cardiac output. HEX lowered arterial pressure through a reduction in total peripheral resistance without altering cardiac output or resistance to venous return. The results confirm previous findings that ANP decreases cardiac output through a reduction in venous return and suggest that this results partly from increased resistance to venous return and not from venodilation or distribution of blood flow.

  14. Atrial natriuretic factor in maternal and fetal sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, C.Y.; Gibbs, D.M.; Brace, R.A.

    1987-02-01

    To determine atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) concentrations in the circulation and body fluids of adult pregnant sheep and their fetuses, pregnant ewes were anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium, and the fetuses were exteriorized for sampling. ANF concentration, as measured by radioimmunoassay, was 47 +/- 6 (SE) pg/ml in maternal plasma, which was significantly higher than the 15 +/- 3 pg/ml in maternal urine. In the fetus, plasma ANF concentration was 265 +/- 49 pg/ml, 5.6 times that in maternal plasma. No umbilical arterial and venous difference in ANF concentration was observed. Fetal urine ANF concentration was significantly lower than that in fetal plasma, and was similar to that measured in amniotic and allantoic fluid. In chronically catheterized maternal and fetal sheep, fetal plasma ANF was again 5.1 times that in maternal plasma, and these levels were not different from those measured in acutely anesthetized animals. These results demonstrate that immunoreactive ANF is present in the fetal circulation at levels higher than those found in the mother. The low concentration of ANF in fetal urine suggests that ANF is probably metabolized and/or reabsorbed by the fetal kidney.

  15. Atrial natriuretic peptide prevents cancer metastasis through vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Nojiri, Takashi; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Tokudome, Takeshi; Miura, Koichi; Ishikane, Shin; Otani, Kentaro; Kishimoto, Ichiro; Shintani, Yasushi; Inoue, Masayoshi; Kimura, Toru; Sawabata, Noriyoshi; Minami, Masato; Nakagiri, Tomoyuki; Funaki, Soichiro; Takeuchi, Yukiyasu; Maeda, Hajime; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Shioi, Go; Arai, Yuji; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Takakura, Nobuyuki; Hori, Megumi; Ohno, Yuko; Miyazato, Mikiya; Mochizuki, Naoki; Okumura, Meinoshin; Kangawa, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Most patients suffering from cancer die of metastatic disease. Surgical removal of solid tumors is performed as an initial attempt to cure patients; however, surgery is often accompanied with trauma, which can promote early recurrence by provoking detachment of tumor cells into the blood stream or inducing systemic inflammation or both. We have previously reported that administration of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) during the perioperative period reduces inflammatory response and has a prophylactic effect on postoperative cardiopulmonary complications in lung cancer surgery. Here we demonstrate that cancer recurrence after curative surgery was significantly lower in ANP-treated patients than in control patients (surgery alone). ANP is known to bind specifically to NPR1 [also called guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A) receptor]. In mouse models, we found that metastasis of GC-A–nonexpressing tumor cells (i.e., B16 mouse melanoma cells) to the lung was increased in vascular endothelium-specific GC-A knockout mice and decreased in vascular endothelium-specific GC-A transgenic mice compared with control mice. We examined the effect of ANP on tumor metastasis in mice treated with lipopolysaccharide, which mimics systemic inflammation induced by surgical stress. ANP inhibited the adhesion of cancer cells to pulmonary arterial and micro-vascular endothelial cells by suppressing the E-selectin expression that is promoted by inflammation. These results suggest that ANP prevents cancer metastasis by inhibiting the adhesion of tumor cells to inflamed endothelial cells. PMID:25775533

  16. Circulatory fate of the atrial natriuretic peptide precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Lewicki, J.; Hilliker, S.; Borden, L.; Hancock, N.; Scarborough, R.; Vlasuk, G.

    1986-03-05

    The atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP) are stored in atria principally as a 126 amino acid precursor form (proANP). Although a predominant circulating form of the ANP's is apparently 28 amino acids in length (ANP(1-28)), smaller quantities of proANP can be detected in plasma by radioimmunoassay. This raises the possibility that ANP(1-28) may be derived from proANP within the circulation. To test this possibility, HPLC was used to assess the conversion of recombinant /sup 35/S-cysteine-labelled proANP (/sup 35/S-proANP) to /sup 35/S-ANP(1-28) following incubation with biological fluids. It was determined that incubation with rat or human serum readily converts /sup 35/S-proANP to /sup 35/S-ANP(1-28), however, this conversion did not occur upon incubation with plasma. Furthermore, /sup 35/S-proANP infused into the circulation of the rat was quite stable metabolically. No /sup 35/S-ANP(1-28) or related low molecular weight ANP's could be detected in the circulation for up to two hours following /sup 35/S-proANP administration. These data imply that proANP is not converted significantly to ANP(1-28) in the circulation of the rat. Thus, processing of proANP to ANP(1-28) probably occurs within the atrium or during release of the peptides from atrium.

  17. Specific Binding of Atrial Natriuretic Factor in Brain Microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabrier, Pierre E.; Roubert, Pierre; Braquet, Pierre

    1987-04-01

    Cerebral capillaries constitute the blood--brain barrier. Studies of specific receptors (neurotransmitters or hormones) located on this structure can be performed by means of radioligand-binding techniques on isolated brain microvessels. We examined on pure bovine cerebral microvessel preparations the binding of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), using 125I-labeled ANF. Saturation and competition experiments demonstrated the presence of a single class of ANF-binding sites with high affinity (dissociation constant, ≈ 10-10 M) and with a binding capacity of 58 fmol/mg of protein. The binding of 125I-labeled ANF to brain microvessels is specific, reversible, and time dependent, as is shown by association-dissociation experiments. The demonstration of specific ANF-binding sites on brain microvessels supposes a physiological role of ANF on brain microvasculature. The coexistence of ANF and angiotensin II receptors on this cerebrovascular tissue suggests that the two circulating peptides may act as mutual antagonists in the regulation of brain microcirculation and/or blood--brain barrier function.

  18. Extra-atrial expression of the gene for atrial natriuretic factor.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, D G; Deschepper, C F; Ganong, W F; Hane, S; Fiddes, J; Baxter, J D; Lewicki, J

    1986-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) is a group of peptides, originally isolated from the cardiac atria, that have a number of important effects on blood pressure, renal function, and salt balance. In the current study, expression of the ANF gene in certain extra-atrial tissues of the rat has been examined by radioimmunoassay of extracted ANF protein and by blot-hybridization, nuclease S1 analysis, and primer-extension analysis of the ANF mRNA. ANF peptides and mRNA were detected in cardiac ventricles, lung, and pituitary gland at levels generally less than or equal to 1% those of cardiac atria. The ANF transcripts in extra-atrial tissue appear to be very similar to those synthesized in the atria. They are polyadenylylated, are equivalent in overall length (950-1050 nucleotides), and have identical 5' termini. A secondary transcription start site mapping approximately 80 base pairs upstream from the primary start site is employed in atria and to a lesser extent in other tissues. The ANF transcript is present throughout the cardiac ventricles from apex to base and in the septum as well as the ventricular free walls. The transcript is more prevalent in the left ventricle and interventricular septum than in the right ventricle. Immunocytochemistry using various anti-rat ANF antibodies localized ANF immunoreactivity to the atrial myocytes; the ventricular myocytes, particularly along the endothelial surface of the ventricular chamber; perialveolar cells in the lung; and the gonadotropin-producing cells of the pituitary. The data indicate that the capacity for ANF gene expression extends beyond atrial tissue, albeit at much reduced levels, and may suggest alternative, perhaps paraendocrine, functions for the peptide in these tissues. Images PMID:2428040

  19. Binding sites of atrial natriuretic peptide in tree shrew adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, E.; Shigematsu, K.; Saavedra, J.M.

    1986-09-01

    Adrenal gland binding sites for atrial natriuretic peptide-(99-126) (ANP) were quantitated in tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri) by incubation of adrenal sections with (3-(/sup 125/I)-iodotyrosyl28) atrial natriuretic peptide-(99-126), followed by autoradiography with computerized microdensitometry. In the adrenal glands, there are three types of ANP binding sites. One is located in the zona glomerulosa (BMax 84 +/- 6 fmol/mg protein; Kd 122 +/- 9 pM); the second in the zona fasciculata and reticularis (BMax 29 +/- 2 fmol/mg protein; Kd 153 +/- 6 pM) and the third in the adrenal medulla (BMax 179 +/- 1 fmol/mg protein; Kd 70 +/- 2 pM). Besides the influence of ANP on the regulation of adrenocortical mineralcorticoid and glucocorticoid secretion our findings raise the possibility for a local site of action of atrial natriuretic peptide in the regulation of adrenomedullary catecholamines in the tree shrew, primates and man.

  20. Functional atrial natriuretic peptide receptor in human adrenal tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Shionoiri, H.; Hirawa, N.; Takasaki, I.; Ishikawa, Y.; Oda, H.; Minamisawa, K.; Sugimoto, K.; Matsukawa, T.; Ueda, S.; Miyajima, E.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of synthetic human atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the release of catecholamines, aldosterone, or cortisol were observed in human adrenal tumors obtained surgically from patients with pheochromocytoma, primary aldosteronism, or Cushing's syndrome, respectively. Each tumor tissue or adjacent normal cortical tissue was sectioned into slices, which were incubated in medium-199 in the presence or absence of adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) and ANP. The amounts of epinephrine, norepinephrine, aldosterone, or cortisol released into the medium were measured. Existence of ANP receptors on the adrenal tissues was examined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry. Release of catecholamines from pheochromocytoma tissues was inhibited by ANP, and the presence of the ANP receptor on pheochromocytoma was further demonstrated by both binding assays and affinity labeling; Scatchard analysis revealed a single class of binding sites for ANP with a Kd of 1.0 nM and a Bmax of 0.4 pmol/mg of protein and the molecular size was estimated as 140 and a 70 kDa under nonreducing and reducing conditions, respectively. The presence of ANP receptors in pheochromocytoma was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. ANP inhibited both basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone secretion in the slices of normal cortex, and localization of ANP receptors in zona glomerulosa cells was also demonstrated. However, ANP did not inhibit basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone and cortisol secretion in both tissue slices from aldosteronoma and Cushing's adenoma. Consistent with these observations, the absence of ANP receptors in adenoma tissues was determined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry.

  1. Radioimmunoassay and characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide in human plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yandle, T.G.; Espiner, E.A.; Nicholls, M.G.; Duff, H.

    1986-07-01

    A RIA for alpha-human atrial natriuretic peptide (alpha hANP) in plasma was developed and used to study the immunoreactive components secreted by the heart and circulating in peripheral venous plasma. The assay used (125I)diiodotyrosyl-alpha hANP, purified by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), and a C-terminal-specific antiserum purchased from Peninsula Laboratories. Serial dilution curves of coronary sinus plasma samples were parallel with the standard curve, but significant nonparallelism was found in peripheral plasma samples of low immunoreactivity. When plasma was extracted using C-18 Sep-Pak cartridges, serial dilution curves from both coronary sinus and peripheral plasma samples were parallel to the standard curve. Although values for plasma samples assayed before and after extraction agreed closely (r = 0.99; n = 76), immunoreactive ANP in unextracted plasma was consistently greater (70-79 pmol/liter) than in extracts of plasma, suggesting non-specific interference by a component in plasma when assayed without extraction. Mean plasma immunoreactive ANP in 19 normal subjects consuming a normal salt intake was 14 +/- 1 (+/- SE) pmol/liter. In 5 normal men, increasing dietary sodium intake from 10 to 200 mmol sodium/day was associated with a 2-fold increment in ANP levels, and similar changes accompanied acute sodium loading using iv saline. Elevated values were found in patients with congestive heart failure (mean, 58 pmol/liter; range, 0-200; n = 9), chronic renal failure (mean, 118 pmol/liter; range, 30-290; n = 8), and primary aldosteronism (range, 32-90 pmol/liter; n = 3). HPLC and gel chromatographic analysis of the immunoreactive material found in coronary sinus plasma extracts showed that a large amount of the material eluted in the position of alpha hANP.

  2. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Induces Postprandial Lipid Oxidation in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Birkenfeld, Andreas L.; Budziarek, Petra; Boschmann, Michael; Moro, Cedric; Adams, Frauke; Franke, Gabriele; Berlan, Michel; Marques, Marie A.; Sweep, Fred C.G.J.; Luft, Friedrich C.; Lafontan, Max; Jordan, Jens

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) regulates arterial blood pressure. In addition, ANP has recently been shown to promote human adipose tissue lipolysis through cGMP-mediated hormone-sensitive lipase activation. We hypothesized that ANP increases postprandial free fatty acid (FFA) availability and energy expenditure while decreasing arterial blood pressure. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—We infused human ANP (25 ng · kg−1 · min−1) in 12 men (age 32 ± 0.8 years, BMI 23.3 ± 0.4 kg/m2) before, during, and 2 h after ingestion of a standardized high-fat test meal in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over fashion. Cardiovascular changes were monitored by continuous electrocardiogram and beat-by-beat blood pressure recordings. Metabolism was monitored through venous blood sampling, intramuscular and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue microdialysis, and indirect calorimetry. RESULTS—ANP infusion decreased mean arterial blood pressure by 4 mmHg during the postprandial phase (P < 0.01 vs. placebo). At the same time, ANP induced lipolysis systemically (P < 0.05 vs. placebo) and locally in subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (P < 0.0001 vs. placebo), leading to a 50% increase in venous glycerol (P < 0.01) and FFA (P < 0.05) concentrations compared with placebo. The increase in FFA availability with ANP was paralleled by a 15% increase in lipid oxidation rates (P < 0.05 vs. placebo), driving a substantial increase in postprandial energy expenditure (P < 0.05 vs. placebo). CONCLUSIONS—Our data identify the ANP system as a novel pathway regulating postprandial lipid oxidation, energy expenditure, and concomitantly arterial blood pressure. The findings could have therapeutic implications. PMID:18835931

  3. Protective effect of atrial natriuretic peptide on electrical-field-stimulated rat ventricular strips during hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Ljusegren, M E; Andersson, R G

    1994-12-01

    We have previously shown that atrial natriuretic peptide reduces lactate accumulation in non-beating rat ventricular myocardium exposed to hypoxic conditions, and that hypoxia induces release of atrial natriuretic peptide from isolated rat atrial tissue. In these studies we suggested that atrial natriuretic peptide may be physiologically important for protection of the myocardium during periods of oxygen deficit. In the present study, we used isolated strips of rat right ventricle, contracted by electrical-field-stimulation, as a model of a beating myocardium. After contraction stabilization, hypoxic conditions were introduced through aeration with 20% O2, held for 20 or 30 min., and then interrupted by reoxygenation with 95% O2. The contractile force was recorded and the percentage regain of the contractions after reoxygenation was considered as an indication of the amount of cell damage induced during the period of hypoxia. The results show that after 30 min. of hypoxia and subsequent reoxygenation, ventricular strips treated with atrial natriuretic peptide (0.1 microM) recovered 67.9 +/- 2.8% of the prehypoxic force of contraction; control strips from the same ventricle regained 44.9 +/- 4.4% (P = 0.015) of their initial contractile activity. After 20 min. of hypoxia followed by reoxygenation, a ventricular strip incubated together with an atrium regained 78.6 +/- 2.4% of the prehypoxic force of contraction as compared to a 60.2 +/- 2.7% regain (P = 0.002) for the control strip. We conclude that atrial natriuretic peptide protects the working ventricular myocardium during hypoxia, which further supports our previously reported suggestion that the effect on myocardial metabolism is physiologically relevant during situations of oxygen deficit in heart muscle. PMID:7899254

  4. Binding and aggregation of pro-atrial natriuretic factor by calcium.

    PubMed

    Thibault, G; Doubell, A F

    1992-04-01

    Analysis of atrial secretory granule content by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis followed by a 45Ca2+ overlay assay indicates that a 17,000 protein binds 45Ca2+. This protein, which can be immunostained by atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) antiserum, corresponds to proANF. Ca2+ binding is proportional to the amount of proANF and pH dependent. Generation of ANF-(1-98) by thrombin digestion of proANF does not affect Ca2+ binding. Blocking the carboxyl groups of proANF and the use of NH2-terminal fragments bearing those carboxyl groups demonstrated that the Ca(2+)-interaction site is probably located within the highly acidic portion (11-30) of the propeptide. Ca2+ binding to proANF induces its aggregation that can be verified by sedimentation. ProANF aggregation is Ca2+ dependent, being optimal at 10 mM, partially pH dependent, and greatly increased by high concentrations of proANF. However, because of its relatively low-binding affinity, Ca2+ can be substituted by other divalent cations such as Sr2+, Ba2+, or Mg2+. The high level of Ca2+ in atrial secretory granules and the aggregation of proANF in the presence of Ca2+ suggest a possible involvement of these physicochemical properties in the condensed state of the matrix of secretory granules. Indeed, detergent solubilization of the membrane of the secretory granules in presence of Ca2+ resulted only in a partial dissolution of the dense core matrix. We therefore postulate that, in the Golgi complex, proANF and Ca2+ associate to form a condensed aggregate that helps package secretory material into secretory vesicles. PMID:1533094

  5. Extracellular fluid translocation in perfused rabbit atria: implication in control of atrial natriuretic peptide secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Cho, K W; Kim, S H; Hwang, Y H; Seul, K H

    1993-01-01

    1. Transmural transport of 22Na+, 51Cr-EDTA, [3H]inulin and [14C]Dextran (57 kDa) was measured in perfused rabbit atria. The radiolabelled extracellular space (ECS) markers and [14C]Dextran were introduced into the pericardial space or atrial lumen. Atrial volume changes were induced by steps up and down in atrial pressure. 2. Basal rates of transmural transport of radiolabelled ECS markers across the atrial wall were relatively stable up to 70 min. Atrial stretch and release resulted in a rapid but transient, and reversible increase in the ECS fluid (ECF) translocation. The increased translocation of the ECF into the atrial lumen occurred within 15 s of the reduction of atrial distension and returned to the baseline level within 60 s. 3. Transmural transport of [3H]inulin across the atrial wall was bidirectional. 4. The clearance of radiolabelled ECS markers was molecular-size dependent. The transmural clearance of [3H]inulin was dependent on the distension-reduction volume changes induced by atrial stretch and release. Little transport of [14C]Dextran across the atrial wall was observed. 5. The ECF translocation across the atrial wall was not influenced by changes in external Ca2+ but was suppressed by low temperature. 6. Dynamic changes in the ECS of the atrium were observed in response to atrial distension and reduction. The ECS of the atrium increased on distension and decreased on reduction of atrial distension. 7. Reduction in atrial distension resulted in an increase in the secretion of immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) which coincided with an increase in the translocation of the ECF. The secretion of immunoreactive ANP was a function of the translocation of the ECF. 8. It is suggested that atrial stretch and release may play a role in driving fluid flow within the interstitium and fluid translocation out of the interstitium. This fluid movement presumably leads to convective transport of released ANP into the atrial lumen. PMID:8254526

  6. Increase in plasma concentrations of cardiodilatin (amino terminal pro-atrial natriuretic peptide) in cardiac failure and during recumbency.

    PubMed Central

    Meleagros, L; Gibbs, J S; Ghatei, M A; Bloom, S R

    1988-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of cardiodilatin, the peptide sequence at the amino terminal of the pro-atrial natriuretic peptide, in 17 normal subjects ranged from 59 to 202 (mean 118 (SEM) (9] pmol/l. Recumbency increased the mean (SEM) concentration to 160 (13) pmol/l. The plasma concentration of cardiodilatin in 24 patients with congestive cardiac failure was much higher (964 (175) pmol/l) than in the normal subjects. It was highest in those with heart failure in New York Heart Association functional classes III and IV and the concentration correlated both with atrial natriuretic peptide concentrations and left ventricular ejection fraction. Concentrations rose during induced tachycardia in three patients tested. Chromatography showed a single clean peak of plasma cardiodilatin immunoreactivity. It seems that cardiodilatin is a second circulating cardiac peptide that is jointly released with atrial natriuretic peptide by common stimuli. Other workers have reported that, like atrial natriuretic peptide, three partial cardiodilatin sequences can stimulate renal particulate guanylate cyclase and increase cyclic guanosine monophosphate. The simultaneous release of cardiodilatin in higher circulating concentrations than atrial natriuretic peptide may be relevant to the finding that appropriate concentrations of exogenous atrial natiuretic peptide alone do not produce the full renal effects associated with endogenous peptide release. PMID:2970269

  7. Receptor binding sites for atrial natriuretic factor are expressed by brown adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Bacay, A.C.; Mantyh, C.R.; Vigna, S.R.; Mantyh, P.W. )

    1988-09-01

    To explore the possibility that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) is involved in thermoregulation we used quantitative receptor autoradiography and homogenate receptor binding assays to identify ANF bindings sites in neonatal rat and sheep brown adipose tissue, respectively. Using quantitative receptor autoradiography were were able to localize high levels of specific binding sites for {sup 125}I-rat ANF in neonatal rat brown adipose tissue. Homogenate binding assays on sheep brown fat demonstrated that the radioligand was binding to the membrane fraction and that the specific binding was not due to a lipophilic interaction between {sup 125}I-rat ANF and brown fat. Specific binding of {sup 125}I-rat ANF to the membranes of brown fat cells was inhibited by unlabeled rat ANF with a Ki of 8.0 x 10(-9) M, but not by unrelated peptides. These studies demonstrate that brown fat cells express high levels of ANF receptor binding sites in neonatal rat and sheep and suggest that ANF may play a role in thermoregulation.

  8. [Four-week simulated weightlessness increases the expression of atrial natriuretic peptide in the myocardium].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Cheng; Lu, Yuan-Ming; Yang, Huai-Zhang; Xu, Peng-Tao; Chang, Hui; Yu, Zhi-Bin

    2013-04-25

    One of the major circulatory changes that occur in human during space flight and simulated weightlessness is a cerebral redistribution of body fluids, which is accompanied by an increase of blood volume in the upper body. Therefore, atrial myocardium should increase the secretion of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), but the researches lack common conclusion until now. The present study was to investigate the expression level of ANP in simulated weightlessness rats, and to confirm the changes of ANP by observing the associated proteins of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs). The tail-suspended rat model was used to simulate weightlessness. Western blots were carried out to examine the expression levels of ANP and SNARE proteins in atrial and left ventricular myocardium. The results showed that ANP expression in atrial myocardium showed an increase in 4-week tail-suspended rats (SUS) compared with that in the synchronous control rats (CON). We only detected a trace amount of ANP in the left ventricular myocardium of the CON, but found an enhanced expression of ANP in left ventricular myocardium of the SUS. Expression of VAMP-1/2 (vesicle associated SNARE) increased significantly in both atrial and left ventricular myocardium in the SUS compared with that in the CON. There was no difference of the expression of syntaxin-4 (target compartment associated SNARE) between the CON and SUS, but the expression of SNAP-23 showed an increase in atrial myocardium of the SUS compared with that in the CON. Synip and Munc-18c as regulators of SNAREs did not show significant difference between the CON and SUS. These results suggest that the expression of ANP shows an increase in atrial and left ventricular myocardium of 4-week tail-suspended rats. Enhanced expression of VAMP-1/2 associated with ANP vesicles confirms the increased expression of ANP in atrial and left ventricular myocardium. PMID:23598869

  9. Molecular cloning of hamster brain and atrial natriuretic peptide cDNAs. Cardiomyopathic hamsters are useful models for brain and atrial natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, N; Ogawa, Y; Itoh, H; Arai, H; Suga, S; Nakagawa, O; Komatsu, Y; Kishimoto, I; Takaya, K; Yoshimasa, T

    1994-01-01

    Brain and atrial natriuretic peptides (BNP and ANP) are cardiac hormones with diuretic, natriuretic, and vasodilatory activities. Cardiomyopathic hamsters are widely used animal models of heart failure. Due to the structural divergence of BNP among species, examination on pathophysiological roles of BNP using cardiomyopathic hamsters is so far impossible. We therefore isolated hamster BNP and ANP cDNAs, and investigated synthesis and secretion of these peptides in normal and cardiomyopathic hamsters. The COOH-terminal 32-residue peptide of cloned hamster preproBNP with 122 amino acids, preceded by a single arginine residue, supposedly represents hamster BNP showing < 50% homology to rat BNP. Alpha-hamster ANP, 28-residue peptide, is identical to alpha-rat ANP. In hamsters, BNP and ANP occur mainly in the ventricle and the atrium, respectively. The 32-wk-old hypertrophic cardiomyopathic BIO14.6 strain exhibited ventricular hypertrophy. The 32-wk-old dilated cardiomyopathic BIO53.58 strain remained at the stage without apparent heart failure. In BIO14.6 and BIO53.58 strains at this age, ventricular BNP and ANP gene expressions are augmented, and the plasma BNP concentration is elevated to 136 and 108 fmol/ml, respectively, three times greater than the elevated plasma ANP concentration, which well mimics changes of the plasma BNP and ANP concentrations in human heart failure. Cardiomyopathic hamsters, therefore, are useful models to investigate the implication of BNP in human cardiovascular diseases. Images PMID:8083346

  10. [Human atrial natriuretic peptide: a secretory product of the heart and its significance for physiology and clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Vierhapper, H; Waldhäusl, W

    1987-03-01

    This review deals with the physiological and clinical importance of human atrial natriuretic peptide (hANP). This peptide, which is produced by the myocardial cells of the right atrium, induces a diuretic and natriuretic response and has an inhibitory effect on aldosterone secretion. Recent elucidation of the peptide's structure represents the latest achievement in the search for an endogenous, natriuretic and hypotensive substance and has resulted in the publication of much, partly only preliminary data of its role within the homeostatic control of body sodium and water, as well as in various pathological disorders. The extensive literature is reviewed. PMID:2953110

  11. A Familial Mutation Renders Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Resistant to Proteolytic Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Dickey, Deborah M.; Yoder, Andrea R.; Potter, Lincoln R.

    2009-01-01

    A heterozygous frameshift mutation causing a 12-amino acid extension to the C terminus of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was recently genetically linked to patients with familial atrial fibrillation (Hodgson-Zingman, D. M., Karst, M. L., Zingman, L. V., Heublein, D. M., Darbar, D., Herron, K. J., Ballew, J. D., de Andrade, M., Burnett, J. C., Jr., and Olson, T. M. (2008) N. Engl. J. Med. 359, 158–165). The frameshift product (fsANP), but not wild-type ANP (wtANP), was elevated in the serum of affected patients, but the molecular basis for the elevated peptide concentrations was not determined. Here, we measured the ability of fsANP to interact with natriuretic peptide receptors and to be proteolytically degraded. fsANP and wtANP bound and activated human NPR-A and NPR-C similarly, whereas fsANP had a slightly increased efficacy for human NPR-B. Proteolytic susceptibility was addressed with novel bioassays that measure the time required for kidney membranes or purified neutral endopeptidase to abolish ANP-dependent activation of NPR-A. The half-life of fsANP was markedly greater than that of wtANP in both assays. Additional membrane proteolysis studies indicated that wtANP and fsANP are preferentially degraded by neutral endopeptidase and serine peptidases, respectively. These data indicate that the familial ANP mutation associated with atrial fibrillation has only minor effects on natriuretic peptide receptor interactions but markedly modifies peptide proteolysis. PMID:19458086

  12. Atrial natriuretic factor mRNA and binding sites in the adrenal gland.

    PubMed Central

    Nunez, D J; Davenport, A P; Brown, M J

    1990-01-01

    The factor inhibiting aldosterone secretion produced by the adrenal medulla may be atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), since the latter abolishes aldosterone release in response to a number of secretagogues, including angiotensin II and K+. In this study we have shown that cells in the adrenal medulla contain ANF mRNA and therefore have the potential to synthesize this peptide. The presence of binding sites for ANF predominantly in the adrenal zona glomerulosa suggests that, if ANF is synthesized in the medulla and transferred to the cortex, it may affect mineralocorticoid status. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:2146954

  13. Characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors in brain microvessel endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, Peggy A.; Huls, M. H.; Sams, Clarence F.

    1989-01-01

    In view of the suggestions by Chabrier et al. (1987) and Steardo and Nathanson (1987) that atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) may play a role in the fluid homeostasis of the brain, the ANP receptors in primary cultures of bovine brain microvessel endothelian cells were quantitated and characterized. Results of partition binding studies and the effect of cGMP additions indicated the presence of at least two types of ANP receptors, with the majority of the receptors being the nonguanylate cyclase coupled receptors. The presence of at least two ANP receptor types suggests an active role for ANP in regulating brain endothelial cell function.

  14. Genetic Decreases in Atrial Natriuretic Peptide and Salt-Sensitive Hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Simon W. M.; Krege, John H.; Oliver, Paula M.; Hagaman, John R.; Hodgin, Jeffrey B.; Pang, Stephen C.; Flynn, T. Geoffrey; Smithies, Oliver

    1995-02-01

    To determine if defects in the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) system can cause hypertension, mice were generated with a disruption of the proANP gene. Homozygous mutants had no circulating or atrial ANP, and their blood pressures were elevated by 8 to 23 millimeters of mercury when they were fed standard (0.5 percent sodium chloride) and intermediate (2 percent sodium chloride) salt diets. On standard salt diets, heterozygotes had normal amounts of circulating ANP and normal blood pressures. However, on high (8 percent sodium chloride) salt diets they were hypertensive, with blood pressures elevated by 27 millimeters of mercury. These results demonstrate that genetically reduced production of ANP can lead to salt-sensitive hypertension.

  15. Role of supraspinal vasopressin neurones in the effects of atrial natriuretic peptide on sympathetic nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Yusof, A P M; Yusoff, N H M; Suhaimi, F W; Coote, J H

    2009-06-15

    The aim of the present study was to determine if paraventricular-spinal vasopressin neurones participate in the sympatho-inhibitory effects of systemically administered atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). Experiments were carried out on male Sprague-Dawley rats anesthetized with 1.3 g/kg urethane. Changes in mean arterial pressure (mm Hg), heart rate (beats per minute) and RSNA (%) were measured following intravenous bolus administration of ANP (250 ng, 500 ng and 5 microg). Intrathecal application of selective V 1a receptor antagonist was performed to test for the involvement of supraspinal vasopressin pathways in mediating the effect on sympathetic outflow evoked by intravenous ANP administration. The results obtained demonstrated that both low and high doses of ANP caused renal sympathoinhibition (250 ng; - 7.5 +/- 1%, 500 ng; - 14.2 +/- 1%, 5 microg; - 16.4 +/- 2%), concomitant with vasodilation and bradycardia. After spinal vasopressin receptor blockade, the inhibitory effects of ANP were prevented and there was a small renal sympatho-excitation (250 ng; + 1.7 +/- 0.2%, 500 ng; + 6.1 +/- 0.03%, 5 microg; + 8.0 +/- 0.03%, P < 0.05). Therefore, the renal sympathetic nerve inhibition elicited by circulating ANP is dependent on the efficacy of a well established supraspinal vasopressin pathway. Since supraspinal vasopressin neurones without exception excite renal sympathetic neurones, it is suggested that ANP elicits this effect by activating cardiac vagal afferents that inhibit the spinally projecting vasopressin neurones at their origin in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. PMID:19349212

  16. Atrial natriuretic peptide and circadian blood pressure regulation: clues from a chronobiological approach.

    PubMed

    Portaluppi, F; Vergnani, L; degli Uberti, E C

    1993-06-01

    A critical review of the data available in the literature today permits a better understanding of the multiple actions of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the cardiovascular system. Moreover, the results of chronobiological studies suggest a role for this peptide in the determination of the circadian rhythm of blood pressure (BP). ANP can affect BP by several mechanisms, including modification of renal function and vascular tone, counteraction of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, and action on brain regulatory sites. A series of interrelated events may follow from very small changes in the plasma levels of ANP. The endpoints are blood volume and BP reduction, but they are rapidly offset (mainly by reactive sympathetic activation) as soon as blood volume or pressure is threatened. The circadian rhythms of BP and ANP are antiphasic under normal conditions and in essential hypertension. The loss in the nocturnal decrease of BP is accompanied by a comparable loss in the nocturnal surge of ANP in hypertensive renal failure and hypotensive heart failure. In the latter condition, BP and ANP variabilities correlate significantly both before and after therapy-induced functional recovery, independently of the mean BP levels. Autonomic function modulates the secretion of ANP, which seems more apt to determine only transient changes in BP levels, as suggested by the short half-life of the peptide and the buffering role of its clearance receptors. There is now sufficient evidence that ANP contributes to short-term control over BP and electrolyte balance, in contrast and in opposition to the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, which is involved primarily in long-term BP control. By interfering with other well-established neurohormonal factors, ANP appears to be an additional modulator of the circadian rhythm of BP. PMID:8391398

  17. Glucagon-like peptide-1: effect on pro-atrial natriuretic peptide in healthy males.

    PubMed

    Skov, Jeppe; Holst, Jens Juul; Gøtze, Jens Peter; Frøkiær, Jørgen; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl

    2014-01-01

    The antihypertensive actions of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) receptor agonists have been linked to the release of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in mice. Whether a GLP1-ANP axis exists in humans is unknown. In this study, we examined 12 healthy young males in a randomized, controlled, double-blinded, single-day, cross-over study to evaluate the effects of a 2-h native GLP1 infusion. Plasma proANP concentrations were measured by an automated mid-region-directed proANP immunoassay and N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) on Roche Modular E170. Urine was collected for measurements of sodium excretion. Although GLP1 infusion increased the urinary sodium excretion markedly, there were no significant changes in either proANP or proBNP concentrations. When GLP1 infusion was stopped, sodium excretion declined rapidly. As proANP concentration reflects ANP secretion, our data could not confirm the existence of a GLP1-ANP axis in humans. Especially, the natriuretic effects of GLP1 seem unlikely to be mediated exclusively via ANP. PMID:24327600

  18. Localization of corin and atrial natriuretic peptide expression in human renal segments.

    PubMed

    Dong, Liang; Wang, Hao; Dong, Ningzheng; Zhang, Ce; Xue, Boxin; Wu, Qingyu

    2016-09-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)-mediated natriuretic response is a well-established cardiac endocrine function. Corin is a transmembrane protease that activates ANP in the heart. Corin expression has been detected in non-cardiac tissues including the kidney. Here we examined corin, pro-ANP/ANP and natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) expression in human renal segments. By immunostaining and in situ hybridization, we found similar corin, pro-ANP/ANP and NPR-A protein and mRNA expression in human renal segments. The expression was most abundant in the proximal convoluted tubules and the medullary connecting ducts. In the proximal tubules, corin protein was present in the apical membrane region underneath the brush border where the ANP-degrading protease neprilysin was abundant. These results suggest that corin-mediated pro-ANP activation may occur in renal segments and that locally produced ANP may act in an autocrine manner to regulate sodium and water reabsorption in situ Our results also point to the proximal convoluted tubules as a major site for local ANP action. Such a renal corin/ANP autocrine mechanism may differ from the cardiac corin/ANP endocrine mechanism in regulating sodium homoeostasis under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:27343265

  19. Biological actions of cleaved atrial natriuretic factor (ANF101-105/106-126) in conscious sheep.

    PubMed

    Charles, C J; Espiner, E A; Yandle, T G; Cameron, V A; Richards, A M

    1991-03-01

    Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) cleaved between Cys105 and Phe106 is the primary metabolite of ANF and circulates in human plasma. Because the role of this metabolite in vivo and its possible interaction with intact ANF are unclear, we studied the biologic effects of a 2-h infusion of rat cleaved ANF101-105/106-126 (15 pmol/kg/min) or vehicle alone in six normal sheep. Infusions of cleaved ANF increased venous plasma levels of cleaved ANF from less than 5 to 260 pmol/L and induced a progressive and significant increase in plasma cyclic GMP (p = 0.025) without significantly affecting plasma ANF levels. These changes were associated with a small (nonsignificant) decrease in arterial pressure and a significant increase in heart rate (HR) and sympathetic nervous activity and were followed by activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAA) axis after infusions were terminated. Unlike ANF itself, cleaved ANF was not natriuretic and did not reduce plasma volume or right atrial pressure. Calculated metabolic clearance rate (MCR) (1.47 +/- 0.4 L/min) and disappearance rate of cleaved ANF from plasma (4.8 +/- 0.37 min) were similar to values reported previously for intact ANF in sheep. These studies show that cleaved ANF stimulates guanylate cyclase and alters hemodynamics and the RAA system in vivo. PMID:1711601

  20. The propeptide Asn1-Tyr126 is the storage form of rat atrial natriuretic factor.

    PubMed Central

    Thibault, G; Garcia, R; Gutkowska, J; Bilodeau, J; Lazure, C; Seidah, N G; Chrétien, M; Genest, J; Cantin, M

    1987-01-01

    Granules from rat atria were isolated by differential centrifugation and by a 53% (v/v) Percoll gradient after tissue homogenization in 0.25 M-sucrose/50 mM-Na2EDTA. About 40% of the immunoreactive ANF (atrial natriuretic factor) sedimented with the atrial granules during differential centrifugations. On the Percoll gradient, two distinct bands were observed. Cell debris, mitochondria, lysosomes, myofilaments and microsomes were mostly contained in the lightest-density (rho) (1.03-1.07 g/ml) fraction, as demonstrated by electron microscopy and by enzymic markers such as lactate dehydrogenase, monoamine oxidase, cytochrome c reductase, beta-glucuronidase and acid phosphatase. Atrial granules were mostly contained in the denser (rho 1.11-1.15 g/ml) band and were only slightly contaminated by lysosomes, as shown by beta-glucuronidase activity. Analysis of the ANF content in these isolated granules by h.p.l.c., amino acid composition and sequencing demonstrated that it was only the pro-ANF [ANF-(Asn1-Tyr126)-peptide]. The precursor was present in all granules, as demonstrated by immunocytochemistry. Since hormonal propeptides usually undergo intracellular processing, and the matured peptides are subsequently stored in the secretory granules, these results indicate that the processing pathway of ANF may be different from that of other hormonal peptides. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 5. PMID:2952112

  1. Role of endogenous atrial natriuretic factor in acute congestive heart failure.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M E; Miller, W L; Edwards, B S; Burnett, J C

    1989-01-01

    The current studies were designed to investigate the functional significance of elevated endogenous atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) in acute congestive heart failure (CHF). Integrated cardiorenal and endocrine function were measured in three models of acute low-output congestive heart failure with comparably reduced cardiac output (CO) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). Acute CHF was produced by rapid right ventricular pacing (group I, n = 5) which decreases CO and increases atrial pressures and plasma ANF. In group II, n = 5, thoracic inferior vena caval constriction (TIVCC) was produced to decrease venous return and CO but without increases in atrial pressure or plasma ANF. In group III, n = 5, TIVCC was performed and exogenous ANF infused to achieve plasma concentrations observed in acute CHF. In acute CHF with increases in endogenous ANF, sodium excretion (UNaV), renal blood flow (RBF), plasma renin activity (PRA), and plasma aldosterone (PA) were maintained despite decreases in CO and MAP. In contrast, TIVCC with similar reductions in CO and MAP but without increases in ANF resulted in decreases in UNaV and RBF and increases in PRA and PA. Exogenous administration of ANF in TIVCC to mimic levels in acute CHF prevented sodium retention, renal vasoconstriction, and activation of renin and aldosterone. These studies demonstrate that endogenous ANF serves as an important physiologic volume regulator in acute CHF to maintain sodium excretion and possibly participate in the suppression of activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system despite the stimulus of arterial hypotension. Images PMID:2531762

  2. Immunoreactive atrial natriuretic factor is increased in ovine model of endotoxemia

    SciTech Connect

    Lubbesmeyer, H.J.; Woodson, L.; Traber, L.D.; Flynn, J.T.; Herndon, D.N.; Traber, D.L. Thomas Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, PA Westfaelian Wilhelms Univ., Muenster )

    1988-04-01

    A bolus of Escherichia coli endotoxin (1.5 {mu}g/kg) was administered to chronically instrumented sheep. Immunoreactive atrial natriuretic factor (IR-ANF) was measured in extracted plasma by radioimmunoassay. There was a thirteenfold increase in IR-ANF 2 h after endotoxin administration, and IR-ANF levels remained significantly elevated during the first 6 h. A marked diuresis and natriuresis occurred between 4 and 6 h. ANF not only affects renal function but is also associated with decreased cardiac output, increased peripheral resistance (in sheep), and decreased capillary absorption (in rats). These renal and hemodynamic changes are also characteristic of the early (first 6 h) response to endotoxin. Therefore ANF should be considered as a potential mediator of renal and hemodynamic changes induced by sepsis. It is difficult to determine if ANF elevation is an epiphenomenon or a causative factor, because no antagonist of ANF is currently available.

  3. Gene expression of atrial natriuretic peptide in rat papillary muscle. Rapid induction by mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Jarygin, C; Hänze, J; Lang, R E

    1994-06-13

    The effect of mechanical stretch on protein synthesis and the expression of the gene for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was examined in electrically paced, isolated papillary muscles from rat heart. Incorporation of [3H]phenylalanine into protein increased only in stretched but not in unloaded muscles. Five hours of stretching increased ANP mRNA levels more than threefold as compared to freshly excised papillary muscles. A drastic fall in ANP mRNA levels was observed in unloaded muscles over this time. These data indicate that papillary muscles similar to other ventricular tissue are capable of activating ANP gene expression in response to increased load. The effect occurs in vitro and does not depend on circulating or nervous factors. The unexpected rapid induction of ANP gene expression in such a particular structure of the heart raises the possibility of local actions of ventricular ANP. PMID:8013631

  4. Effects of angiotensin, vasopressin and atrial natriuretic peptide on intraocular pressure in anesthetized rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, D. E.; Shue, S. G.; Keil, L. C.; Balaban, C. D.; Severs, W. B.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), vasopressin (AVP) and angiotensin (ANG) on blood and intraocular pressures of pentobarbital anesthetized rats were evaluated following intravenous, intracerebroventricular or anterior chamber routes of administration. Central injections did not affect intraocular pressure. Equipressor intravenous infusions of ANG raised, whereas AVP decreased, intraocular pressure. Direct infusions of a balanced salt solution (0.175 microliter/min) raised intraocular pressure between 30 and 60 min. Adding ANG or ANP slightly reduced this solvent effect but AVP was markedly inhibitory. An AVP-V1 receptor antagonist reversed the blunting of the solvent-induced rise by the peptide, indicating receptor specificity. Acetazolamide pretreatment lowered intraocular pressure, but the solvent-induced rise in intraocular pressure and inhibition by AVP still occurred without altering the temporal pattern. Thus, these effects appear unrelated to aqueous humor synthesis rate. The data support the possibility of intraocular pressure regulation by peptides acting from the blood and aqueous humor.

  5. Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) inhibits thyroid hormone secretion in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Ahren, B. )

    1990-01-01

    Recently, thyroid follicular cells were shown to exhibit atrial natriuretic factor (ANF)-like immunoreactivity and high affinity ANF receptors. In this study, we therefore examined the effects of synthetic rat ANF{sub 1-28} on basal and stimulated thyroid hormone secretion in the mouse, according to the McKenzie technique. Iodine deficient mice were pretreated with {sup 125}I and thyroxine. ANF (3 nmol/animal) was found to inhibit the increase in blood radioiodine levels that was induced by TSH or vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP). Furthermore, ANF and norepinephrine additively inhibited the TSH-induced increase in blood radioiodine levels. It is concluded that ANF inhibits thyroid hormone secretion, which, therefore, might be locally regulated by intrathyroidal ANF.

  6. Binding sites for atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) in brain: alterations in Brattleboro rats

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, R.; Plunkett, L.M.

    1986-12-01

    Binding sites for atrial natriuretic factor (ANF-28) were analyzed in discrete brain areas of Brattleboro rats with hereditary diabetes insipidus and Long-Evans (LE) controls by quantitative autoradiography. The maximum binding capacity (Bmax) and affinity constant (Ka) for /sup 125/I-ANF-28 were elevated significantly in the subfornical organ of Brattleboro rats compared to matched LE controls. In contrast, values for Bmax and Ka for /sup 125/I-ANF-28 binding in choroid plexus and area postrema were similar for rats of the two strains. These findings are consistent with a selective upregulation of ANF-28 binding sites in the subfornical organ of Brattleboro rats which exhibit a profound disturbance in body fluid homeostasis. These alterations in ANF-28 binding sites in the subfornical organ may represent a compensatory response to the absence of vasopressin in the Brattleboro rat.

  7. Inhibition of atrial natriuretic peptide-induced natriuresis by plasma hydrolysates containing pepsanurin.

    PubMed

    Borić, M P; Croxatto, H R; Albertini, R; Roblero, J S

    1992-02-01

    The specificity of antidiuretic actions of pepsanurin, a peptidic fraction obtained by pepsin hydrolysis of plasma, was studied in anesthetized rats and in isolated perfused rat kidneys. Pepsanurin was obtained from fresh dialyzed human plasma digested with pepsin (2,400 units/ml, 18 hours at 37 degrees C, pH 2.5), deproteinized (10 minutes at 80 degrees C), and centrifuged. In the rat, intraperitoneal injections of pepsanurin (0.5 ml/100 g body wt) significantly inhibited the effects of an intravenous bolus of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) (0.5 micrograms) on water, sodium, and potassium excretion without altering systemic blood pressure. In addition, pepsanurin abolished the peak in glomerular filtration rate and reduced the ANP-induced rise in fractional sodium excretion. Pepsanurin also inhibited the natriuretic effects of amiloride (10 micrograms/100 g body wt i.v.) without changing glomerular filtration rate, but it did not inhibit the potassium-retaining effect of amiloride. In contrast, pepsanurin had no effect on basal urinary excretion, and it did not affect the diuretic response induced by furosemide (doses of 25, 50, or 100 micrograms i.v.). Control peptidic hydrolysates prepared from human plasma preincubated 48 hours at 37 degrees C (PIPH), bovine albumin (BSAH), or human albumin did not inhibit ANP, amiloride, or furosemide. In perfused kidneys, pepsanurin significantly and reversibly reduced sodium and water excretion. Furthermore, pepsanurin, but not PIPH or BSAH, blocked the natriuretic and diuretic effects of ANP. These results support the existence of a specific plasma substrate able to release a peptide or peptides that counteract distal tubule diuresis and natriuresis by an intrarenal mechanism. PMID:1531208

  8. Atrial natriuretic peptide infusion in chronic heart failure in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kohzuki, M; Hodsman, G P; Harrison, R W; Western, P S; Johnston, C I

    1989-01-01

    The natriuretic, diuretic, and hypotensive responses to infused atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) were measured in rats 4 weeks after myocardial infarction induced by coronary artery ligation. Rat [1-28]-ANP was infused intravenously in doses of 0.1, 0.3, and 1.0 microgram/kg/min for 30 min each under pentobarbital anesthesia. There was a marked natriuresis, diuresis, and fall in blood pressure in rats with infarction but each response was significantly attenuated when compared with sham-operated controls (ANOVA: p less than 0.01, p less than 0.05, and p less than 0.01, respectively). Urinary cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) excretion in rats with infarction was higher than that of controls but rose to the same absolute level in both groups in response to ANP infusion (0.3 microgram/kg/min). Reduced ANP responsiveness may result from impaired postreceptor mechanisms or from physiological antagonism by angiotensin II. Reduced ANP responsiveness may partly explain impaired salt handling in heart failure. PMID:2473348

  9. Elevated plasma atrial natriuretic factor and vasopressin in high-altitude pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Cosby, R L; Sophocles, A M; Durr, J A; Perrinjaquet, C L; Yee, B; Schrier, R W

    1988-11-15

    A diagnosis of acute high-altitude pulmonary edema was made in five male skiers (age, 35.0 +/- 1.8 years) by history and physical examination and was confirmed by a characteristic chest radiogram showing alveolar infiltrates associated with a normal cardiac silhouette. Five healthy age- and sex-matched subjects with similar physical activity at the same altitude served as controls. Plasma sodium was 135.0 +/- 1.5 mmol/L in the acutely ill patients compared with 144.0 +/- 3.3 mmol/L in the controls (P less than 0.025). Mean plasma atrial natriuretic factor immunoreactivity averaged 17.6 +/- 5.6 pmol/L in patients with high-altitude pulmonary edema compared with 6.8 +/- 0.7 pmol/L in the controls at the same altitude (P less than 0.05). Elevated atrial natriuretic factor levels normalized to 7.5 +/- 1.9 pmol/L (P less than 0.05) during recovery in Denver (altitude, 1600 meters) 24 hours later. Plasma arginine vasopressin levels were 1.8 +/- 0.37 pmol/L in patients with high-altitude pulmonary edema at diagnosis compared with 0.92 +/- 0.28 pmol/L in controls (P = 0.07). The inappropriately elevated arginine vasopressin levels decreased to 1.29 +/- 0.37 pmol/L during recovery (P less than 0.025), but the lowered plasma sodium concentration had not normalized by discharge within 24-hours of transfer to Denver and averaged 135.8 +/- 1.2 mmol/L. The pathophysiologic implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:2973274

  10. Identification and characterization of atrial natriuretic factor receptors in the rat retina

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Durango, R.; Sanchez, D.; Gutkowska, J.; Carrier, F.; Fernandez-Cruz, A.

    1989-01-01

    The characteristics of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) receptors where studied in rat retinal particulate preparations. Specific /sup 125/I-ANF binding to retinal particulate preparations was greater than 90% of total binding and saturable at a density (B/sub max/) of 40 /plus minus/ 8 fmol/mg protein with an apparent dissociation constant (K/sub d/)/sup /minus// of 6.0 /plus minus/ 2.0 pM (n=3). Apparent equilibrium conditions were established within 30 min. The K/sub d/ value of /sup 125/I-ANF binding calculated by kinetic analysis was 4.0 pM. The B/sub max/ of 60 /plus minus/ 10 fmol/mg protein and the K/sub d/ of 5 /plus minus/ 2 pM, calculated by competition analysis, were in close agreement with the values obtained from Scatchard plots or kinetic analysis. The /sup 125/I-ANF binding to retinal particulate preparations was not inhibited by 1 ..mu..M concentration of somatostatin, vasopressin, vasoactive intestinal peptide, adrenocorticotropin, tyrotropin releasing hormone, or leu-enkephalin. The rank order of potency of the unlabeled atrial natriuretic peptides for competing with specific /sup 125/I-ANF (101-126) binding sites was rANF (92-126) > rANF (101-126) > rANF (99-126) > rANF (103-126) > Tyr-Atriopeptin I > hANF (105-126) > rANF (1-126). Similar results have been obtained in peripheral tissues and mammalian brain.

  11. Participation of the ascending serotonergic system in the stimulation of atrial natriuretic peptide release.

    PubMed Central

    Reis, L C; Ramalho, M J; Favaretto, A L; Gutkowska, J; McCann, S M; Antunes-Rodrigues, J

    1994-01-01

    Results obtained in our laboratories have provided evidence for the participation of the hypothalamic atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) neuronal system in the regulation of water and electrolyte homeostasis. The anterior ventral third ventricular (AV3V) region, a site of the perikarya of the ANP neurons, receives important afferent input from ascending serotoninergic axons. We hypothesized that the ascending serotoninergic tract might be involved in control of the liberation of ANP. Therefore, electrolytic lesions were produced in the mesencephalic dorsal raphé nucleus (DRN), the site of perikarya of serotonin (5-HT) neurons whose axons project to the AV3V region. Rats with sham lesions constituted the control group. In a second group of animals, the serotoninergic system was depleted of 5-HT by lateral ventricular administration of p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA), an amino acid that causes depletion of 5-HT from the serotoninergic neurons. Control animals were injected with an equal amount of isotonic saline. The DRN lesions induced an increase of water intake and urine output beginning on the first day that lasted for 1 week after lesions were produced. There was a concomitant sodium retention that lasted for the same period of time. When water-loaded, DRN-lesioned and PCPA-injected animals showed diminished excretion of sodium, accompanied by a decrease in basal plasma ANP concentrations, and blockade of the increase in plasma ANP, which followed blood volume expansion by intraatrial injection of hypertonic saline. The results are interpreted to mean that ascending stimulatory serotoninergic input into the ANP neuronal system in the AV3V region produces a tonic stimulation of ANP release, which augments sodium excretion and inhibits water intake. Therefore, in the absence of this serotoninergic input following destruction of the serotoninergic neurons by DRN lesions or intraventricular injection of PCPA, an antinatriuretic effect is obtained that is associated with

  12. Influence of doxazosin on biosynthesis of S100A6 and atrial natriuretic factor peptides in the heart of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kasacka, Irena; Piotrowska, Żaneta; Filipek, Anna; Majewski, Mariusz

    2016-02-01

    Hypertension frequently results in severe complications in cardiovascular system and histopathological changes in the heart. To better understand the cellular processes and signaling pathways responsible for the proper functioning of the heart, we decided to check whether doxazosin affects the density of structures containing S100A6 and atrial natriuretic factor in the heart of spontaneously hypertensive rats. The aim of this study is to find differences in the density of the structures containing S100A6 and atrial natriuretic factor in the heart of spontaneously hypertensive rats treated with doxazosin compared to untreated animals. Fragments of heart were collected from five spontaneously hypertensive rats and five spontaneously hypertensive rats receiving doxazosin for six weeks (dose 0.1 mg per 1 kg of body weight). On the paraffin sections S100A6 and atrial natriuretic factor peptides were localized in the heart using immunohistochemistry. Positive immunohistochemical reaction for S100A6 was observed in atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes and in the coronary vasculature. In the heart of hypertensive rats treated with doxazosin the S100A6 immunoreactivity was significantly lower compared to untreated animals. Immunodetection of atrial natriuretic factor in the heart of rats confirmed presence of peptide in atrial myocardium. Delicate atrial natriuretic factor-immunoreactivity was observed also in few ventricular cardiomyocytes. The atrial natriuretic factor-immunosignal was significantly weaker in hearts of hypertensive rats receiving doxazosin compared to spontaneously hypertensive rats untreated. Since we found that doxazosin reduces the levels of S100A6 and atrial natriuretic factor peptides in the heart of spontaneously hypertensive rats, it can be assumed that cardiovascular disorders that occur in hypertension may be associated with disturbances of cellular processes and signaling pathways. PMID:26515144

  13. Atrial natriuretic factor: radioimmunoassay and effects on adrenal and pituitary glands

    SciTech Connect

    Gutkowska, J.; Horky, K.; Schiffrin, E.L.; Thibault, G.; Garcia, R.; De Lean, A.; Hamet, P.; Tremblay, J.; Anand-Srivastava, M.B.; Januszewicz, P.

    1986-06-01

    A simple and sensitive radioimmunoassay was developed for measurement of immunoreactive atrial natriuretic factor (IR-ANF) in rat and human plasma and in rat atria. The two atria contain about 20 ..mu..g ANF per rat. The right atrium contained 2.5 times more ANF than did the left. Ether anesthesia and morphine markedly increased IR-ANF in rat plasma. The concentration of IR-ANF in plasma of clinically normal human subjects was 65.3 +/- 2.5 pg/ml. Paroxysmal tachycardia and rapid atrial pacing significantly increased IR-ANF in human plasma. Two- to seven-fold higher concentrations were found in coronary sinus blood than in the peripheral circulation. In the plasma of rats and humans, circulating ANF is probably a small-molecular-weight peptide. ANF acts on the adrenal and the pituitary. ANF inhibits aldosterone secretion from rat zona glomerulosa and steroid secretion by bovine adrenal zona glomerulosa and fasciculata. ANF stimulated the basal secretion of arginine vasopressin (AVP) in vitro and inhibited KCl-stimulated release of AVP.

  14. Anhedonia and altered cardiac atrial natriuretic peptide following chronic stressor and endotoxin treatment in mice.

    PubMed

    Wann, Boubacar Pasto; Audet, Marie-Claude; Gibb, Julie; Anisman, Hymie

    2010-02-01

    Chronic stressors and inflammatory immune activation may contribute to pathophysiological alterations associated with both major depression and cardiovascular disease. The present study, conducted in mice, assessed whether a chronic stressor of moderate severity that induced an anhedonic effect, when coupled with a bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), additively or interactively provoked circulating and heart atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), a potentially useful diagnostic and prognostic tool in cardiac diseases. As well, given the potential role of inflammatory processes in both depression and cardiovascular disease, we assessed pro-inflammatory mRNA expression in heart in response to the stressor and the LPS treatments. Male CD-1 mice that had been exposed to a chronic, variable stressor over 4 weeks displayed reduced sucrose consumption, possibly reflecting the anhedonic effects of the stressor. Treatment with LPS (10mug) provoked increased circulating corticosterone levels in both chronically stressed and non-stressed mice. Moreover, ANP concentrations in plasma and in the left ventricle were increased by both the stressor and the LPS treatments, as were left atrial and ventricular cytokine (interleukin-1beta; tumor necrosis factor-alpha) mRNA expression. Further, these treatments synergistically influenced the rise of plasma ANP. A link may exist between stressor-provoked depressive features (anhedonia) and immune activation, with elevated levels of ANP, a potential marker of cardiovascular disturbance. These findings are consistent with the view that chronic stressors and inflammatory immune activation may represent a common denominator subserving the frequent comorbidity between these illnesses. PMID:19604644

  15. Influence of storage conditions on in vitro stability of atrial natriuretic peptide and of anesthesia on plasma atrial natriuretic peptide concentration in cats.

    PubMed

    Heishima, Yasuhiro; Hori, Yasutomo; Chikazawa, Seishiro; Kanai, Kazutaka; Hoshi, Fumio; Itoh, Naoyuki

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the in vitro stability of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in plasma samples under various storage conditions and the influence of anesthesia on plasma ANP concentration in cats. ANIMALS 1 cat with congestive heart failure and 5 healthy adult mixed-breed cats. PROCEDURES A plasma sample from the cat with heart failure was serially diluted, and dilutional parallelism of ANP concentration was evaluated. Plasma samples containing aprotinin or serum samples from the 5 healthy cats were kept at room temperature (27°C) for ≤ 12 hours. Plasma samples from the same healthy cats were stored at -70°, -20°, or 4°C for ≤ 14 days. Plasma samples were obtained from the healthy cats before and during isoflurane anesthesia. Plasma ANP concentrations were measured at a commercial laboratory by use of a human ANP chemiluminescence assay. RESULTS Intra- and interassay coefficients of variation were 1.5% and 2.5%, respectively, and dilutional parallelism was established. Although ANP concentration decreased by 82.4 ± 13.6% (mean ± SD) after sample storage for 12 hours at room temperature, this decrease was prevented by aprotinin. Plasma ANP concentrations were stable for 7 days at -20°C and for 14 days at -70°C. However, concentrations decreased markedly to 57.6 ± 6.9% at -20°C and to 18.0 ± 3.0% at 4°C after 14 days. Plasma ANP concentration decreased significantly in cats during anesthesia and was correlated with blood pressure. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that aprotinin should be added routinely in preparation of plasma samples from cats for measurement of ANP concentration, and those samples, if stored, should be frozen immediately at ≤ -20°C. General anesthesia or systemic blood pressure may affect plasma ANP concentration in cats. PMID:27463548

  16. Hemodynamic, renal, and hormonal responses to alpha-human atrial natriuretic peptide in patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Saito, H; Ogihara, T; Nakamaru, M; Hara, H; Higaki, J; Rakugi, H; Tateyama, H; Minamino, T; Iinuma, K; Kumahara, Y

    1987-08-01

    Hemodynamic, renal, and hormonal effects of intravenous bolus injection of 50 micrograms synthetic alpha-human atrial natriuretic peptide (alpha-hANP) were studied in eight patients with congestive heart failure. alpha-hANP caused significant reductions in mean blood pressure and systemic vascular resistance. These responses were sustained up to 90 minutes and not accompanied by reflex tachycardia. Cardiac index and stroke volume index increased significantly at 90 minutes and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, pulmonary arterial pressure, and mean right atrial pressure remained unchanged. Urine volume, urinary sodium excretion, creatinine clearance, and fractional excretion of sodium increased significantly, but fractional excretion of potassium and phosphate did not change. Elevated plasma renin activity, plasma aldosterone, and norepinephrine were suppressed after the injection of alpha-hANP. The bolus injection of this peptide has moderately hypotensive, vasorelaxant, and natriuretic effects in patients with congestive heart failure. PMID:2955995

  17. Effects of atrial and brain natriuretic peptides upon cyclic GMP levels, potassium transport, and receptor binding in rat astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Beaumont, K.; Tan, P.K. )

    1990-02-01

    The ability of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) to alter cyclic GMP levels and NaKCl cotransport in rat neocortical astrocytes was determined. At concentrations of 10(-9)-10(-6) M, rat ANP99-126 (rANF), rat ANP102-126 (auriculin B), and rat ANP103-126 (atriopeptin III) stimulated 6- to 100-fold increases in cyclic GMP levels. Porcine BNP (pBNP) and rat BNP (rBNP) were 20%-90% as effective as rANF over most of this concentration range, although 10(-6) M pBNP produced a greater effect than rANF. NaKCl cotransport as measured by bumetanide-sensitive 86Rb+ influx was not altered by exposure of astrocytes to 10(-6)M rANF, pBNP, or rBNP. Both pBNP and rBNP, as well as rat ANP103-123 (atriopeptin I) and des(gl18, ser19, gly20, leu21, gly22) ANF4-23-NH2 (C-ANF4-23) strongly competed for specific 125I-rANF binding sites in astrocyte membranes with affinities ranging from 0.03 to 0.4 nM, suggesting that virtually all binding sites measured at subnanomolar concentrations of 125I-rANF were of the ANP-C (ANF-R2) receptor subtype. These receptors are thought to serve a clearance function and may be linked to a guanylate cyclase activity that is chemically and pharmacologically distinct from that coupled to ANP-A (ANF-R1) receptors. ANP receptors on astrocytes may function in limiting the access of ANP and BNP to neurons involved in body fluid and cardiovascular regulation.

  18. Electron microscopic analysis of the specific granule content of human atria. An investigation of the role of atrial pressure and atrial rhythm in the release of atrial natriuretic peptide.

    PubMed

    Doubell, A F; Greeff, M P; Rossouw, D J; Weich, H F

    1990-08-18

    Knowledge about the stimulus for the release of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) from human atria is incomplete. Atrial stretch is known to be a stimulus and atrial tachyarrhythmias are thought to be another. The effects of atrial size (by two-dimensional echocardiography) and atrial fibrillation on the atrial specific granule content of human atria were studied to gain insight into the secretory mechanisms of ANP. An electron microscopic analysis of the atrial granule content was used to study 12 patients--5 with mitral stenosis and sinus rhythm, 3 with mitral stenosis and atrial fibrillation and 4 controls. Granules were counted using a free count and montage method. This is the first report of such a morphometric analysis in humans. Granule counts were significantly raised in the patients with mitral stenosis compared with controls (P less than 0.014). This observation probably reflects a high turnover state induced by elevated atrial pressures. Further support for this conclusion is provided by the demonstration of a positive correlation between granule counts and left atrial size (r = 0.86; P less than 0.01). The tendency for higher counts in patients with atrial fibrillation may be related to the rhythm disturbance itself, but clinical and echocardiographic data suggest more severe atrial pressure overload in this group. PMID:2143315

  19. Effect of phorbol ester on the release of atrial natriuretic peptide from the hypertrophied rat myocardium.

    PubMed Central

    Kinnunen, P.; Taskinen, T.; Järvinen, M.; Ruskoaho, H.

    1991-01-01

    1. To determine the cellular mechanisms of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) release from ventricular cardiomyocytes, the secretory and the cardiac effects of a phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), known to stimulate protein kinase C activity in heart cells, were studied in isolated, perfused heart preparations from 2- and 21-month-old Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats. TPA was added to the perfusion fluid for 30 min at a concentration of 46 nM after removal of atrial tissue. Additionally, atrial and ventricular levels of immunoreactive ANP (IR-ANP) and ANP mRNA, the distribution of ANP within ventricles as well as the relative contribution of atria and ventricles in the release of ANP were studied. 2. Ventricular hypertrophy that gradually developed in hypertensive rats resulted in remarkable augmentation of ANP gene expression, as reflected by elevated levels of immunoreactive ANP and ANP mRNA. The total amount of IR-ANP in the ventricles of the SHR rats increased 41 fold and ANP mRNA levels 12.9 fold from the age of 2 to 21 months. At the age of 21 months, levels of IR-ANP and ANP mRNA in the ventricles of SHR rats were 5.4 fold and 3.7 fold higher, respectively, than in the normotensive WKY rats. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated ANP granules within the hypertrophic ventricles of the old SHR rats, but not within normal ventricular tissue. 3. In isolated perfused heart preparations, the severely hypertrophied ventricular tissue of SHR rats after atrialectomy secreted more ANP into the perfusate than did the control hearts.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 2 PMID:1826618

  20. Endothelin-stimulated secretion of natriuretic peptides by rat atrial myocytes is mediated by endothelin A receptors.

    PubMed

    Thibault, G; Doubell, A F; Garcia, R; Larivière, R; Schiffrin, E L

    1994-03-01

    Endothelin (ET), a potent vasoconstrictor peptide, is known to enhance the secretion of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) by the heart. In the present study, we investigated the potency of ET isopeptides to stimulate ANF and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) secretion in primary cultures of neonatal atrial myocytes, and we characterized the receptor mediating these effects. All ET isopeptides caused a twofold increase of ANF and BNP secretion with the following order of potency: ET-1 approximately ET-2 > sarafotoxin 6b > ET-3. Secretion of the natriuretic peptides was blocked by BQ-123, an ETA-receptor antagonist, but was not affected by either IRL-1620 or [Ala1,3,11,15]ET-1, two ETB-receptor agonists. ET receptors were localized by autoradiography on the surface of atrial myocytes, indicating that contaminating cells were not responsible for 125I-ET-1 binding. Competition binding analyses were then used to assess the ET-receptor subtype on atrial myocyte membrane preparations. A high-affinity (100 pmol/L) binding site with high density (approximately 1500 fmol/mg) was found to preferentially bind the ET isopeptides in the following order: ET-1 > or = ET-2 > or = sarafotoxin 6b > ET-3. Binding was totally displaced by BQ-123 but not by IRL-1620. The ET binding site therefore had the characteristics of an ETA-like receptor. Analysis by cross-linking and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that it possessed a molecular mass of approximately 50 kD. Northern blot analysis of both ETA- and ETB-receptor mRNAs allowed only the detection of the former, indicating that the ETB receptor may be expressed in very small amounts. These results demonstrate that ANF and BNP secretion by atrial myocytes is enhanced by ET via binding to an ETA-like receptor. PMID:8118954

  1. Characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide degradation by cell-surface peptidase activity on endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, S. J.; Whitson, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a fluid-regulating peptide hormone that promotes vasorelaxation, natriuresis, and diuresis. The mechanisms for the release of ANP and for its clearance from the circulation play important roles in modulating its biological effects. Recently, we have reported that the cell surface of an endothelial cell line, CPA47, could degrade 125I-ANP in the presence of EDTA. In this study, we have characterized this degradation of 125I-ANP. The kinetics of ANP degradation by the surface of CPA47 cells were first order, with a Km of 320 +/- 60 nM and Vmax of 35 +/- 14 pmol of ANP degraded/10 min/10(5) cells at pH 7.4. ANP is degraded by the surface of CPA47 cells over a broad pH range from 7.0-8.5. Potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor and bestatin inhibited 125I-ANP degradation, suggesting that this degradative activity on the surface of CPA47 cells has exopeptidase characteristics. The selectivity of CPA47 cell-surface degradation of ANP was demonstrated when 125I-ANP degradation was inhibited in the presence of neuropeptide Y and angiotensin I and II but not bradykinin, bombesin, endothelin-1, or substance P. The C-terminal amino acids phe26 and tyr28 were deduced to be important for ANP interaction with the cell-surface peptidase(s) based on comparison of the IC50 of various ANP analogues and other natriuretic peptides for the inhibition of ANP degradation. These data suggest that a newly characterized divalent cation-independent exopeptidase(s) that selectively recognizes ANP and some other vasoactive peptides exists on the surface of endothelial cells.

  2. Plasma concentrations of adrenomedullin and atrial and brain natriuretic peptides in patients with adrenal pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    HU, WEI; SHI, LEI; ZHOU, PANG-HU; ZHANG, XIAO-BIN

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate any changes in the plasma concentrations of adrenomedullin (ADM), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) in patients with adrenal pheochromocytoma (PC). The plasma concentrations of the three peptides were measured in 45 healthy control individuals and 90 untreated patients with PC, who consisted of 20 normotensive patients, 30 borderline hypertensive patients and 40 hypertensive patients. After 4 weeks of effective antihypertensive therapy for hypertensive PC patients, the concentrations of ADM, ANP and BNP were measured again, and laparoscopic adrenalectomy was then performed for all PC patients with values that were measured 2 weeks later. The plasma concentrations of the three peptides were significantly increased in the borderline hypertensive and hypertensive patients compared with the concentrations in control individuals and normotensive patients. In addition, there were significant differences between the levels of ADM, ANP and BNP in the borderline and hypertensive groups. The plasma ADM concentration was not associated with the blood urea nitrogen levels, serum creatinine levels or glomerular filtration rate, but was correlated with the serum epinephrine, serum norepinephrine and urine vanillylmandelic acid levels. In addition, the ADM concentration was associated with the systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, left ventricular ejection fraction, left ventricular mass index and plasma concentrations of ANP and BNP in the hypertensive patients with PC. After 4 weeks of antihypertensive treatment, the values of the three peptides in the hypertensive patients with PC were not significantly changed. As expected, the values in borderline and hypertensive groups were significantly decreased 2 weeks subsequent to surgery, whereas there were no significant changes in the normotensive group. ADM may participate, along with ANP and BNP, in the mechanisms that counteract further elevation

  3. Targeting Angiogenesis Using a C-Type Atrial Natriuretic Factor–Conjugated Nanoprobe and PET

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yongjian; Pressly, Eric D.; Abendschein, Dana R.; Hawker, Craig J.; Woodard, Geoffrey E.; Woodard, Pamela K.; Welch, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Sensitive, specific, and noninvasive detection of angiogenesis would be helpful in discovering new strategies for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Recently, we reported the 64Cu-labeled C-type atrial natriuretic factor (CANF) fragment for detecting the upregulation of natriuretic peptide clearance receptor (NPR-C) with PET on atherosclerosis-like lesions in an animal model. However, it is unknown whether NPR-C is present and overexpressed during angiogenesis. The goal of this study was to develop a novel CANF-integrated nanoprobe to prove the presence of NPR-C and offer sensitive detection with PET during development of angiogenesis in mouse hind limb. Methods We prepared a multifunctional, core-shell nanoparticle consisting of DOTA chelators attached to a poly(methyl methacrylate) core and CANF-targeting moieties attached to poly(ethylene glycol) chain ends in the shell of the nanoparticle. Labeling of this nanoparticle with 64Cu yielded a high-specific-activity nanoprobe for PET imaging NPR-C receptor in a mouse model of hind limb ischemia–induced angiogenesis. Histology and immunohistochemistry were performed to assess angiogenesis development and NPR-C localization. Results 15O-H2O imaging showed blood flow restoration in the previously ischemic hind limb, consistent with the development of angiogenesis. The targeted DOTA-CANF-comb nanoprobe showed optimized pharmacokinetics and biodistribution. PET imaging demonstrated significantly higher tracer accumulation for the targeted DOTA-CANF-comb nanoprobe than for either the CANF peptide tracer or the nontargeted control nanoprobe (P < 0.05, both). Immunohistochemistry confirmed NPR-C upregulation in the angiogenic lesion with colocalization in both endothelial and smooth muscle cells. PET and immunohistochemistry competitive receptor blocking verified the specificity of the targeted nanoprobe to NPR-C receptor. Conclusion As evidence of its translational potential, this customized DOTA

  4. Atrial natriuretic peptide and oxytocin induce natriuresis by release of cGMP

    PubMed Central

    Soares, T. J.; Coimbra, T. M.; Martins, A. R.; Pereira, A. G. F.; Carnio, E. C.; Branco, L. G. S.; Albuquerque-Araujo, W. I. C.; de Nucci, G.; Favaretto, A. L. V.; Gutkowska, J.; McCann, S. M.; Antunes-Rodrigues, J.

