Sample records for iodine-125 prostate brachytherapy

  1. Influence of Dose on Risk of Acute Urinary Retention After Iodine-125 Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Roeloffzen, Ellen M.A., E-mail: E.M.A.Roeloffzen@UMCUtrecht.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Battermann, Jan J.; Deursen, Marijke J.H. van [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Monninkhof, Evelyn M. [Department of Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Visscher, Mareije I.; Moerland, Marinus A.; Vulpen, Marco van [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To assess the influence of dose on the risk of acute urinary retention (AUR) after iodine-125 prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between January 2005 and December 2008, 714 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with iodine-125 prostate brachytherapy at our department. All patients completed four imaging studies: magnetic resonance imaging before and 4 weeks after treatment and intraoperative three-dimensional transrectal ultrasonography before and after implantation. The development of AUR was prospectively recorded. The evaluated treatment and dosimetric parameters included prostate volume, number of needles and seeds used, intra- and postoperative prostate edema, percentage of prostate volume receiving 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescribed dose to the prostate, minimal dose received by 90% of the prostate volume, and percentage of the urethra receiving 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescribed dose. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine which factors were associated with AUR. Results: Of the 714 patients, 57 (8.0%) developed AUR. On univariate analysis, the following treatment and dosimetric factors were significantly associated with AUR: International Prostate Symptom Score (odds ratio [OR], 2.07, per 10-point increase), preimplant prostate volume (OR, 1.06), postimplant prostate volume (OR, 1.04), number of needles used (OR, 1.09), and number of seeds used (OR, 1.03). On multivariate analysis, the only independent predictive factors for AUR were pretreatment prostate volume (OR, 1.05) and International Prostate Symptom Score (OR, 1.76, per 10-point increase). Patients with a pretreatment prostate volume >35 cm{sup 3} had a 10.4% risk of developing AUR compared with 5.4% for those with a prostate volume of {<=}35 cm{sup 3}. No association was found between any of the dosimetric parameters and the development of AUR. Conclusion: The radiation dose, within the range studied, did not influence the risk of AUR after iodine-125 prostate brachytherapy. Prostate volume and International Prostate Symptom Score were the most important predictors of AUR.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Defined Treatment Margins in Iodine-125 Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, Juanita, E-mail: jcrook@bccancer.bc.c [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Patil, Nikhilesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Ma, Clement [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); McLean, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Borg, Jette [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: Low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy achieves a very high and effective intraprostatic dose. Implant quality parameters concentrate on the dose received by the prostate (D90, V100) but not that received by the periprostatic tissue. We calculated implant quality parameters, D90 and V100, for the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-defined prostate plus 2, 3, and 5 mm. Methods and Materials: A total of 131 men with early-stage prostate cancer treated with iodine-125 brachytherapy represent all those treated with brachytherapy monotherapy in our institution in 2005. Postplan assessment was performed at 1 month using magnetic resonance (MR)-computed tomography (CT) fusion. The prostate V100 and D90 were calculated with 2-, 3-, and 5-mm margins. Results were compared with those in 8 patients with biopsy-proven local failure occurring in an experience of more than 1,100 implants. Results: Mean prostate V100 (SD) and D90 (SD) were 95.6% (4.1) and 117.2% (12.7). For prostate plus a 2-mm margin the D90 was 107.9% (14.3) and for a 3-mm margin 96.0 % (14.0). For prostate plus a 5-mm margin, the D90 was only 78.4% (11.0). The 8 patients experiencing local failure, despite adequate implants, had a lower mean V100 of 91.2% (SD, 2.8; p = 0.0008) and D90 of 103.7% (SD, 8.3; p = 0.002) and significantly inferior margin coverage. Conclusions: Satisfactory coverage of a 2-mm and 3-mm periprostatic margin is obtained with the described planning approach. Coverage falls off significantly by 5 mm. The 8 patients who experienced local failure had significantly lower doses than the margin cohort. Although the V100 and D90 would be considered acceptable, the fall-off in margin coverage was observed by 3 mm.

  3. A Phase III Randomized Trial of the Timing of Meloxicam With Iodine-125 Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, Juanita, E-mail: juanita.crook@rmp.uhn.on.c [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Patil, Nikhilesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Wallace, Kris [Department of Radiation Medicine, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Borg, Jette [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Zhou, David [Department of Radiation Medicine, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ma, Clement; Pond, Greg [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication is used to reduce prostate edema and urinary symptoms following prostate brachytherapy. We hypothesized that a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor regimen started 1 week prior to seed implant might diminish the inflammatory response, thus reducing edema, retention rates, and symptom severity. Methods and Materials: From March 2004 to February 2008, 316 men consented to an institutional review board-approved randomized study of a 4-week course of meloxicam, 7.5 mg orally twice per day, starting either on the day of implant or 1 week prior to implant. Brachytherapy was performed using iodine-125 seeds and was preplanned and performed under transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and fluoroscopic guidance. Prostate volume obtained by MR imaging at 1 month was compared to baseline prostate volume obtained by TRUS planimetry and expressed as an edema factor. The trial endpoints were prostate edema at 1 month, International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire results at 1 and 3 months, and any need for catheterization. Results: Results for 300 men were analyzed. Median age was 61 (range, 45-79 years), and median TRUS prostate volume was 35.7 cc (range, 18.1-69.5 cc). Median IPSS at baseline was 5 (range, 0-24) and was 15 at 1 month, 16 at 3 months, and 10 at 6 months. Catheterization was required for 7% of patients (6.2% day 0 arm vs. 7.9% day -7 arm; p = 0.65). The median edema factor at 1 month was 1.02 (range, 0.73-1.7). 1.01 day 0 arm vs. 1.05 day -7 arm. Baseline prostate volume remained the primary predictor of postimplant urinary retention. Conclusions: Starting meloxicam 1 week prior to brachytherapy compared to starting immediately after the procedure did not reduce 1-month edema, improve IPSSs at 1 or 3 months, or reduce the need for catheterization.

  4. Biochemical Disease-Free Rate and Toxicity for Men Treated With Iodine125 Prostate Brachytherapy With D 90 ?180 Gy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alfonso Gómez-Iturriaga Piña; Juanita Crook; Jette Borg; Clement Ma

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Iodine-125 (¹²I) prostate brachytherapy is planned with a prescribed dose of 145 Gy and minimal dose received by 90% of the prostate (D) of 120-125% (174-181 Gy). We examined the clinical outcomes and toxicity profile of men receiving a D (isodose enclosing 90% of the prostate) of {>=}180 Gy. Methods and Materials: Between March 1999 and May 2006, 129

  5. Iodine-125 prostate seed brachytherapy in renal transplant recipients: an analysis of oncological outcomes and toxicity profile

    PubMed Central

    Bucci, Joseph; Malouf, David

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Prostate cancer is among the most common non-cutaneous neoplasms affecting renal transplant recipients (RTRs). Available treatments including radical prostatectomy and external beam radiotherapy carry a risk of damage to the transplanted kidney, ureters, or bladder. We assessed the safety and efficacy of Iodine-125 (125I) prostate seed brachytherapy as an alternative to surgery and radiotherapy in these individuals. Material and methods We retrospectively reviewed our brachytherapy database to identify patients with a prior history of renal transplantation, who had undergone seed implantation for localized prostate cancer. Long term PSA control and treatment related toxicity, including graft dysfunction, urinary, rectal, and sexual complications, were assessed and compared with published outcomes for surgery and external beam radiotherapy. Results Of 1054 patients treated with permanent seed implantation from 2002-2012, we identified four who had a prior history of renal transplantation. Mean time from renal transplantation to prostate cancer diagnosis was 13 years. Mean follow-up after seed implantation was 44 months (range 12-60 months). All four patients remain free of PSA progression. No peri-operative complications were experienced following seed implantation, and all four patients continued to have normal graft function. Long term urinary and rectal function scores were comparable to reported outcomes for seed brachytherapy in the non-transplant population. Conclusions 125I prostate seed brachytherapy is associated with high rates of biochemical control and minimal toxicity to the renal graft in RTRs. This treatment should be considered as an alternative to surgery in managing RTRs with localized prostate cancer. PMID:24790617

  6. The Impact of Acute Urinary Retention After Iodine-125 Prostate Brachytherapy on Health-Related Quality of Life

    SciTech Connect

    Roeloffzen, Ellen M.A., E-mail: E.M.A.Roeloffzen@UMCUtrecht.n [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Hinnen, Karel A.; Battermann, Jan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Monninkhof, Evelyn M. [Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Roermund, Joep G.H. van [Department of Urology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Gellekom, Marion van [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Frank, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Medical Center, Houston, TX (United States); Vulpen, Marco van [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of acute urinary retention (AUR) in patients treated with {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy on short- and long-term health-related quality of life (HRQOL); and to assess whether pretreatment HRQOL has additional value in the prediction of AUR. Methods and Materials: For 127 patients treated with {sup 125}I brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer between December 2000 and June 2003, toxicity and HRQOL data were prospectively collected. Patients received a HRQOL questionnaire at five time points: before and 1 month, 6 months, 1 year, and 6 years after treatment. The questionnaire included the RAND-36 generic health survey, the cancer-specific European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer core questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30), the tumor-specific EORTC prostate cancer module (EORTC QLQ-PR25), and the American Urological Association (AUA) symptom index. Results: Of 127 patients, 13 (10.2%) developed AUR. Patients with AUR had a significantly worse urinary QOL at all time points compared with patients without AUR. The mean difference over time (6 years) between both groups for the EORTC QLQ-PR25 urinary symptom score was 13.0 points (p < 0.001) and for the AUA urinary symptom score was 15.7 points (p = 0.001). Global QOL scores (EORTC QLQ-C30) over time for patients who developed AUR were significantly worse compared with patients without AUR (mean difference 6.7 points; p = 0.043). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, pretreatment International Prostate Symptom Score (p = 0.004) and neoadjuvant hormonal treatment (p = 0.034) were predictors of AUR. Quality of life did not have added predictive value. Conclusion: Acute urinary retention after prostate brachytherapy has a significant negative impact on patient's HRQOL up to 6 years after treatment, in terms of both global QOL measures and urinary symptom scores. Furthermore, our results suggest limited value of pretreatment HRQOL measures for the prediction of AUR.

  7. A novel approach for the adsorption of iodine-125 on silver wire as matrix for brachytherapy source for the treatment of eye and prostate cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Mathew; M. A. Majali; S. A. Balakrishnan

    2002-01-01

    The adsorption of iodine-125 on silver wire bits coated with palladium to be sealed in titanium capsules as brachytherapy sources was studied. A method was optimized to obtain quantitative adsorption of 125I on the palladium treated silver wires. A comparative evaluation of palladium coated and uncoated (bare) silver wires on the adsorption of 125I was made. While, the adsorption of

  8. Novel Parameter Predicting Grade 2 Rectal Bleeding After Iodine-125 Prostate Brachytherapy Combined With External Beam Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Yutaka, E-mail: shiraishi@rad.med.keio.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Hanada, Takashi; Ohashi, Toshio [Department of Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Yorozu, Atsunori; Toya, Kazuhito [Department of Radiology, National Hospital Organization Tokyo Medical Center, Tokyo (Japan); Saito, Shiro [Department of Urology, National Hospital Organization Tokyo Medical Center, Tokyo (Japan); Shigematsu, Naoyuki [Department of Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To propose a novel parameter predicting rectal bleeding on the basis of generalized equivalent uniform doses (gEUD) after {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy combined with external beam radiation therapy and to assess the predictive value of this parameter. Methods and Materials: To account for differences among radiation treatment modalities and fractionation schedules, rectal dose–volume histograms (DVHs) of 369 patients with localized prostate cancer undergoing combined therapy retrieved from corresponding treatment planning systems were converted to equivalent dose-based DVHs. The gEUDs for the rectum were calculated from these converted DVHs. The total gEUD (gEUD{sub sum}) was determined by a summation of the brachytherapy and external-beam radiation therapy components. Results: Thirty-eight patients (10.3%) developed grade 2+ rectal bleeding. The grade 2+ rectal bleeding rate increased as the gEUD{sub sum} increased: 2.0% (2 of 102 patients) for <70 Gy, 10.3% (15 of 145 patients) for 70-80 Gy, 15.8% (12 of 76 patients) for 80-90 Gy, and 19.6% (9 of 46 patients) for >90 Gy (P=.002). Multivariate analysis identified age (P=.024) and gEUD{sub sum} (P=.000) as risk factors for grade 2+ rectal bleeding. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate gEUD to be a potential predictive factor for grade 2+ late rectal bleeding after combined therapy for prostate cancer.

  9. Outcomes Following Iodine-125 Monotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: The Results of Leeds 10-Year Single-Center Brachytherapy Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, Ann M., E-mail: Ann.Henry@leedsth.nhs.u [Department of Clinical Oncology, St. James's Institute of Oncology, St. James's University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); Al-Qaisieh, Bashar [Department of Medical Physics, St. James's Institute of Oncology, St. James's University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); Gould, Kathy [Department of Clinical Oncology, St. James's Institute of Oncology, St. James's University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); Bownes, Peter [Department of Medical Physics, St. James's Institute of Oncology, St. James's University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); Smith, Jonathan; Carey, Brendan [Department of Clinical Radiology, St. James's Institute of Oncology, St. James's University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); Bottomley, David; Ash, Dan [Department of Clinical Oncology, St. James's Institute of Oncology, St. James's University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: This study reports the 10-year experience of permanent brachytherapy monotherapy at a single UK center. Methods and Materials: Between March 1995 and September 2004, 1,298 patients underwent trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS) planned transperineal brachytherapy delivering 145 Gy using I-125. No patient received supplemental external beam; 44.2% received neoadjuvant hormones. In 688, CT postimplant dosimetry was available. Outcome data were analyzed in terms of overall survival (OS), disease specific survival (DSS), and PSA relapse-free survival (PSA-RFS). Results: The mean age was 62.9 (range, 34-83) years. Median follow-up was 4.9 years (range, 2.03-11.7 years). OS and DSS were 85% and 95%, respectively, at 10 years. Twenty-one patients died from prostate cancer (1.6%) and 34 (2.5%) from unrelated causes. Seventy-four (5.7%) developed evidence of clinical failure. Overall PSA-RFS was 79.9% and 72.1% at 10 years (American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology [ASTRO] and Nadir+2 definitions, respectively). Higher presenting PSA or Gleason score and use of neoadjuvant hormones were associated with an increased risk of biochemical failure (p <0.01). Biochemical control was achieved in 86.4%, 76.7%, and 60.6% (ASTRO) and 72.3%, 73.5%, and 57.6% (Nadir+2) of patients in low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups, respectively. Biochemical control was achieved in 88% of patients with D{sub 90} >=140 Gy and in 78% of patients with D{sub 90} <140 Gy (p <0.01). Conclusions: I-125 brachytherapy alone achieved excellent rates of medium-term biochemical control in both low- and selected intermediate-risk localized prostate cancer patients. Postimplant dosimetry improved with experience and longer follow-up, confirming the relationship of D{sub 90} with biochemical control.

  10. [Clinical and dosimetric analysis of 469 prostate cancer patients treated in France in 2005 by permanent implant brachytherapy using the Iodin 125 seeds IsoSeed Bebig: report to the French Economic committee of health products (CEPS)].

    PubMed

    Cosset, J-M; Gomme, S; Peiffert, D; Guerif, S; Labib, A; Hannoun-Lévi, J-M; Martin, P; Quétin, P; Nguyen, T-D; Flam, T; Thiounn, N; Henni, M; Rosenwald, J-C; Housset, M; Pontvert, D; Asselain, B; Chauveinc, L

    2007-06-01

    A French decree of February 3rd 2005, allowed the Iodin 125 seeds from several companies to be reimbursed after a permanent implantation brachytherapy for a prostate cancer. Within this frame, the French "Comité économique des produits de santé" (CEPS; Economic committee for health products) made mandatory the annual writing and publication of a follow-up study with three main aims; make sure that the seeds were used for prostate cancer patients with criterias corresponding to the national recommendations, analyze the quality of the dosimetric data, and report all side effects, complications and possible accidents. We therefore report here a clinical and dosimetric analysis of 469 patient cases treated in France in nine centers in 2005 with the Iodin 125 IsoSeed Bebig. This analysis shows that: 1) The national recommendations for selecting patients for exclusive prostate brachytherapy have been taken into account in 97% of the cases; 2) The dosimetric quality criterias totally fulfilled the recommendations in a large majority of cases; the intra-operative D90 was found to be superior to 145 Gy in 98% of the patients, and the intra-operative V100 was superior to 95% in 96% of the cases; 3) The early toxicity (mainly urinary) was found to be at the lower range of what is reported in the literature, with in particular a retention rate of 2.4%. PMID:17604675

  11. Pulmonary embolization of iodine-125 seeds following prostate implantation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. D. Steinfeld; B. R. Donahue; L. Plaine

    1991-01-01

    The optimal treatment of prostatic carcinoma limited to the gland remains controversial. Treatment has included implantation of Iodine-125 seeds via both a suprapubic approach and, more recently, a transperineal technique utilizing ultrasound guidance. We recently have noted a heretofore unreported complication with this latter technique, namely, embolization of seeds to the lungs. Review of the chest x-ray films of 31

  12. Radioactive iodine-125 implantation for cancer of the prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, S.

    1985-01-01

    Localized cancer of the prostate can be treated by radical prostatectomy, external beam irradiation, or radioactive implantation with similar survival results. Radical prostatectomy, however, almost universally results in impotency, although a new, nerve-sparing procedure may preserve potency in B1 patients. External beam irradiation radiates a large volume of tissue with significant rectal and bladder morbidity, 23-47% risk of impotency, and requires prolonged treatment (6-8 weeks). Radioactive implantation may be done suprapubically or transperineally using iodine-125, gold-198, or radon-222 permanent implantation techniques and iridium-192 or radium-226 removable implantation techniques. Interstitial iodine-125 implantation is frequently employed since it is a short procedure and limits the morbidity to a 7% incidence of impotency, 20% urinary complications, and 5% rectal complications. The overall 5-year survival of patients with iodine-125 is 79%, the survival rate decreasing with increasing T or N stage or increasing grade of tumor.

  13. Analysis of iodine-125 interstitial therapy in the treatment of localized carcinoma of the prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Gomella, L.G.; Steinberg, S.M.; Ellison, M.F.; Reeves, W.W.; Flanigan, R.C.; McRoberts, J.W. (Univ. of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington (USA))

    1991-04-01

    Definitive treatment of localized carcinoma of the prostate has included radical surgery, external beam radiation therapy, and interstitial radiation therapy. The interstitial agent most commonly used is Iodine-125. Forty-eight patients were treated with interstitial radiation therapy using Iodine-125 implants with a median follow-up of 55 months. Forty-three percent of the evaluable patients had progressive disease with approximately 50% progressing at 5 years by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Overall actuarial survival in the group was 80% at 5 years. This and several other studies suggest that control of prostate cancer with Iodine-125 seeds may be suboptimal as compared with other treatment modalities, especially the radical retropubic prostatectomy. Analysis of treatment parameters is presented along with a discussion of the current status and future prospects for treatment of localized carcinoma of the prostate with interstitial radiation therapy.

  14. Correlation Between Pre- and Postimplant Dosimetry for Iodine-125 Seed Implants for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Qaisieh, Bashar [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, St James's Institute of Oncology, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom); Witteveen, Thelma [Department of Oncology, St James's Institute of Oncology, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Bashar@medphysics.leeds.ac.uk; Carey, Brendan [Department of Radiology, St James's Institute of Oncology, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom); Henry, Ann; Bottomley, David [Department of Oncology, St James's Institute of Oncology, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom); Smith, Jonathan; Franks, Kevin [Department of Radiology, St James's Institute of Oncology, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom); Bownes, Peter [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, St James's Institute of Oncology, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom)

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: In order to evaluate implant quality for permanent prostate brachytherapy in patients with localized prostate cancer, American Brachytherapy Society and ESTRO guidelines recommend that postimplant dosimetry should be performed. To understand more about the relationship between pre- and postimplant dosimetry, a comparison was made of patients who received iodine-125 ({sup 125}I) brachytherapy between March 1995 and the end of 2004, using a preplan technique. Methods and Materials: CT postimplant dosimetry was available for 707 patients. Detailed dose volume analysis was performed using both preimplant ultrasound and postimplant CT data sets for a subgroup of 445 patients. The following parameters were compared: prostate volume covered by 100% of the prescription dose (Vp100), Vp150, and Vp200 and dose to 90% (D90) of the prostate. In addition, volume implanted (Vi) parameters were used to compare pre- and postimplant dosimetry. Vi parameters describe dose levels inside the patient, based on number of seeds, seed activity, and their spatial distribution relative to each other, without reference to the actual prostate volume or position. Results: The mean {+-} standard deviation values of preimplant (34.7 {+-} 8.9 cm{sup 3}) and postimplant (36.7 {+-} 9.4 cm{sup 3}) prostate volumes were similar. The mean ({+-}standard deviation) planned D90 was 183.4 ({+-}12.1) Gy while the D90 that was achieved was 145.5 ({+-}20.4) Gy. Over the study period, there was a steady increase of the average D90. Postimplant CT D90 and Vp100 values correlated significantly (R = 0.84; p < 0.001). The Vi and Vp parameters all showed a strong correlation. Conclusions: In this study, we showed that there is a strong correlation between transrectal ultrasound-based preimplant and CT-based postimplant dosimetry. The excellent correlation between prostate D90 and V100 values demonstrates they are both equally valid quality indices. Vi parameters are an additional measure that can be used to assess the quality of the implant.

  15. Prostate brachytherapy

    MedlinePLUS

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer; Radioactive seed placement; Internal radiation therapy - prostate ... Brachytherapy takes 30 minutes or more, depending on the type of therapy you have. Before the procedure, ...

  16. Permanent iodine 125 brachytherapy in patients with progressive or recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Larson, David A.; Suplica, Jeffrey M.; Chang, Susan M.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; McDermott, Michael W.; Sneed, Penny K.; Prados, Michael D.; Wara, William M.; Nicholas, M. Kelly; Berger, Mitchel S.

    2004-01-01

    This study reports the initial experience at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) with tumor resection and permanent, low-activity iodine 125 (125I) brachytherapy in patients with progressive or recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GM) and compares these results to those of similar patients treated previously at UCSF with temporary brachytherapy without tumor resection. Thirty-eight patients with progressive or recurrent GM were treated at UCSF with repeat craniotomy, tumor resection, and permanent, low-activity 125I brachytherapy between June 1997 and May 1998. Selection criteria were Karnofsky performance score ?60, unifocal, contrast-enhancing, well-circumscribed progressive or recurrent GM that was judged to be completely resectable, and no evidence of leptomeningeal or subependymal spread. The median brachytherapy dose 5 mm exterior to the resection cavity was 300 Gy (range, 150–500 Gy). One patient was excluded from analysis. Median survival was 52 weeks from the date of brachytherapy. Age, Karnofsky performance score, and preimplant tumor volume were all statistically significant on univariate analyses. Multivariate analysis for survival showed only age to be significant. Median time to progression was 16 weeks. Both univariate and multivariate analysis of freedom from progression showed only preoperative tumor volume to be significant. Comparison to temporary brachytherapy patients showed no apparent difference in survival time. Chronic steroid requirements were low in patients with minimal postoperative residual tumor. We conclude that permanent 125I brachytherapy for recurrent or progressive GM is well tolerated. Survival time was comparable to that of a similar group of patients treated with temporary brachytherapy. PMID:15134626

  17. Prostate biopsy after definitive treatment by interstitial iodine 125 implant or external beam radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schellhammer, P.F.; el-Mahdi, A.M.; Higgins, E.M.; Schultheiss, T.E.; Ladaga, L.E.; Babb, T.J.

    1987-05-01

    The response to definitive radiation therapy of localized carcinoma of the prostate by iodine 125 implantation or external beam radiotherapy was monitored by examining specimens from biopsies performed after treatment. We analyzed 126 biopsy specimens obtained 18 months or more after treatment: 71 were obtained from 109 patients treated by iodine 125 and 55 from 197 patients treated by external beam radiotherapy. Thereafter, the disease status of these patients was examined at minimum 3-year intervals. No significant statistical difference was found between the negative specimen rates of the 2 treatment modalities: 46 of 71 (65 per cent) after iodine 125 implantation and 39 of 55 (71 per cent) after external beam radiotherapy were negative. To analyze the predictive value of biopsy results 103 patients whose prostatic examination results were normal at biopsy or who showed regression of tumor size and tumor induration after radiation were evaluated. The biopsy results from all patients were combined for analysis. Of 77 patients with negative biopsy specimens 16 (21 per cent) have had recurrent disease, compared to 17 of 26 (65 per cent) with positive biopsy specimens (p equals 0.00005). Of the 77 patients with negative biopsy specimens 7 (9 per cent) had local disease recurrence, compared to 12 of 26 (46 per cent) with a positive biopsy specimen (p equals 0.0001). The value of a positive specimen to predict failure remained significant with patients stratified by pre-treatment clinical stage and grade of the disease. Our results show that patients with positive specimens from the prostate who had been judged clinically by rectal examination to have responded to radiation therapy had a significantly increased incidence of local and distant failure compared to patients who had negative biopsy specimens.

  18. [Brachytherapy of local prostatic carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Deger, S; Böhmer, D; Roigas, J; Türk, I; Budach, V; Loening, S A

    2001-05-01

    Brachytherapy of prostate cancer has become attractive in recent years in Germany. There are several radioactive sources available, which are physically different. Some of them are used as permanent or temporary implants. The permanent sources most frequently used are iodine 125, palladium 103, and gold 198. Iridium is a temporary implant. The techniques used in Germany are low-dose rate (LDR) and high-dose rate brachytherapy, which differ in dose distribution and patient population. The success of prostate cancer brachytherapy depends on patient selection and choosing the right source for the technique used. Best suited for LDR monotherapy is the low-risk patient with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level below 10 ng/ml, maximal tumor stage T2b, and a Gleason score of less than 7. PMID:11405125

  19. Cryosurgery in combination with brachytherapy of iodine-125 seeds for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kecheng; Mu, Feng; Hu, Yize

    2013-01-01

    A major limit of cryoablation is incomplete destruction of cells in the border zone of the cryogenic lesion in which the tissue temperature is warmer than –20 °C. The use of iodine-125 seed implantation is likely to be complementary to cryosurgery for treatment of pancreatic cancer. The procedure of cryosurgery and iodine-125 seed implantation is performed with percutaneous approaches under guidance of ultrasound and/or CT. The number of iodine-125 seeds implanted for every patient was 34 in median. Forty-nine patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer received cryosurgery with combination of iodine-125 seed implantation. During a median follow-up of 18 months, the median of over all survival was 16.2 months. The 6-, 12-, 24- and 36-month overall survival rates were 94.9%, 63.1%, 22.8% and 9.5%, respectively. Compared with patients with cryosurgery alone, combination treatment shows higher the 6- and 12-month survival rates and longer the median survival. PMID:25083464

  20. The effects of intraocular silicone oil placement prior to iodine 125 brachytherapy for uveal melanoma: a clinical case series

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Y; Kapoor, K G; Thomson, R M; Furutani, K M; Shultz, R W; Stafford, S L; Dev, S; Abu-Yaghi, N E; Reynolds, D; Pulido, J S

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the role of silicone oil as an adjunct to iodine 125 (125I) brachytherapy in attenuating radiation dose and reducing radiation retinopathy. Methods A 16-mm COMS plaque loaded with 125I seeds was simulated in vitro on an eye model containing silicone oil as a vitreous substitute using BrachyDose. The radiation dose ratio of silicone oil vs water to ocular structures was calculated at angles subtended from the centre of the eye. Silicone oil was then used in three choroidal melanoma patients who underwent 23-gauge vitrectomy, silicone oil placement, and 125I brachytherapy. Results Silicone oil reduced the ocular radiation dose in vitro to 65%. Radiation dose ratios on the retina increased from 0.45 to 0.99 when moving from points diametrically opposed to the plaque's central axis. In 10–24 months' follow-up, no patients have developed radiation retinopathy. Each patient required silicone oil removal and experienced cataract progression, and one also developed a retinal detachment. Conclusions This study confirms that silicone oil attenuates radiation dose in vitro, and may protect against radiation retinopathy clinically in patients, however it requires extensive surgical interventions. Further studies in only very selected populations using silicone oil as an adjunct to 125I brachytherapy will best elucidate its role in shielding radiation retinopathy. PMID:22935669

  1. Prostate brachytherapy - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer - discharge; Radioactive seed placement - discharge ... You had a procedure called brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer. Your treatment lasted 30 minutes or more, ...

  2. In Vivo Dosimetry With a Linear MOSFET Array to Evaluate the Urethra Dose During Permanent Implant Brachytherapy Using Iodine-125

    SciTech Connect

    Bloemen-van Gurp, Esther J., E-mail: esther.bloemen@maastro.n [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW, University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands); Haanstra, Bjoerk K.C.; Murrer, Lars H.P.; Gils, Francis C.J.M. van; Dekker, Andre L.A.J.; Mijnheer, Ben J.; Lambin, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW, University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a technique to monitor the dose rate in the urethra during permanent implant brachytherapy using a linear MOSFET array, with sufficient accuracy and without significantly extending the implantation time. Methods and Materials: Phantom measurements were performed to determine the optimal conditions for clinical measurements. In vivo measurements were performed in 5 patients during the {sup 125}I brachytherapy implant procedure. To evaluate if the urethra dose obtained in the operating room with the ultrasound transducer in the rectum and the patient in treatment position is a reference for the total accumulated dose; additional measurements were performed after the implantation procedure, in the recovery room. Results: In vivo measurements during and after the implantation procedure agree very well, illustrating that the ultrasound transducer in the rectum and patient positioning do not influence the measured dose in the urethra. In vivo dose values obtained during the implantation are therefore representative for the total accumulated dose in the urethra. In 5 patients, the dose rates during and after the implantation were below the maximum dose rate of the urethra, using the planned seed distribution. Conclusion: In vivo dosimetry during the implantation, using a MOSFET array, is a feasible technique to evaluate the dose in the urethra during the implantation of {sup 125}I seeds for prostate brachytherapy.

  3. Long-Term Results of Brachytherapy With Temporary Iodine-125 Seeds in Children With Low-Grade Gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Korinthenberg, Rudolf, E-mail: rudolf.korinthenberg@uniklinik-freiburg.d [Division of Neuropaediatrics and Muscular Disorders, Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, University Hospital, Albert-Ludwigs University, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Neuburger, Daniela [Division of Neuropaediatrics and Muscular Disorders, Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, University Hospital, Albert-Ludwigs University, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Trippel, Michael; Ostertag, Christoph; Nikkhah, Guido [Department of Stereotactic Neurosurgery, Neurocentre, University Hospital, Albert-Ludwigs University, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively review the results of temporary I-125 brachytherapy in 94 children and adolescents with low-grade glioma. Methods and Materials: Treatment was performed in progressive tumors roughly spherical in shape with a diameter of up to 5 cm, including 79 astrocytomas, 5 oligodendrogliomas, 4 oligoastrocytomas, 1 ependymoma, and 5 other tumors. Location was suprasellar/chiasmal in 44, thalamic/basal ganglia in 18, hemispheric in 15, midbrain/pineal region in 13, and lower brainstem in 3. Initially, 8% of patients were free of symptoms, 47% were symptomatic but not disabled, and 30% were slightly, 6% moderately, and 3% severely disabled. Results: 5- and 10-year survival was 97% and 92%. The response to I-125 brachytherapy over the long term was estimated after a median observation period of 38.4 (range, 6.4-171.0) months. At that time, 4 patients were in complete, 27 in partial, and 18 in objective remission; 15 showed stable and 30 progressive tumors. Treatment results did not correlate with age, sex, histology, tumor size, location, or demarcation of the tumor. Secondary treatment became necessary in 36 patients, including 19 who underwent repeated I-125 brachytherapy. At final follow-up, the number of symptom-free patients had risen to 21%. Thirty-eight percent showed symptoms without functional impairment, 19% were slightly and 11% moderately disabled, and only 4% were severely disabled. Conclusions: Response rates similar to those of conventional radiotherapy or chemotherapy can be anticipated with I-125 brachytherapy in tumors of the appropriate size and shape. We believe it to be a useful contribution to the treatment of low-grade gliomas in children.

  4. Dosimetric characterization of a newly designed encapsulated interstitial brachytherapy source of iodine-125—model LS1 BrachyseedTM

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ravinder Nath; Ning Yue

    2001-01-01

    A newly designed encapsulated 125I source has been introduced (Model LS-1 BrachySeedTM manufactured by DRAXIMAGE Inc.) for interstitial brachytherapy . In this source 125I radionuclide is contained in two ceramic beads positioned at each end of a titanium capsule. The source contains a rod of Pt–Ir, which serves as a radiographic marker for source localization in the patient. Principle photon

  5. An analysis of brachytherapy with computed tomography-guided permanent implantation of Iodine-125 seeds for recurrent nonkeratin nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xinying; Li, Yong; Zhang, Yanfang; Kong, Jian; Li, Yanhao

    2015-01-01

    Background 125I seed implantation is a new method in treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), and it is worthwhile to evaluate its feasibility. In this study, we performed brachytherapy with computed tomography (CT)-guided permanent implantation of 125I seeds in the treatment of patients with the recurrence of NPC. Methods A total 30 patients (20 male and ten female) at the median age of 55 (range 25–80) years were diagnosed with recurrent nonkeratin NPC, with a total 38 lesions and a short disease-free interval (mediañ11 months) after primary radiotherapy alone or combined with chemotherapy. Patients received CT scan, starting from 2 months after the treatment. Follow-up was conducted for ~2–38 months to observe the local control rate and overall survival rate. We also analyzed the possible correlation between survival periods and the status of recurrent tumors. Results The local control rates at 6, 12, 24, 30, and 36 months after the procedure of 125I seed implantation were 86.8%, 73.7%, 26.3%, 15.8%, and 5.3%, respectively. The overall 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates were 80.0% (24/30), 30.0% (9/30), and 6.7% (2/30), respectively, with a median survival period of 18 months (17.6±8.6 months). Interestingly, the survival periods of the patients who had primary radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy were 15.8±7.9 and 24.3±7.9 months, respectively. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis demonstrated that ?2 (log rank) was 7.555, with very significant difference (P<0.01). The survival periods of patients in tumor stages I, II, III, and IV were 25.4±8.7, 19.8±9.4, 16.1±4.5, and 12.8±7.8 months, respectively, with significant differences (P<0.05). Conclusion Our data suggest that the survival period of recurrent NPC patients after 125I seed implantation is inversely related to the tumor stages of the recurrence but not to chemotherapy after the primary radiotherapy. Therefore, CT-guided 125I seed implantation can be set for treatment of recurrent NPC, for better survival rate with minimal damage. PMID:25999732

  6. Bioassay for iodine-125

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.Y.; Chu, R.Y.L. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City (USA) Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Oklahoma City, OK (USA))

    1990-06-01

    The use of the volatile form of iodine-125 ({sup 125}I) in clinics and laboratories often imposes the responsibility of bioassay on nuclear medicine personnel. The authors reviewed several methods with respect to regulations and guidelines. Urinalysis is sufficiently sensitive when performed within two days of accidental ingestion; however, an action level cannot be set unambiguously. In vivo measurement is preferred. Discussion of this method was illustrated by the calibration of their detector system.

  7. Exposure of Treating Physician to Radiation during Pro-state Brachytherapy using Iodine-125 Seeds

    E-print Network

    Krusche, Bernd

    für Radioonkologie, Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Schweiz 2 Klinik für Urologie, Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Schweiz 3 Uroviva Klinik für Urologie, Bülach und Zürich, Schweiz 4 Institut für Physik, Universität Basel, Schweiz 5 Universitätsspital Basel, Schweiz Background and purpose: Only sparse reports have been made

  8. Sexual function after permanent prostate brachytherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. W. Galbreath; G. S. Merrick; W. M. Butler; R. L. Stipetich; L. J. Abel; J. H. Lief

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of potency preservation following permanent prostate brachytherapy and to evaluate the effect of multiple clinical and treatment parameters on penile erectile function.Materials and Methods: 425 patients underwent permanent prostate brachytherapy from April 1995 to October 1999. 209 patients who were potent prior to brachytherapy and currently not receiving hormonal manipulation were mailed an International Index

  9. SU-E-T-55: Biological Equivalent Dose (BED) Comparison Between Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy and Conventional External Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X; Rahimian, J; Cosmatos, H; Goy, B; Heywood, C; Qian, Y [Kaiser Permanente, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The goal of this research is to calculate and compare the Biological Equivalent Dose (BED) between permanent prostate Iodine-125 implant brachytherapy as monotherapy with the BED of conventional external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods: A retrospective study of 605 patients treated with Iodine-125 seed implant was performed in which physician A treated 274 patients and physician B treated 331 patients. All the Brachytherapy treatment plans were created using VariSeed 8 planning system. The Iodine-125 seed source activities and loading patterns varied slightly between the two physicians. The prescription dose is 145 Gy to PTV for each patient. The BED and Tumor Control Probability (TCP) were calculated based on the TG 137 formulas. The BED for conventional EBRT of the prostate given in our institution in 2Gy per fraction for 38 fractions was calculated and compared. Results: Physician A treated 274 patients with an average BED of 123.92±0.87 Gy and an average TCP of 99.20%; Physician B treated 331 patients with an average BED of 124.87±1.12 Gy and an average TCP of 99.30%. There are no statistically significant differences (T-Test) between the BED and TCP values calculated for these two group patients.The BED of the patients undergoing conventional EBRT is calculated to be 126.92Gy. The BED of the patients treated with permanent implant brachytherapy and EBRT are comparable. Our BED and TCP values are higher than the reported values by TG 137 due to higher Iodine-125 seed activity used in our institution. Conclusion: We calculated the BED,a surrogate of the biological response to a permanent prostate brachytherapy using TG 137 formulas and recommendation. The TCP of better than 99% is calculated for these patients. A clinical outcome study of these patients correlating the BED and TCP values with PSA and Gleason Levels as well as patient survival is warranted.

  10. Pretreatment Nomogram to Predict the Risk of Acute Urinary Retention After I-125 Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Roeloffzen, Ellen M., E-mail: e.m.a.roeloffzen@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Vulpen, Marco van; Battermann, Jan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Roermund, Joep G. van [Department of Urology, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Saibishkumar, Elantholi P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Monninkhof, Evelyn M. [Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Acute urinary retention (AUR) after iodine-125 (I-125) prostate brachytherapy negatively influences long-term quality of life and therefore should be prevented. We aimed to develop a nomogram to preoperatively predict the risk of AUR. Methods: Using the preoperative data of 714 consecutive patients who underwent I-125 prostate brachytherapy between 2005 and 2008 at our department, we modeled the probability of AUR. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to assess the predictive ability of a set of pretreatment predictors and the additional value of a new risk factor (the extent of prostate protrusion into the bladder). The performance of the final model was assessed with calibration and discrimination measures. Results: Of the 714 patients, 57 patients (8.0%) developed AUR after implantation. Multivariate analysis showed that the combination of prostate volume, IPSS score, neoadjuvant hormonal treatment and the extent of prostate protrusion contribute to the prediction of AUR. The discriminative value (receiver operator characteristic area, ROC) of the basic model (including prostate volume, International Prostate Symptom Score, and neoadjuvant hormonal treatment) to predict the development of AUR was 0.70. The addition of prostate protrusion significantly increased the discriminative power of the model (ROC 0.82). Calibration of this final model was good. The nomogram showed that among patients with a low sum score (<18 points), the risk of AUR was only 0%-5%. However, in patients with a high sum score (>35 points), the risk of AUR was more than 20%. Conclusion: This nomogram is a useful tool for physicians to predict the risk of AUR after I-125 prostate brachytherapy. The nomogram can aid in individualized treatment decision-making and patient counseling.

  11. Evaluation of the dosimetric parameters for 125I brachytherapy determined in prostate medium using CT images.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Takashi; Yorozu, Atsunori; Ohashi, Toshio; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Maruyama, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, the prostate medium determined from the CT images of 149 patients was developed. The dosimetric parameters such as ?, g(L)(r) and F(r, ?) used in TG-43U1-based calculation for an iodine-125 ((125)I) brachytherapy-source were examined using Monte Carlo code Geant4. Clinical dosimetry parameters such as the D(90) were evaluated among a subgroup of 50 randomly selected patients who had been treated with permanent brachytherapy between January 2008 and December 2008 at the Tokyo Medical Center. The results show a slight difference in the dose rate constant ? (within 1.0%). The radial dose function g(L)(r) exhibits a prominent difference in the region over 3 cm, and this difference is maintained within 2.9% in the region close to the source. The calculated values of F(r, ?) for the prostate medium were similar to values for water (within 1%), except in the longitudinal axis. A comparison of D(90) values shows a systematic dose overestimation of 2.8 ± 0.7 Gy in water, where the distribution of the differences can be seen with a spread of 1.8 ± 0.3% compared to that in prostate medium. It was concluded that the introduction of any kind of tissue correction for the TG-43U1-based calculation was not necessary to allow for the differences in elemental compositions and densities between water and prostate medium. PACS number: 87.00.00; 87.55.dk; 87.55.K-; 87.56.B-. PMID:20921822

  12. Myths and fallacies in permanent prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Wayne M.; Merrick, Gregory S

    2003-09-30

    Because there are competing modalities to treat early-stage prostate cancer, the constraints or deficiencies of one modality may be erroneously applied to others. Some valid concerns arising from surgery and external beam therapy, which have been falsely transferred to brachytherapy, are constraints based on patient age, clinical and pathological parameters, patient weight, and size of prostate. Although the constraints have a valid basis in one modality, knowledge of the origin and mechanism of the constraint has provided a means to circumvent or overcome it in brachytherapy. Failures as measured by biochemical no-evidence of disease (bNED) survival may be attributed to extracapsular disease extension. Such extension often expresses itself in surrogate parameters such as a high percentage of positive biopsies, perineural invasion, or the dominant pattern in Gleason score histology. Failures due to such factors may be prevented by implanting with consistent extracapsular dosimetric margins. Some presumed limitations on prostate brachytherapy originated from data on patients implanted in the first few years the procedure was being developed. Most of the urinary morbidity and a significant part of the decrease in sexual function observed may be avoided by controlling the dosimetry along the prostatic and membranous urethra and at the penile bulb.

  13. Combined brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy without adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy for high-risk prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To report the outcomes of patients treated with combined iodine-125 (I-125) brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for high-risk prostate cancer. Methods Between 2003 and 2009, I-125 permanent prostate brachytherapy plus EBRT was performed for 206 patients with high-risk prostate cancer. High-risk patients had prostate-specific antigen???20 ng/mL, and/or Gleason score???8, and/or Stage???T3. One hundred and one patients (49.0%) received neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) but none were given adjuvant ADT. Biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS) was determined using the Phoenix definition. Results The 5-year actuarial BFFS rate was 84.8%. The 5-year cause-specific survival and overall survival rates were 98.7% and 97.6%, respectively. There were 8 deaths (3.9%), of which 2 were due to prostate cancer. On multivariate analysis, positive biopsy core rates and the number of high-risk factors were independent predictors of BFFS. The 5-year BFFS rates for patients in the positive biopsy core rate <50% and ?50% groups were 89.3% and 78.2%, respectively (p = 0.03). The 5-year BFFS rate for patients with the any single high-risk factor was 86.1%, compared with 73.6% for those with any 2 or all 3 high-risk factors (p = 0.03). Neoadjuvant ADT did not impact the 5-year BFFS. Conclusions At a median follow-up of 60 months, high-risk prostate cancer patients undergoing combined I-125 brachytherapy and EBRT without adjuvant ADT have a high probability of achieving 5-year BFFS. PMID:24401540

  14. Importance of implant dosimetry for patients undergoing prostate brachytherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Louis Potters; David Huang; Emel Calugaru; Paul Fearn; Lucille Lee; Michael W. Kattan

    2003-01-01

    ObjectivesTo evaluate the disease and treatment-related factors for predicting biochemical freedom from recurrence (BFR) in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer undergoing permanent prostate brachytherapy.

  15. Isotope selection for patients undergoing prostate brachytherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christine M Cha; Louis Potters; Richard Ashley; Katherine Freeman; Xiao-Hong Wang; Robert Waldbaum; Steven Leibel

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Ultrasound-guided transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy (TIPPB) is generally performed with either 103Pd or 125I. The use of 125I for low Gleason score tumors and 103Pd for higher Gleason scores has been suggested based on isotope dose rate and cell doubling time observed in in vitro studies. While many centers follow these isotope selection criteria, other centers have elected

  16. Examination of dosimetry accuracy as a function of seed detection rate in permanent prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Su Yi; Davis, Brian J.; Herman, Michael G.; Manduca, Armando; Robb, Richard A. [Biomedical Imaging Resource, Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Biomathematics Resource, Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Biomedical Imaging Resource, Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2005-09-15

    The variation of permanent prostate brachytherapy dosimetry as a function of seed detection rates was investigated for I125 implants with seed activities commonly employed in contemporary practice. Post-implant imaging and radiation dosimetry data from nine patients who underwent PPB served as the basis of this simulation study. One-thousand random configurations of detected seeds were generated for each patient dataset using various seed detection levels from 30% to 99%. Dose parameters, including D90, were computed for each configuration and compared with the actual dosimetry data. A total of 108 000 complete sets of post-PPB dose volume statistics were computed. The results demonstrated that although the average D90 differed from the true value by less than 5% when 70% or more seeds were identified, the D90 of an individual case could deviate up to 13%. The 95% confidence interval (CI) of estimated D90 values differ by less than 5% from the actual value when 95% or more seeds are detected, or approximately a 7 Gy difference in the D90 value for a prescription dose of 144 Gy. Estimated target volume dose parameters tended to decrease with reduced seed detection rates. The most variable dose parameter was the prostate V100 in absolute scale while the urethral V100 was most variable in a relative sense. Based on this comprehensive simulation study, it is suggested that 95% or more seeds need to be localized in order to provide an accurate estimation of dose parameters for contemporary iodine 125 permanent prostate brachytherapy.

  17. Salvage low-dose-rate 125I partial prostate brachytherapy after dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report outcomes on 5 patients treated with salvage partial low-dose-rate (LDR) 125-iodine (125I) permanent prostate seed brachytherapy (BT) for biopsy-proven locally persistent prostate cancer, following failure of dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Material and methods A retrospective review of the Fox Chase Cancer Center prostate cancer database identified five patients treated with salvage partial LDR 125I seed implant for locally persistent disease following dose-escalated EBRT to 76-84 Gy in 2 Gy per fraction equivalent. All patients had post-EBRT biopsies confirming unilateral locally persistent prostate cancer. Pre-treatment, EBRT and BT details, as well as post-treatment characteristics were documented and assessed. Results The median follow-up post-implant was 41 months. All five patients exhibited low acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities. Increased erectile dysfunction was noted in three patients. There were no biochemical failures following salvage LDR 125I seed BT to date, with a median post-salvage PSA of 0.4 ng/mL. Conclusions In carefully selected patients with local persistence of disease, partial LDR 125I permanent prostate seed implant appears to be a feasible option for salvage local therapy with an acceptable toxicity profile. Further study is needed to determine long-term results of this approach. PMID:25337135

  18. Automated intraoperative calibration for prostate cancer brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiran Chen, Thomas; Heffter, Tamas; Lasso, Andras; Pinter, Csaba; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Burdette, E. Clif; Fichtinger, Gabor [Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Acoustic MedSystems, Inc., Champaign, Illinois 61820-3979 (United States); Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada) and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218-2682 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Prostate cancer brachytherapy relies on an accurate spatial registration between the implant needles and the TRUS image, called ''calibration''. The authors propose a new device and a fast, automatic method to calibrate the brachytherapy system in the operating room, with instant error feedback. Methods: A device was CAD-designed and precision-engineered, which mechanically couples a calibration phantom with an exact replica of the standard brachytherapy template. From real-time TRUS images acquired from the calibration device and processed by the calibration system, the coordinate transformation between the brachytherapy template and the TRUS images was computed automatically. The system instantly generated a report of the target reconstruction accuracy based on the current calibration outcome. Results: Four types of validation tests were conducted. First, 50 independent, real-time calibration trials yielded an average of 0.57 {+-} 0.13 mm line reconstruction error (LRE) relative to ground truth. Second, the averaged LRE was 0.37 {+-} 0.25 mm relative to ground truth in tests with six different commercial TRUS scanners operating at similar imaging settings. Furthermore, testing with five different commercial stepper systems yielded an average of 0.29 {+-} 0.16 mm LRE relative to ground truth. Finally, the system achieved an average of 0.56 {+-} 0.27 mm target registration error (TRE) relative to ground truth in needle insertion tests through the template in a water tank. Conclusions: The proposed automatic, intraoperative calibration system for prostate cancer brachytherapy has achieved high accuracy, precision, and robustness.

  19. Erectile Function Durability Following Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Al V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Merrick, Gregory S., E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.or [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Puget Sound Healthcare Corporation, Group Health Cooperative, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Kurko, Brian S.; Anderson, Richard; Lief, Jonathan H. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States)

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term changes in erectile function following prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: This study included 226 patients with prostate cancer and preimplant erectile function assessed by the International Index of Erectile Function-6 (IIEF-6) who underwent brachytherapy in two prospective randomized trials between February 2001 and January 2003. Median follow-up was 6.4 years. Pre- and postbrachytherapy potency was defined as IIEF-6 >= 13 without pharmacologic or mechanical support. The relationship among clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters and erectile function was examined. Results: The 7-year actuarial rate of potency preservation was 55.6% with median postimplant IIEF of 22 in potent patients. Potent patients were statistically younger (p = 0.014), had a higher preimplant IIEF (p < 0.001), were less likely to be diabetic (p = 0.002), and were more likely to report nocturnal erections (p = 0.008). Potency preservation in men with baseline IIEF scores of 29-30, 24-28, 18-23, and 13-17 were 75.5% vs. 73.6%, 51.7% vs. 44.8%, 48.0% vs. 40.0%, and 23.5% vs. 23.5% in 2004 vs. 2008. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, preimplant IIEF, hypertension, diabetes, prostate size, and brachytherapy dose to proximal penis strongly predicted for potency preservation. Impact of proximal penile dose was most pronounced for men with IIEF of 18-23 and aged 60-69. A significant minority of men who developed postimplant impotence ultimately regained erectile function. Conclusion: Potency preservation and median IIEF scores following brachytherapy are durable. Thoughtful dose sparing of proximal penile structures and early penile rehabilitation may further improve these results.

  20. A Novel MRI Marker for Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: sjfrank@mdanderson.org; Stafford, R. Jason; Bankson, James A. [Department of Imaging Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Li Chun [Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Swanson, David A. [Department of Urology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Kudchadker, Rajat J. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Martirosyan, Karen S. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the optimal imaging modality for the prostate and surrounding critical organ structures. However, on MRI, the titanium radioactive seeds used for brachytherapy appear as black holes (negative contrast) and cannot be accurately localized. We sought to develop an encapsulated contrast agent marker (ECAM) with high-signal intensity on MRI to permit accurate localization of radioactive seeds with MRI during and after prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: We investigated several agents with paramagnetic and superparamagnetic properties. The agents were injected into titanium, acrylic, and glass seeds, which were linked together in various combinations and imaged with MRI. The agent with the greatest T1-weighted signal was tested further in a canine prostate and agarose phantom. Studies were performed on a 1.5-T clinical MRI scanner. Results: The cobalt-chloride complex contrast (C4) agent with stoichiometry (CoCl{sub 2}){sub 0.8}(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}NO{sub 2}){sub 0.2} had the greatest T1-weighted signal (positive contrast) with a relaxivity ratio >1 (r{sub 2}/r{sub 1} = 1.21 {+-} 0.29). Acrylic-titanium and glass-titanium seed strands were clearly visualized with the encapsulated contrast agent marker. Conclusion: We have developed a novel ECAM that permits positive identification of the radioactive seeds used for prostate brachytherapy on MRI. Preclinical in vitro phantom studies and in vivo canine studies are needed to further optimize MRI sequencing techniques to facilitate MRI-based dosimetry.

  1. Fast dose kernel interpolation using Fourier transform with application to permanent prostate brachytherapy dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Derek, E-mail: dmliu@ualberta.ca; Sloboda, Ron S. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2, Canada and Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada)] [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2, Canada and Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Boyer and Mok proposed a fast calculation method employing the Fourier transform (FT), for which calculation time is independent of the number of seeds but seed placement is restricted to calculation grid points. Here an interpolation method is described enabling unrestricted seed placement while preserving the computational efficiency of the original method. Methods: The Iodine-125 seed dose kernel was sampled and selected values were modified to optimize interpolation accuracy for clinically relevant doses. For each seed, the kernel was shifted to the nearest grid point via convolution with a unit impulse, implemented in the Fourier domain. The remaining fractional shift was performed using a piecewise third-order Lagrange filter. Results: Implementation of the interpolation method greatly improved FT-based dose calculation accuracy. The dose distribution was accurate to within 2% beyond 3 mm from each seed. Isodose contours were indistinguishable from explicit TG-43 calculation. Dose-volume metric errors were negligible. Computation time for the FT interpolation method was essentially the same as Boyer's method. Conclusions: A FT interpolation method for permanent prostate brachytherapy TG-43 dose calculation was developed which expands upon Boyer's original method and enables unrestricted seed placement. The proposed method substantially improves the clinically relevant dose accuracy with negligible additional computation cost, preserving the efficiency of the original method.

  2. Interpreting a rising prostate-specific antigen after brachytherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Gaztañaga, Miren; Crook, Juanita

    2013-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to review the English language literature on the topic of prostate-specific antigen bounce after brachytherapy and present a summary of the current knowledge. Although ultimately prostate-specific antigen is a reliable measure of success after prostate brachytherapy, it can be very misleading in the first 3 years because of the frequency with which temporary benign rises in prostate-specific antigen occur. We have reviewed the English language literature on the topic of prostate-specific antigen bounce under the following headings: prostate neoplasms, brachytherapy, biochemical definition of prostate-specific antigen failure, "benign prostate-specific antigen bounce" and "prostate-specific antigen spike". We included brachytherapy delivered as either low dose rate or high dose rate, and either as monotherapy or as a boost combined with external beam radiotherapy. A benign self-limited rise in prostate-specific antigen after prostate brachytherapy is seen in an average of 35% of patients, but increases in frequency with younger age. In patients aged less than 55 years, it is observed in up to 68%. Other factors, such as sexual activity, dose, prostate volume and the use of high dose rate versus low dose rate have been implicated in affecting the frequency of the benign bounce. Benign increases in prostate-specific antigen are frequent after prostate brachytherapy. It is important to recognize and correctly diagnose this phenomenon in order to avoid unnecessary salvage treatment. PMID:22905916

  3. A Dynamic Dosimetry System for Prostate Brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Nathanael; Dehghan, Ehsan; Deguet, Anton; Song, Danny Y; Prince, Jerry L; Lee, Junghoon

    2013-03-01

    The lack of dynamic dosimetry tools for permanent prostate brachytherapy causes otherwise avoidable problems in prostate cancer patient care. The goal of this work is to satisfy this need in a readily adoptable manner. Using the ubiquitous ultrasound scanner and mobile non-isocentric C-arm, we show that dynamic dosimetry is now possible with only the addition of an arbitrarily configured marker-based fiducial. Not only is the system easily configured from accessible hardware, but it is also simple and convenient, requiring little training from technicians. Furthermore, the proposed system is built upon robust algorithms of seed segmentation, fiducial detection, seed reconstruction, and image registration. All individual steps of the pipeline have been thoroughly tested, and the system as a whole has been validated on a study of 25 patients. The system has shown excellent results of accurately computing dose, and does so with minimal manual intervention, therefore showing promise for widespread adoption of dynamic dosimetry. PMID:24392207

  4. A Dynamic Dosimetry System for Prostate Brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Nathanael; Dehghan, Ehsan; Deguet, Anton; Song, Danny Y.; Prince, Jerry L.; Lee, Junghoon

    2013-01-01

    The lack of dynamic dosimetry tools for permanent prostate brachytherapy causes otherwise avoidable problems in prostate cancer patient care. The goal of this work is to satisfy this need in a readily adoptable manner. Using the ubiquitous ultrasound scanner and mobile non-isocentric C-arm, we show that dynamic dosimetry is now possible with only the addition of an arbitrarily configured marker-based fiducial. Not only is the system easily configured from accessible hardware, but it is also simple and convenient, requiring little training from technicians. Furthermore, the proposed system is built upon robust algorithms of seed segmentation, fiducial detection, seed reconstruction, and image registration. All individual steps of the pipeline have been thoroughly tested, and the system as a whole has been validated on a study of 25 patients. The system has shown excellent results of accurately computing dose, and does so with minimal manual intervention, therefore showing promise for widespread adoption of dynamic dosimetry. PMID:24392207

  5. Predictors of Metastatic Disease After Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, Kevin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Burri, Ryan [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY (United States); Stone, Nelson [Department of Urology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Stock, Richard G., E-mail: richard.stock@moutsinai.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To identify predictors of metastatic disease after brachytherapy treatment for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: All patients who received either brachytherapy alone (implant) or brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiation therapy for treatment of localized prostate cancer at The Mount Sinai Hospital between June 1990 and March 2007 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed on the following variables: risk group, Gleason score (GS), clinical T stage, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level, post-treatment prostate-specific antigen doubling time (PSA-DT), treatment type (implant vs. implant plus external beam radiation therapy), treatment era, total biological effective dose, use of androgen deprivation therapy, age at diagnosis, and race. PSA-DT was analyzed in the following ordinate groups: 0 to 90 days, 91 to 180 days, 180 to 360 days, and greater than 360 days. Results: We included 1,887 patients in this study. Metastases developed in 47 of these patients. The 10-year freedom from distant metastasis (FFDM) rate for the entire population was 95.1%. Median follow-up was 6 years (range, 2-15 years). The only two significant predictors of metastatic disease by multivariable analyses were GS and PSA-DT (p < 0.001 for both variables). Estimated 10-year FFDM rates for GS of 6 or less, GS of 7, and GS of 8 or greater were 97.9%, 94.3%, and 76.1%, respectively (p < 0.001). Estimated FFDM rates for PSA-DT of 0 to 90 days, 91 to 180 days, 181 to 360 days, and greater than 360 days were 17.5%, 67.9%, 74%, and 94.8%, respectively (p < 0.001). Estimated 10-year FFDM rates for the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups were 98.6%, 96.2%, and 86.7%, respectively. A demographic shift to patients presenting with higher-grade disease in more recent years was observed. Conclusions: GS and post-treatment PSA-DT are both statistically significant independent predictors of metastatic disease. Patients with a high GS and/or short PSA-DT have a higher likelihood of developing metastatic disease and should be considered for systemic therapy.

  6. MCNP modeling of prostate brachytherapy and organ dosimetry

    E-print Network

    Usgaonker, Susrut Rajanikant

    2004-09-30

    MCNP MODELING OF PROSTATE BRACHYTHERAPY AND ORGAN DOSIMETRY A Thesis by SUSRUT RAJANIKANT USGAONKER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2003 Major Subject: Health Physics MCNP MODELING OF PROSTATE BRACHYTHERAPY AND ORGAN DOSIMETRY A Thesis by SUSRUT RAJANIKANT USGAONKER Submitted to Texas A&M...

  7. Harmony search optimization for HDR prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchal, Aditya

    In high dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy, multiple catheters are inserted interstitially into the target volume. The process of treating the prostate involves calculating and determining the best dose distribution to the target and organs-at-risk by means of optimizing the time that the radioactive source dwells at specified positions within the catheters. It is the goal of this work to investigate the use of a new optimization algorithm, known as Harmony Search, in order to optimize dwell times for HDR prostate brachytherapy. The new algorithm was tested on 9 different patients and also compared with the genetic algorithm. Simulations were performed to determine the optimal value of the Harmony Search parameters. Finally, multithreading of the simulation was examined to determine potential benefits. First, a simulation environment was created using the Python programming language and the wxPython graphical interface toolkit, which was necessary to run repeated optimizations. DICOM RT data from Varian BrachyVision was parsed and used to obtain patient anatomy and HDR catheter information. Once the structures were indexed, the volume of each structure was determined and compared to the original volume calculated in BrachyVision for validation. Dose was calculated using the AAPM TG-43 point source model of the GammaMed 192Ir HDR source and was validated against Varian BrachyVision. A DVH-based objective function was created and used for the optimization simulation. Harmony Search and the genetic algorithm were implemented as optimization algorithms for the simulation and were compared against each other. The optimal values for Harmony Search parameters (Harmony Memory Size [HMS], Harmony Memory Considering Rate [HMCR], and Pitch Adjusting Rate [PAR]) were also determined. Lastly, the simulation was modified to use multiple threads of execution in order to achieve faster computational times. Experimental results show that the volume calculation that was implemented in this thesis was within 2% of the values computed by Varian BrachyVision for the prostate, within 3% for the rectum and bladder and 6% for the urethra. The calculation of dose compared to BrachyVision was determined to be different by only 0.38%. Isodose curves were also generated and were found to be similar to BrachyVision. The comparison between Harmony Search and genetic algorithm showed that Harmony Search was over 4 times faster when compared over multiple data sets. The optimal Harmony Memory Size was found to be 5 or lower; the Harmony Memory Considering Rate was determined to be 0.95, and the Pitch Adjusting Rate was found to be 0.9. Ultimately, the effect of multithreading showed that as intensive computations such as optimization and dose calculation are involved, the threads of execution scale with the number of processors, achieving a speed increase proportional to the number of processor cores. In conclusion, this work showed that Harmony Search is a viable alternative to existing algorithms for use in HDR prostate brachytherapy optimization. Coupled with the optimal parameters for the algorithm and a multithreaded simulation, this combination has the capability to significantly decrease the time spent on minimizing optimization problems in the clinic that are time intensive, such as brachytherapy, IMRT and beam angle optimization.

  8. Sexual Function and the Use of Medical Devices or Drugs to Optimize Potency After Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Whaley, J. Taylor; Levy, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Swanson, David A. [Department of Urology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Pugh, Thomas J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Bruno, Teresa L. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Frank, Steven J., E-mail: sjfrank@mdnaderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Prospective evaluation of sexual outcomes after prostate brachytherapy with iodine-125 seeds as monotherapy at a tertiary cancer care center. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 129 men with prostate cancer with I-125 seed implants (prescribed dose, 145 Gy) without supplemental hormonal or external beam radiation therapy. Sexual function, potency, and bother were prospectively assessed at baseline and at 1, 4, 8, and 12 months using validated quality-of-life self-assessment surveys. Postimplant dosimetry values, including dose to 10% of the penile bulb (D10), D20, D33, D50, D75, D90, and penile volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose (V100) were calculated. Results: At baseline, 56% of patients recorded having optimal erections; at 1 year, 62% of patients with baseline erectile function maintained optimal potency, 58% of whom with medically prescribed sexual aids or drugs. Variables associated with pretreatment-to-posttreatment decline in potency were time after implant (p = 0.04) and age (p = 0.01). Decline in urinary function may have been related to decline in potency. At 1 year, 69% of potent patients younger than 70 years maintained optimal potency, whereas 31% of patients older than 70 maintained optimal potency (p = 0.02). Diabetes was related to a decline in potency (p = 0.05), but neither smoking nor hypertension were. For patients with optimal potency at baseline, mean sexual bother scores had declined significantly at 1 year (p < 0.01). Sexual potency, sexual function, and sexual bother scores failed to correlate with any dosimetric variable tested. Conclusions: Erections firm enough for intercourse can be achieved at 1 year after treatment, but most men will require medical aids to optimize potency. Although younger men were better able to maintain erections firm enough for intercourse than older men, there was no correlation between potency, sexual function, or sexual bother and penile bulb dosimetry.

  9. Comparison of Combined X-Ray Radiography and Magnetic Resonance (XMR) Imaging-Versus Computed Tomography-Based Dosimetry for the Evaluation of Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Acher, Peter [Division of Imaging Sciences, King's College London School of Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Department of Urology, Guy's and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: pete_acher@hotmail.com; Rhode, Kawal [Division of Imaging Sciences, King's College London School of Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Morris, Stephen; Gaya, Andrew [Department of Clinical Oncology, Guy's and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Miquel, Marc [Division of Imaging Sciences, King's College London School of Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Popert, Rick [Department of Urology, Guy's and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Tham, Ivan [Department of Clinical Oncology, Guy's and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Nichol, Janette [Department of Urology, Guy's and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); McLeish, Kate [Division of Imaging Sciences, King's College London School of Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Deehan, Charles [Department of Medical Physics, Guy's and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Dasgupta, Prokar; Beaney, Ronald [Department of Urology, Guy's and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Keevil, Stephen F. [Division of Imaging Sciences, King's College London School of Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Department of Medical Physics, Guy's and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To present a method for the dosimetric analysis of permanent prostate brachytherapy implants using a combination of stereoscopic X-ray radiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (XMR) in an XMR facility, and to compare the clinical results between XMR- and computed tomography (CT)-based dosimetry. Methods and Materials: Patients who had received nonstranded iodine-125 permanent prostate brachytherapy implants underwent XMR and CT imaging 4 weeks later. Four observers outlined the prostate gland on both sets of images. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were derived, and agreement was compared among the observers and between the modalities. Results: A total of 30 patients were evaluated. Inherent XMR registration based on prior calibration and optical tracking required a further automatic seed registration step that revealed a median root mean square registration error of 4.2 mm (range, 1.6-11.4). The observers agreed significantly more closely on prostate base and apex positions as well as outlining contours on the MR images than on those from CT. Coefficients of variation were significantly higher for observed prostate volumes, D90, and V100 parameters on CT-based dosimetry as opposed to XMR. The XMR-based dosimetry showed little agreement with that from CT for all observers, with D90 95% limits of agreement ranges of 65, 118, 79, and 73 Gy for Observers 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Conclusions: The study results showed that XMR-based dosimetry offers an alternative to other imaging modalities and registration methods with the advantages of MR-based prostate delineation and confident three-dimensional reconstruction of the implant. The XMR-derived dose-volume histograms differ from the CT-derived values and demonstrate less interobserver variability.

  10. American Brachytherapy Society Guidelines for High-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoshiya Yamada; LeLand Rogers; Jeffery Demanes; Gerard Morton; Bradley R Prestidge; Jean Pouliot; Mihai Ghilezan; Gilad Cohen; Marco Zaider; I Chow J. Hsu

    IntroductionA well established body of literature supports the use of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as definitive treatment for localized prostate cancer. The majority of articles describe HDR as a boost with adjuvant external beam radiation, but there is growing experience with HDR monotherapy.

  11. System for Prostate Brachytherapy and Biopsy in a Standard 1.5 T MRI Scanner

    E-print Network

    Atalar, Ergin

    System for Prostate Brachytherapy and Biopsy in a Standard 1.5 T MRI Scanner Robert C. Susil,1-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy and needle biopsy in a standard 1.5 T MRI scan- ner is demonstrated. In each of eight procedures (in four pa- tients with intermediate to high risk localized prostate cancer

  12. Is there a role for postimplant dosimetry after real-time dynamic permanent prostate brachytherapy?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Louis. Potters; Emel Calugaru; Anup Jassal; Joseph Presser

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the correlation of real-time dynamic prostate brachytherapy (RTDPB) dosimetry and traditional postimplant dosimetry for permanent prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 164 patients underwent RTDPB for clinically confined prostate cancer. Of these 164 patients, 45 were implanted with ¹°³Pd and 119 with ¹²⁵I. Additionally, 44 patients underwent combined external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy and 120

  13. Radiobiological evaluation of low dose-rate prostate brachytherapy implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaup, Courtney James

    Low dose-rate brachytherapy is a radiation therapy treatment for men with prostate cancer. While this treatment is common, the use of isotopes with varying dosimetric characteristics means that the prescription level and normal organ tolerances vary. Additionally, factors such as prostate edema, seed loss and seed migration may alter the dose distribution within the prostate. The goal of this work is to develop a radiobiological response tool based on spatial dose information which may be used to aid in treatment planning, post-implant evaluation and determination of the effects of prostate edema and seed migration. Aim 1: Evaluation of post-implant prostate edema and its dosimetric and biological effects. Aim 2: Incorporation of biological response to simplify post-implant evaluation. Aim 3: Incorporation of biological response to simplify treatment plan comparison. Aim 4: Radiobiologically based comparison of single and dual-isotope implants. Aim 5: Determine the dosimetric and radiobiological effects of seed disappearance and migration.

  14. PSA Kinetics and PSA Bounce Following Permanent Seed Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, Juanita [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: juanita.crook@rmp.uhn.on.ca; Gillan, Caitlin B.Sc. [Department of Radiation Medicine, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Yeung, Ivan Ph.D. [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Austen, Lynette; McLean, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Lockwood, Gina M.Math. [Department of Biostatistics, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To report the incidence, timing, and magnitude of the benign prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce after {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy and correlate the bounce with clinical and/or dosimetric factors. Methods and Materials: From March 1999 to August 2003, a total of 292 men received {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy without androgen deprivation or supplemental beam radiotherapy and have PSA follow-up >30 months. Implants were preplanned using transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and performed under transrectal ultrasound/fluoroscopy guidance using preloaded needles. A PSA bounce is defined as an increase {>=}0.2 ng/ml with spontaneous return to prebounce level or lower. Results: Resolved PSA bounces were seen in 40% of men with follow-up >30 months. Median onset was 15 months, and median magnitude was 0.76 ng/ml. Magnitude >2 ng/ml was seen in 15%. The only clinical or dosimetric factor predictive of bounce in multivariate analysis was younger age. Median time to increasing PSA level indicative of failure was 30 months. Conclusions: Benign PSA bounces are common after {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy, especially in younger men. An increase >2 ng/ml above the nadir was seen in 15%. Magnitude of increase does not distinguish bounce from failure. Time to the start of the PSA increase can be helpful, but is not absolute. The PSA bounce does not predict subsequent failure. Caution is advised in interpreting an early increasing PSA level in the first 30 months after {sup 125}I brachytherapy in favorable-risk patients.

  15. Praseodymium142 glass seeds for the brachytherapy of prostate cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jae Won Jung

    2007-01-01

    A beta-emitting glass seed was proposed for the brachytherapy treatment of prostate cancer. Criteria for seed design were derived and several beta-emitting nuclides were examined for suitability. 142Pr was selected as the isotope of choice. Seeds 0.08 cm in diameter and 0.9 cm long were manufactured for testing. The seeds were activated in the Texas A&M University research reactor. The

  16. Ejaculatory Function After Permanent {sup 125}I Prostate Brachytherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Huyghe, Eric [Department of Urology and Andrology, University Hospital, CHU Rangueil, Toulouse (France); Department of Urology and Andrology, Paul Sabatier University, CHU Paule de Viguier, Toulouse (France)], E-mail: huyghe.e@chu-toulouse.fr; Delannes, Martine [Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Wagner, Fabien M. [Department of Urology and Andrology, Paul Sabatier University, CHU Paule de Viguier, Toulouse (France); Delaunay, Boris [Department of Urology and Andrology, University Hospital, CHU Rangueil, Toulouse (France); Nohra, Joe; Thoulouzan, Matthieu; Shut-Yee, J. Yeung [Department of Urology and Andrology, Paul Sabatier University, CHU Paule de Viguier, Toulouse (France); Plante, Pierre [Department of Urology and Andrology, University Hospital, CHU Rangueil, Toulouse (France); Department of Urology and Andrology, Paul Sabatier University, CHU Paule de Viguier, Toulouse (France); Soulie, Michel [Department of Urology and Andrology, University Hospital, CHU Rangueil, Toulouse (France); Thonneau, Patrick [Department of Urology and Andrology, Paul Sabatier University, CHU Paule de Viguier, Toulouse (France); Bachaud, Jean Marc [Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France)

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: Ejaculatory function is an underreported aspect of male sexuality in men treated for prostate cancer. We conducted the first detailed analysis of ejaculatory function in patients treated with permanent {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: Of 270 sexually active men with localized prostate cancer treated with permanent {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy, 241 (89%), with a mean age of 65 years (range, 43-80), responded to a mailed questionnaire derived from the Male Sexual Health Questionnaire regarding ejaculatory function. Five aspects of ejaculatory function were examined: frequency, volume, dry ejaculation, pleasure, and pain. Results: Of the 241 sexually active men, 81.3% had conserved ejaculatory function after prostate brachytherapy; however, the number of patients with rare/absent ejaculatory function was double the pretreatment number (p < .0001). The latter finding was correlated with age (p < .001) and the preimplant International Index of Erectile Function score (p < .001). However, 84.9% of patients with maintained ejaculatory function after implantation reported a reduced volume of ejaculate compared with 26.9% before (p < .001), with dry ejaculation accounting for 18.7% of these cases. After treatment, 30.3% of the patients experienced painful ejaculation compared with 12.9% before (p = .0001), and this was associated with a greater number of implanted needles (p = .021) and the existence of painful ejaculation before implantation (p < .0001). After implantation, 10% of patients who continued to be sexually active experienced no orgasm compared with only 1% before treatment. in addition, more patients experienced late/difficult or weak orgasms (p = .001). Conclusion: Most men treated with brachytherapy have conserved ejaculatory function after prostate brachytherapy. However, most of these men experience a reduction in volume and a deterioration in orgasm.

