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Sample records for ion beam intensity

  1. Intense ion beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Humphries, Jr., Stanley; Sudan, Ravindra N.

    1977-08-30

    Methods and apparatus for producing intense megavolt ion beams are disclosed. In one embodiment, a reflex triode-type pulsed ion accelerator is described which produces ion pulses of more than 5 kiloamperes current with a peak energy of 3 MeV. In other embodiments, the device is constructed so as to focus the beam of ions for high concentration and ease of extraction, and magnetic insulation is provided to increase the efficiency of operation.

  2. Electron Cooling of Intense Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, J.; Kamerdjiev, V.; Maier, R.; Prasuhn, D.; Stein, J.; Stockhorst, H.; Korotaev, Yu.; Meshkov, I.; Sidorin, A.; Smirnov, A.

    2006-03-20

    Results of experimental studies of the electron cooling of a proton beam at COSY (Juelich, Germany) are presented. Intensity of the proton beam is limited by two general effects: particle loss directly after the injection and development of instability in a deep cooled ion beam. Results of the instability investigations performed at COSY during last years are presented in this report in comparison with previous results from HIMAC (Chiba, Japan) CELSIUS (Uppsala, Sweden) and LEAR (CERN). Methods of the instability suppression, which allow increasing the cooled beam intensity, are described. This work is supported by RFBR grant no. 05-02-16320 and INTAS grant no. 03-54-5584.

  3. Intense Pulsed Heavy Ion Beam Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masugata, Katsumi; Ito, Hiroaki

    Development of intense pulsed heavy ion beam accelerator technology is described for the application of materials processing. Gas puff plasma gun and vacuum arc discharge plasma gun were developed as an active ion source for magnetically insulated pulsed ion diode. Source plasma of nitrogen and aluminum were successfully produced with the gas puff plasma gun and the vacuum arc plasma gun, respectively. The ion diode was successfully operated with gas puff plasma gun at diode voltage 190 kV, diode current 2.2 kA and nitrogen ion beam of ion current density 27 A/cm2 was obtained. The ion composition was evaluated by a Thomson parabola spectrometer and the purity of the nitrogen ion beam was estimated to be 86%. The diode also operated with aluminum ion source of vacuum arc plasma gun. The ion diode was operated at 200 kV, 12 kA, and aluminum ion beam of current density 230 A/cm2 was obtained. The beam consists of aluminum ions (Al(1-3)+) of energy 60-400 keV, and protons (90-130 keV), and the purity was estimated to be 89 %. The development of the bipolar pulse accelerator (BPA) was reported. A double coaxial type bipolar pulse generator was developed as the power supply of the BPA. The generator was tested with dummy load of 7.5 ohm, bipolar pulses of -138 kV, 72 ns (1st pulse) and +130 kV, 70 ns (2nd pulse) were succesively generated. By applying the bipolar pulse to the drift tube of the BPA, nitrogen ion beam of 2 A/cm2 was observed in the cathode, which suggests the bipolar pulse acceleration.

  4. Intense ion beams accelerated by ultra-intense laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Markus; Cowan, T. E.; Gauthier, J. C.; Vehn, J. Meyer-Ter; Allen, M.; Audebert, P.; Blazevic, A.; Fuchs, J.; Geissel, M.; Hegelich, M.; Karsch, S.; Pukhov, A.; Schlegel, T.

    2002-04-01

    The discovery of intense ion beams off solid targets irradiated by ultra-intense laser pulses has become the subject of extensive international interest. These highly collimated, energetic beams of protons and heavy ions are strongly depending on the laser parameters as well as on the properties of the irradiated targets. Therefore we have studied the influence of the target conditions on laser-accelerated ion beams generated by multi-terawatt lasers. The experiments were performed using the 100 TW laser facility at Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Laser Intense (LULI). The targets were irradiated by pulses up to 5×1019 W/cm2 (~300 fs,λ=1.05 μm) at normal incidence. A strong dependence on the surface conditions, conductivity, shape and purity was observed. The plasma density on the front and rear surface was determined by laser interferometry. We characterized the ion beam by means of magnetic spectrometers, radiochromic film, nuclear activation and Thompson parabolas. The strong dependence of the ion beam acceleration on the conditions on the target back surface was confirmed in agreement with predictions based on the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) mechanism. Finally shaping of the ion beam has been demonstrated by the appropriate tailoring of the target. .

  5. Materials processing with intense pulsed ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Davis, H.A.; Olson, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    We review research investigating the application of intense pulsed ion beams (IPIBs) for the surface treatment and coating of materials. The short range (0.1-10 {mu}m) and high-energy density (1-50 J/cm{sup 2}) of these short-pulsed ({le} 1 {mu}s) beams (with ion currents I = 5 - 50 kA, and energies E = 100 - 1000 keV) make them ideal to flash-heat a target surface, similar to the more familiar pulsed laser processes. IPIB surface treatment induces rapid melt and solidification at up to 10{sup 10} K/s to cause amorphous layer formation and the production of non-equilibrium microstructures. At higher energy density the target surface is vaporized, and the ablated vapor is condensed as coatings onto adjacent substrates or as nanophase powders. Progress towards the development of robust, high-repetition rate IPIB accelerators is presented along with economic estimates for the cost of ownership of this technology.

  6. Intense non-relativistic cesium ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lampel, M.C.

    1984-02-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion group at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has constructed the One Ampere Cesium Injector as a proof of principle source to supply an induction linac with a high charge density and high brightness ion beam. This is studied here. An electron beam probe was developed as the major diagnostic tool for characterizing ion beam space charge. Electron beam probe data inversion is accomplished with the EBEAM code and a parametrically adjusted model radial charge distribution. The longitudinal charge distribution was not derived, although it is possible to do so. The radial charge distribution that is derived reveals an unexpected halo of trapped electrons surrounding the ion beam. A charge fluid theory of the effect of finite electron temperature on the focusing of neutralized ion beams (Nucl. Fus. 21, 529 (1981)) is applied to the problem of the Cesium beam final focus at the end of the injector. It is shown that the theory's predictions and assumptions are consistent with the experimental data, and that it accounts for the observed ion beam radius of approx. 5 cm, and the electron halo, including the determination of an electron Debye length of approx. 10 cm.

  7. Funnel cone for focusing intense ion beams on a target

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Ni, P.

    2009-10-05

    We describe a funnel cone for concentrating an ion beam on a target. The cone utilizes the reflection characteristic of ion beams on solid walls to focus the incident beam andincrease beam intensity on target. The cone has been modeled with the TRIM code. A prototype has been tested and installed for use in the 350-keV K+ NDCX target chamber.

  8. The generation and application of intense pulsed ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, J.; Kapetanakos, C. A.; Pasour, J. A.; Mahaffey, R. A.

    1981-04-01

    Means for the generation of pulsed, ultrahigh power beams of low-atomic-mass ions are considered, and potential applications of the beams in thermonuclear fusion and other applications are discussed. The intense ion beam sources represent an extension of the pulsed-power technology of relativistic electron beams, employing transmission lines powered by Marx generators to produce pulses of 25-100 nsec duration, energies of 0.1-2 MV, currents of 1 kA to 1 MA, and power levels above 1 GW. The most successful approach to intense pulsed beam generation is based on the acceleration of plasma ions within vacuum-diode-like sources involving the processes of plasma generation, ion extraction, and the suppression of the electron current, which may be accomplished by reflexing, pinching or magnetic insulation. Ion beams thus generated have been used to form transient, field-reversed ion layers and to excite high-power gas lasers. Intense ion beams are also under investigation as drivers of inertial confinement in thermonuclear reactors.

  9. High intensity ion beam injection into the 88-inch cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Wutte, Daniela; Clark, Dave J.; Laune, Bernard; Leitner,Matthaeus A.; Lyneis, Claude M.

    2000-05-31

    Low cross section experiments to produce super-heavyelements have increased the demand for high intensity heavy ion beams atenergies of about 5 MeV/nucleon at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at the LawrenceBerkeley National Laboratory. Therefore, efforts are underway to increasethe overall ion beam transmission through the axial injection line andthe cyclotron. The ion beam emittance has been measured for various ionmasses and charge states. Beam transport simulations including spacecharge effects were performed for both of the injection line and the ionsource extraction. The relatively low nominal injection voltage of 10 kVwas found to be the main factor for ion beam losses, because of beam blowup due to space charge forces at higher intensities. Consequently,experiments and simulations have been performed at higherinjectionenergies, and it was demonstrated that the ion beams could still becentered in the cyclotron at these energies. Therefore, the new injectorion source VENUS and its ion beam transport system (currently underconstruction at the 88-Inch Cyclotron) are designed for extractionvoltages up to 30 kV.

  10. Drift compression of an intense neutralized ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.; Henestroza, E.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Coleman, J.; Eylon, S.; Greenway, W.G.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.R.; Thoma, C.; Sefkow, A.B.; Gilson, E.P.; Efthimion, P.C.; Davidson, R.C.

    2004-10-25

    Longitudinal compression of a tailored-velocity, intense neutralized ion beam has been demonstrated. The compression takes place in a 1-2 m drift section filled with plasma to provide space-charge neutralization. An induction cell produces a head-to-tail velocity ramp that longitudinally compresses the neutralized beam, enhancing the beam peak current by a factor of 50 and producing a pulse duration of about 3 ns. this measurement has been confirmed independently with two different diagnostic systems.

  11. Generation of intense negative ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor); Aladzhadzhyan, Samuel H. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An electron gun is used with a mirror electrostatic field to produce zero or near zero velocity electrons by forming a turning point in their trajectories. A gas capable of attaching zero or near zero velocity is introduced at this turning point, and negative ions are produced by the attachment or dissociative attachment process. Operation may be continuous or pulsed. Ions thus formed are extracted by a simple lens system and suitable biasing of grids.

  12. Intense ion beam neutralization using underdense background plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Berdanier, William; Roy, Prabir K.; Kaganovich, Igor

    2015-01-15

    Producing an overdense background plasma for neutralization purposes with a density that is high compared to the beam density is not always experimentally possible. We show that even an underdense background plasma with a small relative density can achieve high neutralization of intense ion beam pulses. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we show that if the total plasma electron charge is not sufficient to neutralize the beam charge, electron emitters are necessary for effective neutralization but are not needed if the plasma volume is so large that the total available charge in the electrons exceeds that of the ion beam. Several regimes of possible underdense/tenuous neutralization plasma densities are investigated with and without electron emitters or dense plasma at periphery regions, including the case of electron emitters without plasma, which does not effectively neutralize the beam. Over 95% neutralization is achieved for even very underdense background plasma with plasma density 1/15th the beam density. We compare results of particle-in-cell simulations with an analytic model of neutralization and find close agreement with the particle-in-cell simulations. Further, we show experimental data from the National Drift Compression experiment-II group that verifies the result that underdense plasma can neutralize intense heavy ion beams effectively.

  13. Transport of intense beams of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, M.; Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Celona, L.; Spadtke, P.; Tinschert, K.

    2005-10-01

    The new generation of ion sources delivers beams with intensities of several mA. This requires a careful design of the analysing system and the low-energy beam transport (LEBT) from the source to the subsequent systems. At INFN-LNS, high intensity proton sources (TRIPS [L. Celona, G. Ciavola, S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1423 (2004)], PM-TRIPS [G. Ciavola, L. Celona, S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1453 (2004)]) as well as ECR ion sources for the production of highly charged high-intensity heavy ion beams are developed (SERSE [S. Gammino, G. Ciavola, L. Celona et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 72(11) 4090 (2001), and references therein], GyroSERSE [S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1637 (2004)], MS-ECRIS [G. Ciavola et al ., (2005), 11th Int. Conf. on Ion Sources, Caen, (in press)]). In this paper, we present ion-optical design studies of various LEBT systems for ion-sources devoted to the production of intense beams. Calculations were performed using the computer codes GIOS [H. Wollnik, J. Brezina and M. Berz, NIM A 258 (1987)], GICO [M. Berz, H.C. Hoffmann, and H. Wollnik, NIM A 258 (1987)], and TRANSPORT [K.L. Brown, F. Rothacker and D.C. Carey, SLAC-R-95-462, Fermilab-Pub-95/069, UC-414 (1995)]. Simulations take into account the expected phase space growth of the beam emittance due to space-charge effects and image aberrations introduced by the magnetic elements.

  14. Physics design of linear accelerators for intense ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.

    1988-01-01

    Advances in the physics and technology of linear accelerators for intense ion beams are leading to new methods for the design of such machines. The physical effects that limit beam current and brightness are better understood and provide the criteria for choosing the rf frequency and for determining optimum focusing configurations to control longitudinal and transverse emittances. During the past decade, the use of developments such as the radio-frequency quadrupole, multiple beams, funneling, ramped-field linac tanks, and self-matching linac tanks is leading to greater design flexibility and improved performance capabilities. 39 refs., 3 tabs., 1 fig.

  15. Intense Ion Beam for Warm Dense Matter Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Joshua Eugene

    2008-05-23

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is exploring the physical limits of compression and focusing of ion beams for heating material to warm dense matter (WDM) and fusion ignition conditions. The NDCX is a beam transport experiment with several components at a scale comparable to an inertial fusion energy driver. The NDCX is an accelerator which consists of a low-emittance ion source, high-current injector, solenoid matching section, induction bunching module, beam neutralization section, and final focusing system. The principal objectives of the experiment are to control the beam envelope, demonstrate effective neutralization of the beam space-charge, control the velocity tilt on the beam, and understand defocusing effects, field imperfections, and limitations on peak intensity such as emittance and aberrations. Target heating experiments with space-charge dominated ion beams require simultaneous longitudinal bunching and transverse focusing. A four-solenoid lattice is used to tune the beam envelope to the necessary focusing conditions before entering the induction bunching module. The induction bunching module provides a head-to-tail velocity ramp necessary to achieve peak axial compression at the desired focal plane. Downstream of the induction gap a plasma column neutralizes the beam space charge so only emittance limits the focused beam intensity. We present results of beam transport through a solenoid matching section and simultaneous focusing of a singly charged K{sup +} ion bunch at an ion energy of 0.3 MeV. The results include a qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results after the solenoid matching section, which include time resolved current density, transverse distributions, and phase-space of the beam at different diagnostic planes. Electron cloud and gas measurements in the solenoid lattice and in the vicinity of intercepting diagnostics are also presented. Finally, comparisons

  16. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2010-03-16

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  17. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2008-08-01

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  18. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W. M.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Barnard, J. J.; Cohen, R. H.; Dorf, M. A.; Lund, S. M.; Perkins, L. J.; Terry, M. R.; Logan, B. G.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J. Y.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Lidia, S. M.; Ni, P. A.; Reginato, L. L.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Takakuwa, J. H.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R. A.; Koniges, A. E.

    2011-03-31

    Intense heavy-ion beams have long been considered a promising driver option for inertial-fusion energy production. This paper briefly compares inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to the more-familiar magnetic-confinement approach and presents some advantages of using beams of heavy ions to drive ICF instead of lasers. Key design choices in heavy-ion fusion (HIF) facilities are discussed, particularly the type of accelerator. We then review experiments carried out at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) over the past thirty years to understand various aspects of HIF driver physics. A brief review follows of present HIF research in the US and abroad, focusing on a new facility, NDCX-II, being built at LBNL to study the physics of warm dense matter heated by ions, as well as aspects of HIF target physics. Future research directions are briefly summarized.

  19. Plasma neutralization models for intense ion beam transport in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; O'Rourke, Sean; Lee, Edward P.

    2003-05-01

    Plasma neutralization of an intense ion pulse is of interest for many applications, including plasma lenses, heavy ion fusion, cosmic ray propagation, etc. An analytical electron fluid model has been developed based on the assumption of long charge bunches (l{sub b} >> r{sub b}). Theoretical predictions are compared with the results of calculations utilizing a particle-in-cell (PIC) code. The cold electron fluid results agree well with the PIC simulations for ion beam propagation through a background plasma. The analytical predictions for the degree of ion beam charge and current neutralization also agree well with the results of the numerical simulations. The model predicts very good charge neutralization (>99%) during quasi-steady-state propagation, provided the beam pulse duration {tau}{sub b} is much longer than the electron plasma period 2{pi}/{omega}{sub p}, where {omega}{sub p} = (4{pi}e{sup 2}n{sub p}/m){sup 1/2} is the electron plasma frequency, and n{sub p} is the background plasma density. In the opposite limit, the beam pulse excites large-amplitude plasma waves. The analytical formulas derived in this paper can provide an important benchmark for numerical codes, and provide scaling relations for different beam and plasma parameters.

  20. SIMULATION OF INTENSE BEAMS FOR HEAVY ION FUSION

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A

    2004-06-10

    Computer simulations of intense ion beams play a key role in the Heavy Ion Fusion research program. Along with analytic theory, they are used to develop future experiments, guide ongoing experiments, and aid in the analysis and interpretation of experimental results. They also afford access to regimes not yet accessible in the experimental program. The U.S. Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory and its collaborators have developed state-of-the art computational tools, related both to codes used for stationary plasmas and to codes used for traditional accelerator applications, but necessarily differing from each in important respects. These tools model beams in varying levels of detail and at widely varying computational cost. They include moment models (envelope equations and fluid descriptions), particle-in-cell methods (electrostatic and electromagnetic), nonlinear-perturbative descriptions (''{delta}f''), and continuum Vlasov methods. Increasingly, it is becoming clear that it is necessary to simulate not just the beams themselves, but also the environment in which they exist, be it an intentionally-created plasma or an unwanted cloud of electrons and gas. In this paper, examples of the application of simulation tools to intense ion beam physics are presented, including support of present-day experiments, fundamental beam physics studies, and the development of future experiments. Throughout, new computational models are described and their utility explained. These include Mesh Refinement (and its dynamic variant, Adaptive Mesh Refinement); improved electron cloud and gas models, and an electron advance scheme that allows use of larger time steps; and moving-mesh and adaptive-mesh Vlasov methods.

  1. Bipolar pulse generator for intense pulsed ion beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, H.; Igawa, K.; Kitamura, I.; Masugata, K.

    2007-01-15

    A new type of pulsed ion beam accelerator named ''bipolar pulse accelerator'' (BPA) has been proposed in order to improve the purity of intense pulsed ion beams. To confirm the principle of the BPA, we developed a bipolar pulse generator for the bipolar pulse experiment, which consists of a Marx generator and a pulse forming line (PFL) with a rail gap switch on its end. In this article, we report the first experimental result of the bipolar pulse and evaluate the electrical characteristics of the bipolar pulse generator. When the bipolar pulse generator was operated at 70% of the full charge condition of the PFL, the bipolar pulse with the first (-138 kV, 72 ns) and the second pulse (+130 kV, 70 ns) was successfully obtained. The evaluation of the electrical characteristics indicates that the developed generator can produce the bipolar pulse with fast rise time and sharp reversing time.

  2. Bipolar pulse generator for intense pulsed ion beam accelerator.

    PubMed

    Ito, H; Igawa, K; Kitamura, I; Masugata, K

    2007-01-01

    A new type of pulsed ion beam accelerator named "bipolar pulse accelerator" (BPA) has been proposed in order to improve the purity of intense pulsed ion beams. To confirm the principle of the BPA, we developed a bipolar pulse generator for the bipolar pulse experiment, which consists of a Marx generator and a pulse forming line (PFL) with a rail gap switch on its end. In this article, we report the first experimental result of the bipolar pulse and evaluate the electrical characteristics of the bipolar pulse generator. When the bipolar pulse generator was operated at 70% of the full charge condition of the PFL, the bipolar pulse with the first (-138 kV, 72 ns) and the second pulse (+130 kV, 70 ns) was successfully obtained. The evaluation of the electrical characteristics indicates that the developed generator can produce the bipolar pulse with fast rise time and sharp reversing time. PMID:17503918

  3. Plasma opening switch for long-pulse intense ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, H.A.; Mason, R.J.; Bartsch, R.R.; Greenly, J.B.; Rej, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    A Plasma Opening Switch (POS) is being developed at Los Alamos, as part of an intense ion beam experiment with special application to materials processing. The switch must conduct up to 100 kA for 600 ns, and open quickly to avoid premature gap closure in the ion beam diode load. Power multiplication is not a necessity, but prepulse suppression is. A positive central polarity is desirable, since with it an ion beam can be conveniently launched beyond the switch from the central anode toward a negatively charged target. Thus, otherwise by virtue of traditional scaling rules, a POS was designed with a 1.25 cm radius inner anode, and a 4.75 cm radius outer cathode. This has been constructed, and subjected to circuit, and simulational analysis. The computations are being performed with the 2D ANTHEM implicit code. Preliminary results show a marked difference in switching dynamics, when the central positive polarity is used in place of the more conventional opposite choice. Opening goes by the fast development of a central anode magnetic layer, rather than by the more conventional slow evolution of a cathode gap. With the central anode, higher fill densities are needed to achieve desired conduction times. This has suggested switch design improvements, which are discussed.

  4. Plasma opening switch for long-pulse intense ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, H.A.; Mason, R.J.; Bartsch, R.R.; Greenly, J.B.; Rej, D.J.

    1992-08-01

    A Plasma Opening Switch (POS) is being developed at Los Alamos, as part of an intense ion beam experiment with special application to materials processing. The switch must conduct up to 100 kA for 600 ns, and open quickly to avoid premature gap closure in the ion beam diode load. Power multiplication is not a necessity, but prepulse suppression is. A positive central polarity is desirable, since with it an ion beam can be conveniently launched beyond the switch from the central anode toward a negatively charged target. Thus, otherwise by virtue of traditional scaling rules, a POS was designed with a 1.25 cm radius inner anode, and a 4.75 cm radius outer cathode. This has been constructed, and subjected to circuit, and simulational analysis. The computations are being performed with the 2D ANTHEM implicit code. Preliminary results show a marked difference in switching dynamics, when the central positive polarity is used in place of the more conventional opposite choice. Opening goes by the fast development of a central anode magnetic layer, rather than by the more conventional slow evolution of a cathode gap. With the central anode, higher fill densities are needed to achieve desired conduction times. This has suggested switch design improvements, which are discussed.

  5. Survey of Collective Instabilities and Beam-Plasma Interactions in Intense Heavy Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Ronald C.; Dorf, Mikhail A.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Qin, Hong; Startsev, Edward A.; Rose, David V.; Lund, Steven M.; Welch, Dale R.; Sefkow, Adam

    2008-06-19

    This paper presents a survey of the present theoretical understanding based on advanced analytical and numerical studies of collective processes and beam-plasma interactions in intense heavy ion beams for applications to ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy ion fusion. The topics include: discussion of the conditions for quiescent beam propagation over long distances; and the electrostatic Harris instability and the transverse electromagnetic Weibel instability in highly anisotropic, intense one-component ion beams. In the longitudinal drift compression and transverse compression regions, collective processes associated with the interaction of the intense ion beam with a charge-neutralizing background plasma are described, including the electrostatic electron-ion two-stream instability, the multispecies electromagnetic Weibel instability, and collective excitations in the presence of a solenoidal magnetic field. The effects of a velocity tilt on reducing two-stream instability growth rates are also discussed. Operating regimes are identified where the possible deleterious effects of collective processes on beam quality are minimized.

  6. Accessing defect dynamics using intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Persaud, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Guo, H.; Hosemann, P.; Lidia, S.; Minor, A. M.; Seidl, P. A.; Schenkel, T.

    2015-06-18

    Gaining in-situ access to relaxation dynamics of radiation induced defects will lead to a better understanding of materials and is important for the verification of theoretical models and simulations. We show preliminary results from experiments at the new Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory that will enable in-situ access to defect dynamics through pump-probe experiments. Here, the unique capabilities of the NDCX-II accelerator to generate intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams are utilized. Preliminary data of channeling experiments using lithium and potassium ions and silicon membranes are shown. We compare these data to simulation results using Crystal Trim. Furthermore, we discuss the improvements to the accelerator to higher performance levels and the new diagnostics tools that are being incorporated.

  7. Accessing defect dynamics using intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Persaud, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Guo, H.; Hosemann, P.; Lidia, S.; Minor, A. M.; Seidl, P. A.; Schenkel, T.

    2015-06-18

    Gaining in-situ access to relaxation dynamics of radiation induced defects will lead to a better understanding of materials and is important for the verification of theoretical models and simulations. We show preliminary results from experiments at the new Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory that will enable in-situ access to defect dynamics through pump-probe experiments. Here, the unique capabilities of the NDCX-II accelerator to generate intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams are utilized. Preliminary data of channeling experiments using lithium and potassium ions and silicon membranes are shown. We compare these data to simulation results using Crystalmore » Trim. Furthermore, we discuss the improvements to the accelerator to higher performance levels and the new diagnostics tools that are being incorporated.« less

  8. Images of Complex Interactions of an Intense Ion Beam with Plasma Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

    2004-08-03

    Ion beam propagation in a background plasma is an important scientific issue for many practical applications. The process of ion beam charge and current neutralization is complex because plasma electrons move in strong electric and magnetic fields of the beam. Computer simulation images of plasma interaction with an intense ion beam pulse are presented.

  9. Energy gain and spectral tailoring of ion beams using ultra-high intensity laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Rajendra; Swantusch, Marco; Cerchez, Mirela; Spickermann, Sven; Auorand, Bastian; Wowra, Thomas; Boeker, Juergen; Willi, Oswald

    2015-11-01

    The field of laser driven ion acceleration over the past decade has produced a huge amount of research. Nowadays, several multi-beam facilities with high rep rate system, e.g. ELI, are being developed across the world for different kinds of experiments. The study of interaction dynamics of multiple beams possessing ultra-high intensity and ultra-short pulse duration is of vital importance. Here, we present the first experimental results on ion acceleration using two ultra-high intensity beams. Thanks to the unique capability of Arcturus laser at HHU Düsseldorf, two almost identical, independent beams in laser parameters such as intensity (>1020 W/cm2), pulse duration (30 fs) and contrast (>1010), could be accessed. Both beams are focused onto a 5 μm thin Ti target. While ensuring spatial overlap of the two beams, at relative temporal delay of ~ 50 ps (optimum delay), the proton and carbon ion energies were enhanced by factor of 1.5. Moreover, strong modulation in C4+ions near the high energy cut-off is observed later than the optimum delay for the proton enhancement. This offers controlled tailoring of the spectral content of heavy ions.

  10. Intense ion beams accelerated by relativistic laser plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Markus; Cowan, Thomas E.; Gauthier, Jean-Claude J.; Allen, Matthew; Audebert, Patrick; Blazevic, Abel; Fuchs, Julien; Geissel, Matthias; Hegelich, Manuel; Karsch, S.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, Jurgen; Pukhov, Alexander; Schlegel, Theodor

    2001-12-01

    We have studied the influence of the target properties on laser-accelerated proton and ion beams generated by the LULI multi-terawatt laser. A strong dependence of the ion emission on the surface conditions, conductivity, shape and material of the thin foil targets were observed. We have performed a full characterization of the ion beam using magnetic spectrometers, Thompson parabolas, radiochromic film and nuclear activation techniques. The strong dependence of the ion beam acceleration on the conditions on the target back surface was found in agreement with theoretical predictions based on the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) mechanism. Proton kinetic energies up to 25 MeV have been observed.

  11. Three-Dimensional Perturbative Particle Simulation of Intense Ion Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. Wei-Li; Stoltz, Peter H.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Qin, Hong

    1998-11-01

    A three-dimensional nonlinear perturbative (δ f) particle simulation scheme is under developement for studying the stability and transport properties of an intense ion beam propagating through background electrons and a periodic focusing lattice,(Q. Qian, W. Lee, and R. C. Davidson, Phys. Plasmas 4), 1915 (1997).^,(P. H. Stoltz, W. W. Lee, R. C. Davidson, this conference.) in which the distribution function is split into equilibrium and perturbed parts. To further facilitate the simulations, a mode expansion scheme (C. Z. Cheng and H. Okuda, J. Comp. Phys. 25), 133 (1977). for the perturbative scheme has been developed, in which only a few long wavelength modes along the direction of propagation are kept. The code will be useful for many applications in beam physics and is an intermediate step toward a fully three-dimensional multi-species code. The algorithm and its applications to the electron-proton instability (R. C. Davidson, P. H. Stoltz, W. W. Lee and T.-S. Wang, this conference.) in proton linacs and storage rings will be reported.

  12. Production of intense metal ion beams from ECR ion sources using the MIVOC method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogomolov, S. L.; Bondarchenko, A. E.; Efremov, A. A.; Kuzmenkov, K. I.; Lebedev, A. N.; Lebedev, K. V.; Lebedev, V. Ya.; Loginov, V. N.; Mironov, V. E.; Yazvitsky, N. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    The production of metal ion beams by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources using the MIVOC (Metal Ions from Volatile Compounds) method is described. The method is based on the use of metal compounds which have high vapor pressure at room temperature, e.g., C2B10H12, Fe(C5H5)2, etc. Intense ion beams of B and Fe were produced using this method at the FLNR JINR cyclotrons. Experiments on the production of cobalt, chromium, vanadium, germanium, and hafnium ion beams were performed at the test bench of ECR ion sources. Main efforts were put into production and acceleration of 50Ti ion beams at the U-400 cyclotron. The experiments on the production of 50Ti ion beams were performed at the test bench using natural and enriched compounds of titanium (CH3)5C5Ti(CH3)3. In these experiments, 80 μA 48Ti5+ and 70 μA 48Ti11+ beam currents were obtained at different settings of the source. Following successful tests, two 3-week runs were performed with 50Ti beams at the U-400 cyclotron aimed to perform experiments on the spectroscopy of superheavy elements. The intensity of the injected 50Ti5+ beam was 50-60 μA. The source worked stably during experiments. The compound consumption rate was determined at about 2.4 mg/h, which corresponded to the 50Ti consumption of 0.6 mg/h.

