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Sample records for ion cyclotron transmission

  1. Ion cyclotron transmission spectroscopy in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.J.

    1993-09-01

    The propagation of waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies has been investigated experimentally in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. A small, broadband, radiofrequency (rf) magnetic probe located outside the plasma limiter, at a major radius near that of the plasma center, was excited with a low power, frequency swept source (1--200 MHz). Waves propagating to a distant location were detected with a second, identical probe. The rf transmission spectrum revealed a region of attenuation over a band of frequencies for which the minority fundamental resonance was located between the outer plasma edge and the major radius of the probe location. Distinct, non-overlapping attenuation bands were observed from hydrogen and helium-3 minority species; a distinct tritium band should be observed in future DT experiments. Rapid spectrum acquisition during a helium-3 gas puff experiment showed that the wave attenuation involved the plasma core and was not a surface effect. A model in which the received power varied exponentially with the minority density, averaged over the resonance region, fit the time evolution of the probe signal relatively well. Estimation of a 1-d tunneling parameter from the experimental observations is discussed. Minority concentrations of less than 0.5 % can be resolved with this measurement.

  2. Transmission line component testing for the ITER Ion Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulding, Richard; Bell, G. L.; Deibele, C. E.; McCarthy, M. P.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Swain, D. W.; Barber, G. C.; Barbier, C. N.; Cambell, I. H.; Moon, R. L.; Pesavento, P. V.; Fredd, E.; Greenough, N.; Kung, C.

    2014-10-01

    High power RF testing is underway to evaluate transmission line components for the ITER Ion Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive System. The transmission line has a characteristic impedance Z0 = 50 Ω and a nominal outer diameter of 305 mm. It is specified to carry up to 6 MW at VSWR = 1.5 for 3600 s pulses, with transient voltages up to 40 kV. The transmission line is actively cooled, with turbulent gas flow (N2) used to transfer heat from the inner to outer conductor, which is water cooled. High voltage and high current testing of components has been performed using resonant lines generating steady state voltages of 35 kV and transient voltages up to 60 kV. A resonant ring, which has operated with circulating power of 6 MW for 1 hr pulses, is being used to test high power, low VSWR operation. Components tested to date include gas barriers, straight sections of various lengths, and 90 degree elbows. Designs tested include gas barriers fabricated from quartz and aluminum nitride, and transmission lines with quartz and alumina inner conductor supports. The latest results will be presented. This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  3. Component tests for the ITER Ion Cyclotron Transmission Line and Matching System - Status and Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulding, R. H.; McCarthy, M. P.; Deibele, C. E.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Swain, D. W.; Barber, G. C.; Campbell, I. H.; Gray, S. L.; Moon, R. L.; Pesavento, P. V.; Sanabria, R. M.; Fredd, E.; Greenough, N.; Kung, C.

    2015-11-01

    New Z0 = 50 Ω gas-cooled component designs for the ITER Ion Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive System have been successfully tested at high RF power levels. They include two types featuring spoke-ring assembly (SRA) inner conductor supports: 20° elbows, and variable length assembly bellows, both achieving RF voltages > 35 kV peak, and currents ~ 760 A peak during quasi-steady state operation. The SRA utilizes mechanically preloaded fused quartz spokes, increasing lateral load handling capability. Components with SRA supports have been seismically tested, with no variation in low power electrical performance detected after testing. A 3 MW four-port switch has also been successfully tested at high RF power, and tests of a 6 MW hybrid power splitter are planned in the near future. Latest results will be presented. Plans for arc localization tests in a 60 m SRA transmission line run, and RF tests of Z0 = 50 Ω and Z0 = 20 Ω matching components with water-cooled inner conductors will also be discussed. This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  4. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOEpatents

    Weller, R.R.

    1995-02-14

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell is disclosed having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions. 5 figs.

  5. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOEpatents

    Weller, Robert R.

    1995-01-01

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions.

  6. ITER Ion Cyclotron Heating and Fueling Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, D.A.; Baylor, L.R.; Combs, S.K.; Fredd, E.; Goulding, R.H.; Hosea, J.; Swain, D.W.

    2005-04-15

    The ITER burning plasma and advanced operating regimes require robust and reliable heating and current drive and fueling systems. The ITER design documents describe the requirements and reference designs for the ion cyclotron and pellet fueling systems. Development and testing programs are required to optimize, validate and qualify these systems for installation on ITER.The ITER ion cyclotron system offers significant technology challenges. The antenna must operate in a nuclear environment and withstand heat loads and disruption forces beyond present-day designs. It must operate for long pulse lengths and be highly reliable, delivering power to a plasma load with properties that will change throughout the discharge. The ITER ion cyclotron system consists of one eight-strap antenna, eight rf sources (20 MW, 35-65 MHz), associated high-voltage DC power supplies, transmission lines and matching and decoupling components.The ITER fueling system consists of a gas injection system and multiple pellet injectors for edge fueling and deep core fueling. Pellet injection will be the primary ITER fuel delivery system. The fueling requirements will require significant extensions in pellet injector pulse length ({approx}3000 s), throughput (400 torr-L/s,) and reliability. The proposed design is based on a centrifuge accelerator fed by a continuous screw extruder. Inner wall pellet injection with the use of curved guide tubes will be utilized for deep fueling.

  7. Ion cyclotron waves at Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Wei, H. Y.; Cowee, M. M.; Neubauer, F. M.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2016-03-01

    During the interaction of Titan's thick atmosphere with the ambient plasma, it was expected that ion cyclotron waves would be generated by the free energy of the highly anisotropic velocity distribution of the freshly ionized atmospheric particles created in the interaction. However, ion cyclotron waves are rarely observed near Titan, due to the long growth times of waves associated with the major ion species from Titan's ionosphere, such as CH4+ and N2+. In the over 100 Titan flybys obtained by Cassini to date, there are only two wave events, for just a few minutes during T63 flyby and for tens of minutes during T98 flyby. These waves occur near the gyrofrequencies of proton and singly ionized molecular hydrogen. They are left-handed, elliptically polarized, and propagate nearly parallel to the field lines. Hybrid simulations are performed to understand the wave growth under various conditions in the Titan environment. The simulations using the plasma and field conditions during T63 show that pickup protons with densities ranging from 0.01 cm-3 to 0.02 cm-3 and singly ionized molecular hydrogens with densities ranging from 0.015 cm-3 to 0.25 cm-3 can drive ion cyclotron waves with amplitudes of ~0.02 nT and of ~0.04 nT within appropriate growth times at Titan, respectively. Since the T98 waves were seen farther upstream than the T63 waves, it is possible that the instability was stronger and grew faster on T98 than T63.

  8. Method and apparatus for ion cyclotron spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Dahl, David A [Idaho Falls, ID; Scott, Jill R [Idaho Falls, ID; McJunkin, Timothy R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-08-17

    An ion cyclotron spectrometer may include a vacuum chamber that extends at least along a z-axis and means for producing a magnetic field within the vacuum chamber so that a magnetic field vector is generally parallel to the z-axis. The ion cyclotron spectrometer may also include means for producing a trapping electric field within the vacuum chamber that includes at least a first section that induces a first magnetron effect that increases a cyclotron frequency of an ion and at least a second section that induces a second magnetron effect that decreases the cyclotron frequency of an ion. The cyclotron frequency changes induced by the first and second magnetron effects substantially cancel one another so that an ion traversing the at least first and second sections will experience no net change in cyclotron frequency.

  9. Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating System on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei

    2009-08-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) system which will provide at least than 10 MW heating power, with a frequency range from 25 MHz to 100 MHz, is being built up for the EAST. The system includes high-power and wide-frequency radio amplifier, transmission line as well as resonant double loop (RDL) antenna. As a part of this system a sub-ICRH system unit with a ultimate output power of 2.5 MW was set up and employed for heating experiment. The maximum of the launched power reached 200 kW in 2008.

  10. ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion sources for cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lyneis, C.M.

    1986-10-01

    In the last decade ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion sources have evolved from a single large, power consuming, complex prototype into a variety of compact, simple, reliable, efficient, high performance sources of high charge state ions for accelerators and atomic physics. The coupling of ECR sources to cyclotrons has resulted in significant performance gains in energy, intensity, reliability, and variety of ion species. Seven ECR sources are in regular operation with cyclotrons and numerous other projects are under development or in the planning stag. At least four laboratories have ECR sources dedicated for atomic physics research and other atomic physics programs share ECR sources with cyclotrons. An ECR source is now installed on the injector for the CERN SPS synchrotron to accelerate O/sup 8 +/ to relativistic energies. A project is underway at Argonne to couple an ECR source to a superconducting heavy-ion linac. Although tremendous progress has been made, the field of ECR sources is still a relatively young technology and there is still the potential for further advances both in source development and understanding of the plasma physics. The development of ECR sources is reviewed. The important physics mechanisms which come into play in the operation of ECR Sources are discussed, along with various models for charge state distributions (CSD). The design and performance of several ECR sources are compared. The 88-Inch Cyclotron and the LBL ECR is used as an example of cyclotron+ECR operation. The future of ECR sources is considered.

  11. Cyclotron axial ion-beam-buncher system

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, R.W.; Swenson, D.A.; Wangler, T.P.

    1982-02-11

    Adiabatic ion bunching is achieved in a cyclotron axial ion injection system through the incorporation of a radio frequency quadrupole system, which receives ions from an external ion source via an accelerate-decelerate system and a focusing einzel lens system, and which adiabatically bunches and then injects the ions into the median plane of a cyclotron via an electrostatic quadrupole system and an inflection mirror.

  12. Method and apparatuses for ion cyclotron spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Dahl, David A.; Scott, Jill R.; McJunkin, Timothy R.

    2012-03-06

    An ion cyclotron spectrometer may include a vacuum chamber that extends at least along a z-axis and means for producing a magnetic field within the vacuum chamber so that a magnetic field vector is generally parallel to the z-axis. The ion cyclotron spectrometer may also include means for producing a trapping electric field within the vacuum chamber. The trapping electric field may comprise a field potential that, when taken in cross-section along the z-axis, includes at least one section that is concave down and at least one section that is concave up so that ions traversing the field potential experience a net magnetron effect on a cyclotron frequency of the ions that is substantially equal to zero. Other apparatuses and a method for performing ion cyclotron spectrometry are also disclosed herein.

  13. The electromagnetic ion cyclotron beam anisotropy instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peter Gary, S.; Schriver, David

    1987-01-01

    Electromagnetic instabilities driven by an anisotropic, relatively cool ion beam are studied for the case in which both the beam and the instabilities propagate parallel or antiparallel to a uniform magnetic field. At modest beam-core relative drift speeds, sufficiently large perpendicular-to-parallel beam temperature ratios and sufficiently large plasma beta, the mode of fastest growth rate is the ion cyclotron beam anisotropy instability. Because the right-hand polarized waves observed upstream of slow shocks in the earth's magnetotail can lead to the appropriate beam anisotropy, the ion cyclotron instability may be present and account for the left-hand polarized magnetic waves observed there. Also, because of its relatively low phase speed, the ion cyclotron beam anisotropy instability may provide the scattering necessary for ion Fermi acceleration at slow shocks of sufficiently high plasma beta.

  14. High intensity ion beam injection into the 88-inch cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Wutte, Daniela; Clark, Dave J.; Laune, Bernard; Leitner,Matthaeus A.; Lyneis, Claude M.

    2000-05-31

    Low cross section experiments to produce super-heavyelements have increased the demand for high intensity heavy ion beams atenergies of about 5 MeV/nucleon at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at the LawrenceBerkeley National Laboratory. Therefore, efforts are underway to increasethe overall ion beam transmission through the axial injection line andthe cyclotron. The ion beam emittance has been measured for various ionmasses and charge states. Beam transport simulations including spacecharge effects were performed for both of the injection line and the ionsource extraction. The relatively low nominal injection voltage of 10 kVwas found to be the main factor for ion beam losses, because of beam blowup due to space charge forces at higher intensities. Consequently,experiments and simulations have been performed at higherinjectionenergies, and it was demonstrated that the ion beams could still becentered in the cyclotron at these energies. Therefore, the new injectorion source VENUS and its ion beam transport system (currently underconstruction at the 88-Inch Cyclotron) are designed for extractionvoltages up to 30 kV.

  15. Xe/+/ -induced ion-cyclotron harmonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D.

    Xenon ion sources on an ejectable package separated from the main payload during the flights of Porcupine rockets F3 and F4 which were launched from Kiruna, Sweden on March 19 and 31, 1979, respectively. The effects of the xenon ion beam, detected by the LF (f less than 16 kHz) wideband electric field experiment and analyzed by using a sonograph, are discussed. Particular attention is given to the stimulation of the ion-cyclotron harmonic waves which are usually linked to the local proton gyro-frequency, but are sometimes related to half that frequency. It was found that in a plasma dominated by O(+) ions, a small amount (1-10%) of protons could cause an effect such that the O(+) cyclotron harmonic waves are set up by the hydrogen ions, the net result being the observation of harmonic emissions separated by the hydrogen ion gyro frequency.

  16. Interpretive Experiments: An Interpretive Experiment in Ion Cyclotron Resonance Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnier, R. C.; Freiser, B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Provides a discussion which is intended for chemistry college students on the ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) spectroscopy, the physical basis for ion cyclotron resonance, and the experimental methodology employed by ICR spectroscopists. (HM)

  17. Influence of injection beam emittance on beam transmission efficiency in a cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Kurashima, Satoshi Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Yoshida, Ken-Ichi; Okumura, Susumu

    2014-02-15

    The JAEA AVF cyclotron accelerates various kinds of high-energy ion beams for research in biotechnology and materials science. Beam intensities of an ion species of the order of 10{sup −9}–10{sup −6} ampere are often required for various experiments performed sequentially over a day. To provide ion beams with sufficient intensity and stability, an operator has to retune an ion source in a short time. However, the beam intensity downstream of the cyclotron rarely increases in proportion to the intensity at the ion source. To understand the cause of this beam behavior, transmission efficiencies of a {sup 12}C{sup 5+} beam from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source to the cyclotron were measured for various conditions of the ion source. Moreover, a feasible region for acceleration in the emittance of the injection beam was clarified using a transverse-acceptance measuring system. We confirmed that the beam emittance and profile were changed depending on the condition of the ion source and that matching between the beam emittance and the acceptance of the cyclotron was degraded. However, after fine-tuning to improve the matching, beam intensity downstream of the cyclotron increased.

  18. Ion-cyclotron instability in magnetic mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlstein, L.D.

    1987-02-02

    This report reviews the role of ion-cyclotron frequency instability in magnetic mirrors. The modes discussed here are loss-cone or anisotropy driven. The discussion includes quasilinear theory, explosive instabilities of 3-wave interaction and non-linear Landau damping, and saturation due to non-linear orbits. (JDH)

  19. Ion-beam-driven electrostatic ion cyclotron instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, A.; Okuda, H.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    1982-10-01

    We present results of numerical simulations on the electrostatic ion cyclotron instabilities driven by the ion beam parallel to the magnetic field. For the beam speed exceeding the thermal speed of background ions and the beam temperature much lower than the background ion temperature, it is found that the instability results in strong perpendicular heating and slowing down of parallel drift of the beam ions, leading to the saturation of the instability. Applications to plasma heating and space plasma physics are discussed.

  20. Ion cyclotron waves observed near the plasmapause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, B. J.; Samson, J. C.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Russell, C. T.

    1986-01-01

    Pc2 electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves at 0.1 Hz, near the oxygen cyclotron frequency, have been observed by ISEE-1 and -2 between L = 7.6 - 5.8 on an inbound near equatorial pass in the dusk sector. The waves occurred in a thick plasmapause of width about 1 earth radius and penetrated about 1 earth radius into the plasmasphere. Wave onset was accompanied by significant increases in the thermal (0-100 eV) He(+) and the warm (0.1-16 keV/e) O(+) and He(+) heavy ion populations. Wave polarization is predominantly left-handed with propagation almost parallel to the ambient magnetic field, and the spectral slot and polarization reversal predicted by multicomponent cold plasma propagation theory are identified in the wave data. The results are considered as an example of wave-particle interactions occurring during the outer plasmasphere refilling process at the time of the substorm recovery phase.

  1. Electrostatic ion cyclotron velocity shear instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, D. S.; Winske, D.; Gary, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    A local electrostatic dispersion equation is derived for a shear flow perpendicular to an ambient magnetic field, which includes all kinetic effects and involves only one important parameter. The dispersion equation is cast in the form of Gordeyev integrals and is solved numerically. Numerical solutions indicate that an ion cyclotron instability is excited. The instability occurs roughly at multiples of the ion cyclotron frequency (modified by the shear), with the growth rate or the individual harmonics overlapping in the wavenumber. At large values of the shear parameter, the instability is confined to long wavelengths, but at smaller shear, a second distinct branch at shorter wavelengths also appears. The properties of the instability obtained are compared with those obtained in the nonlocal limit by Ganguli et al. (1985, 1988).

  2. Single-pass ion cyclotron resonance absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Breizman, Boris N.; Arefiev, Alexey V.

    2001-03-01

    The ion response to the rf-field during single-pass ion-cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) can be essentially nonlinear. This paper presents a self-consistent theory of the rf-wave propagation and ion motion through the resonance. An important ingredient of the problem is the ion flow along the magnetic field. The flow velocity limits the time the ions spend at the resonance, which in turn limits the ion energy gain. A feature that makes the problem nonlinear is that the flow accelerates under the effect of the {nabla}B force and rf-pressure. This acceleration can produce a steep decrease in the plasma density at the resonance, resulting in partial reflection of the incident wave.

  3. Improved ion optics for introduction of ions into a 9.4-T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Leach, Franklin E; Kaiser, Nathan K; Dang, Xibei; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Norheim, Randolph V; Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D; Marshall, Alan G

    2015-01-01

    Enhancements to the ion source and transfer optics of our 9.4 T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) mass spectrometer have resulted in improved ion transmission efficiency for more sensitive mass measurement of complex mixtures at the MS and MS/MS levels. The tube lens/skimmer has been replaced by a dual ion funnel and the following octopole by a quadrupole for reduced ion cloud radial expansion before transmission into a mass-selective quadrupole. The number of ions that reach the ICR cell is increased by an order of magnitude for the funnel/quadrupole relative to the tube lens/skimmer/octopole. PMID:25601704

  4. Current driven electrostatic and electromagnetic ion cyclotron instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forslund, D. W.; Kennel, C. F.; Kindel, J. M.

    1971-01-01

    Growth rates and parameter dependences are calculated for the current driven instabilities of electrostatic (with finite-beta corrections) and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. For 0.25 (T sub e)/(T sub i) 2.5, ion cyclotron waves have large growth rates, while ion acoustic waves are still stable. In fusion devices, where electrostatic waves may be stable, electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves are unstable for beta sub i 0.001.

  5. Cyclotron resonance effects on stochastic acceleration of light ionospheric ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, N.; Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.

    1982-09-01

    The production of energetic ions with conical pitch angle distributions along the auroral field lines is a subject of considerable current interest. There are several theoretical treatments showing the acceleration (heating) of the ions by ion cyclotron waves. The quasi-linear theory predicts no acceleration when the ions are nonresonant. In the present investigation, it is demonstrated that the cyclotron resonances are not crucial for the transverse acceleration of ions by ion cyclotron waves. It is found that transverse energization of ionospheric ions, such as He(+), He(++), O(++), and O(+), is possible by an Electrostatic Hydrogen Cyclotron (EHC) wave even in the absence of cyclotron resonance. The mechanism of acceleration is the nonresonant stochastic heating. However, when there are resonant ions both the total energy gain and the number of accelerated ions increase with increasing parallel wave number.

  6. Cyclotron resonance effects on stochastic acceleration of light ionospheric ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    The production of energetic ions with conical pitch angle distributions along the auroral field lines is a subject of considerable current interest. There are several theoretical treatments showing the acceleration (heating) of the ions by ion cyclotron waves. The quasi-linear theory predicts no acceleration when the ions are nonresonant. In the present investigation, it is demonstrated that the cyclotron resonances are not crucial for the transverse acceleration of ions by ion cyclotron waves. It is found that transverse energization of ionospheric ions, such as He(+), He(++), O(++), and O(+), is possible by an Electrostatic Hydrogen Cyclotron (EHC) wave even in the absence of cyclotron resonance. The mechanism of acceleration is the nonresonant stochastic heating. However, when there are resonant ions both the total energy gain and the number of accelerated ions increase with increasing parallel wave number.

  7. The mirror and ion cyclotron anisotropy instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    The linear dispersion equation for fully electromagnetic waves and instabilities at arbitrary directions of propagation relative to a background magnetic field B(0) in a homogeneous Vlasov plasma is solved numerically for bi-Maxwellian particle distributions. For isotropic plasmas the dispersion and damping of the three modes below the proton cyclotron frequency are studied as functions of Beta(i) and T(e)/T(i). The transport ratios of helicity, cross-helicity, Alfven ratio, compressibility, and parallel compressibility are defined. Under the condition that the proton temperature perpendicular to B(0) is greater than the parallel temperature, the growth rates and transport ratios of the mirror instability and the ion cyclotron anisotropy instability are examined and compared. Both the proton parallel compressibility and the proton Alfven ratio are significantly different for the two growing modes.

  8. Improved ion optics for introduction of ions into a 9.4-T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu; Leach, Franklin E.; Kaiser, Nathan K.; Dang, Xibei; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2015-01-19

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry provides unparalleled mass accuracy and resolving power.[1],[2] With electrospray ionization (ESI), ions are typically transferred into the mass spectrometer through a skimmer, which serves as a conductance-limiting orifice. However, the skimmer allows only a small fraction of incoming ions to enter the mass spectrometer. An ion funnel, originally developed by Smith and coworkers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)[3-5] provides much more efficient ion focusing and transfer. The large entrance aperture of the ion funnel allows almost all ions emanating from a heated capillary to be efficiently captured and transferred, resulting in nearly lossless transmission.

  9. Electronuclear ion fusion in an ion cyclotron resonance reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cowgill, Donald F.

    1996-12-01

    A method and apparatus for generating nuclear fusion by ion cyclotron resonance in an ion trap reactor. The reactor includes a cylindrical housing having an axial axis, an internal surface, and first and second ends. First and second end plates that are charged are respectively located at the first and second ends of the cylindrical housing. A gas layer is adsorbed on the internal surface of the cylindrical housing. Ions are desorbed from the gas layer, forming a plasma layer adjacent to the cylindrical housing that includes first ions that have a same charge sign as the first and second end plates. A uniform magnetic field is oriented along the axial axis of the cylindrical housing. Second ions, that are unlike the first ions, but have the same charge sign, are injected into the cylindrical housing along the axial axis of the cylindrical housing. A radio frequency field resonantly accelerates the injected second ions at the cyclotron resonance frequency of the second ions. The second ions circulate in increasing helical orbits and react with the first ions, at the optimum energy for nuclear fusion. The amplitude of the radio frequency field is adjusted to accelerate the second ions at a rate equal to the rate of tangential energy loss of the second ions by nuclear scattering in the first ions, causing the ions to continually interact until fusion occurs.

  10. Ion Behavior in an Electrically Compensated Ion Cyclotron Resonance Trap

    PubMed Central

    Brustkern, Adam M.; Rempel, Don L.; Gross, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    We recently described a new electrically compensated trap in FT ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry and developed a means of tuning traps of this general design. Here, we describe a continuation of that research by comparing the ion transient lifetimes and the resulting mass resolving powers and signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios that are achievable in the compensated vs. uncompensated modes of this trap. Transient lifetimes are ten times longer under the same conditions of pressure, providing improved mass resolving power and S/N ratios. The mass resolving power as a function of m/z is linear (log-log plot) and nearly equal to the theoretical maximum. Importantly, the ion cyclotron frequency as a function of ion number decreases linearly in accord with theory, unlike its behavior in the uncompensated mode. This linearity should lead to better control in mass calibration and increased mass accuracy than achievable in the uncompensated mode. PMID:21499521

  11. Ion cyclotron bands in VLF saucers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeda, Kaichi; Fung, Shing F.; Calvert, Wynne

    1990-01-01

    In the wideband VLF data obtained by the polar orbiting DE-1 satellite over the polar night ion trough region of the upper ionosphere, conspicuous frequency-band structures are found to occur both in absorption and emission, particularly associating with VLF saucers. The attenuation bands indicate that the ions of atomic hydrogen from the polar ionosphere are accelerated by the ac electric fields of VLF waves oscillating normal to the static magnetic field, analogous to a cyclotron accelerator. The observed frequencies of the cyclotron harmonics suggest that the acceleration is taking place in the layer below the satellite at a geocentric distance of less than about 1.5 earth radii. This example indicates the existence of upward propagating hiss at those altitudes inside the auroral zone. On the other hand, the frequency shifts of the emission bands are attributed to a combination of two different types of Doppler shift, one due to the orbital motion of the satellite and the other due to the upward motion of the medium at the emission source. This indicates the existence of an upward plasma flow at the source, with a velocity of the order of 20 km/s inside the saucer. The amount of this frequency shift decreases with increasing harmonic order, indicating a higher phase velocity for the electrostatic waves of higher harmonic order.

  12. Global Simulation of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K.; Gallagher, D. L.; Kozyra, J. U.

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that the effects of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves on ring current (RC) ion and radiation belt (RB) electron dynamics strongly depend on such particle/wave characteristics as the phase-space distribution function, frequency, wave-normal angle, wave energy, and the form of wave spectral energy density. The consequence is that accurate modeling of EMIC waves and RC particles requires robust inclusion of the interdependent dynamics of wave growth/damping, wave propagation, and particles. Such a self-consistent model is being progressively developed by Khazanov et al. [2002 - 2007]. This model is based on a system of coupled kinetic equations for the RC and EMIC wave power spectral density along with the ray tracing equations. We will discuss the recent progress in understanding EMIC waves formation mechanisms in the inner magnetosphere. This problem remains unsettled in spite of many years of experimental and theoretical studies. Modern satellite observations by CRRES, Polar and Cluster still do not reveal the whole picture experimentally since they do not stay long enough in the generation region to give a full account of all the spatio-temporal structure of EMIC waves. The complete self-consistent theory taking into account all factors significant for EMIC waves generation remains to be developed. Several mechanisms are discussed with respect to formation of EMIC waves, among them are nonlinear modification of the ionospheric reflection by precipitating energetic protons, modulation of ion-cyclotron instability by long-period (Pc3/4) pulsations, reflection of waves from layers of heavy-ion gyroresonances, and nonlinearities of wave generation process. We show that each of these mechanisms have their attractive features and explains certain part experimental data but any of them, if taken alone, meets some difficulties when compared to observations. We conclude that development of a refined nonlinear theory and further correlated analysis

  13. Global Simulation of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, George V.; Gallagher, D. L.; Kozyra, J. U.

    2007-01-01

    It is very well known that the effects of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves on ring current (RC) ion and radiation belt (RB) electron dynamics strongly depend on such particle/wave characteristics as the phase-space distribution function, frequency, wave-normal angle, wave energy, and the form of wave spectral energy density. The consequence is that accurate modeling of EMIC waves and RC particles requires robust inclusion of the interdependent dynamics of wave growth/damping, wave propagation, and particles. Such a self-consistent model is being progressively developed by Khazanov et al. This model is based on a system of coupled kinetic equations for the RC and EMIC wave power spectral density along with the ray tracing equations. We will discuss the recent progress in understanding EMIC waves formation mechanisms in the inner magnetosphere. This problem remains unsettled in spite of many years of experimental and theoretical studies. Modern satellite observations by CRRES, Polar and Cluster still do not reveal the whole picture experimentally since they do not stay long enough in the generation region to give a full account of all the spatio-temporal structure of EMIC waves. The complete self-consistent theory taking into account all factors significant for EMIC waves generation remains to be developed. Several mechanisms are discussed with respect to formation of EMIC waves, among them are nonlinear modification of the ionospheric reflection by precipitating energetic protons, modulation of ion-cyclotron instability by long-period (Pc3/4) pulsations, reflection of waves from layers of heavy-ion gyroresonances, and nonlinearities of wave generation process. We show that each of these mechanisms have their attractive features and explains certain part experimental data but any of them, if taken alone, meets some difficulties when compared to observations. We conclude that development of a refined nonlinear theory and further correlated analysis of modern

  14. A room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the DC-110 cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Efremov, A. Bogomolov, S.; Lebedev, A.; Loginov, V.; Yazvitsky, N.

    2014-02-15

    The project of the DC-110 cyclotron facility to provide applied research in the nanotechnologies (track pore membranes, surface modification of materials, etc.) has been designed by the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna). The facility includes the isochronous cyclotron DC-110 for accelerating the intensive Ar, Kr, Xe ion beams with 2.5 MeV/nucleon fixed energy. The cyclotron is equipped with system of axial injection and ECR ion source DECRIS-5, operating at the frequency of 18 GHz. This article reviews the design and construction of DECRIS-5 ion source along with some initial commissioning results.

  15. Ion cyclotron emission studies: Retrospects and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelenkov, N. N.

    2016-05-01

    Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) studies emerged in part from the papers by A.B. Mikhailovskii published in the 1970s. Among the discussed subjects were electromagnetic compressional Alfvénic cyclotron instabilities with the linear growth rate √ {n_α /n_e } driven by fusion products, -particles which draw a lot of attention to energetic particle physics. The theory of ICE excited by energetic particles was significantly advanced at the end of the 20th century motivated by first DT experiments on TFTR and subsequent JET experimental studies which we highlight. More recently ICE theory was advanced by detailed theoretical and experimental studies on spherical torus (ST) fusion devices where the instability signals previously indistinguishable in high aspect ratio tokamaks due to high toroidal magnetic field became the subjects of experiments. We discuss further prospects of ICE theory applications for future burning plasma (BP) experiments such as those to be conducted in ITER device in France, where neutron and gamma rays escaping the plasma create extremely challenging conditions fusion alpha particle diagnostics.

  16. Ion cyclotron emission studies: Retrospects and prospects

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gorelenkov, N. N.