  17. Haptic System Design for MRI-Guided Needle Based Prostate Brachytherapy

    E-print Network

    Camesano, Terri

    Haptic System Design for MRI-Guided Needle Based Prostate Brachytherapy Hao Su Weijian Shang Gregory A. Cole Kevin Harrington Gregory S. Fischer ABSTRACT This paper presents the design of a haptic system for prostate nee- dle brachytherapy under magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guid- ance. This haptic

  18. Secondary sarcoma of bone post-prostate brachytherapy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Allison Y.; Conway, Jessica; Peacock, Michael; Clarkson, Paul W.; Lee, Cheng-Han; Simmons, Christine; Weir, Lorna; McKenzie, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Malignancies associated with brachytherapy for prostate cancer are largely unreported in the literature. We report a case of post-brachytherapy osteogenic sarcoma in the pelvis 6 years after permanent 125I implant for intermediate-risk prostate cancer. The patient was treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, limb-sparing surgical resection and postoperative radiation therapy for unexpected positive margins. PMID:25024811

  19. High-dose-rate brachytherapy as monotherapy for prostate cancer: technique, rationale and perspective

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Osamu; Otani, Yuki; Yoshida, Ken; Nose, Takayuki; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as monotherapy is a comparatively new brachytherapy procedure for prostate cancer. Although clinical results are not yet mature enough, it is a highly promising approach in terms of potential benefits for both radiation physics and radiobiology. In this article, we describe our technique for monotherapeutic HDR prostate brachytherapy, as well as the rationale and theoretical background, with educational intent. PMID:24790627

  20. Efficacy of sildenafil citrate in prostate brachytherapy patients with erectile dysfunction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gregory S Merrick; Wayne M Butler; Jonathan H Lief; Robin L Stipetich; Laurie J Abel; Anthony T Dorsey

    1999-01-01

    Objectives. To ascertain the efficacy of sildenafil citrate (Viagra) in patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) either before or after prostate brachytherapy by an open-label, nonrandomized study.Methods. Sixty-two patients who underwent prostate brachytherapy between March 1995 and July 1998, had ED either before or after brachytherapy, and were interested in treatment with sildenafil comprised the patient population. Clinical and treatment parameters

  1. Brachytherapy Anatomy-based inverse planning dose optimization in HDR prostate

    E-print Network

    Pouliot, Jean

    Brachytherapy Anatomy-based inverse planning dose optimization in HDR prostate implant: A toxicity and methods: Between September 1999 and October 2002, 44 patients with locally advanced prostate cancer (PSA R used to collect prostate related measures of quality of life, and international prostate symptom score

  2. Primary Gleason Grade 4 Impact on Biochemical Recurrence After Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy in Japanese Patients With Low- or Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Uesugi, Tatsuya [Department of Urology, Okayama University, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama (Japan); Saika, Takashi, E-mail: saika@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Department of Urology, Okayama University, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama (Japan); Edamura, Kohei; Nose, Hiroyuki; Kobuke, Makoto; Ebara, Shin; Abarzua, Fernand [Department of Urology, Okayama University, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama (Japan); Katayama, Norihisa [Department of Radiology, Okayama University, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama (Japan); Yanai, Hiroyuki [Department of Pathology, Okayama University, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama (Japan); Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi [Department of Urology, Okayama University, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To reveal a predictive factor for biochemical recurrence (BCR) after permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) using iodine-125 seed implantation in patients with localized prostate cancer classified as low or intermediate risk based on National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines. Methods and Materials: From January 2004 to December 2009, 414 consecutive Japanese patients with clinically localized prostate cancer classified as low or intermediate risk based on the NCCN guidelines were treated with PPB. The clinical factors including pathological data reviewed by a central pathologist and follow-up data were prospectively collected. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to assess the factors associated with BCR. Results: Median follow-up was 36.5 months. The 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-year BCR-free rates using the Phoenix definition were 98.3%, 96.0%, 91.6%, and 87.0%, respectively. On univariate analysis, the Gleason score, especially primary Gleason grade 4 in biopsy specimens, was a strong predicting factor (p < 0.0001), while age, initial prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, T stage, and minimal dose delivered to 90% of the prostate volume (D90) were insignificant. Multivariate analysis indicated that a primary Gleason grade 4 was the most powerful prognostic factor associated with BCR (hazard ratio = 6.576, 95% confidence interval, 2.597-16.468, p < 0.0001). Conclusions: A primary Gleason grade 4 carried a worse BCR prognosis than the primary grade 3 in patients treated with PPB. Therefore, the indication for PPB in patients with a Gleason sum of 4 + 3 deserves careful and thoughtful consideration.

  3. Recurrent Prostate Cancer Genomic Alterations Predict Response to Brachytherapy Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fontugne, Jacqueline; Lee, Daniel; Cantaloni, Chiara; Barbieri, Christopher E.; Caffo, Orazio; Hanspeter, Esther; Mazzoleni, Guido; Palma, Paolo Dalla; Rubin, Mark A.; Fellin, Giovanni; Mosquera, Juan Miguel; Barbareschi, Mattia; Demichelis, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the association of recurrent molecular alterations in prostate cancer, such as ERG rearrangements and phosphatase and tensin homolog gene (PTEN) deletions, with oncologic outcomes in patients with prostate cancer treated with brachytherapy. Methods Ninety-two men underwent I-125 brachytherapy with a 145 Gy delivered dose between 2000 and 2008. Pretreatment prostate biopsies were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and FISH for ERG rearrangement and overexpression, PTEN deletion, and expression loss. Univariable and multivariable Cox-regression analyses evaluated association of ERG and PTEN status with biochemical recurrence (BCR). Results Within a median follow-up of 73 months, 11% of patients experienced BCR. Of 80 samples with both IHC and FISH performed for ERG, 46 (57.8%) demonstrated rearrangement by FISH and 45 (56.3%) by IHC. Of 77 samples with both IHC and FISH for PTEN, 14 (18.2%) had PTEN deletion by FISH and 22 (28.6%) by IHC. No significant associations were found between ERG, PTEN status, and clinicopathologic features. Patients with concurrent ERG rearrangement and PTEN deletion demonstrated significantly worse relapse-free survival rates compared with those with ERG or PTEN wild type (P < 0.01). In multivariable Cox regression analysis adjusted for the effects of standard clinicopathologic features, combined ERG rearranged and PTEN deletion was independently associated with BCR (HR = 2.6; P = 0.02). Conclusions Concurrent ERG rearrangement and PTEN loss was independently associated with time to BCR in patients undergoing brachytherapy. Future studies are needed to validate prostate cancer molecular subtyping for risk stratification. Impact Identifying patients in the ERG-rearranged/PTEN-deleted molecular subclass may improve treatment personalization. PMID:24515272

  4. Anisotropy Characterization of I-125 Seed with Attached Encapsulated Cobalt Chloride Complex Contrast Agent Markers for MRI-Based Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Steven J., E-mail: sjfrank@mdanderson.or [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tailor, Ramesh C.; Kudchadker, Rajat J. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Martirosyan, Karen S. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Stafford, R. Jason; Elliott, Andrew M. [Department of Imaging Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Swanson, David A. [Department of Urology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Sing, David; Choi, Jonathan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mourtada, Firas; Ibbott, Geoffrey S. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-07-01

    We have developed a novel MRI marker for prostate brachytherapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in anisotropy when cobalt chloride complex contrast agent encapsulated contrast agent markers (C4-ECAM) were placed adjacent to an iodine-125 (I-125) titanium seed, and to verify that the C4-ECAMs were visible on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after radiation exposure. Two C4-ECAMs were verified to be MRI visible in a phantom before radiation exposure. The C4-ECAMs were then attached to each end of a 12.7-U (10-mCi) I-125 titanium seed in a polymer tube. Anisotropy was measured and analyzed with the seed alone and with attached C4-ECAMs by suspending thermoluminescent dosimeters in a water phantom in 2 circles surrounding the radioactive source with radius of 1 or 2 cm. A T1-weighted MRI evaluation of C4-ECAMs was then performed after exposure to the amount of radiation typically delivered during 1 month of prostate brachytherapy. Measured values of the anisotropy function F(r, {theta}) for the I-125 seed with and without the C4-ECAMs were mutually statistically indistinguishable (standard error of the mean <4.2%) and agreed well with published TG-43 values for the bare seed. As expected, the anisotropy function {phi}{sub an}(r) for the 2 datasets (with and without C4-ECAMs) derived from the measured F(r, {theta}) did not exhibit statistically measurable difference. Both datasets showed agreement with the published TG-43 {phi}{sub an}(r) for the bare seed. The C4-ECAMs were well visualized by MRI after 1 month of radiation exposure. There were no changes in anisotropy when the C4-ECAMs were placed next to an I-125 radioactive seed, and the C4-ECAMs were visualized after radiation exposure.

  5. Radiation-Induced Leiomyosarcoma of the Prostate after Brachytherapy for Prostatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Horiguchi, Hiroto; Takada, Kohichi; Kamihara, Yusuke; Ibata, Soushi; Iyama, Satoshi; Sato, Tsutomu; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Miyanishi, Koji; Sato, Yasushi; Takimoto, Rishu; Kobune, Masayoshi; Kobayashi, Ko; Hirayama, Yasuo; Masumori, Naoya; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Kato, Junji

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Radiation therapy (RTx) has been employed as a curative therapy for prostatic adenocarcinoma. RTx-induced sarcomas (RISs) are rare, late adverse events, representing less than 0.2% of all irradiated patients. RISs are more aggressive tumors than prostatic adenocarcinomas. Herein, we present a case with RTx-induced prostatic leiomyosarcoma after permanent brachytherapy for prostatic adenocarcinoma. A 69-year-old male presented with dysuria and gross hematuria. Six years previously, he had been diagnosed with localized prostate cancer and was treated by permanent brachytherapy. Urethroscopy showed stenosis by a tumor at the prostate. Transurethral prostatectomy was performed for a diagnosis. Based on pathological findings, the diagnosis was leiomyosarcoma of the prostate. He was treated with three cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (CTx) that consisted of doxorubicin and ifosfamide (AI), followed by a prostatocystectomy with intrapelvic lymphadenectomy. The tumor extended from the prostate and infiltrated the bladder wall and serosa with lymphatic and venous invasion. The surgical margin was negative, and no residual prostatic adenocarcinoma was observed. The proportion of necrotic tumor cells by neoadjuvant CTx was around 50%. Subsequently, adjuvant CTx was offered, but the patient chose a follow-up without CTx. Local recurrence and lung metastasis were detected by computed tomography 3 months after the surgery. He was treated again with AI. However, CTx was not effective and he died 6 months after the operation. In conclusion, an effective treatment strategy for prostatic sarcoma should be developed in the near future, although the clinical feature of prostatic sarcoma remains unclear due to its rare incidence. PMID:25232328

  6. Comparison of biochemical failure definitions for permanent prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuban, Deborah A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)]. E-mail: dakuban@mdanderson.org; Levy, Larry B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Potters, Louis [New York Prostate Institute, Oceanside, NY (United States); Beyer, David C. [Arizona Oncology Services, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Blasko, John C. [Seattle Prostate Institute, Seattle, WA (United States); Moran, Brian J. [Chicago Prostate Institute, Chicago, IL (United States); Ciezki, Jay P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Zietman, Anthony L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Zelefsky, Michael J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Pisansky, Thomas M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Elshaikh, Mohamed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Horwitz, Eric M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: To assess prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure definitions for patients with Stage T1-T2 prostate cancer treated by permanent prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 2,693 patients treated with radioisotopic implant as solitary treatment for T1-T2 prostatic adenocarcinoma were studied. All patients had a pretreatment PSA, were treated at least 5 years before analysis, 1988 to 1998, and did not receive hormonal therapy before recurrence. Multiple PSA failure definitions were tested for their ability to predict clinical failure. Results: Definitions which determined failure by a certain increment of PSA rise above the lowest PSA level to date (nadir + x ng/mL) were more sensitive and specific than failure definitions based on PSA doubling time or a certain number of PSA rises. The sensitivity and specificity for the nadir + 2 definition were 72% and 83%, vs. 51% and 81% for 3 PSA rises. The surgical type definitions (PSA exceeding an absolute value) could match this sensitivity and specificity but only when failure was defined as exceeding a PSA level in the 1-3 ng/mL range and only when patients were allowed adequate time to nadir. When failure definitions were compared by time varying covariate regression analysis, nadir + 2 ng/mL retained the best fit. Conclusions: For patients treated by permanent radioisotopic implant for prostate cancer, the definition nadir + 2 ng/mL provides the best surrogate for failure throughout the entire follow-up period, similar to patients treated by external beam radiotherapy. Therefore, the same PSA failure definition could be used for both modalities. For brachytherapy patients with long-term follow-up, at least 6 years, defining failure as exceeding an absolute PSA level in the 0.5 ng/mL range may be reasonable.

  7. Primary Causes of Death After Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bittner, Nathan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Merrick, Gregory S. [Schiffler Cancer Center Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States)], E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.org; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M. [Schiffler Cancer Center Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Healthcare Corporation, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Allen, Zachariah A.; Brammer, Sarah G. [Schiffler Cancer Center Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Moyad, Mark [Department of Urology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the primary causes of death in low-risk (low-risk), intermediate-risk (intermediate-risk), and high-risk (high-risk) patients undergoing permanent prostate brachytherapy with or without supplemental therapies. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 through November 2004, a total of 1,354 consecutive patients underwent prostate brachytherapy. All patients underwent brachytherapy >3 years before analysis. Of the patients, 532 (39.3%) received androgen deprivation therapy and 703 (51.9%) received supplemental radiation therapy. The median follow-up was 5.4 years. Multiple parameters were evaluated as predictors of cause-specific, biochemical progression-free, and overall survival. Results: The 10-year cause-specific survival was 97.0% (99.7%, 99.0%, and 90.1% for low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk patients). Overall survival was 76.7% (82.5%, 78.3%, and 67.6% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, respectively). The cumulative death rate for cardiovascular disease was 11.5% (8.7%, 9.3%, and 19.8% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients). The death rate from second malignancies (nonprostate cancer) was 7.2% and was not substantially different when stratified by risk group. Death from all other causes was 6.5% for the entire cohort but 1.3%, 5.0%, and 10.8% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients. In multivariate analysis, death from prostate cancer was best predicted by Gleason score and risk group, whereas death from cardiovascular disease, nonprostate cancer, and all other causes were most closely related to patient age and tobacco use. Conclusions: Although cardiovascular mortality was the predominant cause of death, prostate cancer was responsible for approximately 10% of all deaths. In particular, overall survival was poorest in the high-risk group. Although high-risk patients were most likely to die of prostate cancer, the divergence in overall survival between high-risk and lower-risk patients primarily resulted from an excess of cardiovascular deaths. Changes in lifestyle to improve cardiovascular health may improve overall survival in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer.

  8. Sequential evaluation of prostate edema after permanent seed prostate brachytherapy using CT-MRI fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Taussky, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Austen, Lyn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Toi, Ants [Department of Medical Imaging, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Yeung, Ivan [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Williams, Theresa [Department of Radiation Medicine, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Pearson, Shannon [Department of Radiation Medicine, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); McLean, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Pond, Gregory [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Crook, Juanita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada)]. E-mail: juanita.crook@rmp.uhn.on.ca

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the extent and time course of prostate edema and its effect on dosimetry after permanent seed prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients scheduled for permanent seed {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy agreed to a prospective study on postimplant edema. Implants were preplanned using transrectal ultrasonography. Postimplant dosimetry was calculated using computed tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (CT-MRI) fusion on the day of the implant (Day 1) and Days 8 and 30. The prostate was contoured on MRI, and the seeds were located on CT. Factors investigated for an influence on edema were the number of seeds and needles, preimplant prostate volume, transitional zone index (transition zone volume divided by prostate volume), age, and prostate-specific antigen level. Prostate dosimetry was evaluated by the percentage of the prostate volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose (V{sub 100}) and percentage of prescribed dose received by 90% of the prostate volume (D{sub 90}). Results: Prostate edema was maximal on Day 1, with the median prostate volume 31% greater than preimplant transrectal ultrasound volume (range, 0.93-1.72; p < 0.001) and decreased with time. It was 21% greater than baseline at Day 8 (p = 0.013) and 5% greater on Day 30 (p < 0.001). Three patients still had a prostate volume greater than baseline by Day 30. The extent of edema depended on the transition zone volume (p = 0.016) and the preplan prostate volume (p 0.003). The median V{sub 100} on Day 1 was 93.6% (range, 86.0-98.2%) and was 96.3% (range, 85.7-99.5%) on Day 30 (p = 0.079). Patients with a Day 1 V{sub 100} >93% were less affected by edema resolution, showing a median increase in V{sub 100} of 0.67% on Day 30 compared with 2.77% for patients with a V{sub 100} <93 % on Day 1. Conclusion: Despite the extreme range of postimplant edema, the effect on dosimetry was less than expected. Dose coverage of the prostate was good for all patients during Days 1-30. Our data indicate that postimplant dosimetry on the day of implant is sufficient for patients with good dose coverage (Day 1 V{sub 100} >93%)

  9. Ultrasound-Fluoroscopy Registration for Prostate Brachytherapy Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan, Ehsan; Lee, Junghoon; Fallavollita, Pascal; Kuo, Nathanael; Deguet, Anton; Le, Yi; Burdette, E. Clif; Song, Danny Y.; Prince, Jerry L.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2012-01-01

    Prostate brachytherapy is a treatment for prostate cancer using radioactive seeds that are permanently implanted in the prostate. The treatment success depends on adequate coverage of the target gland with a therapeutic dose, while sparing the surrounding tissue. Since seed implantation is performed under transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging, intraoperative localization of the seeds in ultrasound can provide physicians with dynamic dose assessment and plan modification. However, since all seeds cannot be seen in the ultrasound images, registration between ultrasound and fluoroscopy is a practical solution for intraoperative dosimetry. In this manuscript, we introduce a new image-based nonrigid registration method that obviates the need for manual seed segmentation in TRUS images and compensates for the prostate displacement and deformation due to TRUS probe pressure. First, we filter the ultrasound images for subsequent registration using thresholding and Gaussian blurring. Second, a computationally efficient point-to-volume similarity metric, an affine transformation and an evolutionary optimizer are used in the registration loop. A phantom study showed final registration errors of 0.84 ± 0.45 mm compared to ground truth. In a study on data from 10 patients, the registration algorithm showed overall seed-to-seed errors of 1.7 ± 1.0 mm and 1.5 ± 0.9 mm for rigid and nonrigid registration methods, respectively, performed in approximately 30 seconds per patient. PMID:22784870

  10. Ultrasound-fluoroscopy registration for prostate brachytherapy dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Dehghan, Ehsan; Lee, Junghoon; Fallavollita, Pascal; Kuo, Nathanael; Deguet, Anton; Le, Yi; Clif Burdette, E; Song, Danny Y; Prince, Jerry L; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2012-10-01

    Prostate brachytherapy is a treatment for prostate cancer using radioactive seeds that are permanently implanted in the prostate. The treatment success depends on adequate coverage of the target gland with a therapeutic dose, while sparing the surrounding tissue. Since seed implantation is performed under transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging, intraoperative localization of the seeds in ultrasound can provide physicians with dynamic dose assessment and plan modification. However, since all the seeds cannot be seen in the ultrasound images, registration between ultrasound and fluoroscopy is a practical solution for intraoperative dosimetry. In this manuscript, we introduce a new image-based nonrigid registration method that obviates the need for manual seed segmentation in TRUS images and compensates for the prostate displacement and deformation due to TRUS probe pressure. First, we filter the ultrasound images for subsequent registration using thresholding and Gaussian blurring. Second, a computationally efficient point-to-volume similarity metric, an affine transformation and an evolutionary optimizer are used in the registration loop. A phantom study showed final registration errors of 0.84 ± 0.45 mm compared to ground truth. In a study on data from 10 patients, the registration algorithm showed overall seed-to-seed errors of 1.7 ± 1.0 mm and 1.5 ± 0.9 mm for rigid and nonrigid registration methods, respectively, performed in approximately 30s per patient. PMID:22784870

  11. The influence of isotope and prostate volume on urinary morbidity after prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Niehaus, Angela [Schiffler Cancer Center and Department of Physics, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Merrick, Gregory S. [Schiffler Cancer Center and Department of Physics, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States)]. E-mail: gmerrick@wheelinghospital.com; Butler, Wayne M. [Schiffler Cancer Center and Department of Physics, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Puget Sound Healthcare CorporationGroup Health Cooperative and University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Allen, Zachariah A. [Schiffler Cancer Center and Department of Physics, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Galbreath, Robert W. [Schiffler Cancer Center and Department of Physics, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Department of Physical Education and Sport Science, Ohio University, Eastern Campus, St. Clairsville, OH (United States); Adamovich, Edward [Department of Pathology, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, WV (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of isotope and prostate size on International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) normalization, catheter dependency, and the need for surgical intervention secondary to bladder outlet obstruction after prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between January 1998 and June 2003, 976 consecutive patients underwent brachytherapy for clinical stage T1b-T3a (2002 American Joint Committee on Cancer) prostate cancer. Seven hundred eighty-nine (80.8%) were implanted with {sup 103}Pd and 187 (19.2%) with {sup 125}I. The median follow-up was 41.2 months. Patients were stratified into size cohorts {<=}25 cm{sup 3}, 25.1-35 cm{sup 3}, 35.1-45 cm{sup 3}, and >45 cm{sup 3}. Four hundred eighteen patients (42.8%) received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Four hundred eighty-six patients (49.7%) received supplemental external-beam radiation therapy (XRT). In all patients, an alpha blocker was initiated before implantation and continued at least until the IPSS returned to baseline. IPSS resolution was defined as a return to within one point of baseline. The median number of IPSS determinations per patient was 21. Clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters evaluated included patient age, pretreatment PSA, Gleason score, clinical T stage, percent positive biopsies, preimplant IPSS, ultrasound volume, planning volume, isotope, V{sub 100/150/20}, D{sub 9}, urethral dose (average and maximum), supplemental XRT, ADT, and the duration of ADT ({<=}6 months vs. >6 months). Catheter dependency and the need for postsurgical intervention were also evaluated. Results: For both isotopes and all prostate size cohorts, IPSS peaked 1 month after implantation and returned to baseline at a mean of 1.9 months. Stratification of prostate size cohorts by isotope demonstrated no significant differences in prolonged catheter dependency ({>=}5 days), IPSS resolution, or postimplant surgical intervention. In Cox regression analysis, IPSS normalization was best predicted by preimplant IPSS, XRT, and any need for a catheter after brachytherapy. Catheter dependency correlated with prostate size and ADT, whereas the need for surgical intervention was most closely related to any catheter dependency, maximum urethral dose, ADT, and maximum IPSS increase. Conclusions: Regardless of prostate size, isotope did not impact IPSS resolution, catheter dependency, or the need for postbrachytherapy surgical intervention. Although prostate size did predict for short-term (<5 days) catheter dependency, it did not influence IPSS resolution or the need for surgical intervention.

  12. Patient perception of local anesthesia for prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Smathers, S; Wallner, K; Simpson, C; Roof, J

    2000-05-01

    Prostate brachytherapy is an increasingly popular treatment for early-stage prostate cancer. Until now, spinal or general anesthesia for the procedure has been the standard of care. For patient safety, patient convenience, and to limit use of operating facilities, the authors started performing implants routinely with local anesthesia. We present here an evaluation of patients' acceptance of prostate brachytherapy under local anesthesia. On arrival at our department on the morning of the procedure, the patient is brought into the simulator suite, an intravenous line is started, and a urinary catheter is inserted. With the patient in the lithotomy position, a 5-by-5-cm patch of perineal skin and subcutaneous tissue is anesthetized by local infiltration of 10 mL of 1% lidocaine, using a 25-gauge 5/8-inch needle. Immediately following injection into the subcutaneous tissues, the deeper tissues, including the pelvic floor and prostate apex, are anesthetized by injecting 15 mL lidocaine solution with approximately 8 passes of a 20-gauge 1-inch needle. Following subcutaneous and periapical lidocaine injections, the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe is positioned to reproduce the planning images and a 3.5- or 6-inch, 22-gauge spinal needle is inserted into the peripheral planned needle tracks, monitored by TRUS. When the tips of the needles reach the prostatic base, about 1 mL of lidocaine solution is injected in the intraprostatic track, as the needle is slowly withdrawn. The lidocaine infiltration procedure takes approximately 10 to 15 minutes. Seed implantation is then performed as previously described. At the time of this report preparation, 58 of the 71 patients (81%) were interviewed, with a median follow-up of 6 months since the implant procedure. On a scale of 1 to 10, the median biopsy pain score was 4.5 compared with a median pain score with the implant procedure of 3.0. There was no clear correlation between the two scores (r = .26). There was no correlation between patients' implant pain score and the number of implant needles used, the pre-implant prostate size, or patient age. The prostate radiation dose coverage, calculated as the percent of the post-implant volume covered by the prescription isodose, averaged 88% (range, 75% to 99%). Five of the 55 patients interviewed (9%) stated that they would have preferred to have the procedure under general anesthesia. Ranked on a 1 to 5 scale, the median patient satisfaction was 5 and the average was 4.4. The substitution of local anesthesia has facilitated rapid introduction of a high-volume brachytherapy program at an institution, without requiring the allocation of significant operating room time. We are pleased with the overall level of patient comfort and satisfaction. PMID:10875456

  13. Body Mass Index and Prostate-Specific Antigen Failure Following Brachytherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Efstathiou, Jason A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)], E-mail: jefstathiou@partners.org; Skowronski, Rafi Y.; Coen, John J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Grocela, Joseph A. [Department of Urology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Hirsch, Ariel E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Zietman, Anthony L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: Increasing body mass index (BMI) is associated with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure after radical prostatectomy and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). We investigated whether BMI is associated with PSA failure in men treated with brachytherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: Retrospective analyses were conducted on 374 patients undergoing brachytherapy for stage T1c-T2cNXM0 prostate cancer from 1996-2001. Forty-nine patients (13%) received supplemental EBRT and 131 (35%) received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Height and weight data were available for 353 (94%). Cox regression analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship between BMI and PSA failure (nadir + 2 ng/ml definition). Covariates included age, race, preimplantation PSA, Gleason score, T category, percent of prescription dose to 90% of the prostate, use of supplemental EBRT, and ADT. Results: Median age, PSA, and BMI were 66 years (range, 42-80 years), 5.7 ng/ml (range, 0.4-22.6 ng/ml), and 27.1 kg/m{sup 2} (range, 18.2-53.6 kg/m{sup 2}), respectively. After a median follow-up of 6.0 years (range, 3.0-10.2 years), there were 76 PSA recurrences. The BMI was not associated with PSA failure. Six-year PSA failure rates were 30.2% for men with BMI less than 25 kg/m{sup 2}, 19.5% for BMI of 25 or greater to less than 30 kg/m{sup 2}, and 14.4% for BMI of 30 kg/m{sup 2} or greater (p = 0.19). Results were similar when BMI was analyzed as a continuous variable, using alternative definitions of PSA failure, and excluding patients treated with EBRT and/or ADT. In multivariate analyses, only baseline PSA was significantly associated with shorter time to PSA failure (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.12; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.20; p 0.0006). Conclusions: Unlike after surgery or EBRT, BMI is not associated with PSA failure in men treated with brachytherapy for prostate cancer. This raises the possibility that brachytherapy may be a preferred treatment strategy in obese patients.

  14. AAPM Task Group 128: Quality assurance tests for prostate brachytherapy ultrasound systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, Douglas; Sutlief, Steven; Feng Wenzheng; Pierce, Heather M.; Kofler, Jim [Imaging Department, Boulder Community Foothills Hospital, Boulder, Colorado 80301 (United States); Radiation Therapy, VA Medical Center, VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, Washingon 98108 (United States); Cardiology and Interventional Radiology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan 48073 (United States); CIRS, Inc., Norfolk, Virginia 23513 (United States); Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    While ultrasound guided prostate brachytherapy has gained wide acceptance as a primary treatment tool for prostate cancer, quality assurance of the ultrasound guidance system has received very little attention. Task Group 128 of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine was created to address quality assurance requirements specific to transrectal ultrasound used for guidance of prostate brachytherapy. Accurate imaging guidance and dosimetry calculation depend upon the quality and accuracy of the ultrasound image. Therefore, a robust quality assurance program for the ultrasound system is essential. A brief review of prostate brachytherapy and ultrasound physics is provided, followed by a recommendation for elements to be included in a comprehensive test phantom. Specific test recommendations are presented, covering grayscale visibility, depth of penetration, axial and lateral resolution, distance measurement, area measurement, volume measurement, needle template/electronic grid alignment, and geometric consistency with the treatment planning computer.

  15. Prostate Specific Antigen Bounce Is Related to Overall Survival in Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hinnen, Karel A., E-mail: KAHinnen@Gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Monninkhof, Evelyn M. [Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Battermann, Jan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Roermund, Joep G.H. van [Department of Urology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Frank, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Vulpen, Marco van [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association between prostate specific antigen (PSA) bounce and disease outcome after prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 975 patients treated with {sup 125}I implantation monotherapy between 1992 and 2006. All patients had tumor Stage {<=}2c, Gleason score {<=}7 prostate cancer, a minimum follow-up of 2 years with at least four PSA measurements, and no biochemical failure in the first 2 years. Median follow-up was 6 years. Bounce was defined as a PSA elevation of +0.2 ng/mL with subsequent decrease to previous nadir. We used the Phoenix +2 ng/mL definition for biochemical failure. Additional endpoints were disease-specific and overall survival. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was performed to adjust for potential confounding factors. Results: Bounce occurred in 32% of patients, with a median time to bounce of 1.6 years. More than 90% of bounces took place in the first 3 years after treatment and had disappeared within 2 years of onset. Ten-year freedom from biochemical failure, disease-specific survival, and overall survival rates were, respectively, 90%, 99%, and 88% for the bounce group and 70%, 93%, and 82% for the no-bounce group. Only 1 patient (0.3%) died of prostate cancer in the bounce group, compared with 40 patients (6.1%) in the no-bounce group. Adjusted for confounding, a 70% biochemical failure risk reduction was observed for patients experiencing a bounce (hazard ratio 0.31; 95% confidence interval 0.20-0.48). Conclusions: A PSA bounce after prostate brachytherapy is strongly related to better outcome in terms of biochemical failure, disease-specific survival, and overall survival.

  16. Prostate CT segmentation method based on nonrigid registration in ultrasound-guided CT-based HDR prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaofeng, E-mail: xyang43@emory.edu; Rossi, Peter; Ogunleye, Tomi; Marcus, David M.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Mao, Hui [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The technological advances in real-time ultrasound image guidance for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy have placed this treatment modality at the forefront of innovation in cancer radiotherapy. Prostate HDR treatment often involves placing the HDR catheters (needles) into the prostate gland under the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance, then generating a radiation treatment plan based on CT prostate images, and subsequently delivering high dose of radiation through these catheters. The main challenge for this HDR procedure is to accurately segment the prostate volume in the CT images for the radiation treatment planning. In this study, the authors propose a novel approach that integrates the prostate volume from 3D TRUS images into the treatment planning CT images to provide an accurate prostate delineation for prostate HDR treatment. Methods: The authors’ approach requires acquisition of 3D TRUS prostate images in the operating room right after the HDR catheters are inserted, which takes 1–3 min. These TRUS images are used to create prostate contours. The HDR catheters are reconstructed from the intraoperative TRUS and postoperative CT images, and subsequently used as landmarks for the TRUS–CT image fusion. After TRUS–CT fusion, the TRUS-based prostate volume is deformed to the CT images for treatment planning. This method was first validated with a prostate-phantom study. In addition, a pilot study of ten patients undergoing HDR prostate brachytherapy was conducted to test its clinical feasibility. The accuracy of their approach was assessed through the locations of three implanted fiducial (gold) markers, as well as T2-weighted MR prostate images of patients. Results: For the phantom study, the target registration error (TRE) of gold-markers was 0.41 ± 0.11 mm. For the ten patients, the TRE of gold markers was 1.18 ± 0.26 mm; the prostate volume difference between the authors’ approach and the MRI-based volume was 7.28% ± 0.86%, and the prostate volume Dice overlap coefficient was 91.89% ± 1.19%. Conclusions: The authors have developed a novel approach to improve prostate contour utilizing intraoperative TRUS-based prostate volume in the CT-based prostate HDR treatment planning, demonstrated its clinical feasibility, and validated its accuracy with MRIs. The proposed segmentation method would improve prostate delineations, enable accurate dose planning and treatment delivery, and potentially enhance the treatment outcome of prostate HDR brachytherapy.

  17. Registration of prostate brachytherapy seeds with prostate anatomy for improved patient dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Lixin; Cho, Paul S.; Han, Ben; Pathak, Sayan D.; Haynor, David R.; Wallner, Kent; Sutlief, Steve; Kim, Yongmin

    2002-05-01

    Brachytherapy of prostate cancer involves permanent implantation of radioactive seeds in the prostate gland under transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and fluoroscopic guidance with the goal to treat the entire gland to a prescribed tumoricidal dose. The seed coordinates are calculated prior to the procedure. However, due to uncertainties associated with the seed insertion process and changes in the anatomy, it is difficult to faithfully reproduce the planned dose distribution. The procedure can be improved substantially by identifying the underdosed regions via real-time dosimetry before the completion of implantation. The physician can then insert additional seeds to achieve clinically needed dose distribution. One possible method of performing such dosimetry is to fuse TRUS (which images the prostate gland very well but not the metallic seeds) and fluoroscopy (which images metallic seeds well but not soft tissue) data. We have developed a technique to register the 3D seed positions reconstructed from multiple fluoroscopic images with the prostate TRUS images. The technique utilizes a set of fiducials that are detectable by both imaging modalities. The method was tested using a prostate mimicking phantom. The results demonstrate that the method is sufficiently accurate and practical for clinical use.

  18. Prostate brachytherapy postimplant dosimetry: Automatic plan reconstruction of stranded implants

    SciTech Connect

    Chng, N.; Spadinger, I.; Morris, W. J.; Usmani, N.; Salcudean, S. [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Cancer Centre, 600 West 10th, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E6 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Cancer Centre, 600 West 10th, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E6 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, 11460 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of British Columbia, 5500-2332 Main Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Plan reconstruction for permanent implant prostate brachytherapy is the process of determining the correspondence between planned and implanted seeds in postimplant analysis. Plan reconstruction informs many areas of brachytherapy quality assurance, including the verification of seed segmentation, misplacement and migration assessment, implant simulations, and the dosimetry of mixed-activity or mixed-species implants. Methods: An algorithm has been developed for stranded implants which uses the interseed spacing constraints imposed by the suture to improve the accuracy of reconstruction. Seventy randomly selected clinical cases with a mean of 23.6 (range 18-30) needles and mean density of 2.0 (range 1.6-2.6) 2.0 (range 1.6-2.6) seeds/cm{sup 3} were automatically reconstructed and the accuracy compared to manual reconstructions performed using a custom 3D graphical interface. Results: Using the automatic algorithm, the mean accuracy of the assignment relative to manual reconstruction was found to be 97.7{+-}0.5%. Fifty-two of the 70 cases (74%) were error-free; of seeds in the remaining cases, 96.7{+-}0.3% were found to be attributed to the correct strand and 97.0{+-}0.3% were correctly connected to their neighbors. Any necessary manual correction using the interface is usually straightforward. For the clinical data set tested, neither the number of seeds or needles, average density, nor the presence of clusters was found to have an effect on reconstruction accuracy using this method. Conclusions: Routine plan reconstruction of stranded implants can be performed with a high degree of accuracy to support postimplant dosimetry and quality analyses.

  19. Temporal relationship between prostate brachytherapy and the diagnosis of colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gutman, Sarah A. [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Merrick, Gregory S. [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States)]. E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.org; Butler, Wayne M. [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Puget Sound Healthcare Corporation, Group Health Cooperative, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Allen, Zachariah A. [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Galbreath, Robert W. [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Ohio University Eastern, St. Clairsville, OH (United States); Adamovich, Edward [Wheeling Hospital, Department of Pathology, Wheeling, WV (United States)

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To identify the location of pretreatment and posttreatment colorectal malignancies and posttreatment colorectal polyps in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer managed with brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 through July 2004, 1,351 consecutive patients underwent brachytherapy for clinical stage T1b-T3a (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 2002) prostate cancer. Supplemental external beam radiotherapy (XRT) was administered to 699 patients. The median follow-up was 4.6 years. Operative and pathology reports were reviewed for all patients with pretreatment and posttreatment colorectal cancer and posttreatment colorectal polyps. Multiple parameters were evaluated for the development of colorectal cancer or colorectal polyps. Results: Colorectal cancer was diagnosed in 23 and 25 patients before and after prostate brachytherapy, respectively. No differences were identified in the distribution of colorectal cancers either before or after treatment (3 and 4 rectal cancers in the pre- and postbrachytherapy cohorts). Thirty-five of the 48 colorectal cancers (73%) were diagnosed within 5 years of brachytherapy with a peak incidence 1 year after brachytherapy. One hundred ninety-two colorectal polyps were diagnosed after brachytherapy, 160 (83%) occurred within 4 years of brachytherapy, and only 27 (14%) were located in the rectum. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, prostate D{sub 9} (minimum percentage of the dose covering 90% of the target volume) predicted for posttreatment colorectal cancer. Rectal polyps were most closely related to patient age and percent positive biopsies, whereas sigmoid/colon polyps were best predicted by patient age, planning volume, and supplemental XRT. Conclusions: Colorectal cancer was diagnosed with equal frequency before and after brachytherapy with comparable geographic distributions. In addition, the vast majority of postbrachytherapy colorectal polyps were located beyond the confines of the rectum.

  20. Long-Term Results of an RTOG Phase II Trial (00-19) of External-Beam Radiation Therapy Combined With Permanent Source Brachytherapy for Intermediate-Risk Clinically Localized Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Colleen A., E-mail: clawton@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Yan, Yan [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC (United States); Gillin, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Firat, Selim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Baikadi, Madhava [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northeast Radiation Oncology Center, Scranton, PA (United States); Crook, Juanita [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of British Columbia, Kelowna, BC (Canada); Kuettel, Michael [Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Morton, Gerald [Department of Radiation Oncology, Toronto-Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Center, Toronto, ON (Canada); Sandler, Howard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: External-beam radiation therapy combined with low-doserate permanent brachytherapy are commonly used to treat men with localized prostate cancer. This Phase II trial was performed to document late gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity as well as biochemical control for this treatment in a multi-institutional cooperative group setting. This report defines the long-term results of this trial. Methods and Materials: All eligible patients received external-beam radiation (45 Gy in 25 fractions) followed 2-6 weeks later by a permanent iodine 125 implant of 108 Gy. Late toxicity was defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer late radiation morbidity scoring scheme. Biochemical control was defined by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Consensus definition and the ASTRO Phoenix definition. Results: One hundred thirty-eight patients were enrolled from 20 institutions, and 131 were eligible. Median follow-up (living patients) was 8.2 years (range, 2.7-9.3 years). The 8-year estimate of late grade >3 genitourinary and/or gastrointestinal toxicity was 15%. The most common grade >3 toxicities were urinary frequency, dysuria, and proctitis. There were two grade 4 toxicities, both bladder necrosis, and no grade 5 toxicities. In addition, 42% of patients complained of grade 3 impotence (no erections) at 8 years. The 8-year estimate of biochemical failure was 18% and 21% by the Phoenix and ASTRO consensus definitions, respectively. Conclusion: Biochemical control for this treatment seems durable with 8 years of follow-up and is similar to high-dose external beam radiation alone or brachytherapy alone. Late toxicity in this multi-institutional trial is higher than reports from similar cohorts of patients treated with high-dose external-beam radiation alone or permanent low-doserate brachytherapy alone, perhaps suggesting further attention to strategies that limit doses to normal structures or to unimodal radiotherapy techniques.

  1. Rectal ulcer: Due to ketoprofen, argon plasma coagulation and prostatic brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Koessler, Thibaud; Servois, Vincent; Mariani, Pascale; Aubert, Emilie; Cacheux, Wulfran

    2014-12-01

    Prostatic brachytherapy with permanent seed implants is a recent and safe radiation therapy technique associated with radiation-induced digestive disease. Argon plasma coagulation procedure is a validated modality in the management of haemorrhagic radiation proctitis, which is known to occasionally induce chronic rectal ulcers. We report here an original case report of an acute painful rectal ulcer as a consequence of the combination of short-term therapy with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs therapy, prostatic brachytherapy with malposition of seed implants and argon plasma coagulation procedure in a patient with haemorrhagic radiation proctitis. The description of this clinical observation is essential to recommend the discontinuation of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs therapy and the control of the position of seed implants in case of prostatic brachytherapy before argon plasma coagulation for radiation-induced proctitis. PMID:25493041

  2. Rectal ulcer: Due to ketoprofen, argon plasma coagulation and prostatic brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Koessler, Thibaud; Servois, Vincent; Mariani, Pascale; Aubert, Emilie; Cacheux, Wulfran

    2014-01-01

    Prostatic brachytherapy with permanent seed implants is a recent and safe radiation therapy technique associated with radiation-induced digestive disease. Argon plasma coagulation procedure is a validated modality in the management of haemorrhagic radiation proctitis, which is known to occasionally induce chronic rectal ulcers. We report here an original case report of an acute painful rectal ulcer as a consequence of the combination of short-term therapy with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs therapy, prostatic brachytherapy with malposition of seed implants and argon plasma coagulation procedure in a patient with haemorrhagic radiation proctitis. The description of this clinical observation is essential to recommend the discontinuation of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs therapy and the control of the position of seed implants in case of prostatic brachytherapy before argon plasma coagulation for radiation-induced proctitis. PMID:25493041

  3. Predictors of Urinary Morbidity in Cs-131 Prostate Brachytherapy Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Ryan P., E-mail: smithrp@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Jones, Heather A.; Beriwal, Sushil; Gokhale, Abhay [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Benoit, Ronald [Department of Urology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Cesium-131 is a newer radioisotope being used in prostate brachytherapy (PB). This study was conducted to determine the predictors of urinary morbidity with Cs-131 PB. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 159 patients underwent PB with Cs-131 at our institution and were followed by using Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) surveys to determine urinary morbidity over time. EPIC scores were obtained preoperatively and postoperatively at 2 and 4 weeks, and 3 and 6 months. Different factors were evaluated to determine their individual effect on urinary morbidity, including patient characteristics, disease characteristics, treatment, and dosimetry. Multivariate analysis of covariance was carried out to identify baseline determinants affecting urinary morbidity. Factors contributing to the need for postoperative catheterization were also studied and reported. Results: At 2 weeks, patient age, dose to 90% of the organ (D90), bladder neck maximum dose (D{sub max}), and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) predicted for worse function. At 4 weeks, age and EBRT continued to predict for worse function. At the 3-month mark, better preoperative urinary function, preoperative alpha blockers, bladder neck D{sub max}, and EBRT predicted for worse urinary morbidity. At 6 months, better preoperative urinary function, preoperative alpha blockers, bladder neck D{sub max}, and EBRT were predictive of increased urinary problems. High bladder neck D{sub max} and poor preoperative urinary function predicted for the need for catheterization. Conclusions: The use of EBRT plus Cs-131 PB predicts for worse urinary toxicity at all time points studied. Patients should be cautioned about this. Age was a consistent predictor of worsened morbidity immediately following Cs-131 PB, while bladder D{sub max} was the only consistent dosimetric predictor. Paradoxically, patients with better preoperative urinary function had worse urinary morbidity at 3 and 6 months, consistent with recently published literature.

  4. [Usefulness of urethral endoprosthesis in the management of urinary retention after brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Kerkeni, W; Chahwan, C; Lenormand, C; Dubray, B; Benyoucef, A; Pfister, C

    2014-03-01

    Brachytherapy is a possible treatment for localized low risk prostate cancer. Although this option is minimally invasive, some side effects may occur. Acute retention of urine (ARU) has been observed in 5% to 22% of cases and can be prevented in most cases by alpha-blocker treatment. Several alternatives have been reported in the literature for the management of ARU following brachytherapy: prolonged suprapubic catheterization, transurethral resection of the prostate and also intermittent self-catheterization. The authors report an original endoscopic approach, using urethral endoprosthesis, with a satisfactory voiding status. PMID:24560204

  5. Prostate brachytherapy seed reconstruction using an adaptive grouping technique

    SciTech Connect

    Su Yi; Davis, Brian J.; Furutani, Keith M.; Herman, Michael G.; Robb, Richard A. [Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Imaging Resource, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Biomedical Imaging Resource, Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Fluoroscopy-based three-dimensional seed localization as a component of intraoperative dosimetry for prostate brachytherapy is an active area of research. A novel adaptive-grouping-based reconstruction approach is developed. This approach can recover overlapped seeds that are not detected from the fluoroscopic images. Two versions of the adaptive-grouping-based reconstruction approach are implemented and compared to an epipolar geometry-based seed reconstruction technique. Simulations based on nine patient datasets are used to validate the algorithms. A total of 2259 reconstructions is performed in which different types of error such as random noise in seed image locations and ambiguities in projection geometry are incorporated. Among those reconstructions, nine of the cases with overlapping seeds and the different types of error are performed. It is demonstrated that the adaptive-grouping-based reconstruction method is more accurate than the epipolar geometry method and allows faster reconstruction. At a random noise level of 0.6 mm, the mean distance error in reconstructed seed locations is approximately 1.0 mm for one of the relevant cases examined in detail. The best adaptive-grouping-based approach successfully recovered overlapped seeds in the majority of simulated cases (89%), with the remainder of cases generating one false positive seed. Phantom validation is also performed, and overlapped seeds are successfully recovered with all 92 seeds correctly localized and reconstructed. The mean distance error between segmented seed images and projected seeds is 0.5 mm in the phantom study.

  6. Quantification of Edematic Effects in Prostate Brachytherapy Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Hefny, Mohamed; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Karimaghaloo, Zahra; Gobbi, David G.; Ellis, Randy; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2010-01-01

    We present a quantitative model to analyze the detrimental effects of edema on the quality of prostate brachytherapy implants. We account for both tissue expansion and implant migration by mapping intra-operative ultrasound and post-implant CT. We pre-process the ultrasound with a phase congruency filter, and map it to the volume CT using a B-spline deformable mutual information similarity metric. To test the method, we implanted a standard training phantom with 48 seeds, imaged the phantom with ultrasound and CT and registered the two for ground truth. Edema was simulated by distorting the CT volume by known transformations. The objective was to match the distorted implant to the intra-operative ultrasound. Performance was measured relative to ground truth. We successfully mapped 100% of deformed seeds to ground truth under edematic expansion up to 40% of volume growth. Seed matching performance was 98% with random seed migration of 3mm superimposed on 10% edematic volume growth. This method promises to be clinically applicable as the first quantitative analysis tool to measure edematic implant deformations occurring between the operating room and post-operative CT imaging. PMID:18982641

  7. Iodine-125 Seeds Strand for Treatment of Tumor Thrombus in Inferior Vena Cava: An Experimental Study in a Rabbit Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wen, E-mail: wenzhangxiao@126.com; Yan, Zhiping, E-mail: Yan.zhiping@zs-hospital.sh.cn; Luo, Jianjun, E-mail: luo.jianjun@zs-hospital.sh.cn; Fang, Zhuting, E-mail: 470389481@qq.com; Wu, Linlin, E-mail: linlinzhifubao@126.com; Liu, QingXin, E-mail: liu.qingxin@zs-hospital.sh.cn; Qu, Xudong, E-mail: qu.xudong@zs-hospital.sh.cn; Liu, Lingxiao, E-mail: liu.lingxiao@zs-hospital.sh.cn; Wang, Jianhua, E-mail: wang.jianhua@zs-hospital.sh.cn [Fudan University, Department of Interventional Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital (China)] [Fudan University, Department of Interventional Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital (China)

    2013-10-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to establish an animal model of implanted inferior vena cava tumor thrombus (IVCTT) and to evaluate the effect of linear iodine-125 seeds strand in treating implanted IVCTT. Methods: Tumor cell line VX{sub 2} was inoculated subcutaneously into New Zealand rabbit to develop the parent tumor. The tumor strip was inoculated into inferior vena cava (IVC) to establish the IVCTT model. The IVCTT was confirmed by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) after 2 weeks. Twelve rabbits with IVCTT were randomly divided into two groups. Treatment group (group T; n = 6) underwent Iodine-125 seeds brachytherapy, and the control group (group C; n = 6) underwent blank seeds strand. The blood laboratory examination (including blood routine examination, hepatic and renal function), body weight, survival time, and IVCTT volume by MDCT were monitored. All rabbits were dissected postmortem, and the therapeutic effects were evaluated on the basis of histopathology. The proliferating cell nuclear antigen index (PI) and apoptosis index (AI) of IVCTT were compared between two groups. T test, Wilcoxon rank test, and Kaplan-Meier survival curve analysis were used. Results: The success rate of establishing IVCTT was 100 %. The body weight loss and cachexia of rabbits in group C appeared earlier than in group T. Body weight in the third week, the mean survival time, PI, AI in groups T and C were 2.23 {+-} 0.12 kg, 57.83 {+-} 8.68 days, (16.73 {+-} 5.18 %), (29.47 {+-} 7.18 %), and 2.03 {+-} 0.13 kg, 43.67 {+-} 5.28 days, (63.01 {+-} 2.01 %), (6.02 {+-} 2.93 %), respectively. There were statistically significant differences between group T and group C (P < 0.05). The IVCTT volume of group T was remarkably smaller than that of group C. Conclusions: Injecting and suspensory fixing VX2 tumor strip into IVC is a reliable method to establish IVCTT animal model. The linear Iodine-125 seeds strand brachytherapy was a safe and effective method for treating IVCTT in rabbit model.

  8. SU-E-T-397: Include Organ Deformation Into Dose Calculation of Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Y; Shen, D; Chen, R; Wang, A; Lian, J [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Prostate brachytherapy is an important curative treatment for patients with localized prostate cancer. In brachytherapy, rectal balloon is generally needed to adjust for unfavorable prostate position for seed placement. However, rectal balloon causes prostate deformation, which is not accounted for in dosimetric planning. Therefore, it is possible that brachytherapy dosimetry deviates significantly from initial plan when prostate returns to its non-deformed state (after procedure). The goal of this study is to develop a method to include prostate deformation into the treatment planning of brachytherapy dosimetry. Methods: We prospectively collected ultrasound images of prostate pre- and post- rectal balloon inflation from thirty five consecutive patients undergoing I-125 brachytherapy. Based on the cylinder coordinate systems, we learned the initial coordinate transformation parameters between the manual segmentations of both deformed and non-deformed prostates of each patient in training set. With the nearest-neighbor interpolation, we searched the best transformation between two coordinate systems to maximum the mutual information of deformed and non-deformed images. We then mapped the implanted seeds of five selected patients from the deformed prostate into non-deformed prostate. The seed position is marked on original pre-inflation US image and it is imported into VariSeed software for dose calculation. Results: The accuracy of image registration is 87.5% as quantified by Dice Index. The prostate coverage V100% dropped from 96.5±0.5% of prostate deformed plan to 91.9±2.6% (p<0.05) of non-deformed plan. The rectum V100% decreased from 0.44±0.26 cc to 0.10±0.18 cc (p<0.05). The dosimetry of the urethra showed mild change but not significant: V150% changed from 0.05±0.10 cc to 0.14±0.15 cc (p>0.05) and D1% changed from 212.9±37.3 Gy to 248.4±42.8 Gy (p>0.05). Conclusion: We have developed a deformable image registration method that allows dosimetry calculation in the non-deformed prostate – which may be used to more accurately reflect “true” dosimetry during planning.

  9. Distinguishing prostate-specific antigen bounces from biochemical failure after low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Cian; Ghosh, Sunita; Sloboda, Ron; Martell, Kevin; Lan, Lanna; Pervez, Nadeem; Pedersen, John; Yee, Don; Murtha, Albert; Amanie, John

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to characterize benign prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounces of at least 2.0 ng/mL and biochemical failure as defined by the Phoenix definition after prostate brachytherapy at our institution, and to investigate distinguishing features between three outcome groups: patients experiencing a benign PSA bounce, biochemical failure, or neither. Material and methods Five hundred and thirty consecutive men treated with low-dose-rate brachytherapy with follow-up of at least 3 years were divided into outcome groups experiencing bounce, failure, or neither. A benign bounce was defined as a rise of at least 2.0 ng/mL over the pre-rise nadir followed by a decline to 0.5 ng/mL or below, without intervention. Patient and tumor characteristics, treatment variables, and PSA kinetics were analyzed between groups. Results Thirty-two (6.0%) men experienced benign bounces and 47 (8.9%) men experienced failure. Men experiencing a bounce were younger (p = 0.01), had a higher 6-month PSA level (p = 0.03), and took longer to reach a final nadir (p < 0.01). Compared to the failure group, men with bounce had a lower pre-treatment PSA level (p = 0.01) and experienced a rise of at least 2.0 ng/mL that occurred sooner after the implant (p < 0.01) with a faster PSA doubling time (p = 0.01). Only time to PSA rise independently differentiated between bounce and failure (p < 0.01), with a benign bounce not being seen after 36 months post-treatment. Prostate-specific antigen levels during a bounce reached levels as high as 12.6 ng/mL in this cohort, and in some cases took over 5 years to decline to below 0.5 ng/mL. Conclusions Although there is substantial overlap between the features of benign PSA bounces and failure, physicians may find it useful to evaluate the timing, absolute PSA level, initial response to treatment, and rate of rise when contemplating management for a PSA rise after low-dose-rate brachytherapy. PMID:25337125

  10. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound as support for prostate brachytherapy treatment planning

    PubMed Central

    Wijkstra, Hessel; van Herk, Marcel; Kuipers, Ruud; Kaljouw, Emmie; de la Rosette, Jean; Koning, Caro

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the possibility of localization of intraprostatic lesions (IL) with contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) to support the brachytherapy treatment planning of temporary implants. Material and methods Two brachytherapy treatment plans were generated for 8 patients treated with external beam radiotherapy and pulsed-dose rate brachytherapy boost for prostate cancer. The first and second brachytherapy treatment plan was without and with knowledge of the localization of the ILs, respectively. Pairwise comparison was performed on prostate, rectum, and urethra dose-volume parameters and total reference air kerma (TRAK)-values. Results Coverage of the ILs by the 140% isodose was increased from mean 66.0-67.7% for the standard plan to mean 92.5-95.7% for the adapted plan. The mean D90 of the ILs increased from 1.49-1.57 Gy/pulse to 1.76-1.81 Gy/pulse. Dose-volume parameters for the prostate, rectum, and urethra and the TRAK did not change. Conclusions CEUS technique is a promising method for IL localization to aid in brachytherapy treatment planning. Dose coverage on the IL could be improved without any increase of dose in organs at risk. PMID:23349647

  11. Risk of All-Cause and Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality After Brachytherapy in Men With Small Prostate Size

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Paul L., E-mail: E-pnguyen@LROC.harvard.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Chen, Ming H. [Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Choueiri, Toni K. [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Hoffman, Karen E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hu, Jim C. [Department of Urology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Martin, Neil E.; Beard, Clair J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Dosoretz, Daniel E. [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, FL (United States); Moran, Brian J. [Chicago Prostate Center, Westmont, IL (United States); Katin, Michael J. [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, FL (United States); Braccioforte, Michelle H. [Chicago Prostate Center, Westmont, IL (United States); Ross, Rudi; Salenius, Sharon A. [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, FL (United States); Kantoff, Philip W. [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); D'Amico, Anthony V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Background: Brachytherapy for prostate cancer can be technically challenging in men with small prostates ({<=}20 cc), but it is unknown whether their outcomes are different than those of men with larger prostates. Methods and Materials: We studied 6,416 men treated with brachytherapy in one of 21 community-based practices. Cox regression and Fine and Gray's regression were used to determine whether volume {<=}20 cc was associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality (ACM) or prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), respectively, after adjustment for other known prognostic factors. Results: 443 patients (6.9%) had a prostate volume {<=}20 cc. After a median follow-up of 2.91 years (interquartile range, 1.06-4.79), volume {<=}20 cc was associated with a significantly higher risk of ACM (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.33 [95% CI 1.08-1.65], p = 0.0085) with 3-year estimates of ACM for {<=}20 cc vs. >20 cc of 13.0% vs. 6.9% (p = 0.028). Only 23 men (0.36%) have died of prostate cancer, and no difference was seen in PCSM by volume (p = 0.4). Conclusion: Men with small prostates at the time of implant had a 33% higher risk of ACM, and the underlying cause of this remains uncertain. No increase in PCSM was observed in men with volume {<=}20cc, suggesting that a small prostate should not in itself be a contraindication for brachytherapy, but inasmuch as absolute rates of PCSM were small, further follow-up will be needed to confirm this finding.

  12. Abstract--Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) guided prostate biopsy and brachytherapy has been introduced in

    E-print Network

    Camesano, Terri

    -guided prostate biopsy and brachytherapy. A preliminary evaluation of the robot was conducted using previously%) for men. In the last two decades, however, the death rate is decreasing, which largely reflects and C. Tempany are with Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, US Gabor

  13. Praseodymium-142 glass seeds for the brachytherapy of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jae Won

    A beta-emitting glass seed was proposed for the brachytherapy treatment of prostate cancer. Criteria for seed design were derived and several beta-emitting nuclides were examined for suitability. 142Pr was selected as the isotope of choice. Seeds 0.08 cm in diameter and 0.9 cm long were manufactured for testing. The seeds were activated in the Texas A&M University research reactor. The activity produced was as expected when considering the meta-stable state and epi-thermal neutron flux. The MCNP5 Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the quantitative dosimetric parameters suggested in the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) TG-43/60. The Monte Carlo calculation results were compared with those from a dose point kernel code. The dose profiles agree well with each other. The gamma dose of 142Pr was evaluated. The gamma dose is 0.3 Gy at 1.0 cm with initial activity of 5.95 mCi and is insignificant to other organs. Measurements were performed to assess the 2-dimensional axial dose distributions using Gafchromic radiochromic film. The radiochromic film was calibrated using an X-ray machine calibrated against a National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceable ion chamber. A calibration curve was derived using a least squares fit of a second order polynomial. The measured dose distribution agrees well with results from the Monte Carlo simulation. The dose was 130.8 Gy at 6 mm from the seed center with initial activity of 5.95 mCi. AAPM TG-43/60 parameters were determined. The reference dose rate for 2 mm and 6 mm were 0.67 and 0.02 cGy/s/mCi, respectively. The geometry function, radial dose function and anisotropy function were generated.

  14. Determination of the prescription dose for biradionuclide permanent prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nuttens, V. E.; Lucas, S. [Laboratoire d'Analyses par Reactions Nucleaires, Physics Department, LARN Lab, University of Namur (FUNDP), Rue de Bruxelles, 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2008-12-15

    A model based on the linear quadratic model that has been corrected for repopulation, sublethal cell damage repair, and RBE effect has been used to determine the prescription dose for prostate permanent brachytherapy using seeds loaded with a mixture of {sup 103}Pd and {sup 125}I or a mixture of {sup 103}Pd and {sup 131}Cs. The prescription dose was determined by comparing the tumor cell survival fractions between the considered biradionuclide seed implant and one monoradionuclide seed implant chosen from {sup 103}Pd, {sup 125}I, and {sup 131}Cs. Prostate edema is included in the model. The influence of the value of the radiobiological parameters and RBE were also investigated. Two mixtures of radionuclides were considered: {sup 103}Pd{sub 0.75}-{sup 125}I{sub 0.25} and {sup 103}Pd{sub 0.25}-{sup 131}Cs{sub 0.75}, where the subscripts indicate the fractions of total initial internal activity in the biradionuclide seed. These fractions were selected in order to obtain a dose distribution that lies between that of {sup 103}Pd and {sup 125}I/{sup 131}Cs. As expected, the computed prescription dose values are dependent on the model parameters (edema half-life and magnitude, radiobiogical parameters, and RBE). The radionuclide used as a benchmark also has a strong impact on the derived prescribed dose. The large uncertainties in the radiobiological parameters and RBE values produce big errors in the computed prescribed dose. Averaged over the range of all the parameters and depending on the radionuclide used as a benchmark (in subscript), the derived prescription dose for the first mixture (PdI) would be: D{sub Pd}{sup PdI}=142{sub -16}{sup +15} Gy and D{sub I}{sup PdI}=142{sub -8}{sup +6} Gy; and D{sub Pd}{sup PdCs}=128{sub -13}{sup +13} Gy and D{sub Cs}{sup PdCs}=115{sub -7}{sup +6} Gy for the PdCs mixture. The uncertainties could be reduced if the radiobiological parameters and RBE value were known more accurately. However, as edema characteristics are patient dependent and can be obtained only after the treatment, an unpredictable error is unavoidable.

  15. Long-Term Results of a Prospective, Phase II Study of Long-Term Androgen Ablation, Pelvic Radiotherapy, Brachytherapy Boost, and Adjuvant Docetaxel in Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    DiBiase, Steven J., E-mail: sdibiase@dvullc.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Robert Wood Johnson School of Medicine and Cooper University Hospital, Camden, NJ (United States); Hussain, Arif [Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Kataria, Ritesh; Amin, Pradip; Bassi, Sunakshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Dawson, Nancy [Lombardi Cancer Center, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC (United States); Kwok, Young [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: We report the long-term results of a prospective, Phase II study of long-term androgen deprivation (AD), pelvic radiotherapy (EBRT), permanent transperineal prostate brachytherapy boost (PB), and adjuvant docetaxel in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligibility included biopsy-proven prostate adenocarcinoma with the following: prostate-specific antigen (PSA) > 20 ng/ml; or Gleason score of 7 and a PSA >10 ng/ml; or any Gleason score of 8 to 10; or stage T2b to T3 irrespective of Gleason score or PSA. Treatment consisted of 45 Gy of pelvic EBRT, followed 1 month later by PB with either iodine-125 or Pd-103. One month after PB, patients received three cycles of docetaxel chemotherapy (35 mg/m{sup 2} per week, Days 1, 8, and 15 every 28 days). All patients received 2 years of AD. Biochemical failure was defined as per the Phoenix definition (PSA nadir + 2). Results: From August 2000 to March 2004, 42 patients were enrolled. The median overall and active follow-ups were 5.6 years (range, 0.9-7.8 years) and 6.3 years (range, 4-7.8 years), respectively. Grade 2 and 3 acute genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were 50.0% and 14.2%, respectively, with no Grade 4 toxicities noted. Grade 3 and 4 acute hematologic toxicities were 19% and 2.4%, respectively. Of the patients, 85.7% were able to complete the planned multimodality treatment. The 5- and 7-year actuarial freedom from biochemical failures rates were 89.6% and 86.5%, and corresponding rates for disease-free survival were 76.2% and 70.4%, respectively. The 5- and 7-year actuarial overall survival rates were 83.3% and 80.1%, respectively. The 5- and 7-year actuarial rates of late Grade 2 GI/GU toxicity (no Grade 3-5) was 7.7%. Conclusions: The trimodality approach of using 2 years of AD, external radiation, brachytherapy, and upfront docetaxel in high-risk prostate cancer is well tolerated, produces encouraging long-term results, and should be validated in a multi-institutional setting.

  16. A dosimetric comparison of 169Yb versus 192Ir for HDR prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Lymperopoulou, G; Papagiannis, P; Sakelliou, L; Milickovic, N; Giannouli, S; Baltas, D

    2005-12-01

    For the purpose of evaluating the use of 169Yb for prostate High Dose Rate brachytherapy (HDR), a hypothetical 169Yb source is assumed with the exact same design of the new microSelectron source replacing the 192Ir active core by pure 169Yb metal. Monte Carlo simulation is employed for the full dosimetric characterization of both sources and results are compared following the AAPM TG-43 dosimetric formalism. Monte Carlo calculated dosimetry results are incorporated in a commercially available treatment planning system (SWIFT), which features an inverse treatment planning option based on a multiobjective dose optimization engine. The quality of prostate HDR brachytherapy using the real 192Ir and hypothetical 169Yb source is compared in a comprehensive analysis of different prostate implants in terms of the multiobjective dose optimization solutions as well as treatment quality indices such as Dose Volume Histograms (DVH) and the Conformal Index (COIN). Given that scattering overcompensates for absorption in intermediate photon energies and distances in the range of interest to prostate HDR brachytherapy, 169Yb proves at least equivalent to 192Ir irrespective of prostate volume. This has to be evaluated in view of the shielding requirements for the 169Yb energies that are minimal relative to that for 192Ir. PMID:16475783

  17. Comparison of 3 different postimplant dosimetry methods following permanent {sup 125}I prostate seed brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Marcu, Loredana G., E-mail: loredana@marcunet.com [Department of Medical Physics, Royal Adelaide Hospital, South Australia (Australia); Faculty of Science, University of Oradea (Romania); School of Chemistry and Physics, University of Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Gowda, Raghu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, South Australia (Australia)

    2013-10-01

    Postimplant dosimetry (PID) after Iodine-125 ({sup 125}I) implant of the prostate should offer a reliable qualitative assessment. So far, there is no consensus regarding the optimum PID method, though the latest literature is in favor of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study aims to simultaneously compare 3 PID techniques: (1) MRI-computed tomography (CT) fusion; (2) ultrasound (US)-CT fusion; and (3) manual target delineation on CT. The study comprised 10 patients with prostate cancer. CT/MR scans with urinary catheters in place for PID were done either on day 0 or day 1 postimplantation. The main parameter evaluated and compared among methods was target D90. The results show that CT-based D90s are lower than US-CT D90s (median difference,?6.85%), whereas MR-CT PID gives higher D90 than US-CT PID (median difference, 4.25%). Manual contouring on CT images tends to overestimate the prostate volume compared with transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) (median difference, 23.33%), whereas on US images the target is overestimated compared with MR-based contouring (median difference, 13.25%). Although there are certain differences among the results given by various PID techniques, the differences are statistically insignificant for this small group of patients. Any dosimetric comparison between 2 PID techniques should also account for the limitations of each technique, to allow for an accurate quantification of data. Given that PID after permanent radioactive seed implant is mandatory for quality assurance, any imaging method–based PID (MR-CT, US-CT, and CT) available in a radiotherapy department can be indicative of the quality of the procedure.

  18. SU-E-T-259: Particle Swarm Optimization in Radial Dose Function Fitting for a Novel Iodine-125 Seed

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, X [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Al (United States); Duan, J; Popple, R; Huang, M; Shen, S; Brezovich, I [University of Alabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Cardan, R [UAB University of Alabama, Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Benhabib, S [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the coefficients of bi- and tri-exponential functions for the best fit of radial dose functions of the new iodine brachytherapy source: Iodine-125 Seed AgX-100. Methods: The particle swarm optimization (PSO) method was used to search for the coefficients of the biand tri-exponential functions that yield the best fit to data published for a few selected radial distances from the source. The coefficients were encoded into particles, and these particles move through the search space by following their local and global best-known positions. In each generation, particles were evaluated through their fitness function and their positions were changed through their velocities. This procedure was repeated until the convergence criterion was met or the maximum generation was reached. All best particles were found in less than 1,500 generations. Results: For the I-125 seed AgX-100 considered as a point source, the maximum deviation from the published data is less than 2.9% for bi-exponential fitting function and 0.2% for tri-exponential fitting function. For its line source, the maximum deviation is less than 1.1% for bi-exponential fitting function and 0.08% for tri-exponential fitting function. Conclusion: PSO is a powerful method in searching coefficients for bi-exponential and tri-exponential fitting functions. The bi- and tri-exponential models of Iodine-125 seed AgX-100 point and line sources obtained with PSO optimization provide accurate analytical forms of the radial dose function. The tri-exponential fitting function is more accurate than the bi-exponential function.

  19. PSA Bounce and Biochemical Failure After Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Study of 820 Patients With a Minimum of 3 Years of Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Caloglu, Murat, E-mail: caloglumurat@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Trakya University, Edirne (Turkey); Ciezki, Jay P.; Reddy, Chandana A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Angermeier, Kenneth; Ulchaker, James [Glickman Urologic Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Chehade, Nabil; Altman, Andrew [Department of Urology, Kaiser Permanente-Ohio, Parma, OH (United States); Magi-Galuzzi, Christina [Department of Anatomic Pathology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Klein, Eric A. [Glickman Urologic Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To determine clinical or dosimetric factors associated with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce, as well as an association between a PSA bounce and biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS), in patients treated with iodine-125 brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A variety of clinical and treatment factors were examined in 820 patients who had a minimum of 3 years of PSA follow-up with T1-T2cN0M0 prostate cancer. Four different PSA threshold values were used for defining a PSA bounce: a PSA rise of {>=}0.2, {>=}0.4, {>=}0.6, and {>=}0.8 ng/mL. Results: A PSA bounce of {>=}0.2, {>=}0.4, {>=}0.6, and {>=}0.8 ng/mL was noted in 247 patients (30.1%), 161 (19.6%), 105 (12.8%), and 78 (9.5%), respectively. The median time to the first PSA rise was 17.4, 16.25, 16.23, and 15.71 months, respectively, vs. 34.35 months for a biochemical failure (p < 0.0001). A PSA rise of {>=}0.2 ng/mL was the only definition for which there was a significant difference in bRFS between bounce and non-bounce patients. The 5-year bRFS rate of patients having a PSA bounce of {>=}0.2 was 97.7% vs. 91% for those who did not have a PSA bounce (p = 0.0011). On univariate analysis for biochemical failure, age, risk group, and PSAs per year had a statistically significant correlation with PSA bounce of {>=}0.2 ng/mL. On multivariate analysis, age and PSAs per year remained statistically significant (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0456, respectively). Conclusions: A bounce definition of a rise {>=}0.2 ng/mL is a reliable definition among several other definitions. The time to first PSA rise is the most valuable factor for distinguishing between a bounce and biochemical failure.