  13. The WARP Code: Modeling High Intensity Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, D P; Friedman, A; Vay, J L; Haber, I

    2004-12-09

    The Warp code, developed for heavy-ion driven inertial fusion energy studies, is used to model high intensity ion (and electron) beams. Significant capability has been incorporated in Warp, allowing nearly all sections of an accelerator to be modeled, beginning with the source. Warp has as its core an explicit, three-dimensional, particle-in-cell model. Alongside this is a rich set of tools for describing the applied fields of the accelerator lattice, and embedded conducting surfaces (which are captured at sub-grid resolution). Also incorporated are models with reduced dimensionality: an axisymmetric model and a transverse ''slice'' model. The code takes advantage of modern programming techniques, including object orientation, parallelism, and scripting (via Python). It is at the forefront in the use of the computational technique of adaptive mesh refinement, which has been particularly successful in the area of diode and injector modeling, both steady-state and time-dependent. In the presentation, some of the major aspects of Warp will be overviewed, especially those that could be useful in modeling ECR sources. Warp has been benchmarked against both theory and experiment. Recent results will be presented showing good agreement of Warp with experimental results from the STS500 injector test stand. Additional information can be found on the web page http://hif.lbl.gov/theory/WARP{_}summary.html.

  14. Development of a Negative Hydrogen Ion Source for Spatial Beam Profile Measurement of a High Intensity Positive Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Shinto, Katsuhiro; Wada, Motoi; Nishida, Tomoaki; Demura, Yasuhiro; Sasaki, Daichi; Tsumori, Katsuyoshi; Nishiura, Masaki; Kaneko, Osamu; Kisaki, Masashi; Sasao, Mamiko

    2011-09-26

    We have been developing a negative hydrogen ion (H{sup -} ion) source for a spatial beam profile monitor of a high intensity positive ion beam as a new diagnostic tool. In case of a high intensity continuous-wave (CW) deuteron (D{sup +}) beam for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), it is difficult to measure the beam qualities in the severe high radiation environment during about one-year cyclic operation period. Conventional techniques are next to unusable for diagnostics in the operation period of about eleven months and for maintenance in the one-month shutdown period. Therefore, we have proposed an active beam probe system by using a negative ion beam and started an experimental study for the proof-of-principle (PoP) of the new spatial beam profile monitoring tool. In this paper, we present the status of development of the H{sup -} ion source as a probe beam source for the PoP experiment.

  15. Arc-based smoothing of ion beam intensity on targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-01

    By manipulating a set of ion beams upstream of a target, it is possible to arrange for a smoother deposition pattern, so as to achieve more uniform illumination of the target. A uniform energy deposition pattern is important for applications including ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy-ion beam-driven inertial fusion energy ("heavy-ion fusion"). Here, we consider an approach to such smoothing that is based on rapidly "wobbling" each of the beams back and forth along a short arc-shaped path, via oscillating fields applied upstream of the final pulse compression. In this technique, uniformity is achieved in the time-averaged sense; this is sufficient provided the beam oscillation timescale is short relative to the hydrodynamic timescale of the target implosion. This work builds on two earlier concepts: elliptical beams applied to a distributed-radiator target [D. A. Callahan and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2083 (2000)] and beams that are wobbled so as to trace a number of full rotations around a circular or elliptical path [R. C. Arnold et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods 199, 557 (1982)]. Here, we describe the arc-based smoothing approach and compare it to results obtainable using an elliptical-beam prescription. In particular, we assess the potential of these approaches for minimization of azimuthal asymmetry, for the case of a ring of beams arranged on a cone. It is found that, for small numbers of beams on the ring, the arc-based smoothing approach offers superior uniformity. In contrast with the full-rotation approach, arc-based smoothing remains usable when the geometry precludes wobbling the beams around a full circle, e.g., for the X-target [E. Henestroza, B. G. Logan, and L. J. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 18, 032702 (2011)] and some classes of distributed-radiator targets.

  16. Arc-based smoothing of ion beam intensity on targets

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-20

    Manipulating a set of ion beams upstream of a target, makes it possible to arrange a smoother deposition pattern, so as to achieve more uniform illumination of the target. A uniform energy deposition pattern is important for applications including ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy-ion beam-driven inertial fusion energy (“heavy-ion fusion”). Here, we consider an approach to such smoothing that is based on rapidly “wobbling” each of the beams back and forth along a short arc-shaped path, via oscillating fields applied upstream of the final pulse compression. In this technique, uniformity is achieved in the time-averaged sense; this is sufficient provided the beam oscillation timescale is short relative to the hydrodynamic timescale of the target implosion. This work builds on two earlier concepts: elliptical beams applied to a distributed-radiator target [D. A. Callahan and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2083 (2000)] and beams that are wobbled so as to trace a number of full rotations around a circular or elliptical path [R. C. Arnold et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods 199, 557 (1982)]. Here, we describe the arc-based smoothing approach and compare it to results obtainable using an elliptical-beam prescription. In particular, we assess the potential of these approaches for minimization of azimuthal asymmetry, for the case of a ring of beams arranged on a cone. We also found that, for small numbers of beams on the ring, the arc-based smoothing approach offers superior uniformity. In contrast with the full-rotation approach, arc-based smoothing remains usable when the geometry precludes wobbling the beams around a full circle, e.g., for the X-target [E. Henestroza, B. G. Logan, and L. J. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 18, 032702 (2011)] and some classes of distributed-radiator targets.

  17. Arc-based smoothing of ion beam intensity on targets

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-15

    By manipulating a set of ion beams upstream of a target, it is possible to arrange for a smoother deposition pattern, so as to achieve more uniform illumination of the target. A uniform energy deposition pattern is important for applications including ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy-ion beam-driven inertial fusion energy ('heavy-ion fusion'). Here, we consider an approach to such smoothing that is based on rapidly 'wobbling' each of the beams back and forth along a short arc-shaped path, via oscillating fields applied upstream of the final pulse compression. In this technique, uniformity is achieved in the time-averaged sense; this is sufficient provided the beam oscillation timescale is short relative to the hydrodynamic timescale of the target implosion. This work builds on two earlier concepts: elliptical beams applied to a distributed-radiator target [D. A. Callahan and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2083 (2000)] and beams that are wobbled so as to trace a number of full rotations around a circular or elliptical path [R. C. Arnold et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods 199, 557 (1982)]. Here, we describe the arc-based smoothing approach and compare it to results obtainable using an elliptical-beam prescription. In particular, we assess the potential of these approaches for minimization of azimuthal asymmetry, for the case of a ring of beams arranged on a cone. It is found that, for small numbers of beams on the ring, the arc-based smoothing approach offers superior uniformity. In contrast with the full-rotation approach, arc-based smoothing remains usable when the geometry precludes wobbling the beams around a full circle, e.g., for the X-target [E. Henestroza, B. G. Logan, and L. J. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 18, 032702 (2011)] and some classes of distributed-radiator targets.

  18. Arc-based smoothing of ion beam intensity on targets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-20

    Manipulating a set of ion beams upstream of a target, makes it possible to arrange a smoother deposition pattern, so as to achieve more uniform illumination of the target. A uniform energy deposition pattern is important for applications including ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy-ion beam-driven inertial fusion energy (“heavy-ion fusion”). Here, we consider an approach to such smoothing that is based on rapidly “wobbling” each of the beams back and forth along a short arc-shaped path, via oscillating fields applied upstream of the final pulse compression. In this technique, uniformity is achieved in the time-averaged sense; this ismore » sufficient provided the beam oscillation timescale is short relative to the hydrodynamic timescale of the target implosion. This work builds on two earlier concepts: elliptical beams applied to a distributed-radiator target [D. A. Callahan and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2083 (2000)] and beams that are wobbled so as to trace a number of full rotations around a circular or elliptical path [R. C. Arnold et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods 199, 557 (1982)]. Here, we describe the arc-based smoothing approach and compare it to results obtainable using an elliptical-beam prescription. In particular, we assess the potential of these approaches for minimization of azimuthal asymmetry, for the case of a ring of beams arranged on a cone. We also found that, for small numbers of beams on the ring, the arc-based smoothing approach offers superior uniformity. In contrast with the full-rotation approach, arc-based smoothing remains usable when the geometry precludes wobbling the beams around a full circle, e.g., for the X-target [E. Henestroza, B. G. Logan, and L. J. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 18, 032702 (2011)] and some classes of distributed-radiator targets.« less

  19. Beam Phase Space of an Intense Ion Beam in a Neutralizing Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Peter A.; Bazouin, Guillaume; Beneytout, Alice; Lidia, Steven M.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Grote, David P.

    2011-10-01

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-I) generates high intensity ion beams to explore warm dense matter physics. Transverse final focusing is accomplished with an 8-Tesla, 10-cm long pulsed solenoid magnet combined with a background neutralizing plasma to effectively cancel the space charge field of the ion beam. We report on phase space measurements of the beam before the neutralization channel and of the focused ion beam at the target plane. These are compared to WARP particle-in-cell simulations of the ion beam propagation through the focusing system and neutralizing plasma. Due to the orientation of the plasma sources with respect to the focusing magnet, the plasma distribution within the final focusing lens is strongly affected by the magnetic field, an effect which can influence the peak intensity at the target and which is included in the model of the experiment. Work performed under auspices of U.S. DoE by LLNL, LBNL under Contracts DE-AC52-07NA27344, DE-AC02-05CH1123.

  20. Review of intense-ion-beam propagation with a view toward measuring ion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.

    1982-08-25

    The subject of this review is intense ion beam propagation and the possibilities of measuring time dependent ion energy in the beam. Propagation effects discussed include charge separation, charge and current autoneutralization, electron thermalization and current neutralization decay. The interaction of a plasma beam with material obstacles, like collimators, and with transverse magnetic fields is also described. Depending on beam energy, density and pulse length, these interactions can include material ablation with plasmadynamic flow and undeflected propagation across transverse magnetic fields by a polarization drift. On the basis of this review I conclude that three diagnostics: a single floating potential probe, net current probes (Faraday cups) and a Rutherford scattering spectrometer appear capable of giving prompt, time dependent ion energy measurements.

  1. Transport of intense ion beams and space charge compensation issues in low energy beam lines (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Chauvin, N.; Delferriere, O.; Duperrier, R.; Gobin, R.; Nghiem, P. A. P.; Uriot, D.

    2012-02-15

    Over the last few years, the interest of the international scientific community for high power accelerators in the megawatt range has been increasing. For such machines, the ion source has to deliver a beam intensity that ranges from several tens up to a hundred of mA. One of the major challenges is to extract and transport the beam while minimizing the emittance growth and optimizing its injection into the radio frequency quadrupole. Consequently, it is crucial to perform precise simulations and cautious design of the low energy beam transport (LEBT) line. In particular, the beam dynamics calculations have to take into account not only the space charge effects but also the space charge compensation of the beam induced by ionization of the residual gas. The physical phenomena occurring in a high intensity LEBT and their possible effects on the beam are presented, with a particular emphasis on space charge compensation. Then, beam transport issues in different kind of LEBTs are briefly reviewed. The SOLMAXP particle-in-cell code dedicated to the modeling of the transport of charge particles under a space charge compensation regime is described. Finally, beam dynamics simulations results obtained with SOLMAXP are presented in the case of international fusion materials irradiation facility injector.

  2. Production of intense negative hydrogen beams with polarized nuclei by selective neutralization of cold negative ions

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, A.

    1984-02-13

    A process for selectively neutralizing H/sup -/ ions in a magnetic field to produce an intense negative hydrogen ion beam with spin polarized protons. Characteristic features of the process include providing a multi-ampere beam of H/sup -/ ions that are

  3. Production of intense beams of polarized negative hydrogen ions by double charge exchange in alkali vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruëbler, W.; Schmelzbach, P. A.

    1983-07-01

    The intensity of the polarized negative hydrogen ion beam of the ETHZ atomic beam polarized ion source has been substantially improved by a new double charge exchange device. Increasing the diameter of the charge exchange canal to 1.4 cm results in a beam output of the source of 6 μA of polarized negative hydrogen ions. Further improvements of the charge exchanger are proposed and discussed. With an updated design of the atomic beam apparatus, beams of 0.5 mA polarized negative hydrogen ions may be obtained from such a source.

  4. High intensity ion guides and purification techniques for low energy radioactive ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grévy, S.

    2016-06-01

    This report gives an overview of the different devices which can be used for the purification of high intensity low energy radioactive ion beams: high resolution magnetic separators (HRS), multi-reflection time-of-flight mass separators (MR-TOF-MS) and Penning traps (PT). An overview of HRS, existing or in development, and the methods to increase the resolving power are presented. The MR-TOF-MS of ISOLTRAP and other projects having been presented during this conference, only the main characteristics of such devices are discussed. Concerning the PT, intensively used to measure masses with high precisions, we will present the PIPERADE project which aims to provide pure beams of exotic nuclei with unprecedent intensities at the future DESIR/SPIRAL2 facility.

  5. Production of intense negative hydrogen beams with polarized nuclei by selective neutralization of negative ions

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    1987-01-01

    A process for selectively neutralizing H.sup.- ions in a magnetic field to produce an intense negative hydrogen ion beam with spin polarized protons. Characteristic features of the process include providing a multi-ampere beam of H.sup.- ions that are intersected by a beam of laser light. Photodetachment is effected in a uniform magnetic field that is provided around the beam of H.sup.- ions to spin polarize the H.sup.- ions and produce first and second populations or groups of ions, having their respective proton spin aligned either with the magnetic field or opposite to it. The intersecting beam of laser light is directed to selectively neutralize a majority of the ions in only one population, or given spin polarized group of H.sup.- ions, without neutralizing the ions in the other group thereby forming a population of H.sup.- ions each of which has its proton spin down, and a second group or population of H.sup.o atoms having proton spin up. Finally, the two groups of ions are separated from each other by magnetically bending the group of H.sup.- ions away from the group of neutralized ions, thereby to form an intense H.sup.- ion beam that is directed toward a predetermined objective.

  6. A new luminescence beam profile monitor for intense proton and heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang,T.; Bellavia, S.; Connolly, R.; Gassner, D.; Makdisi, Y.; Russo, T.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Zelenski, A.

    2008-10-01

    A new luminescence beam profile monitor is realized in the polarized hydrogen gas jet target at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility. In addition to the spin polarization of the proton beam being routinely measured by the hydrogen gas jet, the luminescence produced by beam-hydrogen excitation leads to a strong Balmer series lines emission. A selected hydrogen Balmer line is spectrally filtered and imaged to produce the transverse RHIC proton beam shape with unprecedented details on the RHIC beam profile. Alternatively, when the passage of the high energy RHIC gold ion beam excited only the residual gas molecules in the beam path, sufficient ion beam induced luminescence is produced and the transverse gold ion beam profile is obtained. The measured transverse beam sizes and the calculated emittances provide an independent confirmation of the RHIC beam characteristics and to verify the emittance conservation along the RHIC accelerator. This optical beam diagnostic technique by making use of the beam induced fluorescence from injected or residual gas offers a truly noninvasive particle beam characterization, and provides a visual observation of proton and heavy ion beams. Combined with a longitudinal bunch measurement system, a 3-dimensional spatial particle beam profile can be reconstructed tomographically.

  7. FINAL FOCUS ION BEAM INTENSITY FROM TUNGSTEN FOIL CALORIMETER AND SCINTILLATOR IN NDCX-I

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, S.M.; Bieniosek, F.; Henestroza, E.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.

    2010-04-30

    Laboratory high energy density experiments using ion beam drivers rely upon the delivery of high-current, high-brightness ion beams with high peak intensity onto targets. Solid-state scintillators are typically used to measure the ion beam spatial profile but they display dose-dependent degradation and aging effects. These effects produce uncertainties and limit the accuracy of measuring peak beam intensities delivered to the target. For beam tuning and characterizing the incident beam intensity, we have developed a cross-calibrating diagnostic suite that extends the upper limit of measurable peak intensity dynamic range. Absolute intensity calibration is obtained with a 3 {micro}m thick tungsten foil calorimeter and streak spectrometer. We present experimental evidence for peak intensity measures in excess of 400 kW/cm{sup 2} using a 0.3 MV, 25 mA, 5-20 {micro}sec K{sup +1} beam. Radiative models and thermal diffusion effects are discussed because they affect temporal and spatial resolution of beam intensity profiles.

  8. Progress toward a microsecond duration, repetitive, intense-ion beam for active spectroscopic measurements on ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, H.A.; Bartsch, R.R.; Barnes, C.W.

    1996-06-01

    The authors describe the design of an intense, pulsed, repetitive, neutral beam based on magnetically insulated diode technology for injection into ITER for spectroscopic measurements of thermalizing alpha particle and thermal helium density profiles, ion temperature, plasma rotation, and low Z impurity concentrations in the confinement region. The beam is being developed to enhance low signal-to-noise ratios expected with conventional steady-state ion beams because of severe beam attenuation and intense bremstrahlung emission. A 5 GW (e.g., 100 keV, 50 kA) one-microsecond-duration beam would increase the signal by 10{sup 3} compared to a conventional 5 MW beam with signal-to-noise ratios comparable to those from a chopped conventional beam in one second.

  9. Apparatus for reduction of selected ion intensities in confined ion beams

    DOEpatents

    Eiden, Gregory C.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Koppenaal, David W.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus for producing an ion beam having an increased proportion of analyte ions compared to carrier gas ions is disclosed. Specifically, the apparatus has an ion trap or a collision cell containing a reagent gas wherein the reagent gas accepts charge from the analyte ions thereby selectively neutralizing the carrier gas ions. Also disclosed is the collision cell as employed in various locations within analytical instruments including an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer.

  10. Method for reduction of selected ion intensities in confined ion beams

    DOEpatents

    Eiden, G.C.; Barinaga, C.J.; Koppenaal, D.W.

    1998-06-16

    A method for producing an ion beam having an increased proportion of analyte ions compared to carrier gas ions is disclosed. Specifically, the method has the step of addition of a charge transfer gas to the carrier analyte combination that accepts charge from the carrier gas ions yet minimally accepts charge from the analyte ions thereby selectively neutralizing the carrier gas ions. Also disclosed is the method as employed in various analytical instruments including an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. 7 figs.

  11. Method for reduction of selected ion intensities in confined ion beams

    DOEpatents

    Eiden, Gregory C.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Koppenaal, David W.

    1998-01-01

    A method for producing an ion beam having an increased proportion of analyte ions compared to carrier gas ions is disclosed. Specifically, the method has the step of addition of a charge transfer gas to the carrier analyte combination that accepts charge from the carrier gas ions yet minimally accepts charge from the analyte ions thereby selectively neutralizing the carrier gas ions. Also disclosed is the method as employed in various analytical instruments including an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer.

  12. Ion beam enhancement in magnetically insulated ion diodes for high-intensity pulsed ion beam generation in non-relativistic mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X. P.; Zhang, Z. C.; Pushkarev, A. I.; Lei, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    High-intensity pulsed ion beam (HIPIB) with ion current density above Child-Langmuir limit is achieved by extracting ion beam from anode plasma of ion diodes with suppressing electron flow under magnetic field insulation. It was theoretically estimated that with increasing the magnetic field, a maximal value of ion current density may reach nearly 3 times that of Child-Langmuir limit in a non-relativistic mode and close to 6 times in a highly relativistic mode. In this study, the behavior of ion beam enhancement by magnetic insulation is systematically investigated in three types of magnetically insulated ion diodes (MIDs) with passive anode, taking into account the anode plasma generation process on the anode surface. A maximal enhancement factor higher than 6 over the Child-Langmuir limit can be obtained in the non-relativistic mode with accelerating voltage of 200-300 kV. The MIDs differ in two anode plasma formation mechanisms, i.e., surface flashover of a dielectric coating on the anode and explosive emission of electrons from the anode, as well as in two insulation modes of external-magnetic field and self-magnetic field with either non-closed or closed drift of electrons in the anode-cathode (A-K) gap, respectively. Combined with ion current density measurement, energy density characterization is employed to resolve the spatial distribution of energy density before focusing for exploring the ion beam generation process. Consistent results are obtained on three types of MIDs concerning control of neutralizing electron flows for the space charge of ions where the high ion beam enhancement is determined by effective electron neutralization in the A-K gap, while the HIPIB composition of different ion species downstream from the diode may be considerably affected by the ion beam neutralization during propagation.

  13. Intense beam production of highly charged heavy ions by the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source SECRAL (invited)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H. W.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Guo, X. H.; Cao, Y.; Lu, W.; Zhang, Z. M.; Yuan, P.; Song, M. T.; Zhao, H. Y.; Jin, T.; Shang, Y.; Zhan, W. L.; Wei, B. W.; Xie, D. Z.

    2008-02-01

    There has been increasing demand to provide higher beam intensity and high enough beam energy for heavy ion accelerator and some other applications, which has driven electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source to produce higher charge state ions with higher beam intensity. One of development trends for highly charged ECR ion source is to build new generation ECR sources by utilization of superconducting magnet technology. SECRAL (superconducting ECR ion source with advanced design in Lanzhou) was successfully built to produce intense beams of highly charged ion for Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). The ion source has been optimized to be operated at 28GHz for its maximum performance. The superconducting magnet confinement configuration of the ion source consists of three axial solenoid coils and six sextupole coils with a cold iron structure as field booster and clamping. An innovative design of SECRAL is that the three axial solenoid coils are located inside of the sextupole bore in order to reduce the interaction forces between the sextupole coils and the solenoid coils. For 28GHz operation, the magnet assembly can produce peak mirror fields on axis of 3.6T at injection, 2.2T at extraction, and a radial sextupole field of 2.0T at plasma chamber wall. During the commissioning phase at 18GHz with a stainless steel chamber, tests with various gases and some metals have been conducted with microwave power less than 3.5kW by two 18GHz rf generators. It demonstrates the performance is very promising. Some record ion beam intensities have been produced, for instance, 810eμA of O7+, 505eμA of Xe20+, 306eμA of Xe27+, and so on. The effect of the magnetic field configuration on the ion source performance has been studied experimentally. SECRAL has been put into operation to provide highly charged ion beams for HIRFL facility since May 2007.

  14. Intense beam production of highly charged heavy ions by the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source SECRAL.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H W; Sun, L T; Zhang, X Z; Guo, X H; Cao, Y; Lu, W; Zhang, Z M; Yuan, P; Song, M T; Zhao, H Y; Jin, T; Shang, Y; Zhan, W L; Wei, B W; Xie, D Z

    2008-02-01

    There has been increasing demand to provide higher beam intensity and high enough beam energy for heavy ion accelerator and some other applications, which has driven electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source to produce higher charge state ions with higher beam intensity. One of development trends for highly charged ECR ion source is to build new generation ECR sources by utilization of superconducting magnet technology. SECRAL (superconducting ECR ion source with advanced design in Lanzhou) was successfully built to produce intense beams of highly charged ion for Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). The ion source has been optimized to be operated at 28 GHz for its maximum performance. The superconducting magnet confinement configuration of the ion source consists of three axial solenoid coils and six sextupole coils with a cold iron structure as field booster and clamping. An innovative design of SECRAL is that the three axial solenoid coils are located inside of the sextupole bore in order to reduce the interaction forces between the sextupole coils and the solenoid coils. For 28 GHz operation, the magnet assembly can produce peak mirror fields on axis of 3.6 T at injection, 2.2 T at extraction, and a radial sextupole field of 2.0 T at plasma chamber wall. During the commissioning phase at 18 GHz with a stainless steel chamber, tests with various gases and some metals have been conducted with microwave power less than 3.5 kW by two 18 GHz rf generators. It demonstrates the performance is very promising. Some record ion beam intensities have been produced, for instance, 810 e microA of O(7+), 505 e microA of Xe(20+), 306 e microA of Xe(27+), and so on. The effect of the magnetic field configuration on the ion source performance has been studied experimentally. SECRAL has been put into operation to provide highly charged ion beams for HIRFL facility since May 2007. PMID:18315105

  15. Beam loss studies in high-intensity heavy-ion linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Aseev, V. N.; Mustapha, B.

    2004-09-01

    The proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) Facility, an innovative exotic-beam facility for the production of high-quality beams of short-lived isotopes, consists of a fully superconducting 1.4GV driver linac and a 140MV postaccelerator. To produce sufficient intensities of secondary beams the driver linac will provide 400kW primary beams of any ion from hydrogen to uranium. Because of the high intensity of the primary beams the beam losses must be minimized to avoid radioactivation of the accelerator equipment. To keep the power deposited by the particles lost on the accelerator structures below 1 W/m, the relative beam losses per unit length should be less than 10-5, especially along the high-energy section of the linac. A new beam dynamics simulation code TRACK has been developed and used for beam loss studies in the RIA driver linac. In the TRACK code, ions are tracked through the three-dimensional electromagnetic fields of every element of the linac starting from the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source to the production target. The simulation starts with a multicomponent dc ion beam extracted from the ECR. The space charge forces are included in the simulations. They are especially important in the front end of the driver linac. Beam losses are studied by tracking a large number of particles (up to 106) through the whole linac considering all sources of error such us element misalignments, rf field errors, and stripper thickness fluctuations. For each configuration of the linac, multiple sets of error values have been randomly generated and used in the calculations. The results are then combined to calculate important beam parameters, estimate beam losses, and characterize the corresponding linac configuration. To track a large number of particles for a comprehensive number of error sets (up to 500), the code TRACK was parallelized and run on the Jazz computer cluster at ANL.

  16. Focusing of intense and divergent ion beams in a magnetic mass analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Jianlin, Ke; Changgeng, Zhou; Rui, Qiu; Yonghong, Hu

    2014-07-15

    A magnetic mass analyzer is used to determine the beam composition of a vacuum arc ion source. In the analyzer, we used the concentric multi-ring electrodes to focus the intense and divergent ion beams. We describe the principle, design, and the test results of the focusing device. The diameter of the beam profile is less than 20 mm when the accelerating voltage is 30 kV and the focusing voltage is about 2.0 kV. The focusing device has been successfully used in the magnetic mass analyzer to separate Ti{sup +}, Ti{sup 2+}, and Ti{sup 3+}.

  17. Density and potential measurements in an intense ion-beam-generated plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Abt, N.E.

    1982-05-01

    Neutral beams are created by intense large area ion beams which are neutralized in a gas cell. The interaction of the beam with the gas cell creates a plasma. Such a plasma is studied here. The basic plasma parameters, electron temperature, density, and plasma potential, are measured as a function of beam current and neutral gas pressure. These measurements are compared to a model based on the solution of Poisson's equation. Because of the cylindrical geometry the equation cannot be solved analytically. Details of the numerical method are presented.

  18. Intense beams from gases generated by a permanent magnet ECR ion source at PKU.

    PubMed

    Ren, H T; Peng, S X; Lu, P N; Yan, S; Zhou, Q F; Zhao, J; Yuan, Z X; Guo, Z Y; Chen, J E

    2012-02-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is designed for the production of high-current ion beams of various gaseous elements. At the Peking University (PKU), the primary study is focused on developing suitable permanent magnet ECR ion sources (PMECRs) for separated function radio frequency quadrupole (SFRFQ) accelerator and for Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility. Recently, other kinds of high-intensity ion beams are required for new acceleration structure demonstration, simulation of fusion reactor material irradiation, aviation bearing modification, and other applications. So we expanded the ion beam category from O(+), H(+), and D(+) to N(+), Ar(+), and He(+). Up to now, about 120 mA of H(+), 83 mA of D(+), 50 mA of O(+), 63 mA of N(+), 70 mA of Ar(+), and 65 mA of He(+) extracted at 50 kV through a φ 6 mm aperture were produced by the PMECRs at PKU. Their rms emittances are less than 0.2 π mm mrad. Tungsten samples were irradiated by H(+) or He(+) beam extracted from this ion source and H∕He holes and bubbles have been observed on the samples. A method to produce a high intensity H∕He mixed beam to study synergistic effect is developed for nuclear material irradiation. To design a He(+) beam injector for coupled radio frequency quadruple and SFRFQ cavity, He(+) beam transmission experiments were carried out on PKU low energy beam transport test bench and the transmission was less than 50%. It indicated that some electrode modifications must be done to decrease the divergence of He(+) beam. PMID:22380337

  19. Intense beams from gases generated by a permanent magnet ECR ion source at PKUa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, H. T.; Peng, S. X.; Lu, P. N.; Yan, S.; Zhou, Q. F.; Zhao, J.; Yuan, Z. X.; Guo, Z. Y.; Chen, J. E.

    2012-02-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is designed for the production of high-current ion beams of various gaseous elements. At the Peking University (PKU), the primary study is focused on developing suitable permanent magnet ECR ion sources (PMECRs) for separated function radio frequency quadrupole (SFRFQ) accelerator and for Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility. Recently, other kinds of high-intensity ion beams are required for new acceleration structure demonstration, simulation of fusion reactor material irradiation, aviation bearing modification, and other applications. So we expanded the ion beam category from O+, H+, and D+ to N+, Ar+, and He+. Up to now, about 120 mA of H+, 83 mA of D+, 50 mA of O+, 63 mA of N+, 70 mA of Ar+, and 65 mA of He+ extracted at 50 kV through a ϕ 6 mm aperture were produced by the PMECRs at PKU. Their rms emittances are less than 0.2 π mm mrad. Tungsten samples were irradiated by H+ or He+ beam extracted from this ion source and H/He holes and bubbles have been observed on the samples. A method to produce a high intensity H/He mixed beam to study synergistic effect is developed for nuclear material irradiation. To design a He+ beam injector for coupled radio frequency quadruple and SFRFQ cavity, He+ beam transmission experiments were carried out on PKU low energy beam transport test bench and the transmission was less than 50%. It indicated that some electrode modifications must be done to decrease the divergence of He+ beam.