    2016-06-05

    Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) studies emerged in part from the papers by A.B. Mikhailovskii published in the 1970s. Among the discussed subjects were electromagnetic compressional Alfv,nic cyclotron instabilities with the linear growth rate similar ~ √(nα/ne) driven by fusion products, -particles which draw a lot of attention to energetic particle physics. The theory of ICE excited by energetic particles was significantly advanced at the end of the 20th century motivated by first DT experiments on TFTR and subsequent JET experimental studies which we highlight. Recently ICE theory was advanced by detailed theoretical and experimental studies on spherical torus (ST) fusionmore » devices where the instability signals previously indistinguishable in high aspect ratio tokamaks due to high toroidal magnetic field became the subjects of experiments. Finally, we discuss prospects of ICE theory applications for future burning plasma (BP) experiments such as those to be conducted in ITER device in France, where neutron and gamma rays escaping the plasma create extremely challenging conditions fusion alpha particle diagnostics.« less

  17. Ion trajectories in an electrostatic ion guide for external ion source fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Marto, J A; Marshall, A G; May, M A; Limbach, P A

    1995-10-01

    An electrostatic ion guide (EIG) that consists of concentric cylinder and central wire electrodes can transport ions efficiently from an external ion source to an ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) ion trap for mass analysis, with several advantages over current injection methods. Because the electrostatic force of the EIG captures ions in a stable orbit about the wire electrode, ions with initially divergent trajectories may be redirected toward the ICR ion trap for improved ion transmission efficiency. SIMION trajectory calculations (ion kinetic energy, 1-200 eV; elevation angle, 0.30 °; azimuthal angle, 0.360°) predict that ions of m/z 1000 may be transmitted through a strong (0.01 → 3.0-T) magnetic field gradient. Judicious choice of ion source position and EIG potential minimizes the spread in ion axial kinetic energy at the ICR ion trap. Advantages of the EIG include large acceptance angle, even for ions that have large initial kinetic energy and large radial displacement with respect to the central z-axis, low ion extraction voltage (5-20 V), and efficient trapping because ions need not be accelerated to high velocity to pass through the magnetic field gradient. PMID:24214038

  18. Fourth generation electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    PubMed

    Lyneis, Claude M; Leitner, D; Todd, D S; Sabbi, G; Prestemon, S; Caspi, S; Ferracin, P

    2008-02-01

    The concepts and technical challenges related to developing a fourth generation electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source with a rf frequency greater than 40 GHz and magnetic confinement fields greater than twice B(ECR) will be explored in this article. Based on the semiempirical frequency scaling of ECR plasma density with the square of operating frequency, there should be significant gains in performance over current third generation ECR ion sources, which operate at rf frequencies between 20 and 30 GHz. While the third generation ECR ion sources use NbTi superconducting solenoid and sextupole coils, the new sources will need to use different superconducting materials, such as Nb(3)Sn, to reach the required magnetic confinement, which scales linearly with rf frequency. Additional technical challenges include increased bremsstrahlung production, which may increase faster than the plasma density, bremsstrahlung heating of the cold mass, and the availability of high power continuous wave microwave sources at these frequencies. With each generation of ECR ion sources, there are new challenges to be mastered, but the potential for higher performance and reduced cost of the associated accelerator continues to make this a promising avenue for development. PMID:18315111

  19. Response of thermal ions to electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. J.; Fuselier, S. A.

    1994-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves generated by 10 - 50 keV protons in the Earth's equatorial magnetosphere will interact with the ambient low-energy ions also found in this region. We examine H(+) and He(+) distribution functions from approx. equals 1 to 160 eV using the Hot Plasma Composition Experiment instrument on AMPTE/CCE to investigate the thermal ion response to the waves. A total of 48 intervals were chosen on the basis of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave activity: 24 with prevalent EMIC waves and 24 with no EMIC waves observed on the orbit. There is a close correlation between EMIC waves and perpendicular heated ion distributions. For protons the perpendicular temperature increase is modest, about 5 eV, and is always observed at 90 deg pitch angles. This is consistent with a nonresonant interaction near the equator. By contrast, He(+) temperatures during EMIC wave events averaged 35 eV and sometimes exceeded 100 eV, indicating stronger interaction with the waves. Furthermore, heated He(+) ions have X-type distributions with maximum fluxes occurring at pitch angles intermediate between field-aligned and perpendicular directions. The X-type He(+) distributions are consistent with a gyroresonant interaction off the equator. The concentration of He(+) relative to H(+) is found to correlate with EMIC wave activity, but it is suggested that the preferential heating of He(+) accounts for the apparent increase in relative He(+) concentration by increasing the proportion of He(+) detected by the ion instrument.

  20. Electromagnetic ion/ion cyclotron instability - Theory and simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winske, D.; Omidi, N.

    1992-01-01

    Linear theory and 1D and 2D hybrid simulations are employed to study electromagnetic ion/ion cyclotron (EMIIC) instability driven by the relative streaming of two field-aligned ion beams. The characteristics of the instability are studied as a function of beam density, propagation angle, electron-ion temperature ratios, and ion beta. When the propagation angle is near 90 deg the EMIIC instability has the characteristics of an electrostatic instability, while at smaller angles electromagnetic effects play a significant role as does strong beam coupling. The 2D simulations point to a narrowing of the wave spectrum and accompanying coherent effects during the linear growth stage of development. The EMIIC instability is an important effect where ion beta is low such as in the plasma-sheet boundary layer and upstream of slow shocks in the magnetotail.

  1. Ion Cyclotron Waves in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, H. Y.; Jian, L. K.; Russell, C. T.; Omidi, N.

    2016-02-01

    The ion cyclotron waves (ICWs) refer to electromagnetic transverse waves with nearly field-aligned propagation, circular polarization, and frequencies near the proton gyro-frequency. This chapter presents the ICW studies observed in the solar wind over a wide range of heliocentric distances, at all solar longitudes, and at locations far from planets or comets. To better understand the wave source region, case studies have been performed on a special group of ICW storm events, in which the left-handed (LH) and right-handed (RH) waves were observed simultaneously in the spacecraft frame. The study in the chapter assumes the waves are generated through one possible mechanism (i.e., the temperature anisotropy instability). The variations of the wave properties with heliocentric distances may also provide information on the possible wave generation sources and the effects of the wave to the solar wind plasma.

  2. Folded waveguide coupler for ion cyclotron heating

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, T.L.; Chen, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    A new type of waveguide coupler for plasma heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies is described. The coupler consists of a series of interleaved metallic vanes within a rectangular enclosure analogous to a wide rectangular waveguide that has been ''folded'' several times. At the mouth of the coupler, a plate is attached which contains coupling apertures in each fold or every other fold of the waveguide, depending upon the wavenumber spectrum desired. This plate serves primarily as a wave field polarizer that converts coupler fields to the polarization of the fast magnetosonic wave within the plasma. Theoretical estimates indicate that the folded waveguide is capable of high-efficiency, multimegawatt operation into a plasma. Bench tests have verified the predicted field structure within the waveguide in preparation for high-power tests on the Radio Frequency Test Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  3. Mirror and ion cyclotron anisotropy instabilities in the magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckean, M. E.; Winske, D.; Gary, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    The kinetic properties of the ion cyclotron anisotropy and the mirror instabilities are investigated using one-dimensional hybrid simulations. It is found that, for moderate values of the ion beta and the proton temperature anisotropy, the two instabilities produce similar levels of turbulence. For high values of beta or temperature anisotropy, the ion cyclotron instability produces higher fluctuation levels of turbulence than does the mirror instability.

  4. Simulations of ion cyclotron anisotropy instabilities in the terrestrial magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. P.; Winske, Dan

    1993-01-01

    Enhanced transverse magnetic fluctuations observed below the proton cyclotron frequency in the terrestrial magnetosheath have been identified as due to the proton cyclotron and helium cyclotron instabilities driven by the T-perpendicular greater than T-parallel condition of the sheath ions. One-dimensional hybrid computer simulations are used here to examine the nonlinear properties of these two growing modes at relatively weak fluctuation energies and for wave vectors parallel to the background magnetic field. Second-order theory predicts fluctuating magnetic field energies at saturation of the proton cyclotron anisotropy instability in semiquantitative agreement with the simulation results. Introduction of the helium component enhances the wave-particle exchange rate for proton anisotropy reduction by that instability, thereby reducing the saturation energy of that mode. The simulations demonstrate that wave-particle interactions by the proton cyclotron and helium cyclotron instabilities lead to the anticorrelation observed by Anderson and Fuselier (1993).

  5. Suppression of cyclotron instability in Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion sources by two-frequency heating

    SciTech Connect

    Skalyga, V.; Izotov, I.; Mansfeld, D.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Laulainen, J.; Tarvainen, O.

    2015-08-15

    Multiple frequency heating is one of the most effective techniques to improve the performance of Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion sources. The method increases the beam current and average charge state of the extracted ions and enhances the temporal stability of the ion beams. It is demonstrated in this paper that the stabilizing effect of two-frequency heating is connected with the suppression of electron cyclotron instability. Experimental data show that the interaction between the secondary microwave radiation and the hot electron component of ECR ion source plasmas plays a crucial role in mitigation of the instabilities.

  6. Nonresonant interaction of heavy ions with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berchem, J.; Gendrin, R.

    1985-01-01

    The motion of a heavy ion in the presence of an intense ultralow-frequency electromagnetic wave propagating along the dc magnetic field is analyzed. Starting from the basic equations of motion and from their associated two invariants, the heavy ion velocity-space trajectories are drawn. It is shown that after a certain time, particles whose initial phase angles are randomly distributed tend to bunch together, provided that the wave intensity b-sub-1 is sufficiently large. The importance of these results for the interpretation of the recently observed acceleration of singly charged He ions in conjunction with the occurrence of large-amplitude ion cyclotron waves in the equatorial magnetosphere is discussed.

  7. Convection of ion cyclotron waves to ion-heating regions

    SciTech Connect

    Roennmark, K.; Andre, M. )

    1991-10-01

    Low-frequency waves associated with ion conics have been observed in the central plasma sheet, in a region where there are no obvious sources of free energy that could destabilize these waves locally. The authors consider ion cyclotron waves generated in the equatorial plane by a proton temperature anisotropy and use computed growth rates to create a model wave distribution. Using ray tracing and conservation of the wave distribution function along phase space rays, they then map the wave intensities form the equatorial plane to the top of the ion-heating region. They find that the spectral density at a geocentric distance of 2.8 R{sub E} will be about 10 times higher than that in the equatorial region. Thus, convection from the equatorial plane could explain the observed spectral density of 10{sup {minus}6} V{sup 2} m{sup {minus}2} Hz{sup {minus}1} and the associated oxygen ion heating.

  8. An electron cyclotron resonance ion source based low energy ion beam platform.

    PubMed

    Sun, L T; Shang, Y; Ma, B H; Zhang, X Z; Feng, Y C; Li, X X; Wang, H; Guo, X H; Song, M T; Zhao, H Y; Zhang, Z M; Zhao, H W; Xie, D Z

    2008-02-01

    To satisfy the requirements of surface and atomic physics study in the field of low energy multiple charge state ion incident experiments, a low energy (10 eV/q-20 keV/q) ion beam platform is under design at IMP. A simple test bench has been set up to test the ion beam deceleration systems. Considering virtues such as structure simplicity, easy handling, compactness, cost saving, etc., an all-permanent magnet ECRIS LAPECR1 [Lanzhou all-permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source No. 1] working at 14.5 GHz has been adopted to produce intense medium and low charge state ion beams. LAPECR1 source has already been ignited. Some intense low charge state ion beams have been produced on it, but the first test also reveals that many problems are existing on the ion beam transmission line. The ion beam transmission mismatches result in the depressed performance of LAPECR1, which will be discussed in this paper. To obtain ultralow energy ion beam, after being analyzed by a double-focusing analyzer magnet, the selected ion beam will be further decelerated by two afocal deceleration lens systems, which is still under design. This design has taken into consideration both ions slowing down and also ion beam focusing. In this paper, the conceptual design of deceleration system will be discussed. PMID:18315202

  9. Ion source and injection line for high intensity medical cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, XianLu Guan, Fengping; Yao, Hongjuan; Zhang, TianJue; Yang, Jianjun; Song, Guofang; Ge, Tao; Qin, Jiuchang

    2014-02-15

    A 14 MeV high intensity compact cyclotron, CYCIAE-14, was built at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). An injection system based on the external H− ion source was used on CYCIAE-14 so as to provide high intensity beam, while most positron emission tomography cyclotrons adopt internal ion source. A beam intensity of 100 μA/14 MeV was extracted from the cyclotron with a small multi-cusp H− ion source (CIAE-CH-I type) and a short injection line, which the H− ion source of 3 mA/25 keV H− beam with emittance of 0.3π mm mrad and the injection line of with only 1.2 m from the extraction of ion source to the medial plane of the cyclotron. To increase the extracted beam intensity of the cyclotron, a new ion source (CIAE-CH-II type) of 9.1 mA was used, with maximum of 500 μA was achieved from the cyclotron. The design and test results of the ion source and injection line optimized for high intensity acceleration will be given in this paper.

  10. Ring Current Ion Coupling with Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, George V.

    2002-01-01

    A new ring current global model has been developed for the first time that couples the system of two kinetic equations: one equation describes the ring current (RC) ion dynamic, and another equation describes wave evolution of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves (EMIC). The coupled model is able to simulate, for the first time self-consistently calculated RC ion kinetic and evolution of EMIC waves that propagate along geomagnetic field lines and reflect from the ionosphere. Ionospheric properties affect the reflection index through the integral Pedersen and Hall coductivities. The structure and dynamics of the ring current proton precipitating flux regions, intensities of EMIC, global RC energy balance, and some other parameters will be studied in detail for the selected geomagnetic storms. The space whether aspects of RC modelling and comparison with the data will also be discussed.

  11. Ring Current Ion Coupling with Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov. G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Jordanova, V. K.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A new ring current global model has been developed that couples the system of two kinetic equations: one equation describes the ring current (RC) ion dynamic, and another equation describes wave evolution of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves (EMIC). The coupled model is able to simulate, for the first time self-consistently calculated RC ion kinetic and evolution of EMIC waves that propagate along geomagnetic field lines and reflect from the ionosphere. Ionospheric properties affect the reflection index through the integral Pedersen and Hall conductivities. The structure and dynamics of the ring current proton precipitating flux regions, intensities of EMIC global RC energy balance, and some other parameters will be studied in detail for the selected geomagnetic storms.

  12. Cyclotron Mode Frequency Shifts in Multi-Species Ion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affolter, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    Plasmas exhibit a variety of cyclotron modes, which are used in a broad range of devices to manipulate and diagnose charged particles. Here we discuss cyclotron modes in trapped plasmas with a single sign of charge. Collective effects and electric fields shift these cyclotron mode frequencies away from the ``bare'' cyclotron frequencies Ωs ≡ qB /ms c for each species s. These electric fields may arise from applied trap potentials, from space charge including collective effects, and from image charge in the trap walls. We will describe a new laser-thermal cyclotron spectroscopy technique, applied to well-diagnosed pure ion plasmas. This technique enables detailed observations of cos (mθ) surface cyclotron modes with m = 0 , 1, and 2 in near rigid-rotor multi-species ion plasmas. For each species s, we observe cyclotron mode frequency shifts which are dependent on the plasma density through the E × B rotation frequency, and on the charge concentration of species s, in close agreement with recent theory. This includes the novel m = 0 radial ``breathing'' mode, which generates no external electric field except at the plasma ends. These cyclotron frequencies can be used to determine the plasma E × B rotation frequency and the species charge concentrations, in close agreement with our laser diagnostics. Here, this plasma characterization permits a determination of the ``bare'' cyclotron frequencies to an accuracy of 2 parts in 104. These new results give a physical basis for the ``space charge'' and ``amplitude'' calibration equations of cyclotron mass spectroscopy, widely used in molecular chemistry and biology. Also, at high temperatures there is preliminary evidence that radially-standing electrostatic Bernstein waves couple to the surface cyclotron modes, producing new resonant frequencies. Supported by NSF/DOE Partnership grants PHY-0903877 and DE-SC0002451.

  13. Improved ion optics for introduction of ions into a 9.4-T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Yu; Leach, Franklin E.; Kaiser, Nathan K.; Dang, Xibei; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2015-01-19

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry provides unparalleled mass accuracy and resolving power.[1],[2] With electrospray ionization (ESI), ions are typically transferred into the mass spectrometer through a skimmer, which serves as a conductance-limiting orifice. However, the skimmer allows only a small fraction of incoming ions to enter the mass spectrometer. An ion funnel, originally developed by Smith and coworkers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)[3-5] provides much more efficient ion focusing and transfer. The large entrance aperture of the ion funnel allows almost all ions emanating from a heated capillary to be efficiently captured and transferred, resulting inmore » nearly lossless transmission.« less

  14. A laboratory study of collisional electrostatic ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suszcynsky, D. M.; Cartier, S. L.; Merlino, R. L.; Dangelo, N.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of neutral-particle collisions on electrostatic ion cyclotron instability are analyzed. Experiments were conducted in the Q machine of Motley (1975) with a cesium plasma in which the neutral gas pressure in the main chamber varied from about 5 microtorr-10 mtorr. The relation between electrostatic ion cyclotron wave amplitude and frequency and neutral argon pressure is examined. It is observed that over the full range of neutral pressure the frequency changes by less than 10 percent and the ion cyclotron waves continue to be excited and reach amplitudes of at least several percent at values of the neutral pressure where the ion-neutral collision frequency/ion gyrofrequency is about 0.3.

  15. Gas breakdown in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalyga, V. A.; Zorin, V. G.; Izotov, I. V.; Sidorov, A. V.; Lamy, T.; Sortais, P.; Thuillier, T.

    2006-03-01

    The realization of the beta-beam project (http://beta-beam.web.cern.ch/beta-beam/) assumes the formation of a pulsed ion beam of helium and neon radioactive isotopes. A pulsed electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) source of multicharged ions has been proposed to produce such a beam [P. Sortais et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 1610 (2004)]. The rising of plasma density up to a stationary level must be fast enough to actualize this approach. This condition is mandatory to avoid particle losses in the transmission line. In the presented work, the rising time of the plasma density in an ECR ion source from a background level up to 98% of a stationary level is calculated. A zero-dimensional model of plasma formation in a mirror trap [V. Semenov et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 635 (2002)] is used, able to make calculation for a wide range of microwave frequencies. Plasma confinement regime can either be classic (Pastoukhov [Rev. Plasma Phys. 13, 203 (1987)]) or gas dynamic, depending on the plasma parameters. The calculations are in good agreement with the experimental results obtained at the SMIS'37 setup. Numerical calculations also show that particle losses can be significantly reduced by pumping effect; thanks to microwave frequency increase above 40GHz.

  16. Nonlinear particle simulation of ion cyclotron waves in toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kuley, A. Lin, Z.; Bao, J.; Wei, X. S.; Xiao, Y.

    2015-12-10

    Global particle simulation model has been developed in this work to provide a first-principles tool for studying the nonlinear interactions of radio frequency (RF) waves with plasmas in tokamak. In this model, ions are considered as fully kinetic particles using the Vlasov equation and electrons are treated as guiding centers using the drift kinetic equation with realistic electron-to-ion mass ratio. Boris push scheme for the ion motion has been developed in the toroidal geometry using magnetic coordinates and successfully verified for the ion cyclotron and ion Bernstein waves in global gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC). The nonlinear simulation capability is applied to study the parametric decay instability of a pump wave into an ion Bernstein wave side band and a low frequency ion cyclotron quasi mode.

  17. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source DECRIS-4 for the U400 cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Leporis, M.; Bekhterev, V.; Bogomolov, S.; Efremov, A.; Gulbekian, G.; Kostyukhov, Yu.; Lebedev, A.; Loginov, V.; Yazvitsky, N.

    2006-03-15

    The electron cyclotron resonance ion source DECRIS-4 has been designed and constructed at the FLNR to be used as a second injector of heavy multiply charged ions for the U-400 cyclotron. After the modification of the injection side this source can be also used as a 'charge breeder' (the ''1{sup +}{yields}n{sup +}'' method) for the second phase of the Dubna radioactive ion beams project. The main feature of the ion source design is the creation of the extended resonance zone in a comparatively compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source. For this purpose the axial magnetic field is formed with a flat minimum. In this case the superposition of the axial magnetic field and the radial field of the permanent-magnet hexapole, made from NdFeB, allows one to create a larger resonance volume. For the plasma heating a microwave frequency of 14 GHz is used. In this paper we will present the basic design features of the ion source, including the results of the magnetic-field measurements. Some preliminary results of ion source tests are also reported.

  18. Heavy-ion injection from tandems into an isochronous cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    LeVine, M.J.; Chasman, C.

    1981-01-01

    A design has been realized for the injection of heavy ion beams generated by the BNL 3-stage tandem facility into a proposed isochronous cyclotron. The tandem beams are bunched into +- 1/sup 0/ R.F. phase (less than or equal to 0.5 nsec) in two stages. The beam is then injected into the cyclotron through a valley, past a hill, and into the next valley on to a stripper foil. Only a single steerer is required to make trajectory corrections for the different beams. Two achromats are used to regulate the tandem potential and to provide phase control. A final section of the injection optics provides matching of transverse phase space to the acceptance of the cyclotron. The calculations use realistic tandem emittances and magnetic fields for the cyclotron based on measurements with a model magnet.

  19. Shear-flow-driven ion cyclotron and ion sound-drift instabilities of cylindrical inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailenko, V. S.; Chibisov, D. V.

    2007-08-15

    The effects of the shear flow along the magnetic field on the development of the ion cyclotron, ion sound, and drift instabilities in the radially inhomogeneous cylindrical plasma are studied on the ground of a kinetic approach. It is shown that flow shear not only modifies the frequencies and growth rates of known current driven electrostatic ion cyclotron, ion sound, and drift instabilities, but is the source of the development of specific shear-flow-driven ion cyclotron, ion sound, and drift instabilities. These instabilities are excited at the levels of current along the ambient magnetic field which is below the critical value for the development of the modified by flow shear current driven ion cyclotron, ion sound, and drift instabilities.

  20. Development of a high current H(-) ion source for cyclotrons.

    PubMed

    Etoh, H; Aoki, Y; Mitsubori, H; Arakawa, Y; Mitsumoto, T; Yajima, S; Sakuraba, J; Kato, T; Okumura, Y

    2014-02-01

    A multi-cusp DC H(-) ion source has been designed and fabricated for medical applications of cyclotrons. Optimization of the ion source is in progress, such as the improvement of the filament configuration, magnetic filter strength, extraction electrode's shape, configuration of electron suppression magnets, and plasma electrode material. A small quantity of Cs has been introduced into the ion source to enhance the negative ion beam current. The ion source produced 16 mA of DC H(-) ion beam with the Cs-seeded operation at a low arc discharge power of 2.8 kW. PMID:24593547

  1. Linear analysis of ion cyclotron interaction in a multicomponent plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendrin, R.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Omura, Y.; Quest, K.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanism by which hot anisotropic protons generate electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves in a plasma containing cold H(+) and He(+) ions is quantitatively studied. Linear growth rates (both temporal and spatial) are computed for different plasma parameters: concentration, temperature,and anisotropy of cold He(+) ions and of hot protons. It is shown that: (1) for parameters typical of the geostationary altitude the maximum growth rates are not drastically changed when a small proportion (about 1 to 20 percent) of cold He(+) ions is present; (2) because of the important cyclotron absorption by thermal He(+) ions in the vicinity of the He(+) gyrofrequency, waves which could resonate with the bulk of the He(+) distribution cannot be generated. Therefore quasi-linear effects, in a homogeneous medium at least, cannot be responsible for the heating of He(+) ions which is often observed in conjunction with ion cyclotron waves. The variation of growth rate versus wave number is also studied for its importance in selecting suitable parameters in numerical simulation experiments.

  2. Ion cyclotron heating experiments in magnetosphere plasma device RT-1

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiura, M. Yoshida, Z.; Yano, Y.; Kawazura, Y.; Saitoh, H.; Yamasaki, M.; Mushiake, T.; Kashyap, A.; Takahashi, N.; Nakatsuka, M.; Fukuyama, A.

    2015-12-10

    The ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating with 3 MHz and ∼10 kW is being prepared in RT-1. The operation regime for electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating is surveyed as the target plasmas. ECRH with 8.2 GHz and ∼50 kW produces the plasmas with high energy electrons in the range of a few ten keV, but the ions still remain cold at a few ten eV. Ion heating is expected to access high ion beta state and to change the aspect of plasma confinement theoretically. The ICRF heating is applied to the target plasma as an auxiliary heating. The preliminary result of ICRF heating is reported.

  3. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves observed near the oxygen cyclotron frequency by ISEE 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, B. J.; Samson, J. C.; Hu, Y. D.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Russell, C. T.

    1992-01-01

    The first results of observations of ion cyclotron waves by the elliptically orbiting ISEE 1 and 2 pair of spacecraft are reported. The most intense waves (8 nT) were observed in the outer plasmasphere where convection drift velocities were largest and the Alfven velocity was a minimum. Wave polarization is predominantly left-handed with propagation almost parallel to the ambient magnetic field, and the spectral slot and polarization reversal predicted by cold plasma propagation theory are identified in the wave data. Computations of the experimental wave spectra during the passage through the plasmapause show that the spectral slots relate to the local plasma parameters, possibly suggesting an ion cyclotron wave growth source near the spacecraft. A regular wave packet structure seen over the first 30 min of the event is attributed to the modulation of this energy source by the Pc 5 waves seen at the same time.

  4. Miniature cyclotron resonance ion source using small permanent magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anicich, V. G.; Huntress, W. T., Jr. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An ion source using the cyclotron resonance principle is described. A miniaturized ion source device is used in an air gap of a small permanent magnet with a substantially uniform field in the air gap of about 0.5 inch. The device and permanent magnet are placed in an enclosure which is maintained at a high vacuum (typically 10 to the minus 7th power) into which a sample gas can be introduced. The ion beam end of the device is placed very close to an aperture through which an ion beam can exit into the apparatus for an experiment.

  5. LH wave absorption by mode conversion near ion cyclotron harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, K.; Bers, A.; Fuchs, V.

    1981-02-01

    Numerical studies of the dispersion relation near the lower-hybrid frequency in an inhomogeneous plasma (..delta.. n, ..delta.. T, ..delta.. B) show that portions of an incident lower-hybrid wave spectrum undergo successive but partial mode conversions to warm-plasma waves in the presence of ion cyclotron harmonics. Wave absorption beyond the first mode conversion occurs near an ion cyclotron harmonic where ion Landau damping is enhanced. A second-order dispersion relation numerically in good agreement with the full dispersion relation in the mode conversion region is derived using the condition par. delta D/par. delta k = 0. The mode conversion efficiency at each confluence is evaluated by solving the corresponding differential equation.

  6. RF Heating in Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascali, D.; Gammino, S.; Celona, L.; Ciavola, G.

    2011-12-01

    ECRIS—Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources are able to feed accelerators with intense currents of highly charged ions. In ECRIS a high density—high temperature plasma is generated by means of the Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating inside a B-min, MHD stable trap. The state of the art about the principal heating mechanisms will be given. The paper will specially discuss the most critical and still open issues concerning the influence of the magnetic field and of the RF frequency on the plasma heating, as well as the impact of possible non-linear pumping wave—to—plasma interactions. The contribution of INFN-LNS will be specifically underlined. A short review on the future perspectives for the design of new generation ion sources will be given in conclusion.

  7. Evidence that the electrostatic ion cyclotron instability is saturated by ion heating. [in auroral arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.; Bering, E. A.; Mozer, F. S.

    1975-01-01

    Observations have been made of electric field oscillations near the local ion gyro frequency and of an intense beam of plasma ions at the edge of an auroral arc. The observations are in good agreement with ion heating as the saturation mechanism for electrostatic ion cyclotron waves.

  8. The multi-ion, multi-event test of ion cyclotron resonance heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persoon, Ann M.

    1993-01-01

    The multi-ion, multi-event study of ion cyclotron resonance heating was funded to study ion energization through ion cyclotron resonance with low frequency broadband electromagnetic turbulence. The initial work on the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) of oxygen ions was presented in Crew et al. Crew and his co-authors developed a two-parameter representation of selected oxygen conic distributions and modeled the conic formation in terms of resonance heating. The first year seeks to extend the work of Crew and his co-authors by testing the applicability of the ICRH mechanism to helium ion conic distributions, using data obtained from the Energetic Ion Composition Spectrometer and the Plasma Wave Instrument on Dynamics Explorer 1.

  9. Multi-ion, multi-event test of ion cyclotron resonance heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persoon, Ann M.

    1993-01-01

    The multi-ion, multi-event study of ion cyclotron resonance heating has been funded to study ion energization through ion cyclotron resonance with low frequency broadband electromagnetic turbulence. The modeling algorithm for the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) of oxygen ions was presented in Crew et al. (1990). Crew and his co-authors developed a two-parameter representation of selected oxygen conic distributions and modelled the conic formation in terms of resonance heating. The first year of this study seeks to extend the work of Crew and his co-authors by testing the applicability of the ICRH mechanism to helium ion conic distributions, using data obtained from the Energetic Ion Composition Spectrometer and the Plasma Wave Instrument on Dynamics Explorer 1.

  10. Theory for broadband detection of ion cyclotron resonance signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIver, Robert T.; Ledford, Edward B.; Hunter, Richard L.

    1980-02-01

    A complete line shape theory is developed for the transient response of a new type of ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) detector circuit. The detector is basically a balanced capacitance bridge which is sensitive to the abundance of gaseous ions stored in a static magnetic ion trap. For the first time, the equations of motion of ions in the ICR analyzer cell are shown to be coupled to the circuit equations of the detector. Also, the effect of nonreactive ion-molecule collisions on line shapes and on the transient response of the detector are analyzed and shown to allow measurement of ion-molecule collisions frequencies as a function of ion translational energy. One of the most important features of the capacitance bridge detector is its broadband sensitivity to a wide range of ion cyclotron resonance frequencies. This allows a mass spectrum of ions stored in the ICR analyzer cell to be obtained by scanning the frequency ω1 of the irradiating rf electric field at a fixed magnetic field strength. The capacitance bridge circuit can serve not only as a direct replacement for marginal oscillator circuits traditionally used in ICR experiments, but also as the detector for recently developed Fourier Transform and Rapid Scan ICR experiments.

