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Sample records for iodine-125 prostate brachytherapy

  1. Influence of Dose on Risk of Acute Urinary Retention After Iodine-125 Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Roeloffzen, Ellen M.A.; Battermann, Jan J.; Deursen, Marijke J.H. van; Monninkhof, Evelyn M.; Visscher, Mareije I.; Moerland, Marinus A.; Vulpen, Marco van

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To assess the influence of dose on the risk of acute urinary retention (AUR) after iodine-125 prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between January 2005 and December 2008, 714 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with iodine-125 prostate brachytherapy at our department. All patients completed four imaging studies: magnetic resonance imaging before and 4 weeks after treatment and intraoperative three-dimensional transrectal ultrasonography before and after implantation. The development of AUR was prospectively recorded. The evaluated treatment and dosimetric parameters included prostate volume, number of needles and seeds used, intra- and postoperative prostate edema, percentage of prostate volume receiving 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescribed dose to the prostate, minimal dose received by 90% of the prostate volume, and percentage of the urethra receiving 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescribed dose. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine which factors were associated with AUR. Results: Of the 714 patients, 57 (8.0%) developed AUR. On univariate analysis, the following treatment and dosimetric factors were significantly associated with AUR: International Prostate Symptom Score (odds ratio [OR], 2.07, per 10-point increase), preimplant prostate volume (OR, 1.06), postimplant prostate volume (OR, 1.04), number of needles used (OR, 1.09), and number of seeds used (OR, 1.03). On multivariate analysis, the only independent predictive factors for AUR were pretreatment prostate volume (OR, 1.05) and International Prostate Symptom Score (OR, 1.76, per 10-point increase). Patients with a pretreatment prostate volume >35 cm{sup 3} had a 10.4% risk of developing AUR compared with 5.4% for those with a prostate volume of {<=}35 cm{sup 3}. No association was found between any of the dosimetric parameters and the development of AUR. Conclusion: The radiation dose, within the range studied, did not influence the risk of AUR

  2. Complications associated with preoperative radiation therapy and Iodine-125 brachytherapy for localized prostatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Flanigan, R.C.; Patterson, J.; Mendiondo, O.A.; Gee, W.F.; Lucas, B.A.; McRoberts, J.W.

    1983-08-01

    Twenty-five consecutive patients with localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate treated with 1,050 rad preoperative radiation therapy and Iodine-125 seed brachytherapy are reviewed. Significant long-term postoperative complications included radiation cystitis (12%), radiation proctitis (4%), genital and leg edema (12%), stress incontinence (8%), total incontinence (4%), and impotence (26%). Complications occurred in 75 per cent of patients who received additional postoperative radiation. Improved staging with CT scan, lymphangiography, and Chiba needle biopsy of any possibly abnormal lymph nodes provided excellent preoperative staging with only 1 patient (6%) upstaged at surgery to Stage D1.

  3. A Phase III Randomized Trial of the Timing of Meloxicam With Iodine-125 Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, Juanita; Patil, Nikhilesh; Wallace, Kris; Borg, Jette; Zhou, David; Ma, Clement; Pond, Greg

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication is used to reduce prostate edema and urinary symptoms following prostate brachytherapy. We hypothesized that a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor regimen started 1 week prior to seed implant might diminish the inflammatory response, thus reducing edema, retention rates, and symptom severity. Methods and Materials: From March 2004 to February 2008, 316 men consented to an institutional review board-approved randomized study of a 4-week course of meloxicam, 7.5 mg orally twice per day, starting either on the day of implant or 1 week prior to implant. Brachytherapy was performed using iodine-125 seeds and was preplanned and performed under transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and fluoroscopic guidance. Prostate volume obtained by MR imaging at 1 month was compared to baseline prostate volume obtained by TRUS planimetry and expressed as an edema factor. The trial endpoints were prostate edema at 1 month, International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire results at 1 and 3 months, and any need for catheterization. Results: Results for 300 men were analyzed. Median age was 61 (range, 45-79 years), and median TRUS prostate volume was 35.7 cc (range, 18.1-69.5 cc). Median IPSS at baseline was 5 (range, 0-24) and was 15 at 1 month, 16 at 3 months, and 10 at 6 months. Catheterization was required for 7% of patients (6.2% day 0 arm vs. 7.9% day -7 arm; p = 0.65). The median edema factor at 1 month was 1.02 (range, 0.73-1.7). 1.01 day 0 arm vs. 1.05 day -7 arm. Baseline prostate volume remained the primary predictor of postimplant urinary retention. Conclusions: Starting meloxicam 1 week prior to brachytherapy compared to starting immediately after the procedure did not reduce 1-month edema, improve IPSSs at 1 or 3 months, or reduce the need for catheterization.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Defined Treatment Margins in Iodine-125 Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, Juanita; Patil, Nikhilesh; Ma, Clement; McLean, Michael; Borg, Jette

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: Low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy achieves a very high and effective intraprostatic dose. Implant quality parameters concentrate on the dose received by the prostate (D90, V100) but not that received by the periprostatic tissue. We calculated implant quality parameters, D90 and V100, for the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-defined prostate plus 2, 3, and 5 mm. Methods and Materials: A total of 131 men with early-stage prostate cancer treated with iodine-125 brachytherapy represent all those treated with brachytherapy monotherapy in our institution in 2005. Postplan assessment was performed at 1 month using magnetic resonance (MR)-computed tomography (CT) fusion. The prostate V100 and D90 were calculated with 2-, 3-, and 5-mm margins. Results were compared with those in 8 patients with biopsy-proven local failure occurring in an experience of more than 1,100 implants. Results: Mean prostate V100 (SD) and D90 (SD) were 95.6% (4.1) and 117.2% (12.7). For prostate plus a 2-mm margin the D90 was 107.9% (14.3) and for a 3-mm margin 96.0 % (14.0). For prostate plus a 5-mm margin, the D90 was only 78.4% (11.0). The 8 patients experiencing local failure, despite adequate implants, had a lower mean V100 of 91.2% (SD, 2.8; p = 0.0008) and D90 of 103.7% (SD, 8.3; p = 0.002) and significantly inferior margin coverage. Conclusions: Satisfactory coverage of a 2-mm and 3-mm periprostatic margin is obtained with the described planning approach. Coverage falls off significantly by 5 mm. The 8 patients who experienced local failure had significantly lower doses than the margin cohort. Although the V100 and D90 would be considered acceptable, the fall-off in margin coverage was observed by 3 mm.

  5. Prostate-Specific Antigen Bounce After Permanent Iodine-125 Prostate Brachytherapy-An Australian Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zwahlen, Daniel R.; Smith, Ryan; Andrianopoulos, Nick; Matheson, Bronwyn; Royce, Peter; Millar, Jeremy L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) 'bounces' after {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy to review the relationship to biochemical control and correlate both clinical and dosimetric variables. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 194 hormone-naive patients with a follow-up of {>=}3 years. Four bounce definitions were applied: an increase of {>=}0.2 ng/mL (definition I), {>=}0.4 ng/mL (definition II), {>=}15% (definition III), and {>=}35% (definition IV) of a previous value with spontaneous return to the prebounce level or lower. Results: Using definition I, II, III, and IV, a bounce was detected in 50%, 34%, 11%, and 9% of patients, respectively. The median time to onset was 14-16 months, the duration was 12-21.5 months, and the magnitude of the increase was 0.5-2 ng/mL. A magnitude of >2 ng/mL, fulfilling the criteria for biochemical failure (BF) according to the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Phoenix definition, was detected in 11.3%, 16.9%, 47.6%, and 50% using definitions I, II, III, and IV, respectively; 11 patients (5.7%) had true BF. The PSA bounces occurred earlier than BF (p < 0.001). The prediction of BF remains controversial and is probably unrelated to biochemical control. The only statistically significant factor predictive of a PSA bounce was younger age (definitions I and II). Conclusion: PSA bounces are common after brachytherapy. All definitions resulted in a high number of false-positive calls for BF during the first 2 years. The definition of an increase of {>=}0.2 ng/mL should be preferred because of the lowest number of false-positive results for BF. Patients experiencing a PSA bounce during the first 2 years after brachytherapy should undergo surveillance every 3-6 months. Additional investigations are recommended for elevated postimplant PSA levels that have not corrected by 3 years of follow-up.

  6. The Impact of Acute Urinary Retention After Iodine-125 Prostate Brachytherapy on Health-Related Quality of Life

    SciTech Connect

    Roeloffzen, Ellen M.A.; Hinnen, Karel A.; Battermann, Jan J.; Monninkhof, Evelyn M.; Roermund, Joep G.H. van; Gellekom, Marion van; Frank, Steven J.; Vulpen, Marco van

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of acute urinary retention (AUR) in patients treated with {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy on short- and long-term health-related quality of life (HRQOL); and to assess whether pretreatment HRQOL has additional value in the prediction of AUR. Methods and Materials: For 127 patients treated with {sup 125}I brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer between December 2000 and June 2003, toxicity and HRQOL data were prospectively collected. Patients received a HRQOL questionnaire at five time points: before and 1 month, 6 months, 1 year, and 6 years after treatment. The questionnaire included the RAND-36 generic health survey, the cancer-specific European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer core questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30), the tumor-specific EORTC prostate cancer module (EORTC QLQ-PR25), and the American Urological Association (AUA) symptom index. Results: Of 127 patients, 13 (10.2%) developed AUR. Patients with AUR had a significantly worse urinary QOL at all time points compared with patients without AUR. The mean difference over time (6 years) between both groups for the EORTC QLQ-PR25 urinary symptom score was 13.0 points (p < 0.001) and for the AUA urinary symptom score was 15.7 points (p = 0.001). Global QOL scores (EORTC QLQ-C30) over time for patients who developed AUR were significantly worse compared with patients without AUR (mean difference 6.7 points; p = 0.043). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, pretreatment International Prostate Symptom Score (p = 0.004) and neoadjuvant hormonal treatment (p = 0.034) were predictors of AUR. Quality of life did not have added predictive value. Conclusion: Acute urinary retention after prostate brachytherapy has a significant negative impact on patient's HRQOL up to 6 years after treatment, in terms of both global QOL measures and urinary symptom scores. Furthermore, our results suggest limited value of pretreatment HRQOL measures for the prediction of AUR.

  7. Comparison of implant quality between loose and intra-operatively linked iodine-125 seeds in prostate cancer brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Jarusevicius, Laimonas; Inciura, Arturas; Juozaityte, Elona; Vaiciunas, Kestutis; Vaitkus, Antanas; Sniureviciute, Migle

    2012-01-01

    From 2007 to 2010, 230 patients had iodine-125 seeds implanted (loose or intra-operatively linked into seed trains with variable seed-to-seed spacing). The primary aim was to evaluate differences in implant quality by comparing the intra-operative and post-implant dosimetry in patients treated with loose and intra-operatively linked seeds. The secondary aim was to evaluate the "learning curve" for the procedure. The following parameters were compared: the radiation dose to 90% of the prostate volume (D90), the radiation dose to 30% of the urethral volume (DU30), the percentage of the prostate volume receiving 100% or 200% of the prescribed dose (V100 or V200, respectively), the percentage of the rectal volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose (VR100), and the homogeneity index (HI). We obtained the following results for loose vs. intra-operatively linked seeds: D90 (Gy), 184.7 ± 15.0 vs. 177.9 ± 12.7 (p = 0.002); V100 (%), 95.5 ± 2.4 vs. 94.9 ± 3.2 (p = 0.206); V200 (%), 35.1 ± 7.5 vs. 24.3 plusmn; 6,9 (p < 0.001); DU30 (Gy), 218.6 ± 24.1 vs. 197.4 ± 19.5 (p = 0.001); VR100 (cm³), 0.6 ± 0.47 vs. 0.3 ± 0.3 (p < 0.001); HI (%), 31.8 ± 7.3 vs. 44.0 ± 9.8 (p < 0.001). The advantages of intra-operatively linked seed implantation over loose seed implantation are a more homogeneous prostate dose and lower urethral and rectal doses. The disadvantage is a lower post-implant D90. Sufficient experience with the loose seed implantation procedure was obtained after the first 40 patients. There was essentially no learning curve when a new implantation method using intra-operatively linked seeds was subsequently initiated. PMID:22739013

  8. Biochemical Disease-Free Rate and Toxicity for Men Treated With Iodine-125 Prostate Brachytherapy With D{sub 90} {>=}180 Gy

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Iturriaga Pina, Alfonso; Crook, Juanita; Borg, Jette; Ma, Clement

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: Iodine-125 ({sup 125}I) prostate brachytherapy is planned with a prescribed dose of 145 Gy and minimal dose received by 90% of the prostate (D{sub 90}) of 120-125% (174-181 Gy). We examined the clinical outcomes and toxicity profile of men receiving a D{sub 90} (isodose enclosing 90% of the prostate) of {>=}180 Gy. Methods and Materials: Between March 1999 and May 2006, 129 men (17% of our total brachytherapy population) treated with {sup 125}I monotherapy for Stage T1-T2 prostate cancer received a D{sub 90} {>=}180 Gy. Implants were performed using transrectal ultrasonography and fluoroscopic guidance. The 1-month postplan dosimetry used magnetic resonance imaging-computed tomography fusion. The minimal follow-up was 2 years. Toxicity was scored according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events toxicity scale, version 3. Results: The median patient age was 63 years (range, 50-76), and the pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level was 5.5 ng/mL (range, 0.6-13.5). The Gleason score was {<=}6 in 125 patients and was 7 in 4 patients. The median follow-up period was 40 months (range, 24-111), and the median D{sub 90} was 186 Gy. The median minimal dose received by 30% of the urethra was 203 Gy, and the median rectal volume receiving a minimum of 100% of the prescribed dose was 0.81 cm{sup 3}. Acute Grade 2 genitourinary toxicity was seen in 5.4% and late Grade 2 in 7%. Late urinary retention (Grade 3) was seen in 2 patients (1.5%). Grade 1 rectal bleeding occurred in 9.3% and Grade 2 in 2.3%. On univariate logistic regression analysis, none of the clinical and dosimetric parameters predicted for rectal bleeding. Of 110 men who were potent before treatment, 81% remained potent 5 years after treatment. Three biochemical failures and only one local failure developed. The 5-year biochemical no evidence of disease rate using the 'nadir plus 2' definition was 96.8%. Conclusion: A D{sub 90} of {>=}180 Gy is associated with

  9. Iodine-125 brachytherapy for brain tumours - a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Iodine-125 brachytherapy has been applied to brain tumours since 1979. Even though the physical and biological characteristics make these implants particularly attractive for minimal invasive treatment, the place for stereotactic brachytherapy is still poorly defined. An extensive review of the literature has been performed, especially concerning indications, results and complications. Iodine-125 seeds have been implanted in astrocytomas I-III, glioblastomas, metastases and several other tumour entities. Outcome data given in the literature are summarized. Complications are rare in carefully selected patients. All in all, for highly selected patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent primary or metastatic tumours, this method provides encouraging survival rates with relatively low complication rates and a good quality of life. PMID:22394548

  10. Iodine 125 interstitial irradiation for localized prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, P.P.; Good, R.R.; Bartone, F.F. )

    1990-03-01

    We present the technique, complications, and 5-year results of transperineal percutaneous template permanent interstitial iodine 125 endocurietherapy of localized prostate cancer in 85 treated patients. The 5-year outcome appears similar to that of external beam radiation therapy or radical surgery, but the iatrogenic mortality, morbidity, treatment time, and hospitalization are significantly reduced.

  11. Iodine 125 interstitial irradiation for localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, P. P.; Good, R. R.; Bartone, F. F.

    1990-01-01

    We present the technique, complications, and 5-year results of transperineal percutaneous template permanent interstitial iodine 125 endocurietherapy of localized prostate cancer in 85 treated patients. The 5-year outcome appears similar to that of external beam radiation therapy or radical surgery, but the iatrogenic mortality, morbidity, treatment time, and hospitalization are significantly reduced. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2319613

  12. Pulmonary embolization of iodine-125 seeds following prostate implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfeld, A.D.; Donahue, B.R.; Plaine, L. )

    1991-02-01

    The optimal treatment of prostatic carcinoma limited to the gland remains controversial. Treatment has included implantation of Iodine-125 seeds via both a suprapubic approach and, more recently, a transperineal technique utilizing ultrasound guidance. We recently have noted a heretofore unreported complication with this latter technique, namely, embolization of seeds to the lungs. Review of the chest x-ray films of 31 patients who underwent suprapubic implants showed no evidence of this phenomenon. One of 5 patients undergoing transperineal implant was found to have seeds lodged in the lung. Complications surrounding the various treatments of localized prostate carcinoma are reviewed.

  13. Analysis of iodine-125 interstitial therapy in the treatment of localized carcinoma of the prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Gomella, L.G.; Steinberg, S.M.; Ellison, M.F.; Reeves, W.W.; Flanigan, R.C.; McRoberts, J.W. )

    1991-04-01

    Definitive treatment of localized carcinoma of the prostate has included radical surgery, external beam radiation therapy, and interstitial radiation therapy. The interstitial agent most commonly used is Iodine-125. Forty-eight patients were treated with interstitial radiation therapy using Iodine-125 implants with a median follow-up of 55 months. Forty-three percent of the evaluable patients had progressive disease with approximately 50% progressing at 5 years by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Overall actuarial survival in the group was 80% at 5 years. This and several other studies suggest that control of prostate cancer with Iodine-125 seeds may be suboptimal as compared with other treatment modalities, especially the radical retropubic prostatectomy. Analysis of treatment parameters is presented along with a discussion of the current status and future prospects for treatment of localized carcinoma of the prostate with interstitial radiation therapy.

  14. Permanent iodine 125 brachytherapy in patients with progressive or recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Larson, David A.; Suplica, Jeffrey M.; Chang, Susan M.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; McDermott, Michael W.; Sneed, Penny K.; Prados, Michael D.; Wara, William M.; Nicholas, M. Kelly; Berger, Mitchel S.

    2004-01-01

    This study reports the initial experience at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) with tumor resection and permanent, low-activity iodine 125 (125I) brachytherapy in patients with progressive or recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GM) and compares these results to those of similar patients treated previously at UCSF with temporary brachytherapy without tumor resection. Thirty-eight patients with progressive or recurrent GM were treated at UCSF with repeat craniotomy, tumor resection, and permanent, low-activity 125I brachytherapy between June 1997 and May 1998. Selection criteria were Karnofsky performance score ⩾60, unifocal, contrast-enhancing, well-circumscribed progressive or recurrent GM that was judged to be completely resectable, and no evidence of leptomeningeal or subependymal spread. The median brachytherapy dose 5 mm exterior to the resection cavity was 300 Gy (range, 150–500 Gy). One patient was excluded from analysis. Median survival was 52 weeks from the date of brachytherapy. Age, Karnofsky performance score, and preimplant tumor volume were all statistically significant on univariate analyses. Multivariate analysis for survival showed only age to be significant. Median time to progression was 16 weeks. Both univariate and multivariate analysis of freedom from progression showed only preoperative tumor volume to be significant. Comparison to temporary brachytherapy patients showed no apparent difference in survival time. Chronic steroid requirements were low in patients with minimal postoperative residual tumor. We conclude that permanent 125I brachytherapy for recurrent or progressive GM is well tolerated. Survival time was comparable to that of a similar group of patients treated with temporary brachytherapy. PMID:15134626

  15. Long-term follow-up of patients of intrahepatic malignancies treated with Iodine-125 brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, Subir . E-mail: nag.1@osu.edu; DeHaan, Megan; Scruggs, Granger; Mayr, Nina; Martin, Edward W.

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: We investigated the role of intraoperative iodine-125 ({sup 125}I) brachytherapy as a treatment option for unresectable primary and metastatic liver tumors. Methods and Materials: Between 1989 and 2002, 64 patients with unresectable or residual disease after surgical resection for intrahepatic malignancies underwent 160-Gy permanent {sup 125}I brachytherapy. Results: The median length of follow-up was 13.2 years. The overall 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year actuarial intrahepatic local control rates were 44%, 22%, and 22%, respectively, with a median time to liver recurrence of 9 months (95% CI, 6-12 months). The 5-year actuarial intrahepatic control was higher for patients with solitary metastasis (38%) than for those with multiple metastases (6%, p = 0.04). The 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year actuarial overall survival rates were 73%, 23%, and 5%, respectively (median, 20 months; 95% CI, 16-24; longest survival, 7.5 years). Overall survival was higher for patients with smaller-volume implants (p = 0.003) and for patients without prior liver resection (p = 0.002). No mortality occurred. Radiation-related complications were minimal. Conclusions: For select patients with unresectable primary and metastatic liver tumors for whom curative surgical resection is not an option, {sup 125}I brachytherapy is a safe and effective alternative to other locally ablative techniques and can provide long-term local control and increased survival.

  16. Permanent Iodine-125 Interstitial Planar Seed Brachytherapy for Close or Positive Margins for Thoracic Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Mutyala, Subhakar; Stewart, Alexandra; Khan, Atif J.; Cormack, Robert A.; O'Farrell, Desmond; Sugarbaker, David; Devlin, Phillip M.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To assess toxicity and outcome following permanent iodine-125 seed implant as an adjunct to surgical resection in cases of advanced thoracic malignancy. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved retrospective review was performed. Fifty-nine patients were identified as having undergone thoracic brachytherapy seed implantation between September 1999 and December 2006. Data for patient demographics, tumor details, and morbidity and mortality were recorded. Results: Fifty-nine patients received 64 implants. At a median follow-up of 17 months, 1-year and 2-year Kaplan-Meier rates of estimated overall survival were 94.1% and 82.0%, respectively. The 1-year and 2-year local control rates were 80.1% and 67.4%, respectively. The median time to develop local recurrence was 11 months. Grades 3 and 4 toxicity rates were 12% at 1 year. Conclusions: This review shows relatively low toxicity for interstitial planar seed implantation after thoracic surgical resection. The high local control results suggest that an incomplete oncologic surgery plus a brachytherapy implant for treating advanced thoracic malignancy merit further investigation.

  17. Prostate biopsy after definitive treatment by interstitial iodine 125 implant or external beam radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schellhammer, P.F.; el-Mahdi, A.M.; Higgins, E.M.; Schultheiss, T.E.; Ladaga, L.E.; Babb, T.J.

    1987-05-01

    The response to definitive radiation therapy of localized carcinoma of the prostate by iodine 125 implantation or external beam radiotherapy was monitored by examining specimens from biopsies performed after treatment. We analyzed 126 biopsy specimens obtained 18 months or more after treatment: 71 were obtained from 109 patients treated by iodine 125 and 55 from 197 patients treated by external beam radiotherapy. Thereafter, the disease status of these patients was examined at minimum 3-year intervals. No significant statistical difference was found between the negative specimen rates of the 2 treatment modalities: 46 of 71 (65 per cent) after iodine 125 implantation and 39 of 55 (71 per cent) after external beam radiotherapy were negative. To analyze the predictive value of biopsy results 103 patients whose prostatic examination results were normal at biopsy or who showed regression of tumor size and tumor induration after radiation were evaluated. The biopsy results from all patients were combined for analysis. Of 77 patients with negative biopsy specimens 16 (21 per cent) have had recurrent disease, compared to 17 of 26 (65 per cent) with positive biopsy specimens (p equals 0.00005). Of the 77 patients with negative biopsy specimens 7 (9 per cent) had local disease recurrence, compared to 12 of 26 (46 per cent) with a positive biopsy specimen (p equals 0.0001). The value of a positive specimen to predict failure remained significant with patients stratified by pre-treatment clinical stage and grade of the disease. Our results show that patients with positive specimens from the prostate who had been judged clinically by rectal examination to have responded to radiation therapy had a significantly increased incidence of local and distant failure compared to patients who had negative biopsy specimens.

  18. Outcomes of Iodine-125 Plaque Brachytherapy for Uveal Melanoma With Intraoperative Ultrasonography and Supplemental Transpupillary Thermotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Badiyan, Shahed N.; Rao, Rajesh C.; Apicelli, Anthony J.; Acharya, Sahaja; Verma, Vivek; Garsa, Adam A.; DeWees, Todd; Speirs, Christina K.; Garcia-Ramirez, Jose; Esthappan, Jacqueline; Grigsby, Perry W.; Harbour, J. William

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the impact on local tumor control of intraoperative ultrasonographic plaque visualization and selective application of transpupillary thermotherapy (TTT) in the treatment of posterior uveal melanoma with iodine-125 (I-125) episcleral plaque brachytherapy (EPB). Methods and Materials: Retrospective analysis of 526 patients treated with I-125 EPB for posterior uveal melanoma. Clinical features, dosimetric parameters, TTT treatments, and local tumor control outcomes were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazards and Kaplan-Meier life table method. Results: The study included 270 men (51%) and 256 women (49%), with a median age of 63 years (mean, 62 years; range, 16-91 years). Median dose to the tumor apex was 94.4 Gy (mean, 97.8; range, 43.9-183.9) and to the tumor base was 257.9 Gy (mean, 275.6; range, 124.2-729.8). Plaque tilt >1 mm away from the sclera at plaque removal was detected in 142 cases (27%). Supplemental TTT was performed in 72 patients (13.7%). One or 2 TTT sessions were required in 71 TTT cases (98.6%). After a median follow-up of 45.9 months (mean, 53.4 months; range, 6-175 months), local tumor recurrence was detected in 19 patients (3.6%). Local tumor recurrence was associated with lower dose to the tumor base (P=.02). Conclusions: Ultrasound-guided plaque localization of I-125 EPB is associated with excellent local tumor control. Detection of plaque tilt by ultrasonography at plaque removal allows supplemental TTT to be used in patients at potentially higher risk for local recurrence while sparing the majority of patients who are at low risk. Most patients require only 1 or 2 TTT sessions.

  19. Brachytherapy of recurrent malignant brain tumors with removable high-activity iodine-125 sources

    SciTech Connect

    Gutin, P.H.; Phillips, T.L.; Wara, W.M.; Leibel, S.A.; Hosobuchi, Y.; Levin, V.A.; Weaver, K.A.; Lamb, S.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-seven patients harboring recurrent malignant primary or metastatic brain tumors were treated by 40 implantations of high-activity iodine-125 (/sup 125/I) sources. All patients had been treated with irradiation and most had been treated with chemotherapeutic agents, primarily nitrosoureas. Implantations were performed using computerized tomography (CT)-directed stereotaxy; /sup 125/I sources were held in one or more afterloaded catheters that were removed after the desired dose (minimum tumor dose of 3000 to 12,000 rads) had been delivered. Patients were followed with sequential neurological examinations and CT scans. Results of 34 implantation procedures were evaluable: 18 produced documented tumor regression (response) for 4 to 13+ months; five, performed in deteriorating patients, resulted in disease stability for 4 to 12 months. The overall response rate was 68%. In 11 patients, implantation did not halt clinical deterioration. At exploratory craniotomy 5 to 12 months after implantation, focal radiation necrosis was documented in two patients whose tumor had responded initially and then progressed, and in three patients whose disease had progressed initially (four glioblastomas, one anaplastic astrocytoma); histologically identifiable tumor was documented in two of these patients. All improved after resection of the focal necrotic mass and are still alive 10, 15, 19, 24, and 25 months after the initial implantation procedure; only one patient has evidence of tumor regrowth. The median follow-up period after implantation for the malignant glioma (anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma multiforme) group is 9 months, with 48% of patients still surviving. While direct comparison with the results of chemotherapy is difficult, results obtained in this patient group with interstitial brachytherapy are probably superior to results obtained with chemotherapy.

  20. Intra-operative Iodine-125 prostatic implant following bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Kwong, E.W.H.; Huh, S.H.; Nobler, M.P.; Smith, H.S.

    1984-05-01

    Sixty-five patients with prostatic adenocarcinoma Stages B and C were treated with intraoperative Iodine-125 prostatic implantation following bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy. Pelvic nodal metastases were found in 31% of the patients. All the patients have been followed for a period of 1 1/2 to 6 years. Serial digital rectal examination revealed complete regression of the palpable disease in 15% of the patients at 6 months, 47% at 1 year, and 87% at 2 years. Post-operative complications were also evaluated: 13% of the patients became sexually impotent, 11% had impaired potency after the procedure, and 26% of patients complained of dry ejaculation; and 17% developed scrotal and/or penile swelling, which persisted up to 14 months, but usually subsided within 5 months. Two patients developed local recurrence.

  1. Treasure of the Past IX: Exposure Standardization of Iodine-125 Seeds Used for Brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Loftus, T. P.

    2001-01-01

    A method for calibrating iodine-125 seeds in terms of exposure has been established. The standard free-air ionization chamber, used for measuring soft x rays, was chosen for the measurements. Arrays of four to six seeds were used to enhance the ionization-current-to-background-current ratio. Seeds from an array were measured individually in a re-entrant chamber. The quotient of the exposure rate for the array by the sum of the ionization currents in the re-entrant chamber is the calibration factor for the re-entrant chamber. Calibration factors were established for three types of iodine-125 seeds. The overall uncertainty for the seed exposure calibrations is less than 6%.

  2. Ocular Response of Choroidal Melanoma With Monosomy 3 Versus Disomy 3 After Iodine-125 Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Marathe, Omkar S.; Wu, Jeffrey; Lee, Steve P.; Yu Fei; Burgess, Barry L.; Leu Min; Straatsma, Bradley R.; McCannel, Tara A.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To report the ocular response of choroidal melanoma with monosomy 3 vs. disomy 3 after {sup 125}I brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: We evaluated patients with ciliochoroidal melanoma managed with fine needle aspiration biopsy immediately before plaque application for {sup 125}I brachytherapy between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2008. Patients with (1) cytopathologic diagnosis of melanoma, (2) melanoma chromosome 3 status identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and (3) 6 or more months of follow-up after brachytherapy were sorted by monosomy 3 vs. disomy 3 and compared by Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: Among 40 ciliochoroidal melanomas (40 patients), 15 had monosomy 3 and 25 had disomy 3. Monosomy 3 melanomas had a median greatest basal diameter of 12.00 mm and a median tumor thickness of 6.69 mm before brachytherapy; at a median of 1.75 years after brachytherapy, median thickness was 3.10 mm. Median percentage decrease in tumor thickness was 48.3%. Disomy 3 melanomas had a median greatest basal diameter of 10.00 mm and median tumor thickness of 3.19 mm before brachytherapy; at a median of 2.00 years after brachytherapy, median tumor thickness was 2.37 mm. The median percentage decrease in tumor thickness was 22.7%. Monosomy 3 melanomas were statistically greater in size than disomy 3 melanomas (p < 0.001) and showed a greater decrease in tumor thickness after brachytherapy (p = 0.006). Conclusion: In this study, ciliochoroidal melanomas with monosomy 3 were significantly greater in size than disomy 3 melanoma and showed a significantly greater decrease in thickness at a median of 1.75 years after brachytherapy. The greater decrease in monosomy 3 melanoma thickness after brachytherapy is consistent with other malignancies in which more aggressive pathology has been shown to be associated with a greater initial response to radiotherapy.

  3. Dosimetric and Late Radiation Toxicity Comparison Between Iodine-125 Brachytherapy and Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Juxtapapillary Choroidal Melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Krema, Hatem

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To compare the dose distributions and late radiation toxicities for {sup 125}I brachytherapy (IBT) and stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) in the treatment of juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma. Methods: Ninety-four consecutive patients with juxtapapillary melanoma were reviewed: 30 have been treated with IBT and 64 with SRT. Iodine-125 brachytherapy cases were modeled with plaque simulator software for dosimetric analysis. The SRT dosimetric data were obtained from the Radionics XKnife RT3 software. Mean doses at predetermined intraocular points were calculated. Kaplan-Meier estimates determined the actuarial rates of late toxicities, and the log–rank test compared the estimates. Results: The median follow-up was 46 months in both cohorts. The 2 cohorts were balanced with respect to pretreatment clinical and tumor characteristics. Comparisons of radiation toxicity rates between the IBT and SRT cohorts yielded actuarial rates at 50 months for cataracts of 62% and 75% (P=.1), for neovascular glaucoma 8% and 47% (P=.002), for radiation retinopathy 59% and 89% (P=.0001), and for radiation papillopathy 39% and 74% (P=.003), respectively. Dosimetric comparisons between the IBT and SRT cohorts yielded mean doses of 12.8 and 14.1 Gy (P=.56) for the lens center, 17.6 and 19.7 Gy (P=.44) for the lens posterior pole, 13.9 and 10.8 Gy (P=.30) for the ciliary body, 61.9 and 69.7 Gy (P=.03) for optic disc center, and 48.9 and 60.1 Gy (P<.0001) for retina at 5-mm distance from tumor margin, respectively. Conclusions: Late radiation-induced toxicities were greater with SRT, which is secondary to the high-dose exposure inherent to the technique as compared with IBT. When technically feasible, IBT is preferred to treat juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma.

  4. Stereotactic iodine-125 brachytherapy for brain tumors: temporary versus permanent implantation.

    PubMed

    Ruge, Maximilian I; Kickingereder, Philipp; Grau, Stefan; Treuer, Harald; Sturm, Volker; Voges, Juergen

    2012-01-01

    Stereotactic brachytherapy (SBT) has been described in several publications as an effective, minimal invasive and safe highly focal treatment option in selected patients with well circumscribed brain tumors <4 cm. However, a still ongoing discussion about indications and technique is hindering the definition of a clear legitimation of SBT in modern brain tumor treatment. These controversies encompass the question of how intense the irradiation should be delivered into the target volume (dose rate). For instance, reports about the use of high does rate (HDR) implantation schemes (>40 cGy/h) in combination with adjuvant external beam radiation and/or chemotherapy for the treatment of malignant gliomas and metastases resulted in increased rates of radiation induced adverse tissue changes requiring surgical intervention. Vice versa, such effects have been only minimally observed in numerous studies applying low dose rate (LDR) regiments (3-8 cGy/h) for low grade gliomas, metastases and other rare indications. Besides these observations, there are, however, no data available directly comparing the long term incidences of tissue changes after HDR and LDR and there is, furthermore, no evidence regarding a difference between temporary or permanent LDR implantation schemes. Thus, recommendations for effective and safe implantation schemes have to be investigated and compared in future studies. PMID:22713629

  5. Iodine 125 Brachytherapy With Vitrectomy and Silicone Oil in the Treatment of Uveal Melanoma: 1-to-1 Matched Case-Control Series

    SciTech Connect

    McCannel, Tara A. McCannel, Colin A.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We initially reported the radiation-attenuating effect of silicone oil 1000 centistokes for iodine 125. The purpose of this report was to compare the clinical outcomes in case patients who had iodine 125 brachytherapy with vitrectomy and silicone oil 1000 centistokes with the outcomes in matched control patients who underwent brachytherapy alone. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients with uveal melanoma who were treated with iodine 125 plaque brachytherapy and vitrectomy with silicone oil with minimum 1-year follow-up were included. Control patients who underwent brachytherapy alone were matched for tumor size, location, and sex. Baseline patient and tumor characteristics and tumor response to radiation, final visual acuity, macular status, central macular thickness by ocular coherence tomography (OCT), cataract progression, and metastasis at last follow-up visit were compared. Surgical complications were also determined. Results: Twenty case patients met the inclusion criteria. The average follow-up time was 22.1 months in case patients and 19.4 months in control patients. The final logMAR vision was 0.81 in case patients and 1.1 in control patients (P=.071); 8 case patients and 16 control patients had abnormal macular findings (P=.011); and the average central macular thickness by OCT was 293.2 μm in case patients and 408.5 μm in control patients (P=.016). Eleven case patients (55%) and 1 control patient (5%) had required cataract surgery at last follow-up (P=.002). Four patients in the case group and 1 patient in the control group experienced metastasis (P=.18). Among the cases, intraoperative retinal tear occurred in 3 patients; total serous retinal detachment and macular hole developed in 1 case patient each. There was no case of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, treatment failure, or local tumor dissemination in case patients or control patients. Conclusions: With up to 3 years of clinical follow-up, silicone oil during brachytherapy

  6. Prostate brachytherapy

    MedlinePlus

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer; Radioactive seed placement; Internal radiation therapy - prostate; High dose radiation (HDR) ... CT scan to plan and then place the seeds that deliver radiation into your prostate. The seeds ...

  7. In Vivo Dosimetry With a Linear MOSFET Array to Evaluate the Urethra Dose During Permanent Implant Brachytherapy Using Iodine-125

    SciTech Connect

    Bloemen-van Gurp, Esther J.; Haanstra, Bjoerk K.C.; Murrer, Lars H.P.; Gils, Francis C.J.M. van; Dekker, Andre L.A.J.; Mijnheer, Ben J.; Lambin, Philippe

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a technique to monitor the dose rate in the urethra during permanent implant brachytherapy using a linear MOSFET array, with sufficient accuracy and without significantly extending the implantation time. Methods and Materials: Phantom measurements were performed to determine the optimal conditions for clinical measurements. In vivo measurements were performed in 5 patients during the {sup 125}I brachytherapy implant procedure. To evaluate if the urethra dose obtained in the operating room with the ultrasound transducer in the rectum and the patient in treatment position is a reference for the total accumulated dose; additional measurements were performed after the implantation procedure, in the recovery room. Results: In vivo measurements during and after the implantation procedure agree very well, illustrating that the ultrasound transducer in the rectum and patient positioning do not influence the measured dose in the urethra. In vivo dose values obtained during the implantation are therefore representative for the total accumulated dose in the urethra. In 5 patients, the dose rates during and after the implantation were below the maximum dose rate of the urethra, using the planned seed distribution. Conclusion: In vivo dosimetry during the implantation, using a MOSFET array, is a feasible technique to evaluate the dose in the urethra during the implantation of {sup 125}I seeds for prostate brachytherapy.

  8. Prostate brachytherapy

    MedlinePlus

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer; Radioactive seed placement; Internal radiation therapy - prostate; High dose radiation (HDR) ... radiation safety precautions. If you have a permanent implant, your provider may tell you to limit the ...

  9. Iodine-125 prostate implants for recurrent carcinomas after external beam irradiation: preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Goffinet, D.R.; Martinez, A.; Freiha, F.; Pooler, D.M.; Pistenma, D.A.; Cumes, D.; Bagshaw, M.A.

    1980-06-01

    Fourteen patients with locally recurrent prostate carcinomas after external beam irradiation received /sup 125/I seed implants at Stanford between 1975 and 1979. Clinical local control was obtained in 11 of the 14 patients for follow-up periods of 6 to 36 months. Eight remain without evidence of disease, but 2 of the 3 patients whose pelvic lymph nodes were involved by carcinoma have developed distant metastases. Complications, consisting of either cystoproctitis, urinary incontinence, or the development of a vesicorectal fistula occurred in 4 of the 14 patients. These complications were noted only in those patients who had implantation of high intensity /sup 125/I seeds (>0.50 mCi) into large prostatic volumes (greater than or equal to 50cc). No complications occurred in patients who received lower intensity /sup 125/I seed implants in smaller prostatic volumes. We conclude that /sup 125/I seed implants may be used in a second attempt to obtain local control after a local relapse following external beam irradiation, if the use of high intensity /sup 125/I sources and/or the implantation of large prostate volumes are avoided.

  10. Phase I Trial of Gross Total Resection, Permanent Iodine-125 Brachytherapy, and Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Chang, Susan; Pouliot, Jean; Sneed, Penny K.; Prados, Michael D.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Malec, Mary K.; McDermott, Michael W.; Berger, Mitchell S.; Larson, David A.

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of gross total resection and permanent I-125 brachytherapy followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy for patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Methods and Materials: From April 1999 to May 2002, 21 patients with glioblastoma multiforme were enrolled on a Phase I protocol investigating planned gross total resection and immediate placement of permanent I-125 seeds, followed by postoperative hyperfractionated radiotherapy to a dose of 60 Gy at 100 cGy b.i.d., 5 days per week. Median age and Karnofsky performance status were 50 years (range, 32-65 years) and 90 (range, 70-100), respectively. Toxicity was assessed according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: Eighteen patients completed treatment according to protocol. The median preoperative tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging was 18.6 cm{sup 3} (range, 4.4-41.2 cm{sup 3}). The median brachytherapy dose measured 5 mm radially outward from the resection cavity was 400 Gy (range, 200-600 Gy). Ten patients underwent 12 reoperations, with 11 of 12 reoperations demonstrating necrosis without evidence of tumor. Because of high toxicity, the study was terminated early. Median progression-free survival and overall survival were 57 and 114 weeks, respectively, but not significantly improved compared with historical patients treated at University of California, San Francisco, with gross total resection and radiotherapy without brachytherapy. Conclusions: Treatment with gross total resection and permanent I-125 brachytherapy followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy as performed in this study results in high toxicity and reoperation rates, without demonstrated improvement in survival.

  11. Long-Term Results of Brachytherapy With Temporary Iodine-125 Seeds in Children With Low-Grade Gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Korinthenberg, Rudolf; Neuburger, Daniela; Trippel, Michael; Ostertag, Christoph; Nikkhah, Guido

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively review the results of temporary I-125 brachytherapy in 94 children and adolescents with low-grade glioma. Methods and Materials: Treatment was performed in progressive tumors roughly spherical in shape with a diameter of up to 5 cm, including 79 astrocytomas, 5 oligodendrogliomas, 4 oligoastrocytomas, 1 ependymoma, and 5 other tumors. Location was suprasellar/chiasmal in 44, thalamic/basal ganglia in 18, hemispheric in 15, midbrain/pineal region in 13, and lower brainstem in 3. Initially, 8% of patients were free of symptoms, 47% were symptomatic but not disabled, and 30% were slightly, 6% moderately, and 3% severely disabled. Results: 5- and 10-year survival was 97% and 92%. The response to I-125 brachytherapy over the long term was estimated after a median observation period of 38.4 (range, 6.4-171.0) months. At that time, 4 patients were in complete, 27 in partial, and 18 in objective remission; 15 showed stable and 30 progressive tumors. Treatment results did not correlate with age, sex, histology, tumor size, location, or demarcation of the tumor. Secondary treatment became necessary in 36 patients, including 19 who underwent repeated I-125 brachytherapy. At final follow-up, the number of symptom-free patients had risen to 21%. Thirty-eight percent showed symptoms without functional impairment, 19% were slightly and 11% moderately disabled, and only 4% were severely disabled. Conclusions: Response rates similar to those of conventional radiotherapy or chemotherapy can be anticipated with I-125 brachytherapy in tumors of the appropriate size and shape. We believe it to be a useful contribution to the treatment of low-grade gliomas in children.

  12. Canadian prostate brachytherapy in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Mira; Crook, Juanita; Morris, W. James; Morton, Gerard; Pickles, Tom; Usmani, Nawaid; Vigneault, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Prostate brachytherapy can be used as a monotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk patients or in combination with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) as a form of dose escalation for selected intermediate- and high-risk patients. Prostate brachytherapy with either permanent implants (low dose rate [LDR]) or temporary implants (high dose rate [HDR]) is emerging as the most effective radiation treatment for prostate cancer. Several large Canadian brachytherapy programs were established in the mid- to late-1990s. Prostate brachytherapy is offered in British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick. We anticipate the need for brachytherapy services in Canada will significantly increase in the near future. In this review, we summarize brachytherapy programs across Canada, contemporary eligibility criteria for the procedure, toxicity and prostate-specific antigen recurrence free survival (PRFS), as published from Canadian institutions for both LDR and HDR brachytherapy. PMID:23671495

  13. Brachytherapy with Iodine-125 seeds strand for treatment of main portal vein tumor thrombi: an experimental study in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Luo, Jianjun; Liu, Qingxin; Ma, Jingqin; Qu, Xudong; Yang, Minjie; Yan, Zhiping; Wang, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to establish an animal model of implanted main portal vein tumor thrombus (MPVTT) and to evaluate safety and efficacy of brachy therapy with Iodine-125 (125I) seeds strand to treat MPVTT of rabbit. VX2 tumor thrombus was implanted in main portal vein (MPV) of 32 New Zealand white rabbits. These rabbits were randomly divided into treatment group (Group T, T1-T16) and control group (Group C, C1-C16). 125I seeds and blank seeds strand were implanted in MPV of rabbits in Group T and C, respectively. Changes of general condition, body weight and blood laboratory examination were monitored at every time point after procedure. 2 weeks later, 8 rabbits of each group were sacrificed for pathologic examination. The rest of rabbits were dissected postmortem, and therapeutic effects were evaluated on basis of multi-detector computed tomography and histopathology. Ki-67 labeling index (Ki-67 LI) and apoptosis index (AI) were compared between two groups. Overall survival period was recorded. At every time point after brachytherapy, more serious weight loss were detected in Group C. Results of liver function tests and blood cells counts showed no significant difference between two groups. Mean volume of tumor tissue within MPV were 565.40 ± 220.90 mm3 in Group T and 2269.90 ± 437.00 mm3 in Group C (P < 0.001). (Ki-67 LI) and AI were (4.14 ± 1.84)% and (6.51 ± 1.92)% in Group T, compared with (33.82 ± 6.07)% and (0.91 ± 0.26)% in Group C, respectively (P < 0.001). Media survival time of rabbits were 39.50 ± 2.37 days in Group T and 27.38 ± 1.22 days in Group C, respectively (P = 0.001). In conclusion, injecting and suspensory fixing VX2 tumor strip into MPV is a reliable method to establish MPVTT animal model. Brachytherapy with 125I seeds strand was safe and effective to treat VX2 tumor strand inoculated in the MPV of rabbit. PMID:27152237

  14. Dosimetry of a thyroid uptake detected in seed migration survey following a patient's iodine-125 prostate implant and in vitro measurements of intentional seed leakages

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Qinsheng; Russell, John L. Jr.; Macklis, Roger R.; Weinhous, Martin S.; Blair, Henry F.

    2006-07-15

    As a quality control procedure, a post-implant seed migration survey has been accomplished on 340 prostate cancer patients since November 2001. Pulmonary seed embolization and intracardiac seed embolization have been detected. A case of thyroid uptake due to leaking iodine-125 (I-125) sources was also seized. In order to determine the dose to the thyroid, a dosimetry method was developed to link in vivo measurements and the cumulated dose to the thyroid. The calculated source leakage half-life in the case was approximately 15 days based on the measurements and the estimated cumulated dose to thyroid was 204 cGy. It is concluded that one seed was leaking. In order to verify the in vivo measurements, intentional in vitro seed leakage tests were performed. A seed was cut open and placed in a sealed glass container filled with a given volume of saline. The I-125 concentration in the saline was subsequently measured over a period of six months. Consistent in vivo and in vitro results were obtained. Recent incidents of seed leaks reported from other centers have drawn practitioners' attention to this problem. In order to make the measurements more useful, the seed leakage tests were expanded to include I-125 seeds from six other vendors. The results show that the leakage half-lives of those seeds varied from nine days to a half-year. Two seed models demonstrated least leakage. Since the measurements lasted for six months, the escape of iodine resulted from oxidation of iodide in the saline was a concern for the measurement accuracy. As a reference, another set of leakage tests were performed by adding sodium thiosulfate salt (Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}5H{sub 2}O) to the saline. Sodium thiosulfate is a reducing agent that prevents the conversion of iodide to iodate so as to minimize I-125 evaporation. As a result, significantly shortened leakage half-lives were observed in this group. Seed agitation was also performed and no significant deviations of the

  15. SU-E-T-55: Biological Equivalent Dose (BED) Comparison Between Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy and Conventional External Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X; Rahimian, J; Cosmatos, H; Goy, B; Heywood, C; Qian, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The goal of this research is to calculate and compare the Biological Equivalent Dose (BED) between permanent prostate Iodine-125 implant brachytherapy as monotherapy with the BED of conventional external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods: A retrospective study of 605 patients treated with Iodine-125 seed implant was performed in which physician A treated 274 patients and physician B treated 331 patients. All the Brachytherapy treatment plans were created using VariSeed 8 planning system. The Iodine-125 seed source activities and loading patterns varied slightly between the two physicians. The prescription dose is 145 Gy to PTV for each patient. The BED and Tumor Control Probability (TCP) were calculated based on the TG 137 formulas. The BED for conventional EBRT of the prostate given in our institution in 2Gy per fraction for 38 fractions was calculated and compared. Results: Physician A treated 274 patients with an average BED of 123.92±0.87 Gy and an average TCP of 99.20%; Physician B treated 331 patients with an average BED of 124.87±1.12 Gy and an average TCP of 99.30%. There are no statistically significant differences (T-Test) between the BED and TCP values calculated for these two group patients.The BED of the patients undergoing conventional EBRT is calculated to be 126.92Gy. The BED of the patients treated with permanent implant brachytherapy and EBRT are comparable. Our BED and TCP values are higher than the reported values by TG 137 due to higher Iodine-125 seed activity used in our institution. Conclusion: We calculated the BED,a surrogate of the biological response to a permanent prostate brachytherapy using TG 137 formulas and recommendation. The TCP of better than 99% is calculated for these patients. A clinical outcome study of these patients correlating the BED and TCP values with PSA and Gleason Levels as well as patient survival is warranted.