  20. HDR Brachytherapy in the Management of High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Masson, Susan; Persad, Raj; Bahl, Amit

    2012-01-01

    High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is used with increasing frequency for the treatment of prostate cancer. It is a technique which allows delivery of large individual fractions to the prostate without exposing adjacent normal tissues to unacceptable toxicity. This approach is particularly favourable in prostate cancer where tumours are highly sensitive to dose escalation and to increases in radiotherapy fraction size, due to the unique radiobiological behaviour of prostate cancers in contrast with other malignancies. In this paper we discuss the rationale and the increasing body of clinical evidence for the use of this technique in patients with high-risk prostate cancer, where it is combined with external beam radiotherapy. We highlight practical aspects of delivering treatment and discuss toxicity and limitations, with particular reference to current practice in the United Kingdom. PMID:22461791

  1. A theoretical derivation of the nomograms for permanent prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, X H; Potters, L

    2001-04-01

    This study calculates the required minimum radioactivity to deliver a prescribed dose of radiation to a target using radioisotopes in permanent prostate brachytherapy. Assuming the radioactivity to be in a continuous form, an integral equation--Fredholm equation of the first kind, can be formulated with the radioactivity density used as the variable. The density distribution to produce a uniform volume dose rate is determined using a quadrature method and the radial profile behaves smoothly from the zero radius, and peaks sharply approaching the volume boundary. The density for Pd-103 is about 1.5 times that of I-125 due to its higher spatial attenuation. A nomogram is the relationship between the total activity per unit dose (A) and the dimension of the volume (d). Expressing the nomogram as A=c X dn U/Gy, then (c,n)= [(0.0098, 2.09) I-125] and [(0.031, 2.25) Pd-103]. Compared with the Memorial nomogram, (c,n)=[(0.011,2.2) I-125] and [(0.036,2.56) Pd-103], or that quoted by AAPM TG64, (c,n)=[(0.014,2.05) I-125] and [(0.056,2.22) Pd-103], our calculation determined an average 33% and 35% decrease for I-125, and 89% and 77% decrease for Pd-103, respectively. Two reasons for the extra total activity found in the Memorial and AAPM nomograms are: (a) An imperfect clinical situation limited by the restraints of implant techniques (e.g., use of templates) associated with the presence of adjacent normal organs, and (b) source discretization into seeds. When radioactivity is clumped as discrete seeds, higher activity is needed because of "wastage" in two aspects: (a) Dose cold-spots at intersource spaces, (b) hot-spots around the sources. Thus in theory, use of lower activity seeds will require less total activity to deliver a prescribed dose. Based on our study, Pd-103 delivers a higher therapeutic ratio and a lower integral dose to the patient compared to I-125. PMID:11339766

  2. Automatic segmentation of radiographic fiducial and seeds from X-ray images in prostate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Nathanael; Deguet, Anton; Song, Danny Y.; Burdette, Everette C.; Prince, Jerry L.; Lee, Junghoon

    2011-01-01

    Prostate brachytherapy guided by transrectal ultrasound is a common treatment option for early stage prostate cancer. Prostate cancer accounts for 28% of cancer cases and 11% of cancer deaths in men with 217,730 estimated new cases and 32,050 estimated deaths in 2010 in the United States alone. The major current limitation is the inability to reliably localize implanted radiation seeds spatially in relation to the prostate. Multimodality approaches that incorporate X-ray for seed localization have been proposed, but they require both accurate tracking of the imaging device and segmentation of the seeds. Some use image-based radiographic fiducials to track the X-ray device, but manual intervention is needed to select proper regions of interest for segmenting both the tracking fiducial and the seeds, to evaluate the segmentation results, and to correct the segmentations in the case of segmentation failure, thus requiring a significant amount of extra time in the operating room. In this paper, we present an automatic segmentation algorithm that simultaneously segments the tracking fiducial and brachytherapy seeds, thereby minimizing the need for manual intervention. In addition, through the innovative use of image processing techniques such as mathematical morphology, Hough transforms, and RANSAC, our method can detect and separate overlapping seeds that are common in brachytherapy implant images. Our algorithm was validated on 55 phantom and 206 patient images, successfully segmenting both the fiducial and seeds with a mean seed segmentation rate of 96% and sub-millimeter accuracy. PMID:21802975

  3. A haptic-enhanced 3D real-time interactive needle insertion simulation for prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaogang; Fenster, Aaron

    2004-05-01

    A virtual reality based surgical simulation can improve the accuracy and quality of prostate brachytherapy by facilitating surgeon training, rehearsal, and intra-operative assistance. In this paper, we describe a prototype 3D realtime interactive simulation environment for needle insertion and seed implantation for prostate brachytherapy. A restricted 3D ChainMail method, derived from the original 3D ChainMail method based on our modification, was used to account for dynamic soft tissue deformation during needle insertion. We improved the neighbor-searching algorithm for the original 3D ChainMail method to enable a complete search for any objects including strict-concave. A direct manipulation model for needle-tissue interaction was implemented. A haptic feedback has also been provided to enhance realism and training outcome. For simplicity and efficacy, we have adopted a distributed system structure functionally incorporating two software modules: visual simulation module and haptic simulation module. The simulation was demonstrated using four key steps of the brachytherapy procedure: 1) specification of seed positions inside the prostate; 2) placement of a needle at a specified entry point and trajectory; 3) insertion of the needle into the prostate consisting of two basic sub-steps: membrane contraction and penetration insertion; and, 4) retraction of the needle after seed implantation. The preliminary results of the simulation are promising.

  4. A new CT prostate segmentation for CT-based HDR brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Rossi, Peter; Ogunleye, Tomi; Jani, Ashesh B.; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian

    2014-03-01

    High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has become a popular treatment modality for localized prostate cancer. Prostate HDR treatment involves placing 10 to 20 catheters (needles) into the prostate gland, and then delivering radiation dose to the cancerous regions through these catheters. These catheters are often inserted with transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance and the HDR treatment plan is based on the CT images. The main challenge for CT-based HDR planning is to accurately segment prostate volume in CT images due to the poor soft tissue contrast and additional artifacts introduced by the catheters. To overcome these limitations, we propose a novel approach to segment the prostate in CT images through TRUS-CT deformable registration based on the catheter locations. In this approach, the HDR catheters are reconstructed from the intra-operative TRUS and planning CT images, and then used as landmarks for the TRUS-CT image registration. The prostate contour generated from the TRUS images captured during the ultrasound-guided HDR procedure was used to segment the prostate on the CT images through deformable registration. We conducted two studies. A prostate-phantom study demonstrated a submillimeter accuracy of our method. A pilot study of 5 prostate-cancer patients was conducted to further test its clinical feasibility. All patients had 3 gold markers implanted in the prostate that were used to evaluate the registration accuracy, as well as previous diagnostic MR images that were used as the gold standard to assess the prostate segmentation. For the 5 patients, the mean gold-marker displacement was 1.2 mm; the prostate volume difference between our approach and the MRI was 7.2%, and the Dice volume overlap was over 91%. Our proposed method could improve prostate delineation, enable accurate dose planning and delivery, and potentially enhance prostate HDR treatment outcome.

  5. MCNP modeling of prostate brachytherapy and organ dosimetry 

    E-print Network

    Usgaonker, Susrut Rajanikant

    2004-09-30

    because the doses delivered to the prostate are extremely high and the organs near the prostate are potentially at risk for receiving high doses of radiation, leading to increased probabilities of adverse health effects such as cancer. In this research...

  6. A comparison of radiation dose to the neurovascular bundles in men with and without prostate brachytherapy-induced erectile dysfunction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gregory S Merrick; Wayne M Butler; Anthony T Dorsey; Jonathan H Lief; Joseph G Donzella

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The etiology of erectile dysfunction after definitive local therapy for carcinoma of the prostate gland represents a multifactorial phenomenon including neurogenic compromise, venous insufficiency, local trauma, and psychogenic causes. It has been suggested that impotence after prostate brachytherapy is a consequence of excessive radiation dose to the neurovascular bundles (NVB). Herein we evaluate the potential relationship between radiation dose

  7. Effect of edema, relative biological effectiveness, and dose heterogeneity on prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian Z.; Mayr, Nina A.; Nag, Subir; Montebello, Joseph; Gupta, Nilendu; Samsami, Nina; Kanellitsas, Christos [Department of Radiation Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2006-04-15

    Many factors influence response in low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy of prostate cancer. Among them, edema, relative biological effectiveness (RBE), and dose heterogeneity have not been fully modeled previously. In this work, the generalized linear-quadratic (LQ) model, extended to account for the effects of edema, RBE, and dose heterogeneity, was used to assess these factors and their combination effect. Published clinical data have shown that prostate edema after seed implant has a magnitude (ratio of post- to preimplant volume) of 1.3-2.0 and resolves exponentially with a half-life of 4-25 days over the duration of the implant dose delivery. Based on these parameters and a representative dose-volume histogram (DVH), we investigated the influence of edema on the implant dose distribution. The LQ parameters ({alpha}=0.15 Gy{sup -1} and {alpha}/{beta}=3.1 Gy) determined in earlier studies were used to calculate the equivalent uniform dose in 2 Gy fractions (EUD{sub 2}) with respect to three effects: edema, RBE, and dose heterogeneity for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd implants. The EUD{sub 2} analysis shows a negative effect of edema and dose heterogeneity on tumor cell killing because the prostate edema degrades the dose coverage to tumor target. For the representative DVH, the V{sub 100} (volume covered by 100% of prescription dose) decreases from 93% to 91% and 86%, and the D{sub 90} (dose covering 90% of target volume) decrease from 107% to 102% and 94% of prescription dose for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd implants, respectively. Conversely, the RBE effect of LDR brachytherapy [versus external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy] enhances dose effect on tumor cell kill. In order to balance the negative effects of edema and dose heterogeneity, the RBE of prostate brachytherapy was determined to be approximately 1.2-1.4 for {sup 125}I and 1.3-1.6 for {sup 103}Pd implants. These RBE values are consistent with the RBE data published in the literature. These results may explain why in earlier modeling studies, when the effects of edema, dose heterogeneity, and RBE were all ignored simultaneously, prostate LDR brachytherapy was reported to show an overall similar dose effect as EBRT and HDR brachytherapy, which are independent of edema and RBE effects and have a better dose coverage.

  8. On the Sensitivity of ?/? Prediction to Dose Calculation Methodology in Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Afsharpour, Hossein [Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer, Université Laval and Département de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Québec, QC (Canada); Centre Intégré de Cancérologie de la Montérégie, Hôpital Charles-LeMoyne, Greenfield Park, QC (Canada); Walsh, Sean [Department of Radiation Oncology Maastricht Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, The University of Oxford, The United Kingdom (United Kingdom); Collins Fekete, Charles-Antoine; Vigneault, Eric [Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer, Université Laval and Département de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Québec, QC (Canada); Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology Maastricht Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Medical Physics Unit, Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montréal, Québec (Canada); Beaulieu, Luc, E-mail: Luc.Beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca [Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer, Université Laval and Département de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Québec, QC (Canada)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To study the relationship between the accuracy of the dose calculation in brachytherapy and the estimations of the radiosensitivity parameter, ?/?, for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In this study, Monte Carlo methods and more specifically the code ALGEBRA was used to produce accurate dose calculations in the case of prostate brachytherapy. Equivalent uniform biologically effective dose was calculated for these dose distributions and was used in an iso-effectiveness relationship with external beam radiation therapy. Results: By considering different levels of detail in the calculations, the estimation for the ?/? parameter varied from 1.9 to 6.3 Gy, compared with a value of 3.0 Gy suggested by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 137. Conclusions: Large variations of the ?/? show the sensitivity of this parameter to dose calculation modality. The use of accurate dose calculation engines is critical for better evaluating the biological outcomes of treatments.

  9. Prostate-specific antigen bounce predicts for a favorable prognosis following brachytherapy: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Michael B.; Ohri, Nitin; Hodge, James W.; Garg, Madhur; Bodner, William; Kalnicki, Shalom; Dicker, Adam P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Controversy exists whether the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce phenomenon following definitive radiation for prostate cancer has prognostic significance. Here, we perform a meta-analysis to determine the association between PSA bounce and biochemical control after brachytherapy alone. Material and methods We reviewed Medline, EMBASE, and CENTRAL citations through February 2012. Studies that recorded biochemical failure rates in bouncers and non-bouncers were included. Hazard ratios describing the impact of bounce on biochemical failure were extracted directly from the studies or calculated from survival curves. Pooled estimates were obtained using the inverse variance method. A random effects model was used in cases of significant effect heterogeneity (p < 0.10 using Q test). Results The final analysis included 3011 patients over 6 studies treated with brachytherapy. Meta-analysis revealed that patients experiencing PSA bounce after brachytherapy, conferred a decreased risk of biochemical failure (random effects model HR = 0.42, 95% CI: 0.30-0.59; p < 0.001). Conclusions Our meta-analysis determined that PSA bounce predicts for improved biochemical control following brachytherapy. To our knowledge, this is the first study describing this effect. PMID:24474969

  10. A Fully Actuated Robotic Assistant for MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy and Brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Su, Hao; Shang, Weijian; Tokuda, Junichi; Hata, Nobuhiko; Tempany, Clare M.; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    Intra-operative medical imaging enables incorporation of human experience and intelligence in a controlled, closed-loop fashion. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an ideal modality for surgical guidance of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, with its ability to perform high resolution, real-time, high soft tissue contrast imaging without ionizing radiation. However, for most current image-guided approaches only static pre-operative images are accessible for guidance, which are unable to provide updated information during a surgical procedure. The high magnetic field, electrical interference, and limited access of closed-bore MRI render great challenges to developing robotic systems that can perform inside a diagnostic high-field MRI while obtaining interactively updated MR images. To overcome these limitations, we are developing a piezoelectrically actuated robotic assistant for actuated percutaneous prostate interventions under real-time MRI guidance. Utilizing a modular design, the system enables coherent and straight forward workflow for various percutaneous interventions, including prostate biopsy sampling and brachytherapy seed placement, using various needle driver configurations. The unified workflow compromises: 1) system hardware and software initialization, 2) fiducial frame registration, 3) target selection and motion planning, 4) moving to the target and performing the intervention (e.g. taking a biopsy sample) under live imaging, and 5) visualization and verification. Phantom experiments of prostate biopsy and brachytherapy were executed under MRI-guidance to evaluate the feasibility of the workflow. The robot successfully performed fully actuated biopsy sampling and delivery of simulated brachytherapy seeds under live MR imaging, as well as precise delivery of a prostate brachytherapy seed distribution with an RMS accuracy of 0.98mm. PMID:25076821

  11. A fully actuated robotic assistant for MRI-guided prostate biopsy and brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Su, Hao; Shang, Weijian; Tokuda, Junichi; Hata, Nobuhiko; Tempany, Clare M.; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2013-03-01

    Intra-operative medical imaging enables incorporation of human experience and intelligence in a controlled, closed-loop fashion. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an ideal modality for surgical guidance of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, with its ability to perform high resolution, real-time, high soft tissue contrast imaging without ionizing radiation. However, for most current image-guided approaches only static pre-operative images are accessible for guidance, which are unable to provide updated information during a surgical procedure. The high magnetic field, electrical interference, and limited access of closed-bore MRI render great challenges to developing robotic systems that can perform inside a diagnostic high-field MRI while obtaining interactively updated MR images. To overcome these limitations, we are developing a piezoelectrically actuated robotic assistant for actuated percutaneous prostate interventions under real-time MRI guidance. Utilizing a modular design, the system enables coherent and straight forward workflow for various percutaneous interventions, including prostate biopsy sampling and brachytherapy seed placement, using various needle driver configurations. The unified workflow compromises: 1) system hardware and software initialization, 2) fiducial frame registration, 3) target selection and motion planning, 4) moving to the target and performing the intervention (e.g. taking a biopsy sample) under live imaging, and 5) visualization and verification. Phantom experiments of prostate biopsy and brachytherapy were executed under MRI-guidance to evaluate the feasibility of the workflow. The robot successfully performed fully actuated biopsy sampling and delivery of simulated brachytherapy seeds under live MR imaging, as well as precise delivery of a prostate brachytherapy seed distribution with an RMS accuracy of 0.98mm.

  12. Prostate Brachytherapy Seed Localization with Gaussian Blurring and Camera Self-calibration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Junghoon Lee; Xiaofeng Liu; Jerry L. Prince; Gabor Fichtinger

    2008-01-01

    A tomosynthesis-based prostate brachytherapy seed localization method is described. Gaussian-blurred images are computed from\\u000a a limited number of X-ray images, and a 3-D volume is reconstructed by backprojection. Candidate seed locations are extracted\\u000a from the reconstructed volume and false positive seeds are removed by optimizing a local cost function. In case where the\\u000a estimated pose error is large, a self-calibration

  13. Oblique Needle Segmentation for 3D Trus-Guided Robot-Aided Transperineal Prostate Brachytherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhouping Wei; Lori Gardi; Dónal B. Downey; Aaron Fenster

    2004-01-01

    3D TRUS-guided robot-aided prostate brachytherapy provides tools for dynamic re-optimization of a dose plan by freeing needle insertions from parallel trajectory constraints, i.e., needle trajectories can be positioned with considerable flexibility including oblique. However, oblique insertion results in the needle intersecting the 2D TRUS image and appearing as a dot, leading to blind guidance. Here, we propose a method for

  14. A Dosimetric Selectivity Intercomparison of HDR Brachytherapy, IMRT and Helical Tomotherapy in Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Johanne Hermesse; Sylvie Biver; Nicolas Jansen; Eric Lenaerts; Nathalie De Patoul; Stefaan Vynckier; Philippe Coucke; Pierre Scalliet; Philippe Nickers

    2009-01-01

    \\u000a \\u000a Background and Purpose:\\u000a   Dose escalation in order to improve the biochemical control in prostate cancer requires the application of irradiation techniques\\u000a with high conformality. The dosimetric selectivity of three radiation modalities is compared: high-dose-rate brachytherapy\\u000a (HDR-BT), intensity-modulated radiation radiotherapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT).\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Patients and Methods:\\u000a   Ten patients with prostate adenocarcinoma treated by a 10-Gy HDR-BT boost after external-beam

  15. Fast prostate segmentation for brachytherapy based on joint fusion of images and labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouranian, Saman; Ramezani, Mahdi; Mahdavi, S. Sara; Spadinger, Ingrid; Morris, William J.; Salcudean, Septimiu E.; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2014-03-01

    Brachytherapy as one of the treatment methods for prostate cancer takes place by implantation of radioactive seeds inside the gland. The standard of care for this treatment procedure is to acquire transrectal ultrasound images of the prostate which are segmented in order to plan the appropriate seed placement. The segmentation process is usually performed either manually or semi-automatically and is associated with subjective errors because the prostate visibility is limited in ultrasound images. The current segmentation process also limits the possibility of intra-operative delineation of the prostate to perform real-time dosimetry. In this paper, we propose a computationally inexpensive and fully automatic segmentation approach that takes advantage of previously segmented images to form a joint space of images and their segmentations. We utilize joint Independent Component Analysis method to generate a model which is further employed to produce a probability map of the target segmentation. We evaluate this approach on the transrectal ultrasound volume images of 60 patients using a leave-one-out cross-validation approach. The results are compared with the manually segmented prostate contours that were used by clinicians to plan brachytherapy procedures. We show that the proposed approach is fast with comparable accuracy and precision to those found in previous studies on TRUS segmentation.

  16. Acute Urinary Retention After I-125 Prostate Brachytherapy in Relation to Dose in Different Regions of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Roeloffzen, Ellen M.A., E-mail: e.m.a.roeloffzen@umcutrecht.n [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Monninkhof, Evelyn M. [Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Battermann, Jan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Roermund, Joep G.H. van [Department of Urology, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Moerland, Marinus A.; Vulpen, Marco van [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the influence of dose in different prostate regions, and the influence of anatomic variation on the risk of acute urinary retention (AUR) after I-125 prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: In this case-control study, dosimetry and anatomy were compared between 50 patients with AUR (cases) and 50 patients without AUR (controls). Cases and controls were randomly selected from our database. The following structures were delineated on magnetic resonance imaging: prostate, urethra, peripheral zone, transitional zone, apex, base, midprostate, lower sphincter, and bladder neck. The dosimetric parameters analyzed were D{sub 10}, D{sub 50}, D{sub 90}, V{sub 100}, V{sub 150}, and V{sub 200}. The anatomic parameters analyzed were prostate protrusion into the bladder, bladder overlap, urethra angle, and urethra-bladder angle. The delineator was blinded to the patient's AUR status. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the association of these factors with AUR. Results: The dose delivered to different regions of the prostate was not significantly associated with the risk of AUR. Only dose to the bladder neck was significantly associated with AUR (odds ratio 1.13 per 10 Gy; 95% CI 1.02;1.26; p = 0.023). Mean bladder neck D{sub 90} was 65 Gy in AUR cases vs. 56 Gy in controls (p = 0.016), and mean bladder neck D{sub 10} was 128 Gy vs. 107 Gy, respectively (p = 0.018). Furthermore, on univariate analysis, a larger extent of both bladder overlap and of prostate protrusion were associated with a higher risk of AUR (odds ratio 1.16; 95% CI 1.04-1.28; p = 0.005, and odds ratio 1.83; 95% CI 1.37-2.45; p < 0.001, respectively). The mean extent of prostate protrusion was 3.5 mm in AUR cases vs. 1.0 mm in controls (p < 0.001). Odds ratios did not change substantially after adjustment for potential confounders. On multivariate analysis, the extent of prostate protrusion seemed to be a stronger risk factor for AUR than bladder overlap. Conclusion: The risk of AUR is not associated with dose delivered to different regions of the prostate. However, a higher dose to the bladder neck and a larger extent of prostate protrusion into the bladder are risk factors for the development of AUR after I-125 prostate brachytherapy.

  17. Low-dose-rate or high-dose-rate brachytherapy in treatment of prostate cancer – between options

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Permanent low-dose-rate (LDR-BT) and temporary high-dose-rate (HDR-BT) brachytherapy are competitive techniques for clinically localized prostate radiotherapy. Although a randomized trial will likely never to be conducted comparing these two forms of brachytherapy, a comparative analysis proves useful in understanding some of their intrinsic differences, several of which could be exploited to improve outcomes. The aim of this paper is to look for possible similarities and differences between both brachytherapy modalities. Indications and contraindications for monotherapy and for brachytherapy as a boost to external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) are presented. It is suggested that each of these techniques has attributes that advocates for one or the other. First, they represent the extreme ends of the spectrum with respect to dose rate and fractionation, and therefore have inherently different radiobiological properties. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy has the great advantage of being practically a one-time procedure, and enjoys a long-term follow-up database supporting its excellent outcomes and low morbidity. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy has been a gold standard for prostate brachytherapy in low risk patients since many years. On the other hand, HDR is a fairly invasive procedure requiring several sessions associated with a brief hospital stay. Although lacking in significant long-term data, it possesses the technical advantage of control over its postimplant dosimetry (by modulating the source dwell time and position), which is absent in LDR brachytherapy. This important difference in dosimetric control allows HDR doses to be escalated safely, a flexibility that does not exist for LDR brachytherapy. Conclusions Radiobiological models support the current clinical evidence for equivalent outcomes in localized prostate cancer with either LDR or HDR brachytherapy, using current dose regimens. At present, all available clinical data regarding these two techniques suggests that they are equally effective, stage for stage, in providing high tumor control rates. PMID:23634153

  18. There Is No Correlation Between Erectile Dysfunction and Dose to Penile Bulb and Neurovascular Bundles Following Real-Time Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amy N. Solan; Jamie A. Cesaretti; Nelson N. Stone; Richard G. Stock

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the relationship between the onset of erectile dysfunction and dose to the penile bulb and neurovascular bundles (NVBs) after real-time ultrasound-guided prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: One hundred forty-seven patients who underwent prostate brachytherapy met the following eligibility criteria: (1) treatment with ¹²I brachytherapy to a prescribed dose of 160 Gy with or without hormones without supplemental

  19. Short-lag spatial coherence beamforming of photoacoustic images for enhanced visualization of prostate brachytherapy seeds

    PubMed Central

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Kuo, Nathanael; Song, Danny Y.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate brachytherapy, administered by implanting tiny radioactive seeds to treat prostate cancer, currently relies on transrectal ultrasound imaging for intraoperative visualization of the metallic seeds. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has been suggested as a feasible alternative to ultrasound imaging due to its superior sensitivity to metal surrounded by tissue. However, PA images suffer from poor contrast when seeds are distant from the light source. We propose a transperineal light delivery method and investigate the application of a short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) beamformer to enhance low-contrast photoacoustic signals that are distant from this type of light source. Performance is compared to a conventional delay-and-sum beamformer. A pure gelatin phantom was implanted with black ink-coated brachytherapy seeds and the mean contrast was improved by 3–25 dB with the SLSC beamformer for fiber-seed distances ranging 0.6–6.3 cm, when approximately 10% of the receive aperture elements were included in the short-lag sum. For fiber-seed distances greater than 3–4 cm, the mean contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was approximately doubled with the SLSC beamformer, while mean signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) were mostly similar with both beamformers. Lateral resolution was decreased by 2 mm, but improved with larger short-lag values at the expense of poorer CNR and SNR. Similar contrast and CNR improvements were achieved with an uncoated brachytherapy seed implanted in ex vivo tissue. Results indicate that the SLSC beamformer has potential to enhance the visualization of prostate brachytherapy seeds that are distant from the light source. PMID:24156057

  20. Interfraction patient motion and implant displacement in prostate high dose rate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, C. D.; Kron, T.; Leahy, M.; Duchesne, G.; Williams, S.; Tai, K. H.; Haworth, A.; Herschtal, A.; Foroudi, F. [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria 3002 (Australia); Nursing Service, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria 3002 (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria 3002 (Australia); Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and Royal Melbourne Insititute of Technology, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia); Department of Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria 3002 (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To quantify movement of prostate cancer patients undergoing treatment, using an in-house developed motion sensor in order to determine a relationship between patient movement and high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy implant displacement. Methods: An electronic motion sensor was developed based on a three axis accelerometer. HDR brachytherapy treatment for prostate is delivered at this institution in two fractions 24 h apart and 22 patients were monitored for movement over the interval between fractions. The motion sensors functioned as inclinometers, monitoring inclination of both thighs, and the inclination and roll of the abdomen. The implanted HDR brachytherapy catheter set was assessed for displacement relative to fiducial markers in the prostate. Angle measurements and angle differences over a 2 s time base were binned, and the standard deviations of the resulting frequency distributions used as a metric for patient motion in each monitored axis. These parameters were correlated to measured catheter displacement using regression modeling. Results: The mean implant displacement was 12.6 mm in the caudal direction. A mean of 19.95 h data was recorded for the patient cohort. Patients generally moved through a limited range of angles with a mean of the exception of two patients who spent in excess of 2 h lying on their side. When tested for a relationship between movement in any of the four monitored axes and the implant displacement, none was significant. Conclusions: It is not likely that patient movement influences HDR prostate implant displacement. There may be benefits to patient comfort if nursing protocols were relaxed to allow patients greater freedom to move while the implant is in situ.

  1. The impact of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control after permanent interstitial brachytherapy for early stage prostate cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    (Jay Chen, Zhe; Roberts, Kenneth; Decker, Roy; Pathare, Pradip; Rockwell, Sara; Nath, Ravinder

    2011-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that procedure-induced prostate edema during permanent interstitial brachytherapy (PIB) can cause significant variations in the dose delivered to the prostate gland. Because the clinical impact of edema-induced dose variations strongly depends on the magnitude of the edema, the temporal pattern of its resolution and its interplay with the decay of radioactivity and the underlying biological processes of tumor cells (such as tumor potential doubling time), we investigated the impact of edema-induced dose variations on the tumor cell survival and tumor control probability after PIB with the 131Cs, 125I and 103Pd sources used in current clinical practice. The exponential edema resolution model reported by Waterman et al (1998 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 41 1069-77) was used to characterize the edema evolutions previously observed during clinical PIB for prostate cancer. The concept of biologically effective dose, taking into account tumor cell proliferation and sublethal damage repair during dose delivery, was used to characterize the effects of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control probability. Our calculation indicated that prostate edema, if not appropriately taken into account, can increase the cell survival and decrease the probability of local control of PIB. The magnitude of an edema-induced increase in cell survival increased with increasing edema severity, decreasing half-life of radioactive decay and decreasing photon energy emitted by the source. At the doses currently prescribed for PIB and for prostate cancer cells characterized by nominal radiobiology parameters recommended by AAPM TG-137, PIB using 125I sources was less affected by edema than PIB using 131Cs or 103Pd sources due to the long radioactive decay half-life of 125I. The effect of edema on PIB using 131Cs or 103Pd was similar. The effect of edema on 103Pd PIB was slightly greater, even though the decay half-life of 103Pd (17 days) is longer than that of 131Cs (9.7 days), because the advantage of the longer 103Pd decay half-life was negated by the lower effective energy of the photons it emits (~21 keV compared to ~30.4 keV for 131Cs). In addition, the impact of edema could be reduced or enhanced by differences in the tumor characteristics (e.g. potential tumor doubling time or the ?/? ratio), and the effect of these factors varied for the different radioactive sources. There is a clear need to consider the effects of prostate edema during the planning and evaluation of permanent interstitial brachytherapy treatments for prostate cancer.

  2. High-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy Consistently Results in High Quality Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    White, Evan C.; Kamrava, Mitchell R.; Demarco, John; Park, Sang-June; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Kayode, Oluwatosin; Steinberg, Michael L. [California Endocurietherapy at UCLA, Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine of University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)] [California Endocurietherapy at UCLA, Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine of University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Demanes, D. Jeffrey, E-mail: jdemanes@mednet.ucla.edu [California Endocurietherapy at UCLA, Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine of University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: We performed a dosimetry analysis to determine how well the goals for clinical target volume coverage, dose homogeneity, and normal tissue dose constraints were achieved with high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Cumulative dose-volume histograms for 208 consecutively treated HDR prostate brachytherapy implants were analyzed. Planning was based on ultrasound-guided catheter insertion and postoperative CT imaging; the contoured clinical target volume (CTV) was the prostate, a small margin, and the proximal seminal vesicles. Dosimetric parameters analyzed for the CTV were D90, V90, V100, V150, and V200. Dose to the urethra, bladder, bladder balloon, and rectum were evaluated by the dose to 0.1 cm{sup 3}, 1 cm{sup 3}, and 2 cm{sup 3} of each organ, expressed as a percentage of the prescribed dose. Analysis was stratified according to prostate size. Results: The mean prostate ultrasound volume was 38.7 {+-} 13.4 cm{sup 3} (range: 11.7-108.6 cm{sup 3}). The mean CTV was 75.1 {+-} 20.6 cm{sup 3} (range: 33.4-156.5 cm{sup 3}). The mean D90 was 109.2% {+-} 2.6% (range: 102.3%-118.4%). Ninety-three percent of observed D90 values were between 105 and 115%. The mean V90, V100, V150, and V200 were 99.9% {+-} 0.05%, 99.5% {+-} 0.8%, 25.4% {+-} 4.2%, and 7.8% {+-} 1.4%. The mean dose to 0.1 cm{sup 3}, 1 cm{sup 3}, and 2 cm{sup 3} for organs at risk were: Urethra: 107.3% {+-} 3.0%, 101.1% {+-} 14.6%, and 47.9% {+-} 34.8%; bladder wall: 79.5% {+-} 5.1%, 69.8% {+-} 4.9%, and 64.3% {+-} 5.0%; bladder balloon: 70.3% {+-} 6.8%, 59.1% {+-} 6.6%, and 52.3% {+-} 6.2%; rectum: 76.3% {+-} 2.5%, 70.2% {+-} 3.3%, and 66.3% {+-} 3.8%. There was no significant difference between D90 and V100 when stratified by prostate size. Conclusions: HDR brachytherapy allows the physician to consistently achieve complete prostate target coverage and maintain normal tissue dose constraints for organs at risk over a wide range of target volumes.

  3. Salvage brachytherapy in prostate local recurrence after radiation therapy: predicting factors for control and toxicity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate efficacy and toxicity after salvage brachytherapy (BT) in prostate local recurrence after radiation therapy. Methods and materials Between 1993 and 2007, we retrospectively analyzed 56 consecutively patients (pts) undergoing salvage brachytherapy. After local biopsy-proven recurrence, pts received 145 Gy LDR-BT (37 pts, 66%) or HDR-BT (19 pts, 34%) in different dose levels according to biological equivalent doses (BED2 Gy). By the time of salvage BT, only 15 pts (27%) received ADT. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of biochemical control and toxicities. Acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were graded using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCv3.0). Results Median follow-up after salvage BT was 48 months. The 5-year FFbF was 77%. HDR and LDR late grade 3 GU toxicities were observed in 21% and 24%. Late grade 3 GI toxicities were observed in 2% (HDR) and 2.7% (LDR). On univariate analysis, pre-salvage prostate-specific antigen (PSA)?>?10 ng/ml (p?=?0.004), interval to relapse after initial treatment?Prostate BT is an effective salvage modality in some selected prostate local recurrence patients after radiation therapy. Even, we provide some potential predictors of biochemical control and toxicity for prostate salvage BT, further investigation is recommended. PMID:24885287

  4. Effect of post-implant edema on prostate brachytherapy treatment margins

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Daniel R. [Radiation Oncology, Arizona Oncology Services, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Wallner, Kent [Department of Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Radiation Oncology, Group Health Cooperative, Seattle, WA (United States); Ford, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Mueller, Amy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Merrick, Gregory [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, WV (United States); Maki, Jeffrey [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Sutlief, Steven [Department of Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Butler, Wayne [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, WV (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To determine if postimplant prostate brachytherapy treatment margins calculated on Day 0 differ substantially from those calculated on Day 30. Methods: Thirty patients with 1997 American Joint Commission on Cancer clinical stage T1-T2 prostatic carcinoma underwent prostate brachytherapy with I-125 prescribed to 144 Gy. Treatment planning methods included using loose seeds in a modified peripheral loading pattern and treatment margins (TMs) of 5-8 mm. Postimplant plain radiographs, computed tomography scans, and magnetic resonance scans were obtained 1-4 hours after implantation (Day 0). A second set of imaging studies was obtained at 30 days after implantation (Day 30) and similarly analyzed. Treatment margins were measured as the radial distance in millimeters from the prostate edge to the 100% isodose line. The TMs were measured and tabulated at 90{sup o} intervals around the prostate periphery at 0.6-cm intervals. Each direction was averaged to obtain the mean anterior, posterior, left, and right margins. Results: The mean overall TM increased from 2.6 mm ({+-}2.3) on Day 0 to 3.5 mm ({+-}2.4) on Day 30. The mean anterior margin increased from 1.2 mm on Day 0 to 1.8 mm on Day 30. The posterior margin increased from 1.2 mm on Day 0 to 2.8 mm on Day 30. The lateral treatment margins increased most over time, with mean right treatment margin increasing from 3.9 mm on Day 0 to 4.7 mm on Day 30. Conclusion: Treatment margins appear to be durable in the postimplant period, with a clinically insignificant increase from Day 0 to Day 30.

  5. Evaluation of the effect of prostate volume change on tumor control probability in LDR brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Knaup, Courtney; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Stathakis, Sotirios; Smith, Mark; Swanson, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluates low dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR) prostate plans to determine the biological effect of dose degradation due to prostate volume changes. Material and methods In this study, 39 patients were evaluated. Pre-implant prostate volume was determined using ultrasound. These images were used with the treatment planning system (Nucletron Spot Pro 3.1®) to create treatment plans using 103Pd seeds. Following the implant, patients were imaged using CT for post-implant dosimetry. From the pre and post-implant DVHs, the biologically equivalent dose and the tumor control probability (TCP) were determined using the biologically effective uniform dose. The model used RBE = 1.75 and ?/? = 2 Gy. Results The prostate volume changed between pre and post implant image sets ranged from –8% to 110%. TCP and the mean dose were reduced up to 21% and 56%, respectively. TCP is observed to decrease as the mean dose decreases to the prostate. The post-implant tumor dose was generally observed to decrease, compared to the planned dose. A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was established. Below this dose, TCP begins to fall-off. It was also determined that patients with a small prostates were more likely to suffer TCP decrease. Conclusions The biological effect of post operative prostate growth due to operative trauma in LDR was evaluated using the concept. The post-implant dose was lower than the planned dose due to an increase of prostate volume post-implant. A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was determined, below which TCP begun to decline. PMID:23346121

  6. Predictive Factors and Management of Rectal Bleeding Side Effects Following Prostate Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Jeremy G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States); Stone, Nelson N. [Department of Urology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States); Stock, Richard G., E-mail: Richard.Stock@mountsinai.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To report on the incidence, nature, and management of rectal toxicities following individual or combination brachytherapy following treatment for prostate cancer over a 17-year period. We also report the patient and treatment factors predisposing to acute ?grade 2 proctitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 2752 patients were treated for prostate cancer between October 1990 and April 2007 with either low-dose-rate brachytherapy alone or in combination with androgen depletion therapy (ADT) or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and were followed for a median of 5.86 years (minimum 1.0 years; maximum 19.19 years). We investigated the 10-year incidence, nature, and treatment of acute and chronic rectal toxicities following BT. Using univariate, and multivariate analyses, we determined the treatment and comorbidity factors predisposing to rectal toxicities. We also outline the most common and effective management for these toxicities. Results: Actuarial risk of ?grade 2 rectal bleeding was 6.4%, though notably only 0.9% of all patients required medical intervention to manage this toxicity. The majority of rectal bleeding episodes (72%) occurred within the first 3 years following placement of BT seeds. Of the 27 patients requiring management for their rectal bleeding, 18 underwent formalin treatment and nine underwent cauterization. Post-hoc univariate statistical analysis revealed that coronary artery disease (CAD), biologically effective dose, rectal volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose (RV100), and treatment modality predict the likelihood of grade ?2 rectal bleeding. Only CAD, treatment type, and RV100 fit a Cox regression multivariate model. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy is very well tolerated and rectal bleeding toxicities are either self-resolving or effectively managed by medical intervention. Treatment planning incorporating adjuvant ADT while minimizing RV100 has yielded the best toxicity-free survival following BT.

  7. Permanent 125I-seed prostate brachytherapy: early prostate specific antigen value as a predictor of PSA bounce occurrence

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate predictive factors for PSA bounce after 125I permanent seed prostate brachytherapy and identify criteria that distinguish between benign bounces and biochemical relapses. Materials and methods Men treated with exclusive permanent 125I seed brachytherapy from November 1999, with at least a 36 months follow-up were included. Bounce was defined as an increase ? 0.2 ng/ml above the nadir, followed by a spontaneous return to the nadir. Biochemical failure (BF) was defined using the criteria of the Phoenix conference: nadir +2 ng/ml. Results 198 men were included. After a median follow-up of 63.9 months, 21 patients experienced a BF, and 35.9% had at least one bounce which occurred after a median period of 17 months after implantation (4-50). Bounce amplitude was 0.6 ng/ml (0.2-5.1), and duration was 13.6 months (4.0-44.9). In 12.5%, bounce magnitude exceeded the threshold defining BF. Age at the time of treatment and high PSA level assessed at 6 weeks were significantly correlated with bounce but not with BF. Bounce patients had a higher BF free survival than the others (100% versus 92%, p = 0,007). In case of PSA increase, PSA doubling time and velocity were not significantly different between bounce and BF patients. Bounces occurred significantly earlier than relapses and than nadir + 0.2 ng/ml in BF patients (17 vs 27.8 months, p < 0.0001). Conclusion High PSA value assessed 6 weeks after brachytherapy and young age were significantly associated to a higher risk of bounces but not to BF. Long delays between brachytherapy and PSA increase are more indicative of BF. PMID:22449081

  8. Combination of 5?-reductase inhibitor with combined androgen blockade (CAB) as a novel cytoreductive regimen before prostate brachytherapy: Ultra-CAB

    PubMed Central

    Muro, Yusuke; Kosaka, Takeo; Mizuno, Ryuichi; Ohashi, Toshio; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Oya, Mototsugu

    2015-01-01

    We report a first case of using a 5?-reductase inhibitor (5ARI) and combined androgen blockade (CAB) as a cytoreductive regimen before prostate brachytherapy. Prostate volume reduction with CAB is limited to approximately 40% in most cases, making it difficult to meet anatomical constraints to perform these procedures in cases with large prostate volume. With the added administration of 5ARI, further volume reduction can be expected. Here, we describe this cytoreductive regimen used in a 63 year-old prostate cancer patient who became eligible to receive brachytherapy after dutasteride (0.5 mg daily) was added to CAB and prostate volume reduction of 57% was achieved.

  9. High-dose-rate brachytherapy delivered in two fractions as monotherapy for low-risk prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alwers, Elizabeth; Cifuentes, Javier; Bobadilla, Ivan; Torres, Felipe; Arbelaez, Juan; Gaitan, Armando; Cortes, Helber; Acevedo, Yenny; Quintero, Paulo; Vasquez, Jaider

    2015-01-01

    Purpose High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has been accepted as an effective and safe method to treat prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to describe acute toxicity following HDR brachytherapy to the prostate, and to examine the association between dosimetric parameters and urinary toxicity in low-risk prostate cancer patients. Material and methods Patients with low-risk prostate cancer were given HDR brachytherapy as monotherapy in two 12.5 Gy fractions. Planning objectives for the planning target volume (PTV) were V100% ? 90% and V150% ? 35%. Planning objectives for organs at risk were V75% ? 1 cc for the bladder, rectum and perineum, and V125% ? 1 cc for the urethra. Toxicity was assessed three months after treatment using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Results Seventy-three patients were included in the analysis. Thirty-three patients (45%) reported having any type of toxicity in the three months following HDR brachytherapy. Most toxicity cases (26%) were grade 1 urinary toxicity. Mean coverage index was 0.89 and mean V100 was 88.85. Doses administered to the urethra were associated with urinary toxicity. Patients who received more than 111.3% of the prescribed dose in 1 cc of the urethra were four times more likely to have urinary toxicity compared to patients receiving less than 111.3% (OR = 4.71, 95% CI: 1.43-15.6; p = 0.011). Conclusions High-dose-rate brachytherapy administered as monotherapy for prostate cancer proved to be a safe alternative treatment for patients with low-risk prostate cancer. Urinary toxicity was associated with the dose administered to 1 cc and 0.1 cc of the urethra and was remarkably inferior to the reported toxicity in similar studies. PMID:25829931

  10. Abstract--In prostate brachytherapy, the analysis of the 3D pose information of each individual implanted seed is one of the

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Abstract--In prostate brachytherapy, the analysis of the 3D pose information of each individual, localization and 3D orientation estimation of prostate seeds. This solution combines an initial detection of 152 per 100,000 men worldwide per year for 2006-2010, prostate cancer is the second most frequently

  11. PSA spike after brachytherapy For localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Abel, Laurie; Zeroski, Debra; Brammer, Sarah; Butler, Wayne; Wallner, Kent E; Merrick, Gregory S

    2007-12-01

    A common concern for patients who have undergone treatment for prostate cancer and their families is an elevation or spike in the PSA level following definitive treatment. A number of factors can be responsible for this, but often the PSA spike may be benign. An informed health care worker can reasonably assess whether this is the case, and can help to alleviate the fears of the patient and his family. PMID:18217533

  12. Biomaterial characteristics and application of silicone rubber and PVA hydrogels mimicked in organ groups for prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Pan; Jiang, Shan; Yu, Yan; Yang, Jun; Yang, Zhiyong

    2015-09-01

    It is definite that transparent material with similar structural characteristics and mechanical properties to human tissue is favorable for experimental study of prostate brachytherapy. In this paper, a kind of transparent polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogel and silicone rubber are developed as suitable substitutions for human soft tissue. Segmentation and 3D reconstruction of medical image are performed to manufacture the mould of organ groups through rapid prototyping technology. Micro-structure observation, force test and CCD deformation test have been conducted to investigate the structure and mechanical properties of PVA hydrogel used in organ group mockup. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) image comparison results show that PVA hydrogel consisting of 3g PVA, 17g de-ionized water, 80g dimethyl-sulfoxide (DMSO), 4g NaCl, 1.5g NaOH, 3g epichlorohydrin (ECH) and 7 freeze/thaw cycles reveals similar micro-structure to human prostate tissue. Through the insertion force comparison between organ group mockup and clinical prostate brachytherapy, PVA hydrogel and silicone rubber are found to have the same mechanical properties as prostate tissue and muscle. CCD deformation test results show that insertion force suffers a sharp decrease and a relaxation of tissue deformation appears when needle punctures the capsule of prostate model. The results exhibit that organ group mockup consisting of PVA hydrogel, silicone rubber, membrane and agarose satisfies the needs of prostate brachytherapy simulation in general and can be used to mimic the soft tissues in pelvic structure. PMID:26042767

  13. Inverse planning optimization for hybrid prostate permanent-seed implant brachytherapy plans using two source strengths.

    PubMed

    Cunha, J Adam M; Pickett, Barby; Pouliot, Jean

    2010-01-01

    The purpose is to demonstrate the ability to generate clinically acceptable prostate permanent seed implant plans using two seed types which are identical except for their activity. The IPSA inverse planning algorithms were modified to include multiple dose matrices for the calculation of dose from different sources, and a selection algorithm was implemented to allow for the swapping of source type at any given source position. Five previously treated patients with a range of prostate volumes from 20-48 cm3 were re-optimized under two hybrid scenarios: (1) using 0.32 and 0.51 mGy m2 / h 125I, and (2) using 0.64 and 0.76 mGy m2 / h 125I. Isodose lines were generated and dosimetric indices , V150Prostate, D90Prostate, V150Urethra, V125Urethra, V120Urethra,V100Urethra, and D10Urethra were calculated. The algorithm allows for the generation of single-isotope, multi-activity hybrid brachytherapy plans. By dealing with only one radionuclide, but of different activity, the biology is unchanged from a standard plan. All V100Prostate were within 2.3 percentage points for every plan and always above the clinically desirable 95%. All V150Urethra were identically zero, and V120Urethra is always below the clinically acceptable value of 1.0 cm3. Clinical optimization times for the hybrid plans are still under one minute, for most cases. It is possible to generate clinically advantageous brachytherapy plans (i.e. obtain the same quality dose distribution as a standard single-activity plan) while incorporating leftover seeds from a previous patient treatment. This method will allow a clinic to continue to provide excellent patient care, but at a reduced cost. Multi-activity hybrid plans were equal in quality (as measured by the standard dosimetric indices) to plans with seeds of a single activity. Despite the expanded search space, optimization times for these studies were still under two minutes on a modern day laptop and can be reduced to below one minute in a clinical setting. With the typical cost of a set of PPI seeds on the order of thousands of dollars, it is possible to reduce the cost of brachytherapy treatments by allowing for easier use of seeds left over from a previous patient or unused due to a cancelled treatment. PMID:20717078

  14. Seed-based transrectal ultrasound-fluoroscopy registration method for intraoperative dosimetry analysis of prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tutar, Ismail B.; Gong Lixin; Narayanan, Sreeram; Pathak, Sayan D.; Cho, Paul S.; Wallner, Kent; Kim, Yongmin [Departments of Electrical Engineering and Bioengineering, Image Computing Systems Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Insightful Corporation, 1700 Westlake Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, Washington 98109 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Departments of Electrical Engineering and Bioengineering, Image Computing Systems Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Box 355061, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2008-03-15

    Prostate brachytherapy is an effective treatment option for early-stage prostate cancer. During a prostate brachytherapy procedure, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and fluoroscopy imaging modalities complement each other by providing good visualization of soft tissue and implanted seeds, respectively. Therefore, the registration of these two imaging modalities, which are readily available in the operating room, could facilitate intraoperative dosimetry, thus enabling physicians to implant additional seeds into the underdosed portions of the prostate while the patient is still on the operating table. It is desirable to register TRUS and fluoroscopy images by using the seeds as fiducial markers. Although the locations of all the implanted seeds can be reconstructed from three fluoroscopy images, only a fraction of these seeds can be located in TRUS images. It is challenging to register the TRUS and fluoroscopy images by using the identified seeds, since the correspondence between them is unknown. Furthermore, misdetection of nonseed structures as seeds can lead to the inclusion of spurious points in the data set. We developed a new method called iterative optimal assignment (IOA) to overcome these challenges in TRUS-fluoroscopy registration. By using the Hungarian method in an optimization framework, IOA computes a set of transformation parameters that yield the one-to-one correspondence with minimum cost. We have evaluated our registration method at varying noise levels, seed detection rates, and number of spurious points using data collected from 25 patients. We have found that IOA can perform registration with an average root mean square error of about 0.2 cm even when the seed detection rate is only 10%. We believe that IOA can offer a robust solution to seed-based TRUS-fluoroscopy registration, thus making intraoperative dosimetry possible.

  15. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost for Prostate Cancer: Comparison of Two Different Fractionation Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Kaprealian, Tania [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Weinberg, Vivian [Biostatistics and Computational Biology Core, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Speight, Joycelyn L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Gottschalk, Alexander R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Shinohara, Katsuto [Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Hsu, I.-Chow, E-mail: IHsu@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This is a retrospective study comparing our experience with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost for prostate cancer, using two different fractionation schemes, 600 cGy Multiplication-Sign 3 fractions (patient group 1) and 950 cGy Multiplication-Sign 2 fractions (patient group 2). Methods and Materials: A total of 165 patients were treated for prostate cancer using external beam radiation therapy up to a dose of 45 Gy, followed by an HDR brachytherapy prostate radiation boost. Between July 1997 and Nov 1999, 64 patients were treated with an HDR boost of 600 cGy Multiplication-Sign 3 fractions; and between June 2000 and Nov 2005, 101 patients were treated with an HDR boost of 950 cGy Multiplication-Sign 2 fractions. All but 9 patients had at least one of the following risk features: pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level >10, a Gleason score {>=}7, and/or clinical stage T3 disease. Results: Median follow-up was 105 months for group 1 and 43 months for group 2. Patients in group 2 had a greater number of high-risk features than group 1 (p = 0.02). Adjusted for comparable follow-up, there was no difference in biochemical no-evidence-of-disease (bNED) rate between the two fractionation scheme approaches, with 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of 93.5% in group 1 and 87.3% in group 2 (p = 0.19). The 5-year estimates of progression-free survival were 86% for group 1 and 83% for group 2 (p = 0.53). Among high-risk patients, there were no differences in bNED or PFS rate due to fractionation. Conclusions: Results were excellent for both groups. Adjusted for comparable follow-up, no differences were found between groups.

  16. DuraSeal as a spacer to reduce rectal doses in low-dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, Vesa-Pekka; Kärnä, Aarno; Vaarala, Markku H

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of off-label use of DuraSeal polyethylene glycol (PEG) gel in low-dose rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy seed implantation to reduce rectal doses. Diluted DuraSeal was easy to use and, in spite of a clearance effect, useful in decreasing D?cc rectal doses. PMID:25201125

  17. Detailed urethral dosimetry in the evaluation of prostate brachytherapy-related urinary morbidity

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Zachariah A. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, WV (United States); Merrick, Gregory S. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, WV (United States) and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States)]. E-mail: gmerrick@wheelinghospital.com; Butler, Wayne M. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Puget Sound Healthcare Corporation, Group Health Cooperative, and University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Kurko, Brian [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, WV (United States); Anderson, Richard L. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, WV (United States); Murray, Brian C. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, WV (United States); Galbreath, Robert W. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Ohio University Eastern, St. Clairsville, OH (United States)

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between urinary morbidity after prostate brachytherapy and urethral doses calculated at the base, midprostate, apex, and urogenital diaphragm. Methods and Materials: From February 1998 through July 2002, 186 consecutive patients without a prior history of a transurethral resection underwent monotherapeutic brachytherapy (no supplemental external beam radiation therapy or androgen deprivation therapy) with urethral-sparing techniques (average urethral dose 100%-140% minimum peripheral dose) for clinical T1c-T2b (2002 AJCC) prostate cancer. The median follow-up was 45.5 months. Urinary morbidity was defined by time to International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) resolution, maximum increase in IPSS, catheter dependency, and the need for postimplant surgical intervention. An alpha blocker was initiated approximately 2 weeks before implantation and continued at least until the IPSS returned to baseline. Evaluated parameters included overall urethral dose (average and maximum), doses to the base, midprostate, apex, and urogenital diaphragm, patient age, clinical T stage, preimplant IPSS, ultrasound volume, isotope, and D90 and V100/150/200. Results: Of the 186 patients, 176 (94.6%) had the urinary catheter permanently removed on the day of implantation with only 1 patient requiring a urinary catheter >5 days. No patient had a urethral stricture and only 2 patients (1.1%) required a postbrachytherapy transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). For the entire cohort, IPSS on average peaked 2 weeks after implantation with a mean and median time to IPSS resolution of 14 and 3 weeks, respectively. For the entire cohort, only isotope predicted for IPSS resolution, while neither overall average prostatic urethra nor segmental urethral dose predicted for IPSS resolution. The maximum postimplant IPSS increase was best predicted by preimplant IPSS and the maximum apical urethral dose. Conclusions: With the routine use of prophylactic alpha blockers and strict adherence to urethral-sparing techniques, detailed urethral dosimetry did not substantially improve the ability to predict urinary morbidity. Neither the average dose to the prostatic urethra nor urethral doses stratified into base, midprostate, apex, or urogenital diaphragm segments predicted for IPSS normalization. Radiation doses of 100%-140% minimum peripheral dose are well tolerated by all segments of the prostatic urethra with resultant tumorcidal doses to foci of periurethral cancer.

  18. Measurement of the strength of iodine-125 seed moving at unknown speed during implantation in brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satoru; Tateoka, Kunihiko; Asanuma, Osamu; Kamo, Ken-ichi; Sato, Kaori; Takeda, Hiromitsu; Takagi, Masaru; Hareyama, Masato; Takada, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of estimating the strength of the moving radiation source during patient implantation. The requirement for the counting time was investigated by comparing the results of the measurements for the static source with those for the source moving at 2, 5, 10 and 20 cm s?1. The utilized source was 125I with an air-kerma strength of 0.432 U (?Gym2h–1). The detector utilized was a plastic scintillation detector (8 cm × 5 cm × 2 cm in thickness) set at 8 cm away from the needle to guide the source. Experiments were conducted in order to determine the most desirable counting time. Analysis using the maximum of the measured values while the source passed through the needle indicated that the results for the moving source increased more than those for the static source as the counting time decreased. The combined standard uncertainty, with the coverage factor of 1, was within 4% at the counting time of 100 ms. This investigation supported the feasibility of the method proposed for estimating the source strength during the implantation procedure, regardless of the source speed. The method proposed is a potential option for reducing the risk of accidental replacements of sources with those of incorrect strengths. PMID:23816530

  19. Dynamic dosimetry and edema detection in prostate brachytherapy: a complete system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, A.; Deguet, A.; Iordachita, I.; Chintalapani, G.; Blevins, J.; Le, Y.; Armour, E.; Burdette, C.; Song, D.; Fichtinger, G.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy (radioactive seed insertion) has emerged as one of the most effective treatment options for patients with prostate cancer, with the added benefit of a convenient outpatient procedure. The main limitation in contemporary brachytherapy is faulty seed placement, predominantly due to the presence of intra-operative edema (tissue expansion). Though currently not available, the capability to intra-operatively monitor the seed distribution, can make a significant improvement in cancer control. We present such a system here. Methods: Intra-operative measurement of edema in prostate brachytherapy requires localization of inserted radioactive seeds relative to the prostate. Seeds were reconstructed using a typical non-isocentric C-arm, and exported to a commercial brachytherapy delivery system. Technical obstacles for 3D reconstruction on a non-isocentric C-arm include pose-dependent C-arm calibration; distortion correction; pose estimation of C-arm images; seed reconstruction; and C-arm to TRUS registration. Results: In precision-machined hard phantoms with 40-100 seeds and soft tissue phantoms with 45-87 seeds, we correctly reconstructed the seed implant shape with an average 3D precision of 0.35 mm and 0.24 mm, respectively. In a DoD Phase-1 clinical trial on 6 patients with 48-82 planned seeds, we achieved intra-operative monitoring of seed distribution and dosimetry, correcting for dose inhomogeneities by inserting an average of 4.17 (1-9) additional seeds. Additionally, in each patient, the system automatically detected intra-operative seed migration induced due to edema (mean 3.84 mm, STD 2.13 mm, Max 16.19 mm). Conclusions: The proposed system is the first of a kind that makes intra-operative detection of edema (and subsequent re-optimization) possible on any typical non-isocentric C-arm, at negligible additional cost to the existing clinical installation. It achieves a significantly more homogeneous seed distribution, and has the potential to affect a paradigm shift in clinical practice. Large scale studies and commercialization are currently underway.

  20. Automatic segmentation of seeds and fluoroscope tracking (FTRAC) fiducial in prostate brachytherapy x-ray images

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Nathanael; Lee, Junghoon; Deguet, Anton; Song, Danny; Burdette, E. Clif; Prince, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    C-arm X-ray fluoroscopy-based radioactive seed localization for intraoperative dosimetry of prostate brachytherapy is an active area of research. The fluoroscopy tracking (FTRAC) fiducial is an image-based tracking device composed of radio-opaque BBs, lines, and ellipses that provides an effective means for pose estimation so that three-dimensional reconstruction of the implanted seeds from multiple X-ray images can be related to the ultrasound-computed prostate volume. Both the FTRAC features and the brachytherapy seeds must be segmented quickly and accurately during the surgery, but current segmentation algorithms are inhibitory in the operating room (OR). The first reason is that current algorithms require operators to manually select a region of interest (ROI), preventing automatic pipelining from image acquisition to seed reconstruction. Secondly, these algorithms fail often, requiring operators to manually correct the errors. We propose a fast and effective ROI-free automatic FTRAC and seed segmentation algorithm to minimize such human intervention. The proposed algorithm exploits recent image processing tools to make seed reconstruction as easy and convenient as possible. Preliminary results on 162 patient images show this algorithm to be fast, effective, and accurate for all features to be segmented. With near perfect success rates and subpixel differences to manual segmentation, our automatic FTRAC and seed segmentation algorithm shows promising results to save crucial time in the OR while reducing errors. PMID:22977294

  1. Data fusion for planning target volume and isodose prediction in prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouranian, Saman; Ramezani, Mahdi; Mahdavi, S. Sara; Spadinger, Ingrid; Morris, William J.; Salcudean, Septimiu E.; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2015-03-01

    In low-dose prostate brachytherapy treatment, a large number of radioactive seeds is implanted in and adjacent to the prostate gland. Planning of this treatment involves the determination of a Planning Target Volume (PTV), followed by defining the optimal number of seeds, needles and their coordinates for implantation. The two major planning tasks, i.e. PTV determination and seed definition, are associated with inter- and intra-expert variability. Moreover, since these two steps are performed in sequence, the variability is accumulated in the overall treatment plan. In this paper, we introduce a model based on a data fusion technique that enables joint determination of PTV and the minimum Prescribed Isodose (mPD) map. The model captures the correlation between different information modalities consisting of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) volumes, PTV and isodose contours. We take advantage of joint Independent Component Analysis (jICA) as a linear decomposition technique to obtain a set of joint components that optimally describe such correlation. We perform a component stability analysis to generate a model with stable parameters that predicts the PTV and isodose contours solely based on a new patient TRUS volume. We propose a framework for both modeling and prediction processes and evaluate it on a dataset of 60 brachytherapy treatment records. We show PTV prediction error of 10:02+/-4:5% and the V100 isodose overlap of 97+/-3:55% with respect to the clinical gold standard.

  2. CT-guided brachytherapy of prostate cancer: reduction of effective dose from X-ray examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanin, Dmitriy B.; Biryukov, Vitaliy A.; Rusetskiy, Sergey S.; Sviridov, Pavel V.; Volodina, Tatiana V.

    2014-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is one of the most effective and informative diagnostic method. Though the number of CT scans among all radiographic procedures in the USA and European countries is 11% and 4% respectively, CT makes the highest contribution to the collective effective dose from all radiographic procedures, it is 67% in the USA and 40% in European countries [1-5]. Therefore it is necessary to understand the significance of dose value from CT imaging to a patient . Though CT dose from multiple scans and potential risk is of great concern in pediatric patients, this applies to adults as well. In this connection it is very important to develop optimal approaches to dose reduction and optimization of CT examination. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its publications recommends radiologists to be aware that often CT image quality is higher than it is necessary for diagnostic confidence[6], and there is a potential to reduce the dose which patient gets from CT examination [7]. In recent years many procedures, such as minimally invasive surgery, biopsy, brachytherapy and different types of ablation are carried out under guidance of computed tomography [6;7], and during a procedures multiple CT scans focusing on a specific anatomic region are performed. At the Clinics of MRRC different types of treatment for patients with prostate cancer are used, incuding conformal CT-guided brachytherapy, implantation of microsources of I into the gland under guidance of spiral CT [8]. So, the purpose of the study is to choose optimal method to reduce radiation dose from CT during CT-guided prostate brachytherapy and to obtain the image of desired quality.

  3. Predictive Factors for Acute and Late Urinary Toxicity After Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy: Long-Term Outcome in 712 Consecutive Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, Mira [Vancouver Cancer Center, Vancouver, BC (Canada)], E-mail: mkeyes@bccancer.bc.ca; Miller, Stacy [Vancouver Cancer Center, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Moravan, Veronika [Population and Preventive Oncology, Vancouver Island Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Pickles, Tom; McKenzie, Michael [Vancouver Cancer Center, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Pai, Howard [Population and Preventive Oncology, Vancouver Island Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Liu, Mitchell; Kwan, Winkle; Agranovich, Alexander [Fraser Valley Cancer Centre for Southern Interior Provincial Prostate Brachytherapy Program, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Spadinger, Ingrid; Lapointe, Vincent [Vancouver Cancer Center, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Halperin, Ross [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Morris, W. James [Vancouver Cancer Center, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To describe the frequency of acute and late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) urinary toxicity, associated predictive factors, and resolution of International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) in 712 consecutive prostate brachytherapy patients. Methods and Materials: Patients underwent implantation between 1998 and 2003 (median follow-up, 57 months). The IPSS and RTOG toxicity data were prospectively collected. The patient, treatment, and implant factors were examined for an association with urinary toxicity. The time to IPSS resolution was examined using Kaplan-Meier curves, and multivariate modeling of IPSS resolution was done using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the factors associated with urinary toxicity. Results: The IPSS returned to baseline at a median of 12.6 months. On multivariate analysis, patients with a high baseline IPSS had a quicker resolution of their IPSS. Higher prostate D90 (dose covering 90% of the prostate), maximal postimplant IPSS, and urinary retention slowed the IPSS resolution time. The rate of the actuarial 5-year late urinary (>12 months) RTOG Grade 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 was 32%, 36%, 24%, 6.2%, and 0.1%, respectively. At 7 years, the prevalence of RTOG Grade 0-1 was 92.5%. Patients with a larger prostate volume, greater number of needles, greater baseline IPSS, and use of hormonal therapy had more acute toxicity. On multivariate analysis, the significant predictors for late greater than or equal to RTOG toxicity 2 were a greater baseline IPSS, maximal postimplant IPSS, presence of acute toxicity, and higher prostate V150 (volume of the prostate covered by 150% of the dose). More recently implanted patients had less acute urinary toxicity and patients given hormonal therapy had less late urinary toxicity (all p < 0.02). Conclusion: Most urinary symptoms resolved within 12 months after prostate brachytherapy, and significant long-term urinary toxicity was very low. Refined patient selection and greater technical experience in prostate brachytherapy were associated with less urinary toxicity.

  4. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) Practice Guideline for the Transperineal Permanent Brachytherapy of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, Seth A., E-mail: rosenthals@radiological.co [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Bittner, Nathan H.J. [Tacoma/Valley Radiation Oncology Centers, Tacoma, WA (United States); Beyer, David C. [Arizona Oncology Services, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Demanes, D. Jeffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Goldsmith, Brian J. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Horwitz, Eric M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ibbott, Geoffrey S. [Radiological Physics Center, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Nag, Subir [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaiser Permanante, Santa Clara, CA (United States); Suh, W. Warren [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center of Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Potters, Louis [Department of Radiation Oncology, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Transperineal permanent prostate brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with organ-confined prostate cancer. Careful adherence to established brachytherapy standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for permanent prostate brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrist. Factors with respect to patient selection and appropriate use of supplemental treatment modalities such as external beam radiation and androgen suppression therapy are discussed. Logistics with respect to the brachtherapy implant procedure, the importance of dosimetric parameters, and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful prostate brachytherapy program.

  5. [Intraoperative and post-implant dosimetry in patients treated with permanent prostate implant brachytherapy].

    PubMed

    Herein, András; Ágoston, Péter; Szabó, Zoltán; Jorgo, Kliton; Markgruber, Balázs; Pesznyák, Csilla; Polgár, Csaba; Major, Tibor

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of our work was to compare intraoperative and four-week post-implant dosimetry for loose and stranded seed implants for permanent prostate implant brachytherapy. In our institute low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy is performed with encapsulated I-125 isotopes (seeds) using transrectal ultrasound guidance and metal needles. The SPOT PRO 3.1 (Elekta, Sweden) system is used for treatment planning. In this study the first 79 patients were treated with loose seed (LS) technique, the consecutive patients were treated with stranded seed (SS) technique. During intraoperative planning the dose constraints were the same for both techniques. All LSs were placed inside the prostate capsule, while with SS a 2 mm margin around the prostate was allowed for seed positioning. The prescribed dose for the prostate was 145 Gy. This study investigated prostate dose coverage in 30-30 randomly selected patients with LS and SS. Four weeks after the implantation native CT and MRI were done and CT/MRI image fusion was performed. The target was contoured on MRI and the plan was prepared on CT data. To assess the treatment plan dose-volume histograms were used. For the target coverage V100, V90, D90, D100, for the dose inhomogeneity V150, V200, and the dose-homogeneity index (DHI), for dose conformality the conformal index (COIN) were calculated. Intraoperative and postimplant plans were compared. The mean V100 values decreased at four-week plan for SS (97% vs. 84%) and for LS (96% vs. 80%) technique, as well. Decrease was observed for all parameters except for the DHI value. The DHI increased for SS (0.38 vs. 0.41) and for LS (0.38 vs. 0.47) technique, as well. The COIN decreased for both techniques at four-week plan (SS: 0.63 vs. 0.57; LS: 0.67 vs. 0.50). All differences were significant except for the DHI value at SS technique. The percentage changes were not significant, except the COIN value. The dose coverage of the target decreased significantly at four-week plans for both techniques. The decrease was larger for LS technique, but the difference between techniques was not significant at this patient number. The dose distribution was more homogenous, but the conformality was worse at four-week plans. PMID:26035163

  6. Rectal-wall dose dependence on postplan timing after permanent-seed prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Taussky, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Yeung, Ivan [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Williams, Theresa [Department of Radiation Medicine, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Pearson, Shannon [Department of Radiation Medicine, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); McLean, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Pond, Gregory [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Crook, Juanita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada)]. E-mail: Juanita.crook@rmp.uhn.on.ca

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: Dose to rectal wall after permanent-seed prostate brachytherapy is dependent on distance between posterior prostatic seeds and anterior rectal wall and is influenced by postimplant periprostatic edema. We analyzed the effect of postplan timing on anterior rectal-wall dose. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients received permanent seed {sup 125}I brachytherapy as monotherapy (145 Gy). Implants were preplanned by use of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and carried out by use of preloaded needles. Postimplant dosimetry was calculated by use of magnetic resonance imaging-computed tomography fusion on Days 1, 8, and 30. The anterior rectal-wall dose is reported as the isodose enclosing 1.0 or 2.0 cc of rectal wall and as the RV100 in cc. Results: The dose to rectal wall increased progressively over time. The median increase in dose to 1.0 cc of rectal wall (RD [1 cc]) from Day 1 to 30 was 39.2 Gy (p < 0.001). RV100 increased from a median of 0.07 cc on Day 1 to 0.67 cc on Day 30. The most significant predictor of rectal-wall dose (RD [1 cc], RD [2 cc], or RV100) was the time of evaluation (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Although periprostatic edema cannot be quantified by postimplant imaging, the dose to the anterior rectal wall increases significantly over time as prostatic and periprostatic edema resolve. Critical-organ dose reporting and guidelines for minimizing toxicity must take into account the time of the assessment.

  7. A study of optimization techniques in HDR brachytherapy for the prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokharel, Ghana Shyam

    Several studies carried out thus far are in favor of dose escalation to the prostate gland to have better local control of the disease. But optimal way of delivery of higher doses of radiation therapy to the prostate without hurting neighboring critical structures is still debatable. In this study, we proposed that real time high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with highly efficient and effective optimization could be an alternative means of precise delivery of such higher doses. This approach of delivery eliminates the critical issues such as treatment setup uncertainties and target localization as in external beam radiation therapy. Likewise, dosimetry in HDR brachytherapy is not influenced by organ edema and potential source migration as in permanent interstitial implants. Moreover, the recent report of radiobiological parameters further strengthen the argument of using hypofractionated HDR brachytherapy for the management of prostate cancer. Firstly, we studied the essential features and requirements of real time HDR brachytherapy treatment planning system. Automating catheter reconstruction with fast editing tools, fast yet accurate dose engine, robust and fast optimization and evaluation engine are some of the essential requirements for such procedures. Moreover, in most of the cases we performed, treatment plan optimization took significant amount of time of overall procedure. So, making treatment plan optimization automatic or semi-automatic with sufficient speed and accuracy was the goal of the remaining part of the project. Secondly, we studied the role of optimization function and constraints in overall quality of optimized plan. We have studied the gradient based deterministic algorithm with dose volume histogram (DVH) and more conventional variance based objective functions for optimization. In this optimization strategy, the relative weight of particular objective in aggregate objective function signifies its importance with respect to other objectives. Based on our study, DVH based objective function performed better than traditional variance based objective function in creating a clinically acceptable plan when executed under identical conditions. Thirdly, we studied the multiobjective optimization strategy using both DVH and variance based objective functions. The optimization strategy was to create several Pareto optimal solutions by scanning the clinically relevant part of the Pareto front. This strategy was adopted to decouple optimization from decision such that user could select final solution from the pool of alternative solutions based on his/her clinical goals. The overall quality of treatment plan improved using this approach compared to traditional class solution approach. In fact, the final optimized plan selected using decision engine with DVH based objective was comparable to typical clinical plan created by an experienced physicist. Next, we studied the hybrid technique comprising both stochastic and deterministic algorithm to optimize both dwell positions and dwell times. The simulated annealing algorithm was used to find optimal catheter distribution and the DVH based algorithm was used to optimize 3D dose distribution for given catheter distribution. This unique treatment planning and optimization tool was capable of producing clinically acceptable highly reproducible treatment plans in clinically reasonable time. As this algorithm was able to create clinically acceptable plans within clinically reasonable time automatically, it is really appealing for real time procedures. Next, we studied the feasibility of multiobjective optimization using evolutionary algorithm for real time HDR brachytherapy for the prostate. The algorithm with properly tuned algorithm specific parameters was able to create clinically acceptable plans within clinically reasonable time. However, the algorithm was let to run just for limited number of generations not considered optimal, in general, for such algorithms. This was done to keep time window desirable for real time procedures. Therefore, it requires further s

  8. Salvage HDR Brachytherapy for Recurrent Prostate Cancer After Previous Definitive Radiation Therapy: 5-Year Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chien Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Scripps Clinic, San Diego, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Scripps Clinic, San Diego, California (United States); Weinberg, Vivian [Comprehensive Cancer Center Biostatistics Core, University of California—San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Comprehensive Cancer Center Biostatistics Core, University of California—San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Shinohara, Katsuto [Department of Urology, University of California—San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Urology, University of California—San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Roach, Mack; Nash, Marc; Gottschalk, Alexander; Chang, Albert J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California—San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California—San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Hsu, I-Chow, E-mail: IHsu@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California—San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California—San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Evaluate efficacy and toxicity of salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) for locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 52 consecutively accrued patients undergoing salvage HDRB between 1998 and 2009 for locally recurrent prostate cancer after previous definitive RT. After pathologic confirmation of locally recurrent disease, patients received 36 Gy in 6 fractions. Twenty-four patients received neoadjuvant hormonal therapy before salvage, and no patients received adjuvant hormonal therapy. Determination of biochemical failure after salvage HDRB was based on the Phoenix definition. Overall survival (OS) and bF distributions were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of biochemical control. Acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities, based on Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 4), were documented. Results: Median follow-up after salvage HDRB was 59.6 months. The 5-year OS estimate was 92% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 80%-97%) with median survival not yet reached. Five-year biochemical control after salvage was 51% (95% CI: 34%-66%). Median PSA nadir postsalvage was 0.1 (range: 0-7.2) reached at a median of 10.2 months after completing HDRB. As for complications, acute and late grade 3 GU toxicities were observed in only 2% and 2%, respectively. No grade 2 or higher acute GI events and 4% grade 2 GI late events were observed. On univariate analysis, disease-free interval after initial definitive RT (P=.07), percent of positive cores at the time of diagnosis (P=.08), interval from first recurrence to salvage HDRB (P=.09), and pre-HDRB prostate-specific antigen (P=.07) were each of borderline significance in predicting biochemical control after salvage HDRB. Conclusions: Prostate HDRB is an effective salvage modality with relatively few long-term toxicities. We provide potential predictors of biochemical control for prostate salvage HDRB.