  11. Loss-cone-driven ion cyclotron waves in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denton, Richard E.; Hudson, Mary K.; Roth, Ilan

    1992-01-01

    The study examines the theoretical properties of linear ion cyclotron waves propagating in the magnetosphere at arbitrary angles to the background magnetic field. It is found that in some cases the linear wave growth of modes with oblique propagation can dominate that of the parallel propagating electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave. The growth rate of the loss-cone-driven mode depends strongly on the depth of the loss cone. A simple analytical theory which explains the scaling of the growth rate of the oblique mode with respect to various parameters is presented. The loss-cone-driven mode is an electromagnetic mode which is preferentially nearly linearly polarized. The wave field which results from the oblique mode in its perferentially nearly linearly polarized form are nearly perpendicular to B0 and are such that they may be difficult to distinguish from those of a linearly polarized parallel propgating EMIC wave.

  12. Heating by waves in the ion cyclotron frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, R.

    1996-03-01

    The main aspects of heating with the fast wave in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are reviewed. First, the ion cyclotron resonance mechanism, fundamental and harmonics, is examined. Then the properties of fast wave dispersion are reviewed, and the principles of minority and higher cylcotron harmonic heating are discussed. An elementary coupling model is worked out in order to outline the computation of the electrical properties of ICRF antennas. Using the simple model, the antenna radiation pattern inside the plasma is computed and the effect of phasing on the k spectrum and on the antenna radiation properties is illustrated. The quasi linear-Fokker-Planck computation of the deformation of distribution functions due to Radio-Frequency (RF) and tail formation are briefly discussed. 11 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves in magnetospheric plasmas Nonlocal aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguli, G.; Bakshi, P.; Palmadesso, P.

    1984-01-01

    The importance of the effect of the magnetic shear and the finite size of current channel on the electrostatic ion-cyclotron instability for the space plasmas is illustrated. A non-local treatment is used. When the channel width Lc, is larger than the shear length Ls, there is a large reduction in the growth rate along with a noteworthy reduction of the band of the unstable perpendicular wavelengths. For Lc less than or = Ls/10 the growth rate is not much altered from its local value, however for Lc/pi i less than or = 10 to the second power the growth rate starts falling below the local value and vanishes for Lc pi i. The non-local effects lead to enhanced coherence in the ion cyclotron waves. Previously announced in STAR as N84-14917

  14. Linear and nonlinear physics of the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability of fusion-born ions in relation to ion cyclotron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbajal, L.; Dendy, R. O.; Chapman, S. C.; Cook, J. W. S.

    2014-01-01

    The magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability (MCI) probably underlies observations of ion cyclotron emission (ICE) from energetic ion populations in tokamak plasmas, including fusion-born alpha-particles in JET and TFTR [Dendy et al., Nucl. Fusion 35, 1733 (1995)]. ICE is a potential diagnostic for lost alpha-particles in ITER; furthermore, the MCI is representative of a class of collective instabilities, which may result in the partial channelling of the free energy of energetic ions into radiation, and away from collisional heating of the plasma. Deep understanding of the MCI is thus of substantial practical interest for fusion, and the hybrid approximation for the plasma, where ions are treated as particles and electrons as a neutralising massless fluid, offers an attractive way forward. The hybrid simulations presented here access MCI physics that arises on timescales longer than can be addressed by fully kinetic particle-in-cell simulations and by analytical linear theory, which the present simulations largely corroborate. Our results go further than previous studies by entering into the nonlinear stage of the MCI, which shows novel features. These include stronger drive at low cyclotron harmonics, the re-energisation of the alpha-particle population, self-modulation of the phase shift between the electrostatic and electromagnetic components, and coupling between low and high frequency modes of the excited electromagnetic field.

  15. Linear and nonlinear physics of the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability of fusion-born ions in relation to ion cyclotron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajal, L. Cook, J. W. S.; Dendy, R. O.; Chapman, S. C.

    2014-01-15

    The magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability (MCI) probably underlies observations of ion cyclotron emission (ICE) from energetic ion populations in tokamak plasmas, including fusion-born alpha-particles in JET and TFTR [Dendy et al., Nucl. Fusion 35, 1733 (1995)]. ICE is a potential diagnostic for lost alpha-particles in ITER; furthermore, the MCI is representative of a class of collective instabilities, which may result in the partial channelling of the free energy of energetic ions into radiation, and away from collisional heating of the plasma. Deep understanding of the MCI is thus of substantial practical interest for fusion, and the hybrid approximation for the plasma, where ions are treated as particles and electrons as a neutralising massless fluid, offers an attractive way forward. The hybrid simulations presented here access MCI physics that arises on timescales longer than can be addressed by fully kinetic particle-in-cell simulations and by analytical linear theory, which the present simulations largely corroborate. Our results go further than previous studies by entering into the nonlinear stage of the MCI, which shows novel features. These include stronger drive at low cyclotron harmonics, the re-energisation of the alpha-particle population, self-modulation of the phase shift between the electrostatic and electromagnetic components, and coupling between low and high frequency modes of the excited electromagnetic field.

  16. Electromagnetic ion beam instabilities - Growth at cyclotron harmonic wave numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Charles W.; Gary, S. Peter

    1987-01-01

    The linear theory of electromagnetic ion beam instabilities for arbitrary angles of propagation is studied, with an emphasis on the conditions necessary to generate unstable modes at low harmonics of the ion cyclotron resonance condition. The present results extend the analysis of Smith et al. (1985). That paper considered only the plasma parameters at a time during which harmonic wave modes were observed in the earth's foreshock. The parameters of that paper are used as the basis of parametric variations here to establish the range of beam properties which may give rise to observable harmonic spectra. It is shown that the growth rates of both left-hand and right-hand cyclotron harmonic instabilities are enhanced by an increase in the beam temperature anisotropy and/or the beam speed. Decreases in the beam density and/or the core-ion beta reduce the overall growth of the cyclotron harmonic instabilities but favor the growth of these modes over the growth of the nonresonant instability and thereby enhance the observability of the harmonics.

  17. Electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves in a nonuniform magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartier, S. L.; Dangelo, N.; Merlino, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves excited in a single-ended cesium Q machine with a nonuniform magnetic field are described. The electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves are generated in the usual manner by drawing an electron current to a small exciter disk immersed in the plasma column. The parallel and perpendicular (to B) wavelengths and phase velocities are determined by mapping out two-dimensional wave phase contours. The wave frequency f depends on the location of the exciter disk in the nonuniform magnetic field, and propagating waves are only observed in the region where f is approximately greater than fci, where fci is the local ion-cyclotron frequency. The parallel phase velocity is in the direction of the electron drift. From measurements of the plasma properties along the axis, it is inferred that the electron drift velocity is not uniform along the entire current channel. The evidence suggests that the waves begin being excited at that axial position where the critical drift velocity is first exceeded, consistent with a current-driven excitation mechanism.

  18. Coupling of electrostatic ion cyclotron and ion acoustic waves in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeraj, T.; Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S.

    2016-08-01

    The coupling of electrostatic ion cyclotron and ion acoustic waves is examined in three component magnetized plasma consisting of electrons, protons, and alpha particles. In the theoretical model relevant to solar wind plasma, electrons are assumed to be superthermal with kappa distribution and protons as well as alpha particles follow the fluid dynamical equations. A general linear dispersion relation is derived for such a plasma system which is analyzed both analytically and numerically. For parallel propagation, electrostatic ion cyclotron (proton and helium cyclotron) and ion acoustic (slow and fast) modes are decoupled. For oblique propagation, coupling between the cyclotron and acoustic modes occurs. Furthermore, when the angle of propagation is increased, the separation between acoustic and cyclotron modes increases which is an indication of weaker coupling at large angle of propagation. For perpendicular propagation, only cyclotron modes are observed. The effect of various parameters such as number density and temperature of alpha particles and superthermality on dispersion characteristics is examined in details. The coupling between various modes occurs for small values of wavenumber.

  19. Analytic model of electromagnetic ion-cyclotron anisotropy instability

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, P. H.; Seough, J. J.; Khim, K. K.; Kim, Hyunnam; Kwon, Hyuck-Jin; Park, Jongsun; Parkh, Sarah; Park, Kyung Sun

    2010-08-15

    In the present paper, the real frequency and growth rate associated with the electromagnetic ion cyclotron instability driven by temperature anisotropy are analytically modeled on the basis of conjecture and upon comparison with numerical roots of the dispersion relation. The ions are assumed to have an anisotropic distribution function with Maxwellian parallel distribution. Under such an assumption complex roots of the dispersion relation depend only on two dimensionless parameters, namely, the temperature anisotropy factor A=T{sub perpendiculari}/T{sub ||}i-1, where T{sub perpendiculari} and T{sub ||i} are the perpendicular and parallel ion temperatures, respectively, and the parallel ion beta, {beta}=(8{pi}nT{sub i}/B{sup 2}){sup 1/2}, where n and B are the plasma density and magnetic field intensity, respectively. The ion-cyclotron instability is thus heuristically modeled by complex frequency which is parametrically dependent on A and {beta}. The present result constitutes a useful shortcut research tool that may be employed in a wide variety of applications.

  20. Backward mode of the ion-cyclotron wave in a semi-bounded magnetized Lorentzian plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ki, Dae-Han; Jung, Young-Dae

    2012-08-15

    The backward modes of the surface ion-cyclotron wave are investigated in a semi-bounded magnetized Lorentzian plasma. The dispersion relation of the backward mode of the surface ion-cyclotron wave is obtained using the specular reflection boundary condition with the plasma dielectric function. The result shows that the nonthermal effect suppresses the wave frequency as well as the group velocity of the surface ion-cyclotron wave. It is also found that the nonthermal effect on the surface ion-cyclotron wave increases with an increase of the wave number. In addition, it is found that the propagation domain of the surface ion-cyclotron wave increases with an increase of the ratio of the electron plasma frequency to the electron gyrofrequency. It is also found that the nonthermal effect increases the propagation domain of the surface ion-cyclotron wave in a semi-bounded magnetized Lorentzian plasma.

  1. Sawtooth control in ITER using ion cyclotron resonance heating

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, I. T.; Graves, J P; Johnson, T.; Asunta, O.; Bonoli, P.; Choi, M.; Jaeger, E. F.; Jucker, M.; Sauter, O.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical modeling of the effects of ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) on the stability of the internal kink mode suggests that ICRH should be considered as an essential sawtooth control tool in ITER. Sawtooth control using ICRH is achieved by directly affecting the energy of the internal kink mode rather than through modification of the magnetic shear by driving localized currents. Consequently, ICRH can be seen as complementary to the planned electron cyclotron current drive actuator, and indeed will improve the efficacy of current drive schemes. Simulations of the ICRH distribution using independent RF codes give confidence in numerical predictions that the stabilizing influence of the fusion-born alphas can be negated by appropriately tailored minority (3)He ICRH heating in ITER. Finally, the effectiveness of all sawtooth actuators is shown to increase as the q = 1 surface moves towards the manetic axis, whilst the passive stabilization arising from the alpha and NBI particles decreases.

  2. Observation of a high-confinement regime in a tokamak plasma with ion cyclotron resonance heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmetz, K.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Wagner, F.; Wesner, F.; Bäumler, J.; Becker, G.; Bosch, H. S.; Brambilla, M.; Braun, F.; Brocken, H.; Eberhagen, A.; Fritsch, R.; Fussmann, G.; Gehre, O.; Gernhardt, J.; v. Gierke, G.; Glock, E.; Gruber, O.; Haas, G.; Hofmann, J.; Hofmeister, F.; Izvozchikov, A.; Janeschitz, G.; Karger, F.; Keilhacker, M.; Klüber, O.; Kornherr, M.; Lackner, K.; Lisitano, G.; van Mark, E.; Mast, F.; Mayer, H. M.; McCormick, K.; Meisel, D.; Mertens, V.; Müller, E. R.; Murmann, H.; Niedermeyer, H.; Poschenrieder, W.; Puri, S.; Rapp, H.; Röhr, H.; Ryter, F.; Schmitter, K.-H.; Schneider, F.; Setzensack, C.; Siller, G.; Smeulders, P.; Söldner, F.; Speth, E.; Steuer, K.-H.; Vollmer, O.; Wedler, H.; Zasche, D.

    1987-01-01

    The H mode in ion cyclotron-resonance-heated plasmas has been investigated with and without additional neutral beam injection. Ion cyclotron-resonance heating can cause the transition into a high-confinement regime (H mode) in combination with beam heating. The H mode, however, has also been realized-for the first time-with ion cyclotron-resonance heating alone in the D (H)-hydrogen minority scheme at an absorbed rf power of 1.1 MW.

  3. Frequency-swept detector for ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wronka, J.; Ridge, D. P.

    1982-04-01

    Design, construction, performance, and use of a frequency-swept bridge detector for ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry are described. Special features include characterization and simple automatic correction of phase shift to allow broadband detection. The result is a detection system that may be used either at constant field or constant frequency. Drift-mode operation is simplified in that it may be satisfactorily used without the various signal modulation schemes used in previous detectors. In the trapped mode the detector may be pulsed to control the timing of ion detection. This detector makes it possible to do frequency-swept double resonance experiments which provide spectra of all the product ions of a given reactant ion. Circuit schematics and typical frequency- and field-swept spectra are shown.

  4. Ion cyclotron resonance bridge detector for frequency sweep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitsakis, Michael N.; Wobschall, Darold C.

    1983-11-01

    An electronic ion cyclotron resonance detection system was designed and constructed. The ions are excited by sweeping the frequency of the electric field (3-300 kHz) using a sweep frequency generator with a nonlinear sweep voltage in order to maintain an approximately constant mass resolution. Ion detection is accomplished by a bridge with a phase-sensitive detector as a demodulator. The required reference signal for the phase-sensitive detector is generated by a circuit with a transfer function which approximates that of the ICR signal in order to obtain an accurate phase match between the signal source and the detector. The device is capable of detecting a minimum concentration of 50 ions/cm3 over a mass range of 15 to 1500 amu.

  5. Grating monochromator for electron cyclotron resonance ion source operation.

    PubMed

    Muto, Hideshi; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Yamaka, Shouichi; Watanabe, Shin-ichi; Oyaizu, Michihiro; Kubono, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Kase, Masayuki; Hattori, Toshiyuki; Shimoura, Susumu

    2013-07-01

    Recently, we started to observe optical line spectra from an ECR plasma using a grating monochromator with a photomultiplier. The light intensity of line spectrum from the ECR plasma had a strong correlation with ion beam intensity measured by a magnetic mass analyzer. This correlation is a significant information for beam tuning because it allows the extraction of the desired ion species from the ECR plasma. Separation of ion species of the same charge to mass ratio with an electromagnetic mass analyzer is known to be an exceptionally complex process, but this research gives new insights into its simplification. In this paper, the grating monochromator method for beam tuning of a Hyper-ECR ion source as an injector for RIKEN azimuthal varying field (AVF) cyclotron is described. PMID:23902055

  6. Application of compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Iwata, Y.; Ogawa, H.; Hojo, S.; Kubo, T.; Kato, Y.; Biri, S.; Fekete, E.; Yoshida, Y.; Drentje, A. G.

    2008-02-15

    The compact electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source with a permanent magnet configuration (Kei2 source) has been developed at National Institute of Radiological Sciences for a new carbon therapy facility. The Kei2 source was designed for production of C{sup 4+} ions; its performance such as beam intensity and stability has already reached the medical requirements. Therefore, the prototype development of the source for medical use is essentially finished. Recently, we have started a few studies on other applications of the source. One is the production of fullerenes in the ECR plasma and modified fullerenes with various atoms for new materials. A second application is the production of multiply charged ions (not only carbon) for ion implantation. In this paper, some basic experiments for these applications are reported.

  7. Glow plasma trigger for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Vodopianov, A. V.; Golubev, S. V.; Izotov, I. V.; Nikolaev, A. G.; Oks, E. M.; Savkin, K. P.; Yushkov, G. Yu.

    2010-02-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRISs) are particularly useful for nuclear, atomic, and high energy physics, as unique high current generators of multicharged ion beams. Plasmas of gas discharges in an open magnetic trap heated by pulsed (100 {mu}s and longer) high power (100 kW and higher) high-frequency (greater than 37.5 GHz) microwaves of gyrotrons is promising in the field of research in the development of electron cyclotron resonance sources for high charge state ion beams. Reaching high ion charge states requires a decrease in gas pressure in the magnetic trap, but this method leads to increases in time, in which the microwave discharge develops. The gas breakdown and microwave discharge duration becomes greater than or equal to the microwave pulse duration when the pressure is decreased. This makes reaching the critical plasma density initiate an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge during pulse of microwave gyrotron radiation with gas pressure lower than a certain threshold. In order to reduce losses of microwave power, it is necessary to shorten the time of development of the ECR discharge. For fast triggering of ECR discharge under low pressure in an ECRIS, we initially propose to fill the magnetic trap with the plasmas of auxiliary pulsed discharges in crossed ExB fields. The glow plasma trigger of ECR based on a Penning or magnetron discharge has made it possible not only to fill the trap with plasma with density of 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}, required for a rapid increase in plasma density and finally for ECR discharge ignition, but also to initially heat the plasma electrons to T{sub e}{approx_equal}20 eV.

  8. Glow plasma trigger for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    PubMed

    Vodopianov, A V; Golubev, S V; Izotov, I V; Nikolaev, A G; Oks, E M; Savkin, K P; Yushkov, G Yu

    2010-02-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRISs) are particularly useful for nuclear, atomic, and high energy physics, as unique high current generators of multicharged ion beams. Plasmas of gas discharges in an open magnetic trap heated by pulsed (100 micros and longer) high power (100 kW and higher) high-frequency (greater than 37.5 GHz) microwaves of gyrotrons is promising in the field of research in the development of electron cyclotron resonance sources for high charge state ion beams. Reaching high ion charge states requires a decrease in gas pressure in the magnetic trap, but this method leads to increases in time, in which the microwave discharge develops. The gas breakdown and microwave discharge duration becomes greater than or equal to the microwave pulse duration when the pressure is decreased. This makes reaching the critical plasma density initiate an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge during pulse of microwave gyrotron radiation with gas pressure lower than a certain threshold. In order to reduce losses of microwave power, it is necessary to shorten the time of development of the ECR discharge. For fast triggering of ECR discharge under low pressure in an ECRIS, we initially propose to fill the magnetic trap with the plasmas of auxiliary pulsed discharges in crossed ExB fields. The glow plasma trigger of ECR based on a Penning or magnetron discharge has made it possible not only to fill the trap with plasma with density of 10(12) cm(-3), required for a rapid increase in plasma density and finally for ECR discharge ignition, but also to initially heat the plasma electrons to T(e) approximately = 20 eV. PMID:20192326

  9. Effects of energetic heavy ions on electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave generation in the plasmapause region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Cravens, T. E.; Nagy, A. F.; Fontheim, E. G.; Ong, R. S. B.

    1984-01-01

    An expression for electromagnetic ion cyclotron convective growth rates is derived. The derivation of the dispersion relation and convective growth rates in the presence of a multicomponent energetic and cold plasma is presented. The effects that multiple heavy ions in the ring current and cold plasma produce in the growth and propagation characteristics of ion cyclotron waves are explored. Results of growth rate calculations using parameters consistent with conditions in the plasmapause region during the early recovery phase of geomagnetic storms are presented and compared with ground-based and satellite observations of waves in this region. The geophysical implications of the results are discussed.

  10. A new ion and electron detector for ion cyclotron resonance spectroscopy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntress, W. T., Jr.; Simms, W. T.

    1973-01-01

    A new detector using an extremelly driven tuned circuit has been developed for use in ion cyclotron resonance spectroscopy experiments. Based on the Q-meter circuit, this detector will operate at frequencies greater than 1 MHz at rf levels less than 1 mV. Operation in the frequency range 1-15 MHz allows the use of higher magnetic fields for more efficient storage of low mass ions in the trapping mode of operation. In the frequency range 2-6 MHz electrons can be detected in the ion cyclotron resonance cell by their resonant motion in the trapping plane.

  11. Ion beam driven resonant ion-cyclotron instability in a magnetized dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, Ved; Vijayshri; Sharma, Suresh C.; Gupta, Ruby

    2014-03-15

    Electrostatic ion cyclotron waves are excited by axial ion beam in a dusty plasma via Cerenkov and slow cyclotron interaction. The dispersion relation of the instability is derived in the presence of positively/negatively charged dust grains. The minimum beam velocity needed for the excitation is estimated for different values of relative density of negatively charged dust grains. It is shown that the minimum beam velocity needed for excitation increases as the charge density carried by dust increases. Temperature of electrons and ions, charge and mass of dust grains, external static magnetic field and finite boundary of dusty plasma significantly modify the dispersion properties of these waves and play a crucial role in the growth of resonant ion cyclotron instability. The ion cyclotron modes with phase velocity comparable to the beam velocity possess a large growth rate. The maximum value of growth rate increases with the beam density and scales as the one-third power of the beam density in Cerenkov interaction and is proportional to the square root of beam density in slow cyclotron interaction.

  12. Electrostatic ion cyclotron and ion plasma waves in a symmetric pair-ion plasma cylinder.

    PubMed

    Kono, M; Vranjes, J; Batool, N

    2014-03-14

    Complicated wave behavior observed in the cylindrical pair-ion (fullerene) experiments by Oohara and co-workers are now identified to be low harmonic ion cyclotron waves combined with ion plasma oscillations inherent to kinetic theory. The electrostatic dispersion equation derived is based on an approximation for the current from the exact solutions of the characteristic cylindrical geometry form of the Vlasov plasma equation in a uniform magnetized plasma cylinder surrounded by a larger metal boundary outside a vacuum gap, which thus differs from that in unbounded plasmas. Positive and negative ions, differing only in the sign of their charge, respond to a potential in the same time scale and cooperate to reflect the enhanced kinetic orbital behaviors to the macroscopic propagation characteristics. In addition, the experimental value of the Larmor radius (comparable to the discharge radius but small enough to make the analytic approximation useful) makes higher harmonic ion cyclotron effects both observable and calculable with the appropriate approximation for the kinetic theory. PMID:24679299

  13. Ion cyclotron range of frequency heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma via the second-harmonic tritium cyclotron resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.R.; Bush, C.E.; Darrow, D.; Hosea, J.C.; Jaeger, E.F.; Majeski, R.; Murakami, M.; Phillips, C.K.; Rogers, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Stevens, J.E.; Synakowski, E.; Taylor, G.

    1995-07-31

    Experiments have been performed on the TFTR to study rf wave heating of a D-T plasma by way of the second-harmonic tritium cyclotron resonance. The addition of tritium ions to a deuterium plasma allows for absorption of the rf waves at the tritium cyclotron harmonics and by electron damping of a mode converted ion Bernstein wave. Competing mechanisms include direct electron damping and damping at the fundamental cyclotron resonance of deuterium, {alpha} particles, and {sup 3}He ions. The contribution of each is estimated from a series of plasma discharges where various plasma parameters are varied. The majority of the rf power is found to damp on the tritium ions.

  14. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves in the plasma depletion layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denton, Richard E.; Hudson, Mary K.; Fuselier, Stephen A.; Anderson, Brian J.

    1993-01-01

    Results of a study of the theoretical properties of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves which occur in the plasma depletion layer are presented. The analysis assumes a homogeneous plasma with the characteristics which were measured by the AMPTE/CCE satellite at 1450-1501 UT on October 5, 1984. Waves were observed in the Pc 1 frequency range below the hydrogen gyrofrequency, and these waves are identified as EMIC waves. The higher-frequency instability is driven by the temperature anisotropy of the H(+) ions, while the lower-frequency instability is driven by the temperature anisotropy of the He(2+) ions. It is argued that the higher-frequency waves will have k roughly parallel to B(0) and will be left-hand polarized, while the lower frequency wave band will have k oblique to B(0) and will be linearly polarized, in agreement with observations.

  15. Pulsed magnetic field-electron cyclotron resonance ion source operation

    SciTech Connect

    Muehle, C.; Ratzinger, U.; Joest, G.; Leible, K.; Schennach, S.; Wolf, B.H.

    1996-03-01

    The pulsed magnetic field (PuMa)-electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source uses a pulsed coil to improve the peak current by opening the magnetic bottle along the beam axis. After demonstration of the principle of the pulsed magnetic extraction, the ion source was tested with different gases. We received promising results from helium to krypton. The influence of the current in the pulsed coil on the analyzed ion current was measured. With increased current levels within the pulsed coil not only the pulse height of the PuMa pulse, but the pulse length can also be controlled. By using the pulsed coil the maximum of the charge state distribution can be shifted to higher charge states. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Frequency-scanning marginal oscillator for ion cyclotron resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Paul R.; Bowers, Michael T.

    1982-07-01

    A number of ion cyclotron resonance applications have arisen in the past few years which require a frequency-scanned detection system. Since the traditional marginal oscillator detector has always been a fixed-frequency detector, alternative detection techniques such as bridge circuit detectors have become widely used. In this paper we present an alternative to the bridge detector, namely, a frequency-scanning marginal oscillator. Requirements and modifications necessary to convert a marginal oscillator to frequency scanning operation are discussed in detail and the necessary circuit diagrams presented. Finally, a theoretical comparison is made between bridge circuit and marginal oscillator sensitivities.

  17. Electron cyclotron resonance microwave ion sources for thin film processing

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, L.A.; Gorbatkin, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    Plasmas created by microwave absorption at the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) are increasingly used for a variety of plasma processes, including both etching and deposition. ECR sources efficiently couple energy to electrons and use magnetic confinement to maximize the probability of an electron creating an ion or free radical in pressure regimes where the mean free path for ionization is comparable to the ECR source dimensions. The general operating principles of ECR sources are discussed with special emphasis on their use for thin film etching. Data on source performance during Cl base etching of Si using an ECR system are presented. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Multi-Species Test of Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating at High Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persoon, A. M.; Peterson, W. K.; Andre, M.; Chang, T.; Gurnett, D. A.; Retterer, J. M.; Crew, G. B.

    1997-01-01

    Observations of ion distributions and plasma waves obtained by the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite in the high-altitude, nightside auroral zone are used to study ion energization for three ion species. A number of theoretical models have been proposed to account for the transverse heating of these ion populations. One of these, the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) mechanism, explains ion conic formation through ion cyclotron resonance with broadband electromagnetic wave turbulence in the vicinity of the characteristic ion cyclotron frequency. The cyclotron resonant heating of the ions by low- frequency electromagnetic waves is an important energy source for the transport of ions from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere. In this paper we test the applicability of the ICRH mechanism to three simultaneously heated and accelerated ion species by modelling the ion conic formation in terms of a resonant wave-particle interaction in which the ions extract energy from the portion of the broadband electromagnetic wave spectrum which includes the ion cyclotron frequency. Using a Monte Carlo technique we evaluate the ion heating produced by the electromagnetic turbulence at low frequencies and find that the wave amplitudes near the ion cyclotron frequencies are sufficient to explain the observed ion energies.

  19. Multi-Species Test of Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating at High Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persoon, A. M.; Peterson, W. K.; Andre, M.; Chang, T.; Gurnett, D. A.; Retterer, J. M.; Crew, G. B.

    1997-01-01

    Observations of ion distributions and plasma waves obtained by the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite in the high-altitude, nightside auroral zone are used to study ion energization for three ion species. A number of theoretical models have been proposed to account for the transverse heating of these ion populations. One of these, the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) mechanism, explains ion conic formation through ion cyclotron resonance with broadband electromagnetic wave turbulence in the vicinity of the characteristic ion cyclotron frequency. The cyclotron resonant heating of the ions by low-frequency electromagnetic waves is an important energy source for the transport of ions from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere. In this paper we test the applicability of the ICRH mechanism to three simultaneously heated and accelerated ion species by modelling the ion conic formation in terms of a resonant wave-particle interaction in which the ions extract energy from the portion of the broadband electromagnetic wave spectrum which includes the ion cyclotron frequency. Using a Monte Carlo technique we evaluate the ion heating produced by the electromagnetic turbulence at low frequencies and find that the wave amplitudes near the ion cyclotron frequencies are sufficient to explain the observed ion energies.

  20. The negative hydrogen Penning ion gauge ion source for KIRAMS-13 cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    An, D. H.; Jung, I. S.; Kang, J.; Chang, H. S.; Hong, B. H.; Hong, S.; Lee, M. Y.; Kim, Y.; Yang, T. K.; Chai, J. S.

    2008-02-15

    The cold-cathode-type Penning ion gauge (PIG) ion source for the internal ion source of KIRAMS-13 cyclotron has been used for generation of negative hydrogen ions. The dc H-beam current of 650 {mu}A from the PIG ion source with the Dee voltage of 40 kV and arc current of 1.0 A is extrapolated from the measured dc extraction beam currents at the low extraction dc voltages. The output optimization of PIG ion source in the cyclotron has been carried out by using various chimneys with different sizes of the expansion gap between the plasma boundary and the chimney wall. This paper presents the results of the dc H-extraction measurement and the expansion gap experiment.

  1. Collisional electrostatic ion cyclotron waves as a possible source of energetic heavy ions in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Providakes, Jason; Seyler, Charles E.

    1990-01-01

    A new mechanism is proposed for the source of energetic heavy ions (NO/+/, O2/+/, and O/+/) found in the magnetosphere. Simulations using a multispecies particle simulation code for resistive current-driven electrostatic ion cyclotron waves show transverse and parallel bulk heating of bottomside ionospheric heavy ion populations. The dominant mechanism for the transverse bulk heating is resonant ion heating by wave-particle ion trapping. Using a linear kinetic dispersion relation for a magnetized, collisional, homogenous, and multiion plasma, it is found that collisional electrostatic ion cyclotron waves near the NO(+), O2(+), and O(+) gyrofrequencies are unstable to field-aligned currents of 50 microA/sq m for a typical bottomside ionosphere.