    1999-01-01

    Our hypothesis is that oxytocin (OT) causes natriuresis by activation of renal NO synthase that releases NO followed by cGMP that mediates the natriuresis. To test this hypothesis, an inhibitor of NO synthase, l-nitroarginine methyl ester (NAME), was injected into male rats. Blockade of NO release by NAME had no effect on natriuresis induced by atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP). This natriuresis presumably is caused by cGMP because ANP also activates guanylyl cyclase, which synthesizes cGMP from GTP. The 18-fold increase in sodium (Na+) excretion induced by OT (1 μg) was accompanied by an increase in urinary cGMP and preceded by 20 min a 20-fold increase in NO3− excretion. NAME almost completely inhibited OT-induced natriuresis and increased NO3− excretion; however, when the dose of OT was increased 10-fold, a dose that markedly increases plasma ANP concentrations, NAME only partly inhibited the natriuresis. We conclude that the natriuretic action of OT is caused by a dual action: generation of NO leading to increased cGMP and at higher doses release of ANP that also releases cGMP. OT-induced natriuresis is caused mainly by decreased tubular Na+ reabsorption mediated by cGMP. In contrast to ANP that releases cGMP in the renal vessels and the tubules, OT acts on its receptors on NOergic cells demonstrated in the macula densa and proximal tubules to release cGMP that closes Na+ channels. Both ANP- and OT-induced kaliuresis also appear to be mediated by cGMP. We conclude that cGMP mediates natriuresis and kaliuresis induced by both ANP and OT. PMID:9874809

  5. Atrial natriuretic factor increases splenic microvascular pressure and fluid extravasation in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Sultanian, Richard; Deng, Yiming; Kaufman, Susan

    2001-01-01

    The spleen is an important site of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF)-induced fluid extravasation into the systemic lymphatic system. The mechanism underlying this process was studied in a blood-perfused (1 ml min−1) rat spleen using the double occlusion technique. To ensure that our observations were spleen specific, a similar protocol was repeated in the hindquarters. Rat ANF(1-28), infused into the splenic artery of anaesthetized male rats, caused a dose-dependent (0.3-59 pmol min−1) increase in microvascular pressure from 11.3 ± 0.7 to 14.9 ± 0.5 mmHg and in post-capillary resistance from 7.2 ± 0.6 to 10.1 ± 1.1 mmHg ml−1. ANF elicited no change in splenic pre-capillary resistance or in hindquarter haemodynamics. Intrasplenic ANF (6.5 pmol min−1) caused a sustained increase in intrasplenic fluid efflux from 0.1 ± 0.1 to 0.3 ± 0.1 ml min−1, and in capillary filtration coefficient (Kf) from 1.2 ± 0.5 to 2.4 ± 0.6 ml mmHg−1 min−1 (100 g tissue)−1. Mechanical elevation of splenic intravascular pressure (from 11.3 ± 0.7 to 22.4 ± 0.2 mmHg) significantly increased intrasplenic fluid extravasation (from 0.4 ± 0.3 to 1.4 ± 0.3 ml min−1). The natriuretic peptide receptor-C (NPRC)-specific agonist C-ANF(4-23) (12.5 and 125 pmol min−1) did not alter splenic intravascular pressure or pre-/post-capillary resistance. The ANF antagonist A71915 (8.3 and 83 pmol min−1), which blocks ANF-stimulated cGMP production via natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPRA), inhibited the ANF-induced changes in splenic microvascular pressure and post-capillary resistance. It is concluded that ANF enhances the extravasation of isoncotic fluid from the splenic vasculature both by raising intrasplenic microvascular pressure (increased post-capillary resistance) and by increasing filtration area. The constrictive activity of ANF on the splenic vasculature is mediated through NPRA. PMID:11351034

  6. Immunocytochemical localization of atrial natriuretic factor in the heart and salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Cantin, M; Gutkowska, J; Thibault, G; Milne, R W; Ledoux, S; MinLi, S; Chapeau, C; Garcia, R; Hamet, P; Genest, J

    1984-01-01

    Antibodies produced in the mouse by repeated intraperitoneal injections of partly purified atrial natriuretic factor (low molecular weight peptide (LMWP) and high molecular weight peptide (HMWP)) have been used to localize these factors by immunohistochemistry (immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase method) and by immunocytochemistry (protein A-gold technique) in the heart of rats and of a variety of animal species including man and in the rat salivary glands. Immunofluorescence and the immunoperoxidase method gave identical results; in the rat, atrial cardiocytes gave a positive reaction at both nuclear poles while ventricular cardiocytes were consistently negative. The cardiocytes of the right atrial appendage were more intensely reactive than those localized in the left appendage. A decreasing gradient of intensity was observed from the subpericardial to the subendocardial cardiocytes. The cardiocytes of the interatrial septum were only lightly granulated. Sodium deficiency and thirst (deprivation of drinking water for 5 days) produced, as already shown at the ultrastructural level, a marked increase in the reactivity of all cardiocytes from both atria with the same gradient of intensity as in control animals. Cross-reactivity of intragranular peptides with the rat antibodies allowed visualization of specific granules in a variety of animal species (mouse, guinea pig, rabbit, rat, dog) and in human atrial appendages. No reaction could be elicited in the frog atrium and ventricle although, in this species, specific granules have been shown to be present by electron microscopy in all cardiac chambers. With the protein A-gold technique, at the ultrastructural level, single labeling (use of one antibody on one face of a fine section) or double labeling (use of two antibodies on the two faces of a fine section) showed that the two peptides are localized simultaneously in all three types (A, B and D) of specific granules. In the rat salivary glands

  7. Atrial natriuretic peptide regulates lipid mobilization and oxygen consumption in human adipocytes by activating AMPK

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, Sandra C.; Chau, Mary D.L.; Yang, Qing; Gauthier, Marie-Soleil; Clairmont, Kevin B.; Wu, Zhidan; Gromada, Jesper; Dole, William P.

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment of differentiated human adipocytes with atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) increased lipolysis and oxygen consumption by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). {yields} ANP stimulated lipid mobilization by selective activation of the alpha2 subunit of AMPK and increased energy utilization through activation of both the alpha1 and alpha2 subunits of AMPK. {yields} ANP enhanced adipocyte mitochondrial oxidative capacity as evidenced by induction of oxidative mitochondrial genes and increase in oxygen consumption. {yields} Exposure of human adipocytes to fatty acids and (TNF{alpha}) induced insulin resistance and decreased expression of mitochondrial genes which was restored to normal by ANP. -- Abstract: Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) has been shown to regulate lipid and carbohydrate metabolism providing a possible link between cardiovascular function and metabolism by mediating the switch from carbohydrate to lipid mobilization and oxidation. ANP exerts a potent lipolytic effect via cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK)-I mediated-stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Activation of the ANP/cGK signaling cascade also promotes muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and fat oxidation. Here we demonstrate that ANP regulates lipid metabolism and oxygen utilization in differentiated human adipocytes by activating the alpha2 subunit of AMPK. ANP treatment increased lipolysis by seven fold and oxygen consumption by two fold, both of which were attenuated by inhibition of AMPK activity. ANP-induced lipolysis was shown to be mediated by the alpha2 subunit of AMPK as introduction of dominant-negative alpha2 subunit of AMPK attenuated ANP effects on lipolysis. ANP-induced activation of AMPK enhanced mitochondrial oxidative capacity as evidenced by a two fold increase in oxygen consumption and induction of mitochondrial genes, including carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1a) by 1.4-fold, cytochrome C (CytC) by 1.3-fold, and

  8. Pertussis toxin treatment does not block inhibition by atrial natriuretic factor of aldosterone secretion in cultured bovine zona glomerulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    De Lean, A.; Cantin, M.

    1986-03-05

    The authors have previously reported that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) potently inhibits PGE or forskolin-stimulation aldosterone secretion in bovine zona glomerulosa (ZG) by acting through specific high affinity receptors. In order to evaluate the functional role of the regulatory protein N/sub i/ and the inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity (AC) in ZG, the authors have studied the effect of treatment with PT on inhibition by ANF of aldosterone production. Primary cultures of ZG were treated for 18 hours in serum-free F12 medium with (0-100 ng/ml PT). No effect of PT pretreatment was observed either on basal, PGE-stimulated or ANF-inhibited levels of steroidogenesis. When membranes prepared from control ZG were ADP-ribosylated with (/sup 32/P) NAD in the presence of PT, two toxin-specific bands with 39 Kd and 41 Kd were documented on SDS gel. Cell pretreatment with as low as 1 ng/ml drastically reduced further labelling of these two bands while higher doses completely abolished them. Since PT treatment covalently modifies completely the toxin substrate without altering ANF inhibition of adrenal steroidogenesis, the authors conclude that N/sub i/ is not involved in the mode of action of ANF on aldosterone production.

  9. Oxytocin mediates atrial natriuretic peptide release and natriuresis after volume expansion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Haanwinckel, M A; Elias, L K; Favaretto, A L; Gutkowska, J; McCann, S M; Antunes-Rodrigues, J

    1995-08-15

    Our previous studies have shown that stimulation of the anterior ventral third ventricular region increases atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) release, whereas lesions of this structure, the median eminence, or removal of the neural lobe of the pituitary block ANP release induced by blood volume expansion (BVE). These results indicate that participation of the central nervous system is crucial in these responses, possibly through mediation by neurohypophysial hormones. In the present research we investigated the possible role of oxytocin, one of the two principal neurohypophysial hormones, in the mediation of ANP release. Oxytocin (1-10 nmol) injected i.p. caused significant, dose-dependent increases in urinary osmolality, natriuresis, and kaliuresis. A delayed antidiuretic effect was also observed. Plasma ANP concentrations increased nearly 4-fold (P < 0.01) 20 min after i.p. oxytocin (10 nmol), but there was no change in plasma ANP values in control rats. When oxytocin (1 or 10 nmol) was injected i.v., it also induced a dose-related increase in plasma ANP at 5 min (P < 0.001). BVE by intra-atrial injection of isotonic saline induced a rapid (5 min postinjection) increase in plasma oxytocin and ANP concentrations and a concomitant decrease in plasma arginine vasopressin concentration. Results were similar with hypertonic volume expansion, except that this induced a transient (5 min) increase in plasma arginine vasopressin. The findings are consistent with the hypothesis that baroreceptor activation of the central nervous system by BVE stimulates the release of oxytocin from the neurohypophysis. This oxytocin then circulates to the right atrium to induce release of ANP, which circulates to the kidney and induces natriuresis and diuresis, which restore body fluid volume to normal levels. PMID:7644511

  10. Developmental stage-specific regulation of atrial natriuretic factor gene transcription in cardiac cells.

    PubMed Central

    Argentin, S; Ardati, A; Tremblay, S; Lihrmann, I; Robitaille, L; Drouin, J; Nemer, M

    1994-01-01

    Cardiac myocytes undergo a major genetic switch within the first week of postnatal development, when cell division ceases terminally and many cardiac genes are either activated or silenced. We have developed stage-specific cardiocyte cultures to analyze transcriptional control of the rat atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) gene to identify the mechanisms underlying tissue-specific and developmental regulation of this gene in the heart. The first 700 bp of ANF flanking sequences was sufficient for cardiac muscle- and stage-specific expression in both atrial and ventricular myocytes, and a cardiac muscle-specific enhancer was localized between -136 and -700 bp. Deletion of this enhancer markedly reduced promoter activity in cardiac myocytes and derepressed ANF promoter activity in nonexpressing cells. Two distinct domains of the enhancer appeared to contribute differentially to cardiac specificity depending on the differentiation stage of the myocytes. DNase I footprinting of the enhancer domain active in differentiated cells revealed four putative regulatory elements including an A+T-rich region and a CArG element. Deletion mutagenesis and promoter reconstitution assays revealed an important role for the CArG-containing element exclusively in cardiac cells, where its activity was switched on in differentiated myocytes. Transcriptional activity of the ANF-CArG box correlated with the presence of a cardiac- and stage-specific DNA-binding complex which was not recognized by the c-fos serum response element. Thus, the use of this in vitro model system representing stage-specific cardiac development unraveled the presence of different regulatory mechanisms for transcription of the ANF gene during cardiac differentiation and may be useful for studying the regulatory pathways of other genes that undergo switching during cardiac myogenesis. Images PMID:8264645

  11. Plasma pro-atrial natriuretic peptide to indicate fluid balance during cystectomy: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Kirsten C; Højskov, Michael; Ruhnau, Birgitte; Salling, Lisbeth; Pedersen, Tom; Goetze, Jens P; Secher, Niels H

    2016-01-01

    Objectives During surgery the volume of administered fluid is debated. Pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (proANP) is released by atrial distension, and we evaluated the relationship between changes in proANP associated with perioperative fluid balance. Design Prospective observational study. Setting One university/tertiary centre. Participants The study included patients who underwent radical cystectomy. Plasma for determination of proANP was obtained before surgery, after resection of the bladder, and at the end of surgery for 20 robotic-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) and 20 open radical cystectomy (ORC) procedures. Results The blood loss was 1871 (95% CI 1267 to 2475) vs 589 mL (378 to 801) in the ORC and RARC groups (p=0.001), respectively, and fluid balance was positive by 1518 mL (1215 to 1821) during ORC, and by 1858 mL (1461 to 2255) during RARC (p=0.163). Yet, at the end of ORC, plasma proANP was reduced by 23% (14% to 32%, p=0.001), while plasma proANP did not change significantly during RARC. Thus, plasma proANP was associated both with the perioperative blood loss (r= −0.475 (0.632 to −0.101), p=0.002), and with fluid balance (r=0.561 (0.302 to 0.740), p=0.001), indicating that a stable plasma proANP required a fluid surplus by 2.4 L (2.0 to 2.7). Conclusions There was a correlation between intraoperative haemorrhage and a decrease in plasma proANP and, taking plasma proANP to indicate filling of the heart, about 2.5 L surplus volume of lactated Ringer's solution appears to maintain cardiac preload during cystectomy. Trial registration number EudraCT (2012-005040-20), Results. PMID:26908528

  12. Atrial natriuretic peptide decreases blood volume in intact and anephric rats

    SciTech Connect

    Trippodo, N.C.; Chien, Y.W.; Pegram, B.L.; Cole, F.E.; MacPhee, A.A.; Kardon, M.B.

    1986-03-05

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) reportedly lowers atrial pressure and increases hematocrit, suggesting venodilation and/or decreased blood volume (BV). To examine these possibilities, rat ANP (99-126) was administered to Inactinanesthetized rats (313 +/- 9 g, +/- SE) at 0.5 ..mu..g/kg/min for 30 minutes. Urine flow increased by 0.05 ml/min (p < 0.001) during the last 15 minutes of infusion. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and thoracic central venous pressure (CVP) decreased (p < 0.001) by 12 and 0.5 mmHg, respectively; hematocrit increased by 4.1 units (p < 0.001) and BV (/sup 51/Cr-RBC) decreased by 3.4 ml/kg (p < 0.001). Mean circulatory filling pressure, measured by inflating an intracardiac balloon to briefly stop the circulation, did not change. Distribution of BV between the thoracic and spanchnic organs (whole-animal freezing in liquid nitrogen) was not measurably altered. The results suggest that the decrease in CVP was related more to decreased BV than to venodilation. To investigate possible mechanisms for the decreased BV, the same dose of ANP was administered to anephric rats. MAP decreased by 8 mmHg (p < 0.001); hematocrit increased by 2.4 units (p < 0.001) and BV decreased by 1.7 ml/kg (p < 0.05). The results indicate that short-term administration of ANP decreases blood volume by causing intravascular fluid to shift into the interstitium as well as by inducing diuresis.

  13. The effect of calcium antagonists on atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) release from the rat heart during rapid cardiac pacing.

    PubMed

    Doubell, A F

    1989-05-01

    The diuresis associated with rapid atrial rhythms is a well recognized clinical entity (Wood, 1963). Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) levels are elevated during rapid atrial rhythms (Hirata et al., 1987), including during rapid atrial pacing (Rankin et al., 1986; Schiebinger and Linden 1986; Walsh et al., 1987), and may contribute to the associated diuresis. Calcium channel antagonists are often used to treat atrial tachycardias but the effect this may have on ANP secretion and subsequent compensatory responses, such as a diuresis, is unknown. Reported here are experiments demonstrating that the increase in ANP secretion that accompanies rapid atrial pacing of the isolated perfused rat heart is abolished by calcium channel antagonists. This effect is not limited to a single class of calcium channel antagonists and could be demonstrated with Verapamil and Nifedipine. Although extrapolation to the in vivo situation should always be done with care, the results reported here contribute towards clarifying the effect of the calcium channel antagonists on the ANP response to rapid heart rates. PMID:2528639

  14. Angiotensin II-stimulated secretion of arginine vasopressin is inhibited by atrial natriuretic peptide in humans.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Toshiyoshi; Miyamoto, Takenori

    2011-03-01

    We investigated the effect of the intravenous infusion of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the response of plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) levels to intravenous infusion of angiotensin II (ANG II) in healthy individuals. Intravenous infusion of ANP (10 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1)) slightly but significantly decreased plasma AVP levels, while intravenous infusion of ANG II (10 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1)) resulted in slightly increased plasma AVP levels. ANG II infused significant elevations in arterial blood pressure and central venous pressure (CVP). Because the elevation in blood pressure could have potentially inhibited AVP secretion via baroreceptor reflexes, the effect of ANG II on blood pressure was attenuated by the simultaneous infusion of nitroprusside. ANG II alone produced a remarkable increase in plasma AVP levels when infused with nitroprusside, whereas the simultaneous ANP intravenous infusion (10 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1)) abolished the increase in plasma AVP levels induced by ANG II when blood pressure elevation was attenuated by nitroprusside. Thus, ANG II increased AVP secretion and ANP inhibited not only basal AVP secretion but also ANG II-stimulated AVP secretion in humans. These findings support the hypothesis that circulating ANP modulates AVP secretion, in part, by antagonizing the action of circulating ANG II. PMID:21123762

  15. Genetic Analysis of the Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Gene Polymorphisms among Essential Hypertensive Patients in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Ghodsian, Nooshin; Ismail, Patimah; Ahmadloo, Salma; Eskandarian, Narges; Etemad, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) considerably influences blood pressure regulation through water and sodium homoeostasis. Several of the studies have utilized anonymous genetic polymorphic markers and made inconsequent claims about the ANP relevant disorders. Thus, we screened Insertion/Deletion (ID) and G191A polymorphisms of ANP to discover sequence variations with potential functional significance and to specify the linkage disequilibrium pattern between polymorphisms. The relationships of detected polymorphisms with EH with or without Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) status were tested subsequently. Method. ANP gene polymorphisms (I/D and A191G) were specified utilizing mutagenically separated Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) in 320 subjects including 163 EH case subjects and 157 controls. Result. This case-control study discovered a significant association between I/D polymorphisms of ANP gene in EH patient without T2DM. However, the study determined no association between G191A polymorphisms of ANP in EH with or without T2DM. In addition, sociodemographic factors in the case and healthy subjects exhibited strong differences (P < 0.05). Conclusion. As a risk factor, ANP gene polymorphisms may affect hypertension. Despite the small sample size in this study, it is the first research assessing the ANP gene polymorphisms in both EH and T2DM patients among Malaysian population. PMID:27413750

  16. Therapeutic actions of alpha-human atrial natriuretic polypeptide in 16 clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Tang, J; Xie, C W; Xu, C B; Jiang, B Q; Xu, Y Y; Zhang, J Y; Meng, Z H; Wu, H J; Liu, L S; Chang, D

    1987-05-25

    Alpha-human atrial natriuretic polypeptide (alpha-hANP) was applied to 16 clinical patients, 6 patients with essential hypertension, 7 patients with congestive heart failure and 3 patients with cirrhosis. Following intravenous bolus injection of 400 micrograms of synthetic alpha-hANP, a hypotensive effect of very rapid onset was found, which was more potent in the hypertensive patients than in the normotensive cases. Cardiac functions were improved significantly with a similar time course as the depressor response in the cases of heart failure or hypertension. Hemodynamic observations showed a marked increase in cardiac output, cardiac index, stroke volume, ejection fraction and ejection rate, and a concomitant decrease of the pressure in the right side of the heart and pulmonary circulation in these subjects. In addition, the renal response to alpha-hANP induced obvious increases in urine volume, electrolytes and creatinine excretions in all the subjects. Finally, plasma levels of aldosterone, Arg-vasopressin and noradrenaline were also altered by alpha-hANP. No significant side effects were registered. The above result confirms the therapeutic actions of alpha-hANP in human subjects and opens the possibility to research alpha-hANP as a powerful pharmacological tool as well as potential new medicine for human disorders. PMID:2953943

  17. Hydrodynamic properties of solubilized atrial natriuretic factor receptor from bovine adrenal cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Meloche, S.; Ong, H.; De Lean, A.

    1986-03-05

    The authors have previously reported the pharmacological characterization of specific receptors for atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) in bovine adrenal cortex. In this study they report the physicochemical characteristics of this receptor solubilized with the nonionic detergent octyl glucoside. /sup 125/I-ANF binding activity was assayed by a PEG precipitation technique. Analysis of competitive binding curves with the soluble receptor preparation revealed the presence of high-affinity binding sites with a K/sub d/ of 40 pM and a density of 400 fmol/mg protein. The hydrodynamic properties of the solubilized receptor prelabeled with /sup 125/I-ANF were then determined. The receptor-detergent complex eluted as a major peak with a stokes radius of 51.3 A as determined by gel filtration on Superose-6. The sedimentation coefficient, S/sub 20 w/, of the complex was 6.19 S as determined by ultracentrifugation on a 5-20% sucrose gradient. From these data, the molecular weight of the ANF receptor-octyl glucoside complex was estimated to be 133,000 assuming a partial specific volume of 0.730 ml/g. This value is in agreement with the values that they have previously reported by SDS-gel electrophoresis.

  18. Role of calcium in effects of atrial natriuretic peptide on aldosterone production in adrenal glomerulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chartier, L.; Schiffrin, E.L.

    1987-04-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) inhibits the stimulation of aldosterone secretion by isolated adrenal glomerulosa cells produced by angiotensin II (ANG II), ACTH, and potassium. The effect of ANP on the dose-response curve of aldosterone stimulated by ANG II, ACTH, and potassium on isolated rat adrenal glomerulosa cells was studied. In the presence of ANP the maximal response of aldosterone output stimulated by ANG II or potassium decreased and the half-maximum (EC/sub 50/) of the response to ACTH was displaced to the right. Because these effects resemble those of calcium-channel blockers, the authors investigated the effect of different concentrations of nifedipine, a dihydropyridine calcium-channel blocker, on the dose-response curve of aldosterone stimulated by ANG II, ACTH, and potassium. Nifedipine produced effects similar to ANP. The maximal response of aldosterone stimulated by ANG II and potassium was decreased and the dose-response curve to ACTH was displaced to the right. ANP decreased the maximal response of aldosterone to the dihydropyridine derivative BAY K8644, a calcium-channel activator, without change in its EC/sub 50/. In contrast, nifedipine displaced the dose-response curve to BAY K8644 to the right as expected of a competitive inhibitor. The effect of ANP and nifedipine on basal and stimulated /sup 45/Ca influx into isolated rat adrenal glomerulosa cells was studied. ANP may act on the rat adrenal glomerulosa cells at least in part by interference with calcium entry.

  19. Specific membrane receptors for atrial natriuretic factor in renal and vascular tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Napier, M A; Vandlen, R L; Albers-Schönberg, G; Nutt, R F; Brady, S; Lyle, T; Winquist, R; Faison, E P; Heinel, L A; Blaine, E H

    1984-01-01

    Membranes from rabbit aorta and from rabbit and rat kidney cortex possess high-affinity (Kd = 10(-10) M) specific binding sites for atrial natriuretic factor (ANF). Similar high-affinity sites are present in an established cell line from pig kidney, LLC-PK1. Results of fractionation studies indicate that the receptors are localized in the plasma membrane of these tissues. The binding is time-dependent and saturable. An excellent quantitative correlation was found between the affinity of synthetic ANF and analogs of intermediate activity to aorta membranes and the half-maximal concentration needed for relaxation of rabbit aorta rings contracted by addition of serotonin. Furthermore, the binding affinity of the receptor in kidney membranes is consistent with the concentration required for in vivo natriuresis in the rat. Biologically inactive synthetic ANF fragments and other peptide hormones such as angiotensin II and vasopressin do not significantly inhibit binding. These data suggest that the receptors for ANF in vascular and renal tissues are responsible for mediating the physiological actions of this peptide in these target tissues. PMID:6091122

  20. Atrial natriuretic peptide stimulates salt secretion by shark rectal gland by releasing VIP

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, P.; Stoff, J.S.; Solomon, R.J.; Lear, S.; Kniaz, D.; Greger, R.; Epstein, F.H.

    1987-01-01

    Salt secretion by the isolated perfused rectal gland of the spiny dogfish shark, Squalus acanthias, is stimulated by synthetic rat atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP II) as well as extracts of shark heart, but not by 8-bromo-cyclic guanosine 5'-monophosphate. Cardiac peptides have no effect on isolated rectal gland cells or perfused tubules, suggesting that stimulation requires an intact gland. The stimulation of secretion by ANP II is eliminated by maneuvers that block neurotransmitter release. Cardiac peptides stimulate the release of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), known to be present in rectal glands nerves, into the venous effluent of perfused glands in parallel with their stimulation of salt secretion, but the release of VIP induced by ANP II is prevented by perfusion with procaine. VIP was measured by radioimmunoassay. Cardiac peptides thus appear to regulate rectal gland secretion by releasing VIP from neural stores within the gland. It is possible that other physiological effects of these hormones might be explained by an action to enhanced local release of neurotransmitters.

  1. Culture on electrospun polyurethane scaffolds decreases atrial natriuretic peptide expression by cardiomyocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rockwood, Danielle N; Akins, Robert E; Parrag, Ian C; Woodhouse, Kimberly A; Rabolt, John F

    2008-12-01

    The function of the mammalian heart depends on the functional alignment of cardiomyocytes, and controlling cell alignment is an important consideration in biomaterial design for cardiac tissue engineering and research. The physical cues that guide functional cell alignment in vitro and the impact of substrate-imposed alignment on cell phenotype, however, are only partially understood. In this report, primary cardiac ventricular cells were grown on electrospun, biodegradable polyurethane (ES-PU) with either aligned or unaligned microfibers. ES-PU scaffolds supported high-density cultures and cell subpopulations remained intact over two weeks in culture. ES-PU cultures contained electrically-coupled cardiomyocytes with connexin-43 localized to points of cell:cell contact. Multi-cellular organization correlated with microfiber orientation and aligned materials yielded highly oriented cardiomyocyte groupings. Atrial natriuretic peptide, a molecular marker that shows decreasing expression during ventricular cell maturation, was significantly lower in cultures grown on ES-PU scaffolds than in those grown on tissue culture polystyrene. Cells grown on aligned ES-PU had significantly lower steady state levels of ANP and constitutively released less ANP over time indicating that scaffold-imposed cell organization resulted in a shift in cell phenotype to a more mature state. We conclude that the physical organization of microfibers in ES-PU scaffolds impacts both multi-cellular architecture and cardiac cell phenotype in vitro. PMID:18823659

  2. Role of a molecular variant of rat atrial natriuretic Peptide gene in vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    De Paolis, Paola; Nobili, Valerio; Lombardi, Alessia; Tarasi, David; Barbato, Daniela; Marchitti, Simona; Ganten, Ursula; Brunetti, Ercole; Volpe, Massimo; Rubattu, Speranza

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies in a hypertensive animal model of stroke and in humans showed that mutations of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) gene are associated with increased risk of stroke. To elucidate the vascular disease mechanisms that result from structural modifications of the ANP gene, we investigated a coding mutation of the ANP gene in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRsp). This mutation leads to a Gly/Ser transposition in the prosegment of ANP. We found that presence of this mutation is associated with increased immunostaining of ANP in the wall of SHRsp cerebral vessels. The mutation causes a major inhibitory effect on endothelial cell proliferation, as assessed by thymidine incorporation, and on angiogenesis, as determined by an endothelial cell tube formation assay, in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) exposed to ANP/SHRsp. These in vitro findings show that the SHRsp-derived form of ANP has an inhibitory effect on vascular remodeling and they provide further support for a role of the ANP gene in the pathogenesis of cerebrovascular disease in the animal model. PMID:17522368

  3. The role of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in cold-induced diuresis (CID)

    SciTech Connect

    Agnew, J.W.; Freund, B.J.; DuBose, D.A.; McKay, J.M.; Hashiro, G.M. Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI )

    1991-03-11

    The hormonal control of cold-induced diuresis (CID) remains unresolved. This study investigated the role of ANP, plasma vasopressin (AVP), and aldosterone (ALDO) on CID. Four semi-nude men participated in a 210 min exposure to 15C and 29C air, on separate days. These subjects drank 300 mL of water and had an intravenous saline drip throughout both exposures to replace blood and insensible fluid losses. CID was observed in 15C but not in the 29C experiment, as indicated by a greater urine output. In 15C, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) increased after 90 min by 41% and remained elevated for 2 h relative to 29C. No differences were observed in AVP between 15C and 29C. In the 15C versus the 29C experiment, ALDO was approximately 37% lower at the pre, 15 and 90 min time periods. Mean arterial blood pressure was generally greater but only significant at 60 min during the 15C versus the 29C experiment. Urinary NA{sup +} excretion was elevated in 15C relative to 29C while no difference in K{sup +} excretion was observed. Although pressure effects may contribute, the observed natriuresis in the absence of a kaliuresis in the cold suggests a physiological role of ANP in CID.

  4. Differential changes in atrial natriuretic peptide and vasopressin receptor bindings in kidney of spontaneously hypertensive rat

    SciTech Connect

    Ogura, T.; Mitsui, T.; Yamamoto, I.; Katayama, E.; Ota, Z.; Ogawa, N.

    1987-01-19

    To elucidate the role of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and vasopressin (VP) in a hypertensive state, ANP and VP receptor bindings in spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) kidney were analyzed using the radiolabeled receptor assay (RRA) technique. Systolic blood pressure of SHR aged 12 weeks was statistically higher than that of age-matched Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. Maximum binding capacity (Bmax) of (/sup 125/I)-ANP binding to the SHR kidney membrane preparations was statistically lower than that of WKY rats, but dissociation constant (Kd) was not significantly different. On the other hand, Bmax of (/sup 3/H)-VP binding to the SHR kidney membrane preparations was statistically higher than that of WKY rats, but Kd were similar. Since the physiological action of ANP is natriuresis and VP is the most important antidiuretic hormone in mammalia, these opposite changes of ANP and VP receptor bindings in SHR kidney suggested that these peptides may play an important role in the pathophysiology of the hypertensive state, although it has not been confirmed as yet.

  5. Atrial natriuretic peptide receptor heterogeneity and effects on cyclic GMP accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Leitman, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) on guanylate cyclase activity and cyclic GMP accumulation were examined, since these hormones appear to be intimately associated with blood pressure and intravascular volume homeostasis. ANP was found to increase cyclic GMP accumulation in ten cell culture systems, which were derived from blood vessels, adrenal cortex, kidney, lung, testes and mammary gland. ANP receptors were characterized in intact cultured cells using {sup 125}I-ANP{sub 8-33}. Specific {sup 125}I-ANP binding was saturable and of high affinity. Scratchard analysis of the binding data for all cell types exhibited a straight line, indicating that these cells possessed a single class of binding sites. Despite the presence of linear Scatchard plots, these studies demonstrated that cultured cells possess two functionally and physically distinct ANP-binding sites. Most of the ANP-binding sites in cultured cells have a molecular size of 66,000 daltons under reducing conditions. The identification of cultured cell types in which hormones (ANP and oxytocin) regulate guanylate cyclase activity and increase cyclic GMP synthesis will provide valuable systems to determine the mechanisms of hormone-receptor coupling to guanylate cyclase and the cellular processes regulated by cyclic GMP.

  6. Pulmonary and urinary clearance of atrial natriuretic factor in acute congestive heart failure in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Perrella, M A; Margulies, K B; Wei, C M; Aarhus, L L; Heublein, D M; Burnett, J C

    1991-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) is a peptide hormone of cardiac origin elevated in acute congestive heart failure (CHF), which is degraded by the enzyme neutral endopeptidase 24.11 (NEP). This study was designed to investigate the pulmonary and urinary clearance of ANF before and after the initiation of acute experimental CHF in dogs, and to assess the contribution of enzymatic degradation to these clearances in CHF. This study demonstrated a significant clearance of plasma ANF across the pulmonary circulation at baseline, and a tendency for pulmonary clearance to decrease in CHF (1115 +/- 268 to 498 +/- 173 ml/min, NS). The pulmonary extraction of ANF present at baseline was not altered with acute CHF (36.0 +/- 7.8 to 34.9 +/- 12.1%, NS). NEP inhibition (NEPI) abolished both the clearance and extraction of plasma ANF across the lung in CHF. Similarly, significant urinary clearance of ANF was present at baseline, and in acute CHF the urinary clearance of ANF decreased (0.14 +/- 0.02 to 0.02 +/- 0.01 ml/min, P less than 0.05). NEPI prevented the decrease in the urinary clearance of ANF, and enhanced the renal response to endogenous ANF, independent of further increases in plasma ANF during CHF. This study supports an important role for NEP in the pulmonary and urinary metabolism of endogenous ANF during acute CHF. Images PMID:1850758

  7. Regulation of endothelial cell shape and monolayer permeability by atrial natriuretic peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Lofton-Day, C.E.

    1989-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), considered to be an important regulator of intravascular fluid volume, binds specifically to receptors on endothelial cells. In this study, the role of ANP-specific binding was investigated by examining the effect of ANP on the morphology and macromolecular permeability of monolayer cultures of bovine aortic endothelial cells. ANP alone had no observable effect on the monolayers. However, incubation of monolayers with ANP antagonized thrombin- or glucose oxidase-induced cell shape changes and intercellular gap formation. ANP pretreatment also opposed the effect of thrombin and glucose oxidase on actin filament distribution as observed by rhodamine-phalloidin staining and digital image analysis of F0actin staining. In addition, ANP reversed cell shape changes and cytoskeletal alterations induced by thrombin treatment but did not reverse alternations induced by glucose oxidase treatment. ANP significantly reduced increases in monolayer permeability to albumin resulting from thrombin or glucose oxidases treatment. Thrombin caused a 2-fold increase in monolayer permeability to {sup 125}I-labeled albumin, which was abolished by 10{sup {minus}8}-10{sup {minus}6}M ANP pretreatment. Glucose oxidase caused similar increases in permeability and was inhibited by ANP at slightly shorter time periods.

  8. Atrial natriuretic peptide increases microvascular blood flow and macromolecular escape during renin infusion in the hamster

    SciTech Connect

    Boric, M.P.; Albertini, R. )

    1990-02-01

    The effects of Atrial Natriuretic Peptide (ANP) on microvascular hemodynamics and macromolecular permselectivity were studied in the hamster cheek pouch under resting conditions and during intravenous renin infusion. Fluorescent intravital microscopy was used to observe arteriolar diameters and to detect escape of fluorescent dextran of 150 K-Daltons (FITC-Dx-150). Microvascular plasma flow was estimated by clearance of 51Cr-EDTA and net macromolecular transport by clearance of FITC-Dx-150. At rest, topical ANP (2-250 ng/ml) had no effect on arteriolar diameter, 51Cr-EDTA clearance, relative vascular conductance (RVC) or FITC-Dx-150 clearance. Infusion of renin (10 mU/Kg/Hr, iv) elevated systemic arterial pressure by 30% and reduced cheek pouch RVC by 26%. During renin infusion, topical ANP (50 ng/ml) produced transient arteriolar vasodilation, and increased 51Cr-EDTA clearance (+35%), RVC (+58%) and FITC-Dx-150 clearance (+54%), without affecting systemic pressure. ANP did not induce venular leakage sites under any condition, but changes in FITC-Dx-150 clearance were highly correlated with changes in 51Cr-EDTA clearance, suggesting that the larger macromolecular escape was due to increases in microvascular blood flow and capillary/post-capillary hydrostatic pressure.

  9. Impaired sinoatrial node function and increased susceptibility to atrial fibrillation in mice lacking natriuretic peptide receptor C

    PubMed Central

    Egom, Emmanuel E; Vella, Kimberly; Hua, Rui; Jansen, Hailey J; Moghtadaei, Motahareh; Polina, Iuliia; Bogachev, Oleg; Hurnik, Rhea; Mackasey, Martin; Rafferty, Sara; Ray, Gibanananda; Rose, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NPs) are critical regulators of the cardiovascular system that are currently viewed as possible therapeutic targets for the treatment of heart disease. Recent work demonstrates potent NP effects on cardiac electrophysiology, including in the sinoatrial node (SAN) and atria. NPs elicit their effects via three NP receptors (NPR-A, NPR-B and NPR-C). Among these receptors, NPR-C is poorly understood. Accordingly, the goal of this study was to determine the effects of NPR-C ablation on cardiac structure and arrhythmogenesis. Cardiac structure and function were assessed in wild-type (NPR-C+/+) and NPR-C knockout (NPR-C−/−) mice using echocardiography, intracardiac programmed stimulation, patch clamping, high-resolution optical mapping, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and histology. These studies demonstrate that NPR-C−/− mice display SAN dysfunction, as indicated by a prolongation (30%) of corrected SAN recovery time, as well as an increased susceptibility to atrial fibrillation (6% in NPR-C+/+ vs. 47% in NPR-C−/−). There were no differences in SAN or atrial action potential morphology in NPR-C−/− mice; however, increased atrial arrhythmogenesis in NPR-C−/− mice was associated with reductions in SAN (20%) and atrial (15%) conduction velocity, as well as increases in expression and deposition of collagen in the atrial myocardium. No differences were seen in ventricular arrhythmogenesis or fibrosis in NPR-C−/− mice. This study demonstrates that loss of NPR-C results in SAN dysfunction and increased susceptibility to atrial arrhythmias in association with structural remodelling and fibrosis in the atrial myocardium. These findings indicate a critical protective role for NPR-C in the heart. Key points Natriuretic peptides (NPs) elicit their effects via multiple NP receptors (including NPR-A, NPR-B and NPR-C, with NPR-C being relatively poorly understood). We have studied the effects of NPR-C ablation on cardiac structure

  10. Atrial natriuretic factor receptors in rat kidney, adrenal gland, and brain: Autoradiographic localization and fluid balance dependent changes

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, David R.; Braas, Karen M.; Snyder, Soloman H.

    1986-01-01

    Mammalian atria contain natriuretic peptides designated atrial natriuretic factors (ANF). Using in vitro autoradiography with 125I-labeled ANF, we have localized high-affinity (Kd = 150 pM) ANF binding sites to the glomeruli of the kidney, zona glomerulosa of the adrenal gland, and choroid plexus of the brain. The numbers of sites in both kidney and adrenal are increased in rats deprived of water; increases are detectable within 72 hr of water deprivation in the kidney and within 24 hr in the adrenal gland. Receptor numbers decline in rats given 2.0% NaCl as drinking water and in diabetic rats. The discrete localizations and dynamic alterations of these receptors suggest that ANF regulates fluid balance through diverse but coordinated effects on receptors in numerous organs including the kidney, adrenal, and brain. Images PMID:3010291

  11. Characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors in brain microvessel endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, P. A.; Huls, M. H.; Sams, C. F.

    1991-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binding and ANP-induced increases in cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels have been observed in brain microvessels (Chabrier et al., 1987; Steardo and Nathanson, 1987), suggesting that this fluid-regulating hormone may play a role in the fluid homeostasis of the brain. This study was initiated to characterize the ANP receptors in primary cultures of brain microvessel endothelial cells (BMECs). The apparent equilibrium dissociation constant, Kd, for ANP increased from 0.25 nM to 2.5 nM, and the number of ANP binding sites as determined by Scatchard analysis increased from 7,100 to 170,000 sites/cell between 2 and 10 days of culture following monolayer formation. Time- and concentration-dependent studies on the stimulation of cGMP levels by ANP indicated that guanylate cyclase-linked ANP receptors were present in BMECs. The relative abilities of ANP, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), and a truncated analog of ANP containing amino acids 5-27 (ANP 5-27) to modulate the accumulation of cGMP was found to be ANP greater than BNP much greater than ANP 5-27. Affinity cross-linking with disuccinimidyl suberate and radiolabeled ANP followed by gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions demonstrated a single band corresponding to the 60-70 kD receptor, indicating the presence of the nonguanylate cyclase-linked ANP receptor. Radiolabeled ANP binding was examined in the presence of various concentrations of either ANP, BNP, or ANP 5-27 and suggested that a large proportion of the ANP receptors present in blood-brain barrier endothelial cells bind all of these ligands similarly. These data indicate both guanylate cyclase linked and nonguanylate cyclase linked receptors are present on BMECs and that a higher proportion of the nonguanylate cyclase linked receptors is expressed. This in vitro culture system may provide a valuable tool for the examination of ANP receptor expression and function in blood-brain barrier endothelial cells.

  12. Plasma atrial natriuretic peptide and N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide concentrations in dogs with right-sided congestive heart failure

    PubMed Central

    KANNO, Nobuyuki; HORI, Yasutomo; HIDAKA, Yuichi; CHIKAZAWA, Seishiro; KANAI, Kazutaka; HOSHI, Fumio; ITOH, Naoyuki

    2015-01-01

    The clinical utility of plasma natriuretic peptide concentrations in dogs with right-sided congestive heart failure (CHF) remains unclear. We investigated whether plasma levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) are useful for assessing the congestive signs of right-sided heart failure in dogs. This retrospective study enrolled 16 healthy dogs and 51 untreated dogs with presence (n=28) or absence (n=23) of right-sided CHF. Medical records of physical examinations, thoracic radiography and echocardiography were reviewed. The plasma concentration of canine ANP was measured with a chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay. Plasma NT-proBNP concentrations were determined using an enzyme immunoassay. Plasma ANP and NT-proBNP concentrations in dogs with right-sided CHF were significantly higher than in healthy controls and those without right-sided CHF. The plasma NT-proBNP concentration >3,003 pmol/l used to identify right-sided CHF had a sensitivity of 88.5% and specificity of 90.3%. An area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.93. The AUC for NT-proBNP was significantly higher than the AUCs for the cardiothoracic ratio, vertebral heart score, ratio of right ventricular end-diastolic internal diameter to body surface area, tricuspid late diastolic flow and ratio of the velocities of tricuspid early to late diastolic flow. These results suggest that plasma ANP and NT-proBNP concentrations increase markedly in dogs with right-sided CHF. Particularly, NT-proBNP is simple and helpful biomarkers to assess the right-sided CHF. PMID:26607133

  13. Allotopic antagonism of the non-peptide atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) antagonist HS-142-1 on natriuretic peptide receptor NPR-A.

    PubMed Central

    Poirier, Hugo; Labrecque, Jean; Deschênes, Julie; DeLéan, André

    2002-01-01

    The microbial polysaccharide HS-142-1 has been documented as an antagonist of natriuretic peptides. It inhibits activation and peptide binding to both guanylate receptors natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-A and NPR-B, but has no effect on the non-cyclase receptor NPR-C. At first sight the effect of HS-142-1 on peptide binding appears to be surmountable, suggesting that it might be competitive despite its chemically divergent nature. We explored its mode of action on wild-type NPR-A (WT), on a disulphide-bridged constitutively active mutant (C423S) and on truncated mutants lacking either their cytoplasmic domain (DeltaKC) or both the cytoplasmic and the transmembrane domains (ECD). On the WT, HS-142-1 inhibited atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binding with a pK value of 6.51 +/- 0.07 (K(d)=0.31 microM). It displayed a similar effect on the C423S mutant (pK=6.31 +/- 0.11), indicating that its action might not be due to interference with receptor dimerization. HS-142-1 also inhibited ANP binding to DeltaKC with a pK of 7.05 +/- 0.05 (K(d)=0.089 microM), but it was inactive on ANP binding to ECD at a concentration of 10(-4) M, suggesting that the antagonism was not competitive at the peptide-binding site located on the ECD and that the transmembrane domain might be required. HS-142-1 also enhanced dissociation of NPR-A-bound (125)I-ANP in the presence of excess unlabelled ANP, implying an allotopic (allosteric) mode of action for the antagonist. PMID:11829760

  14. A cardiac pathway of cyclic GMP-independent signaling of guanylyl cyclase A, the receptor for atrial natriuretic peptide

    PubMed Central

    Klaiber, Michael; Dankworth, Beatrice; Kruse, Martin; Hartmann, Michael; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Yang, Ruey-Bing; Völker, Katharina; Gaßner, Birgit; Oberwinkler, Heike; Feil, Robert; Freichel, Marc; Groschner, Klaus; Skryabin, Boris V.; Frantz, Stefan; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Pongs, Olaf; Kuhn, Michaela

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) regulates arterial blood pressure, moderates cardiomyocyte growth, and stimulates angiogenesis and metabolism. ANP binds to the transmembrane guanylyl cyclase (GC) receptor, GC-A, to exert its diverse functions. This process involves a cGMP-dependent signaling pathway preventing pathological [Ca2+]i increases in myocytes. In chronic cardiac hypertrophy, however, ANP levels are markedly increased and GC-A/cGMP responses to ANP are blunted due to receptor desensitization. Here we show that, in this situation, ANP binding to GC-A stimulates a unique cGMP-independent signaling pathway in cardiac myocytes, resulting in pathologically elevated intracellular Ca2+ levels. This pathway involves the activation of Ca2+‐permeable transient receptor potential canonical 3/6 (TRPC3/C6) cation channels by GC-A, which forms a stable complex with TRPC3/C6 channels. Our results indicate that the resulting cation influx activates voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channels and ultimately increases myocyte Ca2+i levels. These observations reveal a dual role of the ANP/GC-A–signaling pathway in the regulation of cardiac myocyte Ca2+i homeostasis. Under physiological conditions, activation of a cGMP-dependent pathway moderates the Ca2+i-enhancing action of hypertrophic factors such as angiotensin II. By contrast, a cGMP-independent pathway predominates under pathophysiological conditions when GC-A is desensitized by high ANP levels. The concomitant rise in [Ca2+]i might increase the propensity to cardiac hypertrophy and arrhythmias. PMID:22027011

  15. Cross-linking of atrial natriuretic peptide to binding sites in rat olfactory bulb membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Wildey, G.M.; Glembotski, C.C.

    1986-12-01

    Binding sites for /sup 125/I-atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)2 in rat olfactory bulb membranes have been studied using pharmacological and biochemical methods. Various unlabeled ANP-related peptides were tested for the ability to inhibit the binding of the radioligand in membrane binding assays. ANP(92-126) and ANP(99-126) were the most potent inhibitors tested, both exhibiting an IC50 value of 0.40 nM. ANP(103-126) and ANP(103-123) were 3 and 70 times less potent, respectively. ANP(111-126) was unable to inhibit the binding of the radioligand at a concentration of 1 microM. Several peptides unrelated to ANP were unable to inhibit the binding of the radioligand to rat olfactory bulb membranes. Membranes labeled with /sup 125/I-ANP were incubated with cross-linking agents and subjected to SDS-PAGE followed by autoradiography. A band possessing an apparent molecular mass of 116 kDa was identified. The labeling of this band was progressively decreased by increasing concentrations of unlabeled ANP(99-126) (IC50 = 0.6 nM) and by several other ANP-related peptides at nanomolar concentrations. For comparison purposes, ANP binding sites in rat aorta membranes were labeled with /sup 125/I-ANP and cross-linked using identical techniques. Three bands possessing molecular masses of 120, 72, and 62 kDa were identified. These results indicate that the ANP binding site in rat olfactory bulb membranes displays pharmacological and biochemical properties similar to peripheral ANP receptors.

  16. Chronic Treatment with Atrial Natriuretic Peptide in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats: Beneficial Renal Effects and Sex Differences

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Mariana; Caniffi, Carolina; Bouchet, Gonzalo; Costa, María A.; Elesgaray, Rosana; Arranz, Cristina; Tomat, Analía L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic treatment with atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on renal function, nitric oxide (NO) system, oxidative stress, collagen content and apoptosis in kidneys of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), as well as sex-related differences in the response to the treatment. Methods 10 week-old male and female SHR were infused with ANP (100 ng/h/rat) or saline (NaCl 0.9%) for 14 days (subcutaneous osmotic pumps). Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was recorded and diuresis and natriuresis were determined. After treatment, renal NO synthase (NOS) activity and eNOS expression were evaluated. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), glutathione concentration and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were determined in the kidney. Collagen was identified in renal slices by Sirius red staining and apoptosis by Tunel assay. Results Female SHR showed lower SBP, oxidative stress, collagen content and apoptosis in kidney, and higher renal NOS activity and eNOS protein content, than males. ANP lowered SBP, increased diuresis, natriuresis, renal NOS activity and eNOS expression in both sexes. Renal response to ANP was more marked in females than in males. In kidney, ANP reduced TBARS, renal collagen content and apoptosis, and increased glutathione concentration and activity of GPx and SOD enzymes in both sexes. Conclusions Female SHR exhibited less organ damage than males. Chronic ANP treatment would ameliorate hypertension and end-organ damage in the kidney by reducing oxidative stress, increasing NO-system activity, and diminishing collagen content and apoptosis, in both sexes. PMID:25774801

  17. Haemodynamic effects of atrial natriuretic peptide in hypoxic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, T. K.; Sheedy, W.; Waterhouse, J.; Howard, P.; Morice, A. H.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Pulmonary artery pressure is elevated in patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Release of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is increased in pulmonary hypertension and this hormone may both selectively vasodilate pulmonary vessels and inhibit pulmonary vascular remodelling. The hypothesis that ANP has a physiological role in protection of the pulmonary circulation from pressure overload, and that it may be beneficial in patients with COPD, has been examined. METHODS--Ten patients with hypoxic COPD were infused for 30 minute periods with saline followed by ANP at 0.4, 2, and 10 pmol/kg/min respectively via a pulmonary artery catheter whilst monitoring haemodynamics and oxygenation. RESULTS--Levels of immunoreactive ANP (irANP) increased from a mean (SD) of 23 (15) pmol/l to a maximum of 94 (41) pmol/l. Neither systemic blood pressure, cardiac output nor total systemic vascular resistance showed any correlation with irANP levels. There were negative correlations between levels of ANP and mean pulmonary artery pressure which fell from 28.7 to 25.9 mm Hg, pulmonary artery wedge pressure which fell from 6.5 to 4.6 mmHg, and total pulmonary vascular resistance which fell from 489 to 428 dynes s cm-5. There was a small fall in PaCO2 from 6.2 to 5.9 kPa, whilst venous admixture and oxygen delivery both increased non-significantly. CONCLUSIONS--At these pathophysiological concentrations there was evidence that ANP selectively reduced right ventricular afterload. These data support the hypotheses that increased plasma levels of ANP may be beneficial in hypoxic COPD, and that endogenous ANP may ameliorate pulmonary hypertension in humans. PMID:8202879

  18. Permeability and contractile responses of collecting lymphatic vessels elicited by atrial and brain natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed

    Scallan, Joshua P; Davis, Michael J; Huxley, Virginia H

    2013-10-15

    Atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP, respectively) are cardiac hormones released into the bloodstream in response to hypervolaemia or fluid shifts to the central circulation. The actions of both peptides include natriuresis and diuresis, a decrease in systemic blood pressure, and inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Further, ANP and BNP elicit increases in blood microvessel permeability sufficient to cause protein and fluid extravasation into the interstitium to reduce the vascular volume. Given the importance of the lymphatic vasculature in maintaining fluid balance, we tested the hypothesis that ANP or BNP (100 nM) would likewise elevate lymphatic permeability (Ps) to serum albumin. Using a microfluorometric technique adapted to in vivo lymphatic vessels, we determined that rat mesenteric collecting lymphatic Ps to rat serum albumin increased by 2.0 ± 0.4-fold (P = 0.01, n = 7) and 2.7 ± 0.8-fold (P = 0.07, n = 7) with ANP and BNP, respectively. In addition to measuring Ps responses, we observed changes in spontaneous contraction amplitude and frequency from the albumin flux tracings in vivo. Notably, ANP abolished spontaneous contraction amplitude (P = 0.005) and frequency (P = 0.006), while BNP augmented both parameters by ∼2-fold (P < 0.01 each). These effects of ANP and BNP on contractile function were examined further by using an in vitro assay. In aggregate, these data support the theory that an increase in collecting lymphatic permeability opposes the absorptive function of the lymphatic capillaries, and aids in the retention of protein and fluid in the interstitial space to counteract volume expansion. PMID:23897233

  19. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Regulates Ca2+ Channel in Early Developmental Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Lin; Wang, Min; Yin, Wen-Xuan; Yuan, Qi; Chen, Ying-Xiao; Fleischmann, Bernd; Hescheler, Jürgen; Ji, Guangju

    2010-01-01

    Background Cardiomyocytes derived from murine embryonic stem (ES) cells possess various membrane currents and signaling cascades link to that of embryonic hearts. The role of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in regulation of membrane potentials and Ca2+ currents has not been investigated in developmental cardiomyocytes. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the role of ANP in regulating L-type Ca2+ channel current (ICaL) in different developmental stages of cardiomyocytes derived from ES cells. ANP decreased the frequency of action potentials (APs) in early developmental stage (EDS) cardiomyocytes, embryonic bodies (EB) as well as whole embryo hearts. ANP exerted an inhibitory effect on basal ICaL in about 70% EDS cardiomyocytes tested but only in about 30% late developmental stage (LDS) cells. However, after stimulation of ICaL by isoproterenol (ISO) in LDS cells, ANP inhibited the response in about 70% cells. The depression of ICaL induced by ANP was not affected by either Nω, Nitro-L-Arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a nitric oxide synthetase (NOS) inhibitor, or KT5823, a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) selective inhibitor, in either EDS and LDS cells; whereas depression of ICaL by ANP was entirely abolished by erythro-9-(2-Hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine (EHNA), a selective inhibitor of type 2 phosphodiesterase(PDE2) in most cells tested. Conclusion/Significances Taken together, these results indicate that ANP induced depression of action potentials and ICaL is due to activation of particulate guanylyl cyclase (GC), cGMP production and cGMP-activation of PDE2 mediated depression of adenosine 3′, 5′–cyclic monophophate (cAMP)–cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in early cardiomyogenesis. PMID:20107504

  20. Synthesis, internalization, and localization of atrial natriuretic peptide in rat adrenal medulla

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, G.; Chabot, J.G.; Garcia-Caballero, T.; Gossard, F.; Dihl, F.; Belles-Isles, M.; Heisler, S.

    1988-07-01

    Some, though not all studies, have indicated that atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) can bind to adrenal medullary cells. ANP-like immunoreactivity (ANP-LI) has also been identified in catecholamine-secreting cells. Together, these findings suggest that ANP may be taken up and/or synthesized in the adrenal medulla. The present study was designed to ascertain, by in situ hybridization, whether adrenal chromaffin cells could synthesize ANP, to define by an in vivo ultrastructural autoradiographic approach, whether ANP could, in fact, bind to rat adrenal medulla cells, to determine whether there was a cellular (noradrenaline (NA) vs. adrenaline (A)) selectivity in the binding process, and to establish whether extracellular (125I)ANP could be internalized by these cells. The cellular and subcellular distribution of endogenous ANP-LI was also investigated in both cell types by cryoultramicrotomy and immunocytochemical approaches. The in situ hybridization studies indicate the presence of mRNA to ANP in about 15% of adrenal medullary cells. Intravenous injection of (125I)ANP resulted in a 3-fold, preferential and specific radiolabeling of A-as compared to NA-containing cells. In A-containing cells, plasma membranes were significantly labeled 2 and 5 min post injection; cytoplasmic matrix, mitochondria, and secretory granules throughout the time course studied (1-30 min post injection). Lysosomes, rough endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and nuclei were not labeled. ANP-LI was identified in both NA- and A-containing cells; in the former, it was almost exclusively localized in secretory vesicles, in the latter it was detected in plasma membranes, cytoplasmic matrix, nuclear euchromatin, some mitochondria and relatively fewer granules than in NA-containing cells.

  1. Thyrotropin modulates receptor-mediated processing of the atrial natriuretic peptide receptor in cultured thyroid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Y.L.; Burman, K.D.; Lahiri, S.; Abdelrahim, M.M.; D'Avis, J.C.; Wartofsky, L. )

    1991-03-01

    In a prior study of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binding to cultured thyroid cells, we reported that at 4 C, more than 95% of bound ANP is recovered on cell membranes, with negligible ANP internalization observed. Since ANP binding was inhibited by TSH, we have further studied TSH effects on postbinding ANP processing to determine whether this phenomenon reflects enhanced endocytosis of the ANP-receptor complex. An ANP chase study was initiated by binding (125I) ANP to thyroid cells at 4 C for 2 h, followed by incubation at 37 C. ANP processing was then traced by following 125I activity at various time intervals in three fractions: cell surface membranes, incubation medium, and inside the cells. Radioactivity released into medium represented processed ANP rather than ANP dissociated from surface membranes, since prebound (125I)ANP could not be competitively dissociated by a high concentration of ANP (1 mumol/L) at 37 C. Chase study results showed that prebound ANP quickly disappeared from cell membranes down to 34% by 30 min. Internalized ANP peaked at 10 min, with 21% of initial prebound ANP found inside the cells. At the same time, radioactivity recovered in incubation medium sharply increased between 10-30 min from 8% to 52%. Preincubation of cells with chloroquine (which blocks degradation of the ANP-receptor complex by inhibiting lysosomal hydrolase) caused a 146% increase in internalized (125I)ANP by 30 min (39% compared to 15% control), while medium radioactivity decreased from 52% to 16%, suggesting that processing of the receptor complex is mediated via lysosomal enzymes. In chase studies employing cells pretreated with chloroquine, TSH stimulated the internalization rate of ANP-receptor complex. By 30 min, TSH significantly reduced the membrane-bound ANP, and the decrease was inversely correlated to the increase in internalized radioactivity.

  2. Metabolism of /sup 125/I-atrial natriuretic factor by vascular smooth muscle cells. Evidence for a peptidase that specifically removes the COOH-terminal tripeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.R.; Arik, L.; Foster, C.J.

    1989-07-15

    The addition of 200 pM monoiodinated human atrial natriuretic factor-(99-126) (125I-hANF) to cultured bovine aortic smooth muscle cells at 37/degree/C resulted in a rapid clearance from the medium (t1/2 approximately 7.5 min). Within 5 min, (125I)iodotyrosine126 (125I-Y), Arg125-(125I)iodotyrosine126 (125I-RY) and Phe124-Arg-(125)iodotyrosine126 (125I-FRY) appeared in the medium. The identities of these degradation products were confirmed by (1) retention time on high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) relative to standards, (2) products generated by digestion with aminopeptidase M, and (3) the absence of the Met110. Preincubation of the cells with ammonium chloride or chloroquine resulted in a significant increase in the intracellular accumulation of radiolabel, indicative of endocytosis and rapid delivery of 125I-hANF to an acidic intracellular compartment (endosome and/or lysosome). Neither ammonium chloride, chloroquine, nor excess unlabeled hANF blocked the rapid appearance in the medium of 125I-RY or 125I-FRY. Bestatin inhibited the generation of 125I-RY, with a concomitant increase in 125I-FRY, suggesting that the 125I-RY is produced by aminopeptidase action on 125I-FRY. The endopeptidase 24.11 (enkephalinase) inhibitor, SCH 39370, did not inhibit the formation of 125I-FRY. These results provide evidence of a peptidase capable of specifically removing the COOH-terminal tripeptide from 125I-hANF. The COOH-terminal tripeptide, Phe124-Arg-Tyr126, was also isolated from cell digests of hANF by HPLC and its identity confirmed by amino acid analysis. Since it is generally believed that the COOH-terminal tripeptide is critical to many of atrial natriuretic factor-(99-126)'s bioactivities, this enzyme may be involved in the inactivation of atrial natriuretic factor-(99-126) in target tissues.

  3. The second messenger system(s) mediating the secretion of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) from the isolated rat heart during rapid cardiac pacing.

    PubMed

    Doubell, A F

    1989-01-01

    This study demonstrates that rapid cardiac pacing elevates Atrial Natriuretic Peptide (ANP) levels, independently from atrial stretch. The second messenger system mediating this response was examined. The phosphoinositide system, generally regarded to be important in mediating ANP release, was shown to play only a modulating role during rapid cardiac pacing. The main mediator would appear to be calcium, and a non-calmodulin dependent, calcium mediated system controlling ANP release during rapid cardiac pacing is suggested. PMID:2532285

  4. Atrial natriuretic peptide suppresses endothelin gene expression and proliferation in cardiac fibroblasts through a GATA4-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Denis J.; Rahmutula, Dolkun; Nishimoto, Minobu; Liang, Faquan; Gardner, David G.

    2009-01-01

    Aims Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a hormone that has both antihypertrophic and antifibrotic properties in the heart. We hypothesized that myocyte-derived ANP inhibits endothelin (ET) gene expression in fibroblasts. Methods and results We have investigated the mechanism(s) involved in the antiproliferative effect of ANP on cardiac fibroblasts in a cell culture model. We found that cardiac myocytes inhibited DNA synthesis in co-cultured cardiac fibroblasts as did treatment with the ET-1 antagonist BQ610. The effect of co-culture was reversed by antibody directed against ANP or the ANP receptor antagonist HS-142-1. ANP inhibited the expression of the ET-1 gene and ET-1 gene promoter activity in cultured fibroblasts. The site of the inhibition was localized to a GATA-binding site positioned between −132 and −135 upstream from the transcription start site. GATA4 expression was demonstrated in cardiac fibroblasts, GATA4 bound the ET-1 promoter both in vitro and in vivo, and siRNA-mediated knockdown of GATA4 inhibited ET-1 expression. ET-1 treatment resulted in increased levels of phospho-serine105 GATA4 in cardiac fibroblasts and this induction was partially suppressed by co-treatment with ANP. Conclusion Collectively, these findings suggest that locally produced ET-1 serves as an autocrine stimulator of fibroblast proliferation, that ANP produced in neighbouring myocytes serves as a paracrine inhibitor of this proliferation, and that the latter effect operates through a reduction in GATA4 phosphorylation and coincident reduction in GATA4-dependent transcriptional activity. PMID:19546173

  5. Cocaine-associated increase of atrial natriuretic peptides: an early predictor of cardiac complications in cocaine users?

    PubMed Central

    Casartelli, Alessandro; Dacome, Lisa; Tessari, Michela; Pascali, Jennifer; Bortolotti, Federica; Trevisan, Maria Teresa; Bosco, Oliviero; Cristofori, Patrizia; Tagliaro, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cocaine is known to produce life-threatening cardiovascular complications, and the investigation of the causes of death may be challenging in forensic medicine. The increasing knowledge of the cardiac function biomarkers and the increasing sensitivity of assays provide new tools in monitoring the cardiac life-threatening pathological conditions and in the sudden death investigation in chronic abusers. In this work, cardiac dysfunction was assessed in an animal model by measuring troponin I and natriuretic peptides as biomarkers, and considering other standard endpoints used in preclinical toxicology studies. Methods Lister Hooded rats were treated with cocaine in chronic self-administration studies. Troponin I (cTnI) and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) were evaluated at different time points and heart weight and histopathology were assessed at the end of the treatment period. Furthermore, cocaine and its main metabolites were measured in the rat fur to assess rats’ cocaine exposure. All the procedures and endpoints considered were designed to allow an easy and complete translation from the laboratory animals to human beings, and the same approach was also adopted with a group of 10 healthy cocaine abuse volunteers with no cardiac pathologies. Results Cardiac troponin I values were unaffected, and ANP showed an increasing trend with time in all cocaine-treated animals considered. Similarly, in the healthy volunteers, no changes were observed in troponin serum levels, whereas the N-terminal brain natriuretic pro-peptide (NT proBNP) showed variations comparable with the changes observed in rats. Conclusions In conclusion, natriuretic peptides could represent an early indicator of heart dysfunction liability in chronic cocaine abusers. PMID:27326180

  6. Atrial natriuretic factor in oliguric acute renal failure. Anaritide Acute Renal Failure Study Group.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J; Salem, M M; Chertow, G M; Weisberg, L S; McGrew, F; Marbury, T C; Allgren, R L

    2000-10-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), an endogenous hormone synthesized by the cardiac atria, has been shown to improve renal function in multiple animal models of acute renal failure. In a recent multicenter clinical trial of 504 patients with acute tubular necrosis (oliguric and nonoliguric), ANP decreased the need for dialysis only in the oliguric patients. In the present study, 222 patients with oliguric acute renal failure were enrolled into a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial designed to assess prospectively the safety and efficacy of ANP compared with placebo. Subjects were randomized to treatment with a 24-hour infusion of ANP (anaritide, 0.2 microgram/kg/min; synthetic form of human ANP) or placebo. Dialysis and mortality status were followed up for 60 days. The primary efficacy end point was dialysis-free survival through day 21. Dialysis-free survival rates were 21% in the ANP group and 15% in the placebo group (P = 0.22). By day 14 of the study, 64% and 77% of the ANP and placebo groups had undergone dialysis, respectively (P = 0.054), and 9 additional patients (7 patients, ANP group; 2 patients, placebo group) needed dialysis but did not receive it. Although a trend was present, there was no statistically significant beneficial effect of ANP in dialysis-free survival or reduction in dialysis in these subjects with oliguric acute renal failure. Mortality rates through day 60 were 60% versus 56% in the ANP and placebo groups, respectively (P = 0.541). One hundred two of 108 (95%) versus 63 of 114 (55%) patients in the ANP and placebo groups had systolic blood pressures less than 90 mm Hg during the study-drug infusion (P < 0.001). The maximal absolute decrease in systolic blood pressure was significantly greater in the anaritide group than placebo group (33.6 versus 23.9 mm Hg; P < 0.001). This well-characterized population with oliguric acute renal failure had an overall high morbidity and mortality. PMID:11007679

  7. Interactive Roles of Ets-1, Sp1, and Acetylated Histones in the Retinoic Acid-dependent Activation of Guanylyl Cyclase/Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-A Gene Transcription*

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prerna; Garg, Renu; Bolden, Gevoni; Pandey, Kailash N.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac hormones atrial and brain natriuretic peptides activate guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA), which plays a critical role in reduction of blood pressure and blood volume. Currently, the mechanisms responsible for regulating the Npr1 gene (coding for GC-A/NPRA) transcription are not well understood. The present study was conducted to examine the interactive roles of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), Ets-1, Sp1, and histone acetylation on the transcriptional regulation and function of the Npr1 gene. Deletion analysis of the Npr1 promoter and luciferase assays showed that ATRA enhanced a 16-fold Npr1 promoter activity and greatly stimulated guanylyl cyclase (GC) activity of the receptor protein in both atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)-dependent and -independent manner. As confirmed by gel shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, ATRA enhanced the binding of both Ets-1 and Sp1 to the Npr1 promoter. The retinoic acid receptor α (RARα) was recruited by Ets-1 and Sp1 to form a transcriptional activator complex with their binding sites in the Npr1 promoter. Interestingly, ATRA also increased the acetylation of histones H3 and H4 and enhanced their recruitment to Ets-1 and Sp1 binding sites within the Npr1 promoter. Collectively, the present results demonstrate that ATRA regulates Npr1 gene transcription and GC activity of the receptor by involving the interactive actions of Ets-1, Sp1, and histone acetylation. PMID:20864529

  8. [Relations of intracardiac dimensions as measured by echocardiography and plasma atrial natriuretic peptide levels in various cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Tomoda, H

    1989-03-01

    The correlation between the plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) levels and echocardiographically measured atrial and ventricular dimensions was studied in various cardiovascular diseases. A total of 107 patients (valvular heart disease 27, cardiomyopathy 11, ischemic heart disease 17, hypertension 42, congenital heart disease 2, and normal 8) were studied. None of the patients had overt signs of heart failure, though 22 of them had atrial fibrillation. Left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic diameters, ejection rate and end-diastolic posterior wall thickness were measured by M-mode echocardiography. Maximal left and right atrial diameters and right ventricular end-diastolic diameter were measured by the apical four-chamber view. Following echocardiographic evaluation and blood pressure measurement, blood sampling was performed via the antecubital vein into a tube containing aprotinin and the samples were analyzed by radioimmunoassay. There was no significant correlation between ANP level and heart rate, systemic blood pressure, left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic diameters, ejection fraction, posterior wall thickness or right ventricular end-diastolic diameter. The most probable reason for the insignificant relationships was that the correlation varied according to the underlying cardiovascular diseases; e.g., correlation between ANP level and left ventricular diameter was significantly positive in mitral regurgitation, while it was significantly negative in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. There was a significant correlation between ANP level and the maximal right (r = 0.40, p less than 0.001) or left atrial diameter (r = 0.57, p less than 0.001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2530334

  9. Homologous desensitization of guanylyl cyclase A, the receptor for atrial natriuretic peptide, is associated with a complex phosphorylation pattern

    PubMed Central

    Schröter, Juliane; Zahedi, René P; Hartmann, Michael; Gaßner, Birgit; Gazinski, Alexandra; Waschke, Jens; Sickmann, Albert; Kuhn, Michaela

    2010-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), via its guanylyl cyclase A (GC-A) receptor and intracellular guanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate production, is critically involved in the regulation of blood pressure. In patients with chronic heart failure, the plasma levels of ANP are increased, but the cardiovascular actions are severely blunted, indicating a receptor or postreceptor defect. Studies on metabolically labelled GC-A-overexpressing cells have indicated that GC-A is extensively phosphorylated, and that ANP-induced homologous desensitization of GC-A correlates with receptor dephosphorylation, a mechanism which might contribute to a loss of function in vivo. In this study, tandem MS analysis of the GC-A receptor, expressed in the human embryonic kidney cell line HEK293, revealed unambiguously that the intracellular domain of the receptor is phosphorylated at multiple residues: Ser487, Ser497, Thr500, Ser502, Ser506, Ser510 and Thr513. MS quantification based on multiple reaction monitoring demonstrated that ANP-provoked desensitization was accompanied by a complex pattern of receptor phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. The population of completely phosphorylated GC-A was diminished. However, intriguingly, the phosphorylation of GC-A at Ser487 was selectively enhanced after exposure to ANP. The functional relevance of this observation was analysed by site-directed mutagenesis. The substitution of Ser487 by glutamate (which mimics phosphorylation) blunted the activation of the GC-A receptor by ANP, but prevented further desensitization. Our data corroborate previous studies suggesting that the responsiveness of GC-A to ANP is regulated by phosphorylation. However, in addition to the dephosphorylation of the previously postulated sites (Ser497, Thr500, Ser502, Ser506, Ser510), homologous desensitization seems to involve the phosphorylation of GC-A at Ser487, a newly identified site of phosphorylation. The identification and further characterization of the

  10. Beta-adrenergic modulation of the release of atrial natriuretic factor from rat cardiac atria in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, A.; Imada, T.; Takayanagi, B.; Inagami, T.

    1986-03-01

    Several stimulatory factors for the release of atrial natriuretic factor, such as atrial stretch, atrial pacing and vasopressin, have been reported. We studied the effects of the adrenergic nervous system on the release of ANF using an in vitro perfusion system. Right and left atria from Sprague-Dawley rats were quartered and perfused with Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate solution gassed with 95% CO/sub 2//5% O/sub 2/ at 37/sup 0/C. Perfusate factions were collected every 2 minutes. Fractions were collected 20 minutes before and for 2 hours during the administration of test agents. ANF was measured by radioimmunoassay. Within 10 minutes of exposure to 10/sup -6/M isoproterenol, ANF secretion fell to less than 50% of its baseline level. However, beta agonists showed a stimulatory effect of 4-5 fold. Carbachol, in a concentration of 10/sup -2/M was used to demonstrate the viability of the atria exposed to isoproterenol, and produced a stimulation of ANF release of 4-6 times the basal level. The adrenergic nervous system can modulate ANF release in vitro. Further studies are being performed with selective beta agonists and antagonists to elucidate these results.

  11. Alpha-human atrial natriuretic polypeptide (. cap alpha. -hANP) specific binding sites in bovine adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, K.; Nawata, H.; Kato, K.I.; Ibayashi, H.; Matsuo, H.

    1986-06-13

    The effects of synthetic ..cap alpha..-human atrial natriuretic polypeptide (..cap alpha..-hANP) on steroidogenesis in bovine adrenocortical cells in primary monolayer culture were investigated. ..cap alpha..-hANP did not inhibit basal aldosterone secretion. ..cap alpha..-hANP induced a significant dose-dependent inhibition of basal levels of cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) secretion and also of aCTH (10/sup -8/M)-stimulated increases in aldosterone, cortisol and DHEA secretion. Visualization of (/sup 125/I) ..cap alpha..-hANP binding sites in bovine adrenal gland by an in vitro autoradiographic technique demonstrated that these sites were highly localized in the adrenal cortex, especially the zona glomerulosa. These results suggest that the adrenal cortex may be a target organ for direct receptor-mediated actions of ..cap alpha..-hANP.

  12. Increased atrial natriuretic peptide (6-33) binding sites in the subfornical organ of water deprived and Brattleboro rats

    SciTech Connect

    Saavedra, J.M.; Israel, A.; Correa, F.M.A.; Kurihara, M.

    1986-09-01

    Binding sites for rat atrial natriuretic eptide (6-33) (ANP) were quantitated in the subfornical organ of chronically dehydrated homozygous Brattleboro rats unable to synthesize vasopressin; heterozygous Brattleboro rats, their controls, Long Evans rats and Long Evans rats after 4 days of water deprivation. Brain sections were incubated in the presence of /sup 125/I-ANP and the results analyzed by autoradiography coupled to computerized microdensitometry and comparison to /sup 125/I-standards. Brattleboro rats and water deprived Long Evans rats presented a higher number of ANP binding sites than their normally hydrated controls. The results suggest a role of ANP binding sites in the subfornical organ in the central regulation of fluid balance and vasopressin secretion.

  13. Differential expression of the pro-natriuretic peptide convertases corin and furin in experimental heart failure and atrial fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Boerrigter, Guido; Huntley, Brenda K.; Sangaralingham, S. Jeson; McKie, Paul M.; Harty, Gail J.; Harders, Gerald E.; Burnett, John C.

    2013-01-01

    In heart failure (HF), the cardiac hormone natriuretic peptides (NPs) atrial (ANP), B-type (BNP), and C-type (CNP) play a key role to protect cardiac remodeling. The proprotein convertases corin and furin process their respective pro-NPs into active NPs. Here we define in a canine model of HF furin and corin gene and protein expression in normal and failing left atrium (LA) or ventricle (LV) testing the hypothesis that the NP proproteins convertases production is altered in experimental HF. Experimental canine HF was produced by rapid right ventricular pacing for 10 days. NPs, furin, and corin mRNA expression were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Protein concentration or expression was determined by immunostaining, radioimmunoassay, or Western blot. Furin and corin proteins were present in normal canine LA and LV myocardium and vasculature and in smooth muscle cells. In normal canines, expression of NPs was dominant in the atrium compared with the ventricle. In experimental early stage HF characterized with marked atrial fibrosis, ANP, BNP, and CNP mRNA, and protein concentrations were higher in HF LA but not HF LV compared with normals. In LA, corin mRNA and protein expressions in HF were lower, whereas furin mRNA and protein expressions were higher than normals. NPs and furin expressions were augmented in the atrium in experimental early stage HF and, conversely, corin mRNA and protein expressions were decreased with atrial remodeling. Selective changes of these NP convertases may have significance in the regulation of pro-NP processing and atrial remodeling in early stage HF. PMID:23152112

  14. Atrial natriuretic peptide attenuates agonist-induced pulmonary edema in mice with targeted disruption of the gene for natriuretic peptide receptor-A

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shu-Whei; Green, Sabrina; Grinnell, Katie L.; Machan, Jason T.; Harrington, Elizabeth O.

    2013-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) inhibits agonist-induced pulmonary edema formation, but the signaling pathway responsible is not well defined. To investigate the role of the particulate guanylate cyclase-linked receptor, natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A), we measured acute lung injury responses in intact mice and pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVEC) with normal and disrupted expression of NPR-A. NPR-A wild-type (NPR-A+/+), heterozygous (NPR-A+/−), and knockout (NPR-A−/−) mice were anesthetized and treated with thrombin receptor agonist peptide (TRAP) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Lung injury was assessed by lung wet-to-dry (W/D) weight and by protein and cell concentration of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. No difference in pulmonary edema formation was seen between NPR-A genotypes under baseline conditions. TRAP and LPS increased lung W/D weight and BAL fluid cell counts more in NPR-A−/− mice than in NPR-A+/− or NPR-A+/+ mice, but no genotype-related differences were seen in TRAP-induced increases in bloodless lung W/D weight or LPS-induced increases in BAL protein concentration. Pretreatment with ANP infusion completely blocked TRAP-induced increases in lung W/D weight and blunted LPS-induced increases in BAL cell counts and protein concentration in both NPR-A−/− and NPR-A+/+ mice. Thrombin decreased transmembrane electrical resistance in monolayers of PMVECs in vitro, and this effect was attenuated by ANP in PMVECs isolated from both genotypes. Administration of the NPR-C-specific ligand, cANF, also blocked TRAP-induced increases in lung W/D weight and LPS-induced increases in BAL cell count and protein concentration in NPR-A+/+ and NPR-A−/− mice. We conclude that ANP is capable of attenuating agonist-induced lung edema in the absence of NPR-A. The protective effect of ANP on agonist-induced lung injury and pulmonary barrier function may be mediated by NPR-C. PMID:23195629

  15. Atrial natriuretic peptide attenuates agonist-induced pulmonary edema in mice with targeted disruption of the gene for natriuretic peptide receptor-A.