  9. Irradiation of localized prostatic carcinoma with a combination of high dose rate iridium-192 brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy with three target definitions and dose levels inside the prostate gland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Göran Borghede; Hans Hedelin; Sten Holmäng; Karl Axel Johansson; Göran Sernbo; Claes Mercke

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Localized prostate cancer was treated with combined external beam radiotherapy and high dose rate Ir-192 brachytherapy with the purpose of a high dose. The technical aspects of a modified treatment are described.Methods: The brachytherapy was given in two sessions preceded and succeeded by external beam radiation. The radioactive source was temporarily implanted by a remote afterloading device through six

  10. Intraoperative Ultrasound-Fluoroscopy Fusion can Enhance Prostate Brachytherapy Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Orio, Peter F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Tutar, Ismail B. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Narayanan, Sreeram [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Arthurs, Sandra [Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Cho, Paul S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Kim, Yongmin [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Merrick, Gregory [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Radiation Oncology, Group Health Cooperative, Seattle, WA (United States)], E-mail: kent.wallner@med.va.gov

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-fluoroscopy fusion-based intraoperative dosimetry system. Method and Materials: Twenty-five patients were treated for prostate cancer with Pd-103 implantation. After the execution of the treatment plan, two sets of TRUS images were collected using the longitudinal and axial transducers of a biplanar probe. Then, three fluoroscopic images were acquired at 0, -15 and +15{sup o}. The three-dimensional locations of all implanted seeds were reconstructed from fluoroscopic images. A subset of the implanted seeds was manually identified in TRUS images and used as fiducial markers to perform TRUS-fluoroscopy fusion. To improve the implant quality, additional seeds were placed if adverse isodose patterns were identified during visual inspection. If additional seeds were placed, intraoperative dosimetry was repeated. Day 0 computed tomography-based dosimetry was compared with final intraoperative dosimetry to validate dosimetry achieved in the implant suite. Results: An average of additional 4.0 seeds was implanted in 16 patients after initial intraoperative dose evaluation. Based on TRUS-fluoroscopy fusion-based dosimetry, the V100 improved from 86% to 93% (p = 0.005), whereas D90 increased from 94% to 109% (p = 0.011) with the guided additional seed implantation. No statistical difference was observed in V200 and V300 values. V100 and D90 values were 95 {+-} 4% and 120 {+-} 24%, respectively, based on the final intraoperative dosimetry evaluation, compared with 95 {+-} 4% and 122 {+-} 24%, respectively, based on Day 0 computed tomography-based dosimetry. Conclusions: Implantation of extra seeds based on TRUS-fluoroscopy fusion-based intraoperative dosimetry can improve the final V100 and D90 values with minimal increase in V200 and V300 values.

  11. Low-dose rate prostate brachytherapy is well tolerated in patients with a history of inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Christopher A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)]. E-mail: christopher.peters@mountsinai.org; Cesaretti, Jamie A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Stone, Nelson N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Department of Urology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Stock, Richard G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: We report on the follow-up of 24 patients with a prior history of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) treated with brachytherapy for early-stage prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients with a history of inflammatory bowel disease (17 with ulcerative colitis (UC), 7 with Crohn's disease [CD]) underwent prostate brachytherapy between 1992 and 2004. Fifteen patients were treated with I-125 implantation and 6 patients were treated with Pd-103 alone or in combination with 45 Gy external beam radiation. Charts were reviewed for all patients, and all living patients were contacted by phone. National Cancer Institute common toxicity scores for proctitis were assigned to all patients. Actuarial risk of late toxicity was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software. Follow-up ranged from 3 to 126 months (median, 48.5 months; mean, 56.8 months). Results: None of the patients experienced Grade 3 or 4 rectal toxicity. Four patients experienced Grade 2 late rectal toxicity. The 5-year actuarial freedom from developing late Grade 2 rectal toxicity was 81%. At a median follow-up of 48.5 months, 23 patients were alive and had no evidence of disease with a median prostate-specific antigen for the sample of 0.1 ng/mL (range, <0.05-0.88 ng/mL). One patient died of other causes unrelated to his prostate cancer. Conclusions: Prostate brachytherapy is well tolerated in patients with a history of controlled IBD. Therefore, brachytherapy should be considered a viable therapeutic option in this patient population.

  12. A simple analytical method for heterogeneity corrections in low dose rate prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Hueso-González, Fernando; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Siebert, Frank-André

    2015-07-01

    In low energy brachytherapy, the presence of tissue heterogeneities contributes significantly to the discrepancies observed between treatment plan and delivered dose. In this work, we present a simplified analytical dose calculation algorithm for heterogeneous tissue. We compare it with Monte Carlo computations and assess its suitability for integration in clinical treatment planning systems. The algorithm, named as RayStretch, is based on the classic equivalent path length method and TG-43 reference data. Analytical and Monte Carlo dose calculations using Penelope2008 are compared for a benchmark case: a prostate patient with calcifications. The results show a remarkable agreement between simulation and algorithm, the latter having, in addition, a high calculation speed. The proposed analytical model is compatible with clinical real-time treatment planning systems based on TG-43 consensus datasets for improving dose calculation and treatment quality in heterogeneous tissue. Moreover, the algorithm is applicable for any type of heterogeneities. PMID:26118956

  13. A simple analytical method for heterogeneity corrections in low dose rate prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso-González, Fernando; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Siebert, Frank-André

    2015-07-01

    In low energy brachytherapy, the presence of tissue heterogeneities contributes significantly to the discrepancies observed between treatment plan and delivered dose. In this work, we present a simplified analytical dose calculation algorithm for heterogeneous tissue. We compare it with Monte Carlo computations and assess its suitability for integration in clinical treatment planning systems. The algorithm, named as RayStretch, is based on the classic equivalent path length method and TG-43 reference data. Analytical and Monte Carlo dose calculations using Penelope2008 are compared for a benchmark case: a prostate patient with calcifications. The results show a remarkable agreement between simulation and algorithm, the latter having, in addition, a high calculation speed. The proposed analytical model is compatible with clinical real-time treatment planning systems based on TG-43 consensus datasets for improving dose calculation and treatment quality in heterogeneous tissue. Moreover, the algorithm is applicable for any type of heterogeneities.

  14. High-dose regions versus likelihood of cure after prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, Kent [Department of Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States) and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States) and Group Health Cooperative, Seattle, WA (United States)]. E-mail: kent.wallner@med.va.gov; Merrick, Gregory [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Sutlief, Steven [Department of Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States); True, Laurence [Department of Pathology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States); Butler, Wayne [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, WV (United States)

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of high-dose regions on biochemical cancer control rates after prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients with 1997 American Joint Committee on Cancer clinical Stage T1c-T2a prostate carcinoma (Gleason grade 5-6, prostate-specific antigen level 4-10 ng/mL) were randomized to implantation with {sup 125}I (144 Gy) vs. {sup 103}Pd (125 Gy, National Institute of Standards and Technology 1999). Isotope implantation was performed by standard techniques, using a modified peripheral loading pattern. Of the 313 patients entered in the protocol, 270 were included in this analysis. The {sup 125}I source strength ranged from 0.4 to 0.89 mCi (median, 0.55 mCi), and the {sup 103}Pd source strength ranged from 1.3 to 1.6 mCi (median, 1.5 mCi). CT was performed within 4 h after implantation. The dosimetric parameters analyzed included the percentage of the postimplant prostate volume covered by the 100%, 150%, 200%, and 300% prescription dose (V{sub 100}, V{sub 150}, V{sub 200}, and V{sub 300}, respectively). The median time to the last follow-up for patients without failure was 2.7 years. Freedom from biochemical failure was defined as a serum prostate-specific antigen level of {<=}0.5 ng/mL at last follow-up. Patients were censored at last follow-up if their serum prostate-specific antigen level was still decreasing. Results: The mean V{sub 100}, V{sub 150}, V{sub 200}, and V{sub 300} value was 90% ({+-}8%), 63% ({+-}14), 35% ({+-}13%), and 14% ({+-}7%), respectively. Patients with a V{sub 100} of {>=}90% had a 3-year freedom from biochemical failure rate of 96% vs. 87% for those with a V{sub 100} of <90% (p = 0.0029). Overall, patients with more high-dose regions had a greater chance of biochemical control. However, when only patients with a V{sub 100} of {>=}90% were analyzed, no relationship was found between higher dose regions and the likelihood of cancer control. This lack of effect on biochemical control was apparent for both isotopes. Conclusion: High-dose regions do not appear to affect cancer control rates, as long as >90% of the prostate volume is covered by the prescription dose.

  15. Comparison Between High and Low Source Activity Seeds for I-125 Permanent Seed Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Masucci, Giuseppina Laura; Donath, David; Tetreault-Laflamme, Audrey; Carrier, Jean-Francois; Hervieux, Yannick; Larouche, Renee Xaviere; Bahary, Jean-Paul [Department of Radiation Oncology Centre Hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal (Canada); Taussky, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.taussky.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.c [Department of Radiation Oncology Centre Hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal (Canada)

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To compare low (mean 0.44, SD {+-} 0.0163 mCi) with high source activity (0.61 {+-} 0.0178 mCi) in I{sup 125} permanent seed brachytherapy regarding seed loss, dosimetric outcome, and toxicity. Methods and Materials: The study included 199 patients with prostate cancer treated by permanent seed brachytherapy alone: the first 105 with seeds of lower activity (first cohort), the following 94 with higher seed activity (second cohort). The V100, V150, V200, and D90 were analyzed on the CT scan 30 days after implantation (CTD30). The V100, V150, and D2 of the rectum were also calculated on CTD30. Seed loss was determined 30 days after implantation. Urinary toxicity was measured with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire. Results: Lower seed activity was associated with lower V150 and V200 (p = 0.01 and p {<=} 0.001, respectively) on CTD30. More patients had a V100 <90% and D90 <140 Gy in the lower activity cohort (p = 0.098 for D90 and p = 0.029 for V100) on CTD30. There was no difference between cohorts in dose to the rectum (p = 0.325-0.516) or difference in patients' IPSS score from baseline (p = 0.0.117-0.618), although there was a trend toward more urinary toxicity at 4 and 8 months for high activity seeds. Seed loss as a percentage of implanted seeds was not different (p = 0.324). Conclusions: Higher seed activity (I{sup 125} {>=} 0.6 mCi) results in at least equal V100 and D90 on CTD30. However, dose inhomogeneity and a trend toward more urinary toxicity at 4 and 8 months after treatment may lead to a higher long-term urinary complications.

  16. Predicting pubic arch interference in prostate brachytherapy on transrectal ultrasonography-computed tomography fusion images

    PubMed Central

    Fukada, Junichi; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Nakashima, Jun; Ohashi, Toshio; Kawaguchi, Osamu; Oya, Mototsugu

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the usefulness of the fusion image created by transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) and large-bore computed tomography (CT) for predicting pubic arch interference (PAI) during prostate seed brachytherapy. The TRUS volume study was performed in 21 patients, followed by large-bore computed tomography of patients in the lithotomy position. Then, we created TRUS-CT fusion images using a radiation planning treatment system. TRUS images in which the prostate outline was the largest were overlaid on CT images with the narrowest pubic arch. PAI was estimated in the right and left arch separately and classified to three grades: no PAI, PAI positive within 5 mm and PAI of >5 mm. If the estimated PAI was more than 5 mm on at least one side of the arch, we judged there to be a significant PAI. Brachytherapy was performed in 18 patients who were evaluated as not having significant PAI on TRUS. Intra-operative PAI was observed in one case, which was also detected with a fusion image. On the other hand, intra-operative PAI was not observed in one case that had been evaluated as having significant PAI with a fusion image. In the remaining three patients, TRUS suggested the presence of significant PAI, which was also confirmed by a fusion image. Intra-operative PAI could be predicted by TRUS-CT fusion imaging, even when it was undetectable by TRUS. Although improvement of the reproducibility of the patients’ position to avoid false-positive cases is warranted, TRUS-CT fusion imaging has the possibility that the uncertainty of TRUS can be supplemented. PMID:22843359

  17. SU-FF-T-390: In-Vivo Prostate Brachytherapy Absorbed Dose Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gueye, Paul; Velasco, Carlos; Keppel, Cynthia; Murphy, B.; Sinesi, C.

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: In-vivo prostate brachytherapy absorbed dosimetrydetector using scintillating fibers. Method and Materials: Five pairs of 85.5 {+-} 0.05 cm long blue shifted scintillating fibers (model BCF-10) with 1 mm{sup 2} cross sectional area were placed in a mixture of gelatin (368.6 {+-} 0.5 grams) and water (3.78 {+-} 0.025 liters) to measured the absorbed dose delivered by a 12 Ci {sup 192}Ir HDR source. The fibers were held by a 7 x 7 cm{sup 2} template grid and optically connected to a 16-channel multianode photomultiplier tube (Hamamatsu, model H6568). Each pair consisted of one fiber 4 mm shorter than the other one to extract the dose by the subtraction method. A dose atlas was used for radiation delivered to the phantom. The plans followed delivered 5 and 7 Gy to a point located 2.0 centimeters away from the central dwelling positions. A total of 32 data points were acquired in a plan to assess the linearity and reproducibility of the measurements.Results: Reproducibility of the data was found to be within 5% and the overall accuracy of the system estimated to be {+-}5.5%. The linearity of the data for all 7 measureddose values (ranging from 0.6 to 7 Gy), gives a slope of 312 counts/Gy with a 1.4% relative deviation. Conclusion: This work indicates the possibility of measuring in real-time the dose effectively delivered to a biological system during prostate brachytherapy treatments. The availability of commercially thin (150 {micro}m) scintillating fibers opens the capability of using such system during clinical treatments (by embedding the fibers within the catheters) with the advantage of performing real-time adjustment of the dose delivery.

  18. Fast GPU-based Monte Carlo simulations for LDR prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonenfant, Éric; Magnoux, Vincent; Hissoiny, Sami; Ozell, Benoît; Beaulieu, Luc; Després, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of bGPUMCD, a Monte Carlo algorithm executed on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), for fast dose calculations in permanent prostate implant dosimetry. It also aimed to validate a low dose rate brachytherapy source in terms of TG-43 metrics and to use this source to compute dose distributions for permanent prostate implant in very short times. The physics of bGPUMCD was reviewed and extended to include Rayleigh scattering and fluorescence from photoelectric interactions for all materials involved. The radial and anisotropy functions were obtained for the Nucletron SelectSeed in TG-43 conditions. These functions were compared to those found in the MD Anderson Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core brachytherapy source registry which are considered the TG-43 reference values. After appropriate calibration of the source, permanent prostate implant dose distributions were calculated for four patients and compared to an already validated Geant4 algorithm. The radial function calculated from bGPUMCD showed excellent agreement (differences within 1.3%) with TG-43 accepted values. The anisotropy functions at r = 1 cm and r = 4 cm were within 2% of TG-43 values for angles over 17.5°. For permanent prostate implants, Monte Carlo-based dose distributions with a statistical uncertainty of 1% or less for the target volume were obtained in 30 s or less for 1 × 1 × 1 mm3 calculation grids. Dosimetric indices were very similar (within 2.7%) to those obtained with a validated, independent Monte Carlo code (Geant4) performing the calculations for the same cases in a much longer time (tens of minutes to more than a hour). bGPUMCD is a promising code that lets envision the use of Monte Carlo techniques in a clinical environment, with sub-minute execution times on a standard workstation. Future work will explore the use of this code with an inverse planning method to provide a complete Monte Carlo-based planning solution.

  19. Fast GPU-based Monte Carlo simulations for LDR prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Bonenfant, Éric; Magnoux, Vincent; Hissoiny, Sami; Ozell, Benoît; Beaulieu, Luc; Després, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of bGPUMCD, a Monte Carlo algorithm executed on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), for fast dose calculations in permanent prostate implant dosimetry. It also aimed to validate a low dose rate brachytherapy source in terms of TG-43 metrics and to use this source to compute dose distributions for permanent prostate implant in very short times.The physics of bGPUMCD was reviewed and extended to include Rayleigh scattering and fluorescence from photoelectric interactions for all materials involved. The radial and anisotropy functions were obtained for the Nucletron SelectSeed in TG-43 conditions. These functions were compared to those found in the MD Anderson Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core brachytherapy source registry which are considered the TG-43 reference values. After appropriate calibration of the source, permanent prostate implant dose distributions were calculated for four patients and compared to an already validated Geant4 algorithm.The radial function calculated from bGPUMCD showed excellent agreement (differences within 1.3%) with TG-43 accepted values. The anisotropy functions at r = 1 cm and r = 4 cm were within 2% of TG-43 values for angles over 17.5°. For permanent prostate implants, Monte Carlo-based dose distributions with a statistical uncertainty of 1% or less for the target volume were obtained in 30 s or less for 1 × 1 × 1 mm(3) calculation grids. Dosimetric indices were very similar (within 2.7%) to those obtained with a validated, independent Monte Carlo code (Geant4) performing the calculations for the same cases in a much longer time (tens of minutes to more than a hour).bGPUMCD is a promising code that lets envision the use of Monte Carlo techniques in a clinical environment, with sub-minute execution times on a standard workstation. Future work will explore the use of this code with an inverse planning method to provide a complete Monte Carlo-based planning solution. PMID:26061145

  20. Implementation of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Androgen Deprivation in Patients With Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lilleby, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.lilleby@ous-hf.no [Cancer Clinic, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radiumhospital, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Oslo (Norway); Tafjord, Gunnar; Raabe, Nils K. [Cancer Clinic, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radiumhospital, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Oslo (Norway)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate outcome (overall survival [OS], the actuarial 5-year cancer-specific survival [CSS], disease-free survival [DFS], biochemical failure-free survival [BFS]), complications and morbidity in patients treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) boost and hormonal treatment with curative aims. Methods: Between 2004 and 2009, 275 prospectively followed pN0/N0M0 patients were included: 19 patients (7%) with T2, Gleason score 7 and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) <10 and 256 patients (93%) with T3 or Gleason score 8-10 or PSA >20 received multimodal treatment with conformal four-field radiotherapy (prostate/vesiculae 2 Gy Multiplication-Sign 25) combined with HDR-BT (iridium 192; prostate 10 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2) with long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Results: After a median observation time of 44.2 months (range, 10.4-90.5 months) 12 patients had relapsed clinically and/or biochemically and 10 patients were dead, of which 2 patients died from prostate cancer. Five-year estimates of BFS, CSS, DFS, and OS rates were 98.5%, 99.3%, 95.6%, and 96.3%, respectively. None of the patients with either Gleason score <8 or with intermediate risk profile had relapsed. The number of HDR-BT treatments was not related to outcome. Despite of age (median, 65.7 years; range, 45.7-77 years) and considerable pretreatment comorbidity in 39 of 275 patients, Genitourinary treatment-related morbidity was moderate with long-lasting Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 2 voiding problems in 26 patients (9.5%) and occasionally mucous discharge in 20 patients (7%), none with Grade >2 for gastrointestinal at follow-up. Complications during implantations were related to pubic arch interference (4 patients) and lithotomy time, causing 2 patients to develop compartment syndrome. Conclusion: Despite still preliminary observations, our 5-year outcome estimates favor the implementation of high-dose-rate brachytherapy in high-risk patients combined with conformal external radiotherapy and long-term ADT. High-quality implants can be achieved by a trained specialized team at a high-turnover center using transrectal ultrasound-based treatment plans with acceptable morbidity and complication rates.

  1. A new inexpensive customized plaque for choroidal melanoma iodine-125 plaque therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Vine, A.K.; Tenhaken, R.K.; Diaz, R.F.; Maxson, B.B.; Lichter, A.S.

    1989-04-01

    The authors have developed a new inexpensive precious metal alloy plaque for use in customized iodine-125 plaque therapy. Each plaque is formed from two flat circular gold/palladium foils which are used in dental crown work. Using a simple manual mechanism, the two forms are stamped over a customized acrylic die shaped to the dimensions of the tumor base plus a 2-mm margin. Completed plaques consist of a back wall, a 2-mm side wall, and a 1.5-mm wide lip with holes for suture placement. Advantages include: simple construction from inexpensive components, customized shape, and iodine seeds that are readily visible on plane radiographs.

  2. Simulation of the artefact of an iodine seed placed at the needle tip in MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagerburg, V.; Moerland, M. A.; Seppenwoolde, J. H.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the influence of different needle materials on the artefact of a prostate brachytherapy iodine seed, placed at the needle tip, in MRI (magnetic resonance imaging)-guided prostate brachytherapy. For this research simulations were performed. The simulations showed that with the currently available MRI compatible titanium needles, determination of the exact seed position is difficult, because of the large artefact at the needle tip. This hampers accurate MRI-guided seed delivery. When a plastic needle is used, the image disturbance is caused by the artefact of the iodine seed alone. When a gradient echo sequence is used, the middle of the seed artefact corresponds well with to middle of the real seed position. With the scan parameters we used this deviation was less than 0.4 mm compared to 1.5 mm when a titanium needle is used.

  3. Radiation dose to the neurovascular bundles or penile bulb does not predict erectile dysfunction after prostate brachytherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rex A Kiteley; W. Robert Lee; Allan F deGuzman; Mahta Mirzaei; David L McCullough

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the relationship between calculated doses to the neurovascular bundles (NVBs) and the penile bulb (PB) and the development of erectile dysfunction (ED) after low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDRPB) alone. Methods and Materials: Between September 1997 and June 1999, 84 men were treated with LDRPB alone. Inclusion criteria for this study were (1) no ED according to a self-administered

  4. Maximum vs. Mono Androgen Blockade and the Risk of Recurrence in Men With Localized Prostate Cancer Undergoing Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ronald C. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)], E-mail: rcchen@partners.org; Sadetsky, Natalia [Department of Urology, Program in Urologic Oncology, Urology Outcomes Research Group, UCSF Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Chen, M.-H. [Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Carroll, Peter R. [Department of Urology, Program in Urologic Oncology, Urology Outcomes Research Group, UCSF Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); D'Amico, Anthony V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: We examined whether maximum androgen blockade (MAB) is associated with a decreased recurrence risk vs. single-agent androgen suppression (monotherapy) for men undergoing brachytherapy (BT) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Data from 223 men in Cancer of the Prostate Strategic Urologic Research Endeavor database who received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) concurrent with BT for intermediate- or high-risk prostatic adenocarcinoma were included; 159 (71%) received MAB, and 64 (29%) monotherapy (luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist or anti-androgen alone). Cox regression analysis was performed to assess whether the choice of ADT was associated with disease recurrence adjusting for known prognostic factors. Results: Men who received MAB had similar Gleason scores, T categories, and pretreatment prostate-specific antigen as those who received monotherapy. After a median follow-up of 49 months, the use of MAB was not associated with a decrease in the risk recurrence (p = 0.72), after adjusting for known prognostic factors. A higher PSA at diagnosis (p = 0.03) and younger age at diagnosis (p < 0.01) were associated with increased recurrence risk. The 3-year recurrence free survival was 76% for patients in both monotherapy and MAB groups. Conclusions: There are varied practice patterns in physicians' choice of the extent of concurrent ADT when used with brachytherapy for men with intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancer. Given a lack of demonstrated superiority from either ADT choice, both appear to be reasonable options.

  5. MRI of prostate brachytherapy seeds at high field: A study in phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, S. D.; Wachowicz, K.; Fallone, B. G. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada) and Department of Physics, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada) and Department of Oncology, Division of Medical Physics, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada) and Department of Physics and Department of Oncology, Division of Medical Physics, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada)

    2009-11-15

    Postimplant evaluation of prostate brachytherapy using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 1.5 T has met with some difficulties due to the uncertainty associated with seed localization despite the excellent anatomical delineation this imaging modality can achieve. Seeds in vascularized regions or outside the prostate, where signal heterogeneity or drop off can obscure their position, can be difficult to identify. The increase in SNR available at 3.0 T offers the potential to improve these issues with visualization. However, before moving directly to in vivo studies, it is important to investigate the effects of artifact size on the ability to localize multiple seeds in close proximity. These artifacts are of extra concern at higher field because of the increased induced field distortions surrounding the seeds. A single prostate brachytherapy seed (IMC6711, OncoSeed) and arrays of seed pairs were suspended in a porcine gel medium and imaged on 1.5 and 3 T MRI scanners for comparison. Two basic acquisition techniques utilized in a wide array of clinical sequences [spin-echo based and gradient-echo (GE) based] were investigated for the types of artifacts they produce, and their dependence on field. Analysis of the resulting voids was performed to determine the relative size of seeds as seen on the images, as well as the ability to distinguish seeds at close proximity. The seed voids at 3 T were only slightly larger than those obtained at 1.5 T (0.5 mm longer and wider) when using a spin-echo type sequence. For this work, the authors used a proton density fast spin-echo (FSE) sequence. These results are promising for the use of 3 T imaging for postimplant evaluation since the SNR will increase by roughly a factor of 2 with only a limited corresponding increase in artifact size. The minimum separation of the seeds to be completely distinguished using void analysis increased from between 1.5 and 3 mm to between 3 and 4.5 mm when going from 1.5 to 3 T FSE imaging. The minimum separation of the seeds for GE at the demonstration TE of 11 ms was found to be between 3 and 4.5 mm for 1.5 T and between 4.5 and 6 mm for 3 T. These GE artifact dimensions will scale down with TE and, as this happens, approach the dimensions of the FSE artifacts given above.

  6. A CsI(Na) based radiation detector for high resolution imaging studies using iodine 125 in small animal research

    SciTech Connect

    A. Weisenberger; E. Bradley; S. Majewski; and M. Saha

    1997-05-01

    The authors report on the development of a high resolution radiation imaging system which is capable of detecting and imaging the coincident gamma and X-ray emissions of the radioisotope iodine 125 ({sup 125}I). Iodine 125 is commonly available as a radioactive label to tag molecular biology probes. Iodine 125 decays via electron capture emitting a 35 keV gamma-ray with the prompt emission of several 27-32 keV X-rays. A coincidence condition can be set to detect the {sup 125}I decays thus reducing background radiation contribution to the image. They are testing the use of arrays of CsI(Na) crystal scintillators coupled to position sensitive photomultiplier tubes for this application. Laboratory studies have thus far been done on mice using a prototype of the detector which is intended to be used to image gene expression in live mice to advance research in neurobiology.

  7. Predictors of distant metastasis after combined HDR brachytherapy and external beam radiation for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rwigema, Jean-Claude; Chung, Melody; Banerjee, Robyn; Wang, Jason; Steinberg, Michael; Demanes, David Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine predictors of distant metastases (DM) in prostate cancer patients treated with high dose rate brachytherapy boost (HDR-B) and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Material and methods From 1991 to 2002, 768 men with localized prostate cancer were treated with HDR-B and EBRT. The mean EBRT dose was 37.5 Gy (range: 30.6-45 Gy), and the HDR-B was 22 or 24 Gy delivered in 4 fractions. Univariate and multivariate analyses using a Cox proportional hazards model including age at diagnosis, T stage, Gleason score (GS), pretreatment PSA, biologically equivalent dose (BED), and use of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) was used to determine predictors of developing distant metastases. Results The median follow-up time for the entire patient population was 4.2 years (range: 1-11.2 years). Distant metastases were identified in 22/768 (3%) of patients at a median of 4.1 years. PSA failure according to the Phoenix definition developed in 3%, 5%, and 14% of men with low, intermediate, and high risk disease with a median time to failure of 3.8 years. Prostate cancer specific mortality was observed in 2% of cases. T stage, GS, and use of ADT were significantly associated with developing DM on univariate analysis. GS, and use of ADT were the only factors significantly associated with developing DM on multivariate analysis (p < 0.01). Patients who received ADT had significantly higher risk features suggesting patient selection bias for higher DM in this group of patients rather than a negative interaction between HDR-B and EBRT. Conclusions In men treated with HDR-B and EBRT, GS is a significant factor on multivariate analysis for developing distant metastasis. PMID:24143146

  8. Characterization of the performance of the new MOSkin dosimeter as a quality assurance tool for pulsed dose-rate (PDR) prostate brachytherapy, and the effect of rectal heterogeneity on the dose delivered to the rectal wall

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian S Kwan

    2009-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a common treatment modality used for treating prostate cancer. The radiation is emitted from within the prostate, which focuses the damage on the tumour rather than the surrounding healthy tissue. However, due to the close proximity of the rectum to the prostate, there is a possibility that the rectum will receive too much radiation dose during prostate treatment.

  9. Health-Related Quality of Life up to Six Years After {sup 125}I Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Roeloffzen, Ellen M.A., E-mail: E.M.A.Roeloffzen@UMCUtrecht.n [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Lips, Irene M.; Gellekom, Marion P.R. van [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Roermund, Joep van [Department of Urology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Frank, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Medical Center, Houston, TX (United States); Battermann, Jan J.; Vulpen, Marco van [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) after prostate brachytherapy has been extensively described in published reports but hardly any long-term data are available. The aim of the present study was to prospectively assess long-term HRQOL 6 years after {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 127 patients treated with {sup 125}I brachytherapy for early-stage prostate cancer between December 2000 and June 2003 completed a HRQOL questionnaire at five time-points: before treatment and 1 month, 6 months, 1 year, and 6 years after treatment. The questionnaire included the RAND-36 generic health survey, the cancer-specific European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer core questionnaire (EORTCQLQ-C30), and the tumor-specific EORTC prostate cancer module (EORTC-PR25). A change in a score of >=10 points was considered clinically relevant. Results: Overall, the HRQOL at 6 years after {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy did not significantly differ from baseline. Although a statistically significant deterioration in HRQOL at 6 years was seen for urinary symptoms, bowel symptoms, pain, physical functioning, and sexual activity (p <.01), most changes were not clinically relevant. A statistically significant improvement at 6 years was seen for mental health, emotional functioning, and insomnia (p <.01). The only clinically relevant changes were seen for emotional functioning and sexual activity. Conclusion: This is the first study presenting prospective HRQOL data up to 6 years after {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy. HRQOL scores returned to approximately baseline values at 1 year and remained stable up to 6 years after treatment. {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy did not adversely affect patients' long-term HRQOL.

  10. Dwell time modulation restrictions do not necessarily improve treatment plan quality for prostate HDR brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balvert, Marleen; Gorissen, Bram L.; den Hertog, Dick; Hoffmann, Aswin L.

    2015-01-01

    Inverse planning algorithms for dwell time optimisation in interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy may produce solutions with large dwell time variations within catheters, which may result in undesirable selective high-dose subvolumes. Extending the dwell time optimisation model with a dwell time modulation restriction (DTMR) that limits dwell time differences between neighboring dwell positions has been suggested to eliminate this problem. DTMRs may additionally reduce the sensitivity for uncertainties in dwell positions that inevitably result from catheter reconstruction errors and afterloader source positioning inaccuracies. This study quantifies the reduction of high-dose subvolumes and the robustness against these uncertainties by applying a DTMR to template-based prostate HDR brachytherapy implants. Three different DTMRs were consecutively applied to a linear dose-based penalty model (LD) and a dose-volume based model (LDV), both obtained from literature. The models were solved with DTMR levels ranging from no restriction to uniform dwell times within catheters in discrete steps. Uncertainties were simulated on clinical cases using in-house developed software, and dose-volume metrics were calculated in each simulation. For the assessment of high-dose subvolumes, the dose homogeneity index (DHI) and the contiguous dose volume histogram were analysed. Robustness was measured by the improvement of the lowest D90% of the planning target volume (PTV) observed in the simulations. For (LD), a DTMR yields an increase in DHI of approximately 30% and reduces the size of the largest high-dose volume by 2–5 cc. However, this comes at a cost of a reduction in D90% of the PTV of 10%, which often implies that it drops below the desired minimum of 100%. For (LDV), none of the DTMRs were able to improve high-dose volume measures. DTMRs were not capable of improving robustness of PTV D90% against uncertainty in dwell positions for both models.

  11. Dwell time modulation restrictions do not necessarily improve treatment plan quality for prostate HDR brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Balvert, Marleen; Gorissen, Bram L; den Hertog, Dick; Hoffmann, Aswin L

    2015-01-21

    Inverse planning algorithms for dwell time optimisation in interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy may produce solutions with large dwell time variations within catheters, which may result in undesirable selective high-dose subvolumes. Extending the dwell time optimisation model with a dwell time modulation restriction (DTMR) that limits dwell time differences between neighboring dwell positions has been suggested to eliminate this problem. DTMRs may additionally reduce the sensitivity for uncertainties in dwell positions that inevitably result from catheter reconstruction errors and afterloader source positioning inaccuracies. This study quantifies the reduction of high-dose subvolumes and the robustness against these uncertainties by applying a DTMR to template-based prostate HDR brachytherapy implants. Three different DTMRs were consecutively applied to a linear dose-based penalty model (LD) and a dose-volume based model (LDV), both obtained from literature. The models were solved with DTMR levels ranging from no restriction to uniform dwell times within catheters in discrete steps. Uncertainties were simulated on clinical cases using in-house developed software, and dose-volume metrics were calculated in each simulation. For the assessment of high-dose subvolumes, the dose homogeneity index (DHI) and the contiguous dose volume histogram were analysed. Robustness was measured by the improvement of the lowest D90% of the planning target volume (PTV) observed in the simulations. For (LD), a DTMR yields an increase in DHI of approximately 30% and reduces the size of the largest high-dose volume by 2-5 cc. However, this comes at a cost of a reduction in D90% of the PTV of 10%, which often implies that it drops below the desired minimum of 100%. For (LDV), none of the DTMRs were able to improve high-dose volume measures. DTMRs were not capable of improving robustness of PTV D90% against uncertainty in dwell positions for both models. PMID:25549084

  12. Matched-pair analysis and dosimetric variations of two types of software for interstitial permanent brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiyama, Hiromichi, E-mail: hishiyam@kitasato-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Nakamura, Ryuji [Department of Radiology, Iwate Medical University, Morioka, Iwate (Japan); Satoh, Takefumi [Department of Urology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Tanji, Susumu [Department of Urology, Iwate Medical University, Morioka, Iwate (Japan); Teh, Bin S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX (United States); Uemae, Mineko [Division of Radiation Oncology, Kitasato University Hospital, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Baba, Shiro [Department of Urology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Hayakawa, Kazushige [Department of Radiology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether identical dosimetric results could be achieved using different planning software for permanent interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Data from 492 patients treated with brachytherapy were used for matched-pair analysis. Interplant and Variseed were used as software for ultrasound-based treatment planning. Institution, neoadjuvant hormonal therapy, prostate volume, and source strength were used for factors to match the 2 groups. The study population comprised of 126 patients with treatment planning using Interplant software and 127 matched patients using Variseed software. Dosimetric results were compared between the 2 groups. The Variseed group showed significantly higher values for dose covering 90% of prostate volume (pD90), prostate volume covered by 150% of prescription dose (pV150), and dose covering 30% of the urethra (uD30) compared with the Interplant group. Our results showed that use of different software could lead to different dosimetric results, which might affect the clinical outcomes.

  13. Investigating the dosimetric and tumor control consequences of prostate seed loss and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Knaup, Courtney; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Esquivel, Carlos; Stathakis, Sotirios; Swanson, Gregory; Baltas, Dimos; Papanikolaou, Nikos [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States) and Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karalinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm 17176 (Sweden); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States); Department of Medical Physics and Engineering Offenbach Clinic, Offenbach 63069 (Germany) and Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, Physics Department, University of Athens (Greece); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: Low dose-rate brachytherapy is commonly used to treat prostate cancer. However, once implanted, the seeds are vulnerable to loss and movement. The goal of this work is to investigate the dosimetric and radiobiological effects of the types of seed loss and migration commonly seen in prostate brachytherapy. Methods: Five patients were used in this study. For each patient three treatment plans were created using Iodine-125, Palladium-103, and Cesium-131 seeds. The three seeds that were closest to the urethra were identified and modeled as the seeds lost through the urethra. The three seeds closest to the exterior of prostatic capsule were identified and modeled as those lost from the prostate periphery. The seed locations and organ contours were exported from Prowess and used by in-house software to perform the dosimetric and radiobiological evaluation. Seed loss was simulated by simultaneously removing 1, 2, or 3 seeds near the urethra 0, 2, or 4 days after the implant or removing seeds near the exterior of the prostate 14, 21, or 28 days after the implant. Results: Loss of one, two or three seeds through the urethra results in a D{sub 90} reduction of 2%, 5%, and 7% loss, respectively. Due to delayed loss of peripheral seeds, the dosimetric effects are less severe than for loss through the urethra. However, while the dose reduction is modest for multiple lost seeds, the reduction in tumor control probability was minimal. Conclusions: The goal of this work was to investigate the dosimetric and radiobiological effects of the types of seed loss and migration commonly seen in prostate brachytherapy. The results presented show that loss of multiple seeds can cause a substantial reduction of D{sub 90} coverage. However, for the patients in this study the dose reduction was not seen to reduce tumor control probability.

  14. Investigating the dosimetric and tumor control consequences of prostate seed loss and migration

    PubMed Central

    Knaup, Courtney; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Esquivel, Carlos; Stathakis, Sotirios; Swanson, Gregory; Baltas, Dimos; Papanikolaou, Nikos

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Low dose-rate brachytherapy is commonly used to treat prostate cancer. However, once implanted, the seeds are vulnerable to loss and movement. The goal of this work is to investigate the dosimetric and radiobiological effects of the types of seed loss and migration commonly seen in prostate brachytherapy. Methods: Five patients were used in this study. For each patient three treatment plans were created using Iodine-125, Palladium-103, and Cesium-131 seeds. The three seeds that were closest to the urethra were identified and modeled as the seeds lost through the urethra. The three seeds closest to the exterior of prostatic capsule were identified and modeled as those lost from the prostate periphery. The seed locations and organ contours were exported from Prowess and used by in-house software to perform the dosimetric and radiobiological evaluation. Seed loss was simulated by simultaneously removing 1, 2, or 3 seeds near the urethra 0, 2, or 4 days after the implant or removing seeds near the exterior of the prostate 14, 21, or 28 days after the implant. Results: Loss of one, two or three seeds through the urethra results in aD90 reduction of 2%, 5%, and 7% loss, respectively. Due to delayed loss of peripheral seeds, the dosimetric effects are less severe than for loss through the urethra. However, while the dose reduction is modest for multiple lost seeds, the reduction in tumor control probability was minimal. Conclusions: The goal of this work was to investigate the dosimetric and radiobiological effects of the types of seed loss and migration commonly seen in prostate brachytherapy. The results presented show that loss of multiple seeds can cause a substantial reduction ofD90 coverage. However, for the patients in this study the dose reduction was not seen to reduce tumor control probability. PMID:22755712

  15. Is a Loose-Seed Nomogram Still Valid for Prostate Brachytherapy in a Stranded-Seed Era?

    SciTech Connect

    Kudchadker, Rajat J. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Swanson, David A. [Department of Urology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Kuban, Deborah A.; Lee, Andrew K.; Bruno, Teresa L. C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Frank, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: sjfrank@mdanderson.org

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To characterize the amount of activity required to treat the prostate with stranded {sup 125}I radioactive seeds and compare our stranded data with the amount of activity recommended when individual seeds are implanted using a Mick applicator. Methods and Materials: Data from two groups of patients at University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center who were treated with prostate brachytherapy as monotherapy were analyzed. The first group included 100 patients implanted with individual seeds in 2000 and 2001. The second group comprised 81 patients for whom stranded seeds were implanted in 2006 and 2007. Seeds in both groups were {sup 125}I seeds with an air kerma strength of 0.497 U per seed (0.391 mCi per seed). The prescribed dose to planning target volume was 145 Gy. Results: The total implanted activity and the number of seeds used were significantly lower in the second group (p < 0.0001) than in the first group. The reduction in activity in the stranded-seed group was approximately 23% for a 20-cm{sup 3} prostate and approximately 15% for a 60-cm{sup 3} prostate. With equivalent activity between the two groups, the stranded-seed treatment covered a larger treatment volume with the prescribed dose. Conclusions: The amount of activity required to effectively treat a prostate of a given volume was lower with stranded seeds than with loose seeds. Our experience suggests that prostate brachytherapy that uses stranded seeds leads to a more efficient implant with fewer seeds and lower overall activity, resulting in improved homogeneity.

  16. Effects of iodine-125 seeds on the methylation of SFRP2 and P16 in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaogang; Lu, Ping; Li, Bo; Zhang, Wangfu; Luo, Kaiyuan

    2013-11-01

    The current study investigated the effects of iodine-125 seeds on the gene methylation of SFRP2 and P16 in colorectal cancer. Mouse models of human colorectal cancer were randomly divided into an experimental group (n=25) and a control group (n=25). The control group was implanted with blank seeds (0 MBq) and the experimental group with iodine-125 seeds (14.8 MBq). At 20 days after implantation, the animals were sacrificed. The methylation levels of SFRP2 and P16 were detected using methylation-specific polymerase chain reactions (MSPs). Following iodine-125 seed irradiation, the level of SFRP2 methylation decreased. The methylation index of the experimental group (0.67±0.05) was significantly lower than that of the control group (0.84±0.07; P<0.05). In the experimental group, 10 samples (40%) displayed methylation in the P16 promoter region compared with 14 (56%) in the control group, which was a significant difference (P<0.05). Iodine-125 seeds induce the downregulation of methylated tumor suppressor gene promoters, thereby inhibiting the proliferation and growth of tumor cells. PMID:24223648

  17. The Impact of Brachytherapy on Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality for Definitive Radiation Therapy of High-Grade Prostate Cancer: A Population-Based Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Xinglei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Keith, Scott W. [Division of Biostatistics, Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mishra, Mark V.; Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Showalter, Timothy N., E-mail: timothy.showalter@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: This population-based analysis compared prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) in a cohort of patients with high-risk prostate cancer after nonsurgical treatment with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), brachytherapy (BT), or combination (BT + EBRT). Methods and Materials: We identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database patients diagnosed from 1988 through 2002 with T1-T3N0M0 prostate adenocarcinoma of poorly differentiated grade and treated with BT, EBRT, or BT + EBRT. During this time frame, the database defined high grade as prostate cancers with Gleason score 8-10, or Gleason grade 4-5 if the score was not recorded. This corresponds to a cohort primarily with high-risk prostate cancer, although some cases where only Gleason grade was recorded may have included intermediate-risk cancer. We used multivariate models to examine patient and tumor characteristics associated with the likelihood of treatment with each radiation modality and the effect of radiation modality on PCSM. Results: There were 12,745 patients treated with EBRT (73.5%), BT (7.1%), or BT + EBRT (19.4%) included in the analysis. The median follow-up time for all patients was 6.4 years. The use of BT or BT + EBRT increased from 5.1% in 1988-1992 to 31.4% in 1998-2002. Significant predictors of use of BT or BT + EBRT were younger age, later year of diagnosis, urban residence, and earlier T-stage. On multivariate analysis, treatment with either BT (hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% confidence interval, 0.49-0.86) or BT + EBRT (hazard ratio, 0.77; 95% confidence ratio, 0.66-0.90) was associated with significant reduction in PCSM compared with EBRT alone. Conclusion: In patients with high-grade prostate cancer, treatment with brachytherapy is associated with reduced PCSM compared with EBRT alone. Our results suggest that brachytherapy should be investigated as a component of definitive treatment strategies for patients with high-risk prostate cancer.

  18. The investigation of prostatic calcifications using ?-PIXE analysis and their dosimetric effect in low dose rate brachytherapy treatments using Geant4.

    PubMed

    Pope, D J; Cutajar, D L; George, S P; Guatelli, S; Bucci, J A; Enari, K E; Miller, S; Siegele, R; Rosenfeld, A B

    2015-06-01

    Low dose rate brachytherapy is a widely used modality for the treatment of prostate cancer. Most clinical treatment planning systems currently in use approximate all tissue to water, neglecting the existence of inhomogeneities, such as calcifications. The presence of prostatic calcifications may perturb the dose due to the higher photoelectric effect cross section in comparison to water. This study quantitatively evaluates the effect of prostatic calcifications on the dosimetric outcome of brachytherapy treatments by means of Monte Carlo simulations and its potential clinical consequences.Four pathological calcification samples were characterised with micro-particle induced x-ray emission (?-PIXE) to determine their heavy elemental composition. Calcium, phosphorus and zinc were found to be the predominant heavy elements in the calcification composition. Four clinical patient brachytherapy treatments were modelled using Geant4 based Monte Carlo simulations, in terms of the distribution of brachytherapy seeds and calcifications in the prostate. Dose reductions were observed to be up to 30% locally to the calcification boundary, calcification size dependent. Single large calcifications and closely placed calculi caused local dose reductions of between 30-60%. Individual calculi smaller than 0.5?mm in diameter showed minimal dosimetric impact, however, the effects of small or diffuse calcifications within the prostatic tissue could not be determined using the methods employed in the study. The simulation study showed a varying reduction on common dosimetric parameters. D90 showed a reduction of 2-5%, regardless of calcification surface area and volume. The parameters V100, V150 and V200 were also reduced by as much as 3% and on average by 1%. These reductions were also found to relate to the surface area and volume of calcifications, which may have a significant dosimetric impact on brachytherapy treatment, however, such impacts depend strongly on specific factors in the patient's individual treatment. These factors include the number, size, composition and spatial distribution of calcifications in the prostate as well as the distribution of brachytherapy seeds. PMID:25984817

  19. The investigation of prostatic calcifications using ?-PIXE analysis and their dosimetric effect in low dose rate brachytherapy treatments using Geant4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, D. J.; Cutajar, D. L.; George, S. P.; Guatelli, S.; Bucci, J. A.; Enari, K. E.; Miller, S.; Siegele, R.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2015-06-01

    Low dose rate brachytherapy is a widely used modality for the treatment of prostate cancer. Most clinical treatment planning systems currently in use approximate all tissue to water, neglecting the existence of inhomogeneities, such as calcifications. The presence of prostatic calcifications may perturb the dose due to the higher photoelectric effect cross section in comparison to water. This study quantitatively evaluates the effect of prostatic calcifications on the dosimetric outcome of brachytherapy treatments by means of Monte Carlo simulations and its potential clinical consequences. Four pathological calcification samples were characterised with micro-particle induced x-ray emission (?-PIXE) to determine their heavy elemental composition. Calcium, phosphorus and zinc were found to be the predominant heavy elements in the calcification composition. Four clinical patient brachytherapy treatments were modelled using Geant4 based Monte Carlo simulations, in terms of the distribution of brachytherapy seeds and calcifications in the prostate. Dose reductions were observed to be up to 30% locally to the calcification boundary, calcification size dependent. Single large calcifications and closely placed calculi caused local dose reductions of between 30–60%. Individual calculi smaller than 0.5?mm in diameter showed minimal dosimetric impact, however, the effects of small or diffuse calcifications within the prostatic tissue could not be determined using the methods employed in the study. The simulation study showed a varying reduction on common dosimetric parameters. D90 showed a reduction of 2–5%, regardless of calcification surface area and volume. The parameters V100, V150 and V200 were also reduced by as much as 3% and on average by 1%. These reductions were also found to relate to the surface area and volume of calcifications, which may have a significant dosimetric impact on brachytherapy treatment, however, such impacts depend strongly on specific factors in the patient’s individual treatment. These factors include the number, size, composition and spatial distribution of calcifications in the prostate as well as the distribution of brachytherapy seeds.

  20. In vivo real-time dosimetric verification in high dose rate prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Seymour, Erin L.; Downes, Simon J.; Fogarty, Gerald B.; Izard, Michael A.; Metcalfe, Peter [Radiation Oncology Associates, Mater Hospital, Crows Nest, New South Wales 2065, Australia and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); Radiation Oncology Associates, Mater Hospital, Crows Nest, New South Wales 2065 (Australia); Radiation Oncology Associates, Mater Hospital, Crows Nest, New South Wales 2065 Australia and Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of a diode array in the routine verification of planned dose to points inside the rectum from prostate high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy using a real-time planning system. Methods: A dosimetric study involving 28 patients was undertaken where measured doses received during treatment were compared to those calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS). After the ultrasound imaging required for treatment planning had been recorded, the ultrasound probe was replaced with a geometric replica that contained an 8 mm diameter cylindrical cavity in which a PTW diode array type 9112 was placed. The replica probe was then positioned inside the rectum with the individual diode positions determined using fluoroscopy. Dose was then recorded during the patients' treatment and compared to associated coordinates in the planning system. Results: Factors influencing diode response and experimental uncertainty were initially investigated to estimate the overall uncertainty involved in dose measurements, which was determined to be {+-}10%. Data was acquired for 28 patients' first fractions, 11 patients' second fractions, and 13 patients' third fractions with collection dependent upon circumstances. Deviations between the diode measurements and predicted values ranged from -42% to +35% with 71% of measurements experiencing less than a 10% deviation from the predicted values. If the {+-}10% measurement uncertainty was combined with a tolerated dose discrepancy of {+-}10% then over 95% of the diode results exhibited agreement with the calculated data to within {+-}20%. It must also be noted that when large dose discrepancies were apparent they did not necessarily occur for all five diodes in the one measurement. Conclusions: This technique provided a method that could be utilized to detect gross errors in dose delivery of a real-time prostate HDR plan. Limitations in the detection system used must be well understood if meaningful results are to be achieved.

  1. Mixed integer programming improves comprehensibility and plan quality in inverse optimization of prostate HDR brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Gorissen, Bram L; den Hertog, Dick; Hoffmann, Aswin L

    2013-02-21

    Current inverse treatment planning methods that optimize both catheter positions and dwell times in prostate HDR brachytherapy use surrogate linear or quadratic objective functions that have no direct interpretation in terms of dose-volume histogram (DVH) criteria, do not result in an optimum or have long solution times. We decrease the solution time of the existing linear and quadratic dose-based programming models (LP and QP, respectively) to allow optimizing over potential catheter positions using mixed integer programming. An additional average speed-up of 75% can be obtained by stopping the solver at an early stage, without deterioration of the plan quality. For a fixed catheter configuration, the dwell time optimization model LP solves to optimality in less than 15 s, which confirms earlier results. We propose an iterative procedure for QP that allows us to prescribe the target dose as an interval, while retaining independence between the solution time and the number of dose calculation points. This iterative procedure is comparable in speed to the LP model and produces better plans than the non-iterative QP. We formulate a new dose-volume-based model that maximizes V(100%) while satisfying pre-set DVH criteria. This model optimizes both catheter positions and dwell times within a few minutes depending on prostate volume and number of catheters, optimizes dwell times within 35 s and gives better DVH statistics than dose-based models. The solutions suggest that the correlation between the objective value and the clinical plan quality is weak in the existing dose-based models. PMID:23363622

  2. Brachytherapy or Conformal External Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Single-Institution Matched-Pair Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pickles, Tom, E-mail: tpickles@bccancer.bc.c [Prostate Outcomes and Provincial Prostate Brachytherapy Program, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Keyes, Mira; Morris, W. James [Prostate Outcomes and Provincial Prostate Brachytherapy Program, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: In the absence of randomized study data, institutional case series have shown brachytherapy (BT) to produce excellent biochemical control (bNED) in patients with localized prostate cancer compared with alternative curative treatments. This study was designed to overcome some of the limitations of case series studies by using a matched-pair design in patients treated contemporaneously with BT and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) at a single institution. Methods and Materials: Six hundred one eligible patients treated between 1998 and 2001 were prospectively followed up in our institutional databases and matched on a 1:1 basis for the following known prognostic variables: prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, Gleason score, T stage, the use and duration of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy, and the percentage of positive tissue core samples. Two hundred seventy-eight perfect matches of patients (139 in each group) with low- and intermediate-risk cancer were further analyzed. bNED (Phoenix definition) was the primary endpoint. Other endpoints were toxicity, PSA kinetics, and the secondary use of androgen deprivation therapy. Results: The 5-year bNED rates were 95% (BT) and 85% (EBRT) (p < 0.001). After 7 years, the BT bNED result was unchanged, but the rate in EBRT patients had fallen to 75%. The median posttreatment PSA nadirs were 0.04 ng/mL (BT) and 0.62 ng/mL (EBRT, p < 0.001), which predicted a higher ongoing treatment failure rate in association with EBRT use than with BT use. Late urinary toxicity and rectal/bowel toxicity were worse in patients treated with BT and EBRT, respectively. Conclusions: BT for both low-risk and selected intermediate-risk cancers achieves exceptional cure rates. Even with dose escalation, it will be difficult for EBRT to match the proven track record of BT seen over the past decade.

  3. BrachyView, A novel inbody imaging system for HDR prostate brachytherapy: Design and Monte Carlo feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Safavi-Naeini, M.; Han, Z.; Cutajar, D.; Guatelli, S.; Petasecca, M.; Lerch, M. L. F. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Franklin, D. R. [Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Technology, Sydney, NSW 2007 (Australia); Jakubek, J.; Pospisil, S. [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics (IEAP), Czech Technical University in Prague (CTU) (Czech Republic); Bucci, J.; Zaider, M.; Rosenfeld, A. B. [St. George Hospital Cancer Care Centre, Gray Street, Kogarah, NSW 2217 (Australia); Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a form of radiation therapy for treating prostate cancer whereby a high activity radiation source is moved between predefined positions inside applicators inserted within the treatment volume. Accurate positioning of the source is essential in delivering the desired dose to the target area while avoiding radiation injury to the surrounding tissue. In this paper, HDR BrachyView, a novel inbody dosimetric imaging system for real time monitoring and verification of the radioactive seed position in HDR prostate brachytherapy treatment is introduced. The current prototype consists of a 15 Multiplication-Sign 60 mm{sup 2} silicon pixel detector with a multipinhole tungsten collimator placed 6.5 mm above the detector. Seven identical pinholes allow full imaging coverage of the entire treatment volume. The combined pinhole and pixel sensor arrangement is geometrically designed to be able to resolve the three-dimensional location of the source. The probe may be rotated to keep the whole prostate within the transverse plane. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the efficacy of the design through computer simulation, and to estimate the accuracy in resolving the source position (in detector plane and in 3D space) as part of the feasibility study for the BrachyView project.Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were performed using the GEANT4 radiation transport model, with a {sup 192}Ir source placed in different locations within a prostate phantom. A geometrically accurate model of the detector and collimator were constructed. Simulations were conducted with a single pinhole to evaluate the pinhole design and the signal to background ratio obtained. Second, a pair of adjacent pinholes were simulated to evaluate the error in calculated source location.Results: Simulation results show that accurate determination of the true source position is easily obtainable within the typical one second source dwell time. The maximum error in the estimated projection position was found to be 0.95 mm in the imaging (detector) plane, resulting in a maximum source positioning estimation error of 1.48 mm.Conclusions: HDR BrachyView is a feasible design for real-time source tracking in HDR prostate brachytherapy. It is capable of resolving the source position within a subsecond dwell time. In combination with anatomical information obtained from transrectal ultrasound imaging, HDR BrachyView adds a significant quality assurance capability to HDR brachytherapy treatment systems.

  4. Characterization of ultrasound elevation beamwidth artifacts for prostate brachytherapy needle insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Peikari, Mohammad; Chen, Thomas Kuriran; Lasso, Anras; Heffter, Tamas; Fichtinger, Gabor; Burdette, Everette C. [Laboratory for Percutaneous Surgery (Perk), School of Computing, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada); Acoustic MedSystems, 208 Burwash Avenue, Savoy, Illinois 61874 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: Ultrasound elevation beamwidth leads to image artifacts and uncertainties in localizing objects (such as a surgical needle) in ultrasound images. The authors examined the clinical significance of errors caused by elevation beamwidth artifacts and imaging parameters in needle insertion procedures. Methods: Beveled prostate brachytherapy needles were inserted through all holes of a grid template under real-time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance. The needle tip position as indicated by the TRUS image was compared to their observed physical location. A new device was developed to measure the ultrasound elevation beamwidth. Results: Imaging parameters of the TRUS scanner have direct impact on the localization error ranging from 0.5 up to 4 mm. The smallest localization error was observed laterally close to the center of the grid template and axially within the beam's focal zone. Largest localization error occurs laterally around both sides of the grid template and axially within the beam's far field. The authors also found that the localization errors vary with both lateral and elevation offsets. Conclusions: The authors found properly adjusting the TRUS imaging settings to lower the ultrasound gain and power effectively minimized the appearance of elevation beamwidth artifacts and in turn reduced the localization errors of the needle tip.

  5. PSA Nadir of <0.5 ng/mL Following Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Prostate Adenocarcinoma is Associated With Freedom From Prostate-Specific Antigen Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Eric C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Stone, Nelson N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Department of Urology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Stock, Richard G., E-mail: Richard.Stock@mountsinai.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Because limited information exists regarding whether the rate or magnitude of PSA decline following brachytherapy predicts long-term clinical outcomes, we evaluated whether achieving a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir (nPSA) <0.5 ng/mL following brachytherapy is associated with decreased PSA failure and/or distant metastasis. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed our database of early-stage prostate adenocarcinoma patients who underwent brachytherapy, excluding those receiving androgen-deprivation therapy and those with <2 years follow-up. Median and mean pretreatment PSA were 6 ng/mL and 7.16 ng/mL, respectively. By clinical stage, 775 were low risk ({<=}T2a), 126 were intermediate risk (T2b), and 20 were high risk (>T2b). By Gleason score, 840 were low risk ({<=}6), 71 were intermediate risk (7), and 10 were high risk (>7). Patients were treated with brachytherapy only (I-125, n = 779, or Pd-103, n = 47), or brachytherapy + external-beam radiation therapy (n = 95). Median follow-up was 6.3 years. We noted whether nPSA <0.5 ng/mL was achieved and the time to achieve this nadir and tested for associations with pretreatment risk factors. We also determined whether this PSA endpoint was associated with decreased PSA failure or distant metastasis. Results: Absence of high-risk factors in clinical stage ({<=}T2b), Gleason score ({<=}7), and pretreatment PSA ({<=}20 ng/mL) was significantly associated with achieving nPSA <0.5 ng/mL. By Kaplan-Meier analysis, patients achieving nPSA <0.5 ng/mL had significantly higher long-term freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF) than nonresponders (5-year FFBF: 95.2 {+-} 0.8% vs. 71.5 {+-} 6.7%; p < 0.0005). Among responders, those who achieved nPSA <0.5 ng/mL in {<=}5 years had higher FFBF than those requiring >5 years (5-year FFBF: 96.7 {+-} 0.7% vs. 80.8 {+-} 4.6%; p < 0.0005). On multivariate analysis, patients who achieved nPSA <0.5 ng/mL in {<=}5 years had significantly higher FFBF than other patients. Conclusions: Pretreatment risk factors (clinical tumor stage, Gleason score, pretreatment PSA) strongly predict for patients achieving nPSA <0.5 ng/mL following brachytherapy, and this cohort had significantly higher long-term FFBF.

  6. SU-E-T-279: Realization of Three-Dimensional Conformal Dose Planning in Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z; Jiang, S; Yang, Z [Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Bai, H; Zhang, X [Seeds biological Pharmacy Ltd, Tianjin (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Successful clinical treatment in prostate brachytherapy is largely dependent on the effectiveness of pre-surgery dose planning. Conventional dose planning method could hardly arrive at a satisfy result. In this abstract, a three-dimensional conformal localized dose planning method is put forward to ensure the accuracy and effectiveness of pre-implantation dose planning. Methods: Using Monte Carlo method, the pre-calculated 3-D dose map for single source is obtained. As for multiple seeds dose distribution, the maps are combined linearly to acquire the 3-D distribution. The 3-D dose distribution is exhibited in the form of isodose surface together with reconstructed 3-D organs group real-timely. Then it is possible to observe the dose exposure to target volume and normal tissues intuitively, thus achieving maximum dose irradiation to treatment target and minimum healthy tissues damage. In addition, the exfoliation display of different isodose surfaces can be realized applying multi-values contour extraction algorithm based on voxels. The needles could be displayed in the system by tracking the position of the implanted seeds in real time to conduct block research in optimizing insertion trajectory. Results: This study extends dose planning from two-dimensional to three-dimensional, realizing the three-dimensional conformal irradiation, which could eliminate the limitations of 2-D images and two-dimensional dose planning. A software platform is developed using VC++ and Visualization Toolkit (VTK) to perform dose planning. The 3-D model reconstruction time is within three seconds (on a Intel Core i5 PC). Block research could be conducted to avoid inaccurate insertion into sensitive organs or internal obstructions. Experiments on eight prostate cancer cases prove that this study could make the dose planning results more reasonable. Conclusion: The three-dimensional conformal dose planning method could improve the rationality of dose planning by safely reducing the large target margin and avoiding dose dead zones for prostate cancer treatment. 1) National Natural Science Foundation of People's Republic of China (No. 51175373); 2) New Century Educational Talents Plan of Chinese Education Ministry (NCET-10-0625); 3) Scientific and Technological Major Project, Tianjin (No. 12ZCDZSY10600)

  7. Natural History of Clinically Staged Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated With Monotherapeutic Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Al V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Merrick, Gregory S., E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.or [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Galbreath, Robert W. [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Puget Sound Healthcare Corporation, Group Health Cooperative, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Butler, Wayne M. [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States)

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the natural history of clinically staged low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with permanent interstitial seed implants as monotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between April 1995 and May 2005, 463 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer underwent brachytherapy as the sole definitive treatment. Men who received supplemental external beam radiotherapy or androgen deprivation therapy were excluded. Dosimetric implant quality was determined based on the minimum dose that covered 90% of the target volume and the volume of the prostate gland receiving 100% of the prescribed dose. Multiple parameters were evaluated as predictors of treatment outcomes. Results: The 12-year biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates for the entire cohort were 97.1%, 99.7%, and 75.4%, respectively. Only pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level, percent positive biopsy cores, and minimum dose that covered 90% of the target volume were significant predictors of biochemical recurrence. The bPFS, cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates were 97.4%, 99.6%, and 76.2%, respectively, for low-risk patients and 96.4%, 100%, and 74.0%, respectively, for intermediate-risk patients. The bPFS rate was 98.8% for low-risk patients with high-quality implants versus 92.1% for those with less adequate implants (p < 0.01), and it was 98.3% for intermediate-risk patients with high-quality implants versus 86.4% for those with less adequate implants (p < 0.01). Conclusions: High-quality brachytherapy implants as monotherapy can provide excellent outcomes for men with clinically staged low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer. For these men, a high-quality implant can achieve results comparable to high-quality surgery in the most favorable pathologically staged patient subgroups.

  8. On the Need to Compensate for Edema-Induced Dose Reductions in Preplanned {sup 131}Cs Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z. Jay [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)], E-mail: zhe.chen@yale.edu; Deng Jun; Roberts, Kenneth; Nath, Ravinder [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Surgical trauma-induced edema and its protracted resolution can lead to significant dose reductions in preplanned {sup 131}Cs prostate brachytherapy. The purpose of this work was to examine whether these dose reductions should be actively compensated for and to estimate the magnitude of the additional irradiation needed for dose compensation. Methods and Materials: The quantitative edema resolution characteristics observed by Waterman et al. were used to examine the physical and radiobiologic effects of prostate edema in preplanned {sup 131}Cs implants. The need for dose compensation was assessed using the dose responses observed in {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd prostate implants. The biologically effective dose, calculated with full consideration of edema evolution, was used to estimate the additional irradiation needed for dose compensation. Results: We found that the edema-induced dose reduction in preplanned {sup 131}Cs implants could easily exceed 10% of the prescription dose for implants with moderate or large edema. These dose reductions could lead to a >10% reduction in the biochemical recurrence-free survival for individual patients if the effect of edema was ignored. For a prescribed dose of 120 Gy, the number of 2-Gy external beam fractions needed to compensate for a 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25% edema-induced dose reduction would be one, four, six, seven, and nine, respectively, for prostate cancer with a median potential doubling time of 42 days. The required additional irradiation increased for fast-growing tumors and/or those less efficient in sublethal damage repair. Conclusion: Compensation of edema-induced dose reductions in preplanned {sup 131}Cs prostate brachytherapy should be actively considered for those implants with moderate or large edema.

  9. Second Primary Cancer After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer-A SEER Analysis of Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Wahab, May [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States)], E-mail: mwahab@med.miami.edu; Reis, Isildinha M. [Division of Biostatistics, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, FL (United States); Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Hamilton, Kara [Division of Biostatistics, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, FL (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of second primary cancers (SPCs) and radiotherapy-induced SPCs (RTSPCs). Patients and Methods: The incidence of SPCs and RTSPCs was compared among four treatment groups with locoregional prostate adenocarcinoma in the 1973-2002 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. These groups were no radiotherapy (RT), no surgery (Group 1); external beam RT (EBRT) (Group 2); brachytherapy (Group 3); and a combination of EBRT and brachytherapy (Group 4). Results: The age-adjusted estimates of SPCs were greater with EBRT than with brachytherapy (2,178 vs. 1,901 SPCs/100,000; p = 0.025) or with the no RT, no surgery group (1,971 SPCs/100,000; p <0.0001). The age-adjusted rate of late SPC ({>=}5 years) for EBRT (2,425 SPCs/100,000) was only significantly greater (p <0.0001) than that for no RT, no surgery (1,950 SPCs/100,000). The hazard ratio adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, and grade was constant at 1.263 for EBRT compared with no RT, no surgery (p <0.0001) but varied with the length of follow-up in both the brachytherapy (0.721 at 5 years to 1.200 at 9 years) and combination (0.920 at 5 years to 1.317 at 9 years) groups. The incidence of RTSPCs was only significantly different between the no RT, no surgery group and the EBRT group, with an increase of 162 cases/100,000 or a 0.16% increased SPC risk (p = 0.023). No significant differences in the incidence of RTSPC were seen between the RT groups. Conclusion: No significant differences were seen in the incidence of RTSPCs between the RT groups. The initial smaller relative risk of overall SPCs in the brachytherapy group increased with time until the curves converged, suggesting that the effect had resulted from patient selection bias.

  10. Comparison of Real-Time Intraoperative Ultrasound-Based Dosimetry With Postoperative Computed Tomography-Based Dosimetry for Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, Subir [Department of Radiation Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Kaiser Permanente Radiation Oncology, Santa Clara, CA (United States); Shi Peipei [Department of Radiation Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Department of Statistics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Liu Bingren [Department of Radiation Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY (United States); Gupta, Nilendu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Bahnson, Robert R. [Department of Urologic Surgery, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Wang, Jian Z. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)], E-mail: wang.993@osu.edu

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether real-time intraoperative ultrasound (US)-based dosimetry can replace conventional postoperative computed tomography (CT)-based dosimetry in prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between December 2001 and November 2002, 82 patients underwent {sup 103}Pd prostate brachytherapy. An interplant treatment planning system was used for real-time intraoperative transrectal US-guided treatment planning. The dose distribution was updated according to the estimated seed position to obtain the dose-volume histograms. Postoperative CT-based dosimetry was performed a few hours later using the Theraplan-Plus treatment planning system. The dosimetric parameters obtained from the two imaging modalities were compared. Results: The results of this study revealed correlations between the US- and CT-based dosimetry. However, large variations were found in the implant-quality parameters of the two modalities, including the doses covering 100%, 90%, and 80% of the prostate volume and prostate volumes covered by 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescription dose. The mean relative difference was 38% and 16% for doses covering 100% and 90% of the prostate volume and 10% and 21% for prostate volumes covered by 100% and 150% of the prescription dose, respectively. The CT-based volume covered by 200% of the prescription dose was about 30% greater than the US-based one. Compared with CT-based dosimetry, US-based dosimetry significantly underestimated the dose to normal organs, especially for the rectum. The average US-based maximal dose and volume covered by 100% of the prescription dose for the rectum was 72 Gy and 0.01 cm{sup 3}, respectively, much lower than the 159 Gy and 0.65 cm{sup 3} obtained using CT-based dosimetry. Conclusion: Although dosimetry using intraoperative US-based planning provides preliminary real-time information, it does not accurately reflect the postoperative CT-based dosimetry. Until studies have determined whether US-based dosimetry or postoperative CT-based dosimetry can better predict patient outcomes, the American Brachytherapy Society recommendation of CT-based postimplant dosimetry should remain the standard of care.

  11. Postoperative Nomogram Predicting the 9-Year Probability of Prostate Cancer Recurrence After Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy Using Radiation Dose as a Prognostic Variable

    SciTech Connect

    Potters, Louis, E-mail: LPotters@nshs.ed [Department of Radiation Medicine, North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System, New Hyde Park, NY (United States); Roach, Mack [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Urology, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Davis, Brian J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Stock, Richard G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Ciezki, Jay P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Zelefsky, Michael J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Stone, Nelson N. [Department of Urology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Fearn, Paul A. [Department of Urology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Yu Changhong [Glickman Urological Institute and the Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Shinohara, Katsuto [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Urology, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Kattan, Michael W. [Glickman Urological Institute and the Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To report a multi-institutional outcomes study on permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) to 9 years that includes postimplant dosimetry, to develop a postimplant nomogram predicting biochemical freedom from recurrence. Methods and Materials: Cox regression analysis was used to model the clinical information for 5,931 patients who underwent PPB for clinically localized prostate cancer from six centers. The model was validated against the dataset using bootstrapping. Disease progression was determined using the Phoenix definition. The biological equivalent dose was calculated from the minimum dose to 90% of the prostate volume (D90) and external-beam radiotherapy dose using an alpha/beta of 2. Results: The 9-year biochemical freedom from recurrence probability for the modeling set was 77% (95% confidence interval, 73-81%). In the model, prostate-specific antigen, Gleason sum, isotope, external beam radiation, year of treatment, and D90 were associated with recurrence (each p < 0.05), whereas clinical stage was not. The concordance index of the model was 0.710. Conclusion: A predictive model for a postimplant nomogram for prostate cancer recurrence at 9-years after PPB has been developed and validated from a large multi-institutional database. This study also demonstrates the significance of implant dosimetry for predicting outcome. Unique to predictive models, these nomograms may be used a priori to calculate a D90 that likely achieves a desired outcome with further validation. Thus, a personalized dose prescription can potentially be calculated for each patient.

  12. A study of a pretreatment method to predict the number of I-125 seeds required for prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Qaisieh, Bashar [Medical Physics Department, Cookridge Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: bashar@medphysics.leeds.ac.uk; Brearley, Elizabeth [Medical Physics Department, Cookridge Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); St Clair, Shaun [Medical Physics Department, Cookridge Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); Flynn, Anthony [Medical Physics Department, Cookridge Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: Prediction of the number of iodine seeds (I-125) required for prostate implantation is an important tool to reduce the number of unused seeds for brachytherapy. This study was designed to investigate the relationship between the number of seeds implanted vs. prostate volume. This can produce a tool to accurately estimate the number of seeds required for a given target volume. In addition, total cost of treatment, personal radiation risks during storage and handling, and errors in accounting for seeds can be reduced. Methods and Materials: Data from two groups of patients who had I-125 seed prostate implants (Oncura/Amersham RAPIDStrand model 6711 I-125) have been separately analyzed: (A) The relationship between prostate volume vs. number of seeds implanted was based on 401 patients treated between 1999 and 2002 who were implanted with seeds of air kerma strength (AKS) of 0.459 {mu}Gyh{sup -1} at 1 m per seed. (B) The relationship between prostate volume vs. total seed AKS was analyzed. This was based on 628 patients treated between 1999 and 2002 who were implanted with a range of seed strengths from 0.381 to 0.521 U. Both patient groups were subdivided into integer prostate volume bins. For each bin, the mean and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the implanted number of seeds or total AKS implanted were calculated. The upper 95% CI was used to investigate the relationship between the number of seeds implanted and total AKS implanted vs. prostate volume. Results: The new method of predicting the number of seeds shows valid and accurate results. The required number of seeds can be predicted, which helps to reduce the number of leftover seeds to 3% of the total number of seeds ordered. Conclusion: The number of I-125 seeds or the total activity that is required to deliver the prescribed dose for the target volume can be predicted. This could reduce the overall treatment cost by accurate seed ordering before implantation.