  2. An ion cyclotron resonance study of reactions of some atomic and simple polyatomic ions with water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpas, Z.; Anicich, V. G.; Huntress, W. T., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Reactions of various positive ions with water vapor were studied by ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometric techniques. Rate constants and product distributions were determined for reactions of the ions: Ar(+), Co(+), N2(+), and CO2(+), CH2(+), and CH4(+), CH2Cl(+), HCO(+), H2CO(+), H2COH(+), H2S(+) and HS(+). The results obtained in this work are compared with earlier reported data where available.

  3. Wall-loss distribution of charge breeding ions in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, S. C.; Oyaizu, M.; Imai, N.; Hirayama, Y.; Ishiyama, H.; Miyatake, H.; Niki, K.; Okada, M.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Otokawa, Y.; Osa, A.; Ichikawa, S.

    2012-02-15

    We investigated the ion-loss distribution on the sidewall of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma chamber using the 18-GHz ECR charge breeder at the Tokai Radioactive Ion Accelerator Complex (TRIAC). Similarities and differences between the ion-loss distributions (longitudinal and azimuthal) of different ion species (i.e., radioactive {sup 111}In{sup 1+} and {sup 140}Xe{sup 1+} ions that are typical volatile and nonvolatile elements) was qualitatively discussed to understand the element dependence of the charge breeding efficiency. Especially, the similarities represent universal ion loss characteristics in an ECR charge breeder, which are different from the loss patterns of electrons on the ECRIS wall.

  4. Sawtooth-Control Mechanism using Toroidally Propagating Ion-Cyclotron-Resonance Waves in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, J. P.; Coda, S.; Chapman, I.

    2009-02-13

    The sawtooth control mechanism in plasmas employing off-axis toroidally propagating ion cyclotron resonance waves in tokamaks is reinvestigated. The radial drift excursion of energetic passing ions distributed asymmetrically in the velocity parallel to the magnetic field determines stability when the rational q=1 surface resides within a narrow region centered about the shifted fundamental cyclotron resonance.

  5. Ion-cyclotron turbulence and diagonal double layers in a magnetospheric plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liperovskiy, V. A.; Pudovkin, M. I.; Skuridin, G. A.; Shalimov, S. L.

    1981-01-01

    A survey of current concepts regarding electrostatic ion-cyclotron turbulence (theory and experiment), and regarding inclined double potential layers in the magnetospheric plasma is presented. Anomalous resistance governed by electrostatic ion-cyclotron turbulence, and one-dimensional and two-dimensional models of double electrostatic layers in the magnetospheric plasma are examined.

  6. Excitation of low frequency waves by streaming ions via anomalous cyclotron resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. S.; Dillenburg, D.; Gaffey, J. D., Jr.; Ziebell, L. F.; Goedert, J.; Freund, H. P.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of a small population of streaming ions on low-frequency waves with frequencies below the ion cyclotron frequency is analyzed for three modes of interest: Alfven waves, magnetosonic waves, and ion-cyclotron waves. The instability mechanism is the anomalous cyclotron resonance of the waves with the streaming ions. Conditions for excitation of the three types of waves are derived and expressions for the growth rates are obtained. Excitation of Alfven waves is possible even if the ratio of the densities of the streaming ions to the thermal ions is very small. For magnetosonic waves, excitation can easily occur if waves are propagating parallel or nearly parallel to the ambient magnetic field. As for ion-cyclotron waves, it is found that for the ion-whistler branch the excitation is suppressed over a broader range of wave frequencies than for the fast magnetosonic branch.

  7. Dynamic regimes of cyclotron instability in the afterglow mode of minimum-B electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfeld, D.; Izotov, I.; Skalyga, V.; Tarvainen, O.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Laulainen, J.

    2016-04-01

    The paper is concerned with the dynamic regimes of cyclotron instabilities in non-equilibrium plasma of a minimum-B electron cyclotron resonance ion source operated in pulsed mode. The instability appears in decaying ion source plasma shortly (1-10 ms) after switching off the microwave radiation of the klystron, and manifests itself in the form of powerful pulses of electromagnetic emission associated with precipitation of high-energy electrons along the magnetic field lines. Recently it was shown that this plasma instability causes perturbations of the extracted ion current, which limits the performance of the ion source and generates strong bursts of bremsstrahlung emission. In this article we present time-resolved diagnostics of electromagnetic emission bursts related to cyclotron instability in the decaying plasma. The temporal resolution is sufficient to study the fine structure of the dynamic spectra of the electromagnetic emission at different operating regimes of the ion source. It was found that at different values of magnetic field and heating power the dynamic spectra demonstrate common features: Decreasing frequency from burst to burst and an always falling tone during a single burst of instability. The analysis has shown that the instability is driven by the resonant interaction of hot electrons, distributed between the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) zone and the trap center, with slow extraordinary wave propagation quasi-parallel with respect to the external magnetic field.

  8. Research and development of ion surfing RF carpets for the cyclotron gas stopper at the NSCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehring, A. E.; Brodeur, M.; Bollen, G.; Morrissey, D. J.; Schwarz, S.

    2016-06-01

    A model device to transport thermal ions in the cyclotron gas stopper, a next-generation beam thermalization device under construction at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, is presented. Radioactive ions produced by projectile fragmentation will come to rest at distances as large as 45 cm from the extraction orifice of the cyclotron gas stopper. The thermalized ions will be transported to the exit by RF carpets employing the recently developed "ion surfing" method. A quarter-circle prototype RF carpet was tested with potassium ions, and ion transport velocities as high as 60 m/s were observed over distances greater than 10 cm at a helium buffer gas pressure of 80 mbar. The transport of rubidium ions from an RF carpet to an electrode below was also demonstrated. The results of this study formed the basis of the design of the RF carpets for use in the cyclotron gas stopper.

  9. Parallel Spectral Acquisition with an Ion Cyclotron Resonance Cell Array.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Gun; Anderson, Gordon A; Navare, Arti T; Bruce, James E

    2016-01-19

    Mass measurement accuracy is a critical analytical figure-of-merit in most areas of mass spectrometry application. However, the time required for acquisition of high-resolution, high mass accuracy data limits many applications and is an aspect under continual pressure for development. Current efforts target implementation of higher electrostatic and magnetic fields because ion oscillatory frequencies increase linearly with field strength. As such, the time required for spectral acquisition of a given resolving power and mass accuracy decreases linearly with increasing fields. Mass spectrometer developments to include multiple high-resolution detectors that can be operated in parallel could further decrease the acquisition time by a factor of n, the number of detectors. Efforts described here resulted in development of an instrument with a set of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) cells as detectors that constitute the first MS array capable of parallel high-resolution spectral acquisition. ICR cell array systems consisting of three or five cells were constructed with printed circuit boards and installed within a single superconducting magnet and vacuum system. Independent ion populations were injected and trapped within each cell in the array. Upon filling the array, all ions in all cells were simultaneously excited and ICR signals from each cell were independently amplified and recorded in parallel. Presented here are the initial results of successful parallel spectral acquisition, parallel mass spectrometry (MS) and MS/MS measurements, and parallel high-resolution acquisition with the MS array system. PMID:26669509

  10. A new mechanism for excitation of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves and associated perpendicular ion heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguli, G.; Lee, Y. C.; Palmadesso, P.

    1985-01-01

    A new mechanism for exciting the kinetic ion cyclotron waves in the presence of a nonuniform electric field perpendicular to the external magnetic field is given. Application of this instability to various space plasmas is discussed. The new instability mechanism may provide a more efficient agent for perpendicular ion heating than other EIC generation processes, since the linear growth rate is insensitive to the temperature ratio.

  11. Resonance of relativistic electrons with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, R. E.; Jordanova, V. K.; Bortnik, J.

    2015-06-29

    Relativistic electrons have been thought to more easily resonate with electromagnetic ion cyclotron EMIC waves if the total density is large. We show that, for a particular EMIC mode, this dependence is weak due to the dependence of the wave frequency and wave vector on the density. A significant increase in relativistic electron minimum resonant energy might occur for the H band EMIC mode only for small density, but no changes in parameters significantly decrease the minimum resonant energy from a nominal value. The minimum resonant energy depends most strongly on the thermal velocity associated with the field line motion of the hot ring current protons that drive the instability. High density due to a plasmasphere or plasmaspheric plume could possibly lead to lower minimum resonance energy by causing the He band EMIC mode to be dominant. We demonstrate these points using parameters from a ring current simulation.

  12. Transport induced by ion cyclotron range of frequencies waves

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Debing Xu, Yingfeng; Wang, Shaojie

    2014-11-15

    The Vlasov equation, which includes the effect of the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) waves, can be written as the Fokker-Planck equation which describes the quasilinear transport in phase space by using the Lie-transform method. The radial transport fluxes of particle, energy and parallel momentum driven by ICRF waves in the slab geometry have been derived. The results show that the ICRF-induced radial redistributions of particle, energy and parallel momentum are driven by the inhomogeneity in energy of the equilibrium distribution function, and related to the correlation between the excursion in the real space and the excursion in energy. For the case with strong asymmetry of k{sub y} spectrum, the ICRF-induced radial transport driven by the energy inhomogeneity dominates the ICRF-induced radial transport driven by the spatial inhomogeneity.

  13. The technology of the ion cyclotron range of frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.J.; Barber, G.C.

    1988-01-01

    Plasma heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is the least expensive means of accomplishing auxiliary heating in fusion experiments. RF systems comprise two major elements: the transmitter and the antenna. The state of the art for the transmitter is already at the megawatt level. The technology of the antenna is strongly coupled to the plasma character. Typically, these antennas are designed to operate at a high power density (1.2 kW/cm/sup 2/) with an efficiency of 96%. ICRF technology and options have improved over the past few years, owing to development and experiments; however, the optimal combination of options can be defined only when results from confinement experiments and test facilities are in hand. 19 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves observed in the plasma depletion layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Murr, D.

    1991-01-01

    Observations from AMPTE/CCE in the earth's magnetosheath on October 5, 1984 are presented to illustrate 0.1 - 4.0 Hz magnetic field pulsations in the subsolar plasma depletion layer (PDL) for northward sheath field during a magnetospheric compression. The PDL is unambiguously identified by comparing CCE data with data from IRM in the upstream solar wind. Pulsations in the PDL are dominated by transverse waves with F/F(H+) 1.0 or less and a slot in spectral power at F/F(H+) = 0.5. The upper branch is left hand polarized while the lower branch is linearly polarized. In the sheath the proton temperature anisotropy is about 0.6 but it is about 1.7 in the PDL during wave occurrence. The properties and correlation of waves with increased anisotropy indicate that they are electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves.

  15. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves stimulated by modest magnetospheric compressions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. J.; Hamilton, D. C.

    1993-01-01

    AMPTE/CCE magnetic field and particle data are used to test the suggestion that increased hot proton temperature anisotropy resulting from convection during magnetospheric compression is responsible for the enhancement in Pc 1 emission via generation of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in the dayside outer equatorial magnetosphere. The relative increase in magnetic field is used to gauge the strength of the compression, and an image dipole model is used to estimate the motion of the plasma during compression. Proton data are used to analyze the evolution of the proton distribution and the corresponding changes in EMIC wave activity expected during the compression. It is suggested that enhancements in dynamic pressure pump the energetic proton distributions in the outer magnetosphere, driving EMIC waves. Waves are expected to be generated most readily close to the magnetopause, and transient pressure pulses may be associated with bursts of EMIC waves, which would be observed on the ground in association with ionospheric transient signatures.

  16. Resonance of relativistic electrons with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Denton, R. E.; Jordanova, V. K.; Bortnik, J.

    2015-06-29

    Relativistic electrons have been thought to more easily resonate with electromagnetic ion cyclotron EMIC waves if the total density is large. We show that, for a particular EMIC mode, this dependence is weak due to the dependence of the wave frequency and wave vector on the density. A significant increase in relativistic electron minimum resonant energy might occur for the H band EMIC mode only for small density, but no changes in parameters significantly decrease the minimum resonant energy from a nominal value. The minimum resonant energy depends most strongly on the thermal velocity associated with the field line motionmore » of the hot ring current protons that drive the instability. High density due to a plasmasphere or plasmaspheric plume could possibly lead to lower minimum resonance energy by causing the He band EMIC mode to be dominant. We demonstrate these points using parameters from a ring current simulation.« less

  17. Status of a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source for National Institute of Radiological Sciences-930 cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hojo, S.; Katagiri, K.; Nakao, M.; Sugiura, A.; Muramatsu, M.; Noda, A.; Okada, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Komiyama, A.; Honma, T.; Noda, K.

    2014-02-01

    The Kei-source is a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source using only permanent magnets and a frequency of 10 GHz. It was developed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) for producing C4+ ions oriented for high-energy carbon therapy. It has also been used as an ion source for the NIRS-930 cyclotron. Its microwave band region for the traveling-wave-tube amplifier and maximum output power are 8-10 GHz and 350 W, respectively. Since 2006, it has provided various ion beams such as proton, deuteron, carbon, oxygen, and neon with sufficient intensity (200 μA for proton and deuteron, 50 μA for C4+, for example) and good stability for radioisotope production, tests of radiation damage, and basic research experiments. Its horizontal and vertical emittances were measured using a screen monitor and waist-scan. The present paper reports the current status of the Kei-source.

  18. Status of a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source for National Institute of Radiological Sciences-930 cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Hojo, S; Katagiri, K; Nakao, M; Sugiura, A; Muramatsu, M; Noda, A; Okada, T; Takahashi, Y; Komiyama, A; Honma, T; Noda, K

    2014-02-01

    The Kei-source is a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source using only permanent magnets and a frequency of 10 GHz. It was developed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) for producing C(4+) ions oriented for high-energy carbon therapy. It has also been used as an ion source for the NIRS-930 cyclotron. Its microwave band region for the traveling-wave-tube amplifier and maximum output power are 8-10 GHz and 350 W, respectively. Since 2006, it has provided various ion beams such as proton, deuteron, carbon, oxygen, and neon with sufficient intensity (200 μA for proton and deuteron, 50 μA for C(4+), for example) and good stability for radioisotope production, tests of radiation damage, and basic research experiments. Its horizontal and vertical emittances were measured using a screen monitor and waist-scan. The present paper reports the current status of the Kei-source. PMID:24593538

  19. Production of a highly charged uranium ion beam with RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Higurashi, Y.; Ohnishi, J.; Nakagawa, T.; Haba, H.; Fujimaki, M.; Komiyama, M.; Kamigaito, O.; Tamura, M.; Aihara, T.; Uchiyama, A.

    2012-02-15

    A highly charged uranium (U) ion beam is produced from the RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source using 18 and 28 GHz microwaves. The sputtering method is used to produce this U ion beam. The beam intensity is strongly dependent on the rod position and sputtering voltage. We observe that the emittance of U{sup 35+} for 28 GHz microwaves is almost the same as that for 18 GHz microwaves. It seems that the beam intensity of U ions produced using 28 GHz microwaves is higher than that produced using 18 GHz microwaves at the same Radio Frequency (RF) power.

  20. Development of an 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at RCNP.

    PubMed

    Yorita, Tetsuhiko; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Kibayashi, Mitsuru; Morinobu, Shunpei; Okamura, Hiroyuki; Tamii, Atsushi

    2008-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source has recently been developed and installed in order to extend the variety and the intensity of ions at the RCNP coupled cyclotron facility. Production of several ions such as O, N, Ar, Kr, etc., is now under development and some of them have already been used for user experiments. For example, highly charged heavy ion beams like (86)Kr(21+,23+) and intense (16)O(5+,6+) and (15)N(6+) ion beams have been provided for experiments. The metal ion from volatile compounds method for boron ions has been developed as well. PMID:18315101

  1. Incorporation of a Flared Inlet Capillary Tube on a Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer.

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Si; Zhang, Kai; Kaiser, Nathan K.; Bruce, James E.; Prior, David C.; Anderson, Gordon A.

    2006-04-17

    Atmospheric pressure ion sources such as electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (AP-MALDI) are widely used with mass spectrometry for proteomics studies. Other newly developed atmospheric ion sources include desorption electrospray ionization (DESI). For these ionization methods, analyte ions created at atmospheric pressure are transferred to the high vacuum region for mass analysis after several stages of differential pumping. It has been reported that overall charge transmission between the ion source and the first vacuum stage is primarily dependent upon the proximity of the emitter and gas conductance of the interface inlet. We therefore developed an atmospheric pressure interface using flared inlet tubes. This report highlights our results obtained by coupling the customized flared inlet tubes with a Fourier transfer ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICRMS). We have also investigated the new interface with different types of atmospheric pressure ionization methods. For most of the ionization methods we investigated, such as ESI and DESI, increased ion current transmitted from the atmospheric pressure ion source to the first stage vacuum system was observed with the use of our enhanced ion inlet designs. The ion intensity that was detected with the flared inlet tube on a FT-ICRMS was also observed to increase {approx} 2-5 fold using ESI or DESI with the flared tube inlet. Moreover, increased spray tip positional tolerance was observed with implementation of the flared inlet tube. We also include our preliminary results obtained by coupling APMALDI with flared inlet tube in this paper. For AP-MALDI, the measured ion current transferred through the flared inlet tube was about 3 times larger than the ion current through the control non-flared inlet tube.

  2. Means for obtaining a metal ion beam from a heavy-ion cyclotron source

    DOEpatents

    Hudson, E.D.; Mallory, M.L.

    1975-08-01

    A description is given of a modification to a cyclotron ion source used in producing a high intensity metal ion beam. A small amount of an inert support gas maintains the usual plasma arc, except that it is necessary for the support gas to have a heavy mass, e.g., xenon or krypton as opposed to neon. A plate, fabricated from the metal (or anything that can be sputtered) to be ionized, is mounted on the back wall of the ion source arc chamber and is bombarded by returning energetic low-charged gas ions that fail to cross the initial accelerating gap between the ion source and the accelerating electrode. Some of the atoms that are dislodged from the plate by the returning gas ions become ionized and are extracted as a useful beam of heavy ions. (auth)

  3. HIGH FREQUENCY POWER TRANSMISSION LINE FOR CYCLOTRONS AND THE LIKE

    DOEpatents

    Armstrong, W.J.

    1954-04-20

    High-frequency power transmission systems, particularly a stacked capacitance alternating power current transmission line wherein maximum utilization of the effective conductios skin of the line conductors is achieved while enabling a low impedance to be obtained are reported. The transmission line consists of a number of flat metal strips with interleaved dielectric strips. The metal dielectric strips are coiled spirally with the axis of the spiral extending along the length of the strips, and the alternating metal strips at the output end have outwardly extending aligned lugs which are directly strapped together and connected to the respective terminals on the load. At the input end of the transmission line, similarly, the alternate metal strips are directly strapped together and connected to an altereating current source. With the arrangement described each metal strip conducts on both sides, so that the metal strips are designed to have a thickness corresponding to twice the depth of the "skin effect" conducting lamina of each conductor at the source frequency.

  4. Emission of ion and electron cyclotron harmonic radiation from mode conversion layers

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, D.G.; Cho, S. )

    1989-07-01

    The asymmetry of cyclotron radiation from a mode conversion layer is presented for harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency and the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency for weakly relativistic electrons. The same form of Kirchhoff's law is found for all cases, relating the emission along each branch to the absorption of an incident wave along the corresponding branch. Results show that the fast wave radiation is more strongly asymmetric at the third harmonic than at the second harmonic of the ion cyclotron frequency, while the slow wave radiation ratio is about same. At the second cyclotron harmonic of weakly relativistic electrons, the asymmetry of radiation is found to be small at high temperature. The effect of equilibrium Bernstein wave radiation is also discussed.

  5. Emission of ion and electron cyclotron harmonic radiation from mode conversion layers

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, S.; Swanson, D.G. )

    1990-02-01

    The asymmetry of cyclotron radiation from a mode conversion layer is presented for harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency and the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency for weakly relativistic electrons. The same form of Kirchhoff's law is found for all cases, relating the emission along each branch to the absorption of an incident wave along the corresponding branch. Results show that the fast wave radiation is more strongly asymmetric at the third harmonic than at the second harmonic of the ion cyclotron frequency, while the slow wave radiation ratio is about same. At the second cyclotron harmonic of weakly relativistic electrons, the asymmetry of radiation is found to be small at high temperature. The effect of equilibrium Bernstein wave radiation is also discussed.

  6. ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) ion sources and applications with heavy-ion linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    The electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source has been developed in the last few years into a reliable source of high charge-state heavy ions. The availability of heavy ions with relatively large charge-to-mass ratios (0.1--0.5) has made it possible to contemplate essentially new classes of heavy-ion linear accelerators. In this talk, I shall review the state-of-the-art in ECR source performance and describe some of the implications this performance level has for heavy-ion linear accelerator design. The present linear accelerator projects using ECR ion sources will be noted and the performance requirements of the ECR source for these projects will be reviewed. 30 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Plasma spectroscopy of metal ions for hyper-electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Muto, Hideshi; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Yamaka, Shoichi; Watanabe, Shin-ichi; Oyaizu, Michihiro; Kubono, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Kase, Masayuki; Hattori, Toshiyuki; Shimoura, Susumu

    2014-02-01

    In this research, the optical line spectra of metal ions from ECR plasma were observed using a grating monochromator with a photomultiplier. The light intensity of line spectrum from the ECR plasma had a strong correlation with ion beam intensity measured by a magnetic mass analyzer. This correlation is a significant information for the beam tuning process, because it allows to conduct the extraction of the desired metal ion species from the ECR plasma. Separation of ion species of the same charge to mass ratio with an electromagnetic mass analyzer is known to be an exceptionally complex process, but this research provides a new approach for its simplification. In this paper the grating monochromator method for metal ion beam tuning such as (40)Ca(12+), (56)Fe(15+), and (85)Rb(20+) of hyper-ECR ion source as an injector for RIKEN Azimuthal Varying Field cyclotron is described. PMID:24593484

  8. Ring Current-Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves, generated by ion temperature anisotropy in Earth s ring current (RC), is the best known example of wave- particle interaction in the magnetosphere. Also, there is much controversy over the importance of EMIC waves on RC depletion. Under certain conditions, relativistic electrons, with energies 21 MeV, can be removed from the outer radiation belt (RB) by EMIC wave scattering during a magnetic storm. That is why the calculation of EMIC waves must be a very critical part of the space weather studies. The new RC model that we have developed and present for the first time has several new features that we have combine together in a one single model: (a) several lower frequency cold plasma wave modes are taken into account; (b) wave tracing of these wave has been incorporated in the energy EMIC wave equation; (c) no assumptions regarding wave shape spectra have been made; (d) no assumptions regarding the shape of particle distribution have been made to calculate the growth rate; (e) pitch-angle, energy, and mix diffusions are taken into account together for the first time; (f) the exact loss-cone RC analytical solution has been found and coupled with bounce-averaged numerical solution of kinetic equation; (g) the EMIC waves saturation due to their modulation instability and LHW generation are included as an additional factor that contributes to this process; and (h) the hot ions were included in the real part of dielectric permittivity tensor. We compare our theoretical results with the different EMIC waves models as well as RC experimental data.

  9. Experiments on ion cyclotron damping at the deuterium fourth harmonic in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R.I.; Petty, C.C.; Baity, F.W.; Bernabei, S.; Greenough, N.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Mau, T.K.; Porkolab, M.

    1999-05-01

    Absorption of fast Alfven waves by the energetic ions of an injected beam is evaluated in the DIII-D tokamak. Ion cyclotron resonance absorption at the fourth harmonic of the deuteron cyclotron frequency is observed with deuterium neutral beam injection (f = 60 MHz, B{sub T} = 1.9 T). Enhanced D-D neutron rates are evidence of absorption at the Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance. Characteristics of global energy confinement provide further proof of substantial beam acceleration by the rf. In many cases, the accelerated deuterons cause temporary stabilization of the sawtooth (monster sawteeth), at relatively low rf power levels of {approximately}1 MW.

  10. Comments on finite Larmor radius models for ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.K.; Wilson, J.R.; Hosea, J.C.; Majeski, R.; Smithe, D.N.

    1994-06-01

    The accuracy of standard finite Larmor radius (FLR) models for wave propagation in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is compared against full hot plasma models. For multiple ion species plasmas, the FLR model is shown to predict the presence of a spurious second harmonic ion-ion type resonance between the second harmonic cyclotron layers of two ion species. It is shown explicitly here that the spurious resonance is an artifact of the FLR models and that no absorption occurs in the plasma as a result of this ``resonance.``

  11. Comments on finite Larmor radius models for ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.K.; Wilson, J.R.; Hosea, J.C.; Majeski, R. ); Smithe, D.N. )

    1994-12-01

    The accuracy of standard finite Larmor radius (FLR) models for wave propagation in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is compared against full hot plasma models. For multiple ion species plasmas, the FLR model is shown to predict the presence of a spurious second harmonic ion--ion type resonance between the second harmonic cyclotron layers of two ion species. It is shown explicitly here that the spurious resonance is an artifact of the FLR models and that no absorption occurs in the plasma as a result of this resonance.''

  12. ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) source for the HHIRF (Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility) tandem accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.K.; Alton, G.D.; Dowling, D.T.; Haynes, D.L.; Jones, C.M.; Juras, R.C.; Lane, S.N.; Meigs, M.J.; Mills, G.D.; Mosko, S.W.; Tatum, B.A.

    1990-01-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance, ECR, ion source technology has developed rapidly since the original pioneering work of R. Geller and his group at Grenoble in the early 1970s. These ion sources are capable of producing intense beams of highly charged positive ions and are used extensively for cyclotron injection, linac injection, and atomic physics research. In this paper, the advantages of using an ECR heavy-ion source in the terminal of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) 25-MV tandem accelerator is discussed. A possible ECR system for installation in the HHIRF tandem terminal is described.

  13. Characterization of the fast ions distribution from ion cyclotron emission measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Inca, R.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-02-01

    The ion cyclotron emission (ICE) is triggered by the free energy from an anisotropic distribution of fast ions in cyclotron resonance with plasma waves. Several theories have been developed in the hope of using the spectrum featured by this emission to extract information on the fast ion population [3], but the strong coupling between the fast ions orbits, their energy profile and the plasma waves properties makes it difficult to disentangle the role of each actor in the emission. We present here the three main results which, once combined, have improved our understanding of ICE on ASDEX Upgrade: (1) the measurement of all the main types of ICE which enables a comparison of their properties and of their interactions, (2) the use of a fast acquisition system with an increased accuracy in the time and frequency processing of the signal where the fine structure of the emission is resolved and (3) the use of the Hamiltonian theoretical framework developed for ICRF heating. It unifies the analysis of large extension orbits and of their interactions with the plasma waves and reveals the respective roles of the fast ions (through their velocities) and of the waves (through their frequencies and wave numbers) in the resonance condition. If these results are confirmed on other machines, they could lead to the development of a non intrusive diagnostic for fast ions.

  14. Wall-loss distribution of charge breeding ions in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, S. C.; Oyaizu, M.; Imai, N.; Hirayama, Y.; Ishiyama, H.; Miyatake, H.; Niki, K.; Okada, M.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Otokawa, Y.; Osa, A.; Ichikawa, S.

    2011-03-15

    The ion loss distribution in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) was investigated to understand the element dependence of the charge breeding efficiency in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) charge breeder. The radioactive {sup 111}In{sup 1+} and {sup 140}Xe{sup 1+} ions (typical nonvolatile and volatile elements, respectively) were injected into the ECR charge breeder at the Tokai Radioactive Ion Accelerator Complex to breed their charge states. Their respective residual activities on the sidewall of the cylindrical plasma chamber of the source were measured after charge breeding as functions of the azimuthal angle and longitudinal position and two-dimensional distributions of ions lost during charge breeding in the ECRIS were obtained. These distributions had different azimuthal symmetries. The origins of these different azimuthal symmetries are qualitatively discussed by analyzing the differences and similarities in the observed wall-loss patterns. The implications for improving the charge breeding efficiencies of nonvolatile elements in ECR charge breeders are described. The similarities represent universal ion loss characteristics in an ECR charge breeder, which are different from the loss patterns of electrons on the ECRIS wall.

  15. Predictive ion source control using artificial neural network for RFT-30 cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Young Bae; Hur, Min Goo; Lee, Eun Je; Park, Jeong Hoon; Park, Yong Dae; Yang, Seung Dae

    2016-01-01

    An RFT-30 cyclotron is a 30 MeV proton accelerator for radioisotope production and fundamental research. The ion source of the RFT-30 cyclotron creates plasma from hydrogen gas and transports an ion beam into the center region of the cyclotron. Ion source control is used to search source parameters for best quality of the ion beam. Ion source control in a real system is a difficult and time consuming task, and the operator should search the source parameters by manipulating the cyclotron directly. In this paper, we propose an artificial neural network based predictive control approach for the RFT-30 ion source. The proposed approach constructs the ion source model by using an artificial neural network and finds the optimized parameters with the simulated annealing algorithm. To analyze the performance of the proposed approach, we evaluated the simulations with the experimental data of the ion source. The performance results show that the proposed approach can provide an efficient way to analyze and control the ion source of the RFT-30 cyclotron.

  16. Modeling electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves in the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamayunov, Konstantin; Engebretson, Mark; Zhang, Ming; Rassoul, Hamid

    The evolution of He+-mode electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves is studied inside the geostationary orbit using our global model of ring current (RC) ions, electric field, plasmasphere, and EMIC waves. In contrast to the approach previously used by Gamayunov et al. [2009], however, we do not use the bounce-averaged wave kinetic equation but instead use a complete, non bounce-averaged, equation to model the evolution of EMIC wave power spectral density, including off-equatorial wave dynamics. The major results of our study can be summarized as follows. (1) The thermal background level for EMIC waves is too low to allow waves to grow up to the observable level during one pass between the “bi-ion latitudes” (the latitudes where the given wave frequency is equal to the O+-He+ bi-ion frequency) in conjugate hemispheres. As a consequence, quasi-field-aligned EMIC waves are not typically produced in the model if the thermal background level is used, but routinely observed in the Earth’s magnetosphere. To overcome this model-observation discrepancy we suggest a nonlinear energy cascade from the lower frequency range of ultra low frequency waves into the frequency range of EMIC wave generation as a possible mechanism supplying the needed level of seed fluctuations that guarantees growth of EMIC waves during one pass through the near equatorial region. The EMIC wave development from a suprathermal background level shows that EMIC waves are quasi-field-aligned near the equator, while they are oblique at high latitudes, and the Poynting flux is predominantly directed away from the near equatorial source region in agreement with observations. (2) An abundance of O+ strongly controls the energy of oblique He+-mode EMIC waves that propagate to the equator after their reflection at “bi-ion latitudes”, and so it controls a fraction of wave energy in the oblique normals. (3) The RC O+ not only causes damping of the He+-mode EMIC waves but also causes wave generation

  17. Model of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves in the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamayunov, K. V.; Engebretson, M. J.; Zhang, M.; Rassoul, H. K.