  16. Mature Follow-Up for High-Risk Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma Treated With Sublobar Resection and Intraoperative Iodine-125 Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Colonias, Athanasios; Betler, James; Trombetta, Mark; Bigdeli, Ghazaleh; Gayou, Olivier; Keenan, Robert; Werts, E. Day; Parda, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To update the Allegheny General Hospital experience of high-risk Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with sublobar resection and intraoperative {sup 125}I Vicryl mesh brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between January 5, 1996 and February 19, 2008, 145 patients with Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer who were not lobectomy candidates because of cardiopulmonary compromise underwent sublobar resection and placement of {sup 125}I seeds along the resection line. The {sup 125}I seeds embedded in Vicryl suture were attached with surgical clips to a sheet of Vicryl mesh, inserted over the target area, and prescribed to a 0.5-cm planar margin. Results: The mean target area, total activity, number of seeds implanted, and prescribed total dose was 33.3 cm{sup 2} (range, 18.0-100.8), 20.2 mCi (range, 11.1-29.7), 46 (range, 30-100), and 117 Gy (range, 80-180), respectively. The median length of the surgical stay was 6 days (range, 1-111), with a perioperative mortality rate of 3.4%. At a median follow-up of 38.3 months (range, 1-133), 6 patients had developed local recurrence (4.1%), 9 had developed regional failure (6.2%), and 25 had distant failure (17.2%). On multivariate analysis, no patient- or tumor-specific factors or surgical or dosimetric factors were predictive of local recurrence. The overall median survival was 30.5 months with a 3- and 5-year overall survival rate of 65% and 35%, respectively. Conclusion: {sup 125}I brachytherapy for high-risk, Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer after sublobar resection is well tolerated and associated with a low local failure rate.

  17. Prostate brachytherapy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... into your prostate. They were inserted through your perineum (the area between the scrotum and the anus). ... feel the urge to urinate more often. Your perineum may be tender and bruised. You can use ...

  18. 10-Year Experience With I-125 Prostate Brachytherapy at the Princess Margaret Hospital: Results for 1,100 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, Juanita; Borg, Jette; Evans, Andrew; Toi, Ants; Saibishkumar, E.P.; Fung, Sharon; Ma, Clement

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes for 1,111 men treated with iodine-125 brachytherapy (BT) at a single institution. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,111 men (median age, 63) were treated with iodine-125 prostate BT for low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer between March 1999 and November 2008. Median prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was 5.4 ng/ml (range, 0.9-26.1). T stage was T1c in 66% and T2 in 34% of patients. Gleason score was 6 in 90.1% and 7 or 8 in 9.9% of patients. Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy (2-6 months course) was used in 10.1% of patients and combined external radiotherapy (45 Gy) with BT (110 Gy) in 4.1% (n = 46) of patients. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards were used to determine predictors of failure. Results: Median follow-up was 42 months (range, 6-114), but for biochemical freedom from relapse, a minimum PSA test follow-up of 30 months was required (median 54; n = 776). There were 27 failures, yielding an actuarial 7-year disease-free survival rate of 95.2% (96 at risk beyond 84 months). All failures underwent repeat 12-core transrectal ultrasound -guided biopsies, confirming 8 local failures. On multivariate analysis, Gleason score was the only independent predictor of failure (p = 0.001; hazard ratio, 4.8 (1.9-12.4). Median International Prostate Symptom score from 12 to 108 months ranged between 3 and 9. Of the men reporting baseline potency, 82.8% retained satisfactory erectile function beyond 5 years. Conclusion: Iodine-125 prostate BT is a highly effective treatment option for favorable- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer and is associated with maintenance of good urinary and erectile functions.

  19. Urinary and Rectal Toxicity Profiles After Permanent Iodine-125 Implant Brachytherapy in Japanese Men: Nationwide J-POPS Multi-institutional Prospective Cohort Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ohashi, Toshio; Yorozu, Atsunori; Saito, Shiro; Tanaka, Nobumichi; Katayama, Norihisa; Kojima, Shinsuke; Maruo, Shinichiro; Kikuchi, Takashi; Dokiya, Takushi; Fukushima, Masanori; Yamanaka, Hidetoshi

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To assess, in a nationwide multi-institutional cohort study begun in 2005 and in which 6927 subjects were enrolled by 2010, the urinary and rectal toxicity profiles of subjects who enrolled during the first 2 years, and evaluate the toxicity profiles for permanent seed implantation (PI) and a combination therapy with PI and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: Baseline data for 2339 subjects out of 2354 patients were available for the analyses. Toxicities were evaluated using the National Cancer Institute's Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, and the International Prostate Symptom Scores were recorded prospectively until 36 months after radiation therapy. Results: Grade 2+ acute urinary toxicities developed in 7.36% (172 of 2337) and grade 2+ acute rectal toxicities developed in 1.03% (24 of 2336) of the patients. Grade 2+ late urinary and rectal toxicities developed in 5.75% (133 of 2312) and 1.86% (43 of 2312) of the patients, respectively. A higher incidence of grade 2+ acute urinary toxicity occurred in the PI group than in the EBRT group (8.49% vs 3.66%; P<.01). Acute rectal toxicity outcomes were similar between the treatment groups. The 3-year cumulative incidence rates for grade 2+ late urinary toxicities were 6.04% versus 4.82% for the PI and the EBRT groups, respectively, with no significant differences between the treatment groups. The 3-year cumulative incidence rates for grade 2+ late rectal toxicities were 0.90% versus 5.01% (P<.01) for the PI and the EBRT groups, respectively. The mean of the postimplant International Prostate Symptom Score peaked at 3 months, but it decreased to a range that was within 2 points of the baseline score, which was observed in 1625 subjects (69.47%) at the 1-year follow-up assessment. Conclusions: The acute urinary toxicities observed were acceptable given the frequency and retention, and the late rectal toxicities were more favorable than those of other studies.

  20. Modern prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Butler, W M; Merrick, G S; Dorsey, A T; Lief, J H; Galbreath, R W

    2000-01-01

    As computer-aided margin tools become more sophisticated, physicists will be increasingly called upon to convert ultrasound prostate volumes to expanded planning target volumes (PTVs) to treat adequately extracapsular disease. The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 43 formalism and the new National Institute of Standards and Technology calibration system suitable for single low-energy seeds have been crucial in smoothly implementing changes in established seeds and in incorporating data from new manufacturers. However, the lack of consensus on treatment design and evaluation has led to an uncomfortably wide spectrum of clinical practice, only part of which can be attributed to variations inherent to any surgical procedure due to the practitioner's skill. The relative merits of implanting the prostate and margin with a modified uniform seed-loading approach to create plans with a relatively homogeneous dose distribution and a corresponding low risk of overdosing critical structures are addressed. Likewise, the advantages of performing postoperative dosimetry at the physically optimum time of greater than 2 weeks post implant are contrasted with the clinical advantages of obtaining the dosimetry as soon as possible. Proposed lower limits for quality parameters such D90 and V100 are reviewed. Measures of doses to the urethra, rectum, and neurovascular bundles are presented, along with correlations between various dosimetric parameters and other patient specific data with quality of life metrics involving urinary incontinence, rectal damage, and sexual dysfunction. PMID:11025262

  1. AB012. Brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yong; Yang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the security and effect of brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. Methods Forty five patients with Tl–T2 prostate cancer were treated with real-time transperineal ultrasound-guide 125I seeds prostate implantation. Results The median operation time was 90 min, the median number of I seeds used was 56. The follow up time was 12–48 months, the cases of PSA <1 µg/L were 29, PSA 1–2 µg/L were 11 and PSA ≥2 µg/L were 5. Conclusions Brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer is safe and effective.

  2. Preoperative treatment planning with intraoperative optimization can achieve consistent high-quality implants in prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Pugh, Thomas J.; Swanson, David A.; Bruno, Teresa L.; Bolukbasi, Yasemin; Frank, Steven J.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in brachytherapy treatment planning systems have allowed the opportunity for brachytherapy to be planned intraoperatively as well as preoperatively. The relative advantages and disadvantages of each approach have been the subject of extensive debate, and some contend that the intraoperative approach is vital to the delivery of optimal therapy. The purpose of this study was to determine whether high-quality permanent prostate implants can be achieved consistently using a preoperative planning approach that allows for, but does not necessitate, intraoperative optimization. To achieve this purpose, we reviewed the records of 100 men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer who had been prospectively treated with brachytherapy monotherapy between 2006 and 2009 at our institution. All patients were treated with iodine-125 stranded seeds; the planned target dose was 145 Gy. Only 8 patients required adjustments to the plan on the basis of intraoperative findings. Consistency and quality were assessed by calculating the correlation coefficient between the planned and implanted amounts of radioactivity and by examining the mean values of the dosimetric parameters obtained on preoperative and 30 days postoperative treatment planning. The amount of radioactivity implanted was essentially identical to that planned (mean planned radioactivity, 41.27 U vs. mean delivered radioactivity, 41.36 U; R{sup 2} = 0.99). The mean planned and day 30 prostate V100 values were 99.9% and 98.6%, respectively. The mean planned and day 30 prostate D90 values were 186.3 and 185.1 Gy, respectively. Consistent, high-quality prostate brachytherapy treatment plans can be achieved using a preoperative planning approach, mostly without the need for intraoperative optimization. Good quality assurance measures during simulation, treatment planning, implantation, and postimplant evaluation are paramount for achieving a high level of quality and consistency.

  3. Salvage Brachytherapy for Biochemically Recurrent Prostate Cancer following Primary Brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, John M.; Wilson, William A.; Bole, Raevti; Chen, Li; Meigooni, Ali S.; Rowland, Randall G.; Clair, William H. St.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. In this study, we evaluated our experience with salvage brachytherapy after discovery of biochemical recurrence after a prior brachytherapy procedure. Methods and Materials. From 2001 through 2012 twenty-one patients treated by brachytherapy within University of Kentucky or from outside centers developed biochemical failure and had no evidence of metastases. Computed tomography (CT) scans were evaluated; patients who had an underseeded portion of their prostate were considered for reimplantation. Results. The majority of the patients in this study (61.9%) were low risk and median presalvage PSA was 3.49 (range 17.41–1.68). Mean follow-up was 61 months. At last follow-up after reseeding, 11/21 (52.4%) were free of biochemical recurrence. There was a trend towards decreased freedom from biochemical recurrence in low risk patients (p = 0.12). International Prostate Symptom Scores (IPSS) increased at 3-month follow-up visits but decreased and were equivalent to baseline scores at 18 months. Conclusions. Salvage brachytherapy after primary brachytherapy is possible; however, in our experience the side-effect profile after the second brachytherapy procedure was higher than after the first brachytherapy procedure. In this cohort of patients we demonstrate that approximately 50% oncologic control, low risk patients appear to have better outcomes than others. PMID:27092279

  4. Early voiding dysfunction associated with prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Wagner; Nag; Young; Bahnson

    2000-12-15

    Introduction: Transperineal prostate brachytherapy is gaining popularity as a treatment for clinically localized carcinoma of the prostate. Very little prospective data exists addressing the issue of complications associated with this procedure. We present an analysis of the early voiding dysfunction associated with prostate brachytherapy. Materials and Methods: Forty-six consecutive patients who underwent Palladium-103 (Pd-103) seed placement for clinically localized prostate carcinoma were evaluated prospectively for any morbidity associated with the procedure. Twenty-three patients completed an International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire preoperatively, at their first postoperative visit, and at their second postoperative visit. The total IPSS, each of the seven individual components, and the "bother" score were evaluated separately for each visit, and statistical significance was determined. Results: Urinary retention occurred in 7/46 patients (15%). Of these, 5 were able to void spontaneously after catheter removal. One patient is maintained with a suprapubic tube, and one patient is currently on continuous intermittent catheterization. Baseline IPSS was 7.1 and this went to 20.0 at the first postoperative visit (p<0.001). By the second postoperative visit, the IPSS was 8.0. Conclusions: In our experience, prostate brachytherapy for localized carcinoma of the prostate is associated with a 15% catheterization rate and a significant increase in the IPSS (7.1 to 20.0). This increase in the IPSS seems to be self-limited. Patients need to be educated on these issues prior to prostate brachytherapy. PMID:11113369

  5. Angiosarcoma of the Prostate Gland following Brachytherapy for Prostatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Arjun; Patnaik, Mrinal M.; Naina, Harris V.

    2015-01-01

    Prostatic adenocarcinoma is the most common cancer in men, but only a handful of cases of prostatic angiosarcoma have been reported in the literature. Prior radiation therapy for prostatic adenocarcinoma has been hypothesized to be a risk factor for angiosarcoma. The increasing practice of prostate cancer screening and the use of radiation therapy for management of prostatic adenocarcinoma will likely lead to more cases of prostatic angiosarcoma. Diagnosis is made by tissue sampling. Optimal management of these aggressive tumors remains to be defined and outcomes are poor with a high 1-year mortality. Primary care physicians and urologists should be aware of this rare entity and refer these patients to specialist centers where they can be managed by a multidisciplinary team. We report a case of angiosarcoma of the prostate gland diagnosed in a male presenting with lower urinary tract symptoms 5 years after brachytherapy for prostate adenocarcinoma. PMID:26889128

  6. Evaluation of the dosimetric parameters for 125I brachytherapy determined in prostate medium using CT images.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Takashi; Yorozu, Atsunori; Ohashi, Toshio; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Maruyama, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, the prostate medium determined from the CT images of 149 patients was developed. The dosimetric parameters such as Λ, g(L)(r) and F(r, θ) used in TG-43U1-based calculation for an iodine-125 ((125)I) brachytherapy-source were examined using Monte Carlo code Geant4. Clinical dosimetry parameters such as the D(90) were evaluated among a subgroup of 50 randomly selected patients who had been treated with permanent brachytherapy between January 2008 and December 2008 at the Tokyo Medical Center. The results show a slight difference in the dose rate constant Λ (within 1.0%). The radial dose function g(L)(r) exhibits a prominent difference in the region over 3 cm, and this difference is maintained within 2.9% in the region close to the source. The calculated values of F(r, θ) for the prostate medium were similar to values for water (within 1%), except in the longitudinal axis. A comparison of D(90) values shows a systematic dose overestimation of 2.8 ± 0.7 Gy in water, where the distribution of the differences can be seen with a spread of 1.8 ± 0.3% compared to that in prostate medium. It was concluded that the introduction of any kind of tissue correction for the TG-43U1-based calculation was not necessary to allow for the differences in elemental compositions and densities between water and prostate medium. PACS number: 87.00.00; 87.55.dk; 87.55.K-; 87.56.B-. PMID:20921822

  7. Establishing High-Quality Prostate Brachytherapy Using a Phantom Simulator Training Program

    SciTech Connect

    Thaker, Nikhil G.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Swanson, David A.; Albert, Jeffrey M.; Bruno, Teresa L.; Prestidge, Bradley R.; Crook, Juanita M.; Cox, Brett W.; Potters, Louis; Moran, Brian J.; Keyes, Mira; Kuban, Deborah A.; Frank, Steven J.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To design and implement a unique training program that uses a phantom-based simulator to teach the process of prostate brachytherapy (PB) quality assurance and improve the quality of education. Methods and Materials: Trainees in our simulator program were practicing radiation oncologists, radiation oncology residents, and fellows of the American Brachytherapy Society. The program emphasized 6 core areas of quality assurance: patient selection, simulation, treatment planning, implant technique, treatment evaluation, and outcome assessment. Using the Iodine 125 ({sup 125}I) preoperative treatment planning technique, trainees implanted their ultrasound phantoms with dummy seeds (ie, seeds with no activity). Pre- and postimplant dosimetric parameters were compared and correlated using regression analysis. Results: Thirty-one trainees successfully completed the simulator program during the period under study. The mean phantom prostate size, number of seeds used, and total activity were generally consistent between trainees. All trainees met the V100 >95% objective both before and after implantation. Regardless of the initial volume of the prostate phantom, trainees' ability to cover the target volume with at least 100% of the dose (V100) was not compromised (R=0.99 pre- and postimplant). However, the V150 had lower concordance (R=0.37) and may better reflect heterogeneity control of the implant process. Conclusions: Analysis of implants from this phantom-based simulator shows a high degree of consistency between trainees and uniformly high-quality implants with respect to parameters used in clinical practice. This training program provides a valuable educational opportunity that improves the quality of PB training and likely accelerates the learning curve inherent in PB. Prostate phantom implantation can be a valuable first step in the acquisition of the required skills to safely perform PB.

  8. Myths and fallacies in permanent prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Wayne M.; Merrick, Gregory S

    2003-09-30

    Because there are competing modalities to treat early-stage prostate cancer, the constraints or deficiencies of one modality may be erroneously applied to others. Some valid concerns arising from surgery and external beam therapy, which have been falsely transferred to brachytherapy, are constraints based on patient age, clinical and pathological parameters, patient weight, and size of prostate. Although the constraints have a valid basis in one modality, knowledge of the origin and mechanism of the constraint has provided a means to circumvent or overcome it in brachytherapy. Failures as measured by biochemical no-evidence of disease (bNED) survival may be attributed to extracapsular disease extension. Such extension often expresses itself in surrogate parameters such as a high percentage of positive biopsies, perineural invasion, or the dominant pattern in Gleason score histology. Failures due to such factors may be prevented by implanting with consistent extracapsular dosimetric margins. Some presumed limitations on prostate brachytherapy originated from data on patients implanted in the first few years the procedure was being developed. Most of the urinary morbidity and a significant part of the decrease in sexual function observed may be avoided by controlling the dosimetry along the prostatic and membranous urethra and at the penile bulb.

  9. Iodine-125 radiation of posterior uveal melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Packer, S.

    1987-12-01

    Twenty-eight cases of posterior choroidal melanoma were treated with iodine-125 in gold eye plaques. Eleven cases were located within 3.0 mm of the optic nerve (group A), nine were within 3.0 mm of the fovea (group B), and eight were within 3.0 mm of the optic nerve and fovea (group C). The mean follow-up of group A was 46.3 months; group B, 25.5 months; and group C, 42.7 months. Complications included macular edema, cataract and tumor growth. Visual acuity remained within two lines of that tested preoperatively for 4 of 11 patients in group A, 4 of 9 in group B, and 5 of 8 in group C. These results with iodine-125 suggest it as an appropriate treatment for patients with choroidal melanoma located near optic nerve and/or macula.

  10. Erectile Function Durability Following Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Kurko, Brian S.; Anderson, Richard; Lief, Jonathan H.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term changes in erectile function following prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: This study included 226 patients with prostate cancer and preimplant erectile function assessed by the International Index of Erectile Function-6 (IIEF-6) who underwent brachytherapy in two prospective randomized trials between February 2001 and January 2003. Median follow-up was 6.4 years. Pre- and postbrachytherapy potency was defined as IIEF-6 >= 13 without pharmacologic or mechanical support. The relationship among clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters and erectile function was examined. Results: The 7-year actuarial rate of potency preservation was 55.6% with median postimplant IIEF of 22 in potent patients. Potent patients were statistically younger (p = 0.014), had a higher preimplant IIEF (p < 0.001), were less likely to be diabetic (p = 0.002), and were more likely to report nocturnal erections (p = 0.008). Potency preservation in men with baseline IIEF scores of 29-30, 24-28, 18-23, and 13-17 were 75.5% vs. 73.6%, 51.7% vs. 44.8%, 48.0% vs. 40.0%, and 23.5% vs. 23.5% in 2004 vs. 2008. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, preimplant IIEF, hypertension, diabetes, prostate size, and brachytherapy dose to proximal penis strongly predicted for potency preservation. Impact of proximal penile dose was most pronounced for men with IIEF of 18-23 and aged 60-69. A significant minority of men who developed postimplant impotence ultimately regained erectile function. Conclusion: Potency preservation and median IIEF scores following brachytherapy are durable. Thoughtful dose sparing of proximal penile structures and early penile rehabilitation may further improve these results.

  11. A Novel MRI Marker for Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Steven J. Stafford, R. Jason; Bankson, James A.; Li Chun; Swanson, David A.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Martirosyan, Karen S.

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the optimal imaging modality for the prostate and surrounding critical organ structures. However, on MRI, the titanium radioactive seeds used for brachytherapy appear as black holes (negative contrast) and cannot be accurately localized. We sought to develop an encapsulated contrast agent marker (ECAM) with high-signal intensity on MRI to permit accurate localization of radioactive seeds with MRI during and after prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: We investigated several agents with paramagnetic and superparamagnetic properties. The agents were injected into titanium, acrylic, and glass seeds, which were linked together in various combinations and imaged with MRI. The agent with the greatest T1-weighted signal was tested further in a canine prostate and agarose phantom. Studies were performed on a 1.5-T clinical MRI scanner. Results: The cobalt-chloride complex contrast (C4) agent with stoichiometry (CoCl{sub 2}){sub 0.8}(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}NO{sub 2}){sub 0.2} had the greatest T1-weighted signal (positive contrast) with a relaxivity ratio >1 (r{sub 2}/r{sub 1} = 1.21 {+-} 0.29). Acrylic-titanium and glass-titanium seed strands were clearly visualized with the encapsulated contrast agent marker. Conclusion: We have developed a novel ECAM that permits positive identification of the radioactive seeds used for prostate brachytherapy on MRI. Preclinical in vitro phantom studies and in vivo canine studies are needed to further optimize MRI sequencing techniques to facilitate MRI-based dosimetry.

  12. Prostate Brachytherapy With Oblique Needles to Treat Large Glands and Overcome Pubic Arch Interference

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Bon; Bax, Jeff; Edirisinge, Chandima; Lewis, Craig; Chen, Jeff; D'Souza, David; Fenster, Aaron; Wong, Eugene

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: First, to show that low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy plans using oblique needle trajectories are more successful than parallel trajectories for large prostates with pubic arch interference (PAI); second, to test the accuracy of delivering an oblique plan by using a three-dimensional (3D) transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS)-guided mechatronic system. Methods and Materials: Prostates were contoured for 5 subjects' 3D TRUS images showing a maximum PAI of {<=}1 cm and a prostate volume of <50 cc. Two planning studies were done. First, prostate contours were artificially enlarged to 45 to 80 cc in 5- to 10-cc increments for a single subject. Second, all subject prostate contours were enlarged to 60 cc. For each study, three types of plans were manually created for comparison: a parallel needle template (PT) plan, a parallel needle no-template (PNT) plan, and an oblique needle no-template (OBL) plan. Needle positions and angles were not discretized for nontemplate plans. European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology dose-volume histogram guidelines, iodine-125 (145-Gy prescription, 0.43 U), and needle angles of <15 Degree-Sign were used. An OBL plan was delivered to a pubic arch containing a 60-cc prostate phantom that mimicked the anatomy of the subject with the greatest PAI (23% by volume). Results: In the increasing-prostate volume study, OBL plans were successful for prostates of {<=}80 cc, and PT plans were successful for prostates of <65 cc. In paired, one-sided t tests for the 60-cc volume study, OBL plans showed dosimetric improvements for all organs compared to both of the parallel type plans (p < 0.05); PNT plans showed a benefit only in planning target volumes receiving more than 100 Gy compared to PT plans. A computed tomography scan of the phantom showed submillimeter seed placement accuracy in all directions. Conclusion: OBL plans were significantly better than parallel plans, and an OBL plan was accurately delivered to a 60-cc

  13. A novel perineal shield for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, David; Safdieh, Joseph; Polubarov, Alex; Telivala, Tejas; Worth, Matthew; Schreiber, David

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To study the impact on radiation exposure to staff through the use of an original perineal shield during low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy. Material and methods We designed a 1 mm thick stainless steel shield that duplicates and is able to slide directly over a standard commercialized prostate brachytherapy grid. We then analyzed the post-procedure exposure in 15 consecutive patients who underwent Iodine-125 seed placement. Measurements were performed with and without the shield in place at fixed locations relative to the grid template. Endpoints were analyzed using the paired two-sample t-test, with statistical significance defined as a p-value < 0.05. Results The exposure at the midline grid template ranged from 0.144-0.768 mSv/hr without the shield, and 0.038-0.144 mSv/hr with the shield (p < 0.0001). The exposure 10 cm left of the grid template was 0.134-0.576 mSv/hr without the shield, and 0.001-0.012 mSv/hr with the shield (p < 0.0001). The exposure 10 cm right of the grid template was 0.125-0.576 mSv/hr without the shield, and 0.001-0.012 mSv/hr with the shield (p < 0.0001). The median reduction of exposure at the grid was 76% midline, 98.5% left, and 99% right. Similarly, each individual dose rate was recorded at 25 cm from the perineum, both with and without shield. The median reduction of exposure 25 cm from the perineum was 73.7% midline, 77.7% left and 81.6% right (p < 0.0001). Conclusions Our novel shield took seconds to install and was non-restrictive during the procedure, and provided at least a four-fold reduction in radiation exposure to the brachytherapist. PMID:26207107

  14. Fast dose kernel interpolation using Fourier transform with application to permanent prostate brachytherapy dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Derek Sloboda, Ron S.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Boyer and Mok proposed a fast calculation method employing the Fourier transform (FT), for which calculation time is independent of the number of seeds but seed placement is restricted to calculation grid points. Here an interpolation method is described enabling unrestricted seed placement while preserving the computational efficiency of the original method. Methods: The Iodine-125 seed dose kernel was sampled and selected values were modified to optimize interpolation accuracy for clinically relevant doses. For each seed, the kernel was shifted to the nearest grid point via convolution with a unit impulse, implemented in the Fourier domain. The remaining fractional shift was performed using a piecewise third-order Lagrange filter. Results: Implementation of the interpolation method greatly improved FT-based dose calculation accuracy. The dose distribution was accurate to within 2% beyond 3 mm from each seed. Isodose contours were indistinguishable from explicit TG-43 calculation. Dose-volume metric errors were negligible. Computation time for the FT interpolation method was essentially the same as Boyer's method. Conclusions: A FT interpolation method for permanent prostate brachytherapy TG-43 dose calculation was developed which expands upon Boyer's original method and enables unrestricted seed placement. The proposed method substantially improves the clinically relevant dose accuracy with negligible additional computation cost, preserving the efficiency of the original method.

  15. Predictors of Metastatic Disease After Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, Kevin; Burri, Ryan; Stone, Nelson; Stock, Richard G.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To identify predictors of metastatic disease after brachytherapy treatment for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: All patients who received either brachytherapy alone (implant) or brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiation therapy for treatment of localized prostate cancer at The Mount Sinai Hospital between June 1990 and March 2007 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed on the following variables: risk group, Gleason score (GS), clinical T stage, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level, post-treatment prostate-specific antigen doubling time (PSA-DT), treatment type (implant vs. implant plus external beam radiation therapy), treatment era, total biological effective dose, use of androgen deprivation therapy, age at diagnosis, and race. PSA-DT was analyzed in the following ordinate groups: 0 to 90 days, 91 to 180 days, 180 to 360 days, and greater than 360 days. Results: We included 1,887 patients in this study. Metastases developed in 47 of these patients. The 10-year freedom from distant metastasis (FFDM) rate for the entire population was 95.1%. Median follow-up was 6 years (range, 2-15 years). The only two significant predictors of metastatic disease by multivariable analyses were GS and PSA-DT (p < 0.001 for both variables). Estimated 10-year FFDM rates for GS of 6 or less, GS of 7, and GS of 8 or greater were 97.9%, 94.3%, and 76.1%, respectively (p < 0.001). Estimated FFDM rates for PSA-DT of 0 to 90 days, 91 to 180 days, 181 to 360 days, and greater than 360 days were 17.5%, 67.9%, 74%, and 94.8%, respectively (p < 0.001). Estimated 10-year FFDM rates for the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups were 98.6%, 96.2%, and 86.7%, respectively. A demographic shift to patients presenting with higher-grade disease in more recent years was observed. Conclusions: GS and post-treatment PSA-DT are both statistically significant independent predictors of metastatic

  16. Photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jimmy L.; Bouchard, Richard R.; Karpiouk, Andrei B.; Hazle, John D.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2011-01-01

    Brachytherapy seed therapy is an increasingly common way to treat prostate cancer through localized radiation. The current standard of care relies on transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) for imaging guidance during the seed placement procedure. As visualization of individual metallic seeds tends to be difficult or inaccurate under TRUS guidance, guide needles are generally tracked to infer seed placement. In an effort to improve seed visualization and placement accuracy, the use of photoacoustic (PA) imaging, which is highly sensitive to metallic objects in soft tissue, was investigated for this clinical application. The PA imaging properties of bare (i.e., embedded in pure gelatin) and tissue-embedded (at depths of up to 13 mm) seeds were investigated with a multi-wavelength (750 to 1090 nm) PA imaging technique. Results indicate that, much like ultrasonic (US) imaging, an angular dependence (i.e., seed orientation relative to imaging transducer) of the PA signal exists. Despite this shortcoming, however, PA imaging offers improved contrast, over US imaging, of a seed in prostate tissue if sufficient local fluence is achieved. Additionally, although the PA signal of a bare seed is greatest for lower laser wavelengths (e.g., 750 nm), the scattering that results from tissue tends to favor the use of higher wavelengths (e.g., 1064 nm, which is the primary wavelength of Nd:YAG lasers) when the seed is located in tissue. A combined PA and US imaging approach (i.e., PAUS imaging) shows strong potential to visualize both the seed and the surrounding anatomical environment of the prostate during brachytherapy seed placement procedures. PMID:21833361

  17. Harmony search optimization for HDR prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchal, Aditya

    In high dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy, multiple catheters are inserted interstitially into the target volume. The process of treating the prostate involves calculating and determining the best dose distribution to the target and organs-at-risk by means of optimizing the time that the radioactive source dwells at specified positions within the catheters. It is the goal of this work to investigate the use of a new optimization algorithm, known as Harmony Search, in order to optimize dwell times for HDR prostate brachytherapy. The new algorithm was tested on 9 different patients and also compared with the genetic algorithm. Simulations were performed to determine the optimal value of the Harmony Search parameters. Finally, multithreading of the simulation was examined to determine potential benefits. First, a simulation environment was created using the Python programming language and the wxPython graphical interface toolkit, which was necessary to run repeated optimizations. DICOM RT data from Varian BrachyVision was parsed and used to obtain patient anatomy and HDR catheter information. Once the structures were indexed, the volume of each structure was determined and compared to the original volume calculated in BrachyVision for validation. Dose was calculated using the AAPM TG-43 point source model of the GammaMed 192Ir HDR source and was validated against Varian BrachyVision. A DVH-based objective function was created and used for the optimization simulation. Harmony Search and the genetic algorithm were implemented as optimization algorithms for the simulation and were compared against each other. The optimal values for Harmony Search parameters (Harmony Memory Size [HMS], Harmony Memory Considering Rate [HMCR], and Pitch Adjusting Rate [PAR]) were also determined. Lastly, the simulation was modified to use multiple threads of execution in order to achieve faster computational times. Experimental results show that the volume calculation that was

  18. Sexual Function and the Use of Medical Devices or Drugs to Optimize Potency After Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Whaley, J. Taylor; Levy, Lawrence B.; Swanson, David A.; Pugh, Thomas J.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Bruno, Teresa L.; Frank, Steven J.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Prospective evaluation of sexual outcomes after prostate brachytherapy with iodine-125 seeds as monotherapy at a tertiary cancer care center. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 129 men with prostate cancer with I-125 seed implants (prescribed dose, 145 Gy) without supplemental hormonal or external beam radiation therapy. Sexual function, potency, and bother were prospectively assessed at baseline and at 1, 4, 8, and 12 months using validated quality-of-life self-assessment surveys. Postimplant dosimetry values, including dose to 10% of the penile bulb (D10), D20, D33, D50, D75, D90, and penile volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose (V100) were calculated. Results: At baseline, 56% of patients recorded having optimal erections; at 1 year, 62% of patients with baseline erectile function maintained optimal potency, 58% of whom with medically prescribed sexual aids or drugs. Variables associated with pretreatment-to-posttreatment decline in potency were time after implant (p = 0.04) and age (p = 0.01). Decline in urinary function may have been related to decline in potency. At 1 year, 69% of potent patients younger than 70 years maintained optimal potency, whereas 31% of patients older than 70 maintained optimal potency (p = 0.02). Diabetes was related to a decline in potency (p = 0.05), but neither smoking nor hypertension were. For patients with optimal potency at baseline, mean sexual bother scores had declined significantly at 1 year (p < 0.01). Sexual potency, sexual function, and sexual bother scores failed to correlate with any dosimetric variable tested. Conclusions: Erections firm enough for intercourse can be achieved at 1 year after treatment, but most men will require medical aids to optimize potency. Although younger men were better able to maintain erections firm enough for intercourse than older men, there was no correlation between potency, sexual function, or sexual bother and penile bulb dosimetry.

  19. [Salvage 125I brachytherapy of locally recurrent prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Gesztesi, László; Ágoston, Péter; Major, Tibor; Gődény, Mária; Andi, Judit; Lengyel, Zsolt; Polgár, Csaba

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the study is to report a case of salvage low dose rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy in a patient with locally recurrent prostate cancer, four years after his first treatment with combined external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. A 61-year-old man was treated with 1x10 Gy HDR brachytherapy and a total of 60 Gy EBRT for an organ confined intermediate risk carcinoma of the prostate in 2009. The patient's tumor had been in regression with the lowest PSA level of 0.09 ng/ml, till the end of 2013. After slow but continuous elevation, his PSA level had reached 1.46 ng/ml by February 2014. Pelvis MRI and whole body acetate PET/CT showed recurrent tumor in the dorsal-right region of the prostate. Bone scan was negative. After discussing the possible salvage treatment options with the patient, he chose LDR brachytherapy. In 2014, in spinal anesthesia 21 125I "seeds" were implanted with transrectal ultrasound guidance into the prostate. The prescribed dose to the whole prostate was 100 Gy, to the volume of the recurrent tumor was 140 Gy. The patient tolerated the salvage brachytherapy well. The postimplant dosimetry was evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging-computed tomography (MR-CT) fusion and appeared satisfactory. PSA level decreased from the pre-salvage value of 1.46 ng/ml to 0.42 ng/ml by one month and 0.18 ng/ml by two months after the brachytherapy. No gastrointestinal side effects appeared, the patient's urination became slightly more frequent. In selected patients, salvage LDR brachytherapy can be a good choice for curative treatment of locally recurrent prostate cancer, after primary radiation therapy. Multiparametric MRI is fundamental, acetate PET/CT can play an important role when defining the localization of the recurrent tumor. PMID:25260087

  20. Evaluation of the MIM Symphony treatment planning system for low-dose-rate- prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Dhanesar, Sandeep K; Lim, Tze Y; Du, Weiliang; Bruno, Teresa L; Frank, Steven J; Kudchadker, Rajat J

    2015-01-01

    MIM Symphony is a recently introduced low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy treatment planning system (TPS). We evaluated the dosimetric and planning accuracy of this new TPS compared to the universally used VariSeed TPS. For dosimetric evaluation of the MIM Symphony version 5.4 TPS, we compared dose calculations from the MIM Symphony TPS with the formalism recommended by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 43 report (TG-43) and those generated by the VariSeed version 8.0 TPS for iodine-125 (I-125; Models 6711 and IAI-125A), palladium-103 (Pd-103; Model 200), and cesium-131 (Cs-131; Model Cs-1). Validation was performed for both line source and point source approximations. As part of the treatment planning validation, first a QA phantom (CIRS Brachytherapy QA Phantom Model 045 SN#D7210-3) containing three ellipsoid objects with certified volumes was scanned in order to check the volume accuracy of the contoured structures in MIM Symphony. Then the DICOM data containing 100 patient plans from the VariSeed TPS were imported into the MIM Symphony TPS. The 100 plans included 25 each of I-125 pre-implant plans, Pd-103 pre-implant plans, I-125 Day 30 plans (i.e., from 1 month after implantation), and Pd-103 Day 30 plans. The dosimetric parameters (including prostate volume, prostate D90 values, and rectum V100 values) of the 100 plans were calculated independently on the two TPSs. Other TPS tests that were done included verification of source input and geometrical accuracy, data transfer between different planning systems, text printout, 2D dose plots, DVH printout, and template grid accuracy. According to the line source formalism, the dosimetric results between the MIM Symphony TPS and TG-43 were within 0.5% (0.02 Gy) for r > 1 cm. In the line source approximation validation, MIM Symphony TPS values agreed with VariSeed TPS values to within 0.5% (0.09 Gy) for r > 1 cm. Similarly, in point source approximation validation, the MIM Symphony values

  1. Interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Quentin E. Xu, Jinghzu; Breitbach, Elizabeth K.; Li, Xing; Rockey, William R.; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Enger, Shirin A.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To present a novel needle, catheter, and radiation source system for interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy (I-RSBT) of the prostate. I-RSBT is a promising technique for reducing urethra, rectum, and bladder dose relative to conventional interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT). Methods: A wire-mounted 62 GBq{sup 153}Gd source is proposed with an encapsulated diameter of 0.59 mm, active diameter of 0.44 mm, and active length of 10 mm. A concept model I-RSBT needle/catheter pair was constructed using concentric 50 and 75 μm thick nickel-titanium alloy (nitinol) tubes. The needle is 16-gauge (1.651 mm) in outer diameter and the catheter contains a 535 μm thick platinum shield. I-RSBT and conventional HDR-BT treatment plans for a prostate cancer patient were generated based on Monte Carlo dose calculations. In order to minimize urethral dose, urethral dose gradient volumes within 0–5 mm of the urethra surface were allowed to receive doses less than the prescribed dose of 100%. Results: The platinum shield reduced the dose rate on the shielded side of the source at 1 cm off-axis to 6.4% of the dose rate on the unshielded side. For the case considered, for the same minimum dose to the hottest 98% of the clinical target volume (D{sub 98%}), I-RSBT reduced urethral D{sub 0.1cc} below that of conventional HDR-BT by 29%, 33%, 38%, and 44% for urethral dose gradient volumes within 0, 1, 3, and 5 mm of the urethra surface, respectively. Percentages are expressed relative to the prescription dose of 100%. For the case considered, for the same urethral dose gradient volumes, rectum D{sub 1cc} was reduced by 7%, 6%, 6%, and 6%, respectively, and bladder D{sub 1cc} was reduced by 4%, 5%, 5%, and 6%, respectively. Treatment time to deliver 20 Gy with I-RSBT was 154 min with ten 62 GBq {sup 153}Gd sources. Conclusions: For the case considered, the proposed{sup 153}Gd-based I-RSBT system has the potential to lower the urethral dose relative to HDR-BT by 29

  2. Photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds with transurethral light delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Guo, Xiaoyu; Song, Danny Y.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-03-01

    We present a novel approach to photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds utilizing an existing urinary catheter for transurethral light delivery. Two canine prostates were surgically implanted with brachyther- apy seeds under transrectal ultrasound guidance. One prostate was excised shortly after euthanasia and fixed in gelatin. The second prostate was imaged in the native tissue environment shortly after euthanasia. A urinary catheter was inserted in the urethra of each prostate. A 1-mm core diameter optical fiber coupled to a 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser was inserted into the urinary catheter. Light from the fiber was either directed mostly parallel to the fiber axis (i.e. end-fire fire) or mostly 90° to the fiber axis (i.e. side-fire fiber). An Ultrasonix SonixTouch scanner, transrectal ultrasound probe with curvilinear (BPC8-4) and linear (BPL9-5) arrays, and DAQ unit were utilized for synchronized laser light emission and photoacoustic signal acquisition. The implanted brachytherapy seeds were visualized at radial distances of 6-16 mm from the catheter. Multiple brachytherapy seeds were si- multaneously visualized with each array of the transrectal probe using both delay-and-sum (DAS) and short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) beamforming. This work is the first to demonstrate the feasibility of photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds using a transurethral light delivery method.

  3. Prostate brachytherapy in patients with median lobe hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Wallner, K; Smathers, S; Sutlief, S; Corman, J; Ellis, W

    2000-06-20

    Our aim was to document the technical and clinical course of prostate brachytherapy patients with radiographic evidence of median lobe hyperplasia (MLH). Eight patients with MLH were identified during our routine brachytherapy practice, representing 9% of the 87 brachytherapy patients treated during a 6-month period. No effort was made to avoid brachytherapy in patients noted to have MLH on diagnostic work-up. Cystoscopic evaluation was not routinely performed. Postimplant axial computed tomographic (CT) images of the prostate were obtained at 0.5 cm intervals. Preimplant urinary obstructive symptoms were quantified by the criteria of the American Urologic Association (AUA). Each patient was contacted during the writing of this report to update postimplant morbidity information. There was no apparent association between the degree of MLH and preimplant prostate volume or AUA score. Intraoperatively, we were able to visualize MLH by transrectal ultrasound and did not notice any particular difficulty placing sources in the MLH tissue or migration of sources out of the tissue. The prescription isodose covered from 81% to 99% of the postimplant CT-defined target volume, achieving adequate dose to the median lobe tissue in all patients. Two of the eight patients developed acute, postimplant urinary retention. The first patient required intermittent self-catheterization for 3 months and then resumed spontaneous urination. MLH does not appear to be a strong contraindication to prostate brachytherapy, and prophylactic resection of hypertrophic tissue in such patients is probably not warranted. Int. J. Cancer (Radiat. Oncol. Invest.) 90, 152-156 (2000). PMID:10900427

  4. Brachytherapy versus prostatectomy in localized prostate cancer: Results of a French multicenter prospective medico-economic study

    SciTech Connect

    Buron, Catherine; Le Vu, Beatrice; Cosset, Jean-Marc; Peiffert, Didier; Delannes, Martine; Flam, Thierry; Guerif, Stephane; Salem, Naji; Chauveinc, Laurent; Livartowski, Alain . E-mail: alain.livartowski@curie.net

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To prospectively compare health-related quality of life (HRQOL), patient-reported treatment-related symptoms, and costs of iodine-125 permanent implant interstitial brachytherapy (IB) with those of radical prostatectomy (RP) during the first 2 years after these treatments for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 435 men with localized low-risk prostate cancer, from 11 French hospitals, treated with IB (308) or RP (127), were offered to complete the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer core Quality of Life Questionnaire QLQ-C30 version 3 (EORTC QLQ-C30) and the prostate cancer specific EORTC QLQ-PR25 module before and at the end of treatment, 2, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after treatment. Repeated measures analysis of variance and analysis of covariance were conducted on HRQOL changes. Comparative cost analysis covered initial treatment, hospital follow-up, outpatient and production loss costs. Results: Just after treatment, the decrease of global HRQOL was less pronounced in the IB than in the RP group, with a 13.5 points difference (p < 0.0001). A difference slightly in favor of RP was observed 6 months after treatment (-7.5 points, p = 0.0164) and was maintained at 24 months (-8.2 points, p = 0.0379). Impotence and urinary incontinence were more pronounced after RP, whereas urinary frequency, urgency, and urination pain were more frequent after IB. Mean societal costs did not differ between IB ( Euro 8,019 at T24) and RP ( Euro 8,715 at T24, p = 0.0843) regardless of the period. Conclusions: This study suggests a similar cost profile in France for IB and RP but with different HRQOL and side effect profiles. Those findings may be used to tailor localized prostate cancer treatments to suit individual patients' needs.

  5. Comparison of Combined X-Ray Radiography and Magnetic Resonance (XMR) Imaging-Versus Computed Tomography-Based Dosimetry for the Evaluation of Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Acher, Peter Rhode, Kawal; Morris, Stephen; Gaya, Andrew; Miquel, Marc; Popert, Rick; Tham, Ivan; Nichol, Janette; McLeish, Kate; Deehan, Charles; Dasgupta, Prokar; Beaney, Ronald; Keevil, Stephen F.

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To present a method for the dosimetric analysis of permanent prostate brachytherapy implants using a combination of stereoscopic X-ray radiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (XMR) in an XMR facility, and to compare the clinical results between XMR- and computed tomography (CT)-based dosimetry. Methods and Materials: Patients who had received nonstranded iodine-125 permanent prostate brachytherapy implants underwent XMR and CT imaging 4 weeks later. Four observers outlined the prostate gland on both sets of images. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were derived, and agreement was compared among the observers and between the modalities. Results: A total of 30 patients were evaluated. Inherent XMR registration based on prior calibration and optical tracking required a further automatic seed registration step that revealed a median root mean square registration error of 4.2 mm (range, 1.6-11.4). The observers agreed significantly more closely on prostate base and apex positions as well as outlining contours on the MR images than on those from CT. Coefficients of variation were significantly higher for observed prostate volumes, D90, and V100 parameters on CT-based dosimetry as opposed to XMR. The XMR-based dosimetry showed little agreement with that from CT for all observers, with D90 95% limits of agreement ranges of 65, 118, 79, and 73 Gy for Observers 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Conclusions: The study results showed that XMR-based dosimetry offers an alternative to other imaging modalities and registration methods with the advantages of MR-based prostate delineation and confident three-dimensional reconstruction of the implant. The XMR-derived dose-volume histograms differ from the CT-derived values and demonstrate less interobserver variability.

  6. Introduction of Transperineal Image-Guided Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Aronowitz, Jesse N.

    2014-07-15

    The modern prostate brachytherapy procedure is characterized by ultrasound guidance, template assistance, and a return to a “closed” transperineal approach. This review traces the introduction and evolution of these elements and charts the development of the procedure from the ashes of previous, failed efforts.

  7. [Brachytherapy].

    PubMed

    Itami, Jun

    2014-12-01

    Brachytherapy do require a minimal expansion of CTV to obtain PTV and it is called as ultimate high precision radiation therapy. In high-dose rate brachytherapy, applicators will be placed around or into the tumor and CT or MRI will be performed with the applicators in situ. With such image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) 3-dimensional treatment planning becomes possible and DVH of the tumor and organs at risk can be obtained. It is now even possible to make forward planning satisfying dose constraints. Traditional subjective evaluation of brachytherapy can be improved to the objective one by IGBT. Brachytherapy of the prostate cancer, cervical cancer, and breast cancer with IGBT technique was described. PMID:25596048

  8. Radiobiological evaluation of low dose-rate prostate brachytherapy implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaup, Courtney James

    Low dose-rate brachytherapy is a radiation therapy treatment for men with prostate cancer. While this treatment is common, the use of isotopes with varying dosimetric characteristics means that the prescription level and normal organ tolerances vary. Additionally, factors such as prostate edema, seed loss and seed migration may alter the dose distribution within the prostate. The goal of this work is to develop a radiobiological response tool based on spatial dose information which may be used to aid in treatment planning, post-implant evaluation and determination of the effects of prostate edema and seed migration. Aim 1: Evaluation of post-implant prostate edema and its dosimetric and biological effects. Aim 2: Incorporation of biological response to simplify post-implant evaluation. Aim 3: Incorporation of biological response to simplify treatment plan comparison. Aim 4: Radiobiologically based comparison of single and dual-isotope implants. Aim 5: Determine the dosimetric and radiobiological effects of seed disappearance and migration.