    PubMed

    Klinger, James R; Tsai, Shu-Whei; Green, Sabrina; Grinnell, Katie L; Machan, Jason T; Harrington, Elizabeth O

    2013-02-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) inhibits agonist-induced pulmonary edema formation, but the signaling pathway responsible is not well defined. To investigate the role of the particulate guanylate cyclase-linked receptor, natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A), we measured acute lung injury responses in intact mice and pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVEC) with normal and disrupted expression of NPR-A. NPR-A wild-type (NPR-A+/+), heterozygous (NPR-A+/-), and knockout (NPR-A-/-) mice were anesthetized and treated with thrombin receptor agonist peptide (TRAP) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Lung injury was assessed by lung wet-to-dry (W/D) weight and by protein and cell concentration of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. No difference in pulmonary edema formation was seen between NPR-A genotypes under baseline conditions. TRAP and LPS increased lung W/D weight and BAL fluid cell counts more in NPR-A-/- mice than in NPR-A+/- or NPR-A+/+ mice, but no genotype-related differences were seen in TRAP-induced increases in bloodless lung W/D weight or LPS-induced increases in BAL protein concentration. Pretreatment with ANP infusion completely blocked TRAP-induced increases in lung W/D weight and blunted LPS-induced increases in BAL cell counts and protein concentration in both NPR-A-/- and NPR-A+/+ mice. Thrombin decreased transmembrane electrical resistance in monolayers of PMVECs in vitro, and this effect was attenuated by ANP in PMVECs isolated from both genotypes. Administration of the NPR-C-specific ligand, cANF, also blocked TRAP-induced increases in lung W/D weight and LPS-induced increases in BAL cell count and protein concentration in NPR-A+/+ and NPR-A-/- mice. We conclude that ANP is capable of attenuating agonist-induced lung edema in the absence of NPR-A. The protective effect of ANP on agonist-induced lung injury and pulmonary barrier function may be mediated by NPR-C. PMID:23195629

  16. [Brain natriuretic peptide].

    PubMed

    La Villa, G; Lazzeri, C; Fronzaroli, C; Franchi, F; Gentilini, P

    1995-01-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a cardiac hormone with a spectrum of activities quite similar to those of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), including diuretic, natriuretic, hypotensive and smooth muscle relaxant activities. These effects are due to the stimulation of guanylate cyclase-linked natriuretic peptide receptors, leading to an increase in cyclic GMP concentration in target cells. BNP has a lower affinity than ANP for C (clearance) receptors, and is less susceptible to degradation by neutral endopeptidase-24.11, resulting in a longer half-life. In the kidney, BNP increases the glomerular filtration rate and inhibits sodium reabsorption in the distal tubule. It also inhibits the release of renin and aldosterone. Unlike ANP, produced by the atria, BNP is mainly synthesized and released into circulation by the left ventricle and is therefore influenced by stimuli involving this cardiac chamber, such as an increase in arterial pressure, left ventricular hypertrophy and dilation. Plasma BNP levels are very low in healthy subjects, and respond modestly, although significantly to physiological stimuli such as changes in posture or sodium intake. In contrast, plasma BNP concentrations increase in disease states such as cirrhosis with ascites, hypertension, chronic renal failure, acute myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure. In the latter condition, plasma BNP concentration is a reliable prognostic index. Evidence obtained by administering BNP to healthy subjects and hypertensive patients suggests that BNP, at physiological and pathophysiological plasma concentrations, markedly influences cardiovascular homeostasis, mainly due to its effects on sodium excretion and the renin-aldosterone axis. PMID:8718658

  17. Altered Regulation of Renal Nitric Oxide and Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Systems in Lipopolysaccharide-induced Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Eun Hui; Kim, In Jin; Ma, Seong Kwon; Lee, Jong Un

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) may induce vascular relaxation by increasing the production of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), an important mediator of vascular tone during sepsis. This study aimed to determine whether regulation of NO and the ANP system is altered in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced kidney injury. LPS (10 mg.kg-1) was injected in the tail veins of male Sprague-Dawley rats; 12 hours later, the kidneys were removed. Protein expression of NO synthase (NOS) and neutral endopeptidase (NEP) was determined by semiquantitative immunoblotting. As an index of synthesis of NO, its stable metabolites (nitrite/nitrate, NOx) were measured using colorimetric assays. mRNA expression of the ANP system was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. To determine the activity of guanylyl cyclase (GC), the amount of cGMP generated in response to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and ANP was calculated. Creatinine clearance decreased and fractional excretion of sodium increased in LPS-treated rats compared with the controls. Inducible NOS protein expression increased in LPS-treated rats, while that of endothelial NOS, neuronal NOS, and NEP remained unchanged. Additionally, urinary and plasma NOx levels increased in LPS-treated rats. SNP-stimulated GC activity remained unchanged in the glomerulus and papilla in the LPS-treated rats. mRNA expression of natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-C decreased in LPS-treated rats, while that of ANP and NPR-A did not change. ANP-stimulated GC activity reduced in the glomerulus and papilla. In conclusion, enhancement of the NO/cGMP pathway and decrease in ANP clearance were found play a role in the pathogenesis of LPS-induced kidney injury. PMID:22128259

  18. A Constitutively “Phosphorylated” Guanylyl Cyclase-linked Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Receptor Mutant Is Resistant to Desensitization

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Lincoln R.; Hunter, Tony

    1999-01-01

    Dephosphorylation of the natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) is hypothesized to mediate its desensitization in response to atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binding. Recently, we identified six phosphorylation sites within the kinase homology domain of NPR-A and determined that the conversion of these residues to alanine abolished the ability of the receptor to be phosphorylated or to be activated by ANP and ATP. In an attempt to generate a form of NPR-A that mimics a fully phosphorylated receptor but that is resistant to dephosphorylation, we engineered a receptor variant (NPR-A-6E) containing glutamate substitutions at all six phosphorylation sites. Consistent with the known ability of negatively charged glutamate residues to substitute functionally, in some cases, for phosphorylated residues, we found that NPR-A-6E was activated 10-fold by ANP and ATP. As determined by guanylyl cyclase assays, the hormone-stimulated activity of the wild-type receptor declined over time in membrane preparations in vitro, and this loss was blocked by the serine/threonine protein phosphatase inhibitor microcystin. In contrast, the activity of NPR-A-6E was more linear with time and was unaffected by microcystin. The nonhydrolyzable ATP analogue adenosine 5′-(β,γ-imino)-triphosphate was half as effective as ATP in stimulating the wild-type receptor but was equally as potent in stimulating NPR-A-6E, suggesting that ATP is required to keep the wild-type but not 6E variant phosphorylated. Finally, the desensitization of NPR-A-6E in whole cells was markedly blunted compared with that of the wild-type receptor, consistent with its inability to shed the negative charge from its kinase homology domain via dephosphorylation. These data provide the first direct test of the requirement for dephosphorylation in guanylyl cyclase desensitization and they indicate that it is an essential component of this process. PMID:10359598

  19. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Stimulates Dopamine Tubular Transport by Organic Cation Transporters: A Novel Mechanism to Enhance Renal Sodium Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Kouyoumdzian, Nicolás M.; Rukavina Mikusic, Natalia L.; Kravetz, María C.; Lee, Brenda M.; Carranza, Andrea; Del Mauro, Julieta S.; Pandolfo, Marcela; Gironacci, Mariela M.; Gorzalczany, Susana; Toblli, Jorge E.; Fernández, Belisario E.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on organic cation transporters (OCTs) expression and activity, and its consequences on dopamine urinary levels, Na+, K+-ATPase activity and renal function. Male Sprague Dawley rats were infused with isotonic saline solution during 120 minutes and randomized in nine different groups: control, pargyline plus tolcapone (P+T), ANP, dopamine (DA), D-22, DA+D-22, ANP+D-22, ANP+DA and ANP+DA+D-22. Renal functional parameters were determined and urinary dopamine concentration was quantified by HPLC. Expression of OCTs and D1-receptor in membrane preparations from renal cortex tissues were determined by western blot and Na+, K+-ATPase activity was determined using in vitro enzyme assay. 3H-DA renal uptake was determined in vitro. Compared to P+T group, ANP and dopamine infusion increased diuresis, urinary sodium and dopamine excretion significantly. These effects were more pronounced in ANP+DA group and reversed by OCTs blockade by D-22, demonstrating that OCTs are implied in ANP stimulated-DA uptake and transport in renal tissues. The activity of Na+, K+-ATPase exhibited a similar fashion when it was measured in the same experimental groups. Although OCTs and D1-receptor protein expression were not modified by ANP, OCTs-dependent-dopamine tubular uptake was increased by ANP through activation of NPR-A receptor and protein kinase G as signaling pathway. This effect was reflected by an increase in urinary dopamine excretion, natriuresis, diuresis and decreased Na+, K+-ATPase activity. OCTs represent a novel target that links the activity of ANP and dopamine together in a common mechanism to enhance their natriuretic and diuretic effects. PMID:27392042

  20. Autoradiographic localization and characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide binding sites in the rat central nervous system and adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, T.R.; Wildey, G.M.; Manaker, S.; Glembotski, C.C.

    1986-07-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP) have recently been identified in both heart and CNS. These peptides possess potent natriuretic, diuretic, and vasorelaxant activities, and are all apparently derived from a single prohormone. Specific ANP binding sites have been characterized in the adrenal zona glomerulosa and kidney cortex, and one study reported ANP binding sites in the CNS. However, a detailed examination of the localization of ANP binding sites throughout the brain has not been reported. In this study, quantitative autoradiography was employed to examine the distribution of ANP receptors in the rat CNS. The binding of (3-/sup 125/I-iodotyrosyl28) rat ANP-28 to binding sites in the rat CNS was saturable, specific for ANP-related peptides, and displayed high affinity (Kd = 600 pM). When the relative concentrations of ANP binding sites were determined throughout the rat brain, the highest levels of ANP binding were localized to the circumventricular organs, including the area postrema and subfornical organ, and the olfactory apparatus. Moderate levels of ANP binding sites were present throughout the midbrain and brain stem, while low levels were found in the forebrain, diencephalon, basal ganglia, cortex, and cerebellum. The presence of ANP binding sites in the subfornical organ and the area postrema, regions considered to be outside the blood-brain barrier, suggests that peripheral ANP levels may regulate some aspects of CNS control of salt and water balance. The possible functions of ANP binding sites in other regions of the rat brain are not known, but, like many other peptides, ANP may act as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator at these loci.

  1. Attenuated atrial natriuretic peptide-mediated lipolysis in subcutaneous adipocytes of obese type 2 diabetic men.

    PubMed

    Verboven, Kenneth; Hansen, Dominique; Moro, Cedric; Eijnde, Bert O; Hoebers, Nicole; Knol, Joep; Bouckaert, Wim; Dams, Anne; Blaak, Ellen E; Jocken, Johan W E

    2016-07-01

    Catecholamines and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) are major regulators of adipocyte lipolysis. Although obesity is characterized by catecholamine resistance in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SCAT), data on ANP lipolytic response and sensitivity in different adipose tissue (AT) depots of metabolically distinct humans are scarce. Ex vivo catecholamine- and ANP-induced lipolysis was investigated in adipocytes derived from SCAT and visceral AT (VAT) depot of lean (n=13) and obese men, with (n=11) or without (n=18) type 2 diabetes (HbA1c < or ≥ 6.5%). Underlying molecular mechanisms were examined by looking at functional receptors in the NP signalling pathway at the mRNA and protein level. Maximal ANP- and catecholamine-induced lipolysis in SCAT was blunted in obese type 2 diabetics compared with age-matched lean men whereas non-diabetic obese subjects showed intermediate responses. This blunted ANP-mediated lipolytic response was accompanied by lower mRNA and protein expression of the type-A natriuretic peptide (NP) receptor and higher mRNA but reduced protein expression of the scavenging type-C receptor. Maximal ANP-induced lipolysis was lower in VAT compared with SCAT but not different between groups. Collectively, our data show that both ANP- and catecholamine-mediated lipolysis is attenuated in SCAT of obese men with type 2 diabetes, and might be partially explained by NP receptor defects. Therefore, improving maximal ANP responsiveness in adipose tissue might be a potential novel strategy to improve obesity-associated metabolic complications. PMID:27129190

  2. Response to atrial natriuretic peptide, endopeptidase 24.11 inhibitor and C-ANP receptor ligand in the rat.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, M R; Settle, S L; Kirk, J E; Taylor, S A; Moore, K P; Unwin, R J

    1992-09-01

    1. The present studies compared the renal and hypotensive response to (a) exogenous atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) (99-126), (b) an endopeptidase-24.11 inhibitor (candoxatrilat) and (c) an antagonist of ANP clearance receptors (SC 46542) in conscious rats. 2. Infusion of low-dose-ANP (100 ng kg-1 min-1) produced a gradual increase in urinary sodium and guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) excretion without significant change in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) or fractional lithium clearance (FeLi). There was a significant fall in blood pressure. 3. Infusion of high-dose ANP (300 ng kg-1 min-1) produced a brisk, 3 fold increase in urinary sodium and cyclic GMP excretion along with a rise in GFR, but had no significant effect on FeLi compared to the control group. The renal response was accompanied by a pronounced fall in blood pressure. 4. Candoxatrilat or SC 46542, alone, had no significant effect on sodium excretion compared to control animals. Both compounds enhanced the natriuretic and cyclic GMP responses to a low-dose ANP infusion (100 ng kg-1 min-1) to levels similar to, or greater than, those observed with the high-dose ANP (300 ng kg-1 min-1). However, unlike high-dose ANP, these renal effects were not accompanied by a significant change in GFR and neither compound potentiated the hypotensive effect of the low-dose ANP infusion. Only candoxatrilat when given with ANP produced a marked rise in FeLi.5. Similarly, combined administration of candoxatrilat and SC 46542 (without exogenous ANP) induced an increase in sodium and cyclic GMP excretion comparable to high-dose ANP but did so without a significant increase in GFR and with a significantly smaller fall in blood pressure. Interestingly, there was no increase in FeLi with the combination of the two compounds, suggesting that the major contribution to sodium excretion came from SC 46542.6. Both candoxatrilat and SC 46542 increased sodium and cyclic GMP excretion in the rat A-V fistula model

  3. Role of atrial natriuretic peptide in mediating the blood pressure-independent natriuresis elicited by systemic inhibition of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, Leszek; Kuczeriszka, Marta; Castillo, Alexander; Majid, Dewan S; Navar, L Gabriel

    2015-04-01

    While it is clearly recognized that increased intrarenal nitric oxide (NO) levels elicit natriuresis, confounding data showing that systemic nitric oxide synthase inhibition (NOSi) also increases sodium excretion (UNaV) poses a conundrum. This response has been attributed to the associated increases in arterial pressure (AP); however, the increases in AP and in UNaV are temporally dissociated. The changes in regional renal haemodynamics induced by NOSi could also contribute to the alterations of UNaV. To evaluate the roles of AP and non-AP mechanisms mediating the natriuresis, N ω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) was infused i.v. at doses ranging from 5 to 50 μg/kg/min in anaesthetized rats. UNaV, perfusion of the cortex (cortical blood flow, CBF) and medulla (medullary blood flow, MBF) with laser-Doppler flowmetry and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were measured. UNaV increased from 0.6 ± 0.2 to 1.6 ± 0.1 μmol/kg/min (P < 0.05) with the lower nonpressor doses. With the higher doses, AP increased from 116 ± 4 to 122 ± 4 mmHg and UNaV increased from 1.1 ± 0.3 to 3.3 ± 0.7 μmol/min/g (P < 0.002). UNaV increased similarly in a group where renal AP was maintained at baseline levels. The associated reductions in CBF (17 ± 5 and 38 ± 5 %) and MBF (27 ± 6 and 52 ± 6 %) would be expected to attenuate rather than contribute to the natriuresis. Plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) concentrations increased significantly following NOSi. Anantin, a natriuretic peptide receptor-A blocker, prevented or reversed the L-NAME-induced natriuresis without altering the L-NAME-induced changes in AP or CBF. The results indicate that increased ANP and related natriuretic peptides mediate the AP-independent natriuresis, at least partly, elicited by systemic L-NAME infusion and help resolve the conundrum of natriuresis during systemic NOSi. PMID:24953240

  4. Atrial natriuretic peptide in the locus coeruleus and its possible role in the regulation of arterial blood pressure, fluid and electrolyte homeostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, H.; Sterzel, R.B. ); Bahner, U.; Heidland, A. ); Palkovits, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic factor (ANP) is present in neuronal cells of the locus coeruleus and its vicinity in the pontine tegmentum and moderate amount of ANP is detectable in this area by radioimmunoassay. The ANP is known as a neuropeptide which may influence the body salt and water homeostasis and blood pressure by targeting both central and peripheral regulatory mechanisms. Whether this pontine ANP cell group is involved in any of these regulatory mechanisms, the effect of various types of hypertension and experimental alterations in the salt and water balance on ANP levels was measured by radioimmunoassay in the locus coeruleus of rats. Adrenalectomy, as well as aldosterone and dexamethasone treatments failed to alter ANP levels in the locus coeruleus. Reduced ANP levels were measured in spontaneously hypertensive rats, and in diabetes insipidus rats with vasopressin replacement. In contrast to these situations, elevated ANP levels were found in rats with DOCA-salt or 1-Kidney-1-clip hypertension. These data suggest a link between ANP levels in the locus coeruleus and fluid volume homeostasis. Whether this link is causal and connected with the major activity of locus coeruleus neurons needs further information.

  5. Receptors for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and regulation of thyroglobulin secretion by ANP in human thyroid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sellitti, D.F.; Tseng, Y.C.L.; Wartofsky, L. Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC )

    1989-01-01

    Specific binding sites for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) were identified and characterized in primary cultures of human thyroid cells. Saturation analysis using ({sup 125}I) {alpha} rat (1-28) ANP as the ligand showed a single class of high affinity binding which was inhibited by atriopeptin I and the {alpha} -human form of ANP, but not by a C-terminal fragment (13-28) of the peptide. The number of ANP binding sites in these cultures was not altered by the thyroid hormone concentration of the medium. In a dose-response experiment, thyroglobulin secretion was significantly reduced in the presence of 0.01 nM ANP and was maximally reduced with 10 nM ANP. Cyclic GMP production was increased threefold in the presence of 100 nM ANP, but was unchanged with lower doses of the peptides. The finding of receptors in thyroid follicular cells suggests a hitherto unrecognized role of ANP in the thyroid gland.

  6. An analogue of atrial natriuretic peptide (C-ANP4-23) modulates glucose metabolism in human differentiated adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ojeda, Francisco Javier; Aguilera, Concepción María; Rupérez, Azahara Iris; Gil, Ángel; Gomez-Llorente, Carolina

    2016-08-15

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of C-atrial natriuretic peptide (C-ANP4-23) in human adipose-derived stem cells differentiated into adipocytes over 10 days (1 μM for 4 h). The intracellular cAMP, cGMP and protein kinase A levels were determined by ELISA and gene and protein expression were determined by qRT-PCR and Western blot, respectively, in the presence or absence of C-ANP4-23. The levels of lipolysis and glucose uptake were also determined. C-ANP4-23 treatment significantly increased the intracellular cAMP levels and the gene expression of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) and protein kinase, AMP-activated, alpha 1 catalytic subunit (AMPK). Western blot showed a significant increase in GLUT4 and phosphor-AMPKα levels. Importantly, the adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 abolished these effects. Additionally, C-ANP4-23 increased glucose uptake by 2-fold. Our results show that C-ANP4-23 enhances glucose metabolism and might contribute to the development of new peptide-based therapies for metabolic diseases. PMID:27181211

  7. Atrial natriuretic peptide degradation by CPA47 cells - Evidence for a divalent cation-independent cell-surface proteolytic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, S. J.; Chen, Y. M.; Whitson, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is rapidly cleared and degraded in vivo. Nonguanylate-cyclase receptors (C-ANPR) and a metalloproteinase, neutral endopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.11) (NEP 24.11), are thought to be responsible for its metabolism. We investigated the mechanisms of ANP degradation by an endothelial-derived cell line, CPA47. CPA47 cells degraded 88 percent of 125I-ANP after 1 h at 37 degrees C as determined by HPLC. Medium preconditioned by these cells degraded 41 percent of the 125I-ANP, and this activity was inhibited by a divalent cation chelator, EDTA. Furthermore, a cell-surface proteolytic activity degraded 125I-ANP in the presence of EDTA when receptor-mediated endocytosis was inhibited either by low temperature (4 degrees C) or by hyperosmolarity at 37 degrees C. The metalloproteinase, NEP 24.11, is unlikely to be the cell-surface peptidase because 125I-ANP is degraded by CPA47 cells at 4 degrees C in the presence of 5 mM EDTA. These data indicate that CPA47 cells can degrade ANP by a novel divalent cation-independent cell-surface proteolytic activity.

  8. Ischaemia-reperfusion and toxic oxygen metabolites do not induce release of immunoreactive atrial natriuretic factor from isolated rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Valen, G; Lettrem, I; Sundsfjord, J; Vaage, J

    1993-07-01

    Secretion of immunoreactive atrial natriuretic factors (ANF) after injury by ischaemia-reperfusion and toxic oxygen metabolites (TOM) was investigated in the following groups of Langendorff-perfused rat hearts: 1.1., control perfusion; 1.2., hearts perfused with H2O2 (200 mumol l-1) as a TOM-generating agent for 10 min, followed by recovery for 30 min; 1.3., thiourea (10 mmol l-1), a hydroxyl radical scavenger, was given together with H2O2; 2.1., control perfusion; 2.2., ischaemia (37 degrees C) for 20 min followed by reperfusion for 40 min. Ischaemia-reperfusion and TOM temporarily decreased left ventricular developed pressure and increased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure. The cardiac effects of H2O2 were inhibited by thiourea. Coronary flow (CF) was increased by TOM and decreased by ischaemia-reperfusion. Immunoreactive ANF was measured sequentially in the coronary effluent by radioimmunoassay. Basal secretion of immunoreactive ANF for all groups pooled was 0.45 +/- 0.02 pmol min-1 (mean +/- SEM), and did not change significantly with time in any group. In conclusion, ischaemia-reperfusion and TOM do not influence secretion of immunoreactive ANF. PMID:8378741

  9. Effects of atrial natriuretic peptide on type II alveolar epithelial cells of the rat lung. Autoradiographic and morphometric studies.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Y; Watanabe, T; Watanabe, M; Hasegawa, S; Uchiyama, Y

    1989-01-01

    Effects of atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP) on Type II cells of the rat lung were examined, using autoradiographic and morphometric techniques. The injection of an excess of ANP, together with [125I]ANP, significantly inhibited the uptake of radioactive ANP in the lung tissue. Following autoradiography, silver grains of [125I]ANP labelled Type II cells, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells of vessels, bronchi and bronchioles. As for morphometric changes in subcellular structures of Type II cells after the injection of ANP, the volume and surface densities of the rough endoplasmic reticulum increased at 15 minutes, while those of the Golgi complex increased from 5 minutes, peaking at 30 minutes. At 15 minutes the volume and surface densities of mitochondria significantly increased. The volume and surface densities of multivesicular bodies with an electron-dense matrix also increased from 15 minutes after the injection. Lamellar bodies showed decreased volume and surface densities at 15 minutes whereas the densities showed an increase at 30 minutes and were higher at 60 minutes than those in the control. These results suggest that Type II cells provide a binding site for ANP which facilitates the production of lamellar bodies in addition to their secretion. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:2533592

  10. Atrial natriuretic peptide down-regulates neutrophil recruitment on inflamed endothelium by reducing cell deformability and resistance to detachment force

    PubMed Central

    Morikis, Vasilios A.; Radecke, Chris; Jiang, Yanyan; Heinrich, Volkmar; Curry, Fitz-Roy; Simon, Scott I.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recombinant atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is administered in patients with acute heart failure in Japan to improve renal function and hemodynamics, but its anti-inflammatory effect on activated leukocytes may also contribute to its therapeutic efficacy. OBJECTIVE Examine unconventional role of ANP in neutrophil adhesion to inflamed endothelium. METHODS Human neutrophils were perfused over endothelial monolayers in a microfluidic lab-chip assay. Cell rheology was assessed by micropipette aspiration to assess changes in cortical tension and viscosity. Fluorescence microscopy was applied to measure adhesive contact area and β2-integrin focal bond formation. RESULTS ANP inhibited neutrophil rolling and firm adhesion without influencing the upregulation of cellular adhesion molecules on endothelium or the regulation of high affinity CD18 and shedding of L-selectin during neutrophil activation. Exposed to fluid shear, integrin mediated arrest was disrupted with ANP treatment, which elicited formation of long tethers and diminished cell spreading and contact. This correlated with a ~40% increase in neutrophil viscosity and a reduction in the adhesive footprint. CONCLUSIONS A decrease in cell deformation and neutrophil flattening with ANP results in fewer integrin bond clusters, which translates to higher tensile forces and impaired adhesion strengthening and cell detachment. PMID:26639357

  11. Role of atrial natriuretic peptide in systemic responses to acute isotonic volume expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Yancy, Clyde W.; Buckey, Jay C.; Lane, Lynda D.; Hargens, Alan R.; Blomqvist, C. G.

    1992-01-01

    A hypothesis is proposed that a temporal relationship exists between increases in cardiac filling pressure and plasma artrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) concentration and also between ANP elevation and vasodilation, fluid movement from plasma to interstitium, and increased urine volume (UV). To test the hypothesis, 30 ml/kg isotonic saline were infused in supine male subjects over 24 min and responses were monitored for 3 h postinfusion. Results show that at end infusion, mean arterial pressure (RAP), heart rate and plasma volume exhibited peak increases of 146, 23, and 27 percent, respectively. Mean plasma ANP and UV peaked (45 and 390 percent, respectively) at 30 min postinfusion. Most cardiovascular variables had returned toward control levels by 1 h postinfusion, and net reabsorption of extravascular fluid ensued. It is concluded that since ANP was not significantly increased until 30 min postinfusion, factors other than ANP initiate responses to intravascular fluid loading. These factors include increased vascular pressures, baroreceptor-mediated vasolidation, and hemodilution of plasma proteins. ANP is suggested to mediate, in part, the renal response to saline infusion.

  12. Relaxin and atrial natriuretic peptide pathways participate in the anti-fibrotic effect of a melon concentrate in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Carillon, Julie; Gauthier, Audrey; Barial, Sandy; Tournier, Michel; Gayrard, Nathalie; Lajoix, Anne-Dominique; Jover, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Background In spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), a model of human essential hypertension, oxidative stress is involved in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis associated with hypertension. Dietary supplementation with agents exhibiting antioxidant properties could have a beneficial effect in remodeling of the heart. We previously demonstrated a potent anti-hypertrophic effect of a specific melon (Cucumis melo L.) concentrate with antioxidant properties in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Relaxin and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) were reported to reduce collagen deposition and fibrosis progression in various experimental models. Objective The aim of the present investigation was to test the hypothesis that, beside reduction in oxidative stress, the melon concentrate may act through relaxin, its receptor (relaxin/insulin-like family peptide receptor 1, RXFP1), and ANP in SHR. Design and results The melon concentrate, given orally during 4 days, reduced cardiomyocyte size (by 25%) and totally reversed cardiac collagen content (Sirius red staining) in SHR but not in their normotensive controls. Treatment with the melon concentrate lowered cardiac nitrotyrosine-stained area (by 45%) and increased by 17–19% the cardiac expression (Western blot) of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase. In addition, plasma relaxin concentration was normalized while cardiac relaxin (Western blot) was lowered in treated SHR. Cardiac relaxin receptor level determined by immunohistochemical analysis increased only in treated SHR. Similarly, the melon concentrate reversed the reduction of plasma ANP concentration and lowered its cardiac expression. Conclusions The present results demonstrate that reversal of cardiac fibrosis by the melon concentrate involves antioxidant defenses, as well as relaxin and ANP pathways restoration. It is suggested that dietary SOD supplementation could be a useful additional strategy against cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis

  13. Effect of short-term endurance training on exercise capacity, haemodynamics and atrial natriuretic peptide secretion in heart transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Geny, B; Saini, J; Mettauer, B; Lampert, E; Piquard, F; Follenius, M; Epailly, E; Schnedecker, B; Eisenmann, B; Haberey, P; Lonsdorfer, J

    1996-01-01

    Exercise tolerance of heart transplant patients is often limited. Central and peripheral factors have been proposed to explain such exercise limitation but, to date, the leading factors remain to be determined. We examined how a short-term endurance exercise training programme may improve exercise capacity after heart transplantation, and whether atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) release may contribute to the beneficial effects of exercise training by minimizing ischaemia and/or cardiac and circulatory congestion through its vasodilatation and haemoconcentration properties. Seven heart transplant recipients performed a square-wave endurance exercise test before and after 6 weeks of supervised training, while monitoring haemodynamic parameters, ANP and catecholamine concentrations. After training, the maximal tolerated power and the total mechanical work load increased from 130.4 (SEM 6.5) to 150.0 (SEM 6.0) W (P < 0.05) and from 2.05 (SEM 0.1) to 3.58 (SEM 0.14) kJ.kg-1 (P < 0.001). Resting heart rate decreased from 100.0 (SEM 3.4) to 92.4 (SEM 3.5) beats.min-1 (P < 0.05) but resting and exercise induced increases in cardiac output, stroke volume, right atrial, pulmonary capillary wedge, systemic and pulmonary artery pressures were not significantly changed by training. Exercise-induced decrease of systemic vascular resistance was similar before and after training. After training arterio-venous differences in oxygen content were similar but maximal lactate concentrations decreased from 6.20 (SEM 0.55) to 4.88 (SEM 0.6) mmol.l-1 (P < 0.05) during exercise. Similarly, maximal exercise noradrenaline concentration tended to decrease from 2060 (SEM 327) to 1168 (SEM 227) pg.ml-1. A significant correlation was observed between lactate and catecholamines concentrations. The ANP concentration at rest and the exercise-induced ANP concentration did not change throughout the experiment [104.8 (SEM 13.1) pg.ml-1 vs 116.0 (SEM 13.5) pg.ml-1 and 200.0 (SEM 23.0) pg.ml-1 vs 206

  14. Characterization of solubilized atrial natriuretic peptide receptors from rat olfactory bulb and A10 cultured smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, T.R.; Zyskind, A.D.; Glembotski, C.C.

    1988-08-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) receptors from A10 cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and rat olfactory bulbs have been solubilized and then pharmacologically and biochemically compared. The dissociation constant for 125I-ANP(99-126) was 12.7 pM for the VSMC-derived receptor and 164 pM for the olfactory receptor. Competition binding between 125I-ANP(99-126) and several unlabeled ANP analogs with the soluble olfactory receptor, demonstrated a rank order potency of ANP(99-126) = ANP(103-126) much greater than ANP(103-123). However, the rank order potency of the soluble VSMC ANP receptor was ANP(99-126) = ANP(103-126) = ANP(103-123). Therefore, the olfactory ANP receptor appears to require the complete COOH-terminal sequence of ANP as compared with the VSMC ANP receptor. When the 2 soluble receptor preparations were applied to a GTP-agarose column, a portion of the olfactory ANP receptor was retained on the column and could be eluted with 5 mM GTP, while the VSMC ANP receptor did not adsorb to the column. Since the olfactory bulb ANP receptor has been shown to contain a binding component of 116 kDa, while the VSMC ANP receptor binding component is 66 kDa, these receptors appear to be similar to the 2 receptor classes described recently in which the 120 kDa receptor that binds GTP is postulated to be coupled to guanylate cyclase, while the 60 kDa receptor does not bind GTP, is not coupled to guanylate cyclase, and may possess a hormone clearance function. Taken together, these data indicate that cyclic GMP appears to be a second messenger for ANP in the brain.

  15. Sex Differences in the Beneficial Cardiac Effects of Chronic Treatment with Atrial Natriuretic Peptide In Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Mariana; Caniffi, Carolina; Bouchet, Gonzalo; Elesgaray, Rosana; Laughlin, Myriam Mac; Tomat, Analía; Arranz, Cristina; Costa, Maria A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate both the effects of chronic treatment with atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on systolic blood pressure (SBP), cardiac nitric oxide (NO) system, oxidative stress, hypertrophy, fibrosis and apoptosis in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), and sex-related differences in the response to the treatment. Methods 10 week-old male and female SHR were infused with ANP (100 ng/hr/rat) or saline (NaCl 0.9%) for 14 days (subcutaneous osmotic pumps). SBP was recorded and nitrites and nitrates excretion (NOx) were determined. After treatment, NO synthase (NOS) activity, eNOS expression, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and glutathione concentration were determined in left ventricle, as well as the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Morphological studies in left ventricle were performed in slices stained with hematoxylin-eosin or Sirius red to identify collagen as a fibrosis indicator; immunohistochemistry was employed for identification of transforming growth factor beta; and apoptosis was evaluated by Tunel assay. Results Female SHR showed lower SBP, higher NO-system activity and less oxidative stress, fibrosis and hypertrophy in left ventricle, as well as higher cardiac NOS activity, eNOS protein content and NOx excretion than male SHR. Although ANP treatment lowered blood pressure and increased NOS activity and eNOS expression in both sexes, cardiac NOS response to ANP was more marked in females. In left ventricle, ANP reduced TBARS and increased glutathione concentration and activity of CAT and SOD enzymes in both sexes, as well as GPx activity in males. ANP decreased fibrosis and apoptosis in hearts from male and female SHR but females showed less end-organ damage in heart. Chronic ANP treatment would ameliorate hypertension and end-organ damage in heart by reducing oxidative stress, increasing NO-system activity, and diminishing fibrosis and

  16. Dual role for adenine nucleotides in the regulation of the atrial natriuretic peptide receptor, guanylyl cyclase-A.

    PubMed

    Foster, D C; Garbers, D L

    1998-06-26

    The ability to both sensitize and desensitize a guanylyl cyclase receptor has not been previously accomplished in a broken cell or membrane preparation. The guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A) receptor is known to require both atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and an adenine nucleotide for maximal cyclase activation. When membranes from NIH 3T3 cells stably overexpressing GC-A were incubated with ATP, AMPPNP, or ATPgammaS, only ATPgammaS dramatically potentiated ANP-dependent cyclase activity. When the membranes were incubated with ATPgammaS and then washed, GC-A now became sensitive to ANP/AMPPNP stimulation, suggestive that thiophosphorylation had sensitized GC-A to ligand and adenine nucleotide binding. Consistent with this hypo- thesis, the ATPgammaS effects were both time- and concentration-dependent. Protein phosphatase stability of thiophosphorylation (ATPgammaS) relative to phosphorylation (ATP) appeared to explain the differential effects of the two nucleotides since microcystin, beta-glycerol phosphate, or okadaic acid coincident with ATP or ATPgammaS effectively sensitized GC-A to ligand stimulation over prolonged periods of time in either case. GC-A was phosphorylated in the presence of [gamma32P]ATP, and the magnitude of the phosphorylation was increased by the addition of microcystin. Thus, the phosphorylation of GC-A correlates with the acquisition of ligand sensitivity. The establishment of an in vitro system to sensitize GC-A demonstrates that adenine nucleotides have a daul function in the regulation of GC-A through both phosphorylation of and binding to regulatory sites. PMID:9632692

  17. Area postrema, a brain circumventricular organ, is the site of antidipsogenic action of circulating atrial natriuretic peptide in eels.

    PubMed

    Tsukada, Takehiro; Nobata, Shigenori; Hyodo, Susumu; Takei, Yoshio

    2007-11-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that circulating atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) potently reduces excess drinking to ameliorate hypernatremia in seawater (SW) eels. However, the cerebral mechanism underlying the antidipsogenic effect is largely unknown. To localize the ANP target site in the brain, we examined the distribution of ANP receptors (NPR-A) in eel brain immunohistochemically using an antiserum specific for eel NPR-A. The immunoreactive NPR-A was localized in the capillaries of various brain regions. In addition, immunoreactive neurons were observed mostly in the medulla oblongata, including the reticular formation, glossopharyngeal-vagal motor complex, commissural nucleus of Cajal, and area postrema (AP). Trypan Blue, which binds serum albumin and does not cross the blood-brain barrier, was injected peripherally and stained the neurons in the AP but not other NPR-A immunopositive neurons. These histological data indicate that circulating ANP acts on the AP, which was further confirmed by physiological experiments. To this end, the AP in SW eels was topically destroyed by electric cauterization or were by chemical lesion of its neurons by kainic acid, and ANP (100 pmol kg(-1)) was then injected into the circulation. Both heat-coagulative and chemical lesions to the AP greatly reduced an antidipsogenic effect of ANP, but the ANP effect was retained in sham-operated eels and in those with lesions outside the AP. These results strongly suggest that the AP, a circumventricular organ without a blood-brain barrier, serves as a functional window of access for the circulating ANP to inhibit drinking in eels. PMID:17981865

  18. Enhanced Hypertrophy In ob/ob Mice Due To An Impairment in Expression Of Atrial Natriuretic Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Mascareno, Eduardo; Beckles, Daniel; Dhar-Mascareno, Manya; Siddiqui, M.A.Q.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale We investigated the molecular mechanism(s) that play a role in leptin signaling during the development of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) due to pressure overload. To this end, ob/ob leptin deficient and C57BL/6J control mice were subjected transverse aortic constriction (TAC). Methods Control sham C57BL/6J and ob/ob mice, along with C57BL/6J and ob/ob leptin deficient mice were subjected transverse aortic constriction (TAC) for 15 days and then evaluated for morphological, physiological, and molecular changes associated with pressure overload hypertrophy. Results Evaluation by echocardiography revealed a significant increase in left ventricular mass (LVmass) and wall thickness in ob/ob mice subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC) as compared to C57BL/6J. Analysis of the expression of molecular markers of LVH, such as atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), revealed a blunted increase in the level of ANP in ob/ob mice as compared to C57BL/6J mice. We observed that leptin plays a role in modulating the transcriptional activity of the promoter of the ANP gene. Leptin acts by regulating NFATc4, a member of the nuclear factor activated T cell (NFAT) family of transcription factors in cardiomyocytes. Our in vivo studies revealed that ob/ob mice subjected to TAC failed to activate the NFATc4 in the heart, however, intraperitoneal injection of leptin in ob/ob mice restored the NFATc4 DNA-binding activity and induced expression of the ANP gene. Conclusion This study establishes the role of leptin as an anti-hypertrophic agent during pressure overload hypertrophy, and suggests that a key molecular event is the leptin mediated activation of NFATc4 that regulates the transcriptional activation of the ANP gene promoter. PMID:19560554

  19. Effectiveness of brain natriuretic peptide in predicting postoperative atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing non-cardiac thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Toufektzian, Levon; Zisis, Charalambos; Balaka, Christina; Roussakis, Antonios

    2015-05-01

    A best evidence topic was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels could effectively predict the occurrence of postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients undergoing non-cardiac thoracic surgery. A total of 14 papers were identified using the reported search, of which 5 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, date, journal, country, study type, population, outcomes and key results are tabulated. All studies were prospective observational, and all reported a significant association between BNP and N-terminal (NT)-proBNP plasma levels measured in the immediate preoperative period and the incidence of postoperative AF in patients undergoing either anatomical lung resections or oesophagectomy. One study reported a cut-off value of 30 pg/ml above which significantly more patients suffered from postoperative AF (P < 0.0001), while another one reported that this value could predict postoperative AF with a sensitivity of 77% and a specificity of 93%. Another study reported that patients with NT-proBNP levels of 113 pg/ml or above had an 8-fold increased risk of developing postoperative AF. These findings support that BNP or NT-proBNP levels, especially when determined during the preoperative period, if increased, are able to identify patients at risk for the development of postoperative AF after anatomical major lung resection or oesophagectomy. The same does not seem to be true for lesser lung resections. These high-risk patients might have a particular benefit from the administration of prophylactic antiarrhythmic therapy. PMID:25630332

  20. B-type natriuretic peptide and C-reactive protein in the prediction of atrial fibrillation risk: the CHARGE-AF Consortium of community-based cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Sinner, Moritz F.; Stepas, Katherine A.; Moser, Carlee B.; Krijthe, Bouwe P.; Aspelund, Thor; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Fontes, João D.; Janssens, A. Cecile J.W.; Kronmal, Richard A.; Magnani, Jared W.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Chamberlain, Alanna M.; Lubitz, Steven A.; Schnabel, Renate B.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Wang, Thomas J.; Agarwal, Sunil K.; McManus, David D.; Franco, Oscar H.; Yin, Xiaoyan; Larson, Martin G.; Burke, Gregory L.; Launer, Lenore J.; Hofman, Albert; Levy, Daniel; Gottdiener, John S.; Kääb, Stefan; Couper, David; Harris, Tamara B.; Astor, Brad C.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Hoogeveen, Ron C.; Arai, Andrew E.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Stricker, Bruno H.C.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Heckbert, Susan R.; Pencina, Michael J.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Alonso, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Aims B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and C-reactive protein (CRP) predict atrial fibrillation (AF) risk. However, their risk stratification abilities in the broad community remain uncertain. We sought to improve risk stratification for AF using biomarker information. Methods and results We ascertained AF incidence in 18 556 Whites and African Americans from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC, n=10 675), Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS, n = 5043), and Framingham Heart Study (FHS, n = 2838), followed for 5 years (prediction horizon). We added BNP (ARIC/CHS: N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide; FHS: BNP), CRP, or both to a previously reported AF risk score, and assessed model calibration and predictive ability [C-statistic, integrated discrimination improvement (IDI), and net reclassification improvement (NRI)]. We replicated models in two independent European cohorts: Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility Reykjavik Study (AGES), n = 4467; Rotterdam Study (RS), n = 3203. B-type natriuretic peptide and CRP were significantly associated with AF incidence (n = 1186): hazard ratio per 1-SD ln-transformed biomarker 1.66 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.56–1.76], P < 0.0001 and 1.18 (95% CI, 1.11–1.25), P < 0.0001, respectively. Model calibration was sufficient (BNP, χ2 = 17.0; CRP, χ2 = 10.5; BNP and CRP, χ2 = 13.1). B-type natriuretic peptide improved the C-statistic from 0.765 to 0.790, yielded an IDI of 0.027 (95% CI, 0.022–0.032), a relative IDI of 41.5%, and a continuous NRI of 0.389 (95% CI, 0.322–0.455). The predictive ability of CRP was limited (C-statistic increment 0.003). B-type natriuretic peptide consistently improved prediction in AGES and RS. Conclusion B-type natriuretic peptide, not CRP, substantially improved AF risk prediction beyond clinical factors in an independently replicated, heterogeneous population. B-type natriuretic peptide may serve as a benchmark to evaluate novel putative AF risk biomarkers. PMID:25037055

  1. Blockade of Multidrug Resistance-Associated Proteins Aggravates Acute Pancreatitis and Blunts Atrial Natriuretic Factor’s Beneficial Effect in Rats: Role of MRP4 (ABCC4)

    PubMed Central

    Ventimiglia, María Silvia; Najenson, Ana Clara; Perazzo, Juan Carlos; Carozzo, Alejandro; Vatta, Marcelo S; Davio, Carlos A; Bianciotti, Liliana G

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) stimulates secretin-evoked cAMP efflux through multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (MRP4) in the exocrine pancreas. Here we sought to establish in vivo whether this mechanism was involved in acute pancreatitis onset in the rat. Rats pretreated with or without probenecid (MRPs general inhibitor) were infused with secretin alone or with ANF. A set of these animals were given repetitive cerulein injections to induce acute pancreatitis. Plasma amylase and intrapancreatic trypsin activities were measured and histological examination of the pancreas performed. Secretin alone activated trypsinogen but induced no pancreatic histological changes. Blockade by probenecid in secretin-treated rats increased trypsin and also induced vacuolization, a hallmark of acute pancreatitis. ANF prevented the secretin response but in the absence of probenecid. In rats with acute pancreatitis, pretreatment with secretin aggravated the disease, but ANF prevented secretin-induced changes. Blockade of MRPs in rats with acute pancreatitis induced trypsinogen activation and larger cytoplasmic vacuoles as well as larger areas of necrosis and edema that were aggravated by secretin but not prevented by ANF. The temporal resolution of intracellular cAMP levels seems critical in the onset of acute pancreatitis, since secretin-evoked cAMP in a context of MRP inhibition makes the pancreas prone to injury in normal rats and aggravates the onset of acute pancreatitis. Present findings support a protective role for ANF mediated by cAMP extrusion through MRP4 and further suggest that the regulation of MRP4 by ANF would be relevant to maintain pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis. PMID:25569802

  2. Targeting of a distinctive protein-serine phosphatase to the protein kinase-like domain of the atrial natriuretic peptide receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Chinkers, M

    1994-01-01

    Protein kinase-related domains of unknown function are present in the JAK family of protein tyrosine kinases and in receptor/guanylyl cyclases. I used the yeast two-hybrid system to screen for proteins interacting with the kinase-like domain of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) receptor/guanylyl cyclase. A yeast strain was constructed expressing a fusion of this kinase-like domain to the lexA DNA-binding domain and containing a HIS3 gene under the control of lexA upstream activating sequences. These yeast cells were transformed with a plasmid library of mouse embryo cDNA fragments fused to the VP16 transcriptional activation domain. Cells containing VP16-fusion proteins interacting with the lexA-kinase-like domain fusion protein were selected by growth in the absence of histidine. A partial-length cDNA clone isolated by using this approach encoded a protein that interacted specifically with the ANP-receptor protein kinase-like domain both in yeast cells and in vitro. Tissue-specific expression of a 2.2-kb mRNA hybridizing to this cDNA paralleled the known pattern of ANP-receptor mRNA expression. A full-length cDNA clone isolated from a rat lung library was predicted to encode a 55-kDa protein containing at its amino terminus a targeting domain that binds to the ANP-receptor kinase-like domain and containing at its carboxyl terminus a putative protein-serine phosphatase domain. This protein is a possible candidate for the phosphatase involved in desensitizing the ANP receptor. Targeting of regulatory proteins may be an important function of protein kinase-like domains. Images PMID:7972012

  3. Mechanical ventilation with positive end-expiratory pressure decreases the circulating concentrations of the N-terminus and C-terminus of the atrial natriuretic factor prohormone.

    PubMed

    Vesely, D L; Salmon, J S

    1990-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation with positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) decreases urine output and urinary sodium excretion. The influence of PEEP during controlled mechanical ventilation on the circulating concentrations of the N-terminus and C-terminus of the atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) prohormone which both contain natriuretic and diuretic peptides was investigated in 7 patients with acute respiratory failure. The 98 amino acid (aa) N-terminus, the midportion of the N-terminus consisting of aa 31-67 of the 126 aa ANF prohormone (i.e., pro ANF 31-67) and the C-terminus (aa 99-126; ANF) were found to be significantly (p less than 0.05; ANOVA) elevated compared to 54 healthy volunteers during acute respiratory failure prior to institution of PEEP. With institution of 10 cm of H2O of PEEP all 7 patients had a significant (p less than 0.05) decrease in the circulating concentrations of pro ANFs 1-98, 31-67 and ANF. These findings suggest that the increased thoracic pressure secondary to PEEP which reduces venous return and lowers atrial filling pressure results in a decreased release of the N-terminus and C-terminus of the ANF prohormone. This decrease in the N-terminus and C-terminus of the ANF prohormone appears to represent a physiologic mechanism for restoration of intravascular volume, secondary to decreased sodium excretion. PMID:2151585

  4. Immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide and dopamine beta-hydroxylase in myocytes and chromaffin cells of the heart of the African lungfish, Protopterus aethiopicus.

    PubMed

    Larsen, T H; Helle, K B; Saetersdal, T

    1994-07-01

    The heart of the African lungfish, Protopterus aethiopicus, was examined for immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and dopamine beta-hydroxylase (D beta H) as markers for hormone secreting myocytes and chromaffin cells, respectively. Specific antibodies raised against rat alpha-ANP and rat D beta H were used for immunofluorescence microscopy and immunogold electron microscopy. D beta H-immunoreactive cells were restricted to subendocardial areas of the atrium whereas ANP immunoreactivity occurred throughout both the atrial and the ventricular myocardium, showing particularly strong staining intensity in the atrial myocytes. The granular ANP immunostaining in the atrial myocytes was frequently accumulated in the sarcoplasm. In the ventricular myocytes ANP immunoreactivity occurred as scattered granular staining throughout the sarcoplasm. ANP and D beta H immunofluorescence staining coincided with the presence of immunoreactive specific granules and secretory vesicles in the cardiac myocytes and chromaffin cells, respectively, as revealed by electron microscopy. The number of ANP-containing specific granules was generally high in the atrial myocytes, and they were frequently observed in clusters in subsarcolemmal areas. Granular frequency was considerably lower and the mean granular diameter was smaller (0.142 +/- 0.045 micron versus 0.213 +/- 0.049 micron) in the ventricular than in the atrial myocytes. The present results indicate that ANP and D beta H are phylogenetically highly conserved proteins from the dipnoi to the rat. The large amounts of ANP and of specific granules are consistent with an endocrine myocardium in the Protopterus heart. The presence of D beta H and secretory vesicles in the subendocardial chromaffin cells of the atrium suggests a local production of catecholamines from dopamine in the heart of this dipnoan. PMID:7926645

  5. The diagnostic performance of mid-regional portion of pro-atrial natriuretic peptide for the detection of left ventricular hypertrophy in Caucasian hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, S S; Davies, J E; Struck, J; Ng, L L

    2012-12-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is predictive of cardiovascular disease. The vasodilator, natriuretic and diuretic actions of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) support a role in the pathophysiology of hypertension. Measuring the redundant precursor fragment mid-regional portion of pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (MRproANP) overcomes the technical difficulties of quantifying the bioactive ANP. This study sought to investigate the diagnostic and prognostic utility of MRproANP in a hypertensive Caucasian patient population. A total of 194 hypertensive patients (39 patients with LVH, 69±7.82 years of age, 74% female vs 155 patients without LVH, 68±6.51 years of age, 71% female) were derived from a screening study. Plasma MRproANP concentrations were quantified using immunoluminometric assays. Hypertensive patients with LVH had higher MRproANP concentrations than those without LVH (103.04 (50.58) vs 84.11 pmol l(-1) (44.82); P=0.014). Independent predictors of left ventricular mass index were LogMRproANP (P=0.022), male gender (P<0.001), body mass index (P=0.001) and history of angina or myocardial infarction (P=0.009). The receiver operating curve for MRproANP for the detection of LVH was limited, yielding an area under the curve of only 0.628 (confidence interval 0.523-0.733; P=0.014). Therefore, the role of MRproANP may not lie in the diagnosis of LVH but in monitoring the response to therapy. A nonsignificant trend towards greater mortality in patients with above-median MRproANP levels compared with below-median levels (P=0.167) was observed. Larger studies are required to assess its prognostic utility further. PMID:22113442

  6. Efficacy and Safety of 1-Hour Infusion of Recombinant Human Atrial Natriuretic Peptide in Patients With Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guogan; Wang, Pengbo; Li, Yishi; Liu, Wenxian; Bai, Shugong; Zhen, Yang; Li, Dongye; Yang, Ping; Chen, Yu; Hong, Lang; Sun, Jianhui; Chen, Junzhu; Wang, Xian; Zhu, Jihong; Hu, Dayi; Li, Huimin; Wu, Tongguo; Huang, Jie; Tan, Huiqiong; Zhang, Jian; Liao, Zhongkai; Yu, Litian; Mao, Yi; Ye, Shaodong; Feng, Lei; Hua, Yihong; Ni, Xinhai; Zhang, Yuhui; Wang, Yang; Li, Wei; Luan, Xiaojun; Sun, Xiaolu; Wang, Sijia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of 1-h infusion of recombinant human atrial natriuretic peptide (rhANP) in combination with standard therapy in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). This was a phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial. Eligible patients with ADHF were randomized to receive a 1-h infusion of either rhANP or placebo at a ratio of 3:1 in combination with standard therapy. The primary endpoint was dyspnea improvement (a decrease of at least 2 grades of dyspnea severity at 12 h from baseline). Reduction in pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) 1 h after infusion was the co-primary endpoint for catheterized patients. Overall, 477 patients were randomized: 358 (93 catheterized) patients received rhANP and 118 (28 catheterized) received placebo. The percentage of patients with dyspnea improvement at 12 h was higher, although not statistically significant, in the rhANP group than in the placebo group (32.0% vs 25.4%, odds ratio=1.382, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.863–2.212, P = 0.17). Reduction in PCWP at 1 h was significantly greater in patients treated with rhANP than in patients treated with placebo (−7.74 ± 5.95 vs −1.82 ± 4.47 mm Hg, P < 0.001). The frequencies of adverse events and renal impairment within 3 days of treatment were similar between the 2 groups. Mortality at 1 month was 3.1% in the rhANP group vs 2.5% in the placebo group (hazard ratio = 1.21, 95% CI: 0.34–4.26; P > 0.99). 1-h rhANP infusion appears to result in prompt, transient hemodynamic improvement with a small, nonsignificant, effect on dyspnea in ADHF patients receiving standard therapy. The safety of 1-h infusion of rhANP seems to be acceptable. (WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform [ICTRP] number, ChiCTR-IPR-14005719.) PMID:26945407

  7. Relationship of Left Atrial Global Peak Systolic Strain with Left Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction and Brain Natriuretic Peptide Level in Patients Presenting with Non-ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Değirmenci, Hüsnü; Bakırcı, Eftal Murat; Demirtaş, Levent; Duman, Hakan; Hamur, Hikmet; Ceyhun, Gökhan; Topal, Ergün

    2014-01-01

    Background In patients presenting with non-ST elevation myocardial infarction, we investigated the relationship of left atrial deformational parameters evaluated by 2-dimensional speckle tracking imaging (2D-STI) with conventional echocardiographic diastolic dysfunction parameters and brain natriuretic peptide level. Material/Methods We enrolled 74 non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction patients who were treated with percutaneous coronary intervention and 58 healthy control subjects. Non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction patients had echocardiographic examination 48 h after the percutaneous coronary intervention procedure and venous blood samples were drawn simultaneously. In addition to conventional echocardiographic parameters, left atrial strain curves were obtained for each patient. Average peak left atrial strain values during left ventricular systole were measured. Results BNP values were higher in non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction patients compared to controls. Mean left atrium peak systolic global longitudinal strain in Group 2 (the control group) was higher than in the non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction group. Left atrium peak systolic global longitudinal strain was significantly correlated with left ventricular ejection fraction. There was a significant inverse correlation between left atrium peak systolic global longitudinal strain and brain natriuretic peptide level, left atrium volume maximum, and left atrium volume minimum. Conclusions Our study shows that Left atrium peak systolic global longitudinal strain values decreased consistently with deteriorating systolic and diastolic function in non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention. Left atrium peak systolic global longitudinal strain measurements may be helpful as a complimentary method to evaluate diastolic function in this patient population. PMID:25338184

  8. Treatment of hypertension with perindopril reduces plasma atrial natriuretic peptide levels, left ventricular mass, and improves echocardiographic parameters of diastolic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yalcin, F.; Aksoy, F. G.; Muderrisoglu, H.; Sabah, I.; Garcia, M. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypertension is a major independent risk factor for cardiac deaths, and diastolic dysfunction is a usual finding during the course of this disease. HYPOTHESIS: This study was designed to investigate the effects of chronic therapy with perindopril on left ventricular (LV) mass, left atrial size, diastolic function, and plasma level of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in patients with hypertension. METHODS: Twenty four patients who had not been previously taking any antihypertensive medication and without prior history of angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, dysrhythmias, valvular heart disease, or systemic illnesses received 4-8 mg/day of perindopril orally. Echocardiographic studies were acquired at baseline and 6 months after the initiation of therapy. RESULTS: Systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased from 174 +/- 19.7 and 107.5 +/- 7.8 mmHg to 134 +/- 10.6 and 82 +/- 6.7 mmHg, respectively (p < 0.001). Left ventricular mass decreased from 252.4 +/- 8.3 to 205.7 +/- 7.08 g and left atrial volume from 20.4 +/- 5.1 to 17.6 +/- 5.2 ml, respectively (p < 0.001). Transmitral Doppler early and atrial filling velocity ratio (E/A) increased from 0.69 +/- 0.06 to 0.92 +/- 0.05 m/s and plasma ANP level decreased from 71.9 +/- 11.7 to 35.3 +/- 7.8 pg/ml (p < 0.001). Reduction of LV mass correlated positively with a reduction in ANP levels (r = 0.66, p < 0.0005). CONCLUSIONS: Perindopril caused a significant reduction of LV mass, left atrial volume, and plasma ANP levels, as well as improvement in Doppler parameters of LV filling in this group of patients with hypertension.

  9. Atrial natriuretic peptide(31-67) inhibits Na+ transport in rabbit inner medullary collecting duct cells. Role of prostaglandin E2.

    PubMed Central

    Gunning, M E; Brady, H R; Otuechere, G; Brenner, B M; Zeidel, M L

    1992-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)(31-67), a portion of the atrial peptide prohormone, circulates in humans, and its plasma level varies with atrial pressure. Like the more widely studied carboxy-terminal fragment ANP(99-126), ANP(31-67) stimulates natriuresis and diuresis. We examined the mechanism of this natriuresis by measuring the effects of ANP(31-67) on Na+ transport in cells of the rabbit inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD). ANP(31-67) (10(-8) M) caused a 26 +/- 4% inhibition of oxygen consumption (QO2); half-maximal inhibition occurred at 10(-11) M, suggesting a physiologic effect. This effect was not additive with either ouabain or amiloride, suggesting that it reflected inhibition of Na+ transport-dependent QO2. ANP(31-67) reduced the amphotericin-induced stimulation of QO2 consistent with inhibition by this peptide of the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase. In addition, ANP(31-67) reduced ouabain-sensitive 86Rb+ uptake under Vmax conditions. Several lines of evidence indicated that PGE2, a known endogenous IMCD Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase inhibitor, mediates pump inhibition by ANP(31-67). Thus, ANP(31-67) inhibits Na+ transport by inhibiting the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase of IMCD cells, an effect mediated by the generation of PGE2. PMID:1533229

  10. Immunoreactive prohormone atrial natriuretic peptides 1-30 and 31-67 - Existence of a single circulating amino-terminal peptide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yu-Ming; Whitson, Peggy A.; Cintron, Nitza M.

    1990-01-01

    Sep-Pak C18 extraction of human plasma and radioimmunoassay using antibodies which recognize atrial natriuretic peptide (99-128) and the prohormone sequences 1-30 and 31-67 resulted in mean values from 20 normal subjects of 26.2 (+/- 9.2), 362 (+/- 173) and 368 (+/- 160) pg/ml, respectively. A high correlation coefficient between values obtained using antibodies recognizing prohormone sequences 1-30 and 31-67 was observed (R = 0.84). Extracted plasma immunoreactivity of 1-30 and 31-67 both eluted at 46 percent acetonitrile. In contrast, chromatographic elution of synthetic peptides 1-30 and 31-67 was observed at 48 and 39 percent acetonitrile, respectively. Data suggest that the radioimmunoassay of plasma using antibodies recognizing prohormone sequences 1-30 and 31-67 may represent the measurement of a unique larger amino-terminal peptide fragment containing antigenic sites recognized by both antisera.

  11. Natriuretic peptides in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

    PubMed

    Porzionato, Andrea; Macchi, Veronica; Rucinski, Marcin; Malendowicz, Ludwik K; De Caro, Raffaele

    2010-01-01

    Atrial (ANP), brain (BNP), and C-type (CNP) natriuretic peptides act by binding to three main subtypes of receptors, named NPR-A, -B, and -C. NPR-A and NPR-B are coupled with guanylate cyclase. Not only NPR-C is involved in removing natriuretic peptides from the circulation but it also acts through inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. NPR-A binds ANP and BNP; NPR-B preferentially binds CNP; and NPR-C binds all natriuretic peptides with similar affinities. All natriuretic peptides and their receptors are widely present in the hypothalamus, pituitary, adrenal cortex, and medulla. In the hypothalamus, they reduce norepinephrine release, inhibit oxytocin, vasopressin, corticotropin-releasing factor, and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone release. In the hypophysis, natriuretic peptides inhibit basal and induced ACTH release. Conversely, the effects of natriuretic peptides on secretion of growth, luteinizing, and follicle-stimulating hormones are not clear. Natriuretic peptides are known to inhibit basal and stimulated aldosterone secretion, through an increase of intracellular cGMP, and to inhibit the growth of zona glomerulosa. Inhibition or stimulation of glucocorticoid secretion by adrenocortical cells has been reported on the basis of the species involved, and an indirect effect mediated by adrenalmedullary cells has been hypothesized. In the adrenal medulla, natriuretic peptides inhibit catecholamine release and increase catecholamine uptake. It appears that natriuretic peptides may play a role in the pathophysiology of adrenocortical neoplasias and pheochromocytomas. PMID:20797680

  12. Transient silencing of Npr3 gene expression improved the circulatory levels of atrial natriuretic peptides and attenuated β-adrenoceptor activation- induced cardiac hypertrophic growth in experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Balaji; Tumala, Anusha; Subramanian, Vimala; Vellaichamy, Elangovan

    2016-07-01

    Natriuretic peptide receptor-C (NPR-C) is considered as a clearance receptor that maintains the circulatory levels of natriuretic peptides. It has been suggested that augmented expression of NPR-C as a cause for the diminished anti-hypertrophic action of natriuretic peptides in the failing heart. Hence, we sought to determine the level of Npr3 gene (coding for NPR-C) expression in the Isoproterenol (ISO) treated Wistar rats. In addition, we studied the effect of Npr3 gene silencing on the hypertrophic growth. A significant increase in heart weight-to-body weight ratio (HW/BW-24%,P<0.01), an indicator of cardiac hypertrophic growth was observed in the ISO (10mg/kg BW/day,i.p for 7 days) treated rats. As expected, the cardiac NPR-C protein expression was significantly increased by 4 fold as compared to control rats. In parallel, the circulatory atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) level was significantly decreased (2 fold) in ISO treated rats. Upon treatment with siRNA-Npr3, a significant decrease in the cardiac NPR-C protein expression (70%,P<0.01), HW/BW ratio (70%,P<0.01) and hypertrophic marker genes (α-Sk, β-MHC, c-fos, P<0.01, respectively) mRNA expression were observed. Interestingly, the circulatory ANP level was increased by 1.5 fold in the siRNA-Npr3 treated rats as compared to ISO treated rats. Moreover, the cardiac collagen content, matrixmetalloprotinases-2 (MMP-2) and enzymatic antioxidant status (P<0.01, respectively) were found to be restored back to near normal upon siRNA-Npr3 treatment. Taken together, the results of this study indicates that specific down-regulation of Npr3 gene improves the circulatory levels of ANP and antioxidant system and there by attenuates the β-adrenoceptor over-activation mediated cardiac hypertrophic growth in experimental rats. PMID:27108789

  13. Modulation by atrial natriuretic factor of receptor-mediated cyclic AMP-dependent responses in canine pulmonary artery during heart failure.

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, R.; Omar, H. A.; Fayngersh, R.; Shen, W.; Wang, J.; Gewitz, M. H.; Hintze, T. H.; Wolin, M. S.

    1996-01-01

    1. Pacing-induced congestive heart failure (CHF) in dogs is associated with increased plasma levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) and inhibition of receptor-mediated cyclic AMP-dependent relaxation in isolated pulmonary arteries (PA). Since ANF is known to be negatively coupled to adenylate cyclase, we studied cyclic AMP-mediated relaxation to isoprenaline (Iso) and arachidonic acid (AA) in PA from control dogs (C), dogs with pacing-induced CHF (CHF) and dogs with bilateral atrial appendectomy and CHF (ATR APP+CHF). 2. In CHF, plasma ANF levels increased from a baseline of 80 +/- 8 pg ml-1 to 283 +/- 64 pg ml-1 (P < 0.05), but the ATR APP+CHF group failed to show this increase (67 +/- 7 pg ml-1 vs 94 +/- 15 pg ml-1, P = NS). Plasma ANF levels, however, did not influence myocardial dysfunction in CHF. 3. The relaxation of 49 +/- 5% to 1 microM Iso in C was reduced to 23 +/- 4% in CHF (P < 0.05), but relaxation of 49 +/- 12% was observed in the ATR APP+CHF group (P = NS vs C). Relaxation responses to 10 microM AA were as follows: 77 +/- 5% (C, n = 8), 27 +/- 8% (CHF, n = 10, P < 0.05 vs C), and 93 +/- 5% (ATR APP+CHF, n = 5). The presence of CHF, or the plasma ANF levels, did not affect responses to cyclic GMP-mediated relaxing agents in PA. 4. These data indicate that the myocardial performance in CHF is not influenced by plasma ANF levels. However, altered cyclic AMP-mediated relaxation in PA during CHF is, in part, modulated by circulating ANF levels. PMID:8864519

  14. Natriuretic peptides in fish physiology.

    PubMed

    Loretz, C A; Pollina, C

    2000-02-01

    Natriuretic peptides exist in the fishes as a family of structurally-related isohormones including atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and ventricular natriuretic peptide (VNP); to date, brain natriuretic peptide (or B-type natriuretic peptide, BNP) has not been definitively identified in the fishes. Based on nucleotide and amino acid sequence similarity, the natriuretic peptide family of isohormones may have evolved from a neuromodulatory, CNP-like brain peptide. The primary sites of synthesis for the circulating hormones are the heart and brain; additional extracardiac and extracranial sites, including the intestine, synthesize and release natriuretic peptides locally for paracrine regulation of various physiological functions. Membrane-bound, guanylyl cyclase-coupled natriuretic peptide receptors (A- and B-types) are generally implicated in mediating natriuretic peptide effects via the production of cyclic GMP as the intracellular messenger. C- and D-type natriuretic peptide receptors lacking the guanylyl cyclase domain may influence target cell function through G(i) protein-coupled inhibition of membrane adenylyl cyclase activity, and they likely also act as clearance receptors for circulating hormone. In the few systems examined using homologous or piscine reagents, differential receptor binding and tissue responsiveness to specific natriuretic peptide isohormones is demonstrated. Similar to their acute physiological effects in mammals, natriuretic peptides are vasorelaxant in all fishes examined. In contrast to mammals, where natriuretic peptides act through natriuresis and diuresis to bring about long-term reductions in blood volume and blood pressure, in fishes the primary action appears to be the extrusion of excess salt at the gills and rectal gland, and the limiting of drinking-coupled salt uptake by the alimentary system. In teleosts, both hypernatremia and hypervolemia are effective stimuli for cardiac secretion of

  15. Syndecan-4 shedding is involved in the oxidative stress and inflammatory responses in left atrial tissue with valvular atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Han; Zhou, Qing; Xie, Jun; Li, Guan-Nan; Chen, Qin-Hua; Kang, Li-Na; Xu, Biao

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation play critical roles in the development and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF). In addition, syndecan-4 (Synd4) shedding induced by oxidative stress or inflammation plays a role in the migration of inflammatory cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that Synd4 shedding was also involved in the inflammatory response in atrial fibrillation patients with valvular heart disease. To confirm this suppose, left atrial appendages and clinical data were obtained from 65 patients with valvular disease undergoing valve surgery. Ten left atrial appendages obtained from healthy heart donors were used as controls. Analyses including histopathology, western blotting, and enzyme kinetics were performed to assess the oxidative injury, inflammation responses, and Synd4 shedding. The results showed that the inflammatory response and oxidative injury were increased significantly, whereas as levels of the Synd4 ectodomain was decreased significantly in AF patients. Furthermore, Synd4 ectodomain levels were correlated with atrial oxidative and inflammatory markers. The results showed that Synd4 shedding is a molecular pathological alteration in the development and maintenance of inflammation-associated AF. PMID:26261514

  16. Atrial natriuretic peptide down-regulates LPS/ATP-mediated IL-1β release by inhibiting NF-kB, NLRP3 inflammasome and caspase-1 activation in THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Mezzasoma, Letizia; Antognelli, Cinzia; Talesa, Vincenzo Nicola

    2016-02-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is an hormone/paracrine/autocrine factor regulating cardiovascular homeostasis by guanylyl cyclase natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR-1). ANP plays an important role also in regulating inflammatory and immune systems by altering macrophages functions and cytokines secretion. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is a potent pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in a wide range of biological responses, including the immunological one. Unlike other cytokines, IL-1β production is rigorously controlled. Primarily, NF-kB activation is required to produce pro-IL-1β; subsequently, NALP3 inflammasome/caspase-1 activation is required to cleave pro-IL-1β into the active secreted protein. NALP3 is a molecular platform capable of sensing a large variety of signals and a major player in innate immune defense. Due to their pleiotropism, IL-1β and NALP3 dysregulation is a common feature of a wide range of diseases. Therefore, identifying molecules regulating IL-1β/NALP3/caspase-1 expression is an important step in the development of new potential therapeutic agents. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of ANP on IL-1β/NALP3/caspase-1 expression in LPS/ATP-stimulated human THP1 monocytes. We provided new evidence of the direct involvement of ANP/NPR-1/cGMP axis on NF-kB/NALP3/caspase-1-mediated IL-1β release and NF-kB-mediated pro-IL-1β production. In particular, ANP inhibited both NF-kB and NALP3/caspase-1 activation leading to pro- and mature IL-1β down-regulation. Our data, pointing out a modulatory role of this endogenous peptide on IL-1β release and on NF-kB/NALP3/caspase-1 activation, indicate an important anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effect of ANP via these mechanisms. We suggest a possible employment of ANP for the treatment of inflammatory/immune-related diseases and IL-1β/NALP3-associated disorders, affecting millions of people worldwide. PMID:26616294

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Expresses a Functional Human Natriuretic Peptide Receptor Ortholog: Involvement in Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Rosay, Thibaut; Bazire, Alexis; Diaz, Suraya; Clamens, Thomas; Blier, Anne-Sophie; Mijouin, Lily; Hoffmann, Brice; Sergent, Jacques-Aurélien; Bouffartigues, Emeline; Boireau, Wilfrid; Vieillard, Julien; Hulen, Christian; Dufour, Alain; Harmer, Nicholas J.; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Considerable evidence exists that bacteria detect eukaryotic communication molecules and modify their virulence accordingly. In previous studies, it has been demonstrated that the increasingly antibiotic-resistant pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa can detect the human hormones brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) at micromolar concentrations. In response, the bacterium modifies its behavior to adapt to the host physiology, increasing its overall virulence. The possibility of identifying the bacterial sensor for these hormones and interfering with this sensing mechanism offers an exciting opportunity to directly affect the infection process. Here, we show that BNP and CNP strongly decrease P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. Isatin, an antagonist of human natriuretic peptide receptors (NPR), prevents this effect. Furthermore, the human NPR-C receptor agonist cANF4-23 mimics the effects of natriuretic peptides on P. aeruginosa, while sANP, the NPR-A receptor agonist, appears to be weakly active. We show in silico that NPR-C, a preferential CNP receptor, and the P. aeruginosa protein AmiC have similar three-dimensional (3D) structures and that both CNP and isatin bind to AmiC. We demonstrate that CNP acts as an AmiC agonist, enhancing the expression of the ami operon in P. aeruginosa. Binding of CNP and NPR-C agonists to AmiC was confirmed by microscale thermophoresis. Finally, using an amiC mutant strain, we demonstrated that AmiC is essential for CNP effects on biofilm formation. In conclusion, the AmiC bacterial sensor possesses structural and pharmacological profiles similar to those of the human NPR-C receptor and appears to be a bacterial receptor for human hormones that enables P. aeruginosa to modulate biofilm expression. PMID:26307165

  18. Association of Polymorphisms in the Atrial Natriuretic Factor Gene with the Risk of Essential Hypertension: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinyao; Wang, Zhenkun; Yu, Chuanhua

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies evaluating the association between the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) genetic polymorphism and the risk of essential hypertension (EH) have reported inconsistent results. The aim of this meta-analysis was to provide a more reliable estimation of the possible relationship between the atrial natriuretic peptide genetic polymorphism and the risk of essential hypertension (EH). Methods: Relevant articles were searched to identify all case-control or cohort design studies of the associations between ANP polymorphism and EH. The heterogeneity was checked using the Q test and the inconsistent index (I2). The odds ratio (OR) test and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated in a fixed or random effects model to evaluate the strength of association. Begg’s test and Egger’s test were applied to evaluate the publication bias. Results: A total of 25 case-control studies including 5520 cases and 5210 controls exploring the association between ANP polymorphism and EH were available for this meta-analysis. No significant association between the T2238C polymorphism and overall EH risk under the five genetic models was found (C vs. T: OR = 1.1, 95%CI = 0.94–1.2, p = 0.38; TC vs. TT: OR = 1.1, 95%CI = 0.88–1.5, p = 0.32; CC vs. TT: OR = 1.3, 95%CI = 0.90–1.9, p = 0.16; (CC + TC) vs. TT: OR = 1.1, 95%CI = 0.88–1.4, p = 0.35; CC vs. (TT + TC): OR = 1.1, 95%CI = 0.83–1.4, p = 0.55). We also found that the G1837A polymorphism had no significant association with overall EH risk (A vs. G: OR = 1.3, 95%CI = 0.96–1.9, p = 0.090; GA vs. GG: OR = 1.5, 95%CI = 0.83–2.6, p = 0.19; AA vs. GG: OR = 0.87, 95%CI = 0.34–2.3, p = 0.78; (AA + GA) vs. GG: OR = 1.5, 95%CI = 0.86–2.5, p = 0.17; AA vs. (GG + GA): OR = 1.3, 95%CI = 0.85–2.0, p = 0.22). In the analysis of the T1766C polymorphism, after removing the study of Nkeh, the 1766C allele suggested a protective effect in the model of TC vs. TT (OR = 0.64, 95%CI = 0.47–0.86, p = 0.003) and (CC + TC

  19. Reversibly bound chloride in the atrial natriuretic peptide receptor hormone-binding domain: Possible allosteric regulation and a conserved structural motif for the chloride-binding site

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Haruo; Qiu, Yue; Philo, John S; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Ogata, Craig M; Misono, Kunio S

    2010-01-01

    The binding of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) to its receptor requires chloride, and it is chloride concentration dependent. The extracellular domain (ECD) of the ANP receptor (ANPR) contains a chloride near the ANP-binding site, suggesting a possible regulatory role. The bound chloride, however, is completely buried in the polypeptide fold, and its functional role has remained unclear. Here, we have confirmed that chloride is necessary for ANP binding to the recombinant ECD or the full-length ANPR expressed in CHO cells. ECD without chloride (ECD(−)) did not bind ANP. Its binding activity was fully restored by bromide or chloride addition. A new X-ray structure of the bromide-bound ECD is essentially identical to that of the chloride-bound ECD. Furthermore, bromide atoms are localized at the same positions as chloride atoms both in the apo and in the ANP-bound structures, indicating exchangeable and reversible halide binding. Far-UV CD and thermal unfolding data show that ECD(−) largely retains the native structure. Sedimentation equilibrium in the absence of chloride shows that ECD(−) forms a strongly associated dimer, possibly preventing the structural rearrangement of the two monomers that is necessary for ANP binding. The primary and tertiary structures of the chloride-binding site in ANPR are highly conserved among receptor-guanylate cyclases and metabotropic glutamate receptors. The chloride-dependent ANP binding, reversible chloride binding, and the highly conserved chloride-binding site motif suggest a regulatory role for the receptor bound chloride. Chloride-dependent regulation of ANPR may operate in the kidney, modulating ANP-induced natriuresis. PMID:20066666

  20. Effects of immobilizations stress with or without water immersion on the expression of atrial natriuretic peptide in the hearts of two rat strains.