  13. Calculated organ doses using Monte Carlo simulations in a reference male phantom undergoing HDR brachytherapy applied to localized prostate carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Candela-Juan, Cristian [Radioprotection Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026 (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, Jose [Radiotherapy Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026 (Spain); Ballester, Facundo [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to obtain equivalent doses in radiosensitive organs (aside from the bladder and rectum) when applying high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy to a localized prostate carcinoma using {sup 60}Co or {sup 192}Ir sources. These data are compared with results in a water phantom and with expected values in an infinite water medium. A comparison with reported values from proton therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is also provided. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations in Geant4 were performed using a voxelized phantom described in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 110, which reproduces masses and shapes from an adult reference man defined in ICRP Publication 89. Point sources of {sup 60}Co or {sup 192}Ir with photon energy spectra corresponding to those exiting their capsules were placed in the center of the prostate, and equivalent doses per clinical absorbed dose in this target organ were obtained in several radiosensitive organs. Values were corrected to account for clinical circumstances with the source located at various positions with differing dwell times throughout the prostate. This was repeated for a homogeneous water phantom. Results: For the nearest organs considered (bladder, rectum, testes, small intestine, and colon), equivalent doses given by {sup 60}Co source were smaller (8%-19%) than from {sup 192}Ir. However, as the distance increases, the more penetrating gamma rays produced by {sup 60}Co deliver higher organ equivalent doses. The overall result is that effective dose per clinical absorbed dose from a {sup 60}Co source (11.1 mSv/Gy) is lower than from a {sup 192}Ir source (13.2 mSv/Gy). On the other hand, equivalent doses were the same in the tissue and the homogeneous water phantom for those soft tissues closer to the prostate than about 30 cm. As the distance increased, the differences of photoelectric effect in water and soft tissue, and appearance of other materials such as air, bone, or lungs, produced variations between both phantoms which were at most 35% in the considered organ equivalent doses. Finally, effective doses per clinical absorbed dose from IMRT and proton therapy were comparable to those from both brachytherapy sources, with brachytherapy being advantageous over external beam radiation therapy for the furthest organs. Conclusions: A database of organ equivalent doses when applying HDR brachytherapy to the prostate with either {sup 60}Co or {sup 192}Ir is provided. According to physical considerations, {sup 192}Ir is dosimetrically advantageous over {sup 60}Co sources at large distances, but not in the closest organs. Damage to distant healthy organs per clinical absorbed dose is lower with brachytherapy than with IMRT or protons, although the overall effective dose per Gy given to the prostate seems very similar. Given that there are several possible fractionation schemes, which result in different total amounts of therapeutic absorbed dose, advantage of a radiation treatment (according to equivalent dose to healthy organs) is treatment and facility dependent.

  14. Radiation Dose Predicts for Biochemical Control in Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Alice Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Burri, Ryan J.; Cesaretti, Jamie A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Stone, Nelson N. [Department of Urology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Stock, Richard G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)], E-mail: richard.stock@mountsinai.org

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of patient- and treatment-related factors on freedom from biochemical failure (FFbF) in patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From a prospectively collected database of 2250 men treated at Mount Sinai Hospital from 1990 to 2004 with low-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer, 558 men with either one or more intermediate-risk features (prostate-specific antigen [PSA] level 10-20 ng/mL, Gleason score 7, or Stage T2b) were identified who had a minimum follow-up of 24 months and postimplant CT-based dosimetric analysis. Biologically effective dose (BED) values were calculated to compare doses from different isotopes and treatment regimens. Patients were treated with brachytherapy with or without hormone therapy and/or external-beam radiotherapy. Patient- and treatment-related factors were analyzed with respect to FFbF. The median follow-up was 60 months (range, 24-167 months). Biochemical failure was defined according to the Phoenix definition. Univariate analyses were used to determine whether any variable was predictive of FFbF. A two-sided p value of <0.05 was considered significant. Results: Overall, the actuarial FFbF at 10 years was 86%. Dose (BED <150 Gy{sub 2} vs. {>=}150 Gy{sub 2}) was the only significant predictor of FFbF (p < 0.001). None of the other variables (PSA, external-beam radiotherapy, Gleason score, treatment type, hormones, stage, and number of risk factors) was found to be a statistically significant predictor of 10-year FFbF. Conclusions: Radiation dose is an important predictor of FFbF in intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Treatment should continue to be individualized according to presenting disease characteristics until results from Radiation Therapy Oncology Group trial 0232 become available.

  15. Urinary Symptom Flare in 712 {sup 125}I Prostate Brachytherapy Patients: Long-Term Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, Mira, E-mail: mkeyes@bccancer.bc.c [Provincial Prostate Brachytherapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Miller, Stacy; Moravan, Veronika; Pickles, Tom; Liu, Mitchell; Spadinger, Ingrid; Lapointe, Vincent; Morris, W. James [Provincial Prostate Brachytherapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To describe the late transient worsening of urinary symptoms ('urinary symptom flare') in 712 consecutive prostate brachytherapy patients, associated predictive factors, association with rectal and urinary toxicity, and the development of erectile dysfunction. Methods and Materials: Patients underwent implantation between 1998 and 2003 (median follow-up, 57 months). International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity, and erectile function data were prospectively collected. Flare was defined as an increase in IPSS of >=5 and of >=8 points greater than the post-treatment nadir. The relationships between the occurrence of flare and the patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were examined. The Cox proportional hazards method was used to test individual variables and the multivariate models. Results: The incidence of flare was 52% and 30% using the flare definition of an IPSS of >=5 and >=8 points greater than the postimplant nadir, respectively. Of the patients with symptoms, 65% had resolution of their symptoms within 6 months and 91% within 1 year. Flares most commonly occurred 16-24 months after implantation. On multivariate analysis, a greater baseline IPSS and greater maximal postimplant IPSS were the predictors of flare, regardless of the flare definition used. Androgen suppression was a predictor for fewer flares (IPSS >=5). Diabetes and prostate edema predicted for more frequent flares (IPSS >=8). Patients with flare had a greater incidence of RTOG Grade 3 urinary toxicity and RTOG Grade 2 or greater rectal toxicity. No association was found between erectile dysfunction and the occurrence of flare. Conclusion: Urinary symptom flare is a common, transient phenomenon after prostate brachytherapy. A greater baseline IPSS and maximal postimplant IPSS were the strongest predictive factors. Flare was associated with a greater incidence of late RTOG Grade 3 urinary toxicity and greater rate of late RTOG Grade 2 or greater rectal toxicity.

  16. Combined Modality Treatment for Prostate Cancer With Dynamic Adaptive Radiation Therapy Using Four-Dimensional Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Brachytherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer C. Cash; Jone Fay; Michael J. Dattoli

    2009-01-01

    Prostate cancer can be successfully treated using dynamic adaptive external beam radiation techniques along with interstitial brachytherapy to deliver curative therapies with low urinary, rectal and erectile function morbidity. Through the use of sophisticated, state-of-the art radiographic imaging for staging and treatment planning, a precise, individual design for treatment is accomplished. Symptom management and patient education are of paramount importance

  17. Comparison of Oncentra® Brachy IPSA and graphical optimisation techniques: a case study of HDR brachytherapy head and neck and prostate plans

    PubMed Central

    Jameson, Michael G; Ohanessian, Lucy; Batumalai, Vikneswary; Patel, Virendra; Holloway, Lois C

    2015-01-01

    There are a number of different dwell positions and time optimisation options available in the Oncentra® Brachy (Elekta Brachytherapy Solutions, Veenendaal, The Netherlands) brachytherapy treatment planning system. The purpose of this case study was to compare graphical (GRO) and inverse planning by simulated annealing (IPSA) optimisation techniques for interstitial head and neck (HN) and prostate plans considering dosimetry, modelled radiobiology outcome and planning time. Four retrospective brachytherapy patients were chosen for this study, two recurrent HN and two prostatic boosts. Manual GRO and IPSA plans were generated for each patient. Plans were compared using dose–volume histograms (DVH) and dose coverage metrics including; conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI) and conformity number (CN). Logit and relative seriality models were used to calculate tumour control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Approximate planning time was also recorded. There was no significant difference between GRO and IPSA in terms of dose metrics with mean CI of 1.30 and 1.57 (P > 0.05) respectively. IPSA achieved an average HN TCP of 0.32 versus 0.12 for GRO while for prostate there was no significant difference. Mean GRO planning times were greater than 75 min while average IPSA planning times were less than 10 min. Planning times for IPSA were greatly reduced compared to GRO and plans were dosimetrically similar. For this reason, IPSA makes for a useful planning tool in HN and prostate brachytherapy.

  18. Pulmonary Metastases After Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kido, Masahito; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Miki, Kenta; Aoki, Manabu; Kimura, Takahiro; Takahash, Hiroyuki; Kanehira, Chihiro; Egawa, Shin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To analyze unusual events and focus discussion on pulmonary metastasis in particular after low-dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR-BT) for prostate cancer (PCa). Materials and Methods A total of 616 consecutive patients who had undergone LDR-BT for clinically localized PCa at Jikei University Hospital between October 2003 and April 2010 were enrolled in this study. Follow-up information was summarized, and patterns of biochemical recurrence and clinical outcome were investigated. Results Disease risk was stratified as low-risk in 231 patients, intermediate-risk in 365, and high-risk in 20, respectively. Of these patients, 269 (43.7%) had received hormonal therapy (HT) in combination with LDR-BT, and 80 (13.0%) had received external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Average dosimetric parameter values with and without EBRT were 95.3% and 94.2% for V100, 132.8 Gy and 164.2 Gy for D90, and 180.6 Gy2 and 173.7 Gy2 for the biologically effective dose. Biochemical recurrence was noted in 14 patients (6.1%) in the low-risk group, 25 patients (6.8%) in the intermediate-risk group, and 6 patients (30.0%) in the high-risk group, respectively. In these cases of biochemical recurrence, 9 (64.3%), 13 (52.0%), and 4 patients (66.7%) in each respective risk group showed signs of clinical recurrence. Five patients (19.2%) with clinical recurrence developed pulmonary metastases, of which 4 were isolated lesions. All tumors responded favorably to subsequent HT. Conclusions LDR-BT for biologically aggressive PCa may be linked to possible pulmonary metastasis owing to tumor dissemination during seed implantation. This information is important in planning adequate treatment for these patients. PMID:24868334

  19. Development of Late Toxicity and International Prostate Symptom Score Resolution After External-Beam Radiotherapy Combined With Pulsed Dose Rate Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pieters, Bradley R., E-mail: b.r.pieters@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rezaie, Elisa; Geijsen, Elisabeth D.; Koedooder, Kees; Grient, Johan N.B. van der; Blank, Leo E.C.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reijke, Theo M. de [Department of Urology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Koning, Caro C.E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the development of gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity, genitourinary (GU) toxicity, erectile dysfunction, and International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) resolution in a cohort of patients treated with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) followed by a brachytherapy pulsed dose rate (PDR) boost. Methods and Materials: Between 2002 and 2008, 110 patients were treated with 46-Gy EBRT followed by PDR brachytherapy (24.96-28.80 Gy). The investigated outcome variables, GI toxicity, GU toxicity, erectile dysfunction, and IPSS were prospectively scored at several time points during follow-up. Association between time (as continuous and categorical variable) and the outcome variables was assessed using generalized linear models. Results: No statistically significant association was found between time (continuous) and GI toxicity (odds ratio [OR], 0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.89-1.06), GU toxicity (OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.91-1.03), erectile dysfunction (OR, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.99-1.11), and IPSS (-0.11; 95% CI, -0.41-0.20). Also, no statistically significant association was found between these variables and time as a categorical variable. GU toxicity was associated with IPSS resolution (OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.09-1.24). Posttreatment IPSS was associated with pretreatment IPSS (0.52; 95% CI, 0.25-0.79). Conclusions: No accumulation of high-grade toxicity over time could be established for a group of patients treated with EBRT and PDR brachytherapy for prostate cancer, probably because high-grade late toxicity resolves with time. Also, differences in IPSS values among patients are smaller after treatment than before treatment.

  20. Characteristic variation of ?-fetoprotein DNA nanometer-range irradiated by iodine-125.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mu-hua; Huang, Yao-xiong; Li, Jian-fang; Wu, Zheng-jie; Xie, Liang-jun

    2013-04-01

    To obtain the characteristic variation of structure and functional groups of ?-fetoprotein (AFP) DNA irradiated by iodine-125((125)I), the AFP antisense oligonucleotide labeled with various radioactivity dose (125)I was mixed with the AFP DNA in a simulated polymerase chain reaction temperature condition. After the mixtures were irradiated by the (125)I from 2 to 72 hours, the mutation of the biogenic conformation and functional groups of the irradiated DNA were investigated using laser Raman spectroscopy. The shifted peak and the decreased intensity of the characteristic Raman spectra were found, which demonstrated that the structure of the phosphodiester linkage was broke, the pyridine and purine bases in DNA emerged and damaged. The model of gene conformation changed from form B to form C spectrum after the nanometer-range irradiation with (125)I from 2 to 24 hours. The damage of local pyridine and purine bases gradually increased along with the accumulation of irradiation, and the bases and ribosome were finally dissociated and stacked. PMID:23573955

  1. The biochemical recurrence-free rate in patients who underwent prostate low-dose-rate brachytherapy, using two different definitions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To assess the biochemical recurrence (BCR)-free rate in patients who underwent prostate low-dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR-brachytherapy), using two different definitions (Phoenix definition and PSA???0.2 ng/mL). Methods Two hundreds and three patients who were clinically diagnosed with localized prostate cancer (cT1c-2cN0M0) and underwent LDR-brachytherapy between July 2004 and September 2008 were enrolled. The median follow-up period was 72 months. We evaluated the BCR-free rate using the Phoenix definition and the PSA cut-off value of 0.2 ng/mL, as in the definition for radical prostatectomy. To evaluate an independent variable that can predict BCR, Cox’s proportional hazard regression analysis was carried out. Results The BCR-free rate in patients using the Phoenix definition was acceptable (5-year: 92.8%). The 5- year BCR-free rate using the strict definition (PSA???0.2 ng/mL) was 74.1%. Cox’s proportional hazard regression analysis showed that a higher biological effective dose (BED) of ?180 Gy2 was the only independent variable that could predict BCR (HR: 0.570, 95% C.I.: 0.327-0.994, p?=?0.048). Patients with a higher BED (?180 Gy2) had a significantly higher BCR-free rate than those with a lower BED (<180 Gy2) (5-year BCR-free rate: 80.5% vs. 67.4%). Conclusions A higher BED ?180 Gy2 promises a favorable BCR-free rate, even if the strict definition is adopted. PMID:24885896

  2. The use of iodine-125 seeds as a substitute for iridium-192 seeds in temporary interstitial breast implants

    SciTech Connect

    Vicini, F.; White, J.; Gustafson, G.; Matter, R.C.; Edmundson, G.; Martinez, A. [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Clarke, D.H. [Northern Virginia Cancer Center, Alexandria, VA (United States)

    1993-10-20

    We have previously reported that the use of iodine-125 seeds in temporary plastic tube interstitial implants may be more advantageous than iridium-192 seeds due to less patient and personnel radiation exposure, reduced shielding requirements, and significant dosimetric advantages. The impact of this isotope on the rate of local control and cosmetic outcome in patients with early stage breast cancer treated with interstitial implants for their irradiation {open_quotes}boost{close_quotes} remains to be defined. We reviewed the treatment outcome of 402 consecutive cases of Stage I and II breast cancer undergoing breast conserving therapy between 1/1/80 and 12/31/87. All patients underwent excisional biopsy and received 45-50 Gy to the entire breast followed by a boost to the tumor bed using either electrons (104 patients), photons (15 patients), or an interstitial implant with either iridium-192 (197 patients) or iodine-125 (86 patients) to at least 60 Gy. Iodine-125 implants were primarily performed in patients with significant risk factors for local recurrence (71%) or in patients with large breasts (17%). Local tumor control and cosmetic outcome were assessed and contrasted between patients boosted with each modality. We conclude that patients with State I and II breast cancer undergoing breast conserving therapy and judged to be candidates for boosts with interstitial implants can be effectively treated with iodine-125 seeds. Use of the isotope results in less patient and personnel irradiation exposure and a better dose distribution than iridium-192, since dose optimization can be routinely employed. Overall, local control and cosmetic outcome have been excellent and are similar to either iridium-192, electrons, or photons. 21 refs., 4 tabs.

  3. Twelve-Month Prostate-Specific Antigen Values and Perineural Invasion as Strong Independent Prognostic Variables of Long-Term Biochemical Outcome After Prostate Seed Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, William, E-mail: billyding888@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Lee, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Chamberlain, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Mary's Regional Medical Center, Reno, Nevada (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Mary's Regional Medical Center, Reno, Nevada (United States); Cunningham, James [Carson Urology, Carson City, Nevada (United States)] [Carson Urology, Carson City, Nevada (United States); Yang Lixi [Department of Radiation Oncology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Tay, Jonathan [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Mary's Regional Medical Center, Reno, Nevada (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Mary's Regional Medical Center, Reno, Nevada (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To determine whether post-treatment prostate-specific antigen (ptPSA) values at 12 months and other clinical parameters predict long-term PSA relapse-free survival (PRFS) following prostate seed brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Records of 204 hormone-naieve patients with localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate treated at St. Mary's Regional Medical Center in Reno, NV, and at Carson Tahoe Regional Medical Center in Carson City, NV, between 1998 and 2003, using I-125 or Pd-103 seed brachytherapy, were retrospectively analyzed. Treatment planning was done using a preplanned, modified peripheral loading technique. A total of 185 of 204 patients had PSA records at 12 months after implant. Variables included were age, initial pretreatment PSA, Gleason score, T stage, National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk group (RG), perineural invasion (PNI), external beam boost, dose, and ptPSA levels at 12 months with cutpoints at {<=}1, 1.01 to 2.00, 2.01 to 3.00, and >3.00 ng/ml. Results: Median follow-up was 80 months, and median age was 69 years. The numbers of patients stratified by NCCN low, intermediate, and high RG were 110:65:10, respectively. Monotherapy and boost prescription doses were 145 Gy and 110 Gy for I-125, and 125 Gy and 100 Gy for Pd-103 seeds, respectively. The median dose (D90) was 95.4% of the prescribed dose. The 5-year PRFS at the 12-months ptPSA levels of {<=}1, 1.01 to 2.00, 2.01 to 3.00, and >3.00 ng/ml were 98.5%, 85.7%, 61.5%, and 22.2%, respectively. The 10-year PRFS at the 12-months ptPSA levels of {<=}1 and 1.01 to 2.00 ng/ml were 90.5% and 85.7%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, both ptPSA and PNI were significant independent predictors of PRFS. Hazard ratios (HR) for ptPSA levels at {<=}1, 1.01 to 2.00, 2.01 to 3.00, and >3.00 ng/ml at 12 months were 1, 4.96, 27.57, and 65.10, respectively. PNI had an HR of 6.1 (p = 0.009). Conclusions: Presence of PNI and ptPSA values at 12 months are strong prognostic variables for long-term PRFS after definitive prostate brachytherapy seed implantation.

  4. Catheter-based ultrasound hyperthermia with HDR brachytherapy for treatment of locally advanced cancer of the prostate and cervix.

    PubMed

    Diederich, Chris J; Wootton, Jeff; Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant; Juang, Titania; Scott, Serena; Chen, Xin; Cunha, Adam; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I C

    2011-02-22

    A clinical treatment delivery platform has been developed and is being evaluated in a clinical pilot study for providing 3D controlled hyperthermia with catheter-based ultrasound applicators in conjunction with high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Catheter-based ultrasound applicators are capable of 3D spatial control of heating in both angle and length of the devices, with enhanced radial penetration of heating compared to other hyperthermia technologies. Interstitial and endocavity ultrasound devices have been developed specifically for applying hyperthermia within HDR brachytherapy implants during radiation therapy in the treatment of cervix and prostate. A pilot study of the combination of catheter based ultrasound with HDR brachytherapy for locally advanced prostate and cervical cancer has been initiated, and preliminary results of the performance and heating distributions are reported herein. The treatment delivery platform consists of a 32 channel RF amplifier and a 48 channel thermocouple monitoring system. Controlling software can monitor and regulate frequency and power to each transducer section as required during the procedure. Interstitial applicators consist of multiple transducer sections of 2-4 cm length × 180 deg and 3-4 cm × 360 deg. heating patterns to be inserted in specific placed 13g implant catheters. The endocavity device, designed to be inserted within a 6 mm OD plastic tandem catheter within the cervix, consists of 2-3 transducers × dual 180 or 360 deg sectors. 3D temperature based treatment planning and optimization is dovetailed to the HDR optimization based planning to best configure and position the applicators within the catheters, and to determine optimal base power levels to each transducer section. To date we have treated eight cervix implants and six prostate implants. 100 % of treatments achieved a goal of >60 min duration, with therapeutic temperatures achieved in all cases. Thermal dosimetry within the hyperthermia target volume (HTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) are reported. Catheter-based ultrasound hyperthermia with HDR appears feasible with therapeutic temperature coverage of the target volume within the prostate or cervix while sparing surrounding more sensitive regions. (NIHR01CA122276). PMID:25076820

  5. Catheter-based ultrasound hyperthermia with HDR brachytherapy for treatment of locally advanced cancer of the prostate and cervix

    PubMed Central

    Diederich, Chris J.; Wootton, Jeff; Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant; Juang, Titania; Scott, Serena; Chen, Xin; Cunha, Adam; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I.C.

    2014-01-01

    A clinical treatment delivery platform has been developed and is being evaluated in a clinical pilot study for providing 3D controlled hyperthermia with catheter-based ultrasound applicators in conjunction with high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Catheter-based ultrasound applicators are capable of 3D spatial control of heating in both angle and length of the devices, with enhanced radial penetration of heating compared to other hyperthermia technologies. Interstitial and endocavity ultrasound devices have been developed specifically for applying hyperthermia within HDR brachytherapy implants during radiation therapy in the treatment of cervix and prostate. A pilot study of the combination of catheter based ultrasound with HDR brachytherapy for locally advanced prostate and cervical cancer has been initiated, and preliminary results of the performance and heating distributions are reported herein. The treatment delivery platform consists of a 32 channel RF amplifier and a 48 channel thermocouple monitoring system. Controlling software can monitor and regulate frequency and power to each transducer section as required during the procedure. Interstitial applicators consist of multiple transducer sections of 2–4 cm length × 180 deg and 3–4 cm × 360 deg. heating patterns to be inserted in specific placed 13g implant catheters. The endocavity device, designed to be inserted within a 6 mm OD plastic tandem catheter within the cervix, consists of 2–3 transducers × dual 180 or 360 deg sectors. 3D temperature based treatment planning and optimization is dovetailed to the HDR optimization based planning to best configure and position the applicators within the catheters, and to determine optimal base power levels to each transducer section. To date we have treated eight cervix implants and six prostate implants. 100 % of treatments achieved a goal of >60 min duration, with therapeutic temperatures achieved in all cases. Thermal dosimetry within the hyperthermia target volume (HTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) are reported. Catheter-based ultrasound hyperthermia with HDR appears feasible with therapeutic temperature coverage of the target volume within the prostate or cervix while sparing surrounding more sensitive regions. (NIHR01CA122276). PMID:25076820

  6. PSA kinetics after prostate brachytherapy: PSA bounce phenomenon and its implications for PSA doubling time

    SciTech Connect

    Ciezki, Jay P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States)]. E-mail: ciezkij@ccf.org; Reddy, Chandana A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Garcia, Jorge [Department of Medical Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Angermeier, Kenneth [Glickman Urologic Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Ulchaker, James [Glickman Urologic Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Mahadevan, Arul [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Chehade, Nabil [Department of Urology, Kaiser Permanente Medical Group, Cleveland, OH (United States); Altman, Andrew [Department of Urology, Kaiser Permanente Medical Group, Cleveland, OH (United States); Klein, Eric A. [Glickman Urologic Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics in patients treated with prostate brachytherapy (PI) with a minimum of 5 years of PSA follow-up. Methods and Materials: The records of 162 patients treated with PI for localized prostate cancer with a minimum of 5 years of PSA follow-up were reviewed. A variety of pretreatment and posttreatment variables were examined. Patients were coded as having a PSA bounce if their PSA achieved a nadir, elevated at least 0.2 ng/mL greater than that nadir, and decreased to, or below, the initial nadir. Two definitions of biochemical failure (bF) or biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) were used: the classic American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus definition of three consecutive rises (bF3) and the nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition (bFn+2). Associations between a PSA bounce and the various pre- and posttreatment factors were assessed with logistic regression analysis, and the association between a PSA bounce and bF was examined with the log-rank test. The Mann-Whitney U test was applied to test for differences in the PSA doubling time (PSADT) and the time to a PSA rise between the PSA bounce patients and the bF patients. PSADT was calculated from the nadir to the time of the first PSA rise, because this point is known first in the clinical setting. Results: The 5-year overall bRFS rate was 87% for the bF3 definition and 96% for the bFn+2 definition. A PSA bounce was experienced by 75 patients (46.3%). Patients who experienced a PSA bounce were less likely to have a bF, regardless of the bRFS definition used (bF3: p = 0.0015; bFn+2: p = 0.0040). Among the pre- and posttreatment factors, only younger age predicted for a PSA bounce on multivariate analysis (p = 0.0018). The use of androgen deprivation had no effect on PSA bounce. No difference was found in the PSADT between patients who had a PSA bounce and those with bF. The median PSADT for those with a PSA bounce was 8.3 months vs. 10.3 months using the bF3 definition and 8.8 months using the bFn+2 definition. However, a significant difference was found in the time to the first rise in PSA after PI for patients with a PSA bounce vs. patients with bF. The median time to the first rise in PSA after nadir for those with a PSA bounce was 15.1 months vs. 30.0 months using the bF3 definition (p = 0.001) and 22.3 months using the bFn+2 definition (p = 0.013). Conclusion: Patients experiencing a PSA bounce are more likely to be younger and will have a better bRFS. The PSADT cannot differentiate a PSA bounce from bF. The time to the initial PSA rise after nadir is an excellent discriminator of bF from PSA bounce. The time of the PSA rise after nadir occurs far sooner for a PSA bounce than for bF. This factor should be considered when assessing a patient with a rising PSA level after PI before a patient is administered salvage therapy.

  7. In vitro comparative study of vibro-acoustography versus pulse-echo ultrasound in imaging permanent prostate brachytherapy seeds

    PubMed Central

    Mitri, F.G.; Davis, B.J.; Greenleaf, J.F.; Fatemi, M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) is a common treatment for early stage prostate cancer. While the modern approach using trans-rectal ultrasound guidance has demonstrated excellent outcome, the efficacy of PPB depends on achieving complete radiation dose coverage of the prostate by obtaining a proper radiation source (seed) distribution. Currently, brachytherapy seed placement is guided by trans-rectal ultrasound imaging and fluoroscopy. A significant percentage of seeds are not detected by trans-rectal ultrasound because certain seed orientations are invisible making accurate intra-operative feedback of radiation dosimetry very difficult, if not impossible. Therefore, intra-operative correction of suboptimal seed distributions cannot easily be done with current methods. Vibro-acoustography (VA) is an imaging modality that is capable of imaging solids at any orientation, and the resulting images are speckle free. Objective and methods The purpose of this study is to compare the capabilities of VA and pulse-echo ultrasound in imaging PPB seeds at various angles and show the sensitivity of detection to seed orientation. In the VA experiment, two intersecting ultrasound beams driven at f1 = 3.00 MHz and f2 = 3.020 MHz respectively were focused on the seeds attached to a latex membrane while the amplitude of the acoustic emission produced at the difference frequency 20 kHz was detected by a low frequency hydrophone. Results Finite element simulations and results of experiments conducted under well-controlled conditions in a water tank on a series of seeds indicate that the seeds can be detected at any orientation with VA, whereas pulse-echo ultrasound is very sensitive to the seed orientation. Conclusion It is concluded that vibro-acoustography is superior to pulse-echo ultrasound for detection of PPB seeds. PMID:18538365

  8. Iodine-125-labeled cRGD-gold nanoparticles as tumor-targeted radiosensitizer and imaging agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ning; Dang, Yajie; Liang, Guangli; Liu, Guizhi

    2015-04-01

    Research interests on radiosensitive property of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are rapidly raised because of the extensively proved in vitro effectiveness and clinical necessity. However, the issue of targeted accumulation of GNPs in tumor tissues hindered the transference to in vivo applications. In this study, hybrid nano-sized cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp-conjugated GNPs (cRGD-GNPs) integrated with radioactive iodine-125 was fabricated as tumor-targeted radiosensitizer. Therapeutic effects, including acute apoptosis (2 days post treatment) and long-term influence (up to 21 days), were investigated on NCI-H446 tumor-bearing mice via Tc-99 m-Annexin V SPECT and volume measurements, respectively. Apoptosis and volume loss were consistent in showing that tumor growth was effectively suppressed via the treatment of 125I-cRGD-GNP sensitized radiotherapy (RT), a more significantly radiosensitive effect than the treatment of non-targeted GNPs with RT, RT treatment alone, and no treatment. SPECT/CT images showed that the uptake of cRGD-GNPs by tumor tissues reached the peak target/non-target value of 4.76 at around 2 h post injection, and dynamic radioactivity monitoring showed that 125I-cRGD-GNPs maintained about 2.5% of injected dosage at 55 h post injection. For long-term influence, a significant radiosensitized RT-induced volume loss was observed. Hence, cyclic RGD conjugation makes the GNP-based radiosensitizer tumor targeting, offering a new modality for enhancing radiotherapeutic efficacy. Additionally, the introduction of I-125 serves as both a therapeutic factor and a radiotracer for in vivo tracking of GNPs.

  9. MRI characterization of cobalt dichloride-N-acetyl cysteine (C4) contrast agent marker for prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Tze Yee; Stafford, R. Jason; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Sankaranarayanapillai, Madhuri; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Rao, Arvind; Martirosyan, Karen S.; Frank, Steven J.

    2014-05-01

    Brachytherapy, a radiotherapy technique for treating prostate cancer, involves the implantation of numerous radioactive seeds into the prostate. While the implanted seeds can be easily identified on a computed tomography image, distinguishing the prostate and surrounding soft tissues is not as straightforward. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers superior anatomical delineation, but the seeds appear as dark voids and are difficult to identify, thus creating a conundrum. Cobalt dichloride-N-acetyl-cysteine (C4) has previously been shown to be promising as an encapsulated contrast agent marker. We performed spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) and spin-spin relaxation time (T2) measurements of C4 solutions with varying cobalt dichloride concentrations to determine the corresponding relaxivities, r1 and r2. These relaxation parameters were investigated at different field strengths, temperatures and orientations. T1 measurements obtained at 1.5 and 3.0 T, as well as at room and body temperature, showed that r1 is field-independent and temperature-independent. Conversely, the T2 values at 3.0 T were shorter than at 1.5 T, while the T2 values at body temperature were slightly higher than at room temperature. By examining the relaxivities with the C4 vials aligned in three different planes, we found no orientation-dependence. With these relaxation characteristics, we aim to develop pulse sequences that will enhance the C4 signal against prostatic stroma. Ultimately, the use of C4 as a positive contrast agent marker will encourage the use of MRI to obtain an accurate representation of the radiation dose delivered to the prostate and surrounding normal anatomical structures.

  10. Permanent prostate brachytherapy: Dosimetric results and analysis of a learning curve with a dynamic dose-feedback technique

    SciTech Connect

    Acher, Peter [Department of Urology, Guy's and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: peter.acher@gstt.nhs.uk; Popert, Rick [Department of Urology, Guy's and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Nichol, Janette [Department of Urology, Guy's Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Potters, Louis [New York Prostate Institute, South Nassau Communities Hospital, Oceanside, NY (United States); Morris, Stephen [Department of Clinical Oncology, Guy's and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Beaney, Ronald [Department of Clinical Oncology, Guy's and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: A permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) program utilizing intraoperative inverse-planned dynamic dose-feedback was initiated without prior firsthand experience of alternative techniques. The purpose of this study is to assess the dosimetric learning curve associated with this approach. Methods and Materials: A total of 77 patients underwent PPB implants as monotherapy for localized prostate cancer to a prescription dose of 145 Gy with loose 125I seeds between December 2003 and June 2004. Intraoperative and postoperative dosimetric values, total implanted radioactivity, and operating room (OR) times were compared by sequential case number for all cases. Results: The median intraoperative dosimetric values were: D90 (the minimum dose to 90% of the prostate) = 170 Gy (range, 135-203 Gy), V100 (the volume of the prostate that receives 100% of the prescription dose) = 96% (range, 86-100), V150 = 66% (range, 34-86). Median postoperative dosimetric values were as follows: D90 = 168 Gy (range, 132-197 Gy), V100 = 95% (range, 86-99), V150 = 74% (range, 51-84). Median implanted activity was 0.79 mCi per cubic centimeter of prostate (range, 0.541-1.13). There was no significant correlation by case number on any postoperative dosimetric parameter studied. Door-to-door OR time was reduced from median 138 to 97.5 min per case at the end of the series with a correlation coefficient of -0.76 for the initial 28 cases. Conclusion: Satisfactory dosimetric parameters can be achieved from the outset without a learning curve effect in an appropriately trained environment. The learning curve for dynamic dose-feedback PPB in a clinic naive to other techniques is apparent in terms of OR time.

  11. Long-Term Outcome and Toxicity of Salvage Brachytherapy for Local Failure After Initial Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Burri, Ryan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Stone, Nelson N. [Department of Urology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Unger, Pam [Department of Pathology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Stock, Richard G., E-mail: richard.stock@mountsinai.or [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To describe long-term outcomes and toxicity after salvage brachytherapy (BT) for local failure after initial radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1994 and 2008, 37 men with local failure after initial prostate radiotherapy (32 external-beam radiation therapy [EBRT] and 5 BT) underwent salvage BT with {sup 103}Pd or {sup 125}I. Estimates of freedom from biochemical failure (FFbF, Phoenix definition) and cause-specific survival (CSS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicities were graded using CTCv3.0. Results: Median follow-up was 86 months (range, 2-156). The median dose to 90% of the prostate volume was 122 Gy (range, 67-166). The 10-year FFbF and CSS were 54% and 96%, respectively. On univariate analysis, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) >10 ng/mL at initial diagnosis was significantly associated with FFbF (p = 0.01), and there were trends for both age <70 years (p = 0.08) and PSA <6 ng/mL (p = 0.08) at the time of salvage BT. On multivariate analysis, only presalvage PSA <6 ng/mL (p = 0.046) was significantly associated with improved FFbF. There were three Grade 3 toxicities and one Grade 4 toxicity. Pelvic lymph node dissection before salvage BT was the only variable significantly associated with Grade {>=}2 toxicity (p = 0.03). Conclusion: With a median follow-up of 86 months, salvage prostate BT was associated with a 10-year FFbF of 54% and CSS of 96%. Improved FFbF was associated with a presalvage PSA <6 ng/mL. Toxicity was worse in patients who had undergone pelvic lymph node dissection before salvage BT. Careful patient selection for salvage BT may result in improved outcomes and reduced toxicity.

  12. MRI characterization of cobalt dichloride-N-acetyl cysteine (C4) contrast agent marker for prostate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Tze Yee; Stafford, R Jason; Kudchadker, Rajat J; Sankaranarayanapillai, Madhuri; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Rao, Arvind; Martirosyan, Karen S; Frank, Steven J

    2014-01-01

    Brachytherapy, a radiotherapy technique for treating prostate cancer, involves the implantation of numerous radioactive seeds into the prostate. While the implanted seeds can be easily identified on a CT image, distinguishing the prostate and surrounding soft tissues is not as straightforward. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) offers superior anatomical delineation, but the seeds appear as dark voids and are difficult to identify, thus creating a conundrum. Cobalt dichloride-N-acetyl-cysteine (C4) has previously been shown to be promising as an encapsulated contrast agent marker. We performed spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) and spin-spin relaxation time (T2) measurements of C4 solutions with varying cobalt dichloride concentrations to determine the corresponding relaxivities, r1 and r2. These relaxation parameters were investigated at different field strengths, temperatures and orientations. T1 measurements obtained at 1.5 T and 3.0 T, as well as at room and body temperature, showed that r1 is field-independent and temperature-independent. Conversely, the T2 values at 3.0 T were shorter than at 1.5 T, while the T2 values at body temperature were slightly higher than at room temperature. By examining the relaxivities with the C4 vials aligned in three different planes, we found no orientation-dependence. With these relaxation characteristics, we aim to develop pulse sequences that will enhance the C4 signal against prostatic stroma. Ultimately, the use of C4 as a positive contrast agent marker will encourage the use of MRI to obtain an accurate representation of the radiation dose delivered to the prostate and surrounding normal anatomical structures. PMID:24778352

  13. Greater Biopsy Core Number Is Associated With Improved Biochemical Control in Patients Treated With Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bittner, Nathan [Tacoma/Valley Radiation Oncology Centers, Tacoma, WA (United States); Merrick, Gregory S., E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.or [Schiffler Cancer Center/Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M. [Schiffler Cancer Center/Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Adamovich, Edward [Department of Pathology, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Standard prostate biopsy schemes underestimate Gleason score in a significant percentage of cases. Extended biopsy improves diagnostic accuracy and provides more reliable prognostic information. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that greater biopsy core number should result in improved treatment outcome through better tailoring of therapy. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 to May 2006, 1,613 prostate cancer patients were treated with permanent brachytherapy. Patients were divided into five groups stratified by the number of prostate biopsy cores ({<=}6, 7-9, 10-12, 13-20, and >20 cores). Biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were evaluated as a function of core number. Results: The median patient age was 66 years, and the median preimplant prostate-specific antigen was 6.5 ng/mL. The overall 10-year bPFS, CSS, and OS were 95.6%, 98.3%, and 78.6%, respectively. When bPFS was analyzed as a function of core number, the 10-year bPFS for patients with >20, 13-20, 10-12, 7-9 and {<=}6 cores was 100%, 100%, 98.3%, 95.8%, and 93.0% (p < 0.001), respectively. When evaluated by treatment era (1995-2000 vs. 2001-2006), the number of biopsy cores remained a statistically significant predictor of bPFS. On multivariate analysis, the number of biopsy cores was predictive of bPFS but did not predict for CSS or OS. Conclusion: Greater biopsy core number was associated with a statistically significant improvement in bPFS. Comprehensive regional sampling of the prostate may enhance diagnostic accuracy compared to a standard biopsy scheme, resulting in better tailoring of therapy.

  14. Localization of linked {sup 125}I seeds in postimplant TRUS images for prostate brachytherapy dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Xue Jinyu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)]. E-mail: Jinyu.Xue@mail.tju.edu; Waterman, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Handler, Jay [Department of Urology, Frankford Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Gressen, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate that {sup 125}I seeds can be localized in transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images obtained with a high-resolution probe when the implant is performed with linked seeds and spacers. Adequate seed localization is essential to the implementation of TRUS-based intraoperative dosimetry for prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Thirteen preplanned peripherally loaded prostate implants were performed using {sup 125}I seeds and spacers linked together in linear arrays that prevent seed migration and maintain precise seed spacing. A set of two-dimensional transverse images spaced at 0.50-cm intervals were obtained with a high-resolution TRUS probe at the conclusion of the procedure with the patient still under anesthesia. The image set extended from 1.0 cm superior to the base to 1.0 cm inferior to the apex. The visible echoes along each needle track were first localized and then compared with the known construction of the implanted array. The first step was to define the distal and proximal ends of each array. The visible echoes were then identified as seeds or spacers from the known sequence of the array. The locations of the seeds that did not produce a visible echo were interpolated from their known position in the array. A CT scan was obtained after implantation for comparison with the TRUS images. Results: On average, 93% (range, 86-99%) of the seeds were visible in the TRUS images. However, it was possible to localize 100% of the seeds in each case, because the locations of the missing seeds could be determined from the known construction of the arrays. Two factors complicated the interpretation of the TRUS images. One was that the spacers also produced echoes. Although weak and diffuse, these echoes could be mistaken for seeds. The other was that the number of echoes along a needle track sometimes exceeded the number of seeds and spacers implanted. This was attributed to the overall length of the array, which was approximately 0.5 cm longer than the center-to-center distance between the first and last seed owing to the finite length of the seeds at the ends of the array. When this occurred, it was necessary to disregard either the most distal or most proximal echo, which produced a 0.5-cm uncertainty in the location of the array in the axial direction. For these reasons, simply localizing the visible echoes in the TRUS images did not guarantee the reliable identification of the seeds. Conclusion: Our results have demonstrated that a high percentage (>85%) of the implanted {sup 125}I seeds can be directly visualized in postimplant TRUS images when the seeds and spacers are linked to preclude seed migration and rotation and when the images are obtained with a high-resolution TRUS probe. Moreover, it is possible to localize 100% of the seeds with the mechanism of linked seeds because the locations of the missing seeds can be determined from the known construction of the arrays.

  15. Multi-Parametric MRI-Directed Focal Salvage Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy for Locally Recurrent Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate: A Novel Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, T.; Avital, I.; Stojadinovic, A.; Brücher, B.L.D.M.; Cote, E.; Yu, J.

    2013-01-01

    Even with the technological advances of dose-escalated IMRT with the addition of the latest image guidance technologies, local failures still occur. The combination of MRI-based imaging techniques can yield quantitative information that reflects on the biological properties of prostatic tissues. These techniques provide unique information that can be used for tumor detection in the treated gland. With the advent of these improved imaging modalities, it has become possible to more effectively image local recurrences within the prostate gland. With better imaging, these focal recurrences can be differentially targeted with salvage brachytherapy minimizing rectal and bladder toxicity. Here we report a novel use of MRI-directed focal brachytherapy after local recurrence. This technique offers a unique opportunity to safely and successfully treat recurrent prostate cancer, previously treated with definitive radiation therapy. The use of multi-parametric MRI-directed focal salvage permanent interstitial brachytherapy for locally recurrent adenocarcinoma of the prostate is a promising strategy to avoid more aggressive and expensive treatments that are associated with increased morbidity, potentially improving survival at potentially lower costs. PMID:23412660

  16. Multi-Parametric MRI-Directed Focal Salvage Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy for Locally Recurrent Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate: A Novel Approach.

    PubMed

    Wallace, T; Avital, I; Stojadinovic, A; Brücher, B L D M; Cote, E; Yu, J

    2013-01-01

    Even with the technological advances of dose-escalated IMRT with the addition of the latest image guidance technologies, local failures still occur. The combination of MRI-based imaging techniques can yield quantitative information that reflects on the biological properties of prostatic tissues. These techniques provide unique information that can be used for tumor detection in the treated gland. With the advent of these improved imaging modalities, it has become possible to more effectively image local recurrences within the prostate gland. With better imaging, these focal recurrences can be differentially targeted with salvage brachytherapy minimizing rectal and bladder toxicity. Here we report a novel use of MRI-directed focal brachytherapy after local recurrence. This technique offers a unique opportunity to safely and successfully treat recurrent prostate cancer, previously treated with definitive radiation therapy. The use of multi-parametric MRI-directed focal salvage permanent interstitial brachytherapy for locally recurrent adenocarcinoma of the prostate is a promising strategy to avoid more aggressive and expensive treatments that are associated with increased morbidity, potentially improving survival at potentially lower costs. PMID:23412660

  17. EchoSeed Model 6733 Iodine-125 brachytherapy source: Improved dosimetric characterization using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code

    SciTech Connect

    Mosleh-Shirazi, M. A.; Hadad, K.; Faghihi, R.; Baradaran-Ghahfarokhi, M.; Naghshnezhad, Z.; Meigooni, A. S. [Center for Research in Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering and Physics Unit, Radiotherapy Department, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz 71936-13311 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Radiation Research Center and Medical Radiation Department, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71936-13311 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Comprehensive Cancer Center of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89169 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    This study primarily aimed to obtain the dosimetric characteristics of the Model 6733 {sup 125}I seed (EchoSeed) with improved precision and accuracy using a more up-to-date Monte-Carlo code and data (MCNP5) compared to previously published results, including an uncertainty analysis. Its secondary aim was to compare the results obtained using the MCNP5, MCNP4c2, and PTRAN codes for simulation of this low-energy photon-emitting source. The EchoSeed geometry and chemical compositions together with a published {sup 125}I spectrum were used to perform dosimetric characterization of this source as per the updated AAPM TG-43 protocol. These simulations were performed in liquid water material in order to obtain the clinically applicable dosimetric parameters for this source model. Dose rate constants in liquid water, derived from MCNP4c2 and MCNP5 simulations, were found to be 0.993 cGyh{sup -1} U{sup -1} ({+-}1.73%) and 0.965 cGyh{sup -1} U{sup -1} ({+-}1.68%), respectively. Overall, the MCNP5 derived radial dose and 2D anisotropy functions results were generally closer to the measured data (within {+-}4%) than MCNP4c and the published data for PTRAN code (Version 7.43), while the opposite was seen for dose rate constant. The generally improved MCNP5 Monte Carlo simulation may be attributed to a more recent and accurate cross-section library. However, some of the data points in the results obtained from the above-mentioned Monte Carlo codes showed no statistically significant differences. Derived dosimetric characteristics in liquid water are provided for clinical applications of this source model.

  18. Prostate volume changes during permanent seed brachytherapy: an analysis of intra-operative variations, predictive factors and clinical implication

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To determine prostate volume (Pvol) changes at 3 different time points during the course of I125 permanent seed brachytherapy (PB). To assess the impact of these changes on acute urinary retention (AUR) and dosimetric outcome. Methods We analyzed 149 hormone-naïve patients. Measurements of the prostate volume were done using three-dimensional transrectal ultrasound (3D-TRUS) in the operating room before insertion of any needle (V1), after the insertion of 2 fixation needles with a harpoon (V2) and upon completion of the implant (V3). The quality of the implant was analyzed with the D90 (minimum dose in Grays received by 90% of the prostate volume) at day 30. Results Mean baseline prostate volume (V1) was 37.4?±?9.6 cc. A volume increase of >5% was seen in 51% between V1-V2 (mean?=?2.5 cc, p?prostate swelling had an influence on D90. An increase of 10% in prostate volume between V1 and V2 results in an increase of D90 at Day 30 by 11.7%. Baseline Pvol (V1) was the only predictor of the duration of urinary retention in both univariate and multivariate (p?=?0.04) regression analysis. Conclusions A large part of intraoperative swelling occurs already after the insertion of the fixation needles. This early prostate swelling predicts for D90 but not for AUR. PMID:23837971

  19. Prophylactic tamsulosin (Flomax) in patients undergoing prostate {sup 125}I brachytherapy for prostate carcinoma: Final report of a double-blind placebo-controlled randomized study

    SciTech Connect

    Elshaikh, Mohamed A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Ulchaker, James C. [Glickman Urologic Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Reddy, Chandana A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Angermeier, Kenneth W. [Glickman Urologic Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Klein, Eric A. [Glickman Urologic Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Chehade, Nabil [Department of Urology, Kaiser Permanente, Cleveland, OH (United States); Altman, Andrew [Department of Urology, Kaiser Permanente, Cleveland, OH (United States); Ciezki, Jay P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States)]. E-mail: ciezkj@ccf.org

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of prophylactic tamsulosin (Flomax) in reducing the urinary symptoms in patients undergoing {sup 125}I prostate implantation (PI) for prostate adenocarcinoma. Methods and materials: This is a single-institution, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial for patients undergoing PI for prostate adenocarcinoma comparing prophylactic tamsulosin versus placebo. Eligibility criteria included patients not taking tamsulosin or other {alpha}-blockers treated with PI. The patients were randomly assigned to either tamsulosin (0.8 mg, orally once a day) or matched placebo. All patients started the medication 4 days before PI and continued for 60 days. The American Urologic Association (AUA) symptom index questionnaire was used to assess urinary symptoms. The AUA questionnaire was administered before PI for a baseline score and weekly for 8 weeks after PI. Patients were taken off the study if they developed urinary retention, had intolerable urinary symptoms, or wished to discontinue with the trial. Results: One hundred twenty-six patients were enrolled in this study from November 2001 to January 2003 (118 were evaluable: 58 in the tamsulosin arm and 60 in the placebo group). Pretreatment and treatment characteristics were comparably matched between the two groups. The urinary retention rate was 17% (10 patients) in the placebo group compared with 10% (6 patients) in the tamsulosin group (p = 0.3161). Eighty-eight percent (14 patients) of those who developed urinary retention experienced it within 2 weeks after the PI. Intolerable urinary symptoms were reported equally (10 patients in each group) with 70% occurring in the first 2 weeks after PI. There was a significant difference in mean AUA score in favor of tamsulosin at Week 5 after PI (p = 0.03). Conclusions: Prophylactic tamsulosin (0.8 mg/day) before prostate brachytherapy did not significantly affect urinary retention rates, but had a positive effect on urinary morbidity at Week 5 after PI.

  20. Dosimetric Comparison of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy as a Boost to the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Hermesse, Johanne, E-mail: jhermesse@chu.ulg.ac.b [Department of Radiation Oncology, Liege University Hospital, Liege (Belgium); Biver, Sylvie; Jansen, Nicolas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Liege University Hospital, Liege (Belgium); Lenaerts, Eric [Department of Medical Physics, Liege University Hospital, Liege (Belgium); Nickers, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oscar Lambret Center, Lille (France)

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: We compared the dose conformity of two radiation modalities: high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR BT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to deliver a boost to the prostate after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: Ten successive patients with prostate adenocarcinoma treated with a single 10-Gy HDR BT boost after EBRT were investigated. Four theoretical IMRT plans were computed: (a) 32.85 Gy IMRT and (b) 26 Gy IMRT with CTV-PTV expansions, doses corresponding to the equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions (EQD2) of one 10-Gy fraction calculated with a prostate alpha/beta ratio of respectively 1.5 and 3 Gy; and (c) 32.85 Gy IMRT and (d) 26 Gy IMRT without CTV-PTV expansions. The dose-volume histogram values converted in EQD2 with an alpha/beta ratio of 3 Gy for the organs at risk were compared. Results: The HDR BT plan delivered higher mean doses to the PTV compared with IMRT plans. In all, 33% of the rectal volume received a mean dose of 5.32 +- 0.65 Gy and 20% of bladder volume received 4.61 +- 1.24 Gy with HDR BT. In comparison, doses delivered with IMRT were respectively 13.4 +- 1.49 Gy and 10.81 +- 4 Gy, even if only 26 Gy was prescribed to the PTV with no CTV-PTV expansion (p < 0.0001). The hot spots inside the urethra were greater with HDR BT but acceptable. Conclusions: Use of HDR BT produced a more conformal plan for the boost to the prostate than IMRT even without CTV-PTV expansions.

  1. Benefits of a dual sagittal crystal transducer for ultrasound imaging during I-125 seed implantation for permanent prostate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pieters, Bradley; Koedooder, Kees; Lucas, Cees; Koning, Caro

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether a longer sagittal view and less movement using a dual sagittal crystal probe (DSCP) for trans rectal ultra sound (TRUS) allow for more accurate online-planning in I-125 permanent implant brachytherapy of the prostate, compared to a single sagittal crystal probe (SSCP). Material and methods Between March 2008 and March 2010, 50 patients with prostate cancer were consecutively included in the study. The first 25 of these patients had both their pre- and online-planning based on a single sagittal crystal probe (SSCP). The treatment-plans of the other 25 patients were based on a DSCP TRUS. Three weeks after implantation a post-planning was made based on CT. TRUS online and CT post-plan dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters, D90 and V100, were compared for both groups. Also, the post-plan DVH parameters of SSCP were compared to DSCP. The possible factors that might influence the post-plan D90 and V100 were analysed using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Results SSCP and DSCP online mean D90 and V100 were significantly larger than post-plan mean D90 and V100 (P < 0.01). The post-plan mean D90 and mean V100 were both non-significantly larger for SSCP based post-plans compared to DSCP based post plans (P = 0.76 and P = 0.68). ANOVA showed significant impact of prostate volume on the post-plan D90 and V100. Conclusions The advantages of the dual sagittal crystal probe did not lead to more accurate online planning by investigating DVH-parameters. The only factor found to have influence on the DVH-parameters was the prostate volume. PMID:23346143

  2. Biochemical relapse-free survival in 400 patients treated with I-125 prostate brachytherapy: the Guildford experience.

    PubMed

    Nobes, J P; Wells, I G; Khaksar, S J; Money-Kyrle, J F; Laing, R W; Langley, S E M

    2009-01-01

    A total of 1200 patients had undergone I-125 prostate brachytherapy (BXT) in our centre. We present prospective outcome data for the first 400 treated patients. Data were analysed from a prospective database of 400 consecutive patients treated with permanent prostate BXT between March 1999 and December 2003. Patients were stratified into low (49%), intermediate (36%) and high (15%) risk as defined by the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Prognostic Index. Patients received 145 Gy BXT alone (41%), BXT with 3 months neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (NAAD) (39%), 45 Gy external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) with 110 Gy BXT (3%) or a combination of NAAD, 45 Gy EBRT and 110 Gy BXT (17%). Biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadirs were analysed for treatment received in each risk group. Median follow-up was 54 months (range, 38-96 months) with a mean patient age of 63 years. Prostate cancer-specific survival was 99.5%. Twenty-eight patients (7%) experienced biochemical failure according to the 2006 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (RTOG-ASTRO) Phoenix Consensus definition (PSA nadir plus >or=2 ng ml(-1)): nine low-, fourteen intermediate- and five high-risk patients. When stratified by treatment group for low-, intermediate- and high-risk groups, the 5-year actuarial bRFS was 98, 89 and 100% for BXT; 91, 87 and 88% for NAAD and BXT; 100, 80 and 100% for EBRT and BXT; and 100, 92 and 88% for NAAD, EBRT and BXT, respectively. Overall 4- and 5-year PSA

  3. A comparative study of seed localization and dose calculation on pre- and post-implantation ultrasound and CT images for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Imad; Algan, Ozer; Thompson, Spencer; Sindhwani, Puneet; Herman, Terence; Cheng, Chih-Yao; Ahmad, Salahuddin

    2009-09-01

    This work investigates variation in the volume of the prostate measured at different stages through the prostate brachytherapy procedure for 30 patients treated with I-125 radioactive seeds. The implanted seeds were localized on post-implantation ultrasound (US) images and the effect of prostate enlargement due to edema on dose coverage for 15 patients was studied. The volume of the prostate was measured at four stages as follows: (a) 2-3 weeks prior to implantation using US imaging, (b) then at the start of the intra-operative prostate brachytherapy procedure on the day of the implant, (c) immediately post-implantation using US imaging in the operating room and (d) finally by CT imaging at nearly 4 weeks post-implantation. Comparative prostate volume studies were performed using US imaging stepper and twister modes. For the purpose of this study, the implanted seeds were localized successfully on post-implant ultrasound twister images, retrospectively. The plans using post-implant US imaging were compared with intra-operative plans on US and plans created on CT images. The prostate volume increases about 10 cm3 on average due to edema induced by needle insertion and seed loading during implantation. The visibility of the implanted seeds on US twister images acquired post-implantation is as good as those on CT images and can be localized and used for dose calculation. The dose coverage represented by parameters such as D90 (dose covering 90% of the volume) and V100 (volume covered by 100% dose) is poorer on plans performed on post-implantation twister US studies than on the intra-operative live plan or the CT scan performed 4 weeks post-operatively. For example, the mean D90 difference on post-implantation US is lower by more than 15% than that on pre-implantation US. The volume enlargement of the prostate due to edema induced by needle insertion and seed placement has a significant effect on the quality of dosimetric coverage in brachytherapy prostate seed implants. Here, we introduced a new approach based on the use of post-implant US twister images to correct for prostate enlargement intra-operatively. Besides the ability to localize the seeds and superior soft tissue visibility, the twister US images include effects of the enlargement of the prostate gland and seed migration during the implantation procedure.

  4. Timing of Computed Tomography–Based Postimplant Assessment Following Permanent Transperineal Prostate Brachytherapy 1 1 The opinions or assertions contained herein are those of the authors and do not purport to reflect the official view of the Department of Defense or the Department of the Air Force

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bradley R. Prestidge M. D; William S. Bice; Eric J. Kiefer; James J. Prete

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To establish the rate of resolution of prostatic edema following transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy, and to determine the results and impact of timing of the postimplant assessment on the dose–volume relationship.Methods and Materials: A series of 19 consecutive patients with early-stage adenocarcinoma of the prostate receiving transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy, were enrolled in this study. Twelve received

  5. A review of rectal toxicity following permanent low dose-rate prostate brachytherapy and the potential value of biodegradable rectal spacers.

    PubMed

    Schutzer, M E; Orio, P F; Biagioli, M C; Asher, D A; Lomas, H; Moghanaki, D

    2015-06-01

    Permanent radioactive seed implantation provides highly effective treatment for prostate cancer that typically includes multidisciplinary collaboration between urologists and radiation oncologists. Low dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy offers excellent tumor control rates and has equivalent rates of rectal toxicity when compared with external beam radiotherapy. Owing to its proximity to the anterior rectal wall, a small portion of the rectum is often exposed to high doses of ionizing radiation from this procedure. Although rare, some patients develop transfusion-dependent rectal bleeding, ulcers or fistulas. These complications occasionally require permanent colostomy and thus can significantly impact a patient's quality of life. Aside from proper technique, a promising strategy has emerged that can help avoid these complications. By injecting biodegradable materials behind Denonviller's fascia, brachytherpists can increase the distance between the rectum and the radioactive sources to significantly decrease the rectal dose. This review summarizes the progress in this area and its applicability for use in combination with permanent LDR brachytherapy. PMID:25687401

  6. Feasibility of high-dose-rate brachytherapy salvage for local prostate cancer recurrence after radiotherapy: University of California-San Francisco experience

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Shinohara, Katsuto [Department of Urology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Weinberg, Vivian [Comprehensive Cancer Center Biostatistics Core, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Gottschalk, Alexander R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Pouliot, Jean [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Hsu, I.-Chow [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)]. E-mail: Hsu@radonc17.ucsf.edu

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of salvage high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 21 consecutively accrued patients undergoing salvage HDR brachytherapy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after EBRT between November 1998 and December 2005. After pathologic confirmation of locally recurrent disease, all patients were treated with 36 Gy in six fractions using two transrectal ultrasound-guided HDR prostate implants, separated by 1 week. Eleven patients received neoadjuvant hormonal therapy immediately presalvage, whereas none received adjuvant hormonal therapy postsalvage. Median follow-up time from recurrence was 18.7 months (range, 6-84 months). Determination of subsequent biochemical failure after brachytherapy was based on the definition by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. Results: Based on the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE version 3), 18 patients reported Grade 1 to 2 genitourinary symptoms by 3 months postsalvage. Three patients developed Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity. Maximum observed gastrointestinal toxicity was Grade 2; all cases spontaneously resolved. The 2-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of biochemical control after recurrence was 89%. Thirteen patients have achieved a PSA nadir {<=}0.1 ng/ml, but at the time of writing this endpoint has not yet been reached for all patients. All patients are alive; however 2 have experienced biochemical failure, both with PSA nadirs {>=}1, and have subsequently been found to have distant metastases. Conclusions: Salvage HDR prostate brachytherapy appears to be feasible and effective.

  7. Analysis of high-dose rate brachytherapy dose distribution resemblance in CyberKnife hypofractionated treatment plans of localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sudahar, H; Kurup, P G G; Murali, V; Mahadev, P; Velmurugan, J

    2013-01-01

    The present study is to analyze the CyberKnife hypofractionated dose distribution of localized prostate cancer in terms of high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy equivalent doses to assess the degree of HDR brachytherapy resemblance of CyberKnife dose distribution. Thirteen randomly selected localized prostate cancer cases treated using CyberKnife with a dose regimen of 36.25Gy in 5 fractions were considered. HDR equivalent doses were calculated for 30Gy in 3 fractions of HDR brachytherapy regimen. The D5% of the target in the CyberKnife hypofractionation was 41.57 ± 2.41Gy. The corresponding HDR fractionation (3 fractions) equivalent dose was 32.81 ± 1.86Gy. The mean HDR fractionation equivalent dose, D98%, was 27.93 ± 0.84Gy. The V100% of the prostate target was 95.57% ± 3.47%. The V100% of the bladder and the rectum were 717.16 and 79.6mm(3), respectively. Analysis of the HDR equivalent dose of CyberKnife dose distribution indicates a comparable resemblance to HDR dose distribution in the peripheral target doses (D98% to D80%) reported in the literature. However, there is a substantial difference observed in the core high-dose regions especially in D10% and D5%. The dose fall-off within the OAR is also superior in reported HDR dose distribution than the HDR equivalent doses of CyberKnife. PMID:23809693

  8. 15-Year biochemical relapse free survival in clinical Stage T1-T3 prostate cancer following combined external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy; Seattle experience

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvester, John E. [Seattle Prostate Institute, Seattle, WA (United States)]. E-mail: johnsylvester@seattleprostate.com; Grimm, Peter D. [Seattle Prostate Institute, Seattle, WA (United States); Blasko, John C. [Seattle Prostate Institute, Seattle, WA (United States); Millar, Jeremy [Department Radiation Oncology, William Buckland Radiotherapy Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Orio, Peter F. [Department Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Skoglund, Scott [Seattle Prostate Institute, Seattle, WA (United States); Galbreath, Robert W. [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Ohio University Eastern, St. Clairsville, OH (United States); Merrick, Gregory [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Long-term biochemical relapse-free survival (BRFS) rates in patients with clinical Stages T1-T3 prostate cancer continue to be scrutinized after treatment with external beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: We report 15-year BRFS rates on 223 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer that were consecutively treated with I{sup 125} or Pd {sup 103} brachytherapy after 45-Gy neoadjuvant EBRT. Multivariate regression analysis was used to create a pretreatment clinical prognostic risk model using a modified American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus definition (two consecutive serum prostate-specific antigen rises) as the outcome. Gleason scoring was performed by the pathologists at a community hospital. Time to biochemical failure was calculated and compared by using Kaplan-Meier plots. Results: Fifteen-year BRFS for the entire treatment group was 74%. BRFS using the Memorial Sloan-Kettering risk cohort analysis (95% confidence interval): low risk, 88%, intermediate risk 80%, and high risk 53%. Grouping by the risk classification described by D'Amico, the BRFS was: low risk 85.8%, intermediate risk 80.3%, and high risk 67.8% (p = 0.002). Conclusions: I{sup 125} or Pd{sup 103} brachytherapy combined with supplemental EBRT results in excellent 15-year biochemical control. Different risk group classification schemes lead to different BRFS results in the high-risk group cohorts.

  9. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Alone for Localized Prostate Cancer in Patients at Moderate or High Risk of Biochemical Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskin, Peter [Cancer Centre, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Rojas, Ana, E-mail: arc03@btconnect.com [Cancer Centre, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Lowe, Gerry; Bryant, Linda; Ostler, Peter; Hughes, Rob; Milner, Jessica; Cladd, Helen [Cancer Centre, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) morbidity and biochemical control of disease in patients with localized prostate adenocarcinoma treated with escalating doses per fraction of high-dose rate brachytherapy alone. Methods and Materials: A total of 197 patients were treated with 34 Gy in four fractions, 36 Gy in four fractions, 31.5 Gy in three fractions, or 26 Gy in two fractions. Median follow-up times were 60, 54, 36, and 6 months, respectively. Results: Incidence of early Grade {>=} 3 GU morbidity was 3% to 7%, and Grade 4 was 0% to 4%. During the first 12 weeks, the highest mean International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) value was 14, and between 6 months and 5 years it was 8. Grade 3 or 4 early GI morbidity was not observed. The 3-year actuarial rate of Grade 3 GU was 3% to 16%, and was 3% to 7% for strictures requiring surgery (4-year rate). An incidence of 1% Grade 3 GI events was seen at 3 years. Late Grade 4 GU or GI events were not observed. At 3 years, 99% of patients with intermediate-risk and 91% with high-risk disease were free of biochemical relapse (log-rank p = 0.02). Conclusions: There was no significant difference in urinary and rectal morbidity between schedules. Biochemical control of disease in patients with intermediate and high risk of relapse was good.

  10. Gold marker displacement due to needle insertion during HDR-brachytherapy for treatment of prostate cancer: A prospective cone beam computed tomography and kilovoltage on-board imaging (kV-OBI) study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate gold marker displacement due to needle insertion during HDR-brachytherapy for therapy of prostate cancer. Patients and methods 18 patients entered into this prospective evaluation. Three gold markers were implanted into the prostate during the first HDR-brachytherapy procedure after the irradiation was administered. Three days after marker implantation all patients had a CT-scan for planning purpose of the percutaneous irradiation. Marker localization was defined on the digitally-reconstructed-radiographs (DRR) for daily (VMAT technique) or weekly (IMRT) set-up error correction. Percutaneous therapy started one week after first HDR-brachytherapy. After the second HDR-brachytherapy, two weeks after first HDR-brachtherapy, a cone-beam CT-scan was done to evaluate marker displacement due to needle insertion. In case of marker displacement, the actual positions of the gold markers were adjusted on the DRR. Results The value of the gold marker displacement due to the second HDR-brachytherapy was analyzed in all patients and for each gold marker by comparison of the marker positions in the prostate after soft tissue registration of the prostate of the CT-scans prior the first and second HDR-brachytherapy. The maximum deviation was 5 mm, 7 mm and 12 mm for the anterior-posterior, lateral and superior-inferior direction. At least one marker in each patient showed a significant displacement and therefore new marker positions were adjusted on the DRRs for the ongoing percutaneous therapy. Conclusions Needle insertion in the prostate due to HDR-brachytherapy can lead to gold marker displacements. Therefore, it is necessary to verify the actual position of markers after the second HDR-brachytherapy. In case of significant deviations, a new DRR with the adjusted marker positions should be generated for precise positioning during the ongoing percutaneous irradiation. PMID:22348595

  11. High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy as Monotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: Treatment Evolution and Mature Results

    SciTech Connect

    Zamboglou, Nikolaos [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Tselis, Nikolaos, E-mail: ntselis@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Baltas, Dimos [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Buhleier, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Martin, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Bremen-Mitte, Bremen (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Bremen-Mitte, Bremen (Germany); Milickovic, Natasa; Papaioannou, Sokratis [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Ackermann, Hanns [Institute of Biostatistics, J.W. Goethe University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Institute of Biostatistics, J.W. Goethe University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Tunn, Ulf W. [Department of Urology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Urology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcome of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial (IRT) brachytherapy (BRT) as sole treatment (monotherapy) for clinically localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2009, 718 consecutive patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided HDR monotherapy. Three treatment protocols were applied; 141 patients received 38.0 Gy using one implant in 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy with computed tomography-based treatment planning; 351 patients received 38.0 Gy in 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy, using 2 implants (2 weeks apart) and intraoperative TRUS real-time treatment planning; and 226 patients received 34.5 Gy, using 3 single-fraction implants of 11.5 Gy (3 weeks apart) and intraoperative TRUS real-time treatment planning. Biochemical failure was defined according to the Phoenix consensus, and toxicity was evaluated using Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 3. Results: The median follow-up time was 52.8 months. The 36-, 60-, and 96-month biochemical control and metastasis-free survival rates for the entire cohort were 97%, 94%, and 90% and 99%, 98%, and 97%, respectively. Toxicity was scored per event, with 5.4% acute grade 3 genitourinary and 0.2% acute grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity. Late grade 3 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were 3.5% and 1.6%, respectively. Two patients developed grade 4 incontinence. No other instance of grade 4 or greater acute or late toxicity was reported. Conclusion: Our results confirm IRT-HDR-BRT is safe and effective as monotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer.

  12. Quality of Life After Open or Robotic Prostatectomy, Cryoablation or Brachytherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John B. Malcolm; Michael D. Fabrizio; Bethany B. Barone; Robert W. Given; Raymond S. Lance; Donald F. Lynch; John W. Davis; Mark E. Shaves; Paul F. Schellhammer

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Health related quality of life concerns factor prominently in prostate cancer management. We describe health related quality of life impact and recov- ery profiles of 4 commonly used operative treatments for localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Beginning in February 2000 all patients treated with open radical prostatectomy, robot assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy, brachy- therapy or cryotherapy were asked to

  13. Pelvic complications after definitive treatment of prostate cancer by interstitial or external beam radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul F. Schellhammer; Anas M. El-Mahdi

    1983-01-01

    Radiation complications, after definitive treatment of localized prostatic carcinoma by either external beam or interstitial implantation with Iodine-125 seeds, are reviewed. Late serious complications to immediately adjacent structures of the anterior rectal wall, prostatic urethra, bladder neck, and external sphincter occurred with similar frequency in both treatment groups. However, late serious complications of the remotely adjacent structures of the bladder,

  14. Comparison of intraoperative dosimetric implant representation with postimplant dosimetry in patients receiving prostate brachytherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nelson N Stone; Suzanne Hong; Yeh-Chi Lo; Victor Howard; Richard G Stock

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the results of intraoperative dosimetry with those of CT-based postimplant dosimetry in patients undergoing prostate seed implantation.Methods and Materials: Seventy-seven patients with T1–T3 prostate cancer received an ultrasound-guided permanent seed implant (36 received 125I, 7 103Pd, and 34 a partial 103Pd implant plus external beam radiation therapy). The implantation was augmented with an intraoperative dosimetric planning system.

  15. Optimal radiotherapy for prostate cancer: predictions for conventional external beam, imrt, and brachytherapy from radiobiologic models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher R. King; Thomas A. DiPetrillo; David E. Wazer

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To determine, on the basis of radiobiological models, optimal modalities of radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer, and to provide a rational basis for therapeutic decisions.Methods and Materials: An algorithm based on extensions to the linear-quadratic (LQ) cell survival model is constructed for fractionated and protracted irradiation. These radiobiological models include prostate tumor cell line-derived LQ parameters, clonogen repopulation, repair

  16. 3D MR-Spectroscopic Imaging Assessment of Metabolic Activity in the Prostate During the PSA 'Bounce' Following {sup 125}Iodine Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kirilova, Anna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Damyanovich, Andrei [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Crook, Juanita, E-mail: jcrook@bccancer.bc.c [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Jezioranski, John [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Wallace, Kris [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Pintilie, Melania [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: A temporary increase in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values is observed in 30%-40% of men following {sup 125} I brachytherapy (BT) for prostate cancer. We present the results of a study to characterize prostate metabolic activity during the PSA 'bounce' and to correlate metabolic changes with PSA levels using three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (3D-MRSI). Methods and Materials: 3D-MRSI was performed in 24 patients during the PSA bounce. Eight of these had also had a baseline 3D-MRSI scan before BT for the purpose of tumor mapping. The 3D-MRSI was repeated at 6- and 12-month intervals, and PSA levels were monitored every 3 months. Twenty-one of the patients had favorable-risk prostate cancer, and 3 had intermediate risk. Results: The choline+creatine signal intensity, although markedly reduced, was observable following BT. Diffuse activity not corresponding to original biopsy-positive sites was observed in 22 cases, and 2 cases were documented to have local recurrence. No statistically significant correlation between metabolic activity and PSA levels at each interval was found. Conclusion: Post-BT prostate 3D-MRSI shows evidence of diffuse metabolic activity unrelated to residual malignancy. This supports the benign nature of the PSA bounce and suggests an inflammatory etiology. In the situation of a rising PSA, observation of focal activity on MRI/3D-MRSI could be a useful adjunct to suggest local recurrence at an earlier interval after brachytherapy when prostate biopsies would still be unhelpful. Longer follow-up is necessary to confirm the complex relationship between metabolic activity and PSA levels.