  9. Prostate Brachytherapy in Men {>=}75 Years of Age

    SciTech Connect

    Merrick, Gregory S. Wallner, Kent E.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Brammer, Sarah G.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Adamovich, Edward

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate cause-specific survival (CSS), biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), and overall survival (OS) in prostate cancer patients aged {>=}75 years undergoing brachytherapy with or without supplemental therapies. Methods and Materials: Between April 1995 and August 2004, 145 consecutive patients aged {>=}75 years underwent permanent prostate brachytherapy. Median follow-up was 5.8 years. Biochemical progression-free survival was defined by a prostate-specific antigen level {<=}0.40 ng/mL after nadir. Patients with metastatic prostate cancer or hormone-refractory disease without obvious metastases who died of any cause were classified as dead of prostate cancer. All other deaths were attributed to the immediate cause of death. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated for impact on survival. Results: Nine-year CSS, bPFS, and OS rates for the entire cohort were 99.3%, 97.1%, and 64.5%, respectively. None of the evaluated parameters predicted for CSS, whereas bPFS was most closely predicted by percentage positive biopsies. Overall survival and non-cancer deaths were best predicted by tobacco status. Thirty-seven patients have died, with 83.8% of the deaths due to cardiovascular disease (22 patients) or second malignancies (9 patients). To date, only 1 patient (0.7%) has died of metastatic prostate cancer. Conclusions: After brachytherapy, high rates of CSS and bPFS are noted in elderly prostate cancer patients. Overall, approximately 65% of patients are alive at 9 years, with survival most closely related to tobacco status. We believe our results support an aggressive locoregional approach in appropriately selected elderly patients.

  10. Serum Testosterone Kinetics After Brachytherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Lief, Jonathan H.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Wallner, Kent E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate temporal changes in testosterone after prostate brachytherapy and investigate the potential impact of these changes on response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Between January 2008 and March 2009, 221 consecutive patients underwent Pd-103 brachytherapy without androgen deprivation for clinically localized prostate cancer. Prebrachytherapy prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and serum testosterone were obtained for each patient. Repeat levels were obtained 3 months after brachytherapy and at least every 6 months thereafter. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated to determine an association with temporal testosterone changes. In addition, analysis was conducted to determine if there was an association between testosterone changes and treatment outcomes or the occurrence of a PSA spike. Results: There was no significant difference in serum testosterone over time after implant (p = 0.57). 29% of men experienced an increase {>=}25%, 23% of men experienced a decrease {>=}25%, and the remaining 48% of men had no notable change in testosterone over time. There was no difference in testosterone trends between men who received external beam radiotherapy and those who did not (p = 0.12). On multivariate analysis, preimplant testosterone was the only variable that consistently predicted for changes in testosterone over time. Men with higher than average testosterone tended to experience drop in testosterone (p < 0.001), whereas men with average or below average baseline testosterone had no significant change. There was no association between men who experienced PSA spike and testosterone temporal trends (p = 0.50) nor between initial PSA response and testosterone trends (p = 0.21). Conclusion: Prostate brachytherapy does not appear to impact serum testosterone over time. Changes in serum testosterone do not appear to be associated with PSA spike phenomena nor with initial PSA response to treatment; therefore, PSA response

  11. PSA Kinetics and PSA Bounce Following Permanent Seed Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, Juanita Gillan, Caitlin B.Sc.; Yeung, Ivan Ph.D.; Austen, Lynette; McLean, Michael; Lockwood, Gina M.Math.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To report the incidence, timing, and magnitude of the benign prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce after {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy and correlate the bounce with clinical and/or dosimetric factors. Methods and Materials: From March 1999 to August 2003, a total of 292 men received {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy without androgen deprivation or supplemental beam radiotherapy and have PSA follow-up >30 months. Implants were preplanned using transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and performed under transrectal ultrasound/fluoroscopy guidance using preloaded needles. A PSA bounce is defined as an increase {>=}0.2 ng/ml with spontaneous return to prebounce level or lower. Results: Resolved PSA bounces were seen in 40% of men with follow-up >30 months. Median onset was 15 months, and median magnitude was 0.76 ng/ml. Magnitude >2 ng/ml was seen in 15%. The only clinical or dosimetric factor predictive of bounce in multivariate analysis was younger age. Median time to increasing PSA level indicative of failure was 30 months. Conclusions: Benign PSA bounces are common after {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy, especially in younger men. An increase >2 ng/ml above the nadir was seen in 15%. Magnitude of increase does not distinguish bounce from failure. Time to the start of the PSA increase can be helpful, but is not absolute. The PSA bounce does not predict subsequent failure. Caution is advised in interpreting an early increasing PSA level in the first 30 months after {sup 125}I brachytherapy in favorable-risk patients.

  12. Dosimetry Modeling for Focal Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Qaisieh, Bashar; Mason, Josh; Bownes, Peter; Henry, Ann; Dickinson, Louise; Ahmed, Hashim U.; Emberton, Mark; Langley, Stephen

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Focal brachytherapy targeted to an individual lesion(s) within the prostate may reduce side effects experienced with whole-gland brachytherapy. The outcomes of a consensus meeting on focal prostate brachytherapy were used to investigate optimal dosimetry of focal low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy targeted using multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) and transperineal template prostate mapping (TPM) biopsy, including the effects of random and systematic seed displacements and interseed attenuation (ISA). Methods and Materials: Nine patients were selected according to clinical characteristics and concordance of TPM and mp-MRI. Retrospectively, 3 treatment plans were analyzed for each case: whole-gland (WG), hemi-gland (hemi), and ultra-focal (UF) plans, with 145-Gy prescription dose and identical dose constraints for each plan. Plan robustness to seed displacement and ISA were assessed using Monte Carlo simulations. Results: WG plans used a mean 28 needles and 81 seeds, hemi plans used 17 needles and 56 seeds, and UF plans used 12 needles and 25 seeds. Mean D90 (minimum dose received by 90% of the target) and V100 (percentage of the target that receives 100% dose) values were 181.3 Gy and 99.8% for the prostate in WG plans, 195.7 Gy and 97.8% for the hemi-prostate in hemi plans, and 218.3 Gy and 99.8% for the focal target in UF plans. Mean urethra D10 was 205.9 Gy, 191.4 Gy, and 92.4 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Mean rectum D2 cm{sup 3} was 107.5 Gy, 77.0 Gy, and 42.7 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Focal plans were more sensitive to seed displacement errors: random shifts with a standard deviation of 4 mm reduced mean target D90 by 14.0%, 20.5%, and 32.0% for WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. ISA has a similar impact on dose-volume histogram parameters for all plan types. Conclusions: Treatment planning for focal LDR brachytherapy is feasible. Dose constraints are easily met with a notable

  13. Ejaculatory Function After Permanent {sup 125}I Prostate Brachytherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Huyghe, Eric Delannes, Martine; Wagner, Fabien M.; Delaunay, Boris; Nohra, Joe; Thoulouzan, Matthieu; Shut-Yee, J. Yeung; Plante, Pierre; Soulie, Michel; Thonneau, Patrick; Bachaud, Jean Marc

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: Ejaculatory function is an underreported aspect of male sexuality in men treated for prostate cancer. We conducted the first detailed analysis of ejaculatory function in patients treated with permanent {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: Of 270 sexually active men with localized prostate cancer treated with permanent {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy, 241 (89%), with a mean age of 65 years (range, 43-80), responded to a mailed questionnaire derived from the Male Sexual Health Questionnaire regarding ejaculatory function. Five aspects of ejaculatory function were examined: frequency, volume, dry ejaculation, pleasure, and pain. Results: Of the 241 sexually active men, 81.3% had conserved ejaculatory function after prostate brachytherapy; however, the number of patients with rare/absent ejaculatory function was double the pretreatment number (p < .0001). The latter finding was correlated with age (p < .001) and the preimplant International Index of Erectile Function score (p < .001). However, 84.9% of patients with maintained ejaculatory function after implantation reported a reduced volume of ejaculate compared with 26.9% before (p < .001), with dry ejaculation accounting for 18.7% of these cases. After treatment, 30.3% of the patients experienced painful ejaculation compared with 12.9% before (p = .0001), and this was associated with a greater number of implanted needles (p = .021) and the existence of painful ejaculation before implantation (p < .0001). After implantation, 10% of patients who continued to be sexually active experienced no orgasm compared with only 1% before treatment. in addition, more patients experienced late/difficult or weak orgasms (p = .001). Conclusion: Most men treated with brachytherapy have conserved ejaculatory function after prostate brachytherapy. However, most of these men experience a reduction in volume and a deterioration in orgasm.

  14. Secondary sarcoma of bone post-prostate brachytherapy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Allison Y.; Conway, Jessica; Peacock, Michael; Clarkson, Paul W.; Lee, Cheng-Han; Simmons, Christine; Weir, Lorna; McKenzie, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Malignancies associated with brachytherapy for prostate cancer are largely unreported in the literature. We report a case of post-brachytherapy osteogenic sarcoma in the pelvis 6 years after permanent 125I implant for intermediate-risk prostate cancer. The patient was treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, limb-sparing surgical resection and postoperative radiation therapy for unexpected positive margins. PMID:25024811

  15. Prognostic Importance of Small Prostate Size in Men Receiving Definitive Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Adamovich, Edward; Wallner, Kent E.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To assess whether small prostate size is an adverse prognostic factor in men undergoing brachytherapy in the same manner in which it seems to be for men undergoing radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 to June 2008, 2024 patients underwent brachytherapy by a single brachytherapist. Median follow-up was 7.4 years. The role of small prostate size ({<=}20 cm{sup 3}) as a prognostic factor for biochemical progression-free survival, cause-specific survival, and all-cause mortality was investigated. The differences in survival between men with small and larger prostates were compared using Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests. Results: Median prostate size for the entire cohort was 32.7 cm{sup 3}. For the 167 men with small prostates, median prostate size was 17.4 cm{sup 3}. There was no difference in biochemical progression-free survival (95.2% vs 96.2%, P=.603), cause-specific survival (97.7% vs 98.3%, P=.546), or all-cause mortality (78.0% vs 77.2%, P=.838) at 10 years for men with small prostates compared with men with larger prostates. On univariate and multivariate analysis, small prostate size was not associated with any of the primary outcome measures. Conclusion: Men with small prostates treated with brachytherapy have excellent outcomes and are at no higher risk of treatment failure than men with larger glands. High-quality implants with adequate margins seem sufficient to address the increased adverse risk factors associated with small prostate size.

  16. Primary Gleason Grade 4 Impact on Biochemical Recurrence After Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy in Japanese Patients With Low- or Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Uesugi, Tatsuya; Saika, Takashi; Edamura, Kohei; Nose, Hiroyuki; Kobuke, Makoto; Ebara, Shin; Abarzua, Fernand; Katayama, Norihisa; Yanai, Hiroyuki; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To reveal a predictive factor for biochemical recurrence (BCR) after permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) using iodine-125 seed implantation in patients with localized prostate cancer classified as low or intermediate risk based on National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines. Methods and Materials: From January 2004 to December 2009, 414 consecutive Japanese patients with clinically localized prostate cancer classified as low or intermediate risk based on the NCCN guidelines were treated with PPB. The clinical factors including pathological data reviewed by a central pathologist and follow-up data were prospectively collected. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to assess the factors associated with BCR. Results: Median follow-up was 36.5 months. The 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-year BCR-free rates using the Phoenix definition were 98.3%, 96.0%, 91.6%, and 87.0%, respectively. On univariate analysis, the Gleason score, especially primary Gleason grade 4 in biopsy specimens, was a strong predicting factor (p < 0.0001), while age, initial prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, T stage, and minimal dose delivered to 90% of the prostate volume (D90) were insignificant. Multivariate analysis indicated that a primary Gleason grade 4 was the most powerful prognostic factor associated with BCR (hazard ratio = 6.576, 95% confidence interval, 2.597-16.468, p < 0.0001). Conclusions: A primary Gleason grade 4 carried a worse BCR prognosis than the primary grade 3 in patients treated with PPB. Therefore, the indication for PPB in patients with a Gleason sum of 4 + 3 deserves careful and thoughtful consideration.

  17. Perineural invasion on prostate needle biopsy does not predict biochemical failure following brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Weight, Christopher J.; Ciezki, Jay P.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Zhou Ming; Klein, Eric A.

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: To determine if the presence of perineural invasion (PNI) predicts biochemical recurrence in patients who underwent low-dose-rate brachytherapy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A retrospective case control matching study was performed. The records of 651 patients treated with brachytherapy between 1996 and 2003 were reviewed. Sixty-three of these patients developed biochemical failure. These sixty-three patients were then matched in a one-to-one ratio to patients without biochemical failure, controlling for biopsy Gleason score, clinical stage, initial prostate-specific antigen, age, and the use of androgen deprivation. The pathology of the entire cohort was then reviewed for evidence of perineural invasion on initial prostate biopsy specimens. The biochemical relapse free survival rates for these two groups were compared. Results: Cases and controls were well matched, and there were no significant differences between the two groups in age, Gleason grade, clinical stage, initial prostate-specific antigen, and the use of androgen deprivation. PNI was found in 19 (17%) patients. There was no significant difference in the rates of PNI between cases and controls, 19.6% and 14.3% respectively (p 0.45). PNI did not correlate with biochemical relapse free survival (p 0.40). Conclusion: Perineural invasion is not a significant predictor of biochemical recurrence in patients undergoing brachytherapy for prostate cancer.

  18. Salvage brachytherapy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after external beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yasuhiro; Okihara, Koji; Iwata, Tsuyoshi; Masui, Koji; Kamoi, Kazumi; Yamada, Kei; Miki, Tsuneharu

    2015-01-01

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is a standard treatment for prostate cancer. Despite the development of novel radiotherapy techniques such as intensity-modulated conformal radiotherapy, the risk of local recurrence after EBRT has not been obviated. Various local treatment options (including salvage prostatectomy, brachytherapy, cryotherapy, and high-intensity focused ultrasound [HIFU]) have been employed in cases of local recurrence after primary EBRT. Brachytherapy is the first-line treatment for low-risk and selected intermediate-risk prostate tumors. However, few studies have examined the use of brachytherapy to treat post-EBRT recurrent prostate cancer. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the current state of our knowledge about the effects of salvage brachytherapy in patients who develop locally recurrent prostate cancer after primary EBRT. This article also introduces our novel permanent brachytherapy salvage method. PMID:26112477

  19. Anisotropy characterization of I-125 seed with attached encapsulated cobalt chloride complex contrast agent markers for MRI-based prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Frank, Steven J; Tailor, Ramesh C; Kudchadker, Rajat J; Martirosyan, Karen S; Stafford, R Jason; Elliott, Andrew M; Swanson, David A; Sing, David; Choi, Jonathan; Mourtada, Firas; Ibbott, Geoffrey S

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a novel MRI marker for prostate brachytherapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in anisotropy when cobalt chloride complex contrast agent encapsulated contrast agent markers (C4-ECAM) were placed adjacent to an iodine-125 (I-125) titanium seed, and to verify that the C4-ECAMs were visible on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after radiation exposure. Two C4-ECAMs were verified to be MRI visible in a phantom before radiation exposure. The C4-ECAMs were then attached to each end of a 12.7-U (10-mCi) I-125 titanium seed in a polymer tube. Anisotropy was measured and analyzed with the seed alone and with attached C4-ECAMs by suspending thermoluminescent dosimeters in a water phantom in 2 circles surrounding the radioactive source with radius of 1 or 2 cm. A T1-weighted MRI evaluation of C4-ECAMs was then performed after exposure to the amount of radiation typically delivered during 1 month of prostate brachytherapy. Measured values of the anisotropy function F(r, θ) for the I-125 seed with and without the C4-ECAMs were mutually statistically indistinguishable (standard error of the mean <4.2%) and agreed well with published TG-43 values for the bare seed. As expected, the anisotropy function ϕ(an)(r) for the 2 datasets (with and without C4-ECAMs) derived from the measured F(r, θ) did not exhibit statistically measurable difference. Both datasets showed agreement with the published TG-43 ϕ(an)(r) for the bare seed. The C4-ECAMs were well visualized by MRI after 1 month of radiation exposure. There were no changes in anisotropy when the C4-ECAMs were placed next to an I-125 radioactive seed, and the C4-ECAMs were visualized after radiation exposure. PMID:20537886

  20. Anisotropy Characterization of I-125 Seed with Attached Encapsulated Cobalt Chloride Complex Contrast Agent Markers for MRI-Based Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Steven J.; Tailor, Ramesh C.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Martirosyan, Karen S.; Stafford, R. Jason; Elliott, Andrew M.; Swanson, David A.; Sing, David; Choi, Jonathan; Mourtada, Firas; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.

    2011-07-01

    We have developed a novel MRI marker for prostate brachytherapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in anisotropy when cobalt chloride complex contrast agent encapsulated contrast agent markers (C4-ECAM) were placed adjacent to an iodine-125 (I-125) titanium seed, and to verify that the C4-ECAMs were visible on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after radiation exposure. Two C4-ECAMs were verified to be MRI visible in a phantom before radiation exposure. The C4-ECAMs were then attached to each end of a 12.7-U (10-mCi) I-125 titanium seed in a polymer tube. Anisotropy was measured and analyzed with the seed alone and with attached C4-ECAMs by suspending thermoluminescent dosimeters in a water phantom in 2 circles surrounding the radioactive source with radius of 1 or 2 cm. A T1-weighted MRI evaluation of C4-ECAMs was then performed after exposure to the amount of radiation typically delivered during 1 month of prostate brachytherapy. Measured values of the anisotropy function F(r, {theta}) for the I-125 seed with and without the C4-ECAMs were mutually statistically indistinguishable (standard error of the mean <4.2%) and agreed well with published TG-43 values for the bare seed. As expected, the anisotropy function {phi}{sub an}(r) for the 2 datasets (with and without C4-ECAMs) derived from the measured F(r, {theta}) did not exhibit statistically measurable difference. Both datasets showed agreement with the published TG-43 {phi}{sub an}(r) for the bare seed. The C4-ECAMs were well visualized by MRI after 1 month of radiation exposure. There were no changes in anisotropy when the C4-ECAMs were placed next to an I-125 radioactive seed, and the C4-ECAMs were visualized after radiation exposure.

  1. REDMAPS: reduced-dimensionality matching for prostate brachytherapy seed reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junghoon; Labat, Christian; Jain, Ameet K; Song, Danny Y; Burdette, Everette Clif; Fichtinger, Gabor; Prince, Jerry L

    2011-01-01

    The success of prostate brachytherapy critically depends on delivering adequate dose to the prostate gland. Intraoperative localization of the implanted seeds provides potential for dose evaluation and optimization during therapy. A reduced-dimensionality matching algorithm for prostate brachytherapy seed reconstruction (REDMAPS) that uses multiple X-ray fluoroscopy images obtained from different poses is proposed. The seed reconstruction problem is formulated as a combinatorial optimization problem, and REDMAPS finds a solution in a clinically acceptable amount of time using dimensionality reduction to create a smaller space of possible solutions. Dimensionality reduction is possible since the optimal solution has approximately zero cost when the poses of the acquired images are known to be within a small error. REDMAPS is also formulated to address the "hidden seed problem" in which seeds overlap on one or more observed images. REDMAPS uses a pruning algorithm to avoid unnecessary computation of cost metrics and the reduced problem is solved using linear programming. REDMAPS was first evaluated and its parameters tuned using simulations. It was then validated using five phantom and 21 patient datasets. REDMAPS was successful in reconstructing the seeds with an overall seed matching rate above 99% and a reconstruction error below 1 mm in less than 5 s. PMID:20643600

  2. Comparison of biochemical failure definitions for permanent prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuban, Deborah A. . E-mail: dakuban@mdanderson.org; Levy, Larry B.; Potters, Louis; Beyer, David C.; Blasko, John C.; Moran, Brian J.; Ciezki, Jay P.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Pisansky, Thomas M.; Elshaikh, Mohamed; Horwitz, Eric M.

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: To assess prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure definitions for patients with Stage T1-T2 prostate cancer treated by permanent prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 2,693 patients treated with radioisotopic implant as solitary treatment for T1-T2 prostatic adenocarcinoma were studied. All patients had a pretreatment PSA, were treated at least 5 years before analysis, 1988 to 1998, and did not receive hormonal therapy before recurrence. Multiple PSA failure definitions were tested for their ability to predict clinical failure. Results: Definitions which determined failure by a certain increment of PSA rise above the lowest PSA level to date (nadir + x ng/mL) were more sensitive and specific than failure definitions based on PSA doubling time or a certain number of PSA rises. The sensitivity and specificity for the nadir + 2 definition were 72% and 83%, vs. 51% and 81% for 3 PSA rises. The surgical type definitions (PSA exceeding an absolute value) could match this sensitivity and specificity but only when failure was defined as exceeding a PSA level in the 1-3 ng/mL range and only when patients were allowed adequate time to nadir. When failure definitions were compared by time varying covariate regression analysis, nadir + 2 ng/mL retained the best fit. Conclusions: For patients treated by permanent radioisotopic implant for prostate cancer, the definition nadir + 2 ng/mL provides the best surrogate for failure throughout the entire follow-up period, similar to patients treated by external beam radiotherapy. Therefore, the same PSA failure definition could be used for both modalities. For brachytherapy patients with long-term follow-up, at least 6 years, defining failure as exceeding an absolute PSA level in the 0.5 ng/mL range may be reasonable.

  3. AUTOMATIC SEGMENTATION OF PELVIS FOR BRACHYTHERAPY OF PROSTATE.

    PubMed

    Kardell, M; Magnusson, M; Sandborg, M; Alm Carlsson, G; Jeuthe, J; Malusek, A

    2016-06-01

    Advanced model-based iterative reconstruction algorithms in quantitative computed tomography (CT) perform automatic segmentation of tissues to estimate material properties of the imaged object. Compared with conventional methods, these algorithms may improve quality of reconstructed images and accuracy of radiation treatment planning. Automatic segmentation of tissues is, however, a difficult task. The aim of this work was to develop and evaluate an algorithm that automatically segments tissues in CT images of the male pelvis. The newly developed algorithm (MK2014) combines histogram matching, thresholding, region growing, deformable model and atlas-based registration techniques for the segmentation of bones, adipose tissue, prostate and muscles in CT images. Visual inspection of segmented images showed that the algorithm performed well for the five analysed images. The tissues were identified and outlined with accuracy sufficient for the dual-energy iterative reconstruction algorithm whose aim is to improve the accuracy of radiation treatment planning in brachytherapy of the prostate. PMID:26567322

  4. Sequential evaluation of prostate edema after permanent seed prostate brachytherapy using CT-MRI fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Taussky, Daniel; Austen, Lyn; Toi, Ants; Yeung, Ivan; Williams, Theresa; Pearson, Shannon; McLean, Michael; Pond, Gregory; Crook, Juanita . E-mail: juanita.crook@rmp.uhn.on.ca

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the extent and time course of prostate edema and its effect on dosimetry after permanent seed prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients scheduled for permanent seed {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy agreed to a prospective study on postimplant edema. Implants were preplanned using transrectal ultrasonography. Postimplant dosimetry was calculated using computed tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (CT-MRI) fusion on the day of the implant (Day 1) and Days 8 and 30. The prostate was contoured on MRI, and the seeds were located on CT. Factors investigated for an influence on edema were the number of seeds and needles, preimplant prostate volume, transitional zone index (transition zone volume divided by prostate volume), age, and prostate-specific antigen level. Prostate dosimetry was evaluated by the percentage of the prostate volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose (V{sub 100}) and percentage of prescribed dose received by 90% of the prostate volume (D{sub 90}). Results: Prostate edema was maximal on Day 1, with the median prostate volume 31% greater than preimplant transrectal ultrasound volume (range, 0.93-1.72; p < 0.001) and decreased with time. It was 21% greater than baseline at Day 8 (p = 0.013) and 5% greater on Day 30 (p < 0.001). Three patients still had a prostate volume greater than baseline by Day 30. The extent of edema depended on the transition zone volume (p = 0.016) and the preplan prostate volume (p 0.003). The median V{sub 100} on Day 1 was 93.6% (range, 86.0-98.2%) and was 96.3% (range, 85.7-99.5%) on Day 30 (p = 0.079). Patients with a Day 1 V{sub 100} >93% were less affected by edema resolution, showing a median increase in V{sub 100} of 0.67% on Day 30 compared with 2.77% for patients with a V{sub 100} <93 % on Day 1. Conclusion: Despite the extreme range of postimplant edema, the effect on dosimetry was less than expected. Dose coverage of the prostate was good for all patients during Days 1

  5. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Kuo, Nathanael P.; Song, Danny Y.; Kang, Jin; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-03-01

    We conducted an approved canine study to investigate the in vivo feasibility of photoacoustic imaging for intraoperative updates to brachytherapy treatment plans. Brachytherapy seeds coated with black ink were inserted into the canine prostate using methods similar to a human procedure. A transperineal, interstitial, fiber optic light delivery method, coupled to a 1064 nm laser, was utilized to irradiate the prostate and the resulting acoustic waves were detected with a transrectal ultrasound probe. The fiber was inserted into a high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy needle that acted as a light-diffusing sheath, enabling radial light delivery from the tip of the fiber inside the sheath. The axis of the fiber was located at a distance of 4-9 mm from the long axis of the cylindrical seeds. Ultrasound images acquired with the transrectal probe and post-operative CT images of the implanted seeds were analyzed to confirm seed locations. In vivo limitations with insufficient light delivery within the ANSI laser safety limit (100 mJ/cm2) were overcome by utilizing a short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) beamformer, which provided average seed contrasts of 20-30 dB for energy densities ranging 8-84 mJ/cm2. The average contrast was improved by up to 20 dB with SLSC beamforming compared to conventional delay-and-sum beamforming. There was excellent agreement between photoacoustic, ultrasound, and CT images. Challenges included visualization of photoacoustic artifacts that corresponded with locations of the optical fiber and hyperechoic tissue structures.

  6. Prostate Brachytherapy seed migration to the Bladder presenting with Gross Hematuria

    PubMed Central

    Haroun, Reham R; Nance, John W; Fishman, Elliot K

    2016-01-01

    We present the radiologic findings in a case of prostate brachytherapy seed migration to the bladder presenting as gross hematuria. While prostate brachytherapy seed implantation is considered a relatively safe procedure, migration is not uncommon; however, it is usually clinically silent and the seeds most commonly migrate to the lungs through the venous circulation via the periprostatic venous plexus. Our case illustrates that local erosion is possible, can be symptomatic, and therefore must be considered when evaluating select patients. PMID:27200152

  7. Patient perception of local anesthesia for prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Smathers, S; Wallner, K; Simpson, C; Roof, J

    2000-05-01

    Prostate brachytherapy is an increasingly popular treatment for early-stage prostate cancer. Until now, spinal or general anesthesia for the procedure has been the standard of care. For patient safety, patient convenience, and to limit use of operating facilities, the authors started performing implants routinely with local anesthesia. We present here an evaluation of patients' acceptance of prostate brachytherapy under local anesthesia. On arrival at our department on the morning of the procedure, the patient is brought into the simulator suite, an intravenous line is started, and a urinary catheter is inserted. With the patient in the lithotomy position, a 5-by-5-cm patch of perineal skin and subcutaneous tissue is anesthetized by local infiltration of 10 mL of 1% lidocaine, using a 25-gauge 5/8-inch needle. Immediately following injection into the subcutaneous tissues, the deeper tissues, including the pelvic floor and prostate apex, are anesthetized by injecting 15 mL lidocaine solution with approximately 8 passes of a 20-gauge 1-inch needle. Following subcutaneous and periapical lidocaine injections, the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe is positioned to reproduce the planning images and a 3.5- or 6-inch, 22-gauge spinal needle is inserted into the peripheral planned needle tracks, monitored by TRUS. When the tips of the needles reach the prostatic base, about 1 mL of lidocaine solution is injected in the intraprostatic track, as the needle is slowly withdrawn. The lidocaine infiltration procedure takes approximately 10 to 15 minutes. Seed implantation is then performed as previously described. At the time of this report preparation, 58 of the 71 patients (81%) were interviewed, with a median follow-up of 6 months since the implant procedure. On a scale of 1 to 10, the median biopsy pain score was 4.5 compared with a median pain score with the implant procedure of 3.0. There was no clear correlation between the two scores (r = .26). There was no correlation

  8. The influence of isotope and prostate volume on urinary morbidity after prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Niehaus, Angela; Merrick, Gregory S. . E-mail: gmerrick@wheelinghospital.com; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Adamovich, Edward

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of isotope and prostate size on International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) normalization, catheter dependency, and the need for surgical intervention secondary to bladder outlet obstruction after prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between January 1998 and June 2003, 976 consecutive patients underwent brachytherapy for clinical stage T1b-T3a (2002 American Joint Committee on Cancer) prostate cancer. Seven hundred eighty-nine (80.8%) were implanted with {sup 103}Pd and 187 (19.2%) with {sup 125}I. The median follow-up was 41.2 months. Patients were stratified into size cohorts {<=}25 cm{sup 3}, 25.1-35 cm{sup 3}, 35.1-45 cm{sup 3}, and >45 cm{sup 3}. Four hundred eighteen patients (42.8%) received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Four hundred eighty-six patients (49.7%) received supplemental external-beam radiation therapy (XRT). In all patients, an alpha blocker was initiated before implantation and continued at least until the IPSS returned to baseline. IPSS resolution was defined as a return to within one point of baseline. The median number of IPSS determinations per patient was 21. Clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters evaluated included patient age, pretreatment PSA, Gleason score, clinical T stage, percent positive biopsies, preimplant IPSS, ultrasound volume, planning volume, isotope, V{sub 100/150/20}, D{sub 9}, urethral dose (average and maximum), supplemental XRT, ADT, and the duration of ADT ({<=}6 months vs. >6 months). Catheter dependency and the need for postsurgical intervention were also evaluated. Results: For both isotopes and all prostate size cohorts, IPSS peaked 1 month after implantation and returned to baseline at a mean of 1.9 months. Stratification of prostate size cohorts by isotope demonstrated no significant differences in prolonged catheter dependency ({>=}5 days), IPSS resolution, or postimplant surgical intervention. In Cox regression analysis, IPSS normalization was best

  9. Incidence of Second Malignancies in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Radical Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Sarah Nicole; Tyldesley, Scott; Hamm, Jeremy; Jiang, Wei Ning; Keyes, Mira; Pickles, Tom; Lapointe, Vince; Kahnamelli, Adam; McKenzie, Michael; Miller, Stacy; Morris, W. James

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To compare the second malignancy incidence in prostate cancer patients treated with brachytherapy (BT) relative to radical prostatectomy (RP) and to compare both groups with the cancer incidence in the general population. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2010, 2418 patients were treated with Iodine 125 prostate BT monotherapy at the British Columbia Cancer Agency, and 4015 referred patients were treated with RP. Cancer incidence was compared with the age-matched general population using standardized incidence ratios (SIRs). Pelvic malignancies included invasive and noninvasive bladder cancer and rectal cancer. Cox multivariable analysis was performed with adjustment for covariates to determine whether treatment (RP vs BT) was associated with second malignancy risk. Results: The median age at BT was 66 years and at RP 62 years. The SIR comparing BT patients with the general population was 1.06 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.91-1.22) for second malignancy and was 1.53 (95% CI 1.12-2.04) for pelvic malignancy. The SIR comparing RP patients with the general population was 1.11 (95% CI 0.98-1.25) for second malignancy and was 1.11 (95% CI 0.82-1.48) for pelvic malignancy. On multivariable analysis, older age (hazard ratio [HR] 1.05) and smoking (HR 1.65) were associated with increased second malignancy risk (P<.0001). Radical prostatectomy was not associated with a decreased second malignancy risk relative to BT (HR 0.90, P=.43), even when excluding patients who received postprostatectomy external beam radiation therapy (HR 1.13, P=.25). Older age (HR 1.09, P<.0001) and smoking (HR 2.17, P=.0009) were associated with increased pelvic malignancy risk. Radical prostatectomy was not associated with a decreased pelvic malignancy risk compared with BT (HR 0.57, P=.082), even when excluding postprostatectomy external beam radiation therapy patients (HR 0.87, P=.56). Conclusions: After adjustment for covariates, BT patients did not have an increased second

  10. In vivo visualization of prostate brachytherapy seeds with photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Kuo, Nathanael P.; Song, Danny Y.; Kang, Jin U.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-12-01

    We conducted a canine study to investigate the in vivo feasibility of photoacoustic imaging for intraoperative updates to brachytherapy treatment plans. A fiber coupled to a 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser was inserted into high-dose-rate brachytherapy needles, which diffused light spherically. These needles were inserted through the perineum into the prostate for interstitial light delivery and the resulting acoustic waves were detected with a transrectal ultrasound probe. Postoperative computed tomography images and ex vivo photoacoustic images confirmed seed locations. Limitations with insufficient light delivery were mitigated with short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) beamforming, providing a 10-20 dB contrast improvement over delay-and-sum (DAS) beamforming for pulse energies ranging from 6.8 to 10.5 mJ with a fiber-seed distance as large as 9.5 mm. For the same distance and the same range of energy densities, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were similar while the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was higher in SLSC compared to DAS images. Challenges included visualization of signals associated with the interstitial fiber tip and acoustic reverberations between seeds separated by ≤2 mm. Results provide insights into the potential for clinical translation to humans.

  11. In vivo visualization of prostate brachytherapy seeds with photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Kuo, Nathanael P.; Song, Danny Y.; Kang, Jin U.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. We conducted a canine study to investigate the in vivo feasibility of photoacoustic imaging for intraoperative updates to brachytherapy treatment plans. A fiber coupled to a 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser was inserted into high-dose-rate brachytherapy needles, which diffused light spherically. These needles were inserted through the perineum into the prostate for interstitial light delivery and the resulting acoustic waves were detected with a transrectal ultrasound probe. Postoperative computed tomography images and ex vivo photoacoustic images confirmed seed locations. Limitations with insufficient light delivery were mitigated with short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) beamforming, providing a 10–20 dB contrast improvement over delay-and-sum (DAS) beamforming for pulse energies ranging from 6.8 to 10.5 mJ with a fiber-seed distance as large as 9.5 mm. For the same distance and the same range of energy densities, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were similar while the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was higher in SLSC compared to DAS images. Challenges included visualization of signals associated with the interstitial fiber tip and acoustic reverberations between seeds separated by ≤2 mm. Results provide insights into the potential for clinical translation to humans. PMID:25531797

  12. Body Mass Index and Prostate-Specific Antigen Failure Following Brachytherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Efstathiou, Jason A. Skowronski, Rafi Y.; Coen, John J.; Grocela, Joseph A.; Hirsch, Ariel E.; Zietman, Anthony L.

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: Increasing body mass index (BMI) is associated with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure after radical prostatectomy and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). We investigated whether BMI is associated with PSA failure in men treated with brachytherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: Retrospective analyses were conducted on 374 patients undergoing brachytherapy for stage T1c-T2cNXM0 prostate cancer from 1996-2001. Forty-nine patients (13%) received supplemental EBRT and 131 (35%) received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Height and weight data were available for 353 (94%). Cox regression analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship between BMI and PSA failure (nadir + 2 ng/ml definition). Covariates included age, race, preimplantation PSA, Gleason score, T category, percent of prescription dose to 90% of the prostate, use of supplemental EBRT, and ADT. Results: Median age, PSA, and BMI were 66 years (range, 42-80 years), 5.7 ng/ml (range, 0.4-22.6 ng/ml), and 27.1 kg/m{sup 2} (range, 18.2-53.6 kg/m{sup 2}), respectively. After a median follow-up of 6.0 years (range, 3.0-10.2 years), there were 76 PSA recurrences. The BMI was not associated with PSA failure. Six-year PSA failure rates were 30.2% for men with BMI less than 25 kg/m{sup 2}, 19.5% for BMI of 25 or greater to less than 30 kg/m{sup 2}, and 14.4% for BMI of 30 kg/m{sup 2} or greater (p = 0.19). Results were similar when BMI was analyzed as a continuous variable, using alternative definitions of PSA failure, and excluding patients treated with EBRT and/or ADT. In multivariate analyses, only baseline PSA was significantly associated with shorter time to PSA failure (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.12; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.20; p 0.0006). Conclusions: Unlike after surgery or EBRT, BMI is not associated with PSA failure in men treated with brachytherapy for prostate cancer. This raises the possibility that brachytherapy may be a preferred treatment

  13. Late Urinary Side Effects 10 Years After Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy: Population-Based Results From a Multiphysician Practice Treating With a Standardized Protocol and Uniform Dosimetric Goals

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, Mira Miller, Stacy; Pickles, Tom; Halperin, Ross; Kwan, Winkle; Lapointe, Vincent; McKenzie, Michael; Spadinger, Ingrid; Pai, Howard; Chan, Elisa K.; Morris, W. James

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To determine late urinary toxicity (>12 months) in a large cohort of uniformly treated low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy patients. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2009, 2709 patients with National Comprehensive Cancer Network–defined low-risk and low-tier intermediate-risk prostate cancer were treated with Iodine 125 ({sup 125}I) low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy; 2011 patients with a minimum of 25 months of follow-up were included in the study. Baseline patients, treatment, implant factors, and late urinary toxicity (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [RTOG] grading system and International Prostate Symptom Score [IPSS]) were recorded prospectively. Time to IPSS resolution, late RTOG genitourinary toxicity was examined with Kaplan-Meier and log-rank tests. Cox proportional hazards regression was done for individual covariates and multivariable models. Results: Median follow-up was 54.5 months (range, 2-13 years). Actuarial toxicity rates reached 27% and 10% (RTOG ≥2 and ≥3, respectively) at 9-13 years. Symptoms resolved quickly in the majority of patients (88% in 6-12 months). The prevalence of RTOG 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 toxicity with a minimum of 7 years' follow-up was 70%, 21%, 6.4%, 2.3%, and 0.08%, respectively. Patients with a larger prostate volume, higher baseline IPSS, higher D90, acute toxicity, and age >70 years had more late RTOG ≥2 toxicity (all P≤.02). The IPSS resolved slower in patients with lower baseline IPSS and larger ultrasound prostate volume, those not receiving androgen deprivation therapy, and those with higher D90. The crude rate of RTOG 3 toxicity was 6%. Overall the rate of transurethral resection of the prostate was 1.9%; strictures, 2%; incontinence, 1.3%; severe symptoms, 1.8%; late catheterization, 1.3%; and hematuria, 0.8%. The majority (80%) resolved their symptoms in 6-12 months. Conclusion: Long-term urinary toxicity after brachytherapy is low. Although actuarial rates increase with longer follow

  14. Dose to the Bladder Neck Is the Most Important Predictor for Acute and Late Toxicity After Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy: Implications for Establishing New Dose Constraints for Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Hathout, Lara; Folkert, Michael R.; Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Cohen, Gil'ad N.; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To identify an anatomic structure predictive for acute (AUT) and late (LUT) urinary toxicity in patients with prostate cancer treated with low-dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR) with or without external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: From July 2002 to January 2013, 927 patients with prostate cancer (median age, 66 years) underwent LDR brachytherapy with Iodine 125 (n=753) or Palladium 103 (n=174) as definitive treatment (n=478) and as a boost (n=449) followed by supplemental EBRT (median dose, 50.4 Gy). Structures contoured on the computed tomographic (CT) scan on day 0 after implantation included prostate, urethra, bladder, and the bladder neck, defined as 5 mm around the urethra between the catheter balloon and the prostatic urethra. AUT and LUT were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version4. Clinical and dosimetric factors associated with AUT and LUT were analyzed with Cox regression and receiver operating characteristic analysis to calculate area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) (AUC). Results: Grade ≥2 AUT and grade ≥2 LUT occurred in 520 patients (56%) and 154 patients (20%), respectively. No grade 4 toxicities were observed. Bladder neck D2cc retained a significant association with AUT (hazard ratio [HR], 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.04; P<.0001) and LUT (HR, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.00-1.03; P=.014) on multivariable analysis. In a comparison of bladder neck with the standard dosimetric variables by use of ROC analysis (prostate V100 >90%, D90 >100%, V150 >60%, urethra D20 >130%), bladder neck D2cc >50% was shown to have the strongest prognostic power for AUT (AUC, 0.697; P<.0001) and LUT (AUC, 0.620; P<.001). Conclusions: Bladder neck D2cc >50% was the strongest predictor for grade ≥2 AUT and LUT in patients treated with LDR brachytherapy. These data support inclusion of bladder neck constraints into brachytherapy planning to decrease urinary toxicity.

  15. Comparison of seed loading approaches in prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Butler, W M; Merrick, G S; Lief, J H; Dorsey, A T

    2000-02-01

    Since uniform seed loading in prostate brachytherapy can produce an intolerably high dose along the urethra, some form of peripheral loading is commonly employed. We define three variants of peripheral loading and compare them in a small, medium, and large prostate in terms of coverage of the planning target volume (PTV), homogeneity, and ability to spare critical structures of excessive dose. Modified uniform loading has at least 2/3 of the seeds occupying sites on a 1 cm cubic grid keyed to the prostate base and the posterior border of the prostate. Nonuniform loading explicitly spares the urethra by using only basal and apical seeds in at least two centrally located needles. Peripheral loading uses higher activity seeds with the posterior implant plane 5 mm anterior to the posterior border of the prostate. The three prostate volumes (18.7, 40.7, and 60.2 cm3 by ultrasound) were expanded to planning volumes (32.9, 60.0, and 87.8 cm3, respectively). The planning volumes (PTVs) were loaded with a 125I seed distribution and activity sufficient to cover 99.7+/-0.3% of the PTV with the prescribed minimal peripheral dose (mPD) of 145 Gy. Activities used ranged from 0.32 to 0.37 mCi/seed (0.41-0.47 U/seed) for the first two approaches and from 0.57 to 0.66 mCi (0.72-0.84 U) for peripheral loading. Modified uniform loading produced the most uniform distribution based on dose-volume histograms and the volume receiving >150% of prescribed dose. All the approaches are capable of constraining the superior-inferior dose profile (the urethral path) to less than 150% of the mPD, but the nonuniform approach with explicit urethral sparing kept the urethral dose below 120% of the mPD. Dose profiles for the three approaches along the posterior-anterior midline axis are comparable near the urethra, but peripheral and nonuniform approaches have extended regions where the dose is >150% of mPD. These regions approach within 10 mm of the rectum or urethra, so these two approaches

  16. AAPM Task Group 128: Quality assurance tests for prostate brachytherapy ultrasound systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, Douglas; Sutlief, Steven; Feng Wenzheng; Pierce, Heather M.; Kofler, Jim

    2008-12-15

    While ultrasound guided prostate brachytherapy has gained wide acceptance as a primary treatment tool for prostate cancer, quality assurance of the ultrasound guidance system has received very little attention. Task Group 128 of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine was created to address quality assurance requirements specific to transrectal ultrasound used for guidance of prostate brachytherapy. Accurate imaging guidance and dosimetry calculation depend upon the quality and accuracy of the ultrasound image. Therefore, a robust quality assurance program for the ultrasound system is essential. A brief review of prostate brachytherapy and ultrasound physics is provided, followed by a recommendation for elements to be included in a comprehensive test phantom. Specific test recommendations are presented, covering grayscale visibility, depth of penetration, axial and lateral resolution, distance measurement, area measurement, volume measurement, needle template/electronic grid alignment, and geometric consistency with the treatment planning computer.

  17. Prostate Specific Antigen Bounce Is Related to Overall Survival in Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hinnen, Karel A.; Monninkhof, Evelyn M.; Battermann, Jan J.; Roermund, Joep G.H. van; Frank, Steven J.; Vulpen, Marco van

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association between prostate specific antigen (PSA) bounce and disease outcome after prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 975 patients treated with {sup 125}I implantation monotherapy between 1992 and 2006. All patients had tumor Stage {<=}2c, Gleason score {<=}7 prostate cancer, a minimum follow-up of 2 years with at least four PSA measurements, and no biochemical failure in the first 2 years. Median follow-up was 6 years. Bounce was defined as a PSA elevation of +0.2 ng/mL with subsequent decrease to previous nadir. We used the Phoenix +2 ng/mL definition for biochemical failure. Additional endpoints were disease-specific and overall survival. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was performed to adjust for potential confounding factors. Results: Bounce occurred in 32% of patients, with a median time to bounce of 1.6 years. More than 90% of bounces took place in the first 3 years after treatment and had disappeared within 2 years of onset. Ten-year freedom from biochemical failure, disease-specific survival, and overall survival rates were, respectively, 90%, 99%, and 88% for the bounce group and 70%, 93%, and 82% for the no-bounce group. Only 1 patient (0.3%) died of prostate cancer in the bounce group, compared with 40 patients (6.1%) in the no-bounce group. Adjusted for confounding, a 70% biochemical failure risk reduction was observed for patients experiencing a bounce (hazard ratio 0.31; 95% confidence interval 0.20-0.48). Conclusions: A PSA bounce after prostate brachytherapy is strongly related to better outcome in terms of biochemical failure, disease-specific survival, and overall survival.

  18. Prostate CT segmentation method based on nonrigid registration in ultrasound-guided CT-based HDR prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaofeng Rossi, Peter; Ogunleye, Tomi; Marcus, David M.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian; Mao, Hui

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The technological advances in real-time ultrasound image guidance for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy have placed this treatment modality at the forefront of innovation in cancer radiotherapy. Prostate HDR treatment often involves placing the HDR catheters (needles) into the prostate gland under the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance, then generating a radiation treatment plan based on CT prostate images, and subsequently delivering high dose of radiation through these catheters. The main challenge for this HDR procedure is to accurately segment the prostate volume in the CT images for the radiation treatment planning. In this study, the authors propose a novel approach that integrates the prostate volume from 3D TRUS images into the treatment planning CT images to provide an accurate prostate delineation for prostate HDR treatment. Methods: The authors’ approach requires acquisition of 3D TRUS prostate images in the operating room right after the HDR catheters are inserted, which takes 1–3 min. These TRUS images are used to create prostate contours. The HDR catheters are reconstructed from the intraoperative TRUS and postoperative CT images, and subsequently used as landmarks for the TRUS–CT image fusion. After TRUS–CT fusion, the TRUS-based prostate volume is deformed to the CT images for treatment planning. This method was first validated with a prostate-phantom study. In addition, a pilot study of ten patients undergoing HDR prostate brachytherapy was conducted to test its clinical feasibility. The accuracy of their approach was assessed through the locations of three implanted fiducial (gold) markers, as well as T2-weighted MR prostate images of patients. Results: For the phantom study, the target registration error (TRE) of gold-markers was 0.41 ± 0.11 mm. For the ten patients, the TRE of gold markers was 1.18 ± 0.26 mm; the prostate volume difference between the authors’ approach and the MRI-based volume was 7.28% ± 0

  19. Alternative Dose for Choroidal Melanoma Treated With an Iodine-125 Radioactive Plaque: A Single-Institution Retrospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Saconn, Paul A.; Gee, Christopher J.; Greven, Craig M.; McCoy, Thomas P.; Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Greven, Kathryn M.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: The Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS) established iodine-125 plaque brachytherapy as an accepted standard treatment for medium-size choroidal melanoma. In the COMS, the prescription dose was 85 Gy. This is a retrospective review of our outcomes in patients treated with lower doses than those used in the COMS. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 2004, 62 patients were treated with iodine-125 plaque brachytherapy for choroidal melanoma. COMS eye plaques were used with dose prescribed to the apex of the tumor. The median and average dose rates at the tumor apex were 63.5 cGy/h and 62.7 cGy/h, respectively. The median and average total doses were 63.0 Gy and 62.5 Gy (range, 56-69 Gy), respectively. The median and mean durations of implant were 100.0 hours and 101.1 hours (range, 71-165 hours). Results: Median follow-up time was 58.2 months. The 5-year outcomes including overall survival, disease-free survival, cause-specific survival, local failure, secondary enucleation rate, and visual acuity (VA) <20/200 were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Overall, there were 7 local failures, 4 distant failures, and 10 secondary enucleations (6 due to local failure and 4 due to treatment complications). Univariate analysis was performed to identify significant prognostic factors associated with disease-free survival (baseline VA in tumor eye, tumor shape), cause-specific survival (diabetic retinopathy), local failure (none found), secondary enucleation rate (diabetic retinopathy, basal tumor dimension) and VA <20/200 (diabetic retinopathy, tumor shape, age, retinal detachment, treatment depth, and history of vision-limiting condition). Conclusions: Our survival and local control outcomes are comparable to those of the COMS. However, VA at 5 years seems to be better. Lower doses of radiation could potentially lead to better visual outcomes.