    PubMed

    Slavikova, Jana; Mistrova, Eliska; Klenerova, Vera; Kruzliak, Peter; Caprnda, Martin; Hynie, Sixtus; Sida, Pavel; Dvorakova, Magdalena Chottova

    2016-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is produced and released by mammalian cardiomyocytes and induces natriuresis, diuresis, and lowering of blood pressure. The present study examined localization of ANP and a possible role of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) activity on the expression of proANP gene in the heart. The Sprague Dawley (SD) and Lewis (LE) rat strains were used. The animals were exposed to the two types of stress: immobilization and immobilization combined with water immersion for 1 hour. Localization of ANP was detected by immunohistochemistry and expression of the proANP mRNA by real-time qPCR in all heart compartments of control and stressed animals after 1 and 3 hours after stress termination (IS1, IS3, ICS1, and ICS3). Relatively high density of ANP-immunoreactivity was observed in both atria of both rat strains. In control rats of both strains, the expression of the proANP mRNA was higher in the atria than in ventricles. In SD rats with the intact HPA axis, an upregulation of ANP gene expression was observed in the right atrium after IS1, in both atria and the left ventricle after IS3 and in the left atrium and the left ventricle after ICS3. In LE rats with a blunted reactivity of the HPA axis, no increase or even a downregulation of the gene expression was observed. Thus, acute stress-induced increase in the expression of the proANP gene is related to the activity of the HPA axis. It may have relevance to ANP-induced protection of the heart. PMID:27508036

  1. Reversibly Bound Chloride in the Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Receptor Hormone Binding Domain: Possible Allosteric Regulation and a Conserved Structural Motif for the Chloride-binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, H.; Qiu, Y; Philo, J; Arakawa, T; Ogata, C; Misono, K

    2010-01-01

    The binding of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) to its receptor requires chloride, and it is chloride concentration dependent. The extracellular domain (ECD) of the ANP receptor (ANPR) contains a chloride near the ANP-binding site, suggesting a possible regulatory role. The bound chloride, however, is completely buried in the polypeptide fold, and its functional role has remained unclear. Here, we have confirmed that chloride is necessary for ANP binding to the recombinant ECD or the full-length ANPR expressed in CHO cells. ECD without chloride (ECD(-)) did not bind ANP. Its binding activity was fully restored by bromide or chloride addition. A new X-ray structure of the bromide-bound ECD is essentially identical to that of the chloride-bound ECD. Furthermore, bromide atoms are localized at the same positions as chloride atoms both in the apo and in the ANP-bound structures, indicating exchangeable and reversible halide binding. Far-UV CD and thermal unfolding data show that ECD(-) largely retains the native structure. Sedimentation equilibrium in the absence of chloride shows that ECD(-) forms a strongly associated dimer, possibly preventing the structural rearrangement of the two monomers that is necessary for ANP binding. The primary and tertiary structures of the chloride-binding site in ANPR are highly conserved among receptor-guanylate cyclases and metabotropic glutamate receptors. The chloride-dependent ANP binding, reversible chloride binding, and the highly conserved chloride-binding site motif suggest a regulatory role for the receptor bound chloride. Chloride-dependent regulation of ANPR may operate in the kidney, modulating ANP-induced natriuresis.

  2. Effects of immobilizations stress with or without water immersion on the expression of atrial natriuretic peptide in the hearts of two rat strains

    PubMed Central

    Slavikova, Jana; Mistrova, Eliska; Klenerova, Vera; Kruzliak, Peter; Caprnda, Martin; Hynie, Sixtus; Sida, Pavel; Dvorakova, Magdalena Chottova

    2016-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is produced and released by mammalian cardiomyocytes and induces natriuresis, diuresis, and lowering of blood pressure. The present study examined localization of ANP and a possible role of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) activity on the expression of proANP gene in the heart. The Sprague Dawley (SD) and Lewis (LE) rat strains were used. The animals were exposed to the two types of stress: immobilization and immobilization combined with water immersion for 1 hour. Localization of ANP was detected by immunohistochemistry and expression of the proANP mRNA by real-time qPCR in all heart compartments of control and stressed animals after 1 and 3 hours after stress termination (IS1, IS3, ICS1, and ICS3). Relatively high density of ANP-immunoreactivity was observed in both atria of both rat strains. In control rats of both strains, the expression of the proANP mRNA was higher in the atria than in ventricles. In SD rats with the intact HPA axis, an upregulation of ANP gene expression was observed in the right atrium after IS1, in both atria and the left ventricle after IS3 and in the left atrium and the left ventricle after ICS3. In LE rats with a blunted reactivity of the HPA axis, no increase or even a downregulation of the gene expression was observed. Thus, acute stress-induced increase in the expression of the proANP gene is related to the activity of the HPA axis. It may have relevance to ANP-induced protection of the heart. PMID:27508036

  3. Right Ventricular and Right Atrial Involvement Can Predict Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed Central

    Doesch, Christina; Lossnitzer, Dirk; Rudic, Boris; Tueluemen, Erol; Budjan, Johannes; Haubenreisser, Holger; Henzler, Thomas; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Borggrefe, Martin; Papavassiliu, Theano

    2016-01-01

    Objectives and Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with clinical deterioration, stroke and disability in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluated cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR)-derived determinants for the occurrence of AF in patients with HCM. Methods: 98 Patients with HCM and 30 healthy controls underwent CMR and were followed-up for 6±3 years. Results: 19 (19.4%) patients presented with AF at initial diagnosis, 19 (19.4%) developed AF during follow-up and 60 (61.2%) remained in sinus rhythm (SR). Compared to healthy controls, patients with HCM who remained in SR presented with significantly increased left ventricular mass, an elevated left ventricular remodeling index, enlarged left atrial volumes and reduced septal mitral annular plane systolic excursion (MAPSE) compared to healthy controls. Whereas HCM patients who presented with AF at initial diagnosis and those who developed AF during follow-up additionally presented with reduced tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) and right atrial (RA) dilatation. Receiver-operator curve analysis indicated good predictive performance of TAPSE, RA diameter and septal MAPSE (AUC 0.73, 0.69 and 0.71, respectively) to detect patients at risk of developing AF. Conclusion: Reduced MAPSE measurements and enlarged LA volumes seems to be a common feature in patients with HCM, whereas reduced TAPSE and RA dilatation only seem to be altered in patients with history of AF and those developing AF. Therefore, they could serve as easy determinable markers of AF in patients with HCM. PMID:26812947

  4. Natriuretic peptides and their therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Cho, Y; Somer, B G; Amatya, A

    1999-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides are a group of naturally occurring substances that act in the body to oppose the activity of the renin-angiotensin system. There are three major natriuretic peptides: atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), which is synthesized in the atria; brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), which is synthesized in the ventricles; and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), which is synthesized in the brain. Both ANP and BNP are released in response to atrial and ventricular stretch, respectively, and will cause vasorelaxation, inhibition of aldosterone secretion in the adrenal cortex, and inhibition of renin secretion in the kidney. Both ANP and BNP will cause natriuresis and a reduction in intravascular volume, effects amplified by antagonism of antidiuretic hormone (ADH). The physiologic effects of CNP are different from those of ANP and BNP. CNP has a hypotensive effect, but no significant diuretic or natriuretic actions. Three natriuretic peptide receptors (NPRs) have been described that have different binding capacities for ANP, BNP, and CNP. Removal of the natriuretic peptides from the circulation is affected mainly by binding to clearance receptors and enzymatic degradation in the circulation. Increased blood levels of natriuretic peptides have been found in certain disease states, suggesting a role in the pathophysiology of those diseases, including congestive heart failure (CHF), systemic hypertension, and acute myocardial infarction. The natriuretic peptides also serve as disease markers and indicators of prognosis in various cardiovascular conditions. The natriuretic peptides have been used in the treatment of disease, with the most experience with intravenous BNP in the treatment of CHF. Another pharmacologic approach being used is the inhibition of natriuretic peptide metabolism by neutral endopeptidase (NEP) inhibitor drugs. The NEP inhibitors are currently being investigated as treatments for CHF and systemic hypertension. PMID:11720638

  5. THE ATRIAL NATRIURETIC PEPTIDE GENETIC VARIANT RS5065 AND RISK FOR CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE IN THE GENERAL COMMUNITY: A NINE-YEAR FOLLOW-UP STUDY RR

    PubMed Central

    Cannone, Valentina; Huntley, Brenda; Olson, Timothy M.; Heublein, Denise M.; Scott, Christopher; Bailey, Kent R.; Redfield, Margaret M.; Rodeheffer, Richard J.; Burnett, John C.

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the phenotype associated with the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) genetic variant rs5065 in a random community-based sample. We also assessed and compared the biological action of two concentrations (10−10 mol/L, 10−8 mol/L) of ANP and ANP-RR, the protein variant encoded by the minor allele of rs5065, on activation of the guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A) and B (GC-B) receptors, production of the second messenger 3’,5’cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) in endothelial cells and endothelial permeability. Rs5065 genotypes were determined in a cross-sectional adult cohort from Olmsted County, MN (n=1623). Genotype frequencies for rs5065 were 75%, 24%, and 1% for TT, TC and CC, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that the C allele was associated with increased risk of cerebrovascular accident (hazard ratio 1.43; 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.86; p= 0.009) and higher prevalence of myocardial infarction (odd ratio = 1.82; 95% CI, 1.07 to 3.09; p= 0.026). ANP-RR 10−8mol/L activated the GC-A receptor (83.07 ±8.31 vs no treatment 0.18±0.04 6-per well, p=0.006), ANP-RR 10−10mol/L did not. Neither 10−8mol/L nor 10−10mol/L ANP-RR activated GC-B receptor (p=0.10, p= 0.35). ANP 10−8mol/L and ANP-RR 10−8mol/L stimulated cGMP production in endothelial cells similarly (p=0.58). Both concentrations of ANP-RR significantly enhanced human aortic endothelial cell permeability (69 vs 29 RFUs, p=0.012; 58 vs 39 RFUs, p= 0.015) compared to ANP. The minor allele of rs5065 was associated with increased cardiovascular risk. ANP-RR activated the GC-A receptor, increased cGMP in endothelial cells and when compared to ANP, ANP-RR augmented endothelial cell permeability. PMID:24041948

  6. Mid-regional pro-atrial natriuretic peptide as a prognostic marker for all-cause mortality in patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    von Haehling, Stephan; Papassotiriou, Jana; Hartmann, Oliver; Doehner, Wolfram; Stellos, Konstantinos; Geisler, Tobias; Wurster, Thomas; Schuster, Andreas; Botnar, Rene M; Gawaz, Meinrad; Bigalke, Boris

    2012-11-01

    In the present study, we investigated the prognostic value of MR-proANP (mid-regional pro-atrial natriuretic peptide). We consecutively evaluated a catheterization laboratory cohort of 2700 patients with symptomatic CAD (coronary artery disease) [74.1% male; ACS (acute coronary syndrome), n=1316; SAP (stable angina pectoris), n=1384] presenting to the Cardiology Department of a large primary care hospital, all of whom underwent coronary angiography. Serum MR-proANP and other laboratory markers were sampled at the time of presentation or in the catheterization laboratory. Clinical outcome was assessed by hospital chart analysis and telephone interviews. The primary end point was all-cause death at 3 months after enrolment. Follow-up data were complete in 2621 patients (97.1%). Using ROC (receiver operating characteristic) curves, the AUC (area under the curve) of 0.73 [95% CI (confidence interval), 0.67-0.79] for MR-proANP was significantly higher compared with 0.58 (95% CI, 0.55-0.62) for Tn-I (troponin-I; DeLong test, P=0.0024). According to ROC analysis, the optimal cut-off value of MR-proANP was at 236 pmol/l for all-cause death, which helped to find a significantly increased rate of all-cause death (n=76) at 3 months in patients with elevated baseline concentrations (≥236 pmol/l) compared with patients with a lower concentration level in Kaplan-Meier survival analysis (log rank, P<0.001). The predictive performance of MR-proANP was independent of other clinical variables or cardiovascular risk factors, and superior to that of Tn-I or other cardiac biomarkers (all: P<0.0001). MR-proANP may help in the prediction of all-cause death in patients with symptomatic CAD. Further studies should verify its prognostic value and confirm the appropriate cut-off value. PMID:22690794

  7. Solubilization and molecular characterization of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) receptor in human platelets: Comparison with ANP receptors in rat tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffrin, E.L.; Carrier, F.; Thibault, G.; Deslongchamps, M. )

    1991-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated the presence of binding sites for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in human platelets. These sites have pharmacological characteristics similar to those of rat vascular smooth muscle. They are subject to regulation by circulating levels of ANP in plasma, varying inversely with the latter after high sodium intake, in arterial hypertension and congestive heart failure. We have now solubilized these platelet receptors with the nonionic detergent Triton X-100 (0.6%). The preparations were incubated with (125I)ANP in the presence of increasing concentrations of ANP-(99-126), ANP-(101-126), ANP-(103-126), and ANP-(103-123). The order of potency of these peptides to displace (125I)ANP was similar for the solubilized and particulate receptor. Bound (125I)ANP was covalently cross-linked to the receptor with 5 mM disuccinimidyl suberate. Autoradiography of the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel showed that (125I)ANP specifically interacts with a 125-kDa membrane component, some of which may be reduced by 2% mercaptoethanol or 10 mmol/L dithiothreitol to a 70-kDa species. A small proportion of a 70-kDa peptide is also found under nonreducing conditions. The concentration of ANP-(99-126) that inhibits binding of (125I)ANP by 50% to both the 125-kDa and the 70-kDa species was 0.1 nM, while that for ANP-(103-123) was 3 nM. The internally ring-deleted analog Des(Gln116,Ser117,Gly118,Leu119,Gly120)ANP -(102-121) or C-ANP displaced with equal potency ANP binding to the high and low mol wt (Mr) bands, as also found in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells, but not in the mesemteric arteries these cells are derived from. In the latter, C-ANP displaced only binding from the lower Mr band. These results show that the ANP receptor in human platelets is heterogeneous.

  8. Natriuretic peptides in cardiovascular diseases: current use and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Volpe, Massimo; Rubattu, Speranza; Burnett, John

    2014-01-01

    The natriuretic peptides (NPs) family, including atrial, B-type, and C-type NPs, is a group of hormones possessing relevant haemodynamic and anti-remodelling actions in the cardiovascular (CV) system. Due to their diuretic, natriuretic, vasorelaxant, anti-proliferative, and anti-hypertrophic effects, they are involved in the pathogenic mechanisms leading to major CV diseases, such as heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease, hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy, and cerebrovascular accidents. Blood levels of NPs have established predictive value in the diagnosis of HF, as well as for its prognostic stratification. In addition, they provide useful clinical information in hypertension and in both stable and unstable coronary artery disease. Structural abnormalities of atrial natriuretic peptide gene (NPPA), as well as genetically induced changes in circulating levels of NPs, have a pathogenic causal link with CV diseases and represent emerging markers of CV risk. Novel NP-based therapeutic strategies are currently under advanced clinical development, as they are expected to contribute to the future management of hypertension and HF. The present review provides a current appraisal of NPs’ clinical implications and a critical perspective of the potential therapeutic impact of pharmacological manipulation of this class of CV hormones. PMID:24227810

  9. Inhibition of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) C receptor expression by antisense oligodeoxynucleotides in A10 vascular smooth-muscle cells is associated with attenuation of ANP-C-receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Palaparti, A; Li, Y; Anand-Srivastava, M B

    2000-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) mediates a variety of physiological effects through its interaction with ANP-A, ANP-B or ANP-C receptors. However, controversies exist regarding the involvement of ANP-C receptor and adenylyl cyclase/cAMP signal-transduction systems to which these receptors are coupled in mediating these responses. In the present studies, we have employed an antisense approach to eliminate the ANP-C receptor and to examine the effect of this elimination on adenylyl cyclase inhibition. An 18-mer antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide (OH-2) targeted at the initiation codon of the ANP-C receptor was used to examine its effects on the expression of the ANP-C receptor and ANP-C-receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase in vascular smooth-muscle cells (A10). Treatment of the cells with antisense oligonucleotide resulted in complete attenuation of C-ANP(4-23) [des(Gln(18), Ser(19), Gln(20), Leu(21), Gly(22))ANP(4-23)-NH(2)]-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase, whereas sense and missense oligomers did not affect the inhibition of adenylyl cyclase by C-ANP(4-23). In addition, the stimulatory effects of guanine nucleotides, isoproterenol, sodium fluoride and forskolin as well as the inhibitory effects of angiotensin II on adenylyl cyclase were not affected by antisense-oligonucleotide treatment. The attenuation of C-ANP(4-23)-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase by antisense oligonucleotide was dose- and time-dependent. A complete attenuation of ANP-C-receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase was observed at 2.5 microM. In addition, treatment of the cells with antisense oligonucleotide and not with sense or missense oligomers resulted in the inhibition of the levels of ANP-C-receptor protein and mRNA as determined by immunoblotting and Northern blotting using antisera against the ANP-C receptor and a cDNA probe of the ANP-C receptor respectively. On the other hand, ANP-A/B-receptor-mediated increases in cGMP levels were not

  10. Acetylcholine Promotes Ca2+and NO-Oscillations in Adipocytes Implicating Ca2+→NO→cGMP→cADP-ribose→Ca2+ Positive Feedback Loop - Modulatory Effects of Norepinephrine and Atrial Natriuretic Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Turovsky, Egor A.; Turovskaya, Mariya V.; Dolgacheva, Ludmila P.; Zinchenko, Valery P.; Dynnik, Vladimir V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated possible mechanisms of autoregulation of Ca2+ signalling pathways in adipocytes responsible for Ca2+ and NO oscillations and switching phenomena promoted by acetylcholine (ACh), norepinephrine (NE) and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP). Methods Fluorescent microscopy was used to detect changes in Ca2+ and NO in cultures of rodent white adipocytes. Agonists and inhibitors were applied to characterize the involvement of various enzymes and Ca2+-channels in Ca2+ signalling pathways. Results ACh activating M3-muscarinic receptors and Gβγ protein dependent phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase induces Ca2+ and NO oscillations in adipocytes. At low concentrations of ACh which are insufficient to induce oscillations, NE or α1, α2-adrenergic agonists act by amplifying the effect of ACh to promote Ca2+ oscillations or switching phenomena. SNAP, 8-Br-cAMP, NAD and ANP may also produce similar set of dynamic regimes. These regimes arise from activation of the ryanodine receptor (RyR) with the implication of a long positive feedback loop (PFL): Ca2+→ NO→cGMP→cADPR→Ca2+, which determines periodic or steady operation of a short PFL based on Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release via RyR by generating cADPR, a coagonist of Ca2+ at the RyR. Interplay between these two loops may be responsible for the observed effects. Several other PFLs, based on activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase or of protein kinase B by Ca2+-dependent kinases, may reinforce functioning of main PFL and enhance reliability. All observed regimes are independent of operation of the phospholipase C/Ca2+-signalling axis, which may be switched off due to negative feedback arising from phosphorylation of the inositol-3-phosphate receptor by protein kinase G. Conclusions This study presents a kinetic model of Ca2+-signalling system operating in adipocytes and integrating signals from various agonists, which describes it as multivariable multi feedback network with a family of nested

  11. ENaC is regulated by natriuretic peptide receptor-dependent cGMP signaling

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lai-Jing; Alli, Abdel A.; Eaton, Douglas C.

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial sodium channels (ENaCs) located at the apical membrane of polarized epithelial cells are regulated by the second messenger guanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP). The mechanism for this regulation has not been completely characterized. Guanylyl cyclases synthesize cGMP in response to various intracellular and extracellular signals. We investigated the regulation of ENaC activity by natriuretic peptide-dependent activation of guanylyl cyclases in Xenopus 2F3 cells. Confocal microscopy studies show natriuretic peptide receptors (NPRs), including those coupled to guanylyl cyclases, are expressed at the apical membrane of 2F3 cells. Single-channel patch-clamp studies using 2F3 cells revealed that atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) or 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-cGMP, but not C-type natriuretic peptide or cANP, decreased the open probability of ENaC. This suggests that NPR-A, but not NPR-B or NPR-C, is involved in the natriuretic peptide-mediated regulation of ENaC activity. Also, it is likely that a signaling pathway involving cGMP and nitric oxide (NO) are involved in this mechanism, since inhibitors of soluble guanylyl cyclase, protein kinase G, inducible NO synthase, or an NO scavenger blocked or reduced the effect of ANP on ENaC activity. PMID:23324181

  12. Plasma cardiac natriuretic peptide determination as a screening test for the detection of patients with mild left ventricular impairment.

    PubMed Central

    Omland, T.; Aakvaag, A.; Vik-Mo, H.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the usefulness of measuring the cardiac natriuretic peptides, atrial natriuretic factor, N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic factor, and brain natriuretic peptide, as screening tests for identifying patients with mild left ventricular impairment. DESIGN: Cross-sectional evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of the cardiac natriuretic peptides. SETTING: Cardiac catheterisation unit, Norwegian central hospital. PATIENTS: A consecutive series of 254 patients undergoing diagnostic left-sided cardiac catheterisation. One hundred and twenty eight of these patients had a history of previous myocardial infarction. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The presence of normal and impaired left ventricular function, as evaluated by logistic regression analysis and estimation of the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (an index of overall diagnostic accuracy). Ventricular function was assessed by the measurement of left ventricular end diastolic pressure and angiographically determined left ventricular ejection fraction. RESULTS: Logistic regression analysis showed that plasma brain natriuretic peptide was the best predictor of increased left ventricular end diastolic pressure (> or = 15 mm Hg) (P < 0.001), decreased left ventricular ejection fraction (< or = 45%) (P < 0.001), and the combination of left ventricular ejection fraction < or = 45% and left ventricular end diastolic pressure > or = 15 mm Hg (P < 0.001). The areas under the ROC function for the detection of left ventricular dysfunction were 0.789 for brain natriuretic peptide, 0.665 for atrial natriuretic factor, and 0.610 for N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic factor. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma brain natriuretic peptide seemed to be a better indicator of left ventricular function than plasma atrial natriuretic factor or N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic factor. However, the overall diagnostic accuracy of circulating atrial natriuretic factor, N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic factor, and

  13. Natriuretic peptides in relation to the cardiac innervation and conduction system.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Magnus

    2002-09-01

    During the past two decades, the heart has been known to undergo endocrine action, harbouring peptides with hormonal activities. These, termed "atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)," "brain natriuretic peptide (BNP)," and "C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP)," are polypeptides mainly produced in the cardiac myocardium, where they are released into the circulation, producing profound hypotensive effects due to their diuretic, natriuretic, and vascular dilatory properties. It is, furthermore, well established that cardiac disorders such as congestive heart failure and different forms of cardiomyopathy are combined with increased expression of ANP and BNP, leading to elevated levels of these peptides in the plasma. Besides the occurrence of natriuretic peptides (NPs) in the ordinary myocardium, the presence of ANP in the cardiac conduction system has been described. There is also evidence of ANP gene expression in nervous tissue such as the nodose ganglion and the superior cervical ganglion of the rat, ganglia known to be involved in the neuronal regulation of the heart. Furthermore, in the mammalian heart, ANP appears to affect the cardiac autonomic nervous system by sympathoinhibitory and vagoexcitatory actions. This article provides an overview of the relationship between the cardiac conduction system, the cardiac innervation and NPs in the mammalian heart and provides data for the concept that ANP is also involved in neuronal cardiac regulation. PMID:12226807

  14. Signaling Pathways Involved in Renal Oxidative Injury: Role of the Vasoactive Peptides and the Renal Dopaminergic System

    PubMed Central

    Rukavina Mikusic, N. L.; Kravetz, M. C.; Kouyoumdzian, N. M.; Della Penna, S. L.; Rosón, M. I.; Fernández, B. E.; Choi, M. R.

    2014-01-01

    The physiological hydroelectrolytic balance and the redox steady state in the kidney are accomplished by an intricate interaction between signals from extrarenal and intrarenal sources and between antinatriuretic and natriuretic factors. Angiotensin II, atrial natriuretic peptide and intrarenal dopamine play a pivotal role in this interactive network. The balance between endogenous antioxidant agents like the renal dopaminergic system and atrial natriuretic peptide, by one side, and the prooxidant effect of the renin angiotensin system, by the other side, contributes to ensuring the normal function of the kidney. Different pathological scenarios, as nephrotic syndrome and hypertension, where renal sodium excretion is altered, are associated with an impaired interaction between two natriuretic systems as the renal dopaminergic system and atrial natriuretic peptide that may be involved in the pathogenesis of renal diseases. The aim of this review is to update and comment the most recent evidences about the intracellular pathways involved in the relationship between endogenous antioxidant agents like the renal dopaminergic system and atrial natriuretic peptide and the prooxidant effect of the renin angiotensin system in the pathogenesis of renal inflammation. PMID:25436148

  15. Vascular Relaxation Induced by C-Type Natriuretic Peptide Involves the Ca2+/NO-Synthase/NO Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Fernanda A.; Restini, Carolina B. A.; Grando, Marcella D.; Ramalho, Leandra N. Z.; Bendhack, Lusiane M.

    2014-01-01

    Aims C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and nitric oxide (NO) are endothelium-derived factors that play important roles in the regulation of vascular tone and arterial blood pressure. We hypothesized that NO produced by the endothelial NO-synthase (NOS-3) contributes to the relaxation induced by CNP in isolated rat aorta via activation of endothelial NPR-C receptor. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the putative contribution of NO through NPR-C activation in the CNP induced relaxation in isolated conductance artery. Main Methods Concentration-effect curves for CNP were constructed in aortic rings isolated from rats. Confocal microscopy was used to analyze the cytosolic calcium mobilization induced by CNP. The phosphorylation of the residue Ser1177 of NOS was analyzed by Western blot and the expression and localization of NPR-C receptors was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Key Findings CNP was less potent in inducing relaxation in denuded endothelium aortic rings than in intact ones. L-NAME attenuated the potency of CNP and similar results were obtained in the presence of hydroxocobalamin, an intracellular NO0 scavenger. CNP did not change the phosphorylation of Ser1177, the activation site of NOS-3, when compared with control. The addition of CNP produced an increase in [Ca2+]c in endothelial cells and a decrease in [Ca2+]c in vascular smooth muscle cells. The NPR-C-receptors are expressed in endothelial and adventitial rat aortas. Significance These results suggest that CNP-induced relaxation in intact aorta isolated from rats involves NO production due to [Ca2+]c increase in endothelial cells possibly through NPR-C activation expressed in these cells. The present study provides a breakthrough in the understanding of the close relationship between the vascular actions of nitric oxide and CNP. PMID:24787693

  16. A Butterfly-Shaped Primary Cardiac Lymphoma That Showed Bi-Atrial Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jung Sun; Park, Mahn-Won; Kim, Hyoung Doo; Baek, Ju Yeal; Youn, Ho-Joong; Seung, Ki-Bae; Kim, Jae-Hyung

    2012-01-01

    We described here a patient who presented with symptoms of heart failure who was found to have severe bilateral impairment of atrioventricular inflow. Primary cardiac lymphoma (PCL) with extensive involvement of the two atria, pericardium and myocardium is an extremely rare tumor in immunocompetent patients. We report here a case of PCL in an immunocompetent patient with involvement of both atria and the atrial septum. The tumor had a butterfly shape. We could not do surgical excision because of the massive pericardiac invasion. The diagnosis was B-cell lymphoma and this was confirmed by the pericardiac biopsy. PMID:22363383

  17. Nonthyroidal Illness Syndrome in Cardiac Illness Involves Elevated Concentrations of 3,5-Diiodothyronine and Correlates with Atrial Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Johannes W.; Müller, Patrick; Schiedat, Fabian; Schlömicher, Markus; Strauch, Justus; Chatzitomaris, Apostolos; Klein, Harald H.; Mügge, Andreas; Köhrle, Josef; Rijntjes, Eddy; Lehmphul, Ina

    2015-01-01

    Background Although hyperthyroidism predisposes to atrial fibrillation, previous trials have suggested decreased triiodothyronine (T3) concentrations to be associated with postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF). Therapy with thyroid hormones (TH), however, did not reduce the risk of POAF. This study reevaluates the relation between thyroid hormone status, atrial electromechanical function and POAF. Methods Thirty-nine patients with sinus rhythm and no history of atrial fibrillation or thyroid disease undergoing cardiac surgery were prospectively enrolled. Serum concentrations of thyrotropin, free (F) and total (T) thyroxine (T4) and T3, reverse (r)T3, 3-iodothyronamine (3-T1AM) and 3,5-diiodothyronine (3,5-T2) were measured preoperatively, complemented by evaluation of echocardiographic and electrophysiological parameters of cardiac function. Holter-ECG and telemetry were used to screen for POAF for 10 days following cardiac surgery. Results Seven of 17 patients who developed POAF demonstrated nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS; defined as low T3 and/or low T4 syndrome), compared to 2 of 22 (p < 0.05) patients who maintained sinus rhythm. In patients with POAF, serum FT3 concentrations were significantly decreased, but still within their reference ranges. 3,5-T2 concentrations directly correlated with rT3 concentrations and inversely correlated with FT3 concentrations. Furthermore, 3,5-T2 concentrations were significantly elevated in patients with NTIS and in subjects who eventually developed POAF. In multivariable logistic regression FT3, 3,5-T2, total atrial conduction time, left atrial volume index and Fas ligand were independent predictors of POAF. Conclusion This study confirms reduced FT3 concentrations in patients with POAF and is the first to report on elevated 3,5-T2 concentrations in cardiac NTIS. The pathogenesis of NTIS therefore seems to involve more differentiated allostatic mechanisms. PMID:26279999

  18. Novel bifunctional natriuretic peptides as potential therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Dickey, Deborah M; Burnett, John C; Potter, Lincoln R

    2008-12-12

    Synthetic atrial natriuretic peptide (carperitide) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP; nesiritide) are used to treat congestive heart failure. However, despite beneficial cardiac unloading properties, reductions in renal perfusion pressures limit their clinical effectiveness. Recently, CD-NP, a chimeric peptide composed of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) fused to the C-terminal tail of Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP), was shown to be more glomerular filtration rate-enhancing than BNP in dogs. However, the molecular basis for the increased responsiveness was not determined. Here, we show that the DNP tail has a striking effect on CNP, converting it from a non-agonist to a partial agonist of natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-A while maintaining the ability to activate NPR-B. This effect is specific for human receptors because CD-NP was only a slightly better activator of rat NPR-A due to the promiscuous nature of CNP in this species. Interesting, the DNP tail alone had no effect on any NPR even though it is effective in vivo. To further increase the potency of CD-NP for NPR-A, we converted two different triplet sequences within the CNP ring to their corresponding residues in BNP. Both variants demonstrated increased affinity and full agonist activity for NPR-A, whereas one was as potent as any NPR-A activator known. In contrast to a previous report, we found that DNP binds the natriuretic peptide clearance receptor (NPR-C). However, none of the chimeric peptides bound NPR-C with significantly higher affinity than endogenous ligands. We suggest that bifunctional chimeric peptides represent a new generation of natriuretic peptide therapeutics. PMID:18940797

  19. Novel Bifunctional Natriuretic Peptides as Potential Therapeutics*

    PubMed Central

    Dickey, Deborah M.; Burnett, John C.; Potter, Lincoln R.

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic atrial natriuretic peptide (carperitide) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP; nesiritide) are used to treat congestive heart failure. However, despite beneficial cardiac unloading properties, reductions in renal perfusion pressures limit their clinical effectiveness. Recently, CD-NP, a chimeric peptide composed of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) fused to the C-terminal tail of Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP), was shown to be more glomerular filtration rate-enhancing than BNP in dogs. However, the molecular basis for the increased responsiveness was not determined. Here, we show that the DNP tail has a striking effect on CNP, converting it from a non-agonist to a partial agonist of natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-A while maintaining the ability to activate NPR-B. This effect is specific for human receptors because CD-NP was only a slightly better activator of rat NPR-A due to the promiscuous nature of CNP in this species. Interesting, the DNP tail alone had no effect on any NPR even though it is effective in vivo. To further increase the potency of CD-NP for NPR-A, we converted two different triplet sequences within the CNP ring to their corresponding residues in BNP. Both variants demonstrated increased affinity and full agonist activity for NPR-A, whereas one was as potent as any NPR-A activator known. In contrast to a previous report, we found that DNP binds the natriuretic peptide clearance receptor (NPR-C). However, none of the chimeric peptides bound NPR-C with significantly higher affinity than endogenous ligands. We suggest that bifunctional chimeric peptides represent a new generation of natriuretic peptide therapeutics. PMID:18940797

  20. Efficacy and Safety of 1-Hour Infusion of Recombinant Human Atrial Natriuretic Peptide in Patients With Acute Decompensated Heart Failure: A Phase III, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter Trial.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guogan; Wang, Pengbo; Li, Yishi; Liu, Wenxian; Bai, Shugong; Zhen, Yang; Li, Dongye; Yang, Ping; Chen, Yu; Hong, Lang; Sun, Jianhui; Chen, Junzhu; Wang, Xian; Zhu, Jihong; Hu, Dayi; Li, Huimin; Wu, Tongguo; Huang, Jie; Tan, Huiqiong; Zhang, Jian; Liao, Zhongkai; Yu, Litian; Mao, Yi; Ye, Shaodong; Feng, Lei; Hua, Yihong; Ni, Xinhai; Zhang, Yuhui; Wang, Yang; Li, Wei; Luan, Xiaojun; Sun, Xiaolu; Wang, Sijia

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of 1-h infusion of recombinant human atrial natriuretic peptide (rhANP) in combination with standard therapy in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF).This was a phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial. Eligible patients with ADHF were randomized to receive a 1-h infusion of either rhANP or placebo at a ratio of 3:1 in combination with standard therapy. The primary endpoint was dyspnea improvement (a decrease of at least 2 grades of dyspnea severity at 12 h from baseline). Reduction in pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) 1 h after infusion was the co-primary endpoint for catheterized patients. Overall, 477 patients were randomized: 358 (93 catheterized) patients received rhANP and 118 (28 catheterized) received placebo. The percentage of patients with dyspnea improvement at 12 h was higher, although not statistically significant, in the rhANP group than in the placebo group (32.0% vs 25.4%, odds ratio=1.382, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.863-2.212, P = 0.17). Reduction in PCWP at 1 h was significantly greater in patients treated with rhANP than in patients treated with placebo (-7.74 ± 5.95 vs -1.82 ± 4.47 mm Hg, P < 0.001). The frequencies of adverse events and renal impairment within 3 days of treatment were similar between the 2 groups. Mortality at 1 month was 3.1% in the rhANP group vs 2.5% in the placebo group (hazard ratio = 1.21, 95% CI: 0.34-4.26; P > 0.99).1-h rhANP infusion appears to result in prompt, transient hemodynamic improvement with a small, nonsignificant, effect on dyspnea in ADHF patients receiving standard therapy. The safety of 1-h infusion of rhANP seems to be acceptable. (WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform [ICTRP] number, ChiCTR-IPR-14005719.). PMID:26945407

  1. Design, Synthesis, and Actions of a Novel Chimeric Natriuretic Peptide: CD-NP

    PubMed Central

    Lisy, Ondrej; Huntley, Brenda K.; McCormick, Daniel J.; Kurlansky, Paul A.; Burnett, John C.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Our aim was to design, synthesize and test in vivo and in vitro a new chimeric peptide that would combine the beneficial properties of 2 distinct natriuretic peptides with a biological profile that goes beyond native peptides. Background Studies have established the beneficial vascular and antiproliferative properties of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP). While lacking renal actions, CNP is less hypotensive than the cardiac peptides atrial natriuretic peptide and B-type natriuretic peptide but unloads the heart due to venodilation. Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide is a potent natriuretic and diuretic peptide that is markedly hypotensive and functions via a separate guanylyl cyclase receptor compared with CNP. Methods Here we engineered a novel chimeric peptide CD-NP that represents the fusion of the 22-amino acid peptide CNP together with the 15-amino acid linear C-terminus of Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide. We also determined in vitro in cardiac fibroblasts cyclic guanosine monophosphate-activating and antiproliferative properties of CD-NP. Results Our studies demonstrate in vivo that CD-NP is natriuretic and diuretic, glomerular filtration rate enhancing, cardiac unloading, and renin inhibiting. CD-NP also demonstrates less hypotensive properties when compared with B-type natriuretic peptide. In addition, CD-NP in vitro activates cyclic guanosine monophosphate and inhibits cardiac fibroblast proliferation. Conclusions The current findings advance an innovative design strategy in natriuretic peptide drug discovery and development to create therapeutic peptides with favorable properties that may be preferable to those associated with native natriuretic peptides. PMID:18582636

  2. Natriuretic peptide C receptor signalling in the heart and vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Robert A; Giles, Wayne R

    2008-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NPs), including atrial, brain and C-type natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP and CNP), bind two classes of cell surface receptors: the guanylyl cyclase-linked A and B receptors (NPR-A and NPR-B) and the C receptor (NPR-C). The biological effects of NPs have been mainly attributed to changes in intracellular cGMP following their binding to NPR-A and NPR-B. NPR-C does not include a guanylyl cyclase domain. It has been denoted as a clearance receptor and is thought to bind and internalize NPs for ultimate degradation. However, a substantial body of biochemical work has demonstrated the ability of NPR-C to couple to inhibitory G proteins (Gi) and cause inhibition of adenylyl cyclase and activation of phospholipase-C. Recently, novel physiological effects of NPs, mediated specifically by NPR-C, have been discovered in the heart and vasculature. We have described the ability of CNP, acting via NPR-C, to selectively inhibit L-type calcium currents in atrial and ventricular myocytes, as well as in pacemaker cells (sinoatrial node myocytes). In contrast, our studies of the electrophysiological effects of CNP on cardiac fibroblasts demonstrated an NPR-C–Gi–phospholipase-C-dependent activation of a non-selective cation current mediated by transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. It is also known that CNP and BNP have important anti-proliferative effects in cardiac fibroblasts that appear to involve NPR-C. In the mammalian resistance vessels, including mesenteric and coronary arteries, CNP has been found to function as an NPR-C-dependent endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor that regulates local blood flow and systemic blood pressure by hyperpolarizing smooth muscle cells. In this review we highlight the role of NPR-C in mediating these NP effects in myocytes and fibroblasts from the heart as well as in vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:18006579

  3. Natriuretic peptides induce weak VASP phosphorylation at Serine 239 in platelets

    PubMed Central

    Borgognone, Alessandra; Lowe, Kate L; Watson, Stephen P; Madhani, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic guanosine-3′,5′-monophoshate (cGMP) is the common second messenger for the cardiovascular effects of nitric oxide (NO) and natriuretic peptides (NP; for example, atrial natriuretic peptide [ANP]), which activate soluble and particulate guanylyl cyclases (sGC and pGC), respectively. The role of NO in regulating cGMP and platelet function is well documented, whereas there is little evidence supporting a role for NPs in regulating platelet reactivity. By studying platelet aggregation and secretion in response to a PAR-1 peptide, collagen and ADP, and phosphorylation of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) substrate VASP at serine 239, we evaluated the effects of NPs in the absence or presence of the non-selective cGMP and cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor, 3-isobutyl-1-methylanxthine (IBMX). Our results show that NPs, possibly through the clearance receptor (natriuretic peptide receptor-C, NPR-C) expressed on platelet membranes, increase VASP phosphorylation but only following PDE inhibition, indicating a small, localised cGMP synthesis. As platelet aggregation and secretion measured under the same conditions were not affected, we conclude that the magnitude of PKG activation achieved by NPs in platelets per se is not sufficient to exert functional inhibition of platelet involvement in haemostasis. PMID:23469931

  4. Evaluation of New Diagnostic Biomarkers in Pediatric Sepsis: Matrix Metalloproteinase-9, Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1, Mid-Regional Pro-Atrial Natriuretic Peptide, and Adipocyte Fatty-Acid Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Alqahtani, Mashael F.; Smith, Craig M.; Weiss, Scott L.; Dawson, Susan; Ralay Ranaivo, Hantamalala; Wainwright, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated plasma concentrations of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), mid-regional pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (mrProANP), and adipocyte fatty-acid-binding proteins (A-FaBPs) have been investigated as biomarkers for sepsis or detection of acute neurological injuries in adults, but not children. We carried out a single-center, prospective observational study to determine if these measures could serve as biomarkers to identify children with sepsis. A secondary aim was to determine if these biomarkers could identify children with neurologic complications of sepsis. A total of 90 patients ≤ 18 years-old were included in this study. 30 with severe sepsis or septic shock were compared to 30 age-matched febrile and 30 age-matched healthy controls. Serial measurements of each biomarker were obtained, beginning on day 1 of ICU admission. In septic patients, MMP9-/TIMP-1 ratios (Median, IQR, n) were reduced on day 1 (0.024, 0.004–0.174, 13), day 2 (0.020, 0.002–0.109, 10), and day 3 (0.018, 0.003–0.058, 23) compared with febrile (0.705, 0.187–1.778, 22) and healthy (0.7, 0.4–1.2, 29) (p< 0.05) controls. A-FaBP and mrProANP (Median, IQR ng/mL, n) were elevated in septic patients compared to control groups on first 2 days after admission to the PICU (p <0.05). The area under the curve (AUC) for MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio, mrProANP, and A-FaBP to distinguish septic patients from healthy controls were 0.96, 0.99, and 0.76, respectively. MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio was inversely and mrProANP was directly related to PIM-2, PELOD, and ICU and hospital LOS (p<0.05). A-FaBP level was associated with PELOD, hospital and ICU length of stay (p<0.05). MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio associated with poor Glasgow Outcome Score (p<0.05). A-FaBP levels in septic patients with neurological dysfunction (29.3, 17.2–54.6, 7) were significantly increased compared to septic patients without neurological dysfunction (14.6, 13.3–20.6, 11). MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratios

  5. Natriuretic peptide receptors in the fetal rat.

    PubMed

    Brown, J; Zuo, Z

    1995-08-01

    In vitro autoradiography of rat fetuses from embryonic days 12-19 (E12-E19) showed widespread high-affinity specific binding sites for natriuretic peptides. The sites on E16 somites avidly bound C-type natriuretic peptide [CNP-(1-22)] as well as C-ANP, a synthetic ligand that selects the C-type natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR-C). Most somitic binding sites had high affinity for atrial natriuretic peptide [ANP-(1-28)], confirming their resemblance to NPR-C. A few had a lower apparent affinity for ANP-(1-28), suggesting that they might be NPR-B. CNP-(1-22) was more powerful than ANP-(1-28) as an agonist of guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate production in somites, and ATP augmented the action of CNP-(1-22). These observations further suggest the presence of NPR-B. However, with cross-linking of 3-[125I]iodo-0-tyrosyl rat CNP-(1-22) to somitic membranes followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, only a single 64-kDa binding protein was detected under reducing conditions. This is not consistent with intact approximately 120-kDa NPR-B. In vitro autoradiography of the binding of natriuretic peptides to E16 liver implied the presence of NPR-A and NPR-C-like receptors. Hepatic guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate production was most powerfully stimulated by ANP-(1-28), as expected for NPR-A. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis also identified NPR-A and NPR-C-like proteins in E16 hepatic membranes. Thus different NPRs are expressed by specific fetal tissues. This may be developmentally significant. PMID:7653543

  6. Identification, localization and interaction of SNARE proteins in atrial cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Peters, Christian G; Miller, Daniel F; Giovannucci, David R

    2006-03-01

    Atrial cardiac myocytes secrete the vasoactive hormone atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) by both constitutive and regulated exocytotic fusion of ANP-containing large dense core vesicles (LDCV) with the sarcolemma. Detailed information, however, regarding the identity and function of specific membrane fusion proteins (SNARE proteins) involved in exocytosis in the endocrine heart is lacking. In the current study, we identified SNARE proteins and determined their association with ANP-containing secretory granules using primary cultures of neonatal and adult rat atrial cardiac myocytes. Using RT-PCR, cardiac myocytes were screened for SNARE and SNARE-associated transcripts. Identified SNARE proteins that have been implicated in exocytosis in neuroendocrine cells were further characterized by Western blot analysis. Functional interaction between SNARE proteins was demonstrated using immunoprecipitation. Using cell fractionation and immunocytochemical methods, it was revealed that VAMP-1, VAMP-2 and synaptotagmin-1 (the putative Ca(2+) sensor) localized to subpopulations of ANP-containing secretory granules in atrial myocytes. Currently, there is conflicting data regarding the role of Ca(2+) in ANP exocytosis. To judge whether secretory activity could be evoked by intracellular Ca(2+) elevation, time-resolved membrane capacitance measurements were used in combination with the flash photolysis of caged compounds to follow the exocytotic activity of single neonatal atrial myocytes. These studies demonstrated that multiple SNARE proteins are present in neonatal and adult cardiac myocytes and suggest the importance of Ca(2+) in exocytosis of ANP from neonatal atrial cardiac myocytes. PMID:16458920

  7. C-TYPE NATRIURETIC PEPTIDE (CNP): CARDIOVASCULAR ROLES AND POTENTIAL AS A THERAPEUTIC TARGET

    PubMed Central

    Lumsden, Natalie G.; Khambata, Rayomand S.; Hobbs, Adrian J.

    2012-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides play a fundamental role in cardiovascular homeostasis by modulation of fluid and electrolyte balance and vascular tone. C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) represents the paracrine element of the natriuretic peptide axis which complements the endocrine actions of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). CNP is produced by the endothelium and the heart and appears to play a prominent role in vascular and cardiac function, both physiologically and pathologically. This provides a rationale for the therapeutic potential of pharmacological interventions targeted to CNP signalling. This article provides an overview of the biology and pharmacology of CNP, with emphasis on the cardiovascular system, and discusses pathologies in which drugs designed to manipulate CNP signalling maybe of clinical benefit. PMID:21247399

  8. Increased plasma levels and blunted effects of brain natriuretic peptide in rats with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, A; Grossman, E; Keiser, H R

    1991-07-01

    The hemodynamic and renal effects of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) were studied in conscious rats with experimental congestive heart failure (CHF) produced by an aortocaval fistula. The peptide had potent hypotensive, diuretic, and natriuretic effects in control rats, all of which were abolished in CHF. Plasma levels of BNP increased time-dependently during the development of CHF, and were more than four-fold higher in sodium retaining rats than in control rats. The data suggest that BNP secretion from the atria is increased in CHF, and that resistance to BNP, in addition to the relative resistance to atrial natriuretic factor, may contribute to sodium retention in CHF. PMID:1831369

  9. Contribution of Kv7 channels to natriuretic peptide mediated vasodilation in normal and hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Stott, Jennifer B; Barrese, Vincenzo; Jepps, Thomas A; Leighton, Emma V; Greenwood, Iain A

    2015-03-01

    The Kv7 family of voltage-gated potassium channels are expressed within the vasculature where they are key regulators of vascular tone and mediate cAMP-linked endogenous vasodilator responses, a pathway that is compromised in hypertension. However, the role of Kv7 channels in non-cAMP-linked vasodilator pathways has not been investigated. Natriuretic peptides are potent vasodilators, which operate primarily through the activation of a cGMP-dependent signaling pathway. This study investigated the putative role of Kv7 channels in natriuretic peptide-dependent relaxations in the vasculature of normal and hypertensive animals. Relaxant responses of rat aorta to both atrial and C-type natriuretic peptides and the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside were impaired by the Kv7 blocker linopirdine (10 μmol/L) but not by the Kv7.1-specific blocker HMR1556 (10 μmol/L) and other K(+) channel blockers. In contrast, only the atrial natriuretic peptide response was sensitive to linopirdine in the renal artery. These Kv7-mediated responses were attenuated in arteries from hypertensive rats. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that A- and B-type natriuretic peptide receptors were expressed at high levels in the aorta and renal artery from normal and spontaneously hypertensive rats. This study provides the first evidence that natriuretic peptide responses are impaired in hypertension and that recruitment of Kv7 channels is a key component of natriuretic peptide-dependent vasodilations. PMID:25547342

  10. Insulin/glucose induces natriuretic peptide clearance receptor in human adipocytes: a metabolic link with the cardiac natriuretic pathway.

    PubMed

    Bordicchia, M; Ceresiani, M; Pavani, M; Minardi, D; Polito, M; Wabitsch, M; Cannone, V; Burnett, J C; Dessì-Fulgheri, P; Sarzani, R

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac natriuretic peptides (NP) are involved in cardiorenal regulation and in lipolysis. The NP activity is largely dependent on the ratio between the signaling receptor NPRA and the clearance receptor NPRC. Lipolysis increases when NPRC is reduced by starving or very-low-calorie diet. On the contrary, insulin is an antilipolytic hormone that increases sodium retention, suggesting a possible functional link with NP. We examined the insulin-mediated regulation of NP receptors in differentiated human adipocytes and tested the association of NP receptor expression in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) with metabolic profiles of patients undergoing renal surgery. Differentiated human adipocytes from VAT and Simpson-Golabi-Behmel Syndrome (SGBS) adipocyte cell line were treated with insulin in the presence of high-glucose or low-glucose media to study NP receptors and insulin/glucose-regulated pathways. Fasting blood samples and VAT samples were taken from patients on the day of renal surgery. We observed a potent insulin-mediated and glucose-dependent upregulation of NPRC, through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway, associated with lower lipolysis in differentiated adipocytes. No effect was observed on NPRA. Low-glucose medium, used to simulate in vivo starving conditions, hampered the insulin effect on NPRC through modulation of insulin/glucose-regulated pathways, allowing atrial natriuretic peptide to induce lipolysis and thermogenic genes. An expression ratio in favor of NPRC in adipose tissue was associated with higher fasting insulinemia, HOMA-IR, and atherogenic lipid levels. Insulin/glucose-dependent NPRC induction in adipocytes might be a key factor linking hyperinsulinemia, metabolic syndrome, and higher blood pressure by reducing NP effects on adipocytes. PMID:27101299

  11. Physiology of natriuretic peptides: The volume overload hypothesis revisited

    PubMed Central

    Arjamaa, Olli

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of the natriuretic peptide system in the early 1980s aroused great interest among clinical cardiologists. The heart was not a mechanical pump alone, but also an endocrine organ that had powerful effects on blood circulation. Natriuretic peptides caused both natriuresis and diuresis, and they responded to a volume overload which caused either stretch or pressure on the heart. As a result, the findings led to the conclusion that the human body had a hormone with effects similar to those of a drug which treats high blood pressure. Later, it became evident that the volume contraction was fortified by extrarenal plasma shift. Here, a hypothesis is presented in which the role of natriuretic peptides is to regulate oxygen transport as the volume contraction leads to hemoconcentration with an increased oxygen-carrying capacity. Wall stress, either chemical or mechanical, changes the oxygen gradient of the myocardium and affects the diffusion of oxygen within a myocyte. In support of this hypothesis, hypoxia-response elements have been found in both the atrial natriuretic peptide and the brain natriuretic peptide genes. PMID:24527182

  12. Endothelial NO/cGMP system contributes to natriuretic peptide-mediated coronary and peripheral vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Brunner, F; Wölkart, G

    2001-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the endothelial nitric oxide (NO)-soluble guanylyl cyclase system is involved in atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) mediated regulation of coronary and peripheral vascular resistance. Rat hearts were perfused via the aorta at constant flow and the effect of ANP and CNP on coronary perfusion pressure and release of cGMP was determined in the absence and presence of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA; 0.2 mmol/L) and the specific inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase ODQ (20 micromol/L), respectively (n = 6). ANP (10-300 nmol/L) reduced perfusion pressure from 133 +/- 2 to 53 +/- 2 mm Hg (-60%; control) in the presence of L-NNA from 132 +/- 1 to 71 +/- 1 mm Hg (-46%) and in the presence of ODQ from 133 +/- 1 to 85 +/- 2 (-36%) (n = 6; P < 0.05). Disruption of the coronary endothelium by perfusion of hearts with collagenase reduced the relaxant effect of ANP to a similar extent as L-NNA. Basal release of cGMP was increased up to sixfold by ANP and this increase was reduced by L-NNA and ODQ (n = 6; P < 0.05). The coronary relaxant effect of CNP (0.1-3 micromol/L) was similarly attenuated by L-NNA and ODQ (n = 6). In conscious mice, a low dose of L-NNA (30 nmol) consistently reduced the blood pressure lowering effect of ANP (30 nmol) by approximately 40% (n = 7), whereas the hypotensive effect of nitroprusside (0.15 micromol) was not affected (n = 5). We conclude that the coronary dilatory and hypotensive action of natriuretic peptides involves the endothelium and is partly mediated by soluble guanylyl cyclase. The data may explain previous observations in humans with congestive heart failure showing impaired vascular ANP responses. PMID:11162200

  13. Tissue-specific expression of the human brain natriuretic peptide gene in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    LaPointe, M C; Wu, G; Garami, M; Yang, X P; Gardner, D G

    1996-03-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a cardiac hormone constitutively expressed in the adult heart. To identify the cis-acting elements involved in regulation of the human BNP gene, we subcloned the full-length promoter (-1818 to +100) and deletions thereof upstream from a luciferase reporter gene and transiently transfected them into primary cultures of neonatal rat atrial and ventricular myocytes and myocardial fibroblasts. Luciferase activity of the full-length construct was higher in ventricular (39064 +/- 8488 relative light units, N=11) and atrial (11225 +/- 1907, N=17) myocytes than myocardial fibroblasts (329 +/- 113, n=5). Maximal promoter activity in ventricular and atrial myocytes was maintained by sequences positioned between -1818 and -1283 relative to the transcription start site. Deletion to -1175 resulted in a decrease, whereas further deletion to -500 effected an increase in reporter activity in both cell types. In ventricular and atrial myocytes, deletion from -500 to -40 reduced luciferase activity 20-fold and 2-fold, respectively, whereas in myocardial fibroblasts, deletion to -40 upregulated the BNP promoter 2-fold. Of note, deleting 16 bp between -127 and -111 reduced luciferase activity 7-fold and 4-fold in ventricular and atrial myocytes, respectively, but had essentially no effect on luciferase activity in fibroblasts. Placement of sequences lying between -127 and -40 upstream from a heterologous thymidine kinase promoter resulted in reporter expression that was 7.4-fold greater than the vector alone in ventricular myocytes, approximately 2-fold greater in atrial myocytes, and equivalent to the vector alone in fibroblasts. For study of activity of the human BNP promoter in adult myocytes, either 408 or 97 bp of 5' flanking sequence coupled to the luciferase reporter gene was injected into the apex of adult male Sprague-Dawley rat hearts. After 7 days, luciferase activity in the injected myocardium was 9.8-fold higher for the longer construct

  14. Role of extracellular domain dimerization in agonist-induced activation of natriuretic peptide receptor A.

    PubMed

    Parat, Marie; McNicoll, Normand; Wilkes, Brian; Fournier, Alain; De Léan, André

    2008-02-01

    Natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR) A is composed of an extracellular domain (ECD) with a ligand binding site, a single transmembrane region, a kinase homology domain, and a guanylyl cyclase domain. The natural agonists atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP) bind and activate NPRA, leading to cyclic GMP production, which is responsible for their role in cardiovascular homeostasis. Previous studies suggested that stabilization of a dimeric form of NPRA by agonist is essential for receptor activation. However, ligand specificity and sequential steps of this dimerization process have not been investigated. We used radioligand binding, fluorescence resonance energy transfer homoquenching, and molecular modeling to characterize the interaction of human NPRA-ECD with ANP, BNP, the superagonist (Arg(10),Leu(12),Ser(17),Leu(18))-rANP-(1-28), the minimized analog mini-ANP and the antagonist (Arg(6),beta-cyclohexyl-Ala(8),d-Tic(16),Arg(17),Cys(18))-rANP-(6-18)-amide (A71915). ANP binds to preformed ECD dimers and spontaneous dimerization is the rate-limiting step of the ligand binding process. All the studied peptides, including A71915 antagonist, induce a dose-dependent fluorescence homoquenching, specific to dimerization, with potencies highly correlated with their binding affinities. A71915 induced more quenching than other peptides, suggesting stabilization by the antagonist of ECD dimer in a distinct inactive conformation. In summary, these results indicate that the ligand-induced dimerization process of NPRA is different from that for cytokine receptor model. Agonists or antagonists bind to preformed dimeric ECD, leading to dimer stabilization in an active or inactive conformation, respectively. Furthermore, the highly sensitive fluorescence assay designed to assess dimerization could serve as a powerful tool for further detailing the kinetic steps involved in natriuretic peptide receptor binding and activation. PMID:17965196

  15. B and C types natriuretic peptides modulate norepinephrine uptake and release in the rat hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Vatta, M S; Presas, M; Bianciotti, L G; Zarrabeitia, V; Fernández, B E

    1996-09-16

    We previously reported that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) regulates catecholamine metabolism in the central nervous system. ANF, B and C types natriuretic peptides (BNP and CNP) also play a regulatory role in body fluid homeostasis, cardiovascular activity and hormonal and neuro-hormonal secretions. The aim of the present work was to investigate BNP and CNP effects on the uptake and release of norepinephrine (NE) in rat hypothalamic slices incubated in vitro. Results showed that BNP (100 nM) and CNP (1, 10 and 100 nM) enhanced total and neuronal [3H]NE uptake but did not modify non-neuronal uptake. BNP (100 nM) and CNP (1 nM) caused a rapid increase in NE uptake (1 min), which was sustained for 60 min. BNP (100 nM) did not modify the intracellular distribution of NE; however, 1 nM CNP increased the granular store and decreased the cytosolic pool of NE. BNP (100 nM) and CNP (1, 10 and 100 nM), diminished spontaneous NE release. In addition, BNP (1, 10, 100 nM) and CNP (1, 10 and 100 pM, as well as 1, 10 and 100 nM) reduced NE output induced by 25 mM KCl. These results suggest that BNP and CNP may be involved in the regulation of several central as well as peripheral physiological functions through the modulation of noradrenergic neurotransmission at the presynaptic neuronal level. Present results provide evidence to consider CNP as the brain natriuretic peptide since physiological concentrations of this peptide (pM) diminished NE evoked release. PMID:8897640

  16. Chamber-dependent circadian expression of cardiac natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed

    Goetze, Jens Peter; Georg, Birgitte; Jørgensen, Henrik L; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2010-02-25

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) have important local functions within the myocardium, where they protect against accelerated fibrosis. As circadian expression of cardiac natriuretic peptides could be of importance in local cardiac protection against disease, we examined the diurnal changes of the mRNAs encoding ANP, BNP, and their common receptor NPR-A in atrial and ventricular myocardium. Forty eight mice were killed at the following ZT times: 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24, where ZT designates Zeitgeber; ZT 0 corresponds to lights ON and ZT 12 corresponds to lights OFF. Eight animals (4 males and 4 females) were included at each time point. Another 48 animals were killed during the second cycle of dark/dark (designated Circadian Time or CT: CT 4, CT 8, CT 12, CT 16, CT 20, and CT 24). The cellular contents of the clock genes Per1 and Bmal1 as well as ANP, BNP, and their common receptor (NPR-A) were determined using RT-PCR. Per1 and Bmal1 mRNA contents oscillated in antiphase in both atrial and ventricular regions, where Bmal1 mRNA peaked 12h out of phase relative to Per1 mRNA. ANP and NPR-A atrial mRNA contents revealed borderline significant diurnal changes, whereas ventricular BNP mRNA contents exhibited pronounced oscillation during constant darkness with nadir at CT 12 (P<0.0001). In conclusion, we report a chamber-dependent circadian profile of cardiac BNP mRNA contents, which is not paralleled by the related ANP gene. Our findings suggest that the BNP mRNA pattern could be associated with increased cardiac susceptibility and response to disease. PMID:20035806

  17. Effect of natriuretic peptides on cerebral artery blood flow in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Guo, Song; Goetze, Jens P; Jeppesen, Jørgen L; Burnett, John C; Olesen, Jes; Jansen-Olesen, Inger; Ashina, Messoud

    2015-12-01

    The natriuretic peptides (NPs), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), have vasoactive functions that concern humans and most animals, but their specific effects on cerebral circulation are poorly understood. We therefore examined the responsiveness of cerebral arteries to different doses of the natriuretic peptides in animals and humans. We conducted a dose-response experiment in guinea pigs (in vitro) and a double-blind, three-way cross-over study in healthy volunteers (in vivo). In the animal experiment, we administered cumulative doses of NPs to pre-contracted segments of cerebral arteries. In the main study, six healthy volunteers were randomly allocated to receive two intravenous doses of ANP, BNP or CNP, respectively, over 20 min on three separate study days. We recorded blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (VMCA) by transcranial Doppler. In addition, we measured temporal and radial artery diameters, headache response and plasma concentrations of the NPs. In guinea pigs, ANP and BNP but not CNP showed significant dose-dependent relaxation of cerebral arteries. In healthy humans, NP infusion had no effect on mean VMCA, and we found no difference in hemodynamic responses between the NPs. Furthermore, natriuretic peptides did not affect temporal and radial artery diameters or induce headache. In conclusion, natriuretic peptides in physiological and pharmacological doses do not affect blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery or dilate extracerebral arteries in healthy volunteers. PMID:26417835

  18. Staphylococcus aureus Endocarditis with Multivalvular Involvement Secondary to an Atrial Septal Defect

    PubMed Central

    Daruwalla, Vistasp Jimmy; Sagi, Jahnavi; Tahir, Hassan; Penumetsa, Srikanth

    2016-01-01

    Infective endocarditis is usually diagnosed using modified Duke's criteria. Our patient had a subacute presentation and a low suspicion for endocarditis during admission, unfortunately leading to her death. Despite advances in diagnostic and therapeutic measures including antibiotic therapy and surgical techniques, morbidity and mortality with staphylococcal infective endocarditis remain high. Hence, we stress the significance of having a low threshold for TEE in patients with multisystem involvement due to Staphylococcus aureus that have evidence of persistent infection despite antibiotic treatment, even if the suspicion for endocarditis is low based on Duke's criteria. TEE substantially improves the sensitivity of diagnosis but may not be readily available in many medical centers. Presence of an ASD has been noted to have increased the risk of left sided endocarditis even with conditions that predispose to right sided endocarditis, particularly in patients with hemodialysis and diabetes as morbid risk factors. PMID:26989519

  19. Gene network and familial analyses uncover a gene network involving Tbx5/Osr1/Pcsk6 interaction in the second heart field for atrial septation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke K; Xiang, Menglan; Zhou, Lun; Liu, Jielin; Curry, Nathan; Heine Suñer, Damian; Garcia-Pavia, Pablo; Zhang, Xiaohua; Wang, Qin; Xie, Linglin

    2016-03-15

    Atrial septal defects (ASDs) are a common human congenital heart disease (CHD) that can be induced by genetic abnormalities. Our previous studies have demonstrated a genetic interaction between Tbx5 and Osr1 in the second heart field (SHF) for atrial septation. We hypothesized that Osr1 and Tbx5 share a common signaling networking and downstream targets for atrial septation. To identify this molecular networks, we acquired the RNA-Seq transcriptome data from the posterior SHF of wild-type, Tbx5(+/) (-), Osr1(+/-), Osr1(-/-) and Tbx5(+/-)/Osr1(+/-) mutant embryos. Gene set analysis was used to identify the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways that were affected by the doses of Tbx5 and Osr1. A gene network module involving Tbx5 and Osr1 was identified using a non-parametric distance metric, distance correlation. A subset of 10 core genes and gene-gene interactions in the network module were validated by gene expression alterations in posterior second heart field (pSHF) of Tbx5 and Osr1 transgenic mouse embryos, a time-course gene expression change during P19CL6 cell differentiation. Pcsk6 was one of the network module genes that were linked to Tbx5. We validated the direct regulation of Tbx5 on Pcsk6 using immunohistochemical staining of pSHF, ChIP-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and luciferase reporter assay. Importantly, we identified Pcsk6 as a novel gene associated with ASD via a human genotyping study of an ASD family. In summary, our study implicated a gene network involving Tbx5, Osr1 and Pcsk6 interaction in SHF for atrial septation, providing a molecular framework for understanding the role of Tbx5 in CHD ontogeny. PMID:26744331

  20. Natriuretic Peptides and Cardiometabolic Health.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepak K; Wang, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides are cardiac-derived hormones with a range of protective functions, including natriuresis, diuresis, vasodilation, lusitropy, lipolysis, weight loss, and improved insulin sensitivity. Their actions are mediated through membrane-bound guanylyl cyclases that lead to production of the intracellular second-messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that genetic and acquired deficiencies of the natriuretic peptide system can promote hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, obesity, diabetes mellitus, the metabolic syndrome, and heart failure. Clinically, natriuretic peptides are robust diagnostic and prognostic markers, and augmenting natriuretic peptides is a target for therapeutic strategies in cardiometabolic disease. This review will summarize current understanding and highlight novel aspects of natriuretic peptide biology. PMID:26103984

  1. [Natriuretic peptides. History of discovery, chemical structure, mechanism of action and the removal routes. Basis of diagnostic and therapeutic use].

    PubMed

    Stryjewski, Piotr J; Nessler, Bohdan; Cubera, Katarzyna; Nessler, Jadwiga

    2013-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NP) are the group of proteins synthesized and secreted by the mammalian heart. All the NP are synthesized from prohormones and have 17-amino acid cyclic structures containing two cysteine residues linked by internal disulphide bond. They are characterized by a wide range of actions, mainly through their membrane receptors. The NP regulate the water and electrolyte balance, blood pressure through their diuretic, natriuretic, and relaxating the vascular smooth muscles effects. They also affect the endocrine system and the nervous system. The neurohormonal regulation of blood circulation results are mainly based on antagonism with renin--angiotensin--aldosterone system. The NP representatives are: atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), urodilatine and (DNP) Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide, not found in the human body. According to the guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology determination of NT-proBNP level have found a use in the diagnosis of acute and chronic heart failure, risk stratification in acute coronary syndromes and pulmonary embolism. There are reports found in the literature, that demonstrate the usefulness of NT-proBNP determination in valvular, atrial fibrillation, and syncopes. Recombinant human ANP--Carperitid and BNP--Nesiritid, have already found a use in the adjunctive therapy of dyspnea in acute heart failure. PMID:24167949

  2. Guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A signaling antagonizes phosphoinositide hydrolysis, Ca2+ release, and activation of protein kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash N.

    2014-01-01

    Thus far, three related natriuretic peptides (NPs) and three distinct sub-types of cognate NP receptors have been identified and characterized based on the specific ligand binding affinities, guanylyl cyclase activity, and generation of intracellular cGMP. Atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) specifically bind and activate guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA), and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) shows specificity to activate guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-B (GC-B/NPRB). All three NPs bind to natriuretic peptide receptor-C (NPRC), which is also known as clearance or silent receptor. The NPRA is considered the principal biologically active receptor of NP family; however, the molecular signaling mechanisms of NP receptors are not well understood. The activation of NPRA and NPRB produces the intracellular second messenger cGMP, which serves as the major signaling molecule of all three NPs. The activation of NPRB in response to CNP also produces the intracellular cGMP; however, at lower magnitude than that of NPRA, which is activated by ANP and BNP. In addition to enhanced accumulation of intracellular cGMP in response to all three NPs, the levels of cAMP, Ca2+ and inositol triphosphate (IP3) have also been reported to be altered in different cells and tissue types. Interestingly, ANP has been found to lower the concentrations of cAMP, Ca2+, and IP3; however, NPRC has been proposed to increase the levels of these metabolic signaling molecules. The mechanistic studies of decreased and/or increased levels of cAMP, Ca2+, and IP3 in response to NPs and their receptors have not yet been clearly established. This review focuses on the signaling mechanisms of ANP/NPRA and their biological effects involving an increased level of intracellular accumulation of cGMP and a decreased level of cAMP, Ca2+, and IP3 in different cells and tissue systems. PMID:25202235

  3. The natriuretic peptide/guanylyl cyclase--a system functions as a stress-responsive regulator of angiogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Michaela; Völker, Katharina; Schwarz, Kristine; Carbajo-Lozoya, Javier; Flögel, Ulrich; Jacoby, Christoph; Stypmann, Jörg; van Eickels, Martin; Gambaryan, Stepan; Hartmann, Michael; Werner, Matthias; Wieland, Thomas; Schrader, Jürgen; Baba, Hideo A

    2009-07-01

    Cardiac atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) modulate blood pressure and volume by activation of the receptor guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A) and subsequent intracellular cGMP formation. Here we report what we believe to be a novel function of these peptides as paracrine regulators of vascular regeneration. In mice with systemic deletion of the GC-A gene, vascular regeneration in response to critical hind limb ischemia was severely impaired. Similar attenuation of ischemic angiogenesis was observed in mice with conditional, endothelial cell-restricted GC-A deletion (here termed EC GC-A KO mice). In contrast, smooth muscle cell-restricted GC-A ablation did not affect ischemic neovascularization. Immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR revealed BNP expression in activated satellite cells within the ischemic muscle, suggesting that local BNP elicits protective endothelial effects. Since within the heart, BNP is mainly induced in cardiomyocytes by mechanical load, we investigated whether the natriuretic peptide/GC-A system also regulates angiogenesis accompanying load-induced cardiac hypertrophy. EC GC-A KO hearts showed diminished angiogenesis, mild fibrosis, and diastolic dysfunction. In vitro BNP/GC-A stimulated proliferation and migration of cultured microvascular endothelia by activating cGMP-dependent protein kinase I and phosphorylating vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein and p38 MAPK. We therefore conclude that BNP, produced by activated satellite cells within ischemic skeletal muscle or by cardiomyocytes in response to pressure load, regulates the regeneration of neighboring endothelia via GC-A. This paracrine communication might be critically involved in coordinating muscle regeneration/hypertrophy and angiogenesis. PMID:19487812

  4. Cardiac content of brain natriuretic peptide in DOCA-salt hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, Naoto; Aburaya, Masahito; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka; Kato, Johji; Kitamura, Kazuo; Kida, Osamu; Eto, Tanenao; Kangawa, Kenji; Tanaka, Kenjiro ); Minamino, Naoto; Matsuo, Hisayuki )

    1991-01-01

    The cardiac content of immunoreactive rat brain natriuretic peptide (ir-rBNP) in deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt hypertensive rats was measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). The atrial content of ir-rBNP was significantly lower in the DOCA-salt group than in the control group. However, the ventricular content of ir-rBNP was markedly increased in the DOCA-salt group as compared to the other groups. Ir-rBNP level in the atria was negatively correlated with blood pressure, while that in the ventricle was positively correlated with blood pressure. A significant correlation was observed between tissue levels of ir-rBNP and ir-rat atrial natriuretic peptide (rANP) both in atrium and ventricle. These results raise the possibility that rBNP as well as rANP functions as a cardiac hormone, the production of which probably changes in response to increased of body fluid and blood pressure.

  5. INTERACTING DISCIPLINES: Cardiac natriuretic peptides and obesity: perspectives from an endocrinologist and a cardiologist

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Hugo R; Birkenfeld, Andreas L; de Bold, Adolfo J

    2015-01-01

    Since their discovery in 1981, the cardiac natriuretic peptides (cNP) atrial natriuretic peptide (also referred to as atrial natriuretic factor) and brain natriuretic peptide have been well characterised in terms of their renal and cardiovascular actions. In addition, it has been shown that cNP plasma levels are strong predictors of cardiovascular events and mortality in populations with no apparent heart disease as well as in patients with established cardiac pathology. cNP secretion from the heart is increased by humoral and mechanical stimuli. The clinical significance of cNP plasma levels has been shown to differ in obese and non-obese subjects. Recent lines of evidence suggest important metabolic effects of the cNP system, which has been shown to activate lipolysis, enhance lipid oxidation and mitochondrial respiration. Clinically, these properties lead to browning of white adipose tissue and to increased muscular oxidative capacity. In human association studies in patients without heart disease higher cNP concentrations were observed in lean, insulin-sensitive subjects. Highly elevated cNP levels are generally observed in patients with systolic heart failure or high blood pressure, while obese and type-2 diabetics display reduced cNP levels. Together, these observations suggest that the cNP system plays a role in the pathophysiology of metabolic vascular disease. Understanding this role should help define novel principles in the treatment of cardiometabolic disease. PMID:26115665

  6. [Measurement of natriuretic peptides in heart failure: the good laboratory and clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Kovács, L Gábor; Nyolczas, Noémi; Habon, Tamás; Sepp, Róbert; Piroth, Zsolt; Hajas, Ágota; Boncz, Imre; Tomcsányi, János; Kappelmayer, János; Merkely, Béla

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac natriuretic peptides (BNP, NT-proBNP) play a pivotal role in cardiovascular homeostasis, mainly due to their roles in vasodilatation, natriuresis, diuresis and due to their antiproliferative properties. Proper measurement of the natriuretic peptide levels may help differentiate between respiratory and cardiac forms of dyspnea, diagnose early forms of heart failure, evaluate severity of heart failure (prognosis) and monitor the efficacy of therapy. In many countries natriuretic peptide levels are being used as one of the earliest diagnostics tools to evaluate the involvement of the heart. Current theoretical and clinical data confirm the importance of natriuretic peptides in routine healthcare. These roles are clearly described in international recommendations and guidelines. In the current review the authors discuss the problems of the measurement of natriuretic peptides in Hungary, including several aspects related to laboratory medicine, cardiology and health economy. PMID:26211747

  7. Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide binds to the natriuretic peptide clearance receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, Douglas G. . E-mail: Douglas.G.Johns@gsk.com; Ao, Zhaohui; Heidrich, Bradley J.; Hunsberger, Gerald E.; Graham, Taylor; Payne, Lisa; Elshourbagy, Nabil; Lu, Quinn; Aiyar, Nambi; Douglas, Stephen A.

    2007-06-22

    Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP) is a newly-described natriuretic peptide which lowers blood pressure via vasodilation. The natriuretic peptide clearance receptor (NPR-C) removes natriuretic peptides from the circulation, but whether DNP interacts with human NPR-C directly is unknown. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that DNP binds to NPR-C. ANP, BNP, CNP, and the NPR-C ligands AP-811 and cANP(4-23) displaced [{sup 125}I]-ANP from NPR-C with pM-to-nM K {sub i} values. DNP displaced [{sup 125}I]-ANP from NPR-C with nM potency, which represents the first direct demonstration of binding of DNP to human NPR-C. DNP showed high pM affinity for the GC-A receptor and no affinity for GC-B (K {sub i} > 1000 nM). DNP was nearly 10-fold more potent than ANP at stimulating cGMP production in GC-A expressing cells. Blockade of NPR-C might represent a novel therapeutic approach in augmenting the known beneficial actions of DNP in cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and heart failure.