  17. Assessment of I-125 seed implant accuracy when using the live-planning technique for low dose rate prostate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Low risk prostate cancers are commonly treated with low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy involving I-125 seeds. The implementation of a ‘live-planning’ technique at the Royal Adelaide Hospital (RAH) in 2007 enabled the completion of the whole procedure (i.e. scanning, planning and implant) in one sitting. ‘Live-planning’ has the advantage of a more reliable delivery of the planned treatment compared to the ‘traditional pre-plan’ technique (where patient is scanned and planned in the weeks prior to implant). During live planning, the actual implanted needle positions are updated real-time on the treatment planning system and the dosimetry is automatically recalculated. The aim of this investigation was to assess the differences and clinical relevance between the planned dosimetry and the updated real-time implant dosimetry. Methods A number of 162 patients were included in this dosimetric study. A paired t-test was performed on the D90, V100, V150 and V200 target parameters and the differences between the planned and implanted dose distributions were analysed. Similarly, dosimetric differences for the organs at risk (OAR) were also evaluated. Results Small differences between the primary dosimetric parameters for the target were found. Still, the incidence of hotspots was increased with approximately 20% for V200. Statistically significant increases were observed in the doses delivered to the OAR between the planned and implanted data; however, these increases were consistently below 3% thus probably without clinical consequences. Conclusions The current study assessed the accuracy of prostate implants with I-125 seeds when compared to initial plans. The results confirmed the precision of the implant technique which RAH has in place. Nevertheless, geographical misses, anatomical restrictions and needle displacements during implant can have repercussions for centres without live-planning option if dosimetric changes are not taken into consideration. PMID:23173620

  18. Whole-Pelvis Radiotherapy in Combination With Interstitial Brachytherapy: Does Coverage of the Pelvic Lymph Nodes Improve Treatment Outcome in High-Risk Prostate Cancer?

    SciTech Connect

    Bittner, Nathan [Tacoma/Valley Radiation Oncology Centers, Tacoma, Washington (United States); Merrick, Gregory S., E-mail: gmerrick@UrologicResearchInstitute.or [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, Washington (United States); Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Adamovich, Edward [Wheeling Hospital, Department of Pathology, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To compare biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) rates among high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with brachytherapy and supplemental external beam radiation (EBRT) using either a mini-pelvis (MP) or a whole-pelvis (WP) field. Methods and Materials: From May 1995 to October 2005, 186 high-risk prostate cancer patients were treated with brachytherapy and EBRT with or without androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). High-risk prostate cancer was defined as a Gleason score of >=8 and/or a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration of >=20 ng/ml. Results: With a median follow-up of 6.7 years, the 10-year bPFS, CSS, and OS rates for the WP vs. the MP arms were 91.7% vs. 84.4% (p = 0.126), 95.5% vs. 92.6% (p = 0.515), and 79.5% vs. 67.1% (p = 0.721), respectively. Among those patients who received ADT, the 10-year bPFS, CSS, and OS rates for the WP vs. the MP arms were 93.6% vs. 90.1% (p = 0.413), 94.2% vs. 96.0% (p = 0.927), and 73.7% vs. 70.2% (p = 0.030), respectively. Among those patients who did not receive ADT, the 10-year bPFS, CSS, and OS rates for the WP vs. the MP arms were 82.4% vs. 75.0% (p = 0.639), 100% vs. 88% (p = 0.198), and 87.5% vs. 58.8% (p = 0.030), respectively. Based on multivariate analysis, none of the evaluated parameters predicted for CSS, while bPFS was best predicted by ADT and percent positive biopsy results. OS was best predicted by age and percent positive biopsy results. Conclusions: For high-risk prostate cancer patients receiving brachytherapy, there is a nonsignificant trend toward improved bPFS, CSS, and OS rates when brachytherapy is given with WPRT. This trend is most apparent among ADT-naive patients, for whom a significant improvement in OS was observed.

  19. Treatment planning for brachytherapy: an integer programming model, two computational approaches and experiments with permanent prostate implant planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eva K.; Gallagher, Richard J.; Silvern, David; Wuu, Cheng-Shie; Zaider, Marco

    1999-01-01

    An integer linear programming model is proposed as a framework for optimizing seed placement and dose distribution in brachytherapy treatment planning. The basic model involves using 0/1 indicator variables to describe the placement or non-placement of seeds in a prespecified three-dimensional grid of potential locations. The dose delivered to each point in a discretized representation of the diseased organ and neighbouring healthy tissue can then be modelled as a linear combination of the indicator variables. A system of linear constraints is imposed to attempt to keep the dose level at each point to within specified target bounds. Since it is physically impossible to satisfy all constraints simultaneously, each constraint uses a variable to either record when the target dose level is achieved, or to record the deviation from the desired level. These additional variables are embedded into an objective function to be optimized. Variations on this model are discussed and two computational approaches - a branch-and-bound algorithm and a genetic algorithm - for finding `optimal' seed placements are described. Results of computational experiments on a collection of prostate cancer cases are reported. The results indicate that both optimization algorithms are capable of producing good solutions within 5 to 15 min, and that small variations in model parameters can have a measurable effect on the dose distribution of the resulting plans.

  20. Improved dosimetry in prostate brachytherapy using high resolution contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Morancy, Tye; Kaplan, Irving; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Hirsch, Ariel E.; Rofksy, Neil M.; Holupka, Edward; Oismueller, Renee; Hawliczek, Robert; Helbich, Thomas H.; Bloch, B. Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess detailed dosimetry data for prostate and clinical relevant intra- and peri-prostatic structures including neurovascular bundles (NVB), urethra, and penile bulb (PB) from postbrachytherapy computed tomography (CT) versus high resolution contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (HR-CEMRI). Material and methods Eleven postbrachytherapy prostate cancer patients underwent HR-CEMRI and CT imaging. Computed tomography and HR-CEMRI images were randomized and 2 independent expert readers created contours of prostate, intra- and peri-prostatic structures on each CT and HR-CEMRI scan for all 11 patients. Dosimetry data including V100, D90, and D100 was calculated from these contours. Results Mean V100 values from CT and HR-CEMRI contours were as follows: prostate (98.5% and 96.2%, p = 0.003), urethra (81.0% and 88.7%, p = 0.027), anterior rectal wall (ARW) (8.9% and 2.8%, p < 0.001), left NVB (77.9% and 51.5%, p = 0.002), right NVB (69.2% and 43.1%, p = 0.001), and PB (0.09% and 11.4%, p = 0.005). Mean D90 (Gy) derived from CT and HR-CEMRI contours were: prostate (167.6 and 150.3, p = 0.012), urethra (81.6 and 109.4, p = 0.041), ARW (2.5 and 0.11, p = 0.003), left NVB (98.2 and 58.6, p = 0.001), right NVB (87.5 and 55.5, p = 0.001), and PB (11.2 and 12.4, p = 0.554). Conclusions Findings of this study suggest that HR-CEMRI facilitates accurate and meaningful dosimetric assessment of prostate and clinically relevant structures, which is not possible with CT. Significant differences were seen between CT and HR-CEMRI, with volume overestimation of CT derived contours compared to HR-CEMRI. PMID:25834576

  1. Second malignancies after prostate brachytherapy: Incidence of bladder and colorectal cancers in patients with 15 years of potential follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Liauw, Stanley L. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Sylvester, John E. [Seattle Prostate Institute at Swedish Hospital, Seattle, WA (United States) and Swedish Cancer Center at Stevens Hospital, Edmonds, WA (United States)]. E-mail: johnsylvester@seattleprostateinst.com; Morris, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Blasko, John C. [Seattle Prostate Institute at Swedish Hospital, Seattle, WA (United States); Grimm, Peter D. [Seattle Prostate Institute at Swedish Hospital, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: To report the incidence of second bladder and colorectal cancers after prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: This review included 125 patients treated with I-125 brachytherapy alone, and 223 patients who received supplemental external beam radiation therapy. Median follow-up was 10.5 years. Patients were followed for the development of lower genitourinary and colorectal cancers. Second malignancies arising five years after radiation therapy were defined as being potentially associated with treatment; observed rates were then compared with age-matched expected rates according to Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data. Results: Five years out of treatment, there were 15 patients with a second solid tumor, including bladder cancer (n = 11), colorectal cancer (n = 3), and prostatic urethra cancer (n = 1). The incidence of second malignancy was no different in patients treated with brachytherapy alone (1.6%) vs. those receiving external beam radiotherapy (5.8%, p = 0.0623). There were more observed bladder cancers compared with those expected (relative risk, 2.34, 95% confidence interval 0.96-3.72; absolute excess risk 35 cancers per 10,000 patients). Relative risk did not significantly change over increasing follow-up intervals up to 20 years after treatment. Conclusions: There may be an increased but small risk of developing a second malignancy after radiation therapy for prostate cancer. This outcome could be related to radiation carcinogenesis, but more vigilant screening and thorough workup as a result of radiation side effects and predisposing conditions (e.g., genetic and environmental factors) in many of the patients found to have second malignancies likely contributed to the higher number of observed malignancies than expected.

  2. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy of a Single Implant With Two Fractions Combined With External Beam Radiotherapy for Hormone-Naive Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Morio [Department of Radiology, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama (Japan)], E-mail: morisato@mail.wakayama-med.ac.jp; Mori, Takashi [Department of Urology, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama (Japan); Shirai, Shintaro; Kishi, Kazushi [Department of Radiology, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama (Japan); Inagaki, Takeshi; Hara, Isao [Department of Urology, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama (Japan)

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the preliminary outcomes of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy of a single implant with two fractions and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for hormone-naive prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between March 2000 and Sept 2003, a total of 53 patients with tumor Stage T1c-T3b N0 M0 prostate cancer were treated with HDR brachytherapy boost doses (7.5 Gy/fraction) and 50-Gy EBRT during a 5.5-week period. Median follow-up was 61 months. Patients were divided into groups with localized (T1c-T2b) and advanced disease (T3a-T3b). We used the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) definition for biochemical failure. According to recommendations of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-ASTRO Phoenix Consensus Conference, biochemical failure-free control rates (BF-FCRs) at 3 years were investigated as 2 years short of the median follow-up. Results: Between April 2000 and Sept 2007, Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 2.0 late Grade 2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity rates were 0% and 3.8%, respectively. Erectile preservation was 25% at 5 years. Overall survival was 88.1% and cause-specific survival was 100%. At 3 years, ASTRO BF-FCRs of the localized and advanced groups were 100% and 42%, respectively (p = 0.001). Conclusions: The HDR brachytherapy of a single implant with two fractions plus EBRT is effective in treating patients with localized hormone-naive prostate cancer, with the least genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities; however, longer median BF-FCR follow-up is required to assess these findings.

  3. An MRI-Based Dose-Response Analysis of Urinary Sphincter Dose and Urinary Morbidity after Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer in a Phase II Prospective Trial

    PubMed Central

    Register, Steven P.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Levy, Larry; Swanson, David A.; Pugh, Thomas J.; Bruno, Teresa L.; Frank, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To compare dose-volume histogram (DVH) variables for the internal and external urinary sphincters (IUS/EUS) with urinary quality of life after prostate brachytherapy. Materials and Methods Subjects were 42 consecutive men from a prospective study of brachytherapy as monotherapy with 125I for intermediate-risk localized prostate cancer. No patient received hormone therapy. Preplanning constraints included prostate V100 >95%, V150 <60%, and V200 <20% and rectal R100 < 1 cm3. Patients completed the EPIC quality of life questionnaire before and 1, 4, 8, and 12 months after implantation, and urinary domain scores were analyzed. All structures including the IUS and EUS were contoured on T2-weighted MRI at day 30, and doses received were calculated from identification of seeds on CT. Spearman's (nonparametric) rank correlation coefficient (?) was used for statistical analyses. Results Overall urinary morbidity was worst 1 month after the implant. Urinary function declined when the IUS V285 was 0.4% (? =–0.32, p=0.04); bother worsened when the IUS V35 was 99% (?=–0.31, p=0.05) or the EUS V240 was 63% (?=–0.31, p=0.05); irritation increased when the IUS V35 was 95% (?=–0.37, p=0.02) and the EUS V265 was 24% (?=–0.32, p=0.04); and urgency worsened when the IUS V35 was 99.5% (?=–0.38, p=0.02). Incontinence did not correlate with EUS or IUS dose Conclusions Doses to the IUS and EUS on MRI/CT predicted worse urinary function, with greater bother, irritative symptoms, and urgency. Incorporating MRI-based DVH analysis into the treatment planning process may reduce acute urinary morbidity after brachytherapy. PMID:23466360

  4. Monotherapeutic High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer: Five-Year Results of an Extreme Hypofractionation Regimen With 54 Gy in Nine Fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshioka, Yasuo, E-mail: yoshioka@radonc.med.osaka-u.ac.j [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Konishi, Koji; Sumida, Iori; Takahashi, Yutaka; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Koizumi, Masahiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Yamazaki, Hideya [Department of Radiology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Nonomura, Norio; Okuyama, Akihiko [Department of Urology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Inoue, Takehiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan)

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate an extreme hypofractionation regimen with 54 Gy in nine fractions provided by high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as monotherapy for prostate cancer by reporting 5-year clinical results. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 2005, 112 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with HDR brachytherapy without external beam radiotherapy. Of the 112 patients, 15 were considered low risk, 29 intermediate risk, and 68 as high risk. The prescribed dose was uniformly 54 Gy in nine fractions within 5 days. Of the 112 patients, 94 also received hormonal therapy. The median follow-up time was 5.4 years. Results: All the patients safely completed the treatment regimen. The 5-year prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure-free, local control, disease-free survival, and overall survival rate was 83%, 97%, 87%, and 96%, respectively. The 5-year PSA failure-free rate for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients was 85% (95% confidence interval, 66-100%), 93% (95% confidence interval, 83-100%), and 79% (95% confidence interval, 69-89%), respectively. The significant prognostic factors for PSA failure were the initial PSA level (p = .029) and younger age (p = .019). The maximal toxicities observed were Grade 3 using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, for both acute and late toxicity (6 and 3 patients had acute and late Grade 3 toxicity, respectively). Late Grade 2 toxicity was observed in 13 patients. Conclusion: Monotherapeutic HDR brachytherapy with an extreme hypofractionation regimen of 54 Gy in nine fractions associated with hormonal therapy was feasible, and its toxicity was acceptable. The interim tumor control rate at a median 5.4 years was promising, even for patients with locally advanced disease. This dose-fractionation scheme might be referred to by other terms, such as stereotactic body radiotherapy. Studies with longer follow-up periods and from multiple institutions are needed to confirm the efficacy of this novel approach.

  5. Evaluation of Dosimetric Parameters and Disease Response After {sup 125}Iodine Transperineal Brachytherapy for Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, W. James [Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver (Canada)], E-mail: jmorris@bccancer.bc.ca; Keyes, Mira M.D.; Palma, David M.D.; McKenzie, Michael; Spadinger, Ingrid [Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver (Canada); Agranovich, Alex [Fraser Valley Cancer Centre, Surrey (Canada); Pickles, Tom [Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver (Canada); Liu, Mitchell; Kwan, Winkle [Fraser Valley Cancer Centre, Surrey (Canada); Wu, Jonn; Lapointe, Vince [Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver (Canada); Berthelet, Eric; Pai, Howard [Vancouver Island Cancer Centre, Victoria (Canada); Harrison, Robert; Kwa, William [Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver (Canada); Bucci, Joe [Saint George's Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Racz, Violet [Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver (Canada); Woods, Ryan [Population and Preventive Oncology, Vancouver (Canada)

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To analyze dosimetric outcomes after permanent brachytherapy for men with low-risk and 'low-tier' intermediate-risk prostate cancer and explore the relationship between the traditional dosimetric values, V100 (volume of prostate receiving 100% of the prescribed dose) and D90 (minimum dose to 90% of the prostate), and risk of biochemical failure. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,006 consecutive patients underwent implantation between July 20, 1998, and Oct 23, 2003. Most (58%) had low-risk disease; the remaining 42% comprised a selected low-tier subgroup of intermediate-risk patients. The prescribed minimum peripheral dose (MPD) was 144 Gy. All implants used 0.33 mCi {sup 125}I sources using a preplan technique featuring right-left symmetry and a strong posterior-peripheral dose bias. Sixty-five percent of patients had 6 months of androgen deprivation therapy. Postimplantation dosimetry was calculated using day-28 CT scans. Results: With a median follow-up of 54 months, the actuarial 5-year rate of freedom from biochemical recurrence (bNED) was 95.6% {+-} 1.6%. Median D90 was 105% of MPD, median V100 was 92%, median V150 was 58%, and median V200 was 9%. Dosimetric values were not predictive of biochemical recurrence on univariate or multivariate analysis. Analysis of dosimetric values by implantation number showed statistically significant increases in all values with time (D90, V100, V150, and V200; p < 0.001), but this did not translate into improved bNED. Conclusions: In contrast to some previous studies, dosimetric outcomes did not correlate with biochemical recurrence in the first 1,006 patients treated with {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy at the British Columbia Cancer Agency. Despite a median D90 of only 105% of MPD, our bNED rates are indistinguishable from series that reported higher D90 values.

  6. Clinical implementation of a digital tomosynthesis-based seed reconstruction algorithm for intraoperative postimplant dose evaluation in low dose rate prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Brunet-Benkhoucha, Malik; Verhaegen, Frank; Lassalle, Stephanie; Beliveau-Nadeau, Dominic; Reniers, Brigitte; Donath, David; Taussky, Daniel; Carrier, Jean-Francois [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, 1560 rue Sherbrooke Est, Quebec, Montreal, Quebec H2L 4M1 (Canada); Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada) and Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW Research Institute, University Medical Centre Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, 1560 rue Sherbrooke Est, Quebec, Montreal, Quebec H2L 4M1 (Canada); Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada) and Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW Research Institute, University Medical Centre Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, 1560 rue Sherbrooke Est, Quebec, Montreal, Quebec H2L 4M1 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, 1560 rue Sherbrooke Est, Quebec, Montreal, Quebec H2L 4M1 (Canada) and CRCHUM, Centre Hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, 1560 rue Sherbrooke Est, Quebec, Montreal, Quebec H2L 4M1 (Canada)

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: The low dose rate brachytherapy procedure would benefit from an intraoperative postimplant dosimetry verification technique to identify possible suboptimal dose coverage and suggest a potential reimplantation. The main objective of this project is to develop an efficient, operator-free, intraoperative seed detection technique using the imaging modalities available in a low dose rate brachytherapy treatment room. Methods: This intraoperative detection allows a complete dosimetry calculation that can be performed right after an I-125 prostate seed implantation, while the patient is still under anesthesia. To accomplish this, a digital tomosynthesis-based algorithm was developed. This automatic filtered reconstruction of the 3D volume requires seven projections acquired over a total angle of 60 deg. with an isocentric imaging system. Results: A phantom study was performed to validate the technique that was used in a retrospective clinical study involving 23 patients. In the patient study, the automatic tomosynthesis-based reconstruction yielded seed detection rates of 96.7% and 2.6% false positives. The seed localization error obtained with a phantom study is 0.4{+-}0.4 mm. The average time needed for reconstruction is below 1 min. The reconstruction algorithm also provides the seed orientation with an uncertainty of 10 deg. {+-}8 deg. The seed detection algorithm presented here is reliable and was efficiently used in the clinic. Conclusions: When combined with an appropriate coregistration technique to identify the organs in the seed coordinate system, this algorithm will offer new possibilities for a next generation of clinical brachytherapy systems.

  7. CT, MR, and ultrasound image artifacts from prostate brachytherapy seed implants: The impact of seed size

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Andrew K. H.; Basran, Parminder S.; Thomas, Steven D.; Wells, Derek [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8W 3P6 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8W 3P6 (Canada) and Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver Island Cancer Centre, Victoria, British Columbia V8R 6V5 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency-Fraser Valley Cancer Centre, Victoria, British Columbia V3V 1Z2 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8W 3P6 (Canada) and Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver Island Cancer Centre, Victoria, British Columbia V8R 6V5 (Canada)

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of brachytherapy seed size on the quality of x-ray computed tomography (CT), ultrasound (US), and magnetic resonance (MR) images and seed localization through comparison of the 6711 and 9011 {sup 125}I sources. Methods: For CT images, an acrylic phantom mimicking a clinical implantation plan and embedded with low contrast regions of interest (ROIs) was designed for both the 0.774 mm diameter 6711 (standard) and the 0.508 mm diameter 9011 (thin) seed models (Oncura, Inc., and GE Healthcare, Arlington Heights, IL). Image quality metrics were assessed using the standard deviation of ROIs between the seeds and the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) within the low contrast ROIs. For US images, water phantoms with both single and multiseed arrangements were constructed for both seed sizes. For MR images, both seeds were implanted into a porcine gel and imaged with pelvic imaging protocols. The standard deviation of ROIs and CNR values were used as metrics of artifact quantification. Seed localization within the CT images was assessed using the automated seed finder in a commercial brachytherapy treatment planning system. The number of erroneous seed placements and the average and maximum error in seed placements were recorded as metrics of the localization accuracy. Results: With the thin seeds, CT image noise was reduced from 48.5 {+-} 0.2 to 32.0 {+-} 0.2 HU and CNR improved by a median value of 74% when compared with the standard seeds. Ultrasound image noise was measured at 50.3 {+-} 17.1 dB for the thin seed images and 50.0 {+-} 19.8 dB for the standard seed images, and artifacts directly behind the seeds were smaller and less prominent with the thin seed model. For MR images, CNR of the standard seeds reduced on average 17% when using the thin seeds for all different imaging sequences and seed orientations, but these differences are not appreciable. Automated seed localization required an average ({+-}SD) of 7.0 {+-} 3.5 manual corrections in seed positions for the thin seed scans and 3.0 {+-} 1.2 manual corrections in seed positions for the standard seed scans. The average error in seed placement was 1.2 mm for both seed types and the maximum error in seed placement was 2.1 mm for the thin seed scans and 1.8 mm for the standard seed scans. Conclusions: The 9011 thin seeds yielded significantly improved image quality for CT and US images but no significant differences in MR image quality.

  8. Late toxicity and five year outcomes after high-dose-rate brachytherapy as a monotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To determine the 5-year outcome after high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) as a monotherapy. Methods Between 10/2003 and 06/2006, 36 patients with low (28) and intermediate (8) risk prostate cancer were treated by HDR-BT monotherapy. All patients received one implant and 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy within 48 hours for a total prescribed dose (PD) of 38 Gy. Five patients received concomitant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Toxicity was scored according to the common terminology criteria for adverse events from the National Cancer Institute (CTCAE) version 3.0. Biochemical recurrence was defined according to the Phoenix criteria and analyzed using the Kaplan Meier method. Predictors for late grade 3 GU toxicity were analyzed using univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses. Results The median follow-up was 6.9 years (range, 1.5-8.0 years). Late grade 2 and 3 genitourinary (GU) toxicity was observed in 10 (28%) and 7 (19%) patients, respectively. The actuarial proportion of patients with late grade 3 GU toxicity at 5 years was 17.7%. Late grade 2 and 3 gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were not observed. The crude erectile function preservation rate in patients without ADT was 75%. The 5 year biochemical recurrence-free survival (bRFS) rate was 97%. Late grade 3 GU toxicity was associated with the urethral volume (p?=?0.001) and the urethral V120 (urethral volume receiving ?120% of the PD; p?=?0.0005) after multivariate Cox regression. Conclusions After HDR-BT monotherapy late grade 3 GU was observed relatively frequently and was associated with the urethral V120. GI toxicity was negligible, the erectile function preservation rate and the bRFS rate was excellent. PMID:24885327

  9. Timing of High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy With External Beam Radiotherapy in Intermediate and High-Risk Localized Prostate CAncer (THEPCA) Patients and Its Effects on Toxicity and Quality of Life: Protocol of a Randomized Feasibility Trial

    PubMed Central

    Palvai, Sreekanth; Harrison, Michael; Shibu Thomas, Sharon; Hayden, Karen; Green, James; Anderson, Oliver; Romero, Lavinia; Lodge, Richard; Burns, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in males in the UK and affects around 105 men for every 100,000. The role of radiotherapy in the management of prostate cancer significantly changed over the last few decades with developments in brachytherapy, external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). One of the challenging factors of radiotherapy treatment of localized prostate cancer is the development of acute and late genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities. The recent European guidelines suggest that there is no consensus regarding the timing of high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy and EBRT. The schedules vary in different institutions where an HDR boost can be given either before or after EBRT. Few centers deliver HDR in between the fractions of EBRT. Objective Assessment of acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities at various time points to better understand if the order in which treatment modality is delivered (ie, HDR brachytherapy or EBRT first) has an effect on the toxicity profile. Methods Timing of HDR brachytherapy with EBRT in Prostate CAncer (THEPCA) is a single-center, open, randomized controlled feasibility trial in patients with intermediate and high-risk localized prostate cancer. A group of 50 patients aged 18 years old and over with histological diagnosis of prostate cancer (stages T1b-T3BNOMO), will be randomized to one of two treatment arms (ratio 1:1), following explanation of the study and informed consent. Patients in both arms of the study will be treated with HDR brachytherapy and EBRT, however, the order in which they receive the treatments will vary. In Arm A, patients will receive HDR brachytherapy before EBRT. In Arm B (control arm), patients will receive EBRT before HDR brachytherapy. Study outcomes will look at prospective assessment of genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities. The primary endpoint will be grade 3 genitourinary toxicity and the secondary endpoints will be all other grades of genitourinary toxicities (grades 1 and 2), gastrointestinal toxicities (grades 1 to 4), prostate-specific antigen (PSA) recurrence-free survival, overall survival, and quality of life. Results Results from this feasibility trial will be available in mid-2016. Conclusions If the results from this feasibility trial show evidence that the sequence of treatment modality does affect the patients’ toxicity profiles, then funding would be sought to conduct a large, multicenter, randomized controlled trial. Trial Registration International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN): 15835424; http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN15835424 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6Xz7jfg1u). PMID:25926023

  10. Unification of a common biochemical failure definition for prostate cancer treated with brachytherapy or external beam radiotherapy with or without androgen deprivation

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, Dwight L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); McGrath, Samuel [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Martinez, Alvaro A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Vicini, Frank A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Kestin, Larry L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)]. E-mail: lkestin@beaumont.edu

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: Minimal data are available regarding selection of an optimal biochemical failure (BF) definition for patients treated with brachytherapy, external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), and combinations of these treatments with or without androgen deprivation (AD). We retrospectively analyzed our institution's experience treating localized prostate cancer in an attempt to determine a BF definition that could be applied for these various treatment modalities. Methods and Materials: A total of 2376 patients with clinical stage T1-T3 N0 M0 prostate cancer were treated with conventional dose (median, 66.6 Gy) EBRT (n = 1201), high-dose (median, 75.6 Gy) adaptive radiation therapy (n = 465), EBRT + high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost (n 416), or brachytherapy alone (n = 294) between 1987 and 2003. A total of 496 patients (21%) received neoadjuvant AD with radiation therapy. There were 21924 posttreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) measurements. Multiple BF definitions were tested for their sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (+PV), and negative PV (-PV) in predicting subsequent clinical failure (CF) (any local failure or distant metastasis), overall survival (OS), and cause-specific survival (CSS). Median follow-up was 4.5 years. The date of BF was the date BF criteria were met (e.g., date of third rise). Results: A total of 290 patients (12%) experienced CF at a median interval of 3.6 years (range, 0.2-15.2 years). The 5- and 10-year CF rates were 12% and 26%, respectively. Three consecutive rises yielded a 46% sensitivity and 84% specificity for predicting CF. The 10-year CF for those 475 patients who experienced three rises (BF) was 37% vs. 17% for those patients who did not meet these criteria (biochemically controlled [BC]). For all patients, the following definitions were superior to three rises for predicting CF for both +PV, and -PV: n + 1 ({>=}1 ng/mL above nadir), n + 2, n + 3, threshold 2 (any PSA {>=}2.0 ng/mL at or after nadir), threshold 3, threshold 4, and threshold 5. For the subset of patients treated with EBRT alone, the n + k definitions and threshold k definitions maintained superior predictive capacity. However, the threshold k definitions seemed to maintain a slightly greater separation in 10-year CF rates (43% for BF vs. 13% for BC = 30% difference for threshold 3). Surprisingly, all definitions generally had better predictive capacity for those patients who received brachytherapy or neoadjuvant AD vs. EBRT alone. The endpoints appeared similar for n + 1 vs. threshold 3 and n + 2 vs. threshold 4 in EBRT alone patients, but for brachytherapy or neoadjuvant AD patients, there were similarities for n + 2 vs. threshold 3 and n + 3 vs. threshold 4. This may be a reflection of the lower nadir levels in patients receiving AD (median <0.1 ng/mL vs. 0.2 ng/mL for brachytherapy vs. 0.8 ng/mL for EBRT alone, p < 0.01). When examining CF correlation for the various classes of BF definitions, the threshold k definitions clearly demonstrated the greatest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, followed by the n + k definitions. For OS, the threshold k definitions again demonstrated the greatest area under the curve, followed by definitions based on specific nadir cutoffs (nadir {>=}k ng/mL). Conclusions: Biochemical failure definitions applying a PSA threshold at or after the nadir (e.g., threshold 3) demonstrated the highest association with CF, OS, and CSS for all assessed treatment modalities. Definitions incorporating a PSA increase above the nadir value (e.g., nadir + 2 ng/mL) were also superior for all modalities. In general, BF definitions have greater predictive capacity for clinical outcome with brachytherapy or neoadjuvant AD than EBRT alone, possibly because of less 'noise' from production of background PSA.

  11. There Is No Correlation Between Erectile Dysfunction and Dose to Penile Bulb and Neurovascular Bundles Following Real-Time Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Solan, Amy N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)], E-mail: amy.solan@mountsinai.org; Cesaretti, Jamie A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Stone, Nelson N. [Department of Urology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Stock, Richard G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the relationship between the onset of erectile dysfunction and dose to the penile bulb and neurovascular bundles (NVBs) after real-time ultrasound-guided prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: One hundred forty-seven patients who underwent prostate brachytherapy met the following eligibility criteria: (1) treatment with {sup 125}I brachytherapy to a prescribed dose of 160 Gy with or without hormones without supplemental external beam radiation therapy, (2) identification as potent before the time of implantation based on a score of 2 or higher on the physician-assigned Mount Sinai Erectile Function Score and a score of 16 or higher on the abbreviated International Index of Erectile Function patient assessment, and (3) minimum follow-up of 12 months. Median follow-up was 25.7 months (range, 12-47 months). Results: The 3-year actuarial rate of impotence was 23% (34 of 147 patients). An additional 43% of potent patients (49 of 113 patients) were using a potency aid at last follow-up. The penile bulb volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose (V{sub 100}) ranged from 0-0.05 cc (median, 0 cc), with a dose to the hottest 5% (D{sub 5}) range of 12.5-97.9 Gy (median, 40.8 Gy). There was no correlation between penile bulb D{sub 5} or V{sub 100} and postimplantation impotency on actuarial analysis. For the combined right and left NVB structures, V{sub 100} range was 0.3-5.1 cc (median, 1.8 cc), and V{sub 150} range was 0-1.5 cc (median, 0.31 cc). There was no association between NVB V{sub 100} or V{sub 150} and postimplantation impotency on actuarial analysis. Conclusion: Penile bulb doses are low after real-time ultrasound-guided prostate brachytherapy. We found no correlation between dose to either the penile bulb or NVBs and the development of postimplantation impotency.

  12. Automated localization of implanted seeds in 3D TRUS images used for prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Zhouping; Gardi, Lori; Downey, Donal B.; Fenster, Aaron [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, ON N6A 5K8 (Canada) and Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 5B9 (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, ON N6A 5K8 (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, ON N6A 5K8 (Canada) and Medical Imaging Department, Royal Island Hospital, Kamloops, BC V2C 2T1 (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, ON N6A 5K8 (Canada); Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 5B9 (Canada) and Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 5A5 (Canada)

    2006-07-15

    An algorithm has been developed in this paper to localize implanted radioactive seeds in 3D ultrasound images for a dynamic intraoperative brachytherapy procedure. Segmentation of the seeds is difficult, due to their small size in relatively low quality of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images. In this paper, intraoperative seed segmentation in 3D TRUS images is achieved by performing a subtraction of the image before the needle has been inserted, and the image after the seeds have been implanted. The seeds are searched in a 'local' space determined by the needle position and orientation information, which are obtained from a needle segmentation algorithm. To test this approach, 3D TRUS images of the agar and chicken tissue phantoms were obtained. Within these phantoms, dummy seeds were implanted. The seed locations determined by the seed segmentation algorithm were compared with those obtained from a volumetric cone-beam flat-panel micro-CT scanner and human observers. Evaluation of the algorithm showed that the rms error in determining the seed locations using the seed segmentation algorithm was 0.98 mm in agar phantoms and 1.02 mm in chicken phantoms.

  13. High dose rate brachytherapy boost for prostate cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Zaorsky, Nicholas G; Doyle, Laura A; Yamoah, Kosj; Andrel, Jocelyn A; Trabulsi, Edouard J; Hurwitz, Mark D; Dicker, Adam P; Den, Robert B

    2014-04-01

    Studies of dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and low dose rate brachytherapy (LDR-BT) have shown excellent rates of tumor control and cancer specific survival. Moreover, LDR-BT combined with EBRT (i.e. "LDR-BT boost") is hypothesized to improve local control. While phase II trials with LDR-BT boost have produced mature data of outcomes and toxicities, high dose rate (HDR)-BT has been growing in popularity as an alternative boost therapy. Boost from HDR-BT has theoretical advantages over LDR-BT, including improved cancer cell death and better dose distribution from customization of catheter dwell times, locations, and inverse dose optimization. Freedom from biochemical failure rates at five years for low-, intermediate-, high-risk, and locally advanced patients have generally been 85-100%, 80-98%, 59-96%, and 34-85%, respectively. Late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 3-4 toxicities have also been encouraging with <6% of patients experiencing any toxicity. Limitations of current HDR-BT boost studies include reports of only single-institution experiences, and unrefined reports of toxicity or patient quality of life. Comparative effectiveness research will help guide clinicians in selecting the most appropriate treatment option for individual patients based on risk-stratification, expected outcomes, toxicities, quality of life, and cost. PMID:24231548

  14. Selecting Patients for Exclusive Permanent Implant Prostate Brachytherapy: The Experience of the Paris Institut Curie/Cochin Hospital/Necker Hospital Group on 809 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Cosset, Jean-Marc [Institut Curie, Paris (France)], E-mail: jean-marc.cosset@curie.net; Flam, Thierry [Cochin Hospital, Paris (France); Thiounn, Nicolas [Necker Hospital, Paris (France); Gomme, Stephanie; Rosenwald, Jean-Claude; Asselain, Bernard; Pontvert, Dominique; Henni, Mehdi [Institut Curie, Paris (France); Debre, Bernard [Cochin Hospital, Paris (France); Chauveinc, Laurent [Institut Curie, Paris (France)

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to analyze overall and relapse-free survival in a cohort of 809 patients, 34% of whom corresponded to a higher-risk group than American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) criteria. Methods and Materials: Between January 1999 and September 2004, 809 patients were treated with permanent loose 125 iodine seed implantation (IsoSeed Bebig, Eckert and Ziegler) by the Paris Institut Curie, Cochin Hospital, and Necker Hospital group. Of these 809 patients, 533 (65.9%) corresponded exactly to ABS criteria. Two hundred and seventy-six patients (34.1%) had a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level between 10 and 15, or a Gleason score of 7, or both (non-ABS group). Results: Overall 5-year survival was 98%, with no difference between the ABS group and the non-ABS patient subgroups (p 0.62).Five-year relapse-free survival was 97% in the ABS group; it was significantly lower (p = 0.001) in the non-ABS group but remained satisfactory at 94%. On subgroup analysis, the results appeared to be better for the subgroup of patients with PSA 10-15 than for the subgroup with a Gleason score of 7. Conclusions: Our results suggest that selected patients in the intermediate-risk group of localized prostate cancers can be safely proposed as recipients of permanent implant brachytherapy as monotherapy.

  15. Implanting iodine-125 seeds into rat dorsal root ganglion for neuropathic pain: neuronal microdamage without impacting hind limb motion

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Ling; Zhang, Tengda; Wang, Huixing; Zhang, Wenyi; Fan, Saijun; Huo, Xiaodong; Zheng, Baosen; Ma, Wenting

    2014-01-01

    The use of iodine-125 (125I) in cancer treatment has been shown to relieve patients’ pain. Considering dorsal root ganglia are critical for neural transmission between the peripheral and central nervous systems, we assumed that 125I could be implanted into rat dorsal root ganglia to provide relief for neuropathic pain. 125I seeds with different radioactivity (0, 14.8, 29.6 MBq) were implanted separately through L4–5 and L5–6 intervertebral foramen into the vicinity of the L5 dorsal root ganglion. von Frey hair results demonstrated the mechanical pain threshold was elevated after implanting 125I seeds from the high radioactivity group. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that nuclear membrane shrinkage, nucleolar margination, widespread mitochondrial swelling, partial vacuolization, lysosome increase, and partial endoplasmic reticulum dilation were visible at 1,440 hours in the low radioactivity group and at 336 hours in the high radioactivity group. Abundant nuclear membrane shrinkage, partial fuzzy nuclear membrane and endoplasmic reticulum necrosis were observed at 1,440 hours in the high radioactivity group. No significant difference in combined behavioral scores was detected between preoperation and postoperation in the low and high radioactivity groups. These results suggested that the mechanical pain threshold was elevated after implanting 125I seeds without influencing motor functions of the hind limb, although cell injury was present. PMID:25206783

  16. Interstitial iodine-125 radiosurgery alone or in combination with microsurgery for pediatric patients with eloquently located low-grade glioma: a pilot study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Peraud; C. Goetz; A. Siefert; J. C. Tonn; F. W. Kreth

    2007-01-01

    Purpose  The optimal therapeutic management of children with World Health Organization grade I and II gliomas not accessible to complete resection is poorly defined. Radical surgical resection is the first-line treatment for large hemispheric tumors, whereas interstitial iodine-125 radiosurgery (IRS) might be an attractive treatment concept for selected patients with small (tumor diameter in the range of 4 cm) and circumscribed tumors

  17. BrachyView: Proof-of-principle of a novel in-body gamma camera for low dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Petasecca, M.; Loo, K. J.; Safavi-Naeini, M.; Han, Z.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Qi, Y.; Rosenfeld, A. B. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Meikle, S. [Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Pospisil, S.; Jakubek, J. [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University of Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Bucci, J. A. [St George Cancer Care Centre, St George Hospital, Kogarah, NSW 2217 (Australia); Zaider, M. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10021 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: The conformity of the achieved dose distribution to the treatment plan strongly correlates with the accuracy of seed implantation in a prostate brachytherapy treatment procedure. Incorrect seed placement leads to both short and long term complications, including urethral and rectal toxicity. The authors present BrachyView, a novel concept of a fast intraoperative treatment planning system, to provide real-time seed placement information based on in-body gamma camera data. BrachyView combines the high spatial resolution of a pixellated silicon detector (Medipix2) with the volumetric information acquired by a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS). The two systems will be embedded in the same probe so as to provide anatomically correct seed positions for intraoperative planning and postimplant dosimetry. Dosimetric calculations are based on the TG-43 method using the real position of the seeds. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of BrachyView using the Medipix2 pixel detector and a pinhole collimator to reconstruct the real-time 3D position of low dose-rate brachytherapy seeds in a phantom. Methods: BrachyView incorporates three Medipix2 detectors coupled to a multipinhole collimator. Three-dimensionally triangulated seed positions from multiple planar images are used to determine the seed placement in a PMMA prostate phantom in real time. MATLAB codes were used to test the reconstruction method and to optimize the device geometry. Results: The results presented in this paper show a 3D position reconstruction accuracy of the seed in the range of 0.5-3 mm for a 10-60 mm seed-to-detector distance interval (Z direction), respectively. The BrachyView system also demonstrates a spatial resolution of 0.25 mm in the XY plane for sources at 10 mm distance from Medipix2 detector plane, comparable to the theoretical value calculated for an equivalent gamma camera arrangement. The authors successfully demonstrated the capability of BrachyView for real-time imaging (using a 3 s data acquisition time) of different brachytherapy seed configurations (with an activity of 0.05 U) throughout a 60 Multiplication-Sign 60 Multiplication-Sign 60 mm{sup 3} Perspex prostate phantom. Conclusions: The newly developed miniature gamma camera component of BrachyView, with its high spatial resolution and real time capability, allows accurate 3D localization of seeds in a prostate phantom. Combination of the gamma camera with TRUS in a single probe will complete the BrachyView system.

  18. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Causes Fewer Side Effects than Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy When Used in Combination With Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, Kevin; Blacksburg, Seth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Stone, Nelson [Department of Urology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Stock, Richard G., E-mail: richard.stock@moutsinai.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To measure the benefits of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) when used in combination with brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of all patients with localized prostate cancer who received external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in combination with brachytherapy with at least 1 year follow-up (n = 812). Combination therapy consisted of {sup 103}Pd or {sup 125}I implant, followed by a course of EBRT. From 1993 to March 2003 521 patients were treated with 3D-CRT, and from April 2003 to March 2009 291 patients were treated with IMRT. Urinary symptoms were prospectively measured with the International Prostate Symptom Score questionnaire with a single quality of life (QOL) question; rectal bleeding was assessed per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Schema. The Pearson {chi}{sup 2} test was used to compare toxicities experienced by patients who were treated with either IMRT or 3D-CRT. Logistic regression analyses were also performed to rule out possible confounding factors. Results: Within the first 3 months after treatment, patients treated with 3D-CRT scored their urinary symptoms as follows: 19% mild, 44% moderate, and 37% severe; patients treated with IMRT scored their urinary symptoms as follows: 36% mild, 47% moderate, and 17% severe (p < 0.001). The 3D-CRT patients rated their QOL as follows: 35% positive, 20% neutral, and 45% negative; IMRT patients rated their QOL as follows: 51% positive, 18% neutral, and 31% negative (p < 0.001). After 1 year of follow-up there was no longer any difference in urinary morbidity between the two groups. Logistic regression confirmed the differences in International Prostate Symptom Score and QOL in the acute setting (p < 0.001 for both). Grade {>=}2 rectal bleeding was reported by 11% of 3D-CRT patients and 7% of IMRT patients (p = 0.046); logistic regression analysis also confirmed this observation (p = 0.040). Conclusions: When used in combination with brachytherapy, IMRT offers less Grade {>=}2 rectal bleeding, less acute urinary toxicities, and is associated with a higher QOL compared with 3D-CRT.

  19. Radiofrequency ablation and percutaneous permanent iodine-125 implantation as salvage therapy for giant recurrent sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma of the chest wall: A case report

    PubMed Central

    KE, SHAN; DING, XUE-MEI; GAO, JUN; WANG, SHAO-HONG; ZHANG, JUN; KONG, JIAN; SUN, WEN-BING

    2015-01-01

    Sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma (SEF) is a rare soft-tissue sarcoma for which there is no standardized treatment regimen available. The current treatment options for SEF are resection, radiation and chemotherapy. Surgical resection remains the mainstay of therapy for SEF. However, SEF is an aggressive tumor that is prone to repeated local recurrence if not widely excised. Radiation and chemotherapy are less commonly used due to the insensitivity of SEF to these therapies. The treatment of recurrent SEF is even more challenging. The present study describes a patient who presented with a giant recurrent SEF arising from the chest wall that was accompanied by emergent bleeding. The patient was a 70-year-old male who had multiple comorbid diseases, including hypertension and chronic cardiac dysfunction. A computed tomography (CT) scan indicated the involvement of the sternum and anterior mediastinum. However, the patient refused any further surgery. Subsequent to careful discussion and consideration, radiofrequency (RF) ablation and percutaneous iodine-125 implantation was administered. The emergent bleeding was successfully stopped and the tumor was eliminated using RF ablation. Percutaneous iodine-125 implantation under CT guidance established effective control on the growth of the tumor involving the mediastinum. Despite this, the tumor recurred 6 months after treatment. The patient refused any further treatment and was discharged. In conclusion, RF ablation and percutaneous permanent iodine-125 implantation is a feasible and safe salvage therapy for patients with recurrent SEF of the chest wall.

  20. Monte Carlo investigation of I-125 interseed attenuation for standard and thinner seeds in prostate brachytherapy with phantom validation using a MOSFET

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.; Al-Qaisieh, B.; Bownes, P. [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, St. James's Institute of Oncology, St. James's University Hospital, Leeds, LS9 7TF (United Kingdom); Henry, A. [Clinical Oncology, St. James's Institute of Oncology, St. James's University Hospital, Leeds, LS9 7TF (United Kingdom); Thwaites, D. [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia and Academic Unit of Medical Physics, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: In permanent seed implant prostate brachytherapy the actual dose delivered to the patient may be less than that calculated by TG-43U1 due to interseed attenuation (ISA) and differences between prostate tissue composition and water. In this study the magnitude of the ISA effect is assessed in a phantom and in clinical prostate postimplant cases. Results are compared for seed models 6711 and 9011 with 0.8 and 0.5 mm diameters, respectively. Methods: A polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom was designed to perform ISA measurements in a simple eight-seed arrangement and at the center of an implant of 36 seeds. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and experimental measurements using a MOSFET dosimeter were used to measure dose rate and the ISA effect. MC simulations of 15 CT-based postimplant prostate treatment plans were performed to compare the clinical impact of ISA on dose to prostate, urethra, rectum, and the volume enclosed by the 100% isodose, for 6711 and 9011 seed models. Results: In the phantom, ISA reduced the dose rate at the MOSFET position by 8.6%-18.3% (6711) and 7.8%-16.7% (9011) depending on the measurement configuration. MOSFET measured dose rates agreed with MC simulation predictions within the MOSFET measurement uncertainty, which ranged from 5.5% to 7.2% depending on the measurement configuration (k= 1, for the mean of four measurements). For 15 clinical implants, the mean ISA effect for 6711 was to reduce prostate D90 by 4.2 Gy (3%), prostate V100 by 0.5 cc (1.4%), urethra D10 by 11.3 Gy (4.4%), rectal D2cc by 5.5 Gy (4.6%), and the 100% isodose volume by 2.3 cc. For the 9011 seed the mean ISA effect reduced prostate D90 by 2.2 Gy (1.6%), prostate V100 by 0.3 cc (0.7%), urethra D10 by 8.0 Gy (3.2%), rectal D2cc by 3.1 Gy (2.7%), and the 100% isodose volume by 1.2 cc. Differences between the MC simulation and TG-43U1 consensus data for the 6711 seed model had a similar impact, reducing mean prostate D90 by 6 Gy (4.2%) and V100 by 0.6 cc (1.8%). Conclusions: ISA causes the delivered dose in prostate seed implant brachytherapy to be lower than the dose calculated by TG-43U1. MC simulation of phantom seed arrangements show that dose at a point can be reduced by up to 18% and this has been validated using a MOSFET dosimeter. Clinical simulations show that ISA reduces DVH parameter values, but the reduction is less for thinner seeds.

  1. Clinical Impact of Implementing the Recommendations of AAPM Task Group 43 on Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy Using 125I 1 1 The opinions or assertions contained herein are those of the authors and do not purport to reflect the official view of the Department of Defense or the Department of the Air Force

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William S. Bice Jr; Bradley R. Prestidge; James J. Prete; Donald F. Dubois

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the clinical impact upon permanent interstitial prostate 125I brachytherapy after conversion to AAPM Task Group 43 (TG 43) guidelines.Methods: The value of quantities used in the calculation of dose from two institutions, Northwest Tumor Institute (NWTI) and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), which pioneered interstitial techniques for prostate brachytherapy were compared to those recently determined and published

  2. I-125 interstitial implantation for prostate cancer. What have we learned 10 years later

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deborah A. Kuban; Anas M. El-Mahdi; Paul F. Schellhammer

    1989-01-01

    From 1975 to 1984, 120 patients were treated at Eastern Virginia Medical School with iodine-125 (I-125) interstitial implantation and pelvic lymphadenectomy as the definitive therapy for stage A2-C prostatic carcinoma. As might be expected, a higher incidence of local recurrence was seen with tumors at a more advanced stage but also with tumors of moderate and poor differentiation. Local tumor

  3. Impact of intraoperative MRI/TRUS fusion on dosimetric parameters in cT3a prostate cancer patients treated with high-dose-rate real-time brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Juanita; Casquero, Francisco; Carvajal, Claudia; Urresola, Arantxa; Canteli, Begoña; Ezquerro, Ana; Hortelano, Eduardo; Cacicedo, Jon; Espinosa, Jose Maria; Perez, Fernando; Minguez, Pablo; Bilbao, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of intraoperative MRI/TRUS fusion procedure in cT3a prostate cancer patients treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) real-time brachytherapy. Material and methods Prostate gland, dominant intraprostatic lesions (DILs), and extracapsular extension (ECE) were delineated in the pre-brachytherapy magnetic resonance images (MRI) of 9 consecutive patients. The pre-implant P-CTVUS (prostate clinical target volume) was defined as the prostate seen in the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images. The CTVMR includedthe prostate with the ECE image (ECE-CTV) as defined on the MRI. Two virtual treatment plans were performed based on the MRI/TRUS fusion images, the first one prescribing 100% of the dose to the P-PTVUS, and the second prescribing to the PTVMR. The implant parameters and dose-volume histogram (DVH) related parameters of the prostate, OARs, and ECE were compared between both plans. Results Mean radial distance of ECE was 3.6 mm (SD: 1.1). No significant differences were found between prostate V100, V150, V200, and OARs DVH-related parameters between the plans. Mean values of ECE V100, V150, and V200 were 85.9% (SD: 15.1), 18.2% (SD: 17.3), and 5.85% (SD: 7) when the doses were prescribed to the PTVUS, whereas ECE V100, V150, and V200 were 99.3% (SD: 1.2), 45.8% (SD: 22.4), and 19.6% (SD: 12.6) when doses were prescribed to PTVMR (p = 0.028, p = 0.002 and p = 0.004, respectively). Conclusions TRUS/MRI fusion provides important information for prostate brachytherapy, allowing for better coverage and higher doses to extracapsular disease in patients with clinical stage T3a. PMID:25097555

  4. Transperineal Injection of Hyaluronic Acid in Anterior Perirectal Fat to Decrease Rectal Toxicity From Radiation Delivered With Intensity Modulated Brachytherapy or EBRT for Prostate Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Prada, Pedro J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Central de Asturias, Oviedo (Spain)], E-mail: pprada@telecable.es; Fernandez, Jose [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Central de Asturias, Oviedo (Spain); Martinez, Alvaro A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Rua, Angeles de la; Gonzalez, Jose M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Central de Asturias, Oviedo (Spain); Fernandez, Jose M. [Department of Radiology, Hospital Central de Asturias, Oviedo (Spain); Juan, German [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Central de Asturias, Oviedo (Spain)

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: Rectal toxicity remains a serious complication affecting quality of life for prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. We began an investigational trial injecting hyaluronic acid (HA) in the perirectal fat to increase the distance between the prostate and the anterior rectal wall. This is the first report using HA injection in oncology. Methods and Materials: This is a trial of external beam radiation therapy with HDR brachytherapy boosts in prostate cancer. During the two high-dose-rate (HDR) fractions, thermoluminescent dosimeter dosimeters were placed in the urethra and in the rectum. Before the second HDR fraction, 3-7 mL (mean, 6 mL) of HA was injected under transrectal ultrasound guidance in the perirectal fat to systematically create a 1.5-cm space. Urethral and rectal HDR doses were calculated and measured. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were used to assess the stability of the new space. Results: Twenty-seven patients enrolled in the study. No toxicity was produced from the HA or the injection. In follow-up computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, the HA injection did not migrate or change in mass/shape for close to 1 year. The mean distance between rectum and prostate was 2.0 cm along the entire length of the prostate. The median measured rectal dose, when normalized to the median urethral dose, demonstrated a decrease in dose from 47.1% to 39.2% (p < 0.001) with or without injection. For an HDR boost dose of 1150 cGy, the rectum mean Dmax reduction was from 708 cGy to 507 cGy, p < 0.001, and the rectum mean Dmean drop was from 608 to 442 cGy, p < 0.001 post-HA injection. Conclusion: The new 2-cm distance derived from the HA injection significantly decreased rectal dose in HDR brachytherapy. Because of the several-month duration of stability, the same distance was maintained during the course of external beam radiation therapy.

  5. Is robotic arm stereotactic body radiation therapy 'virtual high-dose rate brachytherapy' effective for prostate cancer? An analysis of comparative effectiveness using published data.

    PubMed

    Zaorsky, Nicholas George; Hurwitz, Mark D; Dicker, Adam P; Showalter, Timothy N; Den, Robert B

    2015-05-01

    High-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) monotherapy and robotic arm (i.e., CyberKnife) stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) are emerging technologies that have become popular treatment options for prostate cancer. Proponents of both HDR-BT monotherapy and robotic arm SBRT claim that these modalities are as efficacious as intensity-modulated radiation therapy in treating prostate cancer. Moreover, proponents of robotic arm SBRT believe it is more effective than HDR-BT monotherapy because SBRT is non-invasive, touting it as 'virtual HDR-BT.' We perform a comparative effective analysis of the two technologies. The tumor control rates and toxicities of HDR-BT monotherapy and robotic arm SBRT are promising. However, at present, it would be inappropriate to state that HDR-BT monotherapy and robotic arm SBRT are as efficacious or effective as other treatment modalities for prostate cancer, which have stronger foundations of evidence. Studies reporting on these technologies have relatively short follow-up time, few patients and are largely retrospective. PMID:25540018

  6. Treatment Results of PDR Brachytherapy Combined With External Beam Radiotherapy in 106 Patients With Intermediate- to High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pieters, Bradley R., E-mail: b.r.pieters@amc.uva.n [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center/University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Geijsen, Elisabeth D.; Koedooder, Kees; Blank, Leo E.C.M.; Rezaie, Elisa; Grient, Johan N.B. van der [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center/University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reijke, Theo M. de [Department of Urology, Academic Medical Center/University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Koning, Caro C.E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center/University of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate treatment outcome of pulsed dose-rate brachytherapy (PDR) combined with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 2002 and 2007, 106 patients were treated by EBRT combined with PDR and followed prospectively. Two, 38, and 66 patients were classified as low-, intermediate-, and high-risk disease respectively according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria. EBRT dose was 46 Gy in 2.0-Gy fractions. PDR dose was increased stepwise from 24.96 to 28.80 Gy. Biochemical disease free survival and overall survival were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Cumulative incidence of late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity were scored, according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Results: The 3- and 5-year biochemical nonevidence of disease (bNED) were 92.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 87.1-98.5) and 89.5% (95% CI, 85.2-93.8), respectively. Overall survival at 3 and 5 years was 99% (95% CI, 96-100) and 96% (95% CI, 90-100), respectively. The 3- and 5-year Grade 2 GI toxicity was 5.3% (95% CI, 0-10.6) and 12.0% (95% CI, 1.4-22.6), respectively. No Grade 3 or higher GI toxicity was observed. The 3- and 5-year Grade 2 or higher GU toxicity was 18.7% (95% CI, 10.3-27.1) and 26.9% (95% CI, 15.1-38.7), respectively. Conclusion: Results on tumor control and late toxicity of EBRT combined with PDR are good and comparable to results obtained with EBRT combined with high-dose-rate brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  7. Anatomy-Based Inverse Planning Simulated Annealing Optimization in High-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy: Significant Dosimetric Advantage Over Other Optimization Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Dayee [Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen F. Graham Cancer Center, Christiana Care Health System, Newark, DE (United States)], E-mail: djacob@christianacare.org; Raben, Adam; Sarkar, Abhirup; Grimm, Jimm; Simpson, Larry [Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen F. Graham Cancer Center, Christiana Care Health System, Newark, DE (United States)

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To perform an independent validation of an anatomy-based inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) algorithm in obtaining superior target coverage and reducing the dose to the organs at risk. Method and Materials: In a recent prostate high-dose-rate brachytherapy protocol study by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (0321), our institution treated 20 patients between June 1, 2005 and November 30, 2006. These patients had received a high-dose-rate boost dose of 19 Gy to the prostate, in addition to an external beam radiotherapy dose of 45 Gy with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Three-dimensional dosimetry was obtained for the following optimization schemes in the Plato Brachytherapy Planning System, version 14.3.2, using the same dose constraints for all the patients treated during this period: anatomy-based IPSA optimization, geometric optimization, and dose point optimization. Dose-volume histograms were generated for the planning target volume and organs at risk for each optimization method, from which the volume receiving at least 75% of the dose (V{sub 75%}) for the rectum and bladder, volume receiving at least 125% of the dose (V{sub 125%}) for the urethra, and total volume receiving the reference dose (V{sub 100%}) and volume receiving 150% of the dose (V{sub 150%}) for the planning target volume were determined. The dose homogeneity index and conformal index for the planning target volume for each optimization technique were compared. Results: Despite suboptimal needle position in some implants, the IPSA algorithm was able to comply with the tight Radiation Therapy Oncology Group dose constraints for 90% of the patients in this study. In contrast, the compliance was only 30% for dose point optimization and only 5% for geometric optimization. Conclusions: Anatomy-based IPSA optimization proved to be the superior technique and also the fastest for reducing the dose to the organs at risk without compromising the target coverage.

  8. Six year experience of external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy boost with a 1Ci {sup 192}Ir source, and neoadjuvant hormonal manipulation for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Izard, Michael A. [Radiation Oncology Associates, Mater Hospital, North Sydney, NSW (Australia)]. E-mail: michael.izard@i-med.com.au; Haddad, Richard L. [Radiation Oncology Associates, Mater Hospital, North Sydney, NSW (Australia); Fogarty, Gerald B. [Radiation Oncology Associates, Mater Hospital, North Sydney, NSW (Australia); Rinks, Adrian [Radiation Oncology Associates, Mater Hospital, North Sydney, NSW (Australia); Dobbins, Timothy [Radiation Oncology Associates, Mater Hospital, North Sydney, NSW (Australia); Katelaris, Philip [Radiation Oncology Associates, Mater Hospital, North Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To present preliminary outcomes of pulsed dose rate brachytherapy (PDR-BT), external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), and hormonal manipulation, for prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: Between December 1999 and January 2005, 165 consecutive patients with Stage T1-T3, N0, M0 prostate cancer were treated. Hormones were used in every patient. Median follow-up was 36 months. Risk groups were low (either Stage {<=}T2a, {+-} Gleason score {<=}6, {+-} Prostate-Specific Antigen [PSA] level {<=}10 ng/mL); intermediate (either Stage T2b,c, {+-} Gleason score 7, {+-} PSA 10-20 ng/mL); and high (either Stage T3, {+-} Gleason score 8-10, {+-} PSA >20 ng/mL). Results: At 3 years, Radiotherapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Grade 3 and 4 genito-urinary toxicity was 4% and 1.4%; RTOG Grade 3 and 4 gastro-intestinal toxicity was 2.6% and 0%, respectively. Erectile preservation was 61%. Overall survival was 93% (154 of 165) and cause-specific survival was 98% (162 of 165). At 3 years, disease free survival (DFS) was 93% (153 of 165). DFS for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups was 100%, 97%, and 81%, respectively ({chi}{sup 2} (2) = 16.02, p = 0.0003). The nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition ({chi}{sup 2} (2) = 14.49, p 0.0007) best predicted clinical failure, having the lowest false-positive rate (3 of 165). The nadir plus 2 ng/mL PSA-progression-free survival (PSA-PFS) rate was 100%, 95%, and 87% for the low-, intermediate, and high-risk groups, respectively. Overall ASTRO PSA-PFS rate was 88%. Conclusions: Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy plus EBRT is effective in treating localized prostate cancer, with acceptable toxicity. However, a median 5-year PSA-PFS follow-up is required before providing a solid recommendation. This preliminary information supports continued use.

  9. Imaging of implant needles for real-time HDR-brachytherapy prostate treatment using biplane ultrasound transducers.

    PubMed

    Siebert, Frank-André; Hirt, Markus; Niehoff, Peter; Kovács, György

    2009-08-01

    Ultrasound imaging is becoming increasingly important in prostate brachytherapy. In high-dose-rate (HDR) real-time planning procedures the definition of the implant needles is often performed by transrectal ultrasound. This article describes absolute measurements of the visibility and accuracy of manual detection of implant needle tips and compares measurement results of different biplane ultrasound systems in transversal and longitudinal (i.e., sagittal) ultrasound modes. To obtain a fixed coordinate system and stable conditions the measurements were carried out in a water tank using a dedicated marker system. Needles were manually placed in the phantom until the observer decided by the real-time ultrasound image that the zero position was reached. A comparison of three different ultrasound systems yielded an offset between 0.8 and 3.1 mm for manual detection of the needle tip in ultrasound images by one observer. The direction of the offset was discovered to be in the proximal direction, i.e., the actual needle position was located more distally compared to the ultrasound-based definition. In the second part of the study, the ultrasound anisotropy of trocar implant needles is reported. It was shown that the integrated optical density in a region of interest around the needle tip changes with needle rotation. Three peaks were observed with a phase angle of 120 degrees. Peaks appear not only in transversal but also in longitudinal ultrasound images, with a phase shift of 60 degrees. The third section of this study shows results of observer dependent influences on needle tip detection in sagittal ultrasound images considering needle rotation. These experiments were carried out using the marker system in a water tank. The needle tip was placed exactly at the position z=0 mm. It was found that different users tend to differently interpret the same ultrasound images. The needle tip was manually detected five times in the ultrasound images by three experienced observers at positions (+/- standard deviation) -0.53 +/- 0.16, -0.16 +/- 0.14, and -0.30 +/- 0.16 mm using a gain of 15 dB. The minus sign indicates that the needle tips were detected more proximally than the actual position of the needle tip. When using a gain of -15 dB the mean values of two observers resulted in -0.62 +/- 0.08 and -0.51 +/- 0.12 mm. Additionally an alternative approach to the direct needle tip definition was investigated. Two observers detected the solid part of the needle tip in sagittal images. This solid part, often named as "dead space end," is the distance between the needle tip and the beginning of the hollow part of the implant needle. The dead space end is 6.2 mm for the investigated needle type. Two users found mean values of -6.70 +/- 0.16 and -7.00 +/- 0.06 mm, respectively, for 15 dB gain and -6.90 +/- 0.09 and -7.02 +/- 0.06 mm using the -15 dB gain setting. The results show that ultrasound-based needle tip definition in sagittal viewing mode is accurate. The inter- and intraobserver errors should, however, be taken into account. A lower gain setting of the ultrasound system reduces the intraobserver error. PMID:19746773

  10. Comparison of biochemical failure rates between permanent prostate brachytherapy and radical retropubic prostatectomy as a function of posttherapy PSA nadir plus ‘X’

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir?+?2 ng/mL, also known as the Phoenix definition, is the definition most commonly used to establish biochemical failure (BF) after external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer management. The purpose of this study is to compare BF rates between permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) and radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) as a function of PSA nadir plus varying values of X and examine the associated implications. Methods and materials We retrospectively searched for patients who underwent PPB or RRP at our institution between 1998 and 2004. Only primary patients not receiving androgen-deprivation therapy were included in the study. Three RRP patients were matched to each PPB patient on the basis of prognostic factors. BF rates were estimated for PSA nadirs?+?different values of X. Results A total of 1,164 patients were used for analysis: 873 in the RRP group and 291 in the PPB group. Patients were equally matched by clinical stage, biopsy Gleason sum, primary Gleason grade, and pretherapy PSA value. Median follow-up was 3.1 years for RRP patients and 3.6 years in the PPB group (P =?.01). Using PSA nadir?+?0.1 ng/mL for the definition of BF, the 5-year BF rate was 16.3% for PPB patients and 13.5% for RRP patients (P =?.007), whereas at nadir?+?2 ng/mL or greater, the BF rates were less than 3% and were indistinguishable between PPB and RRP patients. Conclusions In a cohort of well-matched patients who had prostatectomy or brachytherapy, we examined BF as a function of nadir?+?X, where X was treated as a continuous variable. As X increases from 0.1 to 2.0 ng/mL, the BF curves converge, and above 2.0 ng/mL they are essentially indistinguishable. The data presented are of interest as BF definitions continue to evolve. PMID:25074478

  11. Single-Fraction High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Hypofractionated External Beam Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer - Long Term Results

    SciTech Connect

    Cury, Fabio L., E-mail: fabio.cury@muhc.mcgill.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Duclos, Marie [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Aprikian, Armen [Department of Urology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Patrocinio, Horacio [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Kassouf, Wassim [Department of Urology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Shenouda, George; Faria, Sergio; David, Marc; Souhami, Luis [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: We present the long-term results of a cohort of patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer (PC) treated with single-fraction high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) combined with hypofractionated external beam radiation therapy (HypoRT). Methods and Materials: Patients were treated exclusively with HDRB and HypoRT. HDRB delivered a dose of 10 Gy to the prostate surface and HypoRT consisted of 50 Gy delivered in 20 daily fractions. The first 121 consecutive patients with a minimum of 2 years posttreatment follow-up were assessed for toxicity and disease control. Results: The median follow-up was 65.2 months. No acute Grade III or higher toxicity was seen. Late Grade II gastrointestinal toxicity was seen in 9 patients (7.4%) and Grade III in 2 (1.6%). Late Grade III genitourinary toxicity was seen in 2 patients (1.6%). After a 24-month follow-up, a rebiopsy was offered to the first 58 consecutively treated patients, and 44 patients agreed with the procedure. Negative biopsies were found in 40 patients (91%). The 5-year biochemical relapse-free survival rate was 90.7% (95% CI, 84.5-96.9%), with 13 patients presenting biochemical failure. Among them, 9 were diagnosed with distant metastasis. Prostate cancer-specific and overall survival rates at 5 years were 100% and 98.8% (95% CI, 96.4-100%), respectively. Conclusion: The combination of HDRB and HypoRT is well tolerated, with acceptable toxicity rates. Furthermore, results from rebiopsies revealed an encouraging rate of local control. These results confirm that the use of conformal RT techniques, adapted to specific biological tumor characteristics, have the potential to improve the therapeutic ratio in intermediate-risk PC patients.

  12. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and External-Beam Radiotherapy for Hormone-Naieve Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: A 7-Year Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Aluwini, Shafak, E-mail: s.aluwini@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rooij, Peter H. van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kirkels, Wim J. [Department of Urology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Urology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Jansen, Peter P.; Praag, John O. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Bangma, Chris H. [Department of Urology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Urology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karine K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To report clinical outcomes and early and late complications in 264 hormone-naieve patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in combination with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: Between February 2000 and July 2007, 264 patients underwent HDR-BT in combination with EBRT as a treatment for their low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer. The HDR-BT was performed using ultrasound-based implantation. The total HDR-BT dose was 18 Gy in 3 fractions within 24 h, with a 6-h minimum interval. The EBRT started 2 weeks after HDR-BT and was delivered in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy to 45 Gy within 5 weeks. Results: After a mean follow-up of 74.5 months, 4 patients (1.5%) showed prostate-specific antigen progression according to the American Society for Radiation Oncology definition and 8 patients (3%) according to the Phoenix definition. A biopsy-proven local recurrence was registered in 1 patient (0.4%), and clinical progression (bone metastases) was documented in 2 patients (0.7%). Seven-year actuarial freedom from biochemical failure was 97%, and 7-year disease-specific survival and overall survival were 100% and 91%, respectively. Toxicities were comparable to other series. Conclusions: Treatment with interstitial HDR-BT plus EBRT shows a low incidence of late complications and a favorable oncologic outcome after 7 years follow-up.

  13. ROPES eye plaque dosimetry: commissioning and verification of an ophthalmic brachytherapy treatment planning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poder, J.; Annabell, N.; Geso, M.; Alqathami, M.; Corde, S.

    2013-06-01

    In this study, the Plaque SimulatorTM eye plaque brachytherapy planning system was commissioned for ROPES eye plaques and Amersham Health model 6711 Iodine 125 seeds, using TG43-UI data. The brachytherapy module of the RADCALC® independent checking program was configured to allow verification of the accuracy of the dose calculated by Plaque SimulatorTM. Central axis depth dose distributions were compared and observed to agree to within 2% for all ROPES plaque models and depths of interest. Experimental measurements were performed with a customized PRESAGEm 3-D type dosimeter to validate the calculated depth dose distributions. Preliminary results have shown the effect of the stainless steel plaque backing decreases the measured fluorescence intensity by up to 25%, and 40% for the 15 mm and 10 mm diameter ROPES plaques respectively. This effect, once fully quantified should be accounted for in the Plaque SimulatorTM eye plaque brachytherapy planning system.

  14. Acute genitourinary toxicity after high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external-beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer: Second analysis to determine the correlation between the urethral dose in HDR brachytherapy and the severity of acute genitourinary toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Akimoto, Tetsuo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan)]. E-mail: takimoto@showa.gunma-u.ac.jp; Katoh, Hiroyuki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Noda, Shin-ei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Ito, Kazuto [Department of Urology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Yamamoto, Takumi [Department of Urology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Kashiwagi, Bunzo [Department of Urology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Nakano, Takashi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan)

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: We have been treating localized prostate cancer with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) at our institution. We recently reported the existence of a correlation between the severity of acute genitourinary (GU) toxicity and the urethral radiation dose in HDR brachytherapy by using different fractionation schema. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of the urethral dose in the development of acute GU toxicity more closely than in previous studies. For this purpose, we conducted an analysis of patients who had undergone HDR brachytherapy with a fixed fractionation schema combined with hypofractionated EBRT. Methods and Materials: Among the patients with localized prostate cancer who were treated by 192-iridium HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT at Gunma University Hospital between August 2000 and November 2004, we analyzed 67 patients who were treated by HDR brachytherapy with the fractionation schema of 9 Gy x two times combined with hypofractionated EBRT. Hypofractionated EBRT was administered at a fraction dose of 3 Gy three times weekly, and a total dose of 51 Gy was delivered to the prostate gland and seminal vesicles using the four-field technique. No elective pelvic irradiation was performed. After the completion of EBRT, all the patients additionally received transrectal ultrasonography-guided HDR brachytherapy. The planning target volume was defined as the prostate gland with a 5-mm margin all around, and the planning was conducted based on computed tomography images. The tumor stage was T1c in 13 patients, T2 in 31 patients, and T3 in 23 patients. The Gleason score was 2-6 in 12 patients, 7 in 34 patients, and 8-10 in 21 patients. Androgen ablation was performed in all the patients. The median follow-up duration was 11 months (range 3-24 months). The toxicities were graded based on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer toxicity criteria. Results: The main symptoms of acute GU toxicity were dysuria and increase in the urinary frequency or nocturia. The grade distribution of acute GU toxicity in the patients was as follows: Grade 0-1, 42 patients (63%); Grade 2-3, 25 patients (37%). The urethral dose in HDR brachytherapy was determined using the following dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters: V30 (percentage of the urethral volume receiving 30% of the prescribed radiation dose), V80, V90, V100, V110, V120, V130, and V150. In addition, the D5 (dose covering 5% of the urethral volume), D10, D20, and D50 of the urethra were also estimated. The V30-V150 values in the patients with Grade 2-3 acute GU toxicity were significantly higher than those in patients with Grade 0-1 toxicity. The D10 and D20, but not D5 and D50, values were also significantly higher in the patients with Grade 2-3 acute GU toxicity than in those with Grade 0-1 toxicity. Regarding the influence of the number of needles implanted, there was no correlation between the number of needles implanted and the severity of acute GU toxicity or the V30-V150 values and D5-D50 values. Conclusions: It was concluded that HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT is feasible for localized prostate cancer, when considered from the viewpoint of acute toxicity. However, because the urethral dose was closely associated with the grade of severity of the acute GU toxicity, the urethral dose in HDR brachytherapy must be kept low to reduce the severity of acute GU toxicity.