  20. Iodine-125 Seeds Strand for Treatment of Tumor Thrombus in Inferior Vena Cava: An Experimental Study in a Rabbit Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wen Yan, Zhiping Luo, Jianjun Fang, Zhuting Wu, Linlin Liu, QingXin Qu, Xudong Liu, Lingxiao Wang, Jianhua

    2013-10-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to establish an animal model of implanted inferior vena cava tumor thrombus (IVCTT) and to evaluate the effect of linear iodine-125 seeds strand in treating implanted IVCTT. Methods: Tumor cell line VX{sub 2} was inoculated subcutaneously into New Zealand rabbit to develop the parent tumor. The tumor strip was inoculated into inferior vena cava (IVC) to establish the IVCTT model. The IVCTT was confirmed by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) after 2 weeks. Twelve rabbits with IVCTT were randomly divided into two groups. Treatment group (group T; n = 6) underwent Iodine-125 seeds brachytherapy, and the control group (group C; n = 6) underwent blank seeds strand. The blood laboratory examination (including blood routine examination, hepatic and renal function), body weight, survival time, and IVCTT volume by MDCT were monitored. All rabbits were dissected postmortem, and the therapeutic effects were evaluated on the basis of histopathology. The proliferating cell nuclear antigen index (PI) and apoptosis index (AI) of IVCTT were compared between two groups. T test, Wilcoxon rank test, and Kaplan-Meier survival curve analysis were used. Results: The success rate of establishing IVCTT was 100 %. The body weight loss and cachexia of rabbits in group C appeared earlier than in group T. Body weight in the third week, the mean survival time, PI, AI in groups T and C were 2.23 {+-} 0.12 kg, 57.83 {+-} 8.68 days, (16.73 {+-} 5.18 %), (29.47 {+-} 7.18 %), and 2.03 {+-} 0.13 kg, 43.67 {+-} 5.28 days, (63.01 {+-} 2.01 %), (6.02 {+-} 2.93 %), respectively. There were statistically significant differences between group T and group C (P < 0.05). The IVCTT volume of group T was remarkably smaller than that of group C. Conclusions: Injecting and suspensory fixing VX2 tumor strip into IVC is a reliable method to establish IVCTT animal model. The linear Iodine-125 seeds strand brachytherapy was a safe and effective method for treating IVCTT

  1. Prostate brachytherapy postimplant dosimetry: Automatic plan reconstruction of stranded implants

    SciTech Connect

    Chng, N.; Spadinger, I.; Morris, W. J.; Usmani, N.; Salcudean, S.

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Plan reconstruction for permanent implant prostate brachytherapy is the process of determining the correspondence between planned and implanted seeds in postimplant analysis. Plan reconstruction informs many areas of brachytherapy quality assurance, including the verification of seed segmentation, misplacement and migration assessment, implant simulations, and the dosimetry of mixed-activity or mixed-species implants. Methods: An algorithm has been developed for stranded implants which uses the interseed spacing constraints imposed by the suture to improve the accuracy of reconstruction. Seventy randomly selected clinical cases with a mean of 23.6 (range 18-30) needles and mean density of 2.0 (range 1.6-2.6) 2.0 (range 1.6-2.6) seeds/cm{sup 3} were automatically reconstructed and the accuracy compared to manual reconstructions performed using a custom 3D graphical interface. Results: Using the automatic algorithm, the mean accuracy of the assignment relative to manual reconstruction was found to be 97.7{+-}0.5%. Fifty-two of the 70 cases (74%) were error-free; of seeds in the remaining cases, 96.7{+-}0.3% were found to be attributed to the correct strand and 97.0{+-}0.3% were correctly connected to their neighbors. Any necessary manual correction using the interface is usually straightforward. For the clinical data set tested, neither the number of seeds or needles, average density, nor the presence of clusters was found to have an effect on reconstruction accuracy using this method. Conclusions: Routine plan reconstruction of stranded implants can be performed with a high degree of accuracy to support postimplant dosimetry and quality analyses.

  2. Characterization of liposomes containing iodine-125-labeled radiographic contrast agents

    SciTech Connect

    Zalutsky, M.R.; Noska, M.A.; Seltzer, S.E.

    1987-02-01

    Multilamellar liposomes were prepared containing either iodine-125-labeled (/sup 125/I) diatrizoate or /sup 125/I labeled iotrol in their aqueous phase. The in vitro permeabilities of liposomes containing both contrast agents were measured in the presence of saline and serum at 37 degrees C. Two different phospholipid compositions were studied: phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol/stearylamine (PC/C/S, 8: 1:1 molar ratio) and distearoylphosphatidylcholine/sphingomyelin (DSPC/SM, 5:2 mole ratio). In saline, similar permeabilities were observed for the four phospholipid-contrast agent combinations. In serum, however, leakage of /sup 125/I activity was 2 to 3 times greater from PC/C/S liposomes than from vesicles composed of DSPC/SM. When PC/C/S liposomes that contained /sup 125/I-diatrizoate were injected into rats, the clearance half-times for /sup 125/I activity from the liver, spleen, and whole body were 4.4 hours, 4.5 hours, and 2.8 hours, respectively. Liposomes composed of DSPC/SM cleared at a significantly slower rate from the liver, spleen, and whole body with half-times of 24.0 hours, 18.4 hours, and 17.2 hours observed from these tissues, respectively.

  3. Temporal relationship between prostate brachytherapy and the diagnosis of colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gutman, Sarah A.; Merrick, Gregory S. . E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.org; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Adamovich, Edward

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To identify the location of pretreatment and posttreatment colorectal malignancies and posttreatment colorectal polyps in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer managed with brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 through July 2004, 1,351 consecutive patients underwent brachytherapy for clinical stage T1b-T3a (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 2002) prostate cancer. Supplemental external beam radiotherapy (XRT) was administered to 699 patients. The median follow-up was 4.6 years. Operative and pathology reports were reviewed for all patients with pretreatment and posttreatment colorectal cancer and posttreatment colorectal polyps. Multiple parameters were evaluated for the development of colorectal cancer or colorectal polyps. Results: Colorectal cancer was diagnosed in 23 and 25 patients before and after prostate brachytherapy, respectively. No differences were identified in the distribution of colorectal cancers either before or after treatment (3 and 4 rectal cancers in the pre- and postbrachytherapy cohorts). Thirty-five of the 48 colorectal cancers (73%) were diagnosed within 5 years of brachytherapy with a peak incidence 1 year after brachytherapy. One hundred ninety-two colorectal polyps were diagnosed after brachytherapy, 160 (83%) occurred within 4 years of brachytherapy, and only 27 (14%) were located in the rectum. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, prostate D{sub 9} (minimum percentage of the dose covering 90% of the target volume) predicted for posttreatment colorectal cancer. Rectal polyps were most closely related to patient age and percent positive biopsies, whereas sigmoid/colon polyps were best predicted by patient age, planning volume, and supplemental XRT. Conclusions: Colorectal cancer was diagnosed with equal frequency before and after brachytherapy with comparable geographic distributions. In addition, the vast majority of postbrachytherapy colorectal polyps were located beyond the confines of the

  4. Systematic Review of Focal Prostate Brachytherapy and the Future Implementation of Image-Guided Prostate HDR Brachytherapy Using MR-Ultrasound Fusion.

    PubMed

    Peach, M Sean; Trifiletti, Daniel M; Libby, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy found in North American and European men and the second most common cause of cancer related death. Since the practice of PSA screening has become common the disease is most often found early and can have a long indolent course. Current definitive therapy treats the whole gland but has considerable long-term side effects. Focal therapies may be able to target the cancer while decreasing dose to organs at risk. Our objective was to determine if focal prostate brachytherapy could meet target objectives while permitting a decrease in dose to organs at risk in a way that would allow future salvage treatments. Further, we wanted to determine if focal treatment results in less toxicity. Utilizing the Medline repository, dosimetric papers comparing whole gland to partial gland brachytherapy and clinical papers that reported toxicity of focal brachytherapy were selected. A total of 9 dosimetric and 6 clinical papers met these inclusion criteria. Together, these manuscripts suggest that focal brachytherapy may be employed to decrease dose to organs at risk with decreased toxicity. Of current technology, image-guided HDR brachytherapy using MRI registered to transrectal ultrasound offers the flexibility and efficiency to achieve such focal treatments. PMID:27293899

  5. Systematic Review of Focal Prostate Brachytherapy and the Future Implementation of Image-Guided Prostate HDR Brachytherapy Using MR-Ultrasound Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Peach, M. Sean; Trifiletti, Daniel M.; Libby, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy found in North American and European men and the second most common cause of cancer related death. Since the practice of PSA screening has become common the disease is most often found early and can have a long indolent course. Current definitive therapy treats the whole gland but has considerable long-term side effects. Focal therapies may be able to target the cancer while decreasing dose to organs at risk. Our objective was to determine if focal prostate brachytherapy could meet target objectives while permitting a decrease in dose to organs at risk in a way that would allow future salvage treatments. Further, we wanted to determine if focal treatment results in less toxicity. Utilizing the Medline repository, dosimetric papers comparing whole gland to partial gland brachytherapy and clinical papers that reported toxicity of focal brachytherapy were selected. A total of 9 dosimetric and 6 clinical papers met these inclusion criteria. Together, these manuscripts suggest that focal brachytherapy may be employed to decrease dose to organs at risk with decreased toxicity. Of current technology, image-guided HDR brachytherapy using MRI registered to transrectal ultrasound offers the flexibility and efficiency to achieve such focal treatments. PMID:27293899

  6. Predictors of Urinary Morbidity in Cs-131 Prostate Brachytherapy Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Ryan P.; Jones, Heather A.; Beriwal, Sushil; Gokhale, Abhay; Benoit, Ronald

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Cesium-131 is a newer radioisotope being used in prostate brachytherapy (PB). This study was conducted to determine the predictors of urinary morbidity with Cs-131 PB. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 159 patients underwent PB with Cs-131 at our institution and were followed by using Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) surveys to determine urinary morbidity over time. EPIC scores were obtained preoperatively and postoperatively at 2 and 4 weeks, and 3 and 6 months. Different factors were evaluated to determine their individual effect on urinary morbidity, including patient characteristics, disease characteristics, treatment, and dosimetry. Multivariate analysis of covariance was carried out to identify baseline determinants affecting urinary morbidity. Factors contributing to the need for postoperative catheterization were also studied and reported. Results: At 2 weeks, patient age, dose to 90% of the organ (D90), bladder neck maximum dose (D{sub max}), and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) predicted for worse function. At 4 weeks, age and EBRT continued to predict for worse function. At the 3-month mark, better preoperative urinary function, preoperative alpha blockers, bladder neck D{sub max}, and EBRT predicted for worse urinary morbidity. At 6 months, better preoperative urinary function, preoperative alpha blockers, bladder neck D{sub max}, and EBRT were predictive of increased urinary problems. High bladder neck D{sub max} and poor preoperative urinary function predicted for the need for catheterization. Conclusions: The use of EBRT plus Cs-131 PB predicts for worse urinary toxicity at all time points studied. Patients should be cautioned about this. Age was a consistent predictor of worsened morbidity immediately following Cs-131 PB, while bladder D{sub max} was the only consistent dosimetric predictor. Paradoxically, patients with better preoperative urinary function had worse urinary morbidity at 3 and 6 months, consistent with

  7. Long-Term Results of an RTOG Phase II Trial (00-19) of External-Beam Radiation Therapy Combined With Permanent Source Brachytherapy for Intermediate-Risk Clinically Localized Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Colleen A.; Yan, Yan; Lee, W. Robert; Gillin, Michael; Firat, Selim; Baikadi, Madhava; Crook, Juanita; Kuettel, Michael; Morton, Gerald; Sandler, Howard

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: External-beam radiation therapy combined with low-doserate permanent brachytherapy are commonly used to treat men with localized prostate cancer. This Phase II trial was performed to document late gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity as well as biochemical control for this treatment in a multi-institutional cooperative group setting. This report defines the long-term results of this trial. Methods and Materials: All eligible patients received external-beam radiation (45 Gy in 25 fractions) followed 2-6 weeks later by a permanent iodine 125 implant of 108 Gy. Late toxicity was defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer late radiation morbidity scoring scheme. Biochemical control was defined by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Consensus definition and the ASTRO Phoenix definition. Results: One hundred thirty-eight patients were enrolled from 20 institutions, and 131 were eligible. Median follow-up (living patients) was 8.2 years (range, 2.7-9.3 years). The 8-year estimate of late grade >3 genitourinary and/or gastrointestinal toxicity was 15%. The most common grade >3 toxicities were urinary frequency, dysuria, and proctitis. There were two grade 4 toxicities, both bladder necrosis, and no grade 5 toxicities. In addition, 42% of patients complained of grade 3 impotence (no erections) at 8 years. The 8-year estimate of biochemical failure was 18% and 21% by the Phoenix and ASTRO consensus definitions, respectively. Conclusion: Biochemical control for this treatment seems durable with 8 years of follow-up and is similar to high-dose external beam radiation alone or brachytherapy alone. Late toxicity in this multi-institutional trial is higher than reports from similar cohorts of patients treated with high-dose external-beam radiation alone or permanent low-doserate brachytherapy alone, perhaps suggesting further attention to strategies that limit doses to

  8. A comparison study on various low energy sources in interstitial prostate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshabadi, Mahdi; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Knaup, Courtney; Meigooni, Ali S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Low energy sources are routinely used in prostate brachytherapy. 125I is one of the most commonly used sources. Low energy 131Cs source was introduced recently as a brachytherapy source. The aim of this study is to compare dose distributions of 125I, 103Pd, and 131Cs sources in interstitial brachytherapy of prostate. Material and methods ProstaSeed 125I brachytherapy source was simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. Additionally, two hypothetical sources of 103Pd and 131Cs were simulated with the same geometry as the ProstaSeed 125I source, while having their specific emitted gamma spectra. These brachytherapy sources were simulated with distribution of forty-eight seeds in a phantom including prostate. The prostate was considered as a sphere with radius of 1.5 cm. Absolute and relative dose rates were obtained in various distances from the source along the transverse and longitudinal axes inside and outside the tumor. Furthermore, isodose curves were plotted around the sources. Results Analyzing the initial dose profiles for various sources indicated that with the same time duration and air kerma strength, 131Cs delivers higher dose to tumor. However, relative dose rate inside the tumor is higher and outside the tumor is lower for the 103Pd source. Conclusions The higher initial absolute dose in cGy/(h.U) of 131Cs brachytherapy source is an advantage of this source over the others. The higher relative dose inside the tumor and lower relative dose outside the tumor for the 103Pd source are advantages of this later brachytherapy source. Based on the total dose the 125I source has advantage over the others due to its longer half-life. PMID:26985200

  9. SU-E-T-397: Include Organ Deformation Into Dose Calculation of Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Y; Shen, D; Chen, R; Wang, A; Lian, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Prostate brachytherapy is an important curative treatment for patients with localized prostate cancer. In brachytherapy, rectal balloon is generally needed to adjust for unfavorable prostate position for seed placement. However, rectal balloon causes prostate deformation, which is not accounted for in dosimetric planning. Therefore, it is possible that brachytherapy dosimetry deviates significantly from initial plan when prostate returns to its non-deformed state (after procedure). The goal of this study is to develop a method to include prostate deformation into the treatment planning of brachytherapy dosimetry. Methods: We prospectively collected ultrasound images of prostate pre- and post- rectal balloon inflation from thirty five consecutive patients undergoing I-125 brachytherapy. Based on the cylinder coordinate systems, we learned the initial coordinate transformation parameters between the manual segmentations of both deformed and non-deformed prostates of each patient in training set. With the nearest-neighbor interpolation, we searched the best transformation between two coordinate systems to maximum the mutual information of deformed and non-deformed images. We then mapped the implanted seeds of five selected patients from the deformed prostate into non-deformed prostate. The seed position is marked on original pre-inflation US image and it is imported into VariSeed software for dose calculation. Results: The accuracy of image registration is 87.5% as quantified by Dice Index. The prostate coverage V100% dropped from 96.5±0.5% of prostate deformed plan to 91.9±2.6% (p<0.05) of non-deformed plan. The rectum V100% decreased from 0.44±0.26 cc to 0.10±0.18 cc (p<0.05). The dosimetry of the urethra showed mild change but not significant: V150% changed from 0.05±0.10 cc to 0.14±0.15 cc (p>0.05) and D1% changed from 212.9±37.3 Gy to 248.4±42.8 Gy (p>0.05). Conclusion: We have developed a deformable image registration method that allows

  10. Distinguishing prostate-specific antigen bounces from biochemical failure after low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Cian; Ghosh, Sunita; Sloboda, Ron; Martell, Kevin; Lan, Lanna; Pervez, Nadeem; Pedersen, John; Yee, Don; Murtha, Albert; Amanie, John

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to characterize benign prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounces of at least 2.0 ng/mL and biochemical failure as defined by the Phoenix definition after prostate brachytherapy at our institution, and to investigate distinguishing features between three outcome groups: patients experiencing a benign PSA bounce, biochemical failure, or neither. Material and methods Five hundred and thirty consecutive men treated with low-dose-rate brachytherapy with follow-up of at least 3 years were divided into outcome groups experiencing bounce, failure, or neither. A benign bounce was defined as a rise of at least 2.0 ng/mL over the pre-rise nadir followed by a decline to 0.5 ng/mL or below, without intervention. Patient and tumor characteristics, treatment variables, and PSA kinetics were analyzed between groups. Results Thirty-two (6.0%) men experienced benign bounces and 47 (8.9%) men experienced failure. Men experiencing a bounce were younger (p = 0.01), had a higher 6-month PSA level (p = 0.03), and took longer to reach a final nadir (p < 0.01). Compared to the failure group, men with bounce had a lower pre-treatment PSA level (p = 0.01) and experienced a rise of at least 2.0 ng/mL that occurred sooner after the implant (p < 0.01) with a faster PSA doubling time (p = 0.01). Only time to PSA rise independently differentiated between bounce and failure (p < 0.01), with a benign bounce not being seen after 36 months post-treatment. Prostate-specific antigen levels during a bounce reached levels as high as 12.6 ng/mL in this cohort, and in some cases took over 5 years to decline to below 0.5 ng/mL. Conclusions Although there is substantial overlap between the features of benign PSA bounces and failure, physicians may find it useful to evaluate the timing, absolute PSA level, initial response to treatment, and rate of rise when contemplating management for a PSA rise after low-dose-rate brachytherapy. PMID:25337125

  11. SU-E-T-259: Particle Swarm Optimization in Radial Dose Function Fitting for a Novel Iodine-125 Seed

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, X; Duan, J; Popple, R; Huang, M; Shen, S; Brezovich, I; Cardan, R; Benhabib, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the coefficients of bi- and tri-exponential functions for the best fit of radial dose functions of the new iodine brachytherapy source: Iodine-125 Seed AgX-100. Methods: The particle swarm optimization (PSO) method was used to search for the coefficients of the biand tri-exponential functions that yield the best fit to data published for a few selected radial distances from the source. The coefficients were encoded into particles, and these particles move through the search space by following their local and global best-known positions. In each generation, particles were evaluated through their fitness function and their positions were changed through their velocities. This procedure was repeated until the convergence criterion was met or the maximum generation was reached. All best particles were found in less than 1,500 generations. Results: For the I-125 seed AgX-100 considered as a point source, the maximum deviation from the published data is less than 2.9% for bi-exponential fitting function and 0.2% for tri-exponential fitting function. For its line source, the maximum deviation is less than 1.1% for bi-exponential fitting function and 0.08% for tri-exponential fitting function. Conclusion: PSO is a powerful method in searching coefficients for bi-exponential and tri-exponential fitting functions. The bi- and tri-exponential models of Iodine-125 seed AgX-100 point and line sources obtained with PSO optimization provide accurate analytical forms of the radial dose function. The tri-exponential fitting function is more accurate than the bi-exponential function.

  12. Determination of the prescription dose for biradionuclide permanent prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nuttens, V. E.; Lucas, S.

    2008-12-15

    A model based on the linear quadratic model that has been corrected for repopulation, sublethal cell damage repair, and RBE effect has been used to determine the prescription dose for prostate permanent brachytherapy using seeds loaded with a mixture of {sup 103}Pd and {sup 125}I or a mixture of {sup 103}Pd and {sup 131}Cs. The prescription dose was determined by comparing the tumor cell survival fractions between the considered biradionuclide seed implant and one monoradionuclide seed implant chosen from {sup 103}Pd, {sup 125}I, and {sup 131}Cs. Prostate edema is included in the model. The influence of the value of the radiobiological parameters and RBE were also investigated. Two mixtures of radionuclides were considered: {sup 103}Pd{sub 0.75}-{sup 125}I{sub 0.25} and {sup 103}Pd{sub 0.25}-{sup 131}Cs{sub 0.75}, where the subscripts indicate the fractions of total initial internal activity in the biradionuclide seed. These fractions were selected in order to obtain a dose distribution that lies between that of {sup 103}Pd and {sup 125}I/{sup 131}Cs. As expected, the computed prescription dose values are dependent on the model parameters (edema half-life and magnitude, radiobiogical parameters, and RBE). The radionuclide used as a benchmark also has a strong impact on the derived prescribed dose. The large uncertainties in the radiobiological parameters and RBE values produce big errors in the computed prescribed dose. Averaged over the range of all the parameters and depending on the radionuclide used as a benchmark (in subscript), the derived prescription dose for the first mixture (PdI) would be: D{sub Pd}{sup PdI}=142{sub -16}{sup +15} Gy and D{sub I}{sup PdI}=142{sub -8}{sup +6} Gy; and D{sub Pd}{sup PdCs}=128{sub -13}{sup +13} Gy and D{sub Cs}{sup PdCs}=115{sub -7}{sup +6} Gy for the PdCs mixture. The uncertainties could be reduced if the radiobiological parameters and RBE value were known more accurately. However, as edema characteristics are patient

  13. A gEUD-based inverse planning technique for HDR prostate brachytherapy: Feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Giantsoudi, D.; Baltas, D.; Karabis, A.; Mavroidis, P.; Zamboglou, N.; Tselis, N.; Shi, C.; Papanikolaou, N.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to study the feasibility of a new inverse planning technique based on the generalized equivalent uniform dose for image-guided high dose rate (HDR) prostate cancer brachytherapy in comparison to conventional dose-volume based optimization. Methods: The quality of 12 clinical HDR brachytherapy implants for prostate utilizing HIPO (Hybrid Inverse Planning Optimization) is compared with alternative plans, which were produced through inverse planning using the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD). All the common dose-volume indices for the prostate and the organs at risk were considered together with radiobiological measures. The clinical effectiveness of the different dose distributions was investigated by comparing dose volume histogram and gEUD evaluators. Results: Our results demonstrate the feasibility of gEUD-based inverse planning in HDR brachytherapy implants for prostate. A statistically significant decrease in D{sub 10} or/and final gEUD values for the organs at risk (urethra, bladder, and rectum) was found while improving dose homogeneity or dose conformity of the target volume. Conclusions: Following the promising results of gEUD-based optimization in intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment optimization, as reported in the literature, the implementation of a similar model in HDR brachytherapy treatment plan optimization is suggested by this study. The potential of improved sparing of organs at risk was shown for various gEUD-based optimization parameter protocols, which indicates the ability of this method to adapt to the user's preferences.

  14. Risk of All-Cause and Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality After Brachytherapy in Men With Small Prostate Size

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Paul L.; Chen, Ming H.; Choueiri, Toni K.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Hu, Jim C.; Martin, Neil E.; Beard, Clair J.; Dosoretz, Daniel E.; Moran, Brian J.; Katin, Michael J.; Braccioforte, Michelle H.; Ross, Rudi; Salenius, Sharon A.; Kantoff, Philip W.; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2011-04-01

    Background: Brachytherapy for prostate cancer can be technically challenging in men with small prostates ({<=}20 cc), but it is unknown whether their outcomes are different than those of men with larger prostates. Methods and Materials: We studied 6,416 men treated with brachytherapy in one of 21 community-based practices. Cox regression and Fine and Gray's regression were used to determine whether volume {<=}20 cc was associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality (ACM) or prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), respectively, after adjustment for other known prognostic factors. Results: 443 patients (6.9%) had a prostate volume {<=}20 cc. After a median follow-up of 2.91 years (interquartile range, 1.06-4.79), volume {<=}20 cc was associated with a significantly higher risk of ACM (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.33 [95% CI 1.08-1.65], p = 0.0085) with 3-year estimates of ACM for {<=}20 cc vs. >20 cc of 13.0% vs. 6.9% (p = 0.028). Only 23 men (0.36%) have died of prostate cancer, and no difference was seen in PCSM by volume (p = 0.4). Conclusion: Men with small prostates at the time of implant had a 33% higher risk of ACM, and the underlying cause of this remains uncertain. No increase in PCSM was observed in men with volume {<=}20cc, suggesting that a small prostate should not in itself be a contraindication for brachytherapy, but inasmuch as absolute rates of PCSM were small, further follow-up will be needed to confirm this finding.

  15. Plastic optical fibre sensor for in-vivo radiation monitoring during brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woulfe, P.; Sullivan, F. J.; Lewis, E.; O'Keeffe, S.

    2015-09-01

    An optical fibre sensor is presented for applications in real-time in-vivo monitoring of the radiation dose a cancer patient receives during seed implantation in Brachytherapy. The sensor is based on radioluminescence whereby radiation sensitive scintillation material is embedded in the core of a 1mm plastic optical fibre. Three scintillation materials are investigated: thallium-doped caesium iodide (CsI:Tl), terbium-doped gadolinium oxysulphide (Gd2O2S:Tb) and europium-doped lanthanum oxysulphide (La2O2S:Eu). Terbium-doped gadolinium oxysulphide was identified as being the most suitable scintillator and further testing demonstrates its measureable response to different activities of Iodine-125, the radio-active source commonly used in Brachytherapy for treating prostate cancer.

  16. Long-Term Results of a Prospective, Phase II Study of Long-Term Androgen Ablation, Pelvic Radiotherapy, Brachytherapy Boost, and Adjuvant Docetaxel in Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    DiBiase, Steven J.; Hussain, Arif; Kataria, Ritesh; Amin, Pradip; Bassi, Sunakshi; Dawson, Nancy; Kwok, Young

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: We report the long-term results of a prospective, Phase II study of long-term androgen deprivation (AD), pelvic radiotherapy (EBRT), permanent transperineal prostate brachytherapy boost (PB), and adjuvant docetaxel in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligibility included biopsy-proven prostate adenocarcinoma with the following: prostate-specific antigen (PSA) > 20 ng/ml; or Gleason score of 7 and a PSA >10 ng/ml; or any Gleason score of 8 to 10; or stage T2b to T3 irrespective of Gleason score or PSA. Treatment consisted of 45 Gy of pelvic EBRT, followed 1 month later by PB with either iodine-125 or Pd-103. One month after PB, patients received three cycles of docetaxel chemotherapy (35 mg/m{sup 2} per week, Days 1, 8, and 15 every 28 days). All patients received 2 years of AD. Biochemical failure was defined as per the Phoenix definition (PSA nadir + 2). Results: From August 2000 to March 2004, 42 patients were enrolled. The median overall and active follow-ups were 5.6 years (range, 0.9-7.8 years) and 6.3 years (range, 4-7.8 years), respectively. Grade 2 and 3 acute genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were 50.0% and 14.2%, respectively, with no Grade 4 toxicities noted. Grade 3 and 4 acute hematologic toxicities were 19% and 2.4%, respectively. Of the patients, 85.7% were able to complete the planned multimodality treatment. The 5- and 7-year actuarial freedom from biochemical failures rates were 89.6% and 86.5%, and corresponding rates for disease-free survival were 76.2% and 70.4%, respectively. The 5- and 7-year actuarial overall survival rates were 83.3% and 80.1%, respectively. The 5- and 7-year actuarial rates of late Grade 2 GI/GU toxicity (no Grade 3-5) was 7.7%. Conclusions: The trimodality approach of using 2 years of AD, external radiation, brachytherapy, and upfront docetaxel in high-risk prostate cancer is well tolerated, produces encouraging long-term results, and should be validated in a

  17. Source strength assay of iodine-125 seeds sealed within sterile packaging.

    PubMed

    Otani, Yuki; Yamada, Takahiro; Kato, Shingo; Shikama, Naoto; Funakoshi, Kazuto; Kuroda, Isao; Numasaki, Hodaka; Nose, Takayuki; Dokiya, Takushi; Oguchi, Masahiko

    2013-01-01

    Early-stage prostate cancer is widely treated by iodine-125 (I-125) seed implantation. While quality assurance methods are in place to assure consistency in I-125 seed source strength, current methods involve the breaking of the sterilization package, raising issues concerning sterility and time limitations. The purpose of this study was to develop a method of characterizing the total source strength of I-125 seeds within a cartridge that has been sealed within a sterilization package and to evaluate the probability of detecting an out-of-calibration seed (aberrant seed). We defined a protocol to determine the ability of a well-type ionization chamber to detect aberrant I-125 seeds within a cartridge sealed in the sterilization package. A novel jig for a well-type ionization chamber was designed to accommodate the sterilization package. One seed was chosen randomly from two cartridges containing five or 15 seeds (0.544 U source strength) and was exchanged with aberrant seeds of six different source strengths. The source strength was measured at each position within the cartridge. The results indicated that the response of the well chamber was sensitive to changes in the aberrant seed position within the cartridge and the source strength of the aberrant seed. The correlation coefficient between single seed and batch assay results was high (0.998). A novel jig and a measurement method using a well ionization chamber were developed, which allowed for a batch assay characterization of the total source strength of I-125 seeds within a cartridge sealed within sterilization package. This method is simple, time-saving, and offers greater practical application. PMID:23470939

  18. Comparison of 3 different postimplant dosimetry methods following permanent {sup 125}I prostate seed brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Marcu, Loredana G.; Gowda, Raghu

    2013-10-01

    Postimplant dosimetry (PID) after Iodine-125 ({sup 125}I) implant of the prostate should offer a reliable qualitative assessment. So far, there is no consensus regarding the optimum PID method, though the latest literature is in favor of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study aims to simultaneously compare 3 PID techniques: (1) MRI-computed tomography (CT) fusion; (2) ultrasound (US)-CT fusion; and (3) manual target delineation on CT. The study comprised 10 patients with prostate cancer. CT/MR scans with urinary catheters in place for PID were done either on day 0 or day 1 postimplantation. The main parameter evaluated and compared among methods was target D90. The results show that CT-based D90s are lower than US-CT D90s (median difference,−6.85%), whereas MR-CT PID gives higher D90 than US-CT PID (median difference, 4.25%). Manual contouring on CT images tends to overestimate the prostate volume compared with transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) (median difference, 23.33%), whereas on US images the target is overestimated compared with MR-based contouring (median difference, 13.25%). Although there are certain differences among the results given by various PID techniques, the differences are statistically insignificant for this small group of patients. Any dosimetric comparison between 2 PID techniques should also account for the limitations of each technique, to allow for an accurate quantification of data. Given that PID after permanent radioactive seed implant is mandatory for quality assurance, any imaging method–based PID (MR-CT, US-CT, and CT) available in a radiotherapy department can be indicative of the quality of the procedure.

  19. Brachytherapy in the therapy of prostate cancer – an interesting choice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a curative alternative to radical prostatectomy or external beam radiation [i.e. 3D conformal external beam radiation therapy (CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)] with comparable long-term survival and biochemical control and the most favorable toxicity. HDR brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in treatment of prostate cancer is most frequently used together with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) as a boost (increasing the treatment dose precisely to the tumor). In the early stages of the disease (low, sometimes intermediate risk group), HDR-BT is more often used as monotherapy. There are no significant differences in treatment results (overall survival rate – OS, local recurrence rate – LC) between radical prostatectomy, EBRT and HDR-BT. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR-BT) is a radiation method that has been known for several years in treatment of localized prostate cancer. The LDR-BT is applied as a monotherapy and also used along with EBRT as a boost. It is used as a sole radical treatment modality, but not as a palliative treatment. The use of brachytherapy as monotherapy in treatment of prostate cancer enables many patients to keep their sexual functions in order and causes a lower rate of urinary incontinence. Due to progress in medical and technical knowledge in brachytherapy (“real-time” computer planning systems, new radioisotopes and remote afterloading systems), it has been possible to make treatment time significantly shorter in comparison with other methods. This also enables better protection of healthy organs in the pelvis. The aim of this publication is to describe both brachytherapy methods. PMID:24596528

  20. Does prior transurethral resection of prostate compromise brachytherapy quality: A dosimetric analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cesaretti, Jamie A. . E-mail: Jamie.Cesaretti@msnyuhealth.org; Stone, Nelson N.; Stock, Richard G.

    2004-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a retrospective review, prostate brachytherapy dosimetry outcomes relative to the transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) cavity size to address the theoretical concern that an intraprostatic cavity may hinder adequate radioactive source placement. Methods and materials: A total of 73 patients who underwent prostate brachytherapy as part of their treatment of localized prostate cancer had a history of a prior TURP. Of these 73 patients, 37 underwent {sup 125}I implantation, 19 {sup 103}Pd implantation, and 17 partial {sup 103}Pd implantation. The dose was calculated using the dose to 90% of the prostate gland (D{sub 90}) from the 1-month post-implant dosimetric analysis. The doses were normalized relative to 100% of the prescription dose. Archived transrectal ultrasound images were used to determine the maximal length and width of the visible residual TURP cavities. The prolate spheroid or symmetric egg shape was used to calculate each residual cavity volume. The derived volume of the TURP cavity was divided by the measured ultrasound volume of the prostate at brachytherapy, creating a percentage of volume measurement for each prostate. All p values, unless otherwise specified, were generated by comparing patients without a visible TURP defect with the subgroups of patients with a visible defect using the Student t test. Results: A visible residual TURP defect was noted on the operative transrectal ultrasound images of 55 (75%) of the 73 patients with a history of TURP before brachytherapy. The 18 patients without a visible TURP defect had a median D{sub 90} of 96% and were used for subsequent statistical comparison. Thirty-six patients with a TURP defect <10% of the entire prostate volume had a median D{sub 90} of 109% (p = 0.02). Thirteen patients with a TURP defect between 10% and 20% of the prostate volume had a median D{sub 90} of 112% (p = 0.03). Six patients with a TURP defect >20% of the prostate volume had a D{sub 90} of 89

  1. Focal partial salvage low-dose-rate brachytherapy for local recurrent prostate cancer after permanent prostate brachytherapy with a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Wakumoto, Yoshiaki; Yamaguchi, Nanae; Horie, Shigeo; Sasai, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the treatment results for focal partial salvage re-implantation against local recurrence after permanent prostate brachytherapy. Material and methods Between January 2010 and September 2015, 12 patients were treated with focal partial salvage re-implantation for local recurrence after low-dose-rate brachytherapy using 125I seeds. The focal clinical target volume (F-CTV) was delineated on positive biopsy areas in a mapping biopsy, combining the cold spots on the post-implant dosimetry for initial brachytherapy. The F-CTV was expanded by 3 mm to create the planning target volume (PTV) as a margin to compensate for uncertainties in image registration and treatment delivery. The prescribed dose to the PTV was 145 Gy. The characteristics and biochemical disease-free survival (BdFS) rates were analyzed. Genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were evaluated using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4. Results The median prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level at re-implantation was 4.09 ng/ml (range: 2.91-8.24 ng/ml). The median follow-up time was 56 months (range: 6-74 months). The median RD2cc and UD10 were 63 Gy and 159 Gy, respectively. The 4-year BdFS rate was 78%, which included non-responders. Biochemical recurrence occurred in two patients after 7 and 31 months, respectively. The former was treated with hormonal therapy after biochemical failure, and the latter underwent watchful waiting (PSA at the last follow-up of 53 months: 7.3 ng/ml) at the patient's request. No patients had grade 3 GU/GI toxicities or died after salvage re-implantation. Conclusions The partial salvage low-dose-rate brachytherapy used to treat local recurrence after permanent prostate brachytherapy is well-tolerated, with high biochemical response rates. This treatment can be not only a method to delay chemical castration but also a curative treatment option in cases of local recurrence of prostate carcinoma after seed implantation

  2. PSA Bounce and Biochemical Failure After Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Study of 820 Patients With a Minimum of 3 Years of Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Caloglu, Murat; Ciezki, Jay P.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Angermeier, Kenneth; Ulchaker, James; Chehade, Nabil; Altman, Andrew; Magi-Galuzzi, Christina; Klein, Eric A.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To determine clinical or dosimetric factors associated with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce, as well as an association between a PSA bounce and biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS), in patients treated with iodine-125 brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A variety of clinical and treatment factors were examined in 820 patients who had a minimum of 3 years of PSA follow-up with T1-T2cN0M0 prostate cancer. Four different PSA threshold values were used for defining a PSA bounce: a PSA rise of {>=}0.2, {>=}0.4, {>=}0.6, and {>=}0.8 ng/mL. Results: A PSA bounce of {>=}0.2, {>=}0.4, {>=}0.6, and {>=}0.8 ng/mL was noted in 247 patients (30.1%), 161 (19.6%), 105 (12.8%), and 78 (9.5%), respectively. The median time to the first PSA rise was 17.4, 16.25, 16.23, and 15.71 months, respectively, vs. 34.35 months for a biochemical failure (p < 0.0001). A PSA rise of {>=}0.2 ng/mL was the only definition for which there was a significant difference in bRFS between bounce and non-bounce patients. The 5-year bRFS rate of patients having a PSA bounce of {>=}0.2 was 97.7% vs. 91% for those who did not have a PSA bounce (p = 0.0011). On univariate analysis for biochemical failure, age, risk group, and PSAs per year had a statistically significant correlation with PSA bounce of {>=}0.2 ng/mL. On multivariate analysis, age and PSAs per year remained statistically significant (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0456, respectively). Conclusions: A bounce definition of a rise {>=}0.2 ng/mL is a reliable definition among several other definitions. The time to first PSA rise is the most valuable factor for distinguishing between a bounce and biochemical failure.

  3. Improved iodine-125 plaque design in the treatment of choroidal malignant melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, J C; Sealy, R; Shackleton, D; Stannard, C; Korrubel, J; Hering, E; Loxton, C

    1992-01-01

    The use and development of iodine-125 plaque therapy for choroidal malignant melanoma are described. Since 1975 experience has led to changes in plaque design and insertion techniques. Twenty-one patients were irradiated with local episcleral iodine-125 plaques. Three patients required a second plaque for tumour recurrence. Four eyes were enucleated because of continued tumour growth and a further eye was removed because of glaucoma secondary to radiation retinopathy. Two patients (9.5%) died of metastases. The remaining 19 patients are alive and clinically clear of metastases, with a mean follow up time of 73.1 months (range 43-142 months). PMID:1739723

  4. A new CT prostate segmentation for CT-based HDR brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Rossi, Peter; Ogunleye, Tomi; Jani, Ashesh B.; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian

    2014-03-01

    High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has become a popular treatment modality for localized prostate cancer. Prostate HDR treatment involves placing 10 to 20 catheters (needles) into the prostate gland, and then delivering radiation dose to the cancerous regions through these catheters. These catheters are often inserted with transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance and the HDR treatment plan is based on the CT images. The main challenge for CT-based HDR planning is to accurately segment prostate volume in CT images due to the poor soft tissue contrast and additional artifacts introduced by the catheters. To overcome these limitations, we propose a novel approach to segment the prostate in CT images through TRUS-CT deformable registration based on the catheter locations. In this approach, the HDR catheters are reconstructed from the intra-operative TRUS and planning CT images, and then used as landmarks for the TRUS-CT image registration. The prostate contour generated from the TRUS images captured during the ultrasound-guided HDR procedure was used to segment the prostate on the CT images through deformable registration. We conducted two studies. A prostate-phantom study demonstrated a submillimeter accuracy of our method. A pilot study of 5 prostate-cancer patients was conducted to further test its clinical feasibility. All patients had 3 gold markers implanted in the prostate that were used to evaluate the registration accuracy, as well as previous diagnostic MR images that were used as the gold standard to assess the prostate segmentation. For the 5 patients, the mean gold-marker displacement was 1.2 mm; the prostate volume difference between our approach and the MRI was 7.2%, and the Dice volume overlap was over 91%. Our proposed method could improve prostate delineation, enable accurate dose planning and delivery, and potentially enhance prostate HDR treatment outcome.

  5. Migration of a strand of four seeds in low-dose-rate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dedic-Hagan, Jasmina; Teh, Amy Y M; Liang, Eisen; Collett, Nicholas; Woo, Henry H

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of stranded-seed migration (one strand of four seeds), via the prostatic venous plexus to the internal pudendal vein, in low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy. A 70-year-old man with low-risk prostate adenocarcinoma underwent transperineal permanent seed implantation. A total of 93 iodine-125 seeds were implanted (91 stranded seeds and 2 loose seeds). Immediate postimplantation fluoroscopic image and day 1 postimplantation CT scan indicated all implanted seeds to be within the vicinity of the prostate as planned. Day 30 pelvic X-ray and CT scan revealed migration of a strand of four seeds to the right pelvis (adjacent to ischial spine). At 2 years postimplantation, the patient continues to have good disease control with prostate specific antigen level of 0.69 μg/L, and asymptomatic. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of migration of an entire strand of seeds following LDR prostate brachytherapy. PMID:24879735

  6. Effect of edema, relative biological effectiveness, and dose heterogeneity on prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian Z.; Mayr, Nina A.; Nag, Subir; Montebello, Joseph; Gupta, Nilendu; Samsami, Nina; Kanellitsas, Christos

    2006-04-15

    Many factors influence response in low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy of prostate cancer. Among them, edema, relative biological effectiveness (RBE), and dose heterogeneity have not been fully modeled previously. In this work, the generalized linear-quadratic (LQ) model, extended to account for the effects of edema, RBE, and dose heterogeneity, was used to assess these factors and their combination effect. Published clinical data have shown that prostate edema after seed implant has a magnitude (ratio of post- to preimplant volume) of 1.3-2.0 and resolves exponentially with a half-life of 4-25 days over the duration of the implant dose delivery. Based on these parameters and a representative dose-volume histogram (DVH), we investigated the influence of edema on the implant dose distribution. The LQ parameters ({alpha}=0.15 Gy{sup -1} and {alpha}/{beta}=3.1 Gy) determined in earlier studies were used to calculate the equivalent uniform dose in 2 Gy fractions (EUD{sub 2}) with respect to three effects: edema, RBE, and dose heterogeneity for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd implants. The EUD{sub 2} analysis shows a negative effect of edema and dose heterogeneity on tumor cell killing because the prostate edema degrades the dose coverage to tumor target. For the representative DVH, the V{sub 100} (volume covered by 100% of prescription dose) decreases from 93% to 91% and 86%, and the D{sub 90} (dose covering 90% of target volume) decrease from 107% to 102% and 94% of prescription dose for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd implants, respectively. Conversely, the RBE effect of LDR brachytherapy [versus external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy] enhances dose effect on tumor cell kill. In order to balance the negative effects of edema and dose heterogeneity, the RBE of prostate brachytherapy was determined to be approximately 1.2-1.4 for {sup 125}I and 1.3-1.6 for {sup 103}Pd implants. These RBE values are consistent with the RBE data published in the

  7. Seed Implant Retention Score Predicts the Risk of Prolonged Urinary Retention After Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hoon K.; Adams, Marc T.; Shi, Qiuhu; Basillote, Jay; LaMonica, Joanne; Miranda, Luis; Motta, Joseph

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To risk-stratify patients for urinary retention after prostate brachytherapy according to a novel seed implant retention score (SIRS). Patients and Methods: A total of 835 patients underwent transperineal prostate seed implant from March 1993 to January 2007; 197 patients had {sup 125}I and 638 patients had {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy. Four hundred ninety-four patients had supplemental external-beam radiation. The final downsized prostate volume was used for the 424 patients who had neoadjuvant hormone therapy. Retention was defined as reinsertion of a Foley catheter after the implant. Results: Retention developed in 7.4% of patients, with an average duration of 6.7 weeks. On univariate analysis, implant without supplemental external-beam radiation (10% vs. 5.6%; p = 0.02), neoadjuvant hormone therapy (9.4% vs. 5.4%; p = 0.02), baseline alpha-blocker use (12.5% vs. 6.3%; p = 0.008), and increased prostate volume (13.4% vs. 6.9% vs. 2.9%, >45 cm{sup 3}, 25-45 cm{sup 3}, <25 cm{sup 3}; p = 0.0008) were significantly correlated with increased rates of retention. On multivariate analysis, implant without supplemental external-beam radiation, neoadjuvant hormone therapy, baseline alpha-blocker use, and increased prostate volume were correlated with retention. A novel SIRS was modeled as the combined score of these factors, ranging from 0 to 5. There was a significant correlation between the SIRS and retention (p < 0.0001). The rates of retention were 0, 4%, 5.6%, 9%, 20.9%, and 36.4% for SIRS of 0 to 5, respectively. Conclusions: The SIRS may identify patients who are at high risk for prolonged retention after prostate brachytherapy. A prospective validation study of the SIRS is planned.

  8. Dose reduction in LDR brachytherapy by implanted prostate gold fiducial markers

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Lutgens, Ludy; Murrer, Lars; Afsharpour, Hossein; Haas-Kock, Danielle de; Visser, Peter; Gils, Francis van; Verhaegen, Frank

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric impact of gold fiducial markers (FM) implanted prior to external beam radiotherapy of prostate cancer on low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy seed implants performed in the context of combined therapy was investigated. Methods: A virtual water phantom was designed containing a single FM. Single and multi source scenarios were investigated by performing Monte Carlo dose calculations, along with the influence of varying orientation and distance of the FM with respect to the sources. Three prostate cancer patients treated with LDR brachytherapy for a recurrence following external beam radiotherapy with implanted FM were studied as surrogate cases to combined therapy. FM and brachytherapy seeds were identified on post implant CT scans and Monte Carlo dose calculations were performed with and without FM. The dosimetric impact of the FM was evaluated by quantifying the amplitude of dose shadows and the volume of cold spots. D{sub 90} was reported based on the post implant CT prostate contour. Results: Large shadows are observed in the single source-FM scenarios. As expected from geometric considerations, the shadows are dependent on source-FM distance and orientation. Large dose reductions are observed at the distal side of FM, while at the proximal side a dose enhancement is observed. In multisource scenarios, the importance of shadows appears mitigated, although FM at the periphery of the seed distribution caused underdosage (prostate contour, cold spots (<95% prescription dose) of the order of 20 mm{sup 3} were observed. D{sub 90} proved insensitive to the presence of FM for the cases selected. Conclusions: There is a major local impact of FM present in LDR brachytherapy seed implant dose distributions. Therefore, reduced tumor control could be expected from FM implanted in tumors, although

  9. A fully actuated robotic assistant for MRI-guided prostate biopsy and brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Su, Hao; Shang, Weijian; Tokuda, Junichi; Hata, Nobuhiko; Tempany, Clare M.; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2013-03-01

    Intra-operative medical imaging enables incorporation of human experience and intelligence in a controlled, closed-loop fashion. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an ideal modality for surgical guidance of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, with its ability to perform high resolution, real-time, high soft tissue contrast imaging without ionizing radiation. However, for most current image-guided approaches only static pre-operative images are accessible for guidance, which are unable to provide updated information during a surgical procedure. The high magnetic field, electrical interference, and limited access of closed-bore MRI render great challenges to developing robotic systems that can perform inside a diagnostic high-field MRI while obtaining interactively updated MR images. To overcome these limitations, we are developing a piezoelectrically actuated robotic assistant for actuated percutaneous prostate interventions under real-time MRI guidance. Utilizing a modular design, the system enables coherent and straight forward workflow for various percutaneous interventions, including prostate biopsy sampling and brachytherapy seed placement, using various needle driver configurations. The unified workflow compromises: 1) system hardware and software initialization, 2) fiducial frame registration, 3) target selection and motion planning, 4) moving to the target and performing the intervention (e.g. taking a biopsy sample) under live imaging, and 5) visualization and verification. Phantom experiments of prostate biopsy and brachytherapy were executed under MRI-guidance to evaluate the feasibility of the workflow. The robot successfully performed fully actuated biopsy sampling and delivery of simulated brachytherapy seeds under live MR imaging, as well as precise delivery of a prostate brachytherapy seed distribution with an RMS accuracy of 0.98mm.