  8. Cardiovascular biomarker midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide during and after preeclamptic pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Sugulle, Meryam; Herse, Florian; Hering, Lydia; Mockel, Martin; Dechend, Ralf; Staff, Anne Cathrine

    2012-02-01

    Preeclampsia is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP), a precursor of the atrial natriuretic peptide, is a biomarker for cardiovascular disease. We obtained plasma from 184 pregnant women in gestational weeks 24 to 42 (normotensive pregnancies: n=77, preeclampsia: n=107), from 25 of these women at 5 to 8 years after index pregnancy (normotensive pregnancies: n=11, preeclampsia: n=14), and from 49 normotensive, nonpregnant women and analyzed them by immunoassay for MR-proANP. To investigate potential sources, placental and decidual atrial natriuretic peptide mRNA expression levels were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR in 21 normotensive and 23 preeclamptic pregnancies, as well as in human heart and kidney samples. For further confirmation, we measured circulating MR-proANP and performed expression studies in a transgenic rat model for preeclampsia. MR-proANP was significantly elevated in maternal plasma in preeclampsia compared with normotensive pregnancies (135 versus 56 pmol/L; P<0.001). However, 5 to 8 years after pregnancy, there was no difference (formerly preeclamptic women versus formerly normotensive in pregnancy: 53 versus 49 pmol/L; P=0.5). Our preeclamptic rat model confirmed the acute MR-proANP differences between preeclamptic and normotensive pregnancies (10.9±1.9 versus 4.3±0.3 pmol/L; P=0.05). Atrial natriuretic peptide expression was high in the heart but negligible in the uteroplacental unit in both normotensive humans and rats, whereas expression in maternal and fetal hearts in the preeclamptic rats was significantly increased, compared with controls. MR-proANP is a serviceable biomarker in preeclampsia, both in humans and a rat model, probably reflecting cardiovascular hemodynamic stress. PMID:22184318

  9. Plasma concentrations of adrenomedullin and natriuretic peptides in patients with essential hypertension

    PubMed Central

    HU, WEI; ZHOU, PANG-HU; ZHANG, XIAO-BIN; XU, CHANG-GENG; WANG, WEI

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to assess any changes in the plasma concentrations of adrenomedullin (ADM) and atrial and brain natriuretic peptide (ANP and BNP, respectively), and to investigate their pathophysiological roles in patients with essential hypertension (EH). The plasma ADM, ANP and BNP concentrations were measured in 64 patients with untreated EH and 35 normotensive control subjects. After 4 weeks of effective antihypertensive therapy with oral drugs for the hypertensive patients, the plasma concentrations of ADM, ANP and BNP in the hypertensive patients were measured again. The plasma concentrations of ADM, ANP and BNP were significantly higher in the hypertensive patients than those in the control subjects, and the concentrations increased with the clinical stage. Furthermore, the hypertensive patients exhibited increased mean arterial pressure (MAP), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (Scr) and decreased glomerular filtration rates (GFRs) compared with the control subjects. The plasma ADM concentration was not only correlated with BUN, Scr and the GFR, but was also associated with the MAP and the plasma levels of ANP and BNP. Following effective antihypertensive therapy with oral medication for 4 weeks, the plasma concentrations of ADM, ANP and BNP were significantly, but not sharply, decreased. In conclusion, ADM, along with ANP and BNP, may be involved in the mechanisms acting against a further increase in blood pressure and may be useful biomarkers for the diagnosis and treatment of hypertensive patients. PMID:26136912

  10. Transcriptome analysis of canine cardiac fat pads: involvement of two novel long non-coding RNAs in atrial fibrillation neural remodeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weizong; Wang, Ximin; Zhang, Yujiao; Li, Zhan; Xie, Xinxing; Wang, Jiangrong; Gao, Mei; Zhang, Shuyu; Hou, Yinglong

    2015-05-01

    Intrinsic cardiac autonomic neural remodeling (ANR) has been reported to be involved in the initiation and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF). Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are important orchestrators of gene regulatory networks. However, little is known about the relationships between lncRNAs and cardiac ANR in AF. In this study, second-generation RNA sequencing was performed to examine the transcriptomes of lncRNAs in AF and non-AF canine cardiac fat pads. A total of 61,616 putative lncRNAs were yielded, in which 166 were downregulated and 410 were upregulated with more than twofold change. Bioinformatics analysis showed that the aberrantly expressed genes were associated with neural development, migration and neurodegenerative disorders. On the basis of a series of filtering pipelines, two new lncRNAs, namely, TCONS_00032546 and TCONS_00026102, were selected. Silencing of TCONS_00032546 or TCONS_00026102 with lentiviruses in vivo could significantly shorten or prolong the atrial effective refractory period thereby increasing or preventing AF inducibility by promoting or inhibiting the neurogenesis. Besides, the expression of CCND1-FGF19-FGF4-FGF3 gene cluster and SLC25A4, the nearby genes of TCONS_00032546 and TCONS_00026102, were negatively correlated with that of lncRNAs. Furthermore, combining bioinformatics analysis with literature review, TCONS_00032546 and TCONS_00026102 may induce effects by increasing the CCND1-FGF19-FGF3-FGF4 gene cluster and SLC25A4 via complex mechanisms during neural remodeling. Taken together, dysregulated lncRNAs may play regulatory roles in AF neural remodeling, which may further provide potential therapeutic targets for prophylaxis and treatment of AF. PMID:25559442

  11. Vascular effects and electrolyte homeostasis of the natriuretic peptide isolated from Crotalus oreganus abyssus (North American Grand Canyon rattlesnake) venom.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, S L; Dias-Junior, C A; Baldasso, P A; Damico, D C S; Carvalho, B M A; Garanto, A; Acosta, G; Oliveira, E; Albericio, F; Soares, A M; Marangoni, S; Resende, R R

    2012-08-01

    Crotalus oreganus abyssus is a rattlesnake that is usually found in the Grand Canyon, United States of America. Knowledge regarding the composition of C. o. abyssus venom is scarce. New natriuretic peptides (NPs) have been isolated and characterized from the venoms of members of the Crotalinae family. The NP family comprises three members, ANP (atrial natriuretic peptide), BNP (b-type natriuretic peptide) and CNP (c-type natriuretic peptide), and has an important role in blood pressure regulation and electrolyte homeostasis. The aim of the present study was to characterize a novel natriuretic-like peptide (Coa_NP2), isolated from C. o. abyssus venom. The Coa_NP2 presents an average molecular mass of 3419.88Da (theoretical average molecular mass 3418.94Da, monoisotopic molecular mass 3416.66Da and theoretical PI 7.78) and its amino acid sequence presents the loop region that is characteristic of natriuretic peptides. The peptide has 32 amino acids and its complete sequence is SYGISSGCFGLKLDRIGTMSGLGCWRLLQDSP. Coa_NP2 is a natriuretic peptide of the ANP/BNP-like family, since the carboxyterminal region of CNP has its own NP domain. We demonstrate, herein, that Coa_NP2 produces a dose-dependent decrease in mean arterial pressure in rats, followed by significant increases in concentrations of markers of nitric oxide formation measured in the plasma and vasorelaxation in a thoracic aortic ring bath. The structural and biological aspects confirm Coa_NP2 as a new natriuretic peptide, isolated from snake venom. PMID:22617223

  12. Down-regulation does not mediate natriuretic peptide-dependent desensitization of natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-A or NPR-B: guanylyl cyclase-linked natriuretic peptide receptors do not internalize.

    PubMed

    Fan, Danhua; Bryan, Paula M; Antos, Laura K; Potthast, Regine J; Potter, Lincoln R

    2005-01-01

    Natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPR-A/GC-A) and B (NPR-B/GC-B) are members of the transmembrane guanylyl cyclase family that mediate the effects of natriuretic peptides via the second messenger, cGMP. Despite numerous reports of these receptors being down-regulated in response to various pathological conditions, no studies have actually measured desensitization and receptor internalization in the same cell line. Furthermore, the ligand-dependent trafficking properties of NPR-A remain controversial, whereas nothing is known about the trafficking of NPR-B. In this report, we tested whether down-regulation explains the ligand-dependent desensitization of NPR-A and NPR-B and characterized their trafficking properties using a combination of hormone-binding and antibody-based assays. Quantitative partition analysis indicated that (125)I-atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was rapidly released into the medium after 293T cells stably expressing NPR-A were warmed from 4 degrees to 37 degrees C. High-performance liquid chromatography fractionation of medium supplemented with the protease inhibitor phosphoramidon indicated that the (125)I-ANP was mostly intact. In contrast, (125)I-ANP purified from medium bathing cells expressing NPR-C, a receptor known to internalize natriuretic peptides, was degraded. Cleavable biotinylation and noncleavable biotinylation assays indicated that neither NPR-A nor NPR-B was internalized or degraded in response to natriuretic peptide binding. In contrast, agonist-dependent internalization of a G protein-coupled receptor was clearly apparent in the same cell line. Finally, we show that NPR-A and NPR-B are desensitized in cells in which they are not internalized. We suggest that mechanisms other than receptor down-regulation account for the desensitization of NPR-A and NPR-B that occurs in response to various physiological and pathological stimuli. PMID:15459247

  13. Annexins V and VI: major calcium-dependent atrial secretory granule-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Doubell, A F; Bester, A J; Thibault, G

    1991-11-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide is stored by atrial myocytes in secretory granules, known as atrial specific granules, and is released from these granules by exocytosis. We have isolated a group of atrial proteins by affinity chromatography that bind to atrial specific granules in a calcium-dependent manner. The two major proteins isolated (32.5 kd and 67 kd) are calcium-binding proteins and have been identified as annexins V and VI by immunoblotting with specific antisera. The calcium dependence of their binding to atrial specific granules has been characterized in vitro and indicates that this interaction takes place at micromolar levels of calcium. In addition, the group of proteins isolated includes another calcium-binding protein of 20 kd, as well as GTP-binding proteins of 22 to 26 kd. Membrane interactions during exocytosis are presumably mediated by the interaction of specific proteins with the granule membrane. The properties of the proteins described here, and their ability to bind to atrial specific granules in a calcium-dependent manner, make them likely candidates in the search for regulatory proteins mediating atrial natriuretic peptide secretion. PMID:1834552

  14. Porcine brain natriuretic peptide receptor in bovine adrenal cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, K.; Hashiguchi, T.; Ohashi, M.; Takayanagi, R.; Haji, M.; Matsuo, H.; Nawata, H.

    1989-01-01

    The action of porcine brain natriuretic peptide (pBNP) on the steroidogenesis was investigated in cultured bovine adrenocortical cells. Porcine BNP induced a significant dose-dependent inhibition of both ACTH- and A II-stimulated aldosterone secretion. 10/sup /minus/8/M and 10/sup /minus/7/M pBNP also significantly inhibited ACTH-stimulated cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) secretions. Binding studies of (/sup 125/I)-pBNP to bovine adrenocortical membrane fractions showed that adrenal cortex had high-affinity and low-capacity pBNP binding sites, with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.70 x 10/sup /minus/10/M and a maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of 19.9 fmol/mg protein. Finally, the 135 Kd radioactive band was specially visualized in the affinity labeling of bovine adrenal cortex with disuccinimidyl suberate (DSS). These results suggest that pBNP may have receptor-mediated suppressive actions on bovine adrenal steroidogenesis, similar to that in atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP).

  15. Natriuretic peptide receptor-B (guanylyl cyclase-B) mediates C-type natriuretic peptide relaxation of precontracted rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Drewett, J G; Fendly, B M; Garbers, D L; Lowe, D G

    1995-03-01

    The most potent known agonist for the natriuretic peptide receptor-B (NPR-B)/guanylyl cyclase-B is C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP). A homologous ligand-receptor system consists of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and NPR-A/guanylyl cyclase-A. A third member of this family is NPR-C, a non-guanylyl cyclase receptor. Monoclonal antibodies were raised against NPR-B by immunizing mice with a purified receptor-IgG fusion protein consisting of the extracellular domain of NPR-B and the Fc portion of human IgG-gamma 1. One monoclonal antibody, 3G12, did not recognize NPR-A or NPR-C and bound to human and rat NPR-B. CNP binding to NPR-B and stimulation of cGMP synthesis were inhibited by 3G12. With cells isolated from either the media or adventitia layers of rat thoracic aorta, 3G12 did not interfere with ANP-stimulated cGMP synthesis, but it inhibited CNP-stimulated cGMP levels in cells from both layers. CNP (IC50 = 10 nM) and ANP (IC50 = 1 nM) caused relaxation of phenylephrine-contracted rat aortic rings. 3G12 caused a marked increase in the IC50 for CNP, from 10 nM to 140 nM, but failed to affect ANP-mediated relaxation. Therefore, our results for the first time demonstrate that CNP relaxes vascular smooth muscle by virtue of its binding to NPR-B. PMID:7876238

  16. Agonist selectivity for three species of natriuretic peptide receptor-A.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, J R; Sehl, P; Quan, C; Burnier, J P; Lowe, D G

    1995-01-01

    We determined the nucleotide sequence of mouse natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) cDNA and compared the revised deduced amino acid sequence with those of rat and human NPR-A. The ligand selectivity of these three receptor/guanylyl cyclases was examined by whole-cell stimulation of cGMP production. The 28-amino acid atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) has only one difference among these three species, i.e., human Met-12 versus rat and mouse Ile-12. However, despite the nearly invariant ANP sequence among these species, ANP analogs have marked differences in ED50 values and maximal cGMP responses among the three receptors. With the natriuretic peptide analogs we tested, human NPR-A is less sensitive than rat or mouse NPR-A to changes in the 17-amino acid, disulfide-bonded ring of ANP and to the species differences in brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) but is more sensitive to deletions in the carboxyl tail of ANP. The ANP determinants of agonist potency have therefore changed for different species of NPR-A. This is reflected in the amino acid sequence divergence in the receptor extracellular domains and in the divergence and specificity of BNP among species. Our results suggest that the coevolution of NPR-A and BNP has thus been constrained within the context of the conserved ANP sequence. PMID:7838126

  17. Downregulation of natriuretic peptide system and increased steroidogenesis in rat polycystic ovary.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Virginia M; Honorato-Sampaio, Kinulpe; Martins, Almir S; Reis, Fernando M; Reis, Adelina M

    2014-10-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is known to regulate ovarian functions, such as follicular growth and steroid hormone production. The aim of the present study was to investigate the natriuretic peptide system in a rat model of chronic anovulation, the rat polycystic ovary. Adult female Wistar rats received a single subcutaneous injection of 2mg estradiol valerate to induce polycystic ovaries, while the control group received vehicle injection. Two months later, their ovaries were quickly removed and analyzed. Polycystic ovaries exhibited marked elevation of testosterone and estradiol levels compared to control ovaries. The levels of ANP and the expression of ANP mRNA were highly reduced in the polycystic ovaries compared to controls. By immunohistochemistry, polycystic ovaries showed weaker ANP staining in stroma, theca cells and oocytes compared to controls. Polycystic ovaries also had increased activity of neutral endopeptidase, the main proteolytic enzyme that degrades natriuretic peptides. ANP receptor C mRNA was reduced and ANP binding to this receptor was absent in polycystic ovaries. Collectively, these results indicate a downregulation of the natriuretic peptide system in rat polycystic ovary, an established experimental model of anovulation with high ovarian testosterone and estradiol levels. Together with previous evidence demonstrating that ANP inhibits ovarian steroidogenesis, these findings suggest that low ovarian ANP levels may contribute to the abnormal steroid hormone balance in polycystic ovaries. PMID:25111374

  18. Atrial remodeling, fibrosis, and atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Jalife, José; Kaur, Kuljeet

    2015-08-01

    The fundamental mechanisms governing the perpetuation of atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common arrhythmia seen in clinical practice, are poorly understood, which explains in part why AF prevention and treatment remain suboptimal. Although some clinical parameters have been identified as predicting a transition from paroxysmal to persistent AF in some patients, the molecular, electrophysiological, and inflammation changes leading to such a progression have not been described in detail. Oxidative stress, atrial dilatation, calcium overload, inflammation, microRNAs, and myofibroblast activation are all thought to be involved in AF-induced atrial remodeling. However, it is unknown to what extent and at which time points such alterations influence the remodeling process that perpetuates AF. Here we postulate a working model that might open new pathways for future investigation into mechanisms of AF perpetuation. We start from the premise that the progression to AF perpetuation is the result of interplay among manifold signaling pathways with differing kinetics. Some such pathways have relatively fast kinetics (e.g., oxidative stress-mediated shortening of refractory period); others likely depend on molecular processes with slower kinetics (e.g., transcriptional changes in myocyte ion channel protein expression mediated through inflammation and fibroblast activation). We stress the need to fully understand the relationships among such pathways should one hope to identify novel, truly effective targets for AF therapy and prevention. PMID:25661032

  19. Natriuretic peptide resistance of mesenteric arteries in spontaneous hypertensive rat is alleviated by exercise.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Zhang, B; Su, X-L; Tie, R; Chang, P; Zhang, X-C; Wang, J-B; Zhao, G; Zhu, M-Z; Zhang, H-F; Chen, B-Y

    2016-06-20

    Proximal resistance vessels, such as the mesenteric arteries, contribute substantially to the peripheral resistance. The reactivity of resistance vessels to vasoactive substance like natriuretic peptides plays an important role in the regulation of blood pressure. In current study, we investigated the reactivity of mesenteric arteries to atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), a well known vasodilating factor, in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), as well as the effects of exercise training on it. As a result, ANP-induced vasorelaxation was attenuated in SHR with significantly increased phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5), and decreased cGMP/ANP ratio, compared with WKY rats as control. Intriguingly, the decreased reactivity to ANP in SHR was markedly reversed by exercise training. In addition, ANP resistance of in vitro mesenteric arteries was diminished by sildenafil a potent selective inhibitor of PDE5. In conclusion, ANP resistance occurs in resistance vessels of SHR, suggesting predisposition to hypertension, which can be reversed by exercise. PMID:26447511

  20. Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find People About NINDS NINDS Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... done? Clinical Trials What is Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke? Atrial fibrillation (AF) describes the rapid, irregular beating ...

  1. Living with Atrial Fibrillation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics » Atrial Fibrillation » Living With Atrial Fibrillation Explore Atrial Fibrillation What Is... Types Other Names Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Arrhythmia ...

  2. The natriuretic peptides and cardiometabolic health

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Deepak K.; Wang, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides are cardiac-derived hormones with a range of protective functions, including natriuresis, diuresis, vasodilation, lusitropy, lipolysis, weight loss, and improved insulin sensitivity. The actions are mediated through membrane bound guanylyl cyclases that lead to production of the intracellular second-messenger cGMP. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that genetic and acquired deficiencies of the natriuretic peptide system can promote hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, obesity, diabetes mellitus, the metabolic syndrome, and heart failure. Clinically, natriuretic peptides are robust diagnostic and prognostic markers and augmenting natriuretic peptides is a target for therapeutic strategies in cardio-metabolic disease. This review will summarize current understanding and highlight novel aspects of natriuretic peptide biology. PMID:26103984

  3. Atrial fibrillation or flutter

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes of atrial fibrillation include: Alcohol use (especially binge drinking) Coronary artery disease Heart attack or heart ... conditions that cause atrial fibrillation and flutter. Avoid binge drinking.

  4. Changes of adrenomedullin and natriuretic peptides in patients with adrenal medullary hyperplasia prior to and following pharmacological therapy and adrenalectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Pang-Hu; Shi, Lei; Hu, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Li-Jun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the pathophysiological functions of adrenomedullin (ADM), atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) in patients with adrenal medullary hyperplasia (AMH). Plasma ADM, ANP and BNP concentrations were measured in 20 patients with AMH, 35 patients with essential hypertension (EH), and 40 healthy control subjects. Following effective antihypertensive therapy, the values in AMH and EH patients were measured again and laparoscopic adrenalectomy was performed for AMH patients. At 2 weeks after surgery, the three peptides were measured again. The AMH patients had higher plasma concentrations of ADM, ANP and BNP compared with the EH and control subjects. There were significant differences in the values of ADM, ANP and BNP between adrenal vein and inferior vena cava and between AMH and contralateral adrenal vein. Plasma ADM concentration was correlated with serum epinephrine and norepinephrine and urine vanillylmandelic acid, in addition to systolic and diastolic blood pressure, left ventricular ejection fraction, left ventricular mass index and ANP and BNP values in the AMH group. Following antihypertensive treatment, ADM, ANP and BNP were significantly decreased in EH patients, but remained unchanged in AMH subjects. However, these concentrations significantly decreased following surgery. Therefore, the present results suggest that ADM, ANP and BNP may be involved in regulating adrenal medulla functions. PMID:27446289

  5. Guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A signaling antagonizes the vascular endothelial growth factor-stimulated MAPKs and downstream effectors AP-1 and CREB in mouse mesangial cells

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Satyabha; Pandey, Kailash N.

    2012-01-01

    Along with its natriuretic, diuretic, and vasodilatory properties, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and its guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) exhibit an inhibitory effect on cell growth and proliferation. However, the signaling pathways mediating this inhibition are not well understood. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of ANP-NPRA system on mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and the downstream proliferative transcription factors involving activating protein-1 (AP-1) and cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) in agonist-stimulated mouse mesangial cells (MMCs). We found that ANP inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-stimulated phosphorylation of MAPKs (Erk1, Erk2, JNK, and p38), to a greater extent in NPRA-transfected cells (50–60%) relative to vector-transfected cells (25–30%). The analyses of the phosphorylated transcription factors revealed that ANP inhibited VEGF-stimulated activation of CREB, and the AP-1 subunits (c-jun and c-fos). Gel shift assays demonstrated that ANP inhibited VEGF-stimulated AP-1 and CREB DNA-binding ability by 67 % and 62 %, respectively. The addition of the protein kinase G (PKG) inhibitor, KT-5823, restored the VEGF-stimulated activation of MAPKs, AP-1, and CREB, demonstrating the integral role of cGMP/PKG signaling in NPRA-mediated effects. Our results delineate the under lying mechanisms through which ANP-NPRA system exerts an inhibitory effect on MAPKs and down-stream effector molecules, AP-1 and CREB, critical for cell growth and proliferation. PMID:22610792

  6. Natriuretic Hormones in Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Hodes, Anastasia; Lichtstein, David

    2014-01-01

    Natriuretic hormones (NH) include three groups of compounds: the natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP and CNP), the gastrointestinal peptides (guanylin and uroguanylin), and endogenous cardiac steroids. These substances induce the kidney to excrete sodium and therefore participate in the regulation of sodium and water homeostasis, blood volume, and blood pressure (BP). In addition to their peripheral functions, these hormones act as neurotransmitters or neuromodulators in the brain. In this review, the established information on the biosynthesis, release and function of NH is discussed, with particular focus on their role in brain function. The available literature on the expression patterns of each of the NH and their receptors in the brain is summarized, followed by the evidence for their roles in modulating brain function. Although numerous open questions exist regarding this issue, the available data support the notion that NH participate in the central regulation of BP, neuroprotection, satiety, and various psychiatric conditions, including anxiety, addiction, and depressive disorders. In addition, the interactions between the different NH in the periphery and the brain are discussed. PMID:25506340

  7. Atrial myocardial infarction: A tale of the forgotten chamber.

    PubMed

    Lu, Marvin Louis Roy; De Venecia, Toni; Patnaik, Soumya; Figueredo, Vincent M

    2016-01-01

    It has been almost a century since atrial infarction was first described, yet data describing its significance remain limited. To date, there are still no universally accepted criteria for the diagnosis of atrial infarction. Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of atrial infarction but it has also been described in cor pulmonale and pulmonary hypertension. Atrial infarction almost always occurs concomitantly with ventricular infarction. Its clinical presentation depends largely on the extent and site of ventricular involvement. Atrial infarction can present with supraventricular tachyarrhythmias. Electrocardiographic (ECG) criteria for diagnosing atrial infarction have been described but none have yet to be validated by prospective studies. Atrial ECG patterns include abnormal P-wave morphologies, PR-segment deviations, as well as transient rhythm abnormalities, including atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, atrial tachycardia, wandering atrial pacemaker (WAP) and atrioventricular (AV) blocks. Complications of atrial infarction include thromboembolic events and cardiogenic shock. There are no specific additional recommendations in the management of myocardial infarction with suspected involvement of the atria. The primary goal remains coronary reperfusion and maintenance of, or conversion to, sinus rhythm. PMID:26485186

  8. Plasma proatrial natriuretic factor (1-98) concentration after myocardial infarction: relation to indices of cardiac and renal function.

    PubMed Central

    Bonarjee, V. V.; Omland, T.; Nilsen, D. W.; Caidahl, K.; Sundsfjord, J. A.; Dickstein, K.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--(a) To assess the relation between plasma concentrations of proatrial natriuretic factor (1-98) and non-invasively derived indices of left ventricular systolic and diastolic performance and (b) to assess the potential confounding effect of renal function and age on this relation in patients with acute myocardial infarction. DESIGN--Cross sectional comparison of biochemical and echocardiographic indices of cardiac function. SETTING--Norwegian central hospital. PATIENTS--Sixty four patients with acute myocardial infarction. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Relation between plasma proatrial natriuretic factor (1-98) concentrations and echocardiographic indices of left ventricular systolic function as assessed by univariate and multivariate linear regression analysis. Sensitivity and specificity of plasma proatrial natriuretic factor (1-98) concentration as a measure of left ventricular systolic and diastolic dysfunction. RESULTS--Plasma proatrial natriuretic factor (1-98) concentrations were significantly related to left ventricular ejection fraction (r = -0.33; P = 0.008), age (r = 0.43; P < 0.001), and creatinine clearance (r = - 0.53; P < 0.001). In a multivariate model left ventricular ejection fraction and creatinine clearance were both independently related to plasma values. The mean concentration of proatrial natriuretic factor (1-98) was significantly higher in patients with an ejection fraction of < 40% than in those with an ejection fraction of > or = 40% (1876 (1151) v 1174 (530) pmol/l; P = 0.03) and in patients with an abnormal transmitral E/A ratio ( < 0.65 or > 1.65, where E/A is ratio of peak early filling velocity to peak atrial component) compared with those with a normal ratio (1572 (895) v 1137 (523) pmol/l, respectively; P = 0.02). When patients were subdivided according to the median concentration of proatrial natriuretic factor (1192 pmol/l) the sensitivity and specificity were 89% and 56% respectively for detecting a left ventricular ejection

  9. George E. Brown memorial lecture. Role of atrial peptides in body fluid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ballermann, B J; Brenner, B M

    1986-05-01

    Extracts of mammalian atria, but not ventricles, induce marked diuresis, natriuresis, and reduction in blood pressure when infused systemically in rats and dogs. These extracts also inhibit aldosterone biosynthesis and renal renin release. Natriuretic peptides, 21 amino acids and longer, have been isolated from atria of rodents and man, and share a nearly homologous amino acid sequence at the carboxyterminus. Natriuretic activity resides in a 17-amino acid ring formed by a disulfide bridge, and the C-terminal Phe-Arg appears necessary for full biological potency. The deoxyribonucleic acid-encoding atrial natriuretic peptides have been cloned and the gene structure elucidated. Reduction of the diuretic and natriuretic responses to an acute volume load by right atrial appendectomy first suggested a role for atrial peptides in the physiological response to plasma volume expansion. Subsequently, release of peptides with natriuretic and spasmolytic properties from isolated heart preparations in response to right atrial distension was demonstrated by bioassay and radioimmunoassay. The presence of these peptides in normal rat and human plasma in concentrations of 20-100 pM, and the findings of increased levels in response to acute and chronic plasma volume expansion, rapid atrial tachyarrhythmias, systemic hypertension, congestive heart failure, and renal insufficiency imply that they play an important role in body fluid homeostasis. The mechanisms by which atrial peptides increase renal salt and water excretion are as yet unclear. Renal vascular effects have been consistently demonstrated, and limited evidence for direct actions on tubule ion transport has also been reported recently. In vitro, these peptides cause precontracted vascular and nonvascular smooth muscle to relax, mediated by a direct action on smooth muscle cells. Specific receptors for these peptides have been characterized in crude membranes prepared from whole kidney homogenates and adrenal glomerulosa

  10. Atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Munger, Thomas M.; Wu, Li-Qun; Shen, Win K.

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia affecting patients today. Disease prevalence is increasing at an alarming rate worldwide, and is associated with often catastrophic and costly consequences, including heart failure, syncope, dementia, and stroke. Therapies including anticoagulants, anti-arrhythmic medications, devices, and non-pharmacologic procedures in the last 30 years have improved patients' functionality with the disease. Nonetheless, it remains imperative that further research into AF epidemiology, genetics, detection, and treatments continues to push forward rapidly as the worldwide population ages dramatically over the next 20 years. PMID:24474959

  11. Molecular Basis of Gene-Gene Interaction: Cyclic Cross-Regulation of Gene Expression and Post-GWAS Gene-Gene Interaction Involved in Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chengqi; Zhang, Hongfu; Lu, Qiulun; Chang, Le; Wang, Fan; Wang, Pengxia; Zhang, Rongfeng; Hu, Zhenkun; Song, Qixue; Yang, Xiaowei; Li, Cong; Li, Sisi; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Yang, Qin; Yin, Dan; Wang, Xiaojing; Si, Wenxia; Li, Xiuchun; Xiong, Xin; Wang, Dan; Huang, Yuan; Luo, Chunyan; Li, Jia; Wang, Jingjing; Chen, Jing; Wang, Longfei; Wang, Li; Han, Meng; Ye, Jian; Chen, Feifei; Liu, Jingqiu; Liu, Ying; Wu, Gang; Yang, Bo; Cheng, Xiang; Liao, Yuhua; Wu, Yanxia; Ke, Tie; Chen, Qiuyun; Tu, Xin; Elston, Robert; Rao, Shaoqi; Yang, Yanzong; Xia, Yunlong; Wang, Qing K.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia at the clinic. Recent GWAS identified several variants associated with AF, but they account for <10% of heritability. Gene-gene interaction is assumed to account for a significant portion of missing heritability. Among GWAS loci for AF, only three were replicated in the Chinese Han population, including SNP rs2106261 (G/A substitution) in ZFHX3, rs2200733 (C/T substitution) near PITX2c, and rs3807989 (A/G substitution) in CAV1. Thus, we analyzed the interaction among these three AF loci. We demonstrated significant interaction between rs2106261 and rs2200733 in three independent populations and combined population with 2,020 cases/5,315 controls. Compared to non-risk genotype GGCC, two-locus risk genotype AATT showed the highest odds ratio in three independent populations and the combined population (OR=5.36 (95% CI 3.87-7.43), P=8.00×10-24). The OR of 5.36 for AATT was significantly higher than the combined OR of 3.31 for both GGTT and AACC, suggesting a synergistic interaction between rs2106261 and rs2200733. Relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI) analysis also revealed significant interaction between rs2106261 and rs2200733 when exposed two copies of risk alleles (RERI=2.87, P<1.00×10-4) or exposed to one additional copy of risk allele (RERI=1.29, P<1.00×10-4). The INTERSNP program identified significant genotypic interaction between rs2106261 and rs2200733 under an additive by additive model (OR=0.85, 95% CI: 0.74-0.97, P=0.02). Mechanistically, PITX2c negatively regulates expression of miR-1, which negatively regulates expression of ZFHX3, resulting in a positive regulation of ZFHX3 by PITX2c; ZFHX3 positively regulates expression of PITX2C, resulting in a cyclic loop of cross-regulation between ZFHX3 and PITX2c. Both ZFHX3 and PITX2c regulate expression of NPPA, TBX5 and NKX2.5. These results suggest that cyclic cross-regulation of gene expression is a molecular basis for gene

  12. Brain natriuretic peptide binding sites in rats: In vitro autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Konrad, E.M.; Thibault, G.; Pelletier, S.; Genest, J.; Cantin, M. )

    1990-08-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a recently discovered family of natriuretic peptides highly homologous to atrial natriuretic factor (ANF). Quantitative in vitro autoradiography with a computerized microdensitometer demonstrated that the distribution of BNP binding sites is similar to the known distribution pattern of ANF binding sites in rat tissues. Analysis of saturation and competition curves disclosed that the maximal binding capacity for BNP-(Asp-81--Tyr-106) and ANF-(Ser-99--Tyr-126) is similar within the plexiform layer of the olfactory bulb, the choroid plexus, and the adrenal zona glomerulosa. Examination of the competition curves of BNP-(Asp-81--Tyr-106), ANF-(Ser-99--Tyr-126), and des-(Gln-116--Gly-120)ANF-(Asp-102--Cys-121)NH2 (C-ANF, a ligand highly specific for ANF-R2 receptors) for {sup 125}I-labeled BNP-(Asp-81--Tyr-106) and {sup 125}I-labeled ANF-(Ser-99--Tyr-126) binding revealed that ANF fully displaced {sup 125}I-BNP binding and, conversely, BNP completely displaced {sup 125}I-ANF binding in these tissues, whereas C-ANF partially displaced 125-BNP and 125-ANF binding. Angiotensin II, insulin, glucagon, and substance P had no influence on {sup 125}I-BNP binding in the above tissues. These results support the view that BNP and ANF share the same binding sites in rats.

  13. Atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Fauchier, Laurent; Freedman, Saul B; Van Gelder, Isabelle; Natale, Andrea; Gianni, Carola; Nattel, Stanley; Potpara, Tatjana; Rienstra, Michiel; Tse, Hung-Fat; Lane, Deirdre A

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac rhythm disorder, and increases in prevalence with increasing age and the number of cardiovascular comorbidities. AF is characterized by a rapid and irregular heartbeat that can be asymptomatic or lead to symptoms such as palpitations, dyspnoea and dizziness. The condition can also be associated with serious complications, including an increased risk of stroke. Important recent developments in the clinical epidemiology and management of AF have informed our approach to this arrhythmia. This Primer provides a comprehensive overview of AF, including its epidemiology, mechanisms and pathophysiology, diagnosis, screening, prevention and management. Management strategies, including stroke prevention, rate control and rhythm control, are considered. We also address quality of life issues and provide an outlook on future developments and ongoing clinical trials in managing this common arrhythmia. PMID:27159789

  14. Structure, signaling mechanism and regulation of the natriuretic peptide receptor guanylate cyclase.

    SciTech Connect

    Misono, K. S.; Philo, J. S.; Arakawa, T.; Ogata, C. M.; Qiu, Y.; Ogawa, H.; Young, H. S.

    2011-06-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and the homologous B-type natriuretic peptide are cardiac hormones that dilate blood vessels and stimulate natriuresis and diuresis, thereby lowering blood pressure and blood volume. ANP and B-type natriuretic peptide counterbalance the actions of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and neurohormonal systems, and play a central role in cardiovascular regulation. These activities are mediated by natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPRA), a single transmembrane segment, guanylyl cyclase (GC)-linked receptor that occurs as a homodimer. Here, we present an overview of the structure, possible chloride-mediated regulation and signaling mechanism of NPRA and other receptor GCs. Earlier, we determined the crystal structures of the NPRA extracellular domain with and without bound ANP. Their structural comparison has revealed a novel ANP-induced rotation mechanism occurring in the juxtamembrane region that apparently triggers transmembrane signal transduction. More recently, the crystal structures of the dimerized catalytic domain of green algae GC Cyg12 and that of cyanobacterium GC Cya2 have been reported. These structures closely resemble that of the adenylyl cyclase catalytic domain, consisting of a C1 and C2 subdomain heterodimer. Adenylyl cyclase is activated by binding of G{sub s}{alpha} to C2 and the ensuing 7{sup o} rotation of C1 around an axis parallel to the central cleft, thereby inducing the heterodimer to adopt a catalytically active conformation. We speculate that, in NPRA, the ANP-induced rotation of the juxtamembrane domains, transmitted across the transmembrane helices, may induce a similar rotation in each of the dimerized GC catalytic domains, leading to the stimulation of the GC catalytic activity.

  15. Myeloperoxidase acts as a profibrotic mediator of atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Volker; Andrié, René P; Rudolph, Tanja K; Friedrichs, Kai; Klinke, Anna; Hirsch-Hoffmann, Birgit; Schwoerer, Alexander P; Lau, Denise; Fu, XiaoMing; Klingel, Karin; Sydow, Karsten; Didié, Michael; Seniuk, Anika; von Leitner, Eike-Christin; Szoecs, Katalin; Schrickel, Jan W; Treede, Hendrik; Wenzel, Ulrich; Lewalter, Thorsten; Nickenig, Georg; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus; Meinertz, Thomas; Böger, Rainer H; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Freeman, Bruce A; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Ehmke, Heimo; Hazen, Stanley L; Willems, Stephan; Baldus, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    Observational clinical and ex vivo studies have established a strong association between atrial fibrillation and inflammation1. However, whether inflammation is the cause or the consequence of atrial fibrillation and which specific inflammatory mediators may increase the atria's susceptibility to fibrillation remain elusive. Here we provide experimental and clinical evidence for the mechanistic involvement of myeloperoxidase (MPO), a heme enzyme abundantly expressed by neutrophils, in the pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation. MPO-deficient mice pretreated with angiotensin II (AngII) to provoke leukocyte activation showed lower atrial tissue abundance of the MPO product 3-chlorotyrosine, reduced activity of matrix metalloproteinases and blunted atrial fibrosis as compared to wild-type mice. Upon right atrial electrophysiological stimulation, MPO-deficient mice were protected from atrial fibrillation, which was reversed when MPO was restored. Humans with atrial fibrillation had higher plasma concentrations of MPO and a larger MPO burden in right atrial tissue as compared to individuals devoid of atrial fibrillation. In the atria, MPO colocalized with markedly increased formation of 3-chlorotyrosine. Our data demonstrate that MPO is a crucial prerequisite for structural remodeling of the myocardium, leading to an increased vulnerability to atrial fibrillation. PMID:20305660

  16. Atrial Fibrillation in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Atrial Fibrillation in Children Updated:Jul 18,2016 Does your ... content was last reviewed on 04/16/14. Atrial Fibrillation • Introduction • What is Atrial Fibrillation? • Why AFib Matters • ...

  17. Functional Role and Mechanism of microRNA-28b in Atrial Myocyte in a Persistent Atrial Fibrillation Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongbin; Kang, Weiqiang; Wang, Xu; Chen, Meina; Qin, Qiaoji; Guo, Minglei; Ge, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    Background Persistent atrial fibrillation has been indicated to be related with microRNA-28b. However, the exact role of microRNA-28b in persistent atrial fibrillation needs to be further elucidated. Therefore, this study aimed to establish a rat model of persistent atrial fibrillation to investigate the level of microRNA-28b in atrial myocytes and to explore the molecular mechanism involved. Material/Methods A persistent atrial fibrillation model was established in rats by using chronic rapid atrial pacing induction. The size of the heart was measured by ultrasonic method. The expression of microRNA-28b in left atrial myocytes was quantified by RT-PCR. Cardiomyocytes were isolated and cultured to detect cell proliferation and apoptosis by MTT and flow cytometry, respectively. The specific inhibitor of ERK signaling pathway, PD98059, was used to further illustrate the role of ERK signaling pathway in the modulation of cardiomyocytes in persistent atrial fibrillation. Results MicroRNA-28b was up-regulated in the experimental rat model with persistent atrial fibrillation. The proliferation of cardiomyocytes was significantly inhibited with potentiated apoptosis. Blockage of the ERK pathway suppressed the microRNA-28b expression and inhibited cell apoptosis. Conclusions microRNA-28b-induced growth inhibition and cell apoptosis of atrial myocytes was observed in the rat model with persistent atrial fibrillation, via activation of the ERK signaling pathway. PMID:27574952

  18. [Atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Colín Lizalde, L J

    2001-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia. AF has now been exhaustively studied: more is known about its mechanism and research is moving towards new forms of treatment. For chronic AF, basically the control of ventricular rate and the brain protection are the main issues. It is well known that with the identification of high risk group for embolism, oral anticoagulation should be administered. Ventricular rate control can be achieved by using betablockers or calcium channel blockers, unless these are contraindicated for the elderly. Oral anticoagulation prevents the stroke. The main mechanism of AF is the re-entry of multiple wavelets, but now it is more frequently found on patients with focal AF. Therapies are employed to bring the patient to a sinusal rhythm as soon as possible with antiarryhthmics or electric cardioversion externally or internally. The internal procedure includes 1 to 15 J and the success rate is of 91% vs 67% in relation to the external one. The introduction of the catheter ablation has opened new frontiers for the treatment of AF, first as the ablate-and-pace technique and now trying to mimic the maze procedure or with the ablation of the focal tachycardia. The stimulation for prevention of AF under research, as well as the implantable dysfibrillation for selected patients. On going studies will show the possible benefit of this type of benefits. PMID:11565343

  19. Natriuretic peptides modify Pseudomonas fluorescens cytotoxicity by regulating cyclic nucleotides and modifying LPS structure

    PubMed Central

    Veron, Wilfried; Orange, Nicole; Feuilloley, Marc GJ; Lesouhaitier, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    Background Nervous tissues express various communication molecules including natriuretic peptides, i.e. Brain Natriuretic Peptide (BNP) and C-type Natriuretic Peptide (CNP). These molecules share structural similarities with cyclic antibacterial peptides. CNP and to a lesser extent BNP can modify the cytotoxicity of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The psychrotrophic environmental species Pseudomonas fluorescens also binds to and kills neurons and glial cells, cell types that both produce natriuretic peptides. In the present study, we investigated the sensitivity of Pseudomonas fluorescens to natriuretic peptides and evaluated the distribution and variability of putative natriuretic peptide-dependent sensor systems in the Pseudomonas genus. Results Neither BNP nor CNP modified P. fluorescens MF37 growth or cultivability. However, pre-treatment of P. fluorescens MF37 with BNP or CNP provoked a decrease of the apoptotic effect of the bacterium on glial cells and an increase of its necrotic activity. By homology with eukaryotes, where natriuretic peptides act through receptors coupled to cyclases, we observed that cell-permeable stable analogues of cyclic AMP (dbcAMP) and cyclic GMP (8BcGMP) mimicked the effect of BNP and CNP on bacteria. Intra-bacterial concentrations of cAMP and cGMP were measured to study the involvement of bacterial cyclases in the regulation of P. fluorescens cytotoxicity by BNP or CNP. BNP provoked an increase (+49%) of the cAMP concentration in P. fluorescens, and CNP increased the intra-bacterial concentrations of cGMP (+136%). The effect of BNP and CNP on the virulence of P. fluorescens was independent of the potential of the bacteria to bind to glial cells. Conversely, LPS extracted from MF37 pre-treated with dbcAMP showed a higher necrotic activity than the LPS from untreated or 8BcGMP-pre-treated bacteria. Capillary electrophoresis analysis suggests that these different effects of the LPS may be due, at least in part, to

  20. Giant atrial septal aneurysm originating from the right coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Osada, Hiroaki; Kanemitsu, Naoki; Meshii, Katsuaki; Ohnaka, Motoaki

    2016-08-01

    Giant coronary artery aneurysm is a rare clinical entity and its involvement in the interatrial space is extremely rare. We here report the rare surgical case of a 67-year old man with giant right coronary artery aneurysm located in the atrial septum with fistula formation to the right atrium, complicated with congestive heart failure, rapid atrial fibrillation and left atrial appendage thrombus. The patient eventually recovered fully without sequelae. PMID:27118290

  1. Atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Bang, Casper N

    2013-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common complication after myocardial infarction (MI) and new-onset AF has been demonstrated to be associated with adverse outcome and a large excess risk of death in both MI and aortic stenosis (AS) patients. Prevention of new-onset AF is therefore a potential therapeutic target in AS and MI patients. Lipid-lowering drugs, particularly statins, have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that may prevent AF. Accordingly, statins are recommended as a class IIa recommendation for prevention of new-onset AF after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). However, this preventive effect has not been investigated on new-onset AF in asymptomatic patients with AS or a large scale first-time MI patient sample and data in patients not undergoing invasive cardiac interventions are limited. This PhD thesis was conducted at the Heart Centre, Rigshospitalet, Denmark, with the aim to investigate the three aforementioned questions and to add to the existing evidence of AF prevention with statins. This was done using three different settings: 1) a randomized patients sample of 1,873 from the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study, 2) a register patient sample of 97,499 with first-time MI, and 3) all published studies until beginning of June 2011 examining statin treatment on new-onset and recurrent AF in patients not undergoing cardiac surgery. This thesis revealed that statins did not lower the incidence or the time to new-onset AF in patients with asymptomatic AS. However, statin treatment showed an independently preventive effect on new-onset AF, including type-dependent effect and a trend to dosage-dependent effect. In addition, this thesis showed that good compliance to statin treatment was important to prevent new-onset AF. Finally, the meta-analysis in this PhD thesis showed a preventive effect in the observational studies although this effect was absent in the randomized controlled trials. Based on this PhD thesis

  2. Atrial Septal Defect (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Atrial Septal Defect KidsHealth > For Teens > Atrial Septal Defect Print A ... Care of Yourself What Is an Atrial Septal Defect? Having a doctor listen to your heart is ...

  3. Morphological and morphometric study of atrial specific granules and other secretory components in dogs experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    Caliari, M. V.; Lana, M.; Leite, V. H.; Tafuri, W. L.

    1995-01-01

    Changes in blood volume can induce morphometric and morphological alterations in the secretory complex of the myoendocrine cells due to the stretching of atrial walls. These alterations were studied by electron microscopy, using dogs infected intraperitonially with Trypanosoma cruzi and necropsied during the acute phase of the infection when congestive heart failure was present. Several changes were observed in the myoendocrine cells of the heart: hypertrophy and hyperplasia of rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex, increase in telenuclear secretory complex, increase in fusion of type B atrial specific granules (ASG), decrease of the total number of ASG, enlargement of the maximum diameter of type A ASG and a relative increase in the number of type B ASG. These alterations suggest a larger secretory activity of the atrial myoendocrine cells with a larger secretion of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7547444

  4. Effect of exercise training on cardiac oxytocin and natriuretic peptide systems in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Gutkowska, Jolanta; Paquette, Amélie; Wang, Donghao; Lavoie, Jean-Marc; Jankowski, Marek

    2007-07-01

    Exercise training results in cardiovascular and metabolic adaptations that may be beneficial in menopausal women by reducing blood pressure, insulin resistance, and cholesterol level. The adaptation of the cardiac hormonal systems oxytocin (OT), natriuretic peptides (NPs), and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in response to exercise training was investigated in intact and ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Ovariectomy significantly augmented body weight (BW), left ventricle (LV) mass, and intra-abdominal fat pad weight and decreased the expression of oxytocin receptor (OTR), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), and guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A), in the right atrium (RA) and LV, indicating estrogenic control of these genes. These effects of ovariectomy were counteracted by 8-wk-long exercise training which decreased fat pad weight (33.4 +/- 2.3 to 23.4 +/- 3.1 g, n = 8, P < 0.05), plasma free fatty acids (0.124 +/- 0.033 to 0.057 +/- 0.010 mM, n = 8, P < 0.01), and plasma triacylglycerol (0.978 +/- 0.174 to 0.588 +/- 0.115 mM, n = 8, P < 0.05). Chronic exercise tended to decrease BW and stimulated ANP (4- to 5-fold) and OTR gene expression in the LV and RA and BNP and inducible NOS (iNOS) mRNA in the LV. In sham-operated rats, exercise augmented ANP expression in the RA, downregulated GC-A mRNA in the LV and RA, but increased its expression threefold in the RA of OVX animals. Endothelial NOS and iNOS expression was enhanced in the left atrium of sham-operated rats. Altogether, these data indicate that in OVX animals, chronic exercise significantly enhances cardiac OT, NPs, and NOS, thus implicating all three hormonal systems in the beneficial effects of exercise training. PMID:17475680

  5. Structure, signaling mechanism and regulation of natriuretic peptide receptor-guanylate cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Misono, Kunio S.; Philo, John S.; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Ogata, Craig M.; Qiu, Yue; Ogawa, Haruo; Young, Howard S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and homologous B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) are cardiac hormones that dilate blood vessels and stimulate natriuresis and diuresis, thereby lowering blood pressure and blood volume. ANP and BNP counterbalance the actions of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and neurohormonal systems, and play a central role in cardiovascular regulation. These activities are mediated by the A-type natriuretic peptide receptor (NPRA), a single transmembrane segment, guanylate cyclase (GC) linked receptor that occurs as a homodimer. Here we present an overview of the structure, possible chloride-mediated regulation, and signaling mechanism of the NPRA and other receptor-GCs. Earlier, we determined the crystal structures of the NPRA extracellular domain with and without bound ANP. Their structural comparison has revealed a novel ANP-induced rotation mechanism occurring in the juxtamembrane region that apparently triggers transmembrane signal transduction. More recently, the crystal structures of the dimerized catalytic domain of green algae GC Cyg12 and that of cyanobacter GC Cya2 have been reported. These structures closely resemble that of the adenylate cyclase catalytic domain consisting of C1 and C2 subdomain heterodimer. AC is activated by binding of Gsα to C2 and ensuing 7° rotation of C1 around an axis parallel to the central cleft, thereby inducing the heterodimer into a catalytically active conformation. We speculate that, in the NPRA, the ANP-induced rotation of the juxtamembrane domains, transmitted across the transmembrane helices, may induce a similar rotation in each of the dimerized GC catalytic domains, leading to the stimulation of the GC catalytic activity. PMID:21375693

  6. Biological actions of brain natriuretic peptide in thoracic inferior vena caval constriction.

    PubMed

    Clavell, A L; Stingo, A J; Aarhus, L L; Burnett, J C

    1993-12-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) shares structural and functional similarities to atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP). Although BNP and ANP interact with the same biologically active guanylate cyclase-coupled receptor, recent reports conflict with regard to the biological actions of exogenous BNP in sodium-retaining and edematous states. We studied the biological actions of BNP in normal dogs (n = 5) and sodium-avid dogs with chronic thoracic inferior vena caval constriction (TIVCC) (n = 6). In normal dogs BNP increased glomerular filtration rate, renal blood flow, and urinary sodium excretion and decreased proximal and distal fractional reabsorption of sodium with activation of urinary guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP). These renal actions occurred in association with marked hypotensive actions and activation of systemic cGMP. In TIVCC, a state characterized by chronic reductions of cardiac output, avid sodium retention, edema, and activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), the renal actions of BNP were absent in association with marked attenuation of the urinary cGMP response. In contrast, an enhanced hypotensive response with preserved activation of systemic cGMP was observed. In neither normal dogs nor TIVCC dogs did BNP inhibit the RAAS. These studies report that BNP is a potent vasoactive and natriuretic peptide with potent proximal and distal tubular actions in normal dogs. These studies also demonstrate that in TIVCC, a model of low cardiac output and congestive failure that results in marked sodium retention with edema in which there is activation of the RAAS, the renal actions of BNP are attenuated while the vasoactive actions are enhanced. PMID:8285286

  7. The Functional Genomics of Guanylyl Cyclase/Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-A: Perspectives and Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash N.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac hormones atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) activate guanylyl cyclase-A/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) and produce the second messenger cGMP. The GC-A/NPRA is a member of the growing family of GC receptors. The recent biochemical, molecular, and genomic studies of GC-A/NPRA have provided important insights into the regulation and functional activity of this receptor protein with a particular emphasis on cardiac and renal protective roles in hypertension and cardiovascular disease states. The progress in this field of research has significantly strengthened and advanced our knowledge about the critical roles of Npr1 gene (coding for GC-A/NPRA) in control of fluid volume, blood pressure, cardiac remodeling, and other physiological functions and pathological states. Overall, this review attempts to provide insight and to delineate the current concepts in the field of functional genomics and signaling of GC-A/NPRA in hypertension and cardiovascular disease states at the molecular level. PMID:21375691

  8. Atriopeptin III. A potent natriuretic, diuretic, and hypotensive agent in rats with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Cole, B R; Kuhnline, M A; Needleman, P

    1985-12-01

    Chronic renal failure is frequently associated with volume overload, resulting in hypertension and, in some cases, congestive heart failure. Atriopeptin III (AP III), a 24-amino acid atrial peptide, is a potent vasodilator and natriuretic/diuretic agent in normal rats. An infusion of AP III at 0.2 microgram/kg per min for 60 min produced dramatic responses in animals with chronic renal failure (5/6 nephrectomy 4 wk before study). Systemic blood pressure fell 20% by the end of infusion. A pronounced rise in glomerular filtration rate (24%) was maintained during the infusion period when urine flow rate was stable (35-60 min), even though renal blood flow was unchanged from base line. Urinary volume increased 4.4-fold and sodium excretion increased 9 to 12-fold during the infusion. Fractional excretion of sodium ranged between 9 and 15% in those animals whose initial GFR values were lower than 0.5 ml/min. We conclude that AP III is a potent natriuretic/diuretic agent in rats with reduced renal mass, presumably exerting that effect predominantly through increases in GFR. This agent may well be useful in the treatment of volume overload in patients with chronic renal failure. PMID:2934412

  9. B and C types natriuretic peptides modify norepinephrine uptake and release in the rat adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Vatta, M S; Presas, M F; Bianciotti, L G; Rodriguez-Fermepin, M; Ambros, R; Fernandez, B E

    1997-01-01

    We have previously reported that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) modulates adrenomedullar norepinephrine (NE) metabolism. On this basis, the aim of the present work was to study the effects of B and C types natriuretic peptides (BNP and CNP) on the uptake, intracellular distribution and release of 3H-NE. Experiments were carried out in rat adrenal medulla slices incubated "in vitro." Results showed that 100 nM of both, CNP and BNP, enhanced total and neuronal NE uptake. Both peptides (100 nM) caused a rapid increase in NE uptake during the first minute, which was sustained for 60 min. NE intracellular distribution was only modified by CNP (100 nM), which increased the granular fraction and decreased the cytosolic pool. On the other hand, spontaneous as well as evoked (KCl) NE release, was decreased by BNP and CNP (50 and 100 nM for spontaneous release and 1, 10, 50 and 100 nM for evoked output). The present results suggest that BNP and CNP may regulate catecholamine secretion and modulate adrenomedullary biological actions mediated by catecholamines, such as blood arterial pressure, smooth muscle tone, and metabolic activities. PMID:9437706

  10. Endocytosis and Trafficking of Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-A: Potential Role of Short Sequence Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash N.

    2015-01-01

    The targeted endocytosis and redistribution of transmembrane receptors among membrane-bound subcellular organelles are vital for their correct signaling and physiological functions. Membrane receptors committed for internalization and trafficking pathways are sorted into coated vesicles. Cardiac hormones, atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) bind to guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) and elicit the generation of intracellular second messenger cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP), which lowers blood pressure and incidence of heart failure. After ligand binding, the receptor is rapidly internalized, sequestrated, and redistributed into intracellular locations. Thus, NPRA is considered a dynamic cellular macromolecule that traverses different subcellular locations through its lifetime. The utilization of pharmacologic and molecular perturbants has helped in delineating the pathways of endocytosis, trafficking, down-regulation, and degradation of membrane receptors in intact cells. This review describes the investigation of the mechanisms of internalization, trafficking, and redistribution of NPRA compared with other cell surface receptors from the plasma membrane into the cell interior. The roles of different short-signal peptide sequence motifs in the internalization and trafficking of other membrane receptors have been briefly reviewed and their potential significance in the internalization and trafficking of NPRA is discussed. PMID:26151885

  11. Prevalence of Isolated Atrial Amyloidosis in Young Patients Affected by Congestive Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Millucci, Lia; Ghezzi, Lorenzo; Bernardini, Giulia; Braconi, Daniela; Tanganelli, Piero; Santucci, Annalisa

    2012-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), whose amyloid is responsible of isolated atrial amyloidosis (IAA), is known to play an important role in the pathophysiology of congestive heart failure (CHF). We provide here the microscopic examination of atrial biopsies from 36 young (mean 40 years) CHF patients distinguished in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DC) affected and hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HC) affected, endorsing the presumptive association of early CHF with IAA. We utilized a multiple method, using Congo red (CR) staining, CR fluorescence (CRF), and immunohistochemistry to assess the presence of IAA in CHF. Immunostaining showed a moderate deposition of IAA in the atrium surrounding working myocardium with small intracellular deposits. Our findings suggest a monitoring of young CHF cases for the development of IAA. Our study also demonstrated how the concurrent use of immunohistochemistry, CR, and CRF may greatly enhance the detection of low-grade amyloid deposits. PMID:22536133

  12. Prevalence of isolated atrial amyloidosis in young patients affected by congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Millucci, Lia; Ghezzi, Lorenzo; Bernardini, Giulia; Braconi, Daniela; Tanganelli, Piero; Santucci, Annalisa

    2012-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), whose amyloid is responsible of isolated atrial amyloidosis (IAA), is known to play an important role in the pathophysiology of congestive heart failure (CHF). We provide here the microscopic examination of atrial biopsies from 36 young (mean 40 years) CHF patients distinguished in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DC) affected and hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HC) affected, endorsing the presumptive association of early CHF with IAA. We utilized a multiple method, using Congo red (CR) staining, CR fluorescence (CRF), and immunohistochemistry to assess the presence of IAA in CHF. Immunostaining showed a moderate deposition of IAA in the atrium surrounding working myocardium with small intracellular deposits. Our findings suggest a monitoring of young CHF cases for the development of IAA. Our study also demonstrated how the concurrent use of immunohistochemistry, CR, and CRF may greatly enhance the detection of low-grade amyloid deposits. PMID:22536133

  13. Update on atrial fibrillation: part I.

    PubMed

    Savelieva, Irina; Camm, John

    2008-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an epidemic, affecting 1% to 1.5% of the population in the developed world. Projected data from the population-based studies suggest that the prevalence of AF will grow at least 3-fold by 2050. The health and economic burden imposed by AF and AF-related morbidity is enormous. Atrial fibrillation has a multiplicity of causes ranging from genetic to degenerative, but hypertension and heart failure are the commonest and epidemiologically most prevalent conditions associated with AF as both have been shown to create an arrhythmogenic substrate. Several theories emerged regarding the mechanism of AF, which can be combined into two groups: the single focus hypothesis and the multiple sources hypothesis. Several lines of evidence point to the relevance of both hypotheses to the mechanism of AF, probably with a different degree of involvement depending on the variety of AF (paroxysmal or persistent). Sustained AF alters electrophysiological and structural properties of the atrial myocardium such that the atria become more susceptible to the initiation and maintenance of the arrhythmia, a process known as atrial remodeling. Angiotensin II has been recognized as a key element in atrial remodeling in association with AF opening the possibility of exploitation of "upstream" therapies to prevent or delay atrial remodeling. The clinical significance of AF lies predominantly in a 5-fold increased risk of stroke. The limitations of warfarin prompted the development of new antithrombotic drugs, which include anticoagulants, such as direct oral thrombin inhibitors (dabigatran) and factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban). Novel mechanical approaches for the prevention of cardioembolic stroke have recently been evaluated: percutaneous left atrial appendage occluders, minimally invasive surgical isolation of the left atrial appendage, and implantation of carotid filtering devices. PMID:18257025

  14. Relative antidipsogenic potencies of six homologous natriuretic peptides in eels.

    PubMed

    Miyanishi, Hiroshi; Nobata, Shigenori; Takei, Yoshio

    2011-10-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) exhibits a potent antidipsogenic effect in seawater (SW) eels to limit excess Na(+) uptake, thereby effectively promoting SW adaptation. Recently, cardiac ANP, BNP and VNP and brain CNP1, 3 and 4, have been identified in eels. We examined the antidipsogenic effect of all homologous NPs using conscious, cannulated eels in both FW and SW together with parameters that affect drinking. A dose-response study (0.01-1 nmol/kg) in SW eels showed the relative potency of the antidipsogenic effect was in the order ANP ≥ VNP > BNP = CNP3 > CNP1 ≥ CNP4, while the order was ANP = VNP = BNP > CNP3 = CNP1 = CNP4 for the vasodepressor effect. The minimum effective dose of ANP for the antidipsogenic effect is much lower than that in mammals. ANP, BNP and VNP at 0.3 nmol/kg decreased drinking, plasma Na(+) concentration and aortic pressure and increased hematocrit in SW eels. The cardiac NPs induced similar changes in drinking, aortic pressure and hematocrit in FW eels, but aside from BNP no change in plasma Na(+) concentration. CNPs had no effect on drinking, plasma Na(+) concentration and hematocrit but induced mild hypotension in both FW and SW eels, except for CNP3 that inhibited drinking in SW eels. These results show that ANP, BNP and VNP are potent antidipsogenic hormones in eels in spite of other regulatory factors working to induce drinking, and that CNPs are without effects on drinking except for the ancestor of the cardiac NPs, CNP3. PMID:21967218

  15. Atrial mass: a myxoma?

    PubMed

    Chatzis, Andrew C; Kostopanagiotou, Kostas; Kousi, Theofili; Mitropoulos, Fotios

    2016-08-01

    A middle-aged woman with a history of resected colorectal cancer and receiving chemotherapy presented with a right atrial mass and the provisional diagnosis of myxoma supported by echocardiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Successful surgical removal revealed organized thrombus instead. Atrial thrombus may be mistaken for myxoma and long-term intracardiac indwelling catheters can be thrombogenic. PMID:27525099

  16. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery atrial clipping for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Mithiran, Harish; Sule, Jai; Sazzad, Faizus; Ong, Yilin; Kah Ti, Lian; Kofidis, Theo

    2016-05-01

    The majority of thrombi that arise due to atrial fibrillation occur in the left atrial appendage. Eliminating this cul-de-sac within the left atrium reduces the risk of stroke in these patients. We present a unique case of left atrial appendage occlusion performed via video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery, using an Atriclip to occlude the left atrial appendage in a patient with atrial fibrillation in whom anticoagulation was contraindicated due to a history of recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:25504982

  17. [Cardioversion and atrial stunning].

    PubMed

    Dabek, Józefa; Gasior, Zbigniew; Monastyrska-Cup, Barbara; Jakubowski, Daniel

    2007-03-01

    Stunned atrium is defined as a state of temporary mechanic atrial dysfunction with preserved bioeletrical function. It may follow up to 38-80% successful cardioversions performed to convert atrial fibrillation to regular sinus rhythm. Lack of effective atrial contractility leads to hemodynamic changes, which may result in thrombus formation with subsequent thromboembolic events. It becomes a priority to research in depth the pathophysiology of stunned atrium phenomenon and form strategies to avoid complications associated with it. Studies have shown, that even patients who had no evidence of thrombotic material (as proven by transesophageal echocardiography performed prior to cardioversion), are still at increased risk of embolic events. This fact created basis for hypothesis, that conditions for clot formation may be met only when sinus rhythm is restored. 93% of thrombi are accompanied by so-called spontaneous contrast phenomenon. The purpose of our study was to find relations between factors contributing to stunned atrium and its cellular mechanisms. It is suggested, that stunned atrium results from changes in atrial muscular membrane which occur during atrial fibrillation. Stunned atrium is encountered more frequently in patients with coronary artery disease than in hypertensive heart disease or even lone atrial fibrillation. It is also associated with rheumatic valvular abnormalities and left ventricular dysfunction from other causes. Studies have shown no correlation between the frequency of stunned atrium and the mode of cardioversion. It was observed, that duration of atrial fibrillation and dimensions of atria have substantial impact on time to mechanical function recovery and magnitude of atrial stunning. Studies on subjects undergoing cardioversion due to atrial fibrillation proved that there is a higher tendency to stunned atrium in patients with atrial enlargement. Due to significant delay until full mechanical function recovery, it is of prominent

  18. C-type natriuretic peptide activates a non-selective cation current in acutely isolated rat cardiac fibroblasts via natriuretic peptide C receptor-mediated signalling.

    PubMed

    Rose, R A; Hatano, N; Ohya, S; Imaizumi, Y; Giles, W R

    2007-04-01

    In the heart, fibroblasts play an essential role in the deposition of the extracellular matrix and they also secrete a number of hormonal factors. Although natriuretic peptides, including C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and brain natriuretic peptide, have antifibrotic effects on cardiac fibroblasts, the effects of CNP on fibroblast electrophysiology have not been examined. In this study, acutely isolated ventricular fibroblasts from the adult rat were used to measure the effects of CNP (2 x 10(-8) M) under whole-cell voltage-clamp conditions. CNP, as well as the natriuretic peptide C receptor (NPR-C) agonist cANF (2 x 10(-8) M), significantly increased an outwardly rectifying non-selective cation current (NSCC). This current has a reversal potential near 0 mV. Activation of this NSCC by cANF was abolished by pre-treating fibroblasts with pertussis toxin, indicating the involvement of G(i) proteins. The cANF-activated NSCC was inhibited by the compounds Gd(3+), SKF 96365 and 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of mRNA from rat ventricular fibroblasts revealed the expression of several transient receptor potential (TRP) channel transcripts. Additional electrophysiological analysis showed that U73122, a phospholipase C antagonist, inhibited the cANF-activated NSCC. Furthermore, the effects of CNP and cANF were mimicked by the diacylglycerol analogue 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG), independently of protein kinase C activity. These are defining characteristics of specific TRPC channels. More detailed molecular analysis confirmed the expression of full-length TRPC2, TRPC3 and TRPC5 transcripts. These data indicate that CNP, acting via the NPR-C receptor, activates a NSCC that is at least partially carried by TRPC channels in cardiac fibroblasts. PMID:17204501

  19. Multiple Biomarkers and Atrial Fibrillation in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Schnabel, Renate B.; Wild, Philipp S.; Wilde, Sandra; Ojeda, Francisco M.; Schulz, Andreas; Zeller, Tanja; Sinning, Christoph R.; Kunde, Jan; Lackner, Karl J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Different biological pathways have been related to atrial fibrillation (AF). Novel biomarkers capturing inflammation, oxidative stress, and neurohumoral activation have not been investigated comprehensively in AF. Methods and Results In the population-based Gutenberg Health Study (n = 5000), mean age 56±11 years, 51% males, we measured ten biomarkers representing inflammation (C-reactive protein, fibrinogen), cardiac and vascular function (midregional pro adrenomedullin [MR-proADM], midregional pro atrial natriuretic peptide [MR-proANP], N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide [Nt-proBNP], sensitive troponin I ultra [TnI ultra], copeptin, and C-terminal pro endothelin-1), and oxidative stress (glutathioneperoxidase-1, myeloperoxidase) in relation to manifest AF (n = 161 cases). Individuals with AF were older, mean age 64.9±8.3, and more often males, 71.4%. In Bonferroni-adjusted multivariable regression analyses strongest associations per standard deviation increase in biomarker concentrations were observed for the natriuretic peptides Nt-proBNP (odds ratio [OR] 2.89, 99.5% confidence interval [CI] 2.14–3.90; P<0.0001), MR-proANP (OR 2.45, 99.5% CI 1.91–3.14; P<0.0001), the vascular function marker MR-proADM (OR 1.54, 99.5% CI 1.20–1.99; P<0.0001), TnI ultra (OR 1.50, 99.5% CI 1.19–1.90; P<0.0001) and. fibrinogen (OR 1.44, 99.5% CI 1.19–1.75; P<0.0001). Based on a model comprising known clinical risk factors for AF, all biomarkers combined resulted in a net reclassification improvement of 0.665 (99.3% CI 0.441–0.888) and an integrated discrimination improvement of >13%. Conclusions In conclusion, in our large, population-based study, we identified novel biomarkers reflecting vascular function, MR-proADM, inflammation, and myocardial damage, TnI ultra, as related to AF; the strong association of natriuretic peptides was confirmed. Prospective studies need to examine whether risk prediction of AF can be enhanced beyond clinical risk

  20. Atrial fibrillation ablation.

    PubMed

    Pappone, Carlo; Santinelli, Vincenzo

    2012-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the commonest cardiac arrhythmia, with significant morbidity related to symptoms, heart failure, and thromboembolism, which is associated with excess mortality. Over the past 10 years, many centers worldwide have reported high success rates and few complications after a single ablation procedure in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Recent studies indicate a short-term and long-term superiority of catheter ablation as compared with conventional antiarrhythmic drug therapy in terms of arrhythmia recurrence, quality of life, and arrhythmia progression. As a result, catheter ablation is evolving to a front-line therapy in many patients with atrial fibrillation. However, in patients with persistent long-standing atrial fibrillation catheter ablation strategy is more complex and time-consuming, frequently requiring repeat procedures to achieve success rates as high as in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. In the near future, however, with growing experience and evolving technology, catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation may be extended also to patients with long-standing atrial fibrillation. PMID:22541284

  1. Natriuretic peptide-guided management in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Chioncel, Ovidiu; Collins, Sean P; Greene, Stephen J; Ambrosy, Andrew P; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Macarie, Cezar; Butler, Javed; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2016-08-01

    Heart failure is a clinical syndrome that manifests from various cardiac and noncardiac abnormalities. Accordingly, rapid and readily accessible methods for diagnosis and risk stratification are invaluable for providing clinical care, deciding allocation of scare resources, and designing selection criteria for clinical trials. Natriuretic peptides represent one of the most important diagnostic and prognostic tools available for the care of heart failure patients. Natriuretic peptide testing has the distinct advantage of objectivity, reproducibility, and widespread availability.The concept of tailoring heart failure management to achieve a target value of natriuretic peptides has been tested in various clinical trials and may be considered as an effective method for longitudinal biomonitoring and guiding escalation of heart failure therapies with overall favorable results.Although heart failure trials support efficacy and safety of natriuretic peptide-guided therapy as compared with usual care, the relationship between natriuretic peptide trajectory and clinical benefit has not been uniform across the trials, and certain subgroups have not shown robust benefit. Furthermore, the precise natriuretic peptide value ranges and time intervals of testing are still under investigation. If natriuretic peptides fail to decrease following intensification of therapy, further work is needed to clarify the optimal pharmacologic approach. Despite decreasing natriuretic peptide levels, some patients may present with other high-risk features (e.g. elevated troponin). A multimarker panel investigating multiple pathological processes will likely be an optimal alternative, but this will require prospective validation.Future research will be needed to clarify the type and magnitude of the target natriuretic peptide therapeutic response, as well as the duration of natriuretic peptide-guided therapy in heart failure patients. PMID:27110656

  2. DEFINITIVE ROLE FOR NATRIURETIC PEPTIDE RECEPTOR-C IN MEDIATING THE VASORELAXANT ACTIVITY OF C-TYPE NATRIURETIC PEPTIDE AND ENDOTHELIUM-DERIVED HYPERPOLARISING FACTOR

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Inmaculada C.; Panayiotou, Catherine M.; Sheraz, Adil; Madhani, Melanie; Scotland, Ramona S.; Nobles, Muriel; Kemp-Harper, Barbara; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Hobbs, Adrian J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) has recently been suggested to represent an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) in the mammalian resistance vasculature, important in the regulation of local blood flow and systemic blood pressure. Additionally, this peptide has been shown to protect against ischaemia-reperfusion injury and inhibits leukocyte and platelet activation. Herein, we use a novel, selective natriuretic peptide receptor-C (NPR-C) antagonist (M372049) to highlight the pivotal contribution of CNP/NPR-C signalling in the EDHF-dependent regulation of vascular tone and investigate the mechanism(s) underlying the release and biological activity of CNP and EDHF. Methods In vitro pharmacological investigation was conducted in rat (Sprague-Dawley) aorta and mesenteric resistance arteries. Relaxant responses to CNP, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), the nitric oxide donor spermine-NONOate (SPER-NO) and the endothelium-dependent vasodilator, acetylcholine (ACh) were examined in the absence and presence of M372049 or inhibitor cocktails shown previously to block endothelium-dependent dilatation in the resistance vasculature. RT-PCR was employed to characterize the expression of NPR subtypes in the vessels studied. Results M372049 produced concentration-dependent inhibition of the vasorelaxant activity of CNP in rat isolated mesenteric resistance arteries but not aorta; in contrast, M372049 did not affect relaxations to ANP or SPER-NO in either vessel. M372049 or ouabain alone produced small, significant inhibition of EDHF-dependent relaxations in mesenteric arteries and in combination acted synergistically to abolish such responses. A combination of M372049 with established inhibitors of EDHF-dependent relaxation revealed that multiple, distinct pathways coordinate the bioactivity of EDHF in the resistance vasculature, and that CNP/NPR-C signalling represents a major component. Conclusions These data substantiate CNP/NPR-C signalling as a

  3. Specific heart granules and natriuretic peptide in the developing myocardium of fetal and neonatal rats and hamsters.

    PubMed Central

    Navaratnam, V; Woodward, J M; Skepper, J N

    1989-01-01

    The ontogenesis of specific heart granules and of the related natriuretic peptide activity in heart muscle was studied in fetal and neonatal rats and golden hamsters by ultrastructural analysis including immunogold labelling for ANP-28 and by radioimmunoassay. In both species, immunoreactive granules first appear in the myocardial sleeve of the embryonic heart tube during the looping stages which precede chamber formation and the peptide becomes detectable by radioimmunoassay two or three days later by which time the chambers are identifiable. Granule density and ANP concentration in the rat are higher than in the hamster at all stages of development. Almost all atrial myocytes express ANP in fetal hearts whereas, in the ventricular wall, cells containing immunoreactive granules are scattered. The density of granules in atrial myocytes increases during further stages of fetal and neonatal development, while it decreases markedly even in those ventricular myocytes which are immunoreactive. Changes in the ultrastructural appearance of ventricular SHG suggest that the mode of production of ANP changes in ventricular myocytes after birth but does not change in atrial cells. There is no correlation between the distribution of immunoreactive ventricular myocytes and that of the conducting system. In both species, the concentration of ANP in the atrial well is higher than ventricular levels from the outset and the disparity becomes exaggerated with development till, in six months old adult animals, the atrial to ventricular concentration ratio is about 3 x 10(3):1 in the rat and 1.5 x 10(3): 1 in the hamster. In the hamster, a distinct gradient of ANP concentration between the right and left atria is already established in the early fetal period and it becomes enhanced in the neonatal period. In the rat, however, a slight difference becomes discernible only after birth. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:2532637

  4. Atrial Tachycardias Arising from Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation: A Proarrhythmic Bump or an Antiarrhythmic Turn?