  20. Device for providing high-intensity ion or electron beam

    DOEpatents

    McClanahan, Edwin D.; Moss, Ronald W.

    1977-01-01

    A thin film of a low-thermionic-work-function material is maintained on the cathode of a device for producing a high-current, low-pressure gas discharge by means of sputter deposition from an auxiliary electrode. The auxiliary electrode includes a surface with a low-work-function material, such as thorium, uranium, plutonium or one of the rare earth elements, facing the cathode but at a disposition and electrical potential so as to extract ions from the gas discharge and sputter the low-work-function material onto the cathode. By continuously replenishing the cathode film, high thermionic emissions and ion plasmas can be realized and maintained over extended operating periods.

  1. Michigan state upgrade to produce intense radioactive ion beams by fragmentation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Lubkin, G.B.

    1997-05-01

    This article describes the planned upgrading of accelerator facilities to produce intense radioactive ion beams, by a fragmentation technique, for experimental simulation of nucleosynthesis in novas and supernovas. (AIP) {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.} {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital American Institute of Physics}

  2. Physics of Neutralization of Intense High-Energy Ion Beam Pulses by Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I. D.; Davidson, R. C.; Dorf, M. A.; Startsev, E. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Lee, E. P.; Friedman, A.

    2010-04-28

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by electrons forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self- magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating through the

  3. Physics of neutralization of intense high-energy ion beam pulses by electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I. D.; Davidson, R. C.; Dorf, M. A.; Startsev, E. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Lee, E. P.; Friedman, A.

    2010-05-15

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by electrons form the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self-magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100 G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating through the

  4. New Capabilities for Modeling Intense Beams in Heavy Ion Fusion Drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Bieniosek, F M; Celata, C M; Cohen, R H; Davidson, R C; Grote, D P; Haber, I; Henestroza, E; Lee, E P; Lund, S M; Qin, H; Sharp, W M; Startsev, E; Vay, J L

    2003-09-09

    Significant advances have been made in modeling the intense beams of heavy-ion beam-driven Inertial Fusion Energy (Heavy Ion Fusion). In this paper, a roadmap for a validated, predictive driver simulation capability, building on improved codes and experimental diagnostics, is presented, as are examples of progress. The Mesh Refinement and Particle-in-Cell methods were integrated in the WARP code; this capability supported an injector experiment that determined the achievable current rise time, in good agreement with calculations. In a complementary effort, a new injector approach based on the merging of {approx}100 small beamlets was simulated, its basic feasibility established, and an experimental test designed. Time-dependent 3D simulations of the High Current Experiment (HCX) were performed, yielding voltage waveforms for an upcoming study of bunch-end control. Studies of collective beam modes which must be taken into account in driver designs were carried out. The value of using experimental data to tomographically ''synthesize'' a 4D beam particle distribution and so initialize a simulation was established; this work motivated further development of new diagnostics which yield 3D projections of the beam phase space. Other developments, including improved modeling of ion beam focusing and transport through the fusion chamber environment and onto the target, and of stray electrons and their effects on ion beams, are briefly noted.

  5. Nonlinear Plasma Waves Excitation by Intense Ion Beams in Background Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward A. Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

    2004-04-15

    Plasma neutralization of an intense ion pulse is of interest for many applications, including plasma lenses, heavy ion fusion, cosmic ray propagation, etc. An analytical electron fluid model has been developed to describe the plasma response to a propagating ion beam. The model predicts very good charge neutralization during quasi-steady-state propagation, provided the beam pulse duration {tau}{sub b} is much longer than the electron plasma period 2{pi}/{omega}{sub p}, where {omega}{sub p} = (4{pi}e{sup 2}n{sub p}/m){sup 1/2} is the electron plasma frequency and n{sub p} is the background plasma density. In the opposite limit, the beam pulse excites large-amplitude plasma waves. If the beam density is larger than the background plasma density, the plasma waves break. Theoretical predictions are compared with the results of calculations utilizing a particle-in-cell (PIC) code. The cold electron fluid results agree well with the PIC simulations for ion beam propagation through a background plasma. The reduced fluid description derived in this paper can provide an important benchmark for numerical codes and yield scaling relations for different beam and plasma parameters. The visualization of numerical simulation data shows complex collective phenomena during beam entry and exit from the plasma.

  6. Intense ion beams as a tool for opacity measurements in warm dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Abdallah, Joseph; Tauschwiz, An; Jacoby, J; Maruhn, J A; Novikov, V G; Tauschwitz, A; Onkels, E; Wittle, K; Rosmej, F B; Schott, R

    2009-01-01

    Opacity measurements in warm dense matter (WDM) provide a valuable benchmark for the diverging theoretical models in this regime. Heating of thin foils with intense heavy-ion beams allows one to create isolated samples of warm dense matter suitable for experimental determination of frequency-dependent opacities. A prerequisite for the measurements is the isothermal expansion of the heated foil. Hydrodynamic simulations predict that this condition is fulfilled. The analysis shows that existing ion-beam accelerators are capable to contribute to this field of research.

  7. Low-emittance monoenergetic electron and ion beams from ultra-intense laser-solid interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, T E; Roth, M; Allen, M M; Johnson, J; Hatchett, S P; Le Sage, G P; Wilks, S C

    2000-03-03

    Recent experiments at the LLNL Petawatt Laser have demonstrated the generation of intense, high energy beams of electrons and ions from the interaction of ultra-intense laser light with solid targets. Focused laser intensities as high as 6 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2} are achieved, at which point the quiver energies of the target electrons extend to {approx}10 MeV. In this new, fully relativistic regime of laser-plasma interactions, nuclear processes become important and nuclear techniques are required to diagnose the high-energy particle production. In recent experiments we have observed electrons accelerated to 100 MeV, up to 60 MeV brehmsstrahlung generation, photo-nuclear fission and positron-electron pair creation. We also have observed monoenergetic jets of electrons having sufficiently small emittance to be interesting as a laser-accelerated beam, if the production mechanism could be understood and controlled. The huge flux of multi-MeV ponderomotively accelerated electrons produced in the laser-solid interaction is also observed to accelerate contaminant ions from the rear surface of the solid target up to 50 MeV. We describe spectroscopic measurements which reveal intense monoenergetic beam features in the proton energy spectrum. The total spectrum contains >10{sup 13} protons, while the monoenergetic beam pulses contain {approx}1 nC of protons, and exhibits a longitudinal and transverse emittance smaller than conventional RF proton accelerator beams.

  8. Formation of plasma and ion flux on a target, irradiated by an intense electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Engelko, Vladimir; Mueller, Georg

    2005-07-01

    Theoretical consideration shows that under the influence of an intense electron beam, first, an ion flux and then plasma are formed on the surface of a target. The target plasma is created when the density of the ion flux achieves a certain limiting value. The time necessary for the plasma formation depends on the beam current density and the efficiency of gas desorption and ionization. This time is few microseconds under typical vacuum conditions of about 5.0x10{sup -5} mbar, electron-beam current density in the range of 10 A/cm{sup 2}, and kinetic energy of electrons in the range of 100 keV. When the density of the ion flux reaches a limiting value the beam potential decreases to a level, which is half of the initial one. A transient layer is formed between the plasma boundary and the electron beam. For conditions mentioned above its length are few centimeters. The target plasma expands into the beam drift region, with a velocity increasing in time. The expansion of the target plasma is the main reason for neutralization of the electron-beam space charge.

  9. Design of a compact Faraday cup for low energy, low intensity ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantero, E. D.; Sosa, A.; Andreazza, W.; Bravin, E.; Lanaia, D.; Voulot, D.; Welsch, C. P.

    2016-01-01

    Beam intensity is one of the key parameters in particle accelerators, in particular during machine commissioning, but also during operation for experiments. At low beam energies and low intensities a number of challenges arise in its measurement as commonly used non-invasive devices are no longer sensitive enough. It then becomes necessary to stop the beam in order to measure its absolute intensity. A very compact Faraday cup for determining ion beam currents from a few nanoamperes down to picoamperes for the HIE-ISOLDE post-accelerator at CERN has been designed, built and tested with beam. It has a large aperture diameter of 30 mm and a total length of only 16 mm, making it one of the most compact designs ever used. In this paper we present the different steps that were involved in the design and optimization of this device, including beam tests with two early prototypes and the final monitor. We also present an analysis of the losses caused by secondary particle emission for different repelling electrode voltages and beam energies. Finally, we show that results obtained from an analytical model for electron loss probability combined with Monte Carlo simulations of particles trajectories provide a very good agreement with experimental data.

  10. A mask for high-intensity heavy-ion beams in the MAYA active target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Pancin, J.; Damoy, S.; Roger, T.; Babo, M.; Caamaño, M.; Farget, F.; Grinyer, G. F.; Jacquot, B.; Pérez-Loureiro, D.; Ramos, D.; Suzuki, D.

    2014-12-01

    The use of high-intensity and/or heavy-ion beams in active targets and time-projection chambers is often limited by the strong ionization produced by the beam. Besides the difficulties associated with the saturation of the detector and electronics, beam-related signals may hide the physical events of interest or reduce the detector performance. In addition, space-charge effects may deteriorate the homogeneity of the electric drift field and distort the subsequent reconstruction of particle trajectories. In anticipation of future projects involving such conditions, a dedicated beam mask has been developed and tested in the MAYA active target. Experimental results with a 136Xe beam are presented.

  11. Investigation of Generation, Acceleration, Transport and Final Focusing of High-Intensity Heavy Ion Beams from Sources to Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Chiping Chen

    2006-10-26

    Under the auspices of the research grant, the Intense Beam Theoretical Research Goup at Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Plasma Science and Fusion Center made significant contributions in a number of important areas in the HIF and HEDP research, including: (a) Derivation of rms envelope equations and study of rms envelope dynamics for high-intensity heavy ion beams in a small-aperture AG focusing transport systems; (b) Identification of a new mechanism for chaotic particle motion, halo formation, and beam loss in high-intensity heavy ion beams in a small-aperture AG focusing systems; Development of elliptic beam theory; (d) Study of Physics Issues in the Neutralization Transport Experiment (NTX).

  12. Rapid Melt and Resolidification of Surface Layers Using Intense, Pulsed Ion Beams Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Renk, Timothy J. Turman, Bob Senft, Donna Sorensen, Neil R. Stinnett, Regan Greenly, John B. Thompson, Michael O. Buchheit, Rudolph G.

    1998-10-02

    The emerging technology of pulsed intense ion beams has been shown to lead to improvements in surface characteristics such as hardness and wear resistance, as well as mechanical smoothing. We report hereon the use of this technology to systematically study improvements to three types of metal alloys - aluminum, iron, and titanium. Ion beam tieatment produces a rapid melt and resolidification (RMR) of the surface layer. In the case of a predeposited thin-fihn layer, the beam mixes this layer into the substrate, Ieading to improvements that can exceed those produced by treatment of the alloy alone, In either case, RMR results in both crystal refinement and metastable state formation in the treated surface layer not accessible by conventional alloy production. Although more characterization is needed, we have begun the process of relating these microstructural changes to the surface improvements we discuss in this report.

  13. Acceleration of Ultra-Low Emittance Proton and Ion Beams with High Intensity Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Thomas E.

    2002-11-01

    Intense beams of several MeV protons and ions, generated by the interaction of high-intensity short pulse lasers with thin foils, have been observed by many researchers in recent years.(S.P. Hatchett et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2076 (2000); T.E. Cowan et al., Nucl. Inst. Meth. A 455, 130 (2000); R.A. Snavely et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 2945 (2000); S.C. Wilks et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 532 (2000); E. Clark et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 670 (2000).) In experiments performed at the 100 TW LULI laser, we have succeeded to control the ion acceleration process to produce ultra high quality proton beams, whose transverse emittance is <0.006 π mm-mrad (rms-normalized), a factor of 100 lower than is typical of conventional RF linear accelerators. Within the envelope of the entire beam, we could focus individual proton beamlets to 100 nm spatial scales. This required control of the laser-plasma interaction, of the transport of MA currents of relativistic electrons through the target substrate, and of the surface topology and source material layering on the target foil rear-surface.(M. Roth et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 5, 061002 (2002).) By varying the source material, we also accelerated light ion beams, such as He-like fluorine, to over 5 MeV/nucleon.(M. Hegelich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 085002 (2002).) From PIC simulations we understand the highest-energy and lowest-divergence proton acceleration as a transient laser-driven virtual cathode effect occurring at the target rear-surface. We have also confirmed the acceleration of ions from the front surface (A. Maksimchuk et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 4108 (2000).), which we find exhibits an intense low-energy component, but only a tenuous high-energy component, in agreement with PIC simulations. This work was performed with corporate support of General Atomics.

  14. Ion Beams in Short-Pulse, High Intensity Laser Matter Interactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasinski, B. F.; Langdon, A. B.; Still, C. H.; Tabak, M.; Town, R. P. J.; Kruer, W. L.; Wilks, S. C.; Welch, D. R.

    2002-11-01

    Experiments on the interaction of short pulse high intensity lasers with thin foils have produced intense ion beams with surprisingly good emittance. We report on explicit PIC and hybrid particle-fluid simulations motivated by these experiments. In addition, we study the focusing of these beams and their possible collective effects. The LSP code footnote D. R. Welch, et al, Nucl. Inst. Meth. Phys. Res. A 242, 134 (2001). uses a direct implicit particle-in-cell algorithm in 2 or 3 dimensions to solve for the beam particles and the background particles are treated as a fluid. Implications for the fast ignitor concept footnote M. Tabak, et al, Phys. Plasmas 1, 1626 (1994). in which energetic fast particles transport energy to the high-density compressed fuel will be discussed.

  15. Theoretical studies of defect formation and target heating by intense pulsed ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, J. J.; Schenkel, T.; Persaud, A.; Seidl, P. A.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I.

    2015-11-01

    We present results of three studies related to experiments on NDCX-II, the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, a short-pulse (~ 1ns), high-current (~ 70A) linear accelerator for 1.2 MeV ions at LBNL. These include: (a) Coupled transverse and longitudinal envelope calculations of the final non-neutral ion beam transport, followed by neutralized drift and final focus, for a number of focus and drift lengths and with a series of ion species (Z =1-19). Predicted target fluences were obtained and target temperatures in the 1 eV range estimated. (b) HYDRA simulations of the target response for Li and He ions and for Al and Au targets at various ion fluences (up to 1012 ions/pulse/mm2) and pulse durations, benchmarking temperature estimates from the envelope calculations. (c) Crystal-Trim simulations of ion channeling through single-crystal lattices, with comparisons to ion transmission data as a function of orientation angle of the crystal foil and for different ion intensities and ion species. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE under contracts DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL), DE-AC02-05CH11231 (LBNL) and DE-AC02-76CH0307 (PPPL) and was supported by the US DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Sciences. LLNL-ABS-67521.

  16. The initial stage of surface modification of magnesium alloys by high intensity pulse ions beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, P.; Liu, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.

    2016-06-01

    The initial stage of high intensity pulsed ion beam irradiated magnesium alloys was studied by MD simulation. Specimens containing Mg17Al12 precipitation were modeled to investigate the evolution of magnesium alloys during several picoseconds after a high-energy ion impacting. It was found that the Mg17Al12 precipitation has little effects on the kinetic energy evolution in the heat zone, but considerable effects on strength of kinetic energy peak moving to the deep matrix and on the surface morphology of the magnesium alloy at thermal equilibrium state. The thickness of the heat zone is independent on the temperature of surface region.

  17. Intense Laser Ionization and Acceleration of Electrons in Highly-Charged Ions Using Vortex Laser Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Liang-Wen; Vikartofsky, Andrew; Starace, Anthony F.

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in laser technology have led to the development of high-power petawatt lasers, making possible laser intensities of the order of 1022 W /cm2 . An electron in a highly-charged ion can be ionized in a laser field at its peak intensity and swiftly accelerated to GeV energies. Our prior investigation of laser acceleration of electrons using linearly-polarized Gaussian beams (with zero orbital angular momentum) has revealed that the final-state energies and ejection angles of the electrons depend on the initial target ion positions relative to the laser focus. We report here recent simulations of laser ionization and acceleration of electrons using linearly-polarized vortex laser beams (i.e., Laguerre-Gaussian beams), which carry orbital angular momentum and can spin microscopic objects. These simulations show that the inherent spiral phase structure of the vortex beams leads to improved final-state energy and ejection angle distributions of the electrons. This work is supported in part by DOE, Office of Science, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, under Grant No. DE-FG02-96ER14646.

  18. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1984-05-29

    The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

  19. Current neutralization and focusing of intense ion beams with a plasma-filled solenoidal lens. I

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, B.V.; Sudan, R.N.

    1996-12-01

    The response of the magnetized plasma in an axisymmetric, plasma-filled, solenoidal magnetic lens, to intense light ion beam injection is studied. The lens plasma fill is modeled as an inertialess, resistive, electron magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) fluid since characteristic beam times {tau} satisfy 2{pi}/{omega}{sub {ital pe}},2{pi}/{Omega}{sub {ital e}}{lt}{tau}{le}2{pi}/{Omega}{sub {ital i}} ({omega}{sub {ital pe}} is the electron plasma frequency and {Omega}{sub {ital e},{ital i}} are the electron, ion gyrofrequencies). When the electron collisionality satisfies {nu}{sub {ital e}}{lt}{Omega}{sub {ital e}}, the linear plasma response is determined by whistler wave dynamics. In this case, current neutralization of the beam is reduced on the time scale for whistler wave transit across the beam. The transit time is inversely proportional to the electron density and proportional to the angle of incidence of the beam with respect to the applied solenoidal field. In the collisional regime ({nu}{sub {ital e}}{gt}{Omega}{sub {ital e}}) the plasma return currents decay on the normal diffusive time scale determined by the conductivity. The analysis is supported by two-and-one-half dimensional hybrid particle-in-cell simulations. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Collective focusing of intense ion beam pulses for high-energy density physics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2011-03-15

    The collective focusing concept in which a weak magnetic lens provides strong focusing of an intense ion beam pulse carrying a neutralizing electron background is investigated by making use of advanced particle-in-cell simulations and reduced analytical models. The original analysis by Robertson [Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 149 (1982)] is extended to the parameter regimes of particular importance for several high-energy density physics applications. The present paper investigates (1) the effects of non-neutral collective focusing in a moderately strong magnetic field; (2) the diamagnetic effects leading to suppression of the applied magnetic field due to the presence of the beam pulse; and (3) the influence of a finite-radius conducting wall surrounding the beam cross-section on beam neutralization. In addition, it is demonstrated that the use of the collective focusing lens can significantly simplify the technical realization of the final focusing of ion beam pulses in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-I (NDCX-I), and the conceptual designs of possible experiments on NDCX-I are investigated by making use of advanced numerical simulations.

  1. Collective Focusing of Intense Ion Beam Pulses for High-energy Density Physics Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2011-04-27

    The collective focusing concept in which a weak magnetic lens provides strong focusing of an intense ion beam pulse carrying a neutralizing electron background is investigated by making use of advanced particle-in-cell simulations and reduced analytical models. The original analysis by Robertson Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 149 (1982) is extended to the parameter regimes of particular importance for several high-energy density physics applications. The present paper investigates (1) the effects of non-neutral collective focusing in a moderately strong magnetic field; (2) the diamagnetic effects leading to suppression of the applied magnetic field due to the presence of the beam pulse; and (3) the influence of a finite-radius conducting wall surrounding the beam cross-section on beam neutralization. In addition, it is demonstrated that the use of the collective focusing lens can significantly simplify the technical realization of the final focusing of ion beam pulses in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-I (NDCX-I) , and the conceptual designs of possible experiments on NDCX-I are investigated by making use of advanced numerical simulations. 2011 American Institute of Physics

  2. Proceedings of the workshop on the science of intense radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, J.B.; Vieira, D.J.

    1990-10-01

    This report contains the proceedings of a 2-1/2 day workshop on the Science of Intense Radioactive Ion Beams which was held at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on April 10--12, 1990. The workshop was attended by 105 people, representing 30 institutions from 10 countries. The thrust of the workshop was to develop the scientific opportunities which become possible with a new generation intense Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility, currently being discussed within North America. The workshop was organized around five primary topics: (1) reaction physics; (2) nuclei far from stability/nuclear structure; (3) nuclear astrophysics; (4) atomic physics, material science, and applied research; and (5) facilities. Overview talks were presented on each of these topics, followed by 1-1/2 days of intense parallel working group sessions. The final half day of the workshop was devoted to the presentation and discussion of the working group summary reports, closing remarks and a discussion of future plans for this effort.

  3. Microwave guiding and intense plasma generation at subcutoff dimensions for focused ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Jose V.; Dey, Indranuj; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2007-07-23

    The mechanism of microwave guiding and plasma generation is investigated in a circular waveguide with a subcutoff dimension using pulsed microwaves of 3 GHz. During the initial phase, gaseous breakdown is induced by the exponentially decaying wave. Upon breakdown, the refractive index of the plasma medium varies radially, with the plasma density reaching close to cutoff values in the central region. At lower pressures, the waves can propagate through the peripheral plasma with a reduced wavelength, due to the collisionally broadened upper hybrid resonance region. The intense narrow cross sectional plasma bears promise for multielemental focused ion beams.

  4. Collective Focusing of a Plasma-Neutralized Intense Ion Beam Propagating Along a Weak Solenoidal Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2009-11-01

    Two schemes are considered for focusing intense ion beams utilizing the collective dynamics of plasma electrons. In the first approach, an ion beam propagates through a neutralizing background plasma along a uniform magnetic field. In the second approach, an ion beam passes through a finite size plasma, extracts neutralizing electrons from the plasma, and then enters a magnetic lens. In the both cases, a strong radial electric field is produced due to the collective electron dynamics. This self-electric field provides the enhanced transverse focusing of the ion beam. Detailed analytical and advanced numerical studies using particle-in-cell simulations are performed for both approaches. The radial focusing force acting on beam ions is calculated for an arbitrary ratio between the electron cyclotron and plasma frequencies. Collective focusing effects are shown to be important for the design of heavy ion drivers for high energy density and warm dense matter physics applications.

  5. High-intensity positive beams extracted from a compact double-chamber ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Huck, H.; Somacal, H.; Di Gregorio, D.E.; Fernandez Niello, J.O.; Igarzabal, M.; Di Paolo, H.; Reinoso, M.

    2005-06-15

    This work presents the design and development of a simple ion source, the associated ion extraction optics, and the beam transport of a low-energy and high-current proton accelerator. In its actual version, the ion source can deliver positive proton currents up to 100 mA. This rather high beam current is achieved by adding a small ionization chamber between the discharge chamber containing the filament and the extraction electrode of the ion source. Different parameters of the ion source and the injection beam line are evaluated by means of computer simulations to optimize the beam production and transmission.

  6. LARGE-SCALE SIMULATION OF BEAM DYNAMICS IN HIGH INTENSITY ION LINACS USING PARALLEL SUPERCOMPUTERS

    SciTech Connect

    R. RYNE; J. QIANG

    2000-08-01

    In this paper we present results of using parallel supercomputers to simulate beam dynamics in next-generation high intensity ion linacs. Our approach uses a three-dimensional space charge calculation with six types of boundary conditions. The simulations use a hybrid approach involving transfer maps to treat externally applied fields (including rf cavities) and parallel particle-in-cell techniques to treat the space-charge fields. The large-scale simulation results presented here represent a three order of magnitude improvement in simulation capability, in terms of problem size and speed of execution, compared with typical two-dimensional serial simulations. Specific examples will be presented, including simulation of the spallation neutron source (SNS) linac and the Low Energy Demonstrator Accelerator (LEDA) beam halo experiment.

  7. Ion Accelerator Merges Several Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G.

    1984-01-01

    Intense ion beam formed by merging multiple ion beamlets into one concentrated beam. Beamlet holes in graphite screen and focusing grids arranged in hexagonal pattern. Merged beam passes through single hole in each of aluminum accelerator and decelerator grids. Ion extraction efficiency, beam intensity, and focusing improved.

  8. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.

    1986-01-01

    A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

  9. Perturbative Particle Simulation for an Intense Ion Beam in a Periodic Quadrupole Focusing Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. W.

    1996-11-01

    footnotetext[1]This work is supported the DOE contract DE-AC02-76-CHO-3073. footnotetext[2]In collaboration with Q. Qian and R. C. Davidson, PPPL. Stability and transport properties of an intense ion beam propagating through an alternating-gradient quadrupole focusing field with initial Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) distribution(I. M. Kapchinksij and V. V. Vladimirskj, Proceedings of the International Conference on High Energy Accelerators and Instrumentation (CERN Geneva, 1959), p. 274.) are studied using newly-developed perturbative particle simulation techniques. Specifically, two different schemes have been investigated: the first is based on the δ f scheme originally developed for tokamak plasmas,(A. Dimits and W. W. Lee, J. Comput. Phys. 107), 309 (1993); S. Parker and W. W. Lee, Phys. Fluids B 5, 77 (1993). and the other is related to the linearized trajectory scheme.(J. Byers, Proceedings of the 4th Conference on Numerical Simulation of Plasmas, (NRL, Washington D.C., 1970),p.496.) While the former is useful for both linear and nonlinear simulations, the latter can be used for benchmark purpose. Stability properties and associated mode structures are investigated over a wide range of beam current and focusing field strength. The new schemes are found to be highly effective in describing detailed properties of beam stability and propagation over long distances. For example, a stable KV beam can indeed propagate over hundreds of lattice period in the simulation with negligible growth. On the other hand, in the unstable region when the beam current is sufficiently high,(I. Hoffman, L. Laslett, L. Smith, and I. Haber, Particle Accelerators 13), 145 (1983). large-amplitude density perturbations with (δ n)_max/hatn0 ~ 1 with low azimuthal harmonic numbers, concentrated near the beam surface, are observed. The corresponding mode structures are of Gaussian shape in the radial direction. The physics of nonlinear saturation and emittance growth will be discussed

  10. Lifetime of anode polymer in magnetically insulated ion diodes for high-intensity pulsed ion beam generation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X. P.; Dong, Z. H.; Han, X. G.; Xin, J. P.; Lei, M. K.

    2007-02-15

    Generation of high-intensity pulsed ion beam (HIPIB) has been studied experimentally using polyethylene as the anode polymer in magnetically insulated ion diodes (MIDs) with an external magnetic field. The HIPIB is extracted from the anode plasma produced during the surface discharging process on polyethylene under the electrical and magnetic fields in MIDs, i.e., high-voltage surface breakdown (flashover) with bombardments by electrons. The surface morphology and the microstructure of the anode polymer are characterized using scanning electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry, respectively. The surface roughening of the anode polymer results from the explosive release of trapped gases or newly formed gases under the high-voltage discharging, leaving fractured surfaces with bubble formation. The polyethylene in the surface layer degrades into low-molecular-weight polymers such as polyethylene wax and paraffin under the discharging process. Both the surface roughness and the fraction of low molecular polymers apparently increase as the discharging times are prolonged for multipulse HIPIB generation. The changes in the surface morphology and the composition of anode polymer lead to a noticeable decrease in the output of ion beam intensity, i.e., ion current density and diode voltage, accompanied with an increase in instability of the parameters with the prolonged discharge times. The diode voltage (or surface breakdown voltage of polymer) mainly depends on the surface morphology (or roughness) of anode polymers, and the ion current density on the composition of anode polymers, which account for the two stages of anode polymer degradation observed experimentally, i.e., stage I which has a steady decrease of the two parameters and stage II which shows a slow decrease, but with an enhanced fluctuation of the two parameters with increasing pulses of HIPIB generation.

  11. Cluster ion beam profiling of organics by secondary ion mass spectrometry--does sodium affect the molecular ion intensity at interfaces?

    PubMed

    Green, Felicia M; Gilmore, Ian S; Seah, Martin P

    2008-12-01

    The use of cluster ion beam sputtering for depth profiling organic materials is of growing technological importance and is a very active area of research. At the 44th IUVSTA Workshop on "Sputtering and Ion Emission by Cluster Ion Beams", recent results were presented of a cluster ion beam depth profile of a thin organic molecular layer on a silicon wafer substrate. Those data showed that the intensity of molecular secondary ions is observed to increase at the interface and this was explained in terms of the higher stopping power in the substrate and a consequently higher sputtering yield and even higher secondary ion molecular sputtering yield. An alternative hypothesis was postulated in the workshop discussion which may be paraphrased as: "under primary ion bombardment of an organic layer, mobile ions such as sodium may migrate to the interface with the inorganic substrate and this enhancement of the sodium concentration increases the ionisation probability, so increasing the molecular ion yield observed at the interface". It is important to understand if measurement artefacts occur at interfaces for quantification as these are of great technological relevance - for example, the concentration of drug in a drug delivery system. Here, we evaluate the above hypothesis using a sample that exhibits regions of high and low sodium concentration at both the organic surface and the interface with the silicon wafer substrate. There is no evidence to support the hypothesis that the probability of molecular secondary ion ionisation is related to the sodium concentration at these levels. PMID:19039819

  12. Production of intense ion beams in a reflex triode with an external plasma source at the anode

    SciTech Connect

    Bystritskii, V.M.; Verigin, A.A.; Volkov, S.N.; Krasik, Y.E.; Podkatov, V.I.