  10. Decline in urinary retention incidence in 805 patients after prostate brachytherapy: The effect of learning curve?

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, Mira . E-mail: mkeyes@bccancer.bc.ca; Schellenberg, Devin; Moravan, Veronika M.Sc.; McKenzie, Michael; Agranovich, Alexander; Pickles, Tom; Wu, Jonn; Liu, Mitchell; Bucci, Joseph M.B.B.S.; Morris, W. James

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and factors predictive of acute urinary retention (AUR) in 805 consecutive patients treated with prostate brachytherapy monotherapy and to examine the possible effect of a learning curve. Methods and Materials: Between July 1998 and November 2002, 805 patients were treated with prostate brachytherapy. Low-risk patients (Gleason Score (GS) {<=}6; prostate specific antigen (PSA) {<=}10, and {<=} T2b [UICC 1997]) received implant alone. Patients with prostate volume of 50 cc or more, GS = 7, or PSA = 10 to 15 received 6 months of androgen suppression (AS) with brachytherapy. Patient, treatment, and dosimetric factors examined include baseline prostate symptom score (IPSS), diabetes, vascular disease, PSA, Gleason score, clinical stage, AS, ultrasound planning target volume (PUTV), postimplant prostate volume (obtained with 'Day 30' postimplant CT), CT:PUTV ratio (surrogate for postimplant edema), number of seeds, number of needles, number of seeds per needle, dosimetric parameters (V100, V150, and D90), date of implant (learning curve), and implanting oncologists. Univariate and multivariate analyses were carried out. Results: Acute urinary retention in the first 200 patients was 17% vs. 6.3% in the most recently treated 200 patients (p = 0.002). Overall AUR was 12.7%, and prolonged urinary obstruction incidence (>20 days) was 5%. On multivariate analysis, factors predictive of any AUR include baseline IPSS (p = < 0.004), CT:PUTV ratio (p = < 0.001), PUTV (p = < 0.001), and implant order (learning curve) (p = 0.001). Factors predictive for 'prolonged' catheterization (>20 days) on multivariate analysis include IPSS (p < 0.01), number of needles (p < 0.001), diabetes mellitus (p = 0.048), and CT:PUTV ratio (p < 0.001) Conclusion: Over the years, our AUR rate has fallen significantly (from 17% to 6.3%). On multivariate analysis, highly significant factors include IPSS, PUTV, CT:PUTV ratio (i.e., degree of prostate edema), and order of

  11. Fast prostate segmentation for brachytherapy based on joint fusion of images and labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouranian, Saman; Ramezani, Mahdi; Mahdavi, S. Sara; Spadinger, Ingrid; Morris, William J.; Salcudean, Septimiu E.; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2014-03-01

    Brachytherapy as one of the treatment methods for prostate cancer takes place by implantation of radioactive seeds inside the gland. The standard of care for this treatment procedure is to acquire transrectal ultrasound images of the prostate which are segmented in order to plan the appropriate seed placement. The segmentation process is usually performed either manually or semi-automatically and is associated with subjective errors because the prostate visibility is limited in ultrasound images. The current segmentation process also limits the possibility of intra-operative delineation of the prostate to perform real-time dosimetry. In this paper, we propose a computationally inexpensive and fully automatic segmentation approach that takes advantage of previously segmented images to form a joint space of images and their segmentations. We utilize joint Independent Component Analysis method to generate a model which is further employed to produce a probability map of the target segmentation. We evaluate this approach on the transrectal ultrasound volume images of 60 patients using a leave-one-out cross-validation approach. The results are compared with the manually segmented prostate contours that were used by clinicians to plan brachytherapy procedures. We show that the proposed approach is fast with comparable accuracy and precision to those found in previous studies on TRUS segmentation.

  12. Impact of short course hormonal therapy on overall and cancer specific survival after permanent prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, David C. . E-mail: dbeyer@azoncology.com; McKeough, Timothy; Thomas, Theresa

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: To review the impact of prior hormonal therapy on 10-year overall and prostate cancer specific survival after primary brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed on the Arizona Oncology Services tumor registry for 2,378 consecutive permanent prostate brachytherapy cases from 1988 through 2001. Hormonal therapy was administered before the implant in 464 patients for downsizing of the prostate or at the discretion of the referring physician. All deceased patients with known clinical recurrence were considered to have died of prostate cancer, irrespective of the immediate cause of death. Risk groups were defined, with 1,135 favorable (prostate-specific antigen [PSA] < 10, Gleason < 7, Stage T1-T2a), 787 intermediate (single adverse feature), and 456 unfavorable (two or more adverse features) patients. Kaplan-Meier actuarial survival curves were generated for both overall and cause-specific survival from the time of treatment. Multivariate analysis was performed to assess the impact of hormonal intervention in comparison with known risk factors of grade, PSA, and age. Results: With follow-up ranging up to 12.6 years and a median of 4.1 year, a total of 474 patients died, with 67 recorded as due to prostate cancer. Overall and cause-specific 10-year survival rates are 43% and 88%, respectively. Overall survival is 44% for the hormone naive patients, compared with 20% for the hormone-treated cohort (p = 0.02). The cancer-specific survival is 89% vs. 81% for the same groups (p = 0.133). Multivariate analysis confirms the significance of age > 70 years (p = 0.0013), Gleason score {>=} 7 (p = 0.0005), and prior hormone use (p = 0.0065) on overall survival. Conclusions: At 10 years, in prostate cancer patients receiving brachytherapy, overall survival is worse in men receiving neoadjuvant hormonal therapy, compared with hormone naive patients. This does not appear to be due to other known risk factors for survival (i.e., stage, grade

  13. Analysis of monotherapy prostate brachytherapy in patients with prostate cancer. Initial PSA and Gleason are important for recurrence?

    PubMed Central

    Galego, Pedro; Silva, Fernando C.; Pinheiro, Luís Campos

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical outcome of a cohort of localized prostate cancer patients treate with 125-I permanent brachytherapy at the São José Hospital – CHLC, Lisbon. Materials and Methods A retrospective analysis was carried out on 429 patients with low and intermediate-risk of prostate adenocarcinoma, according to the recommendations of the EORTC, who underwent 125I brachytherapies in intraoperative dosimetry “real-time” system between September 2003 and September 2013. Results The mean follow-up was 71.98 months. Biochemical relapse of disease by rising PSA (Phoenix criterion) was observed in 18 patients (4.2%). Through the application of Kaplan-Meier survival curves in this sample, the rate of survival at 6 years without biochemical relapse was higher than 95%. By Iog rank test comparing biochemical relapse with initial PSA (15-10 and <10) and Gleason values (7 and <7), there was no statistical difference (P=0.830) of the initial PSA in the probability of developing biochemical relapse. In relation to Gleason score, it was noted a statistical difference (P<0.05), demonstrating that patients with Gleason 7 are more likely to develop biochemical relapse. Conclusions Brachytherapy as monotherapy is at present an effective choice in the treatment of localized prostate adenocarcinoma. Biochemical relapses are minimal. The initial PSA showed no statistically difference in the rate of relapses, unlike the value Gleason, where it was demonstrated that patients with Gleason 7 have a higher probability of biochemical relapse. Cases with PSA bounce should be controlled before starting a salvage treatment. PMID:26005979

  14. Interfraction patient motion and implant displacement in prostate high dose rate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, C. D.; Kron, T.; Leahy, M.; Duchesne, G.; Williams, S.; Tai, K. H.; Haworth, A.; Herschtal, A.; Foroudi, F.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To quantify movement of prostate cancer patients undergoing treatment, using an in-house developed motion sensor in order to determine a relationship between patient movement and high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy implant displacement. Methods: An electronic motion sensor was developed based on a three axis accelerometer. HDR brachytherapy treatment for prostate is delivered at this institution in two fractions 24 h apart and 22 patients were monitored for movement over the interval between fractions. The motion sensors functioned as inclinometers, monitoring inclination of both thighs, and the inclination and roll of the abdomen. The implanted HDR brachytherapy catheter set was assessed for displacement relative to fiducial markers in the prostate. Angle measurements and angle differences over a 2 s time base were binned, and the standard deviations of the resulting frequency distributions used as a metric for patient motion in each monitored axis. These parameters were correlated to measured catheter displacement using regression modeling. Results: The mean implant displacement was 12.6 mm in the caudal direction. A mean of 19.95 h data was recorded for the patient cohort. Patients generally moved through a limited range of angles with a mean of the exception of two patients who spent in excess of 2 h lying on their side. When tested for a relationship between movement in any of the four monitored axes and the implant displacement, none was significant. Conclusions: It is not likely that patient movement influences HDR prostate implant displacement. There may be benefits to patient comfort if nursing protocols were relaxed to allow patients greater freedom to move while the implant is in situ.

  15. Single fraction multimodal image guided focal salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy for recurrent prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rischke, Hans-Christian; Meyer, Philipp Tobias; Knobe, Sven; Volgeova-Neher, Natalja; Kollefrath, Michael; Jilg, Cordula Annette; Grosu, Anca Ligia; Baltas, Dimos; Kroenig, Malte

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We present a novel method for treatment of locally recurrent prostate cancer (PCa) following radiation therapy: focal, multimodal image guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Material and methods We treated two patients with recurrent PCa after primary (#1) or adjuvant (#2) external beam radiation therapy. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI), choline, positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT), or prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-PET combined with CT identified a single intraprostatic lesion. Positron emission tomography or magnetic resonance imaging – transrectal ultrasound (MRI-TRUS) fusion guided transperineal biopsy confirmed PCa within each target lesion. We defined a PET and mpMRI based gross tumor volume (GTV). A 5 mm isotropic margin was applied additionally to each lesion to generate a planning target volume (PTV), which accounts for technical fusion inaccuracies. A D90 of 18 Gy was intended in one fraction to each PTV using ultrasound guided HDR brachytherapy. Results Six month follow-up showed adequate prostate specific antygen (PSA) decline in both patients (ΔPSA 83% in patient 1 and ΔPSA 59.3% in patient 2). Follow-up 3-tesla MRI revealed regressive disease in both patients and PSMA-PET/CT showed no evidence of active disease in patient #1. No acute or late toxicities occurred. Conclusions Single fraction, focal, multimodal image guided salvage HDR brachytherapy for recurrent prostate cancer is a feasible therapy for selected patients with single lesions. This approach has to be evaluated in larger clinical trials. PMID:27504134

  16. Coherence-based photoacoustic imaging of brachytherapy seeds implanted in a canine prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Song, Danny Y.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-03-01

    Visualization of individual brachytherapy seed locations assists with intraoperative updates to brachytherapy treatment plans. Photoacoustic imaging is advantageous when compared to current ultrasound imaging methods, due to its superior sensitivity to metal surrounded by tissue. However, photoacoustic images suffer from poor contrast with insufficient laser fluence. A short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) beamformer was implemented to enhance these low-contrast photoacoustic signals. Photoacoustic imaging was performed with a transrectal ultrasound probe and an optical fiber surrounded by a light-diffusing sheath, placed at a distance of approximately 4-5 mm from the location of seeds implanted in an in vivo canine prostate. The average energy density through the tip of the sheath was varied from 8 to 167 mJ/cm2. When compared to a fast Fourier transform (FFT)- based reconstruction method, the mean contrast and signal-to-noise ratios were improved by up to 22 dB and a factor of 4, respectively, with the SLSC beamformer (12% of the receive aperture elements were included in the short-lag sum). Image artifacts that were spatially coherent had spatial frequency spectra that were quadrantally symmetric about the origin, while the spatial frequency spectra of the seed signals possessed diagonal symmetry. These differences were utilized to reduce artifacts by 9-14 dB after applying a bandpass filter with diagonal symmetry. Results indicate that advanced methods, such as SLSC beamforming or frequency-based filters, hold promise for intraoperative localization of prostate brachytherapy seeds

  17. Brachytherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... smaller area in less time than conventional external beam radiation therapy. Brachytherapy is used to treat cancers ... to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) involves high-energy x-ray ...

  18. Measurement uncertainty analysis of low-dose-rate prostate seed brachytherapy: post-implant dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Kent J; Pattison, John E; Bibbo, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    The minimal dose covering 90 % of the prostate volume--D 90--is arguably the most important dosimetric parameter in low-dose-rate prostate seed brachytherapy. In this study an analysis of the measurement uncertainties in D 90 from low-dose-rate prostate seed brachytherapy was conducted for two common treatment procedures with two different post-implant dosimetry methods. The analysis was undertaken in order to determine the magnitude of D 90 uncertainty, how the magnitude of the uncertainty varied when D 90 was calculated using different dosimetry methods, and which factors were the major contributors to the uncertainty. The analysis considered the prostate as being homogeneous and tissue equivalent and made use of published data, as well as original data collected specifically for this analysis, and was performed according to the Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM). It was found that when prostate imaging and seed implantation were conducted in two separate sessions using only CT images for post-implant analysis, the expanded uncertainty in D 90 values were about 25 % at the 95 % confidence interval. When prostate imaging and seed implantation were conducted during a single session using CT and ultrasound images for post-implant analysis, the expanded uncertainty in D 90 values were about 33 %. Methods for reducing these uncertainty levels are discussed. It was found that variations in contouring the target tissue made the largest contribution to D 90 uncertainty, while the uncertainty in seed source strength made only a small contribution. It is important that clinicians appreciate the overall magnitude of D 90 uncertainty and understand the factors that affect it so that clinical decisions are soundly based, and resources are appropriately allocated. PMID:25555753

  19. Template guided transperineal saturation biopsy of the prostate: lessons for focal and urethra-sparing high-dose-rate brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kanaev, Sergey Vasilevich; Novikov, Roman Vladimirovich; IIlin, Nikolay Dmitrievich; Artemieva, Anna Sergeevna; Ivantcov, Alexnder Olegovich; Piskunov, Evgeniy Alexandrovich; Gotovchikova, Mariya Yurievna

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this work is to evaluate results of prostate transperineal saturation biopsy as a guide for focal high-dose-rate brachytherapy in patients with prostate cancer (PCa). Material and methods Template guided saturation biopsy was performed in 67 primary patients with suspicion for prostate cancer. Biopsy was performed under ultrasonography (US) control with the help of brachytherapy grid and 5 mm distance between samples. We put special attention for accurate sampling of prostate in periurethral region. The number of cores varied from 17 to 81 (average 36 cores). Finally, in 40 patients with confirmed prostate cancer results of biopsy were used for brachytherapy planning. Results Saturation biopsy revealed prostate cancer in 40 of 67 evaluated patients. The extent of biopsy core involvement varied from 5% to 100% (average: 57%). Focal nature of PCa (single unilateral tumor nodule) was diagnosed in 10 (25%), multifocal – in another 30 (75%) patients. Hemigland invasion was mentioned in 12 (30%) cases. Saturation biopsy detected PCa in periurethral cores in 27 (67.5%) of 40 evaluated patients. In 10 patients, the extent of involvement in periurethral cores varied between 10% and 50%; in another, 17 observations exceeded 50%. According to results obtained on saturation biopsy, we performed HDR brachytherapy with “urethra low dose tunnel” (D10ur ≤ 80-90%) in 13 patients with noninvolved periurethral cores. Theoretically, hemigland brachytherapy was possible in 12 of 40 evaluated patients with PCa. Conclusions In low risk patients with PCa results of template guided saturation biopsy indicates high frequency (75%) of multifocal disease and high probability (67.5%) of periurethral invasion. Suitable candidates for focal HDR brachytherapy or irradiation with additional sparing of urethra can be effectively determined with the help of saturation biopsy. PMID:27257414

  20. The impact of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control after permanent interstitial brachytherapy for early stage prostate cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    (Jay Chen, Zhe; Roberts, Kenneth; Decker, Roy; Pathare, Pradip; Rockwell, Sara; Nath, Ravinder

    2011-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that procedure-induced prostate edema during permanent interstitial brachytherapy (PIB) can cause significant variations in the dose delivered to the prostate gland. Because the clinical impact of edema-induced dose variations strongly depends on the magnitude of the edema, the temporal pattern of its resolution and its interplay with the decay of radioactivity and the underlying biological processes of tumor cells (such as tumor potential doubling time), we investigated the impact of edema-induced dose variations on the tumor cell survival and tumor control probability after PIB with the 131Cs, 125I and 103Pd sources used in current clinical practice. The exponential edema resolution model reported by Waterman et al (1998 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 41 1069-77) was used to characterize the edema evolutions previously observed during clinical PIB for prostate cancer. The concept of biologically effective dose, taking into account tumor cell proliferation and sublethal damage repair during dose delivery, was used to characterize the effects of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control probability. Our calculation indicated that prostate edema, if not appropriately taken into account, can increase the cell survival and decrease the probability of local control of PIB. The magnitude of an edema-induced increase in cell survival increased with increasing edema severity, decreasing half-life of radioactive decay and decreasing photon energy emitted by the source. At the doses currently prescribed for PIB and for prostate cancer cells characterized by nominal radiobiology parameters recommended by AAPM TG-137, PIB using 125I sources was less affected by edema than PIB using 131Cs or 103Pd sources due to the long radioactive decay half-life of 125I. The effect of edema on PIB using 131Cs or 103Pd was similar. The effect of edema on 103Pd PIB was slightly greater, even though the decay half-life of 103Pd (17 days) is longer than

  1. Impact of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control after permanent interstitial brachytherapy for early stage prostate cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhe (Jay); Roberts, Kenneth; Decker, Roy; Pathare, Pradip; Rockwell, Sara; Nath, Ravinder

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the procedure-induced prostate edema during permanent interstitial brachytherapy (PIB) can cause significant variations in the dose delivered to the prostate gland. Because the clinical impact of edema-induced dose variations depends strongly on the magnitude of the edema, the temporal pattern of its resolution and its interplay with the decay of radioactivity and the underlying biological processes of tumor cells (such as tumor potential doubling time), we investigated the impact of edema-induced dose variations on the tumor cell survival and tumor control probability after PIB with the 131Cs, 125I and 103Pd sources used in current clinical practice. The exponential edema resolution model reported by Waterman et al. (Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 41, 1069–1077–1998) was used to characterize the edema evolutions observed previously during clinical PIB for prostate cancer. The concept of biologically effective dose (BED), taking into account tumor cell proliferation and sublethal damage repair during dose delivery, was used to characterize the effects of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control probability. Our calculation indicated that prostate edema, if not taken into account appropriately, can increase the cell survival and decrease the probability of local control of PIB. The edema-induced increase in cell survival increased with increasing edema severity, decreasing half-life for radioactive decay and decreasing energy of the photons energy emitted by the source. At the doses currently prescribed for PIB and for prostate cancer cells characterized by nominal radiobiology parameters recommended by AAPM TG-137, PIB using 125I sources was less affected by edema than PIB using 131Cs or 103Pd sources due to the long radioactive decay half-life of 125I. The effect of edema on PIB using 131Cs or 103Pd was similar. The effect of edema on 103Pd PIB was slightly greater, even though the decay half-life of 103Pd (17 days

  2. Bioevaluation of 125I Ocu-Prosta seeds for application in prostate cancer brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Archana; Sarma, Haladhar Dev; Saxena, Sanjay; Kumar, Yogendra; Chaudhari, Pradip; Goda, Jayant Sastri; Adurkar, Pranjal; Dash, Ashutosh; Samuel, Grace

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: In recent years, brachytherapy involving permanent radioactive seed implantation has emerged as an effective modality for the management of cancer of prostate. 125I-Ocu-Prosta seeds were indigenously developed and studies were carried out to assess the safety of the indigenously developed 125I-Ocu-Prosta seeds for treatment of prostate cancer. Methods: Animal experiments were performed to assess the likelihood of in vivo release of 125I from radioactive seeds and migration of seeds implanted in the prostate gland of the rabbit. In vivo release of 125I activity was monitored by serial blood sampling from the auricular vein and subsequent measurement of 125I activity. Serial computed tomography (CT) scans were done at regular intervals till 6 months post implant to assess the physical migration of the seeds. Results: The laser welded seeds maintained their hermeticity and prevented the in vivo release of 125I activity into the blood as no radioactivity was detected during follow up blood measurements. Our study showed that the miniature 125I seeds were clearly resolved in CT images. Seeds remained within the prostate gland during the entire study period. Moreover, the seed displacement was minimal even within the prostate gland. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings have demonstrated that indigenously developed 125I-Ocu-Prosta seeds may be suitable for application in treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:24927341

  3. High-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy Consistently Results in High Quality Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    White, Evan C.; Kamrava, Mitchell R.; Demarco, John; Park, Sang-June; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Kayode, Oluwatosin; Steinberg, Michael L.; Demanes, D. Jeffrey

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: We performed a dosimetry analysis to determine how well the goals for clinical target volume coverage, dose homogeneity, and normal tissue dose constraints were achieved with high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Cumulative dose-volume histograms for 208 consecutively treated HDR prostate brachytherapy implants were analyzed. Planning was based on ultrasound-guided catheter insertion and postoperative CT imaging; the contoured clinical target volume (CTV) was the prostate, a small margin, and the proximal seminal vesicles. Dosimetric parameters analyzed for the CTV were D90, V90, V100, V150, and V200. Dose to the urethra, bladder, bladder balloon, and rectum were evaluated by the dose to 0.1 cm{sup 3}, 1 cm{sup 3}, and 2 cm{sup 3} of each organ, expressed as a percentage of the prescribed dose. Analysis was stratified according to prostate size. Results: The mean prostate ultrasound volume was 38.7 {+-} 13.4 cm{sup 3} (range: 11.7-108.6 cm{sup 3}). The mean CTV was 75.1 {+-} 20.6 cm{sup 3} (range: 33.4-156.5 cm{sup 3}). The mean D90 was 109.2% {+-} 2.6% (range: 102.3%-118.4%). Ninety-three percent of observed D90 values were between 105 and 115%. The mean V90, V100, V150, and V200 were 99.9% {+-} 0.05%, 99.5% {+-} 0.8%, 25.4% {+-} 4.2%, and 7.8% {+-} 1.4%. The mean dose to 0.1 cm{sup 3}, 1 cm{sup 3}, and 2 cm{sup 3} for organs at risk were: Urethra: 107.3% {+-} 3.0%, 101.1% {+-} 14.6%, and 47.9% {+-} 34.8%; bladder wall: 79.5% {+-} 5.1%, 69.8% {+-} 4.9%, and 64.3% {+-} 5.0%; bladder balloon: 70.3% {+-} 6.8%, 59.1% {+-} 6.6%, and 52.3% {+-} 6.2%; rectum: 76.3% {+-} 2.5%, 70.2% {+-} 3.3%, and 66.3% {+-} 3.8%. There was no significant difference between D90 and V100 when stratified by prostate size. Conclusions: HDR brachytherapy allows the physician to consistently achieve complete prostate target coverage and maintain normal tissue dose constraints for organs at risk over a wide range of target volumes.

  4. Effect of Edema on Postimplant Dosimetry in Prostate Brachytherapy Using CT/MRI Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Osamu Hayashi, Shinya; Matsuo, Masayuki; Nakano, Masahiro; Uno, Hiromi; Ohtakara, Kazuhiro; Miyoshi, Toshiharu; Deguchi, Takashi; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the time course of prostatic edema and the effect on the dose-volume histograms of the prostate for patients treated with brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 74 patients with prostate cancer were enrolled in this prospective study. A transrectal ultrasound-based preplan was performed 4 weeks before implantation and computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging fusion-based postimplant dosimetry was performed on the day after implantation (Day 1) and 30 days after implantation (Day 30). The prostate volume, prostate volume covered by 100% of the prescription dose (V{sub 100}), and dose covering 90% of the prostate (D{sub 90}) were evaluated with prostatic edema over time. Results: Prostatic edema was greatest on Day 1, with the mean prostate volume 36% greater than the preplan transrectal ultrasound-based volume; it thereafter decreased over time. It was 9% greater than preplan volume on Day 30. The V{sub 100} increased 5.7% from Day 1 to Day 30, and the D{sub 90} increased 13.1% from Day 1 to Day 30. The edema ratio (postplan/preplan) on Day 1 of low-quality implants with a V{sub 100} of <80% was significantly greater than that of intermediate- to high-quality implants (>80% V{sub 100}; p = 0.0272). The lower V{sub 100} on Day 1 showed a greater increase from Day 1 to Day 30. A V{sub 100} on Day 1 of >92% is unlikely to increase >0% during the interval studied. Conclusion: Low-quality implants on Day 1 were highly associated with edema; however, such a low-quality implant on Day 1, with significant edema, tended to improve by Day 30. If a high-quality implant (V100 >92%) can be obtained on Day 1, a re-examination is no longer necessary.

  5. Long-Term Outcome for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Treated With Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Lief, Jonathan; Adamovich, Edward; Wallner, Kent E.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To present the largest series of prostate cancer brachytherapy patients treated with modern brachytherapy techniques and postimplant day 0 dosimetric evaluation. Methods and Materials: Between April 1995 and July 2006, 1,656 consecutive patients were treated with permanent interstitial brachytherapy. Risk group stratification was carried out according to the Mt. Sinai guidelines. Median follow-up was 7.0 years. The median day 0 minimum dose covering at least 90% of the target volume was 118.8% of the prescription dose. Cause of death was determined for each deceased patient. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated for impact on the evaluated survival parameters. Results: At 12 years, biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) for the entire cohort was 95.6%, 98.2%, and 72.6%, respectively. For low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, bPFS was 98.6%, 96.5%, and 90.5%; CSS was 99.8%, 99.3%, and 95.2%; and OS was 77.5%, 71.1%, and 69.2%, respectively. For biochemically controlled patients, the median posttreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration was 0.02 ng/ml. bPFS was most closely related to percent positive biopsy specimens and risk group, while Gleason score was the strongest predictor of CSS. OS was best predicted by patient age, hypertension, diabetes, and tobacco use. At 12 years, biochemical failure and cause-specific mortality were 1.8% and 0.2%, 5.1% and 2.1%, and 10.4% and 7.1% for Gleason scores 5 to 6 and 7 and {>=}8, respectively. Conclusions: Excellent long-term outcomes are achievable with high-quality brachytherapy for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients. These results compare favorably to alternative treatment modalities including radical prostatectomy.

  6. Tumour and immune cell dynamics explain the PSA bounce after prostate cancer brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yoichiro; Offord, Chetan P; Kimura, Go; Kuribayashi, Shigehiko; Takeda, Hayato; Tsuchiya, Shinichi; Shimojo, Hisashi; Kanno, Hiroyuki; Bozic, Ivana; Nowak, Martin A; Bajzer, Željko; Dingli, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: Interstitial brachytherapy for localised prostate cancer may be followed by transient increases in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) that resolve without therapy. Such PSA bounces may be associated with an improved outcome but often cause alarm in the patient and physician, and have defied explanation. Methods: We developed a mathematical model to capture the interactions between the tumour, radiation and anti-tumour immune response. The model was fitted to data from a large cohort of patients treated exclusively with interstitial brachytherapy. Immunohistological analysis for T-cell infiltration within the same tumours was also performed. Results: Our minimal model captures well the dynamics of the tumour after therapy, and suggests that a strong anti-tumour immune response coupled with the therapeutic effect of radiation on the tumour is responsible for the PSA bounce. Patients who experience a PSA bounce had a higher density of CD3 and CD8 cells within the tumour that likely contribute to the PSA bounce and the overall better outcomes observed. Conclusions: Our observations provide a novel and unifying explanation for the PSA bounce in patients with early prostate cancer and also have implications for the use of immune-based therapies in such patients to improve outcomes. PMID:27404586

  7. Effect of post-implant edema on prostate brachytherapy treatment margins

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Daniel R.; Wallner, Kent; Ford, Eric; Mueller, Amy; Merrick, Gregory; Maki, Jeffrey; Sutlief, Steven; Butler, Wayne

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To determine if postimplant prostate brachytherapy treatment margins calculated on Day 0 differ substantially from those calculated on Day 30. Methods: Thirty patients with 1997 American Joint Commission on Cancer clinical stage T1-T2 prostatic carcinoma underwent prostate brachytherapy with I-125 prescribed to 144 Gy. Treatment planning methods included using loose seeds in a modified peripheral loading pattern and treatment margins (TMs) of 5-8 mm. Postimplant plain radiographs, computed tomography scans, and magnetic resonance scans were obtained 1-4 hours after implantation (Day 0). A second set of imaging studies was obtained at 30 days after implantation (Day 30) and similarly analyzed. Treatment margins were measured as the radial distance in millimeters from the prostate edge to the 100% isodose line. The TMs were measured and tabulated at 90{sup o} intervals around the prostate periphery at 0.6-cm intervals. Each direction was averaged to obtain the mean anterior, posterior, left, and right margins. Results: The mean overall TM increased from 2.6 mm ({+-}2.3) on Day 0 to 3.5 mm ({+-}2.4) on Day 30. The mean anterior margin increased from 1.2 mm on Day 0 to 1.8 mm on Day 30. The posterior margin increased from 1.2 mm on Day 0 to 2.8 mm on Day 30. The lateral treatment margins increased most over time, with mean right treatment margin increasing from 3.9 mm on Day 0 to 4.7 mm on Day 30. Conclusion: Treatment margins appear to be durable in the postimplant period, with a clinically insignificant increase from Day 0 to Day 30.

  8. Predictive Factors and Management of Rectal Bleeding Side Effects Following Prostate Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Jeremy G.; Stone, Nelson N.; Stock, Richard G.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To report on the incidence, nature, and management of rectal toxicities following individual or combination brachytherapy following treatment for prostate cancer over a 17-year period. We also report the patient and treatment factors predisposing to acute ≥grade 2 proctitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 2752 patients were treated for prostate cancer between October 1990 and April 2007 with either low-dose-rate brachytherapy alone or in combination with androgen depletion therapy (ADT) or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and were followed for a median of 5.86 years (minimum 1.0 years; maximum 19.19 years). We investigated the 10-year incidence, nature, and treatment of acute and chronic rectal toxicities following BT. Using univariate, and multivariate analyses, we determined the treatment and comorbidity factors predisposing to rectal toxicities. We also outline the most common and effective management for these toxicities. Results: Actuarial risk of ≥grade 2 rectal bleeding was 6.4%, though notably only 0.9% of all patients required medical intervention to manage this toxicity. The majority of rectal bleeding episodes (72%) occurred within the first 3 years following placement of BT seeds. Of the 27 patients requiring management for their rectal bleeding, 18 underwent formalin treatment and nine underwent cauterization. Post-hoc univariate statistical analysis revealed that coronary artery disease (CAD), biologically effective dose, rectal volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose (RV100), and treatment modality predict the likelihood of grade ≥2 rectal bleeding. Only CAD, treatment type, and RV100 fit a Cox regression multivariate model. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy is very well tolerated and rectal bleeding toxicities are either self-resolving or effectively managed by medical intervention. Treatment planning incorporating adjuvant ADT while minimizing RV100 has yielded the best toxicity-free survival following

  9. Biologically effective dose values for prostate brachytherapy: Effects on PSA failure and posttreatment biopsy results

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, Richard G. . E-mail: richard.stock@msnyuhealth.org; Stone, Nelson N.; Cesaretti, Jamie A.; Rosenstein, Barry S.

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of biologically effective dose (BED) values on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure and posttreatment biopsy. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 2003, 1,377 patients had prostate brachytherapy alone (I-125 or Pd-103) (571), hormonal and brachytherapy (371), and trimodality therapy (hormonal, implant, and external beam) (435). Dose was defined as the D90 (dose delivered to 90% of the gland from the dose-volume histogram). Results: Freedom from PSA failure (FFPF) at 10 years was 87%. The 10-year FFPF for BED <100, >100-120, >120-140, >140-160, <160-180, >180-200, and >200 were 46%, 68%, 81%, 85.5%, 90%, 90%, and 92%, respectively (p < 0.0001). BED and Gleason score had the greatest effect, with p values of p < 0.0001 in multivariate analysis. Posttreatment positive biopsy rate was 7% (31/446). The positive biopsy rates for BED {<=}100, >100-120, >120-140, >140-160, >160-180, >180-200, and >200 were 24% (8/33), 15% (3/20), 6% (2/33), 6% (3/52), 7% (6/82), 1% (1/72), and 3% (4/131), respectively (p < 0.0001). BED was the most significant predictor of biopsy outcome in multivariate analysis (p = 0.006). Conclusions: Biologically effective dose equations provide a method of comparing different isotopes and combined therapies in the brachytherapy management of prostate cancer. The effects of BED on FFPF and posttreatment biopsy demonstrate a strong dose-response relationship.

  10. Combination of 5α-reductase inhibitor with combined androgen blockade (CAB) as a novel cytoreductive regimen before prostate brachytherapy: Ultra-CAB.

    PubMed

    Muro, Yusuke; Kosaka, Takeo; Mizuno, Ryuichi; Ohashi, Toshio; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Oya, Mototsugu

    2015-01-01

    We report a first case of using a 5α-reductase inhibitor (5ARI) and combined androgen blockade (CAB) as a cytoreductive regimen before prostate brachytherapy. Prostate volume reduction with CAB is limited to approximately 40% in most cases, making it difficult to meet anatomical constraints to perform these procedures in cases with large prostate volume. With the added administration of 5ARI, further volume reduction can be expected. Here, we describe this cytoreductive regimen used in a 63 year-old prostate cancer patient who became eligible to receive brachytherapy after dutasteride (0.5 mg daily) was added to CAB and prostate volume reduction of 57% was achieved. PMID:26069888

  11. Combination of 5α-reductase inhibitor with combined androgen blockade (CAB) as a novel cytoreductive regimen before prostate brachytherapy: Ultra-CAB

    PubMed Central

    Muro, Yusuke; Kosaka, Takeo; Mizuno, Ryuichi; Ohashi, Toshio; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Oya, Mototsugu

    2015-01-01

    We report a first case of using a 5α-reductase inhibitor (5ARI) and combined androgen blockade (CAB) as a cytoreductive regimen before prostate brachytherapy. Prostate volume reduction with CAB is limited to approximately 40% in most cases, making it difficult to meet anatomical constraints to perform these procedures in cases with large prostate volume. With the added administration of 5ARI, further volume reduction can be expected. Here, we describe this cytoreductive regimen used in a 63 year-old prostate cancer patient who became eligible to receive brachytherapy after dutasteride (0.5 mg daily) was added to CAB and prostate volume reduction of 57% was achieved. PMID:26069888

  12. Optical fibre luminescence sensor for real-time LDR brachytherapy dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woulfe, P.; Sullivan, F. J.; O'Keeffe, S.

    2016-05-01

    An optical fibre sensor for monitoring low dose radiation is presented. The sensor is based on a scintillation material embedded within the optical fibre core, which emits visible light when exposed to low level ionising radiation. The incident level of ionising radiation can be determined by analysing the optical emission. An optical fibre sensor is presented, based on radioluminescence whereby radiation sensitive scintillation material, terbium doped gadolinium oxysulphide (Gd2O2S:Tb), is embedded in a cavity of 250μm of a 500μm plastic optical fibre. The sensor is designed for in-vivo monitoring of the radiation dose during radio-active seed implantation for brachytherapy, in prostate cancer treatment, providing oncologists with real-time information of the radiation dose to the target area and/or nearby critical structures. The radiation from the brachytherapy seeds causes emission of visible light from the scintillation material through the process of radioluminescence, which penetrates the fibre, propagating along the optical fibre for remote detection using a multi-pixel photon counter. The sensor demonstrates a high sensitivity to Iodine-125, the radioactive source most commonly used in brachytherapy for treating prostate cancer.

  13. Biomaterial characteristics and application of silicone rubber and PVA hydrogels mimicked in organ groups for prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Pan; Jiang, Shan; Yu, Yan; Yang, Jun; Yang, Zhiyong

    2015-09-01

    It is definite that transparent material with similar structural characteristics and mechanical properties to human tissue is favorable for experimental study of prostate brachytherapy. In this paper, a kind of transparent polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogel and silicone rubber are developed as suitable substitutions for human soft tissue. Segmentation and 3D reconstruction of medical image are performed to manufacture the mould of organ groups through rapid prototyping technology. Micro-structure observation, force test and CCD deformation test have been conducted to investigate the structure and mechanical properties of PVA hydrogel used in organ group mockup. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) image comparison results show that PVA hydrogel consisting of 3 g PVA, 17 g de-ionized water, 80 g dimethyl-sulfoxide (DMSO), 4 g NaCl, 1.5 g NaOH, 3 g epichlorohydrin (ECH) and 7 freeze/thaw cycles reveals similar micro-structure to human prostate tissue. Through the insertion force comparison between organ group mockup and clinical prostate brachytherapy, PVA hydrogel and silicone rubber are found to have the same mechanical properties as prostate tissue and muscle. CCD deformation test results show that insertion force suffers a sharp decrease and a relaxation of tissue deformation appears when needle punctures the capsule of prostate model. The results exhibit that organ group mockup consisting of PVA hydrogel, silicone rubber, membrane and agarose satisfies the needs of prostate brachytherapy simulation in general and can be used to mimic the soft tissues in pelvic structure. PMID:26042767

  14. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost for Prostate Cancer: Comparison of Two Different Fractionation Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Kaprealian, Tania; Weinberg, Vivian; Speight, Joycelyn L.; Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Roach, Mack; Shinohara, Katsuto; Hsu, I.-Chow

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This is a retrospective study comparing our experience with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost for prostate cancer, using two different fractionation schemes, 600 cGy Multiplication-Sign 3 fractions (patient group 1) and 950 cGy Multiplication-Sign 2 fractions (patient group 2). Methods and Materials: A total of 165 patients were treated for prostate cancer using external beam radiation therapy up to a dose of 45 Gy, followed by an HDR brachytherapy prostate radiation boost. Between July 1997 and Nov 1999, 64 patients were treated with an HDR boost of 600 cGy Multiplication-Sign 3 fractions; and between June 2000 and Nov 2005, 101 patients were treated with an HDR boost of 950 cGy Multiplication-Sign 2 fractions. All but 9 patients had at least one of the following risk features: pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level >10, a Gleason score {>=}7, and/or clinical stage T3 disease. Results: Median follow-up was 105 months for group 1 and 43 months for group 2. Patients in group 2 had a greater number of high-risk features than group 1 (p = 0.02). Adjusted for comparable follow-up, there was no difference in biochemical no-evidence-of-disease (bNED) rate between the two fractionation scheme approaches, with 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of 93.5% in group 1 and 87.3% in group 2 (p = 0.19). The 5-year estimates of progression-free survival were 86% for group 1 and 83% for group 2 (p = 0.53). Among high-risk patients, there were no differences in bNED or PFS rate due to fractionation. Conclusions: Results were excellent for both groups. Adjusted for comparable follow-up, no differences were found between groups.

  15. Seed-based transrectal ultrasound-fluoroscopy registration method for intraoperative dosimetry analysis of prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tutar, Ismail B.; Gong Lixin; Narayanan, Sreeram; Pathak, Sayan D.; Cho, Paul S.; Wallner, Kent; Kim, Yongmin

    2008-03-15

    Prostate brachytherapy is an effective treatment option for early-stage prostate cancer. During a prostate brachytherapy procedure, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and fluoroscopy imaging modalities complement each other by providing good visualization of soft tissue and implanted seeds, respectively. Therefore, the registration of these two imaging modalities, which are readily available in the operating room, could facilitate intraoperative dosimetry, thus enabling physicians to implant additional seeds into the underdosed portions of the prostate while the patient is still on the operating table. It is desirable to register TRUS and fluoroscopy images by using the seeds as fiducial markers. Although the locations of all the implanted seeds can be reconstructed from three fluoroscopy images, only a fraction of these seeds can be located in TRUS images. It is challenging to register the TRUS and fluoroscopy images by using the identified seeds, since the correspondence between them is unknown. Furthermore, misdetection of nonseed structures as seeds can lead to the inclusion of spurious points in the data set. We developed a new method called iterative optimal assignment (IOA) to overcome these challenges in TRUS-fluoroscopy registration. By using the Hungarian method in an optimization framework, IOA computes a set of transformation parameters that yield the one-to-one correspondence with minimum cost. We have evaluated our registration method at varying noise levels, seed detection rates, and number of spurious points using data collected from 25 patients. We have found that IOA can perform registration with an average root mean square error of about 0.2 cm even when the seed detection rate is only 10%. We believe that IOA can offer a robust solution to seed-based TRUS-fluoroscopy registration, thus making intraoperative dosimetry possible.

  16. Detailed urethral dosimetry in the evaluation of prostate brachytherapy-related urinary morbidity

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Zachariah A.; Merrick, Gregory S. . E-mail: gmerrick@wheelinghospital.com; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Kurko, Brian; Anderson, Richard L.; Murray, Brian C.; Galbreath, Robert W.

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between urinary morbidity after prostate brachytherapy and urethral doses calculated at the base, midprostate, apex, and urogenital diaphragm. Methods and Materials: From February 1998 through July 2002, 186 consecutive patients without a prior history of a transurethral resection underwent monotherapeutic brachytherapy (no supplemental external beam radiation therapy or androgen deprivation therapy) with urethral-sparing techniques (average urethral dose 100%-140% minimum peripheral dose) for clinical T1c-T2b (2002 AJCC) prostate cancer. The median follow-up was 45.5 months. Urinary morbidity was defined by time to International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) resolution, maximum increase in IPSS, catheter dependency, and the need for postimplant surgical intervention. An alpha blocker was initiated approximately 2 weeks before implantation and continued at least until the IPSS returned to baseline. Evaluated parameters included overall urethral dose (average and maximum), doses to the base, midprostate, apex, and urogenital diaphragm, patient age, clinical T stage, preimplant IPSS, ultrasound volume, isotope, and D90 and V100/150/200. Results: Of the 186 patients, 176 (94.6%) had the urinary catheter permanently removed on the day of implantation with only 1 patient requiring a urinary catheter >5 days. No patient had a urethral stricture and only 2 patients (1.1%) required a postbrachytherapy transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). For the entire cohort, IPSS on average peaked 2 weeks after implantation with a mean and median time to IPSS resolution of 14 and 3 weeks, respectively. For the entire cohort, only isotope predicted for IPSS resolution, while neither overall average prostatic urethra nor segmental urethral dose predicted for IPSS resolution. The maximum postimplant IPSS increase was best predicted by preimplant IPSS and the maximum apical urethral dose. Conclusions: With the routine use of prophylactic alpha

  17. Dynamic dosimetry and edema detection in prostate brachytherapy: a complete system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, A.; Deguet, A.; Iordachita, I.; Chintalapani, G.; Blevins, J.; Le, Y.; Armour, E.; Burdette, C.; Song, D.; Fichtinger, G.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy (radioactive seed insertion) has emerged as one of the most effective treatment options for patients with prostate cancer, with the added benefit of a convenient outpatient procedure. The main limitation in contemporary brachytherapy is faulty seed placement, predominantly due to the presence of intra-operative edema (tissue expansion). Though currently not available, the capability to intra-operatively monitor the seed distribution, can make a significant improvement in cancer control. We present such a system here. Methods: Intra-operative measurement of edema in prostate brachytherapy requires localization of inserted radioactive seeds relative to the prostate. Seeds were reconstructed using a typical non-isocentric C-arm, and exported to a commercial brachytherapy delivery system. Technical obstacles for 3D reconstruction on a non-isocentric C-arm include pose-dependent C-arm calibration; distortion correction; pose estimation of C-arm images; seed reconstruction; and C-arm to TRUS registration. Results: In precision-machined hard phantoms with 40-100 seeds and soft tissue phantoms with 45-87 seeds, we correctly reconstructed the seed implant shape with an average 3D precision of 0.35 mm and 0.24 mm, respectively. In a DoD Phase-1 clinical trial on 6 patients with 48-82 planned seeds, we achieved intra-operative monitoring of seed distribution and dosimetry, correcting for dose inhomogeneities by inserting an average of 4.17 (1-9) additional seeds. Additionally, in each patient, the system automatically detected intra-operative seed migration induced due to edema (mean 3.84 mm, STD 2.13 mm, Max 16.19 mm). Conclusions: The proposed system is the first of a kind that makes intra-operative detection of edema (and subsequent re-optimization) possible on any typical non-isocentric C-arm, at negligible additional cost to the existing clinical installation. It achieves a significantly more homogeneous seed distribution, and has the potential to

  18. Dosimetric Coverage of the Prostate, Normal Tissue Sparing, and Acute Toxicity with High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Large Prostate Volumes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, George; Strom, Tobin J.; Wilder, Richard B.; Shrinath, Kushagra; Mellon, Eric A.; Fernandez, Daniel C.; Biagioli, Matthew C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To evaluate dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with HDR brachytherapy for large prostate volumes. Materials and Methods One hundred and two prostate cancer patients with prostate volumes >50 mL (range: 5-29 mL) were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy ± intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions between 2009 and 2013. HDR brachytherapy monotherapy doses consisted of two 1,350-1,400 cGy fractions separated by 2-3 weeks, and HDR brachytherapy boost doses consisted of two 950-1,150 cGy fractions separated by 4 weeks. Twelve of 32 (38%) unfavorable intermediate risk, high risk, and very high risk patients received androgen deprivation therapy. Acute toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4. Results Median follow-up was 14 months. Dosimetric goals were achieved in over 90% of cases. Three of 102 (3%) patients developed Grade 2 acute proctitis. No variables were significantly associated with Grade 2 acute proctitis. Seventeen of 102 (17%) patients developed Grade 2 acute urinary retention. American Urological Association (AUA) symptom score was the only variable significantly associated with Grade 2 acute urinary retention (p=0.04). There was no ≥ Grade 3 acute toxicity. Conclusions Dosimetric coverage of the prostate and normal tissue sparing were adequate in patients with prostate volumes >50 mL. Higher pre-treatment AUA symptom scores increased the relative risk of Grade 2 acute urinary retention. However, the overall incidence of acute toxicity was acceptable in patients with large prostate volumes. PMID:26200536

  19. Automatic segmentation of seeds and fluoroscope tracking (FTRAC) fiducial in prostate brachytherapy x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Nathanael; Lee, Junghoon; Deguet, Anton; Song, Danny; Burdette, E. Clif; Prince, Jerry

    2010-02-01

    C-arm X-ray fluoroscopy-based radioactive seed localization for intraoperative dosimetry of prostate brachytherapy is an active area of research. The fluoroscopy tracking (FTRAC) fiducial is an image-based tracking device composed of radio-opaque BBs, lines, and ellipses that provides an effective means for pose estimation so that three-dimensional reconstruction of the implanted seeds from multiple X-ray images can be related to the ultrasound-computed prostate volume. Both the FTRAC features and the brachytherapy seeds must be segmented quickly and accurately during the surgery, but current segmentation algorithms are inhibitory in the operating room (OR). The first reason is that current algorithms require operators to manually select a region of interest (ROI), preventing automatic pipelining from image acquisition to seed reconstruction. Secondly, these algorithms fail often, requiring operators to manually correct the errors. We propose a fast and effective ROI-free automatic FTRAC and seed segmentation algorithm to minimize such human intervention. The proposed algorithm exploits recent image processing tools to make seed reconstruction as easy and convenient as possible. Preliminary results on 162 patient images show this algorithm to be fast, effective, and accurate for all features to be segmented. With near perfect success rates and subpixel differences to manual segmentation, our automatic FTRAC and seed segmentation algorithm shows promising results to save crucial time in the OR while reducing errors.