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ashok J.; Jadidi, Amir; Liu, Xingpeng; Miyazaki, Shinsuke; Forclaz, Andrei; Nault, Isabelle; Rivard, Lena; Linton, Nick; Xhaet, Olivier; Derval, Nicolas; Sacher, Frederic; Bordachar, Pierre; Ritter, Philippe; Hocini, Meleze; Jais, Pierre; Haissaguerre, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence of atrial tachycardias (AT) is a direct function of the volume of atrial tissue ablated in the patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Thus, the incidence of AT is highest in persistent AF patients undergoing stepwise ablation using the strategic combination of pulmonary vein isolation, electrogram based ablation and left atrial linear ablation. Using deductive mapping strategy, AT can be divided into three clinical categories viz. the macroreentry, the focal and the newly described localized reentry all of which are amenable to catheter ablation with success rate of 95%. Perimitral, roof dependent and cavotricuspid isthmus dependent AT involve large reentrant circuits which can be successfully ablated at the left mitral isthmus, left atrial roof and tricuspid isthmus respectively. Complete bidirectional block across the sites of linear ablation is a necessary endpoint. Focal and localized reentrant AT commonly originate from but are not limited to the septum, posteroinferior left atrium, venous ostia, base of the left atrial appendage and left mitral isthmus and they respond quickly to focal ablation. AT not only represents ablation-induced proarrhythmia but also forms a bridge between AF and sinus rhythm in longstanding AF patients treated successfully with catheter ablation. PMID:20379387

  5. Atrial fibrillation from the pathologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia encountered in clinical practice, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Electrophysiologically, it is characterized by a high rate of asynchronous atrial cell depolarization causing a loss of atrial contractile function and irregular ventricular rates. For a long time, AF was considered as a pure functional disorder without any structural background. Only in recent years, have new mapping and imaging techniques identified atrial locations, which are very often involved in the initiation and maintenance of this supraventricular arrhythmia (i.e. the distal portion of the pulmonary veins and the surrounding atrial myocardium). Morphological analysis of these myocardial sites has demonstrated significant structural remodeling as well as paved the way for further knowledge of AF natural history, pathogenesis, and treatment. This architectural myocardial disarrangement is induced by the arrhythmia itself and the very frequently associated cardiovascular disorders. At the same time, the structural remodeling is also capable of sustaining AF, thereby creating a sort of pathogenetic vicious circle. This review focuses on current understanding about the structural and genetic bases of AF with reference to their classification, pathogenesis, and clinical implications. PMID:24462196

  6. [Acute effects of ventricular and bicameral stimulation on plasma levels of natriuretic hormone].

    PubMed

    Lo Bianco, F; Altamura, G; Bianconi, L; Toscano, S; Pandozi, C; Castro, A; Magliocca, V; Gentilucci, G; Magris, B; Santini, M

    1997-10-01

    Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) is a peptide produced by the atrium in response to increases in atrial pressure. It is a potent vasodilator and recent studies suggest that ANF may modulate vasomotor changes in patients (pts) with pacemaker (PM) syndrome. To evaluate the incidence of pacing mode on peptide secretion, plasma concentrations of ANF were determined in 32 pts (18 men and 14 women, mean age 71 +/- 4 years) with a DDD PM implant. Blood samples were collected one hour after a randomly assigned PM programming either in VVI or DDD mode at 70 ppm. Mean plasma ANF levels were 84.12 +/- 51 pg/ml in DDD mode and 156.0 +/- 15 pg/ml in VVI mode (p < 0.05). In 12 pts presenting ventriculoatrial retroconduction, the ANF levels were 77.16 +/- 50 pg/ml during DDD stimulation and 219.0 +/- 16 pg/ml during VVI stimulation (p < 0.05). ANF level was 88.50 +/- 46 pg/ml in DDD mode and 114.25 +/- 65 pg/ml in VVI mode in the 20 pts without AV retroconduction (p < 0.05). During DDD mode, 18 patients showed a DVI stimulation whereas 14 showed a VDD stimulation: the mean ANF level was 67.40 +/- 15 pg/ml during DVI and 100.40 +/- 28 pg/ml during VDD stimulation; the difference between these data was not significant. The increase in ANF levels during VVI pacing confirms the lower haemodynamic performance of this stimulation mode. The increase of ANF levels during VVI stimulation, which was in the subgroup without AV retroconduction, confirms the benefits of DDD stimulation also in this group of patients as well. Atrial pacing at physiological rates does not trigger the release of ANF. PMID:9410771

  7. Atrial fibrillation or flutter

    MedlinePlus

    ... the mitral valve) Hypertension Medicines Overactive thyroid gland ( hyperthyroidism ) Pericarditis Sick sinus syndrome Symptoms You may not ... procedures Heart attack Heart pacemaker High blood pressure Hyperthyroidism Pericarditis Pulse Stable angina Stroke Patient Instructions Atrial ...

  8. What Is Atrial Fibrillation?

    MedlinePlus

    ... regular beat. Certain cells in your heart make electric signals that cause the heart to contract and ... read your ECG to find out if the electric signals are normal. In atrial fibrillation (AFib), the ...

  9. Multifocal atrial tachycardia

    MedlinePlus

    ... atrial tachycardia (MAT), many locations in the atria fire signals at the same time. Too many signals ... people with conditions that lower the amount of oxygen in the blood. These conditions include: Bacterial pneumonia ...

  10. Atrial Fibrillation Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... think you are pregnant If you notice red, dark brown or black urine or stools If you ... Fibrillation • Introduction • What is Atrial Fibrillation? • Why AFib Matters • Understand your Risk for AFib Children • Symptoms of ...

  11. Methods for the development and assessment of atrial fibrillation and heart failure dog models

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Jon F; Gerhart, Renee L; Krzeszak, Jason R; Leet, Corey R; Lentz, Linnea R; McClay, Carolyn B

    2011-01-01

    Objective To report Medtronic experiences with the development of animal models for atrial fibrillation (AF) and chronic heart failure (CHF) using high-rate pacing for AF and microemboli for CHF. Methods For the AF model, an atrial lead was attached to a Medtronic Synergy™ neurostimulator, which was programmed to stimulate at 50 Hz in an on-off duty cycle. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) were assayed at select time points. For CHF model, a serial injection of 90 µm polystyrene microspheres at 62,400 beads/mL (Polybead, Polysciences, Inc.) was performed to induce global ischemia, either with weekly monitoring and embolization schedule (group 1, n = 25) or with biweekly monitoring and emboliation schedule (group 2, n = 36 ). Echocardiograms were used along with ventriculograms and magnetic resonance imaging scans weekly to assess cardiac function and ANP, BNP and NT-proBNP were monitored. Results For the AF model, the days to sustained AF for four animals following surgery were 7, 25, 21 and 19, respectively; For the CHF model, the days to meet CHF endpoints were 116 in group 1 and 89 in group 2. For both AF and CHF models, NT-proBNP correlated well with the development of disease states. Conclusion Our experience for the development and assessment of AF and CHF dog models may help researchers who are in search for animal model for assessing the safety and efficacy of a device-based therapy. PMID:22783299

  12. Calcium is involved in both positive and negative modulation of the secretory system for ANP.

    PubMed

    Doubell, A F; Thibault, G

    1994-05-01

    The calcium dependence of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) secretory system is controversial. Some studies clearly support a stimulatory role, whereas others favor an inhibitory role for calcium in this endocrine system. We demonstrate that calcium is involved in both a positive modulatory role and a negative modulatory role, thereby providing some explanation for the seemingly irreconcilable findings previously published. The negative modulatory role performed by calcium is evident during basal secretion, whereas the positive modulatory role is especially evident in the sustained phase of the secretory response to stimulation. Furthermore, we demonstrate the calcium dependence of processing of the prohormone to the mature circulating form in a cell culture system. This supports the concept that processing is a function of the atrial myocyte rather than of the mesenchymal cells of the atrium. We have demonstrated previously that calcium is important for packaging of the prohormone into secretory granules. Together these findings support a multifaceted role for calcium in the regulation of the secretory apparatus for ANP. PMID:8203584

  13. Risk factors predictive of atrial fibrillation after lung cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Takekazu; Nagato, Kaoru; Nakajima, Takahiro; Suzuki, Hidemi; Yoshida, Shigetoshi; Yoshino, Ichiro

    2016-08-01

    Postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF), the most frequent arrhythmia after pulmonary resection, is a cause of both morbidity and mortality. Being able to predict the risk of POAF before surgery would help us evaluate the surgical risk and plan prophylaxis. We investigated the reported preoperative risk factors associated with the incidence of POAF and found that the recommended predictive factors were quite variable. Therefore, we evaluated the previously reported preoperative risk factors for POAF using our institutional data. We discuss our findings in this short review. Male gender, resected lung volume, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), and left ventricular early transmitral velocity/mitral annular early diastolic velocity (E/e') calculated by echocardiography were suggested as independent predictors for POAF, but the predictive values of each individual parameter were not high. The lack of definitive predictors for POAF warrants further investigations by gathering the reported knowledge, to establish an effective preoperative examination strategy. PMID:26471506

  14. Exercise-induced changes in atrial peptides in relation to neuroendocrine responses and fluid balance in the horse.

    PubMed

    Kokkonen, U M; Pösö, A R; Hyyppä, S; Huttunen, P; Leppäluoto, J

    2002-04-01

    Previous data show that, in horses, plasma atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP and NT-ANP) remain elevated for a long time after exercise. To study whether exercise-induced changes in hormonal and fluid balance explain this, we measured plasma concentrations of COOH- and NH2-terminal atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP(99-129) and NT-ANP(1-98) together with arginine vasopressin (AVP), adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH), beta-endorphin, cortisol, catecholamines, and indicators of fluid balance in six Finnhorses after a graded submaximal exercise test on a treadmill. After exercise, AVP and catecholamines diminished rapidly; atrial peptides, ACTH, beta-endorphin, and cortisol remained elevated longer. ANP reached its peak value at 5 min and NT-ANP at 30 min post-exercise. At 60 min, ANP was still significantly increased and NT-ANP even above its level at the end of exercise. The different temporal patterns of ANP and NT-ANP are most probably explained by differences in their plasma half-lives. The post-exercise increase in NT-ANP indicates that the release of atrial peptides is stimulated during recovery after exercise. The rapid decrease in AVP and catecholamines suggests that these hormones do not explain the long-lasting increase in atrial peptides. Cortisol remained elevated longer and it may have contributed to some extent. After exercise, the packed cell volume (PCV) decreased more slowly than plasma total protein and electrolytes, which refers to a slow post-exercise return in blood volume. Taken together, the present results show that the long-lasting post-exercise increase in plasma atrial peptides in horses is most probably explained by elevated central blood volume and that the role of vasoactive hormones is small. PMID:12019955

  15. Diversified cardiovascular actions of six homologous natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP, VNP, CNP1, CNP3, and CNP4) in conscious eels.

    PubMed

    Nobata, Shigenori; Ventura, Albert; Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Takei, Yoshio

    2010-06-01

    The natriuretic peptide (NP) family consists of seven paralogs [atrial NP (ANP), brain NP (BNP), ventricular NP (VNP), and C-type NP 1-4 (CNP1-4)] in teleosts, but relative biological activity of the seven NPs has not been comprehensively examined using homologous peptides. In this study, we newly identified CNP3 and CNP4 in eels to use homologous peptides, but the CNP2 gene may have been silenced in this species. The CNP4 gene was expressed exclusively in the brain as CNP1, but the CNP3 gene, from which cardiac ANP, BNP, and VNP were generated by tandem duplication, was most abundantly expressed in the pituitary, suggesting its local action. All NPs induced hypotension dose dependently after intra-arterial injection with a potency order of ANP > VNP > BNP > CNP4 > CNP1 = CNP3. The degree of hypotension was similar at the ventral and dorsal aorta, indicating similar actions on the branchial and systemic circulation. The hypotension induced by cardiac NPs was longer lasting than CNPs, probably because of the difference in preferential receptors. Among cardiac NPs, the hypotensive effect of VNP lasted much longer than those of ANP and BNP, even though VNP disappeared from the blood more quickly than ANP. To analyze the unique effect of VNP, we examined possible involvement of the autonomic nervous system using ANP, VNP, and CNP3. Beta-adrenergic blockade diminished hypotensive effects of all three NPs, but alpha-adrenergic and cholinergic blockade enhanced only the effect of VNP, suggesting a specific mechanism for the VNP action. The NP-induced tachycardia was diminished by all blockers examined. Furthermore, the cardiovascular action of VNP was not impaired by a blocker of NP receptor, HS-142-1. Taken together, the homologous NPs exhibit diverse cardiovascular actions in eels partially through the autonomic nervous system, and the unique VNP action may be mediated by a novel receptor that has not been identified in teleosts. PMID:20357024

  16. Atrial selectivity of antiarrhythmic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Ravens, Ursula; Poulet, Claire; Wettwer, Erich; Knaut, Michael

    2013-01-01

    New antiarrhythmic drugs for treatment of atrial fibrillation should ideally be atrial selective in order to avoid pro-arrhythmic effects in the ventricles. Currently recognized atrial selective targets include atrial Nav1.5 channels, Kv1.5 channels and constitutively active Kir3.1/3.4 channels, each of which confers atrial selectivity by different mechanisms. Na+ channel blockers with potential- and frequency-dependent action preferentially suppress atrial fibrillation because of the high excitation rate and less negative atrial resting potential, which promote drug binding in atria. Kv1.5 channels are truly atrial selective because they do not conduct repolarizing current IKur in ventricles. Constitutively active IK,ACh is predominantly observed in remodelled atria from patients in permanent atrial fibrillation (AF). A lot of effort has been invested to detect compounds which will selectively block Kir3.1/Kir3.4 in their remodelled constitutively active form. Novel drugs which have been and are being developed aim at atrial-selective targets. Vernakalant and ranolazine which mainly block atrial Na+ channels are clinically effective. Newly designed selective IKur blockers and IK,ACh blockers are effective in animal models; however, clinical benefit in converting AF into sinus rhythm (SR) or reducing AF burden remains to be demonstrated. In conclusion, atrial-selective antiarrhythmic agents have a lot of potential, but a long way to go. PMID:23732646

  17. Atrial Fibrillation (AF or AFib)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Atrial Fibrillation (AF or AFib) Updated:Feb 10,2016 What ... to the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy Atrial Fibrillation • Introduction • What is Atrial Fibrillation? • Why AFib Matters • ...

  18. Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Piccini, Jonathan P

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke, which is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The use of oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation at moderate or high risk of stroke, estimated by established criteria, improves outcomes. However, to ensure that the benefits exceed the risks of bleeding, appropriate patient selection is essential. Vitamin K antagonism has been the mainstay of treatment; however, newer drugs with novel mechanisms are also available. These novel oral anticoagulants (direct thrombin inhibitors and factor Xa inhibitors) obviate many of warfarin’s shortcomings, and they have demonstrated safety and efficacy in large randomized trials of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. However, the management of patients taking warfarin or novel agents remains a clinical challenge. There are several important considerations when selecting anticoagulant therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation. This review will discuss the rationale for anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation; risk stratification for treatment; available agents; the appropriate implementation of these agents; and additional, specific clinical considerations for treatment. PMID:24733535

  19. Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Benjamin A; Piccini, Jonathan P

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke, which is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The use of oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation at moderate or high risk of stroke, estimated by established criteria, improves outcomes. However, to ensure that the benefits exceed the risks of bleeding, appropriate patient selection is essential. Vitamin K antagonism has been the mainstay of treatment; however, newer drugs with novel mechanisms are also available. These novel oral anticoagulants (direct thrombin inhibitors and factor Xa inhibitors) obviate many of warfarin's shortcomings, and they have demonstrated safety and efficacy in large randomized trials of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. However, the management of patients taking warfarin or novel agents remains a clinical challenge. There are several important considerations when selecting anticoagulant therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation. This review will discuss the rationale for anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation; risk stratification for treatment; available agents; the appropriate implementation of these agents; and additional, specific clinical considerations for treatment. PMID:24733535

  20. Natriuretic peptides stimulate the cardiac sodium pump via NPR-C-coupled NOS activation.

    PubMed

    William, M; Hamilton, E J; Garcia, A; Bundgaard, H; Chia, K K M; Figtree, G A; Rasmussen, H H

    2008-04-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NPs) and their receptors (NPRs) are expressed in the heart, but their effects on myocyte function are poorly understood. Because NPRs are coupled to synthesis of cGMP, an activator of the sarcolemmal Na(+)-K(+) pump, we examined whether atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) regulates the pump. We voltage clamped rabbit ventricular myocytes and identified electrogenic Na(+)-K(+) pump current (arising from the 3:2 Na(+):K(+) exchange and normalized for membrane capacitance) as the shift in membrane current induced by 100 micromol/l ouabain. Ten nanomoles per liter ANP stimulated the Na(+)-K(+) pump when the intracellular compartment was perfused with pipette solutions containing 10 mmol/l Na(+) but had no effect when the pump was at near maximal activation with 80 mmol/l Na(+) in the pipette solution. Stimulation was abolished by inhibition of cGMP-activated protein kinase with KT-5823, nitric oxide (NO)-activated guanylyl cyclase with 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), or NO synthase with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). Since synthesis of cGMP by NPR-A and NPR-B is not NO dependent or ODQ sensitive, we exposed myocytes to AP-811, a highly selective ligand for the NPR-C "clearance" receptor. It abolished ANP-induced pump stimulation. Conversely, the selective NPR-C agonist ANP(4-23) reproduced stimulation. The stimulation was blocked by l-NAME. To examine NO production in response to ANP(4-23), we loaded myocytes with the NO-sensitive fluorescent dye diacetylated diaminofluorescein-2 and examined them by confocal microscopy. ANP(4-23) induced a significant increase in fluorescence, which was abolished by L-NAME. We conclude that NPs stimulate the Na(+)-K(+) pump via an NPR-C and NO-dependent pathway. PMID:18272821

  1. A perspective on the role of natriuretic peptides in amphibian osmoregulation.

    PubMed

    Donald, John A; Trajanovska, Sofie

    2006-05-15

    The natriuretic peptide (NP) system is a complex family of peptides and receptors that is primarily linked to the maintenance of osmotic and cardiovascular homeostasis. In amphibians, the potential role(s) of NPs is complicated by the range of osmoregulatory strategies found in amphibians, and the different tissues that participate in osmoregulation. Atrial NP, brain NP, and C-type NP have been isolated or cloned from a number of species, which has enabled physiological studies to be performed with homologous peptides. In addition, three types of NP receptors have been cloned and partially characterised. Natriuretic peptides are always potent vasodilators in amphibian blood vessels, and ANP has been shown to increase the permeability of the microcirculation. In the perfused kidney, ANP causes vasodilation, diuresis and natriuresis that are caused by an increased GFR rather than effects in the renal tubules. These data are supported by the presence of ANP receptors only on the glomeruli and renal blood vessels. In the bladder and skin, the function of NPs is enigmatic because physiological analysis of the effects of ANP on bladder and skin function has yielded conflicting data with no clear role for NPs being revealed. Overall, NPs often have no direct effect, but in some studies they have been shown to inhibit the function of AVT. In addition, there is evidence that ANP can inhibit salt retention in amphibians since it can inhibit the ability of adrenocorticotrophic hormone or angiotensin II to stimulate corticosteroid secretion. It is proposed that an important role for cardiac NPs could be in the control of hypervolaemia during periods of rapid rehydration, which occurs in terrestrial amphibians. PMID:16343494

  2. Epithelium integrity is crucial for the relaxant activity of brain natriuretic peptide in human isolated bronchi

    PubMed Central

    Matera, Maria G; Calzetta, Luigino; Passeri, Daniela; Facciolo, Francesco; Rendina, Erino A; Page, Clive; Cazzola, Mario; Orlandi, Augusto

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) plays an important role in several biological functions, including bronchial relaxation. Here, we have investigated the role of BNP and its cognate receptors in human bronchial tone. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Effects of BNP on responses to carbachol and histamine were evaluated in non-sensitized, passively sensitized, epithelium-intact or denuded isolated bronchi and in the presence of methoctramine, Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and aminoguanidine. Natriuretic peptide receptors (NPRs) were investigated by immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR and real-time PCR. Release of NO and acetylcholine from bronchial tissues and cultured BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells was also investigated. KEY RESULTS BNP reduced contractions mediated by carbachol and histamine, with decreased Emax (carbachol: 22.7 ± 4.7%; histamine: 59.3 ± 1.8%) and increased EC50 (carbachol: control 3.33 ± 0.88 µM, BNP 100 ± 52.9 µM; histamine: control 16.7 ± 1.7 µM, BNP 90 ± 30.6 µM); BNP was ineffective in epithelium-denuded bronchi. Among NPRs, only atrial NPR (NPR1) transcripts were detected in bronchial tissue. Bronchial NPR1 immunoreactivity was detected in epithelium and inflammatory cells but faint or absent in airway smooth muscle cells. NPR1 transcripts in bronchi increased after incubation with BNP, but not after sensitization. Methoctramine and quinine abolished BNP-induced relaxant activity. The latter was associated with increased bronchial mRNA for NO synthase and NO release, inhibited by L-NAME and aminoguanidine. In vitro, BNP increased acetylcholine release from bronchial epithelial cells, whereas NO release was unchanged. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Epithelial cells mediate the BNP-induced relaxant activity in human isolated bronchi. PMID:21410689

  3. Urodilatin, a natriuretic peptide with clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Meyer, M; Richter, R; Forssmann, W G

    1998-02-21

    Natriuretic peptides (NP) constitute hormonal systems of great clinical impact. This report deals with Urodilatin (URO), a renal natriuretic peptide type A. From the gene of NP type A, a message for the preprohormone is transcribed in heart and kidney. The cardiac prohormone CDD/ANP-1-126 is synthesized in the heart atrium and processed during exocytosis forming the circulating hormone CDD/ANP-99-126. URO (CDD/ANP 95-126) is a product from the same gene, but differentially processed in the kidney and detected only in urine. Physiologically, URO acts in a paracrine fashion. After release from distal tubular kidney cells into the tubular lumen, URO binds to luminal receptors (NPR-A) in the collecting duct resulting in a cGMP-dependent signal transduction. cGMP generation is followed by an interaction with the amiloriode-sensitive sodium channel which induces diuresis and natriuresis. In this way, URO physiologically regulates fluid balance and sodium homeostasis. Moreover, URO excretion and natriuresis are in turn dependent on several physiological states, such as directly by sodium homeostasis. Pharmacologically, URO at low dose administered intravenously shows a strong diuretic and natriuretic effect and a low hypotensive effect. Renal, pulmonary, and cardiovascular effects evoked by pharmacological doses indicate that URO is a putative drug for several related diseases. Clinical trials show promising results for various clinical indications. However, the reduction in hemodialysis/hemofiltration in patients suffering from ARF following heart and liver transplantation, derived from preliminary trials recruiting a small number of patients, was not confirmed by a multicenter phase II study. In contrast, data for the prophylactic use of URO in this clinical setting suggest a better outcome for the patients. Furthermore, treatment of asthmatic patients showed a convincingly beneficial effect of URO on pulmonary function. Patients with congestive heart failure may also

  4. Clinical utility of natriuretic peptides and troponins in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kehl, Devin W; Buttan, Anshu; Siegel, Robert J; Rader, Florian

    2016-09-01

    The diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is based on clinical, echocardiographic and in some cases genetic findings. However, prognostication remains limited except in the subset of patients with high-risk indicators for sudden cardiac death. Additional methods are needed for risk stratification and to guide clinical management in HCM. We reviewed the available data regarding natriuretic peptides and troponins in HCM. Plasma levels of natriuretic peptides, and to a lesser extent serum levels of troponins, correlate with established disease markers, including left ventricular thickness, symptom status, and left ventricular hemodynamics by Doppler measurements. As a reflection of left ventricular filling pressure, natriuretic peptides may provide an objective measure of the efficacy of a specific therapy. Both natriuretic peptides and troponins predict clinical risk in HCM independently of established risk factors, and their prognostic power is additive. Routine measurement of biomarker levels therefore may be useful in the clinical evaluation and management of patients with HCM. PMID:27236124

  5. Rapid transcriptional activation and early mRNA turnover of brain natriuretic peptide in cardiocyte hypertrophy. Evidence for brain natriuretic peptide as an "emergency" cardiac hormone against ventricular overload.

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, O; Ogawa, Y; Itoh, H; Suga, S; Komatsu, Y; Kishimoto, I; Nishino, K; Yoshimasa, T; Nakao, K

    1995-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a cardiac hormone mainly produced in the ventricle, while the major production site of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is the atrium. To assess the pathophysiological role of BNP in ventricular overload, we have examined the gene expression of BNP, In comparison with that of ANP, in a model of cardiac hypertrophy using cultured neonatal rat ventricular cardiocytes. During cardiocyte hypertrophy evoked by endothelin-1, Phenylephrine, or PMA, the steady state level of BNP mRNA increased as rapidly as the "immediate-early" induction of the c-fos gene expression, and reached a maximal level within 1 h. Actinomycin D, a transcriptional inhibitor, completely diminished the response, while the translational blocked with cycloheximide did not inhibit it. In contrast, ANP mRNA began to increase 3 h after the stimulation, and accumulated during cardiocyte hypertrophy. The BNP secretion from ventricular cardiocytes was also stimulated, more rapidly than the ANP secretion. Furthermore, the turnover of BNP mRNA was significantly faster than that of ANP mRNA, being consistent with the existence of AUUUA motif in the 3'-untranslated region of BNP mRNA. These results demonstrate that the gene expression of BNP is distinctly regulated from that of ANP at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels, and indicate that the characteristics of the BNP gene expression are suitable for its possible role as an " emergency" cardiac hormone against ventricular overload. Images PMID:7657802

  6. The Mechanism of and Preventive Therapy for Stroke in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Roh, Seung-Young

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a major cardiac cause of stroke, and a pathogenesis involving thrombus formation in patients with atrial fibrillation is well established. A strategy for rhythm control that involves catheter ablation and anticoagulation therapy is evolving. A strategy for rhythm control that restores and maintains sinus rhythm should reduce the risk of ischemic stroke that is associated with atrial fibrillation; however, this is yet to be proven in large-scale randomized controlled trials. This paper reviews the emerging role of rhythm control therapy for atrial fibrillation to prevent stroke. PMID:27283277

  7. Clinical value of natriuretic peptides in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Santos-Araújo, Carla; Leite-Moreira, Adelino; Pestana, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    According to several lines of evidence, natriuretic peptides (NP) are the main components of a cardiac-renal axis that operate in clinical conditions of decreased cardiac hemodynamic tolerance to regulate sodium homeostasis, blood pressure and vascular function. Even though it is reasonable to assume that NP may exert a relevant role in the adaptive response to renal mass ablation, evidence gathered so far suggest that this contribution is probably complex and dependent on the type and degree of the functional mass loss. In the last years NP have been increasingly used to diagnose, monitor treatment and define the prognosis of several cardiovascular (CV) diseases. However, in many clinical settings, like chronic kidney disease (CKD), the predictive value of these biomarkers has been questioned. In fact, it is now well established that renal function significantly affects the plasmatic levels of NP and that renal failure is the clinical condition associated with the highest plasmatic levels of these peptides. The complexity of the relation between NP plasmatic levels and CV and renal functions has obvious consequences, as it may limit the predictive value of NP in CV assessment of CKD patients and be a demanding exercise for clinicians involved in the daily management of these patients. This review describes the role of NP in the regulatory response to renal function loss and addresses the main factors involved in the clinical valorization of the peptides in the context of significant renal failure. PMID:26299165

  8. Changes in liraglutide-induced body composition are related to modifications in plasma cardiac natriuretic peptides levels in obese type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims Liraglutide treatment can improve glycemic control with a concomitant weight loss, but the underlying mechanism on weight loss is not completely understood. Cardiac natriuretic peptides (NPs) can resist body fat accumulation through increasing adipocytes lypolysis. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that liraglutide-induced weight loss was associated with increased plasma NPs concentrations. Methods Thirty-one outpatients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) treated with metformin and other oral antidiabetic drugs except for thiazolidinediones (TZDs) were subcutaneously administered with liraglutide for 12 weeks. Body composition, abdominal visceral adipose tissue areas (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue areas (SAT) were assessed at pre- and post-treatment by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scanning and abdominal computerized tomography (CT). Plasma atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP) and B-type ventricular natriuretic peptides (BNP) concentrations were tested by commercial ELISA Kit quantitatively. Results Following 12-week liraglutide treatment, body weight, waist circumference, total fat and lean mass, fat percentage, SAT and VAT areas were significantly reduced from baseline. Concurrently, plasma ANP and BNP levels were significantly increased following 12-week liraglutide treatment. There were significant correlations between the reductions in body compositions and the increases in both plasma ANP and BNP levels. Conclusions There were significant correlations between increases in both plasma ANP and BNP levels and changes in liraglutide-induced body composition. Our data implied that increases in plasma NPs may add a novel dimension to explain how liraglutide induces weight loss. PMID:24498905

  9. Subcellular trafficking of guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A with concurrent generation of intracellular cGMP

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Indra; Garg, Renu; Tripathi, Satyabha; Pandey, Kailash N.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) activates guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA), which lowers blood pressure and blood volume. The objective of the present study was to visualize internalization and trafficking of enhanced GFP (eGFP)-tagged NPRA (eGFP–NPRA) in human embryonic kidney-293 (HEK-293) cells, using immunofluorescence (IF) and co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) of eGFP–NPRA. Treatment of cells with ANP initiated rapid internalization and co-localization of the receptor with early endosome antigen-1 (EEA-1), which was highest at 5 min and gradually decreased within 30 min. Similarly, co-localization of the receptor was observed with lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1); however, after treatment with lysosomotropic agents, intracellular accumulation of the receptor gradually increased within 30 min. Co-IP assays confirmed that the localization of internalized receptors occurred with subcellular organelles during the endocytosis of NPRA. Rab 11, which was used as a recycling endosome (Re) marker, indicated that ∼20% of receptors recycled back to the plasma membrane. ANP-treated cells showed a marked increase in the IF of cGMP, whereas receptor was still trafficking into the intracellular compartments. Thus, after ligand binding, NPRA is rapidly internalized and trafficked from the cell surface into endosomes, Res and lysosomes, with concurrent generation of intracellular cGMP. PMID:26374856

  10. Subcellular trafficking of guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A with concurrent generation of intracellular cGMP.

    PubMed

    Mani, Indra; Garg, Renu; Tripathi, Satyabha; Pandey, Kailash N

    2015-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) activates guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA), which lowers blood pressure and blood volume. The objective of the present study was to visualize internalization and trafficking of enhanced GFP (eGFP)-tagged NPRA (eGFP-NPRA) in human embryonic kidney-293 (HEK-293) cells, using immunofluorescence (IF) and co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) of eGFP-NPRA. Treatment of cells with ANP initiated rapid internalization and co-localization of the receptor with early endosome antigen-1 (EEA-1), which was highest at 5 min and gradually decreased within 30 min. Similarly, co-localization of the receptor was observed with lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1); however, after treatment with lysosomotropic agents, intracellular accumulation of the receptor gradually increased within 30 min. Co-IP assays confirmed that the localization of internalized receptors occurred with subcellular organelles during the endocytosis of NPRA. Rab 11, which was used as a recycling endosome (Re) marker, indicated that ∼20% of receptors recycled back to the plasma membrane. ANP-treated cells showed a marked increase in the IF of cGMP, whereas receptor was still trafficking into the intracellular compartments. Thus, after ligand binding, NPRA is rapidly internalized and trafficked from the cell surface into endosomes, Res and lysosomes, with concurrent generation of intracellular cGMP. PMID:26374856

  11. P wave morphology in guiding the ablation strategy of focal atrial tachycardias and atrial flutter.

    PubMed

    Lee, Justin M S; Fynn, Simon P

    2015-01-01

    Focal atrial tachycardias arise preferentially from specific locations within the atria. Careful analysis of the P wave can provide useful information about the chamber and likely site of origin within that chamber. Macro-reentrant atrial flutter also tends to occur over a limited number of potential circuits. In this case, the ECG usually gives a guide to the chamber of origin, but unless it shows a specific morphology it is less useful in delineating the circuit involved. Nonetheless, prior knowledge of the likely chamber of origin helps to plan the ablation strategy. PMID:25308814

  12. P Wave Morphology in Guiding the Ablation Strategy of Focal Atrial Tachycardias and Atrial Flutter

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Justin M. S; Fynn, Simon P

    2015-01-01

    Focal atrial tachycardias arise preferentially from specific locations within the atria. Careful analysis of the P wave can provide useful information about the chamber and likely site of origin within that chamber. Macro-reentrant atrial flutter also tends to occur over a limited number of potential circuits. In this case, the ECG usually gives a guide to the chamber of origin, but unless it shows a specific morphology it is less useful in delineating the circuit involved. Nonetheless, prior knowledge of the likely chamber of origin helps to plan the ablation strategy. PMID:25308814

  13. Association of Atrial Fibrillation with Morphological and Electrophysiological Changes of the Atrial Myocardium.

    PubMed

    Matějková, Adéla; Šteiner, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia. For long time it was considered as pure functional disorder, but in recent years, there were identified atrial locations, which are involved in the initiation and maintenance of this arrhythmia. These structural changes, so called remodelation, start at electric level and later they affect contractility and morphology. In this study we attempted to find a possible relation between morphological (scarring, amyloidosis, left atrial (LA) enlargement) and electrophysiological (ECG features) changes in patients with AF. We examined grossly and histologically 100 hearts of necropsy patients - 54 with a history of AF and 46 without AF. Premortem ECGs were evaluated. The patients with AF had significantly heavier heart, larger LA, more severely scarred myocardium of the LA and atrial septum, and more severe amyloidosis in both atria. Severity of amyloidosis was higher in LAs vs. right atria (RAs). Distribution of both fibrosis and amyloidosis was irregular. The most affected area was in the LA anterior wall. Patients with a history of AF and with most severe amyloidosis have more often abnormally long P waves. Finding of long P wave may contribute to diagnosis of a hitherto undisclosed atrial fibrillation. PMID:27526304

  14. Left Atrial Appendage Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Saeid; Hashemi, Arash; Saedi, Sedigheh; Jalili, Farshad; Maleki, Majid; Jalalian, Rozita; Rezaei, Yousef

    2016-09-01

    Left atrial appendage aneurysms (LAAA) are extremely rare. This condition is usually diagnosed incidentally or after the occurrence of thrombotic events or cardiac tachyarrhythmias in the second to fourth decades of life. It can predispose to hazardous adverse events, including atrial fibrillation, myocardial infarction, and systemic thromboembolism. We report a case of LAAA in a 68-year-old woman presenting with atypical chest pain, exertional dyspnea, and episodes of sudden-onset palpitation. Aneurysmectomy with the patient under cardiac arrest with cardiopulmonary bypass was performed. In addition, we explore the diagnosis, management, and prognosis of this entity through a meticulous literature review. PMID:27549544

  15. Right atrial spleen.

    PubMed Central

    Kuijer, P; Dion, R; van Merrienboer, F

    1985-01-01

    A large cardiac tumour occupying most of the right atrium and the right ventricle and causing inflow obstruction to the right heart was confirmed by cross sectional echocardiography in a 41 year old man. After surgical resection histological examination showed that the atrial tumour had the characteristics of splenic tissue. Possible mechanisms for the development of such a tumour include an origin analogous to that of an accessory spleen or the implantation and subsequent growth of lymphoid tissue in a pre-existing superior vena caval or high right atrial angioma. Images PMID:4041304

  16. Exploiting periodicity to extract the atrial activity in atrial arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llinares, Raul; Igual, Jorge

    2011-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation disorders are one of the main arrhythmias of the elderly. The atrial and ventricular activities are decoupled during an atrial fibrillation episode, and very rapid and irregular waves replace the usual atrial P-wave in a normal sinus rhythm electrocardiogram (ECG). The estimation of these wavelets is a must for clinical analysis. We propose a new approach to this problem focused on the quasiperiodicity of these wavelets. Atrial activity is characterized by a main atrial rhythm in the interval 3-12 Hz. It enables us to establish the problem as the separation of the original sources from the instantaneous linear combination of them recorded in the ECG or the extraction of only the atrial component exploiting the quasiperiodic feature of the atrial signal. This methodology implies the previous estimation of such main atrial period. We present two algorithms that separate and extract the atrial rhythm starting from a prior estimation of the main atrial frequency. The first one is an algebraic method based on the maximization of a cost function that measures the periodicity. The other one is an adaptive algorithm that exploits the decorrelation of the atrial and other signals diagonalizing the correlation matrices at multiple lags of the period of atrial activity. The algorithms are applied successfully to synthetic and real data. In simulated ECGs, the average correlation index obtained was 0.811 and 0.847, respectively. In real ECGs, the accuracy of the results was validated using spectral and temporal parameters. The average peak frequency and spectral concentration obtained were 5.550 and 5.554 Hz and 56.3 and 54.4%, respectively, and the kurtosis was 0.266 and 0.695. For validation purposes, we compared the proposed algorithms with established methods, obtaining better results for simulated and real registers.

  17. Primary Cardiac Sarcoidosis with Syncope and Refractory Atrial Arrhythmia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Thangam, Manoj; Nathan, Sriram; Kar, Biswajit; Petrovic, Marija; Patel, Manish; Loyalka, Pranav; Buja, L Maximilian; Gregoric, Igor D

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the case of a 38-year-old black man who presented at our hospital with his first episode of syncope, recently developed atrial arrhythmias refractory to pharmacologic therapy, and a left atrial thrombus. He was diagnosed with primary cardiac sarcoidosis characterized by predominant involvement of the epicardium that caused atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter. Histologic analysis of his epicardial lesions yielded a diagnosis of sarcoidosis. This patient's atrial arrhythmia was successfully treated with a hybrid operation that involved resection of his atrial appendage, an Epicor maze procedure, and radiofrequency ablation during a catheter-based electrophysiologic study. The cardiac sarcoidosis was successfully managed with corticosteroid therapy. Our case report shows that sarcoidosis can initially manifest itself as syncope with new-onset atrial arrhythmia. Sarcoidosis is important in the differential diagnosis because of its progressive nature and its potential for treatment with pharmacologic, surgical, and catheter-based interventions. PMID:27303240

  18. Primary Cardiac Sarcoidosis with Syncope and Refractory Atrial Arrhythmia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Thangam, Manoj; Nathan, Sriram; Kar, Biswajit; Petrovic, Marija; Patel, Manish; Loyalka, Pranav; Buja, L. Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the case of a 38-year-old black man who presented at our hospital with his first episode of syncope, recently developed atrial arrhythmias refractory to pharmacologic therapy, and a left atrial thrombus. He was diagnosed with primary cardiac sarcoidosis characterized by predominant involvement of the epicardium that caused atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter. Histologic analysis of his epicardial lesions yielded a diagnosis of sarcoidosis. This patient's atrial arrhythmia was successfully treated with a hybrid operation that involved resection of his atrial appendage, an Epicor maze procedure, and radiofrequency ablation during a catheter-based electrophysiologic study. The cardiac sarcoidosis was successfully managed with corticosteroid therapy. Our case report shows that sarcoidosis can initially manifest itself as syncope with new-onset atrial arrhythmia. Sarcoidosis is important in the differential diagnosis because of its progressive nature and its potential for treatment with pharmacologic, surgical, and catheter-based interventions. PMID:27303240

  19. Cardiopulmonary involvement in Puumala hantavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hantavirus infections cause potentially life-threatening disease in humans world-wide. Infections with American hantaviruses may lead to hantavirus pulmonary syndrome characterised by severe cardiopulmonary distress with high mortality. Pulmonary involvement in European Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) infection has been reported, whereas knowledge of potential cardiac manifestations is limited. We aimed to comprehensively investigate cardiopulmonary involvement in patients with PUUV-infection. Methods Twenty-seven hospitalised patients with PUUV-infection were examined with lung function tests, chest high-resolution CT (HRCT), echocardiography including speckle tracking strain rate analysis, ECG and measurements of cardiac biomarkers N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-ProBNP) and troponin T. Patients were re-evaluated after 3 months. Twenty-five age and sex-matched volunteers acted as controls for echocardiography data. Results Two-thirds of the patients experienced respiratory symptoms as dry cough or dyspnoea. Gas diffusing capacity was impaired in most patients, significantly improving at follow-up but still subnormal in 38%. HRCT showed thoracic effusions or pulmonary oedema in 46% of the patients. Compared to controls, the main echocardiographic findings in patients during the acute phase were significantly higher pulmonary vascular resistance, higher systolic pulmonary artery pressure, lower left ventricular ejection fraction and impaired left atrial myocardial motion. Pathological ECG, atrial fibrillation or T-wave changes, was demonstrated in 26% of patients. NT-ProBNP concentrations were markedly increased and were inversely associated with gas diffusing capacity but positively correlated to pulmonary vascular resistance. Furthermore, patients experiencing impaired general condition at follow-up had significantly lower gas diffusing capacity and higher pulmonary vascular resistance, compared to those feeling fully recovered. Conclusions In

  20. Diuretic and natriuretic activity of two mistletoe species in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Namita; Patil, C. R.; Chaudhari, K. B.; Wagh, J. P.; Surana, S. J.; Jadhav, R. B.

    2010-01-01

    In different cultural groups, the hemiparasitic plants of the families Loranthaceae and Viscaceae (mistletoes) are frequently used in the treatment of hypertension and/or as diuretic agents. However, it remains unclear as to what commonality makes them diuretic agents or a remedy for hypertension. In this article, the diuretic activity of methanol extracts of Viscum articulatum (VA) Burm. f. and Helicanthus elastica (HE) (Ders.) Dans. in rats is reported. The extracts were administered orally at doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg to rats that had been fasted and deprived of water for 18 hours. Investigations were carried out for diuretic, saluretic and natriuretic effects. The polyphenolic and triterpenoid contents were determined quantitatively using chemical assays and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis, respectively. The extracts of VA and HE demonstrated significant and dose-dependent diuretic activity in rats. It was found that while VA mimics the furosemide pattern, HE demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in diuresis, along with an increase in potassium-sparing effects. Phytochemical analysis revealed that polyphenolics and triterpenoids, such as oleanolic acid and lupeol, are the major phytochemicals involved. It was also found that in different combinations, these phytochemicals differed in the way they influenced the electrolyte excretion. A higher content of polyphenolics in association with lower triterpenoid content was found to favor potassium-sparing effects. PMID:21808540

  1. Spontaneous onset of atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Zemlin, Christian W.; Mitrea, Bogdan G.; Pertsov, Arkady M.

    2009-01-01

    Most commonly, atrial fibrillation is triggered by rapid bursts of electrical impulses originating in the myocardial sleeves of pulmonary veins (PVs). However, the nature of such bursts remains poorly understood. Here, we propose a mechanism of bursting consistent with the extensive empirical information about the electrophysiology of the PVs. The mechanism is essentially non-local and involves the spontaneous initiation of non-sustained spiral waves in the distal end of the muscle sleeves of the PVs. It reproduces the experimentally observed dynamics of the bursts, including their frequency, their intermittent character, and the unusual shape of the electrical signals in the pulmonary veins that are reminiscent of so-called early afterdepolarizations (EADs). PMID:20160895

  2. Spontaneous onset of atrial fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemlin, Christian W.; Mitrea, Bogdan G.; Pertsov, Arkady M.

    2009-06-01

    Most commonly, atrial fibrillation is triggered by rapid bursts of electrical impulses originating in the myocardial sleeves of pulmonary veins (PVs). However, the nature of such bursts remains poorly understood. Here, we propose a mechanism of bursting consistent with the extensive empirical information about the electrophysiology of the PVs. The mechanism is essentially non-local and involves the spontaneous initiation of non-sustained spiral waves in the distal end of the muscle sleeves of the PVs. It reproduces the experimentally observed dynamics of the bursts, including their frequency, their intermittent character, and the unusual shape of the electrical signals in the pulmonary veins that are reminiscent of so-called early afterdepolarizations (EADs).

  3. Chronic treatment with trimetazidine reduces the upregulation of atrial natriuretic peptide in heart failure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trimetazidine (TMZ) is effective for the treatment of ischemic cardiomyopathy; however, little is known about the effect of TMZ in established injury-induced heart failure. When rats with established infarct-induced heart failure were treated for 12 weeks with TMZ there was no effect on left ventric...

  4. Prognostic Value of Adrenomedullin and Natriuretic Peptides in Uroseptic Patients Induced by Ureteroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Zhou, Pang-Hu; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Lijun; Zhang, Xiao-Bin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate whether urosepsis is related to irrigation pressure of ureteroscopy (URS) and evaluate the prognostic value of adrenomedullin (ADM) and atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) in URS-induced uroseptic patients. From July 2008 to October 2013, we enrolled 332 patients with untreated unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). The UUO group included three subgroups of, respectively, 118, 132, and 82 patients who underwent URS under intermittent stable irrigation pressure of, respectively, 80, 120, and 160 mmHg. The plasma concentrations of ADM, ANP, and BNP were measured in all subjects. URS was performed for all UUO patients; the values of the three peptides were measured again after URS. Irrigation pressure and stone size were independent risk factors of urosepsis. After URS, the plasma concentrations of ADM, ANP, and BNP were significantly higher in uroseptic patients. Moreover, the concentrations were significantly higher depending on the disease severity. Plasma concentrations of the three peptides were correlated with plasma ET concentration in the uroseptic patients. The areas under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of ADM, ANP, and BNP for predicting urosepsis were 0.811, 0.728, and 0.764, respectively. In conclusion, ADM, along with ANP and BNP, is valuable for prognosis in urosepsis secondary to URS which is associated with irrigation pressure. PMID:26880865

  5. Prognostic Value of Adrenomedullin and Natriuretic Peptides in Uroseptic Patients Induced by Ureteroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Zhou, Pang-hu; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Lijun; Zhang, Xiao-bin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate whether urosepsis is related to irrigation pressure of ureteroscopy (URS) and evaluate the prognostic value of adrenomedullin (ADM) and atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) in URS-induced uroseptic patients. From July 2008 to October 2013, we enrolled 332 patients with untreated unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). The UUO group included three subgroups of, respectively, 118, 132, and 82 patients who underwent URS under intermittent stable irrigation pressure of, respectively, 80, 120, and 160 mmHg. The plasma concentrations of ADM, ANP, and BNP were measured in all subjects. URS was performed for all UUO patients; the values of the three peptides were measured again after URS. Irrigation pressure and stone size were independent risk factors of urosepsis. After URS, the plasma concentrations of ADM, ANP, and BNP were significantly higher in uroseptic patients. Moreover, the concentrations were significantly higher depending on the disease severity. Plasma concentrations of the three peptides were correlated with plasma ET concentration in the uroseptic patients. The areas under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of ADM, ANP, and BNP for predicting urosepsis were 0.811, 0.728, and 0.764, respectively. In conclusion, ADM, along with ANP and BNP, is valuable for prognosis in urosepsis secondary to URS which is associated with irrigation pressure. PMID:26880865

  6. Clinical implications of atrial isomerism.

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, I S; How, S W; Wang, J K; Wu, M H; Chu, S H; Lue, H C; Hung, C R

    1988-01-01

    Right atrial isomerism or left atrial isomerism is frequently diagnosed as situs ambiguous without further discrimination of the specific morbid anatomy. Thirty six cases of right atrial isomerism and seven cases of left atrial isomerism were collected from the records and pathological museum at the National Taiwan University Hospital. There was a necropsy report for 18 cases. In all patients one or more of the following conditions was met: (a) isomeric bronchial anatomy, (b) echocardiographic and angiocardiographic evidence of isomerism, and (c) surgical or necropsy evidence of abnormal atrial anatomy. An anomalous pulmonary venous connection was present in 55% of patients with right atrial isomerism; in left atrial isomerism one case (14%) had a partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection. Forty per cent of cases of anomalous pulmonary venous connection with right atrial isomerism had obstruction. Six (86%) of seven cases with left atrial isomerism had an ambiguous biventricular atrioventricular connection. In contrast, univentricular atrioventricular connection (26 of 36, 72%) was significantly more common in right atrial isomerism. A common atrioventricular valve was the most frequent mode of connection in both forms. Two discrete atrioventricular valves were significantly more common in left atrial isomerism. Atrioventricular valve regurgitation was detected in 14 cases. Double outlet right ventricle was the most common type of ventriculoarterial connection. The most commonly cited causes of death after either palliative or definitive operation were undetected anomalous pulmonary venous connection, pulmonary venous stricture, and uncorrected atrioventricular valve or aortic regurgitation complicated by abnormal coagulation. Although the prognosis is poor, successful operation depends on knowledge of the precise anatomical arrangement associated with atrial isomerism. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 PMID:3408620

  7. Atrial fibrillation and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ozaydin, Mehmet

    2010-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common clinical arrhythmia. Recent investigations have suggested that inflammation might have a role in the pathophysiology of AF. In this review, the association between inflammation and AF, and the effects of several agents that have anti-inflammatory actions, such as statins, polyunsaturated fatty acids, corticosteroids and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers, have been investigated. PMID:21160591

  8. Atrial fibrillation case study.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sarah; Wilson, Tracey

    2016-03-01

    This article discusses the irregular heart rhythm caused by atrial fibrillation (AF). A brief overview of the pathophysiology will be provided. A case study is discussed to highlight the treatment and management of AF. The care provision describes common signs and symptoms and also the treatment and management of AF within the maternity care setting. The importance of maintaining the mother-baby dyad is highlighted. For the purpose of maintaining confidentiality the woman will be referred to as Shama. PMID:27044188

  9. Hyperuricemia and Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Maharani, Nani; Kuwabara, Masanari; Hisatome, Ichiro

    2016-07-27

    The importance of atrial fibrillation (AF) as a cause of mortality and morbidity has prompted research on its pathogenesis and treatment. Recognition of AF risk factors is essential to prevent it and reduce the risk of death. Hyperuricemia has been widely accepted to be associated with the incidence of paroxysmal or persistent AF, as well as to the risk of AF in post cardiovascular surgery patients. The possible explanations for this association have been based on their relation with either oxidative stress or inflammation. To investigate the link between hyperuricemia and AF, it is necessary to refer to hyperuricemia-induced atrial remodeling. So far, both ionic channel and structural remodeling caused by hyperuricemia might be plausible explanations for the occurrence of AF. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-oxidase, or the use of antioxidants, along with serum uric acid (SUA) level reduction to prevent inflammation, might be useful. Uric acid transporters (UATs) play a key role in the regulation of intracellular uric acid concentration. Intracellular rather than serum uric acid level is considered more important for the pathogenesis of AF. Identification of UATs expressed in cells is thus important, and targeting UATs might become a potential strategy to reduce the risk of hyperuricemia-induced atrial fibrillation. PMID:27396561

  10. C-type natriuretic peptide modulates quorum sensing molecule and toxin production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Blier, Anne-Sophie; Veron, Wilfried; Bazire, Alexis; Gerault, Eloïse; Taupin, Laure; Vieillard, Julien; Rehel, Karine; Dufour, Alain; Le Derf, Franck; Orange, Nicole; Hulen, Christian; Feuilloley, Marc G J; Lesouhaitier, Olivier

    2011-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa coordinates its virulence expression and establishment in the host in response to modification of its environment. During the infectious process, bacteria are exposed to and can detect eukaryotic products including hormones. It has been shown that P. aeruginosa is sensitive to natriuretic peptides, a family of eukaryotic hormones, through a cyclic nucleotide-dependent sensor system that modulates its cytotoxicity. We observed that pre-treatment of P. aeruginosa PAO1 with C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) increases the capacity of the bacteria to kill Caenorhabditis elegans through diffusive toxin production. In contrast, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) did not affect the capacity of the bacteria to kill C. elegans. The bacterial production of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) was enhanced by both BNP and CNP whereas the production of phenazine pyocyanin was strongly inhibited by CNP. The amount of 2-heptyl-4-quinolone (HHQ), a precursor to 2-heptyl-3-hydroxyl-4-quinolone (Pseudomonas quinolone signal; PQS), decreased after CNP treatment. The quantity of 2-nonyl-4-quinolone (HNQ), another quinolone which is synthesized from HHQ, was also reduced after CNP treatment. Conversely, both BNP and CNP significantly enhanced bacterial production of acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) [e.g. 3-oxo-dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL) and butanoylhomoserine lactone (C4-HSL)]. These results correlate with an induction of lasI transcription 1 h after bacterial exposure to BNP or CNP. Concurrently, pre-treatment of P. aeruginosa PAO1 with either BNP or CNP enhanced PAO1 exotoxin A production, via a higher toxA mRNA level. At the same time, CNP led to elevated amounts of algC mRNA, indicating that algC is involved in C. elegans killing. Finally, we observed that in PAO1, Vfr protein is essential to the pro-virulent effect of CNP whereas the regulator PtxR supports only a part of the CNP pro-virulent activity. Taken together, these data reinforce the hypothesis that during

  11. C-type natriuretic peptide modulates quorum sensing molecule and toxin production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Blier, Anne-Sophie; Veron, Wilfried; Bazire, Alexis; Gerault, Eloïse; Taupin, Laure; Vieillard, Julien; Rehel, Karine; Dufour, Alain; Le Derf, Franck; Orange, Nicole; Hulen, Christian; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa coordinates its virulence expression and establishment in the host in response to modification of its environment. During the infectious process, bacteria are exposed to and can detect eukaryotic products including hormones. It has been shown that P. aeruginosa is sensitive to natriuretic peptides, a family of eukaryotic hormones, through a cyclic nucleotide-dependent sensor system that modulates its cytotoxicity. We observed that pre-treatment of P. aeruginosa PAO1 with C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) increases the capacity of the bacteria to kill Caenorhabditis elegans through diffusive toxin production. In contrast, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) did not affect the capacity of the bacteria to kill C. elegans. The bacterial production of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) was enhanced by both BNP and CNP whereas the production of phenazine pyocyanin was strongly inhibited by CNP. The amount of 2-heptyl-4-quinolone (HHQ), a precursor to 2-heptyl-3-hydroxyl-4-quinolone (Pseudomonas quinolone signal; PQS), decreased after CNP treatment. The quantity of 2-nonyl-4-quinolone (HNQ), another quinolone which is synthesized from HHQ, was also reduced after CNP treatment. Conversely, both BNP and CNP significantly enhanced bacterial production of acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) [e.g. 3-oxo-dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL) and butanoylhomoserine lactone (C4-HSL)]. These results correlate with an induction of lasI transcription 1 h after bacterial exposure to BNP or CNP. Concurrently, pre-treatment of P. aeruginosa PAO1 with either BNP or CNP enhanced PAO1 exotoxin A production, via a higher toxA mRNA level. At the same time, CNP led to elevated amounts of algC mRNA, indicating that algC is involved in C. elegans killing. Finally, we observed that in PAO1, Vfr protein is essential to the pro-virulent effect of CNP whereas the regulator PtxR supports only a part of the CNP pro-virulent activity. Taken together, these data reinforce the hypothesis that during

  12. [Catheter ablation of atrial flutter and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Márquez, Manlio F

    2003-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation has emerged as a curative therapy for atrial flutter based on studies demonstrating the role of the cavotricuspid isthmus. With a high rate of success and minimal complications, catheter ablation is the therapy of choice for patients with the common type of atrial flutter. Left atrial flutter, non-cavotricuspid isthmus dependent, and those associated with heart disease have a worst outcome with catheter ablation. Radiofrequency catheter ablation has also emerged as a curative therapy for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation based on studies demonstrating the role of triggering foci in the pulmonary veins for the initiation of atrial fibrillation. Catheter ablation is performed by a transseptal approach using radiofrequency energy at the ostium of each pulmonary vein. Mapping is guided by special catheters. Sequential radiofrequency applications eliminates or dissociates pulmonary vein muscle activity. Although complications exists, this is the only curative method for these patients. PMID:12966653

  13. TRIF promotes angiotensin II-induced cross-talk between fibroblasts and macrophages in atrial fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Dao-Liang; Zhang, Ming-Jian; Guo, Meng; Zhan, Yang-Yang; Liu, Fang; Jiang, Wei-Feng; Zhou, Li; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Quan-Xing; Liu, Xu

    2015-08-14

    Aims: Atrial fibroblasts and macrophages have long been thought to participate in atrial fibrillation (AF). However, which specific mediator may regulate the interaction between them remains unclear. Methods and results: We provided the evidence for the involvement of Toll/IL-1 receptor domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-β (TRIF), an important inflammation-related molecule, in the pathophysiology of AF. Patients with AF showed higher levels of angiotensin II (AngII) and TRIF expression and larger number of macrophages infiltration in left atria appendage than individuals with sinus rhythm (SR). In the cell study, AngII induced chemokines expressions in mouse atrial fibroblasts and AngII-stimulated atrial fibroblasts induced the chemotaxis of macrophages, which were reduced by losartan and TRIF siRNA. Meanwhile, AngII-stimulated atrial fibroblasts proliferation was enhanced by macrophages. Conclusions: Our data demonstrated that TRIF may be a crucial factor promoting the interaction between atrial fibroblasts and macrophages, leading to atrial fibrosis. - Highlights: • Compared with SR, AF showed higher TRIF expression in left atrial appendage. • TRIF siRNA reversed macrophage chemotaxis induced by AngII-treated fibroblast. • TRIF siRNA reversed chemokines expressions induced by AngII in fibroblast. • AngII-stimulated atrial fibroblast proliferation was enhanced by macrophage.

  14. Sinus Node and Atrial Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    John, Roy M; Kumar, Saurabh

    2016-05-10

    Although sinus node dysfunction (SND) and atrial arrhythmias frequently coexist and interact, the putative mechanism linking the 2 remain unclear. Although SND is accompanied by atrial myocardial structural changes in the right atrium, atrial fibrillation (AF) is a disease of variable interactions between left atrial triggers and substrate most commonly of left atrial origin. Significant advances have been made in our understanding of the genetic and pathophysiologic mechanism underlying the development and progression of SND and AF. Although some patients manifest SND as a result of electric remodeling induced by periods of AF, others develop progressive atrial structural remodeling that gives rise to both conditions together. The treatment strategy will thus vary according to the predominant disease phenotype. Although catheter ablation will benefit patients with predominantly AF and secondary SND, cardiac pacing may be the mainstay of therapy for patients with predominant fibrotic atrial cardiomyopathy. This contemporary review summarizes current knowledge on sinus node pathophysiology with the broader goal of yielding insights into the complex relationship between sinus node disease and atrial arrhythmias. PMID:27166347

  15. Detection of occult paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Petrėnas, Andrius; Sörnmo, Leif; Lukoševičius, Arūnas; Marozas, Vaidotas

    2015-04-01

    This work introduces a novel approach to the detection of brief episodes of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). The proposed detector is based on four parameters which characterize RR interval irregularity, P-wave absence, f-wave presence, and noise level, of which the latter three are determined from a signal produced by an echo state network. The parameters are used for fuzzy logic classification where the decisions involve information on prevailing signal quality; no training is required. The performance is evaluated on a large set of test signals with brief episodes of PAF. The results show that episodes with as few as five beats can be reliably detected with an accuracy of 0.88, compared to 0.82 for a detector based on rhythm information only (the coefficient of sample entropy); this difference in accuracy increases when atrial premature beats are present. The results also show that the performance remains essentially unchanged at noise levels up to [Formula: see text] RMS. It is concluded that the combination of information on ventricular activity, atrial activity, and noise leads to substantial improvement when detecting brief episodes of PAF. PMID:25502852

  16. Atrial Cardiopathy: A Broadened Concept of Left Atrial Thromboembolism Beyond Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Hooman; Okin, Peter M.; Longstreth, W. T.; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) has long been associated with a heightened risk of ischemic stroke and systemic thromboembolism, but recent data require a re-evaluation of our understanding of the nature of this relationship. New findings about the temporal connection between AF and stroke, alongside evidence linking markers of left atrial abnormalities with stroke in the absence of apparent AF, suggest that left atrial thromboembolism may occur even without AF. These observations undermine the hypothesis that the dysrhythmia that defines AF is necessary and sufficient to cause thromboembolism. In this commentary, we instead suggest that the substrate for thromboembolism may often be the anatomic and physiological atrial derangements associated with AF. Therefore, our understanding of cardioembolic stroke may be more complete if we shift our representation of its origin from AF to the concept of atrial cardiopathy. PMID:26021638

  17. Atrial Fibrillation, Neurocognitive Decline and Gene Expression After Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Rahul S.; Sabe, Ashraf A.; Elmadhun, Nassrene Y.; Ramlawi, Basel; Sellke, Frank W.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline are common complications after cardiopulmonary bypass. By utilizing genomic microarrays we investigate whether gene expression is associated with postoperative atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline. METHODS Twenty one cardiac surgery patients were prospectively matched and underwent neurocognitive assessments pre-operatively and four days postoperatively. The whole blood collected in the pre-cardiopulmonary bypass, 6 hours after-cardiopulmonary bypass, and on the 4th postoperative day was hybridized to Affymetrix Gene Chip U133 Plus 2.0 Microarrays. Gene expression in patients who developed postoperative atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline (n=6; POAF+NCD) was compared with gene expression in patients with postoperative atrial fibrillation and normal cognitive function (n=5; POAF+NORM) and patients with sinus rhythm and normal cognitive function (n=10; SR+NORM). Regulated genes were identified using JMP Genomics 4.0 with a false discovery rate of 0.05 and fold change of >1.5 or <-1.5. RESULTS Eleven patients developed postoperative atrial fibrillation. Six of these also developed neurocognitive decline. Of the 12 patients with sinus rhythm, only 2 developed neurocognitive decline. POAF+NCD patients had unique regulation of 17 named genes preoperatively, 60 named genes six hours after cardiopulmonary bypass, and 34 named genes four days postoperatively (P<0.05) compared with normal patients. Pathway analysis demonstrated that these genes are involved in cell death, inflammation, cardiac remodeling and nervous system function. CONCLUSION Patients who developed postoperative atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline after cardiopulmonary bypass may have differential genomic responses compared to normal patients and patients with only postoperative atrial fibrillation, suggesting common pathophysiology for these conditions. Further exploration of these genes may provide insight into the

  18. [Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Schwarz, M; Bode, Ch

    2008-10-01

    In this overview the actual guideline-recommendations for anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation and the problems of the currently available therapy are discussed. Furthermore an outlook over future developments in this field is given. Effective anticoagulation can prohibit thrombembolic events and is thus essential for the prognosis of patients suffering from atrial fibrillation. Until now vitamin-K-antagonists (VKAs) and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) are available for oral anticoagulation in these patients. VKAs demonstrate a satisfying efficiency combined with rather high bleeding hazard. ASA on the other hand allows only moderate risk reduction with minimal side effects. Thus the guidelines recommend anticoagulation tailored to the individual risk, which can be evaluated by the CHADS2-Score. New therapeutic strategies, like the factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban or the factor II inhibitor dabigatran, are actually evaluated in phase III studies. These drugs bear the hope of higher efficiency combined with improved safety and much more comfortable use in the daily practice (e. g. no need for INR measurement, no dose adaptation). PMID:18836647

  19. Ligand-Mediated Endocytosis and Intracellular Sequestration of Guanylyl Cyclase/Natriuretic Peptide Receptors: Role of GDAY Motif

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash N.

    2015-01-01

    The guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA), also referred to as GC-A, is a single polypeptide molecule having a critical function in blood pressure regulation and cardiovascular homeostasis. GC-A/NPRA, which resides in the plasma membrane, consists of an extracellular ligand-binding domain, a single transmembrane domain, and an intracellular cytoplasmic region containing a protein kinase-like homology domain (KHD) and a guanylyl cyclase (GC) catalytic domain. After binding with atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP), GC-A/NPRA is internalized and sequestered into intracellular compartments. Therefore, GC-A/NPRA is a dynamic cellular macromolecule that traverses different subcellular compartments through its lifetime. This review describes the roles of short-signal sequences in the internalization, trafficking, and intracellular redistribution of GC-A/NPRA from cell surface to cell interior. Evidence indicates that, after internalization, the ligand-receptor complexes dissociate inside the cell and a population of GC-A/NPRA recycles back to the plasma membrane. Subsequently, the disassociated ligands are degraded in the lysosomes. However a small percentage of the ligand escapes the lysosomal degradative pathway and is released intact into culture medium. By using pharmacologic and molecular perturbants, emphasis has been placed on the cellular regulation and processing of ligand-bound GC-A/NPRA in terms of receptor trafficking and down-regulation in intact cells. The discussion is concluded by examining the functions of short-signal sequence motifs in the cellular life-cycle of GC-A/NPRA, including endocytosis, trafficking, metabolic processing, inactivation, and/or down-regulation in model cell systems. PMID:19941037

  20. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease as a Predictor of Atrial Fibrillation in Middle-Aged Population (OPERA Study)

    PubMed Central

    Savolainen, Markku; Kesäniemi, Y. Antero; Huikuri, Heikki; Ukkola, Olavi

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and atrial fibrillation (AF) are widespread diseases and have multiple common risk factors and comorbidities. No studies of association between ultrasonography-diagnosed NAFLD and AF exist in other than diabetic population. The goal of this prospective study was to study the value of NAFLD as a predictor of atrial fibrillation. This study had 958 subjects from the OPERA (Oulu Project Elucidating Risk of Atherosclerosis) cohort, and the mean follow-up time was 16.3 years. NAFLD was diagnosed if the subject had fatty liver in ultrasonography and no excess alcohol intake. AF was followed in the National Registers. In this study 249 subjects (26.0%) had NAFLD and 37 (14.9%) of these had AF whereas only 56 (7.9%) of those without NAFLD experienced AF during the follow-up time (p = 0.001). In the multiple Cox regression analysis including potential confounders (age, sex, study group, diabetes, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, alcohol consumption, smoking, serum alanine aminotransferase concentration (ALT), systolic blood pressure, quick index, left ventricular mass index, left atrial diameter, coronary artery disease (CAD), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP)), NAFLD remained as an independent predictor of AF (Adjusted OR, 1.88 (95% Confidence interval (CI) 1.03–3.45)). In conclusion, our data shows that NAFLD is independently associated with the risk of AF. PMID:26571029

  1. Novel Upstream Approaches to Prevent Atrial Fibrillation Perpetuation.

    PubMed

    Jalife, José

    2016-04-01

    The mechanisms underlying atrial fibrillation (AF) in humans are poorly understood. In particular, we simply do not understand how atrial AF becomes persistent or permanent. The objective of this brief review is to address the most important factors involved in the mechanism of AF perpetuation, including structural remodeling in the form of fibrosis and electrical remodeling secondary to ion channel expression changes. In addition, I discuss the possibility that both fibrosis and electrical remodeling might be preventable when intervening pharmacologically early enough before the remodeling process reaches a point of no return. PMID:26968673

  2. Calcineurin Regulates Homologous Desensitization of Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-A and Inhibits ANP-Induced Testosterone Production in MA-10 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Henesy, Michelle B.; Britain, Andrea L.; Zhu, Bing; Amable, Lauren; Honkanen, Richard E.; Corbin, Jackie D.; Francis, Sharron H.; Rich, Thomas C.

    2012-01-01

    Receptor desensitization is a ubiquitous regulatory mechanism that defines the activatable pool of receptors, and thus, the ability of cells to respond to environmental stimuli. In recent years, the molecular mechanisms controlling the desensitization of a variety of receptors have been established. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that underlie desensitization of natriuretic peptide receptors, including natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A). Here we report that calcineurin (protein phosphatase 2B, PP2B, PPP3C) regulates homologous desensitization of NPR-A in murine Leydig tumor (MA-10) cells. We demonstrate that both pharmacological inhibition of calcineurin activity and siRNA-mediated suppression of calcineurin expression potentiate atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)-induced cGMP synthesis. Treatment of MA-10 cells with inhibitors of other phosphoprotein phosphatases had little or no effect on ANP-induced cGMP accumulation. In addition, overexpression of calcineurin blunts ANP-induced cGMP synthesis. We also present data indicating that the inhibition of calcineurin potentiates ANP-induced testosterone production. To better understand the contribution of calcineurin in the regulation of NPR-A activity, we examined the kinetics of ANP-induced cGMP signals. We observed transient ANP-induced cGMP signals, even in the presence of phosphodiesterase inhibitors. Inhibition of both calcineurin and phosphodiesterase dramatically slowed the decay in the response. These observations are consistent with a model in which calcineurin mediated dephosphorylation and desensitization of NPR-A is associated with significant inhibition of cGMP synthesis. PDE activity hydrolyzes cGMP, thus lowering intracellular cGMP toward the basal level. Taken together, these data suggest that calcineurin plays a previously unrecognized role in the desensitization of NPR-A and, thereby, inhibits ANP-mediated increases in testosterone production. PMID:22876290

  3. Vascular natriuretic peptide receptor-linked particulate guanylate cyclases are modulated by nitric oxide–cyclic GMP signalling

    PubMed Central

    Madhani, Melanie; Scotland, Ramona S; MacAllister, Raymond J; Hobbs, Adrian J

    2003-01-01

    The sensitivity of the particulate guanylate cyclase–cyclic guanosine-3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP) system to atrial (ANP) and C-type (CNP) natriuretic peptides was investigated in aortae and mesenteric small arteries from wild-type (WT) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) knockout (KO) mice. ANP and CNP produced concentration-dependent relaxations of mouse aorta that were significantly attenuated by the natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-A/B antagonist HS-142-1 (10−5 M). Both ANP and CNP were more potent in aortae from eNOS KO mice compared to WT. The potency of ANP and CNP in aortae from WT animals was increased in the presence of the NOS inhibitor, NG-nitro-L-arginine (3 × 10−4 M) and the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolol[4,3,a]quinoxalin-1-one (5 × 10−6 M). In contrast, the potency of ANP and CNP in aortae from eNOS KO animals was reduced following pretreatment of tissues with supramaximal concentrations of the NO-donor, glyceryl trinitrate (3 × 10−5 M, 30 min) or ANP (10−7 M, 30 min). Responses to acetylcholine in aortae from WT mice (dependent on the release of endothelium-derived NO) were significantly reduced following pretreatment of tissues with GTN (3 × 10−5 M, 30 min) and ANP (10−7 M, 30 min). CNP and the NO-donor, spermine-NONOate caused concentration-dependent relaxations of mesenteric small arteries from WT animals that were significantly increased in eNOS KO mice compared to WT. ANP was unable to significantly relax mesenteric arteries from WT or eNOS KO animals. In conclusion, both NPR-A- and NPR-B-linked pGC pathways are modulated by NO–cGMP in murine aorta and mesenteric small arteries and crossdesensitisation occurs between NPR subtypes. The biological activity of endothelium-derived NO is also influenced by the ambient concentration of NO and natriuretic peptides. Such an autoregulatory pathway may represent an important physiological homeostatic mechanism and link the paracrine activity

  4. Clinical and histological predictive risk factors of atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing open-heart surgery

    PubMed Central

    TINICA, GRIGORE; MOCANU, VERONICA; ZUGUN-ELOAE, FLORIN; BUTCOVAN, DOINA

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) is a common complication subsequent to cardiac surgery. Various risk factors have been reported for the development of this complication; however, their precise role in POAF is unknown. In the present study, we attempted to identify clinical factors and histopathological changes in atrial tissue that may predict the development of POAF. Atrial tissue was sampled from 103 patients in sinus rhythm that had undergone open-heart surgery, including elective coronary artery bypass grafting (79.61%) and heart valve surgery (20.38%). Atrial surgical biopsies were obtained from the right atrial appendage at the site of cannulation, prior to cardiopulmonary bypass. Tissues were processed routinely for light microscopy, then stained with hematoxylin and eosin and sirius red. Microscopical exams were used to observe the atrial lesions and morphometry was conducted for quantification. In total, 37 patients (35.92%) developed POAF and atrial lesions were identified in the majority of patients in the normal postoperative sinus rhythm and POAF groups, but were most common in the POAF patients. The most common risk factors involved in developing POAF were found to be: Age of >60 years, male gender, ejection fraction of <50% and increased pulmonary hypertension. Furthermore, interstitial fibrosis and myocytolysis were the most common injuries identified. Abnormalities in atrial surgical biopsies may indicate the susceptibility of a patient to developing POAF. The present results suggest that the pre-existent alterations in the structure of the right atrium may be a major determinant in the development of POAF. PMID:26668632

  5. Recent Trends in Imaging for Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Kabra, Rajesh; Singh, Jagmeet

    2010-01-01

    Catheter ablation provides an important treatment option for patients with both paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation. It mainly involves pulmonary vein isolation and additional ablations in the left atrium in persistent cases. There have been significant advancements in this procedure to enhance the safety and effectiveness. One of them is the evolution of various imaging modalities to facilitate better visualization of the complex left atrial anatomy and the pulmonary veins in order to deliver the lesions accurately. In this article, we review the electroanatomic mapping systems including the magnetic-based and impedence-based systems. Each of these mapping systems has its own advantages and disadvantages. In addition, we also discuss the role of intracardiac echocardiography and three dimensional rotational angiography in atrial fibrillation ablation. PMID:20473373

  6. Atrial Macroreentry in Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Twomey, Darragh J; Sanders, Prashanthan; Roberts-Thomson, Kurt C

    2015-01-01

    Macroreentrant atrial tachycardia is a common complication following surgery for congenital heart disease (CHD), and is often highly symptomatic with potentially significant hamodynamic consequences. Medical management is often unsuccessful, requiring the use of invasive procedures. Cavotricuspid isthmus dependent flutter is the most common circuit but atypical circuits also exist, involving sites of surgical intervention or areas of scar related to abnormal hemodynamics. Ablation can be technically challenging, due to complex anatomy, and difficulty with catheter stability. A thorough assessment of the pa-tients status and pre-catheter ablation planning is critical to successfully managing these patients. PMID:25308809

  7. The Role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Cardiac Computed Tomography in the Assessment of Left Atrial Anatomy, Size, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Kuchynka, Petr; Podzimkova, Jana; Masek, Martin; Lambert, Lukas; Cerny, Vladimir; Danek, Barbara; Palecek, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, there has been increasing evidence that comprehensive evaluation of the left atrium is of utmost importance. Numerous studies have clearly demonstrated the prognostic value of left atrial volume for long-term outcome. Furthermore, advances in catheter ablation procedures used for the treatment of drug-refractory atrial fibrillation require the need for detailed knowledge of left atrial and pulmonary venous morphology as well of atrial wall characteristics. This review article discusses the role of cardiac magnetic resonance and computed tomography in assessment of left atrial size, its normal and abnormal morphology, and function. Special interest is paid to the utility of these rapidly involving noninvasive imaging methods before and after atrial fibrillation ablation. PMID:26221583

  8. [Vectorcardiographic manifestations of atrial enlargements].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, A; Medrano, G A

    1990-01-01

    Rational interpretation of changes of the P loop due to atrial enlargements must to rely on the magnitude and spatial orientation of main resultant vectors of the activation sequence of the atria. Under normal conditions, these vectors give rise to a mean vector oriented to the left downward and discretely forward with respect to their point of origin. In the presence of right atrial enlargement, the manifestation of the first vector of atrial depolarization, oriented downward and forward, is increased. This one moves in the same direction as the mean vector of atrial depolarization, originating an elongated P loop of more than 100 mcv in the three planes. Nevertheless, in the horizontal plane, increase of the P loop voltage predominates when hypertrophy exists, while augmentation of its area predominates when dilatation exists. In left atrial enlargement, the manifestation of the second vector of atrial depolarization, oriented to the left and backward, is augmented, and it moves in the same direction as the mean vector of atrial depolarization. For this, the PF loop acquires a characteristic aspect of a boxing glove, an the PH loop becomes diphasic, with its posterior area more or less prominent, or with a typical figure-eight conformation. If a biatrial enlargement is present, the manifestation of both the main resultant vectors of atrial depolarization is accentuated. Therefore the voltage of the diphasic P loop increases. Moreover the Ps loop has a triangular configuration, with its base of 30 msc or more, located below its point of origin. Generally disturbances of interatrial and intraatrial conduction coexist owing to myocardial damage. PMID:2146934

  9. Genomics of Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Alejandra; Chung, Mina K

    2016-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common clinical arrhythmia that appears to be highly heritable, despite representing a complex interplay of several disease processes that generally do not manifest until later in life. In this manuscript, we will review the genetic basis of this complex trait established through studies of familial AF, linkage and candidate gene studies of common AF, genome wide association studies (GWAS) of common AF, and transcriptomic studies of AF. Since AF is associated with a five-fold increase in the risk of stroke, we also review the intersection of common genetic factors associated with both of these conditions. Similarly, we highlight the intersection of common genetic markers associated with some risk factors for AF, such as hypertension and obesity, and AF. Lastly, we describe a paradigm where genetic factors predispose to the risk of AF, but which may require additional stress and trigger factors in older age to allow for the clinical manifestation of AF. PMID:27139902

  10. Rhythm control in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Piccini, Jonathan P; Fauchier, Laurent

    2016-08-20

    Many patients with atrial fibrillation have substantial symptoms despite ventricular rate control and require restoration of sinus rhythm to improve their quality of life. Acute restoration (ie, cardioversion) and maintenance of sinus rhythm in patients with atrial fibrillation are referred to as rhythm control. The decision to pursue rhythm control is based on symptoms, the type of atrial fibrillation (paroxysmal, persistent, or long-standing persistent), patient comorbidities, general health status, and anticoagulation status. Many patients have recurrent atrial fibrillation and require further intervention to maintain long term sinus rhythm. Antiarrhythmic drug therapy is generally recommended as a first-line therapy and drug selection is on the basis of the presence or absence of structural heart disease or heart failure, electrocardiographical variables, renal function, and other comorbidities. In patients who continue to have recurrent atrial fibrillation despite medical therapy, catheter ablation has been shown to substantially reduce recurrent atrial fibrillation, decrease symptoms, and improve quality of life, although recurrence is common despite continued advancement in ablation techniques. PMID:27560278

  11. Rate control in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Van Gelder, Isabelle C; Rienstra, Michiel; Crijns, Harry J G M; Olshansky, Brian

    2016-08-20

    Control of the heart rate (rate control) is central to atrial fibrillation management, even for patients who ultimately require control of the rhythm. We review heart rate control in patients with atrial fibrillation, including the rationale for the intervention, patient selection, and the treatments available. The choice of rate control depends on the symptoms and clinical characteristics of the patient, but for all patients with atrial fibrillation, rate control is part of the management. Choice of drugs is patient-dependent. β blockers, alone or in combination with digoxin, or non-dihydropyridine calcium-channel blockers (not in heart failure) effectively lower the heart rate. Digoxin is least effective, but a reasonable choice for physically inactive patients aged 80 years or older, in whom other treatments are ineffective or are contraindicated, and as an additional drug to other rate-controlling drugs, especially in heart failure when instituted cautiously. Atrioventricular node ablation with pacemaker insertion for rate control should be used as an approach of last resort but is also an option early in the management of patients with atrial fibrillation treated with cardiac resynchronisation therapy. However, catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation should be considered before atrioventricular node ablation. Although rate control is a top priority and one of the first management issues for all patients with atrial fibrillation, many issues remain. PMID:27560277

  12. The association between brain natriuretic peptide and tissue Doppler parameters in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Oner, Taliha; Ozdemir, Rahmi; Hazan, Filiz; Karadeniz, Cem; Doksoz, Onder; Yilmazer, Murat Muhtar; Mese, Timur; Tavli, Vedide

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the association between brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels and tissue Doppler imaging measurements and also screening for deadly mutations in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We enrolled 20 patients diagnosed with HCM (age:10.7±5 years (1-17), 85% male, weight:42.25±23.10 kg, height:141.80±32.45 cm) and 20 age, gender and body weight-matched control subjects. We performed electrocardiography, transthoracic echocardiography, and tissue Doppler echocardiography in each group, as well as genetic tests (for Arg403Gln, Arg453Cys, Arg719Trp and Arg719Gln mutations in MYH7 Exons 13, 14, 19) and BNP in the patients. The patients were divided into two groups according to the presence (Group 1) or absence (Group 2) of left ventricular (LV) outflow tract obstruction. QTc dispersion and the LV ejection fraction and left atrial (LA) volume index were increased in Group 1. The LA volume index and the mitral and septal E/Ea ratio and septum Z-score were increased while the mitral lateral annulus and septal annulus Ea wave velocities and the mitral and tricuspid E/A ratio were decreased in patients with high levels of BNP compared to those with normal BNP levels. There were no mutations that are associated with increased risk of sudden death found in patients included in this study. In the light of our data, we conclude that such parameters BNP levels above the 98 pg/mL, septal thickness Z-score >6, and higher mitral and septal E/Ea ratios can be used for management of patients with HCM according to life-threatening conditions. PMID:26773184

  13. Atrial Remodeling and Atrial Tachyarrhythmias in Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lingmin; Guo, Jinrui; Zheng, Lihui; Chen, Gang; Ding, Ligang; Qiao, Yu; Sun, Wei; Yao, Yan; Zhang, Shu

    2016-09-01

    Less is known about atrial remodeling and atrial tachyarrhythmias (ATa) in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC); this cross-sectional study aimed to determine the prevalence, characterization, and predictors of atrial remodeling and ATa in a large series of patients with ARVC. From February 2004 to September 2014, 294 consecutive patients who met the task force criteria for ARVC were enrolled. The prevalence, characterization, and predictors of atrial dilation and ATa were investigated. Right atrium (RA) dilation was identified in 160 patients (54.4%) and left atrium dilation in 66 patients (22.4%). Both RA and left atrium dilation were found in 44 patients (15.0%). Twenty-five patients (8.5%) had atrial fibrillation (AF), whereas 19 patients (6.5%) had atrial flutter (AFL). Of which, 7 patients (2.4%) had both AF and AFL. Multivariate analysis showed that AFL (odds ratio [OR] 10.309; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.770 to 38.462; p <0.001), hypertension (OR 9.174; 95% CI 2.364 to 35.714; p = 0.001), and RA dilation (OR 6.993; 95% CI 1.623 to 30.303; p = 0.009) were associated with increased risk for AF. AF (OR 10.526; 95% CI 2.786 to 40.000; p = 0.001) increased the risk of AFL. In conclusion, atrial remodeling and ATa were common in patients with ARVC. PMID:27378141

  14. Who Is at Risk for Atrial Fibrillation?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Who Is at Risk for Atrial Fibrillation? Atrial fibrillation (AF) affects millions ... than 75. AF is uncommon in children. Major Risk Factors AF is more common in people who ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: familial atrial fibrillation

    MedlinePlus

    ... fibrillation also increases the risk of stroke and sudden death. Complications of familial atrial fibrillation can occur at ... beats , increasing the risk of syncope, stroke, and sudden death. Most cases of atrial fibrillation are not caused ...