  15. Comparison of high–dose rate prostate brachytherapy dose distributions with iridium-192, ytterbium-169, and thulium-170 sources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Devan Krishnamurthy; Vivian Weinberg; J. Adam M. Cunha; I-Chow Hsu; Jean Pouliot

    2011-01-01

    PurposeRecent studies have identified that among different available radionuclides, the dose characteristics and shielding properties of ytterbium-169 (169Yb) and thulium-170 (170Tm) may suit high–dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy needs. The purpose of this work was to compare clinically optimized dose distributions using proposed 169Yb and 170Tm HDR sources with the clinical dose distribution from a standard microSelectron V2 HDR iridium-192 (192Ir)

  16. Regulation of Autophagy Via PERK-eIF2? Effectively Relieve the Radiation Myelitis Induced by Iodine-125

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Barbara; Chen, Yanjin; Li, Hongjun; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Hongpu; Yang, Yihao; Xu, Da; Liu, Xuefeng

    2013-01-01

    Radiation myelitis is the most serious complication in clinical radiotherapy for spinal metastases. We previously showed that 125I brachytherapy induced apoptosis of spinal cord neurons accompanied by autophagy. In this study, we further investigated the mechanism by which 125I radiation triggered autophagy in neural cells. We found that autophagy induced by 125I radiation was involved in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and mainly dependent on PERK-eIF2? pathway. The expressions of LC3II, ATG12 and PI3K were significantly suppressed in PERK knockout neural cells. Meanwhile, the expressions of phosphorylated-Akt s473 and caspase3/8 all significantly increased in neural cells transfected with a PERK siRNA and which enhanced apoptosis of neurons after 125I radiation. The results were consistent with that by MTT and Annexin-FITC/PT staining. In annimal model of banna pigs with radiation myelitis caused by 125I brachytherapy, we have successfully decreased PERK expression by intrathecal administration of the lentivirus vector. The apoptosis rate was significantly higher than that in control group and which deteriorated radiation myelitis of banna pigs. Thus, autophagy caused by 125I radiation was mainly as an attempt of cell survival at an early stage, but it would be a self-destructive process and promoted the process of apoptosis and necrosis radiated by 125I for more than 72 hours. The study would be useful and helpful to maximize efficiency of radiation therapy in clinical therapy. PMID:24223705

  17. The Number of High-Risk Factors and the Risk of Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality After Brachytherapy: Implications for Treatment Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Wattson, Daniel A., E-mail: dwattson@partners.org [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA (United States); Chen Minghui [Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Moul, Judd W. [Division of Urology, Department of Surgery and Duke Prostate Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Moran, Brian J. [Prostate Cancer Foundation of Chicago, Westmont, IL (United States); Dosoretz, Daniel E. [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, FL (United States); Robertson, Cary N.; Polascik, Thomas J. [Division of Urology, Department of Surgery and Duke Prostate Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Braccioforte, Michelle H. [Prostate Cancer Foundation of Chicago, Westmont, IL (United States); Salenius, Sharon A. [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, FL (United States); D'Amico, Anthony V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine whether an increasing number of high-risk factors is associated with higher prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) among men treated with brachytherapy (BT)-based treatment, and whether supplemental therapy has an impact on this risk. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the cases of 2234 men with localized prostate cancer treated between 1991 and 2007 with low-dose rate BT monotherapy (n = 457) or BT with supplemental external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT, n = 229), androgen suppression therapy (AST, n = 424), or both (n = 1124). All men had at least one high-risk factor (prostate-specific antigen >20 ng/mL, biopsy Gleason score 8-10, or clinical stage {>=}T2c). Competing-risks multivariable regressions were performed to determine whether the presence of at least two high-risk factors was associated with an increased risk of PCSM, with adjustment for age, comorbidity, and the type of supplemental treatment. Results: The median follow-up time was 4.3 years. The number of men with at least two high-risk factors was highest in the group treated with BT, EBRT, and AST (21%), followed by BT plus EBRT or AST (13%), and BT alone (8%) (p{sub trend} < 0.001). The adjusted hazard ratio (AHR) for PCSM for those with at least two high-risk factors (as compared with one) was 4.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.8-8.0; p < 0.001). The use of both supplemental EBRT and AST was associated with a decreased risk of PCSM (AHR 0.5; 95% CI, 0.2-0.9; p = 0.03) compared with BT alone. When the high-risk factors were analyzed separately, Gleason score 8-10 was most significantly associated with increased PCSM (AHR 6.2; 95% CI, 3.5-11.2; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Men with high-risk prostate adenocarcinoma treated with BT have decreased PCSM if they receive trimodailty therapy that includes EBRT and AST. This benefit is likely most important in men with multiple determinants of high risk.

  18. JPEG compression of ultrasound images and its effect in predicting pubic arch interference for prostrate brachytherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ken Haberman; Sayan D. Pathak; Peter D. Grimm; Yongmin Kim

    2000-01-01

    Prostate brachytherapy is an effective treatment for localized prostate cancer. Recently, it has been shown that prior to surgery a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) study of the prostate and pubic arch can effectively assess pubic arch interference (PAI), a major stumbling block for the brachytherapy procedure. This identification is currently being done with uncompressed digital images taken directly from the ultrasound

  19. Promising Long-Term Health-Related Quality of Life After High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wahlgren, Thomas [Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska University Hospital and Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)], E-mail: thomas.wahlgren@karolinska.se; Nilsson, Sten [Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska University Hospital and Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Lennernaes, Bo [Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska Hospital and Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Brandberg, Yvonne [Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska University Hospital and Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To explore the long-term general and disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL) >5 years after combined radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer, including a high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost and hormonal deprivation therapy. Methods and Materials: Of 196 eligible patients with localized prostate cancer (Stage T1-T3a) consecutively treated with curative radiotherapy at our institution between June 1998 and August 2000, 182 (93%) completed the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life questionnaires QLQ-C30 and QLQ-PR25, including specific questions on fecal incontinence >5 years after treatment in September 2005. A comparison with age-matched normative data was done, as well as a longitudinal analysis using HRQOL data from a previous study. Results: The analysis included 158 nonrecurrent patients. Comparisons made with normative data showed that physical and role functioning were significantly better statistically and social functioning was significantly worse. Diarrhea and sleep disturbances were more pronounced and pain less pronounced than in a normal male population. The longitudinal analysis of disease-specific HRQOL showed that urinary urgency and erectile problems persisted 5 years after treatment, and nocturia and hormonally dependent symptoms had declined significantly, with a statistically significant difference. Fecal incontinence was recognized by 25% of patients, of whom 80% considered it a minor problem. Conclusion: More than 5 years after combined radiotherapy, irritative urinary problems and erectile dysfunction remain concerns, although severe bowel disturbance and fecal incontinence seem to be minor problems. Longitudinally, a decline mainly in hormonally dependent symptoms was seen. Minor differences in general HRQOL compared with normative data were observed, possibly including 'response shift' effects.

  20. Sodium glycididazole enhances the efficacy of combined iodine-125 seed implantation and chemotherapy in patients with non small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, QING; WANG, DAO-QING; WU, YU-FEN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of combined therapy with iodine-125 seed implantation and the gemcitabine plus cisplatin chemotherapeutic regimen, as well as treatment with the radiosensitizer sodium glycididazole (CMNa), in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The 40 patients with NSCLC in the experimental group (19 females; mean age, 52.3±11.5 years; age range, 34–74 years) received the combined therapy and CMNa, and the 41 controls (13 females; mean age, 53.7±10.7 years; age range, 8–79 years) received the combined therapy only. The response rate in the experimental group was significantly higher than in the control group (85.5 vs. 63.4%; P=0.027), with no apparent complications. Therefore, it was concluded that such therapy may be reliable and well-tolerated for the treatment of patients with NSCLC.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Markers for MRI-Guided High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy: Novel Marker-Flange for Cervical Cancer and Marker Catheters for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schindel, Joshua; Muruganandham, Manickam [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Pigge, F. Christopher [Department of Chemistry, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Anderson, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Kim, Yusung, E-mail: yusung-kim@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To present a novel marker-flange, addressing source-reconstruction uncertainties due to the artifacts of a titanium intracavitary applicator used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT); and to evaluate 7 different MRI marker agents used for interstitial prostate BT and intracavitary gynecologic HDR BT when treatment plans are guided by MRI. Methods and Materials: Seven MRI marker agents were analyzed: saline solution, Conray-60, copper sulfate (CuSO{sub 4}) (1.5 g/L), liquid vitamin E, fish oil, 1% agarose gel (1 g agarose powder per 100 mL distilled water), and a cobalt–chloride complex contrast (C4) (CoCl{sub 2}/glycine = 4:1). A plastic, ring-shaped marker-flange was designed and tested on both titanium and plastic applicators. Three separate phantoms were designed to test the marker-flange, interstitial catheters for prostate BT, and intracavitary catheters for gynecologic HDR BT. T1- and T2-weighted MRI were analyzed for all markers in each phantom and quantified as percentages compared with a 3% agarose gel background. The geometric accuracy of the MR signal for the marker-flange was measured using an MRI-CT fusion. Results: The CuSO{sub 4} and C4 markers on T1-weighted MRI and saline on T2-weighted MRI showed the highest signals. The marker-flange showed hyper-signals of >500% with CuSO{sub 4} and C4 on T1-weighted MRI and of >400% with saline on T2-weighted MRI on titanium applicators. On T1-weighted MRI, the MRI signal inaccuracies of marker-flanges were measured <2 mm, regardless of marker agents, and that of CuSO{sub 4} was 0.42 ± 0.14 mm. Conclusion: The use of interstitial/intracavitary markers for MRI-guided prostate/gynecologic BT was observed to be feasible, providing accurate source pathway reconstruction. The novel marker-flange can produce extremely intense, accurate signals, demonstrating its feasibility for gynecologic HDR BT.

  2. Real-time catheter tracking for high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy using an electromagnetic 3D-guidance device: A preliminary performance study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Jun; Sebastian, Evelyn; Mangona, Victor; Yan Di [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan 48073 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: In order to increase the accuracy and speed of catheter reconstruction in a high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate implant procedure, an automatic tracking system has been developed using an electromagnetic (EM) device (trakSTAR, Ascension Technology, VT). The performance of the system, including the accuracy and noise level with various tracking parameters and conditions, were investigated. Methods: A direct current (dc) EM transmitter (midrange model) and a sensor with diameter of 1.3 mm (Model 130) were used in the trakSTAR system for tracking catheter position during HDR prostate brachytherapy. Localization accuracy was assessed under both static and dynamic analyses conditions. For the static analysis, a calibration phantom was used to investigate error dependency on operating room (OR) table height (bottom vs midposition vs top), sensor position (distal tip of catheter vs connector end of catheter), direction [left-right (LR) vs anterior-posterior (AP) vs superior-inferior (SI)], sampling frequency (40 vs 80 vs 120 Hz), and interference from OR equipment (present vs absent). The mean and standard deviation of the localization offset in each direction and the corresponding error vectors were calculated. For dynamic analysis, the paths of five straight catheters were tracked to study the effects of directions, sampling frequency, and interference of EM field. Statistical analysis was conducted to compare the results in different configurations. Results: When interference was present in the static analysis, the error vectors were significantly higher at the top table position (3.3 {+-} 1.3 vs 1.8 {+-} 0.9 mm at bottom and 1.7 {+-} 1.0 mm at middle, p < 0.001), at catheter end position (3.1 {+-} 1.1 vs 1.4 {+-} 0.7 mm at the tip position, p < 0.001), and at 40 Hz sampling frequency (2.6 {+-} 1.1 vs 2.4 {+-} 1.5 mm at 80 Hz and 1.8 {+-} 1.1 at 160 Hz, p < 0.001). So did the mean offset errors in the LR direction (-1.7 {+-} 1.4 vs 0.4 {+-} 0.5 mm in AP and 0.8 {+-} 0.8 mm in SI directions, p < 0.001). The error vectors were significantly higher with surrounding interference (2.2 {+-} 1.3 mm) vs without interference (1.0 {+-} 0.7 mm, p < 0.001). An accuracy of 1.6 {+-} 0.2 mm can be reached when using optimum configuration (160 Hz at middle table position). When interference was present in the dynamic tracking, the mean tracking errors in LR direction (1.4 {+-} 0.5 mm) was significantly higher than that in AP direction (0.3 {+-} 0.2 mm, p < 0.001). So did the mean vector errors at 40 Hz (2.1 {+-} 0.2 mm vs 1.3 {+-} 0.2 mm at 80 Hz and 0.9 {+-} 0.2 mm at 160 Hz, p < 0.05). However, when interference was absent, they were comparable in the both directions and at all sampling frequencies. An accuracy of 0.9 {+-} 0.2 mm was obtained for the dynamic tracking when using optimum configuration. Conclusions: The performance of an EM tracking system depends highly on the system configuration and surrounding environment. The accuracy of EM tracking for catheter reconstruction in a prostate HDR brachytherapy procedure can be improved by reducing interference from surrounding equipment, decreasing distance from transmitter to tracking area, and choosing appropriated sampling frequency. A calibration scheme is needed to further reduce the tracking error when the interference is high.

  3. Development of a Novel Robot for Transperineal Needle-based Interventions: Focal Therapy, Brachytherapy and Prostate Biopsies.

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    methods exist for treating localized prostate cancer. Among these, radical prostatectomy, external beam cryotherapy and photodynamic therapy, although more recent, have been shown to have the potential to improve functional outcomes after treatment of a localized cancer 1, 2 . Except HIFU, most of these treatments use

  4. Equivalent Biochemical Control and Improved Prostate-Specific Antigen Nadir After Permanent Prostate Seed Implant Brachytherapy Versus High-Dose Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy and High-Dose Conformal Proton Beam Radiotherapy Boost

    SciTech Connect

    Jabbari, Siavash [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States); Weinberg, Vivian K. [Department of Urology, University of California San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States); Shinohara, Katsuto [Department of Biostatistics Core, University of California San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States); Speight, Joycelyn L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States); Department of Biostatistics Core, University of California San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States); Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Hsu, I.-C.; Pickett, Barby [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States); McLaughlin, Patrick W.; Sandler, Howard M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Roach, Mack, E-mail: mroach@radonc.ucsf.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States); Department of Urology, University of California San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Permanent prostate implant brachytherapy (PPI), three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and conformal proton beam radiotherapy (CPBRT) are used in the treatment of localized prostate cancer, although no head-to-head trials have compared these modalities. We studied the biochemical control (biochemical no evidence of disease [bNED]) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir achieved with contemporary PPI, and evaluated it against 3D-CRT and CPBRT. Patients and Methods: A total of 249 patients were treated with PPI at the University of California, San Francisco, and the outcomes were compared with those from a 3D-CRT cohort and the published results of a high-dose CPBRT boost (CPBRTB) trial. For each comparison, subsets of the PPI cohort were selected with patient and disease criteria similar to those of the reference group. Results: With a median follow-up of 5.3 years, the bNED rate at 5 and 7 years achieved with PPI was 92% and 86%, respectively, using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) definition, and 93% using the PSA nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition. Using the ASTRO definition, a 5-year bNED rate of 78% was achieved for the 3D-CRT patients compared with 94% for a comparable PPI subset and 93% vs. 92%, respectively, using the PSA nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition. The median PSA nadir for patients treated with PPI and 3D-CRT was 0.10 and 0.40 ng/mL, respectively (p < .0001). For the CPBRT comparison, the 5-year bNED rate after a CPBRTB was 91% using the ASTRO definition vs. 93% for a similar group of PPI patients. A greater proportion of PPI patients achieved a lower PSA nadir compared with those achieved in the CPBRTB trial (PSA nadir <=0.5 ng/mL, 91% vs. 59%, respectively). Conclusion: We have demonstrated excellent outcomes in low- to intermediate-risk patients treated with PPI, suggesting at least equivalent 5-year bNED rates and a greater proportion of men achieving lower PSA nadirs compared with 3D-CRT or CPBRTB.

  5. Prognosis in patients with local recurrence after definitive irradiation for prostatic carcinoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deborah A. Kuban; Anas M. El-mahdi; Paul F. Schellhammer

    1989-01-01

    Of 414 patients with Stage A2-C disease, all with a minimum follow-up period of 3 years, who have been definitively irradiated by external beam therapy or iodine-125 (I-125) implantation for biopsy-proven prostatic adenocarcinoma, 83 patients (20%) have experienced local recurrences. The incidence of distant metastasis was significantly higher in patients with local tumor recurrence (56 of 83; 68%), as compared

  6. Comparison of Intraoperatively Built Custom Linked Seeds Versus Loose Seed Gun Applicator Technique Using Real-Time Intraoperative Planning for Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zauls, A. Jason; Ashenafi, Michael S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Onicescu, Georgiana [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Clarke, Harry S. [Department of Urology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Marshall, David T., E-mail: marshadt@musc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To report our dosimetric results using a novel push-button seed delivery system that constructs custom links of seeds intraoperatively. Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2007, 43 patients underwent implantation using a gun applicator (GA), and from 2007 to 2008, 48 patientsunderwent implantation with a novel technique allowing creation of intraoperatively built custom links of seeds (IBCL). Specific endpoint analyses were prostate D90% (pD90%), rV100% > 1.3 cc, and overall time under anesthesia. Results: Final analyses included 91 patients, 43 GA and 48 IBCL. Absolute change in pD90% ({Delta}pD90%) between intraoperative and postoperative plans was evaluated. Using GA method, the {Delta}pD90% was -8.1Gy and -12.8Gy for I-125 and Pd-103 implants, respectively. Similarly, the IBCL technique resulted in a {Delta}pD90% of -8.7Gy and -9.8Gy for I-125 and Pd-103 implants, respectively. No statistically significant difference in {Delta}pD90% was found comparing methods. The GA method had two intraoperative and 10 postoperative rV100% >1.3 cc. For IBCL, five intraoperative and eight postoperative plans had rV100% >1.3 cc. For GA, the mean time under anesthesia was 75 min and 87 min for Pd-103 and I-125 implants, respectively. For IBCL, the mean time was 86 and 98 min for Pd-103 and I-125. There was a statistical difference between the methods when comparing mean time under anesthesia. Conclusions: Dosimetrically relevant endpoints were equivalent between the two methods. Currently, time under anesthesia is longer using the IBCL technique but has decreased over time. IBCL is a straightforward brachytherapy technique that can be implemented into clinical practice as an alternative to gun applicators.

  7. Dosimetry analyses comparing high-dose-rate brachytherapy, administered as monotherapy for localized prostate cancer, with stereotactic body radiation therapy simulated using CyberKnife.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Shoichi; Seo, Yuji; Shiomi, Hiroya; Yamada, Yuji; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Morimoto, Masahiro; Konishi, Koji; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform dosimetry analyses comparing high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with simulated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). We selected six consecutive patients treated with HDR-BT monotherapy in 2010, and a CyberKnife SBRT plan was simulated for each patient using computed tomography images and the contouring set used in the HDR-BT plan for the actual treatment, but adding appropriate planning target volume (PTV) margins for SBRT. Then, dosimetric profiles for PTVs of the rectum, bladder and urethra were compared between the two modalities. The SBRT plan was more homogenous and provided lower dose concentration but better coverage for the PTV. The maximum doses in the rectum were higher in the HDR-BT plans. However, the HDR-BT plan provided a sharper dose fall-off around the PTV, resulting in a significant and considerable difference in volume sparing of the rectum with the appropriate PTV margins added for SBRT. While the rectum D5cm(3) for HDR-BT and SBRT was 30.7 and 38.3 Gy (P < 0.01) and V40 was 16.3 and 20.8 cm(3) (P < 0.01), respectively, SBRT was significantly superior in almost all dosimetric profiles for the bladder and urethra. These results suggest that SBRT as an alternative to HDR-BT in hypofractionated radiotherapy for prostate cancer might have an advantage for bladder and urethra dose sparing, but for the rectum only when proper PTV margins for SBRT are adopted. PMID:24957754

  8. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as Monotherapy Delivered in Two Fractions Within One Day for Favorable/Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Toxicity Data

    SciTech Connect

    Ghilezan, Michel, E-mail: mghilezan@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital and Rose Cancer Institute, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Martinez, Alvaro; Gustason, Gary; Krauss, Daniel; Antonucci, J. Vito; Chen, Peter; Fontanesi, James; Wallace, Michelle; Ye Hong; Casey, Alyse; Sebastian, Evelyn; Kim, Leonard; Limbacher, Amy [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital and Rose Cancer Institute, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report the toxicity profile of high-dose-rate (HDR)-brachytherapy (BT) as monotherapy in a Human Investigation Committee-approved study consisting of a single implant and two fractions (12 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2) for a total dose of 24 Gy, delivered within 1 day. The dose was subsequently increased to 27 Gy (13.5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2) delivered in 1 day. We report the acute and early chronic genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 173 patients were treated between December 2005 and July 2010. However, only the first 100 were part of the IRB-approved study and out of these, only 94 had a minimal follow-up of 6 months, representing the study population for this preliminary report. All patients had clinical Stage T2b or less (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 5th edition), Gleason score 6-7 (3+4), and prostate-specific antigen level of {<=}12 ng/mL. Ultrasound-guided HDR-BT with real-time dosimetry was used. The prescription dose was 24 Gy for the first 50 patients and 27 Gy thereafter. The dosimetric goals and constraints were the same for the two dose groups. Toxicity was scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. The highest toxicity scores encountered at any point during follow-up are reported. Results: The median follow-up was 17 months (range, 6-40.5). Most patients had Grade 0-1 acute toxicity. The Grade 2 acute genitourinary toxicity was mainly frequency/urgency (13%), dysuria (5%), hematuria, and dribbling/hesitancy (2%). None of the patients required a Foley catheter at any time; however, 8% of the patients experienced transient Grade 1 diarrhea. No other acute gastrointestinal toxicities were found. The most common chronic toxicity was Grade 2 urinary frequency/urgency in 16% of patients followed by dysuria in 4% of patients; 2 patients had Grade 2 rectal bleeding and 1 had Grade 4, requiring laser treatment. Conclusions: Favorable-risk prostate cancer patients treated with a single implant HDR-BT to 24-27 Gy in two fractions within 1 day have excellent tolerance with minimal acute and chronic toxicity. Longer follow-up is needed to confirm these encouraging early results.

  9. Cardiovascular Comorbidity and Mortality in Men With Prostate Cancer Treated With Brachytherapy-Based Radiation With or Without Hormonal Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nanda, Akash, E-mail: akash.nanda@orlandohealth.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, Florida (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, Florida (United States); Chen, Ming-Hui [Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut (United States)] [Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut (United States); Moran, Brian J.; Braccioforte, Michelle H. [Prostate Cancer Foundation of Chicago, Westmont, Illinois (United States)] [Prostate Cancer Foundation of Chicago, Westmont, Illinois (United States); D'Amico, Anthony V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors and sequelae on the risk of all-cause mortality (ACM) in men treated for prostate cancer (PC). Methods and Materials: The study cohort comprised 5077 men with PC consecutively treated with curative intent between 1997 and 2006 at the Chicago Prostate Cancer Center. Cox and Fine and Gray's competing risks regression multivariable analyses were performed, assessing whether cardiovascular comorbidity impacted the risk of ACM and PC-specific mortality, respectively, adjusting for CAD risk factors (diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, or hypertension) and sequelae (congestive heart failure or myocardial infarction), age, year and type of treatment, and known PC prognostic factors. Results: When compared with men with no comorbidity there was a significantly increased risk of ACM in men with congestive heart failure or myocardial infarction (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] 1.96, P<.001) and in men with diabetes mellitus (AHR 1.60, P=.03) and hypertension (AHR 1.25, P=.04). In contrast, men with hypercholesterolemia had a similar risk of ACM (AHR 0.68, P=.17) when compared with men with no comorbidity. Other factors associated with a significantly increased risk of ACM included age (AHR 1.09, P<.001), prostate-specific antigen level (AHR 1.25, P=.008), and Gleason score 8-10 disease (AHR 1.71, P=.003). Cardiovascular comorbidity did not impact the risk of PC-specific mortality. Conclusions: In addition to age and unfavorable PC prognostic factors, select CAD risk factors and sequelae are associated with an increased risk of ACM in men treated for PC. These comorbidity prognostic factors predict time courses of mortality from competing causes, which may be factored into the decision-making process when considering management options for PC in a given individual.

  10. Iodine 125-phenylpentadecanoic acid and its beta-methyl substitute metabolism in cultured mouse embryonal myocytes--iodine-labelled fatty acids as tracers of myocardial high energy phosphate.

    PubMed

    Okano, M; Ishida, H; Ohsuzu, F; Sakata, N; Katsushika, S; Aosaki, N; Nakamura, H

    1993-02-01

    Iodine-labelled fatty acids have been proposed as new tracers of cardiac metabolisms. However, it is not clear how these tracers would reflect the intracellular metabolism. Therefore, we measured the uptake and release of iodine 125-labelled phenylpentadecanoic acid (IPPA), its beta-methyl substitute (BMIPP) and 201Tl in cultured myocytes of mouse embryos, and compared these values to intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content after metabolic inhibitions of oxidative phosphorylation by sodium cyanide (CN), glycolysis by 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) or fatty acid beta-oxidation by lactate. The uptake and release of BMIPP was not changed by any inhibitors suggesting BMIPP would not be metabolized in the myocytes. The uptake of IPPA was significantly reduced by 2DG and 60-80% of IPPA was metabolized to hydrophilic catabolites. The correlation of BMIPP and IPPA uptake to intracellular ATP content were high (r = 0.89, p < 0.05; r = 0.86, p < 0.1), but there was poor correlation of 201Tl to ATP values (r = 0.53, n.s.). These results suggested that iodine-labelled fatty acids could be used as better tracers of myocardial metabolism than 201Tl. PMID:8450598

  11. Differences in the intracellular processing of the radiolabel following the uptake of iodine-125- and technetium-99m-neogalactosyl albumin by the isolated perfused rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Gore, S.; Morris, A.I.; Gilmore, I.T.; Maltby, P.J.; Thornback, J.R.; Billington, D. (Royal Liverpool Hospital (England))

    1991-03-01

    Neogalactosyl albumin (NGA) is a synthetic ligand to the asialoglycoprotein receptor (hepatic binding protein), which has been proposed as a useful receptor binding radiopharmaceutical for the noninvasive assessment of liver function. We have compared the uptake and intracellular processing of iodine-125- (125I) and technetium-99m- ({sup 99m}Tc) NGA following its administration as a 1-min pulse (147 pmol) to the isolated perfused rat liver. Approximately 40% of a pulse of either {sup 125}I- or {sup 99m}Tc-NGA were taken up first pass by the liver. Of the {sup 125}I taken up by the liver, 82% was released after 15-20 min at the sinusoidal pole of the hepatocyte, predominantly as small molecular weight metabolites. A further 8% of the {sup 125}I-associated radioactivity was secreted as intact NGA into bile by the non-lysosomal (direct) pathway while 6% remained in the liver 1 hr after the pulse. In contrast, of the {sup 99m}Tc taken up by the liver, only 4% reappeared in the perfusate while 40% was secreted into bile by the lysosomal (indirect) pathway and 55% remained in the liver 1 hr after the pulse. Since labeled metabolites of {sup 99m}Tc-NGA do not appear in plasma, this permits kinetic modeling with {sup 99m}Tc-NGA without correction for labeled metabolites. Thus, {sup 99m}Tc-NGA is an excellent candidate as a receptor-binding radiopharmaceutical.

  12. Single-Fraction High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Hypofractionated External Beam Radiotherapy for Men With Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: Analysis of Short- and Medium-Term Toxicity and Quality of Life

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, Gerard C., E-mail: gerard.morton@sunnybrook.c [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Loblaw, D. Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Department of Clinical Trials and Epidemiology, Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto (Canada); Sankreacha, Raxa [Department of Medical Physics, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To determine the short- and medium-term effects of a single high-dose-rate brachytherapy fraction of 15Gy and hypofractionated external beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had localized prostate cancer with a Gleason score of 7 and a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration of <20 ng/ml or a Gleason score of 6 with a PSA concentration of 10 to 20 ng/ml. Patients received high-dose-rate brachytherapy as a single 15-Gy dose, followed by external beam radiation therapy at 37.5Gy in 15 fractions, and were followed prospectively for toxicity (using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0), urinary symptoms (using the International Prostate Symptom Score [IPSS]), erectile function (with the International Index of Erectile Function [IIEF]), and health-related quality of life (with the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite [EPIC]). Clinical examinations and PSA measurements were performed at every visit, and prostate biopsies were repeated at 2 years. The trial accrued 125 patients, with a median follow-up of 1.14 years. Results: Acute grade 2 and 3 genitourinary toxicity occurred in 62% and 1.6% of patients, respectively, and acute grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicity occurred in 6.5% of patients. No grade 3 late toxicity has occurred: 47% of patients had grade 2 genitourinary and 10% of patients had grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicity. Median IPSSs rose from 5 at baseline to 12 at 1 month and returned to 7 at 3 months. Of the total number of patients who were initially potent (IIEF, >21), 8% of patients developed mild to moderate dysfunction, and 27% of patients developed severe erectile dysfunction. Baseline EPIC bowel, urinary, and sexual bother scores decreased by 9, 7, and 19 points, respectively, at 1 year. No patient has experienced biochemical failure, and 16 of the first 17 biopsy results showed no malignancy. Conclusions: Treatment is well tolerated in the short and medium term, with low toxicity and encouraging early indicators of disease control.

  13. AAPM recommendations on dose prescription and reporting methods for permanent interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer: Report of Task Group 137

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Ravinder; Bice, William S.; Butler, Wayne M.; Chen, Zhe; Meigooni, Ali S.; Narayana, Vrinda; Rivard, Mark J.; Yu, Yan

    2009-01-01

    During the past decade, permanent radioactive source implantation of the prostate has become the standard of care for selected prostate cancer patients, and the techniques for implantation have evolved in many different forms. Although most implants use 125I or 103Pd sources, clinical use of 131Cs sources has also recently been introduced. These sources produce different dose distributions and irradiate the tumors at different dose rates. Ultrasound was used originally to guide the planning and implantation of sources in the tumor. More recently, CT and?or MR are used routinely in many clinics for dose evaluation and planning. Several investigators reported that the tumor volumes and target volumes delineated from ultrasound, CT, and MR can vary substantially because of the inherent differences in these imaging modalities. It has also been reported that these volumes depend critically on the time of imaging after the implant. Many clinics, in particular those using intraoperative implantation, perform imaging only on the day of the implant. Because the effects of edema caused by surgical trauma can vary from one patient to another and resolve at different rates, the timing of imaging for dosimetry evaluation can have a profound effect on the dose reported (to have been delivered), i.e., for the same implant (same dose delivered), CT at different timing can yield different doses reported. Also, many different loading patterns and margins around the tumor volumes have been used, and these may lead to variations in the dose delivered. In this report, the current literature on these issues is reviewed, and the impact of these issues on the radiobiological response is estimated. The radiobiological models for the biological equivalent dose (BED) are reviewed. Starting with the BED model for acute single doses, the models for fractionated doses, continuous low-dose-rate irradiation, and both homogeneous and inhomogeneous dose distributions, as well as tumor cure probability models, are reviewed. Based on these developments in literature, the AAPM recommends guidelines for dose prescription from a physics perspective for routine patient treatment, clinical trials, and for treatment planning software developers. The authors continue to follow the current recommendations on using D90 and V100 as the primary quantities, with more specific guidelines on the use of the imaging modalities and the timing of the imaging. The AAPM recommends that the postimplant evaluation should be performed at the optimum time for specific radionuclides. In addition, they encourage the use of a radiobiological model with a specific set of parameters to facilitate relative comparisons of treatment plans reported by different institutions using different loading patterns or radionuclides. PMID:19994539

  14. AAPM recommendations on dose prescription and reporting methods for permanent interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer: Report of Task Group 137

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, Ravinder; Bice, William S.; Butler, Wayne M.; Chen Zhe; Meigooni, Ali S.; Narayana, Vrinda; Rivard, Mark J.; Yu Yan [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06510 (United States); International Medical Physics, San Antonio, Texas 78259 (United States); Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, West Virginia 26003 (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06510 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, North Shore University Hospital-Long Island Jewish Health System, Manhasset, New York 11030 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Providence Cancer Center, Southfield, Michigan 48075 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    During the past decade, permanent radioactive source implantation of the prostate has become the standard of care for selected prostate cancer patients, and the techniques for implantation have evolved in many different forms. Although most implants use {sup 125}I or {sup 103}Pd sources, clinical use of {sup 131}Cs sources has also recently been introduced. These sources produce different dose distributions and irradiate the tumors at different dose rates. Ultrasound was used originally to guide the planning and implantation of sources in the tumor. More recently, CT and/or MR are used routinely in many clinics for dose evaluation and planning. Several investigators reported that the tumor volumes and target volumes delineated from ultrasound, CT, and MR can vary substantially because of the inherent differences in these imaging modalities. It has also been reported that these volumes depend critically on the time of imaging after the implant. Many clinics, in particular those using intraoperative implantation, perform imaging only on the day of the implant. Because the effects of edema caused by surgical trauma can vary from one patient to another and resolve at different rates, the timing of imaging for dosimetry evaluation can have a profound effect on the dose reported (to have been delivered), i.e., for the same implant (same dose delivered), CT at different timing can yield different doses reported. Also, many different loading patterns and margins around the tumor volumes have been used, and these may lead to variations in the dose delivered. In this report, the current literature on these issues is reviewed, and the impact of these issues on the radiobiological response is estimated. The radiobiological models for the biological equivalent dose (BED) are reviewed. Starting with the BED model for acute single doses, the models for fractionated doses, continuous low-dose-rate irradiation, and both homogeneous and inhomogeneous dose distributions, as well as tumor cure probability models, are reviewed. Based on these developments in literature, the AAPM recommends guidelines for dose prescription from a physics perspective for routine patient treatment, clinical trials, and for treatment planning software developers. The authors continue to follow the current recommendations on using D{sub 90} and V{sub 100} as the primary quantities, with more specific guidelines on the use of the imaging modalities and the timing of the imaging. The AAPM recommends that the postimplant evaluation should be performed at the optimum time for specific radionuclides. In addition, they encourage the use of a radiobiological model with a specific set of parameters to facilitate relative comparisons of treatment plans reported by different institutions using different loading patterns or radionuclides.

  15. Phase II Trial of Radiation Dose Escalation With Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy and High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Combined With Long-Term Androgen Suppression in Unfavorable Prostate Cancer: Feasibility Report

    SciTech Connect

    Valero, Jeanette; Cambeiro, Mauricio [Department of Oncology, Clinica Universitaria de Navarra, University of Navarre, Navarre (Spain); Galan, Carlos [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Rioja, Logrono (Spain); Teijeira, Mercedes [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Divino Valles, Burgos (Spain); Romero, Pilar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Zudaire, Javier [Department of Urology, Clinica Universitaria de Navarra, University of Navarre, Navarre (Spain); Moreno, Marta; Ciervide, Raquel; Aristu, Jose Javier [Department of Oncology, Clinica Universitaria de Navarra, University of Navarre, Navarre (Spain); Martinez-Monge, Rafael, E-mail: rmartinezm@unav.e [Department of Oncology, Clinica Universitaria de Navarra, University of Navarre, Navarre (Spain)

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of combined long-term luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist-based androgen suppressive therapy (AST) and dose escalation with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for high-risk (HRPC) or very-high-risk prostate cancer (VHRPC). Methods and Materials: Between January 2001 and October 2006, 134 patients (median age, 70 years) with either National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria-defined HRPC (n = 47, 35.1%) or VHRPC (n = 87, 64.9%) were prospectively enrolled in this Phase II trial. Tumor characteristics included a median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level of 14.6 ng/mL, a median clinical stage of T2c, and a median Gleason score of 7. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (54 Gy in 30 fractions) was followed by HDR brachytherapy (19 Gy in 4 b.i.d. treatments). Androgen suppressive therapy started 0-3 months before three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and continued for 2 years. Results: One implant was repositioned with a new procedure (0.7%). Five patients (3.7%) discontinued AST at a median of 13 months (range, 6-18 months) because of disease progression (n = 1), hot flashes (n = 2), fatigue (n = 1), and impotence (n = 1). After a median follow-up of 37.4 months (range, 24-90 months), the highest Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-defined late urinary toxicities were Grade 0 in 47.8%, Grade 1 in 38.1%, Grade 2 in 7.5%, and Grade 3 in 6.7% of patients. Maximal late gastrointestinal toxicities were Grade 0 in 73.1%, Grade 1 in 16.4%, Grade 2 in 7.5%, and Grade 3 in 2.9% of patients. There were no Grade 4 or 5 events. Conclusions: Intermediate-term results show that dose escalation with HDR brachytherapy combined with long-term AST is feasible and has a toxicity profile similar to that reported by previous HDR brachytherapy studies.

  16. A phase II study of external beam radiotherapy combined with permanent source brachytherapy for intermediate-risk, clinically localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate: Preliminary results of RTOG P-0019

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W. Robert [Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)]. E-mail: wrlee@wfubmc.edu; De Silvio, Michelle [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Gillin, Michael [M.D. Anderson Hospital, Houston, TX (United States); Morton, Gerard [Toronto-Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Center, Toronto, ON (Canada); Firat, Selim [Albert Einstein School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Baikadi, Madhava [Albert Einstein School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kuettel, Michael [Roswell Park Cancer Center, Buffalo, NY (United States); Greven, Kathryn [Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Sandler, Howard [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To estimate the rate of acute and late Grade 3-5 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity after treatment with external beam radiotherapy and permanent source brachytherapy in a multi-institutional, cooperative group setting. Methods and Materials: All patients were treated with external beam radiotherapy (45 Gy in 25 fractions), followed 2-6 weeks later by an interstitial implant using {sup 125}I to deliver an additional 108 Gy. Late genitourinary toxicity was graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria Version 2.0, and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer late radiation morbidity scoring system was used for all other toxicity. Results: A total of 138 patients from 28 institutions were entered on this study. Acute toxicity information was available in 131 patients, and 127 patients were analyzable for late toxicity. Acute Grade 3 toxicity was documented in 10 of 131 patients (7.6%). No Grade 4 or 5 acute toxicity has been observed. The 18-month month estimate of late Grade 3 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity was 3.3% (95% confidence interval, 0.1-6.5). No late Grade 4 or 5 toxicity has been observed. Conclusions: The acute and late morbidity observed in this multi-institutional, cooperative group study is consistent with previous reports from single institutions with significant prostate brachytherapy experience.

  17. The impact of activating source dwell positions outside the CTV on the dose to treated normal tissue volumes in TRUS guided 3D conformal interstitial HDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thunberg, Per; Johansson, Bengt; Persliden, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Dose coverage is crucial for successful treatment in mono-brachytherapy. Since few and very high dose fractions are used, there is an important balance between dwell positioning outside the clinical target volume (CTV) and possible damage on adjacent normal tissue. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility of having dwell positions close to the CTV surface, while maintaining an acceptable dose distribution, and to investigate the robustness in terms of known geometrical uncertainties of the implant. Material and methods This study included 37 patients who had received brachytherapy for prostate cancer as a monotherapy with the following schedules: 2 × 14 Gy or 3 × 11 Gy, each fraction separated by two weeks. The source dwell positions were activated 5 mm outside CTV. New optimizations were simulated for dwell positions at 3, 2, 1, and 0 mm. Inverse and graphical optimization were applied according to the relative dose constraints: V100 CTV ? 97%, Dmax, urethra ? 110%, and D10 rectal mucosa ? 65%. The V100, normal tissue outside CTV was used to evaluate dose variations caused by different dwell positions. Prostate geometries and dose distributions for the different dwell positions outside the CTV were used to investigate the impact on the CTV dose distribution due to geometrical uncertainties. Results Both V100, CTV, and V100, normal tissue decreased, 98.6% to 92.2%, and 17 cm3 to 9.0 cm3, for dwell activation from 5 mm to 0 mm. The evaluation of both simulated longitudinal geometrical uncertainties and different source dwell activations implied that V100, CTV ranged from 98.6% to 86.3%. Conclusions It is possible to reduce the V100, normal tissue by decreasing the source dwell positions outside the CTV from 5 to 3 mm, while maintaining dose constraints. In combination with the estimated geometrical uncertainties, however, the source dwell positions need to be 5 mm from the surface in order to maintain a robust implant. PMID:25337130

  18. Rectal Bleeding After High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Combined With Hypofractionated External-Beam Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: The Relationship Between Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters and the Occurrence Rate

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Masahiko, E-mail: masaoka@showa.gunma-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Gunma (Japan); Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Ebara, Takeshi; Kato, Hiroyuki; Tamaki, Tomoaki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Gunma (Japan); Akimoto, Tetsuo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Ito, Kazuto; Miyakubo, Mai; Yamamoto, Takumi; Suzuki, Kazuhiro [Department of Urology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Gunma (Japan); Takahashi, Takeo; Nakano, Takashi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Gunma (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the predictive risk factors for Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding after high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) combined with hypofractionated external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer using dose-volume histogram analysis. Methods and Materials: The records of 216 patients treated with HDR-BT combined with EBRT were analyzed. The treatment protocols for HDR-BT were 5 Gy Multiplication-Sign five times in 3 days or 7 Gy Multiplication-Sign three, 10.5 Gy Multiplication-Sign two, or 9 Gy Multiplication-Sign two in 2 days. The EBRT doses ranged from 45 to 51 Gy with a fractional dose of 3 Gy. Results: In 20 patients Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding developed, and the cumulative incidence rate was 9% at 5 years. By converting the HDR-BT and EBRT radiation doses into biologic effective doses (BED), the BED{sub 3} at rectal volumes of 5% and 10% in the patients who experienced bleeding were significantly higher than those in the remaining 196 patients. Univariate analysis showed that a higher rectal BED{sub 3-5%} and the use of fewer needles in brachytherapy were correlated with the incidence of bleeding, but BED{sub 3-5%} was found to be the only significant factor on multivariate analysis. Conclusions: The radiation dose delivered to small rectal lesions as 5% is important for predicting Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding after HDR-BT combined with EBRT for prostate cancer.

  19. External-Beam Radiation Therapy and High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy Combined With Long-Term Androgen Deprivation Therapy in High and Very High Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Data on Clinical Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Monge, Rafael, E-mail: rmartinezm@unav.es [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinica Universitaria de Navarra, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Navarre (Spain); Moreno, Marta; Ciervide, Raquel; Cambeiro, Mauricio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinica Universitaria de Navarra, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Navarre (Spain); Perez-Gracia, Jose Luis; Gil-Bazo, Ignacio [Department of Medical Oncology, Clinica Universitaria de Navarra, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Navarre (Spain); Gaztanaga, Miren; Arbea, Leire [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinica Universitaria de Navarra, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Navarre (Spain); Pascual, Ignacio [Department of Urology, Clinica Universitaria de Navarra, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Navarre (Spain); Aristu, Javier [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinica Universitaria de Navarra, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Navarre (Spain)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of combined long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and dose escalation with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 2001 and 2007, 200 patients with high-risk prostate cancer (32.5%) or very high-risk prostate cancer (67.5%) were prospectively enrolled in this Phase II trial. Tumor characteristics included a median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen of 15.2 ng/mL, a clinical stage of T2c, and a Gleason score of 7. Treatment consisted of 54 Gy of external irradiation (three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy [3DCRT]) followed by 19 Gy of HDR brachytherapy in four twice-daily treatments. ADT started 0-3 months before 3DCRT and continued for 2 years. Results: One hundred and ninety patients (95%) received 2 years of ADT. After a median follow-up of 3.7 years (range, 2-9), late Grade {>=}2 urinary toxicity was observed in 18% of the patients and Grade {>=}3 was observed in 5%. Prior transurethral resection of the prostate (p = 0.013) and bladder D{sub 50} {>=}1.19 Gy (p = 0.014) were associated with increased Grade {>=}2 urinary complications; age {>=}70 (p = 0.05) was associated with Grade {>=}3 urinary complications. Late Grade {>=}2 gastrointestinal toxicity was observed in 9% of the patients and Grade {>=}3 in 1.5%. CTV size {>=}35.8 cc (p = 0.007) and D{sub 100} {>=}3.05 Gy (p = 0.01) were significant for increased Grade {>=}2 complications. The 5-year and 9-year biochemical relapse-free survival (nadir + 2) rates were 85.1% and 75.7%, respectively. Patients with Gleason score of 7-10 had a decreased biochemical relapse-free survival (p = 0.007). Conclusions: Intermediate-term results at the 5-year time point indicate a favorable outcome without an increase in the rate of late complications.

  20. Prostate-specific antigen (Pasa) bounce and other fluctuations: Which biochemical relapse definition is least prone to PSA false calls? An analysis of 2030 men treated for prostate cancer with external beam or brachytherapy with or without adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pickles, Tom [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)]. E-mail: tpickles@bccancer.bc.ca

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the false call (FC) rate for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse according to nine different PSA relapse definitions after a PSA fluctuation (bounce) has occurred after external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or brachytherapy, with or without adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy. Methods and Materials: An analysis of a prospective database of 2030 patients was conducted. Prostate-specific antigen relapse was scored according to the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO), Vancouver, threshold + n, and nadir + n definitions for the complete data set and then compared against a truncated data set, with data subsequent to the height of the bounce deleted. The FC rate was calculated for each definition. Results: The bounce rate, with this very liberal definition of bounce, was 58% with EBRT and 84% with brachytherapy. The FC rate was lowest with nadir + 2 and + 3 definitions (2.2% and 1.6%, respectively) and greatest with low-threshold and ASTRO definitions (32% and 18%, respectively). The ASTRO definition was particularly susceptible to FC when androgen deprivation therapy was used with radiation (24%). Discussion: New definitions of biochemical non-evidence of disease that are more robust than the ASTRO definition have been identified. Those with the least FC rates are the nadir + 2 and nadir + 3 definitions, both of which are being considered to replace the ASTRO definition by the 2005 meeting of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-ASTRO consensus panel.

  1. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    YamazakI, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Furukawa, Souhei; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer. PMID:23179377

  2. A prospective quality-of-life study in men with clinically localized prostate carcinoma treated with radical prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy, or interstitial brachytherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Robert Lee; M. Craig Hall; Richard P McQuellon; L. Douglas Case; David L McCullough

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively assess the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and changes in HRQOL during the first year after 3 different treatments for clinically localized prostate cancer.Methods and Materials: Ninety men with T1–T2 adenocarcinoma of the prostate were treated with curative intent between May 1998 and June 1999 and completed a quality-of-life Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (FACT-P) questionnaire before

  3. Dose uncertainty due to computed tomography ,,CT... slice thickness in CT-based high dose rate brachytherapy of the prostate cancer

    E-print Network

    Pouliot, Jean

    in CT-based treatment planning. Due to the discrete nature of the spiral CT scan, each slice beingDose uncertainty due to computed tomography ,,CT... slice thickness in CT-based high dose rate tomography CT -based high dose rate HDR brachytherapy, the uncertainty in the localization

  4. The dosimetry of brachytherapy-induced erectile dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M

    2003-12-31

    There is emerging evidence that brachytherapy-induced erectile dysfunction (ED) is technique-related and may be minimized by careful attention to source placement. Herein, we review the relationship between radiation doses to the prostate gland/surrounding structures and the development of brachytherapy-induced ED. The permanent prostate brachytherapy literature was reviewed using MEDLINE searches to ensure completeness. Although the site-specific structure associated with brachytherapy-induced ED remains unknown, there is an increasing body of data implicating the proximal penis. With day 0 CT-based dosimetry, the dose to 50% (D{sub 50}) and 25% (D{sub 25}) of the bulb of the penis should be maintained below 40% and 60% mPD, respectively, while the crura D{sub 50} should be maintained below 28% mPD to maximize post-brachytherapy potency. To date, there is no data to suggest that either radiation doses to the neurovascular bundles or choice of isotope is associated with brachytherapy-induced ED, while conflicting data has been reported regarding radiation dose to the prostate and the use of supplemental external beam radiation therapy. Although the etiology of brachytherapy-induced ED is likely multifactorial, the available data supports the proximal penis as an important site-specific structure. Refinements in implant technique, including preplanning and intraoperative seed placement, will result in lower radiation doses to the proximal penis with potential improvement in potency preservation.

  5. Prostate specific antigen in the diagnosis and treatment of adenocarcinoma of the prostate. III. Radiation treated patients

    SciTech Connect

    Stamey, T.A.; Kabalin, J.N.; Ferrari, M.

    1989-05-01

    Serum prostate specific antigen was determined (Yang polyclonal radioimmunoassay) in 183 men after radiation therapy for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. A total of 163 men had received 7,000 rad external beam radiotherapy and 20 had been implanted with iodine-125 seeds. Only 11 per cent of these 183 patients had undetectable prostate specific antigen levels at a mean interval of 5 years since completion of radiotherapy. Prostate specific antigen levels after radiotherapy were directly related to initial clinical stage and Gleason score before treatment. Multiple prostate specific antigen determinations were performed with time in 124 of 183 patients. During year 1 after radiotherapy prostate specific antigen levels were decreasing in 82 per cent of the patients but only 8 per cent continued to decrease beyond year 1. Of 80 patients observed greater than 1 year after completion of radiotherapy 51 per cent had increasing values and 41 per cent had stable values. Increasing prostate specific antigen values after radiotherapy were correlated with progression to metastastic disease and residual cancer on prostate biopsy. Total serum acid phosphatase levels were poorly related to prostate specific antigen levels, were less effective in discriminating patients with metastatic disease and provided no additional information beyond that provided by prostate specific antigen.

  6. Interstitially implanted I125 for prostate cancer using transrectal ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Greenburg, S.; Petersen, J.; Hansen-Peters, I.; Baylinson, W. (Northwest Tumor Institute, Seattle, WA (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Prostate cancer is the third leading cause of death from cancer among men in the United States. Traditional treatments for prostate cancer are prostatectomy, external beam irradiation, and interstitial implantation of Iodine125 (I125) via laparotomy. These treatments are associated with significant morbidity and limitations. Based on experience with I125 interstitial implantation by transrectal ultrasound guidance for early-stage prostate cancer, it seems that this newer method of treatment has greater accuracy of placement and distribution of the isotope and has had few reported complications. The need for a surgical incision has been eliminated. Hospitalization time also has been decreased, creating the need for ambulatory and inpatient nurses to understand the importance of their respective roles in providing coordinated quality care for these patients. Nurses in these departments must have knowledge of the procedure, radiation safety, and common side effects related to the implant.

  7. Monte Carlo calculated doses to treatment volumes and organs at risk for permanent implant lung brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, J. G. H.; Furutani, K. M.; Thomson, R. M.

    2013-10-01

    Iodine-125 (125I) and Caesium-131 (131Cs) brachytherapy have been used with sublobar resection to treat stage I non-small cell lung cancer and other radionuclides, 169Yb and 103Pd, are considered for these treatments. This work investigates the dosimetry of permanent implant lung brachytherapy for a range of source energies and various implant sites in the lung. Monte Carlo calculated doses are calculated in a patient CT-derived computational phantom using the EGsnrc user-code BrachyDose. Calculations are performed for 103Pd, 125I, 131Cs seeds and 50 and 100 keV point sources for 17 implant positions. Doses to treatment volumes, ipsilateral lung, aorta, and heart are determined and compared to those determined using the TG-43 approach. Considerable variation with source energy and differences between model-based and TG-43 doses are found for both treatment volumes and organs. Doses to the heart and aorta generally increase with increasing source energy. TG-43 underestimates the dose to the heart and aorta for all implants except those nearest to these organs where the dose is overestimated. Results suggest that model-based dose calculations are crucial for selecting prescription doses, comparing clinical endpoints, and studying radiobiological effects for permanent implant lung brachytherapy.

  8. Episcleral plaque brachytherapy using ‘BARC I-125 Ocu-Prosta seeds’ in the treatment of intraocular tumors: A single-institution experience in India

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Parag K; Narendran, V; Selvaraj, U; Guhan, P; Saxena, Sanjay K; Dash, Ashutosh; Astrahan, Melvin

    2012-01-01

    Context: To analyze the results of episcleral plaque brachytherapy using indigenous Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) Iodine-125 Ocu-Prosta seeds for the management of intraocular tumors from a single institute. AIM: To report our initial experience and learning curve on the use of ‘BARC I-125 Ocu-Prosta seeds’ for the management of intraocular tumors such as choroidal melanomas, retinoblastomas and vasoproliferative tumors (VPT). Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 13 eyes of 13 patients who underwent ophthalmic brachytherapy between May 2008 to March 2012. Nine cases had choroidal melanomas; three had retinoblastomas while one case had VPT. Results: For choroidal melanomas the average apical diameter before brachytherapy was 7.6 mm and average largest basal diameter was 12.1 mm, respectively, which reduced to 4.2 mm and 7.7 mm after the procedure at an average follow-up of 24 months (range 10-43 months). Retinoblastoma and VPT also showed good regression after brachytherapy. Conclusion: Plaque radiotherapy using 125I seeds can be performed under peribulbar anesthesia and provides a viable option for the management of intraocular cancer with minimal invasiveness and surgical complications. Patients in our studies experienced excellent local tumor control. With the availability of indigenous ‘BARC I-125 Ocu-Prosta seeds’ locally, cost effective ophthalmic brachytherapy can be performed in India. PMID:22824598

  9. Optimization of HDR brachytherapy dose distributions using linear programming with penalty costs

    E-print Network

    Goldberg, Ken

    the resulting dose distribution minimizes deviation from dose prescriptions that conform to patient sparing surrounding healthy tissues. In HDR brachytherapy, the physician commonly im- plants 14- butions. When treating prostate cancer, physicians desire dose dis- tributions that conform to patient

  10. Curiethérapie du cancer prostatique : haut débit ou bas débit de dose ?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J.-M. Cosset; C. Haie-Meder

    2005-01-01

    Low-dose brachytherapy for prostate cancer was actually proposed in the first years of the XXth century. Its modern version (iodin 125 or palladium 103 permanent implants) now benefits from some 15 years of experience in a few pioneer centers, with very satisfactory results in term of efficacy\\/toxicity ratio. More recently, a high-dose rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy technique has been introduced. Initially

  11. Cold spot mapping inferred from MRI at time of failure predicts biopsy-proven local failure after permanent seed brachytherapy in prostate cancer patients: Implications for focal salvage brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Crehange, Gilles; Krishnamurthy, Devan; Cunha, J. Adam; Pickett, Barby; Kurhanewicz, John; Hsu, I-Chow; Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Shinohara, Katsuto; Roach, Mack; Pouliot, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose To establish a method to evaluate dosimetry at the time of primary prostate permanent implant (pPPI) using MRI of the shrunken prostate at the time of failure (tf). To compare cold spot mapping with sextant-biopsy mapping at tf. Material and methods Twenty-four patients were referred for biopsy-proven local failure (LF) after pPPI. Multiparametric MRI and combined-sextant biopsy with a central review of the pathology at tf were systematically performed. A model of the shrinking pattern was defined as a Volumetric Change Factor (VCF) as a function of time from time of pPPI (t0). An isotropic expansion to both prostate volume (PV) and seed position (SP) coordinates determined at tf was performed using a validated algorithm using the VCF. Results pPPI CT-based evaluation (at 4 weeks) vs. MR-based evaluation: Mean D90% was 145.23 ± 19.16 Gy [100.0–167.5] vs. 85.28 ± 27.36 Gy [39–139] (p = 0.001), respectively. Mean V100% was 91.6 ± 7.9% [70–100%] vs. 73.1 ± 13.8% [55–98%] (p = 0.0006), respectively. Seventy-seven per cent of the pathologically positive sextants were classified as cold. Conclusions Patients with biopsy-proven LF had poorer implantation quality when evaluated by MRI several years after implantation. There is a strong relationship between microscopic involvement at tf and cold spots. PMID:24231238

  12. The relationship between the biochemical control outcomes and the quality of planning of high-dose rate brachytherapy as a boost to external beam radiotherapy for locally and locally advanced prostate cancer using the RTOG-ASTRO Phoenix definition

    PubMed Central

    Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis; Salvajoli, João; Novaes, Paulo; Maia, Maria; Fogaroli, Ricardo; Gides, Doglas; Horriot, Rodrigues

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluated prognostic factors and impact of the quality of planning of high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) for patients with local or locally advanced prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and HDR-BT. Methods and Materials: Between 1997 and 2005, 209 patients with biopsy proven prostate adenocarcinoma were treated with localized EBRT and HDR-BT at the Department of Radiation-Oncology, Hospital A. C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Patient's age, Gleason score (GS), clinical stage (CS), initial PSA (iPSA), risk group for biochemical failure (GR), doses of EBRT and HDR-BT, use of three-dimensional planning for HDR-BT (3DHDR) and the Biological Effective Dose (BED) were evaluated as prognostic factors for biochemical control (bC). Results: Median age and median follow-up time were 68 and 5.3 years, respectively. Median EBRT and HDR-BT doses were 45 Gy and 20 Gy. The crude bC at 3.3 year was 94.2%. For the Low, intermediate and high risk patients the bC rates at 3.3 years were 91.5%, 90.2% and 88.5%, respectively. Overall survival (OS) and disease specific survival rates at 3.3 years were 97.8% and 98.4%, respectively. On univariate analysis the prognostic factors related bC were GR (p= 0.040), GS ? 6 (p= 0.002), total dose of HDR-BT ? 20 Gy (p< 0.001), 3DHDR (p< 0.001), BED-HDR ? 99 Gy1.5 (p<0.001) and BED-TT ? 185 (p<0.001). On multivariate analysis the statistical significant predictive factors related to bC were RG (p< 0.001), HDR-BT ? 20 Gy (p=0.008) and 3DHDR (p<0.001). Conclusions: we observed that the bC rates correlates with the generally accepted risk factors described in the literature. Dose escalation, evaluated through the BED, and the quality of planning of HDR-BT are also important predictive factors when treating prostate cancer. PMID:18566673

  13. MRI/TRUS data fusion for brachytherapy

    E-print Network

    Daanen, V; Giraud, J Y; Fourneret, P; Descotes, J L; Bolla, M; Collomb, D; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prostate brachytherapy consists in placing radioactive seeds for tumour destruction under transrectal ultrasound imaging (TRUS) control. It requires prostate delineation from the images for dose planning. Because ultrasound imaging is patient- and operator-dependent, we have proposed to fuse MRI data to TRUS data to make image processing more reliable. The technical accuracy of this approach has already been evaluated. METHODS: We present work in progress concerning the evaluation of the approach from the dosimetry viewpoint. The objective is to determine what impact this system may have on the treatment of the patient. Dose planning is performed from initial TRUS prostate contours and evaluated on contours modified by data fusion. RESULTS: For the eight patients included, we demonstrate that TRUS prostate volume is most often underestimated and that dose is overestimated in a correlated way. However, dose constraints are still verified for those eight patients. CONCLUSIONS: This confirms our init...

  14. Brachytherapy radiation doses to the neurovascular bundles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven J DiBiase; Kent Wallner; Kevin Tralins; Steven Sutlief

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of radiation dose to the neurovascular bundles (NVB) in brachytherapy-related impotence.Methods and Materials: Fourteen Pd-103 or I-125 implant patients were studied. For patients treated with implant alone, the prostate and margin (clinical target volume [CTV]) received a prescription dose of 144 Gy for I-125 or 115 Gy for Pd-103. Two patients received Pd-103 (90 Gy)

  15. Treatment options for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Mira; Crook, Juanita; Morton, Gerard; Vigneault, Eric; Usmani, Nawaid; Morris, W. James

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe treatment options for clinically localized prostate cancer: radical prostatectomy, prostate brachytherapy, external beam radiation, and active surveillance. Quality of evidence Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) outcomes presented are from non-randomized, cohort, and other comparisons trials (level II evidence). We describe PSA outcomes from Canadian centres when they are available. One small randomized controlled trial (level I evidence) in localized prostate cancer is available to compare radical prostatectomy with brachytherapy. Main message Treatment choice in prostate cancer is based on initial PSA level, clinical stage of disease, and Gleason score, together with baseline urinary function, comorbidities, and patient age. In this article, we describe patients’ eligibility for and the common side effects of all treatment options. Prostate brachytherapy and active surveillance have evolved as new standard treatments of localized prostate cancer. We give a brief overview of the brachytherapy procedure, side effects, and PSA outcomes across Canada, as well as active surveillance guidelines. Conclusion Prostate cancer treatment requires a multidisciplinary approach, with input from both urology and radiation oncology. Input from family physicians is often as important in helping guide patients through the treatment decision process. PMID:24336537

  16. Edema associated with I-125 or Pd103 prostate brachytherapy and its impact on post-implant dosimetry: an analysis based on serial CT acquisition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank M. Waterman; Ning Yue; Benjamin W. Corn; Adam P. Dicker

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the magnitude and duration of post-implant edema following the implantation of I-125 or Pd-103 seeds into the prostate and to investigate its effect on the CT-based calculation of the total dose delivered by the implant.Materials and Methods: A pre-implant CT scan and 3 to 5 serial post-implant CT scans were obtained on 10 patients who received either

  17. Advanced brachytherapy dosimetric considerations

    E-print Network

    Melhus, Christopher S. (Christopher Scott), 1974-

    2008-01-01

    The practice of brachytherapy and brachytherapy dosimetry was investigated with emphasis on evaluations of dose distributions and shielding considerations for both photon- and neutron-emitting radionuclides. Monte Carlo ...

  18. A Monte Carlo investigation of lung brachytherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, J. G. H.; Furutani, K. M.; Thomson, R. M.

    2013-07-01

    Iodine-125 (125I) and Caesium-131 (131Cs) brachytherapy have been used in conjunction with sublobar resection to reduce the local recurrence of stage I non-small cell lung cancer compared with resection alone. Treatment planning for this procedure is typically performed using only a seed activity nomogram or look-up table to determine seed strand spacing for the implanted mesh. Since the post-implant seed geometry is difficult to predict, the nomogram is calculated using the TG-43 formalism for seeds in a planar geometry. In this work, the EGSnrc user-code BrachyDose is used to recalculate nomograms using a variety of tissue models for 125I and 131Cs seeds. Calculated prescription doses are compared to those calculated using TG-43. Additionally, patient CT and contour data are used to generate virtual implants to study the effects that post-implant deformation and patient-specific tissue heterogeneity have on perturbing nomogram-derived dose distributions. Differences of up to 25% in calculated prescription dose are found between TG-43 and Monte Carlo calculations with the TG-43 formalism underestimating prescription doses in general. Differences between the TG-43 formalism and Monte Carlo calculated prescription doses are greater for 125I than for 131Cs seeds. Dose distributions are found to change significantly based on implant deformation and tissues surrounding implants for patient-specific virtual implants. Results suggest that accounting for seed grid deformation and the effects of non-water media, at least approximately, are likely required to reliably predict dose distributions in lung brachytherapy patients.

  19. Experimental and Monte Carlo measurements of dose perturbation around a non-radioactive brachytherapy seed in external beam radiotherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James P. Steinman

    2010-01-01

    I-125 seeds used in permanent prostate brachytherapy are composed of high-Z metals and may number from 40 to over 100 in a typical implant. If any supplemental external beam treatment is administered afterward (as for salvaging failed brachytherapy treatment), it is possible that the seeds may cause substantial dose perturbation which will depend on numerous factors (photon energy, depth, field

  20. Pelvic complications after definitive treatment of prostate cancer by interstitial or external beam radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schellhammer, P.F.; El-Mahdi, A.M.

    1983-05-01

    Radiation complications, after definitive treatment of localized prostatic carcinoma by either external beam or interstitial implantation with Iodine-125 seeds, are reviewed. Late serious complications to immediately adjacent structures of the anterior rectal wall, prostatic urethra, bladder neck, and external sphincter occurred with similar frequency in both treatment groups. However, late serious complications of the remotely adjacent structures of the bladder, urethra, distal ureters, and circumferential rectal wall occurred more frequently in the external beam treatment series, a reflection of the fact that larger tissue volumes were irradiated. Rectal ulceration, while occurring in both treatment groups, was amenable to surgical correction or underwent spontaneous healing only in the 125I group. At this point in our experience, morbidity from late radiation complications has been less among those patients having interstitial implantation for definitive treatment of localized prostatic carcinoma.

  1. MIP Models and BB Strategies in Brachytherapy Treatment Optimization

    E-print Network

    Meyer, Robert R.

    @mail.mdanderson.org) Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 Michael­Madison Abstract. Brachytherapy (brachy being derived from a Greek word meaning short) is the treatment of cancer of therapy is becoming com­ mon in the treatment of early stage prostate cancer, the most common cancer

  2. Coregistered photoacoustic-ultrasound imaging applied to brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Tyler; Zemp, Roger J.

    2011-08-01

    Brachytherapy is a form of radiation therapy commonly used in the treatment of prostate cancer wherein sustained radiation doses can be precisely targeted to the tumor area by the implantation of small radioactive seeds around the treatment area. Ultrasound is a popular imaging mode for seed implantation, but the seeds are difficult to distinguish from the tissue structure. In this work, we demonstrate the feasibility of photoacoustic imaging for identifying brachytherapy seeds in a tissue phantom, comparing the received intensity to endogenous contrast. We have found that photoacoustic imaging at 1064 nm can identify brachytherapy seeds uniquely at laser penetration depths of 5 cm in biological tissue at the ANSI limit for human exposure with a contrast-to-noise ratio of 26.5 dB. Our realtime combined photoacoustic-ultrasound imaging approach may be suitable for brachytherapy seed placement and post-placement verification, potentially allowing for realtime dosimetry assessment during implantation.

  3. Design and optimization of a brachytherapy robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meltsner, Michael A.

    Trans-rectal ultrasound guided (TRUS) low dose rate (LDR) interstitial brachytherapy has become a popular procedure for the treatment of prostate cancer, the most common type of non-skin cancer among men. The current TRUS technique of LDR implantation may result in less than ideal coverage of the tumor with increased risk of negative response such as rectal toxicity and urinary retention. This technique is limited by the skill of the physician performing the implant, the accuracy of needle localization, and the inherent weaknesses of the procedure itself. The treatment may require 100 or more sources and 25 needles, compounding the inaccuracy of the needle localization procedure. A robot designed for prostate brachytherapy may increase the accuracy of needle placement while minimizing the effect of physician technique in the TRUS procedure. Furthermore, a robot may improve associated toxicities by utilizing angled insertions and freeing implantations from constraints applied by the 0.5 cm-spaced template used in the TRUS method. Within our group, Lin et al. have designed a new type of LDR source. The "directional" source is a seed designed to be partially shielded. Thus, a directional, or anisotropic, source does not emit radiation in all directions. The source can be oriented to irradiate cancerous tissues while sparing normal ones. This type of source necessitates a new, highly accurate method for localization in 6 degrees of freedom. A robot is the best way to accomplish this task accurately. The following presentation of work describes the invention and optimization of a new prostate brachytherapy robot that fulfills these goals. Furthermore, some research has been dedicated to the use of the robot to perform needle insertion tasks (brachytherapy, biopsy, RF ablation, etc.) in nearly any other soft tissue in the body. This can be accomplished with the robot combined with automatic, magnetic tracking.

  4. Comparison of Prophylactic Naftopidil, Tamsulosin, and Silodosin for {sup 125}I Brachytherapy-Induced Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Patients With Prostate Cancer: Randomized Controlled Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Tsumura, Hideyasu, E-mail: sugan@pd5.so-net.ne.jp [Department of Urology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Satoh, Takefumi [Department of Urology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Ishiyama, Hiromichi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Tabata, Ken-ichi [Department of Urology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Kotani, Shouko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Minamida, Satoru; Kimura, Masaki; Fujita, Tetsuo; Matsumoto, Kazumasa [Department of Urology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Kitano, Masashi; Hayakawa, Kazushige [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Baba, Shiro [Department of Urology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To compare the efficacy of three {alpha}{sub 1A}/{alpha}{sub 1D}-adrenoceptor (AR) antagonists-naftopidil, tamsulosin, and silodosin-that have differing affinities for the {alpha}{sub 1}-AR subtypes in treating urinary morbidities in Japanese men with {sup 125}I prostate implantation (PI) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This single-institution prospective randomized controlled trial compared naftopidil, tamsulosin, and silodosin in patients undergoing PI. Patients were randomized and received either naftopidil, tamsulosin, or silodosin. Treatment began 1 day after PI and continued for 1 year. The primary efficacy variables were the changes in total International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and postvoid residual urine (PVR). The secondary efficacy variables were changes in IPSS storage score and IPSS voiding score from baseline to set points during the study (1, 3, 6, and 12 months). Results: Two hundred twelve patients were evaluated in this study between June 2006 and February 2009: 71, 70, and 71 patients in the naftopidil, tamsulosin, and silodosin groups, respectively. With respect to the primary efficacy variables, the mean changes in the total IPSS at 1 month after PI in the naftopidil, tamsulosin, and silodosin groups were +10.3, +8.9, and +7.5, respectively. There were significantly greater decreases with silodosin than naftopidil at 1 month in the total IPSS. The mean changes in the PVR at 6 months were +14.6, +23.7, and +5.7 mL in the naftopidil, tamsulosin, and silodosin groups, respectively; silodosin showed a significant improvement in the PVR at 6 months vs. tamsulosin. With respect to the secondary efficacy variables, the mean changes in the IPSS voiding score at 1 month in the naftopidil, tamsulosin, and silodosin groups were +6.5, +5.6, and +4.5, respectively; silodosin showed a significant improvement in the IPSS voiding score at 1 month vs. naftopidil. Conclusions: Silodosin has a greater impact on improving PI-induced lower urinary tract symptoms than the other two agents.

  5. Disease-related effects of perioperative blood transfusions associated with sup 125 I seed implantation for prostate carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, J.P.; Schellhammer, P.F.; el-Mahdi, A.M. (Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk (USA))

    1990-08-01

    In some retrospective studies perioperative transfusions during oncologic surgery have been shown to decrease the time interval between surgery and local and/or distant recurrence of cancer. This study examines the disease-related effect, if any, of perioperative blood transfusions among 108 patients with localized carcinoma of the prostate treated by radioactive iodine-125 seed implantation of the prostate and lymphadenectomy. When all subjects were analyzed, there was no statistical difference of local and distant failure between the transfused and nontransfused groups. Patients with well-differentiated tumors had statistically fewer local recurrences (0% vs 22%, p = 0.036) if they were transfused perioperatively. However, the difference in distant metastases (0% vs 11%) was not statistically significant (p = 0.21). In contrast, patients with moderately and poorly differentiated disease receiving transfusions had more local recurrences and metastases, though this was not statistically significant. Our data suggest that there is no obvious evidence that perioperative blood transfusions have an adverse effect on local recurrence or distant metastases for iodine-125 seed implantation of carcinoma of the prostate.