  20. On the Sensitivity of α/β Prediction to Dose Calculation Methodology in Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Afsharpour, Hossein; Walsh, Sean; Collins Fekete, Charles-Antoine; Vigneault, Eric; Verhaegen, Frank; Beaulieu, Luc

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To study the relationship between the accuracy of the dose calculation in brachytherapy and the estimations of the radiosensitivity parameter, α/β, for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In this study, Monte Carlo methods and more specifically the code ALGEBRA was used to produce accurate dose calculations in the case of prostate brachytherapy. Equivalent uniform biologically effective dose was calculated for these dose distributions and was used in an iso-effectiveness relationship with external beam radiation therapy. Results: By considering different levels of detail in the calculations, the estimation for the α/β parameter varied from 1.9 to 6.3 Gy, compared with a value of 3.0 Gy suggested by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 137. Conclusions: Large variations of the α/β show the sensitivity of this parameter to dose calculation modality. The use of accurate dose calculation engines is critical for better evaluating the biological outcomes of treatments.

  1. Data fusion for planning target volume and isodose prediction in prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouranian, Saman; Ramezani, Mahdi; Mahdavi, S. Sara; Spadinger, Ingrid; Morris, William J.; Salcudean, Septimiu E.; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2015-03-01

    In low-dose prostate brachytherapy treatment, a large number of radioactive seeds is implanted in and adjacent to the prostate gland. Planning of this treatment involves the determination of a Planning Target Volume (PTV), followed by defining the optimal number of seeds, needles and their coordinates for implantation. The two major planning tasks, i.e. PTV determination and seed definition, are associated with inter- and intra-expert variability. Moreover, since these two steps are performed in sequence, the variability is accumulated in the overall treatment plan. In this paper, we introduce a model based on a data fusion technique that enables joint determination of PTV and the minimum Prescribed Isodose (mPD) map. The model captures the correlation between different information modalities consisting of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) volumes, PTV and isodose contours. We take advantage of joint Independent Component Analysis (jICA) as a linear decomposition technique to obtain a set of joint components that optimally describe such correlation. We perform a component stability analysis to generate a model with stable parameters that predicts the PTV and isodose contours solely based on a new patient TRUS volume. We propose a framework for both modeling and prediction processes and evaluate it on a dataset of 60 brachytherapy treatment records. We show PTV prediction error of 10:02+/-4:5% and the V100 isodose overlap of 97+/-3:55% with respect to the clinical gold standard.

  2. CT-guided brachytherapy of prostate cancer: reduction of effective dose from X-ray examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanin, Dmitriy B.; Biryukov, Vitaliy A.; Rusetskiy, Sergey S.; Sviridov, Pavel V.; Volodina, Tatiana V.

    2014-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is one of the most effective and informative diagnostic method. Though the number of CT scans among all radiographic procedures in the USA and European countries is 11% and 4% respectively, CT makes the highest contribution to the collective effective dose from all radiographic procedures, it is 67% in the USA and 40% in European countries [1-5]. Therefore it is necessary to understand the significance of dose value from CT imaging to a patient . Though CT dose from multiple scans and potential risk is of great concern in pediatric patients, this applies to adults as well. In this connection it is very important to develop optimal approaches to dose reduction and optimization of CT examination. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its publications recommends radiologists to be aware that often CT image quality is higher than it is necessary for diagnostic confidence[6], and there is a potential to reduce the dose which patient gets from CT examination [7]. In recent years many procedures, such as minimally invasive surgery, biopsy, brachytherapy and different types of ablation are carried out under guidance of computed tomography [6;7], and during a procedures multiple CT scans focusing on a specific anatomic region are performed. At the Clinics of MRRC different types of treatment for patients with prostate cancer are used, incuding conformal CT-guided brachytherapy, implantation of microsources of I into the gland under guidance of spiral CT [8]. So, the purpose of the study is to choose optimal method to reduce radiation dose from CT during CT-guided prostate brachytherapy and to obtain the image of desired quality.

  3. The Influence of Prostate Volume on Outcome After High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Alone for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Hien Rojas, Ana; Alonzi, Roberto; Hughes, Robert; Ostler, Peter; Lowe, Gerry; Bryant, Linda; Hoskin, Peter

    2013-10-01

    Objective: To determine whether late genitourinary toxicity, biochemical control of prostate cancer, and dosimetric parameters in patients with large prostate glands is different from those variables in men with smaller glands after treatment with high-dose-rate brachytherapy alone (HDR-BT). Methods: From November 2003 to July 2009, 164 patients with locally advanced prostate carcinoma were sequentially enrolled and treated with 34 or 36 Gy in 4 fractions and 31.5 Gy in 3 fractions of {sup 192}Ir HDR-BT alone. The median follow-up time was 71 months. Gland size was not considered in the selection criteria for this study. Estimates of freedom from biochemical relapse (FFbR) and late morbidity, stratified by median clinical target volume (CTV), were obtained, and differences were compared. Results: The median CTV volume was 60 cc (range, 15-208 cc). Dose–volume parameters D90 and V100 (ie, minimum dose to 90% of the prostate volume and volume receiving 100% of the prescribed isodose) achieved in patients with glands ≥60 cc were not significantly different from those with glands <60 cc (P≥.2). Nonetheless, biochemical control in patients with larger CTV was significantly higher (91% vs 78% at 6 years; P=.004). In univariate and multivariate analysis, CTV was a significant predictor for risk of biochemical relapse. This was not at the expense of an increase in either moderate (P=.6) or severe (P=.3) late genitourinary toxicity. The use of hormonal therapy was 17% lower in the large gland group (P=.01). Conclusions: Prostate gland size does not affect dosimetric parameters in HDR-BT assessed by D90 and V100. In patients with larger glands, a significantly higher biochemical control of disease was observed, with no difference in late toxicity. This improvement cannot be attributed to differences in dosimetry. Gland size should not be considered in the selection of patients for HDR-BT.

  4. Comparison of High-Dose Proton Radiotherapy and Brachytherapy in Localized Prostate Cancer: A Case-Matched Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Coen, John J.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Rossi, Carl J.; Grocela, Joseph A.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Yan, Yan; Shipley, William U.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report a case-matched analysis comparing high-dose external-beam radiation (EBRT) for prostate cancer delivered on Proton Radiation Oncology Group (PROG) 95-09, a randomized trial, with permanent prostate brachytherapy over the same era. Methods: From 1996 to 1999, 196 patients were accrued to the high-dose arm (79.2 Gray equivalent (GyE) using photons and protons) of PROG 95-09 at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Loma Linda University Medical Center. Entry criteria specified T1-2 and prostate-specific antigen {<=}15 ng/mL. When Gleason score >7 was excluded, 177 men were left for case matching. At Massachusetts General Hospital, 203 similar patients were treated by a single brachytherapist from 1997 to 2002. Minimum follow-up was 3 years. Case matching, based on T stage, Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen, and age resulted in 141 matches (282 patients). Median follow-up was 8.6 and 7.4 years for EBRT and brachytherapy, respectively. The primary endpoint was biochemical failure (BF). Results: Using the Phoenix definition, the 8-year BF rates were 7.7% and 16.1% for EBRT and brachytherapy, respectively (p = 0.42). A stratified analysis was performed by risk group. In the EBRT group, 113 and 28 patients were low and intermediate risk, respectively. In the brachytherapy group, 118 and 23 were. When stratified by risk group, the BF rates were similar by either technique. Conclusions: High-dose EBRT and brachytherapy result in similar BF rates for men with localized prostate cancer. Comparative quality-of-life and cost-effectiveness studies are warranted.

  5. Predictive Factors for Acute and Late Urinary Toxicity After Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy: Long-Term Outcome in 712 Consecutive Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, Mira Miller, Stacy; Moravan, Veronika; Pickles, Tom; McKenzie, Michael; Pai, Howard; Liu, Mitchell; Kwan, Winkle; Agranovich, Alexander; Spadinger, Ingrid; Lapointe, Vincent; Halperin, Ross; Morris, W. James

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To describe the frequency of acute and late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) urinary toxicity, associated predictive factors, and resolution of International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) in 712 consecutive prostate brachytherapy patients. Methods and Materials: Patients underwent implantation between 1998 and 2003 (median follow-up, 57 months). The IPSS and RTOG toxicity data were prospectively collected. The patient, treatment, and implant factors were examined for an association with urinary toxicity. The time to IPSS resolution was examined using Kaplan-Meier curves, and multivariate modeling of IPSS resolution was done using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the factors associated with urinary toxicity. Results: The IPSS returned to baseline at a median of 12.6 months. On multivariate analysis, patients with a high baseline IPSS had a quicker resolution of their IPSS. Higher prostate D90 (dose covering 90% of the prostate), maximal postimplant IPSS, and urinary retention slowed the IPSS resolution time. The rate of the actuarial 5-year late urinary (>12 months) RTOG Grade 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 was 32%, 36%, 24%, 6.2%, and 0.1%, respectively. At 7 years, the prevalence of RTOG Grade 0-1 was 92.5%. Patients with a larger prostate volume, greater number of needles, greater baseline IPSS, and use of hormonal therapy had more acute toxicity. On multivariate analysis, the significant predictors for late greater than or equal to RTOG toxicity 2 were a greater baseline IPSS, maximal postimplant IPSS, presence of acute toxicity, and higher prostate V150 (volume of the prostate covered by 150% of the dose). More recently implanted patients had less acute urinary toxicity and patients given hormonal therapy had less late urinary toxicity (all p < 0.02). Conclusion: Most urinary symptoms resolved within 12 months after prostate brachytherapy, and significant long-term urinary toxicity was very low

  6. High-Dose-Rate Monotherapy: Safe and Effective Brachytherapy for Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Demanes, D. Jeffrey; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Ghilezan, Michel; Hill, Dennis R.; Schour, Lionel; Brandt, David; Gustafson, Gary

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy used as the only treatment (monotherapy) for early prostate cancer is consistent with current concepts in prostate radiobiology, and the dose is reliably delivered in a prospectively defined anatomic distribution that meets all the requirements for safe and effective therapy. We report the disease control and toxicity of HDR monotherapy from California Endocurietherapy (CET) and William Beaumont Hospital (WBH) in low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: There were 298 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with HDR monotherapy between 1996 and 2005. Two biologically equivalent hypofractionation protocols were used. At CET the dose was 42 Gy in six fractions (two implantations 1 week apart) delivered to a computed tomography-defined planning treatment volume. At WBH the dose was 38 Gy in four fractions (one implantation) based on intraoperative transrectal ultrasound real-time treatment planning. The bladder, urethral, and rectal dose constraints were similar. Toxicity was scored with the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 3. Results: The median follow-up time was 5.2 years. The median age of the patients was 63 years, and the median value of the pretreatment prostate-specific antigen was 6.0 ng/mL. The 8-year results were 99% local control, 97% biochemical control (nadir +2), 99% distant metastasis-free survival, 99% cause-specific survival, and 95% overall survival. Toxicity was scored per event, meaning that an individual patient with more than one symptom was represented repeatedly in the morbidity data table. Genitourinary toxicity consisted of 10% transient Grade 2 urinary frequency or urgency and 3% Grade 3 episode of urinary retention. Gastrointestinal toxicity was <1%. Conclusions: High disease control rates and low morbidity demonstrate that HDR monotherapy is safe and effective for patients with localized prostate cancer.

  7. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) Practice Guideline for the Transperineal Permanent Brachytherapy of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, Seth A.; Bittner, Nathan H.J.; Demanes, D. Jeffrey; Goldsmith, Brian J.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Lee, W. Robert; Nag, Subir; Suh, W. Warren; Potters, Louis

    2011-02-01

    Transperineal permanent prostate brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with organ-confined prostate cancer. Careful adherence to established brachytherapy standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for permanent prostate brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrist. Factors with respect to patient selection and appropriate use of supplemental treatment modalities such as external beam radiation and androgen suppression therapy are discussed. Logistics with respect to the brachtherapy implant procedure, the importance of dosimetric parameters, and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful prostate brachytherapy program.

  8. [Intraoperative and post-implant dosimetry in patients treated with permanent prostate implant brachytherapy].

    PubMed

    Herein, András; Ágoston, Péter; Szabó, Zoltán; Jorgo, Kliton; Markgruber, Balázs; Pesznyák, Csilla; Polgár, Csaba; Major, Tibor

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of our work was to compare intraoperative and four-week post-implant dosimetry for loose and stranded seed implants for permanent prostate implant brachytherapy. In our institute low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy is performed with encapsulated I-125 isotopes (seeds) using transrectal ultrasound guidance and metal needles. The SPOT PRO 3.1 (Elekta, Sweden) system is used for treatment planning. In this study the first 79 patients were treated with loose seed (LS) technique, the consecutive patients were treated with stranded seed (SS) technique. During intraoperative planning the dose constraints were the same for both techniques. All LSs were placed inside the prostate capsule, while with SS a 2 mm margin around the prostate was allowed for seed positioning. The prescribed dose for the prostate was 145 Gy. This study investigated prostate dose coverage in 30-30 randomly selected patients with LS and SS. Four weeks after the implantation native CT and MRI were done and CT/MRI image fusion was performed. The target was contoured on MRI and the plan was prepared on CT data. To assess the treatment plan dose-volume histograms were used. For the target coverage V100, V90, D90, D100, for the dose inhomogeneity V150, V200, and the dose-homogeneity index (DHI), for dose conformality the conformal index (COIN) were calculated. Intraoperative and postimplant plans were compared. The mean V100 values decreased at four-week plan for SS (97% vs. 84%) and for LS (96% vs. 80%) technique, as well. Decrease was observed for all parameters except for the DHI value. The DHI increased for SS (0.38 vs. 0.41) and for LS (0.38 vs. 0.47) technique, as well. The COIN decreased for both techniques at four-week plan (SS: 0.63 vs. 0.57; LS: 0.67 vs. 0.50). All differences were significant except for the DHI value at SS technique. The percentage changes were not significant, except the COIN value. The dose coverage of the target decreased significantly at four-week plans

  9. Robustness of IPSA optimized high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy treatment plans to catheter displacements

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, May

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) optimized brachytherapy treatment plans are characterized with large isolated dwell times at the first or last dwell position of each catheter. The potential of catheter shifts relative to the target and organs at risk in these plans may lead to a more significant change in delivered dose to the volumes of interest relative to plans with more uniform dwell times. Material and methods This study aims to determine if the Nucletron Oncentra dwell time deviation constraint (DTDC) parameter can be optimized to improve the robustness of high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy plans to catheter displacements. A set of 10 clinically acceptable prostate plans were re-optimized with a DTDC parameter of 0 and 0.4. For each plan, catheter displacements of 3, 7, and 14 mm were retrospectively applied and the change in dose volume histogram (DVH) indices and conformity indices analyzed. Results The robustness of clinically acceptable prostate plans to catheter displacements in the caudal direction was found to be dependent on the DTDC parameter. A DTDC value of 0 improves the robustness of planning target volume (PTV) coverage to catheter displacements, whereas a DTDC value of 0.4 improves the robustness of the plans to changes in hotspots. Conclusions The results indicate that if used in conjunction with a pre-treatment catheter displacement correction protocol and a tolerance of 3 mm, a DTDC value of 0.4 may produce clinically superior plans. However, the effect of the DTDC parameter in plan robustness was not observed to be as strong as initially suspected. PMID:27504129

  10. Rectal-wall dose dependence on postplan timing after permanent-seed prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Taussky, Daniel; Yeung, Ivan; Williams, Theresa; Pearson, Shannon; McLean, Michael; Pond, Gregory; Crook, Juanita . E-mail: Juanita.crook@rmp.uhn.on.ca

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: Dose to rectal wall after permanent-seed prostate brachytherapy is dependent on distance between posterior prostatic seeds and anterior rectal wall and is influenced by postimplant periprostatic edema. We analyzed the effect of postplan timing on anterior rectal-wall dose. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients received permanent seed {sup 125}I brachytherapy as monotherapy (145 Gy). Implants were preplanned by use of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and carried out by use of preloaded needles. Postimplant dosimetry was calculated by use of magnetic resonance imaging-computed tomography fusion on Days 1, 8, and 30. The anterior rectal-wall dose is reported as the isodose enclosing 1.0 or 2.0 cc of rectal wall and as the RV100 in cc. Results: The dose to rectal wall increased progressively over time. The median increase in dose to 1.0 cc of rectal wall (RD [1 cc]) from Day 1 to 30 was 39.2 Gy (p < 0.001). RV100 increased from a median of 0.07 cc on Day 1 to 0.67 cc on Day 30. The most significant predictor of rectal-wall dose (RD [1 cc], RD [2 cc], or RV100) was the time of evaluation (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Although periprostatic edema cannot be quantified by postimplant imaging, the dose to the anterior rectal wall increases significantly over time as prostatic and periprostatic edema resolve. Critical-organ dose reporting and guidelines for minimizing toxicity must take into account the time of the assessment.

  11. Chemoembolization and stenting combined with iodine-125 seed strands for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma with inferior vena cava obstruction

    PubMed Central

    LI, WENHUI; DAI, ZHENYU; YAO, LIZHENG; LUO, JIANJUN; YAN, ZHIPING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of stenting combined with radioactive iodine-125 seed strands following chemoembolization for the treatment of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and inferior vena cava (IVC) obstruction. A retrospective analysis was conducted of 52 hepatocellular carcinoma patients with IVC obstruction. All patients received chemoembolization of tumor-supplying arteries and IVC stents, and 18 patients additionally received iodine-125 seed strands, which were fixed to the stents. Improvement of IVC obstruction and the tumor response rates were compared between the two groups with a median follow-up time of 2.5 months. In both groups the stents were successfully deployed. At the 2-month post-procedural follow-up, the mean diameter of the IVC obstruction site, the mean pressure difference between the distal IVC obstructive segment and the right atrium as well as the obstruction scoring did not differ significantly between the two groups. By contrast, the tumor response rate of the iodine-125 seed strand group was 94.4%, whereas for the group without iodine-125 seed strands it was 35.3% (P<0.001). The combination of stent and iodine-125 seed strands was effective and safe for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma with IVC obstruction. PMID:26622424

  12. Penile necrosis requiring penectomy complicating recto-urethral fistula post prostate cancer external beam radiation and brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Kinahan, John; Pai, Howard; Martens, Mildred; Gray, Jason; Biberdorf, Darren; Mihailovic, Alex; McAuley, Iain

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a well-recognized treatment for unfavourable risk localized prostate cancer. Radiation induced recto-urethral fistulae are known rare complications particularly from brachytherapy. We report a case of a recto-urethral fistula 7 years post-external beam radiation and I-125 brachytherapy, which was complicated by a severe polymicrobial soft tissue infection. This infection required penectomy and pelvic exenteration with diverting colostomy, Indiana pouch urinary diversion and gracilis myo-cutaneuos flap closure of the perineum. PMID:24454604

  13. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound versus Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer: A Matched-Pair Analysis.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Fouad; Limani, Ksenija; Peltier, Alexandre; Marcelis, Quentin; Zanaty, Marc; Chamoun, Alexandre; Vanden Bossche, Marc; Roumeguère, Thierry; van Velthoven, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate postoperative morbidity and long term oncologic and functional outcomes of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) compared to brachytherapy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Material and Methods. Patients treated by brachytherapy were matched 1 : 1 with patients who underwent HIFU. Differences in postoperative complications across the two groups were assessed using Wilcoxon's rank-sum or χ (2) test. Kaplan-Meier curves, log-rank tests, and Cox regression models were constructed to assess differences in survival rates between the two groups. Results. Brachytherapy was significantly associated with lower voiding LUTS and less frequent acute urinary retention (p < 0.05). Median oncologic follow-up was 83 months (13-123 months) in the HIFU cohort and 44 months (13-89 months) in the brachytherapy cohort. Median time to achieve PSA nadir was statistically shorter in the HIFU. Biochemical recurrence-free survival rate was significantly higher in the brachytherapy cohort compared to HIFU cohort (68.5% versus 53%, p < 0.05). No statistically significant difference in metastasis-free, cancer specific, and overall survivals was observed between the two groups. Conclusion. HIFU and brachytherapy are safe with no significant difference in cancer specific survival on long term oncologic follow-up. Nonetheless, a randomized controlled trial is needed to confirm these results. PMID:26357511

  14. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound versus Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer: A Matched-Pair Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Aoun, Fouad; Limani, Ksenija; Peltier, Alexandre; Marcelis, Quentin; Zanaty, Marc; Chamoun, Alexandre; Vanden Bossche, Marc; Roumeguère, Thierry; van Velthoven, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate postoperative morbidity and long term oncologic and functional outcomes of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) compared to brachytherapy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Material and Methods. Patients treated by brachytherapy were matched 1 : 1 with patients who underwent HIFU. Differences in postoperative complications across the two groups were assessed using Wilcoxon's rank-sum or χ2 test. Kaplan-Meier curves, log-rank tests, and Cox regression models were constructed to assess differences in survival rates between the two groups. Results. Brachytherapy was significantly associated with lower voiding LUTS and less frequent acute urinary retention (p < 0.05). Median oncologic follow-up was 83 months (13–123 months) in the HIFU cohort and 44 months (13–89 months) in the brachytherapy cohort. Median time to achieve PSA nadir was statistically shorter in the HIFU. Biochemical recurrence-free survival rate was significantly higher in the brachytherapy cohort compared to HIFU cohort (68.5% versus 53%, p < 0.05). No statistically significant difference in metastasis-free, cancer specific, and overall survivals was observed between the two groups. Conclusion. HIFU and brachytherapy are safe with no significant difference in cancer specific survival on long term oncologic follow-up. Nonetheless, a randomized controlled trial is needed to confirm these results. PMID:26357511

  15. Distant Metastases Following Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy for Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Lief, Jonathan; Adamovich, Edward; Wallner, Kent E.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Recent publications have suggested high-risk patients undergoing radical prostatectomy have a lower risk of distant metastases and improved cause-specific survival (CSS) than patients receiving definitive external beam radiation therapy (XRT). To date, none of these studies has compared distant metastases and CSS in brachytherapy patients. In this study, we evaluate such parameters in a consecutive cohort of brachytherapy patients. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 to June 2007, 1,840 consecutive patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with brachytherapy. Risk groups were stratified according to National Comprehensive Cancer Network ( (www.nccn.org)) guidelines. Subgroups of 658, 893, and 289 patients were assigned to low, intermediate, and high-risk categories. Median follow-up was 7.2 years. Along with brachytherapy implantation, 901 (49.0%) patients received supplemental XRT, and 670 (36.4%) patients received androgen deprivation therapy (median duration, 4 months). The mode of failure (biochemical, local, or distant) was determined for each patient for whom therapy failed. Cause of death was determined for each deceased patient. Multiple parameters were evaluated for impact on outcome. Results: For the entire cohort, metastases-free survival (MFS) and CSS at 12 years were 98.1% and 98.2%, respectively. When rates were stratified by low, intermediate, and high-risk groups, the 12-year MFS was 99.8%, 98.1%, and 93.8% (p < 0.001), respectively. CSS rates were 99.8%, 98.0%, and 95.3% (p < 0.001) for low, intermediate, and high-risk groups, respectively. Biochemical progression-free survival was 98.7%, 95.9% and 90.4% for low, intermediate, and high-risk patients, respectively (p < 0.001). In multivariate Cox-regression analysis, MFS was mostly closely related to Gleason score and year of treatment, whereas CSS was most closely associated with Gleason score. Conclusions: Excellent CSS and MFS rates are achievable with high

  16. Salvage brachytherapy in prostate local recurrence after radiation therapy: predicting factors for control and toxicity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate efficacy and toxicity after salvage brachytherapy (BT) in prostate local recurrence after radiation therapy. Methods and materials Between 1993 and 2007, we retrospectively analyzed 56 consecutively patients (pts) undergoing salvage brachytherapy. After local biopsy-proven recurrence, pts received 145 Gy LDR-BT (37 pts, 66%) or HDR-BT (19 pts, 34%) in different dose levels according to biological equivalent doses (BED2 Gy). By the time of salvage BT, only 15 pts (27%) received ADT. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of biochemical control and toxicities. Acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were graded using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCv3.0). Results Median follow-up after salvage BT was 48 months. The 5-year FFbF was 77%. HDR and LDR late grade 3 GU toxicities were observed in 21% and 24%. Late grade 3 GI toxicities were observed in 2% (HDR) and 2.7% (LDR). On univariate analysis, pre-salvage prostate-specific antigen (PSA) > 10 ng/ml (p = 0.004), interval to relapse after initial treatment < 24 months (p = 0.004) and salvage HDR-BT doses BED2 Gy level < 227 Gy (p = 0.012) were significant in predicting biochemical failure. On Cox multivariate analysis, pre-salvage PSA, and time to relapse were significant in predicting biochemical failure. HDR-BT BED2 Gy (α/β 1.5 Gy) levels ≥ 227 (p = 0.013), and ADT (p = 0.049) were significant in predicting grade ≥ 2 urinary toxicity. Conclusions Prostate BT is an effective salvage modality in some selected prostate local recurrence patients after radiation therapy. Even, we provide some potential predictors of biochemical control and toxicity for prostate salvage BT, further investigation is recommended. PMID:24885287

  17. Salvage HDR Brachytherapy for Recurrent Prostate Cancer After Previous Definitive Radiation Therapy: 5-Year Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chien Peter; Weinberg, Vivian; Shinohara, Katsuto; Roach, Mack; Nash, Marc; Gottschalk, Alexander; Chang, Albert J.; Hsu, I-Chow

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Evaluate efficacy and toxicity of salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) for locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 52 consecutively accrued patients undergoing salvage HDRB between 1998 and 2009 for locally recurrent prostate cancer after previous definitive RT. After pathologic confirmation of locally recurrent disease, patients received 36 Gy in 6 fractions. Twenty-four patients received neoadjuvant hormonal therapy before salvage, and no patients received adjuvant hormonal therapy. Determination of biochemical failure after salvage HDRB was based on the Phoenix definition. Overall survival (OS) and bF distributions were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of biochemical control. Acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities, based on Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 4), were documented. Results: Median follow-up after salvage HDRB was 59.6 months. The 5-year OS estimate was 92% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 80%-97%) with median survival not yet reached. Five-year biochemical control after salvage was 51% (95% CI: 34%-66%). Median PSA nadir postsalvage was 0.1 (range: 0-7.2) reached at a median of 10.2 months after completing HDRB. As for complications, acute and late grade 3 GU toxicities were observed in only 2% and 2%, respectively. No grade 2 or higher acute GI events and 4% grade 2 GI late events were observed. On univariate analysis, disease-free interval after initial definitive RT (P=.07), percent of positive cores at the time of diagnosis (P=.08), interval from first recurrence to salvage HDRB (P=.09), and pre-HDRB prostate-specific antigen (P=.07) were each of borderline significance in predicting biochemical control after salvage HDRB. Conclusions: Prostate HDRB is an effective salvage modality with relatively few long-term toxicities. We

  18. Conventional Versus Automated Implantation of Loose Seeds in Prostate Brachytherapy: Analysis of Dosimetric and Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Genebes, Caroline; Filleron, Thomas; Graff, Pierre; Jonca, Frédéric; Huyghe, Eric; Thoulouzan, Matthieu; Soulie, Michel; Malavaud, Bernard; Aziza, Richard; Brun, Thomas; Delannes, Martine; Bachaud, Jean-Marc

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To review the clinical outcome of I-125 permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) for low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer and to compare 2 techniques of loose-seed implantation. Methods and Materials: 574 consecutive patients underwent I-125 PPB for low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer between 2000 and 2008. Two successive techniques were used: conventional implantation from 2000 to 2004 and automated implantation (Nucletron, FIRST system) from 2004 to 2008. Dosimetric and biochemical recurrence-free (bNED) survival results were reported and compared for the 2 techniques. Univariate and multivariate analysis researched independent predictors for bNED survival. Results: 419 (73%) and 155 (27%) patients with low-risk and intermediate-risk disease, respectively, were treated (median follow-up time, 69.3 months). The 60-month bNED survival rates were 95.2% and 85.7%, respectively, for patients with low-risk and intermediate-risk disease (P=.04). In univariate analysis, patients treated with automated implantation had worse bNED survival rates than did those treated with conventional implantation (P<.0001). By day 30, patients treated with automated implantation showed lower values of dose delivered to 90% of prostate volume (D90) and volume of prostate receiving 100% of prescribed dose (V100). In multivariate analysis, implantation technique, Gleason score, and V100 on day 30 were independent predictors of recurrence-free status. Grade 3 urethritis and urinary incontinence were observed in 2.6% and 1.6% of the cohort, respectively, with no significant differences between the 2 techniques. No grade 3 proctitis was observed. Conclusion: Satisfactory 60-month bNED survival rates (93.1%) and acceptable toxicity (grade 3 urethritis <3%) were achieved by loose-seed implantation. Automated implantation was associated with worse dosimetric and bNED survival outcomes.

  19. Intraoperative Ultrasound-Fluoroscopy Fusion can Enhance Prostate Brachytherapy Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Orio, Peter F.; Tutar, Ismail B.; Narayanan, Sreeram; Arthurs, Sandra; Cho, Paul S.; Kim, Yongmin; Merrick, Gregory; Wallner, Kent E.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-fluoroscopy fusion-based intraoperative dosimetry system. Method and Materials: Twenty-five patients were treated for prostate cancer with Pd-103 implantation. After the execution of the treatment plan, two sets of TRUS images were collected using the longitudinal and axial transducers of a biplanar probe. Then, three fluoroscopic images were acquired at 0, -15 and +15{sup o}. The three-dimensional locations of all implanted seeds were reconstructed from fluoroscopic images. A subset of the implanted seeds was manually identified in TRUS images and used as fiducial markers to perform TRUS-fluoroscopy fusion. To improve the implant quality, additional seeds were placed if adverse isodose patterns were identified during visual inspection. If additional seeds were placed, intraoperative dosimetry was repeated. Day 0 computed tomography-based dosimetry was compared with final intraoperative dosimetry to validate dosimetry achieved in the implant suite. Results: An average of additional 4.0 seeds was implanted in 16 patients after initial intraoperative dose evaluation. Based on TRUS-fluoroscopy fusion-based dosimetry, the V100 improved from 86% to 93% (p = 0.005), whereas D90 increased from 94% to 109% (p = 0.011) with the guided additional seed implantation. No statistical difference was observed in V200 and V300 values. V100 and D90 values were 95 {+-} 4% and 120 {+-} 24%, respectively, based on the final intraoperative dosimetry evaluation, compared with 95 {+-} 4% and 122 {+-} 24%, respectively, based on Day 0 computed tomography-based dosimetry. Conclusions: Implantation of extra seeds based on TRUS-fluoroscopy fusion-based intraoperative dosimetry can improve the final V100 and D90 values with minimal increase in V200 and V300 values.

  20. Young Men Have Equivalent Biochemical Outcomes Compared With Older Men After Treatment With Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Burri, Ryan J.; Ho, Alice Y.; Forsythe, Kevin; Cesaretti, Jamie A.; Stone, Nelson N.; Stock, Richard G.

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate retrospectively the biochemical outcomes of young men treated with low-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 2005, 1,665 men with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with low-dose-rate brachytherapy {+-} hormone therapy (HT) {+-} external beam radiotherapy and underwent {>=}2 years of follow-up. Patients were stratified on the basis of age: {<=}60 (n = 378) and >60 years (n = 1,287). Biochemical failure was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir plus 2 ng/mL. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to determine the association of variables with freedom from biochemical failure (FFbF). Results: Median follow-up was 68 months (range, 24-180) for men {<=}60 years and 66 months (range, 24-200) for men >60. For the entire group, the actuarial 5- and 8-year FFbF rates were 94% and 88%, respectively. Men {<=}60 demonstrated similar 5- and 8-year FFbF (95% and 92%) compared with men >60 (93% and 87%; p = 0.071). A larger percent of young patients presented with low-risk disease; lower clinical stage, Gleason score (GS), and pretreatment PSA values; were treated after 1997; did not receive any HT; and had a high biologic effective dose (BED) of radiation (all ps <0.001). On multivariate analysis, PSA (p = 0.001), GS (p = 0.005), and BED (p < 0.001) were significantly associated with FFbF, but age was not (p = 0.665). Conclusion: Young men achieve excellent 5- and 8-year biochemical control rates that are comparable to those of older men after prostate brachytherapy. Young age should not be a deterrent when considering brachytherapy as a primary treatment option for clinically localized prostate cancer.

  1. Low-dose rate prostate brachytherapy is well tolerated in patients with a history of inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Christopher A. . E-mail: christopher.peters@mountsinai.org; Cesaretti, Jamie A.; Stone, Nelson N.; Stock, Richard G.

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: We report on the follow-up of 24 patients with a prior history of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) treated with brachytherapy for early-stage prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients with a history of inflammatory bowel disease (17 with ulcerative colitis (UC), 7 with Crohn's disease [CD]) underwent prostate brachytherapy between 1992 and 2004. Fifteen patients were treated with I-125 implantation and 6 patients were treated with Pd-103 alone or in combination with 45 Gy external beam radiation. Charts were reviewed for all patients, and all living patients were contacted by phone. National Cancer Institute common toxicity scores for proctitis were assigned to all patients. Actuarial risk of late toxicity was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software. Follow-up ranged from 3 to 126 months (median, 48.5 months; mean, 56.8 months). Results: None of the patients experienced Grade 3 or 4 rectal toxicity. Four patients experienced Grade 2 late rectal toxicity. The 5-year actuarial freedom from developing late Grade 2 rectal toxicity was 81%. At a median follow-up of 48.5 months, 23 patients were alive and had no evidence of disease with a median prostate-specific antigen for the sample of 0.1 ng/mL (range, <0.05-0.88 ng/mL). One patient died of other causes unrelated to his prostate cancer. Conclusions: Prostate brachytherapy is well tolerated in patients with a history of controlled IBD. Therefore, brachytherapy should be considered a viable therapeutic option in this patient population.

  2. Androgen-deprivation therapy does not impact cause-specific or overall survival after permanent prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Merrick, Gregory S. . E-mail: gmerrick@wheelinghospital.com; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Allen, Zachariah A. M.S.; Adamovich, Edward

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To determine if androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) has an impact on cause-specific, biochemical progression-free, or overall survival after prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 through June 2002, 938 consecutive patients underwent brachytherapy for clinical Stage T1b to T3a (2002 AJCC) prostate cancer. All patients underwent brachytherapy more than 3 years before analysis. A total of 382 patients (40.7%) received ADT with a duration of 6 months or less in 277 and more than 6 months in 105. The median follow-up was 5.4 years. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated as predictors of cause-specific, biochemical progression-free, and overall survival. Results: The 10-year cause-specific, biochemical progression-free, and overall survival rates for the entire cohort were 96.4%, 95.9%, and 78.1%, respectively. Except for biochemical progression-free survival in high-risk patients, ADT did not statistically impact any of the three survival categories. A Cox linear-regression analysis demonstrated that Gleason score was the best predictor of cause-specific survival, whereas percent-positive biopsies, prostate volume, and risk group predicted for biochemical progression-free survival. Patient age and tobacco use were the strongest predictors of overall survival. One hundred two patients have died, with 80 of the deaths a result of cardiovascular disease (54) and second malignancies (26). To date, only 12 patients have died of metastatic prostate cancer. Conclusions: After brachytherapy, androgen-deprivation therapy did not have an impact on cause-specific or overall survival for any risk group; however, ADT had a beneficial effect on biochemical progression-free survival in high-risk patients. Cardiovascular disease and second malignancies far outweighed prostate cancer as competing causes of death.

  3. Reconfigurable MRI-guided robotic surgical manipulator: prostate brachytherapy and neurosurgery applications.

    PubMed

    Su, Hao; Iordachita, Iulian I; Yan, Xiaoan; Cole, Gregory A; Fischer, Gregory S

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a modular design approach for robotic surgical manipulator under magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance. The proposed manipulator provides 2 degree of freedom (DOF) Cartesian motion and 2-DOF pitch and yaw motion. Primarily built up with dielectric materials, it utilizes parallel mechanism and is compact in size to fit into the limited space of close-bore MRI scanner. It is ideal for needle based surgical procedures which usually require positioning and orientation control for accurate imaging plane alignment. Specifically, this mechanism is easily reconfigurable to over constrained manipulator structure which provides 2-DOF Cartesian motion by simple structure modification. This modular manipulator integrated with different end-effector modules is investigated for prostate brachytherapy and neurosurgery applications as preliminary evaluation. PMID:22254754

  4. A simple analytical method for heterogeneity corrections in low dose rate prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso-González, Fernando; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Siebert, Frank-André

    2015-07-01

    In low energy brachytherapy, the presence of tissue heterogeneities contributes significantly to the discrepancies observed between treatment plan and delivered dose. In this work, we present a simplified analytical dose calculation algorithm for heterogeneous tissue. We compare it with Monte Carlo computations and assess its suitability for integration in clinical treatment planning systems. The algorithm, named as RayStretch, is based on the classic equivalent path length method and TG-43 reference data. Analytical and Monte Carlo dose calculations using Penelope2008 are compared for a benchmark case: a prostate patient with calcifications. The results show a remarkable agreement between simulation and algorithm, the latter having, in addition, a high calculation speed. The proposed analytical model is compatible with clinical real-time treatment planning systems based on TG-43 consensus datasets for improving dose calculation and treatment quality in heterogeneous tissue. Moreover, the algorithm is applicable for any type of heterogeneities.

  5. Prostate brachytherapy seed localization using a mobile C-arm without tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayad, Maria S.; Lee, Junghoon; Prince, Jerry L.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2009-02-01

    The success of prostate brachytherapy depends on the faithful delivery of a dose plan. In turn, intraoperative localization and visualization of the implanted radioactive brachytherapy seeds enables more proficient and informed adjustments to the executed plan during therapy. Prior work has demonstrated adequate seed reconstructions from uncalibrated mobile c-arms using either external tracking devices or image-based fiducials for c-arm pose determination. These alternatives are either time-consuming or interfere with the clinical flow of the surgery, or both. This paper describes a seed reconstruction approach that avoids both tracking devices and fiducials. Instead, it uses the preoperative dose plan in conjunction with a set of captured images to get initial estimates of the c-arm poses followed by an auto-focus technique using the seeds themselves as fiducials to refine the pose estimates. Intraoperative seed localization is achieved through iteratively solving for poses and seed correspondences across images and reconstructing the 3D implanted seeds. The feasibility of this approach was demonstrated through a series of simulations involving variable noise levels, seed densities, image separability and number of images. Preliminary results indicate mean reconstruction errors within 1.2 mm for noisy plans of 84 seeds or fewer. These are attained for additive noise whose standard deviation of the 3D mean error introduced to the plan to simulate the implant is within 3.2 mm.

  6. BrachyView, a novel in-body imaging system for HDR prostate brachytherapy: Experimental evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Safavi-Naeini, M.; Han, Z.; Alnaghy, S.; Cutajar, D.; Petasecca, M.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Franklin, D. R.; Bucci, J.; Carrara, M.; Zaider, M.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: This paper presents initial experimental results from a prototype of high dose rate (HDR) BrachyView, a novel in-body source tracking system for HDR brachytherapy based on a multipinhole tungsten collimator and a high resolution pixellated silicon detector array. The probe and its associated position estimation algorithms are validated and a comprehensive evaluation of the accuracy of its position estimation capabilities is presented. Methods: The HDR brachytherapy source is moved through a sequence of positions in a prostate phantom, for various displacements in x, y, and z. For each position, multiple image acquisitions are performed, and source positions are reconstructed. Error estimates in each dimension are calculated at each source position and combined to calculate overall positioning errors. Gafchromic film is used to validate the accuracy of source placement within the phantom. Results: More than 90% of evaluated source positions were estimated with an error of less than one millimeter, with the worst-case error being 1.3 mm. Experimental results were in close agreement with previously published Monte Carlo simulation results. Conclusions: The prototype of HDR BrachyView demonstrates a satisfactory level of accuracy in its source position estimation, and additional improvements are achievable with further refinement of HDR BrachyView’s image processing algorithms.

  7. High-dose regions versus likelihood of cure after prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, Kent . E-mail: kent.wallner@med.va.gov; Merrick, Gregory; Sutlief, Steven; True, Laurence; Butler, Wayne

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of high-dose regions on biochemical cancer control rates after prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients with 1997 American Joint Committee on Cancer clinical Stage T1c-T2a prostate carcinoma (Gleason grade 5-6, prostate-specific antigen level 4-10 ng/mL) were randomized to implantation with {sup 125}I (144 Gy) vs. {sup 103}Pd (125 Gy, National Institute of Standards and Technology 1999). Isotope implantation was performed by standard techniques, using a modified peripheral loading pattern. Of the 313 patients entered in the protocol, 270 were included in this analysis. The {sup 125}I source strength ranged from 0.4 to 0.89 mCi (median, 0.55 mCi), and the {sup 103}Pd source strength ranged from 1.3 to 1.6 mCi (median, 1.5 mCi). CT was performed within 4 h after implantation. The dosimetric parameters analyzed included the percentage of the postimplant prostate volume covered by the 100%, 150%, 200%, and 300% prescription dose (V{sub 100}, V{sub 150}, V{sub 200}, and V{sub 300}, respectively). The median time to the last follow-up for patients without failure was 2.7 years. Freedom from biochemical failure was defined as a serum prostate-specific antigen level of {<=}0.5 ng/mL at last follow-up. Patients were censored at last follow-up if their serum prostate-specific antigen level was still decreasing. Results: The mean V{sub 100}, V{sub 150}, V{sub 200}, and V{sub 300} value was 90% ({+-}8%), 63% ({+-}14), 35% ({+-}13%), and 14% ({+-}7%), respectively. Patients with a V{sub 100} of {>=}90% had a 3-year freedom from biochemical failure rate of 96% vs. 87% for those with a V{sub 100} of <90% (p = 0.0029). Overall, patients with more high-dose regions had a greater chance of biochemical control. However, when only patients with a V{sub 100} of {>=}90% were analyzed, no relationship was found between higher dose regions and the likelihood of cancer control. This lack of effect on biochemical control was apparent for both

  8. Comparison Between High and Low Source Activity Seeds for I-125 Permanent Seed Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Masucci, Giuseppina Laura; Donath, David; Tetreault-Laflamme, Audrey; Carrier, Jean-Francois; Hervieux, Yannick; Larouche, Renee Xaviere; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Taussky, Daniel

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To compare low (mean 0.44, SD {+-} 0.0163 mCi) with high source activity (0.61 {+-} 0.0178 mCi) in I{sup 125} permanent seed brachytherapy regarding seed loss, dosimetric outcome, and toxicity. Methods and Materials: The study included 199 patients with prostate cancer treated by permanent seed brachytherapy alone: the first 105 with seeds of lower activity (first cohort), the following 94 with higher seed activity (second cohort). The V100, V150, V200, and D90 were analyzed on the CT scan 30 days after implantation (CTD30). The V100, V150, and D2 of the rectum were also calculated on CTD30. Seed loss was determined 30 days after implantation. Urinary toxicity was measured with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire. Results: Lower seed activity was associated with lower V150 and V200 (p = 0.01 and p {<=} 0.001, respectively) on CTD30. More patients had a V100 <90% and D90 <140 Gy in the lower activity cohort (p = 0.098 for D90 and p = 0.029 for V100) on CTD30. There was no difference between cohorts in dose to the rectum (p = 0.325-0.516) or difference in patients' IPSS score from baseline (p = 0.0.117-0.618), although there was a trend toward more urinary toxicity at 4 and 8 months for high activity seeds. Seed loss as a percentage of implanted seeds was not different (p = 0.324). Conclusions: Higher seed activity (I{sup 125} {>=} 0.6 mCi) results in at least equal V100 and D90 on CTD30. However, dose inhomogeneity and a trend toward more urinary toxicity at 4 and 8 months after treatment may lead to a higher long-term urinary complications.

  9. SU-FF-T-390: In-Vivo Prostate Brachytherapy Absorbed Dose Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gueye, Paul; Velasco, Carlos; Keppel, Cynthia; Murphy, B; Sinesi, C

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: In-vivo prostate brachytherapy absorbed dosimetrydetector using scintillating fibers. Method and Materials: Five pairs of 85.5 {+-} 0.05 cm long blue shifted scintillating fibers (model BCF-10) with 1 mm{sup 2} cross sectional area were placed in a mixture of gelatin (368.6 {+-} 0.5 grams) and water (3.78 {+-} 0.025 liters) to measured the absorbed dose delivered by a 12 Ci {sup 192}Ir HDR source. The fibers were held by a 7 x 7 cm{sup 2} template grid and optically connected to a 16-channel multianode photomultiplier tube (Hamamatsu, model H6568). Each pair consisted of one fiber 4 mm shorter than the other one to extract the dose by the subtraction method. A dose atlas was used for radiation delivered to the phantom. The plans followed delivered 5 and 7 Gy to a point located 2.0 centimeters away from the central dwelling positions. A total of 32 data points were acquired in a plan to assess the linearity and reproducibility of the measurements.Results: Reproducibility of the data was found to be within 5% and the overall accuracy of the system estimated to be {+-}5.5%. The linearity of the data for all 7 measureddose values (ranging from 0.6 to 7 Gy), gives a slope of 312 counts/Gy with a 1.4% relative deviation. Conclusion: This work indicates the possibility of measuring in real-time the dose effectively delivered to a biological system during prostate brachytherapy treatments. The availability of commercially thin (150 {micro}m) scintillating fibers opens the capability of using such system during clinical treatments (by embedding the fibers within the catheters) with the advantage of performing real-time adjustment of the dose delivery.