    1986-09-01

    An experimental study of the production of intense ion beams in a reflex triode with an external plasma source at the anode is reported. The ions had various ratios Z/M. When the anode plasma is produced in a preliminary charging pulse of the accelerator, the plasma density is too low for operation under charge-limited emission conditions. In this case, an ion beam is observed to be produced from the plasma formed by the direct heating of the anode material by oscillating electrons. When an anode plasma resulting from the breakdown of a dielectric insert or of the vacuum gap of a composite andode by an external voltage source is used to produce an ion beam, the reflex triode operating conditions depend on delaying the operation of the accelerator with respect to the external source. The highest efficiency (approx. =20%) in the production of an ion beam is observed at t/sub d/ = 3--6 ..mu..s. In this case, the reflex triode operates under increasing or constant impedance conditions. It was shown in the course of the experiments that the ion beam which is produced is nonuniform. There are three groups of ions: H/sup +/, C/sup n//sup +/, and Cu/sup n//sup +/. The energy of the heavy ions depends on the applied anode potential. The different mass components of the ion beam do not appear at the same time. The macroscopic divergence of the beam is 4--6/sup 0/ at the periphery and drops off to approx. <1/sup 0/ at the center. The microscopic divergence of the beam is 3/sup 0/. The total energy of the ion beam which is produced is less than 120 J at an average current approx. =2.8 kA.

  13. Designing Neutralized Drift Compression for Focusing of Intense Ion Beam Pulses in a Background Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I.D.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.; Startsev, E.A.; Barnard, J.J.; Friedman, A.; Lee, E.P.; Lidia, S.M.; Logan, B.G.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Welch, D.R.; Sefkow, A.B.

    2009-04-28

    Neutralized drift compression offers an effective method for particle beam focusing and current amplification. In neutralized drift compression, a linear radial and longitudinal velocity drift is applied to a beam pulse, so that the beam pulse compresses as it drifts in the drift-compression section. The beam intensity can increase more than a factor of 100 in both the radial and longitudinal directions, resulting in more than 10,000 times increase in the beam number density during this process. The self-electric and self-magnetic fields can prevent tight ballistic focusing and have to be neutralized by supplying neutralizing electrons. This paper presents a survey of the present theoretical understanding of the drift compression process and plasma neutralization of intense particle beams. The optimal configuration of focusing and neutralizing elements is discussed in this paper.

  14. Electron Cloud Effects in Intense, Ion Beam Linacs Theory and Experimental Planning for HIF

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Cohen, R H; Lund, S M; Bieniosek, F M; Lee, E P; Prost, L R; Seidl, P A; Vay, P-A

    2002-05-23

    Heavy-ion accelerators for heavy-ion inertial fusion energy (HIF) will operate at high aperture-fill factors with high beam current and long durations. (Injected currents of order 1 A and 20 {micro}s at a few MeV for each of {approx}100 beams, will be compressed to the order of 100 A and 0.2 {micro}s, reaching GeV energies in a power plant driver.) This will be accompanied by beam ions impacting walls, liberating gas molecules and secondary electrons. Without special preparation, the {approx}10% electron population predicted for driver-scale experiments will affect beam transport; but wall conditioning and other mitigation techniques should result in substantial reduction. Theory and particle-in-cell simulations suggest that electrons, from ionization of residual and desorbed gas and secondary electrons from vacuum walls, will be radially trapped in the {approx}4 kV ion beam potential. Trapped electrons can modify the beam space charge, vacuum pressure, ion transport dynamics, and halo generation, and can potentially cause ion-electron instabilities. Within quadrupole (and dipole) magnets, the longitudinal electron velocity is limited to drift velocities (E x B and {del}B) and the electron density can vary azimuthally, radially, and longitudinally. These variations can cause centroid misalignment, emittance growth and halo growth. Diagnostics are being developed to measure the energy and flux of electrons and gas evolved from walls, and the net charge and gas density within magnetic quadrupoles. We will also measure the depth of trapping of electrons, their axial and radial transport, and the effects of electrons on the ion beam.

  15. Ion emission from solid surfaces induced by intense electron beam impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermare, C.; Davis, H. A.; Moir, D. C.; Hughes, T. P.

    2003-01-01

    Ions or ionized neutrals released from solid surfaces by electron beam impact can be accelerated and trapped in the beam potential causing beam disruption. Experiments have been performed on the DARHT-I accelerator (1.7 kA, 19.8 MeV, 60 ns) to study this phenomenon. The beam, focused to a range of diameters, was transmitted through thin targets made of various materials. The time evolution of the beam radial profile was measured downstream of the target. For low current density, the downstream-beam radial profile was time invariant as expected for a pure electron beam. At higher current density, the downstream beam was clearly disrupted during the pulse followed by a large-amplitude transverse centroid instability. Two-dimensional calculations using the Lsp particle-in-cell code show that if the space-charge-limiting ion current is allowed to flow after the target surface temperature increases by about 400 K, the main features of the experimental observations are replicated. Three-dimensional Lsp calculations show growth of the ion hose instability at a frequency close to that observed in the experiments.

  16. Intense Ion Beam Flux of Adsorbed Gases and Metallic Anode Materials in the “Point Pinch Diode” Measured with Thomson-Parabola Ion Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Morihiko

    1987-06-01

    An intense flux of ion beams was observed in a “Point Pinch Diode” which consists of concentric elliptic or spherical electrodes and a slender magnetically insulated transmission line. The ion beam had an energy of about 380 keV, which was equivalent to the supplied diode voltage. The peak current density of the ion beam ranged from 5 to 7.5 kA/cm2 in spite of a small input energy (less than about 1 kJ). Measurements with a Thomson-parabola ion spectrometer show that the major components were hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen, the origins of which were oil and water adsorbed on the surface of the metallic anodes. A significant flux of the metallic ion beams was also detected in the cases of aluminium, copper and gold anodes.

  17. Enhanced collective focusing of intense neutralized ion beam pulses in the presence of weak solenoidal magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.

    2012-05-31

    In this study, the design of ion drivers for warm dense matter and high energy density physics applications and heavy ion fusion involves transverse focusing and longitudinal compression of intense ion beams to a small spot size on the target. To facilitate the process, the compression occurs in a long drift section filled with a dense background plasma, which neutralizes the intense beam self-fields. Typically, the ion bunch charge is better neutralized than its current, and as a result a net self-pinching (magnetic) force is produced. The self-pinching effect is of particular practical importance, and is used in various ion driver designs in order to control the transverse beam envelope. In the present work we demonstrate that this radial self-focusing force can be significantly enhanced if a weak (B~100 G) solenoidal magnetic field is applied inside the neutralized drift section, thus allowing for substantially improved transport. It is shown that in contrast to magnetic self-pinching, the enhanced collective self-focusing has a radial electric field component and occurs as a result of the overcompensation of the beam charge by plasmaelectrons, whereas the beam current becomes well-neutralized. As the beam leaves the neutralizing drift section, additional transverse focusing can be applied. For instance, in the neutralized drift compression experiments (NDCX) a strong (several Tesla) final focus solenoid is used for this purpose. In the present analysis we propose that the tight final focus in the NDCX experiments may possibly be achieved by using a much weaker (few hundred Gauss) magnetic lens, provided the ion beam carries an equal amount of co-moving neutralizing electrons from the preceding drift section into the lens. In this case the enhanced focusing is provided by the collective electrondynamics strongly affected by a weak applied magnetic field.

  18. Enhanced collective focusing of intense neutralized ion beam pulses in the presence of weak solenoidal magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.

    2012-05-15

    The design of ion drivers for warm dense matter and high energy density physics applications and heavy ion fusion involves transverse focusing and longitudinal compression of intense ion beams to a small spot size on the target. To facilitate the process, the compression occurs in a long drift section filled with a dense background plasma, which neutralizes the intense beam self-fields. Typically, the ion bunch charge is better neutralized than its current, and as a result a net self-pinching (magnetic) force is produced. The self-pinching effect is of particular practical importance, and is used in various ion driver designs in order to control the transverse beam envelope. In the present work we demonstrate that this radial self-focusing force can be significantly enhanced if a weak (B {approx} 100 G) solenoidal magnetic field is applied inside the neutralized drift section, thus allowing for substantially improved transport. It is shown that in contrast to magnetic self-pinching, the enhanced collective self-focusing has a radial electric field component and occurs as a result of the overcompensation of the beam charge by plasma electrons, whereas the beam current becomes well-neutralized. As the beam leaves the neutralizing drift section, additional transverse focusing can be applied. For instance, in the neutralized drift compression experiments (NDCX) a strong (several Tesla) final focus solenoid is used for this purpose. In the present analysis we propose that the tight final focus in the NDCX experiments may possibly be achieved by using a much weaker (few hundred Gauss) magnetic lens, provided the ion beam carries an equal amount of co-moving neutralizing electrons from the preceding drift section into the lens. In this case the enhanced focusing is provided by the collective electron dynamics strongly affected by a weak applied magnetic field.

  19. High-intensity ion sources for accelerators with emphasis on H-beam formation and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Roderich

    2009-01-01

    This paper lays out the fundamental working principles of a variety of high-current ion sources for accelerators in a tutorial manner, and gives examples of specific source types such as d. c. discharge- and rf-driven multicusp sources. Penning-type and ECR-based sources while discussing those principles, pointing out general performance limits as well as the performance parameters of specific sources. Laser-based, two-chamber-. and surface-ionization sources are briefly mentioned. Main aspects of this review are particle feed. ionization mechanism, beam formation and beam transport. Issues seen with beam formation and low-energy transport of negative hydrogen-ion beams are treated in detail.

  20. Studies on low energy beam transport for high intensity high charged ions at IMP.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Sun, L T; Hu, Q; Cao, Y; Lu, W; Feng, Y C; Fang, X; Zhang, X Z; Zhao, H W; Xie, D Z

    2014-02-01

    Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) is an advanced fully superconducting ECR ion source at IMP designed to be operational at the microwave frequency of 18-24 GHz. The existing SECRAL beam transmission line is composed of a solenoid lens and a 110° analyzing magnet. Simulations of particle tracking with 3D space charge effect and realistic 3D magnetic fields through the line were performed using particle-in-cell code. The results of the beam dynamics show that such a low energy beam is very sensitive to the space charge effect and significantly suffers from the second-order aberration of the analyzing magnet resulting in large emittance. However, the second-order aberration could be reduced by adding compensating sextupole components in the beam line. On this basis, a new 110° analyzing magnet with relatively larger acceptance and smaller aberration is designed and will be used in the design of low energy beam transport line for a new superconducting ECR ion source SECRAL-II. The features of the analyzer and the corresponding beam trajectory calculation will be detailed and discussed in this paper. PMID:24593453

  1. Studies on low energy beam transport for high intensity high charged ions at IMP

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y. Lu, W.; Fang, X.; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 ; Sun, L. T.; Hu, Q.; Cao, Y.; Feng, Y. C.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.; Xie, D. Z.

    2014-02-15

    Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) is an advanced fully superconducting ECR ion source at IMP designed to be operational at the microwave frequency of 18–24 GHz. The existing SECRAL beam transmission line is composed of a solenoid lens and a 110° analyzing magnet. Simulations of particle tracking with 3D space charge effect and realistic 3D magnetic fields through the line were performed using particle-in-cell code. The results of the beam dynamics show that such a low energy beam is very sensitive to the space charge effect and significantly suffers from the second-order aberration of the analyzing magnet resulting in large emittance. However, the second-order aberration could be reduced by adding compensating sextupole components in the beam line. On this basis, a new 110° analyzing magnet with relatively larger acceptance and smaller aberration is designed and will be used in the design of low energy beam transport line for a new superconducting ECR ion source SECRAL-II. The features of the analyzer and the corresponding beam trajectory calculation will be detailed and discussed in this paper.

  2. A Core-Particle Model for Periodically Focused Ion Beams with Intense Space-Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, S M; Barnard, J J; Bukh, B; Chawla, S R; Chilton, S H

    2006-08-02

    A core-particle model is derived to analyze transverse orbits of test particles evolving in the presence of a core ion beam described by the KV distribution. The core beam has uniform density within an elliptical cross-section and can be applied to model both quadrupole and solenoidal focused beams in periodic or aperiodic lattices. Efficient analytical descriptions of electrostatic space-charge fields external to the beam core are derived to simplify model equations. Image charge effects are analyzed for an elliptical beam centered in a round, conducting pipe to estimate model corrections resulting from image charge nonlinearities. Transformations are employed to remove coherent utter motion associated with oscillations of the ion beam core due to rapidly varying, linear applied focusing forces. Diagnostics for particle trajectories, Poincare phase-space projections, and single-particle emittances based on these transformations better illustrate the effects of nonlinear forces acting on particles evolving outside the core. A numerical code has been written based on this model. Example applications illustrate model characteristics. The core-particle model described has recently been applied to identify physical processes leading to space-charge transport limits for an rms matched beam in a periodic quadrupole focusing channel [Lund and Chawla, Nuc. Instr. and Meth. A 561, 203 (2006)]. Further characteristics of these processes are presented here.

  3. Enhanced collective focusing of intense neutralized ion beam pulses in the presence of weak solenoidal magnetic fields

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.

    2012-05-31

    In this study, the design of ion drivers for warm dense matter and high energy density physics applications and heavy ion fusion involves transverse focusing and longitudinal compression of intense ion beams to a small spot size on the target. To facilitate the process, the compression occurs in a long drift section filled with a dense background plasma, which neutralizes the intense beam self-fields. Typically, the ion bunch charge is better neutralized than its current, and as a result a net self-pinching (magnetic) force is produced. The self-pinching effect is of particular practical importance, and is used in various ionmore » driver designs in order to control the transverse beam envelope. In the present work we demonstrate that this radial self-focusing force can be significantly enhanced if a weak (B~100 G) solenoidal magnetic field is applied inside the neutralized drift section, thus allowing for substantially improved transport. It is shown that in contrast to magnetic self-pinching, the enhanced collective self-focusing has a radial electric field component and occurs as a result of the overcompensation of the beam charge by plasmaelectrons, whereas the beam current becomes well-neutralized. As the beam leaves the neutralizing drift section, additional transverse focusing can be applied. For instance, in the neutralized drift compression experiments (NDCX) a strong (several Tesla) final focus solenoid is used for this purpose. In the present analysis we propose that the tight final focus in the NDCX experiments may possibly be achieved by using a much weaker (few hundred Gauss) magnetic lens, provided the ion beam carries an equal amount of co-moving neutralizing electrons from the preceding drift section into the lens. In this case the enhanced focusing is provided by the collective electrondynamics strongly affected by a weak applied magnetic field.« less

  4. Intense ion beam generation in a diode with explosive emission cathode in self-magnetically insulated mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkarev, Alexander; Isakova, Yulia; Khailov, Iliya

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a review of experimental studies on pulsed intense ion beam generation in self-magnetically insulated diodes with an explosive emission cathode. The experiments were carried out with the TEMP-4M accelerator operating in double-pulse mode: the first pulse is of negative polarity (300-500 ns, 100-150 kV), and this is followed by a second pulse of positive polarity (150 ns, 250-300 kV). The ion beam energy density is 0.5-5 J/cm2 depending on the diode geometry. We have developed a new spiral geometry of the diode. In a spiral diode it is possible to increase the efficiency from 5-9% (previously studied diodes) up to 20-25%. We conducted a study on shot-to-shot variation in the ion beam parameters. It was found that the standard deviation of the energy density does not exceed 11%, whilst the same variation for ion current density was 20-30%. Focusing properties of an ion beam have been significantly improved by using a metal shield on the grounded electrode. Use of the shield on the grounded electrode provides decrease in the beam divergence from 11° to 7.5-8°.

  5. Electron cloud effects in intense, ion beam linacs theory and experimental planning for heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A.W.; Cohen, R.H.; Lund, S.M.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Lee, E.P.; Prost, L.R.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, Jean-Luc

    2002-05-21

    Heavy-ion accelerators for HIF will operate at high aperture-fill factors with high beam current and long pulses. This will lead to beam ions impacting walls: liberating gas molecules and secondary electrons. Without special preparation a large fractional electron population ({approx}>1%) is predicted in the High-Current Experiment (HCX), but wall conditioning and other mitigation techniques should result in substantial reduction. Theory and particle-in-cell simulations suggest that electrons, from ionization of residual and desorbed gas and secondary electrons from vacuum walls, will be radially trapped in the {approx}4 kV ion beam potential. Trapped electrons can modify the beam space charge, vacuum pressure, ion transport dynamics, and halo generation, and can potentially cause ion-electron instabilities. Within quadrupole (and dipole) magnets, the longitudinal electron flow is limited to drift velocities (E x B and {del}B) and the electron density can vary azimuthally, radially, and longitudinally. These variations can cause centroid misalignment, emittance growth and halo growth. Diagnostics are being developed to measure the energy and flux of electrons and gas evolved from walls, and the net charge and gas density within magnetic quadrupoles, as well as the their effect on the ion beam.

  6. A core-particle model for periodically focused ion beams with intense space-charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Steven M.; Barnard, John J.; Bukh, Boris; Chawla, Sugreev R.; Chilton, Sven H.

    2007-07-01

    A core-particle (CP) model is derived to analyze transverse orbits of test-particles evolving in the presence of a core ion beam that has uniform density within an elliptical cross-section. The model can be applied to both quadrupole and solenoidal focused beams in periodic or aperiodic lattices. Efficient analytical descriptions of electrostatic space-charge fields external to the beam core are derived to simplify model equations. Image-charge effects are analyzed for an elliptical beam centered in a round, conducting pipe to estimate model corrections resulting from image-charge nonlinearities. Transformations are employed in diagnostics to remove coherent flutter motion associated with oscillations of the ion beam core due to rapidly varying, linear applied-focusing forces. Diagnostics for particle trajectories, Poincaré phase-space projections, and single-particle emittances based on these transformations better illustrate the effects of nonlinear forces acting on particles evolving outside the core. A numerical code has been written based on this model. Example applications illustrate model characteristics. The CP model described has recently been applied to identify physical processes leading to space-charge transport limits for an rms-envelope matched beam in a periodic quadrupole focusing-channel [S.M. Lund, S.R. Chawla, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 561 (2006) 203]. Further characteristics of these processes are presented here.

  7. High intensity high charge state ion beam production with an evaporative cooling magnet ECRIS.

    PubMed

    Lu, W; Qian, C; Sun, L T; Zhang, X Z; Fang, X; Guo, J W; Yang, Y; Feng, Y C; Ma, B H; Xiong, B; Ruan, L; Zhao, H W; Zhan, W L; Xie, D

    2016-02-01

    LECR4 (Lanzhou ECR ion source No. 4) is a room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source, designed to produce high current, high charge state ion beams for the SSC-LINAC injector (a new injector for sector separated cyclotron) at the Institute of Modern Physics. LECR4 also serves as a PoP machine for the application of evaporative cooling technology in accelerator field. To achieve those goals, LECR4 ECR ion source has been optimized for the operation at 18 GHz. During 2014, LECR4 ion source was commissioned at 18 GHz microwave of 1.6 kW. To further study the influence of injection stage to the production of medium and high charge state ion beams, in March 2015, the injection stage with pumping system was installed, and some optimum results were produced, such as 560 eμA of O(7+), 620 eμA of Ar(11+), 430 eμA of Ar(12+), 430 eμA of Xe(20+), and so on. The comparison will be discussed in the paper. PMID:26931956

  8. High intensity high charge state ion beam production with an evaporative cooling magnet ECRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, W.; Qian, C.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Fang, X.; Guo, J. W.; Yang, Y.; Feng, Y. C.; Ma, B. H.; Xiong, B.; Ruan, L.; Zhao, H. W.; Zhan, W. L.; Xie, D.

    2016-02-01

    LECR4 (Lanzhou ECR ion source No. 4) is a room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source, designed to produce high current, high charge state ion beams for the SSC-LINAC injector (a new injector for sector separated cyclotron) at the Institute of Modern Physics. LECR4 also serves as a PoP machine for the application of evaporative cooling technology in accelerator field. To achieve those goals, LECR4 ECR ion source has been optimized for the operation at 18 GHz. During 2014, LECR4 ion source was commissioned at 18 GHz microwave of 1.6 kW. To further study the influence of injection stage to the production of medium and high charge state ion beams, in March 2015, the injection stage with pumping system was installed, and some optimum results were produced, such as 560 eμA of O7+, 620 eμA of Ar11+, 430 eμA of Ar12+, 430 eμA of Xe20+, and so on. The comparison will be discussed in the paper.

  9. High intensity beams from electron cyclotron resonance ion sources: A study of efficient extraction and transport system (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Celona, L.; Andò, L.; Passarello, S.; Zhang, X. Zh.; Spädtke, P.; Winkler, M.

    2004-05-01

    A study of the design of extraction and transport system for high intensity beams that will be produced by the next generation electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) was carried out in the frame of a European collaboration devoted to the definition of the main parameters of third generation ECRIS. High intensity production tests carried out in the previous years at INFN-LNS have shown evidence for the need to review the main concepts of the beam analysis and transport when high currents of low energy highly charged ions are extracted from the source. The transport of such low energy beams becomes critical as soon as the total current exceeds a few mA. The study reported here is based on the calculated parameters for the GyroSERSE source and the computer simulations have been carried out to obtain low emittance beams. The design of the extraction system was carried out by means of the KOBRA (three dimensional) code. The study of the beam line has been carried out with the codes GIOS, GICO, and TRANSPORT by taking into account both the phase space growth due to space charge and to the aberrations inside the magnets. The description of some different beam line options will be also given.

  10. The direct injection of intense ion beams from a high field electron cyclotron resonance ion source into a radio frequency quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, G. Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.; Becker, R.; Baskaran, R.

    2014-02-15

    The ion current achievable from high intensity ECR sources for highly charged ions is limited by the high space charge. This makes classical extraction systems for the transport and subsequent matching to a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator less efficient. The direct plasma injection (DPI) method developed originally for the laser ion source avoids these problems and uses the combined focusing of the gap between the ion source and the RFQ vanes (or rods) and the focusing of the rf fields from the RFQ penetrating into this gap. For high performance ECR sources that use superconducting solenoids, the stray magnetic field of the source in addition to the DPI scheme provides focusing against the space charge blow-up of the beam. A combined extraction/matching system has been designed for a high performance ECR ion source injecting into an RFQ, allowing a total beam current of 10 mA from the ion source for the production of highly charged {sup 238}U{sup 40+} (1.33 mA) to be injected at an ion source voltage of 60 kV. In this design, the features of IGUN have been used to take into account the rf-focusing of an RFQ channel (without modulation), the electrostatic field between ion source extraction and the RFQ vanes, the magnetic stray field of the ECR superconducting solenoid, and the defocusing space charge of an ion beam. The stray magnetic field is shown to be critical in the case of a matched beam.

  11. The direct injection of intense ion beams from a high field electron cyclotron resonance ion source into a radio frequency quadrupole.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, G; Becker, R; Hamm, R W; Baskaran, R; Kanjilal, D; Roy, A

    2014-02-01

    The ion current achievable from high intensity ECR sources for highly charged ions is limited by the high space charge. This makes classical extraction systems for the transport and subsequent matching to a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator less efficient. The direct plasma injection (DPI) method developed originally for the laser ion source avoids these problems and uses the combined focusing of the gap between the ion source and the RFQ vanes (or rods) and the focusing of the rf fields from the RFQ penetrating into this gap. For high performance ECR sources that use superconducting solenoids, the stray magnetic field of the source in addition to the DPI scheme provides focusing against the space charge blow-up of the beam. A combined extraction/matching system has been designed for a high performance ECR ion source injecting into an RFQ, allowing a total beam current of 10 mA from the ion source for the production of highly charged (238)U(40+) (1.33 mA) to be injected at an ion source voltage of 60 kV. In this design, the features of IGUN have been used to take into account the rf-focusing of an RFQ channel (without modulation), the electrostatic field between ion source extraction and the RFQ vanes, the magnetic stray field of the ECR superconducting solenoid, and the defocusing space charge of an ion beam. The stray magnetic field is shown to be critical in the case of a matched beam. PMID:24593474

  12. The direct injection of intense ion beams from a high field electron cyclotron resonance ion source into a radio frequency quadrupole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, G.; Becker, R.; Hamm, R. W.; Baskaran, R.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.

    2014-02-01

    The ion current achievable from high intensity ECR sources for highly charged ions is limited by the high space charge. This makes classical extraction systems for the transport and subsequent matching to a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator less efficient. The direct plasma injection (DPI) method developed originally for the laser ion source avoids these problems and uses the combined focusing of the gap between the ion source and the RFQ vanes (or rods) and the focusing of the rf fields from the RFQ penetrating into this gap. For high performance ECR sources that use superconducting solenoids, the stray magnetic field of the source in addition to the DPI scheme provides focusing against the space charge blow-up of the beam. A combined extraction/matching system has been designed for a high performance ECR ion source injecting into an RFQ, allowing a total beam current of 10 mA from the ion source for the production of highly charged 238U40+ (1.33 mA) to be injected at an ion source voltage of 60 kV. In this design, the features of IGUN have been used to take into account the rf-focusing of an RFQ channel (without modulation), the electrostatic field between ion source extraction and the RFQ vanes, the magnetic stray field of the ECR superconducting solenoid, and the defocusing space charge of an ion beam. The stray magnetic field is shown to be critical in the case of a matched beam.

  13. Generation of plane shocks using intense heavy ion beams: Application to Richtmyer-Meshkov instability growth studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tahir, N. A.; Stoehlker, Th.; Shutov, A.; Zharkov, A. P.; Piriz, A. R.

    2011-03-15

    A design of a novel experiment that allows the generation of a well defined, steady, and strong plane shock wave employing an intense uranium ion beam that is incident on a wedge shaped compound target is presented. This technique will open up the possibility of carrying out unique high energy density physics experiments using these shock waves. One such experiment is to study the growth of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in fluids as well as in solids, both in the linear and nonlinear regimes, as shown by detailed numerical simulations presented in this paper. The ion beam parameters used in this study correspond to those that will be available at the Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt.

  14. Note: {sup 6}Li III light intensity observation for {sup 6}Li{sup 3+} ion beam operation at Hyper-Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Muto, Hideshi; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Yamaka, Shoichi; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Shimoura, Susumu; Watanabe, Shin-ichi; Oyaizu, Michihiro; Kobayashi, Kiyoshi; Kotaka, Yasuteru; Nishimura, Makoto; Kase, Masayuki; Kubono, Shigeru; Hattori, Toshiyuki

    2014-12-15

    The light intensity of {sup 6}Li III line spectrum at λ = 516.7 nm was observed during {sup 6}Li{sup 3+} beam tuning at the Hyper-Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source. Separation of ion species of the same charge to mass ratio with an electromagnetic mass analyzer is known to be an exceptionally complex process. However, {sup 6}Li III line intensity observation conducted in this study gives new insights into its simplification of this process. The light intensity of {sup 6}Li III line spectrum from the ECR plasma was found to have a strong correlation with the extracted {sup 6}Li{sup 3+} beam intensity from the RIKEN Azimuthal Varying Field cyclotron.

  15. Intense heavy-ion beam transport with electric and magnetic quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Fessenden, T.J.; Barnard, J.J.; Cable, M.D.; Deadrick, F.J.; Eylon, S.; Nelson, M.B.; Sangster, T.C.; Hopkins, H.S.

    1995-08-01

    As part of the small induction recirculator development at LLNL, the authors are testing an injector and transport line that delivers 4 {micro}s beams of potassium with repetition rates up to 10 Hz at a nominal current of 2 mA. The normalized K-V equivalent emittance of the beams is near 0.02 {pi} mm-mrad and is mostly determined by the temperature of the source (0.1 eV). K{sup +} ions generated at 80 keV in a Pierce diode are matched to an alternating gradient transport line by seven electric quadrupoles. Two additional quads have been modified to serve as two-axis steerers. The matching section is followed by a transport section comprised of seven permanent magnet quadrupoles. Matching to this section is achieved by adjusting the voltages on the electric quadrupoles to voltages calculated by an envelope matching code. Measurements of beam envelope parameters are made at the matching section entrance and exit as well as at the end of the permanent magnet transport section. Beam current waveforms along the experiment are compared with results from a one-dimension longitudinal dynamics code. Initial experiments show particle loss occurring at the beam head as a result of overtaking. The apparatus is also being used for the development of non or minimally intercepting diagnostics for future recirculator experiments. These include capacitive monitors for determining beam line-charge density and position in the recirculator; flying wire scanners for beam position; and gated TV scanners for measuring beam profiles and emittance.

  16. Generation of intense and cold beam of Pt-Ag bi-element cluster ions having single-composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasumatsu, H.

    2011-07-01

    An intense beam of bi-element Pt-Ag cluster ions with a single atomic-composition has been gained toward development of new-functional materials of the clusters fixed on a solid surface. Mass production of the bi-element cluster ions has been achieved by operating dual magnetron-sputtering devices independently in a gas aggregation cell, and the ions having a single composition are filtered out by passing through a quadrupole mass filter. The kinetic energies of the cluster ions have been reduced by collision with cold helium in order for low-energy cluster-impact deposition of the clusters on the surface. The cooling process was examined further by means of molecular-dynamics simulation.

  17. Extraction of intense beams from ECR ion sources and electrostatic acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavenago, M.; Galata, A.

    2005-10-01

    High-space charge effects and problems related to beam transport are discussed in the context of an electron cyclotron-resonance ion sources extraction and pre-acceleration low emittance line (which works as the injector of a new superconducting Radio Frequency Quadruple (RFQ) under commissioning at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL)) at several values of the extracted beam current. In the extractor, both the cases of short-range magnetic fringe field (virtual source approximation) and large-range fringe field are simulated. Analytical expression of ion flow and plasma sheaths are easily incorporated in the charged fluid approach and in numerical modeling with three-dimensional simulation programs, which can treat several coupled field variables and lower space dimension (known as multiphysics codes). Advantages of flexibility and of representation of finer details are remarked. Effects of plasma potential and extraction hole thickness (0.5 mm) on the plasma meniscus can be resolved, even in the context of a simulation including 1 m long objects. An example of beam injection into an acceleration tube is also given, results are consistent with the tube-design goals and with the experimentally observed parameters.