  6. Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    Cancer.gov

    Home Cancers Selected for Study Prostate Adenocarcinoma Prostate Adenocarcinoma Last Updated: April 01, 2013 What is prostate cancer? Prostate cancer is a disease of the prostate, a walnut-size gland in the male reproductive system.  Nearly all prostate

  7. Brachytherapy needle deflection evaluation and correction

    SciTech Connect

    Wan Gang; Wei Zhouping; Gardi, Lori; Downey, Donal B.; Fenster, Aaron [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Biomedical Engineering Program, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5A5 (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Biomedical Engineering Program, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada); Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5A5 (Canada)

    2005-04-01

    In prostate brachytherapy, an 18-gauge needle is used to implant radioactive seeds. This thin needle can be deflected from the preplanned trajectory in the prostate, potentially resulting in a suboptimum dose pattern and at times requiring repeated needle insertion to achieve optimal dosimetry. In this paper, we report on the evaluation of brachytherapy needle deflection and bending in test phantoms and two approaches to overcome the problem. First we tested the relationship between needle deflection and insertion depth as well as whether needle bending occurred. Targeting accuracy was tested by inserting a brachytherapy needle to target 16 points in chicken tissue phantoms. By implanting dummy seeds into chicken tissue phantoms under 3D ultrasound guidance, the overall accuracy of seed implantation was determined. We evaluated methods to overcome brachytherapy needle deflection with three different insertion methods: constant orientation, constant rotation, and orientation reversal at half of the insertion depth. Our results showed that needle deflection is linear with needle insertion depth, and that no noticeable bending occurs with needle insertion into the tissue and agar phantoms. A 3D principal component analysis was performed to obtain the population distribution of needle tip and seed position relative to the target positions. Our results showed that with the constant orientation insertion method, the mean needle targeting error was 2.8 mm and the mean seed implantation error was 2.9 mm. Using the constant rotation and orientation reversal at half insertion depth methods, the deflection error was reduced. The mean needle targeting errors were 0.8 and 1.2 mm for the constant rotation and orientation reversal methods, respectively, and the seed implantation errors were 0.9 and 1.5 mm for constant rotation insertion and orientation reversal methods, respectively.

  8. Quantitative analysis of tissue distribution of the B16BL6-derived exosomes using a streptavidin-lactadherin fusion protein and iodine-125-labeled biotin derivative after intravenous injection in mice.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Masaki; Takahashi, Yuki; Nishikawa, Makiya; Sano, Kohei; Kato, Kana; Yamashita, Takuma; Imai, Takafumi; Saji, Hideo; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2015-02-01

    We previously succeeded in the visualization of tissue distribution of B16BL6 cells-derived exosomes by labeling with Gaussia luciferase (gLuc)-LA, a fusion protein of gLuc (a reporter protein) and lactadherin (LA; an exosome-tropic protein). However, total amount of B16BL6-derived exosomes delivered to each organ could not be evaluated because of the reduction of luminescent signal from gLuc-LA. The aim of the present study was to quantitatively evaluate the tissue distribution of B16BL6-derived exosomes. To this end, we labeled B16BL6-derived exosomes with iodine-125 ((125) I) based on streptavidin (SAV)-biotin system. A plasmid vector encoding fusion protein, SAV-LA, was constructed, and B16BL6 cells were transfected with the plasmid to obtain SAV-LA-coupled exosomes. SAV-LA-coupled exosomes were incubated with (3-(125) I-iodobenzoyl) norbiotinamide ((125) I-IBB) to obtain (125) I-labeled B16BL6 exosomes. After intravenous injection of (125) I-labeled B16BL6 exosomes into mice, radioactivity quickly disappeared from the blood circulation. At 4 h, 28%, 1.6%, and 7% of the injected radioactivity/organ was detected in the liver, spleen, and lung, respectively. These results indicate that (125) I-labeling of exosomes using SAV-biotin system is a useful method to quantitatively evaluate the amount of exogenously administered exosomes delivered to each organ and that the liver is the major organ in the clearance of exogenously administered B16BL6-derived exosomes. PMID:25393546

  9. Studies on the development of (169)Yb-brachytherapy seeds: New generation brachytherapy sources for the management of cancer.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Sanjay Kumar; Kumar, Yogendra; Jagadeesan, K C; Nuwad, Jitendra; Bamankar, Y R; Dash, Ashutosh

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes development of (169)Yb-seeds by encapsulating 0.6-0.65mm (?) sized (169)Yb2O3 microspheres in titanium capsules. Microspheres synthesized by a sol-gel route were characterized by XRD, SEM/EDS and ICP-AES. Optimization of neutron irradiation was accomplished and (169)Yb-seeds up to 74MBq of (169)Yb could be produced from natural Yb2O3 microspheres, which have the potential for use in prostate brachytherapy. A protocol to prepare (169)Yb-brachytherapy sources (2.96-3.7TBq of (169)Yb) with the use of enriched targets was also formulated. PMID:25846454

  10. ALGEBRA: ALgorithm for the heterogeneous dosimetry based on GEANT4 for BRAchytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afsharpour, H.; Landry, G.; D'Amours, M.; Enger, S.; Reniers, B.; Poon, E.; Carrier, J.-F.; Verhaegen, F.; Beaulieu, L.

    2012-06-01

    Task group 43 (TG43)-based dosimetry algorithms are efficient for brachytherapy dose calculation in water. However, human tissues have chemical compositions and densities different than water. Moreover, the mutual shielding effect of seeds on each other (interseed attenuation) is neglected in the TG43-based dosimetry platforms. The scientific community has expressed the need for an accurate dosimetry platform in brachytherapy. The purpose of this paper is to present ALGEBRA, a Monte Carlo platform for dosimetry in brachytherapy which is sufficiently fast and accurate for clinical and research purposes. ALGEBRA is based on the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code and is capable of handling the DICOM RT standard to recreate a virtual model of the treated site. Here, the performance of ALGEBRA is presented for the special case of LDR brachytherapy in permanent prostate and breast seed implants. However, the algorithm is also capable of handling other treatments such as HDR brachytherapy.

  11. ALGEBRA: ALgorithm for the heterogeneous dosimetry based on GEANT4 for BRAchytherapy.

    PubMed

    Afsharpour, H; Landry, G; D'Amours, M; Enger, S; Reniers, B; Poon, E; Carrier, J-F; Verhaegen, F; Beaulieu, L

    2012-06-01

    Task group 43 (TG43)-based dosimetry algorithms are efficient for brachytherapy dose calculation in water. However, human tissues have chemical compositions and densities different than water. Moreover, the mutual shielding effect of seeds on each other (interseed attenuation) is neglected in the TG43-based dosimetry platforms. The scientific community has expressed the need for an accurate dosimetry platform in brachytherapy. The purpose of this paper is to present ALGEBRA, a Monte Carlo platform for dosimetry in brachytherapy which is sufficiently fast and accurate for clinical and research purposes. ALGEBRA is based on the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code and is capable of handling the DICOM RT standard to recreate a virtual model of the treated site. Here, the performance of ALGEBRA is presented for the special case of LDR brachytherapy in permanent prostate and breast seed implants. However, the algorithm is also capable of handling other treatments such as HDR brachytherapy. PMID:22572100

  12. Automatic Brachytherapy Seed Placement Under MRI Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Patriciu, Alexandru; Petrisor, Doru; Muntener, Michael; Mazilu, Dumitru; Schär, Michael; Stoianovici, Dan

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents a robotic method of performing low dose rate prostate brachytherapy under magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance. The design and operation of a fully automated MR compatible seed injector is presented. This is used with the MrBot robot for transperineal percutaneous prostate access. A new image-registration marker and algorithms are also presented. The system is integrated and tested with a 3T MRI scanner. Tests compare three different registration methods, assess the precision of performing automated seed deployment, and use the seeds to assess the accuracy of needle targeting under image guidance. Under the ideal conditions of the in vitro experiments, results show outstanding image-guided needle and seed placement accuracy. PMID:17694871

  13. A permanent breast seed implant as partial breast radiation therapy for early-stage patients: A comparison of palladium-103 and iodine-125 isotopes based on radiation safety considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Brian [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook and Women's Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sankreacha, Raxa [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook and Women's Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Rakovitch, Eileen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); O'Brien, Peter [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook and Women's Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Pignol, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: Jean-Philippe.Pignol@sw.ca

    2005-06-01

    Purpose: A permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) technique has been developed as a new form of partial adjuvant radiation therapy for early-stage breast cancer. This study compares iodine-125 ({sup 125}I) and palladium-103 ({sup 103}Pd) isotopes by examining the exposure and effective dose (ED) to a patient's partner.Methods and Materials: A low-energy survey meter was used to measure exposure rates as a function of bolus thickness placed over {sup 103}Pd or {sup 125}I seeds. A general mathematical expression for the initial exposure rate at 1 m (x{sub o,1m}) from the skin surface as a function of the implant size, R, and the distance between the skin surface and the implant, d, was derived. Also, a second general equation is proposed to calculate the ED to the patient's partner.Results: The initial exposure rate at 1 meter and the ED are calculated as follows: x{sub o,1m} = (3{alpha})/2R{sup 3}{center_dot}{beta}{sup 3} [e{sup -{beta}}{sup (2R+d)}({beta}R + 1) + e{sup -{beta}}{sup {center_dot}}{sup d}({beta}R - 1)], and ED = aR{sup b} {center_dot} [e{sup -c(2R+d)} {center_dot} (cR + 1) + e{sup -cd} -bar (cR - 1)]. For {sup 125}I, the parameters are: {alpha} = 0.154409, {beta} = 0.388460, a = 197, b = -0.95, and c = 0.38846. For {sup 103}Pd, they are: {alpha} = 0.06877, {beta} = 0.421098, a = 18.6, b -0.78, and c = 0.421098. For implant diameters varying from 2 to 6 cm and skin-to-implant distances varying from 0.7 to 4 cm, the ED is consistently below 2.6 mSv using the {sup 103}Pd isotope, but more than 5 mSv in many instances and possibly up to 20 mSv using {sup 125}I.Conclusions: PBSI using {sup 103}Pd seeds appears safe because the patient's partner ED is consistently below 5 mSv. The{sup 125}I isotope is not recommended for PBSI.

  14. Directional interstitial brachytherapy from simulation to application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liyong

    Organs at risk (OAR) are sometimes adjacent to or embedded in or overlap with the clinical target volume (CTV) to be treated. The purpose of this PhD study is to develop directionally low energy gamma-emitting interstitial brachytherapy sources. These sources can be applied between OAR to selectively reduce hot spots in the OARs and normal tissues. The reduction of dose over undesired regions can expand patient eligibility or reduce toxicities for the treatment by conventional interstitial brachytherapy. This study covers the development of a directional source from design optimization to construction of the first prototype source. The Monte Carlo code MCNP was used to simulate the radiation transport for the designs of directional sources. We have made a special construction kit to assemble radioactive and gold-shield components precisely into D-shaped titanium containers of the first directional source. Directional sources have a similar dose distribution as conventional sources on the treated side but greatly reduced dose on the shielded side, with a sharp dose gradient between them. A three-dimensional dose deposition kernel for the 125I directional source has been calculated. Treatment plans can use both directional and conventional 125I sources at the same source strength for low-dose-rate (LDR) implants to optimize the dose distributions. For prostate tumors, directional 125I LDR brachytherapy can potentially reduce genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities and improve potency preservation for low risk patients. The combination of better dose distribution of directional implants and better therapeutic ratio between tumor response and late reactions enables a novel temporary LDR treatment, as opposed to permanent or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for the intermediate risk T2b and high risk T2c tumors. Supplemental external-beam treatments can be shortened with a better brachytherapy boost for T3 tumors. In conclusion, we have successfully finished the design optimization and construction of the first prototype directional source. Potential clinical applications and potential benefits of directional sources have been shown for prostate and breast tumors.

  15. Plaque Brachytherapy for Uveal Melanoma: A Vision Prognostication Model

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Niloufer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Khan, Mohammad K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Bena, James [Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Macklis, Roger [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Singh, Arun D., E-mail: singha@ccf.org [Department of Ophthalmic Oncology, Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To generate a vision prognostication model after plaque brachytherapy for uveal melanoma. Methods and Materials: All patients with primary single ciliary body or choroidal melanoma treated with iodine-125 or ruthenium-106 plaque brachytherapy between January 1, 2005, and June 30, 2010, were included. The primary endpoint was loss of visual acuity. Only patients with initial visual acuity better than or equal to 20/50 were used to evaluate visual acuity worse than 20/50 at the end of the study, and only patients with initial visual acuity better than or equal to 20/200 were used to evaluate visual acuity worse than 20/200 at the end of the study. Factors analyzed were sex, age, cataracts, diabetes, tumor size (basal dimension and apical height), tumor location, and radiation dose to the tumor apex, fovea, and optic disc. Univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards were used to determine the influence of baseline patient factors on vision loss. Kaplan-Meier curves (log rank analysis) were used to estimate freedom from vision loss. Results: Of 189 patients, 92% (174) were alive as of February 1, 2011. At presentation, visual acuity was better than or equal to 20/50 and better than or equal to 20/200 in 108 and 173 patients, respectively. Of these patients, 44.4% (48) had post-treatment visual acuity of worse than 20/50 and 25.4% (44) had post-treatment visual acuity worse than 20/200. By multivariable analysis, increased age (hazard ratio [HR] of 1.01 [1.00-1.03], P=.05), increase in tumor height (HR of 1.35 [1.22-1.48], P<.001), and a greater total dose to the fovea (HR of 1.01 [1.00-1.01], P<.001) were predictive of vision loss. This information was used to develop a nomogram predictive of vision loss. Conclusions: By providing a means to predict vision loss at 3 years after treatment, our vision prognostication model can be an important tool for patient selection and treatment counseling.

  16. Cancer de la prostate 2010. Innovations thérapeutiques

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Richaud; O. Chapet; D. Azria; M. Soulié; L. Salomon; C. Hennequin; S. Culine

    2011-01-01

    During the annual congress of the SFRO, a symposium, on “Therapeutic innovations”, described some of the burning questions in the treatment of prostate cancer. What is the best technique to perform radiation dose escalation, brachytherapy or Intensity modulated radiotherapy ? Rational has been highlighted for both techniques, but without a prospective comparative trial, no definitive answer could be given today.

  17. Effect of brachytherapy on NF-?B and VEGF in gastric carcinoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wan-Fu; Jin, Wen-Di; Li, Bo; Wang, Ming-Chun; Li, Xiao-Gang; Mao, Wen-Yuan; Luo, Kai-Yuan

    2014-08-01

    Iodine-125 (125I) seed irradiation can be used as an important supplementary treatment for unresectable advanced gastric cancer. However, the radiobiological mechanism underlying brachytherapy remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated the influence of continuous and low-energy 125I irradiation on the cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, expression of NF-?B and VEGF and tumor growth in a human gastric cancer xenograft model. To create an animal model of gastric cancer, SGC-7901 cells were surgically implanted into mice. The 60 mice bearing SGC-7901 gastric cancer xenografts were randomly separated into 2 groups. Sham seeds (0 mCi) were implanted into the control group (n=30); 125I seeds (0.6 mCi) were implanted into the treatment group (n=30). At 28 days after irradiation, apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. fluorescence micrograph detected intense VEGF and NF-?B immunofluorescence in the tumor samples, and changes in NF-?B and VEGF mRNA and protein expression were assessed by real-time PCR and western blot analysis, respectively. The tumor volume and weight were measured 0-28 days after 125I seed implantation. 125I seed irradiation induced significant apoptosis and G2/M phase arrest. Reduction in the intensities of VEGF and NF-?B immunofluorescence in tumor vessels was observed after treatment. NF-?B and VEGF mRNA and protein expression levels were substantially lower in the implantation treatment group than in the control group. Consequently, 125I seed implantation inhibited cancer growth and reduced cancer volume. The present study revealed that 125I seed irradiation significantly induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the human gastric cancer xenografts. 125I-induced changes in NF-?B and VEGF expression are suggested as potential mechanisms underlying effective brachytherapy. PMID:24926530

  18. Dosimetric audit in brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Palmer, A L; Bradley, D A; Nisbet, A

    2014-09-01

    Dosimetric audit is required for the improvement of patient safety in radiotherapy and to aid optimization of treatment. The reassurance that treatment is being delivered in line with accepted standards, that delivered doses are as prescribed and that quality improvement is enabled is as essential for brachytherapy as it is for the more commonly audited external beam radiotherapy. Dose measurement in brachytherapy is challenging owing to steep dose gradients and small scales, especially in the context of an audit. Several different approaches have been taken for audit measurement to date: thimble and well-type ionization chambers, thermoluminescent detectors, optically stimulated luminescence detectors, radiochromic film and alanine. In this work, we review all of the dosimetric brachytherapy audits that have been conducted in recent years, look at current audits in progress and propose required directions for brachytherapy dosimetric audit in the future. The concern over accurate source strength measurement may be essentially resolved with modern equipment and calibration methods, but brachytherapy is a rapidly developing field and dosimetric audit must keep pace. PMID:24807068

  19. Quelle modalité de curiethérapie prostatique ?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Bossi

    2010-01-01

    Brachytherapy techniques by permanent implant of radioactive sources or by temporary high-dose-rate (HDR) fractions are nowadays extensively used for the treatment of prostatic carcinoma. Long-term results (at 20years) concerning large amount of patients have been published by major centers confirming both in terms of efficacy and toxicities that permanent implant of radioactive iodine-125 seeds yields at least the same good

  20. Treatment- and Disease-Related Complications of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Simoneau, Anne R

    2006-01-01

    One of the highlights of the 16th International Prostate Cancer Update was a session on treatment- and disease-related complications of prostate disease. It began with presentation of a challenging case of rising prostate-specific antigen levels after radical prostatectomy, followed by an overview of the use of zoledronic acid in prostate cancer, a review of side effects of complementary medicines, an overview of complications of cryotherapy, an assessment of complications of brachytherapy and external beam radiation therapy, and a comparison of laparoscopy versus open prostatectomy. PMID:17021643

  1. Resolution and in vitro and initial in vivo evaluation of isomers of iodine-125-labeled 1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl alpha-hydroxy-alpha-(1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl)-alpha-phenylacetate: a high-affinity ligand for the muscarinic receptor.

    PubMed

    McPherson, D W; Lambert, C R; Jahn, K; Sood, V; McRee, R C; Zeeberg, B; Reba, R C; Knapp, F F

    1995-09-29

    1-Azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl alpha-hydroxy-alpha-(1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl)- alpha-phenylacetate (IQNP, 1), is a highly selective ligand for the muscarinic acetylcholinergic receptor (mAChR). There are eight stereoisomers in the racemic mixture. The optical isomers of alpha-hydroxy-alpha-phenyl-alpha-(1-propyn-3-yl)acetic acid were resolved as the alpha-methylbenzylamine salts, and the optical isomers of 3-quinuclidinol were resolved as the tartrate salts. The E and Z isomers were prepared by varying the reaction conditions for the stannylation of the triple bond followed by purification utilizing flash column chromatography. In vitro binding assay of the four stereoisomers containing the (R)-(-)-3-quinuclidinyl ester demonstrated that each isomer of 1 bound to mAChR with high affinity. In addition, (E)-(-)-(-)-IQNP demonstrated the highest receptor subtype specificity between the m1 molecular subtype (KD, nM, 0.383 +/- 0.102) and the m2 molecular subtype (29.6 +/- 9.70). In vivo biodistribution studies demonstrated that iodine-125-labeled (E)-(-)-(+)-1 cleared rapidly from the brain and heart. In contrast, iodine-125-labeled (E)-(-)-(-)-, (Z)-(-)-(-)-, and (Z)-(-)-(+)-1 have high uptake and retention in mAChR rich areas of the brain. It was also observed that (E)-(-)-(-)-IQNP demonstrated an apparent subtype selectivity in vivo with retention in M1 (m1, m4) mAChR areas of the rain. In addition, (Z)-(-)-(-)-IQNP also demonstrated significant uptake in tissues containing the M2 (m2) mAChR subtype. These results demonstrate that the iodine-123-labeled analogues of the (E)-(-)-(-)- and (Z)-(-)-(-)-IQNP isomers are attractive candidates for single-photon emission-computed tomographic imaging of cerebral and cardiac mAChR receptor densities. PMID:7562924

  2. Review of advanced catheter technologies in radiation oncology brachytherapy procedures

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Zamdborg, Leonid; Sebastian, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    The development of new catheter and applicator technologies in recent years has significantly improved treatment accuracy, efficiency, and outcomes in brachytherapy. In this paper, we review these advances, focusing on the performance of catheter imaging and reconstruction techniques in brachytherapy procedures using magnetic resonance images and electromagnetic tracking. The accuracy of catheter reconstruction, imaging artifacts, and other notable properties of plastic and titanium applicators in gynecologic treatments are reviewed. The accuracy, noise performance, and limitations of electromagnetic tracking for catheter reconstruction are discussed. Several newly developed applicators for accelerated partial breast irradiation and gynecologic treatments are also reviewed. New hypofractionated high dose rate treatment schemes in prostate cancer and accelerated partial breast irradiation are presented.

  3. GGEMS-Brachy: GPU GEant4-based Monte Carlo simulation for brachytherapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaréchal, Yannick; Bert, Julien; Falconnet, Claire; Després, Philippe; Valeri, Antoine; Schick, Ulrike; Pradier, Olivier; Garcia, Marie-Paule; Boussion, Nicolas; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2015-07-01

    In brachytherapy, plans are routinely calculated using the AAPM TG43 formalism which considers the patient as a simple water object. An accurate modeling of the physical processes considering patient heterogeneity using Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) methods is currently too time-consuming and computationally demanding to be routinely used. In this work we implemented and evaluated an accurate and fast MCS on Graphics Processing Units (GPU) for brachytherapy low dose rate (LDR) applications. A previously proposed Geant4 based MCS framework implemented on GPU (GGEMS) was extended to include a hybrid GPU navigator, allowing navigation within voxelized patient specific images and analytically modeled 125I seeds used in LDR brachytherapy. In addition, dose scoring based on track length estimator including uncertainty calculations was incorporated. The implemented GGEMS-brachy platform was validated using a comparison with Geant4 simulations and reference datasets. Finally, a comparative dosimetry study based on the current clinical standard (TG43) and the proposed platform was performed on twelve prostate cancer patients undergoing LDR brachytherapy. Considering patient 3D CT volumes of 400??× 250??× 65 voxels and an average of 58 implanted seeds, the mean patient dosimetry study run time for a 2% dose uncertainty was 9.35 s (?500 ms 10?6 simulated particles) and 2.5 s when using one and four GPUs, respectively. The performance of the proposed GGEMS-brachy platform allows envisaging the use of Monte Carlo simulation based dosimetry studies in brachytherapy compatible with clinical practice. Although the proposed platform was evaluated for prostate cancer, it is equally applicable to other LDR brachytherapy clinical applications. Future extensions will allow its application in high dose rate brachytherapy applications.

  4. GGEMS-Brachy: GPU GEant4-based Monte Carlo simulation for brachytherapy applications.

    PubMed

    Lemaréchal, Yannick; Bert, Julien; Falconnet, Claire; Després, Philippe; Valeri, Antoine; Schick, Ulrike; Pradier, Olivier; Garcia, Marie-Paule; Boussion, Nicolas; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2015-07-01

    In brachytherapy, plans are routinely calculated using the AAPM TG43 formalism which considers the patient as a simple water object. An accurate modeling of the physical processes considering patient heterogeneity using Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) methods is currently too time-consuming and computationally demanding to be routinely used. In this work we implemented and evaluated an accurate and fast MCS on Graphics Processing Units (GPU) for brachytherapy low dose rate (LDR) applications. A previously proposed Geant4 based MCS framework implemented on GPU (GGEMS) was extended to include a hybrid GPU navigator, allowing navigation within voxelized patient specific images and analytically modeled (125)I seeds used in LDR brachytherapy. In addition, dose scoring based on track length estimator including uncertainty calculations was incorporated. The implemented GGEMS-brachy platform was validated using a comparison with Geant4 simulations and reference datasets. Finally, a comparative dosimetry study based on the current clinical standard (TG43) and the proposed platform was performed on twelve prostate cancer patients undergoing LDR brachytherapy. Considering patient 3D CT volumes of 400??× 250??× 65 voxels and an average of 58 implanted seeds, the mean patient dosimetry study run time for a 2% dose uncertainty was 9.35 s (?500 ms 10(-6) simulated particles) and 2.5 s when using one and four GPUs, respectively. The performance of the proposed GGEMS-brachy platform allows envisaging the use of Monte Carlo simulation based dosimetry studies in brachytherapy compatible with clinical practice. Although the proposed platform was evaluated for prostate cancer, it is equally applicable to other LDR brachytherapy clinical applications. Future extensions will allow its application in high dose rate brachytherapy applications. PMID:26061230

  5. Dosimetric and technical aspects of intraoperative I-125 brachytherapy for stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Mark; Colonias, Athanasios; Parda, David; Trombetta, Mark; Gayou, Olivier; Reitz, Bodo; Miften, Moyed

    2007-03-01

    Initial treatment outcome data from our institution for stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients have shown that sublobar resection in combination with iodine-125 (I-125) brachytherapy is associated with recurrence rates of 2.0%, compared to 18.6% with sublobar resection alone. In this work, the technical and dosimetric aspects required to execute this procedure from the radiation oncology perspective as well as an analysis of the dose distributions of patients treated with this technique are presented. In this treatment technique, I-125 seeds in vicryl suture are embedded into vicryl mesh and surgically inserted providing a 2.0 cm margin on each side of the resection staple line. A nomogram is developed to determine the suture spacing in the vicryl mesh, as a function of seed activity in order to deliver 120 Gy at a distance of 0.5 cm above and below the seed array. Post-operative dosimetry consists of a CT-based planning and dose volume analysis. Dose distributions, dose volume histograms and mean dose data for lung are analysed in a group of patients. Dosimetric results show significant lung sparing with only a small volume of lung irradiated for all patients with mean lung dose values ranging from 1.5 Gy to 5.4 Gy. Lung brachytherapy with I-125 at the time of sublobar resection is a highly conformal option of dose delivery for stage I NSCLC patients with compromised physiologic reserve. Patient-related toxicity clinically measured by loss of pulmonary function and radiation-induced pneumonitis have not been linked to this procedure.

  6. Urinary morbidity following ultrasound-guided transperineal prostate seed implantation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daphna Y Gelblum; Louis Potters; Richard Ashley; Robert Waldbaum; Xiao-Hong Wang; Steven Leibel

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the urinary morbidity experienced by patients undergoing ultrasound-guided, permanent transperineal seed implantation for adenocarcinoma of the prostate.Methods and Materials: Between September 1992 and September 1997, 693 consecutive patients presented with a diagnosis of clinically localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate, and were treated with ultrasound-guided transperineal interstitial permanent brachytherapy (TPIPB). Ninety-three patients are excluded from this review, having

  7. PROSTATE CANCER 7. PROSTATE CANCER

    E-print Network

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    and 17,829 aged 65 and over were alive up to 15 years after their prostate cancer diagnosis. Table 7PROSTATE CANCER 57 7. PROSTATE CANCER 7.1. SUMMARY Prostate cancer was the most common cancer to 2007 the annual increase was 5% in RoI and 6% in NI. The risk of developing prostate cancer up

  8. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Prostate Cancer: What is Prostate Cancer? In This Topic What is Prostate Cancer? Risk Factors Symptoms and ... for More Information National Institute on Aging Related Topics Life After Cancer Other Cancer Topics The information ...

  9. Enlarged prostate

    MedlinePLUS

    BPH; Benign prostatic hyperplasia (hypertrophy); Prostate - enlarged ... The actual cause of prostate enlargement is unknown. Factors linked to aging and changes in the cells of the testicles may have a role in the growth ...

  10. Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... characterized by changes to the size, shape, or texture of the prostate. Physicians can sometimes detect these ... characterized by changes to the size, shape or texture of the prostate. Definitions Prostate: A walnutsized gland ...

  11. Automated Finite Element Analysis for Deformable Registration of Prostate Images

    E-print Network

    of radiotherapy treatment for prostate cancer. Both external beam radiation and brachytherapy require regis] [3], brain [4] [5] [6] [7] [8], and breast [9] [10], as well as simulation of maxillo-facial surgery. Zaider are with Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center valuable because they provide information about

  12. A retrospective comparison of androgen deprivation (AD) vs. no AD among low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated with brachytherapy, external beam radiotherapy, or radical prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Ciezki, Jay P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Glickman Urological Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States)]. E-mail: ciezkij@ccf.org; Klein, Eric A. [Glickman Urological Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Angermeier, Kenneth [Glickman Urological Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Ulchaker, James [Glickman Urological Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Chehade, Nabil [Department of Urology, Kaiser Permanente Ohio, Cleveland, OH (United States); Altman, Andrew [Department of Urology, Kaiser Permanente Ohio, Cleveland, OH (United States); Mahadevan, Arul [Department of Radiation Oncology, Glickman Urological Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Reddy, Chandana A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Glickman Urological Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: To examine the value of androgen deprivation (AD) in the curative treatment of low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with the three major modalities: radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP), external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), and permanent prostate implantation (PI). Methods and materials: During 1996-2001, 1668 patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer were treated at The Cleveland Clinic Foundation. Only patients with a minimum of 2 years of prostate-specific antigen follow-up were included in the analysis, and biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) was used as the endpoint. Patients were grouped according to treatment modality and stratified according to the use of AD. Results: The overall 5-year bRFS rate was 87.8%. The 5-year bRFS rate for low-risk patients was 89% and for intermediate-risk patients was 79%. For low-risk patients, the 5-year bRFS rates by treatment modality (without AD vs. with AD, respectively) were PI: 90% vs. 93%; EBRT: 90% vs. 93%; and RRP: 89% vs. 84%. For intermediate-risk patients, the 5-year bRFS rates by treatment modality (without AD vs. with AD, respectively) were PI: 88% vs. 82%; EBRT: 81% vs. 84%; and RRP: 75% vs. 72%. None of the comparisons within risk groups or among modalities supports an increased efficacy with the use of AD. Conclusion: Five-year bRFS rates in low-risk and intermediate-risk patients are not improved by the use of AD.

  13. [Salvage cryotherapy for recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy failure: principles, indications, patient selection, oncological results and morbidity].

    PubMed

    Hétet, J-F; Colls, P; Pocholle, P; Chauveau, P; Barré, C; Hallouin, P

    2014-11-01

    Potentially curative salvage options for biochemical failure after primary prostatic radiotherapy include salvage radical prostatectomy, brachytherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound and cryotherapy. Salvage cryoablation for recurrent prostate cancer after irradiation failure is currently a well-established therapeutic option, since technical improvements have permitted better oncologic outcomes and lower complications rates over the years. This article reviews surgical technique, oncologic and functional outcomes, as well as morbidity and complications of salvage cryotherapy for local recurrence after external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy for prostate cancer. PMID:24910288

  14. Online in vivo dosimetry in high dose rate prostate brchytherapy with MOSkin detectors: in phantom feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Gambarini, G; Carrara, M; Tenconi, C; Mantaut, N; Borroni, M; Cutajar, D; Petasecca, M; Fuduli, I; Lerch, M; Pignoli, E; Rosenfeld, A

    2014-01-01

    MOSkin detectors were studied to perform real-time in vivo dose measurements in high dose rate prostate brachytherapy. Measurements were performed inside an urethral catheter in a gel phantom simulating a real prostate implant. Measured and expected doses were compared and the discrepancy was found to be within 8.9% and 3.8% for single MOSkin and dual-MOSkin configurations, respectively. Results show that dual-MOSkin detectors can be profitably adopted in prostate brachytherapy treatments to perform real-time in vivo dosimetry inside the urethra. PMID:23810727

  15. IPIP: A New Approach to Inverse Planning for HDR Brachytherapy by Directly Optimizing Dosimetric Indices

    E-print Network

    Siauw, Timmy; Atamturk, Alper; Hsu, I-Chow; Pouliot, Jean; Goldberg, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Many planning methods for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment planning require an iterative approach. A set of computational parameters are hypothesized that will give a dose plan that meets dosimetric criteria. A dose plan is computed using these parameters, and if any dosimetric criteria are not met, the process is iterated until a suitable dose plan is found. In this way, the dose distribution is controlled by abstract parameters. The purpose of this study is to improve HDR brachytherapy planning by developing a new approach that directly optimizes the dose distribution based on dosimetric criteria. Method: We develop Inverse Planning by Integer Program (IPIP), an optimization model for computing HDR brachytherapy dose plans and a fast heuristic for it. We used our heuristic to compute dose plans for 20 anonymized prostate cancer patient image data sets from our clinic database. Dosimetry was evaluated and compared to dosimetric criteria. Results: Dose plans computed from IPIP satis?ed al...

  16. High-dose-rate brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy for men with intermediate or high risk prostate cancer: analysis of short- and medium-term urinary toxicity and biochemical control

    PubMed Central

    Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis; Fogaroli, Ricardo Cesar; Silva, Maria Leticia Gobo; Castro, Douglas Guedes; Maia, Maria Conte; Lopes, Ademar

    2011-01-01

    The best management of localized and locally advanced prostate cancer remains controversial, but there are clinical evidences that for patients considered of unfavorable outcome that dose escalation radiotherapy has a significantly better outcome. Methods: Between 2005-2009 a total of 39 unfavorable patients were treated in a phase I-II trial for dose escalation with high-dose rate (HDR)- 30 Gy given by 4 fractions BID, in two separated implants and hypofractionated conformal/tri-dimensional radiotherapy (hEBRT) - 45 Gy (3 Gy per fraction in 3 weeks), at Hospital AC Camargo, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Results: Median age of patients was 69 (range, 58-80) years old. With a median follow up of 42.5 months the highest RTOG acute severe genitourinary toxicity (GU-TX) was grade 3 in two (5.1%) patients. Late severe GU-TX was observed in one (2.6%) patient. On univariate analysis the prostate volume > 45cc (p=0.024), <11 needles per implant (p=0.038) and urethral dose >130% of prescribed dose (p<0,001) were statistical significant predictive factors. Multivariate analysis showed urethral dose >130% as the only predictive factor for late severe GU-TX, p=0.017 (95%CI-1.39-29.49), HR-6.4. The actuarial overall survival, biochemical control and disease specific survival rates for the entire group at 3.5-years were 92.0%, 87.6% and 96.9%, respectively. Conclusion: HDR combined to hEBRT is well tolerated in the short and medium term. Acute toxicity was minimal and improved outcomes in terms of reduced late toxicity can be achieved using at least 11 needles and prostate with no more than 45cc to be implanted. The maximum urethral dose should be kept bellow 130% of prescribed dose. PMID:21394285

  17. Prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R., Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results.

  18. Semi-automatic Segmentation for Prostate Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, S. Sara; Chng, Nick; Spadinger, Ingrid; Morris, William J.; Salcudean, Septimiu E.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we report and characterize a semi-automatic prostate segmentation method for prostate brachytherapy. Based on anatomical evidence and requirements of the treatment procedure, a warped and tapered ellipsoid was found suitable as the a priori 3D shape of the prostate. By transforming the acquired endorectal transverse images of the prostate into ellipses, the shape fitting problem was cast into a convex problem which can be solved efficiently. The average whole gland error between volumes created from manual and semi-automatic contours from 21 patients was 6.63±0.9%. For use in brachytherapy treatment planning, the resulting contours were modified, if deemed necessary, by radiation oncologists prior to treatment. The average whole gland volume error between the volumes computed from semi-automatic contours and those computed from modified contours, from 40 patients, was 5.82±4.15%. The amount of bias in the physicians’ delineations when given an initial semi-automatic contour was measured by comparing the volume error between 10 prostate volumes computed from manual contours with those of modified contours. This error was found to be 7.25±0.39% for the whole gland. Automatic contouring reduced subjectivity, as evidenced by a decrease in segmentation inter- and intra-observer variability from 4.65% and 5.95% for manual segmentation to 3.04% and 3.48% for semi-automatic segmentation, respectively. We characterized the performance of the method relative to the reference obtained from manual segmentation by using a novel approach that divides the prostate region into nine sectors. We analyzed each sector independently as the requirements for segmentation accuracy depend on which region of the prostate is considered. The measured segmentation time is 14±1 seconds with an additional 32±14 seconds for initialization. By assuming 1–3 minutes for modification of the contours, if necessary, a total segmentation time of less than 4 minutes is required, with no additional time required prior to treatment planning. This compares favorably to the 5–15 minute manual segmentation time required for experienced individuals. The method is currently used at the British Columbia Cancer Agency (BCCA) Vancouver Cancer Centre as part of the standard treatment routine in low dose rate prostate brachytherapy and is found to be a fast, consistent and accurate tool for the delineation of the prostate gland in ultrasound images. PMID:21084216

  19. Transurethral light delivery for prostate photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Guo, Xiaoyu; Song, Danny Y.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2015-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has broad clinical potential to enhance prostate cancer detection and treatment, yet it is challenged by the lack of minimally invasive, deeply penetrating light delivery methods that provide sufficient visualization of targets (e.g., tumors, contrast agents, brachytherapy seeds). We constructed a side-firing fiber prototype for transurethral photoacoustic imaging of prostates with a dual-array (linear and curvilinear) transrectal ultrasound probe. A method to calculate the surface area and, thereby, estimate the laser fluence at this fiber tip was derived, validated, applied to various design parameters, and used as an input to three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations. Brachytherapy seeds implanted in phantom, ex vivo, and in vivo canine prostates at radial distances of 5 to 30 mm from the urethra were imaged with the fiber prototype transmitting 1064 nm wavelength light with 2 to 8 mJ pulse energy. Prebeamformed images were displayed in real time at a rate of 3 to 5 frames per second to guide fiber placement and beamformed offline. A conventional delay-and-sum beamformer provided decreasing seed contrast (23 to 9 dB) with increasing urethra-to-target distance, while the short-lag spatial coherence beamformer provided improved and relatively constant seed contrast (28 to 32 dB) regardless of distance, thus improving multitarget visualization in single and combined curvilinear images acquired with the fiber rotating and the probe fixed. The proposed light delivery and beamforming methods promise to improve key prostate cancer detection and treatment strategies.

  20. Dosimetric equivalence of nonstandard HDR brachytherapy catheter patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Cunha, J. A. M.; Hsu, I-C.; Pouliot, J. [University of California, San Francisco, California 94115 (United States)

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: To determine whether alternative high dose rate prostate brachytherapy catheter patterns can result in similar or improved dose distributions while providing better access and reducing trauma. Materials and Methods: Standard prostate cancer high dose rate brachytherapy uses a regular grid of parallel needle positions to guide the catheter insertion. This geometry does not easily allow the physician to avoid piercing the critical structures near the penile bulb nor does it provide position flexibility in the case of pubic arch interference. This study used CT datasets with 3 mm slice spacing from ten previously treated patients and digitized new catheters following three hypothetical catheter patterns: conical, bi-conical, and fireworks. The conical patterns were used to accommodate a robotic delivery using a single entry point. The bi-conical and fireworks patterns were specifically designed to avoid the critical structures near the penile bulb. For each catheter distribution, a plan was optimized with the inverse planning algorithm, IPSA, and compared with the plan used for treatment. Irrelevant of catheter geometry, a plan must fulfill the RTOG-0321 dose criteria for target dose coverage (V{sub 100}{sup Prostate}>90%) and organ-at-risk dose sparing (V{sub 75}{sup Bladder}<1 cc, V{sub 75}{sup Rectum}<1 cc, V{sub 125}{sup Urethra}<<1 cc). Results: The three nonstandard catheter patterns used 16 nonparallel, straight divergent catheters, with entry points in the perineum. Thirty plans from ten patients with prostate sizes ranging from 26 to 89 cc were optimized. All nonstandard patterns fulfilled the RTOG criteria when the clinical plan did. In some cases, the dose distribution was improved by better sparing the organs-at-risk. Conclusion: Alternative catheter patterns can provide the physician with additional ways to treat patients previously considered unsuited for brachytherapy treatment (pubic arch interference) and facilitate robotic guidance of catheter insertion. In addition, alternative catheter patterns may decrease toxicity by avoidance of the critical structures near the penile bulb while still fulfilling the RTOG criteria.

  1. Intraoral angiosarcoma: treatment with a brachytherapy prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Evan B; Ko, Eugene; Wolden, Suzanne; Huryn, Joseph M; Estilo, Cherry L

    2015-03-01

    Angiosarcomas are rare, malignant neoplasms of vascular origin that account for less than 1% of all soft tissue tumors. Angiosarcomas of the oral cavity are especially rare, and brachytherapy may be prescribed as a localized treatment to manage these malignancies. Intraoral brachytherapy requires collaboration between the radiation oncologist and a dental professional for the fabrication of the brachytherapy delivery prosthesis. This clinical report describes an intraoral angiosarcoma and the fabrication of an intraoral brachytherapy prosthesis to manage this malignancy. PMID:25449613

  2. Prostate Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... year in the United States to correct BPH. Prostate cancer is a frequent cancer diagnosis in American men. Although it is rare in ... Although prostatitis is less common than BPH or prostate cancer, about 8% of the male population will suffer from it at some point ... May 2012 Posted: May 2012

  3. Prostate Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    The prostate is a gland in men. It helps make semen, the fluid that contains sperm. The prostate surrounds the tube that carries urine away from ... and out of the body. A young man's prostate is about the size of a walnut. It ...

  4. Prognosis in patients with local recurrence after definitive irradiation for prostatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kuban, D.A.; el-Mahdi, A.M.; Schellhammer, P.F.

    1989-06-15

    Of 414 patients with Stage A2-C disease, all with a minimum follow-up period of 3 years, who have been definitively irradiated by external beam therapy or iodine-125 (I-125) implantation for biopsy-proven prostatic adenocarcinoma, 83 patients (20%) have experienced local recurrences. The incidence of distant metastasis was significantly higher in patients with local tumor recurrence (56 of 83; 68%), as compared with those with local control (64 of 331; 19%; P less than 0.001). This difference remained significant within each tumor grade and stage. Subsequently, survival in patients with local recurrence was significantly shorter than in those with local tumor control (66% vs. 89% at 5 years; P = 0.001). Of the 83 patients with local tumor recurrence, 56 had local recurrence and distant metastasis, and 27 had local failure alone, with a median follow-up of 76 months for the latter group. Fifteen of 83 patients with local recurrence (18%) developed major complications secondary to local disease. Three of the 83 (4%) patients were known to die of prostatic recurrence alone and another 11 of 83 (13%) as a result of some combination of local and distant disease. Therefore, in reference to the entire group of definitively irradiated patients, only 0.72% expired solely of complications associated with local tumor recurrence and an additional 2.7% expired of a combination of both local and distant disease.

  5. Management of prostate cancer. Part 2: localized and locally advanced disease.

    PubMed

    Sooriakumaran, Prasanna; Khaksar, Sara Jane; Shah, Jyoti

    2006-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most prevalent nondermatological malignancy affecting men in the Western world. An increase in public awareness has led to earlier detection. Accepted treatments for localized prostate cancer include active surveillance, radical prostatectomy, interstitial brachytherapy, external beam radiotherapy and watchful waiting. The authors discuss the rationale for the different approaches together with outcomes including toxicity. Novel approaches are also explored. The management of locally advanced disease has long been a challenge and the evolving evidence is reviewed. PMID:16613546

  6. 10 CFR 35.432 - Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...false Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. 35.432 Section 35...MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.432 Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. (a) Before the...

  7. 10 CFR 35.2406 - Records of brachytherapy source accountability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Records of brachytherapy source accountability. 35...Records § 35.2406 Records of brachytherapy source accountability. ...licensee shall maintain a record of brachytherapy source accountability...

  8. A comparison of US- versus MR-based 3-D Prostate Shapes Using Radial Basis Function Interpolation and Statistical Shape Models.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ran; Tavakoli, Mahdi; Sloboda, Ron; Usmani, Nawaid

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a comparison of three-dimensional (3-D) segmentations of the prostate, based on two-dimensional (2-D) manually segmented contours, obtained using ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging data collected from 40 patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer and scheduled to receive brachytherapy treatment. The approach we propose here for 3-D prostate segmentation first uses radial basis function interpolation to construct a 3-D point distribution model for each prostate. Next, a modified principal axis transformation is utilized for rigid registration of the US and MR images of the same prostate in preparation for the following shape comparison. Then, statistical shape models are used to capture the segmented 3-D prostate geometries for the subsequent cross-modality comparison. Our study includes not only cross-modality geometric comparisons in terms of prostate volumes and dimensions, but also an investigation of interchangeability of the two imaging modalities in terms of automatic contour segmentation at the pre-implant planning stage of prostate brachytherapy treatment. By developing a new scheme to compare the two imaging modalities in terms of the segmented 3-D shapes, we have taken a first step necessary for building coupled US-MR segmentation strategies for prostate brachytherapy pre-implant planning, which at present is predominantly informed by US images only. PMID:24860042

  9. Automated seed detection and 3D reconstruction II: Reconstruction of Permanent Prostate Implants Using -Simulated Annealing

    E-print Network

    Pouliot, Jean

    step of post-implant evaluation in brachytherapy, 3D reconstruction of implants has receivedAutomated seed detection and 3D reconstruction II: Reconstruction of Permanent Prostate Implants, for automatic seed matching and reconstruction using either three radiographic films or three fluoroscopic

  10. Evaluation of post-plan dosimetry using TRUS and CT after transperineal prostate seed implant

    SciTech Connect

    Helmick, Barbara; Tarver, Russell; Chan, Rafael; Caldwell, Shaun

    2002-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the variability in dosimetry due to the change in prostate volume for permanent transperineal brachytherapy seed implant. This research is the beginning of an in-house quality assessment program. Nineteen cases were retrospectively evaluated. A single physician defined prostate volumes in all cases. Group A consisted of 3 cases that were treated with external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to 4500 cGy, followed by a brachytherapy implant boost of 10,800 cGy. Group B included 16 cases that were implant only, prescribed to 14,400 cGy. Prostate images were acquired before seed implant using transrectal ultrasound (TRUS), immediately following seed implant using TRUS, and by computed tomography (CT) acquired several weeks postimplant. The prostate images were digitized into a commercial treatment planning system for planning purposes and dosimetric evaluation for the 3 procedures. Prostate volumes were calculated by the treatment planning system. Additional data collected included the percentage of prostate receiving the prescribed dose and dose to 90% and 80% of the prostate. The dose delivered to V{sub 150} was also recorded. Overall, the postimplant ultrasound plan showed similar coverage to the ultrasound preplan, while the CT postplan revealed less than expected dosimetric coverage. The postplan CT results prompted us to evaluate our scheduling process, as well as prostate definition using TRUS and CT.

  11. Salvage Brachytherapy for Castration-Resistant and External Beam Radiotherapy-Resistant Local Recurrence 17 Years after Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Hosogoe, Shogo; Soma, Osamu; Matsumoto, Teppei; Imai, Atsushi; Hatakeyama, Shingo; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Koie, Takuya; Ohyama, Chikara; Aoki, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    A 47-year-old Japanese man was diagnosed with prostate cancer in February 1995 (Initial PSA 77.2?ng/mL, GS3 + 4, cT3N0M0). He underwent radical prostatectomy after androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in June 1995. Nine years after operation, he was diagnosed with local recurrence of prostate cancer and he received postoperative external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) (70?Gy). By May 2008, the PSA dropped to 0.33?ng/mL, and a CT scan showed that the mass had disappeared. On April 2012, the PSA once again rose to 3.1?ng/mL. CT scan and MRI revealed a mass in the prostatic bed. We diagnosed local recurrence of prostate cancer. We underwent salvage low-dose brachytherapy after obtaining informed consent. The prescribed dose of the salvage brachytherapy was 145?Gy to control the tumor considering the hormone resistant prostatic cancer and high-risk feature. PSA level rapidly decreased to 0.66?ng/mL by 6 months after seed implantation. No adverse events were seen during the follow-up period. PMID:26171272

  12. Thromboembolic events following brachytherapy: case reports

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Chargari, Cyrus; Bertoletti, Laurent; Magné, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy is a recent brachytherapy modality combining the radiobiological advantages of low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy with increased possibilities of dose optimization and radiation safety. However, treatment duration remains protracted, as the prescribed dose is typically delivered through pulses that do not exceed 0.5 Gy/h for critical organs. It is frequently used for the treatment of gynaecological malignancies. Although, the relationship between thrombosis and cancer is well known, specific data on thromboembolic events during brachytherapy are scarce. We report two cases of major thromboembolic events during brachytherapy treatment for gynaecological malignancies. We discuss the possible causal relationship between brachytherapy procedures and the occurrence of thromboembolic events, drawing a preventive practical attitude. PMID:25829939

  13. Early Quality of Life in Patients with Localized Prostate Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Eton, David T.; Lepore, Stephen J.; Helgeson, Vicki S.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Men with localized prostate carcinoma are faced with important treatment decisions, and quality of life (QoL) information has become a crucial element of decision making. The first objective of this study was to compare the early, health-related QoL (HRQoL) of men with localized prostate carcinoma who were treated with radical prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy, or brachytherapy. A second objective was to identify demographic and psychosocial variables that predict HRQoL. METHODS Two-hundred fifty-six men with localized prostate carcinoma were interviewed within 7 weeks of treatment initiation. The interview included measures of prostate-specific HRQoL (the University of California—Los Angeles Prostate Cancer Index), general HRQoL (the SF-36), and psychosocial variables. RESULTS After adjusting for covariates, treatment group differences were found for both prostate specific HRQoL and general HRQoL. Men who underwent prostatectomy reported more urinary and sexual problems and more general physical dysfunction compared with men who were treated with either form of radiation therapy. Men who were treated with brachytherapy reported the fewest problems in sexual function and the least general physical dysfunction. Few treatment group differences were found in mental functioning. Both demographic factors and psychosocial factors predicted HRQoL. Older men and African-American men reported more physical problems than younger men and Caucasian men, respectively. A supportive social environment, high self-efficacy, and high self-esteem were predictive of better HRQoL. CONCLUSIONS Shortly after undergoing treatment for localized prostate carcinoma, men who underwent radical prostatectomy, older men, and African-American men are at heightened risk for experiencing prostate-specific and general deficits in HRQoL. Having psychosocial resources from which to draw may enhance HRQoL. PMID:11745222

  14. About the Prostate

    MedlinePLUS

    ... My Bridge 4 Life Clinical Trials Guides Newsletters Nutrition & Wellness PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Understanding Prostate Cancer About the Prostate About the Prostate What Can ...

  15. 10 CFR 35.2432 - Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. 35.2432 Section...calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. (a) A licensee...record of the calibrations of brachytherapy sources required by §...

  16. High activity iodine 125 endocurietherapy for recurrent skull base tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, P.P.; Good, R.R.; Leibrock, L.G.; Mawk, J.R.; Yonkers, A.J.; Ogren, F.P.

    1988-04-15

    Experience with endocurietherapy of skull base tumors is reviewed. We present our cases of recurrent pituitary hemangiopericytoma, radiation-induced recurrent meningioma, recurrent clival chordoma, recurrent nasopharyngeal cancer involving the cavernous sinus, and recurrent parotid carcinoma of the skull base which were all successfully retreated with high-activity 125-iodine (I-125) permanent implantation.76 references.

  17. Prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    McArdle, Stephanie EB; Pockley, A Graham; Gibson, Glen R; Rees, Robert C

    2014-01-01

    Vaccine-based immunotherapy can increase the overall survival of patients with advanced prostate cancer. However, the efficacy of vaccine-elicited anticancer immune responses is heavily influenced by the physical, nutritional, and psychological status of the patient. Given their importance, these parameters should be carefully considered for the design of future clinical trials testing this immunotherapeutic paradigm in prostate cancer patients. PMID:25340006

  18. The Effects of Metallic Implants on Electroporation Therapies: Feasibility of Irreversible Electroporation for Brachytherapy Salvage

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, Robert E., E-mail: robert.neal@alfred.org.au [The Alfred Hospital, Radiology Research Unit, Department of Radiology (Australia); Smith, Ryan L., E-mail: ryan.smith@wbrc.org.au [The Alfred Hospital, William Buckland Radiotherapy Centre (Australia); Kavnoudias, Helen, E-mail: H.Kavnoudias@alfred.org.au [The Alfred Hospital, Radiology Research Unit, Department of Radiology (Australia)] [The Alfred Hospital, Radiology Research Unit, Department of Radiology (Australia); Rosenfeldt, Franklin, E-mail: F.Rosenfeldt@alfred.org.au; Ou, Ruchong, E-mail: Ruchong.Ou@bakeridi.edu.au [Monash University, Department of Surgery (Australia)] [Monash University, Department of Surgery (Australia); Mclean, Catriona A., E-mail: C.Mclean@alfred.org.au [The Alfred Hospital, Department of Anatomical Pathology (Australia); Davalos, Rafael V., E-mail: davalos@vt.edu [Virginia Tech, School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences (United States); Thomson, Kenneth R., E-mail: K.Thomson@alfred.org.au [The Alfred Hospital, Radiology Research Unit, Department of Radiology (Australia)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Electroporation-based therapies deliver brief electric pulses into a targeted volume to destabilize cellular membranes. Nonthermal irreversible electroporation (IRE) provides focal ablation with effects dependent on the electric field distribution, which changes in heterogeneous environments. It should be determined if highly conductive metallic implants in targeted regions, such as radiotherapy brachytherapy seeds in prostate tissue, will alter treatment outcomes. Theoretical and experimental models determine the impact of prostate brachytherapy seeds on IRE treatments. Materials and Methods: This study delivered IRE pulses in nonanimal, as well as in ex vivo and in vivo tissue, with and in the absence of expired radiotherapy seeds. Electrical current was measured and lesion dimensions were examined macroscopically and with magnetic resonance imaging. Finite-element treatment simulations predicted the effects of brachytherapy seeds in the targeted region on electrical current, electric field, and temperature distributions. Results: There was no significant difference in electrical behavior in tissue containing a grid of expired radiotherapy seeds relative to those without seeds for nonanimal, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments (all p > 0.1). Numerical simulations predict no significant alteration of electric field or thermal effects (all p > 0.1). Histology showed cellular necrosis in the region near the electrodes and seeds within the ablation region; however, there were no seeds beyond the ablation margins. Conclusion: This study suggests that electroporation therapies can be implemented in regions containing small metallic implants without significant changes to electrical and thermal effects relative to use in tissue without the implants. This supports the ability to use IRE as a salvage therapy option for brachytherapy.

  19. JPEG compression of ultrasound images and its effect in predicting pubic arch interference for prostrate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberman, Ken; Pathak, Sayan D.; Grimm, Peter D.; Kim, Yongmin

    2000-04-01

    Prostate brachytherapy is an effective treatment for localized prostate cancer. Recently, it has been shown that prior to surgery a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) study of the prostate and pubic arch can effectively assess pubic arch interference (PAI), a major stumbling block for the brachytherapy procedure. This identification is currently being done with uncompressed digital images taken directly from the ultrasound (US) machine. However, since not all US machines allow access to the direct digital images, there is a need to perform TRUS based PAI detection using digitized images. For its clinical advantages, we have chosen to use a consumer video digitizer that saves images in the Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) standard. In this paper, our goal is to assess whether, even with some loss of information due to JPEG compression, the degraded TRUS image is still viable for clinical assessment of PAI. This was accomplished by using a PAI assessment algorithm to predict the location of the pubic arch on both lossless uncompressed bitmap images and 11 degrees of lossy JPEG compressed images. The predicted locations of the arches were compared to each other and the true location of the arch. Our results show that there is no clinically significant difference in assessing PAI using images with medium-to-high JPEG compression compared to using uncompressed images.

  20. Intra-operative Localization of Brachytherapy Implants Using Intensity-based Registration

    PubMed Central

    KarimAghaloo, Z.; Abolmaesumi, P.; Ahmidi, N.; Chen, T.K.; Gobbi, D. G.; Fichtinger, G.

    2010-01-01

    In prostate brachytherapy, a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) will show the prostate boundary but not all the implanted seeds, while fluoroscopy will show all the seeds clearly but not the boundary. We propose an intensity-based registration between TRUS images and the implant reconstructed from uoroscopy as a means of achieving accurate intra-operative dosimetry. The TRUS images are first filtered and compounded, and then registered to the uoroscopy model via mutual information. A training phantom was implanted with 48 seeds and imaged. Various ultrasound filtering techniques were analyzed, and the best results were achieved with the Bayesian combination of adaptive thresholding, phase congruency, and compensation for the non-uniform ultrasound beam profile in the elevation and lateral directions. The average registration error between corresponding seeds relative to the ground truth was 0.78 mm. The effect of false positives and false negatives in ultrasound were investigated by masking true seeds in the uoroscopy volume or adding false seeds. The registration error remained below 1.01 mm when the false positive rate was 31%, and 0.96 mm when the false negative rate was 31%. This fully automated method delivers excellent registration accuracy and robustness in phantom studies, and promises to demonstrate clinically adequate performance on human data as well. Keywords: Prostate brachytherapy, Ultrasound, Fluoroscopy, Registration. PMID:21152376

  1. MR-Guided Prostate Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Tempany, Clare; Straus, Sarah; Hata, Nobuhiko; Haker, Steven

    2009-01-01

    In this article the current issues of diagnosis and detection of prostate cancer are reviewed. The limitations for current techniques are highlighted and some possible solutions with MR imaging and MR-guided biopsy approaches are reviewed. There are several different biopsy approaches under investigation. These include transperineal open magnet approaches to closed-bore 1.5T transrectal biopsies. The imaging, image processing, and tracking methods are also discussed. In the arena of therapy, MR guidance has been used in conjunction with radiation methods, either brachytherapy or external delivery. The principles of the radiation treatment, the toxicities, and use of images are outlined. The future role of imaging and image-guided interventions lie with providing a noninvasive surrogate for cancer surveillance or monitoring treatment response. The shift to minimally invasive focal therapies has already begun and will be very exciting when MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery reaches its full potential. PMID:18219689

  2. The Prostate Normaland Prostate Cancer Cells Display

    E-print Network

    Tong, Liang

    The Prostate Normaland Prostate Cancer Cells Display Distinct Molecular Profiles of a epithelial cells (PZ-HPV-7), androgen-dependent prostate cancer cells (LNCaP), transitional androgen-independent prostate cancer cells (LNCaP-cds and CWR22Rv1), and androgen- independent prostate cancer cells (PC3

  3. EM-navigated catheter placement for gynecologic brachytherapy: an accuracy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrtash, Alireza; Damato, Antonio; Pernelle, Guillaume; Barber, Lauren; Farhat, Nabgha; Viswanathan, Akila; Cormack, Robert; Kapur, Tina

    2014-03-01

    Gynecologic malignancies, including cervical, endometrial, ovarian, vaginal and vulvar cancers, cause significant mortality in women worldwide. The standard care for many primary and recurrent gynecologic cancers consists of chemoradiation followed by brachytherapy. In high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, intracavitary applicators and /or interstitial needles are placed directly inside the cancerous tissue so as to provide catheters to deliver high doses of radiation. Although technology for the navigation of catheters and needles is well developed for procedures such as prostate biopsy, brain biopsy, and cardiac ablation, it is notably lacking for gynecologic HDR brachytherapy. Using a benchtop study that closely mimics the clinical interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy procedure, we developed a method for evaluating the accuracy of image-guided catheter placement. Future bedside translation of this technology offers the potential benefit of maximizing tumor coverage during catheter placement while avoiding damage to the adjacent organs, for example bladder, rectum and bowel. In the study, two independent experiments were performed on a phantom model to evaluate the targeting accuracy of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system. The procedure was carried out using a laptop computer (2.1GHz Intel Core i7 computer, 8GB RAM, Windows 7 64-bit), an EM Aurora tracking system with a 1.3mm diameter 6 DOF sensor, and 6F (2 mm) brachytherapy catheters inserted through a Syed-Neblett applicator. The 3D Slicer and PLUS open source software were used to develop the system. The mean of the targeting error was less than 2.9mm, which is comparable to the targeting errors in commercial clinical navigation systems.

  4. Learning about Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... occur in the back, hips or upper thighs. Diagnosis of prostate cancer : The blood level of Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA), ... mean that a man has prostate cancer. The diagnosis of prostate cancer is then made by a biopsy (taking a ...

  5. Current state of prostate cancer treatment in Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Belinda F; Aiken, William D; Mayhew, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the commonest cancer in Jamaica as well as the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. One report suggested that Jamaica has the highest incidence rate of prostate cancer in the world, with an age-standardised rate of 304/100,000 per year. The Caribbean region is reported to have the highest mortality rate of prostate cancer worldwide. Prostate cancer accounts for a large portion of the clinical practice for health-care practitioners in Jamaica. The Jamaica Urological Society is a professional body comprising 19 urologists in Jamaica who provide most of the care for men with prostate cancer in collaboration with medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, and a palliative care physician. The health-care system is structured in two tiers in Jamaica: public and private. The urologist-to-patient ratio is high, and this limits adequate urological care. Screening for prostate cancer is not a national policy in Jamaica. However, the Jamaica Urological Society and the Jamaica Cancer Society work synergistically to promote screening as well as to provide patient education for prostate cancer. Adequate treatment for localised prostate cancer is available in Jamaica in the forms of active surveillance, nerve-sparing radical retropubic prostatectomy, external beam radiation, and brachytherapy. However, there is a geographic maldistribution of centres that provide prostate cancer treatment, which leads to treatment delays. Also, there is difficulty in affording some treatment options in the private health-care sectors. Androgen deprivation therapy is available for treatment of locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer and is subsidised through a programme called the National Health Fund. Second-line hormonal agents and chemotherapeutic agents are available but are costly to most of the population. The infrastructure for treatment of prostate cancer in Jamaica is good, but it requires additional technological advances as well as additional specialist services. PMID:25228912

  6. Paris System for Interstitial Brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinello, Ginette

    The Paris System is a complete dosimetric system which greatly facilitates brachytherapy, using iridium 192 sources at low, pulsed or high dose-rate. The aim of this chapter is to present briefly the part of the system dedicated to interstitial brachytherapy. After a short description of the sources which can be used, the three basic principles of the Paris System are presented together with its particular mode of dose specification within the implanted volume, and the fixed value of the Reference Isodose (RI) equal to 85% of the Basal Dose-rate (BD), representative of the arithmetic mean of the minimal dose-rates in the central region of the implant. The method to calculate the treatment time is given. Simple relationships which can be used to predict the minimal dimensions of the treated volume (volume encompassed by the RI) at the very moment of the implant are presented.

  7. Obesity and Prostate Cancer: Weighing the Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Allott, Emma H.; Masko, Elizabeth M.; Freedland, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Context Obesity and prostate cancer (PCa) affect substantial proportions of Western society. Mounting evidence, both epidemiologic and mechanistic, for an association between the two is of public health interest. An improved understanding of the role of this modifiable risk factor in PCa etiology is imperative to optimize screening, treatment, and prevention. Objective To consolidate and evaluate the evidence for an epidemiologic link between obesity and PCa, in addition to examining the proposed underlying molecular mechanisms. Evidence acquisition A PubMed search for relevant articles published between 1991 and July 2012 was performed by combining the following terms: obesity, BMI, body mass index and prostate cancer risk, prostate cancer incidence, prostate cancer mortality, radical prostatectomy, androgen-deprivation therapy, external-beam radiation, brachytherapy, prostate cancer and quality of life, prostate cancer and active surveillance, in addition to obesity, BMI, body mass index and prostate cancer and insulin, insulinlike growth factor, androgen, estradiol, leptin, adiponectin, and IL-6. Articles were selected based on content, date of publication, and relevancy, and their references were also searched for relevant articles. Evidence synthesis Increasing evidence suggests obesity is associated with elevated incidence of aggressive PCa, increased risk of biochemical failure following radical prostatectomy and external-beam radiotherapy, higher frequency of complications following androgen-deprivation therapy, and increased PCa-specific mortality, although perhaps a lower overall PCa incidence. These results may in part relate to difficulties in detecting and treating obese men. However, multiple molecular mechanisms could explain these associations as well. Weight loss slows PCa in animal models but has yet to be fully tested in human trials. Conclusions Obesity appears to be linked with aggressive PCa. We suggest clinical tips to better diagnose and treat obese men with PCa. Whether reversing obesity slows PCa growth is currently unknown, although it is an active area of research. PMID:23219374

  8. Evaluation of a TG43 compliant analytical dosimetry model in clinical 192Ir HDR brachytherapy treatment planning and assessment of the significance of source position and catheter reconstruction uncertainties

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Pantelis; P. Papagiannis; G. Anagnostopoulos; D. Baltas; P. Karaiskos; P. Sandilos; L. Sakelliou

    2004-01-01

    A simple, time efficient, analytical model incorporating heterogeneities and body dimensions around a point 192Ir source is generalized for accurate dosimetry around commercially available 192Ir brachytherapy sources. The generalized model was verified in dosimetry of a clinical 192Ir high dose rate prostate monotherapy application, involving 16 catheters and 83 source dwell positions, through comparison with corresponding treatment planning system data.

  9. [Endobronchial brachytherapy: technique and indications].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Bleichner, O; Trédaniel, J; Maylin, C

    2003-02-01

    The endobronchial brachytherapy procedure involves the insertion of an afterloading catheter into bronchus in close proximity to an endoluminal lesion, and to perform limited irradiation sparing as much as possible normal health tissues. The catheter is inserted during a classical flexible bronchoscopy. Three types of indications have been discussed: (i) palliative treatment of lung carcinoma, with or without laser desobstruction: an improvement in respiratory symptoms was observed in 60 to 80% of the cases; (ii) curative treatment for localised endobronchial carcinomas, in previously irradiated patients, or in case of contraindication of surgery or external beam irradiation; local control rate range from 60 to 70% at 2 years; (iii) combination of external irradiation and brachytherapy in the first line treatment of lung cancers. Two randomised trials did not show any improvement in survival for this approach; however, they have included advanced diseases. In the opposite, this association seems very effective for early stage lung carcinomas. Two major complications were regularly reported, haemoptysis and radiation bronchitis. Predictive factors for these toxicities are actually better known: haemoptysis could be due to a progressive disease more often than to brachytherapy itself; technical factors (dose, volume, fractionation), however, could explain a number of radiation bronchitis, and their incidence could decrease in the future. PMID:12648715

  10. Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    Resources - benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH); Prostate enlargement resources; BPH resources ... organizations provide information on benign prostatic hyperplasia ( prostate enlargement ): National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse - www. ...

  11. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yunlong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Yang, Wenjun [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process.Methods: A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D{sub 90} for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and {sup 192}Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D{sub 2cc} of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with ?/?= 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively.Results: For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes/fraction (min/fx) assuming a 10 Ci{sup 192}Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D{sub 90} was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D{sub 90} of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min/fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min/fx more. If an additional 20 min/fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D{sub 90} above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively.Conclusions: For cervical cancer patients, D-RSBT can boost HR-CTV D{sub 90} over IS + ICBT and S-RSBT without violating the tolerance doses to the bladder, rectum, or sigmoid. The D{sub 90} improvements from D-RSBT depend on the patient, the delivery time budget, and the applicator structure.

  12. A Monte Carlo study on the effect of seed design on the interseed attenuation in permanent prostate implants.

    PubMed

    Afsharpour, Hossein; D'Amours, Michel; Coté, Benoit; Carrier, Jean-François; Verhaegen, Frank; Beaulieu, Luc

    2008-08-01

    Standard algorithms for postimplant analysis of transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy (TIPPB) are based on AAPM Task Group 43 formalism (TG-43), which makes use of a world entirely made of water. This entails an assignment of the prostate, surrounding organs at risk, as well as all brachytherapy seeds present in a permanent prostate implant to water. Brachytherapy seeds are generally made from high atomic number materials. Because of the simultaneous presence of many brachytherapy seeds in a TIPPB, there is a shielding effect causing an attenuation of energy of the emitted photons generally called the "interseed attenuation" (ISA). This study investigates the impact of seed designs and compositions on the interseed attenuation. For this purpose, six brachytherapy seeds covering a wide variety of seed design and composition were modeled with the GEANT4 Monte Carlo (MC) toolkit. MC has allowed calculation of the contribution of each major component (encapsulation and internal components) of a given seed model to ISA separately. The impact of ISA on real clinical implant configurations was also explored. Two clinical postimplant geometries with different brachytherapy seeds were studied with MC simulations. The change in the clinical parameter D90 was observed. This study shows that Nucletron SelectSeed (similar to the Oncura model 6711), ProstaSeed, and Best Medical model 2335 are the most attenuating designs with 4.8%, 3.9%, and 4.6% of D90 reduction, respectively. The least attenuating seed is a 103Pd seed encapsulated in a polymer shell, the IBt OptiSeed with 1.5%. Finally, based on this systematic study, a new seed design is proposed that is predicted to be the most waterlike brachytherapy seed and thus TG-43 compatible. PMID:18777927

  13. Sensitivity of low energy brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Murrer, Lars; Lutgens, Ludy; Bloemen-Van Gurp, Esther; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Keller, Brian; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, de l'Universite Laval, CHUQ, Pavillon L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands) and Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to assess the sensitivity of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition for a range of low photon energy brachytherapy sources: {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, {sup 131}Cs, and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS). The low energy photons emitted by these sources make the dosimetry sensitive to variations in tissue atomic number due to the dominance of the photoelectric effect. This work reports dose to a small mass of water in medium D{sub w,m} as opposed to dose to a small mass of medium in medium D{sub m,m}. Methods: Mean adipose, mammary gland, and breast tissues (as uniform mixture of the aforementioned tissues) are investigated as well as compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean. Prostate mean compositions from three different literature sources are also investigated. Three sets of MC simulations are performed with the GEANT4 code: (1) Dose calculations for idealized TG-43-like spherical geometries using point sources. Radial dose profiles obtained in different media are compared to assess the influence of compositional uncertainties. (2) Dose calculations for four clinical prostate LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using {sup 125}I seeds (Model 2301, Best Medical, Springfield, VA). The effect of varying the prostate composition in the planning target volume (PTV) is investigated by comparing PTV D{sub 90} values. (3) Dose calculations for four clinical breast LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using {sup 103}Pd seeds (Model 2335, Best Medical). The effects of varying the adipose/gland ratio in the PTV and of varying the elemental composition of adipose and gland within one standard deviation of the assumed mean composition are investigated by comparing PTV D{sub 90} values. For (2) and (3), the influence of using the mass density from CT scans instead of unit mass density is also assessed. Results: Results from simulation (1) show that variations in the mean compositions of tissues affect low energy brachytherapy dosimetry. Dose differences between mean and one standard deviation of the mean composition increasing with distance from the source are observed. It is established that the {sup 125}I and {sup 131}Cs sources are the least sensitive to variations in elemental compositions while {sup 103}Pd is most sensitive. The EBS falls in between and exhibits complex behavior due to significant spectral hardening. Results from simulation (2) show that two prostate compositions are dosimetrically equivalent to water while the third shows D{sub 90} differences of up to 4%. Results from simulation (3) show that breast is more sensitive than prostate with dose variations of up to 30% from water for 70% adipose/30% gland breast. The variability of the breast composition adds a {+-}10% dose variation. Conclusions: Low energy brachytherapy dose distributions in tissue differ from water and are influenced by density, mean tissue composition, and patient-to-patient composition variations. The results support the use of a dose calculation algorithm accounting for heterogeneities such as MC. Since this work shows that variations in mean tissue compositions affect MC dosimetry and result in increased dose uncertainties, the authors conclude that imaging tools providing more accurate estimates of elemental compositions such as dual energy CT would be beneficial.

  14. 142pr glass seeds for the brachytherapy of prostate cancer 

    E-print Network

    Jung, Jae Won

    2007-09-17

    . The dose profiles agree well with each other. The gamma dose of 142Pr was evaluated. The gamma dose is 0.3 Gy at 1.0 cm with initial activity of 5.95 mCi and is insignificant to other organs. Measurements were performed to assess the 2-dimensional axial...

  15. Comparison of radiation shielding requirements for HDR brachytherapy using {sup 169}Yb and {sup 192}Ir sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lymperopoulou, G.; Papagiannis, P.; Sakelliou, L.; Georgiou, E.; Hourdakis, C. J.; Baltas, D. [Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimioupolis, Ilisia, 157 71, Athens (Greece); Dosimetry Laboratory, Institute of Accelerating Systems and Applications (IASA), P.O. Box 17214 GR-10024, Athens (Greece); Medical Physics Department, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 11527, Athens (Greece); Greek Atomic Energy Commission, Licensing and Inspection Department, Agia Paraskeui 15310, Athens (Greece); Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Strahlenklinik, Klinikum Offenbach, 63069 Offenbach, Germany and Nuclear and Particle Physics Secti