  10. An image-guidance system for dynamic dose calculation in prostate brachytherapy using ultrasound and fluoroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Nathanael; Dehghan, Ehsan; Deguet, Anton; Mian, Omar Y.; Le, Yi; Burdette, E. Clif; Fichtinger, Gabor; Prince, Jerry L.; Song, Danny Y.; Lee, Junghoon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy is a standard option of care for prostate cancer patients but may be improved by dynamic dose calculation based on localized seed positions. The American Brachytherapy Society states that the major current limitation of intraoperative treatment planning is the inability to localize the seeds in relation to the prostate. An image-guidance system was therefore developed to localize seeds for dynamic dose calculation. Methods: The proposed system is based on transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and mobile C-arm fluoroscopy, while using a simple fiducial with seed-like markers to compute pose from the nonencoded C-arm. Three or more fluoroscopic images and an ultrasound volume are acquired and processed by a pipeline of algorithms: (1) seed segmentation, (2) fiducial detection with pose estimation, (3) seed matching with reconstruction, and (4) fluoroscopy-to-TRUS registration. Results: The system was evaluated on ten phantom cases, resulting in an overall mean error of 1.3 mm. The system was also tested on 37 patients and each algorithm was evaluated. Seed segmentation resulted in a 1% false negative rate and 2% false positive rate. Fiducial detection with pose estimation resulted in a 98% detection rate. Seed matching with reconstruction had a mean error of 0.4 mm. Fluoroscopy-to-TRUS registration had a mean error of 1.3 mm. Moreover, a comparison of dose calculations between the authors’ intraoperative method and an independent postoperative method shows a small difference of 7% and 2% forD90 and V100, respectively. Finally, the system demonstrated the ability to detect cold spots and required a total processing time of approximately 1 min. Conclusions: The proposed image-guidance system is the first practical approach to dynamic dose calculation, outperforming earlier solutions in terms of robustness, ease of use, and functional completeness. PMID:25186387

  11. An image-guidance system for dynamic dose calculation in prostate brachytherapy using ultrasound and fluoroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Nathanael Prince, Jerry L.; Dehghan, Ehsan; Deguet, Anton; Mian, Omar Y.; Le, Yi; Song, Danny Y.; Burdette, E. Clif; Fichtinger, Gabor; Lee, Junghoon

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Brachytherapy is a standard option of care for prostate cancer patients but may be improved by dynamic dose calculation based on localized seed positions. The American Brachytherapy Society states that the major current limitation of intraoperative treatment planning is the inability to localize the seeds in relation to the prostate. An image-guidance system was therefore developed to localize seeds for dynamic dose calculation. Methods: The proposed system is based on transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and mobile C-arm fluoroscopy, while using a simple fiducial with seed-like markers to compute pose from the nonencoded C-arm. Three or more fluoroscopic images and an ultrasound volume are acquired and processed by a pipeline of algorithms: (1) seed segmentation, (2) fiducial detection with pose estimation, (3) seed matching with reconstruction, and (4) fluoroscopy-to-TRUS registration. Results: The system was evaluated on ten phantom cases, resulting in an overall mean error of 1.3 mm. The system was also tested on 37 patients and each algorithm was evaluated. Seed segmentation resulted in a 1% false negative rate and 2% false positive rate. Fiducial detection with pose estimation resulted in a 98% detection rate. Seed matching with reconstruction had a mean error of 0.4 mm. Fluoroscopy-to-TRUS registration had a mean error of 1.3 mm. Moreover, a comparison of dose calculations between the authors’ intraoperative method and an independent postoperative method shows a small difference of 7% and 2% forD{sub 90} and V{sub 100}, respectively. Finally, the system demonstrated the ability to detect cold spots and required a total processing time of approximately 1 min. Conclusions: The proposed image-guidance system is the first practical approach to dynamic dose calculation, outperforming earlier solutions in terms of robustness, ease of use, and functional completeness.

  12. Fast GPU-based Monte Carlo simulations for LDR prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonenfant, Éric; Magnoux, Vincent; Hissoiny, Sami; Ozell, Benoît; Beaulieu, Luc; Després, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of bGPUMCD, a Monte Carlo algorithm executed on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), for fast dose calculations in permanent prostate implant dosimetry. It also aimed to validate a low dose rate brachytherapy source in terms of TG-43 metrics and to use this source to compute dose distributions for permanent prostate implant in very short times. The physics of bGPUMCD was reviewed and extended to include Rayleigh scattering and fluorescence from photoelectric interactions for all materials involved. The radial and anisotropy functions were obtained for the Nucletron SelectSeed in TG-43 conditions. These functions were compared to those found in the MD Anderson Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core brachytherapy source registry which are considered the TG-43 reference values. After appropriate calibration of the source, permanent prostate implant dose distributions were calculated for four patients and compared to an already validated Geant4 algorithm. The radial function calculated from bGPUMCD showed excellent agreement (differences within 1.3%) with TG-43 accepted values. The anisotropy functions at r = 1 cm and r = 4 cm were within 2% of TG-43 values for angles over 17.5°. For permanent prostate implants, Monte Carlo-based dose distributions with a statistical uncertainty of 1% or less for the target volume were obtained in 30 s or less for 1 × 1 × 1 mm3 calculation grids. Dosimetric indices were very similar (within 2.7%) to those obtained with a validated, independent Monte Carlo code (Geant4) performing the calculations for the same cases in a much longer time (tens of minutes to more than a hour). bGPUMCD is a promising code that lets envision the use of Monte Carlo techniques in a clinical environment, with sub-minute execution times on a standard workstation. Future work will explore the use of this code with an inverse planning method to provide a complete Monte Carlo-based planning solution.

  13. Fast GPU-based Monte Carlo simulations for LDR prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Bonenfant, Éric; Magnoux, Vincent; Hissoiny, Sami; Ozell, Benoît; Beaulieu, Luc; Després, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of bGPUMCD, a Monte Carlo algorithm executed on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), for fast dose calculations in permanent prostate implant dosimetry. It also aimed to validate a low dose rate brachytherapy source in terms of TG-43 metrics and to use this source to compute dose distributions for permanent prostate implant in very short times. The physics of bGPUMCD was reviewed and extended to include Rayleigh scattering and fluorescence from photoelectric interactions for all materials involved. The radial and anisotropy functions were obtained for the Nucletron SelectSeed in TG-43 conditions. These functions were compared to those found in the MD Anderson Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core brachytherapy source registry which are considered the TG-43 reference values. After appropriate calibration of the source, permanent prostate implant dose distributions were calculated for four patients and compared to an already validated Geant4 algorithm. The radial function calculated from bGPUMCD showed excellent agreement (differences within 1.3%) with TG-43 accepted values. The anisotropy functions at r = 1 cm and r = 4 cm were within 2% of TG-43 values for angles over 17.5°. For permanent prostate implants, Monte Carlo-based dose distributions with a statistical uncertainty of 1% or less for the target volume were obtained in 30 s or less for 1 × 1 × 1 mm(3) calculation grids. Dosimetric indices were very similar (within 2.7%) to those obtained with a validated, independent Monte Carlo code (Geant4) performing the calculations for the same cases in a much longer time (tens of minutes to more than a hour). bGPUMCD is a promising code that lets envision the use of Monte Carlo techniques in a clinical environment, with sub-minute execution times on a standard workstation. Future work will explore the use of this code with an inverse planning method to provide a complete Monte Carlo-based planning solution. PMID

  14. Implementation of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Androgen Deprivation in Patients With Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lilleby, Wolfgang; Tafjord, Gunnar; Raabe, Nils K.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate outcome (overall survival [OS], the actuarial 5-year cancer-specific survival [CSS], disease-free survival [DFS], biochemical failure-free survival [BFS]), complications and morbidity in patients treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) boost and hormonal treatment with curative aims. Methods: Between 2004 and 2009, 275 prospectively followed pN0/N0M0 patients were included: 19 patients (7%) with T2, Gleason score 7 and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) <10 and 256 patients (93%) with T3 or Gleason score 8-10 or PSA >20 received multimodal treatment with conformal four-field radiotherapy (prostate/vesiculae 2 Gy Multiplication-Sign 25) combined with HDR-BT (iridium 192; prostate 10 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2) with long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Results: After a median observation time of 44.2 months (range, 10.4-90.5 months) 12 patients had relapsed clinically and/or biochemically and 10 patients were dead, of which 2 patients died from prostate cancer. Five-year estimates of BFS, CSS, DFS, and OS rates were 98.5%, 99.3%, 95.6%, and 96.3%, respectively. None of the patients with either Gleason score <8 or with intermediate risk profile had relapsed. The number of HDR-BT treatments was not related to outcome. Despite of age (median, 65.7 years; range, 45.7-77 years) and considerable pretreatment comorbidity in 39 of 275 patients, Genitourinary treatment-related morbidity was moderate with long-lasting Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 2 voiding problems in 26 patients (9.5%) and occasionally mucous discharge in 20 patients (7%), none with Grade >2 for gastrointestinal at follow-up. Complications during implantations were related to pubic arch interference (4 patients) and lithotomy time, causing 2 patients to develop compartment syndrome. Conclusion: Despite still preliminary observations, our 5-year outcome estimates favor the implementation of high-dose-rate brachytherapy in high-risk patients combined with conformal

  15. Poor Predictive Value of Intraoperative Real-Time Dosimetry for Prostate Seed Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Igidbashian, Levon; Donath, David; Carrier, Jean-Francois; Lassalle, Stephanie; Hervieux, Yannick; David, Sandrine; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Taussky, Daniel

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To identify dosimetric parameters predictive of a good prostate seed I{sup 125} quality implant. We analyzed preimplant and postimplant realtime dosimetry in patients treated with intraoperative (IO) inverse planning. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 127 consecutively treated patients with primarily low-risk prostate carcinoma who underwent prostate permanent seed I{sup 125} brachytherapy using an IO planning approach. The implant was done using the three-dimensional transrectal ultrasound (PRE-TRUS)-guided IO interactive inverse preplanning system. The TRUS was repeated in the operating room after the implant procedure was complete (POST-TRUS). The prostate was recontoured and postimplant dosimetry was calculated. Each patient underwent computed tomography scan on Day 28 (CT-D28) to evaluate implant quality. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROC) was evaluated for models predictive of a V100 of {>=}90% and a D90 of {>=}140 Gy on the basis of CT-D28 values. Results: On CT-D28, 72.4% of patients had a V100 of {>=}90% and 74.8% had a D90 of {>=}140 Gy. AUROC for a V100 of {>=}90% was 0.665 (p = 0.004) on PRE-TRUS and 0.619 (p = 0.039) on POST-TRUS. AUROC for D90 of {>=}140 Gy was 0.602 (p = 0.086) on PRE-TRUS and 0.614 (p = 0.054) on POST-TRUS. Using PRE-TRUS V100 cutoff of >97% gives sensitivity of 88% and a false-positive rate of 63%. A POST-TRUS D90 cutoff of >170 Gy resulted in a sensitivity of 62% and a false-positive rate of 34%. Conclusions: Because of unacceptably high false-positive rates, IO preimplant and postimplant TRUS-based dosimetry are not accurate tools to predict for postimplant computed tomography-based dosimetry.

  16. DNA Ploidy Measured on Archived Pretreatment Biopsy Material May Correlate With Prostate-Specific Antigen Recurrence After Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, Mira; MacAulay, Calum; Hayes, Malcolm; Korbelik, Jagoda; Morris, W. James; Palcic, Branko

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To explore whether DNA ploidy of prostate cancer cells determined from archived transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy specimens correlates with disease-free survival. Methods and Materials: Forty-seven failures and 47 controls were selected from 1006 consecutive low- and intermediate-risk patients treated with prostate {sup 125}I brachytherapy (July 1998-October 2003). Median follow-up was 7.5 years. Ten-year actuarial disease-free survival was 94.1%. Controls were matched using age, initial prostate-specific antigen level, clinical stage, Gleason score, use of hormone therapy, and follow-up (all P nonsignificant). Seventy-eight specimens were successfully processed; 27 control and 20 failure specimens contained more than 100 tumor cells were used for the final analysis. The Feulgen-Thionin stained cytology samples from archived paraffin blocks were used to determine the DNA ploidy of each tumor by measuring integrated optical densities. Results: The samples were divided into diploid and aneuploid tumors. Aneuploid tumors were found in 16 of 20 of the failures (80%) and 8 of 27 controls (30%). Diploid DNA patients had a significantly lower rate of disease recurrence (P=.0086) (hazard ratio [HR] 0.256). On multivariable analysis, patients with aneuploid tumors had a higher prostate-specific antigen failure rate (HR 5.13). Additionally, those with “excellent” dosimetry (V100 >90%; D90 >144 Gy) had a significantly lower recurrence rate (HR 0.25). All patients with aneuploid tumors and dosimetry classified as “nonexcellent” (V100 <90%; D90 <144 Gy) (5 of 5) had disease recurrence, compared with 40% of patients with aneuploid tumors and “excellent” dosimetry (8 of 15). In contrast, dosimetry did not affect the outcome for diploid patients. Conclusions: Using core biopsy material from archived paraffin blocks, DNA ploidy correctly classified the majority of failures and nonfailures in this study. The results suggest that DNA ploidy can be used as a

  17. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) as a Salvage Treatment for Recurrent Prostate Cancer after Brachytherapy — a Feasibility Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Alexander T.; Rivens, Ian H.; Thompson, Alan C.; ter Haar, Gail R.

    2007-05-01

    HIFU may be an effective salvage treatment for patients who develop local recurrence after permanent low-dose brachytherapy. It has been suggested that the presence of seeds in the prostate may obstruct the HIFU beam or alter the heating characteristics of the prostate tissue. Acoustic field measurements were made using a membrane hydrophone and lesioning experiments were carried out in ex vivo bovine liver. These revealed a significant effect of the seeds on the HIFU focal region as well as a reduction in lesion length when seeds were placed in a pre-focal position. Further work is needed to evaluate the full effects of implanted brachytherapy seeds on the clinical delivery of HIFU.

  18. Race and Survival Following Brachytherapy-Based Treatment for Men With Localized or Locally Advanced Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Winkfield, Karen M.; Chen Minghui; Dosoretz, Daniel E.; Salenius, Sharon A.; Katin, Michael; Ross, Rudi; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: We investigated whether race was associated with risk of death following brachytherapy-based treatment for localized prostate cancer, adjusting for age, cardiovascular comorbidity, treatment, and established prostate cancer prognostic factors. Methods: The study cohort was composed of 5,360 men with clinical stage T1-3N0M0 prostate cancer who underwent brachytherapy-based treatment at 20 centers within the 21st Century Oncology consortium. Cox regression multivariable analysis was used to evaluate the risk of death in African-American and Hispanic men compared to that in Caucasian men, adjusting for age, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, Gleason score, clinical T stage, year and type of treatment, median income, and cardiovascular comorbidities. Results: After a median follow-up of 3 years, there were 673 deaths. African-American and Hispanic races were significantly associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality (ACM) (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.77 and 1.79; 95% confidence intervals, 1.3-2.5 and 1.2-2.7; p < 0.001 and p = 0.005, respectively). Other factors significantly associated with an increased risk of death included age (p < 0.001), Gleason score of 8 to 10 (p = 0.04), year of brachytherapy (p < 0.001), and history of myocardial infarction treated with stent or coronary artery bypass graft (p < 0.001). Conclusions: After adjustment for prostate cancer prognostic factors, age, income level, and revascularized cardiovascular comorbidities, African-American and Hispanic races were associated with higher ACM in men with prostate cancer. Additional causative factors need to be identified.

  19. Effect of Family History on Outcomes in Patients Treated With Definitive Brachytherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Christopher A. Stock, Richard G.; Blacksburg, Seth R.; Stone, Nelson N.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact familial prostate cancer has on prognosis in men treated with brachytherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,738 consecutive patients with prostate cancer (cT1-3, N0/X, M0) received low-dose-rate brachytherapy alone or in combination with external beam radiation therapy or hormone ablation from 1992 to 2005. The primary end-point was freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF) using the Phoenix definition. Minimum follow-up was 2 years and the median follow-up was 60 months (range, 24-197 months). Results: A total of 187 of 1,738 men (11%) had a family history of prostate cancer in a first-degree relative. For the low-risk patients, both groups had similar actuarial 5-year FFBF (97.2% vs. 95.5%, p = 0.516). For intermediate-risk patients, there was a trend toward improved biochemical control in men positive for family history (5-yr FFBF 100% vs. 93.6%, p = 0.076). For the high-risk patients, men with a positive family history had similar 5-year FFBF (92.8% vs. 85.2%, p = 0.124). On multivariate analysis, family history was not significant; use of hormones, high biologic effective dose, initial prostate-specific antigen value, and Gleason score were the significant variables predicting biochemical control. Conclusions: This is the first study to examine the relationship of familial prostate cancer and outcomed in men treated with brachytherapy alone or in combination therapy. Men with a positive family history have clinicopathologic characteristics and biochemical outcomes similar to those with sporadic disease.

  20. Health-Related Quality of Life 2 Years After Treatment With Radical Prostatectomy, Prostate Brachytherapy, or External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrer, Montserrat Suarez, Jose Francisco; Guedea, Ferran; Fernandez, Pablo; Macias, Victor; Marino, Alfonso; Hervas, Asuncion; Herruzo, Ismael; Ortiz, Maria Jose; Villavicencio, Humberto; Craven-Bratle, Jordi; Garin, Olatz; Aguilo, Ferran

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To compare treatment impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL) in patients with localized prostate cancer, from before treatment to 2 years after the intervention. Methods and Materials: This was a longitudinal, prospective study of 614 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy (134), three-dimensional external conformal radiotherapy (205), and brachytherapy (275). The HRQL questionnaires administered before and after treatment (months 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24) were the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (General and Prostate Specific), the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC), and the American Urological Association Symptom Index. Differences between groups were tested by analysis of variance and within-group changes by univariate repeated-measures analysis of variance. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) models were constructed to assess between-group differences in HRQL at 2 years of follow-up after adjusting for clinical variables. Results: In each treatment group, HRQL initially deteriorated after treatment with subsequent partial recovery. However, some dimension scores were still significantly lower after 2 years of treatment. The GEE models showed that, compared with the brachytherapy group, radical prostatectomy patients had worse EPIC sexual summary and urinary incontinence scores (-20.4 and -14.1; p < 0.001), and external radiotherapy patients had worse EPIC bowel, sexual, and hormonal summary scores (-3.55, -5.24, and -1.94; p < 0.05). Prostatectomy patients had significantly better EPIC urinary irritation scores than brachytherapy patients (+4.16; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Relevant differences between treatment groups persisted after 2 years of follow-up. Radical prostatectomy had a considerable negative effect on sexual functioning and urinary continence. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy had a moderate negative impact on bowel

  1. Maximum vs. Mono Androgen Blockade and the Risk of Recurrence in Men With Localized Prostate Cancer Undergoing Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ronald C. Sadetsky, Natalia; Chen, M.-H.; Carroll, Peter R.; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: We examined whether maximum androgen blockade (MAB) is associated with a decreased recurrence risk vs. single-agent androgen suppression (monotherapy) for men undergoing brachytherapy (BT) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Data from 223 men in Cancer of the Prostate Strategic Urologic Research Endeavor database who received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) concurrent with BT for intermediate- or high-risk prostatic adenocarcinoma were included; 159 (71%) received MAB, and 64 (29%) monotherapy (luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist or anti-androgen alone). Cox regression analysis was performed to assess whether the choice of ADT was associated with disease recurrence adjusting for known prognostic factors. Results: Men who received MAB had similar Gleason scores, T categories, and pretreatment prostate-specific antigen as those who received monotherapy. After a median follow-up of 49 months, the use of MAB was not associated with a decrease in the risk recurrence (p = 0.72), after adjusting for known prognostic factors. A higher PSA at diagnosis (p = 0.03) and younger age at diagnosis (p < 0.01) were associated with increased recurrence risk. The 3-year recurrence free survival was 76% for patients in both monotherapy and MAB groups. Conclusions: There are varied practice patterns in physicians' choice of the extent of concurrent ADT when used with brachytherapy for men with intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancer. Given a lack of demonstrated superiority from either ADT choice, both appear to be reasonable options.

  2. High dose rate brachytherapy as monotherapy for localised prostate cancer: a hypofractionated two-implant approach in 351 consecutive patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To report the clinical outcome of high dose rate brachytherapy as sole treatment for clinically localised prostate cancer. Methods Between March 2004 and January 2008, a total of 351 consecutive patients with clinically localised prostate cancer were treated with transrectal ultrasound guided high dose rate brachytherapy. The prescribed dose was 38.0 Gy in four fractions (two implants of two fractions each of 9.5 Gy with an interval of 14 days between the implants) delivered to an intraoperative transrectal ultrasound real-time defined planning treatment volume. Biochemical failure was defined according to the Phoenix Consensus and toxicity evaluated using the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 3. Results The median follow-up time was 59.3 months. The 36 and 60 month biochemical control and metastasis-free survival rates were respectively 98%, 94% and 99%, 98%. Toxicity was scored per event with 4.8% acute Grade 3 genitourinary and no acute Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity. Late Grade 3 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity were respectively 3.4% and 1.4%. No instances of Grade 4 or greater acute or late adverse events were reported. Conclusions Our results confirm high dose rate brachytherapy as safe and effective monotherapy for clinically organ-confined prostate cancer. PMID:23656899

  3. In vivo motion and force measurement of surgical needle intervention during prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Podder, Tarun; Clark, Douglas; Sherman, Jason; Fuller, Dave; Messing, Edward; Rubens, Deborah; Strang, John; Brasacchio, Ralph; Liao, Lydia; Ng, W.-S.; Yu Yan

    2006-08-15

    In this paper, we present needle insertion forces and motion trajectories measured during actual brachytherapy needle insertion while implanting radioactive seeds in the prostate glands of 20 different patients. The needle motion was captured using ultrasound images and a 6 degree-of-freedom electromagnetic-based position sensor. Needle velocity was computed from the position information and the corresponding time stamps. From in vivo data we found the maximum needle insertion forces to be about 15.6 and 8.9 N for 17 gauge (1.47 mm) and 18 gauge (1.27 mm) needles, respectively. Part of this difference in insertion forces is due to the needle size difference (17G and 18G) and the other part is due to the difference in tissue properties that are specific to the individual patient. Some transverse forces were observed, which are attributed to several factors such as tissue heterogeneity, organ movement, human factors in surgery, and the interaction between the template and the needle. However, theses insertion forces are significantly responsible for needle deviation from the desired trajectory and target movement. Therefore, a proper selection of needle and modulated velocity (translational and rotational) may reduce the tissue deformation and target movement by reducing insertion forces and thereby improve the seed delivery accuracy. The knowledge gleaned from this study promises to be useful for not only designing mechanical/robotic systems but also developing a predictive deformation model of the prostate and real-time adaptive controlling of the needle.

  4. MRI of prostate brachytherapy seeds at high field: A study in phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, S. D.; Wachowicz, K.; Fallone, B. G.

    2009-11-15

    Postimplant evaluation of prostate brachytherapy using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 1.5 T has met with some difficulties due to the uncertainty associated with seed localization despite the excellent anatomical delineation this imaging modality can achieve. Seeds in vascularized regions or outside the prostate, where signal heterogeneity or drop off can obscure their position, can be difficult to identify. The increase in SNR available at 3.0 T offers the potential to improve these issues with visualization. However, before moving directly to in vivo studies, it is important to investigate the effects of artifact size on the ability to localize multiple seeds in close proximity. These artifacts are of extra concern at higher field because of the increased induced field distortions surrounding the seeds. A single prostate brachytherapy seed (IMC6711, OncoSeed) and arrays of seed pairs were suspended in a porcine gel medium and imaged on 1.5 and 3 T MRI scanners for comparison. Two basic acquisition techniques utilized in a wide array of clinical sequences [spin-echo based and gradient-echo (GE) based] were investigated for the types of artifacts they produce, and their dependence on field. Analysis of the resulting voids was performed to determine the relative size of seeds as seen on the images, as well as the ability to distinguish seeds at close proximity. The seed voids at 3 T were only slightly larger than those obtained at 1.5 T (0.5 mm longer and wider) when using a spin-echo type sequence. For this work, the authors used a proton density fast spin-echo (FSE) sequence. These results are promising for the use of 3 T imaging for postimplant evaluation since the SNR will increase by roughly a factor of 2 with only a limited corresponding increase in artifact size. The minimum separation of the seeds to be completely distinguished using void analysis increased from between 1.5 and 3 mm to between 3 and 4.5 mm when going from 1.5 to 3 T FSE imaging. The

  5. Salvage brachytherapy in combination with interstitial hyperthermia for locally recurrent prostate carcinoma following external beam radiation therapy: a prospective phase II study.

    PubMed

    Kukiełka, Andrzej M; Strnad, Vratislav; Stauffer, Paul; Dąbrowski, Tomasz; Hetnał, Marcin; Nahajowski, Damian; Walasek, Tomasz; Brandys, Piotr; Matys, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Optimal treatment for patients with only local prostate cancer recurrence after external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) failure remains unclear. Possible curative treatments are radical prostatectomy, cryosurgery, and brachytherapy. Several single institution series proved that high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) and pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy (PDRBT) are reasonable options for this group of patients with acceptable levels of genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. A standard dose prescription and scheme have not been established yet, and the literature presents a wide range of fractionation protocols. Furthermore, hyperthermia has shown the potential to enhance the efficacy of re-irradiation. Consequently, a prospective trial is urgently needed to attain clear structured prospective data regarding the efficacy of salvage brachytherapy with adjuvant hyperthermia for locally recurrent prostate cancer. The purpose of this report is to introduce a new prospective phase II trial that would meet this need. The primary aim of this prospective phase II study combining Iridium-192 brachytherapy with interstitial hyperthermia (IHT) is to analyze toxicity of the combined treatment; a secondary aim is to define the efficacy (bNED, DFS, OS) of salvage brachytherapy. The dose prescribed to PTV will be 30 Gy in 3 fractions for HDRBT, and 60 Gy in 2 fractions for PDRBT. During IHT, the prostate will be heated to the range of 40-47°C for 60 minutes prior to brachytherapy dose delivery. The protocol plans for treatment of 77 patients. PMID:26207116

  6. Effects of iodine-125 seeds on the methylation of SFRP2 and P16 in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    LI, XIAOGANG; LU, PING; LI, BO; ZHANG, WANGFU; LUO, KAIYUAN

    2013-01-01

    The current study investigated the effects of iodine-125 seeds on the gene methylation of SFRP2 and P16 in colorectal cancer. Mouse models of human colorectal cancer were randomly divided into an experimental group (n=25) and a control group (n=25). The control group was implanted with blank seeds (0 MBq) and the experimental group with iodine-125 seeds (14.8 MBq). At 20 days after implantation, the animals were sacrificed. The methylation levels of SFRP2 and P16 were detected using methylation-specific polymerase chain reactions (MSPs). Following iodine-125 seed irradiation, the level of SFRP2 methylation decreased. The methylation index of the experimental group (0.67±0.05) was significantly lower than that of the control group (0.84±0.07; P<0.05). In the experimental group, 10 samples (40%) displayed methylation in the P16 promoter region compared with 14 (56%) in the control group, which was a significant difference (P<0.05). Iodine-125 seeds induce the downregulation of methylated tumor suppressor gene promoters, thereby inhibiting the proliferation and growth of tumor cells. PMID:24223648

  7. An automated optimization tool for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy with divergent needle pattern.

    PubMed

    Borot de Battisti, M; Maenhout, M; Denis de Senneville, B; Hautvast, G; Binnekamp, D; Lagendijk, J J W; van Vulpen, M; Moerland, M A

    2015-10-01

    Focal high-dose-rate (HDR) for prostate cancer has gained increasing interest as an alternative to whole gland therapy as it may contribute to the reduction of treatment related toxicity. For focal treatment, optimal needle guidance and placement is warranted. This can be achieved under MR guidance. However, MR-guided needle placement is currently not possible due to space restrictions in the closed MR bore. To overcome this problem, a MR-compatible, single-divergent needle-implant robotic device is under development at the University Medical Centre, Utrecht: placed between the legs of the patient inside the MR bore, this robot will tap the needle in a divergent pattern from a single rotation point into the tissue. This rotation point is just beneath the perineal skin to have access to the focal prostate tumor lesion. Currently, there is no treatment planning system commercially available which allows optimization of the dose distribution with such needle arrangement. The aim of this work is to develop an automatic inverse dose planning optimization tool for focal HDR prostate brachytherapy with needle insertions in a divergent configuration. A complete optimizer workflow is proposed which includes the determination of (1) the position of the center of rotation, (2) the needle angulations and (3) the dwell times. Unlike most currently used optimizers, no prior selection or adjustment of input parameters such as minimum or maximum dose or weight coefficients for treatment region and organs at risk is required. To test this optimizer, a planning study was performed on ten patients (treatment volumes ranged from 8.5 cm(3)to 23.3 cm(3)) by using 2-14 needle insertions. The total computation time of the optimizer workflow was below 20 min and a clinically acceptable plan was reached on average using only four needle insertions. PMID:26378657

  8. An automated optimization tool for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy with divergent needle pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borot de Battisti, M.; Maenhout, M.; de Senneville, B. Denis; Hautvast, G.; Binnekamp, D.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; van Vulpen, M.; Moerland, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    Focal high-dose-rate (HDR) for prostate cancer has gained increasing interest as an alternative to whole gland therapy as it may contribute to the reduction of treatment related toxicity. For focal treatment, optimal needle guidance and placement is warranted. This can be achieved under MR guidance. However, MR-guided needle placement is currently not possible due to space restrictions in the closed MR bore. To overcome this problem, a MR-compatible, single-divergent needle-implant robotic device is under development at the University Medical Centre, Utrecht: placed between the legs of the patient inside the MR bore, this robot will tap the needle in a divergent pattern from a single rotation point into the tissue. This rotation point is just beneath the perineal skin to have access to the focal prostate tumor lesion. Currently, there is no treatment planning system commercially available which allows optimization of the dose distribution with such needle arrangement. The aim of this work is to develop an automatic inverse dose planning optimization tool for focal HDR prostate brachytherapy with needle insertions in a divergent configuration. A complete optimizer workflow is proposed which includes the determination of (1) the position of the center of rotation, (2) the needle angulations and (3) the dwell times. Unlike most currently used optimizers, no prior selection or adjustment of input parameters such as minimum or maximum dose or weight coefficients for treatment region and organs at risk is required. To test this optimizer, a planning study was performed on ten patients (treatment volumes ranged from 8.5 cm3to 23.3 cm3) by using 2-14 needle insertions. The total computation time of the optimizer workflow was below 20 min and a clinically acceptable plan was reached on average using only four needle insertions.

  9. SU-C-16A-05: OAR Dose Tolerance Recommendations for Prostate and Cervical HDR Brachytherapy: Dose Versus Volume Metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Geneser, S; Cunha, J; Pouliot, J; Hsu, I

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: HDR brachytherapy consensus dose tolerance recommendations for organs at risk (OARs) remain widely debated. Prospective trials reporting metrics must be sufficiently data-dense to assess adverse affects and identify optimally predictive tolerances. We explore the tradeoffs between reporting dose-metrics versus volume-metrics and the potential impact on trial outcome analysis and tolerance recommendations. Methods: We analyzed 26 prostate patients receiving 15 Gy HDR single-fraction brachytherapy boost to 45 Gy external beam radiation therapy and 28 cervical patients receiving 28 Gy HDR brachytherapy monotherapy in 4 fractions using 2 implants. For each OAR structure, a robust linear regression fit was performed for the dose-metrics as a function of the volume-metrics. The plan quality information provided by recommended dose-metric and volume-metric values were compared. Results: For prostate rectal dose, D2cc and V75 lie close to the regression line, indicating they are similarly informative. Two outliers for prostate urethral dose are substantially different from the remaining cohort in terms of D0.1cc and V75, but not D1cc, suggesting the choice of reporting dose metric is essential. For prostate bladder and cervical bladder, rectum, and bowel, dose outliers are more apparent via V75 than recommended dose-metrics. This suggests that for prostate bladder dose and all cervical OAR doses, the recommended volume-metrics may be better predictors of clinical outcome than dose-metrics. Conclusion: For plan acceptance criteria, dose and volume-metrics are reciprocally equivalent. However, reporting dosemetrics or volume-metrics alone provides substantially different information. Our results suggest that volume-metrics may be more sensitive to differences in planned dose, and if one metric must be chosen, volumemetrics are preferable. However, reporting discrete DVH points severely limits the ability to identify planning tolerances most predictive of adverse

  10. Long-Term Efficacy and Toxicity of Low-Dose-Rate {sup 125}I Prostate Brachytherapy as Monotherapy in Low-, Intermediate-, and High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kittel, Jeffrey A.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Smith, Kristin L.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Tendulkar, Rahul D.; Ulchaker, James; Angermeier, Kenneth; Campbell, Steven; Stephenson, Andrew; Klein, Eric A.; Wilkinson, D. Allan; Ciezki, Jay P.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose/Objectives: To report long-term efficacy and toxicity for a single-institution cohort of patients treated with low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy permanent implant (PI) monotherapy. Methods and Materials: From 1996 to 2007, 1989 patients with low-risk (61.3%), intermediate-risk (29.8%), high-intermediate-risk (4.5%), and high-risk prostate cancer (4.4%) were treated with PI and followed up prospectively in a registry. All patients were treated with {sup 125}I monotherapy to 144 Gy. Late toxicity was coded retrospectively according to a modified Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 4.0 scale. The rates of biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), overall survival (OS), and prostate cancer–specific mortality (PCSM) were calculated. We identified factors associated with late grade ≥3 genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity, bRFS, DMFS, OS, PCSM, and incontinence. Results: The median age of the patients was 67 years, and the median overall and prostate-specific antigen follow-up times were 6.8 years and 5.8 years, respectively. The overall 5-year rates for bRFS, DMFS, OS, and PCSM were 91.9%, 97.8%, 93.7%, and 0.71%, respectively. The 10-year rates were 81.5%, 91.5%, 76.1%, and 2.5%, respectively. The overall rates of late grade ≥3 GU and GI toxicity were 7.6% and 0.8%, respectively. On multivariable analysis, age and prostate length were significantly associated with increased risk of late grade ≥3 GU toxicity. The risk of incontinence was highly correlated with both pre-PI and post-PI transurethral resection of the prostate. Conclusions: Prostate brachytherapy as monotherapy is an effective treatment for low-risk and low-intermediate-risk prostate cancer and appears promising as a treatment for high-intermediate-risk and high-risk prostate cancer. Significant long-term toxicities are rare when brachytherapy is performed as monotherapy.

  11. WE-A-17A-11: Implanted Brachytherapy Seed Movement Due to Transrectal Ultrasound Probe-Induced Prostate Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D; Usmani, N; Sloboda, R; Meyer, T; Husain, S; Angyalfi, S; Kay, I

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the movement of implanted brachytherapy seeds due to transrectal ultrasound probe-induced prostate deformation and to estimate the effects on prostate dosimetry. Methods: Implanted probe-in and probe-removed seed distributions were reconstructed for 10 patients using C-arm fluoroscopy imaging. The prostate was delineated on ultrasound and registered to the fluoroscopy seeds using a visible subset of seeds and residual needle tracks. A linear tensor and shearing model correlated the seed movement with position. The seed movement model was used to infer the underlying prostate deformation and to simulate the prostate contour without probe compression. Changes in prostate and surrogate urethra dosimetry were calculated. Results: Seed movement patterns reflecting elastic decompression, lateral shearing, and rectal bending were observed. Elastic decompression was characterized by anterior-posterior expansion and superior-inferior and lateral contractions. For lateral shearing, anterior movement up to 6 mm was observed for extraprostatic seeds in the lateral peripheral region. The average intra-prostatic seed movement was 1.3 mm, and the residual after linear modeling was 0.6 mm. Prostate D90 increased by 4 Gy on average (8 Gy max) and was correlated with elastic decompression. For selected patients, lateral shearing resulted in differential change in D90 of 7 Gy between anterior and posterior quadrants, and increase in whole prostate D90 of 4 Gy. Urethra D10 increased by 4 Gy. Conclusion: Seed movement upon probe removal was characterized. The proposed model captured the linear correlation between seed movement and position. Whole prostate dose coverage increased slightly, due to the small but systematic seed movement associated with elastic decompression. Lateral shearing movement increased dose coverage in the anterior-lateral region, at the expense of the posterior-lateral region. The effect on whole prostate D90 was smaller due to the subset

  12. Dwell time modulation restrictions do not necessarily improve treatment plan quality for prostate HDR brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balvert, Marleen; Gorissen, Bram L.; den Hertog, Dick; Hoffmann, Aswin L.

    2015-01-01

    Inverse planning algorithms for dwell time optimisation in interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy may produce solutions with large dwell time variations within catheters, which may result in undesirable selective high-dose subvolumes. Extending the dwell time optimisation model with a dwell time modulation restriction (DTMR) that limits dwell time differences between neighboring dwell positions has been suggested to eliminate this problem. DTMRs may additionally reduce the sensitivity for uncertainties in dwell positions that inevitably result from catheter reconstruction errors and afterloader source positioning inaccuracies. This study quantifies the reduction of high-dose subvolumes and the robustness against these uncertainties by applying a DTMR to template-based prostate HDR brachytherapy implants. Three different DTMRs were consecutively applied to a linear dose-based penalty model (LD) and a dose-volume based model (LDV), both obtained from literature. The models were solved with DTMR levels ranging from no restriction to uniform dwell times within catheters in discrete steps. Uncertainties were simulated on clinical cases using in-house developed software, and dose-volume metrics were calculated in each simulation. For the assessment of high-dose subvolumes, the dose homogeneity index (DHI) and the contiguous dose volume histogram were analysed. Robustness was measured by the improvement of the lowest D90% of the planning target volume (PTV) observed in the simulations. For (LD), a DTMR yields an increase in DHI of approximately 30% and reduces the size of the largest high-dose volume by 2-5 cc. However, this comes at a cost of a reduction in D90% of the PTV of 10%, which often implies that it drops below the desired minimum of 100%. For (LDV), none of the DTMRs were able to improve high-dose volume measures. DTMRs were not capable of improving robustness of PTV D90% against uncertainty in dwell positions for both models.

  13. Matched-pair analysis and dosimetric variations of two types of software for interstitial permanent brachytherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Nakamura, Ryuji; Satoh, Takefumi; Tanji, Susumu; Teh, Bin S; Uemae, Mineko; Baba, Shiro; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether identical dosimetric results could be achieved using different planning software for permanent interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Data from 492 patients treated with brachytherapy were used for matched-pair analysis. Interplant and Variseed were used as software for ultrasound-based treatment planning. Institution, neoadjuvant hormonal therapy, prostate volume, and source strength were used for factors to match the 2 groups. The study population comprised of 126 patients with treatment planning using Interplant software and 127 matched patients using Variseed software. Dosimetric results were compared between the 2 groups. The Variseed group showed significantly higher values for dose covering 90% of prostate volume (pD90), prostate volume covered by 150% of prescription dose (pV150), and dose covering 30% of the urethra (uD30) compared with the Interplant group. Our results showed that use of different software could lead to different dosimetric results, which might affect the clinical outcomes. PMID:21937217

  14. Health-Related Quality of Life up to Six Years After {sup 125}I Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Roeloffzen, Ellen M.A.; Lips, Irene M.; Gellekom, Marion P.R. van; Roermund, Joep van; Frank, Steven J.; Battermann, Jan J.; Vulpen, Marco van

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) after prostate brachytherapy has been extensively described in published reports but hardly any long-term data are available. The aim of the present study was to prospectively assess long-term HRQOL 6 years after {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 127 patients treated with {sup 125}I brachytherapy for early-stage prostate cancer between December 2000 and June 2003 completed a HRQOL questionnaire at five time-points: before treatment and 1 month, 6 months, 1 year, and 6 years after treatment. The questionnaire included the RAND-36 generic health survey, the cancer-specific European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer core questionnaire (EORTCQLQ-C30), and the tumor-specific EORTC prostate cancer module (EORTC-PR25). A change in a score of >=10 points was considered clinically relevant. Results: Overall, the HRQOL at 6 years after {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy did not significantly differ from baseline. Although a statistically significant deterioration in HRQOL at 6 years was seen for urinary symptoms, bowel symptoms, pain, physical functioning, and sexual activity (p <.01), most changes were not clinically relevant. A statistically significant improvement at 6 years was seen for mental health, emotional functioning, and insomnia (p <.01). The only clinically relevant changes were seen for emotional functioning and sexual activity. Conclusion: This is the first study presenting prospective HRQOL data up to 6 years after {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy. HRQOL scores returned to approximately baseline values at 1 year and remained stable up to 6 years after treatment. {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy did not adversely affect patients' long-term HRQOL.

  15. SU-E-J-181: Effect of Prostate Motion On Combined Brachytherapy and External Beam Dose Based On Daily Motion of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Narayana, V; McLaughlin, P; Ealbaj, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In this study, the adequacy of target expansions on the combined external beam and implant dose was examined based on the measured daily motion of the prostate. Methods: Thirty patients received an I–125 prostate implant prescribed to dose of 90Gy. This was followed by external beam to deliver a dose of 90Gyeq (external beam equivalent) to the prostate over 25 to 30 fractions. An ideal IMRT plan was developed by optimizing the external beam dose based on the delivered implant dose. The implant dose was converted to an equivalent external beam dose using the linear quadratic model. Patients were set up on the treatment table by daily orthogonal imaging and aligning the marker seeds in the prostate. Orthogonal images were obtained at the end of treatment to assess prostate intrafraction motion. Based on the observed motion of the markers between the initial and final images, 5 individual plans showing the actual dose delivered to the patient were calculated. A final true dose distribution was established based on summing the implant dose and the 5 external beam plans. Dose to the prostate, seminal vesicles, lymphnodes and normal tissues, rectal wall, urethra and lower sphincter were calculated and compared to ideal. On 18 patients who were sexually active, dose to the corpus cavernosum and internal pudendal artery was also calculated. Results: The average prostate motion in 3 orthogonal directions was less than 1 mm with a standard deviation of less than +2 mm. Dose and volume parameters showed that there was no decrease in dose to the targets and a marginal decrease in dose to in normal tissues. Conclusion: Dose delivered by seed implant moves with the prostate, decreasing the impact of intrafractions dose movement on actual dose delivered. Combined brachytherapy and external beam dose delivered to the prostate was not sensitive to prostate motion.

  16. Urethra-Sparing, Intraoperative, Real-Time Planned, Permanent-Seed Prostate Brachytherapy: Toxicity Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zilli, Thomas; Taussky, Daniel; Donath, David; Le, Hoa Phong; Larouche, Renee-Xaviere; Beliveau-Nadeau, Dominique; Hervieux, Yannick; Delouya, Guila

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To report the toxicity outcome in patients with localized prostate cancer undergoing {sup 125}I permanent-seed brachytherapy (BT) according to a urethra-sparing, intraoperative (IO), real-time planned conformal technique. Methods and Materials: Data were analyzed on 250 patients treated consecutively for low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer between 2005 and 2009. The planned goal was urethral V{sub 150} = 0. Acute and late genitourinary (GU), gastrointestinal (GI), and erectile toxicities were scored with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire and Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 3.0). Median follow-up time for patients with at least 2 years of follow-up (n = 130) was 34.4 months (range, 24-56.9 months). Results: Mean IO urethra V{sub 150} was 0.018% {+-} 0.08%. Mean prostate D{sub 90} and V{sub 100} on day-30 computed tomography scan were 158.0 {+-} 27.0 Gy and 92.1% {+-} 7.2%, respectively. Mean IPSS peak was 9.5 {+-} 6.3 1 month after BT (mean difference from baseline IPSS, 5.3). No acute GI toxicity was observed in 86.8% of patients. The 3-year probability of Grade {>=}2 late GU toxicity-free survival was 77.4% {+-} 4.0%, with Grade 3 late GU toxicity encountered in only 3 patients. Three-year Grade 1 late GI toxicity-free survival was 86.1% {+-} 3.2%. No patient presented Grade {>=}2 late GI toxicity. Of patients with normal sexual status at baseline, 20.7% manifested Grade {>=}2 erectile dysfunction after BT. On multivariate analysis, elevated baseline IPSS (p = 0.016) and high-activity sources (median 0.61 mCi) (p = 0.033) predicted increased Grade {>=}2 late GU toxicity. Conclusions: Urethra-sparing IO BT results in low acute and late GU toxicity compared with the literature. High seed activity and elevated IPSS at baseline increased long-term GU toxicity.

  17. Isotope and Patient Age Predict for PSA Spikes After Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bostancic, Chelsea; Merrick, Gregory S. . E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.org; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Allen, Zachariah; Galbreath, Robert; Lief, Jonathan; Gutman, Sarah E.

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate prostate-specific antigen (PSA) spikes after permanent prostate brachytherapy in low-risk patients. Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 164 prostate cancer patients who were part of a prospective randomized trial comparing {sup 103}Pd and {sup 125}I for low-risk disease. Of the 164 patients, 61 (37.2%) received short-course androgen deprivation therapy. The median follow-up was 5.4 years. On average, 11.1 post-treatment PSA measurements were obtained per patient. Biochemical disease-free survival was defined as a PSA level of {<=}0.40 ng/mL after nadir. A PSA spike was defined as an increase of {>=}0.2 ng/mL, followed by a durable decline to prespike levels. Multiple parameters were evaluated as predictors for a PSA spike. Results: Of the 164 patients, 44 (26.9%) developed a PSA spike. Of the 46 hormone-naive {sup 125}I patients and 57 hormone-naive {sup 103}Pd patients, 21 (45.7%) and 8 (14.0%) developed a PSA spike. In the hormone-naive patients, the mean time between implantation and the spike was 22.6 months and 18.7 months for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd, respectively. In patients receiving neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy, the incidence of spikes was comparable between isotopes ({sup 125}I 28.1% and {sup 103}Pd 20.7%). The incidence of spikes was substantially different in patients <65 years vs. {>=}65 years old (38.5% vs. 16.3%). On multivariate Cox regression analysis, patient age (p < 0.001) and isotope (p = 0.002) were significant predictors for spike. Conclusion: In low-risk prostate cancer, PSA spikes are most common in patients implanted with {sup 125}I and/or <65 years of age. Differences in isotope-related spikes are most pronounced in hormone-naive patients.

  18. A Prospective Quasi-Randomized Comparison of Intraoperatively Built Custom-Linked Seeds Versus Loose Seeds for Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Satoh, Takefumi; Kawakami, Shogo; Tsumura, Hideyasu; Komori, Shouko; Tabata, Ken-ichi; Sekiguchi, Akane; Takahashi, Ryo; Soda, Itaru; Takenaka, Kouji; Iwamura, Masatsugu; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To compare dosimetric parameters, seed migration rates, operation times, and acute toxicities of intraoperatively built custom-linked (IBCL) seeds with those of loose seeds for prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Participants were 140 patients with low or intermediate prostate cancer prospectively allocated to an IBCL seed group (n=74) or a loose seed group (n=66), using quasirandomization (allocated by week of the month). All patients underwent prostate brachytherapy using an interactive plan technique. Computed tomography and plain radiography were performed the next day and 1 month after brachytherapy. The primary endpoint was detection of a 5% difference in dose to 90% of prostate volume on postimplant computed tomography 1 month after treatment. Seed migration was defined as a seed position >1 cm from the cluster of other seeds on radiography. A seed dropped into the seminal vesicle was also defined as a migrated seed. Results: Dosimetric parameters including the primary endpoint did not differ significantly between groups, but seed migration rate was significantly lower in the IBCL seed group (0%) than in the loose seed group (55%; P<.001). Mean operation time was slightly but significantly longer in the IBCL seed group (57 min) than in the loose seed group (50 min; P<.001). No significant differences in acute toxicities were seen between groups (median follow-up, 9 months). Conclusions: This prospective quasirandomized control trial showed no dosimetric differences between IBCL seed and loose seed groups. However, a strong trend toward decreased postimplant seed migration was shown in the IBCL seed group.

  19. A dosimetric study of prostate brachytherapy using Monte Carlo simulations with a voxel phantom, measurements and a comparison with a treatment planning procedure.

    PubMed

    Teles, P; Barros, S; Cardoso, S; Facure, A; da Rosa, L A R; Santos, M; Pereira, P; Vaz, P; Zankl, M

    2015-07-01

    In prostate brachytherapy treatments, there is an initial swelling of the prostate of the patient due to an oedema related to the insertion of the seeds. The variation of the prostate volume can lead to variations in the final prescribed dose in treatment planning procedures. As such, it is important to understand their influence for dose optimisation purposes. This work reports on a dosimetric study of the swelling of the prostate in prostate brachytherapy using Monte Carlo simulations. Dosimetric measurements performed on a physical anthropomorphic tissue-equivalent prostate phantom and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to validate the MC model. Finally the MC model was also used to simulate prostate swelling in a real treatment planning procedure. The obtained results indicate that the parameters mentioned above represent a source of uncertainty in dose assessment in prostate brachytherapy, and can be detrimental to a correct dose evaluation in treatment plannings, and that these parameters can be accurately determined by means of MC simulations with a voxel phantom. PMID:25870437

  20. Is a Loose-Seed Nomogram Still Valid for Prostate Brachytherapy in a Stranded-Seed Era?

    SciTech Connect

    Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Swanson, David A.; Kuban, Deborah A.; Lee, Andrew K.; Bruno, Teresa L. C.; Frank, Steven J.