  16. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Ramlawi, Basel; Abu Saleh, Walid K

    2015-01-01

    The Cox-maze procedure for the restoration of normal sinus rhythm, initially developed by Dr. James Cox, underwent several iterations over the years. The main concept consists of creating a series of transmural lesions in the right and left atria that disrupt re-entrant circuits responsible for propagating the abnormal atrial fibrillation rhythm. The left atrial appendage is excluded as a component of the Maze procedure. For the first three iterations of the Cox- maze procedure, these lesions were performed using a surgical cut-and-sew approach that ensured transmurality. The Cox-Maze IV is the most currently accepted iteration. It achieves the same lesion set of the Cox- maze III but uses alternative energy sources to create the transmural lesions, potentially in a minimally invasive approach on the beating heart. High-frequency ultrasound, microwave, and laser energy have all been used with varying success in the past. Today, bipolar radiofrequency heat or cryotherapy cooling are the most accepted sources for creating linear lesions with consistent safety and transmurality. The robust and reliable nature of these energy delivery methods has yielded a success rate reaching 90% freedom from atrial fibrillation at 12 months. Such approaches offer a significant long-term advantage over catheter-based ablation, especially in patients having longstanding, persistent atrial fibrillation with characteristics such as dilated left atrial dimensions, poor ejection fraction, and failed catheter ablation. Based on these improved results, there currently is significant interest in developing a hybrid ablation strategy that incorporates the superior transmural robust lesions of surgical ablation, the reliable stroke prevention potential of epicardial left atrial appendage exclusion, and sophisticated mapping and confirmatory catheter-based ablation technology. Such a minimally invasive hybrid strategy for ablation may lead to the development of multidisciplinary "Afib teams" to

  17. Surgical Treatment of Atrial Myxomas

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Bum Koo; Lee, Doo Yun; Pezzella, A. Thomas; Hong, Sung Nok; Hong, Pill Whoon

    1989-01-01

    Twenty atrial myxomas were resected in 20 patients with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass, from the beginning of July 1966 through the end of June 1985, at Severance Hospital, Seoul, Korea. Nineteen patients had left atrial myxomas; 1 had a right atrial myxoma. Left atrial myxomas arose from the intra-atrial septum in 17 patients and from the left atrial appendage in 2 patients. The right atrial myxoma arose from the fossa ovalis. The 13 female and 7 male patients ranged in age from 14 to 63 years. Symptoms most often reported on presentation were those associated with mitral valve obstruction; other symptoms were associated with systemic embolization. The 1st 4 patients were tested with angiocardiography alone, and 3 of these were misdiagnosed. The last 16 were tested by angiocardiography, M-mode echocardiography, and 2-dimensional echocardiography, alone or in various combinations, and there were no further misdiagnoses. In our experience, 2-dimensional echocardiography was the most accurate method of diagnosing cardiac tumors. In 19 patients, surgical approach was through a median sternotomy; in the 20th patient, approach was through a left thoracotomy, due to a preoperative misdiagnosis of mitral stenosis. No intraoperative embolizations or deaths occurred. On follow-up of 17 patients during periods ranging from 6 months to 6 years, we had no late deaths, and only 2 patients suffered late complications: 1 had sudden right hemiparesis caused by an embolus 4 months after surgery (this improved upon conservative treatment); and 1 had a recurrence of tumor 3 years after surgery (the new myxoma was successfully resected). We conclude that patients who have undergone complete excision of benign myxomas now have an excellent prognosis, with minimal risk of intraoperative embolization and late recurrence. We conclude also that 2-dimensional echocardiography is an extremely accurate tool both in early diagnosis of intracardiac myxomas and in late follow-up after

  18. Obstructive sleep apnea in atrial fibrillation patients.

    PubMed

    Arias, Miguel A; Alonso-Fernández, Alberto; García-Río, Francisco; Sánchez, Ana; López, Juana M; Pagola, Carlos

    2006-06-28

    A high prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea has been demonstrated in patients with atrial fibrillation. Our comments want to emphasize the importance of identifying and treating a large proportion of patients with atrial fibrillation who have undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea as an additional preventive strategy for atrial fibrillation patients. PMID:16309764

  19. Atriocaval Rupture After Right Atrial Isthmus Ablation for Atrial Flutter.

    PubMed

    Vloka, Caroline; Nelson, Daniel W; Wetherbee, Jule

    2016-06-01

    A patient with symptomatic typical atrial flutter (AFL) underwent right atrial isthmus ablation with an 8-mm catheter. Eight months later, his typical AFL recurred. Ten months later, he underwent a repeat right atrial isthmus ablation with an irrigated tip catheter and an 8-mm tip catheter. Six weeks after his second procedure, while performing intense sprint intervals on a treadmill, he developed an abrupt onset of chest pain, hypotension, and cardiac tamponade. He underwent emergency surgery to repair an atriocaval rupture and has done well since. Our report suggests that an association of multiple radiofrequency ablations with increased risk for delayed atriocaval rupture occurring 1 to 3 months after ablation. In conclusion, although patients generally were advised to limit exercise for 1 to 2 weeks after AFL ablation procedures in the past, it may be prudent to avoid intense exercise for at least 3 months after procedure. PMID:27112285

  20. B-type natriuretic peptide and amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide in pediatric patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Takatsuki, Shinichi; Wagner, Brandie D; Ivy, David Dunbar

    2011-01-01

    Objectives B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and the amino-terminal fragment (NTproBNP) correlate with clinical variables, but have not been simultaneously studied in a large number of pediatric patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The purpose of our investigation was to compare BNP and NTproBNP with clinical indicators of disease in a pediatric PAH population for which biomarkers are much needed. Design We retrospectively compared BNP and NTproBNP levels with exercise capacity, echocardiographic data, and hemodynamics in PAH patients under 21 years-old. Two hundred sixty three blood samples from 88 pediatric PAH patients were obtained, with BNP and NTproBNP drawn at the same time. Results There was a correlation between BNP and NTproBNP with mean pulmonary arterial pressure/mean arterial pressure (mPAP/mSAP) ratio (r=0.40 p<0.01, r=0.45 p<0.01, respectively), mean right atrial pressure (mRAP) (r=0.48 p<0.01, r=0.48 p<0.01), and tricuspid regurgitant (TR) velocity (r=0.36 p<0.01, r=0.41 p<0.01). BNP and NTproBNP are associated with 6 minute walking distance, mPAP, mPAP/mSAP ratio, mRAP, pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI), and TR velocity when investigated longitudinally. On the average, a 1 unit increase in log BNP or NTproBNP was associated with 4.5 unitsxm2 or 3.4 unitsxm2 increase in PVRI, respectively. There was a strong correlation between log BNP and log NTproBNP measurements (r= 0.87, p<0.01). Conclusion In pediatric PAH, BNP and NTProBNP are strongly correlated and predict changes in clinical variables and hemodynamics. In a cross-sectional analysis, NTproBNP correlated with echocardiographic and exercise data better than BNP; NTproBNP showed less within patient variability over time, therefore NTproBNP can add additional information towards predicting these clinical measurements. PMID:22325151

  1. Evaluation of left atrial mechanical function and atrial conduction abnormalities in Maras powder (smokeless tobacco) users and smokers

    PubMed Central

    Akcay, Ahmet; Naci Aydin, M; Acar, Gurkan; Akgungor, Mehmet; Cabioglu, Eren; Ardic, İdris; Mese, Bulent; Bozoglan, Orhan; Çetin, Mustafa; Çakıcı, Musa

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective In Turkey, a type of smokeless tobacco called Maras powder (MP) is widely used in the south-eastern region. Smokeless tobacco is found in preparations for chewing and for absorption by the nasal and oral mucosae. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether MP damages intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay and left atrial (LA) mechanical function as much as cigarette smoking. Method A total of 150 chronic MP users (50 males, 32.5 ± 5.4 years), smokers (50 males, 32.1 ± 6.0 years) and controls (50 males, 30.1 ± 5.8 years) were included in the study. LA volumes were measured echocardiographically according to the biplane area–length method. Atrial electromechanical coupling was measured with tissue Doppler imaging and LA mechanical function parameters were calculated. Results The LA passive emptying fraction was significantly decreased and LA active emptying volume (LAAEV) was significantly increased in the MP group (p = 0.012 and p = 0.024, respectively), and the LA active emptying fraction (LAAEF) was significantly increased in the smokers (p = 0.003). There was a positive correlation between the amount of MP used and smoking (pack years) with LAAEV and LAAEF (r = 0.26, p = 0.009 and r = 0.25, p = 0.013, respectively). Lateral atrial electromechanical intervals (PA) were significantly higher in MP users, and the septal mitral PA was statistically higher in the smokers (p = 0.05 and p = 0.04, respectively). Conclusion We suggest that atrial electromechanical coupling intervals were prolonged and LA mechanical function was impaired in MP users and smokers, but there was no significant difference between the MP users and smokers. These findings may be markers of subclinical cardiac involvement and tendency for atrial fibrillation. PMID:26592906

  2. Associations of plasma natriuretic peptide, adrenomedullin, and homocysteine levels with alterations in arterial stiffness: The Framingham Heart Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experimental studies suggest that the natriuretic peptides influence lipid and fatty acid metabolism. Although it has been shown that obese individuals have reduced natriuretic peptide levels, conflicting data exist on the relation of natriuretic peptide levels to other metabolic risk factors. We ex...

  3. Incidence and predictive factors of atrial fibrillation after ablation of typical atrial flutter.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Valérie; Fauchier, Laurent; Pierre, Bertrand; Grimard, Caroline; Babuty, Dominique

    2009-03-01

    Although cavotricuspid isthmus radiofrequency catheter ablation is considered curative therapy for typical atrial flutter, many patients develop an atrial fibrillation after ablation. The purpose of our study was to determine the incidence and the predictive factors of post-ablation atrial fibrillation. One hundred and forty eight consecutive patients underwent cavotricuspid isthmus ablation for the treatment of typical atrial flutter between January 2004 and December 2005 in our electrophysiological department. Complete cavotricuspid isthmus block was successfully obtained in 96.6% of the patients. At the end of the electrophysiological study a sustained atrial fibrillation was inducible in 20 patients (13.5%). During an average follow-up of 21.3 +/- 8.2 months, atrial fibrillation occurred in 27% of the patients. Univariate analysis identified four parameters correlated with post-ablation atrial fibrillation among the 21 parameters tested: the young age of the patients, a prior history of atrial fibrillation, an inducible atrial fibrillation, and a paroxysmal atrial flutter. Only inducible atrial fibrillation and paroxysmal atrial flutter were independent factors linked to atrial fibrillation after ablation. In our study the incidence of atrial fibrillation after cavotricuspid isthmus radiofrequency catheter ablation is 152 per 1,000 patient-years, i.e. 25 times higher than the incidence of atrial fibrillation in the general population of the same age. Twenty five percent of the patients who had neither prior history of atrial fibrillation nor structural heart disease suffered from atrial fibrillation during a mean follow-up of 21.3 +/- 8.2 months. All these results suggest that atrial flutter and fibrillation could be manifestations of a more general electrophysiologic disease. They emphasize the need for all these patients to benefit from regular, long-term cardiological follow-up after cavotricuspid isthmus ablation because of the high incidence of atrial

  4. Correlation of B-type natriuretic peptide levels and echocardiographic parameters in preterm infants with patent ductus arteriosus

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hyun Ah; Shin, Jeonghee; Kim, Eunji; Lee, Eun Hee; Son, Chang Sung; Lee, Joo Won

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the correlation, according to postnatal age, between plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels and echocardiographic parameters for the assessment of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in preterm infants with respiratory distress. Methods We enrolled 42 preterm infants with respiratory distress who underwent serial echocardiographic evaluation with simultaneous plasma BNP measurements until ductal closure. The correlations between BNP levels and the following 4 representative echocardiographic parameters were studied: diameter of the ductus arteriosus (DA), ratio of the left atrial diameter to the aortic diameter (LA/Ao), ratio of the PDA diameter to the infant's left pulmonary artery diameter (PDA/LPA), and the antegrade diastolic flow of LPA (DFLPA). Results BNP levels were significantly correlated to the magnitude of the ductal shunt, comprising the DA diameter, PDA/LPA ratio, LA/Ao ratio, and antegrade DFLPA for the overall study period. The earliest significant correlation, starting from postnatal day 2, was observed between the LA/Ao ratio and BNP levels. The PDA/LPA ratio and the antegrade DFLPA showed significant correlations with BNP levels postnatal day 3 onward, and with the DA diameter, postnatal day 5 onward. Conclusion BNP levels and echocardiographic parameters showed a positive correlation, but the significance of the correlations differed according to the postnatal age, especially during the first few days of life. PMID:27186229

  5. Cryoballoon Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Jason G; Dubuc, Marc; Guerra, Peter G; Macle, Laurent; Rivard, Lena; Roy, Denis; Talajic, Mario; Thibault, Bernard; Khairy, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Focal point-by-point radiofrequency catheter ablation has shown considerable success in the treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. However, it is not without limitations. Recent clinical and preclinical studies have demonstrated that cryothermal ablation using a balloon catheter (Artic Front©, Medtronic CryoCath LP) provides an effective alternative strategy to treating atrial fibrillation. The objective of this article is to review efficacy and safety data surrounding cryoballoon ablation for paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation. In addition, a practical step-by-step approach to cryoballoon ablation is presented, while highlighting relevant literature regarding: 1) the rationale for adjunctive imaging, 2) selection of an appropriate cryoballoon size, 3) predictors of efficacy, 4) advanced trouble-shooting techniques, and 5) strategies to reduce procedural complications, such as phrenic nerve palsy. PMID:22557842

  6. A Test in Context Critical Evaluation of Natriuretic Peptide Testing in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Gary S.; Felker, G. Michael; Tang, W.H. Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Circulating natriuretic peptide measurements have been used extensively over the past 15 years to diagnose and monitor patients with heart failure. We are still learning how complex the dynamics of natriuretic peptides can be in the interpretation of test results in individual patients. Although natriuretic peptide measurements are widely used in practice, there are questions regarding why these peptides may not necessarily track with blood volume or invasive hemodynamic measurements in individual patients. Interpretation of natriuretic peptide measurements will depend on many factors, including special patient populations, obesity, renal function, the state of congestion or decongestion, and whether patients are receiving specific therapies. Natriuretic peptide measurements have clearly revolutionized clinical care for patients with heart failure, but further research should provide insights to help use these measurements to individualize patient care beyond the current guidelines. PMID:26796399

  7. A Test in Context: Critical Evaluation of Natriuretic Peptide Testing in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Francis, Gary S; Felker, G Michael; Tang, W H Wilson

    2016-01-26

    Circulating natriuretic peptide measurements have been used extensively over the past 15 years to diagnose and monitor patients with heart failure. We are still learning how complex the dynamics of natriuretic peptides can be in the interpretation of test results in individual patients. Although natriuretic peptide measurements are widely used in practice, there are questions regarding why these peptides may not necessarily track with blood volume or invasive hemodynamic measurements in individual patients. Interpretation of natriuretic peptide measurements will depend on many factors, including special patient populations, obesity, renal function, the state of congestion or decongestion, and whether patients are receiving specific therapies. Natriuretic peptide measurements have clearly revolutionized clinical care for patients with heart failure, but further research should provide insights to help use these measurements to individualize patient care beyond the current guidelines. PMID:26796399

  8. A review of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed Central

    Dang, David; Arimie, Raluca; Haywood, L. Julian

    2002-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia and accounts for more physician visits and hospital days than any other cardiac rhythm disturbance. Atrial filbrillation is incresing in frequency as the population ages, and therefore, a knowledge of the clinical spectrum and available treatment regimen is essential. Here, we review the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and current status of management. Experience is being rapidly accumulated in all of the areas discussed in the management of this important clinical entity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:12510703

  9. Fibrinolytic function and atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Marín, Francisco; Roldán, Vanessa; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2003-03-15

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the commonest sustained cardiac arrhythmia, which is associated with a substantial risk of stroke and thromboembolism. A prothrombotic or hypercoagulable state has been observed in these patients, although previous studies have mainly focused on various clotting factors, endothelial damage or dysfunction markers and platelet activation. However, fibrinolytic function has been less frequently studied, despite the fibrinolytic system playing an important role in preventing intravascular thrombosis. Indeed, increasing evidence suggests that an imbalance between the fibrinolytic function is of great importance in cardiovascular disease. This review will begin by providing a brief approach to fibrinolytic function and examine previous studies about fibrinolytic activity and atrial fibrillation. PMID:12818244

  10. [Atrial fibrillation and physical activity].

    PubMed

    Apor, Péter

    2013-03-31

    Atrial fibrillation is the most frequent arrhythmia. Its "lone" form (when underlying pathology is not discovered) can be detected in a small percentage of endurance sports participants, and in growing numbers among veterans, probably as a result of some cardiac or other irregularities. Enhanced vagal tone and sudden sympathetic impulse, repetitive oxidative stress, inflammatory processes, enlarged atria, electric instabilization can explain the higher occurrence. Treatment of atrial fibrillation enables the affected persons to participate in regular medium-intensity exercise, 3-5 hours a week, which offers a protective role against cardiovascular, metabolic and mental illnesses. PMID:23524234

  11. CT findings of atrial myxoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, F.; Kohno, A.; Saitoh, R.; Shigeta, A.

    1984-04-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of six atrial myxomas was analyzed. Five of the myxomas were located in the left atrium and one was in the right atrium. The margin of the myxoma was at least slightly lobulated in five cases and the content was inhomogeneous in all. Calcification was demonstrated in three cases. The site of attachment of the myxoma was demonstrated by CT to be the arial septum in all cases. The CT finding correlated well with the operative findings. It is concluded that it is possible with CT to diagnose atrial myxoma by the location and nature of the intracardiac mass and to differentiate it from thrombus.

  12. Atrial Fibrillation in Ten Cows

    PubMed Central

    Brightling, P.; Townsend, H. G. G.

    1983-01-01

    An irregular cardiac rhythm was identified in ten adult cows during auscultation of the heart and was subsequently characterized as atrial fibrillation by electrocardiography. The occurrence of the arrhythmia was associated with primary, organic disease of the heart in two animals which had valvular endocarditis. In seven of the other cows secondary or “functional” atrial fibrillation occurred in association with disorders of abdominal origin, six gastrointestinal disorders and one uterine torsion. Spontaneous conversion to normal sinus rhythm occurred in six cows after elimination of the primary disease. ImagesFigure 1b.Figure 3a.Figure 3b. PMID:17422324

  13. Laser Atrial Septostomy: An Engineering Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Shachar, Giora; Cohen, Mark H.; Riemenschneider, Thomas A.; Beder, Stanley D.

    1987-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a reproducible method for atrial septostomy in live animals, which would be independent of both atrial septal thickness and left atrial size. Seven mongrel dogs monitored electrocardiographically were anesthetized and instrumented with systemic and pulmonary arterial lines. A modified Mullin's transseptal sheath was advanced under fluoroscopic control to interrogate the left atrium and atrial septum. A 400 micron regular quartz or a laser heated metallic tip fiber was passed through the sheath up to the atrial septum. Lasing of the atrial septum was done with an Argon laser at power output of 5 watts. In three dogs, an atrial septosomy catheter was passed to the left atrium through the laser atrial septostomy and balloon atrial septostomy was performed. The laser atrial septostomy measured 3 x 5 mm in diameter. This interatrial communication could be enlarged with a balloon septostomy to over one cm in diameter. Hemodynamic and electrocardiographic monitoring were stable during the procedure. Engineering problems included: 1) radioluscency of the laser fibers thus preventing fluoroscopic localization of the fiber course; and 2) the inability to increase lateral vaporization of the atrial septum. It is concluded that further changes in the lasing fibers need to be made before the method can be considered for clinical use.

  14. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is not related to cardiac natriuretic peptide in nulliparous and lactating women

    PubMed Central

    Saadi, Hussein F; Nicholls, M Gary; Frampton, Christopher M; Benedict, Sheela; Yasin, Javed

    2009-01-01

    Background Vitamin D deficiency is associated with heightened risk of cardiovascular disease. Potential mechanisms include involvement of vitamin D in regulation of renin-angiotensin system and manufacture and secretion of cardiac natriuretic peptides. Our aim was to document relationships between 25 hydroxyvitamin [25(OH)D] and N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and plasma renin activity (PRA) levels and to document the effect of vitamin D administration on NT-proBNP and PRA levels in vitamin D deficient subjects. Methods Serum 25(OH)D, parathyroid hormone (PTH), plasma or serum NT-proBNP and PRA levels were measured at baseline in nulliparous and lactating women and after 2 months of oral vitamin D2 (2,000 IU/day or 60,000 IU/month) supplementation to lactating women. Results Baseline levels of 25(OH)D were low (<50 nmol/L) in most women whereas PRA and NT-proBNP levels were within the normal range. There were no significant correlations between baseline 25(OH)D or PTH with NT-proBNP and PRA. Vitamin D administration over a 2-month period in lactating women was associated with a decline in NT-proBNP (by 9.1 ± 2.0 pmol/L; p < 0.001) and PRA (by 0.32 ± 0.17 nmol/L/hr; p = 0.064). However, there were no significant correlations between the changes from baseline in 25(OH)D and either NT-proBNP (r = -0.04, p = 0.8) or PRA (r = -0.04, p = 0.8). Conclusion We found no significant correlations between 25(OH)D or PTH with NT-proBNP and PRA in vitamin D deficient women. Further information is required to clarify the effects of vitamin D administration on cardiac structure and function. PMID:19178708

  15. Diurnal gene expression of lipolytic natriuretic peptide receptors in white adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Julie; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Jørgensen, Henrik L; Christoffersen, Christina; Goetze, Jens P

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of the circadian rhythm can lead to obesity and cardiovascular disease. In white adipose tissue, activation of the natriuretic peptide receptors (NPRs) stimulates lipolysis. We have previously shown that natriuretic peptides are expressed in a circadian manner in the heart, but the temporal expression profile of their cognate receptors has not been examined in white adipose tissue. We therefore collected peri-renal white adipose tissue and serum from WT mice. Tissue mRNA contents of NPRs – NPR-A and NPR-C, the clock genes Per1 and Bmal1, and transcripts involved in lipid metabolism were quantified at 4-h intervals: in the diurnal study, mice were exposed to a period of 12 h light followed by 12 h darkness (n=52). In the circadian study, mice were kept in darkness for 24 h (n=47). Concomitant serum concentrations of free fatty acids, glycerol, triglycerides (TGs), and insulin were measured. Per1 and Bmal1 mRNA contents showed reciprocal circadian profiles (P<0.0001). NPR-A mRNA contents followed a temporal pattern (P=0.01), peaking in the dark (active) period. In contrast, NPR-C mRNA was expressed in an antiphase manner with nadir in the active period (P=0.007). TG concentrations in serum peaked in the active dark period (P=0.003). In conclusion, NPR-A and NPR-C gene expression is associated with the expression of clock genes in white adipose tissue. The reciprocal expression may thus contribute to regulate lipolysis and energy homeostasis in a diurnal manner. PMID:26286623

  16. Unexpected low prevalence of atrial fibrillation in cryptogenic ischemic stroke: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Dion, Fanny; Saudeau, Denis; Bonnaud, Isabelle; Friocourt, Patrick; Bonneau, Armel; Poret, Philippe; Giraudeau, Bruno; Régina, Sandra; Fauchier, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Ischemic stroke is a frequent pathology with high rate of recurrence and significant morbidity and mortality. There are several causes of stroke, affecting prognosis, outcomes, and management, but in many cases, the etiology remains undetermined. We hypothesized that atrial fibrillation was involved in this pathology but underdiagnosed by standard methods. The aim of the study was to determine the incidence of atrial fibrillation in cryptogenic ischemic stroke by using continuous monitoring of the heart rate over several months. The secondary objective was to test the value of atrial vulnerability assessment in predicting spontaneous atrial fibrillation. Methods and results We prospectively enrolled 24 patients under 75 years of age, 15 men and 9 women of mean age 49 years, who within the last 4 months had experienced cryptogenic stroke diagnosed by clinical presentation and brain imaging and presumed to be of cardioembolic mechanism. All causes of stroke were excluded by normal 12-lead ECG, 24-h Holter monitoring, echocardiography, cervical Doppler, hematological, and inflammatory tests. All patients underwent electrophysiological study. Of the patients, 37.5% had latent atrial vulnerability, and 33.3% had inducible sustained arrhythmia. Patients were secondarily implanted with an implantable loop recorder to look for spontaneous atrial fibrillation over a mean follow-up interval of 14.5 months. No sustained arrhythmia was found. Only one patient had non-significant episodes of atrial fibrillation. Conclusion In this study, symptomatic atrial fibrillation or AF with fast ventricular rate has not been demonstrated by the implantable loop recorder in patients under 75 years with unexplained cerebral ischemia. The use of this device should not be generalized in the systematic evaluation of these patients. In addition, this study attests that the assessment of atrial vulnerability is poor at predicting spontaneous arrhythmia in such patients. PMID

  17. C-type natriuretic peptide inhibits leukocyte recruitment and platelet-leukocyte interactions via suppression of P-selectin expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotland, Ramona S.; Cohen, Marc; Foster, Paul; Lovell, Matthew; Mathur, Anthony; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Hobbs, Adrian J.

    2005-10-01

    The multifaceted process of immune cell recruitment to sites of tissue injury is key to the development of an inflammatory response and involved in the pathogenesis of numerous cardiovascular disorders. We recently identified C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) as an important endothelium-derived mediator that regulates vascular tone and protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. Herein, we investigated whether CNP inhibits leukocyte recruitment and platelet aggregation and thereby exerts a potential antiinflammatory influence on the blood vessel wall. We assessed the effects of CNP on leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in mouse mesenteric postcapillary venules in vivo in animals with high basal leukocyte activation (endothelial nitric oxide synthase knockout mice, eNOS-/-) or under acute inflammatory conditions (induced by interleukin-1 or histamine). CNP suppressed basal leukocyte rolling in eNOS-/- mice in a rapid, reversible, and concentration-dependent manner. These effects of CNP were mimicked by the selective natriuretic peptide receptor-C agonist cANF4-23. CNP also suppressed leukocyte rolling induced by IL-1 or histamine, inhibited platelet-leukocyte interactions, and prevented thrombin-induced platelet aggregation of human blood. Furthermore, analysis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, leukocytes, and platelets revealed that CNP selectively attenuates expression of P-selectin. Thus, CNP is a modulator of acute inflammation in the blood vessel wall characterized by leukocyte and platelet activation. These antiinflammatory effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, via suppression of P-selectin expression. These observations suggest that endothelial CNP might maintain an anti-atherogenic influence on the blood vessel wall and represent a target for therapeutic intervention in inflammatory cardiovascular disorders. endothelium | natriuretic peptide receptor type C | atherosclerosis | thrombosis

  18. Effect of cholinergic stimulation of the medial septal area on the secretory properties of atrial myocardial fibers.

    PubMed

    Rocha, M J; Moreira, J E; Kohler, F W; Gonçalves, R P; Franci, C R

    1990-01-01

    Adult male Wistar rats weighing 240-260 g were implanted with stainless steel guide cannulae into the medial septal area (MSA). Cholinergic stimulation of the MSA increased natriuresis (344.6 +/- 13.8 vs 22.2 +/- 2.1 microEq for the controls), the number of atrial specific granules (61.0 +/- 6.7 vs 43.8 +/- 3.5 granules/100 microns 2 sarcoplasma for the controls), and the number of electron-dense vesicles near the sarcolemma or appearing to undergo exocytotic extrusion (50.0 +/- 2.3 vs 21.4 +/- 5.7 vesicles/100 microns sarcolemma for the controls). It is not yet clear how cholinergic stimulation of the MSA changes the secretory characteristics of atrial myocardial fibers. However, the present study provides evidence that release of an atrial natriuretic factor may be controlled by the central nervous system (CNS). This may occur through the sympathetic and parasympathetic innervation of the heart or through the release of some substance produced by the CNS or produced at another site whose release is controlled by the CNS. PMID:2143683

  19. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Ramlawi, Basel; Abu Saleh, Walid K.

    2015-01-01

    The Cox-maze procedure for the restoration of normal sinus rhythm, initially developed by Dr. James Cox, underwent several iterations over the years. The main concept consists of creating a series of transmural lesions in the right and left atria that disrupt re-entrant circuits responsible for propagating the abnormal atrial fibrillation rhythm. The left atrial appendage is excluded as a component of the Maze procedure. For the first three iterations of the Cox- maze procedure, these lesions were performed using a surgical cut-and-sew approach that ensured transmurality. The Cox-Maze IV is the most currently accepted iteration. It achieves the same lesion set of the Cox- maze III but uses alternative energy sources to create the transmural lesions, potentially in a minimally invasive approach on the beating heart. High-frequency ultrasound, microwave, and laser energy have all been used with varying success in the past. Today, bipolar radiofrequency heat or cryotherapy cooling are the most accepted sources for creating linear lesions with consistent safety and transmurality. The robust and reliable nature of these energy delivery methods has yielded a success rate reaching 90% freedom from atrial fibrillation at 12 months. Such approaches offer a significant long-term advantage over catheter-based ablation, especially in patients having longstanding, persistent atrial fibrillation with characteristics such as dilated left atrial dimensions, poor ejection fraction, and failed catheter ablation. Based on these improved results, there currently is significant interest in developing a hybrid ablation strategy that incorporates the superior transmural robust lesions of surgical ablation, the reliable stroke prevention potential of epicardial left atrial appendage exclusion, and sophisticated mapping and confirmatory catheter-based ablation technology. Such a minimally invasive hybrid strategy for ablation may lead to the development of multidisciplinary “Afib teams

  20. Management of atrial fibrillation in bradyarrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Boriani, Giuseppe; Padeletti, Luigi

    2015-06-01

    Sinus node disease (SND), a common indication to implant a pacemaker, is frequently associated with atrial fibrillation (AF), either at implantation (paroxysmal AF) or during follow-up, which often evolves to persistent or permanent AF. Pacemakers with an atrial lead allow continuous monitoring of the atrial rhythm and enable detection of the burden of AF. Asymptomatic atrial tachyarrhythmias, being associated with increased risk of stroke, have important prognostic implications, and their detection could guide decision-making about antithrombotic prophylaxis. Pacing mode and pacing algorithms can influence the occurrence of AF and atrial tachyarrhythmias. In DDD/DDDR pacing mode, reduction of unnecessary right ventricular pacing positively affects the occurrence and evolution of AF, but patients with a history of atrial tachyarrhythmias maintain an increased risk of arrhythmic events. In the MINERVA study, the use of algorithms that act in the atrium for preventive pacing and atrial antitachycardia pacing while minimizing right ventricular pacing was beneficial in patients with SND and previous atrial tachyarrhythmias, and was associated with a significant reduction in evolution to permanent AF. New information available on therapies delivered at the atrial level by implanted devices suggests clinical advantages that could improve current guidelines for the management of AF and atrial tachyarrhythmias. PMID:25781413

  1. Atrial Fibrillation Treatment | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Atrial Fibrillation Atrial Fibrillation: Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents Treatment for atrial fibrillation depends on how often you have symptoms, how ...

  2. Chemical-induced atrial thrombosis in NTP rodent studies.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Kissling, Grace E; Johnson, Jo Anne; Clayton, Natasha P; Flagler, Norris D; Nyska, Abraham

    2005-01-01

    Cardiac thrombosis, one of the causes of sudden death throughout the world, plays a principal role in several cardiovascular diseases, such as myocardial infarction and stroke in humans. Data from studies of induction of chemical thrombosis in rodents help to identify substances in our environment that may contribute to cardiac thrombosis. Results for more than 500 chemicals tested in rodents in 2-year bioassays have been published as Technical Reports of the National Toxicology Program (NTP) http://ntp-server.niehs.nih.gov/index. We evaluated atrial thrombosis induced by these chemical exposures and compared it to similarly induced lesions reported in the literature. Spontaneous rates of cardiac thrombosis were determined for control Fischer 344 rats and B6C3F1 mice: 0% in rats and mice in 90-day studies and, in 2-year studies, 0.7% in both genders of mice, 4% in male rats, and 1% in female rats. Incidences of atrial thrombosis were increased in high-dosed groups involving 13 compounds (incidence rate: 20-100%): 2-butoxyethanol, C.I. Direct Blue 15, bis(2-chloroethoxy)methane, diazoaminobenzene, diethanolamine, 3,3'-dimethoxybenzidine dihydrochloride, hexachloroethane, isobutene, methyleugenol, oxazepam, C.I. Pigment Red 23, C.I. Acid Red 114, and 4,4'-thiobis(6-t-butyl-m-cresol). The main localization of spontaneously occurring and chemically induced thromboses occurred in the left atrium. The literature survey suggested that chemical-induced atrial thrombosis might be closely related to myocardial injury, endothelial injury, circulatory stasis, hypercoagulability, and impaired atrial mechanical activity, such as atrial fibrillation, which could cause stasis of blood within the left atrial appendage, contributing to left atrial thrombosis. Supplementary data referenced in this paper are not printed in this issue of Toxicologic Pathology. They are available as downloadable files at http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0192-6233. To

  3. Endothelial C-type natriuretic peptide maintains vascular homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Moyes, Amie J.; Khambata, Rayomand S.; Villar, Inmaculada; Bubb, Kristen J.; Baliga, Reshma S.; Lumsden, Natalie G.; Xiao, Fang; Gane, Paul J.; Rebstock, Anne-Sophie; Worthington, Roberta J.; Simone, Michela I.; Mota, Filipa; Rivilla, Fernando; Vallejo, Susana; Peiró, Concepción; Sánchez Ferrer, Carlos F.; Djordjevic, Snezana; Caulfield, Mark J.; MacAllister, Raymond J.; Selwood, David L.; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Hobbs, Adrian J.

    2014-01-01

    The endothelium plays a fundamental role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by releasing factors that regulate local blood flow, systemic blood pressure, and the reactivity of leukocytes and platelets. Accordingly, endothelial dysfunction underpins many cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Herein, we evaluated mice with endothelial-specific deletion of Nppc, which encodes C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), and determined that this mediator is essential for multiple aspects of vascular regulation. Specifically, disruption of CNP leads to endothelial dysfunction, hypertension, atherogenesis, and aneurysm. Moreover, we identified natriuretic peptide receptor–C (NPR-C) as the cognate receptor that primarily underlies CNP-dependent vasoprotective functions and developed small-molecule NPR-C agonists to target this pathway. Administration of NPR-C agonists promotes a vasorelaxation of isolated resistance arteries and a reduction in blood pressure in wild-type animals that is diminished in mice lacking NPR-C. This work provides a mechanistic explanation for genome-wide association studies that have linked the NPR-C (Npr3) locus with hypertension by demonstrating the importance of CNP/NPR-C signaling in preserving vascular homoeostasis. Furthermore, these results suggest that the CNP/NPR-C pathway has potential as a disease-modifying therapeutic target for cardiovascular disorders. PMID:25105365

  4. Natriuretic peptide control of energy balance and glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Coué, Marine; Moro, Cedric

    2016-05-01

    Cardiac natriuretic peptides (NP) have recently emerged as metabolic hormones. Physiological stimulation of cardiac NP release as during exercise may contribute to increase fatty acid mobilization from adipose tissue and their oxidation by skeletal muscles. Clinical studies have shown that although very high plasma NP level characterizes cardiac dysfunction and heart failure, a consistently reduced plasma NP level is observed in metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. A low circulating NP level also predicts the risk of new onset type 2 diabetes. It is unclear at this stage if the "natriuretic handicap" observed in obesity is causally associated with the incidence of type 2 diabetes. Recent work indicates that NP can activate a thermogenic program in brown and white fat, increase energy expenditure and inhibit food intake. Mouse studies also argue for a key role of NP in the regulation of energy balance and glucose homeostasis. This review will focus on recent human and mouse studies to highlight the metabolic roles of NP and their potential relevance in the context of obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:26037452

  5. Effect of the atrial blanking time on the detection of atrial fibrillation in dual chamber pacing.

    PubMed

    Nowak, B; Kracker, S; Rippin, G; Horstick, G; Vincent, A; Geil, S; Himmrich, E; Meyer, J

    2001-04-01

    Patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) and dual chamber pacemakers frequently have short postventricular atrial blanking times and sensitive atrial sensing thresholds used to provide reliable detection and mode switching during AF. However, short atrial blanking times increase the risk of atrial sensing of ventricular far-field signals. We evaluated if the length of the atrial blanking time influences the detection of AF. The study included ten patients with a VDDR (n = 7) or DDDR system (n = 3), who presented with AF at 18 follow-up visits. Bipolar atrial sensing was programmed to the most sensitive value. Atrial blanking times were programmed from 100 to 200 ms in 25-ms steps in each patient. Using marker annotation, the following parameters were measured at ten consecutive ventricular beats: VAF = the interval between ventricular stimulus and first sensing of AF; AFS = the number of atrial-sensed events between two ventricular events; and XAF = the interpolated number of atrial-sensed events during atrial blanking time. The intervals between ventricular events and between atrial-sensed event markers showed no significant differences for the five blanking times tested. There was no significant influence of the atrial blanking time onto the measured parameters (least square means +/- standard error) with VAF between 281 +/- 12 and 300 +/- 12 ms (P = NS), AFs between 3.4 +/- 0.2 and 3.6 +/- 0.2 beats (P = NS) and XAF between 1.84 +/- 0.12 and 2.03 +/- 0.12 beats (P = NS). At ventricular rates < 100/min, the atrial sensing of AF in dual chamber pacemakers demonstrated no evidence for deterioration by an increase of the atrial blanking time from 100 to 200 ms. Thus, the risk of ventricular far-field sensing may be reduced without compromising atrial sensing. PMID:11341088

  6. [Prophylaxis of thromboembolism in atrial fibrillation: new oral anticoagulants and left atrial appendage closure].

    PubMed

    Zeus, Tobias; Kelm, Malte; Bode, Christoph

    2015-08-01

    Thrombo-embolic prophylaxis is a key element within the therapy of atrial fibrillation/atrial flutter. Besides new oral anticoagulants the concept of left atrial appendage occlusion has approved to be a good alternative option, especially in patients with increased risk of bleeding. PMID:26261929

  7. Plasma brain natriuretic peptide concentrations in patients with valvular heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Ralph A; Lee, Mildred; Gabriel, Ruvin; Van Pelt, Niels; Newby, David E; Kerr, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Objective Plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) concentrations predict prognosis in patients with valvular heart disease (VHD), but it is unclear whether this directly relates to disease severity. We assessed the relationship between BNP and echocardiographic measures of disease severity in patients with VHD. Methods Plasma BNP concentrations were measured in patients with normal left ventricular (LV) systolic function and isolated VHD (mitral regurgitation (MR), n=33; aortic regurgitation (AR), n=39; aortic stenosis (AS), n=34; mitral stenosis (MS), n=30), and age-matched and sex-matched controls (n=39) immediately prior to exercise stress echocardiography. Results Compared with controls, patients with VHD had elevated plasma BNP concentrations (MR median 35 (IQR 23–52), AR 34 (22–45), AS 31 (22–60), MS 58 (34–90); controls 24 (16–33) pg/mL; p<0.01 for all). LV end diastolic volume index varied by valve lesion; (MR (mean 77±14), AR (91±28), AS (50±17), MS (43±11), controls (52±13) mL/m2; p<0.0001). There were no associations between LV volume and BNP. Left atrial (LA) area index varied (MR (18±4 cm2/m2), AR (12±2), AS (11±3), MS (19±6), controls (11±2); p<0.0001), but correlated with plasma BNP concentrations: MR (r=0.42, p=0.02), MS (r=0.86, p<0.0001), AR (r=0.53, p=0.001), AS (r=0.52, p=0.002). Higher plasma BNP concentrations were associated with increased pulmonary artery pressure and reduced exercise capacity. Despite adverse cardiac remodelling, 81 (60%) patients had a BNP concentration within the normal range. Conclusions Despite LV remodelling, plasma BNP concentrations are often normal in patients with VHD. Conversely, mild elevations of BNP occur with LA dilatation in the presence of normal LV. Plasma BNP concentrations should be interpreted with caution when assessing patients with VHD. PMID:27175283

  8. Evaluation of cardiac functions of cirrhotic children using serum brain natriuretic peptide and tissue Doppler imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fattouh, Aya M; El-Shabrawi, Mortada H; Mahmoud, Enas H; Ahmed, Wafaa O

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy (CCM) is described as the presence of cardiac dysfunction in cirrhotic patients. In children with chronic liver disease, CCM has been very rarely investigated. The Aim of the Study: Is to evaluate the cardiac function of cirrhotic children to identify those with CCM. Patients and Methods: Fifty-two cirrhotic patients and 53 age and sex matched controls were assessed using serum brain-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), conventional echocardiography, and tissue Doppler imaging. Results: Patients’ mean ages were 7.66 ± 4.16 years (vs. 6.88 ± 3.04 years for the controls). The study included 27 males and 25 females (28 and 25 respectively for the controls). Patients had larger left atrium and right ventricle (RV) (P value 0.05) and increased LV posterior wall thickness than controls (P value 0.04). They had higher late atrial diastolic filling velocity (A) of tricuspid valve (TV) inflow (0.59 ± 0.17 vs. 0.5 ± 0.1 m/s, P < 0.001) and lower ratios between the early diastolic filling velocity (E) and A wave velocity (E/A) of both mitral valve and TV inflow (1.7 ± 0.35 vs. 1.87 ± 0.34 and 1.3 ± 0.3 vs. 1.5 ± 0.3, P < 0.005 and 0.0008, respectively). Patients had significantly longer isovolumic relaxation time of LV (45.5 ± 11.1 vs. 40.5 ± 7.7 ms P 0.008), higher late diastolic peak myocardial velocity (A’) (11.8 ± 3.6 vs. 9.5 ± 2.7 ms, P 0.0003) and systolic velocity (S’) of the RV (14.5 ± 2.7 vs. 13.2 ± 2.9, P 0.01) and significantly higher myocardial performance index of both LV and RV (P 0.001 and 0.01). BNP levels were significantly higher in cases than controls (5.25 ng/l vs. 3.75 ng/l, P < 0.04) and was correlated with the E wave velocity of the TV (r 0.004) and the E/E’ ratio of the RV (r 0.001). None of the clinical or laboratory data were correlated with the BNP level. Conclusion Cirrhotic children have cardiac dysfunction mainly in the form of diastolic dysfunction. There is a need that CCM be more accurately

  9. Lebetin 2, a Snake Venom-Derived Natriuretic Peptide, Attenuates Acute Myocardial Ischemic Injury through the Modulation of Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore at the Time of Reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Tourki, Bochra; Matéo, Philippe; Morand, Jessica; Elayeb, Mohamed; Godin-Ribuot, Diane; Marrakchi, Naziha; Belaidi, Elise; Messadi, Erij

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac ischemia is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. It is now well established that natriuretic peptides can attenuate the development of irreversible ischemic injury during myocardial infarction. Lebetin 2 (L2) is a new discovered peptide isolated from Macrovipera lebetina venom with structural similarity to B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP). Our objectives were to define the acute cardioprotective actions of L2 in isolated Langendorff-perfused rat hearts after regional or global ischemia-reperfusion (IR). We studied infarct size, left ventricular contractile recovery, survival protein kinases and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening in injured myocardium. L2 dosage was determined by preliminary experiments at its ability to induce cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) release without changing hemodynamic effects in normoxic hearts. L2 was found to be as effective as BNP in reducing infarct size after the induction of either regional or global IR. Both peptides equally improved contractile recovery after regional IR, but only L2 increased coronary flow and reduced severe contractile dysfunction after global ischemia. Cardioprotection afforded by L2 was abolished after isatin or 5-hydroxydecanote pretreatment suggesting the involvement of natriuretic peptide receptors and mitochondrial KATP (mitoKATP) channels in the L2-induced effects. L2 also increased survival protein expression in the reperfused myocardium as evidenced by phosphorylation of signaling pathways PKCε/ERK/GSK3β and PI3K/Akt/eNOS. IR induced mitochondrial pore opening, but this effect was markedly prevented by L2 treatment. These data show that L2 has strong cardioprotective effect in acute ischemia through stimulation of natriuretic peptide receptors. These beneficial effects are mediated, at least in part, by mitoKATP channel opening and downstream activated survival kinases, thus delaying mPTP opening and improving IR-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID

  10. Almanac 2015: atrial fibrillation research in Heart.

    PubMed

    Jawad-Ul-Qamar, Muhammad; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2016-04-01

    Atrial fibrillation continues to attract interest in the cardiovascular community and in Heart Over 60 original research and review papers published in Heart in 2014-2015 cover various aspects of atrial fibrillation, from associated conditions and precipitating factors to new approaches to management. Here, we provide an overview of articles on atrial fibrillation published in Heart in 2014-2015, highlighting new developments, emerging concepts and novel approaches to treatment. PMID:26791994

  11. Almanac 2015: atrial fibrillation research in Heart

    PubMed Central

    Jawad-Ul-Qamar, Muhammad; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation continues to attract interest in the cardiovascular community and in Heart. Over 60 original research and review papers published in Heart in 2014–2015 cover various aspects of atrial fibrillation, from associated conditions and precipitating factors to new approaches to management. Here, we provide an overview of articles on atrial fibrillation published in Heart in 2014–2015, highlighting new developments, emerging concepts and novel approaches to treatment. PMID:26791994

  12. Aspirin Often Wrongly Prescribed for Atrial Fibrillation

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159459.html Aspirin Often Wrongly Prescribed for Atrial Fibrillation Blood thinners -- not aspirin -- dramatically cut the risk of stroke, researchers say ...

  13. Azathioprine-induced atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Pinar; Grbovic, Enis; Inci, Sinan; Bayraktar, Fatih; Cagli, Kumral

    2015-01-01

    Summary Azathioprine, a purine analogue that competitively inhibits the biosynthesis of purine nucleotides, is used in a wide range of conditions. Although its side-effects are well known, cardiac side effects like paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) are based on only a few case reports. We describe here the case of a 55-year-old woman with primary biliary cirrhosis who presented a first-detected, symptomatic AF 2 h after azathioprine therapy which resolved after discontinuation of the drug with no predisposing factors for supraventricular arrhythmias (systemic hypertension, diabetes or coronary artery disease). The temporal coincidence of atrial fibrillation and azathioprine intake and disappearance of the AF episode after discontinuation of therapy allows us to suggest an intrinsic pro-arrhythmic effect of azathioprine. Therefore, physicians should be aware of this problem when this drug is administered. PMID:26668782

  14. Atrial fibrillation: inflammation in disguise?

    PubMed

    Lappegård, K T; Hovland, A; Pop, G A M; Mollnes, T E

    2013-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation is highly prevalent, and affected patients are at an increased risk of a number of complications, including heart failure and thrombo-embolism. Over the past years, there has been increasing interest in the role of inflammatory processes in atrial fibrillation, from the first occurrence of the arrhythmia to dreaded complications such as strokes or peripheral emboli. As the standard drug combination which aims at rate control and anticoagulation only offers partial protection against complications, newer agents are needed to optimize treatment. In this paper, we review recent knowledge regarding the impact of inflammation on the occurrence, recurrence, perpetuation and complications of the arrhythmia, as well as the role of anti-inflammatory therapies in the treatment for the disease. PMID:23672430

  15. Role of FQQI motif in the internalization, trafficking, and signaling of guanylyl-cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A in cultured murine mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Mani, Indra; Garg, Renu; Pandey, Kailash N

    2016-01-01

    Binding of the cardiac hormone atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) to transmembrane guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA), produces the intracellular second messenger cGMP in target cells. To delineate the critical role of an endocytic signal in intracellular sorting of the receptor, we have identified a FQQI (Phe(790), Gln(791), Gln(792), and Ile(793)) motif in the carboxyl-terminal region of NPRA. Mouse mesangial cells (MMCs) were transiently transfected with the enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP)-tagged wild-type (WT) and mutant constructs of eGFP-NPRA. The mutation FQQI/AAAA, in the eGFP-NPRA cDNA sequence, markedly attenuated the internalization of mutant receptors by almost 49% compared with the WT receptor. Interestingly, we show that the μ1B subunit of adaptor protein-1 binds directly to a phenylalanine-based FQQI motif in the cytoplasmic tail of the receptor. However, subcellular trafficking indicated that immunofluorescence colocalization of the mutated receptor with early endosome antigen-1 (EEA-1), lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1), and Rab 11 marker was decreased by 57% in early endosomes, 48% in lysosomes, and 42% in recycling endosomes, respectively, compared with the WT receptor in MMCs. The receptor containing the mutated motif (FQQI/AAAA) also produced a significantly decreased level of intracellular cGMP during subcellular trafficking than the WT receptor. The coimmunoprecipitation assay confirmed a decreased level of colocalization of the mutant receptor with subcellular compartments during endocytic processes. The results suggest that the FQQI motif is essential for the internalization and subcellular trafficking of NPRA during the hormone signaling process in intact MMCs. PMID:26377794

  16. Mathematical Approaches to Understanding and Imaging Atrial Fibrillation: Significance for Mechanisms and Management

    PubMed Central

    Trayanova, Natalia A

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia in humans. The mechanisms that govern AF initiation and persistence are highly complex, of dynamic nature, and involve interactions across multiple temporal and spatial scales in the atria. This articles aims to review the mathematical modeling and computer simulation approaches to understanding AF mechanisms and aiding in its management. Various atrial modeling approaches are presented, with descriptions of the methodological basis and advancements in both lower-dimensional and realistic geometry models. A review of the most significant mechanistic insights made by atrial simulations is provided. The article showcases the contributions that atrial modeling and simulation have made not only to our understanding of the pathophysiology of atrial arrhythmias, but also to the development of AF management approaches. A summary of the future developments envisioned for the field of atrial simulation and modeling is also presented. The review contends that computational models of the atria assembled with data from clinical imaging modalities that incorporate electrophysiological and structural remodeling could become a first line of screening for new AF therapies and approaches, new diagnostic developments, and new methods for arrhythmia prevention. PMID:24763468

  17. Prevalence and spectrum of Nkx2.5 mutations associated with idiopathic atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wen-Hui; Chang, Cheng; Xu, Ying-Jia; Li, Ruo-Gu; Qu, Xin-Kai; Fang, Wei-Yi; Liu, Xu; Yang, Yi-Qing

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and spectrum of Nkx2.5 mutations associated with idiopathic atrial fibrillation (AF). METHODS: A cohort of 136 unrelated patients with idiopathic atrial fibrillation and 200 unrelated, ethnically matched healthy controls were enrolled. The coding exons and splice junctions of the Nkx2.5 gene were sequenced in 136 atrial fibrillation patients, and the available relatives of mutation carriers and 200 controls were subsequently genotyped for the identified mutations. The functional characteristics of the mutated Nkx2.5 gene were analyzed using a dual-luciferase reporter assay system. RESULTS: Two novel heterozygous Nkx2.5 mutations (p.N19D and p.F186S) were identified in 2 of the 136 unrelated atrial fibrillation cases, with a mutational prevalence of approximately 1.47%. These missense mutations co-segregated with atrial fibrillation in the families and were absent in the 400 control chromosomes. Notably, 2 mutation carriers also had congenital atrial septal defects and atrioventricular block. Multiple alignments of the Nkx2.5 protein sequences across various species revealed that the altered amino acids were completely conserved evolutionarily. Functional analysis demonstrated that the mutant Nkx2.5 proteins were associated with significantly reduced transcriptional activity compared to their wild-type counterpart. CONCLUSION: These findings associate the Nkx2.5 loss-of-function mutation with atrial fibrillation and atrioventricular block and provide novel insights into the molecular mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation. These results also have potential implications for early prophylaxis and allele-specific therapy of this common arrhythmia. PMID:23778487

  18. Correlation between B type natriuretic peptide and metabolic risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wen-Hua; Chen, Li-Ying; Dai, Hong-Lei; Chen, Jian-Hua; Chen, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction It has been shown that B type natriuretic peptide (BNP) level can indicate cardiovascular disease. However, the association between BNP and metabolic risk factors is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between N-terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and metabolic risk factors. Material and methods A total of 11,508 subjects were selected from those who underwent health examinations in our hospital. NT-proBNP, waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose and lipid profile were measured. The level of NT-proBNP was measured and classified into four stratifications (BNP ≥ 20 pg/ml, ≥ 40 pg/ml, ≥ 60 pg/ml, and ≥ 80 pg/ml) to analyze the relationship between BNP and metabolic risk factors. Results B type natriuretic peptide increased gradually with increasing age (p < 0.001). The BNP levels were significantly higher in women than in men (p < 0.001). Multivariate regression analysis showed a positive association between NT-proBNP levels and systolic blood pressure (p < 0.001), fasting plasma glucose (p < 0.05), and total cholesterol (p < 0.001 in women). The NT-proBNP levels were inversely associated with diastolic blood pressure, waist circumference, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein, and LDL cholesterol. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated a close relationship between NT-proBNP and systolic blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, and total cholesterol. In the BNP ≥ 60 pg/ml group, odds ratio (OR) values were 1.80, 1.56 and 1.54 (female) and 3.74, 1.59 and 1.51 (male), respectively. In the BNP ≥ 80 pg/ml group, OR values were 2.45, 1.65 and 1.84 (female) and 4.61, 1.66 and 1.75 (male), respectively. Conclusions NT-proBNP was independently associated with the main metabolic risk factors (systolic blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, and total cholesterol). These findings suggest that the combined determination of NT-proBNP and the main metabolic risk factors could be

  19. Role of atrial receptors in the control of sodium excretion. [pressure breathing and antinatiuretic effects in dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meehan, J. R.; Henry, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Responses of an innervated and a contralateral chronically denervated kidney to mild positive pressure breathing are compared for saline volume expansions in chloralose anesthetized dogs. It is shown that mild pressure breathing significantly reduces sodium excretion, urine flow, free water clearance, and PAH clearance. After 20 minutes of positive pressure breathing, both kidney responses are identical suggesting the release of natriuretic hormone which reduces renal function in addition to the demonstrated change in renal nerve activity. Increase of the left atrial pressure through balloon obstruction of the mitral orifice increases urine flow, sodium excretion and PAH clearance; inflation of the balloon and positive pressure breathing again depresses renal function. Preliminary evidence indicates that receptors in the right atrium are more severely affected by pressure breathing than those in the left atrium.

  20. A practical approach to the management of patients with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Christopher J; Gersh, Bernard J

    2010-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most commonly encountered clinical arrhythmia and continues to grow in incidence. Current management involves highly individualised therapies based on underlying concomitant disease processes and symptoms. Moreover, there are numerous therapeutic permutations involving anticoagulation, rate-limitation and antiarrhythmic strategies. This review serves to update the clinician with a practical approach to each patient population and on current advances in management.

  1. Role of Platelets in Thromboembolism in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Gosk-Bierska, Izabela; Wasilewska, Marta; Wysokiński, Waldemar

    2016-01-01

    Thromboembolic complications of atrial fibrillation (AF) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality but the mechanism of its process remain poorly understood. There are many as yet unanswered questions surrounding the increased thrombotic tendency in AF. One of the crucial questions is what determines the fact that a thrombus remains in the left atrium in situ in some patients, while in others it breaks off and leads to embolic complications. Recent studies indicated an important role of platelets in the left atrial's thrombus formation and suggest that the embolic potential of left atrial thromboses depends on the involvement of platelets in the process of fibrin stabilization rather than aggregation. New methods for investigating platelets function, such as the analysis of transcription activity of RNA coming from platelets contained in thrombi formed in AF, creates an opportunity for studying populations of platelets that are directly involved in homeostatic clot formation. In this paper we present current opinions on the participation of platelets in the pathogenesis of thromboembolism in patients with AF. PMID:26935511

  2. Atrial fibrillation management: evaluating rate vs rhythm control.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuan; Jolly, Umjeet; Sidhu, Kiran; Yee, Raymond; Leong-Sit, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an increasing global issue leading to increased hospitalizations, adverse health related events and mortality. This review focuses on the management of atrial fibrillation, in particular in the past decade, comparing two major strategies, rate or rhythm control. We evaluate the evidence for each strategy, pharmacological options and the increasing utilization of invasive techniques, in particular catheter ablation and use of implantable cardiac pacing devices. Pharmacological comparative trials evaluating both strategies have shown rate control being non-inferior to rhythm control for clinical outcomes of mortality and other cardiovascular events (including stroke). Catheter ablation techniques, involving radiofrequency ablation and recently cryoablation, have shown promising results in particular with paroxysmal AF. However, persistent AF provides ongoing challenges and will be a particular focus of continued research. PMID:26960034

  3. Wavelength index at three atrial sites in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Padeletti, L; Michelucci, A; Giovannini, T; Porciani, M C; Bamoshmoosh, M; Mezzani, A; Chelucci, A; Pieragnoli, P; Gensini, G F

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the wavelength index (WLI) at three atrial sites in a group of 23 patients with recurrent episodes of lone paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (LPAF) and a control group (n = 20). All patients underwent programmed atrial stimulation (paced cycle length = 600 ms) at high, medium, and low lateral right atrial wall. P wave duration, sinus cycle length, and corrected sinus node recovery time were not significantly different between the two study groups. WLI was calculated according to the following formulas: atrial effective refractory period (AERP)/duration of atrial extrastimulus electrogram (A2) or AERP/A2 + atrial latency; and atrial functional refractory period (AFRP)/A2. WLI was significantly shorter in LPAF than in the control group at each of the paced atrial sites independently of the formula used. Duration of premature atrial electrogram appeared to play the major role in determining the difference in WLI between patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and the control group. PMID:7659580

  4. Robotic-assisted left atrial ligation for stroke reduction in chronic atrial fibrillation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kiaii, Bob; McClure, R Scott; Skanes, Alan C; Ross, Ian G; Spouge, Alison R; Swinamer, Stuart; Rayman, Reiza; Bainbridge, Daniel T; Iglesias, Ivan; Novick, Richard J

    2006-01-01

    Patients with atrial fibrillation are at significant risk for sustaining a thromboembolic stroke. More than 90% of thromboemboli form in the left atrial appendage. Ligation of the left atrial appendage to reduce the risk of stroke is often performed in connection with other cardiac surgical procedures. As a stand-alone procedure, however, left atrial ligation has generally been deemed too invasive and has gained little support as an alternative therapeutic option. We report a case of port-access robotic-assisted left atrial ligation as a stand-alone procedure in a patient with chronic atrial fibrillation in whom anticoagulation was a contraindication. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of stand-alone robotic-assisted left atrial ligation in the literature. PMID:16387671

  5. A disulfide-bridged mutant of natriuretic peptide receptor-A displays constitutive activity. Role of receptor dimerization in signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Labrecque, J; Mc Nicoll, N; Marquis, M; De Léan, A

    1999-04-01

    Natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A), a particulate guanylyl cyclase receptor, is composed of an extracellular domain (ECD) with a ligand binding site, a transmembrane spanning, a kinase homology domain (KHD), and a guanylyl cyclase domain. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), the natural agonists, bind and activate the receptor leading to cyclic GMP production. This receptor has been reported to be spontaneously dimeric or oligomeric. In response to agonists, the KHD-mediated guanylate cyclase repression is removed, and it is assumed that ATP binds to the KHD. Since NPR-A displays a pair of juxtamembrane cysteines separated by 8 residues, we hypothesized that the removal of one of those cysteines would leave the other unpaired and reactive, thus susceptible to form an interchain disulfide bridge and to favor the dimeric interactions. Here we show that NPR-AC423S mutant, expressed mainly as a covalent dimer, increases the affinity of pBNP for this receptor by enhancing a high affinity binding component. Dimerization primarily depends on ECD since a secreted NPR-A C423S soluble ectodomain (ECDC423S) also documents a covalent dimer. ANP binding to the unmutated ECD yields up to 80-fold affinity loss as compared with the membrane receptor. However, the ECD C423S mutation restores a high binding affinity. Furthermore, C423S mutation leads to cellular constitutive activation (20-40-fold) of basal catalytic production of cyclic GMP by the full-length mutant. In vitro particulate guanylyl cyclase assays demonstrate that NPR-AC423S displays an increased sensitivity to ATP treatment alone and that the effect of ANP + ATP joint treatment is cumulative instead of synergistic. Finally, the cellular and particulate guanylyl cyclase assays indicate that the receptor is desensitized to agonist stimulation. We conclude the following: 1) dimers are functional units of NPR-A guanylyl cyclase activation; and 2) agonists are inducing dimeric contact

  6. Spinal Functions of B-Type Natriuretic Peptide, Gastrin-Releasing Peptide, and Their Cognate Receptors for Regulating Itch in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kiguchi, Norikazu; Sukhtankar, Devki D; Ding, Huiping; Tanaka, Ken-ichi; Kishioka, Shiroh; Peters, Christopher M; Ko, Mei-Chuan

    2016-03-01

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP)-natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPRA) and gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP)-GRP receptor (GRPR) systems contribute to spinal processing of itch. However, pharmacological and anatomic evidence of these two spinal ligand-receptor systems are still not clear. The aim of this study was to determine the spinal functions of BNP-NPRA and GRP-GRPR systems for regulating scratching activities in mice by using pharmacological and immunohistochemical approaches. Our results showed that intrathecal administration of BNP (0.3-3 nmol) dose dependently elicited scratching responses, which could be blocked by the NPRA antagonist (Arg6,β-cyclohexyl-Ala8,D-Tic16,Arg17,Cys18)-atrial natriuretic factor(6-18) amide (A71915). However, A71915 had no effect on intrathecal GRP-induced scratching. In contrast, pretreatment with a GRPR antagonist (D-Tpi6,Leu13ψ(CH2-NH)-Leu14)bombesin(6-14) (RC-3095) inhibited BNP-induced scratching. Immunostaining revealed that NPRA proteins colocalize with GRP, but not GRPR, in the superficial area of dorsal horn, whereas BNP proteins do not colocalize with either GRP or GRPR in the dorsal horn. Intradermal administration of ligands including endothelin-1, U-46619, bovine adrenal medulla 8-22, and Ser-Leu-Ile-Gly-Arg-Leu-NH2 (SLIGRL) increased scratching bouts at different levels of magnitude. Pretreatment with intrathecal A71915 did not affect scratching responses elicited by all four pruritogens, whereas pretreatment with RC-3095 only inhibited SLIGRL-induced scratching. Interestingly, immunostaining showed that RC-3095, but not A71915, inhibited SLIGRL-elicited c-Fos activation in the spinal dorsal horn, which was in line with behavioral outcomes. These findings demonstrate that: 1) BNP-NPRA system may function upstream of the GRP-GRPR system to regulate itch in the mouse spinal cord, and 2) both NPRA and GRPR antagonists may have antipruritic efficacy against centrally, but not peripherally, elicited itch. PMID:26669425

  7. Spinal Functions of B-Type Natriuretic Peptide, Gastrin-Releasing Peptide, and Their Cognate Receptors for Regulating Itch in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kiguchi, Norikazu; Sukhtankar, Devki D.; Ding, Huiping; Tanaka, Ken-ichi; Kishioka, Shiroh; Peters, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP)–natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPRA) and gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP)–GRP receptor (GRPR) systems contribute to spinal processing of itch. However, pharmacological and anatomic evidence of these two spinal ligand-receptor systems are still not clear. The aim of this study was to determine the spinal functions of BNP-NPRA and GRP-GRPR systems for regulating scratching activities in mice by using pharmacological and immunohistochemical approaches. Our results showed that intrathecal administration of BNP (0.3–3 nmol) dose dependently elicited scratching responses, which could be blocked by the NPRA antagonist (Arg6,β-cyclohexyl-Ala8,D-Tic16,Arg17,Cys18)-atrial natriuretic factor(6-18) amide (A71915). However, A71915 had no effect on intrathecal GRP-induced scratching. In contrast, pretreatment with a GRPR antagonist (D-Tpi6,Leu13ψ(CH2-NH)-Leu14)bombesin(6-14) (RC-3095) inhibited BNP-induced scratching. Immunostaining revealed that NPRA proteins colocalize with GRP, but not GRPR, in the superficial area of dorsal horn, whereas BNP proteins do not colocalize with either GRP or GRPR in the dorsal horn. Intradermal administration of ligands including endothelin-1, U-46619, bovine adrenal medulla 8-22, and Ser-Leu-Ile-Gly-Arg-Leu-NH2 (SLIGRL) increased scratching bouts at different levels of magnitude. Pretreatment with intrathecal A71915 did not affect scratching responses elicited by all four pruritogens, whereas pretreatment with RC-3095 only inhibited SLIGRL-induced scratching. Interestingly, immunostaining showed that RC-3095, but not A71915, inhibited SLIGRL-elicited c-Fos activation in the spinal dorsal horn, which was in line with behavioral outcomes. These findings demonstrate that: 1) BNP-NPRA system may function upstream of the GRP-GRPR system to regulate itch in the mouse spinal cord, and 2) both NPRA and GRPR antagonists may have antipruritic efficacy against centrally, but not peripherally, elicited itch. PMID

  8. Agonistic induction of a covalent dimer in a mutant of natriuretic peptide receptor-A documents a juxtamembrane interaction that accompanies receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Labrecque, J; Deschênes, J; McNicoll, N; De Léan, A

    2001-03-16

    The natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) is composed of an extracellular domain with a ligand binding site, a transmembrane-spanning domain, a kinase homology domain, and a guanylyl cyclase domain. In response to agonists (atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide), the kinase homology domain-mediated guanylate cyclase repression is removed, which allows the production of cyclic GMP. Previous work from our laboratory strongly indicated that agonists are exerting their effects through the induction of a juxtamembrane dimeric contact. However, a direct demonstration of this mechanism remains to be provided. As a tool, we are now using the properties of a new mutation, D435C. It introduces a cysteine at a position in NPR-A corresponding to a supplementary cysteine found in NPR-C6, another receptor of this family (a disulfide-linked dimer). Although this D435C mutation only leads to trace levels of NPR-A disulfide-linked dimer at basal state, covalent dimerization can be induced by a treatment with rat ANP or with other agonists. The NPR-A(D435C) mutant has not been subjected to significant structural alterations, since it shares with the wild type receptor a similar dose-response pattern of cellular guanylyl cyclase activation. However, a persistent activation accompanies NPR-A(D435C) dimer formation after the removal of the inducer agonist. On the other hand, a construction where the intracellular domain of NPR-A(D435C) has been truncated (DeltaKC(D435C)) displays a spontaneous and complete covalent dimerization. In addition, the elimination of the intracellular domain in wild type DeltaKC and DeltaKC(D435C) is associated with an increase of agonist binding affinity, this effect being more pronounced with the weak agonist pBNP. Also, a D435C secreted extracellular domain remains unlinked even after incubation with rat ANP. In summary, these results demonstrate, in a dynamic fashion, the agonistic induction of a dimeric contact in the

  9. Defining nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: A quest for clarification.

    PubMed

    Martins, Raphaël P; Galand, Vincent; Colette, Edouard; Behar, Nathalie; Pavin, Dominique; Leclercq, Christophe; Daubert, Jean-Claude; Mabo, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    Non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are currently recommended for patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation since the publication of the 4 major pivotal trials evaluating the efficacy and safety of factor IIa and factor Xa inhibitors. The definition of nonvalvular atrial fibrillation is unclear, varying from one trial to another and even between North American and European guidelines, which is a source of uncertainties in clinical practice. However, many patients with atrial fibrillation present signs of valvular involvement, and clarification of this term is needed to not deny NOACs to patients based on the wrong perception that they may have valvular atrial fibrillation. The currently unique contraindications to NOACs are patients with mechanical heart valves and those with moderate-to-severe mitral stenosis, as stated by the recent 2015 position paper of the European Heart Rhythm Association. Patients with native heart valve involvement, regardless of their severity, are suitable for NOAC therapy. Patients with bioprosthetic heart valves and mitral valve repair may be suitable for NOACs except for the first 3 and the first 3-6 months postoperatively, respectively. Patients with transaortic valve implantation or percutaneous transluminal aortic valvuloplasty are also considered as being eligible for NOACs, although the bleeding risk has to be carefully considered in this population often requiring a combination with antiplatelet therapy. Future studies are warranted to increase the level of evidence of use of NOACs, particularly in patients with transaortic valve implantation and valvular surgery, and to determine whether they could be used in the future in the only 2 remaining contraindications. PMID:27502864

  10. Natriuretic peptides: diagnostic tools and predictors of heart failure outcome.

    PubMed

    Isakson, Susan R; Gardetto, Nancy J; Maisel, Alan S

    2006-11-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a progressive disease whose outcome largely depends on early, accurate and prompt diagnosis, accompanied by evidence-based treatment. The explosion of uptake of natriuretic peptides (NPs) in clinical practice belies an understanding of how peptides are used. The signal for NP release is the same signal that causes symptoms of CHF, such as increased wall stress. Thus, NPs can reliably add to the information a physician brings to the table as they attempt to diagnose the acutely dyspneic patient with CHF. Additionally, NPs have strong prognostic utility in the emergency room and the hospital. Monitoring of NPs during treatment for acute CHF may help manage the patient. In the future, it is possible that NPs will play a more prominent role in early detection of left ventricular dysfunction as well as guiding chronic CHF treatment. PMID:19804259

  11. Molecular evolution of shark C-type natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed

    Takano, M; Sasayama, Y; Takei, Y

    1994-06-01

    C-type natriuretic peptides (CNP) of varying length were isolated from the atrium or ventricle of a shark, Lamna ditropis and their amino acid sequences were determined. Although the sequence of Lamna CNP was highly homologous to those of other CNPs sequenced to date, the Lamna CNP-41, the longest CNP identified in this study, has one amino acid replacement from those of Triakis scyllia and Scyliorhinus canicula, and three amino acid replacements from that of Squalus acanthias. The degree of similarity of CNP molecules coincides well with their systematic positions in the cladogram of elasmobranchs; Lamna, Triakis and Scyliorhinus belong to the same order, but Lamna and Squalus belong to different orders. The facts that Lamna and Triakis are in different suborders but Triakis and Scyliorhinus are in the same suborder and have identical CNP-41, also support this evolutionary implication. PMID:7765421

  12. Neprilysin and Natriuretic Peptide Regulation in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Morant-Talamante, Nuria; Lupón, Josep

    2016-08-01

    Neprilysin is acknowledged as a key player in neurohormonal regulation, a cornerstone of modern drug therapy in chronic heart failure. In the cardiovascular system, neprilysin cleaves numerous vasoactive peptides, some with mainly vasodilating effects (natriuretic peptides, adrenomedullin, bradykinin) and other with mainly vasoconstrictor effects (angiotensin I and II, endothelin-1). For decades, neprilysin has been an important biotarget. Academia and industry have combined active efforts to search for neprilysin inhibitors (NEPIs) that might be useful in clinical practice. NEPI monotherapy was initially tested with little success due to efficacy issues. Next, combination of NEPI and ACE-inhibiting activity agents were abandoned due to safety concerns. Recently, the combination of NEPI and ARB, also known as ARNI, has shown better than expected results in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, and multitude of ongoing studies are set to prove its value across the heart failure spectrum. PMID:27260315

  13. Natriuretic effect of naloxone in fasted, water-loaded rats.

    PubMed

    Walker, L A; Murphy, J C

    1984-01-01

    The influence of naloxone (10 mg/kg i.p.) on water and electrolyte excretion was assessed in water-loaded rats subjected to fasting or fasting and refeeding. In fed animals, naloxone had no effect on water or electrolyte excretion compared to saline injected controls. However, during fasting, which has been shown to activate endogenous opioid systems, naloxone had a marked natriuretic effect (43 +/- 10 vs. 11 +/- 4 muEq/100 g X 2 h, p less than 0.05). Naloxone increased the sodium excretion to a level not significantly different from fed animals. Potassium and water excretion were not significantly changed compared to saline injected rats. The results suggest that fasting activates a naloxone-sensitive mechanism for sodium retention, perhaps by increasing the release of endogenous opioid peptides, and that refeeding inhibits this mechanism. PMID:6539478

  14. Identification of Putative Natriuretic Hormones Isolated from Human Urine

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Herbert J.