  18. Focusing Intense Charged Particle Beams with Achromatic Effects for Heavy Ion Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrani, James; Kaganovich, Igor

    2012-10-01

    Final focusing systems designed to minimize the effects of chromatic aberrations in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) are described. NDCX-II is a linear induction accelerator, designed to accelerate short bunches at high current. Previous experiments showed that neutralized drift compression significantly compresses the beam longitudinally (˜60x) in the z-direction, resulting in a narrow distribution in z-space, but a wide distribution in pz-space. Using simple lenses (e.g., solenoids, quadrupoles) to focus beam bunches with wide distributions in pz-space results in chromatic aberrations, leading to lower beam intensities (J/cm^2). Therefore, the final focusing system must be designed to compensate for chromatic aberrations. The paraxial ray equations and beam envelope equations are numerically solved for parameters appropriate to NDCX-II. Based on these results, conceptual designs for final focusing systems using a combination of solenoids and/or quadrupoles are optimized to compensate for chromatic aberrations. Lens aberrations and emittance growth will be investigated, and analytical results will be compared with results from numerical particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation codes.

  19. Generation and focusing of pulsed intense ion beams: Final report, 1 July 1987--30 September 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, D.A.; Kusse, B.R.; Sudan, R.N.

    1989-08-03

    This paper discusses the following experiments: ion diode experiments at 0.5 /times/ 10/sup 12/ W on the LION accelerator; spectroscopic studies of ion diodes; ion beam-plasma channel transport research; and plasma opening switch experiments.

  20. High Energy Density Physics Research Using Intense Heavy Ion Beam at FAIR: The HEDgeHOB Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Shutov, A.; Piriz, A. R.; Deutsch, C.; Stöhlker, Th.

    2016-03-01

    International project, Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR), has entered in its construction phase at Darmstadt. It is expected that the new powerful heavy ion synchrotron, SIS100 will deliver a strongly bunched intense beam of energetic uranium ions that will provide the scientists with an efficient and novel tool to research High Energy Density (HED) Physics in the laboratory. Over the past 15 years, substantial theoretical work has been done to design numerous experiments that can be done at this facility in this field. This work has resulted in an extensive scientific proposal named HEDgeHOB, that includes experiment proposals addressing various aspects of HED matter, for example, planetary physics, equation of state, hydrodynamic instabilities and others. In this paper we present a summary of this work.

  1. Performance characteristics of HBC stripper foils irradiated by 650 keV H- and high intensity DC ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugai, I.; Takagi, A.; Takeda, Y.; Irie, Y.; Oyaizu, M.; Kawakami, H.

    2014-06-01

    Newly developed Hybrid type Boron mixed Carbon (HBC) stripper foils are extensively used not only for the RCS of J-PARC and PSR of LANL, but also for other low energy, high intensity proton accelerators in medical applications. We had before tested HBC stripper foils with 3.2 MeV Ne+ and DC heavy ion beams. In order to further understand characteristics of HBC stripper foils, we measured the following parameters using the KEK-650 keV H- and light ion Cockcroft Walton DC accelerator: foil lifetime, thickness reduction, uniformity before and after beam irradiation, and foil deformation. Energy deposition in the present experiment was adjusted to a similar level to that of the HBC foil used in the RCS of J-PARC’. In addition, to understand the reason why the HBC stripper foils have high durability against high intensity beam irradiation, we investigated various physical properties, and compared them between the HBC foils and other tested carbon stripper foils. The sizes of the carbon particles in the HBC foil were found to play a vital role in the lifetime.

  2. Fast six-channel pyrometer for warm-dense-matter experiments with intense heavy-ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, P.A.; Kulish, M.I.; Mintsev, V.; Nikolaev, D.N.; Ternovoi, V.Ya.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Udrea, S.; Tahir, N.A.; Varentsov, D.; Hug, A.

    2008-12-01

    This paper describes a fast multi-channel radiation pyrometer that was developed for warmdense-matter experiments with intense heavy ion beams at Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbH (GSI). The pyrometer is capable of measuring of brightness temperatures from 2000 K to 50000 K, at 6 wavelengths in visible and near-infrared parts of spectrum, with 5 nanosecond temporal resolution and several micrometers spatial resolution. The pyrometer's spectral discrimination technique is based on interference filters, which act as filters and mirrors to allow for simultaneous spectral discrimination of the same ray at multiple wavelengths.

  3. Probing the Relationship Between Detected Ion Intensity, Laser Fluence, and Beam Profile in Thin Film and Tissue in MALDI MSI.

    PubMed

    Steven, Rory T; Race, Alan M; Bunch, Josephine

    2016-08-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) is increasingly widely used to provide information regarding molecular location within tissue samples. The nature of the photon distribution within the irradiated region, the laser beam profile, and fluence, will significantly affect the form and abundance of the detected ions. Previous studies into these phenomena have focused on circular-core optic fibers or Gaussian beam profiles irradiating dried droplet preparations, where peptides were employed as the analyte of interest. Within this work, we use both round and novel square core optic fibers of 100 and 50 μm diameter to deliver the laser photons to the sample. The laser beam profiles were recorded and analyzed to quantify aspects of the photon distributions and their relation to the spectral data obtained with each optic fiber. Beam profiles with a relatively small number of large beam profile features were found to give rise to the lowest threshold fluence. The detected ion intensity versus fluence relationship was investigated, for the first time, in both thin films of α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) with phosphatidylcholine (PC) 34:1 lipid standard and in CHCA coated murine tissue sections for both the square and round optic fibers in continuous raster imaging mode. The fluence threshold of ion detection was found to occur at between ~14 and ~64 J/m(2) higher in tissue compared with thin film for the same lipid, depending upon the optic fiber employed. The image quality is also observed to depend upon the fluence employed during image acquisition. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27206508

  4. Probing the Relationship Between Detected Ion Intensity, Laser Fluence, and Beam Profile in Thin Film and Tissue in MALDI MSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steven, Rory T.; Race, Alan M.; Bunch, Josephine

    2016-05-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) is increasingly widely used to provide information regarding molecular location within tissue samples. The nature of the photon distribution within the irradiated region, the laser beam profile, and fluence, will significantly affect the form and abundance of the detected ions. Previous studies into these phenomena have focused on circular-core optic fibers or Gaussian beam profiles irradiating dried droplet preparations, where peptides were employed as the analyte of interest. Within this work, we use both round and novel square core optic fibers of 100 and 50 μm diameter to deliver the laser photons to the sample. The laser beam profiles were recorded and analyzed to quantify aspects of the photon distributions and their relation to the spectral data obtained with each optic fiber. Beam profiles with a relatively small number of large beam profile features were found to give rise to the lowest threshold fluence. The detected ion intensity versus fluence relationship was investigated, for the first time, in both thin films of α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) with phosphatidylcholine (PC) 34:1 lipid standard and in CHCA coated murine tissue sections for both the square and round optic fibers in continuous raster imaging mode. The fluence threshold of ion detection was found to occur at between ~14 and ~64 J/m2 higher in tissue compared with thin film for the same lipid, depending upon the optic fiber employed. The image quality is also observed to depend upon the fluence employed during image acquisition.

  5. Probing the Relationship Between Detected Ion Intensity, Laser Fluence, and Beam Profile in Thin Film and Tissue in MALDI MSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steven, Rory T.; Race, Alan M.; Bunch, Josephine

    2016-08-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) is increasingly widely used to provide information regarding molecular location within tissue samples. The nature of the photon distribution within the irradiated region, the laser beam profile, and fluence, will significantly affect the form and abundance of the detected ions. Previous studies into these phenomena have focused on circular-core optic fibers or Gaussian beam profiles irradiating dried droplet preparations, where peptides were employed as the analyte of interest. Within this work, we use both round and novel square core optic fibers of 100 and 50 μm diameter to deliver the laser photons to the sample. The laser beam profiles were recorded and analyzed to quantify aspects of the photon distributions and their relation to the spectral data obtained with each optic fiber. Beam profiles with a relatively small number of large beam profile features were found to give rise to the lowest threshold fluence. The detected ion intensity versus fluence relationship was investigated, for the first time, in both thin films of α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) with phosphatidylcholine (PC) 34:1 lipid standard and in CHCA coated murine tissue sections for both the square and round optic fibers in continuous raster imaging mode. The fluence threshold of ion detection was found to occur at between ~14 and ~64 J/m2 higher in tissue compared with thin film for the same lipid, depending upon the optic fiber employed. The image quality is also observed to depend upon the fluence employed during image acquisition.

  6. Use of radial self-field geometry for intense pulsed ion beam generation above 6 MeV on Hermes III.

    SciTech Connect

    Renk, Timothy Jerome; Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor Jozef; Ginn, William Craig; Mikkelson, Kenneth A.; Schall, Michael; Cooper, Gary Wayne

    2012-12-01

    We investigate the generation and propagation of intense pulsed ion beams at the 6 MeV level and above using the Hermes III facility at Sandia National Laboratories. While high-power ion beams have previously been produced using Hermes III, we have conducted systematic studies of several ion diode geometries for the purpose of maximizing focused ion energy for a number of applications. A self-field axial-gap diode of the pinch reflex type and operated in positive polarity yielded beam power below predicted levels. This is ascribed both to power flow losses of unknown origin upstream of the diode load in Hermes positive polarity operation, and to anomalies in beam focusing in this configuration. A change to a radial self-field geometry and negative polarity operation resulted in greatly increased beam voltage (> 6 MeV) and estimated ion current. A comprehensive diagnostic set was developed to characterize beam performance, including both time-dependent and time-integrated measurements of local and total beam power. A substantial high-energy ion population was identified propagating in reverse direction, i.e. from the back side of the anode in the electron beam dump. While significant progress was made in increasing beam power, further improvements in assessing the beam focusing envelope will be required before ultimate ion generation efficiency with this geometry can be completely determined.

  7. Development of the carbon foils as charge strippers for high-intensity uranium ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasebe, Hiroo; Kuboki, Hironori; Okuno, Hiroki; Fukunishi, Nobuhisa; Kamigaito, Osamu; Imao, Hiroshi; Goto, Akira; Kase, Masayuki

    2011-11-01

    carbon foil (C-foil) is commonly used as a charge stripper in the heavy-ion accelerators. Since 2005, the polymer-coated carbon foils (PCC-foils) have been fabricated at Nishina Center to prepare larger and thicker C-foils than those previously used as charge strippers. However, the multi-layer PCC-foils did not have sufficiently long life-time. Since August 2009, a new magnetron sputtering system is used to fabricate a thick C-foil. The foils coated with polymer are used as strippers. Life-times of the new single-layer PCC-foils under the uranium beam were measured in two configurations: at the first one a small piece of C-foil was attached to a fixed holder and in the second one a large C-foil was attached to a "rotating-cylinder stripper" device. The properties of the new single-layer PCC-foils and the results of the life-time measurements are reported in this contribution.

  8. Intense electron-beam transport in the ion-focused regime through the collision-dominated regime

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Poukey, J.W.; Welch, D.R.; Mock, R.C.

    1993-12-31

    This paper reviews the transport of the 19-MeV, 700-kA, 25-ns Hermes-III electron beam in long gas cells filled with N{sub 2} gas spanning six decades in pressure from 10{sup 3} to {approximately}10{sup 3} Torr. We show through measurements and theoretical analyses that the beam has two windows of stable transport: a low-pressure window (between {approximately}1 and {approximately}100 mTorr) that is dominated by propagation in the semi-collisionless IFR (ion-focused regime), and a high-pressure window (between {approximately}1 and {approximately}100 Torr) that is dominated by propagation in the resistive CDR (collision-dominated regime). In the CDR, 79{plus_minus}1.5% of the beam energy is transported over 11 m at 20 Torr. In the IFR, we show that intense radiation fields with controllable rise times and pulse widths can be generated on axis at a bremsstrahlung target. In summary, the measurements and analyses presented here provide a quantitative description of the Hermes-III beam transport over six decades in pressure.

  9. THz electromagnetic radiation driven by intense relativistic electron beam based on ion focus regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qing; Yang, Shengpeng; Xu, Jin; Zhang, Wenchao; Tang, Changjian; Duan, Zhaoyun; Gong, Yubin

    2016-06-01

    The simulation study finds that the relativistic electron beam propagating through the plasma background can produce electromagnetic (EM) radiation. With the propagation of the electron beam, the oscillations of the beam electrons in transverse and longitudinal directions have been observed simultaneously, which provides the basis for the electromagnetic radiation. The simulation results clearly show that the electromagnetic radiation frequency can reach up to terahertz (THz) wave band which may result from the filter-like property of plasma background, and the electromagnetic radiation frequency closely depends on the plasma density. To understand the above simulation results physically, the dispersion relation of the beam-plasma system has been derived using the field-matching method, and the dispersion curves show that the slow wave modes can couple with the electron beam effectively in THz wave band, which is an important theoretical evidence of the EM radiation.

  10. Preparation of diamond-like carbon and boron nitirde films by high-intensity pulsed ion beam deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Davis, H.A.; Remnev, G.E.

    1995-05-01

    Intense ion beams (300-keV C{sup +}, O{sup +}, and H{sup +}, 20--30 kA, 50 to 400-ns pulsewidth, up to 0.3-Hz repetition rate) were used to prepare diamond-like carbon (DLC) and boron nitride (BN) films. Deposition rates of up to 25{plus_minus}5 nm/pulse were obtained with instantaneous rates exceeding 1 mm/s. Most films were uniform, light brown, translucent, and nonporous with some micron-size particulates. Raman and parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy indicated the presence of DLC. The films possessed favorable electron field-emission characteristics desirable for cold-cathode displays. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and transmission electron diffraction (TED) revealed that the C films contained diamond crystals with 25 to 125-nm grain size. BN films were composed of hexagonal, cubic and wurtzite phases.

  11. Diagnostics for intense heavy ion beams in the HIF-VNL

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Eylon, S.; Faltens, A.; Friedman, A.; Kwan, J.W.; Leitner, M.A.; Molvik, A.W.; Prost, L.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Westenskow, G.

    2004-06-11

    Modern diagnostic techniques provide detailed information on beam conditions in injector, transport, and final focus experiments in the HIF-VNL. Parameters of interest include beam current, beam energy, transverse and longitudinal distributions, emittance, and space charge neutralization. Imaging techniques, based on kapton films and optical scintillators, complement and in some cases, may replace conventional techniques based on slit scans. Time-resolved optical diagnostics that provide 4-D transverse information on the experimental beams are in operation on the existing experiments. Current work includes a compact optical diagnostic suitable for insertion in transport lines, improved algorithms for optical data analysis and interpretation, a high-resolution electrostatic energy analyzer, and an electron beam probe. A longitudinal diagnostic kicker generates longitudinal space-charge waves that travel on the beam. Time of flight of the space charge waves and an electrostatic energy analyzer provide an absolute measure of the beam energy. Special diagnostics to detect secondary electrons and gases desorbed from the wall have been developed.

  12. Ion Beam Propulsion Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Ion Beam Propulsion Study was a joint high-level study between the Applied Physics Laboratory operated by NASA and ASRC Aerospace at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, and Berkeley Scientific, Berkeley, California. The results were promising and suggested that work should continue if future funding becomes available. The application of ion thrusters for spacecraft propulsion is limited to quite modest ion sources with similarly modest ion beam parameters because of the mass penalty associated with the ion source and its power supply system. Also, the ion source technology has not been able to provide very high-power ion beams. Small ion beam propulsion systems were used with considerable success. Ion propulsion systems brought into practice use an onboard ion source to form an energetic ion beam, typically Xe+ ions, as the propellant. Such systems were used for steering and correction of telecommunication satellites and as the main thruster for the Deep Space 1 demonstration mission. In recent years, "giant" ion sources were developed for the controlled-fusion research effort worldwide, with beam parameters many orders of magnitude greater than the tiny ones of conventional space thruster application. The advent of such huge ion beam sources and the need for advanced propulsion systems for exploration of the solar system suggest a fresh look at ion beam propulsion, now with the giant fusion sources in mind.

  13. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  14. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-10-08

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes. 6 figs.

  15. Broad, intense, quiescent beam of singly charged metal ions obtained by extraction from self-sputtering plasma far above the runaway threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Oks, Efim

    2009-05-19

    Dense metal plasmas obtained by self-sputtering far above the runway threshold are well suited to generate intense quiescent ion beams. The dilemma of high current density and charge state purity can be solved when using target materials of low surface binding energy by utilizing non-resonant exchange reactions before ion extraction. Space-charge-limited quiescent beams of Cu+, Zn+, and Bi+ with ~;;10 mA/cm2 have been obtained through multi-aperture gridded ion extraction up to 45 kV from self-sputtering plasmas.

  16. Generation of high-energy mono-energetic heavy ion beams by radiation pressure acceleration of ultra-intense laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, D.; Qiao, B.; McGuffey, C.; He, X. T.; Beg, F. N.

    2014-12-01

    Generation of high-energy mono-energetic heavy ion beams by radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) of intense laser pulses is investigated. Different from previously studied RPA of protons or light ions, the dynamic ionization of high-Z atoms can stabilize the heavy ion acceleration. A self-organized, stable RPA scheme specifically for heavy ion beams is proposed, where the laser peak intensity is required to match with the large ionization energy gap when the successive ionization state passes the noble gas configurations [such as removing an electron from the helium-like charge state ( Z - 2 ) + to ( Z - 1 ) + ]. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that a mono-energetic Al13+ beam with peak energy 1.0 GeV and energy spread of only 5% can be obtained at intensity of 7 × 10 20 W / cm 2 through the proposed scheme. A heavier, mono-energetic, ion beam (Fe26+) can attain a peak energy of 17 GeV by increasing the intensity to 10 22 W / cm 2 .

  17. Generation of high-energy mono-energetic heavy ion beams by radiation pressure acceleration of ultra-intense laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D.; Qiao, B.; McGuffey, C.; Beg, F. N.; He, X. T.

    2014-12-15

    Generation of high-energy mono-energetic heavy ion beams by radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) of intense laser pulses is investigated. Different from previously studied RPA of protons or light ions, the dynamic ionization of high-Z atoms can stabilize the heavy ion acceleration. A self-organized, stable RPA scheme specifically for heavy ion beams is proposed, where the laser peak intensity is required to match with the large ionization energy gap when the successive ionization state passes the noble gas configurations [such as removing an electron from the helium-like charge state (Z−2){sup +} to (Z−1){sup +}]. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that a mono-energetic Al{sup 13+} beam with peak energy 1.0 GeV and energy spread of only 5% can be obtained at intensity of 7×10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2} through the proposed scheme. A heavier, mono-energetic, ion beam (Fe{sup 26+}) can attain a peak energy of 17 GeV by increasing the intensity to 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}.

  18. Analysis of Ion Motion and Scattering in the Extreme Regime of High Intensity Electron Beams in Plasma Wakefield Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Gholizadeh, Reza; Katsouleas, Tom; Muggli, Patric; Mori, Warren

    2006-11-27

    Plasma wakefield accelerator is examined in the extreme regime of nanometer transverse beam sizes, typical of designs in the multi-TeV range. We find that ion motion, synchrotron radiation, nuclear scattering and particle trapping constrain the design parameters in which high beam quality and efficiency can be maintained. For a particular example relevant to an ILC Afterburner, the analysis suggests that an intermediate mass ion such as Argon may best satisfy the constraints.

  19. Analysis of Ion Motion and Scattering in the Extreme Regime of High Intensity Electron Beams in Plasma Wakefield Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholizadeh, Reza; Katsouleas, Tom; Muggli, Patric; Mori, Warren

    2006-11-01

    Plasma wakefield accelerator is examined in the extreme regime of nanometer transverse beam sizes, typical of designs in the multi-TeV range. We find that ion motion, synchrotron radiation, nuclear scattering and particle trapping constrain the design parameters in which high beam quality and efficiency can be maintained. For a particular example relevant to an ILC Afterburner, the analysis suggests that an intermediate mass ion such as Argon may best satisfy the constraints.

  20. Drift Compression and Final Focus for Intense Heavy Ion Beams with Non-periodic, Time-dependent Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Qin; Ronald C. Davidson; John J. Barnard; Edward P. Lee

    2005-02-14

    In the currently envisioned configurations for heavy ion fusion, it is necessary to longitudinally compress the beam bunches by a large factor after the acceleration phase. Because the space-charge force increases as the beam is compressed, the beam size in the transverse direction will increase in a periodic quadrupole lattice. If an active control of the beam size is desired, a larger focusing force is needed to confine the beam in the transverse direction, and a non-periodic quadrupole lattice along the beam path is necessary. In this paper, we describe the design of such a focusing lattice using the transverse envelope equations. A drift compression and final focus lattice should focus the entire beam pulse onto the same focal spot on the target. This is difficult with a fixed lattice, because different slices of the beam may have different perveance and emittance. Four time-dependent magnets are introduced in the upstream of drift compression to focus the entire pulse onto the sam e focal spot. Drift compression and final focusing schemes are developed for a typical heavy ion fusion driver and for the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX) being designed by the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory.

  1. Traverse Focusing of Intense Charged Particle Beams with Chromatic Effects for Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    James M. Mitrani, Igor D. Kaganovich, Ronald C. Davidson

    2013-01-28

    A fi nal focusing scheme designed to minimize chromatic effects is discussed. The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II) will apply a velocity tilt for longitudinal bunch compression, and a fi nal focusing solenoid (FFS) for transverse bunch compression. In the beam frame, neutralized drift compression causes a suffi ciently large spread in axial momentum, pz , resulting in chromatic effects to the fi nal focal spot during transverse bunch compression. Placing a weaker solenoid upstream of a stronger fi nal focusing solenoid (FFS) mitigates chromatic effects and improves transverse focusing by a factor of approximately 2-4 for appropriate NDCX-II parameters.

  2. Beam halo in high-intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P. )

    1993-12-25

    In space-charge dominated beams the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a filamentation pattern, which in projection to the 2-D phase spaces results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and a diffuse outer halo. The beam-halo is of concern for a next generation of cw, high-power proton linacs that could be applied to intense neutron generators for nuclear materials processing. We describe what has been learned about beam halo and the evolution of space-charge dominated beams using numerical simulations of initial laminar beams in uniform linear focusing channels. We present initial results from a study of beam entropy for an intense space-charge dominated beam.

  3. Beam halo in high-intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.

    1993-06-01

    In space-charge dominated beams the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a filamentation pattern, which in projection to the 2-D phase spaces results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and a diffuse outer halo. The beam-halo is of concern for a next generation of cw, high-power proton linacs that could be applied to intense neutron generators for nuclear materials processing. The author describes what has been learned about beam halo and the evolution of space-charge dominated beams using numerical simulations of initial laminar beams in uniform linear focusing channels. Initial results are presented from a study of beam entropy for an intense space-charge dominated beam.

  4. Beam halo in high-intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.

    1993-01-01

    In space-charge dominated beams the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a filamentation pattern, which in projection to the 2-D phase spaces results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and a diffuse outer halo. The beam-halo is of concern for a next generation of cw, high-power proton linacs that could be applied to intense neutron generators for nuclear materials processing. The author describes what has been learned about beam halo and the evolution of space-charge dominated beams using numerical simulations of initial laminar beams in uniform linear focusing channels. Initial results are presented from a study of beam entropy for an intense space-charge dominated beam.

  5. Surface composition, microstructure and corrosion resistance of AZ31 magnesium alloy irradiated by high-intensity pulsed ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Li, P.; Lei, M.K.; Zhu, X.P.

    2011-06-15

    High-intensity pulsed ion beam (HIPIB) irradiation of AZ31 magnesium alloy is performed and electrochemical corrosion experiment of irradiated samples is carried out by using potentiodynamic polarization technology in order to explore the effect of HIPIB irradiation on corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy. The surface composition, cross-sectional morphology and microstructure are characterized by using electron probe microanalyzer, optical microscope and transmission electron microscope, respectively. The results indicated that HIPIB irradiation leads to a significant improvement in corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy, in terms of the considerable increase in both corrosion potential and pitting breakdown potential. The microstructural refinement and surface purification induced by HIPIB irradiation are responsible for the improved corrosion resistance. - Research Highlights: {yields} A modified layer about 30 {mu}m thick is obtained by HIPIB irradiation. {yields} Selective ablation of element/impurity phase having lower melting point is observed. {yields} More importantly, microstructural refinement occurred on the irradiated surface. {yields} The modified layer exhibited a significantly improved corrosion resistance. {yields} Improved corrosion resistance is ascribed to the combined effect induced by HIPIB.

  6. Time-dependent, x-ray spectral unfolds and brightness temperatures for intense Li + ion beam-driven hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehl, D. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Biggs, F.; Dukart, R. J.; Moats, A. R.; Leeper, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    X-ray-producing hohlraums are being studied as indirect drives for inertial confinement fusion targets. In a 1994 target series on the PBFAII accelerator, cylindrical hohlraum targets were heated by an intense Li+ ion beam and viewed by an array of 13 time-resolved, filtered x-ray detectors (XRDs). The unfold operator (UFO) code and its suite of auxiliary functions were used extensively in obtaining time-resolved x-ray spectra and radiation temperatures from this diagnostic. The UFO was also used to obtain fitted response functions from calibration data, to simulate data from blackbody x-ray spectra of interest, to determine the suitability of various unfolding parameters (e.g., energy domain, energy partition, smoothing conditions, and basis functions), to interpolate the XRD signal traces, and to unfold experimental data. The simulation capabilities of the code were useful in understanding an anomalous feature in the unfolded spectra at low photon energies (⩽100 eV). Uncertainties in the differential and energy-integrated unfolded spectra were estimated from uncertainties in the data. The time-history of the radiation temperature agreed well with independent calculations of the wall temperature in the hohlraum.

  7. Focusing and neutralization of intense beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Simon S.; Anders, Andre; Bieniosek, F.M.; Eylon, Shmuel; Henestroza, Enrique; Roy, Prabir; Shuman, Derek; Waldron, William; Sharp, William; Rose, Dave; Welch, Dale; Efthimion, Philip; Gilson, Eric

    2003-05-01

    In heavy ion inertial confinement fusion systems, intense beams of ions must be transported from the exit of the final focus magnet system through the target chamber to hit millimeter spot sizes on the target. Effective plasma neutralization of intense ion beams through the target chamber is essential for the viability of an economically competitive heavy ion fusion power plant. The physics of neutralized drift has been studied extensively with PIC simulations. To provide quantitative comparisons of theoretical predictions with experiment, the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory has completed the construction and has begun experimentation with the NTX (Neutralized Transport Experiment) as shown in Figure 1. The experiment consists of 3 phases, each with physics issues of its own. Phase 1 is designed to generate a very high brightness potassium beam with variable perveance, using a beam aperturing technique. Phase 2 consists of magnetic transport through four pulsed quadrupoles. Here, beam tuning as well as the effects of phase space dilution through higher order nonlinear fields must be understood. In Phase 3, a converging ion beam at the exit of the magnetic section is transported through a drift section with plasma sources for beam neutralization, and the final spot size is measured under various conditions of neutralization. In this paper, we present first results from all 3 phases of the experiment.

  8. Generation and diagnostics of pulsed intense ion beams with an energy density of 10 J/cm2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isakova, Yu.; Pushkarev, A.; Khailov, I.; Zhong, H.

    2015-07-01

    The paper presents the results of a study on transportation and focusing of a pulsed ion beam at gigawatt power level, generated by a diode with explosive-emission cathode. The experiments were carried out with the TEMP-4M accelerator operating in double-pulse mode: the first pulse is of negative polarity (500 ns, 100-150 kV), and this is followed by a second pulse of positive polarity (120 ns, 200-250 kV). To reduce the beam divergence, we modified the construction of the diode. The width of the anode was increased compared to that of the cathode. We studied different configurations of planar and focusing strip diodes. It was found that the divergence of the ion beam formed by a planar strip diode, after construction modification, does not exceed 3° (half-angle). Modification to the construction of a focusing diode made it possible to reduce the beam divergence from 8° to 4°-5°, as well as to increase the energy density at the focus up to 10-12 J/cm2, and decrease the shot to shot variation in the energy density from 10%-15% to 5%-6%. When measuring the ion beam energy density above the ablation threshold of the target material (3.5-4 J/cm2), we used a metal mesh with 50% transparency to lower the energy density. The influence of the metal mesh on beam transport has been studied.

  9. Generation and diagnostics of pulsed intense ion beams with an energy density of 10 J/cm{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Isakova, Yu. Pushkarev, A.; Khailov, I.; Zhong, H.

    2015-07-15

    The paper presents the results of a study on transportation and focusing of a pulsed ion beam at gigawatt power level, generated by a diode with explosive-emission cathode. The experiments were carried out with the TEMP-4M accelerator operating in double-pulse mode: the first pulse is of negative polarity (500 ns, 100-150 kV), and this is followed by a second pulse of positive polarity (120 ns, 200-250 kV). To reduce the beam divergence, we modified the construction of the diode. The width of the anode was increased compared to that of the cathode. We studied different configurations of planar and focusing strip diodes. It was found that the divergence of the ion beam formed by a planar strip diode, after construction modification, does not exceed 3° (half-angle). Modification to the construction of a focusing diode made it possible to reduce the beam divergence from 8° to 4°-5°, as well as to increase the energy density at the focus up to 10-12 J/cm{sup 2}, and decrease the shot to shot variation in the energy density from 10%-15% to 5%-6%. When measuring the ion beam energy density above the ablation threshold of the target material (3.5-4 J/cm{sup 2}), we used a metal mesh with 50% transparency to lower the energy density. The influence of the metal mesh on beam transport has been studied.