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To characterize the amount of activity required to treat the prostate with stranded {sup 125}I radioactive seeds and compare our stranded data with the amount of activity recommended when individual seeds are implanted using a Mick applicator. Methods and Materials: Data from two groups of patients at University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center who were treated with prostate brachytherapy as monotherapy were analyzed. The first group included 100 patients implanted with individual seeds in 2000 and 2001. The second group comprised 81 patients for whom stranded seeds were implanted in 2006 and 2007. Seeds in both groups were {sup 125}I seeds with an air kerma strength of 0.497 U per seed (0.391 mCi per seed). The prescribed dose to planning target volume was 145 Gy. Results: The total implanted activity and the number of seeds used were significantly lower in the second group (p < 0.0001) than in the first group. The reduction in activity in the stranded-seed group was approximately 23% for a 20-cm{sup 3} prostate and approximately 15% for a 60-cm{sup 3} prostate. With equivalent activity between the two groups, the stranded-seed treatment covered a larger treatment volume with the prescribed dose. Conclusions: The amount of activity required to effectively treat a prostate of a given volume was lower with stranded seeds than with loose seeds. Our experience suggests that prostate brachytherapy that uses stranded seeds leads to a more efficient implant with fewer seeds and lower overall activity, resulting in improved homogeneity.

  1. An Eight-Year Experience of HDR Brachytherapy Boost for Localized Prostate Cancer: Biopsy and PSA Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Bachand, Francois; Martin, Andre-Guy; Beaulieu, Luc; Harel, Francois M.Sc.; Vigneault, Eric

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the biochemical recurrence-free survival (bRFS), the 2-year biopsy outcome and the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce in patients with localized prostate cancer treated with an inversely planned high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost. Materials and methods: Data were collected from 153 patients treated between 1999 and 2006 with external beam pelvic radiation followed by an HDR Ir-192 prostate boost. These patients were given a boost of 18 to 20 Gy using inverse-planning with simulated annealing (IPSA).We reviewed and analyzed all prostate-specific antigen levels and control biopsies. Results: The median follow-up was 44 months (18-95 months). When categorized by risk of progression, 74.5% of patients presented an intermediate risk and 14.4% a high one. Prostate biopsies at 2 years posttreatment were negative in 86 of 94 patients (91.5%), whereas two biopsies were inconclusive. Biochemical control at 60 months was at 96% according to the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology and the Phoenix consensus definitions. A PSA bounce (PSA values of 2 ng/mL or more above nadir) was observed in 15 patients of 123 (9.8%). The median time to bounce was 15.2 months (interquartile range, 11.0-17.7) and the median bounce duration 18.7 months (interquartile range, 12.1-29). The estimate of overall survival at 60 months was 97.1% (95% CI, 91.6-103%). Conclusions: Considering that inverse planned HDR brachytherapy prostate boosts led to an excellent biochemical response, with a 2-year negative biopsy rate, we recommend a conservative approach in face of a PSA bounce even though it was observed in 10% of patients.

  2. Mixed integer programming improves comprehensibility and plan quality in inverse optimization of prostate HDR brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Gorissen, Bram L; den Hertog, Dick; Hoffmann, Aswin L

    2013-02-21

    Current inverse treatment planning methods that optimize both catheter positions and dwell times in prostate HDR brachytherapy use surrogate linear or quadratic objective functions that have no direct interpretation in terms of dose-volume histogram (DVH) criteria, do not result in an optimum or have long solution times. We decrease the solution time of the existing linear and quadratic dose-based programming models (LP and QP, respectively) to allow optimizing over potential catheter positions using mixed integer programming. An additional average speed-up of 75% can be obtained by stopping the solver at an early stage, without deterioration of the plan quality. For a fixed catheter configuration, the dwell time optimization model LP solves to optimality in less than 15 s, which confirms earlier results. We propose an iterative procedure for QP that allows us to prescribe the target dose as an interval, while retaining independence between the solution time and the number of dose calculation points. This iterative procedure is comparable in speed to the LP model and produces better plans than the non-iterative QP. We formulate a new dose-volume-based model that maximizes V(100%) while satisfying pre-set DVH criteria. This model optimizes both catheter positions and dwell times within a few minutes depending on prostate volume and number of catheters, optimizes dwell times within 35 s and gives better DVH statistics than dose-based models. The solutions suggest that the correlation between the objective value and the clinical plan quality is weak in the existing dose-based models. PMID:23363622

  3. Obstructive urination problems after high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost treatment for prostate cancer are avoidable

    PubMed Central

    Kragelj, Borut

    2016-01-01

    Background Aiming at improving treatment individualization in patients with prostate cancer treated with combination of external beam radiotherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy to boost the dose to prostate (HDRB-B), the objective was to evaluate factors that have potential impact on obstructive urination problems (OUP) after HDRB-B. Patients and methods In the follow-up study 88 patients consecutively treated with HDRB-B at the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana in the period 2006-2011 were included. The observed outcome was deterioration of OUP (DOUP) during the follow-up period longer than 1 year. Univariate and multivariate relationship analysis between DOUP and potential risk factors (treatment factors, patients’ characteristics) was carried out by using binary logistic regression. ROC curve was constructed on predicted values and the area under the curve (AUC) calculated to assess the performance of the multivariate model. Results Analysis was carried out on 71 patients who completed 3 years of follow-up. DOUP was noted in 13/71 (18.3%) of them. The results of multivariate analysis showed statistically significant relationship between DOUP and anti-coagulation treatment (OR 4.86, 95% C.I. limits: 1.21-19.61, p = 0.026). Also minimal dose received by 90% of the urethra volume was close to statistical significance (OR = 1.23; 95% C.I. limits: 0.98-1.07, p = 0.099). The value of AUC was 0.755. Conclusions The study emphasized the relationship between DOUP and anticoagulation treatment, and suggested the multivariate model with fair predictive performance. This model potentially enables a reduction of DOUP after HDRB-B. It supports the belief that further research should be focused on urethral sphincter as a critical structure for OUP. PMID:27069455

  4. In vivo real-time dosimetric verification in high dose rate prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Seymour, Erin L.; Downes, Simon J.; Fogarty, Gerald B.; Izard, Michael A.; Metcalfe, Peter

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of a diode array in the routine verification of planned dose to points inside the rectum from prostate high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy using a real-time planning system. Methods: A dosimetric study involving 28 patients was undertaken where measured doses received during treatment were compared to those calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS). After the ultrasound imaging required for treatment planning had been recorded, the ultrasound probe was replaced with a geometric replica that contained an 8 mm diameter cylindrical cavity in which a PTW diode array type 9112 was placed. The replica probe was then positioned inside the rectum with the individual diode positions determined using fluoroscopy. Dose was then recorded during the patients' treatment and compared to associated coordinates in the planning system. Results: Factors influencing diode response and experimental uncertainty were initially investigated to estimate the overall uncertainty involved in dose measurements, which was determined to be {+-}10%. Data was acquired for 28 patients' first fractions, 11 patients' second fractions, and 13 patients' third fractions with collection dependent upon circumstances. Deviations between the diode measurements and predicted values ranged from -42% to +35% with 71% of measurements experiencing less than a 10% deviation from the predicted values. If the {+-}10% measurement uncertainty was combined with a tolerated dose discrepancy of {+-}10% then over 95% of the diode results exhibited agreement with the calculated data to within {+-}20%. It must also be noted that when large dose discrepancies were apparent they did not necessarily occur for all five diodes in the one measurement. Conclusions: This technique provided a method that could be utilized to detect gross errors in dose delivery of a real-time prostate HDR plan. Limitations in the detection system used must be well understood if meaningful results are to

  5. Brachytherapy or Conformal External Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Single-Institution Matched-Pair Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pickles, Tom; Keyes, Mira; Morris, W. James

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: In the absence of randomized study data, institutional case series have shown brachytherapy (BT) to produce excellent biochemical control (bNED) in patients with localized prostate cancer compared with alternative curative treatments. This study was designed to overcome some of the limitations of case series studies by using a matched-pair design in patients treated contemporaneously with BT and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) at a single institution. Methods and Materials: Six hundred one eligible patients treated between 1998 and 2001 were prospectively followed up in our institutional databases and matched on a 1:1 basis for the following known prognostic variables: prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, Gleason score, T stage, the use and duration of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy, and the percentage of positive tissue core samples. Two hundred seventy-eight perfect matches of patients (139 in each group) with low- and intermediate-risk cancer were further analyzed. bNED (Phoenix definition) was the primary endpoint. Other endpoints were toxicity, PSA kinetics, and the secondary use of androgen deprivation therapy. Results: The 5-year bNED rates were 95% (BT) and 85% (EBRT) (p < 0.001). After 7 years, the BT bNED result was unchanged, but the rate in EBRT patients had fallen to 75%. The median posttreatment PSA nadirs were 0.04 ng/mL (BT) and 0.62 ng/mL (EBRT, p < 0.001), which predicted a higher ongoing treatment failure rate in association with EBRT use than with BT use. Late urinary toxicity and rectal/bowel toxicity were worse in patients treated with BT and EBRT, respectively. Conclusions: BT for both low-risk and selected intermediate-risk cancers achieves exceptional cure rates. Even with dose escalation, it will be difficult for EBRT to match the proven track record of BT seen over the past decade.

  6. The Impact of Brachytherapy on Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality for Definitive Radiation Therapy of High-Grade Prostate Cancer: A Population-Based Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Xinglei; Keith, Scott W.; Mishra, Mark V.; Dicker, Adam P.; Showalter, Timothy N.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: This population-based analysis compared prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) in a cohort of patients with high-risk prostate cancer after nonsurgical treatment with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), brachytherapy (BT), or combination (BT + EBRT). Methods and Materials: We identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database patients diagnosed from 1988 through 2002 with T1-T3N0M0 prostate adenocarcinoma of poorly differentiated grade and treated with BT, EBRT, or BT + EBRT. During this time frame, the database defined high grade as prostate cancers with Gleason score 8-10, or Gleason grade 4-5 if the score was not recorded. This corresponds to a cohort primarily with high-risk prostate cancer, although some cases where only Gleason grade was recorded may have included intermediate-risk cancer. We used multivariate models to examine patient and tumor characteristics associated with the likelihood of treatment with each radiation modality and the effect of radiation modality on PCSM. Results: There were 12,745 patients treated with EBRT (73.5%), BT (7.1%), or BT + EBRT (19.4%) included in the analysis. The median follow-up time for all patients was 6.4 years. The use of BT or BT + EBRT increased from 5.1% in 1988-1992 to 31.4% in 1998-2002. Significant predictors of use of BT or BT + EBRT were younger age, later year of diagnosis, urban residence, and earlier T-stage. On multivariate analysis, treatment with either BT (hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% confidence interval, 0.49-0.86) or BT + EBRT (hazard ratio, 0.77; 95% confidence ratio, 0.66-0.90) was associated with significant reduction in PCSM compared with EBRT alone. Conclusion: In patients with high-grade prostate cancer, treatment with brachytherapy is associated with reduced PCSM compared with EBRT alone. Our results suggest that brachytherapy should be investigated as a component of definitive treatment strategies for patients with high-risk prostate cancer.

  7. Topological methods for the comparison of structures using LDR-brachytherapy of the prostate as an example.

    PubMed

    Schiefer, H; von Toggenburg, F; Seelentag, W W; Plasswilm, L; Ries, G; Schmid, H-P; Leippold, T; Krusche, B; Roth, J; Engeler, D

    2009-08-21

    The dose coverage of low dose rate (LDR)-brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer is monitored 4-6 weeks after intervention by contouring the prostate on computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging sets. Dose parameters for the prostate (V100, D90 and D80) provide information on the treatment quality. Those depend strongly on the delineation of the prostate contours. We therefore systematically investigated the contouring process for 21 patients with five examiners. The prostate structures were compared with one another using topological procedures based on Boolean algebra. The coincidence number C(V) measures the agreement between a set of structures. The mutual coincidence C(i, j) measures the agreement between two structures i and j, and the mean coincidence C(i) compares a selected structure i with the remaining structures in a set. All coincidence parameters have a value of 1 for complete coincidence of contouring and 0 for complete absence. The five patients with the lowest C(V) values were discussed, and rules for contouring the prostate have been formulated. The contouring and assessment were repeated after 3 months for the same five patients. All coincidence parameters have been improved after instruction. This shows objectively that training resulted in more consistent contouring across examiners. PMID:19641239

  8. A specially designed domed-cones template for needles (seeds) fixation and incline insertion in prostate implant brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhao-Sheng; Tang, Shi-Qiang; Shi, Jun-Wen; Chen, Fen; Li, Zi-Wei; Wu, Jia-Ming; Jen, Yee-Min

    2016-01-01

    The construction of a conventional prostate needle (seeds) implant template restricts needles tilting or incline insertion when it is necessary to approach a seminal vesicle or to avoid the obstruction of symphysis pubis. To overcome the disadvantages of conventional templates, we developed a special template for guiding needles incline insertion and fixation for prostate needle implant. Phantom needles implantation was performed. Two acrylic boards, each 7.5 cm in width by 7.5 cm in length and 0.5 cm thickness, were drilled with a set of domed holes and cones with embedded template ball inside this combination to provide firm grip and fixation in prostate needle implantation. The specially designed domed-cones combination acrylic board provides a needle of up to 60° rotation flexibility application. Some areas that could not be covered in a conventional parallel needle holes template could now be covered by using this new template. The covering index of prostate radia-tion dosage is up to 84.5%. The specially designed domed-cones acrylic board combination provides not only a reliable means of needle fixation and rotational function, but also a superior dose distribution in the anterior portion of the prostate and good coverage of a seminal vesicle. This special template is a feasible design for prostate needles or seeds implant brachytherapy. PMID:26894355

  9. BrachyView, A novel inbody imaging system for HDR prostate brachytherapy: Design and Monte Carlo feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Safavi-Naeini, M.; Han, Z.; Cutajar, D.; Guatelli, S.; Petasecca, M.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Franklin, D. R.; Jakubek, J.; Pospisil, S.; Bucci, J.; Zaider, M.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a form of radiation therapy for treating prostate cancer whereby a high activity radiation source is moved between predefined positions inside applicators inserted within the treatment volume. Accurate positioning of the source is essential in delivering the desired dose to the target area while avoiding radiation injury to the surrounding tissue. In this paper, HDR BrachyView, a novel inbody dosimetric imaging system for real time monitoring and verification of the radioactive seed position in HDR prostate brachytherapy treatment is introduced. The current prototype consists of a 15 Multiplication-Sign 60 mm{sup 2} silicon pixel detector with a multipinhole tungsten collimator placed 6.5 mm above the detector. Seven identical pinholes allow full imaging coverage of the entire treatment volume. The combined pinhole and pixel sensor arrangement is geometrically designed to be able to resolve the three-dimensional location of the source. The probe may be rotated to keep the whole prostate within the transverse plane. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the efficacy of the design through computer simulation, and to estimate the accuracy in resolving the source position (in detector plane and in 3D space) as part of the feasibility study for the BrachyView project.Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were performed using the GEANT4 radiation transport model, with a {sup 192}Ir source placed in different locations within a prostate phantom. A geometrically accurate model of the detector and collimator were constructed. Simulations were conducted with a single pinhole to evaluate the pinhole design and the signal to background ratio obtained. Second, a pair of adjacent pinholes were simulated to evaluate the error in calculated source location.Results: Simulation results show that accurate determination of the true source position is easily obtainable within the typical one second source dwell time. The maximum error in

  10. Three-dimensional seed reconstruction for prostate brachytherapy using Hough trajectories.

    PubMed

    Lam, Steve T; Cho, Paul S; Marks, Robert J; Narayanan, Sreeram

    2004-02-21

    In order to perform intra-operative or post-implant dosimetry in prostate brachytherapy, the 3D coordinates of the implanted radioactive seeds must be determined. Film or fluoroscopy based seed reconstruction techniques use back projection of x-ray data obtained at two or three x-ray positions. These methods, however, do not perform well when some of the seed images are undetected. To overcome this problem we have developed an alternate technique for 3D seed localization using the principle of Hough transform. The Hough method utilizes the fact that, for each seed coordinate in three dimensions, there exists a unique trajectory in Hough feature space. In this paper we present the Hough transform parametric equations to describe the path of the seed projections from one view to the next and a method to reconstruct the 3D seed coordinates. The results of simulation and phantom studies indicate that the Hough trajectory method can accurately determine the 3D seed positions even from an incomplete dataset. PMID:15005165

  11. Three-dimensional seed reconstruction for prostate brachytherapy using Hough trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Steve T.; Cho, Paul S.; Marks, Robert J., II; Narayanan, Sreeram

    2004-02-01

    In order to perform intra-operative or post-implant dosimetry in prostate brachytherapy, the 3D coordinates of the implanted radioactive seeds must be determined. Film or fluoroscopy based seed reconstruction techniques use back projection of x-ray data obtained at two or three x-ray positions. These methods, however, do not perform well when some of the seed images are undetected. To overcome this problem we have developed an alternate technique for 3D seed localization using the principle of Hough transform. The Hough method utilizes the fact that, for each seed coordinate in three dimensions, there exists a unique trajectory in Hough feature space. In this paper we present the Hough transform parametric equations to describe the path of the seed projections from one view to the next and a method to reconstruct the 3D seed coordinates. The results of simulation and phantom studies indicate that the Hough trajectory method can accurately determine the 3D seed positions even from an incomplete dataset.

  12. Characterization of ultrasound elevation beamwidth artifacts for prostate brachytherapy needle insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Peikari, Mohammad; Chen, Thomas Kuriran; Lasso, Anras; Heffter, Tamas; Fichtinger, Gabor; Burdette, Everette C.

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: Ultrasound elevation beamwidth leads to image artifacts and uncertainties in localizing objects (such as a surgical needle) in ultrasound images. The authors examined the clinical significance of errors caused by elevation beamwidth artifacts and imaging parameters in needle insertion procedures. Methods: Beveled prostate brachytherapy needles were inserted through all holes of a grid template under real-time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance. The needle tip position as indicated by the TRUS image was compared to their observed physical location. A new device was developed to measure the ultrasound elevation beamwidth. Results: Imaging parameters of the TRUS scanner have direct impact on the localization error ranging from 0.5 up to 4 mm. The smallest localization error was observed laterally close to the center of the grid template and axially within the beam's focal zone. Largest localization error occurs laterally around both sides of the grid template and axially within the beam's far field. The authors also found that the localization errors vary with both lateral and elevation offsets. Conclusions: The authors found properly adjusting the TRUS imaging settings to lower the ultrasound gain and power effectively minimized the appearance of elevation beamwidth artifacts and in turn reduced the localization errors of the needle tip.

  13. The clinical utility of image-guided iodine-125 seed in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Niu, Hongxin; Zhang, Xikun; Wang, Bin; Zhou, Zhao; Wang, Jian; Xu, Zhongfa

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, we investigated the clinical effects of image-guided iodine-125 ((125)I) seed on unresectable pancreatic cancer. Twenty-five patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer were enrolled in this study, including 13 patients with seed implantation and 12 patients as control. The survival status, clinical benefits, objective curative effects, and relevant tumor markers were analyzed to assess the feasibility and safety of interstitial (125)I seed implantation. We found that the clinical benefit rate of the seed implantation group is 92.3 % (12/13), compared with 41.7 % (5/12) in the control, and the difference was statistically significant (p < 0.01). Compared with control, patients with seed implantation had significantly shorter operative time, less bleeding, higher albumin, shorter periods to bowel movement, and normal diet as well as lower risk of complications (p < 0.001). The differences of objective curative effects adverse effects, complications, and median survival between these two groups were not significant statistically (p > 0.05). In conclusion, (125)I seed implantation provides a safe and effective method to inhibit the tumor development, relieve pain, and improve quality of life for unresectable pancreatic cancer. These findings need to be validated by conducting further studies with larger cohorts. PMID:26353858

  14. Investigating the dosimetric and tumor control consequences of prostate seed loss and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Knaup, Courtney; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Esquivel, Carlos; Stathakis, Sotirios; Swanson, Gregory; Baltas, Dimos; Papanikolaou, Nikos

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: Low dose-rate brachytherapy is commonly used to treat prostate cancer. However, once implanted, the seeds are vulnerable to loss and movement. The goal of this work is to investigate the dosimetric and radiobiological effects of the types of seed loss and migration commonly seen in prostate brachytherapy. Methods: Five patients were used in this study. For each patient three treatment plans were created using Iodine-125, Palladium-103, and Cesium-131 seeds. The three seeds that were closest to the urethra were identified and modeled as the seeds lost through the urethra. The three seeds closest to the exterior of prostatic capsule were identified and modeled as those lost from the prostate periphery. The seed locations and organ contours were exported from Prowess and used by in-house software to perform the dosimetric and radiobiological evaluation. Seed loss was simulated by simultaneously removing 1, 2, or 3 seeds near the urethra 0, 2, or 4 days after the implant or removing seeds near the exterior of the prostate 14, 21, or 28 days after the implant. Results: Loss of one, two or three seeds through the urethra results in a D{sub 90} reduction of 2%, 5%, and 7% loss, respectively. Due to delayed loss of peripheral seeds, the dosimetric effects are less severe than for loss through the urethra. However, while the dose reduction is modest for multiple lost seeds, the reduction in tumor control probability was minimal. Conclusions: The goal of this work was to investigate the dosimetric and radiobiological effects of the types of seed loss and migration commonly seen in prostate brachytherapy. The results presented show that loss of multiple seeds can cause a substantial reduction of D{sub 90} coverage. However, for the patients in this study the dose reduction was not seen to reduce tumor control probability.

  15. PSA Nadir of <0.5 ng/mL Following Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Prostate Adenocarcinoma is Associated With Freedom From Prostate-Specific Antigen Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Eric C.; Stone, Nelson N.; Stock, Richard G.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Because limited information exists regarding whether the rate or magnitude of PSA decline following brachytherapy predicts long-term clinical outcomes, we evaluated whether achieving a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir (nPSA) <0.5 ng/mL following brachytherapy is associated with decreased PSA failure and/or distant metastasis. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed our database of early-stage prostate adenocarcinoma patients who underwent brachytherapy, excluding those receiving androgen-deprivation therapy and those with <2 years follow-up. Median and mean pretreatment PSA were 6 ng/mL and 7.16 ng/mL, respectively. By clinical stage, 775 were low risk ({<=}T2a), 126 were intermediate risk (T2b), and 20 were high risk (>T2b). By Gleason score, 840 were low risk ({<=}6), 71 were intermediate risk (7), and 10 were high risk (>7). Patients were treated with brachytherapy only (I-125, n = 779, or Pd-103, n = 47), or brachytherapy + external-beam radiation therapy (n = 95). Median follow-up was 6.3 years. We noted whether nPSA <0.5 ng/mL was achieved and the time to achieve this nadir and tested for associations with pretreatment risk factors. We also determined whether this PSA endpoint was associated with decreased PSA failure or distant metastasis. Results: Absence of high-risk factors in clinical stage ({<=}T2b), Gleason score ({<=}7), and pretreatment PSA ({<=}20 ng/mL) was significantly associated with achieving nPSA <0.5 ng/mL. By Kaplan-Meier analysis, patients achieving nPSA <0.5 ng/mL had significantly higher long-term freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF) than nonresponders (5-year FFBF: 95.2 {+-} 0.8% vs. 71.5 {+-} 6.7%; p < 0.0005). Among responders, those who achieved nPSA <0.5 ng/mL in {<=}5 years had higher FFBF than those requiring >5 years (5-year FFBF: 96.7 {+-} 0.7% vs. 80.8 {+-} 4.6%; p < 0.0005). On multivariate analysis, patients who achieved nPSA <0.5 ng/mL in {<=}5 years had significantly higher FFBF than other

  16. Reliability of EUCLIDIAN: An autonomous robotic system for image-guided prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Podder, Tarun K.; Buzurovic, Ivan; Huang Ke; Showalter, Timothy; Dicker, Adam P.; Yu, Yan

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Recently, several robotic systems have been developed to perform accurate and consistent image-guided brachytherapy. Before introducing a new device into clinical operations, it is important to assess the reliability and mean time before failure (MTBF) of the system. In this article, the authors present the preclinical evaluation and analysis of the reliability and MTBF of an autonomous robotic system, which is developed for prostate seed implantation. Methods: The authors have considered three steps that are important in reliability growth analysis. These steps are: Identification and isolation of failures, classification of failures, and trend analysis. For any one-of-a-kind product, the reliability enhancement is accomplished through test-fix-test. The authors have used failure mode and effect analysis for collection and analysis of reliability data by identifying and categorizing the failure modes. Failures were classified according to severity. Failures that occurred during the operation of this robotic system were considered as nonhomogenous Poisson process. The failure occurrence trend was analyzed using Laplace test. For analyzing and predicting reliability growth, commonly used and widely accepted models, Duane's model and the Army Material Systems Analysis Activity, i.e., Crow's model, were applied. The MTBF was used as an important measure for assessing the system's reliability. Results: During preclinical testing, 3196 seeds (in 53 test cases) were deposited autonomously by the robot and 14 critical failures were encountered. The majority of the failures occurred during the first few cases. The distribution of failures followed Duane's postulation as well as Crow's postulation of reliability growth. The Laplace test index was -3.82 (<0), indicating a significant trend in failure data, and the failure intervals lengthened gradually. The continuous increase in the failure occurrence interval suggested a trend toward improved reliability. The MTBF

  17. SU-E-T-279: Realization of Three-Dimensional Conformal Dose Planning in Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z; Jiang, S; Yang, Z; Bai, H; Zhang, X

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Successful clinical treatment in prostate brachytherapy is largely dependent on the effectiveness of pre-surgery dose planning. Conventional dose planning method could hardly arrive at a satisfy result. In this abstract, a three-dimensional conformal localized dose planning method is put forward to ensure the accuracy and effectiveness of pre-implantation dose planning. Methods: Using Monte Carlo method, the pre-calculated 3-D dose map for single source is obtained. As for multiple seeds dose distribution, the maps are combined linearly to acquire the 3-D distribution. The 3-D dose distribution is exhibited in the form of isodose surface together with reconstructed 3-D organs group real-timely. Then it is possible to observe the dose exposure to target volume and normal tissues intuitively, thus achieving maximum dose irradiation to treatment target and minimum healthy tissues damage. In addition, the exfoliation display of different isodose surfaces can be realized applying multi-values contour extraction algorithm based on voxels. The needles could be displayed in the system by tracking the position of the implanted seeds in real time to conduct block research in optimizing insertion trajectory. Results: This study extends dose planning from two-dimensional to three-dimensional, realizing the three-dimensional conformal irradiation, which could eliminate the limitations of 2-D images and two-dimensional dose planning. A software platform is developed using VC++ and Visualization Toolkit (VTK) to perform dose planning. The 3-D model reconstruction time is within three seconds (on a Intel Core i5 PC). Block research could be conducted to avoid inaccurate insertion into sensitive organs or internal obstructions. Experiments on eight prostate cancer cases prove that this study could make the dose planning results more reasonable. Conclusion: The three-dimensional conformal dose planning method could improve the rationality of dose planning by safely reducing

  18. Reliability of EUCLIDIAN: An autonomous robotic system for image-guided prostate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Podder, Tarun K.; Buzurovic, Ivan; Huang, Ke; Showalter, Timothy; Dicker, Adam P.; Yu, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Recently, several robotic systems have been developed to perform accurate and consistent image-guided brachytherapy. Before introducing a new device into clinical operations, it is important to assess the reliability and mean time before failure (MTBF) of the system. In this article, the authors present the preclinical evaluation and analysis of the reliability and MTBF of an autonomous robotic system, which is developed for prostate seed implantation. Methods: The authors have considered three steps that are important in reliability growth analysis. These steps are: Identification and isolation of failures, classification of failures, and trend analysis. For any one-of-a-kind product, the reliability enhancement is accomplished through test-fix-test. The authors have used failure mode and effect analysis for collection and analysis of reliability data by identifying and categorizing the failure modes. Failures were classified according to severity. Failures that occurred during the operation of this robotic system were considered as nonhomogenous Poisson process. The failure occurrence trend was analyzed using Laplace test. For analyzing and predicting reliability growth, commonly used and widely accepted models, Duane’s model and the Army Material Systems Analysis Activity, i.e., Crow’s model, were applied. The MTBF was used as an important measure for assessing the system’s reliability. Results: During preclinical testing, 3196 seeds (in 53 test cases) were deposited autonomously by the robot and 14 critical failures were encountered. The majority of the failures occurred during the first few cases. The distribution of failures followed Duane’s postulation as well as Crow’s postulation of reliability growth. The Laplace test index was −3.82 (<0), indicating a significant trend in failure data, and the failure intervals lengthened gradually. The continuous increase in the failure occurrence interval suggested a trend toward improved

  19. Second Primary Cancer After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer-A SEER Analysis of Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Wahab, May Reis, Isildinha M.; Hamilton, Kara

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of second primary cancers (SPCs) and radiotherapy-induced SPCs (RTSPCs). Patients and Methods: The incidence of SPCs and RTSPCs was compared among four treatment groups with locoregional prostate adenocarcinoma in the 1973-2002 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. These groups were no radiotherapy (RT), no surgery (Group 1); external beam RT (EBRT) (Group 2); brachytherapy (Group 3); and a combination of EBRT and brachytherapy (Group 4). Results: The age-adjusted estimates of SPCs were greater with EBRT than with brachytherapy (2,178 vs. 1,901 SPCs/100,000; p = 0.025) or with the no RT, no surgery group (1,971 SPCs/100,000; p <0.0001). The age-adjusted rate of late SPC ({>=}5 years) for EBRT (2,425 SPCs/100,000) was only significantly greater (p <0.0001) than that for no RT, no surgery (1,950 SPCs/100,000). The hazard ratio adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, and grade was constant at 1.263 for EBRT compared with no RT, no surgery (p <0.0001) but varied with the length of follow-up in both the brachytherapy (0.721 at 5 years to 1.200 at 9 years) and combination (0.920 at 5 years to 1.317 at 9 years) groups. The incidence of RTSPCs was only significantly different between the no RT, no surgery group and the EBRT group, with an increase of 162 cases/100,000 or a 0.16% increased SPC risk (p = 0.023). No significant differences in the incidence of RTSPC were seen between the RT groups. Conclusion: No significant differences were seen in the incidence of RTSPCs between the RT groups. The initial smaller relative risk of overall SPCs in the brachytherapy group increased with time until the curves converged, suggesting that the effect had resulted from patient selection bias.

  20. Natural History of Clinically Staged Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated With Monotherapeutic Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Wallner, Kent E.; Butler, Wayne M.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the natural history of clinically staged low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with permanent interstitial seed implants as monotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between April 1995 and May 2005, 463 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer underwent brachytherapy as the sole definitive treatment. Men who received supplemental external beam radiotherapy or androgen deprivation therapy were excluded. Dosimetric implant quality was determined based on the minimum dose that covered 90% of the target volume and the volume of the prostate gland receiving 100% of the prescribed dose. Multiple parameters were evaluated as predictors of treatment outcomes. Results: The 12-year biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates for the entire cohort were 97.1%, 99.7%, and 75.4%, respectively. Only pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level, percent positive biopsy cores, and minimum dose that covered 90% of the target volume were significant predictors of biochemical recurrence. The bPFS, cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates were 97.4%, 99.6%, and 76.2%, respectively, for low-risk patients and 96.4%, 100%, and 74.0%, respectively, for intermediate-risk patients. The bPFS rate was 98.8% for low-risk patients with high-quality implants versus 92.1% for those with less adequate implants (p < 0.01), and it was 98.3% for intermediate-risk patients with high-quality implants versus 86.4% for those with less adequate implants (p < 0.01). Conclusions: High-quality brachytherapy implants as monotherapy can provide excellent outcomes for men with clinically staged low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer. For these men, a high-quality implant can achieve results comparable to high-quality surgery in the most favorable pathologically staged patient subgroups.

  1. On the Need to Compensate for Edema-Induced Dose Reductions in Preplanned {sup 131}Cs Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z. Jay Deng Jun; Roberts, Kenneth; Nath, Ravinder

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Surgical trauma-induced edema and its protracted resolution can lead to significant dose reductions in preplanned {sup 131}Cs prostate brachytherapy. The purpose of this work was to examine whether these dose reductions should be actively compensated for and to estimate the magnitude of the additional irradiation needed for dose compensation. Methods and Materials: The quantitative edema resolution characteristics observed by Waterman et al. were used to examine the physical and radiobiologic effects of prostate edema in preplanned {sup 131}Cs implants. The need for dose compensation was assessed using the dose responses observed in {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd prostate implants. The biologically effective dose, calculated with full consideration of edema evolution, was used to estimate the additional irradiation needed for dose compensation. Results: We found that the edema-induced dose reduction in preplanned {sup 131}Cs implants could easily exceed 10% of the prescription dose for implants with moderate or large edema. These dose reductions could lead to a >10% reduction in the biochemical recurrence-free survival for individual patients if the effect of edema was ignored. For a prescribed dose of 120 Gy, the number of 2-Gy external beam fractions needed to compensate for a 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25% edema-induced dose reduction would be one, four, six, seven, and nine, respectively, for prostate cancer with a median potential doubling time of 42 days. The required additional irradiation increased for fast-growing tumors and/or those less efficient in sublethal damage repair. Conclusion: Compensation of edema-induced dose reductions in preplanned {sup 131}Cs prostate brachytherapy should be actively considered for those implants with moderate or large edema.

  2. On the need to compensate edema-induced dose reductions in pre-planned 131Cs prostate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Z. Jay; Deng, Jun; Roberts, Kenneth; Nath, Ravinder

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Surgical-trauma-induced edema and its protracted resolution can lead to significant dose reduction in pre-planned 131Cs prostate brachytherapy. The purpose of this work was to examine whether these dose reductions should be actively compensated and to estimate the magnitude of additional irradiations needed for dose compensation. Methods and Materials Quantitative edema resolution characteristics observed by Waterman et. el. were used to examine the physical and radiobiological effects of prostate edema in pre-planned 131Cs implants. The need for dose compensation was assessed based on the dose-responses observed in 125I and 103Pd prostate implants. Biologically effective dose calculated with full consideration of edema evolution was used to estimate the additional irradiations needed for dose compensation. Results Edema-induced dose reduction in pre-planned 131Cs implants could easily exceed 10% prescription dose for implants with moderate or large edemas. These dose reductions could lead to more than 10% reduction in biochemical recurrence-free survival for individual patients if the effect of edema was ignored. For a prescribed dose of 120 Gy, the number of 2-Gy external-beam fractions needed to compensate a 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, or 25% edema-induced dose reduction could be 1, 4, 6, 7, or 9, respectively, for prostate cancers with a median potential doubling time of 42 days. The required additional irradiation increases for tumors that are fast growing and/or are less efficient in sub-lethal damage repair. Conclusions Compensation of edema-induced dose reductions in pre-planned 131Cs prostate brachytherapy should be actively considered for those implants with moderate or large edemas. PMID:17980500

  3. Method for the simultaneous preparation of Radon-211, Xenon-125, Xenon-123, Astatine-211, Iodine-125 and Iodine-123

    DOEpatents

    Mirzadeh, Saed; Lambrecht, Richard M.

    1987-01-01

    A method for simultaneously preparing Radon-211, Astatine-211, Xenon-125, Xenon-123, Iodine-125 and Iodine-123 in a process that includes irradiating a fertile metal material then using a one-step chemical procedure to collect a first mixture of about equal amounts of Radon-211 and Xenon-125, and a separate second mixture of about equal amounts of Iodine-123 and Astatine-211.

  4. Comparison of Real-Time Intraoperative Ultrasound-Based Dosimetry With Postoperative Computed Tomography-Based Dosimetry for Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, Subir; Shi Peipei; Liu Bingren; Gupta, Nilendu; Bahnson, Robert R.; Wang, Jian Z.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether real-time intraoperative ultrasound (US)-based dosimetry can replace conventional postoperative computed tomography (CT)-based dosimetry in prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between December 2001 and November 2002, 82 patients underwent {sup 103}Pd prostate brachytherapy. An interplant treatment planning system was used for real-time intraoperative transrectal US-guided treatment planning. The dose distribution was updated according to the estimated seed position to obtain the dose-volume histograms. Postoperative CT-based dosimetry was performed a few hours later using the Theraplan-Plus treatment planning system. The dosimetric parameters obtained from the two imaging modalities were compared. Results: The results of this study revealed correlations between the US- and CT-based dosimetry. However, large variations were found in the implant-quality parameters of the two modalities, including the doses covering 100%, 90%, and 80% of the prostate volume and prostate volumes covered by 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescription dose. The mean relative difference was 38% and 16% for doses covering 100% and 90% of the prostate volume and 10% and 21% for prostate volumes covered by 100% and 150% of the prescription dose, respectively. The CT-based volume covered by 200% of the prescription dose was about 30% greater than the US-based one. Compared with CT-based dosimetry, US-based dosimetry significantly underestimated the dose to normal organs, especially for the rectum. The average US-based maximal dose and volume covered by 100% of the prescription dose for the rectum was 72 Gy and 0.01 cm{sup 3}, respectively, much lower than the 159 Gy and 0.65 cm{sup 3} obtained using CT-based dosimetry. Conclusion: Although dosimetry using intraoperative US-based planning provides preliminary real-time information, it does not accurately reflect the postoperative CT-based dosimetry. Until studies have determined whether US-based dosimetry

  5. SU-D-BRF-07: Ultrasound and Fluoroscopy Based Intraoperative Image-Guidance System for Dynamic Dosimetry in Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, N; Le, Y; Deguet, A; Prince, J; Song, D; Lee, J; Dehghan, E; Burdette, E; Fichtinger, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Prostate brachytherapy is a common treatment method for low-risk prostate cancer patients. Intraoperative treatment planning is known to improve the treatment procedure and the outcome. The current limitation of intraoperative treatment planning is the inability to localize the seeds in relation to the prostate. We developed an image-guidance system to fulfill this need to achieve intraoperative dynamic dosimetry in prostate brachytherapy. Methods: Our system is based on standard imaging equipments available in the operating room, including the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and the mobile C-arm. A simple fiducial is added to compute the C-arm pose. Three fluoroscopic images and an ultrasound volume of the seeds and the prostate are acquired and processed by four image processing algorithms: seed segmentation, fiducial detection with pose estimation, seed reconstruction, and seeds-to-TRUS registration. The updated seed positions allow the physician to assess the quality of implantation and dynamically adjust the treatment plan during the course of surgery to achieve improved exit dosimetry. Results: The system was tested on 10 phantoms and 37 patients. Seed segmentation resulted in a 1% false negative and 2% false positive rates. Fiducial detection with pose estimation resulted in a detection rate of 98%. Seed reconstruction had a mean reconstruction error of 0.4 mm. Seeds-to-TRUS registration had a mean registration error of 1.3 mm. The total processing time from image acquisition to registration was approximately 1 minute. Conclusion: We present an image-guidance system for intraoperative dynamic dosimetry in prostate brachytherapy. Using standard imaging equipments and a simple fiducial, our system can be easily adopted in any clinics. Robust image processing algorithms enable accurate and fast computation of the delivered dose. Especially, the system enables detection of possible hot/cold spots during the surgery, allowing the physician to address these

  6. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as a Monotherapy for Favorable-Risk Prostate Cancer: A Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Barkati, Maroie; Williams, Scott G.; Foroudi, Farshad; Tai, Keen Hun; Chander, Sarat; Dyk, Sylvia van; See, Andrew; Duchesne, Gillian M.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: There are multiple treatment options for favorable-risk prostate cancer. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as a monotherapy is appealing, but its use is still investigational. A Phase II trial was undertaken to explore the value of such treatment in low-to-intermediate risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This was a single-institution, prospective study. Eligible patients had low-risk prostate cancer features but also Gleason scores of 7 (51% of patients) and stage T2b to T2c cancer. Treatment with HDR brachytherapy with a single implant was administered over 2 days. One of four fractionation schedules was used in a dose escalation study design: 3 fractions of 10, 10.5, 11, or 11.5 Gy. Patients were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 2.0 for urinary toxicity, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer scoring schema for rectal toxicity, and the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) questionnaire to measure patient-reported health-related quality of life. Biochemical failure was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir plus 2 ng/ml. Results: Between 2003 and 2008, 79 patients were enrolled. With a median follow-up of 39.5 months, biochemical relapse occurred in 7 patients. Three- and 5-year actuarial biochemical control rates were 88.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 78.0-96.2%) and 85.1% (95% CI, 72.5-94.5%), respectively. Acute grade 3 urinary toxicity was seen in only 1 patient. There was no instance of acute grade 3 rectal toxicity. Rates of late grade 3 rectal toxicity, dysuria, hematuria, urinary retention, and urinary incontinence were 0%, 10.3%, 1.3%, 9.0%, and 0%, respectively. No grade 4 or greater toxicity was recorded. Among the four (urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal) domains assessed with the EPIC questionnaire, only the sexual domain did not recover with time. Conclusions: HDR brachytherapy as a monotherapy for favorable

  7. Prostate brachytherapy postimplant dosimetry: Seed orientation and the impact of dosimetric anisotropy in stranded implants

    SciTech Connect

    Chng, Nicholas; Spadinger, Ingrid; Rasoda, Rosey; Morris, W. James; Salcudean, Septimiu

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: In postimplant dosimetry for prostate brachytherapy, dose is commonly calculated using the TG-43 1D formalism, because seed orientations are difficult to determine from CT images, the current standard for the procedure. However, the orientation of stranded seeds soon after implantation is predictable, as these seeds tend to maintain their relative spacing, and orient themselves along the implant trajectory. The aim of this study was to develop a method for determining seed orientations from reconstructed strand trajectories, and to use this information to investigate the dosimetric impact of applying the TG-43 2D formalism to clinical postimplant analysis. Methods: Using in-house software, the preplan to postimplant seed correspondence was determined for a cohort of 30 patients during routine day-0 CT-based postimplant dosimetry. All patients were implanted with stranded-seed trains. Spline curves were fit to each set of seeds composing a strand, with the requirement that the distance along the spline between seeds be equal to the seed spacing within the strand. The orientations of the seeds were estimated by the tangents to the spline at each seed centroid. Dose distributions were then determined using the 1D and 2D TG-43 formalisms. These were compared using the TG-137 recommended dose metrics for the prostate, prostatic urethra, and rectum. Results: Seven hundred and sixty one strands were analyzed in total. Defining the z-axis to be cranial-positive and the x-axis to be left-lateral positive in the CT coordinate system, the average seed had an inclination of 21 deg. {+-} 10 deg. and an azimuth of -81 deg. {+-} 57 deg. These values correspond to the average strand rising anteriorly from apex to base, approximately parallel to the midsagittal plane. Clinically minor but statistically significant differences in dose metrics were noted. Compared to the 2D calculation, the 1D calculation underestimated prostate V100 by 1.1% and D90 by 2.3 Gy, while

  8. Postoperative Nomogram Predicting the 9-Year Probability of Prostate Cancer Recurrence After Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy Using Radiation Dose as a Prognostic Variable

    SciTech Connect

    Potters, Louis; Roach, Mack; Davis, Brian J.; Stock, Richard G.; Ciezki, Jay P.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Stone, Nelson N.; Fearn, Paul A.; Yu Changhong; Shinohara, Katsuto; Kattan, Michael W.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To report a multi-institutional outcomes study on permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) to 9 years that includes postimplant dosimetry, to develop a postimplant nomogram predicting biochemical freedom from recurrence. Methods and Materials: Cox regression analysis was used to model the clinical information for 5,931 patients who underwent PPB for clinically localized prostate cancer from six centers. The model was validated against the dataset using bootstrapping. Disease progression was determined using the Phoenix definition. The biological equivalent dose was calculated from the minimum dose to 90% of the prostate volume (D90) and external-beam radiotherapy dose using an alpha/beta of 2. Results: The 9-year biochemical freedom from recurrence probability for the modeling set was 77% (95% confidence interval, 73-81%). In the model, prostate-specific antigen, Gleason sum, isotope, external beam radiation, year of treatment, and D90 were associated with recurrence (each p < 0.05), whereas clinical stage was not. The concordance index of the model was 0.710. Conclusion: A predictive model for a postimplant nomogram for prostate cancer recurrence at 9-years after PPB has been developed and validated from a large multi-institutional database. This study also demonstrates the significance of implant dosimetry for predicting outcome. Unique to predictive models, these nomograms may be used a priori to calculate a D90 that likely achieves a desired outcome with further validation. Thus, a personalized dose prescription can potentially be calculated for each patient.

  9. Brachytherapy Application With In Situ Dose Painting Administered by Gold Nanoparticle Eluters

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Neeharika; Cifter, Gizem; Sajo, Erno; Kumar, Rajiv; Sridhar, Srinivas; Nguyen, Paul L.; Cormack, Robert A.; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike; Ngwa, Wilfred

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Recent studies show promise that administering gold nanoparticles (GNP) to tumor cells during brachytherapy could significantly enhance radiation damage to the tumor. A new strategy proposed for sustained administration of the GNP in prostate tumors is to load them into routinely used brachytherapy spacers for customizable in situ release after implantation. This in silico study investigated the intratumor biodistribution and corresponding dose enhancement over time due to GNP released from such GNP-loaded brachytherapy spacers (GBS). Method and Materials: An experimentally determined intratumoral diffusion coefficient (D) for 10-nm nanoparticles was used to estimate D for other sizes by using the Stokes-Einstein equation. GNP concentration profiles, obtained using D, were then used to calculate the corresponding dose enhancement factor (DEF) for each tumor voxel, using dose painting-by-numbers approach, for times relevant to the considered brachytherapy sources' lifetimes. The investigation was carried out as a function of GNP size for the clinically applicable low-dose-rate brachytherapy sources iodine-125 (I-125), palladium-103 (Pd-103), and cesium-131 (Cs-131). Results: Results showed that dose enhancement to tumor voxels and subvolumes during brachytherapy can be customized by varying the size of GNP released or eluted from the GBS. For example, using a concentration of 7 mg/g GNP, significant DEF (>20%) could be achieved 5 mm from a GBS after 5, 12, 25, 46, 72, 120, and 195 days, respectively, for GNP sizes of 2, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 50 nm and for 80 nm when treating with I-125. Conclusions: Analyses showed that using Cs-131 provides the highest dose enhancement to tumor voxels. However, given its relatively longer half-life, I-125 presents the most flexibility for customizing the dose enhancement as a function of GNP size. These findings provide a useful reference for further work toward development of potential new brachytherapy application with

  10. Alpha 1-Adrenoceptor Blocker May Improve Not Only Voiding But Also Storage Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Caused by 125I Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Yoshitaka; Ito, Hideaki; Miwa, Yoshiji; Akino, Hironobu; Shioura, Hiroki; Kimura, Hirohiko; Yokoyama, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To assess changes in lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) within 1 year after brachytherapy in patients receiving alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonists. Methods. We retrospectively evaluated 116 patients who underwent 125I prostate brachytherapy in our institute. Seventy-one patients were treated with a combination of external beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy. Alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonists were prescribed to all patients after brachytherapy. International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) forms and postvoid residual urine volume were recorded at all follow-up visits. Results. Forty-nine patients were given tamsulosin hydrochloride, 32 were given silodosin hydrochloride, and 35 were given naftopidil for up to 6 months after seed implantation. Patients given tamsulosin or naftopidil tended to show a higher peak IPSS and slower recovery to baseline values than those given silodosin. The patients given naftopidil showed an insufficient recovery in storage symptoms in naftopidil group in comparison with tamsulosin group at 3 months and with silodosin group at 6 and 9 months. Conclusions. In the management of LUT after brachytherapy, silodosin may provide a more favorable improvement. Silodosin and tamsulosin may have an advantage in improving not only voiding but also storage lower urinary tract symptoms after brachytherapy. PMID:25006516