    2014-09-01

    The evolution of He+-mode electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves is studied inside the geostationary orbit using our global model of ring current (RC) ions, electric field, plasmasphere, and EMIC waves. In contrast to the approach previously used by Gamayunov et al. (2009), however, we do not use the bounce-averaged wave kinetic equation but instead use a complete, nonbounce-averaged, equation to model the evolution of EMIC wave power spectral density, including off-equatorial wave dynamics. The major results of our study can be summarized as follows. (1) The thermal background level for EMIC waves is too low to allow waves to grow up to the observable level during one pass between the "bi-ion latitudes" (the latitudes where the given wave frequency is equal to the O+-He+ bi-ion frequency) in conjugate hemispheres. As a consequence, quasi-field-aligned EMIC waves are not typically produced in the model if the thermal background level is used, but routinely observed in the Earth's magnetosphere. To overcome this model-observation discrepancy we suggest a nonlinear energy cascade from the lower frequency range of ultralow frequency waves into the frequency range of EMIC wave generation as a possible mechanism supplying the needed level of seed fluctuations that guarantees growth of EMIC waves during one pass through the near equatorial region. The EMIC wave development from a suprathermal background level shows that EMIC waves are quasi field aligned near the equator, while they are oblique at high latitudes, and the Poynting flux is predominantly directed away from the near equatorial source region in agreement with observations. (2) An abundance of O+ strongly controls the energy of oblique He+-mode EMIC waves that propagate to the equator after their reflection at bi-ion latitudes, and so it controls a fraction of wave energy in the oblique normals. (3) The RC O+ not only causes damping of the He+-mode EMIC waves but also causes wave generation in the region

  18. Model of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves in the Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamayunov, K. V.; Engebretson, M. J.; Zhang, M.; Rassoul, H.

    2014-12-01

    The He-band electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are studied using our global model of ring current (RC) ions, electric field, plasmasphere, and EMIC waves. In contrast to the approach by Gamayunov et al. [2009], however, we do not use the bounce-averaged kinetic equation for waves but instead use a complete, non bounce-averaged, equation to model EMIC wave power spectral density. The major results of our study can be summarized as follows. (1) The thermal background level for EMIC waves is too low to allow waves to grow up to the observable level during one pass between the "bi-ion latitudes" (the latitudes where the given wave frequency is equal to the O+-He+ bi-ion frequency) in conjugate hemispheres. As a consequence, quasi-field-aligned EMIC waves are not typically produced in the model if the thermal background level is used, but routinely observed in the Earth's magnetosphere. To overcome this model-observation discrepancy we suggest a nonlinear energy cascade from the lower frequency range of ULF waves into the frequency range of EMIC wave generation as a possible mechanism supplying the needed level of seed fluctuations that guarantees growth of EMIC waves during one pass through the near equatorial region. The EMIC wave development from a suprathermal background level shows that EMIC waves are quasi-field-aligned near the equator, while they are oblique at high latitudes, and the Poynting flux is predominantly directed away from the near equatorial source region in agreement with observations. (2) An abundance of O+ strongly controls the energy of oblique He-band EMIC waves that propagate to the equator after their reflection at "bi-ion latitudes", and so it controls a fraction of wave energy in the oblique normals. (3) The RC O+ not only causes damping of the He-band EMIC waves but also causes wave generation in the region of highly oblique wave normal angles, typically for θ > 82o, where a growth rate γ > 10-2 rad/s is frequently observed. The

  19. Microwave emission related to cyclotron instabilities in a minimum-B electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izotov, I.; Tarvainen, O.; Mansfeld, D.; Skalyga, V.; Koivisto, H.; Kalvas, T.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Laulainen, J.

    2015-08-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS) have been essential in the research and applications of nuclear physics over the past 40 years. They are extensively used in a wide range of large-scale accelerator facilities for the production of highly charged heavy ion beams of stable and radioactive elements. ECRISs are susceptible to kinetic instabilities due to resonance heating mechanism leading to anisotropic electron velocity distribution function. Instabilities of cyclotron type are a proven cause of frequently observed periodic bursts of ‘hot’ electrons and bremsstrahlung, accompanied with emission of microwave radiation and followed by considerable drop of multiply charged ions current. Detailed studies of the microwave radiation associated with the instabilities have been performed with a minimum-B 14 GHz ECRIS operating on helium, oxygen and argon plasmas. It is demonstrated that during the development of cyclotron instability ‘hot’ electrons emit microwaves in sub-microsecond scale bursts at temporally descending frequencies in the 8-15 GHz range with two dominant frequencies of 11.09 and 12.59 GHz regardless of ECRIS settings i.e. magnetic field strength, neutral gas pressure or species and microwave power. The experimental data suggest that the most probable excited plasma wave is a slow extraordinary Z-mode propagating quasi-longitudinally with respect to the external magnetic field.

  20. High current DC negative ion source for cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etoh, H.; Onai, M.; Aoki, Y.; Mitsubori, H.; Arakawa, Y.; Sakuraba, J.; Kato, T.; Mitsumoto, T.; Hiasa, T.; Yajima, S.; Shibata, T.; Hatayama, A.; Okumura, Y.

    2016-02-01

    A filament driven multi-cusp negative ion source has been developed for proton cyclotrons in medical applications. In Cs-free operation, continuous H- beam of 10 mA and D- beam of 3.3 mA were obtained stably at an arc-discharge power of 3 kW and 2.4 kW, respectively. In Cs-seeded operation, H- beam current reached 22 mA at a lower arc power of 2.6 kW with less co-extracted electron current. The optimum gas flow rate, which gives the highest H- current, was 15 sccm in the Cs-free operation, while it decreased to 4 sccm in the Cs-seeded operation. The relationship between H- production and the design/operating parameters has been also investigated by a numerical study with KEIO-MARC code, which gives a reasonable explanation to the experimental results of the H- current dependence on the arc power.

  1. High current DC negative ion source for cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Etoh, H; Onai, M; Aoki, Y; Mitsubori, H; Arakawa, Y; Sakuraba, J; Kato, T; Mitsumoto, T; Hiasa, T; Yajima, S; Shibata, T; Hatayama, A; Okumura, Y

    2016-02-01

    A filament driven multi-cusp negative ion source has been developed for proton cyclotrons in medical applications. In Cs-free operation, continuous H(-) beam of 10 mA and D(-) beam of 3.3 mA were obtained stably at an arc-discharge power of 3 kW and 2.4 kW, respectively. In Cs-seeded operation, H(-) beam current reached 22 mA at a lower arc power of 2.6 kW with less co-extracted electron current. The optimum gas flow rate, which gives the highest H(-) current, was 15 sccm in the Cs-free operation, while it decreased to 4 sccm in the Cs-seeded operation. The relationship between H(-) production and the design/operating parameters has been also investigated by a numerical study with KEIO-MARC code, which gives a reasonable explanation to the experimental results of the H(-) current dependence on the arc power. PMID:26932017

  2. Isotope exchange by Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning on JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wauters, T.; Douai, D.; Kogut, D.; Lyssoivan, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Belonohy, E.; Blackman, T.; Bobkov, V.; Crombé, K.; Drenik, A.; Graham, M.; Joffrin, E.; Lerche, E.; Loarer, T.; Lomas, P. L.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Monakhov, I.; Oberkofler, M.; Philipps, V.; Plyusnin, V.; Sergienko, G.; Van Eester, D.

    2015-08-01

    The isotopic exchange efficiencies of JET Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ICWC) discharges produced at ITER half and full field conditions are compared for JET carbon (C) and ITER like wall (ILW). Besides an improved isotope exchange rate on the ILW providing cleaner plasma faster, the main advantage compared to C-wall is a reduction of the ratio of retained discharge gas to removed fuel. Complementing experimental data with discharge modeling shows that long pulses with high (∼240 kW coupled) ICRF power maximizes the wall isotope removal per ICWC pulse. In the pressure range 1-7.5 × 10-3 Pa, this removal reduces with increasing discharge pressure. As most of the wall-released isotopes are evacuated by vacuum pumps in the post discharge phase, duty cycle optimization studies for ICWC on JET-ILW need further consideration. The accessible reservoir by H2-ICWC at ITER half field conditions on the JET-ILW preloaded by D2 tokamak operation is estimated to be 7.3 × 1022 hydrogenic atoms, and may be exchanged within 400 s of cumulated ICWC discharge time.

  3. A Tuning Method for Electrically Compensated Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer Traps

    PubMed Central

    Brustkern, Adam M.; Rempel, Don L.; Gross, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a method for tuning electrically compensated ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) traps by tracking the observed cyclotron frequency of an ion cloud at different oscillation mode amplitudes. Although we have used this method to tune the compensation voltages of a custom-built electrically compensated trap, the approach is applicable to other designs that incorporate electrical compensation. To evaluate the effectiveness of tuning, we examined the frequency shift as a function of cyclotron orbit size at different z-mode oscillation amplitudes. The cyclotron frequencies varied by ~ 12 ppm for ions with low z-mode oscillation amplitudes compared to those with high z-mode amplitudes. This frequency difference decreased to ~1 ppm by one iteration of trap tuning. PMID:20060743

  4. Ion cyclotron waves at Mars: Occurrence and wave properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, H. Y.; Cowee, M. M.; Russell, C. T.; Leinweber, H. K.

    2014-07-01

    Ion cyclotron waves (ICWs) are generated during the interaction between the solar wind and the Martian exosphere in a process called ion pickup. Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) detected waves near the proton gyrofrequency, indicating pickup of the exospheric hydrogen. To analyze these waves, we first improve the zero levels of the MGS magnetic field data taken during the first aerobreaking phase and then perform a statistical study of the ICWs observed from just outside the Martian bow shock to over 14 Mars radii away. These ICW events typically last for 5 to 30 min but can occasionally last for hours. The wave power decreases slowly with distance on both the upstream and downstream sides. From the variation of wave properties with the strength of the background field, we find that there are likely still remaining offsets in at least some the data sets even after applying our calibration technique. Thus, we use the events with a strong background field to examine the wave properties that depend on an accurate determination of the field direction and strength. We find the pickup angle associated with the largest occurrence rate of ICWs to be around 45°, but neither the wave amplitude, nor wave frequency, nor wave duration appear to vary with pickup angle. Finally, we find the waves with background field strength greater than 4 nT occur on both the positive and negative electric field sides of Mars but have a larger occurrence rate on the side of Mars in the positive electric field direction (which is defined as the direction of the cross product of the magnetic field vector and solar wind flow vector).

  5. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source related development work for heavy-ion irradiation tests

    SciTech Connect

    Koivisto, H.; Suominen, P.; Tarvainen, O.; Virtanen, A.; Parkkinen, A.

    2006-03-15

    The European Space Agency (ESA) uses the facilities at the Accelerator Laboratory (Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae: JYFL) for heavy-ion irradiation tests of electronic components. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source related development work has been carried out in order to meet the requirements set by the project. During the irradiation tests several beam changes are performed during the day. Therefore, the time needed for the beam changes has to be minimized. As a consequence, a beam cocktail having nearly the same m/q ratio is used. This makes it possible a quick tuning of the cyclotron to select the required ion for the irradiation. In addition to this requirement, very high charge states for the heavy elements are needed to reach a penetration depth of 100 {mu}m in silicon. In this article we present some procedures to optimize the ion source operation. We also present results of the first three-frequency heating tests. The main frequency of 14 GHz was fed from a klystron and both secondary frequencies were launched from a traveling-wave tube amplifier (TWTA). Two separate frequency generators were used simultaneously to provide different signals for the TWTA. During the test an improvement of about 20% was observed for {sup 84}Kr{sup 25+} and {sup 129}Xe{sup 30+} ion beams when the third frequency was applied.

  6. Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves in the Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamayunov, K. V.; Engebretson, M. J.; Zhang, M.; Rassoul, H.

    2013-12-01

    The evolution of He+ mode electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves is studied in the Earth's magnetosphere using our global model of ring current (RC) ions, electric field, plasmasphere, and EMIC waves. In contrast to the approach previously used by Gamayunov et al. (2009), however, we do not use the bounce-averaged wave kinetic equation but instead use a complete, non bounce-averaged, equation to model the evolution of EMIC wave power spectral density, including off-equatorial wave dynamics. The results based on this new approach demonstrate overall agreement with statistical studies of EMIC waves in the inner magnetosphere. The major findings from our study can be summarized as follows. (1) The RC O+ not only causes damping of the He+ mode EMIC waves but also causes wave generation in the region of highly oblique wave normal angles, typically for θ > 82deg, where a growth rate γ > 0.01 rad/s is frequently observed. The wave instability is driven by the loss-cone feature in the RC O+ distribution function. (2) The O+ density strongly controls the He+ mode EMIC wave energetics. For the plasmaspheric O+ fraction less than 1.5%, the wave damping by RC O+ in the vicinity of the O+-He+ bi-ion frequency becomes strong enough leading to a strongly suppressed EMIC wave activity. This suggests that both the RC and thermal O+ should be carefully specified in the model, and RC O+ should be included not only in the imaginary part of wave dispersion relation but in the real part as well. (3) The thermal background level for the He+ mode EMIC waves is too low to allow waves to grow up to the observable level during one pass between the "bi-ion latitudes" in conjugate hemispheres. As a consequence, quasi-field-aligned EMIC waves are not typically produced in the model but routinely observed in the Earth's magnetosphere. Our estimates show that a nonlinear energy cascade from lower frequency pulsations (in the Pc 4 to lower Pc 2 frequency range) into the frequency range of Pc

  7. Dispersion relation of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in multi-component magneto-plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Khaira, Vibhooti Ahirwar, G.

    2015-07-31

    Electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in multi component plasma composed of electrons (denoted by e{sup −}), hydrogen ions (denoted by H{sup +}), helium ions (denoted by He{sup +}) and positively charged oxygen ions (denoted by O{sup +})in magnetized cold plasma. The wave is assumed to propagate perpendicular to the static magnetic field. It is found that the addition of heavy ions in the plasma dispersion modified the lower hybrid mode and also allowed an ion-ion mode. The frequencies of the lower hybrid and ion- ion hybrid modes are derived using cold plasma theory. It is observed that the effect of multi-ionfor different plasma densities on electrostatic ion cyclotron waves is to enhance the wave frequencies. The results are interpreted for the magnetosphere has been applied parameters by auroral acceleration region.

  8. Unidirectional stripping extraction from a cyclotron which accelerates light as well as heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristić-Djurović, Jasna L.; Ćirković, Saša

    2003-03-01

    The VINCY Cyclotron (VINča CYclotron) is a multipurpose machine intended to accelerate light as well as heavy ions. To extract heavy ions with low energy and light ions an extraction system with stripping foil is used. Heavy ions with high energy will be extracted by means of an electrostatic deflector. The former extraction system will be manufactured and used first. The proposed unidirectional stripping extraction system is the optimal balance between the placement of the extraction line and the required diversity and quality of the extracted beam. The available range of extraction directions is set by geometry limitations.

  9. Model for the description of ion beam extraction from electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Spaedtke, P.

    2010-02-15

    The finite difference method trajectory code KOBRA3-INP has been developed now for 25 years to perform the simulation of ion beam extraction in three dimensions. Meanwhile, the code has been validated for different applications: high current ion beam extraction from plasma sources for ion implantation technology, neutral gas heating in fusion devices, or ion thrusters for space propulsion. One major issue of the development of this code was to improve the flexibility of the applied model for the simulation of different types of particle sources. Fixed emitter sources might be simulated with that code as well as laser ion sources, Penning ion sources, electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRISs), or H{sup -} sources, which require the simulation of negative ions, negative electrons, and positive charges simultaneously. The model which has been developed for ECRIS has now been used to explore the conditions for the ion beam extraction from a still nonexisting ion source, a so called ARC-ECRIS [P. Suominen and F. Wenander, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A305 (2008)]. It has to be shown whether the plasma generator has similar properties like regular ECRIS. However, the emittance of the extracted beam seems to be much better compared to an ECRIS equipped with a hexapole.

  10. C60 Secondary Ion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Donald F.; Robinson, Errol W.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Heeren, Ronald M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2011-12-15

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has seen increased application for high spatial chemical imaging of complex biological surfaces. The advent and commercial availability of cluster and polyatomic primary ion sources (e.g. Au and Bi cluster and buckminsterfullerene (C60)) provide improved secondary ion yield and decreased fragmentation of surface species, thus accessibility to intact molecular ions. Despite developments in primary ion sources, development of mass spectrometers to fully exploit their advantages has been limited. Tandem mass spectrometry for identification of secondary ions is highly desirable, but implementation has proven to be difficult. Similarly, high mass resolution and high mass measurement accuracy would greatly improve the chemical specificity of SIMS. Here we combine, for the first time, the advantages of a C60 primary ion source with the ultra-high mass resolving power and high mass measurement accuracy of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Mass resolving power in excess of 100,000 (m/Δm50%) is demonstrated, with mass measurement accuracies below 3 parts-per-million. Imaging of mouse brain tissue at 40 μm pixel size is shown. Tandem mass spectrometry of ions from biological tissue is demonstrated and molecular formulae can be assigned to fragment ions.

  11. Fast neutral beam ion source coupled to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, N.C.; Limbach, P.A.; Shomo, R.E. II; Marshall, A.G. ); Appelhans, A.D.; Delmore, J.E. )

    1991-11-01

    The coupling of an autoneutralizing SF{sup {minus}}{sub 6} fast ion-beam gun to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT/ICR) mass spectrometer is described. The fast neutral beam provides for secondary-ion-type FT/ICR mass analysis (e.g., production of abundant pseudomolecular (M+H){sup +} ions) of involatile samples without the need for external ion injection, since ions are formed at the entrance to the ICR ion trap. The design, construction, and testing of the hybrid instrument are described. The feasibility of the experiment (for both broadband and high-resolution FT/ICR positive-ion mass spectra) is demonstrated with {ital tetra}-butylammonium bromide and a Tylenol{sup ( )} sample. The ability to analyze high molecular weight polymers with high mass resolution is demonstrated for Teflon{sup ( )}. All of the advantages of the fast neutral beam ion source previously demonstrated with quadrupole mass analysis are preserved, and the additional advantages of FT/ICR mass analysis (e.g., high mass resolving power, ion trapping) are retained.

  12. Fast neutral beam ion source coupled to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Nicholas C.; Limbach, Patrick A.; Shomo, Ronald E., II; Marshall, Alan G.; Appelhans, Anthony D.; Delmore, James E.

    1991-11-01

    The coupling of an autoneutralizing SF-6 fast ion-beam gun to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT/ICR) mass spectrometer is described. The fast neutral beam provides for secondary-ion-type FT/ICR mass analysis [e.g., production of abundant pseudomolecular (M+H)+ ions] of involatile samples without the need for external ion injection, since ions are formed at the entrance to the ICR ion trap. The design, construction, and testing of the hybrid instrument are described. The feasibility of the experiment (for both broadband and high-resolution FT/ICR positive-ion mass spectra) is demonstrated with tetra-butylammonium bromide and a Tylenol■ sample. The ability to analyze high molecular weight polymers with high mass resolution is demonstrated for Teflon■. All of the advantages of the fast neutral beam ion source previously demonstrated with quadrupole mass analysis are preserved, and the additional advantages of FT/ICR mass analysis (e.g., high mass resolving power, ion trapping) are retained.

  13. Simulation of electron behavior in PIG ion source for 9 MeV cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    J. Mu, X.; Ghergherehchi, M.; H. Yeon, Y.; W. Kim, J.; S. Chai, J.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we focus on a PIG source for producing intense H-ions inside a 9 MeV cyclotron. The properties of the PIG ion source were simulated for a variety of electric field distributions and magnetic field strengths using a CST particle studio. After analyzing the secondary electron emission (SEE) as a function of both magnetic and electric field strengths, we found that for the modeled PIG geometry, a magnetic field strength of 0.2 T provided the best results in terms of the number of secondary electrons. Furthermore, at 0.2 T, the number of secondary electrons proved to be greatest regardless of the cathode potential. Also, the modified PIG ion source with quartz insulation tubes was tested in a KIRAMS-13 cyclotron by varying the gas flow rate and arc current, respectively. The capacity of the designed ion source was also demonstrated by producing plasma inside the constructed 9 MeV cyclotron. As a result, the ion source is verified as being capable of producing an intense H- beam and high ion beam current for the desired 9 MeV cyclotron. The simulation results provide experimental constraints for optimizing the strength of the plasma and final ion beam current at a target inside a cyclotron.

  14. Heating of ions to superthermal energies in the topside ionosphere by electrostatic ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungstrup, E.; Klumpar, D. M.; Heikkila, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    The soft particle spectrometer on the Isis 2 spacecraft occasionally observes fluxes of ions moving upward out of the ionosphere in the vicinity of the auroral oval. These ion fluxes are characterized by a sharp pitch angle distribution usually peaked at an angle somewhat greater than 90 deg, indicative of particles heated to a large transverse temperature in a narrow range below the spacecraft. The observations are interpreted in terms of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves, which heat the ions to superthermal energies transverse to the earth's magnetic field. When the transverse energy increases, the repulsive force of the earth's magnetic field, proportional to the particle magnetic moment, repels the particles away from the earth.

  15. Kinetic structure of slow shocks - Effects of the electromagnetic ion/ion cyclotron instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidi, N.; Winske, D.

    1992-01-01

    The structure of slow magnetosonic shocks in the low beta regime is analyzed with attention given to ion heating and the effects of waves upstream of the electromagnetic ion/ion cyclotron (EMIIC) instability. Shock formation is assessed by means of three methods - a relaxation method and two based on dynamic flow interactions - to determine the effects of initialization and boundary conditions on the formation. Good solutions are found with the piston method and the similar flow-flow method in which the plasma is injected from two boundaries to form two slow shocks. Plasma parameters and shock normal angle are found to be the key variables dictating the structure of the magnetosonic shocks. Four unique classes of resultant shock structures are described in which classical, steady, or nonsteady behavior is found. The analysis also yields insight into the relationship between EMIIC instability and ion dissipation.

  16. Studies of extraction and transport system for highly charged ion beam of 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Research Center for Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Yorita, T. Hatanaka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Ueda, H.; Yasuda, Y.; Morinobu, S.; Tamii, A.; Kamakura, K.

    2014-02-15

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source is installed to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions especially for highly charged heavy ions which can be accelerated by cyclotrons of Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The beam production developments of several ions from B to Xe have been already done [T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008) and T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02A332 (2010)] and the further studies for those beam extraction and its transport have been done in order to increase the beam current more. The plasma electrode, extraction electrode, and einzel lens are modified. Especially extraction electrode can be applied minus voltage for the beam extraction and it works well to improve the extracted beam current. The extraction voltage dependences of transmission and emittance also have been studied for beam current improvement which is injected into azimuthally varying field cyclotron at RCNP.

  17. Studies of extraction and transport system for highly charged ion beam of 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Research Center for Nuclear Physics.

    PubMed

    Yorita, T; Hatanaka, K; Fukuda, M; Ueda, H; Yasuda, Y; Morinobu, S; Tamii, A; Kamakura, K

    2014-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source is installed to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions especially for highly charged heavy ions which can be accelerated by cyclotrons of Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The beam production developments of several ions from B to Xe have been already done [T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008) and T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02A332 (2010)] and the further studies for those beam extraction and its transport have been done in order to increase the beam current more. The plasma electrode, extraction electrode, and einzel lens are modified. Especially extraction electrode can be applied minus voltage for the beam extraction and it works well to improve the extracted beam current. The extraction voltage dependences of transmission and emittance also have been studied for beam current improvement which is injected into azimuthally varying field cyclotron at RCNP. PMID:24593475

  18. An all permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source for heavy ion therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Yun Li, Jia Qing; Sun, Liang Ting; Zhang, Xue Zhen; Feng, Yu Cheng; Wang, Hui; Ma, Bao Hua; Li, Xi Xia

    2014-02-15

    A high charge state all permanent Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source, Lanzhou All Permanent ECR ion source no. 3-LAPECR3, has been successfully built at IMP in 2012, which will serve as the ion injector of the Heavy Ion Medical Machine (HIMM) project. As a commercial device, LAPECR3 features a compact structure, small size, and low cost. According to HIMM scenario more than 100 eμA of C{sup 5+} ion beam should be extracted from the ion source, and the beam emittance better than 75 π*mm*mrad. In recent commissioning, about 120 eμA of C{sup 5+} ion beam was got when work gas was CH{sub 4} while about 262 eμA of C{sup 5+} ion beam was obtained when work gas was C{sub 2}H{sub 2} gas. The design and construction of the ion source and its low-energy transportation beam line, and the preliminary commissioning results will be presented in detail in this paper.

  19. Nitrogen ion implantation into various materials using 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Shin, Chang Seouk; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Ok, Jung-Woo; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Bahng, Jungbae; Hong, Jonggi; Lee, Seung Wook; Won, Mi-Sook

    2016-02-01

    The installation of the 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) ion implantation beamline was recently completed at the Korea Basic Science Institute. The apparatus contains a beam monitoring system and a sample holder for the ion implantation process. The new implantation system can function as a multipurpose tool since it can implant a variety of ions, ranging hydrogen to uranium, into different materials with precise control and with implantation areas as large as 1-10 mm(2). The implantation chamber was designed to measure the beam properties with a diagnostic system as well as to perform ion implantation with an in situ system including a mass spectrometer. This advanced implantation system can be employed in novel applications, including the production of a variety of new materials such as metals, polymers, and ceramics and the irradiation testing and fabrication of structural and functional materials to be used in future nuclear fusion reactors. In this investigation, the first nitrogen ion implantation experiments were conducted using the new system. The 28 GHz ECRIS implanted low-energy, multi-charged nitrogen ions into copper, zinc, and cobalt substrates, and the ion implantation depth profiles were obtained. SRIM 2013 code was used to calculate the profiles under identical conditions, and the experimental and simulation results are presented and compared in this report. The depths and ranges of the ion distributions in the experimental and simulation results agree closely and demonstrate that the new system will enable the treatment of various substrates for advanced materials research. PMID:26931931

  20. Nitrogen ion implantation into various materials using 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Chang Seouk; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Ok, Jung-Woo; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Bahng, Jungbae; Hong, Jonggi; Lee, Seung Wook; Won, Mi-Sook

    2016-02-01

    The installation of the 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) ion implantation beamline was recently completed at the Korea Basic Science Institute. The apparatus contains a beam monitoring system and a sample holder for the ion implantation process. The new implantation system can function as a multipurpose tool since it can implant a variety of ions, ranging hydrogen to uranium, into different materials with precise control and with implantation areas as large as 1-10 mm2. The implantation chamber was designed to measure the beam properties with a diagnostic system as well as to perform ion implantation with an in situ system including a mass spectrometer. This advanced implantation system can be employed in novel applications, including the production of a variety of new materials such as metals, polymers, and ceramics and the irradiation testing and fabrication of structural and functional materials to be used in future nuclear fusion reactors. In this investigation, the first nitrogen ion implantation experiments were conducted using the new system. The 28 GHz ECRIS implanted low-energy, multi-charged nitrogen ions into copper, zinc, and cobalt substrates, and the ion implantation depth profiles were obtained. SRIM 2013 code was used to calculate the profiles under identical conditions, and the experimental and simulation results are presented and compared in this report. The depths and ranges of the ion distributions in the experimental and simulation results agree closely and demonstrate that the new system will enable the treatment of various substrates for advanced materials research.

  1. ECR heavy-ion source for the LBL 88-inch cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.J.; Kalnins, J.G.; Lyneis, C.M.

    1983-03-01

    An Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) heavy-ion source is under construction at the LBL 88-Inch Cyclotron. This source will produce very-high-charge-state heavy ions, such as 0/sup 8 +/ and Ar/sup 12 +/, which will increase cyclotron energies by a factor of 2-4, up to A = 80. It is a two-stage source using room-temperature coils, a permanent-magnet sextupole, and a 6-9 GHz microwave system. Design features include adjustable first-to-second-stage plasma coupling, a variable second-stage mirror ratio, high-conductance radial pumping of the second stage, and a beam-diagnostic system. A remotely movable extraction electrode will optimize extraction efficiency. The project includes construction of a transport line and improvements to the cyclotron axial-injection system. The construction period is expected to be two years.

  2. Impact of Ring Current Ions on Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Wave Dispersion Relation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.

    2007-01-01

    Effect of the ring current ions in the real part of electromagnetic ion Cyclotron wave dispersion relation is studied on global scale. Recent Cluster observations by Engebretson et al. showed that although the temperature anisotropy of is energetic (> 10 keV) ring current protons was high during the entire 22 November 2003 perigee pass, electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves were observed only in conjunction with intensification of the ion fluxes below 1 keV by over an order of magnitude. To study the effect of the ring current ions on the wave dispersive properties and the corresponding global wave redistribution, we use a self-consistent model of interacting ring current and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, and simulate the May 1998 storm. The main findings of our simulation can be summarized as follows: First, the plasma density enhancement in the night MLT sector during the main and recovery storm phases is mostly caused by injection of suprathermal plasma sheet H + (approximately < 1 keV), which dominate the thermal plasma density. Second, during the recovery storm phases, the ring current modification of the wave dispersion relation leads to a qualitative change of the wave patterns in the postmidnight-dawn sector for L > 4.75. This "new" wave activity is well organized by outward edges of dense suprathermal ring current spots, and the waves are not observed if the ring current ions are not included in the real part of dispersion relation. Third, the most intense wave-induced ring current precipitation is located in the night MLT sector and caused by modification of the wave dispersion relation. The strongest precipitating fluxes of about 8 X 10(exp 6)/ (cm(exp 2) - s X st) are found near L=5.75, MLT=2 during the early recovery phase on 4 May. Finally, the nightside precipitation is more intense than the dayside fluxes, even if there are less intense waves, because the convection field moves ring current ions into the loss cone on the nightside, but drives

  3. An experimental test of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron instability within the earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauk, B. H.; Mcpherron, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Examples of propagating electromagnetic Alfven/ion cyclotron waves in plasma particle and magnetic field data observed by the ATS-6 geostationary satellite are discussed. These waves were viewed mainly near the afternoon and dusk regions of the earth's magnetosphere with normalized frequencies in the 0.05 to 0.5 range. Two wave events were analyzed: both appeared coincidentally with the encounter of cool plasma populations which joined the hot populations already present. An electromagnetic ion cyclotron instability was proposed as the wave generation mechanism; this theory was tested by evaluating the linear growth integrals under the measured anisotropic hot ion distribution.