  10. Generation and diagnostics of pulsed intense ion beams with an energy density of 10 J/cm².

    PubMed

    Isakova, Yu; Pushkarev, A; Khailov, I; Zhong, H

    2015-07-01

    The paper presents the results of a study on transportation and focusing of a pulsed ion beam at gigawatt power level, generated by a diode with explosive-emission cathode. The experiments were carried out with the TEMP-4M accelerator operating in double-pulse mode: the first pulse is of negative polarity (500 ns, 100-150 kV), and this is followed by a second pulse of positive polarity (120 ns, 200-250 kV). To reduce the beam divergence, we modified the construction of the diode. The width of the anode was increased compared to that of the cathode. We studied different configurations of planar and focusing strip diodes. It was found that the divergence of the ion beam formed by a planar strip diode, after construction modification, does not exceed 3° (half-angle). Modification to the construction of a focusing diode made it possible to reduce the beam divergence from 8° to 4°-5°, as well as to increase the energy density at the focus up to 10-12 J/cm(2), and decrease the shot to shot variation in the energy density from 10%-15% to 5%-6%. When measuring the ion beam energy density above the ablation threshold of the target material (3.5-4 J/cm(2)), we used a metal mesh with 50% transparency to lower the energy density. The influence of the metal mesh on beam transport has been studied. PMID:26233370

  11. Two-stream Stability Properties of the Return-Current Layer for Intense Ion Beam Propagation Through Background Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Edward A. Startsev, Ronald C. Davidson and Mikhail Dorf

    2009-09-10

    When an ion beam with sharp edge propagates through a background plasma, its current is neutralized by the plasma return current everywhere except at the beam edge over a characteristic transverse distance Δχ⊥ ~ δpe, where δpe = c/ωpe is the collisionless skin depth, and ωpe is the electron plasma frequency. Because the background plasma electrons neutralizing the ion beam current inside the beam are streaming relative to the background plasma electrons outside the beam, the background plasma can support a two-stream surface-mode excitation. Such surface modes have been studied previously assuming complete charge and current neutralization, and have been shown to be strongly unstable. In this paper we study the detailed stability properties of this two-stream surface mode for an electron flow velocity profile self-consistently driven by the ion beam. In particular, it is shown that the self-magnetic field generated inside the unneutralized current layer, which has not been taken into account previously, completely eliminates the instability.

  12. Use of a radial self-field diode geometry for intense pulsed ion beam generation at 6 MeV on Hermes III

    SciTech Connect

    Renk, T. J. Harper-Slaboszewicz, V.; Mikkelson, K. A.; Ginn, W. C.; Ottinger, P. F.; Schumer, J. W.

    2014-12-15

    We investigate the generation of intense pulsed focused ion beams at the 6 MeV level using an inductive voltage adder (IVA) pulsed-power generator, which employs a magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL). Such IVA machines typical run at an impedance of few tens of Ohms. Previous successful intense ion beam generation experiments have often featured an “axial” pinch-reflex ion diode (i.e., with an axial anode-cathode gap) and operated on a conventional Marx generator/water line driver with an impedance of a few Ohms and no need for an MITL. The goals of these experiments are to develop a pinch-reflex ion diode geometry that has an impedance to efficiently match to an IVA, produces a reasonably high ion current fraction, captures the vacuum electron current flowing forward in the MITL, and focuses the resulting ion beam to small spot size. A new “radial” pinch-reflex ion diode (i.e., with a radial anode-cathode gap) is found to best demonstrate these properties. Operation in both positive and negative polarities was undertaken, although the negative polarity experiments are emphasized. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are consistent with experimental results indicating that, for diode impedances less than the self-limited impedance of the MITL, almost all of the forward-going IVA vacuum electron flow current is incorporated into the diode current. PIC results also provide understanding of the diode-impedance and ion-focusing properties of the diode. In addition, a substantial high-energy ion population is also identified propagating in the “reverse” direction, i.e., from the back side of the anode foil in the electron beam dump.

  13. Use of a radial self-field diode geometry for intense pulsed ion beam generation at 6 MeV on Hermes III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renk, T. J.; Harper-Slaboszewicz, V.; Mikkelson, K. A.; Ginn, W. C.; Ottinger, P. F.; Schumer, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the generation of intense pulsed focused ion beams at the 6 MeV level using an inductive voltage adder (IVA) pulsed-power generator, which employs a magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL). Such IVA machines typical run at an impedance of few tens of Ohms. Previous successful intense ion beam generation experiments have often featured an "axial" pinch-reflex ion diode (i.e., with an axial anode-cathode gap) and operated on a conventional Marx generator/water line driver with an impedance of a few Ohms and no need for an MITL. The goals of these experiments are to develop a pinch-reflex ion diode geometry that has an impedance to efficiently match to an IVA, produces a reasonably high ion current fraction, captures the vacuum electron current flowing forward in the MITL, and focuses the resulting ion beam to small spot size. A new "radial" pinch-reflex ion diode (i.e., with a radial anode-cathode gap) is found to best demonstrate these properties. Operation in both positive and negative polarities was undertaken, although the negative polarity experiments are emphasized. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are consistent with experimental results indicating that, for diode impedances less than the self-limited impedance of the MITL, almost all of the forward-going IVA vacuum electron flow current is incorporated into the diode current. PIC results also provide understanding of the diode-impedance and ion-focusing properties of the diode. In addition, a substantial high-energy ion population is also identified propagating in the "reverse" direction, i.e., from the back side of the anode foil in the electron beam dump.

  14. Use of a radial self-field diode geometry for intense pulsed ion beam generation at 6 MeV on Hermes III

    SciTech Connect

    Renk, Timothy Jerome; Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor Jozef; Mikkelson, Kenneth A.; Ginn, W. C.; Ottinger, P. F.; Schumer, J. W.

    2014-12-15

    We investigate the generation of intense pulsed focused ion beams at the 6 MeV level using an inductive voltage adder (IVA) pulsed-power generator, which employs a magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL). Such IVA machines typical run at an impedance of few tens of Ohms. Previous successful intense ion beam generation experiments have often featured an “axial” pinch-reflex ion diode (i.e., with an axial anode-cathode gap) and operated on a conventional Marx generator/water line driver with an impedance of a few Ohms and no need for an MITL. The goals of these experiments are to develop a pinch-reflex ion diode geometry that has an impedance to efficiently match to an IVA, produces a reasonably high ion current fraction, captures the vacuum electron current flowing forward in the MITL, and focuses the resulting ion beam to small spot size. Furthermore, a new “radial” pinch-reflex ion diode (i.e., with a radial anode-cathode gap) is found to best demonstrate these properties. Operation in both positive and negative polarities was undertaken, although the negative polarity experiments are emphasized. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are consistent with experimental results indicating that, for diode impedances less than the self-limited impedance of the MITL, almost all of the forward-going IVA vacuum electron flow current is incorporated into the diode current. PIC results also provide understanding of the diode-impedance and ion-focusing properties of the diode. Additionally, a substantial high-energy ion population is also identified propagating in the “reverse” direction, i.e., from the back side of the anode foil in the electron beam dump.

  15. Use of a radial self-field diode geometry for intense pulsed ion beam generation at 6 MeV on Hermes III

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Renk, Timothy Jerome; Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor Jozef; Mikkelson, Kenneth A.; Ginn, W. C.; Ottinger, P. F.; Schumer, J. W.

    2014-12-15

    We investigate the generation of intense pulsed focused ion beams at the 6 MeV level using an inductive voltage adder (IVA) pulsed-power generator, which employs a magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL). Such IVA machines typical run at an impedance of few tens of Ohms. Previous successful intense ion beam generation experiments have often featured an “axial” pinch-reflex ion diode (i.e., with an axial anode-cathode gap) and operated on a conventional Marx generator/water line driver with an impedance of a few Ohms and no need for an MITL. The goals of these experiments are to develop a pinch-reflex ion diode geometrymore » that has an impedance to efficiently match to an IVA, produces a reasonably high ion current fraction, captures the vacuum electron current flowing forward in the MITL, and focuses the resulting ion beam to small spot size. Furthermore, a new “radial” pinch-reflex ion diode (i.e., with a radial anode-cathode gap) is found to best demonstrate these properties. Operation in both positive and negative polarities was undertaken, although the negative polarity experiments are emphasized. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are consistent with experimental results indicating that, for diode impedances less than the self-limited impedance of the MITL, almost all of the forward-going IVA vacuum electron flow current is incorporated into the diode current. PIC results also provide understanding of the diode-impedance and ion-focusing properties of the diode. Additionally, a substantial high-energy ion population is also identified propagating in the “reverse” direction, i.e., from the back side of the anode foil in the electron beam dump.« less

  16. Development of a fast cyclotron gas stopper for intense rare isotope beams from projectile fragmentation: Study of ion extraction with a radiofrequency carpet

    SciTech Connect

    Bollen, Georg; Morrissey, David

    2011-01-16

    Research and development has been performed in support of the design of a future rare isotope beam facility in the US. An important aspect of plans for earlier RIA (Rare Isotope Accelerator) and a requirement of FRIB (Facility of Rare Isotope Beams) to be built at Michigan State University are the availability of so-called “stopped beams” for research that contributes to answering questions like how elements in the universe are created and to provide better insight into the nature of Fundamental Interactions. In order to create “stopped beams” techniques are required that transform fast rare isotopes beams as they are available directly after addresses questions like the origin of that will allow and High priority is given to the evaluation of intensity limitations and the efficiency of stopping of fast fragment beams in gas cells and to the exploration of options to increase the efficiency and the reduction of space charge effects. Systematic studies performed at MSU as part of the RIA R&D with a linear gas cell under conditions close to those expected at RIA and related simulations confirm that the efficiency of stopping and extracting ions decreases with increasing beam intensity. Similar results have also been observed at RIKEN in Japan. These results indicate the concepts presently under study will not be able to cover the full range of intensities of fast beams expected at RIA without major losses. The development of a more robust concept is therefore critical to the RIA concept. Recent new beam simulation studies performed at the NSCL show that the stopping of heavy ions in a weakly focusing gas-filled magnetic field can overcome the intensity limitation of present systems while simultaneously providing a much faster ion extraction. We propose to design and build such a cyclotron gas stopper and to test it at the NSCL under conditions as close as possible to those found at RIA.

  17. Heavy ion beams for inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Godlove, T.F.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1980-05-01

    The United States' program in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is described in this paper, with emphasis on the studies of the use of intense high energy beams of heavy ions to provide the power and energy needed to initiate thermonuclear burn. Preliminary calculations of the transport of intense ion beams in an electrostatic quadrupole focussing structure are discussed.

  18. Ion beam thruster shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion thruster beam shield is provided that comprises a cylindrical housing that extends downstream from the ion thruster and a plurality of annular vanes which are spaced along the length of the housing, and extend inwardly from the interior wall of the housing. The shield intercepts and stops all charge exchange and beam ions, neutral propellant, and sputter products formed due to the interaction of beam and shield emanating from the ion thruster outside of a fixed conical angle from the thruster axis. Further, the shield prevents the sputter products formed during the operation of the engine from escaping the interior volume of the shield.

  19. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam. An accelerator electrode device downstream from the extraction grids is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam. The application of the system to ion implantation is mentioned.

  20. The Influence of High-Power Ion Beams and High-Intensity Short-Pulse Implantation of Ions on the Properties of Ceramic Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabyshev, A. V.; Konusov, F. V.; Pavlov, S. K.; Remnev, G. E.

    2016-02-01

    The paper is focused on the study of the structural, electrical and optical characteristics of the ceramic silicon carbide before and after irradiation in the regimes of the high-power ion beams (HPIB) and high-intensity short-pulse implantation (HISPI) of carbon ions. The dominant mechanism of transport of charge carriers, their type and the energy spectrum of localized states (LS) of defects determining the properties of SiC were established. Electrical and optical characteristics of ceramic before and after irradiation are determined by the biographical and radiation defects whose band gap (BG) energy levels have a continuous energetic distribution. A dominant p-type activation component of conduction with participation of shallow acceptor levels 0.05-0.16 eV is complemented by hopping mechanism of conduction involving the defects LS with a density of 1.2T017-2.4T018 eV-Am-3 distributed near the Fermi level.The effect of radiation defects with deep levels in the BG on properties change dominates after HISPI. A new material with the changed electronic structure and properties is formed in the near surface layer of SiC after the impact of the HPIB.

  1. Intense low energy positron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, K.G.; Jacobsen, F.M.

    1993-12-31

    Intense positron beams are under development or being considered at several laboratories. Already today a few accelerator based high intensity, low brightness e{sup +} beams exist producing of the order of 10{sup 8} {minus} 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec. Several laboratories are aiming at high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams with intensities greater than 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec and current densities of the order of 10{sup 13} {minus} 10{sup 14} e{sup +} sec{sup {minus}} {sup 1}cm{sup {minus}2}. Intense e{sup +} beams can be realized in two ways (or in a combination thereof) either through a development of more efficient B{sup +} moderators or by increasing the available activity of B{sup +} particles. In this review we shall mainly concentrate on the latter approach. In atomic physics the main trust for these developments is to be able to measure differential and high energy cross-sections in e{sup +} collisions with atoms and molecules. Within solid state physics high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams are in demand in areas such as the re-emission e{sup +} microscope, two dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation, low energy e{sup +} diffraction and other fields. Intense e{sup +} beams are also important for the development of positronium beams, as well as exotic experiments such as Bose condensation and Ps liquid studies.

  2. Ion beam surface modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwight, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    The essential details of a study on the practical applications and mechanisms of polymer sputtering via Argon ion impact are summarized. The potential to modify the properties of polymer surfaces to improve their adherence, durability, biocompatibility, or other desirable properties by ion beam sputtering was emphasized. Ion beam milling can be of benefit as an analytical tool to obtain composition versus depth information. Ion impact from a directed ion gun source specifically etches polymer structures according to their morphologies, therefore this technique may be useful to study unknown or new morphological features. Factors addressed were related to: (1) the texture that arises on a polymer target after ion impact; (2) the chemistry of the top surface after ion impact; (3) the chemistry of sputtered films of polymeric material deposited on substrates placed adjacent to targets during ion impact; and (4) practical properties of textured polymer targets, specifically the wettability and adhesive bonding properties.

  3. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, Graeme (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids (16, 18) with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets (20) along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam (14). An accelerator electrode device (22) downstream from the extraction grids, is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam.

  4. Focused ion beam system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.; Gough, R.A.; Ji, Q.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1999-08-31

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 {mu}m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 m or less. 13 figs.

  5. Focused ion beam system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Gough, Richard A.; Ji, Qing; Lee, Yung-Hee Yvette

    1999-01-01

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 .mu.m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 .mu.m or less.

  6. Ion beam texturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    A microscopic surface texture is created by sputter etching a surface while simultaneously sputter depositing a lower sputter yield material onto the surface. A xenon ion beam source has been used to perform this texturing process on samples as large as three centimeters in diameter. Ion beam textured surface structures have been characterized with SEM photomicrographs for a large number of materials including Cu, Al, Si, Ti, Ni, Fe, Stainless steel, Au, and Ag. Surfaces have been textured using a variety of low sputter yield materials - Ta, Mo, Nb, and Ti. The initial stages of the texture creation have been documented, and the technique of ion beam sputter removal of any remaining deposited material has been studied. A number of other texturing parameters have been studied such as the variation of the texture with ion beam power, surface temperature, and the rate of texture growth with sputter etching time.

  7. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOEpatents

    Greenly, John B.

    1997-01-01

    An improved pulsed ion beam source having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center.

  8. Molecular Ion Beam Transportation for Low Energy Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kulevoy, T. V.; Kropachev, G. N.; Seleznev, D. N.; Yakushin, P. E.; Kuibeda, R. P.; Kozlov, A. V.; Koshelev, V. A.; Hershcovitch, A.; Johnson, B. M.; Gushenets, V. I.; Oks, E. M.; Polozov, S. M.; Poole, H. J.

    2011-01-07

    A joint research and development of steady state intense boron ion sources for 100's of electron-volt ion implanters has been in progress for the past five years. Current density limitation associated with extracting and transporting low energy ion beams result in lower beam currents that in turn adversely affects the process throughput. The transport channel with electrostatic lenses for decaborane (B{sub 10}H{sub 14}) and carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) ion beams transportation was developed and investigated. The significant increase of ion beam intensity at the beam transport channel output is demonstrated. The transport channel simulation, construction and experimental results of ion beam transportation are presented.

  9. Intensity-symmetric Airy beams.

    PubMed

    Vaveliuk, P; Lencina, Alberto; Rodrigo, Jose A; Martnez-Matos, Ó

    2015-03-01

    Theoretical, numerical, and experimental research on a novel family of Airy beams in rectangular coordinates having a symmetric transverse pattern of light intensity is presented. The intensity-symmetric Airy beams include both the symmetric Airy beam whose field amplitude is an even function of the transverse coordinates and the antisymmetric Airy beam whose field amplitude is an odd function of such coordinates. The theoretical foundations are based on the relationship of the symmetries of the spectral phase with the cosine and sine Fourier transforms. These beams are analyzed in a propagation range also including the region preceding the Fourier plane. These beams exhibit autofocusing, collapse, self-bending, and reversal propagation. Moreover, the intensity distribution is strongly asymmetric with respect to the Fourier plane. All these peculiar features were not reported for other classes of paraxial beams in a rectangular frame. The experimental generation of intensity-symmetric Airy beams is demonstrated supporting the theoretical predictions. Possible applications in planar waveguide writing and optical trapping are also discussed. PMID:26366655

  10. Ion-beam technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Fenske, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    This compilation of figures and diagrams reviews processes for depositing diamond/diamond-like carbon films. Processes addressed are chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD, PACVD, etc.), plasma vapor deposition (plasma sputtering, ion beam sputtering, evaporation, etc.), low-energy ion implantation, and hybrid processes (biased sputtering, IBAD, biased HFCVD, etc.). The tribological performance of coatings produced by different means is discussed.

  11. Ion beam generating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Ian G.; Galvin, James

    1987-01-01

    An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam.

  12. Fusion studies with low-intensity radioactive ion beams using an active-target time projection chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolata, J. J.; Howard, A. M.; Mittig, W.; Ahn, T.; Bazin, D.; Becchetti, F. D.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Chajecki, Z.; Febbrarro, M.; Fritsch, A.; Lynch, W. G.; Roberts, A.; Shore, A.; Torres-Isea, R. O.

    2016-09-01

    The total fusion excitation function for 10Be+40Ar has been measured over the center-of-momentum (c.m.) energy range from 12 to 24 MeV using a time-projection chamber (TPC). The main purpose of this experiment, which was carried out in a single run of duration 90 h using a ≈100 particle per second (pps) 10Be beam, was to demonstrate the capability of an active-target TPC to determine fusion excitation functions for extremely weak radioactive ion beams. Cross sections as low as 12 mb were measured with acceptable (50%) statistical accuracy. It also proved to be possible to separate events in which charged particles were emitted from the fusion residue from those in which only neutrons were evaporated. The method permits simultaneous measurement of incomplete fusion, break-up, scattering, and transfer reactions, and therefore fully exploits the opportunities presented by the very exotic beams that will be available from the new generation of radioactive beam facilities.

  13. Ion beam mixing by focused ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Barna, Arpad; Kotis, Laszlo; Labar, Janos L.; Osvath, Zoltan; Toth, Attila L.; Menyhard, Miklos; Zalar, Anton; Panjan, Peter

    2007-09-01

    Si amorphous (41 nm)/Cr polycrystalline (46 nm) multilayer structure was irradiated by 30 keV Ga{sup +} ions with fluences in the range of 25-820 ions/nm{sup 2} using a focused ion beam. The effect of irradiation on the concentration distribution was studied by Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiling, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The ion irradiation did not result in roughening on the free surface. On the other hand, the Ga{sup +} irradiation produced a strongly mixed region around the first Si/Cr interface. The thickness of mixed region depends on the Ga{sup +} fluence and it is joined to the pure Cr matrix with an unusual sharp interface. With increasing fluence the width of the mixed region increases but the interface between the mixed layer and pure Cr remains sharp. TRIDYN simulation failed to reproduce this behavior. Assuming that the Ga{sup +} irradiation induces asymmetric mixing, that is during the mixing process the Cr can enter the Si layer, but the Si cannot enter the Cr layer, the experimental findings can qualitatively be explained.

  14. Intense positron beam at KEK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Toshikazu; Yagishita, Akira; Enomoto, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Hitoshi; Shidara, Tetsuo; Shirakawa, Akihiro; Nakahara, Kazuo; Saitou, Haruo; Inoue, Kouji; Nagashima, Yasuyuki; Hyodo, Toshio; Nagai, Yasuyoshi; Hasegawa, Masayuki; Inoue, Yoshi; Kogure, Yoshiaki; Doyama, Masao

    2000-08-01

    A positron beam is a useful probe for investigating the electronic states in solids, especially concerning the surface states. The advantage of utilizing positron beams is in their simpler interactions with matter, owing to the absence of any exchange forces, in contrast to the case of low-energy electrons. However, such studies as low-energy positron diffraction, positron microscopy and positronium (Ps) spectroscopy, which require high intensity slow-positron beams, are very limited due to the poor intensity obtained from a conventional radioactive-isotope-based positron source. In conventional laboratories, the slow-positron intensity is restricted to 10 6 e +/s due to the strength of the available radioactive source. An accelerator based slow-positron source is a good candidate for increasing the slow-positron intensity. One of the results using a high intensity pulsed positron beam is presented as a study of the origins of a Ps emitted from SiO 2. We also describe the two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) measurement system with slow-positron beams and a positron microscope.

  15. Ion Beam Simulator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-11-08

    IBSimu(Ion Beam Simulator) is a computer program for making two and three dimensional ion optical simulations. The program can solve electrostatic field in a rectangular mesh using Poisson equation using Finite Difference method (FDM). The mesh can consist of a coarse and a fine part so that the calculation accuracy can be increased in critical areas of the geometry, while most of the calculation is done quickly using the coarse mesh. IBSimu can launch ionmore » beam trajectories into the simulation from an injection surface or fomo plasma. Ion beam space charge of time independent simulations can be taken in account using Viasov iteration. Plasma is calculated by compensating space charge with electrons having Boltzmann energy distribution. The simulation software can also be used to calculate time dependent cases if the space charge is not calculated. Software includes diagnostic tools for plotting the geometry, electric field, space charge map, ion beam trajectories, emittance data and beam profiles.« less

  16. Ion beam lithography system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-08-02

    A maskless plasma-formed ion beam lithography tool provides for patterning of sub-50 nm features on large area flat or curved substrate surfaces. The system is very compact and does not require an accelerator column and electrostatic beam scanning components. The patterns are formed by switching beamlets on or off from a two electrode blanking system with the substrate being scanned mechanically in one dimension. This arrangement can provide a maskless nano-beam lithography tool for economic and high throughput processing.

  17. Beam intensity increases at the intense pulsed neutron source accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Potts, C.; Brumwell, F.; Norem, J.; Rauchas, A.; Stipp, V.; Volk, G.

    1985-01-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) accelerator system has managed a 40% increase in time average beam current over the last two years. Currents of up to 15.6..mu..A (3.25 x 10/sup 12/ protons at 30 Hz) have been successfully accelerated and cleanly extracted. Our high current operation demands low loss beam handling to permit hands-on maintenance. Synchrotron beam handling efficiencies of 90% are routine. A new H/sup -/ ion source which was installed in March of 1983 offered the opportunity to get above 8 ..mu..A but an instability caused unacceptable losses when attempting to operate at 10 ..mu..A and above. Simple techniques to control the instabilities were introduced and have worked well. These techniques are discussed below. Other improvements in the regulation of various power supplies have provided greatly improved low energy orbit stability and contributed substantially to the increased beam current.

  18. Intense diagnostic neutral beam development for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Henins, I.; Fonck, R.J.; Kim, Y.J.

    1992-05-01

    For the next-generation, burning tokamak plasmas such as ITER, diagnostic neutral beams and beam spectroscopy will continue to be used to determine a variety of plasma parameters such as ion temperature, rotation, fluctuations, impurity content, current density profile, and confined alpha particle density and energy distribution. Present-day low-current, long-pulse beam technology will be unable to provide the required signal intensities because of higher beam attenuation and background bremsstrahlung radiation in these larger, higher-density plasmas. To address this problem, we are developing a short-pulse, intense diagnostic neutral beam. Protons or deuterons are accelerated using magnetic-insulated ion-diode technology, and neutralized in a transient gas cell. A prototype 25-kA, 100-kV, 1-{mu}s accelerator is under construction at Los Alamos. Initial experiments will focus on ITER-related issues of beam energy distribution, current density, pulse length, divergence, propagation, impurity content, reproducibility, and maintenance.

  19. Intense diagnostic neutral beam development for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Henins, I. ); Fonck, R.J.; Kim, Y.J. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics)

    1992-01-01

    For the next-generation, burning tokamak plasmas such as ITER, diagnostic neutral beams and beam spectroscopy will continue to be used to determine a variety of plasma parameters such as ion temperature, rotation, fluctuations, impurity content, current density profile, and confined alpha particle density and energy distribution. Present-day low-current, long-pulse beam technology will be unable to provide the required signal intensities because of higher beam attenuation and background bremsstrahlung radiation in these larger, higher-density plasmas. To address this problem, we are developing a short-pulse, intense diagnostic neutral beam. Protons or deuterons are accelerated using magnetic-insulated ion-diode technology, and neutralized in a transient gas cell. A prototype 25-kA, 100-kV, 1-{mu}s accelerator is under construction at Los Alamos. Initial experiments will focus on ITER-related issues of beam energy distribution, current density, pulse length, divergence, propagation, impurity content, reproducibility, and maintenance.

  20. Nonpropulsive applications of ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    Eight centimeter ion beam sources utilizing xenon and argon have been developed that operate over a wide range of beam energies and currents. Three types of processes have been studied: sputter deposition, ion beam machining, and ion beam surface texturing. The broad range of source operating conditions allows optimum sputter deposition of various materials. An ion beam source was used to ion mill laser reflection holograms using photoresist patterns on silicon. Ion beam texturing was tried with many materials and has a multitude of potential applications.

  1. Low energy ion beam dynamics of NANOGAN ECR ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A.

    2016-04-01

    A new low energy ion beam facility (LEIBF) has been developed for providing the mass analyzed highly charged intense ion beams of energy ranging from a few tens of keV to a few MeV for atomic, molecular and materials sciences research. The new facility consists of an all permanent magnet 10 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source (NANOGAN) installed on a high voltage platform (400 kV) which provides large currents of multiply charged ion beams. Higher emittance at low energy of intense ion beam puts a tremendous challenge to the beam optical design of this facility. The beam line consists of mainly the electrostatic quadrupoles, an accelerating section, analyzing cum switching magnet and suitable beam diagnostics including vacuum components. The accelerated ion beam is analyzed for a particular mass to charge (m/q) ratio as well as guided to three different lines along 75°, 90° and 105° using a large acceptance analyzing cum switching magnet. The details of transverse beam optics to all the beam lines with TRANSPORT and GICOSY beam optics codes are being described. Field computation code, OPERA 3D has been utilized to design the magnets and electrostatic quadrupoles. A theoretical estimation of emittance for optimized geometry of ion source is given so as to form the basis of beam optics calculations. The method of quadrupole scan of the beam is used to characterize the emittance of the final beam on the target. The measured beam emittance increases with m/q ratios of various ion beams similar to the trend observed theoretically.

  2. Studies of thermophysical properties of high-energy-density states in matter using intense heavy ion beams at the future FAIR accelerator facilities: The HEDgeHOB collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Shutov, A.; Lomonosov, I. V.; Gryaznov, V.; Deutsch, C.; Fortov, V. E.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Ni, P.; Piriz, A. R.; Udrea, S.; Varentsov, D.; Wouchuk, G.

    2006-06-01

    Intense beams of energetic heavy ions are believed to be a very efficient and novel tool to create states of High-Energy-Density (HED) in matter. This paper shows with the help of numerical simulations that the heavy ion beams that will be generated at the future Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR)[W.F. Henning, Nucl. Instr. Meth. B 214, 211 (2004)] will allow one to use two different experimental schemes to study HED states in matter. First scheme named HIHEX (Heavy Ion Heating and EXpansion), will generate high-pressure, high-entropy states in matter by volumetric isochoric heating. The heated material will then be allowed to expand isentropically. Using this scheme, it will be possible to study important regions of the phase diagram that are either difficult to access or are even unaccessible using traditional methods of shock compression. The second scheme would allow one to achieve low-entropy compression of a sample material like hydrogen or water to produce conditions that are believed to exist in the interiors of the giant planets. This scheme is named LAPLAS (LAboratory PLAnetary Sciences).

  3. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOEpatents

    Greenly, J.B.

    1997-08-12

    An improved pulsed ion beam source is disclosed having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center. 12 figs.

  4. High-powered pulsed-ion-beam acceleration and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Humphries, S. Jr.; Lockner, T.R.

    1981-11-01

    The state of research on intense ion beam acceleration and transport is reviewed. The limitations imposed on ion beam transport by space charge effects and methods available for neutralization are summarized. The general problem of ion beam neutralization in regions free of applied electric fields is treated. The physics of acceleration gaps is described. Finally, experiments on multi-stage ion acceleration are summarized.