    2015-01-01

    This brief review describes some representative methodological approaches to the isolation of putative endogenous inhibitors of epithelial sodium transport – i.e., as ouabain-like factors (OLF) that inhibit the sodium transport enzyme Na-K-ATPase or inhibit the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). Gel chromatography and reverse-phase (RP)-high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of lyophilized and reconstituted 24 h-urine from salt-loaded healthy humans led to two active fractions, a hydrophilic OLF-1 and a lipophilic OLF-2, whose mass (Ms)-spectroscopic data indicate a Mr of 391 (1, 2). Further identification was attempted by Ms-, infrared (IR)-, ultraviolet (UV)-, and 1H-NMR-spectroscopy. OLF-1 and OLF-2 may be closely related if not identical to (di)ascorbic acid or its salts such as vanadium (V)-Vv-diascorbate with Mr 403 (3) and VIV-diascorbate. OLF-1 and Vv-diascorbate are about 10-fold stronger inhibitors of Na-K-ATPase than OLF-2 and VIV-diascorbate, respectively. In conscious rats, i.v. infusion of OLF-1 and OLF-2 resulted in a strong natriuresis. In a similar study, Cain et al. (4) isolated a sodium transport inhibitor from the urine of uremic patients by gel chromatography and RP-HPLC. In uremic rats, a natriuretic response to the injection of the active material was found. Xanthurenic acid 8-O-β-d-glucoside (Mr 368) and xanthurenic acid 8-O-sulfate (Mr 284) were identified as endogenous inhibitors of sodium transport acting, e.g., by ENaC blockade. No definite relation to blood pressure, body fluid volume, or sodium balance has been reported for any of these above factors, and further studies to identify the natriuretic and/or ouabain-like compound(s) or hormone(s) will be needed. PMID:26052310

  15. Identification of Putative Natriuretic Hormones Isolated from Human Urine.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Herbert J

    2015-01-01

    This brief review describes some representative methodological approaches to the isolation of putative endogenous inhibitors of epithelial sodium transport - i.e., as ouabain-like factors (OLF) that inhibit the sodium transport enzyme Na-K-ATPase or inhibit the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). Gel chromatography and reverse-phase (RP)-high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of lyophilized and reconstituted 24 h-urine from salt-loaded healthy humans led to two active fractions, a hydrophilic OLF-1 and a lipophilic OLF-2, whose mass (Ms)-spectroscopic data indicate a Mr of 391 (1, 2). Further identification was attempted by Ms-, infrared (IR)-, ultraviolet (UV)-, and (1)H-NMR-spectroscopy. OLF-1 and OLF-2 may be closely related if not identical to (di)ascorbic acid or its salts such as vanadium (V)-V(v)-diascorbate with Mr 403 (3) and V(IV)-diascorbate. OLF-1 and V(v)-diascorbate are about 10-fold stronger inhibitors of Na-K-ATPase than OLF-2 and V(IV)-diascorbate, respectively. In conscious rats, i.v. infusion of OLF-1 and OLF-2 resulted in a strong natriuresis. In a similar study, Cain et al. (4) isolated a sodium transport inhibitor from the urine of uremic patients by gel chromatography and RP-HPLC. In uremic rats, a natriuretic response to the injection of the active material was found. Xanthurenic acid 8-O-β-d-glucoside (Mr 368) and xanthurenic acid 8-O-sulfate (Mr 284) were identified as endogenous inhibitors of sodium transport acting, e.g., by ENaC blockade. No definite relation to blood pressure, body fluid volume, or sodium balance has been reported for any of these above factors, and further studies to identify the natriuretic and/or ouabain-like compound(s) or hormone(s) will be needed. PMID:26052310

  16. Clinical implications of defective B-type natriuretic peptide.

    PubMed

    Menon, Santosh G; Mills, Roger M; Schellenberger, Ute; Saqhir, Syed; Protter, Andrew A

    2009-12-01

    Our understanding of the natriuretic peptide system continues to evolve rapidly. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), originally thought to be a simple volume-regulating hormone that is produced in response to cardiac stretch, has been shown to also play important roles in modulating bronchodilation, endothelial function, and cardiac remodeling. Recent data demonstrate that elevated levels of BNP in patients with heart failure do not represent a simple ratcheting up of normal production in response to increased stimulus. Instead, we now know that chronic stimulation of BNP synthesis induces a reversion to fetal gene expression, resulting in production of high molecular weight forms of BNP that are functionally deficient. Standard point-of-care BNP assays are immunoassays that will detect any molecule containing the target epitopes. Consequently, these assays cannot distinguish between defective, high molecular weight forms of BNP and normal, physiologically active BNP. In 2 separate evaluations, mass spectroscopy detected little, if any, normal BNP in patients with heart failure, despite the appearance of high circulating levels of immunoreactive BNP (iBNP) using commercial assays. Therefore, these commercial assays should be considered to be only an indication of myocardial stress. They do not measure physiologic BNP activity. This accounts for the "BNP paradox," namely, that administration of exogenous recombinant human BNP (rhBNP, nesiritide) has substantial clinical and hemodynamic impact in the presence of high levels of circulating iBNP using commercial assays. In addition to its short-term hemodynamic impact, rhBNP may have other important effects in this setting, and further investigation is warranted. PMID:20014209

  17. Changes in Serum Natriuretic Peptide Levels after Percutaneous Closure of Small to Moderate Ventricular Septal Defects

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Yuksel; Akdemir, Ramazan; Gunduz, Huseyin; Murat, Sani; Bulut, Orhan; Kocayigit, İbrahim; Vatan, M. Bulent; Cakar, M. Akif; Yeter, Ekrem; Kilic, Harun; Agac, Mustafa Tarik; Acar, Zeydin

    2012-01-01

    Background. B-type natriuretic peptide has been shown to be a very sensitive and specific marker of heart failure. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of percutaneous closure of ventricular septal defects with Amplatzer septal occluders on brain natriuretic peptide levels. Methods. Between 2008 and 2011, 23 patients underwent successfully percutaneous ventricular septal defect closure in 4 cardiology centers. Brain natriuretic peptide levels were measured in nine patients (4 male, mean ages were 25.3 ± 14.3) who underwent percutaneous closure with Amplatzer occluders for membranous or muscular ventricular septal defects were enrolled in the study. Brain natriuretic peptide levels were measured one day before and one month after the closure. Patients were evaluated clinically and by echocardiography one month after the procedure. Results. Percutaneous closures of ventricular septal defects were successfully performed in all patients. There was not any significant adverse event in patients group during followup. Decrease in brain natriuretic peptide levels after closure were statistically significant (97.3 ± 78.6 versus 26.8 ± 15.6, P = 0.013). Conclusion. Brain Natriuretic Peptide levels are elevated in patients with ventricular septal defects as compared to controls. Percutaneous closure of Ventricular Septal Defect with Amplatzer occluders decreases the BNP levels. PMID:22629130

  18. [Typical atrial flutter : Diagnosis and therapy].

    PubMed

    Thomas, Dierk; Eckardt, Lars; Estner, Heidi L; Kuniss, Malte; Meyer, Christian; Neuberger, Hans-Ruprecht; Sommer, Philipp; Steven, Daniel; Voss, Frederik; Bonnemeier, Hendrik

    2016-03-01

    Typical, cavotricuspid-dependent atrial flutter is the most common atrial macroreentry tachycardia. The incidence of atrial flutter (typical and atypical forms) is age-dependent with 5/100,000 in patients less than 50 years and approximately 600/100,000 in subjects > 80 years of age. Concomitant heart failure or pulmonary disease further increases the risk of typical atrial flutter.Patients with atrial flutter may present with symptoms of palpitations, reduced exercise capacity, chest pain, or dyspnea. The risk of thromboembolism is probably similar to atrial fibrillation; therefore, the same antithrombotic prophylaxis is required in atrial flutter patients. Acutely symptomatic cases may be subjected to cardioversion or pharmacologic rate control to relieve symptoms. Catheter ablation of the cavotricuspid isthmus represents the primary choice in long-term therapy, associated with high procedural success (> 97 %) and low complication rates (0.5 %).This article represents the third part of a manuscript series designed to improve professional education in the field of cardiac electrophysiology. Mechanistic and clinical characteristics as well as management of isthmus-dependent atrial flutter are described in detail. Electrophysiological findings and catheter ablation of the arrhythmia are highlighted. PMID:26846223

  19. Blocked atrial bigeminy presenting with bradycardia.

    PubMed

    Akdeniz, Celal; Tanidir, Ibrahim Cansaran; Tuzcu, Volkan

    2012-01-01

    Blocked premature atrial contractions can cause bradycardia by resetting sinoatrial node and prolonging the RR intervals. Herein, we report the management of a patient with frequent premature atrial contractions in bigeminal pattern. The patient presented with symptomatic bradycardia and was successfully treated with propafenone. PMID:22469245

  20. A novel and simple atrial retractor.

    PubMed

    Kofidis, Theo; Lee, Chuen Neng

    2011-05-01

    Minimally invasive cardiac operations require specialized equipment. Atrial retractors are a frequently used tool to expose heart valves for minimally invasive and open procedures. The models currently available in the market are efficient; however, they may be complex, bulky, or expensive. We introduce a novel, very simple atrial retractor we designed using ubiquitously available materials. PMID:21524488

  1. Atrial Arrhythmia Summit: Post Summit Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Yael

    2010-01-01

    The Atrial Arrhythmia Summit brought together nationally and internationally recognized experts in cardiology, electrophysiology, exercise physiology, and space medicine in an effort to elucidate the mechanisms, risk factors, and management of atrial arrhythmias in the unique occupational cohort of the U.S. astronaut corps.

  2. Human adrenal tumor cell line SW-13 contains a natriuretic peptide receptor system that responds preferentially to ANP among various natriuretic peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, T.; Katafuchi, T.; Hagiwara, H.; Ito, T.; Kangawa, K.; Matsuo, H.; Hirose, S. )

    1990-12-31

    A new type of ANP receptor system which clearly distinguishes natriuretic peptides A and B (ANP and BNP) has been identified in the human adrenal tumor cell line SW-13 and characterized. SW-13 cells responded to nanomolar concentrations of ANP with large increases in cGMP levels but in the case of BNP, much higher concentrations were required to produce the same extent of response. This property is unique since the 140-kDa ANP receptors so far characterized do not discriminate between ANP and BNP. For comparison, various natriuretic peptide receptors were also re-characterized using the recently identified CNP.

  3. Salinity-dependent in vitro effects of homologous natriuretic peptides on the pituitary-interrenal axis in eels.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Albert; Kusakabe, Makoto; Takei, Yoshio

    2011-08-01

    We examined the effects of atrial, B-type, ventricular and C-type natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP, VNP and CNP1, 3, 4) on cortisol secretion from interrenal tissue in vitro in both freshwater (FW) and seawater (SW)-acclimated eels. We first localized the interrenal and chromaffin cells in the eel head kidney using cell specific markers (cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450ssc) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), respectively) and established the in vitro incubation system for eel interrenal tissue. Unexpectedly, none of the NPs given alone to the interrenal tissue of FW and SW eels stimulated cortisol secretion. However, ANP and VNP, but not BNP and three CNPs, enhanced the steroidogenic action of ACTH in SW interrenal preparations, while CNP1 and CNP4, but not ANP, BNP, VNP and CNP3, potentiated the ACTH action in FW preparations. These salinity dependent effects of NPs are consistent with the previous in vivo study in the eel where endogenous ACTH can act with the injected NPs. 8-Br-cGMP also enhanced the ACTH action in both FW and SW eel preparations, suggesting that the NP actions were mediated by the guanylyl cyclase-coupled NP receptors (GC-A and B) that were localized in the eel interrenal. Further, ANP and CNP1 stimulated ACTH secretion from isolated pituitary glands of SW and/or FW eels. In summary, the present study revealed complex mechanisms of NP action on corticosteroidogenesis through the pituitary-interrenal axis in eels, thereby providing a deeper insight into the role of the NP family in the acclimation of this euryhaline teleost to diverse salinity environments. PMID:21624369

  4. Efficacy of B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Is Coupled to Phosphodiesterase 2A in Cardiac Sympathetic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Lu, Chieh-Ju; Hao, Guoliang; Wright, Hannah; Woodward, Lavinia; Liu, Kun; Vergari, Elisa; Surdo, Nicoletta C.; Herring, Neil; Zaccolo, Manuela; Paterson, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) regulates cGMP-phosphodiesterase activity. Its elevation is regarded as an early compensatory response to cardiac failure where it can facilitate sympathovagal balance and cardiorenal homeostasis. However, recent reports suggest a paradoxical proadrenergic action of BNP. Because phosphodiesterase activity is altered in cardiovascular disease, we tested the hypothesis that BNP might lose its efficacy by minimizing the action of cGMP on downstream pathways coupled to neurotransmission. BNP decreased norepinephrine release from atrial preparations in response to field stimulation and also significantly reduced the heart rate responses to sympathetic nerve stimulation in vitro. Using electrophysiological recording and fluorescence imaging, BNP also reduced the depolarization evoked calcium current and intracellular calcium transient in isolated cardiac sympathetic neurons. Pharmacological manipulations suggested that the reduction in the calcium transient was regulated by a cGMP/protein kinase G pathway. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements for cAMP, and an immunoassay for cGMP, showed that BNP increased cGMP, but not cAMP. In addition, overexpression of phosphodiesterase 2A after adenoviral gene transfer markedly decreased BNP stimulation of cGMP and abrogated the BNP responses to the calcium current, intracellular calcium transient, and neurotransmitter release. These effects were reversed on inhibition of phosphodiesterase 2A. Moreover, phosphodiesterase 2A activity was significantly elevated in stellate neurons from the prohypertensive rat compared with the normotensive control. Our data suggest that abnormally high levels of phosphodiesterase 2A may provide a brake against the inhibitory action of BNP on sympathetic transmission. PMID:25916722

  5. Comparison of B-type natriuretic peptide and left ventricular dysfunction in patients with constrictive pericarditis undergoing pericardiectomy.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra; Aggarwal, Vikram; Chowdhury, Ujjwal; Choudhury, Minati; Singh, Sarvesh Pal; Kiran, Usha

    2010-01-01

    Chronic constrictive pericarditis (CCP) due to tuberculosis has high morbidity and mortality in the periopeartive period following pericardiectomy because of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. Brain-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is considered a marker for both LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction. We undertook this prospective study in 24 patients, to measure the BNP levels and to compare it with transmitral Doppler flow velocities, that is, the E/A ratio (E = initial peak velocity during early diastolic filling and A = late peak flow velocity during atrial systole), as a marker of diastolic function and systolic parameters, pre- and post-pericardiectomy, at the time of discharge. The latter parameters have been taken as a flow velocity across the mitral valve on a transthoracic echo. There was a significant decrease in the mean values of log BNP (6.19 +/- 0.33 to 4.65 +/- 0.14) (P = 0.001) and E/A ratio (1.81 +/- 0.21 to 1.01 +/- 0.14) (P = 0.001) post pericardiectomy, with a positive correlation, r = 0.896 and 0.837, respectively, between the two values at both the time periods. There was significant improvement in the systolic parameters of the LV function, that is, stroke volume index, cardiac index, systemic vascular resistance index, and delivered oxygen index. However, no correlation was observed between these values and the BNP levels. We believe that BNP can be used as a marker for LV diastolic dysfunction in place of the E/A ratio in patients with CCP, undergoing pericardiectomy. However, more studies have to be performed for validation of the same. PMID:20442542

  6. Minimally Invasive Surgical Therapies for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yoshitsugu; Kiaii, Bob; Chu, Michael W. A.

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained arrhythmia and is associated with significant risks of thromboembolism, stroke, congestive heart failure, and death. There have been major advances in the management of atrial fibrillation including pharmacologic therapies, antithrombotic therapies, and ablation techniques. Surgery for atrial fibrillation, including both concomitant and stand-alone interventions, is an effective therapy to restore sinus rhythm. Minimally invasive surgical ablation is an emerging field that aims for the superior results of the traditional Cox-Maze procedure through a less invasive operation with lower morbidity, quicker recovery, and improved patient satisfaction. These novel techniques utilize endoscopic or minithoracotomy approaches with various energy sources to achieve electrical isolation of the pulmonary veins in addition to other ablation lines. We review advancements in minimally invasive techniques for atrial fibrillation surgery, including management of the left atrial appendage. PMID:22666609

  7. Left atrial strain: A useful index in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Cameli, Matteo; Mandoli, Giulia Elena; Loiacono, Ferdinando; Sparla, Stefania; Iardino, Elisabetta; Mondillo, Sergio

    2016-10-01

    Left atrial (LA) strain is a speckle tracking echocardiography (STE)-derived parameter applied to the analysis of chamber function that provides highly reproducible measures of LA deformation by a non-Doppler, angle-independent quantification. In recent years, data regarding accuracy and clinical application of LA strain are rapidly increasing. This review describes the main features of LA strain and examines the role of STE in the evaluation of various aspects of AF, as the risk of developing the arrhythmia in general population, the evaluation of LA fibrosis and LA impairment, the quantification of cardioembolic risk and of recurrence after cardioversion or ablation therapies. PMID:27389443

  8. The nature of the atrial receptors responsible for a reflex decrease in activity in renal nerves in the dog

    PubMed Central

    Linden, R. J.; Mary, D. A. S. G.; Weatherill, D.

    1980-01-01

    1. In dogs anaesthetized with chloralose, distension of small balloons in the pulmonary vein—atrial junctions and left atrial appendage, to stimulate left atrial receptors, caused a reduction in activity in efferent renal nerves. This response was maintained during distension of the balloons for 30 min periods. 2. In a second group of dogs, cooling the cervical vagi in steps reduced the magnitude of the response in renal nerves. In seven dogs, the response in fourteen preparations of renal nerves was slightly reduced with the vagi at 18 °C and markedly reduced or abolished at 12 °C. The effect of cooling the vagi was the same as the previously shown effect of cooling on the increase in activity in myelinated afferent vagal fibres during similar stimulation of atrial receptors. 3. In a third group of dogs, the cervical vagi were cooled to 9 °C. In six dogs, fifty-four preparations of renal nerves showed no significant response to distension of the balloons. 4. In a fourth group of dogs, both vagi were sectioned in the neck. In three dogs, twenty-four preparations of renal nerves then showed no response to distension of the balloons. 5. It is concluded that the reduction in activity in efferent renal nerves during distension of small balloons in the pulmonary vein—atrial junctions and left atrial appendage involves only atrial receptors discharging into myelinated vagal fibres. PMID:7381789

  9. Aliskiren protecting atrial structural remodeling from rapid atrial pacing in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhiqiang; Chen, Yan; Li, Weimin; Wang, Xinghua; Li, Jian; Yang, Wansong; Cheng, Lijun; Liu, Tong; Liu, Enzhao; Li, Guangping

    2016-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) contributing to the increasing mortality risk is the most common disease in clinical practice. Owing to the side effects and relative inefficacy of current antiarrhythmic drugs, some research focuses on renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAS) for finding out the new treatment of AF. The purpose of this study is to confirm whether aliskiren as a proximal inhibitor of renin, which completely inhibits RAS, has beneficial effects on atrial structural remodeling in AF. In this study, rapid atrial pacing was induced at 500 beats per minute for 2 weeks in a canine model. A different dose of aliskiren was given orally for 2 weeks before rapid atrial pacing. HE staining and Masson's staining were used for analysis of myocardial fibrosis. TGF-β1, signal pathways, and pro-inflammatory cytokines were shown for the mechanism of structural remodeling after the treatment of aliskiren. Serious atrial fibrosis was induced by rapid atrial pacing, followed by the elevated TGF-β1, upregulated MEK and ERK1/2, and increased inflammatory factors. Aliskiren could apparently improve myocardial fibrosis by reducing the expression of TGF-β1, inhibiting MEK and ERK1/2 signal pathways, and decreasing IL-18 and TLR4 in both serum and atrial tissue. In conclusion, aliskiren could prevent atrial structural remodeling from rapid atrial pacing for 2 weeks. Aliskiren may play a potential beneficial role in the treatment of AF induced by rapid atrial pacing. PMID:27118660

  10. Atrial fibrillation and physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Bosomworth, N. John

    2015-01-01

    Objective To review the evidence on the effects of various levels of physical activity (PA) on the incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) in both the general population and in endurance athletes. Data sources A PubMed search was done initially using the MeSH headings or text words (with the search-field descriptor TIAB [title and abstract]) atrial fibrillation and exercise or physical activity or athlet* or sport*, without additional filters. Conclusions regarding quality and strength of evidence were based on the GRADE (grading of recommendations, assessment, development, and evaluation) system. Study selection No interventional studies were available. Observational studies were therefore considered acceptable, and, although larger long-term prospective cohort studies were preferred, case-control or cross-sectional trials were also included in this review. Synthesis Available evidence suggests a dose-response association linking increased exercise levels with reduced incident AF in women. The same is true in men at low and moderate levels of exertional activity. In men only, high levels of PA are associated with increased risk of AF in most, but not all, studies. This risk is moderate, with a hazard ratio of 1.29 in one of the better studies. The risk of AF for most people who exercise regularly is lower than that of a matched sedentary population. Conclusion Atrial fibrillation is probably less common as PA increases, with a demonstrable dose-response relationship. Exercise at any level should be promoted for its effect on physical well-being and mortality reduction. In men exercising at high levels, beneficial effects on AF might be lost and risk might exceed that of the sedentary population; however, the evidence is neither robust nor consistent. These men should be made aware of this modest increase in risk should they choose to continue to engage in high levels of PA. PMID:26668285

  11. Arterial Remodeling in B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Knock-Out Females.

    PubMed

    Holditch, Sara J; Schreiber, Claire A; Burnett, John C; Ikeda, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dimorphisms are recognized in cardiovascular conditions such as hypertension, stroke, thrombosis and vasculitis. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a guanylyl cyclase A (GC-A) agonist. The anti-hypertensive, vasodilatory, anti-fibrotic, and anti-hypertrophic properties of BNP are well established in male animal models. Although circulating BNP levels are higher in women, when compared to age-matched men, the cardiovascular protective propensity of BNP in females is poorly understood. We assessed the cardiovascular consequences of BNP deletion in genetically null (Nppb-/-) female rat lines. Throughout the study, blood pressure (BP) remained uninfluenced by genotype, and cardiorenal consequences of BNP knock out remained minor. Unexpectedly, approximately 60% of Nppb-/- females developed mesenteric polyarteritis-nodosa (PAN)-like vasculitis in their life span, some as early as 4 months of age. Mesenteric lesions involved intense arterial remodeling, progressive inflammation, occluded lumens, and less frequently intestinal necrosis and multiple visceral arterial aneurysms. Cumulative pathologies resulted in a significant decline in survival of the Nppb-/- female. This study highlights BNP's vasoprotective propensity, bringing to light a possible sex specific difference in the cardiovascular protection provided by BNP. Defects in the BNP/GC-A/cGMP pathway may play a role in arteriopathies in women, while GC-A agonists may provide effective therapy for arteritis. PMID:27162120

  12. NT pro B type natriuretic peptide levels in constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Parakh, Neeraj; Mehrotra, Sameer; Seth, Sandeep; Ramakrishnan, S.; Kothari, Shyam S.; Bhargava, Balram; Bahl, V.K.

    2015-01-01

    Background The differentiation of constrictive pericarditis (CP) from restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) may be clinically difficult and may require multiple investigations. Even though brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is shown to be higher in patients with RCM as compared to CP, the clinical utility is not fully established especially in Indian patients known to have advanced CP and myocardial involvement. Methods and results We measured NT-pro-BNP levels in 49 patients suspected of having either CP or RCM, diagnosed on the basis of echocardiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, endomyocardial biopsy and cardiac catheterization data as needed. Twenty nine patients (Mean age – 26 yrs, 24 males) had CP and 20 patients (Mean age – 39 yrs, 14 males) had RCM. The median plasma NT-pro-BNP levels were significantly higher in RCM as compared to CP [1775 (208–7500) pg/ml vs 124 (68–718) pg/ml, respectively; p = 0.001]. A cut off value of 459 pg/ml had sensitivity, specificity and overall accuracy of 90%, 86% and 88% respectively, for differentiating CP from RCM. Conclusions The NT-pro-BNP levels are significantly elevated in RCM as compared to CP. PMID:25820049

  13. Arterial Remodeling in B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Knock-Out Females

    PubMed Central

    Holditch, Sara J.; Schreiber, Claire A.; Burnett, John C.; Ikeda, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dimorphisms are recognized in cardiovascular conditions such as hypertension, stroke, thrombosis and vasculitis. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a guanylyl cyclase A (GC-A) agonist. The anti-hypertensive, vasodilatory, anti-fibrotic, and anti-hypertrophic properties of BNP are well established in male animal models. Although circulating BNP levels are higher in women, when compared to age-matched men, the cardiovascular protective propensity of BNP in females is poorly understood. We assessed the cardiovascular consequences of BNP deletion in genetically null (Nppb−/−) female rat lines. Throughout the study, blood pressure (BP) remained uninfluenced by genotype, and cardiorenal consequences of BNP knock out remained minor. Unexpectedly, approximately 60% of Nppb−/− females developed mesenteric polyarteritis-nodosa (PAN)-like vasculitis in their life span, some as early as 4 months of age. Mesenteric lesions involved intense arterial remodeling, progressive inflammation, occluded lumens, and less frequently intestinal necrosis and multiple visceral arterial aneurysms. Cumulative pathologies resulted in a significant decline in survival of the Nppb−/− female. This study highlights BNP’s vasoprotective propensity, bringing to light a possible sex specific difference in the cardiovascular protection provided by BNP. Defects in the BNP/GC-A/cGMP pathway may play a role in arteriopathies in women, while GC-A agonists may provide effective therapy for arteritis. PMID:27162120

  14. Advances in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Darge, Alicia; Reynolds, Matthew R.; Germano, Joseph J.

    2009-01-01

    Atrial Fibrillation (AF) is an increasingly common and costly medical problem.1–3 Given the disappointing efficacy and side effects associated with pharmacological therapy for AF, new treatment options are needed. Over the last decade, advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of AF, coupled with iterative improvements in catheter ablation techniques, have spurred the evolution of catheter ablation for AF from an experimental procedure to an increasingly important treatment option.4 This paper will review recent advances in the approaches and outcomes of AF ablation. PMID:19411729

  15. Atrial Fibrillation Ablation and Stroke.

    PubMed

    Aagaard, Philip; Briceno, David; Csanadi, Zoltan; Mohanty, Sanghamitra; Gianni, Carola; Trivedi, Chintan; Nagy-Baló, Edina; Danik, Stephan; Barrett, Conor; Santoro, Francesco; Burkhardt, J David; Sanchez, Javier; Natale, Andrea; Di Biase, Luigi

    2016-05-01

    Catheter ablation has become a widely available and accepted treatment to restore sinus rhythm in atrial fibrillation patients who fail antiarrhythmic drug therapy. Although generally safe, the procedure carries a non-negligible risk of complications, including periprocedural cerebral insults. Uninterrupted anticoagulation, maintenance of an adequate ACT during the procedure, and measures to avoid and detect thrombus build-up on sheaths and atheters during the procedure, appears useful to reduce the risk of embolic events. This is a review of the incidence, mechanisms, impact, and methods to reduce catheter ablation related cerebral insults. PMID:27150179

  16. Surgical Treatment of Concomitant Atrial Fibrillation: Focus onto Atrial Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Loardi, Claudia; Alamanni, Francesco; Galli, Claudia; Naliato, Moreno; Veglia, Fabrizio; Zanobini, Marco; Pepi, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Background. Maze procedure aims at restoring sinus rhythm (SR) and atrial contractility (AC). This study evaluated multiple aspects of AC recovery and their relationship with SR regain after ablation. Methods. 122 mitral and fibrillating patients underwent radiofrequency Maze. Rhythm check and echocardiographic control of biatrial contractility were performed at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. A multivariate Cox analysis of risk factors for absence of AC recuperation was applied. Results. At 2-years follow-up, SR was achieved in 79% of patients. SR-AC coexistence increased from 76% until 98%, while biatrial contraction detection augmented from 84 to 98% at late stage. Shorter preoperative arrhythmia duration was the only common predictor of SR-AC restoring, while pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) negatively influenced AC recuperation. Early AC restoration favored future freedom from arrhythmia recurrence. Minor LA dimensions correlated with improved future A/E value and vice versa. Right atrial (RA) contractility restoring favored better left ventricular (LV) performance and volumes. Conclusions. SR and left AC are two interrelated Maze objectives. Factors associated with arrhythmia “chronic state” (PAP and arrhythmia duration) are negative predictors of procedural success. Our results suggest an association between postoperative LA dimensions and “kick” restoring and an influence of RA contraction onto LV function. PMID:26229956

  17. Prevalence, Clinical Phenotype, and Outcomes Associated with Normal B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Levels in Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Anjan, Venkatesh Y.; Loftus, Timothy M.; Burke, Michael A.; Akhter, Nausheen; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Shah, Sanjiv J.

    2012-01-01

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is used widely to exclude heart failure (HF) in patients with dyspnea. However, most studies of BNP have focused on diagnosing HF with reduced ejection fraction (EF). We hypothesized that a normal BNP (≤ 100 pg/ml) is relatively common in HF with preserved EF (HFpEF), a heterogeneous disorder commonly associated with obesity. We prospectively studied 159 consecutive patients enrolled in the Northwestern University HFpEF Program. All subjects had symptomatic HF with EF>50% and elevated pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP). BNP was tested at baseline in all subjects. We compared clinical characteristics, echocardiographic parameters, invasive hemodynamics, and outcomes among HFpEF patients with normal (≤ 100 pg/ml) vs. elevated (>100 pg/ml) BNP. Of the 159 HFpEF patients, 46 (29%) had BNP ≤ 100 pg/ml. Subjects with normal BNP were younger, more often female, had higher rates of obesity and higher body-mass index, and less commonly had chronic kidney disease and atrial fibrillation. Both EF and PCWP were similar in normal vs. elevated BNP groups (62±7 vs. 61±7% [P=0.67] and 25±8 vs. 27±9 mmHg [P=0.42], respectively). Elevated BNP was associated with enlarged left atrial volume, worse diastolic function, abnormal right ventricular structure/function, and worse outcomes (e.g., adjusted hazard ratio for HF hospitalization = 4.0, 95% confidence interval 1.6-9.7, P=0.003). In conclusion, a normal BNP is present in 29% of symptomatic outpatients with HFpEF who have elevated PCWP, obesity is likely the primary driver of this finding, and although BNP is useful as a prognostic marker in HFpEF, a normal BNP does not exclude the outpatient diagnosis of HFpEF. PMID:22681864

  18. Atrial Fibrosis Quantified Using Late Gadolinium Enhancement MRI is Associated With Sinus Node Dysfunction Requiring Pacemaker Implant

    PubMed Central

    Akoum, Nazem; Mcgann, Christopher; Vergara, Gaston; Badger, Troy; Ranjan, Ravi; Mahnkopf, Christian; Kholmovski, Eugene; Macleod, Rob; Marrouche, Nassir

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sinus node dysfunction (SND) commonly manifests with atrial arrhythmias alternating with sinus pauses and sinus bradycardia. The underlying process is thought to be because of atrial fibrosis. We assessed the value of atrial fibrosis, quantified using Late Gadolinium Enhanced-MRI (LGE-MRI), in predicting significant SND requiring pacemaker implant. Methods Three hundred forty-four patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) presenting for catheter ablation underwent LGE-MRI. Left atrial (LA) fibrosis was quantified in all patients and right atrial (RA) fibrosis in 134 patients. All patients underwent catheter ablation with pulmonary vein isolation with posterior wall and septal debulking. Patients were followed prospectively for 329 ± 245 days. Ambulatory monitoring was instituted every 3 months. Symptomatic pauses and bradycardia were treated with pacemaker implantation per published guidelines. Results The average patient age was 65 ± 12 years. The average wall fibrosis was 16.7 ± 11.1% in the LA, and 5.3 ± 6.4% in the RA. RA fibrosis was correlated with LA fibrosis (R2 = 0.26; P < 0.01). Patients were divided into 4 stages of LA fibrosis (Utah I: <5%, Utah II: 5–20%, Utah III: 20–35%, Utah IV: >35%). Twenty-two patients (mean atrial fibrosis, 23.9%) required pacemaker implantation during follow-up. Univariate and multivariate analysis identified LA fibrosis stage (OR, 2.2) as a significant predictor for pacemaker implantation with an area under the curve of 0.704. Conclusions In patients with AF presenting for catheter ablation, LGE-MRI quantification of atrial fibrosis demonstrates preferential LA involvement. Significant atrial fibrosis is associated with clinically significant SND requiring pacemaker implantation. PMID:21806700

  19. Stroke risk assessment in atrial fibrillation: risk factors and markers of atrial myopathy.

    PubMed

    Calenda, Brandon W; Fuster, Valentin; Halperin, Jonathan L; Granger, Christopher B

    2016-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a complex phenomenon associated with electrical, mechanical, and structural abnormalities of the atria. Ischaemic stroke in AF is only partially understood, but the mechanisms are known to be related to the atrial substrate as well as the atrial rhythm. The temporal dissociation between timing of AF and occurrence of stroke has led to the hypothesis that fibrotic, prothrombotic atrial tissue is an important cause of thrombus formation in patients with AF, independent of the atrial rhythm. Current stroke risk scores are practical, but limited in their capacity to predict stroke risk accurately in individual patients. Stroke prediction might be improved by the addition of emerging risk factors, many of which are expressions of atrial fibrosis. The use of novel parameters, including clinical criteria, biomarkers, and imaging data, might improve stroke risk prediction and inform on optimal treatment for patients with AF and perhaps individuals only at risk of AF. PMID:27383079

  20. Acute treatment of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Kowey, P R; Marinchak, R A; Rials, S J; Filart, R A

    1998-03-12

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is a common clinical entity, responsible for significant morbidity and mortality, but it also accounts for a large percentage of healthcare dollar expenditures. Efforts to treat this arrhythmia in the past have focused on subacute antithrombotic therapy and eventually use of antiarrhythmic drugs for maintenance of sinus rhythm. However, there has been a growing interest in the concept of acute electrical and pharmacologic conversion. This treatment strategy has a number of benefits, including immediate alleviation of patient symptoms, avoidance of antithrombotic therapy, and prevention of electrophysiologic remodeling, which is thought to contribute to the perpetuation of the arrhythmia. There is also increasing evidence that this is a cost-effective strategy in that it may obviate admission to the hospital and the cost of long-term therapy. This article represents a summary of the treatments that may be used acutely to control the ventricular response to AFib, prevent thromboembolic events, and provide for acute conversion either pharmacologically or electrically. It includes information on modalities that are currently available and those that are under active development. We anticipate that an active, acute treatment approach to AFib and atrial flutter will become the therapeutic norm in the next few years, especially as the benefits of these interventions are demonstrated in clinical trials. PMID:9525568

  1. The atrial T wave: The elusive electrocardiographic wave exposed by a case of shifting atrial pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Langley, Philip; Caldwell, Jane

    2016-01-01

    The atrial T wave (Ta wave) is the body surface manifestation of atrial repolarisation and, unlike the P wave (atrial depolarisation), is little recognised. We report the case of a patient with shifting pacemaker which clearly demonstrates the effect of the Ta wave on ST segment and T wave. A simple conceptual model is used to explain the observed phenomenon. The case serves as a reminder of this often forgotten ECG wave and its potential effects on other ECG features. PMID:27215648

  2. Relationship of the total atrial conduction time to subclinical atherosclerosis, inflammation and echocardiographic parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Bakirci, Eftal Murat; Demirtas, Levent; Degirmenci, Husnu; Topcu, Selim; Demirelli, Selami; Hamur, Hikmet; Buyuklu, Mutlu; Akbas, Emin Murat; Ozcicek, Adalet; Ozcicek, Fatih; Ceyhun, Gokhan; Topal, Ergun

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of our study was to evaluate the total atrial conduction time and its relationship to subclinical atherosclerosis, inflammation and echocardiographic parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. METHODS: A total of 132 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (mean age 54.5±9.6 years; 57.6% male) and 80 age- and gender-matched controls were evaluated. The total atrial conduction time was measured by tissue-Doppler imaging and the carotid intima-media thickness was measured by B-mode ultrasonography. RESULTS: The total atrial conduction time was significantly longer in the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus than in the control group (131.7±23.6 vs. 113.1±21.3, p<0.001). The patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus had significantly increased carotid intima-media thicknesses, neutrophil to lymphocyte ratios and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels than those of the controls. The total atrial conduction time was positively correlated with the high-sensitivity C-reactive protein level, neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio, carotid intima-media thickness and left atrial volume index and negatively correlated with the early diastolic velocity (Em), Em/late diastolic velocity (Am) ratio and global peak left atrial longitudinal strain. A multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio, carotid intima-media thickness and global peak left atrial longitudinal strain were independent predictors of the total atrial conduction time. CONCLUSIONS: We suggest that subclinical atherosclerosis and inflammation may represent a mechanism related to prolonged total atrial conduction time and that prolonged total atrial conduction time and impaired left atrial myocardial deformation may be represent early subclinical cardiac involvement in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:25789513

  3. A New Algorithm to Diagnose Atrial Ectopic Origin from Multi Lead ECG Systems - Insights from 3D Virtual Human Atria and Torso

    PubMed Central

    Alday, Erick A. Perez; Colman, Michael A.; Langley, Philip; Butters, Timothy D.; Higham, Jonathan; Workman, Antony J.; Hancox, Jules C.; Zhang, Henggui

    2015-01-01

    Rapid atrial arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation (AF) predispose to ventricular arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death and stroke. Identifying the origin of atrial ectopic activity from the electrocardiogram (ECG) can help to diagnose the early onset of AF in a cost-effective manner. The complex and rapid atrial electrical activity during AF makes it difficult to obtain detailed information on atrial activation using the standard 12-lead ECG alone. Compared to conventional 12-lead ECG, more detailed ECG lead configurations may provide further information about spatio-temporal dynamics of the body surface potential (BSP) during atrial excitation. We apply a recently developed 3D human atrial model to simulate electrical activity during normal sinus rhythm and ectopic pacing. The atrial model is placed into a newly developed torso model which considers the presence of the lungs, liver and spinal cord. A boundary element method is used to compute the BSP resulting from atrial excitation. Elements of the torso mesh corresponding to the locations of the placement of the electrodes in the standard 12-lead and a more detailed 64-lead ECG configuration were selected. The ectopic focal activity was simulated at various origins across all the different regions of the atria. Simulated BSP maps during normal atrial excitation (i.e. sinoatrial node excitation) were compared to those observed experimentally (obtained from the 64-lead ECG system), showing a strong agreement between the evolution in time of the simulated and experimental data in the P-wave morphology of the ECG and dipole evolution. An algorithm to obtain the location of the stimulus from a 64-lead ECG system was developed. The algorithm presented had a success rate of 93%, meaning that it correctly identified the origin of atrial focus in 75/80 simulations, and involved a general approach relevant to any multi-lead ECG system. This represents a significant improvement over previously developed algorithms. PMID

  4. N-terminal-pro-brain natriuretic peptide, a surrogate biomarker of combined clinical and hemodynamic outcomes following percutaneous transvenous mitral commissurotomy

    PubMed Central

    Ranganayakulu, K.P.; Rajasekhar, D.; Vanajakshamma, V.; Santosh Kumar, C.; Vasudeva Chetty, P.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To examine the relationship between plasma levels of N-terminal-proB type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and various echocardiographic and hemodynamic parameters in patients with mitral stenosis undergoing percutaneous transvenous mitral commissurotomy (PTMC). Materials and methods The study population consisted of 100 patients with rheumatic mitral stenosis who underwent PTMC. NT-proBNP levels in these patients were measured before PTMC and 48 hours after PTMC. These levels were then correlated with various echocardiographic and hemodynamic parameters measured before and after PTMC. Results Eighty-one percent of the study population were women, and the most common presenting symptom was dyspnea which was present in 94% of the patients. Dyspnea New York Heart Association class correlated significantly with baseline NT-proBNP levels (r = 0.63; p < 0.01). The plasma NT-proBNP levels in these patients increased as echocardiogram signs of left atrial enlargement and right ventricular hypertrophy developed (r = 0.59, p < 0.01). Patients in atrial fibrillation had significantly higher NT-proBNP levels than patients in sinus rhythm. Baseline NT-proBNP levels correlated significantly with left atrial volume (r = 0.38; p < 0.01), left atrial volume index (r = 0.45; p < 0.01), systolic pulmonary artery pressures (r = 0.42; p < 0.01), and mean pulmonary artery pressures (r = 0.41; p < 0.01). All patients who underwent successful PTMC showed a significant decrease in NT-proBNP (decreased from a mean 763.8 pg/mL to 348.6 pg/mL) along with a significant improvement in all echocardiographic and hemodynamic parameters (p < 0.01). The percent change in NT-proBNP correlated significantly with the percent improvement noted with left atrial volume (r = 0.39; p < 0.01), left atrial volume index (r = 0.41; p < 0.01), systolic (r = 0.32, p < 0.01), and mean pulmonary artery pressures (r = 0.31, p < 0.01). Conclusions The decrease in NT

  5. The totally thoracoscopic left atrial maze procedure for the treatment of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    van Laar, Charlotte; Geuzebroek, Guillaume S C; Hofman, Frederik N; Van Putte, Bart P

    2016-01-01

    The totally thoracoscopic left atrial maze (TT-maze) is a recent, minimally invasive surgical procedure for the treatment of atrial fibrillation, with promising results in terms of freedom from atrial fibrillation. The TT-maze consists of a bilateral, epicardial pulmonary vein isolation with the creation of a box using radiofrequency and exclusion of the left atrial appendage (LAA). In addition, the box is connected with the base of the LAA and furthermore with the mitral annulus with the so-called trigonum line. In this report, we describe our surgical approach and short-term results. PMID:26993056

  6. CD-NP, a chimeric natriuretic peptide for the treatment of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Rose, Robert A

    2010-03-01

    In development by Nile Therapeutics Inc, under license from the Mayo Foundation, CD-NP is a chimeric natriuretic peptide in which the 15-amino acid C-terminal tail of Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide is fused to the 22-amino acid human C-type natriuretic peptide. The rationale for its design was to create a peptide with the beneficial cardiovascular and renal effects of native natriuretic peptides, but without a clinically significant hypotensive response. CD-NP is able to bind to all three natriuretic peptide receptors (NPR-A, NPR-B and NPR-C) and, therefore, is unique in being able to increase cyclic guanosine monophosphate production downstream of both NPR-A and NPR-B. Animal studies and human trials demonstrated that CD-NP is safe and improves cardiovascular and renal function without inducing significant levels of hypotension. Preliminary data also suggest improved renal function in human heart failure patients. Ongoing clinical trials are needed to further validate CD-NP as an effective treatment option for heart failure. PMID:20178049

  7. Cyclic GMP-mediated inhibition of L-type Ca2+ channel activity by human natriuretic peptide in rabbit heart cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tohse, N; Nakaya, H; Takeda, Y; Kanno, M

    1995-01-01

    1. Effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the L-type Ca2+ channels were examined in rabbit isolated ventricular cells by use of whole-cell and cell-attached configurations of the patch clamp methods. ANP produced a concentration-dependent decrease (10-100 nM) in amplitude of a basal Ca2+ channel current. 2. The inactive ANP (methionine-oxidized ANP, 30 nM) failed to decrease the current. 3. 8-Bromo-cyclic GMP (300 microM), a potent activator of cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), produced the same effects on the basal Ca2+ channel current as those produced by ANP. The cyclic GMP-induced inhibition of the Ca2+ channel current was still evoked in the presence of 1-isobutyl-3-methyl-xanthine, an inhibitor of phosphodiesterase. ANP failed to produce inhibition of the Ca2+ channel current in the presence of 8-bromo-cyclic GMP. 4. In the single channel recording, ANP and 8-bromo-cyclic GMP also inhibited the activities of the L-type Ca2+ channels. Both agents decreased the open probability (NPo) without affecting the unit amplitude. 5. The present results suggest that ANP inhibits the cardiac L-type Ca2+ channel activity through the intracellular production of cyclic GMP and then activation of PKG. PMID:7540093

  8. Managing atrial fibrillation in the very elderly patient: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Karamichalakis, Nikolaos; Letsas, Konstantinos P; Vlachos, Konstantinos; Georgopoulos, Stamatis; Bakalakos, Athanasios; Efremidis, Michael; Sideris, Antonios

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia affecting elderly patients. Management and treatment of AF in this rapidly growing population of older patients involve a comprehensive assessment that includes comorbidities, functional, and social status. The cornerstone in therapy of AF is thromboembolic protection. Anticoagulation therapy has evolved, using conventional or newer medications. Percutaneous left atrial appendage closure is a new invasive procedure evolving as an alternative to systematic anticoagulation therapy. Rate or rhythm control leads to relief in symptoms, fewer hospitalizations, and an improvement in quality of life. Invasive methods, such as catheter ablation, are the new frontier of treatment in maintaining an even sinus rhythm in this particular population. PMID:26604772

  9. Atrial development in the human heart: an immunohistochemical study with emphasis on the role of mesenchymal tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessels, A.; Anderson, R. H.; Markwald, R. R.; Webb, S.; Brown, N. A.; Viragh, S.; Moorman, A. F.; Lamers, W. H.

    2000-01-01

    The development of the atrial chambers in the human heart was investigated immunohistochemically using a set of previously described antibodies. This set included the monoclonal antibody 249-9G9, which enabled us to discriminate the endocardial cushion-derived mesenchymal tissues from those derived from extracardiac splanchnic mesoderm, and a monoclonal antibody recognizing the B isoform of creatine kinase, which allowed us to distinguish the right atrial myocardium from the left. The expression patterns obtained with these antibodies, combined with additional histological information derived from the serial sections, permitted us to describe in detail the morphogenetic events involved in the development of the primary atrial septum (septum primum) and the pulmonary vein in human embryos from Carnegie stage 14 onward. The level of expression of creatine kinase B (CK-B) was found to be consistently higher in the left atrial myocardium than in the right, with a sharp boundary between high and low expression located between the primary septum and the left venous valve indicating that the primary septum is part of the left atrial gene-expression domain. This expression pattern of CK-B is reminiscent of that of the homeobox gene Pitx2, which has recently been shown to be important for atrial septation in the mouse. This study also demonstrates a poorly appreciated role of the dorsal mesocardium in cardiac development. From the earliest stage investigated onward, the mesenchyme of the dorsal mesocardium protrudes into the dorsal wall of the primary atrial segment. This dorsal mesenchymal protrusion is continuous with a mesenchymal cap on the leading edge of the primary atrial septum. Neither the mesenchymal tissues of the dorsal protrusion nor the mesenchymal cap on the edge of the primary septum expressed the endocardial tissue antigen recognized by 249-9G9 at any of the stages investigated. The developing pulmonary vein uses the dorsal mesocardium as a conduit to reach

  10. Hypokalemia-induced ultrastructural, histochemical and connexin-43 alterations resulting in atrial and ventricular fibrillations.

    PubMed

    Tribulová, N; Manoach, M; Varon, D; Okruhlicová, L; Slobodová, Z; Kubovcáková, L

    1999-12-01

    Perfusion of the isolated guinea pig heart with hypokalemic solution provide simple model for examination of the molecular mechanisms involved in the incidence of atrial and/or ventricular fibrillations. The results point out that dispersion of the metabolic and subcellular alterations and heterogenously impaired intercellular coupling might account for electrical disturbances and desynchronization of the myocardium thus facilitate occurrence of fibrillation. PMID:10707826

  11. Atrial Myxoma Presenting as Myocardial Infarction Diagnosed by Echocardiography, Managed Endoscopically with Robot-Assisted Surgery.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Aadel A; Simmons, Charles; Ellison, Douglas; Hemp, James; Chung, Kiyon

    2016-01-01

    Atrial myxomatous embolization into the coronary arteries is a rare event. Management of large myxomas is usually via surgical resection involving a median sternotomy. Echocardiography is not a routine part of non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) management. Here, we present the case of a 70-year-old Caucasian man with a history of hypertension and hyperlipidemia who presented to the emergency department with an NSTEMI. Transthoracic echocardiogram and transesophageal echocardiogram revealed a large and highly mobile atrial mass, traversing through the mitral valve orifice during diastole. Coronary angiography revealed a focal 60% lesion in the right coronary artery and no other significant obstructive coronary artery disease, suggesting that the cause of his presentation was tumor embolization into the coronary circulation. The patient underwent robot-assisted endoscopic resection of his atrial mass and was discharged in stable condition on postoperative day 2. Pathology revealed atrial myxoma. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an atrial myxoma presenting with an NSTEMI and managed with a robot-assisted endoscopic approach. This case also highlights the importance of routine early echocardiography in patients presenting with NSTEMI. PMID:27014518

  12. Atrial Myxoma Presenting as Myocardial Infarction Diagnosed by Echocardiography, Managed Endoscopically with Robot-Assisted Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Charles, Jr.; Ellison, Douglas; Hemp, James; Chung, Kiyon

    2016-01-01

    Atrial myxomatous embolization into the coronary arteries is a rare event. Management of large myxomas is usually via surgical resection involving a median sternotomy. Echocardiography is not a routine part of non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) management. Here, we present the case of a 70-year-old Caucasian man with a history of hypertension and hyperlipidemia who presented to the emergency department with an NSTEMI. Transthoracic echocardiogram and transesophageal echocardiogram revealed a large and highly mobile atrial mass, traversing through the mitral valve orifice during diastole. Coronary angiography revealed a focal 60% lesion in the right coronary artery and no other significant obstructive coronary artery disease, suggesting that the cause of his presentation was tumor embolization into the coronary circulation. The patient underwent robot-assisted endoscopic resection of his atrial mass and was discharged in stable condition on postoperative day 2. Pathology revealed atrial myxoma. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an atrial myxoma presenting with an NSTEMI and managed with a robot-assisted endoscopic approach. This case also highlights the importance of routine early echocardiography in patients presenting with NSTEMI. PMID:27014518

  13. C-Type Natriuretic Peptide Analog as Therapy for Achondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Legeai-Mallet, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) is an important regulator of bone formation. Gain-of-function mutations in the FGFR3 gene result in chondrodysplasias which include achondroplasia (ACH), the most common form of dwarfism, in which skull, appendicular and axial skeletons are affected. The skeletal phenotype of patients with ACH showed defective proliferation and differentiation of the chondrocytes in the growth plate cartilage. Both endochondral and membranous ossification processes are disrupted during development. At cellular level, Fgfr3 mutations induce increased phosphorylation of the tyrosine kinase receptor FGFR3, which correlate with an enhanced activation of its downstream signaling pathways. Potential therapeutic strategies have emerged for ACH. Several preclinical studies have been conducted such as the C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) analog (BMN111), intermittent parathyroid hormone injections, soluble FGFR3 therapy, and meclozine and statin treatments. Among the putative targets to antagonize FGFR3 signaling, CNP (or BMN111) is one of the most promising strategies. BMN111 acts as a key regulator of longitudinal bone growth by downregulating the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, which is activated as a result of a FGFR3 gain-of-function mutation. Preclinical studies showed that BMN111 treatment led to a large improvement in skeletal parameters in Fgfr3Y367C/+ mice mimicking ACH. In 2014, a clinical trial (phase 2) of BMN111 in pediatric patients with ACH has started. This first clinical trial marks the first big step towards real treatment for these patients. PMID:26684019

  14. Increased atrial arrhythmia susceptibility induced by intense endurance exercise in mice requires TNFα

    PubMed Central

    Aschar-Sobbi, Roozbeh; Izaddoustdar, Farzad; Korogyi, Adam S.; Wang, Qiongling; Farman, Gerrie P.; Yang, FengHua; Yang, Wallace; Dorian, David; Simpson, Jeremy A.; Tuomi, Jari M.; Jones, Douglas L.; Nanthakumar, Kumaraswamy; Cox, Brian; Wehrens, Xander H.T.; Dorian, Paul; Backx, Peter H.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common supraventricular arrhythmia that, for unknown reasons, is linked to intense endurance exercise. Our studies reveal that 6 weeks of swimming or treadmill exercise improves heart pump function and reduces heart-rates. Exercise also increases vulnerability to AF in association with inflammation, fibrosis, increased vagal tone, slowed conduction velocity, prolonged cardiomyocyte action potentials and RyR2 phosphorylation (CamKII-dependent S2814) in the atria, without corresponding alterations in the ventricles. Microarray results suggest the involvement of the inflammatory cytokine, TNFα, in exercised-induced atrial remodelling. Accordingly, exercise induces TNFα-dependent activation of both NFκB and p38MAPK, while TNFα inhibition (with etanercept), TNFα gene ablation, or p38 inhibition, prevents atrial structural remodelling and AF vulnerability in response to exercise, without affecting the beneficial physiological changes. Our results identify TNFα as a key factor in the pathology of intense exercise-induced AF. PMID:25598495

  15. Triggers and Anatomical Substrates in the Genesis and Perpetuation of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Quintana, Damián; López-Mínguez, José Ramón; Pizarro, Gonzalo; Murillo, Margarita; Cabrera, José Angel

    2012-01-01

    The definition of atrial fibrillation (AF) as a functional electrical disorder does not reflect the significant underlying structural abnormalities. Atrial and Pulmonary Vein (PV) muscle sleeve microstructural remodeling is present, and establishes a vulnerable substrate for AF maintenance. In spite of an incomplete understanding of the anatomo-functional basis for AF, current evidence demonstrates that this arrhythmia usually requires a trigger for initiation and a vulnerable electrophysiological and/or anatomical substrate for maintenance. It is still unclear whether the trigger mechanisms include focal enhanced automaticity, triggered activity and/or micro re-entry from myocardial tissue. Initiation of AF can be favored by both parasympathetic and sympathetic stimulation, which also seem to play a role in maintaining AF. Finally, evolving clinical evidence demonstrates that inflammation is associated with new-onset and recurrent AF through a mechanism that possibly involves cellular degeneration, apoptosis, and subsequent atrial fibrosis. PMID:22920484

  16. Increased atrial arrhythmia susceptibility induced by intense endurance exercise in mice requires TNFα.

    PubMed

    Aschar-Sobbi, Roozbeh; Izaddoustdar, Farzad; Korogyi, Adam S; Wang, Qiongling; Farman, Gerrie P; Yang, FengHua; Yang, Wallace; Dorian, David; Simpson, Jeremy A; Tuomi, Jari M; Jones, Douglas L; Nanthakumar, Kumaraswamy; Cox, Brian; Wehrens, Xander H T; Dorian, Paul; Backx, Peter H

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common supraventricular arrhythmia that, for unknown reasons, is linked to intense endurance exercise. Our studies reveal that 6 weeks of swimming or treadmill exercise improves heart pump function and reduces heart-rates. Exercise also increases vulnerability to AF in association with inflammation, fibrosis, increased vagal tone, slowed conduction velocity, prolonged cardiomyocyte action potentials and RyR2 phosphorylation (CamKII-dependent S2814) in the atria, without corresponding alterations in the ventricles. Microarray results suggest the involvement of the inflammatory cytokine, TNFα, in exercised-induced atrial remodelling. Accordingly, exercise induces TNFα-dependent activation of both NFκB and p38MAPK, while TNFα inhibition (with etanercept), TNFα gene ablation, or p38 inhibition, prevents atrial structural remodelling and AF vulnerability in response to exercise, without affecting the beneficial physiological changes. Our results identify TNFα as a key factor in the pathology of intense exercise-induced AF. PMID:25598495

  17. Towards Low Energy Atrial Defibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Philip; Kodoth, Vivek; McEneaney, David; Rodrigues, Paola; Velasquez, Jose; Waterman, Niall; Escalona, Omar

    2015-01-01

    A wireless powered implantable atrial defibrillator consisting of a battery driven hand-held radio frequency (RF) power transmitter (ex vivo) and a passive (battery free) implantable power receiver (in vivo) that enables measurement of the intracardiacimpedance (ICI) during internal atrial defibrillation is reported. The architecture is designed to operate in two modes: Cardiac sense mode (power-up, measure the impedance of the cardiac substrate and communicate data to the ex vivo power transmitter) and cardiac shock mode (delivery of a synchronised very low tilt rectilinear electrical shock waveform). An initial prototype was implemented and tested. In low-power (sense) mode, >5 W was delivered across a 2.5 cm air-skin gap to facilitate measurement of the impedance of the cardiac substrate. In high-power (shock) mode, >180 W (delivered as a 12 ms monophasic very-low-tilt-rectilinear (M-VLTR) or as a 12 ms biphasic very-low-tilt-rectilinear (B-VLTR) chronosymmetric (6ms/6ms) amplitude asymmetric (negative phase at 50% magnitude) shock was reliably and repeatedly delivered across the same interface; with >47% DC-to-DC (direct current to direct current) power transfer efficiency at a switching frequency of 185 kHz achieved. In an initial trial of the RF architecture developed, 30 patients with AF were randomised to therapy with an RF generated M-VLTR or B-VLTR shock using a step-up voltage protocol (50–300 V). Mean energy for successful cardioversion was 8.51 J ± 3.16 J. Subsequent analysis revealed that all patients who cardioverted exhibited a significant decrease in ICI between the first and third shocks (5.00 Ω (SD(σ) = 1.62 Ω), p < 0.01) while spectral analysis across frequency also revealed a significant variation in the impedance-amplitude-spectrum-area (IAMSA) within the same patient group (|∆(IAMSAS1-IAMSAS3)[1 Hz − 20 kHz] = 20.82 Ω-Hz (SD(σ) = 10.77 Ω-Hz), p < 0.01); both trends being absent in all patients that failed to cardiovert. Efficient

  18. Towards Low Energy Atrial Defibrillation.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Philip; Kodoth, Vivek; McEneaney, David; Rodrigues, Paola; Velasquez, Jose; Waterman, Niall; Escalona, Omar

    2015-01-01

    A wireless powered implantable atrial defibrillator consisting of a battery driven hand-held radio frequency (RF) power transmitter (ex vivo) and a passive (battery free) implantable power receiver (in vivo) that enables measurement of the intracardiac impedance (ICI) during internal atrial defibrillation is reported. The architecture is designed to operate in two modes: Cardiac sense mode (power-up, measure the impedance of the cardiac substrate and communicate data to the ex vivo power transmitter) and cardiac shock mode (delivery of a synchronised very low tilt rectilinear electrical shock waveform). An initial prototype was implemented and tested. In low-power (sense) mode, >5 W was delivered across a 2.5 cm air-skin gap to facilitate measurement of the impedance of the cardiac substrate. In high-power (shock) mode, >180 W (delivered as a 12 ms monophasic very-low-tilt-rectilinear (M-VLTR) or as a 12 ms biphasic very-low-tilt-rectilinear (B-VLTR) chronosymmetric (6ms/6ms) amplitude asymmetric (negative phase at 50% magnitude) shock was reliably and repeatedly delivered across the same interface; with >47% DC-to-DC (direct current to direct current) power transfer efficiency at a switching frequency of 185 kHz achieved. In an initial trial of the RF architecture developed, 30 patients with AF were randomised to therapy with an RF generated M-VLTR or B-VLTR shock using a step-up voltage protocol (50-300 V). Mean energy for successful cardioversion was 8.51 J ± 3.16 J. Subsequent analysis revealed that all patients who cardioverted exhibited a significant decrease in ICI between the first and third shocks (5.00 Ω (SD(σ) = 1.62 Ω), p < 0.01) while spectral analysis across frequency also revealed a significant variation in the impedance-amplitude-spectrum-area (IAMSA) within the same patient group (|∆(IAMSAS1-IAMSAS3)[1 Hz - 20 kHz] = 20.82 Ω-Hz (SD(σ) = 10.77 Ω-Hz), p < 0.01); both trends being absent in all patients that failed to cardiovert. Efficient

  19. [Cardiac rehabilitation in patients with atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Schlitt, Axel; Kamke, Wolfram; Guha, Manju; Haberecht, Olaf; Völler, Heinz

    2015-06-01

    The course of cardiac rehabilitation is often altered due to episodes of paroxysmal, predominantly postoperative atrial fibrillation. In symptomatic patients, a TEE-guided cardioversion - preferential DC shock - is indicated. In patients with persistent / permanent atrial fibrillation, a heart rate up to 110 / min and 170 / min at rest and during physical activity should, respectively, be tolerated. Therefore, training should not be quitted by heart rate but rather by load. The antithrombotic management is in addition a great task in treating patients with atrial fibrillation. With the exception of patients with a CHA2DS2-VASc-Score < 1, oral anticoagulation is indicated. Atrial fibrillation has little impact on social aspects, whereas the underlying heart disease and drug treatment (oral anticoagulation) has an important impact. PMID:26115137

  20. Atrial Fibrillation During an Exploration Class Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipsett, Mark; Hamilton, Douglas; Lemery, Jay; Polk, James

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a possible scenario of an astronaut having Atrial Fibrillation during a Mars Mission. In the case review the presentation asks several questions about the alternatives for treatment, medications and the ramifications of the decisions.

  1. Atrial Fibrillation - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Atrial Fibrillation URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/atrialfibrillation.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  2. Atrial Fibrillation - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Atrial Fibrillation URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/languages/atrialfibrillation.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  3. Serum Soluble Semaphorin 4D is Associated with Left Atrial Diameter in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Li; You, Tao; Chen, Jianchang; Xu, Weiting; Jiao, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the serum soluble semaphorin 4D (sSema4D) in patients with atrial fibrillation and to investigate the relationship of serum sSema4D with left atrial diameter (LAD). Material/Methods We studied a total of 113 patients who were subdivided into paroxysmal and non-paroxysmal (included persistent and permanent) atrial fibrillation groups, respectively. Another 55 subjects without atrial fibrillation were enrolled as the healthy control group. Serum levels of soluble semaphorin 4D (Sema4D) were measured in all subjects using the enzyme-labeled immunosorbent assay method. We also evaluated the coagulation parameters and left atrial diameters. Results Patients with paroxysmal and non-paroxysmal atrial fibrillation had significantly higher sSema4D level compared with controls (8.50±2.19 ng/mL and 9.30±2.28 ng/mL vs. 6.56±1.27 ng/ml, P<0.05). Serum sSema4D concentrations were elevated in patients with non-paroxysmal atrial fibrillation compared to those with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (P<0.001). The level of sSema4D was positively correlated with LAD (r=0.606, P<0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that serum sSema4D, LAD, male sex, heart rate, hypertension, and coronary artery disease were associated with atrial fibrillation (P<0.05). Conclusions Serum sSema4D levels are increased in patients with atrial fibrillation and are independently associated with atrial remodeling. PMID:26417899

  4. [Evidence-based treatment of atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Máquez, Manlio F; Gómez Flores, Jorge

    2006-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation has emerged as a curative therapy for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation based on studies demonstrating the role of triggering foci in the pulmonary veins for the initiation of atrial fibrillation. Catheter ablation is performed by a trans-septal approach using radiofrequency energy at the ostium of each pulmonary vein. Mapping is guided by special catheters. Sequential radiofrequency applications eliminates or dissociates pulmonary vein muscle activity. Although complications exists, this procedure can be curative for these patients. PMID:17017102

  5. New oral anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Turpie, Alexander G G

    2008-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a major risk factor for stroke. Currently, acetylsalicylic acid (a platelet inhibitor) and vitamin K antagonists (VKAs; oral anticoagulants), including warfarin, are the only approved antithrombotic therapies for stroke prevention in patients with AF. Although effective, VKAs have unpredictable pharmacological effects, requiring regular coagulation monitoring and dose adjustment to maintain effects within the therapeutic range. The clinical development pathway for novel anticoagulants often involves evaluation of efficacy and safety in a short-term indication, such as the prevention of venous thrombo-embolism (VTE), followed by longer-term VTE treatment studies, and finally chronic indications, including stroke prevention studies in patients with AF. The coagulation pathway provides many targets for novel anticoagulants, including Factor Xa (FXa) and Factor IIa (thrombin). Numerous oral, direct FXa inhibitors are in various stages of clinical development, including rivaroxaban, LY517717, YM150, DU-176b, apixaban, and betrixaban, and are anticipated to overcome the limitations of VKAs. Dabigatran is the only oral direct thrombin inhibitor in late-stage development. Studies of these agents for stroke prevention in patients with AF are planned or ongoing. If approved, they may represent the next generation of anticoagulants, by providing new therapeutic options for stroke prevention in patients with AF. PMID:18096568

  6. C-type natriuretic peptide inhibits leukocyte recruitment and platelet-leukocyte interactions via suppression of P-selectin expression

    PubMed Central

    Scotland, Ramona S.; Cohen, Marc; Foster, Paul; Lovell, Matthew; Mathur, Anthony; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Hobbs, Adrian J.

    2005-01-01

    The multifaceted process of immune cell recruitment to sites of tissue injury is key to the development of an inflammatory response and involved in the pathogenesis of numerous cardiovascular disorders. We recently identified C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) as an important endothelium-derived mediator that regulates vascular tone and protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. Herein, we investigated whether CNP inhibits leukocyte recruitment and platelet aggregation and thereby exerts a potential antiinflammatory influence on the blood vessel wall. We assessed the effects of CNP on leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in mouse mesenteric postcapillary venules in vivo in animals with high basal leukocyte activation (endothelial nitric oxide synthase knockout mice, eNOS-/-) or under acute inflammatory conditions (induced by interleukin-1β or histamine). CNP suppressed basal leukocyte rolling in eNOS-/- mice in a rapid, reversible, and concentration-dependent manner. These effects of CNP were mimicked by the selective natriuretic peptide receptor-C agonist cANF4-23. CNP also suppressed leukocyte rolling induced by IL-1β or histamine, inhibited platelet-leukocyte interactions, and prevented thrombin-induced platelet aggregation of human blood. Furthermore, analysis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, leukocytes, and platelets revealed that CNP selectively attenuates expression of P-selectin. Thus, CNP is a modulator of acute inflammation in the blood vessel wall characterized by leukocyte and platelet activation. These antiinflammatory effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, via suppression of P-selectin expression. These observations suggest that endothelial CNP might maintain an anti-atherogenic influence on the blood vessel wall and represent a target for therapeutic intervention in inflammatory cardiovascular disorders. PMID:16179391

  7. [Clinical significance of natriuretic peptides in the differential diagnosis of dyspnea].

    PubMed

    Špác, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Acute dyspnea is one of the most common emergency department symptoms. But early diagnosis and treatment could be e challenging because of multiple potential causes. The gold standard biomarkers in cardiac dyspnea are B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal pro-B-type (natriuretic peptide NT-pro BNP), which play an important role in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. The purpose of this review is to analyze diagnostic potential of BNP and NT-pro BNP biomarkers use in patients with acute dyspnea. BNP and NT-proBNP are markers of cardiac stress but are not cardiac-specific. They have comparable clinical utility, and both help in excluding acute cardiac dyspnea but they cannot reliably discriminate systolic from diastolic HF.Key word: acute dyspnea - natriuretic peptide - heart failure. PMID:27627091

  8. Atrial fibrillation care improvement collaborative

    PubMed Central

    Robelia, Paul; Kopecky, Stephen; Thacher, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an increasingly common cardiac arrhythmia. Many patients with new onset or recurrent AF present to the emergency department and are subsequently admitted to the hospital and seen by cardiology specialists for follow up. In an attempt to address this high utilization of acute health care resources, reduce costs, and improve patient care, our institution instituted a collaborative project between the departments of emergency medicine, cardiology, family medicine, and primary care internal medicine. The project team oversaw development of a new emergency department AF order set, encouraged utilization of a new oral anticoagulant (dabigatran), improved the primary care follow up connection, and deployed a multimodal education plan for primary care providers. Between 2012 and 2014, these interventions resulted in a 17% reduction in total AF per member per month (PMPM) cost, a 28% reduction in AF PMPM inpatient cost, and a 24% reduction in inpatient admissions for AF. PMID:26734425

  9. Adjuvant therapy for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Khaja S; Kowey, Peter R; Musco, Simone

    2010-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common heart rhythm disorder, with increasing prevalence in the aging US population and affecting more than 2.3 million people. Current approaches for managing AF are rate- or rhythm-control strategies, both using anti-thrombotic therapy to prevent thromboembolism. While great advances have been made in understanding the pathophysiology of AF, few new strategies have shown promise in prevention or treatment of AF. Recent data suggest that non-antiarrhythmic medication may be useful in modifying the substrate that allows AF precipitation and perpetuation. This article reviews the data on the role of these agents in the prevention and management of AF as an adjunct to standard therapy. PMID:20014988

  10. Recurrent Left Atrial Botyroid Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Abay, Günseli; Kocaaslan, Cemal; Günay, Rafet; Doğan, Meryem; Demirtaş, Mahmut Murat

    2016-01-01

    Primary heart tumors are extremely rare and their frequency ranges from approximately 0.01-0.3% in autopsy series. Nearly one quarter of all primary cardiac tumors are malignant tumors such as sarcoma. Rhabdomyosarcoma is the second most common malignant primary tumor of the heart following angiosarcoma.Primary cardiac tumors present with one or more of the symptoms of the classic triad: cardiac symptoms and signs resulting from intracardiac obstruction; signs of systemic embolization; and systemic or constitutional symptoms. The prognosis after surgery is usually excellent in case of benign tumors, but is unfortunately still limited in localized malignant diseases [Butany 2005].In this case report we present a 45-year-old female patient operated three times in 9 years because of left atrial tumor. PMID:27355140

  11. New anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Sobieraj-Teague, Magdalena; O'Donnell, Martin; Eikelboom, John

    2009-07-01

    Atrial fibrillation is already the most common clinically significant cardiac arrhythmia and a common cause of stroke. Vitamin K antagonists are very effective for the prevention of cardioembolic stroke but have numerous limitations that limit their uptake in eligible patients with AF and reduce their effectiveness in treated patients. Multiple new anticoagulants are under development as potential replacements for vitamin K antagonists. Most are small synthetic molecules that target factor IIa (e.g., dabigatran etexilate, AZD-0837) or factor Xa (e.g., rivaroxaban, apixaban, betrixaban, DU176b, idrabiotaparinux). These drugs have predictable pharmacokinetics that allow fixed dosing without laboratory monitoring, and are being compared with vitamin K antagonists or aspirin in phase III clinical trials [corrected]. A new vitamin K antagonist (ATI-5923) with improved pharmacological properties compared with warfarin is also being evaluated in a phase III trial. None of the new agents have as yet been approved for clinical use. PMID:19739042

  12. Atrial fibrillation cardioversion following acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Dilber, Dario; Čerkez-Habek, Jasna; Barić, Hrvoje; Gradišer, Marina

    2015-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia and it is an independent risk for serious events. Acupuncture has been growing in popularity in the West, and there are reports of its