  4. Anisotropic distribution function of minority tail ions generated by strong ion-cyclotron resonance heating

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.S.; Colestock, P.

    1989-05-01

    The highly anisotropic particle distribution function of minority tail ions driven by ion-cyclotron resonance heating at the fundamental harmonic is calculated in a two-dimensional velocity space. It is assumed that the heating is strong enough to drive most of the resonant ions above the in-electron critical slowing-down energy. Simple analytic expressions for the tail distribution are obtained fro the case when the Doppler effect is sufficiently large to flatten the sharp pitch angle dependence in the bounce averaged qualilinear heating coefficient, D/sub b/, and for the case when D/sub b/ is assumed to be constant in pitch angle and energy. It is found that a simple constant-D/sub b/ solution can be used instead of the more complicated sharp-D/sub b/ solution for many analytic purposes. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Time evolution of bremsstrahlung and ion production of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Tarvainen, Ollie; Ropponen, Tommi; Jones, Peter; Peura, Pauli

    2008-01-01

    Bremsstrahlung radiation measurement is one of the most commonly used plasma diagnostics methods. Most of the bremsstrahlung measurements with electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources have been performed in continuous operation mode yielding information only on the steady state bremsstrahlung emission. This article describes the results of bremsstrahlung and ion current measurement with the JYFL 14 GHz ECRIS operated in pulsed mode. The experiments reveal information about the bremsstrahlung radiation in plasma conditions before reaching the equilibrium. The time scale of bremsstrahlung production is compared to ion production time scale for different charge states. The bremsstrahlung data is presented with 2 millisecond time intervals as a function of neutral gas pressure and microwave power. Data from hundreds of microwave pulses is combined in order to have a sufficient amount of events at each time step. The relevant plasma physics phenomena during both, the leading and the trailing edge of the RF pulse, are discussed.

  6. Multiaperture ion beam extraction from gas-dynamic electron cyclotron resonance source of multicharged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorov, A.; Dorf, M.; Zorin, V.; Bokhanov, A.; Izotov, I.; Razin, S.; Skalyga, V.; Rossbach, J.; Spaedtke, P.; Balabaev, A.

    2008-02-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion source with quasi-gas-dynamic regime of plasma confinement (ReGIS), constructed at the Institute of Applied Physics, Russia, provides opportunities for extracting intense and high-brightness multicharged ion beams. Despite the short plasma lifetime in a magnetic trap of a ReGIS, the degree of multiple ionization may be significantly enhanced by the increase in power and frequency of the applied microwave radiation. The present work is focused on studying the intense beam quality of this source by the pepper-pot method. A single beamlet emittance measured by the pepper-pot method was found to be {approx}70 {pi} mm mrad, and the total extracted beam current obtained at 14 kV extraction voltage was {approx}25 mA. The results of the numerical simulations of ion beam extraction are found to be in good agreement with experimental data.

  7. Investigations on the structure of the extracted ion beam from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Spaedtke, P.; Lang, R.; Maeder, J.; Rossbach, J.; Tinschert, K.; Maimone, F.

    2012-02-15

    Using improved beam diagnostic tools, the structure of an ion beam extracted from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) becomes visible. Especially viewing targets to display the beam profile and pepper pot devices for emittance measurements turned out to be very useful. On the contrary, diagnostic tools integrating over one space coordinate like wire harps for profile measurements or slit-slit devices, respectively slit-grid devices to measure the emittance might be applicable for beam transport investigations in a quadrupole channel, but are not very meaningful for investigations regarding the given ECRIS symmetry. Here we try to reproduce the experimentally found structure on the ion beam by simulation. For the simulation, a certain model has to be used to reproduce the experimental results. The model is also described in this paper.

  8. A glow discharge ion source with fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Barhick, C M; Eyler, J R

    1992-02-01

    A glow discharge (CD) ion source has been coupled to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer using a four-element electrostatic lens to accelerate and focus ions generated external to the instrument's high magnetic field into its analyzer cell. Like other CD mass spectrometers, GD-FT-ICR can provide a quantitative measure of bulk analyte concentration with good precision and accuracy. Although detection limits currently attainable are several orders of magnitude higher than the commercially available magnetic sector-based instrument, CD-FT-ICR holds promise for ultrahigh resolving power elemental mass analysis. Several schemes are proposed to lower the detection limits of the technique while still providing high enough resolution to resolve isobaric interferences. PMID:24242880

  9. Comparison of solar wind driving mechanisms: ion cyclotron resonance versus kinetic suprathermal electron effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Sunny W. Y.; Chang, Tom

    2003-09-01

    The combined kinetic effects of two possible solar wind driving mechanisms, ion cyclotron resonance and suprathermal electrons, have been studied in the literature [1]. However, the individual contribution by these two mechanisms was unclear. We compare the two effects in the fast solar wind. Our basic model follows the global kinetic evolution of the solar wind under the influence of ion cyclotron resonance, while taking into account Coulomb collisions, and the ambipolar electric field that is consistent with the particle distributions themselves. The kinetic effects associated with the suprathermal electrons can be included in the model as an option. By comparing our results with and without this option, we conclude that, without considering any wave-particle interactions involving the electrons, the kinetic effects of the suprathermal electrons are relative insignificant in the presence of ion cyclotron resonance in terms of driving the solar wind.

  10. Ion Trap with Narrow Aperture Detection Electrodes for Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagornov, Konstantin O.; Kozhinov, Anton N.; Tsybin, Oleg Y.; Tsybin, Yury O.

    2015-05-01

    The current paradigm in ion trap (cell) design for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) is the ion detection with wide aperture detection electrodes. Specifically, excitation and detection electrodes are typically 90° wide and positioned radially at a similar distance from the ICR cell axis. Here, we demonstrate that ion detection with narrow aperture detection electrodes (NADEL) positioned radially inward of the cell's axis is feasible and advantageous for FT-ICR MS. We describe design details and performance characteristics of a 10 T FT-ICR MS equipped with a NADEL ICR cell having a pair of narrow aperture (flat) detection electrodes and a pair of standard 90° excitation electrodes. Despite a smaller surface area of the detection electrodes, the sensitivity of the NADEL ICR cell is not reduced attributable to improved excite field distribution, reduced capacitance of the detection electrodes, and their closer positioning to the orbits of excited ions. The performance characteristics of the NADEL ICR cell are comparable with the state-of-the-art FT-ICR MS implementations for small molecule, peptide, protein, and petroleomics analyses. In addition, the NADEL ICR cell's design improves the flexibility of ICR cells and facilitates implementation of advanced capabilities (e.g., quadrupolar ion detection for improved mainstream applications). It also creates an intriguing opportunity for addressing the major bottleneck in FTMS—increasing its throughput via simultaneous acquisition of multiple transients or via generation of periodic non-sinusoidal transient signals.

  11. Sensitive test for ion-cyclotron resonant heating in the solar wind.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Justin C; Maruca, Bennett A; Stevens, Michael L; Zaslavsky, Arnaud

    2013-03-01

    Plasma carrying a spectrum of counterpropagating field-aligned ion-cyclotron waves can strongly and preferentially heat ions through a stochastic Fermi mechanism. Such a process has been proposed to explain the extreme temperatures, temperature anisotropies, and speeds of ions in the solar corona and solar wind. We quantify how differential flow between ion species results in a Doppler shift in the wave spectrum that can prevent this strong heating. Two critical values of differential flow are derived for strong heating of the core and tail of a given ion distribution function. Our comparison of these predictions to observations from the Wind spacecraft reveals excellent agreement. Solar wind helium that meets the condition for strong core heating is nearly 7 times hotter than hydrogen on average. Ion-cyclotron resonance contributes to heating in the solar wind, and there is a close link between heating, differential flow, and temperature anisotropy. PMID:23496700

  12. Studies on a Q/A selector for the SECRAL electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.; Sun, L. T.; Feng, Y. C.; Fang, X.; Lu, W.; Zhang, W. H.; Cao, Y.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.

    2014-08-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources are widely used in heavy ion accelerators in the world because they are capable of producing high current beams of highly charged ions. However, the design of the Q/A selector system for these devices is challenging, because it must have a sufficient ion resolution while controlling the beam emittance growth. Moreover, this system has to be matched for a wide range of ion beam species with different intensities. In this paper, research on the Q/A selector system at the SECRAL (Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou) platform both in experiment and simulation is presented. Based on this study, a new Q/A selector system has been designed for SECRAL II. The features of the new design including beam simulations are also presented.

  13. Studies on a Q/A selector for the SECRAL electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Sun, L T; Feng, Y C; Fang, X; Lu, W; Zhang, W H; Cao, Y; Zhang, X Z; Zhao, H W

    2014-08-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources are widely used in heavy ion accelerators in the world because they are capable of producing high current beams of highly charged ions. However, the design of the Q/A selector system for these devices is challenging, because it must have a sufficient ion resolution while controlling the beam emittance growth. Moreover, this system has to be matched for a wide range of ion beam species with different intensities. In this paper, research on the Q/A selector system at the SECRAL (Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou) platform both in experiment and simulation is presented. Based on this study, a new Q/A selector system has been designed for SECRAL II. The features of the new design including beam simulations are also presented. PMID:25173256

  14. Observation of Inverse Ion-Cyclotron Damping Induced by Parallel-Velocity Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorescu, C.; Reynolds, E. W.; Koepke, M. E.

    2002-08-01

    The generation of broadband multiharmonic spectra of electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves is demonstrated in a magnetized laboratory plasma in which shear in the magnetic-field-aligned (parallel) ion flow and a relative parallel electron drift are present. Shear correlates with an increased number of harmonics and a decreased electron drift speed. Wave and particle measurements indicate that cyclotron damping is reduced and even becomes negative. The fluctuations in the time domain are spiky, similar to electric-field fluctuations observed both in Earth's auroral zone and in numerical simulations.

  15. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source experience at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, T; Cee, R; Haberer, T; Naas, B; Peters, A; Scheloske, S; Spädtke, P; Tinschert, K

    2008-02-01

    Radiotherapy with heavy ions is an upcoming cancer treatment method with to date unparalleled precision. It associates higher control rates particularly for radiation resistant tumor species with reduced adverse effects compared to conventional photon therapy. The accelerator beam lines and structures of the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT) have been designed under the leadership of GSI, Darmstadt with contributions of the IAP Frankfurt. Currently, the accelerator is under commissioning, while the injector linac has been completed. When the patient treatment begins in 2008, HIT will be the first medical heavy ion accelerator in Europe. This presentation will provide an overview about the project, with special attention given to the 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources in operation with carbon, hydrogen, helium, and oxygen, and the experience of one year of continuous operation. It also displays examples for beam emittances, measured in the low energy beam transport. In addition to the outlook of further developments at the ECR ion sources for a continuously stable operation, this paper focuses on some of the technical processings of the past year. PMID:18315121

  16. Effect of Ion Cyclotron Heating on Fast Ion Transport and Plasma Rotation in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, V. S.; Omelchenko, Y. A.; Chiu, S. C.

    2000-10-01

    Minority ion cyclotron heating can produce energetic ions with banana orbits which are finite compared with the minor radius of a tokamak. The radial transport of the fast ions in the presence of Coulomb collisions results in a radial current and a corresponding JxB torque density on the bulk plasma. Collisions with the bulk ions provides an additional frictional torque that adds to or opposes the magnetic torque. This study clarifies the various mechanisms which can contribute to the torque components including collision-induced finite orbit particle diffusion, wave-induced asymmetry in canonical momentum when doppler resonance is accounted for, and orbit asymmetry created by magnetic geometry. Ion dynamics are calculated with a Monte-Carlo code in which wave-induced energy diffusion is accounted for by a quasilinear operator. The code follows particle drift trajectories in a tokamak geometry under the influence of RF fields and collisions with the background plasma. Questions on the direction of plasma rotation under different conditions and validity of the Green's function approach in modeling RF-induced rotation will be addressed.

  17. A 1D Model For Describing Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating At Arbitrary Cyclotron Harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Eester, Dirk; Lerche, Ernesto

    2011-12-01

    Both at low and higher cyclotron harmonics, properly accounting for finite Larmor radius effects is crucial in many ICRF heating scenario's creating high energy tails. The present paper discusses an extension of the 1D TOMCAT wave equation solver [1] to arbitrary harmonics and arbitrary wavelengths. Rather than adopting the particle position, the guiding center position is used as the independent variable when writing down an expression for the dielectric response that is suitable for numerical application. This choice of variable yields symmetric and intuitive expressions, and guarantees that a positive definite power absorption is obtained for any of the wave modes in the plasma. Rather than relying on a truncated Taylor series expansion of the dielectric response, an integro-differential approach is proposed. To keep the required computation time for this generalized description reasonable tabulation of integrals is intensively used. An example is provided to illustrate the potential of the new wave code.

  18. Improved Ion Optics for Introduction of Ions into a 9.4 Tesla Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Leach, Franklin E.; Kaiser, Nathan K.; Dang, Xibei; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2014-01-01

    Enhancements to the ion source and transfer optics of our 9.4 T FT-ICR mass spectrometer have resulted in improved ion transmission efficiency for more sensitive mass measurement of complex mixtures at the MS and MS/MS levels. The tube lens/skimmer has been replaced by a dual ion funnel and the following octopole by a quadrupole for reduced ion cloud radial expansion before transmission into a mass-selective quadrupole. The number of ions that reach the ICR cell is increased by an order of magnitude for the funnel/quadrupole relative to the tube lens/skimmer/octopole. PMID:25601704

  19. Ion-cyclotron instability in plasmas described by product-bi-kappa distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, M. S. dos; Ziebell, L. F. Gaelzer, R.

    2015-12-15

    The dispersion relation for parallel propagating waves in the ion-cyclotron branch is investigated numerically by considering that the velocity distribution of the ion population is a function of type product-bi-kappa. We investigate the effects of the non-thermal features and of the anisotropy associated with this type of distribution on the ion-cyclotron instability, as well as the influence of different forms of the electron distribution, by considering Maxwellian distributions, bi-kappa distributions, and product-bi-kappa distributions. The cases of ions described by either Maxwellian or bi-kappa distributions are also considered, for comparison. The results of the numerical analysis show that the increase in the non-thermal character associated with the anisotropic kappa distributions for ions contributes to enhance the instability as compared to that obtained in the Maxwellian case, in magnitude and in wave number range, with more significant enhancement for the case of ion product-bi-kappa distributions than for the case of ion bi-kappa distributions. It is also shown that the ion-cyclotron instability is decreased if the electrons are described by product-bi-kappa distributions, while electrons described by bi-kappa distributions lead to growth rates which are very similar to those obtained considering a Maxwellian distribution for the electron population.

  20. Latitudinal dependence of nonlinear interaction between electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave and terrestrial ring current ions

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Zhenpeng Zhu, Hui; Zheng, Huinan; Xiao, Fuliang; Zhang, Min; Liu, Y. C.-M.; Shen, Chao; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui

    2014-05-15

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves can lead to the rapid decay (on a timescale of hours) of the terrestrial ring current. Such decay process is usually investigated in the framework of quasi-linear theory. Here, both theoretical analysis and test-particle simulation are performed to understand the nonlinear interaction between ring current ions and EMIC waves. In particular, the dependence of the nonlinear wave-particle interaction processes on the ion initial latitude is investigated in detail. These nonlinear processes are classified into the phase trapping and phase bunching, and the phase bunching is further divided into the channel and cluster effects. Compared to the prediction of the quasi-linear theory, the ring current decay rate can be reduced by the phase trapping, increased by the channel effect phase bunching, but non-deterministically influenced by the cluster effect phase bunching. The ion initial latitude changes the occurrence of the phase trapping, modulates the transport direction and strength of the cluster effect phase bunching, and only slightly affects the channel effect phase bunching. The current results suggest that the latitudinal dependence of these nonlinear processes should be considered in the evaluation of the ring current decay induced by EMIC waves.

  1. A CW radiofrequency ion source for production of negative hydrogen ion beams for cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.; Komppula, J.; Koivisto, H.; Tuunanen, J.; Potkins, D.; Stewart, T.; Dehnel, M. P.

    2015-04-08

    A CW 13.56 MHz radiofrequency-driven ion source RADIS for production of H{sup −} and D{sup −} beams is under development for replacing the filament-driven ion source of the MCC30/15 cyclotron. The RF ion source has a 16-pole multicusp plasma chamber, an electromagnet-based magnetic filter and an external planar spiral RF antenna behind an AlN window. The extraction is a 5-electrode system with an adjustable puller electrode voltage for optimizing the beam formation, a water-cooled electron dump electrode and an accelerating einzel lens. At 2650 W of RF power, the source produces 1 mA of H{sup −} (2.6 mA/cm{sup 2}), which is the intensity needed at injection for production of 200 µA H{sup +} with the filament-driven ion source. A simple pepperpot device has been developed for characterizing the beam emittance. Plans for improving the power efficiency with the use of a new permanent magnet front plate is discussed.

  2. Oscillating two stream instability of electromagnetic pump in the ion cyclotron range of frequency in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Nafis; Tripathi, V. K.; Rafat, M.; Husain, Mudassir M.

    2009-06-15

    An analytical formalism of oscillating two stream instability of a large amplitude electromagnetic wave in the ion cyclotron range of frequency in a plasma is developed. The instability produces electrostatic ion cyclotron sidebands and a driven low frequency mode. The nonlinear coupling arises primarily due to the motion of ions and is strong when the pump frequency is close to ion cyclotron frequency and the oscillatory ion velocity is a significant fraction of acoustic speed. For propagation perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, the X-mode pump wave produces flute type perturbation with maximum growth rate at some specific wavelengths, which are three to four times larger than the ion Larmor radius. For propagation at oblique angles to ambient magnetic field, the ion cyclotron O-mode, the growth rate increases with the wave number of the low frequency mode.

  3. SELF-CONSISTENT ION CYCLOTRON ANISOTROPY-BETA RELATION FOR SOLAR WIND PROTONS

    SciTech Connect

    Isenberg, Philip A.; Maruca, Bennett A.; Kasper, Justin C. E-mail: bmaruca@ssl.berkeley.edu

    2013-08-20

    We derive a set of self-consistent marginally stable states for a system of ion-cyclotron waves propagating parallel to the large-scale magnetic field through a homogeneous proton-electron plasma. The proton distributions and the wave dispersions are related through the condition that no further ion-cyclotron resonant particle scattering or wave growth/damping may take place. The thermal anisotropy of the protons in these states therefore defines the threshold value for triggering the proton-cyclotron anisotropy instability. A number of recent papers have noted that the anisotropy of solar wind protons at 1 AU does not seem to be limited by the proton-cyclotron anisotropy threshold, even at low plasma beta. However, this puzzle seems to be due solely to the estimation of this anisotropy threshold under the assumption that the protons have a bi-Maxwellian distribution. We note that bi-Maxwellian distributions are never marginally stable to the resonant cyclotron interaction, so these estimates do not represent physically valid thresholds. The threshold anisotropies obtained from our marginally stable states are much larger, as a function of proton parallel beta, than the bi-Maxwellian estimates, and we show that the measured data remains below these more rigorous thresholds. Thus, the results of this paper resolve the apparent contradiction presented by the solar wind anisotropy observations at 1 AU: the bi-Maxwellian anisotropies are not rigorous thresholds, and so do not limit the proton distributions in the solar wind.

  4. Excitation of electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves by an ion beam in a two-ion component plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Jyotsna; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2010-12-15

    An ion beam propagating through a magnetized plasma cylinder containing electrons, light positive potassium ions (K{sup +}), and heavy positive cesium ions (Cs{sup +}) drives electrostatic ion cyclotron (EIC) waves to instability via Cerenkov interaction. Two EIC wave modes are present, the K{sup +} and Cs{sup +} modes. The unstable wave frequencies and the growth rate of both the light positive ion and heavy positive ion modes increase with an increase in their relative ion concentrations. The growth rate of both the unstable modes (K{sup +} and Cs{sup +}) scales one-third power of the beam density. The real part of the frequency of both the unstable modes (K{sup +} and Cs{sup +}) increases with the beam energy and scales as almost one-half power of the beam energy. Numerical calculations of the growth rate and mode frequencies have been carried out for the parameters of the experiment of Suszcynsky et al. [J. Geophys. Res. 94, 8966 (1989)]. It is found that the unstable wave frequencies of both the light positive ion and heavy positive ion modes increase with the magnetic fields in accordance with the experimental observations.

  5. Nonlinear kinetic simulations of ion cyclotron emission from fusion products in large tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendy, Richard; Cook, James; Chapman, Sandra

    2012-10-01

    Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) was the only collective radiative instability, driven by fusion-born ions, observed from deuterium-tritium plasmas in both JET and TFTR (R O Dendy et al., Nucl. Fusion 35, 1733 (1995)). Suprathermal emission, peaked at sequential ion cyclotron harmonics at the outer mid-plane edge, was detected using heating antennas as receivers on JET and using probes in TFTR. The intensity of ICE spectral peaks scaled linearly with fusion reactivity. The underlying emission mechanism appears to be the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability (MCI), which involves resonance between: the fast Alfv'en wave; cyclotron harmonic waves supported by the energetic ions and by the background thermal plasma; and a set of centrally born fusion products, lying on barely trapped orbits, which undergo large drift excursions. Analytical studies show that the linear growth rate of the MCI corresponds well with certain observational features of ICE, including ones where a nonlinear treatment might be thought essential. To help explain this, we have carried out direct numerical simulations using a particle-in-cell (PIC) code. We focus on the results of extending MCI theory from the linear into the nonlinear regime for large tokamak parameters.

  6. Transport in JET H-mode Plasmas with Beam and Ion Cyclotron Heating

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny, et. al.

    2012-07-13

    Ion Cyclotron (IC) Range of Frequency waves and neutral beam (NB) injection are planned for heating in ITER and other future tokamaks. It is important to understand transport in plasmas with NB and IC to plan, predict, and improve transport and confinement. Transport predictions require simulations of the heating profiles, and for this, accurate modeling of the IC and NB heating is needed.

  7. Production of flickering aurora and field-aligned electron flux by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temerin, M.; Mcfadden, J.; Boehm, M.; Carlson, C. W.; Lotko, W.

    1986-01-01

    Recent observations have suggested that flickering aurora is produced by a modulation of the field-aligned component of the electron flux within an auroral arc. It is proposed that a portion of the field-aligned electrons are of ionospheric origin and that these electrons are accelerated and their flux modulated by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves that occur below the main acceleration region on auroral arc field lines. A model of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave shows that the parallel phase velocity of the wave increase as the wave propagates toward the ionosphere. A test particle calculation shows that ionospheric electrons trapped or reflected by the wave are accelerated to energies of several keV and that their flux is modulated at the wave frequency. The relative amplitudes of the model wave electric fields are consistent with the observations of small-scale low-frequency ionospheric and magnetospheric electric fields near auroral arcs of approximately 10 mV/m and 100 mV/m, respectively. The large-amplitude ion cyclotron waves also produce a ponderomotive force and a self-consistent ambipolar electric field. Energy considerations show that the downward energy flux in the electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave can be several percent of the total downward auroral electron energy flux.

  8. Effect of a RF Wave on Ion Cyclotron Instability in Size Distributed Impurities Containing Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, A. K.; Tripathi, V. K.; Annou, R.

    2008-09-07

    The effect of a large amplitude lower hybrid wave on current driven ion cyclotron waves in a dusty plasma where dust grains are size distributed is examined. The influence of the lower hybrid wave on the stabilization of the instability is studied. The efficacy of rf is dust density dependent.

  9. Ion heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies in the Wisconsin Tokapole II

    SciTech Connect

    Biddle, A. P.

    1980-06-01

    Ion temperatures of 75 eV, a doubling of the ohmic heating temperature in a normal discharge, have been achieved using the fast magnetosonic wave heating at the second, third, and fourth harmonics of the cyclotron frequency in a single component hydrogen plasma. The wave launching structure is a single turn, shielded, insulated loop which constitutes the inductor of the rf source tank circuit. Power levels of 800 kW have been applied to the plasma for periods of up to 1.1 milliseconds. Good agreement has been found between theory and experiment for loading and wave propagation in the plasma for m = 0 and m = +1 modes. Eigenmodes have been observed by peaking of both the rf wave amplitude and the loading of the oscillator, as well as by oscillator frequency shifts imposed by their passage.

  10. Energy transfer between energetic ring current H(+) and O(+) by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, Richard M.; Horne, Richard B.

    1994-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in the frequency range below the helium gyrofrequency can be excited in the equatorial region of the outer magnetosphere by cyclotron resonant instability with anisotropic ring current H(+) ions. As the unducted waves propagate to higher latitudes, the wave normal should become highly inclined to the ambient magnetic field. Under such conditions, wave energy can be absorbed by cyclotron resonant interactions with ambient O(+), leading to ion heating perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. Resonant wave absorption peaks in the vicinity of the bi-ion frequency and the second harmonic of the O(+) gyrofrequrency. This absorption should mainly occur at latitudes between 10 deg and 30 deg along auroral field lines (L is greater than or equal to 7) in the postnoon sector. The concomitant ion heating perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field can contribute to the isotropization and geomagnetic trapping of collapsed O(+) ion conics (or beams) that originate from a low-altitude ionospheric source region. During geomagnetic storms when the O(+) content of the magnetosphere is significantly enhanced, the absorption of EMIC waves should become more efficient, and it may contribute to the observed acceleration of O(+) ions of ionospheric origin up to ring current energies.

  11. Status of the ITER ion cyclotron heating and current drive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamalle, P.; Beaumont, B.; Kazarian, F.; Gassmann, T.; Agarici, G.; Montemayor, T. Alonzo; Bamber, R.; Bernard, J.-M.; Boilson, D.; Cadinot, A.; Calarco, F.; Colas, L.; Courtois, X.; Deibele, C.; Durodié, F.; Fano, J.; Fredd, E.; Goulding, R.; Greenough, N.; Hillairet, J.; Jacquinot, J.; Kaye, A. S.; Kočan, M.; Labidi, H.; Leichtle, D.; Loarte, A.; McCarthy, M.; Messiaen, A.; Meunier, L.; Mukherjee, A.; Oberlin-Harris, C.; Patel, A. M.; Peters, B.; Rajnish, K.; Rasmussen, D.; Sanabria, R.; Sartori, R.; Singh, R.; Swain, D.; Trivedi, R. G.; Turner, A.

    2015-12-01

    The paper reports on latest developments for the ITER Ion Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive system: imminent acceptance tests of a prototype power supply at full power; successful factory acceptance of candidate RF amplifier tubes which will be tested on dedicated facilities; further design integration and experimental validation of transmission line components under 6MW hour-long pulses. The antenna Faraday shield thermal design has been validated above requirements by cyclic high heat flux tests. R&D on ceramic brazing is under way for the RF vacuum windows. The antenna port plug RF design is stable but major evolution of the mechanical design is in preparation to achieve compliance with the load specification, warrant manufacturability and incorporate late interface change requests. The antenna power coupling capability predictions have been strengthened by showing that, if the plasma scrape-off layer turns out to be steep and the edge density low, the reference burning plasma can realistically be displaced to improve the coupling.

  12. Vacuum Ultraviolet Photodissociation and Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) Mass Spectrometry: Revisited.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Jared B; Robinson, Errol W; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2016-03-15

    We revisited the implementation of 193 nm ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) within the ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) cell of a Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. UVPD performance characteristics were examined in the context of recent developments in the understanding of UVPD and in-cell tandem mass spectrometry. Efficient UVPD and photo-ECD of a model peptide and proteins within the ICR cell of a FT-ICR mass spectrometer are accomplished through appropriate modulation of laser pulse timing, relative to ion magnetron motion and the potential applied to an ion optical element upon which photons impinge. It is shown that UVPD yields efficient and extensive fragmentation, resulting in excellent sequence coverage for model peptide and protein cations. PMID:26882021

  13. Gas Feeding System Supplying the U-400M Cyclotron Ion Source with Hydrogen Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Yukhimchuk, A.A.; Angilopov, V.V.; Apasov, V.A.

    2005-07-15

    Automated system feeding into ion source hydrogen isotopes as molecules with preset ratio of the fluxes is described. The control system automatically maintained the working parameters and provided graphic and digital representation of the controlled processes. The radiofrequency (RF) ion source installed at the axial injection line of the cyclotron produced ion beams of HD{sup +}, HT{sup +}, DT{sup +}, D{sub 2}H{sup +}, etc. At a several months DT{sup +} beam acceleration the tritium consumption was less than 108 Bq/hr. The intensity of a 58.2 MeV triton beam (T{sup +} ions) extracted from the cyclotron chamber was about 10 nA.