  5. Ion Beam Therapy in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Gerhard

    2009-03-01

    At present, seven facilities in Europe treat deep-seated tumors with particle beams, six with proton beams and one with carbon ions. Three of these facilities are in Moscow, St. Petersburg and Dubna, Russia. Other facilities include the TSL Uppsala, Sweden, CPO Orsay, France, and PSI Villigen, Switzerland, all for proton therapy, and GSI, Darmstadt, Germany, which utilizes carbon ions only. But only two of these facilities irradiate with scanned ion beams: the Paul Scherer Institute (PSI), Villigen (protons) and the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt. These two facilities are experimental units within physics laboratories and have developed the technique of intensity-modulated beam scanning in order to produce irradiation conforming to a 3-D target. There are three proton centers presently under construction in Munich, Essen and Orsay, and the proton facility at PSI has added a superconducting accelerator connected to an isocentric gantry in order to become independent of the accelerator shared with the physics research program. The excellent clinical results using carbon ions at National Institute of Radiological Science (NIRS) in Chiba and GSI have triggered the construction of four new heavy-ion therapy projects (carbon ions and protons), located in Heidelberg, Pavia, Marburg and Kiel. The projects in Heidelberg and Pavia will begin patient treatment in 2009, and the Marburg and Kiel projects will begin in 2010 and 2011, respectively. These centers use different accelerator designs but have the same kind of treatment planning system and use the same approach for the calculation of the biological effectiveness of the carbon ions as developed at GSI [1]. There are many other planned projects in the works. Do not replace the word "abstract," but do replace the rest of this text. If you must insert a hard line break, please use Shift+Enter rather than just tapping your "Enter" key. You may want to print this page and refer to it as a style

  6. Atomic Oxygen (ATOX) simulation of Teflon FEP and Kapton H surfaces using a high intensity, low energy, mass selected, ion beam facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vered, R.; Grossman, E.; Lempert, G. D.; Lifshitz, Y.

    1994-01-01

    A high intensity (greater than 10(exp 15) ions/sq cm) low energy (down to 5 eV) mass selected ion beam (MSIB) facility was used to study the effects of ATOX on two polymers commonly used for space applications (Kapton H and Teflon FEP). The polymers were exposed to O(+) and Ne(+) fluences on 10(exp 15) - 10(exp 19) ions/sq cm, using 30eV ions. A variety of analytical methods were used to analyze the eroded surfaces including: (1) atomic force microscopy (AFM) for morphology measurements; (2) total mass loss measurements using a microbalance; (3) surface chemical composition using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and (4) residual gas analysis (RGA) of the released gases during bombardment. The relative significance of the collisional and chemical degradation processes was evaluated by comparing the effects of Ne(+) and O(+) bombardment. For 30 eV ions it was found that the Kapton is eroded via chemical mechanisms while Teflon FEP is eroded via collisional mechanisms. AFM analysis was found very powerful in revealing the evolution of the damage from its initial atomic scale (roughness of approx. 1 nm) to its final microscopic scale (roughness greater than 1 micron). Both the surface morphology and the average roughness of the bombarded surfaces (averaged over 1 micron x 1 micron images by the system's computer) were determined for each sample. For 30 eV a non linear increase of the Kapton roughness with the O(+) fluence was discovered (a slow increase rate for fluences phi less than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm, and a rapid increase rate for phi greater than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm). Comparative studies on the same materials exposed to RF and DC oxygen plasmas indicate that the specific details of the erosion depend on the simulation facility emphasizing the advantages of the ion beam facility.

  7. Metal Ion Sources for Ion Beam Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, W. J.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Ren, X. T.

    2008-11-03

    In this paper a theme touched upon the progress of metal ion sources devoted to metal ion beam implantation (MIBI) will be reviewed. A special emphasis will be given to some kinds of ion sources such as ECR, MEVVA and Cluster ion sources. A novel dual hollow cathode metal ion source named DUHOCAMIS will be introduced and discussed.

  8. Ion beam sputter etching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.

    1986-01-01

    An ion beam etching process which forms extremely high aspect ratio surface microstructures using thin sputter masks is utilized in the fabrication of integrated circuits. A carbon rich sputter mask together with unmasked portions of a substrate is bombarded with inert gas ions while simultaneous carbon deposition occurs. The arrival of the carbon deposit is adjusted to enable the sputter mask to have a near zero or even slightly positive increase in thickness with time while the unmasked portions have a high net sputter etch rate.

  9. Introduction to Ion Beam Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Martisikova, Maria

    2010-01-05

    Presently, ion beam therapy reaches an increasing interest within the field of radiation therapy, which is caused by the promising clinical results obtained in the last decades. Ion beams enable higher dose conformation to the tumor and increased sparing of the surrounding tissue in comparison to the standard therapy using high energy photons. Heavy ions, like carbon, offer in addition increased biological effectiveness, which makes them suitable for treatment of radioresistant tumors. This contribution gives an overview over the physical and biological properties of ion beams. Common fundamental principles of ion beam therapy are summarized and differences between standard therapy with high energy photons, proton and carbon ion therapy are discussed. The technologies used for the beam production and delivery are introduced, with emphasis to the differences between passive and active beam delivery systems. The last part concentrates on the quality assurance in ion therapy. Specialties of dosimetry in medical ion beams are discussed.

  10. Ion sources and targets for radioactive beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, J.P.; Back, B.B.; Ahmad, I.

    1995-08-01

    A high-intensity ISOL-type radioactive beam facility depends critically on the performance of the target/ion source system. We developed a concept for producing high-intensity secondary beams of fission fragments, such as {sup 132}Sn, using a two-part target and ion source combination. The idea involves stopping a 1000-kW beam of 200-MeV deuterons in a target of Be or U to produce a secondary beam of neutrons. Just behind the neutron production target is a second target, typically a porous form of UC, coupled to an ISOL-type ion source. In December 1994, we tested this concept with 200-MeV deuterons at low intensity in an experiment at the NSCL. The yields of characteristic gamma rays were measured and confirmed our predictions.

  11. A hybrid electron cyclotron resonance metal ion source with integrated sputter magnetron for the production of an intense Al+ ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichsel, T.; Hartung, U.; Kopte, T.; Zschornack, G.; Kreller, M.; Philipp, A.

    2015-09-01

    A metal ion source prototype has been developed: a combination of magnetron sputter technology with 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source technology—a so called magnetron ECR ion source (MECRIS). An integrated ring-shaped sputter magnetron with an Al target is acting as a powerful metal atom supply in order to produce an intense current of singly charged metal ions. Preliminary experiments show that an Al+ ion current with a density of 167 μA/cm2 is extracted from the source at an acceleration voltage of 27 kV. Spatially resolved double Langmuir probe measurements and optical emission spectroscopy were used to study the plasma states of the ion source: sputter magnetron, ECR, and MECRIS plasma. Electron density and temperature as well as Al atom density were determined as a function of microwave and sputter magnetron power. The effect of ECR heating is strongly pronounced in the center of the source. There the electron density is increased by one order of magnitude from 6 × 109 cm-3 to 6 × 1010 cm-3 and the electron temperature is enhanced from about 5 eV to 12 eV, when the ECR plasma is ignited to the magnetron plasma. Operating the magnetron at constant power, it was observed that its discharge current is raised from 1.8 A to 4.8 A, when the ECR discharge was superimposed with a microwave power of 2 kW. At the same time, the discharge voltage decreased from about 560 V to 210 V, clearly indicating a higher plasma density of the MECRIS mode. The optical emission spectrum of the MECRIS plasma is dominated by lines of excited Al atoms and shows a significant contribution of lines arising from singly ionized Al. Plasma emission photography with a CCD camera was used to prove probe measurements and to identify separated plasma emission zones originating from the ECR and magnetron discharge.

  12. Excitation of transverse dipole and quadrupole modes in a pure ion plasma in a linear Paul trap to study collective processes in intense beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gilson, Erik P.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Efthimion, Philip C.; Majeski, Richard; Startsev, Edward A.; Wang, Hua; Koppell, Stewart; Talley, Matthew

    2013-05-15

    Transverse dipole and quadrupole modes have been excited in a one-component cesium ion plasma trapped in the Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) in order to characterize their properties and understand the effect of their excitation on equivalent long-distance beam propagation. The PTSX device is a compact laboratory Paul trap that simulates the transverse dynamics of a long, intense charge bunch propagating through an alternating-gradient transport system by putting the physicist in the beam's frame of reference. A pair of arbitrary function generators was used to apply trapping voltage waveform perturbations with a range of frequencies and, by changing which electrodes were driven with the perturbation, with either a dipole or quadrupole spatial structure. The results presented in this paper explore the dependence of the perturbation voltage's effect on the perturbation duration and amplitude. Perturbations were also applied that simulate the effect of random lattice errors that exist in an accelerator with quadrupole magnets that are misaligned or have variance in their field strength. The experimental results quantify the growth in the equivalent transverse beam emittance that occurs due to the applied noise and demonstrate that the random lattice errors interact with the trapped plasma through the plasma's internal collective modes. Coherent periodic perturbations were applied to simulate the effects of magnet errors in circular machines such as storage rings. The trapped one component plasma is strongly affected when the perturbation frequency is commensurate with a plasma mode frequency. The experimental results, which help to understand the physics of quiescent intense beam propagation over large distances, are compared with analytic models.

  13. Beam dynamics in heavy ion induction LINACS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.

    1981-10-01

    Interest in the use of an induction linac to accelerate heavy ions for the purpose of providing the energy required to initiate an inertially confined fusion reaction has stimulated a theoretical effort to investigate various beam dynamical effects associated with high intensity heavy ion beams. This paper presents a summary of the work that has been done so far; transverse, longitudinal and coupled longitudinal transverse effects are discussed.

  14. Beam-beam observations in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; White, S.

    2015-06-24

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been operating since 2000. Over the past decade, thanks to the continuously increased bunch intensity and reduced β*s at the interaction points, the maximum peak luminosity in the polarized proton operation has been increased by more than two orders of magnitude. In this article, we first present the beam-beam observations in the previous RHIC polarized proton runs. Then we analyze the mechanisms for the beam loss and emittance growth in the presence of beam-beam interaction. The operational challenges and limitations imposed by beam-beam interaction and their remedies are also presented. In the end, we briefly introduce head-on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses in RHIC.

  15. Beam intensity upgrade at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Marchionni, A.; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01

    The performance of the Fermilab proton accelerator complex is reviewed. The coming into operation of the NuMI neutrino line and the implementation of slip-stacking to increase the anti-proton production rate has pushed the total beam intensity in the Main Injector up to {approx} 3 x 10{sup 13} protons/pulse. A maximum beam power of 270 kW has been delivered on the NuMI target during the first year of operation. A plan is in place to increase it to 350 kW, in parallel with the operation of the Collider program. As more machines of the Fermilab complex become available with the termination of the Collider operation, a set of upgrades are being planned to reach first 700 kW and then 1.2 MW by reducing the Main Injector cycle time and by implementing proton stacking.

  16. Heavy ion beam probing

    SciTech Connect

    Hickok, R L

    1980-07-01

    This report consists of the notes distributed to the participants at the IEEE Mini-Course on Modern Plasma Diagnostics that was held in Madison, Wisconsin in May 1980. It presents an overview of Heavy Ion Beam Probing that briefly describes the principles and discuss the types of measurements that can be made. The problems associated with implementing beam probes are noted, possible variations are described, estimated costs of present day systems, and the scaling requirements for large plasma devices are presented. The final chapter illustrates typical results that have been obtained on a variety of plasma devices. No detailed calculations are included in the report, but a list of references that will provide more detailed information is included.

  17. A hybrid electron cyclotron resonance metal ion source with integrated sputter magnetron for the production of an intense Al{sup +} ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Weichsel, T. Hartung, U.; Kopte, T.; Zschornack, G.; Kreller, M.; Philipp, A.

    2015-09-15

    A metal ion source prototype has been developed: a combination of magnetron sputter technology with 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source technology—a so called magnetron ECR ion source (MECRIS). An integrated ring-shaped sputter magnetron with an Al target is acting as a powerful metal atom supply in order to produce an intense current of singly charged metal ions. Preliminary experiments show that an Al{sup +} ion current with a density of 167 μA/cm{sup 2} is extracted from the source at an acceleration voltage of 27 kV. Spatially resolved double Langmuir probe measurements and optical emission spectroscopy were used to study the plasma states of the ion source: sputter magnetron, ECR, and MECRIS plasma. Electron density and temperature as well as Al atom density were determined as a function of microwave and sputter magnetron power. The effect of ECR heating is strongly pronounced in the center of the source. There the electron density is increased by one order of magnitude from 6 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −3} to 6 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3} and the electron temperature is enhanced from about 5 eV to 12 eV, when the ECR plasma is ignited to the magnetron plasma. Operating the magnetron at constant power, it was observed that its discharge current is raised from 1.8 A to 4.8 A, when the ECR discharge was superimposed with a microwave power of 2 kW. At the same time, the discharge voltage decreased from about 560 V to 210 V, clearly indicating a higher plasma density of the MECRIS mode. The optical emission spectrum of the MECRIS plasma is dominated by lines of excited Al atoms and shows a significant contribution of lines arising from singly ionized Al. Plasma emission photography with a CCD camera was used to prove probe measurements and to identify separated plasma emission zones originating from the ECR and magnetron discharge.

  18. A hybrid electron cyclotron resonance metal ion source with integrated sputter magnetron for the production of an intense Al⁺ ion beam.

    PubMed

    Weichsel, T; Hartung, U; Kopte, T; Zschornack, G; Kreller, M; Philipp, A

    2015-09-01

    A metal ion source prototype has been developed: a combination of magnetron sputter technology with 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source technology-a so called magnetron ECR ion source (MECRIS). An integrated ring-shaped sputter magnetron with an Al target is acting as a powerful metal atom supply in order to produce an intense current of singly charged metal ions. Preliminary experiments show that an Al(+) ion current with a density of 167 μA/cm(2) is extracted from the source at an acceleration voltage of 27 kV. Spatially resolved double Langmuir probe measurements and optical emission spectroscopy were used to study the plasma states of the ion source: sputter magnetron, ECR, and MECRIS plasma. Electron density and temperature as well as Al atom density were determined as a function of microwave and sputter magnetron power. The effect of ECR heating is strongly pronounced in the center of the source. There the electron density is increased by one order of magnitude from 6 × 10(9) cm(-3) to 6 × 10(10) cm(-3) and the electron temperature is enhanced from about 5 eV to 12 eV, when the ECR plasma is ignited to the magnetron plasma. Operating the magnetron at constant power, it was observed that its discharge current is raised from 1.8 A to 4.8 A, when the ECR discharge was superimposed with a microwave power of 2 kW. At the same time, the discharge voltage decreased from about 560 V to 210 V, clearly indicating a higher plasma density of the MECRIS mode. The optical emission spectrum of the MECRIS plasma is dominated by lines of excited Al atoms and shows a significant contribution of lines arising from singly ionized Al. Plasma emission photography with a CCD camera was used to prove probe measurements and to identify separated plasma emission zones originating from the ECR and magnetron discharge. PMID:26429434

  19. Method of enhancing cyclotron beam intensity

    DOEpatents

    Hudson, Ed D.; Mallory, Merrit L.

    1977-01-01

    When an easily ionized support gas such as xenon is added to the cold cathode in sources of the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron, large beam enhancements are produced. For example, .sup.20 Ne.sup.7+ is increased from 0.05 enA to 27 enA, and .sup.16 O.sup.5+ intensities in excess of 35 e.mu.A have been extracted for periods up to 30 minutes. Approximately 0.15 cc/min of the easily ionized support gas is supplied to the ion source through a separate gas feed line and the primary gas flow is reduced by about 30%.

  20. Modified betatron for ion beam fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Rostoker, N.; Fisher, A.

    1986-01-01

    An intense neutralized ion beam can be injected and trapped in magnetic mirror or tokamak geometry. The details of the process involve beam polarization so that the beam crosses the fringing fields without deflection and draining the polarization when the beam reaches the plasma. Equilibrium requires that a large betatron field be added in tokamak geometry. In mirror geometry a toroidal field must be added by means of a current along the mirror axis. In either case, the geometry becomes that of the modified betatron which has been studied experimentally and theoretically in recent years. We consider beams of d and t ions with a mean energy of 500 kev and a temperature of about 50 kev. The plasma may be a proton plasma with cold ions. It is only necessary for beam trapping or to carry currents. The ion energy for slowing down is initially 500 kev and thermonuclear reactions depend only on the beam temperature of 50 kev which changes very slowly. This new configuration for magnetic confinement fusion leads to an energy gain of 10--20 for d-t reactions whereas previous studies of beam target interaction predicted a maximum energy gain of 3--4. The high beam energy available with pulsed ion diode technology is also essential for advanced fuels. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Generation of highly collimated high-current ion beams by skin-layer laser-plasma interaction at relativistic laser intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Badziak, J.; Jablonski, S.; Glowacz, S.

    2006-08-07

    Generation of fast ion beams by laser-induced skin-layer ponderomotive acceleration has been studied using a two-dimensional (2D) two-fluid relativistic computer code. It is shown that the key parameter determining the spatial structure and angular divergence of the ion beam is the ratio d{sub L}/L{sub n}, where d{sub L} is the laser beam diameter and L{sub n} is the plasma density gradient scale length. When d{sub L}>>L{sub n}, a dense highly collimated megaampere ion (proton) beam of the ion current density approaching TA/cm{sup 2} can be generated by skin-layer ponderomotive acceleration, even with a tabletop subpicosecond laser.

  2. Ion source research and development at University of Jyväskylä: Studies of different plasma processes and towards the higher beam intensities.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, H; Kalvas, T; Tarvainen, O; Komppula, J; Laulainen, J; Kronholm, R; Ranttila, K; Tuunanen, J; Thuillier, T; Xie, D; Machicoane, G

    2016-02-01

    Several ion source related research and development projects are in progress at the Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä (JYFL). The work can be divided into investigation of the ion source plasma and development of ion sources, ion beams, and diagnostics. The investigation covers the Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) plasma instabilities, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and visible light emission, photon induced electron emission, and the development of plasma diagnostics. The ion source development covers the work performed for radiofrequency-driven negative ion source, RADIS, beam line upgrade of the JYFL 14 GHz ECRIS, and the development of a new room-temperature-magnet 18 GHz ECRIS, HIISI. PMID:26931943

  3. Studies on the Application of High Voltage Discharge Ionization and Ablation in Supersonic-Jets for the Generation of Intense Cluster Ion Beams.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Ansgar

    Glow discharge and pulsed capacitor discharge ionization in supersonic expansions were investigated for the production of intense beams of molecular cluster ions from seeded and ablated compounds. A low cost high voltage high current pulser based on a triggered spark gap switch is described as a mean for ionization and ablation. Besides, details of the molecular beam apparatus and modified pulsed valve are given. Cluster cations rm (Ar)_ {n}^+, rm (CO_2) _{n}^{+}, rm (C_6H_6)_{n}^+ and rm (H_2O)_{n }^+ were produced by pulsed capacitor discharge ionization in the expansion region of a seeded free-jet. The observed cluster mass spectra (CMS) for Ar, rm C_6H_6 and H _2O show the characteristic features (magic numbers) of electron beam and photo ionized clusters under molecular flow conditions. Indications for the presence of magic numbers in the CMS of {(CO _2)_{n}^+} cluster ions at n = 20, 26, 30 and 34 similar to those found for rare gas clusters have been found. Cationic metal ligand complexes Cu(Toluene) _{rm n}^+, Cu(Acetone) _{rm n}^+, Cu(Methanol)_{rm n}^+ , Cu(Ethylether)_{rm n }^+, Cu(Water)_{ rm n}^+, Al(Water)_ {rm n}^+ were synthesized by ablation of the metal from metallic discharge electrodes in a discharge gas mixture of helium seeded with the ligand of choice. The CMS of the expanded plasmas show little background ion signal besides the metal-ligand species. Charge exchange processes in the expansion guarantee high ionization yields of the desired species and account for low backgrounds. Changes in the successive binding energy of Cu(Water)_ {rm n}^+ clusters n = 1-4 are clearly observed in the CMS as step formation. A similar pattern found in the Cu(Acetone)_{ rm n}^+ CMS suggests the same trend in the successive binding energy as known for water. Ablation from a Cr(acac)_3 in a copper matrix was employed for the synthesis of Cr(Acetone) _{rm n}^+ and Cr(Benzene)^+ complexes demonstrating the ability to use nonconducting compounds as a metal source

  4. The role of space charge compensation for ion beam extraction and ion beam transport (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Spädtke, Peter

    2014-02-15

    Depending on the specific type of ion source, the ion beam is extracted either from an electrode surface or from a plasma. There is always an interface between the (almost) space charge compensated ion source plasma, and the extraction region in which the full space charge is influencing the ion beam itself. After extraction, the ion beam is to be transported towards an accelerating structure in most cases. For lower intensities, this transport can be done without space charge compensation. However, if space charge is not negligible, the positive charge of the ion beam will attract electrons, which will compensate the space charge, at least partially. The final degree of Space Charge Compensation (SCC) will depend on different properties, like the ratio of generation rate of secondary particles and their loss rate, or the fact whether the ion beam is pulsed or continuous. In sections of the beam line, where the ion beam is drifting, a pure electrostatic plasma will develop, whereas in magnetic elements, these space charge compensating electrons become magnetized. The transport section will provide a series of different plasma conditions with different properties. Different measurement tools to investigate the degree of space charge compensation will be described, as well as computational methods for the simulation of ion beams with partial space charge compensation.

  5. Ion Beam Modification of Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Averback, B; de la Rubia, T D; Felter, T E; Hamza, A V; Rehn, L E

    2005-10-10

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Ion Beam Modification of Materials, IBMM 2004, and is published by Elsevier-Science Publishers as a special issue of Nuclear Instruments and Methods B. The conference series is the major international forum to present and discuss recent research results and future directions in the field of ion beam modification, synthesis and characterization of materials. The first conference in the series was held in Budapest, Hungary, 1978, and subsequent conferences were held every two years at locations around the Globe, most recently in Japan, Brazil, and the Netherlands. The series brings together physicists, materials scientists, and ion beam specialists from all over the world. The official conference language is English. IBMM 2004 was held on September 5-10, 2004. The focus was on materials science involving both basic ion-solid interaction processes and property changes occurring either during or subsequent to ion bombardment and ion beam processing in relation to materials and device applications. Areas of research included Nanostructures, Multiscale Modeling, Patterning of Surfaces, Focused Ion Beams, Defects in Semiconductors, Insulators and Metals, Cluster Beams, Radiation Effects in Materials, Photonic Devices, Ion Implantation, Ion Beams in Biology and Medicine including New Materials, Imaging, and Treatment.

  6. Beam experiments towards high-intensity beams in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Montag C.; Ahrens, L.; Brennan, J.M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Mernick, K.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Smith, K.; Than, R.; Thieberger, P.; Yip, K.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2012-05-20

    Proton bunch intensities in RHIC are planned to be increased from 2 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} to 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch to increase the luminosity, together with head-on beam-beam compensation using electron lenses. To study the feasibility of the intensity increase, beam experiments are being performed. Recent experimental results are presented.

  7. Intense electron beam propagation across a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Striffler, C.D.; Yao, R.L.; Destler, W.W.; Reiser, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper we consider the propagation of an intense electron-ion beam across an applied magnetic field. In the absence of the applied field, the beam system is in a Bennett equilibrium state that involves electrons with both large axial and thermal velocities and a cold stationary space-charge neutralizing ion species. Typical parameters under consideration are V{sub o} {approximately} 1 MV, I {approximately} 5 kA, T{sub e} {approximately} 100 keV, and beam radii {approximately} 1 cm. We find that in the intense beam regime, the propagation is limited due to space-charge depression caused by the deflection of the electron beam by the transverse field. This critical field is of the order of the peak self-magnetic field of the electron beam which is substantially higher than the single particle cut-off field. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Post-acceleration of laser-induced ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassisi, V.; Delle Side, D.

    2015-04-01

    A complete review of the essential and recent developments in the field of post-acceleration of laser-induced ion beams is presented. After a brief introduction to the physics of low-intensity nanosecond laser-matter interaction, the details of ions extraction and acceleration are critically analyzed and the key parameters to obtain good-quality ion beams are illustrated. A description of the most common ion beam diagnosis system is given, together with the associated analytical techniques.

  9. Superintense ion beam with high energy density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudnikov, Vadim; Dudnikova, Galina

    2008-04-01

    The energy density of ion beam accumulated in a storage ring can be increased dramatically with using of space charge compensation as was demonstrated in experiments [1]. The intensity of said superintense beam can be far greater than a space charge limit without space charge compensation. The model of secondary plasma build up with secondary ion-electron emission as a source of delayed electrons has been presented and discussed. This model can be used for explanation of bunched beam instability with electron surviving after gap, for prediction of e-cloud generation in coasting and long bunches beam, and can be important for pressure rise in worm and cold sections of storage rings. A fast desorption by ion of physically adsorbed molecules can explain a ``first pulse Instability''. Application of this model for e-p instability selfstabilization and superintense circulating beam accumulation is considered. Importance of secondary plasma for high perveance ion beam stabilization in ion implantation will be considered. Preliminary results of simulation of electron and ion accumulation will be presented. [1]. Belchenko et al., Xth International Particle Accelerator Conference, Protvino, 1977, Vol. 2, p. 287.

  10. Precise formation of geometrically focused ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Davydenko, V.I.; Ivanov, A.A.; Korepanov, S.A.; Kotelnikov, I.A.

    2006-03-15

    Geometrically focused intense neutral beams for plasma diagnostic consist of many elementary beams formed by a multiaperture ion-optical system and aimed at the focal point. In real conditions, some of the elementary beams may have increased angular divergence and/or deviate from the intended direction, thus diminishing the neutral beam density at the focus. Several improvements to the geometrical focusing are considered in the article including flattening of the plasma profile across the emission surface, using of quasi-Pierce electrodes at the beam periphery, and minimizing the deviation of the electrodes from the spherical form. Application of these measures to the neutral beam Russian diagnostic injector developed in Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics allows an increase of neutral beam current density in the focus by {approx}50%.

  11. HIGH-INTENSITY, HIGH CHARGE-STATE HEAVY ION SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    ALESSI,J.G.

    2004-08-16

    There are many accelerator applications for high intensity heavy ion sources, with recent needs including dc beams for RIA, and pulsed beams for injection into synchrotrons such as RHIC and LHC. The present status of sources producing high currents of high charge state heavy ions is reviewed. These sources include ECR, EBIS, and Laser ion sources. Benefits and limitations for these type sources are described. Possible future improvements in these sources are also mentioned.

  12. Electron beam ion source and electron beam ion trap (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Reinard; Kester, Oliver

    2010-02-15

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) and its trap variant [electron beam ion trap (EBIT)] celebrated their 40th and 20th anniversary, respectively, at the EBIS/T Symposium 2007 in Heidelberg. These technologically challenging sources of highly charged ions have seen a broad development in many countries over the last decades. In contrast to most other ion sources the recipe of improvement was not ''sorcery'' but a clear understanding of the physical laws and obeying the technological constraints. This review will report important achievements of the past as well as promising developments in the future.

  13. Ion beam driven warm dense matter experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieniosek, F. M.; Ni, P. A.; Leitner, M.; Roy, P. K.; More, R.; Barnard, J. J.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Molvik, A. W.; Yoneda, H.

    2007-11-01

    We report plans and experimental results in ion beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) experiments. Initial experiments at LBNL are at 0.3-1 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak), increasing toward the Bragg peak in future versions of the accelerator. The WDM conditions are envisioned to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. Initial experiments include an experiment to study transient darkening at LBNL; and a porous target experiment at GSI heated by intense heavy-ion beams from the SIS 18 storage ring. Further experiments will explore target temperature and other properties such as electrical conductivity to investigate phase transitions and the critical point.

  14. Ion beam sputtering of fluoropolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    Etching and deposition of fluoropolymers are of considerable industrial interest for applications dealing with adhesion, chemical inertness, hydrophobicity, and dielectric properties. This paper describes ion beam sputter processing rates as well as pertinent characteristics of etched targets and films. An argon ion beam source was used to sputter etch and deposit the fluoropolymers PTFE, FEP, and CTFE. Ion beam energy, current density, and target temperature were varied to examine effects on etch and deposition rates. The ion etched fluoropolymers yield cone or spire-like surface structures which vary depending upon the type of polymer, ion beam power density, etch time, and target temperature. Also presented are sputter target and film characteristics which were documented by spectral transmittance measurements, X-ray diffraction, ESCA, and SEM photomicrographs.

  15. ION BEAM COLLIMATOR

    DOEpatents

    Langsdorf, A.S. Jr.

    1957-11-26

    A device is described for defining a beam of high energy particles wherein the means for defining the beam in the horizontal and vertical dimension are separately adjustable and the defining members are internally cooled. In general, the device comprises a mounting block having a central opening through which the beam is projected, means for rotatably supporting two pairs of beam- forming members, passages in each member for the flow of coolant; the beam- forming members being insulated from each other and the block, and each having an end projecting into the opening. The beam-forming members are adjustable and may be cooperatively positioned to define the beam passing between the end of the members. To assist in projecting and defining the beam, the member ends have individual means connected thereto for indicating the amount of charge collected thereon due to beam interception.

  16. Time-dependent, x-ray spectral unfolds and brightness temperatures for intense Li{sup +} ion beam-driven hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Fehl, D.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Biggs, F.; Dukart, R.J.; Moats, A.R.; Leeper, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    X-ray-producing hohlraums are being studied as indirect drives for inertial confinement fusion targets. In a 1994 target series on the PBFAII accelerator, cylindrical hohlraum targets were heated by an intense Li{sup +} ion beam and viewed by an array of 13 time-resolved, filtered x-ray detectors (XRDs). The unfold operator (UFO) code and its suite of auxiliary functions were used extensively in obtaining time-resolved x-ray spectra and radiation temperatures from this diagnostic. The UFO was also used to obtain fitted response functions from calibration data, to simulate data from blackbody x-ray spectra of interest, to determine the suitability of various unfolding parameters (e.g., energy domain, energy partition, smoothing conditions, and basis functions), to interpolate the XRD signal traces, and to unfold experimental data. The simulation capabilities of the code were useful in understanding an anomalous feature in the unfolded spectra at low photon energies ({le}100 eV). Uncertainties in the differential and energy-integrated unfolded spectra were estimated from uncertainties in the data. The time{endash}history of the radiation temperature agreed well with independent calculations of the wall temperature in the hohlraum. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Time-dependent, x-ray spectral unfolds and brightness temperatures for intense Li{sup +} ion beam-driven hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Fehl, D.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Biggs, F.; Dukart, R.J.; Moats, A.R.; Leeper, R.J.

    1996-07-01

    X-ray-producing hohlraums are being studied as indirect drives for Inertial Confinement Fusion targets. In a 1994 target series on the PBFAII accelerator, cylindrical hohlraum targets were heated by an intense Li{sup +} ion beam and viewed by an array of 13 time-resolved, filtered x-ray detectors (XRDs). The UFO unfold code and its suite of auxiliary functions were used extensively in obtaining time- resolved x-ray spectra and radiation temperatures from this diagnostic. UFO was also used to obtain fitted response functions from calibration data, to simulate data from blackbody x-ray spectra of interest, to determine the suitability of various unfolding parameters (e.g., energy domain, energy partition, smoothing conditions, and basis functions), to interpolate the XRD signal traces, and to unfold experimental data. The simulation capabilities of the code were useful in understanding an anomalous feature in the unfolded spectra at low photon energies ({le} 100 eV). Uncertainties in the differential and energy-integrated unfolded spectra were estimated from uncertainties in the data. The time-history of the radiation temperature agreed well with independent calculations of the wall temperature in the hohlraum.

  18. Lithium ion beam driven hohlraums for PBFA II

    SciTech Connect

    Dukart, R.J.

    1994-05-06

    In our light ion inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program, fusion capsules are driven with an intense x-ray radiation field produced when an intense beam of ions penetrates a radiation case and deposits energy in a foam x-ray conversion region. A first step in the program is to generate and measure these intense fields on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II). Our goal is to generate a 100-eV radiation temperature in lithium ion beam driven hohlraums, the radiation environment which will provide the initial drive temperature for ion beam driven implosion systems designed to achieve high gain. In this paper, we describe the design of such hohlraum targets and their predicted performance on PBFA II as we provide increasing ion beam intensities.

  19. Development of the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tatum, B.A.

    1997-08-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) construction project has been completed and the first radioactive ion beam has been successfully accelerated. The project, which began in 1992, has involved numerous facility modifications. The Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron has been converted from an energy booster for heavy ion beams to a light ion accelerator with internal ion source. A target-ion source and mass analysis system have been commissioned as key components of the facility`s radioactive ion beam injector to the 25MV tandem electrostatic accelerator. Beam transport lines have been completed, and new diagnostics for very low intensity beams have been developed. Work continues on a unified control system. Development of research quality radioactive beams for the nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics communities continues. This paper details facility development to date.

  20. Direct plasma injection scheme with various ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura, M.

    2010-09-15

    The laser ion source is one of the most powerful heavy ion sources. However, it is difficult to obtain good stability and to control its intense current. To overcome these difficulties, we proposed a new beam injection scheme called 'direct plasma injection scheme'. Following this it was established to provide various species with desired charge state as an intense accelerated beam. Carbon, aluminum and iron beams have been tested.

  1. Ion beam modification of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dearnaley, G.

    1990-04-01

    Energetic ions beams may be used in various ways to modify and so improve the tribological properties of metals. These methods include: — ion implantation of selected additive species; — ion beam mixing of thin deposited coatings; — ion-beam-assisted deposition of thicker overlay coatings. The first of these techniques has been widely used to modify the electronic properties of semiconductors, but has since been extended for the treatment of all classes of material. Tool steels can be strengthened by the ion implantation of nitrogen or titanium, to produce fine dispersions of hard second-phase precipitates. Solid solution strengthening, by combinations of substitutional and interstitial species, such as yttrium and nitrogen, has also been successful. Both ion beam mixing (IBM) and ion-beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) use a combination of coating and ion bombardment. In the first case, the objective is to intermix the coating and substrate by the aid of radiation-enhanced diffusion. In the latter case, the coating is densified and modified during deposition and the process can be continued in order to build up overlay coatings several μm in thickness. The surface can then be tailored, for instance to provide a hard and adherent ceramic such as silicon nitride, boron nitride or titanium nitride. It is an advantage that all the above processes can be applied at relatively low temperatures, below about 200° C, thereby avoiding distortion of precision components. Ion implantation is also being successfully applied for the reduction of corrosion, especially at high temperatures or in the atmosphere and to explore the mechanisms of oxidation. Ion-assisted coatings, being compact and adherent, provide a more substantial protection against corrosion: silicon nitride and boron nitride are potentially useful in this respect. Examples will be given of the successful application of these methods for the surface modification of metals and alloys, and developments in the

  2. Applications of ion beam technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelerinter, E.; Spielberg, N.

    1980-01-01

    Wire adhesion in steel belted radial tires; carbon fibers and composite; cold welding, brazing, and fabrication; hydrogen production, separation, and storage; membrane use; catalysis; sputtering and texture; and ion beam implantation are discussed.

  3. Beam diagnostics for high intensity hadron accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ausset, Patrick; Gardès, Daniel

    2007-07-01

    High intensity hadron beam accelerators have been recently proposed and developed either for the production of high intensity secondary beams for Nuclear and Particle Physics research (EURISOL, SPIRAL2, FAIR), or Applied Physics in the field of Accelerator Driven System and waste transmutation (EUROTRANS). For these applications, high power Linear Accelerator (LINAC) are planned to produce and accelerate hadron beams up to 1 GeV. Both commissioning and operation of these accelerators require dedicated beam instrumentation able to monitor and characterize on line as completely as possible the produced beams having a power in the range of 1 MW. Beam current, transverse beam centroı¨d position and profiles and beam energy are the most important characteristics that have to be measured. Due to the high average power of the beam, nondestructive or at least minimally intercepting beam sensors are required. Beam instrumentation for IPHI (CEA/DSM and CNRS/IN2P3 collaboration) which is a high intensity proton (3 MeV, 100 mA, CW operation) injector initially designed to be a possible front end for this kind of LINAC is under realization. Beam diagnostics already under operation, developments in progress will be described and will introduce a more general description of high power beam instrumentation.

  4. Beam Control for Ion Induction Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sangster, T.C.; Ahle, L.

    2000-02-17

    Coordinated bending and acceleration of an intense space-charge-dominated ion beam has been achieved for the first time. This required the development of a variable waveform, precision, bi-polar high voltage pulser and a precision, high repetition rate induction core modulator. Waveforms applied to the induction cores accelerate the beam as the bi-polar high voltage pulser delivers a voltage ramp to electrostatic dipoles which bend the beam through a 90 degree permanent magnet quadrupole lattice. Further work on emittance minimization is also reported.

  5. High Intensity heavy ion Accelerator Facility (HIAF) in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J. C.; Xia, J. W.; Xiao, G. Q.; Xu, H. S.; Zhao, H. W.; Zhou, X. H.; Ma, X. W.; He, Y.; Ma, L. Z.; Gao, D. Q.; Meng, J.; Xu, Z.; Mao, R. S.; Zhang, W.; Wang, Y. Y.; Sun, L. T.; Yuan, Y. J.; Yuan, P.; Zhan, W. L.; Shi, J.; Chai, W. P.; Yin, D. Y.; Li, P.; Li, J.; Mao, L. J.; Zhang, J. Q.; Sheng, L. N.

    2013-12-01

    HIAF (High Intensity heavy ion Accelerator Facility), a new facility planned in China for heavy ion related researches, consists of two ion sources, a high intensity Heavy Ion Superconducting Linac (HISCL), a 45 Tm Accumulation and Booster Ring (ABR-45) and a multifunction storage ring system. The key features of HIAF are unprecedented high pulse beam intensity and versatile operation mode. The HIAF project aims to expand nuclear and related researches into presently unreachable region and give scientists possibilities to conduct cutting-edge researches in these fields. The general description of the facility is given in this article with a focus on the accelerator design.

  6. Intense beams: The past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect

    Yonas, G.; Sweeney, M.A.

    1998-06-01

    Nobody could have predicted the circuitous course of the last 30 years of progress in intense beams and pulsed power. There were many discoveries and twists and turns along the way, but the steady flow of understanding and technological advances has sustained the field. Pulsed power research began in the early 1960s with the development of the technology to test the reliability of nuclear weapons in a pulsed radiation environment. Because of the effort in the 1970s on an electron beam approach to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) at Sandia National Laboratories and at the Kurchatov Institute, simulation codes, diagnostics, and innovative pulsed power techniques such as self-magnetic insulation were developed. The electron approach ended in 1979, and the more promising ion approach continued. At the same time, z pinches, used since the early 1970s to evaluate the response of materials to keV X rays, were considered as an alternative to drive ICF capsules. The use of z pinches for ICF was discontinued in 1984 because of budget cuts and the belief that ions offered a route to the standoff requirement for energy applications. Now, in 1998, because of budget limitations and the 1995 discovery that the soft x-ray power achievable in a z-pinch implosion can be greatly enhanced, the ion approach has been suspended, and a new facility, X-1, proposed to achieve high yield in the laboratory with z pinches. In this paper the authors review the research paths that led to these changes, describe the present status of z pinches, and predict what the future holds. Although nobody can predict the future, the past 30 years have taught us some lessons that can be applied to the next 30 years. The paper concludes with some of these lessons learned.

  7. High intensity muon beam source for neutrino beam experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal Sayed, Hisham

    2015-09-01

    High intensity muon beams are essential for Muon accelerators like Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders. In this study we report on a global optimization of the muon beam production and capture based on end-to-end simulations of the Muon Front End. The study includes the pion beam production target geometry, capture field profile, and forming muon beam into microbunches for further acceleration. The interplay between the transverse and longitudinal beam dynamics during the capture and transport of muon beam is evaluated and discussed. The goal of the optimization is to provide a set of design parameters that delivers high intensity muon beam that could be fit within the acceptance of a muon beam accelerator.

  8. Cold atomic beam ion source for focused ion beam applications

    SciTech Connect

    Knuffman, B.; Steele, A. V.; McClelland, J. J.

    2013-07-28

    We report measurements and modeling of an ion source that is based on ionization of a laser-cooled atomic beam. We show a high brightness and a low energy spread, suitable for use in next-generation, high-resolution focused ion beam systems. Our measurements of total ion current as a function of ionization conditions support an analytical model that also predicts the cross-sectional current density and spatial distribution of ions created in the source. The model predicts a peak brightness of 2 × 10{sup 7} A m{sup −2} sr{sup −1} eV{sup −1} and an energy spread less than 0.34 eV. The model is also combined with Monte-Carlo simulations of the inter-ion Coulomb forces to show that the source can be operated at several picoamperes with a brightness above 1 × 10{sup 7} A m{sup −2} sr{sup −1} eV{sup −1}. We estimate that when combined with a conventional ion focusing column, an ion source with these properties could focus a 1 pA beam into a spot smaller than 1 nm. A total current greater than 5 nA was measured in a lower-brightness configuration of the ion source, demonstrating the possibility of a high current mode of operation.

  9. Ion source and injection line for high intensity medical cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, XianLu Guan, Fengping; Yao, Hongjuan; Zhang, TianJue; Yang, Jianjun; Song, Guofang; Ge, Tao; Qin, Jiuchang

    2014-02-15

    A 14 MeV high intensity compact cyclotron, CYCIAE-14, was built at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). An injection system based on the external H− ion source was used on CYCIAE-14 so as to provide high intensity beam, while most positron emission tomography cyclotrons adopt internal ion source. A beam intensity of 100 μA/14 MeV was extracted from the cyclotron with a small multi-cusp H− ion source (CIAE-CH-I type) and a short injection line, which the H− ion source of 3 mA/25 keV H− beam with emittance of 0.3π mm mrad and the injection line of with only 1.2 m from the extraction of ion source to the medial plane of the cyclotron. To increase the extracted beam intensity of the cyclotron, a new ion source (CIAE-CH-II type) of 9.1 mA was used, with maximum of 500 μA was achieved from the cyclotron. The design and test results of the ion source and injection line optimized for high intensity acceleration will be given in this paper.

  10. Neon Ion Beam Lithography (NIBL).

    PubMed

    Winston, Donald; Manfrinato, Vitor R; Nicaise, Samuel M; Cheong, Lin Lee; Duan, Huigao; Ferranti, David; Marshman, Jeff; McVey, Shawn; Stern, Lewis; Notte, John; Berggren, Karl K

    2011-10-12

    Existing techniques for electron- and ion-beam lithography, routinely employed for nanoscale device fabrication and mask/mold prototyping, do not simultaneously achieve efficient (low fluence) exposure and high resolution. We report lithography using neon ions with fluence <1 ion/nm(2), ∼1000× more efficient than using 30 keV electrons, and resolution down to 7 nm half-pitch. This combination of resolution and exposure efficiency is expected to impact a wide array of fields that are dependent on beam-based lithography. PMID:21899279

  11. Beam dynamics in heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, P.

    1995-04-01

    A standard design for heavy ion fusion drivers under study in the US is an induction linac with electrostatic focusing at low energy and magnetic focusing at higher energy. The need to focus the intense beam to a few-millimeter size spot at the deuterium-tritium target establishes the emittance budget for the accelerator. Economic and technological considerations favor a larger number of beams in the low-energy, electrostatic-focusing section than in the high-energy, magnetic-focusing section. Combining four beams into a single focusing channel is a viable option, depending on the growth in emittance due to the combining process. Several significant beam dynamics issues that are, or have been, under active study are discussed: large space charge and image forces, beam wall clearances, halos, alignment, longitudinal instability, and bunch length control.

  12. Neutralized transport of high intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Eylon, S.; Roy, P.K.; Anders, A.; Sharp, W.; Efthimion, P.; Gilson, E.; Welch, D.; Rose, D.

    2003-05-01

    The NTX experiment at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus systems for high perveance heavy ion beams. A converging ion beam at the exit of the final focus magnetic system is injected into a neutralized drift section. The neutralization is provided by a metal arc source and an RF plasma source. Effects of a ''plasma plug'', where electrons are extracted from a localized plasma in the upstream end of the drift section, and are then dragged along by the ion potential, as well as the ''volumetric plasma'', where neutralization is provided by the plasma laid down along the ion path, are both studied and their relative effects on the beam spot size are compared. Comparisons with 3-D PIC code predictions will also be presented.

  13. Development leading to a 200 kV, 20 kA, 30 hertz radar-like modulator system for intense ion beam processing

    SciTech Connect

    Reass, W.; Davis, H.; Olson, J.; Coates, D.; Schleinitz, H.

    1996-10-01

    This paper presents the electrical system design methodology being developed for use in the Los Alamos CHAMP (Continuous High-Average Power Microsecond Pulser) program. CHAMP is a Magnetically confined Anode Plasma diode (MAP diode) intense ion source. In addition to overall CHAMP diode system requirements, the design of the pertinent electrical pulse modulator systems are presented.

  14. Production of a highly charged uranium ion beam with RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Higurashi, Y.; Ohnishi, J.; Nakagawa, T.; Haba, H.; Fujimaki, M.; Komiyama, M.; Kamigaito, O.; Tamura, M.; Aihara, T.; Uchiyama, A.

    2012-02-15

    A highly charged uranium (U) ion beam is produced from the RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source using 18 and 28 GHz microwaves. The sputtering method is used to produce this U ion beam. The beam intensity is strongly dependent on the rod position and sputtering voltage. We observe that the emittance of U{sup 35+} for 28 GHz microwaves is almost the same as that for 18 GHz microwaves. It seems that the beam intensity of U ions produced using 28 GHz microwaves is higher than that produced using 18 GHz microwaves at the same Radio Frequency (RF) power.

  15. Emittance Growth in Intense Non-Circular Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, O. A.

    1997-05-01

    The electrostatic energy of intense beams in linear uniform focusing channels is minimized when the initial beam configuration is both uniform and round.(In the case of quadrupole focusing, this means round on the average.) Deviations from either uniformity or roundness produce free energy and emittance growth. Over the past 25 years, the consequences of beam nonuniformity have been thoroughly investigated for the case of round beams. Recently, there has been interest in more complex beam configurations such as those that occur in Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) combiners or splitters. We discuss free energy and emittance growth for a variety of cases: (a) square beams, (b) hexagonal beams, (c) beams bounded by a quadrant or sextant of a circle, (d) rectangular beams, (e) elliptical beams, (f) pairs of beamlets, and (g) arrays of many beamlets. Cases (a) and (b) are approximations for large arrays of beamlets as proposed for HIF combiners or for negative-ion sources. Beam splitting, suggested for a particular HIF final focus scheme, leads to (c). The large emittance growth in cases (d)-(f), calculated by a new method,(O.A. Anderson, Proceedings of EPAC 96 conference.) illustrates the importance of maintaining symmetry. Practical examples are given for several cases.

  16. Final focus system for high intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Eylon, S.; Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.

    2003-05-01

    The NTX experiment at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus systems for high perveance heavy ion beams. The NTX final focus system produces a converging beam at the entrance to the neutralized drift section where it focuses to a small spot. The final focus lattice consists of four pulsed quadrupole magnets. The main issues are the control of emittance growth due to high order fields from magnetic multipoles and image fields. We will present experimental results from NTX on beam envelope and phase space distributions, and compare these results with particle simulations using the particle-in-cell code WARP.

  17. Facility for intense diagnostic neutral beam (IDNB) development

    SciTech Connect

    Kasik, R.J.; Hinckley, W.B.; Bartsch, R.R.; Rej, D.J.; Henins, I.; Greenly, J.B.

    1993-08-01

    An intense, pulsed neutral beam source is under development for use as a probe beam on hot, burning plasmas such as in the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) which is presently in the planning stage. A pulsed, neutral hydrogen beam of 10s of kilo amperes of current can have an alpha particle, charge-exchange-recombination-spectroscopy (alpha-CHERS) signal-to-noise ratio of {approximately} 10. This beam would allow the measurement, on a single pulse of a few hundred nanoseconds duration, of the local alpha particle distribution function as well as other features of the tokamak plasma such as current density profile, impurity density, and microturbulence spectrum. The cross-sections for the CHERS diagnostic dictate operation with proton energies greater than {approximately}50keV. A pulsed neutral hydrogen source of this voltage and intensity can be achieved by neutralizing the ion flux from a magnetized ion-diode. The cross-sections for attachment and stripping, when coupled with scaling from Child-Langmiur, space-charge-limited, ion-current flow imply operation below - 100keV for maximum neutral fluence. The development of a flashover-anode, ion source for forthcoming evaluation of a neutralizing section is described below. This source operates in the accelerator voltage range 70 to 100keV. Eventually, the flashover-anode, magnetized ion-diode will be replaced with a plasma-anode, magnetized ion-diode.

  18. Emittance growth in intense beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Mills, R.S.; Crandall, K.R.

    1987-03-01

    Recent progress in the study of high-current, low-emittance, charged-particle beams may have a significant influence in the design of future linear accelerators and beam-transport systems for higher brightness applications. Three space-charge-induced rms-emittance-growth mechanisms are now well established: (1) charge-density redistribution, (2) kinetic-energy exchange toward equipartitioning, and (3) coherent instabilities driven by periodic focusing systems. We report the results from a numerical simulation study of emittance in a high-current radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linear accelerator, and present a new semiempirical equation for the observed emittance growth, which agrees well with the emittance growth predicted from numerical simulation codes.

  19. ITEP MEVVA ion beam for rhenium silicide production

    SciTech Connect

    Kulevoy, T.; Seleznev, D.; Kropachev, G.; Kozlov, A.; Kuibeda, R.; Yakushin, P.; Petrenko, S.; Gerasimenko, N.; Medetov, N.; Zaporozhan, O.

    2010-02-15

    The rhenium silicides are very attractive materials for semiconductor industry. In the Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP) at the ion source test bench the research program of rhenium silicide production by ion beam implantation are going on. The investigation of silicon wafer after implantation of rhenium ion beam with different energy and with different total dose were carried out by secondary ions mass spectrometry, energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis, and x-ray diffraction analysis. The first promising results of rhenium silicide film production by high intensity ion beam implantation are presented.

  20. Development of broad beam ion sources at CSSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y. C.; You, D. W.; Kuang, Y. Z.

    1994-04-01

    High-energy and intense beam current broad beam ion sources have been developed for ion implantation and dynamic recoil mixing at CSSAR. The sources can be operated over beam energy and current ranges of 3-120 keV and 5-70 mA, respectively. For sputter coating of thin films, a series of focusing beam ion sources with different structures has also been developed. The energy and current range from 1-10 keV and 100-350 mA for different applications. For some applications, low-energy (below 100 eV) ion beams are required. CSSAR has developed a 6-cm-diam broad beam ion source. The source can be operated at beam energy 10-70 eV, and the beam current 15-80 mA has been extracted. Typical structures and operational data are given for the sources mentioned above. Recently a new type of broad beam metal ion source (Electron Beam Evaporation Metal Ion Source EBE) is being studied. Ion beams of several kinds of materials such as C, W, Ta, Mo, Cr, Ti, B, Cu, etc. have been extracted from the source. Typical operation conditions and ion yields are given in this paper.

  1. An electron cyclotron resonance ion source based low energy ion beam platform.

    PubMed

    Sun, L T; Shang, Y; Ma, B H; Zhang, X Z; Feng, Y C; Li, X X; Wang, H; Guo, X H; Song, M T; Zhao, H Y; Zhang, Z M; Zhao, H W; Xie, D Z

    2008-02-01

    To satisfy the requirements of surface and atomic physics study in the field of low energy multiple charge state ion incident experiments, a low energy (10 eV/q-20 keV/q) ion beam platform is under design at IMP. A simple test bench has been set up to test the ion beam deceleration systems. Considering virtues such as structure simplicity, easy handling, compactness, cost saving, etc., an all-permanent magnet ECRIS LAPECR1 [Lanzhou all-permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source No. 1] working at 14.5 GHz has been adopted to produce intense medium and low charge state ion beams. LAPECR1 source has already been ignited. Some intense low charge state ion beams have been produced on it, but the first test also reveals that many problems are existing on the ion beam transmission line. The ion beam transmission mismatches result in the depressed performance of LAPECR1, which will be discussed in this paper. To obtain ultralow energy ion beam, after being analyzed by a double-focusing analyzer magnet, the selected ion beam will be further decelerated by two afocal deceleration lens systems, which is still under design. This design has taken into consideration both ions slowing down and also ion beam focusing. In this paper, the conceptual design of deceleration system will be discussed. PMID:18315202

  2. BEAM HALO FORMATION IN HIGH-INTENSITY BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV, A.V.

    2005-03-18

    Studies of beam halo became unavoidable feature of high-intensity machines where uncontrolled beam loss should be kept to extremely small level. For a well controlled stable beam such a loss is typically associated with the low density halo surrounding beam core. In order to minimize uncontrolled beam loss or improve performance of an accelerator, it is very important to understand what are the sources of halo formation in a specific machine of interest. The dominant mechanisms are, in fact, different in linear accelerators, circular machines or Energy Recovering Linacs (ERL). In this paper, we summarize basic mechanisms of halo formation in high-intensity beams and discuss their application to various types of accelerators of interest, such as linacs, rings and ERL.

  3. Production of highly charged ion beams from ECR ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Z.Q.

    1997-09-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source development has progressed with multiple-frequency plasma heating, higher mirror magnetic fields and better technique to provide extra cold electrons. Such techniques greatly enhance the production of highly charged ions from ECR ion sources. So far at cw mode operation, up to 300 e{mu}A of O{sup 7+} and 1.15 emA of O{sup 6+}, more than 100 e{mu}A of intermediate heavy ions for charge states up to Ar{sup 13+}, Ca{sup 13+}, Fe{sup 13+}, Co{sup 14+} and Kr{sup 18+}, and tens of e{mu}A of heavy ions with charge states to Kr{sup 26+}, Xe{sup 28+}, Au{sup 35+}, Bi{sup 34+} and U{sup 34+} have been produced from ECR ion sources. At an intensity of at least 1 e{mu}A, the maximum charge state available for the heavy ions are Xe{sup 36+}, Au{sup 46+}, Bi{sup 47+} and U{sup 48+}. An order of magnitude enhancement for fully stripped argon ions (I {ge} 60 enA) also has been achieved. This article will review the ECR ion source progress and discuss key requirement for ECR ion sources to produce the highly charged ion beams.

  4. Ion beam deposited protective films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    Sputter deposition of adherent thin films on complex geometric surfaces by ion beam sources is examined in order to evaluate three different types of protective coatings for die materials. In the first experiment, a 30 cm diameter argon ion source was used to sputter deposit adherent metallic films up to eight microns thick on H-13 steel, and a thermal fatigue test specimen sputter deposited with metallic coatings one micron thick was immersed in liquid aluminum and cooled by water for 15,000 cycles to simulate operational environments. Results show that these materials do protect the steel by reducing thermal fatigue and thereby increasing die lifetime. The second experiment generated diamond-like carbon films using a dual beam ion source system that directed an eight cm argon ion source beam at the substrates. These films are still in the process of being evaluated for crystallinity, hardness and infrared absorption. The third experiment coated a fiber glass beam shield incorporated in the eight-cm diameter mercury ion thruster with molybdenum to ensure proper electrical and thermal properties. The coating maintained its integrity even under acceleration tests.

  5. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Olson, C.L.

    1984-03-16

    A generator for producing an intense relativisitc electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  6. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Craig L.

    1987-01-01

    A generator for producing an intense relativistic electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  7. Radiative trapping in intense laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, J. G.

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of electrons in counter-propagating, circularly polarized laser beams are shown to exhibit attractors whose ability to trap particles depends on the ratio of the beam intensities and a single parameter describing radiation reaction. Analytical expressions are found for the underlying limit cycles and the parameter range in which they are stable. In high-intensity optical pulses, where radiation reaction strongly modifies the trajectories, the production of collimated gamma-rays and the initiation of non-linear cascades of electron–positron pairs can be optimized by a suitable choice of the intensity ratio.

  8. Maskless, resistless ion beam lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Qing

    2003-03-10

    As the dimensions of semiconductor devices are scaled down, in order to achieve higher levels of integration, optical lithography will no longer be sufficient for the needs of the semiconductor industry. Alternative next-generation lithography (NGL) approaches, such as extreme ultra-violet (EUV), X-ray, electron-beam, and ion projection lithography face some challenging issues with complicated mask technology and low throughput. Among the four major alternative NGL approaches, ion beam lithography is the only one that can provide both maskless and resistless patterning. As such, it can potentially make nano-fabrication much simpler. This thesis investigates a focused ion beam system for maskless, resistless patterning that can be made practical for high-volume production. In order to achieve maskless, resistless patterning, the ion source must be able to produce a variety of ion species. The compact FIB system being developed uses a multicusp plasma ion source, which can generate ion beams of various elements, such as O{sub 2}{sup +}, BF{sub 2}{sup +}, P{sup +} etc., for surface modification and doping applications. With optimized source condition, around 85% of BF{sub 2}{sup +}, over 90% of O{sub 2}{sup +} and P{sup +} have been achieved. The brightness of the multicusp-plasma ion source is a key issue for its application to maskless ion beam lithography. It can be substantially improved by optimizing the source configuration and extractor geometry. Measured brightness of 2 keV He{sup +} beam is as high as 440 A/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} Sr, which represents a 30x improvement over prior work. Direct patterning of Si thin film using a focused O{sub 2}{sup +} ion beam has been investigated. A thin surface oxide film can be selectively formed using 3 keV O{sub 2}{sup +} ions with the dose of 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. The oxide can then serve as a hard mask for patterning of the Si film. The process flow and the experimental results for directly patterned poly-Si features

  9. Ion acceleration mechanism in electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, A.F.

    1982-07-01

    Analysis of experimental data reveals that several processes observed in diodes and during the transport of intense electron beams in a neutral gas result from polarization of a plasma in an electric field. Under certain conditions this effect gives rise to a high-field region at the boundary of a plasma column. The electron beam is strongly focused in this region. As a result, a two-dimensional potential well forms at the crossover point of a strongly focused beam. The electric field at this well can reach several megavolts per centimeter. The crossover point moves as a result of expansion of the plasma cloud. The ions trapped in the potential well are accelerated. There is effective acceleration over a distance of the order of a few times the beam radius. A new physical model gives a satisfactory explanation of the experimental results.

  10. Beam Compression in Heavy-Ion Induction Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, P.A.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Barnard, J.J.; Calanog, J.; Chen, A.X.; Cohen, R.H.; Coleman, J.E.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E.P.; Grote, D.P.; Jung, J.Y.; Leitner, M.; Lidia, S.M.; Logan, B.G.; Ni, P.; Roy, P.K.; Van den Bogert, K.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.R.

    2009-01-01

    The Heavy-Ion Fusion Sciences Virtual National Laboratory is pursuing an approach to target heating experiments in the Warm Dense Matter regime, using space-charge-dominated ion beams that are simultaneously longitudinally bunched and transversely focused. Longitudinal beam compression by large factors has been demonstrated in the LBNL Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) experiment with controlled ramps and forced neutralization. The achieved peak beam current and energy can be used in experiments to heat targets and create warm dense matter. Using an injected 30 mA K{sup +} ion beam with initial kinetic energy 0.3 MeV, axial compression leading to {approx}50x current amplification and simultaneous radial focusing to beam radii of a few mm have led to encouraging energy deposition approaching the intensities required for eV-range target heating experiments. We discuss experiments that are under development to reach the necessary higher beam intensities and the associated beam diagnostics.