  14. A comprehensive analysis of ion cyclotron waves in the equatorial magnetosphere of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeks, Zachary; Simon, Sven; Kabanovic, Slawa

    2016-09-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of ion cyclotron waves in the equatorial magnetosphere of Saturn, considering all magnetic field data collected during the Cassini era (totaling to over 4 years of data from the equatorial plane). This dataset includes eight targeted flybys of Enceladus, three targeted flybys of Dione, and three targeted flybys of Rhea. Because all remaining orbits of Cassini are high-inclination, our study provides the complete map of ion cyclotron waves in Saturn's equatorial magnetosphere during the Cassini era. We provide catalogs of the radial and longitudinal dependencies of the occurrence rate and amplitude of the ion cyclotron fundamental and first harmonic wave modes. The fundamental wave mode is omnipresent between the orbits of Enceladus and Dione and evenly distributed across all Local Times. The occurrence rate of the fundamental mode displays a Fermi-Dirac-like profile with respect to radial distance from Saturn. Detection of the first harmonic mode is a rare event occurring in only 0.49% of measurements taken and always in conjunction with the fundamental mode. We also search for a dependency of the ion cyclotron wave field on the orbital positions of the icy moons Enceladus, Dione, and Rhea. On magnetospheric length scales, the wave field is independent of the moons' orbital positions. For Enceladus, we analyze wave amplitude profiles of seven close flybys (E9, E12, E13, E14, E17, E18, and E19), which occurred during the studied trajectory segments, to look for any local effects of Enceladan plume variability on the wave field. We find that even in the close vicinity of Enceladus, the wave amplitudes display no discernible dependency on Enceladus' angular distance to its orbital apocenter. Thus, the correlation between plume activity and angular distance to apocenter proposed by Hedman et al. (2013) does not leave a clearly distinguishable imprint in the ion cyclotron wave field.

  15. Status of the Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Toyo University

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, T.; Minezaki, H.; Ishihara, S.; Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Drentje, A. G.; Rácz, R.; Biri, S.; Asaji, T.; Kato, Y.; Yoshida, Y.

    2014-02-15

    In the paper, the material science experiments, carried out recently using the Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) at Toyo University, are reported. We have investigated several methods to synthesize endohedral C{sub 60} using ion-ion and ion-molecule collision reaction in the ECRIS. Because of the simplicity of the configuration, we can install a large choice of additional equipment in the ECRIS. The Bio-Nano ECRIS is suitable not only to test the materials production but also to test technical developments to improve or understand the performance of an ECRIS.

  16. Comparative study of ion cyclotron waves at Mars, Venus and Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, H. Y.; Russell, C. T.; Zhang, T. L.; Blanco-Cano, X.

    2011-08-01

    Ion cyclotron waves are generated in the solar wind when it picks up freshly ionized planetary exospheric ions. These waves grow from the free energy of the highly anisotropic distribution of fresh pickup ions, and are observed in the spacecraft frame with left-handed polarization and a wave frequency near the ion's gyrofrequency. At Mars and Venus and in the Earth's polar cusp, the solar wind directly interacts with the planetary exospheres. Ion cyclotron waves with many similar properties are observed in these diverse plasma environments. The ion cyclotron waves at Mars indicate its hydrogen exosphere to be extensive and asymmetric in the direction of the interplanetary electric field. The production of fast neutrals plays an important role in forming an extended exosphere in the shape and size observed. At Venus, the region of exospheric proton cyclotron wave production may be restricted to the magnetosheath. The waves observed in the solar wind at Venus appear to be largely produced by the solar-wind-Venus interaction, with some waves at higher frequencies formed near the Sun and carried outward by the solar wind to Venus. These waves have some similarity to the expected properties of exospherically produced proton pickup waves but are characterized by magnetic connection to the bow shock or by a lack of correlation with local solar wind properties respectively. Any confusion of solar derived waves with exospherically derived ion pickup waves is not an issue at Mars because the solar-produced waves are generally at much higher frequencies than the local pickup waves and the solar waves should be mostly absorbed when convected to Mars distance as the proton cyclotron frequency in the plasma frame approaches the frequency of the solar-produced waves. In the Earth's polar cusp, the wave properties of ion cyclotron waves are quite variable. Spatial gradients in the magnetic field may cause this variation as the background field changes between the regions in which

  17. First operation of the charge-breeder electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source at the Texas A and M Cyclotron Institute

    SciTech Connect

    May, D. P.; Tabacaru, G.; Abegglen, F. P.; Cornelius, W. D.

    2010-02-15

    The 14.5 GHz electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source (ECRIS) designed and fabricated specifically for charge breeding has been installed at the Texas A and M University Cyclotron Institute for use in the institute's ongoing radioactive-ion-beam upgrade. The initial testing of the source has just begun with magnetic analysis of the ECRIS beam. The source has only been conditioning for a brief time at low microwave power, and it is continuing to improve. After the source has been conditioned and characterized, charge-breeding trials with stable beams from a singly ionizing source will begin.

  18. Ion cyclotron anisotropy instabilities in the magnetosheath - Theory and simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. P.; Mckean, Michael E.; Winske, Dan

    1993-01-01

    Second-order theory and 1D hybrid computer simulations are used to examine the nonlinear properties of proton and helium cyclotron anisotropy instabilities in the terrestrial magnetosheath at relatively weak fluctuations levels and at propagation parallel to the background magnetic field. The simulations confirm the second-order predictions that both instabilities yield efficient wave-particle interactions; the rate at which the driving species anisotropy is reduced is much greater than the rate at which that species loses kinetic energy. It is suggested that these instabilities should saturate at relatively low levels. An approximate expression is derived for the fluctuating field energy at saturation of the fastest growing modes, and it is found that it is in fair agreement with three computer simulations.

  19. Results of RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with 28 GHz.

    PubMed

    Higurashi, Y; Ohnishi, J; Nakagawa, T; Haba, H; Tamura, M; Aihara, T; Fujimaki, M; Komiyama, M; Uchiyama, A; Kamigaito, O

    2012-02-01

    We measured the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions and x-ray heat load for RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with 28 GHz microwaves under the various conditions. The beam intensity of Xe(20+) became maximum at B(min) ∼ 0.65 T, which was ∼65% of the magnetic field strength of electron cyclotron resonance (B(ECR)) for 28 GHz microwaves. We observed that the heat load of x-ray increased with decreasing gas pressure and field gradient at resonance zone. It seems that the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions with 28 GHz is higher than that with 18 GHz at same RF power. PMID:22380155

  20. Observations of ion cyclotron waves near synchronous orbit and on the ground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    Ion cyclotron waves (ICWs) generated in the magnetosphere by the ion cyclotron instability of 10-100 keV protons are now known to be the origin of short-period (0.1-5 Hz) electromagnetic field oscillations observed by synchronous spacecraft and on the earth's surface. Observations of the various wave characteristics, including spectral and polarization properties, that lead to the identification of generation and propagation mechaniisms, and regions in the magnetosphere are described with reference to ATS-6, GEOS, and ground-based wave data and interpreted using cold plasma propagation theory. The presence of heavy ions (O/+/, He/+/) dramatically modifies ICW magnetospheric propagation characteristics giving rise to spectral slots and polarization reversals. These properties may be used in plasma diagnostics. Finally satellite-ground correlations and techniques for determining the magnetospheric source position of ICWs not seen at synchronous orbit but observed on the ground as structured Pc1 pulsations are considered.

  1. Ion cyclotron waves at unmagnetized bodies: a comparison of Mars, Venus and Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, H.; Russell, C. T.; Cowee, M.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Zhang, T.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2009-12-01

    Mars, Venus and Titan do not have appreciable global magnetic fields. Their high-altitude neutral atmospheres are not shielded from being lost to the solar wind and the Saturnian magnetosphere. When the atmospheric hydrogen atoms of Mars and Venus are ionized and picked up by the solar wind, proton cyclotron waves are created from the free energy of the ring-beam distribution of the pick-up ions. At Mars, proton cyclotron waves observed by Mars Global Surveyor extend from the magnetosheath to over 12 Mars radii, with intermittent occurrence and amplitudes slowly varying with distance. The wave occurrence pattern indicates a disk-shaped hydrogen exosphere of Mars with asymmetry in the direction of the interplanetary electric field. Fast neutrals produced by neutralization of the pickup ions can travel across fieldlines to distant regions where they get re-ionized and produce waves far downstream. Thus the top of Mars exosphere extends in a disk to high altitude, with its orientation controlled by the interplanetary magnetic field. At Venus, plasma waves having properties similar to ion cyclotron waves are observed in the solar wind around the planet by Venus Express, with wave frequencies that range from 0.2 to 5.9 times of the proton gyrofrequency. Statistical study shows that the waves with frequency higher than 1.5 times the proton gyrofrequency are not generated locally and are similar to the waves observed at 0.3 AU and 1 AU which appear to be created near the Sun and convected outward with the solar wind. The rest of the waves are mostly magnetically connected to the bow shock, so they are probably generated by particles backstreaming from the shock and propagate out further from the foreshock. At Titan, ion cyclotron waves are not observed although wave generation is expected due to the large pickup rate of hydrocarbon ions at high altitude of Titan. We attempt to understand the lack of ion cyclotron waves at Titan using hybrid simulations. Studying and

  2. Parametric coupling of lower hybrid wave with gyrating ion beam driven ion cyclotron instability in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Rohtash; Tripathi, V. K.

    2013-07-15

    A lower hybrid wave, launched into a tokamak for supplementary heating in the presence of neutral beam turned gyrating ion beam, is seen to excite some prominent channels of parametric decay. The beam driven deuterium cyclotron mode is further destabilized by the lower hybrid pump through the nonlinear 4-wave coupling, involving higher and lower frequency lower hybrid sidebands, when ω{sub 0}/k{sub 0z}v{sub 0z}=(1−ω{sub LH}{sup 2}/ω{sub 0}{sup 2}) , where ω{sub LH} is the lower hybrid frequency, ω{sub 0} and k{sub 0z} are the frequency and parallel wave number of the pump wave, and v{sub 0z} is the velocity of ion beam parallel to the magnetic field. The growth rate increases with parallel wave number of the ion-cyclotron mode. The pump is also susceptible to parametric upconversion into an upper sideband shifted by the frequency of the negative energy deuterium cyclotron mode. For typical parameters, the growth rate of this channel is around one fiftieth of deuterium cyclotron frequency and falls off with the transverse wave number of the mode.

  3. A 1D model for describing ion cyclotron resonance heating at arbitrary cyclotron harmonics in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Eester, Dirk; Lerche, Ernesto

    2013-05-01

    Both at low and higher cyclotron harmonics, properly accounting for finite Larmor radius effects is crucial in many ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating scenario's creating high energy tails. This paper discusses an extension TOMCAT-U of the 1D TOMCAT tokamak plasma wave equation solver (Van Eester and Koch 1998 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 40 1949) to arbitrary harmonics and arbitrary wavelengths while only keeping leading order terms in equilibrium variation terms. Rather than adopting the particle position, the guiding center position is used as the independent variable when writing down an expression for the dielectric response that is suitable for numerical application. This choice of independent variable yields intuitive expressions involving the Kennel-Engelmann operator which can directly be linked to the corresponding expressions in the RF diffusion operator appearing in the Fokker-Planck equation. It also guarantees that a positive definite power transfer from waves to particles is ensured for any of the wave modes in a plasma in which all populations have a Maxwellian distribution, as is expected from first principles. Rather than relying on a truncated Taylor series expansion of the dielectric response, an integrodifferential approach that retains all finite Larmor radius effects is proposed. To keep the required computation time for this generalized description reasonable, tabulation of integrals is intensively used. Although the accent is on the presentation of the upgraded formalism as well as the adopted recursions and tabulations, a few examples are provided to illustrate the potential of the new wave code that relies on these tabulations.

  4. Observations of single-pass ion cyclotron heating in a trans-sonic flowing plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bering, E. A.; Díaz, F. R. Chang; Squire, J. P.; Glover, T. W.; Carter, M. D.; McCaskill, G. E.; Longmier, B. W.; Brukardt, M. S.; Chancery, W. J.; Jacobson, V. T.

    2010-04-01

    The VAriable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR®) is a high power electric spacecraft propulsion system, capable of Isp/thrust modulation at constant power [F. R. Chang Díaz et al., Proceedings of the 39th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, Reno, NV, 8-11 Jan. 2001]. The VASIMR® uses a helicon discharge to generate plasma. This plasma is energized by an rf booster stage that uses left hand polarized slow mode waves launched from the high field side of the ion cyclotron resonance. In the experiments reported in this paper, the booster uses 2-4 MHz waves with up to 50 kW of power. This process is similar to the ion cyclotron heating (ICH) in tokamaks, but in the VASIMR® the ions only pass through the resonance region once. The rapid absorption of ion cyclotron waves has been predicted in recent theoretical studies. These theoretical predictions have been supported with several independent measurements in this paper. The single-pass ICH produced a substantial increase in ion velocity. Pitch angle distribution studies showed that this increase took place in the resonance region where the ion cyclotron frequency was roughly equal to the frequency on the injected rf waves. Downstream of the resonance region the perpendicular velocity boost should be converted to axial flow velocity through the conservation of the first adiabatic invariant as the magnetic field decreases in the exhaust region of the VASIMR®. This paper will review all of the single-pass ICH ion acceleration data obtained using deuterium in the first VASIMR® physics demonstrator machine, the VX-50. During these experiments, the available power to the helicon ionization stage increased from 3 to 20+ kW. The increased plasma density produced increased plasma loading of the ICH coupler. Starting with an initial demonstration of single-pass ion cyclotron acceleration, the experiments demonstrate significant improvements in coupler efficiency and in ion heating efficiency. In

  5. ENSEMBLE SIMULATIONS OF PROTON HEATING IN THE SOLAR WIND VIA TURBULENCE AND ION CYCLOTRON RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2014-07-01

    Protons in the solar corona and heliosphere exhibit anisotropic velocity distributions, violation of magnetic moment conservation, and a general lack of thermal equilibrium with the other particle species. There is no agreement about the identity of the physical processes that energize non-Maxwellian protons in the solar wind, but a traditional favorite has been the dissipation of ion cyclotron resonant Alfvén waves. This paper presents kinetic models of how ion cyclotron waves heat protons on their journey from the corona to interplanetary space. It also derives a wide range of new solutions for the relevant dispersion relations, marginal stability boundaries, and nonresonant velocity-space diffusion rates. A phenomenological model containing both cyclotron damping and turbulent cascade is constructed to explain the suppression of proton heating at low alpha-proton differential flow speeds. These effects are implemented in a large-scale model of proton thermal evolution from the corona to 1 AU. A Monte Carlo ensemble of realistic wind speeds, densities, magnetic field strengths, and heating rates produces a filled region of parameter space (in a plane described by the parallel plasma beta and the proton temperature anisotropy ratio) similar to what is measured. The high-beta edges of this filled region are governed by plasma instabilities and strong heating rates. The low-beta edges correspond to weaker proton heating and a range of relative contributions from cyclotron resonance. On balance, the models are consistent with other studies that find only a small fraction of the turbulent power spectrum needs to consist of ion cyclotron waves.

  6. Are Ring Current Ions Lost in Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Wave Dispersion Relation?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.

    2006-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are widely observed in the inner and outer magnetosphere, at geostationary orbit, at high latitudes along the plasmapause, and at the ionospheric altitudes. Interaction of the Ring Current (RC) ions and EMIC waves causes ion scattering into the loss cone and leads to decay of the RC, especially during the main phase of storms when the RC decay times of about one hour or less are observed. The oblique EMIC waves damp due to Landau resonance with the thermal plasmaspheric electrons, and subsequent transport of the dissipating wave energy into the ionosphere below causes an ionosphere temperature enhancement. Induced scattering of these waves by the plasmaspheric thermal ions leads to ion temperature enhancement, and forms a so-called hot zone near the plasmapause where the temperature of core plasma ions can reach tens of thousands of degrees. Relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt also interact well with the EMIC waves, and during the main and/or recovery phases of the storms these electrons can easily be scattered into the loss cone over a time scale from several hours to a day. The plasma density distribution in the magnetosphere and the ion content play a critical role in EMIC wave generation and propagation, but the wave dispersion relation in the known RC-EMIC wave interaction models is assumed to be determined by the thermal plasma distribution only. In these models, the modification of the EMIC wave dispersion relation caused by the RC ions is not taken into account, and the RC ions are only treated as a source of free energy in order to generate EMIC waves. At the same time, the RC ions can dominate the thermal magnetospheric content in the night MLT sector at great L shells during the main and/or recovery storm phase. In this study, using our self-consistent RC-EMIC wave model [Khazanov et al., 2006], we simulate the May 1998 storm in order to quantify the global EMIC wave redistribution caused by

  7. Effect of Ring Current Ions on Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Wave Dispersion Relation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamayunov, K. V.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2006-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are widely observed in the inner and outer magnetosphere, at geostationary orbit, at high latitudes along the plasmapause, and at the ionospheric altitudes. Interaction of the Ring Current (RC) ions and EMIC waves causes ion scattering into the loss cone and leads to decay of the RC, especially during the main phase of storms when the RC decay times of about one hour or less are observed. The oblique EMIC waves damp due to Landau resonance with the thermal plasmaspheric electrons, and subsequent transport of the dissipating wave energy into the ionosphere below causes an ionosphere temperature enhancement. Induced scattering of these waves by the plasmaspheric thermal ions leads to ion temperature enhancement, and forms a so-called hot zone near the plasmapause where the temperature of core plasma ions can reach tens of thousands of degrees. Relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt also interact well with the EMIC waves, and during the main and/or recovery phases of the storms these electrons can easily be scattered into the loss cone over a time scale from several hours to a day. The plasma density distribution in the magnetosphere and the ion content play a critical role in EMIC wave generation and propagation, but the wave dispersion relation in the known RC-EMIC wave interaction models is assumed to be determined by the thermal plasma distribution only. In these models, the modification of the EMIC wave dispersion relation caused by the RC ions is not taken into account, and the RC ions are only treated as a source of free energy in order to generate EMIC waves. At the same time, the RC ions can dominate the thermal magnetospheric content in the night MLT sector at great L shells during the main and/or recovery storm phase. In this study, using our self-consistent RC-EMIC wave model [Khazanov et al., 2006], we simulate the May 1998 storm in order to quantify the global EMIC wave redistribution caused by

  8. Propagation and absorption of ion cyclotron resonant waves in an FRC configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccherini, Francesco; Galeotti, Laura; Brambilla, Marco; Barnes, Daniel C.; Yang, Xiaokang; TAE Team

    2013-10-01

    The generation and propagation of an ion cyclotron resonant wave is studied in a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasma which includes at least two different ion species. We consider minority heating as the main process through which energy is transferred to the ions and we take two scenarios into account. In the first scenario the charge/mass ratio of the minority species is higher than the corresponding ratio of the majority species and in the second scenario the opposite is considered. The first case is particularly interesting because it allows the study of absorption rates of ions for frequency values higher than the maximun cyclotron frequency of the majority species and lower than the maximum cyclotron frequency of the minority species. In such a frequency range the majority species can absorb energy through second or higher harmonic processes only. Because of the very peculiar magnetic field structure of FRCs, the second scenario may be required in case the resonance process must take place in the very inner regions of the plasma. In this latter case the electron absorption may play a very significant role and we give a preliminary description of the key parameters in the antenna configuration, which can reduce or enhance such an effect.

  9. Ground-satellite study of a Pc 1 ion cyclotron wave event

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, B.J.; Kemp, W.J.; Webster, D.J. )

    1989-09-01

    The magnetospheric generation and propagation characteristics of ion cyclotron waves associated with a Pc 1 emission observed by a network of four middle and low-latitude ground stations are determined using ground source location techniques and ISEE 1 plasma data. The source region at L = 4.7 {plus minus} 0.7 is determined from propagation in the F{sub 2} region ionospheric duct using wave polarization characteristics at ground stations. This source is just inside the steep plasmapause seen by ISEE 1 at L = 4.9 {plus minus} 0.1. The ion cyclotron wave packet interhemispheric bounce period measured from the ground spectra increases with time from 140 to 155 s during the event but is in agreement with dispersion calculations undertaken using ISEE 1 electron density and cool to cold ion composition data in a H{sup +} plasma with 8-10% He{sup +} and <1% O{sup +} ions. The frequency of the Pc 1 emission band seen on the ground (0.5-0.8 Hz) corresponds to the propagation region between the equatorial O{sup +} cutoff frequency and the He{sup +} cyclotron frequency. Linear convective growth rate calculations inside the plasmapause show significant wave amplitudes in this band. With these results it is possible to completely describe the wave generation mechanism and the magnetosphere ionosphere propagation characteristics for the Pc 1 event.

  10. ICRH of JET and LHD Majority Ions at Their Fundamental Cyclotron Frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Krasilnikov, A. V.; Kaschuck, Yu. A.; Amosov, V. N.; Van Eester, D.; Lerche, E.; Mailloux, J.; Stamp, M.; Jachmich, S.; Leggate, H.; Walden, A.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Santala, M.; Kiptily, V.; Popovichev, S.; Vdovin, V.; Biewer, T.; Crombe, K.; Esposito, B.

    2007-09-28

    Results of the experimental studies of ICRH at the fundamental cyclotron frequency of the majority deuterons in JET plasmas with near-tangential deuteron neutral beam injection (NBI) are presented. 1D, 2D and 3D ICRH modeling indicated that several ITER relevant mechanisms of heating may occur simultaneously in this heating scheme: fundamental ion cyclotron resonance heating of majority and beam D ions, impurity ion heating and electron heating due to Landau damping and TTMP. These mechanisms were studied in JET experiments with a {approx}90% D, 5% H plasma including traces of Be and Ar. Up to 2MW of ICRH power was applied at 25 MHz to NBI heated plasmas. In most of the discharges the toroidal magnetic field strength was 3.3T, but in one it was equal to 3.6T. The E{sub +} component of the electric field governs the ion cyclotron heating of not too fast particles. The Doppler shifted RF absorption of the beam deuterons away from the cold resonance at which E{sub +} is small was exploited to enhance the RF power absorption efficiency. Fundamental ICRH experiments were also carried out in LHD hydrogen plasma with high energy hydrogen NBI. ICRH was performed at 38MHz with injected power <1 MW. The effect of fundamental ICRH was clearly demonstrated in both machines.

  11. Ion cyclotron and spin-flip emissions from fusion products in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Arunasalam, V.; Greene, G.J.; Young, K.M.

    1993-02-01

    Power emission by fusion products of tokamak plasmas in their ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) and at their spin-flip resonance frequency is calculated for some specific model fusion product velocity-space distribution functions. The background plasma of say deuterium (D) is assumed to be in equilibrium with a Maxwellian distribution both for the electrons and ions. The fusion product velocity distributions analyzed here are: (1) A monoenergetic velocity space ring distribution. (2) A monoenergetic velocity space spherical shell distribution. (3) An anisotropic Maxwellian distribution with T {perpendicular} {ne} T{parallel}and with appreciable drift velocity along the confining magnetic field. Single ``dressed`` test particle spontaneous emission calculations are presented first and the radiation temperature for ion cyclotron emission (ICE) is analyzed both for black-body emission and nonequilibrium conditions. Thresholds for instability and overstability conditions are then examined and quasilinear and nonlinear theories of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron modes are discussed. Distinctions between ``kinetic or causal instabilities`` and ``hydrodynamic instabilities`` are drawn and some numerical estimates are presented for typical tokamak parameters. Semiquantitative remarks are offered on wave accessibility, mode conversion, and parametric decay instabilities as possible for spatially localized ICE. Calculations are carried out both for k{parallel} = 0 for k{parallel} {ne} 0. The effects of the temperature anisotropy and large drift velocities in the parallel direction are also examined. Finally, proton spin-flip resonance emission and absorption calculations are also presented both for thermal equilibrium conditions and for an ``inverted`` population of states.

  12. Ion cyclotron and spin-flip emissions from fusion products in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Arunasalam, V.; Greene, G.J.; Young, K.M.

    1993-02-01

    Power emission by fusion products of tokamak plasmas in their ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) and at their spin-flip resonance frequency is calculated for some specific model fusion product velocity-space distribution functions. The background plasma of say deuterium (D) is assumed to be in equilibrium with a Maxwellian distribution both for the electrons and ions. The fusion product velocity distributions analyzed here are: (1) A monoenergetic velocity space ring distribution. (2) A monoenergetic velocity space spherical shell distribution. (3) An anisotropic Maxwellian distribution with T [perpendicular] [ne] T[parallel]and with appreciable drift velocity along the confining magnetic field. Single dressed'' test particle spontaneous emission calculations are presented first and the radiation temperature for ion cyclotron emission (ICE) is analyzed both for black-body emission and nonequilibrium conditions. Thresholds for instability and overstability conditions are then examined and quasilinear and nonlinear theories of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron modes are discussed. Distinctions between kinetic or causal instabilities'' and hydrodynamic instabilities'' are drawn and some numerical estimates are presented for typical tokamak parameters. Semiquantitative remarks are offered on wave accessibility, mode conversion, and parametric decay instabilities as possible for spatially localized ICE. Calculations are carried out both for k[parallel] = 0 for k[parallel] [ne] 0. The effects of the temperature anisotropy and large drift velocities in the parallel direction are also examined. Finally, proton spin-flip resonance emission and absorption calculations are also presented both for thermal equilibrium conditions and for an inverted'' population of states.

  13. X-ray-spectroscopy analysis of electron-cyclotron-resonance ion-source plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, J. P.; Martins, M. C.; Parente, F.; Costa, A. M.; Marques, J. P.; Indelicato, P.

    2010-12-15

    Analysis of x-ray spectra emitted by highly charged ions in an electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source (ECRIS) may be used as a tool to estimate the charge-state distribution (CSD) in the source plasma. For that purpose, knowledge of the electron energy distribution in the plasma, as well as the most important processes leading to the creation and de-excitation of ionic excited states are needed. In this work we present a method to estimate the ion CSD in an ECRIS through the analysis of the x-ray spectra emitted by the plasma. The method is applied to the analysis of a sulfur ECRIS plasma.

  14. Production of large resonant plasma volumes in microwave electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Alton, G.D.

    1998-11-24

    Microwave injection methods are disclosed for enhancing the performance of existing electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources. The methods are based on the use of high-power diverse frequency microwaves, including variable-frequency, multiple-discrete-frequency, and broadband microwaves. The methods effect large resonant ``volume`` ECR regions in the ion sources. The creation of these large ECR plasma volumes permits coupling of more microwave power into the plasma, resulting in the heating of a much larger electron population to higher energies, the effect of which is to produce higher charge state distributions and much higher intensities within a particular charge state than possible in present ECR ion sources. 5 figs.

  15. Production of large resonant plasma volumes in microwave electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Alton, Gerald D.

    1998-01-01

    Microwave injection methods for enhancing the performance of existing electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources. The methods are based on the use of high-power diverse frequency microwaves, including variable-frequency, multiple-discrete-frequency, and broadband microwaves. The methods effect large resonant "volume" ECR regions in the ion sources. The creation of these large ECR plasma volumes permits coupling of more microwave power into the plasma, resulting in the heating of a much larger electron population to higher energies, the effect of which is to produce higher charge state distributions and much higher intensities within a particular charge state than possible in present ECR ion sources.

  16. Generation of plasma rotation by ion cyclotron resonance heating in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.S.; Phillips, C.K.; White, R.; Zweben, S.; Bonoli, P.T.; Rice, J.E.; Greenwald, M.J.; deGrassie, J.

    1999-05-01

    A physical mechanism for generation of a plasma rotation and radial electric field by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is presented in a tokamak geometry. By breaking the omnigenity of resonant ion orbits, ICRH can induce a nonambipolar minor-radial transport of resonant ions. This yields a radial charge separation, a modification to radial electric field E{sub r}, and the generation of plasma rotation. It is estimated that the ICRH fast-wave power available in the present-day tokamak experiments can be large enough to give a significant modification to plasma rotation. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Strong Pitch-Angle Diffusion of the Ring Current Ions Induced by Electromagnetic ion Cyclotron Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamayunov, K. V.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2005-12-01

    Deep and intense circulation of the magnetospheric plasma during geomagnetic storm is building up an energy content of the terrestrial ring current (RC) to an unusually high level, and the RC intensity strongly influence the storm-time space weather. The recovery of Dst index takes place hours or days after Dst minimum, and is caused by the decay of magnetopause and magnetotail current systems, and removal of the RC ions due to charge exchange, convection through the dayside magnetopause, Coulomb scattering, RC interaction with electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, and scattering by field-line curvature. During the early recovery phase, the RC loss rate is about one hour or less, and it is more rapid than charge exchange can support. Ion scattering into the loss cone by EMIC waves is believed to be responsible for such fast RC decay during this storm stage. However, most RC-EMIC wave interaction models do not predict the strong pitch-angle diffusion that is theoretically discussed and observed in the Earth magnetosphere (particularly by SEPS detectors on board of the POLAR satellite). In present work, we employ our self-consistent RC-EMIC wave model in order to study systematically the occurrence of the RC strong pitch-angle diffusion caused by interaction with waves during the May 1998 storm. Most of cases of the strong diffusion and of the intense EMIC waves are located in the afternoon-premidnight MLT sector at 3 < L < 6, and exhibit significant linear correlation. During the early recovery phase (at about 08 UT on May 4), the entire RC energy range (less than 450 keV) is subject to strong pitch-angle diffusion. Although the flux transitions between trapped zone and loss cone are steeper for higher energy RC protons than for main body of the distribution function, the pitch-angle distributions are highly isotropic for all energies both inside and outside of the loss cone.

  18. An ICR study of ion-molecule reactions of PH(n)+ ions. [of importance to interstellar chemistry, using ion cyclotron resonance techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, L. R.; Anicich, V. G.; Huntress, W. T.

    1983-01-01

    The reactions of PH(n)+ ions (n = 0-3) were examined with a number of neutrals using ion-cyclotron-resonance techniques. The reactions examined have significance for the distribution of phosphorus in interstellar molecules. The results indicate that interstellar molecules containing the P-O bond are likely to be more abundant than those containing the P-H bond.

  19. Formation of a conical distribution and intense ion heating in the presence of hydrogen cyclotron waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuda, H.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    1981-07-01

    In the considered investigation, it is assumed that the field aligned currents are responsible for producing electrostatic harmonic cyclotron waves (EHC). Using a one-dimensional simulation model in which the electron velocity distribution is maintained by a constant injection of the initial distribution, it is shown that, in contrast to earlier initial value simulations, EHC waves grow to a large amplitude, resulting in the formation of an anisotropic ion velocity distribution. Both the heating rate and the anisotropy are in reasonable agreement with the quasi-linear theory, taking into account the cyclotron resonance. The results show that the saturation is due to the combined effects of wave induced diffusion in an electron velocity space and the heating of ions perpendicularly. Both these effects reduce the growth rate.

  20. Origin of ion-cyclotron turbulence in the downward Birkeland current region

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, B.; Jasperse, J. R.; Lund, E. J.; Grossbard, N.

    2011-02-15

    Linear stability analysis of the electron velocity distributions, which are observed in the FAST satellite measurements in the downward Birkeland current region of the magnetosphere, is presented. The satellite-measured particle (electrons and protons) velocity distributions are fitted with analytic functions and the dispersion relation is derived in terms of the plasma dispersion functions associated with those distribution functions. Numerical solutions of the dispersion relation show that the bump-on-tail structure of the electron velocity distribution can excite electrostatic ion-cyclotron instabilities by the Landau resonance mechanism. Nonlinear evolution of these instabilities may explain the observed electrostatic ion-cyclotron turbulence in the Birkeland current region. Excitation of other types of instabilities by the fitted electron velocity distributions and their relevance are also discussed.

  1. Power requirements for electron cyclotron current drive and ion cyclotron resonance heating for sawtooth control in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, I. T.; Graves, J. P.; Sauter, O.; Zucca, C.; Asunta, O.; Buttery, R. J.; Coda, S.; Goodman, T.; Igochine, V.; Johnson, T.; Jucker, M.; La Haye, R. J.; Lennholm, M.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2013-06-01

    13 MW of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) power deposited inside the q = 1 surface is likely to reduce the sawtooth period in ITER baseline scenario below the level empirically predicted to trigger neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs). However, since the ECCD control scheme is solely predicated upon changing the local magnetic shear, it is prudent to plan to use a complementary scheme which directly decreases the potential energy of the kink mode in order to reduce the sawtooth period. In the event that the natural sawtooth period is longer than expected, due to enhanced α particle stabilization for instance, this ancillary sawtooth control can be provided from >10MW of ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) power with a resonance just inside the q = 1 surface. Both ECCD and ICRH control schemes would benefit greatly from active feedback of the deposition with respect to the rational surface. If the q = 1 surface can be maintained closer to the magnetic axis, the efficacy of ECCD and ICRH schemes significantly increases, the negative effect on the fusion gain is reduced, and off-axis negative-ion neutral beam injection (NNBI) can also be considered for sawtooth control. Consequently, schemes to reduce the q = 1 radius are highly desirable, such as early heating to delay the current penetration and, of course, active sawtooth destabilization to mediate small frequent sawteeth and retain a small q = 1 radius. Finally, there remains a residual risk that the ECCD + ICRH control actuators cannot keep the sawtooth period below the threshold for triggering NTMs (since this is derived only from empirical scaling and the control modelling has numerous caveats). If this is the case, a secondary control scheme of sawtooth stabilization via ECCD + ICRH + NNBI, interspersed with deliberate triggering of a crash through auxiliary power reduction and simultaneous pre-emptive NTM control by off-axis ECCD has been considered, permitting long transient periods with high fusion

  2. Use of a krypton isotope for rapid ion changeover at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 88-inch cyclotron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soli, George A.; Nichols, Donald K.

    1989-01-01

    An isotope of krypton, Kr86, has been combined with a mix of Ar, Ne, and N ions at the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) source, at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory cyclotron, to provide rapid ion changeover in Single Event Phenomena (SEP) testing. The new technique has been proved out successfully by a recent Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) test in which it was found that there was no measurable contamination from other isotopes.

  3. Design study of a 17.3 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source at Louvain-la-Neuve

    SciTech Connect

    Standaert, L. Davin, F.; Loiselet, M.

    2014-02-15

    The Cyclotron Resources Center of the Louvain-la-Neuve University is developing a new electron cyclotron resonance ion source to increase the energy of the accelerated beam by injection of higher charge state ions into the cyclotron. The design of the source is based on a 17.3 GHz frequency and classical coils to produce the axial field. The field reaches 2 T at the injection side and 1.2 T at extraction. The total power consumption for the coils is limited to 80 kW. The design features of the source are presented.

  4. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Plasma isotope separation based on ion cyclotron resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgolenko, Dmitrii A.; Muromkin, Yurii A.

    2009-04-01

    Experiments that have been conducted in the USA, France, and Russia to investigate isotopically selective ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) as a tool for plasma isotope separation are analyzed. Because this method runs into difficulties at low values of the relative isotope mass difference ΔM/M, for some elements (for gadolinium, as an example) isotope separation still remains a problem. There are ways to solve it, however, as experimental results and theoretical calculations suggest.

  5. Validation of the load-resilient ion cyclotron resonance frequency antenna concept on Tore Supra plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vulliez, K.; Argouarch, A.; Bosia, G.; Berger-By, G.; Bremond, S.; Colas, L.; Lombard, G.; Mendes, A.; Millon, L.; Mollard, P.; Volpe, D.; Beaumont, B.; Bécoulet, A.; Clairet, F.; Ekedahl, A.; Elkhaldi, M.; Gunn, J.; Hoang, G. T.; Tore Supra Team

    2008-06-01

    In the framework of the ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating development at CEA Cadarache, a prototype antenna based on the load-resilient electrical layout foreseen for ITER has been built. This prototype was recently tested in Tore Supra. The ITER-like electrical scheme has been validated during fast perturbations at the edge plasma. Clear load resilience properties are reported. The main conclusions and consequences learned from the development of the ITER antenna are discussed.

  6. Note: Production of a mercury beam with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Vondrasek, R.; Pardo, R.; Scott, R.

    2013-11-15

    An electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been utilized to produce mercury beams with intensities of 4.5 eμA of {sup 202}Hg{sup 29+} and 3.0 eμA of {sup 202}Hg{sup 31+} from natural abundance mercury metal. The production technique relies on the evaporation of liquid mercury into the source plasma vacuum region and utilizes elemental mercury instead of a volatile organic compound as the neutral feed material.

  7. Improved charge breeding efficiency of light ions with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Vondrasek, R.; Kutsaev, Sergey; Delahaye, P.; Maunoury, L.

    2012-11-15

    The Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade is a new radioactive beam facility for the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS). The facility utilizes a {sup 252}Cf fission source coupled with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source to provide radioactive beam species for the ATLAS experimental program. The californium fission fragment distribution provides nuclei in the mid-mass range which are difficult to extract from production targets using the isotope separation on line technique and are not well populated by low-energy fission of uranium. To date the charge breeding program has focused on optimizing these mid-mass beams, achieving high charge breeding efficiencies of both gaseous and solid species including 14.7% for the radioactive species {sup 143}Ba{sup 27+}. In an effort to better understand the charge breeding mechanism, we have recently focused on the low-mass species sodium and potassium which up to present have been difficult to charge breed efficiently. Unprecedented charge breeding efficiencies of 10.1% for {sup 23}Na{sup 7+} and 17.9% for {sup 39}K{sup 10+} were obtained injecting stable Na{sup +} and K{sup +} beams from a surface ionization source.

  8. Improved charge breeding efficiency of light ions with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Vondrasek, R; Delahaye, P; Kutsaev, Sergey; Maunoury, L

    2012-11-01

    The Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade is a new radioactive beam facility for the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS). The facility utilizes a (252)Cf fission source coupled with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source to provide radioactive beam species for the ATLAS experimental program. The californium fission fragment distribution provides nuclei in the mid-mass range which are difficult to extract from production targets using the isotope separation on line technique and are not well populated by low-energy fission of uranium. To date the charge breeding program has focused on optimizing these mid-mass beams, achieving high charge breeding efficiencies of both gaseous and solid species including 14.7% for the radioactive species (143)Ba(27+). In an effort to better understand the charge breeding mechanism, we have recently focused on the low-mass species sodium and potassium which up to present have been difficult to charge breed efficiently. Unprecedented charge breeding efficiencies of 10.1% for (23)Na(7+) and 17.9% for (39)K(10+) were obtained injecting stable Na(+) and K(+) beams from a surface ionization source. PMID:23206054

  9. Five-Minute Solar Oscillations and Ion-Cyclotron Waves in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmi, A.; Potapov, A.; Dovbnya, B.

    2015-10-01

    We study the possible impact of the photospheric five-minute oscillations on the ion-cyclotron waves in the solar wind. We proceed from the assumption that the ion-cyclotron waves in the solar wind experience a modulation with a characteristic period of five minutes under the influence of Alfvén waves driven by photospheric motions. The theory presented in this article predicts a deep frequency modulation. This modulation is expected mainly from variations in the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field lines, which, in turn, are caused by the Alfvén waves propagating from the Sun. To test the theoretical predictions, we analyzed records of the ultra-low-frequency (ULF) geoelectromagnetic waves to find the permanent quasi-monochromatic oscillations of natural origin in the Pc1 - 2 frequency band (0.1 - 5 Hz), the carrier frequency of which varies with time in a wide range. As a result, we found the so-called serpentine emission (SE), which was observed in Antarctica at the Vostok station near the South Geomagnetic Pole. The permanency, range of frequencies, and the deep frequency modulation of the SE correspond to the qualitative properties of ion-cyclotron waves in the solar wind. In the context of this work, one of the most important features of the SE is a clearly expressed five-minute modulation of the carrier frequency. We assume that we have found non-trivial manifestations of the solar five-minute oscillations on the Earth.

  10. Studies of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves using AMPTE/CCE and Dynamics Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erlandson, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    The principal activity during the past six months has involved the analysis of ion cyclotron waves recorded from DE-2 using the magnetic field experiment and electric field experiment. The results of this study have been published in the Geophysical Research Letters (GRL). The primary finding of this paper is that ion cyclotron waves were found to heat electrons, as observed in the DE-2 Langmuir probe data, through a Landau damping process. A second activity, which was started during the last six months, involves the study of large amplitude approximately one Hz electric and magnetic field oscillations recorded in the nightside auroral zone at substorm onset. Work is under way to determine the properties of these waves and investigate any association these waves may have with the substorm initiation process. A third activity under way involves a comprehensive study of ion cyclotron waves recorded at ionospheric altitudes by DE-2. This study will be an extension of the work reported in the GRL paper and will involve a larger sampling of wave events. This paper will focus on wave properties at ionospheric altitudes. A fourth activity involves a more in-depth analysis of the acceleration mechanisms and the resulting electron distributions based on the observations presented in the GRL paper.

  11. A revolutionary concept to improve the efficiency of ion cyclotron antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Milanesio, D. Maggiora, R.

    2014-06-15

    The successful design of an ion cyclotron (IC) antenna mainly relies on the capability of coupling high power to the plasma (MW), feature that is currently reached by allowing rather high voltages (tens of kV) on the unavoidable unmatched part of the feeding lines. This requirement is often responsible of arcs along the transmission lines and other unwanted phenomena, such as rectification discharges or hotspots, that considerably limit the usage of IC launchers. In this work, we suggest and describe a revolutionary approach based on high impedance surfaces, which allows to increase the antenna radiation efficiency and, hence, to highly reduce the imposed voltages to couple the same level of power to the plasma. High-impedance surfaces are periodic metallic structures (patches) displaced usually on top of a dielectric substrate and grounded by means of vertical posts usually embedded inside a dielectric, in a mushroom-like shape. In terms of working properties, high impedance surfaces are electrically thin in-phase reflectors, i.e., they present a high impedance, within a given frequency band, such that the image currents are in-phase with the currents of the antenna itself, thus determining a significant efficiency increase. While the usual design of a high impedance surface requires the presence of a dielectric layer, some alternative solutions can be realised in vacuum, taking advantage of double layers of metallic patches. After an introductory part on the properties of high impedance surfaces, this work documents both their design by means of numerical codes and their implementation on a scaled mock-up.

  12. Absorption of Fast Waves at Moderate to High Ion Cyclotron Harmonics on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R.I.; Petty, C.C.; Prater, R.; Choi, M.; Porkolab, M.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Luo, Y.; Baity, F.W.; Murakami, M.; Fredd, E.; Hosea, J.C.; Harvey, R.W.; Smirnov, A.P.; Van Zeeland, M.A.

    2005-09-26

    The absorption of fast Alfven waves (FW) by ion cyclotron harmonic damping in the range of harmonics from fourth to eighth is studied theoretically and with experiments in the DIII-D tokamak. A formula for linear ion cyclotron absorption on Maxwellian ion species is used to estimate the single-pass damping for various cases of experimental interest. It is found that damping on fast ions from neutral beam injection can be significant even at the eighth harmonic if the fast ion beta and the background plasma density are both high enough. The predictions are tested in several L-mode experiments in DIII-D with FW power at 60 MHz and at 116 MHz. It is found that 4th and 5th harmonic absorption of the 60 MHz power on the beam ions can be quite strong, but 8th harmonic absorption of the 116 MHz power appears to be weaker than expected. Possible explanations of the discrepancy are discussed.

  13. Formation of multi-charged ion beams by focusing effect of mid-electrode on electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Youta Kimura, Daiju; Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Yano, Keisuke; Kumakura, Sho; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-15

    We are constructing a tandem type electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) and a beam line for extracting ion beams. The ion beam is extracted from the second stage by an accel-decel extraction system with a single-hole and the ion beam current on each electrode is measured. The total ion beam current is measured by a faraday cup downstream the extraction electrodes. We measure these currents as a function of the mid-electrode potential. We also change the gap length between electrodes and perform similar measurement. The behaviors of these currents obtained experimentally against the mid-electrode potential show qualitatively good agreement with a simple theoretical consideration including sheath potential effects. The effect of mid-electrode potential is very useful for decreasing the beam loss for enhancing ion beam current extracted from ECRIS.

  14. New tandem type ion source based on electron cyclotron resonance for universal source of synthesized ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Yushi Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Yano, Keisuke; Kimura, Daiju; Kumakura, Sho; Imai, Youta; Nishiokada, Takuya; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-15

    A new tandem type source has been constructed on the basis of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma for producing synthesized ion beams. We investigate feasibility and hope to realize the device which has wide range operation window in a single device to produce many kinds of ion beams based on ECR ion source (ECRIS). It is considered that ECR plasmas are necessary to be available to individual operations with different plasma parameters. Both of analysis of ion beams and investigation of plasma parameters are conducted on produced plasmas. We describe construction of the new tandem type ion source based on ECRIS with wide operation window for aiming at producing synthesized ion beams as this new source can be a universal source.

  15. Ion-cyclotron instability in current-carrying Lorentzian (kappa) and Maxwellian plasmas with anisotropic temperatures: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, B.; Grossbard, N. J.

    2011-09-15

    Current-driven electrostatic ion-cyclotron instability has so far been studied for Maxwellian plasma with isotropic and anisotropic temperatures. Since satellite-measured particle velocity distributions in space are often better modeled by the generalized Lorentzian (kappa) distributions and since temperature anisotropy is quite common in space plasmas, theoretical analysis of the current-driven, electrostatic ion-cyclotron instability is carried out in this paper for electron-proton plasma with anisotropic temperatures, where the particle parallel velocity distributions are modeled by kappa distributions and the perpendicular velocity distributions are modeled by Maxwellian distributions. Stability properties of the excited ion cyclotron modes and, in particular, their dependence on electron to ion temperature ratio and ion temperature anisotropy are presented in more detail. For comparison, the corresponding results for bi-Maxwellian plasma are also presented. Although the stability properties of the ion cyclotron modes in the two types of plasmas are qualitatively similar, significant quantitative differences can arise depending on the values of {kappa}{sub e} and {kappa}{sub i}. The comparative study is based on the numerical solutions of the respective linear dispersion relations. Quasilinear estimates of the resonant ion heating rates due to ion-cyclotron turbulence in the two types of plasma are also presented for comparison.

  16. High power heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies in the Wisconsin Tokapole II

    SciTech Connect

    Biddle, A. P.; Sprott, J. C.

    1980-09-01

    Fast wave heating at the second, third, and fourth harmonics of the ion cyclotron resonance, and slow wave heating at the fundamental in a single ion species hydrogen plasma, are found to be in good agreement with warm plasma theory at rf power levels less than or equal to 130 kW. Ion heating is negligible off an eigenmode. Ion body temperatures are more than doubled to 75 eV from the 35 eV ohmically heated case with tails comprising 8% of the plasma at 320 eV. No deleterious effects except a non-disruptive 10% shortening of the discharge length caused by impurity influx are noted. A passive mode tracking technique allows approx. = 40% increase in power deposition in a passing eigenmode over that of a fixed frequency rf source. Ion temperatures are limited by charge exchange due to the < 50 eV central temperature and the small 13 cm radius current channel.

  17. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT ICR) mass spectrometry: Theory and simulations.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, Eugene N; Kostyukevich, Yury I; Vladimirov, Gleb N

    2016-01-01

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT ICR) mass spectrometer offers highest resolving power and mass accuracy among all types of mass spectrometers. Its unique analytical characteristics made FT ICR important tool for proteomics, metabolomics, petroleomics, and investigation of complex mixtures. Signal acquisition in FT ICR MS takes long time (up to minutes). During this time ion-ion interaction considerably affects ion motion and result in decreasing of the resolving power. Understanding of those effects required complicated theory and supercomputer simulations but culminated in the invention of the ion trap with dynamic harmonization which demonstrated the highest resolving power ever achieved. In this review we summarize latest achievements in theory and simulation of FT ICR mass spectrometers. PMID:24515872

  18. Development of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source for Synthesis of Endohedral Metallofullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, K.; Muramatsu, M.; Uchida, T.; Hanajiri, T.; Yoshida, Y.; Biri, S.; Kitagawa, A.; Kato, Y.

    2008-11-03

    A new electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) has been constructed for synthesis of endohedral metallofullerenes. The main purpose of the ion source is to produce new biological and medical materials. The design is based on ECRIS for production of multicharged ion beams with a traditional minimum-B magnetic field. An 8-10 GHz traveling wave tube (TWT) amplifier and a 2.45 GHz magnetron have been applied as microwave sources. Fullerene and metal vapor are introduced with a filament heating micro-oven and an induction heating oven, respectively. In preliminary ion-extraction test, Ar{sup +} is 54 {mu}A. Many broken fullerenes such as C{sub 58} and C{sub 56} are observed in fullerene ion beams.

  19. Effects of ion abundances on electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave growth rate in the vicinity of the plasmapause

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, F. D. Mace, R. L.

    2014-04-15

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in multi-ion species plasmas propagate in branches. Except for the branch corresponding to the heaviest ion species, which has only a resonance at its gyrofrequency, these branches are bounded below by a cutoff frequency and above by a resonant gyrofrequency. The condition for wave growth is determined by the thermal anisotropies of each ion species, j, which sets an upper bound, ω{sub j}{sup ∗}, on the wave frequency below which that ion species contributes positively to the growth rate. It follows that the relative positions of the cutoffs and the critical frequencies ω{sub j}{sup ∗} play a crucial role in determining whether a particular wave branch will be unstable. The effect of the magnetospheric ion abundances on the growth rate of each branch of the EMIC instability in a model where all the ion species have kappa velocity distributions is investigated by appealing to the above ideas. Using the variation of the cutoff frequencies predicted by cold plasma theory as a guide, optimal ion abundances that maximise the EMIC instability growth rate are sought. When the ring current is comprised predominantly of H{sup +} ions, all branches of the EMIC wave are destabilised, with the proton branch having the maximum growth rate. When the O{sup +} ion abundance in the ring current is increased, a decrease in the growth rate of the proton branch and cyclotron damping of the helium branch are observed. The oxygen branch, on the other hand, experiences an increase in the maximum growth rate with an increase in the O{sup +} ion abundance. When the ring current is comprised predominantly of He{sup +} ions, only the helium and oxygen branches of the EMIC wave are destabilised, with the helium branch having the maximum growth rate.

  20. Toward a System-Based Approach to Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves in Earth's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamayunov, K. V.; Engebretson, M. J.; Rassoul, H.

    2015-12-01

    We consider a nonlinear wave energy cascade from the low frequency range into the higher frequency domain of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave generation as a possible source of seed fluctuations for EMIC wave growth due to the ion cyclotron instability in Earth's magnetosphere. The theoretical analysis shows that energy cascade from the Pc 4-5 frequency range (2-22 mHz) into the range of Pc 1-2 pulsations (0.1-5 Hz) is able to supply the level of seed fluctuations that guarantees growth of EMIC waves up to an observable level during one pass through the near equatorial region where the ion cyclotron instability takes place. We also analyze magnetic field data from the Polar and Van Allen Probes spacecraft to test this nonlinear mechanism. We restrict our analysis to magnetic spectra only. We do not analyze the third-order moment for total energy of the magnetic and velocity fluctuations, but judge whether a nonlinear energy cascade is present or whether it is not by only analyzing the appearance of power-law distributions in the low frequency part of the magnetic field spectra. While the power-law spectrum alone does not guarantee that a nonlinear cascade is present, the power-law distribution is a strong indication of the possible development of a nonlinear cascade. Our data analysis shows that a nonlinear energy cascade is indeed observed in both the outer and inner magnetosphere, and EMIC waves are growing from this nonthermal background. All the analyzed data are in good agreement with the theoretical model presented in this study. Overall, the results of this study support a nonlinear energy cascade in Earth's magnetosphere as a mechanism which is responsible for supplying seed fluctuating energy in the higher frequency domain where EMIC waves grow due to the ion cyclotron instability. Keywords: nonlinear energy cascade, ultra low frequency waves, electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, seed fluctuationsAcknowledgments: This paper is based upon work

  1. Fullerene-rare gas mixed plasmas in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Asaji, T. Ohba, T.; Uchida, T.; Yoshida, Y.; Minezaki, H.; Ishihara, S.; Racz, R.; Biri, S.; Kato, Y.

    2014-02-15

    A synthesis technology of endohedral fullerenes such as Fe@C{sub 60} has developed with an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source. The production of N@C{sub 60} was reported. However, the yield was quite low, since most fullerene molecules were broken in the ECR plasma. We have adopted gas-mixing techniques in order to cool the plasma and then reduce fullerene dissociation. Mass spectra of ion beams extracted from fullerene-He, Ar or Xe mixed plasmas were observed with a Faraday cup. From the results, the He gas mixing technique is effective against fullerene destruction.

  2. Design of a new electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Oshima National College of Maritime Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Asaji, T. Hirabara, N.; Izumihara, T.; Nakamizu, T.; Ohba, T.; Nakamura, T.; Furuse, M.; Hitobo, T.; Kato, Y.

    2014-02-15

    A new electron cyclotron resonance ion/plasma source has been designed and will be built at Oshima National College of Maritime Technology by early 2014. We have developed an ion source that allows the control of the plasma parameters over a wide range of electron temperatures for material research. A minimum-B magnetic field composed of axial mirror fields and radial cusp fields was designed using mainly Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets. The axial magnetic field can be varied by three solenoid coils. The apparatus has 2.45 GHz magnetron and 2.5–6.0 GHz solid-state microwave sources.

  3. Development of DRAGON electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Institute of Modern Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, W.; Lin, S. H.; Xie, D. Z.; Zhang, X. Z.; Sha, S.; Zhang, W. H.; Cao, Y.; Guo, J. W.; Fang, X.; Guo, X. H.; Li, X. X.; Ma, H. Y.; Wu, Q.; Zhao, H. Y.; Ma, B. H.; Wang, H.; Zhu, Y. H.; Feng, Y. C.; Li, J. Y.; Li, J. Q.; and others

    2012-02-15

    A new room temperature electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source, DRAGON, is under construction at IMP. DRAGON is designed to operate at microwaves of frequencies of 14.5-18 GHz. Its axial solenoid coils are cooled with evaporative medium to provide an axial magnetic mirror field of 2.5 T at the injection and 1.4 T at the extraction, respectively. In comparison to other conventional room temperature ECR ion sources, DRAGON has so far the largest bore plasma chamber of inner diameter of 126 mm with maximum radial fields of 1.4-1.5 T produced by a non-Halbach permanent sextupole magnet.

  4. Demonstration of Effective Control of Fast-Ion-Stabilized Sawteeth by Electron-Cyclotron Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennholm, M.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Turco, F.; Bouquey, F.; Darbos, C.; Dumont, R.; Giruzzi, G.; Jung, M.; Lambert, R.; Magne, R.; Molina, D.; Moreau, P.; Rimini, F.; Segui, J.-L.; Song, S.; Traisnel, E.

    2009-03-01

    In a tokamak plasma, sawtooth oscillations in the central temperature, caused by a magnetohydrodynamic instability, can be partially stabilized by fast ions. The resulting less frequent sawtooth crashes can trigger unwanted magnetohydrodynamic activity. This Letter reports on experiments showing that modest electron-cyclotron current drive power, with the deposition positioned by feedback control of the injection angle, can reliably shorten the sawtooth period in the presence of ions with energies ≥0.5MeV. Certain surprising elements of the results are evaluated qualitatively in terms of existing theory.

  5. The Spontaneous Loss of Coherence Catastrophe in Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Aizikov, Konstantin; Mathur, Raman; O’Connor, Peter B.

    2009-01-01

    The spontaneous loss of coherence catastrophe (SLCC) is a frequently observed, yet poorly studied, space-charge related effect in Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). This manuscript presents an application of the filter diagonalization method (FDM) in the analysis of this phenomenon. The temporal frequency behavior reproduced by frequency shift analysis using the FDM shows the complex nature of the SLCC, which can be explained by a combination of factors occurring concurrently, governed by electrostatics and ion packet trajectories inside the ICR cell. PMID:19013078

  6. PLT ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating program

    SciTech Connect

    Hosea, J.; Bell, R.; Budny, R.; Cavallo, A.; Cohen, S.; Colestock, P.; Hammett, G.; Hovey, J.; Hwang, D.; Kaita, R.

    1984-09-01

    Measurements of energetic ions, impurity influx, recycling, and Bernstein waves generated in the plasma core are described for ICRF heating in PLT. Such measurements are being used for several launchers in order to optimize rf power deposition and discharge conditions. Preparations are underway to extend operation to higher rf power levels (approx. 5 MW) for the best attainable PLT conditions to permit more reactor-relevant extrapolations.

  7. Diagnostics of a charge breeder electron cyclotron resonance ion source helium plasma with the injection of 23Na1+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarvainen, O.; Koivisto, H.; Galatà, A.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.; Thuillier, T.; Delahaye, P.; Maunoury, L.; Mascali, D.; Neri, L.

    2016-05-01

    This work describes the utilization of an injected 23Na1+ ion beam as a diagnostics of the helium plasma of a charge breeder electron cyclotron resonance ion source. The obtained data allows estimating the upper limit for the ion-ion collision mean-free path of the incident sodium ions, the lower limit of ion-ion collision frequencies for all charge states of the sodium ions and the lower limit of the helium plasma density. The ion-ion collision frequencies of high charge state ions are shown to be at least on the order of 1-10 MHz and the plasma density is estimated to be on the order of 1011 cm-3 or higher. The experimental results are compared to simulations of the 23Na1+ capture into the helium plasma. The results indicate that the lower breeding efficiency of light ions in comparison to heavier elements is probably due to different capture efficiencies in which the in-flight ionization of the incident 1 + ions plays a vital role.

  8. Ion-cyclotron waves at Jupiter - Possibility of detection by Ulysses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, YI; Thorne, Richard M.; Horne, Richard B.

    1992-01-01

    Recent thermal plasma data and a computer code by Horne (1989) are employed to evaluate the linear-path-integrated gain of waves propagating through the Io to predict the Jovian plasma-wave environment. Estimates of the nonlinear saturation amplitudes are utilized with the thermal plasma data from two frequency bands to study the convective growth of the ion-cyclotron (IC) waves. Strong cyclotron resonant damping is theorized to prevent wave propagation to the lower latitudes, and the thermal plasma and cyclotron resonant energetic ions are expected to further confine the IC waves. L-mode waves below the O(+) gyrofrequency in the equatorial region of the torus are shown to inhabit an unstable region. The IC waves probably achieve nonlinear amplitudes regardless of plasma properties due to the rapid amplification in this region. It is suggested that the Ulysses data complicate the identification of the waves because the magnetometer is not adequately sensitive and because of the low frequency of the plasma-wave detector.

  9. Cyclotron mode frequencies and resonant absorption in multi-species ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Affolter, M.; Anderegg, F.; Dubin, D. H. E.; Driscoll, C. F.

    2015-05-15

    Cyclotron mode frequencies are studied on trapped rigid-rotor multi-species ion plasmas. Collective effects and radial electric fields shift the mode frequencies away from the “bare” cyclotron frequencies 2πF{sub c}{sup (s)}≡(q{sub s}B/M{sub s}c) for each species s. These frequency shifts are measured on the distinct cyclotron modes (m=0,1, and 2) with cos(mθ) azimuthal dependence. We find that for radially uniform plasmas the frequency shifts corroborate a simple theory expression, in which collective effects enter only through the E × B rotation frequency f{sub E} and the species fraction δ{sub s}. The m = 1 center-of-mass mode is in agreement with a simple “clump” model. Additionally, ultra-cold ion plasmas exhibit centrifugal separation by mass, and additional frequency shifts are observed, in agreement with a more general theory.

  10. Transverse acceleration of oxygen ions by electromagnetic ion cyclotron resonance with broad band left-hand polarized waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, T.; Crew, G. B.; Hershkowitz, N.; Jasperse, J. R.; Retterer, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Central plasma sheet (CPS) ion conics are oxygen-dominated, with peak energies ranging from tens to hundreds of eV centered around pitch-angles between 115 and 130 degrees. Because of the lack of correlation between the CPS conics and the observed currents and/or electron beam-like structures, it is not likely that all of these conics are generated by interactions with electrostatic ion cyclotron waves or lower hybrid waves. Instead, it is suggested that the observed intense broad band electric field fluctuations in the frequency range between 0 and 100 Hz can be responsible for the transverse energization of the ions through cyclotron resonance heating with the left-hand polarized electromagnetic waves. This process is much more efficient for heating the oxygen ions than hydrogen ions, thus providing a plausible explanation of the oxygen dominance in CPS conics. Simple algebraic expressions are given from which estimates of conic energy and pitch angle can be easily calculated. This suggested mechanism can also provide some preheating of the oxygen ions in the boundary plasma sheet (BPS) where discrete aurorae form.